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Sample records for frequency sinusoidal voltage

  1. Self-mixing vibration measurement using emission frequency sinusoidal modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yufeng; Wang, Ming; Guo, Dongmei; Hao, Hui; Liu, Qiang

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, a simplified phase demodulation scheme is applied to recover vibration trail on a laser self-mixing interferometer for noncontact vibration measurement. The emission of semiconductor laser diode is modulated by injecting sinusoidal wave, and corresponding interference signal is a quasi-sinusoid wave. The vibration mathematical model for semiconductor laser diode is theoretically educed from basic self-mixing theory, the variation of target is converted into phase information. The simulation of demodulation algorithm and standard deviation are presented and the reconstructed waveform displays a desirable consistence with various moving trails. Following the principle, a minimum experimental system is established and position variation of the target mirror driven by voltage signal is translated into phase shifts, feedback is controlled at weak level during experiment, Fourier transform is implemented to analyze phase information. The comparisons of both amplitude and velocity with a Germany Doppler vibrometer are performed to testify vibration model, the error of proposed demodulation method is less than 30 nm and achieve a high accuracy in vibration frequency. The experimental results indicate the traditional phase technology can be applied on complex optical power signal after adaption providing a feasible application prospects in industrial and scientific situation with an inexpensive semiconductor laser.

  2. A phase match based frequency estimation method for sinusoidal signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yan-Lin; Tu, Ya-Qing; Chen, Lin-Jun; Shen, Ting-Ao

    2015-04-01

    Accurate frequency estimation affects the ranging precision of linear frequency modulated continuous wave (LFMCW) radars significantly. To improve the ranging precision of LFMCW radars, a phase match based frequency estimation method is proposed. To obtain frequency estimation, linear prediction property, autocorrelation, and cross correlation of sinusoidal signals are utilized. The analysis of computational complex shows that the computational load of the proposed method is smaller than those of two-stage autocorrelation (TSA) and maximum likelihood. Simulations and field experiments are performed to validate the proposed method, and the results demonstrate the proposed method has better performance in terms of frequency estimation precision than methods of Pisarenko harmonic decomposition, modified covariance, and TSA, which contribute to improving the precision of LFMCW radars effectively.

  3. Frequency to Voltage Converter Analog Front-End Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mata, Carlos; Raines, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    The frequency to voltage converter analog front end evaluation prototype (F2V AFE) is an evaluation board designed for comparison of different methods of accurately extracting the frequency of a sinusoidal input signal. A configurable input stage is routed to one or several of five separate, configurable filtering circuits, and then to a configurable output stage. Amplifier selection and gain, filter corner frequencies, and comparator hysteresis and voltage reference are all easily configurable through the use of jumpers and potentiometers.

  4. Traceability of Voltage Measurements for Non-Sinusoidal Waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espel, P.; Poletaeff, A.; Ndilimabaka, H.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the result of work performed at the Laboratoire National de Métrologie et d'Essais (LNE) aiming at developing a standard system to measure RMS value and harmonic contents of distorted voltage waveforms by means of a sampling voltmeter. Thermal converters are used to trace the RMS value to the SI units. The error of the DVM has been generally found less than 10 μV/V up to 2 kHz but can reach about 50 μV/V at 2.5 kHz for RMS voltage measurements for sine waves. For distorted waveforms, deviations within 15 μV/V have been obtained whatever the total harmonic distortion of the waveforms.

  5. Multilevel-Dc-Bus Inverter For Providing Sinusoidal And Pwm Electrical Machine Voltages

    DOEpatents

    Su, Gui-Jia [Knoxville, TN

    2005-11-29

    A circuit for controlling an ac machine comprises a full bridge network of commutation switches which are connected to supply current for a corresponding voltage phase to the stator windings, a plurality of diodes, each in parallel connection to a respective one of the commutation switches, a plurality of dc source connections providing a multi-level dc bus for the full bridge network of commutation switches to produce sinusoidal voltages or PWM signals, and a controller connected for control of said dc source connections and said full bridge network of commutation switches to output substantially sinusoidal voltages to the stator windings. With the invention, the number of semiconductor switches is reduced to m+3 for a multi-level dc bus having m levels. A method of machine control is also disclosed.

  6. Event synchronous sinusoidal model based on frequency-to-instantaneous frequency mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolfaghari, Parham; Banno, Hideki; Itakura, Fumitada; Kawahara, Hideki

    2002-05-01

    We describe a glottal event synchronous sinusoidal model for speech analysis and synthesis. The sinusoidal components are event synchronously estimated using a mapping from linearly spaced filter center frequencies to the instantaneous frequencies of the filter outputs. Frequency domain fixed points of this mapping correspond to the constituent sinusoidal components of the input signal. A robust technique based on a wavelet representation of this fixed points model is used for fundamental frequency extraction as used in STRAIGHT [Kawahara et al., IEICE (1999)]. The method for event detection and characterization is based on group delay and similar fixed point analysis. This method enables the detection of precise timing and spread of speech events such as vocal fold closure. A trajectory continuation scheme is also applied to the extracted sinusoidal components. The proposed model is capable of high-quality speech synthesis using the overlap-add synthesis method and is also applicable to other sound sources. System evaluation results using spectral distortion measures and mean opinion scores will be reported. A comparison with the fixed frame-rate sinusoidal models will be given.

  7. Frequency response evaluation of radial artery catheter-manometer systems: sinusoidal frequency analysis versus flush method.

    PubMed

    Schwid, H A

    1988-07-01

    It is well recognized that catheter-manometer systems significantly distort direct radial artery pressure measurements. Sinusoidal frequency analysis and the flush method of assessing the degree of distortion caused by the monitoring system were compared to determine whether these two methods agree in the estimation of natural frequency and damping coefficient. The frequency response of 30 radial artery catheter-manometer systems used for intensive-care unit patients was measured by the flush method and sinusoidal frequency analysis. The monitoring system consisted of a 20-gauge cannula, 150-cm pressure tubing, two plastic stopcocks, a continuous infusion device with fast flush valve, an American Edwards dome, a Hewlett-Packard quartz transducer, and a Hewlett-Packard blood pressure amplifier. Sinusoidal frequency analysis demonstrated second-order underdamped response for all 30 catheter-manometer systems. No secondary resonance peaks were observed up to a frequency of 200 Hz. The measured frequency response demonstrated that the average catheter-manometer system in use in our intensive care unit would cause significant distortion of the radial artery pressure, with the mean natural frequency (fn) of 14.7 +/- 3.7 Hz and the mean damping coefficient (zeta) of 0.24 +/- 0.07. Although the 30 monitoring systems had identical configurations and visible bubbles were carefully removed, a wide range of frequency responses was found (fn = 10.2 to 25.3; zeta = 0.15 to 0.44).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Comparison of atmospheric air plasmas excited by high-voltage nanosecond pulsed discharge and sinusoidal alternating current discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuai; Wang, Wen-chun; Jiang, Peng-chao; Yang, De-zheng; Jia, Li; Wang, Sen

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, atmospheric pressure air discharge plasma in quartz tube is excited by 15 ns high-voltage nanosecond pulsed discharge (HVNPD) and sinusoidal alternating current discharge (SACD), respectively, and a comparison study of these two kinds of discharges is made through visual imaging, electrical characterization, optical detection of active species, and plasma gas temperature. The peak voltage of the power supplies is kept at 16 kV while the pulse repetition rate of nanosecond pulse power supply is 100 Hz, and the frequency of sinusoidal power supply is 10 kHz. Results show that the HVNPD is uniform while the SACD presents filamentary mode. For exciting the same cycles of discharge, the average energy consumption in HVNPD is about 1/13 of the SACD. However, the chemical active species generated by the HVNPD is about 2-9 times than that excited by the SACD. Meanwhile, the rotational and vibrational temperatures have been obtained via fitting the simulated spectrum of N2 (C3Πu → B3Πg, 0-2) with the measured one, and the results show that the plasma gas temperature in the HVNPD remains close to room temperature whereas the plasma gas temperature in the SACD is about 200 K higher than that in HVNPD in the initial phase and continually increases as discharge exposure time goes on.

  9. Improvement of stability of sinusoidally driven atmospheric pressure plasma jet using auxiliary bias voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Jin; Kim, Jae Young; Kim, Jae Hyun; Kim, Dong Ha; Lee, Duck-Sik; Park, Choon-Sang; Park, Hyung Dal; Shin, Bhum Jae; Tae, Heung-Sik

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we have proposed the auxiliary bias pulse scheme to improve the stability of atmospheric pressure plasma jets driven by an AC sinusoidal waveform excitation source. The stability of discharges can be significantly improved by the compensation of irregular variation in memory voltage due to the effect of auxiliary bias pulse. From the parametric study, such as the width, voltage, and onset time of auxiliary bias pulse, it has been demonstrated that the auxiliary bias pulse plays a significant role in suppressing the irregular discharges caused by the irregular variation in memory voltage and stable discharge can be initiated with the termination of the auxiliary bias pulse. As a result of further investigating the effects of the auxiliary pulse scheme on the jet stability under various process conditions such as the distance between the jet head and the counter electrode, and carrier gas flow, the jet stability can be improved by adjusting the amplitude and number of the bias pulse depending on the variations in the process conditions.

  10. Modified Smith predictor for frequency identification and disturbance rejection of single sinusoidal signal.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Da; Fang, Jian'an; Ren, Zhengyun

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a frequency identification and disturbance rejection scheme for open loop stable time delay systems with disturbance containing a constant signal and a single sinusoidal signal. Astrom's modified Smith predictor is employed to maintain good setpoint tracking performance. Disturbance rejection controller is designed via internal model control principle and functions as a finite dimensional repetitive controller. Extended Kalman filter is designed to track the frequency of unknown periodic disturbance. The simulation results demonstrate the successful performance of the proposed disturbance rejection method for controlling a linear system with time delays, subjected to both step and sinusoidal disturbances.

  11. Comparative study of SVPWM (space vector pulse width modulation) & SPWM (sinusoidal pulse width modulation) based three phase voltage source inverters for variable speed drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Waheed; Usman Ali, Syed M.

    2013-12-01

    We have performed comparative studies of Space Vector Pulse Width Modulation (SVPWM) and Sinusoidal Pulse Width Modulation (SPWM) techniques utilizing MATLAB tools. During these investigations, we carried out intensive simulations, comprehensively analyzed the obtained results and compared the harmonic density, power factor (PF), & switching losses of SVPWM and SPWM. It has been observed during investigations that if the switching frequency is high then losses due to harmonics are negligible, thus based on obtained results we suggested that the SVPWM technique is a more reliable solution. Because SVPWM utilizes DC bus voltage more efficiently, generates less Total Harmonic Distortion (THD) and has higher output quality it provides flexible control of output voltage and output frequency for Variable Speed Drive (VSD).

  12. Parameters estimation of sinusoidal frequency modulation signal with application in synthetic aperture radar imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Wang, Zhaofa; Zhao, Bin; Xu, Liang

    2016-04-01

    A method for estimating the parameters of the sinusoidal frequency modulation (SFM) signal is presented in this paper. Based on the modified discrete sinusoid frequency modulation transform (DSFMT), the SFM signal can be transformed into the DSFMT domain where it is energy-concentrated and then the parameters can be estimated by the global maximum. To search for the location of the global maximum with less computational load, particle swarm optimization is used in this paper. Then the algorithm is used in the synthetic aperture radar imaging with high frequency vibration of the platform, and the focus performance can be improved significantly. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the method proposed in this paper.

  13. Assessment of non-sinusoidal, pulsed, or intermittent exposure to low frequency electric and magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Hannah

    2007-06-01

    The correct assessment of non-sinusoidal, pulsed, or intermittent exposure to low frequency electric and magnetic fields already is a key issue in the occupational environment while becoming more and more important in the domain of the general public. The method presented provides a simple and safe solution for the assessment of arbitrary field types--including sinusoidal and continuous-wave signals--with frequencies up to several 100 kHz and has already proven its practicability and usefulness for more than 5 years. The concept is based on fundamental laws of physics and electrostimulation and well-established physiological data. It allows for a seamless and easy integration in any standard or guideline dealing with human safety in electric, magnetic, and electromagnetic fields. A very simple-to-use graphical version allows an easy and fast assessment of the exposure to non-sinusoidal, pulsed, or intermittent low-frequency magnetic fields without introducing a large overestimation of the exposure situation. A computer-based version makes a much more detailed signal analysis possible and can provide useful information for exposure reduction using modifications of the magnetic field's time parameters (e.g., rise/fall times). PMID:17495654

  14. Assessment of non-sinusoidal, pulsed, or intermittent exposure to low frequency electric and magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Hannah

    2007-06-01

    The correct assessment of non-sinusoidal, pulsed, or intermittent exposure to low frequency electric and magnetic fields already is a key issue in the occupational environment while becoming more and more important in the domain of the general public. The method presented provides a simple and safe solution for the assessment of arbitrary field types--including sinusoidal and continuous-wave signals--with frequencies up to several 100 kHz and has already proven its practicability and usefulness for more than 5 years. The concept is based on fundamental laws of physics and electrostimulation and well-established physiological data. It allows for a seamless and easy integration in any standard or guideline dealing with human safety in electric, magnetic, and electromagnetic fields. A very simple-to-use graphical version allows an easy and fast assessment of the exposure to non-sinusoidal, pulsed, or intermittent low-frequency magnetic fields without introducing a large overestimation of the exposure situation. A computer-based version makes a much more detailed signal analysis possible and can provide useful information for exposure reduction using modifications of the magnetic field's time parameters (e.g., rise/fall times).

  15. Sinusoidal Siemens star spatial frequency response measurement errors due to misidentified target centers

    SciTech Connect

    Birch, Gabriel Carisle; Griffin, John Clark

    2015-07-23

    Numerous methods are available to measure the spatial frequency response (SFR) of an optical system. A recent change to the ISO 12233 photography resolution standard includes a sinusoidal Siemens star test target. We take the sinusoidal Siemens star proposed by the ISO 12233 standard, measure system SFR, and perform an analysis of errors induced by incorrectly identifying the center of a test target. We show a closed-form solution for the radial profile intensity measurement given an incorrectly determined center and describe how this error reduces the measured SFR of the system. As a result, using the closed-form solution, we propose a two-step process by which test target centers are corrected and the measured SFR is restored to the nominal, correctly centered values.

  16. Sinusoidal Siemens star spatial frequency response measurement errors due to misidentified target centers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Birch, Gabriel Carisle; Griffin, John Clark

    2015-07-23

    Numerous methods are available to measure the spatial frequency response (SFR) of an optical system. A recent change to the ISO 12233 photography resolution standard includes a sinusoidal Siemens star test target. We take the sinusoidal Siemens star proposed by the ISO 12233 standard, measure system SFR, and perform an analysis of errors induced by incorrectly identifying the center of a test target. We show a closed-form solution for the radial profile intensity measurement given an incorrectly determined center and describe how this error reduces the measured SFR of the system. As a result, using the closed-form solution, we proposemore » a two-step process by which test target centers are corrected and the measured SFR is restored to the nominal, correctly centered values.« less

  17. Nonlinear properties of medial entorhinal cortex neurons reveal frequency selectivity during multi-sinusoidal stimulation.

    PubMed

    Magnani, Christophe; Economo, Michael N; White, John A; Moore, Lee E

    2014-01-01

    The neurons in layer II of the medial entorhinal cortex are part of the grid cell network involved in the representation of space. Many of these neurons are likely to be stellate cells with specific oscillatory and firing properties important for their function. A fundamental understanding of the nonlinear basis of these oscillatory properties is critical for the development of theories of grid cell firing. In order to evaluate the behavior of stellate neurons, measurements of their quadratic responses were used to estimate a second order Volterra kernel. This paper uses an operator theory, termed quadratic sinusoidal analysis (QSA), which quantitatively determines that the quadratic response accounts for a major part of the nonlinearity observed at membrane potential levels characteristic of normal synaptic events. Practically, neurons were probed with multi-sinusoidal stimulations to determine a Hermitian operator that captures the quadratic function in the frequency domain. We have shown that the frequency content of the stimulation plays an important role in the characteristics of the nonlinear response, which can distort the linear response as well. Stimulations with enhanced low frequency amplitudes evoked a different nonlinear response than broadband profiles. The nonlinear analysis was also applied to spike frequencies and it was shown that the nonlinear response of subthreshold membrane potential at resonance frequencies near the threshold is similar to the nonlinear response of spike trains. PMID:25191226

  18. Masking effects of low-frequency sinusoidal gratings on the detection of contrast modulation in high-frequency carriers.

    PubMed

    Henning, G Bruce

    2004-04-01

    A modification and extension of Kortum and Geisler's model [Vision Res. 35, 1595 (1995)] of early visual non-linearities that incorporates an expansive nonlinearity (consistent with neurophysiological findings [Vision Res. 35, 2725 (1995)], a normalization based on a local average retinal illumination, similar to Mach's proposal [F. Ratliff, Mach Bands: Quantitative Studies on Neural Networks in the Retina (Holden-Day, San Francisco, Calif, 1965)], and a subsequent compression suggested by Henning et al. [J. Opt. Soc. Am A 17, 1147 (2000)] captures a range of hitherto unexplained interactions between a sinusoidal grating of low spatial frequency and a contrast-modulated grating 2 octaves higher in spatial frequency. PMID:15078018

  19. Broadband frequency and angular response of a sinusoidal bull’s eye antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaskoetxea, U.; Navarro-Cía, M.; Beruete, M.

    2016-07-01

    A thorough experimental study of the frequency and beaming angle response of a metallic leaky-wave bull’s eye antenna working at 77 GHz with a sinusoidally corrugated profile is presented. The beam scanning property of these antennas as frequency is varied is experimentally demonstrated and corroborated through theoretical and numerical results. From the experimental results the dispersion diagram of the n  =  -1 and n  =  -2 space harmonics is extracted, and the operation at different frequency regimes is identified and discussed. In order to show the contribution of each half of the antenna, numerical examples of the near-field behavior are also displayed. Overall, experimental results are in good qualitative and quantitative agreement with theoretical and numerical calculations. Finally, an analysis of the beamwidth as a function of frequency is performed, showing that it can achieve values below 1.5° in a fractional bandwidth of 4% around the operation frequency, which is an interesting frequency-stable broadside radiation.

  20. Range-resolved interferometric signal processing using sinusoidal optical frequency modulation.

    PubMed

    Kissinger, Thomas; Charrett, Thomas O H; Tatam, Ralph P

    2015-04-01

    A novel signal processing technique using sinusoidal optical frequency modulation of an inexpensive continuous-wave laser diode source is proposed that allows highly linear interferometric phase measurements in a simple, self-referencing setup. Here, the use of a smooth window function is key to suppress unwanted signal components in the demodulation process. Signals from several interferometers with unequal optical path differences can be multiplexed, and, in contrast to prior work, the optical path differences are continuously variable, greatly increasing the practicality of the scheme. In this paper, the theory of the technique is presented, an experimental implementation using three multiplexed interferometers is demonstrated, and detailed investigations quantifying issues such as linearity and robustness against instrument drift are performed.

  1. Characterization of Wet Air Plasma Jet Powered by Sinusoidal High Voltage and Nanosecond Pulses for Plasma Agricultural Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, Keisuke; Shimada, Keisuke; Konishi, Hideaki; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2015-09-01

    Not only for the plasma sterilization but also for many of plasma life-science applications, atmospheric pressure plasma devices that allowed us to control its state and reactive species production are deserved to resolve the roles of the chemical species. Influence of the hydroxyl radical and ozone on germination of conidia of a strawberry pathogen is presented. Water addition to air plasma jet significantly improves germination suppression performance, while measured reactive oxygen species (ROS) are reduced. Although the results show a negative correlation between ROS and the germination suppression, this infers the importance of chemical composition generated by plasma. For further control of the plasma product, a plasma jet powered by sinusoidal high voltage and nanosecond pulses is developed and characterized with the voltage-charge Lissajous. Control of breakdown phase and discharge power by pulse-imposed phase is presented. This work is supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant-in-Aid for Young Scientists (B) Grant Number 15K17480 and Exploratory Research Grant Number 23644199.

  2. Action of vibration on the response of cat muscle spindle Ia afferents to low frequency sinusoidal stretching.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, P B; Watson, J D

    1981-01-01

    1. A study has been made of the effect of continuous vibration, at 150 Hz, upon the response of muscle spindle afferents to low frequency sinusoidal stretching (1 and 8 Hz). Using the soleus muscle of the anaesthetized cat, with severed ventral roots, recordings were made of single Ia afferents and of the massed Ia afferent discharges in the main bulk of the cut L7 dorsal root. 2. When the amplitude of vibration was large (50 micrometers, short pulses) and that of the sinusoidal stretching was not too great (50-100 micrometers, peak-to-peak) the discharge of the afferents was largely locked 1:1 to the vibration and the response to the sinusoidal stretching was abolished. 3. When the amplitude of the vibration was reduced to below that eliciting continuous afferent driving, then the response to sinusoidal stretching of any amplitude was often markedly increased. This arose through the vibration having a much more powerful excitatory action during the rising phase of the sinusoidal stretch than it did during the falling phase. 4. Averaged over a full cycle, the phase of the response to the sinusoidal stretching tended to be delayed during the vibration in comparison with the normal. This was largely dependent upon the afferents continuing to respond maximally to the vibration around the peak of the sinusoidal stretch, at which stage their unvibrated response is declining, rather than to a phase lag of the whole pattern of response. 5. The results are discussed in relation to the effects of vibration on tremor and the human stretch reflex, and on the determination of the frequency-response of spindle afferents. PMID:6458696

  3. Broadband linear high-voltage amplifier for radio frequency ion traps.

    PubMed

    Kuhlicke, Alexander; Palis, Klaus; Benson, Oliver

    2014-11-01

    We developed a linear high-voltage amplifier for small capacitive loads consisting of a high-voltage power supply and a transistor amplifier. With this cost-effective circuit including only standard parts sinusoidal signals with a few volts can be amplified to 1.7 kVpp over a usable frequency range at large-signal response spanning four orders of magnitude from 20 Hz to 100 kHz under a load of 10 pF. For smaller output voltages the maximum frequency shifts up to megahertz. We test different capacitive loads to probe the influence on the performance. The presented amplifier is sustained short-circuit proof on the output side, which is a significant advantage over other amplifier concepts. The amplifier can be used to drive radio frequency ion traps for single charged nano- and microparticles, which will be presented in brief.

  4. Quartz crystal microbalance based on passive frequency to voltage converter

    SciTech Connect

    Burda, Ioan; Tunyagi, Arthur

    2012-02-15

    In dynamics of evaporation or drying of microdrops from a solid surface, a faster and precise quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) is needed. The fast QCM based on frequency to voltage converter is an attractive and powerful tool in the investigation of the dynamic regime of evaporation to translate the frequency shift in terms of a continuous voltage change. The frequency shift monitoring in fast QCM applications is a real challenge for electronic processing interface. Originally developed as a frequency shift processing interface, this novel passive frequency to voltage converter can produce faster, stable, and accurate results in regard to the QCM sensor behavior. In this article, the concept and circuit of passive frequency to voltage converter will be explained followed by static and dynamic characterization. Experimental results of microdrops evaporation will be given.

  5. A fast and accurate frequency estimation algorithm for sinusoidal signal with harmonic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jinghua; Pan, Mengchun; Zeng, Zhidun; Hu, Jiafei; Chen, Dixiang; Tian, Wugang; Zhao, Jianqiang; Du, Qingfa

    2016-10-01

    Frequency estimation is a fundamental problem in many applications, such as traditional vibration measurement, power system supervision, and microelectromechanical system sensors control. In this paper, a fast and accurate frequency estimation algorithm is proposed to deal with low efficiency problem in traditional methods. The proposed algorithm consists of coarse and fine frequency estimation steps, and we demonstrate that it is more efficient than conventional searching methods to achieve coarse frequency estimation (location peak of FFT amplitude) by applying modified zero-crossing technique. Thus, the proposed estimation algorithm requires less hardware and software sources and can achieve even higher efficiency when the experimental data increase. Experimental results with modulated magnetic signal show that the root mean square error of frequency estimation is below 0.032 Hz with the proposed algorithm, which has lower computational complexity and better global performance than conventional frequency estimation methods.

  6. Time- and spatially resolved emission spectroscopy of the dielectric barrier discharge for soft ionization sustained by a quasi-sinusoidal high voltage.

    PubMed

    Horvatic, Vlasta; Michels, Antje; Ahlmann, Norman; Jestel, Günter; Veza, Damir; Vadla, Cedomil; Franzke, Joachim

    2015-09-01

    A helium capillary dielectric barrier discharge was investigated by means of time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy with the aim of elucidating the process of the formation of the plasma jet. The helium emission line at 706 nm was utilized to monitor spatial and temporal propagation of the excitation of helium atoms. The discharge was sustained with quasi-sinusoidal high voltage, and the temporal evolution of the helium atomic emission was measured simultaneously with the discharge current. The spatial development of the plasma was investigated along the discharge axis in the whole region, which covers the positions in the capillary between the electrodes as well as the plasma jet outside the capillary. The high voltage electrode was placed 2 mm from the capillary orifice, and the distance between the ground and high voltage electrode was 10 mm. The complete spatiotemporal grid of the development of the helium excitation has shown that during the positive half-period of the applied voltage, two independent plasmas, separated in time, are formed. First, the early plasma that constitutes the plasma jet is formed, while the discharge in the capillary follows subsequently. In the early plasma, the helium atom excitation propagation starts in the vicinity of the high voltage electrode and departs from the capillary towards the ground electrode as well as several millimeters outside of the capillary in the form of the plasma jet. After relatively slow propagation of the early plasma in the capillary and the jet, the second plasma starts between the electrodes. During the negative voltage period, only the plasma in the capillary between the electrodes occurs. PMID:26077750

  7. Response properties and location of neurons selective for sinusoidal frequency modulations in the inferior colliculus of the big brown bat.

    PubMed

    Yue, Qi; Casseday, John H; Covey, Ellen

    2007-09-01

    Most animal vocalizations, including echolocation signals used by bats, contain frequency-modulated (FM) components. Previous studies have described a class of neurons in the inferior colliculus (IC) of the big brown bat that respond exclusively to sinusoidally frequency modulated (SFM) signals and fail to respond to pure tones, noise, amplitude-modulated tones, or single FM sweeps. The aims of this study were to further characterize these neurons' response properties and to determine whether they are localized within a specific area of the IC. We recorded extracellularly from 214 neurons throughout the IC. Of these, 47 (22%) responded exclusively to SFM. SFM-selective cells were tuned to relatively low carrier frequencies (9-50 kHz), low modulation rates (20-210 Hz), and shallow modulation depths (3-10 kHz). Most had extremely low thresholds, with an average of 16.5 +/- 7.6 dB SPL, and 89% had upper thresholds and closed response areas. For SFM-selective cells with spontaneous activity, the spontaneous activity was eliminated when sound amplitude exceeded their upper threshold and resumed after the stimulus was over. These findings suggest that SFM-selective cells receive low-threshold excitatory inputs and high-threshold inhibitory inputs. SFM-selective cells were clustered in the rostrodorsal part of the IC. Within this area, best modulation rate appeared to be correlated with best carrier frequency and depth within the IC.

  8. Voltage-To-Frequency Converter For Pressure Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sealey, Bradley S.; Mitchell, Michael

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of pressures on walls of wind tunnels and on surfaces of models in wind tunnels made with help of electronically scanned pressure-measurement (ESP) system. Voltage-to-frequency converter circuit, designed to convert 0- to 5-Vdc analog output voltage from high-line-pressure, low-differential-pressure standard to required frequency range. Enables selection of wider variety of high-accuracy pressure standards to enhance accuracy of measurement of ESP instrumentation while requiring little modification of manufacturer's system and no modification of operating software of system. Useful primarily in wind-tunnel instrumentation and readily adaptable to commercial instruments currently in use.

  9. Accurate displacement-measuring interferometer with wide range using an I2 frequency-stabilized laser diode based on sinusoidal frequency modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Thanh-Tung; Higuchi, Masato; Aketagawa, Masato

    2016-10-01

    We propose the use of the sinusoidal frequency modulation technique to improve both the frequency stability of an external cavity laser diode (ECLD) and the measurement accuracy and range of a displacement-measuring interferometer. The frequency of the ECLD was modulated at 300 kHz by modulating the injection current, and it was locked to the b21 hyperfine component of the transition 6-3, P(33), 127I2 (633 nm) by the null method. A relative frequency stability of 6.5  ×  10-11 was achieved at 100 s sampling time. The stabilized ECLD was then utilized as a light source for an unbalanced Michelson interferometer. In the interferometer, the displacement and direction of the target mirror can be determined using a Lissajous diagram based on two consecutive and quadrant-phase harmonics of the interference signal. Generally, the measurement range of the interferometer by the proposed method is limited by the modulation index and the signal-to-noise ratio of the harmonics. To overcome this drawback, suitable consecutive harmonic pairs were selected for the specific measurement ranges to measure the displacement. The displacements determined in the specific ranges by the proposed method were compared with those observed by a commercial capacitive sensor. From the comparison, the proposed method has high precision to determine the displacement. The measurement range was also extended up to 10 m by selecting a suitable modulation index and suitable consecutive pairs of harmonics.

  10. 46 CFR 111.01-17 - Voltage and frequency variations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ....01-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS General § 111.01-17 Voltage and frequency variations. Unless otherwise stated, electrical equipment must function at variations of at least ±5 percent of rated...

  11. 46 CFR 111.01-17 - Voltage and frequency variations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ....01-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS General § 111.01-17 Voltage and frequency variations. Unless otherwise stated, electrical equipment must function at variations of at least ±5 percent of rated...

  12. 46 CFR 111.01-17 - Voltage and frequency variations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ....01-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS General § 111.01-17 Voltage and frequency variations. Unless otherwise stated, electrical equipment must function at variations of at least ±5 percent of rated...

  13. 46 CFR 111.01-17 - Voltage and frequency variations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ....01-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS General § 111.01-17 Voltage and frequency variations. Unless otherwise stated, electrical equipment must function at variations of at least ±5 percent of rated...

  14. 46 CFR 111.01-17 - Voltage and frequency variations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ....01-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS General § 111.01-17 Voltage and frequency variations. Unless otherwise stated, electrical equipment must function at variations of at least ±5 percent of rated...

  15. Low-frequency sinusoidal galvanic stimulation of the left and right vestibular nerves reveals two peaks of modulation in muscle sympathetic nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Hammam, Elie; James, Cheree; Dawood, Tye; Macefield, Vaughan G

    2011-09-01

    Studies previously performed in our laboratory have shown that sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation (sGVS), a means of selectively modulating vestibular input without affecting other inputs, can cause partial entrainment of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) at frequencies ranging from 0.2 to 2.0 Hz. Here we test the effect of sGVS on sympathetic outflow when stimulating the vestibular system at lower frequencies. MSNA was recorded via tungsten microelectrodes inserted into the left common peroneal nerve in 12 awake, seated subjects. Bipolar binaural sinusoidal GVS (±2 mA, 100 cycles) was applied to the mastoid processes at 0.08, 0.13 and 0.18 Hz. Cross-correlation analysis revealed two bursts of modulation of MSNA for each cycle of stimulation. We believe the primary peak is related to the positive phase of the sinusoid, in which the right vestibular nerve is hyperpolarised and the left vestibular nerve depolarised. Furthermore, we believe the secondary peak is related to the negative phase of the sinusoid (depolarisation of the right vestibular nerve and hyperpolarisation of the left vestibular nerve). This was never observed at higher frequencies of stimulation, presumably because at such frequencies there is insufficient time for a second peak to be expressed. The incidence of double peaks of MSNA was highest at 0.08 Hz and lowest at 0.18 Hz. These observations emphasise the role of the vestibular apparatus in the control of blood pressure, and further suggest convergence of bilateral inputs from vestibular nuclei onto the output nuclei from which MSNA originates, the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM).

  16. A high voltage nanosecond pulser with independently adjustable output voltage, pulse width, and pulse repetition frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prager, James; Ziemba, Timothy; Miller, Kenneth; Carscadden, John; Slobodov, Ilia

    2014-10-01

    Eagle Harbor Technologies (EHT) is developing a high voltage nanosecond pulser capable of generating microwaves and non-equilibrium plasmas for plasma medicine, material science, enhanced combustion, drag reduction, and other research applications. The EHT nanosecond pulser technology is capable of producing high voltage (up to 60 kV) pulses (width 20-500 ns) with fast rise times (<10 ns) at high pulse repetition frequency (adjustable up to 100 kHz) for CW operation. The pulser does not require the use of saturable core magnetics, which allows for the output voltage, pulse width, and pulse repetition frequency to be fully adjustable, enabling researchers to explore non-equilibrium plasmas over a wide range of parameters. A magnetic compression stage can be added to improve the rise time and drive lower impedance loads without sacrificing high pulse repetition frequency operation. Work supported in part by the US Navy under Contract Number N00014-14-P-1055 and the US Air Force under Contract Number FA9550-14-C-0006.

  17. High-frequency voltage oscillations in cultured astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fleischer, Wiebke; Theiss, Stephan; Slotta, Johannes; Holland, Christine; Schnitzler, Alfons

    2015-01-01

    Because of their close interaction with neuronal physiology, astrocytes can modulate brain function in multiple ways. Here, we demonstrate a yet unknown astrocytic phenomenon: Astrocytes cultured on microelectrode arrays (MEAs) exhibited extracellular voltage fluctuations in a broad frequency spectrum (100–600 Hz) after electrical stimulation. These aperiodic high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) could last several seconds and did not spread across the MEA. The voltage-gated calcium channel antagonist cilnidipine dose-dependently decreased the power of the oscillations. While intracellular calcium was pivotal, incubation with bafilomycin A1 showed that vesicular release of transmitters played only a minor role in the emergence of HFOs. Gap junctions and volume-regulated anionic channels had just as little functional impact, which was demonstrated by the addition of carbenoxolone (100 μmol/L) and NPPB (100 μmol/L). Hyperpolarization with low potassium in the extracellular solution (2 mmol/L) dramatically raised oscillation power. A similar effect was seen when we added extra sodium (+50 mmol/L) or if we replaced it with NMDG+ (50 mmol/L). The purinergic receptor antagonist PPADS suppressed the oscillation power, while the agonist ATP (100 μmol/L) had only an increasing effect when the bath solution pH was slightly lowered to pH 7.2. From these observations, we conclude that astrocytic voltage oscillations are triggered by activation of voltage-gated calcium channels and driven by a downstream influx of cations through channels that are permeable for large ions such as NMDG+. Most likely candidates are subtypes of pore-forming P2X channels with a low affinity for ATP. PMID:25969464

  18. FPGA implementation of high-frequency multiple PWM for variable voltage variable frequency controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boumaaraf, Abdelâali; Mohamadi, Tayeb; Gourmat, Laïd

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present the FPGA implementation of the multiple pulse width modulation (MPWM) signal generation with repetition of data segments, applied to the variable frequency variable voltage systems and specially at to the photovoltaic water pumping system, in order to generate a signal command very easily between 10hz to 60 hz with a small frequency and reduce the cost of the control system.

  19. Energy Conservation Using Dynamic Voltage Frequency Scaling for Computational Cloud

    PubMed Central

    Florence, A. Paulin; Shanthi, V.; Simon, C. B. Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Cloud computing is a new technology which supports resource sharing on a “Pay as you go” basis around the world. It provides various services such as SaaS, IaaS, and PaaS. Computation is a part of IaaS and the entire computational requests are to be served efficiently with optimal power utilization in the cloud. Recently, various algorithms are developed to reduce power consumption and even Dynamic Voltage and Frequency Scaling (DVFS) scheme is also used in this perspective. In this paper we have devised methodology which analyzes the behavior of the given cloud request and identifies the associated type of algorithm. Once the type of algorithm is identified, using their asymptotic notations, its time complexity is calculated. Using best fit strategy the appropriate host is identified and the incoming job is allocated to the victimized host. Using the measured time complexity the required clock frequency of the host is measured. According to that CPU frequency is scaled up or down using DVFS scheme, enabling energy to be saved up to 55% of total Watts consumption. PMID:27239551

  20. Energy Conservation Using Dynamic Voltage Frequency Scaling for Computational Cloud.

    PubMed

    Florence, A Paulin; Shanthi, V; Simon, C B Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Cloud computing is a new technology which supports resource sharing on a "Pay as you go" basis around the world. It provides various services such as SaaS, IaaS, and PaaS. Computation is a part of IaaS and the entire computational requests are to be served efficiently with optimal power utilization in the cloud. Recently, various algorithms are developed to reduce power consumption and even Dynamic Voltage and Frequency Scaling (DVFS) scheme is also used in this perspective. In this paper we have devised methodology which analyzes the behavior of the given cloud request and identifies the associated type of algorithm. Once the type of algorithm is identified, using their asymptotic notations, its time complexity is calculated. Using best fit strategy the appropriate host is identified and the incoming job is allocated to the victimized host. Using the measured time complexity the required clock frequency of the host is measured. According to that CPU frequency is scaled up or down using DVFS scheme, enabling energy to be saved up to 55% of total Watts consumption. PMID:27239551

  1. Energy Conservation Using Dynamic Voltage Frequency Scaling for Computational Cloud.

    PubMed

    Florence, A Paulin; Shanthi, V; Simon, C B Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Cloud computing is a new technology which supports resource sharing on a "Pay as you go" basis around the world. It provides various services such as SaaS, IaaS, and PaaS. Computation is a part of IaaS and the entire computational requests are to be served efficiently with optimal power utilization in the cloud. Recently, various algorithms are developed to reduce power consumption and even Dynamic Voltage and Frequency Scaling (DVFS) scheme is also used in this perspective. In this paper we have devised methodology which analyzes the behavior of the given cloud request and identifies the associated type of algorithm. Once the type of algorithm is identified, using their asymptotic notations, its time complexity is calculated. Using best fit strategy the appropriate host is identified and the incoming job is allocated to the victimized host. Using the measured time complexity the required clock frequency of the host is measured. According to that CPU frequency is scaled up or down using DVFS scheme, enabling energy to be saved up to 55% of total Watts consumption.

  2. Optimization of electric pulse amplitude and frequency in vitro for low voltage and high frequency electrochemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Shankayi, Zeinab; Firoozabadi, S M P; Hassan, Zohair Saraf

    2014-02-01

    During standard electrochemotherapy (ECT), using a train of 1,000 V/cm amplitude rectangular pulses with 1 Hz frequency, patients experience an unpleasant sensation and slight edema. According to the patients, muscle contractions provoked by high amplitude (about 1,000 V/cm) and low repetition frequency (1 Hz) pulses are the most unpleasant and painful sensations. Recently, ECT using low voltage and higher repetition frequency (LVHF) has been shown to be an effective tool for inhibiting tumor growth. The aim of the present study was to optimize electric pulse amplitude and repetition frequency for LVHF ECT by sampling the different sets of pulse parameters on cell viability and permeabilization. In ECT, a reversible effect based on high permeabilization is desirable. For this purpose, we used bleomycin to evaluate the permeabilization of K562 and MIA-PACA2 cells caused by low voltage (50-150 V/cm) and higher repetition frequency (4-6 kHz) electric pulses. We show that the reversible effect with electropermeabilization of the cells caused by LVHF ECT is accessible; this interaction is more effective for electric pulses with 70 V/cm amplitude. PMID:24271721

  3. Systems and methods for process and user driven dynamic voltage and frequency scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Mallik, Arindam; Lin, Bin; Memik, Gokhan; Dinda, Peter; Dick, Robert

    2011-03-22

    Certain embodiments of the present invention provide a method for power management including determining at least one of an operating frequency and an operating voltage for a processor and configuring the processor based on the determined at least one of the operating frequency and the operating voltage. The operating frequency is determined based at least in part on direct user input. The operating voltage is determined based at least in part on an individual profile for processor.

  4. Lower operation voltage in dual-frequency cholesteric liquid crystals based on the thermodielectric effect.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Yu-Cheng; Lee, Wei

    2013-10-01

    Dual-frequency cholesteric liquid crystal (DFCLC) devices characteristically require high operation voltage, which hinders their further development in thin-film-transistor driving. Here we report on a lower-voltage switching method based on the thermodielectric effect. This technique entails applying a high-frequency voltage to occasion dielectric oscillation heating so to induce the increase in crossover frequency. The subsequent change in dielectric anisotropy of the DFCLC allows the switching, with a lower operation voltage, from the planar state to the focal conic or homeotropic state. The temperature rise incurred by the dielectric heating is described.

  5. Lower operation voltage in dual-frequency cholesteric liquid crystals based on the thermodielectric effect.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Yu-Cheng; Lee, Wei

    2013-10-01

    Dual-frequency cholesteric liquid crystal (DFCLC) devices characteristically require high operation voltage, which hinders their further development in thin-film-transistor driving. Here we report on a lower-voltage switching method based on the thermodielectric effect. This technique entails applying a high-frequency voltage to occasion dielectric oscillation heating so to induce the increase in crossover frequency. The subsequent change in dielectric anisotropy of the DFCLC allows the switching, with a lower operation voltage, from the planar state to the focal conic or homeotropic state. The temperature rise incurred by the dielectric heating is described. PMID:24104303

  6. Modulation linearization of a frequency-modulated voltage controlled oscillator, part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honnell, M. A.

    1975-01-01

    An analysis is presented for the voltage versus frequency characteristics of a varactor modulated VHF voltage controlled oscillator in which the frequency deviation is linearized by using the nonlinear characteristics of a field effect transistor as a signal amplifier. The equations developed are used to calculate the oscillator output frequency in terms of pertinent circuit parameters. It is shown that the nonlinearity exponent of the FET has a pronounced influence on frequency deviation linearity, whereas the junction exponent of the varactor controls total frequency deviation for a given input signal. A design example for a 250 MHz frequency modulated oscillator is presented.

  7. Sinusoidal transform coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcaulay, Robert J.; Quatieri, Thomas F.

    1988-01-01

    It has been shown that an analysis/synthesis system based on a sinusoidal representation of speech leads to synthetic speech that is essentially perceptually indistinguishable from the original. Strategies for coding the amplitudes, frequencies and phases of the sine waves have been developed that have led to a multirate coder operating at rates from 2400 to 9600 bps. The encoded speech is highly intelligible at all rates with a uniformly improving quality as the data rate is increased. A real-time fixed-point implementation has been developed using two ADSP2100 DSP chips. The methods used for coding and quantizing the sine-wave parameters for operation at the various frame rates are described.

  8. Radio frequency current-voltage probe for impedance and power measurements in multi-frequency unmatched loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafleur, T.; Delattre, P. A.; Booth, J. P.; Johnson, E. V.; Dine, S.

    2013-01-01

    A broad-band, inline current-voltage probe, with a characteristic impedance of 50 Ω, is presented for the measurement of voltage and current waveforms, impedance, and power in rf systems. The probe, which uses capacitive and inductive sensors to determine the voltage and current, respectively, can be used for the measurement of single or multi-frequency signals into both matched and unmatched loads, over a frequency range of about 1-100 MHz. The probe calibration and impedance/power measurement technique are described in detail, and the calibrated probe results are compared with those obtained from a vector network analyzer and other commercial power meters. Use of the probe is demonstrated with the measurement of power into an unmatched capacitively coupled plasma excited by multi-frequency tailored voltage waveforms.

  9. Radio frequency current-voltage probe for impedance and power measurements in multi-frequency unmatched loads.

    PubMed

    Lafleur, T; Delattre, P A; Booth, J P; Johnson, E V; Dine, S

    2013-01-01

    A broad-band, inline current-voltage probe, with a characteristic impedance of 50 Ω, is presented for the measurement of voltage and current waveforms, impedance, and power in rf systems. The probe, which uses capacitive and inductive sensors to determine the voltage and current, respectively, can be used for the measurement of single or multi-frequency signals into both matched and unmatched loads, over a frequency range of about 1-100 MHz. The probe calibration and impedance/power measurement technique are described in detail, and the calibrated probe results are compared with those obtained from a vector network analyzer and other commercial power meters. Use of the probe is demonstrated with the measurement of power into an unmatched capacitively coupled plasma excited by multi-frequency tailored voltage waveforms. PMID:23387681

  10. [Design of a high-voltage insulation testing system of X-ray high frequency generators].

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong; Mo, Guo-Ming; Wang, Yan; Wang, Hong-Zhi; Yu, Jie-Ying; Dai, Shu-Guang

    2007-09-01

    In this paper, we analyze the transformer of X-ray high-voltage high-frequency generators and, have designed and implemented a high-voltage insulation testing system for its oil tank using full-bridge series resonant soft switching PFM DC-DC converter.

  11. The role of the relative voltage and phase for frequency coupling in a dual-frequency capacitively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, D.; Gans, T.; Semmler, E.; Awakowicz, P.

    2008-08-25

    Frequency coupling in multifrequency discharges is a complex nonlinear interaction of the different frequency components. An alpha-mode low pressure rf capacitively coupled plasma operated simultaneously with two frequencies is investigated and the coupling of the two frequencies is observed to greatly influence the excitation and ionization within the discharge. Through this, plasma production and sustainment are dictated by the corresponding electron dynamics and can be manipulated through the dual-frequency sheath. These mechanisms are influenced by the relative voltage and also the relative phase of the two frequencies.

  12. Characterization of the frequency and muscle responses of the lumbar and thoracic spines of seated volunteers during sinusoidal whole body vibration.

    PubMed

    Baig, Hassam A; Dorman, Daniel B; Bulka, Ben A; Shivers, Bethany L; Chancey, Valeta C; Winkelstein, Beth A

    2014-10-01

    Whole body vibration has been postulated to contribute to the onset of back pain. However, little is known about the relationship between vibration exposure, the biomechanical response, and the physiological responses of the seated human. The aim of this study was to measure the frequency and corresponding muscle responses of seated male volunteers during whole body vibration exposures along the vertical and anteroposterior directions to define the transmissibility and associated muscle activation responses for relevant whole body vibration exposures. Seated human male volunteers underwent separate whole body vibration exposures in the vertical (Z-direction) and anteroposterior (X-direction) directions using sinusoidal sweeps ranging from 2 to 18 Hz, with a constant amplitude of 0.4 g. For each vibration exposure, the accelerations and displacements of the seat and lumbar and thoracic spines were recorded. In addition, muscle activity in the lumbar and thoracic spines was recorded using electromyography (EMG) and surface electrodes in the lumbar and thoracic region. Transmissibility was determined, and peak transmissibility, displacement, and muscle activity were compared in each of the lumbar and thoracic regions. The peak transmissibility for vertical vibrations occurred at 4 Hz for both the lumbar (1.55 ± 0.34) and thoracic (1.49 ± 0.21) regions. For X-directed seat vibrations, the transmissibility ratio in both spinal regions was highest at 2 Hz but never exceeded a value of 1. The peak muscle response in both spinal regions occurred at frequencies corresponding to the peak transmissibility, regardless of the direction of imposed seat vibration: 4 Hz for the Z-direction and 2-3 Hz for the X-direction. In both vibration directions, spinal displacements occurred primarily in the direction of seat vibration, with little off-axis motion. The occurrence of peak muscle responses at frequencies of peak transmissibility suggests that such

  13. Improvement of neurofeedback therapy for improved attention through facilitation of brain activity using local sinusoidal extremely low frequency magnetic field exposure.

    PubMed

    Zandi Mehran, Yasaman; Firoozabadi, Mohammad; Rostami, Reza

    2015-04-01

    Traditional neurofeedback (NF) is a training approach aimed at altering brain activity using electroencephalography (EEG) rhythms as feedback. In NF training, external factors such as the subjects' intelligence can have an effect. In contrast, a low-energy NF system (LENS) does not require conscious effort from the subject, which results in fewer attendance sessions. However, eliminating the subject role seems to eliminate an important part of the NF system. This study investigated the facilitating effect on the theta-to-beta ratio from NF training, using a local sinusoidal extremely low frequency magnetic field (LSELF-MF) versus traditional NF. Twenty-four healthy, intelligent subjects underwent 10 training sessions to enhance beta (15-18 Hz), and simultaneously inhibit theta (4-7 Hz) and high beta (22-30 Hz) activity, at the Cz point in a 3-boat-race video game. Each session consisted of 3 statuses, PRE, DURING, and POST. In the DURING status, the NF training procedure lasted 10 minutes. Subjects were led to believe that they would be exposed to a magnetic field during NF training; however, 16 of the subjects who were assigned to the experimental group were really exposed to 45 Hz-360 µT LSELF-MF at Cz. For the 8 other subjects, only the coil was located at the Cz point with no exposure. The duty cycle of exposure was 40% (2-second exposure and 3-second pause). The results show that the theta-to-beta ratio in the DURING status of each group differs significantly from the PRE and POST statuses. Between-group analysis shows that the theta-to-beta ratio in the DURING status of the experimental group is significantly (P < .001) lower than in the sham group. The result shows the effect of LSELF-MF on NF training.

  14. Low-frequency switching voltage regulators for terrestrial photovoltaic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delombard, R.

    1984-01-01

    The photovoltaic technology project and the stand alone applications project are discussed. Two types of low frequency switching type regulators were investigated. The design, operating characteristics and field application of these regulators is described. The regulators are small in size, low in cost, very low in power dissipation, reliable and allow considerable flexibility in system design.

  15. Theoretical analyses of cellular transmembrane voltage in suspensions induced by high-frequency fields.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yong; Wang, Changzhen; Peng, Ruiyun; Wang, Lifeng; Hu, Xiangjun

    2015-04-01

    A change of the transmembrane voltage is considered to cause biophysical and biochemical responses in cells. The present study focuses on the cellular transmembrane voltage (Δφ) induced by external fields. We detail analytical equations for the transmembrane voltage induced by external high-frequency (above the relaxation frequency of the cell membrane) fields on cells of a spherical shape in suspensions and layers. At direct current (DC) and low frequencies, the cell membrane was assumed to be non-conductive under physiologic conditions. However, with increasing frequency, the permittivity of the cytoplasm/extracellular medium and conductivity of the membrane must be accounted for. Our main work is to extend application of the analytical solution of Δφ to the high-frequency range. We first introduce the transmembrane voltage generated by DC and low-frequency exposures on a single cell. Then, we focus on cell suspensions exposed to high-frequency fields. Using the effective medium theory and the reasonable assumption, the approximate analytical solution of Δφ on cells in suspensions and layers can be derived. Phenomenological effective medium theory equations cannot be used to calculate the local electric field of cell suspensions, so we raised a possible solution based on the Bergman theory.

  16. Development of Low-Frequency AC Voltage Measurement System Using Single-Junction Thermal Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amagai, Yasutaka; Nakamura, Yasuhiro

    Accurate measurement of low-frequency AC voltage using a digital multimeter at frequencies of 4-200Hz is a challenge in the mechanical engineering industry. At the National Metrology Institute of Japan, we developed a low-frequency AC voltage measurement system for calibrating digital multimeters operating at frequencies down to 1 Hz. The system uses a single-junction thermal converter and employs a theoretical model and a three-parameter sine wave fitting algorithm based on the least-square (LS) method. We calibrated the AC voltage down to 1Hz using our measurement system and reduced the measurement time compared with that using thin-film thermal converters. Our measurement results are verified by comparison with those of a digital sampling method using a high-resolution analog-to-digital converter; our data are in agreement to within a few parts in 105. Our proposed method enables us to measure AC voltage with an uncertainty of 25 μV/V (k = 1) at frequencies down to 4 Hz and a voltage of 10 V.

  17. The Coefficient of the Voltage Induced Frequency Shift Measurement on a Quartz Tuning Fork

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yubin; Lu, Qingyou

    2014-01-01

    We have measured the coefficient of the voltage induced frequency shift (VIFS) of a 32.768 KHz quartz tuning fork. Three vibration modes were studied: one prong oscillating, two prongs oscillating in the same direction, and two prongs oscillating in opposite directions. They all showed a parabolic dependence of the eigen-frequency shift on the bias voltage applied across the fork, due to the voltage-induced internal stress, which varies as the fork oscillates. The average coefficient of the VIFS effect is as low as several hundred nano-Hz per millivolt, implying that fast-response voltage-controlled oscillators and phase-locked loops with nano-Hz resolution can be built. PMID:25414971

  18. Spin-torque diode radio-frequency detector with voltage tuned resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skowroński, Witold; Frankowski, Marek; Wrona, Jerzy; Stobiecki, Tomasz; Ogrodnik, Piotr; Barnaś, Józef

    2014-08-01

    We report on a voltage-tunable radio-frequency (RF) detector based on a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ). The spin-torque diode effect is used to excite and/or detect RF oscillations in the magnetic free layer of the MTJ. In order to reduce the overall in-plane magnetic anisotropy of the free layer, we take advantage of the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy at the interface between ferromagnetic and insulating layers. The applied bias voltage is shown to have a significant influence on the magnetic anisotropy, and thus on the resonance frequency of the device. This influence also depends on the voltage polarity. The obtained results are accounted for in terms of the interplay of spin-transfer-torque and voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy effects.

  19. A novel compact repetitive frequency voltage booster based on magnetic switches and Fitch generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hang; Ding, Weidong; Wu, Jiawei

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, a novel repetitive frequency voltage booster (named repetitive Fitch booster by the authors) based on magnetic switches and Fitch generators is proposed. The principle of operation is to charge capacitors in parallel when magnetic switches (MSs) are unsaturated and reverse voltage polarity of every other capacitor when MSs saturate. With the principle, circuit topology of a 4-stage repetitive Fitch booster (RFB) is presented. Simulation as well as experiment shows its feasibility in boosting voltage and compressing rise-time. In simulation, the input voltage of 100 V is boosted to 372 V, while test stand yields output voltage with frequency of 1 kHz, amplitude of 19 kV with each capacitor charged to about 5.6 kV, and rise-time compression from 7.3 μs to 700 ns. Meanwhile, calculations show that the 4-stage RFB effectively reduces core volume by about half, from 1093.5 cm3 to 585.2 cm3. Furthermore, design rules are proposed so that topologies of RFBs with stages other than four can be conveniently derived. As an example, an 8-stage RFB is proposed and verified with circuit simulation, which shows an output voltage of 759 V with the input voltage of 100 V.

  20. Improved frequency/voltage converters for fast quartz crystal microbalance applications

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, R.; Kim, L. To Thi; Garcia, J. V.; Arnau, A.

    2008-04-15

    The monitoring of frequency changes in fast quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) applications is a real challenge in today's instrumentation. In these applications, such as ac electrogravimetry, small frequency shifts, in the order of tens of hertz, around the resonance of the sensor can occur up to a frequency modulation of 1 kHz. These frequency changes have to be monitored very accurately both in magnitude and phase. Phase-locked loop techniques can be used for obtaining a high performance frequency/voltage converter which can provide reliable measurements. Sensitivity higher than 10 mV/Hz, for a frequency shift resolution of 0.1 Hz, with very low distortion in tracking both the magnitude and phase of the frequency variations around the resonance frequency of the sensor are required specifications. Moreover, the resonance frequency can vary in a broad frequency range from 5 to 10 MHz in typical QCM sensors, which introduces an additional difficulty. A new frequency-voltage conversion system based on a double tuning analog-digital phase-locked loop is proposed. The reported electronic characterization and experimental results obtained with conducting polymers prove its reliability for ac-electrogravimetry measurements and, in general, for fast QCM applications.

  1. Frequency dependence of the onset voltage of electroconvection in the nematic liquid crystal N4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaochao; Bowers, Steve; Bajaj, Kapil; Ahlers, Guenter

    2003-03-01

    Onset voltages Vc of electroconvection in a nematic liquid crystal (NLC) cell were measured as a function of the drive frequency ω/ 2 π. The cell (from E.H.C Co, Ltd Japan) had a nominal spacing of 25 μm and planar alignment. It was filled with the NLC Merck phase IV (N4). The NLC was doped with 0.1% by weight of tetra butylammonium bromide(TBAB) and the conductivity was near 1.0 × 10-6 (Ω m)-1 at 30^oC. At low frequencies (15 to 80Hz) the onset voltage dropped as the frequency increased. This is contrary to the usual interpretation of the standard model which yields Vc (1+ω^2 τ^2)/[ξ^2-(1+ω^2 τ^2)] (ξ is related to NLC material properities), with the charge relaxation time τ=ɛ/ ( 4π σ) assumed to be independent of ω. Measurements at higher frequencies agreed reasonably with the standard model prediction. Further measurements using an AC bridge revealed that the dielectric constant ɛ is strongly frequency dependent at low frequencies, whereas the conductivity σ was roughly constant. Taking into account the frequency dependence of ɛ (and thus of τ), the onset-voltage measurements agreed fairly well with the standard-model prediction.

  2. Sinusoidal ghost imaging.

    PubMed

    Khamoushi, S M Mahdi; Nosrati, Yaser; Tavassoli, S Hassan

    2015-08-01

    We introduce sinusoidal ghost imaging (SGI), which uses 2D orthogonal sinusoidal patterns instead of random patterns in "computational ghost imaging" (CGI). Simulations and experiments are performed. In comparison with the"differential ghost imaging" algorithm that was used to improve the SNR of ghost imaging, results of SGI show about 3 orders of magnitude higher SNR, which can be reconstructed even with a much smaller number of patterns. More importantly, based on the results, SGI provides the great opportunity to generate innate processed images by predefined selection of patterns. This can speed up detection process considerably and paves the way for real applications. PMID:26258330

  3. Static current-voltage characteristics for radio-frequency induction discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Budyansky, A.; Zykov, A.

    1995-12-31

    The aim of this work was to obtain experimentally such characteristic of Radio-Frequency Induction Discharge (RFID) that can play the role of its current-voltage characteristic (CVC) and to explain the nature of current and voltage jumps arising in RF coils at exciting of discharge. Experiments were made in quartz 5.5, 11, 20 cm diam tubes with outer RF coil at pressures 10--100 mTorr, at frequency 13.56 MHz and discharge power to 500 W. In case of outer coil as analogue of discharge voltage it`s convenient to use the value of the RF voltage U{sub R}, induced around outer perimeter of discharge tube. It is evident that current and voltage jumps arising at exciting of discharge are due to low output resistance of standard generators and negative slope of initial part of CVC. Three sets of such dependencies for different pressures were obtained for each diameter of tubes. The influence of different metal electrodes placed into discharge volume on CVC`s shape has been studied also. Experimental results can explain the behavior of HFI discharge as a load of RF generator and give data for calculation of RF circuit.

  4. Voltage calibration of dual-frequency liquid crystal devices for infrared beam steering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Milind; Wen, Bing; Bhupathy, Vinay; Taber, Donald; Winker, Bruce

    2005-08-01

    This paper addresses the use of liquid crystal devices for electro-optic infrared laser beam steering, such as liquid crystal optical phased arrays (OPAs) and digital beam deflectors (DBDs). In these devices, voltages are synchronously applied to different liquid crystal pixels to steer light, either by diffraction and/or refraction using birefringent prisms. Dual frequency liquid crystals provide an order of magnitude higher speed as compared to conventional nematic liquid crystals, at the cost of more complex addressing algorithms and control circuits. In order to optimize the optical performance of a liquid crystal device, the control voltages must be calibrated. This procedure involves adjustment of the control voltages while monitoring the optical efficiency, and must be done for both steady-state phase levels as well as transitions between phase levels. Manual voltage calibration is unrealistically time consuming for multi-channel beam steering devices. Computer based calibration algorithms for dual frequency liquid crystal devices are discussed, and results are presented for both steady state and dynamic voltage calibration procedures.

  5. Monitoring of cache miss rates for accurate dynamic voltage and frequency scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singleton, Leo C.; Poellabauer, Christian; Schwan, Karsten

    2005-01-01

    Modern mobile processors offer dynamic voltage and frequency scaling, which can be used to reduce the energy requirements of embedded and real-time applications by exploiting idle CPU resources, while still maintaining all applications' real-time characteristics. However, accurate predictions of task run-times are key to computing the frequencies and voltages that ensure that all tasks' real-time constraints are met. Past work has used feedback-based approaches, where applications' past CPU utilizations are used to predict future CPU requirements. Inaccurate predictions in these approaches can lead to missed deadlines, less than expected energy savings, or large overheads due to frequent voltage and frequency changes. Previous solutions ignore other `indicators' of future CPU requirements, such as the frequency of I/O operations, memory accesses, or interrupts. This paper addresses this shortcoming for memory-intensive applications, where measured task run-times and cache miss rates are used as feedback for accurate run-time predictions. Cache miss rates indicate the frequency of memory accesses and enable us to derive the latencies introduced by these operations. The results shown in this paper indicate improvements in the number of deadlines met and the amount of energy saved.

  6. Monitoring of cache miss rates for accurate dynamic voltage and frequency scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singleton, Leo C.; Poellabauer, Christian; Schwan, Karsten

    2004-12-01

    Modern mobile processors offer dynamic voltage and frequency scaling, which can be used to reduce the energy requirements of embedded and real-time applications by exploiting idle CPU resources, while still maintaining all applications' real-time characteristics. However, accurate predictions of task run-times are key to computing the frequencies and voltages that ensure that all tasks' real-time constraints are met. Past work has used feedback-based approaches, where applications' past CPU utilizations are used to predict future CPU requirements. Inaccurate predictions in these approaches can lead to missed deadlines, less than expected energy savings, or large overheads due to frequent voltage and frequency changes. Previous solutions ignore other `indicators' of future CPU requirements, such as the frequency of I/O operations, memory accesses, or interrupts. This paper addresses this shortcoming for memory-intensive applications, where measured task run-times and cache miss rates are used as feedback for accurate run-time predictions. Cache miss rates indicate the frequency of memory accesses and enable us to derive the latencies introduced by these operations. The results shown in this paper indicate improvements in the number of deadlines met and the amount of energy saved.

  7. Low noise frequency synthesizer with self-calibrated voltage controlled oscillator and accurate AFC algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Qin; Jinbo, Li; Jian, Kang; Xiaoyong, Li; Jianjun, Zhou

    2014-09-01

    A low noise phase locked loop (PLL) frequency synthesizer implemented in 65 nm CMOS technology is introduced. A VCO noise reduction method suited for short channel design is proposed to minimize PLL output phase noise. A self-calibrated voltage controlled oscillator is proposed in cooperation with the automatic frequency calibration circuit, whose accurate binary search algorithm helps reduce the VCO tuning curve coverage, which reduces the VCO noise contribution at PLL output phase noise. A low noise, charge pump is also introduced to extend the tuning voltage range of the proposed VCO, which further reduces its phase noise contribution. The frequency synthesizer generates 9.75-11.5 GHz high frequency wide band local oscillator (LO) carriers. Tested 11.5 GHz LO bears a phase noise of-104 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz frequency offset. The total power dissipation of the proposed frequency synthesizer is 48 mW. The area of the proposed frequency synthesizer is 0.3 mm2, including bias circuits and buffers.

  8. Fast Rise Time and High Voltage Nanosecond Pulses at High Pulse Repetition Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Kenneth E.; Ziemba, Timothy; Prager, James; Picard, Julian; Hashim, Akel

    2015-09-01

    Eagle Harbor Technologies (EHT), Inc. is conducting research to decrease the rise time and increase the output voltage of the EHT Nanosecond Pulser product line, which allows for independently, user-adjustable output voltage (0 - 20 kV), pulse width (20 - 500 ns), and pulse repetition frequency (0 - 100 kHz). The goals are to develop higher voltage pulses (50 - 60 kV), decrease the rise time from 20 to below 10 ns, and maintain the high pulse repetition capabilities. These new capabilities have applications to pseudospark generation, corona production, liquid discharges, and nonlinear transmission line driving for microwave production. This work is supported in part by the US Navy SBIR program.

  9. Origin of terminal voltage variations due to self-mixing in terahertz frequency quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Grier, Andrew; Dean, Paul; Valavanis, Alexander; Keeley, James; Kundu, Iman; Cooper, Jonathan D; Agnew, Gary; Taimre, Thomas; Lim, Yah Leng; Bertling, Karl; Rakić, Aleksandar D; Li, Lianhe H; Harrison, Paul; Linfield, Edmund H; Ikonić, Zoran; Davies, A Giles; Indjin, Dragan

    2016-09-19

    We explain the origin of voltage variations due to self-mixing in a terahertz (THz) frequency quantum cascade laser (QCL) using an extended density matrix (DM) approach. Our DM model allows calculation of both the current-voltage (I-V) and optical power characteristics of the QCL under optical feedback by changing the cavity loss, to which the gain of the active region is clamped. The variation of intra-cavity field strength necessary to achieve gain clamping, and the corresponding change in bias required to maintain a constant current density through the heterostructure is then calculated. Strong enhancement of the self-mixing voltage signal due to non-linearity of the (I-V) characteristics is predicted and confirmed experimentally in an exemplar 2.6 THz bound-to-continuum QCL.

