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Sample records for frequency harmonic imaging

  1. Design factors of intravascular dual frequency transducers for super-harmonic contrast imaging and acoustic angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianguo; Martin, K. Heath; Li, Yang; Dayton, Paul A.; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2015-05-01

    Imaging of coronary vasa vasorum may lead to assessment of the vulnerable plaque development in diagnosis of atherosclerosis diseases. Dual frequency transducers capable of detection of microbubble super-harmonics have shown promise as a new contrast-enhanced intravascular ultrasound (CE-IVUS) platform with the capability of vasa vasorum imaging. Contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) in CE-IVUS imaging can be closely associated with low frequency transmitter performance. In this paper, transducer designs encompassing different transducer layouts, transmitting frequencies, and transducer materials are compared for optimization of imaging performance. In the layout selection, the stacked configuration showed superior super-harmonic imaging compared with the interleaved configuration. In the transmitter frequency selection, a decrease in frequency from 6.5 MHz to 5 MHz resulted in an increase of CTR from 15 dB to 22 dB when receiving frequency was kept constant at 30 MHz. In the material selection, the dual frequency transducer with the lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) 1-3 composite transmitter yielded higher axial resolution compared to single crystal transmitters (70 μm compared to 150 μm pulse length). These comparisons provide guidelines for the design of intravascular acoustic angiography transducers.

  2. Design factors of intravascular dual frequency transducers for super-harmonic contrast imaging and acoustic angiography

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jianguo; Martin, K. Heath; Li, Yang; Dayton, Paul A.; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2015-01-01

    Imaging of coronary vasa vasorum may lead to assessment of the vulnerable plaque development in diagnosis of atherosclerosis diseases. Dual frequency transducers capable of detection of microbubble super-harmonics have shown promise as a new contrast-enhanced intravascular ultrasound (CE-IVUS) platform with the capability of vasa vasorum imaging. Contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) in CE-IVUS imaging can be closely associated with the low frequency transmitter performance. In this paper, transducer designs encompassing different transducer layouts, transmitting frequencies, and transducer materials are compared for optimization of imaging performance. In the layout selection, the stacked configuration showed superior super-harmonic imaging compared with the interleaved configuration. In the transmitter frequency selection, a decrease in frequency from 6.5 MHz to 5 MHz resulted in an increase of CTR from 15 dB to 22 dB when receiving frequency was kept constant at 30 MHz. In the material selection, the dual frequency transducer with the lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) 1-3 composite transmitter yielded higher axial resolution compared to single crystal transmitters (70 μm compared to 150 μm pulse length). These comparisons provide guidelines for design of intravascular acoustic angiography transducers. PMID:25856384

  3. Design factors of intravascular dual frequency transducers for super-harmonic contrast imaging and acoustic angiography.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianguo; Martin, K Heath; Li, Yang; Dayton, Paul A; Shung, K Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2015-05-01

    Imaging of coronary vasa vasorum may lead to assessment of the vulnerable plaque development in diagnosis of atherosclerosis diseases. Dual frequency transducers capable of detection of microbubble super-harmonics have shown promise as a new contrast-enhanced intravascular ultrasound (CE-IVUS) platform with the capability of vasa vasorum imaging. Contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) in CE-IVUS imaging can be closely associated with low frequency transmitter performance. In this paper, transducer designs encompassing different transducer layouts, transmitting frequencies, and transducer materials are compared for optimization of imaging performance. In the layout selection, the stacked configuration showed superior super-harmonic imaging compared with the interleaved configuration. In the transmitter frequency selection, a decrease in frequency from 6.5 MHz to 5 MHz resulted in an increase of CTR from 15 dB to 22 dB when receiving frequency was kept constant at 30 MHz. In the material selection, the dual frequency transducer with the lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) 1-3 composite transmitter yielded higher axial resolution compared to single crystal transmitters (70 μm compared to 150 μm pulse length). These comparisons provide guidelines for the design of intravascular acoustic angiography transducers. PMID:25856384

  4. Ultrasound harmonic imaging with reducing speckle noise by spatial-frequency compounding approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei; Wang, Yuanyuan; Yu, Jinhua

    2015-12-01

    Speckle noise is a phenomenon inherent in any coherent imaging process and decreases the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), which brings down the imaging quality. Speckle noise reduction is particularly important in the tissue harmonic imaging (THI) since it has the lower energy and the poorer SNR than the fundamental imaging (FI). Recently plane wave imaging (PWI) has been widely explored. Since the entire imaging region can be covered in one emission, the frame rate increases greatly. In PWI, speckle can be reduced by incoherently averaging images with different speckle patterns. Such images can be acquired by varying the angle from which a target is imaged (spatial compounding, SC) or by changing the spectrum of the pulse (frequency compounding, FC). In this paper we demonstrate here that each approach is only a partial solution and that combining them provides a better result than applying either approach separately. We propose a spatial-frequency compounding (SFC) method for THI. The new method brings a good speckle suppression result. To illustrate the performance of our method, experiments have been conducted on the simulated data. A nonlinear simulation platform based on the full-wave model is used in the harmonic imaging simulation. Results show that our method brings the SNR an improvement of up to 50% in comparison with the single frame HI while maintaining a far better performance in both terms of resolution and contrast than the FI. Similar results can be obtained from our further experiments.

  5. Harmonic Frequency Lowering

    PubMed Central

    Kirchberger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A novel algorithm for frequency lowering in music was developed and experimentally tested in hearing-impaired listeners. Harmonic frequency lowering (HFL) combines frequency transposition and frequency compression to preserve the harmonic content of music stimuli. Listeners were asked to make judgments regarding detail and sound quality in music stimuli. Stimuli were presented under different signal processing conditions: original, low-pass filtered, HFL, and nonlinear frequency compressed. Results showed that participants reported perceiving the most detail in the HFL condition. In addition, there was no difference in sound quality across conditions. PMID:26834122

  6. Dual-frequency super harmonic imaging piezoelectric transducers for transrectal ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jinwook; Li, Sibo; Kasoji, Sandeep; Dayton, Paul A.; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a 2/14 MHz dual-frequency single-element transducer and a 2/22 MHz sub-array (16/48-elements linear array) transducer were developed for contrast enhanced super-harmonic ultrasound imaging of prostate cancer with the low frequency ultrasound transducer as a transmitter for contrast agent (microbubble) excitation and the high frequency transducer as a receiver for detection of nonlinear responses from microbubbles. The 1-3 piezoelectric composite was used as active materials of the single-element transducers due to its low acoustic impedance and high coupling factor. A high dielectric constant PZT ceramic was used for the sub-array transducer due to its high dielectric property induced relatively low electrical impedance. The possible resonance modes of the active elements were estimated using finite element analysis (FEA). The pulse-echo response, peak-negative pressure and bubble response were tested, followed by in vitro contrast imaging tests using a graphite-gelatin tissue-mimicking phantom. The single-element dual frequency transducer (8 × 4 × 2 mm3) showed a -6 dB fractional bandwidth of 56.5% for the transmitter, and 41.8% for the receiver. A 2 MHz-transmitter (730 μm pitch and 6.5 mm elevation aperture) and a 22 MHz-receiver (240 μm pitch and 1.5 mm aperture) of the sub-array transducer exhibited -6 dB fractional bandwidth of 51.0% and 40.2%, respectively. The peak negative pressure at the far field was about -1.3 MPa with 200 Vpp, 1-cycle 2 MHz burst, which is high enough to excite microbubbles for nonlinear responses. The 7th harmonic responses from micro bubbles were successfully detected in the phantom imaging test showing a contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) of 16 dB.

  7. Color harmonization for images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhen; Miao, Zhenjiang; Wan, Yanli; Wang, Zhifei

    2011-04-01

    Color harmonization is an artistic technique to adjust a set of colors in order to enhance their visual harmony so that they are aesthetically pleasing in terms of human visual perception. We present a new color harmonization method that treats the harmonization as a function optimization. For a given image, we derive a cost function based on the observation that pixels in a small window that have similar unharmonic hues should be harmonized with similar harmonic hues. By minimizing the cost function, we get a harmonized image in which the spatial coherence is preserved. A new matching function is proposed to select the best matching harmonic schemes, and a new component-based preharmonization strategy is proposed to preserve the hue distribution of the harmonized images. Our approach overcomes several shortcomings of the existing color harmonization methods. We test our algorithm with a variety of images to demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach.

  8. Optimization of a phased-array transducer for multiple harmonic imaging in medical applications: frequency and topology.

    PubMed

    Matte, Guillaume M; Van Neer, Paul L M J; Danilouchkine, Mike G; Huijssen, Jacob; Verweij, Martin D; de Jong, Nico

    2011-03-01

    Second-harmonic imaging is currently one of the standards in commercial echographic systems for diagnosis, because of its high spatial resolution and low sensitivity to clutter and near-field artifacts. The use of nonlinear phenomena mirrors is a great set of solutions to improve echographic image resolution. To further enhance the resolution and image quality, the combination of the 3rd to 5th harmonics--dubbed the superharmonics--could be used. However, this requires a bandwidth exceeding that of conventional transducers. A promising solution features a phased-array design with interleaved low- and high-frequency elements for transmission and reception, respectively. Because the amplitude of the backscattered higher harmonics at the transducer surface is relatively low, it is highly desirable to increase the sensitivity in reception. Therefore, we investigated the optimization of the number of elements in the receiving aperture as well as their arrangement (topology). A variety of configurations was considered, including one transmit element for each receive element (1/2) up to one transmit for 7 receive elements (1/8). The topologies are assessed based on the ratio of the harmonic peak pressures in the main and grating lobes. Further, the higher harmonic level is maximized by optimization of the center frequency of the transmitted pulse. The achievable SNR for a specific application is a compromise between the frequency-dependent attenuation and nonlinearity at a required penetration depth. To calculate the SNR of the complete imaging chain, we use an approach analogous to the sonar equation used in underwater acoustics. The generated harmonic pressure fields caused by nonlinear wave propagation were modeled with the iterative nonlinear contrast source (INCS) method, the KZK, or the Burger's equation. The optimal topology for superharmonic imaging was an interleaved design with 1 transmit element per 6 receive elements. It improves the SNR by ~5 dB compared with

  9. The harmonic frequencies of benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handy, Nicholas C.; Maslen, Paul E.; Amos, Roger D.; Andrews, Jamie S.; Murray, Christopher W.; Laming, Gregory J.

    1992-09-01

    We report calculations for the harmonic frequencies of C 6H 6 and C 6D 6. Our most sophisticated quantum chemistry values are obtained with the MP2 method and a TZ2P+f basis set (288 basis functions), which are the largest such calculations reported on benzene to date. Using the SCF density, we also calculate the frequencies using the exchange and correlation expressions of density functional theory. We compare our calculated harmonic frequencies with those deduced from experiment by Goodman, Ozkabak and Thakur. The density functional frequencies appear to be more reliable predictions than the MP2 frequencies and they are obtained at significantly less cost.

  10. High-resolution frequency domain second harmonic optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jianping; Tomov, I. V.; Jiang, Yi; Chen, Zhongping

    2007-02-01

    We used continuum generated in an 8.5 cm long fiber by a femtosecond Yb fiber laser to improve threefold the axial resolution of frequency domain SH-OCT to 12μm. The acquisition time was shortened by more than two orders of magnitude compared to time domain SH-OCT. The system was applied to image biological tissue of fish scales, pig leg tendon and rabbit eye sclera. Highly organized collagen fibrils can be visualized in the recorded images. Polarization dependence on second harmonic has been used to obtain polarization resolved images.

  11. Reduced Switching Frequency Active Harmonic Elimination for Multilevel Converters

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Zhong; Tolbert, Leon M; Chiasson, John N; Ozpineci, Burak

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a reduced switching-frequency active-harmonic-elimination method (RAHEM) to eliminate any number of specific order harmonics of multilevel converters. First, resultant theory is applied to transcendental equations to eliminate low-order harmonics and to determine switching angles for a fundamental frequency-switching scheme. Next, based on the number of harmonics to be eliminated, Newton climbing method is applied to transcendental equations to eliminate high-order harmonics and to determine switching angles for the fundamental frequency-switching scheme. Third, the magnitudes and phases of the residual lower order harmonics are computed, generated, and subtracted from the original voltage waveform to eliminate these low-order harmonics. Compared to the active-harmonic-elimination method (AHEM), which generates square waves to cancel high-order harmonics, RAHEM has lower switching frequency. The simulation results show that the method can effectively eliminate all the specific harmonics, and a low total harmonic distortion (THD) near sine wave is produced. An experimental 11-level H-bridge multilevel converter with a field-programmable gate-array controller is employed to experimentally validate the method. The experimental results show that RAHEM does effectively eliminate any number of specific harmonics, and the output voltage waveform has low switching frequency and low THD.

  12. Effect of power frequency harmonics on magnetic field measurements.

    PubMed

    Isokorpi, J; Rautee, J; Keikko, T; Korpinen, L

    2000-03-01

    This paper presents a study of the effect of harmonic frequencies on magnetic field measurements. We introduced magnetic field meters in a known magnetic field of different frequencies: power frequency (50 Hz) as well as 3rd (150 Hz) and 5th (250 Hz) harmonic frequencies. Two magnetic field levels (0.25 A and 2.5 A) were used. A Helmholtz coil was applied to generate an exact magnetic field. The difference between the measurement results at harmonic frequencies and at power frequency was analyzed using the t-test for matched pairs. The test results show significant differences (P< or =0.01) for 13 out of 28 tests carried out, which is probably due to a curved frequency response near the power frequency. It is, therefore, essential to consider harmonic frequencies in magnetic field measurements in practice.

  13. Perfusion harmonic imaging of the human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzler, Volker H.; Seidel, Guenter; Wiesmann, Martin; Meyer, Karsten; Aach, Til

    2003-05-01

    The fast visualisation of cerebral microcirculation supports diagnosis of acute cerebrovascular diseases. However, the commonly used CT/MRI-based methods are time consuming and, moreover, costly. Therefore we propose an alternative approach to brain perfusion imaging by means of ultrasonography. In spite of the low signal/noise-ratio of transcranial ultrasound and the high impedance of the skull, flow images of cerebral blood flow can be derived by capturing the kinetics of appropriate contrast agents by harmonic ultrasound image sequences. In this paper we propose three different methods for human brain perfusion imaging, each of which yielding flow images indicating the status of the patient's cerebral microcirculation by visualising local flow parameters. Bolus harmonic imaging (BHI) displays the flow kinetics of bolus injections, while replenishment (RHI) and diminution harmonic imaging (DHI) compute flow characteristics from contrast agent continuous infusions. RHI measures the contrast agents kinetics in the influx phase and DHI displays the diminution kinetics of the contrast agent acquired from the decay phase. In clinical studies, BHI- and RHI-parameter images were found to represent comprehensive and reproducible distributions of physiological cerebral blood flow. For DHI it is shown, that bubble destruction and hence perfusion phenomena principally can be displayed. Generally, perfusion harmonic imaging enables reliable and fast bedside imaging of human brain perfusion. Due to its cost efficiency it complements cerebrovascular diagnostics by established CT/MRI-based methods.

  14. Frequency multiplied harmonic gyrotron-traveling-wave-tube amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J.J.; Ganguly, A.K.; Armstrong, C.M. )

    1994-06-01

    Numerical simulations of a [ital W]-band two-stage tapered, frequency multiplied gyrotron- traveling-wave-tube amplifier are reported. Unlike conventional harmonic gyrodevices, a drive signal at the fundamental harmonic frequency is injected in the first stage for beam modulation, and amplified output radiation is extracted from the third harmonic cyclotron resonance interaction. Numerical results show that broadband millimeter wave radiation is obtained with an efficiency of 10%--15%, a gain of [similar to]30 dB, and an instantaneous bandwidth of [similar to]10% at a center frequency of 95 GHz for [Delta][ital v][sub [ital z

  15. Intense harmonics generation with customized photon frequency and optical vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaomei; Shen, Baifei; Shi, Yin; Zhang, Lingang; Ji, Liangliang; Wang, Xiaofeng; Xu, Zhizhan; Tajima, Toshiki

    2016-08-01

    An optical vortex with orbital angular momentum (OAM) enriches the light and matter interaction process, and helps reveal unexpected information in relativistic nonlinear optics. A scheme is proposed for the first time to explore the origin of photons in the generated harmonics, and produce relativistic intense harmonics with expected frequency and an optical vortex. When two counter-propagating Laguerre-Gaussian laser pulses impinge on a solid thin foil and interact with each other, the contribution of each input pulse in producing harmonics can be distinguished with the help of angular momentum conservation of photons, which is almost impossible for harmonic generation without an optical vortex. The generation of tunable, intense vortex harmonics with different photon topological charge is predicted based on the theoretical analysis and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. Inheriting the properties of OAM and harmonics, the obtained intense vortex beam can be applied in a wide range of fields, including atom or molecule control and manipulation.

  16. Intense harmonics generation with customized photon frequency and optical vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaomei; Shen, Baifei; Shi, Yin; Zhang, Lingang; Ji, Liangliang; Wang, Xiaofeng; Xu, Zhizhan; Tajima, Toshiki

    2016-08-01

    An optical vortex with orbital angular momentum (OAM) enriches the light and matter interaction process, and helps reveal unexpected information in relativistic nonlinear optics. A scheme is proposed for the first time to explore the origin of photons in the generated harmonics, and produce relativistic intense harmonics with expected frequency and an optical vortex. When two counter-propagating Laguerre–Gaussian laser pulses impinge on a solid thin foil and interact with each other, the contribution of each input pulse in producing harmonics can be distinguished with the help of angular momentum conservation of photons, which is almost impossible for harmonic generation without an optical vortex. The generation of tunable, intense vortex harmonics with different photon topological charge is predicted based on the theoretical analysis and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. Inheriting the properties of OAM and harmonics, the obtained intense vortex beam can be applied in a wide range of fields, including atom or molecule control and manipulation.

  17. Frequency-resolved optical grating using third-harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, T.; Krumbuegel, M.A.; Delong, K.W.

    1995-12-01

    We demonstrate the first frequency-resolved optical gating measurement of an laser oscillator without the time ambiguity using third-harmonic generation. The experiment agrees well with the phase-retrieved spectrograms.

  18. Phase responses of harmonics reflected from radio-frequency electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzaro, Gregory J.; McGowan, Sean F.; Gallagher, Kyle A.; Sherbondy, Kelly D.; Martone, Anthony F.; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2016-05-01

    The phase responses of nonlinear-radar targets illuminated by stepped frequencies are studied. Data is presented for an experimental radar and two commercial electronic targets at short standoff ranges. The amplitudes and phases of harmonics generated by each target at each frequency are captured over a 100-MHz-wide transmit band. As in the authors' prior work, target detection is demonstrated by receiving at least one harmonic of at least one transmit frequency. In the present work, experiments confirm that the phase of a harmonic reflected from a radio-frequency electronic target at a standoff distance is linear versus frequency. Similar to traditional wideband radar, the change of the reflected phase with respect to frequency indicates the range to the nonlinear target.

  19. Nonlinear propagation in ultrasonic fields: measurements, modelling and harmonic imaging.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, V F

    2000-03-01

    In high amplitude ultrasonic fields, such as those used in medical ultrasound, nonlinear propagation can result in waveform distortion and the generation of harmonics of the initial frequency. In the nearfield of a transducer this process is complicated by diffraction effects associated with the source. The results of a programme to study the nonlinear propagation in the fields of circular, focused and rectangular transducers are described, and comparisons made with numerical predictions obtained using a finite difference solution to the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov (or KZK) equation. These results are extended to consider nonlinear propagation in tissue-like media and the implications for ultrasonic measurements and ultrasonic heating are discussed. The narrower beamwidths and reduced side-lobe levels of the harmonic beams are illustrated and the use of harmonics to form diagnostic images with improved resolution is described. PMID:10829672

  20. Investigation of plasma diagnostics using a dual frequency harmonic technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dong-Hwan; Kim, Young-Do; Cho, Sung-Won; Kim, Yu-Sin; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2014-09-07

    Plasma diagnostic methods using harmonic currents analysis of electrostatic probes were experimentally investigated to understand the differences in their measurement of the plasma parameters. When dual frequency voltage (ω{sub 1},ω{sub 2}) was applied to a probe, various harmonic currents (ω{sub 1}, 2ω{sub 1},ω{sub 2}, 2ω{sub 2},ω{sub 2}±ω{sub 1},ω{sub 2}±2ω{sub 1}) were generated due to the non-linearity of the probe sheath. The electron temperature can be obtained from the ratio of the two harmonics of the probe currents. According to the combinations of the two harmonics, the sensitivities in the measurement of the electron temperature differed, and this results in a difference of the electron temperature. From experiments and simulation, it is shown that this difference is caused by the systematic and random noise.

  1. Tissue harmonic synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Rasmussen, Joachim Hee; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-10-01

    Synthetic aperture sequential beamforming (SASB) and tissue harmonic imaging (THI) are combined to improve the image quality of medical ultrasound imaging. The technique is evaluated in a comparative study against dynamic receive focusing (DRF). The objective is to investigate if SASB combined with THI improves the image quality compared to DRF-THI. The major benefit of SASB is a reduced bandwidth between the probe and processing unit. A BK Medical 2202 Ultraview ultrasound scanner was used to acquire beamformed RF data for offline evaluation. The acquisition was made interleaved between methods, and data were recorded with and without pulse inversion for tissue harmonic imaging. Data were acquired using a Sound Technology 192 element convex array transducer from both a wire phantom and a tissue mimicking phantom to investigate spatial resolution and penetration. In vivo scans were also performed for a visual comparison. The spatial resolution for SASB-THI is on average 19% better than DRI-THI, and the investigation of penetration showed equally good signal-to-noise ratio. In vivo B-mode scans were made and compared. The comparison showed that SASB-THI reduces the artifact and noise interference and improves image contrast and spatial resolution.

  2. Multimode Directional Coupler for Utilization of Harmonic Frequencies from TWTAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, Rainee N.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2013-01-01

    A novel waveguide multimode directional coupler (MDC) intended for the measurement and potential utilization of the second and higher order harmonic frequencies from high-power traveling wave tube amplifiers (TWTAs) has been successfully designed, fabricated, and tested. The design is based on the characteristic multiple propagation modes of the electrical and magnetic field components of electromagnetic waves in a rectangular waveguide. The purpose was to create a rugged, easily constructed, more efficient waveguide- based MDC for extraction and exploitation of the second harmonic signal from the RF output of high-power TWTs used for space communications. The application would be a satellitebased beacon source needed for Qband and V/W-band atmospheric propagation studies. The MDC could function as a CW narrow-band source or as a wideband source for study of atmospheric group delay effects on highdata- rate links. The MDC is fabricated from two sections of waveguide - a primary one for the fundamental frequency and a secondary waveguide for the second harmonic - that are joined together such that the second harmonic higher order modes are selectively coupled via precision- machined slots for propagation in the secondary waveguide. In the TWTA output waveguide port, both the fundamental and the second harmonic signals are present. These signals propagate in the output waveguide as the dominant and higher order modes, respectively. By including an appropriate mode selective waveguide directional coupler, such as the MDC presented here at the output of the TWTA, the power at the second harmonic can be sampled and amplified to the power level needed for atmospheric propagation studies. The important conclusions from the preliminary test results for the multimode directional coupler are: (1) the second harmonic (Ka-band) can be measured and effectively separated from the fundamental (Ku-band) with no coupling of the latter, (2) power losses in the fundamental frequency

  3. Observations of High Frequency Harmonics of the Ionospheric Alfven Resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Ian; Usanova, Maria; Bortnik, Jacob; Milling, David; Kale, Andy; Shao, Leo; Miles, David; Rae, I. Jonathan

    We present observations of high frequency harmonics of the ionospheric Alfven Resonator (IAR). These are seen in the form of spectral resonance structures (SRS) recorded by a ground-based search coil magnetometer sampling at 100 samples/s at the Ministik Lake station at L=4.2 within the expanded CARISMA magnetometer array. Previous observational studies have indicated that such SRS are typically confined to frequencies <~5 Hz with only several SRS harmonics being observed. We report the first observations of clear and discrete SRS, which we believe are harmonics of the IAR, and which extend to around 20 Hz in at least 10-12 clear SRS harmonics. We additionally demonstrate the utility of the Bortnik et al. (2007) auto-detection algorithm, designed for Pc1 wavepackets, for characterising the properties of the IAR. Our results also indicate that the cavity supporting SRS in the IAR at this time must be structured to support and trap much higher frequency IAR harmonics than previously assumed. This impacts the potential importance of the IAR for magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling, especially in relation to the impacts of incident Alfven waves on the ionosphere including Alfvenic aurora. Our observations also highlight the potential value of IAR observations for diagnosing the structure of the topside ionosphere, not least using the observed structure of the SRS. These are the first mid-latitude observations demonstrating that the IAR can extend to frequencies beyond those of the lowest few harmonics of the Schumann resonances - significantly suggesting the possibility that the Schumann resonance modes and the IAR may be coupled. The in-situ structure of the IAR is also examined by combining satellite data with conjugate measurements from the ground, and the impacts of the IAR for magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere coupling examined.

  4. Excitation of electron Langmuir frequency harmonics in the solar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Fomichev, V. V.; Fainshtein, S. M.; Chernov, G. P.

    2013-05-15

    An alternative mechanism for the excitation of electron Langmuir frequency harmonics as a result of the development of explosive instability in a weakly relativistic beam-plasma system in the solar atmosphere is proposed. The efficiency of the new mechanism as compared to the previously discussed ones is analyzed.

  5. Multi-Frequency Harmonics Technique for HIFU Tissue Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybyanets, Andrey N.; Lugovaya, Maria A.; Rybyanets, Anastasia A.

    2010-03-01

    New technique for enhancing of tissue lysis and enlarging treatment volume during one HIFU sonification is proposed. The technique consists in simultaneous or alternative (at optimal repetition frequency) excitation of single element HIFU transducer on a frequencies corresponding to odd natural harmonics of piezoceramic element at ultrasound energy levels sufficient for producing cavitational, thermal or mechanical damage of fat cells at each of aforementioned frequencies. Calculation and FEM modeling of transducer vibrations and acoustic field patterns for different frequencies sets were performed. Acoustic pressure in focal plane was measured in water using calibrated hydrophone and 3D acoustic scanning system. In vitro experiments on different tissues and phantoms confirming the advantages of multifrequency harmonic method were performed.

  6. Localized harmonic motion imaging: theory, simulations and experiments.

    PubMed

    Konofagou, Elisa E; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2003-10-01

    Several techniques have been developed in an effort to estimate mechanical properties of tissues. These techniques typically estimate static or harmonic motion resulting from an externally or internally applied mechanical stimulus. In this paper, we discuss the advantages of utilizing a new technique that performs radiofrequency (RF) signal tracking to estimate the localized oscillatory motion resulting from the harmonic radiation force produced by two focused ultrasound (US) transducer elements with overlapping beams oscillating at distinct frequencies. Finite-element and Monte-Carlo simulations were performed to characterize the range of oscillatory displacements produced by a harmonic radiation force. In the experimental verification, three transducers were used: two single-element focused transducers and one lead zirconate-titanate (PZT) composite 16-element probe. Four agar gels were utilized to determine the effect of stiffness on the motion amplitude. Estimates of the displacement relative to the initial position (i.e., at the onset of the application of the radiation force) were obtained during the application of the radiation force that oscillated at frequencies ranging between 200 Hz and 800 Hz. In the simulations, the estimated oscillatory displacement spanned from -800 to 600 microm and the frequencies of excitation could easily be estimated from the temporal variation of the displacement. In addition, a frequency upshift (on the order of tens of Hz) was estimated with stiffness increase. Furthermore, an exponential decrease of the displacement amplitude with stiffness was observed at all frequencies investigated. An M-mode version to depict both the spatial and temporal variations of the locally induced displacement was used. In experiments with gels of different stiffness, the resulting amplitude of the harmonic displacement estimated oscillated at the same frequencies and ranged from -300 to 250 microm. An exponential decrease of the displacement

  7. Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI) for Tumor Imaging and Treatment Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Konofagou, Elisa E; Maleke, Caroline; Vappou, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Palpation is an established screening procedure for the detection of several superficial cancers including breast, thyroid, prostate, and liver tumors through both self and clinical examinations. This is because solid masses typically have distinct stiffnesses compared to the surrounding normal tissue. In this paper, the application of Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI) for tumor detection based on its stiffness as well as its relevance in thermal treatment is reviewed. HMI uses a focused ultrasound (FUS) beam to generate an oscillatory acoustic radiation force for an internal, non-contact palpation to internally estimate relative tissue hardness. HMI studies have dealt with the measurement of the tissue dynamic motion in response to an oscillatory acoustic force at the same frequency, and have been shown feasible in simulations, phantoms, ex vivo human and bovine tissues as well as animals in vivo. Using an FUS beam, HMI can also be used in an ideal integration setting with thermal ablation using high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), which also leads to an alteration in the tumor stiffness. In this paper, a short review of HMI is provided that encompasses the findings in all the aforementioned areas. The findings presented herein demonstrate that the HMI displacement can accurately depict the underlying tissue stiffness, and the HMI image of the relative stiffness could accurately detect and characterize the tumor or thermal lesion based on its distinct properties. HMI may thus constitute a non-ionizing, cost-efficient and reliable complementary method for noninvasive tumor detection, localization, diagnosis and treatment monitoring.

  8. Contrast and harmonic imaging improves accuracy and efficiency of novice readers for dobutamine stress echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlassak, Irmien; Rubin, David N.; Odabashian, Jill A.; Garcia, Mario J.; King, Lisa M.; Lin, Steve S.; Drinko, Jeanne K.; Morehead, Annitta J.; Prior, David L.; Asher, Craig R.; Klein, Allan L.; Thomas, James D.

    2002-01-01

    of harmonic imaging reduces the frequency of nondiagnostic wall segments.

  9. Multiple frequency fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    PubMed

    Squire, A; Verveer, P J; Bastiaens, P I

    2000-02-01

    The experimental configuration and the computational algorithms for performing multiple frequency fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (mfFLIM) are described. The mfFLIM experimental set-up enables the simultaneous homodyne detection of fluorescence emission modulated at a set of harmonic frequencies. This was achieved in practice by using monochromatic laser light as an excitation source modulated at a harmonic set of frequencies. A minimum of four frequencies were obtained by the use of two standing wave acousto-optic modulators placed in series. Homodyne detection at each of these frequencies was performed simultaneously by mixing with matching harmonics present in the gain characteristics of a microchannel plate (MCP) image intensifier. These harmonics arise as a natural consequence of applying a high frequency sinusoidal voltage to the photocathode of the device, which switches the flow of photoelectrons 'on' and 'off' as the sinus voltage swings from negative to positive. By changing the bias of the sinus it was possible to control the duration of the 'on' state of the intensifier relative to its 'off' state, enabling the amplitude of the higher harmonic content in the gain to be controlled. Relative modulation depths of 400% are theoretically possible from this form of square-pulse modulation. A phase-dependent integrated image is formed by the sum of the mixed frequencies on the phosphor of the MCP. Sampling this signal over a full period of the fundamental harmonic enables each harmonic to be resolved, provided that the Nyquist sampling criterion is satisfied for the highest harmonic component in the signal. At each frequency both the phase and modulation parameters can be estimated from a Fourier analysis of the data. These parameters enable the fractional populations and fluorescence lifetimes of individual components of a complex fluorescence decay to be resolved on a pixel-by-pixel basis using a non-linear fit to the dispersion relationships. The

  10. Ultrasound harmonic enhanced imaging using eigenspace-based coherence factor.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Wang, Yuanyuan; Yu, Jinhua

    2016-12-01

    Tissue harmonic imaging (THI) utilizes harmonic signals generating within the tissue as the result of nonlinear acoustic wave propagation. With inadequate transmitting acoustic energy, THI is incapable to detect the small objects since poor harmonic signals have been generated. In most cases, high transmission energy cannot be guaranteed because of the imaging safety issue or specific imaging modality such as the plane wave imaging (PWI). Discrimination of small point targets such as calcification, however, is particularly important in the ultrasound diagnosis. Few efforts have been made to pursue the THI with high resolution and good small target visibility at the same time. In this paper, we proposed a new eigenspace-based coherence factor (ESBCF) beamformer to solve this problem. A new kind of coherence factor (CF), named as ESBCF, is firstly proposed to detect the point targets. The detected region-of-interest (ROI) is then enhanced adaptively by using a newly developed beamforming method. The ESBCF combines the information from signal eigenspace and coherence factor by expanding the CF to the covariance matrix of signal. Analogous to the image processing but in the radio frequency (RF) data domain, the proposed method fully utilizes the information from the fundamental and harmonic components. The performance of the proposed method is demonstrated by simulation and phantom experiments. The improvement of the point contrast ratio (PCR) is 7.6dB in the simulated data, and 6.0dB in the phantom experiment. Thanks to the improved small point detection ability of the ESBCF, the proposed beamforming algorithm can enhance the PCR considerably and maintain the high resolution of the THI at the same time. PMID:27513207

  11. A high-resolution technique for ultrasound harmonic imaging using sparse representations in Gabor frames.

    PubMed

    Michailovich, Oleg; Adam, Dan

    2002-12-01

    Over the last few decades there were dramatic improvements in ultrasound imaging quality with the utilization of harmonic frequencies induced by both tissue and echo-contrast agents. The advantages of harmonic imaging cause rapid penetration of this modality to diverse clinical uses, among which myocardial perfusion determination seems to be the most important application. In order to effectively employ the information, comprised in the higher harmonics of the received signals, this information should be properly extracted. A commonly used method of harmonics separation is linear filtering. One of its main shortcomings is the inverse relationship between the detectability of the contrast agent and the axial resolution. In this paper, a novel, nonlinear technique is proposed for separating the harmonic components, contained in the received radio-frequency images. It is demonstrated that the harmonic separation can be efficiently performed by means of convex optimization. It performs the separation without affecting the image resolution. The procedure is based on the concepts of sparse signal representation in overcomplete signal bases. A special type of the sparse signal representation, that is especially suitable for the problem at hand, is explicitly described. The ability of the novel technique to acquire "un-masked," second (or higher) harmonic images is demonstrated in series of computer and phantom experiments.

  12. High-resolution frequency-domain second-harmonic optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jianping; Tomov, Ivan V.; Jiang, Yi; Chen, Zhongping

    2007-04-01

    We used continuum generated in an 8.5 cm long fiber by a femtosecond Yb fiber laser to improve threefold the axial resolution of frequency domain second-harmonic optical coherence tomography (SH-OCT) to 12 μm. The acquisition time was shortened by more than 2 orders of magnitude compared to the time-domain SH-OCT. The system was applied to image biological tissue of fish scales, pig leg tendon, and rabbit eye sclera. Highly organized collagen fibrils can be visualized in the recorded images. Polarization dependence on the SH has been used to obtain polarization resolved images.

  13. Localized harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound surgery targeting.

    PubMed

    Curiel, Laura; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2011-08-01

    Recently, an in vivo real-time ultrasound-based monitoring technique that uses localized harmonic motion (LHM) to detect changes in tissues during focused ultrasound surgery (FUS) has been proposed to control the exposure. This technique can potentially be used as well for targeting imaging. In the present study, we evaluated the potential of using LHM to detect changes in stiffness and the feasibility of using it for imaging purposes in phantoms and in vivo tumor detection. A single-element FUS transducer (80 mm focal length, 100 mm diameter, 1.485 MHz) was used for inducing a localized harmonic motion and a separate ultrasound diagnostic transducer excited by a pulser/receiver (5 kHz PRF, 5 MHz) was used to track motion. The motion was estimated using cross-correlation techniques on the acquired radio-frequency (RF) signal. Silicon phantom studies were performed to determine the size of inclusion that was possible to detect using this technique. Inclusions were discerned from the surroundings as a reduction on LHM amplitude and it was possible to depict inclusions as small as 4 mm. The amplitude of the induced LHM was always lower at the inclusions compared with the one obtained at the surroundings. Ten New Zealand rabbits had VX2 tumors implanted on their thighs and LHM was induced and measured at the tumor region. Tumors (as small as 10 mm in length and 4 mm in width) were discerned from the surroundings as a reduction on LHM amplitude.

  14. Bond length, dipole moment, and harmonic frequency of CO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Leslie A.; Liu, Bowen; Lindh, Roland

    1993-01-01

    A detailed comparison of some properties of CO is given, at the modified coupled-pair functional, single and double excitation coupled-cluster (CCSD), and CCSD(T) levels of theory (including a perturbational estimate for connected triple excitations), using a variety of basis sets. With very large one-particle basis sets, the CCSD(T) method gives excellent results for the bond distance, dipole moment, and harmonic frequency of CO. In a (6s 5p 4d 3f 2g 1h) + (1s 1p 1d) basis set, the bond distance is about 0.005a0 too large, the dipole moment about 0.005 a.u. too small, and the frequency about 6/cm too small, when compared with experimental results.

  15. In-phased second harmonic wave array generation with intra-Talbot-cavity frequency-doubling.

    PubMed

    Hirosawa, Kenichi; Shohda, Fumio; Yanagisawa, Takayuki; Kannari, Fumihiko

    2015-03-23

    The Talbot cavity is one promising method to synchronize the phase of a laser array. However, it does not achieve the lowest array mode with the same phase but the highest array mode with the anti-phase between every two adjacent lasers, which is called out-phase locking. Consequently, their far-field images exhibit 2-peak profiles. We propose intra-Talbot-cavity frequency-doubling. By placing a nonlinear crystal in a Talbot cavity, the Talbot cavity generates an out-phased fundamental wave array, which is converted into an in-phase-locked second harmonic wave array at the nonlinear crystal. We demonstrate numerical calculations and experiments on intra-Talbot-cavity frequency-doubling and obtain an in-phase-locked second harmonic wave array for a Nd:YVO₄ array laser.

  16. Balancing Vibrations at Harmonic Frequencies by Injecting Harmonic Balancing Signals into the Armature of a Linear Motor/Alternator Coupled to a Stirling Machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holliday, Ezekiel S. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Vibrations at harmonic frequencies are reduced by injecting harmonic balancing signals into the armature of a linear motor/alternator coupled to a Stirling machine. The vibrations are sensed to provide a signal representing the mechanical vibrations. A harmonic balancing signal is generated for selected harmonics of the operating frequency by processing the sensed vibration signal with adaptive filter algorithms of adaptive filters for each harmonic. Reference inputs for each harmonic are applied to the adaptive filter algorithms at the frequency of the selected harmonic. The harmonic balancing signals for all of the harmonics are summed with a principal control signal. The harmonic balancing signals modify the principal electrical drive voltage and drive the motor/alternator with a drive voltage component in opposition to the vibration at each harmonic.

  17. Efficient broadband third harmonic frequency conversion via angular dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, D.M.; Henesian, M.A.; Milam, D.; Eimerl, D.

    1995-07-18

    In this paper we present experimental measurements and theoretical modeling of third harmonic (3{omega}) conversion efficiency with optical bandwidth. Third harmonic conversion efficiency drops precipitously as the input bandwidth significantly exceeds the phase matching limitations of the conversion crystals. For Type I/Type II frequency tripling, conversion efficiency be-gins to decrease for bandwidths greater than {approximately}60 GHz. However, conversion efficiency corresponding to monochromatic phase-matched beams can be recovered provided that the instantaneous Propagation vectors are phase matched at all times. This is achieved by imposing angular spectral dispersion (ASD) on the input beam via a diffraction grating, with a dispersion such that the phase mismatch for each frequency is zero. Experiments were performed on the Optical Sciences Laser (OSL), a 1--100 J class laser at LLNL. These experiments used a 200 GHz bandwidth source produced by a multipassed electro-optic phase modulator. The spectrum produced was composed of discrete frequency components spaced at 3 GHz intervals. Angular dispersion was incorporated by the addition of a 1200 gr/mm diffraction grating oriented at the Littrow angle, and capable of rotation about the beam direction. Experiments were performed with a pulse length of 1-ns and a 1{omega} input intensity of {approximately} 4 GW/cm{sup 2} for near optimal dispersion for phase matching, 5.2 {mu}rad/GHz, with 0.1, 60, and 155 GHz bandwidth, as well as for partial dispersion compensation, 1.66 {mu}rad/GHz, with 155 GHz and 0.1 GHz bandwidth. The direction of dispersion was varied incrementally 360{degrees} about the beam diameter. The addition of the grating to the beamline reduced the narrowband conversion efficiency by approximately 10%.

  18. Optical coherence tomography imaging based on non-harmonic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xu; Hirobayashi, Shigeki; Chong, Changho; Morosawa, Atsushi; Totsuka, Koki; Suzuki, Takuya

    2009-11-01

    A new processing technique called Non-Harmonic Analysis (NHA) is proposed for OCT imaging. Conventional Fourier-Domain OCT relies on the FFT calculation which depends on the window function and length. Axial resolution is counter proportional to the frame length of FFT that is limited by the swept range of the swept source in SS-OCT, or the pixel counts of CCD in SD-OCT degraded in FD-OCT. However, NHA process is intrinsically free from this trade-offs; NHA can resolve high frequency without being influenced by window function or frame length of sampled data. In this study, NHA process is explained and applied to OCT imaging and compared with OCT images based on FFT. In order to validate the benefit of NHA in OCT, we carried out OCT imaging based on NHA with the three different sample of onion-skin,human-skin and pig-eye. The results show that NHA process can realize practical image resolution that is equivalent to 100nm swept range only with less than half-reduced wavelength range.

  19. Imaging diffusion in a microfluidic device by third harmonic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petzold, Uwe; Büchel, Andreas; Hardt, Steffen; Halfmann, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    We monitor and characterize near-surface diffusion of miscible, transparent liquids in a microfluidic device by third harmonic microscopy. The technique enables observations even of transparent or index-matched media without perturbation of the sample. In particular, we image concentrations of ethanol diffusing in water and estimate the diffusion coefficient from the third harmonic images. We obtain a diffusion coefficient D = (460 ± 30) μm2/s, which is consistent with theoretical predictions. The investigations clearly demonstrate the potential of harmonic microscopy also under the challenging conditions of transparent fluids.

  20. Ultrafast Harmonic Coherent Compound (UHCC) imaging for high frame rate echocardiography and Shear Wave Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Mafalda; Provost, Jean; Chatelin, Simon; Villemain, Olivier; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Transthoracic shear wave elastography of the myocardium remains very challenging due to the poor quality of transthoracic ultrafast imaging and the presence of clutter noise, jitter, phase aberration, and ultrasound reverberation. Several approaches, such as, e.g., diverging-wave coherent compounding or focused harmonic imaging have been proposed to improve the imaging quality. In this study, we introduce ultrafast harmonic coherent compounding (UHCC), in which pulse-inverted diverging-waves are emitted and coherently compounded, and show that such an approach can be used to enhance both Shear Wave Elastography (SWE) and high frame rate B-mode Imaging. UHCC SWE was first tested in phantoms containing an aberrating layer and was compared against pulse-inversion harmonic imaging and against ultrafast coherent compounding (UCC) imaging at the fundamental frequency. In-vivo feasibility of the technique was then evaluated in six healthy volunteers by measuring myocardial stiffness during diastole in transthoracic imaging. We also demonstrated that improvements in imaging quality could be achieved using UHCC B-mode imaging in healthy volunteers. The quality of transthoracic images of the heart was found to be improved with the number of pulse-inverted diverging waves with reduction of the imaging mean clutter level up to 13.8-dB when compared against UCC at the fundamental frequency. These results demonstrated that UHCC B-mode imaging is promising for imaging deep tissues exposed to aberration sources with a high frame-rate. PMID:26890730

  1. Interpretations of Frequency Domain Analyses of Neural Entrainment: Periodicity, Fundamental Frequency, and Harmonics

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hong; Melloni, Lucia; Poeppel, David; Ding, Nai

    2016-01-01

    Brain activity can follow the rhythms of dynamic sensory stimuli, such as speech and music, a phenomenon called neural entrainment. It has been hypothesized that low-frequency neural entrainment in the neural delta and theta bands provides a potential mechanism to represent and integrate temporal information. Low-frequency neural entrainment is often studied using periodically changing stimuli and is analyzed in the frequency domain using the Fourier analysis. The Fourier analysis decomposes a periodic signal into harmonically related sinusoids. However, it is not intuitive how these harmonically related components are related to the response waveform. Here, we explain the interpretation of response harmonics, with a special focus on very low-frequency neural entrainment near 1 Hz. It is illustrated why neural responses repeating at f Hz do not necessarily generate any neural response at f Hz in the Fourier spectrum. A strong neural response at f Hz indicates that the time scales of the neural response waveform within each cycle match the time scales of the stimulus rhythm. Therefore, neural entrainment at very low frequency implies not only that the neural response repeats at f Hz but also that each period of the neural response is a slow wave matching the time scale of a f Hz sinusoid. PMID:27375465

  2. Interpretations of Frequency Domain Analyses of Neural Entrainment: Periodicity, Fundamental Frequency, and Harmonics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hong; Melloni, Lucia; Poeppel, David; Ding, Nai

    2016-01-01

    Brain activity can follow the rhythms of dynamic sensory stimuli, such as speech and music, a phenomenon called neural entrainment. It has been hypothesized that low-frequency neural entrainment in the neural delta and theta bands provides a potential mechanism to represent and integrate temporal information. Low-frequency neural entrainment is often studied using periodically changing stimuli and is analyzed in the frequency domain using the Fourier analysis. The Fourier analysis decomposes a periodic signal into harmonically related sinusoids. However, it is not intuitive how these harmonically related components are related to the response waveform. Here, we explain the interpretation of response harmonics, with a special focus on very low-frequency neural entrainment near 1 Hz. It is illustrated why neural responses repeating at f Hz do not necessarily generate any neural response at f Hz in the Fourier spectrum. A strong neural response at f Hz indicates that the time scales of the neural response waveform within each cycle match the time scales of the stimulus rhythm. Therefore, neural entrainment at very low frequency implies not only that the neural response repeats at f Hz but also that each period of the neural response is a slow wave matching the time scale of a f Hz sinusoid. PMID:27375465

  3. Measuring amplitudes of harmonics and combination frequencies in variable stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellinger, E. P.; Wysocki, D.; Kanbur, S. M.

    2016-05-01

    Discoveries of RR Lyrae and Cepheid variable stars with multiple modes of pulsation have increased tremendously in recent years. The Fourier spectra of these stars can be quite complicated due to the large number of combination frequencies that can exist between their modes. As a result, light- curve fits to these stars often suffer from undesirable ringing effects that arise from noisy observations and poor phase coverage. These non-physical overfitting artifacts also occur when fitting the harmonics of single-mode stars. Here we present a new method for fitting light curves that is much more robust against these effects. We prove that the amplitude measurement problem is very difficult (NP-hard) and provide a heuristic algorithm for solving it quickly and accurately.

  4. Qualitative and quantitative effects of harmonic echocardiographic imaging on endocardial edge definition and side-lobe artifacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, D. N.; Yazbek, N.; Garcia, M. J.; Stewart, W. J.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Harmonic imaging is a new ultrasonographic technique that is designed to improve image quality by exploiting the spontaneous generation of higher frequencies as ultrasound propagates through tissue. We studied 51 difficult-to-image patients with blinded side-by-side cineloop evaluation of endocardial border definition by harmonic versus fundamental imaging. In addition, quantitative intensities from cavity versus wall were compared for harmonic versus fundamental imaging. Harmonic imaging improved left ventricular endocardial border delineation over fundamental imaging (superior: harmonic = 71.1%, fundamental = 18.7%; similar: 10.2%; P <.001). Quantitative analysis of 100 wall/cavity combinations demonstrated brighter wall segments and more strikingly darker cavities during harmonic imaging (cavity intensity on a 0 to 255 scale: fundamental = 15.6 +/- 8.6; harmonic = 6.0 +/- 5.3; P <.0001), which led to enhanced contrast between the wall and cavity (1.89 versus 1.19, P <.0001). Harmonic imaging reduces side-lobe artifacts, resulting in a darker cavity and brighter walls, thereby improving image contrast and endocardial delineation.

  5. Statistical model of clutter suppression in tissue harmonic imaging.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiang; Hamilton, Mark F

    2011-03-01

    A statistical model is developed for the suppression of clutter in tissue harmonic imaging (THI). Tissue heterogeneity is modeled as a random phase screen that is characterized by its correlation length and variance. With the autocorrelation function taken to be Gaussian and for small variance, statistical solutions are derived for the mean intensities at the fundamental and second-harmonic frequencies in the field of a focused sound beam that propagates through the phase screen. The statistical solutions are verified by comparison with ensemble averaging of direct numerical simulations. The model demonstrates that THI reduces the aberration clutter appearing in the focal region regardless of the depth of the aberrating layer, with suppression of the clutter most effective when the layer is close to the source. The model is also applied to the reverberation clutter that is transmitted forward along the axis of the beam. As with aberration clutter, suppression of such reverberation clutter by THI is most pronounced when the tissue heterogeneity is located close to the source.

  6. Driving an Active Vibration Balancer to Minimize Vibrations at the Fundamental and Harmonic Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holliday, Ezekiel S. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Vibrations of a principal machine are reduced at the fundamental and harmonic frequencies by driving the drive motor of an active balancer with balancing signals at the fundamental and selected harmonics. Vibrations are sensed to provide a signal representing the mechanical vibrations. A balancing signal generator for the fundamental and for each selected harmonic processes the sensed vibration signal with adaptive filter algorithms of adaptive filters for each frequency to generate a balancing signal for each frequency. Reference inputs for each frequency are applied to the adaptive filter algorithms of each balancing signal generator at the frequency assigned to the generator. The harmonic balancing signals for all of the frequencies are summed and applied to drive the drive motor. The harmonic balancing signals drive the drive motor with a drive voltage component in opposition to the vibration at each frequency.

  7. General optimal attenuation of harmonic disturbance with unknown frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanovski, Jovan D.

    2012-03-01

    We present algorithms for optimal harmonic disturbance attenuation in standard discrete-time control structure, based on a parametrisation of (marginally) stabilising controllers. The Frobenius norm and the spectral norm of the closed-loop transfer matrix at the disturbance frequencies are minimised. If there is only one frequency of the disturbance, the controller has an observer-based form, which we obtain by solving a static output feedback (SOF) stabilisation control problem. Although the SOF stabilisation problem is hard, the generical case of nonsquare matrix G 22 is solved by linear algebra methods. Numerical simulation results are presented. As a corollary, we transform the control problem with unit circle invariant zeros into a ℋ∞ control problem without such zeros. The elimination of the unit circle invariant zeros is based on the fact that matrix Y(zI - A + BF)-1 is stable, where (Y, F) with Y ≥ 0 is a solution of a discrete-time algebraic Riccati system.

  8. Resonant plasmonic nanoparticles for multicolor second harmonic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accanto, Nicolò; Piatkowski, Lukasz; Hancu, Ion M.; Renger, Jan; van Hulst, Niek F.

    2016-02-01

    Nanoparticles capable of efficiently generating nonlinear optical signals, like second harmonic generation, are attracting a lot of attention as potential background-free and stable nano-probes for biological imaging. However, second harmonic nanoparticles of different species do not produce readily distinguishable optical signals, as the excitation laser mainly defines their second harmonic spectrum. This is in marked contrast to other fluorescent nano-probes like quantum dots that emit light at different colors depending on their sizes and materials. Here, we present the use of resonant plasmonic nanoparticles, combined with broadband phase-controlled laser pulses, as tunable sources of multicolor second harmonic generation. The resonant plasmonic nanoparticles strongly interact with the electromagnetic field of the incident light, enhancing the efficiency of nonlinear optical processes. Because the plasmon resonance in these structures is spectrally narrower than the laser bandwidth, the plasmonic nanoparticles imprint their fingerprints on the second harmonic spectrum. We show how nanoparticles of different sizes produce different colors in the second harmonic spectra even when excited with the same laser pulse. Using these resonant plasmonic nanoparticles as nano-probes is promising for multicolor second harmonic imaging while keeping all the advantages of nonlinear optical microscopy.

  9. Motion artifacts of pulse inversion-based tissue harmonic imaging.

    PubMed

    Shen, Che-Chou; Li, Pai-Chi

    2002-09-01

    Motion artifacts of the pulse inversion technique were studied for finite amplitude distortion-based harmonic imaging. Motion in both the axial and the lateral directions was considered. Two performance issues were investigated. One is the harmonic signal intensity relative to the fundamental intensity and the other is the potential image quality degradation resulting from spectral leakage. A one-dimensional (1-D) correlation-based correction scheme also was used to compensate for motion artifacts. Results indicated that the tissue harmonic signal is significantly affected by tissue motion. For axial motion, the tissue harmonic intensity decreases much more rapidly than with lateral motion. The fundamental signal increases for both axial and lateral motion. Thus, filtering is still required to remove the fundamental signal, even if the pulse inversion technique is applied. The motion also potentially decreases contrast resolution because of the uncancelled spectral leakage. Also, it was indicated that 1-D motion correction is not adequate if nonaxial motion is present.

  10. A multiple deep attenuation frequency window for harmonic analysis in power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Daponte, P.; Falcomata, G. . Dept. di Elettronica Informatica e Sistemistica); Testa, A. . Dipt. di Ingegneria Elettrica)

    1994-04-01

    A novel window is presented and applied in electrical power system harmonic analysis. The goal of increasing the resolvability of low magnitude non-harmonic tones close in frequency to higher magnitude harmonics and the detectability of very low magnitude high frequency harmonics is pursued. The proposed window is derived from the Tseng window; its spectrum can be modeled in the synthesis stage and it is characterized by a narrow width main lobe and by sidelobes which are very low in correspondence to some specified frequencies. Numerical experiments demonstrate the performances and the usefulness of the new window in resolving periodic distorted waveforms in power systems.

  11. Imaging leukocytes in vivo with third harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Cheng-Kun; Chen, Chien-Kuo; Chen, Yu-Shing; Wu, Pei-Chun; Hsieh, Tsung-Yuan; Liu, Han-Wen; Yeh, Chiou-Yueh; Lin, Win-Li; Chia, Jean-San; Liu, Tzu-Ming

    2013-02-01

    Without a labeling, we demonstrated that lipid granules in leukocytes have distinctive third harmonic generation (THG) contrast. Excited by a 1230nm femtosecond laser, THG signals were generated at a significantly higher level in neutrophils than other mononuclear cells, whereas signals in agranular lymphocytes were one order smaller. These characteristic THG features can also be observed in vivo to trace the newly recruited leukocytes following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Furthermore, using video-rate THG microscopy, we also captured images of blood cells in human capillaries. Quite different from red-blood-cells, every now and then, round and granule rich blood cells with strong THG contrast appeared in circulation. The corresponding volume densities in blood, evaluated from their frequencies of appearance and the velocity of circulation, fall within the physiological range of human white blood cell counts. These results suggested that labeling-free THG imaging may provide timely tracing of leukocyte movement and hematology inspection without disturbing the normal cellular or physiological status.

  12. Cerebral perfusion imaging with bolus harmonic imaging (Honorable Mention Poster Award)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kier, Christian; Toth, Daniel; Meyer-Wiethe, Karsten; Schindler, Angela; Cangur, Hakan; Seidel, Gunter; Aach, Til

    2005-04-01

    Fast visualisation of cerebral microcirculation supports diagnosis of acute stroke. However, the commonly used CT/MRI-based methods are time consuming, costly and not applicable to every patient. The bolus perfusion harmonic imaging (BHI) method is an ultrasound imaging technique which makes use of the fact, that ultrasound contrast agents unlike biological tissues resonate at harmonic frequencies. Exploiting this effect, the contrast between perfused and non-perfused areas can be improved. Thus, BHI overcomes the low signal-to-noise ratio of transcranial ultrasound and the high impedance of the skull. By analysing image sequences, visualising the qualitative characteristics of an US contrast agent bolus injection becomes possible. The analysis consists of calculating four perfusion-related parameters, Local Peak Intensity, Time To Peak, Area Under Curve, and Average Rising, from the time/intensity curve and providing them as colour-coded images. For calculating these parameters the fundamental assumption is that image intensity corresponds to contrast agent concentration which in turn shows the perfusion of the corresponding brain region. In a clinical study on patients suffering from acute ischemic stroke it is shown that some of the parameters correlate significantly to the infarction area. Thus, BHI becomes a less time-consuming and inexpensive bedside method for diagnosis of cerebral perfusion deficits.

  13. Confocal Imaging of Biological Tissues Using Second Harmonic Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B-M.; Stoller, P.; Reiser, K.; Eichler, J.; Yan, M.; Rubenchik, A.; Da Silva, L.

    2000-03-06

    A confocal microscopy imaging system was devised to selectively detect Second harmonic signals generated by biological tissues. Several types of biological tissues were examined using this imaging system, including human teeth, bovine blood vessels, and chicken skin. All these tissues generated strong second harmonic signals. There is considerable evidence that the source of these signals in tissue is collagen. Collagen, the predominant component of most tissues, is known to have second order nonlinear susceptibility. This technique may have diagnostic usefulness in pathophysiological conditions characterized by changes in collagen structure including malignant transformation of nevi, progression of diabetic complications, and abnormalities in wound healing.

  14. Quantitative viscoelastic parameters measured by harmonic motion imaging.

    PubMed

    Vappou, Jonathan; Maleke, Caroline; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2009-06-01

    Quantifying the mechanical properties of soft tissues remains a challenging objective in the field of elasticity imaging. In this work, we propose an ultrasound-based method for quantitatively estimating viscoelastic properties, using the amplitude-modulated harmonic motion imaging (HMI) technique. In HMI, an oscillating acoustic radiation force is generated inside the medium by using focused ultrasound and the resulting displacements are measured using an imaging transducer. The proposed approach is a two-step method that uses both the properties of the propagating shear wave and the phase shift between the applied stress and the measured strain in order to infer to the shear storage (G') and shear loss modulus (G''), which refer to the underlying tissue elasticity and viscosity, respectively. The proposed method was first evaluated on numerical phantoms generated by finite-element simulations, where a very good agreement was found between the input and the measured values of G' and G''. Experiments were then performed on three soft tissue-mimicking gel phantoms. HMI measurements were compared to rotational rheometry (dynamic mechanical analysis), and very good agreement was found at the only overlapping frequency (10 Hz) in the estimate of the shear storage modulus G' (14% relative error, averaged p-value of 0.34), whereas poorer agreement was found in G'' (55% relative error, averaged p-value of 0.0007), most likely due to the significantly lower values of G'' of the gel phantoms, posing thus a greater challenge in the sensitivity of the method. Nevertheless, this work proposes an original model-independent ultrasound-based elasticity imaging method that allows for direct, quantitative estimation of tissue viscoelastic properties, together with a validation against mechanical testing.

  15. A Novel Multimode Waveguide Coupler for Accurate Power Measurement of Traveling Wave Tube Harmonic Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Simons, Rainee N.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and test results for a novel waveguide multimode directional coupler (MDC). The coupler fabricated from two dissimilar waveguides is capable of isolating the power at the second harmonic frequency from the fundamental power at the output port of a traveling-wave tube (TWT). In addition to accurate power measurements at harmonic frequencies, a potential application of the MDC is in the design of a beacon source for atmospheric propagation studies at millimeter-wave frequencies.

  16. Corneal imaging by second and third harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocas, Arnaud; Jay, Louis; Mottay, Eric; Brunette, Isabelle; Ozaki, Tsuneyuki

    2008-02-01

    Advanced imaging methods are essential tools for improved outcome of refractive surgery. Second harmonic generation (SHG) and third harmonic generation (THG) microscopy are noninvasive high-resolution imaging methods, which can discriminate the different layers of the cornea, thus having strong impact on the outcome of laser surgery. In this work, we use an Ytterbium femtosecond laser as the laser source, the longer wavelength of which reduces scattering, and allows simultaneous SHG and THG imaging. We present SHG and THG images and profiles of pig corneas that clearly show the anterior surface of the cornea, the entry in the stroma and its end, and the posterior surface of the cornea. These observations allow localizing the epithelium, the stroma and the endothelium. Other experiments give information about the structure and cytology of the corneal layers.

  17. Harmonic Motion Microwave Doppler Imaging method for breast tumor detection.

    PubMed

    Top, Can Barıs; Tafreshi, Azadeh Kamali; Gençer, Nevzat G

    2014-01-01

    Harmonic Motion Microwave Doppler Imaging (HMMDI) method is recently proposed as a non-invasive hybrid breast imaging technique for tumor detection. The acquired data depend on acoustic, elastic and electromagnetic properties of the tissue. The potential of the method is analyzed with simulation studies and phantom experiments. In this paper, the results of these studies are summarized. It is shown that HMMDI method has a potential to detect malignancies inside fibro-glandular tissue.

  18. Harmonic Motion Microwave Doppler Imaging method for breast tumor detection.

    PubMed

    Top, Can Barıs; Tafreshi, Azadeh Kamali; Gençer, Nevzat G

    2014-01-01

    Harmonic Motion Microwave Doppler Imaging (HMMDI) method is recently proposed as a non-invasive hybrid breast imaging technique for tumor detection. The acquired data depend on acoustic, elastic and electromagnetic properties of the tissue. The potential of the method is analyzed with simulation studies and phantom experiments. In this paper, the results of these studies are summarized. It is shown that HMMDI method has a potential to detect malignancies inside fibro-glandular tissue. PMID:25571382

  19. Imaging Observations of a Very High Frequency Type II Burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, S. M.; Mercier, C.; Bradley, R.; Bastian, T.; Kerdraon, A.; Pick, M.

    2006-05-01

    A remarkable Type II burst was detected by the high-frequency system of the Green Bank Solar Radio Burst Spectrometer on 2005 November 14. The harmonic branch of the Type II extended up to 800 MHz, making it one of the highest frequency Type II bursts ever detected, but it failed to propagate to heights corresponding to frequencies below 100 MHz. At such high frequencies, it implies the formation of a shock relatively low in the corona. No coronal mass ejection was evident in the LASCO data for this east limb event. It is one of the few Type II bursts to be observable at every frequency of observation of the Nancay Radio Heliograph (164-432 MHz). Here we present analysis of images of the event, including simultaneous imaging of the fundamental and harmonic branches.

  20. Imaging Collagen Orientation Using Polarization-Modulated Second Harmonic Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, P; Celliers, P M; Reiser, K M; Rubenchik, A M

    2002-01-10

    We use polarization-modulated second harmonic generation to image fiber orientation in collagen tissues, with an axial resolution of about 10 {micro}m and a transverse resolution of up to 1 {micro}m. A linearly polarized ultra-short pulse (200 fs) Ti:Sapphire laser beam is modulated using an electro-optic modulator and quarter-wave plate combination and focused onto a translation stage mounted sample using a microscope objective. The generated second harmonic light is collected using a photomultiplier tube and demodulated using phase sensitive detection to obtain signal intensity and fiber orientation information. In order to obtain second harmonic generation images of different types of collagen organization, we analyze several different tissues, including rat-tail tendon, mouse aorta, mouse fibrotic liver, and porcine skin. We can use our technique to image fibrotic tissue in histological sections of damaged liver and to identify burned tissue in porcine skin to a depth of a few hundred microns. Polarization-modulated second harmonic generation potentially could be a useful clinical technique for diagnosing collagen related disease or damage, especially in the skin.

  1. Radio-frequency excitation of harmonic microwave radiation from a Penning reflex discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Tate, J.P.; Wharton, C.B. )

    1993-04-01

    Experimental results on multiple-harmonic emission at 8.8 GHz from a Penning reflex discharge (PRD) are reported. Observations of the frequency spectra of microwave emission showed copius harmonic generation of frequencies having two completely different origins: (1) spontaneously excited high harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency and (2) high harmonics of the frequency of an injected signal independent of the magnetic field strength, a phenomenon reported here for the first time. For spontaneous harmonic emission there was a current threshold, whose magnitude depended on gas pressure and magnetic field strength. When a signal was injected, however, high harmonics (up to the 18th) could be seen at discharge currents well below this threshold value. Comparisons between the two types of radiation are made and discussion of possible mechanisms is provided. It is concluded that the coupling efficiency of the radio-frequency (rf)-excited emission is dependent on the relationship between the rf drive frequency and the electron cyclotron frequency. Finite Larmor radius effects may also influence this coupling. The plasma sheath size will also be a factor in the transfer of energy from the probe to the bulk plasma. Results which seek to elucidate these effects are presented.

  2. Storage ring free electron laser dynamics in presence of an auxiliary harmonic radio frequency cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C. A.; Botman, J. I. M.; Bruni, C.; Orlandi, G.; de Ninno, G.; Garzella, D.; Couprie, M. E.

    2005-01-01

    In a Storage Ring Free Electron Laser (SRFEL) there is a strong interdependence between the laser beam and the electron beam from which the laser is generated. The Super ACO storage ring has a second Radio Frequency (RF) cavity at the 5th harmonic of the main RF cavity. It is used to shorten the bunch length, thereby enhancing the laser gain. Employing this RF harmonic cavity instabilities are observed with a strong effect on both the laser radiation properties and the electron beam behaviour. In this paper, we first present beam characteristics of Super-ACO as influenced by the harmonic cavity, and the instabilities of the beam due to this RF cavity. Then we discuss the FEL properties in presence of the harmonic RF cavity. In general the harmonic cavity functions as intended, and it is observed that the laser suppresses the instabilities caused by the harmonic cavity in the absence of the FEL.

  3. Harmonic Frequency Lowering: Effects on the Perception of Music Detail and Sound Quality.

    PubMed

    Kirchberger, Martin; Russo, Frank A

    2016-01-01

    A novel algorithm for frequency lowering in music was developed and experimentally tested in hearing-impaired listeners. Harmonic frequency lowering (HFL) combines frequency transposition and frequency compression to preserve the harmonic content of music stimuli. Listeners were asked to make judgments regarding detail and sound quality in music stimuli. Stimuli were presented under different signal processing conditions: original, low-pass filtered, HFL, and nonlinear frequency compressed. Results showed that participants reported perceiving the most detail in the HFL condition. In addition, there was no difference in sound quality across conditions. PMID:26834122

  4. Frequency-resolved optical grating using surface third-harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, T.; Krumbuegel, M.A.; Delong, K.W.; Fittinghoff, D.N.; Trebino, R.

    1995-11-01

    We demonstrate the frequency-resolved optical grating technique using third-harmonic generation on the surface of a cover glass with ultra-short optical pulses and compare that with the phase-retrieved spectrogram.

  5. Content-based image classification with circular harmonic wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacovitti, Giovanni; Neri, Alessandro

    1998-07-01

    Classification of an image on the basis of contained patterns is considered in a context of detection and estimation theory. To simplify mathematical derivations, image and reference patterns are represented on a complex support. This allows to convert the four positional parameters into two complex numbers: complex displacement and complex scale factor. The latter one represents isotropic dilations with its magnitude, and rotations with its phase. In this context, evaluation of the likelihood function under additive Gaussian noise assumption allows to relate basic template matching strategy to wavelet theory. It is shown that using circular harmonic wavelets simplifies the problem from a computational viewpoint. A general purpose pattern detection/estimation scheme is introduced by decomposing the images on a orthogonal basis formed by complex Laguerre-Gauss Harmonic wavelets.

  6. Analysis and measurement of the modulation transfer function of harmonic shear wave induced phase encoding imaging.

    PubMed

    McAleavey, Stephen A

    2014-05-01

    Shear wave induced phase encoding (SWIPE) imaging generates ultrasound backscatter images of tissue-like elastic materials by using traveling shear waves to encode the lateral position of the scatters in the phase of the received echo. In contrast to conventional ultrasound B-scan imaging, SWIPE offers the potential advantages of image formation without beam focusing or steering from a single transducer element, lateral resolution independent of aperture size, and the potential to achieve relatively high lateral resolution with low frequency ultrasound. Here a Fourier series description of the phase modulated echo signal is developed, demonstrating that echo harmonics at multiples of the shear wave frequency reveal target k-space data at identical multiples of the shear wavenumber. Modulation transfer functions of SWIPE imaging systems are calculated for maximum shear wave acceleration and maximum shear constraints, and compared with a conventionally focused aperture. The relative signal-to-noise ratio of the SWIPE method versus a conventionally focused aperture is found through these calculations. Reconstructions of wire targets in a gelatin phantom using 1 and 3.5 MHz ultrasound and a cylindrical shear wave source are presented, generated from the fundamental and second harmonic of the shear wave modulation frequency, demonstrating weak dependence of lateral resolution with ultrasound frequency.

  7. Influence of the bias signal amplitude and frequency on the harmonic probe measurements in plasma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yu-jing; Lu, Wen-qi; Li, Jian-quan; Xu, Jun; Wang, You-nian

    2016-08-01

    The harmonic probe technique may be used for the diagnostics of the plasma in insulative film deposition circumstances where the conventional Langmuir probe cannot work. In this study, we investigated the influence of the bias signal amplitude V0 and frequency f of the harmonic probe on the diagnostic results. While the measured electron temperature Te and ion density ni change little with f within the frequency range of 1-10 kHz, both of them show a considerable increase with V0 . The reasons for the results were analyzed, and based on the understanding, an improved harmonic probe technique was proposed. The validity of the improved technique was verified by comparing its results with those of a conventional Langmuir probe in Ar plasmas. The improved harmonic probe technique was applied in diagnostics of the plasma circumstance for microwave electron cyclotron resonance plasma enhanced radio frequency magnetron sputtering deposition of SiNx films.

  8. Statistical Properties of Real-Time Amplitude Estimate of Harmonics Affected by Frequency Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellan, Diego; Pignari, Sergio A.

