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Sample records for frequency stability measurement

  1. The CO2 laser frequency stability measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, E. H., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Carbon dioxide laser frequency stability data are considered for a receiver design that relates to maximum Doppler frequency and its rate of change. Results show that an adequate margin exists in terms of data acquisition, Doppler tracking, and bit error rate as they relate to laser stability and transmitter power.

  2. 47 CFR 2.1055 - Measurements required: Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Measurements required: Frequency stability. 2.1055 Section 2.1055 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Equipment Authorization...

  3. 47 CFR 2.1055 - Measurements required: Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Measurements required: Frequency stability. 2.1055 Section 2.1055 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Equipment Authorization...

  4. 47 CFR 2.1055 - Measurements required: Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Measurements required: Frequency stability. 2.1055 Section 2.1055 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Equipment Authorization...

  5. 47 CFR 2.1055 - Measurements required: Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Measurements required: Frequency stability. 2.1055 Section 2.1055 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Equipment Authorization...

  6. 47 CFR 2.1055 - Measurements required: Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Measurements required: Frequency stability. 2.1055 Section 2.1055 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Equipment Authorization...

  7. Measurement of the frequency stability of responders in aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Xiaofan

    1994-01-01

    Measurement on an aircraft orbit, such as a satellite launching orbit, is made by the responder in the aircraft along with several remote track stations on the ground. During the launching, the system is required to have precise time synchronization and frequency accuracy. At the same time, accurate measurement of aircraft velocity requires high frequency stability of the system. However, atomic frequency standards in the ground stations supply time and frequency reference standard with excellent long term and short term frequency stability for the above-mentioned goals. The stability of responder is also an important factor affecting the performance of the system and there are more requirements for the corresponding time/frequency measurements. In the system, the responders do not use continuous wave (CW) but narrow pulse modulated wave; consequently, the characterization theory of their stability is more complicated and the measurement technique is more difficult for pulsed wave than that for CW. A systematic characterization theory of the frequency stability for pulsed wave is demonstrated and the measuring methods are discussed. The measurement systems, which have been set up in Beijing Institute of Radio Metrology and Measurement (BIRMM) and can be used to test the frequency stability of pulse coherent responders in time domain and frequency domain with high sensitivity and accuracy, are described. Using these measurement systems, successful measurements for the responders were made with which the satellite launching orbits were precisely obtained and tracked.

  8. The measurement of frequency and frequency stability of precision oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, D. W.

    1974-01-01

    The specification and performance of precision oscillators is discussed as a very important topic to the owners and users of these oscillators. This paper presents at the tutorial level some convenient methods of measuring the frequencies of precision oscillators -- giving advantages and disadvantages of these methods. Further it is shown that by processing the data from the frequency measurements in certain ways, one may be able to state more general characteristics of the oscillators being measured. The goal in this regard is to allow the comparisons of different manufacturers' specifications and more importantly to help assess whether these oscillators will meet the standard of performance the user may have in a particular application.

  9. Time domain measurement of frequency stability: A tutorial introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanier, J.; Tetu, M.

    1978-01-01

    The theoretical basis behind the definition of frequency stability in the time domain is outlined. Various types of variances were examined. Their differences and interrelation are pointed out. Systems that are generally used in the measurement of these variances are described.

  10. Precise Frequency Measurements Using a Superconducting Cavity Stabilized Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strayer, D. M.; Yeh, N.-C.; Jiang, W.; Anderson, V. L.; Asplund, N.

    1999-01-01

    Many physics experiments call on improved resolution to better define the experimental results, thus improving tests of theories. Modern microwave technology combined with high-Q resonators can achieve frequency readout and control with resolutions up to a part in 10(exp 18). When the physical quantity in question in the experiment can be converted to a frequency or a change in frequency, a high-stability microwave oscillator can be applied to obtain state-of-the-art precision. In this work we describe the overall physical concepts and the required experimental procedures for optimizing a high-resolution frequency measurement system that employs a high-Q superconducting microwave cavity and a low-noise frequency synthesizer. The basic approach is to resolve the resonant frequencies of a high-Q (Q > 10(exp 10)) cavity to extremely high precision (one part in 10(exp 17)- 10(exp 18)). Techniques for locking the synthesizer frequency to a resonant frequency of the superconducting cavity to form an ultra-stable oscillator are described. We have recently set up an ultra-high-vacuum high-temperature annealing system to process superconducting niobium cavities, and have been able to consistently achieve Q > 10(exp 9). We have integrated high-Q superconducting cavities with a low-noise microwave synthesizer in a phase-locked-loop to verify the frequency stability of the system. Effects that disturb the cavity resonant frequency (such as the temperature fluctuations and mechanical vibrations) and methods to mitigate those effects are also considered. Applicability of these techniques to experiments will be discussed, and our latest experimental progress in achieving high-resolution frequency measurements using the superconducting-cavity-stabilized-oscillator will be presented.

  11. Frequency stability measurement of a transfer-cavity-stabilized diode laser by using an optical frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uetake, S.; Matsubara, K.; Ito, H.; Hayasaka, K.; Hosokawa, M.

    2009-10-01

    We report results of frequency stability measurements of an extended cavity diode laser (ECDL) whose frequency is stabilized by a non-evacuated scanning transfer cavity. The transfer cavity is locked to a commercial frequency stabilized helium-neon laser. Frequency stability is measured by use of an optical frequency comb. The environmental perturbations (variations of temperature, air pressure, and humidity) are also simultaneously measured. The observed frequency drift of the ECDL is well explained by environmental perturbations. An atmospheric pressure variation, which is difficult to control with a non-evacuated cavity, is mainly affected to the frequency stability. Thus we put the cavity into a simple O-ring sealed (non-evacuated) tube. With this simple O-ring sealed tube, the frequency drift is reduced by a factor of 3, and the Allan variance reaches a value of 2.4×10-10, corresponds to the frequency stability of 83 kHz, at the average time of 3000 s. Since the actual frequency drift is well estimated by simultaneous measurement of the ambient temperature, pressure, and humidity, a feed-forward compensation of frequency drifts is also feasible in order to achieve a higher frequency stability with a simple non-evacuated transfer cavity.

  12. Frequency Comparison and Absolute Frequency Measurement of I2-stabilized Lasers at 532 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevsky, A. Yu.; Holzwarth, R.; Reichert, J.; Udem, Th.; Haensch, T. W.; von Zanthier, J.; Walther, H.; Schnatz, H.; Riehle, F.; Pokasov, P. V.; Skvortsov, M. N.; Bagayev, S. N.

    We present a frequency comparison and an absolute frequency measurement of two independent I2-stabilized frequency-doubled Nd:YAG lasers at 532 nm, one set up at the Institute of Laser Physics, Novosibirsk, Russia, the other at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig, Germany. The absolute frequency of the I2-stabilized lasers was determined using a CH4-stabilized He-Ne laser as a reference. This laser had been calibrated prior to the measurement by an atomic cesium fountain clock. The frequency chain linking phase-coherently the two frequencies made use of the frequency comb of a Kerr-lens mode-locked Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser where the comb mode separation was controlled by a local cesium atomic clock. A new value for the R(56)32-0:a10 component, recommended by the Comité International des Poids et Mesures (CIPM) for the realization of the metre [1], was obtained with reduced uncertainty. Absolute frequencies of the R(56)32-0 and P(54)32-0 iodine absorp tion lines together with the hyperfine line separations were measured.

  13. Frequency Comparison and Absolute Frequency Measurement of I2-stabilized Lasers at 532 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevsky, A. Y.; Holzwarth, R.; Reichert, J.; Udem, Th.; Hänsch, T. W.; von Zanthier, J.; Walther, H.; Schnatz, H.; Riehle, F.; Pokasov, P. V.; Skvortsov, M. N.; Bagayev, S. N.

    We present a frequency comparison and an absolute frequency measurement of two independent I2-stabilized frequency-doubled Nd:YAG lasers at 532 nm, one set up at the Institute of Laser Physics, Novosibirsk, Russia, the other at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig, Germany. The absolute frequency of the I2-stabilized lasers was determined using a CH4-stabilized He-Ne laser as a reference. This laser had been calibrated prior to the me asurement by an atomic cesium fountain clock. The frequency chain linking phase-coherently the two frequencies made use of the frequency comb of a Kerr-lens mode-locked Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser where the comb mode separation was controlled by a local cesium atomic clock. A new value for the R(56)32-0:a10 component, recommended by the Comitacute e International des Poids et Mesures (CIPM) for the realization of the metre [1], was obtained with reduced uncertainty. Absolute frequencies of the R(56)32-0 and P(54)32-0 iodine absorp tion lines together with the hyperfine line separations were measured.

  14. Frequency comparison and absolute frequency measurement of I 2-stabilized lasers at 532 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevsky, A. Yu.; Holzwarth, R.; Reichert, J.; Udem, Th.; Hänsch, T. W.; Zanthier, J. von; Walther, H.; Schnatz, H.; Riehle, F.; Pokasov, P. V.; Skvortsov, M. N.; Bagayev, S. N.

    2001-06-01

    A frequency comparison and an absolute frequency measurement of iodine stabilized frequency-doubled Nd:YAG lasers at 532 nm has been performed at the Max-Planck-Institute for Quantum Optics. Two independent I 2-stabilized laser systems, one assembled at the Institute of Laser Physics, Novosibirsk, Russia, the other at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig, Germany were investigated. Using a phase-coherent frequency chain, the absolute frequency of the I 2-stabilized lasers has been compared to a CH 4-stabilized He-Ne laser at 3.39 μm which has been calibrated against an atomic cesium fountain clock. A new value for the R(56)32-0:a 10 component, recommended by the Comit é International des Poids et Mesures for the realization of the meter [Metrologia 30 (1993/1994) 523; Metrologia 36 (1999) 211], has been obtained with reduced uncertainty. Improved absolute frequency values of the R(56)32-0 and P(54)32-0 iodine absorption lines together with the hyperfine line separations are presented.

  15. Measurement of frequency stability in tunable lasers by using an F-P interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Kuan-lin; Ma, Xiu-rong; Zhang, Shuang-gen; Zhang, Shi-yu; Wang, Xia-yang

    2014-01-01

    A method for measuring the frequency stability of tunable laser is proposed by using confocal Fabry-Perot (F-P) interferometer. The F-P interferometer is used to get the output frequency of the laser as a reference, and the method eliminates the need of an independent optical source as a frequency reference. Using this technique, the frequency stability of the tunable external-cavity diode laser (ECDL) is measured to be 2.26×10-9 with an integration time of 20 ms.

  16. Short term frequency stability measurement for narrow linewidth laser by time domain self-heterodyne method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Lidong; Sun, Xiaoyan; Bu, Xiande; Li, Binglin

    2016-11-01

    Based on the time delay self-heterodyne method to measure the laser linewidth, the short-term linewidth variation of a narrow linewidth laser is experimentally studied and analyzed, and then a time domain self-heterodyne method is proposed to measure the short-term frequency stability of narrow linewidth laser. The Rayleigh backscattering frequency of a pulsed light propagating in an optical fiber with length of 100km is used as the local oscillation frequency with relatively long time duration to measure the frequency variation of the narrow linewidth laser. By heterodyne between the laser frequency and the local oscillation frequency, the variation of the laser frequency is presented in the heterodyne radio frequency (IF). Then the time domain data of the heterodyne IF are extracted by an oscilloscope and through short time Fourier transform the frequency from the laser in different time segments is obtained. Experimental results demonstrate that for narrow linewidth laser its frequency in short-term is randomly fluctuating with a range less than triple of the laser linewidth. The measurement and evaluation of laser short-term frequency stability benefits the application of narrow linewidth lasers in distributed optical fiber sensing area.

  17. Measurement and analysis of the frequency stability of GPS Navstar clocks

    SciTech Connect

    McCaskill, T.B.; Largay, M.M.; Oaks, O.J.

    1994-12-31

    Analysis of the frequency stability of Global Positioning System (GPS) on-orbit Navstar clocks Z`s performed by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). Clock offsets for each Navstar clock are derived from smoothed pseudorange measurements collected as the Navstar space vehicle passes over the tracking station. The clock offsets are further smoothed and estimated at the time of closest approach (TCA) of the space vehicle over the tracking station. Analysis of more than 50 Navstar clocks by NRL shows that the majority of these clocks provide performance that exceeds the GPS frequency stability specification. This precision measurement technique is capable of determining one-day frequency stabilities of the Navstar GPS clocks to an accuracy of better than 1 x 10-13.

  18. Frequency standard stability for Doppler measurements on-board the shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harton, P. L.

    1974-01-01

    The short and long term stability characteristics of crystal and atomic standards are described. Emphasis is placed on crystal oscillators because of the selection which was made for the shuttle baseline and the complexities which are introduced by the shuttle environment. Attention is given, first, to the definitions of stability and the application of these definitions to the shuttle system and its mission. Data from time domain measurements are used to illustrate the definitions. Results of a literature survey to determine environmental effects on frequency reference sources are then presented. Finally, methods of standard frequency dissemination over radio frequency carriers are noted as a possible means of measuring absolute accuracy and long term stability characteristics during on one way Doppler equipment.

  19. Wavemeter measurements of frequency stability of an injection seeded alexandrite laser for pressure and temperature lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, C. R.; Schwemmer, G. K.; Korb, C. L.

    1992-01-01

    The GSFC pressure-temperature lidar is a differential absorption lidar operating in the oxygen A band absorption region (760 to 770 nm), and utilizes two tunable pulsed alexandrite lasers. For obtaining temperature measurements with an accuracy of less than or = 1 K, it has been determined that the stability of the online laser frequency over a period of time corresponding to a set of measurements, 0.1 to 30 min, has to be better than +/- 0.002/cm. In addition, the requirements on laser spectral bandwidth and spectral purity are less than or = 0.02/cm and greater than or = 99.9 percent, respectively. Injection seeding with a stabilized AlGaAs diode laser was used to achieve the required frequency stability and spectral bandwidth. A high resolution Fizeau wavemeter was employed to determine the frequency stability of the pulsed alexandrite laser and determine its bandwidth, mode structure. We present the results of measurements of the frequency stability and the spectrum of the injection seeded alexandrite laser.

  20. Measurement of Primary and Secondary Stability of Dental Implants by Resonance Frequency Analysis Method in Mandible

    PubMed Central

    Shokri, Mehran; Daraeighadikolaei, Arash

    2013-01-01

    Background. There is no doubt that the success of the dental implants depends on the stability. The aim of this work was to measure the stability of dental implants prior to loading the implants, using a resonance frequency analysis (RFA) by Osstell mentor device. Methods. Ten healthy and nonsmoker patients over 40 years of age with at least six months of complete or partial edentulous mouth received screw-type dental implants by a 1-stage procedure. RFA measurements were obtained at surgery and 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, and 11 weeks after the implant surgery. Results. Among fifteen implants, the lowest mean stability measurement was for the 4th week after surgery in all bone types. At placement, the mean ISQ obtained with the magnetic device was 77.2 with 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.49, and then it decreased until the 4th week to 72.13 (95% CI = 2.88), and at the last measurement, the mean implant stability significantly (P value <0.05) increased and recorded higher values to 75.6 (95% CI = 1.88), at the 11th week. Conclusions. The results may be indicative of a period of time when loading might be disadvantageous prior to the 4th week following implant placement. These suggestions need to be further assessed through future studies. PMID:23737790

  1. Stabilized radio frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, H.D.; Fugitt, J.A.; Howard, D.R.

    1984-12-25

    Disclosed is a long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator. 5 figs.

  2. Stabilized radio frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, Henry D.; Fugitt, Jock A.; Howard, Donald R.

    1984-01-01

    A long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator.

  3. The Autonomous Cryocooled Sapphire Oscillator: A Reference for Frequency Stability and Phase Noise Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, V.; Grop, S.; Fluhr, C.; Dubois, B.; Kersalé, Y.; Rubiola, E.

    2016-06-01

    The Cryogenic Sapphire Oscillator (CSO) is the microwave oscillator which feature the highest short-term stability. Our best units exhibit Allan deviation σy (τ) of 4.5x10-16 at 1s, ≈ 1.5x10-16 at 100 s ≤ t ≤ 5,000 s (floor), and ≤ 5x10-15 at one day. The use of a Pulse-Tube cryocooler enables full two year operation with virtually no maintenance. Starting with a short history of the CSO in our lab, we go through the architecture and we provide more details about the resonator, the cryostat, the oscillator loop, and the servo electronics. We implemented three similar oscillators, which enable the evaluation of each with the three- cornered hat method, and provide the potential for Allan deviation measurements at parts of 10-17 level. One of our CSOs (ULISS) is transportable, and goes with a small customized truck. The unique feature of ULISS is that its σy (τ) can be validated at destination by measuring before and after the roundtrip. To this extent, ULISS can be regarded as a traveling standard of frequency stability. The CSOs are a part of the Oscillator IMP project, a platform dedicated to the measurement of noise and short-term stability of oscillators and devices in the whole radio spectrum (from MHz to THz), including microwave photonics. The scope spans from routine measurements to the research on new oscillators, components, and measurement methods.

  4. Stability of the translocation frequency following whole-body irradiation measured in rhesus monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, J. N.; Hill, F. S.; Burk, C. E.; Cox, A. B.; Straume, T.

    1996-01-01

    Chromosome translocations are persistent indicators of prior exposure to ionizing radiation and the development of 'chromosome painting' to efficiently detect translocations has resulted in a powerful biological dosimetry tool for radiation dose reconstruction. However, the actual stability of the translocation frequency with time after exposure must be measured before it can be used reliably to obtain doses for individuals exposed years or decades previously. Human chromosome painting probes were used here to measure reciprocal translocation frequencies in cells from two tissues of 8 rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) irradiated almost three decades previously. Six of the monkeys were exposed in 1965 to whole-body (fully penetrating) radiation and two were unexposed controls. The primates were irradiated as juveniles to single doses of 0.56, 1.13, 2.00, or 2.25 Gy. Blood lymphocytes (and skin fibroblasts from one individual) were obtained for cytogenetic analysis in 1993, near the end of the animals' lifespans. Results show identical dose-response relationships 28 y after exposure in vivo and immediately after exposure in vitro. Because chromosome aberrations are induced with identical frequencies in vivo and in vitro, these results demonstrate that the translocation frequencies induced in 1965 have not changed significantly during the almost three decades since exposure. Finally, our emerging biodosimetry data for individual radiation workers are now confirming the utility of reciprocal translocations measured by FISH in radiation dose reconstruction.

  5. Stability of the translocation frequency following whole-body irradiation measured in rhesus monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, J. N.; Hill, F. S.; Burk, C. E.; Cox, A. B.; Straume, T.

    1996-01-01

    Chromosome translocations are persistent indicators of prior exposure to ionizing radiation and the development of 'chromosome painting' to efficiently detect translocations has resulted in a powerful biological dosimetry tool for radiation dose reconstruction. However, the actual stability of the translocation frequency with time after exposure must be measured before it can be used reliably to obtain doses for individuals exposed years or decades previously. Human chromosome painting probes were used here to measure reciprocal translocation frequencies in cells from two tissues of 8 rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) irradiated almost three decades previously. Six of the monkeys were exposed in 1965 to whole-body (fully penetrating) radiation and two were unexposed controls. The primates were irradiated as juveniles to single doses of 0.56, 1.13, 2.00, or 2.25 Gy. Blood lymphocytes (and skin fibroblasts from one individual) were obtained for cytogenetic analysis in 1993, near the end of the animals' lifespans. Results show identical dose-response relationships 28 y after exposure in vivo and immediately after exposure in vitro. Because chromosome aberrations are induced with identical frequencies in vivo and in vitro, these results demonstrate that the translocation frequencies induced in 1965 have not changed significantly during the almost three decades since exposure. Finally, our emerging biodosimetry data for individual radiation workers are now confirming the utility of reciprocal translocations measured by FISH in radiation dose reconstruction.

  6. A method for using a time interval counter to measure frequency stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, C. A.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown how a commercial time interval counter can be used to measure the relative stability of two signals that are offset in frequency and mixed down to a beat note of about 1 Hz. To avoid the dead-time problem, the counter is set up to read the time interval between each beat note upcrossing and the next pulse of a 10 Hz reference pulse train. The actual upcrossing times are recovered by a simple algorithm whose outputs can be used for computing residuals and Allan variance. A noise floor-test yielded a delta f/f Allan deviation of 1.3 times 10 to the minus 9th power/tau relative to the beat frequency.

  7. Developing Stabilized Lasers, Measuring their Frequencies, demoting the Metre, inventing the Comb, and further consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, John L.

    2010-02-01

    Michelson's 1907 proposal to define the SI Metre in terms of an optical wavelength was realized only in 1960, based on a ^86Krypton discharge lamp. The same year saw the cw HeNe laser arrive and a future redefinition based on laser technology assured. Separation in the late 60's of the laser's gain and spectral-reference-gas functions led to unprecedented levels of laser frequency stability and reproducibility. In addition to HeNe:CH4 system at 3392 nm and HeNe:I2 at 633 nm, systems at 514 nm and 10600 nm were studied. Absolute frequency measurement became the holy grail and some NBS team experiences will be shared. We measured both frequency and wavelength in 1972, and so obtained a speed of light value, improved 100-fold in accuracy. During the next decade, the NBS value of c was confirmed by other national labs, and frequency metrology was extended to the 473 THz (633 nm) Iodine-based wavelength standard. This frequency to ˜10 digit accuracy was obtained in 1983, thus setting the stage for redefining the SI Metre. By consensus choice the value 299 792 458 m/s was adopted for the speed of light, effectively reducing the Metre to a derived SI quantity. Knowledge of the frequency of the particular laser being utilized was controlled by International intercomparisons, but the need for a fast and accurate means to make these laser frequency measurements was obvious. Creative proposals by H"ansch and by Chebotayev were to use ultra-fast repetitive pulses to create an ``Optical Comb,'' but it was years before any technical basis existed to implement their Fourier dreams. Finally, in 1999 the last needed capability was demonstrated -- continuum production at 100 MHz rates and non-destructive power levels. By May 2000 phase-locked combs were operational in both Garching and Boulder, substantially accelerated by their collaborative interactions. Within 18 months all the known proposed ``optical frequency standards'' had been accurately measured via Comb techniques. )

  8. Laser frequency stabilization for LISA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Guido; McNamara, Paul; Thorpe, Ira; Camp, Jordan

    2005-01-01

    The requirement on laser frequency noise in the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) depends on the velocity and our knowledge of the position of each spacecraft of the interferometer. Currently it is assumed that the lasers must have a pre-stabilized frequency stability of 30Hz/square root of Hz over LISA'S most sensitive frequency band (3 mHz - 30 mHz). The intrinsic frequency stability of even the most stable com- mercial lasers is several orders of magnitude above this level. Therefore it is necessary to stabilize the laser frequency to an ultra-stable frequency reference which meets the LISA requirements. The baseline frequency reference for the LISA lasers are high finesse optical cavities based on ULE spacers. We measured the stability of two ULE spacer cavities with respect to each other. Our current best results show a noise floor at, or below, 30 Hz/square root of Hz above 3 mHz. In this report we describe the experimental layout of the entire experiment and discuss the limiting noise sources.

  9. Highly stabilized optical frequency comb interferometer with a long fiber-based reference path towards arbitrary distance measurement.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yoshiaki; Minoshima, Kaoru

    2015-10-05

    An optical frequency comb interferometer with a 342-m-long fiber-based optical reference path was developed. The long fiber-based reference path was stabilized to 10(-12)-order stability by using a fiber noise cancellation technique, and small temperature changes on the millikelvin order were detected by measuring an interferometric phase signal. Pulse number differences of 30 and 61 between the measurement and reference paths were determined precisely, with slight tuning of the 53.4 MHz repetition frequency. Moreover, with pulse number difference of 61, a 6.4-m-wide scanning for the relative pulse position is possible only by 1 MHz repetition frequency tuning, which makes pulses overlapped for arbitrary distance. Such wide-range high-precision delay length scanning can be used to measure arbitrary distances by using a highly stabilized long fiber-based reference path.

  10. Stabilization and time resolved measurement of the frequency evolution of a modulated diode laser for chirped pulse generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga-Umbrich, K.; Bakos, J. S.; Djotyan, G. P.; Ignácz, P. N.; Ráczkevi, B.; Sörlei, Zs; Szigeti, J.; Kedves, M. Á.

    2016-05-01

    We have developed experimental methods for the generation of chirped laser pulses of controlled frequency evolution in the nanosecond pulse length range for coherent atomic interaction studies. The pulses are sliced from the radiation of a cw external cavity diode laser while its drive current, and consequently its frequency, are sinusoidally modulated. By the proper choice of the modulation parameters, as well as of the timing of pulse slicing, we can produce a wide variety of frequency sweep ranges during the pulse. In order to obtain the required frequency chirp, we need to stabilize the center frequency of the modulated laser and to measure the resulting frequency evolution with appropriate temporal resolution. These tasks have been solved by creating a beat signal with a reference laser locked to an atomic transition frequency. The beat signal is then analyzed, as well as its spectral sideband peaks are fed back to the electronics of the frequency stabilization of the modulated laser. This method is simple and it has the possibility for high speed frequency sweep with narrow linewidth that is appropriate, for example, for selective manipulation of atomic states in a magneto-optical trap.

  11. Accurate displacement-measuring interferometer with wide range using an I2 frequency-stabilized laser diode based on sinusoidal frequency modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Thanh-Tung; Higuchi, Masato; Aketagawa, Masato

    2016-10-01

    We propose the use of the sinusoidal frequency modulation technique to improve both the frequency stability of an external cavity laser diode (ECLD) and the measurement accuracy and range of a displacement-measuring interferometer. The frequency of the ECLD was modulated at 300 kHz by modulating the injection current, and it was locked to the b21 hyperfine component of the transition 6-3, P(33), 127I2 (633 nm) by the null method. A relative frequency stability of 6.5  ×  10-11 was achieved at 100 s sampling time. The stabilized ECLD was then utilized as a light source for an unbalanced Michelson interferometer. In the interferometer, the displacement and direction of the target mirror can be determined using a Lissajous diagram based on two consecutive and quadrant-phase harmonics of the interference signal. Generally, the measurement range of the interferometer by the proposed method is limited by the modulation index and the signal-to-noise ratio of the harmonics. To overcome this drawback, suitable consecutive harmonic pairs were selected for the specific measurement ranges to measure the displacement. The displacements determined in the specific ranges by the proposed method were compared with those observed by a commercial capacitive sensor. From the comparison, the proposed method has high precision to determine the displacement. The measurement range was also extended up to 10 m by selecting a suitable modulation index and suitable consecutive pairs of harmonics.

  12. Measurement of laser quantum frequency fluctuations using a Pound-Drever stabilization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuh-Jen; Mussche, Paul L.; Siegman, Anthony E.

    1994-06-01

    We describe a method for measuring the frequency fluctuation spectrum of a laser oscillator, especially the weak noise contributions in the wings of the spectrum, and apply this method to confirm the existence of large excess quantum frequency fluctuations in a laser oscillator using an unstable optical resonator. Our measurement apparatus uses the Pound-Drever technique, which employs an RF phase modulator and a Fabry-Perot cavity to produce a sensitive high-speed frequency discrimination signal. We show that this signal can also be used to measure the quantum noise contributions to the frequency spectrum of a laser oscillator. Experimental measurements on a miniature diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser using a stable optical cavity closely match the predictions of the usual Schawlow-Townes theory, while the frequency fluctuations in a nearly identical laser employing an unstable optical resonator are approximately 1300 times larger. These much larger fluctuations arise in part from the larger output coupling and cavity bandwidth of the unstable cavity, but they also appear to confirm a predicted excess spontaneous emission factor (Petermann excess noise factor) of approximately = 180 times arising from the nonorthogonal transverse mode properties of the unstable cavity.

  13. Biomechanical evaluation of oversized drilling technique on primary implant stability measured by insertion torque and resonance frequency analysis.

    PubMed

    Santamaría-Arrieta, Gorka; Brizuela-Velasco, Aritza; Fernández-González, Felipe J; Chávarri-Prado, David; Chento-Valiente, Yelko; Solaberrieta, Eneko; Diéguez-Pereira, Markel; Vega, José-Antonio; Yurrebaso-Asúa, Jaime

    2016-07-01

    This study evaluated the influence of implant site preparation depth on primary stability measured by insertion torque and resonance frequency analysis (RFA). Thirty-two implant sites were prepared in eight veal rib blocks. Sixteen sites were prepared using the conventional drilling sequence recommended by the manufacturer to a working depth of 10mm. The remaining 16 sites were prepared using an oversize drilling technique (overpreparation) to a working depth of 12mm. Bone density was determined using cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT). The implants were placed and primary stability was measured by two methods: insertion torque (Ncm), and RFA (implant stability quotient [ISQ]). The highest torque values were achieved by the conventional drilling technique (10mm). The ANOVA test confirmed that there was a significant correlation between torque and drilling depth (p<0.05). However, no statistically significant differences were obtained between ISQ values at 10 or 12 mm drilling depths (p>0.05) at either measurement direction (cortical and medullar). No statistical relation between torque and ISQ values was identified, or between bone density and primary stability (p >0.05). Vertical overpreparation of the implant bed will obtain lower insertion torque values, but does not produce statistically significant differences in ISQ values. Implant stability quotient, overdrilling, primary stability, resonance frequency analysis, torque.

  14. Biomechanical evaluation of oversized drilling technique on primary implant stability measured by insertion torque and resonance frequency analysis

    PubMed Central

    Santamaría-Arrieta, Gorka; Brizuela-Velasco, Aritza; Fernández-González, Felipe J.; Chávarri-Prado, David; Chento-Valiente, Yelko; Solaberrieta, Eneko; Diéguez-Pereira, Markel; Yurrebaso-Asúa, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Background This study evaluated the influence of implant site preparation depth on primary stability measured by insertion torque and resonance frequency analysis (RFA). Material and Methods Thirty-two implant sites were prepared in eight veal rib blocks. Sixteen sites were prepared using the conventional drilling sequence recommended by the manufacturer to a working depth of 10mm. The remaining 16 sites were prepared using an oversize drilling technique (overpreparation) to a working depth of 12mm. Bone density was determined using cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT). The implants were placed and primary stability was measured by two methods: insertion torque (Ncm), and RFA (implant stability quotient [ISQ]). Results The highest torque values were achieved by the conventional drilling technique (10mm). The ANOVA test confirmed that there was a significant correlation between torque and drilling depth (p<0.05). However, no statistically significant differences were obtained between ISQ values at 10 or 12 mm drilling depths (p>0.05) at either measurement direction (cortical and medullar). No statistical relation between torque and ISQ values was identified, or between bone density and primary stability (p >0.05). Conclusions Vertical overpreparation of the implant bed will obtain lower insertion torque values, but does not produce statistically significant differences in ISQ values. Key words:Implant stability quotient, overdrilling, primary stability, resonance frequency analysis, torque. PMID:27398182

  15. Frequency stabilization of distributed-feedback laser diodes at 1572 nm for lidar measurements of atmospheric carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Numata, Kenji; Chen, Jeffrey R; Wu, Stewart T; Abshire, James B; Krainak, Michael A

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate a wavelength-locked laser source that rapidly steps through six wavelengths distributed across a 1572.335 nm carbon dioxide (CO(2)) absorption line to allow precise measurements of atmospheric CO(2) absorption. A distributed-feedback laser diode (DFB-LD) was frequency-locked to the CO(2) line center by using a frequency modulation technique, limiting its peak-to-peak frequency drift to 0.3 MHz at 0.8 s averaging time over 72 hours. Four online DFB-LDs were then offset locked to this laser using phase-locked loops, retaining virtually the same absolute frequency stability. These online and two offline DFB-LDs were subsequently amplitude switched and combined. This produced a precise wavelength-stepped laser pulse train, to be amplified for CO(2) measurements.

  16. "A Thermally Stabilized, Two Frequency Laser Measurement System For Industrial Use"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinger, John H.; Quenelle, Robert

    1983-09-01

    Hewlett-Packard Company introduced a new laser system based upon a new HeNe laser tube in September 1982. The 5528A Laser Measurement System is finding wide spread use in industry for improving productivity in the numerically controlled machine shop, and is now being designed into machines as a basic positioning transducer. The new laser tube design is simpler and less expensive than that previously built by HP using 2-frequency techniques.

  17. A proposed far-field method for frequency-stability measurements on the DSS 13 beam-waveguide antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoshi, T. Y.

    1991-01-01

    A method for measuring the frequency stability of the beam-waveguide (BWG) antenna at Deep Space Station 13 is presented. This method is relatively inexpensive and primarily utilizes equipment that is already available. Another desirable feature of the method is that a far-field signal will be used for the measurement. In concert with the goal of employing new technology developments, a fiber optic system will be used at 12 GHz to carry a reference antenna signal to the BWG antenna Ku-band test-package location in the pedestal room.

  18. Stabilized radio-frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, H.D.; Fugitt, J.A.; Howard, D.R.

    1982-09-29

    A long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator.

  19. Consistency of voice frequency and perturbation measures in children using cepstral analyses: a movement toward increased recording stability.

    PubMed

    Diercks, Gillian R; Ojha, Shilpa; Infusino, Scott; Maurer, Rie; Hartnick, Christopher J

    2013-08-01

    Few studies have evaluated the pediatric voice objectively using acoustic measurements. Furthermore, consistency of these measurements across time, particularly for continuous speech, has not been evaluated. (1) To evaluate normal pediatric voice frequency and perturbation using both time-based and frequency-based acoustic measurements, and (2) to determine if continuous speech samples facilitate increased recording stability. DESIGN Prospective, longitudinal study. Pediatric otolaryngology practice within a tertiary hospital. Forty-three children, ages 4 to 17 years. INTERVENTION OR EXPOSURE: Sustained vowel utterances and continuous speech samples, which included 4 Consensus Auditory-Perceptual Evaluation of Voice (CAPE-V) sentences and the first sentence of the "rainbow passage" ("A rainbow is a division of white light into many beautiful colors that takes the shape of a long round arch, with its path high above and its 2 ends apparently beyond the horizon") were obtained at 2 time points. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were calculated to assess reliability between speech samples. Fundamental frequency of sustained vowel utterances had excellent reliability (ICC ≥ 0.94). Time-based analyses of perturbation in sustained vowel utterances demonstrated poor reliability (ICC < 0.40), while frequency-based analyses of perturbation for these utterances demonstrated good to excellent reliability (ICC > 0.40). Fundamental frequency of continuous speech sample had excellent reliability (ICC > 0.94). Frequency-based analyses of continuous speech samples demonstrated excellent reliability (ICC > 0.75) for all but 1 variable, which demonstrated good reliability (cepstral-spectral index of dysphonia of the all voiced sample; ICC =0.72). Sustained vowel utterance and continuous speech samples provide consistent measures of fundamental frequency. Frequency-based analysis of sustained vowel recordings improves the reliability of perturbation measures. Continuous

  20. FREQUENCY STABILIZING SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, Q.A.; Anderson, O.A.

    1960-05-01

    An electronic control circuit is described in which a first signal frequency is held in synchronization with a second varying reference signal. The circuit receives the first and second signals as inputs and produces an output signal having an amplitude dependent upon rate of phase change between the two signals and a polarity dependent on direction of the phase change. The output may thus serve as a correction signal for maintaining the desired synchronization. The response of the system is not dependent on relative phase angle between the two compared signals. By having practically no capacitance in the circuit, there is minimum delay between occurrence of a phase shift and a response in the output signal and therefore very fast synchronization is effected.

  1. DSS 13 frequency stability tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoshi, T. Y.; Franco, M. M.

    1987-01-01

    In a previous article, the results of frequency stability tests at DSS 13 were presented in table form for tau = 1000 s for the test period May 1985 through March 1986. This article is a continuation of that initial report and presents specially selected Allan sigma (square root of variance) plots of each of the subsystem test previously reported. An additional result obtained from tests performed during July 1986 was included for completeness. The Allan sigma plots are useful in that frequency stability information is not only given for tau = 1000 s, but for tau values in the regions of 1, 100, 500, and 2000 s as well.

  2. DSS-13 beam waveguide antenna frequency stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoshi, T. Y.; Franco, M. M.

    1992-01-01

    Measurements made on the frequency stability of the DSS-13 34-m diameter Beam Waveguide (BWG) antenna showed that at 46.5 and 37 deg elevation angles, the BWG antenna stability at 12.2 GHz was between 1.3 and 2.2 x 10(exp -15) for tau = 1024 sec and good weather conditions. These frequency stability values apply to the portion of the antenna that includes the main reflector, subreflector, tripod legs, and the six BWG mirrors. The test results reported are believed to be the first known successful measurements of the stability of the microwave optics portion of a large antenna to a level of 1 or 2 parts in 10(exp 15).

  3. Measurement of dental implant stability by resonance frequency analysis and damping capacity assessment: comparison of both techniques in a clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Zix, Jürgen; Hug, Stefan; Kessler-Liechti, Gerda; Mericske-Stern, Regina

    2008-01-01

    Two noninvasive methods to measure dental implant stability are damping capacity assessment (Periotest) and resonance frequency analysis (Osstell). The objective of the present study was to assess the correlation of these 2 techniques in clinical use. Implant stability of 213 clinically stable loaded and unloaded 1-stage implants in 65 patients was measured in triplicate by means of resonance frequency analysis and Periotest. Descriptive statistics as well as Pearson's, Spearman's, and intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated with SPSS 11.0.2. The mean values were 57.66 +/- 8.19 implant stability quotient for the resonance frequency analysis and -5.08 +/- 2.02 for the Periotest. The correlation of both measuring techniques was -0.64 (Pearson) and -0.65 (Spearman). The single-measure intraclass correlation coefficients for the ISQ and Periotest values were 0.99 and 0.88, respectively (95% CI). No significant correlation of implant length with either resonance frequency analysis or Periotest could be found. However, a significant correlation of implant diameter with both techniques was found (P < .005). The correlation of both measuring systems is moderate to good. It seems that the Periotest is more susceptible to clinical measurement variables than the Osstell device. The intraclass correlation indicated lower measurement precision for the Periotest technique. Additionally, the Periotest values differed more from the normal (Gaussian) curve of distribution than the ISQs. Both measurement techniques show a significant correlation to the implant diameter. Resonance frequency analysis appeared to be the more precise technique.

  4. 47 CFR 24.135 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.135 Section 24.135... SERVICES Narrowband PCS § 24.135 Frequency stability. (a) The frequency stability of the transmitter shall be maintained within ±0.0001 percent (±1 ppm) of the center frequency over a temperature variation of...

  5. 47 CFR 24.135 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.135 Section 24.135... SERVICES Narrowband PCS § 24.135 Frequency stability. (a) The frequency stability of the transmitter shall be maintained within ±0.0001 percent (±1 ppm) of the center frequency over a temperature variation of...

  6. 47 CFR 24.135 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.135 Section 24.135... SERVICES Narrowband PCS § 24.135 Frequency stability. (a) The frequency stability of the transmitter shall be maintained within ±0.0001 percent (±1 ppm) of the center frequency over a temperature variation of...

  7. 47 CFR 24.235 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.235 Section 24.235... SERVICES Broadband PCS § 24.235 Frequency stability. The frequency stability shall be sufficient to ensure that the fundamental emission stays within the authorized frequency block. ...

  8. 47 CFR 24.235 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.235 Section 24.235... SERVICES Broadband PCS § 24.235 Frequency stability. The frequency stability shall be sufficient to ensure that the fundamental emission stays within the authorized frequency block. ...

  9. 47 CFR 24.135 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.135 Section 24.135... SERVICES Narrowband PCS § 24.135 Frequency stability. (a) The frequency stability of the transmitter shall be maintained within ±0.0001 percent (±1 ppm) of the center frequency over a temperature variation of...

  10. 47 CFR 24.235 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.235 Section 24.235... SERVICES Broadband PCS § 24.235 Frequency stability. The frequency stability shall be sufficient to ensure that the fundamental emission stays within the authorized frequency block. ...

  11. 47 CFR 101.507 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency stability. 101.507 Section 101.507... SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.507 Frequency stability. The frequency...% for each DEMS User Station transmitter. The frequency stability in the 24,250-25,250 MHz bands must be...

  12. 47 CFR 24.135 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.135 Section 24.135... SERVICES Narrowband PCS § 24.135 Frequency stability. (a) The frequency stability of the transmitter shall be maintained within ±0.0001 percent (±1 ppm) of the center frequency over a temperature variation of...

  13. 47 CFR 101.507 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency stability. 101.507 Section 101.507... SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.507 Frequency stability. The frequency...% for each DEMS User Station transmitter. The frequency stability in the 24,250-25,250 MHz bands must be...

  14. 47 CFR 24.235 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.235 Section 24.235... SERVICES Broadband PCS § 24.235 Frequency stability. The frequency stability shall be sufficient to ensure that the fundamental emission stays within the authorized frequency block. ...

  15. 47 CFR 101.507 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency stability. 101.507 Section 101.507... SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.507 Frequency stability. The frequency...% for each DEMS User Station transmitter. The frequency stability in the 24,250-25,250 MHz bands must be...

  16. 47 CFR 101.507 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency stability. 101.507 Section 101.507... SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.507 Frequency stability. The frequency...% for each DEMS User Station transmitter. The frequency stability in the 24,250-25,250 MHz bands must be...

  17. 47 CFR 24.235 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.235 Section 24.235... SERVICES Broadband PCS § 24.235 Frequency stability. The frequency stability shall be sufficient to ensure that the fundamental emission stays within the authorized frequency block. ...

  18. 47 CFR 101.507 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency stability. 101.507 Section 101.507... SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.507 Frequency stability. The frequency...% for each DEMS User Station transmitter. The frequency stability in the 24,250-25,250 MHz bands must be...

  19. Coupled Resonance Laser Frequency Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burd, Shaun; Uys, Hermann; MAQClab Team

    2013-05-01

    We have demonstrated simultaneous laser frequency stabilization of a UV and IR laser, to the same photodiode signal derived from the UV laser only. For trapping and cooling Yb+ ions, a frequency stabilized laser is required at 369.9 nm to drive the S1/2-P1/2 cooling cycle. Since that cycle is not closed, a repump beam is needed at 935.18 nm to drive the D3/2-D[ 3 / 2 ] transition, which rapidly decays back to the S1/2 state. Our 369 nm laser is locked using Doppler free polarization spectroscopy of Yb+ ions, generated in a hollow cathode discharge lamp. Without pumping, the metastable D3/2 level is only sparsely populated, making direct absorption of 935 nm light difficult to detect. A resonant 369 nm pump laser can populate the D3/2 state, and fast repumping to the S1/2 ground state by on resonant 935 nm light, can be detected via the change in absorption of the 369 nm laser. This is accomplished using lock-in detection on the same photodiode signal to which the 369 nm laser is locked. In this way, simultaneous locking of two frequencies in very different spectral regimes is accomplished, while exploiting only the photodiode signal from one of the lasers. A rate equation model gives good qualitative agreement with experimental observation. This work was partially funded by the South African National Research Foundation.

  20. Absolute frequency measurement of the iodine-stabilized Ar+ laser at 514.6 nm using a femtosecond optical frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, A.; Amy-Klein, A.; Lopez, O.; du Burck, F.; Chardonnet, C.

    The frequency of 127I2 hyperfine component a3 of the P(13) 43-0 transition at 514.6 nm has been measured with an optical clockwork based on a femtosecond laser frequency comb generator. The measured frequency at an iodine pressure of 0.12 Pa is 67.3(0.75) kHz higher than the value of 582490603.38(15) MHz, adopted by the CIPM in 2003 [9] but is in a good agreement with the value measured by [29]. In our experiment we used H-maser reference frequency located at BNM-SYRTE Observatoire de Paris and transported to our laboratory by a 43 km optical fibre link.

  1. 47 CFR 22.863 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency stability. 22.863 Section 22.863...-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems § 22.863 Frequency stability. The frequency stability of equipment used under this subpart shall be sufficient to ensure that, after...

  2. 47 CFR 22.863 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency stability. 22.863 Section 22.863...-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems § 22.863 Frequency stability. The frequency stability of equipment used under this subpart shall be sufficient to ensure that, after...

  3. 47 CFR 27.54 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency stability. 27.54 Section 27.54 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.54 Frequency stability. The frequency stability shall be...

  4. 47 CFR 22.863 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency stability. 22.863 Section 22.863...-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems § 22.863 Frequency stability. The frequency stability of equipment used under this subpart shall be sufficient to ensure that, after...

  5. 47 CFR 27.54 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency stability. 27.54 Section 27.54 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.54 Frequency stability. The frequency stability shall be...

  6. 47 CFR 90.213 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency stability. 90.213 Section 90.213... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES General Technical Standards § 90.213 Frequency stability. (a) Unless noted elsewhere, transmitters used in the services governed by this part must have a minimum frequency stability...

  7. 47 CFR 27.54 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency stability. 27.54 Section 27.54 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.54 Frequency stability. The frequency stability shall be...

  8. 47 CFR 90.213 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency stability. 90.213 Section 90.213... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES General Technical Standards § 90.213 Frequency stability. (a) Unless noted elsewhere, transmitters used in the services governed by this part must have a minimum frequency stability...

  9. 47 CFR 90.213 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency stability. 90.213 Section 90.213... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES General Technical Standards § 90.213 Frequency stability. (a) Unless noted elsewhere, transmitters used in the services governed by this part must have a minimum frequency stability...

  10. 47 CFR 90.213 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency stability. 90.213 Section 90.213... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES General Technical Standards § 90.213 Frequency stability. (a) Unless noted elsewhere, transmitters used in the services governed by this part must have a minimum frequency stability...

  11. 47 CFR 27.54 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency stability. 27.54 Section 27.54 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.54 Frequency stability. The frequency stability shall be...

  12. 47 CFR 90.213 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency stability. 90.213 Section 90.213... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES General Technical Standards § 90.213 Frequency stability. (a) Unless noted elsewhere, transmitters used in the services governed by this part must have a minimum frequency stability...

  13. 47 CFR 22.863 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency stability. 22.863 Section 22.863...-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems § 22.863 Frequency stability. The frequency stability of equipment used under this subpart shall be sufficient to ensure that, after...

  14. 47 CFR 27.54 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency stability. 27.54 Section 27.54 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.54 Frequency stability. The frequency stability shall be...

  15. 47 CFR 22.863 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency stability. 22.863 Section 22.863...-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems § 22.863 Frequency stability. The frequency stability of equipment used under this subpart shall be sufficient to ensure that, after...

  16. Absolute distance measurement by multi-heterodyne interferometry using a frequency comb and a cavity-stabilized tunable laser.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hanzhong; Zhang, Fumin; Liu, Tingyang; Balling, Petr; Qu, Xinghua

    2016-05-20

    In this paper, we develop a multi-heterodyne system capable of absolute distance measurement using a frequency comb and a tunable diode laser locked to a Fabry-Perot cavity. In a series of subsequent measurements, numerous beat components can be obtained by downconverting the optical frequency into the RF region with multi-heterodyne interferometry. The distances can be measured via the mode phases with a series of synthetic wavelengths. The comparison with the reference interferometer shows an agreement within 1.5 μm for the averages of five measurements and 2.5 μm for the single measurement, which is at the 10-8 relative precision level.

  17. Frequency domain measurement systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eischer, M. C.

    1978-01-01

    Stable frequency sources and signal processing blocks were characterized by their noise spectra, both discrete and random, in the frequency domain. Conventional measures are outlined, and systems for performing the measurements are described. Broad coverage of system configurations which were found useful is given. Their functioning and areas of application are discussed briefly. Particular attention is given to some of the potential error sources in the measurement procedures, system configurations, double-balanced-mixer-phase-detectors, and application of measuring instruments.

  18. Laser Frequency Stabilization for GRACE-II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folkner, W. M.; deVine, G.; Klipstein, W. M.; McKenzie, K.; Shaddock, D.; Spero, R.; Thompson, R.; Wuchenich, D.; Yu, N.; Stephens, M.; hide

    2010-01-01

    The GRACE mission monitors changes in the Earth's gravity field by measuring changes in the distance between spacecraft induced by that changing field. The distance variation is measured with a microwave ranging system with sub-micron accuracy. The ranging measurement accuracy is limited by the signal-to-noise ratio and by the frequency stability of the microwave signal referenced to an ultra-stable oscillator (USO). For GRACE-2 a laser ranging system is envisioned with accuracy better than the GRACE microwave ranging system. A laser ranging system easily provides an improved signal-to-noise ratio over the microwave system. Laser frequency stability better than the GRACE USO stability has been demonstrated in several laboratories using thermally stabilized optical cavities. We are developing a space-qualifiable optical cavity and associated optics and electronics for use on GRACE-2 to provide a stable frequency reference for the laser ranging system. Two breadboard units have been developed and tested for performance and ability to survive launch and orbit environments. A prototype unit is being designed using lessons learned from tests of the breadboard units.

  19. Laser Frequency Stabilization for GRACE-II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folkner, W. M.; deVine, G.; Klipstein, W. M.; McKenzie, K.; Shaddock, D.; Spero, R.; Thompson, R.; Wuchenich, D.; Yu, N.; Stephens, M.; Leitch, J.; Davis, M.; deCino, J.; Pace, C.; Pierce, R.

    2010-01-01

    The GRACE mission monitors changes in the Earth's gravity field by measuring changes in the distance between spacecraft induced by that changing field. The distance variation is measured with a microwave ranging system with sub-micron accuracy. The ranging measurement accuracy is limited by the signal-to-noise ratio and by the frequency stability of the microwave signal referenced to an ultra-stable oscillator (USO). For GRACE-2 a laser ranging system is envisioned with accuracy better than the GRACE microwave ranging system. A laser ranging system easily provides an improved signal-to-noise ratio over the microwave system. Laser frequency stability better than the GRACE USO stability has been demonstrated in several laboratories using thermally stabilized optical cavities. We are developing a space-qualifiable optical cavity and associated optics and electronics for use on GRACE-2 to provide a stable frequency reference for the laser ranging system. Two breadboard units have been developed and tested for performance and ability to survive launch and orbit environments. A prototype unit is being designed using lessons learned from tests of the breadboard units.

  20. Stabilized fiber-optic frequency distribution system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Primas, L. E.; Lutes, G. F.; Sydnor, R. L.

    1989-01-01

    A technique for stabilizing reference frequencies transmitted over fiber-optic cable in a frequency distribution system is discussed. The distribution system utilizes fiber-optic cable as the transmission medium to distribute precise reference signals from a frequency standard to remote users. The stability goal of the distribution system is to transmit a 100-MHz signal over a 22-km fiber-optic cable and maintain a stability of 1 part in 10(17) for 1000-second averaging times. Active stabilization of the link is required to reduce phase variations produced by environmental effects, and is achieved by transmitting the reference signal from the frequency standard to the remote unit and then reflecting back to the reference unit over the same optical fiber. By comparing the phase of the transmitted and reflected signals at the reference unit, phase variations of the remote signal can be measured. An error voltage derived from the phase difference between the two signals is used to add correction phase.

