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Sample records for frequency modulation atomic

  1. Autopilot for frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kuchuk, Kfir; Schlesinger, Itai; Sivan, Uri

    2015-10-01

    One of the most challenging aspects of operating an atomic force microscope (AFM) is finding optimal feedback parameters. This statement applies particularly to frequency-modulation AFM (FM-AFM), which utilizes three feedback loops to control the cantilever excitation amplitude, cantilever excitation frequency, and z-piezo extension. These loops are regulated by a set of feedback parameters, tuned by the user to optimize stability, sensitivity, and noise in the imaging process. Optimization of these parameters is difficult due to the coupling between the frequency and z-piezo feedback loops by the non-linear tip-sample interaction. Four proportional-integral (PI) parameters and two lock-in parameters regulating these loops require simultaneous optimization in the presence of a varying unknown tip-sample coupling. Presently, this optimization is done manually in a tedious process of trial and error. Here, we report on the development and implementation of an algorithm that computes the control parameters automatically. The algorithm reads the unperturbed cantilever resonance frequency, its quality factor, and the z-piezo driving signal power spectral density. It analyzes the poles and zeros of the total closed loop transfer function, extracts the unknown tip-sample transfer function, and finds four PI parameters and two lock-in parameters for the frequency and z-piezo control loops that optimize the bandwidth and step response of the total system. Implementation of the algorithm in a home-built AFM shows that the calculated parameters are consistently excellent and rarely require further tweaking by the user. The new algorithm saves the precious time of experienced users, facilitates utilization of FM-AFM by casual users, and removes the main hurdle on the way to fully automated FM-AFM.

  2. Autopilot for frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchuk, Kfir; Schlesinger, Itai; Sivan, Uri

    2015-10-01

    One of the most challenging aspects of operating an atomic force microscope (AFM) is finding optimal feedback parameters. This statement applies particularly to frequency-modulation AFM (FM-AFM), which utilizes three feedback loops to control the cantilever excitation amplitude, cantilever excitation frequency, and z-piezo extension. These loops are regulated by a set of feedback parameters, tuned by the user to optimize stability, sensitivity, and noise in the imaging process. Optimization of these parameters is difficult due to the coupling between the frequency and z-piezo feedback loops by the non-linear tip-sample interaction. Four proportional-integral (PI) parameters and two lock-in parameters regulating these loops require simultaneous optimization in the presence of a varying unknown tip-sample coupling. Presently, this optimization is done manually in a tedious process of trial and error. Here, we report on the development and implementation of an algorithm that computes the control parameters automatically. The algorithm reads the unperturbed cantilever resonance frequency, its quality factor, and the z-piezo driving signal power spectral density. It analyzes the poles and zeros of the total closed loop transfer function, extracts the unknown tip-sample transfer function, and finds four PI parameters and two lock-in parameters for the frequency and z-piezo control loops that optimize the bandwidth and step response of the total system. Implementation of the algorithm in a home-built AFM shows that the calculated parameters are consistently excellent and rarely require further tweaking by the user. The new algorithm saves the precious time of experienced users, facilitates utilization of FM-AFM by casual users, and removes the main hurdle on the way to fully automated FM-AFM.

  3. Autopilot for frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchuk, Kfir; Schlesinger, Itai; Sivan, Uri

    2015-10-15

    One of the most challenging aspects of operating an atomic force microscope (AFM) is finding optimal feedback parameters. This statement applies particularly to frequency-modulation AFM (FM-AFM), which utilizes three feedback loops to control the cantilever excitation amplitude, cantilever excitation frequency, and z-piezo extension. These loops are regulated by a set of feedback parameters, tuned by the user to optimize stability, sensitivity, and noise in the imaging process. Optimization of these parameters is difficult due to the coupling between the frequency and z-piezo feedback loops by the non-linear tip-sample interaction. Four proportional-integral (PI) parameters and two lock-in parameters regulating these loops require simultaneous optimization in the presence of a varying unknown tip-sample coupling. Presently, this optimization is done manually in a tedious process of trial and error. Here, we report on the development and implementation of an algorithm that computes the control parameters automatically. The algorithm reads the unperturbed cantilever resonance frequency, its quality factor, and the z-piezo driving signal power spectral density. It analyzes the poles and zeros of the total closed loop transfer function, extracts the unknown tip-sample transfer function, and finds four PI parameters and two lock-in parameters for the frequency and z-piezo control loops that optimize the bandwidth and step response of the total system. Implementation of the algorithm in a home-built AFM shows that the calculated parameters are consistently excellent and rarely require further tweaking by the user. The new algorithm saves the precious time of experienced users, facilitates utilization of FM-AFM by casual users, and removes the main hurdle on the way to fully automated FM-AFM.

  4. Time-of-flight detection of ultra-cold atoms using resonant frequency modulation imaging.

    PubMed

    Hardman, K S; Wigley, P B; Everitt, P J; Manju, P; Kuhn, C C N; Robins, N P

    2016-06-01

    Resonant frequency modulation imaging is used to detect free falling ultra-cold atoms. A theoretical comparison of fluorescence imaging (FI) and frequency modulation imaging (FMI) is made, indicating that for low optical depth clouds, FMI accomplished a higher signal-to-noise ratio under conditions necessary for a 200 μm spatially resolved atom interferometer. A 750 ms time-of-flight measurement reveals near atom shot-noise limited number measurements of 2×106 Bose-condensed Rb87 atoms. The detection system is applied to high precision spinor BEC based atom interferometer.

  5. Noncontact microrheology at acoustic frequencies using frequency-modulated atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gavara, Núria; Chadwick, Richard S

    2010-08-01

    We report an atomic force microscopy (AFM) method for assessing elastic and viscous properties of soft samples at acoustic frequencies under non-contact conditions. The method can be used to measure material properties via frequency modulation and is based on hydrodynamics theory of thin gaps we developed here. A cantilever with an attached microsphere is forced to oscillate tens of nanometers above a sample. The elastic modulus and viscosity of the sample are estimated by measuring the frequency-dependence of the phase lag between the oscillating microsphere and the driving piezo at various heights above the sample. This method features an effective area of pyramidal tips used in contact AFM but with only piconewton applied forces. Using this method, we analyzed polyacrylamide gels of different stiffness and assessed graded mechanical properties of guinea pig tectorial membrane. The technique enables the study of microrheology of biological tissues that produce or detect sound.

  6. Atoms in the counter-propagating frequency-modulated waves: splitting, cooling, confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanenko, Victor I.; Kornilovska, Nataliya V.

    2017-09-01

    We show that the counter-propagating frequency-modulated (FM) waves of the same intensity can split an orthogonal atomic beam into two beams. We calculate the temperature of the atomic ensemble for the case when the atoms are grouped around zero velocity in the direction of the waves propagation. The high-intensity laser radiation with a properly chosen carrier frequency can form a one-dimensional trap for atoms. We carry out the numerical simulation of the atomic motion (two-level model of the atom-field interaction) using parameters appropriate for sodium atoms and show that sub-Doppler cooling can be reached. We suppose that such a cooling is partly based on the cooling without spontaneous emission in polychromatic waves [H. Metcalf, Phys. Rev. A 77, 061401 (2008)]. We calculate the state of the atom in the field by the Monte Carlo wave-function method and describe its mechanical motion by the classical mechanics.

  7. Modulation Transfer Through Coherence and Its Application to Atomic Frequency Offset Locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagatap, B. N.; Ray, Ayan; Kale, Y. B.; Singh, Niharika; Lawande, Q. V.

    We discuss the process of modulation transfer in a coherently prepared three-level atomic medium and its prospective application to atomic frequency offset locking (AFOL). The issue of modulation transfer through coherence is treated in the framework of temporal evolution of dressed atomic system with externally superimposed deterministic flow. This dynamical description of the atom-field system offers distinctive advantage of using a single modulation source to dither passively the coherent phenomenon as probed by an independent laser system under pump-probe configuration. Modulation transfer is demonstrated experimentally using frequency modulation spectroscopy on a subnatural linewidth electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) and a sub-Doppler linewidth Autler-Townes (AT) resonance in Doppler broadened alkali vapor medium, and AFOL is realized by stabilizing the probe laser on the first/third derivative signals. The stability of AFOL is discussed in terms of the frequency noise power spectral density and Allan variance. Analysis of AFOL schemes is carried out at the backdrop of closed loop active frequency control in a conventional master-slave scheme to point out the contrasting behavior of AFOL schemes based on EIT and AT resonances. This work adds up to the discussion on the subtle link between dressed state spectroscopy and AFOL, which is relevant for developing a master-slave type laser system in the domain of coherent photon-atom interaction.

  8. Atomic magnetic resonance induced by amplitude-, frequency-, or polarization-modulated light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujić, Z. D.; Weis, A.

    2013-07-01

    In recent years diode laser sources have become widespread and reliable tools in magneto-optical spectroscopy. In particular, laser-driven atomic magnetometers have found a wide range of practical applications. More recently, so-called magnetically silent variants of atomic magnetometers have been developed. While in conventional magnetometers the magnetic resonance transitions between atomic sublevels are phase-coherently driven by a weak oscillating magnetic field, silent magnetometers use schemes in which either the frequency or the amplitude of the light beam is modulated. Here we present a theoretical model that yields algebraic expressions for the parameters of the multiple resonances that occur when either amplitude-, frequency-, or polarization-modulated light of circular polarization is used to drive the magnetic resonance transition in a transverse magnetic field. The relative magnitudes of the resonances that are observed in the transmitted light intensity at harmonic m of the Larmor frequency ωL (either by DC or phase sensitive detection at harmonics q of the modulation frequency ωmod) of the transmitted light are expressed in terms of the Fourier coefficients of the modulation function. Our approach is based on an atomic multipole moment representation that is valid for spin-oriented atomic states with arbitrary angular momentum F in the low light power limit. We find excellent quantitative agreement with an experimental case study using (square-wave) amplitude-modulated light.

  9. General theory of frequency modulated selective reflection. Influence of atom surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducloy, M.; Fichet, M.

    1991-12-01

    We calculate the modulation of the reflection coefficient for a frequency-modulated (FM) light beam incident on the interface between a dielectric and an atomic vapor. The vapor is described as a gas of resonant, Doppler-broadened, two-level systems, with transition frequency and linewidth arbitrarily depending on the atom-dielectric distance. The atoms are supposed to get deexcited at collisions with the surface. The transient atomic response is calculated to first order in the incident field, for both incoming and desorbed atoms. The reflection coefficient, evaluated to first order in the vapor dipole polarization, leads to a formal expression of the reflectivity modulation, valid for arbitrary atom-surface interaction potentials. One first discusses the reflection signal in absence of wall interactions, for arbitrary modulation frequencies. At large frequencies, it allows one to monitor both vapor absorption and dispersion. Second, the formal theory is applied to the case of a Van der Waals-London surface attraction exerted on the atomic vapor. Both normal and oblique beam incidences are considered. One shows how the vapor dispersion signal is red-shifted and strongly distorted by the appearance of vapor-surface long-range interactions, and how it can be used to monitor these interactions. At non-normal incidences, the lineshapes get Doppler-broadened. On calcule le coefficient de réflexion d'un faisceau lumineux, modulé en fréquence, incident sur une interface entre un milieu diélectrique et une vapeur atomique. Cette vapeur est décrite comme un ensemble de systèmes à deux niveaux, présentant un élargissement Doppler, et dont la fréquence de transition et la largeur de raie sont supposées dépendre de la distance au milieu diélectrique. On suppose par ailleurs que les atomes sont déexcités sur la paroi. La réponse transitoire des atomes est analysée au premier ordre en fonction du champ électromagnétique incident. Du coefficient de r

  10. Interaction of frequency modulated light pulses with rubidium atoms in a magneto-optical trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakos, J. S.; Djotyan, G. P.; Ignácz, P. N.; Kedves, M. Á.; Serényi, M.; Sörlei, Zs.; Szigeti, J.; Tóth, Z.

    2006-07-01

    The spatial displacement of the 85Rb atoms in a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT) under the influence of series of frequency modulated light pulse pairs propagating opposite to each other is measured as a function of the time elapsed after the start of the pulse train, and compared with the results of simulations. Adiabatic excitation and consecutive de-excitation take place between the ground 52S1/2 (F=3) and the 52P3/2 (F'=2, 3, 4) excited levels as the result of the interaction. The displacement of the 85Rb atoms is calculated as the solution of simple equation of motion where the expelling force is that arising from the action of the frequency modulated light pulses. The restoring and friction forces of the MOT are taken into account also. The system of Bloch equations for the density matrix elements is solved numerically for transitions between six working hyperfine levels of the atom interacting with the sequence of the frequency modulated laser pulses. According to these simulations, the momentum transferred by one pulse pair is always smaller than the expected 2ħk, (1) where ħ is the Plank constant and k=2π/λ where λ is the wavelength, (2) having a maximum value in a restricted region of variation of the laser pulse peak intensity and the chirp.

  11. Nanoscale potential measurements in liquid by frequency modulation atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Naritaka; Asakawa, Hitoshi; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2010-12-01

    We have developed a method for local potential measurements in liquid using frequency modulation atomic force microscopy. In this method, local potential is calculated from the first and second harmonic vibrations of a cantilever induced by applying an ac bias voltage between a tip and a sample. The use of an ac bias voltage with a relatively high frequency prevents uncontrolled electrochemical reactions and redistribution of ions and water. The nanoscale resolution of the method is demonstrated by imaging potential distribution of a dodecylamine thin film deposited on a graphite surface in 1 mM NaCl solution.

  12. Development of low noise cantilever deflection sensor for multienvironment frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuma, Takeshi; Kimura, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Kei; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2005-05-15

    We have developed a low noise cantilever deflection sensor with a deflection noise density of 17 fm/{radical}(Hz) by optimizing the parameters used in optical beam deflection (OBD) method. Using this sensor, we have developed a multienvironment frequency-modulation atomic force microscope (FM-AFM) that can achieve true molecular resolution in various environments such as in moderate vacuum, air, and liquid. The low noise characteristic of the deflection sensor makes it possible to obtain a maximum frequency sensitivity limited by the thermal Brownian motion of the cantilever in every environment. In this paper, the major noise sources in OBD method are discussed in both theoretical and experimental aspects. The excellent noise performance of the deflection sensor is demonstrated in deflection and frequency measurements. True molecular-resolution FM-AFM images of a polydiacetylene single crystal taken in vacuum, air, and water are presented.

  13. Development of low noise cantilever deflection sensor for multienvironment frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuma, Takeshi; Kimura, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Kei; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2005-05-01

    We have developed a low noise cantilever deflection sensor with a deflection noise density of 17fm/√Hz by optimizing the parameters used in optical beam deflection (OBD) method. Using this sensor, we have developed a multienvironment frequency-modulation atomic force microscope (FM-AFM) that can achieve true molecular resolution in various environments such as in moderate vacuum, air, and liquid. The low noise characteristic of the deflection sensor makes it possible to obtain a maximum frequency sensitivity limited by the thermal Brownian motion of the cantilever in every environment. In this paper, the major noise sources in OBD method are discussed in both theoretical and experimental aspects. The excellent noise performance of the deflection sensor is demonstrated in deflection and frequency measurements. True molecular-resolution FM-AFM images of a polydiacetylene single crystal taken in vacuum, air, and water are presented.

  14. Generating topological optical flux lattices for ultracold atoms by modulated Raman and radio-frequency couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jinlong; Xu, Zhi-Fang; You, Li

    2017-01-01

    We propose a scheme to dynamically generate optical flux lattices with nontrivial band topology using amplitude-modulated Raman lasers and radio-frequency (rf) magnetic fields. By tuning the strength of Raman and rf fields, three distinct phases are realized at unit filling for a unit cell. Respectively, these three phases correspond to normal insulator, topological Chern insulator, and semimetal. Nearly nondispersive bands are found to appear in the topological phase, which promises opportunities for investigating strongly correlated quantum states within a simple cold-atom setup. The validity of our proposal is confirmed by comparing the Floquet quasienergies from the evolution operator with the spectrum of the effective Hamiltonian.

  15. Water distribution at solid/liquid interfaces visualized by frequency modulation atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fukuma, Takeshi

    2010-01-01

    Interfacial phenomena at solid/water interfaces play an important role in a wide range of industrial technologies and biological processes. However, it has been a great challenge to directly probe the molecular-scale behavior of water at solid/water interfaces. Recently, there have been tremendous advancements in frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM), enabling its operation in liquids with atomic resolution. The high spatial and force resolutions of FM-AFM have enabled the visualization of one-dimensional (1D) profiles of the hydration force, two-dimensional (2D) images of hydration layers and three-dimensional (3D) images of the water distribution at solid/water interfaces. Here I present an overview of the recent advances in FM-AFM instrumentation and its applications to the study of solid/water interfaces. PMID:27877337

  16. Coherent cooling of atoms in a frequency-modulated standing laser wave: Wave function and stochastic trajectory approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Argonov, V. Yu.

    2014-11-15

    The wave function of a moderately cold atom in a stationary near-resonant standing light wave delocalizes very fast due to wave packet splitting. However, we show that frequency modulation of the field can suppress packet splitting for some atoms whose specific velocities are in a narrow range. These atoms remain localized in a small space for a long time. We demonstrate and explain this effect numerically and analytically. We also demonstrate that the modulated field can not only trap but also cool the atoms. We perform a numerical experiment with a large atomic ensemble having wide initial velocity and energy distributions. During the experiment, most of atoms leave the wave while the trapped atoms have a narrow energy distribution.

  17. Accurate formula for dissipative interaction in frequency modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi; Kobayashi, Kei; Labuda, Aleksander

    2014-12-08

    Much interest has recently focused on the viscosity of nano-confined liquids. Frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) is a powerful technique that can detect variations in the conservative and dissipative forces between a nanometer-scale tip and a sample surface. We now present an accurate formula to convert the dissipation power of the cantilever measured during the experiment to damping of the tip-sample system. We demonstrated the conversion of the dissipation power versus tip-sample separation curve measured using a colloidal probe cantilever on a mica surface in water to the damping curve, which showed a good agreement with the theoretical curve. Moreover, we obtained the damping curve from the dissipation power curve measured on the hydration layers on the mica surface using a nanometer-scale tip, demonstrating that the formula allows us to quantitatively measure the viscosity of a nano-confined liquid using FM-AFM.

  18. Mechanical Properties of Microcrystalline Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) Measured by Bimodal Amplitude Modulated-Frequency Modulated Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yao; Hu, Zhigang; Zhao, Dan; Zeng, Kaiyang

    2017-09-08

    Direct measurement of the mechanical properties of microcrystalline metal-organic framework (MOF) nanoparticles is challenging and rarely explored. In this work, we apply an effective method to realize elastic modulus mapping of a series of isostructural single MOF nanoparticles (100-500 nm) via bimodal amplitude modulated-frequency modulated atomic force microscopy. By probing five types of zirconium (Zr) and hafnium (Hf) isostructural UiO-66-type MOFs, we experimentally found that UiO-66(Hf)-type MOFs possess the higher elastic modulus (46-104 GPa) than that of UiO-66(Zr)-type MOFs (34-100 GPa), both of which are higher than that of reported zinc/copper based MOFs (3-10 GPa). We also experimentally demonstrate that the mechanical properties of MOFs can be tuned by adjusting the chemical functionalities of the ligands or using different metal nodes. In detail, the sterically bulky functional groups increase the mechanical properties of the resultant UiO-66-type MOFs, possibly due to the increased atomic density. These results pave a way to the direct measurement of mechanical properties of MOFs crystalline particles and provide an incisive perspective to the design of MOFs with high mechanical properties.

  19. Frequency-modulated atomic force microscopy operation by imaging at the frequency shift minimum: The dip-df mode

    SciTech Connect

    Rode, Sebastian; Schreiber, Martin; Kühnle, Angelika; Rahe, Philipp

    2014-04-15

    In frequency modulated non-contact atomic force microscopy, the change of the cantilever frequency (Δf) is used as the input signal for the topography feedback loop. Around the Δf(z) minimum, however, stable feedback operation is challenging using a standard proportional-integral-derivative (PID) feedback design due to the change of sign in the slope. When operated under liquid conditions, it is furthermore difficult to address the attractive interaction regime due to its often moderate peakedness. Additionally, the Δf signal level changes severely with time in this environment due to drift of the cantilever frequency f{sub 0} and, thus, requires constant adjustment. Here, we present an approach overcoming these obstacles by using the derivative of Δf with respect to z as the input signal for the topography feedback loop. Rather than regulating the absolute value to a preset setpoint, the slope of the Δf with respect to z is regulated to zero. This new measurement mode not only makes the minimum of the Δf(z) curve directly accessible, but it also benefits from greatly increased operation stability due to its immunity against f{sub 0} drift. We present isosurfaces of the Δf minimum acquired on the calcite CaCO{sub 3}(101{sup ¯}4) surface in liquid environment, demonstrating the capability of our method to image in the attractive tip-sample interaction regime.

  20. Mapping power-law rheology of living cells using multi-frequency force modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Ryosuke; Okajima, Takaharu

    2015-10-26

    We present multi-frequency force modulation atomic force microscopy (AFM) for mapping the complex shear modulus G* of living cells as a function of frequency over the range of 50–500 Hz in the same measurement time as the single-frequency force modulation measurement. The AFM technique enables us to reconstruct image maps of rheological parameters, which exhibit a frequency-dependent power-law behavior with respect to G{sup *}. These quantitative rheological measurements reveal a large spatial variation in G* in this frequency range for single cells. Moreover, we find that the reconstructed images of the power-law rheological parameters are much different from those obtained in force-curve or single-frequency force modulation measurements. This indicates that the former provide information about intracellular mechanical structures of the cells that are usually not resolved with the conventional force measurement methods.

  1. Length-extension resonator as a force sensor for high-resolution frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy in air

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Tino

    2016-01-01

    Summary Frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy has turned into a well-established method to obtain atomic resolution on flat surfaces, but is often limited to ultra-high vacuum conditions and cryogenic temperatures. Measurements under ambient conditions are influenced by variations of the dew point and thin water layers present on practically every surface, complicating stable imaging with high resolution. We demonstrate high-resolution imaging in air using a length-extension resonator operating at small amplitudes. An additional slow feedback compensates for changes in the free resonance frequency, allowing stable imaging over a long period of time with changing environmental conditions. PMID:27335735

  2. Length-extension resonator as a force sensor for high-resolution frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy in air.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Hannes; Wagner, Tino; Stemmer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy has turned into a well-established method to obtain atomic resolution on flat surfaces, but is often limited to ultra-high vacuum conditions and cryogenic temperatures. Measurements under ambient conditions are influenced by variations of the dew point and thin water layers present on practically every surface, complicating stable imaging with high resolution. We demonstrate high-resolution imaging in air using a length-extension resonator operating at small amplitudes. An additional slow feedback compensates for changes in the free resonance frequency, allowing stable imaging over a long period of time with changing environmental conditions.

  3. Potential dependent structure of electric double layer faced to solid electrode surfaces analyzed by electrochemical frequency modulation atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Ken-ichi; Utsunomiya, Toru; Yokota, Yasuyuki

    2017-08-01

    This progress review summarizes recent achievements on the analyses of electric double layer (EDL) formed at electrolyte/electrode interfaces by using electrochemical frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (EC-FM-AFM), which enables to obtain the liquid side information on the liquid molecules’ structuring as well as the atomic scale resolution of the solid side at low loading forces. Potential and electrolyte dependent EDL structures at aqueous solution/graphite interfaces and strong substrate dependency on the structuring of interfacial ionic liquid are mainly discussed.

  4. Coupled molecular and cantilever dynamics model for frequency-modulated atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Klocke, Michael; Wolf, Dietrich E

    2016-01-01

    A molecular dynamics model is presented, which adds harmonic potentials to the atomic interactions to mimic the elastic properties of an AFM cantilever. It gives new insight into the correlation between the experimentally monitored frequency shift and cantilever damping due to the interaction between tip atoms and scanned surface. Applying the model to ionic crystals with rock salt structure two damping mechanisms are investigated, which occur separately or simultaneously depending on the tip position. These mechanisms are adhesion hysteresis on the one hand and lateral excitations of the cantilever on the other. We find that the short range Lennard-Jones part of the atomic interaction alone is sufficient for changing the predominant mechanism. When the long range ionic interaction is switched off, the two damping mechanisms occur with a completely different pattern, which is explained by the energy landscape for the apex atom of the tip. In this case the adhesion hysteresis is always associated with a distinct lateral displacement of the tip. It is shown how this may lead to a systematic shift between the periodic patterns obtained from the frequency and from the damping signal, respectively.

  5. Coupled molecular and cantilever dynamics model for frequency-modulated atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Klocke, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Summary A molecular dynamics model is presented, which adds harmonic potentials to the atomic interactions to mimic the elastic properties of an AFM cantilever. It gives new insight into the correlation between the experimentally monitored frequency shift and cantilever damping due to the interaction between tip atoms and scanned surface. Applying the model to ionic crystals with rock salt structure two damping mechanisms are investigated, which occur separately or simultaneously depending on the tip position. These mechanisms are adhesion hysteresis on the one hand and lateral excitations of the cantilever on the other. We find that the short range Lennard-Jones part of the atomic interaction alone is sufficient for changing the predominant mechanism. When the long range ionic interaction is switched off, the two damping mechanisms occur with a completely different pattern, which is explained by the energy landscape for the apex atom of the tip. In this case the adhesion hysteresis is always associated with a distinct lateral displacement of the tip. It is shown how this may lead to a systematic shift between the periodic patterns obtained from the frequency and from the damping signal, respectively. PMID:27335760

  6. Near-field light detection of a photo induced force by atomic force microscopy with frequency modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Nobuo; Kobayashi, Kei; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2017-08-01

    We demonstrated near-field light detection using a non contact-mode atomic force microscope (nc-AFM). This system obtains molecular-level resolution by reducing noise in the displacement detection of a Si cantilever. The Si cantilever probe tip was brought close to a glass with a patterned chromium film on a dove prism. The backside of the prism was irradiated by an intensity-modulated laser light to create an evanescent field at the glass surface. We obtained a near-field optical image of the chromium-patterned glass by detecting the amplitude modulation induced by the near-field light while the tip-sample distance was regulated by the frequency modulation method under atmospheric conditions.

  7. Doppler modulation and Zeeman modulation: laser frequency stabilization without direct frequency modulation.

    PubMed

    Weis, A; Derler, S

    1988-07-01

    We discuss two methods (Zeeman modulation and Doppler modulation) for locking the frequency of a singlemode cw laser to an atomic absorption line. These methods do not require the laser frequency to be modulated directly. In the first scheme the absorption frequency of the atom is modulated via the Zeeman effect; in the second scheme the laser frequency is modulated indirectly via the Doppler effect in an atomic beam. We used the two methods successfully to lock two dye lasers to the transitions 6S((1/2)) ? 7S((1/2)) and 7S((1/2)) ? 15P(?) in atomic cesium.

  8. Wideband phase-locked loop circuit with real-time phase correction for frequency modulation atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuma, Takeshi; Yoshioka, Shunsuke; Asakawa, Hitoshi

    2011-07-01

    We have developed a wideband phase-locked loop (PLL) circuit with real-time phase correction for high-speed and accurate force measurements by frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) in liquid. A high-speed operation of FM-AFM requires the use of a high frequency cantilever which, however, increases frequency-dependent phase delay caused by the signal delay within the cantilever excitation loop. Such phase delay leads to an error in the force measurements by FM-AFM especially with a low Q factor. Here, we present a method to compensate this phase delay in real time. Combined with a wideband PLL using a subtraction-based phase comparator, the method allows to perform an accurate and high-speed force measurement by FM-AFM. We demonstrate the improved performance by applying the developed PLL to three-dimensional force measurements at a mica/water interface.

  9. Wideband phase-locked loop circuit with real-time phase correction for frequency modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fukuma, Takeshi; Yoshioka, Shunsuke; Asakawa, Hitoshi

    2011-07-01

    We have developed a wideband phase-locked loop (PLL) circuit with real-time phase correction for high-speed and accurate force measurements by frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) in liquid. A high-speed operation of FM-AFM requires the use of a high frequency cantilever which, however, increases frequency-dependent phase delay caused by the signal delay within the cantilever excitation loop. Such phase delay leads to an error in the force measurements by FM-AFM especially with a low Q factor. Here, we present a method to compensate this phase delay in real time. Combined with a wideband PLL using a subtraction-based phase comparator, the method allows to perform an accurate and high-speed force measurement by FM-AFM. We demonstrate the improved performance by applying the developed PLL to three-dimensional force measurements at a mica/water interface.

  10. Clean surface processing of rubrene single crystal immersed in ionic liquid by using frequency modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yokota, Yasuyuki; Hara, Hisaya; Morino, Yusuke; Bando, Ken-ichi; Imanishi, Akihito; Fukui, Ken-ichi; Uemura, Takafumi; Takeya, Jun

    2014-06-30

    Surface processing of a rubrene single crystal immersed in ionic liquids is valuable for further development of low voltage transistors operated by an electric double layer. We performed a precise and clean surface processing based on the tip-induced dissolution of rubrene molecules at the ionic liquid/rubrene single crystal interfaces by using frequency modulation atomic force microscopy. Molecular resolution imaging revealed that the tip-induced dissolution proceeded via metastable low density states derived from the anisotropic intermolecular interactions within the crystal structure.

  11. Quartz tuning fork-based frequency modulation atomic force spectroscopy and microscopy with all digital phase-locked loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Sangmin; Hong, Mun-heon; Kim, Jongwoo; Kwon, Soyoung; Lee, Kunyoung; Lee, Manhee; Jhe, Wonho

    2012-11-01

    We present a platform for the quartz tuning fork (QTF)-based, frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) system for quantitative study of the mechanical or topographical properties of nanoscale materials, such as the nano-sized water bridge formed between the quartz tip (˜100 nm curvature) and the mica substrate. A thermally stable, all digital phase-locked loop is used to detect the small frequency shift of the QTF signal resulting from the nanomaterial-mediated interactions. The proposed and demonstrated novel FM-AFM technique provides high experimental sensitivity in the measurement of the viscoelastic forces associated with the confined nano-water meniscus, short response time, and insensitivity to amplitude noise, which are essential for precision dynamic force spectroscopy and microscopy.

  12. Quartz tuning fork-based frequency modulation atomic force spectroscopy and microscopy with all digital phase-locked loop.

    PubMed

    An, Sangmin; Hong, Mun-heon; Kim, Jongwoo; Kwon, Soyoung; Lee, Kunyoung; Lee, Manhee; Jhe, Wonho

    2012-11-01

    We present a platform for the quartz tuning fork (QTF)-based, frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) system for quantitative study of the mechanical or topographical properties of nanoscale materials, such as the nano-sized water bridge formed between the quartz tip (~100 nm curvature) and the mica substrate. A thermally stable, all digital phase-locked loop is used to detect the small frequency shift of the QTF signal resulting from the nanomaterial-mediated interactions. The proposed and demonstrated novel FM-AFM technique provides high experimental sensitivity in the measurement of the viscoelastic forces associated with the confined nano-water meniscus, short response time, and insensitivity to amplitude noise, which are essential for precision dynamic force spectroscopy and microscopy.

  13. Combined frequency modulated atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy detection for multi-tip scanning probe microscopy applications.

    PubMed

    Morawski, Ireneusz; Spiegelberg, Richard; Korte, Stefan; Voigtländer, Bert

    2015-12-01

    A method which allows scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tip biasing independent of the sample bias during frequency modulated atomic force microscopy (AFM) operation is presented. The AFM sensor is supplied by an electronic circuit combining both a frequency shift signal and a tunneling current signal by means of an inductive coupling. This solution enables a control of the tip potential independent of the sample potential. Individual tip biasing is specifically important in order to implement multi-tip STM/AFM applications. An extensional quartz sensor (needle sensor) with a conductive tip is applied to record simultaneously topography and conductivity of the sample. The high resonance frequency of the needle sensor (1 MHz) allows scanning of a large area of the surface being investigated in a reasonably short time. A recipe for the amplitude calibration which is based only on the frequency shift signal and does not require the tip being in contact is presented. Additionally, we show spectral measurements of the mechanical vibration noise of the scanning system used in the investigations.

  14. Combined frequency modulated atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy detection for multi-tip scanning probe microscopy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morawski, Ireneusz; Spiegelberg, Richard; Korte, Stefan; Voigtländer, Bert

    2015-12-01

    A method which allows scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tip biasing independent of the sample bias during frequency modulated atomic force microscopy (AFM) operation is presented. The AFM sensor is supplied by an electronic circuit combining both a frequency shift signal and a tunneling current signal by means of an inductive coupling. This solution enables a control of the tip potential independent of the sample potential. Individual tip biasing is specifically important in order to implement multi-tip STM/AFM applications. An extensional quartz sensor (needle sensor) with a conductive tip is applied to record simultaneously topography and conductivity of the sample. The high resonance frequency of the needle sensor (1 MHz) allows scanning of a large area of the surface being investigated in a reasonably short time. A recipe for the amplitude calibration which is based only on the frequency shift signal and does not require the tip being in contact is presented. Additionally, we show spectral measurements of the mechanical vibration noise of the scanning system used in the investigations.

  15. Combined frequency modulated atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy detection for multi-tip scanning probe microscopy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Morawski, Ireneusz; Spiegelberg, Richard; Korte, Stefan; Voigtländer, Bert

    2015-12-15

    A method which allows scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tip biasing independent of the sample bias during frequency modulated atomic force microscopy (AFM) operation is presented. The AFM sensor is supplied by an electronic circuit combining both a frequency shift signal and a tunneling current signal by means of an inductive coupling. This solution enables a control of the tip potential independent of the sample potential. Individual tip biasing is specifically important in order to implement multi-tip STM/AFM applications. An extensional quartz sensor (needle sensor) with a conductive tip is applied to record simultaneously topography and conductivity of the sample. The high resonance frequency of the needle sensor (1 MHz) allows scanning of a large area of the surface being investigated in a reasonably short time. A recipe for the amplitude calibration which is based only on the frequency shift signal and does not require the tip being in contact is presented. Additionally, we show spectral measurements of the mechanical vibration noise of the scanning system used in the investigations.

  16. Efficient generation of a narrow-bandwidth and frequency-modulated beam pair from Yb atoms in a ladder configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Minsoo; Yoon, Tai Hyun

    2011-03-15

    We report on the generation of narrow-bandwidth and frequency-modulated cascaded emission of two photons from a collimated Yb atomic beam. Efficient population transfer from the ground state (6s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0}) to upper state (6s7s {sup 1}S{sub 0}), of which direct transition at 291.1 nm is dipole forbidden, is achieved through a resonant two-photon excitation enhanced by the electromagnetically induced transparency mediated by the intermediate state (6s6p {sup 1}P{sub 1}). Then cascaded emission of two photons with a bandwidth of 54 MHz at 611.3 nm (idler) and 555.8 nm (signal) occurs in sequence from the upper state via the spin triplet state (6s{sup 2} {sup 3}P{sub 1}). Numerical calculations of the density matrix equations taking into account the residual Doppler effect and strong driving fields successfully explain the experimental results for the idler and signal beam intensities depending on the various parameters of the driving fields. Synchronized optical switching and frequency-modulation characteristics of the idler and signal beams are also reported.

  17. Imaging of transverse electron transfer through a DNA molecule by simultaneous scanning tunneling and frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Yasushi; Matsumoto, Takuya; Kawai, Tomoji

    2011-04-26

    Simultaneous scanning tunneling and frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy (STM/FM-AFM) was applied to a DNA molecule on a Cu(111) surface to analyze transverse electron transfer which is related to the electron transfer and the electrical contact in DNA-based devices. In particular, we demonstrated correlation mapping of the electron transfer parameters by visualizing specific combinations of the decay constant β and the contact conductance G. The results clearly revealed that electron transfer across the DNA strand varies spatially in the DNA molecule. This spatial variation is probably correlated with deformation of DNA on the surface. From quantitative analysis, the decay constant β was estimated to be 3.3 nm(-1), which is consistent with previously reported values for π-conjugated molecules.

  18. Self-assembled monolayers of sulfonate-terminated alkanethiols investigated by frequency modulation atomic force microscopy in liquid.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Hitoshi; Inada, Natsumi; Hirata, Kaito; Matsui, Sayaka; Igarashi, Takumi; Oku, Norihisa; Yoshikawa, Norinobu; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2017-09-06

    A molecular-scale understanding of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of sulfonate-terminated alkanethiols is crucial for interfacial studies of functionalized SAMs and their various applications. However, such an understanding has been difficult to achieve because of the lack of direct information on these molecular-scale structures in real space. In this study, we investigated the structures of sulfonate SAMs of sodium 11-mercapto-1-undecanesulfonate (MUS) by frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) in liquid. The subnanometer-resolution FM-AFM images showed that the single-component MUS SAM prepared in pure water had random surface structures. In contrast, the MUS SAM prepared in a water-ethanol mixed solvent showed periodic striped structures with a flat-lying conformation. The results suggest a significant solvent effect on molecular-scale structures of long-chain sulfonate SAMs. In addition, we investigated the molecular-scale structures of mixed SAMs of MUS and 11-mercapto-1-undecanol (MUO) with alkane chains of the same length.The FM-AFM images of the mixed SAMs showed clear phase separation between MUS SAM and MUO SAM domains. In the MUO SAM domains, the incorporated MUS molecules appeared as protrusions. The results obtained in this study provide direct structural information on long-chain sulfonate and mixed SAMs. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  19. Doppler modulation and Zeeman modulation: laser frequency stabilization without direct frequency modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Weis, A.; Derler, S.

    1988-07-01

    We discuss two methods (Zeeman modulation and Doppler modulation) for locking the frequency of a single-mode cw laser to an atomic absorption line. These methods do not require the laser frequency to be modulated directly. In the first scheme the absorption frequency of the atom is modulated via the Zeeman effect; in the second scheme the laser frequency is modulated indirectly via the Doppler effect in an atomic beam. We used the two methods successfully to lock two dye lasers to the transitions 6S/sub 1/2/..-->..7S/sub 1/2/ and 7S/sub 1/2/..-->..15P/sub 3/2/ in atomic cesium.

  20. Bimodal atomic force microscopy driving the higher eigenmode in frequency-modulation mode: Implementation, advantages, disadvantages and comparison to the open-loop case.

    PubMed

    Ebeling, Daniel; Solares, Santiago D

    2013-01-01

    We present an overview of the bimodal amplitude-frequency-modulation (AM-FM) imaging mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM), whereby the fundamental eigenmode is driven by using the amplitude-modulation technique (AM-AFM) while a higher eigenmode is driven by using either the constant-excitation or the constant-amplitude variant of the frequency-modulation (FM-AFM) technique. We also offer a comparison to the original bimodal AFM method, in which the higher eigenmode is driven with constant frequency and constant excitation amplitude. General as well as particular characteristics of the different driving schemes are highlighted from theoretical and experimental points of view, revealing the advantages and disadvantages of each. This study provides information and guidelines that can be useful in selecting the most appropriate operation mode to characterize different samples in the most efficient and reliable way.

  1. Laser frequency locking with 46  GHz offset using an electro-optic modulator for magneto-optical trapping of francium atoms.

    PubMed

    Harada, K; Aoki, T; Ezure, S; Kato, K; Hayamizu, T; Kawamura, H; Inoue, T; Arikawa, H; Ishikawa, T; Aoki, T; Uchiyama, A; Sakamoto, K; Ito, S; Itoh, M; Ando, S; Hatakeyama, A; Hatanaka, K; Imai, K; Murakami, T; Nataraj, H S; Shimizu, Y; Sato, T; Wakasa, T; Yoshida, H P; Sakemi, Y

    2016-02-10

    We demonstrate frequency offset locking between two laser sources using a waveguide-type electro-optic modulator (EOM) with 10th-order sidebands for magneto-optical trapping of Fr atoms. The frequency locking error signal was successfully obtained by performing delayed self-homodyne detection of the beat signal between the repumping frequency and the 10th-order sideband component of the trapping light. Sweeping the trapping-light and repumping-light frequencies with keeping its frequency difference of 46 GHz was confirmed over 1 GHz by monitoring the Doppler absorption profile of I₂. This technique enables us to search for a resonance frequency of magneto-optical trapping of Fr.

  2. Laser frequency locking with 46 GHz offset using an electro-optic modulator for magneto-optical trapping of francium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, K.; Aoki, T.; Ezure, S.; Kato, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Kawamura, H.; Inoue, T.; Arikawa, H.; Ishikawa, T.; Aoki, T.; Uchiyama, A.; Sakamoto, K.; Ito, S.; Itoh, M.; Ando, S.; Hatakeyama, A.; Hatanaka, K.; Imai, K.; Murakami, T.; Nataraj, H. S.; Shimizu, Y.; Sato, T.; Wakasa, T.; Yoshida, H. P.; Sakemi, Y.

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrated a frequency offset locking between two laser sources using a waveguide-type electro-optic modulator (EOM) with 10th-order sidebands for magneto-optical trapping of Fr atoms. The frequency locking error signal was successfully obtained by performing delayed self-homodyne detection of the beat signal between the repumping frequency and the 10th-order sideband component of the trapping light. Sweeping the trapping-light and repumping-light frequencies with keeping its frequency difference of 46 GHz was confirmed over 1 GHz by monitoring the Doppler absorption profile of I2. This technique enables us to search for a resonance frequency of magneto-optical trapping of Fr.

  3. HIGHER FREQUENCY ULTRASONIC LIGHT MODULATORS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    LIGHT ), (*MODULATORS, (*ULTRASONIC RADIATION, MODULATORS), OPTICAL COMMUNICATIONS, BANDWIDTH, TRANSDUCERS, HIGH FREQUENCY, VERY HIGH FREQUENCY, ATTENUATION, DATA PROCESSING, OPTICAL EQUIPMENT, ANALOG COMPUTERS, THEORY.

  4. True atomic-scale imaging of a spinel Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}(111) surface in aqueous solution by frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kitta, Mitsunori Kohyama, Masanori; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2014-09-15

    Spinel-type lithium titanium oxide (LTO; Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}) is a negative electrode material for lithium-ion batteries. Revealing the atomic-scale surface structure of LTO in liquid is highly necessary to investigate its surface properties in practical environments. Here, we reveal an atomic-scale image of the LTO(111) surface in LiCl aqueous solution using frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy. Atomically flat terraces and single steps having heights of multiples of 0.5 nm were observed in the aqueous solution. Hexagonal bright spots separated by 0.6 nm were also observed on the flat terrace part, corresponding to the atomistic contrast observed in the ultrahigh vacuum condition, which suggests that the basic atomic structure of the LTO(111) surface is retained without dramatic reconstruction even in the aqueous solution.

  5. Investigation on nanoscale processes on the BaF{sub 2}(111) surface in various solutions by frequency modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Naritaka; Kawamura, Ryuzo; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y.; Nakabayashi, Seiichiro

    2016-06-07

    In this study, we have directly observed nanoscale processes that occur on BaF{sub 2}(111) surfaces in various solutions using liquid-environment frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) with a true atomic resolution. In addition, to investigate atomic-scale mechanisms of crystal growth process of BaF{sub 2}, we determined a suitable solution for atomic-resolution FM-AFM imaging of the BaF{sub 2}(111) surface. For undersaturated solutions, the surface is roughened by barium hydroxo complexes in the case of high pH, whereas by dissolution and proton or water molecule adsorption throughout the surface in the case of low pH. On the other hand, for supersaturated solutions, the surface shows two-dimensional nucleation and growth (σ = 0.1) and three-dimensional crystal growth with tetrahedral structures (σ = 1), where σ is the degree of supersaturation. The atomic-resolution imaging of the BaF{sub 2}(111) surface has been demonstrated in potassium fluoride (KF) and the supersaturated (σ = 0.1 and 1) solutions, wherein atomically flat terraces are shown at least for about 30 min.

  6. Deep frequency modulation interferometry.

    PubMed

    Gerberding, Oliver

    2015-06-01

    Laser interferometry with pm/Hz precision and multi-fringe dynamic range at low frequencies is a core technology to measure the motion of various objects (test masses) in space and ground based experiments for gravitational wave detection and geodesy. Even though available interferometer schemes are well understood, their construction remains complex, often involving, for example, the need to build quasi-monolithic optical benches with dozens of components. In recent years techniques have been investigated that aim to reduce this complexity by combining phase modulation techniques with sophisticated digital readout algorithms. This article presents a new scheme that uses strong laser frequency modulations in combination with the deep phase modulation readout algorithm to construct simpler and easily scalable interferometers.

  7. Quantum systems under frequency modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveri, M. P.; Tuorila, J. A.; Thuneberg, E. V.; Paraoanu, G. S.

    2017-05-01

    We review the physical phenomena that arise when quantum mechanical energy levels are modulated in time. The dynamics resulting from changes in the transition frequency is a problem studied since the early days of quantum mechanics. It has been of constant interest both experimentally and theoretically since, with the simple two-state model providing an inexhaustible source of novel concepts. When the transition frequency of a quantum system is modulated, several phenomena can be observed, such as Landau-Zener-Stückelberg-Majorana interference, motional averaging and narrowing, and the formation of dressed states with the appearance of sidebands in the spectrum. Adiabatic changes result in the accumulation of geometric phases, which can be used to create topological states. In recent years, an exquisite experimental control in the time domain was gained through the parameters entering the Hamiltonian, and high-fidelity readout schemes allowed the state of the system to be monitored non-destructively. These developments were made in the field of quantum devices, especially in superconducting qubits, as a well as in atomic physics, in particular in ultracold gases. As a result of these advances, it became possible to demonstrate many of the fundamental effects that arise in a quantum system when its transition frequencies are modulated. The purpose of this review is to present some of these developments, from two-state atoms and harmonic oscillators to multilevel and many-particle systems.

  8. Quantum systems under frequency modulation.

    PubMed

    Silveri, M P; Tuorila, J A; Thuneberg, E V; Paraoanu, G S

    2017-05-01

    We review the physical phenomena that arise when quantum mechanical energy levels are modulated in time. The dynamics resulting from changes in the transition frequency is a problem studied since the early days of quantum mechanics. It has been of constant interest both experimentally and theoretically since, with the simple two-state model providing an inexhaustible source of novel concepts. When the transition frequency of a quantum system is modulated, several phenomena can be observed, such as Landau-Zener-Stückelberg-Majorana interference, motional averaging and narrowing, and the formation of dressed states with the appearance of sidebands in the spectrum. Adiabatic changes result in the accumulation of geometric phases, which can be used to create topological states. In recent years, an exquisite experimental control in the time domain was gained through the parameters entering the Hamiltonian, and high-fidelity readout schemes allowed the state of the system to be monitored non-destructively. These developments were made in the field of quantum devices, especially in superconducting qubits, as a well as in atomic physics, in particular in ultracold gases. As a result of these advances, it became possible to demonstrate many of the fundamental effects that arise in a quantum system when its transition frequencies are modulated. The purpose of this review is to present some of these developments, from two-state atoms and harmonic oscillators to multilevel and many-particle systems.

  9. Potential-dependent structures investigated at the perchloric acid solution/iodine modified Au(111) interface by electrochemical frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Utsunomiya, Toru; Tatsumi, Shoko; Yokota, Yasuyuki; Fukui, Ken-ichi

    2015-05-21

    Electrochemical frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy (EC-FM-AFM) was adopted to analyze the electrified interface between an iodine modified Au(111) and a perchloric acid solution. Atomic resolution imaging of the electrode was strongly dependent on the electrode potential within the electrochemical window: each iodine atom was imaged in the cathodic range of the electrode potential, but not in the more anodic range where the tip is retracted by approximately 0.1 nm compared to the cathodic case for the same imaging parameters. The frequency shift versus tip-to-sample distance curves obtained in the electric double layer region on the iodine adlayer indicated that the water structuring became weaker at the anodic potential, where the atomic resolution images could not be obtained, and immediately recovered at the original cathodic potential. The reversible hydration structures were consistent with the reversible topographic images and the cyclic voltammetry results. These results indicate that perchlorate anions concentrated at the anodic potential affect the interface hydration without any irreversible changes to the interface under these conditions.

  10. The limit of time resolution in frequency modulation atomic force microscopy by a pump-probe approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Zeno; Spielhofer, Andreas; Miyahara, Yoichi; Grutter, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) routinely achieves structural information in the sub-nm length scale. Measuring time resolved properties on this length scale to understand kinetics at the nm scale remains an elusive goal. We present a general analysis of the lower limit for time resolution in AFM. Our finding suggests that the time resolution in AFM is ultimately limited by the well-known thermal limit of AFM and not as often proposed by the mechanical response time of the force sensing cantilever. We demonstrate a general pump-probe approach using the cantilever as a detector responding to the averaged signal. This method can be applied to any excitation signal such as electrical, thermal, magnetic or optical. Experimental implementation of this method allows us to measure a photocarrier decay time of ˜1 ps in low temperature grown GaAs using a cantilever with a resonant frequency of 280 kHz.

  11. Visualizing the Subsurface of Soft Matter: Simultaneous Topographical Imaging, Depth Modulation, and Compositional Mapping with Triple Frequency Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solares, Santiago; Ebeling, Daniel; Eslami, Babak

    2014-03-01

    Characterization of subsurface morphology and mechanical properties with nanoscale resolution and depth control is of significant interest in soft matter fields like biology and polymer science, where buried structural and compositional features can be important. However, controllably ``feeling'' the subsurface is a challenging task for which the available imaging tools are relatively limited. This presentation describes a trimodal atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging scheme, whereby three eigenmodes of the microcantilever probe are used as separate control ``knobs'' to simultaneously measure the topography, modulate sample indentation by the tip during tip-sample impact, and map compositional contrast, respectively. This method is illustrated through computational simulation and experiments conducted on ultrathin polymer films with embedded glass nanoparticles. By actively increasing the tip-sample indentation using a higher eigenmode of the cantilever, one is able to gradually and controllably reveal glass nanoparticles that are buried tens of nanometers deep under the surface, while still being able to refocus on the surface. The authors gratefully acknowledge support from the U.S. Department of Energy (conceptual method development and experimental work, award DESC-0008115) and the U.S. National Science Foundation (computational work, award CMMI-0841840).

  12. Influence of modulation frequency in rubidium cell frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Audoin, C.; Viennet, J.; Cyr, N.; Vanier, J.

    1983-01-01

    The error signal which is used to control the frequency of the quartz crystal oscillator of a passive rubidium cell frequency standard is considered. The value of the slope of this signal, for an interrogation frequency close to the atomic transition frequency is calculated and measured for various phase (or frequency) modulation waveforms, and for several values of the modulation frequency. A theoretical analysis is made using a model which applies to a system in which the optical pumping rate, the relaxation rates and the RF field are homogeneous. Results are given for sine-wave phase modulation, square-wave frequency modulation and square-wave phase modulation. The influence of the modulation frequency on the slope of the error signal is specified. It is shown that the modulation frequency can be chosen as large as twice the non-saturated full-width at half-maximum without a drastic loss of the sensitivity to an offset of the interrogation frequency from center line, provided that the power saturation factor and the amplitude of modulation are properly adjusted.

  13. Prospects for atomic frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Audoin, C.

    1984-01-01

    The potentialities of different atomic frequency standards which are not yet into field operation, for most of them, but for which preliminary data, obtained in laboratory experiments, give confidence that they may improve greatly the present state of the art are described. The review will mainly cover the following devices: (1) cesium beam frequency standards with optical pumping and detection; (2) optically pumped rubidium cells; (3) magnesium beam; (4) cold hydrogen masers; and (5) traps with stored and cooled ions.

  14. Chaotic frequency modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, Paul A.

    1993-11-01

    Chaotic Frequency Modulation (CFM) provides the basis for a nonlinear communications system with (1) good noise suppression and (2) analogue signal encryption for secure communication links. A practical realization for a CFM transmitter employs an autonomous chaotic relaxation oscillator (ACRO) circuit for use as a chaotic voltage controlled oscillator (CVCO). The ACRO is simple to construct, consisting of only two capacitors, one inductor, a bistable nonlinear element, and a modulated current source. The CVCO period (Pk) is a nonlinear function of the current (mk) and the two previous pulse periods. Demodulation requires the use of at least three successive waveform-periods. Experimental and theoretical studies of the CVCO circuit have shown that (1) the ACRO return maps of pulse periods are embedded in three dimensions, (2) chaotic outputs are difficult to decode without prior knowledge of the circuit parameters, and (3) demodulation may be accomplished with a digital signal processor.

  15. DEMODULATION OF FREQUENCY OR SPACE MODULATED LIGHT.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    LIGHT , DEMODULATION), (*OPTICAL COMMUNICATIONS, FREQUENCY MODULATION), (*FREQUENCY MODULATION, LIGHT ), OPTICAL TRACKING, BEAMS(ELECTROMAGNETIC), DEFLECTION, MICROWAVE FREQUENCY, ELECTRON BEAMS, PHOTOCATHODES

  16. Dissolution Processes at Step Edges of Calcite in Water Investigated by High-Speed Frequency Modulation Atomic Force Microscopy and Simulation.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Kazuki; Tracey, John; Miyazawa, Keisuke; Haapasilta, Ville; Spijker, Peter; Kawagoe, Yuta; Foster, Adam S; Tsukamoto, Katsuo; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2017-07-12

    The microscopic understanding of the crystal growth and dissolution processes have been greatly advanced by the direct imaging of nanoscale step flows by atomic force microscopy (AFM), optical interferometry, and X-ray microscopy. However, one of the most fundamental events that govern their kinetics, namely, atomistic events at the step edges, have not been well understood. In this study, we have developed high-speed frequency modulation AFM (FM-AFM) and enabled true atomic-resolution imaging in liquid at ∼1 s/frame, which is ∼50 times faster than the conventional FM-AFM. With the developed AFM, we have directly imaged subnanometer-scale surface structures around the moving step edges of calcite during its dissolution in water. The obtained images reveal that the transition region with typical width of a few nanometers is formed along the step edges. Building upon insight in previous studies, our simulations suggest that the transition region is most likely to be a Ca(OH)2 monolayer formed as an intermediate state in the dissolution process. On the basis of this finding, we improve our understanding of the atomistic dissolution model of calcite in water. These results open up a wide range of future applications of the high-speed FM-AFM to the studies on various dynamic processes at solid-liquid interfaces with true atomic resolution.

  17. GPS Block IIF Atomic Frequency Standard Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    Frequency stability of GPS constellation for October 2010 (NGA products). REFERENCES [1] “ Rubidium Atomic Frequency Standard (RAFS) GPS...Block IIR Rubidium Atomic Frequency Standard Life Test,” in Proceedings of the 30 th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and...42 nd Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Meeting 181 GPS BLOCK IIF ATOMIC FREQUENCY STANDARD ANALYSIS

  18. Molecular-resolution imaging of lead phthalocyanine molecules by small amplitude frequency modulation atomic force microscopy using second flexural mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichii, Takashi; Hosokawa, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Kei; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2009-03-01

    Lead phthalocyanine molecules on MoS2(0001) substrates were imaged using an ultrahigh-vacuum AFM apparatus equipped with an optical beam deflection (OBD) sensor. The second flexural mode was employed to utilize its high effective spring constant in order to reduce the oscillation amplitude to 0.5 nm without oscillation instability. Submolecular-resolution images were obtained when a shorter cantilever, which had a very high resonance frequency and a low noise equivalent deflection in the OBD sensor, was used.

  19. Observation of Atom-Wave Beats Using a Kerr Modulator for Atom Waves.

    PubMed

    Décamps, B; Gillot, J; Vigué, J; Gauguet, A; Büchner, M

    2016-02-05

    A phase modulation puts the atom in a coherent superposition of quantum states with different kinetic energies. We have detected the interference of such modulated waves at the output of our atom interferometer, and we have observed beats at the difference of the modulation frequencies and its harmonics, in good agreement with theory. The phase modulations were produced by a Kerr phase modulator, i.e., by the propagation of the atom wave in a time-dependent electric field. An extension of this technique to electron interferometry should open the way to very high temporal resolution in electron microscopy.

  20. Ultrasonic Atomization Amount for Different Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Keiji; Honma, Hiroyuki; Xu, Zheng; Asakura, Yoshiyuki; Koda, Shinobu

    2011-07-01

    The mass flow rate of ultrasonic atomization was estimated by measuring the vaporization amount from a bulk liquid with a fountain. The effects of ultrasonic frequency and intensity on the atomization characteristics were investigated when the directivities of the acoustic field from a transducer were almost the same. The sample was distillated water and the ultrasonic frequencies were 0.5, 1.0, and 2.4 MHz. The mass flow rate of ultrasonic atomization increased with increasing ultrasonic intensity and decreasing ultrasonic frequency. The fountain was formed at the liquid surface where the effective value of acoustic pressure was above atmospheric pressure. The fountain height was strongly governed by the acoustic pressure at the liquid surface of the transducer center. At the same ultrasonic intensity, the dependence of ultrasonic frequency on the number of atomized droplets was small. At the same apparent surface area of the fountain, the number of atomized droplets became larger as the ultrasonic frequency increased.

  1. Primary Atomic Frequency Standards at NIST

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, D. B.; Bergquist, J. C.; Bollinger, J. J.; Drullinger, R. E.; Itano, W. M.; Jefferts, S. R.; Lee, W. D.; Meekhof, D.; Parker, T. E.; Walls, F. L.; Wineland, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    The development of atomic frequency standards at NIST is discussed and three of the key frequency-standard technologies of the current era are described. For each of these technologies, the most recent NIST implementation of the particular type of standard is described in greater detail. The best relative standard uncertainty achieved to date for a NIST frequency standard is 1.5×10−15. The uncertainties of the most recent NIST standards are displayed relative to the uncertainties of atomic frequency standards of several other countries. PMID:27500017

  2. Atomic frequency standards for ultra-high-frequency stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, L.; Prestage, J. D.; Dick, G. J.

    1987-01-01

    The general features of the Hg-199(+) trapped-ion frequency standard are outlined and compared to other atomic frequency standards, especially the hydrogen maser. The points discussed are those which make the trapped Hg-199(+) standard attractive: high line Q, reduced sensitivity to external magnetic fields, and simplicity of state selection, among others.

  3. Accurate rubidium atomic fountain frequency standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, Yuri; Marra, Giuseppe

    2011-06-01

    The design, operating parameters and the accuracy evaluation of the NPL Rb atomic fountain are described. The atomic fountain employs a double magneto-optical arrangement that allows a large number of 87Rb atoms to be trapped, a water-cooled temperature-stabilized interrogation region and a high quality factor interrogation cavity. From the uncertainties of measured and calculated systematic frequency shifts, the fractional frequency accuracy is estimated to be 3.7 × 10-16. The fractional frequency stability, limited predominantly by noise in the local oscillator, is measured to be 7 × 10-16 after one day of averaging. Based on the proposed quasi-continuous regime of operation of the fountain, the accuracy of the Rb standard of 5 × 10-17 reachable in two days of averaging is predicted.

  4. Atomizing, continuous, water monitoring module

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Cyril V.; Wise, Marcus B.

    1997-01-01

    A system for continuously analyzing volatile constituents of a liquid is described. The system contains a pump for continuously pumping the liquid to be tested at a predetermined flow rate into an extracting container through a liquid directing tube having an orifice at one end and positioned to direct the liquid into the extracting container at a flow rate sufficient to atomize the liquid within the extracting container. A continuous supply of helium carrier gas at a predetermined flow rate is directed through a tube into the extracting container and co-mingled with the atomized liquid to extract the volatile constituents contained within the atomized liquid. The helium containing the extracted volatile constituents flows out of the extracting container into a mass spectrometer for an analysis of the volatile constituents of the liquid.

