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Sample records for frequency-dependent stress fiber

  1. Differential frequency-dependent antidromic resonance of the Schaffer collaterals and mossy fibers.

    PubMed

    Franco, Luis M; Beltrán, Jesús Q; Tapia, Jesús A; Ortiz, Franco; Manjarrez, Elías; Gutiérrez, Rafael

    2016-05-01

    To better understand information transfer along the hippocampal pathways and its plasticity, here we studied the antidromic responses of the dentate gyrus (DG) and CA3 to activation of the mossy fibers and Schaffer collaterals, respectively, in hippocampal slices from naïve and epileptic rats. We applied trains of 600 electrical stimuli at functionally meaningful frequencies (θ, β/γ and γ). The responses of the DG to θ frequency trains underwent rapid potentiation that lasted about 400 stimuli, after which they progressively returned to control value. At β/γ and γ frequencies, however, the initial potentiation was followed by a strong frequency-dependent depression within the first 50 stimuli. In kindled animals, the initial potentiation was stronger than in control preparations and the resonant phase at θ frequency lasted longer. In contrast, CA3 responses were exponentially depressed at all frequencies, but depression was significantly less intense at θ frequency in epileptic preparations. Failure of fibers to fire action potentials could account for some of the aforementioned characteristics, but waveforms of the intracellular action potentials also changed as the field responses did, i.e., half-duration and time-to-peak increased in both structures along the stimulation trains. Noteworthy, block of glutamate and GABA ionotropic receptors prevented resonance and reduced the depression of antidromic responses to β/γ and γ stimulation recorded in the DG, but not in CA3. We show that the different behavior in the information transfer along these pathways depends on the frequency at which action potentials are generated, excitability history and anatomical features, including myelination and tortuosity. In addition, the mossy fibers are endowed with ionotropic receptors and terminal active properties conferring them their sui generis non-passive antidromic responses.

  2. Frequency-dependent associative long-term potentiation at the hippocampal mossy fiber-CA3 synapse.

    PubMed

    Derrick, B E; Martinez, J L

    1994-10-25

    The mossy fiber-CA3 synapse displays an N-methyl-D-aspartate-receptor-independent mu-opioid-receptor-dependent form of long-term potentiation (LTP) that is thought not to display cooperativity or associativity with coactive afferents. However, because mossy fiber LTP requires repetitive synaptic activity for its induction, we reevaluated cooperativity and associativity at this synapse by using trains of mossy fiber stimulation. Moderate-, but not low-, intensity trains induced mossy fiber LTP, indicating cooperativity. Low-intensity mossy fiber trains that were normally ineffective in inducing LTP could induce mossy fiber LTP when delivered in conjunction with trains delivered to commissural-CA3 afferents. Associative mossy fiber LTP also could be induced with single mossy fiber pulses when delivered with commissural trains in the presence of a mu-opioid-receptor agonist. Our findings suggest a frequency-dependent variation of Hebbian associative LTP induction that is regulated by the release of endogenous opioid peptides.

  3. Frequency dependence of power and its implications for contractile function of muscle fibers from the digital flexors of horses

    PubMed Central

    Butcher, Michael T.; Bertram, John E.A.; Syme, Douglas A.; Hermanson, John W.; Chase, P. Bryant

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The digital flexors of horses must produce high force to support the body weight during running, and a need for these muscles to generate power is likely limited during locomotion over level ground. Measurements of power output from horse muscle fibers close to physiological temperatures, and when cyclic strain is imposed, will help to better understand the in vivo performance of the muscles as power absorbers and generators. Skinned fibers from the deep (DDF) and superficial (SDF) digital flexors, and the soleus (SOL) underwent sinusoidal oscillations in length over a range of frequencies (0.5–16 Hz) and strain amplitudes (0.01–0.06) under maximum activation (pCa 5) at 30°C. Results were analyzed using both workloop and Nyquist plot analyses to determine the ability of the fibers to absorb or generate power and the frequency dependence of those abilities. Power absorption was dominant at most cycling frequencies and strain amplitudes in fibers from all three muscles. However, small amounts of power were generated (0.002–0.05 Wkg−1) at 0.01 strain by all three muscles at relatively slow cycling frequencies: DDF (4–7 Hz), SDF (4–5 Hz) and SOL (0.5–1 Hz). Nyquist analysis, reflecting the influence of cross‐bridge kinetics on power generation, corroborated these results. The similar capacity for power generation by DDF and SDF versus lower for SOL, and the faster frequency at which this power was realized in DDF and SDF fibers, are largely explained by the fast myosin heavy chain isoform content in each muscle. Contractile function of DDF and SDF as power absorbers and generators, respectively, during locomotion may therefore be more dependent on their fiber architectural arrangement than on the physiological properties of their muscle fibers. PMID:25293602

  4. Frequency dependence of power and its implications for contractile function of muscle fibers from the digital flexors of horses.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Michael T; Bertram, John E A; Syme, Douglas A; Hermanson, John W; Chase, P Bryant

    2014-10-01

    The digital flexors of horses must produce high force to support the body weight during running, and a need for these muscles to generate power is likely limited during locomotion over level ground. Measurements of power output from horse muscle fibers close to physiological temperatures, and when cyclic strain is imposed, will help to better understand the in vivo performance of the muscles as power absorbers and generators. Skinned fibers from the deep (DDF) and superficial (SDF) digital flexors, and the soleus (SOL) underwent sinusoidal oscillations in length over a range of frequencies (0.5-16 Hz) and strain amplitudes (0.01-0.06) under maximum activation (pCa 5) at 30°C. Results were analyzed using both workloop and Nyquist plot analyses to determine the ability of the fibers to absorb or generate power and the frequency dependence of those abilities. Power absorption was dominant at most cycling frequencies and strain amplitudes in fibers from all three muscles. However, small amounts of power were generated (0.002-0.05 Wkg(-1)) at 0.01 strain by all three muscles at relatively slow cycling frequencies: DDF (4-7 Hz), SDF (4-5 Hz) and SOL (0.5-1 Hz). Nyquist analysis, reflecting the influence of cross-bridge kinetics on power generation, corroborated these results. The similar capacity for power generation by DDF and SDF versus lower for SOL, and the faster frequency at which this power was realized in DDF and SDF fibers, are largely explained by the fast myosin heavy chain isoform content in each muscle. Contractile function of DDF and SDF as power absorbers and generators, respectively, during locomotion may therefore be more dependent on their fiber architectural arrangement than on the physiological properties of their muscle fibers. © 2014 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  5. Extended parametric gain range in photonic crystal fibers with strongly frequency-dependent field distributions.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Sidsel R; Alkeskjold, Thomas T; Olausson, Christina B; Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2014-08-15

    The parametric gain range of a degenerate four-wave mixing process is determined in the undepleted pump regime. The gain range is considered with and without taking the mode field distributions of the four-wave mixing components into account. It is found that the mode field distributions have to be included to evaluate the parametric gain correctly in dispersion-tailored speciality fibers and that mode profile engineering can provide a way to increase the parametric gain range.

  6. Kinetics of stress fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachowiak, Matthew R.; O'Shaughnessy, Ben

    2008-02-01

    Stress fibers are contractile cytoskeletal structures, tensile actomyosin bundles which allow sensing and production of force, provide cells with adjustable rigidity and participate in various processes such as wound healing. The stress fiber is possibly the best characterized and most accessible multiprotein cellular contractile machine. Here we develop a quantitative model of the structure and relaxation kinetics of stress fibers. The principal experimentally known features are incorporated. The fiber has a periodic sarcomeric structure similar to muscle fibers with myosin motor proteins exerting contractile force by pulling on actin filaments. In addition the fiber contains the giant spring-like protein titin. Actin is continuously renewed by exchange with the cytosol leading to a turnover time of several minutes. In order that steady state be possible, turnover must be regulated. Our model invokes simple turnover and regulation mechanisms: actin association and dissociation occur at filament ends, while actin filament overlap above a certain threshold in the myosin-containing regions augments depolymerization rates. We use the model to study stress fiber relaxation kinetics after stimulation, as observed in a recent experimental study where some fiber regions were contractile and others expansive. We find that two distinct episodes ensue after stimulation: the turnover-overlap system relaxes rapidly in seconds, followed by the slow relaxation of sarcomere lengths in minutes. For parameter values as they have been characterized experimentally, we find the long time relaxation of sarcomere length is set by the rate at which actin filaments can grow or shrink in response to the forces exerted by the elastic and contractile elements. Consequently, the stress fiber relaxation time scales inversely with both titin spring constant and the intrinsic actin turnover rate. The model's predicted sarcomere velocities and contraction-expansion kinetics are in good

  7. Fiber networks amplify active stress

    PubMed Central

    Ronceray, Pierre; Broedersz, Chase P.

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale force generation is essential for biological functions such as cell motility, embryonic development, and muscle contraction. In these processes, forces generated at the molecular level by motor proteins are transmitted by disordered fiber networks, resulting in large-scale active stresses. Although these fiber networks are well characterized macroscopically, this stress generation by microscopic active units is not well understood. Here we theoretically study force transmission in these networks. We find that collective fiber buckling in the vicinity of a local active unit results in a rectification of stress towards strongly amplified isotropic contraction. This stress amplification is reinforced by the networks’ disordered nature, but saturates for high densities of active units. Our predictions are quantitatively consistent with experiments on reconstituted tissues and actomyosin networks and shed light on the role of the network microstructure in shaping active stresses in cells and tissue. PMID:26921325

  8. [Frequency dependance of compliance].

    PubMed

    Gayrard, P

    1975-01-01

    Resistance of peripheral or "small" airways is only a small part of the total pulmonary resistance (Raw). Even considerable obstruction in these airways will have little effect on total resistance. Conversely this will lead to inequality in the time constants of units in parallel, and dynamic lung compliance (C dyn) shall fall as respiratory frequence increases. C dyn is measured from simultaneous recordings of transpulmonary pressure (esophageal balloon) and volume obtained from a volume displacement plethysmograph. If Raw and static compliance are found to be normal, the frequency dependance of compliance will result from peripheral airway obstruction only. Early stages of chronic airway obstruction can be established by this method. However this appear not suitable for wide-scale studies.

  9. Stress-displacement relation during fiber pullout

    SciTech Connect

    Hsueh, C.H.

    1990-01-01

    During fiber pullout tests of fiber-reinforced composites, initial debonding, partial debonding, complete debonding at the interface, and fiber pullout occur sequentially. Adopting the shear lag model for stress analyses and the strength criterion for interfacial debonding, a bond length dependence of the initial debond stress is derived. During partial debonding, the stress initially increases with the increasing fiber displacement. The partial debond stress reaches a maximum value and begins to decrease with an accompanying decreasing fiber displacement until the interface is completely debonded. Theoretically, the stress-displacement curve shows a nose'' at the maximum debond stress. However, the pullout test is generally conducted under the condition of an increasing fiber displacement. Hence, at the maximum debond stress, the observed stress drops abruptly as the increasing fiber displacement type test obscures the nose-type characteristic.

  10. Fiber networks amplify active stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Martin; Ronceray, Pierre; Broedersz, Chase

    Large-scale force generation is essential for biological functions such as cell motility, embryonic development, and muscle contraction. In these processes, forces generated at the molecular level by motor proteins are transmitted by disordered fiber networks, resulting in large-scale active stresses. While fiber networks are well characterized macroscopically, this stress generation by microscopic active units is not well understood. I will present a comprehensive theoretical study of force transmission in these networks. I will show that the linear, small-force response of the networks is remarkably simple, as the macroscopic active stress depends only on the geometry of the force-exerting unit. In contrast, as non-linear buckling occurs around these units, local active forces are rectified towards isotropic contraction and strongly amplified. This stress amplification is reinforced by the networks' disordered nature, but saturates for high densities of active units. I will show that our predictions are quantitatively consistent with experiments on reconstituted tissues and actomyosin networks, and that they shed light on the role of the network microstructure in shaping active stresses in cells and tissue.

  11. Coexistence under positive frequency dependence.

    PubMed Central

    Molofsky, J.; Bever, J. D.; Antonovics, J.

    2001-01-01

    Negative frequency dependence resulting from interspecific interactions is considered a driving force in allowing the coexistence of competitors. While interactions between species and genotypes can also result in positive frequency dependence, positive frequency dependence has usually been credited with hastening the extinction of rare types and is not thought to contribute to coexistence. In the present paper, we develop a stochastic cellular automata model that allows us to vary the scale of frequency dependence and the scale of dispersal. The results of this model indicate that positive frequency dependence will allow the coexistence of two species at a greater rate than would be expected from chance. This coexistence arises from the generation of banding patterns that will be stable over long time-periods. As a result, we found that positive frequency-dependent interactions over local spatial scales promote coexistence over neutral interactions. This result was robust to variation in boundary conditions within the simulation and to variation in levels of disturbance. Under all conditions, coexistence is enhanced as the strength of positive frequency-dependent interactions is increased. PMID:11217898

  12. Isolation and Contraction of the Stress Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Katoh, Kazuo; Kano, Yumiko; Masuda, Michitaka; Onishi, Hirofumi; Fujiwara, Keigi

    1998-01-01

    Stress fibers were isolated from cultured human foreskin fibroblasts and bovine endothelial cells, and their contraction was demonstrated in vitro. Cells in culture dishes were first treated with a low-ionic-strength extraction solution and then further extracted using detergents. With gentle washes by pipetting, the nucleus and the apical part of cells were removed. The material on the culture dish was scraped, and the freed material was forced through a hypodermic needle and fractionated by sucrose gradient centrifugation. Isolated, free-floating stress fibers stained brightly with fluorescently labeled phalloidin. When stained with anti-α-actinin or anti-myosin, isolated stress fibers showed banded staining patterns. By electron microscopy, they consisted of bundles of microfilaments, and electron-dense areas were associated with them in a semiperiodic manner. By negative staining, isolated stress fibers often exhibited gentle twisting of microfilament bundles. Focal adhesion–associated proteins were also detected in the isolated stress fiber by both immunocytochemical and biochemical means. In the presence of Mg-ATP, isolated stress fibers shortened, on the average, to 23% of the initial length. The maximum velocity of shortening was several micrometers per second. Polystyrene beads on shortening isolated stress fibers rotated, indicating spiral contraction of stress fibers. Myosin regulatory light chain phosphorylation was detected in contracting stress fibers, and a myosin light chain kinase inhibitor, KT5926, inhibited isolated stress fiber contraction. Our study demonstrates that stress fibers can be isolated with no apparent loss of morphological features and that they are truly contractile organelle. PMID:9658180

  13. Considerable different frequency dependence of dynamic tensile modulus between self-heating (Joule heat) and external heating for polymer--nickel-coated carbon fiber composites.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong; Bin, Yuezhen; Dong, Enyuan; Matsuo, Masaru

    2014-06-26

    Dynamic tensile moduli of polyethylene--nickel-coated carbon fiber (NiCF) composites with 10 and 4 vol % NiCF contents under electrical field were measured by a homemade instrument in the frequency range of 100--0.01 Hz. The drastic descent of the storage modulus of the composite with 10 vol % was verified in lower frequency range with elevating surface temperature (T(s)) by self-heating (Joule heat). The composite was cut when T(s) was beyond 108 °C. On the other hand, the measurement of the composite with 4 vol % beyond 88 °C was impossible, since T(s) did not elevate because of the disruption of current networks. Incidentally, the dynamic tensile moduli by external heating could be measured up to 130 and 115 °C for 10 and 4 vol %, respectively, but the two composites could be elongated beyond the above temperatures. Such different properties were analyzed in terms of crystal dispersions, electrical treeing, and thermal fluctuation-induced tunneling effect.

  14. Axial residual stresses in boron fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrendt, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    The axial residual stress distribution as a function of radius was determined from the fiber surface to the core including the average residual stress in the core. Such measurements on boron on tungsten (B/W) fibers show that the residual stresses for 102, 142, 203, and 366 micron diameter fibers were similar, being compressive at the surface and changing monotonically to a region of tensile within the boron. At approximately 25 percent of the original radius, the stress reaches a maximum tensile stress of about 860 mn/sq.m and then decreases to a compressive stress near the tungsten boride core. Data were presented for 203 micron diameter B/W fibers that show annealing above 900 C reduces the residual stresses. A comparison between 102 micron diameter B/W and boron on carbon (b/C) shows that the residual stresses were similar in the outer regions of the fibers, but that large differences near and in the core were observed. The effects of these residual stresses on the fracture of boron fibers were discussed.

  15. A fiber-bridging model with stress gradient effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Sun; Tao, Li

    2000-05-01

    A fiber-bridging model with stress gradient effects is proposed for unidirectional fiber-reinforced composites. The stress gradient terms are introduced by solving a micromechanical model under a non-uniform stress loading. It is shown that the stress gradient effect is significant on both the fiber-bridging stress distribution and the value of the critical load of fiber failure.

  16. Triboluminescent Fiber-Optic Sensors Measure Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogowski, Robert S.

    1994-01-01

    Triboluminescence exploited in fiber-optic sensor system for measuring changes in pressures, strains, vibrations, and acoustic emissions, in structural members. Sensors embedded in members for in situ monitoring of condition of structure. System passive in sense no source of radiation required to interrogate optical fiber. Technique has potential for wide range of applications in which detection and measurement of structural stress required.

  17. A Frequency Dependent Ray Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-28

    4.2 The Korrnilitsin profile 30 4.3 Classical ray diagram for the Kormilitsin profile 32 4.4 Frequency dependent ray diagram for the Kormilitsin ...profile 36 4.5 Propagation loss curves for the Kormilitsin profile 37 4.6 The harmonic oscillator waveguide 41 4.7 Exact rays and classical rays in the...following criteria: (1) Each case should serve as a canonical example of some problem frequently encountered in acoustics. For example, the Kormilitsin

  18. Stress effects in twisted highly birefringent fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolinski, Tomasz R.

