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Sample records for frequency modulation atomic

  1. Autopilot for frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kuchuk, Kfir; Schlesinger, Itai; Sivan, Uri

    2015-10-01

    One of the most challenging aspects of operating an atomic force microscope (AFM) is finding optimal feedback parameters. This statement applies particularly to frequency-modulation AFM (FM-AFM), which utilizes three feedback loops to control the cantilever excitation amplitude, cantilever excitation frequency, and z-piezo extension. These loops are regulated by a set of feedback parameters, tuned by the user to optimize stability, sensitivity, and noise in the imaging process. Optimization of these parameters is difficult due to the coupling between the frequency and z-piezo feedback loops by the non-linear tip-sample interaction. Four proportional-integral (PI) parameters and two lock-in parameters regulating these loops require simultaneous optimization in the presence of a varying unknown tip-sample coupling. Presently, this optimization is done manually in a tedious process of trial and error. Here, we report on the development and implementation of an algorithm that computes the control parameters automatically. The algorithm reads the unperturbed cantilever resonance frequency, its quality factor, and the z-piezo driving signal power spectral density. It analyzes the poles and zeros of the total closed loop transfer function, extracts the unknown tip-sample transfer function, and finds four PI parameters and two lock-in parameters for the frequency and z-piezo control loops that optimize the bandwidth and step response of the total system. Implementation of the algorithm in a home-built AFM shows that the calculated parameters are consistently excellent and rarely require further tweaking by the user. The new algorithm saves the precious time of experienced users, facilitates utilization of FM-AFM by casual users, and removes the main hurdle on the way to fully automated FM-AFM.

  2. Autopilot for frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchuk, Kfir; Schlesinger, Itai; Sivan, Uri

    2015-10-01

    One of the most challenging aspects of operating an atomic force microscope (AFM) is finding optimal feedback parameters. This statement applies particularly to frequency-modulation AFM (FM-AFM), which utilizes three feedback loops to control the cantilever excitation amplitude, cantilever excitation frequency, and z-piezo extension. These loops are regulated by a set of feedback parameters, tuned by the user to optimize stability, sensitivity, and noise in the imaging process. Optimization of these parameters is difficult due to the coupling between the frequency and z-piezo feedback loops by the non-linear tip-sample interaction. Four proportional-integral (PI) parameters and two lock-in parameters regulating these loops require simultaneous optimization in the presence of a varying unknown tip-sample coupling. Presently, this optimization is done manually in a tedious process of trial and error. Here, we report on the development and implementation of an algorithm that computes the control parameters automatically. The algorithm reads the unperturbed cantilever resonance frequency, its quality factor, and the z-piezo driving signal power spectral density. It analyzes the poles and zeros of the total closed loop transfer function, extracts the unknown tip-sample transfer function, and finds four PI parameters and two lock-in parameters for the frequency and z-piezo control loops that optimize the bandwidth and step response of the total system. Implementation of the algorithm in a home-built AFM shows that the calculated parameters are consistently excellent and rarely require further tweaking by the user. The new algorithm saves the precious time of experienced users, facilitates utilization of FM-AFM by casual users, and removes the main hurdle on the way to fully automated FM-AFM.

  3. Autopilot for frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchuk, Kfir; Schlesinger, Itai; Sivan, Uri

    2015-10-15

    One of the most challenging aspects of operating an atomic force microscope (AFM) is finding optimal feedback parameters. This statement applies particularly to frequency-modulation AFM (FM-AFM), which utilizes three feedback loops to control the cantilever excitation amplitude, cantilever excitation frequency, and z-piezo extension. These loops are regulated by a set of feedback parameters, tuned by the user to optimize stability, sensitivity, and noise in the imaging process. Optimization of these parameters is difficult due to the coupling between the frequency and z-piezo feedback loops by the non-linear tip-sample interaction. Four proportional-integral (PI) parameters and two lock-in parameters regulating these loops require simultaneous optimization in the presence of a varying unknown tip-sample coupling. Presently, this optimization is done manually in a tedious process of trial and error. Here, we report on the development and implementation of an algorithm that computes the control parameters automatically. The algorithm reads the unperturbed cantilever resonance frequency, its quality factor, and the z-piezo driving signal power spectral density. It analyzes the poles and zeros of the total closed loop transfer function, extracts the unknown tip-sample transfer function, and finds four PI parameters and two lock-in parameters for the frequency and z-piezo control loops that optimize the bandwidth and step response of the total system. Implementation of the algorithm in a home-built AFM shows that the calculated parameters are consistently excellent and rarely require further tweaking by the user. The new algorithm saves the precious time of experienced users, facilitates utilization of FM-AFM by casual users, and removes the main hurdle on the way to fully automated FM-AFM.

  4. Time-of-flight detection of ultra-cold atoms using resonant frequency modulation imaging.

    PubMed

    Hardman, K S; Wigley, P B; Everitt, P J; Manju, P; Kuhn, C C N; Robins, N P

    2016-06-01

    Resonant frequency modulation imaging is used to detect free falling ultra-cold atoms. A theoretical comparison of fluorescence imaging (FI) and frequency modulation imaging (FMI) is made, indicating that for low optical depth clouds, FMI accomplished a higher signal-to-noise ratio under conditions necessary for a 200 μm spatially resolved atom interferometer. A 750 ms time-of-flight measurement reveals near atom shot-noise limited number measurements of 2×106 Bose-condensed Rb87 atoms. The detection system is applied to high precision spinor BEC based atom interferometer.

  5. Noncontact microrheology at acoustic frequencies using frequency-modulated atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gavara, Núria; Chadwick, Richard S

    2010-08-01

    We report an atomic force microscopy (AFM) method for assessing elastic and viscous properties of soft samples at acoustic frequencies under non-contact conditions. The method can be used to measure material properties via frequency modulation and is based on hydrodynamics theory of thin gaps we developed here. A cantilever with an attached microsphere is forced to oscillate tens of nanometers above a sample. The elastic modulus and viscosity of the sample are estimated by measuring the frequency-dependence of the phase lag between the oscillating microsphere and the driving piezo at various heights above the sample. This method features an effective area of pyramidal tips used in contact AFM but with only piconewton applied forces. Using this method, we analyzed polyacrylamide gels of different stiffness and assessed graded mechanical properties of guinea pig tectorial membrane. The technique enables the study of microrheology of biological tissues that produce or detect sound.

  6. General theory of frequency modulated selective reflection. Influence of atom surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducloy, M.; Fichet, M.

    1991-12-01

    We calculate the modulation of the reflection coefficient for a frequency-modulated (FM) light beam incident on the interface between a dielectric and an atomic vapor. The vapor is described as a gas of resonant, Doppler-broadened, two-level systems, with transition frequency and linewidth arbitrarily depending on the atom-dielectric distance. The atoms are supposed to get deexcited at collisions with the surface. The transient atomic response is calculated to first order in the incident field, for both incoming and desorbed atoms. The reflection coefficient, evaluated to first order in the vapor dipole polarization, leads to a formal expression of the reflectivity modulation, valid for arbitrary atom-surface interaction potentials. One first discusses the reflection signal in absence of wall interactions, for arbitrary modulation frequencies. At large frequencies, it allows one to monitor both vapor absorption and dispersion. Second, the formal theory is applied to the case of a Van der Waals-London surface attraction exerted on the atomic vapor. Both normal and oblique beam incidences are considered. One shows how the vapor dispersion signal is red-shifted and strongly distorted by the appearance of vapor-surface long-range interactions, and how it can be used to monitor these interactions. At non-normal incidences, the lineshapes get Doppler-broadened. On calcule le coefficient de réflexion d'un faisceau lumineux, modulé en fréquence, incident sur une interface entre un milieu diélectrique et une vapeur atomique. Cette vapeur est décrite comme un ensemble de systèmes à deux niveaux, présentant un élargissement Doppler, et dont la fréquence de transition et la largeur de raie sont supposées dépendre de la distance au milieu diélectrique. On suppose par ailleurs que les atomes sont déexcités sur la paroi. La réponse transitoire des atomes est analysée au premier ordre en fonction du champ électromagnétique incident. Du coefficient de r

  7. Interaction of frequency modulated light pulses with rubidium atoms in a magneto-optical trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakos, J. S.; Djotyan, G. P.; Ignácz, P. N.; Kedves, M. Á.; Serényi, M.; Sörlei, Zs.; Szigeti, J.; Tóth, Z.

    2006-07-01

    The spatial displacement of the 85Rb atoms in a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT) under the influence of series of frequency modulated light pulse pairs propagating opposite to each other is measured as a function of the time elapsed after the start of the pulse train, and compared with the results of simulations. Adiabatic excitation and consecutive de-excitation take place between the ground 52S1/2 (F=3) and the 52P3/2 (F'=2, 3, 4) excited levels as the result of the interaction. The displacement of the 85Rb atoms is calculated as the solution of simple equation of motion where the expelling force is that arising from the action of the frequency modulated light pulses. The restoring and friction forces of the MOT are taken into account also. The system of Bloch equations for the density matrix elements is solved numerically for transitions between six working hyperfine levels of the atom interacting with the sequence of the frequency modulated laser pulses. According to these simulations, the momentum transferred by one pulse pair is always smaller than the expected 2ħk, (1) where ħ is the Plank constant and k=2π/λ where λ is the wavelength, (2) having a maximum value in a restricted region of variation of the laser pulse peak intensity and the chirp.

  8. Development of low noise cantilever deflection sensor for multienvironment frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuma, Takeshi; Kimura, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Kei; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2005-05-01

    We have developed a low noise cantilever deflection sensor with a deflection noise density of 17fm/√Hz by optimizing the parameters used in optical beam deflection (OBD) method. Using this sensor, we have developed a multienvironment frequency-modulation atomic force microscope (FM-AFM) that can achieve true molecular resolution in various environments such as in moderate vacuum, air, and liquid. The low noise characteristic of the deflection sensor makes it possible to obtain a maximum frequency sensitivity limited by the thermal Brownian motion of the cantilever in every environment. In this paper, the major noise sources in OBD method are discussed in both theoretical and experimental aspects. The excellent noise performance of the deflection sensor is demonstrated in deflection and frequency measurements. True molecular-resolution FM-AFM images of a polydiacetylene single crystal taken in vacuum, air, and water are presented.

  9. Development of low noise cantilever deflection sensor for multienvironment frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuma, Takeshi; Kimura, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Kei; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2005-05-15

    We have developed a low noise cantilever deflection sensor with a deflection noise density of 17 fm/{radical}(Hz) by optimizing the parameters used in optical beam deflection (OBD) method. Using this sensor, we have developed a multienvironment frequency-modulation atomic force microscope (FM-AFM) that can achieve true molecular resolution in various environments such as in moderate vacuum, air, and liquid. The low noise characteristic of the deflection sensor makes it possible to obtain a maximum frequency sensitivity limited by the thermal Brownian motion of the cantilever in every environment. In this paper, the major noise sources in OBD method are discussed in both theoretical and experimental aspects. The excellent noise performance of the deflection sensor is demonstrated in deflection and frequency measurements. True molecular-resolution FM-AFM images of a polydiacetylene single crystal taken in vacuum, air, and water are presented.

  10. Generating topological optical flux lattices for ultracold atoms by modulated Raman and radio-frequency couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jinlong; Xu, Zhi-Fang; You, Li

    2017-01-01

    We propose a scheme to dynamically generate optical flux lattices with nontrivial band topology using amplitude-modulated Raman lasers and radio-frequency (rf) magnetic fields. By tuning the strength of Raman and rf fields, three distinct phases are realized at unit filling for a unit cell. Respectively, these three phases correspond to normal insulator, topological Chern insulator, and semimetal. Nearly nondispersive bands are found to appear in the topological phase, which promises opportunities for investigating strongly correlated quantum states within a simple cold-atom setup. The validity of our proposal is confirmed by comparing the Floquet quasienergies from the evolution operator with the spectrum of the effective Hamiltonian.

  11. Water distribution at solid/liquid interfaces visualized by frequency modulation atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fukuma, Takeshi

    2010-01-01

    Interfacial phenomena at solid/water interfaces play an important role in a wide range of industrial technologies and biological processes. However, it has been a great challenge to directly probe the molecular-scale behavior of water at solid/water interfaces. Recently, there have been tremendous advancements in frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM), enabling its operation in liquids with atomic resolution. The high spatial and force resolutions of FM-AFM have enabled the visualization of one-dimensional (1D) profiles of the hydration force, two-dimensional (2D) images of hydration layers and three-dimensional (3D) images of the water distribution at solid/water interfaces. Here I present an overview of the recent advances in FM-AFM instrumentation and its applications to the study of solid/water interfaces. PMID:27877337

  12. Coherent cooling of atoms in a frequency-modulated standing laser wave: Wave function and stochastic trajectory approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Argonov, V. Yu.

    2014-11-15

    The wave function of a moderately cold atom in a stationary near-resonant standing light wave delocalizes very fast due to wave packet splitting. However, we show that frequency modulation of the field can suppress packet splitting for some atoms whose specific velocities are in a narrow range. These atoms remain localized in a small space for a long time. We demonstrate and explain this effect numerically and analytically. We also demonstrate that the modulated field can not only trap but also cool the atoms. We perform a numerical experiment with a large atomic ensemble having wide initial velocity and energy distributions. During the experiment, most of atoms leave the wave while the trapped atoms have a narrow energy distribution.

  13. Accurate formula for dissipative interaction in frequency modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi; Kobayashi, Kei; Labuda, Aleksander

    2014-12-08

    Much interest has recently focused on the viscosity of nano-confined liquids. Frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) is a powerful technique that can detect variations in the conservative and dissipative forces between a nanometer-scale tip and a sample surface. We now present an accurate formula to convert the dissipation power of the cantilever measured during the experiment to damping of the tip-sample system. We demonstrated the conversion of the dissipation power versus tip-sample separation curve measured using a colloidal probe cantilever on a mica surface in water to the damping curve, which showed a good agreement with the theoretical curve. Moreover, we obtained the damping curve from the dissipation power curve measured on the hydration layers on the mica surface using a nanometer-scale tip, demonstrating that the formula allows us to quantitatively measure the viscosity of a nano-confined liquid using FM-AFM.

  14. Frequency-modulated atomic force microscopy operation by imaging at the frequency shift minimum: The dip-df mode

    SciTech Connect

    Rode, Sebastian; Schreiber, Martin; Kühnle, Angelika; Rahe, Philipp

    2014-04-15

    In frequency modulated non-contact atomic force microscopy, the change of the cantilever frequency (Δf) is used as the input signal for the topography feedback loop. Around the Δf(z) minimum, however, stable feedback operation is challenging using a standard proportional-integral-derivative (PID) feedback design due to the change of sign in the slope. When operated under liquid conditions, it is furthermore difficult to address the attractive interaction regime due to its often moderate peakedness. Additionally, the Δf signal level changes severely with time in this environment due to drift of the cantilever frequency f{sub 0} and, thus, requires constant adjustment. Here, we present an approach overcoming these obstacles by using the derivative of Δf with respect to z as the input signal for the topography feedback loop. Rather than regulating the absolute value to a preset setpoint, the slope of the Δf with respect to z is regulated to zero. This new measurement mode not only makes the minimum of the Δf(z) curve directly accessible, but it also benefits from greatly increased operation stability due to its immunity against f{sub 0} drift. We present isosurfaces of the Δf minimum acquired on the calcite CaCO{sub 3}(101{sup ¯}4) surface in liquid environment, demonstrating the capability of our method to image in the attractive tip-sample interaction regime.

  15. Mapping power-law rheology of living cells using multi-frequency force modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Ryosuke; Okajima, Takaharu

    2015-10-26

    We present multi-frequency force modulation atomic force microscopy (AFM) for mapping the complex shear modulus G* of living cells as a function of frequency over the range of 50–500 Hz in the same measurement time as the single-frequency force modulation measurement. The AFM technique enables us to reconstruct image maps of rheological parameters, which exhibit a frequency-dependent power-law behavior with respect to G{sup *}. These quantitative rheological measurements reveal a large spatial variation in G* in this frequency range for single cells. Moreover, we find that the reconstructed images of the power-law rheological parameters are much different from those obtained in force-curve or single-frequency force modulation measurements. This indicates that the former provide information about intracellular mechanical structures of the cells that are usually not resolved with the conventional force measurement methods.

  16. Length-extension resonator as a force sensor for high-resolution frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy in air

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Tino

    2016-01-01

    Summary Frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy has turned into a well-established method to obtain atomic resolution on flat surfaces, but is often limited to ultra-high vacuum conditions and cryogenic temperatures. Measurements under ambient conditions are influenced by variations of the dew point and thin water layers present on practically every surface, complicating stable imaging with high resolution. We demonstrate high-resolution imaging in air using a length-extension resonator operating at small amplitudes. An additional slow feedback compensates for changes in the free resonance frequency, allowing stable imaging over a long period of time with changing environmental conditions. PMID:27335735

  17. Length-extension resonator as a force sensor for high-resolution frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy in air.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Hannes; Wagner, Tino; Stemmer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy has turned into a well-established method to obtain atomic resolution on flat surfaces, but is often limited to ultra-high vacuum conditions and cryogenic temperatures. Measurements under ambient conditions are influenced by variations of the dew point and thin water layers present on practically every surface, complicating stable imaging with high resolution. We demonstrate high-resolution imaging in air using a length-extension resonator operating at small amplitudes. An additional slow feedback compensates for changes in the free resonance frequency, allowing stable imaging over a long period of time with changing environmental conditions.

  18. Coupled molecular and cantilever dynamics model for frequency-modulated atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Klocke, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Summary A molecular dynamics model is presented, which adds harmonic potentials to the atomic interactions to mimic the elastic properties of an AFM cantilever. It gives new insight into the correlation between the experimentally monitored frequency shift and cantilever damping due to the interaction between tip atoms and scanned surface. Applying the model to ionic crystals with rock salt structure two damping mechanisms are investigated, which occur separately or simultaneously depending on the tip position. These mechanisms are adhesion hysteresis on the one hand and lateral excitations of the cantilever on the other. We find that the short range Lennard-Jones part of the atomic interaction alone is sufficient for changing the predominant mechanism. When the long range ionic interaction is switched off, the two damping mechanisms occur with a completely different pattern, which is explained by the energy landscape for the apex atom of the tip. In this case the adhesion hysteresis is always associated with a distinct lateral displacement of the tip. It is shown how this may lead to a systematic shift between the periodic patterns obtained from the frequency and from the damping signal, respectively. PMID:27335760

  19. Coupled molecular and cantilever dynamics model for frequency-modulated atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Klocke, Michael; Wolf, Dietrich E

    2016-01-01

    A molecular dynamics model is presented, which adds harmonic potentials to the atomic interactions to mimic the elastic properties of an AFM cantilever. It gives new insight into the correlation between the experimentally monitored frequency shift and cantilever damping due to the interaction between tip atoms and scanned surface. Applying the model to ionic crystals with rock salt structure two damping mechanisms are investigated, which occur separately or simultaneously depending on the tip position. These mechanisms are adhesion hysteresis on the one hand and lateral excitations of the cantilever on the other. We find that the short range Lennard-Jones part of the atomic interaction alone is sufficient for changing the predominant mechanism. When the long range ionic interaction is switched off, the two damping mechanisms occur with a completely different pattern, which is explained by the energy landscape for the apex atom of the tip. In this case the adhesion hysteresis is always associated with a distinct lateral displacement of the tip. It is shown how this may lead to a systematic shift between the periodic patterns obtained from the frequency and from the damping signal, respectively.

  20. Doppler modulation and Zeeman modulation: laser frequency stabilization without direct frequency modulation.

    PubMed

    Weis, A; Derler, S

    1988-07-01

    We discuss two methods (Zeeman modulation and Doppler modulation) for locking the frequency of a singlemode cw laser to an atomic absorption line. These methods do not require the laser frequency to be modulated directly. In the first scheme the absorption frequency of the atom is modulated via the Zeeman effect; in the second scheme the laser frequency is modulated indirectly via the Doppler effect in an atomic beam. We used the two methods successfully to lock two dye lasers to the transitions 6S((1/2)) ? 7S((1/2)) and 7S((1/2)) ? 15P(?) in atomic cesium.

  1. Wideband phase-locked loop circuit with real-time phase correction for frequency modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fukuma, Takeshi; Yoshioka, Shunsuke; Asakawa, Hitoshi

    2011-07-01

    We have developed a wideband phase-locked loop (PLL) circuit with real-time phase correction for high-speed and accurate force measurements by frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) in liquid. A high-speed operation of FM-AFM requires the use of a high frequency cantilever which, however, increases frequency-dependent phase delay caused by the signal delay within the cantilever excitation loop. Such phase delay leads to an error in the force measurements by FM-AFM especially with a low Q factor. Here, we present a method to compensate this phase delay in real time. Combined with a wideband PLL using a subtraction-based phase comparator, the method allows to perform an accurate and high-speed force measurement by FM-AFM. We demonstrate the improved performance by applying the developed PLL to three-dimensional force measurements at a mica/water interface.

  2. Wideband phase-locked loop circuit with real-time phase correction for frequency modulation atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuma, Takeshi; Yoshioka, Shunsuke; Asakawa, Hitoshi

    2011-07-01

    We have developed a wideband phase-locked loop (PLL) circuit with real-time phase correction for high-speed and accurate force measurements by frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) in liquid. A high-speed operation of FM-AFM requires the use of a high frequency cantilever which, however, increases frequency-dependent phase delay caused by the signal delay within the cantilever excitation loop. Such phase delay leads to an error in the force measurements by FM-AFM especially with a low Q factor. Here, we present a method to compensate this phase delay in real time. Combined with a wideband PLL using a subtraction-based phase comparator, the method allows to perform an accurate and high-speed force measurement by FM-AFM. We demonstrate the improved performance by applying the developed PLL to three-dimensional force measurements at a mica/water interface.

  3. Clean surface processing of rubrene single crystal immersed in ionic liquid by using frequency modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yokota, Yasuyuki; Hara, Hisaya; Morino, Yusuke; Bando, Ken-ichi; Imanishi, Akihito; Fukui, Ken-ichi; Uemura, Takafumi; Takeya, Jun

    2014-06-30

    Surface processing of a rubrene single crystal immersed in ionic liquids is valuable for further development of low voltage transistors operated by an electric double layer. We performed a precise and clean surface processing based on the tip-induced dissolution of rubrene molecules at the ionic liquid/rubrene single crystal interfaces by using frequency modulation atomic force microscopy. Molecular resolution imaging revealed that the tip-induced dissolution proceeded via metastable low density states derived from the anisotropic intermolecular interactions within the crystal structure.

  4. Quartz tuning fork-based frequency modulation atomic force spectroscopy and microscopy with all digital phase-locked loop.

    PubMed

    An, Sangmin; Hong, Mun-heon; Kim, Jongwoo; Kwon, Soyoung; Lee, Kunyoung; Lee, Manhee; Jhe, Wonho

    2012-11-01

    We present a platform for the quartz tuning fork (QTF)-based, frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) system for quantitative study of the mechanical or topographical properties of nanoscale materials, such as the nano-sized water bridge formed between the quartz tip (~100 nm curvature) and the mica substrate. A thermally stable, all digital phase-locked loop is used to detect the small frequency shift of the QTF signal resulting from the nanomaterial-mediated interactions. The proposed and demonstrated novel FM-AFM technique provides high experimental sensitivity in the measurement of the viscoelastic forces associated with the confined nano-water meniscus, short response time, and insensitivity to amplitude noise, which are essential for precision dynamic force spectroscopy and microscopy.

  5. Quartz tuning fork-based frequency modulation atomic force spectroscopy and microscopy with all digital phase-locked loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Sangmin; Hong, Mun-heon; Kim, Jongwoo; Kwon, Soyoung; Lee, Kunyoung; Lee, Manhee; Jhe, Wonho

    2012-11-01

    We present a platform for the quartz tuning fork (QTF)-based, frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) system for quantitative study of the mechanical or topographical properties of nanoscale materials, such as the nano-sized water bridge formed between the quartz tip (˜100 nm curvature) and the mica substrate. A thermally stable, all digital phase-locked loop is used to detect the small frequency shift of the QTF signal resulting from the nanomaterial-mediated interactions. The proposed and demonstrated novel FM-AFM technique provides high experimental sensitivity in the measurement of the viscoelastic forces associated with the confined nano-water meniscus, short response time, and insensitivity to amplitude noise, which are essential for precision dynamic force spectroscopy and microscopy.

  6. Combined frequency modulated atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy detection for multi-tip scanning probe microscopy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Morawski, Ireneusz; Spiegelberg, Richard; Korte, Stefan; Voigtländer, Bert

    2015-12-15

    A method which allows scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tip biasing independent of the sample bias during frequency modulated atomic force microscopy (AFM) operation is presented. The AFM sensor is supplied by an electronic circuit combining both a frequency shift signal and a tunneling current signal by means of an inductive coupling. This solution enables a control of the tip potential independent of the sample potential. Individual tip biasing is specifically important in order to implement multi-tip STM/AFM applications. An extensional quartz sensor (needle sensor) with a conductive tip is applied to record simultaneously topography and conductivity of the sample. The high resonance frequency of the needle sensor (1 MHz) allows scanning of a large area of the surface being investigated in a reasonably short time. A recipe for the amplitude calibration which is based only on the frequency shift signal and does not require the tip being in contact is presented. Additionally, we show spectral measurements of the mechanical vibration noise of the scanning system used in the investigations.

  7. Combined frequency modulated atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy detection for multi-tip scanning probe microscopy applications.

    PubMed

    Morawski, Ireneusz; Spiegelberg, Richard; Korte, Stefan; Voigtländer, Bert

    2015-12-01

    A method which allows scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tip biasing independent of the sample bias during frequency modulated atomic force microscopy (AFM) operation is presented. The AFM sensor is supplied by an electronic circuit combining both a frequency shift signal and a tunneling current signal by means of an inductive coupling. This solution enables a control of the tip potential independent of the sample potential. Individual tip biasing is specifically important in order to implement multi-tip STM/AFM applications. An extensional quartz sensor (needle sensor) with a conductive tip is applied to record simultaneously topography and conductivity of the sample. The high resonance frequency of the needle sensor (1 MHz) allows scanning of a large area of the surface being investigated in a reasonably short time. A recipe for the amplitude calibration which is based only on the frequency shift signal and does not require the tip being in contact is presented. Additionally, we show spectral measurements of the mechanical vibration noise of the scanning system used in the investigations.

  8. Combined frequency modulated atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy detection for multi-tip scanning probe microscopy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morawski, Ireneusz; Spiegelberg, Richard; Korte, Stefan; Voigtländer, Bert

    2015-12-01

    A method which allows scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tip biasing independent of the sample bias during frequency modulated atomic force microscopy (AFM) operation is presented. The AFM sensor is supplied by an electronic circuit combining both a frequency shift signal and a tunneling current signal by means of an inductive coupling. This solution enables a control of the tip potential independent of the sample potential. Individual tip biasing is specifically important in order to implement multi-tip STM/AFM applications. An extensional quartz sensor (needle sensor) with a conductive tip is applied to record simultaneously topography and conductivity of the sample. The high resonance frequency of the needle sensor (1 MHz) allows scanning of a large area of the surface being investigated in a reasonably short time. A recipe for the amplitude calibration which is based only on the frequency shift signal and does not require the tip being in contact is presented. Additionally, we show spectral measurements of the mechanical vibration noise of the scanning system used in the investigations.

  9. Efficient generation of a narrow-bandwidth and frequency-modulated beam pair from Yb atoms in a ladder configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Minsoo; Yoon, Tai Hyun

    2011-03-15

    We report on the generation of narrow-bandwidth and frequency-modulated cascaded emission of two photons from a collimated Yb atomic beam. Efficient population transfer from the ground state (6s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0}) to upper state (6s7s {sup 1}S{sub 0}), of which direct transition at 291.1 nm is dipole forbidden, is achieved through a resonant two-photon excitation enhanced by the electromagnetically induced transparency mediated by the intermediate state (6s6p {sup 1}P{sub 1}). Then cascaded emission of two photons with a bandwidth of 54 MHz at 611.3 nm (idler) and 555.8 nm (signal) occurs in sequence from the upper state via the spin triplet state (6s{sup 2} {sup 3}P{sub 1}). Numerical calculations of the density matrix equations taking into account the residual Doppler effect and strong driving fields successfully explain the experimental results for the idler and signal beam intensities depending on the various parameters of the driving fields. Synchronized optical switching and frequency-modulation characteristics of the idler and signal beams are also reported.

  10. Imaging of transverse electron transfer through a DNA molecule by simultaneous scanning tunneling and frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Yasushi; Matsumoto, Takuya; Kawai, Tomoji

    2011-04-26

    Simultaneous scanning tunneling and frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy (STM/FM-AFM) was applied to a DNA molecule on a Cu(111) surface to analyze transverse electron transfer which is related to the electron transfer and the electrical contact in DNA-based devices. In particular, we demonstrated correlation mapping of the electron transfer parameters by visualizing specific combinations of the decay constant β and the contact conductance G. The results clearly revealed that electron transfer across the DNA strand varies spatially in the DNA molecule. This spatial variation is probably correlated with deformation of DNA on the surface. From quantitative analysis, the decay constant β was estimated to be 3.3 nm(-1), which is consistent with previously reported values for π-conjugated molecules.

  11. Frequency modulated atomic force microscopy on MgO(001) thin films: interpretation of atomic image resolution and distance dependence of tip-sample interaction.

    PubMed

    Heyde, M; Sterrer, M; Rust, H-P; Freund, H-J

    2006-04-14

    Atomically resolved images on a MgO(001) thin film deposited on Ag(001) obtained in ultrahigh vacuum by frequency modulated atomic force microscopy at low temperature are presented and analysed. Images obtained in the attractive regime show a different type of contrast formation from those acquired in the repulsive regime. For the interpretation of the image contrast we have investigated the tip-sample interaction. Force and energy were recovered from frequency shift versus distance curves. The derived force curves have been compared to the force laws of long-range, short-range and contact forces. In the attractive regime close to the minimum of the force-distance curve elastic deformations have been confirmed. The recovered energy curve has been scaled to the universal Rydberg model, yielding a decay length of l = 0.3 nm and ΔE = 4.2 aJ (26 eV) for the maximum adhesion energy. A universal binding-energy-distance relation is confirmed for the MgO(001) thin film.

  12. Doppler modulation and Zeeman modulation: laser frequency stabilization without direct frequency modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Weis, A.; Derler, S.

    1988-07-01

    We discuss two methods (Zeeman modulation and Doppler modulation) for locking the frequency of a single-mode cw laser to an atomic absorption line. These methods do not require the laser frequency to be modulated directly. In the first scheme the absorption frequency of the atom is modulated via the Zeeman effect; in the second scheme the laser frequency is modulated indirectly via the Doppler effect in an atomic beam. We used the two methods successfully to lock two dye lasers to the transitions 6S/sub 1/2/..-->..7S/sub 1/2/ and 7S/sub 1/2/..-->..15P/sub 3/2/ in atomic cesium.

  13. Bimodal atomic force microscopy driving the higher eigenmode in frequency-modulation mode: Implementation, advantages, disadvantages and comparison to the open-loop case.

    PubMed

    Ebeling, Daniel; Solares, Santiago D

    2013-01-01

    We present an overview of the bimodal amplitude-frequency-modulation (AM-FM) imaging mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM), whereby the fundamental eigenmode is driven by using the amplitude-modulation technique (AM-AFM) while a higher eigenmode is driven by using either the constant-excitation or the constant-amplitude variant of the frequency-modulation (FM-AFM) technique. We also offer a comparison to the original bimodal AFM method, in which the higher eigenmode is driven with constant frequency and constant excitation amplitude. General as well as particular characteristics of the different driving schemes are highlighted from theoretical and experimental points of view, revealing the advantages and disadvantages of each. This study provides information and guidelines that can be useful in selecting the most appropriate operation mode to characterize different samples in the most efficient and reliable way.

  14. Laser frequency locking with 46  GHz offset using an electro-optic modulator for magneto-optical trapping of francium atoms.

    PubMed

    Harada, K; Aoki, T; Ezure, S; Kato, K; Hayamizu, T; Kawamura, H; Inoue, T; Arikawa, H; Ishikawa, T; Aoki, T; Uchiyama, A; Sakamoto, K; Ito, S; Itoh, M; Ando, S; Hatakeyama, A; Hatanaka, K; Imai, K; Murakami, T; Nataraj, H S; Shimizu, Y; Sato, T; Wakasa, T; Yoshida, H P; Sakemi, Y

    2016-02-10

    We demonstrate frequency offset locking between two laser sources using a waveguide-type electro-optic modulator (EOM) with 10th-order sidebands for magneto-optical trapping of Fr atoms. The frequency locking error signal was successfully obtained by performing delayed self-homodyne detection of the beat signal between the repumping frequency and the 10th-order sideband component of the trapping light. Sweeping the trapping-light and repumping-light frequencies with keeping its frequency difference of 46 GHz was confirmed over 1 GHz by monitoring the Doppler absorption profile of I₂. This technique enables us to search for a resonance frequency of magneto-optical trapping of Fr.

  15. Laser frequency locking with 46 GHz offset using an electro-optic modulator for magneto-optical trapping of francium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, K.; Aoki, T.; Ezure, S.; Kato, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Kawamura, H.; Inoue, T.; Arikawa, H.; Ishikawa, T.; Aoki, T.; Uchiyama, A.; Sakamoto, K.; Ito, S.; Itoh, M.; Ando, S.; Hatakeyama, A.; Hatanaka, K.; Imai, K.; Murakami, T.; Nataraj, H. S.; Shimizu, Y.; Sato, T.; Wakasa, T.; Yoshida, H. P.; Sakemi, Y.

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrated a frequency offset locking between two laser sources using a waveguide-type electro-optic modulator (EOM) with 10th-order sidebands for magneto-optical trapping of Fr atoms. The frequency locking error signal was successfully obtained by performing delayed self-homodyne detection of the beat signal between the repumping frequency and the 10th-order sideband component of the trapping light. Sweeping the trapping-light and repumping-light frequencies with keeping its frequency difference of 46 GHz was confirmed over 1 GHz by monitoring the Doppler absorption profile of I2. This technique enables us to search for a resonance frequency of magneto-optical trapping of Fr.

  16. HIGHER FREQUENCY ULTRASONIC LIGHT MODULATORS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    LIGHT ), (*MODULATORS, (*ULTRASONIC RADIATION, MODULATORS), OPTICAL COMMUNICATIONS, BANDWIDTH, TRANSDUCERS, HIGH FREQUENCY, VERY HIGH FREQUENCY, ATTENUATION, DATA PROCESSING, OPTICAL EQUIPMENT, ANALOG COMPUTERS, THEORY.

  17. True atomic-scale imaging of a spinel Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}(111) surface in aqueous solution by frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kitta, Mitsunori Kohyama, Masanori; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2014-09-15

    Spinel-type lithium titanium oxide (LTO; Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}) is a negative electrode material for lithium-ion batteries. Revealing the atomic-scale surface structure of LTO in liquid is highly necessary to investigate its surface properties in practical environments. Here, we reveal an atomic-scale image of the LTO(111) surface in LiCl aqueous solution using frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy. Atomically flat terraces and single steps having heights of multiples of 0.5 nm were observed in the aqueous solution. Hexagonal bright spots separated by 0.6 nm were also observed on the flat terrace part, corresponding to the atomistic contrast observed in the ultrahigh vacuum condition, which suggests that the basic atomic structure of the LTO(111) surface is retained without dramatic reconstruction even in the aqueous solution.

  18. Deep frequency modulation interferometry.

    PubMed

    Gerberding, Oliver

    2015-06-01

    Laser interferometry with pm/Hz precision and multi-fringe dynamic range at low frequencies is a core technology to measure the motion of various objects (test masses) in space and ground based experiments for gravitational wave detection and geodesy. Even though available interferometer schemes are well understood, their construction remains complex, often involving, for example, the need to build quasi-monolithic optical benches with dozens of components. In recent years techniques have been investigated that aim to reduce this complexity by combining phase modulation techniques with sophisticated digital readout algorithms. This article presents a new scheme that uses strong laser frequency modulations in combination with the deep phase modulation readout algorithm to construct simpler and easily scalable interferometers.

  19. Quantum systems under frequency modulation.

    PubMed

    Silveri, M P; Tuorila, J A; Thuneberg, E V; Paraoanu, G S

    2017-05-01

    We review the physical phenomena that arise when quantum mechanical energy levels are modulated in time. The dynamics resulting from changes in the transition frequency is a problem studied since the early days of quantum mechanics. It has been of constant interest both experimentally and theoretically since, with the simple two-state model providing an inexhaustible source of novel concepts. When the transition frequency of a quantum system is modulated, several phenomena can be observed, such as Landau-Zener-Stückelberg-Majorana interference, motional averaging and narrowing, and the formation of dressed states with the appearance of sidebands in the spectrum. Adiabatic changes result in the accumulation of geometric phases, which can be used to create topological states. In recent years, an exquisite experimental control in the time domain was gained through the parameters entering the Hamiltonian, and high-fidelity readout schemes allowed the state of the system to be monitored non-destructively. These developments were made in the field of quantum devices, especially in superconducting qubits, as a well as in atomic physics, in particular in ultracold gases. As a result of these advances, it became possible to demonstrate many of the fundamental effects that arise in a quantum system when its transition frequencies are modulated. The purpose of this review is to present some of these developments, from two-state atoms and harmonic oscillators to multilevel and many-particle systems.

  20. Potential-dependent structures investigated at the perchloric acid solution/iodine modified Au(111) interface by electrochemical frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Utsunomiya, Toru; Tatsumi, Shoko; Yokota, Yasuyuki; Fukui, Ken-ichi

    2015-05-21

    Electrochemical frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy (EC-FM-AFM) was adopted to analyze the electrified interface between an iodine modified Au(111) and a perchloric acid solution. Atomic resolution imaging of the electrode was strongly dependent on the electrode potential within the electrochemical window: each iodine atom was imaged in the cathodic range of the electrode potential, but not in the more anodic range where the tip is retracted by approximately 0.1 nm compared to the cathodic case for the same imaging parameters. The frequency shift versus tip-to-sample distance curves obtained in the electric double layer region on the iodine adlayer indicated that the water structuring became weaker at the anodic potential, where the atomic resolution images could not be obtained, and immediately recovered at the original cathodic potential. The reversible hydration structures were consistent with the reversible topographic images and the cyclic voltammetry results. These results indicate that perchlorate anions concentrated at the anodic potential affect the interface hydration without any irreversible changes to the interface under these conditions.

  1. The limit of time resolution in frequency modulation atomic force microscopy by a pump-probe approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Zeno; Spielhofer, Andreas; Miyahara, Yoichi; Grutter, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) routinely achieves structural information in the sub-nm length scale. Measuring time resolved properties on this length scale to understand kinetics at the nm scale remains an elusive goal. We present a general analysis of the lower limit for time resolution in AFM. Our finding suggests that the time resolution in AFM is ultimately limited by the well-known thermal limit of AFM and not as often proposed by the mechanical response time of the force sensing cantilever. We demonstrate a general pump-probe approach using the cantilever as a detector responding to the averaged signal. This method can be applied to any excitation signal such as electrical, thermal, magnetic or optical. Experimental implementation of this method allows us to measure a photocarrier decay time of ˜1 ps in low temperature grown GaAs using a cantilever with a resonant frequency of 280 kHz.

  2. Influence of modulation frequency in rubidium cell frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Audoin, C.; Viennet, J.; Cyr, N.; Vanier, J.

    1983-01-01

    The error signal which is used to control the frequency of the quartz crystal oscillator of a passive rubidium cell frequency standard is considered. The value of the slope of this signal, for an interrogation frequency close to the atomic transition frequency is calculated and measured for various phase (or frequency) modulation waveforms, and for several values of the modulation frequency. A theoretical analysis is made using a model which applies to a system in which the optical pumping rate, the relaxation rates and the RF field are homogeneous. Results are given for sine-wave phase modulation, square-wave frequency modulation and square-wave phase modulation. The influence of the modulation frequency on the slope of the error signal is specified. It is shown that the modulation frequency can be chosen as large as twice the non-saturated full-width at half-maximum without a drastic loss of the sensitivity to an offset of the interrogation frequency from center line, provided that the power saturation factor and the amplitude of modulation are properly adjusted.

  3. DEMODULATION OF FREQUENCY OR SPACE MODULATED LIGHT.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    LIGHT , DEMODULATION), (*OPTICAL COMMUNICATIONS, FREQUENCY MODULATION), (*FREQUENCY MODULATION, LIGHT ), OPTICAL TRACKING, BEAMS(ELECTROMAGNETIC), DEFLECTION, MICROWAVE FREQUENCY, ELECTRON BEAMS, PHOTOCATHODES

  4. Visualizing the Subsurface of Soft Matter: Simultaneous Topographical Imaging, Depth Modulation, and Compositional Mapping with Triple Frequency Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solares, Santiago; Ebeling, Daniel; Eslami, Babak

    2014-03-01

    Characterization of subsurface morphology and mechanical properties with nanoscale resolution and depth control is of significant interest in soft matter fields like biology and polymer science, where buried structural and compositional features can be important. However, controllably ``feeling'' the subsurface is a challenging task for which the available imaging tools are relatively limited. This presentation describes a trimodal atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging scheme, whereby three eigenmodes of the microcantilever probe are used as separate control ``knobs'' to simultaneously measure the topography, modulate sample indentation by the tip during tip-sample impact, and map compositional contrast, respectively. This method is illustrated through computational simulation and experiments conducted on ultrathin polymer films with embedded glass nanoparticles. By actively increasing the tip-sample indentation using a higher eigenmode of the cantilever, one is able to gradually and controllably reveal glass nanoparticles that are buried tens of nanometers deep under the surface, while still being able to refocus on the surface. The authors gratefully acknowledge support from the U.S. Department of Energy (conceptual method development and experimental work, award DESC-0008115) and the U.S. National Science Foundation (computational work, award CMMI-0841840).

  5. Prospects for atomic frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Audoin, C.

    1984-01-01

    The potentialities of different atomic frequency standards which are not yet into field operation, for most of them, but for which preliminary data, obtained in laboratory experiments, give confidence that they may improve greatly the present state of the art are described. The review will mainly cover the following devices: (1) cesium beam frequency standards with optical pumping and detection; (2) optically pumped rubidium cells; (3) magnesium beam; (4) cold hydrogen masers; and (5) traps with stored and cooled ions.

  6. GPS Block IIF Atomic Frequency Standard Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    Frequency stability of GPS constellation for October 2010 (NGA products). REFERENCES [1] “ Rubidium Atomic Frequency Standard (RAFS) GPS...Block IIR Rubidium Atomic Frequency Standard Life Test,” in Proceedings of the 30 th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and...42 nd Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Meeting 181 GPS BLOCK IIF ATOMIC FREQUENCY STANDARD ANALYSIS

  7. Molecular-resolution imaging of lead phthalocyanine molecules by small amplitude frequency modulation atomic force microscopy using second flexural mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichii, Takashi; Hosokawa, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Kei; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2009-03-01

    Lead phthalocyanine molecules on MoS2(0001) substrates were imaged using an ultrahigh-vacuum AFM apparatus equipped with an optical beam deflection (OBD) sensor. The second flexural mode was employed to utilize its high effective spring constant in order to reduce the oscillation amplitude to 0.5 nm without oscillation instability. Submolecular-resolution images were obtained when a shorter cantilever, which had a very high resonance frequency and a low noise equivalent deflection in the OBD sensor, was used.

  8. Ultrasonic Atomization Amount for Different Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Keiji; Honma, Hiroyuki; Xu, Zheng; Asakura, Yoshiyuki; Koda, Shinobu

    2011-07-01

    The mass flow rate of ultrasonic atomization was estimated by measuring the vaporization amount from a bulk liquid with a fountain. The effects of ultrasonic frequency and intensity on the atomization characteristics were investigated when the directivities of the acoustic field from a transducer were almost the same. The sample was distillated water and the ultrasonic frequencies were 0.5, 1.0, and 2.4 MHz. The mass flow rate of ultrasonic atomization increased with increasing ultrasonic intensity and decreasing ultrasonic frequency. The fountain was formed at the liquid surface where the effective value of acoustic pressure was above atmospheric pressure. The fountain height was strongly governed by the acoustic pressure at the liquid surface of the transducer center. At the same ultrasonic intensity, the dependence of ultrasonic frequency on the number of atomized droplets was small. At the same apparent surface area of the fountain, the number of atomized droplets became larger as the ultrasonic frequency increased.

  9. Atomic frequency standards for ultra-high-frequency stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, L.; Prestage, J. D.; Dick, G. J.

    1987-01-01

    The general features of the Hg-199(+) trapped-ion frequency standard are outlined and compared to other atomic frequency standards, especially the hydrogen maser. The points discussed are those which make the trapped Hg-199(+) standard attractive: high line Q, reduced sensitivity to external magnetic fields, and simplicity of state selection, among others.

  10. Accurate rubidium atomic fountain frequency standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, Yuri; Marra, Giuseppe

    2011-06-01

    The design, operating parameters and the accuracy evaluation of the NPL Rb atomic fountain are described. The atomic fountain employs a double magneto-optical arrangement that allows a large number of 87Rb atoms to be trapped, a water-cooled temperature-stabilized interrogation region and a high quality factor interrogation cavity. From the uncertainties of measured and calculated systematic frequency shifts, the fractional frequency accuracy is estimated to be 3.7 × 10-16. The fractional frequency stability, limited predominantly by noise in the local oscillator, is measured to be 7 × 10-16 after one day of averaging. Based on the proposed quasi-continuous regime of operation of the fountain, the accuracy of the Rb standard of 5 × 10-17 reachable in two days of averaging is predicted.

  11. Atomizing, continuous, water monitoring module

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, C.V.; Wise, M.B.

    1997-07-08

    A system for continuously analyzing volatile constituents of a liquid is described. The system contains a pump for continuously pumping the liquid to be tested at a predetermined flow rate into an extracting container through a liquid directing tube having an orifice at one end and positioned to direct the liquid into the extracting container at a flow rate sufficient to atomize the liquid within the extracting container. A continuous supply of helium carrier gas at a predetermined flow rate is directed through a tube into the extracting container and co-mingled with the atomized liquid to extract the volatile constituents contained within the atomized liquid. The helium containing the extracted volatile constituents flows out of the extracting container into a mass spectrometer for an analysis of the volatile constituents of the liquid. 3 figs.

  12. Atomizing, continuous, water monitoring module

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Cyril V.; Wise, Marcus B.

    1997-01-01

    A system for continuously analyzing volatile constituents of a liquid is described. The system contains a pump for continuously pumping the liquid to be tested at a predetermined flow rate into an extracting container through a liquid directing tube having an orifice at one end and positioned to direct the liquid into the extracting container at a flow rate sufficient to atomize the liquid within the extracting container. A continuous supply of helium carrier gas at a predetermined flow rate is directed through a tube into the extracting container and co-mingled with the atomized liquid to extract the volatile constituents contained within the atomized liquid. The helium containing the extracted volatile constituents flows out of the extracting container into a mass spectrometer for an analysis of the volatile constituents of the liquid.

  13. Laser frequency stabilization and shifting by using modulation transfer spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Bing; Wang, Zhao-Ying; Wu, Bin; Xu, Ao-Peng; Wang, Qi-Yu; Xu, Yun-Fei; Lin, Qiang

    2014-10-01

    The stabilizing and shifting of laser frequency are very important for the interaction between the laser and atoms. The modulation transfer spectroscopy for the 87Rb atom with D2 line transition F = 2 → F' = 3 is used for stabilizing and shifting the frequency of the external cavity grating feedback diode laser. The resonant phase modulator with electro—optical effect is used to generate frequency sideband to lock the laser frequency. In the locking scheme, circularly polarized pump- and probe-beams are used. By optimizing the temperature of the vapor, the pump- and probe-beam intensity, the laser linewidth of 280 kHz is obtained. Furthermore, the magnetic field generated by a solenoid is added into the system. Therefore the system can achieve the frequency locking at any point in a range of hundreds of megahertz frequency shifting with very low power loss.

  14. Portable atomic frequency standard based on coherent population trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Fan; Yang, Renfu; Nian, Feng; Zhang, Zhenwei; Cui, Yongshun; Zhao, Huan; Wang, Nuanrang; Feng, Keming

    2015-05-01

    In this work, a portable atomic frequency standard based on coherent population trapping is designed and demonstrated. To achieve a portable prototype, in the system, a single transverse mode 795nm VCSEL modulated by a 3.4GHz RF source is used as a pump laser which generates coherent light fields. The pump beams pass through a vapor cell containing atom gas and buffer gas. This vapor cell is surrounded by a magnetic shield and placed inside a solenoid which applies a longitudinal magnetic field to lift the Zeeman energy levels' degeneracy and to separate the resonance signal, which has no first-order magnetic field dependence, from the field-dependent resonances. The electrical control system comprises two control loops. The first one locks the laser wavelength to the minimum of the absorption spectrum; the second one locks the modulation frequency and output standard frequency. Furthermore, we designed the micro physical package and realized the locking of a coherent population trapping atomic frequency standard portable prototype successfully. The short-term frequency stability of the whole system is measured to be 6×10-11 for averaging times of 1s, and reaches 5×10-12 at an averaging time of 1000s.

  15. Atomic frequency standard relativistic Doppler shift experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, H. E.; Reinhardt, V. S.

    1974-01-01

    An experiment has been performed to measure possible space anisotropy as it would effect the frequency of a cesium atomic beam standard clock in a laboratory on earth due to motion relative to external coordinate frames. The cesium frequency was measured as a function of orientation with respect to an atomic hydrogen maser standard. Over a period of 34 days 101 measurements were made. The results are consistent with a conclusion that no general orientation dependance attributable to spacial anisotropy was observed. It is shown that both the airplane clock results, and the null results for the atomic beam clock, are consistent with Einstein general or special relativity, or with the Lorentz transformations alone.

  16. Three-axis atomic magnetometer based on spin precession modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H. C.; Dong, H. F. Hu, X. Y.; Chen, L.; Gao, Y.

    2015-11-02

    We demonstrate a three-axis atomic magnetometer with one intensity-modulated pump beam and one orthogonal probe beam. The main field component is measured using the resonance of the pumping light, while the transverse field components are measured simultaneously using the optical rotation of the probe beam modulated by the spin precession. It is an all-optical magnetometer without using any modulation field or radio frequency field. Magnetic field sensitivity of 0.8 pT/Hz{sup 1∕2} is achieved under a bias field of 2 μT.

  17. Frequency Tunable Atomic Magnetometer based on an Atom Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narducci, Frank; Braje, Danielle; Davis, Jon; Adler, Charles

    2013-05-01

    We theoretically and experimentally study a magnetically sensitive atom interferometer. Using a stationary atom cloud, a time-domain interferometer is formed on magnetically sensitive states of 85Rb. We show that the temporal spacing of a Raman pulse sequence controls the frequency of the magnetic field detected by the interferometer, thereby potentially eliminating unwanted noise and optimizing detection in frequency bands of interest. We focus on a standard π / 2 - π - π / 2 sequence and explore the utility of multiple π pulses. The Lincoln Laboratory portion of this work is sponsored by the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research & Engineering under Air Force Contract #FA8721-05-C-0002. Opinions, interpretations, conclusions and recommendations are those of the authors and are not necessarily endorsed by the United States Government. This work at NavAir was supported by the Office of Naval Research and by the NavAir Chief Technology Office.

  18. Research of frequency modulation to amplitude modulation with multi-frequency modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuliang; Zhan, Sui; Geng, Yuanchao; Liu, Lanqin; Xu, Lixin; Ming, Hai

    2013-12-01

    For better performance of laser coupling in inertial confinement fusion (ICF), beam shaping of the focus spot is required. Among all the beam smoothing methods, the multi frequency modulation smoothing by spectral dispersion (MultiFM-SSD) proposed by LLE has the advantages of the faster smoothing and better operability. Strong frequency modulation to amplitude modulation conversion(FM-to-AM) will take place because of the complex spectrum imposed by the multi frequency modulators applied in the Multi FM-SSD method. The FM-to-AM effect is studied with numerical simulation including the polarization mode dispersion and group velocity dispersion. The results reveal that the modulation frequencies and bandwidths of multi modulators will influence the contrast degree of the FM-to-AM effect. The compensation of the FM-to-AM with arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) is also numerically simulated. The FM-to-AM effect is effectively suppressed, i.e. the non-uniformity of the pulse decreases substantially, by applying multiple intensity and phase compensation (the compensation function is obtained via G-S algorithm).

  19. Effective Atom-Molecule Conversions Using Radio Frequency Fields.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yijue; Pérez-Ríos, Jesús; Greene, Chris H

    2016-11-18

    The present study is inspired by the Wieman group experiment [Phys. Rev. Lett. 2005, 95, 190404], in which they use a slow modulated magnetic field to effectively transfer rubidium atoms into cold molecules near a Feshbach resonance. We develop a time-dependent collision theory based on two channel model potentials to study the atom-molecule population transfer induced by a single-color radio frequency field in an ultracold (87) Rb gas. Wave-packet dynamical simulations allow an investigation of both bound-bound transitions and free-bound transitions. The effects of temperature, detuning and the RF amplitude on the population transfer are discussed in detail. Some of our simulations suggest that oscillatory atom-molecule conversion could originate from the long coherence time of the wave packet. This coherence time is unusually long in ultracold gases because the collision energy is typically quite well-defined.

  20. Efficiency optimization for atomic frequency comb storage

    SciTech Connect

    Bonarota, M.; Ruggiero, J.; Le Goueet, J.-L.; Chaneliere, T.

    2010-03-15

    We study the efficiency of the atomic frequency comb storage protocol. We show that for a given optical depth, the preparation procedure can be optimize to significantly improve the retrieval. Our prediction is well supported by the experimental implementation of the protocol in a Tm{sup 3+}:YAG crystal. We observe a net gain in efficiency from 10 to 17% by applying the optimized preparation procedure. In the perspective of high bandwidth storage, we investigate the protocol under different magnetic fields. We analyze the effect of the Zeeman and superhyperfine interaction.

  1. Laser frequency modulator for modulating a laser cavity

    DOEpatents

    Erbert, Gaylen V.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention relates to a laser frequency modulator for modulating a laser cavity. It is known in the prior art to utilize a PZT (piezoelectric transducer) element in combination with a mirror to change the cavity length of a laser cavity (which changes the laser frequency). Using a PZT element to drive the mirror directly is adequate at frequencies below 10 kHz. However, in high frequency applications (100 kHz and higher) PZT elements alone do not provide a sufficient change in the cavity length. The present invention utilizes an ultrasonic concentrator with a PZT element and mirror to provide modulation of the laser cavity. With an ultrasonic concentrator, the mirror element at the end of a laser cavity can move at larger amplitudes and higher frequencies.

  2. Device for frequency modulation of a laser output spectrum

    DOEpatents

    Beene, J.R.; Bemis, C.E. Jr.

    1984-07-17

    A device is provided for fast frequency modulating the output spectrum of multimode lasers and single frequency lasers that are not actively stabilized. A piezoelectric transducer attached to a laser cavity mirror is driven in an unconventional manner to excite resonance vibration of the tranducer to rapidly, cyclicly change the laser cavity length. The result is a cyclic sweeping of the output wavelength sufficient to fill the gaps in the laser output frequency spectrum. When a laser is used to excite atoms or molecules, complete absorption line coverage is made possible.

  3. Device for frequency modulation of a laser output spectrum

    DOEpatents

    Beene, James R.; Bemis, Jr., Curtis E.

    1986-01-01

    A device is provided for fast frequency modulating the output spectrum of multimode lasers and single frequency lasers that are not actively stabilized. A piezoelectric transducer attached to a laser cavity mirror is driven in an unconventional manner to excite resonance vibration of the transducer to rapidly, cyclicly change the laser cavity length. The result is a cyclic sweeping of the output wavelength sufficient to fill the gaps in the laser output frequency spectrum. When such a laser is used to excite atoms or molecules, complete absorption line coverage is made possible.

  4. Detection of combined frequency and amplitude modulation.

    PubMed

    Moore, B C; Sek, A

    1992-12-01

    This article is concerned with the detection of mixed modulation (MM), i.e., simultaneously occurring amplitude modulation (AM) and frequency modulation (FM). In experiment 1, an adaptive two-alternative forced-choice task was used to determine thresholds for detecting AM alone. Then, thresholds for detecting FM were determined for stimuli which had a fixed amount of AM in the signal interval only. The amount of AM was always less than the threshold for detecting AM alone. The FM thresholds depended significantly on the magnitude of the coexisting AM. For low modulation rates (4, 16, and 64 Hz), the FM thresholds did not depend significantly on the relative phase of modulation for the FM and AM. For a high modulation rate (256 Hz) strong effects of modulator phase were observed. These phase effects are as predicted by the model proposed by Hartmann and Hnath [Acustica 50, 297-312 (1982)], which assumes that detection of modulation at modulation frequencies higher than the critical modulation frequency is based on detection of the lower sideband in the modulated signal's spectrum. In the second experiment, psychometric functions were measured for the detection of AM alone and FM alone, using modulation rates of 4 and 16 Hz. Results showed that, for each type of modulation, d' is approximately a linear function of the square of the modulation index. Application of this finding to the results of experiment 1 suggested that, at low modulation rates, FM and AM are not detected by completely independent mechanisms. In the third experiment, psychometric functions were again measured for the detection of AM alone and FM alone, using a 10-Hz modulation rate. Detectability was then measured for combined AM and FM, with modulation depths selected so that each type of modulation would be equally detectable if presented alone. Significant effects of relative modulator phase were found when detectability was relatively high. These effects were not correctly predicted by either a

  5. Modulated Source Interferometry with Combined Amplitude and Frequency Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez, Roman C. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An improved interferometer is produced by modifying a conventional interferometer to include amplitude and/or frequency modulation of a coherent light source at radio or higher frequencies. The phase of the modulation signal can be detected in an interfering beam from an interferometer and can be used to determine the actual optical phase of the beam. As such, this improvement can be adapted to virtually any two-beam interferometer, including: Michelson, Mach-Zehnder, and Sagnac interferometers. The use of an amplitude modulated coherent tight source results in an interferometer that combines the wide range advantages of coherent interferometry with the precise distance measurement advantages of white light interferometry.

  6. Effects of hydrogen atom spin exchange collisions on atomic hydrogen maser oscillation frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crampton, S. B.

    1979-01-01

    Frequency shifts due to collisions between hydrogen atoms in an atomic hydrogen maser frequency standard are studied. Investigations of frequency shifts proportional to the spin exchange frequency shift cross section and those proportional to the duration of exchange collisions are discussed. The feasibility of operating a hydrogen frequency standard at liquid helium temperatures is examined.

  7. CAFS: A Cesium Atomic Frequency Standard for GPS block IIR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisnia, Jeffry A.

    1993-01-01

    Kernco, Inc. was selected to design the Cesium Atomic Frequency Standards (CAFS) for the GPS Block IIR NAVSTAR satellites. These spacecraft are scheduled to be launched in the mid-1990's to replenish and upgrade the existing constellation of Global Positioning System satellites. The Block IIR CAFS output frequency is 13.4003378 MHz, the 686th submultiple of the cesium atomic resonance frequency. Using an integer submultiple simplifies the design of the atomic frequency standard's rf multiplier circuits, eliminating the secondary frequency synthesizer needed in previous designs. The GPS Block IIR CAFS design, particularly the improvements made on our earlier Block II design is described. Test results are included.