  1. 47 CFR 87.133 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency stability. 87.133 Section 87.133... Technical Requirements § 87.133 Frequency stability. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (c), (d), and (f) of this section, the carrier frequency of each station must be maintained within these tolerances...

  2. 47 CFR 90.539 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency stability. 90.539 Section 90.539... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Regulations Governing the Licensing and Use of Frequencies in the 763-775 and 793-805 MHz Bands § 90.539 Frequency stability. Transmitters designed to operate in 769-775 MHz and 799...

  3. 47 CFR 90.539 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency stability. 90.539 Section 90.539... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Regulations Governing the Licensing and Use of Frequencies in the 758-775 and 788-805 MHz Bands § 90.539 Frequency stability. Transmitters designed to operate in 769-775 MHz and 799...

  4. 47 CFR 87.133 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency stability. 87.133 Section 87.133... Technical Requirements § 87.133 Frequency stability. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (c), (d), (f), and (g) of this section, the carrier frequency of each station must be maintained within these tolerances...

  5. 47 CFR 5.101 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency stability. 5.101 Section 5.101... Operating Requirements § 5.101 Frequency stability. Experimental Radio Service licensees shall ensure that transmitted emissions remain within the authorized frequency band under normal operating conditions: Equipment...

  6. 47 CFR 5.101 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency stability. 5.101 Section 5.101...) Technical Standards and Operating Requirements § 5.101 Frequency stability. An applicant must propose to use a frequency tolerance that would confine emissions within the band of operation, unless permission...

  7. 47 CFR 5.101 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency stability. 5.101 Section 5.101...) Technical Standards and Operating Requirements § 5.101 Frequency stability. An applicant must propose to use a frequency tolerance that would confine emissions within the band of operation, unless permission...

  8. 47 CFR 5.101 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency stability. 5.101 Section 5.101... Operating Requirements § 5.101 Frequency stability. Experimental Radio Service licensees shall ensure that transmitted emissions remain within the authorized frequency band under normal operating conditions: Equipment...

  9. 47 CFR 90.539 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency stability. 90.539 Section 90.539... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Regulations Governing the Licensing and Use of Frequencies in the 763-775 and 793-805 MHz Bands § 90.539 Frequency stability. Transmitters designed to operate in 769-775 MHz and 799...

  10. 47 CFR 87.133 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency stability. 87.133 Section 87.133... Technical Requirements § 87.133 Frequency stability. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (c), (d), (f), and (g) of this section, the carrier frequency of each station must be maintained within these tolerances...

  11. 47 CFR 87.133 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency stability. 87.133 Section 87.133... Technical Requirements § 87.133 Frequency stability. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (c), (d), (f), and (g) of this section, the carrier frequency of each station must be maintained within these tolerances...

  12. 47 CFR 90.539 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency stability. 90.539 Section 90.539... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Regulations Governing the Licensing and Use of Frequencies in the 763-775 and 793-805 MHz Bands § 90.539 Frequency stability. Transmitters designed to operate in 769-775 MHz and 799...

  13. 47 CFR 90.539 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency stability. 90.539 Section 90.539... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Regulations Governing the Licensing and Use of Frequencies in the 763-775 and 793-805 MHz Bands § 90.539 Frequency stability. Transmitters designed to operate in 769-775 MHz and 799...

  14. 47 CFR 5.101 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency stability. 5.101 Section 5.101...) Technical Standards and Operating Requirements § 5.101 Frequency stability. An applicant must propose to use a frequency tolerance that would confine emissions within the band of operation, unless permission...

  15. 47 CFR 87.133 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency stability. 87.133 Section 87.133... Technical Requirements § 87.133 Frequency stability. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (c), (d), (f), and (g) of this section, the carrier frequency of each station must be maintained within these tolerances...

  16. Operational frequency stability of rubidium and cesium frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavery, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    The frequency stabilities under operational conditions of several commercially available rubidium and cesium frequency standards were determined from experimental data for frequency averaging times from 10 to the 7th power s and are presented in table and graph form. For frequency averaging times between 10 to the 5th power and 10 to the 7th power s, the rubidium standards tested have a stability of between 10 to the minus 12th power and 5 x 10 to the minus 12th power, while the cesium standards have a stability of between 2 x 10 to the minus 13th power and 5 x 10 to the minus 13th power.

  17. Phase and frequency stability of Cassegrainian antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cha, A. G.

    1987-01-01

    Phase and frequency stability of Cassegrainian antennas is important in radio astronomy, geodesy, and planetary sciences. This paper presents a rigorous approach, exact definitions, and simple algorithms for computing these characteristics. Such a consistent and rigorous treatment of phase and frequency stability does not appear to exist in the literature.

  18. Stability measurements of one-stage Brånemark implants during healing in mandibles. A clinical resonance frequency analysis study.

    PubMed

    Friberg, B; Sennerby, L; Linden, B; Gröndahl, K; Lekholm, U

    1999-08-01

    Using a one-stage surgical protocol, 75 implants ad modum Brånemark of three different designs were inserted in 15 edentulous mandibles of high bone density. All implants were followed with repeated stability measurements by means of resonance frequency analysis (RFA) from implant placement to connection of the fixed prostheses (3-4 months), in order to evaluate possible stability changes during healing. It was shown that the resonance frequency (RF) values slightly decreased for the majority of the implants during the study period independent of design. Consequently, the results of the present study indicated that the implants were as stable at time of placement as when measured at 3-4 months post-surgery, i.e. when the prostheses were attached. The available data support the concept of direct loading of implants when inserted between the mental interforaminal regions. One implant failed during healing and the corresponding RF measurement disclosed, at six weeks post-surgery, a value being far below the one registered at implant placement. The lowered RF value indicated the failure several weeks before the mobility was clinically diagnosed. The presence or absence of a fixture/abutment junction did not exert any influence on the marginal bone level, as determined radiographically at the end of the short investigation period.

  19. Providing hydrogen maser timing stability to orbiting VLBI radio telescope observations by post-measurement compensation of linked frequency standard imperfections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springett, James C.

    1994-01-01

    Orbiting VLBI (OVLBI) astronomical observations are based upon measurements acquired simultaneously from ground-based and earth-orbiting radio telescopes. By the mid-1990s, two orbiting VLBI observatories, Russia's Radioastron and Japan's VSOP, will augment the worldwide VLBI network, providing baselines to earth radio telescopes as large as 80,000 km. The challenge for OVLBI is to effectuate space to ground radio telescope data cross-correlation (the observation) to a level of integrity currently achieved between ground radio telescopes. VLBI radio telescopes require ultrastable frequency and timing references in order that long term observations may be made without serious cross-correlation loss due to frequency source drift and phase noise. For this reason, such instruments make use of hydrogen maser frequency standards. Unfortunately, space-qualified hydrogen maser oscillators are currently not available for use on OVLBI satellites. Thus, the necessary long-term stability needed by the orbiting radio telescope may only be obtained by microwave uplinking a ground-based hydrogen maser derived frequency to the satellite. Although the idea of uplinking the frequency standard intrinsically seems simple, there are many 'contaminations' which degrade both the long and short term stability of the transmitted reference. Factors which corrupt frequency and timing accuracy include additive radio and electronic circuit thermal noise, slow or systematic phase migration due to changes of electronic circuit temporal operating conditions (especially temperature), ionosphere and troposphere induced scintillations, residual Doppler-incited components, and microwave signal multipath propagation. What is important, though, is to realize that ultimate stability does not have to be achieved in real-time. Instead, information needed to produce a high degree of coherence in the subsequent cross-correlation operation may be derived from a two-way coherent radio link, recorded and later

  20. Line-shape study of self-broadened O{sub 2} transitions measured by Pound-Drever-Hall-locked frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtewicz, S.; Lisak, D.; Cygan, A.; Domyslawska, J.; Trawinski, R. S.; Ciurylo, R.

    2011-09-15

    We present high-sensitivity and high-spectral-resolution line-shape and line-intensity measurements of self-broadened O{sub 2} b {sup 1}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +}(v=1)(leftarrow)X {sup 3}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup -}(v=0) band transitions measured using the Pound-Drever-Hall-locked frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy technique. We give collisional broadening parameters and take into account the line-narrowing effects described by Dicke narrowing or the speed dependence of collisional broadening. We compare line intensities measured with relative uncertainties below 0.4% to data available in the HITRAN spectroscopic database.

  1. Frequency stabilization in nonlinear micromechanical oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonio, Dario; Zanette, Damián H.; López, Daniel

    2012-05-01

    Mechanical oscillators are present in almost every electronic device. They mainly consist of a resonating element providing an oscillating output with a specific frequency. Their ability to maintain a determined frequency in a specified period of time is the most important parameter limiting their implementation. Historically, quartz crystals have almost exclusively been used as the resonating element, but micromechanical resonators are increasingly being considered to replace them. These resonators are easier to miniaturize and allow for monolithic integration with electronics. However, as their dimensions shrink to the microscale, most mechanical resonators exhibit nonlinearities that considerably degrade the frequency stability of the oscillator. Here we demonstrate that, by coupling two different vibrational modes through an internal resonance, it is possible to stabilize the oscillation frequency of nonlinear self-sustaining micromechanical resonators. Our findings provide a new strategy for engineering low-frequency noise oscillators capitalizing on the intrinsic nonlinear phenomena of micromechanical resonators.

  2. Measuring Low Frequency Tilts

    PubMed Central

    Kohl, M. L.; Levine, J.

    1993-01-01

    A borehole tiltmeter with a sensitivity of a few nanoradians is described. It is composed of two orthogonal horizontal pendulums with free periods of 1 s. The pendulums are insensitive to barometric pressure fluctuations, and the measured temperature coefficient is less than 30 nrad/°C. The range of the pendulums is about ±5 μ rad, and their response is linear within 1% and stable over several years. The performance of the tiltmeter in the field was evaluated using tidal data obtained from a closely spaced array of boreholes in Southern California. The long-term stability of the tiltmeter is generally better than 1 μ rad/yr. The data also indicate that instruments in boreholes at least 24 m deepare independent of surface effects. Several different capsules designed to couple the instrument to the surrounding material have been tested. In addition, an experimental method for estimating the magnitudes of local perturbation in the regional tilt field is described. PMID:28053466

  3. Laser frequency stability: a simple approach for a quantitative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, Alexandre; Abreu, Manuel; Rebordão, José M.

    2011-05-01

    The characterization of the laser linewidth and laser frequency stability is critically important for the evaluation of a metrology system performance when the working principle is based in interferometric processes. In particular, the midterm stability range, corresponding to noise in the hundreds of hertz to kilohertz bandwidth, affects strongly the measurement final accuracy when working at measurement rates at the ksample/s level. In this case, it is of crucial importance to know the uncertainty associated to the measurement of the laser instantaneous frequency and what is the variance of this value within the measurement period. In this paper we present a simple method to measure the frequency noise and obtain the Allan variance statistics for an External Cavity Diode Laser (ECDL) used in a Frequency Sweeping Interferometry (FSI) scheme for long distance high accuracy measurements. For this type of lasers, the main contributors affecting the midterm stability are the current and technical noise, including thermal and mechanical fluctuations, optical feedback, as well as the feedback stabilization techniques employed to reduce acoustic disturbances. The proposed method is based in the principle of delayed interferometry, where the variation of the laser center frequency is characterized for measurement conditions in the kilohertz range. The final accuracy of the metrology system is evaluated in accordance with the laser stability characteristics obtained by this method.

  4. Frequency stabilization by synchronization of Duffing oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanette, Damián H.

    2016-07-01

    We present analytical and numerical results on the joint dynamics of two coupled Duffing oscillators with nonlinearity of opposite signs (hardening and softening). In particular, we focus on the existence and stability of synchronized oscillations where the frequency is independent of the amplitude. In this regime, the amplitude-frequency interdependence (a-f effect) —a noxious consequence of nonlinearity, which jeopardizes the use of micromechanical oscillators in the design of time-keeping devices— is suppressed. By means of a multiple time scale formulation, we find approximate conditions under which frequency stabilization is achieved, characterize the stability of the resulting oscillations, and compare with numerical solutions to the equations of motion.

  5. Assessment of Stability of Craniofacial Implants by Resonant Frequency Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ivanjac, Filip; Konstantinović, Vitomir S; Lazić, Vojkan; Dordević, Igor; Ihde, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    Implant stability is a principal precondition for the success of implant therapy. Extraoral implants (EO) are mainly used for anchoring of maxillofacial epithesis. However, assessment of implant stability is mostly based on principles derived from oral implants. The aim of this study was to investigate clinical stability of EO craniofacial disk implants (single, double, and triple) by resonance frequency analysis at different stages of the bone's healing. Twenty patients with orbital (11), nasal (5), and auricular (4) defects with 50 EO implants placed for epithesis anchorage were included. Implant stability was measured 3 times; after implant placement, at 3 months and at least after 6 months. A significant increase in implant stability values was noted between all of the measurements, except for triple-disk implants between third and sixth months, and screw implants between 0 and third months. Disk implants showed lower implant stability quotient (ISQ) values compared with screw implants. Triple-disk implants showed better stability compared with single and double-disk implants. Based on resonance frequency analysis values, disk implants could be safely loaded when their ISQ values are 38 (single disks), 47 (double disks), and 48 (triple disks). According to resonance frequency analysis, disk implant stability increased over time, which showed good osseointegration and increasing mineralization. Although EO screw implants showed higher ISQ values than disk implants, disk-type implants can be safely loaded even if lower values of stability are measured.

  6. Absolute frequency shifts of iodine cells for laser stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazar, Josef; Hrabina, Jan; Jedlička, Petr; Číp, Ondřej

    2009-10-01

    We present an investigation of iodine cell purity and influence of contaminations upon frequency shifts of iodine-stabilized frequency-doubled Nd : YAG lasers. The study combines measurements of laser-induced fluorescence and evaluation through the Stern-Volmer formula, with direct measurement of frequency shifts referenced by means of an optical comb to a radiofrequency clock etalon. These indirect and direct approaches are compared and provide feedback on the cell manufacturing procedure. Significant improvement of the apparatus for the measurement of induced fluorescence is reported, leading to better repeatability of the results. The ultimate precision that can be achieved in measurements of the absolute frequency of a stabilized laser is discussed in terms of the cell quality.

  7. Stabilizing Microwave Frequency of a Photonic Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, Lute; Yu, Nan; Tu, Meirong

    2006-01-01

    A scheme for stabilizing the frequency of a microwave signal is proposed that exploits the operational characteristics of a coupled optoelectronic oscillator (COEO) and related optoelectronic equipment. An essential element in the scheme is a fiber mode-locked laser (MLL), the optical frequency of which is locked to an atomic transition. In this scheme, the optical frequency stability of the mode-locked laser is transferred to that of the microwave in the same device. Relative to prior schemes for using wideband optical frequency comb to stabilize microwave signals, this scheme is simpler and lends itself more readily to implementation in relatively compact, rugged equipment. The anticipated development of small, low-power, lightweight, highly stable microwave oscillators based on this scheme would afford great benefits in communication, navigation, metrology, and fundamental sciences. COEOs of various designs, at various stages of development, in some cases called by different names, have been described in a number of prior NASA Tech Briefs articles. A COEO is an optoelectronic apparatus that generates both short (picosecond) optical pulses and a steady microwave signal having an ultrahigh degree of spectral purity. The term "coupled optoelectronic" in the full name of such an apparatus signifies that its optical and electronic oscillations are coupled to each other in a single device. The present frequency-stabilization scheme is best described indirectly by describing the laboratory apparatus used to demonstrate it. The apparatus (see figure) includes a COEO that generates a comb-like optical spectrum, the various frequency components of which interfere, producing short optical pulses. This spectrum is centered at a nominal wavelength of 1,560 nm. The spectrum separation of this comb is about 10 GHz, as determined primarily by the length of an optical loop and the bandpass filter in the microwave feedback loop. The optical loop serves as microwave resonator

  8. Scientific applications of frequency-stabilized laser technology in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumaker, Bonny L.

    1990-01-01

    A synoptic investigation of the uses of frequency-stabilized lasers for scientific applications in space is presented. It begins by summarizing properties of lasers, characterizing their frequency stability, and describing limitations and techniques to achieve certain levels of frequency stability. Limits to precision set by laser frequency stability for various kinds of measurements are investigated and compared with other sources of error. These other sources include photon-counting statistics, scattered laser light, fluctuations in laser power, and intensity distribution across the beam, propagation effects, mechanical and thermal noise, and radiation pressure. Methods are explored to improve the sensitivity of laser-based interferometric and range-rate measurements. Several specific types of science experiments that rely on highly precise measurements made with lasers are analyzed, and anticipated errors and overall performance are discussed. Qualitative descriptions are given of a number of other possible science applications involving frequency-stabilized lasers and related laser technology in space. These applications will warrant more careful analysis as technology develops.

  9. A phase-stabilized carbon nanotube fiber laser frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jinkang; Knabe, Kevin; Tillman, Karl A; Neely, William; Wang, Yishan; Amezcua-Correa, Rodrigo; Couny, François; Light, Philip S; Benabid, Fetah; Knight, Jonathan C; Corwin, Kristan L; Nicholson, Jeffrey W; Washburn, Brian R

    2009-08-03

    A frequency comb generated by a 167 MHz repetition frequency erbium-doped fiber ring laser using a carbon nanotube saturable absorber is phase-stabilized for the first time. Measurements of the in-loop phase noise show an integrated phase error on the carrier envelope offset frequency of 0.35 radians. The carbon nanotube fiber laser comb is compared with a CW laser near 1533 nm stabilized to the nu(1) + nu(3) overtone transition in an acetylene-filled kagome photonic crystal fiber reference, while the CW laser is simultaneously compared to another frequency comb based on a Cr:Forsterite laser. These measurements demonstrate that the stability of a GPS-disciplined Rb clock is transferred to the comb, resulting in an upper limit on the locked comb's frequency instability of 1.2 x 10(-11) in 1 s, and a relative instability of <3 x 10(-12) in 1 s. The carbon nanotube laser frequency comb offers much promise as a robust and inexpensive all-fiber frequency comb with potential for scaling to higher repetition frequencies.

  10. Cryogenic masers. [frequency stability and design parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berlinsky, A. J.; Hardy, W. N.

    1982-01-01

    Various factors affecting the frequency stability of hydrogen masers are described and related to maser design parameters. The long-term frequency stability of a hydrogen maser is limited by the mechanical stability of the cavity, and the magnitudes of the wall relaxation, spin exchange, and recombination rates which affect the Q of the line. Magnetic resonance studies of hydrogen atoms at temperatures below 1 K and in containers coated with liquid helium films demonstrated that cryogenic masers may allow substantial improvements in all of these parameters. In particular the thermal expansion coefficients of most materials are negligible at 1 K. Spin exchange broadening is three orders of magnitude smaller at 1 K than at room temperature, and the recombination and wall relaxation rates are negligible at 0.52 K where the frequency shift due to the 4 He-coated walls of the container has a broad minimum as a function of temperature. Other advantages of the helium-cooled maser result from the high purity, homogeneity, and resilence of helium-film-coated walls and the natural compatibility of the apparatus with helium-cooled amplifiers.

  11. Frequency stability of maser oscillators operated with cavity Q. [hydrogen and rubidium masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tetu, M.; Tremblay, P.; Lesage, P.; Petit, P.; Audoin, C.

    1982-01-01

    The short term frequency stability of masers equipped with an external feedback loop to increase the cavity quality factor was studied. The frequency stability of a hydrogen and a rubidium maser were measured and compared with theoretical evaluation. It is shown that the frequency stability passes through an optimum when the cavity Q is varied. Long term fluctuations are discussed and the optimum mid term frequency stability achievably by small size active and passive H-masers is considered.

  12. Trajectory of frequency stability in typical development

    PubMed Central

    Irimia, Andrei; Jeste, Shafali S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction This work explores a feature of brain dynamics, metastability, by which transients are observed in functional brain data. Metastability is a balance between static (stable) and dynamic (unstable) tendencies in electrophysiological brain activity. Furthermore, metastability is a theoretical mechanism underlying the rapid synchronization of cell assemblies that serve as neural substrates for cognitive states, and it has been associated with cognitive flexibility. While much previous research has sought to characterize metastability in the adult human brain, few studies have examined metastability in early development, in part because of the challenges of acquiring adequate, noise free continuous data in young children. Methods To accomplish this endeavor, we studied a new method for characterizing the stability of EEG frequency in early childhood, as inspired by prior approaches for describing cortical phase resets in the scalp EEG of healthy adults. Specifically, we quantified the variance of the rate of change of the signal phase (i.e., frequency) as a proxy for phase resets (signal instability), given that phase resets occur almost simultaneously across large portions of the scalp. We tested our method in a cohort of 39 preschool age children (age = 53 ± 13.6 months). Results We found that our outcome variable of interest, frequency variance, was a promising marker of signal stability, as it increased with the number of phase resets in surrogate (artificial) signals. In our cohort of children, frequency variance decreased cross-sectionally with age (r = −0.47, p = 0.0028). Conclusions EEG signal stability, as quantified by frequency variance, increases with age in preschool age children. Future studies will relate this biomarker with the development of executive function and cognitive flexibility in children, with the overarching goal of understanding metastability in atypical development. PMID:25501709

  13. Laser frequency stabilization using bichromatic crossover spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Taek; Seb Moon, Han

    2015-03-07

    We propose a Doppler-free spectroscopic method named bichromatic crossover spectroscopy (BCS), which we then use for the frequency stabilization of an off-resonant frequency that does not correspond to an atomic transition. The observed BCS in the 5S{sub 1/2} → 5P{sub 1/2} transition of {sup 87}Rb is related to the hyperfine structure of the conventional saturated absorption spectrum of this transition. Furthermore, the Doppler-free BCS is numerically calculated by considering all of the degenerate magnetic sublevels of the 5S{sub 1/2} → 5P{sub 1/2} transition in an atomic vapor cell, and is found to be in good agreement with the experimental results. Finally, we successfully achieve modulation-free off-resonant locking at the center frequency between the two 5S{sub 1/2}(F = 1 and 2) → 5P{sub 1/2}(F′ = 1) transitions using a polarization rotation of the BCS. The laser frequency stability was estimated to be the Allan variance of 2.1 × 10{sup −10} at 1 s.

  14. Frequency stabilization for multilocation optical FDM networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Quan; Kavehrad, Mohsen

    1993-04-01

    In a multi-location optical FDM network, the frequency of each user's transmitter can be offset-locked, through a Fabry-Perot, to an absolute frequency standard which is distributed to the users. To lock the local Fabry-Perot to the frequency standard, the standard has to be frequency-dithered by a sinusoidal signal and the sinusoidal reference has to be transmitted to the user location since the lock-in amplifier in the stabilization system requires the reference for synchronous detection. We proposed two solutions to avoid transmitting the reference. One uses an extraction circuit to obtain the sinusoidal signal from the incoming signal. A nonlinear circuit following the photodiode produces a strong second-order harmonic of the sinusoidal signal and a phase-locked loop is locked to it. The sinusoidal reference is obtained by a divide- by-2 circuit. The phase ambiguity (0 degree(s) or 180 degree(s)) is resolved by using a selection- circuit and an initial scan. The other method uses a pseudo-random sequence instead of a sinusoidal signal to dither the frequency standard and a surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) matched-filter instead of a lock-in amplifier to obtain the frequency error. The matched-filter serves as a correlator and does not require the dither reference.

  15. Formulation of frequency stability limited by laser intrinsic noise in feedback systems.

    PubMed

    Hori, Teruhito; Araya, Akito; Moriwaki, Shigenori; Mio, Norikatsu

    2009-01-10

    We investigated the influence of amplitude modulation (AM) noise and phase modulation (PM) noise of a laser source on the frequency stability in frequency stabilization systems. We estimated the frequency stability and evaluated the efficacy of a noise reduction technique (the Doppler-trend subtraction method) of a laser diode frequency stabilization system, where enhanced intensity noise arising from PM-to-AM noise conversion through a reference gas cell is reduced using the technique employed in modulation transfer spectroscopy. To evaluate the relationship between the laser's intrinsic noise and its frequency stability, we performed noise spectrum measurements and formulated frequency stability in addition to measuring Allan standard deviation. As a result, it is found that the extra noise generated in PM-to-AM conversion is efficiently removed by the Doppler-trend subtraction method and that within the feedback bandwidth, the frequency stability becomes 1 order of magnitude better than that without the method.

  16. Frequency stabilized lasers for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieber, Mike; Adkins, Mike; Pierce, Robert; Warden, Robert; Wallace, Cynthia; Weimer, Carl

    2014-09-01

    metrology, spectroscopy, atomic clocks and geodesy. This technology will be a key enabler to several proposed NASA science missions. Although lasers such as Q-switched Nd-YAG are now commonly used in space, other types of lasers - especially those with narrow linewidth - are still few in number and more development is required to advance their technology readiness. In this paper we discuss a reconfigurable laser frequency stabilization testbed, and end-to-end modeling to support system development. Two important features enabling testbed flexibility are that the controller, signal processing and interfaces are hosted on a field programmable gate array (FPGA) which has spacequalified equivalent parts, and secondly, fiber optic relay of the beam paths. Given the nonlinear behavior of lasers, FPGA implementation is a key system reliability aspect allowing on-orbit retuning of the control system and initial frequency acquisition. The testbed features a dual sensor system, one based upon a high finesse resonator cavity which provides relative stability through Pound-Drever-Hall (PDH) modulation and secondly an absolute frequency reference by dither locking to an acetylene gas cell (GC). To provide for differences between ground and space implementation, we have developed an end-to-end Simulink/ Matlab®-based control system model of the testbed components including the important noise sources. This model is in the process of being correlated to the testbed data which then can be used for trade studies, and estimation of space-based performance and sensitivities. A 1530 nm wavelength semiconductor laser is used for this initial work.

  17. Stabilized Fiber-Optic Distribution of Reference Frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calhoun, Malcolm; Tjoelker, Robert; Diener, William; Dick, G. John; Wang, Rabi; Kirk, Albert

    2003-01-01

    An optoelectronic system distributes a reference signal of low noise and highly stabilized phase and frequency (100 MHz) from an atomic frequency standard to a remote facility at a distance up to tens of kilometers. The reference signal is transmitted to the remote station as amplitude modulation of an optical carrier signal propagating in an optical fiber. The stabilization scheme implemented in this system is intended particularly to suppress phase and frequency fluctuations caused by vibrations and by expansion and contraction of the optical fiber and other components in diurnal and seasonal heating and cooling cycles. The system (see figure) comprises several subsystems, the main one being (1) a hydrogen-maser or linear-ion-trap frequency standard in an environmentally controlled room in a signal-processing center (SPC), (2) a stabilized fiber-optic distribution assembly (SFODA), (3) a compensated sapphire oscillator (CSO) in an environmentally controlled room in the remote facility, (4) thermally stabilized distribution amplifiers and cabling from the environmentally controlled room to end users, and (5) performance- measuring equipment.

  18. Measurement of dimensional stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, S. F.; Berthold, J. W., III; Norton, M.

    1975-01-01

    A technique was developed for measuring, with a precision of one part 10 to the 9th power, changes in physical dimensions delta L/L. Measurements have commenced on five materials: Heraeus-Schott Homosil (vitreous silica), Corning 7940 (vitreous silica), Corning ULE 7971 (titanium silicate), Schott Zero-Dur, and Owens-Illinois Cer-Vit C-101. The study was extended to include Universal Cyclops Invar LR-35 and Simonds-Saw Superinvar.

  19. Frequency-stabilization of mode-locked laser-based photonic microwave oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Nan; Tu, Meirong; Salik, Ertan; Maleki, Lute

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we will describe our recent phase-noise measurements of photonic microwave oscillators. We will aslo discuss our investigation of the frequency stability link between the optical and microwave frequencies in the coupled oscillator.

  20. All-optical stabilization of a soliton frequency comb in a crystalline microresonator.

    PubMed

    Jost, J D; Lucas, E; Herr, T; Lecaplain, C; Brasch, V; Pfeiffer, M H P; Kippenberg, T J

    2015-10-15

    We demonstrate the all-optical stabilization of a low-noise temporal soliton based microresonator based optical frequency comb in a crystalline resonator via a new technique to control the repetition rate. This is accomplished by thermally heating the microresonator with an additional probe laser coupled to an auxiliary optical resonator mode. The carrier-envelope offset frequency is controlled by stabilizing the pump laser frequency to a reference optical frequency comb. We analyze the stabilization by performing an out-of-loop comparison and measure the overlapping Allan deviation. This all-optical stabilization technique can prove useful as an actuator for self-referenced microresonator frequency combs.

  1. The Effects of Oscillator Stability on High-frequency GPS Phase Measurements:A Comparison of the First Atmospheric Sounding Data from GRACE with SAC-C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meehan, T.; Ao, C.; Hajj, G.; Iijima, B.

    2003-04-01

    Collection of atmospheric occultation data from identical instruments on CHAMP and SAC-C has been ongoing for nearly 2 full years. Atmospheric occultation data from both instruments show significant high-frequency phase signatures that do not cancel with the traditional single-difference technique. These signatures are due to a flaw in the design of the simple crystal-oscillator reference built in to the occultation instrument. Whether these phase errors cause significant upper-atmospheric measuring errors is unclear. The launch of the twin GRACE spacecraft in 2002 placed in orbit a nearly identical occultation instrument as SAC-C/CHAMP with the augmentation of an Ultra-Stable Oscillator (USO) as the frequency reference. The relative merits of this higher-performance oscillator towards GPS occultation measurements will be presented along with comparisons of the GRACE occultation data with that of SAC-C.

  2. Physics characterization and frequency stability of the pulsed rubidium maser

    SciTech Connect

    Godone, Aldo; Micalizio, Salvatore; Levi, Filippo; Calosso, Claudio

    2006-10-15

    In this paper we report the theoretical and experimental characterization of a pulsed optically pumped vapor-cell frequency standard based on the detection of the free-induction decay microwave signal. The features that make this standard similar to a pulsed passive maser are presented. In order to predict and optimize the frequency stability, thermal and shot noise sources are analyzed, as well as the conversions of the laser and microwave fluctuations into the output frequency. The experimental results obtained with a clock prototype based on {sup 87}Rb in buffer gas are compared with the theoretical predictions, showing the practical possibility to implement a frequency standard limited in the medium term only by thermal drift. The achieved frequency stability is {sigma}{sub y}({tau})=1.2x10{sup -12}{tau}{sup -1/2} for measurement times up to {tau}{approx_equal}10{sup 5} s. It represents one of the best results reported in literature for gas cell frequency standards and is compliant with the present day requirements for on board space applications.

  3. Frequency stabilization for mobile satellite terminals via LORAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ernst, Gregory J.; Kee, Steven M.; Marquart, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    Digital satellite communication systems require careful management of frequency stability. Historically, frequency stability has been accomplished by continuously powered, high cost, high performance reference oscillators. Today's low cost mobile satellite communication equipment must operate under wide ranging environmental conditions, stabilize quickly after application of power, and provide adequate performance margin to overcome RF link impairments unique to the land mobile environment. Methods for frequency stabilization in land mobile applications must meet these objectives without incurring excessive performance degradation. A frequency stabilization scheme utilizing the LORAN (Long Range Navigation) system is presented.

  4. Oscillator frequency stability improvement by means of negative feedback.

    PubMed

    Goryachev, Maxim; Galliou, Serge; Abbé, Philippe; Komine, Vadim

    2011-11-01

    A novel, simple method is proposed to increase the frequency stability of an oscillator. An additional negative feedback is used in combination with the positive loop of the harmonic oscillator to decrease the phase sensitivity to fluctuations of parameters other than the resonator. The main advantage of the proposed correction approach is that it does not require expensive external elements such as mixers or resonators. The validity of the method is theoretically demonstrated on a Colpitts oscillator using the control system theory approach and numerical simulations, and is experimentally verified with phase noise measurements of an actual oscillator-mockup. It is shown that the medium-term frequency stability can be easily improved by a factor of ten.

  5. Better Stability with Measurement Errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argun, Aykut; Volpe, Giovanni

    2016-06-01

    Often it is desirable to stabilize a system around an optimal state. This can be effectively accomplished using feedback control, where the system deviation from the desired state is measured in order to determine the magnitude of the restoring force to be applied. Contrary to conventional wisdom, i.e. that a more precise measurement is expected to improve the system stability, here we demonstrate that a certain degree of measurement error can improve the system stability. We exemplify the implications of this finding with numerical examples drawn from various fields, such as the operation of a temperature controller, the confinement of a microscopic particle, the localization of a target by a microswimmer, and the control of a population.

  6. Long-term laser frequency stabilization using fiber interferometers

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Jia; Lucivero, Vito Giovanni; Jiménez-Martínez, Ricardo; Mitchell, Morgan W.

    2015-07-15

    We report long-term laser frequency stabilization using only the target laser and a pair of 5 m fiber interferometers, one as a frequency reference and the second as a sensitive thermometer to stabilize the frequency reference. When used to stabilize a distributed feedback laser at 795 nm, the frequency Allan deviation at 1000 s drops from 5.6 × 10{sup −8} to 6.9 × 10{sup −10}. The performance equals that of an offset lock employing a second, atom-stabilized laser in the temperature control.

  7. Stability measures in arid ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosshi, M. I.; Brunsell, N. A.; Koerner, S.

    2015-12-01

    Stability, the capacity of ecosystems to persist in the face of change, has proven its relevance as a fundamental component of ecological theory. Here, we would like to explore meaningful and quantifiable metrics to define stability, with a focus on highly variable arid and semi-arid savanna ecosystems. Recognizing the importance of a characteristic timescale to any definition of stability, our metrics will be focused scales from annual to multi-annual, capturing different aspects of stability. Our three measures of stability, in increasing order of temporal scale, are: (1) Ecosystem resistance, quantified as the degree to which the system maintains its mean state in response to a perturbation (drought), based on inter-annual variability in Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). (2) An optimization approach, relevant to arid systems with pulse dynamics, that models vegetation structure and function based on a trade off between the ability to respond to resource availability and avoid stress. (3) Community resilience, measured as species turnover rate (β diversity). Understanding the nature of stability in structurally-diverse arid ecosystems, which are highly variable, yields theoretical insight which has practical implications.

  8. Characterization and measurement of system stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schieder, R.; Rau, G.; Vowinkel, B.

    To characterize noise and stability of any measuring instrument, a method is offered, based on the principles of the 'Allan variance' used to characterize the stability of frequency standards. The Allan plot has been used to obtain precise information about the noise and drift behavior of all frontends and backends of the Cologne 3-meter millimeter and submillimeter radio telescope. The approach shows how the experimental setup will perform under varying conditions in terms of signal to noise ratio. The method, furthermore, is less complicated to interpret than calculations of the correlation function or the Fourier transform. The Allan plot has been used to test digital voltmeters and digital lock-in amplifiers.

  9. Frequency stabilization of diode-laser-pumped solid state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    The goal of the NASA Sunlite program is to fly two diode-laser-pumped solid-state lasers on the space shuttle and while doing so to perform a measurement of their frequency stability and temporal coherence. These measurements will be made by combining the outputs of the two lasers on an optical radiation detector and spectrally analyzing the beat note. Diode-laser-pumped solid-state lasers have several characteristics that will make them useful in space borne experiments. First, this laser has high electrical efficiency. Second, it is of a technology that enables scaling to higher powers in the future. Third, the laser can be made extremely reliable, which is crucial for many space based applications. Fourth, they are frequency and amplitude stable and have high temporal coherence. Diode-laser-pumped solid-state lasers are inherently efficient. Recent results have shown 59 percent slope efficiency for a diode-laser-pumped solid-state laser. As for reliability, the laser proposed should be capable of continuous operation. This is possible because the diode lasers can be remote from the solid state gain medium by coupling through optical fibers. Diode lasers are constructed with optical detectors for monitoring their output power built into their mounting case. A computer can actively monitor the output of each diode laser. If it sees any variation in the output power that might indicate a problem, the computer can turn off that diode laser and turn on a backup diode laser. As for stability requirements, it is now generally believed that any laser can be stabilized if the laser has a frequency actuator capable of tuning the laser frequency as far as it is likely to drift in a measurement time.

  10. Heterodyne stabilization as a possible laser frequency stabilization technique for LISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichholz, Johannes

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna is a joint NASA/ESA mission aimed at the detection of gravitational wave radiation in the frequency range from 30 uHz to 0.1 Hz. LISA uses a modified Michelson interferometer setup consisting of three identical spacecraft, arranged in an equilateral triangular constellation. It measures the differential length changes of the 5 · 109 m long interferometer arms between free-floating proof masses housed within each spacecraft. Laser pre-stabilization is required in conjunction with Time-Delay Interferometry data post-processing to monitor the armlength changes with picometer precision. A modulation/demodulation technique to stabilize the frequency of the lasers to an optical reference cavity has been proposed for a long time, but it requires several additional optical components and would need to be built as a separate system. Using a different sensing tech-nique, heterodyne interferometry, we propose a modified stabilization scheme, which similarly transfers the stability of an optical reference cavity to the laser frequency. It only uses com-ponents that are already available in the LISA assembly and can easily be integrated into the optical bench design. A similar stabilization scheme is going to be used in LISA Pathfinder. We will discuss this technique in detail and present initial experimental results, as well as predicted performances on the LISA bench.

  11. Space interferometry application of laser frequency stabilization with molecular iodine.

    PubMed

    Leonhardt, Volker; Camp, Jordan B

    2006-06-10

    A number of planned space interferometry missions, including the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) gravitational wave detector, require a laser system with high-frequency stability over long time scales. A 1064 nm wavelength nonplanar ring oscillator (NPRO) laser stabilized to a resonant transition in molecular iodine is suitable for these missions, providing high-frequency stability at an absolute reference frequency. The iodine stabilized laser also offers low sensitivity to temperature and alignment fluctuations and allows frequency tuning. We have evaluated the noise performance of a NPRO laser stabilized to iodine using frequency modulation spectroscopy and have found an Allan standard deviation of 10(-14) over 100 s. Simplified optical configurations and the radiation hardness of the frequency-doubling crystals have also been investigated.

  12. Atomic frequency standards for ultra-high-frequency stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, L.; Prestage, J. D.; Dick, G. J.

    1987-01-01

    The general features of the Hg-199(+) trapped-ion frequency standard are outlined and compared to other atomic frequency standards, especially the hydrogen maser. The points discussed are those which make the trapped Hg-199(+) standard attractive: high line Q, reduced sensitivity to external magnetic fields, and simplicity of state selection, among others.

  13. Fiber-based femtosecond optical frequency comb stabilized to iodine frequency standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagayev, S. N.; Denisov, V. I.; Dychkov, A. S.; Koliada, N. A.; Nyushkov, B. N.; Pivtsov, V. S.; Farnosov, S. A.; Antropov, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    A fiber-based femtosecond optical frequency comb spanning wavelengths from 1 to 2 μm was stabilized precisely to an iodine frequency standard by means of heterodyne optical phase-locked loops. It enables transfer of frequency stability across electromagnetic spectrum and implementation of compact optical clocks with ∼10-15 long-term instability.

  14. Methods and apparatus for broadband frequency comb stabilization

    DOEpatents

    Cox, Jonathan A; Kaertner, Franz X

    2015-03-17

    Feedback loops can be used to shift and stabilize the carrier-envelope phase of a frequency comb from a mode-locked fibers laser or other optical source. Compared to other frequency shifting and stabilization techniques, feedback-based techniques provide a wideband closed-loop servo bandwidth without optical filtering, beam pointing errors, or group velocity dispersion. It also enables phase locking to a stable reference, such as a Ti:Sapphire laser, continuous-wave microwave or optical source, or self-referencing interferometer, e.g., to within 200 mrad rms from DC to 5 MHz. In addition, stabilized frequency combs can be coherently combined with other stable signals, including other stabilized frequency combs, to synthesize optical pulse trains with pulse durations of as little as a single optical cycle. Such a coherent combination can be achieved via orthogonal control, using balanced optical cross-correlation for timing stabilization and balanced homodyne detection for phase stabilization.

  15. All-fiber frequency-stabilized erbium doped ring laser.

    PubMed

    Marty, Patrick Thomas; Morel, Jacques; Feurer, Thomas

    2010-12-20

    We present an all-fiber frequency-stabilized ring laser system with an integrated reference gas cell consisting of a hollow core fiber filled with acetylene. Through nonlinear absorption spectroscopy the laser frequency is stabilized to a specific absorption line of acetylene. Three different stabilization schemes are investigated and the minimum Allan deviation obtained after 100 s is 4.4 · 10(-11).

  16. Optical Frequency Metrology of an Iodine-Stabilized He-Ne Laser Using the Frequency Comb of a Quantum-Interference-Stabilized Mode-Locked Laser

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ryan P.; Roos, Peter A.; Wahlstrand, Jared K.; Pipis, Jessica A.; Rivas, Maria Belmonte; Cundiff, Steven T.

    2007-01-01

    We perform optical frequency metrology of an iodine-stabilized He-Ne laser using a mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser frequency comb that is stabilized using quantum interference of photocurrents in a semiconductor. Using this technique, we demonstrate carrier-envelope offset frequency fluctuations of less than 5 mHz using a 1 s gate time. With the resulting stable frequency comb, we measure the optical frequency of the iodine transition [127I2 R(127) 11-5 i component] to be 473 612 214 712.96 ± 0.66 kHz, well within the uncertainty of the CIPM recommended value. The stability of the quantum interference technique is high enough such that it does not limit the measurements. PMID:27110472

  17. Steps to take to enhance gait stability: the effect of stride frequency, stride length, and walking speed on local dynamic stability and margins of stability.

    PubMed

    Hak, Laura; Houdijk, Han; Beek, Peter J; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate whether adaptations of stride length, stride frequency, and walking speed, independently influence local dynamic stability and the size of the medio-lateral and backward margins of stability during walking. Nine healthy subjects walked 25 trials on a treadmill at different combinations of stride frequency, stride length, and consequently at different walking speeds. Visual feedback about the required and the actual combination of stride frequency and stride length was given during the trials. Generalized Estimating Equations were used to investigate the independent contribution of stride length, stride frequency, and walking speed on the measures of gait stability. Increasing stride frequency was found to enhance medio-lateral margins of stability. Backward margins of stability became larger as stride length decreased or walking speed increased. For local dynamic stability no significant effects of stride frequency, stride length or walking speed were found. We conclude that adaptations in stride frequency, stride length and/or walking speed can result in an increase of the medio-lateral and backward margins of stability, while these adaptations do not seem to affect local dynamic stability. Gait training focusing on the observed stepping strategies to enhance margins of stability might be a useful contribution to programs aimed at fall prevention.

  18. Steps to Take to Enhance Gait Stability: The Effect of Stride Frequency, Stride Length, and Walking Speed on Local Dynamic Stability and Margins of Stability

    PubMed Central

    Hak, Laura; Houdijk, Han; Beek, Peter J.; van Dieën, Jaap H.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate whether adaptations of stride length, stride frequency, and walking speed, independently influence local dynamic stability and the size of the medio-lateral and backward margins of stability during walking. Nine healthy subjects walked 25 trials on a treadmill at different combinations of stride frequency, stride length, and consequently at different walking speeds. Visual feedback about the required and the actual combination of stride frequency and stride length was given during the trials. Generalized Estimating Equations were used to investigate the independent contribution of stride length, stride frequency, and walking speed on the measures of gait stability. Increasing stride frequency was found to enhance medio-lateral margins of stability. Backward margins of stability became larger as stride length decreased or walking speed increased. For local dynamic stability no significant effects of stride frequency, stride length or walking speed were found. We conclude that adaptations in stride frequency, stride length and/or walking speed can result in an increase of the medio-lateral and backward margins of stability, while these adaptations do not seem to affect local dynamic stability. Gait training focusing on the observed stepping strategies to enhance margins of stability might be a useful contribution to programs aimed at fall prevention. PMID:24349379

  19. Time, Frequency and Physical Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellwig, Helmut; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes several developments in atomic clocks and frequency standards pointing out the feasibility and practicality in adopting a unified standard of time and frequency to replace other base standards of length, mass, and temperature. (GA)

  20. Time, Frequency and Physical Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellwig, Helmut; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes several developments in atomic clocks and frequency standards pointing out the feasibility and practicality in adopting a unified standard of time and frequency to replace other base standards of length, mass, and temperature. (GA)

  1. Stabilized frequency comb with a self-referenced femtosecond Cr:forsterite laser.

    PubMed

    Kim, K; Washburn, B R; Wilpers, G; Oates, C W; Hollberg, L; Newbury, N R; Diddams, S A; Nicholson, J W; Yan, M F

    2005-04-15

    A frequency comb is generated with a Cr:forsterite femtosecond laser, spectrally broadened through a highly nonlinear optical fiber to span from 1.0 to 2.2 ,m, and stabilized using the f-to-2f self-referencing technique. The repetition rate and the carrier-envelope offset frequency are stabilized to a hydrogen maser, calibrated by a cesium atomic fountain clock. Simultaneous frequency measurement of a 657-nm cw laser by use of the stabilized frequency combs from this Cr:forsterite system and a Ti:sapphire laser agree at the 10(-13) level. The frequency noise of the comb components is observed at 1064, 1314, and 1550 nm by comparing the measured beat frequencies between cw lasers and the supercontinuum frequency combs.

  2. Nobel Lecture: Defining and measuring optical frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, John L.

    2006-10-01

    Four long-running currents in laser technology met and merged in 1999-2000. Two of these were the quest toward a stable repetitive sequence of ever-shorter optical pulses and, on the other hand, the quest for the most time-stable, unvarying optical frequency possible. The marriage of UltraFast and UltraStable lasers was brokered mainly by two international teams and became exciting when a special “designer” microstructure optical fiber was shown to be nonlinear enough to produce “white light” from the femtosecond laser pulses, such that the output spectrum embraced a full optical octave. Then, for the first time, one could realize an optical frequency interval equal to the comb’s lowest frequency, and count out this interval as a multiple of the repetition rate of the femtosecond pulse laser. This “gear-box” connection between the radio frequency standard and any/all optical frequency standards came just as Sensitivity-Enhancing ideas were maturing. The four-way Union empowered an explosion of accurate frequency measurement results in the standards field and prepares the way for refined tests of some of our cherished physical principles, such as the time-stability of some of the basic numbers in physics (e.g., the “fine-structure” constant, the speed of light, certain atomic mass ratios etc.), and the equivalence of time-keeping by clocks based on different physics. The stable laser technology also allows time-synchronization between two independent femtosecond lasers so exact they can be made to appear as if the source were a single laser. By improving pump/probe experiments, one important application will be in bond-specific spatial scanning of biological samples. This next decade in optical physics should be a blast.

  3. Frequency and Intensity Stabilization of Planar Waveguide-External Cavity Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellez, Gregorio; Shoen, Steven; Quetschke, Volker

    2012-02-01

    Planar Waveguide External Cavity Lasers (PW-ECL) show an immense potential for use in precision measurement tasks and space missions because of its compactness and simple design. We show the techniques used to frequency and intensity stabilize a PW-ECL 1550nm laser system with the goal of achieving a frequency stability of 30 Hz/sqrt(Hz) and a RIN of less than 10-6. These PW-ECL systems are a potential replacement for Non-Planar Ring Oscillator (NPRO) laser systems, which have become a standard for low-noise interferometric applications, if the PW-ECL can meet the required stability. We present the initial experimental results of the intensity and frequency stabilization setup and we show a comparison between PW-ECL lasers and NPRO lasers with respect to measurements and applications requiring a high frequency and intensity stability.

  4. 47 CFR 87.71 - Frequency measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency measurements. 87.71 Section 87.71... Operating Requirements and Procedures Operating Requirements § 87.71 Frequency measurements. A licensed operator must measure the operating frequencies of all land-based transmitters at the following times: (a...

  5. 47 CFR 87.71 - Frequency measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency measurements. 87.71 Section 87.71... Operating Requirements and Procedures Operating Requirements § 87.71 Frequency measurements. A licensed operator must measure the operating frequencies of all land-based transmitters at the following times: (a...

  6. 47 CFR 87.71 - Frequency measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency measurements. 87.71 Section 87.71... Operating Requirements and Procedures Operating Requirements § 87.71 Frequency measurements. A licensed operator must measure the operating frequencies of all land-based transmitters at the following times: (a...

  7. 47 CFR 87.71 - Frequency measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency measurements. 87.71 Section 87.71... Operating Requirements and Procedures Operating Requirements § 87.71 Frequency measurements. A licensed operator must measure the operating frequencies of all land-based transmitters at the following times: (a...

  8. 47 CFR 87.71 - Frequency measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency measurements. 87.71 Section 87.71... Operating Requirements and Procedures Operating Requirements § 87.71 Frequency measurements. A licensed operator must measure the operating frequencies of all land-based transmitters at the following times: (a...

  9. 47 CFR 74.762 - Frequency measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency measurements. 74.762 Section 74.762... Booster Stations § 74.762 Frequency measurements. (a) The licensee of a low power TV station, a TV translator, or a TV booster station must measure the carrier frequencies of its output channel as often...

  10. 47 CFR 74.762 - Frequency measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency measurements. 74.762 Section 74.762... Booster Stations § 74.762 Frequency measurements. (a) The licensee of a low power TV station, a TV translator, or a TV booster station must measure the carrier frequencies of its output channel as often...

  11. 47 CFR 74.762 - Frequency measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency measurements. 74.762 Section 74.762... Booster Stations § 74.762 Frequency measurements. (a) The licensee of a low power TV station, a TV translator, or a TV booster station must measure the carrier frequencies of its output channel as often...

  12. 47 CFR 74.762 - Frequency measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency measurements. 74.762 Section 74.762... Booster Stations § 74.762 Frequency measurements. (a) The licensee of a low power TV station, a TV translator, or a TV booster station must measure the carrier frequencies of its output channel as often...

  13. 47 CFR 74.762 - Frequency measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency measurements. 74.762 Section 74.762... Booster Stations § 74.762 Frequency measurements. (a) The licensee of a low power TV station, a TV translator, or a TV booster station must measure the carrier frequencies of its output channel as often...

  14. On the control aspect of laser frequency stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zia, Omar

    1991-01-01

    Realization of frequency stable lasers is viewed as key to progress in many areas of research; therefore, the search for more effective techniques of frequency stabilization has intensified significantly in recent years. Investigating and validating the fundamental linewidth and frequency stability limits of a Nd:YAG laser oscillator, locked to a high finesse reference cavity in the microgravity and vibration-free environment of space, is the objective of a NASA project called SUNLITE at LaRC. The objective of this paper is to further investigate the application of feedback control theory in active frequency control as a frequency stabilization technique and determine the most appropriate control strategy to be used in general and particularly in the SUNLITE Project.