    2016-07-01

    This work deals with the statistical characterization of real-time digital measurement of the amplitude of harmonics affected by frequency instability. In fact, in modern power systems both the presence of harmonics and frequency instability are well-known and widespread phenomena mainly due to nonlinear loads and distributed generation, respectively. As a result, real-time monitoring of voltage/current frequency spectra is of paramount importance as far as power quality issues are addressed. Within this framework, a key point is that in many cases real-time continuous monitoring prevents the application of sophisticated algorithms to extract all the information from the digitized waveforms because of the required computational burden. In those cases only simple evaluations such as peak search of discrete Fourier transform are implemented. It is well known, however, that a slight change in waveform frequency results in lack of sampling synchronism and uncertainty in amplitude estimate. Of course the impact of this phenomenon increases with the order of the harmonic to be measured. In this paper an approximate analytical approach is proposed in order to describe the statistical properties of the measured magnitude of harmonics affected by frequency instability. By providing a simplified description of the frequency behavior of the windows used against spectral leakage, analytical expressions for mean value, variance, cumulative distribution function, and probability density function of the measured harmonics magnitude are derived in closed form as functions of waveform frequency treated as a random variable.

  9. Dynamic simulation of viscoelastic soft tissues in harmonic motion imaging application.

    PubMed

    Shan, Baoxiang; Kogit, Megan L; Pelegri, Assimina A

    2008-10-20

    A finite element model was built to simulate the dynamic behavior of soft tissues subjected to sinusoidal excitation during harmonic motion imaging. In this study, soft tissues and tissue-like phantoms were modeled as isotropic, viscoelastic, and nearly incompressible media. A 3D incompressible mixed u-p element of eight nodes, S1P0, was developed to accurately calculate the stiffness matrix for soft tissues. The finite element equations of motion were solved using the Newmark method. The Voigt description for tissue viscosity was applied to estimate the relative viscous coefficient from the phase shift between the response and excitation in a harmonic case. After validating our model via ANSYS simulation and experiments, a MATLAB finite element program was then employed to explore the effect of excitation location, viscosity, and multiple frequencies on the dynamic displacement at the frequency of interest.

  10. Coupling CARS with multiphoton fluorescence and high harmonic generation imaging modalities using a femtosecond laser source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongtao; Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Zhu, Jiabin; Buhman, Kimberly K.; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2009-02-01

    Multimodal nonlinear optical imaging has opened new opportunities and becomes a powerful tool for imaging complex tissue samples with inherent 3D spatial resolution.. We present a robust and easy-to-operate approach to add the coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging modality to a widely used multiphoton microscope. The laser source composed of a Mai Tai femtosecond laser and an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) offers one-beam, two-beam and three-beam modalities. The Mai Tai output at 790 nm is split into two beams, with 80% of the power being used to pump the OPO. The idler output at 2036 nm from OPO is doubled using a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) crystal. This frequency-doubled idler beam at 1018 nm is sent through a delay line and collinearly combined with the other Mai Tai beam for CARS imaging on a laser-scanning microscope. This Mai Tai beam is also used for multiphoton fluorescence and second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging. The signal output at 1290 nm from OPO is used for SHG and third-harmonic generation (THG) imaging. External detectors are installed for both forward and backward detection, whereas two internal lamda-scan detectors are employed for microspectroscopy analysis. This new system allows vibrationally resonant CARS imaging of lipid bodies, SHG imaging of collagen fibers, and multiphoton fluorescence analysis in fresh tissues. As a preliminary application, the effect of diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) deficiency on liver lipid metabolism in mice was investigated.

  11. Stimulated electromagnetic emissions during pump frequency sweep through fourth electron cyclotron harmonic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carozzi, T. D.; Thidé, B.; Grach, S. M.; Leyser, T. B.; Holz, M.; Komrakov, G. P.; Frolov, V. L.; Sergeev, E. N.

    2002-09-01

    The frequency of a high-power HF radio wave incident on the ionosphere was swept, using a computer-controlled transmitter signal, in <10 s within a 60-kHz-wide frequency band approximately centered on the fourth harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency. Measurements of the spectral behavior of stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE) across this harmonic after preconditioning could thereby be made with unprecedented resolution, speed, and ionospheric stability. Comparison of local electron cyclotron frequency estimations based on the experimental data reveals discrepancies between certain downshifted maximum models and the empirical broad upshifted maximum (BUM) feature formula ΔfBUM = f0 - nfce. Weak emissions related to the BUM were discovered below the nominal BUM cutoff frequency. Finally, we observed that the intensity of certain SEE components differed depending on the whether the pump frequency sweep was ascending or descending.

  12. Frequency locking of a field-widened Michelson interferometer based on optimal multi-harmonics heterodyning.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhongtao; Liu, Dong; Zhou, Yudi; Yang, Yongying; Luo, Jing; Zhang, Yupeng; Shen, Yibing; Liu, Chong; Bai, Jian; Wang, Kaiwei; Su, Lin; Yang, Liming

    2016-09-01

    A general resonant frequency locking scheme for a field-widened Michelson interferometer (FWMI), which is intended as a spectral discriminator in a high-spectral-resolution lidar, is proposed based on optimal multi-harmonics heterodyning. By transferring the energy of a reference laser to multi-harmonics of different orders generated by optimal electro-optic phase modulation, the heterodyne signal of these multi-harmonics through the FWMI can reveal the resonant frequency drift of the interferometer very sensitively within a large frequency range. This approach can overcome the locking difficulty induced by the low finesse of the FWMI, thus contributing to excellent locking accuracy and lock acquisition range without any constraint on the interferometer itself. The theoretical and experimental results are presented to verify the performance of this scheme. PMID:27607936

  13. Examining the impact of harmonic correlation on vibrational frequencies calculated in localized coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson-Heine, Magnus W. D.

    2015-10-01

    Carefully choosing a set of optimized coordinates for performing vibrational frequency calculations can significantly reduce the anharmonic correlation energy from the self-consistent field treatment of molecular vibrations. However, moving away from normal coordinates also introduces an additional source of correlation energy arising from mode-coupling at the harmonic level. The impact of this new component of the vibrational energy is examined for a range of molecules, and a method is proposed for correcting the resulting self-consistent field frequencies by adding the full coupling energy from connected pairs of harmonic and pseudoharmonic modes, termed vibrational self-consistent field (harmonic correlation). This approach is found to lift the vibrational degeneracies arising from coordinate optimization and provides better agreement with experimental and benchmark frequencies than uncorrected vibrational self-consistent field theory without relying on traditional correlated methods.

  14. Examining the impact of harmonic correlation on vibrational frequencies calculated in localized coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson-Heine, Magnus W. D.

    2015-10-28

    Carefully choosing a set of optimized coordinates for performing vibrational frequency calculations can significantly reduce the anharmonic correlation energy from the self-consistent field treatment of molecular vibrations. However, moving away from normal coordinates also introduces an additional source of correlation energy arising from mode-coupling at the harmonic level. The impact of this new component of the vibrational energy is examined for a range of molecules, and a method is proposed for correcting the resulting self-consistent field frequencies by adding the full coupling energy from connected pairs of harmonic and pseudoharmonic modes, termed vibrational self-consistent field (harmonic correlation). This approach is found to lift the vibrational degeneracies arising from coordinate optimization and provides better agreement with experimental and benchmark frequencies than uncorrected vibrational self-consistent field theory without relying on traditional correlated methods.

  15. Artificial Ionization and UHF Radar Response Associated with HF Frequencies near Electron Gyro-Harmonics (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, B. J.; Fallen, C. T.; Secan, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    We present new results from O-mode ionospheric heating experiments at the HAARP facility in Alaska to demonstrate that the magnitude of artificial ionization production is critically dependent on the choice of HF frequency near gyro-harmonics. For O-mode heating in the lower F-region ionosphere, typically about 200 km altitude, artificial ionization enhancements are observed in the lower ionosphere (about 150 - 220 km) and also in the topside ionosphere above about 500 km. Lower ionosphere density enhancements are inferred from HF-enhanced ion and plasma-line signals observed with UHF radar. Upper ionospheric density enhancements have been observed with TEC (total electron content) experiments by monitoring satellite radio beacons where signal paths traverse the HF-modified ionosphere. Both density enhancements and corresponding upward plasma fluxes have also been observed in the upper ionosphere via in-situ satellite observations. The data presented focus mainly on observations near the third and fourth gyro-harmonics. The specific values of the height-dependent gyro-harmonics have been computed from a magnetic model of the field line through the HF heated volume. Experiments with several closely spaced HF frequencies around the gyro-harmonic frequency region show that the magnitude of the lower-ionosphere artificial ionization production maximizes for HF frequencies about 1.0 - 1.5 MHz above the gyro-harmonic frequency. The response is progressively larger as the HF frequency is increased in the frequency region near the gyro-harmonics. For HF frequencies that are initially greater than the gyro-harmonic value the UHF radar scattering cross-section is relatively small, and non-existent or very weak signals are observed; as the signal returns drop in altitude due to density enhancements the HF interaction region passes through lower altitudes where the HF frequency is less than the gyro-harmonic value, for these conditions the radar scattering cross-section is

  16. Single pulse frequency compounding protocol for superharmonic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilouchkine, M. G.; van Neer, P. L. M. J.; Verweij, M. D.; Matte, G. M.; Vletter, W. B.; van der Steen, A. F. W.; de Jong, N.

    2013-07-01

    Second harmonic imaging is currently accepted as the standard in commercial echographic systems. A new imaging technique, coined as superharmonic imaging (SHI), combines the third till the fifth harmonics, arising during nonlinear sound propagation. It could further enhance the resolution and quality of echographic images. To meet the bandwidth requirement for SHI a dedicated phased array has been developed: a low frequency subarray, intended for transmission, interleaved with a high frequency subarray, used in reception. As the bandwidth of the elements is limited, the spectral gaps in between the harmonics cause multiple (ghost) reflection artifacts. A dual-pulse frequency compounding method aims at suppressing those artifacts at a price of a reduced frame rate. In this study we explore a possibility of performing frequency compounding within a single transmission. The traditional frequency compounding method suppresses the ripples by consecutively emitting two short Gaussian bursts with a slightly different center frequency. In the newly proposed method, the transmit aperture is divided into two parts: the first half is used to send a pulse at the lower center frequency, while the other half simultaneously transmits at a slightly higher center frequency. The suitability of the protocol for medical imaging applications in terms of the steering capabilities was performed in a simulation study with INCS and the hydrophone measurements. Moreover, an experimental study was carried out to find the optimal parameters for the clinical imaging protocol. The latter was subsequently used to obtain the images of a tissue mimicking phantom containing strongly reflecting wires. Additionally, the images of a human heart in the parasternal projection were acquired. The scanning aperture with the developed protocol amounts to approximately 90°, which is sufficient to capture the cardiac structures in the standard anatomical projections. The theoretically estimated and

  17. Evading surface and detector frequency noise in harmonic oscillator measurements of force gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Eric W.; Lee, SangGap; Hickman, Steven A.; Harrell, Lee E.; Marohn, John A.

    2010-07-01

    We introduce and demonstrate a method of measuring small force gradients acting on a harmonic oscillator in which the force-gradient signal of interest is used to parametrically up-convert a forced oscillation below resonance into an amplitude signal at the oscillator's resonance frequency. The approach, which we demonstrate in a mechanically detected electron spin resonance experiment, allows the force-gradient signal to evade detector frequency noise by converting a slowly modulated frequency signal into an amplitude signal.

  18. Mitigation of harmonic disturbance at pumped storage power station with static frequency converter

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, J.C.; Wu, C.J.; Yen, S.S.

    1997-09-01

    This paper investigates the harmonic distortion problem and mitigation method at the Mingtan Pumped Storage Power Station in Taiwan, where six 300 MVA synchronous generators/motors are started by a static frequency converter (SFC) before the pumping stage. Since the SFC uses 6-pulse rectifier technique, a large amount of harmonic currents are produced during the starting period. The harmonic distortion level at each bus of the power plant was very high. Especially, the total harmonic distortion (THD) of current at the lighting feeder reached up to 184%, so that power fuses were burned out. At first a 5 mH reactor was inserted in the SFC feeder and a 5th order and high pass filter was installed. However, the harmonic distortion levels were still too high, but there is no space for additional higher-order filters. Finally, the SFC is fed with an individual transformer, and the harmonic disturbance problem is avoided. This paper also gives computer simulations to investigate the harmonic distortion problems and verify the mitigation methods.

  19. Interpreting Second-Harmonic Generation Images of Collagen I Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Rebecca M.; Zipfel, Warren R.; Webb, Watt W.

    2005-01-01

    Fibrillar collagen, being highly noncentrosymmetric, possesses a tremendous nonlinear susceptibility. As a result, second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy of collagen produces extremely bright and robust signals, providing an invaluable tool for imaging tissue structure with submicron resolution. Here we discuss fundamental principles governing SHG phase matching with the tightly focusing optics used in microscopy. Their application to collagen imaging yields several biophysical features characteristic of native collagen structure: SHG radiates from the shell of a collagen fibril, rather than from its bulk. This SHG shell may correspond to the supporting element of the fibril. Physiologically relevant changes in solution ionic strength alter the ratio of forward-to-backward propagating SHG, implying a resulting change in the SHG shell thickness. Fibrillogenesis can be resolved in immature tissue by directly imaging backward-propagating SHG. Such findings are crucial to the design and development of forthcoming diagnostic and research tools. PMID:15533922

  20. Electron cyclotron harmonic resonances in high-frequency heating of the ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Spencer P.

    2013-09-15

    Electron acceleration by upper hybrid waves under cyclotron harmonic resonance interaction is studied. Theory is formulated; the analytical solutions in the second and fourth harmonic cyclotron resonance cases are obtained, and in the third harmonic case, a first order differential equation governing the evolution of the electron energy is derived. The theory is applied for explaining the generation of artificial ionization layers observed in high-frequency (HF) ionospheric heating experiments. The upper hybrid waves are assumed to be excited parametrically by the O-mode HF heating wave. As the decay mode is the lower hybrid wave, the excited upper hybrid waves have wavelengths ranging from 0.25 to 0.5 m, which are short enough to effectively incorporate the finite Larmour radius effect for the harmonic cyclotron resonance interactions as well as have a frequency bandwidth of about 20 kHz, which provides an altitude region of about 10 km for continuous harmonic cyclotron resonance interaction between electrons and descending waves in the slightly inhomogeneous geomagnetic field. The numerical results on electron acceleration show that electron fluxes with energies larger than 14 eV are generated in the three harmonic cases. These energetic electrons cause impact ionizations, which are descending to form artificial ionization layers at the bottom of the ionospheric F region.

  1. Localized, Non-Harmonic Active Flap Motions for Low Frequency In-Plane Rotor Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sim, Ben W.; Potsdam, Mark; Kitaplioglu, Cahit; LeMasurier, Philip; Lorber, Peter; Andrews, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    A first-of-its-kind demonstration of the use of localized, non-harmonic active flap motions, for suppressing low frequency, in-plane rotor noise, is reported in this paper. Operational feasibility is verified via testing of the full-scale AATD/Sikorsky/UTRC active flap demonstration rotor in the NFAC's 40- by 80-Foot anechoic wind tunnel. Effectiveness of using localized, non-harmonic active flap motions are compared to conventional four-per-rev harmonic flap motions, and also active flap motions derived from closed-loop acoustics implementations. All three approaches resulted in approximately the same noise reductions over an in-plane three-by-three microphone array installed forward and near in-plane of the rotor in the nearfield. It is also reported that using an active flap in this localized, non-harmonic manner, resulted in no more that 2% rotor performance penalty, but had the tendency to incur higher hub vibration levels.

  2. Research of second harmonic generation images based on texture analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yao; Li, Yan; Gong, Haiming; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Huang, Zufang; Chen, Guannan

    2014-09-01

    Texture analysis plays a crucial role in identifying objects or regions of interest in an image. It has been applied to a variety of medical image processing, ranging from the detection of disease and the segmentation of specific anatomical structures, to differentiation between healthy and pathological tissues. Second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy as a potential noninvasive tool for imaging biological tissues has been widely used in medicine, with reduced phototoxicity and photobleaching. In this paper, we clarified the principles of texture analysis including statistical, transform, structural and model-based methods and gave examples of its applications, reviewing studies of the technique. Moreover, we tried to apply texture analysis to the SHG images for the differentiation of human skin scar tissues. Texture analysis method based on local binary pattern (LBP) and wavelet transform was used to extract texture features of SHG images from collagen in normal and abnormal scars, and then the scar SHG images were classified into normal or abnormal ones. Compared with other texture analysis methods with respect to the receiver operating characteristic analysis, LBP combined with wavelet transform was demonstrated to achieve higher accuracy. It can provide a new way for clinical diagnosis of scar types. At last, future development of texture analysis in SHG images were discussed.

  3. Harmonic signal generation and frequency upconversion using selective sideband Brillouin amplification in single-mode fiber.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang-Hyun; Choi, Woo-Young

    2007-06-15

    Harmonic signal generation and frequency upconversion at millimeter-wave bands are experimentally demonstrated by using selective sideband Brillouin amplification induced by stimulated Brillouin scattering in a single-mode fiber. The harmonic signals and frequency upconverted signals are simultaneously generated by the beating of optical sidebands, one of which is Brillouin amplified. By using this method, we successfully demonstrate generation of third-harmonic millimeter waves at 32.55 GHz with f(LO) of 10.85 GHz and upconversion of 10 Mbps quadrature-shift keyed data at f(IF) of 1.55 GHz into a 30 GHz band with more than 17 dB RF power gain.

  4. In vivo localized harmonic motion imaging of VX2 tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curiel, Laura; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2012-10-01

    We evaluated the feasibility of localized harmonic motion (LHM) imaging for tumor detection in vivo. LHM was induced using a single-element focused ultrasound (FUS) transducer (80 mm focal, 100 mm diameter, 1.54 MHz) and a separate transducer (5 kHz PRF, 5 MHz) was used to track motion by cross-correlating RF signals. A scan was performed with the transducers assembly and LHM was induced 5 times per location. Images were formed averaging the calculated LHM amplitudes. Ten New Zealand rabbits had VX2 tumors implanted on their thighs. Tumors were located using Magnetic resonance images and LHM images were obtained. Eight out of ten tumors were visualized on LHM images as a region with lower amplitude (5.7±1.3μm in tumors and 19.5±5.8μm in muscle). All tumors had an elongated shape running along the muscle fibers. It was possible to detect tumors larger than 4mm in width (short axis of the tumor). We performed a FUS ablation of one tumor and the ablated region was detected as well on LHM images as a reduced LHM amplitude region.

  5. Data acquisition system for harmonic motion microwave Doppler imaging.

    PubMed

    Tafreshi, Azadeh Kamali; Karadaş, Mürsel; Top, Can Barış; Gençer, Nevzat Güneri

    2014-01-01

    Harmonic Motion Microwave Doppler Imaging (HMMDI) is a hybrid method proposed for breast tumor detection, which images the coupled dielectric and elastic properties of the tissue. In this paper, the performance of a data acquisition system for HMMDI method is evaluated on breast phantom materials. A breast fat phantom including fibro-glandular and tumor phantom regions is produced. The phantom is excited using a focused ultrasound probe and a microwave transmitter. The received microwave signal level is measured on three different points inside the phantom (fat, fibro-glandular, and tumor regions). The experimental results using the designed homodyne receiver proved the effectiveness of the proposed setup. In tumor phantom region, the signal level decreased about 3 dB compared to the signal level obtained from the fibro-glandular phantom area, whereas this signal was about 4 dB higher than the received signal from the fat phantom.

  6. The radio-frequency fluctuation effect on the floating harmonic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaewon; Kim, Kyung-Hyun; Kim, Dong-Hwan; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2016-08-01

    The radio-frequency (RF) plasma diagnostics with an electrical probe facing a challenge, because the RF fluctuation oscillates the plasma potential and distorts the current-voltage (I-V) curve. As Langmuir probe is widely used in plasma diagnostics, many researchers have been studying the effect of RF fluctuation on probe and compensation methods. On the other hand, there have not been enough studies on the fluctuation effect on the floating harmonic method. Therefore, we investigated the impact of RF fluctuation on the floating harmonic method theoretically and experimentally. When the electrons are in ideal Maxwellian distribution, the floating potential is negatively shifted by the RF fluctuation, but the fluctuation does not distort I-V curve around the floating potential. However, in practical plasmas, the I-V curve and their harmonic components are distorted. This RF fluctuation effect becomes more significant in a low density plasma with a high impedance sheath. The second harmonic current decreases with the RF fluctuation while the first harmonic current is merely affected. Therefore, the electron temperatures measured with the floating harmonic method under low density plasma with uncompensated probe are overestimated than the results obtained with the compensated probe.

  7. Quantitative analysis of biological tissues using Fourier transform-second-harmonic generation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambekar Ramachandra Rao, Raghu; Mehta, Monal R.; Toussaint, Kimani C., Jr.

    2010-02-01

    We demonstrate the use of Fourier transform-second-harmonic generation (FT-SHG) imaging of collagen fibers as a means of performing quantitative analysis of obtained images of selected spatial regions in porcine trachea, ear, and cornea. Two quantitative markers, preferred orientation and maximum spatial frequency are proposed for differentiating structural information between various spatial regions of interest in the specimens. The ear shows consistent maximum spatial frequency and orientation as also observed in its real-space image. However, there are observable changes in the orientation and minimum feature size of fibers in the trachea indicating a more random organization. Finally, the analysis is applied to a 3D image stack of the cornea. It is shown that the standard deviation of the orientation is sensitive to the randomness in fiber orientation. Regions with variations in the maximum spatial frequency, but with relatively constant orientation, suggest that maximum spatial frequency is useful as an independent quantitative marker. We emphasize that FT-SHG is a simple, yet powerful, tool for extracting information from images that is not obvious in real space. This technique can be used as a quantitative biomarker to assess the structure of collagen fibers that may change due to damage from disease or physical injury.

  8. Imaging morphodynamics of human blood cells in vivo with video-rate third harmonic generation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Kuo; Liu, Tzu-Ming

    2012-01-01

    With a video-rate third harmonic generation (THG) microscopy system, we imaged the micro-circulation beneath the human skin without labeling. Not only the speed of circulation but also the morpho-hydrodynamics of blood cells can be analyzed. Lacking of nuclei, red blood cells (RBCs) shows typical parachute-like and hollow-core morphology under THG microscopy. Quite different from RBCs, every now and then, round and granule rich blood cells with strong THG contrast appear in circulation. The corresponding volume densities in blood, evaluated from their frequencies of appearance and the velocity of circulation, fall within the physiological range of human white blood cell counts. PMID:23162724

  9. Imaging morphodynamics of human blood cells in vivo with video-rate third harmonic generation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Kuo; Liu, Tzu-Ming

    2012-11-01

    With a video-rate third harmonic generation (THG) microscopy system, we imaged the micro-circulation beneath the human skin without labeling. Not only the speed of circulation but also the morpho-hydrodynamics of blood cells can be analyzed. Lacking of nuclei, red blood cells (RBCs) shows typical parachute-like and hollow-core morphology under THG microscopy. Quite different from RBCs, every now and then, round and granule rich blood cells with strong THG contrast appear in circulation. The corresponding volume densities in blood, evaluated from their frequencies of appearance and the velocity of circulation, fall within the physiological range of human white blood cell counts. PMID:23162724

  10. Contribution of low-frequency harmonics to Mandarin Chinese tone identification in quiet and six-talker babble background.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Azimi, Behnam; Bhandary, Moulesh; Hu, Yi

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate Mandarin Chinese tone identification in quiet and multi-talker babble conditions for normal-hearing listeners. Tone identification was measured with speech stimuli and stimuli with low and/or high harmonics that were embedded in three Mandarin vowels with two fundamental frequencies. There were six types of stimuli: all harmonics (All), low harmonics (Low), high harmonics (High), and the first (H1), second (H2), and third (H3) harmonic. Results showed that, for quiet conditions, individual harmonics carried frequency contour information well enough for tone identification with high accuracy; however, in noisy conditions, tone identification with individual low harmonics (e.g., H1, H2, and H3) was significantly lower than that with the Low, High, and All harmonics. Moreover, tone identification with individual harmonics in noise was lower for a low F0 than for a high F0, and was also dependent on vowel category. Tone identification with individual low-frequency harmonics was accounted for by local signal-to-noise ratios, indicating that audibility of harmonics in noise may play a primary role in tone identification.

  11. Imaging articular cartilage using second harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfield, Jessica C.; Winlove, C. Peter; Knapp, Karen; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2006-02-01

    Sub cellular resolution images of equine articular cartilage have been obtained using both second harmonic generation microscopy (SHGM) and two-photon fluorescence microscopy (TPFM). The SHGM images clearly map the distribution of the collagen II fibers within the extracellular matrix while the TPFM images show the distribution of endogenous two-photon fluorophores in both the cells and the extracellular matrix, highlighting especially the pericellular matrix and bright 2-3μm diameter features within the cells. To investigate the source of TPF in the extracellular matrix experiments have been carried out to see if it may originate from the proteoglycans. Pure solutions of the following proteoglycans hyaluronan, chondroitin sulfate and aggrecan have been imaged, only the aggrecan produced any TPF and here the intensity was not great enough to account for the TPF in the extracellular matrix. Also cartilage samples were subjected to a process to remove proteoglycans and cellular components. After this process the TPF from the samples had decreased by a factor of two, with respect to the SHG intensity.

  12. Dual-frequency piezoelectric transducers for contrast enhanced ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Martin, K Heath; Lindsey, Brooks D; Ma, Jianguo; Lee, Mike; Li, Sibo; Foster, F Stuart; Jiang, Xiaoning; Dayton, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    For many years, ultrasound has provided clinicians with an affordable and effective imaging tool for applications ranging from cardiology to obstetrics. Development of microbubble contrast agents over the past several decades has enabled ultrasound to distinguish between blood flow and surrounding tissue. Current clinical practices using microbubble contrast agents rely heavily on user training to evaluate degree of localized perfusion. Advances in separating the signals produced from contrast agents versus surrounding tissue backscatter provide unique opportunities for specialized sensors designed to image microbubbles with higher signal to noise and resolution than previously possible. In this review article, we describe the background principles and recent developments of ultrasound transducer technology for receiving signals produced by contrast agents while rejecting signals arising from soft tissue. This approach relies on transmitting at a low-frequency and receiving microbubble harmonic signals at frequencies many times higher than the transmitted frequency. Design and fabrication of dual-frequency transducers and the extension of recent developments in transducer technology for dual-frequency harmonic imaging are discussed. PMID:25375755

  13. Dual-frequency piezoelectric transducers for contrast enhanced ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Martin, K Heath; Lindsey, Brooks D; Ma, Jianguo; Lee, Mike; Li, Sibo; Foster, F Stuart; Jiang, Xiaoning; Dayton, Paul A

    2014-11-04

    For many years, ultrasound has provided clinicians with an affordable and effective imaging tool for applications ranging from cardiology to obstetrics. Development of microbubble contrast agents over the past several decades has enabled ultrasound to distinguish between blood flow and surrounding tissue. Current clinical practices using microbubble contrast agents rely heavily on user training to evaluate degree of localized perfusion. Advances in separating the signals produced from contrast agents versus surrounding tissue backscatter provide unique opportunities for specialized sensors designed to image microbubbles with higher signal to noise and resolution than previously possible. In this review article, we describe the background principles and recent developments of ultrasound transducer technology for receiving signals produced by contrast agents while rejecting signals arising from soft tissue. This approach relies on transmitting at a low-frequency and receiving microbubble harmonic signals at frequencies many times higher than the transmitted frequency. Design and fabrication of dual-frequency transducers and the extension of recent developments in transducer technology for dual-frequency harmonic imaging are discussed.

  14. Dual-Frequency Piezoelectric Transducers for Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Martin, K. Heath; Lindsey, Brooks D.; Ma, Jianguo; Lee, Mike; Li, Sibo; Foster, F. Stuart; Jiang, Xiaoning; Dayton, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    For many years, ultrasound has provided clinicians with an affordable and effective imaging tool for applications ranging from cardiology to obstetrics. Development of microbubble contrast agents over the past several decades has enabled ultrasound to distinguish between blood flow and surrounding tissue. Current clinical practices using microbubble contrast agents rely heavily on user training to evaluate degree of localized perfusion. Advances in separating the signals produced from contrast agents versus surrounding tissue backscatter provide unique opportunities for specialized sensors designed to image microbubbles with higher signal to noise and resolution than previously possible. In this review article, we describe the background principles and recent developments of ultrasound transducer technology for receiving signals produced by contrast agents while rejecting signals arising from soft tissue. This approach relies on transmitting at a low-frequency and receiving microbubble harmonic signals at frequencies many times higher than the transmitted frequency. Design and fabrication of dual-frequency transducers and the extension of recent developments in transducer technology for dual-frequency harmonic imaging are discussed. PMID:25375755

  15. Harmonic generation at high field strengths - Frequency shifts and saturation phenomena. [optical mixing technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stappaerts, E. A.

    1975-01-01

    Optical harmonic generation and mixing in the gas phase has been proposed as a technique for the generation of coherent radiation in the vacuum ultraviolet and soft X-ray spectral region. At the high field strengths required by these processes the interaction between atoms and the electromagnetic field shows intensity-dependent resonances. In this paper we modify harmonic generation theory to include the effect of these frequency shifts. Closed-form expressions for generated dipole moment, absorption probability, and coherence length are presented. The most important consequences of frequency shifts on resonantly enhanced processes are that the pump laser must be tuned away from the small-field resonance frequency, that the conversion efficiency may saturate, and that the dispersion of the medium may change sign. As an example, the generation of 198-A radiation by a five-photon mixing process in Li(+) is considered.

  16. Temperature dependence of acoustic harmonics generated by nonlinear ultrasound wave propagation in water at various frequencies.

    PubMed

    Maraghechi, Borna; Hasani, Mojtaba H; Kolios, Michael C; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2016-05-01

    Ultrasound-based thermometry requires a temperature-sensitive acoustic parameter that can be used to estimate the temperature by tracking changes in that parameter during heating. The objective of this study is to investigate the temperature dependence of acoustic harmonics generated by nonlinear ultrasound wave propagation in water at various pulse transmit frequencies from 1 to 20 MHz. Simulations were conducted using an expanded form of the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov nonlinear acoustic wave propagation model in which temperature dependence of the medium parameters was included. Measurements were performed using single-element transducers at two different transmit frequencies of 3.3 and 13 MHz which are within the range of frequencies simulated. The acoustic pressure signals were measured by a calibrated needle hydrophone along the axes of the transducers. The water temperature was uniformly increased from 26 °C to 46 °C in increments of 5 °C. The results show that the temperature dependence of the harmonic generation is different at various frequencies which is due to the interplay between the mechanisms of absorption, nonlinearity, and focusing gain. At the transmit frequencies of 1 and 3.3 MHz, the harmonic amplitudes decrease with increasing the temperature, while the opposite temperature dependence is observed at 13 and 20 MHz. PMID:27250143

  17. Two-Dimensional Frequency Resolved Optomolecular Gating of High-Order Harmonic Generation.

    PubMed

    Ferré, A; Soifer, H; Pedatzur, O; Bourassin-Bouchet, C; Bruner, B D; Canonge, R; Catoire, F; Descamps, D; Fabre, B; Mével, E; Petit, S; Dudovich, N; Mairesse, Y

    2016-02-01

    Probing electronic wave functions of polyatomic molecules is one of the major challenges in high-harmonic spectroscopy. The extremely nonlinear nature of the laser-molecule interaction couples the multiple degrees of freedom of the probed system. We combine two-dimensional control of the electron trajectories and vibrational control of the molecules to disentangle the two main steps in high-harmonic generation-ionization and recombination. We introduce a new measurement scheme, frequency-resolved optomolecular gating, which resolves the temporal amplitude and phase of the harmonic emission from excited molecules. Focusing on the study of vibrational motion in N_{2}O_{4}, we show that such advanced schemes provide a unique insight into the structural and dynamical properties of the underlying mechanism.

  18. Two-Dimensional Frequency Resolved Optomolecular Gating of High-Order Harmonic Generation.

    PubMed

    Ferré, A; Soifer, H; Pedatzur, O; Bourassin-Bouchet, C; Bruner, B D; Canonge, R; Catoire, F; Descamps, D; Fabre, B; Mével, E; Petit, S; Dudovich, N; Mairesse, Y

    2016-02-01

    Probing electronic wave functions of polyatomic molecules is one of the major challenges in high-harmonic spectroscopy. The extremely nonlinear nature of the laser-molecule interaction couples the multiple degrees of freedom of the probed system. We combine two-dimensional control of the electron trajectories and vibrational control of the molecules to disentangle the two main steps in high-harmonic generation-ionization and recombination. We introduce a new measurement scheme, frequency-resolved optomolecular gating, which resolves the temporal amplitude and phase of the harmonic emission from excited molecules. Focusing on the study of vibrational motion in N_{2}O_{4}, we show that such advanced schemes provide a unique insight into the structural and dynamical properties of the underlying mechanism. PMID:26894708

  19. Nonlinear synthetic aperture radar imaging using a harmonic radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, Kyle A.; Mazzaro, Gregory J.; Ranney, Kenneth I.; Nguyen, Lam H.; Martone, Anthony F.; Sherbondy, Kelly D.; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of linear and nonlinear targets. Data are collected using a linear/nonlinear step frequency radar. We show that it is indeed possible to produce SAR images using a nonlinear radar. Furthermore, it is shown that the nonlinear radar is able to reduce linear clutter by at least 80 dB compared to a linear radar. The nonlinear SAR images also show the system's ability to detect small electronic devices in the presence of large linear clutter. The system presented here has the ability to completely ignore a 20-inch trihedral corner reflector while detecting a RF mixer with a dipole antenna attached.

  20. Single-element focused ultrasound transducer method for harmonic motion imaging.

    PubMed

    Maleke, Caroline; Pernot, Mathieu; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2006-07-01

    The harmonic motion imaging (HMI) technique for simultaneous monitoring and generation of ultrasound therapy using two separate focused ultrasound transducer elements was previously demonstrated. In this study, a new HMI technique is described that images tissue displacement induced by a harmonic radiation force using a single focused-ultrasound element. A wave propagation simulation model first indicated that, unlike in the two-beam configuration, the amplitude-modulated beam produced a stable focal zone for the applied harmonic radiation force. The AM beam thus offered the unique advantage of sustaining the application of the spatially-invariant radiation force. Experiments were performed on gelatin phantoms and ex vivo tissues. The radiation force was generated by a 4.68 MHz focused ultrasound (FUS) transducer using a 50 Hz amplitude-modulated wave. A 7.5 MHz pulse-echo transducer was used to acquire rf echoes during the application of the harmonic radiation force. Consecutive rf echoes were acquired with a pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 6.5 kHz and 1D cross-correlation was performed to estimate the resulting axial tissue displacement. The HMI technique was shown capable of estimating stiffness-dependent displacement amplitudes. Finally, taking advantage of the real-time capability of the HMI technique, temperature-dependent measurements enabled monitoring ofHIFU sonication in ex vivo tissues. The new HMI method may thus enable a highly-localized force and stiffness-dependent measurements as well as real-time and low-cost HIFU monitoring.

  1. Improved Shear Wave Motion Detection Using Pulse-Inversion Harmonic Imaging With a Phased Array Transducer.

    PubMed

    Pengfei Song; Heng Zhao; Urban, Matthew W; Manduca, Armando; Pislaru, Sorin V; Kinnick, Randall R; Pislaru, Cristina; Greenleaf, James F; Shigao Chen

    2013-12-01

    Ultrasound tissue harmonic imaging is widely used to improve ultrasound B-mode imaging quality thanks to its effectiveness in suppressing imaging artifacts associated with ultrasound reverberation, phase aberration, and clutter noise. In ultrasound shear wave elastography (SWE), because the shear wave motion signal is extracted from the ultrasound signal, these noise sources can significantly deteriorate the shear wave motion tracking process and consequently result in noisy and biased shear wave motion detection. This situation is exacerbated in in vivo SWE applications such as heart, liver, and kidney. This paper, therefore, investigated the possibility of implementing harmonic imaging, specifically pulse-inversion harmonic imaging, in shear wave tracking, with the hypothesis that harmonic imaging can improve shear wave motion detection based on the same principles that apply to general harmonic B-mode imaging. We first designed an experiment with a gelatin phantom covered by an excised piece of pork belly and show that harmonic imaging can significantly improve shear wave motion detection by producing less underestimated shear wave motion and more consistent shear wave speed measurements than fundamental imaging. Then, a transthoracic heart experiment on a freshly sacrificed pig showed that harmonic imaging could robustly track the shear wave motion and give consistent shear wave speed measurements of the left ventricular myocardium while fundamental imaging could not. Finally, an in vivo transthoracic study of seven healthy volunteers showed that the proposed harmonic imaging tracking sequence could provide consistent estimates of the left ventricular myocardium stiffness in end-diastole with a general success rate of 80% and a success rate of 93.3% when excluding the subject with Body Mass Index higher than 25. These promising results indicate that pulse-inversion harmonic imaging can significantly improve shear wave motion tracking and thus potentially

  2. 2.32 THz quantum cascade laser frequency-locked to the harmonic of a microwave synthesizer source.

    PubMed

    Danylov, Andriy A; Light, Alexander R; Waldman, Jerry; Erickson, Neal R; Qian, Xifeng; Goodhue, William D

    2012-12-01

    Frequency stabilization of a THz quantum cascade laser (QCL) to the harmonic of a microwave source has been accomplished using a Schottky diode waveguide mixer designed for harmonic mixing. The 2.32 THz, 1.0 milliwatt CW QCL is coupled into the signal port of the mixer and a 110 GHz signal, derived from a harmonic of a microwave synthesizer, is coupled into the IF port. The difference frequency between the 21st harmonic of 110 GHz and the QCL is used in a discriminator to adjust the QCL bias current to stabilize the frequency. The short-term frequency jitter is reduced from 550 kHz to 4.5 kHz (FWHM) and the long-term frequency drift is eliminated. This performance is compared to that of several other THz QCL frequency stabilization techniques.

  3. Microwave frequency tuning and harmonic generation in ferroelectric thin film transmission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, James C.; Ono, R. H.; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Chang, Kao-Shuo

    2002-07-01

    We evaluate dielectric tuning on nanosecond time scales in ferroelectric Ba0.3Sr0.7TiO3 thin films by measuring nonlinear harmonic generation at a fundamental frequency of 3 GHz. We compare the form of the distributed nonlinear capacitance per unit length C(Vrf) extracted from a simple model of harmonic generation in coplanar waveguide transmission line structures with the nonlinear capacitance C(Vdc) measured using a dc bias voltage, and obtain excellent agreement for temperatures in the range 235-295 K. This demonstrated agreement implies that full dielectric tuning can be expected in these ferroelectric thin films on nanosecond time scales, and also demonstrates that detrimental high-frequency nonlinear effects in device structures can be accurately predicted based on dc biased measurements.

  4. Dot patterns from second-harmonic and sum-frequency generation in polycrystalline ZnSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinh, Tran Duc; Seibt, Wolfgang; Siegbahn, Kai

    2001-09-01

    During a comparative study of second-harmonic generation (SHG) and sum-frequency generation (SFG) in single-crystal and polycrystalline ZnSe, the polycrystalline material showed a dot pattern in the SHG as well as in the SFG output. No such pattern was found in the output from the single-crystal ZnSe sample. The second-harmonic and also the sum-frequency dot pattern, resembling a diffraction pattern, could be observed over a wide tuning range of the fundamental beam, between 1.1 and 1.6 μm, generated by a femtosecond optical parametric amplifier. The size of the observed pattern is dependent on wavelength and the dots show a characteristic polarization.

  5. Theoretical Characterization of Visual Signatures and Calculation of Approximate Global Harmonic Frequency Scaling Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashinski, D. O.; Nelson, R. G.; Chase, G. M.; di Nallo, O. E.; Byrd, E. F. C.

    2016-05-01

    We are investigating the accuracy of theoretical models used to predict the visible, ultraviolet, and infrared spectra, as well as other properties, of product materials ejected from the muzzle of currently fielded systems. Recent advances in solid propellants has made the management of muzzle signature (flash) a principle issue in weapons development across the calibers. A priori prediction of the electromagnetic spectra of formulations will allow researchers to tailor blends that yield desired signatures and determine spectrographic detection ranges. Quantum chemistry methods at various levels of sophistication have been employed to optimize molecular geometries, compute unscaled harmonic frequencies, and determine the optical spectra of specific gas-phase species. Electronic excitations are being computed using Time Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT). Calculation of approximate global harmonic frequency scaling factors for specific DFT functionals is also in progress. A full statistical analysis and reliability assessment of computational results is currently underway. Work supported by the ARL, DoD-HPCMP, and USMA.

  6. Second harmonic generation imaging microscopy of cellular structure and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millard, Andrew C.; Jin, Lei; Loew, Leslie M.

    2005-03-01

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging microscopy is an important emerging technique for biological research, with many advantages over existing one- or two-photon fluorescence techniques. A non-linear phenomenon employing mode-locked Ti:sapphire or fiber-based lasers, SHG results in intrinsic optical sectioning without the need for a confocal aperture. Furthermore, as a second-order process SHG is confined to loci lacking a center of symmetry. Many important structural proteins such as collagen and cellulose show intrinsic SHG, thus providing access to sub-resolution information on symmetry. However, we are particularly interested here in "resonance-enhanced" SHG from styryl dyes. In general SHG is a combination of a true second-order process and a third-order process dependent on a static electric field, such that SHG from membrane-bound dyes depends on a cell's trans-membrane potential. With simultaneous patch-clamping and non-linear imaging of cells, we have found that SHG is a sensitive probe of trans-membrane potential with sensitivities that are up to four times better than those obtained under optimal conditions using one-photon fluorescence imaging. With the sensitivity of SHG to local electric fields from other sources such as the membrane dipole potential as well as the quadratic dependence of SHG on concentration, we have found that SHG imaging of styryl dyes is also a powerful technique for the investigation of lipid phases and rafts and for the visualization of the dynamics of membrane-vesicle fusion following fertilization of an ovum.

  7. Frequency-resolved optical-gating measurements of ultrashort pulses using surface third-harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, T.; Krumbuegel, M.A.; DeLong, K.W.; Fittinghoff, D.N.; Trebino, R.

    1996-09-01

    We demonstrate what is to our knowledge the first frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG) technique to measure ultrashort pulses from an unamplified Ti:sapphire laser oscillator without direction-of-time ambiguity. This technique utilizes surface third-harmonic generation as the nonlinear-optical effect and, surprisingly, is the most sensitive third-order FROG geometry yet. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  8. A mechanism for plasma waves at the harmonics of the plasma frequency foreshock boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimas, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    A bump-on-tail unstable reduced velocity distribution, constructed from data obtained at the upstream boundary of the electron foreshock by the GSFC electron spectrometer experiment on the ISEE-1 satellite, is used as the initial plasma state for a numerical integration of the 1D-Vlasov-Maxwell system of equations. The integration is carried through the growth of the instability, beyond its saturation, and well into the stabilized plasma regime. A power spectrum computed for the electric field of the stabilized plasma is dominated by a narrow peak at the Bohm-Gross frequency of the unstable field mode but also contains significant power at the harmonics of the Bohm-Gross frequency. The harmonic power is in sharp peaks which are split into closely spaced doublets. The fundamental peak at the Bohm-Gross frequency is split into a closely spaced triplet. The mechanism for excitation of the second harmonic is shown to be second order wave-wave coupling.

  9. Frequency dependence of optical third-harmonic generation from doped graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulis, Vl. A.; Muryumin, E. E.; Gaiduk, E. A.

    2016-01-01

    In connection with the controversial question about the frequency dependence of the optical third-harmonic generation (THG) from doped graphene, which has recently been discussed in the literature, we develop an analytical theory for the THG susceptibility of doped graphene by using the original Genkin-Mednis nonlinear-conductivity-theory formalism including mixed intra- and interband terms. The theory is free of any nonphysical divergences at zero frequency, and it predicts the main resonant peak in the THG spectrum to be located at the photon energy ħω equal to two thirds of the Fermi energy EF of charge carriers in doped graphene.

  10. Observation of harmonically related solar radio zebra patterns in the 1-4 GHz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawant, H. S.; Karlický, M.; Fernandes, F. C. R.; Cecatto, J. R.

    2002-12-01

    A unique case of two zebra patterns related harmonically with ratio of ~ 1:2 was observed by distant radio telescopes at São José dos Campos and Ondřejov Observatories. Accompanied zebras show that the ratio of frequencies of the neighboring zebra lines is in the range of 1.009-1.037. There is a tendency of a decrease of this ratio with decreasing frequency within the specific zebra pattern. Both facts speak in favour of plasma emission models for the zebra pattern fine structure in radio burst continua.

  11. An oscillator circuit for dual-harmonic tracking of frequency and resistance in quartz resonator sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Marco; Ferrari, Vittorio

    2009-12-01

    An oscillator circuit is proposed that simultaneously excites and tracks two harmonic resonances in a quartz crystal resonator sensor. The oscillator outputs two pairs of signals, related to the sensor series resonant frequency and motional resistance for the fundamental and the third harmonic, respectively. The circuit also provides compensation of the sensor parallel capacitance for increased accuracy. By probing the resonator with the superposition of two harmonic modes simultaneously, enhanced sensing capabilities can be advantageously achieved because a larger set of parameters can be measured with a single sensor and its response is tracked in real time. Experimental tests were first run with the developed oscillator connected to 5 MHz AT-cut crystals exposed to different liquid solutions, obtaining results in good agreement with the theory. Evidence of different dynamic responses at the fundamental and the third harmonic was obtained, possibly related to differences in acoustic penetration depth into the liquid. The oscillator was then tested with the sensor loaded by microdroplets of liquid solutions deposited by a piezoelectric microdispenser. The oscillator could detect and track the resulting time response of the sensor, outperforming measurement methods based on impedance analysis in terms of speed and resolution, and evidencing a complex combination of effects in the sensor transient response.

  12. Measurement of optical-beat frequency in a photoconductive terahertz-wave generator using microwave higher harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murasawa, Kengo; Sato, Koki; Hidaka, Takehiko

    2011-05-01

    A new method for measuring optical-beat frequencies in the terahertz (THz) region using microwave higher harmonics is presented. A microwave signal was applied to the antenna gap of a photoconductive (PC) device emitting a continuous electromagnetic wave at about 1 THz by the photomixing technique. The microwave higher harmonics with THz frequencies are generated in the PC device owing to the nonlinearity of the biased photoconductance, which is briefly described in this article. Thirteen nearly periodic peaks in the photocurrent were observed when the microwave was swept from 16 to 20 GHz at a power of -48 dBm. The nearly periodic peaks are generated by the homodyne detection of the optical beat with the microwave higher harmonics when the frequency of the harmonics coincides with the optical-beat frequency. Each peak frequency and its peak width were determined by fitting a Gaussian function, and the order of microwave harmonics was determined using a coarse (i.e., lower resolution) measurement of the optical-beat frequency. By applying the Kalman algorithm to the peak frequencies of the higher harmonics and their standard deviations, the optical-beat frequency near 1 THz was estimated to be 1029.81 GHz with the standard deviation of 0.82 GHz. The proposed method is applicable to a conventional THz-wave generator with a photomixer.

  13. Measurement of optical-beat frequency in a photoconductive terahertz-wave generator using microwave higher harmonics.

    PubMed

    Murasawa, Kengo; Sato, Koki; Hidaka, Takehiko

    2011-05-01

    A new method for measuring optical-beat frequencies in the terahertz (THz) region using microwave higher harmonics is presented. A microwave signal was applied to the antenna gap of a photoconductive (PC) device emitting a continuous electromagnetic wave at about 1 THz by the photomixing technique. The microwave higher harmonics with THz frequencies are generated in the PC device owing to the nonlinearity of the biased photoconductance, which is briefly described in this article. Thirteen nearly periodic peaks in the photocurrent were observed when the microwave was swept from 16 to 20 GHz at a power of -48 dBm. The nearly periodic peaks are generated by the homodyne detection of the optical beat with the microwave higher harmonics when the frequency of the harmonics coincides with the optical-beat frequency. Each peak frequency and its peak width were determined by fitting a Gaussian function, and the order of microwave harmonics was determined using a coarse (i.e., lower resolution) measurement of the optical-beat frequency. By applying the Kalman algorithm to the peak frequencies of the higher harmonics and their standard deviations, the optical-beat frequency near 1 THz was estimated to be 1029.81 GHz with the standard deviation of 0.82 GHz. The proposed method is applicable to a conventional THz-wave generator with a photomixer.

  14. Harmonic motion microwave Doppler imaging: a simulation study using a simple breast model.

    PubMed

    Top, Can Bariş; Gençer, Nevzat G

    2014-02-01

    A hybrid method for tissue imaging using dielectric and elastic properties is proposed and investigated with simple bi-layered breast model. In this method, local harmonic motion is generated in the tissue using a focused ultrasound probe. A narrow-band microwave signal is transmitted to the tissue. The Doppler component of the scattered signal, which depends on the dielectric and elastic properties of the vibrating region, is sensed. A plane-wave spectrum technique is used together with reciprocity theorem for calculating the response of a vibrating electrically small spherical tumor in breast tissue. The effects of operating frequency, antenna alignment and distance, and tumor depth on the received signal are presented. The effect of harmonic motion frequency on the vibration amplitude and displacement distribution is investigated with mechanical simulations using the finite element method. The safety of the method is analyzed in terms of microwave and ultrasound exposure of the breast tissue. The results show that the method has a potential in detecting tumors inside fibro-glandular breast tissue.

  15. Probing nuclear motion by frequency modulation of molecular high-order harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Bian, Xue-Bin; Bandrauk, André D

    2014-11-01

    Molecular high-order harmonic generation (MHOHG) in a non-Born-Oppenheimer treatment of H(2)(+), D(2)(+), is investigated by numerical simulations of the corresponding time-dependent Schrödinger equations in full dimensions. As opposed to previous studies on amplitude modulation of intracycle dynamics in MHOHG, we demonstrate redshifts as frequency modulation (FM) of intercycle dynamics in MHOHG. The FM is induced by nuclear motion using intense laser pulses. Compared to fixed-nuclei approximations, the intensity of MHOHG is much higher due to the dependence of enhanced ionization on the internuclear distance. The width and symmetry of the spectrum of each harmonic in MHOHG encode rich information on the dissociation process of molecules at the rising and falling parts of the laser pulses, which can be used to retrieve the nuclear dynamics. Isotope effects are studied to confirm the FM mechanism.

  16. Increased efficiency of ion acceleration by using femtosecond laser pulses at higher harmonic frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Psikal, J.; Klimo, O.; Weber, S.; Margarone, D.

    2014-07-15

    The influence of laser frequency on laser-driven ion acceleration is investigated by means of two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. When ultrashort intense laser pulse at higher harmonic frequency irradiates a thin solid foil, the target may become re lativistically transparent for significantly lower laser pulse intensity compared with irradiation at fundamental laser frequency. The relativistically induced transparency results in an enhanced heating of hot electrons as well as increased maximum energies of accelerated ions and their numbers. Our simulation results have shown the increase in maximum proton energy and increase in the number of high-energy protons by a factor of 2 after the interaction of an ultrashort laser pulse of maximum intensity 7 × 10{sup 21 }W/cm{sup 2} with a fully ionized plastic foil of realistic density and of optimal thickness between 100 nm and 200 nm when switching from the fundamental frequency to the third harmonics.

  17. Continuous-Wave Operation of a Frequency-Tunable 460-GHz Second-Harmonic Gyrotron for Enhanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Torrezan, Antonio C.; Han, Seong-Tae; Mastovsky, Ivan; Shapiro, Michael A.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Temkin, Richard J.; Griffin, Robert G.; Barnes, Alexander B.

    2012-01-01

    The design, operation, and characterization of a continuous-wave (CW) tunable second-harmonic 460-GHz gyrotron are reported. The gyrotron is intended to be used as a submillimeter-wave source for 700-MHz nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with sensitivity enhanced by dynamic nuclear polarization. The gyrotron operates in the whispering-gallery mode TE11,2 and has generated 16 W of output power with a 13-kV 100-mA electron beam. The start oscillation current measured over a range of magnetic field values is in good agreement with theoretical start currents obtained from linear theory for successive high-order axial modes TE11,2,q. The minimum start current is 27 mA. Power and frequency tuning measurements as a function of the electron cyclotron frequency have also been carried out. A smooth frequency tuning range of 1 GHz was obtained for the operating second-harmonic mode either by magnetic field tuning or beam voltage tuning. Long-term CW operation was evaluated during an uninterrupted period of 48 h, where the gyrotron output power and frequency were kept stable to within ±0.7% and ±6 ppm, respectively, by a computerized control system. Proper operation of an internal quasi-optical mode converter implemented to transform the operating whispering-gallery mode to a Gaussian-like beam was also verified. Based on the images of the gyrotron output beam taken with a pyroelectric camera, the Gaussian-like mode content of the output beam was computed to be 92% with an ellipticity of 12%. PMID:23761938

  18. Continuous-Wave Operation of a Frequency-Tunable 460-GHz Second-Harmonic Gyrotron for Enhanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Torrezan, Antonio C.; Han, Seong-Tae; Mastovsky, Ivan; Shapiro, Michael A.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Temkin, Richard J.; Barnes, Alexander B.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    The design, operation, and characterization of a continuous-wave (CW) tunable second-harmonic 460-GHz gyrotron are reported. The gyrotron is intended to be used as a submillimeter-wave source for 700-MHz nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with sensitivity enhanced by dynamic nuclear polarization. The gyrotron operates in the whispering-gallery mode TE11,2 and has generated 16 W of output power with a 13-kV 100-mA electron beam. The start oscillation current measured over a range of magnetic field values is in good agreement with theoretical start currents obtained from linear theory for successive high-order axial modes TE11,2,q. The minimum start current is 27 mA. Power and frequency tuning measurements as a function of the electron cyclotron frequency have also been carried out. A smooth frequency tuning range of 1 GHz was obtained for the operating second-harmonic mode either by magnetic field tuning or beam voltage tuning. Long-term CW operation was evaluated during an uninterrupted period of 48 h, where the gyrotron output power and frequency were kept stable to within ±0.7% and ±6 ppm, respectively, by a computerized control system. Proper operation of an internal quasi-optical mode converter implemented to transform the operating whispering-gallery mode to a Gaussian-like beam was also verified. Based on the images of the gyrotron output beam taken with a pyroelectric camera, the Gaussian-like mode content of the output beam was computed to be 92% with an ellipticity of 12%. PMID:21243088

  19. Superresolved multiphoton microscopy with spatial frequency-modulated imaging.

    PubMed

    Field, Jeffrey J; Wernsing, Keith A; Domingue, Scott R; Allende Motz, Alyssa M; DeLuca, Keith F; Levi, Dean H; DeLuca, Jennifer G; Young, Michael D; Squier, Jeff A; Bartels, Randy A

    2016-06-14

    Superresolved far-field microscopy has emerged as a powerful tool for investigating the structure of objects with resolution well below the diffraction limit of light. Nearly all superresolution imaging techniques reported to date rely on real energy states of fluorescent molecules to circumvent the diffraction limit, preventing superresolved imaging with contrast mechanisms that occur via virtual energy states, including harmonic generation (HG). We report a superresolution technique based on spatial frequency-modulated imaging (SPIFI) that permits superresolved nonlinear microscopy with any contrast mechanism and with single-pixel detection. We show multimodal superresolved images with two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second-harmonic generation (SHG) from biological and inorganic media. Multiphoton SPIFI (MP-SPIFI) provides spatial resolution up to 2η below the diffraction limit, where η is the highest power of the nonlinear intensity response. MP-SPIFI can be used to provide enhanced resolution in optically thin media and may provide a solution for superresolved imaging deep in scattering media. PMID:27231219

  20. Improvement of Shear Wave Motion Detection Using Harmonic Imaging in Healthy Human Liver.

    PubMed

    Amador, Carolina; Song, Pengfei; Meixner, Duane D; Chen, Shigao; Urban, Matthew W

    2016-05-01

    Quantification of liver elasticity is a major application of shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) to non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis stages. SWEI measurements can be highly affected by ultrasound image quality. Ultrasound harmonic imaging has exhibited a significant improvement in ultrasound image quality as well as for SWEI measurements. This was previously illustrated in cardiac SWEI. The purpose of this study was to evaluate liver shear wave particle displacement detection and shear wave velocity (SWV) measurements with fundamental and filter-based harmonic ultrasound imaging. In a cohort of 17 patients with no history of liver disease, a 2.9-fold increase in maximum shear wave displacement, a 0.11 m/s decrease in the overall interquartile range and median SWV and a 17.6% increase in the success rate of SWV measurements were obtained when filter-based harmonic imaging was used instead of fundamental imaging.

  1. Improvement of Shear Wave Motion Detection Using Harmonic Imaging in Healthy Human Liver.

    PubMed

    Amador, Carolina; Song, Pengfei; Meixner, Duane D; Chen, Shigao; Urban, Matthew W

    2016-05-01

    Quantification of liver elasticity is a major application of shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) to non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis stages. SWEI measurements can be highly affected by ultrasound image quality. Ultrasound harmonic imaging has exhibited a significant improvement in ultrasound image quality as well as for SWEI measurements. This was previously illustrated in cardiac SWEI. The purpose of this study was to evaluate liver shear wave particle displacement detection and shear wave velocity (SWV) measurements with fundamental and filter-based harmonic ultrasound imaging. In a cohort of 17 patients with no history of liver disease, a 2.9-fold increase in maximum shear wave displacement, a 0.11 m/s decrease in the overall interquartile range and median SWV and a 17.6% increase in the success rate of SWV measurements were obtained when filter-based harmonic imaging was used instead of fundamental imaging. PMID:26803391

  2. A 0.33-THz second-harmonic frequency-tunable gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng-Di, Li; Chao-Hai, Du; Xiang-Bo, Qi; Li, Luo; Pu-Kun, Liu

    2016-02-01

    Dynamics of the axial mode transition process in a 0.33-THz second-harmonic gyrotron is investigated to reveal the physical mechanism of realizing broadband frequency tuning in an open cavity circuit. A new interaction mechanism about propagating waves, featured by wave competition and wave cooperation, is presented and provides a new insight into the beam-wave interaction. The two different features revealed in the two different operation regions of low-order axial modes (LOAMs) and high-order axial modes (HOAMs) respectively determine the characteristic of the overall performance of the device essentially. The device performance is obtained by the simulation based on the time-domain nonlinear theory and shows that using a 12-kV/150-mA electron beam and TE-3,4 mode, the second harmonic gyrotron can generate terahertz radiations with frequency-tuning ranges of about 0.85 GHz and 0.60 GHz via magnetic field and beam voltage tuning, respectively. Additionally, some non-stationary phenomena in the mode startup process are also analyzed. The investigation in this paper presents guidance for future developing high-performance frequency-tunable gyrotrons toward terahertz applications. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61471007, 61531002, 61522101, and 11275206) and the Seeding Grant for Medicine and Information Science of Peking University, China (Grant No. 2014-MI-01).

  3. Assessing the accuracy of some popular DFT methods for computing harmonic vibrational frequencies of water clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. Coleman; Enyard, Jordan D.; Tschumper, Gregory S.

    2015-12-01

    A wide range of density functional theory (DFT) methods (37 altogether), including pure, hybrid, range-separated hybrid, double-hybrid, and dispersion-corrected functionals, have been employed to compute the harmonic vibrational frequencies of eight small water clusters ranging in size from the dimer to four different isomers of the hexamer. These computed harmonic frequencies have been carefully compared to recently published benchmark values that are expected to be very close to the CCSD(T) complete basis set limit. Of the DFT methods examined here, ωB97 and ωB97X are the most consistently accurate, deviating from the reference values by less than 20 cm-1 on average and never more than 60 cm-1. The performance of double-hybrid methods including B2PLYP and mPW2-PLYP is only slightly better than more economical approaches, such as the M06-L pure functional and the M06-2X hybrid functional. Additionally, dispersion corrections offer very little improvement in computed frequencies.

  4. The electromagnetic environment of Magnetic Resonance Imaging systems. Occupational exposure assessment reveals RF harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourzoulidis, G.; Karabetsos, E.; Skamnakis, N.; Kappas, C.; Theodorou, K.; Tsougos, I.; Maris, T. G.

    2015-09-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) systems played a crucial role in the postponement of the former occupational electromagnetic fields (EMF) European Directive (2004/40/EC) and in the formation of the latest exposure limits adopted in the new one (2013/35/EU). Moreover, the complex MRI environment will be finally excluded from the implementation of the new occupational limits, leading to an increased demand for Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) surveillance. The gradient function of MRI systems and the application of the RF excitation frequency result in low and high frequency exposures, respectively. This electromagnetic field exposure, in combination with the increased static magnetic field exposure, makes the MRI environment a unique case of combined EMF exposure. The electromagnetic field levels in close proximity of different MRI systems have been assessed at various frequencies. Quality Assurance (QA) & safety issues were also faced. Preliminary results show initial compliance with the forthcoming limits in each different frequency band, but also revealed peculiar RF harmonic components, of no safety concern, to the whole range detected (20-1000MHz). Further work is needed in order to clarify their origin and characteristics.

  5. Simultaneous negative refraction and focusing of fundamental frequency and second-harmonic fields by two-dimensional photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2015-09-28

    Simultaneous negative refraction for both the fundamental frequency (FF) and second-harmonic (SH) fields in two-dimensional nonlinear photonic crystals have been found through both the physical analysis and exact numerical simulation. By combining such a property with the phase-matching condition and strong second-order susceptibility, we have designed a SH lens to realize focusing for both the FF and SH fields at the same time. Good-quality non-near field images for both FF and SH fields have been observed. The physical mechanism for such SH focusing phenomena has been disclosed, which is different from the backward SH generation as has been pointed out in the previous investigations. In addition, the effect of absorption losses on the phenomena has also been discussed. Thus, potential applications of these phenomena to biphotonic microscopy technique are anticipated.

  6. Single pulse frequency compounding protocol for superharmonic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilouchkine, Mikhail G.; van Neer, Paul L. M. J.; Matte, Guillaume M.; Verweij, Martin D.; de Jong, Nico

    2011-03-01

    Second harmonic imaging is currently adopted as standard in commercial echographic systems. A new imaging technique, coined as superharmonic imaging (SHI), combines the 3rd till the 5th harmonics, arising during nonlinear sound propagation. It could further enhance resolution and quality of echographic images. To meet the bandwidth requirement for SHI a dedicated phased array has been developed: a low frequency subarray, intended for transmission, interleaved with a high frequency subarray, used in reception. As the bandwidth of the elements is limited, the spectral gaps in between the harmonics cause multiple reflection artifacts. Recently, we introduce a dual-pulse frequency compounding (DPFC) method to suppress those artifacts at price of a reduced frame rate. In this study we investigate the feasibility of performing the frequency compounding protocol within a single transmission. The traditional DPFC method constructs each trace in a post-processing stage by summing echoes from two emitted pulses, the second slightly frequency-shifted compared to the first. In the newly proposed method, the transmit aperture is divided into two parts: the first half is used to send a pulse at the lower center frequency, while the other half simultaneously transmits at the higher center frequency. The suitability of the protocol for medical imaging applications in terms of the steering capabilities was performed in a simulation study using the FIELD II toolkit. Moreover, an experimental study was performed to deduce the optimal parametric set for implementation of the clinical imaging protocol. The latter was subsequently used to obtain the images of a tissue mimicking phantom containing strongly reflecting wires. For in-vitro acquisitions the SHI probe with interleaved phased array (44 odd elements at 1MHz and 44 even elements at 3.7MHz elements, optimized for echocardiography) was connected to a fully programmable ultrasound system. The results of the Field II simulations

  7. A mechanical model to compute elastic modulus of tissues for harmonic motion imaging.

    PubMed

    Shan, Baoxiang; Pelegri, Assimina A; Maleke, Caroline; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2008-07-19

    Numerous experimental and computational methods have been developed to estimate tissue elasticity. The existing testing techniques are generally classified into in vitro, invasive in vivo and non-invasive in vivo. For each experimental method, a computational scheme is accordingly proposed to calculate mechanical properties of soft biological tissues. Harmonic motion imaging (HMI) is a new technique that performs radio frequency (RF) signal tracking to estimate the localized oscillatory motion resulting from a radiation force produced by focused ultrasound. A mechanical model and computational scheme based on the superposition principle are developed in this paper to estimate the Young's modulus of a tissue mimicking phantom and bovine liver in vitro tissue from the harmonic displacement measured by HMI. The simulation results are verified by two groups of measurement data, and good agreement is shown in each comparison. Furthermore, an inverse function is observed to correlate the elastic modulus of uniform phantoms with amplitude of displacement measured in HMI. The computational scheme is also implemented to estimate 3D elastic modulus of bovine liver in vitro.

  8. Second Harmonic Imaging improves Echocardiograph Quality on board the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Kathleen; Sargsyan, Ashot; Hamilton, Douglas; Martin, David; Ebert, Douglas; Melton, Shannon; Dulchavsky, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) capabilities have been part of the Human Research Facility (HRF) on board the International Space Station (ISS) since 2001. The US equipment on board the ISS includes a first-generation Tissue Harmonic Imaging (THI) option. Harmonic imaging (HI) is the second harmonic response of the tissue to the ultrasound beam and produces robust tissue detail and signal. Since this is a first-generation THI, there are inherent limitations in tissue penetration. As a breakthrough technology, HI extensively advanced the field of ultrasound. In cardiac applications, it drastically improves endocardial border detection and has become a common imaging modality. U.S. images were captured and stored as JPEG stills from the ISS video downlink. US images with and without harmonic imaging option were randomized and provided to volunteers without medical education or US skills for identification of endocardial border. The results were processed and analyzed using applicable statistical calculations. The measurements in US images using HI improved measurement consistency and reproducibility among observers when compared to fundamental imaging. HI has been embraced by the imaging community at large as it improves the quality and data validity of US studies, especially in difficult-to-image cases. Even with the limitations of the first generation THI, HI improved the quality and measurability of many of the downlinked images from the ISS and should be an option utilized with cardiac imaging on board the ISS in all future space missions.

  9. Optimization of contrast resolution by genetic algorithm in ultrasound tissue harmonic imaging.

    PubMed

    Ménigot, Sébastien; Girault, Jean-Marc

    2016-09-01

    The development of ultrasound imaging techniques such as pulse inversion has improved tissue harmonic imaging. Nevertheless, no recommendation has been made to date for the design of the waveform transmitted through the medium being explored. Our aim was therefore to find automatically the optimal "imaging" wave which maximized the contrast resolution without a priori information. To overcome assumption regarding the waveform, a genetic algorithm investigated the medium thanks to the transmission of stochastic "explorer" waves. Moreover, these stochastic signals could be constrained by the type of generator available (bipolar or arbitrary). To implement it, we changed the current pulse inversion imaging system by including feedback. Thus the method optimized the contrast resolution by adaptively selecting the samples of the excitation. In simulation, we benchmarked the contrast effectiveness of the best found transmitted stochastic commands and the usual fixed-frequency command. The optimization method converged quickly after around 300 iterations in the same optimal area. These results were confirmed experimentally. In the experimental case, the contrast resolution measured on a radiofrequency line could be improved by 6% with a bipolar generator and it could still increase by 15% with an arbitrary waveform generator.

  10. Acoustic angiography: a new high frequency contrast ultrasound technique for biomedical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Sarah E.; Lindsey, Brooks D.; Gessner, Ryan; Lee, Yueh; Aylward, Stephen; Lee, Hyunggyun; Cherin, Emmanuel; Foster, F. Stuart; Dayton, Paul A.

    2016-05-01

    Acoustic Angiography is a new approach to high-resolution contrast enhanced ultrasound imaging enabled by ultra-broadband transducer designs. The high frequency imaging technique provides signal separation from tissue which does not produce significant harmonics in the same frequency range, as well as high resolution. This approach enables imaging of microvasculature in-vivo with high resolution and signal to noise, producing images that resemble x-ray angiography. Data shows that acoustic angiography can provide important information about the presence of disease based on vascular patterns, and may enable a new paradigm in medical imaging.

  11. High-order harmonic generation by chirped and self-guided femtosecond laser pulses. II. Time-frequency analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tosa, V.; Kim, H.T.; Kim, I.J.; Nam, C.H.

    2005-06-15

    We present a time-dependent analysis of high-order harmonics generated by a self-guided femtosecond laser pulse propagating through a long gas jet. A three-dimensional model is used to calculate the harmonic fields generated by laser pulses, which only differ by the sign of their initial chirp. The time-frequency distributions of the single-atom dipole and harmonic field reveal the dynamics of harmonic generation in the cutoff. A time-dependent phase-matching calculation was performed, taking into account the self-phase modulation of the laser field. Good phase matching holds for only few optical cycles, being dependent on the electron trajectory. When the cutoff trajectory is phase matched, emitted harmonics are locked in phase and the emission intensity is maximized.

  12. Conformation, orientation and interaction in molecular monolayers: A surface second harmonic and sum frequency generation study

    SciTech Connect

    Superfine, R.; Huang, J.Y.; Shen, Y.R.

    1988-12-01

    We have used sum frequency generation (SFG) to study the order in a silane monolayer before and after the deposition of a coadsorbed liquid crystal monolayer. We observe an increase in the order of the chain of the silane molecule induced by the interpenetration of the liquid crystal molecules. By using second harmonic generation (SHG) and SFG, we have studied the orientation and conformation of the liquid crystal molecule on clean and silane coated glass surfaces. On both surfaces, the biphenyl group is tilted by 70{degree} with the alkyl chain end pointing away from the surface. The shift in the C-H stretch frequencies in the coadsorbed system indicates a significant interaction between molecules. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Phenomena induced by powerful HF pumping towards magnetic zenith with a frequency near the F-region critical frequency and the third electron gyro harmonic frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoveshchenskaya, N. F.; Carlson, H. C.; Kornienko, V. A.; Borisova, T. D.; Rietveld, M. T.; Yeoman, T. K.; Brekke, A.