  10. Origin of terminal voltage variations due to self-mixing in terahertz frequency quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Grier, Andrew; Dean, Paul; Valavanis, Alexander; Keeley, James; Kundu, Iman; Cooper, Jonathan D; Agnew, Gary; Taimre, Thomas; Lim, Yah Leng; Bertling, Karl; Rakić, Aleksandar D; Li, Lianhe H; Harrison, Paul; Linfield, Edmund H; Ikonić, Zoran; Davies, A Giles; Indjin, Dragan

    2016-09-19

    We explain the origin of voltage variations due to self-mixing in a terahertz (THz) frequency quantum cascade laser (QCL) using an extended density matrix (DM) approach. Our DM model allows calculation of both the current-voltage (I-V) and optical power characteristics of the QCL under optical feedback by changing the cavity loss, to which the gain of the active region is clamped. The variation of intra-cavity field strength necessary to achieve gain clamping, and the corresponding change in bias required to maintain a constant current density through the heterostructure is then calculated. Strong enhancement of the self-mixing voltage signal due to non-linearity of the (I-V) characteristics is predicted and confirmed experimentally in an exemplar 2.6 THz bound-to-continuum QCL. PMID:27661929

  11. Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Karen Kristine; Simon-Santamaria, Jaione; McCuskey, Robert S; Smedsrød, Bård

    2015-10-01

    The liver sinusoidal endothelial cell (LSEC) forms the fenestrated wall of the hepatic sinusoid and functions as a control post regulating and surveying the trafficking of molecules and cells between the liver parenchyma and the blood. The cell acts as a scavenger cell responsible for removal of potential dangerous macromolecules from blood, and is increasingly acknowledged as an important player in liver immunity. This review provides an update of the major functions of the LSEC, including its role in plasma ultrafiltration and regulation of the hepatic microcirculation, scavenger functions, immune functions, and role in liver aging, as well as issues that are either undercommunicated or confusingly dealt with in the literature. These include metabolic functions, including energy metabolic interplay between the LSEC and the hepatocyte, and adequate ways of identifying and distinguishing the cells.

  12. Compact high voltage, high peak power, high frequency transformer for converter type modulator applications.

    PubMed

    Reghu, T; Mandloi, V; Shrivastava, Purushottam

    2016-04-01

    The design and development of a compact high voltage, high peak power, high frequency transformer for a converter type modulator of klystron amplifiers is presented. The transformer has been designed to operate at a frequency of 20 kHz and at a flux swing of ±0.6 T. Iron (Fe) based nanocrystalline material has been selected as a core for the construction of the transformer. The transformer employs a specially designed solid Teflon bobbin having 120 kV insulation for winding the high voltage secondary windings. The flux swing of the core has been experimentally found by plotting the hysteresis loop at actual operating conditions. Based on the design, a prototype transformer has been built which is per se a unique combination of high voltage, high frequency, and peak power specifications. The transformer was able to provide 58 kV (pk-pk) at the secondary with a peak power handling capability of 700 kVA. The transformation ratio was 1:17. The performance of the transformer is also presented and discussed.

  13. Compact high voltage, high peak power, high frequency transformer for converter type modulator applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reghu, T.; Mandloi, V.; Shrivastava, Purushottam

    2016-04-01

    The design and development of a compact high voltage, high peak power, high frequency transformer for a converter type modulator of klystron amplifiers is presented. The transformer has been designed to operate at a frequency of 20 kHz and at a flux swing of ±0.6 T. Iron (Fe) based nanocrystalline material has been selected as a core for the construction of the transformer. The transformer employs a specially designed solid Teflon bobbin having 120 kV insulation for winding the high voltage secondary windings. The flux swing of the core has been experimentally found by plotting the hysteresis loop at actual operating conditions. Based on the design, a prototype transformer has been built which is per se a unique combination of high voltage, high frequency, and peak power specifications. The transformer was able to provide 58 kV (pk-pk) at the secondary with a peak power handling capability of 700 kVA. The transformation ratio was 1:17. The performance of the transformer is also presented and discussed.

  14. Compact high voltage, high peak power, high frequency transformer for converter type modulator applications.

    PubMed

    Reghu, T; Mandloi, V; Shrivastava, Purushottam

    2016-04-01

    The design and development of a compact high voltage, high peak power, high frequency transformer for a converter type modulator of klystron amplifiers is presented. The transformer has been designed to operate at a frequency of 20 kHz and at a flux swing of ±0.6 T. Iron (Fe) based nanocrystalline material has been selected as a core for the construction of the transformer. The transformer employs a specially designed solid Teflon bobbin having 120 kV insulation for winding the high voltage secondary windings. The flux swing of the core has been experimentally found by plotting the hysteresis loop at actual operating conditions. Based on the design, a prototype transformer has been built which is per se a unique combination of high voltage, high frequency, and peak power specifications. The transformer was able to provide 58 kV (pk-pk) at the secondary with a peak power handling capability of 700 kVA. The transformation ratio was 1:17. The performance of the transformer is also presented and discussed. PMID:27131709

  15. Wave amplification by a relativistic electron beam in a planar electrostatic system with sinusoidal-ripple boundary

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Shichang

    2009-09-15

    Primary study is devoted to the amplification mechanism of electromagnetic fast wave by a relativistic electron beam in a planar electrostatic system, where the superplate of two parallel metallic plates is corrugated with sinusoidal ripples and connected to a negative voltage, while the subplate is smooth and grounded. In the system the electrostatic field governs the electrons to move along approximately sinusoidal trajectories and pumps the kinetic energy of electrons to the wave. Under exclusion of the space-charge wave effect and the Smith-Purcell effect, the fast wave gets relativistic Doppler upshift frequency and gain by extracting energy from a sheet electron beam, which is very similar to that in a free-electron laser pumped by a magnetostatic wiggler. Formulas derived and numerical analysis indicate that the amplification mechanism of wave pumped by the planar electrostatic system with sinusoidal ripples is favorable for a mildly relativistic electron beam to generate terahertz wave.

  16. Fast optical frequency sweeping using voltage controlled oscillator driven single sideband modulation combined with injection locking.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Chen, Dijun; Cai, Haiwen; Wei, Fang; Qu, Ronghui

    2015-03-23

    An ultrafast optical frequency sweeping technique for narrow linewidth lasers is reported. This technique exploits the large frequency modulation bandwidth of a wideband voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) and a high speed electro-optic dual parallel Mach-Zehnder modulator (DPMZM) which works on the state of carrier suppressed single sideband modulation(CS-SSB). Optical frequency sweeping of a narrow linewidth fiber laser with 3.85 GHz sweeping range and 80 GHz/μs tuning speed is demonstrated, which is an extremely high tuning speed for frequency sweeping of narrow linewidth lasers. In addition, injection locking technique is adopted to improve the sweeper's low optical power output and small side-mode suppression ratio (SMSR). PMID:25837048

  17. Effects of voltage errors caused by gap-voltage and automatic-frequency tuning in an alternating-phase-focused linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Y.; Yamada, S.; Murakami, T.; Fujimoto, T.; Fujisawa, T.; Ogawa, H.; Miyahara, N.; Yamamoto, K.; Hojo, S.; Sakamoto, Y.; Muramatsu, M.; Takeuchi, T.; Mitsumoto, T.; Tsutsui, H.; Watanabe, T.; Ueda, T.

    2008-05-01

    A compact injector for a heavy-ion medical-accelerator complex was developed. It consists of an electron-cyclotron-resonance ion-source (ECRIS) and two linacs, which are a radio-frequency-quadrupole (RFQ) linac and an Interdigital H-mode drift-tube-linac (IH-DTL). Beam acceleration tests of the compact injector were performed, and the designed beam quality was verified by the measured results, as reported earlier. Because the method of alternating-phase-focusing (APF) was used for beam focusing of the IH-DTL, the motion of beam ions would be sensitive to gap-voltage errors, caused during tuning of the gap-voltage distribution and by automatic-frequency tuning in actual operation. To study the effects of voltage errors to beam quality, further measurements were performed during acceleration tests. In this report, the effects of voltage errors for the APF IH-DTL are discussed.

  18. Fast switching dual-frequency liquid crystal optical retarder, driven by an amplitude and frequency modulated voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, Andrii B.; Shiyanovskii, Sergij V.; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.

    2003-11-01

    We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally a fast-switching nematic optical retarder capable to switch a few microns of optical retardation in less than 1 ms. For example, a nematic cell of thickness 14.5 μm switches 0.3 μm of retardation within 0.15 ms and 2.5 μm within 0.5 ms for single passage of beam. The corresponding figure of merit is two orders of magnitude higher than the one known for the best nematic materials synthesized so far. The fit is achieved by employing a dual-frequency nematic liquid crystal in high-pretilt angle cells and a special addressing scheme that features amplitude and frequency modulated voltage. The scheme can be used in spatial light modulators, retarders, beam deflectors, polarization rotator, and displays.

  19. Spontaneous low-frequency voltage oscillations in frog saccular hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Catacuzzeno, Luigi; Fioretti, Bernard; Perin, Paola; Franciolini, Fabio

    2004-01-01

    Spontaneous membrane voltage oscillations were found in 27 of 130 isolated frog saccular hair cells. Voltage oscillations had a mean peak-to-peak amplitude of 23 mV and a mean oscillatory frequency of 4.6 Hz. When compared with non-oscillatory cells, oscillatory cells had significantly greater hyperpolarization-activated and lower depolarization-activated current densities. Two components, the hyperpolarization-activated cation current, Ih, and the K+-selective inward-rectifier current, IK1, contributed to the hyperpolarization-activated current, as assessed by the use of the IK1-selective inhibitor Ba2+ and the Ih-selective inhibitor ZD-7288. Five depolarization-activated currents were present in these cells (transient IBK, sustained IBK, IDRK, IA, and ICa), and all were found to have significantly lower densities in oscillatory cells than in non-oscillatory cells (revealed by using TEA to block IBK, 4-AP to block IDRK, and prepulses at different voltages to isolate IA). Bath application of either Ba2+ or ZD-7288 suppressed spontaneous voltage oscillations, indicating that Ih and IK1 are required for generating this activity. On the contrary, TEA or Cd2+ did not inhibit this activity, suggesting that IBK and ICa do not contribute. A mathematical model has been developed to test the interpretation derived from the pharmacological and biophysical data. This model indicates that spontaneous voltage oscillations can be generated when the electrophysiological features of oscillatory cells are used. The oscillatory behaviour is principally driven by the activity of IK1 and Ih, with IA playing a modulatory role. In addition, the model indicates that the high densities of depolarization-activated currents expressed by non-oscillatory cells help to stabilize the resting membrane potential, thus preventing the spontaneous oscillations. PMID:15489251

  20. Radio-frequency sheath voltages and slow wave electric field spatial structure

    SciTech Connect

    Colas, Laurent Lu, Ling-Feng; Křivská, Alena; Jacquot, Jonathan

    2015-12-10

    We investigate theoretically how sheath radio-frequency (RF) oscillations relate to the spatial structure of the RF parallel electric field emitted by Ion Cyclotron (IC) wave launchers, using a simple model of Slow Wave (SW) evanescence coupled with Direct Current (DC) plasma biasing via sheath boundary conditions in a plasma-filled 2-dimensional (parallel, radial) rectangle. Within a “wide sheaths” asymptotic regime, valid for large-amplitude near RF fields, our model becomes partly linear: the sheath oscillating voltage at open field line boundaries is a linear combination of elementary contributions by every source point of the radiated RF field map. These individual contributions are all the more intense as the SW emission point is toroidally nearer to the sheath walls. A limit formula is given for a source infinitely close to the sheaths. The decay of sheath RF voltages with the sheath/source parallel distance is quantified as a function of two characteristic SW evanescence lengths. Decay lengths are smaller than antenna parallel extensions. The sheath RF voltages at an IC antenna side limiter are therefore mainly sensitive to SW emission near this limiter, as recent observations suggest. Toroidal proximity effects could also explain why sheath oscillations persist with antisymmetric strap toroidal phasing, despite the parallel anti-symmetry of the radiated field map. They could also justify current attempts at reducing the RF fields induced near antenna boxes to attenuate sheath oscillations in their vicinity.

  1. All-Polymer modulator for high frequency low drive voltage applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eng, David L. K.; Kozacik, Stephen; Shi, Shouyuan; Olbricht, Benjamin C.; Prather, Dennis W.

    2014-03-01

    Organic electro-optic material based optical modulators have been fervently pursued over the past two decades. The material properties of organic materials over crystalline electro-optic materials such as LiNbO3 have yielded devices with record low drive voltages and significant promise for high frequency operation that are ideal for implementation in many developing telecommunication technologies. This paper will discuss a TM electro-optic phase modulator based on a recently developed material IKD-1-50. A simple fabrication process that is compatible with wafer scale manufacturability using commercially available cladding materials, spin processing, standard photolithography, and dry etching will be presented. Non-centrosymmetric order is induced in the core material via a thermally enabled poling process that was developed based on work in simple slab waveguide material characterization devices, and optimized for polymer stack waveguide architectures. Basic phase modulators are characterized for half wave voltage and optical loss. In device r33 values are estimated from a combination of measured and simulated values. Additional work will be discussed including amplitude modulation and high frequency applications. The design for a Mach-Zehnder interferometer amplitude modulator that implements a multi mode interference cavity splitter will be presented along with plans for a microstrip transmission line traveling wave modulator.

  2. Numerical investigation of the effect of driving voltage pulse shapes on the characteristics of low-pressure argon dielectric barrier discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Eslami, E. Barjasteh, A.; Morshedian, N.

    2015-06-15

    In this work, we numerically compare the effect of a sinusoidal, triangular, and rectangular pulsed voltage profile on the calculated particle production, electric current, and gas voltage in a dielectric barrier discharge. The total argon gas pressure of 400 Pa, the distance between dielectrics of 5 mm, the dielectric thickness of 0.7 mm, and the temperature of T = 300 K were considered as input parameters. The different driving voltage pulse shapes (triangular, rectangular, and sinusoidal) are considered as applied voltage with a frequency of 7 kHz and an amplitude of 700 V peak to peak. It is shown that applying a rectangular voltage, as compared with a sinusoidal or triangle voltage, increases the current peak, while the peak width is decreased. Higher current density is related to high production of charged particles, which leads to the generation of some highly active species, such as Ar* (4s level), and Ar** (4p level) in the gap.

  3. Sinusoidal Forcing of Interfacial Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasheed, Fayaz; Raghunandan, Aditya; Hirsa, Amir; Lopez, Juan

    2015-11-01

    Fluid transport, in vivo, is accomplished via pumping mechanisms of the heart and lungs, which results in biological fluids being subjected to oscillatory shear. Flow is known to influence biological macromolecules, but predicting the effect of shear is incomplete without also accounting for the influence of complex interfaces ubiquitous throughout the body. Here, we investigated the oscillatory response of the structure of aqueous interfacial films using a cylindrical knife edge viscometer. Vitamin K1 was used as a model monolayer because its behaviour has been thoroughly quantified and it doesn't show any measurable hysteresis. The monolayer was subjected to sinusoidal forcing under varied conditions of surface concentrations, periodic frequencies, and knife edge amplitudes. Particle Image Velocimetry(PIV) data was collected using Brewster Angle Microscopy(BAM), revealing the influence of oscillatory interfacial shear stress on the monolayer. Insights were gained as to how the velocity profile dampens at specific distances from the knife edge contact depending on the amplitude, frequency, and concentration of Vitamin K1. Supported by NNX13AQ22G, National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  4. A High Frequency Active Voltage Doubler in Standard CMOS Using Offset-Controlled Comparators for Inductive Power Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyung-Min; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a fully integrated active voltage doubler in CMOS technology using offset-controlled high speed comparators for extending the range of inductive power transmission to implantable microelectronic devices (IMD) and radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags. This active voltage doubler provides considerably higher power conversion efficiency (PCE) and lower dropout voltage compared to its passive counterpart and requires lower input voltage than active rectifiers, leading to reliable and efficient operation with weakly coupled inductive links. The offset-controlled functions in the comparators compensate for turn-on and turn-off delays to not only maximize the forward charging current to the load but also minimize the back current, optimizing PCE in the high frequency (HF) band. We fabricated the active voltage doubler in a 0.5-μm 3M2P std. CMOS process, occupying 0.144 mm2 of chip area. With 1.46 V peak AC input at 13.56 MHz, the active voltage doubler provides 2.4 V DC output across a 1 kΩ load, achieving the highest PCE = 79% ever reported at this frequency. In addition, the built-in start-up circuit ensures a reliable operation at lower voltages. PMID:23853321

  5. A very low noise, high accuracy, programmable voltage source for low frequency noise measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scandurra, Graziella; Giusi, Gino; Ciofi, Carmine

    2014-04-01

    In this paper an approach for designing a programmable, very low noise, high accuracy voltage source for biasing devices under test in low frequency noise measurements is proposed. The core of the system is a supercapacitor based two pole low pass filter used for filtering out the noise produced by a standard DA converter down to 100 mHz with an attenuation in excess of 40 dB. The high leakage current of the supercapacitors, however, introduces large DC errors that need to be compensated in order to obtain high accuracy as well as very low output noise. To this end, a proper circuit topology has been developed that allows to considerably reduce the effect of the supercapacitor leakage current on the DC response of the system while maintaining a very low level of output noise. With a proper design an output noise as low as the equivalent input voltage noise of the OP27 operational amplifier, used as the output buffer of the system, can be obtained with DC accuracies better that 0.05% up to the maximum output of 8 V. The expected performances of the proposed voltage source have been confirmed both by means of SPICE simulations and by means of measurements on actual prototypes. Turn on and stabilization times for the system are of the order of a few hundred seconds. These times are fully compatible with noise measurements down to 100 mHz, since measurement times of the order of several tens of minutes are required in any case in order to reduce the statistical error in the measured spectra down to an acceptable level.

  6. A very low noise, high accuracy, programmable voltage source for low frequency noise measurements.

    PubMed

    Scandurra, Graziella; Giusi, Gino; Ciofi, Carmine

    2014-04-01

    In this paper an approach for designing a programmable, very low noise, high accuracy voltage source for biasing devices under test in low frequency noise measurements is proposed. The core of the system is a supercapacitor based two pole low pass filter used for filtering out the noise produced by a standard DA converter down to 100 mHz with an attenuation in excess of 40 dB. The high leakage current of the supercapacitors, however, introduces large DC errors that need to be compensated in order to obtain high accuracy as well as very low output noise. To this end, a proper circuit topology has been developed that allows to considerably reduce the effect of the supercapacitor leakage current on the DC response of the system while maintaining a very low level of output noise. With a proper design an output noise as low as the equivalent input voltage noise of the OP27 operational amplifier, used as the output buffer of the system, can be obtained with DC accuracies better that 0.05% up to the maximum output of 8 V. The expected performances of the proposed voltage source have been confirmed both by means of SPICE simulations and by means of measurements on actual prototypes. Turn on and stabilization times for the system are of the order of a few hundred seconds. These times are fully compatible with noise measurements down to 100 mHz, since measurement times of the order of several tens of minutes are required in any case in order to reduce the statistical error in the measured spectra down to an acceptable level. PMID:24784633

  7. Tailored voltage waveform capacitively coupled plasmas in electronegative gases: frequency dependence of asymmetry effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüngel, E.; Korolov, I.; Bruneau, B.; Derzsi, A.; Johnson, E.; O’Connell, D.; Gans, T.; Booth, J.-P.; Donkó, Z.; Schulze, J.

    2016-07-01

    Capacitively coupled radio frequency plasmas operated in an electronegative gas (CF4) and driven by voltage waveforms composed of four consecutive harmonics are investigated for different fundamental driving frequencies using PIC/MCC simulations and an analytical model. As has been observed previously for electropositive gases, the application of peak-shaped waveforms (that are characterized by a strong amplitude asymmetry) results in the development of a DC self-bias due to the electrical asymmetry effect (EAE), which increases the energy of ions arriving at the powered electrode. In contrast to the electropositive case (Korolov et al 2012 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 45 465202) the absolute value of the DC self-bias is found to increase as the fundamental frequency is reduced in this electronegative discharge, providing an increased range over which the DC self-bias can be controlled. The analytical model reveals that this increased DC self-bias is caused by changes in the spatial profile and the mean value of the net charge density in the grounded electrode sheath. The spatio-temporally resolved simulation data show that as the frequency is reduced the grounded electrode sheath region becomes electronegative. The presence of negative ions in this sheath leads to very different dynamics of the power absorption of electrons, which in turn enhances the local electronegativity and plasma density via ionization and attachment processes. The ion flux to the grounded electrode (where the ion energy is lowest) can be up to twice that to the powered electrode. At the same time, while the mean ion energies at both electrodes are quite different, their ratio remains approximately constant for all base frequencies studied here.

  8. Potential therapeutic mechanism of extremely low-frequency high-voltage electric fields in cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ka-Eun; Park, Soon-Kwon; Nam, Sang-Yun; Han, Tae-Jong; Cho, Il-Young

    2016-05-18

    The aim of this survey was to provide background theory based on previous research to elucidate the potential pathway by which medical devices using extremely low-frequency high-voltage electric fields (ELF-HVEF) exert therapeutic effects on the human body, and to increase understanding of the AC high-voltage electrotherapeutic apparatus for consumers and suppliers of the relevant devices. Our review revealed that an ELF field as weak as 1-10 μ V/m can induce diverse alterations of membrane proteins such as transporters and channel proteins, including changes in Ca + + binding to a specific site of the cell surface, changes in ion (e.g., Ca + + ) influx or efflux, and alterations in the ligand-receptor interaction. These alterations then induce cytoplasmic responses within cells (Ca + + , cAMP, kinases, etc.) that can have impacts on cell growth, differentiation, and other functional properties by promoting the synthesis of macromolecules. Moreover, increased cytoplasmic Ca + + involves calmodulin-dependent signaling and consequent Ca + + /calmodulin-dependent stimulation of nitric oxide synthesis. This event in turn induces the nitric oxide-cGMP-protein kinase G pathway, which may be an essential factor in the observed physiological and therapeutic responses.

  9. Optimization of energy harvesting efficiency of an oscillating hydrofoil: Sinusoidal and Non-sinusoidal trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Michael; Strom, Ben; Breuer, Kenneth; Mandre, Shreyas

    2014-11-01

    We determine the feasibility of applying optimization algorithms to an oscillating hydrofoil's motion trajectory to determine maximum efficiency of energy capture. Optimization is performed using the Nelder-Meade downhill simplex method. The objective function is the energy captured measured experimentally in run-time with an oscillating hydrofoil capable of measuring mechanical energy capture in a laboratory flume. For sinusoidal trajectories, optimization is performed over pitch and heave amplitudes as well as frequency; this system is shown to be capable of optimization in run-time. The optimum efficiency of 30% is found for a pitch amplitude of 70°, a heave amplitude of 0.8* chord and a dimensionless frequency of 0.13. To treat non-sinusoidal trajectories, we expand them in a truncated Fourier series and consider the coefficients of this series as variables for optimization. The sinusoidal case is simply an extreme case of such a truncated Fourier series, with only one term in the series retained. We present a systematic method for optimization over general non-sinusoidal trajectories by including more and more terms in the Fourier series.

  10. Effect of driving voltages in dual capacitively coupled radio frequency plasma: A study by nonlinear global model

    SciTech Connect

    Bora, B.

    2015-10-15

    On the basis of nonlinear global model, a dual frequency capacitively coupled radio frequency plasma driven by 13.56 MHz and 27.12 MHz has been studied to investigate the influences of driving voltages on the generation of dc self-bias and plasma heating. Fluid equations for the ions inside the plasma sheath have been considered to determine the voltage-charge relations of the plasma sheath. Geometrically symmetric as well as asymmetric cases with finite geometrical asymmetry of 1.2 (ratio of electrodes area) have been considered to make the study more reasonable to experiment. The electrical asymmetry effect (EAE) and finite geometrical asymmetry is found to work differently in controlling the dc self-bias. The amount of EAE has been primarily controlled by the phase angle between the two consecutive harmonics waveforms. The incorporation of the finite geometrical asymmetry in the calculations shift the dc self-bias towards negative polarity direction while increasing the amount of EAE is found to increase the dc self-bias in either direction. For phase angle between the two waveforms ϕ = 0 and ϕ = π/2, the amount of EAE increases significantly with increasing the low frequency voltage, whereas no such increase in the amount of EAE is found with increasing high frequency voltage. In contrast to the geometrically symmetric case, where the variation of the dc self-bias with driving voltages for phase angle ϕ = 0 and π/2 are just opposite in polarity, the variation for the geometrically asymmetric case is different for ϕ = 0 and π/2. In asymmetric case, for ϕ = 0, the dc self-bias increases towards the negative direction with increasing both the low and high frequency voltages, but for the ϕ = π/2, the dc-self bias is increased towards positive direction with increasing low frequency voltage while dc self-bias increases towards negative direction with increasing high frequency voltage.

  11. Force Sensor Characterization Under Sinusoidal Excitations

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Nieves; de Vicente, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    The aim in the current work is the development of a method to characterize force sensors under sinusoidal excitations using a primary standard as the source of traceability. During this work the influence factors have been studied and a method to minimise their contributions, as well as the corrections to be performed under dynamic conditions have been established. These results will allow the realization of an adequate characterization of force sensors under sinusoidal excitations, which will be essential for its further proper use under dynamic conditions. The traceability of the sensor characterization is based in the direct definition of force as mass multiplied by acceleration. To do so, the sensor is loaded with different calibrated loads and is maintained under different sinusoidal accelerations by means of a vibration shaker system that is able to generate accelerations up to 100 m/s2 with frequencies from 5 Hz up to 2400 Hz. The acceleration is measured by means of a laser vibrometer with traceability to the units of time and length. A multiple channel data acquisition system is also required to simultaneously acquire the electrical output signals of the involved instrument in real time. PMID:25290287

  12. Surface potential imaging with atomic resolution by frequency-modulation Kelvin probe force microscopy without bias voltage feedback.

    PubMed

    Kou, Lili; Ma, Zongmin; Li, Yan Jun; Naitoh, Yoshitaka; Komiyama, Masaharu; Sugawara, Yasuhiro

    2015-05-15

    We investigated the capability of obtaining atomic resolution surface potential images by frequency-modulation Kelvin probe force microscopy (FM-KPFM) without bias voltage feedback. We theoretically derived equations representing the relationship between the contact potential difference and the frequency shift (Δf) of an oscillating cantilever. For the first time, we obtained atomic resolution images and site-dependent spectroscopic curves for Δf and VLCPD on a Si (111)-7 × 7 surface. FM-KPFM without bias voltage feedback does not involve the influence of the FM-KPFM controller because it has no deviation from a parabolic dependence of Δf on the dc-bias voltage. It is particularly suitable for investigation on molecular electronics and organic photovoltaics, because electron or ion movement induced by dc bias is avoided and the electrochemical reactions are inhibited. PMID:25895740

  13. A MEMS Interface IC With Low-Power and Wide-Range Frequency-to-Voltage Converter for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Arefin, Md Shamsul; Redouté, Jean-Michel; Yuce, Mehmet Rasit

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents an interface circuit for capacitive and inductive MEMS biosensors using an oscillator and a charge pump based frequency-to-voltage converter. Frequency modulation using a differential crossed coupled oscillator is adopted to sense capacitive and inductive changes. The frequency-to-voltage converter is designed with a negative feedback system and external controlling parameters to adjust the sensitivity, dynamic range, and nominal point for the measurement. The sensitivity of the frequency-to-voltage converter is from 13.28 to 35.96 mV/MHz depending on external voltage and charging current. The sensitivity ranges of the capacitive and inductive interface circuit are 17.08 to 54.4 mV/pF and 32.11 to 82.88 mV/mH, respectively. A capacitive MEMS based pH sensor is also connected with the interface circuit to measure the high acidic gastric acid throughout the digestive tract. The sensitivity for pH from 1 to 3 is 191.4 mV/pH with 550 μV(pp) noise. The readout circuit is designed and fabricated using the UMC 0.18 μm CMOS technology. It occupies an area of 0.18 mm (2) and consumes 11.8 mW.

  14. Dynamic voltage and frequency scaling for on-demand performance and availability of biomedical embedded systems.

    PubMed

    Raskovic, Dejan; Giessel, David

    2009-11-01

    The goal of the study presented in this paper is to develop an embedded biomedical system capable of delivering maximum performance on demand, while maintaining the optimal energy efficiency whenever possible. Several hardware and software solutions are presented allowing the system to intelligently change the power supply voltage and frequency in runtime. The resulting system allows use of more energy-efficient components, operates most of the time in its most battery-efficient mode, and provides means to quickly change the operation mode while maintaining reliable performance. While all of these techniques extend battery life, the main benefit is on-demand availability of computational performance using a system that is not excessive. Biomedical applications, perhaps more than any other application, require battery operation, favor infrequent battery replacements, and can benefit from increased performance under certain conditions (e.g., when anomaly is detected) that makes them ideal candidates for this approach. In addition, if the system is a part of a body area network, it needs to be light, inexpensive, and adaptable enough to satisfy changing requirements of the other nodes in the network. PMID:19775980

  15. RF voltage modulation at discrete frequencies with applications to crystal channeling extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Gabella, W.; Rosenzweig, J.; Kick, R.; Peggs, S.

    1992-05-01

    RF voltage modulation at a finite number of discrete frequencies is described in a Hamiltonian resonance framework. The theory is applied to the problem of parasitic extraction of a fixed target beam from a high energy proton collider, using a bent crystal as a thin ``septum`` within an effective width of about one micron. Three modes of employment of discrete resonances are proposed.First, a single relatively strong static ``drive`` resonance may be used to excite a test proton so that it will penetrate deeply into the channeling crystal. Second, a moderately strong ``feed`` resonance with a ramped modulation tune may be used to adiabatically trap protons near the edge of the beam core, and transport them to the drive resonance. Third, several weak resonances may be overlapped to create a chaotic amplitude band, either to transport protons to the drive resonance, or to provide a ``pulse stretching`` buffer between a feed resonance and the drive resonance. Extraction efficiency is semi- quantitatively described in terms of characteristic ``penetration,`` ``depletion,`` and ``repetition`` times. simulations are used to quantitatively confirm the fundamental results of the theory, and to show that a prototypical extraction scheme using all three modes promises good extraction performance.

  16. RF voltage modulation at discrete frequencies with applications to crystal channeling extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Gabella, W.; Rosenzweig, J. . Dept. of Physics); Kick, R. ); Peggs, S. )

    1992-05-01

    RF voltage modulation at a finite number of discrete frequencies is described in a Hamiltonian resonance framework. The theory is applied to the problem of parasitic extraction of a fixed target beam from a high energy proton collider, using a bent crystal as a thin septum'' within an effective width of about one micron. Three modes of employment of discrete resonances are proposed.First, a single relatively strong static drive'' resonance may be used to excite a test proton so that it will penetrate deeply into the channeling crystal. Second, a moderately strong feed'' resonance with a ramped modulation tune may be used to adiabatically trap protons near the edge of the beam core, and transport them to the drive resonance. Third, several weak resonances may be overlapped to create a chaotic amplitude band, either to transport protons to the drive resonance, or to provide a pulse stretching'' buffer between a feed resonance and the drive resonance. Extraction efficiency is semi- quantitatively described in terms of characteristic penetration,'' depletion,'' and repetition'' times. simulations are used to quantitatively confirm the fundamental results of the theory, and to show that a prototypical extraction scheme using all three modes promises good extraction performance.

  17. High frequency input impedance modeling of low-voltage residential installations - influence on lightning overvoltage simulations results.

    PubMed

    Bassi, Welson

    2014-01-01

    The overvoltage level of a system is strongly dependent on the connected loads and with more precise models, better and more reliable simulation results are obtained. This paper presents the input impedance characteristics, measured over a wide range of frequencies, of various actual low-voltage residential installations. The measured frequency responses were fitted by effective RLC models and a general model was also developed. The range of frequencies considered in the study, nearly d.c. up to 5 MHz, allows the use of these models for lightning or switching studies. It is also presented overvoltage simulations, using different residential installations models presented in the paper, of a distribution network subjected to lightning surges on the medium voltage circuit. PMID:26034685

  18. High frequency input impedance modeling of low-voltage residential installations - influence on lightning overvoltage simulations results.

    PubMed

    Bassi, Welson

    2014-01-01

    The overvoltage level of a system is strongly dependent on the connected loads and with more precise models, better and more reliable simulation results are obtained. This paper presents the input impedance characteristics, measured over a wide range of frequencies, of various actual low-voltage residential installations. The measured frequency responses were fitted by effective RLC models and a general model was also developed. The range of frequencies considered in the study, nearly d.c. up to 5 MHz, allows the use of these models for lightning or switching studies. It is also presented overvoltage simulations, using different residential installations models presented in the paper, of a distribution network subjected to lightning surges on the medium voltage circuit.

  19. Radio-frequency powered glow discharge device and method with high voltage interface

    DOEpatents

    Duckworth, D.C.; Marcus, R.K.; Donohue, D.L.; Lewis, T.A.

    1994-06-28

    A high voltage accelerating potential, which is supplied by a high voltage direct current power supply, is applied to the electrically conducting interior wall of an RF powered glow discharge cell. The RF power supply desirably is electrically grounded, and the conductor carrying the RF power to the sample held by the probe is desirably shielded completely excepting only the conductor's terminal point of contact with the sample. The high voltage DC accelerating potential is not supplied to the sample. A high voltage capacitance is electrically connected in series between the sample on the one hand and the RF power supply and an impedance matching network on the other hand. The high voltage capacitance isolates the high DC voltage from the RF electronics, while the RF potential is passed across the high voltage capacitance to the plasma. An inductor protects at least the RF power supply, and desirably the impedance matching network as well, from a short that might occur across the high voltage capacitance. The discharge cell and the probe which holds the sample are configured and disposed to prevent the probe's components, which are maintained at ground potential, from bridging between the relatively low vacuum region in communication with the glow discharge maintained within the cell on the one hand, and the relatively high vacuum region surrounding the probe and cell on the other hand. The probe and cell also are configured and disposed to prevent the probe's components from electrically shorting the cell's components. 11 figures.

  20. Radio-frequency powered glow discharge device and method with high voltage interface

    DOEpatents

    Duckworth, Douglas C.; Marcus, R. Kenneth; Donohue, David L.; Lewis, Trousdale A.

    1994-01-01

    A high voltage accelerating potential, which is supplied by a high voltage direct current power supply, is applied to the electrically conducting interior wall of an RF powered glow discharge cell. The RF power supply desirably is electrically grounded, and the conductor carrying the RF power to the sample held by the probe is desirably shielded completely excepting only the conductor's terminal point of contact with the sample. The high voltage DC accelerating potential is not supplied to the sample. A high voltage capacitance is electrically connected in series between the sample on the one hand and the RF power supply and an impedance matching network on the other hand. The high voltage capacitance isolates the high DC voltage from the RF electronics, while the RF potential is passed across the high voltage capacitance to the plasma. An inductor protects at least the RF power supply, and desirably the impedance matching network as well, from a short that might occur across the high voltage capacitance. The discharge cell and the probe which holds the sample are configured and disposed to prevent the probe's components, which are maintained at ground potential, from bridging between the relatively low vacuum region in communication with the glow discharge maintained within the cell on the one hand, and the relatively high vacuum region surrounding the probe and cell on the other hand. The probe and cell also are configured and disposed to prevent the probe's components from electrically shorting the cell's components.

  1. Systematic Review of the Exposure Assessment and Epidemiology of High-Frequency Voltage Transients

    PubMed Central

    de Vocht, Frank; Olsen, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions of epidemiological studies describing adverse health effects as a result of exposure to electromagnetic fields are not unanimous and often contradictory. It has been proposed that an explanation could be that high-frequency voltage transients [dirty electricity (DE)] which are superimposed on 50/60-Hz fields, but are generally not measured, are the real causal agent. DE has been linked to many different health and wellbeing effects, and on the basis of this, an industry selling measurement and filtering equipment is growing. We reviewed the available peer-reviewed evidence for DE as a causal agent for adverse human health effects. A literature search was performed in the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Web of Science, Google Scholar, and additional publications were obtained from reference lists and from the gray literature. This search resulted in 25 publications; 16 included primary epidemiological and/or exposure data. All studies were reviewed by both authors independently, and including a re-review of studies included in a review of data available up to July 31, 2009 by one of the authors. DE has been measured differently in different studies and comparison data are not available. There is no evidence for 50 Graham/Stetzer (GS) units as a safety threshold being anything more than arbitrary. The epidemiological evidence on human health effects of DE is primarily based on, often re-used, case descriptions. Quantitative evidence relies on self-reporting in non-blinded interventions, ecological associations, and one cross-sectional cohort study of cancer risk, which does not point to DE as the causal agent. The available evidence for DE as an exposure affecting human health at present does not stand up to scientific scrutiny. PMID:27066469

  2. Systematic Review of the Exposure Assessment and Epidemiology of High-Frequency Voltage Transients.

    PubMed

    de Vocht, Frank; Olsen, Robert G

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions of epidemiological studies describing adverse health effects as a result of exposure to electromagnetic fields are not unanimous and often contradictory. It has been proposed that an explanation could be that high-frequency voltage transients [dirty electricity (DE)] which are superimposed on 50/60-Hz fields, but are generally not measured, are the real causal agent. DE has been linked to many different health and wellbeing effects, and on the basis of this, an industry selling measurement and filtering equipment is growing. We reviewed the available peer-reviewed evidence for DE as a causal agent for adverse human health effects. A literature search was performed in the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Web of Science, Google Scholar, and additional publications were obtained from reference lists and from the gray literature. This search resulted in 25 publications; 16 included primary epidemiological and/or exposure data. All studies were reviewed by both authors independently, and including a re-review of studies included in a review of data available up to July 31, 2009 by one of the authors. DE has been measured differently in different studies and comparison data are not available. There is no evidence for 50 Graham/Stetzer (GS) units as a safety threshold being anything more than arbitrary. The epidemiological evidence on human health effects of DE is primarily based on, often re-used, case descriptions. Quantitative evidence relies on self-reporting in non-blinded interventions, ecological associations, and one cross-sectional cohort study of cancer risk, which does not point to DE as the causal agent. The available evidence for DE as an exposure affecting human health at present does not stand up to scientific scrutiny.

  3. Systematic Review of the Exposure Assessment and Epidemiology of High-Frequency Voltage Transients.

    PubMed

    de Vocht, Frank; Olsen, Robert G

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions of epidemiological studies describing adverse health effects as a result of exposure to electromagnetic fields are not unanimous and often contradictory. It has been proposed that an explanation could be that high-frequency voltage transients [dirty electricity (DE)] which are superimposed on 50/60-Hz fields, but are generally not measured, are the real causal agent. DE has been linked to many different health and wellbeing effects, and on the basis of this, an industry selling measurement and filtering equipment is growing. We reviewed the available peer-reviewed evidence for DE as a causal agent for adverse human health effects. A literature search was performed in the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Web of Science, Google Scholar, and additional publications were obtained from reference lists and from the gray literature. This search resulted in 25 publications; 16 included primary epidemiological and/or exposure data. All studies were reviewed by both authors independently, and including a re-review of studies included in a review of data available up to July 31, 2009 by one of the authors. DE has been measured differently in different studies and comparison data are not available. There is no evidence for 50 Graham/Stetzer (GS) units as a safety threshold being anything more than arbitrary. The epidemiological evidence on human health effects of DE is primarily based on, often re-used, case descriptions. Quantitative evidence relies on self-reporting in non-blinded interventions, ecological associations, and one cross-sectional cohort study of cancer risk, which does not point to DE as the causal agent. The available evidence for DE as an exposure affecting human health at present does not stand up to scientific scrutiny. PMID:27066469

  4. The Digital Simulation of Synchronous Motors Fed by Voltage-Source Inverters Over Wide Speed and Frequency Ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowihal, Said Soliman

    Both voltage-source and current-source inverters are widely used for supplying three-phase power to induction motor drives, each having their advantages and disadvantages. For high power drives and applications requiring accurate speed and tracking coordination, the synchronous motors are the optimum choice. For constant speed applications of synchronous motor drives, current-source inverters tend to be favored as the motor can usually be operated in the overexcited leading power factor region, thus providing the inverter with sufficient electro-motive force to allow natural commutation. Generally speaking low speed operation of synchronous motors is not satisfactory from naturally commutated current-source inverters. To provide a dynamic range of speed and frequency would require expensive control circuitry and complicates the performance of the drive. The advantage of the voltage-source inverter for the wide range of speed and frequency control herein envisaged is that forced commutation is employed throughout the range and the commutating circuits have been well developed and established. On balance, voltage-source inverters represent a viable compromise for variable-speed three -phase synchronous motor drives including start-up. To investigate the transient response of the voltage -source fed-synchronous motor drives, a digital computer program is developed. The program is based on two models --machine model and inverter model. The machine is represented by a detailed two-axis model which includes the effects due to saliency, damper windings, and machine resistances. The inverter model represents a forced-commutated voltage-source inverter assuming ideal switching devices (thyristors and diodes). To cope with the wide variations of power factor during start-up, a thyristor with a reverse connected parallel diode are integrated as a bidirectional switch. The digital program provides the machine variables of interest (phase currents, field current, damper winding

  5. Stimulated neutrino transformation with sinusoidal density profiles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kneller, J. P.; McLaughlin, G. C.; Patton, K. M.

    2013-03-28

    Large amplitude oscillations between the states of a quantum system can be stimulated by sinusoidal external potentials with frequencies that are similar to the energy level splitting of the states or a fraction thereof. Situations where the applied frequency is equal to an integer fraction of the energy level splittings are known as parametric resonances. We investigate this effect for neutrinos both analytically and numerically for the case of arbitrary numbers of neutrino flavors. We look for environments where the effect may be observed and find that supernovae are the one realistic possibility due to the necessity of both largemore » densities and large amplitude fluctuations. In conclusion, the comparison of numerical and analytical results of neutrino propagation through a model supernova reveals that it is possible to predict the locations and strengths of the stimulated transitions that occur.« less

  6. Stimulated neutrino transformation with sinusoidal density profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Kneller, J. P.; McLaughlin, G. C.; Patton, K. M.

    2013-03-28

    Large amplitude oscillations between the states of a quantum system can be stimulated by sinusoidal external potentials with frequencies that are similar to the energy level splitting of the states or a fraction thereof. Situations where the applied frequency is equal to an integer fraction of the energy level splittings are known as parametric resonances. We investigate this effect for neutrinos both analytically and numerically for the case of arbitrary numbers of neutrino flavors. We look for environments where the effect may be observed and find that supernovae are the one realistic possibility due to the necessity of both large densities and large amplitude fluctuations. In conclusion, the comparison of numerical and analytical results of neutrino propagation through a model supernova reveals that it is possible to predict the locations and strengths of the stimulated transitions that occur.

  7. A Current-Mode Buck DC-DC Converter with Frequency Characteristics Independent of Input and Output Voltages Using a Quadratic Compensation Slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sai, Toru; Sugimoto, Yasuhiro

    By using a quadratic compensation slope, a CMOS current-mode buck DC-DC converter with constant frequency characteristics over wide input and output voltage ranges has been developed. The use of a quadratic slope instead of a conventional linear slope makes both the damping factor in the transfer function and the frequency bandwidth of the current feedback loop independent of the converter's output voltage settings. When the coefficient of the quadratic slope is chosen to be dependent on the input voltage settings, the damping factor in the transfer function and the frequency bandwidth of the current feedback loop both become independent of the input voltage settings. Thus, both the input and output voltage dependences in the current feedback loop are eliminated, the frequency characteristics become constant, and the frequency bandwidth is maximized. To verify the effectiveness of a quadratic compensation slope with a coefficient that is dependent on the input voltage in a buck DC-DC converter, we fabricated a test chip using a 0.18µm high-voltage CMOS process. The evaluation results show that the frequency characteristics of both the total feedback loop and the current feedback loop are constant even when the input and output voltages are changed from 2.5V to 7V and from 0.5V to 5.6V, respectively, using a 3MHz clock.

  8. Improved Transient and Steady-State Performances of Series Resonant ZCS High-Frequency Inverter-Coupled Voltage Multiplier Converter with Dual Mode PFM Control Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Enhui; Gamage, Laknath; Ishitobi, Manabu; Hiraki, Eiji; Nakaoka, Mutsuo

    The A variety of switched-mode high voltage DC power supplies using voltage-fed type or current-fed type high-frequency transformer resonant inverters using MOS gate bipolar power transistors; IGBTs have been recently developed so far for a medical-use X-ray high power generator. In general, the high voltage high power X-ray generator using voltage-fed high frequency inverter with a high voltage transformer link has to meet some performances such as (i) short rising period in start transient of X-ray tube voltage (ii) no overshoot transient response in tube voltage, (iii) minimized voltage ripple in periodic steady-state under extremely wide load variations and filament heater current fluctuation conditions of the X-ray tube. This paper presents two lossless inductor snubber-assisted series resonant zero current soft switching high-frequency inverter using a diode-capacitor ladder type voltage multiplier called Cockcroft-Walton circuit, which is effectively implemented for a high DC voltage X-ray power generator. This DC high voltage generator which incorporates pulse frequency modulated series resonant inverter using IGBT power module packages is based on the operation principle of zero current soft switching commutation scheme under discontinuous resonant current and continuous resonant current transition modes. This series capacitor compensated for transformer resonant power converter with a high frequency transformer linked voltage boost multiplier can efficiently work a novel selectively-changed dual mode PFM control scheme in order to improve the start transient and steady-state response characteristics and can completely achieve stable zero current soft switching commutation tube filament current dependent for wide load parameter setting values with the aid of two lossless inductor snubbers. It is proved on the basis of simulation and experimental results in which a simple and low cost control implementation based on selectively-changed dual-mode PFM for

  9. A utility piezoelectric energy harvester with low frequency and high-output voltage: Theoretical model, experimental verification and energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guangyi; Gao, Shiqiao; Liu, Haipeng

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a utility piezoelectric energy harvester with low frequency and high-output voltage is presented. Firstly, the harvester's three theoretical models are presented, namely the static model, the quasi static model and the dynamic vibration model. By analyzing the influence of the mass ratio of the mass block to the beam on output characteristics of the harvester, we compare the quasi static model and the dynamic vibration model and then define their applicable ranges. Secondly, simulation and experiments are done to verify the models, using the harvester with PZT-5H piezoelectric material, which are proved to be consistent with each other. The experimental results show that the output open-circuit voltage and the output power can reach up to 86.36V and 27.5mW respectively. The experiments are conducted when this harvester system is excited by the first modal frequency (58.90Hz) with the acceleration 10m/s2. In this low frequency vibration case, it is easy to capture the energy in the daily environment. In addition, LTC 3588-1 chip (Linear Technology Corporation) is used as the medium energy circuit to transfer charges from the PZT-5H electrode to the 0.22F 5V super capacitor and ML621 rechargeable button battery. For this super-capacitor, it takes about 100min for the capacitor voltage to rise from 0V to 3.6V. For this button battery, it takes about 200min to increase the battery voltage from 2.5V to 3.48V.

  10. High frequency capacitor-diode voltage multiplier dc-dc converter development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kisch, J. J.; Martinelli, R. M.

    1977-01-01

    A power conditioner was developed which used a capacitor diode voltage multiplier to provide a high voltage without the use of a step-up transformer. The power conditioner delivered 1200 Vdc at 100 watts and was operated from a 120 Vdc line. The efficiency was in excess of 90 percent. The component weight was 197 grams. A modified boost-add circuit was used for the regulation. A short circuit protection circuit was used which turns off the drive circuit upon a fault condition, and recovers within 5 ms after removal of the short. High energy density polysulfone capacitors and high speed diodes were used in the multiplier circuit.

  11. Role of high-voltage activated potassium currents in high-frequency neuronal firing: evidence from a basal metazoan.

    PubMed

    Buckingham, Steven D; Spencer, Andrew N

    2002-08-01

    Certain neurons of vertebrates are specialized for high-frequency firing. Interestingly, high-frequency firing is also seen in central neurons in basal bilateral metazoans. Recently, the role of potassium currents with rightward-shifted activation curves in producing high-frequency firing has come under scrutiny. We apply intracellular recording, patch-clamp techniques, and compartmental modeling to examine the roles of rightward-shifted potassium currents in repetitive firing and shaping of action potentials in central neurons of the flatworm, Notoplana atomata (Phylum Platyhelminthes). The kinetic properties of potassium and sodium currents were determined from patch-clamp experiments on dissociated brain cells. To predict the effects of changing the steady-state and kinetic properties of these potassium currents, these data were incorporated into a computer model of a 30-microm spherical cell with the levels of current adjusted to approximate the values recorded in voltage-clamp experiments. The model was able to support regenerative spikes at high frequencies in response to injected current. Current-clamp recordings of cultured cells and of neurons in situ also showed evidence of very-high-frequency firing. Adjusting the ratio of inactivating to non-inactivating potassium currents had little effect upon the firing pattern of the cell or its ability to fire at high frequencies, whereas the presence of the non-inactivating current was necessary for repetitive firing. Computer simulations suggested that the rightward shift in voltage sensitivity confers a raised firing threshold, while rapid channel kinetics underlie high frequency firing, and the large activation range enhances the coding range of the cell.

  12. The piezoelectronic stress transduction switch for very large-scale integration, low voltage sensor computation, and radio frequency applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdǎu, I.-B.; Liu, X.-H.; Kuroda, M. A.; Shaw, T. M.; Crain, J.; Solomon, P. M.; Newns, D. M.; Martyna, G. J.

    2015-08-01

    The piezoelectronic transduction switch is a device with potential as a post-CMOS transistor due to its predicted multi-GHz, low voltage performance on the VLSI-scale. However, the operating principle of the switch has wider applicability. We use theory and simulation to optimize the device across a wide range of length scales and application spaces and to understand the physics underlying its behavior. We show that the four-terminal VLSI-scale switch can operate at a line voltage of 115 mV while as a low voltage-large area device, ≈200 mV operation at clock speeds of ≈2 GHz can be achieved with a desirable 104 On/Off ratio—ideal for on-board computing in sensors. At yet larger scales, the device is predicted to operate as a fast (≈250 ps) radio frequency (RF) switch exhibiting high cyclability, low On resistance and low Off capacitance, resulting in a robust switch with a RF figure of merit of ≈4 fs. These performance benchmarks cannot be approached with CMOS which has reached fundamental limits. In detail, a combination of finite element modeling and ab initio calculations enables prediction of switching voltages for a given design. A multivariate search method then establishes a set of physics-based design rules, discovering the key factors for each application. The results demonstrate that the piezoelectronic transduction switch can offer fast, low power applications spanning several domains of the information technology infrastructure.

  13. Challenges and opportunities for multi-functional oxide thin films for voltage tunable radio frequency/microwave components

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanyam, Guru; Cole, M. W.; Sun, Nian X.; Kalkur, Thottam S.; Sbrockey, Nick M.; Tompa, Gary S.; Guo, Xiaomei; Chen, Chonglin; Alpay, S. P.; Rossetti, G. A.; Dayal, Kaushik; Chen, Long-Qing; Schlom, Darrell G.

    2013-11-21

    There has been significant progress on the fundamental science and technological applications of complex oxides and multiferroics. Among complex oxide thin films, barium strontium titanate (BST) has become the material of choice for room-temperature-based voltage-tunable dielectric thin films, due to its large dielectric tunability and low microwave loss at room temperature. BST thin film varactor technology based reconfigurable radio frequency (RF)/microwave components have been demonstrated with the potential to lower the size, weight, and power needs of a future generation of communication and radar systems. Low-power multiferroic devices have also been recently demonstrated. Strong magneto-electric coupling has also been demonstrated in different multiferroic heterostructures, which show giant voltage control of the ferromagnetic resonance frequency of more than two octaves. This manuscript reviews recent advances in the processing, and application development for the complex oxides and multiferroics, with the focus on voltage tunable RF/microwave components. The over-arching goal of this review is to provide a synopsis of the current state-of the-art of complex oxide and multiferroic thin film materials and devices, identify technical issues and technical challenges that need to be overcome for successful insertion of the technology for both military and commercial applications, and provide mitigation strategies to address these technical challenges.

  14. Phase Shift of a Coplanar Waveguide by Bias Voltage on Thick Lead Zirconate Titanate Film at Microwave Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Kouji; Iijima, Takashi; Masuda, Yoichiro

    2008-09-01

    A coplanar waveguide was fabricated by depositing a 1-µm-thick Au film on a multilayer dielectric, consisting of a 2-µm-thick lead zirconate titanate (PZT) film over an Al2O3 substrate, through etching. Following this, the reflection constant, transmission constant, and phase variation were measured for this transmission line as bias voltage was varied from 30 to 50 V. As a result, it was confirmed that the phase variation becomes about 15° at a 50 V bias at a frequency of 10 GHz. We then confirmed the basic input-output characteristics of this type of structure in the microwave band. Finally, the relative permittivity of a PZT thick film as a coplanar waveguide was estimated using the measurement results of relative permittivity according to the split cavity resonator method, and phase variation under the condition in which a bias voltage was applied.

  15. Strong ionization asymmetry in a geometrically symmetric radio frequency capacitively coupled plasma induced by sawtooth voltage waveforms.

    PubMed

    Bruneau, Bastien; Gans, Timo; O'Connell, Deborah; Greb, Arthur; Johnson, Erik V; Booth, Jean-Paul

    2015-03-27

    The ionization dynamics in geometrically symmetric parallel plate capacitively coupled plasmas driven by radio frequency tailored voltage waveforms is investigated using phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy (PROES) and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. Temporally asymmetric waveforms induce spatial asymmetries and offer control of the spatiotemporal dynamics of electron heating and associated ionization structures. Sawtooth waveforms with different rise and fall rates are employed using truncated Fourier series approximations of an ideal sawtooth. Experimental PROES results obtained in argon plasmas are compared with PIC simulations, showing excellent agreement. With waveforms comprising a fast voltage drop followed by a slower rise, the faster sheath expansion in front of the powered electrode causes strongly enhanced ionization in this region. The complementary waveform causes an analogous effect in front of the grounded electrode. PMID:25860749

  16. Electron power absorption dynamics in capacitive radio frequency discharges driven by tailored voltage waveforms in CF4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, S.; Berger, B.; Schüngel, E.; Korolov, I.; Derzsi, A.; Bruneau, B.; Johnson, E.; Lafleur, T.; O'Connell, D.; Koepke, M.; Gans, T.; Booth, J.-P.; Donkó, Z.; Schulze, J.

    2016-08-01

    The power absorption dynamics of electrons and the electrical asymmetry effect in capacitive radio-frequency plasmas operated in CF4 and driven by tailored voltage waveforms are investigated experimentally in combination with kinetic simulations. The driving voltage waveforms are generated as a superposition of multiple consecutive harmonics of the fundamental frequency of 13.56 MHz. Peaks/valleys and sawtooth waveforms are used to study the effects of amplitude and slope asymmetries of the driving voltage waveform on the electron dynamics and the generation of a DC self-bias in an electronegative plasma at different pressures. Compared to electropositive discharges, we observe strongly different effects and unique power absorption dynamics. At high pressures and high electronegativities, the discharge is found to operate in the drift-ambipolar (DA) heating mode. A dominant excitation/ionization maximum is observed during sheath collapse at the edge of the sheath which collapses fastest. High negative-ion densities are observed inside this sheath region, while electrons are confined for part of the RF period in a potential well formed by the ambipolar electric field at this sheath edge and the collapsed (floating potential) sheath at the electrode. For specific driving voltage waveforms, the plasma becomes divided spatially into two different halves of strongly different electronegativity. This asymmetry can be reversed electrically by inverting the driving waveform. For sawtooth waveforms, the discharge asymmetry and the sign of the DC self-bias are found to reverse as the pressure is increased, due to a transition of the electron heating mode from the α-mode to the DA-mode. These effects are interpreted with the aid of the simulation results.

  17. Flexible low-voltage organic integrated circuits with megahertz switching frequencies (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zschieschang, Ute; Takimiya, Kazuo; Zaki, Tarek; Letzkus, Florian; Richter, Harald; Burghartz, Joachim N.; Klauk, Hagen

    2015-09-01

    A process for the fabrication of integrated circuits based on bottom-gate, top-contact organic thin-film transistors (TFTs) with channel lengths as short as 1 µm on flexible plastic substrates has been developed. In this process, all TFT layers (gate electrodes, organic semiconductors, source/drain contacts) are patterned with the help of high-resolution silicon stencil masks, thus eliminating the need for subtractive patterning and avoiding the exposure of the organic semiconductors to potentially harmful organic solvents or resists. The TFTs employ a low-temperature-processed gate dielectric that is sufficiently thin to allow the TFTs and circuits to operate with voltages of about 3 V. Using the vacuum-deposited small-molecule organic semiconductor 2,9-didecyl-dinaphtho[2,3-b:2',3'-f]thieno[3,2-b]thiophene (C10 DNTT), TFTs with an effective field-effect mobility of 1.2 cm2/Vs, an on/off current ratio of 107, a width-normalized transconductance of 1.2 S/m (with a standard deviation of 6%), and a signal propagation delay (measured in 11-stage ring oscillators) of 420 nsec per stage at a supply voltage of 3 V have been obtained. To our knowledge, this is the first time that megahertz operation has been achieved in flexible organic transistors at supply voltages of less than 10 V. In addition to flexible ring oscillators, we have also demonstrated a 6-bit digital-to-analog converter (DAC) in a binary-weighted current-steering architecture, based on TFTs with a channel length of 4 µm and fabricated on a glass substrate. This DAC has a supply voltage of 3.3 V, a circuit area of 2.6 × 4.6 mm2, and a maximum sampling rate of 100 kS/s.

  18. Control of plasma process by use of harmonic frequency components of voltage and current

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Paul A.; Kamon, Mattan

    1994-01-01

    The present invention provides for a technique for taking advantage of the intrinsic electrical non-linearity of processing plasmas to add additional control variables that affect process performance. The technique provides for the adjustment of the electrical coupling circuitry, as well as the electrical excitation level, in response to measurements of the reactor voltage and current and to use that capability to modify the plasma characteristics to obtain the desired performance.

  19. Verification of voltage/frequency requirement for emergency diesel generator in nuclear power plant using dynamic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Hur, Jin-Suk; Roh, Myung- Sub

    2014-02-12

    One major cause of the plant shutdown is the loss of electrical power. The study is to comprehend the coping action against station blackout including emergency diesel generator, sequential loading of safety system and to ensure that the emergency diesel generator should meet requirements, especially voltage and frequency criteria using modeling tool. This paper also considered the change of the sequencing time and load capacity only for finding electrical design margin. However, the revision of load list must be verified with safety analysis. From this study, it is discovered that new load calculation is a key factor in EDG localization and in-house capability increase.

  20. Frequency and gate voltage effects on the dielectric properties and electrical conductivity of Al∕SiO(2)∕p-Si metal-insulator-semiconductor Schottky diodes.

    PubMed

    Yıldız, D E; Dökme, I

    2011-07-01

    The dielectric properties and electrical conductivity of Al∕SiO(2)∕p-Si (MIS) Schottky diodes (SDs) in the frequency range of 10 kHz to 10 MHz and the gate voltage range of -2 to 6 V have been investigated in detail using experimental C-V and G∕w-V measurements. Experimental results indicated that the voltage dependence of the real part of the dielectric constant (ɛ') and loss tangent (tan δ) characteristics have a peak at each frequency. The values of ɛ' increase with decreasing frequency and tend to be frequency independent in the negative voltage region. However, the values of the dielectric loss (ɛ″) increase with decreasing frequency at each voltage. In contrast, ɛ' and ɛ″ are almost found to decrease, and the ac electrical conductivity (σ(ac)) and the real part of the electric modulus (M') increase, with increasing frequency. In addition, the imaginary part of the electric modulus (M″) showed a peak that shifts to a higher frequency with increasing applied voltage. It can be concluded that interfacial polarization can more easily occur at low frequencies, and consequently the majority of interface states at the Si-SiO(2) interface contribute to the deviation of the dielectric properties of Al∕SiO(2)∕p-Si (MIS) SDs.

  1. A low-frequency high-voltage rf-barrier-bunching system for high-intensity neutron source compressor rings

    SciTech Connect

    Hardek, T.W.; Ziomek, C.; Rees, D.

    1995-05-01

    A Los Alamos design for a 1-MW pulsed neutron source incorporates a ring utilizing an rf-barrier bunching system. This bunching concept allows uniform longitudinal beam distributions with low momentum spread. Bunching cavities are operated at the revolution frequency (1.5 MHz in this case) and each of the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th revolution frequency harmonics. Their effects combine to maintain a beam free gap in the longitudinal distribution of the accumulated beam. The cavities are driven by low-plate-resistance common-cathode configured retrode amplifiers incorporating local rf feedback. Additional adaptive feed-forward hardware is included to reduce the beam-induced bunching-gap voltages well below that achievable solely with rf feedback. Details of this system are presented along with a discussion of the various feed-back and feed-forward techniques incorporated.

  2. Random telegraph signals and low-frequency voltage noise in Y-Ba-Cu-O thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, G.; Vitale, S.; Konopka, J. ); Bonaldi, M. )

    1991-11-15

    Excess low-frequency noise extending to MHz frequencies was observed in dc current biased granular high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} thin films. At particular bias conditions random telegraph signal produced by a single, fast two-level fluctuator dominated the noise properties of the sample. Lifetimes of the low- and high-voltage states of the fluctuating system were found to be exponentially distributed. Power spectra of the excess noise signal could be well fitted with a single Lorentzian contribution. Duty cycle dependence of the random telegraph signal on bias conditions was used to get an insight into physical mechanism causing the fluctuations. Charge trapping events in the intergranular intrinsic Josephson junctions and trapped flux hopping were identified as possible alternative sources of the observed noise.

  3. High-voltage nanosecond pulses in a low-pressure radio-frequency discharge.

    PubMed

    Pustylnik, M Y; Hou, L; Ivlev, A V; Vasilyak, L M; Couëdel, L; Thomas, H M; Morfill, G E; Fortov, V E

    2013-06-01

    An influence of a high-voltage (3-17 kV) 20 ns pulse on a weakly-ionized low-pressure (0.1-10 Pa) capacitively coupled radiofrequency (RF) argon plasma is studied experimentally. The plasma evolution after pulse exhibits two characteristic regimes: a bright flash, occurring within 100 ns after the pulse (when the discharge emission increases by 2-3 orders of magnitude over the steady-state level), and a dark phase, lasting a few hundreds μs (when the intensity of the discharge emission drops significantly below the steady-state level). The electron density increases during the flash and remains very large at the dark phase. 1D3V particle-in-cell simulations qualitatively reproduce both regimes and allow for detailed analysis of the underlying mechanisms. It is found that the high-voltage nanosecond pulse is capable of removing a significant fraction of plasma electrons out of the discharge gap, and that the flash is the result of the excitation of gas atoms, triggered by residual electrons accelerated in the electric field of immobile bulk ions. The secondary emission from the electrodes due to vacuum UV radiation plays an important role at this stage. High-density plasma generated during the flash provides efficient screening of the RF field (which sustains the steady-state plasma). This leads to the electron cooling and, hence, onset of the dark phase.

  4. Collector optimization for improving the product of the breakdown voltage-cutoff frequency in SiGe HBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Fu; Wanrong, Zhang; Dongyue, Jin; Yanxiao, Zhao; Lianghao, Zhang

    2015-04-01

    Compared with BVCEO, BVCES is more related to collector optimization and more practical significance, so that BVCES × fT rather than BVCEO × fT is employed in representing the limit of the product of the breakdown voltage-cutoff frequency in SiGe HBT for collector engineering design. Instead of a single decrease in collector doping to improve BVCES × fT and BVCEO × fT, a novel thin composite of N- and P+ doping layers inside the CB SCR is presented to improve the well-known tradeoff between the breakdown voltage and cut-off frequency in SiGe HBT, and BVCES and BVCEO are improved respectively with slight degradation in fT. As a result, the BVCES × fT product is improved from 537.57 to 556.4 GHz·V, and the BVCEO × fT product is improved from 309.51 to 326.35 GHz·V. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 60776051, 61006059, 61006044), the Beijing Natural Science Foundation (Nos. 4082007, 4143059, 4142007, 4122014), and the Beijing Municipal Education Committee (Nos. KM200710005015, KM200910005001).

  5. Electrolyte-Gated Graphene Ambipolar Frequency Multipliers for Biochemical Sensing.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wangyang; Feng, Lingyan; Mayer, Dirk; Panaitov, Gregory; Kireev, Dmitry; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Krause, Hans-Joachim

    2016-04-13

    In this Letter, the ambipolar properties of an electrolyte-gated graphene field-effect transistor (GFET) have been explored to fabricate frequency-doubling biochemical sensor devices. By biasing the ambipolar GFETs in a common-source configuration, an input sinusoidal voltage at frequency f applied to the electrolyte gate can be rectified to a sinusoidal wave at frequency 2f at the drain electrode. The extraordinary high carrier mobility of graphene and the strong electrolyte gate coupling provide the graphene ambipolar frequency doubler an unprecedented unity gain, as well as a detection limit of ∼4 pM for 11-mer single strand DNA molecules in 1 mM PBS buffer solution. Combined with an improved drift characteristics and an enhanced low-frequency 1/f noise performance by sampling at doubled frequency, this good detection limit suggests the graphene ambipolar frequency doubler a highly promising biochemical sensing platform. PMID:26928906

  6. Electrolyte-Gated Graphene Ambipolar Frequency Multipliers for Biochemical Sensing.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wangyang; Feng, Lingyan; Mayer, Dirk; Panaitov, Gregory; Kireev, Dmitry; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Krause, Hans-Joachim

    2016-04-13

    In this Letter, the ambipolar properties of an electrolyte-gated graphene field-effect transistor (GFET) have been explored to fabricate frequency-doubling biochemical sensor devices. By biasing the ambipolar GFETs in a common-source configuration, an input sinusoidal voltage at frequency f applied to the electrolyte gate can be rectified to a sinusoidal wave at frequency 2f at the drain electrode. The extraordinary high carrier mobility of graphene and the strong electrolyte gate coupling provide the graphene ambipolar frequency doubler an unprecedented unity gain, as well as a detection limit of ∼4 pM for 11-mer single strand DNA molecules in 1 mM PBS buffer solution. Combined with an improved drift characteristics and an enhanced low-frequency 1/f noise performance by sampling at doubled frequency, this good detection limit suggests the graphene ambipolar frequency doubler a highly promising biochemical sensing platform.