  5. Atomizing, continuous, water monitoring module

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, C.V.; Wise, M.B.

    1997-07-08

    A system for continuously analyzing volatile constituents of a liquid is described. The system contains a pump for continuously pumping the liquid to be tested at a predetermined flow rate into an extracting container through a liquid directing tube having an orifice at one end and positioned to direct the liquid into the extracting container at a flow rate sufficient to atomize the liquid within the extracting container. A continuous supply of helium carrier gas at a predetermined flow rate is directed through a tube into the extracting container and co-mingled with the atomized liquid to extract the volatile constituents contained within the atomized liquid. The helium containing the extracted volatile constituents flows out of the extracting container into a mass spectrometer for an analysis of the volatile constituents of the liquid. 3 figs.

  6. Portable atomic frequency standard based on coherent population trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Fan; Yang, Renfu; Nian, Feng; Zhang, Zhenwei; Cui, Yongshun; Zhao, Huan; Wang, Nuanrang; Feng, Keming

    2015-05-01

    In this work, a portable atomic frequency standard based on coherent population trapping is designed and demonstrated. To achieve a portable prototype, in the system, a single transverse mode 795nm VCSEL modulated by a 3.4GHz RF source is used as a pump laser which generates coherent light fields. The pump beams pass through a vapor cell containing atom gas and buffer gas. This vapor cell is surrounded by a magnetic shield and placed inside a solenoid which applies a longitudinal magnetic field to lift the Zeeman energy levels' degeneracy and to separate the resonance signal, which has no first-order magnetic field dependence, from the field-dependent resonances. The electrical control system comprises two control loops. The first one locks the laser wavelength to the minimum of the absorption spectrum; the second one locks the modulation frequency and output standard frequency. Furthermore, we designed the micro physical package and realized the locking of a coherent population trapping atomic frequency standard portable prototype successfully. The short-term frequency stability of the whole system is measured to be 6×10-11 for averaging times of 1s, and reaches 5×10-12 at an averaging time of 1000s.

  7. Atomic frequency standard relativistic Doppler shift experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, H. E.; Reinhardt, V. S.

    1974-01-01

    An experiment has been performed to measure possible space anisotropy as it would effect the frequency of a cesium atomic beam standard clock in a laboratory on earth due to motion relative to external coordinate frames. The cesium frequency was measured as a function of orientation with respect to an atomic hydrogen maser standard. Over a period of 34 days 101 measurements were made. The results are consistent with a conclusion that no general orientation dependance attributable to spacial anisotropy was observed. It is shown that both the airplane clock results, and the null results for the atomic beam clock, are consistent with Einstein general or special relativity, or with the Lorentz transformations alone.

  8. Laser frequency stabilization and shifting by using modulation transfer spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Bing; Wang, Zhao-Ying; Wu, Bin; Xu, Ao-Peng; Wang, Qi-Yu; Xu, Yun-Fei; Lin, Qiang

    2014-10-01

    The stabilizing and shifting of laser frequency are very important for the interaction between the laser and atoms. The modulation transfer spectroscopy for the 87Rb atom with D2 line transition F = 2 → F' = 3 is used for stabilizing and shifting the frequency of the external cavity grating feedback diode laser. The resonant phase modulator with electro—optical effect is used to generate frequency sideband to lock the laser frequency. In the locking scheme, circularly polarized pump- and probe-beams are used. By optimizing the temperature of the vapor, the pump- and probe-beam intensity, the laser linewidth of 280 kHz is obtained. Furthermore, the magnetic field generated by a solenoid is added into the system. Therefore the system can achieve the frequency locking at any point in a range of hundreds of megahertz frequency shifting with very low power loss.

  9. Frequency Tunable Atomic Magnetometer based on an Atom Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narducci, Frank; Braje, Danielle; Davis, Jon; Adler, Charles

    2013-05-01

    We theoretically and experimentally study a magnetically sensitive atom interferometer. Using a stationary atom cloud, a time-domain interferometer is formed on magnetically sensitive states of 85Rb. We show that the temporal spacing of a Raman pulse sequence controls the frequency of the magnetic field detected by the interferometer, thereby potentially eliminating unwanted noise and optimizing detection in frequency bands of interest. We focus on a standard π / 2 - π - π / 2 sequence and explore the utility of multiple π pulses. The Lincoln Laboratory portion of this work is sponsored by the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research & Engineering under Air Force Contract #FA8721-05-C-0002. Opinions, interpretations, conclusions and recommendations are those of the authors and are not necessarily endorsed by the United States Government. This work at NavAir was supported by the Office of Naval Research and by the NavAir Chief Technology Office.

  10. Frequency modulations in the speech signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonov, A. S.; Makarov, I. S.; Sorokin, V. N.

    2009-11-01

    The paper examines physical mechanisms of frequency modulations in acoustics of the vocal tract and methods of estimation of these modulations in the speech signal. It has been found that vibrations of the tract walls make a negligibly small effect on modulations of its resonance frequencies. The model of the process of speech formation with account for the subglottal cavity shows that a change in boundary conditions at the open glottis produces noticeable variations in resonance frequencies. Along with this type of modulations, modulations determined by the shape of the source of excitation also arise in the speech signal. They substantially depend on the ratio of the frequency of the fundamental tone to the resonance frequency and of the parameters of methods estimating modulations and methods of analysis of the speech signal. Overall, this may sometimes cause unstable and unpredictable modulations of estimated formant frequencies in the speech signal.

  11. Three-axis atomic magnetometer based on spin precession modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H. C.; Dong, H. F. Hu, X. Y.; Chen, L.; Gao, Y.

    2015-11-02

    We demonstrate a three-axis atomic magnetometer with one intensity-modulated pump beam and one orthogonal probe beam. The main field component is measured using the resonance of the pumping light, while the transverse field components are measured simultaneously using the optical rotation of the probe beam modulated by the spin precession. It is an all-optical magnetometer without using any modulation field or radio frequency field. Magnetic field sensitivity of 0.8 pT/Hz{sup 1∕2} is achieved under a bias field of 2 μT.

  12. Frequency Comb Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossel, Kevin C.; Sinclair, Laura C.; Coffey, Tyler; Cornell, Eric; Ye, Jun

    2011-06-01

    We have developed a novel technique for rapid ion-sensitive spectroscopy over a broad spectral bandwidth by combining the high sensitivity of velocity modulation spectroscopy (VMS) with the parallel nature and high frequency accuracy of cavity-enhanced direct frequency comb spectroscopy. Prior to this research, no techniques have been capable of high sensitivity velocity modulation spectroscopy on every parallel detection channel over such a broad spectral range. We have demonstrated the power of this technique by measuring the A^2Π_u - X^2Σ_g^+ (4,2) band of N_2^+ at 830 nm with an absorption sensitivity of 1×10-6 for each of 1500 simultaneous measurement channels spanning 150 Cm-1. A densely sampled spectrum consisting of interleaved measurements to achieve 75 MHz spacing is acquired in under an hour. This technique is ideally suited for high resolution survey spectroscopy of molecular ions with applications including chemical physics, astrochemistry, and precision measurement. Currently, this system is being used to map the electronic transitions of HfF^+ for the JILA electron electric dipole moment (eEDM) experiment. The JILA eEDM experiment uses trapped molecular ions to significantly increase the coherence time of the measurement in addition to utilizing the strong electric field enhancement available from molecules. Previous theoretical work has shown that the metastable ^3Δ_1 state in HfF^+ and ThF^+ provides high sensitivity to the eEDM and good cancellation of systematic effects; however, the electronic level structure of these species have not previously been measured, and the theoretical uncertainties are hundreds to thousands of wavenumbers. This necessitates broad-bandwidth, high-resolution survey spectroscopy provided by frequency comb VMS in the 700-900 nm spectral window. F. Adler, M. J. Thorpe, K. C. Cossel, and J. Ye. Annu. Rev. Anal. Chem. 3, 175-205 (2010) A. E. Leanhardt, et. al. arXiv:1008.2997v2 E. Meyer, J. L. Bohn, and M. P. Deskevich

  13. Frequency modulation detection in cochlear implant subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongbin; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2004-10-01

    Frequency modulation (FM) detection was investigated in acoustic and electric hearing to characterize cochlear-implant subjects' ability to detect dynamic frequency changes and to assess the relative contributions of temporal and spectral cues to frequency processing. Difference limens were measured for frequency upward sweeps, downward sweeps, and sinusoidal FM as a function of standard frequency and modulation rate. In electric hearing, factors including electrode position and stimulation level were also studied. Electric hearing data showed that the difference limen increased monotonically as a function of standard frequency regardless of the modulation type, the modulation rate, the electrode position, and the stimulation level. In contrast, acoustic hearing data showed that the difference limen was nearly a constant as a function of standard frequency. This difference was interpreted to mean that temporal cues are used only at low standard frequencies and at low modulation rates. At higher standard frequencies and modulation rates, the reliance on the place cue is increased, accounting for the better performance in acoustic hearing than for electric hearing with single-electrode stimulation. The present data suggest a speech processing strategy that encodes slow frequency changes using lower stimulation rates than those typically employed by contemporary cochlear-implant speech processors. .

  14. Research of frequency modulation to amplitude modulation with multi-frequency modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuliang; Zhan, Sui; Geng, Yuanchao; Liu, Lanqin; Xu, Lixin; Ming, Hai

    2013-12-01

    For better performance of laser coupling in inertial confinement fusion (ICF), beam shaping of the focus spot is required. Among all the beam smoothing methods, the multi frequency modulation smoothing by spectral dispersion (MultiFM-SSD) proposed by LLE has the advantages of the faster smoothing and better operability. Strong frequency modulation to amplitude modulation conversion(FM-to-AM) will take place because of the complex spectrum imposed by the multi frequency modulators applied in the Multi FM-SSD method. The FM-to-AM effect is studied with numerical simulation including the polarization mode dispersion and group velocity dispersion. The results reveal that the modulation frequencies and bandwidths of multi modulators will influence the contrast degree of the FM-to-AM effect. The compensation of the FM-to-AM with arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) is also numerically simulated. The FM-to-AM effect is effectively suppressed, i.e. the non-uniformity of the pulse decreases substantially, by applying multiple intensity and phase compensation (the compensation function is obtained via G-S algorithm).

  15. Efficiency optimization for atomic frequency comb storage

    SciTech Connect

    Bonarota, M.; Ruggiero, J.; Le Goueet, J.-L.; Chaneliere, T.

    2010-03-15

    We study the efficiency of the atomic frequency comb storage protocol. We show that for a given optical depth, the preparation procedure can be optimize to significantly improve the retrieval. Our prediction is well supported by the experimental implementation of the protocol in a Tm{sup 3+}:YAG crystal. We observe a net gain in efficiency from 10 to 17% by applying the optimized preparation procedure. In the perspective of high bandwidth storage, we investigate the protocol under different magnetic fields. We analyze the effect of the Zeeman and superhyperfine interaction.

  16. Nonlinear magneto-optical rotation with frequency-modulated light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimball, Derek Forrest

    We demonstrate a magnetometric technique suitable for precision measurements of fields ranging from the sub-microgauss level to above the Earth field. It is based on resonant nonlinear magneto-optical rotation (NMOR) caused by alkali atoms contained in a vapor cell with anti-relaxation (paraffin) wall coating. The physical mechanisms causing NMOR are discussed in detail, with particular attention paid to the role of optically induced atomic polarization---responsible for the ultra-narrow (˜1 Hz) NMOR resonances we employ for magnetometric measurements. Linearly polarized, frequency-modulated laser light is used for optical pumping and probing. If the time-dependent optical rotation is measured at the first harmonic of the modulation frequency Om, ultra-narrow resonances are observed at near-zero magnetic fields, and at fields where the Larmor frequency OL is an integer multiple of the light modulation frequency. We demonstrate a sensitivity of 5 x 10-10G/ Hz and show that the projected magnetometric sensitivity of the technique can exceed 10-11G/ Hz . The technique of nonlinear magneto-optical rotation with frequency-modulated light (FM NMOR) allows selective generation and study of atomic polarization moments of up to the highest rank kappa = 2F possible for a quantum state with total angular momentum F. Various polarization moments are distinguished by the periodicity of light-polarization rotation induced by the atoms during Larmor precession and exhibit distinct light-intensity and frequency dependences. We study the FM NMOR signals from various optically induced polarization moments of Rb atoms. We also report on the use of an atomic magnetometer based on FM NMOR to detect nuclear magnetization of xenon gas. The magnetization of a spin-exchange-polarized xenon sample, prepared remotely to the detection apparatus, is measured with an atomic sensor. An average magnetic field of ˜10 nG induced by the xenon sample on the atomic sensor is detected with signal

  17. Effects of hydrogen atom spin exchange collisions on atomic hydrogen maser oscillation frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crampton, S. B.

    1979-01-01

    Frequency shifts due to collisions between hydrogen atoms in an atomic hydrogen maser frequency standard are studied. Investigations of frequency shifts proportional to the spin exchange frequency shift cross section and those proportional to the duration of exchange collisions are discussed. The feasibility of operating a hydrogen frequency standard at liquid helium temperatures is examined.

  18. Device for frequency modulation of a laser output spectrum

    DOEpatents

    Beene, James R.; Bemis, Jr., Curtis E.

    1986-01-01

    A device is provided for fast frequency modulating the output spectrum of multimode lasers and single frequency lasers that are not actively stabilized. A piezoelectric transducer attached to a laser cavity mirror is driven in an unconventional manner to excite resonance vibration of the transducer to rapidly, cyclicly change the laser cavity length. The result is a cyclic sweeping of the output wavelength sufficient to fill the gaps in the laser output frequency spectrum. When such a laser is used to excite atoms or molecules, complete absorption line coverage is made possible.

  19. Device for frequency modulation of a laser output spectrum

    DOEpatents

    Beene, J.R.; Bemis, C.E. Jr.

    1984-07-17

    A device is provided for fast frequency modulating the output spectrum of multimode lasers and single frequency lasers that are not actively stabilized. A piezoelectric transducer attached to a laser cavity mirror is driven in an unconventional manner to excite resonance vibration of the tranducer to rapidly, cyclicly change the laser cavity length. The result is a cyclic sweeping of the output wavelength sufficient to fill the gaps in the laser output frequency spectrum. When a laser is used to excite atoms or molecules, complete absorption line coverage is made possible.

  20. Interferometer with two-frequency phase modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Arkhipov, M.G.; Seregin, A.G.; Etsin, I.S.

    1994-07-01

    An interference method of two-frequency phase modulation is studied experimentally and theoretically as applied to displacement measurement and wave front control. Analysis is performed of errors resulting from shot noise, hysteresis of the piezoceramic modulator, phase shift between modulating oscillations, and scatter of their amplitudes. It is shown that a phase measurement error of 2{pi}/180 can be obtained in actual conditions. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Laser frequency modulator for modulating a laser cavity

    DOEpatents

    Erbert, Gaylen V.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention relates to a laser frequency modulator for modulating a laser cavity. It is known in the prior art to utilize a PZT (piezoelectric transducer) element in combination with a mirror to change the cavity length of a laser cavity (which changes the laser frequency). Using a PZT element to drive the mirror directly is adequate at frequencies below 10 kHz. However, in high frequency applications (100 kHz and higher) PZT elements alone do not provide a sufficient change in the cavity length. The present invention utilizes an ultrasonic concentrator with a PZT element and mirror to provide modulation of the laser cavity. With an ultrasonic concentrator, the mirror element at the end of a laser cavity can move at larger amplitudes and higher frequencies.

  2. Detection of combined frequency and amplitude modulation.

    PubMed

    Moore, B C; Sek, A

    1992-12-01

    This article is concerned with the detection of mixed modulation (MM), i.e., simultaneously occurring amplitude modulation (AM) and frequency modulation (FM). In experiment 1, an adaptive two-alternative forced-choice task was used to determine thresholds for detecting AM alone. Then, thresholds for detecting FM were determined for stimuli which had a fixed amount of AM in the signal interval only. The amount of AM was always less than the threshold for detecting AM alone. The FM thresholds depended significantly on the magnitude of the coexisting AM. For low modulation rates (4, 16, and 64 Hz), the FM thresholds did not depend significantly on the relative phase of modulation for the FM and AM. For a high modulation rate (256 Hz) strong effects of modulator phase were observed. These phase effects are as predicted by the model proposed by Hartmann and Hnath [Acustica 50, 297-312 (1982)], which assumes that detection of modulation at modulation frequencies higher than the critical modulation frequency is based on detection of the lower sideband in the modulated signal's spectrum. In the second experiment, psychometric functions were measured for the detection of AM alone and FM alone, using modulation rates of 4 and 16 Hz. Results showed that, for each type of modulation, d' is approximately a linear function of the square of the modulation index. Application of this finding to the results of experiment 1 suggested that, at low modulation rates, FM and AM are not detected by completely independent mechanisms. In the third experiment, psychometric functions were again measured for the detection of AM alone and FM alone, using a 10-Hz modulation rate. Detectability was then measured for combined AM and FM, with modulation depths selected so that each type of modulation would be equally detectable if presented alone. Significant effects of relative modulator phase were found when detectability was relatively high. These effects were not correctly predicted by either a

  3. Parametric modulation of an atomic magnetometer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhimin; Wakai, Ronald T.; Walker, Thad G.

    2012-01-01

    The authors report on a rubidium atomic magnetometer designed for use in a shielded environment. Operating in the spin-exchange relaxation-free regime, the magnetometer utilizes parametric modulation of the z-magnetic field to suppress noise associated with airflow through the oven and to simultaneously detect x- and y-field components, using a single probe beam, with minimal loss of sensitivity and bandwidth. A white noise level of 60 fT/(Hz)1/2 was achieved. PMID:22942436

  4. Modulated Source Interferometry with Combined Amplitude and Frequency Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez, Roman C. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An improved interferometer is produced by modifying a conventional interferometer to include amplitude and/or frequency modulation of a coherent light source at radio or higher frequencies. The phase of the modulation signal can be detected in an interfering beam from an interferometer and can be used to determine the actual optical phase of the beam. As such, this improvement can be adapted to virtually any two-beam interferometer, including: Michelson, Mach-Zehnder, and Sagnac interferometers. The use of an amplitude modulated coherent tight source results in an interferometer that combines the wide range advantages of coherent interferometry with the precise distance measurement advantages of white light interferometry.

  5. On the frequency modulation of VLF emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharova, M.; Lyatsky, W.

    1996-11-01

    The VLF-wave frequency modulation efficiency as a function of magnetosphere plasma parameters under the weak pitch-angle diffusion regime is studied. The study is based on the VLF growth-rate modulation both in the magnetosphere equatorial plane and after integrating along the magnetic field line. It is shown that for the typical quiet magnetosphere plasma parameters the relative shift of the maximum intensity frequency m/m is approximately equal to relative disturbance of the magnetic field in the magnetosphere equatorial plane, but may exceed it when both electron temperature anisotropy and the parameter ∥ are small; here is the total-to-warm electron content ratio and ∥ is the electron parallel beta. It is also shown that relative shift of the maximum intensity frequency m/m after integrating along the field line is not less than 50% from its value at the equatorial plane, which allows the use of the equatorial-plasma-parameter data to estimate the VLF frequency modulation on the ground. The upper cut-off frequency modulation is considered as well. The calculated theoretical sonagrams show that this frequency modulation may be related to the non-dispersive and to the inverted-V'' structures of QP hiss. Acknowledgements. The work done by P. Henelius and E. Vilenius in programme development is gratefully acknowledged. Topical Editor D. Alcayde thanks I. Pryse and A. Vallance-Jones for their help in evaluating this paper.

  6. Low-frequency and high-frequency all-fiber modulators based on birefringence modulation.

    PubMed

    Boyain, A R; Martínez-León, L; Cruz, J L; Diez, A; Andrés, M V

    1999-10-20

    In-line optical modulators with low insertion losses and high maximum optical powers are required for Q switching and cavity dumping of fiber lasers as well as for nonlinear optical-fiber experiments. We report the design of polarimetric all-fiber modulators based on optical-fiber birefringence modulation combined with an all-fiber polarizer. Birefringence modulation involves a piezoelectric ceramic tube. This simple technique permits efficient low-frequency and high-frequency harmonic modulation, up to the megahertz range, as well as modulation of pulses shorter than 1 micros.

  7. Spectral frequency modulation in vowel identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chang; Eddins, David A.

    2004-05-01

    Psychophysical and physiological studies have demonstrated selectivity for spectral envelope frequency (also termed spatial frequency) in the auditory system, suggesting that auditory perception of complex sounds might be based on spectral envelope channels. The present study investigated relative contribution of different spatial frequencies to vowel identification. Twelve naturally-spoken American-English vowels were presented at 70 dB SPL. In different conditions, vowel stimuli were subjected to various degrees of low-pass and high-pass filtering in the spatial frequency domain, in effect, altering their spectra. Identification performance for the vowels with and without spatial frequency filtering was estimated for normal-hearing listeners. Results indicated that vowel identification performance was progressively degraded as spatial-frequency components were removed. Results will be interpreted in terms of spatial frequency regions most important to specific vowel categories. The specificity and universality of spatial frequency modulations in vowel identification across different vowel categories will be discussed.

  8. Reducing microwave absorption with fast frequency modulation.

    PubMed

    Qin, Juehang; Hubler, A

    2017-05-01

    We study the response of a two-level quantum system to a chirp signal, using both numerical and analytical methods. The numerical method is based on numerical solutions of the Schrödinger solution of the two-level system, while the analytical method is based on an approximate solution of the same equations. We find that when two-level systems are perturbed by a chirp signal, the peak population of the initially unpopulated state exhibits a high sensitivity to frequency modulation rate. We also find that the aforementioned sensitivity depends on the strength of the forcing, and weaker forcings result in a higher sensitivity, where the frequency modulation rate required to produce the same reduction in peak population would be lower. We discuss potential applications of this result in the field of microwave power transmission, as it shows applying fast frequency modulation to transmitted microwaves used for power transmission could decrease unintended absorption of microwaves by organic tissue.

  9. Reducing microwave absorption with fast frequency modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Juehang; Hubler, A.

    2017-05-01

    We study the response of a two-level quantum system to a chirp signal, using both numerical and analytical methods. The numerical method is based on numerical solutions of the Schrödinger solution of the two-level system, while the analytical method is based on an approximate solution of the same equations. We find that when two-level systems are perturbed by a chirp signal, the peak population of the initially unpopulated state exhibits a high sensitivity to frequency modulation rate. We also find that the aforementioned sensitivity depends on the strength of the forcing, and weaker forcings result in a higher sensitivity, where the frequency modulation rate required to produce the same reduction in peak population would be lower. We discuss potential applications of this result in the field of microwave power transmission, as it shows applying fast frequency modulation to transmitted microwaves used for power transmission could decrease unintended absorption of microwaves by organic tissue.

  10. CAFS: A Cesium Atomic Frequency Standard for GPS block IIR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisnia, Jeffry A.

    1993-01-01

    Kernco, Inc. was selected to design the Cesium Atomic Frequency Standards (CAFS) for the GPS Block IIR NAVSTAR satellites. These spacecraft are scheduled to be launched in the mid-1990's to replenish and upgrade the existing constellation of Global Positioning System satellites. The Block IIR CAFS output frequency is 13.4003378 MHz, the 686th submultiple of the cesium atomic resonance frequency. Using an integer submultiple simplifies the design of the atomic frequency standard's rf multiplier circuits, eliminating the secondary frequency synthesizer needed in previous designs. The GPS Block IIR CAFS design, particularly the improvements made on our earlier Block II design is described. Test results are included.

  11. Effective Atom-Molecule Conversions Using Radio Frequency Fields.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yijue; Pérez-Ríos, Jesús; Greene, Chris H

    2016-11-18

    The present study is inspired by the Wieman group experiment [Phys. Rev. Lett. 2005, 95, 190404], in which they use a slow modulated magnetic field to effectively transfer rubidium atoms into cold molecules near a Feshbach resonance. We develop a time-dependent collision theory based on two channel model potentials to study the atom-molecule population transfer induced by a single-color radio frequency field in an ultracold (87) Rb gas. Wave-packet dynamical simulations allow an investigation of both bound-bound transitions and free-bound transitions. The effects of temperature, detuning and the RF amplitude on the population transfer are discussed in detail. Some of our simulations suggest that oscillatory atom-molecule conversion could originate from the long coherence time of the wave packet. This coherence time is unusually long in ultracold gases because the collision energy is typically quite well-defined. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Optical Frequency Comb Spectroscopy of Rare Earth Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swiatlowski, Jerlyn; Palm, Christopher; Joshi, Trinity; Montcrieffe, Caitlin; Jackson Kimball, Derek

    2013-05-01

    We discuss progress in our experimental program to employ optical-frequency-comb-based spectroscopy to understand the complex spectra of rare-earth atoms. We plan to carry out systematic measurements of atomic transitions in rare-earth atoms to elucidate the energy level structure and term assignment and determine presently unknown atomic state parameters. This spectroscopic information is important in view of the increasing interest in rare-earth atoms for atomic frequency standards, in astrophysical investigations of chemically peculiar stars, and in tests of fundamental physics (tests of parity and time-reversal invariance, searches for time variation of fundamental constants, etc.). We are presently studying the use of hollow cathode lamps as atomic sources for two-photon frequency comb spectroscopy. Supported by the National Science Foundation under grant PHY-0958749.

  13. Improved atomic resonance gas cell for use in frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huggett, G. R.

    1968-01-01

    Atomic resonance gas cell maintains a stable operating frequency in the presence of pressure fluctuations in the ambient atmosphere. The new cell includes an envelope which is transparent to radiation in the optical region and to microwave energy at the atomic resonance frequency of the alkali-metal vapor within the envelope.

  14. Note: A four-pass acousto-optic modulator system for laser cooling of sodium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bo; Wang, Dajun

    2017-07-01

    We present a four-pass acousto-optic modulator (AOM) system for providing the repumping light for laser cooling of sodium atoms. With only one 400 MHz AOM, we achieve a tunable laser frequency shift around 1.6 GHz with total efficiency up to 30%. This setup provides an alternative over conventional methods to generate a sodium repumping light using more expensive high frequency AOMs or electro-optical modulators (EOMs) in the GHz domain. This compact and reliable setup can be easily adapted to other frequencies and may find applications in laser spectroscopy, laser cooling and trapping, and coherent manipulation of atomic quantum states.

  15. Note: A four-pass acousto-optic modulator system for laser cooling of sodium atoms.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bo; Wang, Dajun

    2017-07-01

    We present a four-pass acousto-optic modulator (AOM) system for providing the repumping light for laser cooling of sodium atoms. With only one 400 MHz AOM, we achieve a tunable laser frequency shift around 1.6 GHz with total efficiency up to 30%. This setup provides an alternative over conventional methods to generate a sodium repumping light using more expensive high frequency AOMs or electro-optical modulators (EOMs) in the GHz domain. This compact and reliable setup can be easily adapted to other frequencies and may find applications in laser spectroscopy, laser cooling and trapping, and coherent manipulation of atomic quantum states.

  16. Radio Frequency Circuitry for Atomic Force Microscopy up to 100 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Dai; Kawai, Shigeki; Kawakatsu, Hideki

    2003-12-01

    We developed a control circuitry for non-contact atomic force microscopy which generates a self-excited vibration in a cantilever with a frequency up to 100 MHz, and detects its frequency modulation by a novel frequency demodulation technique. The circuitry was tested by applying it to an AFM whose tip vibration was parallel to sample surface. While the self-excitation loop has only a simple superheterodyne configuration, the excited vibration was as stable as we could obtain a topographic image of Si (111)-(7×7) surface with frequency feedback. The frequency demodulator is based on IQ (in-phase and quadrature-phase) direct frequency conversion to zero Hz intermediate frequency and operations including differentiations, multiplications and a subtraction between these signals. It was implemented as an analog circuit. We obtained an atomic step image in graphite by using this demodulator in frequency regulation feedback.

  17. Cerebellar modules operate at different frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haibo; Lin, Zhanmin; Voges, Kai; Ju, Chiheng; Gao, Zhenyu; Bosman, Laurens WJ; Ruigrok, Tom JH; Hoebeek, Freek E

    2014-01-01

    Due to the uniform cyto-architecture of the cerebellar cortex, its overall physiological characteristics have traditionally been considered to be homogeneous. In this study, we show in awake mice at rest that spiking activity of Purkinje cells, the sole output cells of the cerebellar cortex, differs between cerebellar modules and correlates with their expression of the glycolytic enzyme aldolase C or zebrin. Simple spike and complex spike frequencies were significantly higher in Purkinje cells located in zebrin-negative than zebrin-positive modules. The difference in simple spike frequency persisted when the synaptic input to, but not intrinsic activity of, Purkinje cells was manipulated. Blocking TRPC3, the effector channel of a cascade of proteins that have zebrin-like distribution patterns, attenuated the simple spike frequency difference. Our results indicate that zebrin-discriminated cerebellar modules operate at different frequencies, which depend on activation of TRPC3, and that this property is relevant for all cerebellar functions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02536.001 PMID:24843004

  18. Frequency modulation of semiconductor disk laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Zolotovskii, I O; Korobko, D A; Okhotnikov, O G

    2015-07-31

    A numerical model is constructed for a semiconductor disk laser mode-locked by a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM), and the effect that the phase modulation caused by gain and absorption saturation in the semiconductor has on pulse generation is examined. The results demonstrate that, in a laser cavity with sufficient second-order dispersion, alternating-sign frequency modulation of pulses can be compensated for. We also examine a model for tuning the dispersion in the cavity of a disk laser using a Gires–Tournois interferometer with limited thirdorder dispersion. (control of radiation parameters)

  19. JPL Ultrastable Trapped Ion Atomic Frequency Standards.

    PubMed

    Burt, Eric A; Yi, Lin; Tucker, Blake; Hamell, Robert; Tjoelker, Robert L

    2016-07-01

    Recently, room temperature trapped ion atomic clock development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has focused on three directions: 1) ultrastable atomic clocks, usually for terrestrial applications emphasizing ultimate stability performance and autonomous timekeeping; 2) new atomic clock technology for space flight applications that require strict adherence to size, weight, and power requirements; and 3) miniature clocks. In this paper, we concentrate on the first direction and present a design and the initial results from a new ultrastable clock referred to as L10 that achieves a short-term stability of 4.5 ×10(-14)/τ(1/2) and an initial measurement of no significant drift with an uncertainty of 2.4 ×10(-16) /day over a two-week period.

  20. Detecting deception via eyeblink frequency modulation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    To assess the efficacy of using eyeblink frequency modulation to detect deception about a third party, 32 participants were sent on a mission to deliver a package to an interviewer. 17 of the participants lied to the interviewer about the details of their mock mission and 15 responded truthfully. During the interview, eyeblink frequency data were collected via electromyography and recorded video. Liars displayed eyeblink frequency suppression while lying, while truth tellers exhibited an increase in eyeblink frequency during the mission relevant questioning period. The compensatory flurry of eyeblinks following deception observed in previous studies was absent in the present study. A discriminant function using eyeblink suppression to predict lying correctly classified 81.3% of cases, with a sensitivity of 88.2% and a specificity of 73.3%. This technique, yielding a reasonable sensitivity, shows promise for future testing as, unlike polygraph, it is compatible with distance technology. PMID:24688844

  1. Ultrasensitive detection of atmospheric trace gases using frequency modulation spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, David E.

    1986-01-01

    Frequency modulation (FM) spectroscopy is a new technique that promises to significantly extend the state-of-the-art in point detection of atmospheric trace gases. FM spectroscopy is essentially a balanced bridge optical heterodyne approach in which a small optical absorption or dispersion from an atomic or molecular species of interest generates an easily detected radio frequency (RF) signal. This signal can be monitored using standard RF signal processing techniques and is, in principle, limited only by the shot noise generated in the photodetector by the laser source employed. The use of very high modulation frequencies which exceed the spectral width of the probed absorption line distinguishes this technique from the well-known derivative spectroscopy which makes use of low (kHz) modulation frequencies. FM spectroscopy was recently extended to the 10 micron infrared (IR) spectral region where numerous polyatomic molecules exhibit characteristic vibrational-rotational bands. In conjunction with tunable semiconductor diode lasers, the quantum-noise-limited sensitivity of the technique should allow for the detection of absorptions as small as .00000001 in the IR spectral region. This sensitivity would allow for the detection of H2O2 at concentrations as low as 1 pptv with an integration time of 10 seconds.

  2. Speech recognition with amplitude and frequency modulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Fan-Gang; Nie, Kaibao; Stickney, Ginger S.; Kong, Ying-Yee; Vongphoe, Michael; Bhargave, Ashish; Wei, Chaogang; Cao, Keli

    2005-02-01

    Amplitude modulation (AM) and frequency modulation (FM) are commonly used in communication, but their relative contributions to speech recognition have not been fully explored. To bridge this gap, we derived slowly varying AM and FM from speech sounds and conducted listening tests using stimuli with different modulations in normal-hearing and cochlear-implant subjects. We found that although AM from a limited number of spectral bands may be sufficient for speech recognition in quiet, FM significantly enhances speech recognition in noise, as well as speaker and tone recognition. Additional speech reception threshold measures revealed that FM is particularly critical for speech recognition with a competing voice and is independent of spectral resolution and similarity. These results suggest that AM and FM provide independent yet complementary contributions to support robust speech recognition under realistic listening situations. Encoding FM may improve auditory scene analysis, cochlear-implant, and audiocoding performance. auditory analysis | cochlear implant | neural code | phase | scene analysis

  3. Experimental demonstration of deep frequency modulation interferometry.

    PubMed

    Isleif, Katharina-Sophie; Gerberding, Oliver; Schwarze, Thomas S; Mehmet, Moritz; Heinzel, Gerhard; Cervantes, Felipe Guzmán

    2016-01-25

    Experiments for space and ground-based gravitational wave detectors often require a large dynamic range interferometric position readout of test masses with 1 pm/√Hz precision over long time scales. Heterodyne interferometer schemes that achieve such precisions are available, but they require complex optical set-ups, limiting their scalability for multiple channels. This article presents the first experimental results on deep frequency modulation interferometry, a new technique that combines sinusoidal laser frequency modulation in unequal arm length interferometers with a non-linear fit algorithm. We have tested the technique in a Michelson and a Mach-Zehnder Interferometer topology, respectively, demonstrated continuous phase tracking of a moving mirror and achieved a performance equivalent to a displacement sensitivity of 250 pm/Hz at 1 mHz between the phase measurements of two photodetectors monitoring the same optical signal. By performing time series fitting of the extracted interference signals, we measured that the linearity of the laser frequency modulation is on the order of 2% for the laser source used.

  4. An amplitude modulated radio frequency plasma generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Fan; Li, Xiaoping; Liu, Yanming; Liu, Donglin; Yang, Min; Xie, Kai; Yao, Bo

    2017-04-01

    A glow discharge plasma generator and diagnostic system has been developed to study the effects of rapidly variable plasmas on electromagnetic wave propagation, mimicking the plasma sheath conditions encountered in space vehicle reentry. The plasma chamber is 400 mm in diameter and 240 mm in length, with a 300-mm-diameter unobstructed clear aperture. Electron densities produced are in the mid 1010 electrons/cm3. An 800 W radio frequency (RF) generator is capacitively coupled through an RF matcher to an internally cooled stainless steel electrode to form the plasma. The RF power is amplitude modulated by a waveform generator that operates at different frequencies. The resulting plasma contains electron density modulations caused by the varying power levels. A 10 GHz microwave horn antenna pair situated on opposite sides of the chamber serves as the source and detector of probe radiation. The microwave power feed to the source horn is split and one portion is sent directly to a high-speed recording oscilloscope. On mixing this with the signal from the pickup horn antenna, the plasma-induced phase shift between the two signals gives the path-integrated electron density with its complete time dependent variation. Care is taken to avoid microwave reflections and extensive shielding is in place to minimize electronic pickup. Data clearly show the low frequency modulation of the electron density as well as higher harmonics and plasma fluctuations.

  5. A frequency selective atom interferometer magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braje, D. A.; DeSavage, S. A.; Adler, C. L.; Davis, J. P.; Narducci, F. A.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the magnetic-field frequency selectivity of a time-domain interferometer based on the number and timing of intermediate ? pulses. We theoretically show that by adjusting the number of ? pulses and the ?-pulse timing, we can control the frequency selectivity of the interferometer to time varying and DC magnetic fields. We present experimental data demonstrating increased coherence time due to bandwidth filtering with the inclusion of a ? pulse between the initial and final ? pulses, which mitigates sensitivity to low frequency magnetic fields.

  6. Velocity-modulation atomization of liquid jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dressler, John L.

    1994-01-01

    A novel atomizer based on high-amplitude velocity atomization has been developed. Presently, the most common methods of atomization can use only the Rayleigh instability of a liquid cylinder and the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability of a liquid sheet. Our atomizer is capable of atomizing liquid jets by the excitation and destabilization of many other higher-order modes of surface deformation. The potential benefits of this sprayer are more uniform fuel air mixtures, faster fuel-air mixing, extended flow ranges for commercial nozzles, and the reduction of nozzle plugging by producing small drops from large nozzles.

  7. Wideband laser locking to an atomic reference with modulation transfer spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Negnevitsky, V; Turner, L D

    2013-02-11

    We demonstrate that conventional modulated spectroscopy apparatus, used for laser frequency stabilization in many atomic physics laboratories, can be enhanced to provide a wideband lock delivering deep suppression of frequency noise across the acoustic range. Using an acousto-optic modulator driven with an agile oscillator, we show that wideband frequency modulation of the pump laser in modulation transfer spectroscopy produces the unique single lock-point spectrum previously demonstrated with electro-optic phase modulation. We achieve a laser lock with 100 kHz feedback bandwidth, limited by our laser control electronics. This bandwidth is sufficient to reduce frequency noise by 30 dB across the acoustic range and narrows the imputed linewidth by a factor of five.

  8. Transient high-frequency ultrasonic water atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreras, F.; Amaveda, H.; Lozano, A.

    2002-06-01

    An experimental study was performed to improve the understanding of the characteristics of ultrasonic water atomization when excited with waves in the MHz range. In the present experiments, small volumes of water were atomized, observing the temporal evolution of the process. Typical diameters of the resulting droplets are of the order of a few microns. To visualize them, images were acquired with very high magnification. Appropriate lenses were used to enable high resolution at a distance from the flow. Droplet size distributions were also calculated with a Malvern diffractometer. Droplet exit velocity was measured using particle image velocimetry. It was noticeable that, as the remaining liquid mass deposited over the ultrasonic transducer decreased, the atomization characteristics changed, and a second peak of larger droplets appeared in the size distribution function. This phenomenon is related to the change in the curvature of the liquid surface. Although results are not conclusive, it appears that, under the conditions in this study, some observations about droplet formation are better described by cavitation phenomena rather than by the simplified surface wave theory usually invoked to explain these processes.

  9. An optical frequency standard based on ultracold magnesium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, A. N.; Bonert, A. E.; Brazhnikov, D. V.; Prudnikov, O. N.; Tropnikov, M. A.; Kuznetsov, S. A.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Bagayev, S. N.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the recent experimental results on development of an optical frequency standard based on ultra cold magnesium atoms with relative frequency uncertainty and long term stability at the level of Δv/v <10‑16. We stabilized the frequency of our clock laser system at 655 THz to narrow Ramsey fringes in a time separated laser fields interacting with cooled Mg atoms localized in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). The intercombination line 1S0→3P1 was used as the reference for frequency stabilization. The results of stabilization were studied with femtosecond comb based on Ti:Sa laser.

  10. Multiphoton Raman Atom Optics with Frequency-Swept Adiabatic Passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotru, Krish; Butts, David; Kinast, Joseph; Stoner, Richard

    2016-05-01

    Light-pulse atom interferometry is a promising candidate for future inertial navigators, gravitational wave detectors, and measurements of fundamental physical constants. The sensitivity of this technique, however, is often limited by the small momentum separations created between interfering atom wave packets (typically ~ 2 ℏk) . We address this issue using light-pulse atom optics derived from stimulated Raman transitions and frequency-swept adiabatic rapid passage (ARP). In experiments, these Raman ARP atom optics have generated up to 30 ℏk photon recoil momenta in an acceleration-sensitive atom interferometer, thereby enhancing the phase shift per unit acceleration by a factor of 15. Since this approach forgoes evaporative cooling and velocity selection, it could enable large-area atom interferometry at higher data rates, while also lowering the atom shot-noise-limited measurement uncertainty.

  11. Stabilization of a laser on a large-detuned atomic-reference frequency by resonant interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barboza, Priscila M. T.; Nascimento, Guilherme G.; Araújo, Michelle O.; da Silva, Cícero M.; Cavalcante, Hugo L. D. de S.; Oriá, Marcos; Chevrollier, Martine; Passerat de Silans, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    We report a simple technique for stabilization of a laser frequency at the wings of an atomic resonance. The reference signal used for stabilization issues from interference effects obtained in a low-quality cavity filled with a resonant atomic vapour. For a frequency detuned 2.6 GHz from the 133Cs D2 6S{}1/2 F = 4 to 6P{}3/2 F’ = 5 transition, the fractional frequency Allan deviation is 10-8 for averaging times of 300 s, corresponding to a frequency deviation of 4 MHz. Adequate choice of the atomic density and of the cell thickness allows locking the laser at detunings larger than 10 GHz. Such a simple technique does not require magnetic fields or signal modulation.

  12. Potential sensitivities in frequency modulation and heterodyne amplitude modulation Kelvin probe force microscopes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the potential sensitivity in Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) was investigated in frequency modulation (FM) and heterodyne amplitude modulation (AM) modes. We showed theoretically that the minimum detectable contact potential difference (CPD) in FM-KPFM is higher than in heterodyne AM-KPFM. We experimentally confirmed that the signal-to-noise ratio in FM-KPFM is lower than that in heterodyne AM-KPFM, which is due to the higher minimum detectable CPD dependence in FM-KPFM. We also compared the corrugations in the local contact potential difference on the surface of Ge (001), which shows atomic resolution in heterodyne AM-KPFM. In contrast, atomic resolution cannot be obtained in FM-KPFM under the same experimental conditions. The higher potential resolution in heterodyne AM-KPFM was attributed to the lower crosstalk and higher potential sensitivity between topographic and potential measurements. PMID:24350866

  13. Wireless vibration sensor using frequency modulation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minhyuck; Yoon, Hwan-Sik; Kim, Sehun; Kim, Joo-Hyung

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, wireless strain sensors have received attention as an efficient method to measure response of a structure in a remote location. Wireless sensors developed for remote measurement include RF wireless sensor modules and microstrip antenna-based sensors. In this paper, a simple wireless vibration sensor based on a piezoelectric sensor and the Frequency Modulation (FM) technique is developed for remote measurement of vibrating structures. The piezoelectric sensor can generate a voltage signal proportional to dynamic strain of the host structure. The voltage signal is then frequency modulated and transmitted wirelessly to a remote station by a simple FM transmitter circuit. Finally, the received signal is demodulated by a conventional FM radio circuit, and the vibration measurement data can be recovered. Since this type of wireless sensor employs a simple FM circuit, they do not require any wireless data transmission protocols allowing a low-cost wireless sensor in compact format. The proposed concept of the wireless vibration measurement is experimentally verified by measuring vibration of an aluminum cantilever beam. The proposed sensor could potentially be an efficient and cost effective method for measuring vibration of remote structures for dynamic testing or structural health monitoring.

  14. Atomic vapor cells for chip-scale atomic clocks with improved long-term frequency stability.

    PubMed

    Knappe, S; Gerginov, V; Schwindt, P D D; Shah, V; Robinson, H G; Hollberg, L; Kitching, J

    2005-09-15

    A novel technique for microfabricating alkali atom vapor cells is described in which alkali atoms are evaporated into a micromachined cell cavity through a glass nozzle. A cell of interior volume 1 mm3, containing 87Rb and a buffer gas, was made in this way and integrated into an atomic clock based on coherent population trapping. A fractional frequency instability of 6 x 10(-12) at 1000 s of integration was measured. The long-term drift of the F=1, mF=0-->F=2, mF=0 hyperfine frequency of atoms in these cells is below 5 x 10(-11)/day.

  15. Spectro-temporal modulation masking patterns reveal frequency selectivity.

    PubMed

    Oetjen, Arne; Verhey, Jesko L

    2015-02-01

    The present study investigated the possibility that the human auditory system demonstrates frequency selectivity to spectro-temporal amplitude modulations. Threshold modulation depth for detecting sinusoidal spectro-temporal modulations was measured using a generalized masked threshold pattern paradigm with narrowband masker modulations. Four target spectro-temporal modulations were examined, differing in their temporal and spectral modulation frequencies: a temporal modulation of -8, 8, or 16 Hz combined with a spectral modulation of 1 cycle/octave and a temporal modulation of 4 Hz combined with a spectral modulation of 0.5 cycles/octave. The temporal center frequencies of the masker modulation ranged from 0.25 to 4 times the target temporal modulation. The spectral masker-modulation center-frequencies were 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 times the target spectral modulation. For all target modulations, the pattern of average thresholds for the eight normal-hearing listeners was consistent with the hypothesis of a spectro-temporal modulation filter. Such a pattern of modulation-frequency sensitivity was predicted on the basis of psychoacoustical data for purely temporal amplitude modulations and purely spectral amplitude modulations. An analysis of separability indicates that, for the present data set, selectivity in the spectro-temporal modulation domain can be described by a combination of a purely spectral and a purely temporal modulation filter function.

  16. High-frequency multimodal atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nievergelt, Adrian P; Adams, Jonathan D; Odermatt, Pascal D

    2014-01-01

    Summary Multifrequency atomic force microscopy imaging has been recently demonstrated as a powerful technique for quickly obtaining information about the mechanical properties of a sample. Combining this development with recent gains in imaging speed through small cantilevers holds the promise of a convenient, high-speed method for obtaining nanoscale topography as well as mechanical properties. Nevertheless, instrument bandwidth limitations on cantilever excitation and readout have restricted the ability of multifrequency techniques to fully benefit from small cantilevers. We present an approach for cantilever excitation and deflection readout with a bandwidth of 20 MHz, enabling multifrequency techniques extended beyond 2 MHz for obtaining materials contrast in liquid and air, as well as soft imaging of delicate biological samples. PMID:25671141

  17. Holographic frequency modulated continuous wave laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaye, P.; Roosen, G.

    2007-10-01

    We present the operating principle and a first experimental characterization of a holographic rangefinder, that couples a two wave mixing phase demodulation set-up with a frequency modulated laser source. In its first implementation, the system allows millimetre sensitivity on tens of meters measurement range with the ability to work with scattering surfaces. This paper has been presented at “3e colloque interdisciplinaire en instrumentation (C2I 2004)”, École Normale Supérieure de Cachan, 29 30 janvier 2004.

  18. Resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H. (Inventor); Cantrell, Sean A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A scanning probe microscope and methodology called resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM), employs an ultrasonic wave launched from the bottom of a sample while the cantilever of an atomic force microscope, driven at a frequency differing from the ultrasonic frequency by one of the contact resonance frequencies of the cantilever, engages the sample top surface. The nonlinear mixing of the oscillating cantilever and the ultrasonic wave in the region defined by the cantilever tip-sample surface interaction force generates difference-frequency oscillations at the cantilever contact resonance. The resonance-enhanced difference-frequency signals are used to create images of nanoscale near-surface and subsurface features.

  19. New frequency ratios with a PHz-scale atomic clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFerran, J. J.

    2016-11-01

    Atomic clocks are a tour de force when it comes to rigorous tests of measurement. The ultimate validation of one’s careful assessments is to find agreement on a given parameter with a completely independent laboratory. Frequency ratios between clock transitions of different atomic species make for quintessential tests of measurement precision. Tyumenev et al (2016 New J. Phys. 18 113002) report on frequency ratio measurements between a 199Hg optical lattice clock and three other atomic frequency standards: 133Cs, 87Rb and 87Sr, two of which are unprecedented in accuracy. Most notable is the level of agreement for the 199Hg/87Sr frequency ratio found between two independent laboratories at 1.7× {10}-16; further indication that optical lattice clocks are fulfilling their early expectations.

  20. Predictions for collisional frequency shifts of ultracold rubidium atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkelmans, S. J. J. M. F.; Verhaar, B. J.; Heinzen, D. J.; Gibble, K.

    1997-04-01

    A few years ago atomic fountains using cold ^133Cs atoms led to a breakthrough in the field of atomic frequency standards(A. Clairon, C. Salomon, S. Guellati, and W. D. Phillips, Europhys. Lett. 16), 165 (1991); K. Gibble and S. Chu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 1771 (1993).. It was soon found that the frequency shifts induced by collisions between atoms during their fountain orbit stand in the way to drawing the full benefits from this development. A possible way out is to switch to another atomic species(K. Gibble and B.J. Verhaar, Phys. Rev. A 52), 3370 (1995).. Recent experiments have made it possible to determine cold collision parameters for pairs of rubidium atoms with unprecedented accuracy(J.M. Vogels, C.C. Tsai, R.S. Freeland, S.J.J.M.F. Kokkelmans, B.J. Verhaar, and D.J. Heinzen (submitted).). Making use of these parameters we predict the collisional frequency shifts for a ^87Rb and a ^85Rb laser-cooled clock. Our results show the prospects for new atomic clocks based on ultracold rubidium to be promising.

  1. The Brazilian time and frequency atomic standards program.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mushtaq; Magalhães, Daniel V; Bebeachibuli, Aida; Müller, Stella T; Alves, Renato F; Ortega, Tiago A; Weiner, John; Bagnato, Vanderlei S

    2008-06-01

    Cesium atomic beam clocks have been the workhorse for many demanding applications in science and technology for the past four decades. Tests of the fundamental laws of physics and the search for minute changes in fundamental constants, the synchronization of telecommunication networks, and realization of the satellite-based global positioning system would not be possible without atomic clocks. The adoption of optical cooling and trapping techniques, has produced a major advance in atomic clock precision. Cold-atom fountain and compact cold-atom clocks have also been developed. Measurement precision of a few parts in 10(15) has been demonstrated for a cold-atom fountain clock. We present here an overview of the time and frequency metrology program based on cesium atoms under development at USP São Carlos. This activity consists of construction and characterization of atomic-beam, and several variations of cold-atom clocks. We discuss the basic working principles, construction, evaluation, and important applications of atomic clocks in the Brazilian program.

  2. Radio-frequency Electrometry Using Rydberg Atoms in Vapor Cells: Towards the Shot Noise Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Santosh; Fan, Haoquan; Jahangiri, Akbar; Kuebler, Harald; Shaffer, James P.; 5. Physikalisches Institut, Universitat Stuttgart, Germany Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    Rydberg atoms are a promising candidate for radio frequency (RF) electric field sensing. Our method uses electromagnetically induced transparency with Rydberg atoms in vapor cells to read out the effect that the RF electric field has on the Rydberg atoms. The method has the potential for high sensitivity (pV cm-1 Hz- 1 / 2) and can be self-calibrated. Some of the main factors limiting the sensitivity of RF electric field sensing from reaching the shot noise limit are the residual Doppler effect and the sensitivity of the optical read-out using the probe laser. We present progress on overcoming the residual Doppler effect by using a new multi-photon scheme and reaching the shot noise detection limit using frequency modulated spectroscopy. Our experiments also show promise for studying quantum optical effects such as superradiance in vapor cells using Rydberg atoms. This work is supported by DARPA, ARO, and NRO.

  3. Accurate and agile digital control of optical phase, amplitude and frequency for coherent atomic manipulation of atomic systems.

    PubMed

    Thom, Joseph; Wilpers, Guido; Riis, Erling; Sinclair, Alastair G

    2013-08-12

    We demonstrate a system for fast and agile digital control of laser phase, amplitude and frequency for applications in coherent atomic systems. The full versatility of a direct digital synthesis radiofrequency source is faithfully transferred to laser radiation via acousto-optic modulation. Optical beatnotes are used to measure phase steps up to 2π, which are accurately implemented with a resolution of ≤ 10 mrad. By linearizing the optical modulation process, amplitude-shaped pulses of durations ranging from 500 ns to 500 ms, in excellent agreement with the programmed functional form, are demonstrated. Pulse durations are limited only by the 30 ns rise time of the modulation process, and a measured extinction ratio of > 5 × 10(11) is achieved. The system presented here was developed specifically for controlling the quantum state of trapped ions with sequences of multiple laser pulses, including composite and bichromatic pulses. The demonstrated techniques are widely applicable to other atomic systems ranging across quantum information processing, frequency metrology, atom interferometry, and single-photon generation.

  4. Recognition of frequency-modulated signals using the Wigner distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vysotskiy, M. G.; Kaasik, V. P.; Rogov, S. A.; Rozov, S. V.

    2016-03-01

    Precision and resolution ability of the frequency-modulated signals time-frequency distributions at the formation of these distributions with the help of pseudo-Wigner processors is investigated. Linear-frequency modulated signals and signals with frequency dependence on time to the higher than the first power are considered. The results of the numerical simulation are presented.

  5. Difference-frequency combs in cold atom physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliese, Russell; Hoghooghi, Nazanin; Puppe, Thomas; Rohde, Felix; Sell, Alexander; Zach, Armin; Leisching, Patrick; Kaenders, Wilhelm; Keegan, Niamh C.; Bounds, Alistair D.; Bridge, Elizabeth M.; Leonard, Jack; Adams, Charles S.; Cornish, Simon L.; Jones, Matthew P. A.

    2016-12-01

    Optical frequency combs provide the clockwork to relate optical frequencies to radio frequencies. Hence, combs allow optical frequencies to be measured with respect to a radio frequency where the accuracy is limited only by the reference signal. In order to provide a stable link between the radio and optical frequencies, the two parameters of the frequency comb must be fixed: the carrier envelope offset frequency, f ceo, and the pulse repetition-rate, f rep. We have developed the first optical frequency comb based on difference frequency generation (DFG) that eliminates f ceo by design — specifically tailored for applications in cold atom physics. An f ceo-free spectrum at 1550 nm is generated from a super continuum spanning more than an optical octave. Established amplification and frequency conversion techniques based on reliable telecom fibre technology allow the generation of multiple wavelength outputs. The DFG comb is a convenient tool to both stabilise laser sources and accurately measure optical frequencies in Rydberg experiments and more generally in quantum optics. In this paper we discuss the frequency comb design, characterization, and optical frequency measurement of Strontium Rydberg states. The DFG technique allows for a compact and robust, passively f ceo stable frequency comb significantly improving reliability in practical applications.

  6. Frequency-dependent viscoelasticity measurement by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Nan; Wong, Kenneth Kar Ho; de Bruyn, John R.; Hutter, Jeffrey L.

    2009-02-01

    We demonstrate a new technique for investigating viscoelastic properties of soft materials using the atomic force microscope. A small oscillatory voltage is added to the deflection signal of the atomic force microscope causing a vertical oscillatory sample motion. Monitoring the amplitude and phase of this motion allows determination of the viscous and elastic moduli of the sample as a function of frequency during contact imaging. This technique is applied to suspended poly(vinyl alcohol) nanofibers and poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogels, giving results similar to those measured using traditional static methods. However, the moduli of both the fibers and the hydrogels show a significant frequency dependence. The Young's modulus of the fibers increases with frequency, while for the viscoelastic hydrogels, the storage modulus dominates the mechanical response at low frequency whereas the loss modulus dominates at high frequency.

  7. Low frequency mechanical modes of viruses with atomic detail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykeman, Eric; Sankey, Otto

    2008-03-01

    The low frequency mechanical modes of viruses can provide important insights into the large global motions that a virus may exhibit. Recently it has been proposed that these large global motions may be excited using impulsive stimulated Raman scattering producing permanent damage to the virus. In order to understand the coupling of external probes to the capsid, vibrational modes with atomic detail are essential. The standard approach to find the atomic modes of a molecule with N atoms requires the formation and diagonlization of a 3Nx3N matrix. As viruses have 10^5 or more atoms, the standard approach is difficult. Using ideas from electronic structure theory, we have developed a method to construct the mechanical modes of large molecules such as viruses with atomic detail. Application to viruses such as the cowpea chlorotic mottle virus, satellite tobacco necrosis virus, and M13 bacteriophage show a fairly complicated picture of the mechanical modes.

  8. Carrier frequency modulation of an acousto-optic modulator for laser stabilization.

    PubMed

    Aldous, Matthew; Woods, Jonathan; Dragomir, Andrei; Roy, Ritayan; Himsworth, Matt

    2017-05-29

    The stabilization of lasers to absolute frequency references is a fundamental requirement in several areas of atomic, molecular and optical physics. A range of techniques are available to produce a suitable reference onto which one can 'lock' the laser, many of which depend on the specific internal structure of the reference or are sensitive to laser intensity noise. We present a novel method using the frequency modulation of an acousto-optic modulator's carrier (drive) signal to generate two spatially separated beams, with a frequency difference of only a few MHz. These beams are used to probe a narrow absorption feature and the difference in their detected signals leads to a dispersion-like feature suitable for wavelength stabilization of a diode laser. This simple and versatile method only requires a narrow absorption line and is therefore suitable for both atomic and cavity based stabilization schemes. To demonstrate the suitability of this method we lock an external cavity diode laser near the (85)Rb 5S1/2 → 5P3/2, F = 3 → F' = 4 using sub-Doppler pump probe spectroscopy and also demonstrate excellent agreement between the measured signal and a theoretical model.

  9. Frequency redistribution function for the polarized two-term atom

    SciTech Connect

    Casini, R.; Landi Degl'Innocenti, M.; Manso Sainz, R.; Landolfi, M.

    2014-08-20

    We present a generalized frequency redistribution function for the polarized two-term atom in an arbitrary magnetic field. This result is derived within a new formulation of the quantum problem of coherent scattering of polarized radiation by atoms in the collisionless regime. The general theory, which is based on a diagrammatic treatment of the atom-photon interaction, is still a work in progress. However, the results anticipated here are relevant enough for the study of the magnetism of the solar chromosphere and of interest for astrophysics in general.

  10. Ionization of atoms in strong low-frequency electromagnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Krainov, V. P.

    2010-08-15

    The ionization of atoms in a low-frequency linearly polarized electromagnetic field (the photon energy is much lower than the ionization potential of an atom) is considered under new conditions, in which the Coulomb interaction of an electron with the atomic core in the final state of the continuum cannot be considered in perturbation theory in the interaction of the electron with the electromagnetic field. The field is assumed to be much weaker that the atomic field. In these conditions, the classical motion of the electron in the final state of the continuum becomes chaotic (so-called dynamic chaos). Using the well-known Chirikov method of averaging over chaotic variations of the phase of motion, the problem can be reduced to non-linear diffusion on the energy scale. We calculate the classical electron energy in the final state, which is averaged over fast chaotic oscillations and takes into account both the Coulomb field and the electromagnetic field. This energy is used to calculate the probability of ionization from the ground state of the atom to a lower-lying state in the continuum using the Landau-Dykhne approximation (to exponential accuracy). This ionization probability noticeably depends on the field frequency. Upon a decrease in frequency, a transition to the well-known tunnel ionization limit with a probability independent of the field frequency is considered.