  8. Improved atomic resonance gas cell for use in frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huggett, G. R.

    1968-01-01

    Atomic resonance gas cell maintains a stable operating frequency in the presence of pressure fluctuations in the ambient atmosphere. The new cell includes an envelope which is transparent to radiation in the optical region and to microwave energy at the atomic resonance frequency of the alkali-metal vapor within the envelope.

  9. Cerebellar modules operate at different frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haibo; Lin, Zhanmin; Voges, Kai; Ju, Chiheng; Gao, Zhenyu; Bosman, Laurens WJ; Ruigrok, Tom JH; Hoebeek, Freek E

    2014-01-01

    Due to the uniform cyto-architecture of the cerebellar cortex, its overall physiological characteristics have traditionally been considered to be homogeneous. In this study, we show in awake mice at rest that spiking activity of Purkinje cells, the sole output cells of the cerebellar cortex, differs between cerebellar modules and correlates with their expression of the glycolytic enzyme aldolase C or zebrin. Simple spike and complex spike frequencies were significantly higher in Purkinje cells located in zebrin-negative than zebrin-positive modules. The difference in simple spike frequency persisted when the synaptic input to, but not intrinsic activity of, Purkinje cells was manipulated. Blocking TRPC3, the effector channel of a cascade of proteins that have zebrin-like distribution patterns, attenuated the simple spike frequency difference. Our results indicate that zebrin-discriminated cerebellar modules operate at different frequencies, which depend on activation of TRPC3, and that this property is relevant for all cerebellar functions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02536.001 PMID:24843004

  10. Frequency modulation of semiconductor disk laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Zolotovskii, I O; Korobko, D A; Okhotnikov, O G

    2015-07-31

    A numerical model is constructed for a semiconductor disk laser mode-locked by a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM), and the effect that the phase modulation caused by gain and absorption saturation in the semiconductor has on pulse generation is examined. The results demonstrate that, in a laser cavity with sufficient second-order dispersion, alternating-sign frequency modulation of pulses can be compensated for. We also examine a model for tuning the dispersion in the cavity of a disk laser using a Gires–Tournois interferometer with limited thirdorder dispersion. (control of radiation parameters)

  11. Detecting deception via eyeblink frequency modulation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    To assess the efficacy of using eyeblink frequency modulation to detect deception about a third party, 32 participants were sent on a mission to deliver a package to an interviewer. 17 of the participants lied to the interviewer about the details of their mock mission and 15 responded truthfully. During the interview, eyeblink frequency data were collected via electromyography and recorded video. Liars displayed eyeblink frequency suppression while lying, while truth tellers exhibited an increase in eyeblink frequency during the mission relevant questioning period. The compensatory flurry of eyeblinks following deception observed in previous studies was absent in the present study. A discriminant function using eyeblink suppression to predict lying correctly classified 81.3% of cases, with a sensitivity of 88.2% and a specificity of 73.3%. This technique, yielding a reasonable sensitivity, shows promise for future testing as, unlike polygraph, it is compatible with distance technology. PMID:24688844

  12. Radio Frequency Circuitry for Atomic Force Microscopy up to 100 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Dai; Kawai, Shigeki; Kawakatsu, Hideki

    2003-12-01

    We developed a control circuitry for non-contact atomic force microscopy which generates a self-excited vibration in a cantilever with a frequency up to 100 MHz, and detects its frequency modulation by a novel frequency demodulation technique. The circuitry was tested by applying it to an AFM whose tip vibration was parallel to sample surface. While the self-excitation loop has only a simple superheterodyne configuration, the excited vibration was as stable as we could obtain a topographic image of Si (111)-(7×7) surface with frequency feedback. The frequency demodulator is based on IQ (in-phase and quadrature-phase) direct frequency conversion to zero Hz intermediate frequency and operations including differentiations, multiplications and a subtraction between these signals. It was implemented as an analog circuit. We obtained an atomic step image in graphite by using this demodulator in frequency regulation feedback.

  13. Ultrasensitive detection of atmospheric trace gases using frequency modulation spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, David E.

    1986-01-01

    Frequency modulation (FM) spectroscopy is a new technique that promises to significantly extend the state-of-the-art in point detection of atmospheric trace gases. FM spectroscopy is essentially a balanced bridge optical heterodyne approach in which a small optical absorption or dispersion from an atomic or molecular species of interest generates an easily detected radio frequency (RF) signal. This signal can be monitored using standard RF signal processing techniques and is, in principle, limited only by the shot noise generated in the photodetector by the laser source employed. The use of very high modulation frequencies which exceed the spectral width of the probed absorption line distinguishes this technique from the well-known derivative spectroscopy which makes use of low (kHz) modulation frequencies. FM spectroscopy was recently extended to the 10 micron infrared (IR) spectral region where numerous polyatomic molecules exhibit characteristic vibrational-rotational bands. In conjunction with tunable semiconductor diode lasers, the quantum-noise-limited sensitivity of the technique should allow for the detection of absorptions as small as .00000001 in the IR spectral region. This sensitivity would allow for the detection of H2O2 at concentrations as low as 1 pptv with an integration time of 10 seconds.

  14. Speech recognition with amplitude and frequency modulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Fan-Gang; Nie, Kaibao; Stickney, Ginger S.; Kong, Ying-Yee; Vongphoe, Michael; Bhargave, Ashish; Wei, Chaogang; Cao, Keli

    2005-02-01

    Amplitude modulation (AM) and frequency modulation (FM) are commonly used in communication, but their relative contributions to speech recognition have not been fully explored. To bridge this gap, we derived slowly varying AM and FM from speech sounds and conducted listening tests using stimuli with different modulations in normal-hearing and cochlear-implant subjects. We found that although AM from a limited number of spectral bands may be sufficient for speech recognition in quiet, FM significantly enhances speech recognition in noise, as well as speaker and tone recognition. Additional speech reception threshold measures revealed that FM is particularly critical for speech recognition with a competing voice and is independent of spectral resolution and similarity. These results suggest that AM and FM provide independent yet complementary contributions to support robust speech recognition under realistic listening situations. Encoding FM may improve auditory scene analysis, cochlear-implant, and audiocoding performance. auditory analysis | cochlear implant | neural code | phase | scene analysis

  15. Vacuum-ultraviolet frequency-modulation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hollenstein, U; Schmutz, H; Agner, J A; Sommavilla, M; Merkt, F

    2017-01-07

    Frequency-modulation (FM) spectroscopy has been extended to the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) range of the electromagnetic spectrum. Coherent VUV laser radiation is produced by resonance-enhanced sum-frequency mixing (νVUV=2νUV+ν2) in Kr and Xe using two near-Fourier-transform-limited laser pulses of frequencies νUV and ν2. Sidebands generated in the output of the second laser (ν2) using an electro-optical modulator operating at the frequency νmod are directly transferred to the VUV and used to record FM spectra. Demodulation is demonstrated both at νmod and 2νmod. The main advantages of the method compared to VUV absorption spectroscopy are its background-free nature, the fact is that its implementation using table-top laser equipment is straightforward and that it can be used to record VUV absorption spectra of cold samples in skimmed supersonic beams simultaneously with laser-induced-fluorescence and photoionization spectra. To illustrate these advantages, we present VUV FM spectra of Ar, Kr, and N2 in selected regions between 105000 cm(-1) and 122000 cm(-1).

  16. JPL Ultrastable Trapped Ion Atomic Frequency Standards.

    PubMed

    Burt, Eric A; Yi, Lin; Tucker, Blake; Hamell, Robert; Tjoelker, Robert L

    2016-07-01

    Recently, room temperature trapped ion atomic clock development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has focused on three directions: 1) ultrastable atomic clocks, usually for terrestrial applications emphasizing ultimate stability performance and autonomous timekeeping; 2) new atomic clock technology for space flight applications that require strict adherence to size, weight, and power requirements; and 3) miniature clocks. In this paper, we concentrate on the first direction and present a design and the initial results from a new ultrastable clock referred to as L10 that achieves a short-term stability of 4.5 ×10(-14)/τ(1/2) and an initial measurement of no significant drift with an uncertainty of 2.4 ×10(-16) /day over a two-week period.

  17. Wideband laser locking to an atomic reference with modulation transfer spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Negnevitsky, V; Turner, L D

    2013-02-11

    We demonstrate that conventional modulated spectroscopy apparatus, used for laser frequency stabilization in many atomic physics laboratories, can be enhanced to provide a wideband lock delivering deep suppression of frequency noise across the acoustic range. Using an acousto-optic modulator driven with an agile oscillator, we show that wideband frequency modulation of the pump laser in modulation transfer spectroscopy produces the unique single lock-point spectrum previously demonstrated with electro-optic phase modulation. We achieve a laser lock with 100 kHz feedback bandwidth, limited by our laser control electronics. This bandwidth is sufficient to reduce frequency noise by 30 dB across the acoustic range and narrows the imputed linewidth by a factor of five.

  18. Wireless vibration sensor using frequency modulation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minhyuck; Yoon, Hwan-Sik; Kim, Sehun; Kim, Joo-Hyung

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, wireless strain sensors have received attention as an efficient method to measure response of a structure in a remote location. Wireless sensors developed for remote measurement include RF wireless sensor modules and microstrip antenna-based sensors. In this paper, a simple wireless vibration sensor based on a piezoelectric sensor and the Frequency Modulation (FM) technique is developed for remote measurement of vibrating structures. The piezoelectric sensor can generate a voltage signal proportional to dynamic strain of the host structure. The voltage signal is then frequency modulated and transmitted wirelessly to a remote station by a simple FM transmitter circuit. Finally, the received signal is demodulated by a conventional FM radio circuit, and the vibration measurement data can be recovered. Since this type of wireless sensor employs a simple FM circuit, they do not require any wireless data transmission protocols allowing a low-cost wireless sensor in compact format. The proposed concept of the wireless vibration measurement is experimentally verified by measuring vibration of an aluminum cantilever beam. The proposed sensor could potentially be an efficient and cost effective method for measuring vibration of remote structures for dynamic testing or structural health monitoring.

  19. Velocity-modulation atomization of liquid jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dressler, John L.

    1994-01-01

    A novel atomizer based on high-amplitude velocity atomization has been developed. Presently, the most common methods of atomization can use only the Rayleigh instability of a liquid cylinder and the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability of a liquid sheet. Our atomizer is capable of atomizing liquid jets by the excitation and destabilization of many other higher-order modes of surface deformation. The potential benefits of this sprayer are more uniform fuel air mixtures, faster fuel-air mixing, extended flow ranges for commercial nozzles, and the reduction of nozzle plugging by producing small drops from large nozzles.

  20. A frequency selective atom interferometer magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braje, D. A.; DeSavage, S. A.; Adler, C. L.; Davis, J. P.; Narducci, F. A.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the magnetic-field frequency selectivity of a time-domain interferometer based on the number and timing of intermediate ? pulses. We theoretically show that by adjusting the number of ? pulses and the ?-pulse timing, we can control the frequency selectivity of the interferometer to time varying and DC magnetic fields. We present experimental data demonstrating increased coherence time due to bandwidth filtering with the inclusion of a ? pulse between the initial and final ? pulses, which mitigates sensitivity to low frequency magnetic fields.

  1. An optical frequency standard based on ultracold magnesium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, A. N.; Bonert, A. E.; Brazhnikov, D. V.; Prudnikov, O. N.; Tropnikov, M. A.; Kuznetsov, S. A.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Bagayev, S. N.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the recent experimental results on development of an optical frequency standard based on ultra cold magnesium atoms with relative frequency uncertainty and long term stability at the level of Δv/v <10‑16. We stabilized the frequency of our clock laser system at 655 THz to narrow Ramsey fringes in a time separated laser fields interacting with cooled Mg atoms localized in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). The intercombination line 1S0→3P1 was used as the reference for frequency stabilization. The results of stabilization were studied with femtosecond comb based on Ti:Sa laser.

  2. Holographic frequency modulated continuous wave laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaye, P.; Roosen, G.

    2007-10-01

    We present the operating principle and a first experimental characterization of a holographic rangefinder, that couples a two wave mixing phase demodulation set-up with a frequency modulated laser source. In its first implementation, the system allows millimetre sensitivity on tens of meters measurement range with the ability to work with scattering surfaces. This paper has been presented at “3e colloque interdisciplinaire en instrumentation (C2I 2004)”, École Normale Supérieure de Cachan, 29 30 janvier 2004.

  3. Transient high-frequency ultrasonic water atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreras, F.; Amaveda, H.; Lozano, A.

    2002-06-01

    An experimental study was performed to improve the understanding of the characteristics of ultrasonic water atomization when excited with waves in the MHz range. In the present experiments, small volumes of water were atomized, observing the temporal evolution of the process. Typical diameters of the resulting droplets are of the order of a few microns. To visualize them, images were acquired with very high magnification. Appropriate lenses were used to enable high resolution at a distance from the flow. Droplet size distributions were also calculated with a Malvern diffractometer. Droplet exit velocity was measured using particle image velocimetry. It was noticeable that, as the remaining liquid mass deposited over the ultrasonic transducer decreased, the atomization characteristics changed, and a second peak of larger droplets appeared in the size distribution function. This phenomenon is related to the change in the curvature of the liquid surface. Although results are not conclusive, it appears that, under the conditions in this study, some observations about droplet formation are better described by cavitation phenomena rather than by the simplified surface wave theory usually invoked to explain these processes.

  4. Stabilization of a laser on a large-detuned atomic-reference frequency by resonant interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barboza, Priscila M. T.; Nascimento, Guilherme G.; Araújo, Michelle O.; da Silva, Cícero M.; Cavalcante, Hugo L. D. de S.; Oriá, Marcos; Chevrollier, Martine; Passerat de Silans, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    We report a simple technique for stabilization of a laser frequency at the wings of an atomic resonance. The reference signal used for stabilization issues from interference effects obtained in a low-quality cavity filled with a resonant atomic vapour. For a frequency detuned 2.6 GHz from the 133Cs D2 6S{}1/2 F = 4 to 6P{}3/2 F’ = 5 transition, the fractional frequency Allan deviation is 10-8 for averaging times of 300 s, corresponding to a frequency deviation of 4 MHz. Adequate choice of the atomic density and of the cell thickness allows locking the laser at detunings larger than 10 GHz. Such a simple technique does not require magnetic fields or signal modulation.

  5. Multiphoton Raman Atom Optics with Frequency-Swept Adiabatic Passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotru, Krish; Butts, David; Kinast, Joseph; Stoner, Richard

    2016-05-01

    Light-pulse atom interferometry is a promising candidate for future inertial navigators, gravitational wave detectors, and measurements of fundamental physical constants. The sensitivity of this technique, however, is often limited by the small momentum separations created between interfering atom wave packets (typically ~ 2 ℏk) . We address this issue using light-pulse atom optics derived from stimulated Raman transitions and frequency-swept adiabatic rapid passage (ARP). In experiments, these Raman ARP atom optics have generated up to 30 ℏk photon recoil momenta in an acceleration-sensitive atom interferometer, thereby enhancing the phase shift per unit acceleration by a factor of 15. Since this approach forgoes evaporative cooling and velocity selection, it could enable large-area atom interferometry at higher data rates, while also lowering the atom shot-noise-limited measurement uncertainty.

  6. Recognition of frequency-modulated signals using the Wigner distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vysotskiy, M. G.; Kaasik, V. P.; Rogov, S. A.; Rozov, S. V.

    2016-03-01

    Precision and resolution ability of the frequency-modulated signals time-frequency distributions at the formation of these distributions with the help of pseudo-Wigner processors is investigated. Linear-frequency modulated signals and signals with frequency dependence on time to the higher than the first power are considered. The results of the numerical simulation are presented.

  7. Atomic vapor cells for chip-scale atomic clocks with improved long-term frequency stability.

    PubMed

    Knappe, S; Gerginov, V; Schwindt, P D D; Shah, V; Robinson, H G; Hollberg, L; Kitching, J

    2005-09-15

    A novel technique for microfabricating alkali atom vapor cells is described in which alkali atoms are evaporated into a micromachined cell cavity through a glass nozzle. A cell of interior volume 1 mm3, containing 87Rb and a buffer gas, was made in this way and integrated into an atomic clock based on coherent population trapping. A fractional frequency instability of 6 x 10(-12) at 1000 s of integration was measured. The long-term drift of the F=1, mF=0-->F=2, mF=0 hyperfine frequency of atoms in these cells is below 5 x 10(-11)/day.

  8. High-frequency multimodal atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nievergelt, Adrian P; Adams, Jonathan D; Odermatt, Pascal D

    2014-01-01

    Summary Multifrequency atomic force microscopy imaging has been recently demonstrated as a powerful technique for quickly obtaining information about the mechanical properties of a sample. Combining this development with recent gains in imaging speed through small cantilevers holds the promise of a convenient, high-speed method for obtaining nanoscale topography as well as mechanical properties. Nevertheless, instrument bandwidth limitations on cantilever excitation and readout have restricted the ability of multifrequency techniques to fully benefit from small cantilevers. We present an approach for cantilever excitation and deflection readout with a bandwidth of 20 MHz, enabling multifrequency techniques extended beyond 2 MHz for obtaining materials contrast in liquid and air, as well as soft imaging of delicate biological samples. PMID:25671141

  9. Resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H. (Inventor); Cantrell, Sean A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A scanning probe microscope and methodology called resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM), employs an ultrasonic wave launched from the bottom of a sample while the cantilever of an atomic force microscope, driven at a frequency differing from the ultrasonic frequency by one of the contact resonance frequencies of the cantilever, engages the sample top surface. The nonlinear mixing of the oscillating cantilever and the ultrasonic wave in the region defined by the cantilever tip-sample surface interaction force generates difference-frequency oscillations at the cantilever contact resonance. The resonance-enhanced difference-frequency signals are used to create images of nanoscale near-surface and subsurface features.

  10. New frequency ratios with a PHz-scale atomic clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFerran, J. J.

    2016-11-01

    Atomic clocks are a tour de force when it comes to rigorous tests of measurement. The ultimate validation of one’s careful assessments is to find agreement on a given parameter with a completely independent laboratory. Frequency ratios between clock transitions of different atomic species make for quintessential tests of measurement precision. Tyumenev et al (2016 New J. Phys. 18 113002) report on frequency ratio measurements between a 199Hg optical lattice clock and three other atomic frequency standards: 133Cs, 87Rb and 87Sr, two of which are unprecedented in accuracy. Most notable is the level of agreement for the 199Hg/87Sr frequency ratio found between two independent laboratories at 1.7× {10}-16; further indication that optical lattice clocks are fulfilling their early expectations.

  11. Network Models of Frequency Modulated Sweep Detection

    PubMed Central

    Skorheim, Steven; Razak, Khaleel; Bazhenov, Maxim

    2014-01-01

    Frequency modulated (FM) sweeps are common in species-specific vocalizations, including human speech. Auditory neurons selective for the direction and rate of frequency change in FM sweeps are present across species, but the synaptic mechanisms underlying such selectivity are only beginning to be understood. Even less is known about mechanisms of experience-dependent changes in FM sweep selectivity. We present three network models of synaptic mechanisms of FM sweep direction and rate selectivity that explains experimental data: (1) The ‘facilitation’ model contains frequency selective cells operating as coincidence detectors, summing up multiple excitatory inputs with different time delays. (2) The ‘duration tuned’ model depends on interactions between delayed excitation and early inhibition. The strength of delayed excitation determines the preferred duration. Inhibitory rebound can reinforce the delayed excitation. (3) The ‘inhibitory sideband’ model uses frequency selective inputs to a network of excitatory and inhibitory cells. The strength and asymmetry of these connections results in neurons responsive to sweeps in a single direction of sufficient sweep rate. Variations of these properties, can explain the diversity of rate-dependent direction selectivity seen across species. We show that the inhibitory sideband model can be trained using spike timing dependent plasticity (STDP) to develop direction selectivity from a non-selective network. These models provide a means to compare the proposed synaptic and spectrotemporal mechanisms of FM sweep processing and can be utilized to explore cellular mechanisms underlying experience- or training-dependent changes in spectrotemporal processing across animal models. Given the analogy between FM sweeps and visual motion, these models can serve a broader function in studying stimulus movement across sensory epithelia. PMID:25514021

  12. Predictions for collisional frequency shifts of ultracold rubidium atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkelmans, S. J. J. M. F.; Verhaar, B. J.; Heinzen, D. J.; Gibble, K.

    1997-04-01

    A few years ago atomic fountains using cold ^133Cs atoms led to a breakthrough in the field of atomic frequency standards(A. Clairon, C. Salomon, S. Guellati, and W. D. Phillips, Europhys. Lett. 16), 165 (1991); K. Gibble and S. Chu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 1771 (1993).. It was soon found that the frequency shifts induced by collisions between atoms during their fountain orbit stand in the way to drawing the full benefits from this development. A possible way out is to switch to another atomic species(K. Gibble and B.J. Verhaar, Phys. Rev. A 52), 3370 (1995).. Recent experiments have made it possible to determine cold collision parameters for pairs of rubidium atoms with unprecedented accuracy(J.M. Vogels, C.C. Tsai, R.S. Freeland, S.J.J.M.F. Kokkelmans, B.J. Verhaar, and D.J. Heinzen (submitted).). Making use of these parameters we predict the collisional frequency shifts for a ^87Rb and a ^85Rb laser-cooled clock. Our results show the prospects for new atomic clocks based on ultracold rubidium to be promising.

  13. Melanoma incidence and frequency modulation (FM) broadcasting.

    PubMed

    Hallberg, Orjan; Johansson, Olle

    2002-01-01

    The incidence of melanoma has been increasing steadily in many countries since 1960, but the underlying mechanism causing this increase remains elusive. The incidence of melanoma has been linked to the distance to frequency modulation (FM) broadcasting towers. In the current study, the authors sought to determine if there was also a related link on a larger scale for entire countries. Exposure-time-specific incidence was extracted from exposure and incidence data from 4 different countries, and this was compared with reported age-specific incidence of melanoma. Geographic differences in melanoma incidence were compared with the magnitude of this environmental stress. The exposure-time-specific incidence from all 4 countries became almost identical, and they were approximately equal to the reported age-specific incidence of melanoma. A correlation between melanoma incidence and the number of locally receivable FM transmitters was found. The authors concluded that melanoma is associated with exposure to FM broadcasting.

  14. The Brazilian time and frequency atomic standards program.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mushtaq; Magalhães, Daniel V; Bebeachibuli, Aida; Müller, Stella T; Alves, Renato F; Ortega, Tiago A; Weiner, John; Bagnato, Vanderlei S

    2008-06-01

    Cesium atomic beam clocks have been the workhorse for many demanding applications in science and technology for the past four decades. Tests of the fundamental laws of physics and the search for minute changes in fundamental constants, the synchronization of telecommunication networks, and realization of the satellite-based global positioning system would not be possible without atomic clocks. The adoption of optical cooling and trapping techniques, has produced a major advance in atomic clock precision. Cold-atom fountain and compact cold-atom clocks have also been developed. Measurement precision of a few parts in 10(15) has been demonstrated for a cold-atom fountain clock. We present here an overview of the time and frequency metrology program based on cesium atoms under development at USP São Carlos. This activity consists of construction and characterization of atomic-beam, and several variations of cold-atom clocks. We discuss the basic working principles, construction, evaluation, and important applications of atomic clocks in the Brazilian program.

  15. Difference-frequency combs in cold atom physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliese, Russell; Hoghooghi, Nazanin; Puppe, Thomas; Rohde, Felix; Sell, Alexander; Zach, Armin; Leisching, Patrick; Kaenders, Wilhelm; Keegan, Niamh C.; Bounds, Alistair D.; Bridge, Elizabeth M.; Leonard, Jack; Adams, Charles S.; Cornish, Simon L.; Jones, Matthew P. A.

    2016-12-01

    Optical frequency combs provide the clockwork to relate optical frequencies to radio frequencies. Hence, combs allow optical frequencies to be measured with respect to a radio frequency where the accuracy is limited only by the reference signal. In order to provide a stable link between the radio and optical frequencies, the two parameters of the frequency comb must be fixed: the carrier envelope offset frequency, f ceo, and the pulse repetition-rate, f rep. We have developed the first optical frequency comb based on difference frequency generation (DFG) that eliminates f ceo by design — specifically tailored for applications in cold atom physics. An f ceo-free spectrum at 1550 nm is generated from a super continuum spanning more than an optical octave. Established amplification and frequency conversion techniques based on reliable telecom fibre technology allow the generation of multiple wavelength outputs. The DFG comb is a convenient tool to both stabilise laser sources and accurately measure optical frequencies in Rydberg experiments and more generally in quantum optics. In this paper we discuss the frequency comb design, characterization, and optical frequency measurement of Strontium Rydberg states. The DFG technique allows for a compact and robust, passively f ceo stable frequency comb significantly improving reliability in practical applications.

  16. Low frequency mechanical modes of viruses with atomic detail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykeman, Eric; Sankey, Otto

    2008-03-01

    The low frequency mechanical modes of viruses can provide important insights into the large global motions that a virus may exhibit. Recently it has been proposed that these large global motions may be excited using impulsive stimulated Raman scattering producing permanent damage to the virus. In order to understand the coupling of external probes to the capsid, vibrational modes with atomic detail are essential. The standard approach to find the atomic modes of a molecule with N atoms requires the formation and diagonlization of a 3Nx3N matrix. As viruses have 10^5 or more atoms, the standard approach is difficult. Using ideas from electronic structure theory, we have developed a method to construct the mechanical modes of large molecules such as viruses with atomic detail. Application to viruses such as the cowpea chlorotic mottle virus, satellite tobacco necrosis virus, and M13 bacteriophage show a fairly complicated picture of the mechanical modes.

  17. Frequency redistribution function for the polarized two-term atom

    SciTech Connect

    Casini, R.; Landi Degl'Innocenti, M.; Manso Sainz, R.; Landolfi, M.

    2014-08-20

    We present a generalized frequency redistribution function for the polarized two-term atom in an arbitrary magnetic field. This result is derived within a new formulation of the quantum problem of coherent scattering of polarized radiation by atoms in the collisionless regime. The general theory, which is based on a diagrammatic treatment of the atom-photon interaction, is still a work in progress. However, the results anticipated here are relevant enough for the study of the magnetism of the solar chromosphere and of interest for astrophysics in general.

  18. Note: Laser frequency shifting by using two novel triple-pass acousto-optic modulator configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos-Lopez, E. de; Lopez, J. M.; Lopez, S.; Espinosa, M. G.; Lizama, L. A.

    2012-11-15

    We report the design of two novel triple-pass acousto-optic modulator systems. These designs are extensions of the well known acousto-optic modulator (AOM) double-pass configuration, which eliminates the angle dependence of the diffracted beam with respect to the modulation frequency. In a triple-pass system, however, the frequency dependence of the angle does not disappear but the frequency shift is larger, spanning 3 times the AOM central frequency. In some applications, such as optically pumped Cesium-beam frequency standards, the frequencies of the two laser beams remain fixed and a triple-pass optical system can be used to reduce to one the number of lasers used in such atomic clocks. The two triple-pass configurations use either a retro-reflecting mirror, or a right angle prism to pass for third time the laser beam through the AOM, obtaining diffraction efficiencies of about 27% and 44%, respectively.

  19. Optical Frequency Standards Based on Neutral Atoms and Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riehle, Fritz; Helmcke, Juergen

    The current status and prospects of optical frequency standards based on neutral atomic and molecular absorbers are reviewed. Special attention is given to an optical frequency standard based on cold Ca atoms which are interrogated with a pulsed excitation scheme leading to resolved line structures with a quality factor Q > 10^12. The optical frequency was measured by comparison with PTB's primary clock to be νCa = 455 986 240 494.13 kHz with a total relative uncertainty of 2.5 x10^-13. After a recent recommendation of the International Committee of Weights and Measures (CIPM), this frequency standard now represents one of the most accurate realizations of the length unit.

  20. Indirect modulation of nonmagnetic probes for force modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie-Ren; Garno, Jayne C

    2009-02-15

    Frequency-dependent changes for phase and amplitude images are demonstrated with test platforms of organosilane ring patterns, using force modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) with an alternate instrument configuration. The imaging setup using indirect magnetic modulation (IMM) is based on indirect oscillation of soft, nonmagnetic cantilevers, with spring constants <1 N m(-1). The tip is driven to vibrate by the motion of a tip holder assembly which contains ferromagnetic materials. The entire tip assembly is induced to vibrate with the flux of an external ac electromagnetic field, supplied by a wire coil solenoid placed underneath the sample plate. With the use of IMM, dynamic parameters of the driving frequencies and amplitude of the tip motion can be optimized to sensitively map the elastic response of samples. An advantage of this instrument setup is that a magnetic coating is not required to drive the periodic oscillation of the tip. The instrument configuration for IMM may not be practical for intermittent imaging modes, which often work best with stiff cantilevers. However, indirect actuation provides an effective approach for imaging with low force setpoints and is well-suited for dynamic AFM modes using continuous contact imaging.

  1. Compact frequency standard using atoms trapped on a chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Martínez, F.; Lacroûte, C.; Rosenbusch, P.; Reinhard, F.; Deutsch, C.; Schneider, T.; Reichel, J.

    2011-01-01

    We present a compact atomic frequency standard based on the interrogation of magnetically trapped 87Rb atoms. Two photons, in the microwave and radiofrequency domain excite the atomic transition. At a magnetic field of 3.23 G this transition from ∣F = 1, mF = -1> to ∣F = 2, mF = 1> is 1st order insensitive to magnetic field variations. Long Ramsey interrogation times can thus be achieved, leading to a projected stability in the low 10-13 at 1 s. This makes this device a viable alternative to LITE and HORACE as a good candidate for replacing or complementing the rubidium frequency standards and passive hydrogen masers already on board of the GPS, GLONASS, and GALILEO satellites. Here we present preliminary results. We use an atom chip to cool and trap the atoms. A coplanar waveguide is integrated to the chip to carry the Ramsey interrogation signal, making the physics package potentially as small as (5 cm)3. We describe the experimental apparatus and show preliminary Ramsey fringes of 1.25 Hz linewidth. We also show a preliminary frequency stability σy = 1.5 × 10-12τ-1/2 for 10 < τ < 103 s. This represents one order of magnitude improvement with respect to previous experiments.

  2. Modulating action of low frequency oscillations on high frequency instabilities in Hall thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Liqiu, Wei E-mail: weiliqiu@hit.edu.cn; Liang, Han; Ziyi, Yang; Jing, Li; Yong, Cao; Daren, Yu; Jianhua, Du

    2015-02-07

    It is found that the low frequency oscillations have modulating action on high frequency instabilities in Hall thrusters. The physical mechanism of this modulation is discussed and verified by numerical simulations. Theoretical analyses indicate that the wide-range fluctuations of plasma density and electric field associated with the low frequency oscillations affect the electron drift velocity and anomalous electron transport across the magnetic field. The amplitude and frequency of high frequency oscillations are modulated by low frequency oscillations, which show the periodic variation in the time scale of low frequency oscillations.

  3. Frequency characteristics of standing-wave acoustooptic modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apolonskii, A. A.; Shchebetov, S. D.

    1991-10-01

    Experimental data are presented on the performance of wide-aperture standing-wave acoustooptic modulators used as laser mode lockers. In particular, attention is given to the acoustooptic and electrical frequency characteristics of the modulators. The existence of a large effective diffraction frequency region below the fundamental frequency is demonstrated. Individual frequency regions of effective diffraction do not correspond to the even and odd harmonics.

  4. Manipulating Frequency-Bin Entangled States in Cold Atoms

    PubMed Central

    Zavatta, A.; Artoni, M.; Viscor, D.; La Rocca, G.

    2014-01-01

    Optical manipulation of entanglement harnessing the frequency degree of freedom is important for encoding of quantum information. We here devise a phase-resonant excitation mechanism of an atomic interface where full control of a narrowband single-photon two-mode frequency entangled state can be efficiently achieved. We illustrate the working physical mechanism for an interface made of cold 87Rb atoms where entanglement is well preserved from degradation over a typical 100 μm length scale of the interface and with fractional delays of the order of unity. The scheme provides a basis for efficient multi-frequency and multi-photon entanglement, which is not easily accessible to polarization and spatial encoding. PMID:24487523

  5. Drive-amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy: From vacuum to liquids

    PubMed Central

    Jaafar, Miriam; Cuenca, Mariano; Melcher, John; Raman, Arvind

    2012-01-01

    Summary We introduce drive-amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy as a dynamic mode with outstanding performance in all environments from vacuum to liquids. As with frequency modulation, the new mode follows a feedback scheme with two nested loops: The first keeps the cantilever oscillation amplitude constant by regulating the driving force, and the second uses the driving force as the feedback variable for topography. Additionally, a phase-locked loop can be used as a parallel feedback allowing separation of the conservative and nonconservative interactions. We describe the basis of this mode and present some examples of its performance in three different environments. Drive-amplutide modulation is a very stable, intuitive and easy to use mode that is free of the feedback instability associated with the noncontact-to-contact transition that occurs in the frequency-modulation mode. PMID:22563531

  6. Drive-amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy: From vacuum to liquids.

    PubMed

    Jaafar, Miriam; Martínez-Martín, David; Cuenca, Mariano; Melcher, John; Raman, Arvind; Gómez-Herrero, Julio

    2012-01-01

    We introduce drive-amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy as a dynamic mode with outstanding performance in all environments from vacuum to liquids. As with frequency modulation, the new mode follows a feedback scheme with two nested loops: The first keeps the cantilever oscillation amplitude constant by regulating the driving force, and the second uses the driving force as the feedback variable for topography. Additionally, a phase-locked loop can be used as a parallel feedback allowing separation of the conservative and nonconservative interactions. We describe the basis of this mode and present some examples of its performance in three different environments. Drive-amplutide modulation is a very stable, intuitive and easy to use mode that is free of the feedback instability associated with the noncontact-to-contact transition that occurs in the frequency-modulation mode.

  7. Detection of frequency modulation by hearing-impaired listeners: Effects of carrier frequency, modulation rate, and added amplitude modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Brian C. J.; Skrodzka, Ewa

    2002-01-01

    It has been proposed that the detection of frequency modulation (FM) of sinusoidal carriers can be mediated by two mechanisms: a place mechanism based on FM-induced amplitude modulation (AM) in the excitation pattern, and a temporal mechanism based on phase-locking in the auditory nerve. The temporal mechanism appears to be ``sluggish'' and does not play a role for FM rates above about 10 Hz. It also does not play a role for high carrier frequencies (above about 5 kHz). This experiment examined FM detection in three young subjects with normal hearing and four elderly subjects with cochlear hearing loss. Carrier frequencies were 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, and 6 kHz and modulation rates were 2, 5, 10, and 20 Hz. FM detection thresholds were measured both in the absence of AM, and with AM of a fixed depth (m=0.33) added in both intervals of a forced-choice trial. The added AM was intended to disrupt cues based on FM-induced AM in the excitation pattern. Generally, the hearing-impaired subjects performed markedly more poorly than the normal-hearing subjects. For the normal-hearing subjects, the disruptive effect of the AM tended to increase with increasing modulation rate, for carrier frequencies below 6 kHz, as found previously by Moore and Sek [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 100, 2320-2331 (1996)]. For the hearing-impaired subjects, the disruptive effective of the AM was generally larger than for the normal-hearing subjects, and the magnitude of the disruption did not consistently increase with increasing modulation rate. The results suggest that cochlear hearing impairment adversely affects both temporal and excitation pattern mechanisms of FM detection.

  8. Global analysis of frequency modulation experiments in a vortex oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, S. Y.; Thirion, C.; Hoarau, C.; Baraduc, C.; Diény, B.

    2016-02-01

    Frequency modulation is performed on a vortex oscillator at various modulation frequencies and powers. A global analysis of the whole set of data is proposed, so that all experimental curves are described with the same four parameters. Three of these parameters describe the dependence of the instantaneous frequency with modulating current. This dependence appears significantly different from the frequency-current dependence observed in a quasi-static experiment. The discrepancy is ascribed to the different time scales involved, compared to the relaxation time of the vortex oscillator.

  9. Electromagnetic induction imaging with a radio-frequency atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deans, Cameron; Marmugi, Luca; Hussain, Sarah; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2016-03-01

    We report on a compact, tunable, and scalable to large arrays imaging device, based on a radio-frequency optically pumped atomic magnetometer operating in magnetic induction tomography modality. Imaging of conductive objects is performed at room temperature, in an unshielded environment and without background subtraction. Conductivity maps of target objects exhibit not only excellent performance in terms of shape reconstruction but also demonstrate detection of sub-millimetric cracks and penetration of conductive barriers. The results presented here demonstrate the potential of a future generation of imaging instruments, which combine magnetic induction tomography and the unmatched performance of atomic magnetometers.

  10. Rubidium atomic frequency standards for GPS Block IIR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, William J.

    1990-01-01

    The Rubidium Atomic Frequency Standards (RAFS) were provided for the GPS Block IIR NAVSTAR satellites. These satellites will replenish and upgrade the space segment of the Global Positioning System in the mid 1990s. The GPS RAFS Rb clocks are the latest generation of the high-performance rubidium frequency standards. They offer an aging rate in the low pp 10(exp 14)/day range and a drift-corrected 1-day stability in the low pp 10(exp 14) range. The Block IIR version of these devices will have improved performance, higher reliability, smaller size, and greater radiation hardness. The GPS Block IIR atomic clocks have a natural frequency configuration whereby they output a frequency of about 13.4 MHz that is a submultiple of the atomic resonance of Rb (or Cs). The RAFS operates at a low, fixed C-field for increased stability. The GPS Block IIR RAFS design, including the changes and improvements made, and the test results obtained are described.

  11. Detection of electron paramagnetic resonance absorption using frequency modulation.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Hiroshi; Kuyama, Toshifumi; Ono, Mitsuhiro; Shimoyama, Yuhei

    2003-10-01

    A frequency modulation (FM) method was developed to measure electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) absorption. The first-derivative spectrum of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) powder was measured with this FM method. Frequency modulation of up to 1.6 MHz (peak-to-peak) was achieved at a microwave carrier frequency of 1.1 GHz. This corresponds to a magnetic field modulation of 57microT (peak-to-peak) at 40.3 mT. By using a tunable microwave resonator and automatic control systems, we achieved a practical continuous-wave (CW) EPR spectrometer that incorporates the FM method. In the present experiments, the EPR signal intensity was proportional to the magnitude of frequency modulation. The background signal at the modulation frequency (1 kHz) for EPR detection was also proportional to the magnitude of frequency modulation. An automatic matching control (AMC) system reduced the amplitude of noise in microwave detection and improved the baseline stability. Distortion of the spectral lineshape was seen when the spectrometer settings were not appropriate, e.g., with a lack of the open-loop gain in automatic tuning control (ATC). FM is an alternative to field modulation when the side-effect of field modulation is detrimental for EPR detection. The present spectroscopic technique based on the FM scheme is useful for measuring the first derivative with respect to the microwave frequency in investigations of electron-spin-related phenomena.

  12. Cancer cell proliferation is inhibited by specific modulation frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, J W; Pennison, M J; Brezovich, I; Yi, N; Yang, C T; Ramaker, R; Absher, D; Myers, R M; Kuster, N; Costa, F P; Barbault, A; Pasche, B

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is clinical evidence that very low and safe levels of amplitude-modulated electromagnetic fields administered via an intrabuccal spoon-shaped probe may elicit therapeutic responses in patients with cancer. However, there is no known mechanism explaining the anti-proliferative effect of very low intensity electromagnetic fields. Methods: To understand the mechanism of this novel approach, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells were exposed to 27.12 MHz radiofrequency electromagnetic fields using in vitro exposure systems designed to replicate in vivo conditions. Cancer cells were exposed to tumour-specific modulation frequencies, previously identified by biofeedback methods in patients with a diagnosis of cancer. Control modulation frequencies consisted of randomly chosen modulation frequencies within the same 100 Hz–21 kHz range as cancer-specific frequencies. Results: The growth of HCC and breast cancer cells was significantly decreased by HCC-specific and breast cancer-specific modulation frequencies, respectively. However, the same frequencies did not affect proliferation of nonmalignant hepatocytes or breast epithelial cells. Inhibition of HCC cell proliferation was associated with downregulation of XCL2 and PLP2. Furthermore, HCC-specific modulation frequencies disrupted the mitotic spindle. Conclusion: These findings uncover a novel mechanism controlling the growth of cancer cells at specific modulation frequencies without affecting normal tissues, which may have broad implications in oncology. PMID:22134506

  13. Investigations of laser pumped gas cell atomic frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, C. H.; Camparo, J. C.; Fueholz, R. P.

    1982-01-01

    The performance characteristics of a rubidium gas cell atomic frequency standard might be improved by replacing the standard rubidium discharge lamp with a single mode laser diode. Aspects of the laser pumped gas cell atomic clock studied include effects due to laser intensity, laser detuning, and the choice of the particular atomic absorption line. Results indicate that the performance of the gas cell clock may be improved by judicious choice of the operating parameters of the laser diode. The laser diode also proved to be a valuable tool in investigating the operation of the conventional gas cell clock. Results concerning linewidths, the light shift effect and the effect of isotopic spin exchange in the conventional gas cell clock are reported.

  14. Radio-frequency dressed lattices for ultracold alkali atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinuco-León, German A.; Garraway, Barry M.

    2015-05-01

    Ultracold atomic gases in periodic potentials are powerful platforms for exploring quantum physics in regimes dominated by many-body effects as well as for developing applications that benefit from quantum mechanical effects. Further advances face a range of challenges including the realization of potentials with lattice constants smaller than optical wavelengths as well as creating schemes for effective addressing and manipulation of single sites. In this paper we propose a dressed-based scheme for creating periodic potential landscapes for ultracold alkali atoms with the capability of overcoming such difficulties. The dressed approach has the advantage of operating in a low-frequency regime where decoherence and heating effects due to spontaneous emission do not take place. These results highlight the possibilities of atom-chip technology in the future development of quantum simulations and quantum technologies, and provide a realistic scheme for starting such an exploration.

  15. Detection of atomic clock frequency jumps with the Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    Galleani, Lorenzo; Tavella, Patrizia

    2012-03-01

    Frequency jumps are common anomalies in atomic clocks aboard navigation system satellites. These anomalous behaviors must be detected quickly and accurately to minimize the impact on user positioning. We develop a detector for frequency jumps based on the Kalman filter. Numerical simulations show that the detector is fast, with high probability of detection and low probability of false alarms. It also has a low computational cost because it takes advantage of the recursive nature of the Kalman filter. Therefore, it can be used in applications in which little computational power is available, such as aboard navigation system satellites.

  16. Compact frequency-modulation Q-switched single-frequency fiber laser at 1083 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuanfei; Feng, Zhouming; Xu, Shanhui; Mo, Shupei; Yang, Changsheng; Li, Can; Gan, Jiulin; Chen, Dongdan; Yang, Zhongmin

    2015-12-01

    A compact frequency-modulation Q-switched single-frequency fiber laser is demonstrated at 1083 nm. The short linear resonant cavity consists of a 12 mm long homemade Yb3+-doped phosphate fiber and a pair of fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) in which the Q-switching and the frequency excursion is achieved by a tensile-induced period modulation. Over 375 MHz frequency-tuning range is achieved with a modulation frequency varying from tens to hundreds of kilohertz. The highest peak power of the output pulse reaching 6.93 W at the repetition rate of 10 kHz is obtained.

  17. Technique for measuring atomic recoil frequency using coherence functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beattie, S.; Barrett, B.; Chan, I.; Mok, C.; Yavin, I.; Kumarakrishnan, A.

    2009-02-01

    We have developed a technique for measuring the atomic recoil frequency using a single-state echo-type atom interferometer that manipulates laser-cooled atoms in the ground state. The interferometer relies on momentum-state interference due to two standing-wave pulses that produce density gratings. The interference is modified by applying a third standing-wave pulse during the interferometer pulse sequence. As a result, the grating contrast exhibits periodic revivals at the atomic recoil frequency ωr as a function of the time at which the third pulse is applied, allowing ωr to be measured easily and precisely. The contrast is accurately described by a coherence function, which is the Fourier transform of the momentum distribution, produced by the third pulse and by the theory of echo formation. If the third pulse is a traveling wave, loss of grating contrast is observed, an effect also described by a coherence function. The decay of the grating contrast as a function of continuous-wave light intensity is used to infer the cross section for photon absorption.

  18. Spectroscopy of cesium Rydberg atoms in strong radio-frequency fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Yuechun; Han, Xiaoxuan; Yang, Zhiwei; Li, Jingkui; Raithel, Georg; Zhao, Jianming; Jia, Suotang

    2016-08-01

    We study Rydberg atoms modulated by strong radio-frequency (rf) fields with a frequency of 70 MHz. The Rydberg atoms are prepared in a room-temperature cesium cell, and their level structure is probed using electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). As the rf field increases from the weak- into the strong-field regime, the range of observed rf-induced phenomena progresses from ac level shifts through increasingly pronounced and numerous rf modulation sidebands to complex state mixing and level crossings with high - l hydrogenlike states. Weak anharmonic admixtures in the rf field generate clearly visible modifications in the Rydberg EIT spectra. A Floquet analysis is employed to model the Rydberg spectra, and good agreement with the experimental observations is found. Our results show that all-optical spectroscopy of Rydberg atoms in vapor cells can serve as an antenna-free, atom-based, and calibration-free technique to measure rf electric fields and to analyze their higher-harmonic contents.

  19. Microwave frequency modulation for improving polarization transfer in DNP experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, Mallory; Ramanathan, Chandrasekhar

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a driven process that transfers the inherently high electron polarization to surrounding nuclear spins via microwave irradiation at or near the electron Larmor frequency. In a typical DNP experiment, the amplitude and frequency of the applied microwaves are constant. However, by adding time dependence in the form of frequency modulation, the electron excitation bandwidth is increased, thereby increasing the number of electron spins active in the polarization transfer process and improving overall efficiency. Both triangular and sinusoidal modulation show a 3 fold improvement over monochromatic irradiation. In the present study, we compare the nuclear spin polarization after DNP experiments with no modulation of the applied microwaves, triangular and sinusoidal modulation, and modulation schemes derived from the sample's ESR spectrum. We characterize the polarization as a function of the modulation amplitude and frequency and compare the optimal results from each modulation scheme. Working at a field of 3.34 T and at a temperature of 4 K, we show that by using a modulation scheme tailored to the electronic environment of the sample, polarization transfer is improved over other modulation schemes. Small-scale simulations of the spin system are developed to gain further insight into the dynamics of this driven open system. This understanding could enable the design of modulation schemes to achieve even higher polarization transfer efficiencies. With support from NSF (CHE-1410504) and by NIH (U19-A1091173).

  20. Frequency modulation drive for a piezoelectric motor

    DOEpatents

    Mittas, Anthony

    2001-01-01

    A piezoelectric motor has peak performance at a specific frequency f.sub.1 that may vary over a range of frequencies. A drive system is disclosed for operating such a motor at peak performance without feedback. The drive system consists of the motor and an ac source connected to power the motor, the ac source repeatedly generating a frequency over a range from f.sub.1 -.DELTA.x to f.sub.1 +.DELTA.y.

  1. Modulation of the photonic band structure topology of a honeycomb lattice in an atomic vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yiqi; Liu, Xing; Belić, Milivoj R.; Wu, Zhenkun; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2015-12-15

    In an atomic vapor, a honeycomb lattice can be constructed by utilizing the three-beam interference method. In the method, the interference of the three beams splits the dressed energy level periodically, forming a periodic refractive index modulation with the honeycomb profile. The energy band topology of the honeycomb lattice can be modulated by frequency detunings, thereby affecting the appearance (and disappearance) of Dirac points and cones in the momentum space. This effect can be usefully exploited for the generation and manipulation of topological insulators.

  2. Atomic Oxygen Energy in Low Frequency Hyperthermal Plasma Ashers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Miller, Sharon K R.; Kneubel, Christian A.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental and analytical analysis of the atomic oxygen erosion of pyrolytic graphite as well as Monte Carlo computational modeling of the erosion of Kapton H (DuPont, Wilmington, DE) polyimide was performed to determine the hyperthermal energy of low frequency (30 to 35 kHz) plasma ashers operating on air. It was concluded that hyperthermal energies in the range of 0.3 to 0.9 eV are produced in the low frequency air plasmas which results in texturing similar to that in low Earth orbit (LEO). Monte Carlo computational modeling also indicated that such low energy directed ions are fully capable of producing the experimentally observed textured surfaces in low frequency plasmas.

  3. A low-cost, tunable laser lock without laser frequency modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, Margaret E.; Baker, Paul M.; Gauthier, Daniel J.

    2015-05-01

    Many experiments in optical physics require laser frequency stabilization. This can be achieved by locking to an atomic reference using saturated absorption spectroscopy. Often, the laser frequency is modulated and phase sensitive detection used. This method, while well-proven and robust, relies on expensive components, can introduce an undesirable frequency modulation into the laser, and is not easily frequency tuned. Here, we report a simple locking scheme similar to those implemented previously. We modulate the atomic resonances in a saturated absorption setup with an AC magnetic field created by a single solenoid. The same coil applies a DC field that allows tuning of the lock point. We use an auto-balanced detector to make our scheme more robust against laser power fluctuations and stray magnetic fields. The coil, its driver, and the detector are home-built with simple, cheap components. Our technique is low-cost, simple to setup, tunable, introduces no laser frequency modulation, and only requires one laser. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the NSF through Grant # PHY-1206040.

  4. Frequency Specific Modulation of Human Somatosensory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Feurra, Matteo; Paulus, Walter; Walsh, Vincent; Kanai, Ryota

    2011-01-01

    Oscillatory neuronal activities are commonly observed in response to sensory stimulation. However, their functional roles are still the subject of debate. One-way to probe the roles of oscillatory neural activities is to deliver alternating current to the cortex at biologically relevant frequencies and examine whether such stimulation influences perception and cognition. In this study, we tested whether transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) over the primary somatosensory cortex (SI) could elicit tactile sensations in humans in a frequency-dependent manner. We tested the effectiveness of tACS over SI at frequency bands ranging from 2 to 70 Hz. Our results show that stimulation in alpha (10–14 Hz) and high gamma (52–70 Hz) frequency range produces a tactile sensation in the contralateral hand. A weaker effect was also observed for beta (16–20 Hz) stimulation. These findings highlight the frequency dependency of effective tACS over SI with the effective frequencies corresponding to those observed in previous electroencephalography/magnetoencephalography studies of tactile perception. Our present study suggests that tACS could be used as a powerful online stimulation technique to reveal the causal roles of oscillatory brain activities. PMID:21713181

  5. Light modulated switches and radio frequency emitters

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon T.; Tallerico, Paul J.

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a light modulated electron beam driven radiofrequency emitter. Pulses of light impinge on a photoemissive device which generates an electron beam having the pulse characteristics of the light. The electron beam is accelerated through a radiofrequency resonator which produces radiofrequency emission in accordance with the electron, hence, the light pulses.

  6. Computational expressions for signals in frequency-modulation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Di Rosa, Michael D.; Reiten, M. T.

    2015-05-25

    In this study, general expressions for the signals in frequency-modulation spectroscopy (FMS) appear in the literature but are often reduced to simple analytical equations following the assumption of a weak modulation index. This is little help to the experimentalist who wants to predict signals for modulation depths of the order of unity or greater, where strong FMS signals reside. Here, we develop general formulas for FMS signals in the case of an absorber with a Voigt line shape and then link these expressions to an example and existing numerical code for the line shape. The resulting computational recipe is easy to implement and exercised here to show where the larger FMS signals are found over the coordinates of modulation index and modulation frequency. One can also estimate from provided curves the in-phase FMS signal over a wide range of modulation parameters at either the Lorentzian-broadening or Doppler-broadening limit, or anywhere in between by interpolation.

  7. Noise radar using random phase and frequency modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axelsson, Sune R. J.

    2004-01-01

    Pulse compression radar is used in a great number of radar applications. Excellent range resolution and high ECCM performance can be achieved by wide-band modulated long pulses, which spread out the transmitted energy in frequency and time. By using random noise as waveform, the range ambiguity can be suppressed as well. The same limit in doppler resolution is achieved as for a coherent doppler radar when the time compression of the reference is tuned to that of the target. Mostly, the random signal is transmitted directly from a noise generating HF-source. A sine wave, which is phase or frequency modulated by random noise, is an alternative giving similar performance but higher transmitted mean power when peak-limited transmitters are applied. A narrower modulation noise bandwidth can also be applied to generate the same output bandwidth. For phase modulation, the bandwidth amplifying factor is simply the rms value of the phase modulation, and for a frequency modulating waveform the output rms bandwidth equals the rms value of the frequency modulation. The results also show that the range sidelobes can be highly suppressed compared with the sidelobes of the modulating signal. The mean and variance of the correlation integral are derived in terms of the autocorrelation function of the modulation. Finally, random bi-phase modulation and the effects of low-bit ADC at the correlation processing are analyzed and described. The advantages of low range sidelobes and enhanced range resolution make frequency and phase modulation attractive for a great number of applications.

  8. Large phase-by-phase modulations in atomic interfaces.

    PubMed

    Artoni, M; Zavatta, A

    2015-09-11

    Phase-resonant closed-loop optical transitions can be engineered to achieve broadly tunable light phase shifts. Such a novel phase-by-phase control mechanism does not require a cavity and is illustrated here for an atomic interface where a classical light pulse undergoes radian level phase modulations all-optically controllable over a few micron scale. It works even at low intensities and hence may be relevant to new applications of all-optical weak-light signal processing.

  9. Method and apparatus for resonant frequency waveform modulation

    DOEpatents

    Taubman, Matthew S [Richland, WA

    2011-06-07

    A resonant modulator device and process are described that provide enhanced resonant frequency waveforms to electrical devices including, e.g., laser devices. Faster, larger, and more complex modulation waveforms are obtained than can be obtained by use of conventional current controllers alone.

  10. Amplitude modulation reduces loudness adaptation to high-frequency tones

    PubMed Central

    Wynne, Dwight P.; George, Sahara E.; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Long-term loudness perception of a sound has been presumed to depend on the spatial distribution of activated auditory nerve fibers as well as their temporal firing pattern. The relative contributions of those two factors were investigated by measuring loudness adaptation to sinusoidally amplitude-modulated 12-kHz tones. The tones had a total duration of 180 s and were either unmodulated or 100%-modulated at one of three frequencies (4, 20, or 100 Hz), and additionally varied in modulation depth from 0% to 100% at the 4-Hz frequency only. Every 30 s, normal-hearing subjects estimated the loudness of one of the stimuli played at 15 dB above threshold in random order. Without any amplitude modulation, the loudness of the unmodulated tone after 180 s was only 20% of the loudness at the onset of the stimulus. Amplitude modulation systematically reduced the amount of loudness adaptation, with the 100%-modulated stimuli, regardless of modulation frequency, maintaining on average 55%–80% of the loudness at onset after 180 s. Because the present low-frequency amplitude modulation produced minimal changes in long-term spectral cues affecting the spatial distribution of excitation produced by a 12-kHz pure tone, the present result indicates that neural synchronization is critical to maintaining loudness perception over time. PMID:26233027

  11. High-frequency Broadband Modulations of Electroencephalographic Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Onton, Julie; Makeig, Scott

    2009-01-01

    High-frequency cortical potentials in electroencephalographic (EEG) scalp recordings have low amplitudes and may be confounded with scalp muscle activities. EEG data from an eyes-closed emotion imagination task were linearly decomposed using independent component analysis (ICA) into maximally independent component (IC) processes. Joint decomposition of IC log spectrograms into source- and frequency-independent modulator (IM) processes revealed three distinct classes of IMs that separately modulated broadband high-frequency (∼15–200 Hz) power of brain, scalp muscle, and likely ocular motor IC processes. Multi-dimensional scaling revealed significant but spatially complex relationships between mean broadband brain IM effects and the valence of the imagined emotions. Thus, contrary to prevalent assumption, unitary modes of spectral modulation of frequencies encompassing the beta, gamma, and high gamma frequency ranges can be isolated from scalp-recorded EEG data and may be differentially associated with brain sources and cognitive activities. PMID:20076775

  12. Modulation linearization of a frequency-modulated voltage controlled oscillator, part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honnell, M. A.

    1975-01-01

    An analysis is presented for the voltage versus frequency characteristics of a varactor modulated VHF voltage controlled oscillator in which the frequency deviation is linearized by using the nonlinear characteristics of a field effect transistor as a signal amplifier. The equations developed are used to calculate the oscillator output frequency in terms of pertinent circuit parameters. It is shown that the nonlinearity exponent of the FET has a pronounced influence on frequency deviation linearity, whereas the junction exponent of the varactor controls total frequency deviation for a given input signal. A design example for a 250 MHz frequency modulated oscillator is presented.

  13. Optimization of FM spectroscopy parameters for a frequency locking loop in small scale CPT based atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Ben-Aroya, I; Kahanov, M; Eisenstein, G

    2007-11-12

    We describe the optimization of a Frequency Locked Loop (FLL) in an atomic clock which is based on Coherent Population Trapping (CPT) in (87)Rb vapor using the D(2) transition. The FLL uses frequency modulation (FM) spectroscopy and we study the effect of FM parameters (modulation frequency and index) on the sensitivity and the signal to noise ratio of the feedback signal in the FLL. The clock which employs a small spherical glass cell containing (87)Rb atoms and a buffer gas, exhibits a short term stability of 3x10(-11)/ radicaltau. The long term relative frequency stability of the 10 MHz output is better than 10(-10) with a drift of 10(-11) per day.

  14. Nanomechanical electro-optical modulator based on atomic heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, P. A.; Marshall, O. P.; Rodriguez, F. J.; Auton, G. H.; Kravets, V. G.; Kundys, D.; Su, Y.; Grigorenko, A. N.

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional atomic heterostructures combined with metallic nanostructures allow one to realize strong light–matter interactions. Metallic nanostructures possess plasmonic resonances that can be modulated by graphene gating. In particular, spectrally narrow plasmon resonances potentially allow for very high graphene-enabled modulation depth. However, the modulation depths achieved with this approach have so far been low and the modulation wavelength range limited. Here we demonstrate a device in which a graphene/hexagonal boron nitride heterostructure is suspended over a gold nanostripe array. A gate voltage across these devices alters the location of the two-dimensional crystals, creating strong optical modulation of its reflection spectra at multiple wavelengths: in ultraviolet Fabry–Perot resonances, in visible and near-infrared diffraction-coupled plasmonic resonances and in the mid-infrared range of hexagonal boron nitride's upper Reststrahlen band. Devices can be extremely subwavelength in thickness and exhibit compact and truly broadband modulation of optical signals using heterostructures of two-dimensional materials. PMID:27874003

  15. Exploring Ramsey-coherent population trapping atomic clock realized with pulsed microwave modulated laser

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jing; Yun, Peter; Tian, Yuan; Tan, Bozhong; Gu, Sihong

    2014-03-07

    A scheme for a Ramsey-coherent population trapping (CPT) atomic clock that eliminates the acousto-optic modulator (AOM) is proposed and experimentally studied. Driven by a periodically microwave modulated current, the vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser emits a continuous beam that switches between monochromatic and multichromatic modes. Ramsey-CPT interference has been studied with this mode-switching beam. In eliminating the AOM, which is used to generate pulsed laser in conventional Ramsey-CPT atomic clock, the physics package of the proposed scheme is virtually the same as that of a conventional compact CPT atomic clock, although the resource budget for the electronics will slightly increase as a microwave switch should be added. By evaluating and comparing experimentally recorded signals from the two Ramsey-CPT schemes, the short-term frequency stability of the proposed scheme was found to be 46% better than the scheme with AOM. The experimental results suggest that the implementation of a compact Ramsey-CPT atomic clock promises better frequency stability.