    2009-01-01

    Multi-instrument observational data from an experiment on 13 October 2006 at the EISCAT/HEATING facility at Tromsø, Norway are analysed. The experiment was carried out in the evening hours when the electron density in the F-region dropped, and the HF pump frequency fH was near and then above the critical frequency of the F2 layer. The distinctive feature of this experiment is that the pump frequency was just below the third electron gyro harmonic frequency, while both the HF pump beam and UHF radar beam were directed towards the magnetic zenith (MZ). The HF pump-induced phenomena were diagnosed with several instruments: the bi-static HF radio scatter on the London-Tromsø-St. Petersburg path, the CUTLASS radar in Hankasalmi (Finland), the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT) UHF radar at Tromsø and the Tromsø ionosonde (dynasonde). The results show thermal electron excitation of the HF-induced striations seen simultaneously from HF bi-static scatter and CUTLASS radar observations, accompanied by increases of electron temperature when the heater frequency was near and then above the critical frequency of the F2 layer by up to 0.4 MHz. An increase of the electron density up to 25% accompanied by strong HF-induced electron heating was observed, only when the heater frequency was near the critical frequency and just below the third electron gyro harmonic frequency. It is concluded that the combined effect of upper hybrid resonance and gyro resonance at the same altitude gives rise to strong electron heating, the excitation of striations, HF ray trapping and extension of HF waves to altitudes where they can excite Langmuir turbulence and fluxes of electrons accelerated to energies that produce ionization.

  14. Detection of main tidal frequencies using least squares harmonic estimation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavian, R.; Hossainali, M. Mashhadi

    2012-11-01

    In this paper the efficiency of the method of Least Squares Harmonic Estimation (LS-HE) for detecting the main tidal frequencies is investigated. Using this method, the tidal spectrum of the sea level data is evaluated at two tidal stations: Bandar Abbas in south of Iran and Workington on the eastern coast of the UK. The amplitudes of the tidal constituents at these two tidal stations are not the same. Moreover, in contrary to the Workington station, the Bandar Abbas tidal record is not an equispaced time series. Therefore, the analysis of the hourly tidal observations in Bandar Abbas and Workington can provide a reasonable insight into the efficiency of this method for analyzing the frequency content of tidal time series. Furthermore, applying the method of Fourier transform to the Workington tidal record provides an independent source of information for evaluating the tidal spectrum proposed by the LS-HE method. According to the obtained results, the spectrums of these two tidal records contain the components with the maximum amplitudes among the expected ones in this time span and some new frequencies in the list of known constituents. In addition, in terms of frequencies with maximum amplitude; the power spectrums derived from two aforementioned methods are the same. These results demonstrate the ability of LS-HE for identifying the frequencies with maximum amplitude in both tidal records.

  15. High-resolution harmonic motion imaging (HR-HMI) for tissue biomechanical property characterization

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Teng; Qian, Xuejun; Chiu, Chi Tat; Yu, Mingyue; Jung, Hayong; Tung, Yao-Sheng; Shung, K. Kirk

    2015-01-01

    Background Elastography, capable of mapping the biomechanical properties of biological tissues, serves as a useful technique for clinicians to perform disease diagnosis and determine stages of many diseases. Many acoustic radiation force (ARF) based elastography, including acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging and harmonic motion imaging (HMI), have been developed to remotely assess the elastic properties of tissues. However, due to the lower operating frequencies of these approaches, their spatial resolutions are insufficient for revealing stiffness distribution on small scale applications, such as cancerous tumor margin detection, atherosclerotic plaque composition analysis and ophthalmologic tissue characterization. Though recently developed ARF-based optical coherence elastography (OCE) methods open a new window for the high resolution elastography, shallow imaging depths significantly limit their usefulness in clinics. Methods The aim of this study is to develop a high-resolution HMI method to assess the tissue biomechanical properties with acceptable field of view (FOV) using a 4 MHz ring transducer for efficient excitation and a 40 MHz needle transducer for accurate detection. Under precise alignment of two confocal transducers, the high-resolution HMI system has a lateral resolution of 314 µm and an axial resolution of 
147 µm with an effective FOV of 2 mm in depth. Results The performance of this high resolution imaging system was validated on the agar-based tissue mimicking phantoms with different stiffness distributions. These data demonstrated the imaging system’s improved resolution and sensitivity on differentiating materials with varying stiffness. In addition, ex vivo imaging of a human atherosclerosis coronary artery demonstrated the capability of high resolution HMI in identifying layer-specific structures and characterizing atherosclerotic plaques based on their stiffness differences. Conclusions All together high resolution HMI

  16. Mosquito (Aedes aegypti) flight tones: Frequency, harmonicity, spherical spreading, and phase relationships

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, Benjamin J.; Emr, Kevin S.; Wyttenbach, Robert A.; Hoy, Ronald R.

    2014-01-01

    Mosquito flight produces a tone as a side effect of wing movement; this tone is also a communication signal that is frequency-modulated during courtship. Recordings of tones produced by tethered flying male and female Aedes aegypti were undertaken using pairs of pressure-gradient microphones above and below, ahead and behind, and to the left and right over a range of distances. Fundamental frequencies were close to those previously reported, although amplitudes were lower. The male fundamental frequency was higher than that of the female and males modulated it over a wider range. Analysis of harmonics shows that the first six partials were nearly always within 1 Hz of integer multiples of the fundamental, even when the fundamental was being modulated. Along the front-back axis, amplitude attenuated as a function of distance raised to the power 2.3. Front and back recordings were out of phase, as were above and below, while left and right were in phase. Recordings from ahead and behind showed quadratic phase coupling, while others did not. Finally, two methods are presented for separating simultaneous flight tones in a single recording and enhancing their frequency resolution. Implications for mosquito behavior are discussed. PMID:25234901

  17. Layer- and frequency-dependent second harmonic generation in reflection from GaSe atomic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yanhao; Mandal, Krishna C.; McGuire, John A.; Lai, Chih Wei

    2016-09-01

    We report optical second-harmonic generation (SHG) in reflection from GaSe crystals of 1 to more than 100 layers using a fundamental picosecond pulsed pump at 1.58 eV and a supercontinuum white light pulsed laser with energies ranging from 0.85 to 1.4 eV. The measured reflected SHG signal is maximal in samples of ˜20 layers, decreasing in thicker samples as a result of interference. The thickness- and frequency-dependence of the SHG response of samples thicker than ˜7 layers can be reproduced by a second-order optical susceptibility that is the same as in bulk samples. For samples ≲7 layers, the second-order optical susceptibility is reduced compared to that in thicker samples, which is attributed to the expected band-gap increase in mono- and few-layer GaSe.

  18. Quadrupole second harmonic generation and sum-frequency generation in ZnO quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Maikhuri, Deepti; Purohit, S. P. Mathur, K. C.

    2015-04-15

    The second harmonic generation (SHG) and the sum frequency generation (SFG) processes are investigated in the conduction band states of the singly charged ZnO quantum dot (QD) embedded in the HfO{sub 2}, and the AlN matrices. With two optical fields of frequency ω{sub p} and ω{sub q} incident on the dot, we study the variation with frequency of the second order nonlinear polarization resulting in SHG and SFG, through the electric dipole and the electric quadrupole interactions of the pump fields with the electron in the dot. We obtain enhanced value of the second order nonlinear susceptibility in the dot compared to the bulk. The effective mass approximation with the finite confining barrier is used for obtaining the energy and wavefunctions of the quantized confined states of the electron in the conduction band of the dot. Our results show that both the SHG and SFG processes depend on the dot size, the surrounding matrix and the polarization states of the pump beams.

  19. Floquet topological system based on frequency-modulated classical coupled harmonic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salerno, Grazia; Ozawa, Tomoki; Price, Hannah M.; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2016-02-01

    We theoretically propose how to observe topological effects in a generic classical system of coupled harmonic oscillators, such as classical pendula or lumped-element electric circuits, whose oscillation frequency is modulated fast in time. Making use of Floquet theory in the high-frequency limit, we identify a regime in which the system is accurately described by a Harper-Hofstadter model where the synthetic magnetic field can be externally tuned via the phase of the frequency modulation of the different oscillators. We illustrate how the topologically protected chiral edge states, as well as the Hofstadter butterfly of bulk bands, can be observed in the driven-dissipative steady state under a monochromatic drive. In analogy with the integer quantum Hall effect, we show how the topological Chern numbers of the bands can be extracted from the mean transverse shift of the steady-state oscillation amplitude distribution. Finally, we discuss the regime where the analogy with the Harper-Hofstadter model breaks down.

  20. A preliminary engineering design of intravascular dual-frequency transducers for contrast-enhanced acoustic angiography and molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianguo; Martin, K; Dayton, Paul A; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2014-05-01

    Current intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) probes are not optimized for contrast detection because of their design for high-frequency fundamental-mode imaging. However, data from transcutaneous contrast imaging suggests the possibility of utilizing contrast ultrasound for molecular imaging or vasa vasorum assessment to further elucidate atherosclerotic plaque deposition. This paper presents the design, fabrication, and characterization of a small-aperture (0.6 × 3 mm) IVUS probe optimized for high-frequency contrast imaging. The design utilizes a dual-frequency (6.5 MHz/30 MHz) transducer arrangement for exciting microbubbles at low frequencies (near their resonance) and detecting their broadband harmonics at high frequencies, minimizing detected tissue backscatter. The prototype probe is able to generate nonlinear microbubble response with more than 1.2 MPa of rarefractional pressure (mechanical index: 0.48) at 6.5 MHz, and is also able to detect microbubble response with a broadband receiving element (center frequency: 30 MHz, -6-dB fractional bandwidth: 58.6%). Nonlinear super-harmonics from microbubbles flowing through a 200-μm-diameter micro-tube were clearly detected with a signal-to-noise ratio higher than 12 dB. Preliminary phantom imaging at the fundamental frequency (30 MHz) and dual-frequency super-harmonic imaging results suggest the promise of small aperture, dual-frequency IVUS transducers for contrast-enhanced IVUS imaging. PMID:24801226

  1. A Preliminary Engineering Design of Intravascular Dual-Frequency Transducers for Contrast-Enhanced Acoustic Angiography and Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jianguo; Martin, K. Heath; Dayton, Paul A.; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2014-01-01

    Current intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) probes are not optimized for contrast detection because of their design for high-frequency fundamental-mode imaging. However, data from transcutaneous contrast imaging suggests the possibility of utilizing contrast ultrasound for molecular imaging or vasa vasorum assessment to further elucidate atherosclerotic plaque deposition. This paper presents the design, fabrication, and characterization of a small-aperture (0.6 × 3 mm) IVUS probe optimized for high-frequency contrast imaging. The design utilizes a dual-frequency (6.5 MHz/30 MHz) transducer arrangement for exciting microbubbles at low frequencies (near their resonance) and detecting their broadband harmonics at high frequencies, minimizing detected tissue backscatter. The prototype probe is able to generate nonlinear microbubble response with more than 1.2 MPa of rarefractional pressure (mechanical index: 0.48) at 6.5 MHz, and is also able to detect microbubble response with a broadband receiving element (center frequency: 30 MHz, −6-dB fractional bandwidth: 58.6%). Nonlinear super-harmonics from microbubbles flowing through a 200-μm-diameter micro-tube were clearly detected with a signal-to-noise ratio higher than 12 dB. Preliminary phantom imaging at the fundamental frequency (30 MHz) and dual-frequency super-harmonic imaging results suggest the promise of small aperture, dual-frequency IVUS transducers for contrast-enhanced IVUS imaging. PMID:24801226

  2. Definitions of non-stationary vibration power for time-frequency analysis and computational algorithms based upon harmonic wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, YongHwa; Kim, Kwang-joon

    2015-02-01

    While the vibration power for a set of harmonic force and velocity signals is well defined and known, it is not as popular yet for a set of stationary random force and velocity processes, although it can be found in some literatures. In this paper, the definition of the vibration power for a set of non-stationary random force and velocity signals will be derived for the purpose of a time-frequency analysis based on the definitions of the vibration power for the harmonic and stationary random signals. The non-stationary vibration power, defined as the short-time average of the product of the force and velocity over a given frequency range of interest, can be calculated by three methods: the Wigner-Ville distribution, the short-time Fourier transform, and the harmonic wavelet transform. The latter method is selected in this paper because band-pass filtering can be done without phase distortions, and the frequency ranges can be chosen very flexibly for the time-frequency analysis. Three algorithms for the time-frequency analysis of the non-stationary vibration power using the harmonic wavelet transform are discussed. The first is an algorithm for computation according to the full definition, while the others are approximate. Noting that the force and velocity decomposed into frequency ranges of interest by the harmonic wavelet transform are constructed with coefficients and basis functions, for the second algorithm, it is suggested to prepare a table of time integrals of the product of the basis functions in advance, which are independent of the signals under analysis. How to prepare and utilize the integral table are presented. The third algorithm is based on an evolutionary spectrum. Applications of the algorithms to the time-frequency analysis of the vibration power transmitted from an excitation source to a receiver structure in a simple mechanical system consisting of a cantilever beam and a reaction wheel are presented for illustration.

  3. Enhanced Higher Harmonic Imaging of Heterogeneities and Local Plastic Deformation in Steel Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, K.; Imanishi, R.; Aida, T.; Zhou, Y.

    2014-06-01

    Conventional ultrasonic imaging based on the difference in acoustic impedance fails to detect and visualize small heterogeneities and local plastic deformation in metals. Nonlinear ultrasonic imaging technique visualizes higher harmonic amplitudes which are generated at the heterogeneities by finite amplitude sinusoidal burst waves, therefore, it can be applied for detecting small non-metallic inclusions, local plastic deformation and micro cracks. By transmitting 35 MHz sine burst waves and receiving harmonics of 105 MHz in the maximum, non-metallic inclusions in stainless steel of some ten in size and crack tip plastic zone of 2 mm in diameter are visualized.

  4. Imaging the bipolarity of myosin filaments with Interferometric Second Harmonic Generation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rivard, Maxime; Couture, Charles-André; Miri, Amir K.; Laliberté, Mathieu; Bertrand-Grenier, Antony; Mongeau, Luc; Légaré, François

    2013-01-01

    We report that combining interferometry with Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) microscopy provides valuable information about the relative orientation of noncentrosymmetric structures composing tissues. This is confirmed through the imaging of rat medial gastrocnemius muscle. The inteferometric Second Harmonic Generation (ISHG) images reveal that each side of the myosin filaments composing the A band of the sarcomere generates π phase shifted SHG signal which implies that the myosin proteins at each end of the filaments are oriented in opposite directions. This highlights the bipolar structural organization of the myosin filaments and shows that muscles can be considered as a periodically poled biological structure. PMID:24156065

  5. Characteristics of different frequency ranges in scanning electron microscope images

    SciTech Connect

    Sim, K. S. Nia, M. E.; Tan, T. L.; Tso, C. P.; Ee, C. S.

    2015-07-22

    We demonstrate a new approach to characterize the frequency range in general scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. First, pure frequency images are generated from low frequency to high frequency, and then, the magnification of each type of frequency image is implemented. By comparing the edge percentage of the SEM image to the self-generated frequency images, we can define the frequency ranges of the SEM images. Characterization of frequency ranges of SEM images benefits further processing and analysis of those SEM images, such as in noise filtering and contrast enhancement.

  6. Frequency Domain Sampling Using Biomedical Imaging Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Gun Ha; Chung, Minji; Kyung, Richard

    2015-04-01

    In magnetic resonance image analysis using physical and computational method, the process of transformation from frequency domain to image domain requires significant amount time because Inverse Fourier Transformation (IFT) takes every frequency points to determine the final output image. This paper shows the mechanisms and physics of image formation using the selectivity of proper k-space by removing different amounts of high or low frequencies to create the most optimal magnetic resonance image of a human tibial bone. Originally, square unit step function, N/2-N/10:N/2 + N/10 = 1, was used during the Fourier Transformations. And Gaussian filter, y = exp(-t2/40n) , where t = h-L/2, h = [0,M], L =2*7*N/40, the size of frequency matrix (M, N) = (365,557) was tested. Also circle equations as a filter, r = sqrt((x-M/2)2 + (y-N/2)2) , were tested in creating the images of the human tibial bone to find an efficient filter. The best efficiency occurred when the exponent n in the proposed Gaussian filter equation is in between 3 and 8, and therefore, a new algorithm is needed to find the exact number since the number is not only an integer.

  7. Integration of the denoising, inpainting and local harmonic Bz algorithm for MREIT imaging of intact animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Kiwan; Kim, Hyung Joong; Lee, Chang-Ock; Seo, Jin Keun; Woo, Eung Je

    2010-12-01

    Conductivity imaging based on the current-injection MRI technique has been developed in magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography. Current injected through a pair of surface electrodes induces a magnetic flux density distribution inside an imaging object, which results in additional magnetic field inhomogeneity. We can extract phase changes related to the current injection and obtain an image of the induced magnetic flux density. Without rotating the object inside the bore, we can measure only one component Bz of the magnetic flux density B = (Bx, By, Bz). Based on a relation between the internal conductivity distribution and Bz data subject to multiple current injections, one may reconstruct cross-sectional conductivity images. As the image reconstruction algorithm, we have been using the harmonic Bz algorithm in numerous experimental studies. Performing conductivity imaging of intact animal and human subjects, we found technical difficulties that originated from the MR signal void phenomena in the local regions of bones, lungs and gas-filled tubular organs. Measured Bz data inside such a problematic region contain an excessive amount of noise that deteriorates the conductivity image quality. In order to alleviate this technical problem, we applied hybrid methods incorporating ramp-preserving denoising, harmonic inpainting with isotropic diffusion and ROI imaging using the local harmonic Bz algorithm. These methods allow us to produce conductivity images of intact animals with best achievable quality. We suggest guidelines to choose a hybrid method depending on the overall noise level and existence of distinct problematic regions of MR signal void.

  8. Multi-Frequency Intravascular Ultrasound (IVUS) Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Teng; Yu, Mingyue; Chen, Zeyu; Fei, Chunlong; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa

    2015-01-01

    Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is frequently associated with the sudden rupture of a vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque within the coronary artery. Several unique physiological features, including a thin fibrous cap accompanied by a necrotic lipid core, are the targeted indicators for identifying the vulnerable plaques. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), a catheter-based imaging technology, has been routinely performed in clinics for more than 20 years to describe the morphology of the coronary artery and guide percutaneous coronary interventions. However, conventional IVUS cannot facilitate the risk assessment of ACS because of its intrinsic limitations, such as insufficient resolution. Renovation of the IVUS technology is essentially needed to overcome the limitations and enhance the coronary artery characterization. In this paper, a multi-frequency intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging system was developed by incorporating a higher frequency IVUS transducer (80 to 150 MHz) with the conventional IVUS (30–50 MHz) system. The newly developed system maintains the advantage of deeply penetrating imaging with the conventional IVUS, while offering an improved higher resolution image with IVUS at a higher frequency. The prototyped multi-frequency catheter has a clinically compatible size of 0.95 mm and a favorable capability of automated image co-registration. In vitro human coronary artery imaging has demonstrated the feasibility and superiority of the multi-frequency IVUS imaging system to deliver a more comprehensive visualization of the coronary artery. This ultrasonic-only intravascular imaging technique, based on a moderate refinement of the conventional IVUS system, is not only cost-effective from the perspective of manufacturing and clinical practice, but also holds the promise of future translation into clinical benefits. PMID:25585394

  9. Efficient Procedure for the Numerical Calculation of Harmonic Vibrational Frequencies Based on Internal Coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Miliordos, Evangelos; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2013-08-15

    We propose a general procedure for the numerical calculation of the harmonic vibrational frequencies that is based on internal coordinates and Wilson’s GF methodology via double differentiation of the energy. The internal coordinates are defined as the geometrical parameters of a Z-matrix structure, thus avoiding issues related to their redundancy. Linear arrangements of atoms are described using a dummy atom of infinite mass. The procedure has been automated in FORTRAN90 and its main advantage lies in the nontrivial reduction of the number of single-point energy calculations needed for the construction of the Hessian matrix when compared to the corresponding number using double differentiation in Cartesian coordinates. For molecules of C1 symmetry the computational savings in the energy calculations amount to 36N – 30, where N is the number of atoms, with additional savings when symmetry is present. Typical applications for small and medium size molecules in their minimum and transition state geometries as well as hydrogen bonded clusters (water dimer and trimer) are presented. Finally, in all cases the frequencies based on internal coordinates differ on average by <1 cm–1 from those obtained from Cartesian coordinates.

  10. Efficient procedure for the numerical calculation of harmonic vibrational frequencies based on internal coordinates.

    PubMed

    Miliordos, Evangelos; Xantheas, Sotiris S

    2013-08-15

    We propose a general procedure for the numerical calculation of the harmonic vibrational frequencies that is based on internal coordinates and Wilson's GF methodology via double differentiation of the energy. The internal coordinates are defined as the geometrical parameters of a Z-matrix structure, thus avoiding issues related to their redundancy. Linear arrangements of atoms are described using a dummy atom of infinite mass. The procedure has been automated in FORTRAN90 and its main advantage lies in the nontrivial reduction of the number of single-point energy calculations needed for the construction of the Hessian matrix when compared to the corresponding number using double differentiation in Cartesian coordinates. For molecules of C1 symmetry the computational savings in the energy calculations amount to 36N - 30, where N is the number of atoms, with additional savings when symmetry is present. Typical applications for small and medium size molecules in their minimum and transition state geometries as well as hydrogen bonded clusters (water dimer and trimer) are presented. In all cases the frequencies based on internal coordinates differ on average by <1 cm(-1) from those obtained from Cartesian coordinates.

  11. Relationship between dipole moments and harmonic vibrational frequencies in diatomic molecules.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shilin; Bernath, Peter F

    2015-02-26

    Electric dipole moments and harmonic vibrational frequencies are two of the most important molecular properties in many fields of chemistry and physics. With the aid of classical physics, an empirical relationship between them was obtained for diatomic molecules as μd = kq(2)/(ReμAωe(2))(1/2), where k is a constant and μd, q, Re, μA, and ωe are the dipole moment, atomic charge, equilibrium bond length, reduced mass, and equilibrium vibrational frequency, respectively. This relation also provides the atomic charge q as a function of molecular dipole moment. Comparisons with over 60 molecules were made to test this relationship. For typical ionic molecules such as the alkali halides, the predicted dipole moments are in good agreement with the observed data assuming the atomic charges are 1 e. For general polar molecules, the estimated atomic charges obtained from the electric dipole moments are in good agreement with ab initio results for natural bond orbital and/or Mulliken populations.

  12. Fringe-free, background-free, collinear third-harmonic generation frequency-resolved optical gating measurements for multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, Rebecca; Spahr, Erik; Squier, Jeff A.; Durfee, Charles G.; Walker, Barry C.; Fittinghoff, David N.

    2006-11-01

    A background-free, fringe-free form of frequency-resolved optical gating using the third-harmonic signal generated from a glass coverslip is used to characterize 100 fs pulses at the focus of a 0.65 NA objective.

  13. Second harmonic generation imaging of fascia within thick tissue block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeffer, Christian P.; Olsen, Bjorn R.; Légaré, François

    2007-06-01

    Comparing the SHG image formation for thin sections of tail tendon fascia and skeletal muscle fascia, we demonstrate that the forward (F) and backward (B) SHG images are vastly different. In addition, despite the different arrangement of the collagen Type I fibrillar architecture forming these two fascias, their ratios of forward over backward signal (F/B) are nearly equal. SHG images of thick tissue blocks of the fascia-muscle unit show only backward features, as opposed to SHG images of tissue blocks of the fascia-tendon unit. These images are an amalgamation of forward and backward features due to the backscattering of forward components within tendon. These forward features disappear when this tissue block is immersed in glycerol as backscattering is hereby suppressed.

  14. Contrast-enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasound imaging: basic principles, present situation and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Sánchez, María-Victoria; Napoléon, Bertrand

    2014-11-14

    Over the last decade, the development of stabilised microbubble contrast agents and improvements in available ultrasonic equipment, such as harmonic imaging, have enabled us to display microbubble enhancements on a greyscale with optimal contrast and spatial resolution. Recent technological advances made contrast harmonic technology available for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) for the first time in 2008. Thus, the evaluation of microcirculation is now feasible with EUS, prompting the evolution of contrast-enhanced EUS from vascular imaging to images of the perfused tissue. Although the relevant experience is still preliminary, several reports have highlighted contrast-enhanced harmonic EUS (CH-EUS) as a promising noninvasive method to visualise and characterise lesions and to differentiate benign from malignant focal lesions. Even if histology remains the gold standard, the combination of CH-EUS and EUS fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) can not only render EUS more accurate but may also assist physicians in making decisions when EUS-FNA is inconclusive, increasing the yield of EUS-FNA by guiding the puncture with simultaneous imaging of the vascularity. The development of CH-EUS has also opened up exciting possibilities in other research areas, including monitoring responses to anticancer chemotherapy or to ethanol-induced pancreatic tissue ablation, anticancer therapies based on ultrasound-triggered drug and gene delivery, and therapeutic adjuvants by contrast ultrasound-induced apoptosis. Contrast harmonic imaging is gaining popularity because of its efficacy, simplicity and non-invasive nature, and many expectations are currently resting on this technique. If its potential is confirmed in the near future, contrast harmonic imaging will become a standard practice in EUS.

  15. Contrast-enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasound imaging: Basic principles, present situation and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Sánchez, María-Victoria; Napoléon, Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, the development of stabilised microbubble contrast agents and improvements in available ultrasonic equipment, such as harmonic imaging, have enabled us to display microbubble enhancements on a greyscale with optimal contrast and spatial resolution. Recent technological advances made contrast harmonic technology available for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) for the first time in 2008. Thus, the evaluation of microcirculation is now feasible with EUS, prompting the evolution of contrast-enhanced EUS from vascular imaging to images of the perfused tissue. Although the relevant experience is still preliminary, several reports have highlighted contrast-enhanced harmonic EUS (CH-EUS) as a promising noninvasive method to visualise and characterise lesions and to differentiate benign from malignant focal lesions. Even if histology remains the gold standard, the combination of CH-EUS and EUS fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) can not only render EUS more accurate but may also assist physicians in making decisions when EUS-FNA is inconclusive, increasing the yield of EUS-FNA by guiding the puncture with simultaneous imaging of the vascularity. The development of CH-EUS has also opened up exciting possibilities in other research areas, including monitoring responses to anticancer chemotherapy or to ethanol-induced pancreatic tissue ablation, anticancer therapies based on ultrasound-triggered drug and gene delivery, and therapeutic adjuvants by contrast ultrasound-induced apoptosis. Contrast harmonic imaging is gaining popularity because of its efficacy, simplicity and non-invasive nature, and many expectations are currently resting on this technique. If its potential is confirmed in the near future, contrast harmonic imaging will become a standard practice in EUS. PMID:25400439

  16. Frequency-domain interpretation of the plateaus in laser-assisted recombination and high-order harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Taiwang; Li, Xiaofeng; Ao, Shuyan; Wu, Ling-An; Fu, Panming

    2003-09-01

    The plateaus in laser-assisted recombination and high-order harmonic generation are investigated in the frequency domain. It is found that the probability amplitude of finding an electron with a given energy is given by a generalized Bessel function, which can be represented as a coherent superposition of contributions from a few electronic quantum trajectories. This concept is illustrated by comparing the spectral density of the electron with the laser-assisted recombination spectrum. On the other hand, the plateau of high-order harmonic generation reflects the spectral density of the electron at the location of the nucleus after above-threshold ionization.

  17. Three-dimensional high-resolution second-harmonic generation imaging of endogenous structural proteins in biological tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Campagnola, Paul J; Millard, Andrew C; Terasaki, Mark; Hoppe, Pamela E; Malone, Christian J; Mohler, William A

    2002-01-01

    We find that several key endogenous protein structures give rise to intense second-harmonic generation (SHG)-nonabsorptive frequency doubling of an excitation laser line. Second-harmonic imaging microscopy (SHIM) on a laser-scanning system proves, therefore, to be a powerful and unique tool for high-resolution, high-contrast, three-dimensional studies of live cell and tissue architecture. Unlike fluorescence, SHG suffers no inherent photobleaching or toxicity and does not require exogenous labels. Unlike polarization microscopy, SHIM provides intrinsic confocality and deep sectioning in complex tissues. In this study, we demonstrate the clarity of SHIM optical sectioning within unfixed, unstained thick specimens. SHIM and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) were combined in a dual-mode nonlinear microscopy to elucidate the molecular sources of SHG in live cells and tissues. SHG arose not only from coiled-coil complexes within connective tissues and muscle thick filaments, but also from microtubule arrays within interphase and mitotic cells. Both polarization dependence and a local symmetry cancellation effect of SHG allowed the signal from species generating the second harmonic to be decoded, by ratiometric correlation with TPEF, to yield information on local structure below optical resolution. The physical origin of SHG within these tissues is addressed and is attributed to the laser interaction with dipolar protein structures that is enhanced by the intrinsic chirality of the protein helices. PMID:11751336

  18. High-contrast imaging of mycobacterium tuberculosis using third-harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bo Ram; Lee, Eungjang; Park, Seung-Han

    2015-07-01

    Nonlinear optical microcopy has become an important tool in investigating biomaterials due to its various advantages such as label-free imaging capabilities. In particular, it has been shown that third-harmonic generation (THG) signals can be produced at interfaces between an aqueous medium (e.g. cytoplasm, interstitial fluid) and a mineralized lipidic surface. In this work, we have demonstrated that label-free high-contrast THG images of the mycobacterium tuberculosis can be obtained using THG microscopy.

  19. In vivo polarization dependant Second and Third harmonic generation imaging of Caenorhabditis elegans pharyngeal muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippidis, G.; Troulinaki, K.; Fotakis, C.; Tavernarakis, N.

    2009-07-01

    In this study Second and Third harmonic generation (SHG-THG) imaging measurements were performed to the pharyngeal muscles of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, in vivo with linearly polarized laser beam. Complementary information about the anatomy of the pharynx and the morphology of the anterior part of the worm were extracted. THG signals proved to have no dependence on incident light polarization, while SHG images are highly sensitive to the changes of the incident linearly polarized light.

  20. Second harmonic generation imaging of dermal collagen component in human keloid tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H. B.; Chen, S.; Zhu, X. Q.; Yang, H. Q.; Chen, J. X.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we report second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging of human keloid tissue. High resolution SHG images of collagen component were obtained in the superficial, medial and deep dermis of human keloid tissue, respectively. Our results show that this method has a capability to observe the structure of collagen component in human keloid tissue, which will help to better understand the formation process of human keloid scar at the molecular level.

  1. Synthesis of cervical tissue second harmonic generation images using Markov random field modeling.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, S; Kehtarnavaz, N; Gholipour, A

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a statistical image modeling approach based on Markov random field to synthesize cervical tissue second harmonic generation (SHG) images. Binary images representing fiber and pore areas of the cervix tissue are first obtained from SHG images using an image processing pipeline consisting of noise removal, contrast enhancement and optimal thresholding. These binary images are modeled using a Markov random field whose parameters are estimated via the least squares method. The parameters are then used to synthesize fiber and pore areas of cervical tissue in the form of binary images. The effectiveness of the synthesis is demonstrated by reporting the classification outcome for two classes of cervical SHG images collected from mice at two different stages of normal pregnancy. The developed synthesis allows generation of realistic fiber and pore area binary images for cervical tissue studies.

  2. Sum frequency and second harmonic generation from the surface of a liquid microjet.

    PubMed

    Smolentsev, Nikolay; Chen, Yixing; Jena, Kailash C; Brown, Matthew A; Roke, Sylvie

    2014-11-14

    The use of a liquid microjet as a possible source of interest for Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) and Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) spectroscopy is examined. We measured non-resonant SHG scattering patterns from the air/water interface of a microjet of pure water and observe a strong enhancement of the SHG signal for certain scattering angles. These enhancements can be explained by the optical properties and the shape of the liquid microjet. SFG experiments at the surface of a liquid microjet of ethanol in air show that it is also possible to measure the coherent vibrational SFG spectrum of the ethanol/air interface in this way. Our findings are useful for future far-UV or X-ray based nonlinear optical surface experiments on liquid jets. In addition, combined X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and SHG/SFG measurements are feasible, which will be very useful in improving our understanding of the molecular foundations of electrostatic and chemical surface properties and phenomena.

  3. A Spectral Finite Element Approach to Modeling Soft Solids Excited with High-Frequency Harmonic Loads

    PubMed Central

    Brigham, John C.; Aquino, Wilkins; Aguilo, Miguel A.; Diamessis, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    An approach for efficient and accurate finite element analysis of harmonically excited soft solids using high-order spectral finite elements is presented and evaluated. The Helmholtz-type equations used to model such systems suffer from additional numerical error known as pollution when excitation frequency becomes high relative to stiffness (i.e. high wave number), which is the case, for example, for soft tissues subject to ultrasound excitations. The use of high-order polynomial elements allows for a reduction in this pollution error, but requires additional consideration to counteract Runge's phenomenon and/or poor linear system conditioning, which has led to the use of spectral element approaches. This work examines in detail the computational benefits and practical applicability of high-order spectral elements for such problems. The spectral elements examined are tensor product elements (i.e. quad or brick elements) of high-order Lagrangian polynomials with non-uniformly distributed Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre nodal points. A shear plane wave example is presented to show the dependence of the accuracy and computational expense of high-order elements on wave number. Then, a convergence study for a viscoelastic acoustic-structure interaction finite element model of an actual ultrasound driven vibroacoustic experiment is shown. The number of degrees of freedom required for a given accuracy level was found to consistently decrease with increasing element order. However, the computationally optimal element order was found to strongly depend on the wave number. PMID:21461402

  4. Sum frequency and second harmonic generation from the surface of a liquid microjet

    SciTech Connect

    Smolentsev, Nikolay; Chen, Yixing; Roke, Sylvie; Jena, Kailash C.; Brown, Matthew A.

    2014-11-14

    The use of a liquid microjet as a possible source of interest for Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) and Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) spectroscopy is examined. We measured non-resonant SHG scattering patterns from the air/water interface of a microjet of pure water and observe a strong enhancement of the SHG signal for certain scattering angles. These enhancements can be explained by the optical properties and the shape of the liquid microjet. SFG experiments at the surface of a liquid microjet of ethanol in air show that it is also possible to measure the coherent vibrational SFG spectrum of the ethanol/air interface in this way. Our findings are useful for future far-UV or X-ray based nonlinear optical surface experiments on liquid jets. In addition, combined X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and SHG/SFG measurements are feasible, which will be very useful in improving our understanding of the molecular foundations of electrostatic and chemical surface properties and phenomena.

  5. The Harmonic Structure of High-Frequency Quasi-periodic Oscillations in Accreting Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnittman, Jeremy D.; Bertschinger, Edmund

    2004-05-01

    Observations from the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer have shown the existence of high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (HFQPOs) in the X-ray flux from accreting black hole binary systems. In at least two systems, these HFQPOs come in pairs with a 2:3 frequency commensurability. We employ a simple ``hot spot'' model to explain the position and amplitude of the HFQPO peaks. Using the exact geodesic equations for the Kerr metric, we calculate the trajectories of massive test particles, which are treated as isotropic, monochromatic emitters in their rest frames. Photons are traced from the accretion disk to a distant observer to produce time- and frequency-dependent images of the orbiting hot spot and background disk. The power spectrum of the X-ray light curve consists of multiple peaks at integral combinations of the black hole coordinate frequencies. In particular, if the radial frequency is one-third of the azimuthal frequency (as is the case near the innermost stable circular orbit), beat frequencies appear in the power spectrum at two-thirds and four-thirds of the fundamental azimuthal orbital frequency, in agreement with observations. In addition, we model the effects of shearing the hot spot in the disk, producing an arc of emission that also follows a geodesic orbit, as well as the effects of nonplanar orbits that experience Lens-Thirring precession around the black hole axis. By varying the arc length, we are able to explain the relative amplitudes of the QPOs at either 2ν or 3ν in observations from XTE J1550-564 and GRO J1655-40. In the context of this model, the observed power spectra allow us to infer values for the black hole mass and angular momentum and also constrain the parameters of the model, such as the hot spot size and luminosity.

  6. Generalized Mach-Zehnder interferometer architectures for radio frequency translation and multiplication: Suppression of unwanted harmonics by design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado-Basilio, Ramón; Hasan, Mehedi; Guemri, Rabiaa; Lucarz, Frédéric; Hall, Trevor J.

    2015-11-01

    A generalized array of N parallel phase modulators electrically driven with a progressive 2 π / N phase shift is analyzed. For N-even, the equivalence of this configuration to parallel Mach-Zehnder architectures, and specifically the equivalence for N=4 to a dual parallel Mach-Zehnder modulator is shown. A simple approach to the design of this architecture that determines the static optical phase shifts required in each of the N parallel arms to suppress unwanted harmonics while maximizing the harmonics of interest is developed. The proposed design approach is validated by numerical simulations of N=4 and N=6 architectures with properly determined optical phase shifts. Optical single-side-band modulation (lower and upper) and frequency multiplication of an electrical drive signal with high suppression of unwanted harmonics is shown to be achievable.

  7. Cell tracking in live Caenorhabditis elegans embryos via third harmonic generation imaging microscopy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tserevelakis, George J.; Filippidis, George; Megalou, Evgenia V.; Fotakis, Costas; Tavernarakis, Nektarios

    2011-04-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the potential of employing third harmonic generation (THG) imaging microscopy measurements for cell tracking studies in live Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) embryos. A 1028-nm femtosecond laser was used for the excitation of unstained C. elegans samples. Different C. elegans embryonic stages (from two-cell to threefold) were imaged. Live biological specimens were irradiated for prolonged periods of time (up to 7 h), testifying to the nondestructive nature of this nonlinear imaging technique. Thus, THG image contrast modality is a powerful diagnostic tool for probing in vivo cell division during early embryogenesis.

  8. UHF Radar observations at HAARP with HF pump frequencies near electron gyro-harmonics and associated ionospheric effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, Brenton; Fallen, Christopher; Secan, James

    Results for HF modification experiments at the HAARP facility in Alaska are presented for experiments with the HF pump frequency near third and fourth electron gyro-harmonics. A UHF diagnostic radar with range resolution of 600 m was used to determine time-dependent altitudes of scattering from plasma turbulence during heating experiments. Experiments were conducted with multiple HF frequencies stepped by 20 kHz above and below the gyro-harmonic values. During times of HF heating the HAARP facility has sufficient power to enhance large-scale ionospheric densities in the lower ionosphere (about 150-200 km altitude) and also in the topside ionosphere (above about 350 km). In the lower ionosphere, time-dependent decreases of the altitude of radar scatter result from electron density enhancements. The effects are substantially different even for relatively small frequency steps of 20 kHz. In all cases the time-varying altitude decrease of radar scatter stops about 5-10 km below the gyro-harmonic altitude that is frequency dependent; we infer that electron density enhancements stop at this altitude where the radar signals stop decreasing with altitude. Experiments with corresponding total electron content (TEC) data show that for HF interaction altitudes above about 170 km there is substantial topside electron density increases due to upward electron thermal conduction. For lower altitudes of HF interaction the majority of the thermal energy is transferred to the neutral gas and no significant topside density increases are observed. By selecting an appropriate HF frequency a little greater than the gyro-harmonic value we have demonstrated that the ionospheric response to HF heating is a self-oscillating mode where the HF interaction altitude moves up and down with a period of several minutes. If the interaction region is above about 170 km this also produces a continuously enhanced topside electron density and upward plasma flux. Experiments using an FM scan with the HF

  9. High-order harmonic spectroscopy for molecular imaging of polyatomic molecules.

    PubMed

    Negro, M; Devetta, M; Faccialá, D; De Silvestri, S; Vozzi, C; Stagira, S

    2014-01-01

    High-order harmonic generation is a powerful and sensitive tool for probing atomic and molecular structures, combining in the same measurement an unprecedented attosecond temporal resolution with a high spatial resolution of the order of an angstrom. Imaging of the outermost molecular orbital by high-order harmonic generation has been limited for a long time to very simple molecules, like nitrogen. Recently we demonstrated a technique that overcame several of the issues that have prevented the extension of molecular orbital tomography to more complex species, showing that molecular imaging can be applied to a triatomic molecule like carbon dioxide. Here we report on the application of such a technique to nitrous oxide (N(2)O) and acetylene (C(2)H(2)). This result represents a first step towards the imaging of fragile compounds, a category which includes most of the fundamental biological molecules.

  10. Submillisecond second harmonic holographic imaging of biological specimens in three dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David R.; Winters, David G.; Bartels, Randy A.

    2013-01-01

    Optical microscopy has played a critical role for discovery in biomedical sciences since Hooke’s introduction of the compound microscope. Recent years have witnessed explosive growth in optical microscopy tools and techniques. Information in microscopy is garnered through contrast mechanisms, usually absorption, scattering, or phase shifts introduced by spatial structure in the sample. The emergence of nonlinear optical contrast mechanisms reveals new information from biological specimens. However, the intensity dependence of nonlinear interactions leads to weak signals, preventing the observation of high-speed dynamics in the 3D context of biological samples. Here, we show that for second harmonic generation imaging, we can increase the 3D volume imaging speed from sub-Hertz speeds to rates in excess of 1,500 volumes imaged per second. This transformational capability is possible by exploiting coherent scattering of second harmonic light from an entire specimen volume, enabling new observational capabilities in biological systems. PMID:24173034

  11. Invited Review Article: Imaging techniques for harmonic and multiphoton absorption fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Carriles, Ramón; Schafer, Dawn N.; Sheetz, Kraig E.; Field, Jeffrey J.; Cisek, Richard; Barzda, Virginijus; Sylvester, Anne W.; Squier, Jeffrey A.

    2009-01-01

    We review the current state of multiphoton microscopy. In particular, the requirements and limitations associated with high-speed multiphoton imaging are considered. A description of the different scanning technologies such as line scan, multifoci approaches, multidepth microscopy, and novel detection techniques is given. The main nonlinear optical contrast mechanisms employed in microscopy are reviewed, namely, multiphoton excitation fluorescence, second harmonic generation, and third harmonic generation. Techniques for optimizing these nonlinear mechanisms through a careful measurement of the spatial and temporal characteristics of the focal volume are discussed, and a brief summary of photobleaching effects is provided. Finally, we consider three new applications of multiphoton microscopy: nonlinear imaging in microfluidics as applied to chemical analysis and the use of two-photon absorption and self-phase modulation as contrast mechanisms applied to imaging problems in the medical sciences. PMID:19725639

  12. Simultaneous stimulated Raman scattering and higher harmonic generation imaging for liver disease diagnosis without labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jian; Wang, Zi; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2014-02-01

    Nonlinear optical microscopy (e.g., higher harmonic (second-/third- harmonic) generation (HHG), simulated Raman scattering (SRS)) has high diagnostic sensitivity and chemical specificity, making it a promising tool for label-free tissue and cell imaging. In this work, we report a development of a simultaneous SRS and HHG imaging technique for characterization of liver disease in a bile-duct-ligation rat-modal. HHG visualizes collagens formation and reveals the cell morphologic changes associated with liver fibrosis; whereas SRS identifies the distributions of hepatic fat cells formed in steatosis liver tissue. This work shows that the co-registration of SRS and HHG images can be an effective means for label-free diagnosis and characterization of liver steatosis/fibrosis at the cellular and molecular levels.

  13. Spectral imaging of breast fibroadenoma using second-harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Liqin; Wang, Yuhua

    2014-09-01

    Fibroadenoma (FA), typically composed of stroma and epithelial cells, is a very common benign breast disease. Women with FA are associated with an increased risk of future breast cancer. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the potential of multiphoton laser scanning microscopy (MPLSM) for characterizing the morphology of collagen in the human breast fibroadenomas. In the study, high-contrast SHG images of human normal breast tissues and fibroadenoma tissues were obtained for comparison. The morphology of collagen was different between normal breast tissue and fibroadenoma. This study shows that MPLSM has the ability to distinguish fibroadenoma tissues from the normal breast tissues based on the noninvasive SHG imaging. With the advent of the clinical portability of miniature MPLSM, we believe that the technique has great potential to be used in vivo studies and for monitoring the treatment responses of fibroadenomas in clinical.

  14. Frequency domain analysis of knock images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yunliang; He, Xin; Wang, Zhi; Wang, Jianxin

    2014-12-01

    High speed imaging-based knock analysis has mainly focused on time domain information, e.g. the spark triggered flame speed, the time when end gas auto-ignition occurs and the end gas flame speed after auto-ignition. This study presents a frequency domain analysis on the knock images recorded using a high speed camera with direct photography in a rapid compression machine (RCM). To clearly visualize the pressure wave oscillation in the combustion chamber, the images were high-pass-filtered to extract the luminosity oscillation. The luminosity spectrum was then obtained by applying fast Fourier transform (FFT) to three basic colour components (red, green and blue) of the high-pass-filtered images. Compared to the pressure spectrum, the luminosity spectra better identify the resonant modes of pressure wave oscillation. More importantly, the resonant mode shapes can be clearly visualized by reconstructing the images based on the amplitudes of luminosity spectra at the corresponding resonant frequencies, which agree well with the analytical solutions for mode shapes of gas vibration in a cylindrical cavity.

  15. Modelling of global boundary effects on harmonic motion imaging of soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaodong; Pelegri, Assimina A

    2014-01-01

    Biomechanical imaging techniques have been developed for soft tissue characterisation and detection of breast tumours. Harmonic motion imaging (HMI) uses a focused ultrasound technology to generate a harmonic radiation force in a localised region inside a soft tissue. The resulting dynamic response is used to map the local distribution of the mechanical properties of the tissue. In this study, a finite element (FE) model is developed to investigate the effect of global boundary conditions on the dynamic response of a soft tissue during HMI. The direct-solution steady-state dynamic analysis procedure is used to compute the harmonic displacement amplitude in FE simulations. The model is parameterised in terms of boundary conditions and viscoelastic properties, and the corresponding raster-scan displacement amplitudes are captured to examine its response. The effect of the model's global dimensions on the harmonic response is also investigated. It is observed that the dynamic response of soft tissue with high viscosity is independent of the global boundary conditions for regions remote to the boundary; thus, it can be subjected to local analysis to estimate the underlying mechanical properties. However, the dynamic response is sensitive to global boundary conditions for tissue with low viscosity or regions located near to the boundary.

  16. Cardiac Motion Tracking Using CINE Harmonic Phase (HARP) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Nael F.; Kerwin, William S.; McVeigh, Elliot R.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2007-01-01

    This article introduces a new image processing technique for rapid analysis of tagged cardiac magnetic resonance image sequences. The method uses isolated spectral peaks in SPAMM-tagged magnetic resonance images, which contain information about cardiac motion. The inverse Fourier transform of a spectral peak is a complex image whose calculated angle is called a harmonic phase (HARP) image. It is shown how two HARP image sequences can be used to automatically and accurately track material points through time. A rapid, semiautomated procedure to calculate circumferential and radial Lagrangian strain from tracked points is described. This new computational approach permits rapid analysis and visualization of myocardial strain within 5-10 min after the scan is complete. Its performance is demonstrated on MR image sequences reflecting both normal and abnormal cardiac motion. Results from the new method are shown to compare very well with a previously validated tracking algorithm. PMID:10571926

  17. Revealing the nature of the QPO and its harmonic in GX 339-4 using frequency-resolved spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axelsson, Magnus; Done, Chris

    2016-05-01

    We use frequency-resolved spectroscopy to examine the energy spectra of the prominent low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) and its harmonic in GX 339-4. We track the evolution of these spectra as the source makes a transition from a bright low/hard to hard intermediate state. In the hard/intermediate states, the QPO and time-averaged spectra are similar and the harmonic is either undetected or similar to the QPO. By contrast, in the softer states, the harmonic is dramatically softer than the QPO spectrum and the time-averaged spectrum, and the QPO spectrum is dramatically harder than the time-averaged spectrum. Clearly, the existence of these very different spectral shaped components mean that the time-averaged spectra are complex, as also seen by the fact that the softer spectra cannot be well described by a disc, Comptonization and its reflection. We use the frequency-resolved spectra to better constrain the model components, and find that the data are consistent with a time-averaged spectrum which has an additional low-temperature, optically thick Comptonization component. The harmonic can be described by this additional component alone, while the QPO spectrum is similar to that of the hard Comptonization and its reflection. Neither QPO nor harmonic shows signs of the disc component even when it is strong in the time-averaged spectrum. This adds to the growing evidence for inhomogeneous Comptonization in black hole binaries. While the similarity between the harmonic and QPO spectra in the intermediate state can be produced from the angular dependence of Compton scattering in a single region, this cannot explain the dramatic differences seen in the soft state. Instead, we propose that the soft Compton region is located predominantly above the disc while the hard Compton is from the hotter inner flow. Our results therefore point to multiple possible mechanisms for producing harmonic features in the power spectrum. The dominant mechanism in a given

  18. Frequency-resolved optical gating with the use of second-harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    DeLong, K.W.; Trebino, R. ); Hunter, J.; White, W.E. )

    1994-11-01

    We discuss the use of second-harmonic generation (SHG) as the nonlinearity in the technique of frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG) for measuring the full intensity and phase evolution of an arbitrary ultrashort pulse. FROG that uses a third-order nonlinearity in the polarization-gate geometry has proved extremely successful, and the algorithm required for extraction of the intensity and the phase from the experimental data is quite robust. However, for pulse intensities less than [similar to] 1 MW, third-order nonlinearities generate insufficient signal strength, and therefore SHG FROG appears necessary. We discuss the theoretical, algorithmic, and experimental considerations of SHG FROG in detail. SHG FROG has an ambiguity in the direction of time, and its traces are somewhat unintuitive. Also, previously published algorithms are generally ineffective at extracting the intensity and the phase of an arbitrary laser pulse from the SHG FROG trace. We present an improved pulse-retrieval algorithm, based on the method of generalized projections, that is far superior to the previously published algorithms, although it is still not so robust as the polarization-gate algorithm. We discuss experimental sources of error such as pump depletion and group-velocity mismatch. We also present several experimental examples of pulses measured with SHG FROG and show that the derived intensities and phases are in agreement with more conventional diagnostic techniques, and we demonstrate the high-dynamic-range capability of SHG FROG. We conclude that, despite the above drawbacks, SHG FROG should be useful in measuring low-energy pulses.

  19. Label-free three-dimensional imaging of cell nucleus using third-harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jian; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Zi; Huang, Zhiwei

    2014-09-01

    We report the implementation of the combined third-harmonic generation (THG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy for label-free three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of cell nucleus morphological changes in liver tissue. THG imaging shows regular spherical shapes of normal hepatocytes nuclei with inner chromatin structures while revealing the condensation of chromatins and nuclear fragmentations in hepatocytes of diseased liver tissue. Colocalized THG and TPEF imaging provides complementary information of cell nuclei and cytoplasm in tissue. This work suggests that 3-D THG microscopy has the potential for quantitative analysis of nuclear morphology in cells at a submicron-resolution without the need for DNA staining.

  20. Label-free three-dimensional imaging of cell nucleus using third-harmonic generation microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jian; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Zi; Huang, Zhiwei

    2014-09-08

    We report the implementation of the combined third-harmonic generation (THG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy for label-free three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of cell nucleus morphological changes in liver tissue. THG imaging shows regular spherical shapes of normal hepatocytes nuclei with inner chromatin structures while revealing the condensation of chromatins and nuclear fragmentations in hepatocytes of diseased liver tissue. Colocalized THG and TPEF imaging provides complementary information of cell nuclei and cytoplasm in tissue. This work suggests that 3-D THG microscopy has the potential for quantitative analysis of nuclear morphology in cells at a submicron-resolution without the need for DNA staining.

  1. Third harmonic generation imaging for fast, label-free pathology of human brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Kuzmin, N V; Wesseling, P; Hamer, P C de Witt; Noske, D P; Galgano, G D; Mansvelder, H D; Baayen, J C; Groot, M L

    2016-05-01

    In brain tumor surgery, recognition of tumor boundaries is key. However, intraoperative assessment of tumor boundaries by the neurosurgeon is difficult. Therefore, there is an urgent need for tools that provide the neurosurgeon with pathological information during the operation. We show that third harmonic generation (THG) microscopy provides label-free, real-time images of histopathological quality; increased cellularity, nuclear pleomorphism, and rarefaction of neuropil in fresh, unstained human brain tissue could be clearly recognized. We further demonstrate THG images taken with a GRIN objective, as a step toward in situ THG microendoscopy of tumor boundaries. THG imaging is thus a promising tool for optical biopsies.

  2. Imaging through turbid layers by scanning the phase conjugated second harmonic radiation from a nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chia-Lung; Pu, Ye; Grange, Rachel; Laporte, Grégoire; Psaltis, Demetri

    2010-09-27

    We demonstrate imaging through a turbid layer by using digital phase conjugation of the second harmonic field radiated from a beacon nanoparticle. We show that the phase-conjugated focus can be displaced from its initial position by illuminating the same region of the turbid layer with an angular offset. An image is obtained by scanning the phase-conjugated focus through the turbid layer in a region around the nanoparticle. We obtain a clear image of the target by measuring the light transmitted through it when scanning the focused beam.

  3. Third harmonic generation imaging for fast, label-free pathology of human brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmin, N. V.; Wesseling, P.; Hamer, P. C. de Witt; Noske, D. P.; Galgano, G. D.; Mansvelder, H. D.; Baayen, J. C.; Groot, M. L.

    2016-01-01

    In brain tumor surgery, recognition of tumor boundaries is key. However, intraoperative assessment of tumor boundaries by the neurosurgeon is difficult. Therefore, there is an urgent need for tools that provide the neurosurgeon with pathological information during the operation. We show that third harmonic generation (THG) microscopy provides label-free, real-time images of histopathological quality; increased cellularity, nuclear pleomorphism, and rarefaction of neuropil in fresh, unstained human brain tissue could be clearly recognized. We further demonstrate THG images taken with a GRIN objective, as a step toward in situ THG microendoscopy of tumor boundaries. THG imaging is thus a promising tool for optical biopsies. PMID:27231629

  4. Garner Valley Vibroseis Data Processing Using Time-Frequency Filtering Techniques to Remove Unwanted Harmonics and External Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lord, N. E.; Wang, H. F.; Fratta, D.; Lancelle, C.; Chalari, A.

    2015-12-01

    Time-frequency filtering techniques can greatly improve data quality when combined with frequency swept seismic sources (vibroseis) recorded by seismic arrays by removing unwanted source harmonics or external noise sources (e.g., cultural or ambient noise). A source synchronous filter (SSF) is a time-frequency filter which only passes a specified width frequency band centered on the time varying frequency of the seismic source. A source delay filter (SDF) is a time-frequency filter which only passes those frequencies from the source within a specified delay time range. Both of these time-frequency filters operate on the uncorrelated vibroseis data and allow separate analysis of the source fundamental frequency and each harmonic. In either technique, the time-frequency function of the source can be captured from the source encoder or specified using two or more time-frequency points. SSF and SDF were both used in the processing of the vibroseis data collected in the September 2013 seismic experiment conducted at the NEES@UCSB Garner Valley field site. Three vibroseis sources were used: a 45 kN shear shaker, a 450 N portable mass shaker, and a 26 kN vibroseis truck. Seismic signals from these sources were recorded by two lines of 1 and 3 component accelerometers and geophones, and the Silixa Ltd's intelligent Distributed Acoustic Sensing (iDASTM ) system connected to 762 m of trenched fiber optical cable in a larger rectangular area. SSF and SDF improved vibroseis data quality, simplified data interpretation, and allowed new analysis techniques. This research is part of the larger DOE's PoroTomo project (URL: http://geoscience.wisc.edu/feigl/porotomo).

  5. A mechanism for plasma waves at the harmonics of the plasma frequency in the electron foreshock boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimas, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    A bump-on-tail unstable reduced velocity distribution, constructed from data obtained at the upstream boundary of the electron foreshock by the GSFC electron spectrometer experiment on the ISEE-1 satellite, is used as the initial plasma state for a numerical integration of the 1D-Vlasov-Maxwell system of equations. The integration is carried through the growth of the instability, beyond its saturation, and well into the stabilized plasma regime. A power spectrum computed for the electric field of the stabilized plasma is dominated by a narrow peak at the Bohm-Gross frequency of the unstable field mode but also contains significant power at the harmonics of the Bohm-Gross frequency. The harmonic power is in sharp peaks which are split into closely spaced doublets. The fundamental peak at the Bohm-Gross frequency is split into a closely spaced triplet. The mechanism for excitation of the second harmonic is shown to be second order wave-wave coupling. Previously announced in STAR as N83-17315

  6. Generation of third harmonic picosecond pulses at 355 nm by sum frequency mixing in periodically poled MgSLT crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaltenbach, André; Schönau, Thomas; Lauritsen, Kristian; Tränkle, Günther; Erdmann, Rainer

    2015-02-01

    Third harmonic 355nm picosecond pulses are generated by sum frequency mixing in a periodically poled magnesium doped stoichiometric lithium tantalate (PPMgSLT) crystal. The third harmonic generation is based on the 1064nm radiation of a gain-switched distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser which is amplified by a two-stage fiber amplifier. The diode laser is freely triggerable at variable repetition rates up to 80MHz and provides optical pulses of 65 ps FWHM duration and pulse energies in the range of 5 pJ. The 355nm third harmonic generation is realized in a two-step conversion process. First, the 1064nm fundamental radiation is frequency-doubled to 532 nm, afterwards both frequencies are mixed in the PPMgSLT crystal to 355 nm. The UV-radiation shows a pulse width of 60 ps, a good beam profile and stable pulse energy over a wide range of repetition rates by proprietary pump power management. At 355nm a pulse peak power of 5.3W was achieved with 192W pulse peak power of the fundamental radiation.

  7. Diffractive imaging using a polychromatic high-harmonic generation soft-x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilanian, Ruben A.; Chen, Bo; Williams, Garth J.; Quiney, Harry M.; Nugent, Keith A.; Teichmann, Sven; Hannaford, Peter; Dao, Lap V.; Peele, Andrew G.

    2009-07-01

    A new approach to diffractive imaging using polychromatic diffraction data is described. The method is tested using simulated and experimental data and is shown to yield high-quality reconstructions. Diffraction data produced using a high-harmonic generation source are considered explicitly here. The formalism can be readily adapted, however, to any short-wavelength source producing a discrete spectrum and possessing sufficient spatial coherence.

  8. Efficient 2(nd) and 4(th) harmonic generation of a single-frequency, continuous-wave fiber amplifier.

    PubMed

    Sudmeyer, Thomas; Imai, Yutaka; Masuda, Hisashi; Eguchi, Naoya; Saito, Masaki; Kubota, Shigeo

    2008-02-01

    We demonstrate efficient cavity-enhanced second and fourth harmonic generation of an air-cooled, continuous-wave (cw), single-frequency 1064 nm fiber-amplifier system. The second harmonic generator achieves up to 88% total external conversion efficiency, generating more than 20-W power at 532 nm wavelength in a diffraction-limited beam (M(2) < 1.05). The nonlinear medium is a critically phase-matched, 20-mm long, anti-reflection (AR) coated LBO crystal operated at 25 degrees C. The fourth harmonic generator is based on an AR-coated, Czochralski-grown beta-BaB(2)O(4) (BBO) crystal optimized for low loss and high damage threshold. Up to 12.2 W of 266-nm deep-UV (DUV) output is obtained using a 6-mm long critically phase-matched BBO operated at 40 degrees C. This power level is more than two times higher than previously reported for cw 266-nm generation. The total external conversion efficiency from the fundamental at 1064 nm to the fourth harmonic at 266 nm is >50%.

  9. Quantitative analysis of forward and backward second-harmonic images of collagen fibers using Fourier transform second-harmonic-generation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rao, Raghu Ambekar Ramachandra; Mehta, Monal R; Leithem, Scott; Toussaint, Kimani C

    2009-12-15

    Fourier transform second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy has been applied to quantitatively compare the information content between SHG images obtained from the forward and backward direction for three tissue types: porcine tendon, sclera, and ear cartilage. Both signal types yield consistent information on the preferred orientation of collagen fibers. For all specimens, the Fourier transform of the forward and backward SHG images produces several overlapping peaks in the magnitude spectrum at various depths into the tissues, indicating that some information present in the forward SHG images can be extracted from the backward SHG images. This study highlights the potential of backward SHG microscopy for medical diagnostics.

  10. A high frequency electromagnetic impedance imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, Hung-Wen; Lee, Ki Ha; Becker, Alex

    2003-01-15

    Non-invasive, high resolution geophysical mapping of the shallow subsurface is necessary for delineation of buried hazardous wastes, detecting unexploded ordinance, verifying and monitoring of containment or moisture contents, and other environmental applications. Electromagnetic (EM) techniques can be used for this purpose since electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity are representative of the subsurface media. Measurements in the EM frequency band between 1 and 100 MHz are very important for such applications, because the induction number of many targets is small and the ability to determine the subsurface distribution of both electrical properties is required. Earlier workers were successful in developing systems for detecting anomalous areas, but quantitative interpretation of the data was difficult. Accurate measurements are necessary, but difficult to achieve for high-resolution imaging of the subsurface. We are developing a broadband non-invasive method for accurately mapping the electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity of the shallow subsurface using an EM impedance approach similar to the MT exploration technique. Electric and magnetic sensors were tested to ensure that stray EM scattering is minimized and the quality of the data collected with the high-frequency impedance (HFI) system is good enough to allow high-resolution, multi-dimensional imaging of hidden targets. Additional efforts are being made to modify and further develop existing sensors and transmitters to improve the imaging capability and data acquisition efficiency.

  11. Modeling of large aperture third harmonic frequency conversion of high power Nd:glass laser systems

    SciTech Connect

    Henesian, M.A.; Wegner, P.J.; Speck, D.R.; Bibeau, C.; Ehrlich, R.B.; Laumann, C.W.; Lawson, J.K.; Weiland, T.L.

    1991-03-13

    To provide high-energy, high-power beams at short wavelengths for inertial-confinement-fusion experiments, we routinely convert the 1.053-{mu}m output of the Nova, Nd:phosphate-glass, laser system to its third-harmonic wavelength. We describe performance and conversion efficiency modeling of the 3 {times} 3 arrays potassium-dihydrogen-phosphate crystal plates used for type II/type II phase-matched harmonic conversion of Nova 0.74-m diameter beams, and an alternate type I/type II phase-matching configuration that improves the third-harmonic conversion efficiency. These arrays provide energy conversion of up to 65% and intensity conversion to 70%. 19 refs., 11 figs.

  12. Second harmonic generation imaging of collagen fibrils in cornea and sclera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Meng; Giese, Günter; Bille, Josef F.

    2005-07-01

    Collagen, as the most abundant protein in the human body, determines the unique physiological and optical properties of the connective tissues including cornea and sclera. The ultrastructure of collagen, which conventionally can only be resolved by electron microscopy, now can be probed by optical second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging. SHG imaging revealed that corneal collagen fibrils are regularly packed as a polycrystalline lattice, accounting for the transparency of cornea. In contrast, scleral fibrils possess inhomogeneous, tubelike structures with thin hard shells, maintaining the high stiffness and elasticity of the sclera.

  13. Chiral imaging of collagen by second-harmonic generation circular dichroism

    PubMed Central

    Lee, H.; Huttunen, M. J.; Hsu, K.-J.; Partanen, M.; Zhuo, G.-Y.; Kauranen, M.; Chu, S.-W.

    2013-01-01

    We provide evidence that the chirality of collagen can give rise to strong second-harmonic generation circular dichroism (SHG-CD) responses in nonlinear microscopy. Although chirality is an intrinsic structural property of collagen, most of the previous studies ignore that property. We demonstrate chiral imaging of individual collagen fibers by using a laser scanning microscope and type-I collagen from pig ligaments. 100% contrast level of SHG-CD is achieved with sub-micrometer spatial resolution. As a new contrast mechanism for imaging chiral structures in bio-tissues, this technique provides information about collagen morphology and three-dimensional orientation of collagen molecules. PMID:23761852

  14. Tripling the maximum imaging depth with third-harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildirim, Murat; Durr, Nicholas; Ben-Yakar, Adela

    2015-09-01

    The growing interest in performing high-resolution, deep-tissue imaging has galvanized the use of longer excitation wavelengths and three-photon-based techniques in nonlinear imaging modalities. This study presents a threefold improvement in maximum imaging depth of ex vivo porcine vocal folds using third-harmonic generation (THG) microscopy at 1552-nm excitation wavelength compared to two-photon microscopy (TPM) at 776-nm excitation wavelength. The experimental, analytical, and Monte Carlo simulation results reveal that THG improves the maximum imaging depth observed in TPM significantly from 140 to 420 μm in a highly scattered medium, reaching the expected theoretical imaging depth of seven extinction lengths. This value almost doubles the previously reported normalized imaging depths of 3.5 to 4.5 extinction lengths using three-photon-based imaging modalities. Since tissue absorption is substantial at the excitation wavelength of 1552 nm, this study assesses the tissue thermal damage during imaging by obtaining the depth-resolved temperature distribution through a numerical simulation incorporating an experimentally obtained thermal relaxation time (τ). By shuttering the laser for a period of 2τ, the numerical algorithm estimates a maximum temperature increase of ˜2°C at the maximum imaging depth of 420 μm. The paper demonstrates that THG imaging using 1552 nm as an illumination wavelength with effective thermal management proves to be a powerful deep imaging modality for highly scattering and absorbing tissues, such as scarred vocal folds.

  15. Texture analysis applied to second harmonic generation image data for ovarian cancer classification.

    PubMed

    Wen, Bruce L; Brewer, Molly A; Nadiarnykh, Oleg; Hocker, James; Singh, Vikas; Mackie, Thomas R; Campagnola, Paul J

    2014-09-01

    Remodeling of the extracellular matrix has been implicated in ovarian cancer. To quantitate the remodeling, we implement a form of texture analysis to delineate the collagen fibrillar morphology observed in second harmonic generation microscopy images of human normal and high grade malignant ovarian tissues. In the learning stage, a dictionary of “textons”—frequently occurring texture features that are identified by measuring the image response to a filter bank of various shapes, sizes, and orientations—is created. By calculating a representative model based on the texton distribution for each tissue type using a training set of respective second harmonic generation images, we then perform classification between images of normal and high grade malignant ovarian tissues. By optimizing the number of textons and nearest neighbors, we achieved classification accuracy up to 97% based on the area under receiver operating characteristic curves (true positives versus false positives). The local analysis algorithm is a more general method to probe rapidly changing fibrillar morphologies than global analyses such as FFT. It is also more versatile than other texture approaches as the filter bank can be highly tailored to specific applications (e.g., different disease states) by creating customized libraries based on common image features. PMID:26296156

  16. Texture analysis applied to second harmonic generation image data for ovarian cancer classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Bruce L.; Brewer, Molly A.; Nadiarnykh, Oleg; Hocker, James; Singh, Vikas; Mackie, Thomas R.; Campagnola, Paul J.

    2014-09-01

    Remodeling of the extracellular matrix has been implicated in ovarian cancer. To quantitate the remodeling, we implement a form of texture analysis to delineate the collagen fibrillar morphology observed in second harmonic generation microscopy images of human normal and high grade malignant ovarian tissues. In the learning stage, a dictionary of "textons"-frequently occurring texture features that are identified by measuring the image response to a filter bank of various shapes, sizes, and orientations-is created. By calculating a representative model based on the texton distribution for each tissue type using a training set of respective second harmonic generation images, we then perform classification between images of normal and high grade malignant ovarian tissues. By optimizing the number of textons and nearest neighbors, we achieved classification accuracy up to 97% based on the area under receiver operating characteristic curves (true positives versus false positives). The local analysis algorithm is a more general method to probe rapidly changing fibrillar morphologies than global analyses such as FFT. It is also more versatile than other texture approaches as the filter bank can be highly tailored to specific applications (e.g., different disease states) by creating customized libraries based on common image features.

  17. Second harmonic and sum frequency generation on dye-coated surfaces using collinear and non-collinear excitation geometries. [Rhodamine 6G monolayers on glass

    SciTech Connect

    Muenchausen, R.E.; Nguyen, D.C.; Keller, R.A.; Nogar, N.S.

    1986-01-01

    Doubly resonantly enhanced sum frequency generation from rhodamine 6G monolayers adsorbed on glass substates is compared with resonantly enhanced second harmonic generation using a collinear excitation geometry. Second harmonic and sum frequency generation with a non-collinear excitation geometry is also reported where spatial filtering of the non-collinear output is shown to increase the scattered light rejection by more than 4 orders of magnitude.