  11. Network Models of Frequency Modulated Sweep Detection

    PubMed Central

    Skorheim, Steven; Razak, Khaleel; Bazhenov, Maxim

    2014-01-01

    Frequency modulated (FM) sweeps are common in species-specific vocalizations, including human speech. Auditory neurons selective for the direction and rate of frequency change in FM sweeps are present across species, but the synaptic mechanisms underlying such selectivity are only beginning to be understood. Even less is known about mechanisms of experience-dependent changes in FM sweep selectivity. We present three network models of synaptic mechanisms of FM sweep direction and rate selectivity that explains experimental data: (1) The ‘facilitation’ model contains frequency selective cells operating as coincidence detectors, summing up multiple excitatory inputs with different time delays. (2) The ‘duration tuned’ model depends on interactions between delayed excitation and early inhibition. The strength of delayed excitation determines the preferred duration. Inhibitory rebound can reinforce the delayed excitation. (3) The ‘inhibitory sideband’ model uses frequency selective inputs to a network of excitatory and inhibitory cells. The strength and asymmetry of these connections results in neurons responsive to sweeps in a single direction of sufficient sweep rate. Variations of these properties, can explain the diversity of rate-dependent direction selectivity seen across species. We show that the inhibitory sideband model can be trained using spike timing dependent plasticity (STDP) to develop direction selectivity from a non-selective network. These models provide a means to compare the proposed synaptic and spectrotemporal mechanisms of FM sweep processing and can be utilized to explore cellular mechanisms underlying experience- or training-dependent changes in spectrotemporal processing across animal models. Given the analogy between FM sweeps and visual motion, these models can serve a broader function in studying stimulus movement across sensory epithelia. PMID:25514021

  12. Melanoma incidence and frequency modulation (FM) broadcasting.

    PubMed

    Hallberg, Orjan; Johansson, Olle

    2002-01-01

    The incidence of melanoma has been increasing steadily in many countries since 1960, but the underlying mechanism causing this increase remains elusive. The incidence of melanoma has been linked to the distance to frequency modulation (FM) broadcasting towers. In the current study, the authors sought to determine if there was also a related link on a larger scale for entire countries. Exposure-time-specific incidence was extracted from exposure and incidence data from 4 different countries, and this was compared with reported age-specific incidence of melanoma. Geographic differences in melanoma incidence were compared with the magnitude of this environmental stress. The exposure-time-specific incidence from all 4 countries became almost identical, and they were approximately equal to the reported age-specific incidence of melanoma. A correlation between melanoma incidence and the number of locally receivable FM transmitters was found. The authors concluded that melanoma is associated with exposure to FM broadcasting.

  13. Optical Frequency Standards Based on Neutral Atoms and Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riehle, Fritz; Helmcke, Juergen

    The current status and prospects of optical frequency standards based on neutral atomic and molecular absorbers are reviewed. Special attention is given to an optical frequency standard based on cold Ca atoms which are interrogated with a pulsed excitation scheme leading to resolved line structures with a quality factor Q > 10^12. The optical frequency was measured by comparison with PTB's primary clock to be νCa = 455 986 240 494.13 kHz with a total relative uncertainty of 2.5 x10^-13. After a recent recommendation of the International Committee of Weights and Measures (CIPM), this frequency standard now represents one of the most accurate realizations of the length unit.

  14. Compact frequency standard using atoms trapped on a chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Martínez, F.; Lacroûte, C.; Rosenbusch, P.; Reinhard, F.; Deutsch, C.; Schneider, T.; Reichel, J.

    2011-01-01

    We present a compact atomic frequency standard based on the interrogation of magnetically trapped 87Rb atoms. Two photons, in the microwave and radiofrequency domain excite the atomic transition. At a magnetic field of 3.23 G this transition from ∣F = 1, mF = -1> to ∣F = 2, mF = 1> is 1st order insensitive to magnetic field variations. Long Ramsey interrogation times can thus be achieved, leading to a projected stability in the low 10-13 at 1 s. This makes this device a viable alternative to LITE and HORACE as a good candidate for replacing or complementing the rubidium frequency standards and passive hydrogen masers already on board of the GPS, GLONASS, and GALILEO satellites. Here we present preliminary results. We use an atom chip to cool and trap the atoms. A coplanar waveguide is integrated to the chip to carry the Ramsey interrogation signal, making the physics package potentially as small as (5 cm)3. We describe the experimental apparatus and show preliminary Ramsey fringes of 1.25 Hz linewidth. We also show a preliminary frequency stability σy = 1.5 × 10-12τ-1/2 for 10 < τ < 103 s. This represents one order of magnitude improvement with respect to previous experiments.

  15. Atomic Frequency Standards for the GPS IIF Satellites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-12-01

    29th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Meeting /- ATOMIC FREQUENCY STANDARDS FOR THE GPS IIF SATELLITES Willem Emmer , Boeing Eric...is always accompanied by programmatic risk. Conservative program managers have avoided this risk by maintaining the current EG&G design without these

  16. Low-frequency shift Raman spectroscopy using atomic filters.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xiaobo; Janisch, Corey; Chen, Yizhu; Liu, Zhiwen; Chen, Jingbiao

    2016-11-15

    A Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF) and an atomic resonant absorption filter are used in tandem to demonstrate a low-frequency shift Raman measurement down to few cm-1. The FADOF, with an ultralow bandwidth of 0.08  cm-1 at 780 nm, serves as a bandpass filter, while the rubidium atomic cell acts as a notch filter which has a bandwidth of 0.3  cm-1. A proof-of-concept study to measure a Raman signal generated from a silica optical fiber is performed, demonstrating a low-frequency measurement of both the Stokes and the anti-Stokes shift down to 3  cm-1 at an equivalent signal level. These results indicate the prospect for gigahertz-terahertz low-energy Raman spectroscopy based on atomic filters.

  17. Indirect modulation of nonmagnetic probes for force modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie-Ren; Garno, Jayne C

    2009-02-15

    Frequency-dependent changes for phase and amplitude images are demonstrated with test platforms of organosilane ring patterns, using force modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) with an alternate instrument configuration. The imaging setup using indirect magnetic modulation (IMM) is based on indirect oscillation of soft, nonmagnetic cantilevers, with spring constants <1 N m(-1). The tip is driven to vibrate by the motion of a tip holder assembly which contains ferromagnetic materials. The entire tip assembly is induced to vibrate with the flux of an external ac electromagnetic field, supplied by a wire coil solenoid placed underneath the sample plate. With the use of IMM, dynamic parameters of the driving frequencies and amplitude of the tip motion can be optimized to sensitively map the elastic response of samples. An advantage of this instrument setup is that a magnetic coating is not required to drive the periodic oscillation of the tip. The instrument configuration for IMM may not be practical for intermittent imaging modes, which often work best with stiff cantilevers. However, indirect actuation provides an effective approach for imaging with low force setpoints and is well-suited for dynamic AFM modes using continuous contact imaging.

  18. Note: Laser frequency shifting by using two novel triple-pass acousto-optic modulator configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos-Lopez, E. de; Lopez, J. M.; Lopez, S.; Espinosa, M. G.; Lizama, L. A.

    2012-11-15

    We report the design of two novel triple-pass acousto-optic modulator systems. These designs are extensions of the well known acousto-optic modulator (AOM) double-pass configuration, which eliminates the angle dependence of the diffracted beam with respect to the modulation frequency. In a triple-pass system, however, the frequency dependence of the angle does not disappear but the frequency shift is larger, spanning 3 times the AOM central frequency. In some applications, such as optically pumped Cesium-beam frequency standards, the frequencies of the two laser beams remain fixed and a triple-pass optical system can be used to reduce to one the number of lasers used in such atomic clocks. The two triple-pass configurations use either a retro-reflecting mirror, or a right angle prism to pass for third time the laser beam through the AOM, obtaining diffraction efficiencies of about 27% and 44%, respectively.

  19. Tuning of Human Modulation Filters Is Carrier-Frequency Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Andrew J. R.; Reiss, Joshua D.; McAlpine, David

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies employing speech stimuli to investigate ‘cocktail-party’ listening have focused on entrainment of cortical activity to modulations at syllabic (5 Hz) and phonemic (20 Hz) rates. The data suggest that cortical modulation filters (CMFs) are dependent on the sound-frequency channel in which modulations are conveyed, potentially underpinning a strategy for separating speech from background noise. Here, we characterize modulation filters in human listeners using a novel behavioral method. Within an ‘inverted’ adaptive forced-choice increment detection task, listening level was varied whilst contrast was held constant for ramped increments with effective modulation rates between 0.5 and 33 Hz. Our data suggest that modulation filters are tonotopically organized (i.e., vary along the primary, frequency-organized, dimension). This suggests that the human auditory system is optimized to track rapid (phonemic) modulations at high sound-frequencies and slow (prosodic/syllabic) modulations at low frequencies. PMID:24009759

  20. Manipulating Frequency-Bin Entangled States in Cold Atoms

    PubMed Central

    Zavatta, A.; Artoni, M.; Viscor, D.; La Rocca, G.

    2014-01-01

    Optical manipulation of entanglement harnessing the frequency degree of freedom is important for encoding of quantum information. We here devise a phase-resonant excitation mechanism of an atomic interface where full control of a narrowband single-photon two-mode frequency entangled state can be efficiently achieved. We illustrate the working physical mechanism for an interface made of cold 87Rb atoms where entanglement is well preserved from degradation over a typical 100 μm length scale of the interface and with fractional delays of the order of unity. The scheme provides a basis for efficient multi-frequency and multi-photon entanglement, which is not easily accessible to polarization and spatial encoding. PMID:24487523

  1. Long-term frequency instability of atomic frequency references based on coherent population trapping and microfabricated vapor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gerginov, Vladislav; Knappe, Svenja; Shah, Vishal; Schwindt, Peter D. D.; Hollberg, Leo; Kitching, John

    2006-04-15

    We present an evaluation of the long-term frequency instability and environmental sensitivity of a chip-scale atomic clock based on coherent population trapping, particularly as affected by the light-source subassembly. The long-term frequency stability of this type of device can be dramatically improved by judicious choice of operating parameters of the light-source subassembly. We find that the clock frequency is influenced by the laser-injection current, the laser temperature, and the rf modulation index. The sensitivity of the clock frequency to changes in the laser-injection current or the substrate temperature can be significantly reduced through adjustment of the rf modulation index. This makes the requirements imposed on the laser-temperature stabilization, in order to achieve a given frequency stability, less severe. The clock-frequency instability due to variations in local oscillator power is shown to be reduced through the choice of an appropriate light intensity inside the cell. The importance of these parameters with regard to the long-term stability of such systems is discussed.

  2. Electromagnetic induction imaging with a radio-frequency atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deans, Cameron; Marmugi, Luca; Hussain, Sarah; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2016-03-01

    We report on a compact, tunable, and scalable to large arrays imaging device, based on a radio-frequency optically pumped atomic magnetometer operating in magnetic induction tomography modality. Imaging of conductive objects is performed at room temperature, in an unshielded environment and without background subtraction. Conductivity maps of target objects exhibit not only excellent performance in terms of shape reconstruction but also demonstrate detection of sub-millimetric cracks and penetration of conductive barriers. The results presented here demonstrate the potential of a future generation of imaging instruments, which combine magnetic induction tomography and the unmatched performance of atomic magnetometers.

  3. Electromagnetic induction imaging with a radio-frequency atomic magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Deans, Cameron; Marmugi, Luca Hussain, Sarah; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2016-03-07

    We report on a compact, tunable, and scalable to large arrays imaging device, based on a radio-frequency optically pumped atomic magnetometer operating in magnetic induction tomography modality. Imaging of conductive objects is performed at room temperature, in an unshielded environment and without background subtraction. Conductivity maps of target objects exhibit not only excellent performance in terms of shape reconstruction but also demonstrate detection of sub-millimetric cracks and penetration of conductive barriers. The results presented here demonstrate the potential of a future generation of imaging instruments, which combine magnetic induction tomography and the unmatched performance of atomic magnetometers.

  4. Modulating action of low frequency oscillations on high frequency instabilities in Hall thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Liqiu, Wei E-mail: weiliqiu@hit.edu.cn; Liang, Han; Ziyi, Yang; Jing, Li; Yong, Cao; Daren, Yu; Jianhua, Du

    2015-02-07

    It is found that the low frequency oscillations have modulating action on high frequency instabilities in Hall thrusters. The physical mechanism of this modulation is discussed and verified by numerical simulations. Theoretical analyses indicate that the wide-range fluctuations of plasma density and electric field associated with the low frequency oscillations affect the electron drift velocity and anomalous electron transport across the magnetic field. The amplitude and frequency of high frequency oscillations are modulated by low frequency oscillations, which show the periodic variation in the time scale of low frequency oscillations.

  5. Rubidium atomic frequency standards for GPS Block IIR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, William J.

    1990-01-01

    The Rubidium Atomic Frequency Standards (RAFS) were provided for the GPS Block IIR NAVSTAR satellites. These satellites will replenish and upgrade the space segment of the Global Positioning System in the mid 1990s. The GPS RAFS Rb clocks are the latest generation of the high-performance rubidium frequency standards. They offer an aging rate in the low pp 10(exp 14)/day range and a drift-corrected 1-day stability in the low pp 10(exp 14) range. The Block IIR version of these devices will have improved performance, higher reliability, smaller size, and greater radiation hardness. The GPS Block IIR atomic clocks have a natural frequency configuration whereby they output a frequency of about 13.4 MHz that is a submultiple of the atomic resonance of Rb (or Cs). The RAFS operates at a low, fixed C-field for increased stability. The GPS Block IIR RAFS design, including the changes and improvements made, and the test results obtained are described.

  6. Rubidium atomic frequency standards for GPS Block IIR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, William J.

    1990-01-01

    The Rubidium Atomic Frequency Standards (RAFS) were provided for the GPS Block IIR NAVSTAR satellites. These satellites will replenish and upgrade the space segment of the Global Positioning System in the mid 1990s. The GPS RAFS Rb clocks are the latest generation of the high-performance rubidium frequency standards. They offer an aging rate in the low pp 10(exp 14)/day range and a drift-corrected 1-day stability in the low pp 10(exp 14) range. The Block IIR version of these devices will have improved performance, higher reliability, smaller size, and greater radiation hardness. The GPS Block IIR atomic clocks have a natural frequency configuration whereby they output a frequency of about 13.4 MHz that is a submultiple of the atomic resonance of Rb (or Cs). The RAFS operates at a low, fixed C-field for increased stability. The GPS Block IIR RAFS design, including the changes and improvements made, and the test results obtained are described.

  7. Frequency characteristics of standing-wave acoustooptic modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apolonskii, A. A.; Shchebetov, S. D.

    1991-10-01

    Experimental data are presented on the performance of wide-aperture standing-wave acoustooptic modulators used as laser mode lockers. In particular, attention is given to the acoustooptic and electrical frequency characteristics of the modulators. The existence of a large effective diffraction frequency region below the fundamental frequency is demonstrated. Individual frequency regions of effective diffraction do not correspond to the even and odd harmonics.

  8. Drive-amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy: From vacuum to liquids.

    PubMed

    Jaafar, Miriam; Martínez-Martín, David; Cuenca, Mariano; Melcher, John; Raman, Arvind; Gómez-Herrero, Julio

    2012-01-01

    We introduce drive-amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy as a dynamic mode with outstanding performance in all environments from vacuum to liquids. As with frequency modulation, the new mode follows a feedback scheme with two nested loops: The first keeps the cantilever oscillation amplitude constant by regulating the driving force, and the second uses the driving force as the feedback variable for topography. Additionally, a phase-locked loop can be used as a parallel feedback allowing separation of the conservative and nonconservative interactions. We describe the basis of this mode and present some examples of its performance in three different environments. Drive-amplutide modulation is a very stable, intuitive and easy to use mode that is free of the feedback instability associated with the noncontact-to-contact transition that occurs in the frequency-modulation mode.

  9. Drive-amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy: From vacuum to liquids

    PubMed Central

    Jaafar, Miriam; Cuenca, Mariano; Melcher, John; Raman, Arvind

    2012-01-01

    Summary We introduce drive-amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy as a dynamic mode with outstanding performance in all environments from vacuum to liquids. As with frequency modulation, the new mode follows a feedback scheme with two nested loops: The first keeps the cantilever oscillation amplitude constant by regulating the driving force, and the second uses the driving force as the feedback variable for topography. Additionally, a phase-locked loop can be used as a parallel feedback allowing separation of the conservative and nonconservative interactions. We describe the basis of this mode and present some examples of its performance in three different environments. Drive-amplutide modulation is a very stable, intuitive and easy to use mode that is free of the feedback instability associated with the noncontact-to-contact transition that occurs in the frequency-modulation mode. PMID:22563531

  10. Radio-frequency dressed lattices for ultracold alkali atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinuco-León, German A.; Garraway, Barry M.

    2015-05-01

    Ultracold atomic gases in periodic potentials are powerful platforms for exploring quantum physics in regimes dominated by many-body effects as well as for developing applications that benefit from quantum mechanical effects. Further advances face a range of challenges including the realization of potentials with lattice constants smaller than optical wavelengths as well as creating schemes for effective addressing and manipulation of single sites. In this paper we propose a dressed-based scheme for creating periodic potential landscapes for ultracold alkali atoms with the capability of overcoming such difficulties. The dressed approach has the advantage of operating in a low-frequency regime where decoherence and heating effects due to spontaneous emission do not take place. These results highlight the possibilities of atom-chip technology in the future development of quantum simulations and quantum technologies, and provide a realistic scheme for starting such an exploration.

  11. Investigations of laser pumped gas cell atomic frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, C. H.; Camparo, J. C.; Fueholz, R. P.

    1982-01-01

    The performance characteristics of a rubidium gas cell atomic frequency standard might be improved by replacing the standard rubidium discharge lamp with a single mode laser diode. Aspects of the laser pumped gas cell atomic clock studied include effects due to laser intensity, laser detuning, and the choice of the particular atomic absorption line. Results indicate that the performance of the gas cell clock may be improved by judicious choice of the operating parameters of the laser diode. The laser diode also proved to be a valuable tool in investigating the operation of the conventional gas cell clock. Results concerning linewidths, the light shift effect and the effect of isotopic spin exchange in the conventional gas cell clock are reported.

  12. Characteristics of spectro-temporal modulation frequency selectivity in humans.

    PubMed

    Oetjen, Arne; Verhey, Jesko L

    2017-03-01

    There is increasing evidence that the auditory system shows frequency selectivity for spectro-temporal modulations. A recent study of the authors has shown spectro-temporal modulation masking patterns that were in agreement with the hypothesis of spectro-temporal modulation filters in the human auditory system [Oetjen and Verhey (2015). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 137(2), 714-723]. In the present study, that experimental data and additional data were used to model this spectro-temporal frequency selectivity. The additional data were collected to investigate to what extent the spectro-temporal modulation-frequency selectivity results from a combination of a purely temporal amplitude-modulation filter and a purely spectral amplitude-modulation filter. In contrast to the previous study, thresholds were measured for masker and target modulations with opposite directions, i.e., an upward pointing target modulation and a downward pointing masker modulation. The comparison of this data set with previous corresponding data with the same direction from target and masker modulations indicate that a specific spectro-temporal modulation filter is required to simulate all aspects of spectro-temporal modulation frequency selectivity. A model using a modified Gabor filter with a purely temporal and a purely spectral filter predicts the spectro-temporal modulation masking data.

  13. Effects of low-frequency biasing on spontaneous otoacoustic emissions: Frequency modulation

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Lin

    2008-01-01

    It was previously reported that low-frequency biasing of cochlear structures can suppress and modulate the amplitudes of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAEs) in humans [Bian, L. and Watts, K. L. (2008). “Effects of low-frequency biasing on spontaneous otoacoustic emissions: Amplitude modulation,” J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 123, 887–898]. In addition to amplitude modulation, the bias tone produced an upward shift of the SOAE frequency and a frequency modulation. These frequency effects usually occurred prior to significant modifications of SOAE amplitudes and were dependent on the relative strength of the bias tone and a particular SOAE. The overall SOAE frequency shifts were usually less than 2%. A quasistatic modulation pattern showed that biasing in either positive or negative pressure direction increased SOAE frequency. The instantaneous SOAE frequency revealed a “W-shaped” modulation pattern within one biasing cycle. The SOAE frequency was maximal at the biasing extremes and minimized at the zero crossings of the bias tone. The temporal modulation of SOAE frequency occurred with a short delay. These static and dynamic effects indicate that modifications of the mechanical properties of the cochlear transducer could underlie the frequency shift and modulation. These biasing effects are consistent with the suppression and modulation of SOAE amplitude due to shifting of the cochlear transducer operating point. PMID:19045788

  14. Detection of atomic clock frequency jumps with the Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    Galleani, Lorenzo; Tavella, Patrizia

    2012-03-01

    Frequency jumps are common anomalies in atomic clocks aboard navigation system satellites. These anomalous behaviors must be detected quickly and accurately to minimize the impact on user positioning. We develop a detector for frequency jumps based on the Kalman filter. Numerical simulations show that the detector is fast, with high probability of detection and low probability of false alarms. It also has a low computational cost because it takes advantage of the recursive nature of the Kalman filter. Therefore, it can be used in applications in which little computational power is available, such as aboard navigation system satellites.

  15. Technique for measuring atomic recoil frequency using coherence functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beattie, S.; Barrett, B.; Chan, I.; Mok, C.; Yavin, I.; Kumarakrishnan, A.

    2009-02-01

    We have developed a technique for measuring the atomic recoil frequency using a single-state echo-type atom interferometer that manipulates laser-cooled atoms in the ground state. The interferometer relies on momentum-state interference due to two standing-wave pulses that produce density gratings. The interference is modified by applying a third standing-wave pulse during the interferometer pulse sequence. As a result, the grating contrast exhibits periodic revivals at the atomic recoil frequency ωr as a function of the time at which the third pulse is applied, allowing ωr to be measured easily and precisely. The contrast is accurately described by a coherence function, which is the Fourier transform of the momentum distribution, produced by the third pulse and by the theory of echo formation. If the third pulse is a traveling wave, loss of grating contrast is observed, an effect also described by a coherence function. The decay of the grating contrast as a function of continuous-wave light intensity is used to infer the cross section for photon absorption.

  16. Spectroscopy of cesium Rydberg atoms in strong radio-frequency fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Yuechun; Han, Xiaoxuan; Yang, Zhiwei; Li, Jingkui; Raithel, Georg; Zhao, Jianming; Jia, Suotang

    2016-08-01

    We study Rydberg atoms modulated by strong radio-frequency (rf) fields with a frequency of 70 MHz. The Rydberg atoms are prepared in a room-temperature cesium cell, and their level structure is probed using electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). As the rf field increases from the weak- into the strong-field regime, the range of observed rf-induced phenomena progresses from ac level shifts through increasingly pronounced and numerous rf modulation sidebands to complex state mixing and level crossings with high - l hydrogenlike states. Weak anharmonic admixtures in the rf field generate clearly visible modifications in the Rydberg EIT spectra. A Floquet analysis is employed to model the Rydberg spectra, and good agreement with the experimental observations is found. Our results show that all-optical spectroscopy of Rydberg atoms in vapor cells can serve as an antenna-free, atom-based, and calibration-free technique to measure rf electric fields and to analyze their higher-harmonic contents.

  17. An atomic spin precession detection method based on electro-optic modulation in an all-optical K-Rb hybrid atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yanhui; Liu, Xuejing; Li, Yang; Yao, Han; Dai, Lingling; Yang, Biyao; Ding, Ming

    2017-07-01

    We present an ultrahigh-sensitivity electro-optic modulator (EOM) detection method for detecting the atomic Larmor precession in an all-optical K-Rb hybrid atomic magnetometer operating in the spin-exchange relaxation-free regime. A magnetic field sensitivity of ~10 f T Hz-1/2 has been achieved by optimizing the probe laser parameters and the EOM modulation conditions, which is comparable to that with the Faraday modulation method and has a better performance than the balanced polarimetry method in the low frequency range. The EOM detection method in the atomic magnetometer presents several advantages, such as simple structure, no extra magnetic noise, moderate thermal effect, high measurement sensitivity and reliable stability. It is demonstrated to be feasible for the improved compactness and simplicity of atomic magnetic field measurement devices in the future.

  18. Detection of frequency modulation by hearing-impaired listeners: Effects of carrier frequency, modulation rate, and added amplitude modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Brian C. J.; Skrodzka, Ewa

    2002-01-01

    It has been proposed that the detection of frequency modulation (FM) of sinusoidal carriers can be mediated by two mechanisms: a place mechanism based on FM-induced amplitude modulation (AM) in the excitation pattern, and a temporal mechanism based on phase-locking in the auditory nerve. The temporal mechanism appears to be ``sluggish'' and does not play a role for FM rates above about 10 Hz. It also does not play a role for high carrier frequencies (above about 5 kHz). This experiment examined FM detection in three young subjects with normal hearing and four elderly subjects with cochlear hearing loss. Carrier frequencies were 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, and 6 kHz and modulation rates were 2, 5, 10, and 20 Hz. FM detection thresholds were measured both in the absence of AM, and with AM of a fixed depth (m=0.33) added in both intervals of a forced-choice trial. The added AM was intended to disrupt cues based on FM-induced AM in the excitation pattern. Generally, the hearing-impaired subjects performed markedly more poorly than the normal-hearing subjects. For the normal-hearing subjects, the disruptive effect of the AM tended to increase with increasing modulation rate, for carrier frequencies below 6 kHz, as found previously by Moore and Sek [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 100, 2320-2331 (1996)]. For the hearing-impaired subjects, the disruptive effective of the AM was generally larger than for the normal-hearing subjects, and the magnitude of the disruption did not consistently increase with increasing modulation rate. The results suggest that cochlear hearing impairment adversely affects both temporal and excitation pattern mechanisms of FM detection.

  19. A New Method for Trace Metal Determinations by Monitoring Modulated Magnetically Induced Optical Rotation in Atomic Vapours

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-11

    earlier test of polarisation modulation in AMORS suffered from a rather low modulation frequency, limited largely by the use of a mechanically driven...10 TABLE 1 Detection Limits for Several Elements Obtained with the New Polarisatlon-Modulated AMORS Instrument GFAAS Eletmet Wavelength (nm) Magnetic...and identify by block number) A new atomic magneto-optical rotation spectrometer ( AMORS ) for the determination of trace metals is described. This

  20. Global analysis of frequency modulation experiments in a vortex oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, S. Y.; Thirion, C.; Hoarau, C.; Baraduc, C.; Diény, B.

    2016-02-01

    Frequency modulation is performed on a vortex oscillator at various modulation frequencies and powers. A global analysis of the whole set of data is proposed, so that all experimental curves are described with the same four parameters. Three of these parameters describe the dependence of the instantaneous frequency with modulating current. This dependence appears significantly different from the frequency-current dependence observed in a quasi-static experiment. The discrepancy is ascribed to the different time scales involved, compared to the relaxation time of the vortex oscillator.

  1. Demonstration of the frequency modulation of optical signals with a high frequency deviation parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Shamray, A V; Kozlov, A S; Il'ichev, I V; Petrov, M P

    2008-03-31

    A new type of an integrated optical modulator for the frequency coding of optical signals is developed and fabricated. The modulator operation is based on the original technology of the electric control of a Bragg grating. The frequency modulation of an optical signal with the frequency deviation of 25 GHz is demonstrated experimentally. The modular was used to transfer the ASCII code through an optical fibre. (optical communication)

  2. A review of demodulation techniques for amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Harcombe, David M; Ragazzon, Michael R P; Moheimani, S O Reza; Fleming, Andrew J

    2017-01-01

    In this review paper, traditional and novel demodulation methods applicable to amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy are implemented on a widely used digital processing system. As a crucial bandwidth-limiting component in the z-axis feedback loop of an atomic force microscope, the purpose of the demodulator is to obtain estimates of amplitude and phase of the cantilever deflection signal in the presence of sensor noise or additional distinct frequency components. Specifically for modern multifrequency techniques, where higher harmonic and/or higher eigenmode contributions are present in the oscillation signal, the fidelity of the estimates obtained from some demodulation techniques is not guaranteed. To enable a rigorous comparison, the performance metrics tracking bandwidth, implementation complexity and sensitivity to other frequency components are experimentally evaluated for each method. Finally, the significance of an adequate demodulator bandwidth is highlighted during high-speed tapping-mode atomic force microscopy experiments in constant-height mode. PMID:28900596

  3. A review of demodulation techniques for amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ruppert, Michael G; Harcombe, David M; Ragazzon, Michael R P; Moheimani, S O Reza; Fleming, Andrew J

    2017-01-01

    In this review paper, traditional and novel demodulation methods applicable to amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy are implemented on a widely used digital processing system. As a crucial bandwidth-limiting component in the z-axis feedback loop of an atomic force microscope, the purpose of the demodulator is to obtain estimates of amplitude and phase of the cantilever deflection signal in the presence of sensor noise or additional distinct frequency components. Specifically for modern multifrequency techniques, where higher harmonic and/or higher eigenmode contributions are present in the oscillation signal, the fidelity of the estimates obtained from some demodulation techniques is not guaranteed. To enable a rigorous comparison, the performance metrics tracking bandwidth, implementation complexity and sensitivity to other frequency components are experimentally evaluated for each method. Finally, the significance of an adequate demodulator bandwidth is highlighted during high-speed tapping-mode atomic force microscopy experiments in constant-height mode.

  4. Probing interactions between Rydberg atoms with large electric dipole moments in amplitude-modulated electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelyazkova, V.; Hogan, S. D.

    2015-07-01

    Dipole-dipole interactions between helium atoms in Rydberg-Stark states with principal quantum number n =53 and approximately linear Stark energy shifts, resulting from induced electric dipole moments of approximately 7900 D, have been investigated experimentally. The experiments were performed in pulsed supersonic metastable helium beams, with particle number densities of up to ˜109cm-3 . In the presence of amplitude-modulated, radio-frequency electric fields, changes in the spectral intensity distributions associated with the transitions to these states that are attributed to dipole-dipole interactions within the ensembles of excited atoms have been observed. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with calculations of the Rydberg energy level structure carried out using Floquet methods, and excitations shared by up to four atoms. The use of these Rydberg-Stark states as sensors for nonresonant broadband radio-frequency electrical noise is also discussed.

  5. Detection of electron paramagnetic resonance absorption using frequency modulation.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Hiroshi; Kuyama, Toshifumi; Ono, Mitsuhiro; Shimoyama, Yuhei

    2003-10-01

    A frequency modulation (FM) method was developed to measure electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) absorption. The first-derivative spectrum of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) powder was measured with this FM method. Frequency modulation of up to 1.6 MHz (peak-to-peak) was achieved at a microwave carrier frequency of 1.1 GHz. This corresponds to a magnetic field modulation of 57microT (peak-to-peak) at 40.3 mT. By using a tunable microwave resonator and automatic control systems, we achieved a practical continuous-wave (CW) EPR spectrometer that incorporates the FM method. In the present experiments, the EPR signal intensity was proportional to the magnitude of frequency modulation. The background signal at the modulation frequency (1 kHz) for EPR detection was also proportional to the magnitude of frequency modulation. An automatic matching control (AMC) system reduced the amplitude of noise in microwave detection and improved the baseline stability. Distortion of the spectral lineshape was seen when the spectrometer settings were not appropriate, e.g., with a lack of the open-loop gain in automatic tuning control (ATC). FM is an alternative to field modulation when the side-effect of field modulation is detrimental for EPR detection. The present spectroscopic technique based on the FM scheme is useful for measuring the first derivative with respect to the microwave frequency in investigations of electron-spin-related phenomena.

  6. Atomic Oxygen Energy in Low Frequency Hyperthermal Plasma Ashers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Miller, Sharon K R.; Kneubel, Christian A.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental and analytical analysis of the atomic oxygen erosion of pyrolytic graphite as well as Monte Carlo computational modeling of the erosion of Kapton H (DuPont, Wilmington, DE) polyimide was performed to determine the hyperthermal energy of low frequency (30 to 35 kHz) plasma ashers operating on air. It was concluded that hyperthermal energies in the range of 0.3 to 0.9 eV are produced in the low frequency air plasmas which results in texturing similar to that in low Earth orbit (LEO). Monte Carlo computational modeling also indicated that such low energy directed ions are fully capable of producing the experimentally observed textured surfaces in low frequency plasmas.

  7. Novel amplitude and frequency demodulation algorithm for a virtual dynamic atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Kokavecz, J; Tóth, Z; Horváth, Z L; Heszler, P; Mechler, A

    2006-04-14

    Frequency-modulated atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM; also called non-contact atomic force microscopy) is the prevailing operation mode in (sub-)atomic resolution vacuum applications. A major obstacle that prohibits a wider application range is the low frame capture rate. The speed of FM-AFM is limited by the low bandwidth of the automatic gain control (AGC) and frequency demodulation loops. In this work we describe a novel algorithm that can be used to overcome these weaknesses. We analysed the settling times of the proposed loops and that of the complete system, and we found that an approximately 70-fold improvement can be achieved over the existing real and virtual atomic force microscopes. We show that proportional-integral-differential controllers perform better in the frequency demodulation loop than conventional proportional-integral controllers. We demonstrate that the signal to noise ratio of the proposed system is 5.7 × 10(-5), which agrees with that of the conventional systems; thus, the new algorithm would improve the performance of FM-AFMs without compromising the resolution.

  8. Compact frequency-modulation Q-switched single-frequency fiber laser at 1083 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuanfei; Feng, Zhouming; Xu, Shanhui; Mo, Shupei; Yang, Changsheng; Li, Can; Gan, Jiulin; Chen, Dongdan; Yang, Zhongmin

    2015-12-01

    A compact frequency-modulation Q-switched single-frequency fiber laser is demonstrated at 1083 nm. The short linear resonant cavity consists of a 12 mm long homemade Yb3+-doped phosphate fiber and a pair of fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) in which the Q-switching and the frequency excursion is achieved by a tensile-induced period modulation. Over 375 MHz frequency-tuning range is achieved with a modulation frequency varying from tens to hundreds of kilohertz. The highest peak power of the output pulse reaching 6.93 W at the repetition rate of 10 kHz is obtained.

  9. Modulation of the photonic band structure topology of a honeycomb lattice in an atomic vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yiqi; Liu, Xing; Belić, Milivoj R.; Wu, Zhenkun; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2015-12-15

    In an atomic vapor, a honeycomb lattice can be constructed by utilizing the three-beam interference method. In the method, the interference of the three beams splits the dressed energy level periodically, forming a periodic refractive index modulation with the honeycomb profile. The energy band topology of the honeycomb lattice can be modulated by frequency detunings, thereby affecting the appearance (and disappearance) of Dirac points and cones in the momentum space. This effect can be usefully exploited for the generation and manipulation of topological insulators.

  10. Frequency modulation drive for a piezoelectric motor

    DOEpatents

    Mittas, Anthony

    2001-01-01

    A piezoelectric motor has peak performance at a specific frequency f.sub.1 that may vary over a range of frequencies. A drive system is disclosed for operating such a motor at peak performance without feedback. The drive system consists of the motor and an ac source connected to power the motor, the ac source repeatedly generating a frequency over a range from f.sub.1 -.DELTA.x to f.sub.1 +.DELTA.y.

  11. Microwave frequency modulation for improving polarization transfer in DNP experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, Mallory; Ramanathan, Chandrasekhar

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a driven process that transfers the inherently high electron polarization to surrounding nuclear spins via microwave irradiation at or near the electron Larmor frequency. In a typical DNP experiment, the amplitude and frequency of the applied microwaves are constant. However, by adding time dependence in the form of frequency modulation, the electron excitation bandwidth is increased, thereby increasing the number of electron spins active in the polarization transfer process and improving overall efficiency. Both triangular and sinusoidal modulation show a 3 fold improvement over monochromatic irradiation. In the present study, we compare the nuclear spin polarization after DNP experiments with no modulation of the applied microwaves, triangular and sinusoidal modulation, and modulation schemes derived from the sample's ESR spectrum. We characterize the polarization as a function of the modulation amplitude and frequency and compare the optimal results from each modulation scheme. Working at a field of 3.34 T and at a temperature of 4 K, we show that by using a modulation scheme tailored to the electronic environment of the sample, polarization transfer is improved over other modulation schemes. Small-scale simulations of the spin system are developed to gain further insight into the dynamics of this driven open system. This understanding could enable the design of modulation schemes to achieve even higher polarization transfer efficiencies. With support from NSF (CHE-1410504) and by NIH (U19-A1091173).

  12. Optimization of FM spectroscopy parameters for a frequency locking loop in small scale CPT based atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Ben-Aroya, I; Kahanov, M; Eisenstein, G

    2007-11-12

    We describe the optimization of a Frequency Locked Loop (FLL) in an atomic clock which is based on Coherent Population Trapping (CPT) in (87)Rb vapor using the D(2) transition. The FLL uses frequency modulation (FM) spectroscopy and we study the effect of FM parameters (modulation frequency and index) on the sensitivity and the signal to noise ratio of the feedback signal in the FLL. The clock which employs a small spherical glass cell containing (87)Rb atoms and a buffer gas, exhibits a short term stability of 3x10(-11)/ radicaltau. The long term relative frequency stability of the 10 MHz output is better than 10(-10) with a drift of 10(-11) per day.

  13. A low-cost, tunable laser lock without laser frequency modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, Margaret E.; Baker, Paul M.; Gauthier, Daniel J.

    2015-05-01

    Many experiments in optical physics require laser frequency stabilization. This can be achieved by locking to an atomic reference using saturated absorption spectroscopy. Often, the laser frequency is modulated and phase sensitive detection used. This method, while well-proven and robust, relies on expensive components, can introduce an undesirable frequency modulation into the laser, and is not easily frequency tuned. Here, we report a simple locking scheme similar to those implemented previously. We modulate the atomic resonances in a saturated absorption setup with an AC magnetic field created by a single solenoid. The same coil applies a DC field that allows tuning of the lock point. We use an auto-balanced detector to make our scheme more robust against laser power fluctuations and stray magnetic fields. The coil, its driver, and the detector are home-built with simple, cheap components. Our technique is low-cost, simple to setup, tunable, introduces no laser frequency modulation, and only requires one laser. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the NSF through Grant # PHY-1206040.

  14. Nanomechanical electro-optical modulator based on atomic heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, P. A.; Marshall, O. P.; Rodriguez, F. J.; Auton, G. H.; Kravets, V. G.; Kundys, D.; Su, Y.; Grigorenko, A. N.

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional atomic heterostructures combined with metallic nanostructures allow one to realize strong light–matter interactions. Metallic nanostructures possess plasmonic resonances that can be modulated by graphene gating. In particular, spectrally narrow plasmon resonances potentially allow for very high graphene-enabled modulation depth. However, the modulation depths achieved with this approach have so far been low and the modulation wavelength range limited. Here we demonstrate a device in which a graphene/hexagonal boron nitride heterostructure is suspended over a gold nanostripe array. A gate voltage across these devices alters the location of the two-dimensional crystals, creating strong optical modulation of its reflection spectra at multiple wavelengths: in ultraviolet Fabry–Perot resonances, in visible and near-infrared diffraction-coupled plasmonic resonances and in the mid-infrared range of hexagonal boron nitride's upper Reststrahlen band. Devices can be extremely subwavelength in thickness and exhibit compact and truly broadband modulation of optical signals using heterostructures of two-dimensional materials. PMID:27874003

  15. Frequency Specific Modulation of Human Somatosensory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Feurra, Matteo; Paulus, Walter; Walsh, Vincent; Kanai, Ryota

    2011-01-01

    Oscillatory neuronal activities are commonly observed in response to sensory stimulation. However, their functional roles are still the subject of debate. One-way to probe the roles of oscillatory neural activities is to deliver alternating current to the cortex at biologically relevant frequencies and examine whether such stimulation influences perception and cognition. In this study, we tested whether transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) over the primary somatosensory cortex (SI) could elicit tactile sensations in humans in a frequency-dependent manner. We tested the effectiveness of tACS over SI at frequency bands ranging from 2 to 70 Hz. Our results show that stimulation in alpha (10–14 Hz) and high gamma (52–70 Hz) frequency range produces a tactile sensation in the contralateral hand. A weaker effect was also observed for beta (16–20 Hz) stimulation. These findings highlight the frequency dependency of effective tACS over SI with the effective frequencies corresponding to those observed in previous electroencephalography/magnetoencephalography studies of tactile perception. Our present study suggests that tACS could be used as a powerful online stimulation technique to reveal the causal roles of oscillatory brain activities. PMID:21713181

  16. Light modulated switches and radio frequency emitters

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon T.; Tallerico, Paul J.

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a light modulated electron beam driven radiofrequency emitter. Pulses of light impinge on a photoemissive device which generates an electron beam having the pulse characteristics of the light. The electron beam is accelerated through a radiofrequency resonator which produces radiofrequency emission in accordance with the electron, hence, the light pulses.

  17. Coherent Magnetic Response at Optical Frequencies Using Atomic Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, Nicholas R.; Buckholtz, Zachary N.; Simmons, Zachary J.; Mueller, Eli A.; Yavuz, Deniz D.

    2017-01-01

    In optics, the interaction of atoms with the magnetic field of light is almost always ignored since its strength is many orders of magnitude weaker compared to the interaction with the electric field. In this article, by using a magnetic-dipole transition within the 4 f shell of europium ions, we show a strong interaction between a green laser and an ensemble of atomic ions. The electrons move coherently between the ground and excited ionic levels (Rabi flopping) by interacting with the magnetic field of the laser. By measuring the Rabi flopping frequency as the laser intensity is varied, we report the first direct measurement of a magnetic-dipole matrix element in the optical region of the spectrum. Using density-matrix simulations of the ensemble, we infer the generation of coherent magnetization with magnitude 5.5 ×10-3 A /m , which is capable of generating left-handed electromagnetic waves of intensity 1 nW /cm2 . These results open up the prospect of constructing left-handed materials using sharp transitions of atoms.

  18. Exploring Ramsey-coherent population trapping atomic clock realized with pulsed microwave modulated laser

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jing; Yun, Peter; Tian, Yuan; Tan, Bozhong; Gu, Sihong

    2014-03-07

    A scheme for a Ramsey-coherent population trapping (CPT) atomic clock that eliminates the acousto-optic modulator (AOM) is proposed and experimentally studied. Driven by a periodically microwave modulated current, the vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser emits a continuous beam that switches between monochromatic and multichromatic modes. Ramsey-CPT interference has been studied with this mode-switching beam. In eliminating the AOM, which is used to generate pulsed laser in conventional Ramsey-CPT atomic clock, the physics package of the proposed scheme is virtually the same as that of a conventional compact CPT atomic clock, although the resource budget for the electronics will slightly increase as a microwave switch should be added. By evaluating and comparing experimentally recorded signals from the two Ramsey-CPT schemes, the short-term frequency stability of the proposed scheme was found to be 46% better than the scheme with AOM. The experimental results suggest that the implementation of a compact Ramsey-CPT atomic clock promises better frequency stability.

  19. Computational expressions for signals in frequency-modulation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Di Rosa, Michael D.; Reiten, M. T.

    2015-05-25

    In this study, general expressions for the signals in frequency-modulation spectroscopy (FMS) appear in the literature but are often reduced to simple analytical equations following the assumption of a weak modulation index. This is little help to the experimentalist who wants to predict signals for modulation depths of the order of unity or greater, where strong FMS signals reside. Here, we develop general formulas for FMS signals in the case of an absorber with a Voigt line shape and then link these expressions to an example and existing numerical code for the line shape. The resulting computational recipe is easy to implement and exercised here to show where the larger FMS signals are found over the coordinates of modulation index and modulation frequency. One can also estimate from provided curves the in-phase FMS signal over a wide range of modulation parameters at either the Lorentzian-broadening or Doppler-broadening limit, or anywhere in between by interpolation.

  20. Noise radar using random phase and frequency modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axelsson, Sune R. J.

    2004-01-01

    Pulse compression radar is used in a great number of radar applications. Excellent range resolution and high ECCM performance can be achieved by wide-band modulated long pulses, which spread out the transmitted energy in frequency and time. By using random noise as waveform, the range ambiguity can be suppressed as well. The same limit in doppler resolution is achieved as for a coherent doppler radar when the time compression of the reference is tuned to that of the target. Mostly, the random signal is transmitted directly from a noise generating HF-source. A sine wave, which is phase or frequency modulated by random noise, is an alternative giving similar performance but higher transmitted mean power when peak-limited transmitters are applied. A narrower modulation noise bandwidth can also be applied to generate the same output bandwidth. For phase modulation, the bandwidth amplifying factor is simply the rms value of the phase modulation, and for a frequency modulating waveform the output rms bandwidth equals the rms value of the frequency modulation. The results also show that the range sidelobes can be highly suppressed compared with the sidelobes of the modulating signal. The mean and variance of the correlation integral are derived in terms of the autocorrelation function of the modulation. Finally, random bi-phase modulation and the effects of low-bit ADC at the correlation processing are analyzed and described. The advantages of low range sidelobes and enhanced range resolution make frequency and phase modulation attractive for a great number of applications.

  1. Amplitude modulation reduces loudness adaptation to high-frequency tones

    PubMed Central

    Wynne, Dwight P.; George, Sahara E.; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Long-term loudness perception of a sound has been presumed to depend on the spatial distribution of activated auditory nerve fibers as well as their temporal firing pattern. The relative contributions of those two factors were investigated by measuring loudness adaptation to sinusoidally amplitude-modulated 12-kHz tones. The tones had a total duration of 180 s and were either unmodulated or 100%-modulated at one of three frequencies (4, 20, or 100 Hz), and additionally varied in modulation depth from 0% to 100% at the 4-Hz frequency only. Every 30 s, normal-hearing subjects estimated the loudness of one of the stimuli played at 15 dB above threshold in random order. Without any amplitude modulation, the loudness of the unmodulated tone after 180 s was only 20% of the loudness at the onset of the stimulus. Amplitude modulation systematically reduced the amount of loudness adaptation, with the 100%-modulated stimuli, regardless of modulation frequency, maintaining on average 55%–80% of the loudness at onset after 180 s. Because the present low-frequency amplitude modulation produced minimal changes in long-term spectral cues affecting the spatial distribution of excitation produced by a 12-kHz pure tone, the present result indicates that neural synchronization is critical to maintaining loudness perception over time. PMID:26233027

  2. Method and apparatus for resonant frequency waveform modulation

    DOEpatents

    Taubman, Matthew S [Richland, WA

    2011-06-07

    A resonant modulator device and process are described that provide enhanced resonant frequency waveforms to electrical devices including, e.g., laser devices. Faster, larger, and more complex modulation waveforms are obtained than can be obtained by use of conventional current controllers alone.

  3. High-frequency Broadband Modulations of Electroencephalographic Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Onton, Julie; Makeig, Scott

    2009-01-01

    High-frequency cortical potentials in electroencephalographic (EEG) scalp recordings have low amplitudes and may be confounded with scalp muscle activities. EEG data from an eyes-closed emotion imagination task were linearly decomposed using independent component analysis (ICA) into maximally independent component (IC) processes. Joint decomposition of IC log spectrograms into source- and frequency-independent modulator (IM) processes revealed three distinct classes of IMs that separately modulated broadband high-frequency (∼15–200 Hz) power of brain, scalp muscle, and likely ocular motor IC processes. Multi-dimensional scaling revealed significant but spatially complex relationships between mean broadband brain IM effects and the valence of the imagined emotions. Thus, contrary to prevalent assumption, unitary modes of spectral modulation of frequencies encompassing the beta, gamma, and high gamma frequency ranges can be isolated from scalp-recorded EEG data and may be differentially associated with brain sources and cognitive activities. PMID:20076775

  4. Modulation linearization of a frequency-modulated voltage controlled oscillator, part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honnell, M. A.

    1975-01-01

    An analysis is presented for the voltage versus frequency characteristics of a varactor modulated VHF voltage controlled oscillator in which the frequency deviation is linearized by using the nonlinear characteristics of a field effect transistor as a signal amplifier. The equations developed are used to calculate the oscillator output frequency in terms of pertinent circuit parameters. It is shown that the nonlinearity exponent of the FET has a pronounced influence on frequency deviation linearity, whereas the junction exponent of the varactor controls total frequency deviation for a given input signal. A design example for a 250 MHz frequency modulated oscillator is presented.

  5. Direct frequency comb optical frequency standard based on two-photon transitions of thermal atoms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, S. Y.; Wu, J. T.; Zhang, Y. L.; Leng, J. X.; Yang, W. P.; Zhang, Z. G.; Zhao, J. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Optical clocks have been the focus of science and technology research areas due to their capability to provide highest frequency accuracy and stability to date. Their superior frequency performance promises significant advances in the fields of fundamental research as well as practical applications including satellite-based navigation and ranging. In traditional optical clocks, ultrastable optical cavities, laser cooling and particle (atoms or a single ion) trapping techniques are employed to guarantee high stability and accuracy. However, on the other hand, they make optical clocks an entire optical tableful of equipment, and cannot work continuously for a long time; as a result, they restrict optical clocks used as very convenient and compact time-keeping clocks. In this article, we proposed, and experimentally demonstrated, a novel scheme of optical frequency standard based on comb-directly-excited atomic two-photon transitions. By taking advantage of the natural properties of the comb and two-photon transitions, this frequency standard achieves a simplified structure, high robustness as well as decent frequency stability, which promise widespread applications in various scenarios. PMID:26459877

  6. Direct frequency comb optical frequency standard based on two-photon transitions of thermal atoms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S Y; Wu, J T; Zhang, Y L; Leng, J X; Yang, W P; Zhang, Z G; Zhao, J Y

    2015-10-13

    Optical clocks have been the focus of science and technology research areas due to their capability to provide highest frequency accuracy and stability to date. Their superior frequency performance promises significant advances in the fields of fundamental research as well as practical applications including satellite-based navigation and ranging. In traditional optical clocks, ultrastable optical cavities, laser cooling and particle (atoms or a single ion) trapping techniques are employed to guarantee high stability and accuracy. However, on the other hand, they make optical clocks an entire optical tableful of equipment, and cannot work continuously for a long time; as a result, they restrict optical clocks used as very convenient and compact time-keeping clocks. In this article, we proposed, and experimentally demonstrated, a novel scheme of optical frequency standard based on comb-directly-excited atomic two-photon transitions. By taking advantage of the natural properties of the comb and two-photon transitions, this frequency standard achieves a simplified structure, high robustness as well as decent frequency stability, which promise widespread applications in various scenarios.

  7. Stabilization and time resolved measurement of the frequency evolution of a modulated diode laser for chirped pulse generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga-Umbrich, K.; Bakos, J. S.; Djotyan, G. P.; Ignácz, P. N.; Ráczkevi, B.; Sörlei, Zs; Szigeti, J.; Kedves, M. Á.

    2016-05-01

    We have developed experimental methods for the generation of chirped laser pulses of controlled frequency evolution in the nanosecond pulse length range for coherent atomic interaction studies. The pulses are sliced from the radiation of a cw external cavity diode laser while its drive current, and consequently its frequency, are sinusoidally modulated. By the proper choice of the modulation parameters, as well as of the timing of pulse slicing, we can produce a wide variety of frequency sweep ranges during the pulse. In order to obtain the required frequency chirp, we need to stabilize the center frequency of the modulated laser and to measure the resulting frequency evolution with appropriate temporal resolution. These tasks have been solved by creating a beat signal with a reference laser locked to an atomic transition frequency. The beat signal is then analyzed, as well as its spectral sideband peaks are fed back to the electronics of the frequency stabilization of the modulated laser. This method is simple and it has the possibility for high speed frequency sweep with narrow linewidth that is appropriate, for example, for selective manipulation of atomic states in a magneto-optical trap.

  8. Optimizing Frequency-Modulated CW EDMR in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lihuang; van Schooten, Kipp; Ramanathan, Chandrasekhar

    Electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) is a powerful method of probing dopant and defect spin states in semiconductor devices. Moreover, at the single dopant level, these spin states are heavily investigated as potential qubit systems, though facile electronic access to single dopants is exceedingly difficult. We therefore characterize detection sensitivities of frequency-modulated CW-EDMR of phosphorus donors in silicon Si:P using a home-built 2.5 GHz system (~80 mT) at 5 K. An arbitrary waveform generator controls the frequency modulation, allowing us to optimize the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of both the dangling bond and phosphorus donor signals against multiple experimental parameters, such as modulation amplitude and modulation frequency. The optimal range of frequency modulation parameters is constrained by the relaxation time of the phosphorous electron at 5 K, resulting in the same sensitivity limit as field modulated CW-EDMR, but offers some technical advantages; e.g. reducing the relative contribution of magnetic field induced currents and eliminating the need for field modulation coils. We further characterize the EDMR SNR in Si:P as a function of optical excitation energy by using a narrow line laser, tunable across donor exciton and band gap states.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulation of amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaoli; Egberts, Philip; Dong, Yalin; Martini, Ashlie

    2015-06-12

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to model amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM). In this novel simulation, the model AFM tip responds to both tip-substrate interactions and to a sinusoidal excitation signal. The amplitude and phase shift of the tip oscillation observed in the simulation and their variation with tip-sample distance were found to be consistent with previously reported trends from experiments and theory. These simulation results were also fit to an expression enabling estimation of the energy dissipation, which was found to be smaller than that in a corresponding experiment. The difference was analyzed in terms of the effects of tip size and substrate thickness. Development of this model is the first step toward using MD to gain insight into the atomic-scale phenomena that occur during an AM-AFM measurement.

  10. Hemodynamic responses can modulate the brain oscillations in low frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Feng-Mei; Wang, Yi-Feng; Yuan, Zhen

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have showed that the steady-state responses were able to be used as an effective index for modulating the neural oscillations in the high frequency ranges (> 1 Hz). However, the neural oscillations in low frequency ranges (<1 Hz) remain unknown. In this study, a series of fNIRS experimental tests were conducted to validate if the low frequency bands (0.1 Hz - 0.8 Hz) steady-state hemoglobin responses (SSHbRs) could be evoked and modulate the neural oscillation during a serial reaction time (SRT) task.

  11. Theory for low-frequency modulated Langmuir wave packets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    Langmuir wave packets with low frequency modulations (or beats) observed in the Jovian foreshock are argued to be direct evidence for the Langmuir wave decay L yields L-prime + S. In this decay, 'pump' Langmuir waves L, driven by an electron beam, produce backscattered product Langmuir waves L-prime and ion sound waves S. The L and L-prime waves beat at the frequency and wavevector of the S waves, thereby modulating the wave packets. Beam speeds calculated using the modulated Jovian wave packets (1) are reasonable, at 4-10 times the electron thermal speed, (2) are consistent with theoretical limits on the decay process, and (3) decrease with increasing foreshock depth, as expected theoretically. These results strongly support the theory. The modulation depth of some wave packets suggests saturation by the decay L yields L-prime + S. Applications to modulated Langmuir packets in the Venusian and terrestrial foreshocks and in a type III radio source are proposed.

  12. Method and apparatus for optical communication by frequency modulation

    DOEpatents

    Priatko, Gordon J.

    1988-01-01

    Laser optical communication according to this invention is carried out by producing multi-frequency laser beams having different frequencies, splitting one or more of these constituent beams into reference and signal beams, encoding information on the signal beams by frequency modulation and detecting the encoded information by heterodyne techniques. Much more information can be transmitted over optical paths according to the present invention than with the use of only one path as done previously.

  13. Method and apparatus for optical communication by frequency modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Priatko, G.J.

    1988-12-13

    Laser optical communication according to this invention is carried out by producing multi-frequency laser beams having different frequencies, splitting one or more of these constituent beams into reference and signal beams, encoding information on the signal beams by frequency modulation and detecting the encoded information by heterodyne techniques. Much more information can be transmitted over optical paths according to the present invention than with the use of only one path as done previously.

  14. Digital intermediate frequency QAM modulator using parallel processing

    DOEpatents

    Pao, Hsueh-Yuan [Livermore, CA; Tran, Binh-Nien [San Ramon, CA

    2008-05-27

    The digital Intermediate Frequency (IF) modulator applies to various modulation types and offers a simple and low cost method to implement a high-speed digital IF modulator using field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). The architecture eliminates multipliers and sequential processing by storing the pre-computed modulated cosine and sine carriers in ROM look-up-tables (LUTs). The high-speed input data stream is parallel processed using the corresponding LUTs, which reduces the main processing speed, allowing the use of low cost FPGAs.

  15. Mercury Atomic Frequency Standards for Space Based Navigation and Timekeeping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tjoelker, R. L.; Burt, E. A.; Chung, S.; Hamell, R. L.; Prestage, J. D.; Tucker, B.; Cash, P.; Lutwak, R.

    2012-01-01

    A low power Mercury Atomic Frequency Standard (MAFS) has been developed and demonstrated on the path towards future space clock applications. A self contained mercury ion breadboard clock: emulating flight clock interfaces, steering a USO local oscillator, and consuming approx 40 Watts has been operating at JPL for more than a year. This complete, modular ion clock instrument demonstrates that key GNSS size, weight, and power (SWaP) requirements can be achieved while still maintaining short and long term performance demonstrated in previous ground ion clocks. The MAFS breadboard serves as a flexible platform for optimizing further space clock development and guides engineering model design trades towards fabrication of an ion clock for space flight.

  16. Mercury Atomic Frequency Standards for Space Based Navigation and Timekeeping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tjoelker, R. L.; Burt, E. A.; Chung, S.; Hamell, R. L.; Prestage, J. D.; Tucker, B.; Cash, P.; Lutwak, R.

    2012-01-01

    A low power Mercury Atomic Frequency Standard (MAFS) has been developed and demonstrated on the path towards future space clock applications. A self contained mercury ion breadboard clock: emulating flight clock interfaces, steering a USO local oscillator, and consuming approx 40 Watts has been operating at JPL for more than a year. This complete, modular ion clock instrument demonstrates that key GNSS size, weight, and power (SWaP) requirements can be achieved while still maintaining short and long term performance demonstrated in previous ground ion clocks. The MAFS breadboard serves as a flexible platform for optimizing further space clock development and guides engineering model design trades towards fabrication of an ion clock for space flight.

  17. Controlling dipole-dipole frequency shifts in a lattice-based optical atomic clock

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, D.E.; Lukin, M.D.; Ye Jun

    2004-02-01

    Motivated by the ideas of using cold alkaline-earth atoms trapped in an optical lattice for realization of optical atomic clocks, we investigate theoretically the perturbative effects of atom-atom interactions on a clock transition frequency. These interactions are mediated by the dipole fields associated with the optically excited atoms. We predict resonancelike features in the frequency shifts when constructive interference among atomic dipoles occur. We theoretically demonstrate that by fine tuning the coherent dipole-dipole couplings in appropriately designed lattice geometries, the undesirable frequency shifts can be greatly suppressed.