    1994-03-01

    Hydrostatic pressure and uniaxial longitudinal strain effects in twisted highly birefringent optical fibers have been investigated from the point of the Marcuse mode-coupling theory. The problem is analyzed in terms of local normal modes of the ideal fiber and in the limit of weak twist, where large linear birefringence dominates over twist effect, and therefore twist coupling between local modes is not effective. The authors present the results of birefringence measurements in highly birefringent bow-tie fibers influenced simultaneously by hydrostatic pressure up to 100 MPa and twisting the result for highly birefringent elliptical-core fibers influenced by uniaxial longitudinal strain up to 4000 (mu) (epsilon) and twisting effect. The birefringence measurement method is based on twist-induced effects and has been successfully applied in a stress environment. The experiment was conducted with a specially designed stress generating device that makes it possible to simultaneously generate various mechanical perturbations such as hydrostatic and radial pressure, axial strain and twist, allowing study of their influence on mode propagation in optical fibers. A comparison with theoretical results as well as with pervious experimental data on stress influence on the beat length parameter in highly birefringent fibers is also provided.

  19. Frequency dependence of organic magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fujian; Rybicki, James; Lin, Ran; Hutchinson, Kent; Hou, Jia; Wohlgenannt, Markus

    2011-03-01

    Organic magnetoresistive (OMAR) devices show a large enough magnetoresistive response (typically 10%) for potential applications as magnetic field sensors. However, applications often require sensing high frequency magnetic fields, and the examination of the frequency-dependent magnetoresistive response is therefore required. Analysis of time constants that limit the frequency response may also shed light on the mechanism behind the OMAR effect, because different OMAR mechanisms occur at different time scales In our experiments, the AC magnetic field is supplied by a coil with a ferrite core which is driven by a function generator The AC magnet shows a frequency response that is almost flat up to 1MHz. We found that the OMAR frequency limit is about 10 kHz for a typical organic semiconductor device and at least 100 kHz for devices made from a doped polymer film. We also performed capacitance and conductance vs. frequency measurements to understand the origin of the observed limit frequencies. This work was supported by Army MURI under GrantNo. W911NF-08-1-0317 and NSF under Grant No. ECS 0725280.

  20. Behaviour of a few mode fiber modal pattern under stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egalon, Claudio O.; Rogowski, Robert S.

    1991-01-01

    A numerical model was developed to calculate the interference pattern at the end of a multimode weakly guiding optical fiber under stress. Whenever an optical fiber is under stress, the modal phase in the interference term of the intensity formula changes. Plots of the simulated output of a stressed fiber are presented. For multimode fibers, very complicated patterns result. Under stress, lobes in the pattern are generated, displaced and power is exchanged among them.

  1. Stress In A Fiber During Curing Of Surrounding Matrix Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.; Madhukar, Madhu S.; Kosuri, Ranga P.

    1995-01-01

    Experiments run to determine variation in tensile stress in single fiber during curing of matrix resin surrounding fiber. Study part of effort to understand physical mechanisms affecting residual stresses in matrix/fiber composites, with view toward optimizing curing cycles (in particular, optimizing temperature-vs.-time schedules of final cooldowns to ambient temperature) to minimize residual stresses. Results signify primary mechanisms affecting residual stress in fibers are thermal expansion and contraction and cure shrinkage of matrix material.

  2. Stress In A Fiber During Curing Of Surrounding Matrix Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.; Madhukar, Madhu S.; Kosuri, Ranga P.

    1995-01-01

    Experiments run to determine variation in tensile stress in single fiber during curing of matrix resin surrounding fiber. Study part of effort to understand physical mechanisms affecting residual stresses in matrix/fiber composites, with view toward optimizing curing cycles (in particular, optimizing temperature-vs.-time schedules of final cooldowns to ambient temperature) to minimize residual stresses. Results signify primary mechanisms affecting residual stress in fibers are thermal expansion and contraction and cure shrinkage of matrix material.

  3. Frequency Dependent Attenuation in Rocks.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-03

    Hawaii NTNF/NORSAR Honolulu, HI 96822 P.O. Box 51 N-2007 Kjeller, NORWAY Dr. Michel Bouchon - Universite Scientifique et Medicale de Grenob Mr. Peter...the hysteresis loop, or the surface integral 6W = a dE . -5- The integrals can be easily solved by noting from Fig. 1 that W is approximately the area...example, Lorrain and Corson, 1970), an essential point is that the stress and strain functions are AC-signals, that is, centered about zero with equal

  4. A biomechanical perspective on stress fiber structure and function☆

    PubMed Central

    Kassianidou, Elena; Kumar, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Stress fibers are actomyosin-based bundles whose structural and contractile properties underlie numerous cellular processes including adhesion, motility and mechanosensing. Recent advances in high-resolution live-cell imaging and single-cell force measurement have dramatically sharpened our understanding of the assembly, connectivity, and evolution of various specialized stress fiber subpopulations. This in turn has motivated interest in understanding how individual stress fibers generate tension and support cellular structure and force generation. In this review, we discuss approaches for measuring the mechanical properties of single stress fibers. We begin by discussing studies conducted in cell-free settings, including strategies based on isolation of intact stress fibers and reconstitution of stress fiber-like structures from purified components. We then discuss measurements obtained in living cells based both on inference of stress fiber properties from whole-cell mechanical measurements (e.g., atomic force microscopy) and on direct interrogation of single stress fibers (e.g., subcellular laser nanosurgery). We conclude by reviewing various mathematical models of stress fiber function that have been developed based on these experimental measurements. An important future challenge in this area will be the integration of these sophisticated biophysical measurements with the field’s increasingly detailed molecular understanding of stress fiber assembly, dynamics, and signal transduction. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology. PMID:25896524

  5. Monitoring Fiber Stress During Curing of Single Fiber Glass- and Graphite-Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madhukar, Madhu S.; Kosuri, Ranga P.; Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1994-01-01

    The difference in thermal expansion characteristics of epoxy matrices and graphite fibers can produce significant residual stresses in the fibers during curing of composite materials. Tests on single fiber glass-epoxy and graphite-epoxy composite specimens were conducted in which the glass and graphite fibers were preloaded in tension, and the epoxy matrix was cast around the fibers. The fiber tension was monitored while the matrix was placed around the fiber and subjected to the temperature-time curing cycle. Two mechanisms responsible for producing stress in embedded fibers were identified as matrix thermal expansion and contraction and matrix cure shrinkage. A simple analysis based on the change in fiber tension during the curing cycle was conducted to estimate the produced stresses. Experimental results on single fiber glass- and graphite-epoxy composites show that the fiber was subjected to significant tensile stresses when the temperature was raised from the first to the second dwell period. When initial fiber pretension is about 60 percent of the fiber failure load, these curing-induced stresses can cause tensile fracture of the embedded fiber.

  6. Monitoring fiber stress during curing of single fiber glass- and graphite-epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Madhukar, M.S.; Kosuri, R.P.; Bowles, K.J.

    1994-11-01

    The difference in thermal expansion characteristics of epoxy matrices and graphite fibers can produce significant residual stresses in the fibers during curing of composite materials. Tests on single fiber glass-epoxy and graphite-epoxy composite specimens were conducted in which the glass and graphite fibers were preloaded in tension, and the epoxy matrix was cast around the fibers. The fiber tension was monitored while the matrix was placed around the fiber and subjected to the temperature-time curing cycle. Two mechanisms responsible for producing stress in embedded fibers were identified as matrix thermal expansion and contraction and matrix cure shrinkage. A simple analysis based on the change in fiber tension during the curing cycle was conducted to estimate the produced stresses. Experimental results on single fiber glass- and graphite-epoxy composites show that the fiber was subjected to significant tensile stresses when the temperature was raised from the first to the second dwell period. When initial fiber pretension is about 60 percent of the fiber failure load, these curing-induced stresses can cause tensile fracture of the embedded fiber.

  7. Frequency Dependence of APATS Antenna Gain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    ESD-TR-82-120 HTR-8354 3FREQUENCY DEPENDENCE OF APATS ANTENNA GAIN 0 By G. A. ROBERTSHAW MARCH 1982 Prepared for DEPUTY FOR SURVEILLANCE AND CONTROL...FREQUENCY DEPENDENCE OF APATS ANTENNA GAIN 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER MTR-8354 7. AUTHOR(*) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(s) G. A. ROBERTSHAW F19628-81-C...employed, each channel will lose 1.76 dB of gain. * E.g., if "a" is aperture length in array azimuth plane, frequency dependence begins for 0 > srFl

  8. Frequency-Dependent Fracture Specific Stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.; Folz, M. A.; Acosta-Colon, A.

    2003-12-01

    Monitoring the hydraulic properties of fractures remotely through their seismic signatures is an important goal for field hydrology. Empirical studies have shown that the hydraulic properties of a fracture are implicitly related to the fracture specific stiffness through the amount and distribution of contact area and apertures that arise from two rough surfaces in contact. Complicating this simple picture are seismic measurements that indicate frequency-dependent stiffness, i.e., a scale-dependent fracture stiffness where the scale is set by the wavelength. Thus relating the hydraulic properties of fractures to seismic measurements becomes a scale dependent problem. We have performed laboratory experiments to examine the phenomenon of frequency dependent fracture specific stiffness to aid in the assessment of the hydraulic properties of a fracture using seismic techniques. To this end, we have developed a photolithographic technique with which we can construct synthetic fractures of known fracture geometry with feature sizes controlled over several orders of magnitude. The synthetic fracture (and the control non-fractured samples) are made from acrylic cylinders that measure 15.0 cm in diameter by 7.7 cm in height. The diameter of the samples enables us to sample the acoustic properties of the fracture using acoustic lens over regions that range in scale from 10 mm to 60 mm. A confinement cell controls the normal stress on the fracture. Seismic measurements were made with broadband compressional-mode piezoelectric transducers enabling one-order of magnitude in frequency. We found that when the wavelength is smaller than the asperity size, a linear dependence of fracture specific stiffness on frequency occurs. In this geometric ray regime the asymptotic value of the transmission function provides a direct measure of the contact area of the fracture. On the other hand, when the asperity spacing is less than an eighth of a wavelength, the fracture behaves as a

  9. Reducing stress-induced birefringence in optical fiber ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Várallyay, Z.; Arashitani, Y.; Varga, G.

    2011-01-01

    Coated and ribboned optical fibers are liable to external stress of the coating materials which may induce additional birefringence in the fiber glass. This residual stress in the coating may increase the polarization mode dispersion (PMD) of the fibers with a value well above allowed in modern, optical telecommunication systems. We report our numerical efforts on reducing the stress caused birefringence in fiber ribbons optimizing the geometry as well as the material parameters of the coating materials. We found that changing the cross-sectional geometry of the fiber ribbon such as edge shape or the ratio of primary and secondary coatings may lead to significant stress and constitutively PMD reduction in optical fibers. Changing the stiffness or the glass transition temperature (GTT) of the different components may also yield optimal conditions for stress reduction according to our finite element analyzes.

  10. An analysis of fiber-matrix interface failure stresses for a range of ply stress states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crews, J. H.; Naik, R. A.; Lubowinski, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    A graphite/bismaleimide laminate was prepared without the usual fiber treatment and was tested over a wide range of stress states to measure its ply cracking strength. These tests were conducted using off-axis flexure specimens and produced fiber-matrix interface failure data over a correspondingly wide range of interface stress states. The absence of fiber treatment, weakened the fiber-matrix interfaces and allowed these tests to be conducted at load levels that did not yield the matrix. An elastic micromechanics computer code was used to calculate the fiber-matrix interface stresses at failure. Two different fiber-array models (square and diamond) were used in these calculations to analyze the effects of fiber arrangement as well as stress state on the critical interface stresses at failure. This study showed that both fiber-array models were needed to analyze interface stresses over the range of stress states. A linear equation provided a close fit to these critical stress combinations and, thereby, provided a fiber-matrix interface failure criterion. These results suggest that prediction procedures for laminate ply cracking can be based on micromechanics stress analyses and appropriate fiber-matrix interface failure criteria. However, typical structural laminates may require elastoplastic stress analysis procedures that account for matrix yielding, especially for shear-dominated ply stress states.

  11. Actin Filament Stress Fibers in Vascular Endothelial Cells in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Albert J.; Pollard, Thomas D.; Herman, Ira M.

    1983-02-01

    Fluorescence microscopy with 7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-3-diazole phallacidin was used to survey vertebrate tissues for actin filament bundles comparable to the stress fibers of cultured cells. Such bundles were found only in vascular endothelial cells. Like the stress fibers of cultured cells, these actin filament bundles were stained in a punctate pattern by fluorescent antibodies to both alpha-actinin and myosin. The stress fibers were oriented parallel to the direction of blood flow and were prominent in endothelial cells from regions exposed to high-velocity flow, such as the left ventricle, aortic valve, and aorta. Actin bundles may help the endothelial cell to withstand hemodynamic stress.

  12. Dynamics of Mechanical Signal Transmission through Prestressed Stress Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Yongyun; Barakat, Abdul I.

    2012-01-01

    Transmission of mechanical stimuli through the actin cytoskeleton has been proposed as a mechanism for rapid long-distance mechanotransduction in cells; however, a quantitative understanding of the dynamics of this transmission and the physical factors governing it remains lacking. Two key features of the actin cytoskeleton are its viscoelastic nature and the presence of prestress due to actomyosin motor activity. We develop a model of mechanical signal transmission through prestressed viscoelastic actin stress fibers that directly connect the cell surface to the nucleus. The analysis considers both temporally stationary and oscillatory mechanical signals and accounts for cytosolic drag on the stress fibers. To elucidate the physical parameters that govern mechanical signal transmission, we initially focus on the highly simplified case of a single stress fiber. The results demonstrate that the dynamics of mechanical signal transmission depend on whether the applied force leads to transverse or axial motion of the stress fiber. For transverse motion, mechanical signal transmission is dominated by prestress while fiber elasticity has a negligible effect. Conversely, signal transmission for axial motion is mediated uniquely by elasticity due to the absence of a prestress restoring force. Mechanical signal transmission is significantly delayed by stress fiber material viscosity, while cytosolic damping becomes important only for longer stress fibers. Only transverse motion yields the rapid and long-distance mechanical signal transmission dynamics observed experimentally. For simple networks of stress fibers, mechanical signals are transmitted rapidly to the nucleus when the fibers are oriented largely orthogonal to the applied force, whereas the presence of fibers parallel to the applied force slows down mechanical signal transmission significantly. The present results suggest that cytoskeletal prestress mediates rapid mechanical signal transmission and allows

  13. Fiber stress values for design of glulam timber utility structures

    Treesearch

    R. Hernandez; R. C. Moody; R. H. Falk

    In this study, we developed a simple equation to calculate average fiber stress values for design of glued-laminated (glulam) timber utility structures as a function of design bending stress. We took design stress in bending values specified by the American Institute of Timber Construction (AITC) for various combinations of glulam timber, applied appropriate end-use...

  14. Creep and stress relaxation modeling of polycrystalline ceramic fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, James A.; Morscher, Gregory N.

    1994-01-01

    A variety of high performance polycrystalline ceramic fibers are currently being considered as reinforcement for high temperature ceramic matrix composites. However, under mechanical loading about 800 C, these fibers display creep related instabilities which can result in detrimental changes in composite dimensions, strength, and internal stress distributions. As a first step toward understanding these effects, this study examines the validity of a mechanism-based empirical model which describes primary stage tensile creep and stress relaxation of polycrystalline ceramic fibers as independent functions of time, temperature, and applied stress or strain. To verify these functional dependencies, a simple bend test is used to measure stress relaxation for four types of commercial ceramic fibers for which direct tensile creep data are available. These fibers include both nonoxide (SCS-6, Nicalon) and oxide (PRD-166, FP) compositions. The results of the Bend Stress Relaxation (BSR) test not only confirm the stress, time, and temperature dependencies predicted by the model, but also allow measurement of model empirical parameters for the four fiber types. In addition, comparison of model tensile creep predictions based on the BSR test results with the literature data show good agreement, supporting both the predictive capability of the model and the use of the BSR text as a simple method for parameter determination for other fibers.

  15. Frequency-dependent viscoelasticity measurement by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Nan; Wong, Kenneth Kar Ho; de Bruyn, John R.; Hutter, Jeffrey L.

    2009-02-01

    We demonstrate a new technique for investigating viscoelastic properties of soft materials using the atomic force microscope. A small oscillatory voltage is added to the deflection signal of the atomic force microscope causing a vertical oscillatory sample motion. Monitoring the amplitude and phase of this motion allows determination of the viscous and elastic moduli of the sample as a function of frequency during contact imaging. This technique is applied to suspended poly(vinyl alcohol) nanofibers and poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogels, giving results similar to those measured using traditional static methods. However, the moduli of both the fibers and the hydrogels show a significant frequency dependence. The Young's modulus of the fibers increases with frequency, while for the viscoelastic hydrogels, the storage modulus dominates the mechanical response at low frequency whereas the loss modulus dominates at high frequency.

  16. Time temperature-stress dependence of boron fiber deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    Flexural stress relaxation (FSR) and flexural internal friction (FIF) techniques were employed to measure the time-dependent deformation of boron fibers from -190 to 800 C. The principal specimens were 203 micrometers diameter fibers commercially produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on a 13 micrometer tungsten substrate. The observation of complete creep strain recovery with time and temperature indicated that CVD boron fibers deform flexurally as anelastic solids with no plastic component.