  18. Imaging Jupiter Radiation Belts At Low Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, J. N.; de Pater, I.; Zarka, P.; Santos-Costa, D.; Sault, R.; Hess, S.; Cecconi, B.; Fender, R.; Pewg, Lofar

    2014-04-01

    The ultra-relativistic electrons, trapped in the inner radiation belts of Jupiter, generates a strong synchrotron radio emission (historically known as the jovian decimeter radiation (DIM)) which is beamed, polarized (~20% linear, ~1% circular) and broadband. It has been extensively observed by radio telescopes/ probes and imaged by radio interferometers over a wide frequency spectrum (from >300 MHz up to 22 GHz). This extended emission presents two main emission peaks constantly located on both sides of the planet close to the magnetic plane. High latitude emissions were also regularly observed at particular frequencies, times and in particular observational configurations. This region of the magnetosphere is "frozen" due to the strong magnetic field (~4.2 G as the equator) and therefore is forced to rotate at the planetary period (T≈9h55m). Due to the tilt (~ 10o) between the spin axis of the planet and the magnetic axis (which can be seen as dipolar in first approximation), the belts and the associated radio emission wobble around the planet center. The analysis of the flux at different frequencies highlighted spatial, temporal and spectral variabilities which origins are now partly understood. The emission varies at different time scales (short-time variations of hours to long-term variation over decades) due to the combination of visibility effect (wobbling, beaming, position of the observer in the magnetic rotating reference frame) [1], [2] and intrinsic local variations (interaction between relativistic electrons and satellites/dust, delayed effect of the solar wind ram pressure, impacts events) [3], [4], [5]. A complete framework is necessary to fully understand the source, loss and transport processes of the electrons originating from outside the belt, migrating by inward diffusion and populating the inner region of the magnetosphere. Only a few and unresolved measurements were made below 300 MHz and the nonsystematic observation of this radio emission

  19. Enabling Multiphoton and Second Harmonic Generation Imaging in Paraffin-Embedded and Histologically Stained Sections

    PubMed Central

    Monaghan, Michael G.; Kroll, Sebastian; Brucker, Sara Y.

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear microscopy, namely multiphoton imaging and second harmonic generation (SHG), is an established noninvasive technique useful for the imaging of extracellular matrix (ECM). Typically, measurements are performed in vivo on freshly excised tissues or biopsies. In this article, we describe the effect of rehydrating paraffin-embedded sections on multiphoton and SHG emission signals and the acquisition of nonlinear images from hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-stained sections before and after a destaining protocol. Our results reveal that bringing tissue sections to a physiological state yields a significant improvement in nonlinear signals, particularly in SHG. Additionally, the destaining of sections previously processed with H&E staining significantly improves their SHG emission signals during imaging, thereby allowing sufficient analysis of collagen in these sections. These results are important for researchers and pathologists to obtain additional information from paraffin-embedded tissues and archived samples to perform retrospective analysis of the ECM or gain additional information from rare samples. PMID:27018844

  20. Imaging of targeted lipid microbubbles to detect cancer cells using third harmonic generation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Harpel, Kaitlin; Baker, Robert Dawson; Amirsolaimani, Babak; Mehravar, Soroush; Vagner, Josef; Matsunaga, Terry O.; Banerjee, Bhaskar; Kieu, Khanh

    2016-01-01

    The use of receptor-targeted lipid microbubbles imaged by ultrasound is an innovative method of detecting and localizing disease. However, since ultrasound requires a medium between the transducer and the object being imaged, it is impractical to apply to an exposed surface in a surgical setting where sterile fields need be maintained and ultrasound gel may cause the bubbles to collapse. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is an emerging tool for accurate, label-free imaging of tissues and cells with high resolution and contrast. We have recently determined a novel application of MPM to be used for detecting targeted microbubble adherence to the upregulated plectin-receptor on pancreatic tumor cells. Specifically, the third-harmonic generation response can be used to detect bound microbubbles to various cell types presenting MPM as an alternative and useful imaging method. This is an interesting technique that can potentially be translated as a diagnostic tool for the early detection of cancer and inflammatory disorders. PMID:27446711

  1. Imaging of targeted lipid microbubbles to detect cancer cells using third harmonic generation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Harpel, Kaitlin; Baker, Robert Dawson; Amirsolaimani, Babak; Mehravar, Soroush; Vagner, Josef; Matsunaga, Terry O; Banerjee, Bhaskar; Kieu, Khanh

    2016-07-01

    The use of receptor-targeted lipid microbubbles imaged by ultrasound is an innovative method of detecting and localizing disease. However, since ultrasound requires a medium between the transducer and the object being imaged, it is impractical to apply to an exposed surface in a surgical setting where sterile fields need be maintained and ultrasound gel may cause the bubbles to collapse. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is an emerging tool for accurate, label-free imaging of tissues and cells with high resolution and contrast. We have recently determined a novel application of MPM to be used for detecting targeted microbubble adherence to the upregulated plectin-receptor on pancreatic tumor cells. Specifically, the third-harmonic generation response can be used to detect bound microbubbles to various cell types presenting MPM as an alternative and useful imaging method. This is an interesting technique that can potentially be translated as a diagnostic tool for the early detection of cancer and inflammatory disorders. PMID:27446711

  2. Frequency stabilization of an optically pumped far-infrared laser to the harmonic of a microwave synthesizer.

    PubMed

    Danylov, A A; Light, A R; Waldman, J; Erickson, N

    2015-12-10

    Measurements of the frequency stability of a far-infrared molecular laser have been made by mixing the harmonic of an ultrastable microwave source with a portion of the laser output signal in a terahertz (THz) Schottky diode balanced mixer. A 3 GHz difference-frequency signal was used in a frequency discriminator circuit to lock the laser to the microwave source. Comparisons of the short- and long-term laser frequency stability under free-running and locked conditions show a significant improvement with locking. Short-term frequency jitter was reduced by an order of magnitude, from approximately 40 to 4 kHz, and long-term drift was reduced by more than three orders of magnitude, from approximately 250 kHz to 80 Hz. The results, enabled by the efficient Schottky diode balanced mixer downconverter, demonstrate that ultrastable microwave-based frequency stabilization of THz optically pumped lasers (OPLs) will now be possible at frequencies extending well above 4.0 THz.

  3. Echelle spectrograph calibration with a frequency comb based on a harmonically mode-locked fiber laser: a proposal

    SciTech Connect

    McFerran, J. J.

    2009-05-10

    Details for constructing an astronomical frequency comb suitable as a wavelength reference for echelle spectrographs associated with optical telescopes are outlined. The source laser for the frequency comb is a harmonically mode-locked fiber laser with a central wavelength of 1.56 {mu}m. The means of producing a repetition rate greater than 7 GHz and a peak optical power of {approx}8 kW are discussed. Conversion of the oscillator light into the visible can occur through a two-step process of (i) nonlinear conversion in periodically poled lithium niobate and (ii) spectral broadening in photonic crystal fiber. While not necessarily octave spanning in spectral range to permit the use of an f -to- 2f interferometer for offset frequency control, the frequency comb can be granted accuracy by linking the mode spacing and a comb tooth to separate frequency references. The design avoids the use of a Fabry-Perot cavity to increase the mode spacing of the frequency comb; however, the level of supermode suppression and sideband asymmetry in the fiber oscillator and in the subsequent frequency conversion stages are aspects that need to be experimentally tested.

  4. Frequency stabilization of an optically pumped far-infrared laser to the harmonic of a microwave synthesizer.

    PubMed

    Danylov, A A; Light, A R; Waldman, J; Erickson, N

    2015-12-10

    Measurements of the frequency stability of a far-infrared molecular laser have been made by mixing the harmonic of an ultrastable microwave source with a portion of the laser output signal in a terahertz (THz) Schottky diode balanced mixer. A 3 GHz difference-frequency signal was used in a frequency discriminator circuit to lock the laser to the microwave source. Comparisons of the short- and long-term laser frequency stability under free-running and locked conditions show a significant improvement with locking. Short-term frequency jitter was reduced by an order of magnitude, from approximately 40 to 4 kHz, and long-term drift was reduced by more than three orders of magnitude, from approximately 250 kHz to 80 Hz. The results, enabled by the efficient Schottky diode balanced mixer downconverter, demonstrate that ultrastable microwave-based frequency stabilization of THz optically pumped lasers (OPLs) will now be possible at frequencies extending well above 4.0 THz. PMID:26836876

  5. Collinear type II second-harmonic-generation frequency-resolved optical gating for use with high-numerical-aperture objectives.

    PubMed

    Fittinghoff, D N; Squier, J A; Barty, C P; Sweetser, J N; Trebino, R; Müller, M

    1998-07-01

    Ultrashort-pulse lasers are now commonly used for multiphoton microscopy, and optimizing the performance of such systems requires careful characterization of the pulses at the tight focus of the microscope objective. We solve this problem by use of a collinear geometry in frequency-resolved optical gating that uses type II second-harmonic generation and that allows the full N.A. of the microscope objective to be used. We then demonstrate the technique by measuring the intensity and the phase of a 22-fs pulse focused by a 20x, 0.4-N.A. air objective.

  6. Texture analysis applied to second harmonic generation image data for disease classification and development of a multi-view second harmonic generation imaging platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Lianggong

    Many diseases, e.g. ovarian cancer, breast cancer and pulmonary fibrosis, are commonly associated with drastic alterations in surrounding connective tissue, and changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM) are associated with the vast majority of cellular processes in disease progression and carcinogenesis: cell differentiation, proliferation, biosynthetic ability, polarity, and motility. We use second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy for imaging the ECM because it is a non-invasive, non-linear laser scanning technique with high sensitivity and specificity for visualizing fibrillar collagen. In this thesis, we are interested in developing imaging techniques to understand how the ECM, especially the collagen architecture, is remodeled in diseases. To quantitate remodeling, we implement a 3D texture analysis to delineate the collagen fibrillar morphology observed in SHG microscopy images of human normal and high grade malignant ovarian tissues. In the learning stage, a dictionary of "textons"---frequently occurring texture features that are identified by measuring the image response to a filter bank of various shapes, sizes, and orientations---is created. By calculating a representative model based on the texton distribution for each tissue type using a training set of respective mages, we then perform classification between normal and high grade malignant ovarian tissues classification based on the area under receiver operating characteristic curves (true positives versus false positives). The local analysis algorithm is a more general method to probe rapidly changing fibrillar morphologies than global analyses such as FFT. It is also more versatile than other texture approaches as the filter bank can be highly tailored to specific applications (e.g., different disease states) by creating customized libraries based on common image features. Further, we describe the development of a multi-view 3D SHG imaging platform. Unlike fluorescence microscopy, SHG excites

  7. Second harmonic generation imaging of the collagen in myocardium for atrial fibrillation diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Ming-Rung; Chiou, Yu-We; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2009-02-01

    Myocardial fibrosis, a common sequela of cardiac hypertrophy, has been shown to be associated with arrhythmias in experimental models. Some research has indicated that myocardial fibrosis plays an important role in predisposing patients to atrial fibrillation. Second harmonic generation (SHG) is an optically nonlinear coherent process to image the collagen network. In this presentation, we observe the SHG images of the collagen matrix in atrial myocardium and we analyzed of collagen fibers arrangement by using Fourier-transform analysis. Moreover, comparing the SHG images of the collagen fibers in atrial myocardium between normal sinus rhythm (NSR) and atrial fibrillation (AF), our result indicated that it is possible to realize the relation between myocardial fibrosis and AF.

  8. Multimodal two-photon imaging using a second harmonic generation-specific dye

    PubMed Central

    Nuriya, Mutsuo; Fukushima, Shun; Momotake, Atsuya; Shinotsuka, Takanori; Yasui, Masato; Arai, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging can be used to visualize unique biological phenomena, but currently available dyes limit its application owing to the strong fluorescent signals that they generate together with SHG. Here we report the first non-fluorescent and membrane potential-sensitive SHG-active organic dye Ap3. Ap3 is photostable and generates SH signals at the plasma membrane with virtually no fluorescent signals, in sharp contrast to the previously used fluorescent dye FM4-64. When tested in neurons, Ap3-SHG shows linear membrane potential sensitivity and fast responses to action potentials, and also shows significantly reduced photodamage compared with FM4-64. The SHG-specific nature of Ap3 allows simultaneous and completely independent imaging of SHG signals and fluorescent signals from various reporter molecules, including markers of cellular organelles and intracellular calcium. Therefore, this SHG-specific dye enables true multimodal two-photon imaging in biological samples. PMID:27156702

  9. Image enhancement by non-linear extrapolation in frequency space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Charles H. (Inventor); Greenspan, Hayit K. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An input image is enhanced to include spatial frequency components having frequencies higher than those in an input image. To this end, an edge map is generated from the input image using a high band pass filtering technique. An enhancing map is subsequently generated from the edge map, with the enhanced map having spatial frequencies exceeding an initial maximum spatial frequency of the input image. The enhanced map is generated by applying a non-linear operator to the edge map in a manner which preserves the phase transitions of the edges of the input image. The enhanced map is added to the input image to achieve a resulting image having spatial frequencies greater than those in the input image. Simplicity of computations and ease of implementation allow for image sharpening after enlargement and for real-time applications such as videophones, advanced definition television, zooming, and restoration of old motion pictures.

  10. Multi-oriented windowed harmonic phase reconstruction for robust cardiac strain imaging.

    PubMed

    Cordero-Grande, Lucilio; Royuela-del-Val, Javier; Sanz-Estébanez, Santiago; Martín-Fernández, Marcos; Alberola-López, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a method for direct estimation of the cardiac strain tensor by extending the harmonic phase reconstruction on tagged magnetic resonance images to obtain more precise and robust measurements. The extension relies on the reconstruction of the local phase of the image by means of the windowed Fourier transform and the acquisition of an overdetermined set of stripe orientations in order to avoid the phase interferences from structures outside the myocardium and the instabilities arising from the application of a gradient operator. Results have shown that increasing the number of acquired orientations provides a significant improvement in the reproducibility of the strain measurements and that the acquisition of an extended set of orientations also improves the reproducibility when compared with acquiring repeated samples from a smaller set of orientations. Additionally, biases in local phase estimation when using the original harmonic phase formulation are greatly diminished by the one here proposed. The ideas here presented allow the design of new methods for motion sensitive magnetic resonance imaging, which could simultaneously improve the resolution, robustness and accuracy of motion estimates.

  11. Multi-oriented windowed harmonic phase reconstruction for robust cardiac strain imaging.

    PubMed

    Cordero-Grande, Lucilio; Royuela-del-Val, Javier; Sanz-Estébanez, Santiago; Martín-Fernández, Marcos; Alberola-López, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a method for direct estimation of the cardiac strain tensor by extending the harmonic phase reconstruction on tagged magnetic resonance images to obtain more precise and robust measurements. The extension relies on the reconstruction of the local phase of the image by means of the windowed Fourier transform and the acquisition of an overdetermined set of stripe orientations in order to avoid the phase interferences from structures outside the myocardium and the instabilities arising from the application of a gradient operator. Results have shown that increasing the number of acquired orientations provides a significant improvement in the reproducibility of the strain measurements and that the acquisition of an extended set of orientations also improves the reproducibility when compared with acquiring repeated samples from a smaller set of orientations. Additionally, biases in local phase estimation when using the original harmonic phase formulation are greatly diminished by the one here proposed. The ideas here presented allow the design of new methods for motion sensitive magnetic resonance imaging, which could simultaneously improve the resolution, robustness and accuracy of motion estimates. PMID:26745763

  12. Cellular internalization of LiNbO3 nanocrystals for second harmonic imaging and the effects on stem cell differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianhua; Qiu, Jichuan; Guo, Weibo; Wang, Shu; Ma, Baojin; Mou, Xiaoning; Tanes, Michael; Jiang, Huaidong; Liu, Hong

    2016-03-01

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) nanocrystals have recently been reported to label cancer cells and other functional cell lines due to their unique double-frequency property. In this paper, we report for the first time the use of lithium niobate (LiNbO3, LN) nanocrystals as SHG labels for imaging stem cells. Rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) were labeled with LN nanocrystals in order to study the cellular internalization of the nanocrystals and the influence on stem cell differentiation. The results showed that LN nanocrystals were endocytosed by the rMSCs and the distribution of the internalized nanoparticles demonstrated a high consistency with the orientation of the actin filaments. Besides, LN-labeled rMSCs showed a concentration-dependent viability. Most importantly, rMSCs labeled with 50 μg per mL of LN nanocrystals retained their ability to differentiate into both osteogenic and adipogenic lineages. The results prove that LN nanocrystals can be used as a cytocompatible, near-infrared (NIR) light driven cell label for long-term imaging, without hindering stem cell differentiation. This work will promote the use of LN nanocrystals to broader applications like deep-tissue tracking, remote drug delivery and stem cell therapy.Second harmonic generation (SHG) nanocrystals have recently been reported to label cancer cells and other functional cell lines due to their unique double-frequency property. In this paper, we report for the first time the use of lithium niobate (LiNbO3, LN) nanocrystals as SHG labels for imaging stem cells. Rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) were labeled with LN nanocrystals in order to study the cellular internalization of the nanocrystals and the influence on stem cell differentiation. The results showed that LN nanocrystals were endocytosed by the rMSCs and the distribution of the internalized nanoparticles demonstrated a high consistency with the orientation of the actin filaments. Besides, LN-labeled rMSCs showed a concentration

  13. Evaluation of the developmental toxicity of 60 Hz magnetic fields and harmonic frequencies in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Ryan, B M; Polen, M; Gauger, J R; Mallett, E; Kearns, M B; Bryan, T L; McCormick, D L

    2000-05-01

    Experimental data suggest that exposure to the 50 and 60 Hz sinusoidal components of power-frequency magnetic fields (MFs) does not have an adverse impact on fetal development. However, the possible developmental toxicity of MF harmonics has not been investigated. This study was designed to determine whether exposure to 180 Hz MFs (third harmonic), alone or in combination with 60 Hz MFs, induces birth defects in Sprague-Dawley rats. Groups of sperm-positive dams (> or =20/group) were exposed for 18.5 h per day from gestation days 6 through 19 to (1) ambient MFs only (<0.0001 mT; sham controls); (2) 60 Hz MFs at 0.2 mT; (3) 180 Hz MFs at 0.2 mT; or (4) 60 Hz + 180 Hz MFs (10% third harmonic; total field strength = 0.2 mT). Litter size, litter weight, percentage live births, sex ratio, and number of resorption sites were determined for each dam, and gross external, visceral, cephalic and skeletal examinations were performed on all fetuses. MF exposure had no significant effects on litter size, litter weight, or fetal development. With the exception of common rib variants, the incidence of fetal anomalies was comparable in all groups. A small increase in the incidence of rib variants was seen in the group exposed to 60 Hz + 180 Hz MFs; however, the incidence of rib variants in this group was similar to that in historical controls from our laboratory. These data extend the existing database on developmental toxicity of MFs by demonstrating that exposure to 180 Hz MFs, either alone or superimposed on an underlying 60 Hz signal, does not induce biologically significant developmental toxicity. These data do not support the hypothesis that exposure to power-frequency MFs is an important risk factor for fetal development. PMID:10790286

  14. Label-free live brain imaging and targeted patching with third-harmonic generation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Witte, Stefan; Negrean, Adrian; Lodder, Johannes C.; de Kock, Christiaan P. J.; Testa Silva, Guilherme; Mansvelder, Huibert D.; Louise Groot, Marie

    2011-01-01

    The ability to visualize neurons inside living brain tissue is a fundamental requirement in neuroscience and neurosurgery. Especially the development of a noninvasive probe of brain morphology with micrometer-scale resolution is highly desirable, as it would provide a noninvasive approach to optical biopsies in diagnostic medicine. Two-photon laser-scanning microscopy (2PLSM) is a powerful tool in this regard, and has become the standard for minimally invasive high-resolution imaging of living biological samples. However, while 2PLSM-based optical methods provide sufficient resolution, they have been hampered by the requirement for fluorescent dyes to provide image contrast. Here we demonstrate high-contrast imaging of live brain tissue at cellular resolution, without the need for fluorescent probes, using optical third-harmonic generation (THG). We exploit the specific geometry and lipid content of brain tissue at the cellular level to achieve partial phase matching of THG, providing an alternative contrast mechanism to fluorescence. We find that THG brain imaging allows rapid, noninvasive label-free imaging of neurons, white-matter structures, and blood vessels simultaneously. Furthermore, we exploit THG-based imaging to guide micropipettes towards designated neurons inside live tissue. This work is a major step towards label-free microscopic live brain imaging, and opens up possibilities for the development of laser-guided microsurgery techniques in the living brain. PMID:21444784

  15. Contrast enhancement in second harmonic imaging: discriminating between muscle and collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psilodimitrakopoulos, Sotiris; Artigas, David; Soria, Guadalupe; Amat-Roldan, Ivan; Torre, Iratxe; Gratacos, Eduard; Planas, Anna M.; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo

    2009-07-01

    In this study, polarization second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging is used and data analysis is developed to gain contrast and to discriminate with pixel resolution, in the same image, SHG source architectures. We use mammalian tissue in which both skeletal muscle and fibrilar collagen can be found. The images are fitted point by point using an algorithm based on a biophysical model, where the coefficient of determination is utilized as a filtering mechanism. For the whole image we retrieve for every pixel, the effective orientation, θe , of the SHG active structures. As a result a new image is formed which its contrast depends on the values of θe . Collagen presented in the forward direction for a predefined region of interest (ROI), peak distribution of angles θe centered in the region of ~45°, while muscle in the region of ~65°. Consequently, collagen and muscle are represented in different colors in the same image. Thus, here we show that it is possible to gain contrast and to discriminate between collagen and muscle without the use of any exogenous labeling or any co-localization with fluorescence imaging.

  16. The Harmonic Content of High-Frequency QPOs from the Relativistic Orbiting-Spot vs. Oscillating-Torus Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karas, Vladimir; Bakala, Pavel; Torok, Gabriel; Wildner, Martin; Goluchova, Katerina

    2014-08-01

    Different theoretical schemes have been proposed to explain the origin of high-frequency (kilohertz) quasi-periodic oscillations (HFQPOs) from accreting neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries and stellar-mass accreting black-holes. In the case of twin-peak sources, Fourier power-spectral density exhibits two dominant oscillation modes, often in the approximate ratio of small integers (3:2). Despite the rich phenomenology, base frequencies alone do not allow us to distinguish in a unique way among the most popular models. We discuss the harmonic content predicted by two competing scenarios, namely, the orbiting spot model and the oscillating torus model. By employing a ray-tracing code, we study the relativistic regime where the emerging radiation signal is influenced by effects of strong gravity (energy shifts and light bending). We consider spots moving on slightly non-circular trajectories in an accretion disk, and tori oscillating with fundamental modes. The harmonic content of the observed signal can allow us to reveal the ellipticity of the orbits and discriminate between the scheme of orbiting spots and the case of an oscillating torus. On a practical side, we estimate the required signal-to-noise ratio of the model light curve and we discuss what improvement would be needed in comparison with RXTE, depending on the source brightness.

  17. Low-Power Analog Processing for Sensing Applications: Low-Frequency Harmonic Signal Classification

    PubMed Central

    White, Daniel J.; William, Peter E.; Hoffman, Michael W.; Balkir, Sina

    2013-01-01

    A low-power analog sensor front-end is described that reduces the energy required to extract environmental sensing spectral features without using Fast Fouriér Transform (FFT) or wavelet transforms. An Analog Harmonic Transform (AHT) allows selection of only the features needed by the back-end, in contrast to the FFT, where all coefficients must be calculated simultaneously. We also show that the FFT coefficients can be easily calculated from the AHT results by a simple back-substitution. The scheme is tailored for low-power, parallel analog implementation in an integrated circuit (IC). Two different applications are tested with an ideal front-end model and compared to existing studies with the same data sets. Results from the military vehicle classification and identification of machine-bearing fault applications shows that the front-end suits a wide range of harmonic signal sources. Analog-related errors are modeled to evaluate the feasibility of and to set design parameters for an IC implementation to maintain good system-level performance. Design of a preliminary transistor-level integrator circuit in a 0.13 μm complementary metal-oxide-silicon (CMOS) integrated circuit process showed the ability to use online self-calibration to reduce fabrication errors to a sufficiently low level. Estimated power dissipation is about three orders of magnitude less than similar vehicle classification systems that use commercially available FFT spectral extraction. PMID:23892765

  18. Quantitative second-harmonic generation imaging to detect osteogenesis imperfecta in human skin samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adur, J.; Ferreira, A. E.; D'Souza-Li, L.; Pelegati, V. B.; de Thomaz, A. A.; Almeida, D. B.; Baratti, M. O.; Carvalho, H. F.; Cesar, C. L.

    2012-03-01

    Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disorder that leads to bone fractures due to mutations in the Col1A1 or Col1A2 genes that affect the primary structure of the collagen I chain with the ultimate outcome in collagen I fibrils that are either reduced in quantity or abnormally organized in the whole body. A quick test screening of the patients would largely reduce the sample number to be studied by the time consuming molecular genetics techniques. For this reason an assessment of the human skin collagen structure by Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) can be used as a screening technique to speed up the correlation of genetics/phenotype/OI types understanding. In the present work we have used quantitative second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging microscopy to investigate the collagen matrix organization of the OI human skin samples comparing with normal control patients. By comparing fibril collagen distribution and spatial organization, we calculated the anisotropy and texture patterns of this structural protein. The analysis of the anisotropy was performed by means of the two-dimensional Discrete Fourier Transform and image pattern analysis with Gray-Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM). From these results, we show that statistically different results are obtained for the normal and disease states of OI.

  19. Quantitative analysis of diseased horse tendons using Fourier-transform-second-harmonic generation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaguru, Mayandi; Durgam, Sushmitha; Ambekar, Raghu; Luedtke, David; Fried, Glenn; Stewart, Allison; Toussaint, Kimani C., Jr.

    2011-03-01

    Fourier transform-second-harmonic generation (FT-SHG) imaging is used to quantitatively assess the structural organization of collagen fibers in tendonitis-induced horse tendons. Fiber orientation, isotropy, and the ratio of forward to backward SHG signal (F/B ratio) are used to differentiate the fiber organization between the normal and diseased horse tendons. Each second-harmonic generation (SHG) image is divided into several smaller regions of interest (ROI) and the aforementioned quantitative metrics are calculated across the whole grid. ROIs are further labeled as dark (no or minimal presence of fibers), isotropic (random fiber organization), or anisotropic (regular fiber organization) regions. Results show that the normal tendon possesses minimal isotropic regions and small standard deviations in the histograms of orientation and F/B ratio, indicating an intact and highly regular fiber organization. However, the tendonitis-induced horse tendons possess higher number of dark and isotropic regions, and larger standard deviations of the measured parameters, suggesting significantly disoriented and disorganized collagen fibers. This type of quantification would be highly beneficial in diagnosing and determining the stage of tendonitis in clinical settings. Not limited to tendonitis, the technique could also be applied to other diseases that structurally affect collagen fibers. The advantage of FT-SHG over the conventional polarization microscopy is also discussed.

  20. Positional stability and radial dynamics of sonoluminescent bubbles under bi-harmonic driving: Effect of the high-frequency component and its relative phase.

    PubMed

    Rosselló, J M; Dellavale, D; Bonetto, F J

    2016-07-01

    The use of bi-frequency driving in sonoluminescence has proved to be an effective way to avoid the spatial instability (pseudo-orbits) developed by bubbles in systems with high viscous liquids like sulfuric or phosphoric acids. In this work, we present extensive experimental and numerical evidence in order to assess the effect of the high frequency component (PAc(HF)) of a bi-harmonic acoustic pressure field on the dynamic of sonoluminescent bubbles in an aqueous solution of sulfuric acid. The present study is mainly focused on the role of the harmonic frequency (Nf0) and the relative phase between the two frequency components (φb) of the acoustic field on the spatial, positional and diffusive stability of the bubbles. The results presented in this work were analyzed by means of three different approaches. First, we discussed some qualitative considerations about the changes observed in the radial dynamics, and the stability of similar bubbles under distinct bi-harmonic drivings. Later, we have investigated, through a series of numerical simulations, how the use of high frequency harmonic components of different order N, affects the positional stability of the SL bubbles. Furthermore, the influence of φb in their radius temporal evolution is systematically explored for harmonics ranging from the second to the fifteenth harmonic (N=2-15). Finally, a multivariate analysis based on the covariance method is performed to study the dependences among the parameters characterizing the SL bubble. Both experimental and numerical results indicate that the impact of PAc(HF) on the positional instability and the radial dynamics turns to be progressively negligible as the order of the high frequency harmonic component grows (i.e. N ≫ 1), however its effectiveness on the reduction of the spatial instability remains unaltered or even improved.

  1. Computational segmentation of collagen fibers from second-harmonic generation images of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bredfeldt, Jeremy S; Liu, Yuming; Pehlke, Carolyn A; Conklin, Matthew W; Szulczewski, Joseph M; Inman, David R; Keely, Patricia J; Nowak, Robert D; Mackie, Thomas R; Eliceiri, Kevin W

    2014-01-01

    Second-harmonic generation (SHG) imaging can help reveal interactions between collagen fibers and cancer cells. Quantitative analysis of SHG images of collagen fibers is challenged by the heterogeneity of collagen structures and low signal-to-noise ratio often found while imaging collagen in tissue. The role of collagen in breast cancer progression can be assessed post acquisition via enhanced computation. To facilitate this, we have implemented and evaluated four algorithms for extracting fiber information, such as number, length, and curvature, from a variety of SHG images of collagen in breast tissue. The image-processing algorithms included a Gaussian filter, SPIRAL-TV filter, Tubeness filter, and curvelet-denoising filter. Fibers are then extracted using an automated tracking algorithm called fiber extraction (FIRE). We evaluated the algorithm performance by comparing length, angle and position of the automatically extracted fibers with those of manually extracted fibers in twenty-five SHG images of breast cancer. We found that the curvelet-denoising filter followed by FIRE, a process we call CT-FIRE, outperforms the other algorithms under investigation. CT-FIRE was then successfully applied to track collagen fiber shape changes over time in an in vivo mouse model for breast cancer.

  2. In vivo multiphoton imaging of the cornea: polarization-resolved second harmonic generation from stromal collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latour, G.; Gusachenko, I.; Kowalczuk, L.; Lamarre, I.; Schanne-Klein, M.-C.

    2012-03-01

    Multiphoton microscopy provides specific and contrasted images of unstained collagenous tissues such as tendons or corneas. Polarization-resolved second harmonic generation (SHG) measurements have been implemented in a laserscanning multiphoton microscope. Distortion of the polarimetric response due to birefringence and diattenuation during propagation of the laser excitation has been shown in rat-tail tendons. A model has been developed to account for these effects and correct polarization-resolved SHG images in thick tissues. This new modality is then used in unstained human corneas to access two quantitative parameters: the fibrils orientation within the collagen lamellae and the ratio of the main second-order nonlinear tensorial components. Orientation maps obtained from polarization resolution of the trans-detected SHG images are in good agreement with the striated features observed in the raw images. Most importantly, polarization analysis of the epi-detected SHG images also enables to map the fibrils orientation within the collagen lamellae while epi-detected SHG images of corneal stroma are spatially homogenous and do not enable direct visualization of the fibrils orientation. Depth profiles of the polarimetric SHG response are also measured and compared to models accounting for orientation changes of the collagen lamellae within the focal volume. Finally, in vivo polarization-resolved SHG is performed in rat corneas and structural organization of corneal stroma is determined using epi-detected signals.

  3. A fast and accurate frequency estimation algorithm for sinusoidal signal with harmonic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jinghua; Pan, Mengchun; Zeng, Zhidun; Hu, Jiafei; Chen, Dixiang; Tian, Wugang; Zhao, Jianqiang; Du, Qingfa

    2016-10-01

    Frequency estimation is a fundamental problem in many applications, such as traditional vibration measurement, power system supervision, and microelectromechanical system sensors control. In this paper, a fast and accurate frequency estimation algorithm is proposed to deal with low efficiency problem in traditional methods. The proposed algorithm consists of coarse and fine frequency estimation steps, and we demonstrate that it is more efficient than conventional searching methods to achieve coarse frequency estimation (location peak of FFT amplitude) by applying modified zero-crossing technique. Thus, the proposed estimation algorithm requires less hardware and software sources and can achieve even higher efficiency when the experimental data increase. Experimental results with modulated magnetic signal show that the root mean square error of frequency estimation is below 0.032 Hz with the proposed algorithm, which has lower computational complexity and better global performance than conventional frequency estimation methods.

  4. Harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU): a fully integrated technique for sonication and monitoring of thermal ablation in tissues.

    PubMed

    Maleke, C; Konofagou, E E

    2008-03-21

    FUS (focused ultrasound), or HIFU (high-intensity-focused ultrasound) therapy, a minimally or non-invasive procedure that uses ultrasound to generate thermal necrosis, has been proven successful in several clinical applications. This paper discusses a method for monitoring thermal treatment at different sonication durations (10 s, 20 s and 30 s) using the amplitude-modulated (AM) harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) technique in bovine liver samples in vitro. The feasibility of HMI for characterizing mechanical tissue properties has previously been demonstrated. Here, a confocal transducer, combining a 4.68 MHz therapy (FUS) and a 7.5 MHz diagnostic (pulse-echo) transducer, was used. The therapy transducer was driven by a low-frequency AM continuous signal at 25 Hz, producing a stable harmonic radiation force oscillating at the modulation frequency. A pulser/receiver was used to drive the pulse-echo transducer at a pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 5.4 kHz. Radio-frequency (RF) signals were acquired using a standard pulse-echo technique. The temperature near the ablation region was simultaneously monitored. Both RF signals and temperature measurements were obtained before, during and after sonication. The resulting axial tissue displacement was estimated using one-dimensional cross correlation. When temperature at the focal zone was above 48 degrees C during heating, the coagulation necrosis occurred and tissue damage was irreversible. The HMI displacement profiles in relation to the temperature and sonication durations were analyzed. At the beginning of heating, the temperature at the focus increased sharply, while the tissue stiffness decreased resulting in higher HMI displacements. This was confirmed by an increase of 0.8 microm degrees C(-1)(r=0.93, p<.005). After sustained heating, the tissue became irreversibly stiffer, followed by an associated decrease in the HMI displacement (-0.79 microm degrees C(-1), r=-0.92, p<0.001). Repeated

  5. Second-harmonic and sum-frequency generation for surface studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, J.H.; Guyot-Sionnest, P.; Shen, Y.R.

    1987-07-01

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) has now been well established as a versatile surface-sensitive probe. It has been used to study electrochemical processes at electrode surfaces, molecular adsorption and desorption at metal and semiconductor surfaces, orientational phase transition of molecular monolayers on water, surface reconstruction and epitaxial growth, and so on. More recently, it has been employed as a tool to monitor monolayer polymerization and other surface reactions, to probe polar order of molecules at interfaces, and to measure molecular nonlinearity. While most surface techniques are restricted to the solid/vacuum environment, SHG is applicable to nearly all interfaces as long as the interfaces are accessible by light. In addition, SHG has the advantages of being capable of in-situ measurements with high temporal, spatial, and spectral resolutions.

  6. phiFLIM: a new method to avoid aliasing in frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    PubMed

    Van Munster, E B; Gadella, T W J

    2004-01-01

    In conventional wide-field frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), excitation light is intensity-modulated at megahertz frequencies. Emitted fluorescence is recorded by a CCD camera through an image intensifier, which is modulated at the same frequency. From images recorded at various phase differences between excitation and intensifier gain modulation, the phase and modulation depth of the emitted light is obtained. The fluorescence lifetime is determined from the delay and the decrease in modulation depth of the emission relative to the excitation. A minimum of three images is required, but in this case measurements become susceptible to aliasing caused by the presence of higher harmonics. Taking more images to avoid this is not always possible owing to phototoxicity or movement. A method is introduced, phiFLIM, requiring only three recordings that is not susceptible to aliasing. The phase difference between the excitation and the intensifier is scanned over the entire 360 degrees range following a predefined phase profile, during which the image produced by the intensifier is integrated onto the CCD camera, yielding a single image. Three different images are produced following this procedure, each with a different phase profile. Measurements were performed with a conventional wide-field frequency-domain FLIM system based on an acousto-optic modulator for modulation of the excitation and a microchannel-plate image intensifier coupled to a CCD camera for the detection. By analysis of the harmonic content of measured signals it was found that the third harmonic was effectively the highest present. Using the conventional method with three recordings, phase errors due to aliasing of up to +/- 29 degrees and modulation depth errors of up to 30% were found. Errors in lifetimes of YFP-transfected HeLa cells were as high as 100%. With phiFLIM, using the same specimen and settings, systematic errors due to aliasing did not occur.

  7. Design of a Second Harmonic Double-Beam Continuous Wave Gyrotron with Operating Frequency of 0.79 THz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuilov, V. N.; Glyavin, M. Yu; Sedov, A. S.; Zaslavsky, V. Yu; Idehara, T.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the most essential steps of a design study of a novel second harmonic gyrotron operating in CW (continuous wave) regime at a frequency of 0.79 THz and an output power of 1-100 W. It is based on a novel idea for suppression of the parasitic modes using a double-beam electron-optical system (EOS). It includes a triode magnetron injection gun (MIG), which forms two high-quality helical electron beams (HEB). Different schemes, namely one with two generating beams and another with one generating and one absorbing beam, have been investigated and compared. It has been shown that the scheme with two generating beams is more advantageous since it allows an effective suppression of the parasitic modes and a stable single-mode operation at the second harmonic resonance. A MIG which is appropriate for the realization of the latter scheme has been optimized using numerical codes for computer-aided design (CAD). It forms beams with practically equal pitch factors and moderate velocity spread. The construction of the gun is not sensitive to small misalignments and shifts of the electrodes and the magnetic field. Among the most promising characteristics of the presented design are an improved mode selection and a stable single-mode generation at currents that are two to three times higher than the currents in the single-beam (i.e., conventional) gyrotrons.

  8. Elasticity mapping of murine abdominal organs in vivo using harmonic motion imaging (HMI).

    PubMed

    Payen, Thomas; Palermo, Carmine F; Sastra, Stephen A; Chen, Hong; Han, Yang; Olive, Kenneth P; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2016-08-01

    Recently, ultrasonic imaging of soft tissue mechanics has been increasingly studied to image otherwise undetectable pathologies. However, many underlying mechanisms of tissue stiffening remain unknown, requiring small animal studies and adapted elasticity mapping techniques. Harmonic motion imaging (HMI) assesses tissue viscoelasticity by inducing localized oscillation from a periodic acoustic radiation force. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of HMI for in vivo elasticity mapping of abdominal organs in small animals. Pathological cases, i.e. chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, were also studied in vivo to assess the capability of HMI for detection of the change in mechanical properties. A 4.5 MHz focused ultrasound transducer (FUS) generated an amplitude-modulated beam resulting in 50 Hz harmonic tissue oscillations at its focus. Axial tissue displacement was estimated using 1D-cross-correlation of RF signals acquired with a 7.8 MHz diagnostic transducer confocally aligned with the FUS. In vitro results in canine liver and kidney showed the correlation between HMI displacement and Young's moduli measured by rheometry compression testing. HMI was capable of providing reproducible elasticity maps of the mouse abdominal region in vivo allowing the identification of, from stiffest to softest, the murine kidney, pancreas, liver, and spleen. Finally, pancreata affected by pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer showed HMI displacements 1.7 and 2.2 times lower than in the control case, respectively, indicating higher stiffness. The HMI displacement amplitude was correlated with the extent of fibrosis as well as detecting the very onset of stiffening even before fibrosis could be detected on H&E. This work shows that HMI can produce reliable elasticity maps of mouse abdominal region in vivo, thus providing a potentially critical tool to assess pathologies affecting organ elasticity.

  9. Elasticity mapping of murine abdominal organs in vivo using harmonic motion imaging (HMI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payen, Thomas; Palermo, Carmine F.; Sastra, Stephen A.; Chen, Hong; Han, Yang; Olive, Kenneth P.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2016-08-01

    Recently, ultrasonic imaging of soft tissue mechanics has been increasingly studied to image otherwise undetectable pathologies. However, many underlying mechanisms of tissue stiffening remain unknown, requiring small animal studies and adapted elasticity mapping techniques. Harmonic motion imaging (HMI) assesses tissue viscoelasticity by inducing localized oscillation from a periodic acoustic radiation force. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of HMI for in vivo elasticity mapping of abdominal organs in small animals. Pathological cases, i.e. chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, were also studied in vivo to assess the capability of HMI for detection of the change in mechanical properties. A 4.5 MHz focused ultrasound transducer (FUS) generated an amplitude-modulated beam resulting in 50 Hz harmonic tissue oscillations at its focus. Axial tissue displacement was estimated using 1D-cross-correlation of RF signals acquired with a 7.8 MHz diagnostic transducer confocally aligned with the FUS. In vitro results in canine liver and kidney showed the correlation between HMI displacement and Young’s moduli measured by rheometry compression testing. HMI was capable of providing reproducible elasticity maps of the mouse abdominal region in vivo allowing the identification of, from stiffest to softest, the murine kidney, pancreas, liver, and spleen. Finally, pancreata affected by pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer showed HMI displacements 1.7 and 2.2 times lower than in the control case, respectively, indicating higher stiffness. The HMI displacement amplitude was correlated with the extent of fibrosis as well as detecting the very onset of stiffening even before fibrosis could be detected on H&E. This work shows that HMI can produce reliable elasticity maps of mouse abdominal region in vivo, thus providing a potentially critical tool to assess pathologies affecting organ elasticity.

  10. Elasticity mapping of murine abdominal organs in vivo using harmonic motion imaging (HMI).

    PubMed

    Payen, Thomas; Palermo, Carmine F; Sastra, Stephen A; Chen, Hong; Han, Yang; Olive, Kenneth P; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2016-08-01

    Recently, ultrasonic imaging of soft tissue mechanics has been increasingly studied to image otherwise undetectable pathologies. However, many underlying mechanisms of tissue stiffening remain unknown, requiring small animal studies and adapted elasticity mapping techniques. Harmonic motion imaging (HMI) assesses tissue viscoelasticity by inducing localized oscillation from a periodic acoustic radiation force. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of HMI for in vivo elasticity mapping of abdominal organs in small animals. Pathological cases, i.e. chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, were also studied in vivo to assess the capability of HMI for detection of the change in mechanical properties. A 4.5 MHz focused ultrasound transducer (FUS) generated an amplitude-modulated beam resulting in 50 Hz harmonic tissue oscillations at its focus. Axial tissue displacement was estimated using 1D-cross-correlation of RF signals acquired with a 7.8 MHz diagnostic transducer confocally aligned with the FUS. In vitro results in canine liver and kidney showed the correlation between HMI displacement and Young's moduli measured by rheometry compression testing. HMI was capable of providing reproducible elasticity maps of the mouse abdominal region in vivo allowing the identification of, from stiffest to softest, the murine kidney, pancreas, liver, and spleen. Finally, pancreata affected by pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer showed HMI displacements 1.7 and 2.2 times lower than in the control case, respectively, indicating higher stiffness. The HMI displacement amplitude was correlated with the extent of fibrosis as well as detecting the very onset of stiffening even before fibrosis could be detected on H&E. This work shows that HMI can produce reliable elasticity maps of mouse abdominal region in vivo, thus providing a potentially critical tool to assess pathologies affecting organ elasticity. PMID:27401609

  11. Efficient second-harmonic imaging of collagen in histological slides using Bessel beam excitation.

    PubMed

    Vuillemin, Nelly; Mahou, Pierre; Débarre, Delphine; Gacoin, Thierry; Tharaux, Pierre-Louis; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire; Supatto, Willy; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Second-harmonic generation (SHG) is the most specific label-free indicator of collagen accumulation in widespread pathologies such as fibrosis, and SHG-based measurements hold important potential for biomedical analyses. However, efficient collagen SHG scoring in histological slides is hampered by the limited depth-of-field of usual nonlinear microscopes relying on focused Gaussian beam excitation. In this work we analyze theoretically and experimentally the use of Bessel beam excitation to address this issue. Focused Bessel beams can provide an axially extended excitation volume for nonlinear microscopy while preserving lateral resolution. We show that shaping the focal volume has consequences on signal level and scattering directionality in the case of coherent signals (such as SHG) which significantly differ from the case of incoherent signals (two-photon excited fluorescence, 2PEF). We demonstrate extended-depth SHG-2PEF imaging of fibrotic mouse kidney histological slides. Finally, we show that Bessel beam excitation combined with spatial filtering of the harmonic light in wave vector space can be used to probe collagen accumulation more efficiently than the usual Gaussian excitation scheme. These results open the way to SHG-based histological diagnoses. PMID:27435390

  12. Efficient second-harmonic imaging of collagen in histological slides using Bessel beam excitation

    PubMed Central

    Vuillemin, Nelly; Mahou, Pierre; Débarre, Delphine; Gacoin, Thierry; Tharaux, Pierre-Louis; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire; Supatto, Willy; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Second-harmonic generation (SHG) is the most specific label-free indicator of collagen accumulation in widespread pathologies such as fibrosis, and SHG-based measurements hold important potential for biomedical analyses. However, efficient collagen SHG scoring in histological slides is hampered by the limited depth-of-field of usual nonlinear microscopes relying on focused Gaussian beam excitation. In this work we analyze theoretically and experimentally the use of Bessel beam excitation to address this issue. Focused Bessel beams can provide an axially extended excitation volume for nonlinear microscopy while preserving lateral resolution. We show that shaping the focal volume has consequences on signal level and scattering directionality in the case of coherent signals (such as SHG) which significantly differ from the case of incoherent signals (two-photon excited fluorescence, 2PEF). We demonstrate extended-depth SHG-2PEF imaging of fibrotic mouse kidney histological slides. Finally, we show that Bessel beam excitation combined with spatial filtering of the harmonic light in wave vector space can be used to probe collagen accumulation more efficiently than the usual Gaussian excitation scheme. These results open the way to SHG-based histological diagnoses. PMID:27435390

  13. Efficient second-harmonic imaging of collagen in histological slides using Bessel beam excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuillemin, Nelly; Mahou, Pierre; Débarre, Delphine; Gacoin, Thierry; Tharaux, Pierre-Louis; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire; Supatto, Willy; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel

    2016-07-01

    Second-harmonic generation (SHG) is the most specific label-free indicator of collagen accumulation in widespread pathologies such as fibrosis, and SHG-based measurements hold important potential for biomedical analyses. However, efficient collagen SHG scoring in histological slides is hampered by the limited depth-of-field of usual nonlinear microscopes relying on focused Gaussian beam excitation. In this work we analyze theoretically and experimentally the use of Bessel beam excitation to address this issue. Focused Bessel beams can provide an axially extended excitation volume for nonlinear microscopy while preserving lateral resolution. We show that shaping the focal volume has consequences on signal level and scattering directionality in the case of coherent signals (such as SHG) which significantly differ from the case of incoherent signals (two-photon excited fluorescence, 2PEF). We demonstrate extended-depth SHG-2PEF imaging of fibrotic mouse kidney histological slides. Finally, we show that Bessel beam excitation combined with spatial filtering of the harmonic light in wave vector space can be used to probe collagen accumulation more efficiently than the usual Gaussian excitation scheme. These results open the way to SHG-based histological diagnoses.

  14. Polarization sensitive optical frequency domain imaging system for endobronchial imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianan; Feroldi, Fabio; de Lange, Joop; Daniels, Johannes M A; Grünberg, Katrien; de Boer, Johannes F

    2015-02-01

    A polarization sensitive endoscopic optical frequency domain imaging (PS-OFDI) system with a motorized distal scanning catheter is demonstrated. It employs a passive polarization delay unit to multiplex two orthogonal probing polarization states in depth, and a polarization diverse detection unit to detect interference signal in two orthogonal polarization channels. Per depth location four electro-magnetic field components are measured that can be represented in a complex 2x2 field matrix. A Jones matrix of the sample is derived and the sample birefringence is extracted by eigenvalue decomposition. The condition of balanced detection and the polarization mode dispersion are quantified. A complex field averaging method based on the alignment of randomly pointing field phasors is developed to reduce speckle noise. The variation of the polarization states incident on the tissue due to the circular scanning and catheter sheath birefringence is investigated. With this system we demonstrated imaging of ex vivo chicken muscle, in vivo pig lung and ex vivo human lung specimens. PMID:25836196

  15. Synergy in Two-Frequency Fast Wave Cyclotron Harmonic Absorption in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R. I.; Choi, M.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Zhu, Y.; Porkolab, M.; Baity, F. W.; Hosea, J. C.

    2009-11-26

    Fast waves (FWs) at 60 MHz and at 90 MHz are coupled to DIII-D discharges for central heating and current drive at net FW power up to 3.5 MW. The primary absorption mechanism is intended to be direct electron damping in the plasma core. In discharges at B = 2 T with fast deuteron populations from neutral beam injection, 4th and 6th deuterium cyclotron harmonic absorption on the fast ions competes with direct electron damping. Previous experiments have shown that the 6{omega}{sub D} absorption of the 90 MHz FWs is weaker than the 4{omega}{sub D} absorption of 60 MHz FWs, in agreement with a model that includes unspecified edge losses. Recent experiments have shown that if the fast deuterons are accelerated by absorption of 60 MHz (4{omega}{sub D}) FWs, adding 90 MHz power (6{omega}{sub D}) can increase the fusion neutron rate by a larger increment than is obtained with 90 MHz power alone. Details of this synergy between 4{omega}{sub D} and 6{omega}{sub D} absorption are presented.

  16. Combined chirp coded tissue harmonic and fundamental ultrasound imaging for intravascular ultrasound: 20-60 MHz phantom and ex vivo results.

    PubMed

    Park, Jinhyoung; Li, Xiang; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K Kirk

    2013-02-01

    The application of chirp coded excitation to pulse inversion tissue harmonic imaging can increase signal to noise ratio. On the other hand, the elevation of range side lobe level, caused by leakages of the fundamental signal, has been problematic in mechanical scanners which are still the most prevalent in high frequency intravascular ultrasound imaging. Fundamental chirp coded excitation imaging can achieve range side lobe levels lower than -60dB with Hanning window, but it yields higher side lobes level than pulse inversion chirp coded tissue harmonic imaging (PI-CTHI). Therefore, in this paper a combined pulse inversion chirp coded tissue harmonic and fundamental imaging mode (CPI-CTHI) is proposed to retain the advantages of both chirp coded harmonic and fundamental imaging modes by demonstrating 20-60MHz phantom and ex vivo results. A simulation study shows that the range side lobe level of CPI-CTHI is 16dB lower than PI-CTHI, assuming that the transducer translates incident positions by 50μm when two beamlines of pulse inversion pair are acquired. CPI-CTHI is implemented for a proto-typed intravascular ultrasound scanner capable of combined data acquisition in real-time. A wire phantom study shows that CPI-CTHI has a 12dB lower range side lobe level and a 7dB higher echo signal to noise ratio than PI-CTHI, while the lateral resolution and side lobe level are 50μm finer and -3dB less than fundamental chirp coded excitation imaging respectively. Ex vivo scanning of a rabbit trachea demonstrates that CPI-CTHI is capable of visualizing blood vessels as small as 200μm in diameter with 6dB better tissue contrast than either PI-CTHI or fundamental chirp coded excitation imaging. These results clearly indicate that CPI-CTHI may enhance tissue contrast with less range side lobe level than PI-CTHI.

  17. Monitoring process of human keloid formation based on second harmonic generation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, X. S.; Chen, S.; Chen, J. X.; Zhu, X. Q.; Zheng, L. Q.; Zhuo, S. M.; Wang, D. J.

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, the morphological variation of collagen among the whole dermis from keloid tissue was investigated using second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy. In the deep dermis of keloids, collagen bundles show apparently regular gap. In the middle dermis, the collagen bundles are randomly oriented and loosely arranged in the pattern of fine mesh while the collagen bundles are organized in a parallel manner in the superficial dermis near the epidermis. The developed parameters COI and BD can be used to further quantitatively describe these changes. Our results demonstrate the potential of SHG microscopy to understand the formation process of human keloid scar at the cellular level through imaging collagen variations in different depth of dermis.

  18. Molecular Order of Arterial Collagen Using Circular Polarization Second-Harmonic Generation Imaging.

    PubMed

    Turcotte, Raphaël; Mattson, Jeffrey M; Wu, Juwell W; Zhang, Yanhang; Lin, Charles P

    2016-02-01

    Second-harmonic generation (SHG) originates from the interaction between upconverted fields from individual scatterers. This renders SHG microscopy highly sensitive to molecular distribution. Here, we aim to take advantage of the difference in SHG between aligned and partially aligned molecules to probe the degree of molecular order during biomechanical testing, independently of the absolute orientation of the scattering molecules. Toward this goal, we implemented a circular polarization SHG imaging approach and used it to quantify the intensity change associated with collagen fibers straightening in the arterial wall during mechanical stretching. We were able to observe the delayed alignment of collagen fibers during mechanical loading, thus demonstrating a simple method to characterize molecular distribution using intensity information alone. PMID:26806883

  19. Polarization response of second-harmonic images for different collagen spatial distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ávila, Francisco J.; del Barco, Oscar; Bueno, Juan M.

    2016-06-01

    The response to polarization of second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy images of samples with different collagen distributions (quasialigned, partially organized, and nonorganized) has been analyzed. A linear decay relationship between the external arrangement and polarization sensitivity was found. SHG signal from nonorganized samples presented a large structural dispersion and a weak dependence with incident polarization. Polarization dependence is also associated with the internal organization of the collagen fibers, directly related to the ratio of hyperpolarizabilities ρ. This parameter can experimentally be computed from the modulation of the SHG signal. The results show that both external and internal collagen structures are closely related. This provides a tool to obtain information of internal properties from the polarimetric response of the external spatial distribution of collagen, which might be useful in clinical diagnosis of pathologies related to changes in collagen structure.

  20. Frequency spectrum of the geomagnetic field harmonic coefficients from dynamo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouligand, C.; Gillet, N.; Jault, D.; Schaeffer, N.; Fournier, A.; Aubert, J.

    2016-11-01

    The construction of geomagnetic, archaeomagnetic or palaeomagnetic field models requires some prior knowledge about the actual field, which can be gathered from the statistical properties of the field over a variety of length-scales and timescales. However, available geomagnetic data on centennial to millennial periods are too sparse to infer directly these statistical properties. We thus use high-resolution numerical simulations of the geodynamo to test a method for estimating the temporal power spectra (or equivalently the autocovariance functions) of the individual Gauss coefficients that describe the geomagnetic field outside the Earth's fluid outer core. Based on the spectral analysis of our simulations, we argue that a prior for the observational geomagnetic field over decennial to millennial periods can be constructed from the statistics of the field during the short satellite era. The method rests on the assumption that time-series of spherical harmonic coefficients can be considered as realizations of stationary and differentiable stochastic processes, namely order 2 autoregressive (AR2) processes. In the framework of these processes, the statistics of Gauss coefficients are well constrained by their variance and one or two timescales. We find that the time spectra in the dynamo simulations of all Gauss coefficients but the axial dipole are well approximated by the spectra of AR2 processes characterized by only one timescale. The process parameters can simply be deduced from instantaneous estimates of the spatial power spectra of the magnetic field and of its first time derivative. Some deviations of the Gauss coefficients statistics from this minimal model are also discussed. Characterizing the axial dipole clearly requires a more sophisticated AR2 process, with a second distinct timescale.

  1. Real-time Focused Ultrasound Surgery (FUS) Monitoring Using Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI)

    SciTech Connect

    Maleke, Caroline; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2009-04-14

    Monitoring changes in tissue mechanical properties to optimally control thermal exposure is important in thermal therapies. The amplitude-modulated (AM) harmonic motion imaging (HMI) for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) technique is a radiation force technique, which has the capability of tracking tissue stiffness during application of an oscillatory force. The feasibility of HMIFU for assessing mechanical tissue properties has been previously demonstrated. In this paper, a confocal transducer, combining a 4.5 MHz FUS transducer and a 3.3 MHz phased array imaging transducer, was used. The FUS transducer was driven by AM wave at 15 Hz with an acoustic intensity (I{sub spta}) was equal to 1050 W/cm{sup 2}. A lowpass digital filter was used to remove the spectrum of the higher power beam prior to displacement estimation. The resulting axial tissue displacement was estimated using 1D cross-correlation with a correlation window of 2 mm and a 92.5% overlap. A thermocouple was also used to measure the temperature near the ablated region. 2D HMI-images from six-bovine-liver specimens indicated the onset of coagulation necrosis through changes in amplitude displacement after coagulation due to its simultaneous probing and heating capability. The HMI technique can thus be used to monitor temperature-related stiffness changes of tissues during thermal therapies in real-time, i.e., without interrupting or modifying the treatment protocol.

  2. Quantitative evaluation of skeletal muscle defects in second harmonic generation images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenhua; Raben, Nina; Ralston, Evelyn

    2013-02-01

    Skeletal muscle pathologies cause irregularities in the normally periodic organization of the myofibrils. Objective grading of muscle morphology is necessary to assess muscle health, compare biopsies, and evaluate treatments and the evolution of disease. To facilitate such quantitation, we have developed a fast, sensitive, automatic imaging analysis software. It detects major and minor morphological changes by combining texture features and Fourier transform (FT) techniques. We apply this tool to second harmonic generation (SHG) images of muscle fibers which visualize the repeating myosin bands. Texture features are then calculated by using a Haralick gray-level cooccurrence matrix in MATLAB. Two scores are retrieved from the texture correlation plot by using FT and curve-fitting methods. The sensitivity of the technique was tested on SHG images of human adult and infant muscle biopsies and of mouse muscle samples. The scores are strongly correlated to muscle fiber condition. We named the software MARS (muscle assessment and rating scores). It is executed automatically and is highly sensitive even to subtle defects. We propose MARS as a powerful and unbiased tool to assess muscle health.

  3. Phase and Texture Characterizations of Scar Collagen Second-Harmonic Generation Images Varied with Scar Duration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guannan; Liu, Yao; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Huang, Zufang; Cai, Jianyong; Chen, Rong; Xiong, Shuyuan; Zeng, Haishan

    2015-08-01

    This work developed a phase congruency algorithm combined with texture analysis to quantitatively characterize collagen morphology in second-harmonic generation (SHG) images from human scars. The extracted phase and texture parameters of the SHG images quantified collagen directionality, homogeneity, and coarseness in scars and varied with scar duration. Phase parameters showed an increasing tendency of the mean of phase congruency with scar duration, indicating that collagen fibers are better oriented over time. Texture parameters calculated from local difference local binary pattern (LD-LBP) and Haar wavelet transform, demonstrated that the LD-LBP variance decreased and the energy of all subimages increased with scar duration. It implied that collagen has a more regular pattern and becomes coarser with scar duration. In addition, the random forest regression was used to predict scar duration, demonstrating reliable performance of the extracted phase and texture parameters in characterizing collagen morphology in scar SHG images. Results indicate that the extracted parameters using the proposed method can be used as quantitative indicators to monitor scar progression with time and can help understand the mechanism of scar progression.

  4. Structural Characterization of Edematous Corneas by Forward and Backward Second Harmonic Generation Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Chiu-Mei; Lo, Wen; Chen, Wei-Liang; Hovhannisyan, Vladimir A.; Liu, Guang-Yu; Wang, Sheng-Shun; Tan, Hsin-Yuan; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to image and quantify the structural changes of corneal edema by second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy. Bovine cornea was used as an experimental model to characterize structural alterations in edematous corneas. Forward SHG and backward SHG signals were simultaneously collected from normal and edematous bovine corneas to reveal the morphological differences between them. In edematous cornea, both an uneven expansion in the lamellar interspacing and an increased lamellar thickness in the posterior stroma (depth > 200 μm) were identified, whereas the anterior stroma, composed of interwoven collagen architecture, remained unaffected. Our findings of heterogeneous structural alteration at the microscopic scale in edematous corneas suggest that the strength of collagen cross-linking is heterogeneous in the corneal stroma. In addition, we found that qualitative backward SHG collagen fiber imaging and depth-dependent signal decay can be used to detect and diagnose corneal edema. Our work demonstrates that SHG imaging can provide morphological information for the investigation of corneal edema biophysics, and may be applied in the evaluation of advancing corneal edema in vivo. PMID:19686668

  5. Thin and Slow Smoke Detection by Using Frequency Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Guang; Oe, Shunitiro

    In this paper, a new method to detect thin and slow smoke for early fire alarm by using frequency image has been proposed. The correlation coefficient of the frequency image between the current stage and the initial stage are calculated, so are the gray image correlation coefficient of the color image. When the thin smoke close to transparent enters into the camera view, the correlation coefficient of the frequency image becomes small, while the gray image correlation coefficient of the color image hardly change and keep large. When something which is not transparent, like human beings, etc., enters into the camera view, the correlation coefficient of the frequency image becomes small, as well as that of color image. Based on the difference of correlation coefficient between frequency image and color image in different situations, the thin smoke can be detected. Also, considering the movement of the thin smoke, miss detection caused by the illustration change or noise can be avoided. Several experiments in different situations are carried out, and the experimental results show the effect of the proposed method.

  6. Removing the depth-degeneracy in optical frequency domain imaging with frequency shifting

    PubMed Central

    Yun, S. H.; Tearney, G. J.; de Boer, J. F.; Bouma, B. E.

    2009-01-01

    A novel technique using an acousto-optic frequency shifter in optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) is presented. The frequency shift eliminates the ambiguity between positive and negative differential delays, effectively doubling the interferometric ranging depth while avoiding image cross-talk. A signal processing algorithm is demonstrated to accommodate nonlinearity in the tuning slope of the wavelength-swept OFDI laser source. PMID:19484034

  7. In vivo mouse imaging using frequency domain optoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellnberger, Stephan; Deliolanis, Nikolaos C.; Queirós, Daniel; Sergiadis, George; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2013-06-01

    Frequency domain optoacoustics relates to stimulation of optoacoustic signals using intensity modulated continuous wave light instead of pulsed laser light employed in time domain optoacoustic imaging. We present a method to generate frequency domain tomographic images of optical absorbers and cross sectional in-vivo mouse images, showing the changes of optical absorption before and after injection of indocyanine green (ICG). OCIS codes: 170.6960, 170.3880, 170.5220

  8. First and second harmonic ECRH experience at gyrotron frequencies at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Stallard, B.

    1987-11-01

    Plasma heating of electrons in both mirror machines and tokamaks, using mm wave gyrotron sources, have been carried out in many experiments in recent years. The technology for both sources and mode-preserving waveguide transmission systems is well developed at power levels of 200 kW. At LLNL electron heating at 28 GHz in the TMX-U tandem mirror has been used to create hot electrons required for a thermal barrier (potential well). TMX-U, and other devices operating at lower frequency and power (10 GHz, few kW), routinely generates electron populations with mean energies of 100 to 500 keV and densities in the low to mid 10/sup 11/ cm/sup -3/ range. Radial pressure profiles vary from peaked-on-axis to hollow and are dependent on the mod-B resonance surfaces. Experiments on the axisymmetric mirror SM-1 have shown improved heating efficiency using multiple frequencies with narrow frequency separation. The importance of rf diffusion in determining electron confinement has been shown in CONSTANCE B. Fokker-Planck and particle orbit models have been useful for understanding the importance of cavity heating for creating runaway electrons, the sensitivity of hot electron production to cold plasma, the reduction of electron lifetime by rf diffusion, and the effect of multiple frequencies on heating stochasticity. Potential wells generated in plasmas with large fractions of mirror-trapped electrons have been measured in TMX-U. These offer prospects for enhanced confinement of highly stripped ions. 11 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Elucidating low-frequency vibrational dynamics in calcite and water with time-resolved third-harmonic generation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Liu, Weimin; Fang, Chong

    2015-07-14

    Low-frequency vibrations are foundational for material properties including thermal conductivity and chemical reactivity. To resolve the intrinsic molecular conformational dynamics in condensed phase, we implement time-resolved third-harmonic generation (TRTHG) spectroscopy to unravel collective skeletal motions in calcite, water, and aqueous salt solution in situ. The lifetime of three Raman-active modes in polycrystalline calcite at 155, 282 and 703 cm(-1) is found to be ca. 1.6 ps, 1.3 ps and 250 fs, respectively. The lifetime difference is due to crystallographic defects and anharmonic effects. By incorporating a home-built wire-guided liquid jet, we apply TRTHG to investigate pure water and ZnCl2 aqueous solution, revealing ultrafast dynamics of water intermolecular stretching and librational bands below 500 cm(-1) and a characteristic 280 cm(-1) vibrational mode in the ZnCl4(H2O)2(2-) complex. TRTHG proves to be a compact and versatile technique that directly uses the 800 nm fundamental laser pulse output to capture ultrafast low-frequency vibrational motion snapshots in condensed-phase materials including the omnipresent water, which provides the important time dimension to spectral characterization of molecular structure-function relationships.

  10. The concurrent reinforcement of two interresponse times: the relative frequency of an interresponse time equals its relative harmonic length.

    PubMed

    Shimp, C P

    1969-05-01

    The relative lengths of two concurrently reinforced interresponse times were varied in an experiment in which three pigeons obtained food by pecking on a single key. Visual discriminative stimuli accompanied the two time intervals in which reinforcements were scheduled according to a one-minute variable-interval. The steady-state relative frequency of an interresponse time approximately equalled the complement of its relative length, that is, its relative harmonic length. Thus, lengths of interresponse times and delays of reinforcement have the same effect on the relative frequencies of interresponse times and choices in one-key and two-key concurrent variable-interval schedules, respectively. A second experiment generalized further the functional equivalence between the effects of these one-key and two-key concurrent schedules by revealing that the usual matching-to-relative-immediacy in two-key concurrent schedules is undisturbed if reinforcement depends upon the occurrence of a response at the end of the delay interval, as it does in the one-key schedules. The results of both experiments are consistent with a quantitative theory of concurrent operant behavior.

  11. Elucidating low-frequency vibrational dynamics in calcite and water with time-resolved third-harmonic generation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Liu, Weimin; Fang, Chong

    2015-07-14

    Low-frequency vibrations are foundational for material properties including thermal conductivity and chemical reactivity. To resolve the intrinsic molecular conformational dynamics in condensed phase, we implement time-resolved third-harmonic generation (TRTHG) spectroscopy to unravel collective skeletal motions in calcite, water, and aqueous salt solution in situ. The lifetime of three Raman-active modes in polycrystalline calcite at 155, 282 and 703 cm(-1) is found to be ca. 1.6 ps, 1.3 ps and 250 fs, respectively. The lifetime difference is due to crystallographic defects and anharmonic effects. By incorporating a home-built wire-guided liquid jet, we apply TRTHG to investigate pure water and ZnCl2 aqueous solution, revealing ultrafast dynamics of water intermolecular stretching and librational bands below 500 cm(-1) and a characteristic 280 cm(-1) vibrational mode in the ZnCl4(H2O)2(2-) complex. TRTHG proves to be a compact and versatile technique that directly uses the 800 nm fundamental laser pulse output to capture ultrafast low-frequency vibrational motion snapshots in condensed-phase materials including the omnipresent water, which provides the important time dimension to spectral characterization of molecular structure-function relationships. PMID:26062639

  12. Harmonic Nanoparticles for Regenerative Research

    PubMed Central

    Ronzoni, Flavio; Magouroux, Thibaud; Vernet, Remi; Extermann, Jérôme; Crotty, Darragh; Prina-Mello, Adriele; Ciepielewski, Daniel; Volkov, Yuri; Bonacina, Luigi; Wolf, Jean-Pierre; Jaconi, Marisa

    2014-01-01

    In this visualized experiment, protocol details are provided for in vitro labeling of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) with second harmonic generation nanoparticles (HNPs). The latter are a new family of probes recently introduced for labeling biological samples for multi-photon imaging. HNPs are capable of doubling the frequency of excitation light by the nonlinear optical process of second harmonic generation with no restriction on the excitation wavelength. Multi-photon based methodologies for hESC differentiation into cardiac clusters (maintained as long term air-liquid cultures) are presented in detail. In particular, evidence on how to maximize the intense second harmonic (SH) emission of isolated HNPs during 3D monitoring of beating cardiac tissue in 3D is shown. The analysis of the resulting images to retrieve 3D displacement patterns is also detailed. PMID:24836220

  13. Harmonic spectral modulation of an optical frequency comb to control the ultracold molecules formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinovskaya, Svetlana A.; Liu, Gengyuan

    2016-11-01

    A method for creation of ultracold molecules by stepwise adiabatic passage from the Feshbach state to the fundamentally ground state using an optical frequency comb is presented within a semiclassical multilevel model. The sine modulation of the spectral phase of the comb leads to the creation of a quasi-dark dressed state. An insignificant population of the excited state manifold in this dark state provides an efficient way of mitigating decoherence in the system. In contrast, the cosine modulation does not lead to the quasi-dark state formation. The results demonstrate the importance of the parity of the spectral chirp in quantum control.

  14. Biomechanical assessment and monitoring of thermal ablation using Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Gary Yi

    Cancer remains, one of the major public health problems in the United States as well as many other countries worldwide. According to According to the World Health Organization, cancer is currently the leading cause of death worldwide, accounting for 7.6 million deaths annually, and 25% of the annual death was due to Cancer during the year of 2011. In the long history of the cancer treatment field, many treatment options have been established up to date. Traditional procedures include surgical procedures as well as systemic therapies such as biologic therapy, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, and radiation therapy. Nevertheless, side-effects are often associated with such procedures due to the systemic delivery across the entire body. Recently technologies have been focused on localized therapy under minimally or noninvasive procedure with imaging-guidance, such as cryoablation, laser ablation, radio-frequency (RF) ablation, and High Intensity F-ocused Ultrasound (HIFU). HIFU is a non-invasive procedure aims to coagulate tissue thermally at a localized focal zone created with noninvasively emitting a set of focused ultrasound beams while the surrounding healthy tissues remain relatively untreated. Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) is a dynamic, radiation-force-based imaging technique, which utilizes a single HIFU transducer by emitting an Amplitude-modulated (AM) beam to both thermally ablate the tumor while inducing a stable oscillatory tissue displacement at its focal zone. The oscillatory response is then estimated by a cross-correlation based motion tracking technique on the signal collected by a confocally-aligned diagnostic transducer. HMIFU addresses the most critical aspect and one of the major unmet needs of HIFU treatment, which is the ability to perform real-time monitoring and mapping of tissue property change during the HIFU treatment. In this dissertation, both the assessment and monitoring aspects of HMIFU have been investigated

  15. The Calculation of Accurate Harmonic Frequencies of Large Molecules: The Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons, a Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The vibrational frequencies and infrared intensities of naphthalene neutral and cation are studied at the self-consistent-field (SCF), second-order Moller-Plesset (MP2), and density functional theory (DFT) levels using a variety of one-particle basis sets. Very accurate frequencies can be obtained at the DFT level in conjunction with large basis sets if they are scaled with two factors, one for the C-H stretches and a second for all other modes. We also find remarkably good agreement at the B3LYP/4-31G level using only one scale factor. Unlike the neutral PAHs where all methods do reasonably well for the intensities, only the DFT results are accurate for the PAH cations. The failure of the SCF and MP2 methods is caused by symmetry breaking and an inability to describe charge delocalization. We present several interesting cases of symmetry breaking in this study. An assessment is made as to whether an ensemble of PAH neutrals or cations could account for the unidentified infrared bands observed in many astronomical sources.