  18. Cycle Time Reduction in Trapped Mercury Ion Atomic Frequency Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, Eric A.; Tjoelker, Robert L.; Taghavi, Shervin

    2011-01-01

    The use of the mercury ion isotope (201)Hg(+) was examined for an atomic clock. Taking advantage of the faster optical pumping time in (201)Hg(+) reduces both the state preparation and the state readout times, thereby decreasing the overall cycle time of the clock and reducing the impact of medium-term LO noise on the performance of the frequency standard. The spectral overlap between the plasma discharge lamp used for (201)Hg(+) state preparation and readout is much larger than that of the lamp used for the more conventional (199)Hg(+). There has been little study of (201)Hg(+) for clock applications (in fact, all trapped ion clock work in mercury has been with (199)Hg(+); however, recently the optical pumping time in (201)Hg(+) has been measured and found to be 0.45 second, or about three times faster than in (199)Hg(+) due largely to the better spectral overlap. This can be used to reduce the overall clock cycle time by over 2 seconds, or up to a factor of 2 improvement. The use of the (201)Hg(+) for an atomic clock is totally new. Most attempts to reduce the impact of LO noise have focused on reducing the interrogation time. In the trapped ion frequency standards built so far at JPL, the optical pumping time is already at its minimum so that no enhancement can be had by shortening it. However, by using (201)Hg(+), this is no longer the case. Furthermore, integrity monitoring, the mechanism that determines whether the clock is functioning normally, cannot happen faster than the clock cycle time. Therefore, a shorter cycle time will enable quicker detection of failure modes and recovery from them.

  19. Scaling the perceived fluctuation strength of frequency-modulated tones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickelmaier, Florian; Ellermeier, Wolfgang

    2004-05-01

    Fluctuation strength is one of the major psychoacoustic variables considered in sound-quality evaluation. Zwicker and Fastl [Psychoacoustics (Springer, Berlin, 1999)] summarize recommendations for its computation, which have already been implemented in various software applications, even though the data basis is rather limited. In particular, the dependency of fluctuation strength on modulation frequency and modulation depth has seemingly never been tested in a factorial design. Therefore, in experiment I both of these factors were varied simultaneously in order to create 54 different frequency-modulated sinusoids. The task of the subjects was to directly estimate the perceived magnitude of fluctuation strength. The results do not conform well with the prevalent model of fluctuation strength. In experiment II this finding was further investigated by varying only one factor at a time. The results show that large individual differences, particularly in the effect of modulation frequency, persist. Thus, in experiment III the interaction of both factors was analyzed on an individual basis. By employing a 2AFC procedure, matches in fluctuation strength were obtained. The results suggest that most listeners are not able to integrate modulation frequency and modulation depth additively into a unidimensional percept. [Work supported by Centercontract on Sound Quality, Aalborg University.

  20. A phase-locked laser system based on double direct modulation technique for atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Pan, Xiong; Song, Ningfang; Xu, Xiaobin; Lu, Xiangxiang

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate a laser system based on phase modulation technology and phase feedback control. The two laser beams with frequency difference of 6.835 GHz are modulated using electro-optic and acousto-optic modulators, respectively. Parasitic frequency components produced by the electro-optic modulator are filtered using a Fabry-Perot Etalon. A straightforward phase feedback system restrains the phase noise induced by environmental perturbations. The phase noise of the laser system stays below -125 rad2/Hz at frequency offset higher than 500 kHz. Overall phase noise of the laser system is evaluated by calculating the contribution of the phase noise to the sensitivity limit of a gravimeter. The results reveal that the sensitivity limited by the phase noise of our laser system is lower than that of a state-of-the-art optical phase-lock loop scheme when a gravimeter operates at short pulse duration, which makes the laser system a promising option for our future application of atom interferometer.

  1. Frequency modulation television analysis: Distortion analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, W. H.; Wong, W. H.

    1973-01-01

    Computer simulation is used to calculate the time-domain waveform of standard T-pulse-and-bar test signal distorted in passing through an FM television system. The simulator includes flat or preemphasized systems and requires specification of the RF predetection filter characteristics. The predetection filters are modeled with frequency-symmetric Chebyshev (0.1-db ripple) and Butterworth filters. The computer was used to calculate distorted output signals for sixty-four different specified systems, and the output waveforms are plotted for all sixty-four. Comparison of the plotted graphs indicates that a Chebyshev predetection filter of four poles causes slightly more signal distortion than a corresponding Butterworth filter and the signal distortion increases as the number of poles increases. An increase in the peak deviation also increases signal distortion. Distortion also increases with the addition of preemphasis.

  2. Carrier: Interference ratios for frequency sharing between satellite systems transmitting frequency modulated and digital television signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, S. P.

    1979-01-01

    Results are presented of subjective and quantitative tests describing the results of interference to a particular digital television system from a frequency modulated (FM) television system, and for interference to an FM television system from a digital television system.

  3. Very high frequency plasma reactant for atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Il-Kwon; Yoo, Gilsang; Yoon, Chang Mo; Kim, Tae Hyung; Yeom, Geun Young; Kim, Kangsik; Lee, Zonghoon; Jung, Hanearl; Lee, Chang Wan; Kim, Hyungjun; Lee, Han-Bo-Ram

    2016-11-01

    Although plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) results in several benefits in the formation of high-k dielectrics, including a low processing temperature and improved film properties compared to conventional thermal ALD, energetic radicals and ions in the plasma cause damage to layer stacks, leading to the deterioration of electrical properties. In this study, the growth characteristics and film properties of PE-ALD Al2O3 were investigated using a very-high-frequency (VHF) plasma reactant. Because VHF plasma features a lower electron temperature and higher plasma density than conventional radio frequency (RF) plasma, it has a larger number of less energetic reaction species, such as radicals and ions. VHF PE-ALD Al2O3 shows superior physical and electrical properties over RF PE-ALD Al2O3, including high growth per cycle, excellent conformality, low roughness, high dielectric constant, low leakage current, and low interface trap density. In addition, interlayer-free Al2O3 on Si was achieved in VHF PE-ALD via a significant reduction in plasma damage. VHF PE-ALD will be an essential process to realize nanoscale devices that require precise control of interfaces and electrical properties.

  4. High power laser source for atom cooling based on reliable telecoms technology with all fibre frequency stabilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legg, Thomas; Farries, Mark

    2017-02-01

    Cold atom interferometers are emerging as important tools for metrology. Designed into gravimeters they can measure extremely small changes in the local gravitational field strength and be used for underground surveying to detect buried utilities, mineshafts and sinkholes prior to civil works. To create a cold atom interferometer narrow linewidth, frequency stabilised lasers are required to cool the atoms and to setup and measure the atom interferometer. These lasers are commonly either GaAs diodes, Ti Sapphire lasers or frequency doubled InGaAsP diodes and fibre lasers. The InGaAsP DFB lasers are attractive because they are very reliable, mass-produced, frequency controlled by injection current and simply amplified to high powers with fibre amplifiers. In this paper a laser system suitable for Rb atom cooling, based on a 1560nm DFB laser and erbium doped fibre amplifier, is described. The laser output is frequency doubled with fibre coupled periodically poled LiNbO3 to a wavelength of 780nm. The output power exceeds 1 W at 780nm. The laser is stabilised at 1560nm against a fibre Bragg resonator that is passively temperature compensated. Frequency tuning over a range of 1 GHz is achieved by locking the laser to sidebands of the resonator that are generated by a phase modulator. This laser design is attractive for field deployable rugged systems because it uses all fibre coupled components with long term proven reliability.

  5. Laser for high frequency modulated interferometry

    DOEpatents

    Mansfield, D.K.; Vocaturo, M.; Guttadora, L.J.

    1991-07-23

    A Stark-tuned laser operating in the 119 micron line of CH[sub 3]OH has an output power of several tens of milliwatts at 30 Watts of pump power while exhibiting a doublet splitting of about ten MHz with the application of a Stark field on the order of 500 volts/cm. This output power allows for use of the laser in a multi-channel interferometer, while its high operating frequency permits the interferometer to measure rapid electron density changes in a pellet injected or otherwise fueled plasma such as encountered in magnetic fusion devices. The laser includes a long far-infrared (FIR) pyrex resonator tube disposed within a cylindrical water jacket and incorporating charged electrodes for applying the Stark field to a gas confined therein. With the electrodes located within the resonator tube, the resonator tube walls are cooled by a flowing coolant without electrical breakdown in the coolant liquid during application of the Stark field. Wall cooling allows for substantially increased FIR output powers. Provision is made for introducing a buffer gas into the resonator tube for increasing laser output power and its operating bandwidth. 10 figures.

  6. Laser for high frequency modulated interferometry

    DOEpatents

    Mansfield, Dennis K.; Vocaturo, Michael; Guttadora, Lawrence J.

    1991-01-01

    A Stark-tuned laser operating in the 119 micron line of CH.sub.3 OH has an output power of several tens of milliwatts at 30 Watts of pump power while exhibiting a doublet splitting of about ten MHz with the application of a Stark field on the order of 500 volts/cm. This output power allows for use of the laser in a multi-channel interferometer, while its high operating frequency permits the interferometer to measure rapid electron density changes in a pellet injected or otherwise fueled plasma such as encountered in magnetic fusion devices. The laser includes a long far-infrared (FIR) pyrex resonator tube disposed within a cylindrical water jacket and incorporating charged electrodes for applying the Stark field to a gas confined therein. With the electrodes located within the resonator tube, the resonator tube walls are cooled by a flowing coolant without electrical breakdown in the coolant liquid during application of the Stark field. Wall cooling allows for substantially increased FIR output powers. Provision is made for introducing a buffer gas into the resonator tube for increasing laser output power and its operating bandwidth.

  7. High frequency microbubble-switched oscillations modulated by microfluidic transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fanghao; Dai, Xianming; Li, Chen

    2012-08-01

    Creating high frequency two-phase oscillations (HF-TPOs) remains an important goal in advancing microscale fluidic logic devices, micro-mixers, micro-actuators, and flow controls. However, thermally driven TPO frequency has been hindered by confinements of compressible vapor bubbles and low thermal diffusivity in microfluidic systems. In this study, a mechanism creating high frequency microbubbles growth/collapse cycle has been developed to achieve HF-TPOs. A "microfluidic transistor" was conceptualized and fabricated to passively sustain and modulate HF-TPOs. Three orders of magnitude higher TPO frequency has been achieved compared to TPOs reported in literatures under similar working conditions.

  8. Duobinary pulse shaping for frequency chirp enabled complex modulation.

    PubMed

    Che, Di; Yuan, Feng; Khodakarami, Hamid; Shieh, William

    2016-09-01

    The frequency chirp of optical direct modulation (DM) used to be a performance barrier of optical transmission system, because it broadens the signal optical spectrum, which becomes more susceptible to chromatic dispersion induced inter-symbol interference (ISI). However, by considering the chirp as frequency modulation, the single DM simultaneously generates a 2-D signal containing the intensity and phase (namely, the time integral of frequency). This complex modulation concept significantly increases the optical signal to noise ratio (OSNR) sensitivity of DM systems. This Letter studies the duobinary pulse shaping (DB-PS) for chirp enabled DM and its impact on the optical bandwidth and system OSNR sensitivity. DB-PS relieves the bandwidth requirement, at the sacrifice of system OSNR sensitivity. As DB-PS induces a controlled ISI, the receiver requires one more tap for maximum likelihood sequence estimation (MLSE). We verify this modified MLSE with a 10-Gbaud duobinary PAM-4 transmission experiment.

  9. A mechanism for frequency modulation in songbirds shared with humans.

    PubMed

    Amador, Ana; Margoliash, Daniel

    2013-07-03

    In most animals that vocalize, control of fundamental frequency is a key element for effective communication. In humans, subglottal pressure controls vocal intensity but also influences fundamental frequency during phonation. Given the underlying similarities in the biomechanical mechanisms of vocalization in humans and songbirds, songbirds offer an attractive opportunity to study frequency modulation by pressure. Here, we present a novel technique for dynamic control of subsyringeal pressure in zebra finches. By regulating the opening of a custom-built fast valve connected to the air sac system, we achieved partial or total silencing of specific syllables, and could modify syllabic acoustics through more complex manipulations of air sac pressure. We also observed that more nuanced pressure variations over a limited interval during production of a syllable concomitantly affected the frequency of that syllable segment. These results can be explained in terms of a mathematical model for phonation that incorporates a nonlinear description for the vocal source capable of generating the observed frequency modulations induced by pressure variations. We conclude that the observed interaction between pressure and frequency was a feature of the source, not a result of feedback control. Our results indicate that, beyond regulating phonation or its absence, regulation of pressure is important for control of fundamental frequencies of vocalizations. Thus, although there are separate brainstem pathways for syringeal and respiratory control of song production, both can affect airflow and frequency. We hypothesize that the control of pressure and frequency is combined holistically at higher levels of the vocalization pathways.

  10. A Mechanism for Frequency Modulation in Songbirds Shared with Humans

    PubMed Central

    Margoliash, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    In most animals that vocalize, control of fundamental frequency is a key element for effective communication. In humans, subglottal pressure controls vocal intensity but also influences fundamental frequency during phonation. Given the underlying similarities in the biomechanical mechanisms of vocalization in humans and songbirds, songbirds offer an attractive opportunity to study frequency modulation by pressure. Here, we present a novel technique for dynamic control of subsyringeal pressure in zebra finches. By regulating the opening of a custom-built fast valve connected to the air sac system, we achieved partial or total silencing of specific syllables, and could modify syllabic acoustics through more complex manipulations of air sac pressure. We also observed that more nuanced pressure variations over a limited interval during production of a syllable concomitantly affected the frequency of that syllable segment. These results can be explained in terms of a mathematical model for phonation that incorporates a nonlinear description for the vocal source capable of generating the observed frequency modulations induced by pressure variations. We conclude that the observed interaction between pressure and frequency was a feature of the source, not a result of feedback control. Our results indicate that, beyond regulating phonation or its absence, regulation of pressure is important for control of fundamental frequencies of vocalizations. Thus, although there are separate brainstem pathways for syringeal and respiratory control of song production, both can affect airflow and frequency. We hypothesize that the control of pressure and frequency is combined holistically at higher levels of the vocalization pathways. PMID:23825417

  11. Application of Multi-Frequency Modulation (MFM) facsimile machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickerson, James T.

    1990-09-01

    Multi-Frequency Modulation (MFM) has been developed at NPS using both differential quadrature-amplitude-modulation (DQAM) and differential quadrature-phase-shift-keying (DQPSK) encoding formats. This report discusses the use of each of these formats in transmitting a facsimile encoded message over a voice frequency channel. The satisfactory transmission and receipt of facsimile messages was achieved using both DQPSK and D16-QAM encoding formats. Research and testing for this report included the use of variable facsimile transmission rates in an attempt to optimize MFM operating parameters. Experimental results revealed a higher error rate when decoding messages contained similar contiguous characters.

  12. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Phase-sensitive electric modulation of photoluminescence upon bichromatic excitation of atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astapenko, Valerii A.

    2005-12-01

    A new type of modulation of the photoluminescence intensity of atoms excited by a bichromatic laser radiation with the frequency ratio 1:2 is proposed and analysed. The modulation is produced by alternating electric field acting on atoms and occurs due to the quantum interference of the amplitudes of two excitation channels of an atom, which proves to be possible because the applied electric field removes the parity selection rule for one of the excitation channels. An important feature of this process is the dependence of photoluminescence on the phase difference of monochromatic components of exciting radiation. The calculation was performed for an alkali metal atom excited at the s—s transition taking the saturation effect into account.

  13. Use of amplitude-modulated breathing for assessment of cardiorespiratory frequency response within subrespiratory frequencies.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, A; Vallurupalli, S; Evans, J; Knapp, C; Bruce, E

    1998-02-01

    We present a new technique which uses amplitude-modulated breathing patterns to obtain estimates of frequency response between respiration and heart rate within subrespiratory frequencies. Frequency response between respiration and heart rate has been previously estimated using broadband respiration and metronomic breathing. However, the estimates obtained using these techniques show low coherence between respiration and heart rate within the subrespiratory frequencies (< 0.12-0.15 Hz). The advantages of amplitude-modulated breathing are: enhancement in the degree of perturbation within subrespiratory frequencies as indicated by relatively higher coherencies between respiration and heart rate (approximately equal to 0.7), and the subjects do not have to breathe at very low breathing frequencies or resort to breath holds. Use of a squared sine wave carrier modulated by sinusoidal functions enabled us to obtain energy distributions at subrespiratory frequencies without using demodulation. Results obtained at eight subrespiratory frequencies from ten subjects show that the new technique is easy to implement and produces relatively higher coherence between respiration and heart rate. The advantage of the new technique in terms of enhancing the level of perturbations within subrespiratory frequencies is particularly important, because it is in this frequency range that the interpretation of variability in heart rate in terms of autonomic origins is incompletely understood and is confounded by respiratory interactions.

  14. Laser frequency stabilisation by the Pound - Drever - Hall method using an acousto-optic phase modulator operating in the pure Raman - Nath diffraction regime

    SciTech Connect

    Baryshev, Vyacheslav N

    2012-04-30

    Frequency stabilisation of diode laser radiation has been implemented by the Pound - Drever - Hall method using a new acousto-optic phase modulator, operating in the pure Raman - Nath diffraction regime. It is experimentally shown that, as in the case of saturated-absorption spectroscopy in atomic vapour, the spatial divergence of the frequency-modulated output spectrum of this modulator does not interfere with obtaining error signals by means of heterodyne frequency-modulation spectroscopy with a frequency discriminator based on a high-Q Fabry - Perot cavity with finesse of several tens of thousands.

  15. Neural pulse frequency modulation of an exponentially correlated Gaussian process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchinson, C. E.; Chon, Y.-T.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of NPFM (Neural Pulse Frequency Modulation) on a stationary Gaussian input, namely an exponentially correlated Gaussian input, is investigated with special emphasis on the determination of the average number of pulses in unit time, known also as the average frequency of pulse occurrence. For some classes of stationary input processes where the formulation of the appropriate multidimensional Markov diffusion model of the input-plus-NPFM system is possible, the average impulse frequency may be obtained by a generalization of the approach adopted. The results are approximate and numerical, but are in close agreement with Monte Carlo computer simulation results.

  16. Computational expressions for signals in frequency-modulation spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Di Rosa, Michael D.; Reiten, M. T.

    2015-05-25

    In this study, general expressions for the signals in frequency-modulation spectroscopy (FMS) appear in the literature but are often reduced to simple analytical equations following the assumption of a weak modulation index. This is little help to the experimentalist who wants to predict signals for modulation depths of the order of unity or greater, where strong FMS signals reside. Here, we develop general formulas for FMS signals in the case of an absorber with a Voigt line shape and then link these expressions to an example and existing numerical code for the line shape. The resulting computational recipe is easymore » to implement and exercised here to show where the larger FMS signals are found over the coordinates of modulation index and modulation frequency. One can also estimate from provided curves the in-phase FMS signal over a wide range of modulation parameters at either the Lorentzian-broadening or Doppler-broadening limit, or anywhere in between by interpolation.« less

  17. A kind of magnetron cavity used in rubidium atomic frequency standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiyu, Yang; Jingzhong, Cui; Jianhui, Tu; Yaoting, Liang

    2011-12-01

    Research on the magnetron cavity used in the rubidium atomic frequency standards is developed, through which the main characteristic parameters of the magnetron cavity are studied, mainly including the resonant frequency, quality factor and oscillation mode. The resonant frequency and quality factor of the magnetron cavity were calculated, and the test results of the resonant frequency agreed well with the calculation theory. The test results also show that the resonant frequency of the magnetron cavity can be attenuated to 6.835 GHz, which is the resonant frequency of the rubidium atoms, and the Q-factor can be attenuated to 500-1000. The oscillation mode is a typical TE011 mode and is the correct mode needed for the rubidium atomic frequency standard. Therefore these derivative magnetron cavities meet the requirements of the rubidium atomic frequency standards well.

  18. Double wavelet transform of frequency-modulated nonstationary signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozhokin, S. V.; Suslova, I. M.

    2013-12-01

    A mathematical model is proposed for a frequency-modulated signal in the form of a system of Gaussian peaks randomly distributed in time. An analytic expression is obtained for continuous wavelet transform (CWT) of the model signal. For signals with time-varying sequence of peaks, the main ridge of the skeleton characterized by frequency ν{max/MFB} ( t) is analyzed. The value of ν{max/MFB} ( t) is determined for any instant t from the condition of the CWT maximum in the spectral range of the main frequency band (MFB). Double CWT of function ν{max/MFB} ( t) is calculated for a frequency-modulated signal with a transition regions of smooth frequency variation (trend) as well as with varying frequency oscillations relative to the trend. The duration of transition periods of the signal is determined using spectral integrals E ν( t). The instants of emergence and decay of low-frequency spectral components of the signal are determined. The double CWT method can be used for analyzing cardiac rhythms and neural activity, as well as nonstationary processes in quantum radio physics and astronomy.

  19. Wavelength Modulation Absorption Spectroscopy Using a Frequency-Quadruped Current-Modulated System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Jie; Sun, Hui-Juan; Wang, Hui; Zhou, Wei-Dong; Wu, Gen-Zhu

    2010-05-01

    A wavelength modulation absorption spectrometry (WMAS) with a frequency-quadruped system is demonstrated. The frequency-quadruped system consists of a two-frequency doubled external enhancement cavity with KNO3 and BBO crystals, and a current-modulated 906-nm single mode external cavity diode laser (ECDL), which generates the tunable wavelength modulated radiation at 226.7 nm used to detect the NO absorption line that belongs to the combined Q22(10.5) and QR12(10.5) lines of 7(0, 0) band within the A2Σ+ - X2II electronic transition system. The 1st, 2nd and 3rd harmonic spectra are accomplished to show that it is possible to detect samples using the frequency quadruped system combined with the WMAS technique that can find practical applicability in the future.

  20. 622-Mbps Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing Modulator Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Na T.

    1999-01-01

    The Communications Technology Division at the NASA Lewis Research Center is developing advanced electronic technologies for the space communications and remote sensing systems of tomorrow. As part of the continuing effort to advance the state-of-the art in satellite communications and remote sensing systems, Lewis is developing a programmable Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) modulator card for high-data-rate communication links. The OFDM modulator is particularly suited to high data-rate downlinks to ground terminals or direct data downlinks from near-Earth science platforms. It can support data rates up to 622 megabits per second (Mbps) and high-order modulation schemes such as 16-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (16-ary QAM) or 8- phase shift keying (8PSK). High order modulations can obtain the bandwidth efficiency over the traditional binary phase shift keying (BPSK) or quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) modulator schemes. The OFDM modulator architecture can also be precompensated for channel disturbances and alleviate amplitude degradations caused by nonlinear transponder characteristics.

  1. Carrier - Interference ratios for frequency sharing between satellite systems transmitting frequency modulated and digital television signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, S. P.

    1979-01-01

    As the data rates required for digitally encoded television are reduced, satellite systems employing the transmission of digitally encoded television will become attractive. It is likely that television transmitted in this format will be adjacent to or in the same frequency band as television transmissions in other modulation formats, so a knowledge of carrier to interference power ratios as a function of assessed picture quality will be required for frequency sharing between these different modulation formats. This paper presents the results of subjective and quantitative tests describing the results of interference to a particular digital television system from a frequency modulated (FM) television system, and for interference to an FM television system from a digital television system.

  2. Masking of a brief probe by sinusoidal frequency modulation.

    PubMed

    Edwards, B W; Viemeister, N F

    1997-02-01

    Contrary to level detection models, the thresholds for a brief-duration probe masked by a sinusoidal frequency modulation (FM) masker increases as the modulation index (beta) of FM increases [Zwicker, Acustica 31, 243-256 (1974)]. In this paper the reason for this phenomenon is investigated. In experiment 1, a 10-ms, 1-kHz probe was detected in the presence of an FM masker centered at 1 kHz and sinusoidally modulated at 16 Hz. Thresholds increased by over 15 dB with increasing beta, consistent with Zwicker's findings. In experiment 2, the instantaneous frequency changes of the masker used in experiment 1 were clipped and the resulting thresholds indicated that detection was determined primarily by the masker's total frequency excursion rather than by its instantaneous sweep rate. In experiment 3, the FM maskers from the first two experiments were passed through a roex filter centered at 1 kHz and the resulting envelope was used to amplitude modulate a 1-kHz tone, producing approximately the same effective envelope at 1 kHz as the FM maskers. Threshold functions for the amplitude modulated (AM) maskers were similar to those for their corresponding FM maskers. Thresholds increased by over 15 dB while the total energy of the AM masker decreased by over 10 dB, again contrary to standard level-detection models. The results from these experiments can be explained, at least qualitatively, by a model based on envelope shape discrimination: similarities between the envelopes of the masker alone and masker-plus-probe at the output of an auditory filter centered on the frequency of the probe are primarily responsible for the observed masking, particularly at large beta's.

  3. Method and apparatus for Doppler frequency modulation of radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, J. S.; Mccleese, D. J.; Shumate, M. S.; Seaman, C. H. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A method and apparatus are described for frequency modulating radiation, such as from a laser, for optoacoustic detectors, interferometers, heterodyne spectrometers, and similar devices. Two oppositely reciprocating cats-eye retroreflectors are used to Doppler modulate the radiation. By reciprocally moving both retroreflectors, the center of mass is maintained constant to permit smooth operation at many Hertz. By slightly offsetting the axis of one retroreflector relative to the other, multiple passes of a light beam may be achieved for greater Doppler shifts with the same reciprocating motion of the retroreflectors.

  4. Formation of a beam of cold atoms by laser frequency tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozhdestvenskii, Yu. V.; Vershovskii, A. K.; Ageichik, E. A.; Zholnerov, V. S.

    2016-10-01

    We report the possibility of producing a beam of slow atoms with a characteristic velocity of ∼ 1 {\\text{m s}}-1 by the ‘chirp’ method, namely, cooling by variable-frequency radiation. Method modifications are considered, which substantially reduce dimensions of the slower, the width of the longitudinal velocity distribution of the atomic beam, and the area of its cross section. The modified method of laser radiation frequency tuning for cooling rubidium atoms is mathematically simulated.

  5. Large-Area Atom Interferometry with Frequency-Swept Raman Adiabatic Passage.

    PubMed

    Kotru, Krish; Butts, David L; Kinast, Joseph M; Stoner, Richard E

    2015-09-04

    We demonstrate light-pulse atom interferometry with large-momentum-transfer atom optics based on stimulated Raman transitions and frequency-swept adiabatic rapid passage. Our atom optics have produced momentum splittings of up to 30 photon recoil momenta in an acceleration-sensitive interferometer for laser cooled atoms. We experimentally verify the enhancement of phase shift per unit acceleration and characterize interferometer contrast loss. By forgoing evaporative cooling and velocity selection, this method lowers the atom shot-noise-limited measurement uncertainty and enables large-area atom interferometry at higher data rates.

  6. Generation of a flat optical frequency comb based on a cascaded polarization modulator and phase modulator.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cihai; He, Chao; Zhu, Dan; Guo, Ronghui; Zhang, Fangzheng; Pan, Shilong

    2013-08-15

    A scheme to generate a flat optical frequency comb (OFC) with a fixed phase relationship between the comb lines is proposed and experimentally demonstrated based on a cascaded polarization modulator (PolM) and phase modulator. Because the PolM introduces more controllable parameters compared with the conventional intensity modulator, 9, 11, and 13 comb lines can be generated with relatively low RF powers, or 15, 17, and 19 comb lines can be obtained if high RF powers are applied. The experimentally generated 9, 11, and 13 OFCs have a flatness of 1, 1.3, and 2.1 dB, respectively. The scheme requires no DC bias to the modulators, no optical filter, and no frequency divider or multiplier, which is simple and stable.

  7. Quantum control of ultracold atoms and molecules via linearly chirped laser pulses and optical frequency combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Thomas A.

    This work investigates the potential of performing high yield quantum control operations on atomic and molecular systems using frequency modulated laser fields. The effectiveness of a single laser pulse in creating desired superposition states within the valence shell of Rubidium and the utilization of a single pulse train in order to perform internal state cooling of diatomic hetero-nuclear molecules, in this case KRb, are investigated. These methods are an alternative to the current protocol in the field of quantum control which typically calls for the employment of two laser fields, be they single pulses or pulse trains. Manipulation of the state of the valence electron within Rubidium was studied for two different models of the hyperfine levels of the 5s and 5p orbitals: a three level Λ system and the more realistic four level system accounting for all allowed optical transitions. Numerical analysis of the population dynamics that occur within the system during the time of interaction with the pulse was carried out for various values of the field parameters as well as for two different forms of the pulse envelope. Population inversion within the hyperfine levels of the 5s orbital of Rubidium is demonstrated for a single linearly polarized, linearly down chirped, laser pulse of nanosecond duration and beam intensity on the order of kWcm2 . Superpositions of equally populated hyperfine states, a phenomenon which is crucial in the development of qubits, were also observed for certain values of the field parameters. The results of this analysis are applicable to 85Rb and 87Rb and both the D1 and D2 transitions and are valid for the two models used. For the case of internal state cooling, the power spectrum of a standard pulse train was compared to that of a pulse with sinusoidal phase modulation revealing that the envelope of the frequency comb associated with such a pulse train is controllable via the phase modulation. Thus through frequency modulation the

  8. Polarization decoherence differential frequency-modulated continuous-wave gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chao; Zheng, Gang; Han, Liwei; Luo, Jianhua; Teng, Fei; Wang, Bing; Song, Ping; Gao, Kun; Hou, Zhiqing

    2014-12-01

    A polarization decoherence differential frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) gyroscope is presented. The impact of coherent polarization crosstalk noise on the differential FMCW gyro is analyzed. In order to suppress coherent polarization crosstalk noise, a novel method was proposed to produce two incoherent orthogonal polarization narrow band beams from laser diode. In this way, the random drift has been reduced about one order.

  9. A New Vector Frequency Modulation Method for Power Conversion Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Akio

    This paper presents an excellent PWM method for power conversion circuits. The proposed method is called a Vector Frequency Modulation (VFM) in this paper. VFM does not belong to any conventional PWM methods. Although an idea of space voltage vector is employed in VFM, any traditional equations to calculate the periods of the voltage vectors are not used. The voltage vectors are classified into two groups, zero vectors and non-zero ones. Instead of the complicated equations, a very simple algorithm is employed in VFM. One vector period is fixed and the zero vectors are distributed among the non-zero vectors in the ratio determined by the command voltage or frequency. The behavior of VFM is performed in software and any modulation-wave oscillators, comparators and up-down counters are not needed. At first, a reversible chopper is modulated by VFM and a 2kW DC motor is driven by the chopper. The motor speed is regulated by modern control theory. Next, a three-phase inverter is modulated by VFM and a 2.2kW induction motor is driven by the inverter. Experimental results are shown to prove that VFM is actually useful for power conversion circuits.

  10. Frequency modulation television analysis: Threshold impulse analysis. [with computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, W. H.

    1973-01-01

    A computer program is developed to calculate the FM threshold impulse rates as a function of the carrier-to-noise ratio for a specified FM system. The system parameters and a vector of 1024 integers, representing the probability density of the modulating voltage, are required as input parameters. The computer program is utilized to calculate threshold impulse rates for twenty-four sets of measured probability data supplied by NASA and for sinusoidal and Gaussian modulating waveforms. As a result of the analysis several conclusions are drawn: (1) The use of preemphasis in an FM television system improves the threshold by reducing the impulse rate. (2) Sinusoidal modulation produces a total impulse rate which is a practical upper bound for the impulse rates of TV signals providing the same peak deviations. (3) As the moment of the FM spectrum about the center frequency of the predetection filter increases, the impulse rate tends to increase. (4) A spectrum having an expected frequency above (below) the center frequency of the predetection filter produces a higher negative (positive) than positive (negative) impulse rate.

  11. Ultra Wide Band Communication Device with Chaotic Frequency Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkovskii, Alexander; Langmore, Ian

    2003-08-01

    The Ultra Wide Band (UWB) communicating systems draw a tremendous attention in the last few years because of many potential advantages the UWB technology can bring to the wireless industry. It can solve the RF spectrum availability problem, improve the security, can provide less expensive, less power consuming equipment for a variety of wireless applications. We study a communication device, in which the Chaotic (Rossler) Oscillator (CO) combined with a linear Voltage Controlled Oscillator (VCO) is used to generate the UWB carrier signal with Chaotic Frequency Modulation (CFM). The information signal can be transmitted via the Frequency Modulation (FM) in analog systems or the Binary Frequency Shift Key-in (BFSK) modulation in digital applications. The receiver has the similar CO and VCO with closed parameters. A simple circuit based on the Phase locked Loop (PLL) is used for both synchronization of the chaotic oscillators and demodulation of the carrier signal. Using the dynamical systems approach we show that the suggested device has a broad parameter region in which the synchronization and demodulation take place. In computer simulations we demonstrate that the system is robust against the noise and parameters mismatch.

  12. Linear Frequency Modulated Signals VS Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing Signals for Synthetic Aperture Radar Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    frequency modulation (LFM), communications radar 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 161 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT Unclassified 18...116 APPENDIX MATLAB CODES ...........................................................................117 LIST OF...results obtained for the range imaging case and two-dimensional case, respectively. All simulations were conducted in MATLAB , and the code was derived

  13. Coherent frequency combs produced by self frequency modulation in quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Khurgin, J. B.; Dikmelik, Y.; Hugi, A.; Faist, J.

    2014-02-24

    One salient characteristic of Quantum Cascade Laser (QCL) is its very short τ ∼ 1 ps gain recovery time that so far thwarted the attempts to achieve self-mode locking of the device into a train of single pulses. We show theoretically that four wave mixing, combined with the short gain recovery time causes QCL to operate in the self-frequency-modulated regime characterized by a constant power in time domain and stable coherent comb in the frequency domain. Coherent frequency comb may enable many potential applications of QCL's in sensing and measurement.

  14. Automated force controller for amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miyagi, Atsushi E-mail: simon.scheuring@inserm.fr; Scheuring, Simon E-mail: simon.scheuring@inserm.fr

    2016-05-15

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is widely used in physics, chemistry, and biology to analyze the topography of a sample at nanometer resolution. Controlling precisely the force applied by the AFM tip to the sample is a prerequisite for faithful and reproducible imaging. In amplitude modulation (oscillating) mode AFM, the applied force depends on the free and the setpoint amplitudes of the cantilever oscillation. Therefore, for keeping the applied force constant, not only the setpoint amplitude but also the free amplitude must be kept constant. While the AFM user defines the setpoint amplitude, the free amplitude is typically subject to uncontrollable drift, and hence, unfortunately, the real applied force is permanently drifting during an experiment. This is particularly harmful in biological sciences where increased force destroys the soft biological matter. Here, we have developed a strategy and an electronic circuit that analyzes permanently the free amplitude of oscillation and readjusts the excitation to maintain the free amplitude constant. As a consequence, the real applied force is permanently and automatically controlled with picoNewton precision. With this circuit associated to a high-speed AFM, we illustrate the power of the development through imaging over long-duration and at various forces. The development is applicable for all AFMs and will widen the applicability of AFM to a larger range of samples and to a larger range of (non-specialist) users. Furthermore, from controlled force imaging experiments, the interaction strength between biomolecules can be analyzed.

  15. Complementary modulation of N2 and CRN by conflict frequency.

    PubMed

    Grützmann, Rosa; Riesel, Anja; Klawohn, Julia; Kathmann, Norbert; Endrass, Tanja

    2014-08-01

    The present study investigated the modulation of the N2 and the correct-related negativity (CRN) by conflict frequency. Conflict costs, as measured by reaction times and error rate, were reduced with increasing conflict frequency, indicating improved conflict resolution. N2 amplitudes in incompatible trials increased with higher conflict frequency, while postresponse CRN amplitudes decreased. In concert with behavioral findings of reduced conflict costs and greater interference suppression, the increase of N2 might reflect enhanced conflict resolution during stimulus processing. The CRN, however, might reflect postresponse implementation of cognitive control, which is reduced when conflict is already adequately resolved during stimulus processing. Furthermore, N2 and CRN in incompatible trials were inversely related on the between- and within-subject level, implying that the two modes of implementing cognitive control are applied complementarily.

  16. Measurement of rubidium ground-state hyperfine transition frequency using atomic fountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, Yuri B.; Szymaniec, Krzysztof; Edris, Soliman

    2015-08-01

    The results of precision measurements of the 87Rb ground-state hyperfine transition frequency, which were conducted at NPL from 2009 to 2013, are reported. The resulting frequency, measured using NPL’s Cs and Rb atomic frequency standards, demonstrates reasonable agreement with the most recent measurements reported by LNE-SYRTE.

  17. Principal pitch of frequency-modulated tones with asymmetrical modulation waveform: a comparison of models.

    PubMed

    Etchemendy, Pablo E; Eguia, Manuel C; Mesz, Bruno

    2014-03-01

    In this work, the overall perceived pitch (principal pitch) of pure tones modulated in frequency with an asymmetric waveform is studied. The dependence of the principal pitch on the degree of asymmetric modulation was obtained from a psychophysical experiment. The modulation waveform consisted of a flat portion of constant frequency and two linear segments forming a peak. Consistent with previous results, significant pitch shifts with respect to the time-averaged geometric mean were observed. The direction of the shifts was always toward the flat portion of the modulation. The results from the psychophysical experiment, along with those obtained from previously reported studies, were compared with the predictions of six models of pitch perception proposed in the literature. Even though no single model was able to predict accurately the perceived pitch for all experiments, there were two models that give robust predictions that are within the range of acceptable tuning of modulated tones for almost all the cases. Both models point to the existence of an underlying "stability sensitive" mechanism for the computation of pitch that gives more weight to the portion of the stimuli where the frequency is changing more slowly.

  18. Primary somatosensory contextual modulation is encoded by oscillation frequency change.

    PubMed

    Götz, T; Milde, T; Curio, G; Debener, S; Lehmann, T; Leistritz, L; Witte, O W; Witte, H; Haueisen, J

    2015-09-01

    This study characterized thalamo-cortical communication by assessing the effect of context-dependent modulation on the very early somatosensory evoked high-frequency oscillations (HF oscillations). We applied electrical stimuli to the median nerve together with an auditory oddball paradigm, presenting standard and deviant target tones representing differential cognitive contexts to the constantly repeated electrical stimulation. Median nerve stimulation without auditory stimulation served as unimodal control. A model consisting of one subcortical (near thalamus) and two cortical (Brodmann areas 1 and 3b) dipolar sources explained the measured HF oscillations. Both at subcortical and the cortical levels HF oscillations were significantly smaller during bimodal (somatosensory plus auditory) than unimodal (somatosensory only) stimulation. A delay differential equation model was developed to investigate interactions within the 3-node thalamo-cortical network. Importantly, a significant change in the eigenfrequency of Brodmann area 3b was related to the context-dependent modulation, while there was no change in the network coupling. This model strongly suggests cortico-thalamic feedback from both cortical Brodmann areas 1 and 3b to the thalamus. With the 3-node network model, thalamo-cortical feedback could be described. Frequency encoding plays an important role in contextual modulation in the somatosensory thalamo-cortical network. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Spatial Frequency Modulated Imaging (SPIFI) with amplitude or phase grating from a spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Michael D.; Barbano, Emerson C.; Worts, Nathan; Field, Jeffrey J.; Hoy, Christopher; Wernsing, Keith A.; Bartels, Randy A.; Squier, Jeff

    2017-02-01

    Spatial Frequency Modulated Imaging (SPIFI) with single element detection has previously been demonstrated with a time varying amplitude spatial frequency. This has been shown in a variety of modalities (linear, TPEF, SHG) and also with variations on the base design to provide additional dimensions of information. SPIFI is also capable of providing enhanced resolution images. However, the signal-to-noise is a limiting factor in the quality of the resolution enhancement. We present a microscope design which uses a nematic spatial light modulator to provide a time varying amplitude from an amplitude or phase grating. Twophoton excitation fluorescence images of 10-µm fluorescent polystyrene beads are presented using a phase grating. Additionally, the microscope can provide spatial gratings in polarization which provide an alternative means of imaging in third harmonic generation (THG). THG images are provided using an amplitude and polarization-grating modulation pattern.

  20. Multiband left handed biaxial meta atom at microwave frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehedi Hasan, Md; Faruque, Mohammad Rashed Iqbal; Tariqul Islam, Mohammad

    2017-03-01

    Left handed meta atoms are special class materials that characterized by the negative refractive index. In this paper, a left handed biaxial meta-atom is reported that has 5.81 GHz wide bandwidth and applicable for C-, X- and Ku-band applications. The meta atom is developed by an outer and the inner split ring resonator with inverse E-shape metal strips of copper, which are connected with the outer ring resonator that look like a mirror-shape structure. A finite integration technique based CST Microwave Studio is utilized to design, simulation and analysis purposes, where the Agilent N5227A vector network analyzer is utilized for measurement purpose. Measurements show that, the measured and simulated results are well complied together and negative index bandwidth from 3.27 to 6.55 GHz (bandwidth of 3.28 GHz) and 7 to 12.81 GHz (bandwidth of 5.81 GHz) along the z-axis wave propagation. The total dimensions of the designed structure are 0.2λ  ×  0.2λ  ×  0.035λ and the effective medium ratio 5, makes the proposed biaxial meta-atom is suitable for practical applications.

  1. Low-frequency plasma conductivity in the average-atom approximation.

    PubMed

    Kuchiev, M Yu; Johnson, W R

    2008-08-01

    Low-frequency properties of a plasma are examined within the average-atom approximation, which presumes that scattering of a conducting electron on each atom takes place independently of other atoms. The relaxation time tau distinguishes a high-frequency region omegatau>1 , where the single-atom approximation is applicable explicitly, from extreme low frequencies omegatau<1 , where, naively, the single-atom approximation is invalid. A proposed generalization of the formalism, which takes into account many-atom collisions, is found to be accurate in all frequency regions, from omega=0 to omegatau>1 , reproducing the Ziman formula in the static limit, results based on the Kubo-Greenwood formula for high frequencies and satisfying the conductivity sum rule precisely. The correspondence between physical processes leading to the conventional Ohm's law and the infrared properties of QED is discussed. The suggested average-atom approach to frequency-dependent conductivity is illustrated by numerical calculations for an aluminum plasma in the temperature range 2-10eV .

  2. Comparing the effects of age on amplitude modulation and frequency modulation detection.

    PubMed

    Wallaert, Nicolas; Moore, Brian C J; Lorenzi, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Frequency modulation (FM) and amplitude modulation (AM) detection thresholds were measured at 40 dB sensation level for young (22-28 yrs) and older (44-66 yrs) listeners with normal audiograms for a carrier frequency of 500 Hz and modulation rates of 2 and 20 Hz. The number of modulation cycles, N, varied between 2 and 9. For FM detection, uninformative AM at the same rate as the FM was superimposed to disrupt excitation-pattern cues. For both groups, AM and FM detection thresholds were lower for the 2-Hz than for the 20-Hz rate, and AM and FM detection thresholds decreased with increasing N. Thresholds were higher for older than for younger listeners, especially for FM detection at 2 Hz, possibly reflecting the effect of age on the use of temporal-fine-structure cues for 2-Hz FM detection. The effect of increasing N was similar across groups for both AM and FM. However, at 20 Hz, older listeners showed a greater effect of increasing N than younger listeners for both AM and FM. The results suggest that ageing reduces sensitivity to both excitation-pattern and temporal-fine-structure cues for modulation detection, but more so for the latter, while sparing temporal integration of these cues at low modulation rates.

  3. System and Method for Generating a Frequency Modulated Linear Laser Waveform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierrottet, Diego F. (Inventor); Petway, Larry B. (Inventor); Amzajerdian, Farzin (Inventor); Barnes, Bruce W. (Inventor); Lockard, George E. (Inventor); Hines, Glenn D. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A system for generating a frequency modulated linear laser waveform includes a single frequency laser generator to produce a laser output signal. An electro-optical modulator modulates the frequency of the laser output signal to define a linear triangular waveform. An optical circulator passes the linear triangular waveform to a band-pass optical filter to filter out harmonic frequencies created in the waveform during modulation of the laser output signal, to define a pure filtered modulated waveform having a very narrow bandwidth. The optical circulator receives the pure filtered modulated laser waveform and transmits the modulated laser waveform to a target.

  4. System and Method for Generating a Frequency Modulated Linear Laser Waveform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierrottet, Diego F. (Inventor); Petway, Larry B. (Inventor); Amzajerdian, Farzin (Inventor); Barnes, Bruce W. (Inventor); Lockard, George E. (Inventor); Hines, Glenn D. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A system for generating a frequency modulated linear laser waveform includes a single frequency laser generator to produce a laser output signal. An electro-optical modulator modulates the frequency of the laser output signal to define a linear triangular waveform. An optical circulator passes the linear triangular waveform to a band-pass optical filter to filter out harmonic frequencies created in the waveform during modulation of the laser output signal, to define a pure filtered modulated waveform having a very narrow bandwidth. The optical circulator receives the pure filtered modulated laser waveform and transmits the modulated laser waveform to a target.

  5. Generation of Flat Optical Frequency Comb based on Mach-Zehnder Modulator and Recirculating Frequency Shifter Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shibao; Li, Yulong; Fei, Yue; Hu, Faze

    2014-06-01

    We propose a novel scheme to generate optical frequency comb by using Mach-Zehnder modulator and recirculating frequency shifter loop based on IQ modulator driven by radio frequency clock signals. A system of 4 flat and stable comb lines generation based on Mach-Zehnder modulator is set as the seed light source of the recirculating loop. Through theorical analysis and simulation it is shown that the proposed theoretical model is proved in good agreement with simulation results.

  6. Modulation of microsaccades by spatial frequency during object categorization.

    PubMed

    Craddock, Matt; Oppermann, Frank; Müller, Matthias M; Martinovic, Jasna

    2017-01-01

    The organization of visual processing into a coarse-to-fine information processing based on the spatial frequency properties of the input forms an important facet of the object recognition process. During visual object categorization tasks, microsaccades occur frequently. One potential functional role of these eye movements is to resolve high spatial frequency information. To assess this hypothesis, we examined the rate, amplitude and speed of microsaccades in an object categorization task in which participants viewed object and non-object images and classified them as showing either natural objects, man-made objects or non-objects. Images were presented unfiltered (broadband; BB) or filtered to contain only low (LSF) or high spatial frequency (HSF) information. This allowed us to examine whether microsaccades were modulated independently by the presence of a high-level feature - the presence of an object - and by low-level stimulus characteristics - spatial frequency. We found a bimodal distribution of saccades based on their amplitude, with a split between smaller and larger microsaccades at 0.4° of visual angle. The rate of larger saccades (⩾0.4°) was higher for objects than non-objects, and higher for objects with high spatial frequency content (HSF and BB objects) than for LSF objects. No effects were observed for smaller microsaccades (<0.4°). This is consistent with a role for larger microsaccades in resolving HSF information for object identification, and previous evidence that more microsaccades are directed towards informative image regions.

  7. Contribution of frequency modulation to speech recognition in noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stickney, Ginger S.; Nie, Kaibao; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2005-10-01

    Cochlear implants allow most patients with profound deafness to successfully communicate under optimal listening conditions. However, the amplitude modulation (AM) information provided by most implants is not sufficient for speech recognition in realistic settings where noise is typically present. This study added slowly varying frequency modulation (FM) to the existing algorithm of an implant simulation and used competing sentences to evaluate FM contributions to speech recognition in noise. Potential FM advantage was evaluated as a function of the number of spectral bands, FM depth, FM rate, and FM band distribution. Barring floor and ceiling effects, significant improvement was observed for all bands from 1 to 32 with the additional FM cue both in quiet and noise. Performance also improved with greater FM depth and rate, which might reflect resolved sidebands under the FM condition. Having FM present in low-frequency bands was more beneficial than in high-frequency bands, and only half of the bands required the presence of FM, regardless of position, to achieve performance similar to when all bands had the FM cue. These results provide insight into the relative contributions of AM and FM to speech communication and the potential advantage of incorporating FM for cochlear implant signal processing.

  8. Active mode locking at 50 GHz repetition frequency by half-frequency modulation of monolithic semiconductor lasers integrated with electroabsorption modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kenji; Kotaka, Isamu; Kondo, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Mitsuo

    1996-10-01

    Active mode locking achieved at a 50 GHz repetition frequency by modulation at half (25 GHz) the cavity resonance frequency using a monolithic mode-locked InGaAsP laser integrated with an electroabsorption modulator is described. A pulse width of around 3 ps and a high suppression ratio of more than 33 dB of the intensity modulation at the driving frequency are obtained.

  9. Microrheology of cells with magnetic force modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rebêlo, L M; de Sousa, J S; Mendes Filho, J; Schäpe, J; Doschke, H; Radmacher, M

    2014-04-07

    We propose a magnetic force modulation method to measure the stiffness and viscosity of living cells using a modified AFM apparatus. An oscillating magnetic field makes a magnetic cantilever oscillate in contact with the sample, producing a small AC indentation. By comparing the amplitude of the free cantilever motion (A0) with the motion of the cantilever in contact with the sample (A1), we determine the sample stiffness and viscosity. To test the method, the frequency-dependent stiffness of 3T3 fibroblasts was determined as a power law k(s)(f) = α + β(f/f¯)(γ) (α = 7.6 × 10(-4) N m(-1), β = 1.0 × 10(-4) N m(-1), f¯ = 1 Hz, γ = 0.6), where the coefficient γ = 0.6 is in good agreement with rheological data of actin solutions with concentrations similar to those in cells. The method also allows estimation of the internal friction of the cells. In particular we found an average damping coefficient of 75.1 μN s m(-1) for indentation depths ranging between 1.0 μm and 2.0 μm.

  10. Microrheology of growing Escherichia coli biofilms investigated by using magnetic force modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gan, Tiansheng; Gong, Xiangjun; Schönherr, Holger; Zhang, Guangzhao

    2016-12-01

    Microrheology of growing biofilms provides insightful information about its structural evolution and properties. In this study, the authors have investigated the microrheology of Escherichia coli (strain HCB1) biofilms at different indentation depth (δ) by using magnetic force modulation atomic force microscopy as a function of disturbing frequency (f). As δ increases, the dynamic stiffness (ks) for the biofilms in the early stage significantly increases. However, it levels off when the biofilms are matured. The facts indicate that the biofilms change from inhomogeneous to homogeneous in structure. Moreover, ks is scaled to f, which coincides with the rheology of soft glasses. The exponent increases with the incubation time, indicating the fluidization of biofilms. In contrast, the upper layer of the matured biofilms is solidlike in that the storage modulus is always larger than the loss modulus, and its viscoelasticity is slightly influenced by the shear stress.

  11. Single carrier frequency domain equalization based on SSB modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junwen; Fang, Wuliang; Shao, Yufeng; Huang, Bo; Chi, Nan

    2009-11-01

    Single-carrier frequency domain equalization (SC-FDE), as a mature technique in wireless commutation, is widely researched for signal equalization and compensation utilizing high speed electronic devices such as DSP. In this paper, for the first time, we propose and demonstrate a SC-FDE technique in optical communication system. By adopting SCFDE technique, after 50km, 80km, 100km transmission for a 10Gb/s ASK single sideband (SSB) signal on a single mode fiber (SMF), the dispersion of optical signa1 is effectively compensated. The SSB signal is generated by a dual-arm Mach-Zehnder modulator (MZM) cascading a phase modulator (PM) based on Hilbert Finite impulse response (FIR) digital filter. The results demonstrate, in our proposed SC-FDE model, the eye opening and the clock recovery is improved, and the effect of compensation is enhanced as the transmission distance increases.

  12. Eddy current imaging with an atomic radio-frequency magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Wickenbrock, Arne; Leefer, Nathan; Blanchard, John W.; Budker, Dmitry

    2016-05-02

    We use a radio-frequency {sup 85}Rb alkali-vapor cell magnetometer based on a paraffin-coated cell with long spin-coherence time and a small, low-inductance driving coil to create highly resolved conductivity maps of different objects. We resolve sub-mm features in conductive objects, we characterize the frequency response of our technique, and by operating at frequencies up to 250 kHz we are able to discriminate between differently conductive materials based on the induced response. The method is suited to cover a wide range of driving frequencies and can potentially be used for detecting non-metallic objects with low DC conductivity.

  13. High-speed laser modulation beyond the relaxation resonance frequency limit.

    PubMed

    Sacher, Wesley D; Zhang, Eric J; Kruger, Brett A; Poon, Joyce K S

    2010-03-29

    We propose and show that for coupling modulated lasers (CMLs), in which the output coupler is modulated rather than the pump rate, the conventional relaxation resonance frequency limit to the laser modulation bandwidth can be circumvented. The modulation response is limited only by the coupler. Although CMLs are best suited to microcavities, as a proof-of-principle, a coupling-modulated erbium-doped fiber laser is modulated at 1 Gb/s, over 10000 times its relaxation resonance frequency.

  14. Heterodyne interferometry with a frequency-modulated laser diode.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Ishii, Y; Murata, K

    1988-01-01

    A digital phase measuring interferometer with a frequency-modulated laser diode using the integratedbucket technique is described. The injection current is continuously changed to introduce a time- varying phase difference between the two beams of an unbalanced Twyman-Green interferometer. The intensity of the interference patterns is integrated with a CCD array sensor for intervals of one-quarter period of the fringe. Using the intensity data a microcomputer calculates the phase to be detected. Some experimental results with the interferometer are presented; the rms repeatability obtained was lambda/80.

  15. Frequency-modulated nuclear localization bursts coordinate gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Long; Dalal, Chiraj K.; Elowitz, Michael B.

    2008-01-01

    In yeast, the transcription factor Crz1 is dephosphorylated and translocates into the nucleus in response to extracellular calcium. Using time-lapse microscopy, we found that Crz1 exhibited short bursts of nuclear localization (∼2 minutes) that occurred stochastically in individual cells and propagated to the expression of downstream genes. Strikingly, calcium concentration controlled the frequency, but not duration, of localization bursts. Using an analytic model, we found that this frequency modulation (FM) of bursts ensures proportional expression of multiple target genes across a wide dynamic range of expression levels, independent of promoter characteristics. We experimentally confirmed this theory with natural and synthetic Crz1 target promoters. Another stress response transcription factor, Msn2, exhibits similar, but largely uncorrelated, localization bursts under calcium stress. These results suggest that FM regulation of localization bursts may be a general control strategy utilized by the cell to coordinate multi-gene responses to external signals. PMID:18818649

  16. Time-Frequency and Space-Frequency Characteristics of Optical Modulators,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-20

    order of a few thousand hertz . Furthermore, the ele- mentary logic operations that analog computers are capable of performing make it possible to...56 2.2. Simulation of the Time-and-Frequency Characteristics of Modulators Using Analog Computers ... vowels , and after b, b; e elsewhere. When written as 4 in Russian, transliterate as y9 or 9. RUSSIAN AND ZNGLISH TRIGONOMETRIC FUNCTIONS Russian

  17. Frequency Modulation Spectroscopy Modeling for Remote Chemical Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, David M.

    2000-09-30

    Frequency modulation (FM) spectroscopy techniques show promise for active infrared remote chemical sensing. FM spectroscopy techniques have reduced sensitivity to optical and electronic noise, and are relatively immune to the effects of various electronic and mechanical drifts. FM systems are responsive to sharp spectral features and can therefore reduce the effects of spectral clutter due to interfering chemicals in the plume or in the atmosphere. The relatively high modulation frequencies used for FM also reduces the effects of albedo (reflectance) and plume variations. Conventional differential absorption lidar (DIAL) systems are performance limited by the noise induced by speckle. Analysis presented in this report shows that FM based sensors may reduce the effects of speckle by one to two orders of magnitude. This can result in reduced dwell times and faster area searches, as well as reducing various forms of spatial clutter. FM systems will require a laser system that is continuously tunable at relatively high frequencies (0.1 to 20 MHz). One promising candidate is the quantum-cascade (QC) laser [1, 2]. The QC laser is potentially capable of power levels on the order of 1 Watt and frequency tuning on the order of 3 - 6 GHz, which is the performance level required for FM spectroscopy based remote sensing. In this report we describe a high-level numerical model for an FM spectroscopy based remote sensing system, and application to two unmanned airborne vehicle (UAV) scenarios. A Predator scenario operating at a slant range of 6.5 km with a 10 cm diameter telescope, and a Global Hawk scenario operating at a range of 30 km with a 20 cm diameter telescope, has been assumed to allow estimation of the performance of potential FM systems.

  18. Atomically referenced 1-GHz optical parametric oscillator frequency comb.

    PubMed

    McCracken, Richard A; Balskus, Karolis; Zhang, Zhaowei; Reid, Derryck T

    2015-06-15

    The visible to mid-infrared coverage of femtosecond optical parametric oscillator (OPO) frequency combs makes them attractive resources for high-resolution spectroscopy and astrophotonic spectrograph calibration. Such applications require absolute traceability and wide comb-tooth spacing, attributes which until now have remained unavailable from any single OPO frequency comb. Here, we report a 1-GHz Ti:sapphire pumped OPO comb whose repetition and offset frequencies are referenced to Rb-stabilised microwave and laser oscillators respectively. This technique simultaneously achieves fully stabilized combs from both the Ti:sapphire laser and the OPO with sub-MHz comb-tooth linewidths, multi-hour locking stability and without the need for super-continuum generation.

  19. Improvement in medium long-term frequency stability of the integrating sphere cold atom clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Cheng, Huadong; Meng, Yanling; Wan, Jinyin; Xiao, Ling; Wang, Xiumei; Wang, Yaning; Liu, Liang

    2016-07-01

    The medium-long term frequency stability of the integrating sphere cold atom clock was improved.During the clock operation, Rb atoms were cooled and manipulated using cooling light diffusely reflected by the inner surface of a microwave cavity in the clock. This light heated the cavity and caused a frequency drift from the resonant frequency of the cavity. Power fluctuations of the cooling light led to atomic density variations in the cavity's central area, which increased the clock frequency instability through a cavity pulling effect. We overcame these limitations with appropriate solutions. A frequency stability of 3.5E-15 was achieved when the integrating time ? increased to 2E4 s.

  20. Prospects for advances in microwave atomic frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walls, F. L.

    1979-01-01

    Traditional standards based on rubidium, cesium and hydrogen have been greatly refined over the past decade, such that the frequency stability of the current generation of devices is generally limited by those basic concepts on which they are based. Future advances in frequency stability will principally come from changes in the concepts on which the standards are based, and only secondarily from more careful engineering of the old concepts. The fundamental limitations in these standards are considered and the important conceptual and component advances which could have a major impact on future performance of these standards are indicated. A very promising new class of microwave standards based on ion storage techniques is examined.

  1. Progress Report on Frequency - Modulated Differential Absorption Lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, Bret D.; Harper, Warren W.; Myers, Tanya L.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Williams, Richard M.; Schultz, John F.

    2001-12-15

    Modeling done at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in FY2000 predicted improved sensitivity for remote chemical detection by differential absorption lidar (DIAL) if frequency-modulated (FM) lasers were used. This improved sensitivity results from faster averaging away of speckle noise and the recently developed quantum cascade (QC) lasers offer the first practical method for implementing this approach in the molecular fingerprint region of the infrared. To validate this model prediction, a simple laboratory bench FM-DIAL system was designed, assembled, tested, and laboratory-scale experiments were carried out during FY2001. Preliminary results of the FM DIAL experiments confirm the speckle averaging advantages predicted by the models. In addition, experiments were performed to explore the use of hybrid QC - CO2 lasers for achieving sufficient frequency-modulated laser power to enable field experiments at longer ranges (up to one kilometer or so). This approach will allow model validation at realistic ranges much sooner than would be possible if one had to first develop master oscillator - power amplifier systems utilizing only QC devices. Amplification of a QC laser with a CO2 laser was observed in the first hybrid laser experiments, but the low gain and narrow linewidth of the CO2 laser available for these experiments prevented production of a high-power FM laser beam.