  17. Kinship as a frequency dependent strategy

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Ting; Zheng, Xiu-Deng; He, Qiao-Qiao; Wu, Jia-Jia; Tao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Humans divide themselves up into separate cultures, which is a unique and ubiquitous characteristic of our species. Kinship norms are one of the defining features of such societies. Here we show how norms of marital residence can evolve as a frequency-dependent strategy, using real-world cases from southwestern China and an evolutionary game model. The process of kinship change has occurred in the past and is also occurring now in southwestern China. Our data and models show how transitions between residence types can occur both as response to changing costs and benefits of co-residence with kin, and also due to the initial frequency of the strategies adopted by others in the population: patrilocal societies can become matrilocal, and neolocal societies can become duolocal. This illustrates how frequency-dependent selection plays a role both in the maintenance of group-level cultural diversity and in cultural extinction. PMID:26998333

  18. Analysis of frequency dependent pump light absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlmuth, Matthias; Pflaum, Christoph

    2011-03-01

    Simulations have to accurately model thermal lensing in order to help improving resonator design of diode pumped solid state lasers. To this end, a precise description of the pump light absorption is an important prerequisite. In this paper, we discuss the frequency dependency of the pump light absorption in the laser crystal and its influence on the simulated laser performance. The results show that the pump light absorption has to include the spectral overlap of the emitting pump source and the absorbing laser material. This information can either be used for a fully frequency dependent absorption model or, at least in the shown examples, to compute an effective value for an exponential Beer-Lambert law of absorption. This is particularly significant at pump wavelengths coinciding with a peak of absorption. Consequences for laser stability and performance are analyzed for different pump wavelengths in a Nd:YAG laser.

  19. Kinship as a frequency dependent strategy.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ting; Zheng, Xiu-Deng; He, Qiao-Qiao; Wu, Jia-Jia; Mace, Ruth; Tao, Yi

    2016-02-01

    Humans divide themselves up into separate cultures, which is a unique and ubiquitous characteristic of our species. Kinship norms are one of the defining features of such societies. Here we show how norms of marital residence can evolve as a frequency-dependent strategy, using real-world cases from southwestern China and an evolutionary game model. The process of kinship change has occurred in the past and is also occurring now in southwestern China. Our data and models show how transitions between residence types can occur both as response to changing costs and benefits of co-residence with kin, and also due to the initial frequency of the strategies adopted by others in the population: patrilocal societies can become matrilocal, and neolocal societies can become duolocal. This illustrates how frequency-dependent selection plays a role both in the maintenance of group-level cultural diversity and in cultural extinction.

  20. Frequency-dependent friction in pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dan; Li, Song-Jing; Yang, Ping; Zhao, Tian-Yang

    2015-03-01

    A comprehensive study of modeling the frequency-dependent friction in a pipeline during pressure transients following a sudden cut-off of the flow is presented. A new method using genetic algorithms (GAs) for parameter identification of the weighting function coefficients of the frequency-dependent friction model is described. The number of weighting terms required in the friction model is obtained. Comparisons between simulation results and experimental data of transient pressure pulsations close to the valve in horizontal upstream and downstream pipelines are carried out respectively. The validity of the parameter identification method for weighting function coefficients and the calculation method for the number of weighting terms in the friction model is confirmed. Project supported by the National Science Fund for Distinguished Young Scholars of China (Grant No. 51205045) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. ZYGX2011J083).

  1. Factors Controlling Stress Rupture of Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, J. A.; Yun, H. M.

    1999-01-01

    The successful application of fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMC) depends strongly on maximizing material rupture life over a wide range of temperatures and applied stresses. The objective of this paper is to examine the various intrinsic and extrinsic factors that control the high-temperature stress rupture of CMC for stresses below and above those required for cracking of the 0 C plies (Regions I and II, respectively). Using creep-rupture results for a variety of ceramic fibers and rupture data for CMC reinforced by these fibers, it is shown that in those cases where the matrix carries little structural load, CMC rupture conditions can be predicted very well from the fiber behavior measured under the appropriate test environment. As such, one can then examine the intrinsic characteristics of the fibers in order to develop design guidelines for selecting fibers and fiber microstructures in order to maximize CMC rupture life. For those cases where the fiber interfacial coatings are unstable in the test environment, CMC lives are generally worse than those predicted by fiber behavior alone. For those cases where the matrix can support structural load, CMC life can even be greater provided matrix creep behavior is properly controlled. Thus the achievement of long CMC rupture life requires understanding and optimizing the behavior of all constituents in the proper manner.

  2. Efficient computational simulation of actin stress fiber remodeling.

    PubMed

    Ristori, T; Obbink-Huizer, C; Oomens, C W J; Baaijens, F P T; Loerakker, S

    2016-09-01

    Understanding collagen and stress fiber remodeling is essential for the development of engineered tissues with good functionality. These processes are complex, highly interrelated, and occur over different time scales. As a result, excessive computational costs are required to computationally predict the final organization of these fibers in response to dynamic mechanical conditions. In this study, an analytical approximation of a stress fiber remodeling evolution law was derived. A comparison of the developed technique with the direct numerical integration of the evolution law showed relatively small differences in results, and the proposed method is one to two orders of magnitude faster.

  3. Core stress distribution of phase shifting multimode polymer optical fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Rei Matsuura, Motoharu; Nagata, Morio; Mishima, Kenji; Inoue, Azusa; Tagaya, Akihiro; Koike, Yasuhiro

    2013-11-18

    Poly-(methyl methacrylate-co-benzyl methacrylate) polarization-maintaining optical fibers are known for their high response to normal stress. In this report, responses to higher stress levels up to 0.45 MPa were investigated. The stress amplitude and direction in the fiber cross section were calculated and analyzed with a coincident mode-field obtained from the near-field pattern. The stress amplitude varies significantly in the horizontal direction and is considered to create multiple phases, explaining the measurement results. To investigate possible permanent deformation, the core yield point profile was analyzed. Although it largely exceeds the average applied stress, the calculated stress distribution indicates that the core could partially experience stress that exceeds the yield point.

  4. Time-temperature-stress dependence of boron fiber deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    The time-dependent deformation of boron fibers over the temperature range from -190 to 800 C is studied by flexural stress relaxation and flexural internal friction techniques on 203-micron diam specimen fibers commercially produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on a 13-micron tungsten substrate. It is shown that up to at least 800 C all nonelastic behavior observed during axial deformation of CVD boron fibers can be explained solely by anelastic mechanisms and that although creep strains are small, boron fiber anelasticity can produce significant mechanical effects which would otherwise be neglected under the elastic approximation. Relations are obtained to demonstrate the considerable effects of anelasticity on such fiber/composite properties as modulus, creep, creep recovery, stress relaxation, and damping capacity. For an elastic-core/anelastic-sheath model, boron fibers on tungsten substrates are shown to have predictable fracture stresses for time-temperature conditions ranging from impact to long-time stress rupture. Possible techniques for altering these stresses are discussed.

  5. Frequency dependent thermal expansion in binary viscoelasticcomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, James G.

    2007-12-01

    The effective thermal expansion coefficient beta* of abinary viscoelastic composite is shown to be frequency dependent even ifthe thermal expansion coefficients beta A and beta B of both constituentsare themselves frequency independent. Exact calculations for binaryviscoelastic systems show that beta* is related to constituent valuesbeta A, beta B, volume fractions, and bulk moduli KA, KB, as well as tothe overall bulk modulus K* of the composite system. Then, beta* isdetermined for isotropic systems by first bounding (or measuring) K* andtherefore beta*. For anisotropic systems with hexagonal symmetry, theprincipal values of the thermal expansion beta*perp and beta*para can bedetermined exactly when the constituents form a layered system. In allthe examples studied, it is shown explicitly that the eigenvectors of thethermoviscoelastic system possess non-negative dissipation -- despite thecomplicated analytical behavior of the frequency dependent thermalexpansivities themselves. Methods presented have a variety ofapplications from fluid-fluid mixtures to fluid-solid suspensions, andfrom fluid-saturated porous media to viscoelastic solid-solidcomposites.

  6. Local frequency dependence in transcranial ultrasound transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, P. J.; Clement, G. T.; Hynynen, K.

    2006-05-01

    The development of large-aperture multiple-source transducer arrays for ultrasound transmission through the human skull has demonstrated the possibility of controlled and substantial acoustic energy delivery into the brain parenchyma without the necessitation of a craniotomy. The individual control of acoustic parameters from each ultrasound source allows for the correction of distortions arising from transmission through the skull bone and also opens up the possibility for electronic steering of the acoustic focus within the brain. In addition, the capability to adjust the frequency of insonation at different locations on the skull can have an effect on ultrasound transmission. To determine the efficacy and applicability of a multiple-frequency approach with such a device, this study examined the frequency dependence of ultrasound transmission in the range of 0.6-1.4 MHz through a series of 17 points on four ex vivo human skulls. Effects beyond those that are characteristic of frequency-dependent attenuation were examined. Using broadband pulses, it was shown that the reflected spectra from the skull revealed information regarding ultrasound transmission at specific frequencies. A multiple-frequency insonation with optimized frequencies over the entirety of five skull specimens was found to yield on average a temporally brief 230% increase in the transmitted intensity with an 88% decrease in time-averaged intensity transmission within the focal volume. This finding demonstrates a potential applicability of a multiple-frequency approach in transcranial ultrasound transmission.

  7. Local Frequency Dependence in Transcranial Ultrasound Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, P. J.; Clement, G. T.; Hynynen, K.

    2006-05-01

    The development of large-aperture multiple-source transducer arrays for ultrasound transmission through the human skull has demonstrated the possibility of controlled and substantial acoustic energy delivery into the brain parenchyma without the necessitation of a craniotomy. The individual control of acoustic parameters from each ultrasound source allows for the correction of distortions arising from transmission through the skull bone and also opens up the possibility for electronic steering of the acoustic focus within the brain. In addition, the capability to adjust the frequency of sonication at different locations on the skull can have an effect on ultrasound transmission. To determine the efficacy and applicability of a multiple-frequency approach with such a device, this study examined the frequency dependence of ultrasound transmission in the range of 0.6-1.4 MHz through a series of seventeen points on four ex vivo human skulls. Effects beyond those that are characteristic of frequency-dependent attenuation were examined. Using broadband pulses, it was shown that the reflected spectra from the skull revealed information regarding ultrasound transmission at specific frequencies. This finding demonstrates a potential applicability of a multiple-frequency approach in transcranial ultrasound transmission.

  8. Determining the frequency dependence of elastic properties of fractured rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrens, Benedikt; Renner, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    In the brittle crust, rocks often contain joints or faults on various length scales that have a profound effect on fluid flow and heat transport, as well as on the elastic properties of rocks. Improving the understanding of the effect of fractures and the role of stress state and heterogeneity along the fractures on elastic properties of rocks is potentially important for the characterization of deep geothermal reservoirs. Seismic surveys, typically covering a frequency range of about 1 to 1000 Hz, are a valuable tool to investigate fractured rocks but the extraction of fracture properties remains difficult. The elementary frequency-dependent interaction between fractured rock matrix and viscous pore fluids and the resulting effects on wave propagation require well-founded dispersion analyses of heterogeneous rocks. In this laboratory study, we investigate the stress dependence of the effective elastic properties of fractured reservoir rocks over a broad frequency range. To assess the effect of faults on the effective elastic properties, we performed cyclic axial loading tests on intact and fractured samples of Solnhofen limestone and Padang granodiorite. The samples contained an idealized fault, which was created by stacking two sample discs on top of each other that experienced various surface treatments to vary their roughness. The dynamic loading tests were conducted with frequencies up to 10 Hz and amplitudes reaching 10% of the statically applied stress. Simultaneously, P- and S-wave measurements were performed in the ultrasonic frequency range (above 100 kHz) with a total of 16 sensors, whose positioning above and below the samples guarantees a wide range of transmission and reflection angles. Preliminary results of static and dynamic elastic properties of intact Padang granodiorite show a pronounced increase in Young's moduli and Poisson's ratio with increasing axial stress. Stress relaxation is accompanied by a decrease of the modulus and the Poisson

  9. Chemical Stress Cracking of Acrylic Fibers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    nitrile groups (similar to the "prefatory reaction" in pyrolysis of acrylic fibers), followed immediately by N- chlorination and7 chain scission...cyclization of nitrile groups (similar to the "prefatory reaction" in pyrolysis of acrylic fibers), followed immediately by N- chlorination and chain scission...present experiments were conducted at the boil, slightly greater than 100 C. The decomposition products-- chlorine , chlorate, plus oxygen originating

  10. Actomyosin stress fiber mechanosensing in 2D and 3D.

    PubMed

    Lee, Stacey; Kumar, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Mechanotransduction is the process through which cells survey the mechanical properties of their environment, convert these mechanical inputs into biochemical signals, and modulate their phenotype in response. These mechanical inputs, which may be encoded in the form of extracellular matrix stiffness, dimensionality, and adhesion, all strongly influence cell morphology, migration, and fate decisions. One mechanism through which cells on planar or pseudo-planar matrices exert tensile forces and interrogate microenvironmental mechanics is through stress fibers, which are bundles composed of actin filaments and, in most cases, non-muscle myosin II filaments. Stress fibers form a continuous structural network that is mechanically coupled to the extracellular matrix through focal adhesions. Furthermore, myosin-driven contractility plays a central role in the ability of stress fibers to sense matrix mechanics and generate tension. Here, we review the distinct roles that non-muscle myosin II plays in driving mechanosensing and focus specifically on motility. In a closely related discussion, we also describe stress fiber classification schemes and the differing roles of various myosin isoforms in each category. Finally, we briefly highlight recent studies exploring mechanosensing in three-dimensional environments, in which matrix content, structure, and mechanics are often tightly interrelated. Stress fibers and the myosin motors therein represent an intriguing and functionally important biological system in which mechanics, biochemistry, and architecture all converge.

  11. Actomyosin stress fiber mechanosensing in 2D and 3D

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Stacey; Kumar, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Mechanotransduction is the process through which cells survey the mechanical properties of their environment, convert these mechanical inputs into biochemical signals, and modulate their phenotype in response. These mechanical inputs, which may be encoded in the form of extracellular matrix stiffness, dimensionality, and adhesion, all strongly influence cell morphology, migration, and fate decisions. One mechanism through which cells on planar or pseudo-planar matrices exert tensile forces and interrogate microenvironmental mechanics is through stress fibers, which are bundles composed of actin filaments and, in most cases, non-muscle myosin II filaments. Stress fibers form a continuous structural network that is mechanically coupled to the extracellular matrix through focal adhesions. Furthermore, myosin-driven contractility plays a central role in the ability of stress fibers to sense matrix mechanics and generate tension. Here, we review the distinct roles that non-muscle myosin II plays in driving mechanosensing and focus specifically on motility. In a closely related discussion, we also describe stress fiber classification schemes and the differing roles of various myosin isoforms in each category. Finally, we briefly highlight recent studies exploring mechanosensing in three-dimensional environments, in which matrix content, structure, and mechanics are often tightly interrelated. Stress fibers and the myosin motors therein represent an intriguing and functionally important biological system in which mechanics, biochemistry, and architecture all converge. PMID:27635242

  12. Frequency-Dependent Escherichia coli Chemotaxis Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xuejun; Si, Guangwei; Deng, Nianpei; Ouyang, Qi; Wu, Tailin; He, Zhuoran; Jiang, Lili; Luo, Chunxiong; Tu, Yuhai

    2012-03-01

    We study Escherichia coli chemotaxis behavior in environments with spatially and temporally varying attractant sources by developing a unique microfluidic system. Our measurements reveal a frequency-dependent chemotaxis behavior. At low frequency, the E. coli population oscillates in synchrony with the attractant. In contrast, in fast-changing environments, the population response becomes smaller and out of phase with the attractant waveform. These observations are inconsistent with the well-known Keller-Segel chemotaxis equation. A new continuum model is proposed to describe the population level behavior of E. coli chemotaxis based on the underlying pathway dynamics. With the inclusion of a finite adaptation time and an attractant consumption rate, our model successfully explains the microfluidic experiments at different stimulus frequencies.

  13. Effects of Frequency-Dependent Membrane Capacitance on Neural Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Grill, Warren M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Models of excitable cells consider the membrane specific capacitance as a ubiquitous and constant parameter. However, experimental measurements show that the membrane capacitance declines with increasing frequency, i.e., exhibits dispersion. We quantified the effects of frequency-dependent membrane capacitance, c(f), on the excitability of cells and nerve fibers across the frequency range from dc to hundreds of kilohertz. Approach We implemented a model of c(f) using linear circuit elements, and incorporated it into several models of neurons with different channel kinetics: the Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) model of an unmyelinated axon, the McIntyre-Richardson-Grill (MRG) of a mammalian myelinated axon, and a model of a cortical neuron from prefrontal cortex. We calculated thresholds for excitation and kHz frequency conduction block, the conduction velocity, recovery cycle, strength-distance relationship and firing rate. Main results The impact of c(f) on activation thresholds depended on the stimulation waveform and channel kinetics. We observed no effect using rectangular pulse stimulation, and a reduction for frequencies of 10 kHz and above using sinusoidal signals only for the MRG model. c(f) had minimal impact on the recovery cycle and the strength-distance relationship, whereas the conduction velocity increased by up to 7.9% and 1.7% for myelinated and unmyelinated fibers, respectively. Block thresholds declined moderately when incorporating c(f), the effect was greater at higher frequencies, and the maximum reduction was 11.5%. Finally, c(f) marginally altered the firing pattern of a model of a prefrontal cortex cell, reducing the median interspike interval by less than 2%. Significance This is the first comprehensive analysis of the effects of dispersive capacitance on neural excitability, and as the interest on stimulation with kHz signals gains more attention, it defines the regions over which frequency-dependent membrane capacitance, c(f), should be

  14. High temperature battery cell comprising stress free hollow fiber bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, J. N.; Revak, T. T.; Rossini, F. J.

    1985-04-16

    Thermal stressing of hollow fibers constituting the electrolyte-separator in a high temperature battery cell, and of certain other elements thereof, is avoided by suspending the assembly comprising the anolyte tank, the tube-sheet, the hollow fibers and a cathodic current collector-distributor within the casing and employing a limp connection between the collector-distributor and the cathode terminal of the cell.