  16. Optimizing Frequency-Modulated CW EDMR in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lihuang; van Schooten, Kipp; Ramanathan, Chandrasekhar

    Electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) is a powerful method of probing dopant and defect spin states in semiconductor devices. Moreover, at the single dopant level, these spin states are heavily investigated as potential qubit systems, though facile electronic access to single dopants is exceedingly difficult. We therefore characterize detection sensitivities of frequency-modulated CW-EDMR of phosphorus donors in silicon Si:P using a home-built 2.5 GHz system (~80 mT) at 5 K. An arbitrary waveform generator controls the frequency modulation, allowing us to optimize the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of both the dangling bond and phosphorus donor signals against multiple experimental parameters, such as modulation amplitude and modulation frequency. The optimal range of frequency modulation parameters is constrained by the relaxation time of the phosphorous electron at 5 K, resulting in the same sensitivity limit as field modulated CW-EDMR, but offers some technical advantages; e.g. reducing the relative contribution of magnetic field induced currents and eliminating the need for field modulation coils. We further characterize the EDMR SNR in Si:P as a function of optical excitation energy by using a narrow line laser, tunable across donor exciton and band gap states.

  17. Time-resolved Hyperspectral Fluorescence Spectroscopy using Frequency Modulated Excitation

    SciTech Connect

    ,; Neill, M

    2012-07-01

    An intensity-modulated excitation light source is used together with a micro channel plate intensified CCD (ICCD) detector gated at a slightly different frequency to generate a beat frequency from a fluorescent sample. The addition of a spectrograph produces a hyperspectral time-resolved data product where the resulting beat frequency is detected with a low frame rate camera. Measuring the beat frequency of the spectrum as a function of time allows separation of the excited fluorescence from ambient constant light sources. The excitation and detector repetition rates are varied over a range of discrete frequencies, and the phase shift of the beat wave maps out the emission decay rate(s).

  18. Method and apparatus for optical communication by frequency modulation

    DOEpatents

    Priatko, Gordon J.

    1988-01-01

    Laser optical communication according to this invention is carried out by producing multi-frequency laser beams having different frequencies, splitting one or more of these constituent beams into reference and signal beams, encoding information on the signal beams by frequency modulation and detecting the encoded information by heterodyne techniques. Much more information can be transmitted over optical paths according to the present invention than with the use of only one path as done previously.

  19. Digital intermediate frequency QAM modulator using parallel processing

    DOEpatents

    Pao, Hsueh-Yuan; Tran, Binh-Nien

    2008-05-27

    The digital Intermediate Frequency (IF) modulator applies to various modulation types and offers a simple and low cost method to implement a high-speed digital IF modulator using field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). The architecture eliminates multipliers and sequential processing by storing the pre-computed modulated cosine and sine carriers in ROM look-up-tables (LUTs). The high-speed input data stream is parallel processed using the corresponding LUTs, which reduces the main processing speed, allowing the use of low cost FPGAs.

  20. Coherent Magnetic Response at Optical Frequencies Using Atomic Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, Nicholas R.; Buckholtz, Zachary N.; Simmons, Zachary J.; Mueller, Eli A.; Yavuz, Deniz D.

    2017-01-01

    In optics, the interaction of atoms with the magnetic field of light is almost always ignored since its strength is many orders of magnitude weaker compared to the interaction with the electric field. In this article, by using a magnetic-dipole transition within the 4 f shell of europium ions, we show a strong interaction between a green laser and an ensemble of atomic ions. The electrons move coherently between the ground and excited ionic levels (Rabi flopping) by interacting with the magnetic field of the laser. By measuring the Rabi flopping frequency as the laser intensity is varied, we report the first direct measurement of a magnetic-dipole matrix element in the optical region of the spectrum. Using density-matrix simulations of the ensemble, we infer the generation of coherent magnetization with magnitude 5.5 ×10-3 A /m , which is capable of generating left-handed electromagnetic waves of intensity 1 nW /cm2 . These results open up the prospect of constructing left-handed materials using sharp transitions of atoms.

  1. Scaling the perceived fluctuation strength of frequency-modulated tones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickelmaier, Florian; Ellermeier, Wolfgang

    2004-05-01

    Fluctuation strength is one of the major psychoacoustic variables considered in sound-quality evaluation. Zwicker and Fastl [Psychoacoustics (Springer, Berlin, 1999)] summarize recommendations for its computation, which have already been implemented in various software applications, even though the data basis is rather limited. In particular, the dependency of fluctuation strength on modulation frequency and modulation depth has seemingly never been tested in a factorial design. Therefore, in experiment I both of these factors were varied simultaneously in order to create 54 different frequency-modulated sinusoids. The task of the subjects was to directly estimate the perceived magnitude of fluctuation strength. The results do not conform well with the prevalent model of fluctuation strength. In experiment II this finding was further investigated by varying only one factor at a time. The results show that large individual differences, particularly in the effect of modulation frequency, persist. Thus, in experiment III the interaction of both factors was analyzed on an individual basis. By employing a 2AFC procedure, matches in fluctuation strength were obtained. The results suggest that most listeners are not able to integrate modulation frequency and modulation depth additively into a unidimensional percept. [Work supported by Centercontract on Sound Quality, Aalborg University.

  2. Direct frequency comb optical frequency standard based on two-photon transitions of thermal atoms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, S. Y.; Wu, J. T.; Zhang, Y. L.; Leng, J. X.; Yang, W. P.; Zhang, Z. G.; Zhao, J. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Optical clocks have been the focus of science and technology research areas due to their capability to provide highest frequency accuracy and stability to date. Their superior frequency performance promises significant advances in the fields of fundamental research as well as practical applications including satellite-based navigation and ranging. In traditional optical clocks, ultrastable optical cavities, laser cooling and particle (atoms or a single ion) trapping techniques are employed to guarantee high stability and accuracy. However, on the other hand, they make optical clocks an entire optical tableful of equipment, and cannot work continuously for a long time; as a result, they restrict optical clocks used as very convenient and compact time-keeping clocks. In this article, we proposed, and experimentally demonstrated, a novel scheme of optical frequency standard based on comb-directly-excited atomic two-photon transitions. By taking advantage of the natural properties of the comb and two-photon transitions, this frequency standard achieves a simplified structure, high robustness as well as decent frequency stability, which promise widespread applications in various scenarios. PMID:26459877

  3. Direct frequency comb optical frequency standard based on two-photon transitions of thermal atoms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S Y; Wu, J T; Zhang, Y L; Leng, J X; Yang, W P; Zhang, Z G; Zhao, J Y

    2015-10-13

    Optical clocks have been the focus of science and technology research areas due to their capability to provide highest frequency accuracy and stability to date. Their superior frequency performance promises significant advances in the fields of fundamental research as well as practical applications including satellite-based navigation and ranging. In traditional optical clocks, ultrastable optical cavities, laser cooling and particle (atoms or a single ion) trapping techniques are employed to guarantee high stability and accuracy. However, on the other hand, they make optical clocks an entire optical tableful of equipment, and cannot work continuously for a long time; as a result, they restrict optical clocks used as very convenient and compact time-keeping clocks. In this article, we proposed, and experimentally demonstrated, a novel scheme of optical frequency standard based on comb-directly-excited atomic two-photon transitions. By taking advantage of the natural properties of the comb and two-photon transitions, this frequency standard achieves a simplified structure, high robustness as well as decent frequency stability, which promise widespread applications in various scenarios.

  4. Frequency modulation television analysis: Distortion analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, W. H.; Wong, W. H.

    1973-01-01

    Computer simulation is used to calculate the time-domain waveform of standard T-pulse-and-bar test signal distorted in passing through an FM television system. The simulator includes flat or preemphasized systems and requires specification of the RF predetection filter characteristics. The predetection filters are modeled with frequency-symmetric Chebyshev (0.1-db ripple) and Butterworth filters. The computer was used to calculate distorted output signals for sixty-four different specified systems, and the output waveforms are plotted for all sixty-four. Comparison of the plotted graphs indicates that a Chebyshev predetection filter of four poles causes slightly more signal distortion than a corresponding Butterworth filter and the signal distortion increases as the number of poles increases. An increase in the peak deviation also increases signal distortion. Distortion also increases with the addition of preemphasis.

  5. Laser for high frequency modulated interferometry

    DOEpatents

    Mansfield, D.K.; Vocaturo, M.; Guttadora, L.J.

    1991-07-23

    A Stark-tuned laser operating in the 119 micron line of CH[sub 3]OH has an output power of several tens of milliwatts at 30 Watts of pump power while exhibiting a doublet splitting of about ten MHz with the application of a Stark field on the order of 500 volts/cm. This output power allows for use of the laser in a multi-channel interferometer, while its high operating frequency permits the interferometer to measure rapid electron density changes in a pellet injected or otherwise fueled plasma such as encountered in magnetic fusion devices. The laser includes a long far-infrared (FIR) pyrex resonator tube disposed within a cylindrical water jacket and incorporating charged electrodes for applying the Stark field to a gas confined therein. With the electrodes located within the resonator tube, the resonator tube walls are cooled by a flowing coolant without electrical breakdown in the coolant liquid during application of the Stark field. Wall cooling allows for substantially increased FIR output powers. Provision is made for introducing a buffer gas into the resonator tube for increasing laser output power and its operating bandwidth. 10 figures.

  6. Laser for high frequency modulated interferometry

    DOEpatents

    Mansfield, Dennis K.; Vocaturo, Michael; Guttadora, Lawrence J.

    1991-01-01

    A Stark-tuned laser operating in the 119 micron line of CH.sub.3 OH has an output power of several tens of milliwatts at 30 Watts of pump power while exhibiting a doublet splitting of about ten MHz with the application of a Stark field on the order of 500 volts/cm. This output power allows for use of the laser in a multi-channel interferometer, while its high operating frequency permits the interferometer to measure rapid electron density changes in a pellet injected or otherwise fueled plasma such as encountered in magnetic fusion devices. The laser includes a long far-infrared (FIR) pyrex resonator tube disposed within a cylindrical water jacket and incorporating charged electrodes for applying the Stark field to a gas confined therein. With the electrodes located within the resonator tube, the resonator tube walls are cooled by a flowing coolant without electrical breakdown in the coolant liquid during application of the Stark field. Wall cooling allows for substantially increased FIR output powers. Provision is made for introducing a buffer gas into the resonator tube for increasing laser output power and its operating bandwidth.

  7. Duobinary pulse shaping for frequency chirp enabled complex modulation.

    PubMed

    Che, Di; Yuan, Feng; Khodakarami, Hamid; Shieh, William

    2016-09-01

    The frequency chirp of optical direct modulation (DM) used to be a performance barrier of optical transmission system, because it broadens the signal optical spectrum, which becomes more susceptible to chromatic dispersion induced inter-symbol interference (ISI). However, by considering the chirp as frequency modulation, the single DM simultaneously generates a 2-D signal containing the intensity and phase (namely, the time integral of frequency). This complex modulation concept significantly increases the optical signal to noise ratio (OSNR) sensitivity of DM systems. This Letter studies the duobinary pulse shaping (DB-PS) for chirp enabled DM and its impact on the optical bandwidth and system OSNR sensitivity. DB-PS relieves the bandwidth requirement, at the sacrifice of system OSNR sensitivity. As DB-PS induces a controlled ISI, the receiver requires one more tap for maximum likelihood sequence estimation (MLSE). We verify this modified MLSE with a 10-Gbaud duobinary PAM-4 transmission experiment.

  8. A phase-locked laser system based on double direct modulation technique for atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Pan, Xiong; Song, Ningfang; Xu, Xiaobin; Lu, Xiangxiang

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate a laser system based on phase modulation technology and phase feedback control. The two laser beams with frequency difference of 6.835 GHz are modulated using electro-optic and acousto-optic modulators, respectively. Parasitic frequency components produced by the electro-optic modulator are filtered using a Fabry-Perot Etalon. A straightforward phase feedback system restrains the phase noise induced by environmental perturbations. The phase noise of the laser system stays below -125 rad2/Hz at frequency offset higher than 500 kHz. Overall phase noise of the laser system is evaluated by calculating the contribution of the phase noise to the sensitivity limit of a gravimeter. The results reveal that the sensitivity limited by the phase noise of our laser system is lower than that of a state-of-the-art optical phase-lock loop scheme when a gravimeter operates at short pulse duration, which makes the laser system a promising option for our future application of atom interferometer.

  9. A Mechanism for Frequency Modulation in Songbirds Shared with Humans

    PubMed Central

    Margoliash, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    In most animals that vocalize, control of fundamental frequency is a key element for effective communication. In humans, subglottal pressure controls vocal intensity but also influences fundamental frequency during phonation. Given the underlying similarities in the biomechanical mechanisms of vocalization in humans and songbirds, songbirds offer an attractive opportunity to study frequency modulation by pressure. Here, we present a novel technique for dynamic control of subsyringeal pressure in zebra finches. By regulating the opening of a custom-built fast valve connected to the air sac system, we achieved partial or total silencing of specific syllables, and could modify syllabic acoustics through more complex manipulations of air sac pressure. We also observed that more nuanced pressure variations over a limited interval during production of a syllable concomitantly affected the frequency of that syllable segment. These results can be explained in terms of a mathematical model for phonation that incorporates a nonlinear description for the vocal source capable of generating the observed frequency modulations induced by pressure variations. We conclude that the observed interaction between pressure and frequency was a feature of the source, not a result of feedback control. Our results indicate that, beyond regulating phonation or its absence, regulation of pressure is important for control of fundamental frequencies of vocalizations. Thus, although there are separate brainstem pathways for syringeal and respiratory control of song production, both can affect airflow and frequency. We hypothesize that the control of pressure and frequency is combined holistically at higher levels of the vocalization pathways. PMID:23825417

  10. A mechanism for frequency modulation in songbirds shared with humans.

    PubMed

    Amador, Ana; Margoliash, Daniel

    2013-07-03

    In most animals that vocalize, control of fundamental frequency is a key element for effective communication. In humans, subglottal pressure controls vocal intensity but also influences fundamental frequency during phonation. Given the underlying similarities in the biomechanical mechanisms of vocalization in humans and songbirds, songbirds offer an attractive opportunity to study frequency modulation by pressure. Here, we present a novel technique for dynamic control of subsyringeal pressure in zebra finches. By regulating the opening of a custom-built fast valve connected to the air sac system, we achieved partial or total silencing of specific syllables, and could modify syllabic acoustics through more complex manipulations of air sac pressure. We also observed that more nuanced pressure variations over a limited interval during production of a syllable concomitantly affected the frequency of that syllable segment. These results can be explained in terms of a mathematical model for phonation that incorporates a nonlinear description for the vocal source capable of generating the observed frequency modulations induced by pressure variations. We conclude that the observed interaction between pressure and frequency was a feature of the source, not a result of feedback control. Our results indicate that, beyond regulating phonation or its absence, regulation of pressure is important for control of fundamental frequencies of vocalizations. Thus, although there are separate brainstem pathways for syringeal and respiratory control of song production, both can affect airflow and frequency. We hypothesize that the control of pressure and frequency is combined holistically at higher levels of the vocalization pathways.

  11. Mercury Atomic Frequency Standards for Space Based Navigation and Timekeeping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tjoelker, R. L.; Burt, E. A.; Chung, S.; Hamell, R. L.; Prestage, J. D.; Tucker, B.; Cash, P.; Lutwak, R.

    2012-01-01

    A low power Mercury Atomic Frequency Standard (MAFS) has been developed and demonstrated on the path towards future space clock applications. A self contained mercury ion breadboard clock: emulating flight clock interfaces, steering a USO local oscillator, and consuming approx 40 Watts has been operating at JPL for more than a year. This complete, modular ion clock instrument demonstrates that key GNSS size, weight, and power (SWaP) requirements can be achieved while still maintaining short and long term performance demonstrated in previous ground ion clocks. The MAFS breadboard serves as a flexible platform for optimizing further space clock development and guides engineering model design trades towards fabrication of an ion clock for space flight.

  12. Application of Multi-Frequency Modulation (MFM) facsimile machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickerson, James T.

    1990-09-01

    Multi-Frequency Modulation (MFM) has been developed at NPS using both differential quadrature-amplitude-modulation (DQAM) and differential quadrature-phase-shift-keying (DQPSK) encoding formats. This report discusses the use of each of these formats in transmitting a facsimile encoded message over a voice frequency channel. The satisfactory transmission and receipt of facsimile messages was achieved using both DQPSK and D16-QAM encoding formats. Research and testing for this report included the use of variable facsimile transmission rates in an attempt to optimize MFM operating parameters. Experimental results revealed a higher error rate when decoding messages contained similar contiguous characters.

  13. Cycle Time Reduction in Trapped Mercury Ion Atomic Frequency Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, Eric A.; Tjoelker, Robert L.; Taghavi, Shervin

    2011-01-01

    The use of the mercury ion isotope (201)Hg(+) was examined for an atomic clock. Taking advantage of the faster optical pumping time in (201)Hg(+) reduces both the state preparation and the state readout times, thereby decreasing the overall cycle time of the clock and reducing the impact of medium-term LO noise on the performance of the frequency standard. The spectral overlap between the plasma discharge lamp used for (201)Hg(+) state preparation and readout is much larger than that of the lamp used for the more conventional (199)Hg(+). There has been little study of (201)Hg(+) for clock applications (in fact, all trapped ion clock work in mercury has been with (199)Hg(+); however, recently the optical pumping time in (201)Hg(+) has been measured and found to be 0.45 second, or about three times faster than in (199)Hg(+) due largely to the better spectral overlap. This can be used to reduce the overall clock cycle time by over 2 seconds, or up to a factor of 2 improvement. The use of the (201)Hg(+) for an atomic clock is totally new. Most attempts to reduce the impact of LO noise have focused on reducing the interrogation time. In the trapped ion frequency standards built so far at JPL, the optical pumping time is already at its minimum so that no enhancement can be had by shortening it. However, by using (201)Hg(+), this is no longer the case. Furthermore, integrity monitoring, the mechanism that determines whether the clock is functioning normally, cannot happen faster than the clock cycle time. Therefore, a shorter cycle time will enable quicker detection of failure modes and recovery from them.

  14. Linear Frequency Modulated Signals VS Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing Signals for Synthetic Aperture Radar Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    OFDM ) signal versus a linear frequency modulated or chirp signal on simulated synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery. Various parameters of the...transmitted signal, such as pulse duration, transmitted signal energy, bandwidth, and (specifically for the OFDM signal) number of subcarriers and...SAR system design cost. 14. SUBJECT TERMS Synthetic aperture radar (SAR), orthogonal frequency division multiplexing ( OFDM ), linear

  15. Very high frequency plasma reactant for atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Il-Kwon; Yoo, Gilsang; Yoon, Chang Mo; Kim, Tae Hyung; Yeom, Geun Young; Kim, Kangsik; Lee, Zonghoon; Jung, Hanearl; Lee, Chang Wan; Kim, Hyungjun; Lee, Han-Bo-Ram

    2016-11-01

    Although plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) results in several benefits in the formation of high-k dielectrics, including a low processing temperature and improved film properties compared to conventional thermal ALD, energetic radicals and ions in the plasma cause damage to layer stacks, leading to the deterioration of electrical properties. In this study, the growth characteristics and film properties of PE-ALD Al2O3 were investigated using a very-high-frequency (VHF) plasma reactant. Because VHF plasma features a lower electron temperature and higher plasma density than conventional radio frequency (RF) plasma, it has a larger number of less energetic reaction species, such as radicals and ions. VHF PE-ALD Al2O3 shows superior physical and electrical properties over RF PE-ALD Al2O3, including high growth per cycle, excellent conformality, low roughness, high dielectric constant, low leakage current, and low interface trap density. In addition, interlayer-free Al2O3 on Si was achieved in VHF PE-ALD via a significant reduction in plasma damage. VHF PE-ALD will be an essential process to realize nanoscale devices that require precise control of interfaces and electrical properties.

  16. Laser frequency stabilisation by the Pound - Drever - Hall method using an acousto-optic phase modulator operating in the pure Raman - Nath diffraction regime

    SciTech Connect

    Baryshev, Vyacheslav N

    2012-04-30

    Frequency stabilisation of diode laser radiation has been implemented by the Pound - Drever - Hall method using a new acousto-optic phase modulator, operating in the pure Raman - Nath diffraction regime. It is experimentally shown that, as in the case of saturated-absorption spectroscopy in atomic vapour, the spatial divergence of the frequency-modulated output spectrum of this modulator does not interfere with obtaining error signals by means of heterodyne frequency-modulation spectroscopy with a frequency discriminator based on a high-Q Fabry - Perot cavity with finesse of several tens of thousands.

  17. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Phase-sensitive electric modulation of photoluminescence upon bichromatic excitation of atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astapenko, Valerii A.

    2005-12-01

    A new type of modulation of the photoluminescence intensity of atoms excited by a bichromatic laser radiation with the frequency ratio 1:2 is proposed and analysed. The modulation is produced by alternating electric field acting on atoms and occurs due to the quantum interference of the amplitudes of two excitation channels of an atom, which proves to be possible because the applied electric field removes the parity selection rule for one of the excitation channels. An important feature of this process is the dependence of photoluminescence on the phase difference of monochromatic components of exciting radiation. The calculation was performed for an alkali metal atom excited at the s—s transition taking the saturation effect into account.

  18. Computational expressions for signals in frequency-modulation spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Di Rosa, Michael D.; Reiten, M. T.

    2015-05-25

    In this study, general expressions for the signals in frequency-modulation spectroscopy (FMS) appear in the literature but are often reduced to simple analytical equations following the assumption of a weak modulation index. This is little help to the experimentalist who wants to predict signals for modulation depths of the order of unity or greater, where strong FMS signals reside. Here, we develop general formulas for FMS signals in the case of an absorber with a Voigt line shape and then link these expressions to an example and existing numerical code for the line shape. The resulting computational recipe is easymore » to implement and exercised here to show where the larger FMS signals are found over the coordinates of modulation index and modulation frequency. One can also estimate from provided curves the in-phase FMS signal over a wide range of modulation parameters at either the Lorentzian-broadening or Doppler-broadening limit, or anywhere in between by interpolation.« less

  19. 622-Mbps Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing Modulator Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Na T.

    1999-01-01

    The Communications Technology Division at the NASA Lewis Research Center is developing advanced electronic technologies for the space communications and remote sensing systems of tomorrow. As part of the continuing effort to advance the state-of-the art in satellite communications and remote sensing systems, Lewis is developing a programmable Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) modulator card for high-data-rate communication links. The OFDM modulator is particularly suited to high data-rate downlinks to ground terminals or direct data downlinks from near-Earth science platforms. It can support data rates up to 622 megabits per second (Mbps) and high-order modulation schemes such as 16-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (16-ary QAM) or 8- phase shift keying (8PSK). High order modulations can obtain the bandwidth efficiency over the traditional binary phase shift keying (BPSK) or quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) modulator schemes. The OFDM modulator architecture can also be precompensated for channel disturbances and alleviate amplitude degradations caused by nonlinear transponder characteristics.

  20. Masking of a brief probe by sinusoidal frequency modulation.

    PubMed

    Edwards, B W; Viemeister, N F

    1997-02-01

    Contrary to level detection models, the thresholds for a brief-duration probe masked by a sinusoidal frequency modulation (FM) masker increases as the modulation index (beta) of FM increases [Zwicker, Acustica 31, 243-256 (1974)]. In this paper the reason for this phenomenon is investigated. In experiment 1, a 10-ms, 1-kHz probe was detected in the presence of an FM masker centered at 1 kHz and sinusoidally modulated at 16 Hz. Thresholds increased by over 15 dB with increasing beta, consistent with Zwicker's findings. In experiment 2, the instantaneous frequency changes of the masker used in experiment 1 were clipped and the resulting thresholds indicated that detection was determined primarily by the masker's total frequency excursion rather than by its instantaneous sweep rate. In experiment 3, the FM maskers from the first two experiments were passed through a roex filter centered at 1 kHz and the resulting envelope was used to amplitude modulate a 1-kHz tone, producing approximately the same effective envelope at 1 kHz as the FM maskers. Threshold functions for the amplitude modulated (AM) maskers were similar to those for their corresponding FM maskers. Thresholds increased by over 15 dB while the total energy of the AM masker decreased by over 10 dB, again contrary to standard level-detection models. The results from these experiments can be explained, at least qualitatively, by a model based on envelope shape discrimination: similarities between the envelopes of the masker alone and masker-plus-probe at the output of an auditory filter centered on the frequency of the probe are primarily responsible for the observed masking, particularly at large beta's.

  1. Method and apparatus for Doppler frequency modulation of radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, J. S.; Mccleese, D. J.; Shumate, M. S.; Seaman, C. H. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A method and apparatus are described for frequency modulating radiation, such as from a laser, for optoacoustic detectors, interferometers, heterodyne spectrometers, and similar devices. Two oppositely reciprocating cats-eye retroreflectors are used to Doppler modulate the radiation. By reciprocally moving both retroreflectors, the center of mass is maintained constant to permit smooth operation at many Hertz. By slightly offsetting the axis of one retroreflector relative to the other, multiple passes of a light beam may be achieved for greater Doppler shifts with the same reciprocating motion of the retroreflectors.

  2. A kind of magnetron cavity used in rubidium atomic frequency standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiyu, Yang; Jingzhong, Cui; Jianhui, Tu; Yaoting, Liang

    2011-12-01

    Research on the magnetron cavity used in the rubidium atomic frequency standards is developed, through which the main characteristic parameters of the magnetron cavity are studied, mainly including the resonant frequency, quality factor and oscillation mode. The resonant frequency and quality factor of the magnetron cavity were calculated, and the test results of the resonant frequency agreed well with the calculation theory. The test results also show that the resonant frequency of the magnetron cavity can be attenuated to 6.835 GHz, which is the resonant frequency of the rubidium atoms, and the Q-factor can be attenuated to 500-1000. The oscillation mode is a typical TE011 mode and is the correct mode needed for the rubidium atomic frequency standard. Therefore these derivative magnetron cavities meet the requirements of the rubidium atomic frequency standards well.

  3. Echolocation of insects using intermittent frequency-modulated sounds.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Ikuo; Takanashi, Takuma

    2015-09-01

    Using echolocation influenced by Doppler shift, bats can capture flying insects in real three-dimensional space. On the basis of this principle, a model that estimates object locations using frequency modulated (FM) sound was proposed. However, no investigation was conducted to verify whether the model can localize flying insects from their echoes. This study applied the model to estimate the range and direction of flying insects by extracting temporal changes from the time-frequency pattern and interaural range difference, respectively. The results obtained confirm that a living insect's position can be estimated using this model with echoes measured while emitting intermittent FM sounds.

  4. Generation of a flat optical frequency comb based on a cascaded polarization modulator and phase modulator.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cihai; He, Chao; Zhu, Dan; Guo, Ronghui; Zhang, Fangzheng; Pan, Shilong

    2013-08-15

    A scheme to generate a flat optical frequency comb (OFC) with a fixed phase relationship between the comb lines is proposed and experimentally demonstrated based on a cascaded polarization modulator (PolM) and phase modulator. Because the PolM introduces more controllable parameters compared with the conventional intensity modulator, 9, 11, and 13 comb lines can be generated with relatively low RF powers, or 15, 17, and 19 comb lines can be obtained if high RF powers are applied. The experimentally generated 9, 11, and 13 OFCs have a flatness of 1, 1.3, and 2.1 dB, respectively. The scheme requires no DC bias to the modulators, no optical filter, and no frequency divider or multiplier, which is simple and stable.

  5. Polarization decoherence differential frequency-modulated continuous-wave gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chao; Zheng, Gang; Han, Liwei; Luo, Jianhua; Teng, Fei; Wang, Bing; Song, Ping; Gao, Kun; Hou, Zhiqing

    2014-12-01

    A polarization decoherence differential frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) gyroscope is presented. The impact of coherent polarization crosstalk noise on the differential FMCW gyro is analyzed. In order to suppress coherent polarization crosstalk noise, a novel method was proposed to produce two incoherent orthogonal polarization narrow band beams from laser diode. In this way, the random drift has been reduced about one order.

  6. A New Vector Frequency Modulation Method for Power Conversion Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Akio

    This paper presents an excellent PWM method for power conversion circuits. The proposed method is called a Vector Frequency Modulation (VFM) in this paper. VFM does not belong to any conventional PWM methods. Although an idea of space voltage vector is employed in VFM, any traditional equations to calculate the periods of the voltage vectors are not used. The voltage vectors are classified into two groups, zero vectors and non-zero ones. Instead of the complicated equations, a very simple algorithm is employed in VFM. One vector period is fixed and the zero vectors are distributed among the non-zero vectors in the ratio determined by the command voltage or frequency. The behavior of VFM is performed in software and any modulation-wave oscillators, comparators and up-down counters are not needed. At first, a reversible chopper is modulated by VFM and a 2kW DC motor is driven by the chopper. The motor speed is regulated by modern control theory. Next, a three-phase inverter is modulated by VFM and a 2.2kW induction motor is driven by the inverter. Experimental results are shown to prove that VFM is actually useful for power conversion circuits.

  7. Frequency modulation television analysis: Threshold impulse analysis. [with computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, W. H.

    1973-01-01

    A computer program is developed to calculate the FM threshold impulse rates as a function of the carrier-to-noise ratio for a specified FM system. The system parameters and a vector of 1024 integers, representing the probability density of the modulating voltage, are required as input parameters. The computer program is utilized to calculate threshold impulse rates for twenty-four sets of measured probability data supplied by NASA and for sinusoidal and Gaussian modulating waveforms. As a result of the analysis several conclusions are drawn: (1) The use of preemphasis in an FM television system improves the threshold by reducing the impulse rate. (2) Sinusoidal modulation produces a total impulse rate which is a practical upper bound for the impulse rates of TV signals providing the same peak deviations. (3) As the moment of the FM spectrum about the center frequency of the predetection filter increases, the impulse rate tends to increase. (4) A spectrum having an expected frequency above (below) the center frequency of the predetection filter produces a higher negative (positive) than positive (negative) impulse rate.

  8. Ultra Wide Band Communication Device with Chaotic Frequency Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkovskii, Alexander; Langmore, Ian

    2003-08-01

    The Ultra Wide Band (UWB) communicating systems draw a tremendous attention in the last few years because of many potential advantages the UWB technology can bring to the wireless industry. It can solve the RF spectrum availability problem, improve the security, can provide less expensive, less power consuming equipment for a variety of wireless applications. We study a communication device, in which the Chaotic (Rossler) Oscillator (CO) combined with a linear Voltage Controlled Oscillator (VCO) is used to generate the UWB carrier signal with Chaotic Frequency Modulation (CFM). The information signal can be transmitted via the Frequency Modulation (FM) in analog systems or the Binary Frequency Shift Key-in (BFSK) modulation in digital applications. The receiver has the similar CO and VCO with closed parameters. A simple circuit based on the Phase locked Loop (PLL) is used for both synchronization of the chaotic oscillators and demodulation of the carrier signal. Using the dynamical systems approach we show that the suggested device has a broad parameter region in which the synchronization and demodulation take place. In computer simulations we demonstrate that the system is robust against the noise and parameters mismatch.

  9. Coherent frequency combs produced by self frequency modulation in quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Khurgin, J. B.; Dikmelik, Y.; Hugi, A.; Faist, J.

    2014-02-24

    One salient characteristic of Quantum Cascade Laser (QCL) is its very short τ ∼ 1 ps gain recovery time that so far thwarted the attempts to achieve self-mode locking of the device into a train of single pulses. We show theoretically that four wave mixing, combined with the short gain recovery time causes QCL to operate in the self-frequency-modulated regime characterized by a constant power in time domain and stable coherent comb in the frequency domain. Coherent frequency comb may enable many potential applications of QCL's in sensing and measurement.

  10. Complementary modulation of N2 and CRN by conflict frequency.

    PubMed

    Grützmann, Rosa; Riesel, Anja; Klawohn, Julia; Kathmann, Norbert; Endrass, Tanja

    2014-08-01

    The present study investigated the modulation of the N2 and the correct-related negativity (CRN) by conflict frequency. Conflict costs, as measured by reaction times and error rate, were reduced with increasing conflict frequency, indicating improved conflict resolution. N2 amplitudes in incompatible trials increased with higher conflict frequency, while postresponse CRN amplitudes decreased. In concert with behavioral findings of reduced conflict costs and greater interference suppression, the increase of N2 might reflect enhanced conflict resolution during stimulus processing. The CRN, however, might reflect postresponse implementation of cognitive control, which is reduced when conflict is already adequately resolved during stimulus processing. Furthermore, N2 and CRN in incompatible trials were inversely related on the between- and within-subject level, implying that the two modes of implementing cognitive control are applied complementarily.

  11. Quantum control of ultracold atoms and molecules via linearly chirped laser pulses and optical frequency combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Thomas A.

    This work investigates the potential of performing high yield quantum control operations on atomic and molecular systems using frequency modulated laser fields. The effectiveness of a single laser pulse in creating desired superposition states within the valence shell of Rubidium and the utilization of a single pulse train in order to perform internal state cooling of diatomic hetero-nuclear molecules, in this case KRb, are investigated. These methods are an alternative to the current protocol in the field of quantum control which typically calls for the employment of two laser fields, be they single pulses or pulse trains. Manipulation of the state of the valence electron within Rubidium was studied for two different models of the hyperfine levels of the 5s and 5p orbitals: a three level Λ system and the more realistic four level system accounting for all allowed optical transitions. Numerical analysis of the population dynamics that occur within the system during the time of interaction with the pulse was carried out for various values of the field parameters as well as for two different forms of the pulse envelope. Population inversion within the hyperfine levels of the 5s orbital of Rubidium is demonstrated for a single linearly polarized, linearly down chirped, laser pulse of nanosecond duration and beam intensity on the order of kWcm2 . Superpositions of equally populated hyperfine states, a phenomenon which is crucial in the development of qubits, were also observed for certain values of the field parameters. The results of this analysis are applicable to 85Rb and 87Rb and both the D1 and D2 transitions and are valid for the two models used. For the case of internal state cooling, the power spectrum of a standard pulse train was compared to that of a pulse with sinusoidal phase modulation revealing that the envelope of the frequency comb associated with such a pulse train is controllable via the phase modulation. Thus through frequency modulation the

  12. Large-Area Atom Interferometry with Frequency-Swept Raman Adiabatic Passage.

    PubMed

    Kotru, Krish; Butts, David L; Kinast, Joseph M; Stoner, Richard E

    2015-09-04

    We demonstrate light-pulse atom interferometry with large-momentum-transfer atom optics based on stimulated Raman transitions and frequency-swept adiabatic rapid passage. Our atom optics have produced momentum splittings of up to 30 photon recoil momenta in an acceleration-sensitive interferometer for laser cooled atoms. We experimentally verify the enhancement of phase shift per unit acceleration and characterize interferometer contrast loss. By forgoing evaporative cooling and velocity selection, this method lowers the atom shot-noise-limited measurement uncertainty and enables large-area atom interferometry at higher data rates.

  13. Principal pitch of frequency-modulated tones with asymmetrical modulation waveform: a comparison of models.

    PubMed

    Etchemendy, Pablo E; Eguia, Manuel C; Mesz, Bruno

    2014-03-01

    In this work, the overall perceived pitch (principal pitch) of pure tones modulated in frequency with an asymmetric waveform is studied. The dependence of the principal pitch on the degree of asymmetric modulation was obtained from a psychophysical experiment. The modulation waveform consisted of a flat portion of constant frequency and two linear segments forming a peak. Consistent with previous results, significant pitch shifts with respect to the time-averaged geometric mean were observed. The direction of the shifts was always toward the flat portion of the modulation. The results from the psychophysical experiment, along with those obtained from previously reported studies, were compared with the predictions of six models of pitch perception proposed in the literature. Even though no single model was able to predict accurately the perceived pitch for all experiments, there were two models that give robust predictions that are within the range of acceptable tuning of modulated tones for almost all the cases. Both models point to the existence of an underlying "stability sensitive" mechanism for the computation of pitch that gives more weight to the portion of the stimuli where the frequency is changing more slowly.

  14. System and Method for Generating a Frequency Modulated Linear Laser Waveform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierrottet, Diego F. (Inventor); Petway, Larry B. (Inventor); Amzajerdian, Farzin (Inventor); Barnes, Bruce W. (Inventor); Lockard, George E. (Inventor); Hines, Glenn D. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A system for generating a frequency modulated linear laser waveform includes a single frequency laser generator to produce a laser output signal. An electro-optical modulator modulates the frequency of the laser output signal to define a linear triangular waveform. An optical circulator passes the linear triangular waveform to a band-pass optical filter to filter out harmonic frequencies created in the waveform during modulation of the laser output signal, to define a pure filtered modulated waveform having a very narrow bandwidth. The optical circulator receives the pure filtered modulated laser waveform and transmits the modulated laser waveform to a target.

  15. Generation of Flat Optical Frequency Comb based on Mach-Zehnder Modulator and Recirculating Frequency Shifter Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shibao; Li, Yulong; Fei, Yue; Hu, Faze

    2014-06-01

    We propose a novel scheme to generate optical frequency comb by using Mach-Zehnder modulator and recirculating frequency shifter loop based on IQ modulator driven by radio frequency clock signals. A system of 4 flat and stable comb lines generation based on Mach-Zehnder modulator is set as the seed light source of the recirculating loop. Through theorical analysis and simulation it is shown that the proposed theoretical model is proved in good agreement with simulation results.

  16. Modulation of microsaccades by spatial frequency during object categorization.

    PubMed

    Craddock, Matt; Oppermann, Frank; Müller, Matthias M; Martinovic, Jasna

    2017-01-01

    The organization of visual processing into a coarse-to-fine information processing based on the spatial frequency properties of the input forms an important facet of the object recognition process. During visual object categorization tasks, microsaccades occur frequently. One potential functional role of these eye movements is to resolve high spatial frequency information. To assess this hypothesis, we examined the rate, amplitude and speed of microsaccades in an object categorization task in which participants viewed object and non-object images and classified them as showing either natural objects, man-made objects or non-objects. Images were presented unfiltered (broadband; BB) or filtered to contain only low (LSF) or high spatial frequency (HSF) information. This allowed us to examine whether microsaccades were modulated independently by the presence of a high-level feature - the presence of an object - and by low-level stimulus characteristics - spatial frequency. We found a bimodal distribution of saccades based on their amplitude, with a split between smaller and larger microsaccades at 0.4° of visual angle. The rate of larger saccades (⩾0.4°) was higher for objects than non-objects, and higher for objects with high spatial frequency content (HSF and BB objects) than for LSF objects. No effects were observed for smaller microsaccades (<0.4°). This is consistent with a role for larger microsaccades in resolving HSF information for object identification, and previous evidence that more microsaccades are directed towards informative image regions.

  17. Noise performance of frequency modulation Kelvin force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Diesinger, Heinrich; Deresmes, Dominique; Mélin, Thierry

    2014-01-02

    Noise performance of a phase-locked loop (PLL) based frequency modulation Kelvin force microscope (FM-KFM) is assessed. Noise propagation is modeled step by step throughout the setup using both exact closed loop noise gains and an approximation known as "noise gain" from operational amplifier (OpAmp) design that offers the advantage of decoupling the noise performance study from considerations of stability and ideal loop response. The bandwidth can be chosen depending on how much noise is acceptable and it is shown that stability is not an issue up to a limit that will be discussed. With thermal and detector noise as the only sources, both approaches yield PLL frequency noise expressions equal to the theoretical value for self-oscillating circuits and in agreement with measurement, demonstrating that the PLL components neither modify nor contribute noise. Kelvin output noise is then investigated by modeling the surrounding bias feedback loop. A design rule is proposed that allows choosing the AC modulation frequency for optimized sharing of the PLL bandwidth between Kelvin and topography loops. A crossover criterion determines as a function of bandwidth, temperature and probe parameters whether thermal or detector noise is the dominating noise source. Probe merit factors for both cases are then established, suggesting how to tackle noise performance by probe design. Typical merit factors of common probe types are compared. This comprehensive study is an encouraging step toward a more integral performance assessment and a remedy against focusing on single aspects and optimizing around randomly chosen key values.

  18. Contribution of frequency modulation to speech recognition in noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stickney, Ginger S.; Nie, Kaibao; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2005-10-01

    Cochlear implants allow most patients with profound deafness to successfully communicate under optimal listening conditions. However, the amplitude modulation (AM) information provided by most implants is not sufficient for speech recognition in realistic settings where noise is typically present. This study added slowly varying frequency modulation (FM) to the existing algorithm of an implant simulation and used competing sentences to evaluate FM contributions to speech recognition in noise. Potential FM advantage was evaluated as a function of the number of spectral bands, FM depth, FM rate, and FM band distribution. Barring floor and ceiling effects, significant improvement was observed for all bands from 1 to 32 with the additional FM cue both in quiet and noise. Performance also improved with greater FM depth and rate, which might reflect resolved sidebands under the FM condition. Having FM present in low-frequency bands was more beneficial than in high-frequency bands, and only half of the bands required the presence of FM, regardless of position, to achieve performance similar to when all bands had the FM cue. These results provide insight into the relative contributions of AM and FM to speech communication and the potential advantage of incorporating FM for cochlear implant signal processing.

  19. Heterodyne interferometry with a frequency-modulated laser diode.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Ishii, Y; Murata, K

    1988-01-01

    A digital phase measuring interferometer with a frequency-modulated laser diode using the integratedbucket technique is described. The injection current is continuously changed to introduce a time- varying phase difference between the two beams of an unbalanced Twyman-Green interferometer. The intensity of the interference patterns is integrated with a CCD array sensor for intervals of one-quarter period of the fringe. Using the intensity data a microcomputer calculates the phase to be detected. Some experimental results with the interferometer are presented; the rms repeatability obtained was lambda/80.

  20. Measurement of rubidium ground-state hyperfine transition frequency using atomic fountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, Yuri B.; Szymaniec, Krzysztof; Edris, Soliman

    2015-08-01

    The results of precision measurements of the 87Rb ground-state hyperfine transition frequency, which were conducted at NPL from 2009 to 2013, are reported. The resulting frequency, measured using NPL’s Cs and Rb atomic frequency standards, demonstrates reasonable agreement with the most recent measurements reported by LNE-SYRTE.

  1. Frequency-modulated nuclear localization bursts coordinate gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Long; Dalal, Chiraj K.; Elowitz, Michael B.

    2008-01-01

    In yeast, the transcription factor Crz1 is dephosphorylated and translocates into the nucleus in response to extracellular calcium. Using time-lapse microscopy, we found that Crz1 exhibited short bursts of nuclear localization (∼2 minutes) that occurred stochastically in individual cells and propagated to the expression of downstream genes. Strikingly, calcium concentration controlled the frequency, but not duration, of localization bursts. Using an analytic model, we found that this frequency modulation (FM) of bursts ensures proportional expression of multiple target genes across a wide dynamic range of expression levels, independent of promoter characteristics. We experimentally confirmed this theory with natural and synthetic Crz1 target promoters. Another stress response transcription factor, Msn2, exhibits similar, but largely uncorrelated, localization bursts under calcium stress. These results suggest that FM regulation of localization bursts may be a general control strategy utilized by the cell to coordinate multi-gene responses to external signals. PMID:18818649

  2. Frequency Modulation Spectroscopy Modeling for Remote Chemical Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, David M.

    2000-09-30

    Frequency modulation (FM) spectroscopy techniques show promise for active infrared remote chemical sensing. FM spectroscopy techniques have reduced sensitivity to optical and electronic noise, and are relatively immune to the effects of various electronic and mechanical drifts. FM systems are responsive to sharp spectral features and can therefore reduce the effects of spectral clutter due to interfering chemicals in the plume or in the atmosphere. The relatively high modulation frequencies used for FM also reduces the effects of albedo (reflectance) and plume variations. Conventional differential absorption lidar (DIAL) systems are performance limited by the noise induced by speckle. Analysis presented in this report shows that FM based sensors may reduce the effects of speckle by one to two orders of magnitude. This can result in reduced dwell times and faster area searches, as well as reducing various forms of spatial clutter. FM systems will require a laser system that is continuously tunable at relatively high frequencies (0.1 to 20 MHz). One promising candidate is the quantum-cascade (QC) laser [1, 2]. The QC laser is potentially capable of power levels on the order of 1 Watt and frequency tuning on the order of 3 - 6 GHz, which is the performance level required for FM spectroscopy based remote sensing. In this report we describe a high-level numerical model for an FM spectroscopy based remote sensing system, and application to two unmanned airborne vehicle (UAV) scenarios. A Predator scenario operating at a slant range of 6.5 km with a 10 cm diameter telescope, and a Global Hawk scenario operating at a range of 30 km with a 20 cm diameter telescope, has been assumed to allow estimation of the performance of potential FM systems.

  3. Microrheology of cells with magnetic force modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rebêlo, L M; de Sousa, J S; Mendes Filho, J; Schäpe, J; Doschke, H; Radmacher, M

    2014-04-07

    We propose a magnetic force modulation method to measure the stiffness and viscosity of living cells using a modified AFM apparatus. An oscillating magnetic field makes a magnetic cantilever oscillate in contact with the sample, producing a small AC indentation. By comparing the amplitude of the free cantilever motion (A0) with the motion of the cantilever in contact with the sample (A1), we determine the sample stiffness and viscosity. To test the method, the frequency-dependent stiffness of 3T3 fibroblasts was determined as a power law k(s)(f) = α + β(f/f¯)(γ) (α = 7.6 × 10(-4) N m(-1), β = 1.0 × 10(-4) N m(-1), f¯ = 1 Hz, γ = 0.6), where the coefficient γ = 0.6 is in good agreement with rheological data of actin solutions with concentrations similar to those in cells. The method also allows estimation of the internal friction of the cells. In particular we found an average damping coefficient of 75.1 μN s m(-1) for indentation depths ranging between 1.0 μm and 2.0 μm.

  4. Microrheology of growing Escherichia coli biofilms investigated by using magnetic force modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gan, Tiansheng; Gong, Xiangjun; Schönherr, Holger; Zhang, Guangzhao

    2016-12-01

    Microrheology of growing biofilms provides insightful information about its structural evolution and properties. In this study, the authors have investigated the microrheology of Escherichia coli (strain HCB1) biofilms at different indentation depth (δ) by using magnetic force modulation atomic force microscopy as a function of disturbing frequency (f). As δ increases, the dynamic stiffness (ks) for the biofilms in the early stage significantly increases. However, it levels off when the biofilms are matured. The facts indicate that the biofilms change from inhomogeneous to homogeneous in structure. Moreover, ks is scaled to f, which coincides with the rheology of soft glasses. The exponent increases with the incubation time, indicating the fluidization of biofilms. In contrast, the upper layer of the matured biofilms is solidlike in that the storage modulus is always larger than the loss modulus, and its viscoelasticity is slightly influenced by the shear stress.

  5. Low-frequency plasma conductivity in the average-atom approximation.

    PubMed

    Kuchiev, M Yu; Johnson, W R

    2008-08-01

    Low-frequency properties of a plasma are examined within the average-atom approximation, which presumes that scattering of a conducting electron on each atom takes place independently of other atoms. The relaxation time tau distinguishes a high-frequency region omegatau>1 , where the single-atom approximation is applicable explicitly, from extreme low frequencies omegatau<1 , where, naively, the single-atom approximation is invalid. A proposed generalization of the formalism, which takes into account many-atom collisions, is found to be accurate in all frequency regions, from omega=0 to omegatau>1 , reproducing the Ziman formula in the static limit, results based on the Kubo-Greenwood formula for high frequencies and satisfying the conductivity sum rule precisely. The correspondence between physical processes leading to the conventional Ohm's law and the infrared properties of QED is discussed. The suggested average-atom approach to frequency-dependent conductivity is illustrated by numerical calculations for an aluminum plasma in the temperature range 2-10eV .

  6. Progress Report on Frequency - Modulated Differential Absorption Lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, Bret D.; Harper, Warren W.; Myers, Tanya L.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Williams, Richard M.; Schultz, John F.

    2001-12-15

    Modeling done at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in FY2000 predicted improved sensitivity for remote chemical detection by differential absorption lidar (DIAL) if frequency-modulated (FM) lasers were used. This improved sensitivity results from faster averaging away of speckle noise and the recently developed quantum cascade (QC) lasers offer the first practical method for implementing this approach in the molecular fingerprint region of the infrared. To validate this model prediction, a simple laboratory bench FM-DIAL system was designed, assembled, tested, and laboratory-scale experiments were carried out during FY2001. Preliminary results of the FM DIAL experiments confirm the speckle averaging advantages predicted by the models. In addition, experiments were performed to explore the use of hybrid QC - CO2 lasers for achieving sufficient frequency-modulated laser power to enable field experiments at longer ranges (up to one kilometer or so). This approach will allow model validation at realistic ranges much sooner than would be possible if one had to first develop master oscillator - power amplifier systems utilizing only QC devices. Amplification of a QC laser with a CO2 laser was observed in the first hybrid laser experiments, but the low gain and narrow linewidth of the CO2 laser available for these experiments prevented production of a high-power FM laser beam.

  7. Multiband left handed biaxial meta atom at microwave frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehedi Hasan, Md; Faruque, Mohammad Rashed Iqbal; Tariqul Islam, Mohammad

    2017-03-01

    Left handed meta atoms are special class materials that characterized by the negative refractive index. In this paper, a left handed biaxial meta-atom is reported that has 5.81 GHz wide bandwidth and applicable for C-, X- and Ku-band applications. The meta atom is developed by an outer and the inner split ring resonator with inverse E-shape metal strips of copper, which are connected with the outer ring resonator that look like a mirror-shape structure. A finite integration technique based CST Microwave Studio is utilized to design, simulation and analysis purposes, where the Agilent N5227A vector network analyzer is utilized for measurement purpose. Measurements show that, the measured and simulated results are well complied together and negative index bandwidth from 3.27 to 6.55 GHz (bandwidth of 3.28 GHz) and 7 to 12.81 GHz (bandwidth of 5.81 GHz) along the z-axis wave propagation. The total dimensions of the designed structure are 0.2λ  ×  0.2λ  ×  0.035λ and the effective medium ratio 5, makes the proposed biaxial meta-atom is suitable for practical applications.

  8. Encoding of frequency-modulation (FM) rates in human auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Hidehiko; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2015-12-14

    Frequency-modulated sounds play an important role in our daily social life. However, it currently remains unclear whether frequency modulation rates affect neural activity in the human auditory cortex. In the present study, using magnetoencephalography, we investigated the auditory evoked N1m and sustained field responses elicited by temporally repeated and superimposed frequency-modulated sweeps that were matched in the spectral domain, but differed in frequency modulation rates (1, 4, 16, and 64 octaves per sec). The results obtained demonstrated that the higher rate frequency-modulated sweeps elicited the smaller N1m and the larger sustained field responses. Frequency modulation rate had a significant impact on the human brain responses, thereby providing a key for disentangling a series of natural frequency-modulated sounds such as speech and music.

  9. Encoding of frequency-modulation (FM) rates in human auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Hidehiko; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2015-01-01

    Frequency-modulated sounds play an important role in our daily social life. However, it currently remains unclear whether frequency modulation rates affect neural activity in the human auditory cortex. In the present study, using magnetoencephalography, we investigated the auditory evoked N1m and sustained field responses elicited by temporally repeated and superimposed frequency-modulated sweeps that were matched in the spectral domain, but differed in frequency modulation rates (1, 4, 16, and 64 octaves per sec). The results obtained demonstrated that the higher rate frequency-modulated sweeps elicited the smaller N1m and the larger sustained field responses. Frequency modulation rate had a significant impact on the human brain responses, thereby providing a key for disentangling a series of natural frequency-modulated sounds such as speech and music. PMID:26656920

  10. CMOS in-pixel optical pulse frequency modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nel, Nicolaas E.; du Plessis, M.; Joubert, T.-H.

    2016-02-01

    This paper covers the design of a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) pixel readout circuit with a built-in frequency conversion feature. The pixel contains a CMOS photo sensor along with all signal-to-frequency conversion circuitry. An 8×8 array of these pixels is also designed. Current imaging arrays often use analog-to-digital conversion (ADC) and digital signal processing (DSP) techniques that are off-chip1. The frequency modulation technique investigated in this paper is preferred over other ADC techniques due to its smaller size, and the possibility of a higher dynamic range. Careful considerations are made regarding the size of the components of the pixel, as various characteristics of CMOS devices are limited by decreasing the scale of the components2. The methodology used was the CMOS design cycle for integrated circuit design. All components of the pixel were designed from first principles to meet necessary requirements of a small pixel size (30×30 μm2) and an output resolution greater than that of an 8-bit ADC. For the photodetector, an n+-p+/p-substrate diode was designed with a parasitic capacitance of 3 fF. The analog front-end stage was designed around a Schmitt trigger circuit. The photo current is integrated on an integration capacitor of 200 fF, which is reset when the Schmitt trigger output voltage exceeds a preset threshold. The circuit schematic and layout were designed using Cadence Virtuoso and the process used was the AMS CMOS 350 nm process using a power supply of 5V. The simulation results were confirmed to comply with specifications, and the layout passed all verification checks. The dynamic range achieved is 58.828 dB per pixel, with the output frequencies ranging from 12.341kHz to 10.783 MHz. It is also confirmed that the output frequency has a linear relationship to the photocurrent generated by the photodiode.

  11. Noise performance of frequency modulation Kelvin force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Deresmes, Dominique; Mélin, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Summary Noise performance of a phase-locked loop (PLL) based frequency modulation Kelvin force microscope (FM-KFM) is assessed. Noise propagation is modeled step by step throughout the setup using both exact closed loop noise gains and an approximation known as “noise gain” from operational amplifier (OpAmp) design that offers the advantage of decoupling the noise performance study from considerations of stability and ideal loop response. The bandwidth can be chosen depending on how much noise is acceptable and it is shown that stability is not an issue up to a limit that will be discussed. With thermal and detector noise as the only sources, both approaches yield PLL frequency noise expressions equal to the theoretical value for self-oscillating circuits and in agreement with measurement, demonstrating that the PLL components neither modify nor contribute noise. Kelvin output noise is then investigated by modeling the surrounding bias feedback loop. A design rule is proposed that allows choosing the AC modulation frequency for optimized sharing of the PLL bandwidth between Kelvin and topography loops. A crossover criterion determines as a function of bandwidth, temperature and probe parameters whether thermal or detector noise is the dominating noise source. Probe merit factors for both cases are then established, suggesting how to tackle noise performance by probe design. Typical merit factors of common probe types are compared. This comprehensive study is an encouraging step toward a more integral performance assessment and a remedy against focusing on single aspects and optimizing around randomly chosen key values. PMID:24455457

  12. Active cancellation of residual amplitude modulation in a frequency-modulation based Fabry-Perot interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yinan; Wang, Yicheng; Pratt, Jon R.

    2016-03-01

    Residual amplitude modulation (RAM) is one of the most common noise sources known to degrade the sensitivity of frequency modulation spectroscopy. RAM can arise as a result of the temperature dependent birefringence of the modulator crystal, which causes the orientation of the crystal's optical axis to shift with respect to the polarization of the incident light with temperature. In the fiber-based optical interferometer used on the National Institute of Standards and Technology calculable capacitor, RAM degrades the measured laser frequency stability and correlates with the environmental temperature fluctuations. We have demonstrated a simple approach that cancels out excessive RAM due to polarization mismatch between the light and the optical axis of the crystal. The approach allows us to measure the frequency noise of a heterodyne beat between two lasers individually locked to different resonant modes of a cavity with an accuracy better than 0.5 ppm, which meets the requirement to further determine the longitudinal mode number of the cavity length. Also, this approach has substantially mitigated the temperature dependency of the measurements of the cavity length and consequently the capacitance.

  13. Discrimination of frequency-modulated Baleen whale downsweep calls with overlapping frequencies.

    PubMed

    Ou, Hui; Au, Whitlow W L; Van Parijs, Sofie; Oleson, Erin M; Rankin, Shannon

    2015-06-01

    Automatic classification of fin, sei, and blue whale frequency modulated downsweeps has been a challenging task for bioacousticians. These calls overlap in frequency range and have similar time durations. The traditional spectrogram methodology, the Short Time Fourier Transform, tends to be ineffective because of the large temporal ambiguities needed to achieve the necessary frequency resolution to study the fine time-frequency (TF) structures. Spectrograms generated with the Pseudo Wigner-Ville Distribution (PWVD) provide much higher simultaneous TF resolution compared with the traditional method. The PWVD allows bioacousticians to study the fine TF structures of the sound, such as the instantaneous frequency, instantaneous bandwidth, contour slope, etc. These features set the foundation of identifying sounds that are usually considered difficult to discriminate using the traditional method. Wigner-Ville distribution of the baleen whale downsweeps showed distinguishable characteristics; for example, the TF contour of fin and sei whales exhibited concave and convex shapes, which have never been reported in the literature. A Support Vector Machine classifier was trained and tested based on the parameters extracted from the PWVD.

  14. Range-azimuth decouple beamforming for frequency diverse array with Costas-sequence modulated frequency offsets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhe; Wang, Wen-Qin; Shao, Huaizong

    2016-12-01

    Different from the phased-array using the same carrier frequency for each transmit element, the frequency diverse array (FDA) uses a small frequency offset across the array elements to produce range-angle-dependent transmit beampattern. FDA radar provides new application capabilities and potentials due to its range-dependent transmit array beampattern, but the FDA using linearly increasing frequency offsets will produce a range and angle coupled transmit beampattern. In order to decouple the range-azimuth beampattern for FDA radar, this paper proposes a uniform linear array (ULA) FDA using Costas-sequence modulated frequency offsets to produce random-like energy distribution in the transmit beampattern and thumbtack transmit-receive beampattern. In doing so, the range and angle of targets can be unambiguously estimated through matched filtering and subspace decomposition algorithms in the receiver signal processor. Moreover, random-like energy distributed beampattern can also be utilized for low probability of intercept (LPI) radar applications. Numerical results show that the proposed scheme outperforms the standard FDA in focusing the transmit energy, especially in the range dimension.

  15. Atomically referenced 1-GHz optical parametric oscillator frequency comb.

    PubMed

    McCracken, Richard A; Balskus, Karolis; Zhang, Zhaowei; Reid, Derryck T

    2015-06-15

    The visible to mid-infrared coverage of femtosecond optical parametric oscillator (OPO) frequency combs makes them attractive resources for high-resolution spectroscopy and astrophotonic spectrograph calibration. Such applications require absolute traceability and wide comb-tooth spacing, attributes which until now have remained unavailable from any single OPO frequency comb. Here, we report a 1-GHz Ti:sapphire pumped OPO comb whose repetition and offset frequencies are referenced to Rb-stabilised microwave and laser oscillators respectively. This technique simultaneously achieves fully stabilized combs from both the Ti:sapphire laser and the OPO with sub-MHz comb-tooth linewidths, multi-hour locking stability and without the need for super-continuum generation.

  16. Improvement in medium long-term frequency stability of the integrating sphere cold atom clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Cheng, Huadong; Meng, Yanling; Wan, Jinyin; Xiao, Ling; Wang, Xiumei; Wang, Yaning; Liu, Liang

    2016-07-01

    The medium-long term frequency stability of the integrating sphere cold atom clock was improved.During the clock operation, Rb atoms were cooled and manipulated using cooling light diffusely reflected by the inner surface of a microwave cavity in the clock. This light heated the cavity and caused a frequency drift from the resonant frequency of the cavity. Power fluctuations of the cooling light led to atomic density variations in the cavity's central area, which increased the clock frequency instability through a cavity pulling effect. We overcame these limitations with appropriate solutions. A frequency stability of 3.5E-15 was achieved when the integrating time ? increased to 2E4 s.