  7. Frequency and voltage dependence of series resistance in a solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogle, Alexander; Cox, Thaddeus; Heath, Jennifer

    While admittance measurements of solar cells are typically conducted in reverse or at zero bias, and analyzed using the depletion approximation, the operating point of the solar cell is in forward bias, and the series resistance is often estimated using IV curves with a high forward current. In this mode, the device is no longer in the depletion regime, and the large number of injected minority carriers alter the transport properties significantly. In our Cu(In,Ga)Se2 devices, we measure negative values of capacitance at high forward bias, which may be linked to injected minority carriers and carrier transport limitations, although our calculations of capacitance may also be influenced by series resistance. In this study, we compare ac and dc measurements of voltage dependent series resistance to try to better understand the negative capacitance signal.

  8. Frequency-dependent reduction of voltage-gated sodium current modulates retinal ganglion cell response rate to electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, David; Morley, John W.; Suaning, Gregg J.; Lovell, Nigel H.

    2011-10-01

    The ability to elicit visual percepts through electrical stimulation of the retina has prompted numerous investigations examining the feasibility of restoring sight to the blind with retinal implants. The therapeutic efficacy of these devices will be strongly influenced by their ability to elicit neural responses that approximate those of normal vision. Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) can fire spikes at frequencies greater than 200 Hz when driven by light. However, several studies using isolated retinas have found a decline in RGC spiking response rate when these cells were stimulated at greater than 50 Hz. It is possible that the mechanism responsible for this decline also contributes to the frequency-dependent 'fading' of electrically evoked percepts recently reported in human patients. Using whole-cell patch clamp recordings of rabbit RGCs, we investigated the causes for the spiking response depression during direct subretinal stimulation of these cells at 50-200 Hz. The response depression was not caused by inhibition arising from the retinal network but, instead, by a stimulus-frequency-dependent decline of RGC voltage-gated sodium current. Under identical experimental conditions, however, RGCs were able to spike at high frequency when driven by light stimuli and intracellular depolarization. Based on these observations, we demonstrated a technique to prevent the spiking response depression.

  9. Frequency-dependent reduction of voltage-gated sodium current modulates retinal ganglion cell response rate to electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, David; Morley, John W; Suaning, Gregg J; Lovell, Nigel H

    2011-12-01

    The ability to elicit visual percepts through electrical stimulation of the retina has prompted numerous investigations examining the feasibility of restoring sight to the blind with retinal implants. The therapeutic efficacy of these devices will be strongly influenced by their ability to elicit neural responses that approximate those of normal vision. Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) can fire spikes at frequencies greater than 200 Hz when driven by light. However, several studies using isolated retinas have found a decline in RGC spiking response rate when these cells were stimulated at greater than 50 Hz. It is possible that the mechanism responsible for this decline also contributes to the frequency-dependent 'fading' of electrically evoked percepts recently reported in human patients. Using whole-cell patch clamp recordings of rabbit RGCs, we investigated the causes for the spiking response depression during direct subretinal stimulation of these cells at 50-200 Hz. The response depression was not caused by inhibition arising from the retinal network but, instead, by a stimulus-frequency-dependent decline of RGC voltage-gated sodium current. Under identical experimental conditions, however, RGCs were able to spike at high frequency when driven by light stimuli and intracellular depolarization. Based on these observations, we demonstrated a technique to prevent the spiking response depression. PMID:22027396

  10. Analysis of event-related potentials (ERP) by damped sinusoids.

    PubMed

    Demiralp, T; Ademoglu, A; Istefanopulos, Y; Gülçür, H O

    1998-06-01

    Several researchers propose that event-related potentials (ERPs) can be explained by a superposition of transient oscillations at certain frequency bands in response to external or internal events. The transient nature of the ERP is more suitable to be modelled as a sum of damped sinusoids. These damped sinusoids can be completely characterized by four sets of parameters, namely the amplitude, the damping coefficient, the phase and the frequency. The Prony method is used to estimate these parameters. In this study, the long-latency auditory-evoked potentials (AEP) and the auditory oddball responses (P300) of 10 healthy subjects are analysed by this method. It is shown that the original waveforms can be reconstructed by summing a small number of damped sinusoids. This allows for a parsimonious representation of the ERPs. Furthermore, the method shows that the oddball target responses contain higher amplitude, slower delta and slower damped theta components than those of the AEPs. With this technique, we show that the differentiation of sensory and cognitive potentials are not inherent in their overall frequency content but in their frequency components at certain bands.

  11. All-polymer modulator for high frequency low drive voltage applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eng, David L. K.; Kozacik, Stephen; Olbricht, Benjamin C.; Shi, Shouyuan; Prather, Dennis W.

    2013-03-01

    As EO phase modulators become more prevalent components in optical and RF applications, the demand increases for high bandwidth and low drive voltage modulators that can easily be integrated into developing photonic technologies. The proposed paper will discuss a device architecture for a phase modulator based on a recently developed organic EO material (OEOM), IKD-1-50 integrated into a PMMA polymer host, using a low-index, photo-curable resin as the cladding layers all on a Si platform. Designs for a TM waveguide and electrode configuration will be presented from theory and modeling, through fabrication to characterization. The EO material serving as the core of the waveguide is poled using a poling stage and monitoring apparatus with same electrodes designed for modulation. Poling procedures have been optimized for this material based on experimentation in simple slab-capacitor characterization devices, and produce in-device r33 values that are comparable with attenuated total internal reflection measurements. The challenges presented by the instability of OEOMs in common processing conditions have been addressed and a very simple fabrication process has been developed using standard photolithography and reactive ion etching to define an inverted ridge waveguide structure, pattern surrounding electrodes, and prepare usable end facets. Phase modulator characterization results for fabricated and poled devices have been quantified and will be presented. The simplicity of this device architecture on a Si handle allows for integration into various photonic applications.

  12. Selective Activation of Neuronal Targets With Sinusoidal Electric Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Daniel K.; Eddington, Donald K.; Rizzo, Joseph F.

    2010-01-01

    Electric stimulation of the CNS is being evaluated as a treatment modality for a variety of neurological, psychiatric, and sensory disorders. Despite considerable success in some applications, existing stimulation techniques offer little control over which cell types or neuronal substructures are activated by stimulation. The ability to more precisely control neuronal activation would likely improve the clinical outcomes associated with these applications. Here, we show that specific frequencies of sinusoidal stimulation can be used to preferentially activate certain retinal cell types: photoreceptors are activated at 5 Hz, bipolar cells at 25 Hz, and ganglion cells at 100 Hz. In addition, low-frequency stimulation (≤25 Hz) did not activate passing axons but still elicited robust synaptically mediated responses in ganglion cells; therefore, elicited neural activity is confined to within a focal region around the stimulating electrode. Our results suggest that sinusoidal stimulation provides significantly improved control over elicited neural activity relative to conventional pulsatile stimulation. PMID:20810683

  13. Digitally synthesized high purity, high-voltage radio frequency drive electronics for mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, R T; MacAskill, J A; Mojarradi, M; Chutjian, A; Darrach, M R; Madzunkov, S M; Shortt, B J

    2008-09-01

    Reported herein is development of a quadrupole mass spectrometer controller (MSC) with integrated radio frequency (rf) power supply and mass spectrometer drive electronics. Advances have been made in terms of the physical size and power consumption of the MSC, while simultaneously making improvements in frequency stability, total harmonic distortion, and spectral purity. The rf power supply portion of the MSC is based on a series-resonant LC tank, where the capacitive load is the mass spectrometer itself, and the inductor is a solenoid or toroid, with various core materials. The MSC drive electronics is based on a field programmable gate array (FPGA), with serial peripheral interface for analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog converter support, and RS232/RS422 communications interfaces. The MSC offers spectral quality comparable to, or exceeding, that of conventional rf power supplies used in commercially available mass spectrometers; and as well an inherent flexibility, via the FPGA implementation, for a variety of tasks that includes proportional-integral derivative closed-loop feedback and control of rf, rf amplitude, and mass spectrometer sensitivity. Also provided are dc offsets and resonant dipole excitation for mass selective accumulation in applications involving quadrupole ion traps; rf phase locking and phase shifting for external loading of a quadrupole ion trap; and multichannel scaling of acquired mass spectra. The functionality of the MSC is task specific, and is easily modified by simply loading FPGA registers or reprogramming FPGA firmware. PMID:19044454

  14. Digitally synthesized high purity, high-voltage radio frequency drive electronics for mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, R. T.; Mojarradi, M.; MacAskill, J. A.; Chutjian, A.; Darrach, M. R.; Madzunkov, S. M.; Shortt, B. J.

    2008-09-15

    Reported herein is development of a quadrupole mass spectrometer controller (MSC) with integrated radio frequency (rf) power supply and mass spectrometer drive electronics. Advances have been made in terms of the physical size and power consumption of the MSC, while simultaneously making improvements in frequency stability, total harmonic distortion, and spectral purity. The rf power supply portion of the MSC is based on a series-resonant LC tank, where the capacitive load is the mass spectrometer itself, and the inductor is a solenoid or toroid, with various core materials. The MSC drive electronics is based on a field programmable gate array (FPGA), with serial peripheral interface for analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog converter support, and RS232/RS422 communications interfaces. The MSC offers spectral quality comparable to, or exceeding, that of conventional rf power supplies used in commercially available mass spectrometers; and as well an inherent flexibility, via the FPGA implementation, for a variety of tasks that includes proportional-integral derivative closed-loop feedback and control of rf, rf amplitude, and mass spectrometer sensitivity. Also provided are dc offsets and resonant dipole excitation for mass selective accumulation in applications involving quadrupole ion traps; rf phase locking and phase shifting for external loading of a quadrupole ion trap; and multichannel scaling of acquired mass spectra. The functionality of the MSC is task specific, and is easily modified by simply loading FPGA registers or reprogramming FPGA firmware.

  15. Modeling and simulation of high voltage and radio-frequency transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, Andrés O.; Barbosa, Giancarlos C.; Vieira, Madson A. A.; Quintaes, Filipe de O.; da Silva, Jacimário R.

    2012-04-01

    This work presents a methodology for designing a 50 kW RF transformer operating at a frequency of 400 kHz with a view to operation with minimal magnetic losses used in the project experimental treatment of industrial wastes and effluents of petrochemical thermal plasma. This innovator model of a RF transformer offers many advantages over traditional transformers, the main ones being their small size for this power level, high power density, low electromagnetic radiation level, and easy and economic manufacturing. The equivalent circuit was obtained practically and theoretically at the university lab. From the project, simulations are made to evaluate the performance of different parameters as a function of magnetic induction, current density, and temperature.

  16. A Voltage Controlled Oscillator for a Phase-Locked Loop Frequency Synthesizer in a Silicon-on-Sapphire Process

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, Sean

    2009-05-21

    Engineers from a government-owned engineering and manufacturing facility were contracted by government-owned research laboratory to design and build an S-band telemetry transmitter using Radio Frequency Integrated Circuit (RFIC) technology packaged in a Low-Temperature Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC) Multi-Chip Module. The integrated circuit technology chosen for the Phase-Locked Loop Frequency Synthesizer portion of the telemetry transmitter was a 0.25 um CMOS process that utilizes a sapphire substrate and is fabricated by Peregrine Semiconductor corporation. This thesis work details the design of the Voltage Controlled Oscillator (VCO) portion of the PLL frequency synthesizer and constitutes an fully integrated VCO core circuit and a high-isolation buffer amplifier. The high-isolation buffer amplifier was designed to provide 16 dB of gain for 2200-3495 MHz as well as 60 dB of isolation for the oscillator core to provide immunity to frequency pulling due to RF load mismatch. Actual measurements of the amplifier gain and isolation showed the gain was approximately 5 dB lower than the simulated gain when all bond-wire and test substrate parasitics were taken into account. The isolation measurements were shown to be 28 dB at the high end of the frequency band but the measurement was more than likely compromised due to the aforementioned bond-wire and test substrate parasitics. The S-band oscillator discussed in this work was designed to operate over a frequency range of 2200 to 2300 MHz with a minimum output power of 0 dBm with a phase-noise of -92 dBc/Hz at a 100 kHz offset from the carrier. The tuning range was measured to be from 2215 MHz to 2330 MHz with a minimum output power of -7 dBm over the measured frequency range. A phase-noise of -90 dBc was measured at a 100 kHz offset from the carrier.

  17. Propulsion by sinusoidal locomotion: A motion inspired by Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, Xialing

    Sinusoidal locomotion is commonly seen in snakes, fish, nematodes, or even the wings of some birds and insects. This doctoral thesis presents the study of sinusoidal locomotion of the nematode C. elegans in experiments and the application of the state-space airloads theory to the theoretical forces of sinusoidal motion. An original MATLAB program has been developed to analyze the video records of C. elegans' movement in different fluids, including Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. The experimental and numerical studies of swimming C. elegans has revealed three conclusions. First, though the amplitude and wavelength are varying with time, the motion of swimming C. elegans can still be viewed as sinusoidal locomotion with slips. The average normalized wavelength is a conserved character of the locomotion for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. Second, fluid viscosity affects the frequency but not the moving speed of C. elegans, while fluid elasticity affects the moving speed but not the frequency. Third, by the resistive force theory, for more elastic fluids the ratio of resistive coefficients becomes smaller. Inspired by the motion of C. elegans and other animals performing sinusoidal motion, we investigated the sinusoidal motion of a thin flexible wing in theory. Given the equation of the motion, we have derived the closed forms of propulsive force, lift and other generalized forces applying on the wing. We also calculated the power required to perform the motion, the power lost due to the shed vortices and the propulsive efficiency. These forces and powers are given as functions of reduced frequency k, dimensionless wavelength z, dimensionless amplitude A/b, and time. Our results show that a positive, time-averaged propulsive force is produced for all k>k0=pi/ z. At k=k0, which implies the moment when the moving speed of the wing is the same as the wave speed of its undulation, the motion reaches a steady state with all forces being zero. If there were no

  18. Frequency and voltage dependence dielectric properties, ac electrical conductivity and electric modulus profiles in Al/Co3O4-PVA/p-Si structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilkan, Çiğdem; Azizian-Kalandaragh, Yashar; Altındal, Şemsettin; Shokrani-Havigh, Roya

    2016-11-01

    In this research a simple microwave-assisted method have been used for preparation of cobalt oxide nanostructures. The as-prepared sample has been investigated by UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM). On the other hand, frequency and voltage dependence of both the real and imaginary parts of dielectric constants (ε‧, ε″) and electric modulus (M‧ and M″), loss tangent (tanδ), and ac electrical conductivity (σac) values of Al/Co3O4-PVA/p-Si structures were obtained in the wide range of frequency and voltage using capacitance (C) and conductance (G/ω) data at room temperature. The values of ε‧, ε″ and tanδ were found to decrease with increasing frequency almost for each applied bias voltage, but the changes in these parameters become more effective in the depletion region at low frequencies due to the charges at surface states and their relaxation time and polarization effect. While the value of σ is almost constant at low frequency, increases almost as exponentially at high frequency which are corresponding to σdc and σac, respectively. The M‧ and M″ have low values at low frequencies region and then an increase with frequency due to short-range mobility of charge carriers. While the value of M‧ increase with increasing frequency, the value of M″ shows two peak and the peaks positions shifts to higher frequency with increasing applied voltage due to the decrease of the polarization and Nss effects with increasing frequency.

  19. A 300 mV sub-threshold region 2.4 GHz voltage-controlled oscillator and frequency divider with transformer technique for ultralow power RF applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyahara, Yasunori; Ishikawa, Keisuke; Kuroda, Tadahiro

    2014-01-01

    A new ultralow voltage 2.4 GHz voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) and a divide-by-2 frequency divider circuits operating in a CMOS sub-threshold region using a transformer technique have been developed. In the sub-threshold region, the CMOS transistor high frequency performances are decreased to the point where oscillation and frequency division are challenging to achieve. The new proposed VCO uses the transformer feedback complementary VCO technique to improves VCO negative feedback gain. The circuits have been fabricated in a 65 nm standard CMOS process. The oscillation frequency is designed at 2.4 GHz under a 300 mV supply voltage. The total power consumption is 202 µW with noise performance of -96 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset. The new proposed frequency divider circuit consists of two stages master-slave D-type flip-flop (DFF). The DFF differential input is coupled to a transformer circuit instead of transistors to reduce the number of stacks. The minimum operating supply voltage is 300 mV with power consumption of 34 µW with a free-run frequency of 1.085 GHz.

  20. Dependence of sinusoidal electric field effect on neuronal morphological properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xile; Yin, Xiaowei; Lu, Meili; Yi, Guosheng; Wang, Jiang

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, the neuronal firing patterns under extracellular sinusoidal electric field (EF) are investigated based on a reduced two-compartment model with focus on the effects of morphological and internal coupling parameters. We observe that the neuron can exhibit bursting, synchronous firing and subthreshold oscillation depending on EF amplitude A and frequency f. Furthermore, neuronal firing properties change obviously over a range of morphological parameter p. As p increases, the firing region expands first and then diminishes gradually until it disappears in the observed (A, f) parameter space and the transition from bursting to synchronous firing is also markedly distinct. Meanwhile, the morphological parameter also has significant effects on the EF threshold for triggering neuronal spikes. Unlike morphological parameter, though the internal coupling conductance gc can also induce some changes in firing behavior and EF threshold, it cannot qualitatively change neuronal dynamical properties. All these results demonstrate that neuronal morphology plays a crucial role in neuronal responses to sinusoidal EF.

  1. Semidefinite Programming for Approximate Maximum Likelihood Sinusoidal Parameter Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lui, Kenneth W. K.; So, H. C.

    2009-12-01

    We study the convex optimization approach for parameter estimation of several sinusoidal models, namely, single complex/real tone, multiple complex sinusoids, and single two-dimensional complex tone, in the presence of additive Gaussian noise. The major difficulty for optimally determining the parameters is that the corresponding maximum likelihood (ML) estimators involve finding the global minimum or maximum of multimodal cost functions because the frequencies are nonlinear in the observed signals. By relaxing the nonconvex ML formulations using semidefinite programs, high-fidelity approximate solutions are obtained in a globally optimum fashion. Computer simulations are included to contrast the estimation performance of the proposed semi-definite relaxation methods with the iterative quadratic maximum likelihood technique as well as Cramér-Rao lower bound.

  2. Simulation of temperature field for temperature-controlled radio frequency ablation using a hyperbolic bioheat equation and temperature-varied voltage calibration: a liver-mimicking phantom study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Man; Zhou, Zhuhuang; Wu, Shuicai; Lin, Lan; Gao, Hongjian; Feng, Yusheng

    2015-12-21

    This study aims at improving the accuracy of temperature simulation for temperature-controlled radio frequency ablation (RFA). We proposed a new voltage-calibration method in the simulation and investigated the feasibility of a hyperbolic bioheat equation (HBE) in the RFA simulation with longer durations and higher power. A total of 40 RFA experiments was conducted in a liver-mimicking phantom. Four mathematical models with multipolar electrodes were developed by the finite element method in COMSOL software: HBE with/without voltage calibration, and the Pennes bioheat equation (PBE) with/without voltage calibration. The temperature-varied voltage calibration used in the simulation was calculated from an experimental power output and temperature-dependent resistance of liver tissue. We employed the HBE in simulation by considering the delay time τ of 16 s. First, for simulations by each kind of bioheat equation (PBE or HBE), we compared the differences between the temperature-varied voltage-calibration and the fixed-voltage values used in the simulations. Then, the comparisons were conducted between the PBE and the HBE in the simulations with temperature-varied voltage calibration. We verified the simulation results by experimental temperature measurements on nine specific points of the tissue phantom. The results showed that: (1) the proposed voltage-calibration method improved the simulation accuracy of temperature-controlled RFA for both the PBE and the HBE, and (2) for temperature-controlled RFA simulation with the temperature-varied voltage calibration, the HBE method was 0.55 °C more accurate than the PBE method. The proposed temperature-varied voltage calibration may be useful in temperature field simulations of temperature-controlled RFA. Besides, the HBE may be used as an alternative in the simulation of long-duration high-power RFA. PMID:26583919

  3. Simulation of temperature field for temperature-controlled radio frequency ablation using a hyperbolic bioheat equation and temperature-varied voltage calibration: a liver-mimicking phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Man; Zhou, Zhuhuang; Wu, Shuicai; Lin, Lan; Gao, Hongjian; Feng, Yusheng

    2015-12-01

    This study aims at improving the accuracy of temperature simulation for temperature-controlled radio frequency ablation (RFA). We proposed a new voltage-calibration method in the simulation and investigated the feasibility of a hyperbolic bioheat equation (HBE) in the RFA simulation with longer durations and higher power. A total of 40 RFA experiments was conducted in a liver-mimicking phantom. Four mathematical models with multipolar electrodes were developed by the finite element method in COMSOL software: HBE with/without voltage calibration, and the Pennes bioheat equation (PBE) with/without voltage calibration. The temperature-varied voltage calibration used in the simulation was calculated from an experimental power output and temperature-dependent resistance of liver tissue. We employed the HBE in simulation by considering the delay time τ of 16 s. First, for simulations by each kind of bioheat equation (PBE or HBE), we compared the differences between the temperature-varied voltage-calibration and the fixed-voltage values used in the simulations. Then, the comparisons were conducted between the PBE and the HBE in the simulations with temperature-varied voltage calibration. We verified the simulation results by experimental temperature measurements on nine specific points of the tissue phantom. The results showed that: (1) the proposed voltage-calibration method improved the simulation accuracy of temperature-controlled RFA for both the PBE and the HBE, and (2) for temperature-controlled RFA simulation with the temperature-varied voltage calibration, the HBE method was 0.55 °C more accurate than the PBE method. The proposed temperature-varied voltage calibration may be useful in temperature field simulations of temperature-controlled RFA. Besides, the HBE may be used as an alternative in the simulation of long-duration high-power RFA.

  4. Design of a New Built-in UHF Multi-Frequency Antenna Sensor for Partial Discharge Detection in High-Voltage Switchgears.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxing; Cheng, Zheng; Gui, Yingang

    2016-01-01

    In this study a new built-in ultrahigh frequency (UHF) antenna sensor was designed and applied in a high-voltage switchgear for partial discharge (PD) detection. The casing of the switchgear was initially used as the ground plane of the antenna sensor, which integrated the sensor into the high-voltage switchgear. The Koch snowflake patch was adopted as the radiation patch of the antenna to overcome the disadvantages of common microstrip antennas, and the feed position and the dielectric layer thickness were simulated in detail. Simulation results show that the antenna sensor possessed four resonant points with good impedance matching from 300 MHz to 1000 MHz, and it also presented good multi-frequency performance in the entire working frequency band. PD detection experiments were conducted in the high-voltage switchgear, and the fabricated antenna sensor was effectively built into the high-voltage switchgear. In order to reflect the advantages of the built-in antenna sensor, another external UHF antenna sensor was used as a comparison to simultaneously detect PD. Experimental results demonstrated that the built-in antenna sensor possessed high detection sensitivity and strong anti-interference capacity, which ensured the practicability of the design. In addition, it had more high-voltage switchgear PD detection advantages than the external sensor. PMID:27472331

  5. Design of a New Built-in UHF Multi-Frequency Antenna Sensor for Partial Discharge Detection in High-Voltage Switchgears

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoxing; Cheng, Zheng; Gui, Yingang

    2016-01-01

    In this study a new built-in ultrahigh frequency (UHF) antenna sensor was designed and applied in a high-voltage switchgear for partial discharge (PD) detection. The casing of the switchgear was initially used as the ground plane of the antenna sensor, which integrated the sensor into the high-voltage switchgear. The Koch snowflake patch was adopted as the radiation patch of the antenna to overcome the disadvantages of common microstrip antennas, and the feed position and the dielectric layer thickness were simulated in detail. Simulation results show that the antenna sensor possessed four resonant points with good impedance matching from 300 MHz to 1000 MHz, and it also presented good multi-frequency performance in the entire working frequency band. PD detection experiments were conducted in the high-voltage switchgear, and the fabricated antenna sensor was effectively built into the high-voltage switchgear. In order to reflect the advantages of the built-in antenna sensor, another external UHF antenna sensor was used as a comparison to simultaneously detect PD. Experimental results demonstrated that the built-in antenna sensor possessed high detection sensitivity and strong anti-interference capacity, which ensured the practicability of the design. In addition, it had more high-voltage switchgear PD detection advantages than the external sensor. PMID:27472331

  6. Design of a New Built-in UHF Multi-Frequency Antenna Sensor for Partial Discharge Detection in High-Voltage Switchgears.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxing; Cheng, Zheng; Gui, Yingang

    2016-07-26

    In this study a new built-in ultrahigh frequency (UHF) antenna sensor was designed and applied in a high-voltage switchgear for partial discharge (PD) detection. The casing of the switchgear was initially used as the ground plane of the antenna sensor, which integrated the sensor into the high-voltage switchgear. The Koch snowflake patch was adopted as the radiation patch of the antenna to overcome the disadvantages of common microstrip antennas, and the feed position and the dielectric layer thickness were simulated in detail. Simulation results show that the antenna sensor possessed four resonant points with good impedance matching from 300 MHz to 1000 MHz, and it also presented good multi-frequency performance in the entire working frequency band. PD detection experiments were conducted in the high-voltage switchgear, and the fabricated antenna sensor was effectively built into the high-voltage switchgear. In order to reflect the advantages of the built-in antenna sensor, another external UHF antenna sensor was used as a comparison to simultaneously detect PD. Experimental results demonstrated that the built-in antenna sensor possessed high detection sensitivity and strong anti-interference capacity, which ensured the practicability of the design. In addition, it had more high-voltage switchgear PD detection advantages than the external sensor.

  7. The Application of Auto-Disturbance Rejection Control Optimized by Least Squares Support Vector Machines Method and Time-Frequency Representation in Voltage Source Converter-High Voltage Direct Current System.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying-Pei; Liang, Hai-Ping; Gao, Zhong-Ke

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of voltage source converter-high voltage direct current (VSC-HVDC) system, we propose an improved auto-disturbance rejection control (ADRC) method based on least squares support vector machines (LSSVM) in the rectifier side. Firstly, we deduce the high frequency transient mathematical model of VSC-HVDC system. Then we investigate the ADRC and LSSVM principles. We ignore the tracking differentiator in the ADRC controller aiming to improve the system dynamic response speed. On this basis, we derive the mathematical model of ADRC controller optimized by LSSVM for direct current voltage loop. Finally we carry out simulations to verify the feasibility and effectiveness of our proposed control method. In addition, we employ the time-frequency representation methods, i.e., Wigner-Ville distribution (WVD) and adaptive optimal kernel (AOK) time-frequency representation, to demonstrate our proposed method performs better than the traditional method from the perspective of energy distribution in time and frequency plane.

  8. The Application of Auto-Disturbance Rejection Control Optimized by Least Squares Support Vector Machines Method and Time-Frequency Representation in Voltage Source Converter-High Voltage Direct Current System

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhong-Ke

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of voltage source converter-high voltage direct current (VSC-HVDC) system, we propose an improved auto-disturbance rejection control (ADRC) method based on least squares support vector machines (LSSVM) in the rectifier side. Firstly, we deduce the high frequency transient mathematical model of VSC-HVDC system. Then we investigate the ADRC and LSSVM principles. We ignore the tracking differentiator in the ADRC controller aiming to improve the system dynamic response speed. On this basis, we derive the mathematical model of ADRC controller optimized by LSSVM for direct current voltage loop. Finally we carry out simulations to verify the feasibility and effectiveness of our proposed control method. In addition, we employ the time-frequency representation methods, i.e., Wigner-Ville distribution (WVD) and adaptive optimal kernel (AOK) time-frequency representation, to demonstrate our proposed method performs better than the traditional method from the perspective of energy distribution in time and frequency plane. PMID:26098556

  9. Readily implemented enhanced sinusoid detection in noise

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, K.V.

    1992-03-05

    Significant efforts have been devoted, spanning many years, to the problem of sinusoid detection in noise. Many of these efforts have produced superb, yet complex, algorithms which may be difficult to use for a wide segment of the Digital Signal Processing (DSP) community. This paper presents a simple, easily implemented and high effective method which solves this problem. This method severely degrades non-sinusoidal noise while leaving the embedded sinusoid(s) relatively undisturbed. The algorithm, simply put, exploits the difference between the net effect of integration and differentiation of sinusoids versus the effect of these operations on random noise and other signal sequences. The cross-correlation of sine wave with its differentiated (and/or integrated) self is quite high. Conversely, the cross-reduction of a noise sequence with its differentiated (and/or integrated) self is much lower. Therefore, it is reasonable to assume that for sequences consisting of a sinusoid in noise, significant signal-to-noise-ratios (SNRs) in the correlation results are achievable using a combination of differentiation (and/or integration) and cross-correlation operations on such sequences. This technique has been applied to actual Doppler radar data, as well as to synthesized data, with excellent improvement in signal detection capability. 4 refs.

  10. Symmetrical SOI MESFET with a dual cavity region (DCR-SOI MESFET) to promote high-voltage and radio-frequency performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anvarifard, Mohammad K.

    2016-10-01

    A novel symmetrical SOI-MESFET is reported to enhance high-voltage and radio-frequency performances, successfully. Two p-type cavity regions with certain features are embedded in the proposed structure to control the channel region. The cavity regions absorb the channel potential lines resulting in an evener potential profile throughout the channel region. Hence, the critical electric field at the end of gate edge near the drain will be considerably reduced thus increasing the breakdown voltage, finally. A comprehensive comparison in terms of breakdown voltage, radio-frequency parameters, drain-source conductance and minimum noise figure shows that the reported new device reaches a superior electrical performance when compared with a conventional SOI MESFET.

  11. Frequency and voltage dependent profile of dielectric properties, electric modulus and ac electrical conductivity in the PrBaCoO nanofiber capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirezen, S.; Kaya, A.; Yerişkin, S. A.; Balbaşı, M.; Uslu, İ.

    In this study, praseodymium barium cobalt oxide nanofiber interfacial layer was sandwiched between Au and n-Si. Frequency and voltage dependence of ε‧, ε‧, tanδ, electric modulus (M‧ and M″) and σac of PrBaCoO nanofiber capacitor have been investigated by using impedance spectroscopy method. The obtained experimental results show that the values of ε‧, ε‧, tanδ, M‧, M″ and σac of the PrBaCoO nanofiber capacitor are strongly dependent on frequency of applied bias voltage. The values of ε‧, ε″ and tanδ show a steep decrease with increasing frequency for each forward bias voltage, whereas the values of σac and the electric modulus increase with increasing frequency. The high dispersion in ε‧ and ε″ values at low frequencies may be attributed to the Maxwell-Wagner and space charge polarization. The high values of ε‧ may be due to the interfacial effects within the material, PrBaCoO nanofibers interfacial layer and electron effect. The values of M‧ and M″ reach a maximum constant value corresponding to M∞ ≈ 1/ε∞ due to the relaxation process at high frequencies, but both the values of M‧ and M″ approach almost to zero at low frequencies. The changes in the dielectric and electrical properties with frequency can be also attributed to the existence of Nss and Rs of the capacitors. As a result, the change in the ε‧, ε″, tanδ, M‧, M″ and ac electric conductivity (σac) is a result of restructuring and reordering of charges at the PrBaCoO/n-Si interface under an external electric field or voltage and interface polarization.

  12. Collector optimization for tradeoff between breakdown voltage and cut-off frequency in SiGe HBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Qiang; Zhang, Wan-Rong; Jin, Dong-Yue; Ding, Chun-Bao; Zhao, Yan-Xiao; Lu, Dong

    2014-11-01

    As is well known, there exists a tradeoff between the breakdown voltage BVCEO and the cut-off frequency fT for a standard heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT). In this paper, this tradeoff is alleviated by collector doping engineering in the SiGe HBT by utilizing a novel composite of P+ and N- doping layers inside the collector-base (CB) space-charge region (SCR). Compared with the single N-type collector, the introduction of the thin P+ layers provides a reverse electric field weakening the electric field near the CB metallurgical junction without changing the field direction, and the thin N- layer further effectively lowers the electric field near the CB metallurgical junction. As a result, the electron temperature near the CB metallurgical junction is lowered, consequently suppressing the impact ionization, thus BVCEO is improved with a slight degradation in fT. The results show that the product of fT × BVCEO is improved from 309.51 GHz·V to 326.35 GHz·V.

  13. Characteristics of temperature rise in variable inductor employing magnetorheological fluid driven by a high-frequency pulsed voltage source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ho-Young; Kang, In Man; Shon, Chae-Hwa; Lee, Se-Hee

    2015-05-01

    A variable inductor with magnetorheological (MR) fluid has been successfully applied to power electronics applications; however, its thermal characteristics have not been investigated. To evaluate the performance of the variable inductor with respect to temperature, we measured the characteristics of temperature rise and developed a numerical analysis technique. The characteristics of temperature rise were determined experimentally and verified numerically by adopting a multiphysics analysis technique. In order to accurately estimate the temperature distribution in a variable inductor with an MR fluid-gap, the thermal solver should import the heat source from the electromagnetic solver to solve the eddy current problem. To improve accuracy, the B-H curves of the MR fluid under operating temperature were obtained using the magnetic property measurement system. In addition, the Steinmetz equation was applied to evaluate the core loss in a ferrite core. The predicted temperature rise for a variable inductor showed good agreement with the experimental data and the developed numerical technique can be employed to design a variable inductor with a high-frequency pulsed voltage source.

  14. Characteristics of temperature rise in variable inductor employing magnetorheological fluid driven by a high-frequency pulsed voltage source

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ho-Young; Kang, In Man; Shon, Chae-Hwa; Lee, Se-Hee

    2015-05-07

    A variable inductor with magnetorheological (MR) fluid has been successfully applied to power electronics applications; however, its thermal characteristics have not been investigated. To evaluate the performance of the variable inductor with respect to temperature, we measured the characteristics of temperature rise and developed a numerical analysis technique. The characteristics of temperature rise were determined experimentally and verified numerically by adopting a multiphysics analysis technique. In order to accurately estimate the temperature distribution in a variable inductor with an MR fluid-gap, the thermal solver should import the heat source from the electromagnetic solver to solve the eddy current problem. To improve accuracy, the B–H curves of the MR fluid under operating temperature were obtained using the magnetic property measurement system. In addition, the Steinmetz equation was applied to evaluate the core loss in a ferrite core. The predicted temperature rise for a variable inductor showed good agreement with the experimental data and the developed numerical technique can be employed to design a variable inductor with a high-frequency pulsed voltage source.

  15. A calculable, transportable audio-frequency AC reference standard

    SciTech Connect

    Oldham, N.M.; Hetrick, P.S. ); Zeng, X. )

    1989-04-01

    A transportable ac voltage source is described, in which sinusoidal signals are synthesized digitally in the audio-frequency range. The rms value of the output waveform may be calculated by measuring the dc level of the individual steps used to generate the waveform. The uncertainty of this calculation at the 7-V level is typically less than +-5 ppm from 60 Hz to 2 kHz and less than +-10 ppm from 30 Hz to 15 kHz.

  16. Analysis of a modular generator for high-voltage, high-frequency pulsed applications, using low voltage semiconductors (<1 kV) and series connected step-up (1:10) transformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redondo, L. M.; Fernando Silva, J.; Margato, E.

    2007-03-01

    This article discusses the operation of a modular generator topology, which has been developed for high-frequency (kHz), high-voltage (kV) pulsed applications. The proposed generator uses individual modules, each one consisting of a pulse circuit based on a modified forward converter, which takes advantage of the required low duty cycle to operate with a low voltage clamp reset circuit for the step-up transformer. This reduces the maximum voltage on the semiconductor devices of both primary and secondary transformer sides. The secondary winding of each step-up transformer is series connected, delivering a fraction of the total voltage. Each individual pulsed module is supplied via an isolation transformer. The assembled modular laboratorial prototype, with three 5kV modules, 800V semiconductor switches, and 1:10 step-up transformers, has 80% efficiency, and is capable of delivering, into resistive loads, -15kV/1A pulses with 5μs width, 10kHz repetition rate, with less than 1μs pulse rise time. Experimental results for resistive loads are presented and discussed.

  17. Cavitation on hydrofoils with sinusoidal leading edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johari, H.

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation characteristics of hydrofoils with sinusoidal leading edge were examined experimentally at a Reynolds number of 7.2 × 105. The hydrofoils had an underlying NACA 634-021 profile and an aspect ratio of 4.3. The sinusoidal leading edge geometries included three amplitudes of 2.5%, 5%, and 12% and two wavelengths of 25% and 50% of the mean chord length. Results revealed that cavitation on the leading edge-modified hydrofoils existed in pockets behind the troughs whereas the baseline hydrofoil produced cavitation along its entire span. Moreover, cavitation on the modified hydrofoils appeared at consistently lower angles of attack than on the baseline hydrofoil.

  18. High voltage power supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruitberg, A. P.; Young, K. M. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A high voltage power supply is formed by three discrete circuits energized by a battery to provide a plurality of concurrent output signals floating at a high output voltage on the order of several tens of kilovolts. In the first two circuits, the regulator stages are pulse width modulated and include adjustable ressistances for varying the duty cycles of pulse trains provided to corresponding oscillator stages while the third regulator stage includes an adjustable resistance for varying the amplitude of a steady signal provided to a third oscillator stage. In the first circuit, the oscillator, formed by a constant current drive network and a tuned resonant network included a step up transformer, is coupled to a second step up transformer which, in turn, supplies an amplified sinusoidal signal to a parallel pair of complementary poled rectifying, voltage multiplier stages to generate the high output voltage.

  19. A novel transient rotor current control scheme of a doubly-fed induction generator equipped with superconducting magnetic energy storage for voltage and frequency support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yang-Wu; Ke, De-Ping; Sun, Yuan-Zhang; Daniel, Kirschen; Wang, Yi-Shen; Hu, Yuan-Chao

    2015-07-01

    A novel transient rotor current control scheme is proposed in this paper for a doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG) equipped with a superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) device to enhance its transient voltage and frequency support capacity during grid faults. The SMES connected to the DC-link capacitor of the DFIG is controlled to regulate the transient dc-link voltage so that the whole capacity of the grid side converter (GSC) is dedicated to injecting reactive power to the grid for the transient voltage support. However, the rotor-side converter (RSC) has different control tasks for different periods of the grid fault. Firstly, for Period I, the RSC injects the demagnetizing current to ensure the controllability of the rotor voltage. Then, since the dc stator flux degenerates rapidly in Period II, the required demagnetizing current is low in Period II and the RSC uses the spare capacity to additionally generate the reactive (priority) and active current so that the transient voltage capability is corroborated and the DFIG also positively responds to the system frequency dynamic at the earliest time. Finally, a small amount of demagnetizing current is provided after the fault clearance. Most of the RSC capacity is used to inject the active current to further support the frequency recovery of the system. Simulations are carried out on a simple power system with a wind farm. Comparisons with other commonly used control methods are performed to validate the proposed control method. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51307124) and the Major Program of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51190105).

  20. Connecting Renewables Directly to the Grid: Resilient Multi-Terminal HVDC Networks with High-Voltage High-Frequency Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-23

    GENI Project: GE is developing electricity transmission hardware that could connect distributed renewable energy sources, like wind farms, directly to the grid—eliminating the need to feed the energy generated through intermediate power conversion stations before they enter the grid. GE is using the advanced semiconductor material silicon carbide (SiC) to conduct electricity through its transmission hardware because SiC can operate at higher voltage levels than semiconductors made out of other materials. This high-voltage capability is important because electricity must be converted to high-voltage levels before it can be sent along the grid’s network of transmission lines. Power companies do this because less electricity is lost along the lines when the voltage is high.

  1. Comparative analysis of the intrinsic voltage gain and unit gain frequency between SOI and bulk FinFETs up to high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Alberto Vinicius de; Agopian, Paula Ghedini Der; Martino, Joao Antonio; Simoen, Eddy; Claeys, Cor; Collaert, Nadine; Thean, Aaron

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents an experimental analysis of the analog application figures of merit: the intrinsic voltage gain (AV) and unit gain frequency, focusing on the performance comparison between silicon triple gate pFinFET devices, which were processed on both Si and Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) substrates. The high temperature (from 25 °C to 150 °C) influence and different channel lengths and fin widths were also taken into account. While the temperature impact on the intrinsic voltage gain (AV) is limited, the unit gain frequency was strongly affected due to the carrier mobility degradation at higher temperatures, for both p- and n-type FinFET structures. In addition, the pFinFETs showed slightly larger AV values compared to the n-type counterparts, whereby the bulk FinFETs presented a higher dispersion than the SOI FinFETs.

  2. Riding the Ferris Wheel: A Sinusoidal Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mittag, Kathleen Cage; Taylor, Sharon E.

    2011-01-01

    When thinking of models for sinusoidal waves, examples such as tides of the ocean, daily temperatures for one year in your town, light and sound waves, and certain types of motion are used. Many textbooks [1, p. 222] also present a "Ferris wheel description problem" for students to work. This activity takes the Ferris wheel problem out of the…

  3. Algorithm Reveals Sinusoidal Component Of Noisy Signal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwok, Lloyd C.

    1991-01-01

    Algorithm performs simple statistical analysis of noisy signal to yield preliminary indication of whether or not signal contains sinusoidal component. Suitable for preprocessing or preliminary analysis of vibrations, fluctuations in pressure, and other signals that include large random components. Implemented on personal computer by easy-to-use program.

  4. False Operation of Static Random Access Memory Cells under Alternating Current Power Supply Voltage Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Takuya; Takata, Hidehiro; Nii, Koji; Nagata, Makoto

    2013-04-01

    Static random access memory (SRAM) cores exhibit susceptibility against power supply voltage variation. False operation is investigated among SRAM cells under sinusoidal voltage variation on power lines introduced by direct RF power injection. A standard SRAM core of 16 kbyte in a 90 nm 1.5 V technology is diagnosed with built-in self test and on-die noise monitor techniques. The sensitivity of bit error rate is shown to be high against the frequency of injected voltage variation, while it is not greatly influenced by the difference in frequency and phase against SRAM clocking. It is also observed that the distribution of false bits is substantially random in a cell array.

  5. Space-time resolved density of helium metastable atoms in a nanosecond pulsed plasma jet: influence of high voltage and pulse frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douat, Claire; Kacem, Issaad; Sadeghi, Nader; Bauville, Gérard; Fleury, Michel; Puech, Vincent

    2016-07-01

    Using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy, the spatio-temporal distributions of the helium He(23S1) metastable atoms’ density were measured in a plasma jet propagating in ambient air. The plasma jet was produced by applying short duration high voltage pulses on the electrodes of a DBD-like structure, at a repetition rate in the range 1–30 kHz. In addition to the metastable density, the spatial distribution of helium 587 nm emission intensity was also investigated to give insight into the excitation mechanisms of the He(33D) excited state inside the dielectric tube, in which no laser measurement can be performed. It is demonstrated that the shape of the radial distribution of helium He(23S1) metastable atoms strongly depends on the polarity of the applied voltage and on the repetition frequency. For positive applied voltages, a dramatic constriction of the excited species production is observed whenever the pulse repetition frequency is higher than 6 kHz, and the voltage higher than 5 kV. This shrinking of the jet structure induces an increase by one order of magnitude of the metastable atoms’ density in the jet centre which reaches values as high as 1014 cm‑3. Beyond a critical distance, associated to a transition between a positive streamer and a negative one, the distribution of the excited atoms gets back to an annular structure. For the negative polarity, no shrinking effect correlated to the pulse repetition frequency was observed. The on-axis constriction of the excited species for the high repetition rate and positive polarity is attributed to a memory effect induced by the negative ions, having a lifetime of hundreds of microseconds, left between successive pulses at the periphery of the helium gas flow.

  6. Space-time resolved density of helium metastable atoms in a nanosecond pulsed plasma jet: influence of high voltage and pulse frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douat, Claire; Kacem, Issaad; Sadeghi, Nader; Bauville, Gérard; Fleury, Michel; Puech, Vincent

    2016-07-01

    Using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy, the spatio-temporal distributions of the helium He(23S1) metastable atoms’ density were measured in a plasma jet propagating in ambient air. The plasma jet was produced by applying short duration high voltage pulses on the electrodes of a DBD-like structure, at a repetition rate in the range 1-30 kHz. In addition to the metastable density, the spatial distribution of helium 587 nm emission intensity was also investigated to give insight into the excitation mechanisms of the He(33D) excited state inside the dielectric tube, in which no laser measurement can be performed. It is demonstrated that the shape of the radial distribution of helium He(23S1) metastable atoms strongly depends on the polarity of the applied voltage and on the repetition frequency. For positive applied voltages, a dramatic constriction of the excited species production is observed whenever the pulse repetition frequency is higher than 6 kHz, and the voltage higher than 5 kV. This shrinking of the jet structure induces an increase by one order of magnitude of the metastable atoms’ density in the jet centre which reaches values as high as 1014 cm-3. Beyond a critical distance, associated to a transition between a positive streamer and a negative one, the distribution of the excited atoms gets back to an annular structure. For the negative polarity, no shrinking effect correlated to the pulse repetition frequency was observed. The on-axis constriction of the excited species for the high repetition rate and positive polarity is attributed to a memory effect induced by the negative ions, having a lifetime of hundreds of microseconds, left between successive pulses at the periphery of the helium gas flow.

  7. Fundamental analysis and development of the current and voltage control method by changing the driving frequency for the transcutaneous energy transmission system.

    PubMed

    Miura, Hidekazu; Yamada, Akihiro; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Yambe, Tomoyuki

    2015-08-01

    We have been developing transcutaneous energy transmission system (TETS) for a ventricular assist device, shape memory alloy (SMA) fibered artificial organs and so on, the system has high efficiency and a compact size. In this paper, we summarize the development, design method and characteristics of the TETS. New control methods for stabilizing output voltage or current of the TETS are proposed. These methods are primary side, are outside of the body, not depending on a communication system from the inside the body. Basically, the TETS operates at the fixed frequency with a suitable compensation capacitor so that the internal impedance is minimalized and a flat load characteristic is obtained. However, when the coil shifted from the optimal position, the coupling factor changes and the output is fluctuated. TETS has a resonant property; its output can be controlled by changing the driving frequency. The continuous current to continuous voltage driving method was implemented by changing driving frequency and setting of limitation of low side frequency. This method is useful for battery charging system for electrically driven artificial hearts and also useful for SMA fibered artificial organs which need intermittent high peak power comsumption. In this system, the internal storage capacitor is charged slowly while the fibers are turned off and discharge the energy when the fibers are turned on. We examined the effect of the system. It was found that the size and maximum output of the TETS would able to be reduced.

  8. Dielectric properties and electric modulus of Au/PPy/n-Si (MPS) type Schottky barrier diodes (SBDS) as a function of frequency and applied bias voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yücedağ, Ibrahim; Ersöz, Gülçin; Gümüş, Ahmet; Altındal, Şemsettin

    2015-03-01

    Au/PPy/n-Si Schottky barrier diodes (SBDs) were fabricated by forming polypyrrole (PPy) organic layer on n-Si using the spin coating technique. Frequency-dependent dielectric constant (ɛ‧), dielectric loss (ɛ″), loss tangent (tan δ), real and imaginary parts of electrical modulus (M‧ and M″) and AC electrical conductivity (σac) parameters of the structure were investigated in the frequency range of 10-500 kHz. It was found that the values of the ɛ‧, ɛ″ and tan δ, in general, decrease with increasing frequency while an increase is observed in σac, M‧ and M″. The tanδ and M″ also exhibit a peak at about zero-bias voltage, while peak intensity weakens with increasing frequency. The values of ɛ‧ and M‧ decrease with increasing voltage while an increase is observed in ɛ″, tan δ, σac and M″. These changes in ɛ‧, ɛ″, tan δ, M‧, M″ and σac values was attributed to surface charge polarization and the particular density distribution of surface states localized at PPy/n-Si interface.

  9. Human comfort in relation to sinusoidal vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, B.; Rao, B. K. N.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was made to assess the overall subjective comfort levels to sinusoidal excitations over the range 1 to 19 Hz using a two axis electrohydraulic vibration simulator. Exposure durations of 16 minutes, 25 minutes, 1 hour, and 2.5 hours have been considered. Subjects were not exposed over such durations, but were instructed to estimate the overall comfort levels preferred had they been constantly subjected to vibration over such durations.

  10. Immunological functions of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Knolle, Percy A; Wohlleber, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) line the liver sinusoids and separate passenger leukocytes in the sinusoidal lumen from hepatocytes. LSECs further act as a platform for adhesion of various liver-resident immune cell populations such as Kupffer cells, innate lymphoid cells or liver dendritic cells. In addition to having an extraordinary scavenger function, LSECs possess potent immune functions, serving as sentinel cells to detect microbial infection through pattern recognition receptor activation and as antigen (cross)-presenting cells. LSECs cross-prime naive CD8 T cells, causing their rapid differentiation into memory T cells that relocate to secondary lymphoid tissues and provide protection when they re-encounter the antigen during microbial infection. Cross-presentation of viral antigens by LSECs derived from infected hepatocytes triggers local activation of effector CD8 T cells and thereby assures hepatic immune surveillance. The immune function of LSECs complements conventional immune-activating mechanisms to accommodate optimal immune surveillance against infectious microorganisms while preserving the integrity of the liver as a metabolic organ. PMID:27041636

  11. Orbital component extraction by time-variant sinusoidal modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinnesael, Matthias; Zivanovic, Miroslav; De Vleeschouwer, David; Claeys, Philippe; Schoukens, Johan

    2016-04-01

    Accurately deciphering periodic variations in paleoclimate proxy signals is essential for cyclostratigraphy. Classical spectral analysis often relies on methods based on the (Fast) Fourier Transformation. This technique has no unique solution separating variations in amplitude and frequency. This characteristic makes it difficult to correctly interpret a proxy's power spectrum or to accurately evaluate simultaneous changes in amplitude and frequency in evolutionary analyses. Here, we circumvent this drawback by using a polynomial approach to estimate instantaneous amplitude and frequency in orbital components. This approach has been proven useful to characterize audio signals (music and speech), which are non-stationary in nature (Zivanovic and Schoukens, 2010, 2012). Paleoclimate proxy signals and audio signals have in nature similar dynamics; the only difference is the frequency relationship between the different components. A harmonic frequency relationship exists in audio signals, whereas this relation is non-harmonic in paleoclimate signals. However, the latter difference is irrelevant for the problem at hand. Using a sliding window approach, the model captures time variations of an orbital component by modulating a stationary sinusoid centered at its mean frequency, with a single polynomial. Hence, the parameters that determine the model are the mean frequency of the orbital component and the polynomial coefficients. The first parameter depends on geologic interpretation, whereas the latter are estimated by means of linear least-squares. As an output, the model provides the orbital component waveform, either in the depth or time domain. Furthermore, it allows for a unique decomposition of the signal into its instantaneous amplitude and frequency. Frequency modulation patterns can be used to reconstruct changes in accumulation rate, whereas amplitude modulation can be used to reconstruct e.g. eccentricity-modulated precession. The time-variant sinusoidal model

  12. Admittance–voltage profiling of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N/GaN heterostructures: Frequency dependence of capacitance and conductance

    SciTech Connect

    Köhler, K.; Pletschen, W.; Godejohann, B.; Müller, S.; Menner, H. P.; Ambacher, O.

    2015-11-28

    Admittance–voltage profiling of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N/GaN heterostructures was used to determine the frequency dependent capacitance and conductance of FET devices in the frequency range from 50 Hz to 1 MHz. The nominally undoped low pressure metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy structures were grown with an Al-content of 30%. An additional 1 nm thick AlN interlayer was placed in one structure before the Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}N layer growth. For frequencies below 10{sup 8} Hz it is convenient to use equivalent circuits to represent electric or dielectric properties of a material, a method widely used, for example, in impedance spectroscopy. We want to emphasize the relation between frequency dependent admittance–voltage profiling and the corresponding equivalent circuits to the complex dielectric function. Debye and Drude models are used for the description of the frequency dependent admittance profiles in a range of depletion onset of the two-dimensional electron gas. Capacitance- and conductance-frequency profiles are fitted in the entire measured range by combining both models. Based on our results, we see contributions to the two-dimensional electron gas for our samples from surface states (80%) as well as from background doping in the Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}N barriers (20%). The specific resistance of the layers below the gate is above 10{sup 5} Ω cm for both samples and increases with increasing negative bias, i.e., the layers below the gate are essentially depleted. We propose that the resistance due to free charge carriers, determined by the Drude model, is located between gate and drain and, because of the AlN interlayer, the resistance is lowered by a factor of about 30 if compared to the sample without an AlN layer.

  13. Cochlear hearing loss and the detection of sinusoidal versus random amplitude modulation.

    PubMed

    Grose, John H; Porter, Heather L; Buss, Emily; Hall, Joseph W

    2016-08-01

    This study assessed the effect of cochlear hearing loss on detection of random and sinusoidal amplitude modulation. Listeners with hearing loss and normal-hearing listeners (eight per group) generated temporal modulation transfer functions (TMTFs) for envelope fluctuations carried by a 2000-Hz pure tone. TMTFs for the two groups were similar at low modulation rates but diverged at higher rates presumably because of differences in frequency selectivity. For both groups, detection of random modulation was poorer than for sinusoidal modulation at lower rates but the reverse occurred at higher rates. No evidence was found that cochlear hearing loss, per se, affects modulation detection. PMID:27586778

  14. Attenuation of intense sinusoidal waves in air-saturated, bulk porous materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuntz, Herbert L.; Blackstock, David T.

    1987-01-01

    As intense, initially sinusoidal waves propagate in fluids, shocks form and excess attenuation of the wave occurs. Data are presented indicating that shock formation is not necessary for the occurrence of excess attenuation in nonlinear, lossy media, i.e., air-saturated, porous materials. An empirical equation is used to describe the excess attenuation of intense sinusoids in porous materials. The acoustic nonlinearity of and the excess attenuation in porous materials may be predicted directly from dc flow resistivity data. An empirical relationship is used to relate an acoustic nonlinearity parameter to the fundamental frequency and relative dc nonlinearity of two structurally different materials.

  15. Optical voltage reference

    DOEpatents

    Rankin, R.; Kotter, D.

    1994-04-26

    An optical voltage reference for providing an alternative to a battery source is described. The optical reference apparatus provides a temperature stable, high precision, isolated voltage reference through the use of optical isolation techniques to eliminate current and impedance coupling errors. Pulse rate frequency modulation is employed to eliminate errors in the optical transmission link while phase-lock feedback is employed to stabilize the frequency to voltage transfer function. 2 figures.

  16. Interplay between low threshold voltage-gated K(+) channels and synaptic inhibition in neurons of the chicken nucleus laminaris along its frequency axis.

    PubMed

    Hamlet, William R; Liu, Yu-Wei; Tang, Zheng-Quan; Lu, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Central auditory neurons that localize sound in horizontal space have specialized intrinsic and synaptic cellular mechanisms to tightly control the threshold and timing for action potential generation. However, the critical interplay between intrinsic voltage-gated conductances and extrinsic synaptic conductances in determining neuronal output are not well understood. In chicken, neurons in the nucleus laminaris (NL) encode sound location using interaural time difference (ITD) as a cue. Along the tonotopic axis of NL, there exist robust differences among low, middle, and high frequency (LF, MF, and HF, respectively) neurons in a variety of neuronal properties such as low threshold voltage-gated K(+) (LTK) channels and depolarizing inhibition. This establishes NL as an ideal model to examine the interactions between LTK currents and synaptic inhibition across the tonotopic axis. Using whole-cell patch clamp recordings prepared from chicken embryos (E17-E18), we found that LTK currents were larger in MF and HF neurons than in LF neurons. Kinetic analysis revealed that LTK currents in MF neurons activated at lower voltages than in LF and HF neurons, whereas the inactivation of the currents was similar across the tonotopic axis. Surprisingly, blockade of LTK currents using dendrotoxin-I (DTX) tended to broaden the duration and increase the amplitude of the depolarizing inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) in NL neurons without dependence on coding frequency regions. Analyses of the effects of DTX on inhibitory postsynaptic currents led us to interpret this unexpected observation as a result of primarily postsynaptic effects of LTK currents on MF and HF neurons, and combined presynaptic and postsynaptic effects in LF neurons. Furthermore, DTX transferred subthreshold IPSPs to spikes. Taken together, the results suggest a critical role for LTK currents in regulating inhibitory synaptic strength in ITD-coding neurons at various frequencies.

  17. Skin Sympathetic Nerve Activity is Modulated during Slow Sinusoidal Linear Displacements in Supine Humans

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Philip S.; Hammam, Elie; Kwok, Kenny; Macefield, Vaughan G.

    2016-01-01

    Low-frequency sinusoidal linear acceleration (0.08 Hz, ±4 mG) modulates skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA) in seated subjects (head vertical), suggesting that activation of the utricle in the peripheral vestibular labyrinth modulates SSNA. The aim of the current study was to determine whether SSNA is also modulated by input from the saccule. Tungsten microelectrodes were inserted into the common peroneal nerve to record oligounitary SSNA in 8 subjects laying supine on a motorized platform with the head aligned with the longitudinal axis of the body. Slow sinusoidal (0.08 Hz, 100 cycles) linear acceleration-decelerations (peak ±4 mG) were applied rostrocaudally to predominately activate the saccules, or mediolaterally to predominately activate the utricles. Cross-correlation histograms were constructed between the negative-going sympathetic spikes and the positive peaks of the sinusoidal stimuli. Sinusoidal linear acceleration along the rostrocaudal axis or mediolateral axis both resulted in sinusoidal modulation of SSNA (Median, IQR 27.0, 22–33% and 24.8, 17–39%, respectively). This suggests that both otolith organs act on sympathetic outflow to skin and muscle in a similar manner during supine displacements. PMID:26909019

  18. Measuring of object vibration using sinusoidal-modulation laser-diode active interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Yong; Cao, Qinfeng; Lu, Su

    1996-09-01

    Using the character that the emitting optical frequency of the laser diode is controlled by the injected current, the ability of eliminating environmental disturbance of the sinusoidal modulation laser diode active interferometer will be raised by more than one hundred times through putting the disturbed interference signal produced by the environment into the interferometer. When vibrating frequency of objects is different from that of the sinusoidol modulation, 'beat- frequency' will be produced in the interfere signal, which can be analyzed to get the vibrating frequency of objects. This paper described the operation principle and theoretical delusion of the 'beat-frequency' method.

  19. [The treatment of alopecia areata with sinusoidal modulated currents].

    PubMed

    Sergeev, S Ia; Pesterev, P N; Rodionova, T F; Labzovskaia, N L; Levitskaia, N S

    1989-01-01

    The technique of alopecia areata treatment with sinusoidal modulated currents is simple and may be used on an outpatient basis. The Amplipul's-4 apparatus sensors have been placed in the cervical sympathetic node area. The current parameters have been as follows: P-1, III PP for 2-3 min, then IV PP for 2-3 min, modulation frequency 100-80 Hz and depth 50-75%, the pulse length within 2-4 sec provided the current strength is sufficient. The course of treatment included 10-12 sessions. Parallel with this physiotherapeutic modality, the patients were administered FiBS (a liman mud biogenic stimulant), vitamins B1 and B6, and andecalin. Clinical effect has been achieved in 46 of the 53 patients with a short duration of the disease. The authors' observations confirm the contribution of the sympathetic nervous system function to the genesis of alopecia.

  20. High-voltage direct-current (HVDC) converter station electromagnetic noise study. Volume 2: User`s manual for Radio Frequency Computer Analysis Program; Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kasten, D.G.; Sebo, S.A.

    1994-04-01

    It may be desired to locate a high-voltage direct-current (HVDC) converter station in a sensitive electromagnetic environment. Such converter stations inherently generate electromagnetic noise that can interfere with computer and communication systems. Two previous projects studied this problem. In EPRI report EL-3712, measurements of an actual station were compared with scaled measurement made on a reduced scale model of the station. Radio Frequency Computer Analysis Program (RAFCAP), a digital computer model, was developed based on these results. In EPRI report EL-4956, the model was refined by adding frequency-dependent quantities and expanded to include filters. Volume 1 of the present study completes the work of computer modeling by incorporating measurements made on transformers. Volume 2 is a user`s manual for both the DEC VAX and PC versions of the RAFCAP computer program. This abstract is for Volume 2.

  1. Influence of Ambient Humidity on the Voltage Response of Ionic Polymer-Metal Composite Sensor.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zicai; Horiuchi, Tetsuya; Kruusamäe, Karl; Chang, Longfei; Asaka, Kinji

    2016-03-31

    Electrical potential based on ion migration exists not only in natural systems but also in ionic polymer materials. In order to investigate the influence of ambient humidity on voltage response, classical Au-Nafion IPMC was chosen as the reference sample. Voltage response under a bending deformation was measured in two ways: first, continuous measurement of voltage response in the process of absorption and desorption of water to study the tendency of voltage variation at all water states; second, measurements at multiple fixed ambient humidity levels to characterize the process of voltage response quantitatively. Ambient humidity influences the voltage response mainly by varying water content in ionic polymer. Under a step bending, the amplitude of initial voltage peak first increases and then decreases as the ambient humidity and the inherent water content decrease. This tendency is explained semiquantitatively by mass storage capacity related to the stretchable state of the Nafion polymer network. Following the initial peak, the voltage shows a slow decay to a steady state, which is first characterized in this paper. The relative voltage decay during the steady state always decreases as the ambient humidity is lowered. It is ascribed to progressive increase of the ratio between the water molecules in the cation hydration shell to the free water. Under sinusoidal mechanical bending excitation in the range of 0.1-10 Hz, the voltage magnitude increases with frequency at high ambient humidity but decreases with frequency at low ambient humidity. The relationship is mainly controlled by the voltage decay effect and the response speed.

  2. Combined effect of constant high voltage electrostatic field and variable frequency pulsed electromagnetic field on the morphology of calcium carbonate scale in circulating cooling water systems.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ju-Dong; Liu, Zhi-An; Zhao, Er-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Research on scale inhibition is of importance to improve the heat transfer efficiency of heat exchangers. The combined effect of high voltage electrostatic and variable frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields on calcium carbonate precipitation was investigated, both theoretically and experimentally. Using energy dispersive spectrum analysis, the predominant phase was found to be CaCO(3). The formed crystal phases mainly consist of calcite and aragonite, which is, in part, verified by theory. The results indicate that the setting of water flow velocity, and high voltage electrostatic and variable frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields is very important. Favorable values of these parameters can have a significant anti-scaling effect, with 68.95% of anti-scaling ratio for scale sample 13, while unfavorable values do not affect scale inhibition, but rather promoted fouling, such as scale sample 6. By using scanning electron microscopy analysis, when the anti-scaling ratio is positive, the particle size of scale was found to become smaller than that of untreated sample and the morphology became loose. The X-ray diffraction results verify that the good combined effect favors the appearance and growth of aragonite and restrains its transition to calcite. The mechanism for scale reduction is discussed. PMID:25259497

  3. Combined effect of constant high voltage electrostatic field and variable frequency pulsed electromagnetic field on the morphology of calcium carbonate scale in circulating cooling water systems.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ju-Dong; Liu, Zhi-An; Zhao, Er-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Research on scale inhibition is of importance to improve the heat transfer efficiency of heat exchangers. The combined effect of high voltage electrostatic and variable frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields on calcium carbonate precipitation was investigated, both theoretically and experimentally. Using energy dispersive spectrum analysis, the predominant phase was found to be CaCO(3). The formed crystal phases mainly consist of calcite and aragonite, which is, in part, verified by theory. The results indicate that the setting of water flow velocity, and high voltage electrostatic and variable frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields is very important. Favorable values of these parameters can have a significant anti-scaling effect, with 68.95% of anti-scaling ratio for scale sample 13, while unfavorable values do not affect scale inhibition, but rather promoted fouling, such as scale sample 6. By using scanning electron microscopy analysis, when the anti-scaling ratio is positive, the particle size of scale was found to become smaller than that of untreated sample and the morphology became loose. The X-ray diffraction results verify that the good combined effect favors the appearance and growth of aragonite and restrains its transition to calcite. The mechanism for scale reduction is discussed.

  4. Spur-reduced digital sinusoid synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flanagan, M. J.; Zimmerman, G. A.

    1993-01-01

    This article presents and analyzes a technique for reducing the spurious signal content in digital sinusoid synthesis. Spurious-harmonic (spur) reduction is accomplished through dithering both amplitude and phase values prior to word-length reduction. The analytical approach developed for analog quantization is used to produce new bounds on spur performance in these dithered systems. Amplitude dithering allows output word-length reduction without introducing additional spurs. Effects of periodic dither similar to those produced by a pseudonoise (PN) generator are analyzed. This phase-dithering method provides a spur reduction of 6(M plus one) dB per phase bit when the dither consists of M uniform variates. While the spur reduction is at the expense of an increase in system noise, the noise power can be made white, making the power spectral density small. This technique permits the use of a smaller number of phase bits addressing sinusoid lookup tables, resulting in an exponential decrease in system complexity. Amplitude dithering allows the use of less complicated multipliers and narrower data paths in purely digital applications, as well as the use of coarse resolution, highly linear digital to analog converters (DAC's) to obtain spur performance limited by the DAC linearity rather than its resolution.