  16. A Novel Ku-Band/Ka-Band and Ka-Band/E-Band Multimode Waveguide Couplers for Power Measurement of Traveling-Wave Tube Amplifier Harmonic Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Simons, Rainee N.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and test results for a novel waveguide multimode directional coupler (MDC). The coupler, fabricated from two dissimilar frequency band waveguides, is capable of isolating power at the second harmonic frequency from the fundamental power at the output port of a traveling-wave tube (TWT) amplifier. Test results from proof-of-concept demonstrations are presented for a Ku-band/Ka-band MDC and a Ka-band/E-band MDC. In addition to power measurements at harmonic frequencies, a potential application of the MDC is in the design of a satellite borne beacon source for atmospheric propagation studies at millimeter-wave (mm-wave) frequencies (Ka-band and E-band).

  17. Forward- and backward-second harmonic generation imaging of corneal and scleral collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Wen; Tan, Hsin-Yuan; Lin, Ming-Guo; Hsueh, Chu-Mei; Chen, Wei-Liang; Lin, Sung-Jan; Jee, Shiou-Hwa; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2008-02-01

    Collagen is the most abundant protein in mammalian and forms various types of tissues. On ocular surface, sclera, limbus and cornea are composed with fibril form collagen. However, unlike other connective tissues with high opacity, cornea has extraordinary high transparency which originates from the regular arrangement of collagen fibers within cornea. Cornea is responsible for 80% of focusing power of our vision and any corneal damage can cause severe vision loss. The high transparency of cornea makes it difficult to probe it without invasive processes, especially stromal structure alternations. Collagen, however, is an effective second harmonic generator due to its non-centrosymmetric molecule structure and can be visualized with nonlinear optical process without labeling. In addition, the deeper penetration and point like effective volume of SHG can also provide 3-dimensional information with minimum invasion. Backward SHG imaging has been approved effectively demonstrating structure alternation in infective keratitis, thermal damage in cornea, corneal scar, post refractive surgery wound healing and keratoconus which is also a main complication after refractive surgery[1-6]. In practical, backward SHG has the potentiality to be developed as clinical examination modality. However, Han et al also demonstrated that backward SHG (BSHG) imaging provides collagen bundle information while forward SHG (FSHG) provides more detailed, submicron fibril structure visualization within corneal stroma[7]. In sclera, which also has type I collagen as its main composition, BSHG and FSHG imaging reveal similar morphology. Comparing with what Legare et al demonstrated that BSHG in bulk tissue mainly originate from backscattered FSHG[8], the huge difference between corneal BSHG and FSHG imaging originate from the high transparency of cornea. However, only BSHG could be applied in practical. Therefore, if the correlation of BSHG and FSHG, which reveals more architecture details, can

  18. Label-free imaging of Schwann cell myelination by third harmonic generation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hyungsik; Sharoukhov, Denis; Kassim, Imran; Zhang, Yanqing; Salzer, James L.; Melendez-Vasquez, Carmen V.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the dynamic axon–glial cell interaction underlying myelination is hampered by the lack of suitable imaging techniques. Here we demonstrate third harmonic generation microscopy (THGM) for label-free imaging of myelinating Schwann cells in live culture and ex vivo and in vivo tissue. A 3D structure was acquired for a variety of compact and noncompact myelin domains, including juxtaparanodes, Schmidt–Lanterman incisures, and Cajal bands. Other subcellular features of Schwann cells that escape traditional optical microscopies were also visualized. We tested THGM for morphometry of compact myelin. Unlike current methods based on electron microscopy, g-ratio could be determined along an extended length of myelinated fiber in the physiological condition. The precision of THGM-based g-ratio estimation was corroborated in mouse models of hypomyelination. Finally, we demonstrated the feasibility of THGM to monitor morphological changes of myelin during postnatal development and degeneration. The outstanding capabilities of THGM may be useful for elucidation of the mechanism of myelin formation and pathogenesis. PMID:25453108

  19. In vivo wound healing diagnosis with second harmonic and fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deka, Gitanjal; Wu, Wei-Wen; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2013-06-01

    Skin wounds heal when a series of cell lineages are triggered, followed by collagen deposition, to reconstruct damaged tissues. This study evaluates the regeneration of collagen and change in cellular metabolic rate in vivo during wound healing in rats, with second harmonic generation (SHG) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy respectively. The metabolic rate of cells is reflected through the lifetime of the autofluorescence from the co-enzyme protein, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, due to its change in the relative concentration of bound and free forms. A higher than normal cellular metabolic rate is observed during the first week of healing, which decreases gradually after eight days of wound formation. SHG signal intensity change indicates the net degradation of collagen during the inflammatory phase, and net regeneration begins on day five. Eventually, the quantity of collagen increases gradually to form a scar tissue as the final product. Importantly, this work demonstrates the feasibility of an in vivo imaging approach for a normal wound on rat skin, which has the potential to supplement the noninvasive clinical diagnosis of wounds.

  20. 3D texture analysis for classification of second harmonic generation images of human ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Bruce; Campbell, Kirby R.; Tilbury, Karissa; Nadiarnykh, Oleg; Brewer, Molly A.; Patankar, Manish; Singh, Vikas; Eliceiri, Kevin. W.; Campagnola, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Remodeling of the collagen architecture in the extracellular matrix (ECM) has been implicated in ovarian cancer. To quantify these alterations we implemented a form of 3D texture analysis to delineate the fibrillar morphology observed in 3D Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) microscopy image data of normal (1) and high risk (2) ovarian stroma, benign ovarian tumors (3), low grade (4) and high grade (5) serous tumors, and endometrioid tumors (6). We developed a tailored set of 3D filters which extract textural features in the 3D image sets to build (or learn) statistical models of each tissue class. By applying k-nearest neighbor classification using these learned models, we achieved 83–91% accuracies for the six classes. The 3D method outperformed the analogous 2D classification on the same tissues, where we suggest this is due the increased information content. This classification based on ECM structural changes will complement conventional classification based on genetic profiles and can serve as an additional biomarker. Moreover, the texture analysis algorithm is quite general, as it does not rely on single morphological metrics such as fiber alignment, length, and width but their combined convolution with a customizable basis set. PMID:27767180

  1. Second harmonic generation imaging as a potential tool for staging pregnancy and predicting preterm birth

    PubMed Central

    Akins, Meredith L.; Luby-Phelps, Katherine; Mahendroo, Mala

    2010-01-01

    We use second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy to assess changes in collagen structure of murine cervix during cervical remodeling of normal pregnancy and in a preterm birth model. Visual inspection of SHG images revealed substantial changes in collagen morphology throughout normal gestation. SHG images collected in both the forward and backward directions were analyzed quantitatively for changes in overall mean intensity, forward to backward intensity ratio, collagen fiber size, and porosity. Changes in mean SHG intensity and intensity ratio take place in early pregnancy, suggesting that submicroscopic changes in collagen fibril size and arrangement occur before macroscopic changes become evident. Fiber size progressively increased from early to late pregnancy, while pores between collagen fibers became larger and farther apart. Analysis of collagen features in premature cervical remodeling show that changes in collagen structure are dissimilar from normal remodeling. The ability to quantify multiple morphological features of collagen that characterize normal cervical remodeling and distinguish abnormal remodeling in preterm birth models supports future studies aimed at development of SHG endoscopic devices for clinical assessment of collagen changes during pregnancy in women and for predicting risk of preterm labor which occurs in 12.5% of all pregnancies. PMID:20459265

  2. Second harmonic generation imaging of skin wound healing and scarring in a rabbit ear model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yiyan; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Xiong, Shuyuan; Chen, Jianxin

    2012-12-01

    Skin wound healing and scarring in rabbit ears was examined by second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy. Rabbit ear wound model was created by punching from the ventral surface with removal of epidermis, dermis and perichondrium. The samples were collected weekly, and cut into 100 μm thickness sections for SHG imaging. SHG imaging system was operated at 810 nm, producing SHG signals at half the excitation wavelength 405 nm. A Plan-Neofluar objective (x40 and NA=0.75) was employed for focusing the excitation beam into tissue samples and was also used to collect the backscattered intrinsic SHG signals. Our results showed apparent difference in collagen content and microstructure at various wound healing and scarring time points. It suggested that SHG signals from collagen can serve as a good indicator for characterization of wound status. With the advancement on miniaturization, microscopy based on SHG will become a valuable tool for monitoring the wound healing and scarring in vivo, and help to guide the improvement of scar appearance with appropriate and subtle modulation during wound healing based on better understanding of scarring response mechanism.

  3. Statistical Validation of Brain Tumor Shape Approximation via Spherical Harmonics for Image-Guided Neurosurgery1

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg-Zimring, Daniel; Talos, Ion-Florin; Bhagwat, Jui G.; Haker, Steven J.; Black, Peter M.; Zou, Kelly H.

    2005-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Surgical planning now routinely uses both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) models that integrate data from multiple imaging modalities, each highlighting one or more aspects of morphology or function. We performed a preliminary evaluation of the use of spherical harmonics (SH) in approximating the 3D shape and estimating the volume of brain tumors of varying characteristics. Materials and Methods Magnetic resonance (MR) images from five patients with brain tumors were selected randomly from our MR-guided neurosurgical practice. Standardized mean square reconstruction errors (SMSRE) by tumor volume were measured. Validation metrics for comparing performances of the SH method against segmented contours (SC) were the dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and standardized Euclidean distance (SED) measure. Results Tumor volume range was 22413–85189 mm3, and range of number of vertices in triangulated models was 3674–6544. At SH approximations with degree of at least 30, SMSRE were within 1.66 × 10−5 mm−1. Summary measures yielded a DSC range of 0.89–0.99 (pooled median, 0.97 and significantly >0.7; P < .001) and an SED range of 0.0002–0.0028 (pooled median, 0.0005). Conclusion 3D shapes of tumors may be approximated by using SH for neurosurgical applications. PMID:15831419

  4. Second harmonic generation imaging as a potential tool for staging pregnancy and predicting preterm birth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akins, Meredith L.; Luby-Phelps, Katherine; Mahendroo, Mala

    2010-03-01

    We use second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy to assess changes in collagen structure of murine cervix during cervical remodeling of normal pregnancy and in a preterm birth model. Visual inspection of SHG images revealed substantial changes in collagen morphology throughout normal gestation. SHG images collected in both the forward and backward directions were analyzed quantitatively for changes in overall mean intensity, forward to backward intensity ratio, collagen fiber size, and porosity. Changes in mean SHG intensity and intensity ratio take place in early pregnancy, suggesting that submicroscopic changes in collagen fibril size and arrangement occur before macroscopic changes become evident. Fiber size progressively increased from early to late pregnancy, while pores between collagen fibers became larger and farther apart. Analysis of collagen features in premature cervical remodeling show that changes in collagen structure are dissimilar from normal remodeling. The ability to quantify multiple morphological features of collagen that characterize normal cervical remodeling and distinguish abnormal remodeling in preterm birth models supports future studies aimed at development of SHG endoscopic devices for clinical assessment of collagen changes during pregnancy in women and for predicting risk of preterm labor which occurs in 12.5% of all pregnancies.

  5. Estimating selected low-flow frequency statistics and harmonic-mean flows for ungaged, unregulated streams in Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Gary R.; Fowler, Kathleen K.; Arihood, Leslie D.

    2016-09-06

    Information on low-flow characteristics of streams is essential for the management of water resources. This report provides equations for estimating the 1-, 7-, and 30-day mean low flows for a recurrence interval of 10 years and the harmonic-mean flow at ungaged, unregulated stream sites in Indiana. These equations were developed using the low-flow statistics and basin characteristics for 108 continuous-record streamgages in Indiana with at least 10 years of daily mean streamflow data through the 2011 climate year (April 1 through March 31). The equations were developed in cooperation with the Indiana Department of Environmental Management.Regression techniques were used to develop the equations for estimating low-flow frequency statistics and the harmonic-mean flows on the basis of drainage-basin characteristics. A geographic information system was used to measure basin characteristics for selected streamgages. A final set of 25 basin characteristics measured at all the streamgages were evaluated to choose the best predictors of the low-flow statistics.Logistic-regression equations applicable statewide are presented for estimating the probability that selected low-flow frequency statistics equal zero. These equations use the explanatory variables total drainage area, average transmissivity of the full thickness of the unconsolidated deposits within 1,000 feet of the stream network, and latitude of the basin outlet. The percentage of the streamgage low-flow statistics correctly classified as zero or nonzero using the logistic-regression equations ranged from 86.1 to 88.9 percent.Generalized-least-squares regression equations applicable statewide for estimating nonzero low-flow frequency statistics use total drainage area, the average hydraulic conductivity of the top 70 feet of unconsolidated deposits, the slope of the basin, and the index of permeability and thickness of the Quaternary surficial sediments as explanatory variables. The average standard error of

  6. Estimating selected low-flow frequency statistics and harmonic-mean flows for ungaged, unregulated streams in Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Gary R.; Fowler, Kathleen K.; Arihood, Leslie D.

    2016-01-01

    Information on low-flow characteristics of streams is essential for the management of water resources. This report provides equations for estimating the 1-, 7-, and 30-day mean low flows for a recurrence interval of 10 years and the harmonic-mean flow at ungaged, unregulated stream sites in Indiana. These equations were developed using the low-flow statistics and basin characteristics for 108 continuous-record streamgages in Indiana with at least 10 years of daily mean streamflow data through the 2011 climate year (April 1 through March 31). The equations were developed in cooperation with the Indiana Department of Environmental Management.Regression techniques were used to develop the equations for estimating low-flow frequency statistics and the harmonic-mean flows on the basis of drainage-basin characteristics. A geographic information system was used to measure basin characteristics for selected streamgages. A final set of 25 basin characteristics measured at all the streamgages were evaluated to choose the best predictors of the low-flow statistics.Logistic-regression equations applicable statewide are presented for estimating the probability that selected low-flow frequency statistics equal zero. These equations use the explanatory variables total drainage area, average transmissivity of the full thickness of the unconsolidated deposits within 1,000 feet of the stream network, and latitude of the basin outlet. The percentage of the streamgage low-flow statistics correctly classified as zero or nonzero using the logistic-regression equations ranged from 86.1 to 88.9 percent.Generalized-least-squares regression equations applicable statewide for estimating nonzero low-flow frequency statistics use total drainage area, the average hydraulic conductivity of the top 70 feet of unconsolidated deposits, the slope of the basin, and the index of permeability and thickness of the Quaternary surficial sediments as explanatory variables. The average standard error of

  7. Prediction and measurement of low-frequency harmonic noise of a hovering model helicopter rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarawal, H. R.; Schmitz, F. H.; Boxwell, D. A.

    Far-field acoustic data for a model helicopter rotor have been gathered in a large open-jet, acoustically treated wind tunnel with the rotor operating in hover and out of ground-effect. The four-bladed Boeing 360 model rotor with advanced airfoils, planform, and tip shape was run over a range of conditions typical of today's modern helicopter main rotor. Near in-plane acoustic measurements were compared with two independent implementations of classical linear theory. Measured steady thrust and torque were used together with a free-wake analysis (to predict the thrust and drag distributions along the rotor radius) as input to this first-principles theoretical approach. Good agreement between theory and experiment was shown for both amplitude and phase for measurements made in those positions that minimized distortion of the radiated acoustic signature at low-frequencies.

  8. Near Field Imaging at Microwave and Millemeter Wave Frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Hall, Thomas E.

    2007-06-03

    Near field imaging at microwave and millimeter wave frequencies is useful for a wide variety of applications including concealed weapon detection, through-wall and inner-wall imaging, ground penetrating radar imaging, radar cross section analysis, and non-destructive evaluation of materials. A variety of novel imaging techniques have been developed for many of these applications at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) . These techniques make use of wideband holographic wavefront reconstruction methods, and have been developed to optimize the image quality and resolution. This paper will summarize several of these techniques and show imaging results for several interesting application areas.

  9. Continuous-wave coherent imaging with terahertz quantum cascade lasers using electro-optic harmonic sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravaro, M.; Jagtap, V.; Santarelli, G.; Sirtori, C.; Li, L. H.; Khanna, S. P.; Linfield, E. H.; Barbieri, S.

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate a coherent imaging system based on a terahertz (THz) frequency quantum cascade laser (QCL) phase-locked to a near-infrared fs-laser comb. The phase locking enables coherent electro-optic sampling of the continuous-wave radiation emitted by the QCL through the generation of a heterodyne beat-note signal. We use this beat-note signal to demonstrate raster scan coherent imaging using a QCL emitting at 2.5 THz. At this frequency the detection noise floor of our system is of 3 pW/Hz and the long-term phase stability is <3°/h, limited by the mechanical stability of the apparatus.

  10. Methods for estimating selected low-flow frequency statistics and harmonic mean flows for streams in Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eash, David A.; Barnes, Kimberlee K.

    2012-01-01

    A statewide study was conducted to develop regression equations for estimating six selected low-flow frequency statistics and harmonic mean flows for ungaged stream sites in Iowa. The estimation equations developed for the six low-flow frequency statistics include: the annual 1-, 7-, and 30-day mean low flows for a recurrence interval of 10 years, the annual 30-day mean low flow for a recurrence interval of 5 years, and the seasonal (October 1 through December 31) 1- and 7-day mean low flows for a recurrence interval of 10 years. Estimation equations also were developed for the harmonic-mean-flow statistic. Estimates of these seven selected statistics are provided for 208 U.S. Geological Survey continuous-record streamgages using data through September 30, 2006. The study area comprises streamgages located within Iowa and 50 miles beyond the State's borders. Because trend analyses indicated statistically significant positive trends when considering the entire period of record for the majority of the streamgages, the longest, most recent period of record without a significant trend was determined for each streamgage for use in the study. The median number of years of record used to compute each of these seven selected statistics was 35. Geographic information system software was used to measure 54 selected basin characteristics for each streamgage. Following the removal of two streamgages from the initial data set, data collected for 206 streamgages were compiled to investigate three approaches for regionalization of the seven selected statistics. Regionalization, a process using statistical regression analysis, provides a relation for efficiently transferring information from a group of streamgages in a region to ungaged sites in the region. The three regionalization approaches tested included statewide, regional, and region-of-influence regressions. For the regional regression, the study area was divided into three low-flow regions on the basis of hydrologic

  11. Towards more accurate numerical modeling of impedance based high frequency harmonic vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Yee Yan; Kiong Soh, Chee

    2014-03-01

    The application of smart materials in various fields of engineering has recently become increasingly popular. For instance, the high frequency based electromechanical impedance (EMI) technique employing smart piezoelectric materials is found to be versatile in structural health monitoring (SHM). Thus far, considerable efforts have been made to study and improve the technique. Various theoretical models of the EMI technique have been proposed in an attempt to better understand its behavior. So far, the three-dimensional (3D) coupled field finite element (FE) model has proved to be the most accurate. However, large discrepancies between the results of the FE model and experimental tests, especially in terms of the slope and magnitude of the admittance signatures, continue to exist and are yet to be resolved. This paper presents a series of parametric studies using the 3D coupled field finite element method (FEM) on all properties of materials involved in the lead zirconate titanate (PZT) structure interaction of the EMI technique, to investigate their effect on the admittance signatures acquired. FE model updating is then performed by adjusting the parameters to match the experimental results. One of the main reasons for the lower accuracy, especially in terms of magnitude and slope, of previous FE models is the difficulty in determining the damping related coefficients and the stiffness of the bonding layer. In this study, using the hysteretic damping model in place of Rayleigh damping, which is used by most researchers in this field, and updated bonding stiffness, an improved and more accurate FE model is achieved. The results of this paper are expected to be useful for future study of the subject area in terms of research and application, such as modeling, design and optimization.

  12. Beat-Frequency/Microsphere Medical Ultrasonic Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T.; Cantrell, John H.; Pretlow, Robert A., III

    1995-01-01

    Medical ultrasonic imaging system designed to provide quantitative data on various flows of blood in chambers, blood vessels, muscles, and tissues of heart. Sensitive enough to yield readings on flows of blood in heart even when microspheres used as ultrasonic contrast agents injected far from heart and diluted by circulation of blood elsewhere in body.

  13. A Theory of Dynamic Imaging of Coherent Molecular Rotations by High Harmonic Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faisal, F. H. M.; Abdurrouf, A.

    A dynamic theory of mapping coherent molecular motions from high harmonic generation signals is presented. Application to mapping of coherent rotational motions of linear molecules is made. Results of concrete calculations for N2, O2 and CO2 are analyzed both in time and frequency domains. A "magic angle" for the polarization geometry is predicted at which the HHG signals for all pump-probe delay times become equal for linear molecules of σg orbital symmetry. In contrast only a "crossing neighborhood" near the magic angle is predicted for molecules with orbitals of π symmetry. They are expected to help in identifying the orbital symmetry in the inverse problem of orbital reconstruction from experimental data. Comparison with available experimental data show remarkable agreement with all the salient properties of dynamic HHG signals of linear diatomic molecules, N2 and O2, and some simple organic molecules. Additional results for the triatomic molecule CO2 are discussed that might help to test the theory further.

  14. Real-time Monitoring of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) Ablation of In Vitro Canine Livers Using Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU).

    PubMed

    Grondin, Julien; Payen, Thomas; Wang, Shutao; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-11-03

    Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) is a technique that can perform and monitor high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation. An oscillatory motion is generated at the focus of a 93-element and 4.5 MHz center frequency HIFU transducer by applying a 25 Hz amplitude-modulated signal using a function generator. A 64-element and 2.5 MHz imaging transducer with 68kPa peak pressure is confocally placed at the center of the HIFU transducer to acquire the radio-frequency (RF) channel data. In this protocol, real-time monitoring of thermal ablation using HIFU with an acoustic power of 7 W on canine livers in vitro is described. HIFU treatment is applied on the tissue during 2 min and the ablated region is imaged in real-time using diverging or plane wave imaging up to 1,000 frames/second. The matrix of RF channel data is multiplied by a sparse matrix for image reconstruction. The reconstructed field of view is of 90° for diverging wave and 20 mm for plane wave imaging and the data are sampled at 80 MHz. The reconstruction is performed on a Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) in order to image in real-time at a 4.5 display frame rate. 1-D normalized cross-correlation of the reconstructed RF data is used to estimate axial displacements in the focal region. The magnitude of the peak-to-peak displacement at the focal depth decreases during the thermal ablation which denotes stiffening of the tissue due to the formation of a lesion. The displacement signal-to-noise ratio (SNRd) at the focal area for plane wave was 1.4 times higher than for diverging wave showing that plane wave imaging appears to produce better displacement maps quality for HMIFU than diverging wave imaging.

  15. Real-time monitoring of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation of in vitro canine livers using Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU)

    PubMed Central

    Grondin, Julien; Payen, Thomas; Wang, Shutao; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-01-01

    Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) is a technique that can perform and monitor high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation. An oscillatory motion is generated at the focus of a 93—element and 4.5 MHz center frequency HIFU transducer by applying a 25 Hz amplitude-modulated signal using a function generator. A 64-element and 2.5 MHz imaging transducer with 68kPa peak pressure is confocally placed at the center of the HIFU transducer to acquire the radio-frequency (RF) channel data. In this protocol, real-time monitoring of thermal ablation using HIFU with an acoustic power of 7W on canine livers in vitro is described. HIFU treatment is applied on the tissue during 2 min and the ablated region is imaged in real-time using diverging or plane wave imaging up to 1000 frames/second. The matrix of RF channel data is multiplied by a sparse matrix for image reconstruction. The reconstructed field of view is of 90° for diverging wave and 20 mm for plane wave imaging and the data are sampled at 80 MHz. The reconstruction is performed on a Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) in order to image in real-time at a 4.5 display frame rate. 1-D normalized cross-correlation of the reconstructed RF data is used to estimate axial displacements in the focal region. The magnitude of the peak-to-peak displacement at the focal depth decreases during the thermal ablation which denotes stiffening of the tissue due to the formation of a lesion. The displacement signal-to-noise ratio (SNRd) at the focal area for plane wave was 1.4 times higher than for diverging wave showing that plane wave imaging appears to produce better displacement maps quality for HMIFU than diverging wave imaging. PMID:26556647

  16. Real-time Monitoring of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) Ablation of In Vitro Canine Livers Using Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU).

    PubMed

    Grondin, Julien; Payen, Thomas; Wang, Shutao; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-01-01

    Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) is a technique that can perform and monitor high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation. An oscillatory motion is generated at the focus of a 93-element and 4.5 MHz center frequency HIFU transducer by applying a 25 Hz amplitude-modulated signal using a function generator. A 64-element and 2.5 MHz imaging transducer with 68kPa peak pressure is confocally placed at the center of the HIFU transducer to acquire the radio-frequency (RF) channel data. In this protocol, real-time monitoring of thermal ablation using HIFU with an acoustic power of 7 W on canine livers in vitro is described. HIFU treatment is applied on the tissue during 2 min and the ablated region is imaged in real-time using diverging or plane wave imaging up to 1,000 frames/second. The matrix of RF channel data is multiplied by a sparse matrix for image reconstruction. The reconstructed field of view is of 90° for diverging wave and 20 mm for plane wave imaging and the data are sampled at 80 MHz. The reconstruction is performed on a Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) in order to image in real-time at a 4.5 display frame rate. 1-D normalized cross-correlation of the reconstructed RF data is used to estimate axial displacements in the focal region. The magnitude of the peak-to-peak displacement at the focal depth decreases during the thermal ablation which denotes stiffening of the tissue due to the formation of a lesion. The displacement signal-to-noise ratio (SNRd) at the focal area for plane wave was 1.4 times higher than for diverging wave showing that plane wave imaging appears to produce better displacement maps quality for HMIFU than diverging wave imaging. PMID:26556647

  17. What interactions can distort the orientational distribution of interfacial water molecules as probed by second harmonic and sum frequency generation?

    PubMed

    de Beer, Alex G F; Roke, Sylvie

    2016-07-28

    Aqueous interfaces are omnipresent in nature. Nonlinear optical methods such as second harmonic and sum frequency generation (SHG/SFG) are valuable techniques to access molecular level information from these interfaces. In the interpretation of SHG and SFG data for both scattering and reflection mode experiments, the relation between the second-order hyperpolarizability tensor β(2), a molecular property, and the surface second-order susceptibility χ(2), a surface averaged property, plays a central role. To correctly describe the molecular details of the interface, it needs to be determined how molecules are oriented, and what the influence is of interfacial electrostatic fields and H-bonding on the orientational distribution. Here, we revisit the relations between β(2) and χ(2) and show, by means of a Boltzmann average, that significant energy differences are needed to generate measurable changes in the molecular orientational distribution at the interface. In practice, H-bonding and surface pressure such as applied in a Langmuir trough can be strong enough to alter the shape of the orientational distribution function of water. In contrast, electrostatic fields, such as those present in the Stern layer, will not have a significant impact on the shape of the orientational distribution function of water molecules. PMID:27475384

  18. Testing a simple control law to reduce broadband frequency harmonic vibrations using semi-active tuned mass dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutinho, Carlos

    2015-05-01

    This paper is focused on the control problems related to semi-active tuned mass dampers (TMDs) used to reduce harmonic vibrations, specially involving civil structures. A simplified version of the phase control law is derived and its effectiveness is investigated and evaluated. The objective is to improve the functioning of control systems of this type by simplifying the measurement process and reducing the number of variables involved, making the control system more feasible and reliable. Because the control law is of ON/OFF type, combined with appropriate trigger conditions, the activity of the actuation system may be significantly reduced, which may be of few seconds a day in many practical cases, increasing the durability of the device and reducing its maintenance. Moreover, due to the ability of the control system to command the motion of the inertial mass, the semi-active TMD is relatively insensitive to its initial tuning, resulting in the capability of self-tuning and in the possibility of controlling several vibration modes of a structure over a significant broadband frequency.

  19. What interactions can distort the orientational distribution of interfacial water molecules as probed by second harmonic and sum frequency generation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Beer, Alex G. F.; Roke, Sylvie

    2016-07-01

    Aqueous interfaces are omnipresent in nature. Nonlinear optical methods such as second harmonic and sum frequency generation (SHG/SFG) are valuable techniques to access molecular level information from these interfaces. In the interpretation of SHG and SFG data for both scattering and reflection mode experiments, the relation between the second-order hyperpolarizability tensor β(2), a molecular property, and the surface second-order susceptibility (" separators=" χ(2), a surface averaged property, plays a central role. To correctly describe the molecular details of the interface, it needs to be determined how molecules are oriented, and what the influence is of interfacial electrostatic fields and H-bonding on the orientational distribution. Here, we revisit the relations between β(2) and χ(2) and show, by means of a Boltzmann average, that significant energy differences are needed to generate measurable changes in the molecular orientational distribution at the interface. In practice, H-bonding and surface pressure such as applied in a Langmuir trough can be strong enough to alter the shape of the orientational distribution function of water. In contrast, electrostatic fields, such as those present in the Stern layer, will not have a significant impact on the shape of the orientational distribution function of water molecules.

  20. Ultra high frequency imaging acoustic microscope

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Telschow, Kenneth L.

    2006-05-23

    An imaging system includes: an object wavefront source and an optical microscope objective all positioned to direct an object wavefront onto an area of a vibrating subject surface encompassed by a field of view of the microscope objective, and to direct a modulated object wavefront reflected from the encompassed surface area through a photorefractive material; and a reference wavefront source and at least one phase modulator all positioned to direct a reference wavefront through the phase modulator and to direct a modulated reference wavefront from the phase modulator through the photorefractive material to interfere with the modulated object wavefront. The photorefractive material has a composition and a position such that interference of the modulated object wavefront and modulated reference wavefront occurs within the photorefractive material, providing a full-field, real-time image signal of the encompassed surface area.

  1. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) focal spot localization using harmonic motion imaging (HMI).

    PubMed

    Han, Yang; Hou, Gary Yi; Wang, Shutao; Konofagou, Elisa

    2015-08-01

    Several ultrasound-based imaging modalities have been proposed for image guidance and monitoring of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment. However, accurate localization and characterization of the effective region of treatment (focal spot) remain important obstacles in the clinical implementation of HIFU ablation. Harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) is a HIFU monitoring technique that utilizes radiation-force-induced localized oscillatory displacement. HMIFU has been shown to correctly identify the formation and extent of HIFU thermal ablation lesions. However a significant problem remains in identifying the location of the HIFU focus, which is necessary for treatment planning. In this study, the induced displacement was employed to localize the HIFU focal spot inside the tissue prior to treatment. Feasibility was shown with two separate systems. The 1D HMIFU system consisted of a HIFU transducer emitting an amplitude-modulated HIFU beam for mechanical excitation and a confocal single-element, pulse-echo transducer for simultaneous RF acquisition. The 2D HIFU system consists of a HIFU phased array, and a co-axial imaging phased array for simultaneous imaging. Initial feasibility was first performed on tissue-mimicking gelatin phantoms and the focal zone was defined as the region corresponding to the -3dB full width at half maximum of the HMI displacement. Using the same parameters, in vitro experiments were performed in canine liver specimens to compare the defined focal zone with the lesion. In vitro measurements showed good agreement between the HMI predicted focal zone and the induced HIFU lesion location. HMIFU was experimentally shown to be capable of predicting and tracking the focal region in both phantoms and in vitro tissues. The accuracy of focal spot localization was evaluated by comparing with the lesion location in post-ablative tissues, with a R(2) = 0.821 at p < 0.002 in the 2D HMI system. We demonstrated the

  2. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) focal spot localization using harmonic motion imaging (HMI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yang; Hou, Gary Yi; Wang, Shutao; Konofagou, Elisa

    2015-08-01

    Several ultrasound-based imaging modalities have been proposed for image guidance and monitoring of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment. However, accurate localization and characterization of the effective region of treatment (focal spot) remain important obstacles in the clinical implementation of HIFU ablation. Harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) is a HIFU monitoring technique that utilizes radiation-force-induced localized oscillatory displacement. HMIFU has been shown to correctly identify the formation and extent of HIFU thermal ablation lesions. However a significant problem remains in identifying the location of the HIFU focus, which is necessary for treatment planning. In this study, the induced displacement was employed to localize the HIFU focal spot inside the tissue prior to treatment. Feasibility was shown with two separate systems. The 1D HMIFU system consisted of a HIFU transducer emitting an amplitude-modulated HIFU beam for mechanical excitation and a confocal single-element, pulse-echo transducer for simultaneous RF acquisition. The 2D HIFU system consists of a HIFU phased array, and a co-axial imaging phased array for simultaneous imaging. Initial feasibility was first performed on tissue-mimicking gelatin phantoms and the focal zone was defined as the region corresponding to the  -3dB full width at half maximum of the HMI displacement. Using the same parameters, in vitro experiments were performed in canine liver specimens to compare the defined focal zone with the lesion. In vitro measurements showed good agreement between the HMI predicted focal zone and the induced HIFU lesion location. HMIFU was experimentally shown to be capable of predicting and tracking the focal region in both phantoms and in vitro tissues. The accuracy of focal spot localization was evaluated by comparing with the lesion location in post-ablative tissues, with a R2 = 0.821 at p  <  0.002 in the 2D HMI system. We demonstrated

  3. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) Focal Spot Localization Using Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI)

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yang; Hou, Gary Yi; Wang, Shutao; Konofagou, Elisa

    2015-01-01

    Several ultrasound-based imaging modalities have been proposed for image guidance and monitoring of High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) treatment. However, accurate localization and characterization of the effective region of treatment (focal spot) remain important obstacles in the clinical implementation of HIFU ablation. Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) is a HIFU monitoring technique that utilizes radiation-force-induced localized oscillatory displacement. HMIFU has been shown to correctly identify the formation and extent of HIFU thermal ablation lesions. However a significant problem remains in identifying the location of the HIFU focus, which is necessary for treatment planning. In this study, the induced displacement was employed to localize the HIFU focal spot inside the tissue prior to treatment. Feasibility was shown with two separate systems. The 1D HMIFU system consisted of a HIFU transducer emitting an amplitude-modulated HIFU beam for mechanical excitation and a confocal single-element, pulse-echo transducer for simultaneous RF acquisition. The 2D HIFU system consists of a HIFU phased array, and a co-axial imaging phased array for simultaneous imaging. Initial feasibility was first performed on tissue-mimicking gelatin phantoms and the focal zone was defined as the region corresponding to the −3 dB full width at half maximum of the HMI displacement. Using the same parameters, in vitro experiments were performed in canine liver specimens to compare the defined focal zone with the lesion. In vitro measurements showed good agreement between the HMI predicted focal zone and the induced HIFU lesion location. HMIFU was experimentally shown to be capable of predicting and tracking the focal region in both phantoms and in vitro tissues. The accuracy of focal spot localization was evaluated by comparing with the lesion location in post-ablative tissues, with a R2 = 0.821 at p<0.002 in the 2D HMI system. We demonstrated the

  4. Image enhancement by adjusting the contrast of spatial frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ching-Chung

    2008-02-01

    We demonstrate a brand-new method for image enhancement by adjusting the contrast of different spatial frequencies. Fine characteristics of an image are well enhanced with negligible side effects. This method is easy to implement owing to its simple optical basis.

  5. Effects of frequency- and direction-dependent elastic materials on linearly elastic MRE image reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perreard, I. M.; Pattison, A. J.; Doyley, M.; McGarry, M. D. J.; Barani, Z.; Van Houten, E. E.; Weaver, J. B.; Paulsen, K. D.

    2010-11-01

    The mechanical model commonly used in magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is linear elasticity. However, soft tissue may exhibit frequency- and direction-dependent (FDD) shear moduli in response to an induced excitation causing a purely linear elastic model to provide an inaccurate image reconstruction of its mechanical properties. The goal of this study was to characterize the effects of reconstructing FDD data using a linear elastic inversion (LEI) algorithm. Linear and FDD phantoms were manufactured and LEI images were obtained from time-harmonic MRE acquisitions with variations in frequency and driving signal amplitude. LEI responses to artificially imposed uniform phase shifts in the displacement data from both purely linear elastic and FDD phantoms were also evaluated. Of the variety of FDD phantoms considered, LEI appeared to tolerate viscoelastic data-model mismatch better than deviations caused by poroelastic and anisotropic mechanical properties in terms of visual image contrast. However, the estimated shear modulus values were substantially incorrect relative to independent mechanical measurements even in the successful viscoelastic cases and the variations in mean values with changes in experimental conditions associated with uniform phase shifts, driving signal frequency and amplitude were unpredictable. Overall, use of LEI to reconstruct data acquired in phantoms with FDD material properties provided biased results under the best conditions and significant artifacts in the worst cases. These findings suggest that the success with which LEI is applied to MRE data in tissue will depend on the underlying mechanical characteristics of the tissues and/or organs systems of clinical interest.

  6. Time dependent Doppler shifts in high-order harmonic generation in intense laser interactions with solid density plasma and frequency chirped pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, E. C.; Zhang, P.; He, Z.-H.; Dollar, F.; Krushelnick, K.; Thomas, A. G. R.

    2015-05-15

    High order harmonic generation from solid targets is a compelling route to generating intense attosecond or even zeptosecond pulses. However, the effects of ion motion on the generation of harmonics have only recently started to be considered. Here, we study the effects of ion motion in harmonics production at ultrahigh laser intensities interacting with solid density plasma. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we find that there is an optimum density for harmonic production that depends on laser intensity, which scales linearly with a{sub 0} with no ion motion but with a reduced scaling if ion motion is included. We derive a scaling for this optimum density with ion motion and also find that the background ion motion induces Doppler red-shifts in the harmonic structures of the reflected pulse. The temporal structure of the Doppler shifts is correlated to the envelope of the incident laser pulse. We demonstrate that by introducing a frequency chirp in the incident pulse we are able to eliminate these Doppler shifts almost completely.

  7. Far-field imaging with a multi-frequency metalens

    SciTech Connect

    Jouvaud, C. Ourir, A.; Rosny, J. de

    2014-06-16

    A metalens, i.e., a dense array of identical resonators, allows to image an object pattern at subwavelength scale from far field radiation field. Here, we show that the efficiency can be improved when the resonant frequencies of the cell are distributed over a given frequency range. Because in such systems each eigen mode is localized, the subwavelength image is built from a spectral analysis of the radiated field. A simple model based on coupled resonant dipoles is used to find the best frequency distribution. This multifrequency metalens approach is validated using a flat array of split ring resonators. We experimentally demonstrate the subwavelength resolution of such a device at microwave range.

  8. Detail enhancement of blurred infrared images based on frequency extrapolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fuyuan; Zeng, Deguo; Zhang, Jun; Zheng, Ziyang; Wei, Fei; Wang, Tiedan

    2016-05-01

    A novel algorithm for enhancing the details of the blurred infrared images based on frequency extrapolation has been raised in this paper. Unlike other researchers' work, this algorithm mainly focuses on how to predict the higher frequency information based on the Laplacian pyramid separation of the blurred image. This algorithm uses the first level of the high frequency component of the pyramid of the blurred image to reverse-generate a higher, non-existing frequency component, and adds back to the histogram equalized input blurred image. A simple nonlinear operator is used to analyze the extracted first level high frequency component of the pyramid. Two critical parameters are participated in the calculation known as the clipping parameter C and the scaling parameter S. The detailed analysis of how these two parameters work during the procedure is figure demonstrated in this paper. The blurred image will become clear, and the detail will be enhanced due to the added higher frequency information. This algorithm has the advantages of computational simplicity and great performance, and it can definitely be deployed in the real-time industrial applications. We have done lots of experiments and gave illustrations of the algorithm's performance in this paper to convince its effectiveness.

  9. Analytical Bistatic k Space Images Compared to Experimental Swept Frequency EAR Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaeffer, John; Cooper, Brett; Hom, Kam

    2004-01-01

    A case study of flat plate scattering images obtained by the analytical bistatic k space and experimental swept frequency ISAR methods is presented. The key advantage of the bistatic k space image is that a single excitation is required, i.e., one frequency I one angle. This means that prediction approaches such as MOM only need to compute one solution at a single frequency. Bistatic image Fourier transform data are obtained by computing the scattered field at various bistatic positions about the body in k space. Experimental image Fourier transform data are obtained from the measured response to a bandwidth of frequencies over a target rotation range.

  10. Frequency-difference electrical impedance tomography: Phantom imaging experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sujin; Jun, Sung Chan; Seo, Jin Keun; Lee, Jeehyun; Woo, Eung Je; Holder, David

    2010-04-01

    Frequency-difference electrical impedance tomography (fdEIT) using a weighted voltage difference has been proposed as a means to provide images of admittivity changes at different frequencies. This weighted difference method is an effective way to extract anomaly information while eliminating background effects by unknown boundary geometry, uncertainty in electrode positions and other systematic measurement artefacts. It also properly handles the interplay between conductivity and permittivity in measured boundary voltage data. Though the proposed fdEIT algorithm is promising for applications such as detection of hemorrhagic stroke and breast cancer, more validation studies are needed. In this paper, we performed two-and three-dimensional numerical simulations and phantom experiments. Backgrounds of imaging objects were either saline or carrot pieces suspended in saline. We used carrot pieces to simulate a more realistic frequency-dependent admittivity distribution. Test objects were banana, potato or conductive gel with known admittivity spectra. When the background was saline, both simple and weighted difference approaches produced reasonably accurate images. The weighted difference method yielded better images from two-dimensional imaging objects with background of carrot pieces. For the three-dimensional head-shaped phantom, the advantage of the weighted frequency difference method over the simple difference method is not as obvious as in the case of the two-dimensional phantom. It is unclear if this is due to measurement errors or limitations in the linear algorithm. Further refinement and validation of the frequency difference image reconstructions are currently in progress.

  11. Evidence for Harmonic Content and Frequency Evolution of Oscillations During the Rising Phase of X-ray Bursts From 4U 1636-536

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bgattacharyya, Sudip; Strohmayer, E.

    2005-01-01

    We report on a study of the evolution of burst oscillation properties during the rising phase of X-ray bursts from 4U 1636-536 observed with the proportional counter array (PCA) on board the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) . We present evidence for significant harmonic structure of burst oscillation pulses during the early rising phases of bursts. This is the first such detection in burst rise oscillations, and is very important for constraining neutron star structure parameters and the equation of state models of matter at the core of a neutron star. The detection of harmonic content only during the initial portions of the burst rise is consistent with the theoretical expectation that with time the thermonuclear burning region becomes larger, and hence the fundamental and harmonic amplitudes both diminish. We also find, for the first time from this source, strong evidence of oscillation frequency increase during the burst rise. The timing behavior of harmonic content, amplitude, and frequency of burst rise oscillations may be important in understanding the spreading of thermonuclear flames under the extreme physical conditions on neutron star surfaces.

  12. Image Deconvolution by Means of Frequency Blur Invariant Concept

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Different blur invariant descriptors have been proposed so far, which are either in the spatial domain or based on the properties available in the moment domain. In this paper, a frequency framework is proposed to develop blur invariant features that are used to deconvolve a degraded image caused by a Gaussian blur. These descriptors are obtained by establishing an equivalent relationship between the normalized Fourier transforms of the blurred and original images, both normalized by their respective fixed frequencies set to one. Advantage of using the proposed invariant descriptors is that it is possible to estimate both the point spread function (PSF) and the original image. The performance of frequency invariants will be demonstrated through experiments. An image deconvolution is done as an additional application to verify the proposed blur invariant features. PMID:25202743

  13. Registering spherical navigators with spherical harmonic expansions to measure three-dimensional rotations in magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Costa, Andreu F; Yen, Yi-Fen; Drangova, Maria

    2010-02-01

    Subject motion remains a challenging problem to overcome in clinical and research applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Subject motion degrades the quality of MR images and the integrity of experimental data. A promising method to correct for subject motion in MRI is the spherical navigator (SNAV) echo. Spherical navigators acquire k-space data on the surface of a sphere in order to measure three-dimensional (3D) rigid-body motion. Analysis begins by registering the magnitude of two SNAVs to determine the 3D rotation between them. Several different methods to register SNAV data exist, each with specific capabilities and limitations. In this study, we assessed the accuracy, precision and computational requirements of measuring rotations about all three coordinate axes by correlating the spherical harmonic expansions of SNAV data. We compare the results of this technique to previous SNAV studies and show that, although computationally expensive, the spherical harmonic technique is a highly accurate, precise and robust method to register SNAVs and detect 3D rotations in MRI. A key advantage to the spherical harmonic technique is the ability to optimize the accuracy, precision, processing time and memory requirements by adjusting parameters used in the registration. While present developments are aimed at improving the programming efficiency and memory handling of the algorithm, this registration technique is currently well suited for retrospective motion correction applications, such as removing motion-related image artifacts and aligning slices within a high-resolution 3D volume.

  14. Exchange and polarization effect in high-order harmonic imaging of molecular structures

    SciTech Connect

    Sukiasyan, Suren; Ivanov, Misha Yu.; Patchkovskii, Serguei; Smirnova, Olga; Brabec, Thomas

    2010-10-15

    We analyze the importance of exchange, polarization, and electron-electron correlation in high-order harmonic generation in molecules interacting with intense laser fields. We find that electron exchange can become particularly important for harmonic emission associated with intermediate excitations in the molecular ion. In particular, for orbitals associated with two-hole one-particle excitations, exchange effects can eliminate structure-related minima and maxima in the harmonic spectra. Laser-induced polarization of the neutral molecule may also have major effects on orbital structure-related minima and maxima in the harmonic spectra. Finally, we show how exchange terms in recombination can be viewed as a shakedownlike process induced by sudden electronic excitation in the ion.

  15. Clinical skin imaging using color spatial frequency domain imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bin; Lesicko, John; Moy, Austin J.; Reichenberg, Jason; Tunnell, James W.

    2016-02-01

    Skin diseases are typically associated with underlying biochemical and structural changes compared with normal tissues, which alter the optical properties of the skin lesions, such as tissue absorption and scattering. Although widely used in dermatology clinics, conventional dermatoscopes don't have the ability to selectively image tissue absorption and scattering, which may limit its diagnostic power. Here we report a novel clinical skin imaging technique called color spatial frequency domain imaging (cSFDI) which enhances contrast by rendering color spatial frequency domain (SFD) image at high spatial frequency. Moreover, by tuning spatial frequency, we can obtain both absorption weighted and scattering weighted images. We developed a handheld imaging system specifically for clinical skin imaging. The flexible configuration of the system allows for better access to skin lesions in hard-to-reach regions. A total of 48 lesions from 31 patients were imaged under 470nm, 530nm and 655nm illumination at a spatial frequency of 0.6mm^(-1). The SFD reflectance images at 470nm, 530nm and 655nm were assigned to blue (B), green (G) and red (R) channels to render a color SFD image. Our results indicated that color SFD images at f=0.6mm-1 revealed properties that were not seen in standard color images. Structural features were enhanced and absorption features were reduced, which helped to identify the sources of the contrast. This imaging technique provides additional insights into skin lesions and may better assist clinical diagnosis.

  16. Polarization dependant in vivo second harmonic generation imaging of Caenorhabditis elegans vulval, pharynx, and body wall muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psilodimitrakopoulos, Sotiris; Santos, Susana; Amat-Roldan, Ivan; Mathew, Manoj; Thayil K. N., Anisha; Artigas, David; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo

    2008-02-01

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging has emerged in recent years as an important laboratory imaging technique since it can provide unique structural information with submicron resolution. It enjoys the benefits of non-invasive interaction establishing this imaging modality as ideal for in vivo investigation of tissue architectures. In this study we present, polarization dependant high resolution SHG images of Caenorhabditis elegans muscles in vivo. We imaged a variety of muscular structures such as body walls, pharynx and vulva. By fitting the experimental data into a cylindrical symmetry spatial model we mapped the corresponding signal distribution of the χ (2) tensor and identified its main axis orientation for different sarcomeres of the earth worm. The cylindrical symmetry was considered to arise from the thick filaments architecture of the inside active volume. Moreover, our theoretical analysis allowed calculating the mean orientation of harmonophores (myosin helical pitch). Ultimately, we recorded and analysed vulvae muscle dynamics, where SHG signal decreased during in vivo contraction.

  17. Experimental investigation of the ionospheric hysteresis effect on the threshold excitation level of the Stimulated Electromagnetic Emission (SEE) during heating at the second electron gyro-harmonic frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samimi, A.; Scales, W.; Cruz, M.; Isham, B.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    2012-12-01

    Recent experimental observations of the stimulated electromagnetic emission (SEE) spectrum during heating at the second electron gyro-harmonic show structures ordered by ion gyro-frequency. The proposed generation mechanism considers parametric decay of a pump upper hybrid/electron Bernstein (UH/EB) wave into another UH/EB and a group of neutralized ion Bernstein waves. The presumption of the proposed mechanism is that the pump electromagnetic wave is converted into the UH/EB wave. This conversion process generates field aligned irregularity which exhibits hysteresis effect. The predicted ionospheric hysteresis effect is studied during the PARS 2012 at HAARP. The preliminary results are presented for the first time. Also, experimental study of the effects of 1) the transmitter beam angle and 2) the transmitter frequency offset relative to the second electron gyro-harmonic frequency on the ion gyro-harmonic structures in the SEE spectrum are provided. The aforementioned observations are compared to the predictions of the analytical model. Possible connection of the SEE spectral features and artificially generated ionospheric descending layer is also discussed

  18. Walk-Off-Induced Modulation Instability, Temporal Pattern Formation, and Frequency Comb Generation in Cavity-Enhanced Second-Harmonic Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leo, F.; Hansson, T.; Ricciardi, I.; De Rosa, M.; Coen, S.; Wabnitz, S.; Erkintalo, M.

    2016-01-01

    We derive a time-domain mean-field equation to model the full temporal and spectral dynamics of light in singly resonant cavity-enhanced second-harmonic generation systems. We show that the temporal walk-off between the fundamental and the second-harmonic fields plays a decisive role under realistic conditions, giving rise to rich, previously unidentified nonlinear behavior. Through linear stability analysis and numerical simulations, we discover a new kind of quadratic modulation instability which leads to the formation of optical frequency combs and associated time-domain dissipative structures. Our numerical simulations show excellent agreement with recent experimental observations of frequency combs in quadratic nonlinear media [Phys. Rev. A 91, 063839 (2015)]. Thus, in addition to unveiling a new, experimentally accessible regime of nonlinear dynamics, our work enables predictive modeling of frequency comb generation in cavity-enhanced second-harmonic generation systems. We expect our findings to have wide impact on the study of temporal and spectral dynamics in a diverse range of dispersive, quadratically nonlinear resonators.

  19. Harmonic engine

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Charles L.

    2009-10-20

    A high efficiency harmonic engine based on a resonantly reciprocating piston expander that extracts work from heat and pressurizes working fluid in a reciprocating piston compressor. The engine preferably includes harmonic oscillator valves capable of oscillating at a resonant frequency for controlling the flow of working fluid into and out of the expander, and also preferably includes a shunt line connecting an expansion chamber of the expander to a buffer chamber of the expander for minimizing pressure variations in the fluidic circuit of the engine. The engine is especially designed to operate with very high temperature input to the expander and very low temperature input to the compressor, to produce very high thermal conversion efficiency.

  20. Frequency Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Techniques in Eye Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtkowski, M.; Kowalczyk, A.; Targowski, P.; Gorczyñska, I.

    2000-12-01

    This contribution presents an application of frequency-domain optical tomography to ophthalmology. Essential theoretical foundations of time-domain and frequency-domain optical tomography are presented. Images of sections through the anterior chamber, the corneo-scleral angle and fundus of the eye are reconstructed from the spectral fringes. The morphological information gained by tomograms is important for diagnosing and planning of a treatment of glaucoma.

  1. Ultrasound breast imaging using frequency domain reverse time migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, O.; Zuberi, M. A. H.; Pratt, R. G.; Duric, N.

    2016-04-01

    Conventional ultrasonography reconstruction techniques, such as B-mode, are based on a simple wave propagation model derived from a high frequency approximation. Therefore, to minimize model mismatch, the central frequency of the input pulse is typically chosen between 3 and 15 megahertz. Despite the increase in theoretical resolution, operating at higher frequencies comes at the cost of lower signal-to-noise ratio. This ultimately degrades the image contrast and overall quality at higher imaging depths. To address this issue, we investigate a reflection imaging technique, known as reverse time migration, which uses a more accurate propagation model for reconstruction. We present preliminary simulation results as well as physical phantom image reconstructions obtained using data acquired with a breast imaging ultrasound tomography prototype. The original reconstructions are filtered to remove low-wavenumber artifacts that arise due to the inclusion of the direct arrivals. We demonstrate the advantage of using an accurate sound speed model in the reverse time migration process. We also explain how the increase in computational complexity can be mitigated using a frequency domain approach and a parallel computing platform.

  2. A cost-efficient frequency-domain photoacoustic imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeBoulluec, Peter; Liu, Hanli; Yuan, Baohong

    2013-09-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging techniques have recently attracted much attention and can be used for noninvasive imaging of biological tissues. Most PA imaging systems in research laboratories use the time domain method with expensive nanosecond pulsed lasers that are not affordable for most educational laboratories. Using an intensity modulated light source to excite PA signals is an alternative technique, known as the frequency domain method, with a much lower cost. In this paper, we describe a simple frequency domain PA system and demonstrate its imaging capability. The system provides opportunities not only to observe PA signals in tissue phantoms but also to acquire hands-on skills in PA signal detection. It also provides opportunities to explore the underlying mechanisms of the PA effect.

  3. Wideband image demodulation via bi-dimensional multirate frequency transformations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjing; Santhanam, Balu

    2016-09-01

    Existing image demodulation approaches based on the two-dimensional (2D) multicomponent AM-FM model assume narrowband components that can be demodulated using energy operators, Hilbert transforms, or the monogenic image approaches. However, if the FM components are wideband, then these demodulation approaches incur significant errors. Recent work by the authors extended wideband FM demodulation in one dimension to accommodate large conversion factors using multirate frequency transformations. In this paper, we extend the multirate frequency transformations technique developed for one-dimensional signals to 2D and images in conjunction with a recently proposed 2D higher-order energy demodulation approach. This extension is applied to both synthetic and real images to demonstrate the efficacy of the approach. PMID:27607487

  4. A cost-efficient frequency-domain photoacoustic imaging system

    PubMed Central

    LeBoulluec, Peter; Liu, Hanli; Yuan, Baohong

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging techniques have recently attracted much attention and can be used for noninvasive imaging of biological tissues. Most PA imaging systems in research laboratories use the time domain method with expensive nanosecond pulsed lasers that are not affordable for most educational laboratories. Using an intensity modulated light source to excite PA signals is an alternative technique, known as the frequency domain method, with a much lower cost. In this paper, we describe a simple frequency domain PA system and demonstrate its imaging capability. The system provides opportunities not only to observe PA signals in tissue phantoms, but also to acquire hands-on skills in PA signal detection. It also provides opportunities to explore the underlying mechanisms of the PA effect. PMID:24659823

  5. An introduction to medical imaging with coherent terahertz frequency radiation.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, A J; Berry, E; Zinovev, N N; Walker, G C; Smith, M A; Chamberlain, J M

    2002-04-01

    Methods have recently been developed that make use of electromagnetic radiation at terahertz (THz) frequencies, the region of the spectrum between millimetre wavelengths and the infrared, for imaging purposes. Radiation at these wavelengths is non-ionizing and subject to far less Rayleigh scatter than visible or infrared wavelengths, making it suitable for medical applications. This paper introduces THz pulsed imaging and discusses its potential for in vivo medical applications in comparison with existing modalities.

  6. Predicting the structure and vibrational frequencies of ethylene using harmonic and anharmonic approaches at the Kohn-Sham complete basis set limit.

    PubMed

    Buczek, Aneta; Kupka, Teobald; Broda, Małgorzata A; Żyła, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    In this work, regular convergence patterns of the structural, harmonic, and VPT2-calculated anharmonic vibrational parameters of ethylene towards the Kohn-Sham complete basis set (KS CBS) limit are demonstrated for the first time. The performance of the VPT2 scheme implemented using density functional theory (DFT-BLYP and DFT-B3LYP) in combination with two Pople basis sets (6-311++G** and 6-311++G(3df,2pd)), the polarization-consistent basis sets pc-n, aug-pc-n, and pcseg-n (n = 0, 1, 2, 3, 4), and the correlation-consistent basis sets cc-pVXZ and aug-cc-pVXZ (X = D, T, Q, 5, 6) was tested.The BLYP-calculated harmonic frequencies were found to be markedly closer than the B3LYP-calculated harmonic frequencies to the experimentally derived values, while the calculated anharmonic frequencies consistently underestimated the observed wavenumbers. The different basis set families gave very similar estimated values for the CBS parameters. The anharmonic frequencies calculated with B3LYP/aug-pc-3 were consistently significantly higher than those obtained with the pc-3 basis set; applying the aug-pcseg-n basis set family alleviated this problem. Utilization of B3LYP/aug-pcseg-n basis sets instead of B3LYP/aug-cc-pVXZ, which is computationally less expensive, is suggested for medium-sized molecules. Harmonic BLYP/pc-2 calculations produced fairly accurate ethylene frequencies. Graphical Abstract In this study, the performance of the VPT2 scheme implemented using density functional theory (DFT-BLYP and DFT-B3LYP) in combination with the polarization-consistent basis sets pc-n, aug-pc-n, and pcseg-n (n = 0, 1, 2, 3, 4), and the correlation-consistent basis sets cc-pVXZ and aug-cc-pVXZ (X = D, T, Q, 5, and 6) was tested. For the first time, we demonstrated regular convergence patterns of the structural, harmonic, and VPT2-calculated anharmonic vibrational parameters of ethylene towards the Kohn-Sham complete basis set (KS CBS) limit.

  7. High-frequency ultrasound imaging for breast cancer biopsy guidance.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Thomas; Yoon, Changhan; Choi, Hojong; Eliahoo, Payam; Kim, Hyung Ham; Yamashita, Mary W; Hovanessian-Larsen, Linda J; Lang, Julie E; Sener, Stephen F; Vallone, John; Martin, Sue E; Kirk Shung, K

    2015-10-01

    Image-guided core needle biopsy is the current gold standard for breast cancer diagnosis. Microcalcifications, an important radiographic finding on mammography suggestive of early breast cancer such as ductal carcinoma in situ, are usually biopsied under stereotactic guidance. This procedure, however, is uncomfortable for patients and requires the use of ionizing radiation. It would be preferable to biopsy microcalcifications under ultrasound guidance since it is a faster procedure, more comfortable for the patient, and requires no radiation. However, microcalcifications cannot reliably be detected with the current standard ultrasound imaging systems. This study is motivated by the clinical need for real-time high-resolution ultrasound imaging of microcalcifications, so that biopsies can be accurately performed under ultrasound guidance. We have investigated how high-frequency ultrasound imaging can enable visualization of microstructures in ex vivo breast tissue biopsy samples. We generated B-mode images of breast tissue and applied the Nakagami filtering technique to help refine image output so that microcalcifications could be better assessed during ultrasound-guided core biopsies. We describe the preliminary clinical results of high-frequency ultrasound imaging of ex vivo breast biopsy tissue with microcalcifications and without Nakagami filtering and the correlation of these images with the pathology examination by hematoxylin and eosin stain and whole slide digital scanning. PMID:26693167

  8. High-frequency ultrasonic imaging of thickly sliced specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyasaka, Chiaki; Tittmann, Bernhard R.; Chandraratna, Premindra A. N.

    2003-07-01

    It has been reported that a mechanical scanning reflection acoustic microscope (hereinafter called simply "SAM"), using high frequency ultrasonic tone-burst waves, can form a horizontal cross-sectional image (i.e., c-scan image) showing a highly resolved cellular structure of biological tissue. However, the tissue prepared for the SAM has been mostly a thinly sectioned specimen. In this study, the SAM images of specimens thickly sectioned from the tissue were analyzed. Optical and scanning acoustic microscopies were used to evaluate tissues of human small intestine and esophagus. For preparing thin specimens, the tissue was embedded in paraffin, and substantially sectioned at 5-10μm by the microtome. For optical microscopy, the tissue was stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and affixed onto glass substrates. For scanning acoustic microscopy, two types of specimens were prepared: thinly sectioned specimens affixed on the glass substrate, wherein the specimens were deparaffinized in xylene, but not stained, and thickely sectioned specimens. Images of the thick specimens obtained with frequency at 200 MHz revealed cellular structures. The morphology was very similar to that seen in the thinly sectioned specimens with optical and scanning acoustic microscopy. In addition, scanning electron microscopy was used to compare the images of biological tissue. An acoustic lens with frequency at 200 MHz permitted the imaging of surface and/or subsurface of microstructures in the thick sections of small intestine and esophagus.

  9. Spectroscopic imaging of buried layers in 2+1D via tabletop ptychography with high-harmonic EUV illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Dennis F.; Porter, Christina L.; Shanblatt, Elisabeth R.; Mancini, Giulia F.; Karl, Robert; Tanksalvala, Michael; Bevis, Charles; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Murnane, Margaret M.; Adams, Daniel E.

    2016-03-01

    We use EUV coherent microscopy to obtain high-resolution images of buried interfaces, with chemical specificity, in 2+1 dimensions. We perform reflection mode, ptychographic, coherent diffractive imaging with tabletop EUV light, at 29nm, produced by high harmonic generation. Our damascene-style samples consist of copper structures inlaid in SiO2, polished nearly flat with chemical mechanical polishing. We obtain images of both an unaltered damascene as well as one buried below a 100nm thick layer of evaporated aluminum. The aluminum is opaque to visible light and thick enough that neither optical microscopy, SEM, nor AFM can access the buried interface. EUV microscopy is able to image the buried structures, non-destructively, in conditions where other techniques cannot.

  10. Electromagnetic induction imaging with a radio-frequency atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deans, Cameron; Marmugi, Luca; Hussain, Sarah; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2016-03-01

    We report on a compact, tunable, and scalable to large arrays imaging device, based on a radio-frequency optically pumped atomic magnetometer operating in magnetic induction tomography modality. Imaging of conductive objects is performed at room temperature, in an unshielded environment and without background subtraction. Conductivity maps of target objects exhibit not only excellent performance in terms of shape reconstruction but also demonstrate detection of sub-millimetric cracks and penetration of conductive barriers. The results presented here demonstrate the potential of a future generation of imaging instruments, which combine magnetic induction tomography and the unmatched performance of atomic magnetometers.

  11. Diagnosis of colon cancer using frequency domain fluorescence imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinish, U. S.; Gulati, P.; Murukeshan, V. M.; Seah, L. K.

    2007-03-01

    Early detection and treatment of colon cancer has been associated with better disease prognosis. Conventional and reported optical techniques have limitations in detecting early stages of colon cancer growth. In this paper, a homodyne signal processing assisted frequency domain (FD) fluorescence imaging methodology is proposed for the early diagnosis of colon cancer. Simulated phantom tissues representing the biopsy samples at different stages of colon cancer growth are prepared and used for the imaging study. Selective imaging of healthy and diseased sites simulated in the samples was achieved even for fluorescence emissions having close lifetimes and wavelength values. Possible extension of the methodology for in vivo investigations is also discussed.

  12. Polarized spatial frequency domain imaging of heart valve fiber structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goth, Will; Yang, Bin; Lesicko, John; Allen, Alicia; Sacks, Michael S.; Tunnell, James W.

    2016-03-01

    Our group previously introduced Polarized Spatial Frequency Domain Imaging (PSFDI), a wide-field, reflectance imaging technique which we used to empirically map fiber direction in porcine pulmonary heart valve leaflets (PHVL) without optical clearing or physical sectioning of the sample. Presented is an extended analysis of our PSFDI results using an inverse Mueller matrix model of polarized light scattering that allows additional maps of fiber orientation distribution, along with instrumentation permitting increased imaging speed for dynamic PHVL fiber measurements. We imaged electrospun fiber phantoms with PSFDI, and then compared these measurements to SEM data collected for the same phantoms. PHVL was then imaged and compared to results of the same leaflets optically cleared and imaged with small angle light scattering (SALS). The static PHVL images showed distinct regional variance of fiber orientation distribution, matching our SALS results. We used our improved imaging speed to observe bovine tendon subjected to dynamic loading using a biaxial stretching device. Our dynamic imaging experiment showed trackable changes in the fiber microstructure of biological tissue under loading. Our new PSFDI analysis model and instrumentation allows characterization of fiber structure within heart valve tissues (as validated with SALS measurements), along with imaging of dynamic fiber remodeling. The experimental data will be used as inputs to our constitutive models of PHVL tissue to fully characterize these tissues' elastic behavior, and has immediate application in determining the mechanisms of structural and functional failure in PHVLs used as bio-prosthetic implants.

  13. Contour mapping of Europa using frequency diverse spatial heterodyne imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, R. L.; Höft, Thomas; Marron, J. C.; Pitman, Joe; Seldomridge, Nathan

    2006-09-01

    Three dimensional imaging of planetary and lunar surfaces has traditionally been the purview of Synthetic Aperture Radar payloads. We propose an active imaging technique that utilizes laser frequency diversity coupled with spatial heterodyne imaging. Spatial heterodyne imaging makes use of a local oscillator which encodes pupil plane object information on a carrier frequency. The object information is extracted via Fourier analysis. Snapshots of the encoded pupil plane information are acquired as the frequency of the illumination laser is varied in small steps (GHz). The resulting three-dimensional data cube is processed to provide angle-angle-range information. The range resolution can be adjusted from microns to meters simply by adjusting the range over which the illuminator laser frequency is varied. The proposed technique can provide fine resolution contour maps of planetary surfaces having widely varying characteristics of importance to science exploration, such as the search for astrobiological habitat niches near the surface of heavily irradiated Europa. This information can be used to better understand the geological processes that form the surface features, and help characterize candidate potential habitat sites on the surface of Europa and other planetary bodies of interest. In this paper we present simulations and experimental data that demonstrate the concept.

  14. A New High Frequency Ultrasound Skin Imaging System: Imaging Properties and Clinical in Vivo Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, M.; Scharenberg, R.; Moussa, G.; Sand, M.; Hoffmann, K.; Altmeyer, P.; Ermert, H.

    In this paper, a new high frequency ultrasound (HFUS) system for high-resolution skin imaging is presented. For imaging, mechanical scans are performed with spherically focused single element transducers. Two separate applicators with different transducers are utilized to fulfill the different requirements for imaging the skin with 20MHz ultrasound and for lower range high resolution imaging of the uppermost skin layers with HFUS in the 100MHz range. Clinical images were acquired in the imaging lab of the Dermatological University Hospital. Imaging results of wound healing process and skin lesion nevus investigations are presented

  15. Simulation study of second-harmonic microscopic imaging signals through tissue-like turbid media.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Xianju; Liu, Hanping; Zhuang, Zhengfei; Guo, Zhouyi

    2006-01-01

    We establish, for the first time, a simulation model for dealing with the second-harmonic signals under a microscope through a tissue-like turbid medium, based on the Monte Carlo method. With this model, the angle-resolved distribution and the signal level eta of second-harmonic light through a slab of the turbid medium are demonstrated and the effects of the thickness (d) of the turbid medium, the numerical aperture (NA) of the objective as well as the size (rho) of the scatterers forming the turbid medium are explored. Simulation results reveal that the use of a small objective NA results in a narrow angle distribution but strong second-harmonic signals. A turbid medium consisting of large scattering particles has a strong influence on the angle distribution and the signal level eta, which results in a low penetration limit for second-harmonic signals made up of ballistic photons. It is approximately 30 microm in our situation. PMID:16674203

  16. In vivo feasibility of real-time monitoring of focused ultrasound surgery (FUS) using harmonic motion imaging (HMI).

    PubMed

    Maleke, Caroline; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) technique is applied to monitor changes in mechanical properties of tissues during thermal therapy in a transgenic breast cancer mouse model in vivo. An HMIFU system, composed of a 4.5-MHz focused ultrasound (FUS) and a 3.3-MHz phased-array imaging transducer, was mechanically moved to image and ablate the entire tumor. The FUS transducer was driven by an amplitude-modulated (AM) signal at 15 Hz. The acoustic intensity ( I(spta)) was equal to 1050 W/cm(2) at the focus. A digital low-pass filter was used to filter out the spectrum of the FUS beam and its harmonics prior to displacement estimation. The resulting axial displacement was estimated using 1-D cross-correlation on the acquired RF signals. Results from two mice with eight lesions formed in each mouse (16 lesions total) showed that the average peak-to-peak displacement amplitude before and after lesion formation was respectively equal to 17.34 +/- 1.34 microm and 10.98 +/- 1.82 microm ( p < 0.001). Cell death was also confirmed by hematoxylin and eosin histology. HMI displacement can be used to monitor the relative tissue stiffness changes in real time during heating so that the treatment procedure can be performed in a time-efficient manner. The HMIFU system may, therefore, constitute a cost-efficient and reliable alternative for real-time monitoring of thermal ablation.