  17. Prospects for advances in microwave atomic frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walls, F. L.

    1979-01-01

    Traditional standards based on rubidium, cesium and hydrogen have been greatly refined over the past decade, such that the frequency stability of the current generation of devices is generally limited by those basic concepts on which they are based. Future advances in frequency stability will principally come from changes in the concepts on which the standards are based, and only secondarily from more careful engineering of the old concepts. The fundamental limitations in these standards are considered and the important conceptual and component advances which could have a major impact on future performance of these standards are indicated. A very promising new class of microwave standards based on ion storage techniques is examined.

  18. Robust Detection of Fast and Slow Frequency Jumps of Atomic Clocks.

    PubMed

    Galleani, Lorenzo; Tavella, Patrizia

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a frequency jump detector for atomic clocks. The detector considers both fast frequency jumps, which are abrupt variations of the clock frequency trend, and slow frequency jumps, which correspond to variations of the frequency trend over a finite time interval. These anomalies are particularly critical to space clocks in global navigation satellite systems (GNSSs). The developed detector is robust in the sense that it can deal with time-varying frequency trends, sinusoidal terms, outliers, and missing data. The detection performances are analyzed both analytically and numerically, and the effectiveness of the detector is shown by applying it to GNSS experimental data, as well as to simulated clock data.

  19. Dependence of microwave-excitation signal parameters on frequency stability of caesium atomic clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, A. A.; Davydov, V. V.; Vologdin, V. A.; Zalyotov, D. V.

    2015-11-01

    New scheme of the microwave - excitation signal for the caesium atomic clock is based on method of direct digital synthesis. The theoretical calculations and experimental research showed decrease step frequency tuning by several orders and improvement the spectral characteristics of the output signal of frequency synthesizer. A range of generated output frequencies is expanded, and the possibility of detuning the frequency of the neighboring resonance of spectral line that makes it possible to adjust the C-field in quantum frequency standard is implemented. Experimental research of the metrological characteristics of the quantum frequency standard on the atoms of caesium - 133 with new design scheme of the microwave - excitation signal showed improvement in daily frequency stability on 1.2*10-14.

  20. Study of jamming of the frequency modulation infrared seekers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Fang; Guo, Jin; Shao, Jun-feng; Wang, Ting-feng

    2013-09-01

    The threat of the IR guidance missile is a direct consequence of extensive proliferation of the airborne IR countermeasure. The aim of a countermeasure system is to inject false information into a sensor system to create confusion. Many optical seekers have a single detector that is used to sense the position of its victim in its field of view. A seeker has a spinning reticle in the focal plane of the optical system that collects energy from the thermal scene and focuses it on to the detector. In this paper, the principle of the conical-scan FM reticle is analyzed. Then the effect that different amplitude or frequency modulated mid-infrared laser pulse acts on the reticle system is simulated. When the ratio of jamming energy to target radiation (repression) gradually increases, the azimuth error and the misalignment angle error become larger. The results show that simply increasing the intensity of the jamming light achieves little, but it increases the received signal strength of the FM reticle system ,so that the target will be more easily exposed. A slow variation of amplitude will warp the azimuth information received by the seeker, but the target can't be completely out of the missile tracking. If the repression and the jamming frequency change at the same time, the jamming effects can be more obvious. When the jamming signal's angular frequency is twice as large as the carrier frequency of the reticle system, the seeker will can't receive an accurate signal and the jamming can be achieved. The jamming mechanism of the conical-scan FM IR seeker is described and it is helpful to the airborne IR countermeasure system.

  1. Modulation of Radio Frequency Signals by Nonlinearly Generated Acoustic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Spencer Joseph

    Acousto-electromagnetic scattering is a process in which an acoustic excitation is utilized to induce modulation on an electromagnetic (EM) wave. This phenomenon can be exploited in remote sensing and detection schemes whereby target objects are mechanically excited by high powered acoustic waves resulting in unique object characterizations when interrogated with EM signals. Implementation of acousto-EM sensing schemes, however, are limited by a lack of fundamental understanding of the nonlinear interaction between acoustic and EM waves and inefficient simulation methods in the determination of the radiation patterns of higher order scattered acoustic fields. To address the insufficient simulation issue, a computationally efficient mathematical model describing higher order scattered sound fields, particularly of third-order in which a 40x increase in computation speed is achieved, is derived using a multi-Gaussian beam (MGB) expansion that expresses the sound field of any arbitrary axially symmetric beam as a series of Gaussian base functions. The third-order intermodulation (IM3) frequency components are produced by considering the cascaded nonlinear second-order effects when analyzing the interaction between the first- and second-order frequency components during the nonlinear scattering of sound by sound from two noncollinear ultrasonic baffled piston sources. The theory is extended to the modeling of the sound beams generated by parametric transducer arrays, showing that the MGB model can be efficiently used to calculate both the second- and third-order sound fields of the array. Additionally, a near-to-far-field (NTFF) transformation method is developed to model the far-field characteristics of scattered sound fields, extending Kirchhoff's theorem, typically applied to EM waves, determining the far-field patterns of an acoustic source from amplitude and phase measurements made in the near-field by including the higher order sound fields generated by the

  2. Baseband integrated acousto-optic frequency shifter/modulator module for fiber optic at 1.3 mum.

    PubMed

    Tsai, C S; Cheng, Z Y

    1993-01-01

    A baseband integrated acoustooptic (AO) frequency shifter/modulator module that consists of a pair of titanium-indiffused proton-exchanged (TIPE) waveguide lenses and a pair of cascaded guided-wave AO Bragg cells has been realized in a Y-cut LiNbO(3) waveguide substrate 0.1 cmx1.0 cmx2.0 cm in size. A device module operating at the optical wavelength of 1.3 mum has provided a -3-dB tunable bandwidth of 120 MHz at baseband. The frequency-shifted or -modulated light propagates in a fixed direction, irrespective of the magnitude of frequency shift or modulation, and is focused into a spot (FWHM) of 6.2-mum size on the output edge of the waveguide. Accordingly, this optical frequency shifter/module can be directly interfaced with single-mode optical fibers to facilitate applications in fiber optic systems.

  3. From Sundials to Atomic Clocks: Understanding Time and Frequency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jespersen, James; Fitz-Randolph, Jane

    An introduction to time, timekeeping, and the uses of time information, especially in the scientific and technical areas, are offered in this book for laymen. Historical and philosophical aspects of time and timekeeping are included. The scientific thought on time has been simplified. Contents include: the nature of time, time and frequency, early…

  4. Dual-frequency resonance-tracking atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Brian J.; Callahan, Clint; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Proksch, Roger

    2007-11-01

    A dual-excitation method for resonant-frequency tracking in scanning probe microscopy based on amplitude detection is developed. This method allows the cantilever to be operated at or near resonance for techniques where standard phase locked loops are not possible. This includes techniques with non-acoustic driving where the phase of the driving force is frequency and/or position dependent. An example of the latter is piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM), where the resonant frequency of the cantilever is strongly dependent on the contact stiffness of the tip-surface junction and the local mechanical properties, but the spatial variability of the drive phase rules out the use of a phase locked loop. Combined with high-voltage switching and imaging, dual-frequency, resonance-tracking PFM allows reliable studies of electromechanical and elastic properties and polarization dynamics in a broad range of inorganic and biological systems, and is illustrated using lead zirconate-titanate, rat tail collagen, and native and switched ferroelectric domains in lithium niobate.

  5. Possible applications of atomic frequency standards with an internal high resolution digital synthesizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Detoma, E.; Stern, A.

    1993-01-01

    The applications of Atomic Frequency Standards with an internal synthesizer (thereafter referred as 'Synthesized Frequency Standards or Oscillators') with a special emphasis on the Rb oscillator are reviewed. A fractional frequency synthesizer, developed by SEPA, was incorporated in the Frequency Locked Loop of a TFL Rubidium Frequency Standard. This combination allows a frequency settability in steps of 1.5 x 10(exp -12) (optional 1 x 10(exp -13) over a range of 6 x 10(exp -9) without having to resort to change the C-field to tune the output frequency of the device. This capability, coupled to the excellent short term stability of the Rb frequency standard, opens new possibilities for time and frequency users in the various fields (time metrology, navigation, communication, etc.) in which stable frequency standards find their application.

  6. Metabolic Energy of Action Potentials Modulated by Spike Frequency Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Guo-Sheng; Wang, Jiang; Li, Hui-Yan; Wei, Xi-Le; Deng, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Spike frequency adaptation (SFA) exists in many types of neurons, which has been demonstrated to improve their abilities to process incoming information by synapses. The major carrier used by a neuron to convey synaptic signals is the sequences of action potentials (APs), which have to consume substantial metabolic energies to initiate and propagate. Here we use conductance-based models to investigate how SFA modulates the AP-related energy of neurons. The SFA is attributed to either calcium-activated K+ (IAHP) or voltage-activated K+ (IM) current. We observe that the activation of IAHP or IM increases the Na+ load used for depolarizing membrane, while produces few effects on the falling phase of AP. Then, the metabolic energy involved in Na+ current significantly increases from one AP to the next, while for K+ current it is less affected. As a consequence, the total energy cost by each AP gets larger as firing rate decays down. It is also shown that the minimum Na+ charge needed for the depolarization of each AP is unaffected during the course of SFA. This indicates that the activation of either adaptation current makes APs become less efficient to use Na+ influx for their depolarization. Further, our simulations demonstrate that the different biophysical properties of IM and IAHP result in distinct modulations of metabolic energy usage for APs. These investigations provide a fundamental link between adaptation currents and neuronal energetics, which could facilitate to interpret how SFA participates in neuronal information processing. PMID:27909394

  7. The NASA data systems standardization program - Radio frequency and modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, W. L.

    The modifications being considered by the NASA-ESA Working Group (NEWG) for space-data-systems standardization to maximize the commonality of the NASA and ESA RF and modulation systems linking spaceborne scientific experiments with ground stations are summarized. The first phase of the NEWG project shows that the NASA MK-IVA Deep Space Network and Shuttle Interrogator (SI) systems in place or planned for 1985 are generally compatible with the ESA Network, but that communications involving the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) are incompatible due to its use of spread-spectrum modulation, pseudonoise ranging, multiple-access channels, and Mbit/s data rates. Topics under study for the post-1985 period include low-bit-rate capability for the ESA Network, an optional 8-kHz command subcarrier for the SI, fixing the spacecraft-transponder frequency-multiplication ratios for possible X-band uplinks or X-band nondeep-space downlinks, review of incompatible TDRS features, and development of the 32-GHz band.

  8. The NASA data systems standardization program - Radio frequency and modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, W. L.

    1983-01-01

    The modifications being considered by the NASA-ESA Working Group (NEWG) for space-data-systems standardization to maximize the commonality of the NASA and ESA RF and modulation systems linking spaceborne scientific experiments with ground stations are summarized. The first phase of the NEWG project shows that the NASA MK-IVA Deep Space Network and Shuttle Interrogator (SI) systems in place or planned for 1985 are generally compatible with the ESA Network, but that communications involving the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) are incompatible due to its use of spread-spectrum modulation, pseudonoise ranging, multiple-access channels, and Mbit/s data rates. Topics under study for the post-1985 period include low-bit-rate capability for the ESA Network, an optional 8-kHz command subcarrier for the SI, fixing the spacecraft-transponder frequency-multiplication ratios for possible X-band uplinks or X-band nondeep-space downlinks, review of incompatible TDRS features, and development of the 32-GHz band.

  9. Frequency-shift vibro-acoustic modulation driven by low-frequency broadband excitations in a bistable cantilever oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qingbo; Xu, Yanyan; Lu, Siliang; Shao, Yong

    2017-03-01

    This paper reports a frequency-shift vibro-acoustic modulation (VAM) effect in a bistable microcracked cantilever oscillator. Low-frequency broadband excitations induced a VAM effect with a shifted modulation frequency through involving a microcracked metal beam in a bistable oscillator model. We used nonlinear dynamics equations and principles to describe the mechanism of a bistable oscillator whose natural frequency varied as the oscillation amplitude increased. We demonstrated this frequency-shift VAM effect using a prototype bistable oscillator model designed to efficiently detect microcracks in solid materials via the VAM effect using ambient vibration excitations.

  10. Note: A frequency modulated wireless interrogation system exploiting narrowband acoustic resonator for remote physical quantity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droit, C.; Martin, G.; Ballandras, S.; Friedt, J.-M.

    2010-05-01

    We demonstrate the wireless conversion of frequency modulation to amplitude modulation by radio frequency resonators as means of accurately determining the resonance frequency of passive acoustoelectronic sensors. The emitted frequency modulated radio frequency pulses are generated by a pulsed radar for probing a surface acoustic wave based sensor. The sharp sign transition of the amplitude modulated received signal provides a signal on which a feedback loop is locked to monitor the resonance signal. The strategy is demonstrated using a full software implementation on a generic hardware, resulting in 2 Hz resolution at 1 s integration time limited by the proportional feedback loop.

  11. Note: A frequency modulated wireless interrogation system exploiting narrowband acoustic resonator for remote physical quantity measurement.

    PubMed

    Droit, C; Martin, G; Ballandras, S; Friedt, J-M

    2010-05-01

    We demonstrate the wireless conversion of frequency modulation to amplitude modulation by radio frequency resonators as means of accurately determining the resonance frequency of passive acoustoelectronic sensors. The emitted frequency modulated radio frequency pulses are generated by a pulsed radar for probing a surface acoustic wave based sensor. The sharp sign transition of the amplitude modulated received signal provides a signal on which a feedback loop is locked to monitor the resonance signal. The strategy is demonstrated using a full software implementation on a generic hardware, resulting in 2 Hz resolution at 1 s integration time limited by the proportional feedback loop.

  12. Control of the photoelectron dynamics for the effective conversion of short-pulse, frequency-modulated optical radiation into X-ray radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Silaev, A A; Meshkov, O V; Emelin, M Yu; Vvedenskii, N V; Ryabikin, M Yu

    2015-05-31

    We report a theoretical investigation of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in the ionisation of atoms by nonlinear frequency-modulated laser pulses of short duration. It is shown that the reduction in the instantaneous value of the laser pulse frequency can lead to a significant increase in the width of the plateau in the HHG spectrum. We have found optimal parameters of frequency modulation at which photons with energies of 1 keV are efficiently generated at a relatively low laser-pulse intensity. High HHG efficiency at optimal parameters is explained by the peculiarities of atomic ionisation dynamics and acceleration of photoelectrons by a frequency-modulated laser field. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  13. Nano-rheology of hydrogels using direct drive force modulation atomic force microscopy†

    PubMed Central

    Nalam, Prathima C.; Gosvami, Nitya N.; Caporizzo, Matthew A.; Composto, Russell J.

    2016-01-01

    We present a magnetic force-based direct drive modulation method to measure local nano-rheological properties of soft materials across a broad frequency range (10 Hz to 2 kHz) using colloid-attached atomic force microscope (AFM) probes in liquid. The direct drive method enables artefact-free measurements over several decades of excitation frequency, and avoids the need to evaluate medium-induced hydrodynamic drag effects. The method was applied to measure the local mechanical properties of polyacrylamide hydrogels. The frequency-dependent storage stiffness, loss stiffness, and loss tangent (tan δ) were quantified for hydrogels having high and low crosslinking densities by measuring the amplitude and the phase response of the cantilever while the colloid was in contact with the hydrogel. The frequency bandwidth was further expanded to lower effective frequencies (0.1 Hz to 10 Hz) by obtaining force–displacement (FD) curves. Slow FD measurements showed a recoverable but highly hysteretic response, with the contact mechanical behaviour dependent on the loading direction: approach curves showed Hertzian behaviour while retraction curves fit the JKR contact mechanics model well into the adhesive regime, after which multiple detachment instabilities occurred. Using small amplitude dynamic modulation to explore faster rates, the load dependence of the storage stiffness transitioned from Hertzian to a dynamic punch-type (constant contact area) model, indicating significant influence of material dissipation coupled with adhesion. Using the appropriate contact model across the full frequency range measured, the storage moduli were found to remain nearly constant until an increase began near ∼100 Hz. The softer gels' storage modulus increased from 7.9 ± 0.4 to 14.5 ± 2.1 kPa (∼85%), and the stiffer gels' storage modulus increased from 16.3 ± 1.1 to 31.7 ± 5.0 kPa (∼95%). This increase at high frequencies may be attributed to a contribution from solvent

  14. On the existence in human auditory pathways of channels selectively tuned to the modulation present in frequency-modulated tones

    PubMed Central

    Kay, R. H.; Matthews, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    1. The sensitivity of detecting modulation in a test tone sinusoidally frequency-modulated at a rate ϕtest is diminished after exposure to a conditioning tone more deeply frequency-modulated at a rate ϕcond provided that ϕcond is not very different from ϕtest, the sound amplitude being kept constant for each tone at a comfortable hearing level 40-45 dB above threshold. 2. When ϕcond = ϕtest the frequency deviation in the modulated test tone must be increased to about three times the unconditioned threshold magnitude to be detectable immediately after exposure to the conditioning tone. Detection sensitivity returns to normal in about one minute. 3. At low modulation frequencies the conditioning effects are tuned, being much diminished when ϕcond differs from ϕtest by a few cycles per second. 4. Comparing monaural with contra-aural conditioning demonstrates a considerable interaural transfer of about 60-80% of the effect, indicating that the conditioning and its selectivity are predominantly central phenomena. 5. The magnitude of the deterioration in detection sensitivity after conditioning is about 3 × at modulation frequencies between about 3/sec and 30/sec. It diminishes at lower and higher modulation frequencies and is effectively absent at 100/sec modulation. The bandwidth of the effect increases from a few cycles per second at the lower end of this range, to some tens of cycles per second at the upper end. 6. For the same modulation frequency, the conditioning is relatively insensitive to the mean `carrier' audiofrequency, f0. The band width in terms of carrier frequency is at least as wide as `critical bands'. With a test signal f0 = 250 Hz, ϕtest = 8/sec, conditioning is still appreciable for a conditioning tone of ϕcond = 8/sec but centred upon f0 = 150 Hz or = 350 Hz. Conditioning is thus not explicable in terms of coincidences between particular spectral components in the conditioning and test tones. 7. Whereas the sensitivity of detecting 8/sec

  15. Fast phase stabilization of a low frequency beat note for atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, E.; Horne, R. A.; Sackett, C. A.

    2016-06-01

    Atom interferometry experiments rely on the ability to obtain a stable signal that corresponds to an atomic phase. For interferometers that use laser beams to manipulate the atoms, noise in the lasers can lead to errors in the atomic measurement. In particular, it is often necessary to actively stabilize the optical phase between two frequency components of the beams. Typically this is achieved using a time-domain measurement of a beat note between the two frequencies. This becomes challenging when the frequency difference is small and the phase measurement must be made quickly. The method presented here instead uses a spatial interference detection to rapidly measure the optical phase for arbitrary frequency differences. A feedback system operating at a bandwidth of about 10 MHz could then correct the phase in about 3 μs. This time is short enough that the phase correction could be applied at the start of a laser pulse without appreciably degrading the fidelity of the atom interferometer operation. The phase stabilization system was demonstrated in a simple atom interferometer measurement of the 87Rb recoil frequency.

  16. High resolution atomic coherent control via spectral phase manipulation of an optical frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Stowe, Matthew C; Cruz, Flavio C; Marian, Adela; Ye, Jun

    2006-04-21

    We demonstrate high resolution coherent control of cold atomic rubidium utilizing spectral phase manipulation of a femtosecond optical frequency comb. Transient coherent accumulation is directly manifested by the enhancement of signal amplitude and spectral resolution via the pulse number. The combination of frequency comb technology and spectral phase manipulation enables coherent control techniques to enter a new regime with natural linewidth resolution.

  17. High Resolution Atomic Coherent Control via Spectral Phase Manipulation of an Optical Frequency Comb

    SciTech Connect

    Stowe, Matthew C.; Cruz, Flavio C.; Marian, Adela; Ye Jun

    2006-04-21

    We demonstrate high resolution coherent control of cold atomic rubidium utilizing spectral phase manipulation of a femtosecond optical frequency comb. Transient coherent accumulation is directly manifested by the enhancement of signal amplitude and spectral resolution via the pulse number. The combination of frequency comb technology and spectral phase manipulation enables coherent control techniques to enter a new regime with natural linewidth resolution.

  18. Effective Landau-Zener transitions in the circuit dynamical Casimir effect with time-varying modulation frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodonov, A. V.; Militello, B.; Napoli, A.; Messina, A.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the dissipative single-qubit circuit QED architecture in which the atomic transition frequency undergoes a weak external time modulation. For sinusoidal modulation with linearly varying frequency we derive effective Hamiltonians that resemble the Landau-Zener problem of finite duration associated with a two- or multilevel systems. The corresponding off-diagonal coupling coefficients originate either from the rotating or the counter-rotating terms in the Rabi Hamiltonian, depending on the values of the modulation frequency. It is demonstrated that in the dissipationless case one can accomplish almost complete transitions between the eigenstates of the bare Rabi Hamiltonian even for relatively short durations of the frequency sweep. To assess the experimental feasibility of our scheme we solved numerically the phenomenological and the microscopic quantum master equations in the Markovian regime at zero temperature. Both models exhibit qualitatively similar behavior and indicate that photon generation from vacuum via effective Landau-Zener transitions could be implemented with the current technology on the time scales of a few microseconds. Moreover, unlike the harmonic dynamical Casimir effect implementations, our proposal does not require precise knowledge of the resonant modulation frequency to accomplish meaningful photon generation.

  19. Extracting the differential phase in dual atom interferometers by modulating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Ping; Zhong, Jia-Qi; Chen, Xi; Li, Run-Bing; Li, Da-Wei; Zhu, Lei; Song, Hong-Wei; Wang, Jin; Zhan, Ming-Sheng

    2016-09-01

    We present a new scheme for measuring the differential phase in dual atom interferometers. The magnetic field is modulated in one interferometer, and the differential phase can be extracted without measuring the amplitude of the magnetic field by combining the ellipse and linear fitting methods. The gravity gradient measurements are discussed based on dual atom interferometers. Numerical simulation shows that the systematic error of the differential phase measurement is largely decreased when the duration of the magnetic field is symmetrically modulated. This combined fitting scheme has a high accuracy for measuring an arbitrary differential phase in dual atom interferometers.

  20. Dual Data Pulse Width Modulator for Radio Frequency Identification Biosensor Signal Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Boram; Nakazato, Kazuo

    2013-04-01

    A dual data pulse width modulator is proposed and demonstrated for radio frequency identification (RFID) biosensor signal modulation. Simultaneous wireless measurement of two sensors can be carried out using this circuit, in which two analog signals are modulated and transmitted in a single clock cycle. The measured modulation sensitivity of the two input channels is 84.69 and 85.16 µs/V and the dynamic range is 55.6 and 63.5 dB, respectively. Here, redox potential and temperature are measured wirelessly using the proposed circuit. Temperature change measurement shows a sensitivity of 9.501 µs/°C in the range of 25-40 °C. The measured redox potential shows fairly good linearity for a concentration ratio of hexacyanoferrate (III) to (II) ranging from 10-2 to 102 and the slope is 58.0 mV/decade, almost the same as the theoretical value. The chip area and power consumption are 0.36 mm2 and 650 µW, respectively, using 1.2-µm, 2-metal, 2-poly CMOS technology.

  1. Low frequency steady-state brain responses modulate large scale functional networks in a frequency-specific means.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Feng; Long, Zhiliang; Cui, Qian; Liu, Feng; Jing, Xiu-Juan; Chen, Heng; Guo, Xiao-Nan; Yan, Jin H; Chen, Hua-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Neural oscillations are essential for brain functions. Research has suggested that the frequency of neural oscillations is lower for more integrative and remote communications. In this vein, some resting-state studies have suggested that large scale networks function in the very low frequency range (<1 Hz). However, it is difficult to determine the frequency characteristics of brain networks because both resting-state studies and conventional frequency tagging approaches cannot simultaneously capture multiple large scale networks in controllable cognitive activities. In this preliminary study, we aimed to examine whether large scale networks can be modulated by task-induced low frequency steady-state brain responses (lfSSBRs) in a frequency-specific pattern. In a revised attention network test, the lfSSBRs were evoked in the triple network system and sensory-motor system, indicating that large scale networks can be modulated in a frequency tagging way. Furthermore, the inter- and intranetwork synchronizations as well as coherence were increased at the fundamental frequency and the first harmonic rather than at other frequency bands, indicating a frequency-specific modulation of information communication. However, there was no difference among attention conditions, indicating that lfSSBRs modulate the general attention state much stronger than distinguishing attention conditions. This study provides insights into the advantage and mechanism of lfSSBRs. More importantly, it paves a new way to investigate frequency-specific large scale brain activities.

  2. Comment on 'Accurate rubidium atomic fountain frequency standard'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruoxin; Gibble, Kurt

    2011-10-01

    We discuss the treatment of distributed cavity phase, microwave lensing and microwave leakage in the paper by Ovchinnikov and Marra (2011 Metrologia 48 87-100). The paper neglects the potential distributed cavity phase shifts from linear phase gradients and quadrupolar phase variations. Only azimuthally symmetric phase variations were analysed and an incorrect model was used for these. The paper also omits an uncertainty due to microwave lensing, which must be included. Finally, we describe additional measurements that could clarify the model used to analyse the frequency shifts due to microwave leakage.

  3. Nanoscale Subsurface Imaging via Resonant Difference-Frequency Atomic Force Ultrasonic Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, Sean A.; Cantrell, John H.; Lilehei, Peter T.

    2007-01-01

    A novel scanning probe microscope methodology has been developed that employs an ultrasonic wave launched from the bottom of a sample while the cantilever of an atomic force microscope, driven at a frequency differing from the ultrasonic frequency by the fundamental resonance frequency of the cantilever, engages the sample top surface. The nonlinear mixing of the oscillating cantilever and the ultrasonic wave in the region defined by the cantilever tip-sample surface interaction force generates difference-frequency oscillations at the cantilever fundamental resonance. The resonance-enhanced difference-frequency signals are used to create images of embedded nanoscale features.

  4. Fast, multi-frequency, and quantitative nanomechanical mapping of live cells using the atomic force microscope

    PubMed Central

    Cartagena-Rivera, Alexander X.; Wang, Wen-Horng; Geahlen, Robert L.; Raman, Arvind

    2015-01-01

    A longstanding goal in cellular mechanobiology has been to link dynamic biomolecular processes underpinning disease or morphogenesis to spatio-temporal changes in nanoscale mechanical properties such as viscoelasticity, surface tension, and adhesion. This requires the development of quantitative mechanical microscopy methods with high spatio-temporal resolution within a single cell. The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) can map the heterogeneous mechanical properties of cells with high spatial resolution, however, the image acquisition time is 1–2 orders of magnitude longer than that required to study dynamic cellular processes. We present a technique that allows commercial AFM systems to map quantitatively the dynamically changing viscoelastic properties of live eukaryotic cells at widely separated frequencies over large areas (several 10’s of microns) with spatial resolution equal to amplitude-modulation (AM-AFM) and with image acquisition times (tens of seconds) approaching those of speckle fluorescence methods. This represents a ~20 fold improvement in nanomechanical imaging throughput compared to AM-AFM and is fully compatible with emerging high speed AFM systems. This method is used to study the spatio-temporal mechanical response of MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells to the inhibition of Syk protein tyrosine kinase giving insight into the signaling pathways by which Syk negatively regulates motility of highly invasive cancer cells. PMID:26118423

  5. Frequency and amplitude modulation of ultra-compact terahertz quantum cascade lasers using an integrated avalanche diode oscillator.

    PubMed

    Castellano, Fabrizio; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H; Davies, A Giles; Vitiello, Miriam S

    2016-03-15

    Mode-locked comb sources operating at optical frequencies underpin applications ranging from spectroscopy and ultrafast physics, through to absolute frequency measurements and atomic clocks. Extending their operation into the terahertz frequency range would greatly benefit from the availability of compact semiconductor-based sources. However, the development of any compact mode-locked THz laser, which itself is inherently a frequency comb, has yet to be achieved without the use of an external stimulus. High-power, electrically pumped quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) have recently emerged as a promising solution, owing to their octave spanning bandwidths, the ability to achieve group-velocity dispersion compensation and the possibility of obtaining active mode-locking. Here, we propose an unprecedented compact architecture to induce both frequency and amplitude self-modulation in a THz QCL. By engineering a microwave avalanche oscillator into the laser cavity, which provides a 10 GHz self-modulation of the bias current and output power, we demonstrate multimode laser emission centered around 3 THz, with distinct multiple sidebands. The resulting microwave amplitude and frequency self-modulation of THz QCLs opens up intriguing perspectives, for engineering integrated self-mode-locked THz lasers, with impact in fields such as nano- and ultrafast photonics and optical metrology.

  6. Frequency and amplitude modulation of ultra-compact terahertz quantum cascade lasers using an integrated avalanche diode oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, Fabrizio; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H.; Davies, A. Giles; Vitiello, Miriam S.

    2016-03-01

    Mode-locked comb sources operating at optical frequencies underpin applications ranging from spectroscopy and ultrafast physics, through to absolute frequency measurements and atomic clocks. Extending their operation into the terahertz frequency range would greatly benefit from the availability of compact semiconductor-based sources. However, the development of any compact mode-locked THz laser, which itself is inherently a frequency comb, has yet to be achieved without the use of an external stimulus. High-power, electrically pumped quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) have recently emerged as a promising solution, owing to their octave spanning bandwidths, the ability to achieve group-velocity dispersion compensation and the possibility of obtaining active mode-locking. Here, we propose an unprecedented compact architecture to induce both frequency and amplitude self-modulation in a THz QCL. By engineering a microwave avalanche oscillator into the laser cavity, which provides a 10 GHz self-modulation of the bias current and output power, we demonstrate multimode laser emission centered around 3 THz, with distinct multiple sidebands. The resulting microwave amplitude and frequency self-modulation of THz QCLs opens up intriguing perspectives, for engineering integrated self-mode-locked THz lasers, with impact in fields such as nano- and ultrafast photonics and optical metrology.

  7. Frequency and amplitude modulation of ultra-compact terahertz quantum cascade lasers using an integrated avalanche diode oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Castellano, Fabrizio; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H.; Davies, A. Giles; Vitiello, Miriam S.

    2016-01-01

    Mode-locked comb sources operating at optical frequencies underpin applications ranging from spectroscopy and ultrafast physics, through to absolute frequency measurements and atomic clocks. Extending their operation into the terahertz frequency range would greatly benefit from the availability of compact semiconductor-based sources. However, the development of any compact mode-locked THz laser, which itself is inherently a frequency comb, has yet to be achieved without the use of an external stimulus. High-power, electrically pumped quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) have recently emerged as a promising solution, owing to their octave spanning bandwidths, the ability to achieve group-velocity dispersion compensation and the possibility of obtaining active mode-locking. Here, we propose an unprecedented compact architecture to induce both frequency and amplitude self-modulation in a THz QCL. By engineering a microwave avalanche oscillator into the laser cavity, which provides a 10 GHz self-modulation of the bias current and output power, we demonstrate multimode laser emission centered around 3 THz, with distinct multiple sidebands. The resulting microwave amplitude and frequency self-modulation of THz QCLs opens up intriguing perspectives, for engineering integrated self-mode-locked THz lasers, with impact in fields such as nano- and ultrafast photonics and optical metrology. PMID:26976199

  8. Determining Optimum C-Field Settings that Minimize Output Frequency Variations in Cesium Atomic Frequency Standards

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    current setting is probably on the order of parts in lo4 in our laboratory environment over the three months during which data were taken; this...hardware and long-term frequency-stability measurements. This work was supported, in part , by the U.S. Air Force Space Systems Division under Contract...Long-Term Stability in Cesium Beam Frequency Standards," IEEE Trans. Ultrasonics , Ferroelectronics, and Frequency Control UFFC-34 [6], 598-601 (Novem

  9. Microwave lensing frequency shift of the PHARAO laser-cooled microgravity atomic clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterman, Phillip; Gibble, Kurt; Laurent, Phillipe; Salomon, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    We evaluate the microwave lensing frequency shift of the microgravity laser-cooled caesium clock PHARAO. We find microwave lensing frequency shifts of δν/ν  =  11  ×  10-17 to 13  ×  10-17, larger than the shift of typical fountain clocks. The shift has a weak dependence on PHARAO parameters, including the atomic temperature, size of the atomic cloud, detection laser intensities, and the launch velocity. We also find the lensing frequency shift to be insensitive to selection and detection spatial inhomogeneities and the expected low-frequency vibrations. We conservatively assign a nominal microwave lensing frequency uncertainty of  ±4  ×  10-17.

  10. Electrical power inverter having a phase modulated, twin-inverter, high frequency link and an energy storage module

    DOEpatents

    Pitel, Ira J.

    1987-02-03

    The present invention provides an electrical power inverter method and apparatus, which includes a high frequency link, for converting DC power into AC power. Generally stated, the apparatus includes a first high frequency module which produces an AC voltage at a first output frequency, and a second high frequency inverter module which produces an AC voltage at a second output frequency that is substantially the same as the first output frequency. The second AC voltage is out of phase with the first AC voltage by a selected angular phase displacement. A mixer mixes the first and second output voltages to produce a high frequency carrier which has a selected base frequency impressed on the sidebands thereof. A rectifier rectifies the carrier, and a filter filters the rectified carrier. An output inverter inverts the filtered carrier to produce an AC line voltage at the selected base frequency. A phase modulator adjusts the relative angular phase displacement between the outputs of the first and second high frequency modules to control the base frequency and magnitude of the AC line voltage.

  11. Electrical power inverter having a phase modulated, twin-inverter, high frequency link and an energy storage module

    DOEpatents

    Pitel, I.J.

    1987-02-03

    The present invention provides an electrical power inverter method and apparatus, which includes a high frequency link, for converting DC power into AC power. Generally stated, the apparatus includes a first high frequency module which produces an AC voltage at a first output frequency, and a second high frequency inverter module which produces an AC voltage at a second output frequency that is substantially the same as the first output frequency. The second AC voltage is out of phase with the first AC voltage by a selected angular phase displacement. A mixer mixes the first and second output voltages to produce a high frequency carrier which has a selected base frequency impressed on the sidebands thereof. A rectifier rectifies the carrier, and a filter filters the rectified carrier. An output inverter inverts the filtered carrier to produce an AC line voltage at the selected base frequency. A phase modulator adjusts the relative angular phase displacement between the outputs of the first and second high frequency modules to control the base frequency and magnitude of the AC line voltage. 19 figs.

  12. Superresolved multiphoton microscopy with spatial frequency-modulated imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Jeffrey J.; Wernsing, Keith A.; Domingue, Scott R.; Allende Motz, Alyssa M.; DeLuca, Keith F.; Levi, Dean H.; DeLuca, Jennifer G.; Young, Michael D.; Squier, Jeff A.; Bartels, Randy A.

    2016-05-26

    Superresolved far-field microscopy has emerged as a powerful tool for investigating the structure of objects with resolution well below the diffraction limit of light. Nearly all superresolution imaging techniques reported to date rely on real energy states of fluorescent molecules to circumvent the diffraction limit, preventing superresolved imaging with contrast mechanisms that occur via virtual energy states, including harmonic generation (HG). We report a superresolution technique based on spatial frequency-modulated imaging (SPIFI) that permits superresolved nonlinear microscopy with any contrast mechanism and with single-pixel detection. We show multimodal superresolved images with two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second-harmonic generation (SHG) from biological and inorganic media. Multiphoton SPIFI (MP-SPIFI) provides spatial resolution up to 2..eta.. below the diffraction limit, where ..eta.. is the highest power of the nonlinear intensity response. MP-SPIFI can be used to provide enhanced resolution in optically thin media and may provide a solution for superresolved imaging deep in scattering media.

  13. Self-mixing vibration measurement using emission frequency sinusoidal modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yufeng; Wang, Ming; Guo, Dongmei; Hao, Hui; Liu, Qiang

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, a simplified phase demodulation scheme is applied to recover vibration trail on a laser self-mixing interferometer for noncontact vibration measurement. The emission of semiconductor laser diode is modulated by injecting sinusoidal wave, and corresponding interference signal is a quasi-sinusoid wave. The vibration mathematical model for semiconductor laser diode is theoretically educed from basic self-mixing theory, the variation of target is converted into phase information. The simulation of demodulation algorithm and standard deviation are presented and the reconstructed waveform displays a desirable consistence with various moving trails. Following the principle, a minimum experimental system is established and position variation of the target mirror driven by voltage signal is translated into phase shifts, feedback is controlled at weak level during experiment, Fourier transform is implemented to analyze phase information. The comparisons of both amplitude and velocity with a Germany Doppler vibrometer are performed to testify vibration model, the error of proposed demodulation method is less than 30 nm and achieve a high accuracy in vibration frequency. The experimental results indicate the traditional phase technology can be applied on complex optical power signal after adaption providing a feasible application prospects in industrial and scientific situation with an inexpensive semiconductor laser.

  14. Superresolved multiphoton microscopy with spatial frequency-modulated imaging

    PubMed Central

    Field, Jeffrey J.; Wernsing, Keith A.; Domingue, Scott R.; Allende Motz, Alyssa M.; DeLuca, Keith F.; Levi, Dean H.; DeLuca, Jennifer G.; Young, Michael D.; Squier, Jeff A.; Bartels, Randy A.

    2016-01-01

    Superresolved far-field microscopy has emerged as a powerful tool for investigating the structure of objects with resolution well below the diffraction limit of light. Nearly all superresolution imaging techniques reported to date rely on real energy states of fluorescent molecules to circumvent the diffraction limit, preventing superresolved imaging with contrast mechanisms that occur via virtual energy states, including harmonic generation (HG). We report a superresolution technique based on spatial frequency-modulated imaging (SPIFI) that permits superresolved nonlinear microscopy with any contrast mechanism and with single-pixel detection. We show multimodal superresolved images with two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second-harmonic generation (SHG) from biological and inorganic media. Multiphoton SPIFI (MP-SPIFI) provides spatial resolution up to 2η below the diffraction limit, where η is the highest power of the nonlinear intensity response. MP-SPIFI can be used to provide enhanced resolution in optically thin media and may provide a solution for superresolved imaging deep in scattering media. PMID:27231219

  15. Frequency modulated spectroscopy as a probe of molecular collision dynamics.

    PubMed

    Alagappan, Azhagammai; Costen, Matthew L; McKendrick, Kenneth G

    2006-04-01

    We describe the application of frequency modulated spectroscopy (FMS) with an external cavity tuneable diode laser to the study of the scalar and vector properties of inelastic collisions. CN X(2)Sigma(+) radicals are produced by polarized photodissociation of ICN at 266 nm, with a sharp velocity and rotational angular momentum distribution. The collisional evolution of the distribution is observed via sub-Doppler FMS on the A(2)Pi-X(2)Sigma(+) (2,0) band. He, Ar, N(2), O(2) and CO(2) were studied as collider gases. Doppler profiles were acquired in different experimental geometries of photolysis and probe laser propagation and polarization, and on different spectroscopic branches. These were combined to give composite Doppler profiles from which the speed distributions and specific speed-dependent vector correlations could be determined. The angular scattering dynamics with species other than He are found to be very similar, dominated by backward scattering which accompanies transfer of energy between rotation and translation. The kinematics of collisions with He are not conducive to the determination of differential scattering and angular momentum polarization correlations. Angular momentum correlations show interesting differences between reactive and non-reactive colliders. We propose that this reflects differences in the potential energy surfaces, in particular, the nature and depth of attractive potential wells.

  16. Characterising soil surface roughness with a frequency modulated polarimetric radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeger, Manuel; Gronz, Oliver; Beiske, Joshua; Klein, Tobias

    2014-05-01

    Soil surface roughness is considered crucial for soil erosion as it determines the effective surface exposed to the raindrop impact. It regulates surface runoff velocity and it causes runoff concentration. But a comprehensive characterisation of the shape of the soils' surface is still difficult to achieve. Photographic systems and terrestrial laser-scanning are nowadays able to generate high resolution DEMs, but the derivation of roughness parameters is still not clear. Spaceborne radar systems are used for about 3 decades for earth survey. Spatial soil moisture distribution, ice sheet monitoring and earth-wide topographic survey are the main objectives of these radar systems, working generally with frequencies <10 GHz. Contrasting with this, technologies emitting frequencies up to 77 GHz are generally used for object tracking purposes. But it is known, that the reflection characteristics, such as intensity and polarisation, strongly depend on the properties of the target object. A new design of a frequency modulated continuous wave radar, emitting a right hand shaped circular polarization and receiving both polarization directions, right and left-hand shaped, is tested here for its ability to detect and quantify different surface roughness. The reflection characteristics of 4 different materials 1) steel, 2) sand (0,5-1 mm), 3) fine (2-4 mm) and 4) coarse (15-30 mm) rock-fragments and different roughness as well as moisture content are analysed. In addition, the signals are taken at 2 different angles to the soil's surface (90° and 70°). For quantification of the roughness, a photographic method (Structure-from-Motion) is applied to generate a detailed DEM and random roughness (RR) is calculated. To characterise the radar signal, different ratios of the reflected channels and polarisations are calculated. The signals show differences for all substrates, also clearly visible between sand and fine rock fragments, despite a wavelength of 1 cm of the

  17. A novel Cs-(129)Xe atomic spin gyroscope with closed-loop Faraday modulation.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jiancheng; Wan, Shuangai; Qin, Jie; Zhang, Chen; Quan, Wei; Yuan, Heng; Dong, Haifeng

    2013-08-01

    We report a novel Cs-(129)Xe atomic spin gyroscope (ASG) with closed-loop Faraday modulation method. This ASG requires approximately 30 min to start-up and 110 °C to operate. A closed-loop Faraday modulation method for measurement of the optical rotation was used in this ASG. This method uses an additional Faraday modulator to suppress the laser intensity fluctuation and Faraday modulator thermal induced fluctuation. We theoretically and experimentally validate this method in the Cs-(129)Xe ASG and achieved a bias stability of approximately 3.25 °∕h.

  18. Geometric phase of an atom inside an adiabatic radio-frequency potential

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, P.; You, L.

    2007-09-15

    We investigate the geometric phase of an atom inside an adiabatic radio-frequency (rf) potential created from a static magnetic field (B field) and a time-dependent rf field. The spatial motion of the atomic center of mass is shown to give rise to a geometric phase, or Berry's phase, in the adiabatically evolving atomic hyperfine spin along the local B field. This phase is found to depend on both the static B field along the semiclassical trajectory of the atomic center of mass and an effective magnetic field consisting of the total B field, including the oscillating rf field. Specific calculations are provided for several recent atom interferometry experiments and proposals utilizing adiabatic rf potentials.

  19. The Effects of Ambient Temperature Fluctuations on the Long-Term Frequency Stability of a Miniature Rubidium Atomic Frequency Standard

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    technologies; lasers and electro-optics, solid state laser design, micro-optics, optical communications, and fiber optic sensors ; atomic frequency standards...elastomer change could also shift the position of physics package components, thereby creating a greater sensitivity to microwave power or magnetic...applied laser spectroscopy, laser chemistry, atmospheric propagation and beam control, LEDAR/LADAR remote sensing; solar cell and array testing and

  20. Modulation of Auditory Evoked Magnetic Fields Elicited by Successive Frequency-Modulated (FM) Sweeps

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Hidehiko; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2017-01-01

    In our daily life, we are successively exposed to frequency-modulated (FM) sounds that play an important role in speech and species-specific communication. Previous studies demonstrated that repetitive exposure to identical pure tones resulted in decreased neural activity. However, the effects of repetitively presented FM sounds on neural activity in the human auditory cortex remain unclear. In the present study, we used magnetoencephalography to investigate auditory evoked N1m responses elicited by four successive temporally repeated and superimposed FM sweeps in three sequences: (1) four FM sweeps were identical, (2) four FM sweeps had the same FM direction and rate, but different carrier frequencies, (3) four FM sweeps differed with respect to the FM rate and/or direction and their carrier frequencies. In contrast to our expectations, the results obtained demonstrated that N1m responses were maximal when the four FM sweeps were identical and minimal when they were distinct. These results suggest that the neural processing of repetitive FM sweeps in the human auditory cortex may differ from that of repetitive pure tones. PMID:28220066

  1. Modulation of Auditory Evoked Magnetic Fields Elicited by Successive Frequency-Modulated (FM) Sweeps.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Hidehiko; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2017-01-01

    In our daily life, we are successively exposed to frequency-modulated (FM) sounds that play an important role in speech and species-specific communication. Previous studies demonstrated that repetitive exposure to identical pure tones resulted in decreased neural activity. However, the effects of repetitively presented FM sounds on neural activity in the human auditory cortex remain unclear. In the present study, we used magnetoencephalography to investigate auditory evoked N1m responses elicited by four successive temporally repeated and superimposed FM sweeps in three sequences: (1) four FM sweeps were identical, (2) four FM sweeps had the same FM direction and rate, but different carrier frequencies, (3) four FM sweeps differed with respect to the FM rate and/or direction and their carrier frequencies. In contrast to our expectations, the results obtained demonstrated that N1m responses were maximal when the four FM sweeps were identical and minimal when they were distinct. These results suggest that the neural processing of repetitive FM sweeps in the human auditory cortex may differ from that of repetitive pure tones.

  2. Local atomic structure modulations activate metal oxide as electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu Hang; Liu, Peng Fei; Pan, Lin Feng; Wang, Hai Feng; Yang, Zhen Zhong; Zheng, Li Rong; Hu, P.; Zhao, Hui Jun; Gu, Lin; Yang, Hua Gui

    2015-01-01

    Modifications of local structure at atomic level could precisely and effectively tune the capacity of materials, enabling enhancement in the catalytic activity. Here we modulate the local atomic structure of a classical but inert transition metal oxide, tungsten trioxide, to be an efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water, which has shown promise as an alternative to platinum. Structural analyses and theoretical calculations together indicate that the origin of the enhanced activity could be attributed to the tailored electronic structure by means of the local atomic structure modulations. We anticipate that suitable structure modulations might be applied on other transition metal oxides to meet the optimal thermodynamic and kinetic requirements, which may pave the way to unlock the potential of other promising candidates as cost-effective electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution in industry. PMID:26286479

  3. Local atomic structure modulations activate metal oxide as electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu Hang; Liu, Peng Fei; Pan, Lin Feng; Wang, Hai Feng; Yang, Zhen Zhong; Zheng, Li Rong; Hu, P.; Zhao, Hui Jun; Gu, Lin; Yang, Hua Gui

    2015-08-01

    Modifications of local structure at atomic level could precisely and effectively tune the capacity of materials, enabling enhancement in the catalytic activity. Here we modulate the local atomic structure of a classical but inert transition metal oxide, tungsten trioxide, to be an efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water, which has shown promise as an alternative to platinum. Structural analyses and theoretical calculations together indicate that the origin of the enhanced activity could be attributed to the tailored electronic structure by means of the local atomic structure modulations. We anticipate that suitable structure modulations might be applied on other transition metal oxides to meet the optimal thermodynamic and kinetic requirements, which may pave the way to unlock the potential of other promising candidates as cost-effective electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution in industry.

  4. Local atomic structure modulations activate metal oxide as electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu Hang; Liu, Peng Fei; Pan, Lin Feng; Wang, Hai Feng; Yang, Zhen Zhong; Zheng, Li Rong; Hu, P; Zhao, Hui Jun; Gu, Lin; Yang, Hua Gui

    2015-08-19

    Modifications of local structure at atomic level could precisely and effectively tune the capacity of materials, enabling enhancement in the catalytic activity. Here we modulate the local atomic structure of a classical but inert transition metal oxide, tungsten trioxide, to be an efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water, which has shown promise as an alternative to platinum. Structural analyses and theoretical calculations together indicate that the origin of the enhanced activity could be attributed to the tailored electronic structure by means of the local atomic structure modulations. We anticipate that suitable structure modulations might be applied on other transition metal oxides to meet the optimal thermodynamic and kinetic requirements, which may pave the way to unlock the potential of other promising candidates as cost-effective electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution in industry.

  5. Magnetic-modulation spectroscopy of an atomic Fermi gas in the BCS-BEC crossover: Dissociation spectra in the Bose-Einstein condensate regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plata, J.

    2006-07-01

    The effect of magnetic-field modulation on a Fermi gas of atoms in the BCS-BEC crossover is studied analytically. Recent experimental findings on the system response to a sinusoidal variation of the field are explained. Specifically, the dissociation processes induced by the modulation in the Bose-Einstein condensate regime are described. The role played by the frequency, amplitude, and application time of the perturbation in the emergence of the observed behavior is clarified. The results uncover also the relevance of the detuning from the Feshbach resonance to the appearance of particular spectral features. The applicability of the field modulation as a spectroscopic tool for probing the crossover is discussed.

  6. A compact laser head with high-frequency stability for Rb atomic clocks and optical instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Affolderbach, Christoph; Mileti, Gaetano

    2005-07-15

    We present a compact and frequency-stabilized laser head based on an extended-cavity diode laser. The laser head occupies a volume of 200 cm{sup 3} and includes frequency stabilization to Doppler-free saturated absorption resonances on the hyperfine components of the {sup 87}Rb D{sub 2} lines at 780 nm, obtained from a simple and compact spectroscopic setup using a 2 cm{sup 3} vapor cell. The measured frequency stability is {<=}2x10{sup -12} over integration times from 1 s to 1 day and shows the potential to reach 2x10{sup -13} over 10{sup 2}-10{sup 5} s. Compact laser sources with these performances are of great interest for applications in gas-cell atomic frequency standards, atomic magnetometers, interferometers and other instruments requiring stable and narrow-band optical sources.

  7. Limits on gravitational Einstein equivalence principle violation from monitoring atomic clock frequencies during a year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2017-01-01

    The Sun's gravitational potential at Earth varies during a year due to varying Earth-Sun distance. Comparing the results of very accurate measurements of atomic clock transitions performed at different times in the year allows us to study the dependence of the atomic frequencies on the gravitational potential. We examine the measurement data for the ratio of the frequencies in Hg+ and Al+ clock transitions and absolute frequency measurements (with respect to the caesium frequency standard) for Dy, Sr, H, hyperfine transitions in Rb and H and obtain significantly improved limits on the values of the gravity-related parameter of the Einstein equivalence principle violating term in the electron sector of the Standard Model extension Hamiltonian c00=(-3.0 ±5.7 )×10-7 and the parameter for the gravity-related variation of the fine structure constant κα=(-5.3 ±10 )×10-8.

  8. Note: Directly measuring the direct digital synthesizer frequency chirp-rate for an atom interferometer.

    PubMed

    Tao, Juan-Juan; Zhou, Min-Kang; Zhang, Qiao-Zhen; Cui, Jia-Feng; Duan, Xiao-Chun; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Hu, Zhong-Kun

    2015-09-01

    During gravity measurements with Raman type atom interferometry, the frequency of the laser used to drive Raman transition is scanned by chirping the frequency of a direct digital synthesizer (DDS), and the local gravity is determined by precisely measuring the chip rate α of DDS. We present an effective method that can directly evaluate the frequency chirp rate stability of our DDS. By mixing a pair of synchronous linear sweeping signals, the chirp rate fluctuation is precisely measured with a frequency counter. The measurement result shows that the relative α instability can reach 5.7 × 10(-11) in 1 s, which is neglectable in a 10(-9) g level atom interferometry gravimeter.

  9. Note: Directly measuring the direct digital synthesizer frequency chirp-rate for an atom interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Juan-Juan; Zhou, Min-Kang E-mail: zmk@hust.edu.cn; Zhang, Qiao-Zhen; Cui, Jia-Feng; Duan, Xiao-Chun; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Hu, Zhong-Kun E-mail: zmk@hust.edu.cn

    2015-09-15

    During gravity measurements with Raman type atom interferometry, the frequency of the laser used to drive Raman transition is scanned by chirping the frequency of a direct digital synthesizer (DDS), and the local gravity is determined by precisely measuring the chip rate α of DDS. We present an effective method that can directly evaluate the frequency chirp rate stability of our DDS. By mixing a pair of synchronous linear sweeping signals, the chirp rate fluctuation is precisely measured with a frequency counter. The measurement result shows that the relative α instability can reach 5.7 × 10{sup −11} in 1 s, which is neglectable in a 10{sup −9} g level atom interferometry gravimeter.

  10. Suppression and Feedback Control of Anomalous Induced Backscattering by Pump-Frequency Modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Arkhipenko, V. I.; Simonchik, L. V.; Truhachev, F. M.; Gusakov, E. Z.

    2008-10-24

    The possibility of induced backscattering parametric decay instability resonant suppression by harmonic pump-frequency modulation is demonstrated experimentally. It is shown that the pump anomalous reflection is strongly reduced at the modulation frequency equal to the difference of the decay instability eigenfrequencies. The parametric instability feedback control method is proposed based on this effect.

  11. Low-frequency acoustic atomization with oscillatory flow around micropillars in a microfluidic device

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Yin Nee E-mail: mtnwong@ntu.edu.sg; Wong, Teck Neng E-mail: mtnwong@ntu.edu.sg; Nguyen, Nam Trung

    2014-10-06

    This letter reports a low frequency acoustic atomization technique with oscillatory extensional flow around micropillars. Large droplets passing through two micropillars are elongated. Small droplets are then produced through the pinch-off process at the spindle-shape ends. As the actuation frequency increases, the droplet size decreases with increasing monodispersity. This method is suitable for in-situ mass production of fine droplets in a multi-phase environment without external pumping. Small particles encapsulation was demonstrated with the current technique.

  12. Spectral broadening and inhibition of amplitude and frequency modulation in Nd: glass regenerative amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuqi; Pan, Xue; Wang, Jiangfeng; Li, Xuechun

    2014-11-01

    In order to broaden the spectrum of laser pulse and reduce the gain narrowing effect in Nd:glass regenerative amplifier to realize the ambition of inhibiting amplitude and frequency modulation, proper quartz birefringence crystal plate is inserted into the cavity. The influence factors of central wavelength, depth of modulation and range of modulation are obtained theoretically. The width of the spectrum is broadened by controlling all the factors. Two kinds of thickness, 5mm and 6mm, are inserted into the regenerative amplifier cavity. The results of theoretical calculation and experiment both show that the effect of spectrum widening is evident, which reduces the gain narrowing effect to some extent. The amplitude and frequency modulation resulted from gain narrowing effect is inhibited when the central wavelength deflects. The simulated results show that inhibited effect of amplitude and frequency modulation is remarkable. And the method is a potential effective technique for amplitude and frequency modulation inhibition.

  13. Miniature Surface Plasmon Polariton Amplitude Modulator by Beat Frequency and Polarization Control

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Cheng-Wei; Lin, Chu-En; Yu, Chih-Jen; Yeh, Ting-Tso; Yen, Ta-Jen

    2016-01-01

    The miniaturization of modulators keeps pace for the compact devices in optical applications. Here, we present a miniature surface plasmon polariton amplitude modulator (SPPAM) by directing and interfering surface plasmon polaritons on a nanofabricated chip. Our results show that this SPPAM enables two kinds of modulations. The first kind of modulation is controlled by encoding angular-frequency difference from a Zeeman laser, with a beat frequency of 1.66 MHz; the second of modulation is validated by periodically varying the polarization states from a polarization generator, with rotation frequencies of 0.5–10 k Hz. In addition, the normalized extinction ratio of our plasmonic structure reaches 100. Such miniaturized beat-frequency and polarization-controlled amplitude modulators open an avenue for the exploration of ultrasensitive nanosensors, nanocircuits, and other integrated nanophotonic devices. PMID:27558516

  14. Atomic jump frequencies in intermetallic compounds studied using perturbed angular correlation of gamma rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newhouse, Randal Leslie

    Atomic jump frequencies were determined in a variety of intermetallic compounds through analysis of nuclear relaxation of spectra measured using the nuclear hyperfine technique, perturbed angular correlation (PAC) of gamma rays. Observed at higher temperatures, this relaxation is attributed to fluctuations in the orientation or magnitude of electric field gradients (EFG) at nuclei of 111In/Cd probe atoms as the atoms make diffusive jumps. Jump frequencies were obtained by fitting dynamically relaxed PAC spectra using either an empirical relaxation function or using ab initio relaxation models created using the program PolyPacFit. Jump frequency activation enthalpies were determined from measurements over a range of temperatures. Diffusion was studied in the following systems: 1) Pseudo-binary alloys having the L12 crystal structure such as In3(La1-xPrx). The goal was to see how jump frequencies were affected by random disorder. 2) The family of layered phases, LanCoIn3n+2 ( n=0,1,2,3…∞). The goal was to see how jump frequencies varied with the spacing of Co layers, which were found to block diffusion. 3) Phases having the FeGa3 structure. The goal was to analyze dynamical relaxation for probe atoms having multiple inequivalent jump vectors. 4) Phases having the tetragonal Al4Ba structure. The goal was to search for effects in the PAC spectra caused by fluctuations in magnitudes of EFGs without fluctuations in orientations. Ab initio relaxation models were developed to simulate and fit dynamical relaxation for PAC spectra of FeGa3, and several phases with the Al4Ba structure in order to determine underlying microscopic jump frequencies. In the course of this work, site preferences also were observed for 111In/Cd probe atoms in several FeGa 3 and Al4Ba phases.

  15. Probing the Quantum States of a Single Atom Transistor at Microwave Frequencies.

    PubMed

    Tettamanzi, Giuseppe Carlo; Hile, Samuel James; House, Matthew Gregory; Fuechsle, Martin; Rogge, Sven; Simmons, Michelle Y

    2017-03-28

    The ability to apply gigahertz frequencies to control the quantum state of a single P atom is an essential requirement for the fast gate pulsing needed for qubit control in donor-based silicon quantum computation. Here, we demonstrate this with nanosecond accuracy in an all epitaxial single atom transistor by applying excitation signals at frequencies up to ≈13 GHz to heavily phosphorus-doped silicon leads. These measurements allow the differentiation between the excited states of the single atom and the density of states in the one-dimensional leads. Our pulse spectroscopy experiments confirm the presence of an excited state at an energy ≈9 meV, consistent with the first excited state of a single P donor in silicon. The relaxation rate of this first excited state to the ground state is estimated to be larger than 2.5 GHz, consistent with theoretical predictions. These results represent a systematic investigation of how an atomically precise single atom transistor device behaves under radio frequency excitations.

  16. Serotonin differentially modulates responses to tones and frequency-modulated sweeps in the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Hurley, L M; Pollak, G D

    1999-09-15

    Although almost all auditory brainstem nuclei receive serotonergic innervation, little is known about its effects on auditory neurons. We address this question by evaluating the effects of serotonin on sound-evoked activity of neurons in the inferior colliculus (IC) of Mexican free-tailed bats. Two types of auditory stimuli were used: tone bursts at the neuron's best frequency and frequency-modulated (FM) sweeps with a variety of spectral and temporal structures. There were two main findings. First, serotonin changed tone-evoked responses in 66% of the IC neurons sampled. Second, the influence of serotonin often depended on the type of signal presented. Although serotonin depressed tone-evoked responses in most neurons, its effects on responses to FM sweeps were evenly mixed between depression and facilitation. Thus in most cells serotonin had a different effect on tone-evoked responses than it did on FM-evoked responses. In some neurons serotonin depressed responses evoked by tone bursts but left the responses to FM sweeps unchanged, whereas in others serotonin had little or no effect on responses to tone bursts but substantially facilitated responses to FM sweeps. In addition, serotonin could differentially affect responses to various FM sweeps that differed in temporal or spectral structure. Previous studies have revealed that the efficacy of the serotonergic innervation is partially modulated by sensory stimuli and by behavioral states. Thus our results suggest that the population activity evoked by a particular sound is not simply a consequence of the hard wiring that connects the IC to lower and higher regions but rather is highly dynamic because of the functional reconfigurations induced by serotonin and almost certainly other neuromodulators as well.