  5. Potential damage to DC superconducting magnets due to the high frequency electromagnetic waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabriel, G. J.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental data are presented in support of the hypothesis that a dc superconducting magnet coil does not behave strictly as an inductor, but as a complicated electrodynamic device capable of supporting electromagnetic waves. Travel times of nanosecond pulses and evidence of sinusoidal standing waves were observed on a prototype four-layer solenoidal coil at room temperature. Ringing observed during switching transients appears as a sequence of multiple reflected square pulses whose durations are related to the layer lengths. With sinusoidal excitation of the coil, the voltage amplitude between a pair of points on the coil exhibits maxima at those frequencies such that the distance between these points is an odd multiple of half wavelength in free space. Evidence indicates that any disturbance, such as that resulting from switching or sudden fault, initiates multiple reflections between layers, thus raising the possibility for sufficiently high voltages to cause breakdown.

  6. Damped sinusoidal function to model acute irradiation in radiotherapy patients.

    PubMed

    Tukiendorf, Andrzej; Miszczyk, Leszek; Bojarski, Jacek

    2013-09-01

    In the paper, we suggest a damped sinusoidal function be used to model a regenerative response of mucosa in time after the radiotherapy treatment. The medical history of 389 RT patients irradiated within the years 1994-2000 at the Radiotherapy Department, Cancer Center, Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Institute of Oncology, Gliwice, Poland, was taken into account. In the analyzed group of patients, the number of observations of a single patient ranged from 2 to 25 (mean = 8.3, median = 8) with severity determined by use of Dische's scores from 0 to 24 (mean = 7.4, median = 7). Statistical modeling of radiation-induced mucositis was performed for five groups of patients irradiated within the following radiotherapy schedules: CAIR, CB, Manchester, CHA-CHA, and Conventional. All of the regression parameters of the assumed model, i.e. amplitude, damping coefficient, angular frequency, phase of component, and offset, estimated in the analysis were statistically significant (p-value < 0.05) for the radiotherapy schedules. The model was validated using a non-oscillatory function. Following goodness-of-fit statistics, the damped sinusoidal function fits the data better than the non-oscillatory damped function. Model curves for harmonic characteristics with confidence intervals were plotted separately for each of the RT schedules and together in a combined design. The suggested model might be helpful in the numeric evaluation of the RT toxicity in the groups of patients under analysis as it allows for practical comparisons and treatment optimization. A statistical approach is also briefly described in the paper.

  7. High sensitivity measurement system for the direct-current, capacitance-voltage, and gate-drain low frequency noise characterization of field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giusi, G.; Giordano, O.; Scandurra, G.; Rapisarda, M.; Calvi, S.; Ciofi, C.

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of current fluctuations originating in electron devices have been largely used to understand the electrical properties of materials and ultimate device performances. In this work, we propose a high-sensitivity measurement setup topology suitable for the automatic and programmable Direct-Current (DC), Capacitance-Voltage (CV), and gate-drain low frequency noise characterization of field effect transistors at wafer level. Automatic and programmable operation is particularly useful when the device characteristics relax or degrade with time due to optical, bias, or temperature stress. The noise sensitivity of the proposed topology is in the order of fA/Hz1/2, while DC performances are limited only by the source and measurement units used to bias the device under test. DC, CV, and NOISE measurements, down to 1 pA of DC gate and drain bias currents, in organic thin film transistors are reported to demonstrate system operation and performances.

  8. High sensitivity measurement system for the direct-current, capacitance-voltage, and gate-drain low frequency noise characterization of field effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Giusi, G; Giordano, O; Scandurra, G; Rapisarda, M; Calvi, S; Ciofi, C

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of current fluctuations originating in electron devices have been largely used to understand the electrical properties of materials and ultimate device performances. In this work, we propose a high-sensitivity measurement setup topology suitable for the automatic and programmable Direct-Current (DC), Capacitance-Voltage (CV), and gate-drain low frequency noise characterization of field effect transistors at wafer level. Automatic and programmable operation is particularly useful when the device characteristics relax or degrade with time due to optical, bias, or temperature stress. The noise sensitivity of the proposed topology is in the order of fA/Hz(1/2), while DC performances are limited only by the source and measurement units used to bias the device under test. DC, CV, and NOISE measurements, down to 1 pA of DC gate and drain bias currents, in organic thin film transistors are reported to demonstrate system operation and performances. PMID:27131690

  9. Design and implementation of a new modified sliding mode controller for grid-connected inverter to controlling the voltage and frequency.

    PubMed

    Ghanbarian, Mohammad Mehdi; Nayeripour, Majid; Rajaei, Amirhossein; Mansouri, Mohammad Mahdi

    2016-03-01

    As the output power of a microgrid with renewable energy sources should be regulated based on the grid conditions, using robust controllers to share and balance the power in order to regulate the voltage and frequency of microgrid is critical. Therefore a proper control system is necessary for updating the reference signals and determining the proportion of each inverter in the microgrid control. This paper proposes a new adaptive method which is robust while the conditions are changing. This controller is based on a modified sliding mode controller which provides adapting conditions in linear and nonlinear loads. The performance of the proposed method is validated by representing the simulation results and experimental lab results. PMID:26704720

  10. Design and implementation of a new modified sliding mode controller for grid-connected inverter to controlling the voltage and frequency.

    PubMed

    Ghanbarian, Mohammad Mehdi; Nayeripour, Majid; Rajaei, Amirhossein; Mansouri, Mohammad Mahdi

    2016-03-01

    As the output power of a microgrid with renewable energy sources should be regulated based on the grid conditions, using robust controllers to share and balance the power in order to regulate the voltage and frequency of microgrid is critical. Therefore a proper control system is necessary for updating the reference signals and determining the proportion of each inverter in the microgrid control. This paper proposes a new adaptive method which is robust while the conditions are changing. This controller is based on a modified sliding mode controller which provides adapting conditions in linear and nonlinear loads. The performance of the proposed method is validated by representing the simulation results and experimental lab results.

  11. Energy harvesting under excitations of time-varying frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seuaciuc-Osório, Thiago; Daqaq, Mohammed F.

    2010-06-01

    The design and optimization of energy harvesters capable of scavenging energy efficiently from realistic environments require a deep understanding of their transduction under non-stationary and random excitations. Otherwise, their small energy outputs can be further decreased lowering their efficiency and rendering many critical and possibly life saving technologies inefficient. As a first step towards this critical understanding, this effort investigates the response of energy harvesters to harmonic excitations of time-varying frequency. Such excitations can be used to represent the behavior of realistic vibratory environments whose frequency varies or drifts with time. Specifically, we consider a piezoelectric stack-type harvester subjected to a harmonic excitation of constant amplitude and a sinusoidally varying frequency. We analyze the response of the harvester in the fixed-frequency scenario then use the Jacobi-Anger's expansion to analyze the response in the time-varying case. We obtain analytical expressions for the harvester's response, output voltage, and power. In-depth analysis of the attained results reveals that the solution to the more complex time-varying frequency can be understood through a process which "samples" the fixed-frequency response curve at a discrete and fixed frequency interval then multiplies the response by proper weights. Extensive discussions addressing the effect of the excitation parameters on the output power is presented leading to some initial suggestions pertinent to the harvester's design and optimization in the sinusoidally varying frequency case.

  12. Modulation rate discrimination using half-wave rectified and sinusoidally amplitude modulated stimuli in cochlear-implant users.

    PubMed

    Kreft, Heather A; Oxenham, Andrew J; Nelson, David A

    2010-02-01

    Detection and modulation rate discrimination were measured in cochlear-implant users for pulse-trains that were either sinusoidally amplitude modulated or were modulated with half-wave rectified sinusoids, which in acoustic hearing have been used to simulate the response to low-frequency temporal fine structure. In contrast to comparable results from acoustic hearing, modulation rate discrimination was not statistically different for the two stimulus types. The results suggest that, in contrast to binaural perception, pitch perception in cochlear-implant users does not benefit from using stimuli designed to more closely simulate the cochlear response to low-frequency pure tones. PMID:20136187

  13. Analytical analysis of the Pennes bioheat transfer equation with sinusoidal heat flux condition on skin surface.

    PubMed

    Shih, Tzu-Ching; Yuan, Ping; Lin, Win-Li; Kou, Hong-Sen

    2007-11-01

    This study focuses on the effect of the temperature response of a semi-infinite biological tissue due to a sinusoidal heat flux at the skin. The Pennes bioheat transfer equation such as rho(t)c(t)( partial differentialT/ partial differentialt)+W(b)c(b)(T-T(a))=k partial differential(2)T/ partial differentialx(2) with the oscillatory heat flux boundary condition such as q(0,t)=q(0)e(iomegat) was investigated. By using the Laplace transform, the analytical solution of the Pennes bioheat transfer equation with surface sinusoidal heating condition is found. This analytical expression is suitable for describing the transient temperature response of tissue for the whole time domain from the starting periodic oscillation to the final steady periodic oscillation. The results show that the temperature oscillation due to the sinusoidal heating on the skin surface is unstable in the initial period. Further, it is unavailable to predict the blood perfusion rate via the phase shifting between the surface heat flux and the surface temperature. Moreover, the lower frequency of sinusoidal heat flux on the skin surface induces a more sensitive phase shift response to the blood perfusion rate change, but extends the beginning time of sampling because of the avoidance of the unavailable first cyclic oscillation.

  14. Optical frequency comb generation based on chirping of Mach-Zehnder Modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hmood, Jassim K.; Emami, Siamak D.; Noordin, Kamarul A.; Ahmad, Harith; Harun, Sulaiman W.; Shalaby, Hossam M. H.

    2015-06-01

    A new approach for the generation of an optical frequency comb, based on chirping of modulators, is proposed and numerically demonstrated. The setup includes two cascaded Mach-Zehnder Modulators (MZMs), a sinusoidal wave oscillator, and an electrical time delay. The first MZM is driven directly by a sinusoidal wave, while the second MZM is driven by a delayed replica of the sinusoidal wave. A mathematical model of the proposed system is formulated and modeled using the Matlab software. It is shown that the number of the frequency lines is directly proportional to the chirp factor. In order to achieve the highest number of frequency comb lines with the best flatness, the time delay between the driving voltages of the two MZMs is optimized. Our results reveal that at least 51 frequency lines can be observed at the output spectrum. In addition, 27 of these lines have power fluctuations of less than 1 dB. The performance of the proposed system is also simulated using a split-step numerical analysis. An optical frequency comb, with tunable frequency spacing ranging from 5 to 40 GHz, is successfully generated.

  15. Perceived temporal asynchrony between sinusoidally modulated luminance and depth

    PubMed Central

    Žarić, Gojko; Yazdanbakhsh, Arash; Nishina, Shigeaki; De Weerd, Peter; Watanabe, Takeo

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneously presented visual events lead to temporally asynchronous percepts. This has led some researchers to conclude that the asynchronous experience is a manifestation of differences in neural processing time for different visual attributes. Others, however, have suggested that the asynchronous experience is due to differences in temporal markers for changes of different visual attributes. Here, two sets of bars were presented, one to each eye. Either the bars were moving or their luminance was gradually changing. Bars moved horizontally in counterphase at low frequencies along short trajectories and were presented stereoscopically, such that the horizontal movements were perceived as back-and-forth motion on a sagittal plane, or monocularly to a dominant eye, preserving a perception of the horizontal movements on a frontal plane. In a control condition, bars were stationary and their luminance was modulated. The changes in stimulus speed or luminance occurred sinusoidally. When asked to adjust the phase of one stimulus to the other to achieve synchronous perception, participants showed a constant phase offset at the lowest frequencies used. Given the absence of abrupt transitions and the presence of similar gradual turning points in our stimuli to control for attentional effects, it can be concluded that asynchronous percepts in multimodal stimuli may at least in part be a manifestation of difference in neural processing time of visual attributes rather than solely a difference in the temporal markers (transitions versus turning points). PMID:26605842

  16. A Statistical and Spectral Model for Representing Noisy Sounds with Short-Time Sinusoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, Pierre; Desainte-Catherine, Myriam

    2005-12-01

    We propose an original model for noise analysis, transformation, and synthesis: the CNSS model. Noisy sounds are represented with short-time sinusoids whose frequencies and phases are random variables. This spectral and statistical model represents information about the spectral density of frequencies. This perceptually relevant property is modeled by three mathematical parameters that define the distribution of the frequencies. This model also represents the spectral envelope. The mathematical parameters are defined and the analysis algorithms to extract these parameters from sounds are introduced. Then algorithms for generating sounds from the parameters of the model are presented. Applications of this model include tools for composers, psychoacoustic experiments, and pedagogy.

  17. Optical antennas with sinusoidal modulation in width.

    PubMed

    Dikken, Dirk Jan; Segerink, Frans B; Korterik, Jeroen P; Pfaff, Stefan S; Prangsma, Jord C; Herek, Jennifer L

    2016-08-01

    Small metal structures sustaining plasmon resonances in the optical regime are of great interest due to their large scattering cross sections and ability to concentrate light to subwavelength volumes. In this paper, we study the dipolar plasmon resonances of optical antennas with a constant volume and a sinusoidal modulation in width. We experimentally show that by changing the phase of the width-modulation, with a small 10 nm modulation amplitude, the resonance shifts over 160 nm. Using simulations we show how this simple design can create resonance shifts greater than 600 nm. The versatility of this design is further shown by creating asymmetric structures with two different modulation amplitudes, which we experimentally and numerically show to give rise to two resonances. Our results on both the symmetric and asymmetric antennas show the capability to control the localization of the fields outside the antenna, while still maintaining the freedom to change the antenna resonance wavelength. The antenna design we tested combines a large spectral tunability with a small footprint: all the antenna dimensions are factor 7 to 13 smaller than the wavelength, and hold potential as a design element in meta-surfaces for beam shaping. PMID:27505755

  18. Optical antennas with sinusoidal modulation in width.

    PubMed

    Dikken, Dirk Jan; Segerink, Frans B; Korterik, Jeroen P; Pfaff, Stefan S; Prangsma, Jord C; Herek, Jennifer L

    2016-08-01

    Small metal structures sustaining plasmon resonances in the optical regime are of great interest due to their large scattering cross sections and ability to concentrate light to subwavelength volumes. In this paper, we study the dipolar plasmon resonances of optical antennas with a constant volume and a sinusoidal modulation in width. We experimentally show that by changing the phase of the width-modulation, with a small 10 nm modulation amplitude, the resonance shifts over 160 nm. Using simulations we show how this simple design can create resonance shifts greater than 600 nm. The versatility of this design is further shown by creating asymmetric structures with two different modulation amplitudes, which we experimentally and numerically show to give rise to two resonances. Our results on both the symmetric and asymmetric antennas show the capability to control the localization of the fields outside the antenna, while still maintaining the freedom to change the antenna resonance wavelength. The antenna design we tested combines a large spectral tunability with a small footprint: all the antenna dimensions are factor 7 to 13 smaller than the wavelength, and hold potential as a design element in meta-surfaces for beam shaping.

  19. Sinusoidal nanotextures for light management in silicon thin-film solar cells.

    PubMed

    Köppel, G; Rech, B; Becker, C

    2016-04-28

    Recent progresses in liquid phase crystallization enabled the fabrication of thin wafer quality crystalline silicon layers on low-cost glass substrates enabling conversion efficiencies up to 12.1%. Because of its indirect band gap, a thin silicon absorber layer demands for efficient measures for light management. However, the combination of high quality crystalline silicon and light trapping structures is still a critical issue. Here, we implement hexagonal 750 nm pitched sinusoidal and pillar shaped nanostructures at the sun-facing glass-silicon interface into 10 μm thin liquid phase crystallized silicon thin-film solar cell devices on glass. Both structures are experimentally studied regarding their optical and optoelectronic properties. Reflection losses are reduced over the entire wavelength range outperforming state of the art anti-reflective planar layer systems. In case of the smooth sinusoidal nanostructures these optical achievements are accompanied by an excellent electronic material quality of the silicon absorber layer enabling open circuit voltages above 600 mV and solar cell device performances comparable to the planar reference device. For wavelengths smaller than 400 nm and higher than 700 nm optical achievements are translated into an enhanced quantum efficiency of the solar cell devices. Therefore, sinusoidal nanotextures are a well-balanced compromise between optical enhancement and maintained high electronic silicon material quality which opens a promising route for future optimizations in solar cell designs for silicon thin-film solar cells on glass.

  20. Sinusoidal nanotextures for light management in silicon thin-film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köppel, G.; Rech, B.; Becker, C.

    2016-04-01

    Recent progresses in liquid phase crystallization enabled the fabrication of thin wafer quality crystalline silicon layers on low-cost glass substrates enabling conversion efficiencies up to 12.1%. Because of its indirect band gap, a thin silicon absorber layer demands for efficient measures for light management. However, the combination of high quality crystalline silicon and light trapping structures is still a critical issue. Here, we implement hexagonal 750 nm pitched sinusoidal and pillar shaped nanostructures at the sun-facing glass-silicon interface into 10 μm thin liquid phase crystallized silicon thin-film solar cell devices on glass. Both structures are experimentally studied regarding their optical and optoelectronic properties. Reflection losses are reduced over the entire wavelength range outperforming state of the art anti-reflective planar layer systems. In case of the smooth sinusoidal nanostructures these optical achievements are accompanied by an excellent electronic material quality of the silicon absorber layer enabling open circuit voltages above 600 mV and solar cell device performances comparable to the planar reference device. For wavelengths smaller than 400 nm and higher than 700 nm optical achievements are translated into an enhanced quantum efficiency of the solar cell devices. Therefore, sinusoidal nanotextures are a well-balanced compromise between optical enhancement and maintained high electronic silicon material quality which opens a promising route for future optimizations in solar cell designs for silicon thin-film solar cells on glass.

  1. High frequency, high temperature specific core loss and dynamic B-H hysteresis loop characteristics of soft magnetic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieserman, W. R.; Schwarze, G. E.; Niedra, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Limited experimental data exists for the specific core loss and dynamic B-H loops for soft magnetic materials for the combined conditions of high frequency and high temperature. This experimental study investigates the specific core loss and dynamic B-H loop characteristics of Supermalloy and Metglas 2605SC over the frequency range of 1 to 50 kHz and temperature range of 23 to 300 C under sinusoidal voltage excitation. The experimental setup used to conduct the investigation is described. The effects of the maximum magnetic flux density, frequency, and temperature on the specific core loss and on the size and shape of the B-H loops are examined.

  2. Response of the seated human body to whole-body vertical vibration: biodynamic responses to sinusoidal and random vibration.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhen; Griffin, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The dependence of biodynamic responses of the seated human body on the frequency, magnitude and waveform of vertical vibration has been studied in 20 males and 20 females. With sinusoidal vibration (13 frequencies from 1 to 16 Hz) at five magnitudes (0.1-1.6 ms(-2) r.m.s.) and with random vibration (1-16 Hz) at the same magnitudes, the apparent mass of the body was similar with random and sinusoidal vibration of the same overall magnitude. With increasing magnitude of vibration, the stiffness and damping of a model fitted to the apparent mass reduced and the resonance frequency decreased (from 6.5 to 4.5 Hz). Male and female subjects had similar apparent mass (after adjusting for subject weight) and a similar principal resonance frequency with both random and sinusoidal vibration. The change in biodynamic response with increasing vibration magnitude depends on the frequency of the vibration excitation, but is similar with sinusoidal and random excitation.

  3. System and component design and test of a 10 hp, 18,000 rpm AC dynamometer utilizing a high frequency AC voltage link, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipo, Thomas A.; Alan, Irfan

    1991-01-01

    Hard and soft switching test results conducted with one of the samples of first generation MOS-controlled thyristor (MCTs) and similar test results with several different samples of second generation MCT's are reported. A simple chopper circuit is used to investigate the basic switching characteristics of MCT under hard switching and various types of resonant circuits are used to determine soft switching characteristics of MCT under both zero voltage and zero current switching. Next, operation principles of a pulse density modulated converter (PDMC) for three phase (3F) to 3F two-step power conversion via parallel resonant high frequency (HF) AC link are reviewed. The details for the selection of power switches and other power components required for the construction of the power circuit for the second generation 3F to 3F converter system are discussed. The problems encountered in the first generation system are considered. Design and performance of the first generation 3F to 3F power converter system and field oriented induction moter drive based upon a 3 kVA, 20 kHz parallel resonant HF AC link are described. Low harmonic current at the input and output, unity power factor operation of input, and bidirectional flow capability of the system are shown via both computer and experimental results. The work completed on the construction and testing of the second generation converter and field oriented induction motor drive based upon specifications for a 10 hp squirrel cage dynamometer and a 20 kHz parallel resonant HF AC link is discussed. The induction machine is designed to deliver 10 hp or 7.46 kW when operated as an AC-dynamo with power fed back to the source through the converter. Results presented reveal that the proposed power level requires additional energy storage elements to overcome difficulties with a peak link voltage variation problem that limits reaching to the desired power level. The power level test of the second generation converter after the

  4. Effects of continuous-wave, pulsed, and sinusoidal-amplitude-modulated microwaves on brain energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sanders, A P; Joines, W T; Allis, J W

    1985-01-01

    A comparison of the effects of continuous-wave, sinusoidal-amplitude-modulated, and pulsed square-wave-modulated 591-MHz microwave exposures on brain energy metabolism was made in male Sprague-Dawley rats (175-225 g). Brain NADH fluorescence, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration, and creatine phosphate (CP) concentration were determined as a function of modulation frequency. Brain temperatures of animals were maintained between -0.1 and -0.4 degrees C from the preexposure temperature when subjected to as much as 20 mW/cm2 (average power) CW, pulsed, or sinusoidal-amplitude modulated 591-MHz radiation for 5 min. Sinusoidal-amplitude-modulated exposures at 16-24 Hz showed a trend toward preferential modulation frequency response in inducing an increase in brain NADH fluorescence. The pulse-modulated and sinusoidal-amplitude-modulated (16 Hz) microwaves were not significantly different from CW exposures in inducing increased brain NADH fluorescence and decreased ATP and CP concentrations. When the pulse-modulation frequency was decreased from 500 to 250 pulses per second the average incident power density threshold for inducing an increase in brain NADH fluorescence increased by a factor of 4--ie, from about 0.45 to about 1.85 mW/cm2. Since brain temperature did not increase, the microwave-induced increase in brain NADH and decrease in ATP and CP concentrations was not due to hyperthermia. This suggests a direct interaction mechanism and is consistent with the hypothesis of microwave inhibition of mitochondrial electron transport chain function of ATP production.

  5. Suppression of axonal conduction by sinusoidal stimulation in rat hippocampus in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, A. L.; Durand, D. M.

    2007-06-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS), also known as high frequency stimulation (HFS), is a well-established therapy for Parkinson's disease and essential tremor, and shows promise for the therapeutic control of epilepsy. However, the direct effect of DBS on neural elements close to the stimulating electrode remains an important unanswered question. Computational studies have suggested that HFS has a dual effect on neural elements inhibiting cell bodies, while exciting axons. Prior experiments have shown that sinusoidal HFS (50 Hz) can suppress synaptic and non-synaptic cellular activity in several in vitro epilepsy models, in all layers of the hippocampus. However, the effects of HFS on axons near the electrode are still unclear. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that HFS suppresses axonal conduction in vitro. Sinusoidal HFS was applied to the alvear axon field of transverse rat hippocampal slices. The results show that HFS suppresses the alvear compound action potential (CAP) as well as the CA1 antidromic evoked potential (AEP). Complete suppression was observed as a 100% reduction in the amplitude of the evoked field potential for the duration of the stimulus. Evoked potential width and latency were not significantly affected by sinusoidal HFS. Suppression was dependent on HFS amplitude and frequency, but independent of stimulus duration and synaptic transmission. The frequency dependence of sinusoidal HFS is similar to that observed in clinical DBS, with maximal suppression between 50 and 200 Hz. HFS produced not only suppression of axonal conduction but also a correlated rise in extracellular potassium. These data provide new insights into the effects of HFS on neuronal elements, and show that HFS can block axonal activity through non-synaptic mechanisms.

  6. Nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jet using a combination of 50 kHz/2 MHz dual-frequency power sources

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yong-Jie; Yuan, Qiang-Hua; Li, Fei; Wang, Xiao-Min; Yin, Gui-Qin; Dong, Chen-Zhong

    2013-11-15

    An atmospheric pressure plasma jet is generated by dual sinusoidal wave (50 kHz and 2 MHz). The dual-frequency plasma jet exhibits the advantages of both low frequency and radio frequency plasmas, namely, the long plasma plume and the high electron density. The radio frequency ignition voltage can be reduced significantly by using dual-frequency excitation compared to the conventional radio frequency without the aid of the low frequency excitation source. A larger operating range of α mode discharge can be obtained using dual-frequency excitation which is important to obtain homogeneous and low-temperature plasma. A larger controllable range of the gas temperature of atmospheric pressure plasma could also be obtained using dual-frequency excitation.

  7. Self-sustained oscillations of a sinusoidally-deformed plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muriel, Diego F.; Cowen, Edwin A.

    2015-11-01

    Motivated by energy harvesting, the oscillatory motion of a deformed elastic material with aspect ratio Length/Width=2, immerse in an incompressible flow is studied experimentally. To induce the wave-like deformation a polycarbonate sheet is placed under longitudinal compression with external forcing provided by equispaced tension lines anchored in a frame. No additional constrains are placed in the material. Based on quantitative image-based edge detection, ADV, and PIV measurements, we document the existence of three natural states of motion. Bellow a critical velocity, a stable state presents a sinusoidal-like deformation with weak small perturbations. Above a critical velocity, instability appears in the form of a traveling wave with predictable dominant frequency accompanied by higher-order harmonics. As the flow velocity increases the instability converges faster to its limit cycle in the phase plane (e.g., vertical velocity and position), until the stable oscillatory mode transitions to chaos showing a broad energy spectrum and unstable limit cycle. The underlying objective is to induce the onset of the instability at lower critical velocities for higher bending rigidities, promoting possible energy extraction and increasing the range at which stable oscillations appear.

  8. Computer Program for Thin Wire Antenna over a Perfectly Conducting Ground Plane. [using Galerkins method and sinusoidal bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    A computer program is presented for a thin-wire antenna over a perfect ground plane. The analysis is performed in the frequency domain, and the exterior medium is free space. The antenna may have finite conductivity and lumped loads. The output data includes the current distribution, impedance, radiation efficiency, and gain. The program uses sinusoidal bases and Galerkin's method.

  9. Using composite sinusoidal patterns in structured-illumination reflectance imaging (SIRI) for enhanced detection of defects in food

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study presented a first exploration of using composite sinusoidal patterns that integrated two and three spatial frequencies of interest, in structured-illumination reflectance imaging (SIRI) for enhanced detection of defects in food (e.g., bruises in apples). Three methods based on Fourier tra...

  10. High frequency stimulation of the STN restored the abnormal high-voltage spindles in the cortex and the globus pallidus of 6-OHDA lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chen; Zhang, Jia-Rui; Chen, Lei; Ge, Shun-Nan; Wang, Jue-Lei; Yan, Zhi-Qiang; Jia, Dong; Zhu, Jun-Ling; Gao, Guo-Dong

    2015-05-19

    Many studies showed that abnormal oscillations in the cortical-basal ganglia loop is involved in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD). In contrast to the well-studied beta synchronization, high-voltage spindles (HVSs), another type of abnormal oscillation observed in PD, are neglected. To explore the role of subthalamic nucleus-deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) in HVSs regulation, we simultaneously recorded the local field potential (LFP) in the globus pallidus (GP) and electrocorticogram (ECoG) in the primary motor cortex(M1) in freely moving 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned or control rats before, during, and after STN-DBS. Consistent with our previous study, HVSs occurrence, duration, and relative power and coherence between the M1 cortex and GP increased in 6-OHDA lesioned rats. We found that high but not low frequency stimulation restored the abnormal HVSs activity and motor deficit. These results suggest that the STN is involved in the abnormal oscillation between the M1 cortex and GP.

  11. Low-frequency noise reduction in vertical MOSFETs having tunable threshold voltage fabricated with 60 nm CMOS technology on 300 mm wafer process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamoto, Takuya; Ma, Yitao; Muraguchi, Masakazu; Endoh, Tetsuo

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, DC and low-frequency noise (LFN) characteristics have been investigated with actual measurement data in both n- and p-type vertical MOSFETs (V-MOSFETs) for the first time. The V-MOSFETs which was fabricated on 300 mm bulk silicon wafer process have realized excellent DC performance and a significant reduction of flicker (1/f) noise. The measurement results show that the fabricated V-MOSFETs with 60 nm silicon pillar and 100 nm gate length achieve excellent steep sub-threshold swing (69 mV/decade for n-type and 66 mV/decade for p-type), good on-current (281 µA/µm for n-type 149 µA/µm for p-type), low off-leakage current (28.1 pA/µm for n-type and 79.6 pA/µm for p-type), and excellent on-off ratio (1 × 107 for n-type and 2 × 106 for p-type). In addition, it is demonstrated that our fabricated V-MOSFETs can control the threshold voltage (Vth) by changing the channel doping condition, which is the useful and low-cost technique as it has been widely used in the conventional bulk planar MOSFET. This result indicates that V-MOSFETs can control Vth more finely and flexibly by the combined the use of the doping technique with other techniques such as work function engineering of metal-gate. Moreover, it is also shown that V-MOSFETs can suppress 1/f noise (L\\text{gate}WS\\text{Id}/I\\text{d}2 of 10-13-10-11 µm2/Hz for n-type and 10-12-10-10 µm2/Hz for p-type) to one or two order lower level than previously reported nanowire type MOSFET, FinFET, Tri-Gate, and planar MOSFETs. The results have also proved that both DC and 1/f noise performances are independent from the bias voltage which is applied to substrate or well layer. Therefore, it is verified that V-MOSFETs can eliminate the effects from substrate or well layer, which always adversely affects the circuit performances due to this serial connection.

  12. High-Voltage, Asymmetric-Waveform Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beegle, Luther W.; Duong, Tuan A.; Duong, Vu A.; Kanik, Isik

    2008-01-01

    The shapes of waveforms generated by commercially available analytical separation devices, such as some types of mass spectrometers and differential mobility spectrometers are, in general, inadequate and result in resolution degradation in output spectra. A waveform generator was designed that would be able to circumvent these shortcomings. It is capable of generating an asymmetric waveform, having a peak amplitude as large as 2 kV and frequency of several megahertz, which can be applied to a capacitive load. In the original intended application, the capacitive load would consist of the drift plates in a differential-mobility spectrometer. The main advantage to be gained by developing the proposed generator is that the shape of the waveform is made nearly optimum for various analytical devices requiring asymmetric-waveform such as differential-mobility spectrometers. In addition, this waveform generator could easily be adjusted to modify the waveform in accordance with changed operational requirements for differential-mobility spectrometers. The capacitive nature of the load is an important consideration in the design of the proposed waveform generator. For example, the design provision for shaping the output waveform is based partly on the principle that (1) the potential (V) on a capacitor is given by V=q/C, where C is the capacitance and q is the charge stored in the capacitor; and, hence (2) the rate of increase or decrease of the potential is similarly proportional to the charging or discharging current. The proposed waveform generator would comprise four functional blocks: a sine-wave generator, a buffer, a voltage shifter, and a high-voltage switch (see Figure 1). The sine-wave generator would include a pair of operational amplifiers in a feedback configuration, the parameters of which would be chosen to obtain a sinusoidal timing signal of the desired frequency. The buffer would introduce a slight delay (approximately equal to 20 ns) but would otherwise

  13. Signal Analysis Algorithms for Optimized Fitting of Nonresonant Laser Induced Thermal Acoustics Damped Sinusoids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balla, R. Jeffrey; Miller, Corey A.

    2008-01-01

    This study seeks a numerical algorithm which optimizes frequency precision for the damped sinusoids generated by the nonresonant LITA technique. It compares computed frequencies, frequency errors, and fit errors obtained using five primary signal analysis methods. Using variations on different algorithms within each primary method, results from 73 fits are presented. Best results are obtained using an AutoRegressive method. Compared to previous results using Prony s method, single shot waveform frequencies are reduced approx.0.4% and frequency errors are reduced by a factor of approx.20 at 303K to approx. 0.1%. We explore the advantages of high waveform sample rates and potential for measurements in low density gases.

  14. Optical transmission decay dynamics in dual-frequency nematic liquid crystal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konshina, E. A.; Fedorov, M. A.; Amosova, L. P.; Isaev, M. V.; Kostomarov, D. S.

    2008-05-01

    We have experimentally studied the S-effect dynamics in a dual-frequency nematic liquid crystal (NLC) cell. It is demonstrated that the optical transmission rise and decay times depend on the mode of control over the NLC director orientation in an applied electric field, including the rectangular (square-wave) dc voltage pulses and sinusoidal low-and high-frequency addressing schemes. It is established that the presence of a thin dielectric layer of amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) at the NLC boundary can decrease by an order of magnitude the transmission decay time under the action of a high-frequency voltage as compared to the case of natural elastic relaxation in a cell where only the rise time is controlled.

  15. Structural 3d Monitoring Using a New Sinusoidal Fitting Adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detchev, I.; Habib, A.; Lichti, D.; El-Badry, M.

    2016-06-01

    Digital photogrammetric systems combined with image processing techniques have been used for structural monitoring purposes for more than a decade. For applications requiring sub-millimetre level precision, the use of off-the-shelf DSLR cameras is a suitable choice, especially when the low cost of the involved sensors is a priority. The disadvantage in the use of entry level DSLRs is that there is a trade-off between frame rate and burst rate - a high frame rate is either not available or it cannot be sustained long enough. This problem must be overcome when monitoring a structural element undergoing a dynamic test, where a range of loads are cycled through multiple times a second. In order to estimate deflections during such a scenario, this paper proposes a new least-squares adjustment for sinusoidal fitting. The new technique is capable of processing multiple back-to-back bursts of data within the same adjustment, which synthetically increases the de-facto temporal resolution of the system. The paper describes a beam deformation test done in a structures laboratory. The experimental results were assessed in terms of both their precision and accuracy. The new method increased the effective sampling frequency three-fold, which improved the standard deviations of the estimated parameters with up to two orders of magnitude. A residual RMSE as low as 30 μm was attained, and likewise the RMSE of the computed amplitudes between the photogrammetric system and the control laser transducers was as small as 34 μm.

  16. Influence of the voltage waveform during nanocomposite layer deposition by aerosol-assisted atmospheric pressure Townsend discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Profili, J.; Levasseur, O.; Naudé, N.; Chaneac, C.; Stafford, L.; Gherardi, N.

    2016-08-01

    This work examines the growth dynamics of TiO2-SiO2 nanocomposite coatings in plane-to-plane Dielectric Barrier Discharges (DBDs) at atmospheric pressure operated in a Townsend regime using nebulized TiO2 colloidal suspension in hexamethyldisiloxane as the growth precursors. For low-frequency (LF) sinusoidal voltages applied to the DBD cell, with voltage amplitudes lower than the one required for discharge breakdown, Scanning Electron Microscopy of silicon substrates placed on the bottom DBD electrode reveals significant deposition of TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) close to the discharge entrance. On the other hand, at higher frequencies (HF), the number of TiO2 NPs deposited strongly decreases due to their "trapping" in the oscillating voltage and their transport along the gas flow lines. Based on these findings, a combined LF-HF voltage waveform is proposed and used to achieve significant and spatially uniform deposition of TiO2 NPs across the whole substrate surface. For higher voltage amplitudes, in the presence of hexamethyldisiloxane and nitrous oxide for plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of inorganic layers, it is found that TiO2 NPs become fully embedded into a silica-like matrix. Similar Raman spectra are obtained for as-prepared TiO2 NPs and for nanocomposite TiO2-SiO2 coating, suggesting that plasma exposure does not significantly alter the crystalline structure of the TiO2 NPs injected into the discharge.

  17. Direct calculation of 2D components of myocardial strain using sinusoidal MR tagging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman, Nael F.; Prince, Jerry L.

    1998-07-01

    A new technique to measure local planar strain in left ventricular myocardium using two-dimensional tagged MR images is presented. This new technique is computationally fast, is fully automated, and generates dense motion estimates. It is based on using a 1-1 SPAMM tag pattern which comprise several one-dimensional sinusoidal tag patterns at different frequencies. A local deformation of the myocardium produces a variation in the local frequencies of these patterns, which can be used to compute strain components in the image plane. Local frequency is measured by scanning certain spectral peaks to create complex images, for which the local frequency is the gradient of the angle associated with their complex data points. The method is demonstrated using both simulations and real tagged MR images, and a discussion of these results and of directions for future research is provided.

  18. Thresholds for the perception of whole-body linear sinusoidal motion in the horizontal plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mah, Robert W.; Young, Laurence R.; Steele, Charles R.; Schubert, Earl D.

    1989-01-01

    An improved linear sled has been developed to provide precise motion stimuli without generating perceptible extraneous motion cues (a noiseless environment). A modified adaptive forced-choice method was employed to determine perceptual thresholds to whole-body linear sinusoidal motion in 25 subjects. Thresholds for the detection of movement in the horizontal plane were found to be lower than those reported previously. At frequencies of 0.2 to 0.5 Hz, thresholds were shown to be independent of frequency, while at frequencies of 1.0 to 3.0 Hz, thresholds showed a decreasing sensitivity with increasing frequency, indicating that the perceptual process is not sensitive to the rate change of acceleration of the motion stimulus. The results suggest that the perception of motion behaves as an integrating accelerometer with a bandwidth of at least 3 Hz.

  19. SLM-based sinusoidal fringe projection under coherent illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berberova, Natalia; Stoykova, Elena; Kang, Hoonjong; Park, Joo Sup; Ivanov, Branimir

    2013-09-01

    The paper is dedicated to SLM implementation of a sinusoidal phase grating for fringe projection profilometry with sinusoidal fringes. A low-contrast sinusoidal phase grating is capable of projecting focused sinusoidal fringes with satisfactory visibility in a large spatial region under coherent divergent illumination. The paper presents analysis of distortions in the projected fringes due to phase quantization when the phase grating is generated by a phase-only 8-bit SLM. We showed by simulation of propagation in the free space that the spread of intensity fluctuations of the projected fringes comprises 4-5 gray levels if an SLM with a 2π phase span is used and is much lower for an SLM with π/2 phase span. In addition, we proved that distortion due to the phase encoding of the grating complex amplitude can be modeled as gamma distortion with an invariable behavior in time at small values of the modulation parameter and removed by a proper correction of fringes after polyspectral analysis. The experiments we made with an 8-bit SLM of π/2 phase span confirmed the ability of this optical element to project sinusoidal fringes with a high spectral purity.

  20. VOLTAGE REGULATOR

    DOEpatents

    Von Eschen, R.L.; Scheele, P.F.

    1962-04-24

    A transistorized voltage regulator which provides very close voitage regulation up to about 180 deg F is described. A diode in the positive line provides a constant voltage drop from the input to a regulating transistor emitter. An amplifier is coupled to the positive line through a resistor and is connected between a difference circuit and the regulating transistor base which is negative due to the difference in voltage drop across thc diode and the resistor so that a change in the regulator output causes the amplifier to increase or decrease the base voltage and current and incrcase or decrease the transistor impedance to return the regulator output to normal. (AEC)

  1. High frequency pressure oscillator for microcryocoolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanapalli, S.; ter Brake, H. J. M.; Jansen, H. V.; Zhao, Y.; Holland, H. J.; Burger, J. F.; Elwenspoek, M. C.

    2008-04-01

    Microminiature pulse tube cryocoolers should operate at a frequency of an order higher than the conventional macro ones because the pulse tube cryocooler operating frequency scales inversely with the square of the pulse tube diameter. In this paper, the design and experiments of a high frequency pressure oscillator is presented with the aim to power a micropulse tube cryocooler operating between 300 and 80K, delivering a cooling power of 10mW. Piezoelectric actuators operate efficiently at high frequencies and have high power density making them good candidates as drivers for high frequency pressure oscillator. The pressure oscillator described in this work consists of a membrane driven by a piezoelectric actuator. A pressure ratio of about 1.11 was achieved with a filling pressure of 2.5MPa and compression volume of about 22.6mm3 when operating the actuator with a peak-to-peak sinusoidal voltage of 100V at a frequency of 1kHz. The electrical power input was 2.73W. The high pressure ratio and low electrical input power at high frequencies would herald development of microminiature cryocoolers.

  2. High frequency pressure oscillator for microcryocoolers.

    PubMed

    Vanapalli, S; ter Brake, H J M; Jansen, H V; Zhao, Y; Holland, H J; Burger, J F; Elwenspoek, M C

    2008-04-01

    Microminiature pulse tube cryocoolers should operate at a frequency of an order higher than the conventional macro ones because the pulse tube cryocooler operating frequency scales inversely with the square of the pulse tube diameter. In this paper, the design and experiments of a high frequency pressure oscillator is presented with the aim to power a micropulse tube cryocooler operating between 300 and 80 K, delivering a cooling power of 10 mW. Piezoelectric actuators operate efficiently at high frequencies and have high power density making them good candidates as drivers for high frequency pressure oscillator. The pressure oscillator described in this work consists of a membrane driven by a piezoelectric actuator. A pressure ratio of about 1.11 was achieved with a filling pressure of 2.5 MPa and compression volume of about 22.6 mm(3) when operating the actuator with a peak-to-peak sinusoidal voltage of 100 V at a frequency of 1 kHz. The electrical power input was 2.73 W. The high pressure ratio and low electrical input power at high frequencies would herald development of microminiature cryocoolers.

  3. An analysis of receptor potential and tension of isolated cat muscle spindles in response to sinusoidal stretch.

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, C C; Wilkinson, R S

    1980-01-01

    In isolated cat muscle spindles the receptor potential responses of primary and secondary endings as well as tension responses to sinusoidal length changes in the steady state have been analysed. 1. At a given stimulus frequency, receptor potential per unit length change (receptor potential gain) in both primary and secondary endings is constant when displacement is less than about 10 micrometer. With larger stretches, receptor potential gain decreases approximately as a power function of displacement, the gain of primary endings decreasing more rapidly with increasing displacement than that of secondary endings. Tension per unit length change (tension gain) shows a similar constant range above which it also decreases as a power function of displacement. 2. In spite of the large reduction in gain at high displacement amplitudes, response wave forms remained essentially sinusoidal. The gain reduction results principally from a displacement-dependent non-linearity which has a rapid onset and slow decay. 3. Receptor potential and tension responses to small amplitude sinusoidal stretch depend, in a parallel manner, on the initial length of the preparation. 4. Both receptor potential and tension responses are highly dependent on frequency of sinusoidal stretch. In primary endings receptor potential gain increased as a power function of frequency over the range 0 . 01 to about 40 Hz, above which frequency the gain decreased; phase advance remained relatively constant up to 10 Hz then decreased to become a phase lag at higher frequency. In secondary endings receptor potential gain remained fairly constant between 0 . 01 and 1 Hz then rose as a power function of frequency but less steeply than in primary endings. 3. The possible mechanisms underlying these findings are discussed. PMID:6447781

  4. Time-dependent perturbation of a two-state quantum system by a sinusoidal field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dion, D. R.; Hirschfelder, J. O.

    1976-01-01

    Different methods for solving the 'two-level problem' are discussed, namely, the problem of what happens to a material system having only two nondegenerate energy levels when it is perturbed by an electromagnetic field that varies with time in a monochromatic sinusoidal fashion. The various methods discussed include: (1) the Sen Gupta technique using nondegenerate Rayleigh-Schroedinger perturbation theory, (2) the Salwen-Winter-Shirley partitioning perturbation technique, (3) the Shirley and series degenerate Rayleigh-Schroedinger expansion, (4) the degenerate Rayleigh-Schroedinger technique for considering high frequency fields, and (5) the singular perturbation expansion technique.

  5. Dynamics of ventilation, heart rate, and gas exchange: sinusoidal and impulse work loads in man.

    PubMed

    Bakker, H K; Struikenkamp, R S; De Vries, G A

    1980-02-01

    Dynamic characteristics of ventilation, heart rate, and gas exchange in response to sinusoidally varying work loads were analyzed in four male subjects, exercising in the upright position on a bicycle ergometer. Mean work-load and sinusoidal amplitude were about 1.5 and 0.9 W/kg, fat-free mass), respectively. Seven different frequencies were used, the periods ranging from 12 to 0.75 min. To further investigate the linearity of the variables under study, 10-s impulse loads were also applied to three of the four subjects. Harmonic analysis of the sine-wave data and comparison of the sine-wave fundamental responses with the impulse frequency responses showed that only O2 uptake behaves in a linear fashion. Ventilation and CO2 production showed quasi- to nonlinear behaviors, whereas the responses of heart rate and alveolar partial pressures were clearly dependent on the type of forcing used. By means of mathematical parameter identification techniques, it was found that the individual frequency responses of O2 uptake could be almost completely described by a four-parameter transfer function with parameter values showing second-order underdamped to critically damped dynamics.

  6. Effect of Substrate Bias Voltage on the Physical Properties of Zirconium Nitride (ZrN) Films Deposited by Mid Frequency Reactive Magnetron Sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavitha, A.; Kannan, R.; Loganathan, S.

    2014-05-01

    Present work involves the preparation of Zirconium Nitride thin films on stainless steel (SS) (304L grade) substrate by reactive cylindrical magnetron sputtering method. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) profile of the ZrN thin films prepared with different bias voltage conforms face centered cubic structure with preferred orientation along the (111) plane at lower bias voltage (100 V) and at higher bias voltage (300 V) the preferred orientation shifted to (220) plane. The influences of bias voltage on the thickness and microhardness ZrN thin films have been studied. ZrN thin film sputtered with 300 V bias voltage shows the maximum reflectance of 90% at a wavelength of 1000 nm. The coated substrates have been found to exhibit improved corrosion resistance compared to the SS plate. The root mean square surface roughness and surface morphology were investigated from 3D atomic force microscope (AFM) images and scanning electron microscope (SEM), which indicate smooth and uniform surface pattern without any pin holes.

  7. Electronically Tunable Differential Integrator: Linear Voltage Controlled Quadrature Oscillator.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Rabindranath; Pattanayak, Sandhya; Venkateswaran, Palaniandavar; Das, Sagarika

    2015-01-01

    A new electronically tunable differential integrator (ETDI) and its extension to voltage controlled quadrature oscillator (VCQO) design with linear tuning law are proposed; the active building block is a composite current feedback amplifier with recent multiplication mode current conveyor (MMCC) element. Recently utilization of two different kinds of active devices to form a composite building block is being considered since it yields a superior functional element suitable for improved quality circuit design. The integrator time constant (τ) and the oscillation frequency (ω o ) are tunable by the control voltage (V) of the MMCC block. Analysis indicates negligible phase error (θ e ) for the integrator and low active ω o -sensitivity relative to the device parasitic capacitances. Satisfactory experimental verifications on electronic tunability of some wave shaping applications by the integrator and a double-integrator feedback loop (DIFL) based sinusoid oscillator with linear f o variation range of 60 KHz~1.8 MHz at low THD of 2.1% are verified by both simulation and hardware tests. PMID:27347537

  8. Sinusoidal Regge Oscillations from Short Lived Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolovski, D.; Felfli, Z.; Msezane, A. Z.

    2007-06-01

    It is well known that a resonance with a large angular life can produce sharp Breit-Wigner peaks in the energy dependence of integral cross sections [1,2]. Here we show that a short-lived resonance whose angular life is of order of one full rotation may produce a different kind of contribution to the integral cross section. This contribution has a sinousoidal form and its frequency is determined by the rotational constant of the complex. As one of the examples, we analyze the Regge oscillations observed in numerical simulations of the F+H2(v=0,j=0,φ=0) ->FH(v'=2,j'=0,φ'=0) + H reaction. In particular, we show that these oscillations are produced by two overlapping resonances located near the transition state and the van der Waals well, respectively [3]. [1] J. H. Macek, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 93, 183202, (2004). [2] Z. Felfli et al., J. Phys. B 39, L353 (2006) [3] D. Sokolovski, D. De Fazio, S. Cavalli and V. Aquilanti, J. Chem. Phys. (2007) (submitted).

  9. Performance improvement of smooth impact drive mechanism at low voltage utilizing ultrasonic friction reduction.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tinghai; Lu, Xiaohui; Zhao, Hongwei; Chen, Dong; He, Pu; Wang, Liang; Zhao, Xilu

    2016-08-01

    The smooth impact drive mechanism (SIDM) actuator is traditionally excited by a saw-tooth wave, but it requires large input voltages for high-speed operation and load capacity. To improve the output characteristic of the SIDM operating at low input voltage, a novel driving method based on ultrasonic friction reduction technology is proposed in this paper. A micro-amplitude sinusoidal signal with high frequency is applied to the rapid deformation stage of the traditional saw-tooth wave. The proposed driving method can be realized by a composite waveform that includes a driving wave (D-wave) and a friction regulation wave (FR-wave). The driving principle enables lower input voltage to be used in normal operation, and the principle of the proposed driving method is analyzed. A prototype of the SIDM is fabricated, and its experimental system is established. The tested results indicate that the actuator has suitable velocity and load characteristics while operating at lower input voltage, and the load capacity of the actuator is 2.4 times that of an actuator excited by a traditional saw-tooth driving wave. PMID:27587153

  10. Performance improvement of smooth impact drive mechanism at low voltage utilizing ultrasonic friction reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Tinghai; Lu, Xiaohui; Zhao, Hongwei; Chen, Dong; He, Pu; Wang, Liang; Zhao, Xilu

    2016-08-01

    The smooth impact drive mechanism (SIDM) actuator is traditionally excited by a saw-tooth wave, but it requires large input voltages for high-speed operation and load capacity. To improve the output characteristic of the SIDM operating at low input voltage, a novel driving method based on ultrasonic friction reduction technology is proposed in this paper. A micro-amplitude sinusoidal signal with high frequency is applied to the rapid deformation stage of the traditional saw-tooth wave. The proposed driving method can be realized by a composite waveform that includes a driving wave (D-wave) and a friction regulation wave (FR-wave). The driving principle enables lower input voltage to be used in normal operation, and the principle of the proposed driving method is analyzed. A prototype of the SIDM is fabricated, and its experimental system is established. The tested results indicate that the actuator has suitable velocity and load characteristics while operating at lower input voltage, and the load capacity of the actuator is 2.4 times that of an actuator excited by a traditional saw-tooth driving wave.

  11. Sound waves in two-dimensional ducts with sinusoidal walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayfeh, A. H.

    1974-01-01

    The method of multiple scales is used to analyze the wave propagation in two-dimensional hard-walled ducts with sinusoidal walls. For traveling waves, resonance occurs whenever the wall wavenumber is equal to the difference of the wavenumbers of any two duct acoustic modes. The results show that neither of these resonating modes could occur without strongly generating the other.

  12. Using Antenna Arrays to Motivate the Study of Sinusoids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, J. P.

    2010-01-01

    Educational activities involving antenna arrays to motivate the study of sinusoids are described. Specifically, using fundamental concepts related to phase and simple geometric arguments, students are asked to predict the location of interference nulls in the radiation pattern of two-element phased array antennas. The location of the radiation…

  13. A robust sinusoidal signal processing method for interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiang-long; Zhang, Hui; Tseng, Yang-Yu; Fan, Kuang-Chao

    2013-10-01

    Laser interferometers are widely used as a reference for length measurement. Reliable bidirectional optical fringe counting is normally obtained by using two orthogonally sinusoidal signals derived from the two outputs of an interferometer with path difference. These signals are subject to be disturbed by the geometrical errors of the moving target that causes the separation and shift of two interfering light spots on the detector. It results in typical Heydemann errors, including DC drift, amplitude variation and out-of-orthogonality of two sinusoidal signals that will seriously reduce the accuracy of fringe counting. This paper presents a robust sinusoidal signal processing method to correct the distorted waveforms by hardware. A corresponding circuit board has been designed. A linear stage equipped with a laser displacement interferometer and a height gauge equipped with a linear grating interferometer are used as the test beds. Experimental results show that, even with a seriously disturbed input waveform, the output Lissajous circle can always be stabilized after signal correction. This robust method increases the stability and reliability of the sinusoidal signals for data acquisition device to deal with pulse count and phase subdivision.

  14. Evaluation of the otolith function using sinusoidal off-vertical axis rotation in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    PubMed

    Sugita-Kitajima, Akemi; Azuma, Miki; Hattori, Kosuke; Koizuka, Izumi

    2007-07-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) was studied via sinusoidal off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR) to evaluate the otolith function in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Subjects were sinusoidally rotated with eyes open in complete darkness at frequencies of 0.4 and 0.8 Hz with a maximum angular velocity of 60 degrees s(-1) in earth-vertical axis rotation (EVAR) and OVAR. Twenty-three controls and 24 BPPV patients were investigated. Results showed that VOR gain during OVAR at 0.8 Hz in a 30 degrees nose-up position in BPPV patients was significantly less than the gain during EVAR, whereas the gain was not significantly different between EVAR and OVAR in the controls in each condition. In addition, to examine each type of BPPV, we also investigated whether there were any differences between the patients who suffered from dizziness and those who did not. VOR gain in OVAR of BPPV patients who were suffering from dizziness was significantly less than that of BPPV patients without dizziness. Not only cupulolithiasis or canalolithiasis, but also otolith dysfunction was considered to be the possible origin of BPPV. Because sinusoidal OVAR produced minimal nausea compared to constant velocity OVAR, the stimulation of 0.8 Hz nose-up in sinusoidal OVAR may be used to evaluate otolith function without discomfort for patients. PMID:17597299

  15. A performance-enhanced energy harvester for low frequency vibration utilizing a corrugated cantilevered beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, In-Ho; Jin, SeungSeop; Jang, Seon-Jun; Jung, Hyung-Jo

    2014-03-01

    This note proposes a performance-enhanced piezoelectric energy harvester by replacing a conventional flat cantilevered beam with a corrugated beam. It consists of a proof mass and a sinusoidally or trapezoidally corrugated cantilevered beam covered by a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film. Compared to the conventional energy harvester of the same size, it has a more flexible bending stiffness and a larger bonding area of the PVDF layer, so higher output voltage from the device can be expected. In order to investigate the characteristics of the proposed energy harvester, analytical developments and numerical simulations on its natural frequency and tip displacement are carried out. Shaking table tests are also conducted to verify the performance of the proposed device. It is clearly shown from the tests that the proposed energy harvester not only has a lower natural frequency than an equivalent sized standard energy harvester, but also generates much higher output voltage than the standard one.

  16. Frequency of collisions between ion and neutral particles from the cloning characteristics of filamentary currents in an atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Bing; Zhang, Mengdie; Pan, Lizhu; Zhou, Qiujiao; Huang, Jianjun; Liu, Ying

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, a cold He atmospheric pressure plasma jet that is generated using a dielectric barrier discharge configuration device is presented. This device is equipped with double-grounded ring electrodes that are driven by a sinusoidal excitation voltage. The properties of the cloning of filamentous current are studied. The frequency of the collisions between the ion and the neutral particles is calculated by measuring the current phase difference between the filamentous current and its corresponding clone. The frequency of the collisions between the ion and the neutral particles is of the order of 108 Hz.

  17. Response of autaptic Hodgkin-Huxley neuron with noise to subthreshold sinusoidal signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hengtong; Chen, Yong

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we investigated the response of a stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) neuron with an autapse to subthreshold sinusoidal signals. It is found that the autapse not only adjusts the stochastic responses, but also improves the detection of subthreshold signals. In the case of weak noise, the autapse facilitates the response of neuron to the subthreshold sinusoidal signals with a small parameter region in tdelay- ω space. The increased noise intensity enlarges this parameter region and increases the corresponding response frequency in such range. As the autaptic intensity increases, however, this parameter region shrunks. We also observed that there is an optimal range of the delay time of autapse, within which the stochastic HH neuron fires action potentials with high frequency. The corresponding response spike train for the optimal delay time is nearly a regular sequence with the interspike intervals approximated to the delay time. The current results reveal a novel resonance phenomenon facilitated by autapse, named autaptic delay-induced coherence resonance.

  18. Frequency modulation television analysis: Threshold impulse analysis. [with computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, W. H.

    1973-01-01

    A computer program is developed to calculate the FM threshold impulse rates as a function of the carrier-to-noise ratio for a specified FM system. The system parameters and a vector of 1024 integers, representing the probability density of the modulating voltage, are required as input parameters. The computer program is utilized to calculate threshold impulse rates for twenty-four sets of measured probability data supplied by NASA and for sinusoidal and Gaussian modulating waveforms. As a result of the analysis several conclusions are drawn: (1) The use of preemphasis in an FM television system improves the threshold by reducing the impulse rate. (2) Sinusoidal modulation produces a total impulse rate which is a practical upper bound for the impulse rates of TV signals providing the same peak deviations. (3) As the moment of the FM spectrum about the center frequency of the predetection filter increases, the impulse rate tends to increase. (4) A spectrum having an expected frequency above (below) the center frequency of the predetection filter produces a higher negative (positive) than positive (negative) impulse rate.

  19. Optical characterization of a dual-frequency hybrid aligned nematic liquid crystal cell.

    PubMed

    Jewell, S; Sambles, J R

    2005-04-01

    The dielectric anisotropy of a highly dispersive dual-frequency nematic liquid crystal (MDA-00-3969 (Merck KGa)) has been determined using the optical fully-leaky guided-mode technique. A 4Vrms sinusoidal voltage was applied across a 5microm hybrid aligned nematic (HAN) cell at various frequencies in both the positive and negative dielectric anisotropy regime. Optical data was collected at each frequency enabling the director profile in each case to be determined using a multi-layer optics model in combination with a liquid crystal free-energy minimization routine. The thresholdless response of the HAN cell combined with the extreme sensitivity of the optical characterization technique has allowed subtle changes in dielectric permittivity with frequency to be observed. The resulting measured dispersion shows excellent agreement with a single Debye-type relaxation model.

  20. Optical characterization of a dual-frequency hybrid aligned nematic liquid crystal cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewell, S. A.; Sambles, J. R.

    2005-04-01

    The dielectric anisotropy of a highly dispersive dual-frequency nematic liquid crystal (MDA-00-3969 (Merck KGa)) has been determined using the optical fully-leaky guided-mode technique. A 4Vrms sinusoidal voltage was applied across a 5µm hybrid aligned nematic (HAN) cell at various frequencies in both the positive and negative dielectric anisotropy regime. Optical data was collected at each frequency enabling the director profile in each case to be determined using a multi-layer optics model in combination with a liquid crystal free-energy minimization routine. The thresholdless response of the HAN cell combined with the extreme sensitivity of the optical characterization technique has allowed subtle changes in dielectric permittivity with frequency to be observed. The resulting measured dispersion shows excellent agreement with a single Debye-type relaxation model.

  1. Optical characterization of a dual-frequency hybrid aligned nematic liquid crystal cell.

    PubMed

    Jewell, S; Sambles, J R

    2005-04-01

    The dielectric anisotropy of a highly dispersive dual-frequency nematic liquid crystal (MDA-00-3969 (Merck KGa)) has been determined using the optical fully-leaky guided-mode technique. A 4Vrms sinusoidal voltage was applied across a 5microm hybrid aligned nematic (HAN) cell at various frequencies in both the positive and negative dielectric anisotropy regime. Optical data was collected at each frequency enabling the director profile in each case to be determined using a multi-layer optics model in combination with a liquid crystal free-energy minimization routine. The thresholdless response of the HAN cell combined with the extreme sensitivity of the optical characterization technique has allowed subtle changes in dielectric permittivity with frequency to be observed. The resulting measured dispersion shows excellent agreement with a single Debye-type relaxation model. PMID:19495154

  2. Attitude control and sloshing suppression for liquid-filled spacecraft in the presence of sinusoidal disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Honghua; Wang, Zeguo

    2016-11-01

    The attitude regulation for a liquid-filled spacecraft in the presence of low frequency sinusoidal disturbance is considered in this paper. The liquid-filled spacecraft is modelled as a rigid body attached with a simple pendulum. A novel control scheme is proposed, which is composed of Active Disturbance Rejection Control (ADRC), Positive Position Feedback (PPF), Extended State Observer (ESO) and Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA). The unknown sloshing mode could be estimated from the combined ESO and SSA, and accordingly ADRC and PPF controller is designed for the stabilization of the spacecraft. Particularly, the parameters of the disturbance are not required as long as its frequency is lower than the sloshing one. The proposed approach could provide stabilization for the spacecraft, rejection for the disturbance, and active damping for the sloshing. Its effectiveness is validated by numerical simulations.

  3. Astronomical component estimation (ACE v.1) by time-variant sinusoidal modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinnesael, Matthias; Zivanovic, Miroslav; De Vleeschouwer, David; Claeys, Philippe; Schoukens, Johan

    2016-09-01

    Accurately deciphering periodic variations in paleoclimate proxy signals is essential for cyclostratigraphy. Classical spectral analysis often relies on methods based on (fast) Fourier transformation. This technique has no unique solution separating variations in amplitude and frequency. This characteristic can make it difficult to correctly interpret a proxy's power spectrum or to accurately evaluate simultaneous changes in amplitude and frequency in evolutionary analyses. This drawback is circumvented by using a polynomial approach to estimate instantaneous amplitude and frequency in orbital components. This approach was proven useful to characterize audio signals (music and speech), which are non-stationary in nature. Paleoclimate proxy signals and audio signals share similar dynamics; the only difference is the frequency relationship between the different components. A harmonic-frequency relationship exists in audio signals, whereas this relation is non-harmonic in paleoclimate signals. However, this difference is irrelevant for the problem of separating simultaneous changes in amplitude and frequency. Using an approach with overlapping analysis frames, the model (Astronomical Component Estimation, version 1: ACE v.1) captures time variations of an orbital component by modulating a stationary sinusoid centered at its mean frequency, with a single polynomial. Hence, the parameters that determine the model are the mean frequency of the orbital component and the polynomial coefficients. The first parameter depends on geologic interpretations, whereas the latter are estimated by means of linear least-squares. As output, the model provides the orbital component waveform, either in the depth or time domain. Uncertainty analyses of the model estimates are performed using Monte Carlo simulations. Furthermore, it allows for a unique decomposition of the signal into its instantaneous amplitude and frequency. Frequency modulation patterns reconstruct changes in

  4. Transient voltage oscillations in coils

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhuri, P.

    1985-01-01

    Magnet coils may be excited into internal voltage oscillations by transient voltages. Such oscillations may electrically stress the magnet's dielectric components to many times its normal stress. This may precipitate a dielectric failure, and the attendant prolonged loss of service and costly repair work. Therefore, it is important to know the natural frequencies of oscillations of a magnet during the design stage, and to determine whether the expected switching transient voltages can excite the magnet into high-voltage internal oscillations. The series capacitance of a winding significantly affects its natural frequencies. However, the series capacitance is difficult to calculate, because it may comprise complex capacitance network, consisting of intra- and inter-coil turn-to-turn capacitances of the coil sections. A method of calculating the series capacitance of a winding is proposed. This method is rigorous but simple to execute. The time-varying transient voltages along the winding are also calculated.

  5. Decoupling of excitation and receive coils in pulsed magnetic resonance using sinusoidal magnetic field modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseytlin, Mark; Epel, Boris; Sundramoorthy, Subramanian; Tipikin, Dmitriy; Halpern, Howard J.

    2016-11-01

    In pulsed magnetic resonance, the excitation power is many orders of magnitude larger than that induced by the spin system in the receiving coil or resonator. The receiver must be protected during and immediately after the excitation pulse to allow for the energy stored in the resonator to dissipate to a safe level. The time during which the signal is not detected, the instrumental dead-time, can be shortened by using magnetically decoupled excitation and receive coils. Such coils are oriented, with respect to each other, in a way that minimizes the total magnetic flux produced by one coil in the other. We suggest that magnetically decoupled coils can be isolated to a larger degree by tuning them to separate frequencies. Spins are excited at one frequency, and the echo signal is detected at another. Sinusoidal magnetic field modulation that rapidly changes the Larmor frequency of the spins between the excitation and detection events is used to ensure the resonance conditions for both coils. In this study, the relaxation times of trityl-CD3 were measured in a field-modulated pulsed EPR experiment and compared to results obtained using a standard spin echo method. The excitation and receive coils were tuned to 245 and 256.7 MHz, respectively. Using an available rapid-scan, cross-loop EPR resonator, we demonstrated an isolation improvement of approximately 20-30 dB due to frequency decoupling. Theoretical analysis, numerical simulations, and proof-of-concept experiments demonstrated that substantial excitation-detection decoupling can be achieved. A pulsed L-band system, including a small volume bi-modal resonator equipped with modulation coils, was constructed to demonstrate fivefold dead-time reduction in comparison with the standard EPR experiment. This was achieved by detuning of the excitation and receive coils by 26 MHz and using sinusoidal modulation at 480 kHz.