  17. In vivo imaging of dermal collagen in skin burn by collagen-sensitive second-harmonic-generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Takeshi; Tanaka, Ryosuke; Hase, Eiji; Fukushima, Shu-ichiro; Araki, Tsutomu

    2013-02-01

    Optical assessment of skin burns is possible with second-harmonic-generation (SHG) microscopy due to its high sensitivity to thermal denaturation of collagen molecules. In contrast to previous studies that were performed using excised tissue specimens ex vivo, in this study, we demonstrated in vivo observation of dermal collagen fibers in living rat burn models with SHG microscopy. We confirmed that changes in SHG vanishing patterns in the SHG images depended on the burn degree. The results imply that SHG microscopy can be used as a low-invasiveness, highly quantitative tool for skin burn assessment.

  18. Bipolar-power-transistor-based limiter for high frequency ultrasound imaging systems

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hojong; Yang, Hao-Chung; Shung, K. Kirk

    2013-01-01

    High performance limiters are described in this paper for applications in high frequency ultrasound imaging systems. Limiters protect the ultrasound receiver from the high voltage (HV) spikes produced by the transmitter. We present a new bipolar power transistor (BPT) configuration and compare its design and performance to a diode limiter used in traditional ultrasound research and one commercially available limiter. Limiter performance depends greatly on the insertion loss (IL), total harmonic distortion (THD) and response time (RT), each of which will be evaluated in all the limiters. The results indicated that, compared with commercial limiter, BPT-based limiter had less IL (–7.7 dB), THD (–74.6 dB) and lower RT (43 ns) at 100MHz. To evaluate the capability of these limiters, they were connected to a 100 MHz single element transducer and a two-way pulse-echo test was performed. It was found that the -6 dB bandwidth and sensitivity of the transducer using BPT-based limiter were better than those of the commercial limiter by 22 % and 140 %, respectively. Compared to the commercial limiter, BPT-based limiter is shown to be capable of minimizing signal attenuation, RT and THD at high frequencies and is thus suited for high frequency ultrasound applications. PMID:24199954

  19. Three frequency false-color image of Prince Albert, Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a three-frequency, false color image of Prince Albert, Canada, centered at 53.91 north latitude and 104.69 west longitude. It was produced using data from the X-band, C-band and L-band radars that comprise the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR). SIR-C/X-SAR acquired this image on the 20th orbit of the Shuttle Endeavour. The area is located 40 km north and 30 km east of the town of Prince Albert in the Saskatchewan province of Canada. The image covers the area east of the Candle Lake, between gravel surface highways 120 and 106 and west of 106. The area in the middle of the image covers the entire Nipawin (Narrow Hills) provincial park. Most of the dark blue areas in the image are the ice covered lakes. The dark area on the top right corner of the image is the White Gull Lake north of the intersection of highway 120 and 913. The right middle part of the image shows Lake Ispuchaw and Lower Fishing Lake. The deforested areas are shown by light

  20. Performance assessment of HIFU lesion detection by harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU): a 3-D finite-element-based framework with experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Gary Y; Luo, Jianwen; Marquet, Fabrice; Maleke, Caroline; Vappou, Jonathan; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2011-12-01

    Harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) is a novel high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy monitoring method with feasibilities demonstrated in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. Its principle is based on amplitude-modulated (AM) - harmonic motion imaging (HMI), an oscillatory radiation force used for imaging the tissue mechanical response during thermal ablation. In this study, a theoretical framework of HMIFU is presented, comprising a customized nonlinear wave propagation model, a finite-element (FE) analysis module and an image-formation model. The objective of this study is to develop such a framework to (1) assess the fundamental performance of HMIFU in detecting HIFU lesions based on the change in tissue apparent elasticity, i.e., the increasing Young's modulus, and the HIFU lesion size with respect to the HIFU exposure time and (2) validate the simulation findings ex vivo. The same HMI and HMIFU parameters as in the experimental studies were used, i.e., 4.5-MHz HIFU frequency and 25 Hz AM frequency. For a lesion-to-background Young's modulus ratio of 3, 6 and 9, the FE and estimated HMI displacement ratios were equal to 1.83, 3.69 and 5.39 and 1.65, 3.19 and 4.59, respectively. In experiments, the HMI displacement followed a similar increasing trend of 1.19, 1.28 and 1.78 at 10-s, 20-s and 30-s HIFU exposure, respectively. In addition, moderate agreement in lesion size growth was found in both simulations (16.2, 73.1 and 334.7 mm(2)) and experiments (26.2, 94.2 and 206.2 mm(2)). Therefore, the feasibility of HMIFU for HIFU lesion detection based on the underlying tissue elasticity changes was verified through the developed theoretical framework, i.e., validation of the fundamental performance of the HMIFU system for lesion detection, localization and quantification, was demonstrated both theoretically and ex vivo.

  1. Time and Space Resolved High Harmonic Imaging of Electron Tunnelling from Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, O.

    2009-05-01

    High harmonic generation in intense laser fields carries the promise of combining sub-Angstrom spatial and attosecond temporal resolution of electronic structures and dynamics in molecules, see e.g. [1-3]. High harmonic emission occurs when an electron detached from a molecule by an intense laser field recombines with the parent ion [4]. Similar to Young's double-slit experiment, recombination to several ``lobes'' of the same molecular orbital can produce interference minima and maxima in harmonic intensities [1]. These minima (maxima) carry structural information -- they occur when the de-Broglie wavelength of the recombining electron matches distances between the centers. We demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally that amplitude minima (maxima) in the harmonic spectra can also have dynamical origin, reflecting multi-electron dynamics in the molecule. We use high harmonic spectra to record this dynamics and reconstruct the position of the hole left in the molecule after ionization. Experimental data are consistent with the hole starting in different places as the ionization dynamics changes from tunnelling to the multi-photon regime. Importantly, hole localization and subsequent attosecond dynamics are induced even in the tunnelling limit. Thus, even ``static'' tunnelling induced by a tip of a tunnelling microscope will generate similar attosecond dynamics in a sample. We anticipate that our approach will become standard in disentangling spatial and temporal information from high harmonic spectra of molecules.[4pt] In collaboration with Serguei Patchkovskii, National Research Council, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6, Canada; Yann Mairesse, NRC Canada and CELIA, Universit'e Bordeaux I, UMR 5107 (CNRS, Bordeaux 1, CEA), 351 Cours de la Lib'eration, 33405 Talence Cedex, France; Nirit Dudovich, NRC Canada and Department of Physics of Complex Systems, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel; David Villeneuve, Paul Corkum, NRC Canada

  2. High-frequency ultrasonic arrays for ocular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, M. D.; Kline-Schoder, R. J.; Douville, G. M.; Gagne, J. R.; Morrison, K. T.; Audette, W. E.; Kynor, D. B.

    2007-03-01

    High-resolution ultrasound imaging of the anterior portion of the eye has been shown to provide important information for sizing of intraocular lens implants, diagnosis of pathological conditions, and creation of detailed maps of corneal topography to guide refractive surgery. Current ultrasound imaging systems rely on mechanical scanning of a single acoustic element over the surface of the eye to create the three-dimensional information needed by clinicians. This mechanical scanning process is time-consuming and subject to errors caused by eye movement during the scanning period. This paper describes development of linear ultrasound imaging arrays intended to increase the speed of image acquisition and reduce problems associated with ocular motion. The arrays consist of a linear arrangement of high-frequency transducer elements designed to operate in the 50 - 75 MHz frequency range. The arrays are produced using single-crystal lithium niobate piezoelectric material, thin film electrodes, and epoxy-based acoustic layers. The array elements have been used to image steel test structures and bovine cornea.

  3. Linewidth of the harmonics in a microwave frequency comb generated by focusing a mode-locked ultrafast laser on a tunneling junction

    SciTech Connect

    Hagmann, Mark J.; Stenger, Frank S.; Yarotski, Dmitry A.

    2013-12-14

    Previous analyses suggest that microwave frequency combs (MFCs) with harmonics having extremely narrow linewidths could be produced by photodetection with a mode-locked ultrafast laser. In the MFC generated by focusing a passively mode-locked ultrafast laser on a tunneling junction, 200 harmonics from 74.254 MHz to 14.85 GHz have reproducible measured linewidths approximating the 1 Hz resolution bandwidth (RBW) of the spectrum analyzer. However, in new measurements at a RBW of 0.1 Hz, the linewidths are distributed from 0.12 to 1.17 Hz. Measurements and analysis suggest that, because the laser is not stabilized, the stochastic drift in the pulse repetition rate is the cause for the distribution in measured linewidths. It appears that there are three cases in which the RBW is (1) greater than, (2) less than, or (3) comparable with the intrinsic linewidth. The measured spectra in the third class are stochastic and may show two or more peaks at a single harmonic.

  4. Noninvasive corneal stromal collagen imaging using two-photon-generated second-harmonic signals

    PubMed Central

    Morishige, Naoyuki; Petroll, W. Matthew; Nishida, Teruo; Kenney, M. Cristina; Jester, James V.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE To investigate the feasibility of using femtosecond-pulse lasers to produce second-harmonic generated (SHG) signals to noninvasively assess corneal stromal collagen organization. SETTING The Eye Institute, University of California, Irvine, California, USA. METHODS Mouse, rabbit, and human corneas were examined by two-photon confocal microscopy using a variable-wavelength femtosecond lasers to produce SHG signals. Two types were detected: forward scattered and backward scattered. Wavelength dependence of the SHG signal was confirmed by spectral separation using the 510 Meta (Zeiss). To verify the spatial relation between SHG signals and corneal cells, staining of cytoskeletons and nuclei was performed. RESULTS Second-harmonic-generated signal intensity was strongest with an excitation wavelength of 800 nm for all 3 species. Second-harmonic-generated forward signals showed a distinct fibrillar pattern organized into bands suggesting lamellae, while backscattered SHG signals appeared more diffuse and indistinct. Reconstruction of SHG signals showed two patterns of lamellar organization: highly interwoven in the anterior stroma and orthogonally arranged in the posterior stroma. Unique to the human cornea was the presence of transverse, sutural lamellae that inserted into Bowman’s layer, suggesting an anchoring function. CONCLUSIONS Using two-photon confocal microscopy to generate SHG signals from the corneal collagen provides a powerful new approach to noninvasively study corneal structure. Human corneas had a unique organizational pattern with sutural lamellae to provide important biomechanical support that was not present in mouse or rabbit corneas. PMID:17081858

  5. Brillouin-zone integration schemes: an efficiency study for the phonon frequency moments of the harmonic, solid, one-component plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Albers, R.C.; Gubernatis, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    The efficiency of four different Brillouin-zone integration schemes including the uniform mesh, special point method, special directions method, and Holas method are compared for calculating moments of the harmonic phonon frequencies of the solid one-component plasma. Very accurate values for the moments are also presented. The Holas method for which weights and integration points can easily be generated has roughly the same efficiency as the special directions method, which is much superior to the uniform mesh and special point methods for this problem.

  6. Frequency Up-Conversion Photon-Type Terahertz Imager.

    PubMed

    Fu, Z L; Gu, L L; Guo, X G; Tan, Z Y; Wan, W J; Zhou, T; Shao, D X; Zhang, R; Cao, J C

    2016-01-01

    Terahertz imaging has many important potential applications. Due to the failure of Si readout integrated circuits (ROICs) and the thermal mismatch between the photo-detector arrays and the ROICs at temperatures below 40 K, there are big technical challenges to construct terahertz photo-type focal plane arrays. In this work, we report pixel-less photo-type terahertz imagers based on the frequency up-conversion technique. The devices are composed of terahertz quantum-well photo-detectors (QWPs) and near-infrared (NIR) light emitting diodes (LEDs) which are grown in sequence on the same substrates using molecular beam epitaxy. In such an integrated QWP-LED device, photocurrent in the QWP drives the LED to emit NIR light. By optimizing the structural parameters of the QWP-LED, the QWP part and the LED part both work well. The maximum values of the internal and external energy up-conversion efficiencies are around 20% and 0.5%. A laser spot of a homemade terahertz quantum cascade laser is imaged by the QWP-LED together with a commercial Si camera. The pixel-less imaging results show that the image blurring induced by the transverse spreading of photocurrent is negligible. The demonstrated pixel-less imaging opens a new way to realize high performance terahertz imaging devices. PMID:27147281

  7. High-frequency Ultrasound Imaging of Mouse Cervical Lymph Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Weed, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    High-frequency ultrasound (HFUS) is widely employed as a non-invasive method for imaging internal anatomic structures in experimental small animal systems. HFUS has the ability to detect structures as small as 30 µm, a property that has been utilized for visualizing superficial lymph nodes in rodents in brightness (B)-mode. Combining power Doppler with B-mode imaging allows for measuring circulatory blood flow within lymph nodes and other organs. While HFUS has been utilized for lymph node imaging in a number of mouse  model systems, a detailed protocol describing HFUS imaging and characterization of the cervical lymph nodes in mice has not been reported. Here, we show that HFUS can be adapted to detect and characterize cervical lymph nodes in mice. Combined B-mode and power Doppler imaging can be used to detect increases in blood flow in immunologically-enlarged cervical nodes. We also describe the use of B-mode imaging to conduct fine needle biopsies of cervical lymph nodes to retrieve lymph tissue for histological  analysis. Finally, software-aided steps are described to calculate changes in lymph node volume and to visualize changes in lymph node morphology following image reconstruction. The ability to visually monitor changes in cervical lymph node biology over time provides a simple and powerful technique for the non-invasive monitoring of cervical lymph node alterations in preclinical mouse models of oral cavity disease. PMID:26274059

  8. Frequency Up-Conversion Photon-Type Terahertz Imager

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Z. L.; Gu, L. L.; Guo, X. G.; Tan, Z. Y.; Wan, W. J.; Zhou, T.; Shao, D. X.; Zhang, R.; Cao, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    Terahertz imaging has many important potential applications. Due to the failure of Si readout integrated circuits (ROICs) and the thermal mismatch between the photo-detector arrays and the ROICs at temperatures below 40 K, there are big technical challenges to construct terahertz photo-type focal plane arrays. In this work, we report pixel-less photo-type terahertz imagers based on the frequency up-conversion technique. The devices are composed of terahertz quantum-well photo-detectors (QWPs) and near-infrared (NIR) light emitting diodes (LEDs) which are grown in sequence on the same substrates using molecular beam epitaxy. In such an integrated QWP-LED device, photocurrent in the QWP drives the LED to emit NIR light. By optimizing the structural parameters of the QWP-LED, the QWP part and the LED part both work well. The maximum values of the internal and external energy up-conversion efficiencies are around 20% and 0.5%. A laser spot of a homemade terahertz quantum cascade laser is imaged by the QWP-LED together with a commercial Si camera. The pixel-less imaging results show that the image blurring induced by the transverse spreading of photocurrent is negligible. The demonstrated pixel-less imaging opens a new way to realize high performance terahertz imaging devices. PMID:27147281

  9. Frequency Up-Conversion Photon-Type Terahertz Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Z. L.; Gu, L. L.; Guo, X. G.; Tan, Z. Y.; Wan, W. J.; Zhou, T.; Shao, D. X.; Zhang, R.; Cao, J. C.

    2016-05-01

    Terahertz imaging has many important potential applications. Due to the failure of Si readout integrated circuits (ROICs) and the thermal mismatch between the photo-detector arrays and the ROICs at temperatures below 40 K, there are big technical challenges to construct terahertz photo-type focal plane arrays. In this work, we report pixel-less photo-type terahertz imagers based on the frequency up-conversion technique. The devices are composed of terahertz quantum-well photo-detectors (QWPs) and near-infrared (NIR) light emitting diodes (LEDs) which are grown in sequence on the same substrates using molecular beam epitaxy. In such an integrated QWP-LED device, photocurrent in the QWP drives the LED to emit NIR light. By optimizing the structural parameters of the QWP-LED, the QWP part and the LED part both work well. The maximum values of the internal and external energy up-conversion efficiencies are around 20% and 0.5%. A laser spot of a homemade terahertz quantum cascade laser is imaged by the QWP-LED together with a commercial Si camera. The pixel-less imaging results show that the image blurring induced by the transverse spreading of photocurrent is negligible. The demonstrated pixel-less imaging opens a new way to realize high performance terahertz imaging devices.

  10. High-frequency Ultrasound Imaging of Mouse Cervical Lymph Nodes.

    PubMed

    Walk, Elyse L; McLaughlin, Sarah L; Weed, Scott A

    2015-01-01

    High-frequency ultrasound (HFUS) is widely employed as a non-invasive method for imaging internal anatomic structures in experimental small animal systems. HFUS has the ability to detect structures as small as 30 µm, a property that has been utilized for visualizing superficial lymph nodes in rodents in brightness (B)-mode. Combining power Doppler with B-mode imaging allows for measuring circulatory blood flow within lymph nodes and other organs. While HFUS has been utilized for lymph node imaging in a number of mouse  model systems, a detailed protocol describing HFUS imaging and characterization of the cervical lymph nodes in mice has not been reported. Here, we show that HFUS can be adapted to detect and characterize cervical lymph nodes in mice. Combined B-mode and power Doppler imaging can be used to detect increases in blood flow in immunologically-enlarged cervical nodes. We also describe the use of B-mode imaging to conduct fine needle biopsies of cervical lymph nodes to retrieve lymph tissue for histological  analysis. Finally, software-aided steps are described to calculate changes in lymph node volume and to visualize changes in lymph node morphology following image reconstruction. The ability to visually monitor changes in cervical lymph node biology over time provides a simple and powerful technique for the non-invasive monitoring of cervical lymph node alterations in preclinical mouse models of oral cavity disease. PMID:26274059

  11. High-speed polarization sensitive optical frequency domain imaging with frequency multiplexing.

    PubMed

    Oh, W Y; Yun, S H; Vakoc, B J; Shishkov, M; Desjardins, A E; Park, B H; de Boer, J F; Tearney, G J; Bouma, B E

    2008-01-21

    Polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) provides a cross-sectional image of birefringence in biological samples that is complementary in many applications to the standard reflectance-based image. Recent ex vivo studies have demonstrated that birefringence mapping enables the characterization of collagen and smooth muscle concentration and distribution in vascular tissues. Instruments capable of applying these measurements percutaneously in vivo may provide new insights into coronary atherosclerosis and acute myocardial infarction. We have developed a polarization sensitive optical frequency domain imaging (PS-OFDI) system that enables high-speed intravascular birefringence imaging through a fiber-optic catheter. The novel design of this system utilizes frequency multiplexing to simultaneously measure reflectance of two incident polarization states, overcoming concerns regarding temporal variations of the catheter fiber birefringence and spatial variations in the birefringence of the sample. We demonstrate circular cross-sectional birefringence imaging of a human coronary artery ex vivo through a flexible fiber-optic catheter with an A-line rate of 62 kHz and a ranging depth of 6.2 mm.

  12. Multispectral mid-infrared imaging using frequency upconversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Nicolai; Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Pedersen, Christian

    2013-03-01

    It has recently been shown that it is possible to upconvert infrared images to the near infrared region with high quantum efficiency and low noise by three-wave mixing with a laser field [1]. If the mixing laser is single-frequency, the upconverted image is simply a band-pass filtered version of the infrared object field, with a bandwidth corresponding given by the acceptance parameter of the conversion process, and a center frequency given by the phase-match condition. Tuning of the phase-matched wavelengths has previously been demonstrated by changing the temperature [2] or angle [3 Keywords: Infrared imaging, nonlinear frequency conversion, diode lasers, upconversion ] of the nonlinear material. Unfortunately, temperature tuning is slow, and angle tuning typically results in alignment issues. Here we present a novel approach where the wavelength of the mixing field is used as a tuning parameter, allowing for fast tuning and hence potentially fast image acquisition, paving the way for upconversion based real time multispectral imaging. In the present realization the upconversion module consists of an external cavity tapered diode laser in a Littrow configuration with a computer controlled feedback grating. The output from a tunable laser is used as seed for a fiber amplifier system, boosting the power to approx. 3 W over the tuning range from 1025 to 1085 nm. Using a periodically poled lithium niobate crystal, the infrared wavelength that can be phase-matched is tunable over more than 200 nm. Using a crystal with multiple poling periods allows for upconversion within the entire transparency range of the nonlinear material.

  13. Single-Shot Diffractive Imaging with a Table-Top Femtosecond Soft X-Ray Laser-Harmonics Source

    SciTech Connect

    Ravasio, A.; Gauthier, D.; Billon, M.; Caumes, J-P.; Garzella, D.; Geleoc, M.; Gobert, O.; Hergott, J-F.; Pena, A-M.; Perez, H.; Carre, B.; Maia, F. R. N. C.; Bourhis, E.; Gierak, J.; Madouri, A.; Mailly, D.; Schiedt, B.; Fajardo, M.; Gautier, J.; Zeitoun, P.

    2009-07-10

    Coherent x-ray diffractive imaging is a powerful method for studies on nonperiodic structures on the nanoscale. Access to femtosecond dynamics in major physical, chemical, and biological processes requires single-shot diffraction data. Up to now, this has been limited to intense coherent pulses from a free electron laser. Here we show that laser-driven ultrashort x-ray sources offer a comparatively inexpensive alternative. We present measurements of single-shot diffraction patterns from isolated nano-objects with a single 20 fs pulse from a table-top high-harmonic x-ray laser. Images were reconstructed with a resolution of 119 nm from the single shot and 62 nm from multiple shots.

  14. Expansion-maximization-compression algorithm with spherical harmonics for single particle imaging with x-ray lasers.

    PubMed

    Flamant, Julien; Le Bihan, Nicolas; Martin, Andrew V; Manton, Jonathan H

    2016-05-01

    In three-dimensional (3D) single particle imaging with x-ray free-electron lasers, particle orientation is not recorded during measurement but is instead recovered as a necessary step in the reconstruction of a 3D image from the diffraction data. Here we use harmonic analysis on the sphere to cleanly separate the angular and radial degrees of freedom of this problem, providing new opportunities to efficiently use data and computational resources. We develop the expansion-maximization-compression algorithm into a shell-by-shell approach and implement an angular bandwidth limit that can be gradually raised during the reconstruction. We study the minimum number of patterns and minimum rotation sampling required for a desired angular and radial resolution. These extensions provide new avenues to improve computational efficiency and speed of convergence, which are critically important considering the very large datasets expected from experiment.

  15. Monitoring the effect of low-level laser therapy in healing process of skin with second harmonic generation imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoman; Yu, Biying; Weng, Cuncheng; Li, Hui

    2014-11-01

    The 632nm wavelength low intensity He-Ne laser was used to irradiated on 15 mice which had skin wound. The dynamic changes and wound healing processes were observed with nonlinear spectral imaging technology. We observed that:(1)The wound healing process was accelerated by the low-level laser therapy(LLLT);(2)The new tissues produced second harmonic generation (SHG) signals. Collagen content and microstructure differed dramatically at different time pointed along the wound healing. Our observation shows that the low intensity He-Ne laser irradiation can accelerate the healing process of skin wound in mice, and SHG imaging technique can be used to observe wound healing process, which is useful for quantitative characterization of wound status during wound healing process.

  16. Harmonic motion imaging for abdominal tumor detection and high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation monitoring: an in vivo feasibility study in a transgenic mouse model of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Hou, Gary Y; Han, Yang; Payen, Thomas; Palermo, Carmine F; Olive, Kenneth P; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-09-01

    Harmonic motion imaging (HMI) is a radiationforce- based elasticity imaging technique that tracks oscillatory tissue displacements induced by sinusoidal ultrasonic radiation force to assess the resulting oscillatory displacement denoting the underlying tissue stiffness. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of HMI in pancreatic tumor detection and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring. The HMI system consisted of a focused ultrasound transducer, which generated sinusoidal radiation force to induce oscillatory tissue motion at 50 Hz, and a diagnostic ultrasound transducer, which detected the axial tissue displacements based on acquired radio-frequency signals using a 1-D cross-correlation algorithm. For pancreatic tumor detection, HMI images were generated for pancreatic tumors in transgenic mice and normal pancreases in wild-type mice. The obtained HMI images showed a high contrast between normal and malignant pancreases with an average peak-to-peak HMI displacement ratio of 3.2. Histological analysis showed that no tissue damage was associated with HMI when it was used for the sole purpose of elasticity imaging. For pancreatic tumor ablation monitoring, the focused ultrasound transducer was operated at a higher acoustic power and longer pulse length than that used in tumor detection to simultaneously induce HIFU thermal ablation and oscillatory tissue displacements, allowing HMI monitoring without interrupting tumor ablation. HMI monitoring of HIFU ablation found significant decreases in the peak-to-peak HMI displacements before and after HIFU ablation with a reduction rate ranging from 15.8% to 57.0%. The formation of thermal lesions after HIFU exposure was confirmed by histological analysis. This study demonstrated the feasibility of HMI in abdominal tumor detection and HIFU ablation monitoring.

  17. Three frequency false color image of Flevoland, the Netherlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a three-frequency false color image of Flevoland, the Netherlands, centered at 52.4 degrees north latitude, 5.4 degrees east longitude. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the Shuttle Endeavour. The area shown covers an area approximately 25 kilometers by 28 kilometers. Flevoland, which fills the lower two-thirds of the image, is a very flat area that is made up of reclaimed land that is used for agriculture and forestry. At the top of the image, across the canal from Flevoland, is an older forest shown in red; the city of Harderwijk is shown in white on the shore of the canal. At this time of the year, the agricultural fields are bare soil, and they show up in this image in blue. The dark blue areas are water and the small dots in the canal are boats. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory alternative photo number is P-43941.

  18. Frequency identification of vibration signals using video camera image data.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Yih-Nen; Wu, Chia-Hung

    2012-01-01

    This study showed that an image data acquisition system connecting a high-speed camera or webcam to a notebook or personal computer (PC) can precisely capture most dominant modes of vibration signal, but may involve the non-physical modes induced by the insufficient frame rates. Using a simple model, frequencies of these modes are properly predicted and excluded. Two experimental designs, which involve using an LED light source and a vibration exciter, are proposed to demonstrate the performance. First, the original gray-level resolution of a video camera from, for instance, 0 to 256 levels, was enhanced by summing gray-level data of all pixels in a small region around the point of interest. The image signal was further enhanced by attaching a white paper sheet marked with a black line on the surface of the vibration system in operation to increase the gray-level resolution. Experimental results showed that the Prosilica CV640C CMOS high-speed camera has the critical frequency of inducing the false mode at 60 Hz, whereas that of the webcam is 7.8 Hz. Several factors were proven to have the effect of partially suppressing the non-physical modes, but they cannot eliminate them completely. Two examples, the prominent vibration modes of which are less than the associated critical frequencies, are examined to demonstrate the performances of the proposed systems. In general, the experimental data show that the non-contact type image data acquisition systems are potential tools for collecting the low-frequency vibration signal of a system. PMID:23202026

  19. Detecting vocal fatigue in student singers using acoustic measures of mean fundamental frequency, jitter, shimmer, and harmonics-to-noise ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisakun, Siphan

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the ability of four acoustic parameters, mean fundamental frequency, jitter, shimmer, and harmonics-to-noise ratio, to detect vocal fatigue in student singers. The participants are 15 voice students, who perform two distinct tasks, data collection task and vocal fatiguing task. The data collection task includes the sustained vowel /a/, reading a standard passage, and self-rate on a vocal fatigue form. The vocal fatiguing task is the vocal practice of musical scores for a total of 45 minutes. The four acoustic parameters are extracted using the software EZVoicePlus. The data analyses are performed to answer eight research questions. The first four questions relate to correlations of the self-rating scale and each of the four parameters. The next four research questions relate to differences in the parameters over time using one-factor repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). The result yields a proposed acoustic profile of vocal fatigue in student singers. This profile is characterized by increased fundamental frequency; slightly decreased jitter; slightly decreased shimmer; and slightly increased harmonics-to-noise ratio. The proposed profile requires further investigation.

  20. Molecular structure, Normal Coordinate Analysis, harmonic vibrational frequencies, Natural Bond Orbital, TD-DFT calculations and biological activity analysis of antioxidant drug 7-hydroxycoumarin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, S.; Sylvestre, S.; Jayarajan, D.; Amalanathan, M.; Oudayakumar, K.; Gnanapoongothai, T.; Jayavarthanan, T.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we report harmonic vibrational frequencies, molecular structure, NBO and HOMO, LUMO analysis of Umbelliferone also known as 7-hydroxycoumarin (7HC). The optimized geometric bond lengths and bond angles obtained by computation (monomer and dimmer) shows good agreement with experimental XRD data. Harmonic frequencies of 7HC were determined and analyzed by DFT utilizing 6-311+G(d,p) as basis set. The assignments of the vibrational spectra have been carried out with the help of Normal Coordinate Analysis (NCA) following the Scaled Quantum Mechanical Force Field Methodology (SQMFF). The change in electron density (ED) in the σ* and π* antibonding orbitals and stabilization energies E(2) have been calculated by Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis to give clear evidence of stabilization originating in the hyperconjugation of hydrogen-bonded interaction. The energy and oscillator strength calculated by Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT) complements with the experimental findings. The simulated spectra satisfactorily coincides with the experimental spectra. Microbial activity of studied compounds was tested against Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Psuedomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella typhi and Enterococcus faecalis.

  1. Broadband 120 MHz Impedance Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) with Calibrated Resistance and Quantitative Dissipation for Biosensing Measurements at Higher Harmonic Frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Kasper, Manuel; Traxler, Lukas; Salopek, Jasmina; Grabmayr, Herwig; Ebner, Andreas; Kienberger, Ferry

    2016-01-01

    We developed an impedance quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) approach with the ability to simultaneously record mass changes and calibrated energy dissipation with high sensitivity using an impedance analyzer. This impedance QCM measures frequency shifts and resistance changes of sensing quartz crystals very stable, accurately, and calibrated, thus yielding quantitative information on mass changes and dissipation. Resistance changes below 0.3 Ω were measured with corresponding dissipation values of 0.01 µU (micro dissipation units). The broadband impedance capabilities allow measurements between 20 Hz and 120 MHz including higher harmonic modes of up to 11th order for a 10 MHz fundamental resonance frequency quartz crystal. We demonstrate the adsorbed mass, calibrated resistance, and quantitative dissipation measurements on two biological systems including the high affinity based avidin-biotin interaction and nano-assemblies of polyelectrolyte layers. The binding affinity of a protein-antibody interaction was determined. The impedance QCM is a versatile and simple method for accurate and calibrated resistance and dissipation measurements with broadband measurement capabilities for higher harmonics measurements. PMID:27231946

  2. Broadband 120 MHz Impedance Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) with Calibrated Resistance and Quantitative Dissipation for Biosensing Measurements at Higher Harmonic Frequencies.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Manuel; Traxler, Lukas; Salopek, Jasmina; Grabmayr, Herwig; Ebner, Andreas; Kienberger, Ferry

    2016-05-25

    We developed an impedance quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) approach with the ability to simultaneously record mass changes and calibrated energy dissipation with high sensitivity using an impedance analyzer. This impedance QCM measures frequency shifts and resistance changes of sensing quartz crystals very stable, accurately, and calibrated, thus yielding quantitative information on mass changes and dissipation. Resistance changes below 0.3 Ω were measured with corresponding dissipation values of 0.01 µU (micro dissipation units). The broadband impedance capabilities allow measurements between 20 Hz and 120 MHz including higher harmonic modes of up to 11th order for a 10 MHz fundamental resonance frequency quartz crystal. We demonstrate the adsorbed mass, calibrated resistance, and quantitative dissipation measurements on two biological systems including the high affinity based avidin-biotin interaction and nano-assemblies of polyelectrolyte layers. The binding affinity of a protein-antibody interaction was determined. The impedance QCM is a versatile and simple method for accurate and calibrated resistance and dissipation measurements with broadband measurement capabilities for higher harmonics measurements.

  3. Force correcting atom centred potentials for generalised gradient approximated density functional theory: Approaching hybrid functional accuracy for geometries and harmonic frequencies in small chlorofluorocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anatole von Lilienfeld, O.

    2013-08-01

    Generalised gradient approximated (GGA) density functional theory (DFT) typically overestimates polarisability and bond-lengths, and underestimates force constants of covalent bonds. To overcome this problem we show that one can use empirical force correcting atom centred potentials (FCACPs), parametrised for every nuclear species. Parameters are obtained through minimisation of a penalty functional that explicitly encodes hybrid DFT forces and static polarisabilities of reference molecules. For hydrogen, fluorine, chlorine and carbon the respective reference molecules consist of H2, F2, Cl2 and CH4. The transferability of this approach is assessed for harmonic frequencies in a small set of chlorofluorocarbon molecules. Numerical evidence, gathered for CF4, CCl4, CCl3F, CCl2F2, CClF3, ClF, HF, HCl, CFH3, CF2H2, CF3H, CHCl3, CH2Cl2 and CH3Cl indicates that the GGA+FCACP level of theory yields harmonic frequencies that are significantly more consistent with hybrid DFT values, as well as slightly reduced molecular polarisability.

  4. Broadband 120 MHz Impedance Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) with Calibrated Resistance and Quantitative Dissipation for Biosensing Measurements at Higher Harmonic Frequencies.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Manuel; Traxler, Lukas; Salopek, Jasmina; Grabmayr, Herwig; Ebner, Andreas; Kienberger, Ferry

    2016-01-01

    We developed an impedance quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) approach with the ability to simultaneously record mass changes and calibrated energy dissipation with high sensitivity using an impedance analyzer. This impedance QCM measures frequency shifts and resistance changes of sensing quartz crystals very stable, accurately, and calibrated, thus yielding quantitative information on mass changes and dissipation. Resistance changes below 0.3 Ω were measured with corresponding dissipation values of 0.01 µU (micro dissipation units). The broadband impedance capabilities allow measurements between 20 Hz and 120 MHz including higher harmonic modes of up to 11th order for a 10 MHz fundamental resonance frequency quartz crystal. We demonstrate the adsorbed mass, calibrated resistance, and quantitative dissipation measurements on two biological systems including the high affinity based avidin-biotin interaction and nano-assemblies of polyelectrolyte layers. The binding affinity of a protein-antibody interaction was determined. The impedance QCM is a versatile and simple method for accurate and calibrated resistance and dissipation measurements with broadband measurement capabilities for higher harmonics measurements. PMID:27231946

  5. Coherent Raman spectro-imaging with laser frequency combs.

    PubMed

    Ideguchi, Takuro; Holzner, Simon; Bernhardt, Birgitta; Guelachvili, Guy; Picqué, Nathalie; Hänsch, Theodor W

    2013-10-17

    Advances in optical spectroscopy and microscopy have had a profound impact throughout the physical, chemical and biological sciences. One example is coherent Raman spectroscopy, a versatile technique interrogating vibrational transitions in molecules. It offers high spatial resolution and three-dimensional sectioning capabilities that make it a label-free tool for the non-destructive and chemically selective probing of complex systems. Indeed, single-colour Raman bands have been imaged in biological tissue at video rates by using ultra-short-pulse lasers. However, identifying multiple, and possibly unknown, molecules requires broad spectral bandwidth and high resolution. Moderate spectral spans combined with high-speed acquisition are now within reach using multichannel detection or frequency-swept laser beams. Laser frequency combs are finding increasing use for broadband molecular linear absorption spectroscopy. Here we show, by exploring their potential for nonlinear spectroscopy, that they can be harnessed for coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy and spectro-imaging. The method uses two combs and can simultaneously measure, on the microsecond timescale, all spectral elements over a wide bandwidth and with high resolution on a single photodetector. Although the overall measurement time in our proof-of-principle experiments is limited by the waiting times between successive spectral acquisitions, this limitation can be overcome with further system development. We therefore expect that our approach of using laser frequency combs will not only enable new applications for nonlinear microscopy but also benefit other nonlinear spectroscopic techniques.

  6. Optimum frequency for subsurface-imaging synthetic-aperture radar

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, B.C.; Patitz, W.E.

    1993-05-01

    A subsurface-imaging synthetic-aperture radar (SISAR) has potential for application in areas as diverse as non-proliferation programs for nuclear weapons to environmental monitoring. However, most conventional synthetic-aperture radars operate at higher microwave frequencies which do not significantly penetrate below the soil surface. This study attempts to provide a basis for determining optimum frequencies and frequency ranges which will allow synthetic-aperture imaging of buried targets. Since the radar return from a buried object must compete with the return from surface clutter, the signal-to-clutter ratio is an appropriate measure of performance for a SISAR. A parameter-based modeling approach is used to model the complex dielectric constant of the soil from measured data obtained from the literature. Theoretical random-surface scattering models, based on statistical solutions to Maxwell's equations, are used to model the clutter. These models are combined to estimate the signal-to-clutter ratio for canonical targets buried in several soil configurations. Initial results indicate that the HF spectrum (3--30 MHz), although it could be used to detect certain targets under some conditions, has limited practical value for use with SISAR, while the upper vhf through uhf spectrum ([approximately]100 MHz--1 GHz) shows the most promise for a general purpose SISAR system. Recommendations are included for additional research.

  7. Harmonic engine

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Charles L.; Sewall, Noel; Boroa, Carl

    2014-08-19

    An engine based on a reciprocating piston engine that extracts work from pressurized working fluid. The engine includes a harmonic oscillator inlet valve capable of oscillating at a resonant frequency for controlling the flow of working fluid into of the engine. In particular, the inlet valve includes an inlet valve head and a spring arranged together as a harmonic oscillator so that the inlet valve head is moveable from an unbiased equilibrium position to a biased closed position occluding an inlet. Upon releasing the inlet valve the inlet valve head undergoes a single oscillation past the equilibrium positio to a maximum open position and returns to a biased return position close to the closed position to choke the flow and produce a pressure drop across the inlet valve causing the inlet valve to close. Protrusions carried either by the inlet valve head or piston head are used to bump open the inlet valve from the closed position and initiate the single oscillation of the inlet valve head, and protrusions carried either by the outlet valve head or piston head are used to close the outlet valve ahead of the bump opening of the inlet valve.

  8. Investigation of signal-to-noise ratio in frequency-domain multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yide; Khan, Aamir A; Vigil, Genevieve D; Howard, Scott S

    2016-07-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) combined with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) has enabled three-dimensional quantitative molecular microscopy in vivo. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and thus the imaging rate of MPM-FLIM, which is fundamentally limited by the shot noise and fluorescence saturation, has not been quantitatively studied yet. In this paper, we investigate the SNR performance of the frequency-domain (FD) MPM-FLIM with two figures of merit: the photon economy in the limit of shot noise, and the normalized SNR in the limit of saturation. The theoretical results and Monte Carlo simulations find that two-photon FD-FLIM requires 50% fewer photons to achieve the same SNR as conventional one-photon FLIM. We also analytically show that the MPM-FD-FLIM can exploit the DC and higher harmonic components generated by nonlinear optical mixing of the excitation light to improve SNR, reducing the required number of photons by an additional 50%. Finally, the effect of fluorophore saturation on the experimental SNR performance is discussed. PMID:27409702

  9. Harmonic Golay coded excitation based on harmonic quadrature demodulation method.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Min; Song, Jae-Hee; Song, Tai-Kyong

    2008-01-01

    Harmonic coded excitation techniques have been used to increase SNR of harmonic imaging with limited peak voltage. Harmonic Golay coded excitation, in particular, generates each scan line using four transmit-receive cycles, unlike conventional Golay coded excitation method, thus resulting in low frame rates. In this paper we propose a method of increasing the frame rate of said method without impacting the image quality. The proposed method performs two transmit-receive cycles using QPSK code to ensure that the harmonic components of incoming signals are Golay coded and uses harmonic quadrature demodulation to extract compressed second harmonic component only. The proposed method has been validated through mathematical analysis and MATLAB simulation, and has been verified to yield a limited error of -52.08dB compared to the ideal case. Therefore, the proposed method doubles the frame rate compared to the existing harmonic Golay coded excitation method without significantly deteriorating the image quality.

  10. Spatial-frequency-based metric for image superresolution.

    PubMed

    Woods, Matthew; Katsaggelos, Aggelos K

    2015-11-01

    The image processing technique known as superresolution (SR) has the potential to allow engineers to specify lower resolution and, therefore, less expensive cameras for a given task by enhancing the base camera's resolution. This is especially true in the remote detection and classification of objects in the environment, such as aircraft or human faces. Performing each of these tasks requires a minimum image "sharpness" which is quantified by a maximum resolvable spatial frequency, which is, in turn, a function of the camera optics, pixel sampling density, and signal-to-noise ratio. Much of the existing SR literature focuses on SR performance metrics for candidate algorithms, such as perceived image quality or peak SNR. These metrics can be misleading because they also credit deblurring and/or denoising in addition to true SR. In this paper, we propose a new, task-based metric where the performance of an SR algorithm is, instead, directly tied to the probability of successfully detecting critical spatial frequencies within the scene. PMID:26560915

  11. Simulation study of amplitude-modulated (AM) harmonic motion imaging (HMI) for stiffness contrast quantification with experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Maleke, Caroline; Luo, Jianwen; Gamarnik, Viktor; Lu, Xin L; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2010-07-01

    The objective of this study is to show that Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI) can be used as a reliable tumor-mapping technique based on the tumor's distinct stiffness at the early onset of disease. HMI is a radiation-force-based imaging method that generates a localized vibration deep inside the tissue to estimate the relative tissue stiffness based on the resulting displacement amplitude. In this paper, a finite-element model (FEM) study is presented, followed by an experimental validation in tissue-mimicking polyacrylamide gels and excised human breast tumors ex vivo. This study compares the resulting tissue motion in simulations and experiments at four different gel stiffnesses and three distinct spherical inclusion diameters. The elastic moduli of the gels were separately measured using mechanical testing. Identical transducer parameters were used in both the FEM and experimental studies, i.e., a 4.5-MHz single-element focused ultrasound (FUS) and a 7.5-MHz diagnostic (pulse-echo) transducer. In the simulation, an acoustic pressure field was used as the input stimulus to generate a localized vibration inside the target. Radiofrequency (rf) signals were then simulated using a 2D convolution model. A one-dimensional cross-correlation technique was performed on the simulated and experimental rf signals to estimate the axial displacement resulting from the harmonic radiation force. In order to measure the reliability of the displacement profiles in estimating the tissue stiffness distribution, the contrast-transfer efficiency (CTE) was calculated. For tumor mapping ex vivo, a harmonic radiation force was applied using a 2D raster-scan technique. The 2D HMI images of the breast tumor ex vivo could detect a malignant tumor (20 x 10 mm2) surrounded by glandular and fat tissues. The FEM and experimental results from both gels and breast tumors ex vivo demonstrated that HMI was capable of detecting and mapping the tumor or stiff inclusion with various diameters or

  12. Enhanced speed in fluorescence imaging using beat frequency multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikami, Hideharu; Kobayashi, Hirofumi; Wang, Yisen; Hamad, Syed; Ozeki, Yasuyuki; Goda, Keisuke

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescence imaging using radiofrequency-tagged emission (FIRE) is an emerging technique that enables higher imaging speed (namely, temporal resolution) in fluorescence microscopy compared to conventional fluorescence imaging techniques such as confocal microscopy and wide-field microscopy. It works based on the principle that it uses multiple intensity-modulated fields in an interferometric setup as excitation fields and applies frequency-division multiplexing to fluorescence signals. Unfortunately, despite its high potential, FIRE has limited imaging speed due to two practical limitations: signal bandwidth and signal detection efficiency. The signal bandwidth is limited by that of an acousto-optic deflector (AOD) employed in the setup, which is typically 100-200 MHz for the spectral range of fluorescence excitation (400-600 nm). The signal detection efficiency is limited by poor spatial mode-matching between two interfering fields to produce a modulated excitation field. Here we present a method to overcome these limitations and thus to achieve higher imaging speed than the prior version of FIRE. Our method achieves an increase in signal bandwidth by a factor of two and nearly optimal mode matching, which enables the imaging speed limited by the lifetime of the target fluorophore rather than the imaging system itself. The higher bandwidth and better signal detection efficiency work synergistically because higher bandwidth requires higher signal levels to avoid the contribution of shot noise and amplifier noise to the fluorescence signal. Due to its unprecedentedly high-speed performance, our method has a wide variety of applications in cancer detection, drug discovery, and regenerative medicine.

  13. Detecting structural information of scatterers using spatial frequency domain imaging.

    PubMed

    Bodenschatz, Nico; Krauter, Philipp; Nothelfer, Steffen; Foschum, Florian; Bergmann, Florian; Liemert, André; Kienle, Alwin

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate optical phantom experiments on the phase function parameter γ using spatial frequency domain imaging. The incorporation of two different types of scattering particles allows for control of the optical phantoms’ microscopic scattering properties. By laterally structuring areas with either TiO2 or Al2O3 scattering particles, we were able to obtain almost pure subdiffusive scattering contrast in a single optical phantom. Optical parameter mapping was then achieved using an analytical radiative transfer model revealing the microscopic structural contrast on a macroscopic field of view. As part of our study, we explain several correction and referencing techniques for high spatial frequency analysis and experimentally study the sampling depth of the subdiffusive parameter γ.

  14. Detecting structural information of scatterers using spatial frequency domain imaging.

    PubMed

    Bodenschatz, Nico; Krauter, Philipp; Nothelfer, Steffen; Foschum, Florian; Bergmann, Florian; Liemert, André; Kienle, Alwin

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate optical phantom experiments on the phase function parameter γ using spatial frequency domain imaging. The incorporation of two different types of scattering particles allows for control of the optical phantoms’ microscopic scattering properties. By laterally structuring areas with either TiO2 or Al2O3 scattering particles, we were able to obtain almost pure subdiffusive scattering contrast in a single optical phantom. Optical parameter mapping was then achieved using an analytical radiative transfer model revealing the microscopic structural contrast on a macroscopic field of view. As part of our study, we explain several correction and referencing techniques for high spatial frequency analysis and experimentally study the sampling depth of the subdiffusive parameter γ. PMID:26590206

  15. Coupled third-order simplified spherical harmonics and diffusion equation-based fluorescence tomographic imaging of liver cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xueli; Sun, Fangfang; Yang, Defu; Liang, Jimin

    2015-09-01

    For fluorescence tomographic imaging of small animals, the liver is usually regarded as a low-scattering tissue and is surrounded by adipose, kidneys, and heart, all of which have a high scattering property. This leads to a breakdown of the diffusion equation (DE)-based reconstruction method as well as a heavy computational burden for the simplified spherical harmonics equation (SPN). Coupling the SPN and DE provides a perfect balance between the imaging accuracy and computational burden. The coupled third-order SPN and DE (CSDE)-based reconstruction method is developed for fluorescence tomographic imaging. This is achieved by doubly using the CSDE for the excitation and emission processes of the fluorescence propagation. At the same time, the finite-element method and hybrid multilevel regularization strategy are incorporated in inverse reconstruction. The CSDE-based reconstruction method is first demonstrated with a digital mouse-based liver cancer simulation, which reveals superior performance compared with the SPN and DE-based methods. It is more accurate than the DE-based method and has lesser computational burden than the SPN-based method. The feasibility of the proposed approach in applications of in vivo studies is also illustrated with a liver cancer mouse-based in situ experiment, revealing its potential application in whole-body imaging of small animals.

  16. Multi-view second-harmonic generation imaging of mouse tail tendon via reflective micro-prisms.

    PubMed

    Wen, Bruce; Campbell, Kirby R; Cox, Benjamin L; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Superfine, Richard; Campagnola, Paul J

    2015-07-01

    Here we experimentally show that second-harmonic generation (SHG) imaging is not sensitive to collagen fibers oriented parallel to the direction of laser propagation and, as a consequence, can potentially miss important structural information. As an alternative approach, we demonstrate the use of reflective micro-prisms to enable multi-view SHG imaging of mouse tail tendon by redirecting the focused excitation and collection of subsequent emission. Our approach data corroborates the theoretical treatment on vanishing and nonvanishing orientations, where fibers along the laser direction are largely transparent by SHG. In strong contrast, the two-photon excited fluorescence of dye-labeled collagen fibers is isotropic and is not subject to this constraint. We utilized Pearson correlation to quantify differences in fluorescent and backward detected SHG images of the tendon fiber structure, where the SHG and TPEF were highly statistically correlated (0.6-0.8) for perpendicular excitation but were uncorrelated for excitation parallel to the fiber axis. The results suggest that improved imaging of 3D collagen structure is possible with multi-view SHG microscopy.

  17. Focused high frequency needle transducer for ultrasonic imaging and trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hsiu-Sheng; Zheng, Fan; Li, Ying; Lee, Changyang; Zhou, Qifa; Kirk Shung, K.

    2012-07-01

    A miniature focused needle transducer (<1 mm) was fabricated using the press-focusing technique. The measured pulse-echo waveform showed the transducer had center frequency of 57.5 MHz with 54% bandwidth and 14 dB insertion loss. To evaluate the performance of this type of transducer, invitro ultrasonic biomicroscopy imaging on the rabbit eye was obtained. Moreover, a single beam acoustic trapping experiment was performed using this transducer. Trapping of targeted particle size smaller than the ultrasonic wavelength was observed. Potential applications of these devices include minimally invasive measurements of retinal blood flow and single beam acoustic trapping of microparticles.

  18. Method for imaging with low frequency electromagnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Lee, K.H.; Xie, G.Q.

    1994-12-13

    A method is described for imaging with low frequency electromagnetic fields, and for interpreting the electromagnetic data using ray tomography, in order to determine the earth conductivity with high accuracy and resolution. The imaging method includes the steps of placing one or more transmitters, at various positions in a plurality of transmitter holes, and placing a plurality of receivers in a plurality of receiver holes. The transmitters generate electromagnetic signals which diffuse through a medium, such as earth, toward the receivers. The measured diffusion field data H is then transformed into wavefield data U. The travel times corresponding to the wavefield data U, are then obtained, by charting the wavefield data U, using a different regularization parameter [alpha] for each transform. The desired property of the medium, such as conductivity, is then derived from the velocity, which in turn is constructed from the wavefield data U using ray tomography. 13 figures.

  19. Method for imaging with low frequency electromagnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ki H.; Xie, Gan Q.

    1994-01-01

    A method for imaging with low frequency electromagnetic fields, and for interpreting the electromagnetic data using ray tomography, in order to determine the earth conductivity with high accuracy and resolution. The imaging method includes the steps of placing one or more transmitters, at various positions in a plurality of transmitter holes, and placing a plurality of receivers in a plurality of receiver holes. The transmitters generate electromagnetic signals which diffuse through a medium, such as earth, toward the receivers. The measured diffusion field data H is then transformed into wavefield data U. The traveltimes corresponding to the wavefield data U, are then obtained, by charting the wavefield data U, using a different regularization parameter .alpha. for each transform. The desired property of the medium, such as conductivity, is then derived from the velocity, which in turn is constructed from the wavefield data U using ray tomography.

  20. Polarization-resolved second-harmonic generation imaging for liver fibrosis assessment without labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jian; Pan, Shiying; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2013-10-01

    We apply the polarization-resolved second-harmonic generation (PR-SHG) microscopy to investigate the changes of collagen typings (type I vs type III) and collagen fibril orientations of liver tissue in bile-duct-ligation (BDL) rat models. The PR-SHG results show that the second-order susceptibility tensor ratios (χ31/χ15 and χ33/χ15) of collagen fibers increase with liver fibrotic progression after BDL surgery, reflecting an increase of the type III collagen component with the severity of liver fibrosis; and the square root of the collagen type III to type I ratio linearly correlates (R2 = 0.98) with histopathological scores. Furthermore, the collagen fibril orientations become more random with liver fibrosis transformation as compared to normal liver tissue. This work demonstrates that PR-SHG microscopy has the potential for label-free diagnosis and characterization of liver fibrosis based on quantitative analysis of collagen typings and fibril orientations.

  1. Second harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon fluorescence (TPF) contrast imaging in biomaterial analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Xuye; Lyubovitsky, Julia

    2015-07-01

    Collagen hydrogels are natural biomaterials that comprise 3D networks of high water content and have viscoelastic properties and biocompatibility similar to native tissues. Consequently, these materials play an important role in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine for quite some time. Second harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon fluorescence (TPF) contrasts transpire as valuable label-free spectroscopic probes for analysis of these biomaterials and this presentation will report the structural, mechanical and physicochemical parameters leading to the observed optical SHG and TPF effects in synthesized 3D collagen hydrogels. We will present results regarding understanding the dependency of collagen fiber formation on ion types, new results regarding strengthening of these biomaterials with a nontoxic chemical cross-linker genipin and polarization selection of collagen fibers' orientations.

  2. Intercalating dyes for enhanced contrast in second-harmonic generation imaging of protein crystals.

    PubMed

    Newman, Justin A; Scarborough, Nicole M; Pogranichniy, Nicholas R; Shrestha, Rashmi K; Closser, Richard G; Das, Chittaranjan; Simpson, Garth J

    2015-07-01

    The second-harmonic generation (SHG) activity of protein crystals was found to be enhanced by up to ∼1000-fold by the intercalation of SHG phores within the crystal lattice. Unlike the intercalation of fluorophores, the SHG phores produced no significant background SHG from solvated dye or from dye intercalated into amorphous aggregates. The polarization-dependent SHG is consistent with the chromophores adopting the symmetry of the crystal lattice. In addition, the degree of enhancement for different symmetries of dyes is consistent with theoretical predictions based on the molecular nonlinear optical response. Kinetics studies indicate that intercalation arises over a timeframe of several minutes in lysozyme, with detectable enhancements within seconds. These results provide a potential means to increase the overall diversity of protein crystals and crystal sizes amenable to characterization by SHG microscopy. PMID:26143918

  3. Intercalating dyes for enhanced contrast in second-harmonic generation imaging of protein crystals

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Justin A.; Scarborough, Nicole M.; Pogranichniy, Nicholas R.; Shrestha, Rashmi K.; Closser, Richard G.; Das, Chittaranjan; Simpson, Garth J.

    2015-01-01

    The second-harmonic generation (SHG) activity of protein crystals was found to be enhanced by up to ∼1000-fold by the intercalation of SHG phores within the crystal lattice. Unlike the intercalation of fluorophores, the SHG phores produced no significant background SHG from solvated dye or from dye intercalated into amorphous aggregates. The polarization-dependent SHG is consistent with the chromophores adopting the symmetry of the crystal lattice. In addition, the degree of enhancement for different symmetries of dyes is consistent with theoretical predictions based on the molecular nonlinear optical response. Kinetics studies indicate that intercalation arises over a timeframe of several minutes in lysozyme, with detectable enhancements within seconds. These results provide a potential means to increase the overall diversity of protein crystals and crystal sizes amenable to characterization by SHG microscopy. PMID:26143918

  4. Microscopic imaging of glyceraldehyde-induced tissue glycation with intrinsic second harmonic generation and two-photon fluorescence contrasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Yu Jer; Granelli, Joseph; Tirumalasetty, Manasa; Lyubovitsky, Julia

    2013-02-01

    The bioinspired approaches to tissue strengthening and preservation rely on non-toxic cross-linking agents one of which is glyceraldehyde. In this study we used multiphoton microscopy that employs second harmonic generation (SHG) contrast to evaluate collagen microstructures and two-photon fluorescence (TPF) contrast to monitor progression of cross-linking upon treatment of tissues with glyceraldehyde. We examined collagen hydrogels assembled at 37 °C and 27 °C, bovine scleral and corneal tissues, skin as well as rat tail tendons. The results show a different effect of glyceraldehyde on collagen microstructures within the above tissues. This effect depends on the original microstructural assembly of collagen within a specific tissue. Our data suggests that epidermis (in skin and cornea) will protect collagen from cross-linking with glyceraldehyde. The work highlights benefits of monitoring progression of collagen cross-linking and effects of cross-linking on fiber microstructures as imaged with SHG and TPF signals.

  5. Fast 3D subsurface imaging with stepped-frequency GPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masarik, Matthew P.; Burns, Joseph; Thelen, Brian T.; Sutter, Lena

    2015-05-01

    This paper investigates an algorithm for forming 3D images of the subsurface using stepped-frequency GPR data. The algorithm is specifically designed for a handheld GPR and therefore accounts for the irregular sampling pattern in the data and the spatially-variant air-ground interface by estimating an effective "ground-plane" and then registering the data to the plane. The algorithm efficiently solves the 4th-order polynomial for the Snell reflection points using a fully vectorized iterative scheme. The forward operator is implemented efficiently using an accelerated nonuniform FFT (Greengard and Lee, 2004); the adjoint operator is implemented efficiently using an interpolation step coupled with an upsampled FFT. The imaging is done as a linearized version of the full inverse problem, which is regularized using a sparsity constraint to reduce sidelobes and therefore improve image localization. Applying an appropriate sparsity constraint, the algorithm is able to eliminate most the surrounding clutter and sidelobes, while still rendering valuable image properties such as shape and size. The algorithm is applied to simulated data, controlled experimental data (made available by Dr. Waymond Scott, Georgia Institute of Technology), and government-provided data with irregular sampling and air-ground interface.

  6. Methods, compositions and kits for imaging cells and tissues using nanoparticles and spatial frequency heterodyne imaging

    DOEpatents

    Rose-Petruck, Christoph; Wands, Jack R.; Rand, Danielle; Derdak, Zoltan; Ortiz, Vivian

    2016-04-19

    Methods, compositions, systems, devices and kits are provided herein for preparing and using a nanoparticle composition and spatial frequency heterodyne imaging for visualizing cells or tissues. In various embodiments, the nanoparticle composition includes at least one of: a nanoparticle, a polymer layer, and a binding agent, such that the polymer layer coats the nanoparticle and is for example a polyethylene glycol, a polyelectrolyte, an anionic polymer, or a cationic polymer, and such that the binding agent that specifically binds the cells or the tissue. Methods, compositions, systems, devices and kits are provided for identifying potential therapeutic agents in a model using the nanoparticle composition and spatial frequency heterodyne imaging.

  7. Three-dimensional simulations of harmonic radiation and harmonic lasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Mark J.; McVey, Brian D.

    Characteristics of the harmonic emission from free electron lasers (FELs) are examined in the spontaneous, coherent-spontaneous and stimulated emission regimes. The radiation at both odd and even harmonic frequencies is treated for electron beams with finite emittance and energy spread. In the spontaneous emission regime, the transverse radiation patterns including the transverse frequency dependences, are given. How this expression is modified to include energy spread and emittance is described. In the coherent-spontaneous emission and stimulated emission regimes, the interaction of the radiation fields with the electrons must be treated self consistently. Here, a single frequency distributed transverse source function for each electron is used in the harmonic version of the 3-D code FELEX to model the harmonic radiation. The code has recently been modified to simultaneously model the fundamental and harmonic interactions for multiple-pass oscillator simulations. These modifications facilitate the examination of FELs under various operating conditions. When the FEL is lasing at the fundamental, the evolution of the harmonic fields can be examined. This evolution is unique in the sense that the electron beam radiates at the harmonic frequencies in the presence of the harmonic radiation circulating in the cavity. As a result, enhancements of the harmonic emission can be observed. Finally, harmonic lasing can occur in cases where there is sufficient gain to overcome cavity losses and lasing at the fundamental can be suppressed. The characteristics and efficiency of these interactions are explored.

  8. Three-dimensional simulations of harmonic radiation and harmonic lasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Mark J.; McVey, Brian D.

    1991-07-01

    Characteristics of the harmonic emission from free electron lasers (FELs) are examined in the spontaneous, coherent-spontaneous and stimulated emission regimes. The radiation at both odd and even harmonic frequencies is treated for electron beams with finite emittance and energy spread. In the spontaneous emission regime, the transverse radiation patterns including the transverse frequency dependences, are given. How this expression is modified to include energy spread and emittance is described. In the coherent-spontaneous emission and stimulated emission (lasing) regimes, the interaction of the radiation fields with the electrons must be treated self-consistently. Here, a single-frequency distributed transverse source function for each electron is used in the harmonic version (HELEX) of the 3D code FELEX to model the harmonic radiation. This code has recently been modified to simultaneously model the fundamental and harmonic interactions for multiple-pass oscillator simulations. These modifications facilitate the examination of FELs under various operating conditions. When the FEL is lasing at the fundamental, the evolution of the harmonic fields can be examined. This evolution is unique in the sense that the electron beam (which is bunched by the fundamental optical field) radiates at the harmonic frequencies in the presence of the harmonic radiation circulating in the cavity. As a result, enhancements of the harmonic emission can be observed. Finally, harmonic lasing can occur in cases where there is sufficient gain to overcome cavity losses and lasing at the fundamental can be suppressed. The characteristics and efficiency of these interactions are explored.

  9. Harmonic analysis of electrical distribution systems

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    This report presents data pertaining to research on harmonics of electric power distribution systems. Harmonic data is presented on RMS and average measurements for determination of harmonics in buildings; fluorescent ballast; variable frequency drive; georator geosine harmonic data; uninterruptible power supply; delta-wye transformer; westinghouse suresine; liebert datawave; and active injection mode filter data.

  10. Orbital-optimized coupled-electron pair theory and its analytic gradients: Accurate equilibrium geometries, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and hydrogen transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozkaya, Uǧur; Sherrill, C. David

    2013-08-01

    Orbital-optimized coupled-electron pair theory [or simply "optimized CEPA(0)," OCEPA(0), for short] and its analytic energy gradients are presented. For variational optimization of the molecular orbitals for the OCEPA(0) method, a Lagrangian-based approach is used along with an orbital direct inversion of the iterative subspace algorithm. The cost of the method is comparable to that of CCSD [O(N6) scaling] for energy computations. However, for analytic gradient computations the OCEPA(0) method is only half as expensive as CCSD since there is no need to solve the λ2-amplitude equation for OCEPA(0). The performance of the OCEPA(0) method is compared with that of the canonical MP2, CEPA(0), CCSD, and CCSD(T) methods, for equilibrium geometries, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and hydrogen transfer reactions between radicals. For bond lengths of both closed and open-shell molecules, the OCEPA(0) method improves upon CEPA(0) and CCSD by 25%-43% and 38%-53%, respectively, with Dunning's cc-pCVQZ basis set. Especially for the open-shell test set, the performance of OCEPA(0) is comparable with that of CCSD(T) (ΔR is 0.0003 Å on average). For harmonic vibrational frequencies of closed-shell molecules, the OCEPA(0) method again outperforms CEPA(0) and CCSD by 33%-79% and 53%-79%, respectively. For harmonic vibrational frequencies of open-shell molecules, the mean absolute error (MAE) of the OCEPA(0) method (39 cm-1) is fortuitously even better than that of CCSD(T) (50 cm-1), while the MAEs of CEPA(0) (184 cm-1) and CCSD (84 cm-1) are considerably higher. For complete basis set estimates of hydrogen transfer reaction energies, the OCEPA(0) method again exhibits a substantially better performance than CEPA(0), providing a mean absolute error of 0.7 kcal mol-1, which is more than 6 times lower than that of CEPA(0) (4.6 kcal mol-1), and comparing to MP2 (7.7 kcal mol-1) there is a more than 10-fold reduction in errors. Whereas the MAE for the CCSD method is only 0.1 kcal

  11. Orbital-optimized coupled-electron pair theory and its analytic gradients: accurate equilibrium geometries, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and hydrogen transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Bozkaya, Uğur; Sherrill, C David

    2013-08-01

    Orbital-optimized coupled-electron pair theory [or simply "optimized CEPA(0)," OCEPA(0), for short] and its analytic energy gradients are presented. For variational optimization of the molecular orbitals for the OCEPA(0) method, a Lagrangian-based approach is used along with an orbital direct inversion of the iterative subspace algorithm. The cost of the method is comparable to that of CCSD [O(N(6)) scaling] for energy computations. However, for analytic gradient computations the OCEPA(0) method is only half as expensive as CCSD since there is no need to solve the λ2-amplitude equation for OCEPA(0). The performance of the OCEPA(0) method is compared with that of the canonical MP2, CEPA(0), CCSD, and CCSD(T) methods, for equilibrium geometries, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and hydrogen transfer reactions between radicals. For bond lengths of both closed and open-shell molecules, the OCEPA(0) method improves upon CEPA(0) and CCSD by 25%-43% and 38%-53%, respectively, with Dunning's cc-pCVQZ basis set. Especially for the open-shell test set, the performance of OCEPA(0) is comparable with that of CCSD(T) (ΔR is 0.0003 Å on average). For harmonic vibrational frequencies of closed-shell molecules, the OCEPA(0) method again outperforms CEPA(0) and CCSD by 33%-79% and 53%-79%, respectively. For harmonic vibrational frequencies of open-shell molecules, the mean absolute error (MAE) of the OCEPA(0) method (39 cm(-1)) is fortuitously even better than that of CCSD(T) (50 cm(-1)), while the MAEs of CEPA(0) (184 cm(-1)) and CCSD (84 cm(-1)) are considerably higher. For complete basis set estimates of hydrogen transfer reaction energies, the OCEPA(0) method again exhibits a substantially better performance than CEPA(0), providing a mean absolute error of 0.7 kcal mol(-1), which is more than 6 times lower than that of CEPA(0) (4.6 kcal mol(-1)), and comparing to MP2 (7.7 kcal mol(-1)) there is a more than 10-fold reduction in errors. Whereas the MAE for the CCSD method is

  12. Optoacoustics for high-frequency ultrasonic imaging and manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donnell, Matthew; Buma, Takashi

    2001-05-01

    Pulsed lasers can generate ultrasound through thermoelastic expansion of a thin optical absorber. By carefully designing the optical absorbing structure, efficient transduction is possible for a number of biomedical applications including high-frequency imaging, microfluidics, and sensing. The major key for efficient optoacoustic transduction in biomedical applications is to engineer a nearly perfect optical absorber possessing a large coefficient of thermal expansion with acoustic properties well matched to a water medium. We have obtained an optoacoustic efficiency increase of over 20 dB compared to conventional approaches using a thin, optically absorbing layer consisting of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and carbon black spin coated onto a clear PDMS substrate. This structure has been extensively analyzed both experimentally and analytically and seems to provide opportunities for a wide range of optoacoustic devices. In this talk we show how PDMS-based optoacoustic transduction can be used for high-frequency imaging using longitudinal waves and acoustic tweezing using Lamb waves. The basic mechanism of optoacoustic transduction will be described, and specific devices will be presented.

  13. A high-order, purely frequency based harmonic balance formulation for continuation of periodic solutions: The case of non-polynomial nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karkar, Sami; Cochelin, Bruno; Vergez, Christophe

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we extend the method proposed by Cochelin and Vergez [A high order purely frequency-based harmonic balance formulation for continuation of periodic solutions, Journal of Sound and Vibration, 324 (2009) 243-262] to the case of non-polynomial nonlinearities. This extension allows for the computation of branches of periodic solutions of a broader class of nonlinear dynamical systems. The principle remains to transform the original ODE system into an extended polynomial quadratic system for an easy application of the harmonic balance method (HBM). The transformation of non-polynomial terms is based on the differentiation of state variables with respect to the time variable, shifting the nonlinear non-polynomial nonlinearity to a time-independent initial condition equation, not concerned with the HBM. The continuation of the resulting algebraic system is here performed by the asymptotic numerical method (high order Taylor series representation of the solution branch) using a further differentiation of the non-polynomial algebraic equation with respect to the path parameter. A one dof vibro-impact system is used to illustrate how an exponential nonlinearity is handled, showing that the method works at very high order, 1000 in that case. Various kinds of nonlinear functions are also treated, and finally the nonlinear free pendulum is addressed, showing that very accurate periodic solutions can be computed with the proposed method.

  14. Optical second-harmonic imaging of Pb{sub x}Cd{sub 1-x}Te ternary alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Scheidt, T.; Rohwer, E.G.; Bergmann, H.M. von; Saucedo, E.; Dieguez, E.; Fornaro, L.; Stafast, H.

    2005-05-15

    We employ femtosecond laser pulses (80 fs, 1.59 eV, and 80 MHz) to study the optical second-harmonic (SH) response of Pb{sub x}Cd{sub 1-x}Te ternary alloys (x about 0.2) grown by the vertical Bridgman method. The alloy segregates into a Pb-rich and a Cd-rich phase, the latter dominating the SH response of the ternary alloy by at least two orders of magnitude. Several sample regions show a regular layer-by-layer accommodation of the Pb-rich and Cd-rich phases as seen by a periodic alternation of the alloy's SH response on a {approx}10-{mu}m length scale. Furthermore, we employ polarization-resolved SH imaging as well as SH imaging at different azimuthal angles to obtain spatially resolved mappings of the sample, which are sensitive to the composition as well as the growth orientation of the Pb{sub x}Cd{sub 1-x}Te material system. We observe an azimuthal phase shift of approximately 30 deg. between coherent macroscopic regions (several mm{sup 2}) in the Cd-rich phase of the ternary alloy. We interpret these regions as large area crystalline grains of (111) and (411) crystal orientations and approximately equal composition. Hence, SH imaging is shown to spatially resolve regions of different growth directions within the Pb{sub x}Cd{sub 1-x}Te sample.

  15. Interferometric SAR imaging by transmitting stepped frequency chaotic noise signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunhua; Gu, Xiang; Zhai, Wenshuai; Dong, Xiao; Shi, Xiaojin; Kang, Xueyan

    2015-10-01

    Noise radar has been applied in many fields since it was proposed more than 50 years ago. However, it has not been applied to interferometric SAR imaging yet as far as we know. This paper introduces our recent work on interferometric noise radar. An interferometric SAR system was developed which can transmit both chirp signal and chaotic noise signal (CNS) at multiple carrier frequencies. An airborne experiment with this system by transmitting both signals was carried out, and the data were processed to show the capability of interferometric SAR imaging with CNS. The results shows that although the interferometric phase quality of CNS is degraded due to the signal to noise ratio (SNR) is lower compared with that of chirp signal, we still can get satisfied DEM after multi-looking processing. Another work of this paper is to apply compressed sensing (CS) theory to the interferometric SAR imaging with CNS. The CS theory states that if a signal is sparse, then it can be accurately reconstructed with much less sampled data than that regularly required according to Nyquist Sampling Theory. To form a structured random matrix, if the transmitted signal is of fixed waveform, then random subsampling is needed. However, if the transmitted signal is of random waveform, then only uniform subsampling is needed. This is another advantage of noise signal. Both the interferometric phase images and the DEMs by regular method and by CS method are processed with results compared. It is shown that the degradation of interferometric phases due to subsampling is larger than that of amplitude image.