  2. Dependence of microwave-excitation signal parameters on frequency stability of caesium atomic clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, A. A.; Davydov, V. V.; Vologdin, V. A.; Zalyotov, D. V.

    2015-11-01

    New scheme of the microwave - excitation signal for the caesium atomic clock is based on method of direct digital synthesis. The theoretical calculations and experimental research showed decrease step frequency tuning by several orders and improvement the spectral characteristics of the output signal of frequency synthesizer. A range of generated output frequencies is expanded, and the possibility of detuning the frequency of the neighboring resonance of spectral line that makes it possible to adjust the C-field in quantum frequency standard is implemented. Experimental research of the metrological characteristics of the quantum frequency standard on the atoms of caesium - 133 with new design scheme of the microwave - excitation signal showed improvement in daily frequency stability on 1.2*10-14.

  3. Robust Detection of Fast and Slow Frequency Jumps of Atomic Clocks.

    PubMed

    Galleani, Lorenzo; Tavella, Patrizia

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a frequency jump detector for atomic clocks. The detector considers both fast frequency jumps, which are abrupt variations of the clock frequency trend, and slow frequency jumps, which correspond to variations of the frequency trend over a finite time interval. These anomalies are particularly critical to space clocks in global navigation satellite systems (GNSSs). The developed detector is robust in the sense that it can deal with time-varying frequency trends, sinusoidal terms, outliers, and missing data. The detection performances are analyzed both analytically and numerically, and the effectiveness of the detector is shown by applying it to GNSS experimental data, as well as to simulated clock data.

  4. Dual-frequency resonance-tracking atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Brian J.; Callahan, Clint; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Proksch, Roger

    2007-11-01

    A dual-excitation method for resonant-frequency tracking in scanning probe microscopy based on amplitude detection is developed. This method allows the cantilever to be operated at or near resonance for techniques where standard phase locked loops are not possible. This includes techniques with non-acoustic driving where the phase of the driving force is frequency and/or position dependent. An example of the latter is piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM), where the resonant frequency of the cantilever is strongly dependent on the contact stiffness of the tip-surface junction and the local mechanical properties, but the spatial variability of the drive phase rules out the use of a phase locked loop. Combined with high-voltage switching and imaging, dual-frequency, resonance-tracking PFM allows reliable studies of electromechanical and elastic properties and polarization dynamics in a broad range of inorganic and biological systems, and is illustrated using lead zirconate-titanate, rat tail collagen, and native and switched ferroelectric domains in lithium niobate.

  5. From Sundials to Atomic Clocks: Understanding Time and Frequency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jespersen, James; Fitz-Randolph, Jane

    An introduction to time, timekeeping, and the uses of time information, especially in the scientific and technical areas, are offered in this book for laymen. Historical and philosophical aspects of time and timekeeping are included. The scientific thought on time has been simplified. Contents include: the nature of time, time and frequency, early…

  6. Possible applications of atomic frequency standards with an internal high resolution digital synthesizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Detoma, E.; Stern, A.

    1993-01-01

    The applications of Atomic Frequency Standards with an internal synthesizer (thereafter referred as 'Synthesized Frequency Standards or Oscillators') with a special emphasis on the Rb oscillator are reviewed. A fractional frequency synthesizer, developed by SEPA, was incorporated in the Frequency Locked Loop of a TFL Rubidium Frequency Standard. This combination allows a frequency settability in steps of 1.5 x 10(exp -12) (optional 1 x 10(exp -13) over a range of 6 x 10(exp -9) without having to resort to change the C-field to tune the output frequency of the device. This capability, coupled to the excellent short term stability of the Rb frequency standard, opens new possibilities for time and frequency users in the various fields (time metrology, navigation, communication, etc.) in which stable frequency standards find their application.

  7. Possible applications of atomic frequency standards with an internal high resolution digital synthesizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Detoma, E.; Stern, A.

    1993-01-01

    The applications of Atomic Frequency Standards with an internal synthesizer (thereafter referred as 'Synthesized Frequency Standards or Oscillators') with a special emphasis on the Rb oscillator are reviewed. A fractional frequency synthesizer, developed by SEPA, was incorporated in the Frequency Locked Loop of a TFL Rubidium Frequency Standard. This combination allows a frequency settability in steps of 1.5 x 10(exp -12) (optional 1 x 10(exp -13) over a range of 6 x 10(exp -9) without having to resort to change the C-field to tune the output frequency of the device. This capability, coupled to the excellent short term stability of the Rb frequency standard, opens new possibilities for time and frequency users in the various fields (time metrology, navigation, communication, etc.) in which stable frequency standards find their application.

  8. CMOS in-pixel optical pulse frequency modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nel, Nicolaas E.; du Plessis, M.; Joubert, T.-H.

    2016-02-01

    This paper covers the design of a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) pixel readout circuit with a built-in frequency conversion feature. The pixel contains a CMOS photo sensor along with all signal-to-frequency conversion circuitry. An 8×8 array of these pixels is also designed. Current imaging arrays often use analog-to-digital conversion (ADC) and digital signal processing (DSP) techniques that are off-chip1. The frequency modulation technique investigated in this paper is preferred over other ADC techniques due to its smaller size, and the possibility of a higher dynamic range. Careful considerations are made regarding the size of the components of the pixel, as various characteristics of CMOS devices are limited by decreasing the scale of the components2. The methodology used was the CMOS design cycle for integrated circuit design. All components of the pixel were designed from first principles to meet necessary requirements of a small pixel size (30×30 μm2) and an output resolution greater than that of an 8-bit ADC. For the photodetector, an n+-p+/p-substrate diode was designed with a parasitic capacitance of 3 fF. The analog front-end stage was designed around a Schmitt trigger circuit. The photo current is integrated on an integration capacitor of 200 fF, which is reset when the Schmitt trigger output voltage exceeds a preset threshold. The circuit schematic and layout were designed using Cadence Virtuoso and the process used was the AMS CMOS 350 nm process using a power supply of 5V. The simulation results were confirmed to comply with specifications, and the layout passed all verification checks. The dynamic range achieved is 58.828 dB per pixel, with the output frequencies ranging from 12.341kHz to 10.783 MHz. It is also confirmed that the output frequency has a linear relationship to the photocurrent generated by the photodiode.

  9. Noise performance of frequency modulation Kelvin force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Deresmes, Dominique; Mélin, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Summary Noise performance of a phase-locked loop (PLL) based frequency modulation Kelvin force microscope (FM-KFM) is assessed. Noise propagation is modeled step by step throughout the setup using both exact closed loop noise gains and an approximation known as “noise gain” from operational amplifier (OpAmp) design that offers the advantage of decoupling the noise performance study from considerations of stability and ideal loop response. The bandwidth can be chosen depending on how much noise is acceptable and it is shown that stability is not an issue up to a limit that will be discussed. With thermal and detector noise as the only sources, both approaches yield PLL frequency noise expressions equal to the theoretical value for self-oscillating circuits and in agreement with measurement, demonstrating that the PLL components neither modify nor contribute noise. Kelvin output noise is then investigated by modeling the surrounding bias feedback loop. A design rule is proposed that allows choosing the AC modulation frequency for optimized sharing of the PLL bandwidth between Kelvin and topography loops. A crossover criterion determines as a function of bandwidth, temperature and probe parameters whether thermal or detector noise is the dominating noise source. Probe merit factors for both cases are then established, suggesting how to tackle noise performance by probe design. Typical merit factors of common probe types are compared. This comprehensive study is an encouraging step toward a more integral performance assessment and a remedy against focusing on single aspects and optimizing around randomly chosen key values. PMID:24455457

  10. Fast phase stabilization of a low frequency beat note for atom interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, E.; Horne, R. A.; Sackett, C. A.

    2016-06-15

    Atom interferometry experiments rely on the ability to obtain a stable signal that corresponds to an atomic phase. For interferometers that use laser beams to manipulate the atoms, noise in the lasers can lead to errors in the atomic measurement. In particular, it is often necessary to actively stabilize the optical phase between two frequency components of the beams. Typically this is achieved using a time-domain measurement of a beat note between the two frequencies. This becomes challenging when the frequency difference is small and the phase measurement must be made quickly. The method presented here instead uses a spatial interference detection to rapidly measure the optical phase for arbitrary frequency differences. A feedback system operating at a bandwidth of about 10 MHz could then correct the phase in about 3 μs. This time is short enough that the phase correction could be applied at the start of a laser pulse without appreciably degrading the fidelity of the atom interferometer operation. The phase stabilization system was demonstrated in a simple atom interferometer measurement of the {sup 87}Rb recoil frequency.

  11. Atomic fountain clock with very high frequency stability employing a pulse-tube-cryocooled sapphire oscillator.

    PubMed

    Takamizawa, Akifumi; Yanagimachi, Shinya; Tanabe, Takehiko; Hagimoto, Ken; Hirano, Iku; Watabe, Ken-ichi; Ikegami, Takeshi; Hartnett, John G

    2014-09-01

    The frequency stability of an atomic fountain clock was significantly improved by employing an ultra-stable local oscillator and increasing the number of atoms detected after the Ramsey interrogation, resulting in a measured Allan deviation of 8.3 × 10(-14)τ(-1/2)). A cryogenic sapphire oscillator using an ultra-low-vibration pulse-tube cryocooler and cryostat, without the need for refilling with liquid helium, was applied as a local oscillator and a frequency reference. High atom number was achieved by the high power of the cooling laser beams and optical pumping to the Zeeman sublevel m(F) = 0 employed for a frequency measurement, although vapor-loaded optical molasses with the simple (001) configuration was used for the atomic fountain clock. The resulting stability is not limited by the Dick effect as it is when a BVA quartz oscillator is used as the local oscillator. The stability reached the quantum projection noise limit to within 11%. Using a combination of a cryocooled sapphire oscillator and techniques to enhance the atom number, the frequency stability of any atomic fountain clock, already established as primary frequency standard, may be improved without opening its vacuum chamber.

  12. Fast phase stabilization of a low frequency beat note for atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, E.; Horne, R. A.; Sackett, C. A.

    2016-06-01

    Atom interferometry experiments rely on the ability to obtain a stable signal that corresponds to an atomic phase. For interferometers that use laser beams to manipulate the atoms, noise in the lasers can lead to errors in the atomic measurement. In particular, it is often necessary to actively stabilize the optical phase between two frequency components of the beams. Typically this is achieved using a time-domain measurement of a beat note between the two frequencies. This becomes challenging when the frequency difference is small and the phase measurement must be made quickly. The method presented here instead uses a spatial interference detection to rapidly measure the optical phase for arbitrary frequency differences. A feedback system operating at a bandwidth of about 10 MHz could then correct the phase in about 3 μs. This time is short enough that the phase correction could be applied at the start of a laser pulse without appreciably degrading the fidelity of the atom interferometer operation. The phase stabilization system was demonstrated in a simple atom interferometer measurement of the 87Rb recoil frequency.

  13. Encoding of frequency-modulation (FM) rates in human auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Hidehiko; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2015-01-01

    Frequency-modulated sounds play an important role in our daily social life. However, it currently remains unclear whether frequency modulation rates affect neural activity in the human auditory cortex. In the present study, using magnetoencephalography, we investigated the auditory evoked N1m and sustained field responses elicited by temporally repeated and superimposed frequency-modulated sweeps that were matched in the spectral domain, but differed in frequency modulation rates (1, 4, 16, and 64 octaves per sec). The results obtained demonstrated that the higher rate frequency-modulated sweeps elicited the smaller N1m and the larger sustained field responses. Frequency modulation rate had a significant impact on the human brain responses, thereby providing a key for disentangling a series of natural frequency-modulated sounds such as speech and music. PMID:26656920

  14. Encoding of frequency-modulation (FM) rates in human auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Hidehiko; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2015-12-14

    Frequency-modulated sounds play an important role in our daily social life. However, it currently remains unclear whether frequency modulation rates affect neural activity in the human auditory cortex. In the present study, using magnetoencephalography, we investigated the auditory evoked N1m and sustained field responses elicited by temporally repeated and superimposed frequency-modulated sweeps that were matched in the spectral domain, but differed in frequency modulation rates (1, 4, 16, and 64 octaves per sec). The results obtained demonstrated that the higher rate frequency-modulated sweeps elicited the smaller N1m and the larger sustained field responses. Frequency modulation rate had a significant impact on the human brain responses, thereby providing a key for disentangling a series of natural frequency-modulated sounds such as speech and music.

  15. High resolution atomic coherent control via spectral phase manipulation of an optical frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Stowe, Matthew C; Cruz, Flavio C; Marian, Adela; Ye, Jun

    2006-04-21

    We demonstrate high resolution coherent control of cold atomic rubidium utilizing spectral phase manipulation of a femtosecond optical frequency comb. Transient coherent accumulation is directly manifested by the enhancement of signal amplitude and spectral resolution via the pulse number. The combination of frequency comb technology and spectral phase manipulation enables coherent control techniques to enter a new regime with natural linewidth resolution.

  16. High Resolution Atomic Coherent Control via Spectral Phase Manipulation of an Optical Frequency Comb

    SciTech Connect

    Stowe, Matthew C.; Cruz, Flavio C.; Marian, Adela; Ye Jun

    2006-04-21

    We demonstrate high resolution coherent control of cold atomic rubidium utilizing spectral phase manipulation of a femtosecond optical frequency comb. Transient coherent accumulation is directly manifested by the enhancement of signal amplitude and spectral resolution via the pulse number. The combination of frequency comb technology and spectral phase manipulation enables coherent control techniques to enter a new regime with natural linewidth resolution.

  17. Active cancellation of residual amplitude modulation in a frequency-modulation based Fabry-Perot interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yinan; Wang, Yicheng; Pratt, Jon R.

    2016-03-01

    Residual amplitude modulation (RAM) is one of the most common noise sources known to degrade the sensitivity of frequency modulation spectroscopy. RAM can arise as a result of the temperature dependent birefringence of the modulator crystal, which causes the orientation of the crystal's optical axis to shift with respect to the polarization of the incident light with temperature. In the fiber-based optical interferometer used on the National Institute of Standards and Technology calculable capacitor, RAM degrades the measured laser frequency stability and correlates with the environmental temperature fluctuations. We have demonstrated a simple approach that cancels out excessive RAM due to polarization mismatch between the light and the optical axis of the crystal. The approach allows us to measure the frequency noise of a heterodyne beat between two lasers individually locked to different resonant modes of a cavity with an accuracy better than 0.5 ppm, which meets the requirement to further determine the longitudinal mode number of the cavity length. Also, this approach has substantially mitigated the temperature dependency of the measurements of the cavity length and consequently the capacitance.

  18. Nano-rheology of hydrogels using direct drive force modulation atomic force microscopy†

    PubMed Central

    Nalam, Prathima C.; Gosvami, Nitya N.; Caporizzo, Matthew A.; Composto, Russell J.

    2016-01-01

    We present a magnetic force-based direct drive modulation method to measure local nano-rheological properties of soft materials across a broad frequency range (10 Hz to 2 kHz) using colloid-attached atomic force microscope (AFM) probes in liquid. The direct drive method enables artefact-free measurements over several decades of excitation frequency, and avoids the need to evaluate medium-induced hydrodynamic drag effects. The method was applied to measure the local mechanical properties of polyacrylamide hydrogels. The frequency-dependent storage stiffness, loss stiffness, and loss tangent (tan δ) were quantified for hydrogels having high and low crosslinking densities by measuring the amplitude and the phase response of the cantilever while the colloid was in contact with the hydrogel. The frequency bandwidth was further expanded to lower effective frequencies (0.1 Hz to 10 Hz) by obtaining force–displacement (FD) curves. Slow FD measurements showed a recoverable but highly hysteretic response, with the contact mechanical behaviour dependent on the loading direction: approach curves showed Hertzian behaviour while retraction curves fit the JKR contact mechanics model well into the adhesive regime, after which multiple detachment instabilities occurred. Using small amplitude dynamic modulation to explore faster rates, the load dependence of the storage stiffness transitioned from Hertzian to a dynamic punch-type (constant contact area) model, indicating significant influence of material dissipation coupled with adhesion. Using the appropriate contact model across the full frequency range measured, the storage moduli were found to remain nearly constant until an increase began near ∼100 Hz. The softer gels' storage modulus increased from 7.9 ± 0.4 to 14.5 ± 2.1 kPa (∼85%), and the stiffer gels' storage modulus increased from 16.3 ± 1.1 to 31.7 ± 5.0 kPa (∼95%). This increase at high frequencies may be attributed to a contribution from solvent

  19. Discrimination of frequency-modulated Baleen whale downsweep calls with overlapping frequencies.

    PubMed

    Ou, Hui; Au, Whitlow W L; Van Parijs, Sofie; Oleson, Erin M; Rankin, Shannon

    2015-06-01

    Automatic classification of fin, sei, and blue whale frequency modulated downsweeps has been a challenging task for bioacousticians. These calls overlap in frequency range and have similar time durations. The traditional spectrogram methodology, the Short Time Fourier Transform, tends to be ineffective because of the large temporal ambiguities needed to achieve the necessary frequency resolution to study the fine time-frequency (TF) structures. Spectrograms generated with the Pseudo Wigner-Ville Distribution (PWVD) provide much higher simultaneous TF resolution compared with the traditional method. The PWVD allows bioacousticians to study the fine TF structures of the sound, such as the instantaneous frequency, instantaneous bandwidth, contour slope, etc. These features set the foundation of identifying sounds that are usually considered difficult to discriminate using the traditional method. Wigner-Ville distribution of the baleen whale downsweeps showed distinguishable characteristics; for example, the TF contour of fin and sei whales exhibited concave and convex shapes, which have never been reported in the literature. A Support Vector Machine classifier was trained and tested based on the parameters extracted from the PWVD.

  20. Range-azimuth decouple beamforming for frequency diverse array with Costas-sequence modulated frequency offsets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhe; Wang, Wen-Qin; Shao, Huaizong

    2016-12-01

    Different from the phased-array using the same carrier frequency for each transmit element, the frequency diverse array (FDA) uses a small frequency offset across the array elements to produce range-angle-dependent transmit beampattern. FDA radar provides new application capabilities and potentials due to its range-dependent transmit array beampattern, but the FDA using linearly increasing frequency offsets will produce a range and angle coupled transmit beampattern. In order to decouple the range-azimuth beampattern for FDA radar, this paper proposes a uniform linear array (ULA) FDA using Costas-sequence modulated frequency offsets to produce random-like energy distribution in the transmit beampattern and thumbtack transmit-receive beampattern. In doing so, the range and angle of targets can be unambiguously estimated through matched filtering and subspace decomposition algorithms in the receiver signal processor. Moreover, random-like energy distributed beampattern can also be utilized for low probability of intercept (LPI) radar applications. Numerical results show that the proposed scheme outperforms the standard FDA in focusing the transmit energy, especially in the range dimension.

  1. Vibrational Frequencies of Halogen Atoms Adsorbed on Silver Metal Surfaces.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-17

    TO Ct/Ag (100) Crystalline AgC£ has the face centered cubic structure , with four molecules per unit cell and a lattice constant of 5.547 A. 43 Jones...in the absence of dipolar coupling within the crystal. According to Fox and Hexter,42 (L"d is given by W 2-h + p2 (6) for the face centered cubic ... structure found for AgF, AgCR, AgBr, and AqI (phase III). ust is the transverse optic mode frequency in the single crystal, p is magnitude of the

  2. Comment on 'Accurate rubidium atomic fountain frequency standard'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruoxin; Gibble, Kurt

    2011-10-01

    We discuss the treatment of distributed cavity phase, microwave lensing and microwave leakage in the paper by Ovchinnikov and Marra (2011 Metrologia 48 87-100). The paper neglects the potential distributed cavity phase shifts from linear phase gradients and quadrupolar phase variations. Only azimuthally symmetric phase variations were analysed and an incorrect model was used for these. The paper also omits an uncertainty due to microwave lensing, which must be included. Finally, we describe additional measurements that could clarify the model used to analyse the frequency shifts due to microwave leakage.

  3. Extracting the differential phase in dual atom interferometers by modulating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Ping; Zhong, Jia-Qi; Chen, Xi; Li, Run-Bing; Li, Da-Wei; Zhu, Lei; Song, Hong-Wei; Wang, Jin; Zhan, Ming-Sheng

    2016-09-01

    We present a new scheme for measuring the differential phase in dual atom interferometers. The magnetic field is modulated in one interferometer, and the differential phase can be extracted without measuring the amplitude of the magnetic field by combining the ellipse and linear fitting methods. The gravity gradient measurements are discussed based on dual atom interferometers. Numerical simulation shows that the systematic error of the differential phase measurement is largely decreased when the duration of the magnetic field is symmetrically modulated. This combined fitting scheme has a high accuracy for measuring an arbitrary differential phase in dual atom interferometers.

  4. Study of jamming of the frequency modulation infrared seekers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Fang; Guo, Jin; Shao, Jun-feng; Wang, Ting-feng

    2013-09-01

    The threat of the IR guidance missile is a direct consequence of extensive proliferation of the airborne IR countermeasure. The aim of a countermeasure system is to inject false information into a sensor system to create confusion. Many optical seekers have a single detector that is used to sense the position of its victim in its field of view. A seeker has a spinning reticle in the focal plane of the optical system that collects energy from the thermal scene and focuses it on to the detector. In this paper, the principle of the conical-scan FM reticle is analyzed. Then the effect that different amplitude or frequency modulated mid-infrared laser pulse acts on the reticle system is simulated. When the ratio of jamming energy to target radiation (repression) gradually increases, the azimuth error and the misalignment angle error become larger. The results show that simply increasing the intensity of the jamming light achieves little, but it increases the received signal strength of the FM reticle system ,so that the target will be more easily exposed. A slow variation of amplitude will warp the azimuth information received by the seeker, but the target can't be completely out of the missile tracking. If the repression and the jamming frequency change at the same time, the jamming effects can be more obvious. When the jamming signal's angular frequency is twice as large as the carrier frequency of the reticle system, the seeker will can't receive an accurate signal and the jamming can be achieved. The jamming mechanism of the conical-scan FM IR seeker is described and it is helpful to the airborne IR countermeasure system.

  5. Atomic force microscopy force-distance curves with small amplitude ultrasonic modulation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chengfu; Chen, Yuhang; Wang, Tian; Chu, Jiaru

    2015-01-01

    Force-distance curves were acquired on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) specimen and a gold film specimen under ultrasonic modulation in atomic force microscopy (AFM). Measurements demonstrated that small amplitude ultrasonic oscillation of either the cantilever or the sample has significant impacts on the characteristics of force-distance curves. With the increase of excitation amplitude, the apparent pull-off force decreased gradually and the hysteresis between the approach and retraction curves reduced significantly. Furthermore, the decrease of the pull-off force was determined to be also relevant to the excitation frequency. With the assistance of contact resonance spectra, the pull-off force was verified to have a near-linear relationship with the cantilever contact oscillation amplitude. Theoretical analysis and subsequent numerical simulations well interpreted the experimental results. The emergence of large oscillating contact forces under ultrasonic modulation altered the force-distance curves, and such a mechanism was ascertained by further ultrasonic AFM imaging. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Nanoscale Subsurface Imaging via Resonant Difference-Frequency Atomic Force Ultrasonic Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, Sean A.; Cantrell, John H.; Lilehei, Peter T.

    2007-01-01

    A novel scanning probe microscope methodology has been developed that employs an ultrasonic wave launched from the bottom of a sample while the cantilever of an atomic force microscope, driven at a frequency differing from the ultrasonic frequency by the fundamental resonance frequency of the cantilever, engages the sample top surface. The nonlinear mixing of the oscillating cantilever and the ultrasonic wave in the region defined by the cantilever tip-sample surface interaction force generates difference-frequency oscillations at the cantilever fundamental resonance. The resonance-enhanced difference-frequency signals are used to create images of embedded nanoscale features.

  7. Modulation of Radio Frequency Signals by Nonlinearly Generated Acoustic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Spencer Joseph

    Acousto-electromagnetic scattering is a process in which an acoustic excitation is utilized to induce modulation on an electromagnetic (EM) wave. This phenomenon can be exploited in remote sensing and detection schemes whereby target objects are mechanically excited by high powered acoustic waves resulting in unique object characterizations when interrogated with EM signals. Implementation of acousto-EM sensing schemes, however, are limited by a lack of fundamental understanding of the nonlinear interaction between acoustic and EM waves and inefficient simulation methods in the determination of the radiation patterns of higher order scattered acoustic fields. To address the insufficient simulation issue, a computationally efficient mathematical model describing higher order scattered sound fields, particularly of third-order in which a 40x increase in computation speed is achieved, is derived using a multi-Gaussian beam (MGB) expansion that expresses the sound field of any arbitrary axially symmetric beam as a series of Gaussian base functions. The third-order intermodulation (IM3) frequency components are produced by considering the cascaded nonlinear second-order effects when analyzing the interaction between the first- and second-order frequency components during the nonlinear scattering of sound by sound from two noncollinear ultrasonic baffled piston sources. The theory is extended to the modeling of the sound beams generated by parametric transducer arrays, showing that the MGB model can be efficiently used to calculate both the second- and third-order sound fields of the array. Additionally, a near-to-far-field (NTFF) transformation method is developed to model the far-field characteristics of scattered sound fields, extending Kirchhoff's theorem, typically applied to EM waves, determining the far-field patterns of an acoustic source from amplitude and phase measurements made in the near-field by including the higher order sound fields generated by the

  8. Discrete pulse modulation strategies for high-frequency inverter systems

    SciTech Connect

    Venkataramanan, G. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Divan, D.M. . Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering); Jahns, T.M. )

    1993-07-01

    High-performance high-frequency inverter systems for UPS applications represent a demanding application that cannot be easily realized using conventional hard-switched PWM inverter topologies. Adoption of typical soft-switched inverters such as the resonant dc link inverter require the use of discrete pulse modulation strategies. New controller structures are necessary to cope with stringent voltage regulation and distortion constraints in the presence of unbalanced and nonlinear loads. This paper presents a controller that utilizes load current feed-forward strategy with a cost function current regulator to achieve excellent transient performance characteristics. Voltage regulation is ensured using a synchronous frame regulator. Detailed simulation and experimental results verifying the concepts are presented. Although this paper focuses on soft-switching inverters, the control concepts can be applied to conventional hard-switching inverters as well.

  9. Frequency modulated continuous wave lidar performance model for target detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du Bosq, Todd W.; Preece, Bradley L.

    2017-05-01

    The desire to provide the warfighter both ranging and reflected intensity information is increasing to meet expanding operational needs. LIDAR imaging systems can provide the user with intensity, range, and even velocity information of a scene. The ability to predict the performance of LIDAR systems is critical for the development of future designs without the need to conduct time consuming and costly field studies. Performance modeling of a frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) LIDAR system is challenging due to the addition of the chirped laser source and waveform mixing. The FMCW LIDAR model is implemented in the NV-IPM framework using the custom component generation tool. This paper presents an overview of the FMCW Lidar, the customized LIDAR components, and a series of trade studies using the LIDAR model.

  10. Discrete pulse modulation strategies for high-frequency inverter systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataramanan, Giri; Divan, Deepakraj M.; Jahns, Thomas M.

    1993-07-01

    High-performance, high-frequency inverter systems for UPS (uninterruptible power system) applications cannot be easily realized using conventional hard-switched PWM inverter topologies. Adoption of typical soft-switched inverters such as the resonant dc link inverter require the use of discrete pulse modulation strategies. New controller structures are necessary to cope with stringent voltage regulation and distortion constraints in the presence of unbalanced and nonlinear loads. A controller that utilizes a load current feedforward strategy with a cost function current regulator to achieve excellent transient performance characteristics is presented. Voltage regulation is ensured using a synchronous frame regulator. Detailed simulation and experimental results verifying the concepts are presented. Although this work focuses on soft-switching inverters, the control concepts can be applied to conventional hard-switching inverters as well.

  11. Fast, multi-frequency, and quantitative nanomechanical mapping of live cells using the atomic force microscope

    PubMed Central

    Cartagena-Rivera, Alexander X.; Wang, Wen-Horng; Geahlen, Robert L.; Raman, Arvind

    2015-01-01

    A longstanding goal in cellular mechanobiology has been to link dynamic biomolecular processes underpinning disease or morphogenesis to spatio-temporal changes in nanoscale mechanical properties such as viscoelasticity, surface tension, and adhesion. This requires the development of quantitative mechanical microscopy methods with high spatio-temporal resolution within a single cell. The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) can map the heterogeneous mechanical properties of cells with high spatial resolution, however, the image acquisition time is 1–2 orders of magnitude longer than that required to study dynamic cellular processes. We present a technique that allows commercial AFM systems to map quantitatively the dynamically changing viscoelastic properties of live eukaryotic cells at widely separated frequencies over large areas (several 10’s of microns) with spatial resolution equal to amplitude-modulation (AM-AFM) and with image acquisition times (tens of seconds) approaching those of speckle fluorescence methods. This represents a ~20 fold improvement in nanomechanical imaging throughput compared to AM-AFM and is fully compatible with emerging high speed AFM systems. This method is used to study the spatio-temporal mechanical response of MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells to the inhibition of Syk protein tyrosine kinase giving insight into the signaling pathways by which Syk negatively regulates motility of highly invasive cancer cells. PMID:26118423

  12. Control of the photoelectron dynamics for the effective conversion of short-pulse, frequency-modulated optical radiation into X-ray radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Silaev, A A; Meshkov, O V; Emelin, M Yu; Vvedenskii, N V; Ryabikin, M Yu

    2015-05-31

    We report a theoretical investigation of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in the ionisation of atoms by nonlinear frequency-modulated laser pulses of short duration. It is shown that the reduction in the instantaneous value of the laser pulse frequency can lead to a significant increase in the width of the plateau in the HHG spectrum. We have found optimal parameters of frequency modulation at which photons with energies of 1 keV are efficiently generated at a relatively low laser-pulse intensity. High HHG efficiency at optimal parameters is explained by the peculiarities of atomic ionisation dynamics and acceleration of photoelectrons by a frequency-modulated laser field. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  13. Baseband integrated acousto-optic frequency shifter/modulator module for fiber optic at 1.3 mum.

    PubMed

    Tsai, C S; Cheng, Z Y

    1993-01-01

    A baseband integrated acoustooptic (AO) frequency shifter/modulator module that consists of a pair of titanium-indiffused proton-exchanged (TIPE) waveguide lenses and a pair of cascaded guided-wave AO Bragg cells has been realized in a Y-cut LiNbO(3) waveguide substrate 0.1 cmx1.0 cmx2.0 cm in size. A device module operating at the optical wavelength of 1.3 mum has provided a -3-dB tunable bandwidth of 120 MHz at baseband. The frequency-shifted or -modulated light propagates in a fixed direction, irrespective of the magnitude of frequency shift or modulation, and is focused into a spot (FWHM) of 6.2-mum size on the output edge of the waveguide. Accordingly, this optical frequency shifter/module can be directly interfaced with single-mode optical fibers to facilitate applications in fiber optic systems.

  14. Metabolic Energy of Action Potentials Modulated by Spike Frequency Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Guo-Sheng; Wang, Jiang; Li, Hui-Yan; Wei, Xi-Le; Deng, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Spike frequency adaptation (SFA) exists in many types of neurons, which has been demonstrated to improve their abilities to process incoming information by synapses. The major carrier used by a neuron to convey synaptic signals is the sequences of action potentials (APs), which have to consume substantial metabolic energies to initiate and propagate. Here we use conductance-based models to investigate how SFA modulates the AP-related energy of neurons. The SFA is attributed to either calcium-activated K+ (IAHP) or voltage-activated K+ (IM) current. We observe that the activation of IAHP or IM increases the Na+ load used for depolarizing membrane, while produces few effects on the falling phase of AP. Then, the metabolic energy involved in Na+ current significantly increases from one AP to the next, while for K+ current it is less affected. As a consequence, the total energy cost by each AP gets larger as firing rate decays down. It is also shown that the minimum Na+ charge needed for the depolarization of each AP is unaffected during the course of SFA. This indicates that the activation of either adaptation current makes APs become less efficient to use Na+ influx for their depolarization. Further, our simulations demonstrate that the different biophysical properties of IM and IAHP result in distinct modulations of metabolic energy usage for APs. These investigations provide a fundamental link between adaptation currents and neuronal energetics, which could facilitate to interpret how SFA participates in neuronal information processing. PMID:27909394

  15. The NASA data systems standardization program - Radio frequency and modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, W. L.

    The modifications being considered by the NASA-ESA Working Group (NEWG) for space-data-systems standardization to maximize the commonality of the NASA and ESA RF and modulation systems linking spaceborne scientific experiments with ground stations are summarized. The first phase of the NEWG project shows that the NASA MK-IVA Deep Space Network and Shuttle Interrogator (SI) systems in place or planned for 1985 are generally compatible with the ESA Network, but that communications involving the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) are incompatible due to its use of spread-spectrum modulation, pseudonoise ranging, multiple-access channels, and Mbit/s data rates. Topics under study for the post-1985 period include low-bit-rate capability for the ESA Network, an optional 8-kHz command subcarrier for the SI, fixing the spacecraft-transponder frequency-multiplication ratios for possible X-band uplinks or X-band nondeep-space downlinks, review of incompatible TDRS features, and development of the 32-GHz band.

  16. Metabolic Energy of Action Potentials Modulated by Spike Frequency Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Yi, Guo-Sheng; Wang, Jiang; Li, Hui-Yan; Wei, Xi-Le; Deng, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Spike frequency adaptation (SFA) exists in many types of neurons, which has been demonstrated to improve their abilities to process incoming information by synapses. The major carrier used by a neuron to convey synaptic signals is the sequences of action potentials (APs), which have to consume substantial metabolic energies to initiate and propagate. Here we use conductance-based models to investigate how SFA modulates the AP-related energy of neurons. The SFA is attributed to either calcium-activated K(+) (IAHP) or voltage-activated K(+) (IM) current. We observe that the activation of IAHP or IM increases the Na(+) load used for depolarizing membrane, while produces few effects on the falling phase of AP. Then, the metabolic energy involved in Na(+) current significantly increases from one AP to the next, while for K(+) current it is less affected. As a consequence, the total energy cost by each AP gets larger as firing rate decays down. It is also shown that the minimum Na(+) charge needed for the depolarization of each AP is unaffected during the course of SFA. This indicates that the activation of either adaptation current makes APs become less efficient to use Na(+) influx for their depolarization. Further, our simulations demonstrate that the different biophysical properties of IM and IAHP result in distinct modulations of metabolic energy usage for APs. These investigations provide a fundamental link between adaptation currents and neuronal energetics, which could facilitate to interpret how SFA participates in neuronal information processing.

  17. The NASA data systems standardization program - Radio frequency and modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, W. L.

    1983-01-01

    The modifications being considered by the NASA-ESA Working Group (NEWG) for space-data-systems standardization to maximize the commonality of the NASA and ESA RF and modulation systems linking spaceborne scientific experiments with ground stations are summarized. The first phase of the NEWG project shows that the NASA MK-IVA Deep Space Network and Shuttle Interrogator (SI) systems in place or planned for 1985 are generally compatible with the ESA Network, but that communications involving the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) are incompatible due to its use of spread-spectrum modulation, pseudonoise ranging, multiple-access channels, and Mbit/s data rates. Topics under study for the post-1985 period include low-bit-rate capability for the ESA Network, an optional 8-kHz command subcarrier for the SI, fixing the spacecraft-transponder frequency-multiplication ratios for possible X-band uplinks or X-band nondeep-space downlinks, review of incompatible TDRS features, and development of the 32-GHz band.

  18. Frequency-shift vibro-acoustic modulation driven by low-frequency broadband excitations in a bistable cantilever oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qingbo; Xu, Yanyan; Lu, Siliang; Shao, Yong

    2017-03-01

    This paper reports a frequency-shift vibro-acoustic modulation (VAM) effect in a bistable microcracked cantilever oscillator. Low-frequency broadband excitations induced a VAM effect with a shifted modulation frequency through involving a microcracked metal beam in a bistable oscillator model. We used nonlinear dynamics equations and principles to describe the mechanism of a bistable oscillator whose natural frequency varied as the oscillation amplitude increased. We demonstrated this frequency-shift VAM effect using a prototype bistable oscillator model designed to efficiently detect microcracks in solid materials via the VAM effect using ambient vibration excitations.

  19. Frequency response control of semiconductor laser by using hybrid modulation scheme.

    PubMed

    Mieda, Shigeru; Yokota, Nobuhide; Isshiki, Ryuto; Kobayashi, Wataru; Yasaka, Hiroshi

    2016-10-31

    A hybrid modulation scheme that simultaneously applies the direct current modulation and intra-cavity loss modulation to a semiconductor laser is proposed. Both numerical calculations using rate equations and experiments using a fabricated laser show that the hybrid modulation scheme can control the frequency response of the laser by changing a modulation ratio and time delay between the two modulations. The modulation ratio and time delay provide the degree of signal mixing of the two modulations and an optimum condition is found when a non-flat frequency response for the intra-cavity loss modulation is compensated by that for the direct current modulation. We experimentally confirm a 8.64-dB improvement of the modulation sensitivity at 20 GHz compared with the pure direct current modulation with a 0.7-dB relaxation oscillation peak.

  20. Note: A frequency modulated wireless interrogation system exploiting narrowband acoustic resonator for remote physical quantity measurement.

    PubMed

    Droit, C; Martin, G; Ballandras, S; Friedt, J-M

    2010-05-01

    We demonstrate the wireless conversion of frequency modulation to amplitude modulation by radio frequency resonators as means of accurately determining the resonance frequency of passive acoustoelectronic sensors. The emitted frequency modulated radio frequency pulses are generated by a pulsed radar for probing a surface acoustic wave based sensor. The sharp sign transition of the amplitude modulated received signal provides a signal on which a feedback loop is locked to monitor the resonance signal. The strategy is demonstrated using a full software implementation on a generic hardware, resulting in 2 Hz resolution at 1 s integration time limited by the proportional feedback loop.

  1. Note: A frequency modulated wireless interrogation system exploiting narrowband acoustic resonator for remote physical quantity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droit, C.; Martin, G.; Ballandras, S.; Friedt, J.-M.

    2010-05-01

    We demonstrate the wireless conversion of frequency modulation to amplitude modulation by radio frequency resonators as means of accurately determining the resonance frequency of passive acoustoelectronic sensors. The emitted frequency modulated radio frequency pulses are generated by a pulsed radar for probing a surface acoustic wave based sensor. The sharp sign transition of the amplitude modulated received signal provides a signal on which a feedback loop is locked to monitor the resonance signal. The strategy is demonstrated using a full software implementation on a generic hardware, resulting in 2 Hz resolution at 1 s integration time limited by the proportional feedback loop.

  2. On the existence in human auditory pathways of channels selectively tuned to the modulation present in frequency-modulated tones

    PubMed Central

    Kay, R. H.; Matthews, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    1. The sensitivity of detecting modulation in a test tone sinusoidally frequency-modulated at a rate ϕtest is diminished after exposure to a conditioning tone more deeply frequency-modulated at a rate ϕcond provided that ϕcond is not very different from ϕtest, the sound amplitude being kept constant for each tone at a comfortable hearing level 40-45 dB above threshold. 2. When ϕcond = ϕtest the frequency deviation in the modulated test tone must be increased to about three times the unconditioned threshold magnitude to be detectable immediately after exposure to the conditioning tone. Detection sensitivity returns to normal in about one minute. 3. At low modulation frequencies the conditioning effects are tuned, being much diminished when ϕcond differs from ϕtest by a few cycles per second. 4. Comparing monaural with contra-aural conditioning demonstrates a considerable interaural transfer of about 60-80% of the effect, indicating that the conditioning and its selectivity are predominantly central phenomena. 5. The magnitude of the deterioration in detection sensitivity after conditioning is about 3 × at modulation frequencies between about 3/sec and 30/sec. It diminishes at lower and higher modulation frequencies and is effectively absent at 100/sec modulation. The bandwidth of the effect increases from a few cycles per second at the lower end of this range, to some tens of cycles per second at the upper end. 6. For the same modulation frequency, the conditioning is relatively insensitive to the mean `carrier' audiofrequency, f0. The band width in terms of carrier frequency is at least as wide as `critical bands'. With a test signal f0 = 250 Hz, ϕtest = 8/sec, conditioning is still appreciable for a conditioning tone of ϕcond = 8/sec but centred upon f0 = 150 Hz or = 350 Hz. Conditioning is thus not explicable in terms of coincidences between particular spectral components in the conditioning and test tones. 7. Whereas the sensitivity of detecting 8/sec

  3. Microwave lensing frequency shift of the PHARAO laser-cooled microgravity atomic clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterman, Phillip; Gibble, Kurt; Laurent, Phillipe; Salomon, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    We evaluate the microwave lensing frequency shift of the microgravity laser-cooled caesium clock PHARAO. We find microwave lensing frequency shifts of δν/ν  =  11  ×  10-17 to 13  ×  10-17, larger than the shift of typical fountain clocks. The shift has a weak dependence on PHARAO parameters, including the atomic temperature, size of the atomic cloud, detection laser intensities, and the launch velocity. We also find the lensing frequency shift to be insensitive to selection and detection spatial inhomogeneities and the expected low-frequency vibrations. We conservatively assign a nominal microwave lensing frequency uncertainty of  ±4  ×  10-17.

  4. Spontaneous emission from the atom stabilized by a strong high-frequency laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogatskaya, A. V.; Volkova, E. A.; Popov, A. M.

    2017-09-01

    The spontaneous emission of a quantum system driven by a high-intensity, high-frequency classical laser field is analyzed. The study is based on the accurate consideration of the quantum system interacting with vacuum-quantized field modes in the first order of perturbation theory, while the intense laser field is considered classically beyond this theory. It is demonstrated that the spectrum of the spontaneous emission can be used for analyzing the strong-field dynamics and the structure of the energy spectrum of an atomic system. In particular, it is found that in high-frequency fields (where the energy of the laser quanta is greater than the ionization potential) atoms manifest the features of the Kramers-Henneberger atom. It is also found that in the stabilization regime, the atom emits both odd and even laser radiation harmonics.

  5. Determining Optimum C-Field Settings that Minimize Output Frequency Variations in Cesium Atomic Frequency Standards

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    current setting is probably on the order of parts in lo4 in our laboratory environment over the three months during which data were taken; this...hardware and long-term frequency-stability measurements. This work was supported, in part , by the U.S. Air Force Space Systems Division under Contract...Long-Term Stability in Cesium Beam Frequency Standards," IEEE Trans. Ultrasonics , Ferroelectronics, and Frequency Control UFFC-34 [6], 598-601 (Novem

  6. Effective Landau-Zener transitions in the circuit dynamical Casimir effect with time-varying modulation frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodonov, A. V.; Militello, B.; Napoli, A.; Messina, A.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the dissipative single-qubit circuit QED architecture in which the atomic transition frequency undergoes a weak external time modulation. For sinusoidal modulation with linearly varying frequency we derive effective Hamiltonians that resemble the Landau-Zener problem of finite duration associated with a two- or multilevel systems. The corresponding off-diagonal coupling coefficients originate either from the rotating or the counter-rotating terms in the Rabi Hamiltonian, depending on the values of the modulation frequency. It is demonstrated that in the dissipationless case one can accomplish almost complete transitions between the eigenstates of the bare Rabi Hamiltonian even for relatively short durations of the frequency sweep. To assess the experimental feasibility of our scheme we solved numerically the phenomenological and the microscopic quantum master equations in the Markovian regime at zero temperature. Both models exhibit qualitatively similar behavior and indicate that photon generation from vacuum via effective Landau-Zener transitions could be implemented with the current technology on the time scales of a few microseconds. Moreover, unlike the harmonic dynamical Casimir effect implementations, our proposal does not require precise knowledge of the resonant modulation frequency to accomplish meaningful photon generation.

  7. Locking of self-oscillation frequency by pump modulation in an erbium-doped fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisarchik, A. N.; Barmenkov, Yu. O.

    2005-10-01

    Frequency locking of self-oscillations in a diode-pumped erbium-doped fiber laser by external modulation of the diode current is studied experimentally. The coexistence of locking and unlocking regimes is detected. The condition for onset of the bistability and dependences of the frequency detuning on the modulation frequency and amplitude are established. Transitions to torus-chaos are also demonstrated.

  8. Atomic-resonance-enhanced nonlinear optical frequency conversion with entangled photon pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Du Shengwang

    2011-03-15

    We theoretically study nonlinear optical frequency conversion with time-frequency entangled paired photons whose sum frequency is on two-photon resonance of an atomic ensemble. Assisted by a strong coupling laser, two paired photons with wide spectrum are converted into a single monochromatic photon. The on-resonance nonlinear process is made possible due to the electromagnetically induced transparency that not only eliminates the on-resonance absorption but also enhances the nonlinear interaction between the single photons and atoms. Compared to this quantum-nonlinear conversion, the classical corresponding single-photon counts from accidental two-photon coincidence has a wide spectrum and experiences large absorption. As a result, the system can be used as an efficient two-photon quantum correlator in which the classical accidental coincidences can be suppressed. We perform numerical simulations basing on a Rb atomic vapor cell with realistic operating parameters.

  9. Dual Data Pulse Width Modulator for Radio Frequency Identification Biosensor Signal Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Boram; Nakazato, Kazuo

    2013-04-01

    A dual data pulse width modulator is proposed and demonstrated for radio frequency identification (RFID) biosensor signal modulation. Simultaneous wireless measurement of two sensors can be carried out using this circuit, in which two analog signals are modulated and transmitted in a single clock cycle. The measured modulation sensitivity of the two input channels is 84.69 and 85.16 µs/V and the dynamic range is 55.6 and 63.5 dB, respectively. Here, redox potential and temperature are measured wirelessly using the proposed circuit. Temperature change measurement shows a sensitivity of 9.501 µs/°C in the range of 25-40 °C. The measured redox potential shows fairly good linearity for a concentration ratio of hexacyanoferrate (III) to (II) ranging from 10-2 to 102 and the slope is 58.0 mV/decade, almost the same as the theoretical value. The chip area and power consumption are 0.36 mm2 and 650 µW, respectively, using 1.2-µm, 2-metal, 2-poly CMOS technology.

  10. Low frequency steady-state brain responses modulate large scale functional networks in a frequency-specific means.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Feng; Long, Zhiliang; Cui, Qian; Liu, Feng; Jing, Xiu-Juan; Chen, Heng; Guo, Xiao-Nan; Yan, Jin H; Chen, Hua-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Neural oscillations are essential for brain functions. Research has suggested that the frequency of neural oscillations is lower for more integrative and remote communications. In this vein, some resting-state studies have suggested that large scale networks function in the very low frequency range (<1 Hz). However, it is difficult to determine the frequency characteristics of brain networks because both resting-state studies and conventional frequency tagging approaches cannot simultaneously capture multiple large scale networks in controllable cognitive activities. In this preliminary study, we aimed to examine whether large scale networks can be modulated by task-induced low frequency steady-state brain responses (lfSSBRs) in a frequency-specific pattern. In a revised attention network test, the lfSSBRs were evoked in the triple network system and sensory-motor system, indicating that large scale networks can be modulated in a frequency tagging way. Furthermore, the inter- and intranetwork synchronizations as well as coherence were increased at the fundamental frequency and the first harmonic rather than at other frequency bands, indicating a frequency-specific modulation of information communication. However, there was no difference among attention conditions, indicating that lfSSBRs modulate the general attention state much stronger than distinguishing attention conditions. This study provides insights into the advantage and mechanism of lfSSBRs. More importantly, it paves a new way to investigate frequency-specific large scale brain activities.

  11. Geometric phase of an atom inside an adiabatic radio-frequency potential

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, P.; You, L.

    2007-09-15

    We investigate the geometric phase of an atom inside an adiabatic radio-frequency (rf) potential created from a static magnetic field (B field) and a time-dependent rf field. The spatial motion of the atomic center of mass is shown to give rise to a geometric phase, or Berry's phase, in the adiabatically evolving atomic hyperfine spin along the local B field. This phase is found to depend on both the static B field along the semiclassical trajectory of the atomic center of mass and an effective magnetic field consisting of the total B field, including the oscillating rf field. Specific calculations are provided for several recent atom interferometry experiments and proposals utilizing adiabatic rf potentials.

  12. Optical Measurements of Strong Radio-Frequency Fields Using Rydberg Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Stephanie Anne

    There has recently been an initiative toward establishing atomic measurement standards for field quantities, including radio-frequency, millimeter-wave, and micro-wave electric fields. Current measurement standards are obtained using dipole antennas, which are fundamentally limited in frequency bandwidth (set by the physical size of the antenna) and accuracy (due to the metal perturbing the field during the measurement). Establishing an atomic standard rectifies these problems. My thesis work contributes to an ongoing effort towards establishing the viability of using Rydberg electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) to perform atom-based measurements of radio-frequency (RF) fields over a wide range of frequencies and field strengths, focusing on strong-field measurements. Rydberg atoms are atoms with an electron excited to a high principal quantum number, resulting in a high sensitivity to an applied field. A model based on Floquet theory is implemented to accurately describe the observed atomic energy level shifts from which information about the field is extracted. Additionally, the effects due to the different electric field domains within the measurement volume are accurately modeled. Absolute atomic measurements of fields up to 296 V/m within a +/-0.35% relative uncertainty are demonstrated. This is the strongest field measured at the time of data publication. Moreover, the uncertainty is over an order of magnitude better than that of current standards. A vacuum chamber setup that I implemented during my graduate studies is presented and its unique components are detailed. In this chamber, cold-atom samples are generated and Rydberg atoms are optically excited within the ground-state sample. The Rydberg ion detection and imaging procedure are discussed, particularly the high magnification that the system provides. By analyzing the position of the ions, the spatial correlation g(2) (r) of Rydberg-atom distributions can be extracted. Aside from ion

  13. The Effects of Ambient Temperature Fluctuations on the Long-Term Frequency Stability of a Miniature Rubidium Atomic Frequency Standard

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    technologies; lasers and electro-optics, solid state laser design, micro-optics, optical communications, and fiber optic sensors ; atomic frequency standards...elastomer change could also shift the position of physics package components, thereby creating a greater sensitivity to microwave power or magnetic...applied laser spectroscopy, laser chemistry, atmospheric propagation and beam control, LEDAR/LADAR remote sensing; solar cell and array testing and

  14. Frequency standards based on ultracold atoms in tests of general relativity, navigation and gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khabarova, K. Yu.; Kudeyarov, K. S.; Kolachevsky, N. N.

    2017-06-01

    Research and development in the field of optical clocks based on ultracold atoms and ions have enabled the relative uncertainty in frequency to be reduced down to a few parts in 1018. The use of novel, precise frequency comparison methods opens up new possibilities for basic research (sensitive tests of general relativity, a search for a drift of fundamental constants and a search for ‘dark matter’) as well as for state-of-the-art navigation and gravimetry. We discuss the key methods that are used in creating precision clocks (including transportable clocks) based on ultracold atoms and ions and the feasibility of using them in resolving current relativistic gravimetry issues.

  15. Frequency and amplitude modulation of ultra-compact terahertz quantum cascade lasers using an integrated avalanche diode oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, Fabrizio; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H.; Davies, A. Giles; Vitiello, Miriam S.

    2016-03-01

    Mode-locked comb sources operating at optical frequencies underpin applications ranging from spectroscopy and ultrafast physics, through to absolute frequency measurements and atomic clocks. Extending their operation into the terahertz frequency range would greatly benefit from the availability of compact semiconductor-based sources. However, the development of any compact mode-locked THz laser, which itself is inherently a frequency comb, has yet to be achieved without the use of an external stimulus. High-power, electrically pumped quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) have recently emerged as a promising solution, owing to their octave spanning bandwidths, the ability to achieve group-velocity dispersion compensation and the possibility of obtaining active mode-locking. Here, we propose an unprecedented compact architecture to induce both frequency and amplitude self-modulation in a THz QCL. By engineering a microwave avalanche oscillator into the laser cavity, which provides a 10 GHz self-modulation of the bias current and output power, we demonstrate multimode laser emission centered around 3 THz, with distinct multiple sidebands. The resulting microwave amplitude and frequency self-modulation of THz QCLs opens up intriguing perspectives, for engineering integrated self-mode-locked THz lasers, with impact in fields such as nano- and ultrafast photonics and optical metrology.

  16. Frequency and amplitude modulation of ultra-compact terahertz quantum cascade lasers using an integrated avalanche diode oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Castellano, Fabrizio; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H.; Davies, A. Giles; Vitiello, Miriam S.

    2016-01-01

    Mode-locked comb sources operating at optical frequencies underpin applications ranging from spectroscopy and ultrafast physics, through to absolute frequency measurements and atomic clocks. Extending their operation into the terahertz frequency range would greatly benefit from the availability of compact semiconductor-based sources. However, the development of any compact mode-locked THz laser, which itself is inherently a frequency comb, has yet to be achieved without the use of an external stimulus. High-power, electrically pumped quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) have recently emerged as a promising solution, owing to their octave spanning bandwidths, the ability to achieve group-velocity dispersion compensation and the possibility of obtaining active mode-locking. Here, we propose an unprecedented compact architecture to induce both frequency and amplitude self-modulation in a THz QCL. By engineering a microwave avalanche oscillator into the laser cavity, which provides a 10 GHz self-modulation of the bias current and output power, we demonstrate multimode laser emission centered around 3 THz, with distinct multiple sidebands. The resulting microwave amplitude and frequency self-modulation of THz QCLs opens up intriguing perspectives, for engineering integrated self-mode-locked THz lasers, with impact in fields such as nano- and ultrafast photonics and optical metrology. PMID:26976199

  17. Frequency and amplitude modulation of ultra-compact terahertz quantum cascade lasers using an integrated avalanche diode oscillator.

    PubMed

    Castellano, Fabrizio; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H; Davies, A Giles; Vitiello, Miriam S

    2016-03-15

    Mode-locked comb sources operating at optical frequencies underpin applications ranging from spectroscopy and ultrafast physics, through to absolute frequency measurements and atomic clocks. Extending their operation into the terahertz frequency range would greatly benefit from the availability of compact semiconductor-based sources. However, the development of any compact mode-locked THz laser, which itself is inherently a frequency comb, has yet to be achieved without the use of an external stimulus. High-power, electrically pumped quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) have recently emerged as a promising solution, owing to their octave spanning bandwidths, the ability to achieve group-velocity dispersion compensation and the possibility of obtaining active mode-locking. Here, we propose an unprecedented compact architecture to induce both frequency and amplitude self-modulation in a THz QCL. By engineering a microwave avalanche oscillator into the laser cavity, which provides a 10 GHz self-modulation of the bias current and output power, we demonstrate multimode laser emission centered around 3 THz, with distinct multiple sidebands. The resulting microwave amplitude and frequency self-modulation of THz QCLs opens up intriguing perspectives, for engineering integrated self-mode-locked THz lasers, with impact in fields such as nano- and ultrafast photonics and optical metrology.

  18. Realization of pure frequency modulation of DFB laser via combined optical and electrical tuning.

    PubMed

    Tian, Chao; Chen, I-Chun Anderson; Park, Seong-Wook; Martini, Rainer

    2013-04-08

    In this paper we present a novel approach to convert AM signal into FM signal in semiconductor lasers via off resonance optical pumping and report on experimental results obtained with a commercial DFB laser. Aside of demonstrating discrete and fast frequency modulation, we achieve pure frequency modulation through combination with electrical modulation suppressing the associated amplitude modulation, which is detrimental to application such as spectroscopy and communication.

  19. A novel Cs-(129)Xe atomic spin gyroscope with closed-loop Faraday modulation.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jiancheng; Wan, Shuangai; Qin, Jie; Zhang, Chen; Quan, Wei; Yuan, Heng; Dong, Haifeng

    2013-08-01

    We report a novel Cs-(129)Xe atomic spin gyroscope (ASG) with closed-loop Faraday modulation method. This ASG requires approximately 30 min to start-up and 110 °C to operate. A closed-loop Faraday modulation method for measurement of the optical rotation was used in this ASG. This method uses an additional Faraday modulator to suppress the laser intensity fluctuation and Faraday modulator thermal induced fluctuation. We theoretically and experimentally validate this method in the Cs-(129)Xe ASG and achieved a bias stability of approximately 3.25 °∕h.

  20. Note: Directly measuring the direct digital synthesizer frequency chirp-rate for an atom interferometer.

    PubMed

    Tao, Juan-Juan; Zhou, Min-Kang; Zhang, Qiao-Zhen; Cui, Jia-Feng; Duan, Xiao-Chun; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Hu, Zhong-Kun

    2015-09-01

    During gravity measurements with Raman type atom interferometry, the frequency of the laser used to drive Raman transition is scanned by chirping the frequency of a direct digital synthesizer (DDS), and the local gravity is determined by precisely measuring the chip rate α of DDS. We present an effective method that can directly evaluate the frequency chirp rate stability of our DDS. By mixing a pair of synchronous linear sweeping signals, the chirp rate fluctuation is precisely measured with a frequency counter. The measurement result shows that the relative α instability can reach 5.7 × 10(-11) in 1 s, which is neglectable in a 10(-9) g level atom interferometry gravimeter.

  1. Note: Directly measuring the direct digital synthesizer frequency chirp-rate for an atom interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Juan-Juan; Zhou, Min-Kang E-mail: zmk@hust.edu.cn; Zhang, Qiao-Zhen; Cui, Jia-Feng; Duan, Xiao-Chun; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Hu, Zhong-Kun E-mail: zmk@hust.edu.cn

    2015-09-15

    During gravity measurements with Raman type atom interferometry, the frequency of the laser used to drive Raman transition is scanned by chirping the frequency of a direct digital synthesizer (DDS), and the local gravity is determined by precisely measuring the chip rate α of DDS. We present an effective method that can directly evaluate the frequency chirp rate stability of our DDS. By mixing a pair of synchronous linear sweeping signals, the chirp rate fluctuation is precisely measured with a frequency counter. The measurement result shows that the relative α instability can reach 5.7 × 10{sup −11} in 1 s, which is neglectable in a 10{sup −9} g level atom interferometry gravimeter.

  2. Limits on gravitational Einstein equivalence principle violation from monitoring atomic clock frequencies during a year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2017-01-01

    The Sun's gravitational potential at Earth varies during a year due to varying Earth-Sun distance. Comparing the results of very accurate measurements of atomic clock transitions performed at different times in the year allows us to study the dependence of the atomic frequencies on the gravitational potential. We examine the measurement data for the ratio of the frequencies in Hg+ and Al+ clock transitions and absolute frequency measurements (with respect to the caesium frequency standard) for Dy, Sr, H, hyperfine transitions in Rb and H and obtain significantly improved limits on the values of the gravity-related parameter of the Einstein equivalence principle violating term in the electron sector of the Standard Model extension Hamiltonian c00=(-3.0 ±5.7 )×10-7 and the parameter for the gravity-related variation of the fine structure constant κα=(-5.3 ±10 )×10-8.

  3. A compact laser head with high-frequency stability for Rb atomic clocks and optical instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Affolderbach, Christoph; Mileti, Gaetano

    2005-07-15

    We present a compact and frequency-stabilized laser head based on an extended-cavity diode laser. The laser head occupies a volume of 200 cm{sup 3} and includes frequency stabilization to Doppler-free saturated absorption resonances on the hyperfine components of the {sup 87}Rb D{sub 2} lines at 780 nm, obtained from a simple and compact spectroscopic setup using a 2 cm{sup 3} vapor cell. The measured frequency stability is {<=}2x10{sup -12} over integration times from 1 s to 1 day and shows the potential to reach 2x10{sup -13} over 10{sup 2}-10{sup 5} s. Compact laser sources with these performances are of great interest for applications in gas-cell atomic frequency standards, atomic magnetometers, interferometers and other instruments requiring stable and narrow-band optical sources.