  17. Double sideband suppressed carrier modulation for stable fiber delivery of radio frequency standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikas, Thomas; Bogris, Adonis; Syvridis, Dimitris

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically and experimentally investigate the properties of a double sideband suppressed carrier modulation transmission scheme for long distance microwave frequency standard dissemination. The proposed method effectively doubles the transmitted frequency obtaining enhanced phase noise and stability performance. Suppressing the optical carrier also eliminates the dispersion induced signal fading. Important transmission parameters like optical modulation depth and linearity are also improved. Allan deviation and phase noise measurements prove the superior performance of the proposed modulation format.

  18. TUNE MODULATION FROM BEAM BEAM INTERACTION AND UNEQUAL RADIO FREQUENCIES IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.CAMERON,P.PEGGS,S.SATOGATA,T.

    2003-05-19

    The two RHIC rings have independent rf systems to accommodate different species. Thus, the radio frequencies can differ when the phase and radial loops are closed, and the if frequencies of the two rings are not synchronized. A radio frequency difference leads to longitudinally moving beam crossing points. When the crossing points are between the beam splitting dipoles, the beams experience the beam-beam interaction. Outside the interaction region the beam-beam interaction is switched off. In this way the tune is modulated. A computation of the tune modulation depth, pulse shape and frequency is presented. Tune modulation measurements are shown.

  19. High-frequency signal transmission through single-atom contacts of Au and Pt

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyama, Shodai; Kurokawa, Shu; Sakai, Akira

    2015-03-23

    Signal transmission through atom-sized contacts of Au and Pt has been studied at room temperature for frequencies from 9 kHz to 1 GHz and for conductances (1−10)G{sub 0} (G≡2e{sup 2}/h is the quantum unit of conductance). We measured the frequency spectrum of S parameter S{sub 21}=|S{sub 21}|e{sup iθ} and found θ∼0 up to 1 GHz for all contacts irrespective of their conductance. Our observations directly prove that the atom-sized contacts of Au and Pt, including their single-atom contacts, behave as a pure resistance in the RF regime.

  20. Note: A versatile radio-frequency source for cold atom experiments.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Wu, Yu-Ping; Min, Hao; Yang, Tao; Jiang, Xiao

    2016-08-01

    A radio-frequency (RF) source designed for cold atom experiments is presented. The source uses AD9858, a direct digital synthesizer, to generate the sine wave directly, up to 400 MHz, with sub-Hz resolution. An amplitude control circuit consisting of wideband variable gain amplifier and high speed digital to analog converter is integrated into the source, capable of 70 dB off isolation and 4 ns on-off keying. A field programmable gate array is used to implement a versatile frequency and amplitude co-sweep logic. Owing to modular design, the RF sources have been used on many cold atom experiments to generate various complicated RF sequences, enriching the operation schemes of cold atoms, which cannot be done by standard RF source instruments.

  1. Note: A versatile radio-frequency source for cold atom experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Na; Wu, Yu-Ping; Min, Hao; Yang, Tao; Jiang, Xiao

    2016-08-01

    A radio-frequency (RF) source designed for cold atom experiments is presented. The source uses AD9858, a direct digital synthesizer, to generate the sine wave directly, up to 400 MHz, with sub-Hz resolution. An amplitude control circuit consisting of wideband variable gain amplifier and high speed digital to analog converter is integrated into the source, capable of 70 dB off isolation and 4 ns on-off keying. A field programmable gate array is used to implement a versatile frequency and amplitude co-sweep logic. Owing to modular design, the RF sources have been used on many cold atom experiments to generate various complicated RF sequences, enriching the operation schemes of cold atoms, which cannot be done by standard RF source instruments.

  2. Dynamics of a driven two-level atom coupled to a frequency-tunable cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Peng; Swain, S.

    1998-08-01

    A cavity-modified master equation is derived for a coherently driven two-level atom coupled to a single-mode cavity in the bad cavity limit, in which the cavity frequency is tuned to either the center or one of the sidebands of the Mollow triplet. The atomic populations in both the bare- and dressed-state representations are analyzed in terms of the cavity-modified transition rates. In the bare-state basis, the role of the cavity may be interpreted as enhancing the stimulated absorption of the atom while suppressing the stimulated emission. The bare-state population may thus be inverted under appropriate conditions. The dressed-state inversion, however, originates from the enhancement of the atom-cavity interaction when the cavity is resonant with the atomic dressed-state transition. We show that two-phase quadratures of the atomic polarization decay at different rates. The decay of the in-phase (or out-of-phase) quadrature may be greatly inhibited as the driving intensity increases, depending on the cavity resonant frequency. The spectrum of the atomic fluorescence emitted out the side of the cavity is also studied. The spectral profiles are sensitive to the cavity frequency. When the cavity frequency is tuned to the center of the Mollow resonances, the fluorescence spectrum is symmetrical with three peaks whose linewidths and heights are intensity dependent. When the cavity frequency is tuned to one of the Mollow sidebands, however, it is asymmetric, and the central peak and the sideband on resonance with the cavity can be significantly suppressed for strong driving fields. All three spectral lines can be narrowed by increasing the Rabi frequency. The physics of these striking spectral features is explored in the dressed-state basis. We also investigate the probe absorption spectrum. When the cavity frequency is tuned to the center of the Mollow fluorescence triplet, the central component exhibits a Lorentzian line shape, while the side bands show the Rayleigh

  3. Beating frequency and amplitude modulation of the piano tone due to coupling of tones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartling, Bo

    2005-04-01

    The influence on a piano tone from weak coexcitation of damped adjacent tones due to coupling via the bridge is studied. The frequency and amplitude modulation of the sound resulting from coexcitation of one strong and one or two weak tones is analyzed. One weak tone causes frequency and amplitude modulation of the sound, and two weak tones produce beating frequency and amplitude modulation, where the beatings of the two modulations are of opposite phase. By digital recording of the sound of piano tones, the appearance of these phenomena is verified. The audibility of the observed frequency and amplitude modulation is discussed in terms of previously determined detection thresholds. The beating character of both frequency and amplitude modulations, however, distinguishes the phenomena from those previously studied and prompts further psychoacoustic investigations. It is shown that detuning of unison strings may significantly increase the frequency deviation of the frequency modulation in conjunction with affected amplitude modulation. The modulatory effects of coupling to adjacent tones therefore may possibly be utilized in the tuning process. A coupling of tones analogous to the situation in a piano may arise in other stringed musical instruments transferring string vibrations to a soundboard via a bridge. .

  4. Pulsed, controlled, frequency-chirped laser light at GHz detunings for atomic physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, B.; Paltoo, T.; Grogan, T.; Pena, T.; John, J. P. St.; Wright, M. J.

    2017-02-01

    We have developed a means to control rapidly frequency-chirped laser light at large detuning, by controlling the input modulation frequency of a ˜7 GHz signal into an electro-optical phase modulator in an injection-locked laser system. We show that we can extend the capabilities of the system to effectively pulse the laser on timescales less than 3 ns by turning the injection lock on/off and create arbitrary frequency-chirp shapes on the laser on the tens of nanosecond time scales. We have been able to use this pulsed frequency-chirped laser to control the excitation of a thermal Rb gas via rapid adiabatic passage.

  5. Detecting the classical harmonic vibrations of micro amplitudes and low frequencies with an atomic Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong-Yi

    2014-01-01

    We study the effects of atomic beams classical harmonic vibrations of micro amplitudes and low frequencies perpendicular to the wave vectors of atomic branches on the mean numbers of atoms arriving at the detectors in an atomic Mach-Zehnder interferometer, where the two atomic beams are in the same wave surface and have the same phase. We propose a vibrant factor to quantitatively describe the effects of atomic beams vibrations. It shows that: (i) the vibrant factor depends on the relative vibrant displacement and the initial phase rather than the absolute amplitude, (ii) the factor increases with the increase of the initial phase, and (iii) the frequencies can be derived from equal time interval measurements of the mean numbers of atoms arriving at the detectors. These results indicate that it is possible to detect the classical harmonic vibrations of micro amplitudes and low frequencies by measuring the variations in the mean numbers of atoms arriving at the detectors.

  6. An atomic magnetometer with autonomous frequency stabilization and large dynamic range

    SciTech Connect

    Pradhan, S. E-mail: pradhans75@gmail.com; Poornima,; Dasgupta, K.; Mishra, S.; Behera, R.

    2015-06-15

    The operation of a highly sensitive atomic magnetometer using elliptically polarized resonant light is demonstrated. It is based on measurement of zero magnetic field resonance in degenerate two level systems using polarimetric detection. The transmitted light through the polarimeter is used for laser frequency stabilization, whereas reflected light is used for magnetic field measurement. Thus, the experimental geometry allows autonomous frequency stabilization of the laser frequency leading to compact operation of the overall device and has a preliminary sensitivity of <10 pT/Hz{sup 1/2} @ 1 Hz. Additionally, the dynamic range of the device is improved by feedback controlling the bias magnetic field without compromising on its sensitivity.

  7. An atomic magnetometer with autonomous frequency stabilization and large dynamic range.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, S; Mishra, S; Behera, R; Poornima; Dasgupta, K

    2015-06-01

    The operation of a highly sensitive atomic magnetometer using elliptically polarized resonant light is demonstrated. It is based on measurement of zero magnetic field resonance in degenerate two level systems using polarimetric detection. The transmitted light through the polarimeter is used for laser frequency stabilization, whereas reflected light is used for magnetic field measurement. Thus, the experimental geometry allows autonomous frequency stabilization of the laser frequency leading to compact operation of the overall device and has a preliminary sensitivity of <10 pT/Hz(1/2) @ 1 Hz. Additionally, the dynamic range of the device is improved by feedback controlling the bias magnetic field without compromising on its sensitivity.

  8. Autonomous Time-Frequency Cropping and Feature-Extraction Algorithms for Classification of LPI Radar Modulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    INTERCEPT ( LPI ) SIGNAL MODULATIONS In this chapter nine LPI radar modulations are described: FMCW , Frank, P1, P2, P3, P4, T1(n), T2(n). Although not a LPI ...FREQUENCY CROPPING AND FEATURE-EXTRACTION ALGORITHMS FOR CLASSIFICATION OF LPI RADAR MODULATIONS by Eric R. Zilberman June 2006 Thesis...and Feature- Extraction Algorithms for Classification of LPI Radar Modulations 6. AUTHOR Eric R. Zilberman 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING

  9. Mapping of the Optical Frequency Comb to the Atom Velocity Comb

    SciTech Connect

    Pichler, G.; Aumiler, D.; Vujicic, N.; Vdovic, S.; Ban, T.; Skenderovic, H.

    2006-11-15

    We present the experimental and theoretical study of the resonant excitation of rubidium and cesium atoms with fs pulse train in the conditions when the pulse repetition period is shorter than the atomic relaxation time. Velocity selective optical pumping of the ground state hyperfine levels and velocity comb-like excited state hyperfine level populations is demonstrated. Both effects are a direct consequence of the fs pulse train excitation considered in the frequency domain. A simple experimental apparatus was employed to develop a modified direct frequency comb spectroscopy which uses a fixed frequency comb for the 85,87Rb 5s 2S1/2 {yields} 5s 2P1/2,3/2 and 133Cs 6s 2S1/2 {yields} 6p 2P1/2,3/2 excitation, and a weak cw scanning probe laser at 780 and 852 nm for Rb and Cs ground levels population monitoring.

  10. Frequency-tunable microwave field detection in an atomic vapor cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsley, Andrew; Treutlein, Philipp

    2016-05-01

    We use an atomic vapor cell as a frequency tunable microwave field detector operating at frequencies from GHz to tens of GHz. We detect microwave magnetic fields from 2.3 GHz to 26.4 GHz, and measure the amplitude of the σ+ component of an 18 GHz microwave field. Our proof-of-principle demonstration represents a four orders of magnitude extension of the frequency tunable range of atomic magnetometers from their previous dc to several MHz range. When integrated with a high-resolution microwave imaging system [Horsley et al., New J. Phys. 17, 112002 (2015)], this will allow for the complete reconstruction of the vector components of a microwave magnetic field and the relative phase between them. Potential applications include near-field characterisation of microwave circuitry and devices, and medical microwave sensing and imaging.

  11. Forbidden atomic transitions driven by an intensity-modulated laser trap.

    PubMed

    Moore, Kaitlin R; Anderson, Sarah E; Raithel, Georg

    2015-01-20

    Spectroscopy is an essential tool in understanding and manipulating quantum systems, such as atoms and molecules. The model describing spectroscopy includes the multipole-field interaction, which leads to established spectroscopic selection rules, and an interaction that is quadratic in the field, which is not often employed. However, spectroscopy using the quadratic (ponderomotive) interaction promises two significant advantages over spectroscopy using the multipole-field interaction: flexible transition rules and vastly improved spatial addressability of the quantum system. Here we demonstrate ponderomotive spectroscopy by using optical-lattice-trapped Rydberg atoms, pulsating the lattice light and driving a microwave atomic transition that would otherwise be forbidden by established spectroscopic selection rules. This ability to measure frequencies of previously inaccessible transitions makes possible improved determinations of atomic characteristics and constants underlying physics. The spatial resolution of ponderomotive spectroscopy is orders of magnitude better than the transition frequency would suggest, promising single-site addressability in dense particle arrays for quantum computing applications.

  12. Model polymer etching and surface modification by a time modulated RF plasma jet: role of atomic oxygen and water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, P.; Knoll, A. J.; Wang, H.; Kondeti, V. S. S. K.; Bruggeman, P. J.; Oehrlein, G. S.

    2017-01-01

    The surface interaction of a well-characterized time modulated radio frequency (RF) plasma jet with polystyrene, poly(methyl methacrylate) and poly(vinyl alcohol) as model polymers is investigated. The RF plasma jet shows fast polymer etching but mild chemical modification with a characteristic carbonate ester and NO formation on the etched surface. By varying the plasma treatment conditions including feed gas composition, environment gaseous composition, and treatment distance, we find that short lived species, especially atomic O for Ar/1% O2 and 1% air plasma and OH for Ar/1% H2O plasma, play an essential role for polymer etching. For O2 containing plasma, we find that atomic O initiates polymer etching and the etching depth mirrors the measured decay of O atoms in the gas phase as the nozzle-surface distance increases. The etching reaction probability of an O atom ranging from 10-4 to 10-3 is consistent with low pressure plasma research. We also find that adding O2 and H2O simultaneously into Ar feed gas quenches polymer etching compared to adding them separately which suggests the reduction of O and OH density in Ar/O2/H2O plasma.

  13. Sound speed and oscillation frequencies for solar models evolved with Los Alamos ATOMIC opacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzik, Joyce A.; Fontes, C. J.; Walczak, P.; Wood, S. R.; Mussack, K.; Farag, E.

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has calculated a new generation of radiative opacities (OPLIB data using the ATOMIC code) for elements with atomic number Z = 1-30 with improved physics input, updated atomic data, and finer temperature grid to replace the Los Alamos LEDCOP opacities released in the year 2000. We calculate the evolution of standard solar models including these new opacities, and compare with models evolved using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory OPAL opacities (Iglesias & Rogers 1996). We use the solar abundance mixture of Asplund et al. 2009. The Los Alamos ATOMIC opacities (Colgan et al. 2013a, 2013b, 2015) have steeper opacity derivatives than those of OPAL for temperatures and densities of the solar interior radiative zone. We compare the calculated nonadiabatic solar oscillation frequencies and solar interior sound speed to observed frequencies and helioseismic inferences. The calculated sound-speed profiles are similar for models evolved using either the updated Iben evolution code (see Guzik & Mussack 2010), or the MESA evolution code (Paxton et al. 2015). The LANL ATOMIC opacities partially mitigate the `solar abundance problem'.

  14. Psychophysical frequency modulation thresholds in a FM-bat, Tadarida brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, E; Schmidt, S

    1993-05-01

    Echolocating bats hunting flying insects discriminate complex temporal patterns of acoustic stimuli. For bats using frequency modulated sonar calls (FM bats), there are no behavioral data on the perception of sinusoidally frequency modulated (SFM) stimuli. Discrimination performance for SFM stimuli of varying modulation depth was measured in 4 Tadarida brasiliensis in a two-alternative, forced choice procedure. A center frequency of 40 kHz was modulated with rates between 10 and 2000 Hz. It was found that discrimination performance improved from a mean threshold modulation depth of 3.05 kHz at a modulation rate of 2000 Hz to 1.58 kHz at a modulation rate of 10 Hz. Psychoacoustical modulation depth thresholds of T. brasiliensis are thus distinctly larger than those observed in bat species emitting constant frequency (CF) components followed by an FM-sweep, in active echolocation experiments. The modulation thresholds of T. brasiliensis are discussed in connection with the ability of bats to discriminate insect wingbeats. A comparison between non-echolocating mammals and the FM bat T. brasiliensis shows that the ability to echolocate is not reflected in the modulation thresholds.

  15. Enhancing the low frequency THz resonances (< 1 THz) of organic molecules via electronegative atom substitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, Jyotirmayee; Ray, Shaumik; Pesala, Bala

    2015-03-01

    Terahertz (THz) technology is an active area of research with various applications in non-intrusive imaging and spectroscopy. Very few organic molecules have significant resonances below 1 THz. Understanding the origin of low frequency THz modes in these molecules and their absence in other molecules could be extremely important in design and engineering molecules with low frequency THz resonances. These engineered molecules can be used as THz tags for anti-counterfeiting applications. Studies show that low frequency THz resonances are commonly observed in molecules having higher molecular mass and weak intermolecular hydrogen bonds. In this paper, we have explored the possibility of enhancing the strength of THz resonances below 1 THz through electronegative atom substitution. Adding an electronegative atom helps in achieving higher hydrogen bond strength to enhance the resonances below 1 THz. Here acetanilide has been used as a model system. THz-Time Domain Spectroscopy (THz-TDS) results show that acetanilide has a small peak observed below 1 THz. Acetanilide can be converted to 2-fluoroacetanilide by adding an electronegative atom, fluorine, which doesn't have any prominent peak below 1 THz. However, by optimally choosing the position of the electronegative atom as in 4-fluoroacetanilide, a significant THz resonance at 0.86 THz is observed. The origin of low frequency resonances can be understood by carrying out Density Functional Theory (DFT) simulations of full crystal structure. These studies show that adding an electronegative atom to the organic molecules at an optimized position can result in significantly enhanced resonances below 1 THz.

  16. Ultrabroadband radio-frequency arbitrary waveform generation with high-speed phase and amplitude modulation capability.

    PubMed

    Rashidinejad, Amir; Leaird, Daniel E; Weiner, Andrew M

    2015-05-04

    We introduce a novel photonic-assisted ultrabroadband radio-frequency arbitrary waveform generation setup capable of high-speed phase and amplitude modulation of the individual arbitrary waveforms. The waveform generator is based on an optical interferometer, within which a high-resolution optical pulse shaper and integrated optic phase and intensity modulators are placed, followed by frequency-to-time mapping. The phase and amplitude of each ultrabroadband waveform within the generated sequence can be continuously tuned by adjusting the driving voltages applied to the phase and intensity modulator pair, hence overcoming the slow update speed of conventional spatial light modulator-based pulse shapers. Moreover, this data modulation is completely independent from and does not interfere with RF waveform design. Programmable ultrabroadband RF sequences, spanning more than 4.7 octaves from 2 to 52 GHz, are modulated with real-time data in up to 16 level, M-ary phase-shift keying and quadrature amplitude modulation formats.

  17. THz frequency dynamics of network/guest atom systems : liquid water, clathrates, and network glasses.

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, T.; Materials Science Division

    2009-02-01

    Network/guest atom systems show peculiar dynamic behaviors at THz frequency region such as the plateau of thermal conductivities and the broad band spectra called the Boson peak. These are commonly realized in network/guest atom systems such as glasses, clathrates and even for liquid water. Though the phenomena are universal, there is no consistent view to explain these on the same basis. This paper, pointing out similar behaviors for these different systems, tries to present a unified view for these peculiar dynamics.

  18. Ethanol enrichment from ethanol-water mixtures using high frequency ultrasonic atomization.

    PubMed

    Kirpalani, D M; Suzuki, K

    2011-09-01

    The influence of high frequency ultrasound on the enrichment of ethanol from ethanol-water mixtures was investigated. Experiments performed in a continuous enrichment system showed that the generated atomized mist was at a higher ethanol concentration than the feed and the enrichment ratio was higher than the vapor liquid equilibrium curve for ethanol-water above 40 mol%. Well-controlled experiments were performed to analyze the effect of physical parameters; temperature, carrier gas flow and collection height on the enrichment. Droplet size measurements of the atomized mist and visualization of the oscillating fountain jet formed during sonication were made to understand the separation mechanism.

  19. Nanoscale Subsurface Imaging of Nanocomposites via Resonant Difference-Frequency Atomic Force Ultrasonic Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, Sean A.; Cantrell, John H.; Lillehei, Peter T.

    2007-01-01

    A scanning probe microscope methodology, called resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM), has been developed. The method employs an ultrasonic wave launched from the bottom of a sample while the cantilever of an atomic force microscope engages the sample top surface. The cantilever is driven at a frequency differing from the ultrasonic frequency by one of the contact resonance frequencies of the cantilever. The nonlinear mixing of the oscillating cantilever and the ultrasonic wave at the sample surface generates difference-frequency oscillations at the cantilever contact resonance. The resonance-enhanced difference-frequency signals are used to create amplitude and phase-generated images of nanoscale near-surface and subsurface features. RDF-AFUM phase images of LaRC-CP2 polyimide polymer containing embedded nanostructures are presented. A RDF-AFUM micrograph of a 12.7 micrometer thick film of LaRC-CP2 containing a monolayer of gold nanoparticles embedded 7 micrometers below the specimen surface reveals the occurrence of contiguous amorphous and crystalline phases within the bulk of the polymer and a preferential growth of the crystalline phase in the vicinity of the gold nanoparticles. A RDF-AFUM micrograph of LaRC-CP2 film containing randomly dispersed carbon nanotubes reveals the growth of an interphase region at certain nanotube-polymer interfaces.

  20. Switching circuit to improve the frequency modulation difference-intensity THz quantum cascade laser imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Saat, N. K.; Dean, P.; Khanna, S. P.; Salih, M.; Linfield, E. H.; Davies, A. G.

    2015-04-24

    We demonstrate new switching circuit for difference-intensity THz quantum cascade laser (QCL) imaging by amplitude modulation and lock in detection. The switching circuit is designed to improve the frequency modulation so that it can stably lock the amplitude modulation of the QCL and the detector output. The combination of a voltage divider and a buffer in switching circuit to quickly switch the amplitude of the QCL biases of 15.8 V and 17.2 V is successfully to increase the frequency modulation up to ∼100 Hz.

  1. Cross-Modulated Amplitudes and Frequencies Characterize Interacting Components in Complex Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gans, Fabian; Schumann, Aicko Y.; Kantelhardt, Jan W.; Penzel, Thomas; Fietze, Ingo

    2009-03-01

    The dynamics of complex systems is characterized by oscillatory components on many time scales. To study the interactions between these components we analyze the cross modulation of their instantaneous amplitudes and frequencies, separating synchronous and antisynchronous modulation. We apply our novel technique to brain-wave oscillations in the human electroencephalogram and show that interactions between the α wave and the δ or β wave oscillators as well as spatial interactions can be quantified and related with physiological conditions (e.g., sleep stages). Our approach overcomes the limitation to oscillations with similar frequencies and enables us to quantify directly nonlinear effects such as positive or negative frequency modulation.

  2. Design-oriented analytic model of phase and frequency modulated optical links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsurrò, Pietro; Saitto, Antonio; Tommasino, Pasquale; Trifiletti, Alessandro; Vannucci, Antonello; Cimmino, Rosario F.

    2016-07-01

    An analytic design-oriented model of phase and frequency modulated microwave optical links has been developed. The models are suitable for design of broadband high dynamic range optical links for antenna remoting and optical beamforming, where noise and linearity of the subsystems are a concern Digital filter design techniques have been applied to the design of optical filters working as frequency discriminator, that are the bottleneck in terms of linearity for these systems. The models of frequency modulated, phase modulated, and coherent I/Q link have been used to compare performance of the different architectures in terms of linearity and SFDR.

  3. Propagation of frequency-modulated pulses in active one-dimensional photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Zolotovskii, I O; Korobko, D A; Ostatochnikov, V A

    2015-02-28

    The propagation of frequency-modulated pulses in onedimensional photonic crystals with gain is considered. A correct expression is derived for the delay time of the pulse maximum. This expression takes into account the input pulse characteristics: duration, frequency modulation and spectrum position in the photonic band gap. The analytical results are basically in agreement with the results of numerical simulation. The influence of gain in the photonic-crystal structure is considered. It is shown that the parameters of a transmitted pulse can be controlled by changing the inputpulse frequency modulation. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  4. Radio frequency superconducting quantum interference device meta-atoms and metamaterials: Experiment, theory and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Daimeng

    Metamaterials are 1D, 2D or 3D arrays of artificial atoms. The artificial atoms, called "meta-atoms", can be any component with tailorable electromagnetic properties, such as resonators, LC circuits, nano particles, and so on. By designing the properties of individual meta-atoms and the interaction created by putting them in a lattice, one can create a metamaterial with intriguing properties not found in nature. My Ph. D. work examines the meta-atoms based on radio frequency superconducting quantum interference devices (rf-SQUIDs); their tunability with dc magnetic field, rf magnetic field, and temperature are studied. The rf-SQUIDs are superconducting split ring resonators in which the usual capacitance is supplemented with a Josephson junction, which introduces strong nonlinearity in the rf properties. At relatively low rf magnetic field, a magnetic field tunability of the resonant frequency of up to 80 THz/Gauss by dc magnetic field is observed, and a total frequency tunability of 100% is achieved. The macroscopic quantum superconducting metamaterial also shows manipulative self-induced broadband transparency due to a qualitatively novel nonlinear mechanism that is different from conventional electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) or its classical analogs. A near complete disappearance of resonant absorption under a range of applied rf flux is observed experimentally and explained theoretically. The transparency comes from the intrinsic bi-stability and can be tuned on/ off easily by altering rf and dc magnetic fields, temperature and history. Hysteretic in situ 100% tunability of transparency paves the way for auto-cloaking metamaterials, intensity dependent filters, and fast-tunable power limiters. An rf-SQUID metamaterial is shown to have qualitatively the same behavior as a single rf-SQUID with regards to dc flux, rf flux and temperature tuning. The two-tone response of self-resonant rf-SQUID meta-atoms and metamaterials is then studied here via

  5. Optical atomic magnetometer

    DOEpatents

    Budker, Dmitry; Higbie, James; Corsini, Eric P

    2013-11-19

    An optical atomic magnetometers is provided operating on the principles of nonlinear magneto-optical rotation. An atomic vapor is optically pumped using linearly polarized modulated light. The vapor is then probed using a non-modulated linearly polarized light beam. The resulting modulation in polarization angle of the probe light is detected and used in a feedback loop to induce self-oscillation at the resonant frequency.

  6. Atomic-layer molybdenum sulfide optical modulator for visible coherent light

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuxia; Wang, Shuxian; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Chen, Yanxue; Mei, Liangmo; Di Lieto, Alberto; Tonelli, Mauro; Wang, Jiyang

    2015-01-01

    Coherent light sources in the visible range are playing important roles in our daily life and modern technology, since about 50% of the capability of the our human brains is devoted to processing visual information. Visible lasers can be achieved by nonlinear optical process of infrared lasers and direct lasing of gain materials, and the latter has advantages in the aspects of compactness, efficiency, simplicity, etc. However, due to lack of visible optical modulators, the directly generated visible lasers with only a gain material are constrained in continuous-wave operation. Here, we demonstrated the fabrication of a visible optical modulator and pulsed visible lasers based on atomic-layer molybdenum sulfide (MoS2), a ultrathin two-dimensional material with about 9–10 layers. By employing the nonlinear absorption of the modulator, the pulsed orange, red and deep red lasers were directly generated. Besides, the present atomic-layer MoS2 optical modulator has broadband modulating properties and advantages in the simple preparation process. The present results experimentally verify the theoretical prediction for the low-dimensional optoelectronic modulating devices in the visible wavelength region and may open an attractive avenue for removing a stumbling block for the further development of pulsed visible lasers. PMID:26067821

  7. Atomic-layer molybdenum sulfide optical modulator for visible coherent light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuxia; Wang, Shuxian; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Chen, Yanxue; Mei, Liangmo; di Lieto, Alberto; Tonelli, Mauro; Wang, Jiyang

    2015-06-01

    Coherent light sources in the visible range are playing important roles in our daily life and modern technology, since about 50% of the capability of the our human brains is devoted to processing visual information. Visible lasers can be achieved by nonlinear optical process of infrared lasers and direct lasing of gain materials, and the latter has advantages in the aspects of compactness, efficiency, simplicity, etc. However, due to lack of visible optical modulators, the directly generated visible lasers with only a gain material are constrained in continuous-wave operation. Here, we demonstrated the fabrication of a visible optical modulator and pulsed visible lasers based on atomic-layer molybdenum sulfide (MoS2), a ultrathin two-dimensional material with about 9-10 layers. By employing the nonlinear absorption of the modulator, the pulsed orange, red and deep red lasers were directly generated. Besides, the present atomic-layer MoS2 optical modulator has broadband modulating properties and advantages in the simple preparation process. The present results experimentally verify the theoretical prediction for the low-dimensional optoelectronic modulating devices in the visible wavelength region and may open an attractive avenue for removing a stumbling block for the further development of pulsed visible lasers.

  8. Absolute frequency measurement at 10-16 level based on the international atomic time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachisu, H.; Fujieda, M.; Kumagai, M.; Ido, T.

    2016-06-01

    Referring to International Atomic Time (TAI), we measured the absolute frequency of the 87Sr lattice clock with its uncertainty of 1.1 x 10-15. Unless an optical clock is continuously operated for the five days of the TAI grid, it is required to evaluate dead time uncertainty in order to use the available five-day average of the local frequency reference. We homogeneously distributed intermittent measurements over the five-day grid of TAI, by which the dead time uncertainty was reduced to low 10-16 level. Three campaigns of the five (or four)-day consecutive measurements have resulted in the absolute frequency of the 87Sr clock transition of 429 228 004 229 872.85 (47) Hz, where the systematic uncertainty of the 87Sr optical frequency standard amounts to 8.6 x 10-17.

  9. Control of nanoscale atomic arrangement in multicomponent thin films by temporally modulated vapour fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarakinos, Kostas

    2016-09-01

    Synthesis of multicomponent thin films using vapor fluxes with a modulated deposition pattern is a potential route for accessing a wide gamut of atomic arrangements and morphologies for property tuning. In the current study, we present a research concept that allows for understanding the combined effect of flux modulation, kinetics and thermodynamics on the growth of multinary thin films. This concept entails the combined use of thin film synthesis by means of multiatomic vapor fluxes modulated with sub-monolayer resolution, deterministic growth simulations and nanoscale microstructure probes. Using this research concept we study structure formation within the archetype immiscible Ag-Cu binary system showing that atomic arrangement and morphology at different length scales is governed by diffusion of near-surface Ag atoms to encapsulate 3D Cu islands growing on 2D Ag layers. Moreover, we explore the relevance of the mechanism outlined above for morphology evolution and structure formation within the miscible Ag-Au binary system. The knowledge generated and the methodology presented herein provides the scientific foundation for tailoring atomic arrangement and physical properties in a wide range of miscible and immiscible multinary systems.

  10. Frequency analysis for modulation-enhanced powder diffraction.

    PubMed

    Chernyshov, Dmitry; Dyadkin, Vadim; van Beek, Wouter; Urakawa, Atsushi

    2016-07-01

    Periodic modulation of external conditions on a crystalline sample with a consequent analysis of periodic diffraction response has been recently proposed as a tool to enhance experimental sensitivity for minor structural changes. Here the intensity distributions for both a linear and nonlinear structural response induced by a symmetric and periodic stimulus are analysed. The analysis is further extended for powder diffraction when an external perturbation changes not only the intensity of Bragg lines but also their positions. The derived results should serve as a basis for a quantitative modelling of modulation-enhanced diffraction data measured in real conditions.

  11. The subjective effect of multiple co-channel frequency modulated television interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whyte, W. A., Jr.; Cauley, M. A.; Groumpos, P. P.

    1983-01-01

    As the geostationary orbit/spectrum becomes saturated, there is a need for the ability to reuse frequency assignments. Protection ratios (the ratio of wanted signal power to interfering signal power at the receiver) play a key role in determining efficient frequency reuse plans. A knowledge of the manner in which multiple sources of co-channel interference combine is vital in determining protection ratio requirements such that suitable margin may be allocated for multiple interfering signals. Results of tests examining the subjective assessment of multiple co-channel frequency modulated television signals interfering with another frequency modulated TV system are presented.

  12. Coherent storage of temporally multimode light using a spin-wave atomic frequency comb memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gündoǧan, M.; Mazzera, M.; Ledingham, P. M.; Cristiani, M.; de Riedmatten, H.

    2013-04-01

    We report on the coherent and multi-temporal mode storage of light using the full atomic frequency comb memory scheme. The scheme involves the transfer of optical atomic excitations in Pr3+:Y2SiO5 to spin waves in hyperfine levels using strong single-frequency transfer pulses. Using this scheme, a total of five temporal modes are stored and recalled on-demand from the memory. The coherence of the storage and retrieval is characterized using a time-bin interference measurement resulting in visibilities higher than 80%, independent of the storage time. This coherent and multimode spin-wave memory is promising as a quantum memory for light.

  13. Redistribution of light frequency by multiple scattering in a resonant atomic vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, João Carlos de A.; Oriá, Marcos; Chevrollier, Martine; Cavalcante, Hugo L. D. de Souza; Passerat de Silans, T.

    2015-05-01

    The propagation of light in a resonant atomic vapor can a priori be thought of as a multiple scattering process, in which each scattering event redistributes both the direction and the frequency of the photons. Particularly, the frequency redistribution may result in Lévy flights of photons, directly affecting the transport properties of light in a resonant atomic vapor and turning this propagation into a superdiffusion process. Here, we report on a Monte Carlo simulation developed to study the evolution of the spectrum of the light in a resonant thermal vapor. We observe the gradual change of the spectrum and its convergence towards a regime of complete frequency redistribution as the number of scattering events increases. We also analyze the probability density function of the step length of photons between emissions and reabsorptions in the vapor, which governs the statistics of the light diffusion. We observe two different regimes in the light transport: superdiffusion when the vapor is excited near the line center and normal diffusion for excitation far from the line center. The regime of complete frequency redistribution is not reached for excitation far from resonance even after many absorption and reemission cycles due to correlations between emitted and absorbed frequencies.

  14. Enhancing the optical lever sensitivity of microcantilevers for dynamic atomic force microscopy via integrated low frequency paddles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huda Shaik, Nurul; Reifenberger, Ronald G.; Raman, Arvind

    2016-05-01

    A method is presented to enhance the optical lever sensitivity in dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) by nearly an order of magnitude over a wide frequency bandwidth. This is achieved by fabricating or releasing a paddle with a soft hinge close to the free end of the AFM microcantilever such that the paddle resonance frequency is well below the fundamental resonance frequency of the microcantilever. We show a significant increase in signal to noise ratio when cantilever motion is observed at the paddle for AFM systems that are not limited by thermal noise. Also, any effects due to the excitation of the second eigenmode were decoupled by locating the paddle at the node of the second eigenmode. We use these probes for higher harmonic imaging in amplitude modulated AFM (AM-AFM) on a standard polymer blend made of polystyrene and low density polyethylene. We demonstrate significantly improved contrast in higher harmonic images when observing cantilever motion at the paddle. Thus this microcantilever design can improve significantly conventional cantilever performance for dynamic AFM and is compatible with low-cost, high yield microfabrication processes.

  15. Tunable atomic spin-orbit coupling synthesized with a modulating gradient magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xinyu; Wu, Lingna; Chen, Jiyao; Guan, Qing; Gao, Kuiyi; Xu, Zhi-Fang; You, L.; Wang, Ruquan

    2016-01-01

    We report the observation of synthesized spin-orbit coupling (SOC) for ultracold spin-1 87Rb atoms. Different from earlier experiments where a one dimensional (1D) atomic SOC of pseudo-spin-1/2 is synthesized with Raman laser fields, the scheme we demonstrate employs a gradient magnetic field (GMF) and ground-state atoms, thus is immune to atomic spontaneous emission. The strength of SOC we realize can be tuned by changing the modulation amplitude of the GMF, and the effect of the SOC is confirmed through the studies of: 1) the collective dipole oscillation of an atomic condensate in a harmonic trap after the synthesized SOC is abruptly turned on; and 2) the minimum energy state at a finite adiabatically adjusted momentum when SOC strength is slowly ramped up. The condensate coherence is found to remain very good after driven by modulating GMFs. Our scheme presents an alternative means for studying interacting many-body systems with synthesized SOC. PMID:26752786

  16. Flow-induced charge modulation in superfluid atomic fermions loaded into an optical kagome lattice.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Daisuke; Sato, Chika; Nikuni, Tetsuro; Tsuchiya, Shunji

    2013-04-05

    We study the superfluid state of atomic fermions in a tunable optical kagome lattice motivated by recent experiments. We show that the imposed superflow induces spatial modulations in the density and order parameter of the pair condensate and leads to a charge modulated superfluid state analogous to a supersolid state. The spatial modulations in the superfluid emerge due to the geometric effect of the kagome lattice that introduces anisotropy in hopping amplitudes of fermion pairs in the presence of superflow. We also study superflow instabilities and find that the critical current limited by the dynamical instability is quite enhanced due to the large density of states associated with the flatband. The charge modulated superfluid state can sustain high temperatures close to the transition temperature that is also enhanced due to the flatband and is therefore realizable in experiments.

  17. Low-frequency Raman modes and electronic excitations in atomically thin MoS2 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Hualing; Zhu, Bairen; Liu, Kai; Fan, Jiahe; Cui, Xiaodong; Zhang, Q. M.

    2012-12-01

    Atomically thin MoS2 crystals have been recognized as quasi-two-dimensional semiconductors with remarkable physical properties. We report our Raman scattering measurements on multilayer and monolayer MoS2, especially in the low-frequency range (<50 cm-1). We find two low-frequency Raman modes with a contrasting thickness dependence. When increasing the number of MoS2 layers, one mode shows a significant increase in frequency while the other decreases following a 1/N (N denotes the number of unit layers) trend. With the aid of first-principles calculations we assign the former as the shear mode E2g2. The latter is distinguished as the compression vibrational mode, similar to the surface vibration of other epitaxial thin films. The opposite evolution of the two modes with thickness demonstrates vibrational modes in an atomically thin crystal as well as a more precise way to characterize the thickness of atomically thin MoS2 films. In addition, we observe a broad feature around 38 cm-1(5 meV) which is visible only under near-resonance excitation and pinned at a fixed energy, independent of thickness. We interpret the feature as an electronic Raman scattering associated with the spin-orbit coupling induced splitting in a conduction band at K points in their Brillouin zone.

  18. Measurement of a hyperfine-induced spin-exchange frequency shift in atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Walsworth, R.L.; Silvera, I.F. ); Mattison, E.M.; Vessot, R.F.C. )

    1992-09-01

    We have measured a hyperfine-induced spin-exchange frequency shift in the atomic-hydrogen ground-state hyperfine transition. A recent quantum-mechanical treatment of low-energy hydrogen-hydrogen scattering by Koelman {ital et} {ital al}. (Phys. Rev. A 38, 3535 (1988)) predicts such frequency shifts to become large at low temperature, and to affect the performance of atomic clocks such as the cryogenic hydrogen maser. The experiment reported here was performed with a hydrogen maser operating near room temperature, where the reported hyperfine effects are predicted to be small, but measurable. Using an adiabatic fast passage (AFP) technique to vary the incoming atomic population in the masing states from approximately 100% (AFP on) to 50% (AFP off), we determined the change in the dimensionless hyperfine-induced frequency-shift parameter {Omega} to be {Omega}{sub on}{minus}{Omega}{sub off}=5.38 (1.06){times}10{sup {minus}4}. The theoretical prediction at this temperature is {Omega}{sub on}{minus}{Omega}{sub off}={minus}0.76{times}10{sup {minus}4} to {minus}1.12{times}10{sup {minus}4}, for the range of masing-state populations used in the present experiment. We review the relevant theory, report our experimental method and results, and discuss possible reasons for the discrepancy between experiment and theory.

  19. Frequency-modulated light scattering interferometry used for assessment of optical properties in turbid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Liang; Somesfalean, Gabriel; Svanberg, Sune

    2013-02-01

    Frequency-modulated light scattering interferometry, which employs a frequency-modulated coherent light source and examines the intensity fluctuation of the resulting scattered light using a heterodyne detection scheme, was utilized to evaluate the optical properties of liquid phantoms made of Intralipid® and Indian ink. Based on the diffusion theory, nonlinear fits to the power spectrum of the heterodyne-detected light intensity are performed and discussed in detail, and the optical properties of liquid phantoms are consequently retrieved.

  20. Frequency estimation for optical coherent M-QAM system without removing modulated data phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Song; Cao, Yinwen; Leng, Haijun; Wu, Guohua; Gu, Wanyi

    2012-08-01

    For optical coherent M-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (M-QAM) system, the frequency offset can be extracted directly by applying Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) to the signal's argument, without removing the modulated data phase. By categorizing the constellation points and rotating some constellation points by π/4, this algorithm is robust to extract the frequency offset against the noise. Numerical simulations of 16-QAM and 256-QAM coherent systems are presented to demonstrate this algorithm.

  1. Timbral Sharpness and Modulations in Frequency and Amplitude: Implications for the Fusion of Musical Sounds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goad, Pamela Joy

    The fusion of musical voices is an important aspect of musical blend, or the mixing of individual sounds. Yet, little research has been done to explicitly determine the factors involved in fusion. In this study, the similarity of timbre and modulation were examined for their contribution to the fusion of sounds. It is hypothesized that similar timbres will fuse better than dissimilar timbres, and, voices with the same kind of modulation will fuse better than voices of different modulations. A perceptually-based measure, known as sharpness was investigated as a measure of timbre. The advantages of using sharpness are that it is based on hearing sensitivities and masking phenomena of inner ear processing. Five musical instrument families were digitally recorded in performances across a typical playing range at two extreme dynamic levels. Analyses reveal that sharpness is capable of uncovering subtle changes in timbre including those found in musical dynamics, instrument design, and performer-specific variations. While these analyses alone are insufficient to address fusion, preliminary calculations of timbral combinations indicate that sharpness has the potential to predict the fusion of sounds used in musical composition. Three experiments investigated the effects of modulation on the fusion of a harmonic major sixth interval. In the first experiment using frequency modulation, stimuli varied in deviation about a mean fundamental frequency and relative modulation phase between the two tones. Results showed smaller frequency deviations promoted fusion and relative phase differences had a minimal effect. In a second experiment using amplitude modulation, stimuli varied in deviation about a mean amplitude level and relative phase of modulation. Results showed smaller amplitude deviations promoted better fusion, but unlike frequency modulation, relative phase differences were also important. In a third experiment, frequency modulation, amplitude modulation and mixed

  2. Application of Multi-Frequency Modulation (MFM) for high-speed data communications to a voice frequency channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsman, Charles P.

    1990-06-01

    Multi-Frequency Modulation (MFM) has been developed at NPS using both differential quadrature-phase-shift-keying (DQPSK) and differential-quadrature-amplitude-modulation (DQAM) encoding formats. Previous applications of these encoding formats were on industry standard computers (PC) over a 16 to 20 kHz channel. This report discusses the implementation of MFM to a voice frequency channel of 200 to 3400 Hz, for possible future use with high-speed modems over switched telephone networks. Research and testing for this report included the DQPSK and differential 16 quadrature-amplitude-modulation (D16-QAM) encoding formats implemented on PCs. Experimental results of the implemented MFM signal were comparable to theory with acceptable bit error rates for input signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) of 15 dB and higher.

  3. Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) in medical environment: Gaussian Derivative Frequency Modulation (GDFM) as a novel modulation technique with minimal interference properties.

    PubMed

    Rieche, Marie; Komenský, Tomás; Husar, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) systems in healthcare facilitate the possibility of contact-free identification and tracking of patients, medical equipment and medication. Thereby, patient safety will be improved and costs as well as medication errors will be reduced considerably. However, the application of RFID and other wireless communication systems has the potential to cause harmful electromagnetic disturbances on sensitive medical devices. This risk mainly depends on the transmission power and the method of data communication. In this contribution we point out the reasons for such incidents and give proposals to overcome these problems. Therefore a novel modulation and transmission technique called Gaussian Derivative Frequency Modulation (GDFM) is developed. Moreover, we carry out measurements to show the inteference properties of different modulation schemes in comparison to our GDFM.

  4. High frequency GaAlAs modulator and photodetector for phased array antenna applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claspy, P. C.; Chorey, C. M.; Hill, S. M.; Bhasin, K. B.

    1989-01-01

    A waveguide Mach-Zehnder electro-optic modulator and an interdigitated photoconductive detector designed to operate at 820 nm, fabricated on different GaAlAs/GaAs heterostructure materials, are being investigated for use in optical interconnects in phased array antenna systems. Measured optical attenuation effects in the modulator are discussed and the observed modulation performance up to 1 GHz is presented. Measurements of detector frequency response are described and results presented.

  5. High frequency GaAlAs modulator and photodetector for phased array antenna applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claspy, P. C.; Chorey, C. M.; Hill, S. M.; Bhasin, K. B.

    1988-01-01

    A waveguide Mach-Zehnder electro-optic modulator and an interdigitated photoconductive detector designed to operate at 820 nm, fabricated on different GaAlAs/GaAs heterostructure materials, are being investigated for use in optical interconnects in phased array antenna systems. Measured optical attenuation effects in the modulator are discussed and the observed modulation performance up to 1 GHz is presented. Measurements of detector frequency response are described and results presented.

  6. Acousto-optical modulation of light at a doubled sound frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Kotov, V M; Averin, S V; Shkerdin, G N

    2016-02-28

    A method of acousto-optical (AO) Bragg diffraction is proposed that provides the amplitude modulation of optical radiation at a doubled acoustic frequency. The method is based on the double transmission of the light through the AO modulator made of a gyrotropic crystal and is experimentally tested by the example of the modulation of light with a wavelength of 0.63 μm, controlled by the paratellurite AO cell. (acoustooptics)

  7. Atomic-based stabilization for laser-pumped atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Gerginov, V; Shah, V; Knappe, S; Hollberg, L; Kitching, J

    2006-06-15

    We describe a novel technique for stabilizing frequency shifts in laser-interrogated vapor-cell atomic clocks. The method suppresses frequency shifts due to changes in the laser frequency, intensity, and modulation index as well as atomic vapor density. The clock operating parameters are monitored by using the atoms themselves, rather than by using conventional schemes for laser frequency and cell temperature control. The experiment is realized using a chip-scale atomic clock. The novel atomic-based stabilization approach results in a simpler setup and improved long-term performance.

  8. Simulation of stress-modulated magnetization precession frequency in Heusler-based spin torque oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Houbing; Zhao, Congpeng; Ma, Xingqiao

    2017-03-01

    We investigated stress-modulated magnetization precession frequency in Heusler-based spin transfer torque oscillator by combining micromagnetic simulations with phase field microelasticity theory, by encapsulating the magnetic tunnel junction into multilayers structures. We proposed a novel method of using an external stress to control the magnetization precession in spin torque oscillator instead of an external magnetic field. The stress-modulated magnetization precession frequency can be linearly modulated by externally applied uniaxial in-plane stress, with a tunable range 4.4-7.0 GHz under the stress of 10 MPa. By comparison, the out-of-plane stress imposes negligible influence on the precession frequency due to the large out-of-plane demagnetization field. The results offer new inspiration to the design of spin torque oscillator devices that simultaneously process high frequency, narrow output band, and tunable over a wide range of frequencies via external stress.

  9. Selective attention modulates human auditory brainstem responses: relative contributions of frequency and spatial cues.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Alexandre; Schönwiesner, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Selective attention is the mechanism that allows focusing one's attention on a particular stimulus while filtering out a range of other stimuli, for instance, on a single conversation in a noisy room. Attending to one sound source rather than another changes activity in the human auditory cortex, but it is unclear whether attention to different acoustic features, such as voice pitch and speaker location, modulates subcortical activity. Studies using a dichotic listening paradigm indicated that auditory brainstem processing may be modulated by the direction of attention. We investigated whether endogenous selective attention to one of two speech signals affects amplitude and phase locking in auditory brainstem responses when the signals were either discriminable by frequency content alone, or by frequency content and spatial location. Frequency-following responses to the speech sounds were significantly modulated in both conditions. The modulation was specific to the task-relevant frequency band. The effect was stronger when both frequency and spatial information were available. Patterns of response were variable between participants, and were correlated with psychophysical discriminability of the stimuli, suggesting that the modulation was biologically relevant. Our results demonstrate that auditory brainstem responses are susceptible to efferent modulation related to behavioral goals. Furthermore they suggest that mechanisms of selective attention actively shape activity at early subcortical processing stages according to task relevance and based on frequency and spatial cues.

  10. Simple-design ultra-low phase noise microwave frequency synthesizers for high-performing Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    François, B.; Calosso, C. E.; Abdel Hafiz, M.; Micalizio, S.; Boudot, R.

    2015-09-01

    We report on the development and characterization of novel 4.596 GHz and 6.834 GHz microwave frequency synthesizers devoted to be used as local oscillators in high-performance Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks. The key element of the synthesizers is a custom module that integrates a high spectral purity 100 MHz oven controlled quartz crystal oscillator frequency-multiplied to 1.6 GHz with minor excess noise. Frequency multiplication, division, and mixing stages are then implemented to generate the exact output atomic resonance frequencies. Absolute phase noise performances of the output 4.596 GHz signal are measured to be -109 and -141 dB rad2/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz Fourier frequencies, respectively. The phase noise of the 6.834 GHz signal is -105 and -138 dB rad2/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz offset frequencies, respectively. The performances of the synthesis chains contribute to the atomic clock short term fractional frequency stability at a level of 3.1 × 10-14 for the Cs cell clock and 2 × 10-14 for the Rb clock at 1 s averaging time. This value is comparable with the clock shot noise limit. We describe the residual phase noise measurements of key components and stages to identify the main limitations of the synthesis chains. The residual frequency stability of synthesis chains is measured to be at the 10-15 level for 1 s integration time. Relevant advantages of the synthesis design, using only commercially available components, are to combine excellent phase noise performances, simple-architecture, low-cost, and to be easily customized for signal output generation at 4.596 GHz or 6.834 GHz for applications to Cs or Rb vapor-cell frequency standards.

  11. Simple-design ultra-low phase noise microwave frequency synthesizers for high-performing Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks

    SciTech Connect

    François, B.; Calosso, C. E.; Micalizio, S.; Abdel Hafiz, M.; Boudot, R.

    2015-09-15

    We report on the development and characterization of novel 4.596 GHz and 6.834 GHz microwave frequency synthesizers devoted to be used as local oscillators in high-performance Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks. The key element of the synthesizers is a custom module that integrates a high spectral purity 100 MHz oven controlled quartz crystal oscillator frequency-multiplied to 1.6 GHz with minor excess noise. Frequency multiplication, division, and mixing stages are then implemented to generate the exact output atomic resonance frequencies. Absolute phase noise performances of the output 4.596 GHz signal are measured to be −109 and −141 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz Fourier frequencies, respectively. The phase noise of the 6.834 GHz signal is −105 and −138 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz offset frequencies, respectively. The performances of the synthesis chains contribute to the atomic clock short term fractional frequency stability at a level of 3.1 × 10{sup −14} for the Cs cell clock and 2 × 10{sup −14} for the Rb clock at 1 s averaging time. This value is comparable with the clock shot noise limit. We describe the residual phase noise measurements of key components and stages to identify the main limitations of the synthesis chains. The residual frequency stability of synthesis chains is measured to be at the 10{sup −15} level for 1 s integration time. Relevant advantages of the synthesis design, using only commercially available components, are to combine excellent phase noise performances, simple-architecture, low-cost, and to be easily customized for signal output generation at 4.596 GHz or 6.834 GHz for applications to Cs or Rb vapor-cell frequency standards.

  12. Simple-design ultra-low phase noise microwave frequency synthesizers for high-performing Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    François, B; Calosso, C E; Abdel Hafiz, M; Micalizio, S; Boudot, R

    2015-09-01

    We report on the development and characterization of novel 4.596 GHz and 6.834 GHz microwave frequency synthesizers devoted to be used as local oscillators in high-performance Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks. The key element of the synthesizers is a custom module that integrates a high spectral purity 100 MHz oven controlled quartz crystal oscillator frequency-multiplied to 1.6 GHz with minor excess noise. Frequency multiplication, division, and mixing stages are then implemented to generate the exact output atomic resonance frequencies. Absolute phase noise performances of the output 4.596 GHz signal are measured to be -109 and -141 dB rad(2)/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz Fourier frequencies, respectively. The phase noise of the 6.834 GHz signal is -105 and -138 dB rad(2)/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz offset frequencies, respectively. The performances of the synthesis chains contribute to the atomic clock short term fractional frequency stability at a level of 3.1 × 10(-14) for the Cs cell clock and 2 × 10(-14) for the Rb clock at 1 s averaging time. This value is comparable with the clock shot noise limit. We describe the residual phase noise measurements of key components and stages to identify the main limitations of the synthesis chains. The residual frequency stability of synthesis chains is measured to be at the 10(-15) level for 1 s integration time. Relevant advantages of the synthesis design, using only commercially available components, are to combine excellent phase noise performances, simple-architecture, low-cost, and to be easily customized for signal output generation at 4.596 GHz or 6.834 GHz for applications to Cs or Rb vapor-cell frequency standards.

  13. Gas breakdown mechanism in pulse-modulated asymmetric ratio frequency dielectric barrier discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Sun, Jizhong; Nozaki, Tomohiro; Ding, Zhenfeng; Ding, Hongbin; Wang, Zhanhui; Wang, Dezhen

    2014-08-01

    The gas breakdown mechanisms, especially the roles of metastable species in atmospheric pressure pulse-modulated ratio frequency barrier discharges with co-axial cylindrical electrodes, were studied numerically using a one dimensional self-consistent fluid model. Simulation results showed that in low duty cycle cases, the electrons generated from the channels associated with metastable species played a more important role in initializing next breakdown than the direct ionization of helium atoms of electronic grounded states by electron-impact. In order to quantitatively evaluate the contribution to the discharge by the metastables, we defined a "characteristic time" and examined how the value varied with the gap distance and the electrode asymmetry. The results indicated that the lifetime of the metastable species (including He*and He2*) was much longer than that of the pulse-on period and as effective sources of producing electrons they lasted over a period up to millisecond. When the ratio of the outer radius to the inner radius of the cylindrical electrodes was far bigger than one, it was found that the metastables distributed mainly in a cylindrical region around the inner electrode. When the ratio decreased as the inner electrode moved outward, the density of metastables in the discharge region near the outer electrode became gradually noticeable. As the discharging gap continued to decrease, the two hill-shaped distributions gradually merged to one big hill. When the discharge spacing was fixed, asymmetric electrodes facilitated the discharge.

  14. Atomization off thin water films generated by high-frequency substrate wave vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, David J.; Manor, Ofer; Winkler, Andreas; Schmidt, Hagen; Friend, James R.; Yeo, Leslie Y.

    2012-11-01

    Generating aerosol droplets via the atomization of thin aqueous films with high frequency surface acoustic waves (SAWs) offers several advantages over existing nebulization methods, particularly for pulmonary drug delivery, offering droplet sizes in the 1-5-μm range ideal for effective pulmonary therapy. Nevertheless, the physics underlying SAW atomization is not well understood, especially in the context of thin liquid film formation and spreading and how this affects the aerosol production. Here, we demonstrate that the film geometry, governed primarily by the applied power and frequency of the SAW, indeed plays a crucial role in the atomization process and, in particular, the size of the atomized droplets. In contrast to the continuous spreading of low surface energy liquids atop similar platforms, high surface energy liquids such as water, in the present case, are found to undergo transient spreading due to the SAW to form a quasisteady film whose height is determined by self-selection of the energy minimum state associated with the acoustic resonance in the film and whose length arises from a competition between acoustic streaming and capillary effects. This is elucidated from a fundamental model for the thin film spreading behavior under SAW excitation, from which we show good agreement between the experimentally measured and theoretically predicted droplet dimension, both of which consistently indicate a linear relationship between the droplet diameter and the mechanical power coupled into the liquid by the SAW (the latter captured by an acoustic Weber number to the two thirds power, and the reciprocal of the SAW frequency).

  15. Atomization off thin water films generated by high-frequency substrate wave vibrations.

    PubMed

    Collins, David J; Manor, Ofer; Winkler, Andreas; Schmidt, Hagen; Friend, James R; Yeo, Leslie Y

    2012-11-01

    Generating aerosol droplets via the atomization of thin aqueous films with high frequency surface acoustic waves (SAWs) offers several advantages over existing nebulization methods, particularly for pulmonary drug delivery, offering droplet sizes in the 1-5-μm range ideal for effective pulmonary therapy. Nevertheless, the physics underlying SAW atomization is not well understood, especially in the context of thin liquid film formation and spreading and how this affects the aerosol production. Here, we demonstrate that the film geometry, governed primarily by the applied power and frequency of the SAW, indeed plays a crucial role in the atomization process and, in particular, the size of the atomized droplets. In contrast to the continuous spreading of low surface energy liquids atop similar platforms, high surface energy liquids such as water, in the present case, are found to undergo transient spreading due to the SAW to form a quasisteady film whose height is determined by self-selection of the energy minimum state associated with the acoustic resonance in the film and whose length arises from a competition between acoustic streaming and capillary effects. This is elucidated from a fundamental model for the thin film spreading behavior under SAW excitation, from which we show good agreement between the experimentally measured and theoretically predicted droplet dimension, both of which consistently indicate a linear relationship between the droplet diameter and the mechanical power coupled into the liquid by the SAW (the latter captured by an acoustic Weber number to the two thirds power, and the reciprocal of the SAW frequency).

  16. On low-frequency errors of uniformly modulated filtered white-noise models for ground motions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, Erdal; Boore, David M.

    1988-01-01

    Low-frequency errors of a commonly used non-stationary stochastic model (uniformly modulated filtered white-noise model) for earthquake ground motions are investigated. It is shown both analytically and by numerical simulation that uniformly modulated filter white-noise-type models systematically overestimate the spectral response for periods longer than the effective duration of the earthquake, because of the built-in low-frequency errors in the model. The errors, which are significant for low-magnitude short-duration earthquakes, can be eliminated by using the filtered shot-noise-type models (i. e. white noise, modulated by the envelope first, and then filtered).