  15. Frequency stability improvement for piezoresistive micromechanical oscillators via synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Dong; Huan, Ronghua; Wei, Xueyong

    2017-03-01

    Synchronization phenomenon first discovered in Huygens' clock shows that the rhythms of oscillating objects can be adjusted via an interaction. Here we show that the frequency stability of a piezoresistive micromechanical oscillator can be enhanced via synchronization. The micromechanical clamped-clamped beam oscillator is built up using the electrostatic driving and piezoresistive sensing technique and the synchronization phenomenon is observed after coupling it to an external oscillator. An enhancement of frequency stability is obtained in the synchronization state. The influences of the synchronizing perturbation intensity and frequency detuning applied on the oscillator are studied experimentally. A theoretical analysis of phase noise leads to an analytical formula for predicting Allan deviation of the frequency output of the piezoresistive oscillator, which successfully explains the experimental observations and the mechanism of frequency stability enhancement via synchronization.

  16. Frequency-tunable Pre-stabilized Lasers for LISA via Sideband-locking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livas, Jeffrey C.; Thorpe, James I.; Numata, Kenji; Mitryk, Shawn; Mueller, Guido; Wand, Vinzenz

    2008-01-01

    Laser frequency noise mitigation is one of the most challenging aspects of the LISA interferometric measurement system. The unstabilized frequency fluctuations must be suppressed by roughly twelve orders of magnitude in order to achieve stability sufficient for gravitational wave detection. This enormous suppression will be achieved through a combination of stabilization and common-mode rejection. The stabilization component will itself be achieved in two stages: pre-stabilization to a local optical cavity followed by arm-locking to some combination of the inter-spacecraft distances. In order for these two stabilization stages to work simultaneously, the lock-point of the pre-stabilization loop must be frequency tunable. The current baseline stabilization technique, locking to an optical cavity, does not provide tunability between cavity resonances, which are typically spaced by 100s of MHz. Here we present a modification to the traditional Pound-Drever-Hall cavity locking technique that allows the laser to be locked to a cavity resonance with an adjustable frequency offset. This technique requires no modifications to the optical cavity itself, thus preserving the stability of the frequency reference. We present measurements of the system performance and demonstrate that we can meet implement the first two stages of stabilization.

  17. Third-order chromatic dispersion stabilizes Kerr frequency combs.

    PubMed

    Parra-Rivas, Pedro; Gomila, Damià; Leo, François; Coen, Stéphane; Gelens, Lendert

    2014-05-15

    Using numerical simulations of an extended Lugiato-Lefever equation we analyze the stability and nonlinear dynamics of Kerr frequency combs generated in microresonators and fiber resonators, taking into account third-order dispersion effects. We show that cavity solitons underlying Kerr frequency combs, normally sensitive to oscillatory and chaotic instabilities, are stabilized in a wide range of parameter space by third-order dispersion. Moreover, we demonstrate how the snaking structure organizing compound states of multiple cavity solitons is qualitatively changed by third-order dispersion, promoting an increased stability of Kerr combs underlined by a single cavity soliton.

  18. Laser frequency stabilization and shifting by using modulation transfer spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Bing; Wang, Zhao-Ying; Wu, Bin; Xu, Ao-Peng; Wang, Qi-Yu; Xu, Yun-Fei; Lin, Qiang

    2014-10-01

    The stabilizing and shifting of laser frequency are very important for the interaction between the laser and atoms. The modulation transfer spectroscopy for the 87Rb atom with D2 line transition F = 2 → F' = 3 is used for stabilizing and shifting the frequency of the external cavity grating feedback diode laser. The resonant phase modulator with electro—optical effect is used to generate frequency sideband to lock the laser frequency. In the locking scheme, circularly polarized pump- and probe-beams are used. By optimizing the temperature of the vapor, the pump- and probe-beam intensity, the laser linewidth of 280 kHz is obtained. Furthermore, the magnetic field generated by a solenoid is added into the system. Therefore the system can achieve the frequency locking at any point in a range of hundreds of megahertz frequency shifting with very low power loss.

  19. Determination fo the Rydberg constant by direct frequency measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Nez, F.; Plimmer, M.D.; Bourzeix, S.

    1994-12-31

    We have performed a pure frequency measurement of the 2S-8S/D two photon transition in atomic hydrogen, without any interferometry. The hydrogen frequencies are compared with the difference of two optical standards, the methane stabilized He-Ne laser and the iodine stabilized He-Ne laser. In this way, an optical frequency of atomic hydrogen is directly linked for the first time to the cesium clock. We deduce a new value for the Rydberg constant with an uncertainty of 2.2 parts in 10{sup 11}. This value is currently the most precise available.

  20. Development of Frequency Stabilizing Scheme for Integrating Wind Power Generation into an Isolated Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Koji; Sakamoto, Orie; Kitauchi, Yoshihiro; Nanahara, Toshiya; Inoue, Toshio; Shiohama, Tomohiro; Fukuda, Hitoshi

    Integrating of wind power generation into small islands has been one of the demonstration projects in Okinawa prefecture. Since such integration could deteriorate power quality including frequency in an island grid, a frequency stabilizing system using flywheels has been installed into a small island. In order to establish a proper frequency stabilizing scheme for the small island, an accurate model of a diesel generator including governor is vital. Therefore, the model was developed based on the measured values of generator dump tests. A new frequency stabilizing scheme was also developed through time-domain simulation of the island grid model which consists of the above-mentioned diesel generator model and an equivalent load change representing wind power variation. The proper parameters of the scheme were derived considering role sharing between the diesel generators and the flywheels. The developed stabilizing scheme was applied to the flywheels in the island grid and revealed great performance for mitigating frequency variation.

  1. Frequency-Tunable Pre-stabilized lasers for LISA via Stabilized Lasers for LISA via Sideband Locking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livas, Jeffrey; Thorpe, James Ira; Numata, K.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation discusses a major potential source of noise for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) that is the laser frequency noise and the proposed mechanism to suppress the unstabilized frequency fluctuations. These fluctuations must be suppresed by about 12 orders of magnitude to achieve a stability that is sufficient for the detection of gravitational waves. This presentation reviews present a modification to the traditional cavity locking technique that allows the laser to be locked to a cavity resonance with an adjustable frequency offset. This presentation also discusses measurements of the system stability, demonstrating that the pre-stabilization level satisfies LISA requirements and a demonstration of a phase-lock loop which utilizes the tunable sideband locking technique as a pre-stabilization stage.

  2. Stabilized Lasers and Precision Measurements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, J. L.

    1978-01-01

    Traces the development of stabilized lasers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology passive-stabilization experiments of the early 1960s up through the current epoch of highly stabilized helium-neon and carbon dioxide and continuous wave dye lasers. (Author/HM)

  3. Stabilized Lasers and Precision Measurements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, J. L.

    1978-01-01

    Traces the development of stabilized lasers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology passive-stabilization experiments of the early 1960s up through the current epoch of highly stabilized helium-neon and carbon dioxide and continuous wave dye lasers. (Author/HM)

  4. Design and performance of a frequency-stabilized ring dye laser

    SciTech Connect

    Divens, W.G.; Jarrett, S.M.

    1982-09-01

    A commercial version of a scannable, frequency-stabilized, cw ring dye laser is described. The optical and electronic systems are presented along with the results of long-term stability tests and linewidth measurements. Spectral data obtained using the technique of polarization spectroscopy are also discussed.

  5. Robust frequency stabilization of multiple spectroscopy lasers with large and tunable offset frequencies.

    PubMed

    Nevsky, A; Alighanbari, S; Chen, Q-F; Ernsting, I; Vasilyev, S; Schiller, S; Barwood, G; Gill, P; Poli, N; Tino, G M

    2013-11-15

    We have demonstrated a compact, robust device for simultaneous absolute frequency stabilization of three diode lasers whose carrier frequencies can be chosen freely relative to the reference. A rigid ULE multicavity block is employed, and, for each laser, the sideband locking technique is applied. A small lock error, computer control of frequency offset, wide range of frequency offset, simple construction, and robust operation are the useful features of the system. One concrete application is as a stabilization unit for the cooling and trapping lasers of a neutral-atom lattice clock. The device significantly supports and improves the clock's operation. The laser with the most stringent requirements imposed by this application is stabilized to a line width of 70 Hz, and a residual frequency drift less than 0.5 Hz/s. The carrier optical frequency can be tuned over 350 MHz while in lock.

  6. Mid-IR beam direction stabilization scheme for vibrational spectroscopy, including dual-frequency 2DIR.

    PubMed

    Nyby, Clara M; Leger, Joel D; Tang, Jianan; Varner, Clyde; Kireev, Victor V; Rubtsov, Igor V

    2014-03-24

    A compact laser beam direction stabilization scheme is developed that provides the angular stability of better than 50 μrad over a wide range of frequencies from 800 to 4000 cm-1. The schematic is fully automated and features a single MCT quadrant detector. The schematic was tested to stabilize directions of the two IR beams used for dual-frequency two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) measurements and showed excellent results: automatic tuning of the beam direction allowed achieving the alignment quality within 10% of the optimal alignment obtained manually. The schematic can be easily implemented to any nonlinear spectroscopic measurements in the mid-IR spectral region.

  7. Precise Stabilization of the Optical Frequency of WGMRs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Matsko, Andrey; Matsko, Andrey; Yu, Nan; Maleki, Lute; Iltchenko, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Crystalline whispering gallery mode resonators (CWGMRs) made of crystals with axial symmetry have ordinary and extraordinary families of optical modes. These modes have substantially different thermo-refractive constants. This results in a very sharp dependence of differential detuning of optical frequency on effective temperature. This frequency difference compared with clock gives an error signal for precise compensation of the random fluctuations of optical frequency. Certain crystals, like MgF2, have turnover points where the thermo-refractive effect is completely nullified. An advantage for applications using WGMRs for frequency stabilization is in the possibility of manufacturing resonators out of practically any optically transparent crystal. It is known that there are crystals with negative and zero thermal expansion at some specific temperatures. Doping changes properties of the crystals and it is possible to create an optically transparent crystal with zero thermal expansion at room temperature. With this innovation s stabilization technique, the resultant WGMR will have absolute frequency stability The expansion of the resonator s body can be completely compensated for by nonlinear elements. This results in compensation of linear thermal expansion (see figure). In three-mode, the MgF2 resonator, if tuned at the turnover thermal point, can compensate for all types of random thermal-related frequency drift. Simplified dual-mode method is also available. This creates miniature optical resonators with good short- and long-term stability for passive secondary frequency ethalon and an active resonator for active secondary frequency standard (a narrowband laser with long-term stability).

  8. An atomic magnetometer with autonomous frequency stabilization and large dynamic range.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, S; Mishra, S; Behera, R; Poornima; Dasgupta, K

    2015-06-01

    The operation of a highly sensitive atomic magnetometer using elliptically polarized resonant light is demonstrated. It is based on measurement of zero magnetic field resonance in degenerate two level systems using polarimetric detection. The transmitted light through the polarimeter is used for laser frequency stabilization, whereas reflected light is used for magnetic field measurement. Thus, the experimental geometry allows autonomous frequency stabilization of the laser frequency leading to compact operation of the overall device and has a preliminary sensitivity of <10 pT/Hz(1/2) @ 1 Hz. Additionally, the dynamic range of the device is improved by feedback controlling the bias magnetic field without compromising on its sensitivity.

  9. An atomic magnetometer with autonomous frequency stabilization and large dynamic range

    SciTech Connect

    Pradhan, S. E-mail: pradhans75@gmail.com; Poornima,; Dasgupta, K.; Mishra, S.; Behera, R.

    2015-06-15

    The operation of a highly sensitive atomic magnetometer using elliptically polarized resonant light is demonstrated. It is based on measurement of zero magnetic field resonance in degenerate two level systems using polarimetric detection. The transmitted light through the polarimeter is used for laser frequency stabilization, whereas reflected light is used for magnetic field measurement. Thus, the experimental geometry allows autonomous frequency stabilization of the laser frequency leading to compact operation of the overall device and has a preliminary sensitivity of <10 pT/Hz{sup 1/2} @ 1 Hz. Additionally, the dynamic range of the device is improved by feedback controlling the bias magnetic field without compromising on its sensitivity.

  10. Frequency-Tuneable Pre-Stabilized Lasers for LISA via Sideband Locking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, James Ira; Numata, Kenji; Livas, jeffery

    2008-01-01

    Laser frequency noise mitigation is one of the most challenging aspects of the LISA interferometric measurement system. The unstabilized frequency fluctuations must be suppressed by roughly twelve orders of magnitude in order to achieve a stability sufficient for gravitational wave detection. This enormous suppression will be achieved through a combination of stabilization and common-mode rejection. The stabilization component will itself be achieved in two stages: pre-stabilization to a local optical cavity followed by arm-locking to some combination of the inter-spacecraft distances. In order for these two stabilization stages to work simultaneously, the lock-point of the pre-stabilization loop must be frequency tunable. The current baseline stabilization technique, locking to an optical cavity, does not provide tunability between cavity resonance, which are typically spaced by 100s of MHz. Here we present a modification to the traditional Pound-Drever-Hall cavity locking technique that allows the laser to be locked to a cavity resonance with an adjustable frequency offset. This technique requires no modifications to the optical cavity itself, thus preserving the stability of the frequency reference. We present measurements of the system stability, demonstrating that the pre-stabilization level satisfies LISA requirements. We also present a demonstration of a phase-lock loop which utilizes the tunable sideband locking technique as a pre-stabilizations tage. The performance of the pre-stabilized phase-lock-loop indicates that the tunable sideband technique will meet the requirements as an actuator for arm-locking in LISA.

  11. Heterodyne laser instantaneous frequency measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Wyeth, Richard W.; Johnson, Michael A.; Globig, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    A heterodyne laser instantaneous frequency measurement system is disclosed. The system utilizes heterodyning of a pulsed laser beam with a continuous wave laser beam to form a beat signal. The beat signal is processed by a controller or computer which determines both the average frequency of the laser pulse and any changes or chirp of the frequency during the pulse.

  12. Heterodyne laser instantaneous frequency measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Wyeth, Richard W.; Johnson, Michael A.; Globig, Michael A.

    1989-01-01

    A heterodyne laser instantaneous frequency measurement system is disclosed. The system utilizes heterodyning of a pulsed laser beam with a continuous wave laser beam to form a beat signal. The beat signal is processed by a controller or computer which determines both the average frequency of the laser pulse and any changes or chirp of th frequency during the pulse.

  13. Frequency Control Performance Measurement and Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Illian, Howard F.

    2010-12-20

    Frequency control is an essential requirement of reliable electric power system operations. Determination of frequency control depends on frequency measurement and the practices based on these measurements that dictate acceptable frequency management. This report chronicles the evolution of these measurements and practices. As technology progresses from analog to digital for calculation, communication, and control, the technical basis for frequency control measurement and practices to determine acceptable performance continues to improve. Before the introduction of digital computing, practices were determined largely by prior experience. In anticipation of mandatory reliability rules, practices evolved from a focus primarily on commercial and equity issues to an increased focus on reliability. This evolution is expected to continue and place increased requirements for more precise measurements and a stronger scientific basis for future frequency management practices in support of reliability.

  14. Postural stabilization on a moving platform oscillating at high frequencies.

    PubMed

    Pyykkö, I; Aalto, H; Starck, J; Ishizaki, H

    1993-04-01

    The effect of a fore-aft oscillating platform on postural stability was studied in nine healthy volunteers. The force platform technique was used with automatic analysis that evaluated the position of the center point of force as a function of time. The duration of stimulation lasted 90 s and the perturbation frequencies ranged from 8 to 24 Hz, and were given at constant rms acceleration of 4 m/s2. When compared with a vibration-free baseline stance, horizontal vibration of the platform caused significantly worse postural stability in all subjects. Test frequencies of 8 and 10 Hz produced greater sway velocities than perturbation at frequencies of 14 and 16 Hz. The results indicate that horizontal perturbation of the support surface leads to postural instability that is frequency-dependent.

  15. REVIEW ARTICLE: Frequency domain complex permittivity measurements at microwave frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupka, Jerzy

    2006-06-01

    Overview of frequency domain measurement techniques of the complex permittivity at microwave frequencies is presented. The methods are divided into two categories: resonant and non-resonant ones. In the first category several methods are discussed such as cavity resonator techniques, dielectric resonator techniques, open resonator techniques and resonators for non-destructive testing. The general theory of measurements of different materials in resonant structures is presented showing mathematical background, sources of uncertainties and theoretical and experimental limits. Methods of measurement of anisotropic materials are presented. In the second category, transmission-reflection techniques are overviewed including transmission line cells as well as free-space techniques.

  16. Diode-laser frequency stabilization based on the resonant Faraday effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanninger, P.; Valdez, E. C.; Shay, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    The authors present the results of a method for frequency stabilizing laser diodes based on the resonant Faraday effects. A Faraday cell in conjunction with a polarizer crossed with respect to the polarization of the laser diode comprises the intracavity frequency selective element. In this arrangement, a laser pull-in range of 9 A was measured, and the laser operated at a single frequency with a linewidth less than 6 MHz.

  17. Review of the frequency stabilization of TEA CO2 laser oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willetts, David V.

    1987-01-01

    Most applications of TEA CO2 lasers in heterodyne radar systems require that the transmitter has a high degree of frequency stability. This ensures good Doppler resolution and maximizes receiver sensitivity. However, the environment within the device is far from benign with fast acoustic and electrical transients being present. Consequently the phenomena which govern the frequency stability of pulsed lasers are quite different from those operative in their CW counterparts. This review concentrates on the mechanisms of chirping within the output pulse; pulse to pulse frequency drift may be eliminated by frequency measurement and correction on successive pulses. It emerges that good stability hinges on correct cavity design. The energy-dependent laser-induced frequency sweep falls dramatically as mode diameter is increased. Thus, it is necessary to construct resonators with good selectivity for single mode operation while having a large spot size.

  18. A long-term frequency stabilized deep ultraviolet laser for Mg+ ions trapping experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Yuan, W. H.; Deng, K.; Deng, A.; Xu, Z. T.; Qin, C. B.; Lu, Z. H.; Luo, J.

    2013-12-01

    As many precision laser spectroscopy experiments require frequency stabilized lasers, development of long-term stabilized lasers is of great interest. In this work, we report long-term frequency stabilization of a 280 nm deep ultraviolet laser to a high precision wavemeter with digital servo control such that the long-term drift of the laser frequency was greatly reduced. Long-term laser frequency drift was measured with a fiber frequency comb system over 8 h. After locking, the maximum drift rate of the 280 nm laser was lowered from 576 MHz/h to 6.4 MHz/h. With proper environment control of the wavemeter, the maximum drift rate of the 280 nm laser was further lowered to less than 480 kHz/h. The locked laser system was successfully used in a Mg+ ions trapping experiment, which was also discussed in this work.

  19. Apparatus for measuring high frequency currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagmann, Mark J. (Inventor); Sutton, John F. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring high frequency currents includes a non-ferrous core current probe that is coupled to a wide-band transimpedance amplifier. The current probe has a secondary winding with a winding resistance that is substantially smaller than the reactance of the winding. The sensitivity of the current probe is substantially flat over a wide band of frequencies. The apparatus is particularly useful for measuring exposure of humans to radio frequency currents.

  20. Optical frequency locked loop for long-term stabilization of broad-line DFB laser frequency difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipka, Michał; Parniak, Michał; Wasilewski, Wojciech

    2017-09-01

    We present an experimental realization of the optical frequency locked loop applied to long-term frequency difference stabilization of broad-line DFB lasers along with a new independent method to characterize relative phase fluctuations of two lasers. The presented design is based on a fast photodiode matched with an integrated phase-frequency detector chip. The locking setup is digitally tunable in real time, insensitive to environmental perturbations and compatible with commercially available laser current control modules. We present a simple model and a quick method to optimize the loop for a given hardware relying exclusively on simple measurements in time domain. Step response of the system as well as phase characteristics closely agree with the theoretical model. Finally, frequency stabilization for offsets within 4-15 GHz working range achieving <0.1 Hz long-term stability of the beat note frequency for 500 s averaging time period is demonstrated. For these measurements we employ an I/Q mixer that allows us to precisely and independently measure the full phase trace of the beat note signal.

  1. Frequency stabilization of CO2 lasers at the Hertz level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Thomas; Nicolaisen, H. W.; Bernard, V.; Durand, P. E.; Amy-Klein, Anne; Chardonnet, Christian; Breant, Christian

    1995-04-01

    Ultrahigh resolution spectroscopy and metrology require very stable lasers with a high spectral purity. For spectroscopy with a resolution up to 1 kHz at 30 THz, the laser stabilization on a strong molecular absorption line detected in an external cell can provide a stability of a few Hz/mn and a linewidth of about 10 Hz. The development of a new stabilization scheme which acts separately on the short- and long-term stabilities is in progress. The stabilization on a peak of a high-finesses ULE Fabry-Perot cavity by using a piezoelectric transducer and an acousto-optic modulator should yield a laser linewidth of better than 1 Hz. Frequency locking on a molecular saturation line detected in transmission of another Fabry-Perot cavity can provide a long-term stability of a few Hertz on several hours. Such performances are required for spectroscopy with a resolution better than 100 Hz and for the realization of a new generation of frequency standards in the 10-micrometers spectral region based on a signal of a two-photon Ramsey fringes experiment.

  2. Laser frequency stabilization by magnetically assisted rotation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzemień, Leszek; Brzozowski, Krzysztof; Noga, Andrzej; Witkowski, Marcin; Zachorowski, Jerzy; Zawada, Michał; Gawlik, Wojciech

    2011-03-01

    We present a method of Doppler-free laser frequency stabilization based on magnetically assisted rotation spectroscopy (MARS) which combines the Doppler-free velocity-selective optical pumping (VSOP) and magnetic rotation spectroscopy. The stabilization is demonstrated for the atomic rubidium transitions at 780 nm. The proposed method is largely independent of stray magnetic fields and does not require any modulation of the laser frequency. Moreover, the discussed method allows one to choose between locking the laser exactly to the line center, or with a magnetically-controlled shift to an arbitrary frequency detuned by up to several natural linewidths. This feature is useful in many situations, e.g. for laser cooling experiments. In addition to presenting the principle of the method, its theoretical background and peculiarities inherent to the repopulation VSOP are discussed.

  3. A semiconductor-based, frequency-stabilized mode-locked laser using a phase modulator and an intracavity etalon.

    PubMed

    Davila-Rodriguez, Josue; Ozdur, Ibrahim; Williams, Charles; Delfyett, Peter J

    2010-12-15

    We report a frequency-stabilized semiconductor-based mode-locked laser that uses a phase modulator and an intracavity Fabry-Perot etalon for both active mode-locking and optical frequency stabilization. A twofold multiplication of the repetition frequency of the laser is inherently obtained in the process. The residual timing jitter of the mode-locked pulse train is 13 fs (1 Hz to 100 MHz), measured after regenerative frequency division of the photodetected pulse train.

  4. Precision frequency measurement of visible intercombination lines of strontium.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, G; Cancio, P; Drullinger, R; Giusfredi, G; Poli, N; Prevedelli, M; Toninelli, C; Tino, G M

    2003-12-12

    We report the direct frequency measurement of the visible 5s(2) 1S0-5s5p 3P1 intercombination line of strontium that is considered a possible candidate for a future optical-frequency standard. The frequency of a cavity-stabilized laser is locked to the saturated fluorescence in a thermal Sr atomic beam and is measured with an optical-frequency comb generator referenced to the SI second through a global positioning system signal. The 88Sr transition is measured to be at 434 829 121 311 (10) kHz. We measure also the 88Sr-86Sr isotope shift to be 163 817.4 (0.2) kHz.

  5. Measuring Self-Stability: A Methodological Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Tak-sing

    1981-01-01

    Reviews three major measures of the concept of self-stability: the discrepancy measure, the syndromatic measure, and the longitudinal measure. Assesses their relative strengths as well as weaknesses. Suggests that the longitudinal measure may be used to check the degree of social desirability effect of the syndromatic measure. (Author)

  6. Molecular laser stabilization at low frequencies for the LISA mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argence, B.; Halloin, H.; Jeannin, O.; Prat, P.; Turazza, O.; de Vismes, E.; Auger, G.; Plagnol, E.

    2010-04-01

    We have developed a 532 nm iodine stabilized laser system that may be suitable for the LISA mission (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) or other future spaceborne missions. This system is based on an externally frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser source and uses the molecular transfer spectroscopy technique for the frequency stabilization. This technique has been optimized for LISA: compactness (less than 1.1×1.1m2), vacuum compatibility, ease of use and initialization, minimization of the number of active components (acousto-optic modulators are both used for frequency shifting and phase modulating the pump beam). By locking on the a10 hyperfine component of the R(56)32-0 transition, we find an Allan standard deviation (σ) of 3×10-14 at 1 s and σ<2×10-14 for 20s≤τ≤103s. In terms of linear spectral density, this roughly corresponds to a stability better than 30Hz/Hz between 10-2 and 1 Hz with a stability decrease close to 1/f below 10 mHz.

  7. Measuring Frequency Instability Of A Large Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoshi, Tom Y.; Lutes, George F.; Franco, Manuel M.

    1994-01-01

    Frequency instability of antenna under test determined from measurement of phase deviation between outputs of two antennas. Fiber-optic system used to minimize spurious component of frequency instability contributed by propagation of signal from reference antenna to Allan-variance-measuring instrument. Intended primarily to reveal contributions of wind and air-temperature effects on antenna and beam-waveguide structures to overall frequency instabilities of received signals. Technique simpler, less expensive, potentially capable of providing instability data in shorter measuring times, and more precise.

  8. A compact laser head with high-frequency stability for Rb atomic clocks and optical instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Affolderbach, Christoph; Mileti, Gaetano

    2005-07-15

    We present a compact and frequency-stabilized laser head based on an extended-cavity diode laser. The laser head occupies a volume of 200 cm{sup 3} and includes frequency stabilization to Doppler-free saturated absorption resonances on the hyperfine components of the {sup 87}Rb D{sub 2} lines at 780 nm, obtained from a simple and compact spectroscopic setup using a 2 cm{sup 3} vapor cell. The measured frequency stability is {<=}2x10{sup -12} over integration times from 1 s to 1 day and shows the potential to reach 2x10{sup -13} over 10{sup 2}-10{sup 5} s. Compact laser sources with these performances are of great interest for applications in gas-cell atomic frequency standards, atomic magnetometers, interferometers and other instruments requiring stable and narrow-band optical sources.

  9. Coherent reference generator phase stability. [Deep Space Network's frequency and timing subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korwar, V. N.

    1981-01-01

    Approximate phase stability estimates for the coherent reference generator (CRG) unit in the DSN's Frequency and Timing Subsystem (FTS) are calculated. The method used involves estimating the phase noise introduced by CRG components based upon measurements made in the past on similar components in other parts of the FTS and obtaining the CRG phase noise from the component phase noises. Three estimates of phase stability are calculated: the fractional frequency change for a 5 C step in temperature, the phase noise spectral density, and the Allan standard deviation. It is found from these estimates that the CRG phase stability is better than that of the H-maser physics unit + receiver. Thus, the first step in improving FTS phase stability would be to make improvements in the H-maser physics unit + receiver. These results are corroborated by indirect clock stability estimates calculated from Doppler data.

  10. Amplitude Frequency Response Measurement: A Simple Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satish, L.; Vora, S. C.

    2010-01-01

    A simple method is described to combine a modern function generator and a digital oscilloscope to configure a setup that can directly measure the amplitude frequency response of a system. This is achieved by synchronously triggering both instruments, with the function generator operated in the "Linear-Sweep" frequency mode, while the oscilloscope…

  11. Amplitude Frequency Response Measurement: A Simple Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satish, L.; Vora, S. C.

    2010-01-01

    A simple method is described to combine a modern function generator and a digital oscilloscope to configure a setup that can directly measure the amplitude frequency response of a system. This is achieved by synchronously triggering both instruments, with the function generator operated in the "Linear-Sweep" frequency mode, while the oscilloscope…

  12. Metrology with AN Optical Feedback Frequency Stabilized Crds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassi, Samir; Burkart, Johannes

    2015-06-01

    We will present a metrological application of our recently developed Optical Feedback Frequency Stabilized - Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer (OFFS-CRDS). This instrument, which ideally fits with an optical frequency comb for absolute frequency calibration, relies on the robust lock of a steady cavity ring down resonator against a highly stable, radiofrequency tuned optical source. At 1.6 μm, over 7 nm, we demonstrate Lamb dip spectroscopy of CO_2 with line frequency retrieval at the kHz level, a dynamic in excess of 700,000 on the absorption scale and a detectivity of 4x10-13cm-1Hz-1/2. Such an instrument nicely meets the requirements for the most demanding spectroscopy spanning from accurate isotopic ratio determination and very precise lineshape recordings to Boltzmann constant redefinition.

  13. Low Frequency Vibration Energy Harvesting using Diamagnetically Stabilized Magnet Levitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palagummi, Sri Vikram

    Over the last decade, vibration-based energy harvesting has provided a technology push on the feasibility of self-powered portable small electronic devices and wireless sensor nodes. Vibration energy harvesters in general transduce energy by damping out the environmentally induced relative emotion through either a cantilever beam or an equivalent suspension mechanism with one of the transduction mechanisms, like, piezoelectric, electrostatic, electromagnetic or magnetostrictive. Two major challenges face the present harvesters in literature, one, they suffer from the unavoidable mechanical damping due to internal friction present in the systems, second, they cannot operate efficiently in the low frequency range (< 10 Hz), when most of the ambient vibrational energy is in this low frequency broadband range. Passive and friction free diamagnetically stabilized magnet levitation mechanisms which can work efficiently as a vibration energy harvester in the low frequency range are discussed in this work. First, a mono-stable vertical diamagnetic levitation (VDL) based vibration energy harvester (VEH) is discussed. The harvester consists of a lifting magnet (LM), a floating magnet (FM) and two diamagnetic plates (DPs). The LM balances out the weight of the FM and stability is brought about by the repulsive effect of the DPs, made of pyrolytic graphite. Two thick cylindrical coils, placed in grooves which are engraved in the DPs, are used to convert the mechanical energy into electrical energy. Experimental frequency response of the system is validated by the theoretical analysis which showed that the VEH works in a low frequency range but sufficient levitation gap was not achieved and the frequency response characteristic of the system was effectively linear. To overcome these challenges, the influence of the geometry of the FM, the LM, and the DP were parametrically studied to assess their effects on the levitation gap, size of the system and the natural frequency. For

  14. Frequency reproducibility of an iodine-stabilized Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Feng-Lei; Ishikawa, Jun; Zhang, Yun; Guo, Ruixiang; Onae, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Hirokazu

    2004-05-01

    We have established an ensemble of iodine-stabilized Nd:YAG lasers to verify the frequency reproducibility of the laser. The stability, repeatability and several systematic shifts of the laser frequency are investigated by heterodyne beating of the lasers. The frequency dispersion of the ensemble of lasers is evaluated to be 0.5 kHz (corresponding to a relative frequency uncertainty of 8 × 10 -13). The absolute frequency of one of the lasers (named as Y3) is measured to be 563 260 223 507 897(58) Hz using a femtosecond optical comb, when the laser was stabilized on the a10 component of the R(56)32-0 transition of 127I 2 for a cold-finger temperature of -10 °C. This group of lasers, including one transportable laser, forms an ensemble of optical frequency standards, which serves for many applications such as international comparisons, optical frequency measurements, frequency calibration services and high-resolution spectroscopy.

  15. Laser frequency stabilization by dual arm locking for LISA

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, Andrew; Shaddock, Daniel A.

    2008-10-15

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) will be the first dedicated space based gravitational wave detector. LISA will consist of a triangular formation of spacecraft, forming an interferometer with 5x10{sup 6} km long arms. Annual length variations of the interferometer arms prevent exact laser frequency noise cancellation. Despite prestabilization to an optical cavity the expected frequency noise is many orders of magnitude larger than the required levels. Arm locking is a feedback control method that will further stabilize the laser frequency by referencing it to the 5x10{sup 6} km arms. Although the original arm locking scheme produced a substantial noise reduction, the technique suffered from slowly decaying start-up transients and excess noise at harmonic frequencies of the inverse round-trip time. Dual arm locking, presented here, improves on the original scheme by combining information from two interferometer arms for feedback control. Compared to conventional arm locking, dual arm locking exhibits significantly reduced start-up transients, no noise amplification at frequencies within the LISA signal band, and more than 50 fold improvement in noise suppression at low frequencies. In this article we present a detailed analysis of the dual arm locking control system and present simulation results showing a noise reduction of 10 000 at a frequency of 10 mHz.

  16. Walking at the preferred stride frequency maximizes local dynamic stability of knee motion.

    PubMed

    Russell, Daniel M; Haworth, Joshua L

    2014-01-03

    Healthy humans display a preference for walking at a stride frequency dependent on the inertial properties of their legs. Walking at preferred stride frequency (PSF) is predicted to maximize local dynamic stability, whereby sensitivity to intrinsic perturbations arising from natural variability inherent in biological motion is minimized. Previous studies testing this prediction have employed different variability measures, but none have directly quantified local dynamic stability by computing maximum finite-time Lyapunov exponent (λ(Max)), which quantifies the rate of divergence of nearby trajectories in state space. Here, ten healthy adults walked 45 m overground while sagittal motion of both knees was recorded via electrogoniometers. An auditory metronome prescribed 7 different frequencies relative to each individual's PSF (PSF; ±5, ±10, ±15 strides/min). Stride frequencies were performed under both freely adopted speed (FS) and controlled speed (CS: set at the speed of PSF trials) conditions. Local dynamic stability was maximal (λ(Max) was minimal) at the PSF, becoming less stable for higher and lower stride frequencies. This occurred under both FS and CS conditions, although controlling speed further reduced local dynamic stability at non-preferred stride frequencies. In contrast, measures of variability revealed effects of stride frequency and speed conditions that were distinct from λ(Max). In particular, movement regularity computed by approximate entropy (ApEn) increased for slower walking speeds, appearing to depend on speed rather than stride frequency. The cadence freely adopted by humans has the benefit of maximizing local dynamic stability, which can be interpreted as humans tuning to their resonant frequency of walking. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Optical Frequency Measurements Relying on a Mid-Infrared Frequency Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovera, G. Daniele; Acef, Ouali

    Only a small number of groups are capable of measuring optical frequencies throughout the world. In this contribution we present some of the underlying philosophy of such frequency measurement systems, including some important theoretical hints. In particular, we concentrate on the approach that has been used with the BNM-LPTF frequency chain, where a separate secondary frequency standard in the mid-infrared has been used. The low-frequency section of the chain is characterized by a measurement of the phase noise spectral density Sφ at 716GHz.Most of the significant measurements performed in the last decade are briefly presented, together with a report on the actual stability and reproducibility of the CO2/ OsO4 frequency standard.Measuring the frequency of an optical frequency standard by direct comparison with the signal available at the output of a primary frequency standard (usually between 5MHz and 100MHz) requires a multiplication factor greater than 107. A number of possible configurations, using harmonic generation, sum or difference frequency generation, have been proposed and realized in the past [1,2,3,4,5,6] and in more recent times [7]. A new technique, employing a femtosecond laser, is presently giving its first impressive results [8].All of the classical frequency chains require a large amount of manpower, together with a great deal of simultaneously operating hardware. This has the consequence that only a very few systems are actually in an operating condition throughout the world.

  18. System stability and calibrations for hand-held electromagnetic frequency domain instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saksa, Pauli J.; Sorsa, Joona

    2017-05-01

    There are a few multiple-frequency domain electromagnetic induction (EMI) hand-held rigid boom systems available for shallow geophysical resistivity investigations. They basically measure secondary field real and imaginary components after the system calibrations. One multiple-frequency system, the EMP-400 Profiler from Geophysical Survey Systems Inc., was tested for system calibrations, stability and various effects present in normal measurements like height variation, tilting, signal stacking and time stability. Results indicated that in test conditions, repeatable high-accuracy imaginary component values can be recorded for near-surface frequency soundings. In test conditions, real components are also stable but vary strongly in normal surveying measurements. However, certain calibration issues related to the combination of user influence and measurement system height were recognised as an important factor in reducing for data errors and for further processing like static offset corrections.

  19. Effects of increased anterior-posterior voluntary sway frequency on mechanical and perceived postural stability.

    PubMed

    Martin Lorenzo, Teresa; Vanrenterghem, Jos

    2015-02-01

    Despite a substantial number of studies, the interaction between mechanical indicators of stability and perception of instability remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of sway frequency and verbal restraint on mechanical and perceived postural stability. Fourteen participants underwent a series of standing voluntary anterior-posterior swaying trials at three frequencies (20, 40, and 60bpm) and two levels of restraint (non restraint and verbally restraint to swaying at the ankle). Repeated measures ANOVA tests revealed greater mechanical stability defined though the margin of stability, and greater horizontal ground reaction forces, while the center of pressure excursions remained unchanged with increasing frequency. Furthermore, ground reaction forces were greater in the non-restraint condition. Moreover, a tendency toward greater perceived instability with increasing voluntary sway frequency was observed. Our results indicate that variations in sway frequency and verbal restraint resulted in noticeable alterations in mechanical indicators of stability, with no clear effect on perceived instability. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Ultrafast dynamics and stabilization in chip-scale optical frequency combs (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shu Wei

    2017-02-01

    Optical frequency comb technology has been the cornerstone for scientific breakthroughs such as precision frequency metrology, re-definition of time, extreme light-matter interaction, and attosecond sciences. Recently emerged Kerr-active microresonators are promising alternatives to the current benchmark femtosecond laser platform. These chip-scale frequency combs, or Kerr combs, are unique in their compact footprints and offer the potential for monolithic electronic and feedback integration, thereby expanding the already remarkable applications of optical frequency combs. In this talk, I will first report the generation and characterization of low-phase-noise Kerr frequency combs. Measurements of the Kerr comb ultrafast dynamics and phase noise will be presented and discussed. Then I will describe novel strategies to fully stabilize Kerr comb line frequencies towards chip-scale optical frequency synthesizers with a relative uncertainty better than 2.7×10-16. I will show that the unique generation physics of Kerr frequency comb can provide an intrinsic self-referenced access to the Kerr comb line frequencies. The strategy improves the optical frequency stability by more than two orders of magnitude, while preserving the Kerr comb's key advantage of low SWaP and potential for chip-scale electronic and photonic integration.

  1. GENERAL: A diode laser spectrometer at 634 nm and absolute frequency measurements using optical frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Lin; Yuan, Jie; Qi, Xiang-Hui; Chen, Wen-Lan; Zhou, Da-Wei; Zhou, Tong; Zhou, Xiao-Ji; Chen, Xu-Zong

    2009-04-01

    This paper reports that two identical external-cavity-diode-laser (ECDL) based spectrometers are constructed at 634 nm referencing on the hyperfine B-X transition R(80)8-4 of 127I2. The lasers are stabilized on the Doppler-free absorption signals using the third-harmonic detection technique. The instability of the stabilized laser is measured to be 2.8 × 10-12 (after 1000 s) by counting the beat note between the two lasers. The absolute optical frequency of the transition is, for the first time, determined to be 472851936189.5 kHz by using an optical frequency comb referenced on the microwave caesium atomic clock. The uncertainty of the measurement is less than 4.9 kHz.

  2. Nanofilm thickness measurement by resonant frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Latyshev, A V; Yushkanov, A A

    2015-03-31

    We report a theoretical investigation of monochromatic laser light – thin metal film interaction. The dependences of transmission, reflection and absorption coefficients of an electromagnetic wave on the incidence angle, layer thickness and effective electron collision frequency are obtained. The above coefficients are analysed in the region of resonant frequencies. The resulting formula for the transmission, reflection and absorption coefficients are found to be valid for any angles of incidence. The case of mirror boundary conditions is considered. A formula is derived for contactless measurement of the film thickness by the observed resonant frequencies. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  3. Frequency detection with stability coefficient for steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP)-based BCIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhenghua; Yao, Dezhong

    2008-03-01

    Due to the relative noise and artifact insensitivity, steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) has been used increasingly in the study of a brain-computer interface (BCI). However, SSVEP is still influenced by the same frequency component in the spontaneous EEG, and it is meaningful to find a parameter that can avoid or decrease this influence to improve the transfer rate and the accuracy of the SSVEP-based BCI. In this work, with wavelet analysis, a new parameter named stability coefficient (SC) was defined to measure the stability of a frequency, and then the electrode with the highest stability was selected as the signal electrode for further analysis. After that, the SC method and the traditional power spectrum (PS) method were used comparatively to recognize the stimulus frequency from an analogous BCI data constructed from a real SSVEP data, and the results showed that the SC method is better for a short time window data.

  4. A high-performance frequency stability compact CPT clock based on a Cs-Ne microcell.

    PubMed

    Boudot, Rodolphe; Liu, Xiaochi; Abbé, Philippe; Chutani, Ravinder; Passilly, Nicolas; Galliou, Serge; Gorecki, Christophe; Giordano, Vincent

    2012-11-01

    This paper reports on a compact table-top Cs clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT) with advanced frequency stability performance. The heart of the clock is a single buffer gas Cs-Ne microfabricated cell. Using a distributed feedback (DFB) laser resonant with the Cs D1 line, the contrast of the CPT signal is found to be maximized around 80°C, a value for which the temperature dependence of the Cs clock frequency is canceled. Advanced techniques are implemented to actively stabilize the clock operation on a zero-light-shift point. The clock frequency stability is measured to be 3.8 × 10(-11) at 1 s and well below 10(-11) until 50,000 s. These results demonstrate the possibility to develop high-performance chip-scale atomic clocks using vapor cells containing a single buffer gas.

  5. Atomic fountain clock with very high frequency stability employing a pulse-tube-cryocooled sapphire oscillator.

    PubMed

    Takamizawa, Akifumi; Yanagimachi, Shinya; Tanabe, Takehiko; Hagimoto, Ken; Hirano, Iku; Watabe, Ken-ichi; Ikegami, Takeshi; Hartnett, John G

    2014-09-01

    The frequency stability of an atomic fountain clock was significantly improved by employing an ultra-stable local oscillator and increasing the number of atoms detected after the Ramsey interrogation, resulting in a measured Allan deviation of 8.3 × 10(-14)τ(-1/2)). A cryogenic sapphire oscillator using an ultra-low-vibration pulse-tube cryocooler and cryostat, without the need for refilling with liquid helium, was applied as a local oscillator and a frequency reference. High atom number was achieved by the high power of the cooling laser beams and optical pumping to the Zeeman sublevel m(F) = 0 employed for a frequency measurement, although vapor-loaded optical molasses with the simple (001) configuration was used for the atomic fountain clock. The resulting stability is not limited by the Dick effect as it is when a BVA quartz oscillator is used as the local oscillator. The stability reached the quantum projection noise limit to within 11%. Using a combination of a cryocooled sapphire oscillator and techniques to enhance the atom number, the frequency stability of any atomic fountain clock, already established as primary frequency standard, may be improved without opening its vacuum chamber.

  6. Frequency stabilization via the mixed mode in three mode HeNe lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, J D; Joo, K; Buice, E S; Spronck, J W; Munnig Schmidt, R H

    2010-02-05

    This paper describes a three mode HeNe laser frequency stabilization technique using the mixed mode frequency to obtain a fractional frequency stability of 2 x 10{sup -11}. The mixed mode frequency occurs due to optical nonlinear interactions with the adjacent modes at each of the three modes. In precision displacement interferometry systems, the laser source frequency must be stabilized to provide an accurate conversion ratio between phase change and displacement. In systems, such as lithography applications, which require high speed, high accuracy and low data age uncertainty, it is also desirable to avoid periodic nonlinearities, which reduces computation time and errors. One method to reduce periodic nonlinearity is to spatially separate the measurement and reference beams to prevent optical mixing, which has been shown for several systems. Using spatially separated beams and the proper optical configuration, the interferometer can be fiber fed, which can increase the interferometer's stability by reducing the number of beam steering optical elements. Additionally, as the number of measurement axes increases, a higher optical power from the laser source is necessary.

  7. Nonlinear Trivelpiece-Gould Waves: Frequency, Functional Form, and Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubin, Daniel H. E.

    2015-11-01

    This poster considers the frequency, spatial form, and stability, of nonlinear Trivelpiece- Gould (TG) waves on a cylindrical plasma column of length L and radius rp, treating both traveling and standing waves, and focussing on the regime of experimental interest in which L/rp >> 1. In this regime TG waves are weakly dispersive, allowing strong mode-coupling between Fourier harmonics. The mode coupling implies that linear theory for such waves is a poor approximation even at fairly small amplitudes, and nonlinear theories that include only a small number of harmonics (such as 3-wave parametric resonance theory) fail to fully capture the stability properties of the system. We find that nonlinear standing waves suffer jumps in their functional form as their amplitude is varied continuously. The jumps are caused by nonlinear resonances between the standing wave and nearly linear waves whose frequencies and wave numbers are harmonics of the standing wave. Also, the standing waves are found to be unstable to a multi-wave version of 3-wave parametric resonance, with an amplitude required for instability onset that is much larger than expected from three wave theory. For traveling wave, linearly stability is found for all amplitudes that could be studied, in contradiction to 3-wave theory. Supported by National Science Foundation Grant PHY-1414570, Department of Energy Grants DE-SC0002451and DE-SC0008693.

  8. Measurement of axial forces via natural frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petro, Samer H.; Reynolds, Don; EnChen, Shen; GangaRao, Hota V. S.

    1998-03-01

    This paper presents results from testing several suspender ropes of the Delaware Memorial Bridge using vibration measurements and a non-destructive evaluation (NDE) instrument called the Axial Load Monitor (ALM). The testing consisted of measuring the frequencies of suspender ropes and determining their tension levels. Results were compared to theoretical predictions. This paper presents the results of the testing and discusses the problems associated with vibration measurements on actual bridges.

  9. Fluid phase thermodynamics : I) nucleate pool boiling of oxygen under magnetically enhanced gravity and II) superconducting cavity resonators for high-stability frequency references and precision density measurements of helium-4 gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corcovilos, Theodore Allen

    Although fluids are typically the first systems studied in undergraduate thermodynamics classes, we still have only a rudimentary phenomenological understanding of these systems outside of the classical and equilibrium regimes. Two experiments will be presented. First, we present progress on precise measurements of helium-4 gas at low temperatures (1 K-5 K). We study helium because at low densities it is an approximately ideal gas but at high densities the thermodynamic properties can be predicted by numerical solutions of Schroedinger's equation. By utilizing the high resolution and stability in frequency of a superconducting microwave cavity resonator we can measure the dielectric constant of helium-4 to parts in 109, corresponding to an equivalent resolution in density. These data will be used to calculate the virial coefficients of the helium gas so that we may compare with numerical predictions from the literature. Additionally, our data may allow us to measure Boltzmann's constant to parts in 108, a factor of 100 improvement over previous measurements. This work contains a description of the nearly-completed apparatus and the methods of operation and data analysis for this experiment. Data will be taken by future researchers.The second experiment discussed is a study of nucleate pool boiling. To date, no adequate quantitative model exists of this everyday phenomenon. In our experiment, we vary one parameter inaccessible to most researchers, gravity, by applying a magnetic force to our test fluid, oxygen. Using this technique, we may apply effective gravities of 0-80 times Earth's gravitational acceleration (g). In this work we present heat transfer data for the boiling of oxygen at one atmosphere ambient pressure for effective gravity values between 1g and 16g . Our data describe two relationships between applied heat flux and temperature differential: at low heat flux the system obeys a power law and at high heat flux the behavior is linear. We find that the

  10. Frequency stabilization in nonlinear MEMS and NEMS oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Omar Daniel; Antonio, Dario

    2014-09-16

    An illustrative system includes an amplifier operably connected to a phase shifter. The amplifier is configured to amplify a voltage from an oscillator. The phase shifter is operably connected to a driving amplitude control, wherein the phase shifter is configured to phase shift the amplified voltage and is configured to set an amplitude of the phase shifted voltage. The oscillator is operably connected to the driving amplitude control. The phase shifted voltage drives the oscillator. The oscillator is at an internal resonance condition, based at least on the amplitude of the phase shifted voltage, that stabilizes frequency oscillations in the oscillator.

  11. Characterizing DSN System Frequency Stability with Spacecraft Tracking Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pham, T.; Machuzak, R.; Bedrossian, A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a recent effort in characterizing frequency stability performance of the ground system in the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN). Unlike the traditional approach where performance is obtained from special calibration sessions that are both time consuming and require manual setup, the new method taps into the daily spacecraft tracking data. This method significantly increases the amount of data available for analysis, roughly by two orders of magnitude; making it possible to conduct trend analysis with reasonable confidence. Since the system is monitored daily, any significant variation in performance can be detected timely. This helps the DSN maintain its performance commitment to customers.

  12. Measurement Duration and Frequency Impact Objective Light Exposure Measures.

    PubMed

    Ulaganathan, Sekar; Read, Scott A; Collins, Michael J; Vincent, Stephen J

    2017-05-01

    To determine the measurement duration and frequency required to reliably quantify the typical personal light exposure patterns of children and young adults. Ambient light exposure data were obtained from 31 young adults and 30 children using a wrist-worn light sensor configured to measure ambient light exposure every 30 seconds for 14 days. To examine the influence of measurement duration upon light exposure, the daily time exposed to outdoor light levels (>1000 lux) was initially calculated based upon data from all 14 days and then recalculated from 12, 10, 8, 6, 4, and 2 randomly selected days. To examine the influence of measurement frequency, the outdoor exposure time was calculated for a 30-second sampling rate and again after resampling at 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-, and 10-minute sampling rates. Children spent significantly greater time outdoors (44 minutes higher [95% CI: 26, 62]) compared to adults (P = .001). Children spent more time outdoors during the weekdays (13 minutes higher [-7, 32]) and adults spent more time outdoors during the weekends (24 minutes higher [7, 40]) (P = .005). Calculating light exposure using a lower number of days and coarser sampling frequencies did not significantly alter the group mean light exposure (P > .05). However, a significant increase in measurement variability occurred for outdoor light exposure derived from less than 8 days and 3 minutes or coarser measurement frequencies in adults, and from less than 8 days and 4 minutes or coarser frequencies in children (all P < .05). Reducing measurement duration seemed to have a greater impact upon measurement variability than reducing the measurement frequency. These findings suggest that a measurement duration of at least 1 week and a measurement frequency of 2 minutes or finer provides the most reliable estimates of personal outdoor light exposure measures in children and young adults.