  6. Sinusoidal modulation control method in a chaotic neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qihanyue; Xie, Xiaoping; Zhu, Ping; Chen, Hongping; He, Guoguang

    2014-08-01

    Chaotic neural networks (CNNs) have chaotic dynamic associative memory properties: The memory states appear non-periodically, and cannot be converged to a stored pattern. Thus, it is necessary to control chaos in a CNN in order to recognize associative memory. In this paper, a novel control method, the sinusoidal modulation control method, has been proposed to control chaos in a CNN. In this method, a sinusoidal wave simplified from brain waves is used as a control signal to modulate a parameter of the CNN. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of this control method. The controlled CNN can be applied to information processing. Moreover, the method provides a way to associate brain waves by controlling CNNs.

  7. The physical basis of perceived roughness in virtual sinusoidal textures.

    PubMed

    Unger, Bertram; Klatzky, Roberta; Hollis, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Using a high-fidelity haptic interface based on magnetic levitation, subjects explored virtual sinusoidal textures with a frictionless probe and reported the subjective magnitude of perceived roughness. A psychophysical function was obtained spanning 33 levels of spatial periods from 0.025 to 6.00 mm. Kinematic and dynamic variables were recorded at 1,000 Hz and used to derive a set of variables to correlate with the psychophysical outcome. These included position, velocity, kinetic energy, instantaneous force (based on acceleration), mean force, and variability of the z-axis force signal from the power spectral density. The analysis implicates power of the force signal as the physical correlate of perceived roughness of sinusoidal textures. The relationship between power and roughness held across the range of spatial periods examined. PMID:24808401

  8. Investigation of Calibrating Force Transducer Using Sinusoidal Force

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Li; Wang Yu; Zhang Lizhe

    2010-05-28

    Sinusoidal force calibration method was studied several years before at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). A similar dynamic force calibration system is developed at Changcheng Institute of Metrology and Measurement (CIMM). It uses electro-dynamic shakers to generate dynamic force in the range from 1 N to 20 kN, and heterodyne laser interferometers are used for acceleration measurement. The force transducer to be calibrated is mounted on the shaker, and a mass block is screwed on the top of force transducer, the sinusoidal forces realized by accelerated load masses are traceable to acceleration and mass according to the force definition. The methods of determining Spatial-dependent acceleration on mass block and measuring the end mass of force transducer in dynamic force calibration are discussed in this paper.

  9. Normal seasonal variations for atmospheric radon concentration: a sinusoidal model.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Koseki; Yasuoka, Yumi; Nagahama, Hiroyuki; Muto, Jun; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Omori, Yasutaka; Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Homma, Yoshimi; Mukai, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    Anomalous radon readings in air have been reported before an earthquake activity. However, careful measurements of atmospheric radon concentrations during a normal period are required to identify anomalous variations in a precursor period. In this study, we obtained radon concentration data for 5 years (2003-2007) that can be considered a normal period and compared it with data from the precursory period of 2008 until March 2011, when the 2011 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake occurred. Then, we established a model for seasonal variation by fitting a sinusoidal model to the radon concentration data during the normal period, considering that the seasonal variation was affected by atmospheric turbulence. By determining the amplitude in the sinusoidal model, the normal variation of the radon concentration can be estimated. Thus, the results of this method can be applied to identify anomalous radon variations before an earthquake.

  10. Focal nodular hyperplasia with major sinusoidal dilatation: a misleading entity

    PubMed Central

    Laumonier, Hervé; Frulio, Nora; Laurent, Christophe; Balabaud, Charles; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Bioulac-Sage, Paulette

    2010-01-01

    Focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) is a benign liver lesion thought to be a non-specific response to locally increased blood flow. Although the diagnosis of FNH and hepatocellular adenoma (HCA) has made great progress over the last few years using modern imaging techniques, there are still in daily practice some difficulties concerning some atypical nodules. Here, the authors report the case of a 47-year-old woman with a single liver lesion thought to be, by imaging, an inflammatory HCA with major sinusoidal congestion. This nodule was revealed to be, at the microscopical level and after specific immunostaining and molecular analysis, an FNH with sinusoidal dilatation (so-called telangiectatic focal nodular hyperplasia). PMID:22798311

  11. Interferometric sensors based on sinusoidal optical path length modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knell, Holger; Schake, Markus; Schulz, Markus; Lehmann, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Sinusoidal optical path length modulation of the reference or the measurement arm of an interferometer is a technique which is a fast alternative to white light or phase shifting interferometry. In this paper three different sensors using this periodical modulation are presented. In addition, signal processing algorithms based on Discrete Fourier Transform, Hilbert Transform and parameter estimation are analyzed. These algorithms are used to obtain measurement results which demonstrate the capabilities of the presented interferometric sensors.

  12. Fibronectin Extra Domain A Promotes Liver Sinusoid Repair following Hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Sackey-Aboagye, Bridget; Olsen, Abby L.; Mukherjee, Sarmistha M.; Ventriglia, Alexander; Yokosaki, Yasuyuki; Greenbaum, Linda E.; Lee, Gi Yun; Naga, Hani

    2016-01-01

    Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) are the main endothelial cells in the liver and are important for maintaining liver homeostasis as well as responding to injury. LSECs express cellular fibronectin containing the alternatively spliced extra domain A (EIIIA-cFN) and increase expression of this isoform after liver injury, although its function is not well understood. Here, we examined the role of EIIIA-cFN in liver regeneration following partial hepatectomy. We carried out two-thirds partial hepatectomies in mice lacking EIIIA-cFN and in their wild type littermates, studied liver endothelial cell adhesion on decellularized, EIIIA-cFN-containing matrices and investigated the role of cellular fibronectins in liver endothelial cell tubulogenesis. We found that liver weight recovery following hepatectomy was significantly delayed and that sinusoidal repair was impaired in EIIIA-cFN null mice, especially females, as was the lipid accumulation typical of the post-hepatectomy liver. In vitro, we found that liver endothelial cells were more adhesive to cell-deposited matrices containing the EIIIA domain and that cellular fibronectin enhanced tubulogenesis and vascular cord formation. The integrin α9β1, which specifically binds EIIIA-cFN, promoted tubulogenesis and adhesion of liver endothelial cells to EIIIA-cFN. Our findings identify a role for EIIIA-cFN in liver regeneration and tubulogenesis. We suggest that sinusoidal repair is enhanced by increased LSEC adhesion, which is mediated by EIIIA-cFN. PMID:27741254

  13. Control and measurement of ion bombardment energies at substrates biased with tailored voltage waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Marlann Marinho

    Substrate bombardment by energetic ions is a central element of plasma etching used in fabrication of integrated circuits (IC), as well as plasma processes for thin film deposition and surface modification. A primary advantage of plasma etching is etch directionality resulting from positive ions bombarding the substrate at normal incidence. For plasma etching, high etch rates, etch anisotropy, high selectivity and low damage must be achieved simultaneously, and all are sensitive to ion bombardment energy. Reduction of device dimensions and the use of new materials associated with continuing advancement in IC performance further constrain etch processes. While average bombarding ion energy is typically controlled through application of RF sinusoidal voltage to the substrate electrode, this results in a broad distribution of ion energies (IED). Based on evidence that a narrow IED may improve etch selectivity for some processes, the focus of this study is control of the bombarding IED through manipulation of the shape of the voltage wave form applied to the substrate. Previous studies show dramatic improvements in etch selectivity in fluorocarbon-based plasmas using a specially tailored periodic bias voltage wave form developed by Wang, consisting of a short spike in combination with a longer period of constant voltage. In this study, the IED at the substrate is measured in an argon inductively coupled plasma (ICP) with a gridded energy analyzer, and it is shown that, as expected, the IED produced by Wang's tailored waveform exhibits a significantly narrower width than that produced by a sinusoidal waveform. Instrumentation for the gridded energy analyzer includes an innovation to minimize resolution loss associated with its location on an rf-biased electrode. In addition, a feedback algorithm for automating the process of setting an arbitrary voltage wave form at the electrode was developed, in which frequency components of the wave form are treated individually

  14. Measuring the 3D shape of high temperature objects using blue sinusoidal structured light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xianling; Liu, Jiansheng; Zhang, Huayu; Wu, Yingchun

    2015-12-01

    The visible light radiated by some high temperature objects (less than 1200 °C) almost lies in the red and infrared waves. It will interfere with structured light projected on a forging surface if phase measurement profilometry (PMP) is used to measure the shapes of objects. In order to obtain a clear deformed pattern image, a 3D measurement method based on blue sinusoidal structured light is proposed in this present work. Moreover, a method for filtering deformed pattern images is presented for correction of the unwrapping phase. Blue sinusoidal phase-shifting fringe pattern images are projected on the surface by a digital light processing (DLP) projector, and then the deformed patterns are captured by a 3-CCD camera. The deformed pattern images are separated into R, G and B color components by the software. The B color images filtered by a low-pass filter are used to calculate the fringe order. Consequently, the 3D shape of a high temperature object is obtained by the unwrapping phase and the calibration parameter matrixes of the DLP projector and 3-CCD camera. The experimental results show that the unwrapping phase is completely corrected with the filtering method by removing the high frequency noise from the first harmonic of the B color images. The measurement system can complete the measurement in a few seconds with a relative error of less than 1 : 1000.

  15. Estimating Transmissivity from the Water Level Fluctuations of a Sinusoidally Forced Well

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mehnert, E.; Valocchi, A.J.; Heidari, M.; Kapoor, S.G.; Kumar, P.

    1999-01-01

    The water levels in wells are known to fluctuate in response to earth tides and changes in atmospheric pressure. These water level fluctuations can be analyzed to estimate transmissivity (T). A new method to estimate transmissivity, which assumes that the atmospheric pressure varies in a sinusoidal fashion, is presented. Data analysis for this simplified method involves using a set of type curves and estimating the ratio of the amplitudes of the well response over the atmospheric pressure. Type curves for this new method were generated based on a model for ground water flow between the well and aquifer developed by Cooper et al. (1965). Data analysis with this method confirmed these published results: (1) the amplitude ratio is a function of transmissivity, the well radius, and the frequency of the sinusoidal oscillation; and (2) the amplitude ratio is a weak function of storativity. Compared to other methods, the developed method involves simpler, more intuitive data analysis and allows shorter data sets to be analyzed. The effect of noise on estimating the amplitude ratio was evaluated and found to be more significant at lower T. For aquifers with low T, noise was shown to mask the water level fluctuations induced by atmospheric pressure changes. In addition, reducing the length of the data series did not affect the estimate of T, but the variance of the estimate was higher for the shorter series of noisy data.

  16. Resonant fiber optic gyro based on a sinusoidal wave modulation and square wave demodulation technique.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linglan; Yan, Yuchao; Ma, Huilian; Jin, Zhonghe

    2016-04-20

    New developments are made in the resonant fiber optic gyro (RFOG), which is an optical sensor for the measurement of rotation rate. The digital signal processing system based on the phase modulation technique is capable of detecting the weak frequency difference induced by the Sagnac effect and suppressing the reciprocal noise in the circuit, which determines the detection sensitivity of the RFOG. A new technique based on the sinusoidal wave modulation and square wave demodulation is implemented, and the demodulation curve of the system is simulated and measured. Compared with the past technique using sinusoidal modulation and demodulation, it increases the slope of the demodulation curve by a factor of 1.56, improves the spectrum efficiency of the modulated signal, and reduces the occupancy of the field-programmable gate array resource. On the basis of this new phase modulation technique, the loop is successfully locked and achieves a short-term bias stability of 1.08°/h, which is improved by a factor of 1.47. PMID:27140098

  17. High-Speed Frequency Modulation of a 460-GHz Gyrotron for Enhancement of 700-MHz DNP-NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idehara, T.; Khutoryan, E. M.; Tatematsu, Y.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Kuleshov, A. N.; Dumbrajs, O.; Matsuki, Y.; Fujiwara, T.

    2015-09-01

    The high-speed frequency modulation of a 460-GHz Gyrotron FU CW GVI (the official name in Osaka University is Gyrotron FU CW GOI) was achieved by modulation of acceleration voltage of beam electrons. The modulation speed f m can be increased up to 10 kHz without decreasing the modulation amplitude δ f of frequency. The amplitude δ f was increased almost linearly with the modulation amplitude of acceleration voltage Δ V a. At the Δ V a = 1 kV, frequency spectrum width df was 50 MHz in the case of f m < 10 kHz. The frequency modulation was observed as both the variation of the IF frequency in the heterodyne detection system measured by a high-speed oscilloscope and the widths of frequency spectra df measured on a frequency spectrum analyzer. Both results well agree reasonably. When f m exceeds 10 kHz, the amplitude δ f is decreased gradually with increasing f m because of the degradation of the used amplifier in response for high-speed modulation. The experiment was performed successfully for both a sinusoidal wave and triangle wave modulations. We can use the high-speed frequency modulation for increasing the enhancement factor of the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, which is one of effective and attractive methods for the high-frequency DNP-NMR spectroscopy, for example, at 700 MHz. Because the sensitivity of NMR is inversely proportional to the frequency, high-speed frequency modulation can compensate the decreasing the enhancement factor in the high-frequency DNP-NMR spectroscopy and keep the factor at high value. In addition, the high-speed frequency modulation is useful for frequency stabilization by a PID control of an acceleration voltage by feeding back of the fluctuation of frequency. The frequency stabilization in long time is also useful for application of a DNP-NMR spectroscopy to the analysis of complicated protein molecules.

  18. Study of the generator/motor operation of induction machines in a high frequency link space power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipo, Thomas A.; Sood, Pradeep K.

    1987-01-01

    Static power conversion systems have traditionally utilized dc current or voltage source links for converting power from one ac or dc form to another since it readily achieves the temporary energy storage required to decouple the input from the output. Such links, however, result in bulky dc capacitors and/or inductors and lead to relatively high losses in the converters due to stresses on the semiconductor switches. The feasibility of utilizing a high frequency sinusoidal voltage link to accomplish the energy storage and decoupling function is examined. In particular, a type of resonant six pulse bridge interface converter is proposed which utilizes zero voltage switching principles to minimize switching losses and uses an easy to implement technique for pulse density modulation to control the amplitude, frequency, and the waveshape of the synthesized low frequency voltage or current. Adaptation of the proposed topology for power conversion to single-phase ac and dc voltage or current outputs is shown to be straight forward. The feasibility of the proposed power circuit and control technique for both active and passive loads are verified by means of simulation and experiment.

  19. The influence of anatomical and physiological parameters on the interference voltage at the input of unipolar cardiac pacemakers in low frequency electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joosten, S.; Pammler, K.; Silny, J.

    2009-02-01

    The problem of electromagnetic interference of electronic implants such as cardiac pacemakers has been well known for many years. An increasing number of field sources in everyday life and occupational environment leads unavoidably to an increased risk for patients with electronic implants. However, no obligatory national or international safety regulations exist for the protection of this patient group. The aim of this study is to find out the anatomical and physiological worst-case conditions for patients with an implanted pacemaker adjusted to unipolar sensing in external time-varying electric fields. The results of this study with 15 volunteers show that, in electric fields, variation of the interference voltage at the input of a cardiac pacemaker adds up to 200% only because of individual factors. These factors should be considered in human studies and in the setting of safety regulations.

  20. Measurement of n-type Dry Thermally Oxidized 6H-SiC Metal-oxide Semiconductor Diodes by Quasistatic and High-Frequency Capacitance Versus Voltage and Capacitance Transient Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, P.; Kang, S.; Petit, J.; Tabib-Azar, M.

    1994-01-01

    Dry-oxidized n-type 6H-SiC metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors are investigated using quasistatic capacitance versus voltage (C-V), high-frequency C-V, and pulsed high-frequency capacitance transient (C-t) analysis over the temperature range from 297 to 573 K. The quasistatic C - V characteristics presented are the first reported for 6H-SiC MOS capacitors, and exhibit startling nonidealities due to nonequilibrium conditions that arise from the fact that the recombination/generation process in 6H-SiC is extraordinarily slow even at the highest measurement temperature employed. The high-frequency dark C-V characteristics all showed deep depletion with no observable hysteresis. The recovery of the high-frequency capacitance from deep depletion to inversion was used to characterize the minority-carrier generation process as a function of temperature. Zerbst analysis conducted on the resulting C-t transients, which were longer than 1000 s at 573 K, showed a generation lifetime thermal activation energy of 0.49 eV.

  1. Seariser full scale test campaigns: Riser dynamic behavior under current and under sinusoidal top motions

    SciTech Connect

    Giuggioli, A.; Mirza, S.; Trave, F.

    1995-12-31

    Results of extensive tests at sea on a single instrumented riser are presented. The tests were conducted to examine the validity of existing calculation procedures of riser response to current loading and to investigate the occurrence of hydroelastic vibration due to vortex shedding. It was identified that the riser was vibrating laterally in the first natural mode due to vortex shedding. Lateral amplitude was 52% of the diameter. When top of riser executed sinusoidal motion, a lock-in condition occurred at the first and second natural frequency, with the lateral response about 0.50 of the diameter. The hydrodynamic coefficients calculated from these tests are also reported and show agreement with the published data.

  2. Emissive Probe Measurements in a Dual-Frequency-Confined Capacitively-Coupled-Plasma System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnane, Shane; Ellingboe, Albert R.

    2002-10-01

    Dual frequency confined capacitively coupled plasmas (DFC-CCP) are increasingly used in semiconductor manufacturing for dielectric etching, allowing greater (and independent) control of ion energies and ion flux on the etched substrate. The powered electrode is driven with the summation of 27MHz and 2MHz sinusoidal voltages, while the other electrode is grounded. The electrode areas are similar in size, giving an electrode aspect ratio less than 2. Because of this low aspect ratio, there are large oscillations in the plasma potential. The expectation is for sinusoidal oscillations at the higher driving frequency, due to capacitive sheaths, while a rectified oscillation is expected at the lower driving frequency.(E. Kawamura, V. Vahedi, M. A. Lieberman and C. K. Birdsall, Plasma Sources Sci. Technology. 8 (1999) R45-R64 Work Supported by EURATOM.) Measurements of rf oscillation in the plasma potential taken with a floating emissive probe will be presented. The emissive probe and circuitry allows direct realtime measurement of plasma potential oscillation at both driving frequencies and the harmonics of each, thus allowing measurement of the actual potential on the driven electrode and ion energy incident on grounded electrode.

  3. Voltage-dependent capacitance of human embryonic kidney cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Brenda; Do Shope, Cythnia; Brownell, William E.

    2006-04-01

    We determine membrane capacitance, C as a function of dc voltage for the human embryonic kidney (HEK) cell. C was calculated from the admittance, Y , obtained during a voltage ramp when the HEK cell was held in whole-cell patch-clamp configuration. Y was determined at frequencies of 390.625 and 781.25Hz from the measured current, i obtained with a dual-sinusoidal stimulus. We find that the fractional increase in the capacitance, C is small (<1%) and grows with the square of the voltage, Ψ . C can be described by: C=C(0)(1+α(Ψ+ψs)2) [where C(0) : Capacitance at 0volts , ψs : Difference in surface potential between cytoplasmic and extracellular leaflets and α : Proportionality constant]. We find that α and ψs are 0.120 (±0.01)V-2 and -0.073 (±0.017)V in solutions that contain ion channel blockers and 0.108 (±0.29)V-2 and -0.023 (±0.009)V when 10mM sodium salicylate was added to the extracellular solution. This suggests that salicylate does not affect the rate at which C grows with Ψ , but reduces the charge asymmetry of the membrane. We also observe an additional linear differential capacitance of about (-46fFV-1) in about 60% of the cells, this additional component acts simultaneously with the quadratic component and was not observed when salicylate was added to the solution. We suggest that the voltage dependent capacitance originates from electromechanical coupling either by electrostriction and/or Maxwell stress effects and estimate that a small electromechanical force (≈1pN) acts at physiological potentials. These results are relevant to understand the electromechanical coupling in outer hair cells (OHCs) of the mammalian cochlea, where an asymmetric bell-shaped C versus Ψ relationship is observed upon application of a similar field. Prestin, a membrane protein expressed in OHCs is required to observe this function. When we compare the total charge contributions from HEK cell membrane ( 7×104 electrons, 10pF cell) with that determined for

  4. Sinusoidal current and stress evolutions in lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiao-Guang; Bauer, Christoph; Wang, Chao-Yang

    2016-09-01

    Mechanical breakdown of graphite materials due to diffusion-induced stress (DIS) is a key aging mechanism of lithium-ion batteries. In this work, electrochemical-thermal coupled model along with a DIS model is developed to study the DIS distribution across the anode thickness. Special attention is paid to the evolution behavior of surface tangential stress (STS) in the discharge process for graphite at different locations of the anode. For the first time, we report that the evolution of STS, as well as local current, at all locations of the anode, evolve like sinusoidal waves in the discharge process with several crests and troughs. The staging behavior of graphite active material, in particular the sharp change of open-circuit potential (OCP) of graphite in the region between two plateaus, is found to be the root cause for the sinusoidal patterns of current and stress evolution. Furthermore, the effects of various parameters, such as starting state of charge, discharge C-rate and electrode thickness on the current and stress evolutions are investigated.

  5. Microenvironmental Regulation of the Sinusoidal Endothelial Cell Phenotype In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    March, Sandra; Hui, Elliot E.; Underhill, Gregory H.; Khetani, Salman; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.

    2010-01-01

    Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells (LSEC) differ, both structurally and functionally, from endothelial cells (EC) lining blood vessels of other tissues. For example, in contrast to other EC, LSEC posses fenestrations, have low detectable levels of PECAM-1 expression, and in rat tissue, they distinctively express a cell surface marker recognized by the SE-1 antibody. These unique phenotypic characteristics seen in hepatic tissue are lost over time upon culture in vitro; therefore, this study sought to systematically examine the effects of microenvironmental stimuli, namely, extracellular matrix (ECM) and neighboring cells, on the LSEC phenotype in vitro. In probing the role of the underlying extracellular matrix, we identified collagen I and collagen III as well as mixtures of collagen I/collagen IV/fibronectin as having a positive effect on LSEC survival. Furthermore, using a stable hepatocellular model (hepatocyte-fibroblast) we were able to prolong the expression of both SE-1 and phenotypic functions of LSEC such as Factor VIII activity in co-cultured LSECs through the production of short-range paracrine signals. In the course of these experiments, we identified the antigen recognized by SE-1 as CD32b. Collectively, this study has identified several microenvironmental regulators of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells that prolong their phenotypic functions for up to 2 weeks in culture, enabling the development of better in vitro models of liver physiology and disease. PMID:19585615

  6. Method and apparatus for spur-reduced digital sinusoid synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, George A. (Inventor); Flanagan, Michael J. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A technique for reducing the spurious signal content in digital sinusoid synthesis is presented. Spur reduction is accomplished through dithering both amplitude and phase values prior to word-length reduction. The analytical approach developed for analog quantization is used to produce new bounds on spur performance in these dithered systems. Amplitude dithering allows output word-length reduction without introducing additional spurs. Effects of periodic dither similar to that produced by a pseudo-noise (PN) generator are analyzed. This phase dithering method provides a spur reduction of 6(M + 1) dB per phase bit when the dither consists of M uniform variates. While the spur reduction is at the expense of an increase in system noise, the noise power can be made white, making the power spectral density small. This technique permits the use of a smaller number of phase bits addressing sinusoid look-up tables, resulting in an exponential decrease in system complexity. Amplitude dithering allows the use of less complicated multipliers and narrower data paths in purely digital applications, as well as the use of coarse-resolution, highly-linear digital-to-analog converters (DAC's) to obtain spur performance limited by the DAC linearity rather than its resolution.

  7. Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells Link Hyperinsulinemia to Hepatic Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Kyoichiro; Accili, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    Insulin signaling in vascular endothelial cells (ECs) is critical to maintain endothelial function but also to mediate insulin action on peripheral glucose disposal. However, gene knockout studies have reached disparate conclusions. Thus, insulin receptor inactivation in ECs does not impair insulin action, whereas inactivation of Irs2 does. Previously, we have shown that endothelial ablation of the three Foxo genes protects mice from atherosclerosis. Interestingly, here we show that mice lacking FoxO isoforms in ECs develop hepatic insulin resistance through excessive generation of nitric oxide (NO) that impairs insulin action in hepatocytes via tyrosine nitration of insulin receptors. Coculture experiments demonstrate that NO produced in liver sinusoidal ECs impairs insulin’s ability to suppress glucose production in hepatocytes. The effects of liver sinusoidal ECs can be mimicked by NO donors and can be reversed by NO inhibitors in vivo and ex vivo. The findings are consistent with a model in which excessive, rather than reduced, insulin signaling in ECs predisposes to systemic insulin resistance, prompting a reevaluation of current approaches to insulin sensitization. PMID:23349480

  8. Vestibular modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity by the utricle during sub-perceptual sinusoidal linear acceleration in humans.

    PubMed

    Hammam, Elie; Hau, Chui Luen Vera; Wong, Kwok-Shing; Kwok, Kenny; Macefield, Vaughan G

    2014-04-01

    We assessed the capacity for the vestibular utricle to modulate muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during sinusoidal linear acceleration at amplitudes extending from imperceptible to clearly perceptible. Subjects (n = 16) were seated in a sealed room, eliminating visual cues, mounted on a linear motor that could deliver peak sinusoidal accelerations of 30 mG in the antero-posterior direction. Subjects sat on a padded chair with their neck and head supported vertically, thereby minimizing somatosensory cues, facing the direction of motion in the anterior direction. Each block of sinusoidal motion was applied at a time unknown to subjects and in a random order of amplitudes (1.25, 2.5, 5, 10, 20 and 30 mG), at a constant frequency of 0.2 Hz. MSNA was recorded via tungsten microelectrodes inserted into muscle fascicles of the common peroneal nerve. Subjects used a linear potentiometer aligned to the axis of motion to indicate any perceived movement, which was compared with the accelerometer signal of actual room movement. On average, 67% correct detection of movement did not occur until 6.5 mG, with correct knowledge of the direction of movement at ~10 mG. Cross-correlation analysis revealed potent sinusoidal modulation of MSNA even at accelerations subjects could not perceive (1.25-5 mG). The modulation index showed a positive linear increase with acceleration amplitude, such that the modulation was significantly higher (25.3 ± 3.7%) at 30 mG than at 1.25 mG (15.5 ± 1.2%). We conclude that selective activation of the vestibular utricle causes a pronounced modulation of MSNA, even at levels well below perceptual threshold, and provides further evidence in support of the importance of vestibulosympathetic reflexes in human cardiovascular control. PMID:24504198

  9. Structure and function of sinusoidal lining cells in the liver.

    PubMed

    Wisse, E; Braet, F; Luo, D; De Zanger, R; Jans, D; Crabbé, E; Vermoesen, A

    1996-01-01

    The hepatic sinusoid harbors 4 different cells: endothelial cells (100, 101), Kupffer cells (96, 102, 103), fat-storing cells (34, 51, 93), and pit cells (14, 107, 108). Each cell type has its own specific morphology and functions, and no transitional stages exist between the cells. These cells have the potential to proliferate locally, either in normal or in special conditions, that is, experiments or disease. Sinusoidal cells from a functional unit together with the parenchymal cells. Isolation protocols exist for all sinusoidal cells. Endothelial cells filter the fluids, exchanged between the sinusoid and the space of Disse through fenestrae (100), which measure 175 nm in diameter and are grouped in sieve plates. Fenestrae occupy 6-8% of the surface (106). No intact basal lamina is present under these cells (100). Various factors change the number and diameter of fenestrae [pressure, alcohol, serotonin, and nicotin; for a review, see Fraser et al (32)]. These changes mainly affect the passage of lipoproteins, which contain cholesterol and vitamin A among other components. Fat-storing cells are pericytes, located in the space of Disse, with long, contractile processes, which probably influence liver (sinusoidal) blood flow. Fat-storing cells possess characteristic fat droplets, which contain a large part of the body's depot of vitamin A (91, 93). These cells play a major role in the synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) (34, 39-41). Strongly reduced levels of vitamin A occur in alcoholic livers developing fibrosis (56). Vitamin A deficiency transforms fat-storing cells into myofibroblast-like cells with enhanced ECM production (38). Kupffer cells accumulate in periportal areas. They specifically endocytose endotoxin (70), which activates these macrophages. Lipopolysaccharide, together with interferon gamma, belongs to the most potent activators of Kupffer cells (28). As a result of activation, these cells secrete oxygen radicals, tumor necrosis factor

  10. Neuronal Oscillations with Non-sinusoidal Morphology Produce Spurious Phase-to-Amplitude Coupling and Directionality

    PubMed Central

    Lozano-Soldevilla, Diego; ter Huurne, Niels; Oostenveld, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal oscillations support cognitive processing. Modern views suggest that neuronal oscillations do not only reflect coordinated activity in spatially distributed networks, but also that there is interaction between the oscillations at different frequencies. For example, invasive recordings in animals and humans have found that the amplitude of fast oscillations (>40 Hz) occur non-uniformly within the phase of slower oscillations, forming the so-called cross-frequency coupling (CFC). However, the CFC patterns might be influenced by features in the signal that do not relate to underlying physiological interactions. For example, CFC estimates may be sensitive to spectral correlations due to non-sinusoidal properties of the alpha band wave morphology. To investigate this issue, we performed CFC analysis using experimental and synthetic data. The former consisted in a double-blind magnetoencephalography pharmacological study in which participants received either placebo, 0.5 or 1.5 mg of lorazepam (LZP; GABAergic enhancer) in different experimental sessions. By recording oscillatory brain activity with during rest and working memory (WM), we were able to demonstrate that posterior alpha (8–12 Hz) phase was coupled to beta-low gamma band (20–45 Hz) amplitude envelope during all sessions. Importantly, bicoherence values around the harmonics of the alpha frequency were similar both in magnitude and topographic distribution to the cross-frequency coherence (CFCoh) values observed in the alpha-phase to beta-low gamma coupling. In addition, despite the large CFCoh we found no significant cross-frequency directionality (CFD). Critically, simulations demonstrated that a sizable part of our empirical CFCoh between alpha and beta-low gamma coupling and the lack of CFD could be explained by two-three harmonics aligned in zero phase-lag produced by the physiologically characteristic alpha asymmetry in the amplitude of the peaks relative to the troughs. Furthermore, we

  11. Neuronal Oscillations with Non-sinusoidal Morphology Produce Spurious Phase-to-Amplitude Coupling and Directionality.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Soldevilla, Diego; Ter Huurne, Niels; Oostenveld, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal oscillations support cognitive processing. Modern views suggest that neuronal oscillations do not only reflect coordinated activity in spatially distributed networks, but also that there is interaction between the oscillations at different frequencies. For example, invasive recordings in animals and humans have found that the amplitude of fast oscillations (>40 Hz) occur non-uniformly within the phase of slower oscillations, forming the so-called cross-frequency coupling (CFC). However, the CFC patterns might be influenced by features in the signal that do not relate to underlying physiological interactions. For example, CFC estimates may be sensitive to spectral correlations due to non-sinusoidal properties of the alpha band wave morphology. To investigate this issue, we performed CFC analysis using experimental and synthetic data. The former consisted in a double-blind magnetoencephalography pharmacological study in which participants received either placebo, 0.5 or 1.5 mg of lorazepam (LZP; GABAergic enhancer) in different experimental sessions. By recording oscillatory brain activity with during rest and working memory (WM), we were able to demonstrate that posterior alpha (8-12 Hz) phase was coupled to beta-low gamma band (20-45 Hz) amplitude envelope during all sessions. Importantly, bicoherence values around the harmonics of the alpha frequency were similar both in magnitude and topographic distribution to the cross-frequency coherence (CFCoh) values observed in the alpha-phase to beta-low gamma coupling. In addition, despite the large CFCoh we found no significant cross-frequency directionality (CFD). Critically, simulations demonstrated that a sizable part of our empirical CFCoh between alpha and beta-low gamma coupling and the lack of CFD could be explained by two-three harmonics aligned in zero phase-lag produced by the physiologically characteristic alpha asymmetry in the amplitude of the peaks relative to the troughs. Furthermore, we showed

  12. Neuronal Oscillations with Non-sinusoidal Morphology Produce Spurious Phase-to-Amplitude Coupling and Directionality

    PubMed Central

    Lozano-Soldevilla, Diego; ter Huurne, Niels; Oostenveld, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal oscillations support cognitive processing. Modern views suggest that neuronal oscillations do not only reflect coordinated activity in spatially distributed networks, but also that there is interaction between the oscillations at different frequencies. For example, invasive recordings in animals and humans have found that the amplitude of fast oscillations (>40 Hz) occur non-uniformly within the phase of slower oscillations, forming the so-called cross-frequency coupling (CFC). However, the CFC patterns might be influenced by features in the signal that do not relate to underlying physiological interactions. For example, CFC estimates may be sensitive to spectral correlations due to non-sinusoidal properties of the alpha band wave morphology. To investigate this issue, we performed CFC analysis using experimental and synthetic data. The former consisted in a double-blind magnetoencephalography pharmacological study in which participants received either placebo, 0.5 or 1.5 mg of lorazepam (LZP; GABAergic enhancer) in different experimental sessions. By recording oscillatory brain activity with during rest and working memory (WM), we were able to demonstrate that posterior alpha (8–12 Hz) phase was coupled to beta-low gamma band (20–45 Hz) amplitude envelope during all sessions. Importantly, bicoherence values around the harmonics of the alpha frequency were similar both in magnitude and topographic distribution to the cross-frequency coherence (CFCoh) values observed in the alpha-phase to beta-low gamma coupling. In addition, despite the large CFCoh we found no significant cross-frequency directionality (CFD). Critically, simulations demonstrated that a sizable part of our empirical CFCoh between alpha and beta-low gamma coupling and the lack of CFD could be explained by two-three harmonics aligned in zero phase-lag produced by the physiologically characteristic alpha asymmetry in the amplitude of the peaks relative to the troughs. Furthermore, we

  13. Comparison of high frequency, high temperature core loss and B-H loop characteristics of an 80 Ni-Fe crystalline alloy and two iron-based amorphous alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieserman, William R.; Schwarze, Gene E.; Niedra, Janis M.

    1991-01-01

    Limited experimental data exists for the specific core loss and dynamic B-H loops for soft magnetic materials for the combined conditions of high frequency and high temperature. This experimental study investigates the specific core loss and dynamic B-H characteristics of a nickel-iron crystalline magnetic alloy (Supermalloy) and two iron-based amorphous magnetic materials (Metglas 2605S-3A and Metglas 2605SC) over the frequency range of 1-50 kHz and temperature range of 23-300 C under sinusoidal voltage excitation. The effects of maximum magnetic flux density, frequency, and temperature on the specific core loss and on the size and shape of the B-H loops are examined. The Supermalloy and Metglass 2605S-3A and 2605SC data are used to compare the core loss of transformers with identical kVA and voltage ratings.

  14. Vestibular and pulse-related modulation of skin sympathetic nerve activity during sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation in human subjects.

    PubMed

    James, Cheree; Stathis, Alexandra; Macefield, Vaughan G

    2010-04-01

    We have previously shown that sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation (sGVS), a means of a selectively modulating vestibular afferent input without affecting other inputs, can cause partial entrainment of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA). Given that motion sickness causes sweating and pallor, we tested the hypothesis that sGVS also entrains skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA), but that the optimal frequencies are closer to those associated with slow postural changes (0.2 Hz). SSNA was recorded via tungsten microelectrodes inserted into the common peroneal nerve in 11 awake-seated subjects. Bipolar binaural sinusoidal GVS (+/-2 mA, 200 cycles) was applied to the mastoid processes at frequencies of 0.2, 0.5, 0.8, 1.1, 1.4, 1.7 and 2.0 Hz. All subjects reported strong postural illusions of 'rocking in a boat' or 'swaying in a hammock'. Sinusoidal GVS caused a marked entrainment of SSNA at all frequencies. Measured as the modulation index, vestibular modulation ranged from 81.5 +/- 4.0% at 0.2 Hz to 76.6 +/- 3.6% at 1.7 Hz; it was significantly weaker at 2.0 Hz (63.2 +/- 5.4%). Interestingly, pulse-related modulation of SSNA, which is normally weak, increased significantly during sGVS but was stronger at 0.8 Hz (86.2 +/- 2.0%) than at 0.2 Hz (69.3 +/- 8.3%), the opposite of the pattern seen with vestibular modulation of MSNA. We conclude that vestibular inputs can entrain the firing of cutaneous sympathetic neurones and increase their normally weak pulse-related rhythmicity.

  15. The Frequency-Dependent Neuronal Length Constant in Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ilmoniemi, Risto J.; Mäki, Hanna; Saari, Jukka; Salvador, Ricardo; Miranda, Pedro C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The behavior of the dendritic or axonal membrane voltage due to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is often modeled with the one-dimensional cable equation. For the cable equation, a length constant λ0 is defined; λ0 describes the axial decay of the membrane voltage in the case of constant applied electric field. In TMS, however, the induced electric field waveform is typically a segment of a sinusoidal wave, with characteristic frequencies of the order of several kHz. Objective: To show that the high frequency content of the stimulation pulse causes deviations in the spatial profile of the membrane voltage as compared to the steady state. Methods: We derive the cable equation in complex form utilizing the complex frequency-dependent representation of the membrane conductivity. In addition, we define an effective length constant λeff, which governs the spatial decay of the membrane voltage. We model the behavior of a dendrite in an applied electric field oscillating at 3.9 kHz with the complex cable equation and by solving the traditional cable equation numerically. Results: The effective length constant decreases as a function of frequency. For a model dendrite or axon, for which λ0 = 1.5 mm, the effective length constant at 3.9 kHz is decreased by a factor 10 to 0.13 mm. Conclusion: The frequency dependency of the neuronal length constant has to be taken into account when predicting the spatial behavior of the membrane voltage as a response to TMS. PMID:27555808

  16. The Millimeter Wave Radiation of a Traveling Wave Sinusoidal Wire Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, A. O.; Dibekci, D.; Gavrilov, S.; Vertiy, A. Alexei

    2008-05-01

    In this paper, investigation of radiation properties of the traveling-wave sinusoidal wire antennas is extended to the millimeter-wave frequencies (Ka-band) for the antennas whose geometrical dimensions vary in a wide range. Far-field patterns and S-parameters of composed three antenna sets were measured. A mathematical model was constructed for the structure and a MATLAB code based on this theoretical approach was written to calculate patterns, phase and attenuation constants of all investigated antennas. Frequency characteristics and the relation of antenna dimensions with wave parameters were investigated. Measured and calculated patterns were also compared with the constructed far-field patterns obtained by MoM (method of moments) and the MoM current distributions were used to explain the loss mechanisms of antennas. A directive, undistorted and smooth radiation can be achieved only choosing small undulated antennas whose peak-to-peak amplitude to period ratio κ is smaller than 0.4 (κ < 0.4). It is shown that wavelength of broadside radiation is not equal to antenna period for all antennas, except for very small undulated antennas (κ < 0.2). This antenna type can be used as a frequency-scan antenna for millimeter wave radars.

  17. Contrast constancy revisited: the perceived contrast of sinusoidal gratings above threshold.

    PubMed

    Smith, Wayne S

    2015-01-01

    The contrast sensitivity function of the human visual system, measured with sinusoidal luminance gratings, has an inverted U shape with a peak around 2-4 c/deg. Above threshold, it is thought that luminance gratings of equal physical contrasts but of distinguishably different spatial frequencies are all perceived as having similar contrasts, a phenomenon that has been termed contrast constancy. However, when suprathreshold contrast matches were measured for pairs of luminance gratings whose spatial frequencies were indistinguishable, the matching curves were not flat and followed a similar inverted U shape form as the contrast sensitivity function at threshold. It was therefore suggested that contrast constancy may only be revealed when matching the contrasts of clearly distinguishable spatial frequencies. Here, observers matched the perceived contrasts of suprathreshold luminance gratings of similar but visibly different spatial frequencies between 0.25 and 16 c/deg. The results show that, much like the contrast sensitivity function at threshold, observers are more sensitive to intermediate spatial frequencies (1-6 c/deg) than they are to either higher or to lower spatial frequencies. This tuning is evident when matching reference contrasts of 30-80%, implying a significant role in everyday vision. To demonstrate that these results were not due to local adaptation, the experiment was repeated with shorter stimulus duration, producing the same results. The extent of departure from contrast constancy found in the present study is compared to previously reported suprathreshold measurements. The results are also discussed with consideration to limitations with display apparatus such as monitor blur.

  18. A feedback control system for real-time formant estimation. I--Static and dynamic analysis for sinusoidal input signals.

    PubMed

    Zierhofer, C M; Hochmair, E S

    1993-09-01

    This paper presents a novel analog scheme suitable for the real-time estimation of formant frequencies. Formant tracking is based on a feedback technique which uses both the amplitude and phase characteristics of two stagger-tuned bandpass filters to give an improved dynamic behavior. The implementation of the system requires a small number of components, and is practical for low-power applications. An analysis of the static and dynamic behavior is given for sinusoidal input signals. The transient response is independent of the amplitude level of the input signal. The system is designed for second formant detection in a cochlear prosthesis system.

  19. High-voltage portable pulsed power supply fed by low voltage source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezanejad, Mohammad; Sheikholeslami, Abdolreza; Adabi, Jafar; Valinejad, Mohammadreza

    2016-05-01

    This article proposes a new structure of voltage multiplier for portable pulsed power applications. In this configuration, which is based on capacitor-diode voltage multiplier, the capacitors are charged by low AC input voltage and discharge through the load in series during pulse generation mode. The proposed topology is achieved by integrating of solid-state switches with conventional voltage multiplier, which can increase the low input voltage step by step and generate high-voltage high-frequency pulsed power across the load. After some discussion, simulations and experimental results are provided to verify the effectiveness of the proposed topology.

  20. Absolute phase recovery in structured light illumination systems: Sinusoidal vs. intensity discrete patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porras-Aguilar, Rosario; Falaggis, Konstantinos

    2016-09-01

    Structured light illumination is a well-established technology for noncontact 3D surface measurements. A common challenge in those systems is to obtain the absolute surface information using few measurement frames. This work discusses techniques based on the projection of multiple sinusoidal fringe patterns with different fringe period, as well as the projection of intensity discrete Gray Code and grey-level coded patterns. The use of sinusoidal multi-frequency techniques has been since years an on-going area of research, where various algorithms have been developed based on beats, look-up tables, or number-theoretical approaches. This work shows that a related technique, the so-called algebraic reconstruction technique that is borrowed from the area of multi-wavelength interferometry can be used for this purpose. This approach provides a robust analytical solution to the phase-unwrapping problem. However, this work argues that despite these advances, the acquisition of additional phase maps obtained with different fringe periods requires too many measurement frames, and hence is inefficient. Motivated by that, this work proposes a new grey level coding scheme that uses only few measurement frames, overcomes typical defocus errors, and has an error detecting feature. The latter feature makes the need of separate error detecting algorithms obsolete. This so-called closed-loop space filling curve can be implemented with an arbitrary number of N grey-levels enabling to code up to (2N) code-words. The performance of this so-called closed-loop space filling curve is demonstrated using experimental data.

  1. Sinusoidal Obstruction Syndrome (Hepatic Veno-Occlusive Disease)

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Cathy Q.; Crawford, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS) is an obliterative venulitis of the terminal hepatic venules, which in its more severe forms imparts a high risk of mortality. SOS, also known as veno-occlusive disease (VOD), occurs as a result of cytoreductive therapy prior to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), following oxaliplatin-containing adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemotherapy for colorectal carcinoma metastatic to the liver and treated by partial hepatectomy, in patients taking pyrrolizidine alkaloid-containing herbal remedies, and in other particular settings such as the autosomal recessive condition of veno-occlusive disease with immunodeficiency (VODI). A central pathogenic event is toxic destruction of hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells (SEC), with sloughing and downstream occlusion of terminal hepatic venules. Contributing factors are SEC glutathione depletion, nitric oxide depletion, increased intrahepatic expression of matrix metalloproteinases and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and activation of clotting factors. The clinical presentation of SOS includes jaundice, development of right upper-quadrant pain and tender hepatomegaly, ascites, and unexplained weight gain. Owing to the potentially critical condition of these patients, transjugular biopsy may be the preferred route for liver biopsy to exclude other potential causes of liver dysfunction and to establish a diagnosis of SOS. Treatment includes rigorous fluid management so as to avoid excessive fluid overload while avoiding too rapid diuresis or pericentesis, potential use of pharmaceutics such as defibrotide, coagulolytic agents, or methylprednisolone, and liver transplantation. Proposed strategies for prevention and prophylaxis include reduced-intensity conditioning radiation for HSCT, treatment with ursodeoxycholic acid, and inclusion of bevacizumab with oxaliplatin-based chemotherapeutic regimes. While significant progress has been made in understanding the pathogenesis

  2. Representative Sinusoids for Hepatic Four-Scale Pharmacokinetics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Schwen, Lars Ole; Schenk, Arne; Kreutz, Clemens; Timmer, Jens; Bartolomé Rodríguez, María Matilde; Kuepfer, Lars; Preusser, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian liver plays a key role for metabolism and detoxification of xenobiotics in the body. The corresponding biochemical processes are typically subject to spatial variations at different length scales. Zonal enzyme expression along sinusoids leads to zonated metabolization already in the healthy state. Pathological states of the liver may involve liver cells affected in a zonated manner or heterogeneously across the whole organ. This spatial heterogeneity, however, cannot be described by most computational models which usually consider the liver as a homogeneous, well-stirred organ. The goal of this article is to present a methodology to extend whole-body pharmacokinetics models by a detailed liver model, combining different modeling approaches from the literature. This approach results in an integrated four-scale model, from single cells via sinusoids and the organ to the whole organism, capable of mechanistically representing metabolization inhomogeneity in livers at different spatial scales. Moreover, the model shows circulatory mixing effects due to a delayed recirculation through the surrounding organism. To show that this approach is generally applicable for different physiological processes, we show three applications as proofs of concept, covering a range of species, compounds, and diseased states: clearance of midazolam in steatotic human livers, clearance of caffeine in mouse livers regenerating from necrosis, and a parameter study on the impact of different cell entities on insulin uptake in mouse livers. The examples illustrate how variations only discernible at the local scale influence substance distribution in the plasma at the whole-body level. In particular, our results show that simultaneously considering variations at all relevant spatial scales may be necessary to understand their impact on observations at the organism scale. PMID:26222615

  3. Representative Sinusoids for Hepatic Four-Scale Pharmacokinetics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Schwen, Lars Ole; Schenk, Arne; Kreutz, Clemens; Timmer, Jens; Bartolomé Rodríguez, María Matilde; Kuepfer, Lars; Preusser, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian liver plays a key role for metabolism and detoxification of xenobiotics in the body. The corresponding biochemical processes are typically subject to spatial variations at different length scales. Zonal enzyme expression along sinusoids leads to zonated metabolization already in the healthy state. Pathological states of the liver may involve liver cells affected in a zonated manner or heterogeneously across the whole organ. This spatial heterogeneity, however, cannot be described by most computational models which usually consider the liver as a homogeneous, well-stirred organ. The goal of this article is to present a methodology to extend whole-body pharmacokinetics models by a detailed liver model, combining different modeling approaches from the literature. This approach results in an integrated four-scale model, from single cells via sinusoids and the organ to the whole organism, capable of mechanistically representing metabolization inhomogeneity in livers at different spatial scales. Moreover, the model shows circulatory mixing effects due to a delayed recirculation through the surrounding organism. To show that this approach is generally applicable for different physiological processes, we show three applications as proofs of concept, covering a range of species, compounds, and diseased states: clearance of midazolam in steatotic human livers, clearance of caffeine in mouse livers regenerating from necrosis, and a parameter study on the impact of different cell entities on insulin uptake in mouse livers. The examples illustrate how variations only discernible at the local scale influence substance distribution in the plasma at the whole-body level. In particular, our results show that simultaneously considering variations at all relevant spatial scales may be necessary to understand their impact on observations at the organism scale. PMID:26222615

  4. Resonant circuit which provides dual-frequency excitation for rapid cycling of an electromagnet

    DOEpatents

    Praeg, W.F.

    1982-03-09

    Disclosed is a novel ring-magnet control circuit that permits synchrotron repetition rates much higher than the frequency of the sinusoidal guide field of the ring magnet during particle acceleration. The control circuit generates sinusoidal excitation currents of different frequencies in the half waves. During radio-frequency acceleration of the synchrotron, the control circuit operates with a lower frequency sine wave and, thereafter, the electromagnets are reset with a higher-frequency half sine wave.

  5. Response of the seated human body to whole-body vertical vibration: discomfort caused by sinusoidal vibration.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhen; Griffin, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Frequency weightings for predicting vibration discomfort assume the same frequency-dependence at all magnitudes of vibration, whereas biodynamic studies show that the frequency-dependence of the human body depends on the magnitude of vibration. This study investigated how the frequency-dependence of vibration discomfort depends on the acceleration and the force at the subject-seat interface. Using magnitude estimation, 20 males and 20 females judged their discomfort caused by sinusoidal vertical acceleration at 13 frequencies (1-16 Hz) at magnitudes from 0.1 to 4.0 ms(-2) r.m.s. The frequency-dependence of their equivalent comfort contours depended on the magnitude of vibration, but was less dependent on the magnitude of dynamic force than the magnitude of acceleration, consistent with the biodynamic non-linearity of the body causing some of the magnitude-dependence of equivalent comfort contours. There were significant associations between the biodynamic responses and subjective responses at all frequencies in the range 1-16 Hz. Practitioner Summary: Vertical seat vibration causes discomfort in many forms of transport. This study provides the frequency-dependence of vibration discomfort over a range of vibration magnitudes and shows how the frequency weightings in the current standards can be improved.

  6. Multiple frequency fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    PubMed

    Squire, A; Verveer, P J; Bastiaens, P I

    2000-02-01

    The experimental configuration and the computational algorithms for performing multiple frequency fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (mfFLIM) are described. The mfFLIM experimental set-up enables the simultaneous homodyne detection of fluorescence emission modulated at a set of harmonic frequencies. This was achieved in practice by using monochromatic laser light as an excitation source modulated at a harmonic set of frequencies. A minimum of four frequencies were obtained by the use of two standing wave acousto-optic modulators placed in series. Homodyne detection at each of these frequencies was performed simultaneously by mixing with matching harmonics present in the gain characteristics of a microchannel plate (MCP) image intensifier. These harmonics arise as a natural consequence of applying a high frequency sinusoidal voltage to the photocathode of the device, which switches the flow of photoelectrons 'on' and 'off' as the sinus voltage swings from negative to positive. By changing the bias of the sinus it was possible to control the duration of the 'on' state of the intensifier relative to its 'off' state, enabling the amplitude of the higher harmonic content in the gain to be controlled. Relative modulation depths of 400% are theoretically possible from this form of square-pulse modulation. A phase-dependent integrated image is formed by the sum of the mixed frequencies on the phosphor of the MCP. Sampling this signal over a full period of the fundamental harmonic enables each harmonic to be resolved, provided that the Nyquist sampling criterion is satisfied for the highest harmonic component in the signal. At each frequency both the phase and modulation parameters can be estimated from a Fourier analysis of the data. These parameters enable the fractional populations and fluorescence lifetimes of individual components of a complex fluorescence decay to be resolved on a pixel-by-pixel basis using a non-linear fit to the dispersion relationships. The

  7. Neuronal morphology generates high-frequency firing resonance.

    PubMed

    Ostojic, Srdjan; Szapiro, Germán; Schwartz, Eric; Barbour, Boris; Brunel, Nicolas; Hakim, Vincent

    2015-05-01

    The attenuation of neuronal voltage responses to high-frequency current inputs by the membrane capacitance is believed to limit single-cell bandwidth. However, neuronal populations subject to stochastic fluctuations can follow inputs beyond this limit. We investigated this apparent paradox theoretically and experimentally using Purkinje cells in the cerebellum, a motor structure that benefits from rapid information transfer. We analyzed the modulation of firing in response to the somatic injection of sinusoidal currents. Computational modeling suggested that, instead of decreasing with frequency, modulation amplitude can increase up to high frequencies because of cellular morphology. Electrophysiological measurements in adult rat slices confirmed this prediction and displayed a marked resonance at 200 Hz. We elucidated the underlying mechanism, showing that the two-compartment morphology of the Purkinje cell, interacting with a simple spiking mechanism and dendritic fluctuations, is sufficient to create high-frequency signal amplification. This mechanism, which we term morphology-induced resonance, is selective for somatic inputs, which in the Purkinje cell are exclusively inhibitory. The resonance sensitizes Purkinje cells in the frequency range of population oscillations observed in vivo. PMID:25948257

  8. Experimental Investigation of Dynamic Stall on a NACA0012 Airfoil Undergoing Sinusoidal Pitching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohl, Douglas; Green, Melissa

    2015-11-01

    In this work, the flow field around a NACA0012 Airfoil undergoing large amplitude sinusoidal pitching is investigated using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The airfoil is pitched symmetrically about the quarter chord point with a peak angle of 20 deg, at reduced frequencies of k =0.2-0.6 and Rec = 12000. Sixteen different Fields of View are phase averaged and combined to quantify the flow field from 0.75c upstream of the leading edge to 1c downstream of the trailing edge. This provides spatially and temporally resolved data sets that include the downstream evolution of the flow fields. The velocity and vorticity fields, both around the airfoil and downstream of the trailing edge, will be investigated as a function of the reduced frequency to better understand the dynamics (i.e. formation, separation and development) of the leading edge vortex and the resulting downstream flow evolution. This work was supported by the Office of Naval Research under ONR Award No. N00014-14-1-0418.

  9. Maximum group velocity in a one-dimensional model with a sinusoidally varying staggered potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Tanay; Sen, Diptiman; Dutta, Amit

    2015-06-01

    We use Floquet theory to study the maximum value of the stroboscopic group velocity in a one-dimensional tight-binding model subjected to an on-site staggered potential varying sinusoidally in time. The results obtained by numerically diagonalizing the Floquet operator are analyzed using a variety of analytical schemes. In the low-frequency limit we use adiabatic theory, while in the high-frequency limit the Magnus expansion of the Floquet Hamiltonian turns out to be appropriate. When the magnitude of the staggered potential is much greater or much less than the hopping, we use degenerate Floquet perturbation theory; we find that dynamical localization occurs in the former case when the maximum group velocity vanishes. Finally, starting from an "engineered" initial state where the particles (taken to be hard-core bosons) are localized in one part of the chain, we demonstrate that the existence of a maximum stroboscopic group velocity manifests in a light-cone-like spreading of the particles in real space.

  10. Dynamical pattern formation in a low-concentration magnetorheological fluid under two orthogonal sinusoidal fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yépez, L. D.; Carrillo, J. L.; Donado, F.; Sausedo-Solorio, J. M.; Miranda-Romagnoli, P.

    2016-06-01

    The dynamical pattern formation of clusters of magnetic particles in a low-concentration magnetorheological fluid, under the influence of a superposition of two perpendicular sinusoidal fields, is studied experimentally. By varying the frequency and phase shift of the perpendicular fields, this configuration enables us to experimentally analyze a wide range of field configurations, including the case of a pure rotating field and the case of an oscillating unidirectional field. The fields are applied parallel to the horizontal plane where the fluid lies or in the vertical plane. For fields applied in the horizontal plane, we observed that, when the ratio of the frequencies increases, the average cluster size exhibits a kind of periodic resonances. When the phase shift between the fields is varied, the average chain length reaches maximal values for the cases of the rotating field and the unidirectional case. We analyze and discuss these results in terms of a weighted average of the time-dependent Mason number. In the case of a rotating field on the vertical plane, we also observe that the competition between the magnetic and the viscous forces determines the average cluster size. We show that this configuration generates a series of physically meaningful self-organization of clusters and transport phenomena.

  11. Experimental studies for determining human discomfort response to vertical sinusoidal vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, T. K.; Leatherwood, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate several problems related to methodology and design of experiments to obtain human comfort response to vertical sinusoidal vibration. Specifically, the studies were directed to the determination of (1) the adequacy of frequency averaging of vibration data to obtain discomfort predictors, (2) the effect of practice on subject ratings, (3) the effect of the demographic factors of age, sex, and weight, and (4) the relative importance of seat and floor vibrations in the determination of measurement and criteria specification location. Results indicate that accurate prediction of discomfort requires knowledge of both the acceleration level and frequency content of the vibration stimuli. More importantly, the prediction of discomfort was shown to be equally good based upon either floor accelerations or seat accelerations. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the discomfort levels in different seats resulting from similar vibratory imputs were equal. Therefore, it was recommended that criteria specifications and acceleration measurements be made at the floor location. The results also indicated that practice did not systematically influence discomfort responses nor did the demographic factors of age, weight, and sex contribute to the discomfort response variation.

  12. DISPLAY OF PIXEL LOSS AND REPLICATION IN REPROJECTING RASTER DATA FROM THE SINUSOIDAL PROJECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies show the sinusoidal projection to be a superior planar projection for representing global raster datasets. This study uses the sinusoidal projection as a basis for evaluating pixel loss and replication in eight other planar map projections. The percent of pixels ...

  13. Programable Driver for Voltage-Controlled Oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowler, L. E.; Mcneil, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Electronically programable read-only memory (EPROM) and digital-to-analog converter provide customized time-varying voltage for frequency modulation. Voltage used to modulate IMPATT oscillator that serves as microwave pump for solid-state maser in low-noise amplifier. EPROM simple to tailor voltage waveform to suit characteristics of given maser. Digital information for waveform programed into EPROM chip; digital-to-analog converter reads information and produces corresponding analog wave. Principle readily adapted to other applications.

  14. Electro-Optical High-Voltage Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottsche, Allan; Johnston, Alan R.

    1992-01-01

    Electro-optical sensors for measuring high voltages developed for use in automatically controlled power-distribution systems. Sensors connected to optoelectronic interrogating equipment by optical fibers. Because sensitive material and optical fibers are all dielectric, no problem in electrically isolating interrogating circuitry from high voltage, and no need for voltage dividers. Sensor signals transmitted along fibers immune to electromagnetic noise at radio and lower frequencies.

  15. Multilevel cascade voltage source inverter with seperate DC sources

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Fang Zheng; Lai, Jih-Sheng

    1997-01-01

    A multilevel cascade voltage source inverter having separate DC sources is described herein. This inverter is applicable to high voltage, high power applications such as flexible AC transmission systems (FACTS) including static VAR generation (SVG), power line conditioning, series compensation, phase shifting and voltage balancing and fuel cell and photovoltaic utility interface systems. The M-level inverter consists of at least one phase wherein each phase has a plurality of full bridge inverters equipped with an independent DC source. This inverter develops a near sinusoidal approximation voltage waveform with only one switching per cycle as the number of levels, M, is increased. The inverter may have either single-phase or multi-phase embodiments connected in either wye or delta configurations.

  16. Multilevel cascade voltage source inverter with separate DC sources

    DOEpatents

    Peng, F.Z.; Lai, J.S.

    1997-06-24

    A multilevel cascade voltage source inverter having separate DC sources is described herein. This inverter is applicable to high voltage, high power applications such as flexible AC transmission systems (FACTS) including static VAR generation (SVG), power line conditioning, series compensation, phase shifting and voltage balancing and fuel cell and photovoltaic utility interface systems. The M-level inverter consists of at least one phase wherein each phase has a plurality of full bridge inverters equipped with an independent DC source. This inverter develops a near sinusoidal approximation voltage waveform with only one switching per cycle as the number of levels, M, is increased. The inverter may have either single-phase or multi-phase embodiments connected in either wye or delta configurations. 15 figs.

  17. Multilevel cascade voltage source inverter with seperate DC sources

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Fang Zheng; Lai, Jih-Sheng

    2002-01-01

    A multilevel cascade voltage source inverter having separate DC sources is described herein. This inverter is applicable to high voltage, high power applications such as flexible AC transmission systems (FACTS) including static VAR generation (SVG), power line conditioning, series compensation, phase shifting and voltage balancing and fuel cell and photovoltaic utility interface systems. The M-level inverter consists of at least one phase wherein each phase has a plurality of full bridge inverters equipped with an independent DC source. This inverter develops a near sinusoidal approximation voltage waveform with only one switching per cycle as the number of levels, M, is increased. The inverter may have either single-phase or multi-phase embodiments connected in either wye or delta configurations.

  18. Multilevel cascade voltage source inverter with seperate DC sources

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Fang Zheng; Lai, Jih-Sheng

    2001-04-03

    A multilevel cascade voltage source inverter having separate DC sources is described herein. This inverter is applicable to high voltage, high power applications such as flexible AC transmission systems (FACTS) including static VAR generation (SVG), power line conditioning, series compensation, phase shifting and voltage balancing and fuel cell and photovoltaic utility interface systems. The M-level inverter consists of at least one phase wherein each phase has a plurality of full bridge inverters equipped with an independent DC source. This inverter develops a near sinusoidal approximation voltage waveform with only one switching per cycle as the number of levels, M, is increased. The inverter may have either single-phase or multi-phase embodiments connected in either wye or delta configurations.

  19. An automatic bridge for inductive voltage dividers

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, P.; Liang, C.P.; Hsiao, J.C.

    1994-12-31

    We describe an automatic, injection-type bridge for inductive voltage divider (IVD) applications at low audio frequencies. We used it to self-calibrate programmable IVDs fabricated in house, by an automated {open_quotes}boot-strap{close_quotes} procedure. It is the heart of our reference standard for ac voltage ratios as well as a calibration system for IVDs.

  20. Spontaneous voltage oscillations and response dynamics of a Hodgkin-Huxley type model of sensory hair cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We employ a Hodgkin-Huxley-type model of basolateral ionic currents in bullfrog saccular hair cells for studying the genesis of spontaneous voltage oscillations and their role in shaping the response of the hair cell to external mechanical stimuli. Consistent with recent experimental reports, we find that the spontaneous dynamics of the model can be categorized using conductance parameters of calcium-activated potassium, inward rectifier potassium, and mechano-electrical transduction (MET) ionic currents. The model is demonstrated for exhibiting a broad spectrum of autonomous rhythmic activity, including periodic and quasi-periodic oscillations with two independent frequencies as well as various regular and chaotic bursting patterns. Complex patterns of spontaneous oscillations in the model emerge at small values of the conductance of Ca2+-activated potassium currents. These patterns are significantly affected by thermal fluctuations of the MET current. We show that self-sustained regular voltage oscillations lead to enhanced and sharply tuned sensitivity of the hair cell to weak mechanical periodic stimuli. While regimes of chaotic oscillations are argued to result in poor tuning to sinusoidal driving, chaotically oscillating cells do provide a high sensitivity to low-frequency variations of external stimuli. PMID:22282726

  1. Sinusoidal Wave Estimation Using Photogrammetry and Short Video Sequences.

    PubMed

    Rupnik, Ewelina; Jansa, Josef; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the work is to model the shape of the sinusoidal shape of regular water waves generated in a laboratory flume. The waves are traveling in time and render a smooth surface, with no white caps or foam. Two methods are proposed, treating the water as a diffuse and specular surface, respectively. In either case, the water is presumed to take the shape of a traveling sine wave, reducing the task of the 3D reconstruction to resolve the wave parameters. The first conceived method performs the modeling part purely in 3D space. Having triangulated the points in a separate phase via bundle adjustment, a sine wave is fitted into the data in a least squares manner. The second method presents a more complete approach for the entire calculation workflow beginning in the image space. The water is perceived as a specular surface, and the traveling specularities are the only observations visible to the  cameras, observations that are notably single image. The depth ambiguity is removed given additional constraints encoded within the law of reflection and the modeled parametric surface. The observation and constraint equations compose a single system of equations that is solved with the method of least squares adjustment. The devised approaches are validated against the data coming from a capacitive level sensor and on physical targets floating on the surface. The outcomes agree to a high degree. PMID:26690171

  2. Sinusoidal Wave Estimation Using Photogrammetry and Short Video Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Rupnik, Ewelina; Jansa, Josef; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the work is to model the shape of the sinusoidal shape of regular water waves generated in a laboratory flume. The waves are traveling in time and render a smooth surface, with no white caps or foam. Two methods are proposed, treating the water as a diffuse and specular surface, respectively. In either case, the water is presumed to take the shape of a traveling sine wave, reducing the task of the 3D reconstruction to resolve the wave parameters. The first conceived method performs the modeling part purely in 3D space. Having triangulated the points in a separate phase via bundle adjustment, a sine wave is fitted into the data in a least squares manner. The second method presents a more complete approach for the entire calculation workflow beginning in the image space. The water is perceived as a specular surface, and the traveling specularities are the only observations visible to the cameras, observations that are notably single image. The depth ambiguity is removed given additional constraints encoded within the law of reflection and the modeled parametric surface. The observation and constraint equations compose a single system of equations that is solved with the method of least squares adjustment. The devised approaches are validated against the data coming from a capacitive level sensor and on physical targets floating on the surface. The outcomes agree to a high degree. PMID:26690171

  3. In Hepatic Fibrosis, Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells Acquire Enhanced Immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Michael K.; Bedrosian, Andrea S.; Malhotra, Ashim; Henning, Justin R.; Ibrahim, Junaid; Vera, Valery; Cieza-Rubio, Napoleon E.; Hassan, Burhan U.; Pachter, H. Leon; Cohen, Steven; Frey, Alan B.; Miller, George

    2011-01-01

    The normal liver is characterized by immunologic tolerance. Primary mediators of hepatic immune tolerance are liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs). LSECs block adaptive immunogenic responses to Ag and induce the generation of T regulatory cells. Hepatic fibrosis is characterized by both intense intrahepatic inflammation and altered hepatic immunity. We postulated that, in liver fibrosis, a reversal of LSEC function from tolerogenic to proinflammatory and immunogenic may contribute to both the heightened inflammatory milieu and altered intrahepatic immunity. We found that, after fibrotic liver injury from hepatotoxins, LSECs become highly proinflammatory and secrete an array of cytokines and chemokines. In addition, LSECs gain enhanced capacity to capture Ag and induce T cell proliferation. Similarly, unlike LSECs in normal livers, in fibrosis, LSECs do not veto dendritic cell priming of T cells. Furthermore, whereas in normal livers, LSECs are active in the generation of T regulatory cells, in hepatic fibrosis LSECs induce an immunogenic T cell phenotype capable of enhancing endogenous CTLs and generating potent de novo CTL responses. Moreover, depletion of LSECs from fibrotic liver cultures mitigates the proinflammatory milieu characteristic of hepatic fibrosis. Our findings offer a critical understanding of the role of LSECs in modulating intrahepatic immunity and inflammation in fibro-inflammatory liver disease. PMID:20639479

  4. Molecular response of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells on hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Bartneck, Matthias; Topuz, Fuat; Tag, Carmen Gabriele; Sauer-Lehnen, Sibille; Warzecha, Klaudia Theresa; Trautwein, Christian; Weiskirchen, Ralf; Tacke, Frank

    2015-06-01

    There is a high demand for the isolation of primary endothelial cells for biomaterial endotheliazation studies, tissue engineering, and artificial organ development. Further, biomarkers for monitoring the response of endothelial cells in biomaterials science are required. We systematically compared two strategies for isolating liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC) from mouse liver. We demonstrate that fluorescence-activated cell sorting results in a considerably higher purity (~97%) compared to magnetic-assisted cell sorting (~80%), but is associated with a lower yield and recovery rate. Cell repellent polyethylene glycol (PEG) substrates affected the morphology of primary LSEC in culture and significantly downregulated the intracellular adhesion molecule (ICAM) and upregulated the vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM). This molecular response could partially be reverted by further modification with arginylglycylaspartic acid (RGD). Thus, usage of PEGylated materials may reduce, while applying RGD may support endotheliazation of materials, and we could relate LSEC attachment to their expression of ICAM and VCAM mRNA, suggesting their usage as biomarkers for endothelialization.