  15. The influence of motion and stress on optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Jeremy D.; Hill, Gary J.; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Taylor, Trey; Soukup, Ian; Moreira, Walter; Cornell, Mark E.; Good, John; Anderson, Seth; Fuller, Lindsay; Lee, Hanshin; Kelz, Andreas; Rafal, Marc; Rafferty, Tom; Tuttle, Sarah; Vattiat, Brian

    2012-09-01

    We report on extensive testing carried out on the optical fibers for the VIRUS instrument. The primary result of this work explores how 10+ years of simulated wear on a VIRUS fiber bundle affects both transmission and focal ratio degradation (FRD) of the optical fibers. During the accelerated lifetime tests we continuously monitored the fibers for signs of FRD. We find that transient FRD events were common during the portions of the tests when motion was at telescope slew rates, but dropped to negligible levels during rates of motion typical for science observation. Tests of fiber transmission and FRD conducted both before and after the lifetime tests reveal that while transmission values do not change over the 10+ years of simulated wear, a clear increase in FRD is seen in all 18 fibers tested. This increase in FRD is likely due to microfractures that develop over time from repeated flexure of the fiber bundle, and stands in contrast to the transient FRD events that stem from localized stress and subsequent modal diffusion of light within the fibers. There was no measurable wavelength dependence on the increase in FRD over 350 nm to 600 nm. We also report on bend radius tests conducted on individual fibers and find the 266 μm VIRUS fibers to be immune to bending-induced FRD at bend radii of R 10 cm. Below this bend radius FRD increases slightly with decreasing radius. Lastly, we give details of a degradation seen in the fiber bundle currently deployed on the Mitchell Spectrograph (formally VIRUS-P) at McDonald Observatory. The degradation is shown to be caused by a localized shear in a select number of optical fibers that leads to an explosive form of FRD. In a few fibers, the overall transmission loss through the instrument can exceed 80%. These results are important for the VIRUS instrument, and for both current and proposed instruments that make use of optical fibers, particularly when the fibers are in continual motion during an observation, or experience

  16. Failure mechanics of fiber composite notched charpy specimens. [stress analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1976-01-01

    A finite element stress analysis was performed to determine the stress variation in the vicinity of the notch and far field of fiber composites Charpy specimens (ASTM Standard). NASTRAN was used for the finite element analysis assuming linear behavior and equivalent static load. The unidirectional composites investigated ranged from Thornel 75 Epoxy to S-Glass/Epoxy with the fiber direction parallel to the long dimension of the specimen. The results indicate a biaxial stress state exists in (1) the notch vicinity which is dominated by transverse tensile and interlaminar shear and (2) near the load application point which is dominated by transverse compression and interlaminar shear. The results also lead to the postulation of hypotheses for the predominant failure modes, the fracture initiation, and the fracture process. Finally, the results indicate that the notched Charpy test specimen is not suitable for assessing the impact resistance of nonmetallic fiber composites directly.

  17. Stress-rupture behavior of small diameter polycrystalline alumina fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, Hee Mann; Goldsby, Jon C.; Dicarlo, James A.

    1993-01-01

    Continuous length polycrystalline alumina fibers are candidates as reinforcement in high temperature composite materials. Interest therefore exists in characterizing the thermomechanical behavior of these materials, obtaining possible insights into underlying mechanisms, and understanding fiber performance under long term use. Results are reported on the time-temperature dependent strength behavior of Nextel 610 and Fiber FP alumina fibers with grain sizes of 100 and 300 nm, respectively. Below 1000 C and 100 hours, Nextel 610 with the smaller grain size had a greater fast fracture and rupture strength than Fiber FP. The time exponents for stress-rupture of these fibers were found to decrease from approximately 13 at 900 C to below 3 near 1050 C, suggesting a transition from slow crack growth to creep rupture as the controlling fracture mechanism. For both fiber types, an effective activation energy of 690 kJ/mol was measured for rupture. This allowed stress-rupture predictions to be made for extended times at use temperatures below 1000 C.

  18. Characterization of Optical Fiber Strength Under Applied Tensile Stress and Bending Stress

    SciTech Connect

    P.E. Klingsporn

    2011-08-01

    Various types of tensile testing and bend radius tests were conducted on silica core/silica cladding optical fiber of different diameters with different protective buffer coatings, fabricated by different fiber manufacturers. The tensile tests were conducted to determine not only the average fiber strengths at failure, but also the distribution in fracture strengths, as well as the influence of buffer coating on fracture strength. The times-to-failure of fiber subjected to constant applied bending stresses of various magnitudes were measured to provide a database from which failure times of 20 years or more, and the corresponding minimum bend radius, could be extrapolated in a statistically meaningful way. The overall study was done to provide an understanding of optical fiber strength in tensile loading and in applied bending stress as related to applications of optical fiber in various potential coizfgurations for weapons and enhanced surveillance campaigns.

  19. Global survey of frequency dependent attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, D. E.; Benz, H.; Gee, L. S.; Frankel, A. D.

    2011-12-01

    We analyze frequency-dependent attenuation of Lg waves, 1/Q(f), for numerous tectonic environments. Tectonic environments studied include: south Pacific oceanic subduction zone near Samoa, the oblique subduction zone off Hispaniola, two continental-oceanic subduction zones in Chile and Alaska, the continental-continental collision zone of the Tibetan Plateau, stable continental interior regions of the central US and Colorado Plateau, the eastern US passive margin and the active margins of the western US. Lg propagates with a group velocity of about 3.5 km/s, the average crustal shear wave velocity. This wave is commonly observed as the dominant phase on high-frequency seismograms at regional distances and is generated by a superposition of higher-mode surface waves or multiply-reflected shear energy in a crustal waveguide. Consequently, Lg provides a good measure of path-averaged crustal properties, such as shear-wave velocity and attenuation. Lg is particularly useful since its amplitude is sensitive to lateral heterogeneity in the crust due to varying tectonic environment. In this global survey we observe that Lg attenuation is generally higher for tectonically active regions than for stable continental interiors. Q(f) is an important physical parameter and is required for a variety of USGS research projects such as the simulation of strong ground motion and seismic network magnitude detection threshold modeling.

  20. Effects of stress fiber contractility on uniaxial stretch guiding mitosis orientation and stress fiber alignment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Sang, Chen; Yang, Chun; Zhuang, Fengyuan

    2011-09-02

    It has been documented that mitosis orientation (MO) is guided by stress fibers (SFs), which are perpendicular to exogenous cyclic uniaxial stretch. However, the effect of mechanical forces on MO and the mechanism of stretch-induced SFs reorientation are not well elucidated to date. In the present study, we used murine 3T3 fibroblasts as a model, to investigate the effects of uniaxial stretch on SFO and MO utilizing custom-made stretch device. We found that cyclic uniaxial stretch induced both SFs and mitosis directions orienting perpendicularly to the stretch direction. The F-actin and myosin II blockages, which resulted in disoriented SFs and mitosis directions under uniaxial stretch, suggested a high correlation between SFO and MO. Y27632 (10 μM), ML7 (50 μM, or 75 μM), and blebbistatin (50 μM, or 75 μM) treatments resulted in SFO parallel to the principle stretch direction. Upon stimulating and inhibiting the phosphorylation of myosin light chain (p-MLC), we observed a monotonic proportion of SFO to the level of p-MLC. These results suggested that the level of cell contraction is crucial to the response of SFs, either perpendicular or parallel, to the external stretch. Showing the possible role of cell contractility in tuning SFO under external stretch, our experimental data are valuable to understand the predominant factor controlling SFO response to exogenous uniaxial stretch, and thus helpful for improving mechanical models. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The influence of the fiber drawing process on intrinsic stress and the resulting birefringence optimization of PM fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Just, Florian; Spittel, Ron; Bierlich, Jörg; Grimm, Stephan; Jäger, Matthias; Bartelt, Hartmut

    2015-04-01

    The propagation properties of optical fibers can be significantly influenced by intrinsic stress. These effects are often undesired but in some cases essential for certain applications, e.g. in polarization maintaining (PM) fibers. In this paper, we present systematic studies on the influence of the fiber drawing process on the generated stress and demonstrate an approach to significantly increase the stress induced birefringence of PM-fibers. It is shown that the thermal stress caused by the material composition is superimposed with the mechanical stress caused by the fiber fabrication process. This intrinsic stress has a strong effect on the optical and mechanical properties of the glass and thus influences the fiber stability and modal behavior. By applying a thermal annealing step, the mechanical stress due to the fiber drawing process can be canceled. It is shown that this annealing step compensates the stress reducing influence of the drawing process on the birefringence of PM-fibers with panda structure. The comparison of the intrinsic stress states after fabrication with the state after the additional high temperature annealing step clearly shows that it is possible to improve the overall birefringence of panda fibers using appropriate preparation steps.

  2. AC Magnetic Field Frequency Dependence of Magnetoacoustic Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, M.; Wincheski, B.; Fulton, J. P.; DeNale, R.

    1992-01-01

    Our recent study has proved a strong correlation between the low-frequency AC applied magnetic field amplitude dependence of the asymmetry of the magnetoacoustic emission (MAE) burst and the strength of the domain wall-defect interaction in iron-base ferromagnets. For the present study the AC magnetic field frequency dependence of the asymmetry has been investigated in the range of 1 to 200 Hz. When represented by the third moment of the rectified acoustic emission pulses, the asymmetry becomes a bell-shaped function of frequency with its center located around 25 Hz. This experiment has been performed with low carbon, high yield stress steel specimens of three different levels of domain wall-defect interaction strength. The results show that the increase in the interaction strength causes a vertical down shift of the asymmetry in the entire frequency range investigated.

  3. Stress transfer of a Kevlar 49 fiber pullout test studied by micro-Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zhenkun; Wang, Quan; Qiu, Wei

    2013-06-01

    The interfacial stress transfer behavior of a Kevlar 49 aramid fiber-epoxy matrix was studied with fiber pullout tests, the fibers of which were stretched by a homemade microloading device. Raman spectra on the embedded fiber were recorded by micro-Raman spectroscopy, under different strain levels. Then, the fiber axial stress was obtained by the relationship between the stress and Raman shift of the aramid fiber. Experimental results revealed that the fiber axial stress increased significantly with the load. The shear stress concentration occurred at the fiber entry to the epoxy resin. Thus, interfacial friction stages exist in the debonded fiber segment, and the interfacial friction shear stress is constant within one stage. The experimental results are consistent with the theoretical model predictions.

  4. Lamination residual stresses in fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, I. M.; Liber, T.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the magnitude of lamination residual stresses in angle-ply composites and to evaluate their effects on composite structural integrity. The materials investigated were boron/epoxy, boron/polyimide, graphite/low modulus epoxy, graphite/high modulus epoxy, graphite/polyimide and s-glass/epoxy. These materials were fully characterized. Static properties of laminates were also determined. Experimental techniques using embedded strain gages were developed and used to measure residual strains during curing. The extent of relaxation of lamination residual stresses was investigated. It was concluded that the degree of such relaxation is low. The behavior of angle-ply laminates subjected to thermal cycling, tensile load cycling, and combined thermal cycling with tensile load was investigated. In most cases these cycling programs did not have any measurable influence on residual strength and stiffness of the laminates. In the tensile load cycling tests, the graphite/polyimide shows the highest endurance with 10 million cycle runouts at loads up to 90 percent of the static strength.

  5. Increased molecular mobility in humid silk fibers under tensile stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seydel, Tilo; Knoll, Wiebke; Greving, Imke; Dicko, Cedric; Koza, Michael M.; Krasnov, Igor; Müller, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Silk fibers are semicrystalline nanocomposite protein fibers with an extraordinary mechanical toughness that changes with humidity. Diffusive or overdamped motion on a molecular level is absent in dry silkworm silk, but present in humid silk at ambient temperature. This microscopic diffusion distinctly depends on the externally applied macroscopic tensile force. Quasielastic and inelastic neutron-scattering data as a function of humidity and of tensile strain on humid silk fibers support the model that both the adsorbed water and parts of the amorphous polymers participate in diffusive motion and are affected by the tensile force. It is notable that the quasielastic linewidth of humid silk at 100% relative humidity increases significantly with the applied force. The effect of the tensile force is discussed in terms of an increasing alignment of the polymer chains in the amorphous fraction with increasing tensile stress which changes the geometrical restrictions of the diffusive motions.

  6. Comparison of methods for predicting fiber stresses in a cracked Kevlar/epoxy monolayer

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, E.D. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Shear-lag and 3-D finite element predictions for the fiber stresses in a cracked Kevlar 49/epoxy monolayer are compared. Results are given for a 5-fiber wide monolayer containing a single broken fiber. Both methods of analysis are found to predict nearly the same fiber stress distribution along the crack-tip fiber when the monolayer is fully elastic. Results for highly loaded monolayers with extensive matrix yielding are not in quite as good agreement, but even then the predicted stress distributions are within 5%. These calculations show that a shear-lag analysis is accurate even though the Kevlar 49 fiber is highly anisotropic.

  7. Stress transfer problems for a fully embedded fiber with a bonded interface and bonded ends

    SciTech Connect

    Hsueh, Chun-Hway

    1996-06-01

    Stress transfer between fibers and matrix in fiber-reinforced composite was analyzed extensively using a shear lag model. Ends of the embedded fiber are generally assumed to debond from the matrix and stress transfer occurs only at the interface along the fiber length. The debonded ends are stress-free and the boundary condition at debonded ends in solving the stress transfer problem is trivial. When the fiber ends are bonded to the matrix, stress transfer also occurs at bonded ends, and the sress at bonded endsis finite. However, this finite stress is not a predetermined value, and the boundary condition at bonded ends becomes ambiguous. To resolve this ambiguity, a technique of adding imaginary fibers in the shear lag model is developed. Stress trnafer problems are analyzed when the composite is subjected to residual stresses or load. Comparison with experimental result is also made.

  8. Wakefields in a Dielectric Tube with Frequency Dependent Dielectric Constant

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, R.H.; Chao, A.W.; /SLAC

    2005-05-27

    Laser driven dielectric accelerators could operate at a fundamental mode frequency where consideration must be given to the frequency dependence of the dielectric constant when calculating wakefields. Wakefields are calculated for a frequency dependence that arises from a single atomic resonance. Causality is considered, and the effects on the short range wakefields are calculated.

  9. Developing Fiber Specific Promoter-Reporter Transgenic Lines to Study the Effect of Abiotic Stresses on Fiber Development in Cotton

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junping; Burke, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Cotton is one of the most important cash crops in US agricultural industry. Environmental stresses, such as drought, high temperature and combination of both, not only reduce the overall growth of cotton plants, but also greatly decrease cotton lint yield and fiber quality. The impact of environmental stresses on fiber development is poorly understood due to technical difficulties associated with the study of developing fiber tissues and lack of genetic materials to study fiber development. To address this important question and provide the need for scientific community, we have generated transgenic cotton lines harboring cotton fiber specific promoter (CFSP)-reporter constructs from six cotton fiber specific genes (Expansin, E6, Rac13, CelA1, LTP, and Fb late), representing genes that are expressed at different stages of fiber development. Individual CFSP::GUS or CFSP::GFP construct was introduced into Coker 312 via Agrobacterium mediated transformation. Transgenic cotton lines were evaluated phenotypically and screened for the presence of selectable marker, reporter gene expression, and insertion numbers. Quantitative analysis showed that the patterns of GUS reporter gene activity during fiber development in transgenic cotton lines were similar to those of the native genes. Greenhouse drought and heat stress study showed a correlation between the decrease in promoter activities and decrease in fiber length, increase in micronaire and changes in other fiber quality traits in transgenic lines grown under stressed condition. These newly developed materials provide new molecular tools for studying the effects of abiotic stresses on fiber development and may be used in study of cotton fiber development genes and eventually in the genetic manipulation of fiber quality. PMID:26030401

  10. Residual stresses in continuous graphite fiber Al metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Hun Sub; Zong, Gui Sheng; Marcus, Harris L.

    1988-01-01

    The residual stresses in graphite fiber reinforced aluminum (Gr/Al) composites with various thermal histories are measured using X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods. The XRD stress analysis is based on the determination of lattice strains by precise measurements of the interplanar spacings in different directions of the sample. The sample is a plate consisting of two-ply P 100 Gr/Al 6061 precursor wires and Al 6061 overlayers. Prior to XRD measurement, the 6061 overlayers are electrochemically removed. In order to calibrate the relationship between stress magnitude and lattice spacing shift, samples of Al 6061 are loaded at varying stress levels in a three-point bend fixture, while the stresses are simultaneously determined by XRD and surface-attached strain gages. The stresses determined by XRD closely match those determined by the strain gages. Using these calibrations, the longitudinal residual stresses of P 100 Gr/Al 6061 composites are measured for various heat treatments, and the results are presented.

  11. Residual stresses in continuous graphite fiber Al metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Hun Sub; Zong, Gui Sheng; Marcus, Harris L.

    1988-01-01

    The residual stresses in graphite fiber reinforced aluminum (Gr/Al) composites with various thermal histories are measured using X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods. The XRD stress analysis is based on the determination of lattice strains by precise measurements of the interplanar spacings in different directions of the sample. The sample is a plate consisting of two-ply P 100 Gr/Al 6061 precursor wires and Al 6061 overlayers. Prior to XRD measurement, the 6061 overlayers are electrochemically removed. In order to calibrate the relationship between stress magnitude and lattice spacing shift, samples of Al 6061 are loaded at varying stress levels in a three-point bend fixture, while the stresses are simultaneously determined by XRD and surface-attached strain gages. The stresses determined by XRD closely match those determined by the strain gages. Using these calibrations, the longitudinal residual stresses of P 100 Gr/Al 6061 composites are measured for various heat treatments, and the results are presented.

  12. Accelerated stress rupture lifetime assessment for fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Groves, S.E.; DeTeresa, S.J.; Sanchez, R.J.; Zocher, M.A.; Christensen, R.M.