  13. Improvement in the control aspect of laser frequency stabilization for SUNLITE project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zia, Omar

    1992-01-01

    Flight Electronics Division of Langley Research Center is developing a spaceflight experiment called the Stanford University and NASA Laser In-Space Technology (SUNLITE). The objective of the project is to explore the fundamental limits on frequency stability using an FM laser locking technique on a Nd:YAG non-planar ring (free-running linewidth of 5 KHz) oscillator in the vibration free, microgravity environment of space. Compact and automated actively stabilized terahertz laser oscillators will operate in space with an expected linewidth of less than 3 Hz. To implement and verify this experiment, NASA engineers have designed and built a state of the art, space qualified high speed data acquisition system for measuring the linewidth and stability limits of a laser oscillator. In order to achieve greater stability and better performance, an active frequency control scheme requiring the use of a feedback control loop has been applied. In the summer of 1991, the application of control theory in active frequency control as a frequency stabilization technique was investigated. The results and findings were presented in 1992 at the American Control Conference in Chicago, and have been published in Conference Proceedings. The main focus was to seek further improvement in the overall performance of the system by replacing the analogue controller by a digital algorithm.

  14. Dynamics of microresonator frequency comb generation: models and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansson, Tobias; Wabnitz, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    Microresonator frequency combs hold promise for enabling a new class of light sources that are simultaneously both broadband and coherent, and that could allow for a profusion of potential applications. In this article, we review various theoretical models for describing the temporal dynamics and formation of optical frequency combs. These models form the basis for performing numerical simulations that can be used in order to better understand the comb generation process, for example helping to identify the universal combcharacteristics and their different associated physical phenomena. Moreover, models allow for the study, design and optimization of comb properties prior to the fabrication of actual devices. We consider and derive theoretical formalisms based on the Ikeda map, the modal expansion approach, and the Lugiato-Lefever equation. We further discuss the generation of frequency combs in silicon resonators featuring multiphoton absorption and free-carrier effects. Additionally, we review comb stability properties and consider the role of modulational instability as well as of parametric instabilities due to the boundary conditions of the cavity. These instability mechanisms are the basis for comprehending the process of frequency comb formation, for identifying the different dynamical regimes and the associated dependence on the comb parameters. Finally, we also discuss the phenomena of continuous wave bi- and multistability and its relation to the observation of mode-locked cavity solitons.

  15. Remote Frequency Measurement of TV 5 Rubidium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    measurements were then converted into a frequency drift rate by a program called “TV5 Test” written in Visual Basic . A rubidium clock at the WTTG...Counter and a Windows omputer running the “TV 5 Test” program. The new Visual Basic program used commands sent hrough the GPIB card to the Stanford

  16. Self-Stabilizing Measurement of Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinjanampathy, Sai

    2014-05-01

    Measuring phase accurately constitutes one of the most important task in precision measurement science. Such measurements can be deployed to measure everything from fundamental constants to measuring detuning and tunneling rates of atoms more precisely. Quantum mechanics enhances the ultimate bounds on the precision of such measurements possible, and exploit coherence and entanglement to reduce the phase uncertainty. In this work, we will describe a method to stabilize a decohering two-level atom and use the stabilizing measurements to learn the unknown phase acquired by the atom. Such measurements will employ a Bayesian learner to do active feedback control on the atom. We will discuss some ultimate bounds employed in precision metrology and an experimental proposal for the implementation of this scheme. Financial support from Ministry of Education, Singapore.

  17. Stabilization and line narrowing of a frequency comb locked to an acetylene stabilized fibre laser (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talvard, Thomas; Mortensen, Nicolai F.; Gøth, Bjarke; Westergaard, Philip G.; DePalatis, Michael V.; Drewsen, Michael; Hald, Jan

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate a significant improvement when referencing a frequency comb to an acetylene stabilized fiber laser as compared to a GPS-disciplined Rb clock reference. The Stabilaser 1542 is a compact, maintenance-free stand-alone acetylene stabilized fiber laser with a narrow linewidth and an Allan deviation of 3E-13 and 4E-14 in 1 s and 10000 s, respectively. Switching the comb reference from the Rb clock to the Stabilaser 1542 improves both comb linewidth and Allan deviation by about two orders of magnitude. Furthermore, long-term measurements of the Stabilaser 1542 frequency with reference to the GPS-disciplined clock indicate a potential accuracy of 1E-12.

  18. Nonlinear Trivelpiece-Gould waves: Frequency, functional form, and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubin, D. H. E.; Ashourvan, A.

    2015-10-01

    This paper considers the frequency, spatial form, and stability of nonlinear Trivelpiece-Gould (TG) waves on a cylindrical plasma column of length L and radius rp, treating both traveling waves and standing waves, and focussing on the regime of experimental interest in which L /rp≫1 . In this regime, TG waves are weakly dispersive, allowing strong mode-coupling between Fourier harmonics. The mode coupling implies that linear theory for such waves is a poor approximation even at fairly small amplitude, and nonlinear theories that include a small number of harmonics, such as three-wave parametric resonance theory, also fail to fully capture the stability properties of the system. It is found that nonlinear standing waves suffer jumps in their functional form as their amplitude is varied continuously. The jumps are caused by nonlinear resonances between the standing wave and nearly linear waves whose frequencies and wave numbers are harmonics of the standing wave. Also, the standing waves are found to be unstable to a multi-wave version of three-wave parametric resonance, with an amplitude required for instability onset that is much larger than expected from three wave theory. It is found that traveling waves are linearly stable for all amplitudes that could be studied, in contradiction to three-wave theory.

  19. Stability and noise spectra of relative Loran-C frequency comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proverbio, E.; Quesada, V.; Simoncini, A.

    1973-01-01

    Relative comparisons of Loran-C frequency transmissions between the master station of Catanzaro (Simeri Crichi) and the X, Z slave stations of Estartit (Spain) and Lampedusa (Italy) are carrying out by the GG LORSTA monitor station of the Mediterranean Sea Loran-C chain. These comparisons are able to emphasize the relative and, under certain conditions, the absolute rate of the emitting standard frequencies of the slave stations and some relevant statistical properties of the Loran-C Method for frequency transmission and time synchronization. The stability of each Loran-C frequency standard transmission is subject to perturbations, more or less known, due to the propagation medium and other causes. Following the Allan (1966) method for data processing, the performance of the relative rate of frequency of the transmissions of the X, Z slave stations are described calculating the standard deviation of a set of N frequency measurements from its mean averaged during sampling times. This standard deviation is designated as the measure of the stability of the Loran-C frequency transmission.

  20. Fast phase stabilization of a low frequency beat note for atom interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, E.; Horne, R. A.; Sackett, C. A.

    2016-06-15

    Atom interferometry experiments rely on the ability to obtain a stable signal that corresponds to an atomic phase. For interferometers that use laser beams to manipulate the atoms, noise in the lasers can lead to errors in the atomic measurement. In particular, it is often necessary to actively stabilize the optical phase between two frequency components of the beams. Typically this is achieved using a time-domain measurement of a beat note between the two frequencies. This becomes challenging when the frequency difference is small and the phase measurement must be made quickly. The method presented here instead uses a spatial interference detection to rapidly measure the optical phase for arbitrary frequency differences. A feedback system operating at a bandwidth of about 10 MHz could then correct the phase in about 3 μs. This time is short enough that the phase correction could be applied at the start of a laser pulse without appreciably degrading the fidelity of the atom interferometer operation. The phase stabilization system was demonstrated in a simple atom interferometer measurement of the {sup 87}Rb recoil frequency.

  1. Fast phase stabilization of a low frequency beat note for atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, E.; Horne, R. A.; Sackett, C. A.

    2016-06-01

    Atom interferometry experiments rely on the ability to obtain a stable signal that corresponds to an atomic phase. For interferometers that use laser beams to manipulate the atoms, noise in the lasers can lead to errors in the atomic measurement. In particular, it is often necessary to actively stabilize the optical phase between two frequency components of the beams. Typically this is achieved using a time-domain measurement of a beat note between the two frequencies. This becomes challenging when the frequency difference is small and the phase measurement must be made quickly. The method presented here instead uses a spatial interference detection to rapidly measure the optical phase for arbitrary frequency differences. A feedback system operating at a bandwidth of about 10 MHz could then correct the phase in about 3 μs. This time is short enough that the phase correction could be applied at the start of a laser pulse without appreciably degrading the fidelity of the atom interferometer operation. The phase stabilization system was demonstrated in a simple atom interferometer measurement of the 87Rb recoil frequency.

  2. Experimental setup to demonstrate low-frequency high-precision frequency stabilization of 1550 nm ECL Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoen, Steven; Téllez, Gregorio; Quetschke, Volker

    2012-02-01

    Advances in fiber and waveguide technologies have brought about a new type of laser: the Planar Waveguide External Cavity Laser (PW-ECL) that shows a great potential for precision interferometric measurements. We show an experimental setup based on a 1550nm PW-ECL which was designed to achieve a frequency stabilization of 30 Hz/sqrt(Hz) or less at 10 mHz. The presented design makes use of thermal shielding to suppress temperature fluctuations at low frequencies as well as a vacuum system, high finesse cavity and low-noise electronics to reduce the frequency noise. A description of the components used in the design is given and initial results are presented.

  3. Spiral resonators for on-chip laser frequency stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hansuek; Suh, Myoung-Gyun; Chen, Tong; Li, Jiang; Diddams, Scott A.; Vahala, Kerry J.

    2013-01-01

    Frequency references are indispensable to radio, microwave and time keeping systems, with far reaching applications in navigation, communication, remote sensing and basic science. Over the past decade, there has been an optical revolution in time keeping and microwave generation that promises to ultimately impact all of these areas. Indeed, the most precise clocks and lowest noise microwave signals are now based on a laser with short-term stability derived from a reference cavity. In spite of the tremendous progress, these systems remain essentially laboratory devices and there is interest in their miniaturization, even towards on-chip systems. Here we describe a chip-based optical reference cavity that uses spatial averaging of thermorefractive noise to enhance resonator stability. Stabilized fibre lasers exhibit relative Allan deviation of 3.9 × 10−13 at 400 μs averaging time and an effective linewidth <100 Hz by achieving over 26 dB of phase-noise reduction. PMID:24043134

  4. Frequency stabilization of an external cavity diode laser: countermeasures against atmospheric temperature variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minabe, Yuta; Doi, Kohei; Sato, Takashi; Maruyama, Takeo; Ohkawa, Masashi; Tsubokawa, Tsuneya

    2008-02-01

    External cavity diode lasers (ECDL) are presently experiencing a surge in popularity, as laser light-sources for advanced optical measurement systems. While these devices normally require external optical-output controls, we simplified the setup, a bit, by adding a second external cavity. This technique boasts the added advantage of having a narrower oscillation-linewidth than would be achievable, using a single optical feedback. Because drive-current and atmospheric temperature directly impact the ECDL systems' oscillation frequency, during frequency stability checks, it was necessary, in this instance, to construct a slightly smaller ECDL system, which we mounted on a Super-Invar board, to minimize the influence of thermal expansion. Taking these and other aggressive and timely measures to prevent atmospheric temperature-related changes allowed us to achieve an improvement in oscillation-frequency stability, i.e., to obtain the square root of Allan variance σ =2×10 -10, at averaging time τ =10 -1. We introduced a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) to the setup, for the simple reason that its frequency is far less susceptible to changes in temperature, than other lasers of its type. And, because VCSELs are widely available, and the ECDL systems that use them improve frequency stability, we replaced the Fabry-Perot semiconductor laser with a VCSEL.

  5. Development of a transfer function method for dynamic stability measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1977-01-01

    Flutter testing method based on transfer function measurements is developed. The error statistics of several dynamic stability measurement methods are reviewed. It is shown that the transfer function measurement controls the error level by averaging the data and correlating the input and output. The method also gives a direct estimate of the error in the response measurement. An algorithm is developed for obtaining the natural frequency and damping ratio of low damped modes of the system, using integrals of the transfer function in the vicinity of a resonant peak. Guidelines are given for selecting the parameters in the transfer function measurement. Finally, the dynamic stability measurement technique is applied to data from a wind tunnel test of a proprotor and wing model.

  6. Stability of similarity measurements for bipartite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian-Guo; Hou, Lei; Pan, Xue; Guo, Qiang; Zhou, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Similarity is a fundamental measure in network analyses and machine learning algorithms, with wide applications ranging from personalized recommendation to socio-economic dynamics. We argue that an effective similarity measurement should guarantee the stability even under some information loss. With six bipartite networks, we investigate the stabilities of fifteen similarity measurements by comparing the similarity matrixes of two data samples which are randomly divided from original data sets. Results show that, the fifteen measurements can be well classified into three clusters according to their stabilities, and measurements in the same cluster have similar mathematical definitions. In addition, we develop a top-n-stability method for personalized recommendation, and find that the unstable similarities would recommend false information to users, and the performance of recommendation would be largely improved by using stable similarity measurements. This work provides a novel dimension to analyze and evaluate similarity measurements, which can further find applications in link prediction, personalized recommendation, clustering algorithms, community detection and so on.

  7. Stability of similarity measurements for bipartite networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Guo; Hou, Lei; Pan, Xue; Guo, Qiang; Zhou, Tao

    2016-01-04

    Similarity is a fundamental measure in network analyses and machine learning algorithms, with wide applications ranging from personalized recommendation to socio-economic dynamics. We argue that an effective similarity measurement should guarantee the stability even under some information loss. With six bipartite networks, we investigate the stabilities of fifteen similarity measurements by comparing the similarity matrixes of two data samples which are randomly divided from original data sets. Results show that, the fifteen measurements can be well classified into three clusters according to their stabilities, and measurements in the same cluster have similar mathematical definitions. In addition, we develop a top-n-stability method for personalized recommendation, and find that the unstable similarities would recommend false information to users, and the performance of recommendation would be largely improved by using stable similarity measurements. This work provides a novel dimension to analyze and evaluate similarity measurements, which can further find applications in link prediction, personalized recommendation, clustering algorithms, community detection and so on.

  8. Stability of similarity measurements for bipartite networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian-Guo; Hou, Lei; Pan, Xue; Guo, Qiang; Zhou, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Similarity is a fundamental measure in network analyses and machine learning algorithms, with wide applications ranging from personalized recommendation to socio-economic dynamics. We argue that an effective similarity measurement should guarantee the stability even under some information loss. With six bipartite networks, we investigate the stabilities of fifteen similarity measurements by comparing the similarity matrixes of two data samples which are randomly divided from original data sets. Results show that, the fifteen measurements can be well classified into three clusters according to their stabilities, and measurements in the same cluster have similar mathematical definitions. In addition, we develop a top-n-stability method for personalized recommendation, and find that the unstable similarities would recommend false information to users, and the performance of recommendation would be largely improved by using stable similarity measurements. This work provides a novel dimension to analyze and evaluate similarity measurements, which can further find applications in link prediction, personalized recommendation, clustering algorithms, community detection and so on. PMID:26725688

  9. Single frequency and wavelength stabilized near infrared laser source for water vapor DIAL remote sensing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Ti; Walters, Brooke; Shuman, Tim; Losee, Andrew; Schum, Tom; Puffenberger, Kent; Burnham, Ralph

    2015-02-01

    Fibertek has demonstrated a single frequency, wavelength stabilized near infrared laser transmitter for NASA airborne water vapor DIAL application. The application required a single-frequency laser transmitter operating at 935 nm near infrared (NIR) region of the water vapor absorption spectrum, capable of being wavelength seeded and locked to a reference laser source and being tuned at least 100 pm across the water absorption spectrum for DIAL on/off measurements. Fibertek is building a laser transmitter system based on the demonstrated results. The laser system will be deployed in a high altitude aircraft (ER-2 or UAV) to autonomously perform remote, long duration and high altitude water vapor measurements.

  10. Frequency stability of a dual wavelength quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Sergachev, Ilia; Maulini, Richard; Gresch, Tobias; Blaser, Stéphane; Bismuto, Alfredo; Müller, Antoine; Bidaux, Yves; Südmeyer, Thomas; Schilt, Stéphane

    2017-05-15

    We characterized the dual wavelength operation of a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) quantum cascade laser (QCL) operating at 4.5 μm using two independent optical frequency discriminators. The QCL emits up to 150 mW fairly evenly distributed between two adjacent Fabry-Perot modes separated by ≈11.6 GHz. We show a strong correlation between the instantaneous optical frequencies of the two lasing modes, characterized by a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.96. As a result, we stabilized one laser mode of the QCL to a N2O transition using a side-of-fringe locking technique, reducing its linewidth by a factor 6.2, from 406 kHz in free-running operation down to 65 kHz (at 1-ms observation time), and observed a simultaneous reduction of the frequency fluctuations of the second mode by a similar amount, resulting in a linewidth narrowing by a factor 5.4, from 380 kHz to 70 kHz. This proof-of-principle demonstration was performed with a standard DBR QCL that was not deliberately designed for dual-mode operation. These promising results open the door to the fabrication of more flexible dual-mode QCLs with the use of specifically designed gratings in the future.

  11. 47 CFR 18.309 - Frequency range of measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency range of measurements. 18.309 Section... MEDICAL EQUIPMENT Technical Standards § 18.309 Frequency range of measurements. (a) For field strength measurements: Frequency band in which device operates (MHz) Range of frequency measurements Lowest frequency...

  12. Frequency stabilization of an external-cavity diode laser to metastable argon atoms in a discharge.

    PubMed

    Douglas, P; Maher-McWilliams, C; Barker, P F

    2012-06-01

    A laser stabilization scheme using magnetic dichroism in a RF plasma discharge is presented. This method has been used to provide a frequency stable external-cavity diode laser that is locked to the 4s[3/2](2) → 4p[5/2](3) argon laser cooling transition at 811.53 nm. Using saturated absorption spectroscopy, we lock the laser to a Doppler free peak which gave a locking range of 20 MHz when the slope of the error signal was maximized. The stability of the laser was characterized by determining the square root Allan variance of laser frequency fluctuations when the laser was locked. A stability of 129 kHz was measured at 1 s averaging time for data acquired over 6000 s.

  13. [Measuring the electricity frequency properties of blood].

    PubMed

    Huang, Hua; Hu, Maoqing; Chen, Huaiqing; Yuan, Zirun; Tong, Shan; Luo, An

    2005-04-01

    In order to understand the electricity frequency specialties of blood, we have developed a wide frequency electricity characteristic testing system and used it to test the amplitude frequency property and phase frequency property of the blood in different states and constituents at 1 Hz to 20 MHz. Further analysis on the results of tests helped us know some important properties of blood at even more microcosmic levels from a new angle. Meanwhile, some problems and considerations on the improvement of the electricity model of biotic tissue and blood were pointed out. (1) From 1 Hz to 5 KHz, the impedance of blood descended 99%. (2) Simple equivalent circuit of resistance and capacitance must be used in series equivalent but not in usual parallel connection equivalent. (3) Experiment indicated, equivalent circuits of blood need more analysis, because simple equivalent circuit of resistance and capacitance is liable to gross error. (4) When the three element model is used for measuring the resistance of inside liquid, capacitance of cell membrane and the resistance of outside liquid of blood, the three testing frequencies must be very similar.

  14. Compensated Multi-Pole Mercury Trapped Ion Frequency Standard and Stability Evaluation of Systematic Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burt, E. A.; Taghavi-Larigani, S.; Prestage, J. D.; Tjoelker, R. L.

    2009-04-01

    We have developed a compensated multi-pole Linear Ion Trap Standard (LITS) that eliminates nearly all frequency sensitivity to residual ion number variations. When operated with 199Hg+, this trapped ion clock has recently demonstrated extremely good stability over a 9-month period. The short-term stability has been measured at 5 × 10-14/τ1/2 and an upper limit on long-term fractional frequency deviations of < 2.7 × 10-17/day was measured in comparison to the laser-cooled primary standards and to the post-processed ultra-stable version of TAI known as TTBIPM using GPS carrier phase time transfer. We have also made a first measurement of the Hg+/Hg collision shift and place a limit of +3.8(7.2) × 10-8/Pa on the shift constant.

  15. Precision measurements and applications of femtosecond frequency combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, R. Jason

    2002-05-01

    The merging of femtosecond (fs) laser physics with the field of optical f requency metrology over recent years has had a profound impact on both di sciplines. Precision control of the broad frequency bandwidth from fs la sers has enabled new areas of exploration in ultrafast physics and revolu tionized optical frequency measurement and precision spectroscopy. Most recently, the transition frequency of the length standard at 514.7 nm,^ 127I2 P(13) 43-0 a3 has been measured in our lab with an improvement of more than 100 times in precision. Interesting molecular dynamics and s tructure are being explored using absolute frequency map of molecular tra nsitions over a large wavelength range. The iodine transition at 532 nm h as been used to establish an optical atomic clock with a fs comb providin g both an RF standard with stability comparable to the best atomic clocks and millions of optical frequencies across the visible and near IR spect rum, each stable to the Hz level. Work is presently underway to directly compare the iodine optical clocks at JILA with the Hg and Ca optical cloc ks currently being refined at NIST via a direct optical fiber link. A wi dely tunable single frequency laser in combination with a fs comb has bee n employed to realize an optical frequency synthesizer. Frequency combs of two independent ultrafast lasers have been coherently locked, enablin g several different avenues of application such as synthesis of arbitrary waveforms, coherent control of quantum systems, and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy. This talk will review these recent accompl ishments from our lab and discuss plans for further improving the control and precision of fs laser based measurements. te

  16. Non-contact precision profile measurement to rough-surface objects with optical frequency combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onoe, Taro; Takahashi, Satoru; Takamasu, Kiyoshi; Matsumoto, Hirokazu

    2016-12-01

    In this research, we developed a new method for the high precision and contactless profile measurement of rough-surfaced objects using optical frequency combs. The uncertainty of the frequency beats of an optical frequency comb is very small (relative uncertainty is 10-10 in our laboratory). In addition, the wavelengths corresponding to these frequency beats are long enough to measure rough-surfaced objects. We can conduct high-precision measurement because several GHz frequency beats can be used if the capability of the detector permits. Moreover, two optical frequency combs with Rb-stabilized repetition frequencies are used for the measurement instead of an RF frequency oscillator; thus, we can avoid the cyclic error caused by the RF frequency oscillator. We measured the profile of a wood cylinder with a rough surface (diameter is approximately 113.2 mm) and compared the result with that of coordinate measuring machine (CMM).

  17. Engineering stabilizer measurements in circuit QED: I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Kevin; Blumoff, Jacob; Reagor, M.; Axline, C.; Brierley, R.; Nigg, S.; Reinhold, P.; Heeres, R.; Wang, C.; Sliwa, K.; Narla, A.; Hatridge, M.; Jiang, L.; Devoret, M. H.; Girvin, S. M.; Schoekopf, R. J.

    Quantum error correction based on stabilizer codes has emerged as an attractive approach towards building a practical quantum information processor. One requirement for such a device is the ability to perform hardware efficient measurements on registers of qubits. We demonstrate a new protocol to realize such multi-qubit measurements. A key feature of our approach is that it enables arbitrary stabilizer measurements to be selected in software, and requires a relatively small number of buses, ancillae, and control lines. This allows for a minimally complex sample realizing a simple dispersive hamiltonian while maintaining a high degree of decoupling between our fixed-tuned qubits. We experimentally implement these measurements in 3D circuit QED using transmon qubits coupled to a common bus resonator. In this first of two talks, we introduce our 3D cQED system and describe the protocol for measuring n-qubit parities of a three qubit register. We acknowledge funding from ARO.

  18. Microcalorimetric Measurements of Hydrogen Peroxide Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Dennis D.; Hornung, Steven D.; Baker, Dave L.

    1999-01-01

    Recent interest in propellants with nontoxic reaction products has led to a resurgence of interest in hydrogen peroxide for various propellant applications. Because hydrogen peroxide is sensitive to contaminants and materials interactions, stability and shelf life are issues. A relatively new, ultrasensitive heat measurement technique, isothermal microcalorimetry, is being used at the White Sands Test Facility to monitor the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide at near ambient temperatures. Isothermal microcalorimetry measures the beat flow from a reaction vessel into a surrounding heat sink. In these applications, microcalorimetry is approximately 1,000 times more sensitive than accelerating rate calorimetry or differential scanning calorimetry for measuring thermal events. Experimental procedures have been developed for the microcalorimetric measurement of the ultra-small beat effects caused by incompatible interactions of hydrogen peroxide. The decomposition rates of hydrogen peroxide at the picomole/sec/gram level have been measured showing the effects of stabilizers and peroxide concentration. Typical measurements are carried out at 40 C over a 24-hour period, This paper describes a method for the conversion of the heat flow measurements to chemical reaction rates based on thermochemical considerations. The reaction rates are used in a study of the effects of stabilizer levels on the decomposition of propellant grade hydrogen peroxide.

  19. Microcalorimetric Measurements of Hydrogen Peroxide Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Dennis D.; Hornung, Steven D.; Baker, Dave L.

    1999-01-01

    Recent interest in propellants with nontoxic reaction products has led to a resurgence of interest in hydrogen peroxide for various propellant applications. Because hydrogen peroxide is sensitive to contaminants and materials interactions, stability and shelf life are issues. A relatively new, ultrasensitive heat measurement technique, isothermal microcalorimetry, is being used at the White Sands Test Facility to monitor the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide at near ambient temperatures. Isothermal microcalorimetry measures the beat flow from a reaction vessel into a surrounding heat sink. In these applications, microcalorimetry is approximately 1,000 times more sensitive than accelerating rate calorimetry or differential scanning calorimetry for measuring thermal events. Experimental procedures have been developed for the microcalorimetric measurement of the ultra-small beat effects caused by incompatible interactions of hydrogen peroxide. The decomposition rates of hydrogen peroxide at the picomole/sec/gram level have been measured showing the effects of stabilizers and peroxide concentration. Typical measurements are carried out at 40 C over a 24-hour period, This paper describes a method for the conversion of the heat flow measurements to chemical reaction rates based on thermochemical considerations. The reaction rates are used in a study of the effects of stabilizer levels on the decomposition of propellant grade hydrogen peroxide.

  20. 47 CFR 73.1540 - Carrier frequency measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Carrier frequency measurements. 73.1540 Section... measurements. (a) The carrier frequency of each AM and FM station and the visual carrier frequency and the... departure limits. (c) The primary standard of frequency for radio frequency measurements is the...

  1. 47 CFR 73.1540 - Carrier frequency measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Carrier frequency measurements. 73.1540 Section... measurements. (a) The carrier frequency of each AM and FM station and the visual carrier frequency and the... departure limits. (c) The primary standard of frequency for radio frequency measurements is the standard...

  2. Engineering stabilizer measurements in circuit QED: II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumoff, Jacob; Chou, Kevin; Reagor, M.; Axline, C.; Brierly, R.; Nigg, S.; Reinhold, P.; Heeres, R.; Wang, C.; Sliwa, K.; Narla, A.; Hatridge, M.; Jiang, L.; Devoret, M. H.; Girvin, S. M.; Schoelkopf, R. J.

    Quantum error correction based on stabilizer codes has emerged as an attractive approach towards building a practical quantum information processor. One requirement for such a device is the ability to perform hardware efficient measurements on registers of qubits. We demonstrate a new protocol to realize such multi-qubit measurements. A key feature of our approach is that it enables arbitrary stabilizer measurements to be selected in software, and requires a relatively small number of buses, ancillae, and control lines. This allows for a minimally complex sample realizing a simple dispersive hamiltonian while maintaining a high degree of decoupling between our fixed-tuned qubits. We experimentally implement these measurements in 3D circuit QED using transmon qubits coupled to a common bus resonator. In the second of two talks, we present a full characterization of the algorithm describing the outcome dependent projections via quantum process tomography. We acknowledge funding from ARO.

  3. Estimating Gait Stability: Asymmetrical Loading Effects Measured Using Margin of Stability and Local Dynamic Stability.

    PubMed

    Worden, Timothy A; Beaudette, Shawn M; Brown, Stephen H M; Vallis, Lori Ann

    2016-01-01

    Changes to intersegmental locomotor control patterns may affect body stability. Our study aimed to (a) characterize upper body dynamic stability in response to the unilateral addition of mass to the lower extremity and (b) evaluate the efficacy of 2 different stability measures commonly used in the literature to detect resulting symmetrical step pattern modifications across the weighted segments (spatial) and between epochs of the gait cycle (temporal). Young adults walked on a treadmill while unloaded or with weights applied unilaterally to their foot, shank, or thigh. Both margin of stability and local dynamic stability (LDS) estimates detected similar trends of distal segment weighting resulting in more unstable upper body movement compared to proximal weighting; however only LDS detected anteroposterior changes in upper body stability over time.

  4. Local vs. global redundancy - trade-offs between resilience against cascading failures and frequency stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plietzsch, A.; Schultz, P.; Heitzig, J.; Kurths, J.

    2016-05-01

    When designing or extending electricity grids, both frequency stability and resilience against cascading failures have to be considered amongst other aspects of energy security and economics such as construction costs due to total line length. Here, we compare an improved simulation model for cascading failures with state-of-the-art simulation models for short-term grid dynamics. Random ensembles of realistic power grid topologies are generated using a recent model that allows for a tuning of global vs local redundancy. The former can be measured by the algebraic connectivity of the network, whereas the latter can be measured by the networks transitivity. We show that, while frequency stability of an electricity grid benefits from a global form of redundancy, resilience against cascading failures rather requires a more local form of redundancy and further analyse the corresponding trade-off.

  5. Extreme Low Frequency Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention is an extremely low frequency (ELF) microphone and acoustic measurement system capable of infrasound detection in a portable and easily deployable form factor. In one embodiment of the invention, an extremely low frequency electret microphone comprises a membrane, a backplate, and a backchamber. The backchamber is sealed to allow substantially no air exchange between the backchamber and outside the microphone. Compliance of the membrane may be less than ambient air compliance. The backplate may define a plurality of holes and a slot may be defined between an outer diameter of the backplate and an inner wall of the microphone. The locations and sizes of the holes, the size of the slot, and the volume of the backchamber may be selected such that membrane motion is substantially critically damped.

  6. Extreme low frequency acoustic measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention is an extremely low frequency (ELF) microphone and acoustic measurement system capable of infrasound detection in a portable and easily deployable form factor. In one embodiment of the invention, an extremely low frequency electret microphone comprises a membrane, a backplate, and a backchamber. The backchamber is sealed to allow substantially no air exchange between the backchamber and outside the microphone. Compliance of the membrane may be less than ambient air compliance. The backplate may define a plurality of holes and a slot may be defined between an outer diameter of the backplate and an inner wall of the microphone. The locations and sizes of the holes, the size of the slot, and the volume of the backchamber may be selected such that membrane motion is substantially critically damped.

  7. Femtosecond frequency comb measurement of absolute frequencies and hyperfine coupling constants in cesium vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Stalnaker, Jason E.; Mbele, Vela; Gerginov, Vladislav; Fortier, Tara M.; Diddams, Scott A.; Hollberg, Leo; Tanner, Carol E.

    2010-04-15

    We report measurements of absolute transition frequencies and hyperfine coupling constants for the 8S{sub 1/2}, 9S{sub 1/2}, 7D{sub 3/2}, and 7D{sub 5/2} states in {sup 133}Cs vapor. The stepwise excitation through either the 6P{sub 1/2} or 6P{sub 3/2} intermediate state is performed directly with broadband laser light from a stabilized femtosecond laser optical-frequency comb. The laser beam is split, counterpropagated, and focused into a room-temperature Cs vapor cell. The repetition rate of the frequency comb is scanned and we detect the fluorescence on the 7P{sub 1/2,3/2{yields}}6S{sub 1/2} branches of the decay of the excited states. The excitations to the different states are isolated by the introduction of narrow-bandwidth interference filters in the laser beam paths. Using a nonlinear least-squares method we find measurements of transition frequencies and hyperfine coupling constants that are in agreement with other recent measurements for the 8S state and provide improvement by 2 orders of magnitude over previously published results for the 9S and 7D states.

  8. Note: Stability control of intermediate frequencies of a three laser far-infrared polarimeter-interferometer system.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiang-Tao; Li, He-Ping; Nie, Qiu-Yue; Zou, Zhi-Yong; Liu, Hai-Qing; Bao, Cheng-Yu; Jie, Yin-Xian; Li, Zhan-Xian

    2016-12-01

    Stability of the intermediate frequency (IF) in the far-infrared polarimeter-interferometer diagnostic system is critically important for the long pulse discharge experiments on the EAST tokamak. In this note, a real-time remote/local IF stability control system is described. The measured plasma parameters, including the Faraday rotation angle, electron density, lower hybrid wave, and plasma current, are obtained with the aid of this newly developed IF stability control system.

  9. Note: Stability control of intermediate frequencies of a three laser far-infrared polarimeter-interferometer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jiang-Tao; Li, He-Ping; Nie, Qiu-Yue; Zou, Zhi-Yong; Liu, Hai-Qing; Bao, Cheng-Yu; Jie, Yin-Xian; Li, Zhan-Xian

    2016-12-01

    Stability of the intermediate frequency (IF) in the far-infrared polarimeter-interferometer diagnostic system is critically important for the long pulse discharge experiments on the EAST tokamak. In this note, a real-time remote/local IF stability control system is described. The measured plasma parameters, including the Faraday rotation angle, electron density, lower hybrid wave, and plasma current, are obtained with the aid of this newly developed IF stability control system.

  10. Frequency stabilization for space-based missions using optical fiber interferometry.

    PubMed

    McRae, Terry G; Ngo, Silvie; Shaddock, Daniel A; Hsu, Magnus T L; Gray, Malcolm B

    2013-02-01

    We present measurement results for a laser frequency reference, implemented with an all-optical fiber Michelson interferometer, down to frequencies as low as 1 mHz. Optical fiber is attractive for space-based operations as it is physically robust, small and lightweight. The small free spectral range of fiber interferometers also provides the possibility to prestabilize two lasers on two distant spacecraft and ensures that the beatnote remains within the detector bandwidth. We demonstrate that these fiber interferometers are viable candidates for future laser-based gravity recovery and climate experiment missions requiring a stability of 30 Hz/√Hz over a 10 mHz-1 Hz bandwidth.

  11. Operational stability of rubidium and cesium frequency standards. [analysis of equipment performance at NASA tracking stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavery, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    In the course of testing various rubidium and cesium frequency standards under operational conditions for use in NASA tracking stations, about 55 unit-years of relative frequency measurements for averaging times from 10 to 10 to the 7th power have been accumulated at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). Statistics on the behavior of rubidium and cesium standards under controlled laboratory conditions have been published, but it was not known to what extent the lesser controlled environments of NASA tracking stations affected the performance of the standards. The purpose of this report is to present estimates of the frequency stability of rubidium and cesium frequency standards under operational conditions based on the data accumulated at GSFC.

  12. Photonic instantaneous frequency measurement of wideband microwave signals.

    PubMed

    Li, Yueqin; Pei, Li; Li, Jing; Wang, Yiqun; Yuan, Jin; Ning, Tigang

    2017-01-01

    We propose a photonic system for instantaneous frequency measurement (IFM) of wideband microwave signals with a tunable measurement range and resolution based on a polarization-maintaining fiber Bragg grating (PM-FBG). Firstly, in order to be insensitive to laser power fluctuation, we aim at generating two different frequency to amplitude characteristics so that we can normalize them to obtain an amplitude comparison function (ACF). Then we encode these two different wavelengths in two perpendicular polarizations by using the PM-FBG which shows different transmission profiles at two polarizations. The ACF is capable of being adjusted by tuning polarization angle, therefore the measurement range and resolution are tunable. By theoretical analyses and simulated verification, a frequency measurement range of 0~17.2 GHz with average resolution of ±0.12 GHz can be achieved, which signifies a wide measurement range with relatively high resolution. Our system does not require large optical bandwidth for the components because the wavelength spacing can be small, making the system affordable, stable, and reliable with more consistent characteristics due to the narrowband nature of the optical parts. PM-FBG with high integration can be potentially used for more polarization manipulating systems and the use of a single-polarization dual-wavelength laser can simplify the architecture and enhance the stability.

  13. Dissemination stability and phase noise characteristics in a cascaded, fiber-based long-haul radio frequency dissemination network.

    PubMed

    Gao, C; Wang, B; Zhu, X; Yuan, Y B; Wang, L J

    2015-09-01

    To study the dissemination stability and phase noise characteristics of the cascaded fiber-based RF dissemination, we perform an experiment using three sets of RF modulated frequency dissemination systems. The experimental results show that the total transfer stability of the cascaded system can be given by σ(T)(2)=∑(i=1)(N)σ(i)(2) (σ(i) is the frequency dissemination stability of the ith segment and N is the quantity of segments). Furthermore, for each segment, the phase noise of recovered frequency signal is also measured. The results show that for an N-segment, cascaded dissemination system, its stability degrades only by a factor of N. This sub-linear relation makes the cascaded, RF-dissemination method a very attractive one for long-haul, time and frequency dissemination network.

  14. Stabilization of a self-referenced, prism-based, Cr:forsterite laser frequency comb using an intracavity prism

    SciTech Connect

    Tillman, Karl A.; Thapa, Rajesh; Knabe, Kevin; Wu Shun; Lim, Jinkang; Washburn, Brian R.; Corwin, Kristan L.

    2009-12-20

    The frequency comb from a prism-based Cr:forsterite laser has been frequency stabilized using intracavity prism insertion and pump power modulation. Absolute frequency measurements of a CW fiber laser stabilized to the P(13) transition of acetylene demonstrate a fractional instability of {approx}2x10{sup -11} at a 1 s gate time, limited by a commercial Global Positioning System (GPS)-disciplined rubidium oscillator. Additionally, absolute frequency measurements made simultaneously using a second frequency comb indicate relative instabilities of 3x10{sup -12} for both combs for a 1 s gate time. Estimations of the carrier-envelope offset frequency linewidth based on relative intensity noise and the response dynamics of the carrier-envelope offset to pump power changes confirm the observed linewidths.

  15. Laser frequency stabilization to spectral hole burning frequency references in erbium-doped crystals: Material and device optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottger, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Narrow spectral holes in the absorption lines of Er3+ doped crystals have been explored as references for frequency stabilizing external cavity diode lasers at the important 1.5 mum optical communication wavelength. Allan deviations of the beat signal between two independent stabilized lasers as low as 200 Hz over 10 ms integration time have been achieved using regenerative spectral holes in Er3+:Y2SiO5 and Er3+:KTP, while drift was reduced to ˜7 kHz/min by incorporating the inhomogeneous absorption line as a fixed reference. During active stabilization, the transient spectral hole was continuously regenerated as hole burning balanced relaxation. In contrast, persistent spectral holes in Er3+:D-:CaF2, with lifetimes of several weeks, provided programmable and transportable secondary frequency references that maintained sub-kilohertz stability over several seconds and enabled 6 kHz stability over 1.6 x 103 s. The error signal was derived from the spectral hole transmission using frequency modulation spectroscopy. A servo amplifier applied fast frequency corrections to the injection current of the laser diode and slower adjustments to the piezo-driven feedback prism plate. These stabilized lasers provide ideal sources for spectral hole burning applications based on optical coherent transients, where laser stability is required over the storage time of the material. Since the lifetime of the frequency reference is exactly the material storage time, this requirement is automatically met by using our technique. This was demonstrated in Er 3+:Y2SiO5 and successfully transferred to high-bandwidth signal processing applications. The material Er3+:Y2SiO5 was optimized for these applications. The 4I15/2 and 4 I13/2 crystal field levels were site-selectively determined by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The excited state lifetime was measured to be 11.4 ms for site 1 and 9.2 ms for site 2. Zeeman experiments and two-pulse photon echo spectroscopy as a function of

  16. Neonatal cardiac MRI using prolonged balanced SSFP imaging at 3T with active frequency stabilization.

    PubMed

    Price, Anthony N; Malik, Shaihan J; Broadhouse, Kathryn M; Finnemore, Anna E; Durighel, Giuliana; Cox, David J; Edwards, A David; Groves, Alan M; Hajnal, Joseph V

    2013-09-01

    Cardiac MRI in neonates holds promise as a tool that can provide detailed functional information in this vulnerable group. However, their small size, rapid heart rate, and inability to breath-hold, pose particular challenges that require prolonged high-contrast and high-SNR methods. Balanced-steady state free precession (SSFP) offers high SNR efficiency and excellent contrast, but is vulnerable to off-resonance effects that cause banding artifacts. This is particularly problematic in the blood-pool, where off-resonance flow artifacts severely degrade image quality. In this article, we explore active frequency stabilization, combined with image-based shimming, to achieve prolonged SSFP imaging free of banding artifacts. The method was tested using 2D multislice SSFP cine acquisitions on 18 preterm infants, and the functional measures derived were validated against phase-contrast flow assessment. Significant drifts in the resonant frequency (165 ± 23Hz) were observed during 10-min SSFP examinations. However, full short-axis stacks free of banding artifacts were achieved in 16 subjects with stabilization; the cardiac output obtained revealed a mean difference of 9.0 ± 8.5% compared to phase-contrast flow measurements. Active frequency stabilization has enabled the use of prolonged SSFP acquisitions for neonatal cardiac imaging at 3T. The findings presented could have broader implications for other applications using prolong SSFP acquisitions. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Are gait variability and stability measures influenced by directional changes?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many gait variability and stability measures have been proposed in the literature, with the aim to quantify gait impairment, degree of neuro-motor control and balance disorders in healthy and pathological subjects. These measures are often obtained from lower trunk acceleration data, typically acquired during rectilinear gait, but relevant experimental protocols and data processing techniques lack in standardization. Since directional changes represent an essential aspect of gait, the assessment of their influence on such measures is essential for standardization. In addition, their investigation is needed to evaluate the applicability of these measures in laboratory trials and in daily life activity analysis. A further methodological aspect to be standardized concerns the assessment of the sampling frequency, which could affect stability measures. The aim of the present study was hence to assess if gait variability and stability measures are affected by directional changes, and to evaluate the influence of sampling frequency of trunk acceleration data on the results. Methods Fifty-one healthy young adults performed a 6-minute walk test along a 30 m straight pathway, turning by 180 deg at each end of the pathway. Nine variability and stability measures (Standard deviation, Coefficient of variation, Poincaré plots, maximum Floquet multipliers, short-term Lyapunov exponents, Recurrence quantification analysis, Multiscale entropy, Harmonic ratio and Index of harmonicity) were calculated on stride duration and trunk acceleration data (acquired at 100 Hz and 200 Hz) coming from straight walking windows and from windows including both straight walking and the directional change. Results Harmonic ratio was the only measure that resulted to be affected by directional changes and sampling frequency, decreasing with the presence of a directional change task. HR was affected in the AP and V directions for the 200 Hz, but only in AP direction for the 100 Hz group

  18. Ionospheric calibration for single frequency altimeter measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiner, William S.; Born, George H.

    1993-01-01

    This report investigates the potential of using Global Positioning System (GPS) data and a model of the ionosphere to supply a measure of the sub-satellite Total Electron Current (TEC) of the required accuracy (10 TECU rms) for the purpose of calibrating single frequency radar altimeter measurements. Since climatological (monthly mean) models are known to be in error by as much as 50 percent, this work focused on the Parameterized Real-Time Ionospheric Specification Model (PRISM) which has the capability to improve model accuracy by ingesting (adjusting to) in situ ionospheric measurements. A set of globally distributed TEC measurements were generated using GPS data and were used as input to improve the accuracy of the PRISM model. The adjusted PRISM TEC values were compared to TOPEX dual frequency TEC measurements (which are considered truth) for a number of TOPEX sub-satellite tracks. The adjusted PRISM values generally compared to the TOPEX measurements within the 10 TECU accuracy requirements when the sub-satellite track passed within 300 to 400 km of the GPS TEC data or when the track passed through a night time ionosphere. However, when the sub-satellite points were greater than 300 to 400 km away from the GPS TEC data or when a local noon ionosphere was sampled, the adjusted PRISM values generally differed by greater than 10 TECU rms with data excursions from the TOPEX TEC measurements of as much as 40 TECU (an 8 cm path delay error at K band). Therefore, it can be concluded from this analysis that an unrealistically large number of GPS stations would be needed to predict sub-satellite TEC at the 10 TECU level in the day time ionosphere using a model such as PRISM. However, a technique currently being studied at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) may provide a means of supplying adequate TEC data to meet the 10 TECU ionospheric correction accuracy when using a realistic number of ionospheric stations. This method involves using global GPS TEC data to

  19. Measurement of microresonator frequency comb coherence by spectral interferometry.

    PubMed

    Webb, K E; Jang, J K; Anthony, J; Coen, S; Erkintalo, M; Murdoch, S G

    2016-01-15

    We experimentally investigate the spectral coherence of microresonator optical frequency combs. Specifically, we use a spectral interference method, typically used in the context of supercontinuum generation, to explore the variation of the magnitude of the complex degree of first-order coherence across the full comb bandwidth. We measure the coherence of two different frequency combs and observe wholly different coherence characteristics. In particular, we find that the observed dynamical regimes are similar to the stable and unstable modulation instability regimes reported in previous theoretical studies. Results from numerical simulations are found to be in good agreement with experimental observations. In addition to demonstrating a new technique to assess comb stability, our results provide strong experimental support for previous theoretical analyses.

  20. Optimization of A 2-Micron Laser Frequency Stabilization System for a Double-Pulse CO2 Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Songsheng; Yu, Jirong; Bai, Yingsin; Koch, Grady; Petros, Mulugeta; Trieu, Bo; Petzar, Paul; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Beyon, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    A carbon dioxide (CO2) Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) for accurate CO2 concentration measurement requires a frequency locking system to achieve high frequency locking precision and stability. We describe the frequency locking system utilizing Frequency Modulation (FM), Phase Sensitive Detection (PSD), and Proportional Integration Derivative (PID) feedback servo loop, and report the optimization of the sensitivity of the system for the feed back loop based on the characteristics of a variable path-length CO2 gas cell. The CO2 gas cell is characterized with HITRAN database (2004). The method can be applied for any other frequency locking systems referring to gas absorption line.

  1. Planar-waveguide external cavity laser stabilization for an optical link with 10(-19) frequency stability.

    PubMed

    Clivati, Cecilia; Mura, Alberto; Calonico, Davide; Levi, Filippo; Costanzo, Giovanni A; Calosso, Claudio E; Godone, Aldo

    2011-12-01

    We stabilized the frequency of a compact planar-waveguide external cavity laser (ECL) on a Fabry-Perot cavity (FPC) through a Pound-Drever-Hall scheme. The residual frequency stability of the ECL is 10(-14), comparable to the stability achievable with a fiber laser (FL) locked to an FPC through the same scheme. We set up an optical link of 100 km, based on fiber spools, that reaches 10(-19) relative stability, and we show that its performances using the ECL or FL are comparable. Thus ECLs could serve as an excellent replacement for FLs in optical links where cost-effectiveness and robustness are important considerations.

  2. Semiconductor laser's on-line coherence calibration and testing of frequency stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Yu. N.; Popov, A. Yu.; Tyurin, A. V.

    2008-05-01

    One of the main constituent parts of optical coherent measuring apparatus is laser as source with stable performance of frequency, radiation intensity, and light beam uniformity. At present time semiconductor lasers are rather attractive devices in view of there low prices, small size, serviceability. Progress in its quality leads to including them not only in lightheads, but as lighting unit in measuring apparatus. In order to guarantee accuracy of measuring instruments, all parts of them must have stable performance, and in this respect semiconductor laser demand stabilization more that one characteristic quantity at once. And frequency stability on the one hand is overwhelmingly important for constancy of optical measuring instruments, on the other hand our investigations show that its regulatory control is very arduous task. Both holographic methods and phase modulated speckle interferometry clearly recognize smooth frequency shift and frequency jumping depending on pumping current and temperature. And for repeatability it's required to return both of them. So it is necessary laser frequency testing during working. For interferometric comparison circuit it is frequency variation that exerts influence on fringes pattern generation, so just this parameter should be traced in the course of measuring. Specially prepared test object, introduced in holographic scheme, allows to uncover frequency variation, if they had have place, and to reproduce coherence function of laser source. Complicated coherence function of semiconductor lasers can destroy interference pattern or foul the interpretation of it. So this coherence calibration is also very useful for results validity. Phase modulated speckle interferometry method allows to build phase correlation portraits, analogical to interferograms, hence multiwavelength contour generation masks the picture of intrinsic object information too. Both real wavelength change and nonresolution area, when coherence length is less

  3. VCSEL's frequency stabilization of an external cavity diode laser: countermeasures against atmospheric temperature variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motojima, Mutsuki; Doi, Kohei; Sato, Takashi; Ohkawa, Masashi; Suzuki, Takamasa

    2010-02-01

    We introduced the vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) as the laser diode in tour external cavity system. Because VCSELs are now commercially available, and the External cavity diode laser (ECDL) systems using them are expected to improve their frequency stability, we have replaced a Fabry-Perot type laser diode with a VCSEL, and examined its oscillation-frequency stability. Therefore we were able to expect that the VCSELs with our double optical feedback system have good oscillation frequency stability. The obtained VCSEL's oscillation-frequency stability, i.e., the square root of Allan variance σ was 4×10-10, at an averaging time of τ=1 sec.

  4. Maximum likelihood method for estimating airplane stability and control parameters from flight data in frequency domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, V.

    1980-01-01

    A frequency domain maximum likelihood method is developed for the estimation of airplane stability and control parameters from measured data. The model of an airplane is represented by a discrete-type steady state Kalman filter with time variables replaced by their Fourier series expansions. The likelihood function of innovations is formulated, and by its maximization with respect to unknown parameters the estimation algorithm is obtained. This algorithm is then simplified to the output error estimation method with the data in the form of transformed time histories, frequency response curves, or spectral and cross-spectral densities. The development is followed by a discussion on the equivalence of the cost function in the time and frequency domains, and on advantages and disadvantages of the frequency domain approach. The algorithm developed is applied in four examples to the estimation of longitudinal parameters of a general aviation airplane using computer generated and measured data in turbulent and still air. The cost functions in the time and frequency domains are shown to be equivalent; therefore, both approaches are complementary and not contradictory. Despite some computational advantages of parameter estimation in the frequency domain, this approach is limited to linear equations of motion with constant coefficients.

  5. Time delay measurement in the frequency domain

    DOE PAGES

    Durbin, Stephen M.; Liu, Shih -Chieh; Dufresne, Eric M.; ...

    2015-08-06

    Pump–probe studies at synchrotrons using X-ray and laser pulses require accurate determination of the time delay between pulses. This becomes especially important when observing ultrafast responses with lifetimes approaching or even less than the X-ray pulse duration (~100 ps). The standard approach of inspecting the time response of a detector sensitive to both types of pulses can have limitations due to dissimilar pulse profiles and other experimental factors. Here, a simple alternative is presented, where the frequency response of the detector is monitored versus time delay. Measurements readily demonstrate a time resolution of ~1 ps. Improved precision is possible bymore » simply extending the data acquisition time.« less

  6. Time delay measurement in the frequency domain.

    PubMed

    Durbin, Stephen M; Liu, Shih Chieh; Dufresne, Eric M; Li, Yuelin; Wen, Haidan

    2015-09-01

    Pump-probe studies at synchrotrons using X-ray and laser pulses require accurate determination of the time delay between pulses. This becomes especially important when observing ultrafast responses with lifetimes approaching or even less than the X-ray pulse duration (∼100 ps). The standard approach of inspecting the time response of a detector sensitive to both types of pulses can have limitations due to dissimilar pulse profiles and other experimental factors. Here, a simple alternative is presented, where the frequency response of the detector is monitored versus time delay. Measurements readily demonstrate a time resolution of ∼1 ps. Improved precision is possible by simply extending the data acquisition time.