  17. Optimisation of frequency-modulated characteristics of output radiation in a lidar with Raman amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Grigorievsky, V I; Tezadov, Ya A

    2016-03-31

    The reported study is aimed at increasing the power in the transmission path of a lidar with Raman amplification for longpath sensing of methane by optimising the frequency-modulated characteristics of the output radiation. The pump current of the used distributed-feedback master laser was modulated by a linearfrequency signal with simultaneous application of a non-synchronous high-frequency signal. For such a modulation regime, the Raman amplifier provided the mean output power of 2.5 W at a wavelength of 1650 nm. The spectral broadening did not significantly decrease the lidar sensitivity at long paths. (lidars)

  18. Analytical calculations of frequency-dependent hypermagnetizabilities and Cotton-Mouton constants using London atomic orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorvaldsen, Andreas J.; Ruud, Kenneth; Rizzo, Antonio; Coriani, Sonia

    2008-10-01

    We present the first gauge-origin-independent, frequency-dependent calculations of the hypermagnetizability anisotropy, which determines the temperature-independent contribution to magnetic-field-induced linear birefringence, the so-called Cotton-Mouton effect. A density-matrix-based scheme for analytical calculations of frequency-dependent molecular properties for self-consistent field models has recently been developed, which is also valid with frequency- and field-dependent basis sets. Applying this scheme to Hartree-Fock wave functions and using London atomic orbitals in order to obtain gauge-origin-independent results, we have calculated the hypermagnetizability anisotropy. Our results show that the use of London orbitals leads to somewhat better basis-set convergence for the hypermagnetizability compared to conventional basis sets and that London orbitals are mandatory in order to obtain reliable magnetizability anisotropies.

  19. Absolute frequency measurement with uncertainty below 1× 10^{-15} using International Atomic Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachisu, Hidekazu; Petit, Gérard; Ido, Tetsuya

    2017-01-01

    The absolute frequency of the ^{87}Sr clock transition measured in 2015 (Jpn J Appl Phys 54:112401, 2015) was reevaluated using an improved frequency link to the SI second. The scale interval of International Atomic Time (TAI) that we used as the reference was calibrated for an evaluation interval of 5 days instead of the conventional interval of 1 month which is regularly employed in Circular T. The calibration on a 5-day basis removed the uncertainty in assimilating the TAI scale of the 5-day mean to that of the 1-month mean. The reevaluation resulted in the total uncertainty of 10^{-16} level for the first time without local cesium fountains. Since there are presumably no correlations among systematic shifts of cesium fountains worldwide, the measurement is not limited by the systematic uncertainty of a specific primary frequency standard.

  20. Atomizing characteristics of swirl can combustor modules with swirl blast fuel injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Cold flow atomization tests of several different designs of swirl can combustor modules were conducted in a 7.6 cm diameter duct at airflow rates (per unit area) of 7.3 to 25.7 g/sq cm sec and water flow rates of 6.3 to 18.9 g/sec. The effect of air and water flow rates on the mean drop size of water sprays produced with the swirl blast fuel injectors were determined. Also, from these data it was possible to determine the effect of design modifications on the atomizing performance of various fuel injector and air swirler configurations. The trend in atomizing performance, as based on the mean drop size, was then compared with the trends in the production of nitrogen oxides obtained in combustion studies with the same swirl can combustors.

  1. Detecting the magnetic response of iron oxide capped organosilane nanostructures using magnetic sample modulation and atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie-Ren; Lewandowski, Brian R; Xu, Song; Garno, Jayne C

    2009-06-15

    A new imaging strategy using atomic force microscopy (AFM) is demonstrated for mapping magnetic domains at size regimes below 100 nm. The AFM-based imaging mode is referred to as magnetic sample modulation (MSM), since the flux of an AC-generated electromagnetic field is used to induce physical movement of magnetic nanomaterials on surfaces during imaging. The AFM is operated in contact mode using a soft, nonmagnetic tip to detect the physical motion of the sample. By slowly scanning an AFM probe across a vibrating area of the sample, the frequency and amplitude of vibration induced by the magnetic field is tracked by changes in tip deflection. Thus, the AFM tip serves as a force and motion sensor for mapping the vibrational response of magnetic nanomaterials. Essentially, MSM is a hybrid of contact mode AFM combined with selective modulation of magnetic domains. The positional feedback loop for MSM imaging is the same as that used for force modulation and contact mode AFM; however, the vibration of the sample is analyzed using channels of a lock-in amplifier. The investigations are facilitated by nanofabrication methods combining particle lithography with organic vapor deposition and electroless deposition of iron oxide, to prepare designed test platforms of magnetic materials at nanometer length scales. Custom test platforms furnished suitable surfaces for MSM characterizations at the level of individual metal nanostructures.

  2. Does the light shift drive frequency aging in the rubidium atomic clock?

    PubMed

    Camparo, James

    2005-07-01

    Frequency aging in the rubidium (Rb) vapor-cell atomic clock plays a significant role in the device's timekeeping ability. Though many researchers have speculated on the physical mechanism(s) driving the linear, deterministic frequency change (i.e., deltaf(t)/fo = At), there is little unambiguous experimental data regarding the phenomenon. Here, long-term data were used from on-orbit global positioning system (GPS) Rb clocks to examine one postulated mechanism for frequency aging (i.e., the light-shift effect). Defining the light shift of the clock's fractional frequency as alphaI/Io, where alpha is the light-shift coefficient, we find that temporal variations of the relative light intensity, I/Io, cannot account for frequency aging. However, for the population of clocks considered here, we obtain the intriguing result that alpha/A = 1.7 +/- 1.5. Thus, it may be that frequency aging is driven by the light-shift effect through temporal variations of the light-shift coefficient.

  3. Self-oscillating optical frequency comb generator based on an optoelectronic oscillator employing cascaded modulators.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jian; Xu, Xingyuan; Wu, Zhongle; Dai, Yitang; Yin, Feifei; Zhou, Yue; Li, Jianqiang; Xu, Kun

    2015-11-16

    An ultraflat self-oscillating optical frequency comb generator based on an optoelectronic oscillator employing cascaded modulators was proposed and experimentally demonstrated. By incorporating the optoelectronic oscillation loop with cascaded modulators into the optical frequency comb generator, 11 ultraflat comb lines would be generated, and the frequency spacing is equal to the oscillation frequency of the OEO. 10 and 12GHz optical frequency combs are demonstrated with the spectral power variation below 0.82dB and 0.93dB respectively. The corresponding spectral pure microwave source are also generated and evaluated. The corresponding single-sideband phase noise are as low as -122dBc/Hz and -115 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz offset frequency.

  4. Radio frequency path characterization for wide band quadrature amplitude modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Bracht, R.

    1998-12-31

    Remote, high speed, high explosive wave front monitoring requires very high bandwidth telemetry to allow transmission of diagnostic data before the explosion destroys the sensor system itself. The main motivation for this study is that no known existing implementation of this sort has been applied to realistic weapons environments. These facts have prompted the research and gathering of data that can be used to extrapolate towards finding the best modulation method for this application. In addition to research of similar existing analysis and testing operations, data was recently captured from a Joint Test Assembly (JTA) Air Launched Cruise Missile (ALCM) flight.

  5. Resonance frequency-retuned quartz tuning fork as a force sensor for noncontact atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ooe, Hiroaki; Sakuishi, Tatsuya; Arai, Toyoko; Nogami, Makoto; Tomitori, Masahiko

    2014-07-28

    Based on a two-prong type quartz tuning fork, a force sensor with a high Q factor, which we call a retuned fork sensor, was developed for non-contact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) with atomic resolution. By cutting a small notch and attaching an AFM tip to one prong, its resonance frequency can be retuned to that of the other intact prong. In balancing the two prongs in this manner, a high Q factor (>50 000 in ultrahigh vacuum) is obtained for the sensor. An atomic resolution image of the Si(111)-7 × 7 surface was demonstrated using an nc-AFM with the sensor. The dependence of the Q factor on resonance frequency of the sensor and the long-range force between tip and sample were measured and analyzed in view of the various dissipation channels. Dissipation in the signal detection circuit turned out to be mainly limited by the total Q factor of the nc-AFM system.

  6. Two-dimensional atomic sheets for heterogeneous flexible high-frequency and low-power nanoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akinwande, Deji

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional atomic sheets have emerged as near ideal nanomaterials to overcome the long running challenge of achieving Si CMOS like performance on soft substrates at scales that can be suitable for large integration. For instance, the high mobility and velocity accessible in monolayer graphene affords GHz analog transistor devices while the large bandgap of graphene's semiconducting analogues (MoS2 and similar dichalcogenides) naturally lead to near ideal digital transistors with high on/off current ratio and low subthreshold slope while sustaining mobilities much larger than organic semiconductors or amorphous bulk semiconductors. Together, these physically similar atomic layers with vastly different electronic properties can serve as the electronic platform for low-power digital, high-speed mixed-signal, and high-frequency analog transistor building blocks for flexible nanoelectronic systems. Here we report GHz graphene transistors operating in the microwave frequency range, and address mobility and contact resistance extraction in semiconducting atomic sheets. Further progress on heterogeneous integration of graphene and 2D semiconducting crystals can enable future flexible nanosystems.

  7. Feasibility of controlling speed-dependent low-frequency brake vibration amplification by modulating actuation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Osman Taha; Dreyer, Jason T.; Singh, Rajendra

    2014-12-01

    In this article, a feasibility study of controlling the low frequency torque response of a disc brake system with modulated actuation pressure (in the open loop mode) is conducted. First, a quasi-linear model of the torsional system is introduced, and analytical solutions are proposed to incorporate the modulation effect. Tractable expressions for three different modulation schemes are obtained, and conditions that would lead to a reduction in the oscillatory amplitudes are identified. Second, these conditions are evaluated with a numerical model of the torsional system with clearance nonlinearity, and analytical solutions are verified in terms of the trends observed. Finally, a laboratory experiment with a solenoid valve is built to modulate actuation pressure with a constant duty cycle, and time-frequency domain data are acquired. Measurements are utilized to assess analytical observations, and all methods show that the speed-dependent brake torque amplitudes can be altered with an appropriate modulation of actuation pressure.

  8. Analyzing and imitating calculation of photoelectricity-inspect of sound frequency by phase modulating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie

    2011-12-01

    The paper analyzes and researches the possibility and measure of photoelectric-inspect of sound frequency by phase modulating. Analyzing the 4-Frame Phase Shifting analyzing method used in sound frequency photoelectric-inspect. It is verified that vibrator film and the position of exploring instrument determines inspecting precision. This step directly influences sound frequency spectrum and dynamic range. A kind of vibrator film choosing reference gist has been brought up. This inspecting method can be used in sound information analyzing.

  9. High frequency modulation capabilities and quasi single-sideband emission from a quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Hangauer, Andreas; Spinner, Georg; Nikodem, Michal; Wysocki, Gerard

    2014-09-22

    Both intensity- (IM) and frequency-modulation (FM) behavior of a directly modulated quantum cascade laser (QCL) are measured from 300 Hz to 1.7 GHz. Quantitative measurements of tuning coefficients has been performed and the transition from thermal- to electronic-tuning is clearly observed. A very specific FM behavior of QCLs has been identified which allows for optical quasi single sideband (SSB) modulation through current injection and has not been observed in directly modulated semiconductor lasers before. This predestines QCLs in applications where SSB is required, such as telecommunication or high speed spectroscopy. The experimental procedure and theoretical modeling for data extraction is discussed.

  10. Stimulus-dependent modulation of spontaneous low-frequency oscillations in the rat visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liangming; Liu, Yadong; Gui, Jianjun; Li, Ming; Hu, Dewen

    2014-06-09

    Research on spontaneous low-frequency oscillations is important to reveal underlying regulatory mechanisms in the brain. The mechanism for the stimulus modulation of low-frequency oscillations is not known. Here, we used the intrinsic optical imaging technique to examine stimulus-modulated low-frequency oscillation signals in the rat visual cortex. The stimulation was presented monocularly as a flashing light with different frequencies and intensities. The phases of low-frequency oscillations in different regions tended to be synchronized and the rhythms typically accelerated within a 30-s period after stimulation. These phenomena were confined to visual stimuli with specific flashing frequencies (12.5-17.5 Hz) and intensities (5-10 mA). The acceleration and synchronization induced by the flashing frequency were more marked than those induced by the intensity. These results show that spontaneous low-frequency oscillations can be modulated by parameter-dependent flashing lights and indicate the potential utility of the visual stimulus paradigm in exploring the origin and function of low-frequency oscillations.

  11. Short-term stability improvements of an optical frequency standard based on free Ca atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Jeff; Oates, Chris

    2010-03-01

    Compared to optical frequency standards featuring trapped ions or atoms in optical lattices, the strength of a standard using freely expanding neutral calcium atoms is not ultimate accuracy but rather short-term stability and experimental simplicity. Recently, a fractional frequency instability of 4 x10-15 at 1 second was demonstrated for the Ca standard at 657 nm [1]. The short cycle time (˜2 ms) combined with only a moderate interrogation duty cycle (˜15 %) is thought to introduce excess, and potentially critically limiting technical noise due to the Dick effect---high-frequency noise on the laser oscillator is not averaged away but is instead down-sampled by aliasing. We will present results of two strategies employed to minimize this effect: the reduction of clock laser noise by filtering the master clock oscillator through a high-finesse optical cavity [2], and an optimization of the interrogation cycle to match our laser's noise spectrum.[4pt] [1] Oates et al., Optics Letters, 25(21), 1603--5 (2000)[0pt] [2] Nazarova et al., J. Opt. Soc. Am. B, 5(10), 1632--8 (2008)

  12. Measurement of the 1S-2S Frequency in Atomic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildum, Edward Ames

    A first precise measurement of the 1S-2S energy interval in atomic hydrogen has been obtained by observing the 1S-2S transition in an atomic beam by pulsed Doppler -free two-photon spectroscopy and using an interferometrically calibrated line of ('130)Te(,2) at 486 nm as the reference. The measured 1S-2S frequency is 2 466 061 395.6(4.9) MHz. With the calculated 1S Lamb shift, the 1S-2S frequency yields a value for the Rydberg constant, R(,(INFIN)) = 109 737.314 92(22) cm('-1), which is not in good agreement with the most recent previously measured value, 109 737.315 44(11) cm('-1), obtained by S. R. Amin et al.('16) It is, however, in good agreement with a previous Rydberg value, 109 737.315 04(32) cm('-1), measured by J. E. M. Goldsmith('17). If the Rydberg constant is taken as given, the 1S-2S frequency determines a value for the 1S Lamb shift. With Amin's Rydberg, the measured Lamb shift is 8161.0(5.4) MHz, in poor agreement with the theoretical value of 8149.43(8) MHz. With Goldsmith's Rydberg, the measured Lamb shift is 8151.0(8.7) MHz, in good agreement with theory.

  13. Optical Reflection Measurement System Using A Swept Modulation Frequency Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, David M.; Leyde, Kent W.

    1989-03-01

    A measurement system has been developed capable of mea-suring reflected optical power as low as 0.0025% with a spot size diam-eter of 24 Am. One application for this system is the characterization of small-area photodetectors. The operation of the measurement system is simple, allowing the operator to quickly make multiple reflection measurements, and it does not require a darkroom. The measurement system merges a microscope, for visual alignment and focusing of the laser beam, with a lightwave component analyzer using modulation vec-tor error correction. A measurement comparison between the analyzer-based system and a power-meter-based system showed that each sys-tem can measure reflections as low as 0.0025%. However, the analyzer-based system offers the advantage of identifying the location and magnitude of system reflections. The system operates at a wavelength of 1310 nm.

  14. Sound speed and oscillation frequencies for a solar model evolved with Los Alamos ATOMIC opacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzik, Joyce Ann; Fontes, Christopher; Walczak, Przemyslaw; Wood, Suzannah R.; Mussack, Katie

    2015-08-01

    Los Alamos has calculated a new generation of radiative opacities for elements with atomic number Z=1-30 with improved physics input, updated atomic data, and finer temperature grid to replace the Los Alamos LEDCOP opacities released in the year 2000. We calculate the evolution of a standard solar model including these new opacities, and compare with a model evolved using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory OPAL opacities released about 1996. We use the solar abundance mixture of Asplund, Grevesse, Sauval, and Scott (2009), including 2015 updates. The Los Alamos ATOMIC opacities (Colgan et al. 2013a,b) are somewhat higher than those of OPAL for temperatures and densities near the base of the solar convection zone. We compare the calculated nonadiabatic solar oscillation frequencies and solar interior sound speed to observed frequencies and helioseismic inferences. We discuss the potential for increased opacities to partially mitigate the ‘solar abundance problem’.References:J. Colgan, D.P. Kilcrease, N.H. Magee, Jr., G.S.J. Armstrong, J. Abdallah, Jr., M.E. Sherrill, C.J. Fontes, H.L. Zhang and P. Hakel, Eighth International Conference on Atomic and Molecular Data and their Applications: ICAMDATA, Gaithersburg, MD 2012, AIP Conf. Proc. No. 1545, (AIP, New York, 2013a), pp. 17-26.J. Colgan, D.P. Kilcrease, N.H. Magee, Jr, G.S.J. Armstrong, J. Abdallah, Jr., M.E. Sherrill, C.J. Fontes, H.L. Zhang and P. Hakel, High Energy Density Physics 9, 369 (2013b).

  15. Volitional exaggeration of body size through fundamental and formant frequency modulation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Pisanski, Katarzyna; Mora, Emanuel C.; Pisanski, Annette; Reby, David; Sorokowski, Piotr; Frackowiak, Tomasz; Feinberg, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Several mammalian species scale their voice fundamental frequency (F0) and formant frequencies in competitive and mating contexts, reducing vocal tract and laryngeal allometry thereby exaggerating apparent body size. Although humans’ rare capacity to volitionally modulate these same frequencies is thought to subserve articulated speech, the potential function of voice frequency modulation in human nonverbal communication remains largely unexplored. Here, the voices of 167 men and women from Canada, Cuba, and Poland were recorded in a baseline condition and while volitionally imitating a physically small and large body size. Modulation of F0, formant spacing (∆F), and apparent vocal tract length (VTL) were measured using Praat. Our results indicate that men and women spontaneously and systemically increased VTL and decreased F0 to imitate a large body size, and reduced VTL and increased F0 to imitate small size. These voice modulations did not differ substantially across cultures, indicating potentially universal sound-size correspondences or anatomical and biomechanical constraints on voice modulation. In each culture, men generally modulated their voices (particularly formants) more than did women. This latter finding could help to explain sexual dimorphism in F0 and formants that is currently unaccounted for by sexual dimorphism in human vocal anatomy and body size. PMID:27687571

  16. Development of a frequency-modulated ultrasonic sensor inspired by bat echolocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepa, Krzysztof; Abaid, Nicole

    2015-03-01

    Bats have evolved to sense using ultrasonic signals with a variety of different frequency signatures which interact with their environment. Among these signals, those with time-varying frequencies may enable the animals to gather more complex information for obstacle avoidance and target tracking. Taking inspiration from this system, we present the development of a sonar sensor capable of generating frequency-modulated ultrasonic signals. The device is based on a miniature mobile computer, with on board data capture and processing capabilities, which is designed for eventual autonomous operation in a robotic swarm. The hardware and software components of the sensor are detailed, as well their integration. Preliminary results for target detection using both frequency-modulated and constant frequency signals are discussed.

  17. Frequency, amplitude, and phase measurements in contact resonance atomic force microscopies.

    PubMed

    Stan, Gheorghe; Solares, Santiago D

    2014-01-01

    The resonance frequency, amplitude, and phase response of the first two eigenmodes of two contact-resonance atomic force microscopy (CR-AFM) configurations, which differ in the method used to excite the system (cantilever base vs sample excitation), are analyzed in this work. Similarities and differences in the observables of the cantilever dynamics, as well as the different effect of the tip-sample contact properties on those observables in each configuration are discussed. Finally, the expected accuracy of CR-AFM using phase-locked loop detection is investigated and quantification of the typical errors incurred during measurements is provided.

  18. Trimming algorithm of frequency modulation for CIAE-230 MeV proton superconducting synchrocyclotron model cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengzhan; Zhang, Tianjue; Ji, Bin; Hou, Shigang; Guo, Juanjuan; Yin, Meng; Xing, Jiansheng; Lv, Yinlong; Guan, Fengping; Lin, Jun

    2017-01-01

    A new project, the 230 MeV proton superconducting synchrocyclotron for cancer therapy, was proposed at CIAE in 2013. A model cavity is designed to verify the frequency modulation trimming algorithm featuring a half-wave structure and eight sets of rotating blades for 1 kHz frequency modulation. Based on the electromagnetic (EM) field distribution analysis of the model cavity, the variable capacitor works as a function of time and the frequency can be written in Maclaurin series. Curve fitting is applied for theoretical frequency and original simulation frequency. The second-order fitting excels at the approximation given its minimum variance. Constant equivalent inductance is considered as an important condition in the calculation. The equivalent parameters of theoretical frequency can be achieved through this conversion. Then the trimming formula for rotor blade outer radius is found by discretization in time domain. Simulation verification has been performed and the results show that the calculation radius with minus 0.012 m yields an acceptable result. The trimming amendment in the time range of 0.328-0.4 ms helps to reduce the frequency error to 0.69% in Simulation C with an increment of 0.075 mm/0.001 ms, which is half of the error in Simulation A (constant radius in 0.328-0.4 ms). The verification confirms the feasibility of the trimming algorithm for synchrocyclotron frequency modulation.

  19. Superconducting radio-frequency modules test faciilty operating experience

    SciTech Connect

    Soyars, W.; Bossert, R.; Darve, C.; Degraff, B.; Klebaner, A.; Martinez, A.; Pei, L.; Theilacker, J.; /Fermilab

    2007-07-01

    Fermilab is heavily engaged and making strong technical contributions to the superconducting radio-frequency research and development program (SRF R&D). Four major SRF test areas are being constructed to enable vertical and horizontal cavity testing, as well as cryomodule testing. The existing Fermilab cryogenic infrastructure has been modified to service Fermilab SRF R&D needs. The first stage of the project has been successfully completed, which allows for distribution of cryogens for a single cavity cryomodule using the existing Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF) that houses three Tevatron satellite refrigerators. The cooling capacity available for cryomodule testing at MDB results from the liquefaction capacity of the CTF cryogenic system. The cryogenic system for a single 9-cell cryomodule is currently operational. The paper describes the status, challenges and operational experience of the initial phase of the project.

  20. Space-Charge Modulation in Vacuum Microdiodes at THz Frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersen, Andreas; Manolescu, Andrei; Valfells, Agust

    2010-04-30

    We investigate the dynamics of a space-charge limited, photoinjected, electron beam in a microscopic vacuum diode. Because of the small nature of the system it is possible to conduct high-resolution simulations where the number of simulated particles is equal to the number of electrons within the system. In a series of simulations of molecular dynamics type, where electrons are treated as point charges, we address and analyze space-charge effects in a micrometer-scale vacuum diode. We have been able to reproduce breakup of a single pulse injected with a current density beyond the Child-Langmuir limit, and we find that continuous injection of current into the diode gap results in a well-defined train of electron bunches corresponding to THz frequency. A simple analytical explanation of this behavior is given.

  1. Low-phase-noise frequency synthesizer for the trapped atom clock on a chip.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Martinez, Fernando; Lours, Michel; Rosenbusch, Peter; Reinhard, Friedemann; Reichel, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    We report on the realization of a 6.834-GHz synthesis chain for the trapped atom clock on a chip (TACC) that is being developed at LNE-SYRTE. The chain is based on the frequency multiplication of a 100-MHz reference signal to obtain a signal at 6.4 GHz. It uses a comb generator based on a monolithic GaAs nonlinear transmission line. This is a novelty in the fabrication of high-stability microwave synthesizers. Measurements give a low flicker phase noise of -85 dBrad(2)/Hz at 1-Hz offset frequency and a white phase noise floor < -115 dBrad(2)/Hz. Based on these results, we estimate that the performance of the synthesizer is at least one order of magnitude better than the stability goal of TACC. This ensures that the synthesizer will not be limiting the clock performance.

  2. Modulation of electrical potential and conductivity in an atomic-layer semiconductor heterojunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yu; Yoshida, Shoji; Sakurada, Ryuji; Takashima, Kengo; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Saito, Tetsuki; Konabe, Satoru; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Maniwa, Yutaka; Takeuchi, Osamu; Shigekawa, Hidemi; Miyata, Yasumitsu

    2016-08-01

    Semiconductor heterojunction interfaces have been an important topic, both in modern solid state physics and in electronics and optoelectronics applications. Recently, the heterojunctions of atomically-thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) are expected to realize one-dimensional (1D) electronic systems at their heterointerfaces due to their tunable electronic properties. Herein, we report unique conductivity enhancement and electrical potential modulation of heterojunction interfaces based on TMDC bilayers consisted of MoS2 and WS2. Scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy analyses showed the formation of 1D confining potential (potential barrier) in the valence (conduction) band, as well as bandgap narrowing around the heterointerface. The modulation of electronic properties were also probed as the increase of current in conducting atomic force microscopy. Notably, the observed band bending can be explained by the presence of 1D fixed charges around the heterointerface. The present findings indicate that the atomic layer heterojunctions provide a novel approach to realizing tunable 1D electrical potential for embedded quantum wires and ultrashort barriers of electrical transport.

  3. Modulation of electrical potential and conductivity in an atomic-layer semiconductor heterojunction

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Yu; Yoshida, Shoji; Sakurada, Ryuji; Takashima, Kengo; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Saito, Tetsuki; Konabe, Satoru; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Maniwa, Yutaka; Takeuchi, Osamu; Shigekawa, Hidemi; Miyata, Yasumitsu

    2016-01-01

    Semiconductor heterojunction interfaces have been an important topic, both in modern solid state physics and in electronics and optoelectronics applications. Recently, the heterojunctions of atomically-thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) are expected to realize one-dimensional (1D) electronic systems at their heterointerfaces due to their tunable electronic properties. Herein, we report unique conductivity enhancement and electrical potential modulation of heterojunction interfaces based on TMDC bilayers consisted of MoS2 and WS2. Scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy analyses showed the formation of 1D confining potential (potential barrier) in the valence (conduction) band, as well as bandgap narrowing around the heterointerface. The modulation of electronic properties were also probed as the increase of current in conducting atomic force microscopy. Notably, the observed band bending can be explained by the presence of 1D fixed charges around the heterointerface. The present findings indicate that the atomic layer heterojunctions provide a novel approach to realizing tunable 1D electrical potential for embedded quantum wires and ultrashort barriers of electrical transport. PMID:27515115

  4. High-speed switching of biphoton delays through electro-optic pump frequency modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odele, Ogaga D.; Lukens, Joseph M.; Jaramillo-Villegas, Jose A.; Imany, Poolad; Langrock, Carsten; Fejer, Martin M.; Leaird, Daniel E.; Weiner, Andrew M.

    2017-01-01

    The realization of high-speed tunable delay control has received significant attention in the scene of classical photonics. In quantum optics, however, such rapid delay control systems for entangled photons have remained undeveloped. Here for the first time, we demonstrate rapid (2.5 MHz) modulation of signal-idler arrival times through electro-optic pump frequency modulation. Our technique applies the quantum phenomenon of nonlocal dispersion cancellation along with pump frequency tuning to control the relative delay between photon pairs. Chirped fiber Bragg gratings are employed to provide large amounts of dispersion which result in biphoton delays exceeding 30 ns. This rapid delay modulation scheme could be useful for on-demand single-photon distribution in addition to quantum versions of pulse position modulation.

  5. Photonic generation of versatile frequency-doubled microwave waveforms via a dual-polarization modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zihang; Zhao, Shanghong; Li, Xuan; Qu, Kun; Lin, Tao

    2017-02-01

    We report a photonic approach to generate frequency-doubled microwave waveforms using an integrated electro-optic dual-polarization modulator driven by a sinusoidal radio frequency (RF) signal. With active bias control, two MZMs of the dual-polarization modulator operate at minimum transmission points, a triangular waveform can be generated by a parameter setting of modulation index. After introducing a broadband 90° microwave phase shifter, a square waveform can be obtained by readjusting the power relationship of harmonics. The proposal is first theoretically analyzed and then validated by simulation. Simulation results show that a 10 GHz triangular and square waveform sequences are successfully generated from a 5 GHz sinusoidal RF drive signal, and the performance of the microwave waveforms are not influenced by the finite extinction ratio of modulator.

  6. Composition-Modulated Two-Dimensional Semiconductor Lateral Heterostructures via Layer-Selected Atomic Substitution.

    PubMed

    Li, Honglai; Wu, Xueping; Liu, Hongjun; Zheng, Biyuan; Zhang, Qinglin; Zhu, Xiaoli; Wei, Zheng; Zhuang, Xiujuan; Zhou, Hong; Tang, Wenxin; Duan, Xiangfeng; Pan, Anlian

    2017-01-24

    Composition-controlled growth of two-dimensional layered semiconductor heterostructures is crucially important for their applications in multifunctional integrated photonics and optoelectronics devices. Here, we report the realization of composition completely modulated layered semiconductor MoS2-MoS2(1-x)Se2x (0 < x < 1) lateral heterostructures via the controlled layer-selected atomic substitution of pregrown stacking MoS2, with a bilayer located at the center of a monolayer. Through controlling the reaction time, S at the monolayer MoS2 at the peripheral area can be selectively substituted by Se atoms at different levels, while the bilayer region at the center retains the original composition. Microstructure characterizations demonstrated the formation of lateral heterostructures with a sharp interface, with the composition at the monolayer area gradually modulated from MoS2 to MoSe2 and having high-quality crystallization at both the monolayer and the bilayer areas. Photoluminescence and Raman mapping studies exhibit the tunable optical properties only at the monolayer region of the as-grown heterostructures, which further demonstrates the realization of high-quality composition/bandgap modulated lateral heterostructures. This work offers an interesting and easy route for the development of high-quality layered semiconductor heterostructures for potential broad applications in integrated nanoelectronic and optoelectronic devices.

  7. Polarisation response of delay dependent absorption modulation in strong field dressed helium atoms probed near threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, E. R.; Sanchez-Gonzalez, A.; Austin, D. R.; Diveki, Z.; Hutchinson, S. E. E.; Siegel, T.; Ruberti, M.; Averbukh, V.; Miseikis, L.; Strüber, C. S.; Chipperfield, L.; Marangos, J. P.

    2016-08-01

    We present the first measurement of the vectorial response of strongly dressed helium atoms probed by an attosecond pulse train (APT) polarised either parallel or perpendicular to the dressing field polarisation. The transient absorption is probed as a function of delay between the APT and the linearly polarised 800 nm field of peak intensity 1.3× {10}14 {{W}} {{cm}}-2. The APT spans the photon energy range 16-42 eV, covering the first ionisation energy of helium (24.59 eV). With parallel polarised dressing and probing fields, we observe modulations with periods of one half and one quarter of the dressing field period. When the polarisation of the dressing field is altered from parallel to perpendicular with respect to the APT polarisation we observe a large suppression in the modulation depth of the above ionisation threshold absorption. In addition to this we present the intensity dependence of the harmonic modulation depth as a function of delay between the dressing and probe fields, with dressing field peak intensities ranging from 2 × 1012 to 2 × 1014 {{W}} {{cm}}-2. We compare our experimental results with a full-dimensional solution of the single-atom time-dependent (TD) Schrödinger equation obtained using the recently developed abinitio TD B-spline ADC method and find good qualitative agreement for the above threshold harmonics.

  8. [Pain relief by low-intensity frequency-modulated millimeter waves acting on the acupuncture points].

    PubMed

    Samosiuk, I Z; Kulikovich, Iu N; Tamarova, Z A; Samosiuk, N I; Kazhanova, A K

    2000-01-01

    Analgetic effect of low-intensive frequency-modulated millimetric waves (MW) was studied in mice with formalin induced nociceptive behavior reaction (licking of defeat hindpaw). MW were applied to the acupoint E 36 of the defeat hindpaw. The following MW were used: 60 GHz (1) and 118 GHz (2) which were modulated by 4 Hz; noise MW within the range of 42-95 GHz (3) and 90-140 GHz (4) which were modulated in accidental order by frequencies 1-60 Hz; combinations of fixed frequencies with noise - 60 GHz + noise 42-95 GHz (5) and 118 GHz + noise 90-140 GHz (6). All used MW combinations suppressed licking of the defeat hindpaw and increased duration of sleep and eating. The strongest analgesia was achieved in series 1-3 (42.4-69.7%), the weakest in series 6 and 4 of the experiment (12.2-19.7%).

  9. Performance analysis of the dual-parallel polarization modulator based optical single-sideband modulator/frequency shifter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaofan; Li, Jianping; Li, Zhaohui

    2016-06-01

    The performance of the dual-parallel polarization modulator based optical single-sideband modulator (PSSBM) or frequency shifter (FS) has been studied theoretically. There are various factors impacting the performance of PSSBM/FS, such as the state of polarization (SOP), imbalanced power ratio, and direct current (dc) bias control, and they all have been validated through the VPI software. Based on our simulation results, the desired high-quality SSB frequency shift can be achieved through the PSSBM/FS by applying the optimized parameters while only one dc bias control is required. The results show that PSSBM/FS has the advantages and potentiality to be a commercial product used in various scenarios.

  10. Low frequency gravitational wave detection with ground-based atom interferometer arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaibi, W.; Geiger, R.; Canuel, B.; Bertoldi, A.; Landragin, A.; Bouyer, P.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new detection strategy for gravitational waves (GWs) below a few hertz based on a correlated array of atom interferometers (AIs). Our proposal allows us to reduce the Newtonian noise (NN), which limits all ground based GW detectors below a few hertz, including previous atom interferometry-based concepts. Using an array of long baseline AI gradiometers yields several estimations of the NN, whose effect can thus be reduced via statistical averaging. Considering the km baseline of current optical detectors, a NN rejection of a factor of 2 could be achieved and tested with existing AI array geometries. Exploiting the correlation properties of the gravity acceleration noise, we show that a tenfold or more NN rejection is possible with a dedicated configuration. Considering a conservative NN model and the current developments in cold atom technology, we show that strain sensitivities below 1 ×10-19/√{Hz } in the 0.3 -3 Hz frequency band can be within reach, with a peak sensitivity of 3 ×10-23/√{Hz } at 2 Hz . Our proposed configuration could extend the observation window of current detectors by a decade and fill the gap between ground-based and space-based instruments.

  11. Contactless nondestructive measurement of bulk and surface recombination using frequency-modulated free carrier absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanii, F.; Giles, F. P.; Schwartz, R. J.; Gray, J. L.

    1992-03-01

    A measurement procedure is described which allows the contactless measurement of bulk lifetime and surface recombination. The procedure uses the the free-carrier absorption of a long-wavelength laser beam by a modulated free-carrier wave to measure and separate the bulk recombination from the surface recombination. The dependence of the absorption on the modulation frequency is used to accomplish the separation. Limitations of the technique are also discussed.

  12. Compensation for nonlinear effects in an optical orthogonal frequency-division multiplexed signal using adaptive modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skidin, A. S.; Sidelnikov, O. S.; Fedoruk, M. P.

    2016-12-01

    We study the influence of nonlinear effects on symbol error statistics when a 16-QAM orthogonal frequency-division multiplexed signal is transmitted in a 1000 {\\text{km}} length of fibre. A technique of adaptive modulation is proposed for generating signals that are resistant to nonlinear distortions. A considerable improvement of the transmission quality is shown to take effect in using an adaptive modulation scheme.

  13. Slow light enhanced atomic frequency comb quantum memories in photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chenzhi; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Yidong; Peng, Jiangde

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a slow light-enhanced quantum memory with high efficiency based on atomic frequency comb (AFC) in ion-doped photonic crystal waveguide (PCW). The performance of the quantum memory is investigated theoretically, considering the impact of the signal bandwidth. Both the forward and backward retrieval schemes are analyzed. In the forward retrieval scheme, the analysis shows that a moderate slow light effect can improve the retrieval efficiency to above 50% with very high fidelity, even when the intrinsic optical depth is very low and the signal bandwidth is comparable with the AFC bandwidth. In the backward retrieval scheme, retrieval efficiency larger than 90% can be obtained and fidelity can remain above 90% for signal with bandwidth much narrower than AFC bandwidth, when moderate slow light is introduced into waveguide with low intrinsic optical depth. Although the phase mismatching effect limits the slow light enhancement on retrieval efficiency and decreases the fidelity for signal with bandwidth approaching AFC bandwidth, we design a modified atomic frequency comb structure (MAFC) based on which a moderate slow light can make the retrieval efficiency larger than 85% and keep the fidelity above 80%. Our calculations show that the proposed scheme provides a promising way to realize high efficiency on-chip quantum memory.

  14. Pain modulation induced by respiration: phase and frequency effects.

    PubMed

    Arsenault, Marianne; Ladouceur, Alexandra; Lehmann, Alexandre; Rainville, Pierre; Piché, Mathieu

    2013-11-12

    The voluntary control of respiration is used as a common means to regulate pain and emotions and is fundamental to various relaxation and meditation techniques. The aim of the present study was to examine how breathing frequency and phase affect pain perception, spinal nociceptive activity (RIII-reflex) and brain activity (scalp somatosensory-evoked potentials - SEP's). In 20 healthy volunteers, painful electric shocks individually adjusted to 120% of the RIII-reflex threshold were delivered to the sural nerve near the end of inspiration or expiration phases, during three cued-breathing conditions: (1) slow breathing (0.1 Hz) with slow (4s) inspiration (0.1Hz-SlowIns), (2) slow breathing (0.1 Hz) with fast (2s) inspiration (0.1 Hz-FastIns), and (3) normal breathing (0.2 Hz) with fast (2s) inspiration (0.2 Hz). Pain ratings were not affected by breathing patterns (p=0.3), but were significantly lower during inspiration compared with expiration (p=0.02). This phase effect was also observed on the N100 component of SEP's, but only in the 0.1-Hz-FastIns condition (p=0.03). In contrast, RIII-reflex amplitude was greater during inspiration compared with expiration (p=0.02). It was also decreased in the 0.1-Hz-SlowIns compared with the 0.2-Hz condition (p=0.01). Slow breathing also increased the amplitude of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), although these changes were not significantly associated with changes in pain responses. In conclusion, this study shows that pain and pain-related brain activity may be reduced during inspiration but these changes are dissociated from spinal nociceptive transmission. The small amplitude of these effects suggests that factors other than respiration contribute to the analgesic effects of relaxation and meditation techniques.

  15. Carrier-interference ratios for frequency sharing between frequency-modulated amplitude-modulated-vestigial-sideband television systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, S. P.; Miller, E. F.

    1978-01-01

    For just perceptible interference, an FM television signal interfering with another FM television signal must have an average signal power that is 26 to 37 db less than the wanted signal power. For an AM-VSB television signal interfering with an FM television signal, the AM-VSB television's sync peak average power must be 18 to 31 db below the FM television signal's average power. Also, when an FM television signal interferes with an AM-VSB signal, the average signal power of the FM signal should be 56 to 59 db below the sync peak average power of the AM-VSB television signal. The range of power ratios occur as a result of different TV scenes used in the tests and different FM-signal frequency deviations used. All tests were performed using 525 line, system M, color-television signals.

  16. Optical properties assessment for liquid phantoms using fiber based frequency-modulated light scattering interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Liang; Somesfalean, Gabriel; Svanberg, Sune

    2014-03-01

    Fiber based frequency-modulated light scattering interferometry (FMLSI) is developed for optical properties studies of liquid phantoms, made of Intralipid®. By employing optical frequency modulation on a tunable diode laser, the power spectrum of the heterodyne-detected intensity fluctuations through the dynamic turbid medium is a combination of the time-of-flight distribution and the Doppler power spectrum due to the movement of the scattering particles. The reduced scattering coefficient, absorption coefficient and Brownian diffusion constant are retrieved by employing nonlinear fitting to the power spectrum based on diffusion theory.

  17. Continued analysis of optical frequency-modulated continuous-wave interference.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jesse

    2005-02-10

    I continue to analyze systematically the theory of optical frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) interference. Two special cases, multiple-beam optical FMCW interference and multiple-wavelength optical FMCW interference, are discussed in detail. Multiple-beam optical FMCW interference generates a signal with multiple frequencies because of mutual interference among the waves. Multiple-wavelength optical FMCW interference produces a signal whose amplitude is modulated by a synthetic wave. The applications of both types of optical FMCW interference are also discussed.

  18. Single-Bit All Digital Frequency Synthesis Using Homodyne Sigma-Delta Modulation.

    PubMed

    Sotiriadis, Paul

    2016-10-05

    All-digital frequency synthesis using band-pass sigma-delta modulation to achieve spectrally clean single-bit output is presented and mathematically analyzed resulting in a complete model to predict stability and output spectrum. The quadrature homodyne filter architecture is introduced resulting in efficient implementations of carrier-frequency centred bandpass filters for the modulator. A multiplier-less version of the quadrature homodyne filter architecture is also introduced to reduce complexity maintaining clean in-band spectrum. MATLAB and SIMULINK simulation results present the potential capabilities of the synthesizer architectures and validate the accuracy of the developed theoretical framework.

  19. Tip radius preservation for high resolution imaging in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos, Jorge R.

    2014-07-28

    The acquisition of high resolution images in atomic force microscopy (AFM) is correlated to the cantilever's tip shape, size, and imaging conditions. In this work, relative tip wear is quantified based on the evolution of a direct experimental observable in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy, i.e., the critical amplitude. We further show that the scanning parameters required to guarantee a maximum compressive stress that is lower than the yield/fracture stress of the tip can be estimated via experimental observables. In both counts, the optimized parameters to acquire AFM images while preserving the tip are discussed. The results are validated experimentally by employing IgG antibodies as a model system.

  20. Magnetoreception in the wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus): influence of weak frequency-modulated radio frequency fields

    PubMed Central

    Malkemper, E. Pascal; Eder, Stephan H. K.; Begall, Sabine; Phillips, John B.; Winklhofer, Michael; Hart, Vlastimil; Burda, Hynek

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian magnetic sense is predominantly studied in species with reduced vision such as mole-rats and bats. Far less is known about surface-dwelling (epigeic) rodents with well-developed eyes. Here, we tested the wood mouse Apodemus sylvaticus for magnetoreception using a simple behavioural assay in which mice are allowed to build nests overnight in a visually symmetrical, circular arena. The tests were performed in the ambient magnetic field or in a field rotated by 90°. When plotted with respect to magnetic north, the nests were bimodally clustered in the northern and southern sectors, clearly indicating that the animals used magnetic cues. Additionally, mice were tested in the ambient magnetic field with a superimposed radio frequency magnetic field of the order of 100 nT. Wood mice exposed to a 0.9 to 5 MHz frequency sweep changed their preference from north-south to east-west. In contrast to birds, however, a constant frequency field tuned to the Larmor frequency (1.33 MHz) had no effect on mouse orientation. In sum, we demonstrated magnetoreception in wood mice and provide first evidence for a radical-pair mechanism in a mammal. PMID:25923312

  1. Dissociable Neural Response Signatures for Slow Amplitude and Frequency Modulation in Human Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Molly J.; Obleser, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    Natural auditory stimuli are characterized by slow fluctuations in amplitude and frequency. However, the degree to which the neural responses to slow amplitude modulation (AM) and frequency modulation (FM) are capable of conveying independent time-varying information, particularly with respect to speech communication, is unclear. In the current electroencephalography (EEG) study, participants listened to amplitude- and frequency-modulated narrow-band noises with a 3-Hz modulation rate, and the resulting neural responses were compared. Spectral analyses revealed similar spectral amplitude peaks for AM and FM at the stimulation frequency (3 Hz), but amplitude at the second harmonic frequency (6 Hz) was much higher for FM than for AM. Moreover, the phase delay of neural responses with respect to the full-band stimulus envelope was shorter for FM than for AM. Finally, the critical analysis involved classification of single trials as being in response to either AM or FM based on either phase or amplitude information. Time-varying phase, but not amplitude, was sufficient to accurately classify AM and FM stimuli based on single-trial neural responses. Taken together, the current results support the dissociable nature of cortical signatures of slow AM and FM. These cortical signatures potentially provide an efficient means to dissect simultaneously communicated slow temporal and spectral information in acoustic communication signals. PMID:24205309

  2. Populations of striatal medium spiny neurons encode vibrotactile frequency in rats: modulation by slow wave oscillations.

    PubMed

    Hawking, Thomas G; Gerdjikov, Todor V

    2013-01-01

    Dorsolateral striatum (DLS) is implicated in tactile perception and receives strong projections from somatosensory cortex. However, the sensory representations encoded by striatal projection neurons are not well understood. Here we characterized the contribution of DLS to the encoding of vibrotactile information in rats by assessing striatal responses to precise frequency stimuli delivered to a single vibrissa. We applied stimuli in a frequency range (45-90 Hz) that evokes discriminable percepts and carries most of the power of vibrissa vibration elicited by a range of complex fine textures. Both medium spiny neurons and evoked potentials showed tactile responses that were modulated by slow wave oscillations. Furthermore, medium spiny neuron population responses represented stimulus frequency on par with previously reported behavioral benchmarks. Our results suggest that striatum encodes frequency information of vibrotactile stimuli which is dynamically modulated by ongoing brain state.

  3. A disadvantage in bilingual sentence production modulated by syntactic frequency and similarity across languages

    PubMed Central

    Runnqvist, Elin; Gollan, Tamar H.; Costa, Albert; Ferreira, Victor S.

    2014-01-01

    Bilingual speakers access individual words less fluently, quickly, and accurately than monolinguals, particularly when accessing low-frequency words. Here we examined whether the bilingual speech production disadvantage would (a) extend to full sentences above and beyond single word retrieval and whether it would be modulated by (b) structural frequency and (c) syntactic properties of the bilingual speakers’ other language. English monolinguals, Spanish-English bilinguals and Mandarin-English bilinguals were tested in a sentence production task conducted exclusively in English. Response times were modulated by bilingualism, structural frequency, and structural similarity across the bilingual speakers’ two languages. These results refine our knowledge regarding the scope of the bilingual disadvantage, demonstrate that frequency effects apply to syntactic structures, and also suggest that syntax is partially shared across bilinguals’ two languages. PMID:23948209

  4. Measurements of ocean wave spectra and modulation transfer function with the airborne two frequency scatterometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, D. E.; Johnson, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    The directional spectrum and the microwave modulation transfer function of ocean waves can be measured with the airborne two frequency scatterometer technique. Similar to tower based observations, the aircraft measurements of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) show that it is strongly affected by both wind speed and sea state. Also detected are small differences in the magnitudes of the MTF between downwind and upwind radar look directions, and variations with ocean wavenumber. The MTF inferred from the two frequency radar is larger than that measured using single frequency, wave orbital velocity techniques such as tower based radars or ROWS measurements from low altitude aircraft. Possible reasons for this are discussed. The ability to measure the ocean directional spectrum with the two frequency scatterometer, with supporting MTF data, is demonstrated.

  5. Demodulation effect is observed in neurones by exposure to low frequency modulated microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Bruzón, R. N.; Figols, T.; Azanza, M. J.; del Moral, A.

    2010-01-01

    Neurones exposure to a microwave (carrier fc=13.6 GHz; power P simeq 5 mW; Ho simeq 0.10 Am-1 = 1.25 mOe; E0 simeq 3.5 V/m; ΔT simeq 0.01°C SAR: 3.1×10-3 - 5.8×10-3 W/Kg) EMF amplitude modulated by ELF-AC field (frequency, fm= 0-100 Hz) shows no electrophysiological effect under the carrier MF alone, but "frequency resonances: at 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, 50, 100 Hz: demodulation effect. Resonances appear when applied ELF-MF is close to a dominant characteristic frequency of the neurone impulse Fourier spectrum. This is an interesting result considering that ELF-MF modulating RF or MW in the range of human EEG could induce frequency-resonant effects on exposed human brain.

  6. Multilevel Concatenated Block Modulation Codes for the Frequency Non-selective Rayleigh Fading Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Shu; Rhee, Dojun

    1996-01-01

    This paper is concerned with construction of multilevel concatenated block modulation codes using a multi-level concatenation scheme for the frequency non-selective Rayleigh fading channel. In the construction of multilevel concatenated modulation code, block modulation codes are used as the inner codes. Various types of codes (block or convolutional, binary or nonbinary) are being considered as the outer codes. In particular, we focus on the special case for which Reed-Solomon (RS) codes are used as the outer codes. For this special case, a systematic algebraic technique for constructing q-level concatenated block modulation codes is proposed. Codes have been constructed for certain specific values of q and compared with the single-level concatenated block modulation codes using the same inner codes. A multilevel closest coset decoding scheme for these codes is proposed.

  7. Effect of echolocation behavior-related constant frequency-frequency modulation sound on the frequency tuning of inferior collicular neurons in Hipposideros armiger.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jia; Fu, Zi-Ying; Wei, Chen-Xue; Chen, Qi-Cai

    2015-08-01

    In constant frequency-frequency modulation (CF-FM) bats, the CF-FM echolocation signals include both CF and FM components, yet the role of such complex acoustic signals in frequency resolution by bats remains unknown. Using CF and CF-FM echolocation signals as acoustic stimuli, the responses of inferior collicular (IC) neurons of Hipposideros armiger were obtained by extracellular recordings. We tested the effect of preceding CF or CF-FM sounds on the shape of the frequency tuning curves (FTCs) of IC neurons. Results showed that both CF-FM and CF sounds reduced the number of FTCs with tailed lower-frequency-side of IC neurons. However, more IC neurons experienced such conversion after adding CF-FM sound compared with CF sound. We also found that the Q 20 value of the FTC of IC neurons experienced the largest increase with the addition of CF-FM sound. Moreover, only CF-FM sound could cause an increase in the slope of the neurons' FTCs, and such increase occurred mainly in the lower-frequency edge. These results suggested that CF-FM sound could increase the accuracy of frequency analysis of echo and cut-off low-frequency elements from the habitat of bats more than CF sound.

  8. Phase-modulation method for AWG phase-error measurement in the frequency domain.

    PubMed

    Takada, Kazumasa; Hirose, Tomohiro

    2009-12-15

    We report a phase-modulation method for measuring arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) phase error in the frequency domain. By combining the method with a digital sampling technique that we have already reported, we can measure the phase error within an accuracy of +/-0.055 rad for the center 90% waveguides in the array even when no carrier frequencies are generated in the beat signal from the interferometer.

  9. Linear, Low Noise Microwave Photonic Systems using Phase and Frequency Modulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-11

    12 2.3 History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 2.4 Analytical link...Transmission Offset Frequency From Carrier Phase Offset Frequency From Carrier A B A B A B Filter A Filter B 2.3 History The work of Harris, [40], was...Available: http://link.aip.org/link/?APL/2/47/1&Agg=doi [41] S. Saito and T. Kimura, “Demodulation of phase-modulated optical maser beam by autocorrelation

  10. Local impedance measurement of an electrode/single-pentacene-grain interface by frequency-modulation scanning impedance microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Tomoharu; Yamada, Hirofumi; Kobayashi, Kei

    2015-08-07

    The device performances of organic thin film transistors are often limited by the metal–organic interface because of the disordered molecular layers at the interface and the energy barriers against the carrier injection. It is important to study the local impedance at the interface without being affected by the interface morphology. We combined frequency modulation atomic force microscopy with scanning impedance microscopy (SIM) to sensitively measure the ac responses of the interface to an ac voltage applied across the interface and the dc potential drop at the interface. By using the frequency-modulation SIM (FM-SIM) technique, we characterized the interface impedance of a Pt electrode and a single pentacene grain as a parallel circuit of a contact resistance and a capacitance. We found that the reduction of the contact resistance was caused by the reduction of the energy level mismatch at the interface by the FM-SIM measurements, demonstrating the usefulness of the FM-SIM technique for investigation of the local interface impedance without being affected by its morphology.

  11. Stabilisation of a fibre frequency synthesiser using acousto-optical and electro-optical modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koliada, N. A.; Nyushkov, B. N.; Pivtsov, V. S.; Dychkov, A. S.; Farnosov, S. A.; Denisov, V. I.; Bagayev, S. N.

    2016-12-01

    A fibre-optic frequency synthesiser is developed that is stabilised to the optical frequency standard based on molecular iodine ({\\text{Nd : YAG/I}}2). The possibility of transferring stability of the optical frequency standard to other optical frequencies in the IR range 1 - 2 \\unicode{956}{\\text{m}} and to the RF range by using synthesiser phase-locked loops (PLLs) with acousto-optical and electro-optical modulators is experimentally demonstrated. The additive instability introduced into the optical frequency comb of the synthesiser (which arises due to PLL residual random errors) is several orders less than the intrinsic instability of the reference optical frequency standard employed (i.e., is noticeably less than 1 × 10-13 for 1 {\\text{s}} and 5 × 10-15 for 1000 {\\text{s}}).

  12. Analytical application of 2f-wavelength modulation for isotope selective diode laser graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wizemann, H D

    2000-01-01

    Experiences in the analytical application of the 2f-wavelength modulation technique for isotope selective atomic absorption spectroscopy in a graphite furnace are reported. Experimental as well as calculated results are presented, mainly for the natural lithium isotopes. Sensitivity, linearity, and (isotope) selectivity are studied by intensity modulation and wavelength modulation. High selectivities can be attained, however, on the cost of detection power. It is shown that the method enables the measurement of lithium isotope ratios larger than 2000 by absorption in a low-pressure graphite tube atomizer.

  13. Frequency control of tunable lasers using a frequency-calibrated λ-meter in an experiment on preparation of Rydberg atoms in a magneto-optical trap

    SciTech Connect

    Saakyan, S A; Vilshanskaya, E V; Zelener, B B; Zelener, B V; Sautenkov, V A; Vasiliev, V V

    2015-09-30

    A new technique is proposed and applied to study the frequency drift of an external-cavity semiconductor laser, locked to the transmission resonances of a thermally stabilised Fabry–Perot interferometer. The interferometer frequency drift is measured to be less than 2 MHz h{sup -1}. The laser frequency is measured using an Angstrom wavemeter, calibrated using an additional stabilised laser. It is shown that this system of laser frequency control can be used to identify Rydberg transitions in ultracold {sup 7}Li atoms. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  14. Push-pull laser-atomic oscillator.

    PubMed

    Jau, Y-Y; Happer, W

    2007-11-30

    A vapor of alkali-metal atoms in the external cavity of a semiconductor laser, pumped with a time-independent injection current, can cause the laser to self-modulate at the "field-independent 0-0 frequency" of the atoms. Push-pull optical pumping by the modulated light drives most of the atoms into a coherent superposition of the two atomic sublevels with an azimuthal quantum number m=0. The atoms modulate the optical loss of the cavity at the sharply defined 0-0 hyperfine frequency. As in a maser, the system is not driven by an external source of microwaves, but a very stable microwave signal can be recovered from the modulated light or from the modulated voltage drop across the laser diode. Potential applications for this new phenomenon include atomic clocks, the production of long-lived coherent atomic states, and the generation of coherent optical combs.

  15. Push-Pull Laser-Atomic Oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Jau, Y.-Y.; Happer, W.

    2007-11-30

    A vapor of alkali-metal atoms in the external cavity of a semiconductor laser, pumped with a time-independent injection current, can cause the laser to self-modulate at the 'field-independent 0-0 frequency' of the atoms. Push-pull optical pumping by the modulated light drives most of the atoms into a coherent superposition of the two atomic sublevels with an azimuthal quantum number m=0. The atoms modulate the optical loss of the cavity at the sharply defined 0-0 hyperfine frequency. As in a maser, the system is not driven by an external source of microwaves, but a very stable microwave signal can be recovered from the modulated light or from the modulated voltage drop across the laser diode. Potential applications for this new phenomenon include atomic clocks, the production of long-lived coherent atomic states, and the generation of coherent optical combs.

  16. Chip Scale Atomic Resonator Frequency Stabilization System With Ultra-Low Power Consumption for Optoelectronic Oscillators.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianye; Zhang, Yaolin; Lu, Haoyuan; Hou, Dong; Zhang, Shuangyou; Wang, Zhong

    2016-07-01

    We present a long-term chip scale stabilization scheme for optoelectronic oscillators (OEOs) based on a rubidium coherent population trapping (CPT) atomic resonator. By locking a single mode of an OEO to the (85)Rb 3.035-GHz CPT resonance utilizing an improved phase-locked loop (PLL) with a PID regulator, we achieved a chip scale frequency stabilization system for the OEO. The fractional frequency stability of the stabilized OEO by overlapping Allan deviation reaches 6.2 ×10(-11) (1 s) and  ∼ 1.45 ×10 (-11) (1000 s). This scheme avoids a decrease in the extra phase noise performance induced by the electronic connection between the OEO and the microwave reference in common injection locking schemes. The total physical package of the stabilization system is [Formula: see text] and the total power consumption is 400 mW, which provides a chip scale and portable frequency stabilization approach with ultra-low power consumption for OEOs.

  17. Influences of impedance matching network on pulse-modulated radio frequency atmospheric pressure glow discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Huo, W. G.; Xu, K.; Sun, B.; Ding, Z. F.

    2012-08-15

    Pulse-modulated RF atmospheric pressure glow discharges (APDGs) were investigated in recent years to reduce the thermal accumulation and extend the operation region of the stable alpha glow mode. Different pulse-modulated voltage and current waveforms were acquired in previous experiments, but no attention was paid to the interpretation. We investigated this issue and associated phenomenon via positive and negative feedback effects derived from varying the series capacitor in the inversely L-shaped matching network used in our pulse-modulated RF APGD source. The evolutions of pulse-modulated RF waveforms were found to be associated with the feedback region and the pulsed plasma absorbed RF power. In the positive feedback region, pulse-modulated RF APGDs are relatively stable. In the negative feedback region, wide spikes as well as undershoots occur in RF voltage and current waveforms and the plasma absorbed RF power. In case of a high RF power discharge with a low modulation frequency, the pulse-modulated RF APGD is extinguished and re-ignited due to the enhanced undershoot during the initial pulse phase. The pulse-modulated RF APGD can transit from positive to negative feedback region in a range of series capacitance. Experimental results are discussed by the aid of equivalent circuit, negative and positive feedback effects.

  18. Interaction of frequency-modulated light beams in multistage parametric amplifiers at the maximum gain bandwidth

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasov, Sergei N; Koposova, E V; Freidman, Gennadii I

    2009-05-31

    Conditions of the applicability of equations in the quasi-static approximation for studying the parametric interaction of frequency-modulated light beams in multistage amplifiers are considered. This approximation is used to simulate numerically processes in a multistage DKDP crystal amplifier with the output power exceeding 10 PW and suppressed luminescence. (lasers and amplifiers)

  19. High flatness optical frequency comb generator based on the chirping of modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Kun; Zhao, Shanghong; Liang, Dan Ya; Zhu, Zihang; Dong, Chen; Li, Xuan

    2016-06-01

    A novel scheme for generation of an optical frequency comb (OFC) based on the chirping of two cascaded modulators is proposed. The first modulator is a dual-electrode Mach-Zehnder modulator (MZM), while the other modulator is an integrated MZM composed of two parallel MZMs that increases the number of comb lines. Our modified scheme can generate a large number of frequency lines with excellent flatness by simply modifying the chirp factor, and it is shown that up to 54 frequency lines could be observed. Theoretical analysis and simulation results show that under the variety of conditions that can be used in this scheme, the power fluctuations of the OFC lines are less than 0.5 dB in all cases; these results demonstrate the robustness of our scheme and verify its good accuracy and high stability with perfect flatness. Additionally, our modified scheme has the merit of tunable frequency spacing, which is practical for experimental realization of the OFC.