  4. Effect of ultrasonic frequency on size distributions of nanosized mist generated by ultrasonic atomization.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Takahisa; Sekiguchi, Kazuhiko; Sankoda, Kenshi; Namiki, Norikazu; Nii, Susumu

    2017-07-01

    Ultrasonic atomization is used to produce fine liquid mists with diameter ranges below 100nm. We investigated the effect of the frequency on the size distribution of ultrasonic mist. A bimodal distribution was obtained for the mist generated by ultrasonic atomization with a wide-range particle spectrometer. The peak diameter decreased with increasing frequency, and the number concentration of the mist increased in the smaller range. We determined the relation between the size distribution of the mist and the ultrasonic frequency, and we proposed a generation mechanism for the ultrasonic nanosized mist based on the amount of water vapor around the liquid column. Increasing the power intensity and density by changing the surface diameter of the ultrasonic oscillator affected the number concentration and size distribution of the nanosized mist. Using this technique, the diameter of the mist can be controlled by changing the frequency of the ultrasonic transducer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Local atomic structure modulations activate metal oxide as electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu Hang; Liu, Peng Fei; Pan, Lin Feng; Wang, Hai Feng; Yang, Zhen Zhong; Zheng, Li Rong; Hu, P; Zhao, Hui Jun; Gu, Lin; Yang, Hua Gui

    2015-08-19

    Modifications of local structure at atomic level could precisely and effectively tune the capacity of materials, enabling enhancement in the catalytic activity. Here we modulate the local atomic structure of a classical but inert transition metal oxide, tungsten trioxide, to be an efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water, which has shown promise as an alternative to platinum. Structural analyses and theoretical calculations together indicate that the origin of the enhanced activity could be attributed to the tailored electronic structure by means of the local atomic structure modulations. We anticipate that suitable structure modulations might be applied on other transition metal oxides to meet the optimal thermodynamic and kinetic requirements, which may pave the way to unlock the potential of other promising candidates as cost-effective electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution in industry.

  6. Local atomic structure modulations activate metal oxide as electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu Hang; Liu, Peng Fei; Pan, Lin Feng; Wang, Hai Feng; Yang, Zhen Zhong; Zheng, Li Rong; Hu, P.; Zhao, Hui Jun; Gu, Lin; Yang, Hua Gui

    2015-01-01

    Modifications of local structure at atomic level could precisely and effectively tune the capacity of materials, enabling enhancement in the catalytic activity. Here we modulate the local atomic structure of a classical but inert transition metal oxide, tungsten trioxide, to be an efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water, which has shown promise as an alternative to platinum. Structural analyses and theoretical calculations together indicate that the origin of the enhanced activity could be attributed to the tailored electronic structure by means of the local atomic structure modulations. We anticipate that suitable structure modulations might be applied on other transition metal oxides to meet the optimal thermodynamic and kinetic requirements, which may pave the way to unlock the potential of other promising candidates as cost-effective electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution in industry. PMID:26286479

  7. Local atomic structure modulations activate metal oxide as electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu Hang; Liu, Peng Fei; Pan, Lin Feng; Wang, Hai Feng; Yang, Zhen Zhong; Zheng, Li Rong; Hu, P.; Zhao, Hui Jun; Gu, Lin; Yang, Hua Gui

    2015-08-01

    Modifications of local structure at atomic level could precisely and effectively tune the capacity of materials, enabling enhancement in the catalytic activity. Here we modulate the local atomic structure of a classical but inert transition metal oxide, tungsten trioxide, to be an efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water, which has shown promise as an alternative to platinum. Structural analyses and theoretical calculations together indicate that the origin of the enhanced activity could be attributed to the tailored electronic structure by means of the local atomic structure modulations. We anticipate that suitable structure modulations might be applied on other transition metal oxides to meet the optimal thermodynamic and kinetic requirements, which may pave the way to unlock the potential of other promising candidates as cost-effective electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution in industry.

  8. Low-frequency acoustic atomization with oscillatory flow around micropillars in a microfluidic device

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Yin Nee E-mail: mtnwong@ntu.edu.sg; Wong, Teck Neng E-mail: mtnwong@ntu.edu.sg; Nguyen, Nam Trung

    2014-10-06

    This letter reports a low frequency acoustic atomization technique with oscillatory extensional flow around micropillars. Large droplets passing through two micropillars are elongated. Small droplets are then produced through the pinch-off process at the spindle-shape ends. As the actuation frequency increases, the droplet size decreases with increasing monodispersity. This method is suitable for in-situ mass production of fine droplets in a multi-phase environment without external pumping. Small particles encapsulation was demonstrated with the current technique.

  9. Electrical power inverter having a phase modulated, twin-inverter, high frequency link and an energy storage module

    DOEpatents

    Pitel, I.J.

    1987-02-03

    The present invention provides an electrical power inverter method and apparatus, which includes a high frequency link, for converting DC power into AC power. Generally stated, the apparatus includes a first high frequency module which produces an AC voltage at a first output frequency, and a second high frequency inverter module which produces an AC voltage at a second output frequency that is substantially the same as the first output frequency. The second AC voltage is out of phase with the first AC voltage by a selected angular phase displacement. A mixer mixes the first and second output voltages to produce a high frequency carrier which has a selected base frequency impressed on the sidebands thereof. A rectifier rectifies the carrier, and a filter filters the rectified carrier. An output inverter inverts the filtered carrier to produce an AC line voltage at the selected base frequency. A phase modulator adjusts the relative angular phase displacement between the outputs of the first and second high frequency modules to control the base frequency and magnitude of the AC line voltage. 19 figs.

  10. Electrical power inverter having a phase modulated, twin-inverter, high frequency link and an energy storage module

    DOEpatents

    Pitel, Ira J.

    1987-02-03

    The present invention provides an electrical power inverter method and apparatus, which includes a high frequency link, for converting DC power into AC power. Generally stated, the apparatus includes a first high frequency module which produces an AC voltage at a first output frequency, and a second high frequency inverter module which produces an AC voltage at a second output frequency that is substantially the same as the first output frequency. The second AC voltage is out of phase with the first AC voltage by a selected angular phase displacement. A mixer mixes the first and second output voltages to produce a high frequency carrier which has a selected base frequency impressed on the sidebands thereof. A rectifier rectifies the carrier, and a filter filters the rectified carrier. An output inverter inverts the filtered carrier to produce an AC line voltage at the selected base frequency. A phase modulator adjusts the relative angular phase displacement between the outputs of the first and second high frequency modules to control the base frequency and magnitude of the AC line voltage.

  11. Atomic jump frequencies in intermetallic compounds studied using perturbed angular correlation of gamma rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newhouse, Randal Leslie

    Atomic jump frequencies were determined in a variety of intermetallic compounds through analysis of nuclear relaxation of spectra measured using the nuclear hyperfine technique, perturbed angular correlation (PAC) of gamma rays. Observed at higher temperatures, this relaxation is attributed to fluctuations in the orientation or magnitude of electric field gradients (EFG) at nuclei of 111In/Cd probe atoms as the atoms make diffusive jumps. Jump frequencies were obtained by fitting dynamically relaxed PAC spectra using either an empirical relaxation function or using ab initio relaxation models created using the program PolyPacFit. Jump frequency activation enthalpies were determined from measurements over a range of temperatures. Diffusion was studied in the following systems: 1) Pseudo-binary alloys having the L12 crystal structure such as In3(La1-xPrx). The goal was to see how jump frequencies were affected by random disorder. 2) The family of layered phases, LanCoIn3n+2 ( n=0,1,2,3…∞). The goal was to see how jump frequencies varied with the spacing of Co layers, which were found to block diffusion. 3) Phases having the FeGa3 structure. The goal was to analyze dynamical relaxation for probe atoms having multiple inequivalent jump vectors. 4) Phases having the tetragonal Al4Ba structure. The goal was to search for effects in the PAC spectra caused by fluctuations in magnitudes of EFGs without fluctuations in orientations. Ab initio relaxation models were developed to simulate and fit dynamical relaxation for PAC spectra of FeGa3, and several phases with the Al4Ba structure in order to determine underlying microscopic jump frequencies. In the course of this work, site preferences also were observed for 111In/Cd probe atoms in several FeGa 3 and Al4Ba phases.

  12. Superresolved multiphoton microscopy with spatial frequency-modulated imaging

    PubMed Central

    Field, Jeffrey J.; Wernsing, Keith A.; Domingue, Scott R.; Allende Motz, Alyssa M.; DeLuca, Keith F.; Levi, Dean H.; DeLuca, Jennifer G.; Young, Michael D.; Squier, Jeff A.; Bartels, Randy A.

    2016-01-01

    Superresolved far-field microscopy has emerged as a powerful tool for investigating the structure of objects with resolution well below the diffraction limit of light. Nearly all superresolution imaging techniques reported to date rely on real energy states of fluorescent molecules to circumvent the diffraction limit, preventing superresolved imaging with contrast mechanisms that occur via virtual energy states, including harmonic generation (HG). We report a superresolution technique based on spatial frequency-modulated imaging (SPIFI) that permits superresolved nonlinear microscopy with any contrast mechanism and with single-pixel detection. We show multimodal superresolved images with two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second-harmonic generation (SHG) from biological and inorganic media. Multiphoton SPIFI (MP-SPIFI) provides spatial resolution up to 2η below the diffraction limit, where η is the highest power of the nonlinear intensity response. MP-SPIFI can be used to provide enhanced resolution in optically thin media and may provide a solution for superresolved imaging deep in scattering media. PMID:27231219

  13. Self-mixing vibration measurement using emission frequency sinusoidal modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yufeng; Wang, Ming; Guo, Dongmei; Hao, Hui; Liu, Qiang

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, a simplified phase demodulation scheme is applied to recover vibration trail on a laser self-mixing interferometer for noncontact vibration measurement. The emission of semiconductor laser diode is modulated by injecting sinusoidal wave, and corresponding interference signal is a quasi-sinusoid wave. The vibration mathematical model for semiconductor laser diode is theoretically educed from basic self-mixing theory, the variation of target is converted into phase information. The simulation of demodulation algorithm and standard deviation are presented and the reconstructed waveform displays a desirable consistence with various moving trails. Following the principle, a minimum experimental system is established and position variation of the target mirror driven by voltage signal is translated into phase shifts, feedback is controlled at weak level during experiment, Fourier transform is implemented to analyze phase information. The comparisons of both amplitude and velocity with a Germany Doppler vibrometer are performed to testify vibration model, the error of proposed demodulation method is less than 30 nm and achieve a high accuracy in vibration frequency. The experimental results indicate the traditional phase technology can be applied on complex optical power signal after adaption providing a feasible application prospects in industrial and scientific situation with an inexpensive semiconductor laser.

  14. Superresolved multiphoton microscopy with spatial frequency-modulated imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Jeffrey J.; Wernsing, Keith A.; Domingue, Scott R.; Allende Motz, Alyssa M.; DeLuca, Keith F.; Levi, Dean H.; DeLuca, Jennifer G.; Young, Michael D.; Squier, Jeff A.; Bartels, Randy A.

    2016-05-26

    Superresolved far-field microscopy has emerged as a powerful tool for investigating the structure of objects with resolution well below the diffraction limit of light. Nearly all superresolution imaging techniques reported to date rely on real energy states of fluorescent molecules to circumvent the diffraction limit, preventing superresolved imaging with contrast mechanisms that occur via virtual energy states, including harmonic generation (HG). We report a superresolution technique based on spatial frequency-modulated imaging (SPIFI) that permits superresolved nonlinear microscopy with any contrast mechanism and with single-pixel detection. We show multimodal superresolved images with two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second-harmonic generation (SHG) from biological and inorganic media. Multiphoton SPIFI (MP-SPIFI) provides spatial resolution up to 2..eta.. below the diffraction limit, where ..eta.. is the highest power of the nonlinear intensity response. MP-SPIFI can be used to provide enhanced resolution in optically thin media and may provide a solution for superresolved imaging deep in scattering media.

  15. Characterising soil surface roughness with a frequency modulated polarimetric radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeger, Manuel; Gronz, Oliver; Beiske, Joshua; Klein, Tobias

    2014-05-01

    Soil surface roughness is considered crucial for soil erosion as it determines the effective surface exposed to the raindrop impact. It regulates surface runoff velocity and it causes runoff concentration. But a comprehensive characterisation of the shape of the soils' surface is still difficult to achieve. Photographic systems and terrestrial laser-scanning are nowadays able to generate high resolution DEMs, but the derivation of roughness parameters is still not clear. Spaceborne radar systems are used for about 3 decades for earth survey. Spatial soil moisture distribution, ice sheet monitoring and earth-wide topographic survey are the main objectives of these radar systems, working generally with frequencies <10 GHz. Contrasting with this, technologies emitting frequencies up to 77 GHz are generally used for object tracking purposes. But it is known, that the reflection characteristics, such as intensity and polarisation, strongly depend on the properties of the target object. A new design of a frequency modulated continuous wave radar, emitting a right hand shaped circular polarization and receiving both polarization directions, right and left-hand shaped, is tested here for its ability to detect and quantify different surface roughness. The reflection characteristics of 4 different materials 1) steel, 2) sand (0,5-1 mm), 3) fine (2-4 mm) and 4) coarse (15-30 mm) rock-fragments and different roughness as well as moisture content are analysed. In addition, the signals are taken at 2 different angles to the soil's surface (90° and 70°). For quantification of the roughness, a photographic method (Structure-from-Motion) is applied to generate a detailed DEM and random roughness (RR) is calculated. To characterise the radar signal, different ratios of the reflected channels and polarisations are calculated. The signals show differences for all substrates, also clearly visible between sand and fine rock fragments, despite a wavelength of 1 cm of the

  16. Probing the Quantum States of a Single Atom Transistor at Microwave Frequencies.

    PubMed

    Tettamanzi, Giuseppe Carlo; Hile, Samuel James; House, Matthew Gregory; Fuechsle, Martin; Rogge, Sven; Simmons, Michelle Y

    2017-03-28

    The ability to apply gigahertz frequencies to control the quantum state of a single P atom is an essential requirement for the fast gate pulsing needed for qubit control in donor-based silicon quantum computation. Here, we demonstrate this with nanosecond accuracy in an all epitaxial single atom transistor by applying excitation signals at frequencies up to ≈13 GHz to heavily phosphorus-doped silicon leads. These measurements allow the differentiation between the excited states of the single atom and the density of states in the one-dimensional leads. Our pulse spectroscopy experiments confirm the presence of an excited state at an energy ≈9 meV, consistent with the first excited state of a single P donor in silicon. The relaxation rate of this first excited state to the ground state is estimated to be larger than 2.5 GHz, consistent with theoretical predictions. These results represent a systematic investigation of how an atomically precise single atom transistor device behaves under radio frequency excitations.

  17. Detection, direction discrimination, and off-frequency interference of center-frequency modulations and glides for vowel formants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyzenga, J.; Carlyon, R. P.

    2005-05-01

    Vowels are mainly classified by the positions of peaks in their frequency spectra, the formants. For normal-hearing subjects, change detection and direction discrimination were measured for linear glides in the center frequency (CF) of formantlike sounds. A CF rove was used to prevent subjects from using either the start or end points of the glides as cues. In addition, change detection and starting-phase (start-direction) discrimination were measured for similar stimuli with a sinusoidal 5-Hz formant-frequency modulation. The stimuli consisted of single formants generated using a number of different stimulus parameters including fundamental frequency, spectral slope, frequency region, and position of the formant relative to the harmonic spectrum. The change detection thresholds were in good agreement with the predictions of a model which analyzed and combined the effects of place-of-excitation and temporal cues. For most stimuli, thresholds were approximately equal for change detection and start-direction discrimination. Exceptions were found for stimuli that consisted of only one or two harmonics. In a separate experiment, it was shown that change detection and start-direction discrimination of linear and sinusoidal formant-frequency modulations were impaired by off-frequency frequency-modulated interferers. This frequency modulation detection interference was larger for formants with shallow than for those with steep spectral slopes. .

  18. Magnetic-modulation spectroscopy of an atomic Fermi gas in the BCS-BEC crossover: Dissociation spectra in the Bose-Einstein condensate regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plata, J.

    2006-07-01

    The effect of magnetic-field modulation on a Fermi gas of atoms in the BCS-BEC crossover is studied analytically. Recent experimental findings on the system response to a sinusoidal variation of the field are explained. Specifically, the dissociation processes induced by the modulation in the Bose-Einstein condensate regime are described. The role played by the frequency, amplitude, and application time of the perturbation in the emergence of the observed behavior is clarified. The results uncover also the relevance of the detuning from the Feshbach resonance to the appearance of particular spectral features. The applicability of the field modulation as a spectroscopic tool for probing the crossover is discussed.

  19. Waveform measurement technique for phase/frequency-modulated lights based on self-heterodyne interferometry.

    PubMed

    Tsuchida, Hidemi

    2017-03-06

    A novel technique is proposed and demonstrated for measuring the temporal waveforms of phase/frequency-modulated lights based on self-heterodyne interferometry with a delay time much shorter than the modulation period and on the unwrapped phase detection of heterodyne beat signals with real-time vector signal analysis. The technique makes use of an approximated relationship between the beat signal phase and the instantaneous frequency of modulated lights. The results of waveform measurements are presented for directly frequency-modulated and externally phase-modulated lights, which have been commonly employed for FWCW-LIDAR and serrodyne frequency translation, respectively. The temporal waveforms of triangular modulation are successfully measured with a frequency deviation as large as 15 GHz and the detailed investigation is presented on the deviation of measured waveform from ideal ones.

  20. Cylindrical PVF2 film based fiber optic phase modulator - Phase shift nonlinearity and frequency response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudarshanam, V. S.; Claus, Richard O.

    1993-03-01

    A new cylindrical coil configuration for polyvinylidene flouride (PVF2) film based fiber optic phase modulator is studied for the frequency response and nonlinearity of phase shift at the resonance frequency. This configuration, hitherto unapproached for PVF2 film modulators, offers resonance at well defined, controllable and higher frequencies than possible for the flat-strip configuration. Two versions of this configuration are presented that differ strongly in both the resonance frequency and the phase shift nonlinearity coefficient.

  1. High-frequency signal transmission through single-atom contacts of Au and Pt

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyama, Shodai; Kurokawa, Shu; Sakai, Akira

    2015-03-23

    Signal transmission through atom-sized contacts of Au and Pt has been studied at room temperature for frequencies from 9 kHz to 1 GHz and for conductances (1−10)G{sub 0} (G≡2e{sup 2}/h is the quantum unit of conductance). We measured the frequency spectrum of S parameter S{sub 21}=|S{sub 21}|e{sup iθ} and found θ∼0 up to 1 GHz for all contacts irrespective of their conductance. Our observations directly prove that the atom-sized contacts of Au and Pt, including their single-atom contacts, behave as a pure resistance in the RF regime.

  2. Note: A versatile radio-frequency source for cold atom experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Na; Wu, Yu-Ping; Min, Hao; Yang, Tao; Jiang, Xiao

    2016-08-15

    A radio-frequency (RF) source designed for cold atom experiments is presented. The source uses AD9858, a direct digital synthesizer, to generate the sine wave directly, up to 400 MHz, with sub-Hz resolution. An amplitude control circuit consisting of wideband variable gain amplifier and high speed digital to analog converter is integrated into the source, capable of 70 dB off isolation and 4 ns on-off keying. A field programmable gate array is used to implement a versatile frequency and amplitude co-sweep logic. Owing to modular design, the RF sources have been used on many cold atom experiments to generate various complicated RF sequences, enriching the operation schemes of cold atoms, which cannot be done by standard RF source instruments.

  3. Note: A versatile radio-frequency source for cold atom experiments.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Wu, Yu-Ping; Min, Hao; Yang, Tao; Jiang, Xiao

    2016-08-01

    A radio-frequency (RF) source designed for cold atom experiments is presented. The source uses AD9858, a direct digital synthesizer, to generate the sine wave directly, up to 400 MHz, with sub-Hz resolution. An amplitude control circuit consisting of wideband variable gain amplifier and high speed digital to analog converter is integrated into the source, capable of 70 dB off isolation and 4 ns on-off keying. A field programmable gate array is used to implement a versatile frequency and amplitude co-sweep logic. Owing to modular design, the RF sources have been used on many cold atom experiments to generate various complicated RF sequences, enriching the operation schemes of cold atoms, which cannot be done by standard RF source instruments.

  4. Note: A versatile radio-frequency source for cold atom experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Na; Wu, Yu-Ping; Min, Hao; Yang, Tao; Jiang, Xiao

    2016-08-01

    A radio-frequency (RF) source designed for cold atom experiments is presented. The source uses AD9858, a direct digital synthesizer, to generate the sine wave directly, up to 400 MHz, with sub-Hz resolution. An amplitude control circuit consisting of wideband variable gain amplifier and high speed digital to analog converter is integrated into the source, capable of 70 dB off isolation and 4 ns on-off keying. A field programmable gate array is used to implement a versatile frequency and amplitude co-sweep logic. Owing to modular design, the RF sources have been used on many cold atom experiments to generate various complicated RF sequences, enriching the operation schemes of cold atoms, which cannot be done by standard RF source instruments.

  5. Distributed Brillouin optical fiber sensing for dynamic strain with frequency agility based on dual-modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ba, Dexin; Zhou, Dengwang; Wang, Benzhang; Yin, Mingjing; Dong, Yongkang; Lu, Zhiwei; Fan, Zhigang

    2017-04-01

    A dynamic distributed Brillouin optical fiber sensing based on dual-modulation is proposed, in which the scanning of the Brillouin gain spectrum (BGS) is implemented by the combination of a single-frequency modulation and a frequency-agility modulation. The frequency of the single-frequency modulation is a little less than the Brillouin frequency shift of the fiber ( 10.8 GHz for silica fiber), while the tuning range of the frequency-agility modulation is required to cover only several-hundred MHz for the scanning of BGS, which can significantly reduce the bandwidth requirement for the arbitrary waveform generator and ultimately reduce the cost of dynamic Brillouin sensors. With a 30-m fiber, a 11.8-Hz strain is measured. The spatial resolution and the sampling rate are 1 m and 200 Hz, respectively.

  6. Higher-order modulations of fs laser pulses for GHz frequency domain photon migration system.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huang-Yi; Cheng, Nanyu; Tseng, Sheng-Hao; Chan, Ming-Che

    2014-02-24

    Except the fundamental modulation frequency, by higher-order-harmonic modulations of mode-locked laser pulses and a simple frequency demodulation circuit, a novel approach to GHz frequency-domain-photon-migration (FDPM) system was reported. With this novel approach, a wide-band modulation frequency comb is available without any external modulation devices and the only electronics to extract the optical attenuation and phase properties at a selected modulation frequency in FDPM systems are good mixers and lock-in devices. This approach greatly expands the frequency range that could be achieved by conventional FDPM systems and suggests that our system could extract much more information from biological tissues than the conventional FDPM systems. Moreover, this demonstration will be beneficial for discerning the minute change of tissue properties.

  7. Dynamics of a driven two-level atom coupled to a frequency-tunable cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Peng; Swain, S.

    1998-08-01

    A cavity-modified master equation is derived for a coherently driven two-level atom coupled to a single-mode cavity in the bad cavity limit, in which the cavity frequency is tuned to either the center or one of the sidebands of the Mollow triplet. The atomic populations in both the bare- and dressed-state representations are analyzed in terms of the cavity-modified transition rates. In the bare-state basis, the role of the cavity may be interpreted as enhancing the stimulated absorption of the atom while suppressing the stimulated emission. The bare-state population may thus be inverted under appropriate conditions. The dressed-state inversion, however, originates from the enhancement of the atom-cavity interaction when the cavity is resonant with the atomic dressed-state transition. We show that two-phase quadratures of the atomic polarization decay at different rates. The decay of the in-phase (or out-of-phase) quadrature may be greatly inhibited as the driving intensity increases, depending on the cavity resonant frequency. The spectrum of the atomic fluorescence emitted out the side of the cavity is also studied. The spectral profiles are sensitive to the cavity frequency. When the cavity frequency is tuned to the center of the Mollow resonances, the fluorescence spectrum is symmetrical with three peaks whose linewidths and heights are intensity dependent. When the cavity frequency is tuned to one of the Mollow sidebands, however, it is asymmetric, and the central peak and the sideband on resonance with the cavity can be significantly suppressed for strong driving fields. All three spectral lines can be narrowed by increasing the Rabi frequency. The physics of these striking spectral features is explored in the dressed-state basis. We also investigate the probe absorption spectrum. When the cavity frequency is tuned to the center of the Mollow fluorescence triplet, the central component exhibits a Lorentzian line shape, while the side bands show the Rayleigh

  8. New generation of a mobile primary frequency standard based on cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, S. T.; Júnior, J. de Martin; Pechoneri, R. D.; Santa Catharina, P.; Bagnato, V. S.; Magalhães, D. V.

    2015-01-01

    We have constructed a mobile primary frequency standard using intra-cavity cold cesium atoms and the results have shown the advantages of using this kind of system compared to cesium beam standards. Based on the first setup with an expanding cloud of atoms, we can plan the construction of a clock more compact since it has no strict size limitations. In order to assemble the new system even smaller, the development of a system containing lasers, microwave source and cavity in a single box has already begun. The mobile atomic standard based on cold atoms is a possible strategic product with a broad range of applications and an important contribution to a primary standard of high relevance.

  9. A spectral study of a radio-frequency plasma-generated flux of atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batten, Carmen E.; Brown, Kenneth G.; Lewis, Beverley W.

    1994-01-01

    The active environment of a radio-frequency (RF) plasma generator, with and without low-pressure oxygen, has been characterized through the identification of emission lines in the spectral region from 250 to 900 nm. The environment is shown to be dependent on the partial pressure of oxygen and the power applied to the RF generator. Atomic oxygen has been found in significant amounts as well as atomic hydrogen and the molecular oxygen species O2((sup 1)Sigma). The only charged species observed was the singly charged molecular ion O2(+). With a polymer specimen in the plasma chamber, carbon monoxide was also observed. The significance of these observations with respect to previous studies using this type of generator to stimulate material degradation in space is discussed. The possibility of using these generators as atomic oxygen sources in the development of oxygen atom fluorescence sensors is explored.

  10. Detecting the classical harmonic vibrations of micro amplitudes and low frequencies with an atomic Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong-Yi

    2014-01-01

    We study the effects of atomic beams classical harmonic vibrations of micro amplitudes and low frequencies perpendicular to the wave vectors of atomic branches on the mean numbers of atoms arriving at the detectors in an atomic Mach-Zehnder interferometer, where the two atomic beams are in the same wave surface and have the same phase. We propose a vibrant factor to quantitatively describe the effects of atomic beams vibrations. It shows that: (i) the vibrant factor depends on the relative vibrant displacement and the initial phase rather than the absolute amplitude, (ii) the factor increases with the increase of the initial phase, and (iii) the frequencies can be derived from equal time interval measurements of the mean numbers of atoms arriving at the detectors. These results indicate that it is possible to detect the classical harmonic vibrations of micro amplitudes and low frequencies by measuring the variations in the mean numbers of atoms arriving at the detectors.

  11. How solvent modulates hydroxyl radical reactivity in hydrogen atom abstractions.

    PubMed

    Mitroka, Susan; Zimmeck, Stephanie; Troya, Diego; Tanko, James M

    2010-03-10

    The hydroxyl radical (HO*) is a highly reactive oxygen-centered radical whose bimolecular rate constants for reaction with organic compounds (hydrogen atom abstraction) approach the diffusion-controlled limit in aqueous solution. The results reported herein show that hydroxyl radical is considerably less reactive in dipolar, aprotic solvents such as acetonitrile. This diminished reactivity is explained on the basis of a polarized transition state for hydrogen abstraction, in which the oxygen of the hydroxyl radical becomes highly negative and can serve as a hydrogen bond acceptor. Because acetonitrile cannot participate as a hydrogen bond donor, the transition state cannot be stabilized by hydrogen bonding, and the reaction rate is lower; the opposite is true when water is the solvent. This hypothesis explains hydroxyl radical reactivity both in solution and in the gas phase and may be the basis for a "containment strategy" used by Nature when hydroxyl radical is produced endogenously.

  12. Modulation of Auditory Evoked Magnetic Fields Elicited by Successive Frequency-Modulated (FM) Sweeps

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Hidehiko; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2017-01-01

    In our daily life, we are successively exposed to frequency-modulated (FM) sounds that play an important role in speech and species-specific communication. Previous studies demonstrated that repetitive exposure to identical pure tones resulted in decreased neural activity. However, the effects of repetitively presented FM sounds on neural activity in the human auditory cortex remain unclear. In the present study, we used magnetoencephalography to investigate auditory evoked N1m responses elicited by four successive temporally repeated and superimposed FM sweeps in three sequences: (1) four FM sweeps were identical, (2) four FM sweeps had the same FM direction and rate, but different carrier frequencies, (3) four FM sweeps differed with respect to the FM rate and/or direction and their carrier frequencies. In contrast to our expectations, the results obtained demonstrated that N1m responses were maximal when the four FM sweeps were identical and minimal when they were distinct. These results suggest that the neural processing of repetitive FM sweeps in the human auditory cortex may differ from that of repetitive pure tones. PMID:28220066

  13. Modulation of Auditory Evoked Magnetic Fields Elicited by Successive Frequency-Modulated (FM) Sweeps.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Hidehiko; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2017-01-01

    In our daily life, we are successively exposed to frequency-modulated (FM) sounds that play an important role in speech and species-specific communication. Previous studies demonstrated that repetitive exposure to identical pure tones resulted in decreased neural activity. However, the effects of repetitively presented FM sounds on neural activity in the human auditory cortex remain unclear. In the present study, we used magnetoencephalography to investigate auditory evoked N1m responses elicited by four successive temporally repeated and superimposed FM sweeps in three sequences: (1) four FM sweeps were identical, (2) four FM sweeps had the same FM direction and rate, but different carrier frequencies, (3) four FM sweeps differed with respect to the FM rate and/or direction and their carrier frequencies. In contrast to our expectations, the results obtained demonstrated that N1m responses were maximal when the four FM sweeps were identical and minimal when they were distinct. These results suggest that the neural processing of repetitive FM sweeps in the human auditory cortex may differ from that of repetitive pure tones.

  14. An atomic magnetometer with autonomous frequency stabilization and large dynamic range.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, S; Mishra, S; Behera, R; Poornima; Dasgupta, K

    2015-06-01

    The operation of a highly sensitive atomic magnetometer using elliptically polarized resonant light is demonstrated. It is based on measurement of zero magnetic field resonance in degenerate two level systems using polarimetric detection. The transmitted light through the polarimeter is used for laser frequency stabilization, whereas reflected light is used for magnetic field measurement. Thus, the experimental geometry allows autonomous frequency stabilization of the laser frequency leading to compact operation of the overall device and has a preliminary sensitivity of <10 pT/Hz(1/2) @ 1 Hz. Additionally, the dynamic range of the device is improved by feedback controlling the bias magnetic field without compromising on its sensitivity.

  15. An atomic magnetometer with autonomous frequency stabilization and large dynamic range

    SciTech Connect

    Pradhan, S. E-mail: pradhans75@gmail.com; Poornima,; Dasgupta, K.; Mishra, S.; Behera, R.

    2015-06-15

    The operation of a highly sensitive atomic magnetometer using elliptically polarized resonant light is demonstrated. It is based on measurement of zero magnetic field resonance in degenerate two level systems using polarimetric detection. The transmitted light through the polarimeter is used for laser frequency stabilization, whereas reflected light is used for magnetic field measurement. Thus, the experimental geometry allows autonomous frequency stabilization of the laser frequency leading to compact operation of the overall device and has a preliminary sensitivity of <10 pT/Hz{sup 1/2} @ 1 Hz. Additionally, the dynamic range of the device is improved by feedback controlling the bias magnetic field without compromising on its sensitivity.

  16. Absolute frequency measurement of the 2S-8S/D transitions in atomic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nez, F.; Plimmer, M. D.; Bourzeix, S.; Julien, L.; Biraben, F.; Felder, R.; Millerioux, Y.; De Natale, P.

    1993-10-01

    We have performed an absolute frequency measurement of the 2S-8S/D two-photon transition in atomic hydrogen. We have compared the hydrogen frequencies with the difference of two optical standards, namely the methane stabilized and iodine stabilized He-Ne laser. In this way, we have linked the 2S-8S/D frequencies to the cesium clock. We have deduced a new value for the Rydberg constant with an uncertainty of 2.2 parts in 1011.

  17. Features of anti-inflammatory effects of modulated extremely high-frequency electromagnetic radiation.

    PubMed

    Gapeyev, Andrew B; Mikhailik, Elena N; Chemeris, Nikolay K

    2009-09-01

    Using a model of acute zymosan-induced paw edema in NMRI mice, we test the hypothesis that anti-inflammatory effects of extremely high-frequency electromagnetic radiation (EHF EMR) can be essentially modified by application of pulse modulation with certain frequencies. It has been revealed that a single exposure of animals to continuous EHF EMR for 20 min reduced the exudative edema of inflamed paw on average by 19% at intensities of 0.1-0.7 mW/cm(2) and frequencies from the range of 42.2-42.6 GHz. At fixed effective carrier frequency of 42.2 GHz, the anti-inflammatory effect of EHF EMR did not depend on modulation frequencies, that is, application of different modulation frequencies from the range of 0.03-100 Hz did not lead to considerable changes in the effect level. On the contrary, at "ineffective" carrier frequencies of 43.0 and 61.22 GHz, the use of modulation frequencies of 0.07-0.1 and 20-30 Hz has allowed us to restore the effect up to a maximal level. The results obtained show the critical dependence of anti-inflammatory action of low-intensity EHF EMR on carrier and modulation frequencies. Within the framework of this study, the possibility of changing the level of expected biological effect of modulated EMR by a special selection of combination of carrier and modulation frequencies is confirmed.

  18. NONLINEAR-OPTICS PHENOMENA: Formation of optical pulses by modulating the resonant quantum transition frequency in a spectrally inhomogeneous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polovinkin, V. A.; Radionychev, E. V.

    2010-02-01

    We consider the conversion of monochromatic radiation in the case of resonant interaction with a quantum system under the condition of harmonic modulation of the quantum transition frequency by the action of additional nonresonant radiation due to the Stark or Zeeman effect, taking into account the inhomogeneous broadening of the quantum transition line. It is shown analytically and numerically that resonant radiation can be converted in a train of ultrashort pulses with a peak intensity exceeding manifold the incident wave intensity. The possibility of the additional compression of the produced pulses is studied by compensating the inherent frequency modulation in a medium with a quadratic or programmable dispersion. The optimal values of the radiation — matter interaction parameters are found numerically. It is shown that generation of femtosecond optical pulses of radiation quasi-resonant to the δ transition of the atomic hydrogen Balmer series is possible.

  19. Pulsed, controlled, frequency-chirped laser light at GHz detunings for atomic physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, B.; Paltoo, T.; Grogan, T.; Pena, T.; John, J. P. St.; Wright, M. J.

    2017-02-01

    We have developed a means to control rapidly frequency-chirped laser light at large detuning, by controlling the input modulation frequency of a ˜7 GHz signal into an electro-optical phase modulator in an injection-locked laser system. We show that we can extend the capabilities of the system to effectively pulse the laser on timescales less than 3 ns by turning the injection lock on/off and create arbitrary frequency-chirp shapes on the laser on the tens of nanosecond time scales. We have been able to use this pulsed frequency-chirped laser to control the excitation of a thermal Rb gas via rapid adiabatic passage.

  20. Frequency-tunable microwave field detection in an atomic vapor cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsley, Andrew; Treutlein, Philipp

    2016-05-01

    We use an atomic vapor cell as a frequency tunable microwave field detector operating at frequencies from GHz to tens of GHz. We detect microwave magnetic fields from 2.3 GHz to 26.4 GHz, and measure the amplitude of the σ+ component of an 18 GHz microwave field. Our proof-of-principle demonstration represents a four orders of magnitude extension of the frequency tunable range of atomic magnetometers from their previous dc to several MHz range. When integrated with a high-resolution microwave imaging system [Horsley et al., New J. Phys. 17, 112002 (2015)], this will allow for the complete reconstruction of the vector components of a microwave magnetic field and the relative phase between them. Potential applications include near-field characterisation of microwave circuitry and devices, and medical microwave sensing and imaging.

  1. Mapping of the Optical Frequency Comb to the Atom Velocity Comb

    SciTech Connect

    Pichler, G.; Aumiler, D.; Vujicic, N.; Vdovic, S.; Ban, T.; Skenderovic, H.

    2006-11-15

    We present the experimental and theoretical study of the resonant excitation of rubidium and cesium atoms with fs pulse train in the conditions when the pulse repetition period is shorter than the atomic relaxation time. Velocity selective optical pumping of the ground state hyperfine levels and velocity comb-like excited state hyperfine level populations is demonstrated. Both effects are a direct consequence of the fs pulse train excitation considered in the frequency domain. A simple experimental apparatus was employed to develop a modified direct frequency comb spectroscopy which uses a fixed frequency comb for the 85,87Rb 5s 2S1/2 {yields} 5s 2P1/2,3/2 and 133Cs 6s 2S1/2 {yields} 6p 2P1/2,3/2 excitation, and a weak cw scanning probe laser at 780 and 852 nm for Rb and Cs ground levels population monitoring.

  2. Suppression and Feedback Control of Anomalous Induced Backscattering by Pump-Frequency Modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Arkhipenko, V. I.; Simonchik, L. V.; Truhachev, F. M.; Gusakov, E. Z.

    2008-10-24

    The possibility of induced backscattering parametric decay instability resonant suppression by harmonic pump-frequency modulation is demonstrated experimentally. It is shown that the pump anomalous reflection is strongly reduced at the modulation frequency equal to the difference of the decay instability eigenfrequencies. The parametric instability feedback control method is proposed based on this effect.

  3. Modulation-Frequency-Specific Adaptation in Awake Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Beitel, Ralph E.; Vollmer, Maike; Heiser, Marc A.; Schreiner, Christoph E.

    2015-01-01

    Amplitude modulations are fundamental features of natural signals, including human speech and nonhuman primate vocalizations. Because natural signals frequently occur in the context of other competing signals, we used a forward-masking paradigm to investigate how the modulation context of a prior signal affects cortical responses to subsequent modulated sounds. Psychophysical “modulation masking,” in which the presentation of a modulated “masker” signal elevates the threshold for detecting the modulation of a subsequent stimulus, has been interpreted as evidence of a central modulation filterbank and modeled accordingly. Whether cortical modulation tuning is compatible with such models remains unknown. By recording responses to pairs of sinusoidally amplitude modulated (SAM) tones in the auditory cortex of awake squirrel monkeys, we show that the prior presentation of the SAM masker elicited persistent and tuned suppression of the firing rate to subsequent SAM signals. Population averages of these effects are compatible with adaptation in broadly tuned modulation channels. In contrast, modulation context had little effect on the synchrony of the cortical representation of the second SAM stimuli and the tuning of such effects did not match that observed for firing rate. Our results suggest that, although the temporal representation of modulated signals is more robust to changes in stimulus context than representations based on average firing rate, this representation is not fully exploited and psychophysical modulation masking more closely mirrors physiological rate suppression and that rate tuning for a given stimulus feature in a given neuron's signal pathway appears sufficient to engender context-sensitive cortical adaptation. PMID:25878263

  4. Modulation-frequency-specific adaptation in awake auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Malone, Brian J; Beitel, Ralph E; Vollmer, Maike; Heiser, Marc A; Schreiner, Christoph E

    2015-04-15

    Amplitude modulations are fundamental features of natural signals, including human speech and nonhuman primate vocalizations. Because natural signals frequently occur in the context of other competing signals, we used a forward-masking paradigm to investigate how the modulation context of a prior signal affects cortical responses to subsequent modulated sounds. Psychophysical "modulation masking," in which the presentation of a modulated "masker" signal elevates the threshold for detecting the modulation of a subsequent stimulus, has been interpreted as evidence of a central modulation filterbank and modeled accordingly. Whether cortical modulation tuning is compatible with such models remains unknown. By recording responses to pairs of sinusoidally amplitude modulated (SAM) tones in the auditory cortex of awake squirrel monkeys, we show that the prior presentation of the SAM masker elicited persistent and tuned suppression of the firing rate to subsequent SAM signals. Population averages of these effects are compatible with adaptation in broadly tuned modulation channels. In contrast, modulation context had little effect on the synchrony of the cortical representation of the second SAM stimuli and the tuning of such effects did not match that observed for firing rate. Our results suggest that, although the temporal representation of modulated signals is more robust to changes in stimulus context than representations based on average firing rate, this representation is not fully exploited and psychophysical modulation masking more closely mirrors physiological rate suppression and that rate tuning for a given stimulus feature in a given neuron's signal pathway appears sufficient to engender context-sensitive cortical adaptation. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/355904-13$15.00/0.

  5. A low emission, low power non-linear frequency modulation based transmitter for implanted devices.

    PubMed

    Saraswat, Ruchir; Rodriguez-Villegas, Esther

    2013-01-01

    The paper proposes a low emission, non linear frequency modulator for transmitting neural signals. With the advent of embedded medical devices, designers need to start developing low Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) and Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) devices. We propose a non-phase locked loop based frequency modulator. The modulator utilizes a ramp to encode the bit stream from the neural amplifier. In addition it utilizes a non linear signal to modulate the encoded signal leading to lowering of peak of power spectrum, a measure of electro-magnetic interference. The proposed algorithm has been implemented on 0.18µ AMS technology and results presented.

  6. Forbidden atomic transitions driven by an intensity-modulated laser trap.

    PubMed

    Moore, Kaitlin R; Anderson, Sarah E; Raithel, Georg

    2015-01-20

    Spectroscopy is an essential tool in understanding and manipulating quantum systems, such as atoms and molecules. The model describing spectroscopy includes the multipole-field interaction, which leads to established spectroscopic selection rules, and an interaction that is quadratic in the field, which is not often employed. However, spectroscopy using the quadratic (ponderomotive) interaction promises two significant advantages over spectroscopy using the multipole-field interaction: flexible transition rules and vastly improved spatial addressability of the quantum system. Here we demonstrate ponderomotive spectroscopy by using optical-lattice-trapped Rydberg atoms, pulsating the lattice light and driving a microwave atomic transition that would otherwise be forbidden by established spectroscopic selection rules. This ability to measure frequencies of previously inaccessible transitions makes possible improved determinations of atomic characteristics and constants underlying physics. The spatial resolution of ponderomotive spectroscopy is orders of magnitude better than the transition frequency would suggest, promising single-site addressability in dense particle arrays for quantum computing applications.

  7. Effects of nonsinusoidal character of atomic modulation on NQR spin-lattice relaxation time of incommensurate phases

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Silvina C.; Schurrer, Clemar; Wolfenson, Alberto

    2001-06-01

    The present work is an extention of the theoretical calculation developed by Blinc to explain the temperature and frequency dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation time in incommensurate phases. We have evaluated the influence of the nonsinusoidal character of the atomic modulation, in the linear approximation, over the NQR spectra and over the spin-lattice relaxation due to direct and Raman processes. It is shown that the peak with lower intensity in the NQR spectra always has a larger T{sub 1} and viceversa. The results have been applied to bis(4-chlorophenyl)sulfone T{sub 1} and line-shape data. The temperature and frequency dependence of T{sub 1} are well reproduced if Raman processes are considered.

  8. Sound speed and oscillation frequencies for solar models evolved with Los Alamos ATOMIC opacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzik, Joyce A.; Fontes, C. J.; Walczak, P.; Wood, S. R.; Mussack, K.; Farag, E.

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has calculated a new generation of radiative opacities (OPLIB data using the ATOMIC code) for elements with atomic number Z = 1-30 with improved physics input, updated atomic data, and finer temperature grid to replace the Los Alamos LEDCOP opacities released in the year 2000. We calculate the evolution of standard solar models including these new opacities, and compare with models evolved using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory OPAL opacities (Iglesias & Rogers 1996). We use the solar abundance mixture of Asplund et al. 2009. The Los Alamos ATOMIC opacities (Colgan et al. 2013a, 2013b, 2015) have steeper opacity derivatives than those of OPAL for temperatures and densities of the solar interior radiative zone. We compare the calculated nonadiabatic solar oscillation frequencies and solar interior sound speed to observed frequencies and helioseismic inferences. The calculated sound-speed profiles are similar for models evolved using either the updated Iben evolution code (see Guzik & Mussack 2010), or the MESA evolution code (Paxton et al. 2015). The LANL ATOMIC opacities partially mitigate the `solar abundance problem'.

  9. Spectral broadening and inhibition of amplitude and frequency modulation in Nd: glass regenerative amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuqi; Pan, Xue; Wang, Jiangfeng; Li, Xuechun

    2014-11-01

    In order to broaden the spectrum of laser pulse and reduce the gain narrowing effect in Nd:glass regenerative amplifier to realize the ambition of inhibiting amplitude and frequency modulation, proper quartz birefringence crystal plate is inserted into the cavity. The influence factors of central wavelength, depth of modulation and range of modulation are obtained theoretically. The width of the spectrum is broadened by controlling all the factors. Two kinds of thickness, 5mm and 6mm, are inserted into the regenerative amplifier cavity. The results of theoretical calculation and experiment both show that the effect of spectrum widening is evident, which reduces the gain narrowing effect to some extent. The amplitude and frequency modulation resulted from gain narrowing effect is inhibited when the central wavelength deflects. The simulated results show that inhibited effect of amplitude and frequency modulation is remarkable. And the method is a potential effective technique for amplitude and frequency modulation inhibition.

  10. Miniature Surface Plasmon Polariton Amplitude Modulator by Beat Frequency and Polarization Control

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Cheng-Wei; Lin, Chu-En; Yu, Chih-Jen; Yeh, Ting-Tso; Yen, Ta-Jen

    2016-01-01

    The miniaturization of modulators keeps pace for the compact devices in optical applications. Here, we present a miniature surface plasmon polariton amplitude modulator (SPPAM) by directing and interfering surface plasmon polaritons on a nanofabricated chip. Our results show that this SPPAM enables two kinds of modulations. The first kind of modulation is controlled by encoding angular-frequency difference from a Zeeman laser, with a beat frequency of 1.66 MHz; the second of modulation is validated by periodically varying the polarization states from a polarization generator, with rotation frequencies of 0.5–10 k Hz. In addition, the normalized extinction ratio of our plasmonic structure reaches 100. Such miniaturized beat-frequency and polarization-controlled amplitude modulators open an avenue for the exploration of ultrasensitive nanosensors, nanocircuits, and other integrated nanophotonic devices. PMID:27558516

  11. Model polymer etching and surface modification by a time modulated RF plasma jet: role of atomic oxygen and water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, P.; Knoll, A. J.; Wang, H.; Kondeti, V. S. S. K.; Bruggeman, P. J.; Oehrlein, G. S.

    2017-01-01

    The surface interaction of a well-characterized time modulated radio frequency (RF) plasma jet with polystyrene, poly(methyl methacrylate) and poly(vinyl alcohol) as model polymers is investigated. The RF plasma jet shows fast polymer etching but mild chemical modification with a characteristic carbonate ester and NO formation on the etched surface. By varying the plasma treatment conditions including feed gas composition, environment gaseous composition, and treatment distance, we find that short lived species, especially atomic O for Ar/1% O2 and 1% air plasma and OH for Ar/1% H2O plasma, play an essential role for polymer etching. For O2 containing plasma, we find that atomic O initiates polymer etching and the etching depth mirrors the measured decay of O atoms in the gas phase as the nozzle-surface distance increases. The etching reaction probability of an O atom ranging from 10-4 to 10-3 is consistent with low pressure plasma research. We also find that adding O2 and H2O simultaneously into Ar feed gas quenches polymer etching compared to adding them separately which suggests the reduction of O and OH density in Ar/O2/H2O plasma.

  12. Serotonin differentially modulates responses to tones and frequency-modulated sweeps in the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Hurley, L M; Pollak, G D

    1999-09-15

    Although almost all auditory brainstem nuclei receive serotonergic innervation, little is known about its effects on auditory neurons. We address this question by evaluating the effects of serotonin on sound-evoked activity of neurons in the inferior colliculus (IC) of Mexican free-tailed bats. Two types of auditory stimuli were used: tone bursts at the neuron's best frequency and frequency-modulated (FM) sweeps with a variety of spectral and temporal structures. There were two main findings. First, serotonin changed tone-evoked responses in 66% of the IC neurons sampled. Second, the influence of serotonin often depended on the type of signal presented. Although serotonin depressed tone-evoked responses in most neurons, its effects on responses to FM sweeps were evenly mixed between depression and facilitation. Thus in most cells serotonin had a different effect on tone-evoked responses than it did on FM-evoked responses. In some neurons serotonin depressed responses evoked by tone bursts but left the responses to FM sweeps unchanged, whereas in others serotonin had little or no effect on responses to tone bursts but substantially facilitated responses to FM sweeps. In addition, serotonin could differentially affect responses to various FM sweeps that differed in temporal or spectral structure. Previous studies have revealed that the efficacy of the serotonergic innervation is partially modulated by sensory stimuli and by behavioral states. Thus our results suggest that the population activity evoked by a particular sound is not simply a consequence of the hard wiring that connects the IC to lower and higher regions but rather is highly dynamic because of the functional reconfigurations induced by serotonin and almost certainly other neuromodulators as well.

  13. Enhancing the low frequency THz resonances (< 1 THz) of organic molecules via electronegative atom substitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, Jyotirmayee; Ray, Shaumik; Pesala, Bala

    2015-03-01

    Terahertz (THz) technology is an active area of research with various applications in non-intrusive imaging and spectroscopy. Very few organic molecules have significant resonances below 1 THz. Understanding the origin of low frequency THz modes in these molecules and their absence in other molecules could be extremely important in design and engineering molecules with low frequency THz resonances. These engineered molecules can be used as THz tags for anti-counterfeiting applications. Studies show that low frequency THz resonances are commonly observed in molecules having higher molecular mass and weak intermolecular hydrogen bonds. In this paper, we have explored the possibility of enhancing the strength of THz resonances below 1 THz through electronegative atom substitution. Adding an electronegative atom helps in achieving higher hydrogen bond strength to enhance the resonances below 1 THz. Here acetanilide has been used as a model system. THz-Time Domain Spectroscopy (THz-TDS) results show that acetanilide has a small peak observed below 1 THz. Acetanilide can be converted to 2-fluoroacetanilide by adding an electronegative atom, fluorine, which doesn't have any prominent peak below 1 THz. However, by optimally choosing the position of the electronegative atom as in 4-fluoroacetanilide, a significant THz resonance at 0.86 THz is observed. The origin of low frequency resonances can be understood by carrying out Density Functional Theory (DFT) simulations of full crystal structure. These studies show that adding an electronegative atom to the organic molecules at an optimized position can result in significantly enhanced resonances below 1 THz.

  14. Double sideband suppressed carrier modulation for stable fiber delivery of radio frequency standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikas, Thomas; Bogris, Adonis; Syvridis, Dimitris

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically and experimentally investigate the properties of a double sideband suppressed carrier modulation transmission scheme for long distance microwave frequency standard dissemination. The proposed method effectively doubles the transmitted frequency obtaining enhanced phase noise and stability performance. Suppressing the optical carrier also eliminates the dispersion induced signal fading. Important transmission parameters like optical modulation depth and linearity are also improved. Allan deviation and phase noise measurements prove the superior performance of the proposed modulation format.

  15. Physical/physiological meaning of frequency modulation in brain wave with/without photostimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Hidetoshi; Chatani, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Yusuke; Sakata, Ayumi; Tobimatsu, Shozo

    2007-06-01

    Theory of frequency modulation of electroencephalogram (EEG) in human brain with/without photo-stimulation is presented. Firstly, physical/physiological significance of frequency modulation is discussed based on EEG data in the state of closed eyes at rest. Secondly, possible phenomenological theoretical models under photo-stimulation (PS) are examined to explain the features of intrinsic/induced frequency modulation and the frequency responses induced by PS. Properties of a generalized Kubo oscillator with a parametric periodic driving force are demonstrated to give the qualitative understandings of the observed age-dependent and light-induced natures of EEGs.

  16. TUNE MODULATION FROM BEAM BEAM INTERACTION AND UNEQUAL RADIO FREQUENCIES IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.CAMERON,P.PEGGS,S.SATOGATA,T.

    2003-05-19

    The two RHIC rings have independent rf systems to accommodate different species. Thus, the radio frequencies can differ when the phase and radial loops are closed, and the if frequencies of the two rings are not synchronized. A radio frequency difference leads to longitudinally moving beam crossing points. When the crossing points are between the beam splitting dipoles, the beams experience the beam-beam interaction. Outside the interaction region the beam-beam interaction is switched off. In this way the tune is modulated. A computation of the tune modulation depth, pulse shape and frequency is presented. Tune modulation measurements are shown.

  17. Ethanol enrichment from ethanol-water mixtures using high frequency ultrasonic atomization.

    PubMed

    Kirpalani, D M; Suzuki, K

    2011-09-01

    The influence of high frequency ultrasound on the enrichment of ethanol from ethanol-water mixtures was investigated. Experiments performed in a continuous enrichment system showed that the generated atomized mist was at a higher ethanol concentration than the feed and the enrichment ratio was higher than the vapor liquid equilibrium curve for ethanol-water above 40 mol%. Well-controlled experiments were performed to analyze the effect of physical parameters; temperature, carrier gas flow and collection height on the enrichment. Droplet size measurements of the atomized mist and visualization of the oscillating fountain jet formed during sonication were made to understand the separation mechanism.

  18. THz frequency dynamics of network/guest atom systems : liquid water, clathrates, and network glasses.

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, T.; Materials Science Division

    2009-02-01

    Network/guest atom systems show peculiar dynamic behaviors at THz frequency region such as the plateau of thermal conductivities and the broad band spectra called the Boson peak. These are commonly realized in network/guest atom systems such as glasses, clathrates and even for liquid water. Though the phenomena are universal, there is no consistent view to explain these on the same basis. This paper, pointing out similar behaviors for these different systems, tries to present a unified view for these peculiar dynamics.

  19. Nanoscale Subsurface Imaging of Nanocomposites via Resonant Difference-Frequency Atomic Force Ultrasonic Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, Sean A.; Cantrell, John H.; Lillehei, Peter T.

    2007-01-01

    A scanning probe microscope methodology, called resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM), has been developed. The method employs an ultrasonic wave launched from the bottom of a sample while the cantilever of an atomic force microscope engages the sample top surface. The cantilever is driven at a frequency differing from the ultrasonic frequency by one of the contact resonance frequencies of the cantilever. The nonlinear mixing of the oscillating cantilever and the ultrasonic wave at the sample surface generates difference-frequency oscillations at the cantilever contact resonance. The resonance-enhanced difference-frequency signals are used to create amplitude and phase-generated images of nanoscale near-surface and subsurface features. RDF-AFUM phase images of LaRC-CP2 polyimide polymer containing embedded nanostructures are presented. A RDF-AFUM micrograph of a 12.7 micrometer thick film of LaRC-CP2 containing a monolayer of gold nanoparticles embedded 7 micrometers below the specimen surface reveals the occurrence of contiguous amorphous and crystalline phases within the bulk of the polymer and a preferential growth of the crystalline phase in the vicinity of the gold nanoparticles. A RDF-AFUM micrograph of LaRC-CP2 film containing randomly dispersed carbon nanotubes reveals the growth of an interphase region at certain nanotube-polymer interfaces.

  20. High-frequency waves in plasma formed as a result of tunnel ionization of atoms by circularly polarized radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagin, K. Yu.; Mamontova, T. V.; Uryupin, S. A.

    2017-08-01

    New dependencies of frequency and damping decrement of high-frequency longitudinal waves on the wave vector in photoionized plasma formed by tunnel ionization of atoms in the field of circularly polarized radiation are found. Weakly damped longitudinal waves with a frequency much higher than the electron Langmuir frequency are predicted.

  1. Radio frequency superconducting quantum interference device meta-atoms and metamaterials: Experiment, theory and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Daimeng

    Metamaterials are 1D, 2D or 3D arrays of artificial atoms. The artificial atoms, called "meta-atoms", can be any component with tailorable electromagnetic properties, such as resonators, LC circuits, nano particles, and so on. By designing the properties of individual meta-atoms and the interaction created by putting them in a lattice, one can create a metamaterial with intriguing properties not found in nature. My Ph. D. work examines the meta-atoms based on radio frequency superconducting quantum interference devices (rf-SQUIDs); their tunability with dc magnetic field, rf magnetic field, and temperature are studied. The rf-SQUIDs are superconducting split ring resonators in which the usual capacitance is supplemented with a Josephson junction, which introduces strong nonlinearity in the rf properties. At relatively low rf magnetic field, a magnetic field tunability of the resonant frequency of up to 80 THz/Gauss by dc magnetic field is observed, and a total frequency tunability of 100% is achieved. The macroscopic quantum superconducting metamaterial also shows manipulative self-induced broadband transparency due to a qualitatively novel nonlinear mechanism that is different from conventional electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) or its classical analogs. A near complete disappearance of resonant absorption under a range of applied rf flux is observed experimentally and explained theoretically. The transparency comes from the intrinsic bi-stability and can be tuned on/ off easily by altering rf and dc magnetic fields, temperature and history. Hysteretic in situ 100% tunability of transparency paves the way for auto-cloaking metamaterials, intensity dependent filters, and fast-tunable power limiters. An rf-SQUID metamaterial is shown to have qualitatively the same behavior as a single rf-SQUID with regards to dc flux, rf flux and temperature tuning. The two-tone response of self-resonant rf-SQUID meta-atoms and metamaterials is then studied here via

  2. Beating frequency and amplitude modulation of the piano tone due to coupling of tones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartling, Bo

    2005-04-01

    The influence on a piano tone from weak coexcitation of damped adjacent tones due to coupling via the bridge is studied. The frequency and amplitude modulation of the sound resulting from coexcitation of one strong and one or two weak tones is analyzed. One weak tone causes frequency and amplitude modulation of the sound, and two weak tones produce beating frequency and amplitude modulation, where the beatings of the two modulations are of opposite phase. By digital recording of the sound of piano tones, the appearance of these phenomena is verified. The audibility of the observed frequency and amplitude modulation is discussed in terms of previously determined detection thresholds. The beating character of both frequency and amplitude modulations, however, distinguishes the phenomena from those previously studied and prompts further psychoacoustic investigations. It is shown that detuning of unison strings may significantly increase the frequency deviation of the frequency modulation in conjunction with affected amplitude modulation. The modulatory effects of coupling to adjacent tones therefore may possibly be utilized in the tuning process. A coupling of tones analogous to the situation in a piano may arise in other stringed musical instruments transferring string vibrations to a soundboard via a bridge. .