  7. Time delay measurement in the frequency domain

    PubMed Central

    Durbin, Stephen M.; Liu, Shih-Chieh; Dufresne, Eric M.; Li, Yuelin; Wen, Haidan

    2015-01-01

    Pump–probe studies at synchrotrons using X-ray and laser pulses require accurate determination of the time delay between pulses. This becomes especially important when observing ultrafast responses with lifetimes approaching or even less than the X-ray pulse duration (∼100 ps). The standard approach of inspecting the time response of a detector sensitive to both types of pulses can have limitations due to dissimilar pulse profiles and other experimental factors. Here, a simple alternative is presented, where the frequency response of the detector is monitored versus time delay. Measurements readily demonstrate a time resolution of ∼1 ps. Improved precision is possible by simply extending the data acquisition time. PMID:26289282

  8. Time delay measurement in the frequency domain

    SciTech Connect

    Durbin, Stephen M.; Liu, Shih -Chieh; Dufresne, Eric M.; Li, Yuelin; Wen, Haidan

    2015-08-06

    Pump–probe studies at synchrotrons using X-ray and laser pulses require accurate determination of the time delay between pulses. This becomes especially important when observing ultrafast responses with lifetimes approaching or even less than the X-ray pulse duration (~100 ps). The standard approach of inspecting the time response of a detector sensitive to both types of pulses can have limitations due to dissimilar pulse profiles and other experimental factors. Here, a simple alternative is presented, where the frequency response of the detector is monitored versus time delay. Measurements readily demonstrate a time resolution of ~1 ps. Improved precision is possible by simply extending the data acquisition time.

  9. Balanced interferometric system for stability measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Jonathan D.; Joo, Ki-Nam; Spronck, Jo W.; Munnig Schmidt, Robert H

    2009-03-20

    We describe two different, double-sided interferometer designs for measuring material stability. Both designs are balanced interferometers where the only optical path difference is the sample and the reference beams are located within the interferometer. One interferometer is a double-pass design, whereas the other is a single-pass system. Based on a tolerancing analysis, the single-pass system is less susceptible to initial component misalignment and motions during experiments. This single-pass interferometer was tested with an 86 nm thin-film silver sample for both short-term repeatability and long-term stability. In 66 repeatability tests of 30 min each, the mean measured drift rate was less than 1 pm/h rms. In two long-term tests (>9 h), the mean drift rate was less than 1.1 pm/h, which shows good agreement between the short- and long-term measurements. In these experiments, the mean measured length change was 2 nm rms.

  10. Long term frequency stability analysis of the GPS NAVSTAR 6 Cesium clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccaskill, T. B.; Stebbins, S.; Carson, C.; Buisson, J.

    1982-01-01

    Time domain measurements, taken between the NAVSTAR 6 Spacecraft Vehicle (SV) and the Vandenberg Global Positioning System (GPS) Monitor Site, by a pseudo random noise receiver, were collected over an extended period of time and analyzed to estimate the long term frequency stability of the NAVSTAR 6 onboard frequency standard, referenced to the Vandenberg MS frequency standard. The technique employed separates the clock offset from the composite signal by first applying corrections for equipment delays, ionospheric delay, tropospheric delay, Earth rotation and the relativistic effect. The data are edited and smoothed using the predicted SV ephemeris to calculate the geometric delay. Then all available passes from each of the four GPS monitor stations, are collected at 1-week intervals and used to calculate the NAVSTAR orbital elements. The procedure is then completed by subtracting the corrections and the geometric delay, using the final orbital elements, from the composite signal, thus leaving the clock offset and random error.

  11. Lasic -Cavity-enhanced molecular iodine laser frequency stabilization for space projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turazza, Oscar; Acef, O.; Auger, G.; Halloin, H.; Duburck, F.; Plagnol, E.; Holleville, D.; Dimarcq, N.; Binetruy, P.; Brillet, A.; Lemonde, P.; Devismes, E.; Prat, P.; Lours, M.; Tuckey, P.; Argence, B.

    We present work in progress at SYRTE, APC and ARTEMIS aiming at stabilizing the frequency of a Nd:YAG laser using saturated absorption spectroscopy of molecular iodine 127I2. The novel design of the LASIC project allows for robustness and compacity while achieving high-performance phase noise suppression. The project is a follow-up of the laser stabilization work started at Artemis and continued at APC. The use of a low-finesse bow-tie optical cavity around the iodine absorber, combined with an adapted high-frequency modulation of the laser phase -NICE-OHMS technique-yields shot-noise limited saturated absorption signals with cavity-enhanced signal-to-noise ratios. Residual fractional frequency instability in terms of Allan Std. Deviation is expected below 10-14 @1s integration time and down to 10-15 over several hours. The compact iodine / cavity design, and performance well above LISA requirements make this project an interesting candidate for the space-based Gravitational Waves detector. We discuss the scientific background and outline of this project within the LISA framework, as well as its potential impact on other stringent technical requirements of the LISA project (e.g. U.S.O. clock-stability, arm-length measurements. . . ). We also present other possible applications for space projects involving interferometry, laser ranging or onboard ultrastable oscillators.

  12. Carrier frequency modulation of an acousto-optic modulator for laser stabilization.

    PubMed

    Aldous, Matthew; Woods, Jonathan; Dragomir, Andrei; Roy, Ritayan; Himsworth, Matt

    2017-05-29

    The stabilization of lasers to absolute frequency references is a fundamental requirement in several areas of atomic, molecular and optical physics. A range of techniques are available to produce a suitable reference onto which one can 'lock' the laser, many of which depend on the specific internal structure of the reference or are sensitive to laser intensity noise. We present a novel method using the frequency modulation of an acousto-optic modulator's carrier (drive) signal to generate two spatially separated beams, with a frequency difference of only a few MHz. These beams are used to probe a narrow absorption feature and the difference in their detected signals leads to a dispersion-like feature suitable for wavelength stabilization of a diode laser. This simple and versatile method only requires a narrow absorption line and is therefore suitable for both atomic and cavity based stabilization schemes. To demonstrate the suitability of this method we lock an external cavity diode laser near the (85)Rb 5S1/2 → 5P3/2, F = 3 → F' = 4 using sub-Doppler pump probe spectroscopy and also demonstrate excellent agreement between the measured signal and a theoretical model.

  13. Optical wire guided lumpectomy: frequency domain measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayton, A. L.; Keränen, V. T.; Prahl, S. A.

    2009-02-01

    In practice, complete removal of the tumor during a lumpectomy is difficult; the published rates of positive margins range from 10% to 50%. A spherical lumpectomy specimen with tumor directly in the middle may improve the success rate. A light source placed within the tumor may accomplish this goal by creating a sphere surrounding the tumor that can serve as a guide for resection. In an optical phantom and a prophylactic mastectomy specimen, sinusoidally modulated light within the medium was collected by optical fiber(s) at fixed distance(s) from the source and used to measure the optical properties. These optical properties were then used to calculate the distance the light had traveled through the medium. The fiber was coupled to an 830nm diode laser that was modulated at 100, 200 and 300 MHz. A handheld optical probe collected the modulated light and a network analyzer measured the phase lag. This data was used to calculate the distance the light traveled from the emitting fiber tip to the probe. The optical properties were μa = 0.004mm-1 and μ1s = 0.38mm-1 in the phantom. The optical properties for the tissue were μa = 0.005mm-1 and μ1s = 0.20mm-1. The prediction of distance from the source was within 4mm of the actual distance at 30mm in the phantom and within 3mm of the actual distance at 25mm in the tissue. The feasibility of a frequency domain system that makes measurements of local optical properties and then extrapolates those optical properties to make measurements of distance with a separate probe was demonstrated.

  14. Ionospheric calibration for single frequency altimeter measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiner, William S.; Born, George H.; Markin, Robert E.

    1994-01-01

    This study is a preliminary analysis of the effectiveness (in terms of altimeter calibration accuracy) of various ionosphere models and the Global Positioning System (GPS) to calibrate single frequency altimeter height measurements for ionospheric path delay. In particular, the research focused on ingesting GPS Total Electron Content (TEC) data into the physical Parameterized Real-Time Ionospheric Specification Model (PRISM), which estimates the composition of the ionosphere using independent empirical and physical models and has the capability of adjusting to additional ionospheric measurements. Two types of GPS data were used to adjust the PRISM model: GPS receiver station data mapped from line-of-sight observations to the vertical at the point of interest and a grid map (generated at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory) of GPS derived TEC in a sun-fixed longitude frame. The adjusted PRISM TEC values, as well as predictions by the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI-90), a climatological (monthly mean) model of the ionosphere, were compared to TOPEX dual-frequency TEC measurements (considered as truth) for a number of TOPEX sub-satellite tracks. For a 13.6 GHz altimeter, a Total Electron Content (TEC) of 1 TECU 10(exp 16) electrons/sq m corresponds to approximately 0.218 centimeters of range delay. A maximum expected TEC (at solar maximum or during solar storms) of 10(exp 18) electrons/sq m will create 22 centimeters of range delay. Compared with the TOPEX data, the PRISM predictions were generally accurate within the TECU when the sub-satellite track of interest passed within 300 to 400 km of the GPS TEC data or when the track passed through a night-time ionosphere. If neither was the case, in particular if the track passed through a local noon ionosphere, the PRISM values differed by more than 10 TECU and by as much as 40 TECU. The IRI-90 model, with no current ability to unseat GPS data, predicted TEC to a slightly higher error of 12 TECU. The performance of

  15. Measurement of ventilatory threshold by respiratory frequency.

    PubMed

    Nabetani, Teru; Ueda, Takeshi; Teramoto, Keisuke

    2002-06-01

    This study was conducted to assess whether respiratory frequency can be used as a valid parameter for estimating ventilatory threshold and for examining differences in exercise modes such as a cycle ergometer and a treadmill. 24 men and 12 women performed an incremental exercise test to exhaustion on a cycle ergometer and on a treadmill. Oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide output, pulmonary ventilation, ventilatory frequency, and heart rate were measured continuously every 30 sec. during the test. Three different and independent reviewers detected the ventilatory threshold point and break point of respiratory rate, which were then compared. Analysis indicated that (1) ventilatory threshold was well correlated with break point of respiratory rate for both cycle (r=.88, p<.001) and treadmill exercise (r=.96, p<.001). However, on the average, ventilatory threshold was only 71% (cycle) or 88% (treadmill) of break point of respiratory rate. (2) The regression equation for treadmill exercise was more accurate than that for cycling, but the detected data samples were smaller. The break point of respiratory rate was more easily detected for the cycle ergometer test 33 of 36 subjects) than for the treadmill test (only 15 of 36). The cycle ergometer test identified the break point of respiratory rate more easily than did the treadmill test. (3) There was an association between physical fitness and whether the break point of respiratory rate was detectable, and the more fit the subject (above average), the more likely the break point was to be undetected. Our study demonstrates that the break point of respiratory rate is closely associated with ventilatory threshold and that the cycle ergometer test is more conducive than the treadmill test to the detectability of break point of respiratory rate.

  16. Long-path atmospheric measurements using dual frequency comb measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waxman, Eleanor; Cossel, Kevin; Truong, Gar-Wing; Giorgetta, Fabrizio; Swann, William; Coddington, Ian; Newbury, Nathan

    2016-04-01

    The dual frequency comb spectrometer is a new tool for performing atmospheric trace gas measurements. This instrument is capable of measuring carbon dioxide, methane, and water with extremely high resolution in the region between 1.5 and 2.1 microns in the near-IR. It combines the high resolution of a laboratory-based FTIR instrument with the portability of a long-path DOAS system. We operate this instrument at path lengths of a few kilometers, thus bridging the spatial resolution of in-situ point sensors and the tens of square kilometer footprints of satellites. This spatial resolution is ideal for measuring greenhouse gas emissions from cities. Here we present initial long-path integrated column measurements of the greenhouse gases water, carbon dioxide, and methane in an urban environment. We present a time series with 5 minute time resolution over a 2 kilometer path in Boulder, Colorado at the urban-rural interface. We validate this data via a comparison with an in-situ greenhouse gas monitor co-located along the measurement path and show that we agree well on the baseline concentration but that we are significantly less sensitive to local point source emission that have high temporal variability, making this instrument ideal for measurements of average city-wide emissions. We additionally present progress towards measurements over an 11 kilometer path over downtown Boulder to measure the diurnal flux of greenhouse gases across the city.

  17. Frequency measurement of a Sr lattice clock using an SI-second-referenced optical frequency comb linked by a global positioning system (GPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Feng-Lei; Takamoto, Masao; Higashi, Ryoichi; Fukuyama, Yasuhiro; Jiang, Jie; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2005-07-01

    We have established a transportable frequency measurement system using an optical frequency comb linked to a commercial Cs atomic clock, which is in turn linked to international atomic time (TAI) through global positioning system (GPS) time. An iodine-stabilized Nd:YAG laser is used as a flywheel in the frequency measurement system. This system is used to measure the absolute frequency of the clock transition of 87Sr in an optical lattice. We obtained a fractional uncertainty of 2×10-14 in the frequency measurement with a total averaging time of ~ 105 s over 9 days.

  18. Frequency measurement of a Sr lattice clock using an SI-second-referenced optical frequency comb linked by a global positioning system (GPS).

    PubMed

    Hong, Feng-Lei; Takamoto, Masao; Higashi, Ryoichi; Fukuyama, Yasuhiro; Jiang, Jie; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2005-07-11

    We have established a transportable frequency measurement system using an optical frequency comb linked to a commercial Cs atomic clock, which is in turn linked to international atomic time (TAI) through global positioning system (GPS) time. An iodine-stabilized Nd:YAG laser is used as a flywheel in the frequency measurement system. This system is used to measure the absolute frequency of the clock transition of (87)Sr in an optical lattice. We obtained a fractional uncertainty of 2x10(-14) in the frequency measurement with a total averaging time of ~ 10(5) s over 9 days.

  19. 47 CFR 18.309 - Frequency range of measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency range of measurements. 18.309 Section 18.309 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL INDUSTRIAL, SCIENTIFIC, AND MEDICAL EQUIPMENT Technical Standards § 18.309 Frequency range of measurements. (a) For field strength measurements: Frequency band in which device...

  20. 47 CFR 74.562 - Frequency monitors and measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency monitors and measurements. 74.562... Auxiliary Stations § 74.562 Frequency monitors and measurements. The licensee shall ensure that the STL, ICR... accomplished by appropriate frequency measurement techniques and consideration of the transmitter emissions....

  1. 47 CFR 74.562 - Frequency monitors and measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency monitors and measurements. 74.562... Auxiliary Stations § 74.562 Frequency monitors and measurements. The licensee shall ensure that the STL, ICR... accomplished by appropriate frequency measurement techniques and consideration of the transmitter emissions. ...

  2. Laser-Frequency Stabilization via a Quasimonolithic Mach-Zehnder Interferometer with Arms of Unequal Length and Balanced dc Readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerberding, Oliver; Isleif, Katharina-Sophie; Mehmet, Moritz; Danzmann, Karsten; Heinzel, Gerhard

    2017-02-01

    Low-frequency high-precision laser interferometry is subject to excess laser-frequency-noise coupling via arm-length differences which is commonly mitigated by locking the frequency to a stable reference system. This approach is crucial to achieve picometer-level sensitivities in the 0.1-mHz to 1-Hz regime, where laser-frequency noise is usually high and couples into the measurement phase via arm-length mismatches in the interferometers. Here we describe the results achieved by frequency stabilizing an external cavity diode laser to a quasimonolithic unequal arm-length Mach-Zehnder interferometer readout at midfringe via balanced detection. We find this stabilization scheme to be an elegant solution combining a minimal number of optical components, no additional laser modulations, and relatively low-frequency-noise levels. The Mach-Zehnder interferometer is designed and constructed to minimize the influence of thermal couplings and to reduce undesired stray light using the optical simulation tool ifocad. We achieve frequency-noise levels below 100 Hz /√{Hz } at 1 Hz and are able to demonstrate the LISA frequency prestabilization requirement of 300 Hz /√{Hz } down to frequencies of 100 mHz by beating the stabilized laser with an iodine-locked reference.

  3. Chronic alcohol self-administration in monkeys shows long-term quantity/frequency categorical stability.

    PubMed

    Baker, Erich J; Farro, Jonathan; Gonzales, Steven; Helms, Christa; Grant, Kathleen A

    2014-11-01

    The current criteria for alcohol use disorders (AUDs) do not include consumption (quantity/frequency) measures of alcohol intake, in part due to the difficulty of these measures in humans. Animal models of ethanol (EtOH) self-administration have been fundamental in advancing our understanding of the neurobiological basis of AUD and can address quantity/frequency measures with accurate measurements over prolonged periods of time. The nonhuman primate model of voluntary oral alcohol self-administration has documented both binge drinking and drinking to dependence and can be used to test the stability of consumption measures over time. Here, an extensive set of alcohol intakes (g/kg/d) was analyzed from a large multi-cohort population of Rhesus (Macaca mulatta) monkeys (n = 31). Daily EtOH intake was uniformly distributed over chronic (12 months) access for all animals. Underlying this distribution of intakes were subpopulations of monkeys that exhibited distinctive clustering of drinking patterns, allowing us to categorically define very heavy drinking (VHD), heavy drinking (HD), binge drinking (BD), and low drinking (LD). These categories were stable across the 12 months assessed by the protocol, but exhibited fluctuations when examined at shorter intervals. The establishment of persistent drinking categories based on quantity/frequency suggests that consumption variables can be used to track long-term changes in behavioral, molecular, or physiochemical mechanisms related to our understanding of diagnosis, prevention, intervention, and treatment efficacies. Copyright © 2014 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  4. Chronic alcohol self-administration in monkeys shows long-term quantity/frequency categorical stability

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Erich J.; Farro, Jonathan; Gonzales, Steven; Helms, Christa; Grant, Kathleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The current criteria for alcohol use disorders (AUD) do not include consumption (quantity/frequency) measures of alcohol intake, in part due to the difficulty of these measures in humans. Animal models of ethanol self-administration have been fundamental in advancing our understanding of the neurobiological basis of (AUD) and can address quantity/frequency measures with accurate measurements over prolonged periods of time. The non-human primate (NHP) model of voluntary oral alcohol self-administration has documented both binge drinking and drinking to dependence and can be used to test the stability of consumption measures over time. Methods and Results Here, an extensive set of alcohol intakes (g/kg/day) was analyzed from a large multi-cohort population of Rhesus (Macaca mulatta) monkeys (n=31). Daily ethanol intake was uniformly distributed over chronic (12 months) access for all animals. Underlying this distribution of intakes were subpopulations of monkeys that exhibited distinctive clustering of drinking patterns, allowing us to categorically define very heavy drinking (VHD), heavy drinking (HD), binge drinking (BD), and low drinking (LD). These categories were stable across the 12-month assessed by the protocol, but exhibited fluctuations when examined at shorter intervals. Conclusions The establishment of persistent drinking categories based on quantity/frequency suggests that consumption variables can be used to track long-term changes in behavioral, molecular or physiochemical mechanisms related to our understanding of diagnosis, prevention, intervention and treatment efficacies. PMID:25421519

  5. Stability of the FOCES spectrograph using an astro-frequency comb as calibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brucalassi, Anna; Grupp, Frank; Kellermann, Hanna; Wang, Liang; Lang-Bardl, Florian; Baisert, Nils; Hu, Shao Ming; Hopp, Ulrich; Bender, Ralf

    2016-08-01

    We present the results of a series of measurements conducted using the upgraded Fiber Optic Cassegrain Echelle Spectrograph (FOCES)1 intended to be operated at the 2.0 m Fraunhofer Telescope at the Wendelstein Observatory (Germany) in combination with a laser frequency comb as calibrator. Details about the laboratory set-up of the system integrated with FOCES are shown. Different analysis techniques are applied to investigate the calibration precision and the medium-long term stability of the system in term of changes in stellar radial velocity.

  6. Sexual Frequency and the Stability of Marital and Cohabiting Unions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yabiku, Scott T.; Gager, Constance T.

    2009-01-01

    Prior research found that lower sexual frequency and satisfaction were associated with higher rates of divorce, but little research had examined the role of sexual activity in the dissolution of cohabiting unions. We drew upon social exchange theory to hypothesize why sexual frequency is more important in cohabitation: (a) cohabitors' lower costs…

  7. Sexual Frequency and the Stability of Marital and Cohabiting Unions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yabiku, Scott T.; Gager, Constance T.

    2009-01-01

    Prior research found that lower sexual frequency and satisfaction were associated with higher rates of divorce, but little research had examined the role of sexual activity in the dissolution of cohabiting unions. We drew upon social exchange theory to hypothesize why sexual frequency is more important in cohabitation: (a) cohabitors' lower costs…

  8. Experimental Investigation of Hexagon Stability in Two Frequency Forced Faraday Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yu; Umbanhowar, Paul

    2003-03-01

    We have conducted experiments on a deep layer of silicone oil vertically oscillated with an acceleration a(t) = Am sin(m ω t + φ_m) + An sin(n ω t + φ_n). The stability of hexagonal surface wave patterns is investigated as a function of the overall acceleration, the ratio m:n, and the phase of the two rationally related driving frequencies. When the ratio A_m/An is chosen so the system is near a co-dimension two point, the stability of hexagons above onset is determined by the acceleration amplitude and the relative phase. Recent results by Porter and Silver (J. Porter and M. Silber, Phys. Rev. Lett. 084501, 2002) predicts that the range of pattern stability above onset as a function of acceleration is determined by cos(Φ), where Φ = π/4 - m φn / 2- n φm /2. We have tested this prediction for a number of m:n ratios and for various values of the dimensionless damping coefficient γ. We find that the patterns exhibit the predicted functional dependence on s(Φ) but with an additional phase offset. We measure the phase offset as a function of m:n and γ for varying frequency ω and fluid viscosity 5 cS <= ν <= 30 cS.

  9. Frequency and amplitude stabilization in MEMS and NEMS oscillators

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Changyao; Lopez, Omar Daniel; Czaplewski, David A.

    2017-06-14

    This invention comprises a nonlinear micro- and nano-mechanical resonator that can maintain frequency of operation and amplitude of operation for a period of time after all external power has been removed from the device. Utilizing specific nonlinear dynamics of the micromechanical resonator, mechanical energy at low frequencies can be input and stored in higher frequencies modes, thus using the multiple degrees of freedom of the resonator to extend its energy storage capacity. Furthermore, the energy stored in multiple vibrational modes can be used to maintain the resonator oscillating for a fixed period of time, even without an external power supply. This is the first demonstration of an "autonomous" frequency source that can maintain a constant frequency and vibrating amplitude when no external power is provided, making it ideal for applications requiring an oscillator in low power, or limited and intermittent power supplies.

  10. Absolute frequency measurement of the 2S-8S/D transitions in atomic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nez, F.; Plimmer, M. D.; Bourzeix, S.; Julien, L.; Biraben, F.; Felder, R.; Millerioux, Y.; De Natale, P.

    1993-10-01

    We have performed an absolute frequency measurement of the 2S-8S/D two-photon transition in atomic hydrogen. We have compared the hydrogen frequencies with the difference of two optical standards, namely the methane stabilized and iodine stabilized He-Ne laser. In this way, we have linked the 2S-8S/D frequencies to the cesium clock. We have deduced a new value for the Rydberg constant with an uncertainty of 2.2 parts in 1011.

  11. Direct frequency comb measurement of OD + CO → DOCO kinetics.

    PubMed

    Bjork, B J; Bui, T Q; Heckl, O H; Changala, P B; Spaun, B; Heu, P; Follman, D; Deutsch, C; Cole, G D; Aspelmeyer, M; Okumura, M; Ye, J

    2016-10-28

    The kinetics of the hydroxyl radical (OH) + carbon monoxide (CO) reaction, which is fundamental to both atmospheric and combustion chemistry, are complex because of the formation of the hydrocarboxyl radical (HOCO) intermediate. Despite extensive studies of this reaction, HOCO has not been observed under thermal reaction conditions. Exploiting the sensitive, broadband, and high-resolution capabilities of time-resolved cavity-enhanced direct frequency comb spectroscopy, we observed deuteroxyl radical (OD) + CO reaction kinetics and detected stabilized trans-DOCO, the deuterated analog of trans-HOCO. By simultaneously measuring the time-dependent concentrations of the trans-DOCO and OD species, we observed unambiguous low-pressure termolecular dependence of the reaction rate coefficients for N2 and CO bath gases. These results confirm the HOCO formation mechanism and quantify its yield.

  12. Sway ratio - a new measure for quantifying postural stability.

    PubMed

    Błaszczyk, Janusz W

    2008-01-01

    In the search of a reliable postural stability index, two sway time series: the center-of-mass (COM) and the center-of-foot pressure (COP) were recorded simultaneously in elderly subjects standing quiet with eyes open and with eyes closed. From a battery of commonly use sway measures, only the anteroposterior COM and the COP path lengths proved their high sensitivity and discriminative power to the imposed vision conditions. Based upon these indices, a new measure - sway ratio (SR) - was computed, as the COP-to-COM path length ratio. The measure can easily distinguish vision vs. no vision in the elderly. The SR can be successfully accessed base upon the COP signal only. In contrast to traditional sway indices, the SR as a relative measure is insensitive to the length of sampled record and to the signal sampling frequency. Its magnitude can be interpreted as an average amount of balance controlling motor activity that coincides with a unit COM displacement. The SR is recommended as a reliable measure that allows for assessment of postural stability.

  13. Frequency stabilization of a 2.05 μm laser using hollow-core fiber CO2 frequency reference cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meras, Patrick; Poberezhskiy, Ilya Y.; Chang, Daniel H.; Spiers, Gary D.

    2010-04-01

    We have designed and built a hollow-core fiber frequency reference cell, filled it with CO2, and used it to demonstrate frequency stabilization of a 2.05 μm Tm:Ho:YLF laser using frequency modulation (FM) spectroscopy technique. The frequency reference cell is housed in a compact and robust hermetic package that contains a several meter long hollow-core photonic crystal fiber optically coupled to index-guiding fibers with a fusion splice on one end and a mechanical splice on the other end. The package has connectorized fiber pigtails and a valve used to evacuate, refill it, or adjust the gas pressure. We have demonstrated laser frequency standard deviation decreasing from >450MHz (free-running) to <2.4MHz (stabilized). The 2.05 μm laser wavelength is of particular interest for spectroscopic instruments due to the presence of many CO2 and H20 absorption lines in its vicinity. To our knowledge, this is the first reported demonstration of laser frequency stabilization at this wavelength using a hollow-core fiber reference cell. This approach enables all-fiber implementation of the optical portion of laser frequency stabilization system, thus making it dramatically more lightweight, compact, and robust than the traditional free-space version that utilizes glass or metal gas cells. It can also provide much longer interaction length of light with gas and does not require any alignment. The demonstrated frequency reference cell is particularly attractive for use in aircraft and space coherent lidar instruments for measuring atmospheric CO2 profile.

  14. On-chip multi spectral frequency standard replication by stabilizing a microring resonator to a molecular line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zektzer, Roy; Stern, Liron; Mazurski, Noa; Levy, Uriel

    2016-07-01

    Stabilized laser lines are highly desired for myriad of applications ranging from precise measurements to optical communications. While stabilization can be obtained by using molecular or atomic absorption references, these are limited to specific frequencies. On the other hand, resonators can be used as wide band frequency references. Unfortunately, such resonators are unstable and inaccurate. Here, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a chip-scale multispectral frequency standard replication operating in the spectral range of the near IR. This is obtained by frequency locking a microring resonator (MRR) to an acetylene absorption line. The MRR consists of a Si3N4 waveguides with microheater on top of it. The thermo-optic effect is utilized to lock one of the MRR resonances to an acetylene line. This locked MRR is then used to stabilize other laser sources at 980 nm and 1550 nm wavelength. By beating the stabilized laser to another stabilized laser, we obtained frequency instability floor of 4 ×10-9 at around 100 s in terms of Allan deviation. Such stable and accurate chip scale sources are expected to serve as important building block in diverse fields such as communication and metrology.

  15. Phase stabilization of a frequency comb using multipulse quantum interferometry.

    PubMed

    Cadarso, Andrea; Mur-Petit, Jordi; García-Ripoll, Juan José

    2014-02-21

    From the interaction between a frequency comb and an atomic qubit, we derive quantum protocols for the determination of the carrier-envelope offset phase, using the qubit coherence as a reference, and without the need of frequency doubling or an octave spanning comb. Compared with a trivial interference protocol, the multipulse protocol results in a polynomial enhancement of the sensitivity O(N-2) with the number N of laser pulses involved. We specialize the protocols using optical or hyperfine qubits, Λ schemes, and Raman transitions, and introduce methods where the reference is another phase-stable cw laser or frequency comb.

  16. Enhancement of Frequency Stability Using Synchronization of a Cantilever Array for MEMS-Based Sensors.

    PubMed

    Torres, Francesc; Uranga, Arantxa; Riverola, Martí; Sobreviela, Guillermo; Barniol, Núria

    2016-10-13

    Micro and nano electromechanical resonators have been widely used as single or multiple-mass detection sensors. Smaller devices with higher resonance frequencies and lower masses offer higher mass responsivities but suffer from lower frequency stability. Synchronization phenomena in multiple MEMS resonators have become an important issue because they allow frequency stability improvement, thereby preserving mass responsivity. The authors present an array of five cantilevers (CMOS-MEMS system) that are forced to vibrate synchronously to enhance their frequency stability. The frequency stability has been determined in closed-loop configuration for long periods of time by calculating the Allan deviation. An Allan deviation of 0.013 ppm (@ 1 s averaging time) for a 1 MHz cantilever array MEMS system was obtained at the synchronized mode, which represents a 23-fold improvement in comparison with the non-synchronized operation mode (0.3 ppm).

  17. Enhancement of Frequency Stability Using Synchronization of a Cantilever Array for MEMS-Based Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Francesc; Uranga, Arantxa; Riverola, Martí; Sobreviela, Guillermo; Barniol, Núria

    2016-01-01

    Micro and nano electromechanical resonators have been widely used as single or multiple-mass detection sensors. Smaller devices with higher resonance frequencies and lower masses offer higher mass responsivities but suffer from lower frequency stability. Synchronization phenomena in multiple MEMS resonators have become an important issue because they allow frequency stability improvement, thereby preserving mass responsivity. The authors present an array of five cantilevers (CMOS-MEMS system) that are forced to vibrate synchronously to enhance their frequency stability. The frequency stability has been determined in closed-loop configuration for long periods of time by calculating the Allan deviation. An Allan deviation of 0.013 ppm (@ 1 s averaging time) for a 1 MHz cantilever array MEMS system was obtained at the synchronized mode, which represents a 23-fold improvement in comparison with the non-synchronized operation mode (0.3 ppm). PMID:27754377

  18. A digital frequency stabilization system of external cavity diode laser based on LabVIEW FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhuohuan; Hu, Zhaohui; Qi, Lu; Wang, Tao

    2015-10-01

    Frequency stabilization for external cavity diode laser has played an important role in physics research. Many laser frequency locking solutions have been proposed by researchers. Traditionally, the locking process was accomplished by analog system, which has fast feedback control response speed. However, analog system is susceptible to the effects of environment. In order to improve the automation level and reliability of the frequency stabilization system, we take a grating-feedback external cavity diode laser as the laser source and set up a digital frequency stabilization system based on National Instrument's FPGA (NI FPGA). The system consists of a saturated absorption frequency stabilization of beam path, a differential photoelectric detector, a NI FPGA board and a host computer. Many functions, such as piezoelectric transducer (PZT) sweeping, atomic saturation absorption signal acquisition, signal peak identification, error signal obtaining and laser PZT voltage feedback controlling, are totally completed by LabVIEW FPGA program. Compared with the analog system, the system built by the logic gate circuits, performs stable and reliable. User interface programmed by LabVIEW is friendly. Besides, benefited from the characteristics of reconfiguration, the LabVIEW program is good at transplanting in other NI FPGA boards. Most of all, the system periodically checks the error signal. Once the abnormal error signal is detected, FPGA will restart frequency stabilization process without manual control. Through detecting the fluctuation of error signal of the atomic saturation absorption spectrum line in the frequency locking state, we can infer that the laser frequency stability can reach 1MHz.

  19. 47 CFR 74.162 - Frequency monitors and measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... frequency as measured, and a description or identification of the method employed shall be entered in the station log. Sufficient observations shall be made to insure that the assigned carrier frequency is...

  20. 47 CFR 74.162 - Frequency monitors and measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... frequency as measured, and a description or identification of the method employed shall be entered in the station log. Sufficient observations shall be made to insure that the assigned carrier frequency is...

  1. System and method for tuning adjusting the central frequency of a laser while maintaining frequency stabilization to an external reference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livas, Jeffrey (Inventor); Thorpe, James I. (Inventor); Numata, Kenji (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method and system for stabilizing a laser to a frequency reference with an adjustable offset. The method locks a sideband signal generated by passing an incoming laser beam through the phase modulator to a frequency reference, and adjusts a carrier frequency relative to the locked sideband signal by changing a phase modulation frequency input to the phase modulator. The sideband signal can be a single sideband (SSB), dual sideband (DSB), or an electronic sideband (ESB) signal. Two separate electro-optic modulators can produce the DSB signal. The two electro-optic modulators can be a broadband modulator and a resonant modulator. With a DSB signal, the method can introduce two sinusoidal phase modulations at the phase modulator. With ESB signals, the method can further drive the optical phase modulator with an electrical signal with nominal frequency OMEGA(sub 1) that is phase modulated at a frequency OMEGA(sub 2)

  2. Characterizing Far-infrared Laser Emissions and the Measurement of Their Frequencies.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Michael; Zink, Lyndon R

    2015-12-18

    The generation and subsequent measurement of far-infrared radiation has found numerous applications in high-resolution spectroscopy, radio astronomy, and Terahertz imaging. For about 45 years, the generation of coherent, far-infrared radiation has been accomplished using the optically pumped molecular laser. Once far-infrared laser radiation is detected, the frequencies of these laser emissions are measured using a three-laser heterodyne technique. With this technique, the unknown frequency from the optically pumped molecular laser is mixed with the difference frequency between two stabilized, infrared reference frequencies. These reference frequencies are generated by independent carbon dioxide lasers, each stabilized using the fluorescence signal from an external, low pressure reference cell. The resulting beat between the known and unknown laser frequencies is monitored by a metal-insulator-metal point contact diode detector whose output is observed on a spectrum analyzer. The beat frequency between these laser emissions is subsequently measured and combined with the known reference frequencies to extrapolate the unknown far-infrared laser frequency. The resulting one-sigma fractional uncertainty for laser frequencies measured with this technique is ± 5 parts in 10(7). Accurately determining the frequency of far-infrared laser emissions is critical as they are often used as a reference for other measurements, as in the high-resolution spectroscopic investigations of free radicals using laser magnetic resonance. As part of this investigation, difluoromethane, CH2F2, was used as the far-infrared laser medium. In all, eight far-infrared laser frequencies were measured for the first time with frequencies ranging from 0.359 to 1.273 THz. Three of these laser emissions were discovered during this investigation and are reported with their optimal operating pressure, polarization with respect to the CO2 pump laser, and strength.

  3. Frequency stabilization at the sub-kilohertz level of an external cavity diode laser.

    PubMed

    Bayrakli, Ismail

    2016-03-20

    A simple external cavity diode laser (ECDL) in a Littrow configuration was established and actively frequency-stabilized by using a side-of-fringe stabilization technique. A wavelength tuning range of 60 nm for the spectral range between 1000 and 1060 nm was demonstrated by rotating the diffraction grating. A sub-kilohertz frequency stabilization of the ECDL was achieved. The linewidth of the laser was narrowed from 160 kHz to 400 Hz by laser frequency locking to a flank of a Fabry-Perot interferometer peak.

  4. Thermal Noise Limit in Frequency Stabilization of Lasers with Rigid Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, Kenji; Kemery, Amy; Camp, Jordan

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated thermal noise (Brownian motion) in a rigid reference cavity used for frequency stabilization of lasers, based on the mechanical loss of cavity materials and the numerical analysis of the mirror-spacer mechanics with t.he direct application of the fluctuation dissipation theorem. This noise sets a fundamental limit for the frequency stability achieved with a rigid frequency- reference cavity of order 1 Hz/square root Hz(0.01 Hz/square root Hz) at 10 mHz (100 Hz) at room temperature. This level coincides with the world-highest level stabilization results.

  5. Thermal Noise Limit in Frequency Stabilization of Lasers with Rigid Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, Kenji; Kemery, Amy; Camp, Jordan

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated thermal noise (Brownian motion) in a rigid reference cavity Used for frequency stabilization of lasers, based on the mechanical loss of cavity materials and the numerical analysis of the mirror-spacer mechanics with the direct application of the fluctuation dissipation theorem. This noise sets a fundamental limit for the frequency stability achieved with a rigid frequency-reference cavity of order 1 Hz/rtHz at 10mHz at room temperature. This level coincides with the world-highest level stabilization results.

  6. Thermal Noise Limit in Frequency Stabilization of Lasers with Rigid Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, Kenji; Kemery, Amy; Camp, Jordan

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated thermal noise (Brownian motion) in a rigid reference cavity used for frequency stabilization of lasers, based on the mechanical loss of cavity materials and the numerical analysis of the mirror-spacer mechanics with t.he direct application of the fluctuation dissipation theorem. This noise sets a fundamental limit for the frequency stability achieved with a rigid frequency- reference cavity of order 1 Hz/square root Hz(0.01 Hz/square root Hz) at 10 mHz (100 Hz) at room temperature. This level coincides with the world-highest level stabilization results.

  7. Thermal Noise Limit in Frequency Stabilization of Lasers with Rigid Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, Kenji; Kemery, Amy; Camp, Jordan

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated thermal noise (Brownian motion) in a rigid reference cavity Used for frequency stabilization of lasers, based on the mechanical loss of cavity materials and the numerical analysis of the mirror-spacer mechanics with the direct application of the fluctuation dissipation theorem. This noise sets a fundamental limit for the frequency stability achieved with a rigid frequency-reference cavity of order 1 Hz/rtHz at 10mHz at room temperature. This level coincides with the world-highest level stabilization results.

  8. Photonic radio-frequency dissemination via optical fiber with high-phase stability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaocheng; Liu, Zhangweiyi; Wang, Siwei; Sun, Dongning; Dong, Yi; Hu, Weisheng

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate a photonic radio-frequency transmission system via optical fiber. Optical radio-frequency signal is generated utilizing a Mach-Zehnder modulator based on double-side-band with carrier suppression modulation scheme. The phase error induced by optical fiber transmission is transferred to an intermediate frequency signal by the dual-heterodyne phase error transfer scheme, and then canceled by a phase locked loop. With precise phase compensation, a radio frequency with high-phase stability can be obtained at the remote end. We performed 20.07-GHz radio-frequency transfer over 100-km optical fiber, and achieved residual phase noise of -65  dBc/Hz at 1-Hz offset frequency, and the RMS timing jitter in the frequency range from 0.01 Hz to 1 MHz reaches 110 fs. The long-term frequency stability also achieves 8×10(-17) at 10,000 s averaging time.

  9. Frequency-dependent stability of parallel-plate electrostatic actuators in conductive fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sounart, T. L.; Panchawagh, H. V.; Mahajan, R. L.

    2010-05-01

    We present an electromechanical stability analysis of passivated parallel-plate electrostatic actuators in conductive dielectric media and show that the pull-in instability can be eliminated by tuning the applied frequency below a design-dependent stability limit. A partial instability region is also obtained, where the actuator jumps from the pull-in displacement to another stable position within the gap. The results predict that the stability limit is always greater than the critical actuation frequency, and therefore any device that is feasible to actuate in a conductive fluid can be operated with stability over the full range of motion.

  10. Space position measurement using long-path heterodyne interferometer with optical frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaonan; Takahashi, Satoru; Takamasu, Kiyoshi; Matsumoto, Hirokazu

    2012-01-30

    A heterodyne interference system was developed for position measurement. A stabilized optical-frequency comb is used as the laser source. The preliminary experiment to measure a distance of 22.478 m shows a drift of 1.6 μm in 20 minutes after the temperature compensation. Comparison and frequency shift experiments have been done for a distance of about 7.493 m. The experimental results show that the drift is mainly caused by environmental condition changes and the vibration of the table and floor also has some effects. It was verified that the absolute distance measurement can be realized by fringe scanning and frequency-shifting methods.

  11. Laser frequency stabilization using a dispersive line shape induced by Doppler Effect.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Qi, Xianghui; Liu, Shuyong; Yu, Jiachen; Chen, Xuzong

    2015-02-09

    We report a simple and robust Doppler-free spectroscopic technique to stabilize a laser frequency to the atomic transition. By employing Doppler Effect on the atomic beam, we obtained a very stable dispersive signal with a high signal-to-noise ratio and no Doppler-background, which served as an error signal to electronically stabilize a laser frequency without modulation. For validating the performance of this technique, we locked a DFB laser to the (133)Cs D2 line and observed an efficient suppression of the frequency noise and a long-term reduction of the frequency drifts in a laboratory environment.

  12. Stabilization of Gyrotron Frequency by PID Feedback Control on the Acceleration Voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khutoryan, E. M.; Idehara, T.; Kuleshov, A. N.; Tatematsu, Y.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Matsuki, Y.; Fujiwara, T.

    2015-12-01

    The results of frequency stabilization by proportional-integral-derivative (PID) feedback control of acceleration voltage in the 460-GHz Gyrotron FU CW GVI (the official name in Osaka University is Gyrotron FU CW GOI) are presented. The experiment was organized on the basis of the frequency modulation by modulation of acceleration voltage of beam electrons. The frequency stabilization during 10 h experiment was better than 10-6, which is compared with the results of the frequency deviation in free-running gyrotron operation.

  13. Seabed Scattering from Low Frequency Reverberation Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    X.Z. Zhang, " Low frequency seabed scattering at low grazing angles," Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 131 (4), 261 1-2621 (Apr 2012). 2...13). 15. SUBJECT TERMS ocean reverberation, modeling and inversion, seabed scattering , seabottom acoustic model, the energy flux method for...reverberation, shallow water acoustics , low grazing angles scattering , shear waves 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF a . REPORT b

  14. Dynamic resonant frequency control of ultrasonic transducer for stabilizing resonant state in wide frequency band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokozawa, Hiroki; Twiefel, Jens; Weinstein, Michael; Morita, Takeshi

    2017-07-01

    Controlling the resonant frequency of ultrasonic transducers is important to achieve the excellent performance of ultrasonic devices. The resonant frequency can be shifted by a nonlinear effect or by increasing the temperature under high-power operation. We propose a resonant frequency control method during the transducer’s operation that enables the dynamic compensation of resonant frequency shifts. To realize this, a transducer with passive piezoelectric parts was fabricated. By controlling the electric boundary condition of the passive piezoelectric parts between short and open by utilizing a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET), the stiffness was changed, thus modifying the resonant frequency. In both simulation and experiment, the resonant frequency was modified successfully by controlling the switching duty ratio of the MOSFET. Additionally, a system for exciting a transducer at a resonant state with a wide frequency band was demonstrated.

  15. Enhanced Lamb dip for absolute laser frequency stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegman, A. E.; Byer, R. L.; Wang, S. C.

    1972-01-01

    Enhanced Lamb dip width is 5 MHz and total depth is 10 percent of peak power. Present configuration is useful as frequency standard in near infrared. Technique extends to other lasers, for which low pressure narrow linewidth gain tubes can be constructed.

  16. Elimination of frequency noise from groundwater measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Y.M.; Bryce, R.W.; Strait, S.R.; Yeatman, R.A.

    1986-04-01

    Groundwater response to atmospheric fluctuation can be effectively removed from downhole-pressure records using the systematic approach. The technique is not as successful for removal of earth tides, due to a probable discrepancy between the actual earth tide and the theoretical earth tide. The advantage of the systematic technique is that a causative relationship is established for each component of the pressure response removed. This concept of data reduction is easily understood and well accepted. The disadvantage is that a record of the stress causing the pressure fluctuation must be obtained. This may be done by monitoring or synthesizing the stress. Frequency analysis offers a simpler way to eliminate the undesirable hydrologic fluctuations from the downhole pressure. Frequency analysis may prove to be impractical if the fluctuations being removed have broadband characteristics. A combination of the two techniques, such as eliminating the atmospheric effect with the systematic method and the earth-tide fluctuations with the frequency method, is the most effective and efficient approach.

  17. Emulsification by high frequency ultrasound using piezoelectric transducer: formation and stability of emulsifier free emulsion.

    PubMed

    Kaci, Messaouda; Meziani, Smail; Arab-Tehrany, Elmira; Gillet, Guillaume; Desjardins-Lavisse, Isabelle; Desobry, Stephane

    2014-05-01

    Emulsifier free emulsion was developed with a new patented technique for food and cosmetic applications. This emulsification process dispersed oil droplets in water without any emulsifier. Emulsions were prepared with different vegetable oil ratios 5%, 10% and 15% (v/v) using high frequency ultrasounds generated by piezoelectric ceramic transducer vibrating at 1.7 MHz. The emulsion was prepared with various emulsification times between 0 and 10h. Oil droplets size was measured by laser granulometry. The pH variation was monitored; electrophoretic mobility and conductivity variation were measured using Zêtasizer equipment during emulsification process. The results revealed that oil droplets average size decreased significantly (p<0.05) during the first 6h of emulsification process and that from 160 to 1 μm for emulsions with 5%, 10% and from 400 to 29 μm for emulsion with 15% of initial oil ratio. For all tested oil ratios, pH measurement showed significant decrease and negative electrophoretic mobility showed the accumulation of OH(-) at oil/water interface leading to droplets stability in the emulsion. The conductivity of emulsions showed a decrease of the ions quantity in solution, which indicated formation of positive charge layer around OH(-) structure. They constitute a double ionic layer around oil particles providing emulsion stability. This study showed a strong correlation between turbidity measurement and proportion of emulsified oil. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Measuring the Frequency of Light with Femtosecond Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udem, Thomas

    2001-04-01

    We have shown that the modes of a femtosecond mode-locked laser are distributed uniformly in frequency space and can be used like a ruler to measure large optical frequency differences. To measure absolute optical frequencies we created a frequency comb that contained a full optical octave to measure the gap that is spanned by this octave. Unlike the complex harmonic frequency chains used in the past this new approach uses only one laser sources and is nevertheless capable of measuring almost any optical frequency with the same set up. We applied the new technique to determine the absolute frequencies of the cesium D1, of several components in Iodine around 563 THz, a sharp "clock" transition in a single trapped Indium ion and the hydrogen 1S-2S transition. We also tested its performance by comparing two similar set-ups.

  19. Study of fuzzy adaptive PID controller on thermal frequency stabilizing laser with double longitudinal modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Qingkai; Zhang, Tao; Yan, Yining

    2016-10-01

    There are contradictions among speediness, anti-disturbance performance, and steady-state accuracy caused by traditional PID controller in the existing light source systems of thermal frequency stabilizing laser with double longitudinal modes. In this paper, a new kind of fuzzy adaptive PID controller was designed by combining fuzzy PID control technology and expert system to make frequency stabilizing system obtain the optimal performance. The experiments show that the frequency stability of the designed PID controller is similar to the existing PID controller (the magnitude of frequency stability is less than 10-9 in constant temperature and 10-7 in open air). But the preheating time is shortened obviously (from 10 minutes to 5 minutes) and the anti-disturbance capability is improved significantly (the recovery time needed after strong interference is reduced from 1 minute to 10 seconds).

  20. Stability improvement of an operational two-way satellite time and frequency transfer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi-Jiun; Fujieda, Miho; Takiguchi, Hiroshi; Tseng, Wen-Hung; Tsao, Hen-Wai

    2016-04-01

    To keep national time accurately coherent with coordinated universal time, many national metrology institutes (NMIs) use two-way satellite time and frequency transfer (TWSTFT) to continuously measure the time difference with other NMIs over an international baseline. Some NMIs have ultra-stable clocks with stability better than 10-16. However, current operational TWSTFT can only provide frequency uncertainty of 10-15 and time uncertainty of 1 ns, which is inadequate. The uncertainty is dominated by the short-term stability and the diurnals, i.e. the measurement variation with a period of one day. The aim of this work is to improve the stability of operational TWSTFT systems without additional transmission, bandwidth or increase in signal power. A software-defined receiver (SDR) comprising a high-resolution correlator and successive interference cancellation associated with open-loop configuration as the TWSTFT receiver reduces the time deviation from 140 ps to 73 ps at averaging time of 1 h, and occasionally suppresses diurnals. To study the source of the diurnals, TWSTFT is performed using a 2  ×  2 earth station (ES) array. Consequently, some ESs sensitive to temperature variation are identified, and the diurnals are significantly reduced by employing insensitive ESs. Hence, the operational TWSTFT using the proposed SDR with insensitive ESs achieves time deviation to 41 ps at 1 h, and 80 ps for averaging times from 1 h to 20 h.

  1. Optimality of the genetic code with respect to protein stability and amino-acid frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Gilis, Dimitri; Massar, Serge; Cerf, Nicolas J; Rooman, Marianne

    2001-01-01

    Background The genetic code is known to be efficient in limiting the effect of mistranslation errors. A misread codon often codes for the same amino acid or one with similar biochemical properties, so the structure and function of the coded protein remain relatively unaltered. Previous studies have attempted to address this question quantitatively, by estimating the fraction of randomly generated codes that do better than the genetic code in respect of overall robustness. We extended these results by investigating the role of amino-acid frequencies in the optimality of the genetic code. Results We found that taking the amino-acid frequency into account decreases the fraction of random codes that beat the natural code. This effect is particularly pronounced when more refined measures of the amino-acid substitution cost are used than hydrophobicity. To show this, we devised a new cost function by evaluating in silico the change in folding free energy caused by all possible point mutations in a set of protein structures. With this function, which measures protein stability while being unrelated to the code's structure, we estimated that around two random codes in a billion (109) are fitter than the natural code. When alternative codes are restricted to those that interchange biosynthetically related amino acids, the genetic code appears even more optimal. Conclusions These results lead us to discuss the role of amino-acid frequencies and other parameters in the genetic code's evolution, in an attempt to propose a tentative picture of primitive life. PMID:11737948

  2. Effect of master oscillator stability over pulse repetition frequency on hybrid semiconductor mode-locked laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro Alves, D.; Abreu, Manuel; Cabral, Alexandre; Rebordão, J. M.