  20. Impedance modulation and feedback corrections in tracking targets of variable size and frequency.

    PubMed

    Selen, Luc P J; van Dieën, Jaap H; Beek, Peter J

    2006-11-01

    Humans are able to adjust the accuracy of their movements to the demands posed by the task at hand. The variability in task execution caused by the inherent noisiness of the neuromuscular system can be tuned to task demands by both feedforward (e.g., impedance modulation) and feedback mechanisms. In this experiment, we studied both mechanisms, using mechanical perturbations to estimate stiffness and damping as indices of impedance modulation and submovement scaling as an index of feedback driven corrections. Eight subjects tracked three differently sized targets (0.0135, 0.0270, and 0.0405 rad) moving at three different frequencies (0.20, 0.25, and 0.33 Hz). Movement variability decreased with both decreasing target size and movement frequency, whereas stiffness and damping increased with decreasing target size, independent of movement frequency. These results are consistent with the theory that mechanical impedance acts as a filter of noisy neuromuscular signals but challenge stochastic theories of motor control that do not account for impedance modulation and only partially for feedback control. Submovements during unperturbed cycles were quantified in terms of their gain, i.e., the slope between their duration and amplitude in the speed profile. Submovement gain decreased with decreasing movement frequency and increasing target size. The results were interpreted to imply that submovement gain is related to observed tracking errors and that those tracking errors are expressed in units of target size. We conclude that impedance and submovement gain modulation contribute additively to tracking accuracy.

  1. Broadcasting Stations of the World; Part II. Amplitude Modulation Broadcasting Stations According to Frequency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foreign Broadcast Information Service, Washington, DC.

    This second part of "Broadcasting Stations of the World", which lists all reported radio broadcasting and television stations with the exception of those in the United States which broadcast on domestic channels, covers amplitude modulation broadcasting stations according to frequency in ascending order. Information included covers call letters,…

  2. Broadcasting Stations of the World; Part III. Frequency Modulation Broadcasting Stations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foreign Broadcast Information Service, Washington, DC.

    This third part of "Broadcasting Stations of the World", which lists all reported radio broadcasting and television stations, with the exception of those in the United States which broadcast on domestic channels, covers frequency modulation broadcasting stations. It contains two sections: one indexed alphabetically by country and city, and the…

  3. Effects of spanwise topographic heterogeneity on amplitude and frequency modulation of streamwise velocity fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awasthi, Ankit; Subdberg, Matthew; Anderson, William

    2016-11-01

    We present results on the effects of topographic height, and spanwise heterogeneity, on amplitude and frequency modulation of small-scale structures in the roughness sublayer due to large-scale structures in the logarithmic region of turbulent channel flows. This work follows preceding contributions on amplitude and frequency modulation in smooth wall turbulent boundary layers. We have considered three topographic cases with different characteristics from homogeneous (sandpaper), to two spanwise heterogeneous cases where the height amplitude is increased (this topographic configuration induces turbulent secondary flows, which are known to alter the outer-layer flow characteristics). Indeed, pre-multiplied energy spectra across wavelength and elevation (so-called spectrograms) illustrate how turbulent energy is redistributed with systematic modification to the underlying topography. We have determined how the large-scale (low-pass filtered) streamwise velocity modulates the amplitude and frequency response of small-scale (high-pass filtered) signal. We find that outer-layer topographic-induced perturbations completely alter the intensity of amplitude and frequency modulation. This highlights the passive-actuator-like role of roughness heterogeneity, and underpins the need to incorporate such functional dependence in the development of wall models for LES. Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Grant # FA9550-14-1-0101.

  4. Frequency-Modulated Microwave Photonic Links with Direct Detection: Review and Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-15

    splitters was suggested by [13]. In this case, balanced photodetection was used to cancel AM. Such an interferometer was experimentally veried by [14...residual intensity modulation as well as imperfect common- mode rejection from the balanced photodetection . 3.2 Filter coecients The frequency...Numerical model of an FM photonic link with two discriminator lters and balanced detection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 3.2.1

  5. Electroacoustic Evaluation of Frequency-Modulated Receivers Interfaced with Personal Hearing Aids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schafer, Erin C.; Thibodeau, Linda M.; Whalen, Holly S.; Overson, Gary J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the electroacoustic outputs of frequency-modulated (FM) systems coupled to hearing aids. Method: Electroacoustic performance of FM systems coupled to hearing aids was determined for 3 FM receivers: body-worn with neck loop, ear-level nonprogrammable, and ear-level programmable. Systems were…

  6. Modulational excitation of low-frequency dust acoustic waves in the Earth's lower ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Kopnin, S. I.; Popel, S. I.; Yu, M. Y.

    2007-04-15

    During the observation of Perseid, Leonid, Gemenid, and Orionid meteor showers, stable low-frequency lines in the frequency range of 20-60 Hz were recorded against the radio-frequency noise background. A physical mechanism for this effect is proposed, and it is established that the effect itself is related to the modulational interaction between electromagnetic and dust acoustic waves. The dynamics of the components of a complex (dusty) ionospheric plasma with dust produced from the evolution of meteoric material is described. The conditions for the existence of dust acoustic waves in the ionosphere are considered, and the waves are shown to dissipate energy mainly in collisions of neutral particles with charged dust grains. The modulational instability of electromagnetic waves in a complex (dusty) ionospheric plasma is analyzed and is found to be driven by the nonlinear Joule heating, the ponderomotive force, and the processes governing dust charging and dynamics. The conditions for the onset of the modulational instability of electromagnetic waves, as well as its growth rate and threshold, are determined for both daytime and nighttime. It is shown that low-frequency perturbations generated in the modulational interaction are related to dust acoustic waves.

  7. Electro-optic modulation of a laser at microwave frequencies for interferometric purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Specht, Paul E.; Jilek, Brook A.

    2017-02-01

    A multi-point microwave interferometer (MPMI) concept was previously proposed by the authors for spatially-resolved, non-invasive tracking of a shock, reaction, or detonation front in energetic media [P. Specht et al., AIP Conf. Proc. 1793, 160010 (2017).]. The advantage of the MPMI concept over current microwave interferometry techniques is its detection of Doppler shifted microwave signals through electro-optic (EO) modulation of a laser. Since EO modulation preserves spatial variations in the Doppler shift, collecting the EO modulated laser light into a fiber array for recording with an optical heterodyne interferometer yields spatially-resolved velocity information. This work demonstrates the underlying physical principle of the MPMI diagnostic: the monitoring of a microwave signal with nanosecond temporal resolution using an optical heterodyne interferometer. For this purpose, the MPMI concept was simplified to a single-point construction using two tunable 1550 nm lasers and a 35.2 GHz microwave source. A (110) ZnTe crystal imparted the microwave frequency onto a laser, which was combined with a reference laser for determination of the microwave frequency in an optical heterodyne interferometer. A single, characteristic frequency associated with the microwave source was identified in all experiments, providing a means to monitor a microwave signal on nanosecond time scales. Lastly, areas for improving the frequency resolution of this technique are discussed, focusing on increasing the phase-modulated signal strength.

  8. [Design of modulating intermediate frequency electrotherapy system based on microcontroller unit].

    PubMed

    Yu, Xuefei; Liu, Xianfeng; Peng, Daming

    2010-12-01

    This article is devoted to the design of a system for modulating intermediate frequency electrotherapy waveform output. Prescriptions with different output waveform combinations were produced using microcontroller unit (MCU). The rich output waveforms effectively improve tolerance of human adaptability and achieve a therapeutic effect.

  9. Experiments and error analysis of laser ranging based on frequency-sweep polarization modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shuyuan; Ji, Rongyi; Li, Yao; Cheng, Zhi; Zhou, Weihu

    2016-11-01

    Frequency-sweep polarization modulation ranging uses a polarization-modulated laser beam to determine the distance to the target, the modulation frequency is swept and frequency values are measured when transmitted and received signals are in phase, thus the distance can be calculated through these values. This method gets much higher theoretical measuring accuracy than phase difference method because of the prevention of phase measurement. However, actual accuracy of the system is limited since additional phase retardation occurs in the measuring optical path when optical elements are imperfectly processed and installed. In this paper, working principle of frequency sweep polarization modulation ranging method is analyzed, transmission model of polarization state in light path is built based on the theory of Jones Matrix, additional phase retardation of λ/4 wave plate and PBS, their impact on measuring performance is analyzed. Theoretical results show that wave plate's azimuth error dominates the limitation of ranging accuracy. According to the system design index, element tolerance and error correcting method of system is proposed, ranging system is built and ranging experiment is performed. Experiential results show that with proposed tolerance, the system can satisfy the accuracy requirement. The present work has a guide value for further research about system design and error distribution.

  10. Determining optical path difference with a frequency-modulated continuous-wave method.

    PubMed

    Song, Ningfang; Lu, Xiangxiang; Li, Wei; Li, Yang; Wang, Yingying; Liu, Jixun; Xu, Xiaobin; Pan, Xiong

    2015-08-01

    A technique for determining the optical path difference (OPD) between two Raman beams using a frequency-modulated continuous-wave method is investigated. This approach greatly facilitates the measurement and adjustment of the OPD when tuning the OPD is essential to minimize the effects of the diode laser's phase noise on Raman lasers. As a demonstration, the frequencies of the beat note with different OPDs are characterized and analyzed. When the measured beat frequency is 0.367 Hz, the OPD between Raman beams is zero. The phase noise of the Raman laser system after implementation of zeroing of the OPD is also measured.

  11. Electronic frequency modulation for the increase of maximum measurable velocity in a heterodyne laser interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Hyunseung; La, Jongpil; Park, Kyihwan

    2006-10-15

    A Zeeman-type He-Ne laser is frequently used as a heterodyne laser due to the simple construction and the small loss of a light. However, the low beat frequency of the Zeeman-type laser limits the maximum measurable velocity. In this article, an electronic frequency modulation algorithm is proposed to overcome the drawback of the low velocity measurement capability by increasing the beat frequency electronically. The brief analysis, the measurement scheme of the proposed algorithm, and the experimental results are presented. It is demonstrated that the proposed algorithm is proven to enhance the maximum measurable velocity.

  12. Two-tone frequency-modulation spectroscopy in off-axis cavity.

    PubMed

    Malara, P; Witinski, M F; Gagliardi, G; De Natale, P

    2013-11-15

    As opposed to a conventional optical resonator, an off-axis-aligned cavity is able to transmit without distortion radiation modulated at a frequency even far above the cavity bandpass. This allows us to implement a simple spectroscopic technique that combines the cavity path-length enhancement of integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS) and the noise reduction associated with radio-frequency modulation (FM). An FM-ICOS spectrometer is demonstrated for the first time using a two-tone modulation technique. The performance is compared to the traditional ICOS by examining the acetylene absorption at 1543.77 nm. A signal-to-noise ratio improvement by a factor 3.5 is found with our proof-of-concept setup. Larger improvements are expected in a more optimized setup.

  13. Modulated single-bubble sonoluminescence: Dependence of phase of flashes, their intensity and rise/decay times on viscosity, the modulation strength, and frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastikhin, Igor; Djurkovic, Borko

    2004-05-01

    The single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) signal was studied for the case of driving frequency modulated by lower frequency with an offset. In our work, the driving frequency of 28 kHz and the modulation frequencies of 25-1000 Hz were used. The modulation strength of 0.2, 0.5, and 0.8 was defined as the difference of highest and lowest pressures over modulation period. The measurements were performed for water-glycerol mixtures of various viscosities. The measured SBSL signal appeared as a train of flashes for modulation frequencies below 250 Hz, and as a continuous modulated signal for higher frequencies. At the same frequency, the flashes covered similar phase intervals for different modulation strengths and, accordingly, pressure ranges. At higher glycerol concentrations (up to 24%) both the intensity and the stability of flashes increased, due to damped shape instabilities and reduced dancing; however, the phase interval of flashes remained about the same. Such phase-locked behavior can be explained by translational movements of the bubble due to modulated Bjerknes force and changes in the symmetry of the bubble collapse. The changes in intensities and rise/decay times can serve as a measure of the gas exchange between the bubble and its surroundings during silent and luminescent intervals.

  14. Frequency shift, damping, and tunneling current coupling with quartz tuning forks in noncontact atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nony, Laurent; Bocquet, Franck; Para, Franck; Loppacher, Christian

    2016-09-01

    A combined experimental and theoretical approach to the coupling between frequency-shift (Δ f ) , damping, and tunneling current (It) in combined noncontact atomic force microscopy/scanning tunneling microscopy using quartz tuning forks (QTF)-based probes is reported. When brought into oscillating tunneling conditions, the tip located at the QTF prong's end radiates an electromagnetic field which couples to the QTF prong motion via its piezoelectric tensor and loads its electrodes by induction. Our approach explains how those It-related effects ultimately modify the Δ f and the damping measurements. This paradigm to the origin of the coupling between It and the nc-AFM regular signals relies on both the intrinsic piezoelectric nature of the quartz constituting the QTF and its electrodes design.

  15. Atom-Based Sensing of Weak Radio Frequency Electric Fields Using Homodyne Readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Santosh; Fan, Haoquan; Kübler, Harald; Sheng, Jiteng; Shaffer, James P.

    2017-02-01

    We utilize a homodyne detection technique to achieve a new sensitivity limit for atom-based, absolute radio-frequency electric field sensing of 5 μV cm‑1 Hz‑1/2. A Mach-Zehnder interferometer is used for the homodyne detection. With the increased sensitivity, we investigate the dominant dephasing mechanisms that affect the performance of the sensor. In particular, we present data on power broadening, collisional broadening and transit time broadening. Our results are compared to density matrix calculations. We show that photon shot noise in the signal readout is currently a limiting factor. We suggest that new approaches with superior readout with respect to photon shot noise are needed to increase the sensitivity further.

  16. Note: Calibration of atomic force microscope cantilevers using only their resonant frequency and quality factor

    SciTech Connect

    Sader, John E.; Friend, James R.

    2014-11-15

    A simplified method for calibrating atomic force microscope cantilevers was recently proposed by Sader et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 103705 (2012); Sec. III D] that relies solely on the resonant frequency and quality factor of the cantilever in fluid (typically air). This method eliminates the need to measure the hydrodynamic function of the cantilever, which can be time consuming given the wide range of cantilevers now available. Using laser Doppler vibrometry, we rigorously assess the accuracy of this method for a series of commercially available cantilevers and explore its performance under non-ideal conditions. This shows that the simplified method is highly accurate and can be easily implemented to perform fast, robust, and non-invasive spring constant calibration.

  17. Hyperfine frequencies of {sup 87}Rb and {sup 133}Cs atoms in Xe gas

    SciTech Connect

    McGuyer, B. H.; Xia, T.; Jau, Y.-Y.; Happer, W.

    2011-09-15

    The microwave resonant frequencies of ground-state {sup 87}Rb and {sup 133}Cs atoms in Xe buffer gas are shown to have a relatively large nonlinear dependence on the Xe pressure, presumably because of RbXe or CsXe van der Waals molecules. The nonlinear shifts for Xe are opposite in sign to the previously measured shifts for Ar and Kr, even though all three gases have negative linear shifts. The Xe data show striking discrepancies with the previous theory for nonlinear shifts. Most of this discrepancy is eliminated by accounting for the spin-rotation interaction, {gamma}N{center_dot}S, in addition to the hyperfine-shift interaction, {delta} A I{center_dot}S, in the molecules. To the limit of our experimental accuracy, the shifts of {sup 87}Rb and {sup 133}Cs in He, Ne, and N{sub 2} were linear with pressure.

  18. Atom-Based Sensing of Weak Radio Frequency Electric Fields Using Homodyne Readout.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Santosh; Fan, Haoquan; Kübler, Harald; Sheng, Jiteng; Shaffer, James P

    2017-02-20

    We utilize a homodyne detection technique to achieve a new sensitivity limit for atom-based, absolute radio-frequency electric field sensing of 5 μV cm(-1) Hz(-1/2). A Mach-Zehnder interferometer is used for the homodyne detection. With the increased sensitivity, we investigate the dominant dephasing mechanisms that affect the performance of the sensor. In particular, we present data on power broadening, collisional broadening and transit time broadening. Our results are compared to density matrix calculations. We show that photon shot noise in the signal readout is currently a limiting factor. We suggest that new approaches with superior readout with respect to photon shot noise are needed to increase the sensitivity further.

  19. Atom-Based Sensing of Weak Radio Frequency Electric Fields Using Homodyne Readout

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Santosh; Fan, Haoquan; Kübler, Harald; Sheng, Jiteng; Shaffer, James P.

    2017-01-01

    We utilize a homodyne detection technique to achieve a new sensitivity limit for atom-based, absolute radio-frequency electric field sensing of 5 μV cm−1 Hz−1/2. A Mach-Zehnder interferometer is used for the homodyne detection. With the increased sensitivity, we investigate the dominant dephasing mechanisms that affect the performance of the sensor. In particular, we present data on power broadening, collisional broadening and transit time broadening. Our results are compared to density matrix calculations. We show that photon shot noise in the signal readout is currently a limiting factor. We suggest that new approaches with superior readout with respect to photon shot noise are needed to increase the sensitivity further. PMID:28218308

  20. Electrothermally driven high-frequency piezoresistive SiC cantilevers for dynamic atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Boubekri, R.; Cambril, E.; Couraud, L.; Bernardi, L.; Madouri, A.; Portail, M.; Chassagne, T.; Moisson, C.; Zielinski, M.; Jiao, S.; Michaud, J.-F.; Alquier, D.; Bouloc, J.; Nony, L.; Bocquet, F.; Loppacher, C.

    2014-08-07

    Cantilevers with resonance frequency ranging from 1 MHz to 100 MHz have been developed for dynamic atomic force microscopy. These sensors are fabricated from 3C-SiC epilayers grown on Si(100) substrates by low pressure chemical vapor deposition. They use an on-chip method both for driving and sensing the displacement of the cantilever. A first gold metallic loop deposited on top of the cantilever is used to drive its oscillation by electrothermal actuation. The sensing of this oscillation is performed by monitoring the resistance of a second Au loop. This metallic piezoresistive detection method has distinct advantages relative to more common semiconductor-based schemes. The optimization, design, fabrication, and characteristics of these cantilevers are discussed.

  1. Transcriptional burst frequency and burst size are equally modulated across the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Roy D.; Razooky, Brandon S.; Singh, Abhyudai; Trimeloni, Thomas V.; McCollum, James M.; Cox, Chris D.; Simpson, Michael L.; Weinberger, Leor S.

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression occurs either as an episodic process, characterized by pulsatile bursts, or as a constitutive process, characterized by a Poisson-like accumulation of gene products. It is not clear which mode of gene expression (constitutive versus bursty) predominates across a genome or how transcriptional dynamics are influenced by genomic position and promoter sequence. Here, we use time-lapse fluorescence microscopy to analyze 8,000 individual human genomic loci and find that at virtually all loci, episodic bursting—as opposed to constitutive expression—is the predominant mode of expression. Quantitative analysis of the expression dynamics at these 8,000 loci indicates that both the frequency and size of the transcriptional bursts varies equally across the human genome, independent of promoter sequence. Strikingly, weaker expression loci modulate burst frequency to increase activity, whereas stronger expression loci modulate burst size to increase activity. Transcriptional activators such as trichostatin A (TSA) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF) only modulate burst size and frequency along a constrained trend line governed by the promoter. In summary, transcriptional bursting dominates across the human genome, both burst frequency and burst size vary by chromosomal location, and transcriptional activators alter burst frequency and burst size, depending on the expression level of the locus. PMID:23064634

  2. Targeted treatment of cancer with radiofrequency electromagnetic fields amplitude-modulated at tumor-specific frequencies.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Jacquelyn W; Jimenez, Hugo; Pennison, Michael J; Brezovich, Ivan; Morgan, Desiree; Mudry, Albert; Costa, Frederico P; Barbault, Alexandre; Pasche, Boris

    2013-11-01

    In the past century, there have been many attempts to treat cancer with low levels of electric and magnetic fields. We have developed noninvasive biofeedback examination devices and techniques and discovered that patients with the same tumor type exhibit biofeedback responses to the same, precise frequencies. Intrabuccal administration of 27.12 MHz radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMF), which are amplitude-modulated at tumor-specific frequencies, results in long-term objective responses in patients with cancer and is not associated with any significant adverse effects. Intrabuccal administration allows for therapeutic delivery of very low and safe levels of EMF throughout the body as exemplified by responses observed in the femur, liver, adrenal glands, and lungs. In vitro studies have demonstrated that tumor-specific frequencies identified in patients with various forms of cancer are capable of blocking the growth of tumor cells in a tissue- and tumor-specific fashion. Current experimental evidence suggests that tumor-specific modulation frequencies regulate the expression of genes involved in migration and invasion and disrupt the mitotic spindle. This novel targeted treatment approach is emerging as an appealing therapeutic option for patients with advanced cancer given its excellent tolerability. Dissection of the molecular mechanisms accounting for the anti-cancer effects of tumor-specific modulation frequencies is likely to lead to the discovery of novel pathways in cancer.

  3. Targeted treatment of cancer with radiofrequency electromagnetic fields amplitude-modulated at tumor-specific frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Jacquelyn W.; Jimenez, Hugo; Pennison, Michael J.; Brezovich, Ivan; Morgan, Desiree; Mudry, Albert; Costa, Frederico P.; Barbault, Alexandre; Pasche, Boris

    2013-01-01

    In the past century, there have been many attempts to treat cancer with low levels of electric and magnetic fields. We have developed noninvasive biofeedback examination devices and techniques and discovered that patients with the same tumor type exhibit biofeedback responses to the same, precise frequencies. Intrabuccal administration of 27.12 MHz radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMF), which are amplitude-modulated at tumor-specific frequencies, results in long-term objective responses in patients with cancer and is not associated with any significant adverse effects. Intrabuccal administration allows for therapeutic delivery of very low and safe levels of EMF throughout the body as exemplified by responses observed in the femur, liver, adrenal glands, and lungs. In vitro studies have demonstrated that tumor-specific frequencies identified in patients with various forms of cancer are capable of blocking the growth of tumor cells in a tissue- and tumor-specific fashion. Current experimental evidence suggests that tumor-specific modulation frequencies regulate the expression of genes involved in migration and invasion and disrupt the mitotic spindle. This novel targeted treatment approach is emerging as an appealing therapeutic option for patients with advanced cancer given its excellent tolerability. Dissection of the molecular mechanisms accounting for the anti-cancer effects of tumor-specific modulation frequencies is likely to lead to the discovery of novel pathways in cancer. PMID:24206915

  4. Single snapshot multiple frequency modulated imaging of subsurface optical properties of turbid media with structured light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, M.; Cao, Zili; Lin, Weihao; Chen, Xinlin; Zheng, Longfei; Zeng, Bixin

    2016-12-01

    We report a novel demodulation method that enables single snapshot wide field imaging of optical properties of turbid media in the Spatial Frequency Domain (SFD). This Single Snapshot Multiple frequency Demodulation (SSMD) method makes use of the orthogonality of harmonic functions to extract the modulation transfer function (MTF) at multiple modulation frequencies simultaneously from a single structured-illuminated image at once. The orientation, frequency, and amplitude of each modulation can be set arbitrarily subject to the limitation of the implementation device. We first validate and compare SSMD to the existing demodulation methods by numerical simulations. The performance of SSMD is then demonstrated with experiments on both tissue mimicking phantoms and in vivo for recovering optical properties by comparing to the standard three-phase demodulation approach. The results show that SSMD increases significantly the data acquisition speed and reduces motion artefacts. SSMD exhibits excellent noise suppression in imaging as well at the rate proportional to the square root of the number of pixels contained in its kernel. SSMD is ideal in the implementation of a real-time spatial frequency domain imaging platform and will open up SFDI for vast applications in imaging and monitoring dynamic turbid medium and processes.

  5. Hybrid wide-band, low-phase-noise scheme for Raman lasers in atom interferometry by integrating an acousto-optic modulator and a feedback loop.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Yao, Zhanwei; Li, Runbing; Lu, Sibin; Chen, Xi; Wang, Jin; Zhan, Mingsheng

    2016-02-10

    We report a hybrid scheme for phase-coherent Raman lasers with low phase noise in a wide frequency range. In this scheme, a pair of Raman lasers with a frequency difference of 3.04 GHz is generated by the ±1-order diffracted lights of an acousto-optic modulator (1.52 GHz), where a feedback loop is simultaneously applied for suppressing the phase noise. The beat width of the Raman lasers is narrower than 3 Hz. In the low-frequency range, the phase noise of the Raman lasers is suppressed by 35 dB with the feedback. The phase noise is less than -109  dBc/Hz in the high-frequency range. The sensitivity of an atom gyroscope employing the hybrid Raman lasers can be implicitly improved 10 times. Due to the better high-frequency response, the sensitivity is not limited by the durations of Raman pulses. This work is important for improving the performance of atom-interferometer-based measurements.

  6. Nonresonant corrections for the optical resonance frequency measurements in the hydrogen atom

    SciTech Connect

    Labzowsky, Leonti; Schedrin, Gavriil; Solovyev, Dmitrii; Chernovskaya, Evgenia; Plunien, Guenter; Karshenboim, Savely

    2009-05-15

    The deviation of the natural spectral line profile from the Lorentz shape for the optical resonant frequency measurements is considered. This deviation leads to an asymmetry, which is mainly due to nonresonant correction to the resonant Lorentz profile. The nonresonant corrections are studied for the different types of the atomic resonant experiments. The most accurate recent optical resonance experiments are analyzed, i.e., the two-photon 1s-2s resonance excitation of the hydrogen atom with the delayed decay in the external electric field. The description of the nonresonant correction in the latter case requires the employment of QED with different in and out Hamiltonians. The nonresonant corrections for this experiment are investigated and found to be about 10{sup -5} Hz, while the recent experimental uncertainty is 34 Hz and in the near feature is expected to be a few hertz. The projected 1s-2s resonance excitation experiment with the three-photon ionization detection (which is now in progress) is also considered.

  7. qPlus magnetic force microscopy in frequency-modulation mode with millihertz resolution.

    PubMed

    Schneiderbauer, Maximilian; Wastl, Daniel; Giessibl, Franz J

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) allows one to image the domain structure of ferromagnetic samples by probing the dipole forces between a magnetic probe tip and a magnetic sample. The magnetic domain structure of the sample depends on the alignment of the individual atomic magnetic moments. It is desirable to be able to image both individual atoms and domain structures with a single probe. However, the force gradients of the interactions responsible for atomic contrast and those causing domain contrast are orders of magnitude apart, ranging from up to 100 Nm(-1) for atomic interactions down to 0.0001 Nm(-1) for magnetic dipole interactions. Here, we show that this gap can be bridged with a qPlus sensor, with a stiffness of 1800 Nm(-1) (optimized for atomic interaction), which is sensitive enough to measure millihertz frequency contrast caused by magnetic dipole-dipole interactions. Thus we have succeeded in establishing a sensing technique that performs scanning tunneling microscopy, atomic force microscopy and MFM with a single probe.

  8. qPlus magnetic force microscopy in frequency-modulation mode with millihertz resolution

    PubMed Central

    Wastl, Daniel; Giessibl, Franz J

    2012-01-01

    Summary Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) allows one to image the domain structure of ferromagnetic samples by probing the dipole forces between a magnetic probe tip and a magnetic sample. The magnetic domain structure of the sample depends on the alignment of the individual atomic magnetic moments. It is desirable to be able to image both individual atoms and domain structures with a single probe. However, the force gradients of the interactions responsible for atomic contrast and those causing domain contrast are orders of magnitude apart, ranging from up to 100 Nm−1 for atomic interactions down to 0.0001 Nm−1 for magnetic dipole interactions. Here, we show that this gap can be bridged with a qPlus sensor, with a stiffness of 1800 Nm−1 (optimized for atomic interaction), which is sensitive enough to measure millihertz frequency contrast caused by magnetic dipole–dipole interactions. Thus we have succeeded in establishing a sensing technique that performs scanning tunneling microscopy, atomic force microscopy and MFM with a single probe. PMID:22428108

  9. Resonance of a Metal Drop under the Effect of Amplitude-Modulated High Frequency Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jiahong; Lei, Zuosheng; Zhu, Hongda; Zhang, Lijie; Magnetic Hydrodynamics(Siamm) Team; Magnetic Mechanics; Engineering(Smse) Team

    2016-11-01

    The resonance of a sessile and a levitated drop under the effect of high frequency amplitude-modulated magnetic field (AMMF) is investigated experimentally and numerically. It is a new method to excite resonance of a metal drop, which is different from the case in the presence of a low-frequency magnetic field. The transient contour of the drop is obtained in the experiment and the simulation. The numerical results agree with the experimental results fairly well. At a given frequency and magnetic flux density of the high frequency AMMF, the edge deformations of the drop with an azimuthal wave numbers were excited. A stability diagram of the shape oscillation of the drop and its resonance frequency spectrum are obtained by analysis of the experimental and the numerical data. The results show that the resonance of the drop has a typical character of parametric resonance. The National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51274237 and 11372174).

  10. Determination of nanovibration amplitudes using frequency-modulated semiconductor laser autodyne

    SciTech Connect

    Usanov, D A; Skripal, A V; Astakhov, E I

    2014-02-28

    The method for measuring nanovibration amplitudes using the autodyne signal of a semiconductor laser at several laser radiation wavelengths is described. The theoretical description of the frequency-modulated autodyne signal under harmonic vibrations of the reflector is presented and the relations for its spectral components are derived using the expansions into the Fourier and Bessel series. The results of numerical modelling based on the proposed method for measuring the reflector nanovibration amplitudes are presented that make use of the low-frequency spectrum of the autodyne signal from the frequency-modulated laser autodyne and the solution of the appropriate inverse problem. The experimental setup is described; the results of the measurements are presented for the nanovibration amplitudes and the autodyne signal spectra under the reflector nanovibrations. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  11. Single channel speech separation in modulation frequency domain based on a novel pitch range estimation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoodzadeh, Azar; Abutalebi, Hamid Reza; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Sheikhzadeh, Hamid

    2012-12-01

    Computational Auditory Scene Analysis (CASA) has been the focus in recent literature for speech separation from monaural mixtures. The performance of current CASA systems on voiced speech separation strictly depends on the robustness of the algorithm used for pitch frequency estimation. We propose a new system that estimates pitch (frequency) range of a target utterance and separates voiced portions of target speech. The algorithm, first, estimates the pitch range of target speech in each frame of data in the modulation frequency domain, and then, uses the estimated pitch range for segregating the target speech. The method of pitch range estimation is based on an onset and offset algorithm. Speech separation is performed by filtering the mixture signal with a mask extracted from the modulation spectrogram. A systematic evaluation shows that the proposed system extracts the majority of target speech signal with minimal interference and outperforms previous systems in both pitch extraction and voiced speech separation.

  12. Extinction-ratio-independent electrical method for measuring chirp parameters of Mach-Zehnder modulators using frequency-shifted heterodyne.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shangjian; Wang, Heng; Zou, Xinhai; Zhang, Yali; Lu, Rongguo; Liu, Yong

    2015-06-15

    An extinction-ratio-independent electrical method is proposed for measuring chirp parameters of Mach-Zehnder electric-optic intensity modulators based on frequency-shifted optical heterodyne. The method utilizes the electrical spectrum analysis of the heterodyne products between the intensity modulated optical signal and the frequency-shifted optical carrier, and achieves the intrinsic chirp parameters measurement at microwave region with high-frequency resolution and wide-frequency range for the Mach-Zehnder modulator with a finite extinction ratio. Moreover, the proposed method avoids calibrating the responsivity fluctuation of the photodiode in spite of the involved photodetection. Chirp parameters as a function of modulation frequency are experimentally measured and compared to those with the conventional optical spectrum analysis method. Our method enables an extinction-ratio-independent and calibration-free electrical measurement of Mach-Zehnder intensity modulators by using the high-resolution frequency-shifted heterodyne technique.

  13. Narrow-linewidth chirped frequency comb from a frequency-shifted feedback Ti:sapphire laser seeded by a phase-modulated single-frequency fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Brandl, Matthias F; Mücke, Oliver D

    2010-12-15

    Frequency-shifted feedback (FSF) lasers have emerged as powerful tools for precision distance metrology. At the output of a Michelson interferometer, the detected rf spectra of the FSF laser light contain a length-dependent heterodyne beat signal whose linewidth ultimately limits the achievable accuracy of length measurements. Here, we demonstrate a narrow-linewidth chirped frequency comb from an FSF Ti:sapphire ring laser seeded by a phase-modulated, ultra-low-phase-noise, single-frequency fiber laser. We experimentally investigate the influence of the seed laser linewidth on the resulting width and shape of the length-dependent rf beat signal. An ultranarrow heterodyne beat linewidth of <20 Hz is observed.

  14. Performance analysis on quality of optical frequency comb generated by the recirculating frequency shifter based on linear IQ modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lu; Li, Jianping; Lin, Jiachuan; Xi, Lixia; Tang, Xianfeng; Zhang, Xiaoguang

    2015-11-01

    An optical frequency comb generator using a modified single-sideband recirculating frequency shifter scheme adopting a linear IQ modulator as the kernel device (SSB-RFS-LIQM) is proposed. The optical comb lines generated by the proposed scheme possess good features such as extreme flatness and high optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR), compared to the quality we can obtain when we use a conventional IQ modulator in the SSB-RFS structure (called SSB-RFS-CIQM scheme). The mechanism of how the SSB-RFS-LIQM works is carefully analyzed with analytical and numerical methods. With the capability of strong suppression of high-order crosstalk and less demand of the gain of erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (and hence less amplified spontaneous noise induced) in the loop, 5.5 dB OSNR improvement can be achieved when 100 extreme flat comb lines are generated using the SSB-RFS-LIQM scheme compared to using the SSB-RFS-CIQM scheme.

  15. Role of geometry on the frequency spectra of U-shaped atomic force microscope probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, E.; Turner, J. A.

    2017-02-01

    Contact resonance atomic force microscopy (CR-AFM) is a specific technique that is used to determine elastic or viscoelastic properties of materials. The success of this technique is highly dependent on the accuracy of frequency spectra that must be measured for both noncontact and the case in which the tip is in contact with the sample of interest. Thus, choosing the right probe is crucial for accurate experiments. U-shaped probes also offer new opportunities for CR-AFM measurements because of certain specific modes that have tip motion parallel to the sample surface such that these resonances can access in-plane sample properties. However, analysis of the spectra from U-shaped probes is much more challenging due to these modes. The geometry of these probes is the main driver for the spectral response. Here, this influence on the resonance frequencies of the commercially fabricated U-shaped probe AN2-300 is evaluated with respect to geometry in terms of leg width, crossbeam width, and crossbeam length. Both noncontact and contact cases are examined with respect to variations of the nominal geometry. An energy distribution approach is also presented to assist with the identification of modes that have close resonances. Finally, this analysis allows recommendations to be made in order to minimize the convergence of multiple resonances for a specific range of measurement parameters.

  16. Frequency domain approach for time-resolved pump-probe microscopy using intensity modulated laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, J.; Kawasumi, K.; Kobayashi, T.

    2014-09-01

    We present a scheme for time-resolved pump-probe microscopy using intensity modulated laser diodes. The modulation frequencies of the pump and probe beams are varied up to 500 MHz with fixed frequency detuning typically set at 15 kHz. The frequency response of the pump-probe signal is detected using a lock-in amplifier referenced at the beat frequency. This frequency domain method is capable of characterizing the nanosecond to picosecond relaxation dynamics of sample species without the use of a high speed detector or a high frequency lock-in amplifier. Furthermore, as the pump-probe signal is based on the nonlinear interaction between the two laser beams and the sample, our scheme provides better spatial resolution than the conventional diffraction-limited optical microscopes. Time-resolved pump-probe imaging of fluorescence beads and aggregates of quantum dots demonstrates that this method is useful for the microscopic analysis of optoelectronic devices. The system is implemented using compact and low-cost laser diodes, and thus has a broad range of applications in the fields of photochemistry, optical physics, and biological imaging.

  17. Spindle error motion measurement using concentric circle grating and sinusoidal frequency-modulated semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, Masato; Vu, Thanh-Tung; Aketagawa, Masato

    2016-11-01

    The conventional method of measuring the radial, axial and angular spindle motion is complicated and needs large spaces. Smaller instrument is better in terms of accurate and practical measurement. A method of measuring spindle error motion using a sinusoidal phase modulation and a concentric circle grating was described in the past. In the method, the concentric circle grating with fine pitch is attached to the spindle. Three optical sensors are fixed under grating and observe appropriate position of grating. The each optical sensor consists of a sinusoidal frequency modulated semiconductor laser as the light source, and two interferometers. One interferometer measures an axial spindle motion by detecting the interference fringe between reflected beam from fixed mirror and 0th-order diffracted beam. Another interferometer measures a radial spindle motion by detecting the interference fringe between ±2nd-order diffracted beams. With these optical sensor, 3 axial and 3 radial displacement of grating can be measured. From these measured displacements, axial, radial and angular spindle motion is calculated concurrently. In the previous experiment, concurrent measurement of the one axial and one radial spindle displacement at 4rpm was described. In this paper, the sinusoidal frequency modulation realized by modulating injection current is used instead of the sinusoidal phase modulation, which contributes simplicity of the instrument. Furthermore, concurrent measurement of the 5 axis (1 axial, 2 radial and 2 angular displacements) spindle motion at 4000rpm may be described.

  18. Commissioning of a multiple-frequency modulation smoothing by spectral dispersion demonstration system on OMEGA EP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruschwitz, B. E.; Kelly, J. H.; Dorrer, C.; Okishev, A. V.; Waxer, L. J.; Balonek, G.; Begishev, I. A.; Bittle, W.; Consentino, A.; Cuffney, R.; Hill, E.; Marozas, J. A.; Moore, M.; Roides, R. G.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2013-02-01

    A one-dimensional smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) demonstration system for smoothing focal-spot nonuniformities using multiple modulation frequencies (multi-FM SSD) was commissioned on one long-pulse beamline of OMEGA EP—the first use of such a system in a high-energy laser. System models of frequency modulation-to-amplitude modulation (FM-to-AM) conversion in the OMEGA EP beamline and final optics were used to develop an AM budget. The AM budget in turn provided a UV power limit of 0.85 TW, based on accumulation of B-integral in the final optics. The front end of the demonstration system utilized a National Ignition Facility preamplifier module (PAM) with a custom SSD grating inserted into the PAM's multipass amplifier section. The dispersion of the SSD grating was selected to cleanly propagate the dispersed SSD bandwidth through various pinholes in the system while maintaining sufficient focal-spot smoothing performance. A commissioning plan was executed that systematically introduced the new features of the demonstration system into OMEGA EP. Ultimately, the OMEGA EP beamline was ramped to the UV power limit with various pulse shapes. The front-end system was designed to provide flexibility in pulse shaping. Various combinations of pickets and nanosecond-scale drive pulses were demonstrated, with multi-FM SSD selectively applied to portions of the pulse. Analysis of the dispersion measured by the far-field diagnostics at the outputs of the infrared beamline and the frequency-conversion crystals indicated that the SSD modulation spectrum was maintained through both the beamline and the frequency-conversion process. At the completion of the plan, a series of equivalent-target-plane measurements with distributed phase plates installed were conducted that confirmed the expected timeintegrated smoothing of the focal spot.

  19. Single-photon frequency conversion via interaction with a three-level atom coupled to a microdisk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, M.; Andrianov, S. N.; Kalachev, A. A.

    2017-02-01

    The frequency conversion of light has proved to be an important instrument for communication, spectroscopy, imaging and information processing. We theoretically study the frequency conversion of a single photon via its interaction with a Λ -type atom coupled to a microdisk. We show that the frequency conversion efficiency approaches unity even in the case of an interaction between clockwise and counterclockwise modes in the microdisk due to surface imperfections. By the use of the Schrieffer-Wolff transformation, we get an effective Hamiltonian that allows us to investigate the dynamics of the system and obtain time and probability of frequency conversion in different conditions.

  20. Metastability and Inter-Band Frequency Modulation in Networks of Oscillating Spiking Neuron Populations

    PubMed Central

    Bhowmik, David; Shanahan, Murray

    2013-01-01

    Groups of neurons firing synchronously are hypothesized to underlie many cognitive functions such as attention, associative learning, memory, and sensory selection. Recent theories suggest that transient periods of synchronization and desynchronization provide a mechanism for dynamically integrating and forming coalitions of functionally related neural areas, and that at these times conditions are optimal for information transfer. Oscillating neural populations display a great amount of spectral complexity, with several rhythms temporally coexisting in different structures and interacting with each other. This paper explores inter-band frequency modulation between neural oscillators using models of quadratic integrate-and-fire neurons and Hodgkin-Huxley neurons. We vary the structural connectivity in a network of neural oscillators, assess the spectral complexity, and correlate the inter-band frequency modulation. We contrast this correlation against measures of metastable coalition entropy and synchrony. Our results show that oscillations in different neural populations modulate each other so as to change frequency, and that the interaction of these fluctuating frequencies in the network as a whole is able to drive different neural populations towards episodes of synchrony. Further to this, we locate an area in the connectivity space in which the system directs itself in this way so as to explore a large repertoire of synchronous coalitions. We suggest that such dynamics facilitate versatile exploration, integration, and communication between functionally related neural areas, and thereby supports sophisticated cognitive processing in the brain. PMID:23614040

  1. An optically modulated zero-field atomic magnetometer with suppressed spin-exchange broadening

    SciTech Connect

    Jiménez-Martínez, R.; Knappe, S.; Kitching, J.

    2014-04-15

    We demonstrate an optically pumped {sup 87}Rb magnetometer in a microfabricated vapor cell based on a zero-field dispersive resonance generated by optical modulation of the {sup 87}Rb ground state energy levels. The magnetometer is operated in the spin-exchange relaxation-free regime where high magnetic field sensitivities can be achieved. This device can be useful in applications requiring array-based magnetometers where radio frequency magnetic fields can induce cross-talk among adjacent sensors or affect the source of the magnetic field being measured.

  2. An optically modulated zero-field atomic magnetometer with suppressed spin-exchange broadening.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Martínez, R; Knappe, S; Kitching, J

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate an optically pumped (87)Rb magnetometer in a microfabricated vapor cell based on a zero-field dispersive resonance generated by optical modulation of the (87)Rb ground state energy levels. The magnetometer is operated in the spin-exchange relaxation-free regime where high magnetic field sensitivities can be achieved. This device can be useful in applications requiring array-based magnetometers where radio frequency magnetic fields can induce cross-talk among adjacent sensors or affect the source of the magnetic field being measured.

  3. Analytic solutions and their dynamics of atomic-molecular Bose-Einstein condensates with time- and space-modulated nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huilan; Yao, Yuqin

    2017-01-01

    The time- and space-modulated nonlinearity is the important character of the Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs). Many works have been done on atomic BECs with spatially modulated nonlinearity, but there is little work on atomic-molecular BECs. In this paper, we construct one family of explicitly exact solutions of the atomic-molecular BECs with time- and space-modulated nonlinearities and trapping potential by similarity transformations. We discuss the dynamics of matter waves including breathing solitons, quasi-breathing solitons, resonant solitons and moving solitons. We analyze the linear stability of the solutions by adding various initial stochastic noise. We also provide the experimental parameters to produce these phenomena in future experiments.

  4. Harmonic spectral modulation of an optical frequency comb to control the ultracold molecules formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinovskaya, Svetlana A.; Liu, Gengyuan

    2016-11-01

    A method for creation of ultracold molecules by stepwise adiabatic passage from the Feshbach state to the fundamentally ground state using an optical frequency comb is presented within a semiclassical multilevel model. The sine modulation of the spectral phase of the comb leads to the creation of a quasi-dark dressed state. An insignificant population of the excited state manifold in this dark state provides an efficient way of mitigating decoherence in the system. In contrast, the cosine modulation does not lead to the quasi-dark state formation. The results demonstrate the importance of the parity of the spectral chirp in quantum control.

  5. Selectivity enhancement in photoacoustic gas analysis via phase-sensitive detection at high modulation frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosterev, Anatoliy (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method for detecting a target fluid in a fluid sample comprising a first fluid and the target fluid using photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS), comprises a) providing a light source configured to introduce an optical signal having at least one wavelength into the fluid sample; b) modulating the optical signal at a desired modulation frequency such that the optical signal generates an acoustic signal in the fluid sample; c) measuring the acoustic signal in a resonant acoustic detector; and d) using the phase of the acoustic signal to detect the presence of the target fluid.

  6. Resolving multipath interference in time-of-flight imaging via modulation frequency diversity and sparse regularization.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Ayush; Kadambi, Achuta; Whyte, Refael; Barsi, Christopher; Feigin, Micha; Dorrington, Adrian; Raskar, Ramesh

    2014-03-15

    Time-of-flight (ToF) cameras calculate depth maps by reconstructing phase shifts of amplitude-modulated signals. For broad illumination of transparent objects, reflections from multiple scene points can illuminate a given pixel, giving rise to an erroneous depth map. We report here a sparsity-regularized solution that separates K interfering components using multiple modulation frequency measurements. The method maps ToF imaging to the general framework of spectral estimation theory and has applications in improving depth profiles and exploiting multiple scattering.

  7. Frequency-modulated, tunable, semiconductor-optical-amplifier-based fiber ring laser for linewidth and line shape control.

    PubMed

    Girard, Simon Lambert; Chen, Hongxin; Schinn, Gregory W; Piché, Michel

    2008-08-15

    We report how the linewidth and line shape of a tunable semiconductor-optical-amplifier-based fiber ring laser can be actively adjusted by applying an intracavity frequency modulation to the laser. Frequency-modulated laser operation is achieved by driving the phase modulator frequency close to the cavity axial-mode spacing, leading to a constant-amplitude laser output having a periodically varying instantaneous frequency. The resulting linewidth varies proportionally with the inverse of the frequency detuning, and it is adjustable from submegahertz to over more than 5 GHz. By appropriate selection of the modulating waveform we have synthesized a near-Gaussian output line shape; other line shapes can be produced by modifying the modulating waveform. Experimental observations are in good agreement with a simple model.

  8. Subharmonic excitation in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy in the presence of adsorbed water layers

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, Sergio; Barcons, Victor; Verdaguer, Albert; Chiesa, Matteo

    2011-12-01

    In ambient conditions, nanometric water layers form on hydrophilic surfaces covering them and significantly changing their properties and characteristics. Here we report the excitation of subharmonics in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy induced by intermittent water contacts. Our simulations show that there are several regimes of operation depending on whether there is perturbation of water layers. Single period orbitals, where subharmonics are never induced, follow only when the tip is either in permanent contact with the water layers or in pure noncontact where the water layers are never perturbed. When the water layers are perturbed subharmonic excitation increases with decreasing oscillation amplitude. We derive an analytical expression which establishes whether water perturbations compromise harmonic motion and show that the predictions are in agreement with numerical simulations. Empirical validation of our interpretation is provided by the observation of a range of values for apparent height of water layers when subharmonic excitation is predicted.

  9. Optical limiting using spatial self-phase modulation in hot atomic sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qian; Cheng, Xuemei; Zhang, Ying; Yin, Xunli; Jiang, Man; Chen, Haowei; Bai, Jintao

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we characterized the performance of optical limiting by self-phase modulation (SPM) in hot atomic vapor cell. The results indicated that the performance of the optical limiter is closely related to the position of the sample cell, which is determined by the Rayleigh lenght of beam. The lowest limiting threshold and clamp output were obtained at the sample position at -10 mm from the coordinate origin (the beam waist). The phenomenon was explained well by the theory of SPM and z-scan, which are caused by both Kerr effect and the thermal optical nonlinear effect. This useful information obtained in the meaning of this work is determining the optimal position of the sample cell in the optical limiter and other applications of SPM.

  10. An assessment of tunneling-multiphoton dichotomy in atomic photo-ionization: Keldysh parameter versus scaled frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topcu, Turker; Robicheaux, Francis

    2012-06-01

    It is common practice in strong-laser physics community that dynamical regime of atomic ionization is described by the Keldysh parameter, γ. Two distinct cases where γ1 and γ1 are associated with ionization mechanisms that are predominantly in tunneling and in multi-photon regimes, respectively. We report on our fully three-dimensional ab initio quantum simulations of ionization of hydrogen atoms in laser fields described in terms of the Keldysh parameter by solving the corresponding time-dependent Schr"odinger equation. We find that the Keldysh parameter is useful in inferring the dynamical ionization regime only when coupled with the scaled laser frequency, φ, when a large range of laser frequencies and peak intensities are considered. The additional parameter φ relates the laser frequency φ to the classical Kepler frequency φK of the electron, and together with the Keldysh parameter, they can be used to refer to an ionization regime.

  11. Auditory imagery modulates frequency-specific areas in the human auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jihoon; Kwon, Jae Hyung; Yang, Po Song; Jeong, Jaeseung

    2013-02-01

    Neural responses in early sensory areas are influenced by top-down processing. In the visual system, early visual areas have been shown to actively participate in top-down processing based on their topographical properties. Although it has been suggested that the auditory cortex is involved in top-down control, functional evidence of topographic modulation is still lacking. Here, we show that mental auditory imagery for familiar melodies induces significant activation in the frequency-responsive areas of the primary auditory cortex (PAC). This activation is related to the characteristics of the imagery: when subjects were asked to imagine high-frequency melodies, we observed increased activation in the high- versus low-frequency response area; when the subjects were asked to imagine low-frequency melodies, the opposite was observed. Furthermore, we found that A1 is more closely related to the observed frequency-related modulation than R in tonotopic subfields of the PAC. Our findings suggest that top-down processing in the auditory cortex relies on a mechanism similar to that used in the perception of external auditory stimuli, which is comparable to early visual systems.

  12. Transcriptional burst frequency and burst size are equally modulated across the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Dar, Roy D.; Simpson, Michael L; Weinberger, Leor S.; Razooky, B; Cox, Chris D.; McCollum, James M.; Trimeloni, Tom; Singh, A

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression occurs either as an episodic process, characterized by pulsatile bursts or as a constitutive, Poisson-like accumulation of gene products. It is not clear which mode of gene expression (constitutive versus bursty) predominates across a genome or how transcriptional dynamics are influenced by genomic position and promoter sequence. Here, we use time-lapse fluorescence microscopy, building off of theoretical studies that exploit the time-resolved structure of stochastic fluctuations in gene expression, to develop a three-dimensional method for mapping underlying gene-regulatory mechanisms. Over 8,000 individual human genomic loci were analyzed, and at virtually all loci, episodic bursting as opposed to constitutive expression was found to be the predominant mode of expression. Quantitative analysis of the expression dynamics at these 8,000 loci indicates that both frequency and size of transcriptional bursts vary equally across the human genome independent of promoter sequence. Strikingly, weaker expression loci modulate burst frequency to increase activity, while stronger expression loci modulate burst size to increase activity. Transcriptional activators, such as TNF, generate similar patterns of change in burst frequency and burst size. In summary, transcriptional bursting dominates across the human genome, both burst frequency and burst size vary by chromosomal location, and transcriptional activators alter burst frequency and burst size, depending on the expression level of the locus.

  13. High pulse repetition frequency fiber-coupled laser-diode module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Guangyuan; Li, Song; Huang, Ke; Zheng, Guoxing

    2016-12-01

    A practical and simple approach of achieving a high pulse repetition frequency fiber-coupled laser-diode device is demonstrated both by experiment and TRACEPRO software simulation, which is obtained by beam collimating, spatial beam combining, and polarization beam combining based on multiple cycle-emitting pulsed laser-diode emitters. Using this method, fiber-coupled laser-diode module output pulse repetition frequency from the multimode fiber with 200-μm core diameter and 0.22 numerical aperture can reach 300 kHz, and the coupling efficiency is beyond 72%. This technique has superiors of great flexibility, low cost, and high reliability for wide applications.

  14. Effect of Irregularities in the Earth's Rotation on Relativistic Shifts in Frequency and Time of Earthbound Atomic Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fateev, V. F.; Kopeikin, S. M.; Pasynok, S. L., S. L.

    2015-10-01

    The effect of irregularities in the earth's rotation (precession and nutation of the earth's axis of rotation, oscillations in the modulus of the angular velocity, periodic deviations in the line of the poles, and the angular momentum of the globe) on the frequency and time of high-stability atomic clocks are examined in terms of the theory of relativity. It is shown that the relative shift in frequency and time owing to these effects can exceed 5×10-16.

  15. ISAR Imaging Based on the Wideband Hyperbolic Frequency-Modulation Waveform.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Yeh, Chun-mao; Jin, Kan; Yang, Jian; Lu, Yao-bin

    2015-09-15

    The hyperbolic frequency-modulated (HFM) waveform has an inherent Doppler-invariant property. It is more conducive than the conventional linear frequency-modulated (LFM) waveform to high speed moving target imaging. In order to apply the HFM waveform to existing inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging systems, a new pulse compression algorithm is proposed. First, the received HFM echoes are demodulated with the transmitted signal, which is called "decurve" in this paper. By this operation, the bandwidth of the demodulated echoes is effectively reduced and can be processed by the existing narrow-band receiver. Then, the phase of the decurved HFM echoes is analyzed, and thus, the pulse compression is accomplished by space-variant phase compensation. In addition, the space-variant phase compensation is realized by resampling and fast Fourier transform (FFT) with high computational efficiency. Finally, numerical results illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  16. Frequency-modulated light scattering interferometry employed for optical properties and dynamics studies of turbid media

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Liang; Somesfalean, Gabriel; Svanberg, Sune

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, fiber-based frequency-modulated light scattering interferometry (FMLSI) is developed and employed for studies of optical properties and dynamics in liquid phantoms made from Intralipid®. The fiber-based FMLSI system retrieves the optical properties by examining the intensity fluctuations through the turbid medium in a heterodyne detection scheme using a continuous-wave frequency-modulated coherent light source. A time resolution of 21 ps is obtained, and the experimental results for the diluted Intralipid phantoms show good agreement with the predicted results based on published data. The present system shows great potential for assessment of optical properties as well as dynamic studies in liquid phantoms, dairy products, and human tissues. PMID:25136504

  17. ISAR Imaging Based on the Wideband Hyperbolic Frequency-Modulation Waveform

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wei; Yeh, Chun-mao; Jin, Kan; Yang, Jian; Lu, Yao-bin

    2015-01-01

    The hyperbolic frequency-modulated (HFM) waveform has an inherent Doppler-invariant property. It is more conducive than the conventional linear frequency-modulated (LFM) waveform to high speed moving target imaging. In order to apply the HFM waveform to existing inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging systems, a new pulse compression algorithm is proposed. First, the received HFM echoes are demodulated with the transmitted signal, which is called “decurve” in this paper. By this operation, the bandwidth of the demodulated echoes is effectively reduced and can be processed by the existing narrow-band receiver. Then, the phase of the decurved HFM echoes is analyzed, and thus, the pulse compression is accomplished by space-variant phase compensation. In addition, the space-variant phase compensation is realized by resampling and fast Fourier transform (FFT) with high computational efficiency. Finally, numerical results illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:26389901

  18. Pacemaking the ice ages by frequency modulation of Earth's orbital eccentricity

    PubMed

    Rial

    1999-07-23

    Evidence from power spectra of deep-sea oxygen isotope time series suggests that the climate system of Earth responds nonlinearly to astronomical forcing by frequency modulating eccentricity-related variations in insolation. With the help of a simple model, it is shown that frequency modulation of the approximate 100,000-year eccentricity cycles by the 413,000-year component accounts for the variable duration of the ice ages, the multiple-peak character of the time series spectra, and the notorious absence of significant spectral amplitude at the 413,000-year period. The observed spectra are consistent with the classic Milankovitch theories of insolation, so that climate forcing by 100,000-year variations in orbital inclination that cause periodic dust accretion appear unnecessary.

  19. Frequency modulated femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy of ultrafast energy transfer in a donor-acceptor copolymer.

    PubMed

    Grumstrup, Erik M; Chen, Zhuo; Vary, Ryan P; Moran, Andrew M; Schanze, Kirk S; Papanikolas, John M

    2013-07-11

    A Raman-pump frequency modulation scheme and an automated signal-processing algorithm are developed for improved collection of time-resolved femtosecond stimulated Raman spectra. Together, these two advancements remove the broad background signals endemic to FSRS measurements and retrieve signals with high sensitivity. We apply this frequency-modulated femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FM-FSRS) to the characterization of ultrafast energy transport in a copolymer comprised of polystyrene linked oligo(phenylene-ethynylene) donor and thiophene-benzothiadiazole acceptor chromophores. After photoexcitation of the donor, ultrafast energy transfer is monitored by the decay of donor vibrational modes and simultaneous growth of acceptor modes. The FM-FSRS method shows clear advantages in signal-to-noise levels, mitigation of artifact features, and ease of data processing over the conventional FSRS technique.

  20. Sub-nanometer Resolution Imaging with Amplitude-modulation Atomic Force Microscopy in Liquid

    PubMed Central

    Farokh Payam, Amir; Piantanida, Luca; Cafolla, Clodomiro; Voïtchovsky, Kislon

    2016-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has become a well-established technique for nanoscale imaging of samples in air and in liquid. Recent studies have shown that when operated in amplitude-modulation (tapping) mode, atomic or molecular-level resolution images can be achieved over a wide range of soft and hard samples in liquid. In these situations, small oscillation amplitudes (SAM-AFM) enhance the resolution by exploiting the solvated liquid at the surface of the sample. Although the technique has been successfully applied across fields as diverse as materials science, biology and biophysics and surface chemistry, obtaining high-resolution images in liquid can still remain challenging for novice users. This is partly due to the large number of variables to control and optimize such as the choice of cantilever, the sample preparation, and the correct manipulation of the imaging parameters. Here, we present a protocol for achieving high-resolution images of hard and soft samples in fluid using SAM-AFM on a commercial instrument. Our goal is to provide a step-by-step practical guide to achieving high-resolution images, including the cleaning and preparation of the apparatus and the sample, the choice of cantilever and optimization of the imaging parameters. For each step, we explain the scientific rationale behind our choices to facilitate the adaptation of the methodology to every user's specific system. PMID:28060262

  1. Fortnightly modulation of San Andreas tremor and low-frequency earthquakes

    PubMed Central

    van der Elst, Nicholas J.; Delorey, Andrew A.; Shelly, David R.; Johnson, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Earth tides modulate tremor and low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) on faults in the vicinity of the brittle−ductile (seismic−aseismic) transition. The response to the tidal stress carries otherwise inaccessible information about fault strength and rheology. Here, we analyze the LFE response to the fortnightly tide, which modulates the amplitude of the daily tidal stress over a 14-d cycle. LFE rate is highest during the waxing fortnightly tide, with LFEs most strongly promoted when the daily stress exceeds the previous peak stress by the widest margin. This pattern implies a threshold failure process, with slip initiated when stress exceeds the local fault strength. Variations in sensitivity to the fortnightly modulation may reflect the degree of stress concentration on LFE-producing brittle asperities embedded within an otherwise aseismic fault. PMID:27432977

  2. Convective stability in the Rayleigh-Benard and directional solidification problems - High-frequency gravity modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, A. A.; Mcfadden, G. B.; Murray, B. T.; Coriell, S. R.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of vertical, sinusoidal, time-dependent gravitational acceleration on the onset of solutal convection during directional solidification is analyzed in the limit of large modulation frequency. When the unmodulated state is unstable, the modulation amplitude required to stabilize the system is determined by the method of averaging. When the unmodulated state is stable, resonant modes of instability occur at large modulation amplitude. These are analyzed using matched asymptotic expansions to elucidate the boundary-layer structure for both the Rayleigh-Benard and directional solidification configurations. Based on these analyses, a thorough examination of the dependence of the stability criteria on the unmodulated Rayleigh number, Schmidt number, and distribution coefficient, is carried out.

  3. Fortnightly modulation of San Andreas tremor and low-frequency earthquakes

    SciTech Connect

    van der Elst, Nicholas J.; Delorey, Andrew A.; Shelly, David R.; Johnson, Paul A.