    1997-02-01

    Objective was to develop a theoretical and experimental framework for predicting stress rupture lifetime for fiber polymer composites based on short-term accelerated testing. Originally a 3-year project, it was terminated after the first year, which included stress rupture experiments and viscoelastic material characterization. In principle, higher temperature, stress, and saturated environmental conditions are used to accelerate stress rupture. Two types of specimens were to be subjected to long-term and accelerated static tensile loading at various temperatures, loads in order to quantify both fiber and matrix dominated failures. Also, we were to apply state-of-the-art analytical and experimental characterization techniques developed under a previous DOE/DP CRADA for capturing and tracking incipient degradation mechanisms associated with mechanical performance. Focus was increase our confidence to design, analyze, and build long-term composite structures such as flywheels and hydrogen gas storage vessels; other applications include advanced conventional weapons, infrastructures, marine and offshore systems, and stockpile stewardship and surveillance. Capabilities developed under this project, though not completed or verified, are being applied to NIF, AVLIS, and SSMP programs.

  13. Fluoropolymer barriers to stress corrosion in optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinger, L.; Griffith, J. R.

    1982-06-01

    Organic polymer coatings play a critical role in determining the overall performance of optical fibers. They protect the very fine silica glass core from abrasive damage and environmental effects such as stress induced corrosion. In addition they act as a buffer in reducing the sensitivity of the optical fiber to microbending loss. In designing a coating system for optical fibers it is necessary to strike a balance between two factors: a soft compliant enclosure that acts as a buffer in masking the nonuniform surface of the glass and a hard enclosure to act as a stiffener and make the fiber resistant to the environmental surface. These requirements are best suited by using a photocured polyfluoropolyolacrylate of reduced crosslink density as a primary coating and the high modulus fluoroepoxy resin as a secondary coating. Although it is possible to lower the glass transition and modulus of the fluoroepoxy system, the longer cure times required for heat curing systems, make them less attractive as a primary coating. Also the superior surface properties of the fluoroepoxy suggest themselves for use as an external coating.

  14. The behavior of Kevlar fibers under environmental-stress conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Mark Charles

    There are a myriad of mechanisms by which polymers can degrade and fail. It is therefore important to understand the physical mechanics, chemistry, their interactions, and kinetics. This pursuit becomes more than just "academic" because these mechanisms might just change with service conditions (i.e. environment and loading). If one does not understand these processes from the molecular to macroscopic scale it would be exceedingly difficult to gain information from accelerated testing because the mechanisms just might change from one condition to another. The purpose of this study was to probe these processes on scales ranging from molecular to macroscopic in environmental stress conditions. This study reports the results of environmental-stress degradation of Kevlar 49 fibers. The environmental agent of focus was the ubiquitous air pollutant complex NOsb{x}. Other materials and environments were investigated to a lesser extent for purposes of comparison. Mechanical property (i.e., short-term strength, modulus, and creep lifetime) degradation was examined using single fiber, yarn, and epoxy coated yarn (composite) specimens under environmental-stress conditions. Optical and scanning electron microscopes were employed to examine and compare the appearance of fracture features resulting from the various testing conditions. Atomic force microscopy augmented these studies with detailed topographical mappings and measures of the fracture surface frictional and modulus properties. Molecular processes (i.e., chain scission and other mechanical-chemical reactions) were probed by measures of changes in viscosity average molecular weight and the infrared spectra. It was demonstrated that environmental-stress degradation effects do occur in the Kevlar-NOsb{x} gas system. Strength decay in environmentally exposed unloaded fibers was demonstrated and a synergistic response in creep reduced fiber lifetimes by three orders of magnitude at moderate loadings. That is to say, the

  15. Effect of stress on ultrasonic pulses in fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemann, J. H.; Baaklini, G. Y.

    1986-01-01

    An acoustical-ultrasonic technique was used to demonstrate relationships existing between changes in attenuation of stress waves and tensile stress on an eight ply 0 degree graphite-epoxy fiber reinforced composite. All tests were conducted in the linear range of the material for which no mechanical or macroscopic damage was evident. Changes in attenuation were measured as a function of tensile stress in the frequency domain and in the time domain. Stress wave propagation in these specimens was dispersive, i.e., the wave speed depends on frequency. Wave speeds varied from 267,400 cm/sec to 680,000 cm/sec as the frequency of the signal was varied from 150 kHz to 1.9 MHz which strongly suggests that flexural/lamb wave modes of propagation exist. The magnitude of the attenuation changes depended strongly on tensile stress. It was further observed that the wave speeds increased slightly for all tested frequencies as the stress was increased.

  16. Noninvasive detection of plant nutrient stress using fiber optic spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun-Wei; Asundi, Anand K.; Liew, Oi Wah; Boey, William S. L.

    2001-05-01

    In a previous paper, we described the use of fiber optic spectrophotometry as a non-destructive and sensitive method to detect early symptoms of plant nutrient deficiency. We report further developments of our work on Brassica chinensis var parachinensis (Bailey) showing reproducibility of our data collected at a different seasonal period. Plants at the mid-log growth phase were subjected to nutrient stress by transferring them to nitrate- and calcium- deficient nutrient solution in a standing aerated hydroponic system. After tracking changes in leaf reflectance by FOSpectr for nine days, the plants were returned to complete nutrient solution and their recovery was monitored for a further nine days. The responses of nutrient stressed plants were compared with those grown under complete nutrient solution over the 18-day trial period. We also compared the sensitivity of FOSpectr detection against plant growth measurements vis-a-vis average leaf number and leaf width and show that the former method gave an indication of nutrient stress much earlier than the latter. In addition, this work indicated that while normal and nutrient-stressed plants could not be distinguished within the first 7 days by tracking plant growth indicators, stressed plants did show a clear decline in average leaf number and leaf width in later stages of growth even after the plants were returned to complete nutrient solution. The results further reinforce the need for early detection of nutrient stress, as late remedial action could not reverse the loss in plant growth in later stages of plant development.

  17. Pore Size Determination Using Frequency-Dependent Electro-Osmosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reppert, P. M.; Morgan, F. D.

    2001-12-01

    Frequency-dependent electro-osmosis has the potential for use as an alternative method for determining the average pore size of porous media. It has been previously shown for the frequency-dependent streaming potential case that the frequency response of the streaming potential coupling coefficient is directly related to the pore size of the rock. However, a drawback to using frequency-dependent streaming potentials is that it is difficult to generate sufficient pressures at intermediate frequencies where both mechanical and piezoelectric devices are not efficient. Frequency-dependent electro-osmosis does not have this problem since the driving electric field can efficiently be applied in the frequency range of interest. Although the underlying physics of both the frequency-dependent electro-osmosis and frequency-dependent streaming potential cases are similar, there are differences in their frequency responses. Similar to the frequency-dependent streaming potential case, it is shown that the electro-osmosis frequency-dependent coupling coefficient is constant with increasing frequency until the critical frequency is reached, at which time the coupling coefficient starts to decrease with increasing frequency. The frequency response of the electro-osmosis coupling coefficient is dependent on the capillary radius. As the capillary radius decreases, the rollover frequency increases. The theory is developed that demonstrates the rollover frequency for the electro-osmosis frequency response is higher than that for the related streaming potential frequency response for the same size capillary. It is shown that this higher rollover frequency is due to the presence of velocity zeros within the bulk fluid of the capillary which serve to reduce the effective radius of the capillary. Data is presented for a 0.127 mm capillary that supports the theoretical findings. Frequency-dependent electro-osmosis can be used for the laboratory determination of average pore sizes of rocks

  18. The tension mounts: Stress fibers as force-generating mechanotransducers

    PubMed Central

    Wittchen, Erika S.

    2013-01-01

    Stress fibers (SFs) are often the most prominent cytoskeletal structures in cells growing in tissue culture. Composed of actin filaments, myosin II, and many other proteins, SFs are force-generating and tension-bearing structures that respond to the surrounding physical environment. New work is shedding light on the mechanosensitive properties of SFs, including that these structures can respond to mechanical tension by rapid reinforcement and that there are mechanisms to repair strain-induced damage. Although SFs are superficially similar in organization to the sarcomeres of striated muscle, there are intriguing differences in their organization and behavior, indicating that much still needs to be learned about these structures. PMID:23295347

  19. Modeling of stress/strain behavior of fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites including stress redistribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mital, Subodh K.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1994-01-01

    A computational simulation procedure is presented for nonlinear analyses which incorporates microstress redistribution due to progressive fracture in ceramic matrix composites. This procedure facilitates an accurate simulation of the stress-strain behavior of ceramic matrix composites up to failure. The nonlinearity in the material behavior is accounted for at the constituent (fiber/matrix/interphase) level. This computational procedure is a part of recent upgrades to CEMCAN (Ceramic Matrix Composite Analyzer) computer code. The fiber substructuring technique in CEMCAN is used to monitor the damage initiation and progression as the load increases. The room-temperature tensile stress-strain curves for SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) matrix unidirectional and angle-ply laminates are simulated and compared with experimentally observed stress-strain behavior. Comparison between the predicted stress/strain behavior and experimental stress/strain curves is good. Collectively the results demonstrate that CEMCAN computer code provides the user with an effective computational tool to simulate the behavior of ceramic matrix composites.

  20. Characterization of the stress and refractive-index distributions in optical fibers and fiber-based devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutsel, Michael R.

    2011-07-01

    Optical fiber technology continues to advance rapidly as a result of the increasing demands on communication systems and the expanding use of fiber-based sensing. New optical fiber types and fiber-based communications components are required to permit higher data rates, an increased number of channels, and more flexible installation requirements. Fiber-based sensors are continually being developed for a broad range of sensing applications, including environmental, medical, structural, industrial, and military. As optical fibers and fiber-based devices continue to advance, the need to understand their fundamental physical properties increases. The residual-stress distribution (RSD) and the refractive-index distribution (RID) play fundamental roles in the operation and performance of optical fibers. Custom RIDs are used to tailor the transmission properties of fibers used for long-distance transmission and to enable fiber-based devices such as long-period fiber gratings (LPFGs). The introduction and modification of RSDs enable specialty fibers, such as polarization-maintaining fiber, and contribute to the operation of fiber-based devices. Furthermore, the RSD and the RID are inherently linked through the photoelastic effect. Therefore, both the RSD and the RID need to be characterized because these fundamental properties are coupled and affect the fabrication, operation, and performance of fibers and fiber-based devices. To characterize effectively the physical properties of optical fibers, the RSD and the RID must be measured without perturbing or destroying the optical fiber. Furthermore, the techniques used must not be limited in detecting small variations and asymmetries in all directions through the fiber. Finally, the RSD and the RID must be characterized concurrently without moving the fiber to enable the analysis of the relationship between the RSD and the RID. Although many techniques exist for characterizing the residual stress and the refractive index in

  1. A molecular explanation of frequency-dependent selection in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Haj-Ahmad, Y; Hickey, D A

    1982-09-23

    Frequency-dependent selection provides a means for maintaining genetic variability within populations, without incurring a large genetic load. There is a wealth of experimental evidence for the existence of frequency-dependent changes in genotypic fitness among a wide variety of organisms. Examples of traits which have been shown to be subject to frequency-dependent selection include the self-incompatibility alleles of plants, chromosomal rearrangements in Drosophila, visible mutations, enzyme variants and rare-male mating advantage in Drosophila. These experiments have been interpreted in a number of different ways. Principally, frequency dependence of genotype fitness may result from intergenotype facilitation due to the production of biotic residues, or from the differential use of resources by the competing genotypes. However, it has proved extremely difficult to isolate and identify any biotic residue of importance or, alternatively, to understand the manner in which genotypes partition the environment. Thus, the difficulty in the interpretation of experiments which show frequency-dependent selective effects stems largely from our lack of understanding of the exact physiological mechanisms which produce these frequency-dependent effects. The principal aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms associated with frequency-dependent selection at the amylase locus in Drosophila melanogaster. The excretion of catalytically active amylase enzyme and its effect on food medium composition were correlated with the outcome of intraspecific competition between amylase-deficient and amylase-producing genotypes. Amylase-producing genotypes were shown to excrete enzymatically active amylase protein into the food medium. The excreted amylase causes the external digestion of dietary starch; this accounts for the frequency-dependent increase in the viability of the amylase-deficient mutants in mixed cultures, maintained on a starch-rich diet.

  2. Discrete diffusion Monte Carlo for frequency-dependent radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Densmore, Jeffrey D; Kelly, Thompson G; Urbatish, Todd J

    2010-11-17

    Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Implicit Monte Carlo radiative-transfer simulations. In this paper, we develop an extension of DDMC for frequency-dependent radiative transfer. We base our new DDMC method on a frequency-integrated diffusion equation for frequencies below a specified threshold. Above this threshold we employ standard Monte Carlo. With a frequency-dependent test problem, we confirm the increased efficiency of our new DDMC technique.

  3. Frequency-dependent FDTD methods using Z transforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Dennis M.

    1992-01-01

    While the frequency-dependent finite-difference time-domain, or (FD)2TD, method can correctly calculate EM propagation through media whose dielectric properties are frequency-dependent, more elaborate applications lead to greater (FD)2TD complexity. Z-transform theory is presently used to develop the mathematical bases of the (FD)2TD method, simultaneously obtaining a clearer formulation and allowing researchers to draw on the existing literature of systems analysis and signal-processing.

  4. Stress Corrosion Cracking in Polymer Matrix Glass Fiber Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosak, Jonathan

    With the use of Polymer Matrix Glass Fiber Composites ever expanding, understanding conditions that lead to failure before expected service life is of increasing importance. Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) has proven to be one such example of conditions found in use in high voltage transmission line applications that leads to brittle fracture of polymer matrix composites. SCC has been proven to be the result of acid buildup on the lines due to corona discharges and water buildup. This acid leaches minerals from the fibers, leading to fracture at low loads and service life. In order to combat this problem, efforts are being made to determine which composites have greater resistance to SCC. This study was used to create a methodology to monitor for damage during SCC and classify damage by mechanism type (matrix cracking and fiber breaking) by using 4-point SCC bend testing, 3-point bend testing, a forward predictive model, unique post processing techniques, and microscopy. This would allow a classification in composite resistance to SCC as well as create a methodology for future research in this field. Concluding this study, only matrix cracking was able to be fully classified, however, a methodology was developed for future experimentation.

  5. Frequency-Dependent Selection Predicts Patterns of Radiations and Biodiversity

    PubMed Central

    Melián, Carlos J.; Alonso, David; Vázquez, Diego P.; Regetz, James; Allesina, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    Most empirical studies support a decline in speciation rates through time, although evidence for constant speciation rates also exists. Declining rates have been explained by invoking pre-existing niches, whereas constant rates have been attributed to non-adaptive processes such as sexual selection and mutation. Trends in speciation rate and the processes underlying it remain unclear, representing a critical information gap in understanding patterns of global diversity. Here we show that the temporal trend in the speciation rate can also be explained by frequency-dependent selection. We construct a frequency-dependent and DNA sequence-based model of speciation. We compare our model to empirical diversity patterns observed for cichlid fish and Darwin's finches, two classic systems for which speciation rates and richness data exist. Negative frequency-dependent selection predicts well both the declining speciation rate found in cichlid fish and explains their species richness. For groups like the Darwin's finches, in which speciation rates are constant and diversity is lower, speciation rate is better explained by a model without frequency-dependent selection. Our analysis shows that differences in diversity may be driven by incipient species abundance with frequency-dependent selection. Our results demonstrate that genetic-distance-based speciation and frequency-dependent selection are sufficient to explain the high diversity observed in natural systems and, importantly, predict decay through time in speciation rate in the absence of pre-existing niches. PMID:20865126

  6. Fatigue and fracture of fiber composites under combined interlaminar stresses

    SciTech Connect

    DeTeresa, S J; Freeman, D C; Groves, S E

    1998-06-25

    As part of efforts to develop a three-dimensional failure model for composites, a study of failure and fatigue due to combined interlaminar stresses was conducted. The combined stresses were generated using a hollow cylindrical specimen, which was subjected to normal compression and torsion. For both glass and carbon fiber composites, normal compression resulted in a significant enhancement in the interlaminar shear stress and strain at failure. Under moderate compression levels, the failure mode transitioned from elastic to plastic. The observed failure envelope could not be adequately captured using common ply- level failure models. Alternate modeling approaches were examined and it was found that a pressure-dependent failure criterion was required to reproduce the experimental results. The magnitude of the pressure-dependent terms of this model was found to be material dependent. The interlaminar shear fatigue behavior of a carbon/epoxy system was also studied using the cylindrical specimen. Preliminary results indicate that a single S/N curve which is normalized for interlaminar shear strength may be able to reproduce the effects of both temperature and out-of-plane compression on fatigue life. The results demonstrate that there are significant gains to be made in improving interlaminar strengths of composite structures by applying out-of-plane compression. This effect could be exploited for improved strength and fatigue life of composite joints and other regions in structures where interlaminar stress states are critical.

  7. Residual stress effects on the impact resistance and strength of fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    Equations have been derived to predict degradation effects of microresidual stresses on impact resistance of unidirectional fiber composites. Equations also predict lamination residual stresses in multilayered angle ply composites.

  8. Curvature and Rho activation differentially control the alignment of cells and stress fibers

    PubMed Central

    Bade, Nathan D.; Kamien, Randall D.; Assoian, Richard K.; Stebe, Kathleen J.