  5. High Voltage Lines: Hazard at a Distance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marino, Andrew A.; Becker, Robert O.

    1978-01-01

    It appears that a variety of biological organisms, including man, are sensitive to both long and short-term exposure to the extra low frequency electric and magnetic fields produced by high voltage lines. (BB)

  6. Frequency domain photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Langer, Gregor; Buchegger, Bianca; Jacak, Jaroslaw; Klar, Thomas A; Berer, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    We report on simultaneous frequency domain optical-resolution photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy with sub-µm lateral resolution. With the help of a blood smear, we show that photoacoustic and fluorescence images provide complementary information. Furthermore, we compare theoretically predicted signal-to-noise ratios of sinusoidal modulation in frequency domain with pulsed excitation in time domain. PMID:27446698

  7. Frequency domain photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Langer, Gregor; Buchegger, Bianca; Jacak, Jaroslaw; Klar, Thomas A; Berer, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    We report on simultaneous frequency domain optical-resolution photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy with sub-µm lateral resolution. With the help of a blood smear, we show that photoacoustic and fluorescence images provide complementary information. Furthermore, we compare theoretically predicted signal-to-noise ratios of sinusoidal modulation in frequency domain with pulsed excitation in time domain.

  8. Frequency domain photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Gregor; Buchegger, Bianca; Jacak, Jaroslaw; Klar, Thomas A.; Berer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We report on simultaneous frequency domain optical-resolution photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy with sub-µm lateral resolution. With the help of a blood smear, we show that photoacoustic and fluorescence images provide complementary information. Furthermore, we compare theoretically predicted signal-to-noise ratios of sinusoidal modulation in frequency domain with pulsed excitation in time domain. PMID:27446698

  9. Optical response from dual-frequency hybrid-aligned nematic liquid crystal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konshina, E. A.; Vakulin, D. A.; Ivanova, N. L.; Gavrish, E. O.; Vasil'ev, V. N.

    2012-05-01

    Dual-frequency hybrid-aligned nematic liquid crystal cells and the influence of the parameters of a control electric field on their optical response are studied. It is found that the harmonic oscillations of the optical transmission in such cells are observed in the interval between low frequency-to-high frequency voltage switchings unlike in conventional twisted nematic cells. A V-shaped bistable optical response is obtained by successively applying sinusoidal electric fields with frequencies of 1 and 30 kHz to a twisted nematic cell. For a liquid crystal layer 8 μm thick and an applied voltage of 50 V, the response time is 10 ms. In a hybrid-aligned twisted-nematic cell with a large initial tilt angle of the director (about 70°), the V-shaped optical response is observed when the inclined homeotropic state is switched to the twisted state by applying a 30-kHz field. The initial structure of the layer recovers as a result of natural elastic relaxation, and the response time increases roughly fourfold.

  10. Hedgehog signaling regulates liver sinusoidal endothelial cell capillarisation

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guanhua; Choi, Steve S.; Syn, Wing-Kin; Michelotti, Gregory A.; Swiderska-Syn, Marzena; Karaca, Gamze; Chan, Isaac S.; Chen, Yuping; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2013-01-01

    Objective Vascular remodeling during liver damage involves loss of healthy liver sinusoidal endothelial cell (LSEC) phenotype via capillarisation. Hedgehog (Hh) signaling regulates vascular development and increases during liver injury. Therefore, we examined its role in capillarisation. Design Primary LSEC were cultured for 5 days to induce capillarisation. Pharmacologic, antibody-mediated, and genetic approaches were used to manipulate Hh signaling. Effects on mRNA and protein expression of Hh-regulated genes and capillarisation markers were evaluated by qRT-PCR and immunoblot. Changes in LSEC function were assessed by migration and tube forming assay, and gain/loss of fenestrae was examined by electron microscopy. Mice with acute or chronic liver injury were treated with Hh inhibitors; effects on capillarisation were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results Freshly isolated LSEC expressed Hh ligands, Hh receptors, and Hh ligand antagonist Hhip. Capillarisation was accompanied by repression of Hhip and increased expression of Hh-regulated genes. Treatment with Hh agonist further induced expression of Hh ligands and Hh-regulated genes, and up-regulated capillarisation-associated genes; whereas Hh signaling antagonist or Hh ligand neutralizing antibody each repressed expression of Hh target genes and capillarisation markers. LSEC isolated from SmoloxP/loxP transgenic mice that had been infected with adenovirus expressing Cre-recombinase to delete Smoothened showed over 75% knockdown of Smoothened. During culture, Smoothened-deficient LSEC had inhibited Hh signaling, less induction of capillarisation-associated genes, and retention of fenestrae. In mice with injured livers, inhibiting Hh signaling prevented capillarisation. Conclusions LSEC produce and respond to Hh ligands, and use Hh signaling to regulate complex phenotypic changes that occur during capillarisation. PMID:22362915

  11. Green's functions of the scalar model of electromagnetic fields in sinusoidal superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatchenko, V. A.; Tsikalov, D. S.

    2016-03-01

    Problems of obtaining Green's function and using it for studying the structure of scalar electromagnetic fields in a sinusoidal superlattice are considered. An analytical solution of equation in the k-space for Green's function is found. Green's function in the r-space is obtained by both the numerical and the approximate analytical Fourier transformation of that solution. It is shown, that from the experimental study of Green's function in the k-space the position of the plane radiation source relative to the extremes of the dielectric permittivity ε(z) can be determined. The relief map of Green's function in the r-space shows that the structure of the field takes the form of chains of islets in the plane ωz, the number of which increases with increasing the distance from a radiation source. This effect leads to different frequency dependences of Green's function at different distances from the radiation source and can be used to measure the distance to the internal source. The real component of Green's function and its spatial decay in the forbidden zones in the near field is investigated. The local density of states, depending on the position of the source in the superlattice, is calculated.

  12. Comparison of high temperature, high frequency core loss and dynamic B-H loops of a 2V-49Fe-49Co and a grain oriented 3Si-Fe alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieserman, W. R.; Schwarze, G. E.; Niedra, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    The design of power magnetic components such as transformers, inductors, motors, and generators, requires specific knowledge about the magnetic and electrical characteristics of the magnetic materials used in these components. Limited experimental data exists that characterizes the performance of soft magnetic materials for the combined conditions of high temperature and high frequency over a wide flux density range. An experimental investigation of a 2V-49-Fe-49Co (Supermendur) and a grain oriented 3 Si-Fe (Magnesil) alloy was conducted over the temperature range of 23 to 300 C and frequency range of 0.1 to 10 kHz. The effects of temperature, frequency, and maximum flux density on the core loss and dynamic B-H loops for sinusoidal voltage excitation conditions are examined for each of these materials. A comparison of the core loss of these two materials is also made over the temperature and frequency range investigated.

  13. An experimental distribution of analog and digital information in a hybrid wireless visible light communication system based on acousto-optic modulation and sinusoidal gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez Colín, R.; García Juárez, A.; Zaldívar Huerta, I. E.; Marquina, A. Vera; García Delgado, L. A.; Leal Cruz, A. L.; Gómez Fuentes, R.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we propose a photonic architecture as an alternative tool to distribute point to multipoint analog and digital information over a hybrid wireless visible optical communication system. The experimental set-up is composed of a red laser pointer, an acousto-optic modulator, a sinusoidal grating and a photo-detector array. By using a simple and variable interferometric system, diffraction gratings with different spatial frequencies are generated and recorded on a photoemulsion which is composed of vanilla with dichromate gelatin. Analog video and digital information are first transmitted and recovered over a wireless communication system using a microwave carrier at 4.52 GHz which is generated by distributed feedback lasers operating in the low laser threshold current region. Separately, the recovered video information and digital data are combined with a radio frequency signal of 80 MHz, obtaining a subcarrier of information that is imposed on the optical carrier of the pointer laser using an acousto-optic modulator which is operated with an angle of incident light that satisfies the Bragg condition. The modulated optical carrier is sent to a sinusoidal grating, the diffraction pattern is photo-detected using an array of PIN photo-detectors. The use of sinusoidal gratings with acousto-optic modulators allows that number of channels to be increased when both components are placed in cascade.

  14. Electro-cochlear potentials elicited by sinusoidally modulated signals.

    PubMed

    Verweij, C; Rodenburg, M

    1977-01-01

    Responses of the guinea pig cochlea to amplitude-modulated stimuli were measured with the aid of a gross electrode. The dynamic characteristics of this part of the auditory system was studied by varying several parameters of the applied signal. The signals used as carriers in our experiments were either white noise or pure tones of 1 and 4 kHz. The modulation frequency, dynamic and intensity characteristics were determined by varying the modulating frequency, the modulation depth and the intensity of the applied signal. To get an idea about possible non-linear aspects of the system under investigation, we always computed the Fourier transform of the response data and plotted the amplitude of the various harmonics and the phase of the fundamental separately as functions of the signal parameter in question. The greatest response was always found at a modulation frequency of about 200 Hz, with a relatively gradual rise up to this frequency and a sharper drop above 200 Hz. The phase of the fundamental changes very rapidly at frequencies above Hz. The distortion is mainly second-harmonic and has a maximum about 1 octave lower than the fundamental. The carrier frequency and the intensity of the stimulus were not found to have a great influence on the frequency characteristic. For small modulation depths, the system is nearly linear; at higher intensities and modulation depths saturation occurs, coinciding with a relative increase in the intensity of the second harmonic with respect to the fundamental. PMID:880128

  15. Experimental validation of a high voltage pulse measurement method.

    SciTech Connect

    Cular, Stefan; Patel, Nishant Bhupendra; Branch, Darren W.

    2013-09-01

    This report describes X-cut lithium niobates (LiNbO3) utilization for voltage sensing by monitoring the acoustic wave propagation changes through LiNbO3 resulting from applied voltage. Direct current (DC), alternating current (AC) and pulsed voltage signals were applied to the crystal. Voltage induced shift in acoustic wave propagation time scaled quadratically for DC and AC voltages and linearly for pulsed voltages. The measured values ranged from 10 - 273 ps and 189 ps 2 ns for DC and non-DC voltages, respectively. Data suggests LiNbO3 has a frequency sensitive response to voltage. If voltage source error is eliminated through physical modeling from the uncertainty budget, the sensors U95 estimated combined uncertainty could decrease to ~0.025% for DC, AC, and pulsed voltage measurements.

  16. Scintillations associated with bottomside sinusoidal irregularities in the equatorial F region

    SciTech Connect

    Valladares, C.E.; DasGupta, A.; Whitney, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    A new category of equatorial F region plasma irregularities characterized by nearly sinusoidal wave forms in the ion number density N/sub i/ was observed by the Atmosphere Explorer satellites. Multisatellite scintillation observations made at Huancayo, Peru and spaced-receiver drive measurements made at Ancon, Peru are associated with such irregularities observed by AE-E on a few nights in December 1979. The scintillations continue for a period of almost 6 hours, at a level that varies from moderate to fairly intense (S4 = 0.1-0.8 at 250 MHz), and these S4 fluctuations are quite well correlated, even over a distance of 1000 km. The irregularities constituting the large patch are found to drift eastward at a velocity of approximately 140 m/s. This and other such events are accompanied by the frequency spread signatures on Huancayo ionograms, as previously reported. The unique feature of the Fourier spectra associated with such bottomside sinusiodal (BSS) irregularities is the presence of Fresnel oscillations, which allow a determination of the velocity of the diffraction pattern perpendicular to the direction of the ray from the satellite to the ground station. The velocity so determined agrees well with the results of simultaneously performed spaced-receiver drift measurements. The presence of Fresnel oscillations indicates that the BSS irregularities occur in a relatively thin layer. However, while the scintillation data indicate a high frequency, roll off with a spectral index of the order of -3 to -4, the in-situ data tend to indicate that the index is of the order -5 to -6. Modeling studies are necessary to resolve this difference.

  17. Characteristics and performance of offset phase locked single frequency heterodyned laser systems.

    PubMed

    Tulchinsky, David A; Hastings, Alexander S; Williams, Keith J

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate and characterize the performance of two heterodyned optical phase locked loop (PLL) laser systems for use in characterizing photodetector RF frequency response and nonlinearities. Descriptions of PLL circuit parameters for Nd:YAG non-planar ring oscillator lasers at 1064 nm and 1319 nm, and Er ion fiber lasers from 1530 nm to 1565 nm are presented. Both laser systems have piezoelectric transducer wavelength control over the PLL voltage controlled oscillator circuit. Offset frequency phase locking from 1.5 kHz to 51+ GHz is demonstrated. Frequency stability at 10 MHz is measured to be ±50 μHz, limited by the stability of the Rb stabilized crystal oscillator. Phase noise of the phase-locked 1319 nm laser system is discussed where we find that the phase noise is dominated by the input source noise at frequency offsets below 100 Hz and by the laser's RIN noise at frequency offsets > 100 Hz. Comparing nonlinearity data from an InGaAs p-i-n photodiode using both 1319 nm and 1550 nm PLL nonlinearity measurement systems, we find two new separate photodetector nonlinearity mechanisms. Measurements of the harmonic components of a 11 MHz sinusoidal heterodyned optical beat note signal are found to be at or below 1 nW/mW for the second harmonic (at 22 MHz) and at or below 0.25 nW/mW for the 3rd harmonic (at 33 MHz), confirming the nearly pure sinusoidal nature of the optically generated microwave beat note.

  18. Characteristics and performance of offset phase locked single frequency heterodyned laser systems.

    PubMed

    Tulchinsky, David A; Hastings, Alexander S; Williams, Keith J

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate and characterize the performance of two heterodyned optical phase locked loop (PLL) laser systems for use in characterizing photodetector RF frequency response and nonlinearities. Descriptions of PLL circuit parameters for Nd:YAG non-planar ring oscillator lasers at 1064 nm and 1319 nm, and Er ion fiber lasers from 1530 nm to 1565 nm are presented. Both laser systems have piezoelectric transducer wavelength control over the PLL voltage controlled oscillator circuit. Offset frequency phase locking from 1.5 kHz to 51+ GHz is demonstrated. Frequency stability at 10 MHz is measured to be ±50 μHz, limited by the stability of the Rb stabilized crystal oscillator. Phase noise of the phase-locked 1319 nm laser system is discussed where we find that the phase noise is dominated by the input source noise at frequency offsets below 100 Hz and by the laser's RIN noise at frequency offsets > 100 Hz. Comparing nonlinearity data from an InGaAs p-i-n photodiode using both 1319 nm and 1550 nm PLL nonlinearity measurement systems, we find two new separate photodetector nonlinearity mechanisms. Measurements of the harmonic components of a 11 MHz sinusoidal heterodyned optical beat note signal are found to be at or below 1 nW/mW for the second harmonic (at 22 MHz) and at or below 0.25 nW/mW for the 3rd harmonic (at 33 MHz), confirming the nearly pure sinusoidal nature of the optically generated microwave beat note. PMID:27250392

  19. Characteristics and performance of offset phase locked single frequency heterodyned laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulchinsky, David A.; Hastings, Alexander S.; Williams, Keith J.

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate and characterize the performance of two heterodyned optical phase locked loop (PLL) laser systems for use in characterizing photodetector RF frequency response and nonlinearities. Descriptions of PLL circuit parameters for Nd:YAG non-planar ring oscillator lasers at 1064 nm and 1319 nm, and Er ion fiber lasers from 1530 nm to 1565 nm are presented. Both laser systems have piezoelectric transducer wavelength control over the PLL voltage controlled oscillator circuit. Offset frequency phase locking from 1.5 kHz to 51+ GHz is demonstrated. Frequency stability at 10 MHz is measured to be ±50 μHz, limited by the stability of the Rb stabilized crystal oscillator. Phase noise of the phase-locked 1319 nm laser system is discussed where we find that the phase noise is dominated by the input source noise at frequency offsets below 100 Hz and by the laser's RIN noise at frequency offsets > 100 Hz. Comparing nonlinearity data from an InGaAs p-i-n photodiode using both 1319 nm and 1550 nm PLL nonlinearity measurement systems, we find two new separate photodetector nonlinearity mechanisms. Measurements of the harmonic components of a 11 MHz sinusoidal heterodyned optical beat note signal are found to be at or below 1 nW/mW for the second harmonic (at 22 MHz) and at or below 0.25 nW/mW for the 3rd harmonic (at 33 MHz), confirming the nearly pure sinusoidal nature of the optically generated microwave beat note.

  20. Subthreshold oscillations and resonant frequency in guinea-pig cortical neurons: physiology and modelling.

    PubMed

    Gutfreund, Y; yarom, Y; Segev, I

    1995-03-15

    1. Intracellular recordings were made from neurons in slices from guinea-pig frontal cortex. In 50% of the cells, sustained subthreshold voltage oscillations were evoked by long (> 6 s) depolarizing pulses. The peak-to-peak amplitude of these oscillations was less than 5 mV and the frequency was voltage dependent, increasing with depolarization from 4 (near rest) to 20 Hz (at 30 mV depolarization). 2. The impedance-frequency relationship of both oscillating and non-oscillating cells was studied by intracellular injection of sinusoidal current with linearly changing frequency. In most cells, a peak in the impedance magnitude (resonant behaviour) was observed at depolarized levels. The frequency of the peak impedance (peak frequency) increased with depolarization from 3 (near rest) to 15 Hz (at 30 mV depolarization). 3. Application of TTX (10(-6) M) significantly decreased the impedance magnitude near the peak frequency. The subthreshold oscillations, however, as well as the action potentials, were fully blocked by TTX. On the other hand, TEA (15 mM) and Cs+ (5 mM) abolished both the subthreshold oscillations and the resonant behaviour. Replacing Ca2+ with Co2+ (5 mM) or Ni2+ (1 mM) did not abolish the subthreshold oscillations. The peak in the frequency-response curve was only slightly reduced. 4. An isopotential membrane model, consisting of a leak current, a fast persistent sodium current, a slow non-inactivating potassium current (with the kinetics of the M-current) and membrane capacitance, is sufficient to produce both voltage oscillations and resonant behaviour. The kinetics of the K+ current by itself is sufficient to produce resonance behaviour. The Na+ current amplifies the peak impedance magnitude and is essential for the generation of subthreshold oscillation. The model correctly predicted the behaviour of the frequency response before and after TTX and TEA application, as well as the relation between the expected passive impedance and the experimental

  1. Subthreshold oscillations and resonant frequency in guinea-pig cortical neurons: physiology and modelling.

    PubMed Central

    Gutfreund, Y; yarom, Y; Segev, I

    1995-01-01

    1. Intracellular recordings were made from neurons in slices from guinea-pig frontal cortex. In 50% of the cells, sustained subthreshold voltage oscillations were evoked by long (> 6 s) depolarizing pulses. The peak-to-peak amplitude of these oscillations was less than 5 mV and the frequency was voltage dependent, increasing with depolarization from 4 (near rest) to 20 Hz (at 30 mV depolarization). 2. The impedance-frequency relationship of both oscillating and non-oscillating cells was studied by intracellular injection of sinusoidal current with linearly changing frequency. In most cells, a peak in the impedance magnitude (resonant behaviour) was observed at depolarized levels. The frequency of the peak impedance (peak frequency) increased with depolarization from 3 (near rest) to 15 Hz (at 30 mV depolarization). 3. Application of TTX (10(-6) M) significantly decreased the impedance magnitude near the peak frequency. The subthreshold oscillations, however, as well as the action potentials, were fully blocked by TTX. On the other hand, TEA (15 mM) and Cs+ (5 mM) abolished both the subthreshold oscillations and the resonant behaviour. Replacing Ca2+ with Co2+ (5 mM) or Ni2+ (1 mM) did not abolish the subthreshold oscillations. The peak in the frequency-response curve was only slightly reduced. 4. An isopotential membrane model, consisting of a leak current, a fast persistent sodium current, a slow non-inactivating potassium current (with the kinetics of the M-current) and membrane capacitance, is sufficient to produce both voltage oscillations and resonant behaviour. The kinetics of the K+ current by itself is sufficient to produce resonance behaviour. The Na+ current amplifies the peak impedance magnitude and is essential for the generation of subthreshold oscillation. The model correctly predicted the behaviour of the frequency response before and after TTX and TEA application, as well as the relation between the expected passive impedance and the experimental

  2. Characteristics of probe current harmonics based on various applied voltage waveforms in low temperature plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Do; Kim, Yu-Sin; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Bang, Jin-Young; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2011-03-15

    The characteristics of probe currents induced by applying various probe voltage waveforms, such as sinusoidal, sawtooth, square, and triangular, were investigated at a floating potential. It was found that the measured probe currents have many harmonics depending on the voltage waveforms. This was mainly due to the nonlinearity of the sheath in the plasma and was analyzed using the fast Fourier transform and a circuit model. By applying a triangular voltage waveform to a probe, plasma parameters such as electron temperature and plasma density could be obtained and compared to those of a single Langmuir probe and a floating harmonic method.

  3. Dynamical Coulomb blockade of tunnel junctions driven by alternating voltages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabert, Hermann

    2015-12-01

    The theory of the dynamical Coulomb blockade is extended to tunneling elements driven by a time-dependent voltage. It is shown that, for standard setups where an external voltage is applied to a tunnel junction via an impedance, time-dependent driving entails an excitation of the modes of the electromagnetic environment by the applied voltage. Previous approaches for ac driven circuits need to be extended to account for the driven bath modes. A unitary transformation involving also the variables of the electromagnetic environment is introduced which allows us to split off the time dependence from the Hamiltonian in the absence of tunneling. This greatly simplifies perturbation-theoretical calculations based on treating the tunneling Hamiltonian as a perturbation. In particular, the average current flowing in the leads of the tunnel junction is studied. Explicit results are given for the case of an applied voltage with a constant dc part and a sinusoidal ac part. The connection with standard dynamical Coulomb blockade theory for constant applied voltage is established. It is shown that an alternating voltage source reveals significant additional effects caused by the electromagnetic environment. The hallmark of the dynamical Coulomb blockade in ac driven devices is a suppression of higher harmonics of the current by the electromagnetic environment. The theory presented basically applies to all tunneling devices driven by alternating voltages.

  4. The hepatic sinusoid 'classic and contemporary’: a report on the 17th international symposium on cells of the hepatic sinusoid (ISCHS)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The 17th ISCHS took place in Osaka, Japan, on 23 to 25 September 2013. This symposium focuses on an exchange of views on the structure and function of hepatic sinusoidal cells in addition to their roles in clinical pathophysiology. PMID:24484528

  5. A PLL Scheme for Synchronization with Grid Voltage Phasor in Active Power Filter Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krievs, Oskars; Steiks, Ingars; Ribickis, Leonids

    2010-01-01

    Voltage source inverters connected to the grid in applications such as active power filters require synchronization with the grid voltage. Since in practice the grid voltage can be unbalanced and distorted, but the operation of the whole active filter control system is strongly dependant on precise estimation of grid voltage phase, the fundamental positive sequence phasor of the grid voltage has to be extracted. In this paper a system for smooth estimation of the position of the voltage phasor at the point of common coupling of a parallel active filter system is presented using a sinusoidal signal integrator and a simple software PLL. The performance of the proposed system is verified by simulation and experimental results. The proposed PLL scheme can also be used in other vector oriented control systems.

  6. VOLTAGE-CONTROLLED TRANSISTOR OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Scheele, P.F.

    1958-09-16

    This patent relates to transistor oscillators and in particular to those transistor oscillators whose frequencies vary according to controlling voltages. A principal feature of the disclosed transistor oscillator circuit resides in the temperature compensation of the frequency modulating stage by the use of a resistorthermistor network. The resistor-thermistor network components are selected to have the network resistance, which is in series with the modulator transistor emitter circuit, vary with temperature to compensate for variation in the parameters of the transistor due to temperature change.

  7. Characterization of surface dielectric barrier discharge influenced by intermediate frequency for ozone production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelaziz, Ayman A.; Ishijima, Tatsuo; Seto, Takafumi; Osawa, Naoki; Wedaa, Hassan; Otani, Yoshio

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the intermediate frequency (1-10 kHz) of the sinusoidal driving voltage on the characteristics of a developed surface dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD)-based reactor having spikes on its discharge electrode. Moreover, its influence on the production of ozone and nitrogen oxide byproducts is evaluated. The results show that SDBD is operated in the filamentary mode at all the frequencies. Nevertheless, the pulses of the discharge current at high frequencies are much denser and have higher amplitudes than those at low frequencies. The analysis of the power consumed in the reactor shows that a small portion of the input power is dissipated in the dielectric material of SDBD source, whereas the major part of the power is consumed in the plasma discharge. The results of the ozone production show that higher frequencies have a slightly adverse effect on the ozone production at relatively high energy density values, where the ozone concentration is slightly decreased when the frequency is increased at the same energy density. The temperature of the discharge channels and gas is not a crucial factor for the decomposition of ozone in this reactor, while the results of the measurements of nitrogen oxides characteristics indicate that the formation of NO and NO2 has a significant adverse effect on the production efficiency of ozone due to their oxidation to another nitrogen oxides and their catalytic effect.

  8. Estimation of blood perfusion using phase shift in temperature response to sinusoidal heating at the skin surface.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Xu, L X

    1999-09-01

    A closed form analytical solution of the Pennes' bio-heat equation was obtained for temperature distributions in the skin tissue subject to the sinusoidal heat flux. Phase shifts in the surface temperature response were revealed to be related to local blood perfusion rate and heating frequency. The influence of the thermal contact resistance on the perfusion estimation was investigated. It has been proved that this influence is relatively small because of the phase shift based estimation and can be effectively eliminated by application of highly conductive grease. This analysis provides the theoretical foundation for a new noninvasive modality of blood perfusion estimation based on the surface temperature measurement which can have significant applications in future clinical practices.

  9. Three dimensional dynamic study of a metal halide thallium iodine discharge plasma powered by a sinusoidal and square signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechir Ben Hamida, Mohamed; Charrada, Kamel

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study the dynamic of a metal halide thallium iodine discharge lamp fed by a sinusoidal and square power supply. For this, a chemical model under Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium conditions has been developed to compute the plasma composition and transport coefficients such as thermal conductivity, viscosity and electric conductivity. This is then coupled with a three-dimensional time-dependent code that solves the system of the mass, energy and momentum equations, as well as the Laplace equation for the plasma using Comsol Multiphysics with Matlab. After validation with the experimental results, this model was applied to analyze the influence of the key parameters on the discharge behavior such as frequency for an AC arc current and the atomic ratio for square arc-current wave form on the convective process.

  10. Batteries: Widening voltage windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kang; Wang, Chunsheng

    2016-10-01

    The energy output of aqueous batteries is largely limited by the narrow voltage window of their electrolytes. Now, a hydrate melt consisting of lithium salts is shown to expand such voltage windows, leading to a high-energy aqueous battery.

  11. Automatic voltage imbalance detector

    DOEpatents

    Bobbett, Ronald E.; McCormick, J. Byron; Kerwin, William J.

    1984-01-01

    A device for indicating and preventing damage to voltage cells such as galvanic cells and fuel cells connected in series by detecting sequential voltages and comparing these voltages to adjacent voltage cells. The device is implemented by using operational amplifiers and switching circuitry is provided by transistors. The device can be utilized in battery powered electric vehicles to prevent galvanic cell damage and also in series connected fuel cells to prevent fuel cell damage.

  12. Stable voltage source for Penning trap experiments.

    PubMed

    Pinegar, David B; Blaum, Klaus; Biesiadzinski, Tomasz P; Zafonte, Steven L; Van Dyck, Robert S

    2009-06-01

    A voltage reference has been developed to bias ring electrodes of two Penning traps between -90 and 0 V. For output voltages near -90 V, the Allan deviation of the system's voltage instability is less than 1 part in 10(8) over all time scales shorter than 10(4) s. For averaging times longer than several seconds, the system's stability is determined almost completely by the noise, drift, and aging of the zener diodes in the array of voltage reference integrated circuits. For shorter averaging times, active filters built into the new system significantly reduce the intrinsic noise of the zener diodes. The system makes it possible to continuously adjust the ring voltages for frequency locking the axial motion in the two Penning traps. By keeping electrical noise highly correlated between the two traps, measurement uncertainty should be reduced for precision experiments such as Penning trap mass spectrometry.

  13. Responses of central vestibular neurons to sinusoidal yaw rotation in compensated macaques after unilateral labyrinthectomy

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Min

    2013-01-01

    After vestibular labyrinth injury, behavioral measures of vestibular function partially recover through the process of vestibular compensation. The present study was performed to improve our understanding of the physiology of macaque vestibular nucleus neurons in the compensated state (>6 wk) after unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL). The responses of neurons to sinusoidal yaw rotation at a series of frequencies (0.1–2.0 Hz) and peak velocities (7.5–210°/s) were examined to determine how the behavior of these cells differed from those in animals with intact labyrinths. The sensitivity of neurons responding to ipsilateral rotation (type I) did not differ between the intact and injured sides after UL, although this sensitivity was lower bilaterally after lesion than before lesion. The sensitivity of neurons that increase firing with contralateral rotation (type II) was higher ipsilateral to the UL than before lesion or in the nucleus contralateral to the UL. UL did not increase asymmetry in the responses of individual type I or II neurons to ipsilateral vs. contralateral rotation, nor does it change the power law relationship between neuronal firing and level of stimulation. Increased sensitivities of contralesional type I neurons to the remaining vestibular nerve input and increased efficacy of inhibitory vestibular commissures projecting to the ipsilesional vestibular nucleus appear to be responsible for recovery of dynamic function of central vestibular neurons in compensated animals. The portion of type I neurons on the ipsilesional side is reduced in compensated animals, which likely accounts for the asymmetries in vestibular reflexes and perception that characterize vestibular function after UL. PMID:23864379

  14. High Voltage SPT Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzella, David; Jacobson, David; Jankovsky, Robert

    2001-01-01

    A 2.3 kW stationary plasma thruster designed to operate at high voltage was tested at discharge voltages between 300 and 1250 V. Discharge specific impulses between 1600 and 3700 sec were demonstrated with thrust between 40 and 145 mN. Test data indicated that discharge voltage can be optimized for maximum discharge efficiency. The optimum discharge voltage was between 500 and 700 V for the various anode mass flow rates considered. The effect of operating voltage on optimal magnet field strength was investigated. The effect of cathode flow rate on thruster efficiency was considered for an 800 V discharge.

  15. Scanning electron microscopic study of flowing erythrocytes in hepatic sinusoids as revealed by 'in vivo cryotechnique'.

    PubMed

    Terada, N; Kato, Y; Fuji, Y; Ueda, H; Baba, T; Ohno, S

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a method for stabilizing erythrocytes under flowing condition in living livers, as revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After the procedure of the 'in vivo cryotechnique', both freeze-substitution and subsequent t-butyl alcohol freeze-drying methods were used for preparing SEM specimens. By freeze-fracturing with a scalpel in liquid nitrogen before the freeze-substitution, better preserved surface tissues were obtained for examination. Erythrocytes in hepatic sinusoids were clearly detected without plasma components by the freeze-substitution method, and well preserved in parts where they were flowing with their original shapes. Some were accumulated in sinusoids, especially injunctioning areas of sinusoidal networks, as compared with those in narrow lumens between hepatocyte plates. Shapes of such erythrocytes were various, locating along endothelial cells. After stopping the blood supply into livers by artificial cardiac arrest, their shapes were dramatically changed into biconcaves and they became aggregated side by side to be packed in the sinusoids. The three-dimensional shapes of flowing erythrocytes in hepatic sinusoids were demonstrated for the first time by the 'in vivo cryotechnique' combined with SEM. PMID:9602528

  16. Hepatic sinusoids in liver injury, inflammation, and fibrosis: new pathophysiological insights.

    PubMed

    Greuter, Thomas; Shah, Vijay H

    2016-06-01

    Changes of hepatic sinusoids are crucial in the pathogenesis of liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Liver injury leads to distinct morphological abnormalities such as loss of sinusoidal fenestration, vasoconstriction, and angiogenesis as well as molecular changes. Communication between the two key cells in this hepatic microenvironment-hepatic stellate cells (HSC) and sinusoidal endothelial cells (SEC)-has been studied for many years and several canonical pathways have been elucidated, such as decreased eNOS activity or increased PDGF and TGF-β production leading to activation and migration of HSC. In recent studies, alternative pathways of intercellular communication in liver diseases have been described such as cell-derived extracellular vesicles called exosomes, which deliver cell compounds to their target cells. Moreover, such extracellular vesicles may link injury to inflammation in alcoholic hepatitis. While inflammation leading to liver fibrosis has been studied in detail, in some circumstances pathways other than the known canonical inflammatory pathways may contribute to hepatic fibrogenesis. For example, in congestive hepatopathy, sinusoidal dilatation and fibrosis have been shown to be mediated by non-inflammatory mechanisms and associated with sinusoidal thrombi. A recently developed murine model further enables experimental studies of this disease entity. Increasing knowledge about these alternative disease pathways in liver injury, inflammation, and fibrosis may reveal possible target molecules for future therapies. This article builds upon a seminar given at the recent 3rd JSGE International Topic Conference in Sendai, Japan, and reviews the areas outlined above. PMID:26939970

  17. Photoacoustic imaging of voltage signals (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Bin; Zhang, Ruiying; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-03-01

    Optical imaging of brain voltage signals is significantly limited in depth due to optical scattering and the absorptive property of brain tissue. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging promises to break this hard limit by utilizing both ballistic and diffused photons. To demonstrate the feasibility of PA, we used an in vivo mouse model. The brain cortex tissue was stained with dipicrylamine dye, electrically stimulated, and imaged with a customized dual-isosbestic-wavelength PA microscope (DIW-PAM). DIW-PAM separates voltage-induced PA signals from blood-induced PA signals and thereby allows recording the voltage response of mouse cortex tissue without interference from hemoglobin responses. The resting state PA voltage response signal exhibited a noise-like signal in the frequency domain. Upon 3 Hz electrical stimulation, the PA voltage response signal showed frequency peaks of 3.2 Hz and 6.3 Hz (Fig. 1). Although dipicrylamine dye is not fast enough for recording neuron action potentials, it served well for the purpose of this feasibility study. In conclusion, we successfully demonstrated in vivo photoacoustic imaging of mouse brain voltage signals for the first time. If a fast voltage-sensitive dye is available, using photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) instead of PA microscopy could allow acquiring full-field PA action potential images at a speed limited only by the laser pulse repetition rate.

  18. External laser frequency stabilizer

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, J.L.; Hansch, T.W.

    1987-10-13

    A frequency transducer for controlling or modulating the frequency of a light radiation system is described comprising: a source of radiation having a predetermined frequency; an electro-optic phase modulator for receiving the radiation and for changing the phase of the radiation in proportion to an applied error voltage; an acousto-optic modulator coupled to the electro-optic modulator for shifting the frequency of the output signal of the electro-optic modulator; a signal source for providing an error voltage representing undesirable fluctuations in the frequency of the light radiation; a first channel including a fast integrator coupled between the signal source and the input circuit of the electro-optic modulator; a second channel including a voltage controlled oscillator coupled between the signal source and the acousto-optic modulator; and a network including an electronic delay circuit coupled between the first and second channels for matching the delay of the acousto-optic modulator.

  19. Time-resolved spectroscopy of a homogeneous dielectric barrier discharge for soft ionization driven by square wave high voltage.

    PubMed

    Horvatic, Vlasta; Michels, Antje; Ahlmann, Norman; Jestel, Günter; Veza, Damir; Vadla, Cedomil; Franzke, Joachim

    2015-10-01

    Helium capillary dielectric barrier discharge driven by the square wave-shaped high voltage was investigated spatially and temporally by means of optical emission spectroscopy. The finding of the previous investigation conducted with the sinusoidal-like high voltage was confirmed, i.e., the plasma in the jet and the plasma in the capillary constitute two temporally separated events. The plasma in the jet occurs prior to the discharge in the capillary and exists only during the positive half period of the applied high voltage. The time delay of the capillary discharge with respect to the discharge in the jet depended on the high voltage, and it was between 2.4 and 8.4 μs for the voltage amplitude change in the range from 1.96 to 2.31 kV, respectively. It was found that, compared to sinusoidal-like voltage, application of the square wave high voltage results with stronger (~6 times) He line emission in the jet, which makes the latter more favorable for efficient soft ionization. The use of the square wave high voltage enabled comparison of the currents (~1 mA) flowing in the capillary during the positive and negative high voltage periods, which yielded the estimation for the charge dissipated in the atmosphere ((4 ± 20 %) × 10(-11) C) through the plasma jet.

  20. Time-resolved spectroscopy of a homogeneous dielectric barrier discharge for soft ionization driven by square wave high voltage.

    PubMed

    Horvatic, Vlasta; Michels, Antje; Ahlmann, Norman; Jestel, Günter; Veza, Damir; Vadla, Cedomil; Franzke, Joachim

    2015-10-01

    Helium capillary dielectric barrier discharge driven by the square wave-shaped high voltage was investigated spatially and temporally by means of optical emission spectroscopy. The finding of the previous investigation conducted with the sinusoidal-like high voltage was confirmed, i.e., the plasma in the jet and the plasma in the capillary constitute two temporally separated events. The plasma in the jet occurs prior to the discharge in the capillary and exists only during the positive half period of the applied high voltage. The time delay of the capillary discharge with respect to the discharge in the jet depended on the high voltage, and it was between 2.4 and 8.4 μs for the voltage amplitude change in the range from 1.96 to 2.31 kV, respectively. It was found that, compared to sinusoidal-like voltage, application of the square wave high voltage results with stronger (~6 times) He line emission in the jet, which makes the latter more favorable for efficient soft ionization. The use of the square wave high voltage enabled comparison of the currents (~1 mA) flowing in the capillary during the positive and negative high voltage periods, which yielded the estimation for the charge dissipated in the atmosphere ((4 ± 20 %) × 10(-11) C) through the plasma jet. PMID:26297466

  1. Graded boosting of synaptic signals by low-threshold voltage-activated calcium conductance

    PubMed Central

    Carbó Tano, Martín; Vilarchao, María Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Low-threshold voltage-activated calcium conductances (LT-VACCs) play a substantial role in shaping the electrophysiological attributes of neurites. We have investigated how these conductances affect synaptic integration in a premotor nonspiking (NS) neuron of the leech nervous system. These cells exhibit an extensive neuritic tree, do not fire Na+-dependent spikes, but express an LT-VACC that was sensitive to 250 μM Ni2+ and 100 μM NNC 55-0396 (NNC). NS neurons responded to excitation of mechanosensory pressure neurons with depolarizing responses for which amplitude was a linear function of the presynaptic firing frequency. NNC decreased these synaptic responses and abolished the concomitant widespread Ca2+ signals. Coherent with the interpretation that the LT-VACC amplified signals at the postsynaptic level, this conductance also amplified the responses of NS neurons to direct injection of sinusoidal current. Synaptic amplification thus is achieved via a positive feedback in which depolarizing signals activate an LT-VACC that, in turn, boosts these signals. The wide distribution of LT-VACC could support the active propagation of depolarizing signals, turning the complex NS neuritic tree into a relatively compact electrical compartment. PMID:25972583

  2. Simple sweep frequency generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yegorov, I.

    1985-01-01

    A sweep frequency generator is described whose center frequency can be varied from 10 kHz to 50 MHz, with seven 1 to 3 and 3 to 10 scales covering the 10 kHz to 30 MHz range and one 3 to 5 scale for the 30 to 50 MHz range. It consists of a tunable pulse generator with output voltage attenuator, a diode mixer for calibration, and a sawtooth voltage generator as a source of frequency deviation. The pulse generator is a multivibrator with two emitter coupled transistors and two diodes in the collector circuit of one. The first diode extends the tuning range and increases the frequency deviation, the second diode provides the necessary base bias to the other transistor. The pulse repetition rate is modulated either directly by the sweep voltage of the calibrating oscilloscope, this voltage being applied to the base of the transistor with the two diodes in its collector circuit through an additional attenuator or a special emitter follower, or by the separate sawtooth voltage generator. The latter is a conventional two transistor multivibrator and produces signals at any constant frequency within the 40 to 60 Hz range. The mixer receives unmodulated signals from a reference frequency source and produces different frequency signals which are sent through an RCR-filter to a calibrating oscilloscope.

  3. Microwave integrated circuit for Josephson voltage standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, L. B.; Toots, J.; Chang, C. C. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A microwave integrated circuit comprised of one or more Josephson junctions and short sections of microstrip or stripline transmission line is fabricated from thin layers of superconducting metal on a dielectric substrate. The short sections of transmission are combined to form the elements of the circuit and particularly, two microwave resonators. The Josephson junctions are located between the resonators and the impedance of the Josephson junctions forms part of the circuitry that couples the two resonators. The microwave integrated circuit has an application in Josephson voltage standards. In this application, the device is asymmetrically driven at a selected frequency (approximately equal to the resonance frequency of the resonators), and a d.c. bias is applied to the junction. By observing the current voltage characteristic of the junction, a precise voltage, proportional to the frequency of the microwave drive signal, is obtained.

  4. In situ analysis of texture development from sinusoidal stress at high pressure and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Li; Weidner, Donald J.

    2015-12-15

    Here, we present a new experimental protocol to investigate the relationship between texture, plastic strain, and the mechanisms of plastic deformation at high pressure and temperature. The method utilizes synchrotron X-ray radiation as the probing tool, coupled with a large-volume high pressure deformation device (D-DIA). The intensity of X-ray diffraction peaks within the spectrum of the sample is used for sampling texture development in situ. The unique feature of this study is given by the sinusoidal variation of the intensity when a sinusoidal strain is applied to the sample. For a sample of magnesium oxide at elevated pressure and temperature, we demonstrate observations that are consistent with elasto-plastic models for texture development and for diffraction-peak measurements of apparent stress. The sinusoidal strain magnitude was 3%.

  5. In situ analysis of texture development from sinusoidal stress at high pressure and temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Weidner, Donald J

    2015-12-01

    Here, we present a new experimental protocol to investigate the relationship between texture, plastic strain, and the mechanisms of plastic deformation at high pressure and temperature. The method utilizes synchrotron X-ray radiation as the probing tool, coupled with a large-volume high pressure deformation device (D-DIA). The intensity of X-ray diffraction peaks within the spectrum of the sample is used for sampling texture development in situ. The unique feature of this study is given by the sinusoidal variation of the intensity when a sinusoidal strain is applied to the sample. For a sample of magnesium oxide at elevated pressure and temperature, we demonstrate observations that are consistent with elasto-plastic models for texture development and for diffraction-peak measurements of apparent stress. The sinusoidal strain magnitude was 3%. PMID:26724072

  6. Ascites due to pre-sinusoidal portal hypertension in dogs: a retrospective analysis of 17 cases.

    PubMed

    James, F E; Knowles, G W; Mansfield, C S; Robertson, I D

    2008-05-01

    Accumulation of a pure transudate abdominal effusion in the absence of significant hypoalbuminaemia is uncommon in dogs and is due to pre-sinusoidal portal hypertension. Reported causes of pre-sinusoidal portal hypertension vary, but suggest a reasonable prognosis. A retrospective analysis of 17 dogs that presented to our institution with ascites due to pre-sinusoidal portal hypertension identified idiopathic hepatic fibrosis or canine chronic hepatitis as the underlying cause in the majority of cases. Twelve (70.5%) dogs were 4 years of age or younger at time of presentation. Total serum protein was higher in dogs with chronic hepatitis than it was in dogs without inflammatory disease. The prognosis was generally poor and no histological, imaging or biochemical parameters were useful as prognostic indicators. Dogs died or were euthanased due to severe clinical signs associated with the portal hypertension and/or perceived poor prognosis.

  7. [The application of sinusoidal modulated currents for the treatment of biliary sludge in an outpatient clinic].

    PubMed

    Filimonov, R M; Korotkova, D Iu; Buslavskaia, I O; Filimonova, T R

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate therapeutic effects of sinusoidal modulated currents (SMC) applied for the treatment of patients at different stages of biliary sludge (BS) under conditions of an outpatient clinic. Biliary sludge is currently considered to be a precursor of cholelithiasis known to be a leading pathology of the digestive system responsible for the high surgery rate. It was shown that the introduction of the technique based on sinusoidal modulated currents into the clinical practice of an outpatient clinic increases the efficacy of management of the patients presenting with stage 1 and 2 biliary sludge and showing neither well-apparent clinical symptoms nor signs of metabolic disorders that imply the necessity of more thorough examination and combined application of sinusoidal modulated currents and mediacmental therapy.

  8. Effects of frequency-modulated auditory tones on the voice fundamental frequency in humans.

    PubMed

    Sapir, S; McClean, M D; Luschei, E S

    1983-03-01

    The sensitivity of audio-laryngeal reflex pathways to sinusoidal changes in the fundamental frequency of complex auditory tones (AF0) was assessed indirectly in three young adult human subjects. The subjects sustained phonation at constant voice fundamental frequency (VF0) and voice intensity while listening to a sawtooth tone whose AF0 varied over time in a sinusoidal fashion (rates = 5-13 Hz). The subjects phonated at a low voice intensity so that the intensity of the auditory tone (80-85 dB SL) completely masked their voice. Using computer signal averaging and Fourier analysis techniques it was found that the sinusoidally modulated AF0 induced similar modulations in the VF0 signal. The VF0 modulations were extremely small in amplitude and showed large phase shifts relative to the auditory input. These findings are discussed in relation to the role of auditory feedback in phonatory control. PMID:6841812

  9. No effect of exposure to static and sinusoidal magnetic fields on nitric oxide production by macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Mnaimneh, S. |; Bizri, M. |; Veyret, B.

    1996-12-31

    The effects of exposure to static (1--100 mT) or sinusoidal (1 Hz, 1.6 mT) magnetic fields on the production of nitric oxide (NO) by murine BCG-activated macrophages were investigated. In these cells, the inducible isoform of NO synthase is present. No significant differences were observed in nitrite levels among exposed, sham-exposed, or control macrophages after exposure for 14 h to static fields of 1, 10, 50, and 100 mT and to sinusoidal 1.6 mT, 1 Hz magnetic fields.

  10. Gain results for low voltage FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, A.; Stuart, R.A.; Al-Shamma`a, A.

    1995-12-31

    We have designed and constructed a low voltage (130 kV) FEL system capable of operating in the microwave frequency range for which the electron beam current is cw (rather than pulsed) in time at a level of {approximately} 12 mA. The gain of this system has been measured as a function of the electron beam accelerating voltage and current level, and the input microwave frequency (8-10 GHz). The results are compared with the predictions of a simple theoretical model.

  11. Sinusoidal error perturbation reveals multiple coordinate systems for sensorymotor adaptation.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Todd E; Landy, Michael S

    2016-02-01

    A coordinate system is composed of an encoding, defining the dimensions of the space, and an origin. We examine the coordinate encoding used to update motor plans during sensory-motor adaptation to center-out reaches. Adaptation is induced using a novel paradigm in which feedback of reach endpoints is perturbed following a sinewave pattern over trials; the perturbed dimensions of the feedback were the axes of a Cartesian coordinate system in one session and a polar coordinate system in another session. For center-out reaches to randomly chosen target locations, reach errors observed at one target will require different corrections at other targets within Cartesian- and polar-coded systems. The sinewave adaptation technique allowed us to simultaneously adapt both dimensions of each coordinate system (x-y, or reach gain and angle), and identify the contributions of each perturbed dimension by adapting each at a distinct temporal frequency. The efficiency of this technique further allowed us to employ perturbations that were a fraction the size normally used, which avoids confounding automatic adaptive processes with deliberate adjustments made in response to obvious experimental manipulations. Subjects independently corrected errors in each coordinate in both sessions, suggesting that the nervous system encodes both a Cartesian- and polar-coordinate-based internal representation for motor adaptation. The gains and phase lags of the adaptive responses are not readily explained by current theories of sensory-motor adaptation.

  12. High voltage RF feedthrough bushing

    DOEpatents

    Grotz, Glenn F.

    1984-01-01

    Described is a multi-element, high voltage radio frequency bushing for trmitting RF energy to an antenna located in a vacuum container. The bushing includes a center conductor of complex geometrical shape, an outer coaxial shield conductor, and a thin-walled hollow truncated cone insulator disposed between central and outer conductors. The shape of the center conductor, which includes a reverse curvature portion formed of a radially inwardly directed shoulder and a convex portion, controls the uniformity of the axial surface gradient on the insulator cone. The outer shield has a first substantially cylindrical portion and a second radially inwardly extending truncated cone portion.

  13. Induction motor control system with voltage controlled oscillator circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J.; Currie, J. R.; Reid, H., Jr. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A voltage controlled oscillator circuit is reported in which there are employed first and second differential amplifiers. The first differential amplifier, being employed as an integrator, develops equal and opposite slopes proportional to an input voltage, and the second differential amplifier functions as a comparator to detect equal amplitude positive and negative selected limits and provides switching signals which gate a transistor switch. The integrating differential amplifier is switched between charging and discharging modes to provide an output of the first differential amplifier which upon the application of wave shaping provides a substantially sinusoidal output signal. A two phased version with a second integrator provides a second 90 deg phase shifted output for induction motor control.

  14. Bayesian spectral analysis of raw tree-ring IntCal04 data: No continuous sinusoids some short duration sinusoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palonen, V.; Tikkanen, P.

    2007-06-01

    An improved Bayesian model for detection of periodic signals is presented and applied to IntCal04 tree-ring data. Our previous model used a discrete-time autoregressive process to model the noise and here a continuous autoregressive process is implemented. In order to take into account the temporal width of the raw tree-ring data samples, the model function has been changed to a mean of the underlying signal for temporal interval of the datapoint. A wavelet-type variant of the model is also presented. It is shown that the presence of continuous cycles in the raw tree-ring data is doubtful. There is however evidence for wavelet-type temporally constrained high-frequency oscillations with periods in the 2-20 year range. The temporal location of these oscillations is given. It is probable that even these oscillations result from the measurement offsets between the datasets used for calibration.

  15. Inverter Surge Voltage Endurance with Various Surge Voltage Waveforms of Organic / Inorganic Nano-composite Enameled Wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Hideyuki; Hanawa, Hidehito

    We developed the new power supply that is able to output various kinds of surge voltage waveform and investigated partial discharge resistance of the nano-composite enameled wires using colloid solution mixing method. Experimental results revealed the relationship between surge voltage waveform and failure time of voltage endurance, as well as the difference in the strength and frequency of the partial discharge under the various kinds of surge voltage waveform. In addition, the developed nano-composite enameled wires have been verified to contribute to the improvement of the motor quality until the present time because long lifetime was confirmed in voltage endurance test with the damaged enameled wire and actual motor.

  16. The influence of large deformations on mechanical properties of sinusoidal ligament structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strek, Tomasz; Jopek, Hubert; Wojciechowski, Krzysztof W.

    2016-05-01

    Studies of mechanical properties of materials, both theoretical and experimental, usually deal with linear characteristics assuming a small range of deformations. In particular, not much research has been published devoted to large deformations of auxetic structures - i.e. structures exhibiting negative Poisson’s ratio. This paper is focused on mechanical properties of selected structures that are subject to large deformations. Four examples of structure built of sinusoidal ligaments are studied and for each geometry the impact of deformation size and geometrical parameters on the effective mechanical properties of these structures are investigated. It is shown that some of them are auxetic when compressed and non-auxetic when stretched. Geometrical parameters describing sinusoidal shape of ligaments strongly affect effective mechanical properties of the structure. In some cases of deformation, the increase of the value of amplitude of the sinusoidal shape decreases the effective Poisson’s ratio by 0.7. Therefore the influence of geometry, as well as the arrangement of ligaments allows for smart control of mechanical properties of the sinusoidal ligament structure being considered. Given the large deformation of the structure, both a linear elastic material model, and a hyperelastic Neo-Hookean material model are used.

  17. Oxaliplatin-induced sinusoidal obstruction syndrome mimicking metastatic colon cancer in the liver

    PubMed Central

    CHOI, JUNG-HYE; WON, YOUNG-WOONG; KIM, HYUN SUNG; OH, YOUNG-HA; LIM, SANGHYEOK; KIM, HAN-JOON

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is an effective chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of colorectal cancer; however, it may cause liver injury, particularly sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS). Although SOS does not usually present with focal lesions on radiological images, the present study describes the case of a 22-year-old woman with oxaliplatin-induced SOS mimicking metastatic colon cancer in the liver. An abdominal computed tomography revealed a novel 1 cm, low-density lesion in segment 1 of the liver following the administration of the fourth round of oxaliplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer. Since the lesion was indistinguishable from metastasis, even with detailed imaging studies, including magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography-computed tomography, an isolated caudate lobectomy was planned. The cut surface of the resected liver showed a localized reddish congested lesion measuring 1.4 cm in diameter. The adjacent hepatic parenchyma also demonstrated diffuse sinusoidal congestion with a nutmeg-like appearance. Histologically, the lesion exhibited severe sinusoidal congestion with peliosis hepatis-like features. The widened sinusoidal space was outlined by markedly attenuated hepatic cords and filled with erythrocytes. The final diagnosis was oxaliplatin-induced SOS. The patient recovered completely and was relapse-free at the time of writing. PMID:27073565

  18. A Perceptual Model for Sinusoidal Audio Coding Based on Spectral Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Par, Steven; Kohlrausch, Armin; Heusdens, Richard; Jensen, Jesper; Jensen, Søren Holdt

    2005-12-01

    Psychoacoustical models have been used extensively within audio coding applications over the past decades. Recently, parametric coding techniques have been applied to general audio and this has created the need for a psychoacoustical model that is specifically suited for sinusoidal modelling of audio signals. In this paper, we present a new perceptual model that predicts masked thresholds for sinusoidal distortions. The model relies on signal detection theory and incorporates more recent insights about spectral and temporal integration in auditory masking. As a consequence, the model is able to predict the distortion detectability. In fact, the distortion detectability defines a (perceptually relevant) norm on the underlying signal space which is beneficial for optimisation algorithms such as rate-distortion optimisation or linear predictive coding. We evaluate the merits of the model by combining it with a sinusoidal extraction method and compare the results with those obtained with the ISO MPEG-1 Layer I-II recommended model. Listening tests show a clear preference for the new model. More specifically, the model presented here leads to a reduction of more than 20% in terms of number of sinusoids needed to represent signals at a given quality level.

  19. Theoretical and experimental analysis of the propagation of sinusoidal signals in Bacteriorhodopsin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaya, S.; Candela, M.; Acebal, P.; Carretero, L.; Gomariz, M.; Madrigal, R. F.; Fimia, A.

    2014-05-01

    Time-delay of transmitted pulses with respect to the incident pulse in bacteriorhodopsin films has been studied without the use of a pump beam. Based on a modified saturable absorber model, analytical expressions of the transmitted pulse have been obtained. As a result, time delay, distortion and fractional delay have been theoretically analyzed for sinusoidal pulses with a low background.

  20. Utilization of HPASubC for the Identification of Sinusoid-Specific Proteins in the Liver.

    PubMed

    Anene, Divine-Favour; Rosenberg, Avi Z; Kleiner, David E; Cornish, Toby C; Halushka, Marc K

    2016-05-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomes of human organs and tissues are powerful tools but fail to capture protein localization and expression at the cellular level. For example, the proteome signal in liver represents the combined protein expression across diverse cellular constituents that include hepatocytes, Kupffer cells, endothelial cells, and others. We utilized HPASubC and the Human Protein Atlas (HPA) to identify the sinusoidal component of protein liver expression to further subset and organize this homogeneous signal. We evaluated 51 109 liver images covering 13 197 proteins from the HPA and discovered 1054 proteins that were exclusive to sinusoidal cells. Sinusoidal staining patterns were identified in a Kupffer cell (n = 247), endothelial cell (n = 358), or lymphocyte (n = 86) specific pattern. Two-hundred and thirty-nine of these proteins were not present in the NextProt or Human Proteome Map liver data sets, potentially expanding our knowledge of the liver proteome. We additionally demonstrate unique endothelial cell expression patterns that distinguish between portal vein, hepatic artery, capillary sinusoids, and central vein regions. These findings significantly improve our understanding of the liver proteome with insight into the endothelial complexity across the hepatic vascular network. PMID:27005832

  1. Large endolymphatic potentials from low-frequency and infrasonic tones in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Salt, Alec N; Lichtenhan, Jeffery T; Gill, Ruth M; Hartsock, Jared J

    2013-03-01

    Responses of the ear to low-frequency and infrasonic sounds have not been extensively studied. Understanding how the ear responds to low frequencies is increasingly important as environmental infrasounds are becoming more pervasive from sources such as wind turbines. This study shows endolymphatic potentials in the third cochlear turn from acoustic infrasound (5 Hz) are larger than from tones in the audible range (e.g., 50 and 500 Hz), in some cases with peak-to-peak amplitude greater than 20 mV. These large potentials were suppressed by higher-frequency tones and were rapidly abolished by perilymphatic injection of KCl at the cochlear apex, demonstrating their third-turn origins. Endolymphatic iso-potentials from 5 to 500 Hz were enhanced relative to perilymphatic potentials as frequency was lowered. Probe and infrasonic bias tones were used to study the origin of the enhanced potentials. Potentials were best explained as a saturating response summed with a sinusoidal voltage (Vo), that was phase delayed by an average of 60° relative to the biasing effects of the infrasound. Vo is thought to arise indirectly from hair cell activity, such as from strial potential changes caused by sustained current changes through the hair cells in each half cycle of the infrasound. PMID:23464026

  2. A frequency-control particle separation device based on resultant effects of electroosmosis and dielectrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shiang-Chi; Tung, Yi-Chung; Lin, Chih-Ting

    2016-08-01

    Particle separation plays an important role in microfluidic sample preparation for various biomedical applications. In this paper, we report a particle manipulation and separation scheme using a microfluidic device based on low-volume/low-voltage electrokinetic frequency modulation. Utilizing a circular micro-electrode array, both electroosmosis and dielectrophoresis can be contributed to manipulate particles in the device by controlling the frequency of applied sinusoidal travelling wave signals. Theoretical simulations based on finite-element methods are employed to establish fundamental understanding of the developed scheme. For experimental demonstration, polystyrene beads (6 μm in diameter) and human promyelocytic leukaemia cells (HL-60) are used to validate the frequency-modulation effect. Furthermore, different diameter polystyrene beads (6 μm and 10 μm in diameter) are mixed to show potentials of precise particle separations (˜90% efficiency) by the reported frequency-controlled electrokinetic device. The developed technique can be exploited as an actuation scheme and particle manipulation method for microfluidic sample preparations of low ionic concentration samples.

  3. Voltage verification unit

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Edward J.

    2008-01-15

    A voltage verification unit and method for determining the absence of potentially dangerous potentials within a power supply enclosure without Mode 2 work is disclosed. With this device and method, a qualified worker, following a relatively simple protocol that involves a function test (hot, cold, hot) of the voltage verification unit before Lock Out/Tag Out and, and once the Lock Out/Tag Out is completed, testing or "trying" by simply reading a display on the voltage verification unit can be accomplished without exposure of the operator to the interior of the voltage supply enclosure. According to a preferred embodiment, the voltage verification unit includes test leads to allow diagnostics with other meters, without the necessity of accessing potentially dangerous bus bars or the like.

  4. Interaction of CD44 and hyaluronan is the dominant mechanism for neutrophil sequestration in inflamed liver sinusoids

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Braedon; McAvoy, Erin F.; Lam, Florence; Gill, Varinder; de la Motte, Carol; Savani, Rashmin C.; Kubes, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Adhesion molecules known to be important for neutrophil recruitment in many other organs are not involved in recruitment of neutrophils into the sinusoids of the liver. The prevailing view is that neutrophils become physically trapped in inflamed liver sinusoids. In this study, we used a biopanning approach to identify hyaluronan (HA) as disproportionately expressed in the liver versus other organs under both basal and inflammatory conditions. Spinning disk intravital microscopy revealed that constitutive HA expression was restricted to liver sinusoids. Blocking CD44–HA interactions reduced neutrophil adhesion in the sinusoids of endotoxemic mice, with no effect on rolling or adhesion in postsinusoidal venules. Neutrophil but not endothelial CD44 was required for adhesion in sinusoids, yet neutrophil CD44 avidity for HA did not increase significantly in endotoxemia. Instead, activation of CD44–HA engagement via qualitative modification of HA was demonstrated by a dramatic induction of serum-derived HA-associated protein in sinusoids in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS-induced hepatic injury was significantly reduced by blocking CD44–HA interactions. Administration of anti-CD44 antibody 4 hours after LPS rapidly detached adherent neutrophils in sinusoids and improved sinusoidal perfusion in endotoxemic mice, revealing CD44 as a potential therapeutic target in systemic inflammatory responses involving the liver. PMID:18362172

  5. Advanced Sensors for Accurate, Broadband AC Voltage Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipe, Thomas E.; Kinard, Joseph R.; Novotny, Donald B.; Sims, June E.

    2013-06-01

    We report on advances in ac voltage metrology made possible by a new generation of Multijunction Thermal Converters (MJTCs). Although intended for use primarily in high-frequency (1 MHz to 100 MHz) metrology, their exceptional low-frequency qualities, combined with a large dynamic range, makes these MJTCs excellent devices for the frequency range 10 Hz to 100 MHz at voltages from 1 V to 20 V, depending on the design. We anticipate that these devices will form the future basis for ac voltage metrology at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

  6. A neural mechanism of phase-locked responses to sinusoidally amplitude-modulated signals in the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Kato, Takayuki; Fujita, Kazuhisa; Kashimori, Yoshiki

    2015-08-01

    The central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICc) is an auditory region that receives convergent inputs from a large number of lower auditory nuclei. ICc neurons phase-lock to low frequencies of sinusoidally amplitude-modulated (SAM) signals but have a different mechanism in the phase-locking from that in neurons of lower nuclei. In the mustached bat, the phase-locking ability in lower nuclei is created by the coincidence of phase-locked excitatory and inhibitory inputs that have slightly different latencies. In contrast, the phase-locking property of ICc neurons is little influenced by the blocking of inhibitory synapses. Moreover, ICc neurons exhibit different characteristics in the spike patterns and synchronicity, classified here by three types of ICc neurons, or sustained, onset, and non-onset phase-locking neurons. However it remains unclear how ICc neurons create the phase-locking ability and the different characteristics. To address this issue, we developed a model of ICc neuronal population. Using this model, we show that the phase-locking ability of ICc neurons to low SAM frequencies is created by an intrinsic membrane property of ICc neuron, limited by inhibitory ion channels. We also show that response characteristics of the three types of neurons arise from the difference in an inhibitory effect sensitive to SAM frequencies. Our model reproduces well the experimental results observed in the mustached bat. These findings provide necessary conditions of how ICc neurons can give rise to the phase-locking ability and characteristic responses to low SAM frequencies. PMID:26032987

  7. Voltage balanced multilevel voltage source converter system

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Fang Zheng; Lai, Jih-Sheng

    1997-01-01

    A voltage balanced multilevel converter for high power AC applications such as adjustable speed motor drives and back-to-back DC intertie of adjacent power systems. This converter provides a multilevel rectifier, a multilevel inverter, and a DC link between the rectifier and the inverter allowing voltage balancing between each of the voltage levels within the multilevel converter. The rectifier is equipped with at least one phase leg and a source input node for each of the phases. The rectifier is further equipped with a plurality of rectifier DC output nodes. The inverter is equipped with at least one phase leg and a load output node for each of the phases. The inverter is further equipped with a plurality of inverter DC input nodes. The DC link is equipped with a plurality of rectifier charging means and a plurality of inverter discharging means. The plurality of rectifier charging means are connected in series with one of the rectifier charging means disposed between and connected in an operable relationship with each adjacent pair of rectifier DC output nodes. The plurality of inverter discharging means are connected in series with one of the inverter discharging means disposed between and connected in an operable relationship with each adjacent pair of inverter DC input nodes. Each of said rectifier DC output nodes are individually electrically connected to the respective inverter DC input nodes. By this means, each of the rectifier DC output nodes and each of the inverter DC input nodes are voltage balanced by the respective charging and discharging of the rectifier charging means and the inverter discharging means.