  16. Demonstration of An Image Rejection Mixer for High Frequency Applications (26-36 GHz)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bankston, Cheryl D.; Carlstrom, John E.

    1999-01-01

    A new high frequency image-rejection mixer was successfully tested in a 26-36 GHz band receiver. This paper briefly describes the motivation for implementation of an image rejection mixer in a receiver system, the basic operation of an image rejection mixer, and the development and testing of an image rejection mixer for a high frequency, cryogenic receiver system.

  17. Harmonic model for solar and climate cyclical variation throughout the Holocene based on Jupiter-Saturn tidal frequencies plus the 11-year solar dynamo cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scafetta, N.

    2012-12-01

    We show that the Schwabe frequency band of the Zurich sunspot record since 1749 is made of three major cycles that are closely related to the spring tidal period of Jupiter and Saturn (~9.93 year), to the tidal sidereal period of Jupiter (about 11.86 years) and to a central cycle that may be associated to a quasi-11-year solar dynamo cycle. The central harmonic is approximately synchronized to the average of the two planetary frequencies. A harmonic model based on the above two planetary tidal frequencies and on the exact dates of Jupiter and Saturn planetary tidal phases, plus a theoretically deduced 10.87-year central cycle reveals major beat periods occurring at about 115, 61 and 130 years, plus a quasi-millennial large beat cycle around 983 years. Equivalent synchronized cycles are found in cosmogenic solar proxy records used to reconstruct solar activity and in proxy climate records throughout the Holocene (last 12,000 years) up to now. The quasi-secular beat oscillations hindcast reasonably well the known prolonged periods of low solar activity during the last millennium such as the Oort, Wolf, Sporer, Maunder and Dalton minima, as well as the 17 115-year long oscillations found in a detailed temperature reconstruction of the Northern Hemisphere covering the last 2000 years. The millennial three-frequency beat cycle hindcasts equivalent solar and climate cycles for 12,000 years. Finally, the harmonic model herein proposed reconstructs the prolonged solar minima around 1900-1920 and 1960-1980, the secular solar maxima around 1870-1890, 1940-1950 and 1995-2005, and a secular upward trending during the 20th century. The latter modulated trending agrees well with some solar proxy model, with the ACRIM TSI satellite composite and with the global surface temperature modulation since 1850. The model forecasts a new prolonged solar minimum during 2020-2045, which is produced by the minima of both the 61 and 115-year reconstructed cycles. Finally, the model predicts

  18. Fast ion energy distribution from third harmonic radio frequency heating measured with a single crystal diamond detector at the Joint European Torus

    SciTech Connect

    Nocente, M.; Rebai, M.; Gorini, G.; Cazzaniga, C.; Tardocchi, M.; Giacomelli, L.; Muraro, A.; Binda, F.; Eriksson, J.; Sharapov, S.; Collaboration:

    2015-10-15

    Neutron spectroscopy measurements with a single crystal diamond detector have been carried out at JET, for the first time in an experiment aimed at accelerating deuterons to MeV energies with radio frequency heating at the third harmonic. Data are interpreted by means of the expected response function of the detector and are used to extract parameters of the highly non-Maxwellian distribution function generated in this scenario. A comparison with observations using a time of flight and liquid scintillator neutron spectrometers is also presented. The results demonstrate the capability of diamond detectors to contribute to fast ion physics studies at JET and are of more general relevance in view of the application of such detectors for spectroscopy measurements in the neutron camera of next step tokamak devices.

  19. Assessment of Multiple Sclerosis Lesions with Spherical Harmonics: Comparison of MR Imaging and Pathologic Findings1

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg-Zimring, Daniel; Shalmon, Bruria; Zou, Kelly H.; Azhari, Haim; Nass, Dvora; Achiron, Anat

    2005-01-01

    Spherical harmonics (SH) were used to approximate the volume and three-dimensional geometry of multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions in deceased patients. The institutional ethical committee does not require its approval for studies involving pathologic specimens. Pathologic findings were used as the reference standard. In addition, lesion volume was measured with cylindrical approximation (CA). Volumetric comparisons of biases were based on summary statistics, Spearman correlation, Wilcoxon test, and two-way analysis of variance. Shape comparison metrics included mean distance and Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). Eight of 11 lesions had smaller biases with SH method (P < .001). Median biases with SH and CA did not differ significantly, as compared with pathologic findings (r = 1.00 vs 0.99, respectively). Variances of the biases were significantly smaller for SH (P =.04). Ranges of normalized distance and DSC were 0.1%–2.5% and 75%–96%, respectively. Mean DSC was significantly higher than 70% (P < .001). SH method provided unbiased lesion volume and added geometric information that may enable a better understanding of the pathogenesis and lesion evolution over time. PMID:15833980

  20. FAMIS (Frequency Agile Modulated Imaging System) sensor for imaging in turbid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullen, Linda J.; Laux, Alan E.; Cochenour, Brandon; Zege, Eleonora P.

    2006-05-01

    Optical imaging in turbid ocean water is a challenge due to the high probability that light will scatter multiple times as it propagates to and from the object of interest. Techniques have been developed to suppress the contribution from scattered light and increase the image contrast, such as those using a pulsed source with a gated receiver or a modulated source with a coherent RF receiver. While improving the amplitude contrast of underwater images, these two approaches also have the capability of providing target range information. The effectiveness of each approach for both 2D and 3D imagery depends highly on the turbidity of the intervening water medium. This paper describes a system based on the optical modulation approach, the Frequency Agile Modulated Imaging System (FAMIS), and the techniques that have been developed to improve both amplitude and range imaging in turbid water.

  1. Quantification of collagen fiber organization in biological tissues at cellular and molecular scales using second-harmonic generation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambekar Ramachandra Rao, Raghu

    Collagen is the most abundant structural protein found in the human body, and is responsible for providing structure and function to tissues. Collagen molecules organize naturally into structures called fibers on the scale of the wavelength of light and lack inversion symmetry, thus allowing for the process of second harmonic generation (SHG) when exposed to intense incident light. We have developed two quantitative techniques: Fourier transform-second-harmonic generation (FT-SHG) imaging and generalized chi2 second-harmonic generation (chi2-SHG) imaging. In order to show that FT-SHG imaging can be used as a valuable diagnostic tool for real-world biological problems, we first investigate collagenase-induced injury in horse tendons. Clear differences in collagen fiber organization between normal and injured tendon are quantified. In particular, we observe that the regularly oriented organization of collagen fibers in normal tendons is disrupted in injured tendons leading to a more random organization. We also observe that FT-SHG microscopy is more sensitive in assessing tendon injury compared to the conventional polarized light microscopy. The second study includes quantifying collagen fibers in cortical bone using FT-SHG imaging and comparing it with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Further, as an example study, we show how FT-SHG imaging could be used to quantify changes in bone structure as a function of age. Some initial work and future directions for extending FT-SHG to 3D are also discussed. The second technique, chi2-SHG imaging, takes advantage of the coherent nature of SHG and utilizes polarization to extract the second-order susceptibility (d elements) which provides information on molecular organization, i.e., it provides access to sub-diffractional changes "optically". We use chi2-SHG in combination with FT-SHG imaging to investigate a couple of biological problems. First, we quantify differences in collagen fiber organization between cornea and

  2. Spatial Frequency Components of Images Modulate Neuronal Activity in Monkey Amygdala.

    PubMed

    Montes-Lourido, Pilar; Bermudez, M A; Romero, M C; Vicente, A F; Gonzalez, F

    2016-04-01

    Processing the spatial frequency components of an image is a crucial feature for visual perception, especially in recognition of faces. Here, we study the correlation between spatial frequency components of images of faces and neuronal activity in monkey amygdala while performing a visual recognition task. The frequency components of the images were analyzed using a fast Fourier transform for 40 spatial frequency ranges. We recorded 65 neurons showing statistically significant responses to at least one of the images used as a stimulus. A total of 37 of these neurons (n = 37) showed significant responses to at least three images, and in eight of them (8/37, 22%), we found a statistically significant correlation between neuron response and the modulus amplitude of at least one frequency range present in the images. Our results indicate that high spatial frequency and low spatial frequency components of images influence the activity of amygdala neurons.

  3. Feasibility of High Frequency Acoustic Imaging for Inspection of Containments

    SciTech Connect

    C.N. Corrado; J.E. Bondaryk; V. Godino

    1998-08-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has a program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide assistance in their assessment of the effects of potential degradation on the structural integrity and Ieaktightness of metal containment vessels and steel liners of concrete containment in nuclear power plants. One of the program objectives is to identify a technique(s) for inspection of inaccessible portions of the containment pressure boundary. Acoustic imaging has been identified as one of these potential techniques. A numerical feasibility study investigated the use of high-frequency bistatic acoustic imaging techniques for inspection of inaccessible portions of the metallic pressure boundary of nuclear power plant containment. The range-dependent version of the OASES Code developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology was utilized to perform a series of numerical simulations. OASES is a well developed and extensively tested code for evaluation of the acoustic field in a system of stratified fluid and/or elastic layers. Using the code, an arbitrary number of fluid or solid elastic layers are interleaved, with the outer layers modeled as halfspaces. High frequency vibrational sources were modeled to simulate elastic waves in the steel. The received field due to an arbitrary source array can be calculated at arbitrary depth and range positions. In this numerical study, waves that reflect and scatter from surface roughness caused by modeled degradations (e.g., corrosion) are detected and used to identify and map the steel degradation. Variables in the numerical study included frequency, flaw size, interrogation distance, and sensor incident angle.Based on these analytical simulations, it is considered unlikely that acoustic imaging technology can be used to investigate embedded steel liners of reinforced concrete containment. The thin steel liner and high signal losses to the concrete make this application difficult. Results for portions of steel containment

  4. Dual-frequency acoustic droplet vaporization detection for medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Arena, Christopher B; Novell, Anthony; Sheeran, Paul S; Puett, Connor; Moyer, Linsey C; Dayton, Paul A

    2015-09-01

    Liquid-filled perfluorocarbon droplets emit a unique acoustic signature when vaporized into gas-filled microbubbles using ultrasound. Here, we conducted a pilot study in a tissue-mimicking flow phantom to explore the spatial aspects of droplet vaporization and investigate the effects of applied pressure and droplet concentration on image contrast and axial and lateral resolution. Control microbubble contrast agents were used for comparison. A confocal dual-frequency transducer was used to transmit at 8 MHz and passively receive at 1 MHz. Droplet signals were of significantly higher energy than microbubble signals. This resulted in improved signal separation and high contrast-to-tissue ratios (CTR). Specifically, with a peak negative pressure (PNP) of 450 kPa applied at the focus, the CTR of B-mode images was 18.3 dB for droplets and -0.4 for microbubbles. The lateral resolution was dictated by the size of the droplet activation area, with lower pressures resulting in smaller activation areas and improved lateral resolution (0.67 mm at 450 kPa). The axial resolution in droplet images was dictated by the size of the initial droplet and was independent of the properties of the transmit pulse (3.86 mm at 450 kPa). In post-processing, time-domain averaging (TDA) improved droplet and microbubble signal separation at high pressures (640 kPa and 700 kPa). Taken together, these results indicate that it is possible to generate high-sensitivity, high-contrast images of vaporization events. In the future, this has the potential to be applied in combination with droplet-mediated therapy to track treatment outcomes or as a standalone diagnostic system to monitor the physical properties of the surrounding environment. PMID:26415125

  5. Imageability, age of acquisition, and frequency factors in acronym comprehension.

    PubMed

    Playfoot, David; Izura, Cristina

    2013-06-01

    In spite of their unusual orthographic and phonological form, acronyms (e.g., BBC, HIV, NATO) can become familiar to the reader, and their meaning can be accessed well enough that they are understood. The factors in semantic access for acronym stimuli were assessed using a word association task. Two analyses examined the time taken to generate a word association response to acronym cues. Responses were recorded more quickly to cues that elicited a large proportion of semantic responses, and those that were high in associative strength. Participants were shown to be faster to respond to cues which were imageable or early acquired. Frequency was not a significant predictor of word association responses. Implications for theories of lexical organisation are discussed. PMID:23153389

  6. Imageability, age of acquisition, and frequency factors in acronym comprehension.

    PubMed

    Playfoot, David; Izura, Cristina

    2013-06-01

    In spite of their unusual orthographic and phonological form, acronyms (e.g., BBC, HIV, NATO) can become familiar to the reader, and their meaning can be accessed well enough that they are understood. The factors in semantic access for acronym stimuli were assessed using a word association task. Two analyses examined the time taken to generate a word association response to acronym cues. Responses were recorded more quickly to cues that elicited a large proportion of semantic responses, and those that were high in associative strength. Participants were shown to be faster to respond to cues which were imageable or early acquired. Frequency was not a significant predictor of word association responses. Implications for theories of lexical organisation are discussed.

  7. Effect of through-plane motion on left ventricular rotation: a study using slice-following harmonic phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Brotman, David; Zhang, Ziheng; Sampath, Smita

    2013-05-01

    Noninvasive quantification of regional left ventricular rotation may improve understanding of cardiac function. Current methods used to quantify rotation typically acquire data on a set of prescribed short-axis slices, neglecting effects due to through-plane myocardial motion. We combine principles of slice-following tagged imaging with harmonic phase analysis methods to account for through-plane motion in regional rotation measurements. We compare rotation and torsion measurements obtained using our method to those obtained from imaging datasets acquired without slice-following. Our results in normal volunteers demonstrate differences in the general trends of average and regional rotation-time plots in midbasal slices and the rotation versus circumferential strain loops. We observe substantial errors in measured peak average rotation of the order of 58% for basal slices (due to change in the pattern of the curve), -6.6% for midventricular slices, and -8.5% for apical slices; and an average error in base-to-apex torsion of 19% when through-plane motion is not considered. This study concludes that due to an inherent base-to-apex gradient in rotation that exists in the left ventricular, accounting for through-plane motion is critical to the accuracy of left ventricular rotation quantification.

  8. Observation of a 100-MHz frequency variation across the output of a frequency-doubled injection-seeded unstable-resonator Q-switched Nd:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Forkey, J N; Lempert, W R; Miles, R B

    1997-02-15

    We report high-resolution measurements of the spatial variation of the optical frequency of an injection-seeded unstable-resonator Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Images of the second harmonic taken through a molecular-iodine notch filter show frequency variations of as much as 100 MHz (second harmonic) between the center and the edge of the beam. PMID:18183159

  9. Higher harmonic generation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2005-01-01

    Higher harmonic-generation, including second harmonic generation and third harmonic generation, leaves no energy deposition to the interacted matters due to its virtual-level transition characteristic, providing a truly non-invasive modality and is ideal for in vivo imaging of live specimens without any preparation. Second harmonic generation microscopy provides images on stacked membranes and arranged proteins with organized nano-structures due to the bio-photonic crystalline effect. Third harmonic generation microscopy provides general cellular or subcellular interface imaging due to optical inhomogeneity. Due to their virtual-transition nature, no saturation or bleaching in the generated signal is expected. With no energy release, continuous viewing without compromising sample viability can thus be achieved. Combined with its nonlinearity, higher harmonic generation microscopy provides sub-micron three-dimensional sectioning capability and millimeter penetration in live samples without using fluorescence and exogenous markers, offering morphological, structural, functional, and cellular information of biomedical specimens without modifying their natural biological and optical environments.

  10. Multi-scale harmonic model for solar and climate cyclical variation throughout the Holocene based on Jupiter-Saturn tidal frequencies plus the 11-year solar dynamo cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scafetta, Nicola

    2012-05-01

    The Schwabe frequency band of the Zurich sunspot record since 1749 is found to be made of three major cycles with periods of about 9.98, 10.9 and 11.86 years. The side frequencies appear to be closely related to the spring tidal period of Jupiter and Saturn (range between 9.5 and 10.5 years, and median 9.93 years) and to the tidal sidereal period of Jupiter (about 11.86 years). The central cycle may be associated to a quasi-11-year solar dynamo cycle that appears to be approximately synchronized to the average of the two planetary frequencies. A simplified harmonic constituent model based on the above two planetary tidal frequencies and on the exact dates of Jupiter and Saturn planetary tidal phases, plus a theoretically deduced 10.87-year central cycle reveals complex quasi-periodic interference/beat patterns. The major beat periods occur at about 115, 61 and 130 years, plus a quasi-millennial large beat cycle around 983 years. We show that equivalent synchronized cycles are found in cosmogenic records used to reconstruct solar activity and in proxy climate records throughout the Holocene (last 12,000 years) up to now. The quasi-secular beat oscillations hindcast reasonably well the known prolonged periods of low solar activity during the last millennium such as the Oort, Wolf, Spörer, Maunder and Dalton minima, as well as the 17 115-year long oscillations found in a detailed temperature reconstruction of the Northern Hemisphere covering the last 2000 years. The millennial three-frequency beat cycle hindcasts equivalent solar and climate cycles for 12,000 years. Finally, the harmonic model herein proposed reconstructs the prolonged solar minima that occurred during 1900-1920 and 1960-1980 and the secular solar maxima around 1870-1890, 1940-1950 and 1995-2005 and a secular upward trending during the 20th century: this modulated trending agrees well with some solar proxy model, with the ACRIM TSI satellite composite and with the global surface temperature

  11. Differential near-edge coherent diffractive imaging using a femtosecond high-harmonic XUV light source.

    PubMed

    Weise, Fabian; Neumark, Daniel M; Leone, Stephen R; Gessner, Oliver

    2012-11-19

    Element-specific contrast enhancement in tabletop coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) is demonstrated by employing an ultrafast extreme ultraviolet (XUV) light source with tunable photon energy. By combining two measurements performed at energies below and above the Al L(2,3) absorption edge, the spatial autocorrelation function of a micron-scale double pinhole in a 300 nm thick aluminum foil is retrieved despite a dominant background signal from directly transmitted light across the entire range of detectable diffraction angles. The fringe visibility in the diffraction patterns is 0 below the Al L(2,3) edge, 0.53 ± 0.06 above the edge, and 0.73 ± 0.08 in the differential image that combines the two measurements. The proof-of-principle experiment demonstrates that the variations of XUV optical constants in the vicinity of an inner-shell absorption edge can be utilized to improve the chemical sensitivity and image reconstruction quality of laboratory-based ultrafast imaging experiments.

  12. New ADPCM image coder using frequency weighted directional filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lien, Chen-Chang; Huang, Chang-Lin; Chang, I.-Chang

    1995-04-01

    This paper proposes a new ADPCM method for image coding called directional ADPCM which can remove more redundancy from the image signals than the conventional ADPCM. The conventional ADPCM calculates the two-dimensional prediction coefficients by using the correlation functions followed by solving the Yule-Walker equation. Actually, the quantities of correlation functions to be the approximation of the correlation function. However, the block size is limited by the error accumulation effect during packet transmission. Using small block may induce the unregulated prediction coefficients. Therefore, we need to develop the directional ADPCM system to overcome such a problem and to have better prediction result. Our directional ADPCM utilized the fan- shape filters to obtain the energy distribution in four directions and then determines the four directional prediction coefficient. All the fan-shape filters are designed by using the singular value decomposition (SVD) method, the two-dimensional Hilbert transform technique, and the frequency weighting concept. In the experiments, we illustrate that the M.S.E. for the directional ADPCM is less than that of the conventional ADPCM.

  13. Radio-frequency energy quantification in magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alon, Leeor

    Mapping of radio frequency (RF) energy deposition has been challenging for 50+ years, especially, when scanning patients in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) environment. As result, electromagnetic simulation software is often used for estimating the specific absorption rate (SAR), the rate of RF energy deposition in tissue. The thesis work presents challenges associated with aligning information provided by electromagnetic simulation and MRI experiments. As result of the limitations of simulations, experimental methods for the quantification of SAR were established. A system for quantification of the total RF energy deposition was developed for parallel transmit MRI (a system that uses multiple antennas to excite and image the body). The system is capable of monitoring and predicting channel-by-channel RF energy deposition, whole body SAR and capable of tracking potential hardware failures that occur in the transmit chain and may cause the deposition of excessive energy into patients. Similarly, we demonstrated that local RF power deposition can be mapped and predicted for parallel transmit systems based on a series of MRI temperature mapping acquisitions. Resulting from the work, we developed tools for optimal reconstruction temperature maps from MRI acquisitions. The tools developed for temperature mapping paved the way for utilizing MRI as a diagnostic tool for evaluation of RF/microwave emitting device safety. Quantification of the RF energy was demonstrated for both MRI compatible and non-MRI-compatible devices (such as cell phones), while having the advantage of being noninvasive, of providing millimeter resolution and high accuracy.

  14. Combined nonlinear laser imaging (two-photon excitation fluorescence, second and third-harmonic generation, and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopies) in ovarian tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adur, J.; Pelegati, V. B.; de Thomaz, A. A.; Bottcher-Luiz, F.; Andrade, L. A. L. A.; Almeida, D. B.; Carvalho, H. F.; Cesar, C. L.

    2012-03-01

    We applied Two-photon Excited Fluorescence (TPEF), Second/Third Harmonic Generation (SHG and THG) and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging (FLIM) Non Linear Optics (NLO) Laser-Scanning Microscopy within the same imaging platform to evaluate their use as a diagnostic tool in ovarian tumors. We assess of applicability of this multimodal approach to perform a pathological evaluation of serous and mucinous tumors in human samples. The combination of TPEF-SHG-THG imaging provided complementary information about the interface epithelium/stromal, such as the transformation of epithelium surface (THG) and the overall fibrillar tissue architecture (SHG). The fact that H&E staining is the standard method used in clinical pathology and that the stored samples are usually fixed makes it important a re-evaluation of these samples with NLO microscopy to compare new results with a library of already existing samples. FLIM, however, depends on the chemical environment around the fluorophors that was completely changed after fixation; therefore it only makes sense in unstained samples. Our FLIM results in unstained samples demonstrate that it is possible to discriminate healthy epithelia from serous or mucinous epithelia. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the different imaging modalities used showed that multimodal nonlinear microscopy has the potential to differentiate between cancerous and healthy ovarian tissue.

  15. Angle correction for small animal tumor imaging with spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanyu; Tabassum, Syeda; Piracha, Shaheer; Nandhu, Mohan Sobhana; Viapiano, Mariano; Roblyer, Darren

    2016-06-01

    Spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) is a widefield imaging technique that allows for the quantitative extraction of tissue optical properties. SFDI is currently being explored for small animal tumor imaging, but severe imaging artifacts occur for highly curved surfaces (e.g. the tumor edge). We propose a modified Lambertian angle correction, adapted from the Minnaert correction method for satellite imagery, to account for tissue surface angles up to 75°. The method was tested in a hemisphere phantom study as well as a small animal tumor model. The proposed method reduced µa and µs` extraction errors by an average of 64% and 16% respectively compared to performing no angle correction, and provided more physiologically agreeable optical property and chromophore values on tumors. PMID:27375952

  16. Angle correction for small animal tumor imaging with spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yanyu; Tabassum, Syeda; Piracha, Shaheer; Nandhu, Mohan Sobhana; Viapiano, Mariano; Roblyer, Darren

    2016-01-01

    Spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) is a widefield imaging technique that allows for the quantitative extraction of tissue optical properties. SFDI is currently being explored for small animal tumor imaging, but severe imaging artifacts occur for highly curved surfaces (e.g. the tumor edge). We propose a modified Lambertian angle correction, adapted from the Minnaert correction method for satellite imagery, to account for tissue surface angles up to 75°. The method was tested in a hemisphere phantom study as well as a small animal tumor model. The proposed method reduced µa and µs` extraction errors by an average of 64% and 16% respectively compared to performing no angle correction, and provided more physiologically agreeable optical property and chromophore values on tumors. PMID:27375952

  17. Harmonic multiplication using resonant tunneling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sollner, T. C. L. G.; Brown, E. R.; Goodhue, W. D.; Correa, C. A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the use of resonant-tunneling diodes as varistors for harmonic multiplication. It is shown that efficient odd-harmonic conversion is possible and that even harmonics do not appear because of the antisymmetry of the current-voltage (I-V) curve. It is also shown that, with the proper choice of resonant-tunneling structure and pump amplitude, most of the harmonic output power can be confined to a single odd-harmonic frequency. Fifth-harmonic multiplication was demonstrated with an output at 21.75 GHz and a power conversion efficiency of 0.5 percent, and a fifth-harmonic efficiency of 2.7 percent was achieved in a circuit simulation using an improved I-V curve.

  18. In vivo time-lapse imaging of skin burn wound healing using second-harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Takeshi; Tanaka, Ryosuke; Hase, Eiji; Fukushima, Shu-ichiro; Araki, Tsutomu

    2014-02-01

    Wound healing is a process to repair the damaged tissue caused by thermal burn, incised wound, or stab wound. Although the wound healing has many aspects, it is common for dynamics of collagen fiber, such as decomposition, production, or growth, to be closely related with wound healing. If such the healing process can be visualized as a timelapse image of the collagen fiber in the same subject, one may obtain new findings regarding biological repairing mechanisms in the healing process. In this article, to investigate the temporal modoification of dermal collagen fiber in the burn wound healing, we used second-harmonic-generation (SHG) microscopy, showing high selectivity and good image contrast to collagen molecules as well as high spatial resolution, optical three-dimensional sectioning, minimal invasiveness, deep penetration, the absence of interference from background light, and in vivo measurement without additional staining. Since SHG light arises from a non-centrosymmetric triple helix of three polypeptide chains in the collagen molecule, SHG intensity sensitively reflects the structure maturity of collagen molecule and its aggregates. A series of time-lapse SHG images during the wound healing process of 2 weeks clearly indicated that condensation and melting of dermal collagen fibers by the deep dermal burn, decomposition of the damaged collagen fibers in the inflammation phase, production of new collagen fibers in the proliferation phase, and the growth of the new collagen fibers in the remodeling phase. These results show a high potential of SHG microscopy for optical assessment of the wound healing process in vivo.

  19. Non-contact, Ultrasound-based Indentation Method for Measuring Elastic Properties of Biological Tissues Using Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI)

    PubMed Central

    Vappou, Jonathan; Hou, Gary Y.; Marquet, Fabrice; Shahmirzadi, Danial; Grondin, Julien; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive measurement of mechanical properties of biological tissues in vivo could play a significant role in improving the current understanding of tissue biomechanics. In this study, we propose a method for measuring elastic properties non-invasively by using internal indentation as generated by Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI). In HMI, an oscillating acoustic radiation force is produced by a focused ultrasound transducer at the focal region, and the resulting displacements are estimated by tracking RF signals acquired by an imaging transducer. In this study, the focal spot region was modeled as a rigid cylindrical piston that exerts an oscillatory, uniform internal force to the underlying tissue. The HMI elastic modulus EHMI was defined as the ratio of the applied force to the axial strain measured by 1D ultrasound imaging. The accuracy and the precision of the EHMI estimate were assessed both numerically and experimentally in polyacrylamide tissue-mimicking phantoms. Initial feasibility of this method in soft tissues was also shown in canine liver specimens in vitro. Very good correlation and agreement was found between the actual Young’s modulus and the HMI modulus in the numerical study (r2>0.99, relative error <10%) and on polyacrylamide gels (r2=0.95, relative error <24%). The average HMI modulus on five liver samples was found to EHMI=2.62±0.41 kPa, compared to EMechTesting=4.2±2.58 kPa measured by rheometry. This study has demonstrated for the first time the initial feasibility of a non-invasive, model-independent method to estimate local elastic properties of biological tissues at a submillimeter scale using an internal indentation-like approach. Ongoing studies include in vitro experiments in a larger number of samples and feasibility testing in in vivo models as well as pathological human specimens. PMID:25776065

  20. Non-contact, ultrasound-based indentation method for measuring elastic properties of biological tissues using harmonic motion imaging (HMI).

    PubMed

    Vappou, Jonathan; Hou, Gary Y; Marquet, Fabrice; Shahmirzadi, Danial; Grondin, Julien; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-04-01

    Noninvasive measurement of mechanical properties of biological tissues in vivo could play a significant role in improving the current understanding of tissue biomechanics. In this study, we propose a method for measuring elastic properties non-invasively by using internal indentation as generated by harmonic motion imaging (HMI). In HMI, an oscillating acoustic radiation force is produced by a focused ultrasound transducer at the focal region, and the resulting displacements are estimated by tracking radiofrequency signals acquired by an imaging transducer. In this study, the focal spot region was modeled as a rigid cylindrical piston that exerts an oscillatory, uniform internal force to the underlying tissue. The HMI elastic modulus EHMI was defined as the ratio of the applied force to the axial strain measured by 1D ultrasound imaging. The accuracy and the precision of the EHMI estimate were assessed both numerically and experimentally in polyacrylamide tissue-mimicking phantoms. Initial feasibility of this method in soft tissues was also shown in canine liver specimens in vitro. Very good correlation and agreement was found between the measured Young's modulus and the HMI modulus in the numerical study (r(2) > 0.99, relative error <10%) and on polyacrylamide gels (r(2) = 0.95, relative error <24%). The average HMI modulus on five liver samples was found to EHMI = 2.62  ±  0.41 kPa, compared to EMechTesting = 4.2  ±  2.58 kPa measured by rheometry. This study has demonstrated for the first time the initial feasibility of a non-invasive, model-independent method to estimate local elastic properties of biological tissues at a submillimeter scale using an internal indentation-like approach. Ongoing studies include in vitro experiments in a larger number of samples and feasibility testing in in vivo models as well as pathological human specimens.

  1. Non-contact, ultrasound-based indentation method for measuring elastic properties of biological tissues using Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vappou, Jonathan; Hou, Gary Y.; Marquet, Fabrice; Shahmirzadi, Danial; Grondin, Julien; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2015-04-01

    Noninvasive measurement of mechanical properties of biological tissues in vivo could play a significant role in improving the current understanding of tissue biomechanics. In this study, we propose a method for measuring elastic properties non-invasively by using internal indentation as generated by harmonic motion imaging (HMI). In HMI, an oscillating acoustic radiation force is produced by a focused ultrasound transducer at the focal region, and the resulting displacements are estimated by tracking radiofrequency signals acquired by an imaging transducer. In this study, the focal spot region was modeled as a rigid cylindrical piston that exerts an oscillatory, uniform internal force to the underlying tissue. The HMI elastic modulus EHMI was defined as the ratio of the applied force to the axial strain measured by 1D ultrasound imaging. The accuracy and the precision of the EHMI estimate were assessed both numerically and experimentally in polyacrylamide tissue-mimicking phantoms. Initial feasibility of this method in soft tissues was also shown in canine liver specimens in vitro. Very good correlation and agreement was found between the measured Young’s modulus and the HMI modulus in the numerical study (r2 > 0.99, relative error <10%) and on polyacrylamide gels (r2 = 0.95, relative error <24%). The average HMI modulus on five liver samples was found to EHMI = 2.62  ±  0.41 kPa, compared to EMechTesting = 4.2  ±  2.58 kPa measured by rheometry. This study has demonstrated for the first time the initial feasibility of a non-invasive, model-independent method to estimate local elastic properties of biological tissues at a submillimeter scale using an internal indentation-like approach. Ongoing studies include in vitro experiments in a larger number of samples and feasibility testing in in vivo models as well as pathological human specimens.

  2. Quantitative Analysis of Vascular Heterogeneity in Breast Lesions Using Contrast-Enhanced 3-D Harmonic and Subharmonic Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Anush; Eisenbrey, John R.; Machado, Priscilla; Ojeda-Fournier, Haydee; Wilkes, Annina; Sevrukov, Alexander; Mattrey, Robert F.; Wallace, Kirk; Chalek, Carl L.; Thomenius, Kai E.; Forsberg, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Ability to visualize breast lesion vascularity and quantify the vascular heterogeneity using contrast-enhanced 3-D harmonic (HI) and subharmonic (SHI) ultrasound imaging was investigated in a clinical population. Patients (n = 134) identified with breast lesions on mammography were scanned using power Doppler imaging, contrast-enhanced 3-D HI, and 3-D SHI on a modified Logiq 9 scanner (GE Healthcare). A region of interest corresponding to ultrasound contrast agent flow was identified in 4D View (GE Medical Systems) and mapped to raw slice data to generate a map of time-intensity curves for the lesion volume. Time points corresponding to baseline, peak intensity, and washout of ultrasound contrast agent were identified and used to generate and compare vascular heterogeneity plots for malignant and benign lesions. Vascularity was observed with power Doppler imaging in 84 lesions (63 benign and 21 malignant). The 3-D HI showed flow in 8 lesions (5 benign and 3 malignant), whereas 3-D SHI visualized flow in 68 lesions (49 benign and 19 malignant). Analysis of vascular heterogeneity in the 3-D SHI volumes found benign lesions having a significant difference in vascularity between central and peripheral sections (1.71 ± 0.96 vs. 1.13 ± 0.79 dB, p < 0.001, respectively), whereas malignant lesions showed no difference (1.66 ± 1.39 vs. 1.24 ± 1.14 dB, p = 0.24), indicative of more vascular coverage. These preliminary results suggest quantitative evaluation of vascular heterogeneity in breast lesions using contrast-enhanced 3-D SHI is feasible and able to detect variations in vascularity between central and peripheral sections for benign and malignant lesions. PMID:25935933

  3. A novel model of interaction between high frequency electromagnetic non-ionizing fields and microtubules viewed as coupled two-degrees of freedom harmonic oscillators.

    PubMed

    Caligiuri, Luigi Maxmilian

    2015-01-01

    The question regarding the potential biological and adverse health effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic fields on living organisms is of primary importance in biophysics and medicine. Despite the several experimental evidences showing such occurrence in a wide frequency range from extremely low frequency to microwaves, a definitive theoretical model able to explain a possible mechanism of interaction between electromagnetic fields and living matter, especially in the case of weak and very weak intensities, is still missing. In this paper it has been suggested a possible mechanism of interaction involving the resonant absorption of electromagnetic radiation by microtubules. To this aim these have been modeled as non-dissipative forced harmonic oscillators characterized by two coupled "macroscopic" degrees of freedom, respectively describing longitudinal and transversal vibrations induced by the electromagnetic field. We have shown that the proposed model, although at a preliminary stage, is able to explain the ability of even weak electromagnetic radiating electromagnetic fields to transfer high quantities of energy to living systems by means of a resonant mechanism, so capable to easily damage microtubules structure. PMID:25714384

  4. A novel model of interaction between high frequency electromagnetic non-ionizing fields and microtubules viewed as coupled two-degrees of freedom harmonic oscillators.

    PubMed

    Caligiuri, Luigi Maxmilian

    2015-01-01

    The question regarding the potential biological and adverse health effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic fields on living organisms is of primary importance in biophysics and medicine. Despite the several experimental evidences showing such occurrence in a wide frequency range from extremely low frequency to microwaves, a definitive theoretical model able to explain a possible mechanism of interaction between electromagnetic fields and living matter, especially in the case of weak and very weak intensities, is still missing. In this paper it has been suggested a possible mechanism of interaction involving the resonant absorption of electromagnetic radiation by microtubules. To this aim these have been modeled as non-dissipative forced harmonic oscillators characterized by two coupled "macroscopic" degrees of freedom, respectively describing longitudinal and transversal vibrations induced by the electromagnetic field. We have shown that the proposed model, although at a preliminary stage, is able to explain the ability of even weak electromagnetic radiating electromagnetic fields to transfer high quantities of energy to living systems by means of a resonant mechanism, so capable to easily damage microtubules structure.

  5. In vivo intracardiac OCT imaging through percutaneous access: towards image guided radio-frequency ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Kang, Wei; Carrigan, Thomas; Bishop, Austin; Rosenthal, Noah; Arruda, Mauricio; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Complete catheter-tissue contact and permanent tissue destruction are essential for efficient radio-frequency ablation (RFA) during cardiac arrhythmia treatment. Current methods of monitoring lesion formation are indirect and unreliable. We aim to develop optical coherence tomography (OCT) as an imaging guidance for RFA. OBJECTIVES The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using OCT catheter to image endocardia wall in active beating hearts through percutaneous access. This is a critical step toward image guided RFA in a clinic setting. METHODS A cone-scanning forward-viewing OCT catheter was advanced into active beating hearts through percutaneous access in four swine. The OCT catheter was steered by an introducer to touch the endocardia wall. The images were then acquired at 10 frames per second at an axial resolution and lateral resolution of 15 μm. RESULTS We report the first in vivo intracardiac OCT imaging through percutaneous access with a thin and flexible OCT catheter. We are able to acquire high quality OCT images in active beating hearts, observe the polarization-related artifacts induced by the birefringence of myocardium and readily evaluate catheter-tissue contact. CONCLUSIONS It is feasible to acquire OCT images in beating hearts through percutaneous access. The observations indicate that OCT could be a promising technique for in vivo guidance of RFA.

  6. High-intensity focused ultrasound monitoring using harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) under boiling or slow denaturation conditions.

    PubMed

    Hou, Gary Y; Marquet, Fabrice; Wang, Shutao; Apostolakis, Iason-Zacharias; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-07-01

    Harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) is a recently developed high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring method that utilizes an amplitude-modulated therapeutic ultrasound beam to induce an oscillatory radiation force at the HIFU focus and estimates the focal tissue displacement to monitor the HIFU thermal treatment. In this study, the performance of HMIFU under acoustic, thermal, and mechanical effects was investigated. The performance of HMIFU was assessed in ex vivo canine liver specimens (n = 13) under slow denaturation or boiling regimes. A passive cavitation detector (PCD) was used to assess the acoustic cavitation activity, and a bare-wire thermocouple was used to monitor the focal temperature change. During lesioning with slow denaturation, high quality displacements (correlation coefficient above 0.97) were observed under minimum cavitation noise, indicating the tissue initial-softening-then- stiffening property change. During HIFU with boiling, HMIFU monitored a consistent change in lesion-to-background displacement contrast (0.46 ± 0.37) despite the presence of strong cavitation noise due to boiling during lesion formation. Therefore, HMIFU effectively monitored softening-then-stiffening during lesioning under slow denaturation, and detected lesioning under boiling with a distinct change in displacement contrast under boiling in the presence of cavitation. In conclusion, HMIFU was shown under both boiling and slow denaturation regimes to be effective in HIFU monitoring and lesioning identification without being significantly affected by cavitation noise.

  7. A real-time algorithm for the harmonic estimation and frequency tracking of dominant components in fusion plasma magnetic diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, D.; Coelho, R. [Associação Euratom Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2013-08-15

    The real-time tracking of instantaneous quantities such as frequency, amplitude, and phase of components immerse in noisy signals has been a common problem in many scientific and engineering fields such as power systems and delivery, telecommunications, and acoustics for the past decades. In magnetically confined fusion research, extracting this sort of information from magnetic signals can be of valuable assistance in, for instance, feedback control of detrimental magnetohydrodynamic modes and disruption avoidance mechanisms by monitoring instability growth or anticipating mode-locking events. This work is focused on nonlinear Kalman filter based methods for tackling this problem. Similar methods have already proven their merits and have been successfully employed in this scientific domain in applications such as amplitude demodulation for the motional Stark effect diagnostic. In the course of this work, three approaches are described, compared, and discussed using magnetic signals from the Joint European Torus tokamak plasma discharges for benchmarking purposes.

  8. Effects of density functionals and dispersion interactions on geometries, bond energies and harmonic frequencies of EUX3 (E=N, P, CH; X=H, F, Cl).

    PubMed

    Pandey, Krishna Kumar; Patidar, Pankaj; Patidar, Sunil Kumar; Vishwakarma, Ravi

    2014-12-10

    Quantum-chemical calculations have been performed to evaluate the geometries, bonding nature and harmonic frequencies of the compounds [EUX3] at DFT, DFT-D3, DFT-D3(BJ) and DFT-dDSc levels using different density functionals BP86, BLYP, PBE, revPBE, PW91, TPSS and M06-L. The stretching frequency of UN bond in [NUF3] calculated with DFT/BLYP closely resembles with the experimental value. The performance of different density functionals for accurate UN vibrational frequencies follows the order BLYP>revPBE>BP86>PW91>TPSS>PBE>M06-L. The BLYP functional gives accurate value of the UE bond distances. The uranium atom in the studied compounds [EUX3] is positively charged. Upon going from [EUF3] to [EUCl3], the partial Hirshfeld charge on uranium atom decreases because of the lower electronegativity of chlorine compared to flourine. The Gopinathan-Jug bond order for UE bonds ranges from 2.90 to 3.29. The UE bond dissociation energies vary with different density functionals as M06-L

  9. Effects of density functionals and dispersion interactions on geometries, bond energies and harmonic frequencies of Etbnd UX3 (E = N, P, CH; X = H, F, Cl)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Krishna Kumar; Patidar, Pankaj; Patidar, Sunil Kumar; Vishwakarma, Ravi

    2014-12-01

    Quantum-chemical calculations have been performed to evaluate the geometries, bonding nature and harmonic frequencies of the compounds [Etbnd UX3] at DFT, DFT-D3, DFT-D3(BJ) and DFT-dDSc levels using different density functionals BP86, BLYP, PBE, revPBE, PW91, TPSS and M06-L. The stretching frequency of Utbnd N bond in [Ntbnd UF3] calculated with DFT/BLYP closely resembles with the experimental value. The performance of different density functionals for accurate Utbnd N vibrational frequencies follows the order BLYP > revPBE > BP86 > PW91 > TPSS > PBE > M06-L. The BLYP functional gives accurate value of the Utbnd E bond distances. The uranium atom in the studied compounds [Etbnd UX3] is positively charged. Upon going from [Etbnd UF3] to [Etbnd UCl3], the partial Hirshfeld charge on uranium atom decreases because of the lower electronegativity of chlorine compared to flourine. The Gopinathan-Jug bond order for Utbnd E bonds ranges from 2.90 to 3.29. The Utbnd E bond dissociation energies vary with different density functionals as M06-L < TPSS < BLYP < revPBE < BP86 < PBE ≈ PW91. The orbital interactions ΔEorb, in all studied compounds [Etbnd UX3] are larger than the electrostatic interaction ΔEelstat, which means the Utbnd N bonds in these compound have greater degree of covalent character (in the range 63.8-77.2%). The Usbnd E σ-bonding interaction is the dominant bonding interaction in the nitride and methylidyne complexes while it is weaker in [Ptbnd UX3]. The dispersion energy contributions to the total bond dissociation energies are rather small. Compared to the Grimme's D3(BJ) corrections, the Corminboeuf's dispersion corrections are larger with metaGGA functionals (TPSS, M06-L) while smaller with GGA functionals.

  10. Advanced Reservoir Imaging Using Frequency-Dependent Seismic Attributes

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Hilterman; Tad Patzek; Gennady Goloshubin; Dmitriy Silin; Charlotte Sullivan; Valeri Korneev

    2007-12-31

    Our report concerning advanced imaging and interpretation technology includes the development of theory, the implementation of laboratory experiments and the verification of results using field data. We investigated a reflectivity model for porous fluid-saturated reservoirs and demonstrated that the frequency-dependent component of the reflection coefficient is asymptotically proportional to the reservoir fluid mobility. We also analyzed seismic data using different azimuths and offsets over physical models of fractures filled with air and water. By comparing our physical model synthetics to numerical data we have identified several diagnostic indicators for quantifying the fractures. Finally, we developed reflectivity transforms for predicting pore fluid and lithology using rock-property statistics from 500 reservoirs in both the shelf and deep-water Gulf of Mexico. With these transforms and seismic AVO gathers across the prospect and its down-dip water-equivalent reservoir, fluid saturation can be estimated without a calibration well that ties the seismic. Our research provides the important additional mechanisms to recognize, delineate, and validate new hydrocarbon reserves and assist in the development of producing fields.

  11. Three Dimensional Speckle Imaging Employing a Frequency-Locked Tunable Diode Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, Bret D.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Schiffern, John T.; Mendoza, Albert

    2015-09-01

    We describe a high accuracy frequency stepping method for a tunable diode laser to improve a three dimensional (3D) imaging approach based upon interferometric speckle imaging. The approach, modeled after Takeda, exploits tuning an illumination laser in frequency as speckle interferograms of the object (specklegrams) are acquired at each frequency in a Michelson interferometer. The resulting 3D hypercube of specklegrams encode spatial information in the x-y plane of each image with laser tuning arrayed along its z-axis. We present laboratory data of before and after results showing enhanced 3D imaging resulting from precise laser frequency control.

  12. Current Density Imaging Using Directly Measured Harmonic Bz Data in MREIT

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Oh In

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) measures magnetic flux density signals through the use of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to visualize the internal conductivity and/or current density. Understanding the reconstruction procedure for the internal current density, we directly measure the second derivative of Bz data from the measured k-space data, from which we can avoid a tedious phase unwrapping to obtain the phase signal of Bz. We determine optimal weighting factors to combine the derivatives of magnetic flux density data, ∇2Bz, measured using the multi-echo train. The proposed method reconstructs the internal current density using the relationships between the induced internal current and the measured ∇2Bz data. Results from a phantom experiment demonstrate that the proposed method reduces the scanning time and provides the internal current density, while suppressing the background field inhomogeneity. To implement the real experiment, we use a phantom with a saline solution including a balloon, which excludes other artifacts by any concentration gradient in the phantom. PMID:23573168

  13. Dual aperture dipole magnet with second harmonic component

    DOEpatents

    Praeg, Walter F.

    1985-01-01

    An improved dual aperture dipole electromagnet includes a second-harmonic frequency magnetic guide field winding which surrounds first harmonic frequency magnetic guide field windings associated with each aperture. The second harmonic winding and the first harmonic windings cooperate to produce resultant magnetic waveforms in the apertures which have extended acceleration and shortened reset portions of electromagnet operation.

  14. Dual aperture dipole magnet with second harmonic component

    DOEpatents

    Praeg, W.F.

    1983-08-31

    An improved dual aperture dipole electromagnet includes a second-harmonic frequency magnetic guide field winding which surrounds first harmonic frequency magnetic guide field windings associated with each aperture. The second harmonic winding and the first harmonic windings cooperate to produce resultant magnetic waveforms in the apertures which have extended acceleration and shortened reset portions of electromagnet operation.

  15. Harmonic 'signatures' of microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Blake-Coleman, B C; Hutchings, M J; Silley, P

    1994-01-01

    The frequency/amplitude effect of various microorganisms exposed to periodic (time varying) electric fields, when proximate to immersed electrodes, has been studied using a novel analytical instrument. The harmonic distribution, in complex signals caused by cells exposed to harmonic free waveforms and occupying part of the electrode/suspension interface volume, was shown to be almost entirely due to the change in the standing interfacial transfer function by the (dielectrically nonlinear) presence of cells. Thus, the characteristic interfacial non-linearity is viewed as variable, being uniquely modulated by the presence of particular cells in the interfacial region. Little can be attributed to bulk (far field) effects. The tendency for subtle (characteristic) signal distortion to occur as a function of particulate (cell or molecular) occupancy of the near electrode interfacial region under controlled current conditions leads to the method of sample characterisation by harmonic (Fourier) analysis. We report here, as a sequel to our original studies (Hutchings et al., 1993; Hutchings and Blake-Coleman, 1993), preliminary results of the harmonic analysis of microbial suspensions under controlled signal conditions using a three-electrode configuration. These data provide three-dimensional graphical representations producing harmonic 'surfaces' for various microorganisms. Thus, cell type differences are characterised by their 'harmonic signature'. The visual distinction provided by these 'surface' forming three-dimensional plots is striking and gives a convincing impression of the ability to identify and enumerate specific microorganisms by acquisition of cell-modulated electrode interfacial Fourier spectra. PMID:8060593

  16. Sparse matrix beamforming and image reconstruction for 2-D HIFU monitoring using harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) with in vitro validation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Gary Y; Provost, Jean; Grondin, Julien; Wang, Shutao; Marquet, Fabrice; Bunting, Ethan; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2014-11-01

    Harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) utilizes an amplitude-modulated HIFU beam to induce a localized focal oscillatory motion simultaneously estimated. The objective of this study is to develop and show the feasibility of a novel fast beamforming algorithm for image reconstruction using GPU-based sparse-matrix operation with real-time feedback. In this study, the algorithm was implemented onto a fully integrated, clinically relevant HMIFU system. A single divergent transmit beam was used while fast beamforming was implemented using a GPU-based delay-and-sum method and a sparse-matrix operation. Axial HMI displacements were then estimated from the RF signals using a 1-D normalized cross-correlation method and streamed to a graphic user interface with frame rates up to 15 Hz, a 100-fold increase compared to conventional CPU-based processing. The real-time feedback rate does not require interrupting the HIFU treatment. Results in phantom experiments showed reproducible HMI images and monitoring of 22 in vitro HIFU treatments using the new 2-D system demonstrated reproducible displacement imaging, and monitoring of 22 in vitro HIFU treatments using the new 2-D system showed a consistent average focal displacement decrease of 46.7 ±14.6% during lesion formation. Complementary focal temperature monitoring also indicated an average rate of displacement increase and decrease with focal temperature at 0.84±1.15%/(°)C, and 2.03±0.93%/(°)C , respectively. These results reinforce the HMIFU capability of estimating and monitoring stiffness related changes in real time. Current ongoing studies include clinical translation of the presented system for monitoring of HIFU treatment for breast and pancreatic tumor applications.

  17. Spatial and frequency-based super-resolution of ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mon-Ju; Karls, Joseph; Duenwald-Kuehl, Sarah; Vanderby, Ray; Sethares, William

    2014-07-01

    Modern ultrasound systems can output video images containing more spatial and temporal information than still images. Super-resolution techniques can exploit additional information but face two challenges: image registration and complex motion. In addition, information from multiple available frequencies is unexploited. Herein, we utilised these information sources to create better ultrasound images and videos, extending existing technologies for image capture. Spatial and frequency-based super-resolution processing using multiple motion estimation and frequency combination was applied to ultrasound videos of deforming models. Processed images are larger, have greater clarity and detail, and less variability in intensity between frames. Significantly, strain measurements are more accurate and precise than those from raw videos, and have a higher contrast ratio between 'tumour' and 'surrounding tissue' in a phantom model. We attribute improvements to reduced noise and increased resolution in processed images. Our methods can significantly improve quantitative and qualitative assessments of ultrasound images when compared assessments of standard images.

  18. Study of inspection on metal sheet with subsurface defects using linear frequency modulated ultrasound excitation thermal-wave imaging (LFM-UTWI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junyan; Gong, Jinlong; Qin, Lei; Wang, Huiming; Wang, Yang

    2014-01-01

    The linear frequency modulated ultrasound excitation thermal wave imaging (LFM-UTWI) was investigated on detection of subsurface defects of metal sheet. A numerical finite element analysis is carried out to calculate thermal wave signal dependence of time by linear frequency modulated ultrasonic wave excitation. Cross-correlation operation in time domain and frequency domain are used to extract the main peak value and the corresponding delay time, respectively. Fourier transform (FT) is applied to calculate the amplitude and phase angle of harmonic component of thermal wave. Experimental results show that various deep subsurface defects are readily detected using LFM-UTWI with once excitation, and LFM-UTWI has an advantage of better defect detectability compared to ultrasound lock-in thermography (ULIT).

  19. Two-photon spectral fluorescence lifetime and second-harmonic generation imaging of the porcine cornea with a 12-femtosecond laser microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, Ana; Breunig, Hans Georg; Uchugonova, Aisada; Morgado, António Miguel; König, Karsten

    2016-03-01

    Five dimensional microscopy with a 12-fs laser scanning microscope based on spectrally resolved two-photon autofluorescence lifetime and second-harmonic generation (SHG) imaging was used to characterize all layers of the porcine cornea. This setup allowed the simultaneous excitation of both metabolic cofactors, NAD(P)H and flavins, and their discrimination based on their spectral emission properties and fluorescence decay characteristics. Furthermore, the architecture of the stromal collagen fibrils was assessed by SHG imaging in both forward and backward directions. Information on the metabolic state and the tissue architecture of the porcine cornea were obtained with subcellular resolution, and high temporal and spectral resolutions.

  20. Co-registration of ultrasound and frequency-domain photoacoustic radar images and image improvement for tumor detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dovlo, Edem; Lashkari, Bahman; Choi, Sung soo Sean; Mandelis, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    This paper demonstrates the co-registration of ultrasound (US) and frequency domain photoacoustic radar (FD-PAR) images with significant image improvement from applying image normalization, filtering and amplification techniques. Achieving PA imaging functionality on a commercial Ultrasound instrument could accelerate clinical acceptance and use. Experimental results presented demonstrate live animal testing and show enhancements in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast and spatial resolution. The co-registered image produced from the US and phase PA images, provides more information than both images independently.

  1. Eddy current imaging with an atomic radio-frequency magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickenbrock, Arne; Leefer, Nathan; Blanchard, John W.; Budker, Dmitry

    2016-05-01

    We use a radio-frequency 85Rb alkali-vapor cell magnetometer based on a paraffin-coated cell with long spin-coherence time and a small, low-inductance driving coil to create highly resolved conductivity maps of different objects. We resolve sub-mm features in conductive objects, we characterize the frequency response of our technique, and by operating at frequencies up to 250 kHz we are able to discriminate between differently conductive materials based on the induced response. The method is suited to cover a wide range of driving frequencies and can potentially be used for detecting non-metallic objects with low DC conductivity.

  2. A compact frequency-domain photon migration system for integration into commercial hybrid small animal imaging scanners for fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darne, Chinmay D.; Lu, Yujie; Tan, I.-Chih; Zhu, Banghe; Rasmussen, John C.; Smith, Anne M.; Yan, Shikui; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2012-12-01

    The work presented herein describes the system design and performance evaluation of a miniaturized near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) frequency-domain photon migration (FDPM) system with non-contact excitation and homodyne detection capability for small animal fluorescence tomography. The FDPM system was developed specifically for incorporation into a Siemens micro positron emission tomography/computed tomography (microPET/CT) commercial scanner for hybrid small animal imaging, but could be adapted to other systems. Operating at 100 MHz, the system noise was minimized and the associated amplitude and phase errors were characterized to be ±0.7% and ±0.3°, respectively. To demonstrate the tomographic ability, a commercial mouse-shaped phantom with 50 µM IRDye800CW and 68Ga containing inclusion was used to associate PET and NIRF tomography. Three-dimensional mesh generation and anatomical referencing was accomplished through CT. A third-order simplified spherical harmonics approximation (SP3) algorithm, for efficient prediction of light propagation in small animals, was tailored to incorporate the FDPM approach. Finally, the PET-NIRF target co-localization accuracy was analyzed in vivo with a dual-labeled imaging agent targeting orthotopic growth of human prostate cancer. The obtained results validate the integration of time-dependent fluorescence tomography system within a commercial microPET/CT scanner for multimodality small animal imaging.

  3. A compact frequency-domain photon migration system for integration into commercial hybrid small animal imaging scanners for fluorescence tomography.

    PubMed

    Darne, Chinmay D; Lu, Yujie; Tan, I-Chih; Zhu, Banghe; Rasmussen, John C; Smith, Anne M; Yan, Shikui; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M

    2012-12-21

    The work presented herein describes the system design and performance evaluation of a miniaturized near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) frequency-domain photon migration (FDPM) system with non-contact excitation and homodyne detection capability for small animal fluorescence tomography. The FDPM system was developed specifically for incorporation into a Siemens micro positron emission tomography/computed tomography (microPET/CT) commercial scanner for hybrid small animal imaging, but could be adapted to other systems. Operating at 100 MHz, the system noise was minimized and the associated amplitude and phase errors were characterized to be ±0.7% and ±0.3°, respectively. To demonstrate the tomographic ability, a commercial mouse-shaped phantom with 50 µM IRDye800CW and ⁶⁸Ga containing inclusion was used to associate PET and NIRF tomography. Three-dimensional mesh generation and anatomical referencing was accomplished through CT. A third-order simplified spherical harmonics approximation (SP₃) algorithm, for efficient prediction of light propagation in small animals, was tailored to incorporate the FDPM approach. Finally, the PET-NIRF target co-localization accuracy was analyzed in vivo with a dual-labeled imaging agent targeting orthotopic growth of human prostate cancer. The obtained results validate the integration of time-dependent fluorescence tomography system within a commercial microPET/CT scanner for multimodality small animal imaging.

  4. High frequency active auroral research program (HAARP) imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lance, Cyril; Eather, Robert

    1993-09-01

    A low-light-level monochromatic imaging system was designed and fabricated which was optimized to detect and record optical emissions associated with high-power RF heating of the ionosphere. The instrument is capable of detecting very low intensities, of the order of 1 Rayleigh, from typical ionospheric atomic and molecular emissions. This is achieved through co-adding of ON images during heater pulses and subtraction of OFF (background) images between pulses. Images can be displayed and analyzed in real time and stored in optical disc for later analysis. Full image processing software is provided which was customized for this application and uses menu or mouse user interaction.

  5. Current collapse imaging of Schottky gate AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors by electric field-induced optical second-harmonic generation measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Katsuno, Takashi Ishikawa, Tsuyoshi; Ueda, Hiroyuki; Uesugi, Tsutomu; Manaka, Takaaki; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa

    2014-06-23

    Two-dimensional current collapse imaging of a Schottky gate AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor device was achieved by optical electric field-induced second-harmonic generation (EFISHG) measurements. EFISHG measurements can detect the electric field produced by carriers trapped in the on-state of the device, which leads to current collapse. Immediately after (e.g., 1, 100, or 800 μs) the completion of drain-stress voltage (200 V) in the off-state, the second-harmonic (SH) signals appeared within 2 μm from the gate edge on the drain electrode. The SH signal intensity became weak with time, which suggests that the trapped carriers are emitted from the trap sites. The SH signal location supports the well-known virtual gate model for current collapse.

  6. Transmit beamforming for optimal second-harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Hoilund-Kaupang, Halvard; Masoy, Svein-Erik

    2011-08-01

    A simulation study of transmit ultrasound beams from several transducer configurations is conducted to compare second-harmonic imaging at 3.5 MHz and 11 MHz. Second- harmonic generation and the ability to suppress near field echoes are compared. Each transducer configuration is defined by a chosen f-number and focal depth, and the transmit pressure is estimated to not exceed a mechanical index of 1.2. The medium resembles homogeneous muscle tissue with nonlinear elasticity and power-law attenuation. To improve computational efficiency, the KZK equation is utilized, and all transducers are circular-symmetric. Previous literature shows that second-harmonic generation is proportional to the square of the transmit pressure, and that transducer configurations with different transmit frequencies, but equal aperture and focal depth in terms of wavelengths, generate identical second-harmonic fields in terms of shape. Results verify this for a medium with attenuation f1. For attenuation f1.1, deviations are found, and the high frequency subsequently performs worse than the low frequency. The results suggest that high frequencies are less able to suppress near-field echoes in the presence of a heterogeneous body wall than low frequencies.

  7. Harmonic uniflow engine

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Charles L.

    2016-03-22

    A reciprocating-piston uniflow engine includes a harmonic oscillator inlet valve capable of oscillating at a resonant frequency for controlling the flow of working fluid into the engine. In particular, the inlet valve includes an inlet valve head and a spring arranged together as a harmonic oscillator so that the inlet valve head is moveable from an unbiased equilibrium position to a biased closed position occluding an inlet. When released, the inlet valve head undergoes a single oscillation past the equilibrium position to a maximum open position and returns to a biased return position close to the closed position to choke the flow and produce a pressure drop across the inlet valve causing the inlet valve to close. In other embodiments, the harmonic oscillator arrangement of the inlet valve enables the uniflow engine to be reversibly operated as a uniflow compressor.

  8. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with a femtosecond high harmonic light source using a two-dimensional imaging electron analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathias, S.; Miaja-Avila, L.; Murnane, M. M.; Kapteyn, H.; Aeschlimann, M.; Bauer, M.

    2007-08-01

    An experimental setup for time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy using a femtosecond 1kHz high harmonic light source and a two-dimensional electron analyzer for parallel energy and momentum detection is presented. A selection of the 27th harmonic (41.85eV) from the harmonic spectrum of the light source is achieved with a multilayer Mo /Si double mirror monochromator. The extinction efficiency of the monochromator in selecting this harmonic is shown to be better than 7:1, while the transmitted bandwidth of the selected harmonic is capable of supporting temporal pulse widths as short as 3fs. The recorded E(k ) photoelectron spectrum from a Cu(111) surface demonstrates an angular resolution of better than 0.6° (=0.03Å-1 at Ekin ,e=36eV). Used in a pump-probe configuration, the described experimental setup represents a powerful experimental tool for studying the femtosecond dynamics of ultrafast surface processes in real time.

  9. Fiber bundle based endomicroscopy prototype with two collection channels for simultaneous coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and second harmonic generation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhengfan; Satira, Zachary A.; Wang, Xi; Xu, Xiaoyun; Chen, Xu; Wong, Kelvin; Chen, Shufen; Xin, Jianguo; Wong, Stephen T. C.

    2014-02-01

    Label-free multiphoton imaging is promising for replacing biopsy and could offer new strategies for intraoperative or surgical applications. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging could provide lipid-band contrast, and second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging is useful for imaging collagen, tendon and muscle fibers. A combination of these two imaging modalities could provide rich information and this combination has been studied by researchers to investigate diseases through microscopy imaging. The combination of these two imaging modalities in endomicroscopy imaging has been rarely investigated. In this research, a fiber bundle consisted of one excitation fiber and 18 collection fibers was developed in our endomicroscopy prototype. The 18 collection fibers were divided into two collection channels with 9 fibers in each channel. These two channels could be used together as one channel for effective signal collection or used separately for simplifying detection part of the system. Differences of collection pattern of these two channels were investigated. Collection difference of central excitation fiber and surrounding 18 fibers was also investigated, which reveals the potential ability of this system to measure forward to backward (F/B) ratio in SHG imaging. CARS imaging of mouse adipocyte and SHG imaging of mouse tail tendon were performed to demonstrate the CARS and SHG tissue imaging performance of this system. Simultaneous CARS and SHG imaging ability of this system was demonstrated by mouse tail imaging. This fiber bundle based endomicroscopy imaging prototype, offers a promising platform for constructing efficient fiber-based CARS and SHG multimodal endomicroscopes for label free intraoperative imaging applications.

  10. Discovery of deep and shallow trap states from step structures of rutile TiO{sub 2} vicinal surfaces by second harmonic and sum frequency generation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Ryosuke; Miyauchi, Yoshihiro; Mizutani, Goro

    2011-04-21

    In this report, local electronic structures of steps and terraces on rutile TiO{sub 2} single crystal faces were studied by second harmonic and sum frequency generation (SHG/SFG) spectroscopy. We attained selective measurement of the local electronic states of the step bunches formed on the vicinal (17 18 1) and (15 13 0) surfaces using a recently developed step-selective probing technique. The electronic structures of the flat (110)-(1x1) (the terrace face of the vicinal surfaces) and (011)-(2x1) surfaces were also discussed. The SHG/SFG spectra showed that step structures are mainly responsible for the formation of trap states, since significant resonances from the trap states were observed only from the vicinal surfaces. We detected deep hole trap (DHT) states and shallow electron trap (SET) states selectively from the step bunches on the vicinal surfaces. Detailed analysis of the SHG/SFG spectra showed that the DHT and SET states are more likely to be induced at the top edges of the step bunches than on their hillsides. Unlike the SET states, the DHT states were observed only at the step bunches parallel to [1 1 1][equivalent to the step bunches formed on the (17 18 1) surface]. Photocatalytic activity for each TiO{sub 2} sample was also measured through methylene blue photodegradation reactions and was found to follow the sequence: (110) < (17 18 1) < (15 13 0) < (011), indicating that steps along [0 0 1] are more reactive than steps along [1 1 1]. This result implies that the presence of the DHT states observed from the step bunches parallel to [1 1 1] did not effectively contribute to the methylene blue photodegradation reactions.

  11. A novel dual-frequency imaging method for intravascular ultrasound applications.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Weibao; Chen, Yan; Wong, Chi-Man; Liu, Baoqiang; Dai, Jiyan; Zheng, Hairong

    2015-03-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), which is able to delineate internal structures of vessel wall with fine spatial resolution, has greatly enriched the knowledge of coronary atherosclerosis. A novel dual-frequency imaging method is proposed in this paper for intravascular imaging applications. A probe combined two ultrasonic transducer elements with different center frequencies (36 MHz and 78 MHz) is designed and fabricated with PMN-PT single crystal material. It has the ability to balance both imaging depth and resolution, which are important imaging parameters for clinical test. A dual-channel imaging platform is also proposed for real-time imaging, and this platform has been proven to support programmable processing algorithms, flexible imaging control, and raw RF data acquisition for IVUS applications. Testing results show that the -6 dB axial and lateral imaging resolutions of low-frequency ultrasound are 78 and 132 μm, respectively. In terms of high-frequency ultrasound, axial and lateral resolutions are determined to be as high as 34 and 106 μm. In vitro intravascular imaging on healthy swine aorta is conducted to demonstrate the performance of the dual-frequency imaging method for IVUS applications. PMID:25454093

  12. Spatial pattern separation of chemicals and frequency-independent components by terahertz spectroscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yuuki; Kawase, Kodo; Ikari, Tomofumi; Ito, Hiromasa; Ishikawa, Youichi; Minamide, Hiroaki

    2003-10-01

    We separated the component spatial patterns of frequency-dependent absorption in chemicals and frequency-independent components such as plastic, paper, and measurement noise in terahertz (THz) spectroscopic images, using known spectral curves. Our measurement system, which uses a widely tunable coherent THz-wave parametric oscillator source, can image at a specific frequency in the range 1-2 THz. The component patterns of chemicals can easily be extracted by use of the frequency-independent components. This method could be successfully used for nondestructive inspection for the detection of illegal drugs and devices of bioterrorism concealed, e.g., inside mail and packages.

  13. High-repetition-rate and high-photon-flux 70 eV high-harmonic source for coincidence ion imaging of gas-phase molecules.

    PubMed

    Rothhardt, Jan; Hädrich, Steffen; Shamir, Yariv; Tschnernajew, Maxim; Klas, Robert; Hoffmann, Armin; Tadesse, Getnet K; Klenke, Arno; Gottschall, Thomas; Eidam, Tino; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas; Boll, Rebecca; Bomme, Cedric; Dachraoui, Hatem; Erk, Benjamin; Di Fraia, Michele; Horke, Daniel A; Kierspel, Thomas; Mullins, Terence; Przystawik, Andreas; Savelyev, Evgeny; Wiese, Joss; Laarmann, Tim; Küpper, Jochen; Rolles, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Unraveling and controlling chemical dynamics requires techniques to image structural changes of molecules with femtosecond temporal and picometer spatial resolution. Ultrashort-pulse x-ray free-electron lasers have significantly advanced the field by enabling advanced pump-probe schemes. There is an increasing interest in using table-top photon sources enabled by high-harmonic generation of ultrashort-pulse lasers for such studies. We present a novel high-harmonic source driven by a 100 kHz fiber laser system, which delivers 1011 photons/s in a single 1.3 eV bandwidth harmonic at 68.6 eV. The combination of record-high photon flux and high repetition rate paves the way for time-resolved studies of the dissociation dynamics of inner-shell ionized molecules in a coincidence detection scheme. First coincidence measurements on CH3I are shown and it is outlined how the anticipated advancement of fiber laser technology and improved sample delivery will, in the next step, allow pump-probe studies of ultrafast molecular dynamics with table-top XUV-photon sources. These table-top sources can provide significantly higher repetition rates than the currently operating free-electron lasers and they offer very high temporal resolution due to the intrinsically small timing jitter between pump and probe pulses. PMID:27505779

  14. Multispectral imaging of tissue absorption and scattering using spatial frequency domain imaging and a computed-tomography imaging spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Jessie R.; Cuccia, David J.; Johnson, William R.; Bearman, Gregory H.; Durkin, Anthony J.; Hsu, Mike; Lin, Alexander; Binder, Devin K.; Wilson, Dan; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2011-01-01

    We present an approach for rapidly and quantitatively mapping tissue absorption and scattering spectra in a wide-field, noncontact imaging geometry by combining multifrequency spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) with a computed-tomography imaging spectrometer (CTIS). SFDI overcomes the need to spatially scan a source, and is based on the projection and analysis of periodic structured illumination patterns. CTIS provides a throughput advantage by simultaneously diffracting multiple spectral images onto a single CCD chip to gather spectra at every pixel of the image, thus providing spatial and spectral information in a single snapshot. The spatial-spectral data set was acquired 30 times faster than with our wavelength-scanning liquid crystal tunable filter camera, even though it is not yet optimized for speed. Here we demonstrate that the combined SFDI-CTIS is capable of rapid, multispectral imaging of tissue absorption and scattering in a noncontact, nonscanning platform. The combined system was validated for 36 wavelengths between 650-1000 nm in tissue simulating phantoms over a range of tissue-like absorption and scattering properties. The average percent error for the range of absorption coefficients (μa) was less than 10% from 650-800 nm, and less than 20% from 800-1000 nm. The average percent error in reduced scattering coefficients (μs') was less than 5% from 650-700 nm and less than 3% from 700-1000 nm. The SFDI-CTIS platform was applied to a mouse model of brain injury in order to demonstrate the utility of this approach in characterizing spatially and spectrally varying tissue optical properties.