  3. Autonomous Time-Frequency Cropping and Feature-Extraction Algorithms for Classification of LPI Radar Modulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    INTERCEPT ( LPI ) SIGNAL MODULATIONS In this chapter nine LPI radar modulations are described: FMCW , Frank, P1, P2, P3, P4, T1(n), T2(n). Although not a LPI ...FREQUENCY CROPPING AND FEATURE-EXTRACTION ALGORITHMS FOR CLASSIFICATION OF LPI RADAR MODULATIONS by Eric R. Zilberman June 2006 Thesis...and Feature- Extraction Algorithms for Classification of LPI Radar Modulations 6. AUTHOR Eric R. Zilberman 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING

  4. Optical atomic magnetometer

    DOEpatents

    Budker, Dmitry; Higbie, James; Corsini, Eric P

    2013-11-19

    An optical atomic magnetometers is provided operating on the principles of nonlinear magneto-optical rotation. An atomic vapor is optically pumped using linearly polarized modulated light. The vapor is then probed using a non-modulated linearly polarized light beam. The resulting modulation in polarization angle of the probe light is detected and used in a feedback loop to induce self-oscillation at the resonant frequency.

  5. Modulation-free frequency stabilization of external-cavity diode laser based on a phase-difference biased Sagnac interferometer.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fang; Chen, Dijun; Fang, Zujie; Cai, Haiwen; Qu, Ronghui

    2010-11-15

    We propose a modulation-free technique for frequency stabilization of an external-cavity diode laser (ECDL) by using a phase-difference biased Sagnac interferometer to produce dispersion spectroscopic error signals. A half-wave plate and a total internal reflection prism are inserted into the loop to provide a phase-difference bias between the clockwise and counterclockwise beams with perpendicular polarizations, instead of the previous method with misaligned optical paths. In the experiments, the frequency of the Littman-Metcalf configuration ECDL is locked at the transition of the Rb atomic vapor, and the frequency fluctuation is suppressed from 8 to less than 0.5 MHz peak to peak. It is shown that this scheme is simple, robust, low cost, and it shows promise for use in a variety of related applications.

  6. GaAlAs laser diode frequency locked at the D/sub 2/ line of Cs atoms in an atomic beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, D.; Xie, L.; Wang, Y.

    1988-10-01

    A GaAlAs laser diode has been locked to the D/sub 2/ transition of Cs atoms in an atomic beam. Measured frequency stabilities are 1 x 10/sup -10/ (0.1 sec), 8.4 x 10/sup -12/ (1 sec), 2.2 x 10/sup -12/ (10 sec), and 7.8 x 10/sup -13/ (100 sec). This system has been successfully applied to an optically pumped Cs-beam frequency standard.

  7. Absolute frequency measurement at 10-16 level based on the international atomic time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachisu, H.; Fujieda, M.; Kumagai, M.; Ido, T.

    2016-06-01

    Referring to International Atomic Time (TAI), we measured the absolute frequency of the 87Sr lattice clock with its uncertainty of 1.1 x 10-15. Unless an optical clock is continuously operated for the five days of the TAI grid, it is required to evaluate dead time uncertainty in order to use the available five-day average of the local frequency reference. We homogeneously distributed intermittent measurements over the five-day grid of TAI, by which the dead time uncertainty was reduced to low 10-16 level. Three campaigns of the five (or four)-day consecutive measurements have resulted in the absolute frequency of the 87Sr clock transition of 429 228 004 229 872.85 (47) Hz, where the systematic uncertainty of the 87Sr optical frequency standard amounts to 8.6 x 10-17.

  8. Frequency signal acquisition of scalar atomic magnetometer based on using TDC and FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Y. H.; Chen, Q. Y.; Zhang, Y. F.; Xia, M. Y.

    2017-09-01

    An improved equal precision frequency measurement method is presented for acquisition of frequency signal output from high sensitivity scalar atomic magnetometers. The frequency range to be measured is from 75 kHz to 350 kHz with a resolution better than 0.01 Hz, and the sampling rate should be at least 10 Hz. To meet the requirements on dynamic range, measurement accuracy and speed, at least eight significant digits must be kept. The TDC and FPGA are used to improve the traditional equal precision method. The FPGA acts as the controlling and computing centre, while the TDC measures the time deviation to eliminate the counting error of ±1 reference signal. A prototype frequency detector is fabricated and tested. The measured data show that the design is viable and further improvement is possible.

  9. Spin-exchange frequency shifts for a mixture of alkali atoms in a buffer gas atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Okunevich, A.I.

    1995-11-01

    It is established that the part of the frequency shift that is proportional to the electron polarization P{sub z} can be compensated as a result of competition between the contributions form the A + A and A + B collisions in the mixture of the alkali A and B atoms. Full compensation, i.e., zero shift, can occur at a certain mixture temperature and buffer gas pressure. It is shown that, in addition to the frequency shift proportional to P{sub z}, an almost P{sub z}-independent shift also exists. This shift is proportional to the square of concentrations of atoms A and B and is inversely proportional to the magnitude of the magnetic field. Numerical calculations of the shifts are performed for the Cs + Rb mixture in the He, Ne, Ar, and N{sub 2} buffer gases, and the conditions for the minimization are revealed. 13 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Coherent storage of temporally multimode light using a spin-wave atomic frequency comb memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gündoǧan, M.; Mazzera, M.; Ledingham, P. M.; Cristiani, M.; de Riedmatten, H.

    2013-04-01

    We report on the coherent and multi-temporal mode storage of light using the full atomic frequency comb memory scheme. The scheme involves the transfer of optical atomic excitations in Pr3+:Y2SiO5 to spin waves in hyperfine levels using strong single-frequency transfer pulses. Using this scheme, a total of five temporal modes are stored and recalled on-demand from the memory. The coherence of the storage and retrieval is characterized using a time-bin interference measurement resulting in visibilities higher than 80%, independent of the storage time. This coherent and multimode spin-wave memory is promising as a quantum memory for light.

  11. Atomic-layer molybdenum sulfide optical modulator for visible coherent light

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuxia; Wang, Shuxian; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Chen, Yanxue; Mei, Liangmo; Di Lieto, Alberto; Tonelli, Mauro; Wang, Jiyang

    2015-01-01

    Coherent light sources in the visible range are playing important roles in our daily life and modern technology, since about 50% of the capability of the our human brains is devoted to processing visual information. Visible lasers can be achieved by nonlinear optical process of infrared lasers and direct lasing of gain materials, and the latter has advantages in the aspects of compactness, efficiency, simplicity, etc. However, due to lack of visible optical modulators, the directly generated visible lasers with only a gain material are constrained in continuous-wave operation. Here, we demonstrated the fabrication of a visible optical modulator and pulsed visible lasers based on atomic-layer molybdenum sulfide (MoS2), a ultrathin two-dimensional material with about 9–10 layers. By employing the nonlinear absorption of the modulator, the pulsed orange, red and deep red lasers were directly generated. Besides, the present atomic-layer MoS2 optical modulator has broadband modulating properties and advantages in the simple preparation process. The present results experimentally verify the theoretical prediction for the low-dimensional optoelectronic modulating devices in the visible wavelength region and may open an attractive avenue for removing a stumbling block for the further development of pulsed visible lasers. PMID:26067821

  12. Atomic-layer molybdenum sulfide optical modulator for visible coherent light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuxia; Wang, Shuxian; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Chen, Yanxue; Mei, Liangmo; di Lieto, Alberto; Tonelli, Mauro; Wang, Jiyang

    2015-06-01

    Coherent light sources in the visible range are playing important roles in our daily life and modern technology, since about 50% of the capability of the our human brains is devoted to processing visual information. Visible lasers can be achieved by nonlinear optical process of infrared lasers and direct lasing of gain materials, and the latter has advantages in the aspects of compactness, efficiency, simplicity, etc. However, due to lack of visible optical modulators, the directly generated visible lasers with only a gain material are constrained in continuous-wave operation. Here, we demonstrated the fabrication of a visible optical modulator and pulsed visible lasers based on atomic-layer molybdenum sulfide (MoS2), a ultrathin two-dimensional material with about 9-10 layers. By employing the nonlinear absorption of the modulator, the pulsed orange, red and deep red lasers were directly generated. Besides, the present atomic-layer MoS2 optical modulator has broadband modulating properties and advantages in the simple preparation process. The present results experimentally verify the theoretical prediction for the low-dimensional optoelectronic modulating devices in the visible wavelength region and may open an attractive avenue for removing a stumbling block for the further development of pulsed visible lasers.

  13. Kinetic theory of radio frequency quadrupole ion traps. I. Trapping of atomic ions in a pure atomic gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viehland, Larry A.; Goeringer, Douglas E.

    2004-05-01

    A kinetic theory based on the Boltzmann equation is developed for the trapping of atomic ions in a radio-frequency quadrupole ion trap containing enough neutral atoms that ion-neutral collisions cannot be ignored. The collisions are treated at the same level of sophistication and detail as is used to deal with the time- and space-dependent electric fields in the trap. As a result, microscopic definitions are obtained for the damping and stochastic forces that originate from such collisions. These definitions contrast with corresponding phenomenological terms added ad hoc in previous treatments to create damped Mathieu and Langevin equations, respectively. Furthermore, the theory indicates that either collisional cooling or heating of the ions is possible, depending upon details of the ion-neutral mass ratios and interaction potential. The kinetic theory is not dependent on any special assumptions about the electric field strengths, the ion-neutral interaction potentials, or the ion-neutral mass ratio. It also provides an ab initio way to describe the ion kinetic energies, temperatures, and other properties by a series of successive approximations.

  14. Redistribution of light frequency by multiple scattering in a resonant atomic vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, João Carlos de A.; Oriá, Marcos; Chevrollier, Martine; Cavalcante, Hugo L. D. de Souza; Passerat de Silans, T.

    2015-05-01

    The propagation of light in a resonant atomic vapor can a priori be thought of as a multiple scattering process, in which each scattering event redistributes both the direction and the frequency of the photons. Particularly, the frequency redistribution may result in Lévy flights of photons, directly affecting the transport properties of light in a resonant atomic vapor and turning this propagation into a superdiffusion process. Here, we report on a Monte Carlo simulation developed to study the evolution of the spectrum of the light in a resonant thermal vapor. We observe the gradual change of the spectrum and its convergence towards a regime of complete frequency redistribution as the number of scattering events increases. We also analyze the probability density function of the step length of photons between emissions and reabsorptions in the vapor, which governs the statistics of the light diffusion. We observe two different regimes in the light transport: superdiffusion when the vapor is excited near the line center and normal diffusion for excitation far from the line center. The regime of complete frequency redistribution is not reached for excitation far from resonance even after many absorption and reemission cycles due to correlations between emitted and absorbed frequencies.

  15. Center frequency modulation detection for harmonic complexes resembling vowel formants and its interference by off-frequency maskers.

    PubMed

    Lyzenga, J; Carlyon, R P

    1999-05-01

    Vowels are characterized by peaks in their spectral envelopes: the formants. To gain insight into the perception of speech as well as into the basic abilities of the ear, sensitivity to modulations in the positions of these formants is investigated. Frequency modulation detection thresholds (FMTs) were measured for the center frequency of formantlike harmonic complexes in the absence and in the presence of simultaneous off-frequency formants (maskers). Both the signals and the maskers were harmonic complexes which were band-pass filtered with a triangular spectral envelope, on a log-log scale, into either a LOW (near 500 Hz), a MID (near 1500 Hz), or a HIGH region (near 3000 Hz). They had a duration of 250 ms, and either an 80- or a 240-Hz fundamental. The modulation rate was 5 Hz for the signals and 10 Hz for the maskers. A pink noise background was presented continuously. In a first experiment no maskers were used. The measured FMTs were roughly two times larger than previously reported just-noticeable differences for formant frequency. In a second experiment, no significant differences were found between the FMTs in the absence of maskers and those in the presence of stationary (i.e., nonfrequency modulated) maskers. However, under many conditions the FMTs were increased by the presence of simultaneous modulated maskers. These results indicate that frequency modulation detection interference (FMDI) can exist for formantlike complex tones. The FMDI data could be divided into two groups. For stimuli characterized by a steep (200-dB/oct) slope, it was found that the size of the FMDI depended on which cues were used for detecting the signal and masker modulations. For stimuli with shallow (50-dB/oct) slopes, the FMDI was reduced when the signal and the masker had widely differing fundamentals, implying that the fundamental information is extracted before the interference occurs.

  16. Control of nanoscale atomic arrangement in multicomponent thin films by temporally modulated vapour fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarakinos, Kostas

    2016-09-01

    Synthesis of multicomponent thin films using vapor fluxes with a modulated deposition pattern is a potential route for accessing a wide gamut of atomic arrangements and morphologies for property tuning. In the current study, we present a research concept that allows for understanding the combined effect of flux modulation, kinetics and thermodynamics on the growth of multinary thin films. This concept entails the combined use of thin film synthesis by means of multiatomic vapor fluxes modulated with sub-monolayer resolution, deterministic growth simulations and nanoscale microstructure probes. Using this research concept we study structure formation within the archetype immiscible Ag-Cu binary system showing that atomic arrangement and morphology at different length scales is governed by diffusion of near-surface Ag atoms to encapsulate 3D Cu islands growing on 2D Ag layers. Moreover, we explore the relevance of the mechanism outlined above for morphology evolution and structure formation within the miscible Ag-Au binary system. The knowledge generated and the methodology presented herein provides the scientific foundation for tailoring atomic arrangement and physical properties in a wide range of miscible and immiscible multinary systems.

  17. Nonlinear, nonequilibrium and collective dynamics in a periodically modulated cold atom system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Geol; Heo, Myoung-Sun; Kim, Yonghee; Noh, Heung-Ryoul; Jhe, Wonho

    2017-06-01

    The physics of critical phenomena in a many-body system far from thermal equilibrium is an interesting and important issue to be addressed both experimentally and theoretically. The trapped cold atoms have been actively used as a clean and versatile simulator for classical and quantum-mechanical systems, deepening understanding of the many-body physics behind. Here we review the nonlinear and collective dynamics in a periodically modulated magneto-optically trapped cold atoms. By temporally modulating the intensity of the trapping lasers with the controlled phases, one can realize two kinds of nonlinear oscillators, the parametrically driven oscillator and the resonantly driven Duffing oscillator, which exhibit the dynamical bistable states. Cold atoms behave not only as the single-particle nonlinear oscillators, but also as the coupled oscillators by the light-induced inter-atomic interaction, which leads to the phase transitions far from equilibrium in a way similar to the phase transition in equilibrium. The parametrically driven cold atoms show the ideal mean-field symmetry-breaking transition, and the symmetry is broken with respect to time translation by the modulation period. Such a phase transition results from the cooperation and competition between the inter-particle interaction and the fluctuations, which lead to the nonlinear switching of atoms between the vibrational states, and the experimentally measured critical characteristics prove it as the ideal mean-field transition class. On the other hand, the resonantly driven cold atoms that possess the coexisting periodic attractors exhibit the kinetic phase transition analogous to the discontinuous gas-liquid phase transition in equilibrium, and interestingly the global interaction between atoms causes the shift of the phase-transition boundary. We demonstrate that the temporally driven cold atom system serves as a unique and controllable platform suitable for investigating the nonlinear dynamics of many

  18. Psychophysical frequency modulation thresholds in a FM-bat, Tadarida brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, E; Schmidt, S

    1993-05-01

    Echolocating bats hunting flying insects discriminate complex temporal patterns of acoustic stimuli. For bats using frequency modulated sonar calls (FM bats), there are no behavioral data on the perception of sinusoidally frequency modulated (SFM) stimuli. Discrimination performance for SFM stimuli of varying modulation depth was measured in 4 Tadarida brasiliensis in a two-alternative, forced choice procedure. A center frequency of 40 kHz was modulated with rates between 10 and 2000 Hz. It was found that discrimination performance improved from a mean threshold modulation depth of 3.05 kHz at a modulation rate of 2000 Hz to 1.58 kHz at a modulation rate of 10 Hz. Psychoacoustical modulation depth thresholds of T. brasiliensis are thus distinctly larger than those observed in bat species emitting constant frequency (CF) components followed by an FM-sweep, in active echolocation experiments. The modulation thresholds of T. brasiliensis are discussed in connection with the ability of bats to discriminate insect wingbeats. A comparison between non-echolocating mammals and the FM bat T. brasiliensis shows that the ability to echolocate is not reflected in the modulation thresholds.

  19. A programmable broadband low frequency active vibration isolation system for atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Biao; Zhou, Lin; Xiong, Zongyuan; Wang, Jin; Zhan, Mingsheng

    2014-09-01

    Vibration isolation at low frequency is important for some precision measurement experiments that use atom interferometry. To decrease the vibrational noise caused by the reflecting mirror of Raman beams in atom interferometry, we designed and demonstrated a compact stable active low frequency vibration isolation system. In this system, a digital control subsystem is used to process and feedback the vibration measured by a seismometer. A voice coil actuator is used to control and cancel the motion of a commercial passive vibration isolation platform. With the help of field programmable gate array-based control subsystem, the vibration isolation system performed flexibly and accurately. When the feedback is on, the intrinsic resonance frequency of the system will change from 0.8 Hz to about 0.015 Hz. The vertical vibration (0.01-10 Hz) measured by the in-loop seismometer is reduced by an additional factor of up to 500 on the basis of a passive vibration isolation platform, and we have proved the performance by adding an additional seismometer as well as applying it in the atom interferometry experiment.

  20. A programmable broadband low frequency active vibration isolation system for atom interferometry.

    PubMed

    Tang, Biao; Zhou, Lin; Xiong, Zongyuan; Wang, Jin; Zhan, Mingsheng

    2014-09-01

    Vibration isolation at low frequency is important for some precision measurement experiments that use atom interferometry. To decrease the vibrational noise caused by the reflecting mirror of Raman beams in atom interferometry, we designed and demonstrated a compact stable active low frequency vibration isolation system. In this system, a digital control subsystem is used to process and feedback the vibration measured by a seismometer. A voice coil actuator is used to control and cancel the motion of a commercial passive vibration isolation platform. With the help of field programmable gate array-based control subsystem, the vibration isolation system performed flexibly and accurately. When the feedback is on, the intrinsic resonance frequency of the system will change from 0.8 Hz to about 0.015 Hz. The vertical vibration (0.01-10 Hz) measured by the in-loop seismometer is reduced by an additional factor of up to 500 on the basis of a passive vibration isolation platform, and we have proved the performance by adding an additional seismometer as well as applying it in the atom interferometry experiment.

  1. Measurement of a hyperfine-induced spin-exchange frequency shift in atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Walsworth, R.L.; Silvera, I.F. ); Mattison, E.M.; Vessot, R.F.C. )

    1992-09-01

    We have measured a hyperfine-induced spin-exchange frequency shift in the atomic-hydrogen ground-state hyperfine transition. A recent quantum-mechanical treatment of low-energy hydrogen-hydrogen scattering by Koelman {ital et} {ital al}. (Phys. Rev. A 38, 3535 (1988)) predicts such frequency shifts to become large at low temperature, and to affect the performance of atomic clocks such as the cryogenic hydrogen maser. The experiment reported here was performed with a hydrogen maser operating near room temperature, where the reported hyperfine effects are predicted to be small, but measurable. Using an adiabatic fast passage (AFP) technique to vary the incoming atomic population in the masing states from approximately 100% (AFP on) to 50% (AFP off), we determined the change in the dimensionless hyperfine-induced frequency-shift parameter {Omega} to be {Omega}{sub on}{minus}{Omega}{sub off}=5.38 (1.06){times}10{sup {minus}4}. The theoretical prediction at this temperature is {Omega}{sub on}{minus}{Omega}{sub off}={minus}0.76{times}10{sup {minus}4} to {minus}1.12{times}10{sup {minus}4}, for the range of masing-state populations used in the present experiment. We review the relevant theory, report our experimental method and results, and discuss possible reasons for the discrepancy between experiment and theory.

  2. A third-order mode high frequency biosensor with atomic resolution.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hua-Lin; Yang, Yi; Chen, Xiao; Mohammad, Mohammad Ali; Ye, Tian-Xiang; Guo, Cang-Ran; Yi, Li-Ting; Zhou, Chang-Jian; Liu, Jing; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2015-09-15

    An atomic resolution ultra-high sensitivity surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensor for DNA sequences and cells detection is proposed. Interdigitated transducers (IDTs) fabricated on LiNbO3 substrate achieve a high quality factor (Q) of over 4000 at a frequency of 6.4 GHz (third-order harmonic mode) using an optimized design and process. The biosensor shows excellent linear responses to target DNA in the range from 1 μg/ml to 1 ng/ml with a high sensitivity of 6.7 × 10(-16)g/cm(2)/Hz, hence the difference of a single hybridized DNA base can also be distinguished. With such a high mass resolution, the biosensor is capable of quantitative detection of living cancer cells. The frequency responses of single mouse mammary adenocarcinoma (EMT6) cell and mouse fibroblast (3T3) cell are studied. The interferences in the experiments show insignificant influence on the frequency shift, which verifies the high selectivity of the biosensor. The biosensor is also able to repeat the sensing ability after rough cleaning, therefore cost reduction is achieved from the recycling process in practical applications. The detection limit is defined from the noise analysis of the device, atomic resolution is realized according to the calculation, thereby initiating a potential tool for high-precision medical diagnoses and phenomena observation at the atomic-level. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Low-frequency Raman modes and electronic excitations in atomically thin MoS2 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Hualing; Zhu, Bairen; Liu, Kai; Fan, Jiahe; Cui, Xiaodong; Zhang, Q. M.

    2012-12-01

    Atomically thin MoS2 crystals have been recognized as quasi-two-dimensional semiconductors with remarkable physical properties. We report our Raman scattering measurements on multilayer and monolayer MoS2, especially in the low-frequency range (<50 cm-1). We find two low-frequency Raman modes with a contrasting thickness dependence. When increasing the number of MoS2 layers, one mode shows a significant increase in frequency while the other decreases following a 1/N (N denotes the number of unit layers) trend. With the aid of first-principles calculations we assign the former as the shear mode E2g2. The latter is distinguished as the compression vibrational mode, similar to the surface vibration of other epitaxial thin films. The opposite evolution of the two modes with thickness demonstrates vibrational modes in an atomically thin crystal as well as a more precise way to characterize the thickness of atomically thin MoS2 films. In addition, we observe a broad feature around 38 cm-1(5 meV) which is visible only under near-resonance excitation and pinned at a fixed energy, independent of thickness. We interpret the feature as an electronic Raman scattering associated with the spin-orbit coupling induced splitting in a conduction band at K points in their Brillouin zone.

  4. Enhancing the optical lever sensitivity of microcantilevers for dynamic atomic force microscopy via integrated low frequency paddles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huda Shaik, Nurul; Reifenberger, Ronald G.; Raman, Arvind

    2016-05-01

    A method is presented to enhance the optical lever sensitivity in dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) by nearly an order of magnitude over a wide frequency bandwidth. This is achieved by fabricating or releasing a paddle with a soft hinge close to the free end of the AFM microcantilever such that the paddle resonance frequency is well below the fundamental resonance frequency of the microcantilever. We show a significant increase in signal to noise ratio when cantilever motion is observed at the paddle for AFM systems that are not limited by thermal noise. Also, any effects due to the excitation of the second eigenmode were decoupled by locating the paddle at the node of the second eigenmode. We use these probes for higher harmonic imaging in amplitude modulated AFM (AM-AFM) on a standard polymer blend made of polystyrene and low density polyethylene. We demonstrate significantly improved contrast in higher harmonic images when observing cantilever motion at the paddle. Thus this microcantilever design can improve significantly conventional cantilever performance for dynamic AFM and is compatible with low-cost, high yield microfabrication processes.

  5. Spectroscopy for cold atom gases in periodically modulated optical lattice potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokuno, Akiyuki; Giamarchi, Thierry

    2011-03-01

    Cold atoms in optical lattices are vigorously studied experimentally and theoretically as one of the candidates for a quantum simulator. At the same time, further development of probes to microscopic structure of systems is needed. We propose a novel spectroscopy in cold atom experiments by use of periodic phase-modulation of optical lattice potentials. Corresponding to the statistics of atoms, we formulate the different observables: The energy absorption rate for bosonic atom gases, and the doublon production rate for fermionic atom gases. These observables are formulated within the linear response theory. Interestingly they are given by the imaginary part of the retarded current-current correlation function which is familiar as a quantity corresponding to an optical conductivity. As an example, we discuss one-dimensional Mott insulating state, and also compare our spectroscopy with another known spectroscopy by amplitude-modulation of an optical lattice. This work was supported in part by the Swiss SNF under MaNEP and division II.

  6. Tunable atomic spin-orbit coupling synthesized with a modulating gradient magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xinyu; Wu, Lingna; Chen, Jiyao; Guan, Qing; Gao, Kuiyi; Xu, Zhi-Fang; You, L.; Wang, Ruquan

    2016-01-01

    We report the observation of synthesized spin-orbit coupling (SOC) for ultracold spin-1 87Rb atoms. Different from earlier experiments where a one dimensional (1D) atomic SOC of pseudo-spin-1/2 is synthesized with Raman laser fields, the scheme we demonstrate employs a gradient magnetic field (GMF) and ground-state atoms, thus is immune to atomic spontaneous emission. The strength of SOC we realize can be tuned by changing the modulation amplitude of the GMF, and the effect of the SOC is confirmed through the studies of: 1) the collective dipole oscillation of an atomic condensate in a harmonic trap after the synthesized SOC is abruptly turned on; and 2) the minimum energy state at a finite adiabatically adjusted momentum when SOC strength is slowly ramped up. The condensate coherence is found to remain very good after driven by modulating GMFs. Our scheme presents an alternative means for studying interacting many-body systems with synthesized SOC. PMID:26752786

  7. Ultrabroadband radio-frequency arbitrary waveform generation with high-speed phase and amplitude modulation capability.

    PubMed

    Rashidinejad, Amir; Leaird, Daniel E; Weiner, Andrew M

    2015-05-04

    We introduce a novel photonic-assisted ultrabroadband radio-frequency arbitrary waveform generation setup capable of high-speed phase and amplitude modulation of the individual arbitrary waveforms. The waveform generator is based on an optical interferometer, within which a high-resolution optical pulse shaper and integrated optic phase and intensity modulators are placed, followed by frequency-to-time mapping. The phase and amplitude of each ultrabroadband waveform within the generated sequence can be continuously tuned by adjusting the driving voltages applied to the phase and intensity modulator pair, hence overcoming the slow update speed of conventional spatial light modulator-based pulse shapers. Moreover, this data modulation is completely independent from and does not interfere with RF waveform design. Programmable ultrabroadband RF sequences, spanning more than 4.7 octaves from 2 to 52 GHz, are modulated with real-time data in up to 16 level, M-ary phase-shift keying and quadrature amplitude modulation formats.

  8. Atomic-based stabilization for laser-pumped atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Gerginov, V; Shah, V; Knappe, S; Hollberg, L; Kitching, J

    2006-06-15

    We describe a novel technique for stabilizing frequency shifts in laser-interrogated vapor-cell atomic clocks. The method suppresses frequency shifts due to changes in the laser frequency, intensity, and modulation index as well as atomic vapor density. The clock operating parameters are monitored by using the atoms themselves, rather than by using conventional schemes for laser frequency and cell temperature control. The experiment is realized using a chip-scale atomic clock. The novel atomic-based stabilization approach results in a simpler setup and improved long-term performance.

  9. Switching circuit to improve the frequency modulation difference-intensity THz quantum cascade laser imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Saat, N. K.; Dean, P.; Khanna, S. P.; Salih, M.; Linfield, E. H.; Davies, A. G.

    2015-04-24

    We demonstrate new switching circuit for difference-intensity THz quantum cascade laser (QCL) imaging by amplitude modulation and lock in detection. The switching circuit is designed to improve the frequency modulation so that it can stably lock the amplitude modulation of the QCL and the detector output. The combination of a voltage divider and a buffer in switching circuit to quickly switch the amplitude of the QCL biases of 15.8 V and 17.2 V is successfully to increase the frequency modulation up to ∼100 Hz.

  10. Vibrotactile Sensory Substitution for Object Manipulation: Amplitude versus Pulse Train Frequency Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Stepp, Cara E.; Matsuoka, Yoky

    2012-01-01

    Incorporating sensory feedback with prosthetic devices is now possible, but the optimal methods of providing such feedback are still unknown. The relative utility of amplitude and pulse train frequency modulated stimulation paradigms for providing vibrotactile feedback for object manipulation was assessed in 10 participants. The two approaches were studied during virtual object manipulation using a robotic interface as a function of presentation order and a simultaneous cognitive load. Despite the potential pragmatic benefits associated with pulse train frequency modulated vibrotactile stimulation, comparison of the approach with amplitude modulation indicates that amplitude modulation vibrotactile stimulation provides superior feedback for object manipulation. PMID:21997322

  11. Propagation of frequency-modulated pulses in active one-dimensional photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Zolotovskii, I O; Korobko, D A; Ostatochnikov, V A

    2015-02-28

    The propagation of frequency-modulated pulses in onedimensional photonic crystals with gain is considered. A correct expression is derived for the delay time of the pulse maximum. This expression takes into account the input pulse characteristics: duration, frequency modulation and spectrum position in the photonic band gap. The analytical results are basically in agreement with the results of numerical simulation. The influence of gain in the photonic-crystal structure is considered. It is shown that the parameters of a transmitted pulse can be controlled by changing the inputpulse frequency modulation. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  12. Cross-Modulated Amplitudes and Frequencies Characterize Interacting Components in Complex Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gans, Fabian; Schumann, Aicko Y.; Kantelhardt, Jan W.; Penzel, Thomas; Fietze, Ingo

    2009-03-01

    The dynamics of complex systems is characterized by oscillatory components on many time scales. To study the interactions between these components we analyze the cross modulation of their instantaneous amplitudes and frequencies, separating synchronous and antisynchronous modulation. We apply our novel technique to brain-wave oscillations in the human electroencephalogram and show that interactions between the α wave and the δ or β wave oscillators as well as spatial interactions can be quantified and related with physiological conditions (e.g., sleep stages). Our approach overcomes the limitation to oscillations with similar frequencies and enables us to quantify directly nonlinear effects such as positive or negative frequency modulation.

  13. Design-oriented analytic model of phase and frequency modulated optical links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsurrò, Pietro; Saitto, Antonio; Tommasino, Pasquale; Trifiletti, Alessandro; Vannucci, Antonello; Cimmino, Rosario F.

    2016-07-01

    An analytic design-oriented model of phase and frequency modulated microwave optical links has been developed. The models are suitable for design of broadband high dynamic range optical links for antenna remoting and optical beamforming, where noise and linearity of the subsystems are a concern Digital filter design techniques have been applied to the design of optical filters working as frequency discriminator, that are the bottleneck in terms of linearity for these systems. The models of frequency modulated, phase modulated, and coherent I/Q link have been used to compare performance of the different architectures in terms of linearity and SFDR.

  14. Flow-induced charge modulation in superfluid atomic fermions loaded into an optical kagome lattice.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Daisuke; Sato, Chika; Nikuni, Tetsuro; Tsuchiya, Shunji

    2013-04-05

    We study the superfluid state of atomic fermions in a tunable optical kagome lattice motivated by recent experiments. We show that the imposed superflow induces spatial modulations in the density and order parameter of the pair condensate and leads to a charge modulated superfluid state analogous to a supersolid state. The spatial modulations in the superfluid emerge due to the geometric effect of the kagome lattice that introduces anisotropy in hopping amplitudes of fermion pairs in the presence of superflow. We also study superflow instabilities and find that the critical current limited by the dynamical instability is quite enhanced due to the large density of states associated with the flatband. The charge modulated superfluid state can sustain high temperatures close to the transition temperature that is also enhanced due to the flatband and is therefore realizable in experiments.

  15. Atomization off thin water films generated by high-frequency substrate wave vibrations.

    PubMed

    Collins, David J; Manor, Ofer; Winkler, Andreas; Schmidt, Hagen; Friend, James R; Yeo, Leslie Y

    2012-11-01

    Generating aerosol droplets via the atomization of thin aqueous films with high frequency surface acoustic waves (SAWs) offers several advantages over existing nebulization methods, particularly for pulmonary drug delivery, offering droplet sizes in the 1-5-μm range ideal for effective pulmonary therapy. Nevertheless, the physics underlying SAW atomization is not well understood, especially in the context of thin liquid film formation and spreading and how this affects the aerosol production. Here, we demonstrate that the film geometry, governed primarily by the applied power and frequency of the SAW, indeed plays a crucial role in the atomization process and, in particular, the size of the atomized droplets. In contrast to the continuous spreading of low surface energy liquids atop similar platforms, high surface energy liquids such as water, in the present case, are found to undergo transient spreading due to the SAW to form a quasisteady film whose height is determined by self-selection of the energy minimum state associated with the acoustic resonance in the film and whose length arises from a competition between acoustic streaming and capillary effects. This is elucidated from a fundamental model for the thin film spreading behavior under SAW excitation, from which we show good agreement between the experimentally measured and theoretically predicted droplet dimension, both of which consistently indicate a linear relationship between the droplet diameter and the mechanical power coupled into the liquid by the SAW (the latter captured by an acoustic Weber number to the two thirds power, and the reciprocal of the SAW frequency).

  16. Atomization off thin water films generated by high-frequency substrate wave vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, David J.; Manor, Ofer; Winkler, Andreas; Schmidt, Hagen; Friend, James R.; Yeo, Leslie Y.

    2012-11-01

    Generating aerosol droplets via the atomization of thin aqueous films with high frequency surface acoustic waves (SAWs) offers several advantages over existing nebulization methods, particularly for pulmonary drug delivery, offering droplet sizes in the 1-5-μm range ideal for effective pulmonary therapy. Nevertheless, the physics underlying SAW atomization is not well understood, especially in the context of thin liquid film formation and spreading and how this affects the aerosol production. Here, we demonstrate that the film geometry, governed primarily by the applied power and frequency of the SAW, indeed plays a crucial role in the atomization process and, in particular, the size of the atomized droplets. In contrast to the continuous spreading of low surface energy liquids atop similar platforms, high surface energy liquids such as water, in the present case, are found to undergo transient spreading due to the SAW to form a quasisteady film whose height is determined by self-selection of the energy minimum state associated with the acoustic resonance in the film and whose length arises from a competition between acoustic streaming and capillary effects. This is elucidated from a fundamental model for the thin film spreading behavior under SAW excitation, from which we show good agreement between the experimentally measured and theoretically predicted droplet dimension, both of which consistently indicate a linear relationship between the droplet diameter and the mechanical power coupled into the liquid by the SAW (the latter captured by an acoustic Weber number to the two thirds power, and the reciprocal of the SAW frequency).

  17. Simple-design ultra-low phase noise microwave frequency synthesizers for high-performing Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks

    SciTech Connect

    François, B.; Calosso, C. E.; Micalizio, S.; Abdel Hafiz, M.; Boudot, R.

    2015-09-15

    We report on the development and characterization of novel 4.596 GHz and 6.834 GHz microwave frequency synthesizers devoted to be used as local oscillators in high-performance Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks. The key element of the synthesizers is a custom module that integrates a high spectral purity 100 MHz oven controlled quartz crystal oscillator frequency-multiplied to 1.6 GHz with minor excess noise. Frequency multiplication, division, and mixing stages are then implemented to generate the exact output atomic resonance frequencies. Absolute phase noise performances of the output 4.596 GHz signal are measured to be −109 and −141 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz Fourier frequencies, respectively. The phase noise of the 6.834 GHz signal is −105 and −138 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz offset frequencies, respectively. The performances of the synthesis chains contribute to the atomic clock short term fractional frequency stability at a level of 3.1 × 10{sup −14} for the Cs cell clock and 2 × 10{sup −14} for the Rb clock at 1 s averaging time. This value is comparable with the clock shot noise limit. We describe the residual phase noise measurements of key components and stages to identify the main limitations of the synthesis chains. The residual frequency stability of synthesis chains is measured to be at the 10{sup −15} level for 1 s integration time. Relevant advantages of the synthesis design, using only commercially available components, are to combine excellent phase noise performances, simple-architecture, low-cost, and to be easily customized for signal output generation at 4.596 GHz or 6.834 GHz for applications to Cs or Rb vapor-cell frequency standards.

  18. Simple-design ultra-low phase noise microwave frequency synthesizers for high-performing Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    François, B; Calosso, C E; Abdel Hafiz, M; Micalizio, S; Boudot, R

    2015-09-01

    We report on the development and characterization of novel 4.596 GHz and 6.834 GHz microwave frequency synthesizers devoted to be used as local oscillators in high-performance Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks. The key element of the synthesizers is a custom module that integrates a high spectral purity 100 MHz oven controlled quartz crystal oscillator frequency-multiplied to 1.6 GHz with minor excess noise. Frequency multiplication, division, and mixing stages are then implemented to generate the exact output atomic resonance frequencies. Absolute phase noise performances of the output 4.596 GHz signal are measured to be -109 and -141 dB rad(2)/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz Fourier frequencies, respectively. The phase noise of the 6.834 GHz signal is -105 and -138 dB rad(2)/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz offset frequencies, respectively. The performances of the synthesis chains contribute to the atomic clock short term fractional frequency stability at a level of 3.1 × 10(-14) for the Cs cell clock and 2 × 10(-14) for the Rb clock at 1 s averaging time. This value is comparable with the clock shot noise limit. We describe the residual phase noise measurements of key components and stages to identify the main limitations of the synthesis chains. The residual frequency stability of synthesis chains is measured to be at the 10(-15) level for 1 s integration time. Relevant advantages of the synthesis design, using only commercially available components, are to combine excellent phase noise performances, simple-architecture, low-cost, and to be easily customized for signal output generation at 4.596 GHz or 6.834 GHz for applications to Cs or Rb vapor-cell frequency standards.

  19. Simple-design ultra-low phase noise microwave frequency synthesizers for high-performing Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    François, B.; Calosso, C. E.; Abdel Hafiz, M.; Micalizio, S.; Boudot, R.

    2015-09-01

    We report on the development and characterization of novel 4.596 GHz and 6.834 GHz microwave frequency synthesizers devoted to be used as local oscillators in high-performance Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks. The key element of the synthesizers is a custom module that integrates a high spectral purity 100 MHz oven controlled quartz crystal oscillator frequency-multiplied to 1.6 GHz with minor excess noise. Frequency multiplication, division, and mixing stages are then implemented to generate the exact output atomic resonance frequencies. Absolute phase noise performances of the output 4.596 GHz signal are measured to be -109 and -141 dB rad2/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz Fourier frequencies, respectively. The phase noise of the 6.834 GHz signal is -105 and -138 dB rad2/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz offset frequencies, respectively. The performances of the synthesis chains contribute to the atomic clock short term fractional frequency stability at a level of 3.1 × 10-14 for the Cs cell clock and 2 × 10-14 for the Rb clock at 1 s averaging time. This value is comparable with the clock shot noise limit. We describe the residual phase noise measurements of key components and stages to identify the main limitations of the synthesis chains. The residual frequency stability of synthesis chains is measured to be at the 10-15 level for 1 s integration time. Relevant advantages of the synthesis design, using only commercially available components, are to combine excellent phase noise performances, simple-architecture, low-cost, and to be easily customized for signal output generation at 4.596 GHz or 6.834 GHz for applications to Cs or Rb vapor-cell frequency standards.

  20. Frequency analysis for modulation-enhanced powder diffraction.

    PubMed

    Chernyshov, Dmitry; Dyadkin, Vadim; van Beek, Wouter; Urakawa, Atsushi

    2016-07-01

    Periodic modulation of external conditions on a crystalline sample with a consequent analysis of periodic diffraction response has been recently proposed as a tool to enhance experimental sensitivity for minor structural changes. Here the intensity distributions for both a linear and nonlinear structural response induced by a symmetric and periodic stimulus are analysed. The analysis is further extended for powder diffraction when an external perturbation changes not only the intensity of Bragg lines but also their positions. The derived results should serve as a basis for a quantitative modelling of modulation-enhanced diffraction data measured in real conditions.

  1. Analytical calculations of frequency-dependent hypermagnetizabilities and Cotton-Mouton constants using London atomic orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorvaldsen, Andreas J.; Ruud, Kenneth; Rizzo, Antonio; Coriani, Sonia

    2008-10-01

    We present the first gauge-origin-independent, frequency-dependent calculations of the hypermagnetizability anisotropy, which determines the temperature-independent contribution to magnetic-field-induced linear birefringence, the so-called Cotton-Mouton effect. A density-matrix-based scheme for analytical calculations of frequency-dependent molecular properties for self-consistent field models has recently been developed, which is also valid with frequency- and field-dependent basis sets. Applying this scheme to Hartree-Fock wave functions and using London atomic orbitals in order to obtain gauge-origin-independent results, we have calculated the hypermagnetizability anisotropy. Our results show that the use of London orbitals leads to somewhat better basis-set convergence for the hypermagnetizability compared to conventional basis sets and that London orbitals are mandatory in order to obtain reliable magnetizability anisotropies.

  2. Absolute frequency measurement with uncertainty below 1× 10^{-15} using International Atomic Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachisu, Hidekazu; Petit, Gérard; Ido, Tetsuya

    2017-01-01

    The absolute frequency of the ^{87}Sr clock transition measured in 2015 (Jpn J Appl Phys 54:112401, 2015) was reevaluated using an improved frequency link to the SI second. The scale interval of International Atomic Time (TAI) that we used as the reference was calibrated for an evaluation interval of 5 days instead of the conventional interval of 1 month which is regularly employed in Circular T. The calibration on a 5-day basis removed the uncertainty in assimilating the TAI scale of the 5-day mean to that of the 1-month mean. The reevaluation resulted in the total uncertainty of 10^{-16} level for the first time without local cesium fountains. Since there are presumably no correlations among systematic shifts of cesium fountains worldwide, the measurement is not limited by the systematic uncertainty of a specific primary frequency standard.

  3. Atom-Based Radio-Frequency Field Calibration and Polarization Measurement Using Cesium n DJ Floquet States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Yuechun; Hao, Liping; Han, Xiaoxuan; Bai, Suying; Raithel, Georg; Zhao, Jianming; Jia, Suotang

    2017-07-01

    We investigate atom-based electric-field calibration and polarization measurement of a 100-MHz linearly polarized radio-frequency (rf) field using cesium Rydberg-atom electromagnetically induced transparency in a room-temperature vapor cell. The calibration method is based on matching experimental data with the results of a theoretical Floquet model. The utilized 60 DJ fine-structure Floquet levels exhibit J - and mj-dependent ac Stark shifts and splittings, and they develop even-order rf-modulation sidebands. The Floquet map of cesium 60 DJ fine-structure states exhibits a series of exact crossings between states of different mj's which are not rf coupled. These exact level crossings are employed to perform a rapid and precise (±0.5 %) calibration of the rf electric field. We also map out three series of narrow avoided crossings between fine-structure Floquet levels of equal mj's and different J 's, which are weakly coupled by the rf field via a Raman process. The coupling leads to narrow avoided crossings that can also be applied as spectroscopic markers for rf-field calibration. We further find that the line-strength ratio of intersecting Floquet levels with different mj's provides a fast and robust measurement of the rf field's polarization.

  4. The subjective effect of multiple co-channel frequency modulated television interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whyte, W. A., Jr.; Cauley, M. A.; Groumpos, P. P.

    1983-01-01

    As the geostationary orbit/spectrum becomes saturated, there is a need for the ability to reuse frequency assignments. Protection ratios (the ratio of wanted signal power to interfering signal power at the receiver) play a key role in determining efficient frequency reuse plans. A knowledge of the manner in which multiple sources of co-channel interference combine is vital in determining protection ratio requirements such that suitable margin may be allocated for multiple interfering signals. Results of tests examining the subjective assessment of multiple co-channel frequency modulated television signals interfering with another frequency modulated TV system are presented.

  5. Modeling of Pulses Having Arbitrary Amplitude and Frequency Modulation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    function, fi(t), has been discussed in great detail in Section II. The linearized amplitude modulation, 1(t), is given by: (IV-6) vo A +h( -) TO’ # where "A...10. LCDR Francis Martin Lunney, USN 6143 Gatsby Green Columbia, Maryland 21045 149

  6. Carrier and Envelope Frequency Measurements for Supply-Modulated Microwave Power Amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, Scott R.

    Transmitters for high peak-to-average power ratio communication are increasingly using supply modulation to improve efficiency. In addition to a dc component, the dynamic supply may contain ac components up to 500MHz. The signal envelope dynamic impedance of the supply terminal of a power amplifier (PA) is often unknown and available nonlinear transistor models are unable to predict dynamic low frequency effects required for design of wideband efficient supply modulators. This thesis investigates envelope frequency effects on nonlinear behavior of microwave transistors and PAs under supply-modulated conditions. A measurement setup is created to characterize multi-frequency large-signal excitation of GaN transistors and PAs at carrier frequencies in the 10GHz range with 1-500MHz low frequency excitation on the drain terminal. A novel method for multi-frequency analysis of nonlinear circuit components based on describing functions is developed. It is shown that the describing functions agree with simulation and measurements. In addition, the measurement setup is used to characterize the low frequency drain impedance of a MMIC PA when connected to a simple resonant supply modulator. The main motivation for this work is to obtain knowledge of the dynamic supply terminal in the low frequency regime (1-500MHz) that can enable power amplifier and supply modulator co-design for very broadband signals.

  7. Does the light shift drive frequency aging in the rubidium atomic clock?

    PubMed

    Camparo, James

    2005-07-01

    Frequency aging in the rubidium (Rb) vapor-cell atomic clock plays a significant role in the device's timekeeping ability. Though many researchers have speculated on the physical mechanism(s) driving the linear, deterministic frequency change (i.e., deltaf(t)/fo = At), there is little unambiguous experimental data regarding the phenomenon. Here, long-term data were used from on-orbit global positioning system (GPS) Rb clocks to examine one postulated mechanism for frequency aging (i.e., the light-shift effect). Defining the light shift of the clock's fractional frequency as alphaI/Io, where alpha is the light-shift coefficient, we find that temporal variations of the relative light intensity, I/Io, cannot account for frequency aging. However, for the population of clocks considered here, we obtain the intriguing result that alpha/A = 1.7 +/- 1.5. Thus, it may be that frequency aging is driven by the light-shift effect through temporal variations of the light-shift coefficient.

  8. Resonance frequency-retuned quartz tuning fork as a force sensor for noncontact atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooe, Hiroaki; Sakuishi, Tatsuya; Nogami, Makoto; Tomitori, Masahiko; Arai, Toyoko

    2014-07-01

    Based on a two-prong type quartz tuning fork, a force sensor with a high Q factor, which we call a retuned fork sensor, was developed for non-contact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) with atomic resolution. By cutting a small notch and attaching an AFM tip to one prong, its resonance frequency can be retuned to that of the other intact prong. In balancing the two prongs in this manner, a high Q factor (>50 000 in ultrahigh vacuum) is obtained for the sensor. An atomic resolution image of the Si(111)-7 × 7 surface was demonstrated using an nc-AFM with the sensor. The dependence of the Q factor on resonance frequency of the sensor and the long-range force between tip and sample were measured and analyzed in view of the various dissipation channels. Dissipation in the signal detection circuit turned out to be mainly limited by the total Q factor of the nc-AFM system.

  9. Microwave-to-optical frequency conversion using a cesium atom coupled to a superconducting resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gard, Bryan T.; Jacobs, Kurt; McDermott, R.; Saffman, M.

    2017-07-01

    A candidate for converting quantum information from microwave to optical frequencies is the use of a single atom that interacts with a superconducting microwave resonator on one hand and an optical cavity on the other. The large electric dipole moments and microwave transition frequencies possessed by Rydberg states allow them to couple strongly to superconducting devices. Lasers can then be used to connect a Rydberg transition to an optical transition to realize the conversion. Since the fundamental source of noise in this process is spontaneous emission from the atomic levels, the resulting control problem involves choosing the pulse shapes of the driving lasers so as to maximize the transfer rate while minimizing this loss. Here we consider the concrete example of a cesium atom, along with two specific choices for the levels to be used in the conversion cycle. Under the assumption that spontaneous emission is the only significant source of errors, we use numerical optimization to determine the likely rates for reliable quantum communication that could be achieved with this device. These rates are on the order of a few megaqubits per second.

  10. Two-dimensional atomic sheets for heterogeneous flexible high-frequency and low-power nanoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akinwande, Deji

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional atomic sheets have emerged as near ideal nanomaterials to overcome the long running challenge of achieving Si CMOS like performance on soft substrates at scales that can be suitable for large integration. For instance, the high mobility and velocity accessible in monolayer graphene affords GHz analog transistor devices while the large bandgap of graphene's semiconducting analogues (MoS2 and similar dichalcogenides) naturally lead to near ideal digital transistors with high on/off current ratio and low subthreshold slope while sustaining mobilities much larger than organic semiconductors or amorphous bulk semiconductors. Together, these physically similar atomic layers with vastly different electronic properties can serve as the electronic platform for low-power digital, high-speed mixed-signal, and high-frequency analog transistor building blocks for flexible nanoelectronic systems. Here we report GHz graphene transistors operating in the microwave frequency range, and address mobility and contact resistance extraction in semiconducting atomic sheets. Further progress on heterogeneous integration of graphene and 2D semiconducting crystals can enable future flexible nanosystems.

  11. Resonance frequency-retuned quartz tuning fork as a force sensor for noncontact atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ooe, Hiroaki; Sakuishi, Tatsuya; Arai, Toyoko; Nogami, Makoto; Tomitori, Masahiko

    2014-07-28

    Based on a two-prong type quartz tuning fork, a force sensor with a high Q factor, which we call a retuned fork sensor, was developed for non-contact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) with atomic resolution. By cutting a small notch and attaching an AFM tip to one prong, its resonance frequency can be retuned to that of the other intact prong. In balancing the two prongs in this manner, a high Q factor (>50 000 in ultrahigh vacuum) is obtained for the sensor. An atomic resolution image of the Si(111)-7 × 7 surface was demonstrated using an nc-AFM with the sensor. The dependence of the Q factor on resonance frequency of the sensor and the long-range force between tip and sample were measured and analyzed in view of the various dissipation channels. Dissipation in the signal detection circuit turned out to be mainly limited by the total Q factor of the nc-AFM system.

  12. Atomizing characteristics of swirl can combustor modules with swirl blast fuel injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Cold flow atomization tests of several different designs of swirl can combustor modules were conducted in a 7.6 cm diameter duct at airflow rates (per unit area) of 7.3 to 25.7 g/sq cm sec and water flow rates of 6.3 to 18.9 g/sec. The effect of air and water flow rates on the mean drop size of water sprays produced with the swirl blast fuel injectors were determined. Also, from these data it was possible to determine the effect of design modifications on the atomizing performance of various fuel injector and air swirler configurations. The trend in atomizing performance, as based on the mean drop size, was then compared with the trends in the production of nitrogen oxides obtained in combustion studies with the same swirl can combustors.

  13. Application of Multi-Frequency Modulation (MFM) for high-speed data communications to a voice frequency channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsman, Charles P.

    1990-06-01

    Multi-Frequency Modulation (MFM) has been developed at NPS using both differential quadrature-phase-shift-keying (DQPSK) and differential-quadrature-amplitude-modulation (DQAM) encoding formats. Previous applications of these encoding formats were on industry standard computers (PC) over a 16 to 20 kHz channel. This report discusses the implementation of MFM to a voice frequency channel of 200 to 3400 Hz, for possible future use with high-speed modems over switched telephone networks. Research and testing for this report included the DQPSK and differential 16 quadrature-amplitude-modulation (D16-QAM) encoding formats implemented on PCs. Experimental results of the implemented MFM signal were comparable to theory with acceptable bit error rates for input signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) of 15 dB and higher.

  14. Timbral Sharpness and Modulations in Frequency and Amplitude: Implications for the Fusion of Musical Sounds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goad, Pamela Joy

    The fusion of musical voices is an important aspect of musical blend, or the mixing of individual sounds. Yet, little research has been done to explicitly determine the factors involved in fusion. In this study, the similarity of timbre and modulation were examined for their contribution to the fusion of sounds. It is hypothesized that similar timbres will fuse better than dissimilar timbres, and, voices with the same kind of modulation will fuse better than voices of different modulations. A perceptually-based measure, known as sharpness was investigated as a measure of timbre. The advantages of using sharpness are that it is based on hearing sensitivities and masking phenomena of inner ear processing. Five musical instrument families were digitally recorded in performances across a typical playing range at two extreme dynamic levels. Analyses reveal that sharpness is capable of uncovering subtle changes in timbre including those found in musical dynamics, instrument design, and performer-specific variations. While these analyses alone are insufficient to address fusion, preliminary calculations of timbral combinations indicate that sharpness has the potential to predict the fusion of sounds used in musical composition. Three experiments investigated the effects of modulation on the fusion of a harmonic major sixth interval. In the first experiment using frequency modulation, stimuli varied in deviation about a mean fundamental frequency and relative modulation phase between the two tones. Results showed smaller frequency deviations promoted fusion and relative phase differences had a minimal effect. In a second experiment using amplitude modulation, stimuli varied in deviation about a mean amplitude level and relative phase of modulation. Results showed smaller amplitude deviations promoted better fusion, but unlike frequency modulation, relative phase differences were also important. In a third experiment, frequency modulation, amplitude modulation and mixed

  15. Frequency-modulated light scattering interferometry used for assessment of optical properties in turbid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Liang; Somesfalean, Gabriel; Svanberg, Sune

    2013-02-01

    Frequency-modulated light scattering interferometry, which employs a frequency-modulated coherent light source and examines the intensity fluctuation of the resulting scattered light using a heterodyne detection scheme, was utilized to evaluate the optical properties of liquid phantoms made of Intralipid® and Indian ink. Based on the diffusion theory, nonlinear fits to the power spectrum of the heterodyne-detected light intensity are performed and discussed in detail, and the optical properties of liquid phantoms are consequently retrieved.

  16. Frequency estimation for optical coherent M-QAM system without removing modulated data phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Song; Cao, Yinwen; Leng, Haijun; Wu, Guohua; Gu, Wanyi

    2012-08-01

    For optical coherent M-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (M-QAM) system, the frequency offset can be extracted directly by applying Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) to the signal's argument, without removing the modulated data phase. By categorizing the constellation points and rotating some constellation points by π/4, this algorithm is robust to extract the frequency offset against the noise. Numerical simulations of 16-QAM and 256-QAM coherent systems are presented to demonstrate this algorithm.

  17. Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) in medical environment: Gaussian Derivative Frequency Modulation (GDFM) as a novel modulation technique with minimal interference properties.

    PubMed

    Rieche, Marie; Komenský, Tomás; Husar, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) systems in healthcare facilitate the possibility of contact-free identification and tracking of patients, medical equipment and medication. Thereby, patient safety will be improved and costs as well as medication errors will be reduced considerably. However, the application of RFID and other wireless communication systems has the potential to cause harmful electromagnetic disturbances on sensitive medical devices. This risk mainly depends on the transmission power and the method of data communication. In this contribution we point out the reasons for such incidents and give proposals to overcome these problems. Therefore a novel modulation and transmission technique called Gaussian Derivative Frequency Modulation (GDFM) is developed. Moreover, we carry out measurements to show the inteference properties of different modulation schemes in comparison to our GDFM.

  18. Corticospinal interaction during isometric compensation for modulated forces with different frequencies.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, José R; Wang, Xi; Schulte-Mönting, Jürgen; Huethe, Frank; Maurer, Christoph; Hepp-Reymond, Marie-Claude; Kristeva, Rumyana

    2010-12-31

    During isometric compensation of modulated low-level forces corticomuscular coherence (CMC) has been shown to occur in high-beta or gamma-range. The influence of the frequency of force modulation on CMC has up to now remained unexplored. We addressed this question by investigating CMC, motor performance, and cortical spectral power during a visuomotor task in which subjects had to compensate a modulated force of 8% of the maximum voluntary contraction exerted on their right index finger. The effect of three frequencies of force modulation (0.6, 1.0 and 1.6 Hz) was tested. EEG, EMG from first dorsal interosseus, hand flexor and extensor muscles, and finger position were recorded in eight right-handed women. Five subjects showed CMC in gamma- (28-45 Hz) and three in beta-range (15-30 Hz). Beta- and gamma-range CMC and cortical motor spectral power were not modulated by the various frequencies. However, a sharp bilateral CMC peak at 1.6 Hz was observed, but only in the five gamma-range CMC subjects. The performance error increased linearly with the frequency. Our findings suggest that the frequency of force modulation has no effect on the beta- and gamma-range CMC during isometric compensation for modulated forces at 8% MVC. The beta- and gamma-range CMC may be related to interindividual differences and possibly to strategy differences.

  19. Corticospinal interaction during isometric compensation for modulated forces with different frequencies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background During isometric compensation of modulated low-level forces corticomuscular coherence (CMC) has been shown to occur in high-beta or gamma-range. The influence of the frequency of force modulation on CMC has up to now remained unexplored. We addressed this question by investigating CMC, motor performance, and cortical spectral power during a visuomotor task in which subjects had to compensate a modulated force of 8% of the maximum voluntary contraction exerted on their right index finger. The effect of three frequencies of force modulation (0.6, 1.0 and 1.6 Hz) was tested. EEG, EMG from first dorsal interosseus, hand flexor and extensor muscles, and finger position were recorded in eight right-handed women. Results Five subjects showed CMC in gamma- (28-45 Hz) and three in beta-range (15-30 Hz). Beta- and gamma-range CMC and cortical motor spectral power were not modulated by the various frequencies. However, a sharp bilateral CMC peak at 1.6 Hz was observed, but only in the five gamma-range CMC subjects. The performance error increased linearly with the frequency. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the frequency of force modulation has no effect on the beta- and gamma-range CMC during isometric compensation for modulated forces at 8% MVC. The beta- and gamma-range CMC may be related to interindividual differences and possibly to strategy differences. PMID:21194447

  20. Acousto-optical modulation of light at a doubled sound frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Kotov, V M; Averin, S V; Shkerdin, G N

    2016-02-28

    A method of acousto-optical (AO) Bragg diffraction is proposed that provides the amplitude modulation of optical radiation at a doubled acoustic frequency. The method is based on the double transmission of the light through the AO modulator made of a gyrotropic crystal and is experimentally tested by the example of the modulation of light with a wavelength of 0.63 μm, controlled by the paratellurite AO cell. (acoustooptics)

  1. High frequency GaAlAs modulator and photodetector for phased array antenna applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claspy, P. C.; Chorey, C. M.; Hill, S. M.; Bhasin, K. B.

    1988-01-01

    A waveguide Mach-Zehnder electro-optic modulator and an interdigitated photoconductive detector designed to operate at 820 nm, fabricated on different GaAlAs/GaAs heterostructure materials, are being investigated for use in optical interconnects in phased array antenna systems. Measured optical attenuation effects in the modulator are discussed and the observed modulation performance up to 1 GHz is presented. Measurements of detector frequency response are described and results presented.

  2. High frequency GaAlAs modulator and photodetector for phased array antenna applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claspy, P. C.; Chorey, C. M.; Hill, S. M.; Bhasin, K. B.

    1989-01-01

    A waveguide Mach-Zehnder electro-optic modulator and an interdigitated photoconductive detector designed to operate at 820 nm, fabricated on different GaAlAs/GaAs heterostructure materials, are being investigated for use in optical interconnects in phased array antenna systems. Measured optical attenuation effects in the modulator are discussed and the observed modulation performance up to 1 GHz is presented. Measurements of detector frequency response are described and results presented.