    2015-04-01

    Semiconductor mode-locked lasers are a very attractive laser pulse source for high accuracy length metrology. However, for some applications, this kind of device does not have the required frequency stability. Operating the laser in hybrid mode will increase the laser pulse repetition frequency (PRF) stability. In this study it is showed that the laser PRF is not only locked to the master oscillator but also maintains the same level of stability of the master oscillator. The device used in this work is a 10 mm long mode-locked asymmetrical cladding single section InAs/InP quantum dash diode laser emitting at 1580 nm with a pulse repetition frequency of ≈4.37 GHz. The laser nominal stability in passive mode (no external oscillator) shows direct dependence with the gain current and the stability range goes from 10-4 to 10-7. Several oscillators with different stabilities were used for the hybrid-mode operation (with external oscillator) and the resulting mode-locked laser stability compared. For low cost oscillators with low stability, the laser PRF stability achieves a value of 10-7 and for higher stable oscillation source (such as oven controlled quartz oscillators (OXCO)) the stability can reach values up to 10-12 (τ =1 s).

  3. Compensating sampling errors in stabilizing helmet-mounted displays using auxiliary acceleration measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merhav, S.; Velger, M.

    1991-01-01

    A method based on complementary filtering is shown to be effective in compensating for the image stabilization error due to sampling delays of HMD position and orientation measurements. These delays would otherwise have prevented the stabilization of the image in HMDs. The method is also shown to improve the resolution of the head orientation measurement, particularly at low frequencies, thus providing smoother head control commands, which are essential for precise head pointing and teleoperation.

  4. Compensating sampling errors in stabilizing helmet-mounted displays using auxiliary acceleration measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merhav, S.; Velger, M.

    1991-01-01

    A method based on complementary filtering is shown to be effective in compensating for the image stabilization error due to sampling delays of HMD position and orientation measurements. These delays would otherwise have prevented the stabilization of the image in HMDs. The method is also shown to improve the resolution of the head orientation measurement, particularly at low frequencies, thus providing smoother head control commands, which are essential for precise head pointing and teleoperation.

  5. Astronomical Verification of a Stabilized Frequency Reference Transfer System for the Square Kilometer Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozzard, David R.; Schediwy, Sascha W.; Dodson, Richard; Rioja, María J.; Hill, Mike; Lennon, Brett; McFee, Jock; Mirtschin, Peter; Stevens, Jamie; Grainge, Keith

    2017-07-01

    In order to meet its cutting-edge scientific objectives, the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) telescope requires high-precision frequency references to be distributed to each of its antennas. The frequency references are distributed via fiber-optic links and must be actively stabilized to compensate for phase noise imposed on the signals by environmental perturbations on the links. SKA engineering requirements demand that any proposed frequency reference distribution system be proved in “astronomical verification” tests. We present results of the astronomical verification of a stabilized frequency reference transfer system proposed for SKA-mid. The dual-receiver architecture of the Australia Telescope Compact Array was exploited to subtract the phase noise of the sky signal from the data, allowing the phase noise of observations performed using a standard frequency reference, as well as the stabilized frequency reference transfer system transmitting over 77 km of fiber-optic cable, to be directly compared. Results are presented for the fractional frequency stability and phase drift of the stabilized frequency reference transfer system for celestial calibrator observations at 5 and 25 GHz. These observations plus additional laboratory results for the transferred signal stability over a 166 km metropolitan fiber-optic link are used to show that the stabilized transfer system under test exceeds all SKA phase-stability requirements within a broad range of observing conditions. Furthermore, we have shown that alternative reference dissemination systems that use multiple synthesizers to supply reference signals to sub-sections of an array may limit the imaging capability of the telescope.

  6. 47 CFR 73.1540 - Carrier frequency measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 73.1540 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES... measurements. (a) The carrier frequency of each AM and FM station and the visual carrier frequency and the difference between the visual carrier and the aural carrier or center frequency of each TV and Class A...

  7. Frequency stabilization in injection controlled pulsed CO2 lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, Robert T.; Ancellet, Gerard M.

    1987-01-01

    Longitudinal mode selection by injection has been demonstrated as a viable technique for tailoring a TEA-CO2 laser with pulse energies of a Joule or greater to fit the requirements of a coherent lidar transmitter. Once reliable generation of single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) pulses is obtained, one can study the intrapulse frequency variation and attempt to determine the sources of frequency sweeping, or chirp. These sources include the effect of the decaying plasma, the thermal gradient due to the energy dissipation associated with the laser mechanism itself, and the pressure shift of the center frequency of the laser transition. The use of the positive-branch unstable resonator as an efficient means of coupling a discharge with transverse spatial dimensions of the order of centimeters to an optical cavity mode introduces another concern: namely, what can be done to emphasize transverse mode discrimination in an unstable resonator cavity while maintaining high coupling efficiency. These issues are briefly discussed in the paper, and representative experimental examples are included.

  8. Frequency-comb-referenced tunable diode laser spectroscopy and laser stabilization applied to laser cooling.

    PubMed

    Fordell, Thomas; Wallin, Anders E; Lindvall, Thomas; Vainio, Markku; Merimaa, Mikko

    2014-11-01

    Laser cooling of trapped atoms and ions in optical clocks demands stable light sources with precisely known absolute frequencies. Since a frequency comb is a vital part of any optical clock, the comb lines can be used for stabilizing tunable, user-friendly diode lasers. Here, a light source for laser cooling of trapped strontium ions is described. The megahertz-level stability and absolute frequency required are realized by stabilizing a distributed-feedback semiconductor laser to a frequency comb. Simple electronics is used to lock and scan the laser across the comb lines, and comb mode number ambiguities are resolved by using a separate, saturated absorption cell that exhibits easily distinguishable hyperfine absorption lines with known frequencies. Due to the simplicity, speed, and wide tuning range it offers, the employed technique could find wider use in precision spectroscopy.

  9. Laser Frequency Stabilization and Control through Offset Sideband Locking to Optical Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, James I.; Livas, J.; Numata, K.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a class of techniques whereby a laser frequency can be stabilized to a fixed optical cavity resonance with an adjustable offset, providing a wide tuning range for the central frequency. These techniques require only minor modifications to the standard Pound-Drever-Hall locking techniques and have the advantage of not altering the intrinsic stability of the frequency reference. In a laboratory investigation the sideband techniques were found to perform equally well as the standard, non-tunable Pound-Drever-Hall technique, each providing more than four decades of frequency noise suppression over the free-running noise. An application of a tunable system as a pre-stabilization stage in a phase-lock loop is also presented with the combined system achieving a frequency noise suppression of nearly twelve orders of magnitude.

  10. Doppler modulation and Zeeman modulation: laser frequency stabilization without direct frequency modulation.

    PubMed

    Weis, A; Derler, S

    1988-07-01

    We discuss two methods (Zeeman modulation and Doppler modulation) for locking the frequency of a singlemode cw laser to an atomic absorption line. These methods do not require the laser frequency to be modulated directly. In the first scheme the absorption frequency of the atom is modulated via the Zeeman effect; in the second scheme the laser frequency is modulated indirectly via the Doppler effect in an atomic beam. We used the two methods successfully to lock two dye lasers to the transitions 6S((1/2)) ? 7S((1/2)) and 7S((1/2)) ? 15P(?) in atomic cesium.

  11. An inkjet vision measurement technique for high-frequency jetting

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Kye-Si Jang, Min-Hyuck; Park, Ha Yeong; Ko, Hyun-Seok

    2014-06-15

    Inkjet technology has been used as manufacturing a tool for printed electronics. To increase the productivity, the jetting frequency needs to be increased. When using high-frequency jetting, the printed pattern quality could be non-uniform since the jetting performance characteristics including the jetting speed and droplet volume could vary significantly with increases in jet frequency. Therefore, high-frequency jetting behavior must be evaluated properly for improvement. However, it is difficult to measure high-frequency jetting behavior using previous vision analysis methods, because subsequent droplets are close or even merged. In this paper, we present vision measurement techniques to evaluate the drop formation of high-frequency jetting. The proposed method is based on tracking target droplets such that subsequent droplets can be excluded in the image analysis by focusing on the target droplet. Finally, a frequency sweeping method for jetting speed and droplet volume is presented to understand the overall jetting frequency effects on jetting performance.

  12. Frequency Measurements of Al+ and Hg+ Optical Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itano, W. M.; Bergquist, J. C.; Rosenband, T.; Wineland, D. J.; Hume, D.; Chou, C.-W.; Jefferts, S. R.; Heavner, T. P.; Parker, T. E.; Diddams, S. A.; Fortier, T. M.

    2010-02-01

    Frequency standards based on narrow optical transitions in 27Al+ and 199Hg+ ions have been developed at NIST. Both standards have absolute reproducibilities of a few parts in 1017. This is about an order of magnitude better than the fractional uncertainty of the SI second, which is based on the 133Cs hyperfine frequency. Use of femtosecond laser frequency combs makes it possible to compare the optical frequency standards to microwave frequency standards or to each other. The ratio of the Al+ and Hg+ frequencies can be measured more accurately than the reproducibility of the primary cesium frequency standards. Frequency measurements made over time can be used to set limits on the time variation of fundamental constants, such as the fine structure constant α or the quark masses.

  13. An inkjet vision measurement technique for high-frequency jetting.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Kye-Si; Jang, Min-Hyuck; Park, Ha Yeong; Ko, Hyun-Seok

    2014-06-01

    Inkjet technology has been used as manufacturing a tool for printed electronics. To increase the productivity, the jetting frequency needs to be increased. When using high-frequency jetting, the printed pattern quality could be non-uniform since the jetting performance characteristics including the jetting speed and droplet volume could vary significantly with increases in jet frequency. Therefore, high-frequency jetting behavior must be evaluated properly for improvement. However, it is difficult to measure high-frequency jetting behavior using previous vision analysis methods, because subsequent droplets are close or even merged. In this paper, we present vision measurement techniques to evaluate the drop formation of high-frequency jetting. The proposed method is based on tracking target droplets such that subsequent droplets can be excluded in the image analysis by focusing on the target droplet. Finally, a frequency sweeping method for jetting speed and droplet volume is presented to understand the overall jetting frequency effects on jetting performance.

  14. Measuring Postural Stability: Strategies For Signal Acquisition And Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, Susan A.; Harris, Gerald F.

    1987-01-01

    A balance platform was used to collect postural stability data from 60 children, approximately half of whom have been diagnosed with cerebral palsy. The data was examined with respect to its frequency content, resulting in an improved strategy for frequency estimation. With a reliable assessment of the frequency domain characteristics, the signal stationarity could then be examined. Significant differences in signal stationarity were observed when the epoch length was changed, as well as between the normal and cerebral palsy populations.

  15. All optical measurement of an unknown wideband microwave frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A.; Priye, V.; Raj Singh, R.

    2016-12-01

    A novel all optical measurement scheme is proposed to measure wideband microwave frequencies up to 30 GHz. The proposed method is based on a four-wave mixing (FWM) approach in a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) of both even order side-bands generated by an unknown microwave frequency modulating an optical carrier. The optical power of a generated FWM signal depends on frequency spacing between extracted side-bands. A mathematical relation is established between FWM power and frequency of an unknown signal. A calibration curve is drawn based on the mathematical relation which predicts the unknown frequency from power withdrawn after FWM.

  16. Method of detecting system function by measuring frequency response

    DOEpatents

    Morrison, John L.; Morrison, William H.; Christophersen, Jon P.; Motloch, Chester G.

    2013-01-08

    Methods of rapidly measuring an impedance spectrum of an energy storage device in-situ over a limited number of logarithmically distributed frequencies are described. An energy storage device is excited with a known input signal, and a response is measured to ascertain the impedance spectrum. An excitation signal is a limited time duration sum-of-sines consisting of a select number of frequencies. In one embodiment, magnitude and phase of each frequency of interest within the sum-of-sines is identified when the selected frequencies and sample rate are logarithmic integer steps greater than two. This technique requires a measurement with a duration of one period of the lowest frequency. In another embodiment, where selected frequencies are distributed in octave steps, the impedance spectrum can be determined using a captured time record that is reduced to a half-period of the lowest frequency.

  17. Low-frequency vibration measurement by a dual-frequency DBR fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bing; Cheng, Linghao; Liang, Yizhi; Jin, Long; Guo, Tuan; Guan, Bai-Ou

    2017-09-01

    A dual-frequency distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) fiber laser based sensor is demonstrated for low-frequency vibration measurement through the Doppler effect. The response of the proposed sensor is quite linear and is much higher than that of a conventional accelerometer. The proposed sensor can work down to 1 Hz with high sensitivity. Therefore, the proposed sensor is very efficient in low-frequency vibration measurement.

  18. Stabilizing Conditional Standard Errors of Measurement in Scale Score Transformations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moses, Tim; Kim, YoungKoung

    2017-01-01

    The focus of this article is on scale score transformations that can be used to stabilize conditional standard errors of measurement (CSEMs). Three transformations for stabilizing the estimated CSEMs are reviewed, including the traditional arcsine transformation, a recently developed general variance stabilization transformation, and a new method…

  19. Stride frequency and length adjustment in post-stroke individuals: influence on the margins of stability.

    PubMed

    Hak, Laura; Houdijk, Han; van der Wurff, Peter; Prins, Maarten R; Beek, Peter J; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2015-02-01

    To investigate whether post-stroke participants can walk at different combinations of stride frequency and stride length and how these adaptations affect the backward and medio-lateral margins of stability. Computer Assisted Rehabilitation Environment (CAREN). Ten post-stroke individuals. Six trials of 2 min walking on a treadmill at different combinations of stride frequency and stride length. Treadmill speed was set at the corresponding speed, and subjects received visual feedback about the required and actual stride length. Mean stride length and frequency and backward and medio-lateral margins of stability for each trial. Stroke patients were able to adjust step length when required, but had difficulty adjusting step frequency. When a stride frequency higher than self-selected stride frequency was imposed patients additionally needed to increase stride length in order to match the imposed treadmill speed. For trials at a high stride frequency, in particular, the increase in the backward and medio-lateral margins of stability was limited. In conclusion, training post-stroke individuals to increase stride frequency during walking might give them more opportunities to increase the margins of stability and consequently reduce fall risk.

  20. The study of the emission frequency control system stability in hydropulse generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapelyuhovskiy, Andrey A.; Kapelyuhovskaya, Alexandra A.; Stepanova, Elena P.

    2017-08-01

    During a low-frequency acoustic treatment of the oil-bearing formation, downhole hydraulic vibrators are used. Their efficient operation is possible when using the automatic frequency control system due to the change of the expenditure pump flow rate. A long hydraulic line specifies additional requirements to the parameters of the control system in terms of its stability. The stability of a control system using the Nyquist criterion is made. Approximating the delay by the second degree of the Pade polynomial, the stability region is determined by the D-decomposition method. The dependence of the critical delay on the system transfer ratio is found out.

  1. Frequency-stabilized high-power violet laser diode with an ytterbium hollow-cathode lamp.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Ihn; Park, Chang Yong; Yeom, Jin Yong; Kim, Eok Bong; Yoon, Tai Hyun

    2003-02-15

    We have demonstrated in an ytterbium laser cooling and trapping experiment a high-power violet extendedcavity diode laser (ECDL) stabilized to the Yb resonant transition at 398.9 nm in an Yb hollow-cathode lamp. A frequency-dispersion signal, which we obtained by applying a modulation-free dichroic-atomic-vapor laser lock technique, allowed us to stabilize the violet ECDL at a frequency stability below 1 MHz at 1-s average time and a useful output power of 15 mW.

  2. FROM STABLE LASERS TO OPTICAL-FREQUENCY CLOCKS:. Merging the UltraFast and the UltraStable, for a New Epoch of Optical Frequency Measurements, Standards, & Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, J. L.; Ye, J.; Ma, L.-S.; Peng, J.-L.; Notcutt, M.; Jost, J. D.; Marian, A.

    2002-04-01

    This is a report on behalf of the World Team of Stable Laser and Optical Frequency Measurement Enthusiasts, even if most detailed illustrations draw mainly from our work at JILA. Specifically we trace some of the key ideas that have led from the first stabilized lasers, to frequency measurement up to 88 THz using frequency chains, revision of the Definition of the Metre, extension of coherent frequency chain technology into the visible, development of a vast array of stabilized lasers, and finally the recent explosive growth of direct frequency measurement capability in the visible using fs comb techniques. We present our recent work showing a Molecular Iodine-based Optical Clock which delivers, over a range of time scales, rf output at a stability level basically equivalent to the RF stability prototype, the Hydrogen Maser. We note the bifurcation between single-ion-based clocks - likely to be the stability/reproducibility ultimate winners in the next generation - and simpler systems based on gas cells, which can have impressive stabilities but may suffer from a variety of reproducibility-limiting processes. Active Phase-Lock synchronization of independent fs lasers allows sub-fs timing control. Copies of related works in our labs may be found/obtained at our website .

  3. Low-Frequency Measurements of the CMB Spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Kogut, A.; Bensadoun, M.; De Amici, Giovanni; Levin, S.; Limon,M.; Smoot, George F.; Sironi, G.; Bersanelli, M.; Bonelli, G.

    1989-10-01

    As part of an extended program to characterize the spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at low frequencies, we have performed multiple measurements from a high-altitude site in California. On average, these measurements suggest a CMB temperature slightly lower than measurements at higher frequencies. Atmospheric conditions and the encroachment of civilization are now significant limitations from our present observing site. In November 1989, we will make new measurements from the South Pole Amundsen-Scott Station at frequencies 0.82, 1.5, 2.5, 3.8, 7.5, and 90 GHz. We discuss recent measurements and indicate improvements possible from a polar observing site.

  4. Low-frequency measurements of the CMB spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Kogut, A.; Bensadoun, M.; Amici, G.D.; Levin, S.; Limon, M.; Smoot, G. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA Space Sciences Laboratory, Berkeley, CA ); Sironi, G. ); Bersanelli, M.; Bonelli, G. )

    1990-01-15

    As part of an extended program to characterize the spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at low frequencies, we have performed multiple measurements from a high-altitude site in Calfornia. On average, these measurements suggests a CMB temperature slightly lower than measurements at higher frequencies. Atmospheric conditions and the encroachment of civilization are now significant limitations from our present observing site. In November 1989, we will make new measurements from the South Pole Amundsen-Scott Station at frequencies 0.82, 1.5, 2.5, 3.8, 7.5, and 90 GHz. We discuss recent measurements and indicate improvements possible from a polar observing site.

  5. Matrix method of determining the longitudinal-stability coefficients and frequency response of an aircraft from transient flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donegan, James J; Pearson, Henry A

    1952-01-01

    A matrix method is presented for determining the longitudinal-stability coefficients and frequency response of an aircraft from arbitrary maneuvers. The method is devised so that it can be applied to time-history measurements of combinations of such simple quantities as angle of attack, pitching velocity, load factor, elevator angle, and hinge moment to obtain the over-all coefficients. Although the method has been devised primarily for the evaluation of stability coefficients which are of primary interest in most aircraft loads and stability studies, it can be used also, with a simple additional computation, to determine the frequency-response characteristics. The entire procedure can be applied or extended to other problems which can be expressed by linear differential equations.

  6. 47 CFR 74.662 - Frequency monitors and measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency monitors and measurements. 74.662 Section 74.662 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES... Auxiliary Stations § 74.662 Frequency monitors and measurements. The licensee of a television...

  7. 47 CFR 74.465 - Frequency monitors and measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency monitors and measurements. 74.465 Section 74.465 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES... Broadcast Stations § 74.465 Frequency monitors and measurements. The licensee of a remote pickup station...

  8. Measurement of soil water content with dielectric dispersion frequency

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Frequency domain reflectometry (FDR) is an inexpensive and attractive methodology for repeated measurements of soil water content (SWC). Although there are some known measurement limitations for dry soil and sand, a fixed-frequency method is commonly employed using commercially available FDR probes....

  9. 47 CFR 78.113 - Frequency monitors and measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency monitors and measurements. 78.113 Section 78.113 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES CABLE TELEVISION RELAY SERVICE Technical Regulations § 78.113 Frequency monitors and measurements....

  10. 47 CFR 78.113 - Frequency monitors and measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency monitors and measurements. 78.113 Section 78.113 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES CABLE TELEVISION RELAY SERVICE Technical Regulations § 78.113 Frequency monitors and measurements....

  11. 47 CFR 78.113 - Frequency monitors and measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency monitors and measurements. 78.113 Section 78.113 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES CABLE TELEVISION RELAY SERVICE Technical Regulations § 78.113 Frequency monitors and measurements....

  12. 47 CFR 78.113 - Frequency monitors and measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency monitors and measurements. 78.113 Section 78.113 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES CABLE TELEVISION RELAY SERVICE Technical Regulations § 78.113 Frequency monitors and measurements....

  13. 47 CFR 78.113 - Frequency monitors and measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency monitors and measurements. 78.113 Section 78.113 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES CABLE TELEVISION RELAY SERVICE Technical Regulations § 78.113 Frequency monitors and measurements....

  14. 47 CFR 74.662 - Frequency monitors and measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency monitors and measurements. 74.662 Section 74.662 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES... Auxiliary Stations § 74.662 Frequency monitors and measurements. The licensee of a television broadcast...

  15. 47 CFR 74.465 - Frequency monitors and measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency monitors and measurements. 74.465 Section 74.465 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES... Broadcast Stations § 74.465 Frequency monitors and measurements. The licensee of a remote pickup station or...

  16. 47 CFR 74.1262 - Frequency monitors and measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency monitors and measurements. 74.1262 Section 74.1262 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES... Translator Stations and FM Broadcast Booster Stations § 74.1262 Frequency monitors and measurements. (a) The...

  17. Center Frequency Stabilization in Planar Dual-Mode Resonators during Mode-Splitting Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naji, Adham; Soliman, Mina H.

    2017-03-01

    Shape symmetry in dual-mode planar electromagnetic resonators results in their ability to host two degenerate resonant modes. As the designer enforces a controllable break in the symmetry, the degeneracy is removed and the two modes couple, exchanging energy and elevating the resonator into its desirable second-order resonance operation. The amount of coupling is controlled by the degree of asymmetry introduced. However, this mode coupling (or splitting) usually comes at a price. The centre frequency of the perturbed resonator is inadvertently drifted from its original value prior to coupling. Maintaining centre frequency stability during mode splitting is a nontrivial geometric design problem. In this paper, we analyse the problem and propose a novel method to compensate for this frequency drift, based on field analysis and perturbation theory, and we validate the solution through a practical design example and measurements. The analytical method used works accurately within the perturbational limit. It may also be used as a starting point for further numerical optimization algorithms, reducing the required computational time during design, when larger perturbations are made to the resonator. In addition to enabling the novel design example presented, it is hoped that the findings will inspire akin designs for other resonator shapes, in different disciplines and applications.

  18. Center Frequency Stabilization in Planar Dual-Mode Resonators during Mode-Splitting Control.

    PubMed

    Naji, Adham; Soliman, Mina H

    2017-03-08

    Shape symmetry in dual-mode planar electromagnetic resonators results in their ability to host two degenerate resonant modes. As the designer enforces a controllable break in the symmetry, the degeneracy is removed and the two modes couple, exchanging energy and elevating the resonator into its desirable second-order resonance operation. The amount of coupling is controlled by the degree of asymmetry introduced. However, this mode coupling (or splitting) usually comes at a price. The centre frequency of the perturbed resonator is inadvertently drifted from its original value prior to coupling. Maintaining centre frequency stability during mode splitting is a nontrivial geometric design problem. In this paper, we analyse the problem and propose a novel method to compensate for this frequency drift, based on field analysis and perturbation theory, and we validate the solution through a practical design example and measurements. The analytical method used works accurately within the perturbational limit. It may also be used as a starting point for further numerical optimization algorithms, reducing the required computational time during design, when larger perturbations are made to the resonator. In addition to enabling the novel design example presented, it is hoped that the findings will inspire akin designs for other resonator shapes, in different disciplines and applications.

  19. Center Frequency Stabilization in Planar Dual-Mode Resonators during Mode-Splitting Control

    PubMed Central

    Naji, Adham; Soliman, Mina H.

    2017-01-01

    Shape symmetry in dual-mode planar electromagnetic resonators results in their ability to host two degenerate resonant modes. As the designer enforces a controllable break in the symmetry, the degeneracy is removed and the two modes couple, exchanging energy and elevating the resonator into its desirable second-order resonance operation. The amount of coupling is controlled by the degree of asymmetry introduced. However, this mode coupling (or splitting) usually comes at a price. The centre frequency of the perturbed resonator is inadvertently drifted from its original value prior to coupling. Maintaining centre frequency stability during mode splitting is a nontrivial geometric design problem. In this paper, we analyse the problem and propose a novel method to compensate for this frequency drift, based on field analysis and perturbation theory, and we validate the solution through a practical design example and measurements. The analytical method used works accurately within the perturbational limit. It may also be used as a starting point for further numerical optimization algorithms, reducing the required computational time during design, when larger perturbations are made to the resonator. In addition to enabling the novel design example presented, it is hoped that the findings will inspire akin designs for other resonator shapes, in different disciplines and applications. PMID:28272422

  20. Compact double optical feedback external-cavity diode laser system and its frequency stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doi, Kohei; Minabe, Yuta; Sato, Takashi; Maruyama, Takeo; Ohkawa, Masashi; Tsubokawa, Tsuneya

    2007-02-01

    External cavity diode laser (ECDL) systems are presently experiencing a surge in popularity as laser light-sources, in advanced optical communications- and measurement-systems. Because such systems require that their external reflectors be precisely controlled, to eliminate low frequency fluctuations (LFF) in optical output, we conducted experiments with a two-cavity version, which easily eliminated LFFs, as expected. The technique has the added advantage of a narrower oscillation-linewidth than would be achievable, using a single optical feedback. However, the ECDL's oscillation frequency is susceptible to the influences of the drive-current, as well as changes, both in the refractive index, and the overall length of the external reflector that results from fluctuations in atmospheric temperature. We made every effort to maintain the length of the ECDL cavity, while evaluating oscillation-frequency stability. We used a Super-Invar board as the platform for our compact ECDL system to minimize the influence of thermal expansion, because of its low expansion coefficient. We then compared the effect of atmospheric temperature variations between two experimental conditions, with the Super-invar board and without it, and finally took note of the improvement in performance, using the board.

  1. The PSDAVLL signal detection with synchronous ferroelectric liquid crystal switching as a laser frequency stabilization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudzik, G.; Rzepka, J.; Abramski, K. M.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we present the DAVLL (Dichroic Atomic Vapor Laser Lock) signals detection method for laser frequency stabilization which has been improved by synchronous detection system based on the surface-stabilized ferroelectric liquid crystal (SSFLC). The SSFLC cell is a polarization switch and quarter waveplate component and it replaces the well-known two-photodiode detection configuration known as the balanced polarimeter. The presented polarization switching dichroic atomic vapor laser lock technique (PSDAVLL) was practically used in VCSEL-based frequency stabilization system with vapor isotopes (85,87Rb) rubidium cell. The applied PSDAVLL method has allowed us to obtain a frequency stability of 2.7 × 10-9 and a reproducibility of 1.2 × 10-8, with a dynamic range ratio (DNR) of detected signals of around 81.4 dB, what is 9.6 dB better than obtained in the balanced polarimeter configuration. The described PSDAVLL technique was compared with 3-f (on the 3rd harmonic) and passive frequency stabilization methods. Additionally, the presented setup consists only one-photodiode detection path what reduces parasitic phenomena like offsets between photodiode amplifiers, amplifier gain changes due to ambient conditions, aging effects of electronic components etc. as a consequence leads to better frequency reproducibility, stabilization accuracy and less detection system sensitivity to ambient condition changes.

  2. Hybrid nanolaminate dielectrics engineered for frequency and bias stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, S. K.; Patel, R. P.; Wolden, C. A.

    2013-08-01

    Metal-insulator-metal capacitors were fabricated from hybrid alumina-silicone nanolaminates deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. These two materials have complementary properties that produce dielectrics that are exceptionally stable with respect to frequency and dc bias. 50% alumina-silicone nanolaminates displayed low dielectric loss (tan δ = 0.04) and a negligible quadratic voltage coefficient (α = 7 ppm/V2). Both of these values are exceptionally improved over the properties of the individual components. This performance was achieved in 165 nm thick films that provide both high specific capacitance (30 nF/cm2) and extremely low leakage (˜10-9 A/cm2 at 1 MV/cm).

  3. Exploring the Frequency Stability Limits of Whispering Gallery Mode Resonators for Metrological Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chembo, Yanne K.; Baumgartel, Lukas; Grudinin, Ivan; Strekalov, Dmitry; Thompson, Robert; Yu, Nan

    2012-01-01

    Whispering gallery mode resonators are attracting increasing interest as promising frequency reference cavities. Unlike commonly used Fabry-Perot cavities, however, they are filled with a bulk medium whose properties have a significant impact on the stability of its resonance frequencies. In this context that has to be reduced to a minimum. On the other hand, a small monolithic resonator provides opportunity for better stability against vibration and acceleration. this feature is essential when the cavity operates in a non-laboratory environment. In this paper, we report a case study for a crystalline resonator, and discuss the a pathway towards the inhibition of vibration-and acceleration-induced frequency fluctuations.

  4. Time and frequency measuring metrological equipment in the USSR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uljanov, Adolph A.

    1990-01-01

    The complex of the means of providing time and frequency traceability in the USSR includes the system of time and frequency standards of the National Time and Frequency Calibration Service, time and frequency transfer facilities and local time and frequency standards. Control on measurement correctness is performed by the All-Union State Standard calibration service. The hardware of most of the above-mentioned systems is provided by the instruments developed by our institute. A common scientific and technological approach allowed us to create a unified system of time-frequency equipment composed of widely used serial instruments, sets, automated systems and complexes. Primary frequency standards of different classes, time and frequency references and instruments are based on the unified system. CH1-70 hydrogen frequency standard and its CH1-70A, CH1-80 modifications are used in the group time and frequency standards. Measuring time and data processing techniques, and also instrumentation specifications on the results of 10-year operation are given. The existing system provides time-frequency measurements with 2 times 10(exp -13) plus or minus 1 times 10(exp -14) accuracy.

  5. Hyperfine structure measurement of rubidium atom and tunable diode laser stabilization by using Sagnac interferometer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Tae; Zhen, Liu; Kapitanov, Venedikt; Kim, Hyun Su; Park, Jong Rak; Park, Si-Hyun

    2006-11-01

    The Rubidium saturated absorption spectra for D2 transition lines are used to measure the Fabry-Perot interferometer free spectral range (FSR). The scale linearity of the laser frequency tuning is determined. The Sagnac interferometer has been used for the laser stabilization. The result shows that the laser frequency is stabilized upto sub-mega Herz level. Also the hyperfine structure [5(2)S(1/2) F = 3 --> F' = 2, 3, 4 5(2)P(3/2) 85Rb] of the rubidium atom has been measured by using the tilt locking method, which shows the same result as the conventional saturation spectroscopy.

  6. Doppler modulation and Zeeman modulation: laser frequency stabilization without direct frequency modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Weis, A.; Derler, S.

    1988-07-01

    We discuss two methods (Zeeman modulation and Doppler modulation) for locking the frequency of a single-mode cw laser to an atomic absorption line. These methods do not require the laser frequency to be modulated directly. In the first scheme the absorption frequency of the atom is modulated via the Zeeman effect; in the second scheme the laser frequency is modulated indirectly via the Doppler effect in an atomic beam. We used the two methods successfully to lock two dye lasers to the transitions 6S/sub 1/2/..-->..7S/sub 1/2/ and 7S/sub 1/2/..-->..15P/sub 3/2/ in atomic cesium.

  7. Measurement of high-degree solar oscillation frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachmann, K. T.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Harvey, J. W.; Hill, F.

    1995-01-01

    We present m-averaged solar p- and f-mode oscillation frequencies over the frequency range nu greater than 1.8 and less than 5.0 mHz and the spherical harmonic degree range l greater than or equal to 100 and less than or equal to 1200 from full-disk, 1000 x 1024 pixel, Ca II intensity images collected 1993 June 22-25 with a temporal cadence of 60 s. We itemize the sources and magnitudes of statistical and systematic uncertainties and of small frequency corrections, and we show that our frequencies represent an improvement in accuracy and coverage over previous measurements. Our frequencies agree at the 2 micro Hz level with Mount Wilson frequencies determined for l less than or equal to 600 from full-disk images, and we find systematic offsets of 10-20 micro Hz with respect to frequencies measured from Big Bear and La Palma observations. We give evidence that these latter offsets are indicative of spatial scaling uncertainties associated with the analysis of partial-disk images. In comparison with theory, our p-mode frequencies agree within 10 micro Hz of frequencies predicted by the Los Alamos model but are as much as 100 micro Hz smaller than frequencies predicted by the Denmark and Yale models at degrees near 1000. We also find systematic differences between our n = 0 frequencies and the frequencies closely agreed upon by all three models.

  8. Frequency stabilization of an external cavity diode laser to molecular iodine at 657.483 nm.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hui-Mei; Wang, Shing-Chung; Shy, Jow-Tsong

    2006-05-01

    The saturation spectrum of the P(84) 5-5 transition of 127I2 at 657.483 nm is obtained with the third-harmonic demodulation method using an external cavity diode laser. The laser frequency is modulated by modulating the diode current instead of modulating the cavity length with a piezoelectric transducer (PZT). Current modulation allows a modulation frequency that is higher than PZT modulation. The signal-to-noise ratio of 1000 is better than previous results presented in the literature. The laser is frequency stabilized to the hyperfine component o of the P(84) 5-5 transition with a frequency stability of better than 10 kHz (2.2 x 10(-11) relative stability).

  9. Intermittent optical frequency measurements to reduce the dead time uncertainty of frequency link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachisu, Hidekazu; Ido, Tetsuya

    2015-11-01

    The absolute frequency of the 87Sr lattice clock transition was evaluated with an uncertainty of 1.1 × 10-15 using a frequency link to the international atomic time (TAI). The frequency uncertainty of a hydrogen maser used as a transfer oscillator was reduced by homogeneously distributed intermittent measurement over a five-day grid of TAI. Three sets of four or five days measurements as well as systematic uncertainty of the clock at 8.6 × 10-17 have resulted in an absolute frequency of 87Sr 1S0-3P0 clock transition to be 429 228 004 229 872.85 (47) Hz.

  10. The Jovian S-bursts. II - Frequency drift measurements at different frequencies throughout several storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, Y.; Aubier, M. G.; Rosolen, C.; Genova, F.; de La Noe, J.

    1980-06-01

    The frequency drift measurements performed at different frequencies throughout several storms to test the hypothesis of trapped electrons accelerated at Io are presented. The observations were made in the 20-40 MHz range with high time and frequency resolutions; the measurements show that the average value of the drift-rate at a fixed frequency varies all along a given storm. The measured drift-rate of a storm cannot be fitted by a set of curves deduced from the trapped electrons hypothesis; at the maximum frequency of emission, very high drift-rates are measured for most cases, which contradicts this hypothesis. It is concluded that the electrons responsible for the S-burst emission are more likely accelerated in the ionosphere of Jupiter than at Io.

  11. Absolute distance measurement using frequency-sweeping heterodyne interferometer calibrated by an optical frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xuejian; Wei, Haoyun; Zhang, Hongyuan; Ren, Libing; Li, Yan; Zhang, Jitao

    2013-04-01

    We present a frequency-sweeping heterodyne interferometer to measure an absolute distance based on a frequency-tunable diode laser calibrated by an optical frequency comb (OFC) and an interferometric phase measurement system. The laser frequency-sweeping process is calibrated by the OFC within a range of 200 GHz and an accuracy of 1.3 kHz, which brings about a precise temporal synthetic wavelength of 1.499 mm. The interferometric phase measurement system consisting of the analog signal processing circuit and the digital phase meter achieves a phase difference resolution better than 0.1 deg. As the laser frequency is sweeping, the absolute distance can be determined by measuring the phase difference variation of the interference signals. In the laboratory condition, our experimental scheme realizes micrometer accuracy over meter distance.

  12. Swept frequency technique for dispersion measurement of microstrip lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Richard Q.

    1987-01-01

    Microstrip lines used in microwave integrated circuits are dispersive. Because a microstrip line is an open structure, the dispersion can not be derived with pure TEM, TE, or TM mode analysis. Dispersion analysis has commonly been done using a spectral domain approach, and dispersion measurement has been made with high Q microstrip ring resonators. Since the dispersion of a microstrip line is fully characterized by the frequency dependent phase velocity of the line, dispersion measurement of microstrip lines requires the measurement of the line wavelength as a function of frequency. In this paper, a swept frequency technique for dispersion measurement is described.

  13. Advanced high frequency partial discharge measuring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karady, George G.

    1994-01-01

    This report explains the Advanced Partial Discharge Measuring System in ASU's High Voltage Laboratory and presents some of the results obtained using the setup. While in operation an insulation is subjected to wide ranging temperature and voltage stresses. Hence, it is necessary to study the effect of temperature on the behavior of partial discharges in an insulation. The setup described in this report can be used to test samples at temperatures ranging from -50 C to 200 C. The aim of conducting the tests described herein is to be able to predict the behavior of an insulation under different operating conditions in addition to being able to predict the possibility of failure.

  14. Note: Directly measuring the direct digital synthesizer frequency chirp-rate for an atom interferometer.

    PubMed

    Tao, Juan-Juan; Zhou, Min-Kang; Zhang, Qiao-Zhen; Cui, Jia-Feng; Duan, Xiao-Chun; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Hu, Zhong-Kun

    2015-09-01

    During gravity measurements with Raman type atom interferometry, the frequency of the laser used to drive Raman transition is scanned by chirping the frequency of a direct digital synthesizer (DDS), and the local gravity is determined by precisely measuring the chip rate α of DDS. We present an effective method that can directly evaluate the frequency chirp rate stability of our DDS. By mixing a pair of synchronous linear sweeping signals, the chirp rate fluctuation is precisely measured with a frequency counter. The measurement result shows that the relative α instability can reach 5.7 × 10(-11) in 1 s, which is neglectable in a 10(-9) g level atom interferometry gravimeter.

  15. Note: Directly measuring the direct digital synthesizer frequency chirp-rate for an atom interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Juan-Juan; Zhou, Min-Kang E-mail: zmk@hust.edu.cn; Zhang, Qiao-Zhen; Cui, Jia-Feng; Duan, Xiao-Chun; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Hu, Zhong-Kun E-mail: zmk@hust.edu.cn

    2015-09-15

    During gravity measurements with Raman type atom interferometry, the frequency of the laser used to drive Raman transition is scanned by chirping the frequency of a direct digital synthesizer (DDS), and the local gravity is determined by precisely measuring the chip rate α of DDS. We present an effective method that can directly evaluate the frequency chirp rate stability of our DDS. By mixing a pair of synchronous linear sweeping signals, the chirp rate fluctuation is precisely measured with a frequency counter. The measurement result shows that the relative α instability can reach 5.7 × 10{sup −11} in 1 s, which is neglectable in a 10{sup −9} g level atom interferometry gravimeter.

  16. Relative frequency stabilization of extended-cavity diode lasers for the re-pumping of Ca ion

    SciTech Connect

    Minamino, K.; Hasegawa, S.

    2009-03-17

    Traditional stabilization methods of multiple lasers using Fabry-Perot interferometers need several optical devices for combining and separating the laser beams. Therefore, laser beams with similar frequencies are difficult to stabilize because they cannot be easily optically separated. For this reason, we built a new laser frequency stabilization system which does not require the optical separation of the laser beams. We achieved the frequency stabilization of two extended-cavity diode lasers using an FPI within {+-}5 MHz per hour.

  17. Active frequency stabilization of a 1.062-micron, Nd:GGG, diode-laser-pumped nonplanar ring oscillator to less than 3 Hz of relative linewidth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, T.; Gustafson, E. K.; Byer, R. L.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented on the frequency stabilization of two diode-laser-pumped ring lasers that are independently locked to the same high-finesse interferometer. The relative frequency stability is measured by locking the lasers one free spectral range apart and observing the heterodyne beat note. The resultant beat note width of 2.9 Hz is consistent with the theoretical system noise-limited linewidth and is approximately 20 times that expected for shot-noise-limited performance.

  18. Improvement in medium long-term frequency stability of the integrating sphere cold atom clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Cheng, Huadong; Meng, Yanling; Wan, Jinyin; Xiao, Ling; Wang, Xiumei; Wang, Yaning; Liu, Liang

    2016-07-01

    The medium-long term frequency stability of the integrating sphere cold atom clock was improved.During the clock operation, Rb atoms were cooled and manipulated using cooling light diffusely reflected by the inner surface of a microwave cavity in the clock. This light heated the cavity and caused a frequency drift from the resonant frequency of the cavity. Power fluctuations of the cooling light led to atomic density variations in the cavity's central area, which increased the clock frequency instability through a cavity pulling effect. We overcame these limitations with appropriate solutions. A frequency stability of 3.5E-15 was achieved when the integrating time ? increased to 2E4 s.

  19. Constant-Frequency Pulsed Phase-Locked-Loop Measuring Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T.; Cantrell, John H.; Kushnick, Peter W.

    1992-01-01

    Constant-frequency pulsed phase-locked-loop measuring device is sensitive to small changes in phase velocity and easily automated. Based on use of fixed-frequency oscillator in measuring small changes in ultrasonic phase velocity when sample exposed to such changes in environment as changes in pressure and temperature. Automatically balances electrical phase shifts against acoustical phase shifts to obtain accurate measurements of acoustical phase shifts.

  20. Constant-Frequency Pulsed Phase-Locked-Loop Measuring Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T.; Cantrell, John H.; Kushnick, Peter W.

    1992-01-01

    Constant-frequency pulsed phase-locked-loop measuring device is sensitive to small changes in phase velocity and easily automated. Based on use of fixed-frequency oscillator in measuring small changes in ultrasonic phase velocity when sample exposed to such changes in environment as changes in pressure and temperature. Automatically balances electrical phase shifts against acoustical phase shifts to obtain accurate measurements of acoustical phase shifts.

  1. Collective Thomson scattering measurements with high frequency resolution at TEXTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Stejner, M.; Nielsen, S. K.; Korsholm, S. B.; Salewski, M.; Bindslev, H.; Furtula, V.; Leipold, F.; Meo, F.; Michelsen, P. K.; Moseev, D.; Buerger, A.; Kantor, M.; Baar, M. de

    2010-10-15

    We discuss the development and first results of a receiver system for the collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostic at TEXTOR with frequency resolution in the megahertz range or better. The improved frequency resolution expands the diagnostic range and utility of CTS measurements in general and is a prerequisite for measurements of ion Bernstein wave signatures in CTS spectra. The first results from the new acquisition system are shown to be consistent with theory and with simultaneous measurements by the standard receiver system.

  2. Frequency stabilization of ambience-isolated internal-mirror He-Ne lasers by thermoelectric-cooling thermal compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirvani-Mahdavi, Hamidreza; Narges, Yaghoubi

    2016-12-01

    An approach for frequency stabilization of an ambience-isolated internal-mirror He-Ne laser (632.8 nm) utilizing temperature control of the laser tube with Peltier thermoelectric coolers is demonstrated. Measurements indicate that there are an optimal temperature (23 °C) and an optimal discharge current (5.5 mA) of laser tube for which the laser light power is separately maximized. To prevent the effect of fluctuation of discharge current on the laser stability, an adjustable current source is designed and fabricated so that the current is set to be optimal (5.50 ± 0.01 mA). To isolate the laser tube from the environment, the laser metallic box connected to two Peltier thermoelectric coolers is surrounded by two thermal and acoustic insulator shells. The laser has two longitudinal modes very often. Any change in the frequency of longitudinal modes at the optimal temperature is monitored by sampling the difference of longitudinal modes' intensities. Therefore, using a feedback mechanism, the current of thermoelectric coolers is so controlled that the frequency of modes stays constant on the gain profile of the laser. The frequency stability is measured equal to 1.17 × 10-9 (˜2700×) for less than 1 min and 2.57 × 10-9 (˜1200×) for more than 1 h.

  3. Microresonator-stabilized extended-cavity diode laser for supercavity frequency stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jinkang; Savchenkov, Anatoliy A.; Matsko, Andrey B.; Huang, Shu-Wei; Maleki, Lute; Wong, Chee Wei

    2017-04-01

    We demonstrate a simple, compact, and cost-effective laser noise reduction method for stabilizing an extended cavity diode laser to a 3x105 finesse mirror Fabry-P\\'erot (F-P) cavity corresponding to resonance linewidth of 10 kHz using a crystalline MgF2 whispering gallery mode microresonator (WGMR). The laser linewidth is reduced to sub-kHz such that a stable Pound-Drever-Hall (PDH) error signal is built up. The wavelength of the pre-stabilized laser is tunable within a large bandwidth covering the high reflection mirror coating of a F-P supercavity.

  4. A multi-frequency approach to soil moisture measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castiglione, Paolo; Campbell, Colin S.; Cobos, Doug R.; Campbell, Gaylon S.

    2014-05-01

    The greatest challenge in estimating soil water content from dielectric measurements derives from the dependence of soil permittivity on, a number of additional environmental (such as salinity, temperature) and structural (bulk density, texture etc.) parameters besides water content. The ideal relationship between soil dielectric permittivity and water content (sometimes referred to as universal relationship) is one that performs satisfactorily under all possible instances of the additional variables. We show that when permittivity is measured at a single frequency, an ideal relationship does not exist. This is true in spite of conventional wisdom suggesting that those effects can be mitigated by increasing the measurement frequency. As a consequence, high frequency techniques, such as TDR, are often believed to provide the greatest accuracy. However, this is only partially true. While soil permittivity is indeed only slightly affected by salinity in the frequency range characteristic of TDR, the effects from texture are much more pronounced there compared to lower frequency techniques. This is due to the dielectric properties displayed by bound water (abundant in fine textured soils), which differ substantially from those of free water (predominant in coarse soils). Multivariate statistical analysis suggests that a much more robust predictor for soil water content can be obtained from permittivity measurements at multiple frequencies. As an alternative to classical broadband spectroscopy, which appears too sophisticated and expensive for most practical applications, we provide an example of dielectric measurements at three different frequencies, combined with soil electrical conductivity and temperature, as an alternative predictor for water content. Such measurements are conveniently obtained with a traditional capacitance sensor through a slight modification of circuitry. The proposed method was tested for four different soils (sand, sandy loam, silt loam and

  5. Dependence of microwave-excitation signal parameters on frequency stability of caesium atomic clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, A. A.; Davydov, V. V.; Vologdin, V. A.; Zalyotov, D. V.

    2015-11-01

    New scheme of the microwave - excitation signal for the caesium atomic clock is based on method of direct digital synthesis. The theoretical calculations and experimental research showed decrease step frequency tuning by several orders and improvement the spectral characteristics of the output signal of frequency synthesizer. A range of generated output frequencies is expanded, and the possibility of detuning the frequency of the neighboring resonance of spectral line that makes it possible to adjust the C-field in quantum frequency standard is implemented. Experimental research of the metrological characteristics of the quantum frequency standard on the atoms of caesium - 133 with new design scheme of the microwave - excitation signal showed improvement in daily frequency stability on 1.2*10-14.

  6. Dielectric measurements of selected ceramics at microwave frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahiya, J. N.; Templeton, C. K.

    1994-01-01

    Dielectric measurements of strontium titanate and lead titanate zirconate ceramics are conducted at microwave frequencies using a cylindrical resonant cavity in the TE(sub 011) mode. The perturbations of the electric field are recorded in terms of the frequency shift and Q-changes of the cavity signal. Slater's perturbation equations are used to calculate e' and e" of the dielectric constant as a function of temperature and frequency.

  7. Electron neutral collision frequency measurement with the hairpin resonator probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, David J.; Kraus, Philip; Chua, Thai Cheng; Larson, Lynda; Shannon, Steven C.

    2017-09-01

    Electron neutral collision frequency is measured using both grounded and floating hairpin resonator probes in a 27 MHz parallel plate capacitively coupled plasma. Operating conditions are 0.1-2 Torr (13.3-267 Pa) in Ar, He, and Ar-He gas mixtures. The method treats the hairpin probe as a two wire transmission line immersed in a dielectric medium. Measurements are obtained using a pressure and sheath correction process by sweeping over assumed collision frequencies in order to obtain the measured collision frequency. Results are compared to hybrid plasma equipment module simulations and show good agreement.

  8. Precision Spectroscopy, Diode Lasers, and Optical Frequency Measurement Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollberg, Leo (Editor); Fox, Richard (Editor); Waltman, Steve (Editor); Robinson, Hugh

    1998-01-01

    This compilation is a selected set of reprints from the Optical Frequency Measurement Group of the Time and Frequency Division of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and consists of work published between 1987 and 1997. The two main programs represented here are (1) development of tunable diode-laser technology for scientific applications and precision measurements, and (2) research toward the goal of realizing optical-frequency measurements and synthesis. The papers are organized chronologically in five, somewhat arbitrarily chosen categories: Diode Laser Technology, Tunable Laser Systems, Laser Spectroscopy, Optical Synthesis and Extended Wavelength Coverage, and Multi-Photon Interactions and Optical Coherences.

  9. Oxidative stability measurement of high-stability oils by pressure differential scanning calorimeter (PDSC).

    PubMed

    Kodali, Dharma R

    2005-10-05

    High-stability oils are used as coatings on food products that require long shelf life. The high stability oils produced from high-oleic oils require less processing and bring additional nutritional benefits such as lower trans and saturated fat contents. Accurate and reproducible oxidative stability measurement of these oils is necessary to assess the performance. The accelerated oxidative stability measurement method often used in the fats and oils industry, the oxidative stability index (OSI, AOCS Cd 12b-92) is unreliable for higher stability oils due to poor reproducibility. This study presents a pressure differential scanning calorimetry (PDSC) method, which is highly reproducible and versatile and applies to oils from low to very high oxidative stability. PDSC has been used in industrial applications such as lubricants (ASTM D 6186-98) and measures the oxidative induction time (OIT) of oils under high temperature and pressure in the presence of pure oxygen. The OITs of a number of hydrogenated oils with different unsaturation and oxidative stability are measured. Unlike OSI data, the PDSC OIT measurement is highly reproducible and precise and requires only a small sample and a couple of hours. The regression analysis of the PDSC data indicated the natural log OIT of all samples linearly correlated with the temperature. The equation derived from this relationship helps to compare the oxidative stabilities of the same or different oils determined at different temperatures. The development of this method into an approved method will benefit the fats/oils and food industry.