    2017-01-01

    In vivo, cells respond to a host of physical cues ranging from substrate stiffness to the organization of micro- and nanoscale fibrous networks. We show that macroscale substrates with radii of curvature from tens to hundreds of micrometers influence cell alignment. In a model system of fibroblasts, isolated cells aligned strongly in the axial direction on cylinders with radii similar to the cell length and more weakly on cylinders of much larger radius. Isolated vascular smooth muscle cells did not align as effectively as fibroblasts. However, both cell types aligned robustly in weak curvature fields when in confluent monolayers. We identified two distinct populations of stress fibers in both cell types: long, apical stress fibers that aligned axially and short, basal stress fibers that aligned circumferentially. Circumferential alignment of the basal stress fibers is in apparent disagreement with a long-standing hypothesis that energetic penalties for bending enforce axial alignment on cylinders. To explore this phenomenon, we manipulated stress fibers by activating Rho, a small guanosine triphosphatase that regulates stress fiber assembly. In response, apical stress fibers disassembled, whereas basal stress fibers thickened and aligned more strongly in the circumferential direction. By activating Rho in confluent monolayers of vascular smooth muscle cells, we recapitulated the circumferential alignment pattern of F-actin within these cells that is observed in cylindrical vessels in vivo. In agreement with recent theory, these results suggest that stress fiber bending penalties are overcome when stress fiber contractility is enhanced and motivate deeper study of the mechanics of these distinct stress fiber populations. PMID:28913421

  9. Curvature and Rho activation differentially control the alignment of cells and stress fibers.

    PubMed

    Bade, Nathan D; Kamien, Randall D; Assoian, Richard K; Stebe, Kathleen J

    2017-09-01

    In vivo, cells respond to a host of physical cues ranging from substrate stiffness to the organization of micro- and nanoscale fibrous networks. We show that macroscale substrates with radii of curvature from tens to hundreds of micrometers influence cell alignment. In a model system of fibroblasts, isolated cells aligned strongly in the axial direction on cylinders with radii similar to the cell length and more weakly on cylinders of much larger radius. Isolated vascular smooth muscle cells did not align as effectively as fibroblasts. However, both cell types aligned robustly in weak curvature fields when in confluent monolayers. We identified two distinct populations of stress fibers in both cell types: long, apical stress fibers that aligned axially and short, basal stress fibers that aligned circumferentially. Circumferential alignment of the basal stress fibers is in apparent disagreement with a long-standing hypothesis that energetic penalties for bending enforce axial alignment on cylinders. To explore this phenomenon, we manipulated stress fibers by activating Rho, a small guanosine triphosphatase that regulates stress fiber assembly. In response, apical stress fibers disassembled, whereas basal stress fibers thickened and aligned more strongly in the circumferential direction. By activating Rho in confluent monolayers of vascular smooth muscle cells, we recapitulated the circumferential alignment pattern of F-actin within these cells that is observed in cylindrical vessels in vivo. In agreement with recent theory, these results suggest that stress fiber bending penalties are overcome when stress fiber contractility is enhanced and motivate deeper study of the mechanics of these distinct stress fiber populations.

  10. Frequency dependence of the acoustic field generated from a spherical cavity transducer with open ends

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Faqi; Zeng, Deping; He, Min; Wang, Zhibiao E-mail: wangzhibiao@haifu.com.cn; Song, Dan; Lei, Guangrong; Lin, Zhou; Zhang, Dong E-mail: wangzhibiao@haifu.com.cn; Wu, Junru

    2015-12-15

    Resolution of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) focusing is limited by the wave diffraction. We have developed a spherical cavity transducer with two open ends to improve the focusing precision without sacrificing the acoustic intensity (App Phys Lett 2013; 102: 204102). This work aims to theoretically and experimentally investigate the frequency dependence of the acoustic field generated from the spherical cavity transducer with two open ends. The device emits high intensity ultrasound at the frequency ranging from 420 to 470 kHz, and the acoustic field is measured by a fiber optic probe hydrophone. The measured results shows that the spherical cavity transducer provides high acoustic intensity for HIFU treatment only in its resonant modes, and a series of resonant frequencies can be choosen. Furthermore, a finite element model is developed to discuss the frequency dependence of the acoustic field. The numerical simulations coincide well with the measured results.

  11. Frequency dependence of ionic conductivity of electrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Amalendu; Bagchi, Biman

    2000-01-01

    A theory for the frequency dependence of ionic conductivity of an electrolyte solution is presented. In this theory contributions to the conductivity from both the ion atmosphere relaxation and the electrophoretic effects are included in a self-consistent fashion. Mode coupling theory, combined with time-dependent density functional theory of ion atmosphere fluctuations, leads to expressions for these two contributions at finite frequencies. These expressions need to be solved self-consistently for the frequency dependence of the electrolyte friction and the ion conductivity at varying ion concentrations. In the limit of low concentration, the present theory reduces exactly to the well-known Debye-Falkenhagen (DF) expression of the frequency-dependent electrolyte friction when the non-Markovian effects in the ion atmosphere relaxation are ignored and in addition the ions are considered to be pointlike. The present theory also reproduces the expressions of the frequency-dependent conductivity derived by Chandra, Wei, and Patey when appropriate limiting situations are considered. We have carried out detailed numerical solutions of the self-consistent equations for concentrated solutions of a 1:1 electrolyte by using the expressions of pair correlation functions given by Attard. Numerical results reveal that the frequency dependence of the electrolyte friction at finite concentration can be quite different from that given by the DF expression. With the increase of ion concentration, the dispersion of the friction is found to occur at a higher frequency because of faster relaxation of the ion atmosphere. At low frequency, the real part of the conductivity shows a small increase with frequency which can be attributed to the well-known Debye-Falkenhagen effect. At high frequency, the conductivity decreases as expected. The extensions of the present theory to treat frequency-dependent diffusivities of charged colloid suspensions and conductivity of a dilute

  12. Rho and Rab Small G Proteins Coordinately Reorganize Stress Fibers and Focal Adhesions in MDCK Cells

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Hiroshi; Takaishi, Kenji; Nakano, Katsutoshi; Kodama, Atsuko; Oishi, Hideto; Shiozaki, Hitoshi; Monden, Morito; Sasaki, Takuya; Takai, Yoshimi

    1998-01-01

    The Rho subfamily of the Rho small G protein family (Rho) regulates formation of stress fibers and focal adhesions in many types of cultured cells. In moving cells, dynamic and coordinate disassembly and reassembly of stress fibers and focal adhesions are observed, but the precise mechanisms in the regulation of these processes are poorly understood. We previously showed that 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) first induced disassembly of stress fibers and focal adhesions followed by their reassembly in MDCK cells. The reassembled stress fibers showed radial-like morphology that was apparently different from the original. We analyzed here the mechanisms of these TPA-induced processes. Rho inactivation and activation were necessary for the TPA-induced disassembly and reassembly, respectively, of stress fibers and focal adhesions. Both inactivation and activation of the Rac subfamily of the Rho family (Rac) inhibited the TPA-induced reassembly of stress fibers and focal adhesions but not their TPA-induced disassembly. Moreover, microinjection or transient expression of Rab GDI, a regulator of all the Rab small G protein family members, inhibited the TPA-induced reassembly of stress fibers and focal adhesions but not their TPA-induced disassembly, indicating that, furthermore, activation of some Rab family members is necessary for their TPA-induced reassembly. Of the Rab family members, at least Rab5 activation was necessary for the TPA-induced reassembly of stress fibers and focal adhesions. The TPA-induced, small G protein-mediated reorganization of stress fibers and focal adhesions was closely related to the TPA-induced cell motility. These results indicate that the Rho and Rab family members coordinately regulate the TPA-induced reorganization of stress fibers and focal adhesions that may cause cell motility. PMID:9725912

  13. A comparative study of the stress-rupture lifetimes of high-strength carbon fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimes-Ledesma, Lorie

    Stress-rupture life is the time a composite can survive under load at an assigned risk level. The stress-rupture lifetimes of high-strength PAN-based carbon fibers are important to the development and use of lightweight composite structures such as composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs). To quantify appropriate stress-rupture risk levels based on available models, quantification of single fiber variability and lifetime is necessary to understand the variability observed in larger composite structures. In the present work, three PAN-based carbon fibers commonly used in COPV technology were examined, Hexcel IM9, Toray T700, and Toray T1000. The diameter of each fiber type was quantified by measuring samples in the scanning electron microscope and failure loads were determined by performing tensile tests on single fibers. Weibull statistics were used to describe the results. Fractography was performed on IM9 and T1000 fibers after tensile failure. The fracture surfaces are consistent with crack growth from a volume or surface defect. Stress-rupture testing was completed at two stress levels at each fiber type, 97% and 93% of the mean fiber strength for each of the fiber types. The results indicate that differences in stress-rupture life performance exist between the three fiber types. Differences in stress ratio of between 5 and 10% were observed, which may translate to significant difference in stress-rupture life behavior for larger composite structures. The results indicate that a relationship may exist between strength and stress-rupture life. However, if this relationship exists, it is not a simple one, and the relationship is likely complicated by manufacturing.

  14. The frequency dependent impedance of an HVdc converter

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, A.R.; Arrillaga, J.

    1995-07-01

    A linear and direct method of determining the frequency dependent impedance of a 12 pulse HVdc converter is presented. Terms are developed for both the dc and ac side impedances of the converter, including the effect of the firing angle control system, the commutation period, and the variability of the commutation period. The impedance predictions are verified by dynamic simulation.

  15. Multi-Stress Monitoring System with Fiber-Optic Mandrels and Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors in a Sagnac Loop

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunjin; Sampath, Umesh; Song, Minho

    2015-01-01

    Fiber Bragg grating sensors are placed in a fiber-optic Sagnac loop to combine the grating temperature sensors and the fiber-optic mandrel acoustic emission sensors in single optical circuit. A wavelength-scanning fiber-optic laser is used as a common light source for both sensors. A fiber-optic attenuator is placed at a specific position in the Sagnac loop in order to separate buried Bragg wavelengths from the Sagnac interferometer output. The Bragg wavelength shifts are measured with scanning band-pass filter demodulation and the mandrel output is analyzed by applying a fast Fourier transform to the interference signal. This hybrid-scheme could greatly reduce the size and the complexity of optical circuitry and signal processing unit, making it suitable for low cost multi-stress monitoring of large scale power systems. PMID:26230700

  16. Multi-Stress Monitoring System with Fiber-Optic Mandrels and Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors in a Sagnac Loop.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunjin; Sampath, Umesh; Song, Minho

    2015-07-29

    Fiber Bragg grating sensors are placed in a fiber-optic Sagnac loop to combine the grating temperature sensors and the fiber-optic mandrel acoustic emission sensors in single optical circuit. A wavelength-scanning fiber-optic laser is used as a common light source for both sensors. A fiber-optic attenuator is placed at a specific position in the Sagnac loop in order to separate buried Bragg wavelengths from the Sagnac interferometer output. The Bragg wavelength shifts are measured with scanning band-pass filter demodulation and the mandrel output is analyzed by applying a fast Fourier transform to the interference signal. This hybrid-scheme could greatly reduce the size and the complexity of optical circuitry and signal processing unit, making it suitable for low cost multi-stress monitoring of large scale power systems.

  17. Pretension-Dependent Residual Stress of Alumina Fiber-Reinforced Composite Wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xiaoya; Zhang, Wenlong; Gao, Ping; Zhang, Shaozong; Gu, Mingyuan; Peng, Hua-Xin

    2013-11-01

    The relationship between pretension and residual stress of an aluminum wire reinforced with 45 vol pct continuous Nextel™ 610 alumina fibers is investigated. It is shown that as pretension stress increases, the matrix residual stress decreases. A transition in matrix residual stress from tension to compression occurs at a pretension stress of about 80 MPa. The initial rapidly decreased residual stress caused by pretension at relatively low pretension stresses is a result of matrix elastic compressive deformation; while the later gradually decreased residual stress at higher pretension stresses comes from matrix plastic compressive deformation. As the matrix yield stress and hardening exponent increase, the decrease in matrix residual stress with pretension stress is more rapid and the absolute value of matrix residual stress increases. An analytical model suitable for fiber-reinforced metal matrix composites (MMCs) with strong interfacial bonding is developed to describe the relationship between pretension and matrix residual stress and is shown to be in good agreement with the experimental and finite-element calculated results. The pretension-dependent matrix residual stress phenomenon suggests that the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced MMCs associated with matrix residual stress may be effectively improved by applying tensile loads.

  18. Nondestructive evaluation of residual stress in short-fiber reinforced plastics by x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Keisuke; Tokoro, Syouhei; Akiniwa, Yoshiaki; Egami, Noboru

    2014-06-01

    The X-ray diffraction method is used to measure the residual stress in injection-molded plates of short-fiber reinforced plastics (SFRP) made of crystalline thermoplastics, polyphenylene sulphide (PPS), reinforced by carbon fibers with 30 mass%. Based on the orientation of carbon fibers, injection molded plates can be modeled as three-layered lamella where the core layer is sandwiched by skin layers. The stress in the matrix in the skin layer was measured using Cr-Kα radiation with the sin2Ψ method. Since the X-ray penetration depth is shallow, the state of stresses measured by X-rays in FRP can be assumed to be plane stress. The X-ray measurement of stress in carbon fibers was not possible because of high texture. A new method was proposed to evaluate the macrostress in SFRP from the measurement of the matrix stress. According to micromechanics analysis of SFRP, the matrix stresses in the fiber direction, σ1m, and perpendicular to the fiber direction, σ2m, and shear stress τ12m can be expressed as the functions of the applied (macro-) stresses, σ1A, σ2A , τ12A as follows: σ1m = α11σ1A +α12σ2A, σ2m = α21σ1A + α22σ2A, τ12m = α66τ12A, where α11 ,α12, α21, α22, α66 are stress-partitioning coefficients. Using skin-layer strips cut parallel, perpendicular and 45° to the molding direction, the stress in the matrix was measured under the uniaxial applied stress and the stress-partitioning coefficients of the above equations were determined. Once these relations are established, the macrostress in SFRP can be determined from the measurements of the matrix stresses by X-rays.

  19. Residual stresses in boron/tungsten and boron/carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrendt, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    By measuring the change in fracture stress of 203 micrometer diameter fibers of boron on tungsten (B/W) as a function of fiber diameter as reduced by chemical etching, it is shown that the flaws which limit B/W fiber strength are located at the surface and in the tungsten boride core. After etching to a diameter of 188 micrometers m virtually all fiber fractures were caused by core flaws, the average strength being 4.50 GN/sq m. If both the surface and core flaws are removed, the fracture strength, limited by flaws in the boron itself, is approximately 6.89 GN/sq m. This was measured on B/W fibers which were split longitudinally and had their cores removed by chemical etching. The longitudinal residual stress distribution was determined for 102 micrometer diameter B/W and B/C fibers.

  20. Understanding the Stress Relaxation Behavior of Polymers Reinforced with Short Elastic Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Obaid, Numaira; Kortschot, Mark T.; Sain, Mohini

    2017-01-01

    Although it has been experimentally shown that the addition of short-fibers slows the stress relaxation process in composites, the underlying phenomenon is complex and not well understood. Previous studies have proposed that fibers slow the relaxation process by either hindering the movement of nearby polymeric chains or by creating additional covalent bonds at the fiber-matrix interface that must be broken before bulk relaxation can occur. In this study, we propose a simplified analytical model that explicitly accounts for the influence of polymer viscoelasticity on shear stress transfer to the fibers. This model adequately explains the effect of fiber addition on the relaxation behavior without the need to postulate structural changes at the fiber-matrix interface. The model predictions were compared to those from Monte Carlo finite-element simulations, and good agreement between the two was observed. PMID:28772835

  1. Mechanical Stability Determines Stress Fiber and Focal Adhesion Orientation.

    PubMed

    Stamenović, Dimitrije; Lazopoulos, Konstantinos A; Pirentis, Athanassios; Suki, Béla

    2009-12-01

    It is well documented in a variety of adherent cell types that in response to anisotropic signals from the microenvironment cells alter their cytoskeletal organization. Previous theoretical studies of these phenomena were focused primarily on the elasticity of cytoskeletal actin stress fibers (SFs) and of the substrate while the contribution of focal adhesions (FAs) through which the cytoskeleton is linked to the external environment has not been considered. Here we propose a mathematical model comprised of a single linearly elastic SF and two identical linearly elastic FAs of a finite size at the endpoints of the SF to investigate cytoskeletal realignment in response to uniaxial stretching of the substrate. The model also includes the contribution of the chemical potential energies of the SF and the FAs to the total potential energy of the SF-FA assembly. Using the global (Maxwell's) stability criterion, we predict stable configurations of the SF-FA assembly in response to substrate stretching. Model predictions obtained for physiologically feasible values of model parameters are consistent with experimental data from the literature. The model shows that elasticity of SFs alone can not predict their realignment during substrate stretching and that geometrical and elastic properties of SFs and FAs need to be included.

  2. Frequency-dependent effective hydraulic conductivity of strongly heterogeneous media.

    PubMed

    Caspari, E; Gurevich, B; Müller, T M

    2013-10-01

    The determination of the transport properties of heterogeneous porous rocks, such as an effective hydraulic conductivity, arises in a range of geoscience problems, from groundwater flow analysis to hydrocarbon reservoir modeling. In the presence of formation-scale heterogeneities, nonstationary flows, induced by pumping tests or propagating elastic waves, entail localized pressure diffusion processes with a characteristic frequency depending on the pressure diffusivity and size of the heterogeneity. Then, on a macroscale, a homogeneous equivalent medium exists, which has a frequency-dependent effective conductivity. The frequency dependence of the conductivity can be analyzed with Biot's equations of poroelasticity. In the quasistatic frequency regime of this framework, the slow compressional wave is a proxy for pressure diffusion processes. This slow compressional wave is associated with the out-of-phase motion of the fluid and solid phase, thereby creating a relative fluid-solid displacement vector field. Decoupling of the poroelasticity equations gives a diffusion equation for the fluid-solid displacement field valid in a poroelastic medium with spatial fluctuations in hydraulic conductivity. Then, an effective conductivity is found by a Green's function approach followed by a strong-contrast perturbation theory suggested earlier in the context of random dielectrics. This theory leads to closed-form expressions for the frequency-dependent effective conductivity as a function of the one- and two-point probability functions of the conductivity fluctuations. In one dimension, these expressions are consistent with exact solutions in both low- and high-frequency limits for arbitrary conductivity contrast. In 3D, the low-frequency limit depends on the details of the microstructure. However, the derived approximation for the effective conductivity is consistent with the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds.