  8. Voltage balanced multilevel voltage source converter system

    DOEpatents

    Peng, F.Z.; Lai, J.S.

    1997-07-01

    Disclosed is a voltage balanced multilevel converter for high power AC applications such as adjustable speed motor drives and back-to-back DC intertie of adjacent power systems. This converter provides a multilevel rectifier, a multilevel inverter, and a DC link between the rectifier and the inverter allowing voltage balancing between each of the voltage levels within the multilevel converter. The rectifier is equipped with at least one phase leg and a source input node for each of the phases. The rectifier is further equipped with a plurality of rectifier DC output nodes. The inverter is equipped with at least one phase leg and a load output node for each of the phases. The inverter is further equipped with a plurality of inverter DC input nodes. The DC link is equipped with a plurality of rectifier charging means and a plurality of inverter discharging means. The plurality of rectifier charging means are connected in series with one of the rectifier charging means disposed between and connected in an operable relationship with each adjacent pair of rectifier DC output nodes. The plurality of inverter discharging means are connected in series with one of the inverter discharging means disposed between and connected in an operable relationship with each adjacent pair of inverter DC input nodes. Each of said rectifier DC output nodes are individually electrically connected to the respective inverter DC input nodes. By this means, each of the rectifier DC output nodes and each of the inverter DC input nodes are voltage balanced by the respective charging and discharging of the rectifier charging means and the inverter discharging means. 15 figs.

  9. Low voltage to high voltage level shifter and related methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mentze, Erik J. (Inventor); Hess, Herbert L. (Inventor); Buck, Kevin M. (Inventor); Cox, David F. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A shifter circuit comprises a high and low voltage buffer stages and an output buffer stage. The high voltage buffer stage comprises multiple transistors arranged in a transistor stack having a plurality of intermediate nodes connecting individual transistors along the stack. The transistor stack is connected between a voltage level being shifted to and an input voltage. An inverter of this stage comprises multiple inputs and an output. Inverter inputs are connected to a respective intermediate node of the transistor stack. The low voltage buffer stage has an input connected to the input voltage and an output, and is operably connected to the high voltage buffer stage. The low voltage buffer stage is connected between a voltage level being shifted away from and a lower voltage. The output buffer stage is driven by the outputs of the high voltage buffer stage inverter and the low voltage buffer stage.

  10. Automatic ac/dc thermal voltage converter and ac voltage calibration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lentner, K. J.; Flach, D. R.; Bell, B. A.

    1984-11-01

    An automatic ac/dc difference calibration system is described which uses direct measurement of thermoelement emfs. In addition to ac/dc difference testing, the system can be used to measure some important characteristics of thermoelements, as well as to calibrate ac voltage calibrators and precision voltmeters. The system operates over a frequency range from 20 Hz to 100 kHz, covering the voltage range from 0.5 V to 1 kv. For all voltages the total measurement uncertainties expected (including the uncertainty of the specific reference thermal converters used) were 50 parts per million (ppm) at frequencies from 20 Hz to 20 kHz, inclusive, and 100 ppm at higher frequencies up to 100 kHz.

  11. A multilevel voltage-source inverter with separate dc sources for static var generation

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Fang Zheng |; Lai, Jih-Sheng; McKeever, J.; VanCoevering, J.

    1995-09-01

    A new multilevel voltage-source inverter with a separate dc sources is proposed for high-voltage, high-power applications, such as flexible ac transmission systems (FACTS) including static var generation (SVG), power line conditioning, series compensation, phase shifting, voltage balancing, fuel cell and photovoltaic utility systems interfacing, etc. The new M-level inverter consists of (M-1)/2 single phase full bridges in which each bridge has its own separate dc source. This inverter can generate almost sinusoidal waveform voltage with only one time switching per cycle as the number of levels increases. It can solve the problems of conventional transformer-based multipulse inverters and the problems of the multilevel diode-clamped inverter and the multilevel flying capacitor inverter. To demonstrate the superiority of the new inverter, a SVG system using the new inverter topology is discussed through analysis, simulation and experiment.

  12. Analytical model for the radio-frequency sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2013-12-01

    symmetry. The externally applied rf voltage is assumed to be sinusoidal, although the model can be extended to arbitrary wave forms, e.g., for dual-frequency discharges. The model calculates explicitly the cubic correction parameter in the charge-voltage relation for the case of highly asymmetric discharges. It is shown that the cubic correction is generally moderate but more pronounced in the collisionless case. The analytical results are compared to experimental data from the literature obtained by laser electric field measurements of the mean and dynamic fields in the capacitive sheath for various gases and pressures. Very good agreement is found throughout.

  13. Defect of Fc receptors and phenotypical changes in sinusoidal endothelial cells in human liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed Central

    Muro, H.; Shirasawa, H.; Kosugi, I.; Nakamura, S.

    1993-01-01

    To analyze the pathological changes occurring in Fc receptors (FcRs) in sinusoidal endothelial cells (SECs) in chronic liver diseases, we first characterized immunohistochemically the SEC FcRs by using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to FcRs and then investigated the distribution of the SEC FcRs by using peroxidase-antiperoxidase IgG complexes as a ligand on frozen sections. MAb 2E1 to FcRII reacted with SECs in a similar manner to peroxidase-antiperoxidase IgG and blocked the peroxidase-antiperoxidase IgG binding to SECs, whereas MAbs 3G8 and Leu-11b to FcRIII did not. FcRs in normal liver were found along the sinusoidal walls, except for those in the outer periportal zones, but FcRs in chronic active hepatitis and cirrhosis were intermittently or focally absent. The lengths of the FcR-positive portion of sinusoids in unit areas were respectively about 54% and 76% of the normal values in active and inactive cirrhosis. Where FcRs were absent, the MAbs CD36, CD31, and EN4 revealed the presence of sinusoids and, in active cirrhosis, frequently the thickening of liver cell plates. The FcR-negative SECs in the outer periportal zones of normal livers were different from the SECs of other sites in the presence of PAL-E antigen and a rich amount of EN4 antigen, though these sinusoids possessed Kupffer cells and no perisinusoidal deposition of laminin. The FcR-negative SECs in liver diseases occasionally presented the character of ordinary blood vessels, viz., PAL-E antigen, CD34 antigen, and a deficiency of Kupffer cells, regardless of perisinusoidal laminin deposition. However, they preserved the character of normally FcR-possessing SECs, viz., CD36 antigen, and a small amount of EN4 and CD31 antigens. These findings indicate that the outer-periportal SECs in normal livers are phenotypically different from other SECs and that the SECs in diseased livers frequently undergo phenotypical changes, including loss of FcRs, regardless of perisinusoidal laminin deposition, i

  14. Electron microscope study on the hepatic sinusoidal wall and fat-storing cells in the bat.

    PubMed

    Tanuma, Y; Ito, T

    1978-02-01

    The three cell types known to form the hepatic sinusoidal wall were electron microscopically observed in three kinds of bats captured in winter and summer. 1. The cytoplasmic extensions of sinusoidal endothelial cells consisted of continuous thicker parts ("cytoplasmic processes") and discontinuous thinner parts ("sieve plates"). The alternate disposition of the two parts was rather irregular, and the sizes, shapes and spacings of the fenestrae were variable. In the thinner parts with numerous small fenestrae, larger gaps were also mingled. The endothelium was simple-layered and devoid of basal lamina. Interendothelial junctions were found mainly between closely apposed margins of the "cytoplasmic processes" and agreed in structure with the "junctional complex" of WISSE (1970). 2. Kupffer cells, morphologically distinct from the endothelial cells, bulged strongly into the sinusoidal lumen. Provided with many microvillous pseudopods, they were stellate in appearance. They were fixed to the endothelial lining by small junctional areas which occurred between the Kupffer cell body and the "cytoplasmic processes" of the endothelium. 3. Fat-storing cells were located in the Disse's space. They generally contained only smaller amounts of lipid in a few droplets. So-called empty fat-storing cells were numerous, especially in winter bats. The perikaryonal cytoplasm revealed a large Golgi complex and well-developed granular endoplasmic reticulum. The three mesenchymal cell types of the sinusoidal wall possessed the centriole in common within the Golgi complex, but only the fat-storing cell was provided with the single cilium. Fat-storing cells extended cytoplasmic processes ramifying beneath the endothelial lining occasionally surrounding the sinusoids almost completely, and which seemed to reinforce the endothelial lining and to bring about the constriction of the sinusoid. In hypervitaminotic bats that daily received 6,000 I.U. vitamin A for three days, remarkable increase

  15. Imaging voltage in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Peterka, Darcy S.; Takahashi, Hiroto; Yuste, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    In the last decades, imaging membrane potential has become a fruitful approach to study neural circuits, especially in invertebrate preparations with large, resilient neurons. At the same time, particularly in mammalian preparations, voltage imaging methods suffer from poor signal to noise and secondary side effects, and they fall short of providing single-cell resolution when imaging of the activity of neuronal populations. As an introduction to these techniques, we briefly review different voltage imaging methods (including organic fluorophores, SHG chromophores, genetic indicators, hybrid, nanoparticles and intrinsic approaches), and illustrate some of their applications to neuronal biophysics and mammalian circuit analysis. We discuss their mechanisms of voltage sensitivity, from reorientation, electrochromic or electro-optical phenomena, to interaction among chromophores or membrane scattering, and highlight their advantages and shortcomings, commenting on the outlook for development of novel voltage imaging methods. PMID:21220095

  16. High voltage DC power supply

    DOEpatents

    Droege, T.F.

    1989-12-19

    A high voltage DC power supply having a first series resistor at the output for limiting current in the event of a short-circuited output, a second series resistor for sensing the magnitude of output current, and a voltage divider circuit for providing a source of feedback voltage for use in voltage regulation is disclosed. The voltage divider circuit is coupled to the second series resistor so as to compensate the feedback voltage for a voltage drop across the first series resistor. The power supply also includes a pulse-width modulated control circuit, having dual clock signals, which is responsive to both the feedback voltage and a command voltage, and also includes voltage and current measuring circuits responsive to the feedback voltage and the voltage developed across the second series resistor respectively. 7 figs.

  17. High voltage DC power supply

    DOEpatents

    Droege, Thomas F.

    1989-01-01

    A high voltage DC power supply having a first series resistor at the output for limiting current in the event of a short-circuited output, a second series resistor for sensing the magnitude of output current, and a voltage divider circuit for providing a source of feedback voltage for use in voltage regulation is disclosed. The voltage divider circuit is coupled to the second series resistor so as to compensate the feedback voltage for a voltage drop across the first series resistor. The power supply also includes a pulse-width modulated control circuit, having dual clock signals, which is responsive to both the feedback voltage and a command voltage, and also includes voltage and current measuring circuits responsive to the feedback voltage and the voltage developed across the second series resistor respectively.

  18. Influence of fog parameters on withstand voltage of contaminated insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Naito, K.; Ito, M.; Katsukawa, H.; Kawaguchi, T.; Suzuki, Y.

    1983-03-01

    This paper describes the investigation results of fog parameters which affect the withstand voltage of contaminated insulators. As a result, the guideline is proposed on fog conditions such as density, droplet size distribution, temperature rise in the fog room, and so on, basing upon the comparison between natural and artificial fog conditions and the relation between fog condition and power-frequency withstand voltage.

  19. An Ultra-Low Voltage Analog Front End for Strain Gauge Sensory System Application in 0.18µm CMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edward, Alexander; Chan, Pak Kwong

    This paper presents analysis and design of a new ultra-low voltage analog front end (AFE) dedicated to strain sensor applications. The AFE, designed in 0.18µm CMOS process, features a chopper-stabilized instrumentation amplifier (IA), a balanced active MOSFET-C 2nd order low pass filter (LPF), a clock generator and a voltage booster which operate at supply voltage (Vdd) of 0.6V. The designed IA achieves 30dB of closed-loop gain, 101dB of common-mode rejection ratio (CMRR) at 50Hz, 80dB of power-supply rejection ratio (PSRR) at 50Hz, thermal noise floor of 53.4 nV/√Hz, current consumption of 14µA, and noise efficiency factor (NEF) of 9.7. The high CMRR and rail-to-rail output swing capability is attributed to a new low voltage realization of the active-bootstrapped technique using a pseudo-differential gain-boosting operational transconductance amplifier (OTA) and proposed current-driven bulk (CDB) biasing technique. An output capacitor-less low-dropout regulator (LDO), with a new fast start-up LPF technique, is used to regulate this 0.6V supply from a 0.8-1.0V energy harvesting power source. It achieves power supply rejection (PSR) of 42dB at frequency of 1MHz. A cascode compensated pseudo differential amplifier is used as the filter's building block for low power design. The filter's single-ended-to-balanced converter is implemented using a new low voltage amplifier with two-stage common-mode cancellation. The overall AFE was simulated to have 65.6dB of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), total harmonic distortion (THD) of less than 0.9% for a 100Hz sinusoidal maximum input signal, bandwidth of 2kHz, and power consumption of 51.2µW. Spectre RF simulations were performed to validate the design using BSIM3V3 transistor models provided by GLOBALFOUNDRIES 0.18µm CMOS process.

  20. Silicon-Germanium Voltage-Controlled Oscillator at 105 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Alden; Larocca, Tim; Chang, M. Frank; Samoska, Lorene A.

    2011-01-01

    A group at UCLA, in collaboration with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, has designed a voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) created specifically for a compact, integrated, electronically tunable frequency generator useable for submillimeter- wave science instruments operating in extreme cold environments.

  1. The Nonlocal Dual Phase Lag Model of a Thermoelastic Nanobeam Subjected to a Sinusoidal Pulse Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenkour, Ashraf M.; Abouelregal, Ahmed E.

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the vibration phenomenon of a nanobeam subjected to a sinusoidal pulse varying heat. A unified generalized nonlocal thermoelasticity model with dual phase lag (DPL) is deduced to solve this problem. The nonlocal theories of coupled thermoelasticity, generalized thermoelasticity with one relaxation time, and without energy dissipation can be extracted as limited and special cases of the present model. An analytical technique based on Laplace transform is used to calculate the vibration of deflection and the temperature. The inverse of Laplace transforms is computed numerically using Fourier expansion techniques. The effects of the nonlocal parameter, the phase lags, and the pulse width of the sinusoidal pulse are studied on the lateral vibration, the temperature, and the displacement of the nanobeam. Comparisons among the effects of the phase lags and the pulse width are discussed.

  2. Single orthogonal sinusoidal grating for gamma correction in digital projection phase measuring profilometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yanshan; Cao, Yiping; Wu, Yingchun; Shi, Shunping

    2013-05-01

    The gamma nonlinearity of the digital projector leads to obvious phase errors in the phase measuring profilometry. Based on the Fourier spectrum analysis of the captured pattern, a robust gamma correction method is proposed in this paper. An orthogonal sinusoidal grating precoded with two different known gamma values is used to evaluate the gamma value of the pattern. The evaluated gamma value is then encoded into the computer-generated phase-shifting fringe patterns before the fringe patterns are sent to the digital projector, which makes the captured fringe patterns well-sinusoidal and alleviates the phase errors caused by the gamma nonlinearity. Compared with other gamma correction methods, only one captured pattern is needed to evaluate the gamma value without loss of the accuracy. With the proposed method, a fast and accurate three-dimensional shape measurement can be achieved using the conventional three-step phase-shifting algorithm. Experiments have verified its feasibility and validity.

  3. Spur-Reduced Digital Sinusoid Generation Using Higher-Order Phase Dithering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flanagan, M.; Zimmerman, G.

    1993-01-01

    A higher-order phase dithering technique that reduces the complexity of digital sinusoid generation is presented and analyzed. M(sup th) order phase dithering denotes the addition of M independent, uniform variates to the sinusoid phase prior to word-length reduction. Spurious magnitudes due to quantization effects are accelerated from the usual -6 dBc per phase bit to -6(M + 1) dBc per phase bit, while the noise power increases linearly in M. For a given spurious specification, higher-order phase dithering permits the use of fewer phase bits than the non-dithered system, resulting in an exponential reduction in look-up table size, dramatically decreasing system complexity.

  4. Discrimination of steady state and transient state of dither extremum seeking control via sinusoidal detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Baojie; Li, Yaoyu; Seem, John E.

    2016-08-01

    A major class of extremum seeking control (ESC) is based on the use of periodic dither perturbation of plant input for extracting the gradient information. Presence of the dither input into the steady state operation is undesirable in practice due to the possible excessive wear of actuators. It is thus beneficial to stop the dithering action after the ESC reaches its steady state. In this paper, we propose a method for automatically discriminating between the steady state and the transient state modes of extremum seeking control process using the sinusoidal detection techniques. Some design guidelines are proposed for the parameter selection of the relevant sinusoidal detection scheme. The proposed scheme is validated with simulation study on dynamic virtual plant of two building HVAC systems.

  5. Bone marrow long label-retaining cells reside in the sinusoidal hypoxic niche

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, Yoshiaki; Takubo, Keiyo; Suda, Toshio

    2008-02-08

    In response to changing signals, quiescent hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) can be induced to an activated cycling state and provide multi-lineage hematopoietic cells to the whole body via blood vessels. However, the precise localization of quiescent HSCs in bone marrow microenvironment is not fully characterized. Here, we performed whole-mount immunostaining of bone marrow and found that BrdU label-retaining cells (LRCs) definitively reside in the sinusoidal hypoxic zone distant from the 'vascular niche'. Although LRCs expressed very low level of a well-known HSC marker, c-kit in normal circumstances, myeloablation by 5-FU treatment caused LRCs to abundantly express c-kit and proliferate actively. These results demonstrate that bone marrow LRCs reside in the sinusoidal hypoxic niche, and function as a regenerative cell pool of HSCs.

  6. Effects of ramped amplitude waveforms on the onset response of high-frequency mammalian nerve block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, J. D.; Kilgore, K. L.; Bhadra, N.; Lahowetz, E. A.

    2007-12-01

    Though high-frequency alternating current (HFAC) can block nerve conduction, the block is invariably preceded by an onset response which is a period of repetitive nerve firing. We tested the hypothesis that slowly ramping up the amplitude of the HFAC waveform could produce block without this initial onset response. Computer simulations were performed, using the McIntyre-Richardson-Grill (MRG) model of myelinated mammalian axon. A ramped-amplitude HFAC was applied to axons of diameters ranging from 7.3 µm to 16 µm and at frequencies ranging from 3125 Hz to 40 kHz. The ramped-amplitude HFAC was also investigated in vivo in preparations of rat sciatic nerve. Sinusoidal voltage-regulated waveforms, at frequencies between 10 kHz and 30 kHz, were applied with initial amplitudes of 0 V, linearly increasing with time to 10 V. Ramp durations ranged from 0 s to 60 s. In both the MRG model simulations and the experiments, ramping the HFAC waveform did not eliminate the onset response. In the rat experiments, the peak amplitude of the onset response was lessened by ramping the amplitude, but both the onset response duration and the amount of onset activity as measured by the force-time integral were increased.

  7. Fundamental Frequency Switching Control of Seven-Level Hybrid Cascaded H-bridge Multilevel Inverter

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Zhong; Chiasson, John N; Ozpineci, Burak; Tolbert, Leon M

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a cascaded H-bridge multilevel inverter that can be implemented using only a single dc power source and capacitors. Standard cascaded multilevel inverters require n dc sources for 2n + 1 levels. Without requiring transformers, the scheme proposed here allows the use of a single dc power source (e.g., a battery or a fuel cell stack) with the remaining n-1 dc sources being capacitors, which is referred to as hybrid cascaded H-bridge multilevel inverter (HCMLI) in this paper. It is shown that the inverter can simultaneously maintain the dc voltage level of the capacitors and choose a fundamental frequency switching pattern to produce a nearly sinusoidal output. HCMLI using only a single dc source for each phase is promising for high-power motor drive applications as it significantly decreases the number of required dc power supplies, provides high-quality output power due to its high number of output levels, and results in high conversion efficiency and low thermal stress as it uses a fundamental frequency switching scheme. This paper mainly discusses control of seven-level HCMLI with fundamental frequency switching control and how its modulation index range can be extended using triplen harmonic compensation.

  8. Highly enhanced avalanche probability using sinusoidally-gated silicon avalanche photodiode

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Shingo; Namekata, Naoto Inoue, Shuichiro; Tsujino, Kenji

    2014-01-27

    We report on visible light single photon detection using a sinusoidally-gated silicon avalanche photodiode. Detection efficiency of 70.6% was achieved at a wavelength of 520 nm when an electrically cooled silicon avalanche photodiode with a quantum efficiency of 72.4% was used, which implies that a photo-excited single charge carrier in a silicon avalanche photodiode can trigger a detectable avalanche (charge) signal with a probability of 97.6%.

  9. Bouncing ball dynamics: Simple model of motion of the table and sinusoidal motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okniński, Andrzej; Radziszewski, Bogusław

    2014-10-01

    Nonlinear dynamics of a bouncing ball moving vertically in a gravitational field and colliding with a moving limiter is considered and the Poincar\\'e map, describing evolution from an impact to the next impact, is described. Displacement of the table is approximated in one period by four cubic polynomials. Results obtained for this model are used to elucidate dynamics of the standard model of bouncing ball with sinusoidal motion of the limiter.

  10. Sinusoidal gratings for optimized light management in c-Si thin-film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, Klaus; Köppel, Grit; Barth, Carlo; Hammerschmidt, Martin; Herrmann, Sven; Burger, Sven; Schmidt, Frank; Becker, Christiane

    2016-04-01

    Hexagonal sinusoidal nanotextures are well suited to couple light into silicon on glass at normal incidence, as we have shown in an earlier publication [K. Jäger et al., Opt. Express 24, A569 (2016)]. In this manuscript we discuss how these nanotextures perform under oblique incidence illumination. For this numerical study we use a rigorous solver for the Maxwell equations. We discuss nanotextures with periods between 350 nm and 730 nm and an aspect ratio of 0.5.

  11. High voltage pulse generator

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.

    1977-03-08

    An improved high-voltage pulse generator has been provided which is especially useful in ultrasonic testing of rock core samples. An N number of capacitors are charged in parallel to V volts and at the proper instance are coupled in series to produce a high-voltage pulse of N times V volts. Rapid switching of the capacitors from the paralleled charging configuration to the series discharging configuration is accomplished by using silicon-controlled rectifiers which are chain self-triggered following the initial triggering of a first one of the rectifiers connected between the first and second of the plurality of charging capacitors. A timing and triggering circuit is provided to properly synchronize triggering pulses to the first SCR at a time when the charging voltage is not being applied to the parallel-connected charging capacitors. Alternate circuits are provided for controlling the application of the charging voltage from a charging circuit to be applied to the parallel capacitors which provides a selection of at least two different intervals in which the charging voltage is turned "off" to allow the SCR's connecting the capacitors in series to turn "off" before recharging begins. The high-voltage pulse-generating circuit including the N capacitors and corresponding SCR's which connect the capacitors in series when triggered "on" further includes diodes and series-connected inductors between the parallel-connected charging capacitors which allow sufficiently fast charging of the capacitors for a high pulse repetition rate and yet allow considerable control of the decay time of the high-voltage pulses from the pulse-generating circuit.

  12. Device for monitoring cell voltage

    DOEpatents

    Doepke, Matthias; Eisermann, Henning

    2012-08-21

    A device for monitoring a rechargeable battery having a number of electrically connected cells includes at least one current interruption switch for interrupting current flowing through at least one associated cell and a plurality of monitoring units for detecting cell voltage. Each monitoring unit is associated with a single cell and includes a reference voltage unit for producing a defined reference threshold voltage and a voltage comparison unit for comparing the reference threshold voltage with a partial cell voltage of the associated cell. The reference voltage unit is electrically supplied from the cell voltage of the associated cell. The voltage comparison unit is coupled to the at least one current interruption switch for interrupting the current of at least the current flowing through the associated cell, with a defined minimum difference between the reference threshold voltage and the partial cell voltage.

  13. Propagation of Sinusoidally-Corrugated Shock Fronts of Laser-Supported Detonations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, T.; Kawaguchi, A.; Hanta, Y.; Susa, A.; Namba, S.; Johzaki, T.; Endo, T.; Shiraga, H.; Shigemori, K.; Koga, M.; Nagatomo, H.

    The behavior of sinusoidally-rippled shock fronts is a fundamental research topic in the dynamics of shock waves [1]. The Whitham's ray-shock theory, which is sometimes called the geometrical-shock-dynamics (GSD) theory, is known as a simple method for analyzing the behavior of a non-planar shock front. In this theory, narrow ray tubes corresponding to the light rays in the geometrical optics are placed perpendicularly to the every portions of a non-planar shock front, and the evolution of the shock front is calculated by tracking the shock front in each ray tube sequentially. When the behavior of an inert sinusoidally-rippled shock front is analyzed by the GSD theory and the Chester-Chisnell-Whitham's (CCW's) A-M relationship [2], where A is the cross-sectional area of a ray tube and M is the propagation Mach number of the shock wave in the ray tube, the amplitude of the shock-front ripple oscillates as the shock wave propagates [3]. Actually, the behavior of an inert sinusoidally-rippled shock front is influenced by the fluid motion in the shock-compressed region, and the amplitude of the shock-front ripple shows damped oscillation as the shock wave propagates [1,3,4,5].

  14. Motion stability analysis of non-sinusoidal oscillation of mold driven by servomotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yunfeng; Li, Junxia; Fang, Yiming

    2015-11-01

    The investments of the electro-hydraulic servo system of the mold non-sinusoidal oscillator are great, the modification ratio of the mechanical type is unable to be adjusted online, and some continuous casters suffer from server resonance during the casting. A mold non-sinusoidal oscillation mechanism driven by servomotor is proposed and the prototype is produced in the lab, the investment is low and the modification ratio is can be adjusted online, and the stability problem is studied. At first the dynamics model of the servomotor non-sinusoidal oscillation is established, and the kinematics differential function is deduced. Furthermore, based on the harmonic balance method, the eigenvalues of the system are solved; the criterion of the stability of the system is put forward. In addition, the eigenvalues and harmonic with different oscillating parameters are analyzed. Analytical results show that the real parts of the eigenvalues are positive, the system will be unstable, and the resonance will occur when the positive real parts of the eigenvalues are extremum. A foundation is established for solving the running smooth problem and next application of this mechanism.

  15. Nonpulsed sinusoidal electromagnetic fields as a noninvasive strategy in bone repair: the effect on human mesenchymal stem cell osteogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ledda, Mario; D'Emilia, Enrico; Giuliani, Livio; Marchese, Rodolfo; Foletti, Alberto; Grimaldi, Settimio; Lisi, Antonella

    2015-02-01

    In vivo control of osteoblast differentiation is an important process needed to maintain the continuous supply of mature osteoblast cells for growth, repair, and remodeling of bones. The regulation of this process has also an important and significant impact on the clinical strategies and future applications of cell therapy. In this article, we studied the effect of nonpulsed sinusoidal electromagnetic field radiation tuned at calcium-ion cyclotron frequency of 50 Hz exposure treatment for bone differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) alone or in synergy with dexamethasone, their canonical chemical differentiation agent. Five days of continuous exposure to calcium-ion cyclotron resonance affect hMSC proliferation, morphology, and cytoskeletal actin reorganization. By quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, we also observed an increase of osteoblast differentiation marker expression such as Runx2, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin (OC), and osteopontin (OPN) together with the osteoprotegerin mRNA modulation. Moreover, in these cells, the increase of the protein expression of OPN and ALP was also demonstrated. These results demonstrate bone commitment of hMSCs through a noninvasive and biocompatible differentiating physical agent treatment and highlight possible applications in new regenerative medicine protocols. PMID:25087470

  16. Electro-optic control of a PPLN-unpoled LiNbO3 boundary for low-voltage Q switching of an intracavity frequency-doubled Nd3+:YVO4 laser.

    PubMed

    Torregrosa, A J; Maestre, H; Fernández-Pousa, C R; Pereda, J A; Capmany, J

    2009-08-01

    We present a simple technique to integrate an electro-optic Q switch in a periodically poled bulk lithium niobate crystal bounded by two unpoled (monodomain) regions. The technique exploits the high sensitivity to low applied electric fields of the total internal reflection condition in the periodic poled-unpoled boundary for the small grazing incidence angles associated with the diffraction of a focused Gaussian beam that propagates in the periodically poled region with its axis parallel to the boundary. When the arrangement is placed intracavity to a 1064 nm diode-pumped Nd(3+):YVO(4) laser, it performs simultaneously as a Q switch and as a second-harmonic generator, with Q switching starting at applied voltages as low as 1 V over a 500 microm thickness and with no additional optical elements.

  17. Electro-optic control of a PPLN-unpoled LiNbO3 boundary for low-voltage Q switching of an intracavity frequency-doubled Nd3+:YVO4 laser.

    PubMed

    Torregrosa, A J; Maestre, H; Fernández-Pousa, C R; Pereda, J A; Capmany, J

    2009-08-01

    We present a simple technique to integrate an electro-optic Q switch in a periodically poled bulk lithium niobate crystal bounded by two unpoled (monodomain) regions. The technique exploits the high sensitivity to low applied electric fields of the total internal reflection condition in the periodic poled-unpoled boundary for the small grazing incidence angles associated with the diffraction of a focused Gaussian beam that propagates in the periodically poled region with its axis parallel to the boundary. When the arrangement is placed intracavity to a 1064 nm diode-pumped Nd(3+):YVO(4) laser, it performs simultaneously as a Q switch and as a second-harmonic generator, with Q switching starting at applied voltages as low as 1 V over a 500 microm thickness and with no additional optical elements. PMID:19649073

  18. The effect of voltage waveform and tube diameter on transporting cold plasma strings through a flexible dielectric tube

    SciTech Connect

    Sohbatzadeh, Farshad; Omran, Azadeh Valinataj

    2014-11-15

    In this work, we developed transporting atmospheric pressure cold plasma using single electrode configuration through a sub-millimetre flexible dielectric tube beyond 100 cm. It was shown that the waveform of the applied high voltage is essential for controlling upstream and downstream plasma inside the tube. In this regard, sawtooth waveform enabled the transport of plasma with less applied high voltage compared to sinusoidal and pulsed form voltages. A cold plasma string as long as 130 cm was obtained by only 4 kV peak-to-peak sawtooth high voltage waveform. Optical emission spectroscopy revealed that reactive chemical species, such as atomic oxygen and hydroxyl, are generated at the tube exit. The effect of tube diameter on the transported plasma was also examined: the smaller the diameter, the higher the applied voltage. The device is likely to be used for sterilization, decontamination, and therapeutic endoscopy as already suggested by other groups in recent past years.

  19. Voltage controlled current source

    DOEpatents

    Casne, Gregory M.

    1992-01-01

    A seven decade, voltage controlled current source is described for use in testing intermediate range nuclear instruments that covers the entire test current range of from 10 picoamperes to 100 microamperes. High accuracy is obtained throughout the entire seven decades of output current with circuitry that includes a coordinated switching scheme responsive to the input signal from a hybrid computer to control the input voltage to an antilog amplifier, and to selectively connect a resistance to the antilog amplifier output to provide a continuous output current source as a function of a preset range of input voltage. An operator controlled switch provides current adjustment for operation in either a real-time simulation test mode or a time response test mode.

  20. Electron launching voltage monitor

    DOEpatents

    Mendel, Clifford W.; Savage, Mark E.

    1992-01-01

    An electron launching voltage monitor measures MITL voltage using a relationship between anode electric field and electron current launched from a cathode-mounted perturbation. An electron launching probe extends through and is spaced from the edge of an opening in a first MITL conductor, one end of the launching probe being in the gap between the MITL conductor, the other end being adjacent a first side of the first conductor away from the second conductor. A housing surrounds the launching probe and electrically connects the first side of the first conductor to the other end of the launching probe. A detector detects the current passing through the housing to the launching probe, the detected current being representative of the voltage between the conductors.

  1. Electron launching voltage monitor

    DOEpatents

    Mendel, C.W.; Savage, M.E.

    1992-03-17

    An electron launching voltage monitor measures MITL voltage using a relationship between anode electric field and electron current launched from a cathode-mounted perturbation. An electron launching probe extends through and is spaced from the edge of an opening in a first MITL conductor, one end of the launching probe being in the gap between the MITL conductor, the other end being adjacent a first side of the first conductor away from the second conductor. A housing surrounds the launching probe and electrically connects the first side of the first conductor to the other end of the launching probe. A detector detects the current passing through the housing to the launching probe, the detected current being representative of the voltage between the conductors. 5 figs.

  2. High voltage variable diameter insulator

    DOEpatents

    Vanacek, D.L.; Pike, C.D.

    1982-07-13

    A high voltage feedthrough assembly having a tubular insulator extending between the ground plane ring and the high voltage ring. The insulator is made of Pyrex and decreases in diameter from the ground plane ring to the high voltage ring, producing equipotential lines almost perpendicular to the wall of the insulator to optimize the voltage-holding capability of the feedthrough assembly.

  3. Voltage Regulators for Photovoltaic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delombard, R.

    1986-01-01

    Two simple circuits developed to provide voltage regulation for highvoltage (i.e., is greater than 75 volts) and low-voltage (i.e., is less than 36 volts) photovoltaic/battery power systems. Use of these circuits results in voltage regulator small, low-cost, and reliable, with very low power dissipation. Simple oscillator circuit controls photovoltaic-array current to regulate system voltage and control battery charging. Circuit senses battery (and system) voltage and adjusts array current to keep battery voltage from exceeding maximum voltage.

  4. Voltage control of cavity magnon polariton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, S.; Yao, B. M.; Rao, J. W.; Gui, Y. S.; Hu, C.-M.

    2016-07-01

    We have experimentally investigated the microwave transmission of the cavity-magnon-polariton (CMP) generated by integrating a low damping magnetic insulator onto a 2D microwave cavity. The high tunability of our planar cavity allows the cavity resonance frequency to be precisely controlled using a DC voltage. By appropriately tuning the voltage and magnetic bias, we can observe the cavity photon magnon coupling and the magnetic coupling between a magnetostatic mode and the generated CMP. The dispersion of the generated CMP was measured by either tuning the magnetic field or the applied voltage. This electrical control of CMP may open up avenues for designing advanced on-chip microwave devices that utilize light-matter interaction.

  5. An automatic AC/DC thermal voltage converter and AC voltage calibration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lentner, K. J.; Flach, D. R.; Bell, B. A.

    1985-10-01

    An automatic ac/dc difference calibration system is described which uses direct measurement of thermoelement emfs. In addition to ac/dc difference testing, the system can be used to measure some important characteristics of thermoelements, as well as to calibrate ac voltage calibrators and precision voltmeters. The system operates over a frquency range from 20 Hz to 100 kHz, covering the voltage range from 0.5 V to 1 kv. For all voltages the total measurement uncertainties expected (including the uncertainty of the specific reference thermal converters used) were 50 parts per million (ppm) at frequencies from 20 Hz to 20 kHz, inclusive, and 100 ppm at higher frequencies up to 100 kHz.

  6. The influence of a magnetic field on the heat transfer of a magnetic nanofluid in a sinusoidal channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiallah Mousavi, S.; Barzegar Gerdroodbary, M.; Sheikholeslami, Mohsen; Ganji, D. D.

    2016-09-01

    In this study, two dimensional numerical simulations are performed to investigate the influence of the magnetic field on the nanofluid flow inside a sinusoidal channel. This work reveals the influence of variable magnetic field in the heat transfer of heat exchanger while the mixture is in a single phase. In this heat exchanger, the inner tube is sinusoidal and the outer tube is considered smooth. The magnetic field is applied orthogonal to the axis of the sinusoidal tube. In our study, the ferrofluid (water with 4 vol% nanoparticles (Fe3O4)) flows in a channel with sinusoidal bottom. The finite volume method with the SIMPLEC algorithm is used for handling the pressure-velocity coupling. The numerical results present validated data with experimentally measured data and show good agreement with measurement. The influence of different parameters, like the intensity of magnetic field and Reynolds number, on the heat transfer is investigated. According to the obtained results, the sinusoidal formation of the internal tube significantly increases the Nusselt number inside the channel. Our findings show that the magnetic field increases the probability of eddy formation inside the cavities and consequently enhances the heat transfer (more than 200%) in the vicinity of the magnetic field at low Reynolds number ( Re=50). In addition, the variation of the skin friction shows that the magnetic field increases the skin friction (more than 600%) inside the sinusoidal channel.

  7. Factor VIII-Related Antigen Detects Phenotypic Change of Sinusoidal to Vascular Endothelium in Hepatic Fibrosis of Elderly Cadavers

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Ki M.; Sehgal, Priya; Harris, Cynthia K.

    2014-01-01

    In advanced stages of hepatic fibrosis, the liver sinusoidal endothelium transforms to vascular endothelium with accompanying expression of factor VIII-related antigen (FVIIIRAg), a phenotypic marker of vascular endothelial cells. Liver fibrosis has been shown to be associated with aging and was found to be prevalent in elderly cadavers. Using immunohistochemistry, we studied FVIIIRAg expression in the livers of elderly cadavers with progressive stages of fibrosis. The vascular endothelium of portal tracts and central veins was stained for FVIIIRAg, providing an internal positive control. The incidence of FVIIIRAg expression was low in the sinusoids of livers that showed minimal fibrosis or perisinusoidal fibrosis but was increased in livers with advanced fibrosis (i.e., septa formation, bridging fibrosis, and cirrhosis). FVIIIRAg positive sinusoidal endothelial cells were distributed in loose aggregates in the periportal, periseptal, and midlobular parenchyma and were found less frequently in the centrilobular area. FVIIIRAg immune deposits appeared patchy and discontinuous along the sinusoidal lining, likely representing focalized transformation of sinusoidal to vascular endothelium. There was a discrete localization of FVIIIRAg immunoreactivity in the foci of severe parenchymal fibrosis. Conclusion. FVIIIRAg is a reliable marker for detecting the transformation of sinusoidal to vascular endothelium in advanced liver fibrosis in elderly cadavers. PMID:27437476

  8. Voltage-Controlled Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Integrated Component Systems, Inc. incorporated information from a NASA Tech Briefs article into a voltage-controlled oscillator it designed for a customer. The company then applied the technology to its series of phase-locked loop synthesizers, which offer superior phase noise performance.

  9. High Voltage Insulation Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherb, V.; Rogalla, K.; Gollor, M.

    2008-09-01

    In preparation of new Electronic Power Conditioners (EPC's) for Travelling Wave Tub Amplifiers (TWTA's) on telecom satellites a study for the development of new high voltage insulation technology is performed. The initiative is mandatory to allow compact designs and to enable higher operating voltages. In a first task a market analysis was performed, comparing different materials with respect to their properties and processes. A hierarchy of selection criteria was established and finally five material candidates (4 Epoxy resins and 1 Polyurethane resin) were selected to be further investigated in the test program. Samples for the test program were designed to represent core elements of an EPC, the high voltage transformer and Printed Circuit Boards of the high voltage section. All five materials were assessed in the practical work flow of the potting process and electrical, mechanical, thermal and lifetime testing was performed. Although the lifetime tests results were overlayed by a larges scatter, finally two candidates have been identified for use in a subsequent qualification program. This activity forms part of element 5 of the ESA ARTES Programme.

  10. Geomagnetism and Induced Voltage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdul-Razzaq, W.; Biller, R. D.

    2010-01-01

    Introductory physics laboratories have seen an influx of "conceptual integrated science" over time in their classrooms with elements of other sciences such as chemistry, biology, Earth science, and astronomy. We describe a laboratory to introduce this development, as it attracts attention to the voltage induced in the human brain as it is…

  11. Measuring Breakdown Voltage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auer, Herbert J.

    1978-01-01

    The article discusses an aspect of conductivity, one of the electrical properties subdivisions, and describes a tester that can be shop-built. Breakdown voltage of an insulation material is specifically examined. Test procedures, parts lists, diagrams, and test data form are included. (MF)

  12. Ultrahigh and audio frequencies in a laser beam

    SciTech Connect

    Casabella, P.A.; Gonsiorowski, T.; Leitner, A.

    1980-05-01

    The helium--neon lasers readily available in teaching laboratories usually operate in several photon modes simultaneously. The first-difference and second-difference beats lie in the uhf- and audio-frequency ranges, respectively, and can be detected as sinusoidal signals with photodiodes. These are instructive experiments which raise thought provoking questions about cavity resonance and negative dispersion.

  13. Impact Testing and Simulation of a Sinusoid Foam Sandwich Energy Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Fasanella, Edwin L; Littell, Justin D.

    2015-01-01

    A sinusoidal-shaped foam sandwich energy absorber was developed and evaluated at NASA Langley Research Center through multi-level testing and simulation performed under the Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT) research project. The energy absorber, designated the "sinusoid," consisted of hybrid carbon- Kevlar® plain weave fabric face sheets, two layers for each face sheet oriented at +/-45deg with respect to the vertical or crush direction, and a closed-cell ELFOAM(TradeMark) P200 polyisocyanurate (2.0-lb/ft3) foam core. The design goal for the energy absorber was to achieve an average floor-level acceleration of between 25- and 40-g during the full-scale crash test of a retrofitted CH-46E helicopter airframe, designated TRACT 2. Variations in the design were assessed through quasi-static and dynamic crush testing of component specimens. Once the design was finalized, a 5-ft-long subfloor beam was fabricated and retrofitted into a barrel section of a CH-46E helicopter. A vertical drop test of the barrel section was conducted onto concrete to evaluate the performance of the energy absorber prior to retrofit into TRACT 2. Finite element models were developed of all test articles and simulations were performed using LSDYNA ®, a commercial nonlinear explicit transient dynamic finite element code. Test analysis results are presented for the sinusoid foam sandwich energy absorber as comparisons of load-displacement and acceleration-time-history responses, as well as predicted and experimental structural deformations and progressive damage for each evaluation level (component testing through barrel section drop testing).

  14. Electromagnetic characterization of current transformer with toroidal core under sinusoidal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koprivica, Branko; Milovanovic, Alenka

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a new procedure for the electromagnetic analysis of a measuring current transformer under sinusoidal conditions in its electrical and magnetic circuit. The influence of the magnetic hysteresis has been taken into account using the measured inverse magnetization curve and phase lag between the time waveforms of the magnetic field and the magnetic induction. Using the proposed analysis, ratio and phase errors of the current transformer have been calculated. The results of the calculation have been compared with experimental results and a good agreement has been found.

  15. Nonlinear dynamics of a sinusoidally driven pendulum in a repulsive magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siahmakoun, Azad; French, Valentina A.; Patterson, Jeffrey

    1997-05-01

    The dynamics of a sinusoidally driven pendulum in a repulsive magnetic field is investigated theoretically and experimentally. The experimental data are acquired using a shaft encoder interfaced to a PC which measures the angular displacement of the pendulum as a function of time. Both the theoretical simulations and the experimental measurements exhibit regions of periodic and chaotic behavior, depending on the system parameters. Amplitude jumps, hysteresis, and bistable states are also observed. The simplicity of the apparatus makes this experiment suitable for an advanced undergraduate laboratory.

  16. Wide-band coronagraph with sinusoidal phase in the angular direction.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ourui; Cao, Qing; Hou, Fanzhen

    2012-05-01

    We suggest a new phase mask coronagraph that can work in a wide band of wavelengths. The phase mask has alternatively sinusoidal and uniform functions in the angular direction. We compare it with the four-quadrant phase mask coronagraph and vortex phase mask coronagraph. Through numerical tests, we find that the new mask gives a deep extinction of star light and has a small inner working angle. It is also shown that this mask has a better performance in chromatism than the others for a wide band of wavelengths.

  17. Simulation of residual oil displacement in a sinusoidal channel with the lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otomo, Hiroshi; Fan, Hongli; Hazlett, Randy; Li, Yong; Staroselsky, Ilya; Zhang, Raoyang; Chen, Hudong

    2015-10-01

    We simulate oil slug displacement in a sinusoidal channel in order to validate computational models and algorithms for multi-component flow. This case fits in the gap between fully realistic cases characterized by complicated geometry and academic cases with simplistic geometry. Our computational model is based on the lattice Boltzmann method and allows for variation of physical parameters such as wettability and viscosity. The effect of variation of model parameters is analyzed, in particular via comparison with analytical solutions. We discuss the requirements for accurate solution of the oil slug displacement problem.

  18. Enhanced nonlinear spectral compression in fiber by external sinusoidal phase modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boscolo, S.; Mouradian, L. Kh; Finot, C.

    2016-10-01

    We propose a new, simple approach to enhance the spectral compression process arising from nonlinear pulse propagation in an optical fiber. We numerically show that an additional sinusoidal temporal phase modulation of the pulse enables efficient reduction of the intensity level of the side lobes in the spectrum that are produced by the mismatch between the initial linear negative chirp of the pulse and the self-phase modulation-induced nonlinear positive chirp. Remarkable increase of both the extent of spectrum narrowing and the quality of the compressed spectrum is afforded by the proposed approach across a wide range of experimentally accessible parameters.

  19. Efficacy of an AC sinusoidal electric field for apoptosis induction in lung carcinoma cells (A549)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyoun-Hyang; Lee, Seung S.; Hoon Lee, Dae

    2012-08-01

    An AC sinusoidal electric field was applied to lung carcinoma cells for the induction of apoptosis. The occurrence of apoptosis was determined by analysis of Annexin V/PI and DNA fragmentation. Additional evidence of apoptosis was confirmed by caspase-3 cleavage and disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential. These results demonstrated that the expression of apoptosis can be controlled by varying the magnitude and the duration of the field, and that the application of an AC electric field can stimulate the apoptosis via mitochondria-mediated pathway.

  20. Single order x-ray diffraction with binary sinusoidal transmission grating

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, L. F.; Foerster, E.; Fuhrmann, A.; Wang, C. K.; Kuang, L. Y.; Liu, S. Y.; Ding, Y. K.

    2007-01-29

    All existing x-ray dispersive devices including crystals, multilayers and diffraction gratings generate spectra in multiple orders. In this letter the authors describe how an axis symmetrically distributed sinusoidal-shaped aperture with binary transmittance values can be used to disperse x rays and with a superior diffraction pattern where, along its symmetry axis, all higher-order diffractions can be effectively suppressed. Hence this sophisticated dispersive element generates pure soft x-ray spectra in the first diffraction order, free from interference from higher diffraction orders.

  1. Investigation of phase error correction for digital sinusoidal phase-shifting fringe projection profilometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, S.; Quan, C.; Zhu, R.; Tay, C. J.

    2012-08-01

    Digital sinusoidal phase-shifting fringe projection profilometry (DSPFPP) is a powerful tool to reconstruct three-dimensional (3D) surface of diffuse objects. However, a highly accurate profile is often hindered by nonlinear response, color crosstalk and imbalance of a pair of digital projector and CCD/CMOS camera. In this paper, several phase error correction methods, such as Look-Up-Table (LUT) compensation, intensity correction, gamma correction, LUT-based hybrid method and blind phase error suppression for gray and color-encoded DSPFPP are described. Experimental results are also demonstrated to evaluate the effectiveness of each method.

  2. Pharmacokinetic modeling of the sinusoidal efflux of anionic ligands from the isolated perfused rat liver: the influence of albumin.

    PubMed

    Proost, J H; Nijssen, H M; Strating, C B; Meijer, D K; Groothuis, G M

    1993-08-01

    This study contains a pharmacokinetic analysis on the efflux of organic anions from the liver into the bloodstream (sinusoidal efflux) with specific reference to the influence of albumin. The net sinusoidal efflux rate of dibromosulfophthalein (DBSP) from preloaded livers, being the resultant of sinusoidal efflux and reuptake of ligand by hepatocytes downstream the sinusoid, can be strongly increased by the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA), a protein having multiple binding sites for DBSP. We previously attributed this effect to a reduction of reuptake through extracellular binding of the organic anion to the protein, rather than to an intrinsic stimulatory effect on the actual membrane transport process from the cells. In the present study we tested this hypothesis using a pharmacokinetic multicompartment liver model. This model resembles the parallel tube model in that the liver is described by several compartments placed in series instead of a single well-stirred compartment and it takes into account rates of dissociation and association in binding to proteins in the sinusoidal space. The model parameters were fitted from the sinusoidal efflux and biliary excretion data from efflux experiments measuring the stimulatory effect of various concentrations of BSA. Equilibrium binding of DBSP to albumin as well as the dissociation rate constant (koff) were determined in vitro with rapid filtration techniques. The experimental data could not be fitted satisfactorily when using the experimentally obtained values of the protein association and dissociation rate constants (kon and koff). However, they could be simulated accurately assuming 16 times higher values for the association and dissociation rate constant compared to those determined in vitro. Time constants of the perfusate flow, liver (re)uptake, and protein association and dissociation indicate that binding equilibrium does not exist within the sinusoids and that, in particular at low protein

  3. A simple method for the estimation of power losses in silicon iron sheets under alternating pulse voltage excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Amar, M.; Protat, F.

    1994-03-01

    The prediction of iron losses in magnetic steels submitted to alternating pulse voltages is studied and an efficient method is proposed. It is developed by coupling the pulse voltage form factor and the loss separation model. Prediction of iron losses becomes possible directly from the loss model corresponding to the sinusoidal flux density. This method is validated on silicon iron grain-oriented and nonoriented magnetic steels. The predetermined iron losses are coherent with those measured and this approach allows both simplicity and precision well appreciated by industry.

  4. Seizure entrainment with polarizing low frequency electric fields in a chronic animal epilepsy model

    PubMed Central

    Sunderam, Sridhar; Chernyy, Nick; Peixoto, Nathalia; Mason, Jonathan P.; Weinstein, Steven L.; Schiff, Steven J.; Gluckman, Bruce J.

    2009-01-01

    Neural activity can be modulated by applying a polarizing low frequency (≪ 100 Hz) electric field (PLEF). Unlike conventional pulsed stimulation, PLEF stimulation has a graded, modulatory effect on neuronal excitability, and permits the simultaneous recording of neuronal activity during stimulation suitable for continuous feedback control. We tested a prototype system that allows for simultaneous PLEF stimulation with minimal recording artifact in a chronic tetanus toxin animal model (rat) of hippocampal epilepsy with spontaneous seizures. Depth electrode local field potentials recorded during seizures revealed a characteristic pattern of field postsynaptic potentials (fPSPs). Sinusoidal voltage-controlled PLEF stimulation (0.5–25 Hz) was applied in open-loop cycles radially across the CA3 of ventral hippocampus. For stimulated seizures, fPSPs were transiently entrained with the PLEF waveform. Statistical significance of entrainment was assessed with Thomson’s harmonic F-test, with 45/132 stimulated seizures in 4 animals individually demonstrating significant entrainment (p < 0.04). Significant entrainment for multiple presentations at the same frequency (p < 0.01) was observed in 3 of 4 animals in 42/64 stimulated seizures. This is the first demonstration in chronically implanted freely behaving animals of PLEF modulation of neural activity with simultaneous recording. PMID:19602730

  5. Seizure entrainment with polarizing low-frequency electric fields in a chronic animal epilepsy model.

    PubMed

    Sunderam, Sridhar; Chernyy, Nick; Peixoto, Nathalia; Mason, Jonathan P; Weinstein, Steven L; Schiff, Steven J; Gluckman, Bruce J

    2009-08-01

    Neural activity can be modulated by applying a polarizing low-frequency (<100 Hz) electric field (PLEF). Unlike conventional pulsed stimulation, PLEF stimulation has a graded, modulatory effect on neuronal excitability, and permits the simultaneous recording of neuronal activity during stimulation suitable for continuous feedback control. We tested a prototype system that allows for simultaneous PLEF stimulation with minimal recording artifact in a chronic tetanus toxin animal model (rat) of hippocampal epilepsy with spontaneous seizures. Depth electrode local field potentials recorded during seizures revealed a characteristic pattern of field postsynaptic potentials (fPSPs). Sinusoidal voltage-controlled PLEF stimulation (0.5-25 Hz) was applied in open-loop cycles radially across the CA3 of ventral hippocampus. For stimulated seizures, fPSPs were transiently entrained with the PLEF waveform. Statistical significance of entrainment was assessed with Thomson's harmonic F-test, with 45/132 stimulated seizures in four animals individually demonstrating significant entrainment (p < 0.04). Significant entrainment for multiple presentations at the same frequency (p < 0.01) was observed in three of four animals in 42/64 stimulated seizures. This is the first demonstration in chronically implanted freely behaving animals of PLEF modulation of neural activity with simultaneous recording.

  6. Seizure entrainment with polarizing low-frequency electric fields in a chronic animal epilepsy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunderam, Sridhar; Chernyy, Nick; Peixoto, Nathalia; Mason, Jonathan P.; Weinstein, Steven L.; Schiff, Steven J.; Gluckman, Bruce J.

    2009-08-01

    Neural activity can be modulated by applying a polarizing low-frequency (Lt100 Hz) electric field (PLEF). Unlike conventional pulsed stimulation, PLEF stimulation has a graded, modulatory effect on neuronal excitability, and permits the simultaneous recording of neuronal activity during stimulation suitable for continuous feedback control. We tested a prototype system that allows for simultaneous PLEF stimulation with minimal recording artifact in a chronic tetanus toxin animal model (rat) of hippocampal epilepsy with spontaneous seizures. Depth electrode local field potentials recorded during seizures revealed a characteristic pattern of field postsynaptic potentials (fPSPs). Sinusoidal voltage-controlled PLEF stimulation (0.5-25 Hz) was applied in open-loop cycles radially across the CA3 of ventral hippocampus. For stimulated seizures, fPSPs were transiently entrained with the PLEF waveform. Statistical significance of entrainment was assessed with Thomson's harmonic F-test, with 45/132 stimulated seizures in four animals individually demonstrating significant entrainment (p < 0.04). Significant entrainment for multiple presentations at the same frequency (p < 0.01) was observed in three of four animals in 42/64 stimulated seizures. This is the first demonstration in chronically implanted freely behaving animals of PLEF modulation of neural activity with simultaneous recording.

  7. A cascaded three-phase symmetrical multistage voltage multiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Shahid; Singh, G. K.; Besar, R.; Muhammad, G.

    2006-10-01

    A cascaded three-phase symmetrical multistage Cockcroft-Walton voltage multiplier (CW-VM) is proposed in this report. It consists of three single-phase symmetrical voltage multipliers, which are connected in series at their smoothing columns like string of batteries and are driven by three-phase ac power source. The smoothing column of each voltage multiplier is charged twice every cycle independently by respective oscillating columns and discharged in series through load. The charging discharging process completes six times a cycle and therefore the output voltage ripple's frequency is of sixth order of the drive signal frequency. Thus the proposed approach eliminates the first five harmonic components of load generated voltage ripples and sixth harmonic is the major ripple component. The proposed cascaded three-phase symmetrical voltage multiplier has less than half the voltage ripple, and three times larger output voltage and output power than the conventional single-phase symmetrical CW-VM. Experimental and simulation results of the laboratory prototype are given to show the feasibility of proposed cascaded three-phase symmetrical CW-VM.

  8. Subthreshold voltage noise of rat neocortical pyramidal neurones.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Gilad A; Diba, Kamran; Yaron-Jakoubovitch, Anat; Oz, Yasmin; Koch, Christof; Segev, Idan; Yarom, Yosef

    2005-04-01

    Neurones are noisy elements. Noise arises from both intrinsic and extrinsic sources, and manifests itself as fluctuations in the membrane potential. These fluctuations limit the accuracy of a neurone's output but have also been suggested to play a computational role. We present a detailed study of the amplitude and spectrum of voltage noise recorded at the soma of layer IV-V pyramidal neurones in slices taken from rat neocortex. The dependence of the noise on holding potential, synaptic activity and Na+ conductance is systematically analysed. We demonstrate that voltage noise increases non-linearly as the cell depolarizes (from a standard deviation (s.d.) of 0.19 mV at -75 mV to an s.d. of 0.54 mV at -55 mV). The increase in voltage noise is accompanied by an increase in the cell impedance, due to voltage dependence of Na+ conductance. The impedance increase accounts for the majority (70%) of the voltage noise increase. The increase in voltage noise and impedance is restricted to the low-frequency range (0.2-2 Hz). At the high frequency range (5-100 Hz) the voltage noise is dominated by synaptic activity. In our slice preparation, synaptic noise has little effect on the cell impedance. A minimal model reproduces qualitatively these data. Our results imply that ion channel noise contributes significantly to membrane voltage fluctuations at the subthreshold voltage range, and that Na+ conductance plays a key role in determining the amplitude of this noise by acting as a voltage-dependent amplifier of low-frequency transients. PMID:15695244

  9. Subthreshold voltage noise of rat neocortical pyramidal neurones

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Gilad A; Diba, Kamran; Yaron-Jakoubovitch, Anat; Oz, Yasmin; Koch, Christof; Segev, Idan; Yarom, Yosef

    2005-01-01

    Neurones are noisy elements. Noise arises from both intrinsic and extrinsic sources, and manifests itself as fluctuations in the membrane potential. These fluctuations limit the accuracy of a neurone's output but have also been suggested to play a computational role. We present a detailed study of the amplitude and spectrum of voltage noise recorded at the soma of layer IV–V pyramidal neurones in slices taken from rat neocortex. The dependence of the noise on holding potential, synaptic activity and Na+ conductance is systematically analysed. We demonstrate that voltage noise increases non-linearly as the cell depolarizes (from a standard deviation (s.d.) of 0.19 mV at −75 mV to an s.d. of 0.54 mV at −55 mV). The increase in voltage noise is accompanied by an increase in the cell impedance, due to voltage dependence of Na+ conductance. The impedance increase accounts for the majority (70%) of the voltage noise increase. The increase in voltage noise and impedance is restricted to the low-frequency range (0.2–2 Hz). At the high frequency range (5–100 Hz) the voltage noise is dominated by synaptic activity. In our slice preparation, synaptic noise has little effect on the cell impedance. A minimal model reproduces qualitatively these data. Our results imply that ion channel noise contributes significantly to membrane voltage fluctuations at the subthreshold voltage range, and that Na+ conductance plays a key role in determining the amplitude of this noise by acting as a voltage-dependent amplifier of low-frequency transients. PMID:15695244

  10. A low voltage ``railgun''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starr, Stanley O.; Youngquist, Robert C.; Cox, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    Due to recent advances in solid-state switches and ultra-capacitors, it is now possible to construct a "railgun" that can operate at voltages below 20 V. Railguns typically operate above a thousand volts, generating huge currents for a few milliseconds to provide thousands of g's of acceleration to a small projectile. The low voltage railgun described herein operates for much longer time periods (tenths of seconds to seconds), has far smaller acceleration and speed, but can potentially propel a much larger object. The impetus for this development is to lay the groundwork for a possible ground-based supersonic launch track, but the resulting system may also have applications as a simple linear motor. The system would also be a useful teaching tool, requiring concepts from electrodynamics, mechanics, and electronics for its understanding, and is relatively straightforward to construct.

  11. Increased voltage photovoltaic cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, B.; Bickler, D. B.; Gallagher, B. D. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A photovoltaic cell, such as a solar cell, is provided which has a higher output voltage than prior cells. The improved cell includes a substrate of doped silicon, a first layer of silicon disposed on the substrate and having opposite doping, and a second layer of silicon carbide disposed on the first layer. The silicon carbide preferably has the same type of doping as the first layer.

  12. Insulators for high voltages

    SciTech Connect

    Looms, J.S.T.

    1987-01-01

    This book describes electrical insulators for high voltage applications. Topics considered include the insulating materials, the manufacture of wet process porcelain, the manufacture of tempered glass, the glass-fibre core, the polymeric housing, the common problem - terminating an insulator, mechanical constraints, the physics of pollution flashover, the physics of contamination, testing of insulators, conclusions from testing, remedies for flashover, insulators for special cases, interference and noise, and the insulator of the future.

  13. High voltage pulse conditioning

    DOEpatents

    Springfield, Ray M.; Wheat, Jr., Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus for conditioning high voltage pulses from particle accelerators in order to shorten the rise times of the pulses. Flashover switches in the cathode stalk of the transmission line hold off conduction for a determinable period of time, reflecting the early portion of the pulses. Diodes upstream of the switches divert energy into the magnetic and electrostatic storage of the capacitance and inductance inherent to the transmission line until the switches close.

  14. High voltage generator

    DOEpatents

    Schwemin, A. J.

    1959-03-17

    A generator for producing relatively large currents at high voltages is described. In general, the invention comprises a plurality of capacitors connected in series by a plurality of switches alternately disposed with the capacitors. The above-noted circuit is mounted for movement with respect to contact members and switch closure means so that a load device and power supply are connected across successive numbers of capacitors, while the other capacitors are successively charged with the same power supply.

  15. High Voltage Seismic Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogacz, Adrian; Pala, Damian; Knafel, Marcin

    2015-04-01

    This contribution describes the preliminary result of annual cooperation of three student research groups from AGH UST in Krakow, Poland. The aim of this cooperation was to develop and construct a high voltage seismic wave generator. Constructed device uses a high-energy electrical discharge to generate seismic wave in ground. This type of device can be applied in several different methods of seismic measurement, but because of its limited power it is mainly dedicated for engineering geophysics. The source operates on a basic physical principles. The energy is stored in capacitor bank, which is charged by two stage low to high voltage converter. Stored energy is then released in very short time through high voltage thyristor in spark gap. The whole appliance is powered from li-ion battery and controlled by ATmega microcontroller. It is possible to construct larger and more powerful device. In this contribution the structure of device with technical specifications is resented. As a part of the investigation the prototype was built and series of experiments conducted. System parameter was measured, on this basis specification of elements for the final device were chosen. First stage of the project was successful. It was possible to efficiently generate seismic waves with constructed device. Then the field test was conducted. Spark gap wasplaced in shallowborehole(0.5 m) filled with salt water. Geophones were placed on the ground in straight line. The comparison of signal registered with hammer source and sparker source was made. The results of the test measurements are presented and discussed. Analysis of the collected data shows that characteristic of generated seismic signal is very promising, thus confirms possibility of practical application of the new high voltage generator. The biggest advantage of presented device after signal characteristics is its size which is 0.5 x 0.25 x 0.2 m and weight approximately 7 kg. This features with small li-ion battery makes

  16. High Voltage Connector

    SciTech Connect

    Kurita, C.H.; /Fermilab

    1987-03-06

    The originally designed high voltage connectors were to be made of brass. However, if treated like a Bellevile spring with the initially given dimensions, the stresses of the connector when crimped were calculated to be much higher than the yield stress of brass. Since the flange and outer diameters of the connector are to remain small, it was necessary to alter the other dimensions and choice of material in order to bring down the stresses applied to the connector.

  17. HIGH VOLTAGE GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Schwemin, A.J.

    1959-03-17

    A generator is presented for producing relatively large currents at high voltages. In general, the invention comprises a plurality of capacitors connected in series by a plurality of switches alternately disposed with the capacitors. The circuit is mounted for movement with respect to contact members and switch closure means so that a load device and power supply are connected across successive numbers of capacitors, while the other capacitors are successively charged with the same power supply.

  18. HIGH VOLTAGE ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Luce, J.S.

    1960-04-19

    A device is described for providing a source of molecular ions having a large output current and with an accelerated energy of the order of 600 kv. Ions are produced in an ion source which is provided with a water-cooled source grid of metal to effect maximum recombination of atomic ions to molecular ions. A very high accelerating voltage is applied to withdraw and accelerate the molecular ions from the source, and means are provided for dumping the excess electrons at the lowest possible potentials. An accelerating grid is placed adjacent to the source grid and a slotted, grounded accelerating electrode is placed adjacent to the accelerating grid. A potential of about 35 kv is maintained between the source grid and accelerating grid, and a potential of about 600 kv is maintained between the accelerating grid and accelerating electrode. In order to keep at a minimum the large number of oscillating electrons which are created when such high voltages are employed in the vicinity of a strong magnetic field, a plurality of high voltage cascaded shields are employed with a conventional electron dumping system being employed between each shield so as to dump the electrons at the lowest possible potential rather than at 600 kv.

  19. Laser frequency offset synthesizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, D. A.; Evans, R. M.; Finn, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    A method is reported for locking the frequency difference of two lasers with an accuracy of 0.5 kHz or less over a one-second interval which is simple, stable, and relatively free from systematic errors. Two 633 nm He-Ne lasers are used, one with a fixed frequency and the other tunable. The beat frequency between the lasers is controlled by a voltage applied to a piezoelectric device which varies the cavity length of the tunable laser. This variable beat frequency, scaled by a computer-controlled modulus, is equivalent to a synthesizer. This approach eliminates the need for a separate external frequency synthesizer; furthermore, the phase detection process occurs at a relatively low frequency, making the required electronics simple and straightforward.

  20. APPARATUS FOR REGULATING HIGH VOLTAGE

    DOEpatents

    Morrison, K.G.