  10. Motion correction and frequency stabilization for MRS of the human spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Hock, Andreas; Henning, Anke

    2016-04-01

    Subject motion is challenging for MRS, because it can falsify results. For spinal cord MRS in particular, subject movement is critical, since even a small movement > 1 mm) can lead to a voxel shift out of the desired measurement region. Therefore, the identification of motion corrupted MRS scans is essential. In this investigation, MR navigators acquired simultaneously with the MRS data are used to identify a displacement of the spinal cord due to subject motion. It is shown that navigators are able to recognize substantial subject motion (>1 mm) without impairing the MRS measurement. In addition, navigators are easy to apply to the measurement, because no additional hardware and just a minor additional user effort are needed. Moreover, no additional scan time is required, because navigators can be applied in the deadtime of the MRS sequence. Furthermore, in this work, retrospective motion correction combined with frequency stabilization is presented by combining navigators with non-water-suppressed (1)H-MRS, resulting in an improved spectral quality of the spinal cord measurements.

  11. Method for wavelength stabilization of pulsed difference frequency laser at 1572 nm for CO(2) detection lidar.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wei; Ma, Xin; Han, Ge; Xiang, Chengzhi; Liang, Ailin; Fu, Weidong

    2015-03-09

    High-accuracy on-line wavelength stabilization is required for differential absorption lidar (DIAL), which is ideal for precisely measuring atmospheric CO(2) concentration. Using a difference-frequency laser, we developed a ground-based 1.57-μm pulsed DIAL for performing atmospheric CO(2) measurements. Owing to the system complexity, lacking phase, and intensity instability, the stabilization method was divided into two parts-wavelength calibration and locking-based on saturated absorption. After obtaining the on-line laser position, accuracy verification using statistical theory and locking stabilization using a one-dimensional template matching method, namely least-squares matching (LSM), were adopted to achieve wavelength locking. The resulting system is capable of generating a stable wavelength.

  12. Measuring Stability and Security in Iraq

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    47s, PKCs, Glock pistols, individual body armor, high frequency radios, small pick-ups, mid-size SUVs, and medium pick-ups. Logistics capabilities...report, the IHP is equipped with small pick-ups, mid-size sport utility vehicles, medium pick-ups, AK-47 rifles, PKC machine guns, Glock pistols, high...served weapons are principally Glock pistols, AK-47s, rocket-propelled grenades, and RPK and PKM light machine guns. Most organizational clothing

  13. The Relation between Vowel Recognition and Measures of Frequency Resolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Christopher W.; Henn, Carol C.

    1989-01-01

    The study employed measures of frequency resolution obtained from individual subjects (two normal and three with sensorineural hearing loss) to predict each subject's vowel recognition performance. A relation between impairments of frequency resolution and vowel recognition was found. The described model may be useful in predicting vowel…

  14. Particle simulation on radio frequency stabilization of flute modes in a tandem mirror. I. Parallel antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Kadoya, Y.; Abe, H.

    1988-04-01

    A two- and one-half-dimensional electromagnetic particle code (PS2M) (H. Abe and S. Nakajima, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 53, xxx (1987)) is used to study how an electric field applied parallel to the magnetic field affects the radio frequency stabilization of flute modes in a tandem mirror plasma. The parallel electric field E/sub parallel/ perturbs the electron velocity v/sub parallel/ parallel to the magnetic field and also induces a perpendicular magnetic field perturbation B/sub perpendicular/. The unstable growth of the flute mode in the absence of such a radio frequency electric field is first studied as a basis for comparison. The ponderomotive force originating from the time-averaged product is then shown to stabilize the flute modes. The stabilizing wave power threshold, the frequency dependency, and the dependence on delchemically bondE/sub parallel/chemically bond all agree with the theoretical predictions.

  15. Long-term frequency stabilization system for external cavity diode laser based on mode boundary detection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhouxiang; Huang, Kaikai; Jiang, Yunfeng; Lu, Xuanhui

    2011-12-01

    We have realized a long-term frequency stabilization system for external cavity diode laser (ECDL) based on mode boundary detection method. In this system, the saturated absorption spectroscopy was used. The current and the grating of the ECDL were controlled by a computer-based feedback control system. By checking if there are mode boundaries in the spectrum, the control system determined how to adjust current to avoid mode hopping. This procedure was executed periodically to ensure the long-term stabilization of ECDL in the absence of mode hops. This diode laser system with non-antireflection coating had operated in the condition of long-term mode-hop-free stabilization for almost 400 h, which is a significant improvement of ECDL frequency stabilization system.

  16. Long-term frequency stabilization system for external cavity diode laser based on mode boundary detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhouxiang; Huang, Kaikai; Jiang, Yunfeng; Lu, Xuanhui

    2011-12-01

    We have realized a long-term frequency stabilization system for external cavity diode laser (ECDL) based on mode boundary detection method. In this system, the saturated absorption spectroscopy was used. The current and the grating of the ECDL were controlled by a computer-based feedback control system. By checking if there are mode boundaries in the spectrum, the control system determined how to adjust current to avoid mode hopping. This procedure was executed periodically to ensure the long-term stabilization of ECDL in the absence of mode hops. This diode laser system with non-antireflection coating had operated in the condition of long-term mode-hop-free stabilization for almost 400 h, which is a significant improvement of ECDL frequency stabilization system.

  17. Heterodyne laser Doppler vibrometer using a Zeeman-stabilized He-Ne laser with a one-shot frequency to voltage converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La, Jongpil; Choi, Hyunseung; Park, Kyihwan

    2005-02-01

    The vibration measurement technique using a heterodyne laser interferometer is addressed in this article. A Zeeman-stabilized He-Ne laser is used as the light source. The frequency stabilization of the laser is performed by controlling the length of the laser tube via thermal control. The stability of the laser is measured by comparing it with an iodine-stabilized He-Ne laser. The root Allan variance of the laser is measured as below 5.5×10-9. The frequency modulation demodulation to convert the frequency of the interferent signal to the voltage signal using a one-shot frequency to voltage (F/V) converter is also addressed. Simplicity and robustness of the measurement can be achieved by using the one-shot F/V converter. Since the Doppler frequency is shifted by the heterodyne beat frequency, the compensation algorithm is added to remove the shifted frequency of the interferent signal in the signal processing circuit. The bandwidth of the signal processing circuit using the one-shot F/V converter is 20kHz, and the maximum detectable velocity of the target is ±0.13m/s. The proposed vibration measurement technique proved to be very fast and robust to external disturbances by experimental results.

  18. Development and test of the Ball Aerospace optical frequency comb: a versatile measurement tool for aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachs, Jordan; Leitch, James; Knight, Scott; Pierce, Robert; Adkins, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The Ball Fiber Optical Comb Demo is a lab-based system which is used to develop space applications for optical frequency combs. These developments utilize the broadband optical coherence of the frequency comb to expand the capabilities of ground test and orbital systems used for optical wave-front measurement, control of adaptive optics, precision ranging, and reference frequency stabilization. The work expands upon a NIST-developed all-fiber frequency comb that exhibits high stability in a compact, enclosed package. Previously demonstrated applications for frequency combs include: Spectroscopy, distance and velocity measurement, frequency conversion, and timing transfer. Results from the Ball system show the characterization and performance of a frequency comb system with a technological path-to-space. Demonstrations in high precision metrology and long distance ranging are also presented for application in adaptive and multi-body optical systems.

  19. 47 CFR 74.1262 - Frequency monitors and measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Section 74.1262 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES EXPERIMENTAL RADIO, AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES FM Broadcast Translator Stations and FM Broadcast Booster Stations § 74.1262 Frequency monitors and measurements. (a)...

  20. 47 CFR 74.1262 - Frequency monitors and measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 74.1262 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES EXPERIMENTAL RADIO, AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES FM Broadcast Translator Stations and FM Broadcast Booster Stations § 74.1262 Frequency monitors and measurements. (a)...

  1. Measuring frequency response of surface-micromachined resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, William D.; Bright, Victor M.; Dalton, George C.

    1997-09-01

    Resonator structures offer a unique mechanism for characterizing MEMS materials, but measuring the resonant frequency of microstructures is challenging. In this effort a network analyzer system was used to electrically characterize surface-micromachined resonator structures in a carefully controlled pressure and temperature environment.A microscope laser interferometer was used to confirm actual device deflections.Cantilever, comb, and piston resonators fabricated in the DARPA-sponsored MUMPs process were extensively tested. Measured resonator frequency results show reasonable agreement with analytic predictions computed using manufacturer measured film thickness and residual material stress. Alternatively the measured resonant frequency data can be used to extract materials data. Tuning of resonant frequency with DC bias was also investigated. Because the tested devices vary widely in complexity, form a simple cantilever beam to a comb resonator, the data collected is especially well suited for validation testing of MEMS modeling codes.

  2. Constant frequency pulsed phase-locked loop measuring device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yost, William T.; Kushnick, Peter W.; Cantrell, John H.

    1993-06-01

    A measuring apparatus is presented that uses a fixed frequency oscillator to measure small changes in the phase velocity ultrasonic sound when a sample is exposed to environmental changes such as changes in pressure, temperature, etc. The invention automatically balances electrical phase shifts against the acoustical phase shifts in order to obtain an accurate measurement of electrical phase shifts.

  3. Constant frequency pulsed phase-locked loop measuring device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yost, William T.; Kushnick, Peter W.; Cantrell, John H.

    1991-08-01

    A measuring apparatus is presented that uses a fixed frequency oscillator to measure small changes in the phase velocity ultrasonic sound when a sample is exposed to environmental changes such as changes in pressure, temperature, etc. The invention automatically balances electrical phase shifts against the acoustical phase shifts in order to obtain an accurate measurement of electrical phase shifts.

  4. Constant frequency pulsed phase-locked loop measuring device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T. (Inventor); Kushnick, Peter W. (Inventor); Cantrell, John H. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A measuring apparatus is presented that uses a fixed frequency oscillator to measure small changes in the phase velocity ultrasonic sound when a sample is exposed to environmental changes such as changes in pressure, temperature, etc. The invention automatically balances electrical phase shifts against the acoustical phase shifts in order to obtain an accurate measurement of electrical phase shifts.

  5. Measurement of high frequency waves using a wave follower

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, S.; Shemdin, O. H.

    1983-01-01

    High frequency waves were measured using a laser-optical sensor mounted on a wave follower. Measured down-wind wave slope spectra are shown to be wind speed dependent; the mean square wave-slopes are generally larger than those measured by Cox and Munk (1954) using the sun glitter method.

  6. Chip Scale Atomic Resonator Frequency Stabilization System With Ultra-Low Power Consumption for Optoelectronic Oscillators.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianye; Zhang, Yaolin; Lu, Haoyuan; Hou, Dong; Zhang, Shuangyou; Wang, Zhong

    2016-07-01

    We present a long-term chip scale stabilization scheme for optoelectronic oscillators (OEOs) based on a rubidium coherent population trapping (CPT) atomic resonator. By locking a single mode of an OEO to the (85)Rb 3.035-GHz CPT resonance utilizing an improved phase-locked loop (PLL) with a PID regulator, we achieved a chip scale frequency stabilization system for the OEO. The fractional frequency stability of the stabilized OEO by overlapping Allan deviation reaches 6.2 ×10(-11) (1 s) and  ∼ 1.45 ×10 (-11) (1000 s). This scheme avoids a decrease in the extra phase noise performance induced by the electronic connection between the OEO and the microwave reference in common injection locking schemes. The total physical package of the stabilization system is [Formula: see text] and the total power consumption is 400 mW, which provides a chip scale and portable frequency stabilization approach with ultra-low power consumption for OEOs.

  7. Stabilization of a laser on a large-detuned atomic-reference frequency by resonant interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barboza, Priscila M. T.; Nascimento, Guilherme G.; Araújo, Michelle O.; da Silva, Cícero M.; Cavalcante, Hugo L. D. de S.; Oriá, Marcos; Chevrollier, Martine; Passerat de Silans, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    We report a simple technique for stabilization of a laser frequency at the wings of an atomic resonance. The reference signal used for stabilization issues from interference effects obtained in a low-quality cavity filled with a resonant atomic vapour. For a frequency detuned 2.6 GHz from the 133Cs D2 6S{}1/2 F = 4 to 6P{}3/2 F’ = 5 transition, the fractional frequency Allan deviation is 10-8 for averaging times of 300 s, corresponding to a frequency deviation of 4 MHz. Adequate choice of the atomic density and of the cell thickness allows locking the laser at detunings larger than 10 GHz. Such a simple technique does not require magnetic fields or signal modulation.

  8. Intelligent two-loop time-division-multiplexing (TDM) optical frequency stabilization system for multichannel communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Aiguo; Wu, Deming; Xie, Linzhen

    1995-04-01

    A channel spacing frequency stabilization system for optical frequency-division-multiplexing communications is reported. Considering variable environmental condition and device aging effects, we have designed two loops in the system using a Fabry-perot interferometer as a frequency reference. One loop is a fine-tuning one, which is a time-division-multiplexing frequency stabilization scheme adjusting the driving currents of all the transmitter. The other loop is a rough-tuning one, which is a series of newly designed digital temperature controllers in which microprocessors and electrical oscillation circuits rather than Wheatstone bridge- circuits are used to detect the temperature error signal in order to reduce laser operating temperature dependence on the environmental conditions and there are RS-232 interfaces for communications with the first loop.

  9. Absolute frequency stabilization of an injection-seeded optical parametric oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Plusquellic, D.F.; Votava, O.; Nesbitt, D.J.

    1996-03-01

    A method is described that provides absolute frequency stabilization and calibration of the signal and idler waves generated by an injection-seeded optical parametric oscillator (OPO). The method makes use of a He{endash}Ne stabilized transfer cavity (TC) to control the frequencies of the cw sources used to seed both the pump laser and OPO cavity. The TC serves as a stable calibration source for the signal and idler waves by providing marker fringes as the seed laser is scanned. Additionally, an acoustic-optic modulator (AOM) is used to shift the OPO seed laser{close_quote}s frequency before locking it onto the TC. The sidebands of the AOM are tunable over more than one free spectral range of the TC, thereby permitting stabilization of the signal and idler waves at any frequency. A {plus_minus}25-MHz residual error in the absolute frequency stabilities of the pump, signal, and idler waves is experimentally demonstrated, which is roughly 30{percent} of the 160-MHz near-transform-limited linewidths of the signal and idler pulses. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  10. Fully stabilized mid-infrared frequency comb for high-precision molecular spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vainio, Markku; Karhu, Juho

    2017-02-20

    A fully stabilized mid-infrared optical frequency comb spanning from 2.9 to 3.4 µm is described in this article. The comb is based on half-harmonic generation in a femtosecond optical parametric oscillator, which transfers the high phase coherence of a fully stabilized near-infrared Er-doped fiber laser comb to the mid-infrared region. The method is simple, as no phase-locked loops or reference lasers are needed. Precise locking of optical frequencies of the mid-infrared comb to the pump comb is experimentally verified at sub-20 mHz level, which corresponds to a fractional statistical uncertainty of 2 × 10-16 at the center frequency of the mid-infrared comb. The fully stabilized mid-infrared comb is an ideal tool for high-precision molecular spectroscopy, as well as for optical frequency metrology in the mid-infrared region, which is difficult to access with other stabilized frequency comb techniques.

  11. Real-Time Stability Margin Measurements for X-38 Robustness Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosworth, John T.; Stachowiak, Susan J.

    2005-01-01

    A method has been developed for real-time stability margin measurement calculations. The method relies on a tailored-forced excitation targeted to a specific frequency range. Computation of the frequency response is matched to the specific frequencies contained in the excitation. A recursive Fourier transformation is used to make the method compatible with real-time calculation. The method was incorporated into the X-38 nonlinear simulation and applied to an X-38 robustness test. X-38 stability margins were calculated for different variations in aerodynamic and mass properties over the vehicle flight trajectory. The new method showed results comparable to more traditional stability analysis techniques, and at the same time, this new method provided coverage that is more complete and increased efficiency.

  12. Radio-frequency measurement in semiconductor quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, TianYi; Chen, MingBo; Cao, Gang; Li, HaiOu; Xiao, Ming; Guo, GuoPing

    2017-05-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots have attracted wide interest for the potential realization of quantum computation. To realize efficient quantum computation, fast manipulation and the corresponding readout are necessary. In the past few decades, considerable progress of quantum manipulation has been achieved experimentally. To meet the requirements of high-speed readout, radio-frequency (RF) measurement has been developed in recent years, such as RF-QPC (radio-frequency quantum point contact) and RF-DGS (radio-frequency dispersive gate sensor). Here we specifically demonstrate the principle of the radio-frequency reflectometry, then review the development and applications of RF measurement, which provides a feasible way to achieve high-bandwidth readout in quantum coherent control and also enriches the methods to study these artificial mesoscopic quantum systems. Finally, we prospect the future usage of radio-frequency reflectometry in scaling-up of the quantum computing models.

  13. Phase-stabilization of the carrier-envelope-offset frequency of a SESAM modelocked thin disk laser.

    PubMed

    Klenner, Alexander; Emaury, Florian; Schriber, Cinia; Diebold, Andreas; Saraceno, Clara J; Schilt, Stéphane; Keller, Ursula; Südmeyer, Thomas

    2013-10-21

    We phase-stabilized the carrier-envelope-offset (CEO) frequency of a SESAM modelocked Yb:CaGdAlO₄ (CALGO) thin disk laser (TDL) generating 90-fs pulses at a center wavelength of 1051.6 nm and a repetition rate of 65 MHz. By launching only 2% of its output power into a photonic crystal fiber, we generated a coherent octave-spanning supercontinuum spectrum. Using a standard f-to-2f interferometer for CEO detection, we measured CEO beats with 33 dB signal-to-noise ratio in 100 kHz resolution bandwidth. We achieved a tight lock of the CEO frequency at 26.18 MHz by active feedback to the pump current. The residual in-loop integrated phase noise is 120 mrad (1 Hz-1 MHz). This is, to our knowledge, the first CEO-stabilized SESAM modelocked TDL. Our results show that a reliable lock of the CEO frequency can be achieved using standard techniques in spite of the strongly spatially multimode pumping scheme of TDLs. This opens the door towards fully-stabilized low-noise frequency combs with hundreds of watts of average power from table-top SESAM modelocked thin disk oscillators.

  14. High-frequency threshold measurements using insert earphones.

    PubMed

    Tang, H; Letowski, T

    1992-10-01

    Several recent studies have reported large intersubject variability of high-frequency thresholds measured with circumaural earphones. In the present study, high-frequency thresholds of 10 subjects were measured with circumaural (Sennheiser HD-250) and insert (Etymotic ER-1) earphones at 10, 12, 14, and 16 kHz. Overall results show significantly smaller variability of the threshold data obtained with insert earphones than with circumaural earphones. The above data indicate that insert earphones may be more suitable for high-frequency testing than circumaural earphones.

  15. Algorithm and Software for Landslide Slopes Stability Estimation with Online Very Low Frequency Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordeev, V. F.; Kabanov, M. M.; Kapustin, S. N.

    2017-04-01

    In addition to preliminary surveying, landslide slopes stability estimation problems require online real-time monitoring alerting about potential emergencies. Very low frequency monitoring data provided by geodynamic processes automated control system provides a solution to that problem. Authors describe the software and algorithms implemented for that system, make conclusions on the efficiency of applied solutions and propose options for the further development of online very low frequency monitoring system.

  16. Frequency stabilization of the non-resonant wave of a continuous-wave singly resonant optical parametric oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ly, Aliou; Szymanski, Benjamin; Bretenaker, Fabien

    2015-08-01

    We present an experimental technique allowing to stabilize the frequency of the non-resonant wave in a singly resonant optical parametric oscillator (SRO) down to the kHz level, much below the pump frequency noise level. By comparing the frequency of the non-resonant wave with a reference cavity, the pump frequency noise is imposed to the frequency of the resonant wave and is thus subtracted from the frequency of the non-resonant wave. This permits the non-resonant wave obtained from such a SRO to be simultaneously powerful and frequency stable, which is usually impossible to obtain when the resonant wave frequency is stabilized.

  17. A single-frequency Ho:YLF pulsed laser with frequency stability better than 500 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucirek, P.; Meissner, A.; Nyga, S.; Mertin, J.; Höfer, M.; Hoffmann, H.-D.

    2017-03-01

    The spectral stability of a previously reported Ho:YLF single frequency pulsed laser oscillator emitting at 2051 nm is drastically improved by utilizing a narrow linewidth Optically Pumped Semiconductor Laser (OPSL) as a seed for the oscillator. The oscillator is pumped by a dedicated gain-switched Tm:YLF laser at 1890 nm. The ramp-and-fire method is employed for generating single frequency emission. The heterodyne technique is used to analyze the spectral properties. The laser is designed to meet a part of the specifications for future airborne or space borne LIDAR detection of CO2. Seeding with a DFB diode and with an OPSL are compared. With OPSL seeding an Allan deviation of the centroid of the spectral distribution of 38 kHz and 517 kHz over 10 seconds and 60 milliseconds of sampling time for single pulses is achieved. The spectral width is approximately 30 MHz. The oscillator emits 2 mJ pulse energy with 50 Hz pulse repetition frequency (PRF) and 20 ns pulse duration. The optical to optical efficiency of the Ho:YLF oscillator is 10 % and the beam quality is diffraction limited. To our knowledge this is the best spectral stability demonstrated to date for a Ho:YLF laser with millijoule pulse energy and nanosecond pulse duration.

  18. An Auto-Lock Laser System for Long Term Frequency Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthiaume, Robert; Vorozcovs, Andrew; Kumarakrishnan, A.

    2010-03-01

    We have developed a compact, digitally controlled system to automatically stabilize the frequency of an external cavity diode laser to an atomic resonance. The key component of the system is a low-cost single-board computer with A/D and D/A capability that acts as a specialized lock-in amplifier. The system performs pattern matching between Doppler-free peaks obtained by scanning the laser frequency and reference peaks stored in the processor's memory. The incoming spectral signals are compared with the reference waveforms using a sliding correlation algorithm, which determines the control voltage required for adjusting the laser frequency to the desired lock point. The system has a scan amplitude of less than 1MHz when locked and it can re-lock for frequency drifts up to 10 GHz without human intervention. The dependence of laser frequency stability on ambient temperature, humidity, and pressure has been investigated. The performance of the system is suitable for experiments in atom trapping and atom interferometry that require long-term laser frequency stabilization.

  19. A frequency-stabilized laser based on a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber CO2 gas cell and its application scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ze-Heng; Yang, Fei; Chen, Di-Jun; Cai, Hai-Wen

    2017-04-01

    A frequency-stabilized laser system based on a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) CO2 gas cell for the space-borne CO2 light detection and ranging (LIDAR) is proposed. This system will help realize precise measurement of the global atmospheric CO2 concentrations. The relation between the frequency stability and the temperature of the HC-PCF cell was studied in detail. It is proved that accurate control of the temperature of the HC-PCF cell is very important to realize high stability of the proposed system. The laser is locked to CO2 gas R18 absorption line at 1572.0179 nm, and its peak-to-peak frequency stability is approximately 485 kHz, satisfying the requirements for the integrated path differential absorption system for CO2 measurement with an accuracy of  <1 ppm over 5 h.

  20. Characterizing Fracture Property Using Resistivity Measured at Different Frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Horne, Roland N.; Li, Kewen

    2014-09-30

    The objective was to develop geophysical approaches to detecting and evaluating the fractures created or existing in EGS and other geothermal reservoirs by measuring the resistivity at different frequencies. This project has been divided into two phases: Phase I (first year): Proof of Concept – develop the resistivity approach and verify the effect of frequency on the resistivity in rocks with artificial or natural fractures over a wide range of frequencies. Phase II: Prototyping Part 1 (second year): measure the resistivity in rocks with fractures of different apertures, different length, and different configurations at different frequencies. Part 2 (third year): develop mathematical models and the resistivity method; infer the fracture properties using the measured resistivity data.

  1. Stability measurements of the radio science system at the 34-m high-efficiency antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pham, T. T.; Breidenthal, J. C.; Peng, T. K.; Abbate, S. F.; Rockwell, S. T.

    1993-01-01

    From 1991 to 1993 the fractional frequency stability of the operational Radio Science System was measured at DSS's 15, 45, and 65. These stations are designed to have the most stable uplink and downlink equipment in the Deep Space Network (DSN). Some measurements were performed when the antenna was moving and the frequency was ramped. The stability, including contributions of all elements in the station except for the antenna and the hydrogen maser, was measured to be 0.3 to 1.3 x 10(exp -15) when the frequency was fixed, and 0.6 to 6.0 x 10(exp -15) when the frequency was ramped (sample interval, 1000 sec). Only one measurement out of fifteen exceeded specification. In all other cases, when previous measurements on the antenna and the hydrogen maser were added, a total system stability requirement of 5.0 x 10(exp -15) as met. In addition, ambient temperature was found to cause phase variation in the measurements at a rate of 5.5 deg of phase per deg C.

  2. Velocity measurement using frequency domain interferometer and chirped pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, K.; Nishimura, Y.; Mori, Y.; Hanayama, R.; Kitagawa, Y.; Sekine, T.; Sato, N.; Kurita, T.; Kawashima, T.; Sunahara, A.; Sentoku, Y.; Miura, E.; Iwamoto, A.; Sakagami, H.

    2017-02-01

    An ultra-intense short pulse laser induces a shock wave in material. The pressure of shock compression is stronger than a few tens GPa. To characterize shock waves, time-resolved velocity measurement in nano- or pico-second time scale is needed. Frequency domain interferometer and chirped pulse laser provide single-shot time-resolved measurement. We have developed a laser-driven shock compression system and frequency domain interferometer with CPA laser. In this paper, we show the principle of velocity measurement using a frequency domain interferometer and a chirped pulse laser. Next, we numerically calculated spectral interferograms and show the time-resolved velocity measurement can be done from the phase analysis of spectral interferograms. Moreover we conduct the laser driven shock generation and shock velocity measurement. From the spectral fringes, we analyze the velocities of the sample and shockwaves.

  3. Enabling coherent control of trapped ions with economical multi-laser frequency stabilization technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lybarger, Warren Emanuel, Jr.

    A phase-locked scanning stability transfer cavity (SSTC) for transferring the absolute frequency stability of an iodine referenced He-Ne (master) laser to three otherwise uncalibrated (slave) lasers (at 844, 1033, & 1092 nm) of a trapped-Sr+ quantum information processing (QIP) apparatus is described. When locked, the 422 nm frequency-doubled Doppler-cooling laser exhibits an error of <1 MHz RMS for several hours, and similar stability is achieved with the other slave lasers. When unlocked, each slave laser drifts by a large fraction (or more) of the corresponding transition linewidth in minutes, thus making reliable laser cooling, ion state readout, and execution of QIP algorithms practically infeasible. The SSTC makes coherent control of Sr+ possible by addressing this problem, and the QIP apparatus is now sufficiently stable for single user operation. New single-ion experimental capabilities include ground state cooling, high-fidelity Rabi flopping, Ramsey interferometry, and sympathetic cooling of 88Sr+( 86Sr+) with 86Sr+( 88Sr+). A 2.5 msec coherence time has been achieved with the optical quoit encoded in a |5 2S 1/2> ↔ |4 2D5/2> quadrupole transition, a precision measurement of the isotope shift of the qubit transition in 86Sr+ relative to 88Sr+ is reported, and a single-ion heating rate consistent with results throughout the trapped-ion community is reported. The SSTC is simple to implement, uses no custom optics, and it has a higher scanning rate than previously demonstrated SSTC's. Phase-locked SSTC's are shown to have an advantage over the more common displacement-locked SSTC in the low finesse regime, and they are an attractive alternative to passively stable but complex optical references and diode lasers designed to address the same problem. The SSTC is useful in spectroscopic applications with other ion species, atoms, and molecules, in general. An appendix is dedicated to describing in detail an advanced trapped-ion quantum processor concept

  4. Measurement of background translocation frequencies in individuals with clones

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, Marcelle J.

    1996-08-01

    In the leukemia case the unseparated B and T lymphocytes had a high translocation frequency even after 0.0014, respectively. After purging all clones from the data, the translocation frequencies for Bio 8 and Bio 23 were 0.00750.0014 and 0.0073 metaphases were scored for chromosomal aberrations,, specifically reciprocal translocations, using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Metaphase spreads were used from two healthy, unexposed individuals (not exposed to radiation, chemotherapy or radiotherapy) and one early B- precursor acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) patient (metaphase spreads from both separated T lymphocytes and unseparated B and T lymphocytes were scored). All three individuals had an abnormally high translocation frequency. The high translocation frequencies resulted from clonal expansion of specific translocated chromosomes. I show in this thesis that by purging (discounting or removing) clones from the data of unexposed individuals, one can obtain true background translocation frequencies. In two cases, Bio 8 and Bio 23, the measured translocation frequency for chromosomes 1, 2 and 4 was 0.0124 purging all of the clones from the data. This high translocation frequency may be due to a low frequency of some clones and may not be recognized. The separated T lymphocytes had a higher translocation frequency than expected.

  5. Mode-resolved frequency comb interferometry for high-accuracy long distance measurement.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Steven A; van Eldik, Sjoerd; Bhattacharya, Nandini

    2015-09-30

    Optical frequency combs have developed into powerful tools for distance metrology. In this paper we demonstrate absolute long distance measurement using a single femtosecond frequency comb laser as a multi-wavelength source. By applying a high-resolution spectrometer based on a virtually imaged phased array, the frequency comb modes are resolved spectrally to the level of an individual mode. Having the frequency comb stabilized against an atomic clock, thousands of accurately known wavelengths are available for interferometry. From the spectrally resolved output of a Michelson interferometer a distance is derived. The presented measurement method combines spectral interferometry, white light interferometry and multi-wavelength interferometry in a single scheme. Comparison with a fringe counting laser interferometer shows an agreement within <10(-8) for a distance of 50 m.

  6. Mode-resolved frequency comb interferometry for high-accuracy long distance measurement

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Steven. A.; van Eldik, Sjoerd; Bhattacharya, Nandini

    2015-01-01

    Optical frequency combs have developed into powerful tools for distance metrology. In this paper we demonstrate absolute long distance measurement using a single femtosecond frequency comb laser as a multi-wavelength source. By applying a high-resolution spectrometer based on a virtually imaged phased array, the frequency comb modes are resolved spectrally to the level of an individual mode. Having the frequency comb stabilized against an atomic clock, thousands of accurately known wavelengths are available for interferometry. From the spectrally resolved output of a Michelson interferometer a distance is derived. The presented measurement method combines spectral interferometry, white light interferometry and multi-wavelength interferometry in a single scheme. Comparison with a fringe counting laser interferometer shows an agreement within <10−8 for a distance of 50 m. PMID:26419282

  7. UHF FM receiver having improved frequency stability and low RFI emission

    DOEpatents

    Lupinetti, Francesco

    1990-02-27

    A UHF receiver which converts UHF modulated carrier signals to baseband video signals without any heterodyne or frequency conversion stages. A bandpass filter having a fixed frequency first filters the signals. A low noise amplifier amplifies the filtered signal and applies the signal through further amplification stages to a limited FM demodulator circuit. The UHF signal is directly converted to a baseband video signal. The baseband video signal is clamped by a clamping circuit before driving a monitor. Frequency stability for the receivers is at a theoretical maximum, and interference to adjacent receivers is eliminated due to the absence of a local oscillator.

  8. Arbitrary frequency stabilization of a diode laser based on visual Labview PID VI and sound card output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Guo-Sheng; Wu, Ji-Zhou; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Zheng, Ning-Xuan; Li, Yu-Qing; Ma, Jie; Xiao, Lian-Tuan; Jia, Suo-Tang

    2015-10-01

    We report a robust method of directly stabilizing a grating feedback diode laser to an arbitrary frequency in a large range. The error signal, induced from the difference between the frequency measured by a wavelength meter and the preset target frequency, is fed back to the piezoelectric transducer module of the diode laser via a sound card in the computer. A visual Labview procedure is developed to realize a feedback system. In our experiment the frequency drift of the diode laser is reduced to 8 MHz within 25 min. The robust scheme can be adapted to realize the arbitrary frequency stabilization for many other kinds of lasers. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB921603), the Program for Changjiang Scholars and Innovative Research Team in University of Ministry of Education of China (Grant No. IRT13076), the Major Research Plan of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 91436108), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61378014, 61308023, 61378015, and 11434007), the Fund for Fostering Talents in Basic Science of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. J1103210), the New Teacher Fund of the Ministry of Education of China (Grant No. 20131401120012), and the Natural Science Foundation for Young Scientists of Shanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2013021005-1).

  9. High-Frequency Wave Measurements in the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjorkqvist, J. V.; Kahma, K. K.; Pettersson, H.; Drennan, W. M.

    2016-02-01

    The high-frequency part of the wave field is essential for the understanding of air-sea exchange related processes and the turbulent energy dissipation of breaking waves. The quantification of the dimensionless spectra will aid wave model development and contribute to a better understanding of the fundamental laws governing the evolution of wind driven waves. However, typical wave observation devices, such as wave buoys, are limited to observing frequencies under e.g. 0.6 Hz. Dedicated experiments with devices suitable for high-frequency measurements are, in comparison, rare.We have made high-frequency wave measurements with capacitive wave staffs from RV Aranda. Air turbulence and wind speed measurements are also available and a full motion correction was applied to all measurements. A frequency rage up to 2-3 Hz is enough to study the tail of the wave spectra even during its early development. The unusually high sampling frequency of 200 Hz guarantees that spurious spectral shapes that could be the joint effect of noise and the anti-aliasing filter can be excluded. Directional measurements were made using four wave staffs located 15 or 50 cm apart in the grid.The mobility of the research vessel has enabled measurements in a wide variety of conditions from the Baltic Proper to the irregular Finnish coastal archipelagos. The aim is to determine the conditions and frequency ranges when the shape of the dimensionless spectra is wind dependent. Especially, it's still not clear whether the use of the wind speed or the friction velocity as the scaling parameter produces better results, or where the transition to the Phillips spectra takes place. The directional measurements can shed light on theories that use the directional spread of the two-dimensional spectrum to explain the shape of the one-dimensional spectrum.

  10. Frequency Stabilization of a Single Mode Terahertz Quantum Cascade Laser to the Kilohertz Level

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-27

    Frequency stabilization of a single mode terahertz quantum cascade laser to the kilohertz level 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...primarily in a single-longitudinal mode (SLM) up to a bias voltage of 3.7 V and a multi-lodgitudinal mode ( MLM ) at higher voltages. It was mounted in a

  11. Frequency noise induced by fiber perturbations in a fiber-linked stabilized laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, YI; Hamilton, Jeffrey J.; Richard, Jean-Paul

    1992-01-01

    The effects of acoustic perturbations on an optical fiber that links a stabilized laser to its reference cavity are studied. An extrapolation indicates that 69 dB of acoustic noise impinging on a 1-m segment of the 10-m fiber contribute frequency noise at the level of 1 Hz/(Hz)1/2 in the 1100-2100-Hz band.

  12. Spline function approximation for velocimeter Doppler frequency measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savakis, Andreas E.; Stoughton, John W.; Kanetkar, Sharad V.

    1989-01-01

    A spline function approximation approach for measuring the Doppler spectral peak frequency in a laser Doppler velocimeter system is presented. The processor is designed for signal bursts with mean Doppler shift frequencies up to 100 MHz, input turbulence up to 20 percent, and photon counts as low as 300. The frequency-domain processor uses a bank of digital bandpass filters for the capture of the energy spectrum of each signal burst. The average values of the filter output energies, as a function of normalized frequency, are modeled as deterministic spline functions which are linearly weighted to evaluate the spectral peak location associated with the Doppler shift. The weighting coefficients are chosen to minimize the mean square error. Performance evaluation by simulation yields average errors in estimating mean Doppler frequencies within 0.5 percent for poor signal-to-noise conditions associated with a low photon count of 300 photons/burst.

  13. Frequency-dependent viscoelasticity measurement by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Nan; Wong, Kenneth Kar Ho; de Bruyn, John R.; Hutter, Jeffrey L.

    2009-02-01

    We demonstrate a new technique for investigating viscoelastic properties of soft materials using the atomic force microscope. A small oscillatory voltage is added to the deflection signal of the atomic force microscope causing a vertical oscillatory sample motion. Monitoring the amplitude and phase of this motion allows determination of the viscous and elastic moduli of the sample as a function of frequency during contact imaging. This technique is applied to suspended poly(vinyl alcohol) nanofibers and poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogels, giving results similar to those measured using traditional static methods. However, the moduli of both the fibers and the hydrogels show a significant frequency dependence. The Young's modulus of the fibers increases with frequency, while for the viscoelastic hydrogels, the storage modulus dominates the mechanical response at low frequency whereas the loss modulus dominates at high frequency.

  14. Spike width and frequency alter stability of phase-locking in electrically coupled neurons.

    PubMed

    Dodla, Ramana; Wilson, Charles J

    2013-06-01

    The stability of phase-locked states of electrically coupled type-1 phase response curve neurons is studied using piecewise linear formulations for their voltage profile and phase response curves. We find that at low frequency and/or small spike width, synchrony is stable, and antisynchrony unstable. At high frequency and/or large spike width, these phase-locked states switch their stability. Increasing the ratio of spike width to spike height causes the antisynchronous state to transition into a stable synchronous state. We compute the interaction function and the boundaries of stability of both these phase-locked states, and present analytical expressions for them. We also study the effect of phase response curve skewness on the boundaries of synchrony and antisynchrony.

  15. Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 3 – Frequency Response and Transient Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, N. W.; Shao, M.; Pajic, S.; D'Aquila, R.

    2014-12-01

    Power system operators and utilities worldwide have concerns about the impact of high-penetration wind and solar generation on electric grid reliability (EirGrid 2011b, Hydro-Quebec 2006, ERCOT 2010). The stability of North American grids under these conditions is a particular concern and possible impediment to reaching future renewable energy goals. Phase 3 of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS-3) considers a 33% wind and solar annual energy penetration level that results in substantial changes to the characteristics of the bulk power system, including different power flow patterns, different commitment and dispatch of existing synchronous generation, and different dynamic behavior of wind and solar generation. WWSIS-3 evaluates two specific aspects of fundamental frequency system stability: frequency response and transient stability.

  16. Frequency stabilization of CO laser using RF optogalvanic Lamb-dip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lien, Y.-H.; Liu, D.-K.; Shy, J.-T.

    2009-07-01

    The Lamb dip of CO rovibrational transition is detected by a room temperature extracavity RF optogalvanic cell and employed to stabilize the frequency of a CO laser. The S/N ratio of optogalvanic signal is about 2000 Hz^{-1/2} at optical power < 1 W. The relative depth of Lamb dip is 2.3%. The S/N ratios of first and third harmonic demodulated saturation signals are about 40 Hz^{-1/2} and 10 Hz^{-1/2} , respectively. The CO laser is stabilized using the first harmonic demodulated signal, and the frequency stability is better than 300 kHz. Concurrently, the influences of operational parameters, which include the coil current, partial pressures of gas mixture, are investigated. A simple model for the influence of coil current is presented, and further improvements are addressed as well.

  17. Continuous cardiac output measurement - Aspects of Doppler frequency analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackay, R. S.; Hechtman, H. B.

    1975-01-01

    From the suprasternal notch blood flow velocity in the aorta can be measured non-invasively by a Doppler probe. Integration over systole after frequency analysis gives a measure of stroke volume if a separate diameter observation is incorporated. Frequency analysis by a zero crossing counter or by a set of parallel phaselock loops was less effective than a set of bandpass filters. Observations on dogs, baboons and humans before and after exercise or surgery suggest the indications to be useful. Application to judging heart failure by the effect of introducing a volume load is indicated. Changes in output also are measured in freely moving subjects.

  18. Differential processing for frequency chirp measurement using optical pulse synthesizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiwagi, Ken; Seki, Satoshi; Tsuda, Hiroyuki; Takenouchi, Hirokazu; Kurokawa, Takashi

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we introduced an optical pulse synthesizer (OPS) to measure frequency chirps of optical pulses by differential processing. The OPS has a single-chip integrated structure of all elements for the differential filtering and enables stable measurement. Because the exact filter causes a large loss, we employed a phase-only filter, whose frequency response was only in phase. We measured chirp rates of pulses which were induced by propagating standard single mode fibers with different lengths. The retrieved chirp rates were comparable to calculated results. We simulated accuracy of the method and concluded that our experiment had phase control accuracy within 0.07π.

  19. Improvement of Space Shuttle Main Engine Low Frequency Acceleration Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stec, Robert C.

    1999-01-01

    The noise floor of low frequency acceleration data acquired on the Space Shuttle Main Engines is higher than desirable. Difficulties of acquiring high quality acceleration data on this engine are discussed. The approach presented in this paper for reducing the acceleration noise floor focuses on a search for an accelerometer more capable of measuring low frequency accelerations. An overview is given of the current measurement system used to acquire engine vibratory data. The severity of vibration, temperature, and moisture environments are considered. Vibratory measurements from both laboratory and rocket engine tests are presented.

  20. Continuous cardiac output measurement - Aspects of Doppler frequency analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackay, R. S.; Hechtman, H. B.

    1975-01-01

    From the suprasternal notch blood flow velocity in the aorta can be measured non-invasively by a Doppler probe. Integration over systole after frequency analysis gives a measure of stroke volume if a separate diameter observation is incorporated. Frequency analysis by a zero crossing counter or by a set of parallel phaselock loops was less effective than a set of bandpass filters. Observations on dogs, baboons and humans before and after exercise or surgery suggest the indications to be useful. Application to judging heart failure by the effect of introducing a volume load is indicated. Changes in output also are measured in freely moving subjects.

  1. High-frequency measurements of multilayer ceramic capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafferty, R. E.; Maher, J. P.

    1981-06-01

    A resonant coaxial transmission line, short circuited at one end and open circuited at the other, whose fundamental resonant frequency and Q factor are known, is perturbed with a test capacitor connected either in series at the shorted end of the line, or in shunt at the open end. Measuring the Q factor of the system with the delta f technique yields the effective series resistance, capacitance, and the Q factor of the test specimen. This method of measurement has the advantage that there are no adjustable elements to alter circuit conditions in an unprescribed way, the only variable is the frequency which can be measured with an uncertainty of less than 1 ppm, the loss of the line as a function of frequency is quite predictable, and the Q factor of the line can be made sufficiently high to support accurate measurements of low loss capacitors.

  2. Self-integrating inductive loop for measuring high frequency pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas-Moreno, Mónica V.; Robles, Guillermo; Martínez-Tarifa, Juan M.; Sanz-Feito, Javier

    2011-08-01

    High frequency pulses can be measured by means of inductive sensors. The main advantage of these sensors consists of non-contact measurements that isolate and protect measuring equipment. The objective of this paper is to present the implementation of an inductive sensor for measuring rapidly varying currents. It consists of a rectangular loop with a resistor at its terminals. The inductive loop gives the derivative of the current according to Faraday's law and the resistor connected to the loop modifies the sensor's frequency response to obtain an output proportional to the current pulse. The self-integrating inductive sensor was validated with two sensors, a non-inductive resistor and a commercial high frequency current transformer. The results were compared to determine the advantages and drawbacks of the probe as an adequate inductive transducer.

  3. Frequency-noise measurements of optical frequency combs by multiple fringe-side discriminator

    PubMed Central

    Coluccelli, Nicola; Cassinerio, Marco; Gambetta, Alessio; Laporta, Paolo; Galzerano, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    The frequency noise of an optical frequency comb is routinely measured through the hetherodyne beat of one comb tooth against a stable continuous-wave laser. After frequency-to-voltage conversion, the beatnote is sent to a spectrum analyzer to retrive the power spectral density of the frequency noise. Because narrow-linewidth continuous-wave lasers are available only at certain wavelengths, heterodyning the comb tooth can be challenging. We present a new technique for direct characterization of the frequency noise of an optical frequency comb, requiring no supplementary reference lasers and easily applicable in all spectral regions from the terahertz to the ultraviolet. The technique is based on the combination of a low finesse Fabry-Perot resonator and the so-called “fringe-side locking” method, usually adopted to characterize the spectral purity of single-frequency lasers, here generalized to optical frequency combs. The effectiveness of this technique is demonstrated with an Er-fiber comb source across the wavelength range from 1 to 2 μm. PMID:26548900

  4. Frequency-noise measurements of optical frequency combs by multiple fringe-side discriminator.

    PubMed

    Coluccelli, Nicola; Cassinerio, Marco; Gambetta, Alessio; Laporta, Paolo; Galzerano, Gianluca

    2015-11-09

    The frequency noise of an optical frequency comb is routinely measured through the hetherodyne beat of one comb tooth against a stable continuous-wave laser. After frequency-to-voltage conversion, the beatnote is sent to a spectrum analyzer to retrive the power spectral density of the frequency noise. Because narrow-linewidth continuous-wave lasers are available only at certain wavelengths, heterodyning the comb tooth can be challenging. We present a new technique for direct characterization of the frequency noise of an optical frequency comb, requiring no supplementary reference lasers and easily applicable in all spectral regions from the terahertz to the ultraviolet. The technique is based on the combination of a low finesse Fabry-Perot resonator and the so-called "fringe-side locking" method, usually adopted to characterize the spectral purity of single-frequency lasers, here generalized to optical frequency combs. The effectiveness of this technique is demonstrated with an Er-fiber comb source across the wavelength range from 1 to 2 μm.

  5. Design and Stability of Load-Side Primary Frequency Control in Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, CH; Topcu, U; Li, N; Low, S

    2014-05-01

    We present a systematic method to design ubiquitous continuous fast-acting distributed load control for primary frequency regulation in power networks, by formulating an optimal load control (OLC) problem where the objective is to minimize the aggregate cost of tracking an operating point subject to power balance over the network. We prove that the swing dynamics and the branch power flows, coupled with frequency-based load control, serve as a distributed primal-dual algorithm to solve OLC. We establish the global asymptotic stability of a multimachine network under such type of load-side primary frequency control. These results imply that the local frequency deviations on each bus convey exactly the right information about the global power imbalance for the loads to make individual decisions that turn out to be globally optimal. Simulations confirm that the proposed algorithm can rebalance power and resynchronize bus frequencies after a disturbance with significantly improved transient performance.

  6. Optimal Load Control via Frequency Measurement and Neighborhood Area Communication

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, CH; Topcu, U; Low, SH

    2013-11-01

    We propose a decentralized optimal load control scheme that provides contingency reserve in the presence of sudden generation drop. The scheme takes advantage of flexibility of frequency responsive loads and neighborhood area communication to solve an optimal load control problem that balances load and generation while minimizing end-use disutility of participating in load control. Local frequency measurements enable individual loads to estimate the total mismatch between load and generation. Neighborhood area communication helps mitigate effects of inconsistencies in the local estimates due to frequency measurement noise. Case studies show that the proposed scheme can balance load with generation and restore the frequency within seconds of time after a generation drop, even when the loads use a highly simplified power system model in their algorithms. We also investigate tradeoffs between the amount of communication and the performance of the proposed scheme through simulation-based experiments.

  7. Microwave photonic system for instantaneous frequency measurement based on principles of "frequency-amplitude" conversion in fiber Bragg grating and additional frequency separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Alexander A.; Morozov, Oleg G.; Andreev, Vladimir A.; Morozov, Gennady A.; Kuznetsov, Artem A.; Faskhutdinov, Lenar M.

    2017-04-01

    This article describes the design principles of optoelectronic system (OES) for instantaneous frequency measurement (IFM) of microwave signals based on the use of amplitude-phase modulation conversion of single optical carrier into symmetrical dual-frequency signal for additional frequency separation, its modulation by unknown frequency and subsequent "frequency-amplitude" measurement conversion in Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) with Gaussian reflection profile. Such approach allows increasing of measurement resolution at low frequencies.

  8. Measurement of the 4 S1 /2→6 S1 /2 transition frequency in atomic potassium via direct frequency-comb spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stalnaker, J. E.; Ayer, H. M. G.; Baron, J. H.; Nuñez, A.; Rowan, M. E.

    2017-07-01

    We present an experimental determination of the 4 S1 /2→6 S1 /2 transition frequency in atomic potassium 39K, using direct frequency-comb spectroscopy. The output of a stabilized optical frequency comb was used to excite a thermal atomic vapor. The repetition rate of the frequency comb was scanned and the transitions were excited using stepwise two-photon excitation. The center-of-gravity frequency for the transition was found to be νcog=822 951 698.09 (13 ) MHz and the measured hyperfine A coefficient of the 6 S1 /2 state was 21.93 (11 ) MHz. The measurements are in agreement with previous values and represent an improvement by a factor of 700 in the uncertainty of the center-of-gravity measurement.

  9. Frequency stability optimization of an OEO using phase-locked-loop and self-injection-locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Rongrong; Jin, Xiaofeng; Zhu, Yanhong; Jin, Xiangdong; Yu, Xianbin; Zheng, Shilie; Chi, Hao; Zhang, Xianmin

    2017-03-01

    Frequency stability optimization of an X-band optoelectronic oscillator (OEO) using the technique of phase-locked loop (PLL) and dual loop self-injection-locking (DSIL) is proposed and demonstrated. The relationship between the loop transfer characteristics of a PLL and the phase noise of the oscillation signal is analyzed. The close-in phase noise and frequency overlapping Allan deviation (ADEV) of the OEO are optimized by properly choosing the bandwidth of the loop filter of the PLL. The phase noise of the OEO is suppressed by 41.5 dB at 100 Hz offset and 21.3 dB at 10 kHz offset with PLL and DSIL. The frequency overlapping ADEV achieved 7.03×10-12 at average time of 100 s, which is several orders of magnitude better than that of the DSIL OEO and the free-running OEO, proves the high oscillation stability of proposed scheme.

  10. Frequency stabilization of spin-torque-driven oscillations by coupling with a magnetic nonlinear resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Kudo, Kiwamu Suto, Hirofumi; Nagasawa, Tazumi; Mizushima, Koichi; Sato, Rie

    2014-10-28

    The fundamental function of any oscillator is to produce a waveform with a stable frequency. Here, we show a method of frequency stabilization for spin-torque nano-oscillators (STNOs) that relies on coupling with an adjacent nanomagnet through the magnetic dipole–dipole interaction. It is numerically demonstrated that highly stable oscillations occur as a result of mutual feedback between an STNO and a nanomagnet. The nanomagnet acts as a nonlinear resonator for the STNO. This method is based on the nonlinear behavior of the resonator and can be considered as a magnetic analogue of an optimization scheme in nanoelectromechanical systems. The oscillation frequency is most stabilized when the nanomagnet is driven at a special feedback point at which the feedback noise between the STNO and resonator is completely eliminated.