  3. Detecting the magnetic response of iron oxide capped organosilane nanostructures using magnetic sample modulation and atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie-Ren; Lewandowski, Brian R; Xu, Song; Garno, Jayne C

    2009-06-15

    A new imaging strategy using atomic force microscopy (AFM) is demonstrated for mapping magnetic domains at size regimes below 100 nm. The AFM-based imaging mode is referred to as magnetic sample modulation (MSM), since the flux of an AC-generated electromagnetic field is used to induce physical movement of magnetic nanomaterials on surfaces during imaging. The AFM is operated in contact mode using a soft, nonmagnetic tip to detect the physical motion of the sample. By slowly scanning an AFM probe across a vibrating area of the sample, the frequency and amplitude of vibration induced by the magnetic field is tracked by changes in tip deflection. Thus, the AFM tip serves as a force and motion sensor for mapping the vibrational response of magnetic nanomaterials. Essentially, MSM is a hybrid of contact mode AFM combined with selective modulation of magnetic domains. The positional feedback loop for MSM imaging is the same as that used for force modulation and contact mode AFM; however, the vibration of the sample is analyzed using channels of a lock-in amplifier. The investigations are facilitated by nanofabrication methods combining particle lithography with organic vapor deposition and electroless deposition of iron oxide, to prepare designed test platforms of magnetic materials at nanometer length scales. Custom test platforms furnished suitable surfaces for MSM characterizations at the level of individual metal nanostructures.

  4. Selective attention modulates human auditory brainstem responses: relative contributions of frequency and spatial cues.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Alexandre; Schönwiesner, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Selective attention is the mechanism that allows focusing one's attention on a particular stimulus while filtering out a range of other stimuli, for instance, on a single conversation in a noisy room. Attending to one sound source rather than another changes activity in the human auditory cortex, but it is unclear whether attention to different acoustic features, such as voice pitch and speaker location, modulates subcortical activity. Studies using a dichotic listening paradigm indicated that auditory brainstem processing may be modulated by the direction of attention. We investigated whether endogenous selective attention to one of two speech signals affects amplitude and phase locking in auditory brainstem responses when the signals were either discriminable by frequency content alone, or by frequency content and spatial location. Frequency-following responses to the speech sounds were significantly modulated in both conditions. The modulation was specific to the task-relevant frequency band. The effect was stronger when both frequency and spatial information were available. Patterns of response were variable between participants, and were correlated with psychophysical discriminability of the stimuli, suggesting that the modulation was biologically relevant. Our results demonstrate that auditory brainstem responses are susceptible to efferent modulation related to behavioral goals. Furthermore they suggest that mechanisms of selective attention actively shape activity at early subcortical processing stages according to task relevance and based on frequency and spatial cues.

  5. Simulation of stress-modulated magnetization precession frequency in Heusler-based spin torque oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Houbing; Zhao, Congpeng; Ma, Xingqiao

    2017-03-01

    We investigated stress-modulated magnetization precession frequency in Heusler-based spin transfer torque oscillator by combining micromagnetic simulations with phase field microelasticity theory, by encapsulating the magnetic tunnel junction into multilayers structures. We proposed a novel method of using an external stress to control the magnetization precession in spin torque oscillator instead of an external magnetic field. The stress-modulated magnetization precession frequency can be linearly modulated by externally applied uniaxial in-plane stress, with a tunable range 4.4-7.0 GHz under the stress of 10 MPa. By comparison, the out-of-plane stress imposes negligible influence on the precession frequency due to the large out-of-plane demagnetization field. The results offer new inspiration to the design of spin torque oscillator devices that simultaneously process high frequency, narrow output band, and tunable over a wide range of frequencies via external stress.

  6. Gas breakdown mechanism in pulse-modulated asymmetric ratio frequency dielectric barrier discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Sun, Jizhong; Nozaki, Tomohiro; Ding, Zhenfeng; Ding, Hongbin; Wang, Zhanhui; Wang, Dezhen

    2014-08-01

    The gas breakdown mechanisms, especially the roles of metastable species in atmospheric pressure pulse-modulated ratio frequency barrier discharges with co-axial cylindrical electrodes, were studied numerically using a one dimensional self-consistent fluid model. Simulation results showed that in low duty cycle cases, the electrons generated from the channels associated with metastable species played a more important role in initializing next breakdown than the direct ionization of helium atoms of electronic grounded states by electron-impact. In order to quantitatively evaluate the contribution to the discharge by the metastables, we defined a "characteristic time" and examined how the value varied with the gap distance and the electrode asymmetry. The results indicated that the lifetime of the metastable species (including He*and He2*) was much longer than that of the pulse-on period and as effective sources of producing electrons they lasted over a period up to millisecond. When the ratio of the outer radius to the inner radius of the cylindrical electrodes was far bigger than one, it was found that the metastables distributed mainly in a cylindrical region around the inner electrode. When the ratio decreased as the inner electrode moved outward, the density of metastables in the discharge region near the outer electrode became gradually noticeable. As the discharging gap continued to decrease, the two hill-shaped distributions gradually merged to one big hill. When the discharge spacing was fixed, asymmetric electrodes facilitated the discharge.

  7. Measurement of the 1S-2S Frequency in Atomic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildum, Edward Ames

    A first precise measurement of the 1S-2S energy interval in atomic hydrogen has been obtained by observing the 1S-2S transition in an atomic beam by pulsed Doppler -free two-photon spectroscopy and using an interferometrically calibrated line of ('130)Te(,2) at 486 nm as the reference. The measured 1S-2S frequency is 2 466 061 395.6(4.9) MHz. With the calculated 1S Lamb shift, the 1S-2S frequency yields a value for the Rydberg constant, R(,(INFIN)) = 109 737.314 92(22) cm('-1), which is not in good agreement with the most recent previously measured value, 109 737.315 44(11) cm('-1), obtained by S. R. Amin et al.('16) It is, however, in good agreement with a previous Rydberg value, 109 737.315 04(32) cm('-1), measured by J. E. M. Goldsmith('17). If the Rydberg constant is taken as given, the 1S-2S frequency determines a value for the 1S Lamb shift. With Amin's Rydberg, the measured Lamb shift is 8161.0(5.4) MHz, in poor agreement with the theoretical value of 8149.43(8) MHz. With Goldsmith's Rydberg, the measured Lamb shift is 8151.0(8.7) MHz, in good agreement with theory.

  8. Short-term stability improvements of an optical frequency standard based on free Ca atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Jeff; Oates, Chris

    2010-03-01

    Compared to optical frequency standards featuring trapped ions or atoms in optical lattices, the strength of a standard using freely expanding neutral calcium atoms is not ultimate accuracy but rather short-term stability and experimental simplicity. Recently, a fractional frequency instability of 4 x10-15 at 1 second was demonstrated for the Ca standard at 657 nm [1]. The short cycle time (˜2 ms) combined with only a moderate interrogation duty cycle (˜15 %) is thought to introduce excess, and potentially critically limiting technical noise due to the Dick effect---high-frequency noise on the laser oscillator is not averaged away but is instead down-sampled by aliasing. We will present results of two strategies employed to minimize this effect: the reduction of clock laser noise by filtering the master clock oscillator through a high-finesse optical cavity [2], and an optimization of the interrogation cycle to match our laser's noise spectrum.[4pt] [1] Oates et al., Optics Letters, 25(21), 1603--5 (2000)[0pt] [2] Nazarova et al., J. Opt. Soc. Am. B, 5(10), 1632--8 (2008)

  9. Sound speed and oscillation frequencies for a solar model evolved with Los Alamos ATOMIC opacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzik, Joyce Ann; Fontes, Christopher; Walczak, Przemyslaw; Wood, Suzannah R.; Mussack, Katie

    2015-08-01

    Los Alamos has calculated a new generation of radiative opacities for elements with atomic number Z=1-30 with improved physics input, updated atomic data, and finer temperature grid to replace the Los Alamos LEDCOP opacities released in the year 2000. We calculate the evolution of a standard solar model including these new opacities, and compare with a model evolved using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory OPAL opacities released about 1996. We use the solar abundance mixture of Asplund, Grevesse, Sauval, and Scott (2009), including 2015 updates. The Los Alamos ATOMIC opacities (Colgan et al. 2013a,b) are somewhat higher than those of OPAL for temperatures and densities near the base of the solar convection zone. We compare the calculated nonadiabatic solar oscillation frequencies and solar interior sound speed to observed frequencies and helioseismic inferences. We discuss the potential for increased opacities to partially mitigate the ‘solar abundance problem’.References:J. Colgan, D.P. Kilcrease, N.H. Magee, Jr., G.S.J. Armstrong, J. Abdallah, Jr., M.E. Sherrill, C.J. Fontes, H.L. Zhang and P. Hakel, Eighth International Conference on Atomic and Molecular Data and their Applications: ICAMDATA, Gaithersburg, MD 2012, AIP Conf. Proc. No. 1545, (AIP, New York, 2013a), pp. 17-26.J. Colgan, D.P. Kilcrease, N.H. Magee, Jr, G.S.J. Armstrong, J. Abdallah, Jr., M.E. Sherrill, C.J. Fontes, H.L. Zhang and P. Hakel, High Energy Density Physics 9, 369 (2013b).

  10. Studies on High-Resolution Brillouin and Frequency Modulation Laser Absorption Spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattnaik, Radha Krishna

    1992-01-01

    The discovery of quasicrystals in 1984 has invoked considerable interest in the physics of quasiperiodic layered structures. Interfaces between elastically different media modify the acoustic phonons and give rise to new modes. Observation of these modes and their dependence on structural parameters provide a direct insight into the elastic and photoelastic properties of the layered structures. Brillouin scattering is an excellent non-destructive means to detect these excitations. A simple theoretical model for the acoustic phonons in a quasiperiodic, one dimensional, Fibonacci chain is presented. The results show that the density of states is selfsimilar and the higher frequency modes are suppressed as the length of the chain is increased. Electronic energy band structure of the same chain modeled as a Kronig-Penny system is also studied and is seen to have a selfsimilar structure, and as the number of barriers is increased the lower energy states are found to exhibit localization character. Brillouin scattering from such a superlattice constructed out of layers of AlSb and GaSb is discussed and the intensity of the inelastic components is calculated. Experimental results for the first time detecting these components in a backscattering geometry enploying a triple pass Fabry Perot interferometer are presented. In the second part of this work, frequency modulation (FM) spectroscopy is extended to the important regime of multimode dye lasers. Theoretical calculations show that the edge of the laser power profile plays a decisive role and under certain circumstances can result in an FM signal that is not limited by the FWHM of the laser line. The theoretical results are demonstrated to be in excellent agreement with experimentally measured FM spectra obtained by probing the atomic sodium D_2 transition line. The measured FWHM of the signal is narrower than the laser bandwidth and is in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  11. Effect of substituents on the /sup 35/Cl NQR frequencies of atoms in conditions of hyperconjugation

    SciTech Connect

    Arbuzov, B.A.; Andreeva, A.I.; Bredikhin, A.A.; Safin, I.A.; Vereshchagin, A.N.

    1985-12-10

    The authors studied the mechanisms of the change in the NOR spectra in a series of alpha-chloro-substituted dialkyl ethers, organonitrogen compounds, and benzyl and benzylidene chlorides. The NQR spectra were made on a pulsed IS-3 spectrometer at a temperature of 77 degrees K. There are n-o and ..pi..-o interactions which decrease the Cl 35 and Br 79 NQR frequencies in the series of alpha-chloro ethers, alpha-chloroalkylamides, and benzyl halides. The introduction of a geminal halogen atom (dichloromethyl ethers, benzylidene halides) decreases the effect of hyperconjugation.

  12. Frequency, amplitude, and phase measurements in contact resonance atomic force microscopies.

    PubMed

    Stan, Gheorghe; Solares, Santiago D

    2014-01-01

    The resonance frequency, amplitude, and phase response of the first two eigenmodes of two contact-resonance atomic force microscopy (CR-AFM) configurations, which differ in the method used to excite the system (cantilever base vs sample excitation), are analyzed in this work. Similarities and differences in the observables of the cantilever dynamics, as well as the different effect of the tip-sample contact properties on those observables in each configuration are discussed. Finally, the expected accuracy of CR-AFM using phase-locked loop detection is investigated and quantification of the typical errors incurred during measurements is provided.

  13. Frequency-doubled telecom fiber laser for a cold atom interferometer using optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theron, Fabien; Bidel, Yannick; Dieu, Emily; Zahzam, Nassim; Cadoret, Malo; Bresson, Alexandre

    2017-06-01

    A compact and robust frequency-doubled telecom laser system at 780 nm is presented for a rubidium cold atom interferometer using optical lattices. Adopting an optical switch at 1.5 μm and a dual-wavelength second harmonic generation system, only one laser amplifier is required for the laser system. Our system delivers a 900 mW laser beam with a detuning of 110 GHz for the optical lattice and a 650 mW laser beam with an adjustable detuning between 0 and -1 GHz for the laser cooling, the detection and the Raman transitions.

  14. Optimisation of frequency-modulated characteristics of output radiation in a lidar with Raman amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Grigorievsky, V I; Tezadov, Ya A

    2016-03-31

    The reported study is aimed at increasing the power in the transmission path of a lidar with Raman amplification for longpath sensing of methane by optimising the frequency-modulated characteristics of the output radiation. The pump current of the used distributed-feedback master laser was modulated by a linearfrequency signal with simultaneous application of a non-synchronous high-frequency signal. For such a modulation regime, the Raman amplifier provided the mean output power of 2.5 W at a wavelength of 1650 nm. The spectral broadening did not significantly decrease the lidar sensitivity at long paths. (lidars)

  15. On low-frequency errors of uniformly modulated filtered white-noise models for ground motions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, Erdal; Boore, David M.

    1988-01-01

    Low-frequency errors of a commonly used non-stationary stochastic model (uniformly modulated filtered white-noise model) for earthquake ground motions are investigated. It is shown both analytically and by numerical simulation that uniformly modulated filter white-noise-type models systematically overestimate the spectral response for periods longer than the effective duration of the earthquake, because of the built-in low-frequency errors in the model. The errors, which are significant for low-magnitude short-duration earthquakes, can be eliminated by using the filtered shot-noise-type models (i. e. white noise, modulated by the envelope first, and then filtered).

  16. Experimental demonstration of a flat optical frequency comb generation based on cascaded directly modulated distributed feedback laser and polarization modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dalei; Wang, Rong; Pu, Tao; Xiang, Peng; Fang, Tao; Zheng, Jiling; Huang, Long; Wang, Peng

    2016-03-01

    A scheme to generate a flat optical frequency comb (OFC) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated based on a directly modulated distributed feedback (DFB) laser cascaded with a polarization modulator (PolM). In the proposed scheme, the DFB laser is optically injection-locked by a tunable laser source and directly modulated by a radio frequency (RF) signal, which is amplified by a microwave power amplifier. The optical signal is then sent to PolM via a polarization controller (PC) and modulated by the amplified and phase-shifted RF signal from the same source. The optical signal is finally received and measured by an optical spectrum analyzer (OSA) after transmitting through another PC and a polarizer. Here, the OFC with their power variation within 3 dB is desired, and four OFCs with 6, 6, 5, and 4 comb lines are generated using the RF signals with different frequencies, which have a flatness of, respectively, 2.4, 2.5, 0.7, and 0.6 dB. Here, the number of comb lines is decreased, which is due to the RF signal power decrease while its frequency is raised.

  17. Radio frequency path characterization for wide band quadrature amplitude modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Bracht, R.

    1998-12-31

    Remote, high speed, high explosive wave front monitoring requires very high bandwidth telemetry to allow transmission of diagnostic data before the explosion destroys the sensor system itself. The main motivation for this study is that no known existing implementation of this sort has been applied to realistic weapons environments. These facts have prompted the research and gathering of data that can be used to extrapolate towards finding the best modulation method for this application. In addition to research of similar existing analysis and testing operations, data was recently captured from a Joint Test Assembly (JTA) Air Launched Cruise Missile (ALCM) flight.

  18. Achilles tendinopathy modulates force frequency characteristics of eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Grigg, Nicole L; Wearing, Scott C; O'Toole, John M; Smeathers, James E

    2013-03-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that ground reaction force (GRF) recorded during eccentric ankle exercise is characterized by greater power in the 8- to 12-Hz bandwidth when compared with that recorded during concentric ankle exercise. Subsequently, it was suggested that vibrations in this bandwidth may underpin the beneficial effect of eccentric loading in tendon repair. However, this observation has been made only in individuals without Achilles tendinopathy. This research compared the force frequency characteristics of eccentric and concentric exercises in individuals with and without Achilles tendinopathy. Eleven male adults with unilateral midportion Achilles tendinopathy and nine control male adults without tendinopathy participated in the research. Kinematics and GRF were recorded while the participants performed a common eccentric rehabilitation exercise protocol and a concentric equivalent. Ankle joint kinematics and the frequency power spectrum of the resultant GRF were calculated. Eccentric exercise was characterized by a significantly greater proportion of spectral power between 4.5 and 11.5 Hz when compared with concentric exercise. There were no significant differences between limbs in the force frequency characteristics of concentric exercise. Eccentric exercise, in contrast, was defined by a shift in the power spectrum of the symptomatic limb, resulting in a second spectral peak at 9 Hz, rather than 10 Hz in the control limb. Compared with healthy tendon, Achilles tendinopathy was characterized by lower frequency vibrations during eccentric rehabilitation exercises. This finding may be associated with changes in neuromuscular activation and tendon stiffness that have been shown to occur with tendinopathy and provides a possible rationale for the previous observation of a different biochemical response to eccentric exercise in healthy and injured Achilles tendons.

  19. Frequency domain optical resolution photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy using a modulated laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, Gregor; Langer, Andreas; Buchegger, Bianca; Jacak, Jaroslaw; Klar, Thomas A.; Berer, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    In this paper a multimodal optical-resolution photoacoustic and fluorescence microscope in frequency domain is presented. Photoacoustic waves and modulated fluorescence are generated in chromophores by using a modulated diode laser. The photoacoustic waves, recorded with a hydrophone, and the fluorescence signals, acquired with an avalanche photodiode, are simultaneously measured using a lock-in technique. Two possibilities to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio are discussed. The first method is based on the optimization of the excitation waveform and it is argued why square-wave excitation is best. The second way to enhance the SNR is to optimize the modulation frequency. For modulation periods that are much shorter than the relaxation times of the excited chromophores, the photoacoustic signal scales linearly with the modulation frequency. We come to the conclusion that frequency-domain photoacoustic microscopy performed with modulation frequencies in the range of 100 MHz can compete with time-domain photoacoustic microscopy regarding the signal-to-noise ratio. The theoretical predictions are confirmed by experimental results. Additionally, images of stained and unstained biological samples are presented in order to demonstrate the capabilities of the multimodal imaging system.

  20. Self-oscillating optical frequency comb generator based on an optoelectronic oscillator employing cascaded modulators.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jian; Xu, Xingyuan; Wu, Zhongle; Dai, Yitang; Yin, Feifei; Zhou, Yue; Li, Jianqiang; Xu, Kun

    2015-11-16

    An ultraflat self-oscillating optical frequency comb generator based on an optoelectronic oscillator employing cascaded modulators was proposed and experimentally demonstrated. By incorporating the optoelectronic oscillation loop with cascaded modulators into the optical frequency comb generator, 11 ultraflat comb lines would be generated, and the frequency spacing is equal to the oscillation frequency of the OEO. 10 and 12GHz optical frequency combs are demonstrated with the spectral power variation below 0.82dB and 0.93dB respectively. The corresponding spectral pure microwave source are also generated and evaluated. The corresponding single-sideband phase noise are as low as -122dBc/Hz and -115 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz offset frequency.

  1. Low-phase-noise frequency synthesizer for the trapped atom clock on a chip.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Martinez, Fernando; Lours, Michel; Rosenbusch, Peter; Reinhard, Friedemann; Reichel, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    We report on the realization of a 6.834-GHz synthesis chain for the trapped atom clock on a chip (TACC) that is being developed at LNE-SYRTE. The chain is based on the frequency multiplication of a 100-MHz reference signal to obtain a signal at 6.4 GHz. It uses a comb generator based on a monolithic GaAs nonlinear transmission line. This is a novelty in the fabrication of high-stability microwave synthesizers. Measurements give a low flicker phase noise of -85 dBrad(2)/Hz at 1-Hz offset frequency and a white phase noise floor < -115 dBrad(2)/Hz. Based on these results, we estimate that the performance of the synthesizer is at least one order of magnitude better than the stability goal of TACC. This ensures that the synthesizer will not be limiting the clock performance.

  2. High frequency modulation and injection locking of terahertz quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, L.; Wan, W. J.; Zhu, Y. H.; Fu, Z. L.; Li, H.; Cao, J. C.

    2017-06-01

    Due to intersubband transitions, the quantum cascade laser (QCL) is free of relaxations and able to work under fast modulations. In this work, the authors investigate the fast modulation properties of a continuous wave (cw) terahertz QCL emitting around 3 THz (∼100 μm). Both simulation and experimental results show that the 3 dB modulation bandwidth for the device can reach 11.5 GHz and the modulation response curve is relatively flat upto ∼16 GHz. The radio frequency (RF) injection measurements verify that around the laser threshold the inter-mode beat note interacts strongly with the RF signal and the laser can be modulated at the round trip frequency of 15.5 GHz.

  3. Feasibility of controlling speed-dependent low-frequency brake vibration amplification by modulating actuation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Osman Taha; Dreyer, Jason T.; Singh, Rajendra

    2014-12-01

    In this article, a feasibility study of controlling the low frequency torque response of a disc brake system with modulated actuation pressure (in the open loop mode) is conducted. First, a quasi-linear model of the torsional system is introduced, and analytical solutions are proposed to incorporate the modulation effect. Tractable expressions for three different modulation schemes are obtained, and conditions that would lead to a reduction in the oscillatory amplitudes are identified. Second, these conditions are evaluated with a numerical model of the torsional system with clearance nonlinearity, and analytical solutions are verified in terms of the trends observed. Finally, a laboratory experiment with a solenoid valve is built to modulate actuation pressure with a constant duty cycle, and time-frequency domain data are acquired. Measurements are utilized to assess analytical observations, and all methods show that the speed-dependent brake torque amplitudes can be altered with an appropriate modulation of actuation pressure.

  4. Reliable Adaptive Modulation and Interference Mitigation for Mobile Radio Slow Frequency Hopping Channels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-29

    transmitted frequencies r. The degrading effect of PBI is compensated for by the benefit of frequency diversity on the performance of LRP for these...diversity and AM was investigated for channels with PBI . Numerical and simulation results demonstrate that significant performance gains can be...Modulation and adaptive Frequency Diversity to mitigate the effects of fading and partial-band interference. Significant performance gains are

  5. Analyzing and imitating calculation of photoelectricity-inspect of sound frequency by phase modulating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie

    2011-12-01

    The paper analyzes and researches the possibility and measure of photoelectric-inspect of sound frequency by phase modulating. Analyzing the 4-Frame Phase Shifting analyzing method used in sound frequency photoelectric-inspect. It is verified that vibrator film and the position of exploring instrument determines inspecting precision. This step directly influences sound frequency spectrum and dynamic range. A kind of vibrator film choosing reference gist has been brought up. This inspecting method can be used in sound information analyzing.

  6. High frequency modulation capabilities and quasi single-sideband emission from a quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Hangauer, Andreas; Spinner, Georg; Nikodem, Michal; Wysocki, Gerard

    2014-09-22

    Both intensity- (IM) and frequency-modulation (FM) behavior of a directly modulated quantum cascade laser (QCL) are measured from 300 Hz to 1.7 GHz. Quantitative measurements of tuning coefficients has been performed and the transition from thermal- to electronic-tuning is clearly observed. A very specific FM behavior of QCLs has been identified which allows for optical quasi single sideband (SSB) modulation through current injection and has not been observed in directly modulated semiconductor lasers before. This predestines QCLs in applications where SSB is required, such as telecommunication or high speed spectroscopy. The experimental procedure and theoretical modeling for data extraction is discussed.

  7. Low frequency gravitational wave detection with ground-based atom interferometer arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaibi, W.; Geiger, R.; Canuel, B.; Bertoldi, A.; Landragin, A.; Bouyer, P.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new detection strategy for gravitational waves (GWs) below a few hertz based on a correlated array of atom interferometers (AIs). Our proposal allows us to reduce the Newtonian noise (NN), which limits all ground based GW detectors below a few hertz, including previous atom interferometry-based concepts. Using an array of long baseline AI gradiometers yields several estimations of the NN, whose effect can thus be reduced via statistical averaging. Considering the km baseline of current optical detectors, a NN rejection of a factor of 2 could be achieved and tested with existing AI array geometries. Exploiting the correlation properties of the gravity acceleration noise, we show that a tenfold or more NN rejection is possible with a dedicated configuration. Considering a conservative NN model and the current developments in cold atom technology, we show that strain sensitivities below 1 ×10-19/√{Hz } in the 0.3 -3 Hz frequency band can be within reach, with a peak sensitivity of 3 ×10-23/√{Hz } at 2 Hz . Our proposed configuration could extend the observation window of current detectors by a decade and fill the gap between ground-based and space-based instruments.

  8. Modulation of electrical potential and conductivity in an atomic-layer semiconductor heterojunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yu; Yoshida, Shoji; Sakurada, Ryuji; Takashima, Kengo; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Saito, Tetsuki; Konabe, Satoru; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Maniwa, Yutaka; Takeuchi, Osamu; Shigekawa, Hidemi; Miyata, Yasumitsu

    2016-08-01

    Semiconductor heterojunction interfaces have been an important topic, both in modern solid state physics and in electronics and optoelectronics applications. Recently, the heterojunctions of atomically-thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) are expected to realize one-dimensional (1D) electronic systems at their heterointerfaces due to their tunable electronic properties. Herein, we report unique conductivity enhancement and electrical potential modulation of heterojunction interfaces based on TMDC bilayers consisted of MoS2 and WS2. Scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy analyses showed the formation of 1D confining potential (potential barrier) in the valence (conduction) band, as well as bandgap narrowing around the heterointerface. The modulation of electronic properties were also probed as the increase of current in conducting atomic force microscopy. Notably, the observed band bending can be explained by the presence of 1D fixed charges around the heterointerface. The present findings indicate that the atomic layer heterojunctions provide a novel approach to realizing tunable 1D electrical potential for embedded quantum wires and ultrashort barriers of electrical transport.

  9. Modulation of electrical potential and conductivity in an atomic-layer semiconductor heterojunction

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Yu; Yoshida, Shoji; Sakurada, Ryuji; Takashima, Kengo; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Saito, Tetsuki; Konabe, Satoru; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Maniwa, Yutaka; Takeuchi, Osamu; Shigekawa, Hidemi; Miyata, Yasumitsu

    2016-01-01

    Semiconductor heterojunction interfaces have been an important topic, both in modern solid state physics and in electronics and optoelectronics applications. Recently, the heterojunctions of atomically-thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) are expected to realize one-dimensional (1D) electronic systems at their heterointerfaces due to their tunable electronic properties. Herein, we report unique conductivity enhancement and electrical potential modulation of heterojunction interfaces based on TMDC bilayers consisted of MoS2 and WS2. Scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy analyses showed the formation of 1D confining potential (potential barrier) in the valence (conduction) band, as well as bandgap narrowing around the heterointerface. The modulation of electronic properties were also probed as the increase of current in conducting atomic force microscopy. Notably, the observed band bending can be explained by the presence of 1D fixed charges around the heterointerface. The present findings indicate that the atomic layer heterojunctions provide a novel approach to realizing tunable 1D electrical potential for embedded quantum wires and ultrashort barriers of electrical transport. PMID:27515115

  10. Relative sideband amplitudes versus modulation index for common functions using frequency and phase modulation. [for design and testing of communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocklin, F.

    1973-01-01

    The equations defining the amplitude of sidebands resulting from either frequency modulation or phase modulation by either square wave, sine wave, sawtooth or triangular modulating functions are presented. Spectral photographs and computer generated tables of modulation index vs. relative sideband amplitudes are also included.

  11. Stimulus-dependent modulation of spontaneous low-frequency oscillations in the rat visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liangming; Liu, Yadong; Gui, Jianjun; Li, Ming; Hu, Dewen

    2014-06-09

    Research on spontaneous low-frequency oscillations is important to reveal underlying regulatory mechanisms in the brain. The mechanism for the stimulus modulation of low-frequency oscillations is not known. Here, we used the intrinsic optical imaging technique to examine stimulus-modulated low-frequency oscillation signals in the rat visual cortex. The stimulation was presented monocularly as a flashing light with different frequencies and intensities. The phases of low-frequency oscillations in different regions tended to be synchronized and the rhythms typically accelerated within a 30-s period after stimulation. These phenomena were confined to visual stimuli with specific flashing frequencies (12.5-17.5 Hz) and intensities (5-10 mA). The acceleration and synchronization induced by the flashing frequency were more marked than those induced by the intensity. These results show that spontaneous low-frequency oscillations can be modulated by parameter-dependent flashing lights and indicate the potential utility of the visual stimulus paradigm in exploring the origin and function of low-frequency oscillations.

  12. Smoothly Modulated Frequency-Bounded Impulse Signals for Tomography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    450 500 x105 250 Hz carrier, 4 cycle/digit, 86 deg. M-sequence ( b ) 3 .5 ., " 3- 2.5 S 2- 0 0.5 2 1 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500...a) shows the smooth sine squared envelope one gets if the modulation angle is tan-’(vf(1023)), about 88.2 degrees, while ( b ) shows the result for 86...2 1.5 0.5 0 C 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 x10 4 250 Hz carrier. 3 cycle/digit filtered M-sequence ( b ) 4 3.5 3- C 2.5_ i S 2- 1.5 0řI0

  13. Optical Reflection Measurement System Using A Swept Modulation Frequency Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, David M.; Leyde, Kent W.

    1989-03-01

    A measurement system has been developed capable of mea-suring reflected optical power as low as 0.0025% with a spot size diam-eter of 24 Am. One application for this system is the characterization of small-area photodetectors. The operation of the measurement system is simple, allowing the operator to quickly make multiple reflection measurements, and it does not require a darkroom. The measurement system merges a microscope, for visual alignment and focusing of the laser beam, with a lightwave component analyzer using modulation vec-tor error correction. A measurement comparison between the analyzer-based system and a power-meter-based system showed that each sys-tem can measure reflections as low as 0.0025%. However, the analyzer-based system offers the advantage of identifying the location and magnitude of system reflections. The system operates at a wavelength of 1310 nm.

  14. Nonlinear cavity dumping of a high finesse frequency mixing module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Andersen, Martin T.; Johansson, Sandra; Canalias, Carlota; Laurell, Fredrik; Buchhave, Preben; Karamehmedovic, Emir; Pedersen, Christian

    2007-07-01

    We present a novel generic approach for pulsed light generation in the visible spectrum. We demonstrate how the circulating field of a high finesse laser can be efficiently cavity dumped through sum-frequency mixing with externally injected high peak power single pass pulses. Periodically poled KTP is used as the nonlinear medium to minimize the peak power requirement of the injected beam. The experimental setup consists of a high finesse 1342 nm Nd:YVO4 laser cavity and a passively Qswitched Nd:YAG laser. Yellow pulses at 593 nm are generated.

  15. Slow light enhanced atomic frequency comb quantum memories in photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chenzhi; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Yidong; Peng, Jiangde

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a slow light-enhanced quantum memory with high efficiency based on atomic frequency comb (AFC) in ion-doped photonic crystal waveguide (PCW). The performance of the quantum memory is investigated theoretically, considering the impact of the signal bandwidth. Both the forward and backward retrieval schemes are analyzed. In the forward retrieval scheme, the analysis shows that a moderate slow light effect can improve the retrieval efficiency to above 50% with very high fidelity, even when the intrinsic optical depth is very low and the signal bandwidth is comparable with the AFC bandwidth. In the backward retrieval scheme, retrieval efficiency larger than 90% can be obtained and fidelity can remain above 90% for signal with bandwidth much narrower than AFC bandwidth, when moderate slow light is introduced into waveguide with low intrinsic optical depth. Although the phase mismatching effect limits the slow light enhancement on retrieval efficiency and decreases the fidelity for signal with bandwidth approaching AFC bandwidth, we design a modified atomic frequency comb structure (MAFC) based on which a moderate slow light can make the retrieval efficiency larger than 85% and keep the fidelity above 80%. Our calculations show that the proposed scheme provides a promising way to realize high efficiency on-chip quantum memory.

  16. Responses of Middle-Frequency Modulations in Vocal Fundamental Frequency to Different Vocal Intensities and Auditory Feedback.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shao-Hsuan; Fang, Tuan-Jen; Yu, Jen-Fang; Lee, Guo-She

    2017-09-01

    Auditory feedback can make reflexive responses on sustained vocalizations. Among them, the middle-frequency power of F0 (MFP) may provide a sensitive index to access the subtle changes in different auditory feedback conditions. Phonatory airflow temperature was obtained from 20 healthy adults at two vocal intensity ranges under four auditory feedback conditions: (1) natural auditory feedback (NO); (2) binaural speech noise masking (SN); (3) bone-conducted feedback of self-generated voice (BAF); and (4) SN and BAF simultaneously. The modulations of F0 in low-frequency (0.2 Hz-3 Hz), middle-frequency (3 Hz-8 Hz), and high-frequency (8 Hz-25 Hz) bands were acquired using power spectral analysis of F0. Acoustic and aerodynamic analyses were used to acquire vocal intensity, maximum phonation time (MPT), phonatory airflow, and MFP-based vocal efficiency (MBVE). SN and high vocal intensity decreased MFP and raised MBVE and MPT significantly. BAF showed no effect on MFP but significantly lowered MBVE. Moreover, BAF significantly increased the perception of voice feedback and the sensation of vocal effort. Altered auditory feedback significantly changed the middle-frequency modulations of F0. MFP and MBVE could well detect these subtle responses of audio-vocal feedback. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Composition-Modulated Two-Dimensional Semiconductor Lateral Heterostructures via Layer-Selected Atomic Substitution.

    PubMed

    Li, Honglai; Wu, Xueping; Liu, Hongjun; Zheng, Biyuan; Zhang, Qinglin; Zhu, Xiaoli; Wei, Zheng; Zhuang, Xiujuan; Zhou, Hong; Tang, Wenxin; Duan, Xiangfeng; Pan, Anlian

    2017-01-24

    Composition-controlled growth of two-dimensional layered semiconductor heterostructures is crucially important for their applications in multifunctional integrated photonics and optoelectronics devices. Here, we report the realization of composition completely modulated layered semiconductor MoS2-MoS2(1-x)Se2x (0 < x < 1) lateral heterostructures via the controlled layer-selected atomic substitution of pregrown stacking MoS2, with a bilayer located at the center of a monolayer. Through controlling the reaction time, S at the monolayer MoS2 at the peripheral area can be selectively substituted by Se atoms at different levels, while the bilayer region at the center retains the original composition. Microstructure characterizations demonstrated the formation of lateral heterostructures with a sharp interface, with the composition at the monolayer area gradually modulated from MoS2 to MoSe2 and having high-quality crystallization at both the monolayer and the bilayer areas. Photoluminescence and Raman mapping studies exhibit the tunable optical properties only at the monolayer region of the as-grown heterostructures, which further demonstrates the realization of high-quality composition/bandgap modulated lateral heterostructures. This work offers an interesting and easy route for the development of high-quality layered semiconductor heterostructures for potential broad applications in integrated nanoelectronic and optoelectronic devices.

  18. Polarisation response of delay dependent absorption modulation in strong field dressed helium atoms probed near threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, E. R.; Sanchez-Gonzalez, A.; Austin, D. R.; Diveki, Z.; Hutchinson, S. E. E.; Siegel, T.; Ruberti, M.; Averbukh, V.; Miseikis, L.; Strüber, C. S.; Chipperfield, L.; Marangos, J. P.

    2016-08-01

    We present the first measurement of the vectorial response of strongly dressed helium atoms probed by an attosecond pulse train (APT) polarised either parallel or perpendicular to the dressing field polarisation. The transient absorption is probed as a function of delay between the APT and the linearly polarised 800 nm field of peak intensity 1.3× {10}14 {{W}} {{cm}}-2. The APT spans the photon energy range 16-42 eV, covering the first ionisation energy of helium (24.59 eV). With parallel polarised dressing and probing fields, we observe modulations with periods of one half and one quarter of the dressing field period. When the polarisation of the dressing field is altered from parallel to perpendicular with respect to the APT polarisation we observe a large suppression in the modulation depth of the above ionisation threshold absorption. In addition to this we present the intensity dependence of the harmonic modulation depth as a function of delay between the dressing and probe fields, with dressing field peak intensities ranging from 2 × 1012 to 2 × 1014 {{W}} {{cm}}-2. We compare our experimental results with a full-dimensional solution of the single-atom time-dependent (TD) Schrödinger equation obtained using the recently developed abinitio TD B-spline ADC method and find good qualitative agreement for the above threshold harmonics.

  19. Measurement of the 4 S1 /2→6 S1 /2 transition frequency in atomic potassium via direct frequency-comb spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stalnaker, J. E.; Ayer, H. M. G.; Baron, J. H.; Nuñez, A.; Rowan, M. E.

    2017-07-01

    We present an experimental determination of the 4 S1 /2→6 S1 /2 transition frequency in atomic potassium 39K, using direct frequency-comb spectroscopy. The output of a stabilized optical frequency comb was used to excite a thermal atomic vapor. The repetition rate of the frequency comb was scanned and the transitions were excited using stepwise two-photon excitation. The center-of-gravity frequency for the transition was found to be νcog=822 951 698.09 (13 ) MHz and the measured hyperfine A coefficient of the 6 S1 /2 state was 21.93 (11 ) MHz. The measurements are in agreement with previous values and represent an improvement by a factor of 700 in the uncertainty of the center-of-gravity measurement.

  20. Volitional exaggeration of body size through fundamental and formant frequency modulation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Pisanski, Katarzyna; Mora, Emanuel C.; Pisanski, Annette; Reby, David; Sorokowski, Piotr; Frackowiak, Tomasz; Feinberg, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Several mammalian species scale their voice fundamental frequency (F0) and formant frequencies in competitive and mating contexts, reducing vocal tract and laryngeal allometry thereby exaggerating apparent body size. Although humans’ rare capacity to volitionally modulate these same frequencies is thought to subserve articulated speech, the potential function of voice frequency modulation in human nonverbal communication remains largely unexplored. Here, the voices of 167 men and women from Canada, Cuba, and Poland were recorded in a baseline condition and while volitionally imitating a physically small and large body size. Modulation of F0, formant spacing (∆F), and apparent vocal tract length (VTL) were measured using Praat. Our results indicate that men and women spontaneously and systemically increased VTL and decreased F0 to imitate a large body size, and reduced VTL and increased F0 to imitate small size. These voice modulations did not differ substantially across cultures, indicating potentially universal sound-size correspondences or anatomical and biomechanical constraints on voice modulation. In each culture, men generally modulated their voices (particularly formants) more than did women. This latter finding could help to explain sexual dimorphism in F0 and formants that is currently unaccounted for by sexual dimorphism in human vocal anatomy and body size. PMID:27687571

  1. Space-Charge Modulation in Vacuum Microdiodes at THz Frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersen, Andreas; Manolescu, Andrei; Valfells, Agust

    2010-04-30

    We investigate the dynamics of a space-charge limited, photoinjected, electron beam in a microscopic vacuum diode. Because of the small nature of the system it is possible to conduct high-resolution simulations where the number of simulated particles is equal to the number of electrons within the system. In a series of simulations of molecular dynamics type, where electrons are treated as point charges, we address and analyze space-charge effects in a micrometer-scale vacuum diode. We have been able to reproduce breakup of a single pulse injected with a current density beyond the Child-Langmuir limit, and we find that continuous injection of current into the diode gap results in a well-defined train of electron bunches corresponding to THz frequency. A simple analytical explanation of this behavior is given.

  2. Superconducting radio-frequency modules test faciilty operating experience

    SciTech Connect

    Soyars, W.; Bossert, R.; Darve, C.; Degraff, B.; Klebaner, A.; Martinez, A.; Pei, L.; Theilacker, J.; /Fermilab

    2007-07-01

    Fermilab is heavily engaged and making strong technical contributions to the superconducting radio-frequency research and development program (SRF R&D). Four major SRF test areas are being constructed to enable vertical and horizontal cavity testing, as well as cryomodule testing. The existing Fermilab cryogenic infrastructure has been modified to service Fermilab SRF R&D needs. The first stage of the project has been successfully completed, which allows for distribution of cryogens for a single cavity cryomodule using the existing Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF) that houses three Tevatron satellite refrigerators. The cooling capacity available for cryomodule testing at MDB results from the liquefaction capacity of the CTF cryogenic system. The cryogenic system for a single 9-cell cryomodule is currently operational. The paper describes the status, challenges and operational experience of the initial phase of the project.

  3. Tip radius preservation for high resolution imaging in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos, Jorge R.

    2014-07-28

    The acquisition of high resolution images in atomic force microscopy (AFM) is correlated to the cantilever's tip shape, size, and imaging conditions. In this work, relative tip wear is quantified based on the evolution of a direct experimental observable in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy, i.e., the critical amplitude. We further show that the scanning parameters required to guarantee a maximum compressive stress that is lower than the yield/fracture stress of the tip can be estimated via experimental observables. In both counts, the optimized parameters to acquire AFM images while preserving the tip are discussed. The results are validated experimentally by employing IgG antibodies as a model system.

  4. Task-induced frequency modulation features for brain-computer interfacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaram, Vinay; Hohmann, Matthias; Just, Jennifer; Schölkopf, Bernhard; Grosse-Wentrup, Moritz

    2017-10-01

    Objective. Task-induced amplitude modulation of neural oscillations is routinely used in brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) for decoding subjects’ intents, and underlies some of the most robust and common methods in the field, such as common spatial patterns and Riemannian geometry. While there has been some interest in phase-related features for classification, both techniques usually presuppose that the frequencies of neural oscillations remain stable across various tasks. We investigate here whether features based on task-induced modulation of the frequency of neural oscillations enable decoding of subjects’ intents with an accuracy comparable to task-induced amplitude modulation. Approach. We compare cross-validated classification accuracies using the amplitude and frequency modulated features, as well as a joint feature space, across subjects in various paradigms and pre-processing conditions. We show results with a motor imagery task, a cognitive task, and also preliminary results in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), as well as using common spatial patterns and Laplacian filtering. Main results. The frequency features alone do not significantly out-perform traditional amplitude modulation features, and in some cases perform significantly worse. However, across both tasks and pre-processing in healthy subjects the joint space significantly out-performs either the frequency or amplitude features alone. This result only does not hold for ALS patients, for whom the dataset is of insufficient size to draw any statistically significant conclusions. Significance. Task-induced frequency modulation is robust and straight forward to compute, and increases performance when added to standard amplitude modulation features across paradigms. This allows more information to be extracted from the EEG signal cheaply and can be used throughout the field of BCIs.

  5. Development of a frequency-modulated ultrasonic sensor inspired by bat echolocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepa, Krzysztof; Abaid, Nicole

    2015-03-01

    Bats have evolved to sense using ultrasonic signals with a variety of different frequency signatures which interact with their environment. Among these signals, those with time-varying frequencies may enable the animals to gather more complex information for obstacle avoidance and target tracking. Taking inspiration from this system, we present the development of a sonar sensor capable of generating frequency-modulated ultrasonic signals. The device is based on a miniature mobile computer, with on board data capture and processing capabilities, which is designed for eventual autonomous operation in a robotic swarm. The hardware and software components of the sensor are detailed, as well their integration. Preliminary results for target detection using both frequency-modulated and constant frequency signals are discussed.

  6. Trimming algorithm of frequency modulation for CIAE-230 MeV proton superconducting synchrocyclotron model cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengzhan; Zhang, Tianjue; Ji, Bin; Hou, Shigang; Guo, Juanjuan; Yin, Meng; Xing, Jiansheng; Lv, Yinlong; Guan, Fengping; Lin, Jun

    2017-01-01

    A new project, the 230 MeV proton superconducting synchrocyclotron for cancer therapy, was proposed at CIAE in 2013. A model cavity is designed to verify the frequency modulation trimming algorithm featuring a half-wave structure and eight sets of rotating blades for 1 kHz frequency modulation. Based on the electromagnetic (EM) field distribution analysis of the model cavity, the variable capacitor works as a function of time and the frequency can be written in Maclaurin series. Curve fitting is applied for theoretical frequency and original simulation frequency. The second-order fitting excels at the approximation given its minimum variance. Constant equivalent inductance is considered as an important condition in the calculation. The equivalent parameters of theoretical frequency can be achieved through this conversion. Then the trimming formula for rotor blade outer radius is found by discretization in time domain. Simulation verification has been performed and the results show that the calculation radius with minus 0.012 m yields an acceptable result. The trimming amendment in the time range of 0.328-0.4 ms helps to reduce the frequency error to 0.69% in Simulation C with an increment of 0.075 mm/0.001 ms, which is half of the error in Simulation A (constant radius in 0.328-0.4 ms). The verification confirms the feasibility of the trimming algorithm for synchrocyclotron frequency modulation.

  7. Gigahertz Optomechanical Modulation by Split-Ring-Resonator Nanophotonic Meta-Atom Arrays.

    PubMed

    Imade, Yuta; Ulbricht, Ronald; Tomoda, Motonobu; Matsuda, Osamu; Seniutinas, Gediminas; Juodkazis, Saulius; Wright, Oliver B

    2017-10-05

    Using polarization-resolved transient reflection spectroscopy, we investigate a metasurface consisting of coherently vibrating nanophotonic U-shaped split-ring meta-atoms that exhibit colocalized optical and mechanical resonances. With an array of these resonators formed of gold on glass, essentially miniature tuning forks, we monitor the visible-pump induced gigahertz oscillations in reflected infrared light intensity to probe the multimodal vibrational response. Numerical simulations of the associated transient deformations and strain fields elucidate the complex nanomechanical dynamics contributing to the ultrafast optical modulation and point to the role of acousto-plasmonic interactions through the opening and closing motion of the SRR gaps as the dominant effect. Applications include ultrafast acoustooptic modulator design and sensing.

  8. High-Speed Frequency Modulation of a 460-GHz Gyrotron for Enhancement of 700-MHz DNP-NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idehara, T.; Khutoryan, E. M.; Tatematsu, Y.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Kuleshov, A. N.; Dumbrajs, O.; Matsuki, Y.; Fujiwara, T.

    2015-09-01

    The high-speed frequency modulation of a 460-GHz Gyrotron FU CW GVI (the official name in Osaka University is Gyrotron FU CW GOI) was achieved by modulation of acceleration voltage of beam electrons. The modulation speed f m can be increased up to 10 kHz without decreasing the modulation amplitude δ f of frequency. The amplitude δ f was increased almost linearly with the modulation amplitude of acceleration voltage Δ V a. At the Δ V a = 1 kV, frequency spectrum width df was 50 MHz in the case of f m < 10 kHz. The frequency modulation was observed as both the variation of the IF frequency in the heterodyne detection system measured by a high-speed oscilloscope and the widths of frequency spectra df measured on a frequency spectrum analyzer. Both results well agree reasonably. When f m exceeds 10 kHz, the amplitude δ f is decreased gradually with increasing f m because of the degradation of the used amplifier in response for high-speed modulation. The experiment was performed successfully for both a sinusoidal wave and triangle wave modulations. We can use the high-speed frequency modulation for increasing the enhancement factor of the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, which is one of effective and attractive methods for the high-frequency DNP-NMR spectroscopy, for example, at 700 MHz. Because the sensitivity of NMR is inversely proportional to the frequency, high-speed frequency modulation can compensate the decreasing the enhancement factor in the high-frequency DNP-NMR spectroscopy and keep the factor at high value. In addition, the high-speed frequency modulation is useful for frequency stabilization by a PID control of an acceleration voltage by feeding back of the fluctuation of frequency. The frequency stabilization in long time is also useful for application of a DNP-NMR spectroscopy to the analysis of complicated protein molecules.

  9. Push-pull laser-atomic oscillator.

    PubMed

    Jau, Y-Y; Happer, W

    2007-11-30

    A vapor of alkali-metal atoms in the external cavity of a semiconductor laser, pumped with a time-independent injection current, can cause the laser to self-modulate at the "field-independent 0-0 frequency" of the atoms. Push-pull optical pumping by the modulated light drives most of the atoms into a coherent superposition of the two atomic sublevels with an azimuthal quantum number m=0. The atoms modulate the optical loss of the cavity at the sharply defined 0-0 hyperfine frequency. As in a maser, the system is not driven by an external source of microwaves, but a very stable microwave signal can be recovered from the modulated light or from the modulated voltage drop across the laser diode. Potential applications for this new phenomenon include atomic clocks, the production of long-lived coherent atomic states, and the generation of coherent optical combs.

  10. Push-Pull Laser-Atomic Oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Jau, Y.-Y.; Happer, W.

    2007-11-30

    A vapor of alkali-metal atoms in the external cavity of a semiconductor laser, pumped with a time-independent injection current, can cause the laser to self-modulate at the 'field-independent 0-0 frequency' of the atoms. Push-pull optical pumping by the modulated light drives most of the atoms into a coherent superposition of the two atomic sublevels with an azimuthal quantum number m=0. The atoms modulate the optical loss of the cavity at the sharply defined 0-0 hyperfine frequency. As in a maser, the system is not driven by an external source of microwaves, but a very stable microwave signal can be recovered from the modulated light or from the modulated voltage drop across the laser diode. Potential applications for this new phenomenon include atomic clocks, the production of long-lived coherent atomic states, and the generation of coherent optical combs.

  11. Frequency control of tunable lasers using a frequency-calibrated λ-meter in an experiment on preparation of Rydberg atoms in a magneto-optical trap

    SciTech Connect

    Saakyan, S A; Vilshanskaya, E V; Zelener, B B; Zelener, B V; Sautenkov, V A; Vasiliev, V V

    2015-09-30

    A new technique is proposed and applied to study the frequency drift of an external-cavity semiconductor laser, locked to the transmission resonances of a thermally stabilised Fabry–Perot interferometer. The interferometer frequency drift is measured to be less than 2 MHz h{sup -1}. The laser frequency is measured using an Angstrom wavemeter, calibrated using an additional stabilised laser. It is shown that this system of laser frequency control can be used to identify Rydberg transitions in ultracold {sup 7}Li atoms. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  12. Chip Scale Atomic Resonator Frequency Stabilization System With Ultra-Low Power Consumption for Optoelectronic Oscillators.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianye; Zhang, Yaolin; Lu, Haoyuan; Hou, Dong; Zhang, Shuangyou; Wang, Zhong

    2016-07-01

    We present a long-term chip scale stabilization scheme for optoelectronic oscillators (OEOs) based on a rubidium coherent population trapping (CPT) atomic resonator. By locking a single mode of an OEO to the (85)Rb 3.035-GHz CPT resonance utilizing an improved phase-locked loop (PLL) with a PID regulator, we achieved a chip scale frequency stabilization system for the OEO. The fractional frequency stability of the stabilized OEO by overlapping Allan deviation reaches 6.2 ×10(-11) (1 s) and  ∼ 1.45 ×10 (-11) (1000 s). This scheme avoids a decrease in the extra phase noise performance induced by the electronic connection between the OEO and the microwave reference in common injection locking schemes. The total physical package of the stabilization system is [Formula: see text] and the total power consumption is 400 mW, which provides a chip scale and portable frequency stabilization approach with ultra-low power consumption for OEOs.

  13. High-speed switching of biphoton delays through electro-optic pump frequency modulation

    DOE PAGES

    Odele, Ogaga D.; Lukens, Joseph M.; Jaramillo-Villegas, Jose A.; ...

    2016-12-08

    The realization of high-speed tunable delay control has received significant attention in the scene of classical photonics. In quantum optics, however, such rapid delay control systems for entangled photons have remained undeveloped. Here for the first time, we demonstrate rapid (2.5 MHz) modulation of signal-idler arrival times through electro-optic pump frequency modulation. Our technique applies the quantum phenomenon of nonlocal dispersion cancellation along with pump frequency tuning to control the relative delay between photon pairs. Chirped fiber Bragg gratings are employed to provide large amounts of dispersion which result in biphoton delays exceeding 30 ns. This rapid delay modulation schememore » could be useful for on-demand single-photon distribution in addition to quantum versions of pulse position modulation.« less

  14. Theoretical optimal modulation frequencies for scattering parameter estimation and ballistic photon filtering in diffusing media.

    PubMed

    Panigrahi, Swapnesh; Fade, Julien; Ramachandran, Hema; Alouini, Mehdi

    2016-07-11

    The efficiency of using intensity modulated light for the estimation of scattering properties of a turbid medium and for ballistic photon discrimination is theoretically quantified in this article. Using the diffusion model for modulated photon transport and considering a noisy quadrature demodulation scheme, the minimum-variance bounds on estimation of parameters of interest are analytically derived and analyzed. The existence of a variance-minimizing optimal modulation frequency is shown and its evolution with the properties of the intervening medium is derived and studied. Furthermore, a metric is defined to quantify the efficiency of ballistic photon filtering which may be sought when imaging through turbid media. The analytical derivation of this metric shows that the minimum modulation frequency required to attain significant ballistic discrimination depends only on the reduced scattering coefficient of the medium in a linear fashion for a highly scattering medium.

  15. Photonic generation of versatile frequency-doubled microwave waveforms via a dual-polarization modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zihang; Zhao, Shanghong; Li, Xuan; Qu, Kun; Lin, Tao

    2017-02-01

    We report a photonic approach to generate frequency-doubled microwave waveforms using an integrated electro-optic dual-polarization modulator driven by a sinusoidal radio frequency (RF) signal. With active bias control, two MZMs of the dual-polarization modulator operate at minimum transmission points, a triangular waveform can be generated by a parameter setting of modulation index. After introducing a broadband 90° microwave phase shifter, a square waveform can be obtained by readjusting the power relationship of harmonics. The proposal is first theoretically analyzed and then validated by simulation. Simulation results show that a 10 GHz triangular and square waveform sequences are successfully generated from a 5 GHz sinusoidal RF drive signal, and the performance of the microwave waveforms are not influenced by the finite extinction ratio of modulator.

  16. High-speed switching of biphoton delays through electro-optic pump frequency modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odele, Ogaga D.; Lukens, Joseph M.; Jaramillo-Villegas, Jose A.; Imany, Poolad; Langrock, Carsten; Fejer, Martin M.; Leaird, Daniel E.; Weiner, Andrew M.

    2017-01-01

    The realization of high-speed tunable delay control has received significant attention in the scene of classical photonics. In quantum optics, however, such rapid delay control systems for entangled photons have remained undeveloped. Here for the first time, we demonstrate rapid (2.5 MHz) modulation of signal-idler arrival times through electro-optic pump frequency modulation. Our technique applies the quantum phenomenon of nonlocal dispersion cancellation along with pump frequency tuning to control the relative delay between photon pairs. Chirped fiber Bragg gratings are employed to provide large amounts of dispersion which result in biphoton delays exceeding 30 ns. This rapid delay modulation scheme could be useful for on-demand single-photon distribution in addition to quantum versions of pulse position modulation.

  17. Analytical application of 2f-wavelength modulation for isotope selective diode laser graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wizemann, H D

    2000-01-01

    Experiences in the analytical application of the 2f-wavelength modulation technique for isotope selective atomic absorption spectroscopy in a graphite furnace are reported. Experimental as well as calculated results are presented, mainly for the natural lithium isotopes. Sensitivity, linearity, and (isotope) selectivity are studied by intensity modulation and wavelength modulation. High selectivities can be attained, however, on the cost of detection power. It is shown that the method enables the measurement of lithium isotope ratios larger than 2000 by absorption in a low-pressure graphite tube atomizer.

  18. [Pain relief by low-intensity frequency-modulated millimeter waves acting on the acupuncture points].

    PubMed

    Samosiuk, I Z; Kulikovich, Iu N; Tamarova, Z A; Samosiuk, N I; Kazhanova, A K

    2000-01-01

    Analgetic effect of low-intensive frequency-modulated millimetric waves (MW) was studied in mice with formalin induced nociceptive behavior reaction (licking of defeat hindpaw). MW were applied to the acupoint E 36 of the defeat hindpaw. The following MW were used: 60 GHz (1) and 118 GHz (2) which were modulated by 4 Hz; noise MW within the range of 42-95 GHz (3) and 90-140 GHz (4) which were modulated in accidental order by frequencies 1-60 Hz; combinations of fixed frequencies with noise - 60 GHz + noise 42-95 GHz (5) and 118 GHz + noise 90-140 GHz (6). All used MW combinations suppressed licking of the defeat hindpaw and increased duration of sleep and eating. The strongest analgesia was achieved in series 1-3 (42.4-69.7%), the weakest in series 6 and 4 of the experiment (12.2-19.7%).

  19. Improvement of flatness of optical frequency comb based on nonlinear effect of intensity modulator.

    PubMed

    Dou, Yujie; Zhang, Hongming; Yao, Minyu

    2011-07-15

    Optical frequency comb (OFC) generated using cascaded intensity and phase modulators was experimentally demonstrated. Very flat OFC can be achieved by cascading intensity and phase modulators driven directly by sinusoidal waveform, where chirped fiber Bragg grating or specially tailored radio frequency waveforms are not required. It is found that the spectral flatness of OFC is related to direct current (DC) bias of intensity modulator and the optimum ratio of DC bias to half-wave voltage is 0.35. In the experiment, 15 comb lines within 1 dB spectral power variation are obtained at 10 GHz microwave frequency. The experimental results agree well with the simulation. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  20. Pain modulation induced by respiration: phase and frequency effects.

    PubMed

    Arsenault, Marianne; Ladouceur, Alexandra; Lehmann, Alexandre; Rainville, Pierre; Piché, Mathieu

    2013-11-12

    The voluntary control of respiration is used as a common means to regulate pain and emotions and is fundamental to various relaxation and meditation techniques. The aim of the present study was to examine how breathing frequency and phase affect pain perception, spinal nociceptive activity (RIII-reflex) and brain activity (scalp somatosensory-evoked potentials - SEP's). In 20 healthy volunteers, painful electric shocks individually adjusted to 120% of the RIII-reflex threshold were delivered to the sural nerve near the end of inspiration or expiration phases, during three cued-breathing conditions: (1) slow breathing (0.1 Hz) with slow (4s) inspiration (0.1Hz-SlowIns), (2) slow breathing (0.1 Hz) with fast (2s) inspiration (0.1 Hz-FastIns), and (3) normal breathing (0.2 Hz) with fast (2s) inspiration (0.2 Hz). Pain ratings were not affected by breathing patterns (p=0.3), but were significantly lower during inspiration compared with expiration (p=0.02). This phase effect was also observed on the N100 component of SEP's, but only in the 0.1-Hz-FastIns condition (p=0.03). In contrast, RIII-reflex amplitude was greater during inspiration compared with expiration (p=0.02). It was also decreased in the 0.1-Hz-SlowIns compared with the 0.2-Hz condition (p=0.01). Slow breathing also increased the amplitude of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), although these changes were not significantly associated with changes in pain responses. In conclusion, this study shows that pain and pain-related brain activity may be reduced during inspiration but these changes are dissociated from spinal nociceptive transmission. The small amplitude of these effects suggests that factors other than respiration contribute to the analgesic effects of relaxation and meditation techniques.