    1951-03-20

    This patent describes a high-voltage regulator of the r-f type wherein the modulation of the r-f voltage is accomplished at a high level, resulting in good stabilization over a large range of load conditions.

  1. Moderately nonlinear diffuse-charge dynamics under an ac voltage.

    PubMed

    Stout, Robert F; Khair, Aditya S

    2015-09-01

    The response of a symmetric binary electrolyte between two parallel, blocking electrodes to a moderate amplitude ac voltage is quantified. The diffuse charge dynamics are modeled via the Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations for a dilute solution of point-like ions. The solution to these equations is expressed as a Fourier series with a voltage perturbation expansion for arbitrary Debye layer thickness and ac frequency. Here, the perturbation expansion in voltage proceeds in powers of V_{o}/(k_{B}T/e), where V_{o} is the amplitude of the driving voltage and k_{B}T/e is the thermal voltage with k_{B} as Boltzmann's constant, T as the temperature, and e as the fundamental charge. We show that the response of the electrolyte remains essentially linear in voltage amplitude at frequencies greater than the RC frequency of Debye layer charging, D/λ_{D}L, where D is the ion diffusivity, λ_{D} is the Debye layer thickness, and L is half the cell width. In contrast, nonlinear response is predicted at frequencies below the RC frequency. We find that the ion densities exhibit symmetric deviations from the (uniform) equilibrium density at even orders of the voltage amplitude. This leads to the voltage dependence of the current in the external circuit arising from the odd orders of voltage. For instance, the first nonlinear contribution to the current is O(V_{o}^{3}) which contains the expected third harmonic but also a component oscillating at the applied frequency. We use this to compute a generalized impedance for moderate voltages, the first nonlinear contribution to which is quadratic in V_{o}. This contribution predicts a decrease in the imaginary part of the impedance at low frequency, which is due to the increase in Debye layer capacitance with increasing V_{o}. In contrast, the real part of the impedance increases at low frequency, due to adsorption of neutral salt from the bulk to the Debye layer. PMID:26465471

  2. Calibration-free sinusoidal rectification and uniform retinal irradiance in scanning light ophthalmoscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiang; Yin, Lu; Nozato, Koji; Zhang, Jie; Saito, Kenichi; Merigan, William H; Williams, David R; Rossi, Ethan A

    2015-01-01

    Sinusoidal rectification (i.e., desinusoiding) is necessary for scanning imaging systems and is typically achieved by calculating a rectification transform from a calibration image such as a regular grid. This approach is susceptible to error due to electronic or mechanical instability that can alter the phase of the imaging window with respect to the calibration transform. Here, we show a calibration-free rectification method implemented from live video of a scanning light ophthalmoscope (SLO) with or without adaptive optics (AO). This approach, which capitalizes on positional differences in the images obtained in the forward and backward scan directions, dynamically keeps the imaging window in phase with the motion of the sinusoidal resonant scanner, preventing errors from signal drift over time. A benefit of this approach is that it allows the light power across the field-of-view (FOV) to be modulated inversely to achieve uniform irradiance on the retina, a feature desirable for functional imaging methods and light safety in SLOs.

  3. Exposure to 50Hz-sinusoidal electromagnetic field induces DNA damage-independent autophagy.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yunyun; Xia, Ruohong; Jiang, Hengjun; Chen, Yanfeng; Hong, Ling; Yu, Yunxian; Xu, Zhengping; Zeng, Qunli

    2016-08-01

    As electromagnetic field (EMF) is commonly encountered within our daily lives, the biological effects of EMF are of great concern. Autophagy is a key process for maintaining cellular homeostasis, and it can also reveal cellular responses to environmental stimuli. In this study, we aim to investigate the biological effects of a 50Hz-sinusoidal electromagnetic field on autophagy and we identified its mechanism of action in Chinese Hamster Lung (CHL) cells. CHL cells were exposed to a 50Hz sinusoidal EMF at 0.4mT for 30min or 24h. In this study, we found that a 0.4mT EMF resulted in: (i) an increase in LC3-II expression and increased autophagosome formation; (ii) no significant difference in the incidence of γH2AX foci between the sham and exposure groups; (iii) reorganized actin filaments and increased pseudopodial extensions without promoting cell migration; and (iv) enhanced cell apoptosis when autophagy was blocked by Bafilomycin A1. These results implied that DNA damage was not directly involved in the autophagy induced by a 0.4mT 50Hz EMF. In addition, an EMF induced autophagy balanced the cellular homeostasis to protect the cells from severe adverse biological consequences.

  4. Lensing Effects on the Brightness of SN Ia, When Using the Sinusoidal Potential.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadras, M. J.; Bartlett, D. F.; Motl, P.

    2004-05-01

    In this paper the effects of gravitational lensing of SN Ia are studied, for the case when the Newtonian potential is replaced by the sinusoidal potential (GM/r -> (GM cos[kr])/r). First we treat the point-mass case, then move on to the instance of a diffuse mass. As one might guess, with this new potential, the plot of the bending angle (α ) with respect to impact parameter (b) goes from dropping off as b-1, to having oscillations that die off as the b-1/2. This in turn will cause dramatic effects on magnification and brightness. In principle the value of the cosmological deceleration parameter (q0), can be determined by a measurement of the ratio of α to b. Wambsganss et al (1997) and Holz (1998) discussed the effects of weak gravitational lensing from large-scale structure on determining q0 within standard cosmology. Following their reasoning, we extend that work to the case of the sinusoidal potential.

  5. Increment and decrement detection in sinusoids as a measure of temporal resolution.

    PubMed

    Oxenham, A J

    1997-09-01

    Measuring thresholds for the detection of brief decrements in the level of a sinusoid is an established method of estimating auditory temporal resolution. Generally, a background noise is added to the stimulus to avoid the detection of the "spectral splatter" introduced by the decrement. Results are often described in terms of a temporal-window model, comprising a band-pass filter, a compressive nonlinearity, a sliding temporal integrator, and a decision device. In this study, thresholds for increments, as well as decrements, in the level of a 55 dB SPL, 4-kHz sinusoidal pedestal were measured as function of increment and decrement duration in the presence of a broadband background noise ranging in spectrum level from -20 to +20 dB SPL. Thresholds were also measured using a 55-dB, 8-kHz pedestal in the absence of background noise. Thresholds for decrements, in terms of the dB change in level (delta L), were found to be more dependent on duration than those for increments. Also, performance was found to be dependent on background-noise level over most levels tested. Neither finding is consistent with the predictions of the temporal-window model or other similar models of temporal resolution. The difference between increment and decrement detection was more successfully simulated by using a decision criterion based on the maximum slope of the temporal-window output. PMID:9301055

  6. Diffraction Efficiency Testing of Sinusoidal and Blazed Off-Plane Reflection Gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutt, James H.; McEntaffer, Randall L.; Marlowe, Hannah; Miles, Drew M.; Peterson, Thomas J.; Deroo, Casey T.; Scholze, Frank; Laubis, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Reflection gratings in the off-plane mount have the potential to enhance the performance of future high resolution soft X-ray spectrometers. Diffraction efficiency can be optimized through the use of blazed grating facets, achieving high-throughput on one side of zero-order. This paper presents the results from a comparison between a grating with a sinusoidally grooved profile and two gratings that have been blazed. The results show that the blaze does increase throughput to one side of zero-order; however, the total throughput of the sinusoidal gratings is greater than the blazed gratings, suggesting the method of manufacturing the blazed gratings does not produce precise facets. The blazed gratings were also tested in their Littrow and anti-Littrow configurations to quantify diffraction efficiency sensitivity to rotations about the grating normal. Only a small difference in the energy at which efficiency is maximized between the Littrow and anti-Littrow configurations is seen with a small shift in peak efficiency towards higher energies in the anti-Littrow case. This is due to a decrease in the effective blaze angle in the anti-Littrow mounting. This is supported by PCGrate-SX V6.1 modeling carried out for each blazed grating which predicts similar response trends in the Littrow and anti-Littrow orientations.

  7. Biliary obstruction dissipates bioelectric sinusoidal-canalicular barrier without altering taurocholate uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Cotting, J.; Zysset, T.; Reichen, J.

    1989-02-01

    To study immediate events during extrahepatic cholestasis, we investigated the effect of short-term biliary obstruction on the bioelectrical sinusoidal-canalicular barrier in the rat using molecular weight-matched uncharged and negatively charged inert solute pairs. The bioelectrical barrier averaged -22 +/- 5 and -18 +/- 4 mV (NS) using the pair carboxy-/methoxyinulin and ferrocyanide/sucrose, respectively. After a 20-min biliary obstruction both decreased by 61 and 11%, respectively, but only the large molecular weight pair (the inulins) returned to base line after release of the obstruction. Inert solute clearances were increased after short biliary obstruction depending on molecular size and negative charge (ferrocyanide greater than sucrose greater than carboxyinulin greater than inulin), suggesting that both permeability and bioelectrical barriers were affected by obstruction. The hepatic extraction in vivo of a passively transported drug not excreted into bile (D-propranolol) was not affected by obstruction, whereas that of an actively transported drug (glycocholate) decreased from 66 +/- 8 to 41 +/- 20% during biliary obstruction (P less than 0.01). Unidirectional transfer of glycocholate was not affected by short-term biliary obstruction in the situ perfused rat liver; however, 2 min after (14C)glycocholate administration, increased return was observed in hepatic venous effluent in obstructed animals. Our findings demonstrate a loss of the bioelectrical barrier immediately after short-term biliary obstruction. Decreased hepatic extraction in the view of unaltered sinusoidal uptake demonstrates regurgitation of bile into blood during short-term biliary obstruction.

  8. On shock driven jetting of liquid from non-sinusoidal surfaces into a vacuum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cherne, F. J.; Hammerberg, J. E.; Andrews, M. J.; Karkhanis, V.; Ramaprabhu, P.

    2015-11-09

    Other work employed Richtmyer-Meshkov theory to describe the development of spikes and bubblesfrom shocked sinusoidal surfaces. Here, we discuss the effects of machining different two-dimensional shaped grooves in copper and examine the resulting flow of the material after being shocked into liquid on release. For these simulations, a high performance molecular dynamics code, SPaSM, was used with machined grooves of kh 0 = 1 and kh 0 = 1/8, where 2h 0 is the peak-to-valley height of the perturbation with wavelength λ, and k = 2π/λ. The surface morphologies studied include a Chevron, a Fly-Cut, a Square-Wave, and a Gaussian.more » Furthermore, we describe extensions to an existing ejecta source model that better captures the mass ejected from these surfaces. We also investigate the same profiles at length scales of order 1 cm for an idealized fluid equation of state using the FLASH continuum hydrodynamics code. Our findings indicate that the resulting mass can be scaled by the missing area of a sinusoidal curve with an effective wavelength, λeff , that has the same missing area. Finally, our extended ejecta mass formula works well for all the shapes considered and captures the corresponding time evolution and total mass.« less

  9. Vibration control and sinusoidal external force estimation of a flexible shaft using piezoelectric actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Y.; Kagawa, Y.

    2012-12-01

    In the balancing of a flexible rotor, insufficient damping for a rotor-bearing system may cause excessive vibrations in trial runs. In addition, conventional modal balancing methods are generally time-consuming because they try to balance the rotor one mode at a time. To overcome these issues, we developed a control system using multilayer piezoelectric actuators in order to suppress the vibration of a flexible rotor and to estimate its modal unbalances simultaneously. The H-infinity controller was designed to achieve robust performance for an uncertainty of the system, and its damping ability was examined in free and forced vibration tests. Large reductions were observed in the response near resonance. Then, steady-state responses of the system excited by sinusoidal forces were measured to investigate the estimation accuracy of sinusoidal external forces, and good agreement was observed between the estimated and the experimental results. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that feedforward plus feedback control using the estimated modal force significantly improved the performance of suppression of flexible shaft vibrations compared with simple feedback control.

  10. Amplitude-modulated sinusoidal microchannels for observing adaptability in C. elegans locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Parashar, Archana; Lycke, Roy; Carr, John A.; Pandey, Santosh

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present a movement-based assay to observe adaptability in Caenorhabditis elegans locomotion behavior. The assay comprises a series of sinusoidal microchannels with a fixed wavelength and modulating (increasing or decreasing) amplitude. The channel width is comparable to the body diameter of the organism. Worms are allowed to enter the channel from the input port and migrate toward the output port. Within channel sections that closely match the worm’s natural undulations, the worm movement is relatively quick and steady. As the channel amplitude increases or decreases along the device, the worm faces difficulty in generating the propulsive thrust, begins to slow down and eventually fails to move forward. A set of locomotion parameters (i.e., average forward velocity, number and duration of stops, range of contact angle, and cut-off region) is defined for worm locomotion in modulated sinusoidal channels and extracted from the recorded videos. The device is tested on wild-type C. elegans (N2) and two mutants (lev-8 and unc-38). We anticipate this passive, movement-based assay can be used to screen nematodes showing difference in locomotion phenotype. PMID:21772935

  11. Pseudoislet vascularization. Induction of diaphragm-fenestrated endothelia from the hepatic sinusoids.

    PubMed

    Hart, T K; Pino, R M

    1986-03-01

    The avascular islet tissue preparation, the pseudoislet, was transplanted into the liver of streptozotocin diabetic rats. The vascularization of the islet tissue was studied ultrastructurally over a 2-week period. At 2 days, proliferations of fibroblast-like cells and large amounts of collagen fibers were present at the periphery of grafts. By 7 days, vascular buds were present at the edge of the graft and invaginating into the islet tissue. At this time, diaphragmed fenestrae were present in the endothelial cells of these forming vessels and they were surrounded by a thin continuous basal lamina. By 12 to 14 days, vascularization was complete as determined by the presence of perfused vessels. At this time the mural architecture of the capillary endothelium was identical to that found in pancreatic islets in situ, i.e., diaphragmed fenestrae, transendothelial channels, and a continuous basal lamina. This contrasted sharply with normal hepatic sinusoidal endothelium which has larger open fenestrae, no channels, and a discontinuous or absent basal lamina. In animals that had been labeled with colloidal carbon before pseudoislet transplantation, the fenestrated endothelium in the grafts contained carbon-filled phagocytic vacuoles indicating the hepatic origin of these cells. Also present at this time was a change in the hepatic sinusoids near the graft sites to a near continuous endothelium. This study demonstrates that isolated avascular adult islet cells are capable of inducing a diaphragm-fenestrated endothelium.

  12. First CFOA-based explicit-current-output quadrature sinusoidal oscillators using grounded capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiri, Abhirup; Jaikla, Winai; Siripruchyanun, Montree

    2013-02-01

    To date, no current-feedback operational amplifier (CFOA)-based sinusoidal oscillator has been reported which provides all the following features simultaneously: (i) current-mode quadrature sinusoidal oscillator providing two explicit-current-outputs (ECOs) from high output impedance terminals, (ii) employing no more than three CFOA ICs and six passive components, which include two grounded capacitors, (iii) offers independent tuning of the condition of oscillation (CO) via a resistor and (iv) provides tunability of the ratio of amplitudes of the generated quadrature ECOs via a separate resistor. To the best of authors' knowledge, this article reports first CFOA-based QOs in current-mode (i.e. providing two ECO signals). Experimental results using AD844 CFOA ICs from Analog Devices have been included to verify the workability of the proposed oscillator circuits. An example automatic gain control (AGC) loop to regulate the oscillation amplitude and control the THD has also been used and verified using SPICE simulations using the AD844 macro-model.

  13. The 3-D alignment of objects in dynamic PET scans using filtered sinusoidal trajectories of sinogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostopoulos, Aristotelis E.; Happonen, Antti P.; Ruotsalainen, Ulla

    2006-12-01

    In this study, our goal is to employ a novel 3-D alignment method for dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) scans. Because the acquired data (i.e. sinograms) often contain noise considerably, filtering of the data prior to the alignment presumably improves the final results. In this study, we utilized a novel 3-D stackgram domain approach. In the stackgram domain, the signals along the sinusoidal trajectory signals of the sinogram can be processed separately. In this work, we performed angular stackgram domain filtering by employing well known 1-D filters: the Gaussian low-pass filter and the median filter. In addition, we employed two wavelet de-noising techniques. After filtering we performed alignment of objects in the stackgram domain. The local alignment technique we used is based on similarity comparisons between locus vectors (i.e. the signals along the sinusoidal trajectories of the sinogram) in a 3-D neighborhood of sequences of the stackgrams. Aligned stackgrams can be transformed back to sinograms (Method 1), or alternatively directly to filtered back-projected images (Method 2). In order to evaluate the alignment process, simulated data with different kinds of additive noises were used. The results indicated that the filtering prior to the alignment can be important concerning the accuracy.

  14. Scavenger receptor-mediated endocytosis by sinusoidal cells in rat bone marrow

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffroy, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    Endocytosis of serum albumin by sinusoidal endothelial cells in rat bone marrow was investigated initially at the ultrastructural level with subsequent biochemical investigation of the specificity mediating this event. Bovine serum albumin adsorbed to 20nm colloidal gold particles (AuBSA) was chosen as the electron microscopic probe. Morphological data strongly suggested that a receptor was involved in uptake of AuBSA. Confirmation of receptor involvement in the uptake of AuBSA by marrow sinusoidal endothelial cells was achieved utilizing an in situ isolated hind limb perfusion protocol in conjunction with unlabeled, radiolabeled, and radio-/colloidal gold labeled probes. The major findings of competition and saturation experiments were: (1) endocytosis of AuBSA was mediated by a receptor for modified/treated serum albumin; (2) endocytosis of formaldehyde-treated serum albumin was mediated by a binding site which may be the same or closely related to the site responsible for the uptake of AuBSA; and (3) endocytosis of native untreated albumin was not mediated by receptor and probably represents fluid-phase pinocitosis.

  15. On shock driven jetting of liquid from non-sinusoidal surfaces into a vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Cherne, F. J.; Hammerberg, J. E.; Andrews, M. J.; Karkhanis, V.; Ramaprabhu, P.

    2015-11-09

    Other work employed Richtmyer-Meshkov theory to describe the development of spikes and bubblesfrom shocked sinusoidal surfaces. Here, we discuss the effects of machining different two-dimensional shaped grooves in copper and examine the resulting flow of the material after being shocked into liquid on release. For these simulations, a high performance molecular dynamics code, SPaSM, was used with machined grooves of kh 0 = 1 and kh 0 = 1/8, where 2h 0 is the peak-to-valley height of the perturbation with wavelength λ, and k = 2π/λ. The surface morphologies studied include a Chevron, a Fly-Cut, a Square-Wave, and a Gaussian. Furthermore, we describe extensions to an existing ejecta source model that better captures the mass ejected from these surfaces. We also investigate the same profiles at length scales of order 1 cm for an idealized fluid equation of state using the FLASH continuum hydrodynamics code. Our findings indicate that the resulting mass can be scaled by the missing area of a sinusoidal curve with an effective wavelength, λeff , that has the same missing area. Finally, our extended ejecta mass formula works well for all the shapes considered and captures the corresponding time evolution and total mass.

  16. A Novel Modular Bioreactor to In Vitro Study the Hepatic Sinusoid

    PubMed Central

    Illa, Xavi; Vila, Sergi; Yeste, Jose; Peralta, Carmen; Gracia-Sancho, Jordi; Villa, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    We describe a unique, versatile bioreactor consisting of two plates and a modified commercial porous membrane suitable for in vitro analysis of the liver sinusoid. The modular bioreactor allows i) excellent control of the cell seeding process; ii) cell culture under controlled shear stress stimulus, and; iii) individual analysis of each cell type upon completion of the experiment. The advantages of the bioreactor detailed here are derived from the modification of a commercial porous membrane with an elastomeric wall specifically moulded in order to define the cell culture area, to act as a gasket that will fit into the bioreactor, and to provide improved mechanical robustness. The device presented herein has been designed to simulate the in vivo organization of a liver sinusoid and tested by co-culturing endothelial cells (EC) and hepatic stellate cells (HSC). The results show both an optimal morphology of the endothelial cells as well as an improvement in the phenotype of stellate cells, most probably due to paracrine factors released from endothelial cells. This device is proposed as a versatile, easy-to-use co-culture system that can be applied to biomedical research of vascular systems, including the liver. PMID:25375141

  17. Vibrato in Singing Voice: The Link between Source-Filter and Sinusoidal Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroabarren, Ixone; Carlosena, Alfonso

    2004-12-01

    The application of inverse filtering techniques for high-quality singing voice analysis/synthesis is discussed. In the context of source-filter models, inverse filtering provides a noninvasive method to extract the voice source, and thus to study voice quality. Although this approach is widely used in speech synthesis, this is not the case in singing voice. Several studies have proved that inverse filtering techniques fail in the case of singing voice, the reasons being unclear. In order to shed light on this problem, we will consider here an additional feature of singing voice, not present in speech: the vibrato. Vibrato has been traditionally studied by sinusoidal modeling. As an alternative, we will introduce here a novel noninteractive source filter model that incorporates the mechanisms of vibrato generation. This model will also allow the comparison of the results produced by inverse filtering techniques and by sinusoidal modeling, as they apply to singing voice and not to speech. In this way, the limitations of these conventional techniques, described in previous literature, will be explained. Both synthetic signals and singer recordings are used to validate and compare the techniques presented in the paper.

  18. EU-12: A Small-Pore, High-Silica Zeolite Containing Sinusoidal Eight-Ring Channels.

    PubMed

    Bae, Juna; Cho, Jung; Lee, Jeong Hwan; Seo, Sung Man; Hong, Suk Bong

    2016-06-20

    Zeolite EU-12, the framework structure of which has remained unsolved during the past 30 years, is synthesized at a specific SiO2 /Al2 O3 ratio using choline as an organic structure-directing agent, with both Na(+) and Rb(+) ions present. Synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction and Rietveld analyses reveal that the EU-12 structure has a two-dimensional 8-ring channel system. Among the two distinct 8-ring (4.6×2.8 and 5.0×2.7 Å) channels along c axis, the smaller one interconnects with the sinusoidal 8-ring (4.8×3.3 Å) channel along a axis. The other large one is simply linked up with the sinusoidal channel by sharing 8-rings (4.8×2.6 Å) in the ac plane. The proton form of EU-12 was found to show a considerably higher ethene selectivity in the low-temperature dehydration of ethanol than H-mordenite, the best catalyst for this reaction.

  19. Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells Escape Senescence by Loss of p19ARF

    PubMed Central

    Koudelkova, Petra; Weber, Gerhard; Mikulits, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) represent a highly differentiated cell type that lines hepatic sinusoids. LSECs form a discontinuous endothelium due to fenestrations under physiological conditions, which are reduced upon chronic liver injury. Cultivation of rodent LSECs associates with a rapid onset of stress-induced senescence a few days post isolation, which limits genetic and biochemical studies ex vivo. Here we show the establishment of LSECs isolated from p19ARF-/- mice which undergo more than 50 cell doublings in the absence of senescence. Isolated p19ARF-/- LSECs display a cobblestone-like morphology and show the ability of tube formation. Analysis of DNA content revealed a stable diploid phenotype after long-term passaging without a gain of aneuploidy. Notably, p19ARF-/- LSECs express the endothelial markers CD31, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-2, VE-cadherin, von Willebrand factor, stabilin-2 and CD146 suggesting that these cells harbor and maintain an endothelial phenotype. In line, treatment with small molecule inhibitors against VEGFR-2 caused cell death, demonstrating the sustained ability of p19ARF-/- LSECs to respond to anti-angiogenic therapeutics. From these data we conclude that loss of p19ARF overcomes senescence of LSECs, allowing immortalization of cells without losing endothelial characteristics. Thus, p19ARF-/- LSECs provide a novel cellular model to study endothelial cell biology. PMID:26528722

  20. Vestibular modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity during sinusoidal linear acceleration in supine humans

    PubMed Central

    Hammam, Elie; Bolton, Philip S.; Kwok, Kenny; Macefield, Vaughan G.

    2014-01-01

    The utricle and saccular components of the vestibular apparatus preferentially detect linear displacements of the head in the horizontal and vertical planes, respectively. We previously showed that sinusoidal linear acceleration in the horizontal plane of seated humans causes a pronounced modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), supporting a significant role for the utricular component of the otolithic organs in the control of blood pressure. Here we tested the hypothesis that the saccule can also play a role in blood pressure regulation by modulating lower limb MSNA. Oligounitary MSNA was recorded via tungsten microelectrodes inserted into the common peroneal nerve in 12 subjects, laying supine on a motorized platform with the head aligned with the longitudinal axis of the body. Slow sinusoidal linear accelerations-decelerations (peak acceleration ±4 mG) were applied in the rostrocaudal axis (which predominantly stimulates the saccule) and in the mediolateral axis (which also engages the utricle) at 0.08 Hz. The modulation of MSNA in the rostrocaudal axis (29.4 ± 3.4%) was similar to that in the mediolateral axis (32.0 ± 3.9%), and comparable to that obtained by stimulation of the utricle alone in seated subjects with the head vertical. We conclude that both the saccular and utricular components of the otolithic organs play a role in the control of arterial pressure during postural challenges. PMID:25346657

  1. The Design of In Vitro Liver Sinusoid Mimics Using Chitosan–Hyaluronic Acid Polyelectrolyte Multilayers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeonhee; Larkin, Adam L.; Davis, Richey M.

    2010-01-01

    Interactions between hepatocytes and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) are essential for the development and maintenance of hepatic phenotypic functions. We report the assembly of three-dimensional liver sinusoidal mimics comprised of primary rat hepatocytes, LSECs, and an intermediate chitosan–hyaluronic acid polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM). The height of the PEMs ranged from 30 to 55 nm and exhibited a shear modulus of ∼100 kPa. Hepatocyte–PEM cellular constructs exhibited stable urea and albumin production over a 7-day period, and these values were either higher or similar to cells cultured in a collagen sandwich. This is of significance because the thickness of a collagen gel is ∼1000-fold higher than the height of the chitosan–hyaluronic acid PEM. In the hepatocyte–PEM–LSEC liver-mimetic cellular constructs, LSEC phenotype was maintained, and these cultures exhibited stable urea and albumin production. CYP1A1/2 activity measured over a 7-day period was significantly higher in the hepatocyte–PEM–LSEC constructs than in collagen sandwich cultures. A 16-fold increase in CYP1A1/2 activity was observed for hepatocyte–PEM–10,000 LSEC samples, thereby suggesting that interactions between hepatocytes and LSECs are critical in enhancing the detoxification capability in hepatic cultures in vitro. PMID:20491586

  2. On shock driven jetting of liquid from non-sinusoidal surfaces into a vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherne, F. J.; Hammerberg, J. E.; Andrews, M. J.; Karkhanis, V.; Ramaprabhu, P.

    2015-11-01

    Previous work employed Richtmyer-Meshkov theory to describe the development of spikes and bubbles from shocked sinusoidal surfaces. Here, we discuss the effects of machining different two-dimensional shaped grooves in copper and examine the resulting flow of the material after being shocked into liquid on release. For these simulations, a high performance molecular dynamics code, SPaSM, was used with machined grooves of kh0 = 1 and kh0 = 1/8, where 2h0 is the peak-to-valley height of the perturbation with wavelength λ, and k = 2π/λ. The surface morphologies studied include a Chevron, a Fly-Cut, a Square-Wave, and a Gaussian. We describe extensions to an existing ejecta source model that better captures the mass ejected from these surfaces. We also investigate the same profiles at length scales of order 1 cm for an idealized fluid equation of state using the FLASH continuum hydrodynamics code. Our findings indicate that the resulting mass can be scaled by the missing area of a sinusoidal curve with an effective wavelength, λeff, that has the same missing area. Our extended ejecta mass formula works well for all the shapes considered and captures the corresponding time evolution and total mass.

  3. Exposure to 50Hz-sinusoidal electromagnetic field induces DNA damage-independent autophagy.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yunyun; Xia, Ruohong; Jiang, Hengjun; Chen, Yanfeng; Hong, Ling; Yu, Yunxian; Xu, Zhengping; Zeng, Qunli

    2016-08-01

    As electromagnetic field (EMF) is commonly encountered within our daily lives, the biological effects of EMF are of great concern. Autophagy is a key process for maintaining cellular homeostasis, and it can also reveal cellular responses to environmental stimuli. In this study, we aim to investigate the biological effects of a 50Hz-sinusoidal electromagnetic field on autophagy and we identified its mechanism of action in Chinese Hamster Lung (CHL) cells. CHL cells were exposed to a 50Hz sinusoidal EMF at 0.4mT for 30min or 24h. In this study, we found that a 0.4mT EMF resulted in: (i) an increase in LC3-II expression and increased autophagosome formation; (ii) no significant difference in the incidence of γH2AX foci between the sham and exposure groups; (iii) reorganized actin filaments and increased pseudopodial extensions without promoting cell migration; and (iv) enhanced cell apoptosis when autophagy was blocked by Bafilomycin A1. These results implied that DNA damage was not directly involved in the autophagy induced by a 0.4mT 50Hz EMF. In addition, an EMF induced autophagy balanced the cellular homeostasis to protect the cells from severe adverse biological consequences. PMID:27177844

  4. EU-12: A Small-Pore, High-Silica Zeolite Containing Sinusoidal Eight-Ring Channels.

    PubMed

    Bae, Juna; Cho, Jung; Lee, Jeong Hwan; Seo, Sung Man; Hong, Suk Bong

    2016-06-20

    Zeolite EU-12, the framework structure of which has remained unsolved during the past 30 years, is synthesized at a specific SiO2 /Al2 O3 ratio using choline as an organic structure-directing agent, with both Na(+) and Rb(+) ions present. Synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction and Rietveld analyses reveal that the EU-12 structure has a two-dimensional 8-ring channel system. Among the two distinct 8-ring (4.6×2.8 and 5.0×2.7 Å) channels along c axis, the smaller one interconnects with the sinusoidal 8-ring (4.8×3.3 Å) channel along a axis. The other large one is simply linked up with the sinusoidal channel by sharing 8-rings (4.8×2.6 Å) in the ac plane. The proton form of EU-12 was found to show a considerably higher ethene selectivity in the low-temperature dehydration of ethanol than H-mordenite, the best catalyst for this reaction. PMID:27174769

  5. Automatic voltage-imbalance detector

    SciTech Connect

    Bobbett, R.E.; McCormick, J.B.; Kerwin, W.J.

    1981-05-20

    A device is described for indicating and preventing damage to voltage cells such as galvanic cells and fuel cells connected in series by detecting sequential voltages and comparing these voltages to adjacent voltage cells. The device is implemented by using operational amplifiers and switching circuitry is provided by transistors. The device can be utilized in battery powered electric vehicles to prevent galvanic cell damage and also in series connected fuel cells to prevent fuel cell damage.

  6. High voltage variable diameter insulator

    DOEpatents

    Vanecek, David L.; Pike, Chester D.

    1984-01-01

    A high voltage feedthrough assembly (10) having a tubular insulator (15) extending between the ground plane ring (16) and the high voltage ring (30). The insulator (15) is made of Pyrex and decreases in diameter from the ground plane ring (16) to the high voltage ring (30), producing equipotential lines almost perpendicular to the wall (27) of the insulator (15) to optimize the voltage-holding capability of the feedthrough assembly (10).

  7. Charge-pump voltage converter

    DOEpatents

    Brainard, John P.; Christenson, Todd R.

    2009-11-03

    A charge-pump voltage converter for converting a low voltage provided by a low-voltage source to a higher voltage. Charge is inductively generated on a transfer rotor electrode during its transit past an inductor stator electrode and subsequently transferred by the rotating rotor to a collector stator electrode for storage or use. Repetition of the charge transfer process leads to a build-up of voltage on a charge-receiving device. Connection of multiple charge-pump voltage converters in series can generate higher voltages, and connection of multiple charge-pump voltage converters in parallel can generate higher currents. Microelectromechanical (MEMS) embodiments of this invention provide a small and compact high-voltage (several hundred V) voltage source starting with a few-V initial voltage source. The microscale size of many embodiments of this invention make it ideally suited for MEMS- and other micro-applications where integration of the voltage or charge source in a small package is highly desirable.

  8. Voltage drop over a vacuum arc and the cathode-spot brightness

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarov, S.N.; Rakhovsky, V.I.; Zhurbenko, V.G. )

    1990-06-01

    A spectral investigation of low-current dc vacuum arc voltage is presented. High-speed steak photographs of cathode-spot light emission with high time resolution are obtained. Characteristic frequencies of cathode-spot instabilities are derived from averaged frequency spectra of arc voltage.

  9. Dynamic localization and Bloch oscillations in the spectrum of a frequency mode-locked laser.

    PubMed

    Longhi, Stefano

    2005-04-01

    It is shown that a frequency mode-locked laser with a sinusoidal sweep of modulation frequency around a mode-locking condition represents an ideal optical system for observing in the spectral domain the phenomena of dynamic localization and Bloch oscillations of electrons in an ideal solid placed in an external ac electric field.

  10. E-beam high voltage switching power supply

    DOEpatents

    Shimer, D.W.; Lange, A.C.

    1996-10-15

    A high-power power supply produces a controllable, constant high voltage output under varying and arcing loads. The power supply includes a voltage regulator, an inductor, an inverter for producing a high frequency square wave current of alternating polarity, an improved inverter voltage clamping circuit, a step up transformer, an output rectifier for producing a dc voltage at the output of each module, and a current sensor for sensing output current. The power supply also provides dynamic response to varying loads by controlling the voltage regulator duty cycle and circuitry is provided for sensing incipient arc currents at the output of the power supply to simultaneously decouple the power supply circuitry from the arcing load. The power supply includes a plurality of discrete switching type dc--dc converter modules. 5 figs.

  11. E-beam high voltage switching power supply

    DOEpatents

    Shimer, Daniel W.; Lange, Arnold C.

    1996-01-01

    A high-power power supply produces a controllable, constant high voltage put under varying and arcing loads. The power supply includes a voltage regulator, an inductor, an inverter for producing a high frequency square wave current of alternating polarity, an improved inverter voltage clamping circuit, a step up transformer, an output rectifier for producing a dc voltage at the output of each module, and a current sensor for sensing output current. The power supply also provides dynamic response to varying loads by controlling the voltage regulator duty cycle and circuitry is provided for sensing incipient arc currents at the output of the power supply to simultaneously decouple the power supply circuitry from the arcing load. The power supply includes a plurality of discrete switching type dc--dc converter modules.

  12. Development of a fast voltage control method for electrostatic accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov, Nikolai R.; Linardakis, Peter; Tsifakis, Dimitrios

    2014-12-01

    The concept of a novel fast voltage control loop for tandem electrostatic accelerators is described. This control loop utilises high-frequency components of the ion beam current intercepted by the image slits to generate a correction voltage that is applied to the first few gaps of the low- and high-energy acceleration tubes adjoining the high voltage terminal. New techniques for the direct measurement of the transfer function of an ultra-high impedance structure, such as an electrostatic accelerator, have been developed. For the first time, the transfer function for the fast feedback loop has been measured directly. Slow voltage variations are stabilised with common corona control loop and the relationship between transfer functions for the slow and new fast control loops required for optimum operation is discussed. The main source of terminal voltage instabilities, which are due to variation of the charging current caused by mechanical oscillations of charging chains, has been analysed.

  13. Excitation of voltage oscillations in an induction voltage adder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruner, Nichelle; Genoni, Thomas; Madrid, Elizabeth; Welch, Dale; Hahn, Kelly; Oliver, Bryan

    2009-07-01

    The induction voltage adder is an accelerator architecture used in recent designs of pulsed-power driven x-ray radiographic systems such as Sandia National Laboratories’ Radiographic Integrated Test Stand (RITS), the Atomic Weapons Establishment’s planned Hydrus Facility, and the Naval Research Laboratory’s Mercury. Each of these designs relies on magnetic insulation to prevent electron loss across the anode-cathode gap in the vicinity of the adder as well as in the coaxial transmission line. Particle-in-cell simulations of the RITS adder and transmission line show that, as magnetic insulation is being established during a pulse, some electron loss occurs across the gap. Sufficient delay in the cavity pulse timings provides an opportunity for high-momentum electrons to deeply penetrate the cavities of the adder cells where they can excite radio-frequency resonances. These oscillations may be amplified in subsequent gaps, resulting in oscillations in the output power. The specific modes supported by the RITS-6 accelerator and details of the mechanism by which they are excited are presented in this paper.

  14. Dynamic tracking of the steady state power system magnitude and frequency using linear Kalman filter a variable frequency model

    SciTech Connect

    Soliman, S.A. ); Christiansen, G.S.; Kelly, D.H.; El-Naggar, K.M. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1992-12-01

    This paper presents the application of Kalman Filtering algorithm for tracking the power system voltage magnitude, the rate of change of the frequency, the frequency deviation as well as the voltage phase angle, when the frequency of the voltage signal varies linearly with the time during the data window size. The proposed algorithm uses the digitized samples of the voltage signal at the relay locations. Effects of sampling rate, data window size and the harmonics contaminating the voltage signal on the performance of the algorithm are studied. Furthermore, effects of the noise level are also investigated. A sample of the results obtained is reported in this paper.

  15. High voltage dc-dc converter with dynamic voltage regulation and decoupling during load-generated arcs

    DOEpatents

    Shimer, Daniel W.; Lange, Arnold C.

    1995-01-01

    A high-power power supply produces a controllable, constant high voltage output under varying and arcing loads. The power supply includes a voltage regulator, an inductor, an inverter for producing a high frequency square wave current of alternating polarity, an improved inverter voltage clamping circuit, a step up transformer, an output rectifier for producing a dc voltage at the output of each module, and a current sensor for sensing output current. The power supply also provides dynamic response to varying loads by controlling the voltage regulator duty cycle and circuitry is provided for sensing incipient arc currents at the output of the power supply to simultaneously decouple the power supply circuitry from the arcing load. The power supply includes a plurality of discrete switching type dc--dc converter modules.

  16. High voltage dc--dc converter with dynamic voltage regulation and decoupling during load-generated arcs

    DOEpatents

    Shimer, D.W.; Lange, A.C.

    1995-05-23

    A high-power power supply produces a controllable, constant high voltage output under varying and arcing loads. The power supply includes a voltage regulator, an inductor, an inverter for producing a high frequency square wave current of alternating polarity, an improved inverter voltage clamping circuit, a step up transformer, an output rectifier for producing a dc voltage at the output of each module, and a current sensor for sensing output current. The power supply also provides dynamic response to varying loads by controlling the voltage regulator duty cycle and circuitry is provided for sensing incipient arc currents at the output of the power supply to simultaneously decouple the power supply circuitry from the arcing load. The power supply includes a plurality of discrete switching type dc--dc converter modules. 5 Figs.

  17. Instantaneous frequency based newborn EEG seizure characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesbah, Mostefa; O'Toole, John M.; Colditz, Paul B.; Boashash, Boualem

    2012-12-01

    The electroencephalogram (EEG), used to noninvasively monitor brain activity, remains the most reliable tool in the diagnosis of neonatal seizures. Due to their nonstationary and multi-component nature, newborn EEG seizures are better represented in the joint time-frequency domain than in either the time domain or the frequency domain. Characterising newborn EEG seizure nonstationarities helps to better understand their time-varying nature and, therefore, allow developing efficient signal processing methods for both modelling and seizure detection and classification. In this article, we used the instantaneous frequency (IF) extracted from a time-frequency distribution to characterise newborn EEG seizures. We fitted four frequency modulated (FM) models to the extracted IFs, namely a linear FM, a piecewise-linear FM, a sinusoidal FM, and a hyperbolic FM. Using a database of 30-s EEG seizure epochs acquired from 35 newborns, we were able to show that, depending on EEG channel, the sinusoidal and piecewise-linear FM models best fitted 80-98% of seizure epochs. To further characterise the EEG seizures, we calculated the mean frequency and frequency span of the extracted IFs. We showed that in the majority of the cases (>95%), the mean frequency resides in the 0.6-3 Hz band with a frequency span of 0.2-1 Hz. In terms of the frequency of occurrence of the four seizure models, the statistical analysis showed that there is no significant difference( p = 0.332) between the two hemispheres. The results also indicate that there is no significant differences between the two hemispheres in terms of the mean frequency ( p = 0.186) and the frequency span ( p = 0.302).

  18. Distortion in the frequency demodulator using feedback.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, E.; Schilling, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    The response of a frequency demodulator using feedback (FMFB) to a frequency modulated signal is analyzed. Canonical equations of operation are obtained. Harmonic distortion is calculated for the case of a sinusoidal modulating signal. Intermodulation distortion is calculated assuming a noise-like modulation. Design curves are presented. The special case of harmonic and intermodulation distortion in a discriminator is also presented. It is shown that the results obtained in this paper by treating the discriminator as a degenerate FMFB compare favorably with those obtained by other authors. However, the results presented here do not require digital computation.

  19. Conductance hysteresis in the voltage dependent anion-selective channel

    PubMed Central

    Hoogerheide, David P.; Rostovtseva, Tatiana K.; Berezhkovskii, Alexander M.; Bezrukov, Sergey M.

    2015-01-01

    When the transmembrane voltage is periodically varied with time, the conductance of voltage-sensitive ion channels shows hysteretic behavior. Although this phenomenon has been used in studies of gating of the voltage-dependent anion channel, VDAC, from the outer mitochondrial membrane for nearly four decades, full hysteresis curves have never been reported, since the focus was only on the channel opening branches of the hysteresis loops. Here we study hysteretic response of a multichannel VDAC system to a triangular voltage ramp whose frequency varies within three orders of magnitude, ranging from 0.5 mHz to 0.2 Hz. We find that in this wide frequency range the area encircled by the hysteresis curves changes by less than a factor of three, thus suggesting a broad distribution of the characteristic times and strongly non-equilibrium behavior. At the same time, hysteresis branches corresponding to VDAC opening show quasi-equilibrium two-state behavior. This allows calculating usual equilibrium gating parameters, the gating charge and voltage of equipartitioning, which turn out to be virtually insensitive to the ramp frequency. To rationalize this peculiarity, we hypothesize that during voltage-induced closure and opening the system explores different regions of the complex free energy landscape, where, in the opening branch, it follows quasi-equilibrium paths. PMID:26094068

  20. Conductance hysteresis in the voltage-dependent anion channel.

    PubMed

    Rappaport, Shay M; Teijido, Oscar; Hoogerheide, David P; Rostovtseva, Tatiana K; Berezhkovskii, Alexander M; Bezrukov, Sergey M

    2015-09-01

    Hysteresis in the conductance of voltage-sensitive ion channels is observed when the transmembrane voltage is periodically varied with time. Although this phenomenon has been used in studies of gating of the voltage-dependent anion channel, VDAC, from the outer mitochondrial membrane for nearly four decades, full hysteresis curves have never been reported, because the focus was solely on the channel opening branches of the hysteresis loops. We studied the hysteretic response of a multichannel VDAC system to a triangular voltage ramp the frequency of which was varied over three orders of magnitude, from 0.5 mHz to 0.2 Hz. We found that in this wide frequency range the area encircled by the hysteresis curves changes by less than a factor of three, suggesting broad distribution of the characteristic times and strongly non-equilibrium behavior. At the same time, quasi-equilibrium two-state behavior is observed for hysteresis branches corresponding to VDAC opening. This enables calculation of the usual equilibrium gating parameters, gating charge and voltage of equipartitioning, which were found to be almost insensitive to the ramp frequency. To rationalize this peculiarity, we hypothesize that during voltage-induced closure and opening the system explores different regions of the complex free energy landscape, and, in the opening branch, follows quasi-equilibrium paths.

  1. Fos Expression in Neurons of the Rat Vestibulo-Autonomic Pathway Activated by Sinusoidal Galvanic Vestibular Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Holstein, Gay R.; Friedrich Jr., Victor L.; Martinelli, Giorgio P.; Ogorodnikov, Dmitri; Yakushin, Sergei B.; Cohen, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    The vestibular system sends projections to brainstem autonomic nuclei that modulate heart rate and blood pressure in response to changes in head and body position with regard to gravity. Consistent with this, binaural sinusoidally modulated galvanic vestibular stimulation (sGVS) in humans causes vasoconstriction in the legs, while low frequency (0.02–0.04 Hz) sGVS causes a rapid drop in heart rate and blood pressure in anesthetized rats. We have hypothesized that these responses occur through activation of vestibulo-sympathetic pathways. In the present study, c-Fos protein expression was examined in neurons of the vestibular nuclei and rostral ventrolateral medullary region (RVLM) that were activated by low frequency sGVS. We found c-Fos-labeled neurons in the spinal, medial, and superior vestibular nuclei (SpVN, MVN, and SVN, respectively) and the parasolitary nucleus. The highest density of c-Fos-positive vestibular nuclear neurons was observed in MVN, where immunolabeled cells were present throughout the rostro-caudal extent of the nucleus. c-Fos expression was concentrated in the parvocellular region and largely absent from magnocellular MVN. c-Fos-labeled cells were scattered throughout caudal SpVN, and the immunostained neurons in SVN were restricted to a discrete wedge-shaped area immediately lateral to the IVth ventricle. Immunofluorescence localization of c-Fos and glutamate revealed that approximately one third of the c-Fos-labeled vestibular neurons showed intense glutamate-like immunofluorescence, far in excess of the stain reflecting the metabolic pool of cytoplasmic glutamate. In the RVLM, which receives a direct projection from the vestibular nuclei and sends efferents to preganglionic sympathetic neurons in the spinal cord, we observed an approximately threefold increase in c-Fos labeling in the sGVS-activated rats. We conclude that localization of c-Fos protein following sGVS is a reliable marker for sGVS-activated neurons of the vestibulo

  2. Fos expression in neurons of the rat vestibulo-autonomic pathway activated by sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation.

    PubMed

    Holstein, Gay R; Friedrich, Victor L; Martinelli, Giorgio P; Ogorodnikov, Dmitri; Yakushin, Sergei B; Cohen, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    The vestibular system sends projections to brainstem autonomic nuclei that modulate heart rate and blood pressure in response to changes in head and body position with regard to gravity. Consistent with this, binaural sinusoidally modulated galvanic vestibular stimulation (sGVS) in humans causes vasoconstriction in the legs, while low frequency (0.02-0.04 Hz) sGVS causes a rapid drop in heart rate and blood pressure in anesthetized rats. We have hypothesized that these responses occur through activation of vestibulo-sympathetic pathways. In the present study, c-Fos protein expression was examined in neurons of the vestibular nuclei and rostral ventrolateral medullary region (RVLM) that were activated by low frequency sGVS. We found c-Fos-labeled neurons in the spinal, medial, and superior vestibular nuclei (SpVN, MVN, and SVN, respectively) and the parasolitary nucleus. The highest density of c-Fos-positive vestibular nuclear neurons was observed in MVN, where immunolabeled cells were present throughout the rostro-caudal extent of the nucleus. c-Fos expression was concentrated in the parvocellular region and largely absent from magnocellular MVN. c-Fos-labeled cells were scattered throughout caudal SpVN, and the immunostained neurons in SVN were restricted to a discrete wedge-shaped area immediately lateral to the IVth ventricle. Immunofluorescence localization of c-Fos and glutamate revealed that approximately one third of the c-Fos-labeled vestibular neurons showed intense glutamate-like immunofluorescence, far in excess of the stain reflecting the metabolic pool of cytoplasmic glutamate. In the RVLM, which receives a direct projection from the vestibular nuclei and sends efferents to preganglionic sympathetic neurons in the spinal cord, we observed an approximately threefold increase in c-Fos labeling in the sGVS-activated rats. We conclude that localization of c-Fos protein following sGVS is a reliable marker for sGVS-activated neurons of the vestibulo

  3. Inferior vena cava stenosis-induced sinusoidal obstructive syndrome after living donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Orgoi, Sergelen; Sandag, Erdene; Namkhai, Ulzii-Orshikh; Badarch, Bat-Ireedui; Batsuuri, Batsaikhan

    2016-01-01

    The sinusoidal obstructive syndrome (SOS) is a complication that usually follows hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. It is also known as veno-occlusive disease, which is a rare complication of living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Herein, we reported a 34 year-old female patient presenting SOS after LDLT. Its underlying cause was presumed to be associated with liver abscess and subsequent inferior vena cava stenosis. SOS led to graft failure, thus requiring retransplantation with a deceased donor liver graft. The underlying causes of SOS are complex pathologic entity with multifactorial etiology. It is likely that its multifactorial etiology includes a decrease of hepatic venous outflow that is caused by graft liver infection and inferior vena cava stenosis.

  4. Single-shot calibration of soft x-ray mirrors using a sinusoidal transmission grating.

    PubMed

    Shpilman, Z; Ehrlich, Y; Maman, S; Levy, I; Shussman, T; Oren, G; Zakosky Nueberger, I; Hurvitz, G

    2014-11-01

    Calibration of soft x-ray diagnostics is a challenge due to the lack of laboratory-size calibrated sources. An in situ calibration method for newly developed x-ray mirrors, is presented. The x-ray source is produced by laser-matter interaction, and twin transmission gratings which create two identical dispersion lines. The gratings have a sinusoidal transmission function, which produces a highly precise high-orders free spectrum. An x-ray mirror interacts with one of the dispersion lines, and the mirror efficiency curve as a function of wavelength is extracted. Mirror efficiency shows good agreement with the literature, and evidence of water layer may justify the need of in situ calibration.

  5. Inferior vena cava stenosis-induced sinusoidal obstructive syndrome after living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bat-Erdene, Batsaikhan; Orgoi, Sergelen; Sandag, Erdene; Namkhai, Ulzii-Orshikh; Badarch, Bat-Ireedui; Batsuuri, Batsaikhan

    2016-08-01

    The sinusoidal obstructive syndrome (SOS) is a complication that usually follows hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. It is also known as veno-occlusive disease, which is a rare complication of living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Herein, we reported a 34 year-old female patient presenting SOS after LDLT. Its underlying cause was presumed to be associated with liver abscess and subsequent inferior vena cava stenosis. SOS led to graft failure, thus requiring retransplantation with a deceased donor liver graft. The underlying causes of SOS are complex pathologic entity with multifactorial etiology. It is likely that its multifactorial etiology includes a decrease of hepatic venous outflow that is caused by graft liver infection and inferior vena cava stenosis. PMID:27621751

  6. Mathieu function solutions for photoacoustic waves in sinusoidal one-dimensional structures.

    PubMed

    Wu, Binbin; Diebold, Gerald J

    2012-07-01

    The photoacoustic effect for a one-dimensional structure, the sound speed of which varies sinusoidally in space, is shown to be governed by an inhomogeneous Mathieu equation with the forcing term dependent on the spatial and temporal properties of the exciting optical radiation. New orthogonality relations, traveling wave Mathieu functions, and solutions to the inhomogeneous Mathieu equation are found, which are used to determine the character of photoacoustic waves in infinite and finite length phononic structures. Floquet solutions to the Mathieu equation give the positions of the band gaps, the damping of the acoustic waves within the band gaps, and the dispersion relation for photoacoustic waves. The solutions to the Mathieu equation give the photoacoustic response of the structure, show the space equivalent of subharmonic generation and acoustic confinement when waves are excited within band gaps.

  7. El Perfil Sinusoidal del Jet HH 31 en la Protoestrella IRAS 042482612

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrero, L. V.; Gómez, M. N.

    In this contribution we study the HH 31 jet; associated with the Class I proto-star; IRAS 042482612 (age 10 yrs); in the Taurus molecular cloud. We use mid-infrared images; taken by Spitzer and WISE; to analyze the sinusoidal or S-shape chain of knots (or EGOs) that delineate the jet. The binarity of the central source naturally explains the wiggling jet. The orbital period is 2.7 times the estimated dynamical time of the jet. The spatial difference between knots agrees with time elapse expected between quasi-periodic FU Orionis events; suggesting that central star might have experimented this type of events several times since its birth. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  8. First-order energy-integral model for thin Newtonian liquids falling along sinusoidal furrows.

    PubMed

    Sadiq, I Mohammed Rizwan

    2012-03-01

    An average modeling methodology under the lubrication approach is used to formulate a set of three coupled nonlinear partial differential equations based on the Nusselt scales. This system, known as the energy-integral method in literature, simplifies the Navier-Stokes equation at the first order and analyzes the dynamics of a thin sheet of fluid flowing over a topography with sinusoidally varying longitudinal furrows. Limiting cases of the linear stability results are mathematically discussed and the complete linear system is numerically handled by means of finite differences to approximate the eigenfunctions and their derivatives in a periodic domain. In a geometry which resembles a vertical shift of a topography, with the amplitude being equal to the shift length, it is found that such a geometry stabilizes the flow compared to its counterpart with no shift, such that the wave characteristics get affected. To confirm the stability results, a numerical investigation is performed. PMID:22587182

  9. Lineage tracing reveals conversion of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells into hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhaoli; Chen, Keyan; Shao, Yong; Gao, Lihua; Wang, Yan; Xu, Jianming; Jin, Yang; Hu, Xianwen; Wang, Youliang

    2016-09-01

    Although liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) have long been known to contribute to liver regeneration following injury, the exact role of these cells in liver regeneration remains poorly understood. In this work, we performed lineage tracing of LSECs in mice carrying Tie2-Cre or VE-cadherin-Cre constructs to facilitate fate-mapping of LSECs in liver regeneration. Some YFP-positive LSECs were observed to convert into hepatocytes following a two-thirds partial hepatectomy (PH). Furthermore, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) could be triggered to convert into cells that closely resembled hepatocytes when cultured with serum from mice that underwent an extended PH. These findings suggest that mature non-hepatocyte LSECs play an essential role in mammalian liver regeneration by converting to hepatocytes. The conversion of LSECs to hepatocyte-like (iHep) cells may provide a new approach to tissue engineering.

  10. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) function and NAFLD; NO-based therapy targeted to the liver.

    PubMed

    Maslak, Edyta; Gregorius, Aleksandra; Chlopicki, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) present unique, highly specialised endothelial cells in the body. Unlike the structure and function of typical, vascular endothelial cells, LSECs are comprised of fenestrations, display high endocytic capacity and play a prominent role in maintaining overall liver homeostasis. LSEC dysfunction has been regarded as a key event in multiple liver disorders; however, its role and diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic significance in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is still neglected. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the importance of LSECs in NAFLD. Attention is focused on the LSECs-mediated NO-dependent mechanisms in NAFLD development. We briefly describe the unique, highly specialised phenotype of LSECs and consequences of LSEC dysfunction on function of hepatic stellate cells (HSC) and hepatocytes. The potential efficacy of liver selective NO donors against liver steatosis and novel treatment approaches to modulate LSECs-driven liver pathology including NAFLD are also highlighted.

  11. Inferior vena cava stenosis-induced sinusoidal obstructive syndrome after living donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Orgoi, Sergelen; Sandag, Erdene; Namkhai, Ulzii-Orshikh; Badarch, Bat-Ireedui; Batsuuri, Batsaikhan

    2016-01-01

    The sinusoidal obstructive syndrome (SOS) is a complication that usually follows hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. It is also known as veno-occlusive disease, which is a rare complication of living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Herein, we reported a 34 year-old female patient presenting SOS after LDLT. Its underlying cause was presumed to be associated with liver abscess and subsequent inferior vena cava stenosis. SOS led to graft failure, thus requiring retransplantation with a deceased donor liver graft. The underlying causes of SOS are complex pathologic entity with multifactorial etiology. It is likely that its multifactorial etiology includes a decrease of hepatic venous outflow that is caused by graft liver infection and inferior vena cava stenosis. PMID:27621751

  12. Turbulent forced convection with sinusoidal variation of inlet temperature between two parallel-plates

    SciTech Connect

    Arik, M.; Kakac, S.; Santos, C.A.C.

    1996-12-01

    The thermal entry region heat transfer due to turbulent forced convection, subjected to a sinusoidally varying inlet temperature is solved by employing a hybrid numerical-analytical solution technique under linear variation of wall temperature and constant wall temperature as boundary condition and is verified with the experimental results. The analytical solution of the problem is obtained through extending the generalized integral transform technique. An experimental set-up was built and used in order to validate the employed mathematical modeling. Analytical solutions are compared with the experimental findings. Satisfactory agreement is obtained between theoretically and experimentally determined heat transfer characteristics for different axial positions along the channel. Heat transfer characteristics of flow have been determined for linear wall temperature and constant wall temperature boundary conditions. Results obtained from the analytical-numerical solution technique and experimental studies have been presented in graphical and tabular forms.

  13. Note: Improving low-light-level image detection sensitivity with higher speed using auxiliary sinusoidal light signal.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hongying; Yu, Zhengtao

    2015-06-01

    An improved active imaging method, which upgraded the detection sensitivity by applying an auxiliary sawtooth wave light signal, was reported. Nevertheless, such method sacrificed the imaging speed. To speed up imaging, a sinusoidal light signal is used instead and superposed with the undetectable low-light-level signal on the image sensor. After acquiring a superimposed image set in one sine wave cycle, an unbiased low-light-level image estimation is obtained by using least-square optimization. Through probabilistic analysis and experimental study, we demonstrate that the sinusoidal signal could improve the detection sensitivity 1/3 faster than the sawtooth wave signal.

  14. Note: Improving low-light-level image detection sensitivity with higher speed using auxiliary sinusoidal light signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hongying; Yu, Zhengtao

    2015-06-01

    An improved active imaging method, which upgraded the detection sensitivity by applying an auxiliary sawtooth wave light signal, was reported. Nevertheless, such method sacrificed the imaging speed. To speed up imaging, a sinusoidal light signal is used instead and superposed with the undetectable low-light-level signal on the image sensor. After acquiring a superimposed image set in one sine wave cycle, an unbiased low-light-level image estimation is obtained by using least-square optimization. Through probabilistic analysis and experimental study, we demonstrate that the sinusoidal signal could improve the detection sensitivity 1/3 faster than the sawtooth wave signal.

  15. P-selectin expression in a colon tumor model exposed by sinusoidal electromagnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    TUNCEL, HANDAN; SHIMAMOTO, FUMIO; ÇIRAKOĞLU, AYŞE; KORPINAR, MEHMET ALI; KALKAN, TUNAYA

    2013-01-01

    P-selectin is mainly involved in the initial process of tumor cell adhesion to platelets. The aim of the present study was to determine the expression level of P-selectin in a colon tumor model affected by sinusoidal electromagnetic fields (SMF). Male Wistar albino rats aged 2-2.5 months were used. The animals were divided into the I [N-Methyl-N-Nitrosurea (MNU)], II (SMF-MNU), III (SMF) and IV (control) groups. The rats were housed five per polycarbonate cage. Sixty milligrams of MNU was dissolved in 6 ml sterile 0.9% NaCl. Prepared solutions were administered intra rectally (i.r.) to the 1st and 3rd groups as 0.2 ml/per animal. The same procedure was applied to the 2nd and 4th groups, although 0.2 ml/per animal sterile isotonic solution was administered instead. This procedure was repeated once a week for 10 weeks. Following the administration of MNU, the 2nd and 3rd groups were exposed to a sinusoidal magnetic field (SMF, 50 Hz, 5 mT) for 6 h/day for 8 months. P-selectin expression of the four groups of rat colon tissues was determined using immunohistochemistry on paraffin sections. The labeled streptavidin biotin method was performed. Fisher’s exact test was used for differences between proportions. Results showed that there was no statistically significant (P>0.05) change in the expression level of P-selectin. However, this result should be verified by both in vivo and in vitro experiments to determine the effects of the magnetic fields on P-selectin. PMID:24648955

  16. Flow pattern and pressure drop of vertical upward gas-liquid flow in sinusoidal wavy channels

    SciTech Connect

    Nilpueng, Kitti; Wongwises, Somchai

    2006-06-15

    Flow patterns and pressure drop of upward liquid single-phase flow and air-water two-phase flow in sinusoidal wavy channels are experimentally studied. The test section is formed by a sinusoidal wavy wall of 1.00 m length with a wave length of 67.20mm, an amplitude of 5.76mm. Different phase shifts between the side walls of the wavy channel of 0{sup o}, 90{sup o} and 180{sup o} are investigated. The flow phenomena, which are bubbly flow, slug flow, churn flow, and dispersed bubbly flow are observed and recorded by high-speed camera. When the phase shifts are increased, the onset of the transition from the bubbly flow to the churn flow shifts to a higher value of superficial air velocity, and the regions of the slug flow and the churn flow are smaller. In other words, the regions of the bubbly flow and the dispersed bubbly flow are larger as the phase shift increases. The slug flow pattern is only found in the test sections with phase shifts of 0{sup o} and 90{sup o}. Recirculating gas bubbles are always found in the troughs of the corrugations. The recirculating is higher when the phase shifts are larger. The relationship between the two-phase multipliers calculated from the measured pressure drops, and the Martinelli parameter is compared with the Lockhart-Martinelli correlation. The correlation in the case of turbulent-turbulent condition is shown to fit the data very well for the phase shift of 0{sup o} but shows greater deviation when the phase shifts are higher. (author)

  17. Isomerically Pure Tetramethylrhodamine Voltage Reporters.

    PubMed

    Deal, Parker E; Kulkarni, Rishikesh U; Al-Abdullatif, Sarah H; Miller, Evan W

    2016-07-27

    We present the design, synthesis, and application of a new family of fluorescent voltage indicators based on isomerically pure tetramethylrhodamines. These new Rhodamine Voltage Reporters, or RhoVRs, use photoinduced electron transfer (PeT) as a trigger for voltage sensing, display excitation and emission profiles in the green to orange region of the visible spectrum, demonstrate high sensitivity to membrane potential changes (up to 47% ΔF/F per 100 mV), and employ a tertiary amide derived from sarcosine, which aids in membrane localization and simultaneously simplifies the synthetic route to the voltage sensors. The most sensitive of the RhoVR dyes, RhoVR 1, features a methoxy-substituted diethylaniline donor and phenylenevinylene molecular wire at the 5'-position of the rhodamine aryl ring, exhibits the highest voltage sensitivity to date for red-shifted PeT-based voltage sensors, and is compatible with simultaneous imaging alongside green fluorescent protein-based indicators. The discoveries that sarcosine-based tertiary amides in the context of molecular-wire voltage indicators prevent dye internalization and 5'-substituted voltage indicators exhibit improved voltage sensitivity should be broadly applicable to other types of PeT-based voltage-sensitive fluorophores. PMID:27428174

  18. Transistor voltage comparator performs own sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, R. A.

    1965-01-01

    Detection of the highest voltage input among a group of varying voltage inputs is accomplished by a transistorized voltage comparison circuit. The collector circuits of the transistors perform the sensing function. Input voltage levels are governed by the transistors.

  19. Sauer's non-linear voltage division.

    PubMed

    Schwan, H P; McAdams, E T; Jossinet, J

    2002-09-01

    The non-linearity of the electrode-tissue interface impedance gives rise to harmonics and thus degrades the accuracy of impedance measurements. Also, electrodes are often driven into the non-linear range of their polarisation impedance. This is particularly true in clinical applications. Techniques to correct for electrode effects are usually based on linear electrode impedance data. However, these data can be very different from the non-linear values needed. Non-linear electrode data suggested a model based on simple assumptions. It is useful in predicting the frequency dependence of non-linear effects from linear properties. Sauer's treatment is a first attempt to provide a more general and rigorous basis for modelling the non-linear state. The paper reports Sauer's treatment of the non-linear case and points out its limitations. The paper considers Sauer's treatment of a series arrangement of two impedances. The tissue impedance is represented by a linear voltage-current characteristic. The interface impedance is represented by a Volterra expansion. The response of this network to periodic signals is calculated up to the second-order term of the series expansion. The resultant, time-dependent current is found to contain a DC term (rectification), as well as frequency-dependent terms. Sauer's treatment assumes a voltage clamp across the impedances and neglects higher-order terms in the series expansion. As a consequence, it fails adequately to represent some experimentally observed phenomena. It is therefore suggested that Sauer's expressions for the voltage divider should be combined with the non-linear treatments previously published by the co-authors. Although Sauer's work on the non-linear voltage divider was originally applied to the study of the non-linear behaviour of the electrode-electrolyte interface and biological tissues, it is stressed, however, that the work is applicable to a wide range of research areas.

  20. Electro-optic high voltage sensor

    DOEpatents

    Davidson, James R.; Seifert, Gary D.

    2002-01-01

    A small sized electro-optic voltage sensor capable of accurate measurement of high levels of voltages without contact with a conductor or voltage source is provided. When placed in the presence of an electric field, the sensor receives an input beam of electromagnetic radiation into the sensor. A polarization beam displacer serves as a filter to separate the input beam into two beams with orthogonal linear polarizations. The beam displacer is oriented in such a way as to rotate the linearly polarized beams such that they enter a Pockels crystal having at a preferred angle of 45 degrees. The beam displacer is therefore capable of causing a linearly polarized beam to impinge a crystal at a desired angle independent of temperature. The Pockels electro-optic effect induces a differential phase shift on the major and minor axes of the input beam as it travels through the Pockels crystal, which causes the input beam to be elliptically polarized. A reflecting prism redirects the beam back through the crystal and the beam displacer. On the return path, the polarization beam displacer separates the elliptically polarized beam into two output beams of orthogonal linear polarization representing the major and minor axes. The system may include a detector for converting the output beams into electrical signals, and a signal processor for determining the voltage based on an analysis of the output beams. The output beams are amplitude modulated by the frequency of the electric field and the amplitude of the output beams is proportional to the magnitude of the electric field, which is related to the voltage being measured.