  11. Frequency stabilization of internal-mirror He-Ne lasers by air cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Jin; Liu, Zhongyou; Shi, Chunying; Liu, Xiuying; Wang, Jianbo; Yin, Cong; Cai, Shan

    2013-01-01

    Instead of traditional heating method, the cavity length of an internal-mirror He-Ne laser is controlled by air cooling which is generated by a mini cooling fan. A PID servo controlling system is designed to drive the cooling fan tuning the frequency of the laser. The frequency is stabilized by balancing the power of two operating longitudinal modes. Beating with an iodine stabilized He-Ne laser, a relative uncertainty(Δf / ̅f ) of 4.3×10-9 in 5 months, a frequency fluctuation of less than 2.6 MHz and an Allan deviation of 3×10-11 (τ=100 s) in 75 h are obtained.

  12. Absorption of sound in air - High-frequency measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bass, H. E.; Shields, F. D.

    1977-01-01

    The absorption of sound in air at frequencies from 4 to 100 kHz in 1/12 octave intervals, for temperatures from 255.4 K (0 F) to 310.9 K (100 F) in 5.5 K (10 F) intervals, and at 10% relative-humidity increments between 0% and saturation has been measured. The values of free-field absorption have been analyzed to determine the relaxation frequency of oxygen for each of the 92 combinations of temperature and relative humidity studied and the results are compared to an empirical expression. The relaxation frequencies of oxygen have been analyzed to determine the microscopic energy-transfer rates.

  13. Absorption of sound in air - High-frequency measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bass, H. E.; Shields, F. D.

    1977-01-01

    The absorption of sound in air at frequencies from 4 to 100 kHz in 1/12 octave intervals, for temperatures from 255.4 K (0 F) to 310.9 K (100 F) in 5.5 K (10 F) intervals, and at 10% relative-humidity increments between 0% and saturation has been measured. The values of free-field absorption have been analyzed to determine the relaxation frequency of oxygen for each of the 92 combinations of temperature and relative humidity studied and the results are compared to an empirical expression. The relaxation frequencies of oxygen have been analyzed to determine the microscopic energy-transfer rates.

  14. An improved offset generator developed for Allan deviation measurement of ultra stable frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamell, Robert L.; Kuhnle, Paul F.; Sydnor, Richard L.

    1992-01-01

    Measuring the performance of ultra stable frequency standards such as the Superconducting Cavity Maser Oscillator (SCMO) necessitates improvement of some test instrumentation. The frequency stability test equipment used at JPL includes a 1 Hz Offset Generator to generate a beat frequency between a pair of 100 MHz signals that are being compared. The noise floor of the measurement system using the current Offset Generator is adequate to characterize stability of hydrogen masers, but it is not adequate for the SCMO. A new Offset Generator with improved stability was designed and tested at JPL. With this Offset Generator and a new Zero Crossing Detector, recently developed at JPL, the measurement flow was reduced by a factor of 5.5 at 1 second tau, 3.0 at 1000 seconds, and 9.4 at 10,000 seconds, compared against the previous design. In addition to the new circuit designs of the Offset Generator and Zero Crossing Detector, tighter control of the measurement equipment environment was required to achieve this improvement. The design of this new Offset Generator are described, along with details of the environment control methods used.

  15. An improved offset generator developed for Allan deviation measurement of ultra stable frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamell, Robert L.; Kuhnle, Paul F.; Sydnor, Richard L.

    1992-01-01

    Measuring the performance of ultra stable frequency standards such as the Superconducting Cavity Maser Oscillator (SCMO) necessitates improvement of some test instrumentation. The frequency stability test equipment used at JPL includes a 1 Hz Offset Generator to generate a beat frequency between a pair of 100 MHz signals that are being compared. The noise floor of the measurement system using the current Offset Generator is adequate to characterize stability of hydrogen masers, but it is not adequate for the SCMO. A new Offset Generator with improved stability was designed and tested at JPL. With this Offset Generator and a new Zero Crossing Detector, recently developed at JPL, the measurement flow was reduced by a factor of 5.5 at 1 second tau, 3.0 at 1000 seconds, and 9.4 at 10,000 seconds, compared against the previous design. In addition to the new circuit designs of the Offset Generator and Zero Crossing Detector, tighter control of the measurement equipment environment was required to achieve this improvement. The design of this new Offset Generator are described, along with details of the environment control methods used.

  16. Temporal Stability of Implicit and Explicit Measures: A Longitudinal Analysis.

    PubMed

    Gawronski, Bertram; Morrison, Mike; Phills, Curtis E; Galdi, Silvia

    2017-03-01

    A common assumption about implicit measures is that they reflect early experiences, whereas explicit measures are assumed to reflect recent experiences. This assumption subsumes two distinct hypotheses: (a) Implicit measures are more resistant to situationally induced changes than explicit measures; (b) individual differences on implicit measures are more stable over time than individual differences on explicit measures. Although the first hypothesis has been the subject of numerous studies, the second hypothesis has received relatively little attention. The current research addressed the second hypothesis in two longitudinal studies that compared the temporal stability of individual differences on implicit and explicit measures in three content domains (self-concept, racial attitudes, political attitudes). In both studies, implicit measures showed significantly lower stability over time (weighted average r = .54) than conceptually corresponding explicit measures (weighted average r = .75), despite comparable estimates of internal consistency. Implications for theories of implicit social cognition and interpretations of implicit and explicit measures are discussed.

  17. Basin stability measure of different steady states in coupled oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Rakshit, Sarbendu; Bera, Bidesh K.; Majhi, Soumen; Hens, Chittaranjan; Ghosh, Dibakar

    2017-01-01

    In this report, we investigate the stabilization of saddle fixed points in coupled oscillators where individual oscillators exhibit the saddle fixed points. The coupled oscillators may have two structurally different types of suppressed states, namely amplitude death and oscillation death. The stabilization of saddle equilibrium point refers to the amplitude death state where oscillations are ceased and all the oscillators converge to the single stable steady state via inverse pitchfork bifurcation. Due to multistability features of oscillation death states, linear stability theory fails to analyze the stability of such states analytically, so we quantify all the states by basin stability measurement which is an universal nonlocal nonlinear concept and it interplays with the volume of basins of attractions. We also observe multi-clustered oscillation death states in a random network and measure them using basin stability framework. To explore such phenomena we choose a network of coupled Duffing-Holmes and Lorenz oscillators which are interacting through mean-field coupling. We investigate how basin stability for different steady states depends on mean-field density and coupling strength. We also analytically derive stability conditions for different steady states and confirm by rigorous bifurcation analysis. PMID:28378760

  18. Basin stability measure of different steady states in coupled oscillators.

    PubMed

    Rakshit, Sarbendu; Bera, Bidesh K; Majhi, Soumen; Hens, Chittaranjan; Ghosh, Dibakar

    2017-04-05

    In this report, we investigate the stabilization of saddle fixed points in coupled oscillators where individual oscillators exhibit the saddle fixed points. The coupled oscillators may have two structurally different types of suppressed states, namely amplitude death and oscillation death. The stabilization of saddle equilibrium point refers to the amplitude death state where oscillations are ceased and all the oscillators converge to the single stable steady state via inverse pitchfork bifurcation. Due to multistability features of oscillation death states, linear stability theory fails to analyze the stability of such states analytically, so we quantify all the states by basin stability measurement which is an universal nonlocal nonlinear concept and it interplays with the volume of basins of attractions. We also observe multi-clustered oscillation death states in a random network and measure them using basin stability framework. To explore such phenomena we choose a network of coupled Duffing-Holmes and Lorenz oscillators which are interacting through mean-field coupling. We investigate how basin stability for different steady states depends on mean-field density and coupling strength. We also analytically derive stability conditions for different steady states and confirm by rigorous bifurcation analysis.

  19. Basin stability measure of different steady states in coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakshit, Sarbendu; Bera, Bidesh K.; Majhi, Soumen; Hens, Chittaranjan; Ghosh, Dibakar

    2017-04-01

    In this report, we investigate the stabilization of saddle fixed points in coupled oscillators where individual oscillators exhibit the saddle fixed points. The coupled oscillators may have two structurally different types of suppressed states, namely amplitude death and oscillation death. The stabilization of saddle equilibrium point refers to the amplitude death state where oscillations are ceased and all the oscillators converge to the single stable steady state via inverse pitchfork bifurcation. Due to multistability features of oscillation death states, linear stability theory fails to analyze the stability of such states analytically, so we quantify all the states by basin stability measurement which is an universal nonlocal nonlinear concept and it interplays with the volume of basins of attractions. We also observe multi-clustered oscillation death states in a random network and measure them using basin stability framework. To explore such phenomena we choose a network of coupled Duffing-Holmes and Lorenz oscillators which are interacting through mean-field coupling. We investigate how basin stability for different steady states depends on mean-field density and coupling strength. We also analytically derive stability conditions for different steady states and confirm by rigorous bifurcation analysis.

  20. The frequency and time standard and activities at the Beijing Institute of Radio Metrology and Measurements. [China

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, H. T.

    1979-01-01

    Three kinds of frequency measuring systems are described: frequency comparison, phase comparison, and time comparison. With the help of the portable cesium clock in determining the time delay between two stations, a time synchronization, experiment was conducted using the Symphonie satellite. A result with an accuracy of 30 ns and an uncertainty of about 10 ns was obtained. Another experiment, applying the television pulse technique for time synchronization, yielded a result with an error of about 0.5 mu s in 24 hours. In order to measure the short term frequency stability of crystal oscillators or other frequency sources, a rubidium maser atomic frequency standard was developed as well as a short term stability measuring system.

  1. Does Implant Design Affect Implant Primary Stability? A Resonance Frequency Analysis-Based Randomized Split-Mouth Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Gehrke, Sergio Alexandre; da Silva, Ulisses Tavares; Del Fabbro, Massimo

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess implant stability in relation to implant design (conical vs. semiconical and wide-pitch vs narrow-pitch) using resonance frequency analysis. Twenty patients with bilateral edentulous maxillary premolar region were selected. In one hemiarch, conical implants with wide pitch (group 1) were installed; in the other hemiarch, semiconical implants with narrow pitch were installed (group 2). The implant allocation was randomized. The implant stability quotient (ISQ) was measured by resonance frequency analysis immediately following implant placement to assess primary stability (time 1) and at 90 days after placement (time 2). In group 1, the mean and standard deviation ISQ for time 1 was 65.8 ± 6.22 (95% confidence interval [CI], 55 to 80), and for time 2, it was 68.0 ± 5.52 (95% CI, 57 to 77). In group 2, the mean and standard deviation ISQ was 63.6 ± 5.95 (95% CI, 52 to 78) for time 1 and 67.0 ± 5.71 (95% CI, 58 to 78) for time 2. The statistical analysis demonstrated significant difference in the ISQ values between groups at time 1 (P = .007) and no statistical difference at time 2 (P = .54). The greater primary stability of conical implants with wide pitch compared with semiconical implants with narrow pitch might suggest a preference for the former in case of the adoption of immediate or early loading protocols.

  2. Nonlinear oscillation and interfacial stability of an encapsulated microbubble under dual-frequency ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvisi, Michael; Liu, Yunqiao; Wang, Qianxi

    2016-11-01

    Encapsulated microbubbles (EMBs) are widely used in medical ultrasound imaging as contrast-enhanced agents. However, the potential damaging effects of violent, collapsing EMBs to cells and tissues in clinical practice have remained a concern. Dual-frequency ultrasound is a promising technique for improving the efficacy and safety of sonography. The EMB system modeled consists of the external liquid, membrane, and internal gases. The microbubble dynamics are simulated using a simple nonlinear interactive theory, considering the compressibility of the internal gas, viscosity of the liquid flow, and elasticity of the membrane. The radial oscillation and interfacial stability of an EMB under single and dual-frequency excitations are compared. The simulation results show that the dual-frequency technique produces larger backscatter pressure at higher harmonics of the primary driving frequency. This enriched acoustic spectrum can enhance blood-tissue contrast and improve sonographic image quality. The results further show that the acoustic pressure threshold associated with the onset of shape instability is greater for dual-frequency driving. This suggests that the dual-frequency technique stabilizes the EMB, thereby improving the efficacy and safety of contrast-enhanced agents.

  3. FREQUENCY-DEPENDENT DISPERSION MEASURES AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PULSAR TIMING

    SciTech Connect

    Cordes, J. M.; Shannon, R. M.; Stinebring, D. R. E-mail: ryan.shannon@csiro.au

    2016-01-20

    The dispersion measure (DM), the column density of free electrons to a pulsar, is shown to be frequency dependent because of multipath scattering from small-scale electron-density fluctuations. DMs vary between propagation paths whose transverse extent varies strongly with frequency, yielding arrival times that deviate from the high-frequency scaling expected for a cold, uniform, unmagnetized plasma (1/frequency{sup 2}). Scaling laws for thin phase screens are verified with simulations; extended media are also analyzed. The rms DM difference across an octave band near 1.5 GHz is ∼ 4 × 10{sup −5} pc cm{sup −3} for pulsars at ∼1 kpc distance. The corresponding arrival-time variations are a few to hundreds of nanoseconds for DM ≲ 30 pc cm{sup −3} but increase rapidly to microseconds or more for larger DMs and wider frequency ranges. Chromatic DMs introduce correlated noise into timing residuals with a power spectrum of “low pass” form. The correlation time is roughly the geometric mean of the refraction times for the highest and lowest radio frequencies used, ranging from days to years, depending on the pulsar. We discuss implications for methodologies that use large frequency separations or wide bandwidth receivers for timing measurements. Chromatic DMs are partially mitigable by including an additional chromatic term in arrival time models. Without mitigation, an additional term in the noise model for pulsar timing is implied. In combination with measurement errors from radiometer noise, an arbitrarily large increase in total frequency range (or bandwidth) will yield diminishing benefits and may be detrimental to overall timing precision.

  4. Frequency-dependent Dispersion Measures and Implications for Pulsar Timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, J. M.; Shannon, R. M.; Stinebring, D. R.

    2016-01-01

    The dispersion measure (DM), the column density of free electrons to a pulsar, is shown to be frequency dependent because of multipath scattering from small-scale electron-density fluctuations. DMs vary between propagation paths whose transverse extent varies strongly with frequency, yielding arrival times that deviate from the high-frequency scaling expected for a cold, uniform, unmagnetized plasma (1/frequency2). Scaling laws for thin phase screens are verified with simulations; extended media are also analyzed. The rms DM difference across an octave band near 1.5 GHz is ˜ 4 × 10-5 pc cm-3 for pulsars at ˜1 kpc distance. The corresponding arrival-time variations are a few to hundreds of nanoseconds for DM ≲ 30 pc cm-3 but increase rapidly to microseconds or more for larger DMs and wider frequency ranges. Chromatic DMs introduce correlated noise into timing residuals with a power spectrum of “low pass” form. The correlation time is roughly the geometric mean of the refraction times for the highest and lowest radio frequencies used, ranging from days to years, depending on the pulsar. We discuss implications for methodologies that use large frequency separations or wide bandwidth receivers for timing measurements. Chromatic DMs are partially mitigable by including an additional chromatic term in arrival time models. Without mitigation, an additional term in the noise model for pulsar timing is implied. In combination with measurement errors from radiometer noise, an arbitrarily large increase in total frequency range (or bandwidth) will yield diminishing benefits and may be detrimental to overall timing precision.

  5. Does fundamental-frequency discrimination measure virtual pitch discrimination?

    PubMed

    Micheyl, Christophe; Divis, Kristin; Wrobleski, David M; Oxenham, Andrew J

    2010-10-01

    Studies of pitch perception often involve measuring difference limens for complex tones (DLCs) that differ in fundamental frequency (F0). These measures are thought to reflect F0 discrimination and to provide an indirect measure of subjective pitch strength. However, in many situations discrimination may be based on cues other than the pitch or the F0, such as differences in the frequencies of individual components or timbre (brightness). Here, DLCs were measured for harmonic and inharmonic tones under various conditions, including a randomized or fixed lowest harmonic number, with and without feedback. The inharmonic tones were produced by shifting the frequencies of all harmonics upwards by 6.25%, 12.5%, or 25% of F0. It was hypothesized that, if DLCs reflect residue-pitch discrimination, these frequency-shifted tones, which produced a weaker and more ambiguous pitch than would yield larger DLCs than the harmonic tones. However, if DLCs reflect comparisons of component pitches, or timbre, they should not be systematically influenced by frequency shifting. The results showed larger DLCs and more scattered pitch matches for inharmonic than for harmonic complexes, confirming that the inharmonic tones produced a less consistent pitch than the harmonic tones, and consistent with the idea that DLCs reflect F0 pitch discrimination.

  6. Low-frequency sound absorption measurements in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.; Meredith, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    Thirty sets of sound absorption measurements in air at a pressure of 1 atmosphere are presented at temperatures from 10 C to 50 C, relative humidities from 0 to 100 percent, and frequencies from 10 to 2500 Hz. The measurements were conducted by the method of free decay in a resonant tube having a length of 18.261 m and bore diameter of 0.152 m. Background measurements in a gas consisting of 89.5 percent N2 and 10.5 percent Ar, a mixture which has the same sound velocity as air, permitted the wall and structural losses of the tube to be separated from the constituent absorption, consisting of classical rotational and vibrational absorption, in the air samples. The data were used to evaluate the vibrational relaxation frequencies of N2 and/or O2 for each of the 30 sets of meteorological parameters. Over the full range of humidity, the measured relaxation frequencies of N2 in air lie between those specified by ANSI Standard S1.26-1978 and those measured earlier in binary N2H2O mixtures. The measured relaxation frequencies could be determined only at very low values of humidity, reveal a significant trend away from the ANSI standard, in agreement with a prior investigation.

  7. Improved molecular constants and frequencies for the CO[sub 2] laser from new high-J regular and hot-band frequency measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Maki, A.G.; Chou, C.C.; Evenson, K.M.; Zink, L.R. . Time and Frequency Division); Shy, J.T. . Dept. of Physics)

    1994-09-01

    New frequencies are given for the [sup 12]C[sup 16]O[sub 2], [sup 13]C[sup 16]O[sub 2], [sup 12]C[sup 18]O[sub 2], and [sup 13]C[sup 18]O[sub 2] regular band laser transitions and for the hot-band transitions of [sup 12]C[sup 16]O[sub 2]. These frequencies are based on a new least-squares analysis of all the frequency measurements of these four molecular species including new high-J measurements reported here and recent absolute frequency measurements. Fourteen new high-J transitions of the regular [sup 12]C[sup 16]O[sub 2] laser bands have been observed, the lasers have been stabilized with sub-Doppler saturated 4.3-[mu]m fluorescence, and their frequencies have been measured. Nine of these transitions fill the gap between the 9.4- and 10.4-[mu]m bands. Saturated 4.3-[mu]m fluorescence also has been used to stabilize the 01[sup 1]1-[11[sup 1]0,03[sup 1]0][sub 1] and 01[sup 1]1-[11[sup 1]0,03[sup 1]0][sub 2] hot-band laser lines. New frequency measurements are reported for 84 hot-band lines, which were also included in the reanalysis of the CO[sub 2] laser transitions.

  8. Tailored Excitation for Multivariable Stability-Margin Measurement Applied to the X-31A Nonlinear Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosworth, John T.; Burken, John J.

    1997-01-01

    Safety and productivity of the initial flight test phase of a new vehicle have been enhanced by developing the ability to measure the stability margins of the combined control system and vehicle in flight. One shortcoming of performing this analysis is the long duration of the excitation signal required to provide results over a wide frequency range. For flight regimes such as high angle of attack or hypersonic flight, the ability to maintain flight condition for this time duration is difficult. Significantly reducing the required duration of the excitation input is possible by tailoring the input to excite only the frequency range where the lowest stability margin is expected. For a multiple-input/multiple-output system, the inputs can be simultaneously applied to the control effectors by creating each excitation input with a unique set of frequency components. Chirp-Z transformation algorithms can be used to match the analysis of the results to the specific frequencies used in the excitation input. This report discusses the application of a tailored excitation input to a high-fidelity X-31A linear model and nonlinear simulation. Depending on the frequency range, the results indicate the potential to significantly reduce the time required for stability measurement.

  9. Collinear interferometer with variable delay for carrier-envelope offset frequency measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlowska, Monika; Ozimek, Filip; Fita, Piotr; Radzewicz, Czeslaw

    2009-08-15

    We demonstrate a novel scheme for measuring the carrier-envelope offset frequency in a femtosecond optical frequency comb. Our method is based on a common-path interferometer with a calcite Babinet-Soleil compensator employed to control the delay between the two interfering beams of pulses. The large delay range (up to 8 ps) of our device is sufficient for systems that rely on spectral broadening in microstructured fibers. We show an experimental proof that the stability of a common-path arrangement is superior to that of the standard interferometers.

  10. The Interannual Stability of Cumulative Frequency Distributions for Convective System Size and Intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohr, Karen I.; Molinari, John; Thorncroft, Chris

    2009-01-01

    The characteristics of convective system populations in West Africa and the western Pacific tropical cyclone basin were analyzed to investigate whether interannual variability in convective activity in tropical continental and oceanic environments is driven by variations in the number of events during the wet season or by favoring large and/or intense convective systems. Convective systems were defined from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) data as a cluster of pixels with an 85-GHz polarization-corrected brightness temperature below 255 K and with an area of at least 64 square kilometers. The study database consisted of convective systems in West Africa from May to September 1998-2007, and in the western Pacific from May to November 1998-2007. Annual cumulative frequency distributions for system minimum brightness temperature and system area were constructed for both regions. For both regions, there were no statistically significant differences between the annual curves for system minimum brightness temperature. There were two groups of system area curves, split by the TRMM altitude boost in 2001. Within each set, there was no statistically significant interannual variability. Subsetting the database revealed some sensitivity in distribution shape to the size of the sampling area, the length of the sample period, and the climate zone. From a regional perspective, the stability of the cumulative frequency distributions implied that the probability that a convective system would attain a particular size or intensity does not change interannually. Variability in the number of convective events appeared to be more important in determining whether a year is either wetter or drier than normal.

  11. A Stepped Frequency Sweeping Method for Nonlinearity Measurement of Microresonators

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yumiao; Dong, Yonggui; Huang, Xianxiang; Zhang, Zhili

    2016-01-01

    In order to measure the nonlinear features of micromechanical resonators, a free damped oscillation method based on stair-stepped frequency sinusoidal pulse excitation is investigated. In the vicinity of the resonant frequency, a frequency stepping sinusoidal pulse sequence is employed as the excitation signal. A set of free vibration response signals, containing different degrees of nonlinear dynamical characteristics, are obtained. The amplitude-frequency curves of the resonator are acquired from the forced vibration signals. Together with a singular spectrum analysis algorithm, the instantaneous amplitudes and instantaneous frequencies are extracted by a Hilbert transform from the free vibration signals. The calculated Backbone curves, and frequency response function (FRF) curves are distinct and can be used to characterize the nonlinear dynamics of the resonator. Taking a Duffing system as an example, numerical simulations are carried out for free vibration response signals in cases of different signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). The results show that this method displays better anti-noise performance than FREEVIB. A vibrating ring microgyroscope is experimentally tested. The obtained Backbone and FRF curves agree with those obtained by the traditional frequency sweeping method. As a test technique, the proposed method can also be used to for experimentally testing the dynamic characteristics of other types of micromechanical resonators. PMID:27754381

  12. Compressive inverse scattering: I. High-frequency SIMO/MISO and MIMO measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fannjiang, Albert C.

    2010-03-01

    Inverse scattering from discrete targets with the single-input-multiple-output (SIMO), multiple-input-single-output (MISO) or multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) measurements is analyzed by compressed sensing theory with and without the Born approximation. High-frequency analysis of (probabilistic) recoverability by the L1-based minimization/regularization principles is presented. In the absence of noise, it is shown that the L1-based solution can recover exactly the target of sparsity up to the dimension of the data either with the MIMO measurement for the Born scattering or with the SIMO/MISO measurement for the exact scattering. The stability with respect to noisy data is proved for weak or widely separated scatterers. Reciprocity between the SIMO and MISO measurements is analyzed. Finally a coherence bound (and the resulting recoverability) is proved for diffraction tomography with high-frequency, few-view and limited-angle SIMO/MISO measurements.

  13. Effect of frequency, magnitude and direction of translational and rotational oscillation on the postural stability of standing people

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawayseh, Naser; Griffin, Michael J.

    2006-12-01

    Oscillatory motions can cause injury in transport when standing passengers or crew lose balance and fall. To predict the loss of balance of standing people, a model is required of the relationship between the input motion and the stability of the human body. This experimental study investigated the effect of frequency, magnitude and direction of oscillation on the postural stability of standing subjects and whether response to rotational oscillation can be predicted from knowledge of response to translational oscillation. Twelve male subjects stood on a floor that oscillated in either horizontal (fore-and-aft or lateral) or rotational (pitch or roll) directions. The oscillations were one-third octave bands of random motion centred on five preferred octave centre frequencies (0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 Hz). The horizontal motions were presented at each of four velocities (0.04, 0.062, 0.099, and 0.16 ms -1 rms) and the rotational motions were presented at each of four rotational angles (0.73, 1.46, 2.92, and 5.85° rms) corresponding to four accelerations (0.125, 0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 ms -2 rms), where the acceleration is that caused by rotation through the gravitational vector. Postural stability was determined by subjective methods and by measuring the displacement of the centre of pressure at the feet during horizontal oscillation. During horizontal oscillation, increases in motion magnitude increased instability and, with the same velocity at all frequencies from 0.125 to 2.0 Hz, most instability occurred in the region of 0.5 Hz. Fore-and-aft oscillation produced more instability than lateral oscillation, although displacements of the centre of pressure were similar in both directions. With the same angular displacement at all frequencies from 0.125 to 2.0 Hz, pitch oscillation caused more instability than roll oscillation, but in both directions instability increased with increased frequency of oscillation. Frequency weightings for acceleration in the plane of

  14. A novel single frequency stabilized Fabry-Perot laser diode at 1590 nm for gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weldon, Vincent; Boylan, Karl; Corbett, Brian; McDonald, David; O'Gorman, James

    2002-09-01

    A novel single frequency stabilized Fabry-Perot (SFP) laser diode with an emission wavelength of λ=1590 nm for H 2S gas sensing is reported. Sculpting of the multi-mode spectral distribution of a FP laser to achieve single frequency emission is carried out using post growth photolitographic processing of the device. The resulting longitudinal-mode controlled FP laser has a stabilized single frequency emission with a side mode suppression ratio (SMSR) of 40 dB. The application of this device to spectroscopic based H 2S sensing is demonstrated by targeting absorption lines in the wavelength range 1588≤ λ≤1591 nm. Using wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS), a low detection limit of 120 ppm.m.Hz -1/2 was estimated while targeting the absorption line at 1590.08 nm. These initial results demonstrate the potential of the stabilized FP laser diode at this wavelength as a tunable, single frequency source for spectroscopic based gas sensing.

  15. Precise frequency measurements of {sup 127}I{sub 2} lines in the wavelength region 750-780 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Chun-Chieh; Wu, Kuo-Yu; Lien, Yu-Hung; Shy, Jow-Tsong; Knoeckel, Horst; Tiemann, Eberhard; Chui, Hsiang-Chen

    2010-06-15

    High precision frequency measurements of {sup 127}I{sub 2} hyperfine transitions in the wavelength range between 750 and 780 nm were performed employing an optical frequency comb. A Ti:sapphire laser is frequency stabilized to a hyperfine component of I{sub 2} using a Doppler-free frequency modulation technique, and an optical frequency comb is used to measure its frequency precisely. Improved absolute frequencies of 27 hyperfine transitions between 750 and 780 nm of the bands (0-12) and (0-13) of B {sup 3}{Pi}{sub 0{sub u{sup +}}}-X {sup 1}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +} system of I{sub 2} are presented. The relative uncertainty of the measurement is a few times 10{sup -10}, limited by the frequency instability of the iodine-stabilized laser. The frequencies are compared to the predicted frequencies using the model description of [Eur. Phys. J. D 28, 199 (2004)], which yields differences larger than expected. An improved model is developed for the range from 755 to 815 nm for the prediction of lines with an error limit of the absolute frequency less than 0.2 MHz.

  16. Feasibility demonstration of a variable frequency driver-microwave transient regression rate measurement system. [for solid propellant combustion response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strand, L. D.; Mcnamara, R. P.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of a system capable of rapidly and directly measuring the low-frequency (motor characteristics length bulk mode) combustion response characteristics of solid propellants has been investigated. The system consists of a variable frequency oscillatory driver device coupled with an improved version of the JPL microwave propellant regression rate measurement system. The ratio of the normalized regression rate and pressure amplitudes and their relative phase are measured as a function of varying pressure level and frequency. Test results with a well-characterized PBAN-AP propellant formulation were found to compare favorably with the results of more conventional stability measurement techniques.

  17. Frequency shift measurement in shock-compressed materials

    DOEpatents

    Moore, David S.; Schmidt, Stephen C.

    1985-01-01

    A method for determining molecular vibrational frequencies in shock-compressed transparent materials. A single laser beam pulse is directed into a sample material while the material is shock-compressed from a direction opposite that of the incident laser beam. A Stokes beam produced by stimulated Raman scattering is emitted back along the path of the incident laser beam, that is, in the opposite direction to that of the incident laser beam. The Stokes beam is separated from the incident beam and its frequency measured. The difference in frequency between the Stokes beam and the incident beam is representative of the characteristic frequency of the Raman active mode of the sample. Both the incident beam and the Stokes beam pass perpendicularly through the shock front advancing through the sample, thereby minimizing adverse effects of refraction.

  18. Frequency shift measurement in shock-compressed materials

    DOEpatents

    Moore, D.S.; Schmidt, S.C.

    1984-02-21

    A method is disclosed for determining molecular vibrational frequencies in shock-compressed transparent materials. A single laser beam pulse is directed into a sample material while the material is shock-compressed from a direction opposite that of the incident laser beam. A Stokes beam produced by stimulated Raman scattering is emitted back along the path of the incident laser beam, that is, in the opposite direction to that of the incident laser beam. The Stokes beam is separated from the incident beam and its frequency measured. The difference in frequency between the Stokes beam and the incident beam is representative of the characteristic frequency of the Raman active mode of the sample. Both the incident beam and the Stokes beam pass perpendicularly through the stock front advancing through the sample, thereby minimizing adverse effects of refraction.

  19. Determining low-frequency source location from acoustic phase measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, Travis L.; Frisk, George V.

    2002-11-01

    For low-frequency cw sound sources in shallow water, the time rate-of-change of the measured acoustic phase is well approximated by the time rate-of-change of the source-receiver separation distance. An algorithm for determining a locus of possible source locations based on this idea has been developed. The locus has the general form of a hyperbola, which can be used to provide a bearing estimation at long ranges, and an estimate of source location at short ranges. The algorithm uses only acoustic phase data and receiver geometry as input, and can be used even when the source frequency is slightly unstable and/or imprecisely known. The algorithm has been applied to data from low-frequency experiments (20-300 Hz), both for stable and unstable source frequencies, and shown to perform well. [Work supported by ONR and WHOI Academic Programs Office.

  20. Frequency Measurement System of Optical Clocks Without a Flywheel Oscillator.

    PubMed

    Fujieda, Miho; Ido, Tetsuya; Hachisu, Hidekazu; Gotoh, Tadahiro; Takiguchi, Hiroshi; Hayasaka, Kazuhiro; Toyoda, Kenji; Yonegaki, Kenji; Tanaka, Utako; Urabe, Shinji

    2016-12-01

    We developed a system for the remote frequency comparison of optical clocks. The system does not require a flywheel oscillator at the remote end, making it possible to evaluate optical frequencies even in laboratories, where no stable microwave reference, such as an Rb clock, a Cs clock, or a hydrogen maser exists. The system is established by the integration of several systems: a portable carrier-phase two-way satellite frequency transfer station and a microwave signal generation system by an optical frequency comb from an optical clock. The measurement was as quick as a conventional method that employs a local microwave reference. We confirmed the system uncertainty and instability to be at the low 10(-15) level using an Sr lattice clock.

  1. VALIDATION OF TWO CLINICAL MEASURES OF CORE STABILITY.

    PubMed

    Butowicz, Courtney M; Ebaugh, D David; Noehren, Brian; Silfies, Sheri P

    2016-02-01

    Emerging evidence suggests poor core stability is a risk factor for low back and lower extremity injuries in athletes. Recently the trunk stability test (TST) and unilateral hip bridge endurance test (UHBE) were developed to clinically assess core stability. Although these and other clinical tests of core stability exist, how well they assess core stability when compared to biomechanical measures of isolated core stability has not been thoroughly evaluated. The purposes of this study were to 1) determine concurrent validity of two novel clinical core stability assessments (TST and UHBE), and 2) assess relationships between these assessments and the trunk endurance and Y-Balance tests. The authors' hypothesized that the TST and UHBE would be highly correlated to the lab-based biomechanical measure of isolated core stability. Also, the TST and UHBE would be moderately correlated with each other, but not with the trunk extensor endurance and Y-Balance. Cross-Sectional design. Twenty healthy active individuals completed the TST (recorded number of errors), UHBE (s), trunk extensor endurance (s), Y-Balance (% leg length) test (YBT), and biomechanical test of core stability. Correlational analyses revealed a small, non-significant association between TST and biomechanical measures (rs = 0.2 - 0.22), while a moderate, significant relationship existed between UHBE and biomechanical measures (rs = -0.49 to -0.56, p < 0.05). There was little to no relationship between TST and UHBE (r = -0.07 to - 0.21), or TST and extensor endurance (r = -0.18 to -0.24). A moderate, significant association existed between TST and two reach directions of the YBT (r = -0.41 to -0.43, p < 0.05). Study data support the utility of UHBE as a clinical measure of core stability. The poor relationship between the TST and biomechanical measures, combined with observation of most control faults occurring in the lower extremity (LE) suggest the TST may not be an appropriate

  2. Swept frequency technique for dispersion measurement of microstrip lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. Q.

    1986-01-01

    Microstrip lines used in microwave integrated circuits are dispersive. Because a microstrip line is an open structure, the dispersion can not be derived with pure TEM, TE, or TM mode analysis. Dispersion analysis has commonly been done using a spectral domain approach, and dispersion measurement has been made with high Q microstrip ring resonators. Since the dispersion of a microstrip line is fully characterized by the frequency dependent phase velocity of the line, dispersion measurement of microstrip lines requires the measurement of the line wavelength as a function of frequency. In this paper, a swept frequency technique for dispersion measurement is described. The measurement was made using an automatic network analyzer with the microstrip line terminated in a short circuit. Experimental data for two microstrip lines on 10 and 30 mil Cuflon substrates were recorded over a frequency range of 2 to 20 GHz. Agreement with theoretical results computed by the spectral domain approach is good. Possible sources of error for the discrepancy are discussed.

  3. Measuring ionospheric electron density using the plasma frequency probe

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, M.D.; Baker, K.D. )

    1992-02-01

    During the past decade, the plasma frequency probe (PFP) has evolved into an accurate, proven method of measuring electron density in the ionosphere above about 90 km. The instrument uses an electrically short antenna mounted on a sounding rocket that is immersed in the plasma and notes the frequency where the antenna impedance is large and nonreactive. This frequency is closely related to the plasma frequency, which is a direct function of free electron concentration. The probe uses phase-locked loop technology to follow a changing electron density. Several sections of the plasma frequency probe circuitry are unique, especially the voltage-controlled oscillator that uses both an electronically tuned capacitor and inductor to give the wide tuning range needed for electron density measurements. The results from two recent sounding rocket flights (Thunderstorm II and CRIT II) under vastly different plasma conditions demonstrate the capabilities of the PFP and show the importance of in situ electron density measurements of understanding plasma processes. 9 refs.

  4. Frequency Domain Magnetic Measurements from Kilohertz to Gigahertz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, John F.

    "......we applied much prolonged labor on investigating the magnetical forces; so wonderful indeed are they, compared with the forces in all other minerals, surpassing even the virtues of all bodies around us. Nor have we found this labor idle or unfruitful; since daily in our experimenting new unexpected properties came to light."William Gilbert, De Magnete, 1600Abstract. This review deals with practical aspects of making frequency-domain measurements of magnetic susceptibility and magnetic losses from 200 kHz up to 10 GHz. It sets out the types of measurement concerned, distinguishing resonant from nonresonant phenomena. The techniques available are categorized according to suitability for the different frequency regimes and types of investigation. Practical recipes are provided for undertaking such experiments across the entire frequency range. Marginal oscillator spectrometry is discussed which is applicable across the whole frequency range. Different instruments are presented, and particular emphasis is placed on designs which function on the Robinson principle. Analysis of oscillation condition and signal-to-noise performance is dealt with, also sample considerations such as filling factor. Practical circuits are presented and their merits and demerits evaluated. Layout and radio-frequency design considerations are dealt with. Ultrahigh/microwave frequency marginal oscillator spectrometry is given special treatment and several practical designs are given. The essentials of good microwave design are emphasized. A general discussion of resonant structures is included which treats multiple layer coil design, slow wave line structures, stripline and cavities. Unusual cavity designs such as the rhumbatron are treated. Use of striplines with microwave marginal spectrometry is described and compared with conventional network-analysis techniques. The use of parameter matrices for high-frequency analysis is alluded to. Some details of good construction practice are

  5. Breakfast frequency among adolescents: associations with measures of family functioning.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Trine Pagh; Holstein, Bjørn E; Damsgaard, Mogens Trab; Rasmussen, Mette

    2016-06-01

    To investigate (i) associations between adolescents' frequency of breakfast and family functioning (close relations to parents, quality of family communication and family support) and (ii) if any observed associations between breakfast frequency and family functioning vary by sociodemographic factors. School-based cross-sectional study. Students completed a web-based questionnaire. Associations were estimated by multilevel multivariate logistic regression. Danish arm of the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study, 2014. Adolescents aged 13 and 15 years (n 3054) from a random sample of forty-one schools. Nearly one-quarter of the adolescents had low breakfast frequency. Low breakfast frequency was associated with low family functioning measured by three dimensions. The OR (95 % CI) of low breakfast frequency was 1·81 (1·40, 2·33) for adolescents who reported no close relations to parents, 2·28 (1·61, 3·22) for adolescents who reported low level of quality of family communication and 2·09 (1·39, 3·15) for adolescents who reported low level of family support. Joint effect analyses suggested that the odds of low breakfast frequency among adolescents with low family functioning compared with high family functioning were highest among adolescents being girls, immigrants and living in other than a traditional family structure. Low breakfast frequency was associated with low family functioning measured by close relations to parents, quality of family communication and family support. Further, analyses suggested that the associations were more pronounced among girls, immigrants and adolescents from other family structure than traditional. The study highlights the importance of the family setting in promoting regular breakfast frequency among adolescents.

  6. Carrier-envelope offset frequency stabilization in a femtosecond optical parametric oscillator without nonlinear interferometry.

    PubMed

    Balskus, Karolis; Fleming, Melissa; McCracken, Richard A; Zhang, Zhaowei; Reid, Derryck T

    2016-03-01

    By exploiting the correlation between changes in the wavelength and the carrier-envelope offset frequency (f(CEO)) of the signal pulses in a synchronously pumped optical parametric oscillator, we show that f(CEO) can be stabilized indefinitely to a few megahertz in a 333 MHz repetition-rate system. Based on a position-sensitive photodiode, the technique is easily implemented, requires no nonlinear interferometry, has a wide capture range, and is compatible with feed-forward techniques that can enable f(CEO) stabilization at loop bandwidths far exceeding those currently available to OPO combs.

  7. Vacuum wavelength calibration of frequency-stabilized He-Ne lasers used in commercial laser interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Won-Kyu; Suh, Ho Suhng; Kang, Chu-Shik

    2011-05-01

    We report on the calibration results of the wavelength of the lasers used in commercial laser interferometers, including the vacuum wavelength deviation from its nominal value, the vacuum wavelength stability, the repeatability of stabilized wavelength, and the secular change of these properties, by analyzing the calibration data accumulated for more than two decades. We present an experimental method of calibrating the frequency of laser interferometers. We also propose a proper time interval and an appropriate uncertainty expression for the vacuum wavelength calibration of the laser interferometers.

  8. Thermal analysis and test of SUNLITE reference cavity for laser frequency stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amundsen, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    SUNLITE is a space-based experiment which uses a reference cavity to provide a stable frequency reference for a terahertz laser oscillator. Thermal stability of the cavity is a key factor in attaining a stable narrow-linewidth laser beam. This paper describes the thermal stability requirements on the cavity design and detailed thermal analysis performed, as well as thermal testing that was performed on a prototype. Analytical thermal models were correlated to the test data and additional modeling of the current design is presented. Suggestions for improving similar high-precision thermal tests are given.

  9. High-bandwidth transfer of phase stability through a fiber frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Scharnhorst, Nils; Wübbena, Jannes B; Hannig, Stephan; Jakobsen, Kornelius; Kramer, Johannes; Leroux, Ian D; Schmidt, Piet O

    2015-07-27

    We demonstrate phase locking of a 729 nm diode laser to a 1542 nm master laser via an erbium-doped-fiber frequency comb, using a transfer-oscillator feedforward scheme which suppresses the effect of comb noise in an unprecedented 1.8 MHz bandwidth. We illustrate its performance by carrying out coherent manipulations of a trapped calcium ion with 99 % fidelity even at few-μs timescales. We thus demonstrate that transfer-oscillator locking can provide sufficient phase stability for high-fidelity quantum logic manipulation even without pre-stabilization of the slave diode laser.

  10. Stability and stabilisation of linear multidimensional discrete systems in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lizhen; Xu, Li; Lin, Zhiping

    2013-11-01

    This paper gives a reasonably detailed review of advances in stability and stabilisation of linear multidimensional (N-D) discrete systems in the frequency domain. The emphasis is on the recent progress, especially in the past decade. The discussion will focus on two topics: (i) stability test. Determination of whether a given N-D (N ≥ 2) system is stable; (ii) stabilisation. Parameterisation of all stabilising compensators for a stabilisable N-D system. After reviewing the progress and several state of the art methods in these two topics with illustrative examples, some related issues are also briefly mentioned at the end.

  11. Stability of computer ECG amplitude measurements in the presence of noise. The CSE Working Party.

    PubMed

    Zywietz, C; Willems, J L; Arnaud, P; van Bemmel, J H; Degani, R; Macfarlane, P W

    1990-02-01

    An important feature of an ECG analysis program is its ability to provide reliable measurements under various operating conditions, e.g., on noise-free and noisy ECGs. Therefore, within the European cooperative project "Common Standards For Quantitative Electrocardiography" (CSE), the accuracy and stability of ECG measurements obtained by several computer programs has been compared. To investigate the stability of measurements two sets of 10 ECGs with and without seven different high- and low-frequency types of noise--altogether 160 electrocardiograms and 160 vectorcardiograms--have been analyzed by eight electrocardiographic and five vectorcardiographic computer programs. The stability of measurement was tested with respect to results obtained for the noise-free recordings. In a previous paper, the influence of noise on wave boundary recognition has been reported. In the present paper, the effect of noise on amplitude measurements and on problems of waveform definitions within the QRS complex are described. The results indicate that programs analyzing an averaged beat exhibit less variability than programs which measure every complex or a selected beat. Comparability and stability of measurements could be improved if a standardized procedure for amplitude references were to be introduced. In addition, the stability of QRS waveform labelling could be improved if waveforms' minimum amplitude and duration were to be validated against the noise level which itself should be determined by a standardized procedure.

  12. Frequency-temporal resolution of hearing measured by rippled noise.

    PubMed

    Supin AYa; Popov, V V; Milekhina, O N; Tarakanov, M B

    1997-06-01

    Frequency-temporal resolution of hearing was measured in normal hearers using rippled noise stimulation in conjunction with a phase-reversal test. The principle of the test was to interchange peak and trough positions (the phase reversal) and to find the highest ripple density at which such interchange is detectable depending on reversal rate. The measurements were made using narrow-band noises with center frequencies of 0.5-4 kHz. The ripple-density resolution limits were constant at phase-reversal rates below 2-3/s and diminished at higher phase-reversal rates. A model is proposed to explain the data based on the envelope fluctuations inherent in noise; these fluctuations are supposed to limit detection of frequency-temporal sound patterns.

  13. Newton algorithm for fitting transfer functions to frequency response measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanos, J. T.; Mingori, D. L.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper the problem of synthesizing transfer functions from frequency response measurements is considered. Given a complex vector representing the measured frequency response of a physical system, a transfer function of specified order is determined that minimizes the sum of the magnitude-squared of the frequency response errors. This nonlinear least squares minimization problem is solved by an iterative global descent algorithm of the Newton type that converges quadratically near the minimum. The unknown transfer function is expressed as a sum of second-order rational polynomials, a parameterization that facilitates a numerically robust computer implementation. The algorithm is developed for single-input, single-output, causal, stable transfer functions. Two numerical examples demonstrate the effectiveness of the algorithm.

  14. Nonlinear oscillation and interfacial stability of an encapsulated microbubble under dual-frequency ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yunqiao; Calvisi, Michael L.; Wang, Qianxi

    2017-04-01

    Encapsulated microbubbles (EMBs) are widely used in medical ultrasound imaging as contrast-enhanced agents. However, the potential damaging effects of violent collapsing EMBs to cells and tissues in clinical settings have remained a concern. Dual-frequency ultrasound is a promising technique for improving the efficacy and safety of sonography. The system modeled consists of the external liquid, membrane and internal gases of an EMB. The microbubble dynamics are simulated using a simple nonlinear interactive theory, considering the compressibility of the internal gas, viscosity of the liquid flow and viscoelasticity of the membrane. The radial oscillation and interfacial stability of an EMB under single- and dual-frequency excitations are compared. The simulation results show that the dual-frequency technique produces larger backscatter pressure at higher harmonics of the primary driving frequency—this enriched acoustic spectrum can enhance blood-tissue contrast and improve the quality of sonographic images. The results further show that the acoustic pressure threshold associated with the onset of shape instability is greater for dual-frequency driving. This suggests that the dual-frequency technique stabilizes the encapsulated bubble, thereby improving the efficacy and safety of contrast-enhanced agents.

  15. Secondary stability assessment of titanium implants with an alkali-etched surface: a resonance frequency analysis study in beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Strnad, Jakub; Urban, Karel; Povysil, Ctibor; Strnad, Zdenek

    2008-01-01

    This study was carried out to quantify the effect of an alkali-modified surface on implant stability during healing using an animal model. A total of 24 screw-shaped, self-tapping, commercially pure titanium dental implants, divided into a test group (implants with an alkali-modified surface or "biosurface") and a control group (implants with a turned, machined surface) were inserted without pretapping in the tibiae of 3 beagle dogs. The resonance frequency analysis method was used to measure the implant stability quotient (ISQ) 0, 1, 3, 9, and 12 weeks after implantation. The animals were sacrificed after 2, 5, and 12 weeks, and the bone-implant contact (BIC%) was evaluated histomorphometrically. The difference in the osseointegration rates (deltaISQ/deltahealing time) between the implants with alkali-modified surface (biosurface) and those with a turned, machined surface was evaluated as a mean of 0.843 ISQ/week within the first 9 weeks of healing. The mean increase in the secondary implant stability was found to be proportional to the mean increase in the BIC at healing period earlier than 5 weeks. The characteristics that differed between the implant surfaces, ie, specific surface area, contact angle, and hydroxylation/hydration, may represent factors that influence the rate of osseointegration and the secondary implant stability. The alkali-treated surface enhances the secondary stability in the early stages of healing compared to the turned, machined surface, as a consequence of faster BIC formation.

  16. Optimising a High-Stability CW Laser-Pumped Rubidium Gas-Cell Frequency Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affolderbach, C.; Gruet, F.; Miletic, D.; Mileti, G.

    2009-04-01

    We report on our development of a compact and high-performance laser-pumped Rubidium atomic frequency standard. The clock design is based on optical-microwave double-resonance using cw optical pumping, and a physical realization as simple as possible. Main development goals are a short-term instability of ≤ 6 × 10-13 τ-1/2 and a flicker floor of ≤ 1 × 10-14 up to one day. Here we discuss our approaches for controlling the clock's main physical parameters in view of optimized frequency stability.

  17. Variable optical attenuator with a polymer-stabilized dual-frequency liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yung-Hsun; Liang, Xiao; Lu, Yan-Qing; Du, Fang; Lin, Yi-Hsin; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2005-07-10

    A transmission-type variable optical attenuator (VOA) based on a polymer-stabilized dual-frequency liquid crystal (PSDFLC) is demonstrated at gamma = 1.55 microm. The VOA is highly transparent in the voltage-off state but scatters light in the voltage-on state. By using a birefringent beam displacer incorporated with half-wave plates, we can obtain a VOA that is polarization independent and that exhibits a 31 dB dynamic range. The polymer networks and dual-frequency effect together reduce the response time (rise + decay) of a 16 microm PSDFLC cell to 30 ms at room temperature and at a voltage of 24 Vrms.

  18. Tissue Viscoelasticity Measurement System by Simultaneous Multiple-Frequency Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miwa, Takashi; Yoshihara, Yuki; Kanzawa, Kouki; Parajuli, Raj Kumar; Yamakoshi, Yoshiki

    2012-07-01

    Tissue elasticity measurements by an ultrasonic wave are a promising technique for the qualitative diagnosis of tumors and liver diseases. The viscoelastic characteristics in soft tissue can be quantitatively evaluated by considering the frequency dependence of the velocity of the shear wave propagating in the tissue. To improve the reliability of the in vivo viscoelasticity measurement, we propose a novel elasticity imaging method using continuous vibration wave excitation, which was realized by developing a three dimensional ultrasonic (3D US) wave Doppler measurement system with multiple-frequency excitation. In vivo experiments on the brachial muscle were carried out in order to demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of the developed system. The experimental results show that this system can successfully measure the velocity of a shear wave propagating through a muscle layer. This system has the potential to obtain viscoelastic information from a target with high repeatability and reliability.

  19. Dual frequency scatterometer measurement of ocean wave height

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. W.; Jones, W. L.; Swift, C. T.; Grantham, W. L.; Weissman, D. E.

    1975-01-01

    A technique for remotely measuring wave height averaged over an area of the sea surface was developed and verified with a series of aircraft flight experiments. The measurement concept involves the cross correlation of the amplitude fluctuations of two monochromatic reflected signals with variable frequency separation. The signal reflected by the randomly distributed specular points on the surface is observed in the backscatter direction at nadir incidence angle. The measured correlation coefficient is equal to the square of the magnitude of the characteristic function of the specular point height from which RMS wave height can be determined. The flight scatterometer operates at 13.9 GHz and 13.9 - delta f GHz with a maximum delta f of 40 MHz. Measurements were conducted for low and moderate sea states at altitudes of 2, 5, and 10 thousand feet. The experimental results agree with the predicted decorrelation with frequency separation and with off-nadir incidence angle.

  20. 47 CFR 74.162 - Frequency monitors and measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... EXPERIMENTAL RADIO, AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Experimental... licensee of an experimental broadcast station shall provide the necessary means for determining that the... frequency as measured, and a description or identification of the method employed shall be entered in...