  3. Frequency-dependent changes in the cardiac sarcolemmal ATPase.

    PubMed Central

    Khatter, J C; Prasad, K

    1977-01-01

    1 Effects of various frequencies (0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 or 2.0 Hz) of stimulation for various durations (2, 5, 10 or 15 min) on the contractile force of trabecular or papillary muscles of dog myocardium were investigated. 2 Effects of various frequencies (0, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 Hz) of various stimulus strengths (0.5, 1, 10 V) for various durations (2,5,10 or 15 min) on the Mg2+/-dependent Na+/--K+/--adenosinetriphosinetriphosphatase (ATPase) of isolated sarcolemmal fraction of dog myocardium were determined. 3 There was a frequency-dependent increase in the contractility and inhibition of the Na+/--K+/--ATPase within 2 minutes. 4 Frequency-dependent increase in the contractility and inhibition of Na+/--K+/--ATPase decreased as the duration of stimulation was increased. 5 The diminution in the inhibition of ATPase was associated with a decrease in the contractility with prolonged stimulation. 6 These results suggest that the frequency-dependent increase in the myocardial contractility might be mediated through an inhibition of the sarcolemmal ATPase. Images Figure 2 PMID:138462

  4. Frequency-Dependent Attenuation of Blasting Vibration Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Junru; Lu, Wenbo; Yan, Peng; Chen, Ming; Wang, Gaohui

    2016-10-01

    The dominant frequency, in addition to the peak particle velocity, is a critical factor for assessing adverse effects of the blasting vibration on surrounding structures; however, it has not been fully considered in blasting design. Therefore, the dominant frequency-dependent attenuation mechanism of blast-induced vibration is investigated in the present research. Starting with blasting vibration induced by a spherical charge propagating in an infinite viscoelastic medium, a modified expression of the vibration amplitude spectrum was derived to reveal the frequency dependency of attenuation. Then, ground vibration induced by more complex and more commonly used cylindrical charge that propagates in a semi-infinite viscoelastic medium was analyzed by numerical simulation. Results demonstrate that the absorptive property of the medium results in the frequency attenuation versus distance, whereas a rapid drop or fluctuation occurs during the attenuation of ground vibration. Fluctuation usually appears at moderate to far field, and the dominant frequency generally decreases to half the original value when rapid drop occurs. The decay rate discrepancy between different frequency components and the multimodal structure of vibration spectrum lead to the unsmooth frequency-dependent attenuation. The above research is verified by two field experiments. Furthermore, according to frequency-based vibration standards, frequency drop and fluctuation should be considered when evaluating blast safety. An optimized piecewise assessment is proposed for more accurate evaluation: With the frequency drop point as the breakpoint, the assessment is divided into two independent sections along the propagating path.

  5. Frequency dependent Lg attenuation in south-central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McNamara, D.E.

    2000-01-01

    The characteristics of seismic energy attenuation are determined using high frequency Lg waves from 27 crustal earthquakes, in south-central Alaska. Lg time-domain amplitudes are measured in five pass-bands and inverted to determine a frequency-dependent quality factor, Q(f), model for south-central Alaska. The inversion in this study yields the frequency-dependent quality factor, in the form of a power law: Q(f) = Q0fη = 220(±30) f0.66(±0.09) (0.75≤f≤12Hz). The results from this study are remarkably consistent with frequency dependent quality factor estimates, using local S-wave coda, in south-central Alaska. The consistency between S-coda Q(f) and Lg Q(f) enables constraints to be placed on the mechanism of crustal attenuation in south-central Alaska. For the range of frequencies considered in this study both scattering and intrinsic attenuation mechanisms likely play an equal role.

  6. High temperature battery cell comprising stress-free hollow fiber bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, J.N.; Revak, T.T.; Rossini, F.J.

    1982-06-01

    Thermal stressing of hollow fibers constituting the electrolyteseparator in a high temperature battery cell, and of certain other elements thereof, is avoided by suspending the assembly comprising the anolyte tank, the tubesheet, the hollow fibers and a cathodic current collector-distributing means, within the casing and employing a limp connection between the latter means and the cathode terminal of the cell.

  7. Two-dimensional refractive index and stresses profiles of a homogenous bent optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, W A; Wahba, H H; Shams El-Din, M A

    2014-11-01

    We present a significant contribution to the theory of determining the refractive index profile of a bent homogenous optical fiber. In this theory we consider two different processes controlling the index profile variations. The first is the linear index variation due to stress along the bent radius, and the second is the release of this stress on the fiber surface. This release process is considered to have radial dependence on the fiber radius. These considerations enable us to construct the index profile in two dimensions normal to the optical axis, considering the refraction of light rays traversing the fiber. This theory is applied to optical homogenous bent fiber with two bending radii when they are located orthogonal to the light path of the object arm in the holographic setup (like the Mach-Zehnder interferometer). Digital holographic phase shifting interferometry is employed in this study. The recorded phase shifted holograms have been combined, reconstructed, and processed to extract the phase map of the bent optical fiber. A comparison between the extracted optical phase differences and the calculated one indicates that the refractive index profile variation should include the above mentioned two processes, which are considered as a response for stress distribution across the fiber's cross section. The experimentally obtained refractive index profiles provide the stress induced birefringence profile. Thus we are able to present a realistic induced stress profile due to bending.

  8. Frequency-dependent Lg Q within the continental United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erickson, D.; McNamara, D.E.; Benz, H.M.

    2004-01-01

    Frequency-dependent crustal attenuation (1/Q) is determined for seven distinct physiographic/tectonic regions of the continental United States using high-quality Lg waveforms recorded on broadband stations in the frequency band 0.5 to 16 Hz. Lg attenuation is determined from time-domain amplitude measurements in one-octave frequency bands centered on the frequencies 0.75, 1.0, 3.0, 6.0, and 12.0 Hz. Modeling errors are determined using a delete-j jackknife resampling technique. The frequency-dependent quality factor is modeled in the form of Q = Q0 fη. Regions were initially selected based on tectonic provinces but were eventually limited and adjusted to maximize ray path coverage in each area. Earthquake data was recorded on several different networks and constrained to events occurring within the crust (<40 km depth) and at least mb 3.5 in size. A singular value decomposition inversion technique was applied to the data to simultaneously solve for source and receiver terms along with Q for each region at specific frequencies. The lowest crustal Q was observed in northern and southern California where Q is described by the functions Q = 152(±37)f0.72(±0.16) and Q = 105(±26)f0.67(±0.16), respectively. The Basin and Range Province, Pacific Northwest, and Rocky Mountain states also display lower Q and a strong frequency dependence characterized by the functions Q = 200(±40)f0.68(±0.12), Q = 152(±49)f0.76(±0.18), and Q = 166(±37)f0.61(±0.14), respectively. In contrast, in the central and northeast United States Q functions are Q = 640(±225)f0.344(±0.22) and Q = 650(±143)f0.36(±0.14), respectively, show a high crustal Q and a weaker frequency dependence. These results improve upon previous Lg modeling by subdividing the United States into smaller, distinct tectonic regions and using significantly more data that provide improved constraints on frequency-dependent attenuation and errors. A detailed attenuation map of the continental United States can

  9. Stress-Transfer Micromechanics For Fiber Length with a Photocure Vinyl Ester Composite

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard C.; Lemons, Jack E.; McCracken, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to test how increasing fiber length above the critical length would influence mechanical properties and fracture crack propagation. Micromechanics considering fiber/matrix stress-transfer was used to evaluate the results in addition to a shear debonding volume percent correction term necessary for the final analysis. Fiber lengths of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, and 6.0 mm with 9 μm diameters were added into a photocure vinyl ester particulate-filled composite at a uniform 28.2 vol%. Mechanical flexural testing was performed using four-point fully articulated fixtures for samples measuring 2 × 2 × 50 mm3 across a 40 mm span. Fiber length correlated with improved mechanical properties for flexural strength, modulus, yield strength, strain, work of fracture, and strain energy release, p < 0.001. In addition, sample fracture depth significantly decreased with increasing fiber lengths, p < 0.00001. All mechanical properties correlated significantly as predictors for fracture failure, p < 0.000001, and as estimators for each other, p < 0.0001. The stress-transfer micromechanics for fiber length were improved upon for strength by including a simple correction factor to account for loss of fiber volume percent related to cracks deflecting around debonded fiber ends. In turn, the elastic property of modulus was shown to exhibit a tendency to follow stress-transfer micromechanics. PMID:25382894

  10. Effects of EB irradiation on stress-strain curves for carbon fiber reinforced composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, H.; Yamada, K.; Mizutani, A.; Uchida, N.; Tanaka, K.; Nishi, Yoshitake

    2004-02-01

    In order to evaluate influence of electron beam (EB) irradiation on elasticity and stress- strain curve of composite materials reinforced by carbon fiber (CF), carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) and carbon fiber reinforced graphite (C/C) were treated by EB irradiation of 0.3 MGy. Since the EB strengthening was mainly dominated by the ductility enhancements of carbon fiber and matrix of epoxy resin, EB irradiation enlarged fracture stress and enhanced fracture strain of CFRP. Furthermore, EB irradiation slightly enhanced bending elasticity of CFRP and largely enhanced the initial spring constant related to elasticity of C/C coil. Although the elasticity enhancement of carbon fibers did not largely contribute that of CFRP, that of treated graphite matrix in C/C mainly caused the C/C coil elasticity enhancement by EB irradiation. Such a new treatment is a dream-worthy technology for structural materials to be applied in the fields of future engineering.

  11. Strain or stress component separation in surface mounted interferometric optical fiber strain sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haslach, Henry W., Jr.; Sirkis, James S.

    1990-02-01

    Design flexibility is often touted as an advantage of optical fiber transducers. This advantage is exploited by formalizing the geometric design of interferometric optical fiber stress and strain sensors. The equations that govern the phase-strain correlation are used to define some basic design laws. The most common design goal is to separate strain or stress components from composite phase-strain data. This can be accomplished in a Mach-Zehnder format or in a format in which both the sensing and reference fibers are exposed to the strain field. The design laws together with simple configurations are used to devise several fiber transducers. Design flexibility exists because there are many solutions which satisfy the design objectives and constraints. The constant strain assumption is the basic of design. A comparison of the transverse sensitivity of resistance and optical fiber gages is presented.

  12. Frequency-Dependent Properties of Magnetic Nanoparticle Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Majetich, Sara

    2016-05-17

    In the proposed research program we will investigate the time- and frequency-dependent behavior of ordered nanoparticle assemblies, or nanoparticle crystals. Magnetostatic interactions are long-range and anisotropic, and this leads to complex behavior in nanoparticle assemblies, particularly in the time- and frequency-dependent properties. We hypothesize that the high frequency performance of composite materials has been limited because of the range of relaxation times; if a composite is a dipolar ferromagnet at a particular frequency, it should have the advantages of a single phase material, but without significant eddy current power losses. Arrays of surfactant-coated monodomain magnetic nanoparticles can exhibit long-range magnetic order that is stable over time. The magnetic domain size and location of domain walls is governed not by structural grain boundaries but by the shape of the array, due to the local interaction field. Pores or gaps within an assembly pin domain walls and limit the domain size. Measurements of the magnetic order parameter as a function of temperature showed that domains can exist at high temoerature, and that there is a collective phase transition, just as in an exchange-coupled ferromagnet. Dipolar ferromagnets are not merely of fundamental interest; they provide an interesting alternative to exchange-based ferromagnets. Dipolar ferromagnets made with high moment metallic particles in an insulating matrix could have high permeability without large eddy current losses. Such nanocomposites could someday replace the ferrites now used in phase shifters, isolators, circulators, and filters in microwave communications and radar applications. We will investigate the time- and frequency-dependent behavior of nanoparticle crystals with different magnetic core sizes and different interparticle barrier resistances, and will measure the magnetic and electrical properties in the DC, low frequency (0.1 Hz - 1 kHz), moderate frequency (10 Hz - 500

  13. Frequency-dependent Lg-wave attenuation in northern Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noriega, Raquel; Ugalde, Arantza; Villaseñor, Antonio; Harnafi, Mimoun

    2015-11-01

    Frequency-dependent attenuation (Q- 1) in the crust of northern Morocco is estimated from Lg-wave spectral amplitude measurements every quarter octave in the frequency band 0.8 to 8 Hz. This study takes advantage of the improved broadband data coverage in the region provided by the deployment of the IberArray seismic network. Earthquake data consist of 71 crustal events with magnitudes 4 ≤ mb ≤ 5.5 recorded on 110 permanent and temporary seismic stations between January 2008 and December 2013 with hypocentral distances between 100 and 900 km. 1274 high-quality Lg waveforms provide dense path coverage of northern Morocco, crossing a region with a complex structure and heterogeneous tectonic setting as a result of continuous interactions between the African and Eurasian plates. We use two different methods: the coda normalization (CN) analysis, that allows removal of the source and site effects from the Lg spectra, and the spectral amplitude decay (SAD) method, that simultaneously inverts for source, site, and path attenuation terms. The CN and SAD methods return similar results, indicating that the Lg Q models are robust to differences in the methodologies. Larger errors and no significant frequency dependence are observed for frequencies lower than 1.5 Hz. For distances up to 400 km and the frequency band 1.5 ≤ ƒ (Hz) ≤ 4.5, the model functions Q(f) = (529- 22+ 23)(f/1.5)0.23 ± 0.06 and Q(f) = (457- 7+ 7)(f/1.5)0.44 ± 0.02 are obtained using the CN and SAD methods, respectively. A change in the frequency dependence is observed above 4.5 Hz for both methods which may be related to the influence of the Sn energy on the Lg window. The frequency-dependent Q- 1 estimates represent an average attenuation beneath a broad region including the Rif and Tell mountains, the Moroccan and Algerian mesetas, the Atlas Mountains and the Sahara Platform structural domains, and correlate well with areas of moderate seismicity where intermediate Q values have been obtained.

  14. Divergences in the vacuum energy for frequency-dependent interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Vassilevich, D. V.

    2009-03-15

    We propose a method for determining ultraviolet divergences in the vacuum energy for systems whose spectrum of perturbations is defined through a nonlinear spectrum problem, i.e., when the fluctuation operator itself depends on the frequency. The method is applied to the plasma shell model, which describes some properties of the interaction of electromagnetic field with fullerenes. We formulate a scalar model, which simplifies the matrix structure, but keeps the frequency dependence of the plasma shell, and calculate the ultraviolet divergences in the case when the plasma sheet is slightly curved. The divergent terms are expressed in terms of surface integrals of corresponding invariants.

  15. In-situ Frequency Dependent Dielectric Sensing of Cure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kranbuehl, David E.

    1996-01-01

    With the expanding use of polymeric materials as composite matrices, adhesives, coatings and films, the need to develop low cost, automated fabrication processes to produce consistently high quality parts is critical. Essential to the development of reliable, automated, intelligent processing is the ability to continuously monitor the changing state of the polymeric resin in-situ in the fabrication tool. This final report discusses work done on developing dielectric sensing to monitor polymeric material cure and which provides a fundamental understanding of the underlying science for the use of frequency dependent dielectri sensors to monitor the cure process.

  16. Nucleation and Crystallization as Induced by Bending Stress in Lithium Silicate Glass Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reis, Signo T.; Kim, Cheol W.; Brow, Richard K.; Ray, Chandra S.

    2003-01-01

    Glass Fibers of Li2O.2SiO2 (LS2) and Li2O.1.6SiO2 (LS1.6) compositions were heated near, but below, the glass transition temperature for different times while subjected to a constant bending stress of about 1.2 GPa. The nucleation density and the crystallization tendency estimated by differential thermal analysis (DTA) of a glass sample in the vicinity of the maximum of the bending stress increased relative to that of stress-free glass fibers. LS2 glass fibers were found more resistant to nucleation and crystallization than the Ls1.6 glass fibers. These results are discussed in regards to shear thinning effects on glass stability.

  17. Correlation of fiber composite tensile strength with the ultrasonic stress wave factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.; Lark, R. F.

    1978-01-01

    An ultrasonic-acoustic technique was used to indicate the strength variations of tensile specimens of a graphite-epoxy composite. A 'stress wave factor' was determined and its value was found to depend on variations of the fiber-resin bonding as well as fiber orientation. The fiber orientations studied were 0 deg (longitudinal), 10 deg (off-axis), 90 deg (transverse), (0 deg/+ or - 45 deg/0) symmetrical, and (+ or - 45 deg) symmetrical. The stress wave factor can indicate variations of the tensile and shear strengths of composite materials. The stress wave factor was also found to be sensitive to strength variations associated with microporosity and differences in fiber-resin ratio.

  18. Correlation of fiber composite tensile strength with the ultrasonic stress wave factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.; Lark, R. F.

    1978-01-01

    An ultrasonic-acoustic technique was used to indicate the strength variations of tensile specimens of a graphite-epoxy composite. A 'stress wave factor' was determined and its value was found to depend on variations of the fiber-resin bonding as well as fiber orientation. The fiber orientations studied were 0 deg (longitudinal), 10 deg (off-axis), 90 deg (transverse), (0 deg/+ or - 45 deg/0) symmetrical, and (+ or - 45 deg) symmetrical. The stress wave factor can indicate variations of the tensile and shear strengths of composite materials. The stress wave factor was also found to be sensitive to strength variations associated with microporosity and differences in fiber-resin ratio.

  19. Correlation of Fiber Composite Tensile Strength with the Ultrasonic Stress Wave Factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.; Lark, R. F.

    1978-01-01

    An ultrasonic-acoustic technique was used to indicate the strength variations of tensile specimens of a graphite-epoxy composite. A stress wave factor was determined and its value was found to depend on variations of the fiber-resin bonding as well as fiber orientation. The fiber orientations studied were 0 deg (longitudinal), 10 deg (off-axis), 90 deg (transverse), 0 deg + or - 45 deg/0 deg symmetrical, and + or - 45 deg] symmetrical. The stress wave factor can indicate variations of the tensile and shear strengths of composite materials. The stress wave factor was also found to be sensitive to strength variations associated with microporosity and differences in fiber-resin ratio.