  15. Final Scientific/Technical Report for DE-FG03-02NA00063 Coherent imaging of laser-plasma interactions using XUV high harmonic radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Henry Kapteyn

    2006-06-06

    The objective of this project was to develop experimental techniques for using coherent extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) radiation generated using the high-order harmonic generation technique, as an illumination source for studies of high-density plasmas relevant to the stockpile stewardship mission. In this project, we made considerable progress, including the first demonstration of imaging of dynamic processes using this coherent ultrashort pulse light. This work also stimulated considerable progress in the development of the required ultrashort EUV pulses, and in the development of new laser technologies that have been commercialized. We also demonstrated the first EUV sources that exhibit full intrinsic optical coherence. This work resulted in 12 publications.

  16. Novel infrared image enhancement technology based on the frequency compensation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yuhua; He, Rulong; Lin, Haitao

    2016-05-01

    A novel infrared image enhancement method has been proposed in this paper. Our aim is to develop a detail enhancement method which is focused on the frequency feature of the image. The proposed method is following the most popular strategy of enhancing the infrared images nowadays, but concentrating on the frequency domain. Firstly, the original image is separated by a guided image filter into detail layer and the base layer. Quite unlike the traditional methods, we use the guided image filter to eliminate most of the noise and weak signal of the scenario. Then, by a designed iteration process, the higher frequency of the scenario will be calculated back and add to the detail layer. The noise will not be enhanced because the iteration is only focused on the leftover scenario frequency. We run many tests on the raw data captured by the 320 × 256 HgCdTe cooled thermal imager, and make a comparison between our approach with the previous method of bilateral filtering digital detail enhancement and guided image filtering digital detail enhancement. Figures and analytical data show that our method is better than the previous proposed researches. Our method could effectively process the infrared image with less noise and artifacts, which has potential applications in testing, manufacturing, chemical imaging, night vision, and surveillance security.

  17. Experimental 0.22 THz Stepped Frequency Radar System for ISAR Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Mei Yan; Zhang, Cun Lin; Zhao, Ran; Zhao, Yue Jin

    2014-09-01

    High resolution inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging is demonstrated by using a 0.22 THz stepped-frequency (SF) imaging radar system. The synthesis bandwidth of the terahertz (THz) SF radar is 12 GHz, which are beneficial for high resolution imaging. The resolution of ISAR image can reach centimeter-scale with the use of Range-Doppler algorithm (RDA). Results indicate that high resolution ISAR imaging is realized by using 0.22THz SF radar coupled with turntable scanning, which can provide foundations for further research on high-resolution radar image in the THz band.

  18. Major Bleeding after Percutaneous Image-Guided Biopsies: Frequency, Predictors, and Periprocedural Management

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Sean A.; Milovanovic, Lazar; Midia, Mehran

    2015-01-01

    Major bleeding remains an uncommon yet potentially devastating complication following percutaneous image-guided biopsy. This article reviews two cases of major bleeding after percutaneous biopsy and discusses the frequency, predictors, and periprocedural management of major postprocedural bleeding. PMID:25762845

  19. Extending the ICRF to Higher Radio Frequencies: Imaging and Source Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boboltz, David A.; Fey, Alan L.; Charlot, Patrick; Fomalont, Edward B.; Lanyi, Gabor E.; Zhang, Li-Wei

    2004-01-01

    We present imaging results and source structure analysis of extragalactic radio sources observed using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 24 GHz and 43 GHz as part of an ongoing NASA, USNO, NRAO and Bordeaux Observatory collaboration to extend the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) to higher radio frequencies. The K/Q-band image database now includes images of 108 sources at 43 GHz (Q-braid) and images of 230 sources at 24 GHz (K-band). Preliminary analysis of the observations taken to date shows that the sources are generally more compact as one goes from the ICRF frequency of 8.4 GHz to 24 GHz. This result is consistent with the standard theory of compact extragalactic radio sources and suggests that reference frames defined at these higher radio frequencies will be less susceptible to the effects of intrinsic source structure than those defined at lower frequencies.

  20. Nanoscale Subsurface Imaging via Resonant Difference-Frequency Atomic Force Ultrasonic Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, Sean A.; Cantrell, John H.; Lilehei, Peter T.

    2007-01-01

    A novel scanning probe microscope methodology has been developed that employs an ultrasonic wave launched from the bottom of a sample while the cantilever of an atomic force microscope, driven at a frequency differing from the ultrasonic frequency by the fundamental resonance frequency of the cantilever, engages the sample top surface. The nonlinear mixing of the oscillating cantilever and the ultrasonic wave in the region defined by the cantilever tip-sample surface interaction force generates difference-frequency oscillations at the cantilever fundamental resonance. The resonance-enhanced difference-frequency signals are used to create images of embedded nanoscale features.

  1. Simultaneous sum-frequency and vibro-acoustography imaging for nondestructive evaluation and testing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mitri, F. G.; Silva, G. T.; Greenleaf, J. F.; Fatemi, M.

    2007-12-01

    High-resolution ultrasound imaging systems for inspection of defects and flaws in materials are of great demand in many industries. Among these systems, Vibro-acoustography (VA) has shown excellent capabilities as a noncontact method for nondestructive high-resolution imaging applications. This method consists of mixing two confocal ultrasound beams, slightly shifted in frequency, to produce a dynamic (oscillatory) radiation force in the region of their intersection. This force vibrates the object placed at the focus of the confocal transducer. As a result of the applied force, an acoustic emission field at the difference frequency of the primary incident ultrasound beams is produced. In addition to the difference frequency acoustic emission signal, there exists another signal at the sum frequency, formed in the intersection region of the two primary beams. The goal of this study is to investigate the formation of high-resolution images using the sum frequency of ultrasound waves in VA while concurrently forming the conventional difference-frequency VA image, thereby increasing the amount of information acquired during a single scan. A theoretical model describing the sum-frequency wave propagation, including beam forming and image formation in the confocal configuration, is developed and verified experimentally. Moreover, sample experiments are performed on a flawed fiber-reinforced ceramic composite plate. Images at both the difference and sum frequencies are compared and discussed. Results show that the sum-frequency image produces a high-resolution C scan of the plate by which the flaws and structural details of the plate can be detected.

  2. Optical correlation of spatial-frequency-shifted images in a photorefractive BSO correlator.

    PubMed

    Tavassoli, Abtine; Becker, Michael F

    2004-03-10

    The optical cross correlation of an image with another image that was spatial-frequency shifted in one dimension was demonstrated in a photorefractive VanderLugt correlator. The first image was stored as a Fourier-transform hologram in a photorefractive Bi12SiO20 crystal (BSO) and was successively correlated with different spatial-frequency-shifted versions of a second image. We implemented the spatial-frequency shift by rotating a galvanometer mirror in an image plane, causing the Fourier transform to be shifted laterally in the BSO. We verified that the resulting operation in the BSO was an accurate complex multiplication of the shifted and the stored Fourier transforms. As many as 20 successive readouts were conducted without measurable erasure of the stored hologram. The dynamic range, saturation behavior, and other performance parameters were measured and are discussed. PMID:15046173

  3. Ghost imaging with different frequencies through non-degenerated four-wave mixing.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ya; Wang, Chengyuan; Liu, Jun; Wang, Jinwen; Cao, Mingtao; Wei, Dong; Gao, Hong; Li, Fuli

    2016-08-01

    As a novel imaging method, ghost imaging has been widely explored in various fields of research, such as lensless ghost imaging, computational ghost imaging, turbulence-free ghost imaging. Recently, ghost imaging in non-degenerated system with pseudo-thermal light has been discussed theoretically, however, to our best knowledge, no experimental evidence has been proven yet. In this paper, we propose a new approach to realize ghost imaging with different frequencies, which are generated through a non-degenerated four-wave mixing(FWM) process in Rb vapor. In our experiment, by employing pseudo-thermal light as the probe beam, we found that the generated FWM signal has a strong second-order correlation with the original thermal light. On basis of that, we successfully implement non-degenerate ghost imaging, and reconstruct highly similar images of objects. PMID:27505792

  4. Microwave Frequency Ferroelectric Domain Imaging of Deuterated Triglycine Sulfate Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhauer, David E.; Anlage, Steven M.

    2001-03-01

    We have used a near-field scanning microwave microscope(D. E. Steinhauer, C. P. Vlahacos, F. C. Wellstood, Steven M. Anlage, C. Canedy, R. Ramesh, A. Stanishevsky, and J. Melngailis, "Quantitative Imaging of Dielectric Permittivity and Tunability with a Near-Field Scanning Microwave Microscope," Rev. Sci. Instrum. 71), 2751-2758 (2000). to image domain structure and quantitatively measure dielectric permittivity and nonlinearity in ferroelectric crystals at 8.1 GHz with a spatial resolution of 1 μm. We imaged ferroelectric domains in periodically-poled LiNbO_3, BaTiO_3, and deuterated triglycine sulfate (DTGS) with a signal-to-noise ratio of 7. Measurement of the permittivity and nonlinearity of DTGS in the temperature range 300--400 K shows a peak at the Curie temperature, TC ≈ 340 K, as well as reasonable agreement with thermodynamic theory. In addition, the domain growth relaxation time shows a minimum near T_C. We observe coarsening of ferroelectric domains in DTGS after a temperature quench from 360 K to 330 K, and evaluate the structure factor.

  5. Harmonically excited orbital variations

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, T.

    1985-08-06

    Rephrasing the equations of motion for orbital maneuvers in terms of Lagrangian generalized coordinates instead of Newtonian rectangular cartesian coordinates can make certain harmonic terms in the orbital angular momentum vector more readily apparent. In this formulation the equations of motion adopt the form of a damped harmonic oscillator when torques are applied to the orbit in a variationally prescribed manner. The frequencies of the oscillator equation are in some ways unexpected but can nonetheless be exploited through resonant forcing functions to achieve large secular variations in the orbital elements. Two cases are discussed using a circular orbit as the control case: (1) large changes in orbital inclination achieved by harmonic excitation rather than one impulsive velocity change, and (2) periodic and secular changes to the longitude of the ascending node using both stable and unstable excitation strategies. The implications of these equations are also discussed for both artificial satellites and natural satellites. For the former, two utilitarian orbits are suggested, each exploiting a form of harmonic excitation. 5 refs.

  6. Image blurring and deblurring using two biased photorefractive crystals in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Haiyong; Ma, Chong; Sun, Zhixu; Xu, Tao; Li, Jianwei; Xu, Nan; Wang, Jinjin; Song, Feng; Sheng, Chuanxiang; Sun, Ming; Li, Li

    2014-11-01

    In an imaging system based on a coherent source of moderate power density, images can be blurred when a biased photorefractive crystal is applied at the focal point of the imaging lens. In the frequency domain of the original images, the intensity patterns are diffracted through the photorefractive crystal with varied bias voltage. The high intensity region, which is usually the center or low frequency region of the intensity patterns, is more readily focused or defocused, resulting in blurred images in perception. Such blurred images could not be simply recovered by defocusing methods, which can only indistinguishably focus or defocus the whole intensity patterns. However, the blurred images may be deblurred to certain extent for recovery if a second photorefractive crystal with bias voltage is employed at the focal point of a tandem imaging system. The mechanism of deblurring is similar to that of blurring: the blurred images are transferred through the frequency domain again using an imaging lens, where the second biased photorefractive crystal diffracts the intensity patterns to revert the sensitive region where previously gets focused or defocused. In this work, theoretical analyses are presented in detail to explain the blurring-deblurring mechanism using two biased photorefractive crystals and compatible experimental results are obtained and illustrated. Considering the blurring and deblurring function subgroups of the experiment setup can be potentially developed into encryption and decryption units compatible with far field propagation, the technology presented herein may be promising to find applications in secure laser-based free-space communication systems.

  7. High-resolution harmonics ultrasound imaging for non-invasive characterization of wound healing in a pre-clinical swine model.

    PubMed

    Gnyawali, Surya C; Barki, Kasturi G; Mathew-Steiner, Shomita S; Dixith, Sriteja; Vanzant, Daniel; Kim, Jayne; Dickerson, Jennifer L; Datta, Soma; Powell, Heather; Roy, Sashwati; Bergdall, Valerie; Sen, Chandan K

    2015-01-01

    This work represents the first study employing non-invasive high-resolution harmonic ultrasound imaging to longitudinally characterize skin wound healing. Burn wounds (day 0-42), on the dorsum of a domestic Yorkshire white pig were studied non-invasively using tandem digital planimetry, laser speckle imaging and dual mode (B and Doppler) ultrasound imaging. Wound depth, as measured by B-mode imaging, progressively increased until day 21 and decreased thereafter. Initially, blood flow at the wound edge increased up to day 14 and subsequently regressed to baseline levels by day 21, when the wound was more than 90% closed. Coinciding with regression of blood flow at the wound edge, there was an increase in blood flow in the wound bed. This was observed to regress by day 42. Such changes in wound angiogenesis were corroborated histologically. Gated Doppler imaging quantitated the pulse pressure of the primary feeder artery supplying the wound site. This pulse pressure markedly increased with a bimodal pattern following wounding connecting it to the induction of wound angiogenesis. Finally, ultrasound elastography measured tissue stiffness and visualized growth of new tissue over time. These studies have elegantly captured the physiological sequence of events during the process of wound healing, much of which is anticipated based on certain dynamics in play, to provide the framework for future studies on molecular mechanisms driving these processes. We conclude that the tandem use of non-invasive imaging technologies has the power to provide unprecedented insight into the dynamics of the healing skin tissue.

  8. Attenuation-corrected fluorescence extraction for image-guided surgery in spatial frequency domain

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bin; Sharma, Manu

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. A new approach to retrieve the attenuation-corrected fluorescence using spatial frequency-domain imaging is demonstrated. Both in vitro and ex vivo experiments showed the technique can compensate for the fluorescence attenuation from tissue absorption and scattering. This approach has potential in molecular image-guided surgery. PMID:23955392

  9. Attenuation-corrected fluorescence extraction for image-guided surgery in spatial frequency domain.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Sharma, Manu; Tunnell, James W

    2013-08-01

    A new approach to retrieve the attenuation-corrected fluorescence using spatial frequency-domain imaging is demonstrated. Both in vitro and ex vivo experiments showed the technique can compensate for the fluorescence attenuation from tissue absorption and scattering. This approach has potential in molecular image-guided surgery. PMID:23955392

  10. High efficiency intra-cavity sum-frequency-generation in a self-seeded image-rotating nanosecond optical parametric oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Darrell J.; Smith, Arlee V.

    2005-03-01

    We have built and tested a highly efficient source of pulsed 320 nm light based on intra-cavity sum-frequency-generation in a self-injection-seeded image-rotating nanosecond optical parametric oscillator. The four-mirror nonplanar ring optical cavity uses the RISTRA geometry, denoting rotated-image singly-resonant twisted rectangle. The cavity contains a type-II xz-cut KTP crystal pumped by the 532 nm second harmonic of Nd:YAG to generate an 803~nm signal and 1576 nm idler, and a type-II BBO crystal to sum-frequency mix the 532 nm pump and cavity-resonant 803 nm signal to generate 320 nm light. The cavity is configured so pump light passes first through the BBO crystal and then through the KTP crystal with the 320 nm light exiting through the output coupler following the BBO sum-frequency crystal. The cavity output coupler is designed to be a high reflector at 532 nm, have high transmission at 320 nm, and reflect approximately 85% at 803 nm. With this configuration we've obtained 1064 nm to 320 nm optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 24% and generated single-frequency λ = 320 nm pulses with energies up to 140 mJ.

  11. High-efficiency intra-cavity sum-frequency-generation in a self-seeded image-rotating nanosecond optical parametric oscillator.

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Darrell Jewell; Smith, Arlee Virgil

    2005-02-01

    We have built and tested a highly efficient source of pulsed 320 nm light based on intra-cavity sum-frequency-generation in a self-injection-seeded image-rotating nanosecond optical parametric oscillator. The four-mirror nonplanar ring optical cavity uses the RISTRA geometry, denoting rotated-image singly-resonant twisted rectangle. The cavity contains a type-II xz-cut KTP crystal pumped by the 532 nm second harmonic of Nd:YAG to generate an 803{approx}nm signal and 1576 nm idler, and a type-II BBO crystal to sum-frequency mix the 532 nm pump and cavity-resonant 803 nm signal to generate 320 nm light. The cavity is configured so pump light passes first through the BBO crystal and then through the KTP crystal with the 320 nm light exiting through the output coupler following the BBO sum-frequency crystal. The cavity output coupler is designed to be a high reflector at 532 nm, have high transmission at 320 nm, and reflect approximately 85% at 803 nm. With this configuration we've obtained 1064 nm to 320 nm optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 24% and generated single-frequency {lambda} = 320 nm pulses with energies up to 140 mJ.

  12. Appearance-based exercise motivation moderates the relationship between exercise frequency and positive body image.

    PubMed

    Homan, Kristin J; Tylka, Tracy L

    2014-03-01

    Individuals with a positive body image appreciate their bodies, hold an internal perspective of their bodies, and are satisfied with the functionality of their bodies. Research shows that positive body image is more complex than the absence of body dissatisfaction. Although exercise reduces women's body dissatisfaction, very little research has explored how, or even whether, exercise is associated with positive body image. Therefore, we examined whether exercise frequency was positively related to three aspects of positive body image (body appreciation, internal body orientation, and functional body satisfaction) among 321 college women. Appearance-based exercise motivation (the extent exercise is pursued to influence weight or shape) was hypothesized to moderate these associations. Hierarchical moderated regression analyses showed that exercise frequency was related to higher positive body image, but high levels of appearance-based exercise motivation weakened these relationships. Thus, messages promoting exercise need to de-emphasize weight loss and appearance for positive body image. PMID:24529336

  13. Three-dimensional speckle imaging employing a frequency-locked tunable diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, Bret D.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Schiffern, John T.; Mendoza, Albert

    2015-09-01

    We describe a high accuracy frequency stepping method for a tunable diode laser to improve a three dimensional (3D) imaging approach based upon interferometric speckle imaging. The approach, modeled after Takeda, exploits tuning an illumination laser in frequency as speckle interferograms of the object (specklegrams) are acquired at each frequency in a Michelson interferometer. The resulting 3D hypercube of specklegrams encode spatial information in the x-y plane of each image with laser tuning arrayed along its z-axis. The specklegrams are processed by Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT) along the z-axis of the hypercube and the center of the peak in the resulting power spectrum for each pixel encodes its surface height. Alternatively, Takeda's method can be followed which uses the phase of the FFT, unwraps it, and determines the surface height encoded in the slope of a line fitted to the phase. Wraparound of modulations above the Nyquist limit results in ambiguity in the optical path difference (OPD) between test and reference surfaces. Wraparound also amplifies measurement noise caused by errors and jitter in frequency stepping the illumination laser. By locking the laser frequency to successive cavity modes of a reference confocal interferometer, tuning is precisely controlled resulting in dramatically improved imaging quality/. We present laboratory data of before and after results showing enhanced 3D imaging resulting from precise laser frequency control.

  14. Noncontact imaging of burn depth and extent in a porcine model using spatial frequency domain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mazhar, Amaan; Saggese, Steve; Pollins, Alonda C.; Cardwell, Nancy L.; Nanney, Lillian; Cuccia, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. The standard of care for clinical assessment of burn severity and extent lacks a quantitative measurement. In this work, spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) was used to measure 48 thermal burns of graded severity (superficial partial, deep partial, and full thickness) in a porcine model. Functional (total hemoglobin and tissue oxygen saturation) and structural parameters (tissue scattering) derived from the SFDI measurements were monitored over 72 h for each burn type and compared to gold standard histological measurements of burn depth. Tissue oxygen saturation (stO2) and total hemoglobin (ctHbT) differentiated superficial partial thickness burns from more severe burn types after 2 and 72 h, respectively (p<0.01), but were unable to differentiate deep partial from full thickness wounds in the first 72 h. Tissue scattering parameters separated superficial burns from all burn types immediately after injury (p<0.01), and separated all three burn types from each other after 24 h (p<0.01). Tissue scattering parameters also showed a strong negative correlation to histological burn depth as measured by vimentin immunostain (r2>0.89). These results show promise for the use of SFDI-derived tissue scattering as a correlation to burn depth and the potential to assess burn depth via a combination of SFDI functional and structural parameters. PMID:25147961

  15. Time-of-flight detection of ultra-cold atoms using resonant frequency modulation imaging.

    PubMed

    Hardman, K S; Wigley, P B; Everitt, P J; Manju, P; Kuhn, C C N; Robins, N P

    2016-06-01

    Resonant frequency modulation imaging is used to detect free falling ultra-cold atoms. A theoretical comparison of fluorescence imaging (FI) and frequency modulation imaging (FMI) is made, indicating that for low optical depth clouds, FMI accomplished a higher signal-to-noise ratio under conditions necessary for a 200 μm spatially resolved atom interferometer. A 750 ms time-of-flight measurement reveals near atom shot-noise limited number measurements of 2×106 Bose-condensed Rb87 atoms. The detection system is applied to high precision spinor BEC based atom interferometer.

  16. Time-of-flight detection of ultra-cold atoms using resonant frequency modulation imaging.

    PubMed

    Hardman, K S; Wigley, P B; Everitt, P J; Manju, P; Kuhn, C C N; Robins, N P

    2016-06-01

    Resonant frequency modulation imaging is used to detect free falling ultra-cold atoms. A theoretical comparison of fluorescence imaging (FI) and frequency modulation imaging (FMI) is made, indicating that for low optical depth clouds, FMI accomplished a higher signal-to-noise ratio under conditions necessary for a 200 μm spatially resolved atom interferometer. A 750 ms time-of-flight measurement reveals near atom shot-noise limited number measurements of 2×106 Bose-condensed Rb87 atoms. The detection system is applied to high precision spinor BEC based atom interferometer. PMID:27244400

  17. High precision spectroscopy and imaging in THz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaks, Vladimir L.

    2014-03-01

    Application of microwave methods for development of the THz frequency range has resulted in elaboration of high precision THz spectrometers based on nonstationary effects. The spectrometers characteristics (spectral resolution and sensitivity) meet the requirements for high precision analysis. The gas analyzers, based on the high precision spectrometers, have been successfully applied for analytical investigations of gas impurities in high pure substances. These investigations can be carried out both in absorption cell and in reactor. The devices can be used for ecological monitoring, detecting the components of chemical weapons and explosive in the atmosphere. The great field of THz investigations is the medicine application. Using the THz spectrometers developed one can detect markers for some diseases in exhaled air.

  18. Frequency-domain ultrasound waveform tomography breast attenuation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhu, Gursharan Yash Singh; Li, Cuiping; Roy, Olivier; West, Erik; Montgomery, Katelyn; Boone, Michael; Duric, Neb

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound waveform tomography techniques have shown promising results for the visualization and characterization of breast disease. By using frequency-domain waveform tomography techniques and a gradient descent algorithm, we have previously reconstructed the sound speed distributions of breasts of varying densities with different types of breast disease including benign and malignant lesions. By allowing the sound speed to have an imaginary component, we can model the intrinsic attenuation of a medium. We can similarly recover the imaginary component of the velocity and thus the attenuation. In this paper, we will briefly review ultrasound waveform tomography techniques, discuss attenuation and its relations to the imaginary component of the sound speed, and provide both numerical and ex vivo examples of waveform tomography attenuation reconstructions.

  19. Bistatic frequency-swept microwave imaging: Principle, methodology and experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Dingbing Lin; Tahhsiung Chu . Electrical Engineering Dept.)

    1993-05-01

    The basic principle, methodology and experimental results of frequency-swept microwave imaging of continuous shape conducting and discrete line objects in a bistatic scattering arrangement are presented. Theoretical analysis is developed under the assumptions of plane wave illumination and physical optics approximation. The measurement system and calibration procedures are implemented based on the plane wave spectrum analysis. Images of three different types of scattering objects reconstructed from the experimental data measured in the frequency range 7.5-12.5 GHz are shown in good agreement with the scattering object geometries. The results demonstrate that the developed bistatic frequency-swept microwave imaging system has potential as a cost-effective tool for the application of remote sensing, imaging radar, and nondestructive evaluation.

  20. Texture analysis of collagen second-harmonic generation images based on local difference local binary pattern and wavelets differentiates human skin abnormal scars from normal scars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yao; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Huang, Zufang; Cai, Jianyong; Chen, Rong; Xiong, Shuyuan; Chen, Guannan; Zeng, Haishan

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative methods for noninvasive diagnosis of scars are a challenging issue in medicine. This work aims to implement a texture analysis method for quantitatively discriminating abnormal scars from normal scars based on second-harmonic generation (SHG) images. A local difference local binary pattern (LD-LBP) operator combined with a wavelet transform was explored to extract diagnosis features from scar SHG images that were related to the alteration in collagen morphology. Based on the quantitative parameters including the homogeneity, directional and coarse features in SHG images, the scar collagen SHG images were classified into normal or abnormal scars by a support vector machine classifier in a leave-one-out cross-validation procedure. Our experiments and data analyses demonstrated apparent differences between normal and abnormal scars in terms of their morphological structure of collagen. By comparing with gray level co-occurrence matrix, wavelet transform, and combined basic local binary pattern and wavelet transform with respect to the accuracy and receiver operating characteristic analysis, the method proposed herein was demonstrated to achieve higher accuracy and more reliable classification of SHG images. This result indicated that the extracted texture features with the proposed method were effective in the classification of scars. It could provide assistance for physicians in the diagnostic process.

  1. The analysis of frequency domain characteristics of emotional images in eye-tracking experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Boqiang; Ma, Huimin; Wang, Xiang

    2015-07-01

    Although recently eye-tracking method has been introduced into behavioral experiments based on dot-probe paradigm, some characteristics in eye-tracking data do not draw as much attention as traditional characteristics like reaction time. It is also necessary to associate eye-tracking data to characteristics of images shown in experiments. In this research, new variables, such as fixation length, times of fixation and times of eye movement, in eye-tracking data were extracted from a behavioral experiment based on dot probe paradigm. They were analyzed and compared to traditional reaction time. After the analysis of positive and negative scenery images, parameters such as hue frequency spectrum PAR (Peak to Average Ratio) were extracted and showed difference between negative and positive images. These parameters of emotional images could discriminate scenery images according to their emotions in an SVM classifier well. Besides, it was found that images' hue frequency spectrum PAR is obviously relevant to eye-tracking statistics. When the dot was on the negative side, negative images' hue frequency spectrum PAR and horizontal eye-jumps confirmed to hyperbolic distribution, while that of positive images was linear with horizontal eye-jumps. The result could help to explain the mechanism of human's attention and boost the study in computer vision.

  2. Tissue characterization by imaging the local frequency dependent relative backscatter coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenderka, Klaus V.; Gaertner, Tilio; Cobet, Ulrich; Zacharias, Mario; Heynemann, Hans

    2000-04-01

    Conventional B-scan systems only use the amplitude information of the backscattered signals for imaging. By imaging the local frequency dependent relative backscatter coefficient it is possible to improve the image contrast and to reduce system effects. Based on spectral analysis of rf echo signals, a procedure was developed to correct for system specific effects and to determine the relative backscatter coefficient. A new image with improved contrast results from grayscale or color coding of the frequency components of the relative backscatter coefficient. The method was applied to in vivo measurements of human prostate and transplanted kidney. For cancerous prostate tissue the relative backscatter coefficient is about 8 dB lower than for normal tissue regions. The results of the investigations on kidneys show no correlation to the current function of the organ. Certainly the different course of the frequency dependence of the relative backscatter coefficient of renal cortex and calices regions allows a contrast improvement. The method provides a system independent imaging procedure with improved image contrast for tissues with different scattering behavior and slightly reduced spatial resolution. Imaging the relative backscatter coefficient will not substitute the conventional B-mode image, but it is a useful tool providing additional information about the tissue state.

  3. Long-term in vivo harmonics imaging of zebrafish embryonic development based on a femtosecond Cr:forsterite laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.-Y.; Tsai, T.-H.; Hsieh, C.-S.; Tai, S.-P.; Lin, C.-Y.; Ko, C.-Y.; Chen, Y.-C.; Tsai, H.-J.; Hu, C.-H.; Sun, C.-K.

    2005-03-01

    Based on a femtosecond Cr:forsterite laser, harmonics optical microscopy (HOM) provides a truly "noninvasive" tool for in vivo and long-term study of vertebrate embryonic development. Based on optical nonlinearity, HOM provides sub-micrometer 3D spatial resolution and high 3D optical-sectioning power without using invasive and toxic fluorophores. Since only virtual-level-transition is involved, HOM is known to leave no energy deposition and no photodamage. Combined with second harmonic generation, which is sensitive to specific structure such as nerve and muscle fibers, HOM can perform functional studies of early developmental dynamics of many vertebrate physiological systems. Recently, zebrafish has become a standard model for many biological and medical studies of vertebrates, due to the similarity between embryonic development of zebrafish and human being. Here we demonstrate in vivo HOM studies of developmental dynamics of several important embryonic physiological systems in live zebrafish embryos, with focuses on the developments of brains, eyes, ears, and hearts. Based on a femtosecond Cr:forsterite laser, which provides the deepest penetration (~1.5mm) and least photodamage in the zebrafish embryo, complete developing processes of different physiological systems within a period of time longer than 20 hours can be non-invasively observed inside the same embryo.

  4. Multipixel system for gigahertz frequency-domain optical imaging of finger joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netz, Uwe J.; Beuthan, Jürgen; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2008-03-01

    Frequency-domain optical imaging systems have shown great promise for characterizing blood oxygenation, hemodynamics, and other physiological parameters in human and animal tissues. However, most of the frequency domain systems presented so far operate with source modulation frequencies below 150MHz. At these low frequencies, their ability to provide accurate data for small tissue geometries such as encountered in imaging of finger joints or rodents is limited. Here, we present a new system that can provide data up to 1GHz using an intensity modulated charged coupled device camera. After data processing, the images show the two-dimensional distribution of amplitude and phase of the light modulation on the finger surface. The system performance was investigated and test measurements on optical tissue phantoms were taken to investigate whether higher frequencies yield better signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). It could be shown that local changes in optical tissue properties, as they appear in the initial stages of rheumatoid arthritis in a finger joint, are detectable by simple image evaluation, with the range of modulation frequency around 500MHz proving to yield the highest SNR.

  5. Utilizing intentional internal resonance to achieve multi-harmonic atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Bongwon; Pettit, Chris; Dharmasena, Sajith; Keum, Hohyun; Lee, Joohyung; Kim, Jungkyu; Kim, Seok; McFarland, D. Michael; Bergman, Lawrence A.; Vakakis, Alexander F.; Cho, Hanna

    2016-03-01

    During dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM), the deflection of a scanning cantilever generates multiple frequency terms due to the nonlinear nature of AFM tip–sample interactions. Even though each frequency term is reasonably expected to encode information about the sample, only the fundamental frequency term is typically decoded to provide topographic mapping of the measured surface. One of main reasons for discarding higher harmonic signals is their low signal-to-noise ratio. Here, we introduce a new design concept for multi-harmonic AFM, exploiting intentional nonlinear internal resonance for the enhancement of higher harmonics. The nonlinear internal resonance, triggered by the non-smooth tip–sample dynamic interactions, results in nonlinear energy transfers from the directly excited fundamental bending mode to the higher-frequency mode and, hence, enhancement of the higher harmonic of the measured response. It is verified through detailed theoretical and experimental study that this AFM design can robustly incorporate the required internal resonance and enable high-frequency AFM measurements. Measurements on an inhomogeneous polymer specimen demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed design, namely that the higher harmonic of the measured response is capable of enhanced simultaneous topography imaging and compositional mapping, exhibiting less crosstalk with an abrupt height change.

  6. Generating an image of dispersive energy by frequency decomposition and slant stacking

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Xu, Y.; Miller, R.D.

    2007-01-01

    We present a new algorithm for calculating an image of dispersive energy in the frequency-velocity (f-v) domain. The frequency decomposition is first applied to a shot gather in the offset-time domain to stretch impulsive data into pseudo-vibroseis data or frequency-swept data. Because there is a deterministic relationship between frequency and time in a sweep used in the frequency decomposition, the first step theoretically completes the transform from time to frequency. The slant stacking is then performed on the frequency-swept data to complete the transform from offset to velocity. This simple two-step algorithm generates an image of dispersive energy in the f-v domain. The straightforward transform only uses offset information of data so that this algorithm can be applied to data acquired with arbitrary geophone-acquisition geometry. Examples of synthetic and real-world data demonstrate that this algorithm generates accurate images of dispersive energy of the fundamental as well as higher modes. ?? Birkha??user Verlag, Basel, 2007.

  7. Analytic signals and harmonic measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Tao

    2006-02-01

    We prove that a sufficient and necessary condition for Hei[Theta](s)=-iei[Theta](s), where H is Hilbert transformation, [Theta] is a continuous and strictly increasing function with [Theta](R)=2[pi], is that d[Theta](s) is a harmonic measure on the line. The counterpart result for the periodic case is also established. The study is motivated by, and has significant impact to time-frequency analysis, especially to aspects of analytic signals inducing instantaneous amplitude and frequency. As a by-product we introduce the theory of Hardy-space-preserving weighted trigonometric series and Fourier transformations induced by harmonic measures in the respective contexts.

  8. Towards spatial frequency domain optical imaging of neurovascular coupling in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Alexander J.; Konecky, Soren D.; Rice, Tyler B.; Green, Kim N.; Choi, Bernard; Durkin, Anthony J.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2012-02-01

    Early neurovascular coupling (NVC) changes in Alzheimer's disease can potentially provide imaging biomarkers to assist with diagnosis and treatment. Previous efforts to quantify NVC with intrinsic signal imaging have required assumptions of baseline optical pathlength to calculate changes in oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations during evoked stimuli. In this work, we present an economical spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) platform utilizing a commercially available LED projector, camera, and off-the-shelf optical components suitable for imaging dynamic optical properties. The fast acquisition platform described in this work is validated on silicone phantoms and demonstrated in neuroimaging of a mouse model.

  9. Extraction of small boat harmonic signatures from passive sonar.

    PubMed

    Ogden, George L; Zurk, Lisa M; Jones, Mark E; Peterson, Mary E

    2011-06-01

    This paper investigates the extraction of acoustic signatures from small boats using a passive sonar system. Noise radiated from a small boats consists of broadband noise and harmonically related tones that correspond to engine and propeller specifications. A signal processing method to automatically extract the harmonic structure of noise radiated from small boats is developed. The Harmonic Extraction and Analysis Tool (HEAT) estimates the instantaneous fundamental frequency of the harmonic tones, refines the fundamental frequency estimate using a Kalman filter, and automatically extracts the amplitudes of the harmonic tonals to generate a harmonic signature for the boat. Results are presented that show the HEAT algorithms ability to extract these signatures.

  10. In-vivo and label-free imaging of cellular and tissue structures in mouse ear skin by using second- and third-harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eung Jang; Kim, Boram; Ahn, Hong-Gyu; Park, Seung-Han; Cheong, Eunji; Lee, Sangyoup

    2015-02-01

    A video-rate multimodal microscope, which can obtain second- and third- harmonic generation (SHG and THG) images simultaneously, is developed for investigating cellular and tissue structures in mouse ear skin. By utilizing in-vivo video-rate epi-detected SHG and THG microscopy, we successfully demonstrate that combined images of subcutaneous cellular components and peripheral nerve fibers, together with the collagen fiber, in the mouse ear pinna can be obtained without employing fluorescent probes. We also show that the flow of red blood cells and the diameter change of arteriole-like blood vessels can be visualized with femtosecond laser pulses with a wavelength of 1036 nm. In particular, the epi-THG contrast images of the blood-vessel walls display clearly the difference between the arteriole-like and the venule capillary-like blood-vessel types. We should emphasize that our newly-developed microscope system has a unique feature in that it can produce simultaneous in-vivo label-free SHG and THG images in contrast to the conventional confocal and two-photon microscopes.

  11. Metamaterial fibres for subdiffraction imaging and focusing at terahertz frequencies over optically long distances

    PubMed Central

    Tuniz, Alessandro; Kaltenecker, Korbinian J.; Fischer, Bernd M.; Walther, Markus; Fleming, Simon C.; Argyros, Alexander; Kuhlmey, Boris T.

    2013-01-01

    Using conventional materials, the resolution of focusing and imaging devices is limited by diffraction to about half the wavelength of light, as high spatial frequencies do not propagate in isotropic materials. Wire array metamaterials, because of their extreme anisotropy, can beat this limit; however, focusing with these has only been demonstrated up to microwave frequencies and using propagation over a few wavelengths only. Here we show that the principle can be scaled to frequencies orders of magnitudes higher and to considerably longer propagation lengths. We demonstrate imaging through straight and tapered wire arrays operating in the terahertz spectrum, with unprecedented propagation of near field information over hundreds of wavelengths and focusing down to 1/28 of the wavelength with a net increase in power density. Applications could include in vivo terahertz-endoscopes with resolution compatible with imaging individual cells. PMID:24162458

  12. Metamaterial fibres for subdiffraction imaging and focusing at terahertz frequencies over optically long distances.

    PubMed

    Tuniz, Alessandro; Kaltenecker, Korbinian J; Fischer, Bernd M; Walther, Markus; Fleming, Simon C; Argyros, Alexander; Kuhlmey, Boris T

    2013-01-01

    Using conventional materials, the resolution of focusing and imaging devices is limited by diffraction to about half the wavelength of light, as high spatial frequencies do not propagate in isotropic materials. Wire array metamaterials, because of their extreme anisotropy, can beat this limit; however, focusing with these has only been demonstrated up to microwave frequencies and using propagation over a few wavelengths only. Here we show that the principle can be scaled to frequencies orders of magnitudes higher and to considerably longer propagation lengths. We demonstrate imaging through straight and tapered wire arrays operating in the terahertz spectrum, with unprecedented propagation of near field information over hundreds of wavelengths and focusing down to 1/28 of the wavelength with a net increase in power density. Applications could include in vivo terahertz-endoscopes with resolution compatible with imaging individual cells.

  13. Metamaterial fibres for subdiffraction imaging and focusing at terahertz frequencies over optically long distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuniz, Alessandro; Kaltenecker, Korbinian J.; Fischer, Bernd M.; Walther, Markus; Fleming, Simon C.; Argyros, Alexander; Kuhlmey, Boris T.

    2013-10-01

    Using conventional materials, the resolution of focusing and imaging devices is limited by diffraction to about half the wavelength of light, as high spatial frequencies do not propagate in isotropic materials. Wire array metamaterials, because of their extreme anisotropy, can beat this limit; however, focusing with these has only been demonstrated up to microwave frequencies and using propagation over a few wavelengths only. Here we show that the principle can be scaled to frequencies orders of magnitudes higher and to considerably longer propagation lengths. We demonstrate imaging through straight and tapered wire arrays operating in the terahertz spectrum, with unprecedented propagation of near field information over hundreds of wavelengths and focusing down to 1/28 of the wavelength with a net increase in power density. Applications could include in vivo terahertz-endoscopes with resolution compatible with imaging individual cells.

  14. Harmonic generation in magnetized quantum plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Punit; Singh, Shiv; Singh, Abhisek Kumar

    2016-05-01

    A study of second harmonic generation by propagation of a linearly polarized electromagnetic wave through homogeneous high density quantum plasma in the presence of transverse magnetic field. The nonlinear current density and dispersion relations for the fundamental and second harmonic frequencies have been obtained using the recently developed quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) model. The effect of quantum Bohm potential, Fermi pressure and the electron spin have been taken into account. The second harmonic is found to be less dispersed than the first.

  15. Tip-induced deformation of a phospholipid bilayer: Theoretical perspective of sum frequency generation imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Volkov, Victor

    2014-10-21

    The paper addresses theory of Sum Frequency Generation imaging of an atomic force microscopy tip-induced deformation of a bilayer phospholipid membrane deposited over a pore: known as a nano-drum system. Image modeling employed nonlinearities of the normal modes specific to hydrocarbon terminal methyls, which are distributed about the deformed surfaces of inner and outer leaflets. The deformed profiles are according to the solutions of shape equation for Canham-Helfrich Hamiltonian accounting properties of four membranes, which differ in elasticity and adhesion. The results indicate that in continuous deformed surfaces, the difference in the curvature of the outer and inner leaflets dominates in the imaged nonlinearity. This is different comparing to the results for a perfect bilayer spherical cap system (the subject of previous study), where nonlinear image response is dominated by the mismatch of the inner and outer leaflets’ surface areas (as projected to the image plane) at the edge of perfectly spherical structure. The results of theoretical studies, here, demonstrate that Sum Frequency Generation imaging in continuous and deformed bilayer surfaces are helpful to address curvature locally and anticipate mechanical properties of membrane. The articles discuss applicability and practical limitations of the approach. Combination of Atomic Force Microscopy and Sum Frequency Generation imaging under controlled tip-induced deformation provides a good opportunity to probe and test membranes physical properties with rigor of adopted theory.

  16. Tip-induced deformation of a phospholipid bilayer: Theoretical perspective of sum frequency generation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, Victor

    2014-10-01

    The paper addresses theory of Sum Frequency Generation imaging of an atomic force microscopy tip-induced deformation of a bilayer phospholipid membrane deposited over a pore: known as a nano-drum system. Image modeling employed nonlinearities of the normal modes specific to hydrocarbon terminal methyls, which are distributed about the deformed surfaces of inner and outer leaflets. The deformed profiles are according to the solutions of shape equation for Canham-Helfrich Hamiltonian accounting properties of four membranes, which differ in elasticity and adhesion. The results indicate that in continuous deformed surfaces, the difference in the curvature of the outer and inner leaflets dominates in the imaged nonlinearity. This is different comparing to the results for a perfect bilayer spherical cap system (the subject of previous study), where nonlinear image response is dominated by the mismatch of the inner and outer leaflets' surface areas (as projected to the image plane) at the edge of perfectly spherical structure. The results of theoretical studies, here, demonstrate that Sum Frequency Generation imaging in continuous and deformed bilayer surfaces are helpful to address curvature locally and anticipate mechanical properties of membrane. The articles discuss applicability and practical limitations of the approach. Combination of Atomic Force Microscopy and Sum Frequency Generation imaging under controlled tip-induced deformation provides a good opportunity to probe and test membranes physical properties with rigor of adopted theory.

  17. Frequency-spatial cues based sea-surface salient target detection from UAV image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoliang; Liu, Xiaolin; Yu, Qifeng; Liu, Yan

    2015-05-01

    This paper proposes an algorithm for salient target detection from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) sea surface image using frequency and spatial cues. The algorithm is consisted of three parts: background suppression in the frequency domain, adaptive smoothing of the background suppressed image and salient target detection via adaptive thresholding, region growth and cluster. The sea surface background in UAV image is modeled as non-salient components which correspond to the spikes of the amplitude spectrum in the frequency domain. The background suppression is achieved by removing the spikes using a low pass Gaussian kernel of proper scale. In order to eliminate the negative effects brought by the complex textures, a Gaussian blur kernel is introduced to process the background suppressed image and its scale is determined by the entropy of the background suppressed image. The salient target is detected using adaptive thresholding, region growth and cluster performed on the blurred background suppressed image. Experiments on a large number of images indicate that the algorithm proposed in this paper can detected the sea surface salient target accurately and efficiently.

  18. A frequency domain radar interferometric imaging (FII) technique based on high-resolution methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luce, H.; Yamamoto, M.; Fukao, S.; Helal, D.; Crochet, M.

    2001-01-01

    In the present work, we propose a frequency-domain interferometric imaging (FII) technique for a better knowledge of the vertical distribution of the atmospheric scatterers detected by MST radars. This is an extension of the dual frequency-domain interferometry (FDI) technique to multiple frequencies. Its objective is to reduce the ambiguity (resulting from the use of only two adjacent frequencies), inherent with the FDI technique. Different methods, commonly used in antenna array processing, are first described within the context of application to the FII technique. These methods are the Fourier-based imaging, the Capon's and the singular value decomposition method used with the MUSIC algorithm. Some preliminary simulations and tests performed on data collected with the middle and upper atmosphere (MU) radar (Shigaraki, Japan) are also presented. This work is a first step in the developments of the FII technique which seems to be very promising.

  19. Nonlinear spectral imaging of human normal skin, basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma based on two-photon excited fluorescence and second-harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, S. Y.; Yang, J. G.; Zhuang, J.

    2011-10-01

    In this work, we use nonlinear spectral imaging based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) for analyzing the morphology of collagen and elastin and their biochemical variations in basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and normal skin tissue. It was found in this work that there existed apparent differences among BCC, SCC and normal skin in terms of their thickness of the keratin and epithelial layers, their size of elastic fibers, as well as their distribution and spectral characteristics of collagen. These differences can potentially be used to distinguish BCC and SCC from normal skin, and to discriminate between BCC and SCC, as well as to evaluate treatment responses.

  20. A High-Frequency High Frame Rate Duplex Ultrasound Linear Array Imaging System for Small Animal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lequan; Xu, Xiaochen; Hu, Changhong; Sun, Lei; Yen, Jesse T.; Cannata, Jonathan M.; Shung, K. Kirk

    2010-01-01

    High-frequency (HF) ultrasound imaging has been shown to be useful for non-invasively imaging anatomical structures of the eye and small animals in biological and pharmaceutical research, achieving superior spatial resolution. Cardiovascular research utilizing mice requires not only real-time B-scan imaging, but also ultrasound Doppler to evaluate both anatomy and blood flow of the mouse heart. This paper reports the development of a high frequency ultrasound duplex imaging system capable of both B-mode imaging and Doppler flow measurements, using a 64-element linear array. The system included a HF pulsed-wave Doppler module, a 32-channel HF B-mode imaging module, a PC with a 200 MS/s 14-bit A/D card, and real-time LabView software. A 50dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and a depth of penetration of larger than 12 mm were achieved using a 35 MHz linear array with 50 μm pitch. The two-way beam widths were determined to be 165 μm to 260 μm and the clutter energy to total energy ratio (CTR) were 9.1 dB to 12 dB, when the array was electronically focused at different focal points at depths from 4.8 mm to 9.6 mm. The system is capable of acquiring real-time B-mode images at a rate greater than 400 frames per second (fps) for a 4.8 × 13 mm field of view, using a 30 MHz 64-element linear array with 100 μm pitch. Sample in vivo cardiac high frame rate images and duplex images of mouse hearts are shown to assess its current imaging capability and performance for small animals. PMID:20639149

  1. Implementation of an LED-based clinical spatial frequency domain imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazhar, Amaan; Sharif, Seyed A.; Saggese, Steve; Choi, Bernard; Cuccia, David J.; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2012-03-01

    Spatial Frequency Domain Imaging (SFDI) is a non-contact imaging method that uses multiple frequency spatial illumination to generate two dimensional maps of tissue optical properties (absorption and reduced scattering) and chromophore concentrations. We present phantom validation and pilot clinical data of a deployed light-emitting diode (LED) based system. The system employs four LED wavelengths (658 nm, 730 nm, 850 nm, 970 nm) to quantitatively assess tissue health by measurement of common tissue constituents. Phantom validation results and maps of oxyhemoglobin, deoxy-hemoglobin, water content, reduced scattering, and surface topography will be presented for pilot studies assessing burn severity and efficacy of port wine stain treatment.

  2. Frequency-modulated atomic force microscopy operation by imaging at the frequency shift minimum: The dip-df mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rode, Sebastian; Schreiber, Martin; Kühnle, Angelika; Rahe, Philipp

    2014-04-01

    In frequency modulated non-contact atomic force microscopy, the change of the cantilever frequency (Δf) is used as the input signal for the topography feedback loop. Around the Δf(z) minimum, however, stable feedback operation is challenging using a standard proportional-integral-derivative (PID) feedback design due to the change of sign in the slope. When operated under liquid conditions, it is furthermore difficult to address the attractive interaction regime due to its often moderate peakedness. Additionally, the Δf signal level changes severely with time in this environment due to drift of the cantilever frequency f0 and, thus, requires constant adjustment. Here, we present an approach overcoming these obstacles by using the derivative of Δf with respect to z as the input signal for the topography feedback loop. Rather than regulating the absolute value to a preset setpoint, the slope of the Δf with respect to z is regulated to zero. This new measurement mode not only makes the minimum of the Δf(z) curve directly accessible, but it also benefits from greatly increased operation stability due to its immunity against f0 drift. We present isosurfaces of the Δf minimum acquired on the calcite CaCO3(10overline{1}4) surface in liquid environment, demonstrating the capability of our method to image in the attractive tip-sample interaction regime.

  3. Frequency-modulated atomic force microscopy operation by imaging at the frequency shift minimum: The dip-df mode

    SciTech Connect

    Rode, Sebastian; Schreiber, Martin; Kühnle, Angelika; Rahe, Philipp

    2014-04-15

    In frequency modulated non-contact atomic force microscopy, the change of the cantilever frequency (Δf) is used as the input signal for the topography feedback loop. Around the Δf(z) minimum, however, stable feedback operation is challenging using a standard proportional-integral-derivative (PID) feedback design due to the change of sign in the slope. When operated under liquid conditions, it is furthermore difficult to address the attractive interaction regime due to its often moderate peakedness. Additionally, the Δf signal level changes severely with time in this environment due to drift of the cantilever frequency f{sub 0} and, thus, requires constant adjustment. Here, we present an approach overcoming these obstacles by using the derivative of Δf with respect to z as the input signal for the topography feedback loop. Rather than regulating the absolute value to a preset setpoint, the slope of the Δf with respect to z is regulated to zero. This new measurement mode not only makes the minimum of the Δf(z) curve directly accessible, but it also benefits from greatly increased operation stability due to its immunity against f{sub 0} drift. We present isosurfaces of the Δf minimum acquired on the calcite CaCO{sub 3}(101{sup ¯}4) surface in liquid environment, demonstrating the capability of our method to image in the attractive tip-sample interaction regime.

  4. Multi-frequency time-reversal-based imaging for ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation using full matrix capture.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chengguang; Pan, Mengchun; Luo, Feilu; Drinkwater, Bruce

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, two multi-frequency time-reversal (TR)-based imaging algorithms are explored for application to the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) imaging of defects in solids: time reversal with multiple signal classification (TRMUSIC) and a related phase-coherent form (PC-MUSIC). These algorithms are tested with simulated and experimental ultrasonic array data acquired using the full matrix capture (FMC) process. The performance of these algorithms is quantified in terms of their spatial resolution and robustness to noise. The effect of frequency bandwidth is investigated and the results are compared with the single-frequency versions of these algorithms. It is shown that both TR-MUSIC and PCMUSIC are capable of resolving lateral targets spaced closer than the Rayleigh limit, achieving super-resolution imaging. TR-MUSIC can locate the positions of scatterers correctly, whereas the results from PC-MUSIC are less clear because of the presence of multiple peaks in the vicinity of target. However, an advantage of PC-MUSIC is that it can overcome the elongated point spread function that appears in TR-MUSIC images, and hence provide enhanced axial resolution. For high noise levels, TR-MUSIC and PC-MUSIC are shown to provide stable images and suppress the presence of artifacts seen in their single-frequency equivalents.

  5. Frequency-shift low-pass filtering and least mean square adaptive filtering for ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shanshan; Li, Chunyu; Ding, Mingyue; Yuchi, Ming

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound image quality enhancement is a problem of considerable interest in medical imaging modality and an ongoing challenge to date. This paper investigates a method based on frequency-shift low-pass filtering (FSLF) and least mean square adaptive filtering (LMSAF) for ultrasound image quality enhancement. FSLF is used for processing the ultrasound signal in the frequency domain, while LMSAPF in the time domain. Firstly, FSLF shifts the center frequency of the focused signal to zero. Then the real and imaginary part of the complex data are filtered respectively by finite impulse response (FIR) low-pass filter. Thus the information around the center frequency are retained while the undesired ones, especially background noises are filtered. Secondly, LMSAF multiplies the signals with an automatically adjusted weight vector to further eliminate the noises and artifacts. Through the combination of the two filters, the ultrasound image is expected to have less noises and artifacts and higher resolution, and contrast. The proposed method was verified with the RF data of the CIRS phantom 055A captured by SonixTouch DAQ system. Experimental results show that the background noises and artifacts can be efficiently restrained, the wire object has a higher resolution and the contrast ratio (CR) can be enhanced for about 12dB to 15dB at different image depth comparing to delay-and-sum (DAS).

  6. Video rate imaging at 1.5 THz via frequency upconversion to the near-IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekavec, Patrick F.; Kozlov, Vladimir G.; McNee, Ian; Lee, Yun-Shik; Vodopyanov, Konstantin

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate video rate THz imaging in both reflection and transmission by frequency upconverting the THz image to the near-IR. In reflection, the ability to resolve images generated at different depths is shown. By mixing the THz pulses with a portion of the fiber laser pump (1064 nm) in a quasi-phase matched gallium arsenide crystal, distinct sidebands are observed at 1058 nm and 1070 nm, corresponding to sum and difference frequency generation of the pump pulse with the THz pulse. By using a polarizer and long pass filter, the strong pump light can be removed, leaving a nearly background free signal at 1070 nm. We have obtained video rate images with spatial resolution of 1mm and field of view ca. 20 mm in diameter without any post processing of the data.

  7. High-Resolution Harmonics Ultrasound Imaging for Non-Invasive Characterization of Wound Healing in a Pre-Clinical Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    Mathew-Steiner, Shomita S.; Dixith, Sriteja; Vanzant, Daniel; Kim, Jayne; Dickerson, Jennifer L.; Datta, Soma; Powell, Heather; Roy, Sashwati; Bergdall, Valerie; Sen, Chandan K.

    2015-01-01

    This work represents the first study employing non-invasive high-resolution harmonic ultrasound imaging to longitudinally characterize skin wound healing. Burn wounds (day 0-42), on the dorsum of a domestic Yorkshire white pig were studied non-invasively using tandem digital planimetry, laser speckle imaging and dual mode (B and Doppler) ultrasound imaging. Wound depth, as measured by B-mode imaging, progressively increased until day 21 and decreased thereafter. Initially, blood flow at the wound edge increased up to day 14 and subsequently regressed to baseline levels by day 21, when the wound was more than 90% closed. Coinciding with regression of blood flow at the wound edge, there was an increase in blood flow in the wound bed. This was observed to regress by day 42. Such changes in wound angiogenesis were corroborated histologically. Gated Doppler imaging quantitated the pulse pressure of the primary feeder artery supplying the wound site. This pulse pressure markedly increased with a bimodal pattern following wounding connecting it to the induction of wound angiogenesis. Finally, ultrasound elastography measured tissue stiffness and visualized growth of new tissue over time. These studies have elegantly captured the physiological sequence of events during the process of wound healing, much of which is anticipated based on certain dynamics in play, to provide the framework for future studies on molecular mechanisms driving these processes. We conclude that the tandem use of non-invasive imaging technologies has the power to provide unprecedented insight into the dynamics of the healing skin tissue. PMID:25799513

  8. Imaging system of wavelet optics described by the Gaussian linear frequency-modulated complex wavelet.

    PubMed

    Tan, Liying; Ma, Jing; Wang, Guangming

    2005-12-01

    The image formation and the point-spread function of an optical system are analyzed by use of the wavelet basis function. The image described by a wavelet is no longer an indivisible whole image. It is, rather, a complex image consisting of many wavelet subimages, which come from the changes of different parameters (scale) a and c, and parameters b and d show the positions of wavelet subimages under different scales. A Gaussian frequency-modulated complex-valued wavelet function is introduced to express the point-spread function of an optical system and used to describe the image formation. The analysis, in allusion to the situation of illumination with a monochromatic plain light wave, shows that using the theory of wavelet optics to describe the image formation of an optical system is feasible.

  9. Imaging system of wavelet optics described by the Gaussian linear frequency-modulated complex wavelet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Liying; Ma, Jing; Wang, Guangming

    2005-12-01

    The image formation and the point-spread function of an optical system are analyzed by use of the wavelet basis function. The image described by a wavelet is no longer an indivisible whole image. It is, rather, a complex image consisting of many wavelet subimages, which come from the changes of different parameters (scale) a and c, and parameters b and d show the positions of wavelet subimages under different scales. A Gaussian frequency-modulated complex-valued wavelet function is introduced to express the point-spread function of an optical system and used to describe the image formation. The analysis, in allusion to the situation of illumination with a monochromatic plain light wave, shows that using the theory of wavelet optics to describe the image formation of an optical system is feasible.

  10. Three-dimensional ground penetrating radar imaging using multi-frequency diffraction tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Mast, J.E.; Johansson, E.M.

    1994-11-15

    In this talk we present results from a three-dimensional image reconstruction algorithm for impulse radar operating in monostatic pule-echo mode. The application of interest to us is the nondestructive evaluation of civil structures such as bridge decks. We use a multi-frequency diffraction tomography imaging technique in which coherent backward propagations of the received reflected wavefield form a spatial image of the scattering interfaces within the region of interest. This imaging technique provides high-resolution range and azimuthal visualization of the subsurface region. We incorporate the ability to image in planarly layered conductive media and apply the algorithm to experimental data from an offset radar system in which the radar antenna is not directly coupled to the surface of the region. We present a rendering in three-dimensions of the resulting image data which provides high-detail visualization.

  11. Electrical tissue property imaging using MRI at dc and Larmor frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jin Keun; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Joonsung; In Kwon, Oh; Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Woo, Eung Je

    2012-08-01

    Cross-sectional imaging of conductivity and permittivity distributions inside the human body has been actively investigated in impedance imaging areas such as electrical impedance tomography (EIT) and magnetic induction tomography (MIT). Since the conductivity and permittivity values exhibit frequency-dependent changes, it is worthwhile to perform spectroscopic imaging from almost dc to hundreds of MHz. To probe the human body, we may inject current using surface electrodes or induce current using external coils. In EIT and MIT, measured data are only available on the boundary or exterior of the body unless we invasively place sensors inside the body. Their image reconstruction problems are nonlinear and ill-posed to result in images with a relatively low spatial resolution. Noting that an MRI scanner can noninvasively measure magnetic fields inside the human body, electrical tissue property imaging methods using MRI have lately been proposed. Magnetic resonance EIT (MREIT) performs conductivity imaging at dc or below 1 kHz by externally injecting current into the human body and measuring induced internal magnetic flux density data using an MRI scanner. Magnetic resonance electrical property tomography (MREPT) produces both conductivity and permittivity images at the Larmor frequency of an MRI scanner based on B1-mapping techniques. Since internal data are only available in MREIT and MREPT, we may formulate well-posed inverse problems for image reconstructions. To develop related imaging techniques, we should clearly understand the basic principles of MREIT and MREPT, which are based on coupled physics of bioelectromagnetism and MRI as well as associated mathematical methods. In this paper, we describe the physical principles of MREIT and MREPT in a unified way and associate measurable quantities with the conductivity and permittivity. Clarifying the key relations among them, we examine existing image reconstruction algorithms to reveal their capabilities and

  12. Fourier spatial frequency analysis for image classification: training the training set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Timothy H.; Lhamo, Yigah; Shi, Lingyan; Alfano, Robert R.; Russell, Stewart

    2016-04-01

    The Directional Fourier Spatial Frequencies (DFSF) of a 2D image can identify similarity in spatial patterns within groups of related images. A Support Vector Machine (SVM) can then be used to classify images if the inter-image variance of the FSF in the training set is bounded. However, if variation in FSF increases with training set size, accuracy may decrease as the size of the training set increases. This calls for a method to identify a set of training images from among the originals that can form a vector basis for the entire class. Applying the Cauchy product method we extract the DFSF spectrum from radiographs of osteoporotic bone, and use it as a matched filter set to eliminate noise and image specific frequencies, and demonstrate that selection of a subset of superclassifiers from within a set of training images improves SVM accuracy. Central to this challenge is that the size of the search space can become computationally prohibitive for all but the smallest training sets. We are investigating methods to reduce the search space to identify an optimal subset of basis training images.

  13. Frequency Modulation of Directly Imaged Exoplanets: Geometric Effect as a Probe of Planetary Obliquity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, Hajime

    2016-05-01

    We consider the time-frequency analysis of a scattered light curve of a directly imaged exoplanet. We show that the geometric effect due to planetary obliquity and orbital inclination induce the frequency modulation of the apparent diurnal periodicity. We construct a model of the frequency modulation and compare it with the instantaneous frequency extracted from the pseudo-Wigner distribution of simulated light curves of a cloudless Earth. The model provides good agreement with the simulated modulation factor, even for the light curve with Gaussian noise comparable to the signal. Notably, the shape of the instantaneous frequency is sensitive to the difference between the prograde, retrograde, and pole-on spin rotations. While our technique requires the albedo map to be static, it does not need to solve the albedo map of the planet. The time-frequency analysis is complementary to other methods which utilize the amplitude modulation. This paper demonstrates the importance of the frequency domain of the photometric variability for the characterization of directly imaged exoplanets in future research.

  14. Polarized light spatial frequency domain imaging for non-destructive quantification of soft tissue fibrous structures.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Lesicko, John; Sharma, Manu; Hill, Michael; Sacks, Michael S; Tunnell, James W

    2015-04-01

    The measurement of soft tissue fiber orientation is fundamental to pathophysiology and biomechanical function in a multitude of biomedical applications. However, many existing techniques for quantifying fiber structure rely on transmitted light, limiting general applicability and often requiring tissue processing. Herein, we present a novel wide-field reflectance-based imaging modality, which combines polarized light imaging (PLI) and spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) to rapidly quantify preferred fiber orientation on soft collagenous tissues. PLI utilizes the polarization dependent scattering property of fibers to determine preferred fiber orientation; SFDI imaging at high spatial frequency is introduced to reject the highly diffuse photons and to control imaging depth. As a result, photons scattered from the superficial layer of a multi-layered sample are highlighted. Thus, fiber orientation quantification can be achieved for the superficial layer with optical sectioning. We demonstrated on aortic heart valve leaflet that, at spatial frequency of f = 1mm(-1) , the diffuse background can be effectively rejected and the imaging depth can be limited, thus improving quantification accuracy. PMID:25909033

  15. Polarized light spatial frequency domain imaging for non-destructive quantification of soft tissue fibrous structures

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bin; Lesicko, John; Sharma, Manu; Hill, Michael; Sacks, Michael S.; Tunnell, James W.

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of soft tissue fiber orientation is fundamental to pathophysiology and biomechanical function in a multitude of biomedical applications. However, many existing techniques for quantifying fiber structure rely on transmitted light, limiting general applicability and often requiring tissue processing. Herein, we present a novel wide-field reflectance-based imaging modality, which combines polarized light imaging (PLI) and spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) to rapidly quantify preferred fiber orientation on soft collagenous tissues. PLI utilizes the polarization dependent scattering property of fibers to determine preferred fiber orientation; SFDI imaging at high spatial frequency is introduced to reject the highly diffuse photons and to control imaging depth. As a result, photons scattered from the superficial layer of a multi-layered sample are highlighted. Thus, fiber orientation quantification can be achieved for the superficial layer with optical sectioning. We demonstrated on aortic heart valve leaflet that, at spatial frequency of f = 1mm−1, the diffuse background can be effectively rejected and the imaging depth can be limited, thus improving quantification accuracy. PMID:25909033

  16. A high frequency amplitude-steered array for real-time volumetric imaging.

    PubMed

    Frazier, Catherine H; Hughes, W Jack; O'Brien, William D

    2002-12-01

    Real-time three-dimensional acoustic imaging is difficult in water or tissue because of the slow speed of sound in these media. Conventional pulse-echo data collection, which uses at least one transmit pulse per line in the image, does not allow for the real-time update of a volume of data at practical ranges. Recently, a linear amplitude-steered array was presented that allows the collection of a plane of data with a single transmit pulse by spatially separating frequencies in the lateral direction. Later, by using a linear array with frequency separation in the vertical direction and rotating the array in the horizontal direction, volumetric data were collected with a small number of transmit pulses. By expanding the linear array to a two-dimensional array, data can now be collected for volumetric imaging in real time. In this study, the amplitude-steered array at the heart of a real-time volumetric sonar imaging system is described, giving the design of the array and describing how data are collected and processed to form images. An analysis of lateral resolution in the vertical and horizontal directions shows that resolution is improved in the direction of frequency separation over systems that use a broad transmit beam. Images from simulated data are presented.

  17. Determination of the spectral dependence of reduced scattering and quantitative second-harmonic generation imaging for detection of fibrillary changes in ovarian cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Kirby R.; Tilbury, Karissa B.; Campagnola, Paul J.

    2015-03-01

    Here, we examine ovarian cancer extracellular matrix (ECM) modification by measuring the wavelength dependence of optical scattering measurements and quantitative second-harmonic generation (SHG) imaging metrics in the range of 800-1100 nm in order to determine fibrillary changes in ex vivo normal ovary, type I, and type II ovarian cancer. Mass fractals of the collagen fiber structure is analyzed based on a power law correlation function using spectral dependence measurements of the reduced scattering coefficient μs' where the mass fractal dimension is related to the power. Values of μs' are measured using independent methods of determining the values of μs and g by on-axis attenuation measurements using the Beer-Lambert Law and by fitting the angular distribution of scattering to the Henyey-Greenstein phase function, respectively. Quantitativespectral SHG imaging on the same tissues determines FSHG/BSHG creation ratios related to size and harmonophore distributions. Both techniques probe fibril packing order, but the optical scattering probes structures of sizes from about 50-2000 nm where SHG imaging - although only able to resolve individual fibers - builds contrast from the assembly of fibrils. Our findings suggest that type I ovarian tumor structure has the most ordered collagen fibers followed by normal ovary then type II tumors showing the least order.

  18. Ex vivo and in vivo second-harmonic-generation imaging of dermal collagen fiber in skin: comparison of imaging characteristics between mode-locked Cr:forsterite and Ti:sapphire lasers.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Takeshi; Takahashi, Yu; Ito, Masahiro; Fukushima, Shuichiro; Araki, Tsutomu

    2009-04-01

    Second-harmonic-generation (SHG) microscopy is an interesting new tool for observing dermal collagen fiber in skin. However, conventional SHG microscopy using a mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser suffers from low penetration depth and a slow image acquisition rate caused by scattering and absorption in tissue, making it difficult to use for in vivo applications on human skin. We develop an SHG microscope equipped with a mode-locked Cr:forsterite laser with a long wavelength and compare its imaging characteristics with that of a Ti:sapphire-laser-based SHG microscope for the measurement of dermal collagen fiber in animal and human skins. The results indicate the suitability of the Cr:forsterite laser-based SHG microscope for in vivo imaging of human skin.

  19. Room temperature terahertz wave imaging at 60 fps by frequency up-conversion in DAST crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shuzhen; Qi, Feng; Notake, Takashi; Nawata, Kouji; Matsukawa, Takeshi; Takida, Yuma; Minamide, Hiroaki

    2014-02-01

    Terahertz imaging has attracted a lot of interests for more than 10 years. But real time, high sensitive, low cost THz imaging in room temperature, which is widely needed by fields such as biology, biomedicine and homeland security, has not been fully developed yet. A lot of approaches have been reported on electro-optic (E-O) imaging and THz focal plane arrays with photoconductive antenna or micro-bolometer integrated. In this paper, we report high sensitive realtime THz image at 60 frames per second (fps) employing a commercial infrared camera, using nonlinear optical frequency up-conversion technology. In this system, a flash-lamp pumped nanosecond pulse green laser is used to pump two optical parametric oscillator systems with potassium titanyl phosphate crystals (KTP-OPO). One system with dual KTP crystals is used to generate infrared laser for the pumping of THz difference frequency generation (DFG) in a 4- Dimethylamino-N-Methyl-4-Stilbazolium Tosylate (DAST) crystal. The other one is for generation of pumping laser for THz frequency up-conversion in a second DAST crystal. The THz frequency can be tuned continuously from a few THz to less than 30 THz by controlling the angle of KTP crystals. The frequency up-converted image in infrared region is recorded by a commercial infrared camera working at 60 Hz. Images and videos are presented to show the feasibility of this technique and the real-time ability. Comparison with a general micro-bolometer THz camera shows the high sensitivity of this technique.

  20. Histotripsy Lesion Formation Using an Ultrasound Imaging Probe Enabled by a Low-Frequency Pump Transducer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuang-Wei; Hall, Timothy L; Xu, Zhen; Cain, Charles A

    2015-08-01

    When histotripsy pulses shorter than 2 cycles are applied, the formation of a dense bubble cloud relies only on the applied peak negative pressure (p-) exceeding the "intrinsic threshold" of the medium (absolute value of 26-30 MPa in most soft tissues). It has been found that a sub-threshold high-frequency probe pulse (3 MHz) can be enabled by a sub-threshold low-frequency pump pulse (500 kHz) where the sum exceeds the intrinsic threshold, thus generating lesion-producing dense bubble clouds ("dual-beam histotripsy"). Here, the feasibility of using an imaging transducer to provide the high-frequency probe pulse in the dual-beam histotripsy approach is investigated. More specifically, an ATL L7-4 imaging transducer (Philips Healthcare, Andover, MA, USA), pulsed by a V-1 Data Acquisition System (Verasonics, Redmond, WA, USA), was used to generate the high-frequency probe pulses. The low-frequency pump pulses were generated by a 20-element 345-kHz array transducer, driven by a custom high-voltage pulser. These dual-beam histotripsy pulses were applied to red blood cell tissue-mimicking phantoms at a pulse repetition frequency of 1 Hz, and optical imaging was used to visualize bubble clouds and lesions generated in the red blood cell phantoms. The results indicated that dense bubble clouds (and resulting lesions) were generated when the p- of the sub-threshold pump and probe pulses combined constructively to exceed the intrinsic threshold. The average size of the smallest reproducible lesions using the imaging probe pulse enabled by the sub-threshold pump pulse was 0.7 × 1.7 mm, whereas that using the supra-threshold pump pulse alone was 1.4 × 3.7 mm. When the imaging transducer was steered laterally, bubble clouds and lesions were steered correspondingly until the combined p- no longer exceeded the intrinsic threshold. These results were also validated with ex vivo porcine liver experiments. Using an imaging transducer for dual-beam histotripsy can have two