    2016-07-18

    Earth tides modulate tremor and low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) on faults in the vicinity of the brittle-ductile (seismic-aseismic) transition. Our response to the tidal stress carries otherwise inaccessible information about fault strength and rheology. We analyze the LFE response to the fortnightly tide, which modulates the amplitude of the daily tidal stress over a 14-d cycle. LFE rate is highest during the waxing fortnightly tide, with LFEs most strongly promoted when the daily stress exceeds the previous peak stress by the widest margin. This pattern implies a threshold failure process, with slip initiated when stress exceeds the local fault strength. Furthermore, variations in sensitivity to the fortnightly modulation may reflect the degree of stress concentration on LFE-producing brittle asperities embedded within an otherwise aseismic fault.

  4. Fortnightly modulation of San Andreas tremor and low-frequency earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Der Elst, Nicholas; Delorey, Andrew; Shelly, David R.; Johnson, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Earth tides modulate tremor and low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) on faults in the vicinity of the brittle−ductile (seismic−aseismic) transition. The response to the tidal stress carries otherwise inaccessible information about fault strength and rheology. Here, we analyze the LFE response to the fortnightly tide, which modulates the amplitude of the daily tidal stress over a 14-d cycle. LFE rate is highest during the waxing fortnightly tide, with LFEs most strongly promoted when the daily stress exceeds the previous peak stress by the widest margin. This pattern implies a threshold failure process, with slip initiated when stress exceeds the local fault strength. Variations in sensitivity to the fortnightly modulation may reflect the degree of stress concentration on LFE-producing brittle asperities embedded within an otherwise aseismic fault.

  5. New asymmetric propagation invariant beams obtained by amplitude and phase modulation in frequency space.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Hernández, J; Arroyo Carrasco, M L; Méndez Otero, M M; Chávez-Cerda, S; Iturbe Castillo, M D

    2014-12-12

    In this paper, we demonstrate, numerically and experimentally that using the mask-lens setup used by Durnin to generate Bessel beams Durnin [Phys. Rev. Lett. 58, 1499 (1987)], it is possible to generate different kinds of propagation invariant beams. A modification in the amplitude or phase of the field that illuminates the annular slit is proposed that corresponds to modulation in frequency space. In particular, we characterize the new invariant beams that were obtained by modulating the amplitude of the annular mask and when the incident field was modulated with a one-dimensional quadratic or cubic phase. Experimental results using an amplitude mask are shown in order to corroborate the numerical predictions.

  6. New asymmetric propagation invariant beams obtained by amplitude and phase modulation in frequency space

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Hernández, J.; Arroyo Carrasco, M.L.; Méndez Otero, M.M.; Chávez-Cerda, S.; Iturbe Castillo, M.D.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate, numerically and experimentally that using the mask-lens setup used by Durnin to generate Bessel beams Durnin [Phys. Rev. Lett. 58, 1499 (1987)], it is possible to generate different kinds of propagation invariant beams. A modification in the amplitude or phase of the field that illuminates the annular slit is proposed that corresponds to modulation in frequency space. In particular, we characterize the new invariant beams that were obtained by modulating the amplitude of the annular mask and when the incident field was modulated with a one-dimensional quadratic or cubic phase. Experimental results using an amplitude mask are shown in order to corroborate the numerical predictions. PMID:25705088

  7. Fortnightly modulation of San Andreas tremor and low-frequency earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Elst, Nicholas J.; Delorey, Andrew A.; Shelly, David R.; Johnson, Paul A.

    2016-08-01

    Earth tides modulate tremor and low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) on faults in the vicinity of the brittle-ductile (seismic-aseismic) transition. The response to the tidal stress carries otherwise inaccessible information about fault strength and rheology. Here, we analyze the LFE response to the fortnightly tide, which modulates the amplitude of the daily tidal stress over a 14-d cycle. LFE rate is highest during the waxing fortnightly tide, with LFEs most strongly promoted when the daily stress exceeds the previous peak stress by the widest margin. This pattern implies a threshold failure process, with slip initiated when stress exceeds the local fault strength. Variations in sensitivity to the fortnightly modulation may reflect the degree of stress concentration on LFE-producing brittle asperities embedded within an otherwise aseismic fault.

  8. Fortnightly modulation of San Andreas tremor and low-frequency earthquakes

    DOE PAGES

    van der Elst, Nicholas J.; Delorey, Andrew A.; Shelly, David R.; ...

    2016-07-18

    Earth tides modulate tremor and low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) on faults in the vicinity of the brittle-ductile (seismic-aseismic) transition. Our response to the tidal stress carries otherwise inaccessible information about fault strength and rheology. We analyze the LFE response to the fortnightly tide, which modulates the amplitude of the daily tidal stress over a 14-d cycle. LFE rate is highest during the waxing fortnightly tide, with LFEs most strongly promoted when the daily stress exceeds the previous peak stress by the widest margin. This pattern implies a threshold failure process, with slip initiated when stress exceeds the local fault strength. Furthermore,more » variations in sensitivity to the fortnightly modulation may reflect the degree of stress concentration on LFE-producing brittle asperities embedded within an otherwise aseismic fault.« less

  9. Effect of noise on modulation amplitude and phase in frequency-domain diffusive imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kupinski, Matthew A.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. We theoretically investigate the effect of noise on frequency-domain heterodyne and/or homodyne measurements of intensity-modulated beams propagating through diffusive media, such as a photon density wave. We assumed that the attenuated amplitude and delayed phase are estimated by taking the Fourier transform of the noisy, modulated output data. We show that the estimated amplitude and phase are biased when the number of output photons is small. We also show that the use of image intensifiers for photon amplification in heterodyne or homodyne measurements increases the amount of biases. Especially, it turns out that the biased estimation is independent of AC-dependent noise in sinusoidal heterodyne or homodyne outputs. Finally, the developed theory indicates that the previously known variance model of modulation amplitude and phase is not valid in low light situations. Monte-Carlo simulations with varied numbers of input photons verify our theoretical trends of the bias. PMID:22352660

  10. Frequency modulation technique for wide-field imaging of magnetic field with nitrogen-vacancy ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Yukihiro; Kashiwaya, Satoshi; Nomura, Shintaro

    2017-04-01

    We report on the application of a frequency modulation technique to wide-field magnetic field imaging of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond at room temperature. We use a scientific CMOS (sCMOS) camera to collect photoluminescence images from a large number of nitrogen-vacancy center ensembles in parallel. This technique allows a significant reduction in the measurement time required to obtain a magnetic field image compared with a scanning probe approach at a comparable magnetic field sensitivity.

  11. Two-tone frequency modulation spectroscopy from laser light scattered off a hard target.

    PubMed

    Powers, P E; Taatjes, C A; Kulp, T J

    1996-08-20

    One can apply two-tone frequency modulation spectroscopy techniques to the detection of gas-phase species by using laser light scattered from hard targets. High sensitivities are demonstrated, with a minimum detectable absorption of 10(-4) possible with a simple apparatus. The effects of laser speckle on the FM signal are described, and we show that the detection signal-to-noise ratio can be improved by collecting an increased number of speckle cells.

  12. Discrimination and Identification of Modulation-Frequency Using Noise, Tone, and Tonal-Complex Carriers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-23

    choice discrimination task (2I- 2AFC ) and an identifi- cation task were used to measure listeners’ abilities to resolve modulation frequency using three...different types of carrier—noise, a 1-kHz tone, or a tonal complex. Identification performance was not simply related to 2I- 2AFC discrimination...LABORATORY ii ABSTRACT A two-interval, two-alternative, forced-choice discrimination task (2I- 2AFC ) and an identification task were used to measure

  13. Shaping pulses using frequency conversion with a modulated picosecond free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, B.A.; Madey, J.M.J.

    1995-12-31

    Computer simulations and experiments indicate that we can shape the infrared picosecond pulses of the Mark III FEL in amplitude, frequency, and phase. Strongly modulated fundamental and second harmonic pulses have been generated by operating the Mark III FEL in the regime of strong sideband growth. In this paper, we present the results of simulations and experiments for second harmonic generation with fundamental inputs from 2 to 3 {mu}m.

  14. Modulation of the Interaction between a Peptide Ligand and a G Protein-Coupled Receptor by Halogen Atoms.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Mònica; Caltabiano, Gianluigi; Barreto-Valer, Katy; Gonzalez-Nunez, Verónica; Gómez-Tamayo, José C; Ardá, Ana; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Pardo, Leonardo; Rodríguez, Raquel E; Arsequell, Gemma; Valencia, Gregorio

    2015-08-13

    Systematic halogenation of two native opioid peptides has shown that halogen atoms can modulate peptide-receptor interactions in different manners. First, halogens may produce a steric hindrance that reduces the binding of the peptide to the receptor. Second, chlorine, bromine, or iodine may improve peptide binding if their positive σ-hole forms a halogen bond interaction with negatively charged atoms of the protein. Lastly, the negative electrostatic potential of fluorine can interact with positively charged atoms of the protein to improve peptide binding.

  15. Modulation of the Interaction between a Peptide Ligand and a G Protein-Coupled Receptor by Halogen Atoms

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Systematic halogenation of two native opioid peptides has shown that halogen atoms can modulate peptide–receptor interactions in different manners. First, halogens may produce a steric hindrance that reduces the binding of the peptide to the receptor. Second, chlorine, bromine, or iodine may improve peptide binding if their positive σ-hole forms a halogen bond interaction with negatively charged atoms of the protein. Lastly, the negative electrostatic potential of fluorine can interact with positively charged atoms of the protein to improve peptide binding. PMID:26288687

  16. T-shaped cavity dual-frequency Nd:YAG laser with electro-optical modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Junhong; Jiao, Mingxing; Liu, Yun

    2016-05-01

    A T-shaped cavity dual-frequency Nd:YAG laser with electro-optical modulation is proposed, which consists of both p- and s-cavities sharing the same gain medium of Nd:YAG. Each cavity was not only able to select longitudinal mode but also tune frequency using an electro-optic birefringent filter polarization beam splitter + lithium niobate. The frequency difference of dual frequency was tuned through the whole gain bandwidth of Nd:YAG, which is far above the usually accepted free spectral range value in the case of a single-axis laser. As a result, the simultaneous operation of orthogonally and linearly polarized dual-frequency laser was obtained, which coincides with the theoretical analysis based on Jones matrices. The obtained frequency difference ranges from 0 to 132 GHz. This offers a simple and widely tunable source with potential for portable frequency reference applications in terahertz-wave generation and absolute-distance interferometry measurement areas.

  17. An ultrawide-bandwidth single-sideband modulator for terahertz frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meijer, A. S.; Berden, G.; Arslanov, D. D.; Ozerov, M.; Jongma, R. T.; van der Zande, W. J.

    2016-11-01

    Wireless high-speed data communication using terahertz (THz) carrier frequencies is becoming reality with data rates beyond 100 Gbit s-1. Many of the mobile applications use internet access and require that THz wireless base stations are connected to a global network, such as the radio-over-fibre network. We present the realization of an ultrawide bandwidth THz optical single-sideband (OSSB) modulator for converting (free-space) THz signals to THz optical modulations with an increased spectral efficiency. THz OSSB will mitigate chromatic dispersion-induced propagation losses in optical fibres and support digital modulation schemes. We demonstrate THz OSSB for free-space radiation between 0.3 and 1.0 THz using a specially designed dichroic beamsplitter for signal and carrier, and a planar light-wave circuit with multimode interference structures. This arrangement of optical elements mimics the Hartley single-sideband modulator for electronics signals and accomplishes the required Hilbert transform without any frequency-dependent tuning element over an ultrawide THz spectrum.

  18. Four-dimensional modulation and coding: An alternate to frequency-reuse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, S. G.; Sleeper, H. A.

    1983-01-01

    Four dimensional modulation as a means of improving communication efficiency on the band-limited Gaussian channel, with the four dimensions of signal space constituted by phase orthogonal carriers (cos omega sub c t and sin omega sub c t) simultaneously on space orthogonal electromagnetic waves are discussed. "Frequency reuse' techniques use such polarization orthogonality to reuse the same frequency slot, but the modulation is not treated as four dimensional, rather a product of two-d modulations, e.g., QPSK. It is well known that, higher dimensionality signalling affords possible improvements in the power bandwidth sense. Four-D modulations based upon subsets of lattice-packings in four-D, which afford simplification of encoding and decoding are described. Sets of up to 1024 signals are constructed in four-D, providing a (Nyquist) spectral efficiency of up to 10 bps/Hz. Energy gains over the reuse technique are in the one to three dB range t equal bandwidth.

  19. Low-frequency vibration modulation of guided waves to image nonlinear scatterers for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, J. P.; Drinkwater, B. W.; Neild, S. A.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2009-06-01

    Guided wave structural health monitoring offers the prospect of continuous interrogation of large plate-like structures with a sparse network of permanently attached sensors. Currently, the most common approach is to monitor changes in the received signals by subtraction from a reference signal obtained when the structure was known to be defect-free. In this paper a comparison is made between this defect-free subtraction approach and a technique in which low-frequency vibration modulation of guided wave signals is used to detect nonlinear scatterers. The modulation technique potentially overcomes the need for the defect-free reference measurement as the subtraction is now made between different parts of an externally applied low-frequency vibration. Linear defects were simulated by masses bonded onto a plate and nonlinear scatterers were simulated by loading a similar mass against the plate. The experimental results show that the defect-free subtraction technique performs well in detecting the bonded mass whereas the modulation technique is able to discriminate between the bonded and loaded masses. Furthermore, because the modulation technique does not require a defect-free reference, it is shown to be relatively independent of temperature effects, a significant problem for reference based subtraction techniques.

  20. Hydrogen atom temperature measured with wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, H. Goto, M.; Tsumori, K.; Kisaki, M.; Ikeda, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Osakabe, M.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O.; Nishiyama, S.; Sasaki, K.

    2015-04-08

    The velocity distribution function of hydrogen atoms is one of the useful parameters to understand particle dynamics from negative hydrogen production to extraction in a negative hydrogen ion source. Hydrogen atom temperature is one of the indicators of the velocity distribution function. To find a feasibility of hydrogen atom temperature measurement in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source for fusion, a model calculation of wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy of the hydrogen Balmer alpha line was performed. By utilizing a wide range tunable diode laser, we successfully obtained the hydrogen atom temperature of ∼3000 K in the vicinity of the plasma grid electrode. The hydrogen atom temperature increases as well as the arc power, and becomes constant after decreasing with the filling of hydrogen gas pressure.

  1. Modulation of periodic field on the atomic current in optical lattices with Landau-Zener tunneling considered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jie-Yun; Wang, Lan-Yu

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the atomic current in optical lattices under the presence of both constant and periodic external field with Landau-Zener tunneling considered. By simplifying the system to a two-band model, the atomic current is obtained based on the Boltzmann equations. We focus on three situations to discuss the influence of the Landau-Zener tunneling and periodic field on the atomic current. Numerical calculations show the atomic transient current would finally become the stable oscillation, whose amplitude and average value can be further adjusted by the periodic external field. It is concluded that the periodic external field could provide an effective modulation on the atomic current even when the Landau-Zener tunneling probability has almostly become a constant.

  2. Characterization of spatially modulated multicomponent materials deposited by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Nicholas

    CHARACTERIZATION OF SPATIALLY MODULATED MULTICOMPONENT MATERIALS DEPOSITED BY ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION Nicholas G. Becker, Ph.D. Illinois Institute of Technology, July 2014 Adviser: Dr. John F. Zasadzinski Spatially modulated multicomponent materials are used in a variety of fields and industries. In this dissertation Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) will be used to create two types of spatially modulated materials: Erbium doped Yttrium Oxide (Er +3:Y2O3) for high-energy lasers and standard reference materials for Synchrotron based X-ray Fluorescence (SXRF) and Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM). Er+3:Y2O 3 was produced and the inter- and intra-layer doping of each film was controlled by the cycle ration of ALD grown Er2O3:Y 2O3 and the steric hinderance of erbium precursor ligands, respectively. Photoluminescent spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction measurements showed that all films of Er+3:Y2O3 were crystalline as deposited, with no evidence of amorphous, or glassy, emission lines in the PLS spectra. Photoluminescent Lifetime (PLL) measurements were performed to prove that ALD can be used to control both the inter- and intra-layer doping. PLL was shown to vary with both Er2O3:Y 2O3 cycle ratio ad with erbium precursor growth rate, increasing to a maximum of 6.5ms. This is the longest PLL reported for ALD grown Er +3:Y 2O3. Results from Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, and ultraviolet to visible light spectroscopy are presented to verify inter- and intra-layer doping control. Standard reference materials for SXRF and STXM were produced via ALD on transmission electron microscopy windows and native oxide silicon. Materials produced were Fe203, TiO2, ZnO, AlO 3, and Y2O3. Films were analyzed with SXRF, and STXM to determine the optical density and from this the areal density was calculated using preexisting standard reference materials and absorption value charts. It was found that the RBS measurements were

  3. High accuracy microwave frequency measurement based on single-drive dual-parallel Mach-Zehnder modulator.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying; Pang, Xiaodan; Deng, Lei; Yu, Xianbin; Zheng, Xiaoping; Zhou, Bingkun; Monroy, Idelfonso Tafur

    2011-12-12

    A novel approach for broadband microwave frequency measurement by employing a single-drive dual-parallel Mach-Zehnder modulator is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. Based on bias manipulations of the modulator, conventional frequency-to-power mapping technique is developed by performing a two-stage frequency measurement cooperating with digital signal processing. In the experiment, 10 GHz measurement range is guaranteed and the average uncertainty of estimated microwave frequency is 5.4 MHz, which verifies the measurement accuracy is significantly improved by achieving an unprecedented 10(-3) relative error. This high accuracy frequency measurement technique is a promising candidate for high-speed electronic warfare and defense applications.

  4. Time-frequency atoms-driven support vector machine method for bearings incipient fault diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ruonan; Yang, Boyuan; Zhang, Xiaoli; Wang, Shibin; Chen, Xuefeng

    2016-06-01

    Bearing plays an essential role in the performance of mechanical system and fault diagnosis of mechanical system is inseparably related to the diagnosis of the bearings. However, it is a challenge to detect weak fault from the complex and non-stationary vibration signals with a large amount of noise, especially at the early stage. To improve the anti-noise ability and detect incipient fault, a novel fault detection method based on a short-time matching method and Support Vector Machine (SVM) is proposed. In this paper, the mechanism of roller bearing is discussed and the impact time frequency dictionary is constructed targeting the multi-component characteristics and fault feature of roller bearing fault vibration signals. Then, a short-time matching method is described and the simulation results show the excellent feature extraction effects in extremely low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). After extracting the most relevance atoms as features, SVM was trained for fault recognition. Finally, the practical bearing experiments indicate that the proposed method is more effective and efficient than the traditional methods in weak impact signal oscillatory characters extraction and incipient fault diagnosis.

  5. Spin-wave storage using chirped control fields in atomic frequency comb-based quantum memory

    SciTech Connect

    Minar, Jiri; Sangouard, Nicolas; Afzelius, Mikael; Riedmatten, Hugues de; Gisin, Nicolas

    2010-10-15

    It has been shown that an inhomogeneously broadened optical transition shaped into an atomic frequency comb can store a large number of temporal modes of the electromagnetic field at the single-photon level without the need to increase the optical depth of the storage material. The readout of light modes is made efficient thanks to the rephasing of the optical-wavelength coherence similar to photon-echo-type techniques, and the reemission time is given by the comb structure. For on-demand readout and long storage times, two control fields are used to transfer the optical coherence back and forth into a spin wave. Here, we present a detailed analysis of the spin-wave storage based on chirped adiabatic control fields. In particular, we verify that chirped fields require significantly weaker intensities than {pi} pulses. The price to pay is a reduction of the multimode storage capacity that we quantify for realistic material parameters associated with solids doped with rare-earth-metal ions.

  6. Spin-wave storage using chirped control fields in atomic frequency comb-based quantum memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minář, Jiří; Sangouard, Nicolas; Afzelius, Mikael; de Riedmatten, Hugues; Gisin, Nicolas

    2010-10-01

    It has been shown that an inhomogeneously broadened optical transition shaped into an atomic frequency comb can store a large number of temporal modes of the electromagnetic field at the single-photon level without the need to increase the optical depth of the storage material. The readout of light modes is made efficient thanks to the rephasing of the optical-wavelength coherence similar to photon-echo-type techniques, and the reemission time is given by the comb structure. For on-demand readout and long storage times, two control fields are used to transfer the optical coherence back and forth into a spin wave. Here, we present a detailed analysis of the spin-wave storage based on chirped adiabatic control fields. In particular, we verify that chirped fields require significantly weaker intensities than π pulses. The price to pay is a reduction of the multimode storage capacity that we quantify for realistic material parameters associated with solids doped with rare-earth-metal ions.

  7. Homogeneous spectral spanning of terahertz semiconductor lasers with radio frequency modulation.

    PubMed

    Wan, W J; Li, H; Zhou, T; Cao, J C

    2017-03-08

    Homogeneous broadband and electrically pumped semiconductor radiation sources emitting in the terahertz regime are highly desirable for various applications, including spectroscopy, chemical sensing, and gas identification. In the frequency range between 1 and 5 THz, unipolar quantum cascade lasers employing electron inter-subband transitions in multiple-quantum-well structures are the most powerful semiconductor light sources. However, these devices are normally characterized by either a narrow emission spectrum due to the narrow gain bandwidth of the inter-subband optical transitions or an inhomogeneous broad terahertz spectrum from lasers with heterogeneous stacks of active regions. Here, we report the demonstration of homogeneous spectral spanning of long-cavity terahertz semiconductor quantum cascade lasers based on a bound-to-continuum and resonant phonon design under radio frequency modulation. At a single drive current, the terahertz spectrum under radio frequency modulation continuously spans 330 GHz (~8% of the central frequency), which is the record for single plasmon waveguide terahertz lasers with a bound-to-continuum design. The homogeneous broadband terahertz sources can be used for spectroscopic applications, i.e., GaAs etalon transmission measurement and ammonia gas identification.

  8. A nonmystical treatment of tape speed compensation for frequency modulated signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, O. M., Jr.

    After briefly reviewing frequency modulation and demodulation, tape speed variation is modeled as a distortion of the independent variable of a frequency-modulated signal. This distortion gives rise to an additive amplitude error in the demodulated message, which comprises two terms. Both terms depend on the derivative of time base error, that is, the flutter of the analog tape machine. It is pointed out that the first term depends on the channel's center frequency and frequency deviation constant, as well as on the flutter, and that the second depends solely on the message and flutter. A description is given of the relationship between the additive amplitude error and manufacturer's flutter specification. For the case of a constant message, relative errors and signal-to-noise ratios are discussed to provide insight into when the variation in tape speed will cause significant errors. An algorithm is then developed which theoretically achieves full compensation of tape speed variation. After being confirmed via spectral computations on laboratory data, the algorithm is applied to field data.

  9. Homogeneous spectral spanning of terahertz semiconductor lasers with radio frequency modulation

    PubMed Central

    Wan, W. J.; Li, H.; Zhou, T.; Cao, J. C.

    2017-01-01

    Homogeneous broadband and electrically pumped semiconductor radiation sources emitting in the terahertz regime are highly desirable for various applications, including spectroscopy, chemical sensing, and gas identification. In the frequency range between 1 and 5 THz, unipolar quantum cascade lasers employing electron inter-subband transitions in multiple-quantum-well structures are the most powerful semiconductor light sources. However, these devices are normally characterized by either a narrow emission spectrum due to the narrow gain bandwidth of the inter-subband optical transitions or an inhomogeneous broad terahertz spectrum from lasers with heterogeneous stacks of active regions. Here, we report the demonstration of homogeneous spectral spanning of long-cavity terahertz semiconductor quantum cascade lasers based on a bound-to-continuum and resonant phonon design under radio frequency modulation. At a single drive current, the terahertz spectrum under radio frequency modulation continuously spans 330 GHz (~8% of the central frequency), which is the record for single plasmon waveguide terahertz lasers with a bound-to-continuum design. The homogeneous broadband terahertz sources can be used for spectroscopic applications, i.e., GaAs etalon transmission measurement and ammonia gas identification. PMID:28272492

  10. Homogeneous spectral spanning of terahertz semiconductor lasers with radio frequency modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, W. J.; Li, H.; Zhou, T.; Cao, J. C.

    2017-03-01

    Homogeneous broadband and electrically pumped semiconductor radiation sources emitting in the terahertz regime are highly desirable for various applications, including spectroscopy, chemical sensing, and gas identification. In the frequency range between 1 and 5 THz, unipolar quantum cascade lasers employing electron inter-subband transitions in multiple-quantum-well structures are the most powerful semiconductor light sources. However, these devices are normally characterized by either a narrow emission spectrum due to the narrow gain bandwidth of the inter-subband optical transitions or an inhomogeneous broad terahertz spectrum from lasers with heterogeneous stacks of active regions. Here, we report the demonstration of homogeneous spectral spanning of long-cavity terahertz semiconductor quantum cascade lasers based on a bound-to-continuum and resonant phonon design under radio frequency modulation. At a single drive current, the terahertz spectrum under radio frequency modulation continuously spans 330 GHz (~8% of the central frequency), which is the record for single plasmon waveguide terahertz lasers with a bound-to-continuum design. The homogeneous broadband terahertz sources can be used for spectroscopic applications, i.e., GaAs etalon transmission measurement and ammonia gas identification.

  11. Compact field programmable gate array-based pulse-sequencer and radio-frequency generator for experiments with trapped atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Pruttivarasin, Thaned; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2015-11-15

    We present a compact field-programmable gate array (FPGA) based pulse sequencer and radio-frequency (RF) generator suitable for experiments with cold trapped ions and atoms. The unit is capable of outputting a pulse sequence with at least 32 transistor-transistor logic (TTL) channels with a timing resolution of 40 ns and contains a built-in 100 MHz frequency counter for counting electrical pulses from a photo-multiplier tube. There are 16 independent direct-digital-synthesizers RF sources with fast (rise-time of ∼60 ns) amplitude switching and sub-mHz frequency tuning from 0 to 800 MHz.

  12. Frequency-Modulated, Continuous-Wave Laser Ranging Using Photon-Counting Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erkmen, Baris I.; Barber, Zeb W.; Dahl, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Optical ranging is a problem of estimating the round-trip flight time of a phase- or amplitude-modulated optical beam that reflects off of a target. Frequency- modulated, continuous-wave (FMCW) ranging systems obtain this estimate by performing an interferometric measurement between a local frequency- modulated laser beam and a delayed copy returning from the target. The range estimate is formed by mixing the target-return field with the local reference field on a beamsplitter and detecting the resultant beat modulation. In conventional FMCW ranging, the source modulation is linear in instantaneous frequency, the reference-arm field has many more photons than the target-return field, and the time-of-flight estimate is generated by balanced difference- detection of the beamsplitter output, followed by a frequency-domain peak search. This work focused on determining the maximum-likelihood (ML) estimation algorithm when continuous-time photoncounting detectors are used. It is founded on a rigorous statistical characterization of the (random) photoelectron emission times as a function of the incident optical field, including the deleterious effects caused by dark current and dead time. These statistics enable derivation of the Cramér-Rao lower bound (CRB) on the accuracy of FMCW ranging, and derivation of the ML estimator, whose performance approaches this bound at high photon flux. The estimation algorithm was developed, and its optimality properties were shown in simulation. Experimental data show that it performs better than the conventional estimation algorithms used. The demonstrated improvement is a factor of 1.414 over frequency-domainbased estimation. If the target interrogating photons and the local reference field photons are costed equally, the optimal allocation of photons between these two arms is to have them equally distributed. This is different than the state of the art, in which the local field is stronger than the target return. The optimal

  13. OCT based on multi-frequency sweeping Fizeau interferometer with phase modulating method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S.; Watanabe, T.; Sasaki, O.; Suzuki, T.

    2013-09-01

    The Multi-frequency sweeping Fizeau-type interferometer (MFS-FI) for optical coherence tomography (OCT) is demonstrated. The multi-frequency sweeping by a variable Fabry-Perot filter permits detection of high-order low-coherence interferometric signals in the Fizeau interferometer. The sinusoidal phase modulation technique was utilized to detect accurate interference amplitude and phase distributions of back scattered light from surfaces of a sample. OCT measurements by the MFS-FI were conducted for vibrating glass plates with a frequency of 1 kHz, and cellular tissues fixed with formalin and embedded in paraffin. The tomographic 3-dimensional volume and cross-sectional surface displacements were detected with an accuracy of nano-meters.

  14. A low phase noise microwave frequency synthesis for a high-performance cesium vapor cell atomic clock

    SciTech Connect

    François, B.; Boudot, R.; Calosso, C. E.; Danet, J. M.

    2014-09-15

    We report the development, absolute phase noise, and residual phase noise characterization of a 9.192 GHz microwave frequency synthesis chain devoted to be used as a local oscillator in a high-performance cesium vapor cell atomic clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT). It is based on frequency multiplication of an ultra-low phase noise 100 MHz oven-controlled quartz crystal oscillator using a nonlinear transmission line-based chain. Absolute phase noise performances of the 9.192 GHz output signal are measured to be −42, −100, −117 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz and −129 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 1 Hz, 100 Hz, 1 kHz, and 10 kHz offset frequencies, respectively. Compared to current results obtained in a state-of-the-art CPT-based frequency standard developed at LNE-SYRTE, this represents an improvement of 8 dB and 10 dB at f = 166 Hz and f = 10 kHz, respectively. With such performances, the expected Dick effect contribution to the atomic clock short term frequency stability is reported at a level of 6.2 × 10{sup −14} at 1 s integration time, that is a factor 3 higher than the atomic clock shot noise limit. Main limitations are pointed out.

  15. A low phase noise microwave frequency synthesis for a high-performance cesium vapor cell atomic clock.

    PubMed

    François, B; Calosso, C E; Danet, J M; Boudot, R

    2014-09-01

    We report the development, absolute phase noise, and residual phase noise characterization of a 9.192 GHz microwave frequency synthesis chain devoted to be used as a local oscillator in a high-performance cesium vapor cell atomic clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT). It is based on frequency multiplication of an ultra-low phase noise 100 MHz oven-controlled quartz crystal oscillator using a nonlinear transmission line-based chain. Absolute phase noise performances of the 9.192 GHz output signal are measured to be -42, -100, -117 dB rad(2)/Hz and -129 dB rad(2)/Hz at 1 Hz, 100 Hz, 1 kHz, and 10 kHz offset frequencies, respectively. Compared to current results obtained in a state-of-the-art CPT-based frequency standard developed at LNE-SYRTE, this represents an improvement of 8 dB and 10 dB at f = 166 Hz and f = 10 kHz, respectively. With such performances, the expected Dick effect contribution to the atomic clock short term frequency stability is reported at a level of 6.2 × 10(-14) at 1 s integration time, that is a factor 3 higher than the atomic clock shot noise limit. Main limitations are pointed out.

  16. A low phase noise microwave frequency synthesis for a high-performance cesium vapor cell atomic clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    François, B.; Calosso, C. E.; Danet, J. M.; Boudot, R.

    2014-09-01

    We report the development, absolute phase noise, and residual phase noise characterization of a 9.192 GHz microwave frequency synthesis chain devoted to be used as a local oscillator in a high-performance cesium vapor cell atomic clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT). It is based on frequency multiplication of an ultra-low phase noise 100 MHz oven-controlled quartz crystal oscillator using a nonlinear transmission line-based chain. Absolute phase noise performances of the 9.192 GHz output signal are measured to be -42, -100, -117 dB rad2/Hz and -129 dB rad2/Hz at 1 Hz, 100 Hz, 1 kHz, and 10 kHz offset frequencies, respectively. Compared to current results obtained in a state-of-the-art CPT-based frequency standard developed at LNE-SYRTE, this represents an improvement of 8 dB and 10 dB at f = 166 Hz and f = 10 kHz, respectively. With such performances, the expected Dick effect contribution to the atomic clock short term frequency stability is reported at a level of 6.2 × 10-14 at 1 s integration time, that is a factor 3 higher than the atomic clock shot noise limit. Main limitations are pointed out.

  17. Feasibility of frequency-modulated wireless transmission for a multi-purpose MEMS-based accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Sabato, Alessandro; Feng, Maria Q

    2014-09-05

    Recent advances in the Micro Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) technology have made wireless MEMS accelerometers an attractive tool for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) of civil engineering structures. To date, sensors' low sensitivity and accuracy--especially at very low frequencies--have imposed serious limitations for their application in monitoring large-sized structures. Conventionally, the MEMS sensor's analog signals are converted to digital signals before radio-frequency (RF) wireless transmission. The conversion can cause a low sensitivity to the important low-frequency and low-amplitude signals. To overcome this difficulty, the authors have developed a MEMS accelerometer system, which converts the sensor output voltage to a frequency-modulated signal before RF transmission. This is achieved by using a Voltage to Frequency Conversion (V/F) instead of the conventional Analog to Digital Conversion (ADC). In this paper, a prototype MEMS accelerometer system is presented, which consists of a transmitter and receiver circuit boards. The former is equipped with a MEMS accelerometer, a V/F converter and a wireless RF transmitter, while the latter contains an RF receiver and a F/V converter for demodulating the signal. The efficacy of the MEMS accelerometer system in measuring low-frequency and low-amplitude dynamic responses is demonstrated through extensive laboratory tests and experiments on a flow-loop pipeline.

  18. Transcranial alternating current stimulation modulates spontaneous low frequency fluctuations as measured with fMRI.

    PubMed

    Cabral-Calderin, Yuranny; Williams, Kathleen A; Opitz, Alexander; Dechent, Peter; Wilke, Melanie

    2016-11-01

    Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) is a promising tool for modulating brain oscillations. Combining tACS with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we recently showed that tACS applied over the occipital cortex did not exert its strongest effect on regions below the electrodes, but mainly on more distant fronto-parietal regions. Theoretically, this effect could be explained by tACS-induced modulation of functional connectivity between directly stimulated areas and more distant but anatomically and functionally connected regions. In the present study, we aimed to characterize the effect of tACS on low frequency fMRI signal fluctuations. We employed simultaneous fMRI-tACS in 20 subjects during resting state (eyes open with central fixation for ~8min). Subjects received tACS at different frequencies (10, 16, 40Hz) and with different electrode montages (Cz-Oz, P5-P6) previously used in behavioral studies. Electric field simulations showed that tACS over Cz-Oz directly stimulates occipital cortex, while tACS over P5-P6 primarily targets parietal cortices. Group-level simulation-based functional connectivity maps for Cz-Oz and P5-P6 resembled the visual and fronto-parietal control resting-state networks, respectively. The effects of tACS were frequency and partly electrode montage dependent. In regions where frequency-dependent effects of tACS were observed, 10 and 40Hz tACS generally induced opposite effects. Most tACS effects on functional connectivity were observed between, as opposed to within, resting-state networks. The left fronto-parietal control network showed the most extensive frequency-dependent modulation in functional connectivity, mainly with occipito-parietal regions, where 10Hz tACS increased and 40Hz tACS decreased correlation values. Taken together, our results show that tACS modulates local spontaneous low frequency fluctuations and their correlations with more distant regions, which should be taken into account when

  19. Measuring the spin polarization of alkali-metal atoms using nuclear magnetic resonance frequency shifts of noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X. H.; Luo, H.; Qu, T. L. Yang, K. Y.; Ding, Z. C.

    2015-10-15

    We report a novel method of measuring the spin polarization of alkali-metal atoms by detecting the NMR frequency shifts of noble gases. We calculated the profile of {sup 87}Rb D1 line absorption cross sections. We then measured the absorption profile of the sample cell, from which we calculated the {sup 87}Rb number densities at different temperatures. Then we measured the frequency shifts resulted from the spin polarization of the {sup 87}Rb atoms and calculated its polarization degrees at different temperatures. The behavior of frequency shifts versus temperature in experiment was consistent with theoretical calculation, which may be used as compensative signal for the NMRG closed-loop control system.

  20. Dust removal in radio-frequency plasmas by a traveling potential modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yangfang; Jiang Ke; Thomas, Hubertus M.; Morfill, Gregor E.

    2010-06-16

    The dust contamination in plasma deposition processes plays a crucial role in the quality and the yield of the products. To improve the quality and the yield of plasma processing, a favorable way is to remove the dust particles actively from the plasma reactors.Our recent experiments in the striped electrode device show that a traveling plasma modulation allows for a systematic particle removal independent of the reactor size. Besides the rf powered electrode, the striped electrode device includes a segmented electrode that consists of 100 electrically insulated narrow stripes. A traveling potential profile is produced by the modulation of the voltage signals applied on the stripes. The dust particles are trapped in the potential wells and transported with the traveling of the potential profile.The particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation on the potential above the segmented electrode indicates that the traveling potential profile can be realized either by applying low-frequency (0.1-10 Hz) voltage signals with a fixed phase shift between adjacent stripes or high-frequency (10 kHz a circumflex AS 100 MHz) signals with the amplitudes modulated by a low-frequency envelope. The transportation of the dust particles is simulated with a two-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) code with the potential profile obtained from the PIC simulation. The MD results reproduce the experimental observations successfully.This technology allows for an active removal of the contaminating particles in processing plasmas and it is independent of the reactor size. The removal velocity is controllable by adjusting the parameters for the modulation.

  1. Different pulse pattern generation by frequency detuning in pulse modulated actively mode-locked ytterbium doped fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, He; Chen, Sheng-Ping; Si, Lei; Zhang, Bin; Jiang, Zong-Fu

    2015-10-01

    We report the results of our recent experimental investigation of the modulation frequency detuning effect on the output pulse dynamics in a pulse modulated actively mode-locked ytterbium doped fiber laser. The experimental study shows the existence of five different mode-locking states that mainly depend on the modulation frequency detuning, which are: (a) amplitude-even harmonic/fundamental mode-locking, (b) Q-switched harmonic/fundamental mode-locking, (c) sinusoidal wave modulation mode, (d) pulses bundle state, and (e) noise-like state. A detailed experimental characterization of the output pulses dynamics in each operating mode is presented.

  2. Broadband atomic-layer MoS2 optical modulators for ultrafast pulse generations in the visible range.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuxia; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Rui; Zhao, Gang; Zhang, Huaijin; Chen, Yanxue; Mei, Liangmo; Tonelli, Mauro; Wang, Jiyang

    2017-02-01

    Visible lasers are a fascinating regime, and their significance is illustrated by the 2014 Noble prizes in physics and chemistry. With the development of blue laser diodes (LDs), the LD-pumped solid-state visible lasers become a burgeoning direction today. Constrained by the scarce visible optical modulators, the solid-state ultrafast visible lasers are rarely realized. Based on the bandgap structure and optoelectronic properties of atomic-layer MoS2, it can be proposed that MoS2 has the potential as a visible optical modulator. Here, by originally revealing layer-dependent nonlinear absorption of the atomic-layer MoS2 in the visible range, broadband atomic-layer MoS2 optical modulators for the visible ultrafast pulse generation are developed and selected based on the proposed design criteria for novel two-dimensional (2D) optical modulators. By applying the selected MoS2 optical modulators in the solid-state praseodymium lasers, broadband mode-locked ultrafast lasers from 522 to 639 nm are originally realized. We believe that this Letter should promote the development of visible ultrafast photonics and further applications of 2D optoelectronic materials.

  3. New microwave excitation signal generating circuit for quantum frequency standard on the atoms of caesium Cs133

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, A. A.; Davydov, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    In this work the study, design, development and experimental results of a new microwave excitation signal generating circuit are presented. New design of this circuit is based on the method of direct digital synthesis. The results of theoretical calculations and experimental researches show that the new design not only has a high precision, but also has an improvement in the spectral characteristics of the output signal. Range of generated output frequencies is expanded, that leads to the possibility of detuning the frequency of the neighboring resonance of spectral line and adjust the C-field in quantum frequency standard. Experimental research of the metrological characteristics of the quantum frequency standard on the atoms of caesium with a new functional unit showed an improvement in the daily frequency stability.

  4. Frequency-domain endoscopic diffuse optical tomography reconstruction algorithm based on dual-modulation-frequency and dual-points source diffuse equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhuanping; Hou, Qiang; Zhao, Huijuan; Yang, Yanshuang; Zhou, Xiaoqing; Gao, Feng

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, frequency-domain endoscopic diffuse optical tomography image reconstruction algorithm based on dual-modulation-frequency and dual-points source diffuse equation is investigated for the reconstruction of the optical parameters including the absorption and reducing scattering coefficients. The forward problem is solved by the finite element method based on the frequency domain diffuse equation (FD-DE) for dual-points source approximation and multi-modulation-frequency. In the image reconstruction, a multi-modulation-frequency Newton-Raphson algorithm is applied to obtain the solution. To further improve the image accuracy and quality, a method based on the region of interest (ROI) is applied on the above procedures. The simulation is performed in the tubular model to verify the validity of the algorithm. Results show that the FD-DE with dual-points source approximate is more accuracy at shorter source-detector separation. The reconstruction with dual-modulation-frequency improves the image accuracy and quality compared to the results with single-modulation-frequency and triple-modulation-frequency method. The peak optical coefficients in ROI (ROI_max) are almost equivalent to the true optical coefficients with the relative error less than 6.67%. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) achieves 82% of the true radius. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and image coefficient(IC) is 5.678 and 26.962, respectively. Additionally, the results with the method based on ROI show that the ROI_max is equivalent to the true value. The FWHM can improve by 88% of the true radius. The CNR and IC is improved over 7.782 and 45.335, respectively.

  5. Modulation of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystallization by citrate through selective binding to atomic steps

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, S R; Wierzbicki, A; Salter, E A; Zepeda, S; Orme, C A; Hoyer, J R; Nancollas, G H; Cody, A M; De Yoreo, J J

    2004-10-19

    The majority of human kidney stones are composed primarily of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals. Thus, determining the molecular mechanisms by which urinary constituents modulate calcium oxalate crystallization is crucial for understanding and controlling urolithiassis in humans. A comprehensive molecular-scale view of COM shape modification by citrate, a common urinary constituent, obtained through a combination of in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and molecular modeling is now presented. We show that citrate strongly influences the growth morphology and kinetics on the (-101) face but has much lower effect on the (010) face. Moreover, binding energy calculations show that the strength of the citrate-COM interaction is much greater at steps than on terraces and is highly step-specific. The maximum binding energy, -166.5 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}, occurs for the [101] step on the (-101) face. In contrast, the value is only -56.9 kJ {center_dot} mol-1 for the [012] step on the (010) face. The binding energies on the (-101) and (010) terraces are also much smaller, -65.4 and -48.9 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1} respectively. All other binding energies lie between these extremes. This high selectivity leads to preferential binding of citrate to the acute [101] atomic steps on the (-101) face. The strong citrate-step interactions on this face leads to pinning of all steps, but the anisotropy in interaction strength results in anisotropic reductions in step kinetics. These anisotropic changes in step kinetics are, in turn, responsible for changes in the shape of macroscopic COM crystals. Thus, the molecular scale growth morphology and the bulk crystal habit in the presence of citrate are similar, and the predictions of molecular simulations are fully consistent with the experimental observations.

  6. Multi-spatial-frequency and phase-shifting profilometry using a liquid crystal phase modulator.

    PubMed

    Joo, Kyung-Il; Park, Chang-Sub; Park, Min-Kyu; Park, Kyung-Woo; Park, Ji-Sub; Seo, Youngmin; Hahn, Joonku; Kim, Hak-Rin

    2012-05-10

    Optical profilometry is widely applied for measuring the morphology of objects by projecting predetermined patterns on them. In this technique, the compact size is one of the interesting issues for practical applications. The generation of pattern by the interference of coherent light sources has a potential to reduce the dimension of the illumination part. Moreover, this method can make fine patterns without projection optics, and the illumination part is free of restriction from the numerical aperture of the projection optics. In this paper, a phase-shifting profilometry is implemented by using a single liquid crystal (LC) cell. The LC phase modulator is designed to generate the interference patterns with several different spatial frequencies by changing selection of the spacing between the micro-pinholes. We manufactured the LC phase modulator and calibrated it by measuring the phase modulation amount depending on an applied voltage. Our optical profilometry using the single LC cell can generate multi-spatial frequency patterns as well as four steps of the phase-shifted patterns. This method can be implemented compactly, and the reconstructed depth profile is obtained without a phase-unwrapping algorithm.

  7. A semiconductor-based, frequency-stabilized mode-locked laser using a phase modulator and an intracavity etalon.

    PubMed

    Davila-Rodriguez, Josue; Ozdur, Ibrahim; Williams, Charles; Delfyett, Peter J

    2010-12-15

    We report a frequency-stabilized semiconductor-based mode-locked laser that uses a phase modulator and an intracavity Fabry-Perot etalon for both active mode-locking and optical frequency stabilization. A twofold multiplication of the repetition frequency of the laser is inherently obtained in the process. The residual timing jitter of the mode-locked pulse train is 13 fs (1 Hz to 100 MHz), measured after regenerative frequency division of the photodetected pulse train.

  8. Application of frequency modulated chirp stimuli for rapid and sensitive ABR measurements in the rat.

    PubMed

    Spankovich, Christopher; Hood, Linda J; Wesley Grantham, D; Polley, Daniel B

    2008-11-01

    Rodents have proven to be a useful model system to screen genes, ototoxic compounds and sound exposure protocols that may play a role in hearing loss. High-throughput screening depends upon a rapid and reliable functional assay for hearing loss. This study describes the use of a frequency modulated (FM) chirp stimulus as an alternative to the click to derive a rapid assessment of auditory brainstem response (ABR) threshold in the rodent. We designed a rising frequency A-chirp based upon the spatial mapping of preferred frequency along the rat basilar membrane to provide a more synchronous and equipotent input across the length of the cochlea. We observed that the ABR wave I and wave IV amplitudes evoked by the A-chirp were significantly greater than the click and that A-chirp minimum response thresholds were lower than the click. Subsequent analyses compared the efficacy of the A-chirp to linear, time-reversed and amplitude-reversed chirps and confirmed that the A-chirp was most effective chirp configuration. These data suggest that the A-chirp may be optimally suited as a single screening broad-frequency stimulus for rapid ABR threshold estimations in the rodent and could serve to complement more detailed frequency-specific physiologic and behavioral estimates of hearing threshold.

  9. Feasibility of Frequency-Modulated Wireless Transmission for a Multi-Purpose MEMS-Based Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Sabato, Alessandro; Feng, Maria Q.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in the Micro Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) technology have made wireless MEMS accelerometers an attractive tool for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) of civil engineering structures. To date, sensors' low sensitivity and accuracy—especially at very low frequencies—have imposed serious limitations for their application in monitoring large-sized structures. Conventionally, the MEMS sensor's analog signals are converted to digital signals before radio-frequency (RF) wireless transmission. The conversion can cause a low sensitivity to the important low-frequency and low-amplitude signals. To overcome this difficulty, the authors have developed a MEMS accelerometer system, which converts the sensor output voltage to a frequency-modulated signal before RF transmission. This is achieved by using a Voltage to Frequency Conversion (V/F) instead of the conventional Analog to Digital Conversion (ADC). In this paper, a prototype MEMS accelerometer system is presented, which consists of a transmitter and receiver circuit boards. The former is equipped with a MEMS accelerometer, a V/F converter and a wireless RF transmitter, while the latter contains an RF receiver and a F/V converter for demodulating the signal. The efficacy of the MEMS accelerometer system in measuring low-frequency and low-amplitude dynamic responses is demonstrated through extensive laboratory tests and experiments on a flow-loop pipeline. PMID:25198003

  10. Ultrafast millimeter-wave frequency-modulated continuous-wave reflectometry for NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, S.; Peebles, W. A.; Nguyen, X. V.; Crocker, N. A.; Roquemore, A. L.

    2006-10-15

    The millimeter-wave frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FM-CW) reflectometer on NSTX is a multichannel system providing electron density profile measurements with a frequency coverage of 13-53 GHz [corresponding O-mode density range of (0.21-3.5)x10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}]. Recently, this system has been modified to allow ultrafast full-band sweeps for repetition intervals down to 10 {mu}s. For this system to function as a fluctuation diagnostic it is crucial to eliminate artifacts in the phase derivative caused by nonlinearities in the frequency sweep; we introduce a simple hardware technique for reducing these artifacts to {approx_equal}0.3%. For NSTX, the additional bandwidth ({<=}100 kHz) greatly enhances the capability of the FM-CW reflectometer as a diagnostic for low frequency magnetohydrodynamics instabilities (e.g., internal kinks, resistive wall modes, neoclassical tearing modes, as well as fast-particle driven fishbones and low frequency toroidal Alfven eigenmodes)

  11. Is bone formation induced by high-frequency mechanical signals modulated by muscle activity?

    PubMed

    Judex, S; Rubin, C T

    2010-03-01

    Bone formation and resorption are sensitive to both external loads arising from gravitational loading as well to internal loads generated by muscular activity. The question as to which of the two sources provides the dominant stimulus for bone homeostasis and new bone accretion is arguably tied to the specific type of activity and anatomical site but it is often assumed that, because of their purportedly greater magnitude, muscle loads modulate changes in bone morphology. High-frequency mechanical signals may provide benefits at low- (<1g) and high- (>1g) acceleration magnitudes. While the mechanisms by which cells perceive high-frequency signals are largely unknown, higher magnitude vibrations can cause large muscle loads and may therefore be sensed by pathways similar to those associated with exercise. Here, we review experimental data to examine whether vibrations applied at very low magnitudes may be sensed directly by transmittance of the signal through the skeleton or whether muscle activity modulates, and perhaps amplifies, the externally applied mechanical stimulus. Current data indicate that the anabolic and anti-catabolic effects of whole body vibrations on the skeleton are unlikely to require muscular activity to become effective. Even high-frequency signals that induce bone matrix deformations of far less than five microstrain can promote bone formation in the absence of muscular activity. This independence of cells on large strains suggests that mechanical interventions can be designed that are both safe and effective.

  12. Floquet topological system based on frequency-modulated classical coupled harmonic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salerno, Grazia; Ozawa, Tomoki; Price, Hannah M.; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2016-02-01

    We theoretically propose how to observe topological effects in a generic classical system of coupled harmonic oscillators, such as classical pendula or lumped-element electric circuits, whose oscillation frequency is modulated fast in time. Making use of Floquet theory in the high-frequency limit, we identify a regime in which the system is accurately described by a Harper-Hofstadter model where the synthetic magnetic field can be externally tuned via the phase of the frequency modulation of the different oscillators. We illustrate how the topologically protected chiral edge states, as well as the Hofstadter butterfly of bulk bands, can be observed in the driven-dissipative steady state under a monochromatic drive. In analogy with the integer quantum Hall effect, we show how the topological Chern numbers of the bands can be extracted from the mean transverse shift of the steady-state oscillation amplitude distribution. Finally, we discuss the regime where the analogy with the Harper-Hofstadter model breaks down.

  13. Improved dichotomous search frequency offset estimator for burst-mode continuous phase modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Wen-Chao; Li, Zan; Si, Jiang-Bo; Bai, Jun

    2015-11-01

    A data-aided technique for carrier frequency offset estimation with continuous phase modulation (CPM) in burst-mode transmission is presented. The proposed technique first exploits a special pilot sequence, or training sequence, to form a sinusoidal waveform. Then, an improved dichotomous search frequency offset estimator is introduced to determine the frequency offset using the sinusoid. Theoretical analysis and simulation results indicate that our estimator is noteworthy in the following aspects. First, the estimator can operate independently of timing recovery. Second, it has relatively low outlier, i.e., the minimum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) required to guarantee estimation accuracy. Finally, the most important property is that our estimator is complexity-reduced compared to the existing dichotomous search methods: it eliminates the need for fast Fourier transform (FFT) and modulation removal, and exhibits faster convergence rate without accuracy degradation. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61301179), the Doctorial Programs Foundation of the Ministry of Education, China (Grant No. 20110203110011), and the Programme of Introducing Talents of Discipline to Universities, China (Grant No. B08038).

  14. Light intensity stabilization based on the second harmonic of the photoelastic modulator detection in the atomic magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Duan, Lihong; Fang, Jiancheng; Li, Rujie; Jiang, Liwei; Ding, Ming; Wang, Wei

    2015-12-14

    The fluctuations of the probe light intensity seriously affect the performance of the sensitive atomic magnetometer. Here we propose a novel method for the intensity stabilization based on the second harmonic component of the photoelastic modulator (PEM) detection in the atomic magnetometer. The method not only could be used to eliminate the intensity fluctuations of the laser source, but also remove the fluctuations from the optical components caused by the environment. A relative fluctuation of the light intensity of 0.035% was achieved and the corresponding fluctuation of the output signal of the atomic magnetometer has decreased about two orders of magnitude from 4.06% to 0.041%. As the scheme proposed here only contains optical devices and does not require additional feedback controlled equipments, it is especially suitable for the integration of the atomic magnetometer.

  15. Movement-related frequency modulation of beta oscillatory activity in the human subthalamic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Foffani, G; Bianchi, A M; Baselli, G; Priori, A

    2005-10-15

    Event-related changes of brain electrical rhythms are typically analysed as amplitude modulations of local field potential (LFP) oscillations, like radio amplitude modulation broadcasting. In telecommunications, frequency modulation (FM) is less susceptible to interference than amplitude modulation (AM) and is therefore preferred for high-fidelity transmissions. Here we hypothesized that LFP rhythms detected from deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes implanted in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in patients with Parkinson's disease could represent movement-related activity not only in AM but also in FM. By combining adaptive autoregressive identification with spectral power decomposition, we were able to show that FM of low-beta (13-20 Hz) and high-beta (20-35 Hz) rhythms significantly contributes to the involvement of the human STN in movement preparation, execution and recovery, and that the FM patterns are regulated by the dopamine levels in the system. Movement-related FM of beta oscillatory activity in the human subthalamic nucleus therefore provides a novel informational domain for rhythm-based pathophysiological models of cortico-basal ganglia processing.

  16. Movement-related frequency modulation of beta oscillatory activity in the human subthalamic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Foffani, G; Bianchi, AM; Baselli, G; Priori, A

    2005-01-01

    Event-related changes of brain electrical rhythms are typically analysed as amplitude modulations of local field potential (LFP) oscillations, like radio amplitude modulation broadcasting. In telecommunications, frequency modulation (FM) is less susceptible to interference than amplitude modulation (AM) and is therefore preferred for high-fidelity transmissions. Here we hypothesized that LFP rhythms detected from deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes implanted in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in patients with Parkinson's disease could represent movement-related activity not only in AM but also in FM. By combining adaptive autoregressive identification with spectral power decomposition, we were able to show that FM of low-beta (13–20 Hz) and high-beta (20–35 Hz) rhythms significantly contributes to the involvement of the human STN in movement preparation, execution and recovery, and that the FM patterns are regulated by the dopamine levels in the system. Movement-related FM of beta oscillatory activity in the human subthalamic nucleus therefore provides a novel informational domain for rhythm-based pathophysiological models of cortico-basal ganglia processing. PMID:16123109

  17. Input-Dependent Frequency Modulation of Cortical Gamma Oscillations Shapes Spatial Synchronization and Enables Phase Coding

    PubMed Central

    Lowet, Eric; Roberts, Mark; Hadjipapas, Avgis; Peter, Alina; van der Eerden, Jan; De Weerd, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Fine-scale temporal organization of cortical activity in the gamma range (∼25–80Hz) may play a significant role in information processing, for example by neural grouping (‘binding’) and phase coding. Recent experimental studies have shown that the precise frequency of gamma oscillations varies with input drive (e.g. visual contrast) and that it can differ among nearby cortical locations. This has challenged theories assuming widespread gamma synchronization at a fixed common frequency. In the present study, we investigated which principles govern gamma synchronization in the presence of input-dependent frequency modulations and whether they are detrimental for meaningful input-dependent gamma-mediated temporal organization. To this aim, we constructed a biophysically realistic excitatory-inhibitory network able to express different oscillation frequencies at nearby spatial locations. Similarly to cortical networks, the model was topographically organized with spatially local connectivity and spatially-varying input drive. We analyzed gamma synchronization with respect to phase-locking, phase-relations and frequency differences, and quantified the stimulus-related information represented by gamma phase and frequency. By stepwise simplification of our models, we found that the gamma-mediated temporal organization could be reduced to basic synchronization principles of weakly coupled oscillators, where input drive determines the intrinsic (natural) frequency of oscillators. The gamma phase-locking, the precise phase relation and the emergent (measurable) frequencies were determined by two principal factors: the detuning (intrinsic frequency difference, i.e. local input difference) and the coupling strength. In addition to frequency coding, gamma phase contained complementary stimulus information. Crucially, the phase code reflected input differences, but not the absolute input level. This property of relative input-to-phase conversion, contrasting with latency

  18. Input-dependent frequency modulation of cortical gamma oscillations shapes spatial synchronization and enables phase coding.

    PubMed

    Lowet, Eric; Roberts, Mark; Hadjipapas, Avgis; Peter, Alina; van der Eerden, Jan; De Weerd, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Fine-scale temporal organization of cortical activity in the gamma range (∼25-80Hz) may play a significant role in information processing, for example by neural grouping ('binding') and phase coding. Recent experimental studies have shown that the precise frequency of gamma oscillations varies with input drive (e.g. visual contrast) and that it can differ among nearby cortical locations. This has challenged theories assuming widespread gamma synchronization at a fixed common frequency. In the present study, we investigated which principles govern gamma synchronization in the presence of input-dependent frequency modulations and whether they are detrimental for meaningful input-dependent gamma-mediated temporal organization. To this aim, we constructed a biophysically realistic excitatory-inhibitory network able to express different oscillation frequencies at nearby spatial locations. Similarly to cortical networks, the model was topographically organized with spatially local connectivity and spatially-varying input drive. We analyzed gamma synchronization with respect to phase-locking, phase-relations and frequency differences, and quantified the stimulus-related information represented by gamma phase and frequency. By stepwise simplification of our models, we found that the gamma-mediated temporal organization could be reduced to basic synchronization principles of weakly coupled oscillators, where input drive determines the intrinsic (natural) frequency of oscillators. The gamma phase-locking, the precise phase relation and the emergent (measurable) frequencies were determined by two principal factors: the detuning (intrinsic frequency difference, i.e. local input difference) and the coupling strength. In addition to frequency coding, gamma phase contained complementary stimulus information. Crucially, the phase code reflected input differences, but not the absolute input level. This property of relative input-to-phase conversion, contrasting with latency codes

  19. Numerical investigation of pulse-modulated atmospheric radio frequency discharges in helium under different duty cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Jizhong; Ding Zhengfen; Li Xuechun; Wang Dezhen; Wang Qi

    2011-12-15

    Experiments observed that the pulse duty cycle has effects on the plasma homogeneity in pulse-modulated radio frequency (rf) discharges. In this paper, pulse-modulated rf (13.56 MHz) helium discharges are theoretically investigated using a two dimensional fluid model. With the pulse period being fixed to 15 {mu}s, it is found that when the pulse-on duration is over 4 {mu}s, i.e., the duty cycle is larger than approximately 27%, the discharge transits from an inhomogeneous to a homogeneous mode in every specific part of each pulse cycle under currently-used simulation parameters. More quantitative analysis shows that the discharge becomes more homogeneous as the duty cycle is increased but does not reach complete homogeneity. Possible reasons for the homogeneity improvement are discussed.

  20. Fundamental frequency modulation of the human voice by the heartbeat: preliminary results and possible mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Orlikoff, R F; Baken, R J

    1989-02-01

    Signal-averaging techniques reveal that the vocal fundamental frequency (F0) of a sustained vowel is modulated over a period equal to that of the speaker's heart cycle. Average F0 deviation varies in an orderly way from about 0.5% to about 1.0% as F0 changes. Location of the peak deviation in the time frame of the heart cycle also changes systematically with vocal F0. Modulation of the vocal F0 is likely to be caused by pressure-related changes in the stiffness of the vascular bed of the vocal folds and by alterations of the geometry of the thyroarytenoid muscle produced by periodic vascular engorgement.