  20. Nucleation and Crystallization as Induced by Bending Stress in Lithium Silicate Glass Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reis, Signo T.; Kim, Cheol W.; Brow, Richard K.; Ray, Chandra S.

    2003-01-01

    Glass Fibers of Li2O.2SiO2 (LS2) and Li2O.1.6SiO2 (LS1.6) compositions were heated near, but below, the glass transition temperature for different times while subjected to a constant bending stress of about 1.2 GPa. The nucleation density and the crystallization tendency estimated by differential thermal analysis (DTA) of a glass sample in the vicinity of the maximum of the bending stress increased relative to that of stress-free glass fibers. LS2 glass fibers were found more resistant to nucleation and crystallization than the Ls1.6 glass fibers. These results are discussed in regards to shear thinning effects on glass stability.

  1. Deformation, Stress Relaxation, and Crystallization of Lithium Silicate Glass Fibers Below the Glass Transition Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Chandra S.; Brow, Richard K.; Kim, Cheol W.; Reis, Signo T.

    2004-01-01

    The deformation and crystallization of Li(sub 2)O (center dot) 2SiO2 and Li(sub 2)O (center dot) 1.6SiO2 glass fibers subjected to a bending stress were measured as a function of time over the temperature range -50 to -150 C below the glass transition temperature (Tg). The glass fibers can be permanently deformed at temperatures about 100 C below T (sub)g, and they crystallize significantly at temperatures close to, but below T,, about 150 C lower than the onset temperature for crystallization for these glasses in the no-stress condition. The crystallization was found to occur only on the surface of the glass fibers with no detectable difference in the extent of crystallization in tensile and compressive stress regions. The relaxation mechanism for fiber deformation can be best described by a stretched exponential (Kohlrausch-Williams-Watt (KWW) approximation), rather than a single exponential model.The activation energy for stress relaxation, Es, for the glass fibers ranges between 175 and 195 kJ/mol, which is considerably smaller than the activation energy for viscous flow, E, (about 400 kJ/mol) near T, for these glasses at normal, stress-free condition. It is suspected that a viscosity relaxation mechanism could be responsible for permanent deformation and crystallization of the glass fibers below T,

  2. Deformation, Stress Relaxation, and Crystallization of Lithium Silicate Glass Fibers Below the Glass Transition Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Chandra S.; Brow, Richard K.; Kim, Cheol W.; Reis, Signo T.

    2004-01-01

    The deformation and crystallization of Li(sub 2)O (center dot) 2SiO2 and Li(sub 2)O (center dot) 1.6SiO2 glass fibers subjected to a bending stress were measured as a function of time over the temperature range -50 to -150 C below the glass transition temperature (Tg). The glass fibers can be permanently deformed at temperatures about 100 C below T (sub)g, and they crystallize significantly at temperatures close to, but below T,, about 150 C lower than the onset temperature for crystallization for these glasses in the no-stress condition. The crystallization was found to occur only on the surface of the glass fibers with no detectable difference in the extent of crystallization in tensile and compressive stress regions. The relaxation mechanism for fiber deformation can be best described by a stretched exponential (Kohlrausch-Williams-Watt (KWW) approximation), rather than a single exponential model.The activation energy for stress relaxation, Es, for the glass fibers ranges between 175 and 195 kJ/mol, which is considerably smaller than the activation energy for viscous flow, E, (about 400 kJ/mol) near T, for these glasses at normal, stress-free condition. It is suspected that a viscosity relaxation mechanism could be responsible for permanent deformation and crystallization of the glass fibers below T,

  3. Stress-Rupture of New Tyranno Si-C-O-Zr Fiber Reinforced Minicomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.

    1999-01-01

    Minicomposites consisting of two varieties of Zr containing SiC-based fibers from Ube (Tyranno) with BN interphases and CVI SiC matrices were studied. The two fiber-types were the ZMI and ZE fiber-types that contain approximately 8 and 2% oxygen, respectively. The minicomposites were precracked and tested under constant load testing at temperatures ranging from 700 to 1200 C. The data were then compared to the rupture behavior of Hi- Nicalon (TM) fiber reinforced minicomposites tested under identical conditions. It was found that the Ube fiber-types had stress rupture life equivalent to Hi- Nicalon (TM) over the entire temperature range. A potential benefit of the ZMI fiber-type is that it offers rupture properties almost as good as Hi-Nicalon (TM) at the cost of ceramic grade Nicalon (TM).

  4. Effect of short glass fibers on the polymerization shrinkage stress of dental composite.

    PubMed

    Shouha, Paul S R; Ellakwa, Ayman E

    2016-06-13

    This study examines contraction stresses of seven short fiber reinforced composites (sFRC) exhibiting different volume loads and aspect ratios (AR)* of fibres. The shift towards a greater utilization of posterior resin composites in dentistry has seen increased interest in the use of randomly oriented short glass fibers in these restorative materials. While the effect of these fibers on modulus, strength, and toughness has been studied, very little information exists on their effect on polymerization shrinkage and even less on shrinkage stress. S2-glass fibers with an average AR of 68 were used to form three experimental groups with 5%, 10%, and 20% volume loads. Commercial sFRC with ARs of 20 and 100 were also tested. A tensilometer set up was used with moderate compliance, 5.4 J/cm(2) irradiance, and a C-factor of 2.75. Data was statistically analyzed using ANOVA followed by post hoc Tukey's test. The addition of 5% of the experimental fiber did not significantly increase stress while the 10% and 20% groups resulted in 36.3% and 39.1% higher stress values, respectively, compared to the non-fiber control group (p < 0.05). Of all the sFRC groups, the very low AR material exhibited the lowest stress [0.682 MPa (p = 0.001)] while another commercial material with higher AR fibers exhibited the highest overall value [1.822 MPa (p < 0.001)] when compared to the control group. The results indicate that both short fiber volume and AR are important variables to consider with regards to setting stresses of sFRC. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016.

  5. Effects of tensile stress on the R lines of Cr(3+) in a sapphire fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Huimin; Lim, Ki-Soo; Jia, Weiyi; Strauss, E.; Yen, W. M.; Buoncristiani, A. M.; Byvik, C. E.

    1988-01-01

    The spectroscopic properties of a crystalline sapphire fiber unintentionally dOed with Cr(3+) are investigated. It is found that tensile stress produces blue shifts of the R lines and changes in their radiative lifetimes and integrated intensities that can be correlated to stress-induced changes of the crystal-field parameters.

  6. A Magnus Expansion Analysis of Frequency-Dependent Mueller Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimer, Michael; Yevick, David

    2006-03-01

    We have recently demonstrated that, for any physical system characterized by a non-singular, frequency dependent Jones matrix, the frequency evolution of the corresponding Mueller matrix is described by a differential equation whose general solution can be compactly formulated through the Magnus expansion [M. Reimer, D. Yevick, and D. Dumas, submitted to J. Opt. Soc. Am. A, Photon. Technol. Lett.]. [D. Yevick, T. Lu, W. Huang and W. Bardyszewski to be published in J. Opt. Soc. Am. A]. We subsequently applied our analytic results to optical compensators for communications networks and to the estimation of a system's frequency dependent Mueller matrix based on repeated measurements of the output state of polarization for randomly generated input polarization states [M. Reimer, D. Yevick and D. Dumas, submitted to Photon. Technol. Lett.]. We have also incorporated the Magnus expansion into a Clifford algebra description of polarization evolution. This procedure reformulates numerous physical transformations in a simple and transparent manner [M. Reimer and D. Yevick, submitted to Photon. Technol. Lett.].

  7. Frequency- dependent cell responses to an electromagnetic stimulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghian, Toloo; Sheikh, Abdul; Narmoneva, Daria; Kogan, Andrei

    2013-03-01

    External electric field (EF) acting on cells in the ionic environment can trigger a variety of mechanical and chemical cell responses that regulate cell functions, such as adhesion, migration and cell signaling; thus manipulation of EF can be used in therapeutic applications. To optimize this process, realistic studies of EF interaction with cells are essential. We have developed a combined theoretical-experimental approach to study cell response to the external EF in the native configuration. The cell is modeled as a membrane-enclosed hemisphere which is cultured on a substrate and is surrounded by electrolyte. Maxwell's equations are solved numerically (ANSYS-HFSS) to obtain 3D EF distribution inside and near the cell subjected to an external EF. Theoretical results indicate that the cell response is frequency dependent, where at low frequency EF is excluded from the cell interior while EF penetration into the cell increases for higher frequencies. In both regimes the spatial distribution and strength of induced EF in membrane varies with frequency. Experimental results are consistent with theoretical predictions and show frequency-dependent cell response, including both membrane-initiated and intracellular pathway activation and growth factor release. The authors acknowledge the financial support from the NSF (DMR-1206784 & DMR-0804199 to AK); the NIH (1R21 DK078814-01A1 to DN) and the University of Cincinnati (Interdisciplinary Faculty Research Support Grant to DN and AK).

  8. Removal of interference from fetal MEG by frequency dependent subtraction

    PubMed Central

    Vrba, J.; McCubbin, J.; Govindan, R.B.; Vairavan, S.; Murphy, P.; Preissl, H.; Lowery, C.L.; Eswaran, H.

    2011-01-01

    Fetal magnetoencephalography (fMEG) recordings are contaminated by maternal and fetal magnetocardiography (MCG) signals and by other biological and environmental interference. Currently, all methods for the attenuation of these signals are based on a time-domain approach. We have developed and tested a frequency dependent procedure for removal of MCG and other interference from the fMEG recordings. The method uses a set of reference channels and performs subtraction of interference in the frequency domain (SUBTR). The interference-free frequency domain signals are converted back to the time domain. We compare the performance of the frequency dependent approach with our present approach for MCG attenuation based on orthogonal projection (OP). SUBTR has an advantage over OP and similar template approaches because it removes not only the MCG but also other small amplitude biological interference, avoids the difficulties with inaccurate determination of the OP operator, provides more consistent and stable fMEG results, does not cause signal redistribution, and if references are selected judiciously, it does not reduce fMEG signal amplitude. SUBTR was found to perform well in simulations and on real fMEG recordings, and has a potential to improve the detection of fetal brain signals. The SUBTR removes interference without the need for a model of the individual interference sources. The method may be of interest for any sensor array noise reduction application where signal-free reference channels are available. PMID:21930216

  9. Spatial-frequency dependent binocular imbalance in amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, MiYoung; Wiecek, Emily; Dakin, Steven C.; Bex, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    While amblyopia involves both binocular imbalance and deficits in processing high spatial frequency information, little is known about the spatial-frequency dependence of binocular imbalance. Here we examined binocular imbalance as a function of spatial frequency in amblyopia using a novel computer-based method. Binocular imbalance at four spatial frequencies was measured with a novel dichoptic letter chart in individuals with amblyopia, or normal vision. Our dichoptic letter chart was composed of band-pass filtered letters arranged in a layout similar to the ETDRS acuity chart. A different chart was presented to each eye of the observer via stereo-shutter glasses. The relative contrast of the corresponding letter in each eye was adjusted by a computer staircase to determine a binocular Balance Point at which the observer reports the letter presented to either eye with equal probability. Amblyopes showed pronounced binocular imbalance across all spatial frequencies, with greater imbalance at high compared to low spatial frequencies (an average increase of 19%, p < 0.01). Good test-retest reliability of the method was demonstrated by the Bland-Altman plot. Our findings suggest that spatial-frequency dependent binocular imbalance may be useful for diagnosing amblyopia and as an outcome measure for recovery of binocular vision following therapy. PMID:26603125

  10. Spatial-frequency dependent binocular imbalance in amblyopia.

    PubMed

    Kwon, MiYoung; Wiecek, Emily; Dakin, Steven C; Bex, Peter J

    2015-11-25

    While amblyopia involves both binocular imbalance and deficits in processing high spatial frequency information, little is known about the spatial-frequency dependence of binocular imbalance. Here we examined binocular imbalance as a function of spatial frequency in amblyopia using a novel computer-based method. Binocular imbalance at four spatial frequencies was measured with a novel dichoptic letter chart in individuals with amblyopia, or normal vision. Our dichoptic letter chart was composed of band-pass filtered letters arranged in a layout similar to the ETDRS acuity chart. A different chart was presented to each eye of the observer via stereo-shutter glasses. The relative contrast of the corresponding letter in each eye was adjusted by a computer staircase to determine a binocular Balance Point at which the observer reports the letter presented to either eye with equal probability. Amblyopes showed pronounced binocular imbalance across all spatial frequencies, with greater imbalance at high compared to low spatial frequencies (an average increase of 19%, p < 0.01). Good test-retest reliability of the method was demonstrated by the Bland-Altman plot. Our findings suggest that spatial-frequency dependent binocular imbalance may be useful for diagnosing amblyopia and as an outcome measure for recovery of binocular vision following therapy.

  11. Frequency dependent and transient characteristics of substation grounding systems

    SciTech Connect

    Grcev, L.D. Heimbach, M.

    1997-01-01

    In spite of the existence of a number of analytical models aimed for transient analysis of large grounding systems, more detailed analysis of the influence of different parameters on the transient performance of large ground grids subjected to lightning current impulse is not available. This paper presents analysis of the influence of soil conductivity, location of feed point, grid size, depth, conductor separation, ground rods, and shape of the lightning current impulse, on the transient performance of ground grids with sizes ranging from 10 x 10 m{sup 2} to 120 x 120 m{sup 2} and with 4 to 124 meshes. Maximal transient ground potential rise and frequency dependent impedance are analyzed in time and frequency domain, respectively. Computations are made with computer model based on the electromagnetic field theory approach, taking accurately into account frequency dependent characteristics of large ground grids. Instead of usual simple approximations of the lightning current impulse, recorded channel base currents from triggered lightning are used for the time domain analysis.

  12. Reversible frequency-dependent switches in male mate choice.

    PubMed Central

    van Gossum, H; Stoks, R; De Bruyn, L

    2001-01-01

    Current sexual-selection theories predict that mating should occur preferentially with the highest-quality partner, and assume that for distinguishing among potential mates the choosy sex applies an internal representation of the characteristics of the desired mate, i.e. a template. Binary choice experiments were performed to test male mate choice between two different female colour morphs in the damselfly Ischnura elegans. Choice experiments were conducted before and after an habituation period, during which males were exposed to only one female colour morph. Given the choice between the two female morphs, males did exhibit a choice for the most recently experienced female morph. This is the first evidence for a reversible switch in mate choice in a frequency-dependent way. In contrast with previous studies on mate choice, template formation in male I. elegans seems not to be based on quality. Switching mate choice in a frequency-dependent manner, choosing the most common morph, probably allows males to minimize their search efforts and to maximize fitness. PMID:12123302

  13. Frequency-dependent conductivity in bismuth-vanadate glassy semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Aswini

    1990-01-01

    The first measurements are reported for the frequency-dependent (ac) conductivity (real as well as imaginary parts) for various compositions of the bismuth-vanadate glassy semiconductors in the frequency range 102-105 Hz and in the temperature range 77-420 K. The behavior of the ac conductivity is broadly similar to what has been observed previously in many other types of amorphous semiconductors, namely, nearly linear frequency dependence and weak temperature dependence. The experimental results are analyzed with reference to various theoretical models based on quantum-mechanical tunneling and classical hopping over barriers. The analysis shows that the temperature dependence of the ac conductivity is consistent with the simple quantum-mechanical tunneling model at low temperatures; however, this model completely fails to predict the observed temperature dependence of the frequency exponent. The overlapping-large-polaron tunneling model can explain the temperature dependence of the frequency exponent at low temperatures. Fitting of this model to the low-temperature data yields a reasonable value of the wave-function decay constant. However, this model predicts the temperature dependence of the ac conductivity much higher than what actual data showed. The correlated barrier hopping model is consistent with the temperature dependence of both the ac conductivity and its frequency exponent. This model provides reasonable values of the maximum barrier heights but higher values of characteristic relaxation times.

  14. Bend stress relaxation and tensile primary creep of a polycrystalline alpha-SiC fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hee Man, Yun; Goldsby, Jon C.; Morscher, Gregory N.

    1995-01-01

    Understanding the thermomechanical behavior (creep and stress relaxation) of ceramic fibers is of both practical and basic interest. On the practical level, ceramic fibers are the reinforcement for ceramic matrix composites which are being developed for use in high temperature applications. It is important to understand and model the total creep of fibers at low strain levels where creep is predominantly in the primary stage. In addition, there are many applications where the component will only be subjected to thermal strains. Therefore, the stress relaxation of composite consituents in such circumstances will be an important factor in composite design and performance. The objective of this paper is to compare and analyze bend stress relaxation and tensile creep data for alpha-SiC fibers produced by the Carborundum Co. (Niagara Falls, NY). This fiber is of current technical interest and is similar in composition to bulk alpha-SiC which has been studied under compressive creep conditions. The temperature, time, and stress dependences will be discussed for the stress relaxation and creep results. In addition, some creep and relaxation recovery experiments were performed in order to understand the complete viscoelastic behavior, i.e. both recoverable and nonrecoverable creep components of these materials. The data will be presented in order to model the deformation behavior and compare relaxation and/or creep behavior for relatively low deformation strain conditions of practical concern. Where applicable, the tensile creep results will be compared to bend stress relaxation data.

  15. High extensibility of stress fibers revealed by in vitro micromanipulation with fluorescence imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, Tsubasa S.; Sato, Masaaki; Deguchi, Shinji

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •We isolate contractile stress fibers from vascular smooth muscle cells. •We measure the extensibility of individual stress fibers. •We present the first direct evidence that individual stress fibers are highly extensible. •We quantitatively determine the local strain along the length of stress fibers. •The high extensibility we found is beyond that explained by a conventional model. -- Abstract: Stress fibers (SFs), subcellular bundles of actin and myosin filaments, are physically connected at their ends to cell adhesions. The intracellular force transmitted via SFs plays an essential role in cell adhesion regulation and downstream signaling. However, biophysical properties intrinsic to individual SFs remain poorly understood partly because SFs are surrounded by other cytoplasmic components that restrict the deformation of the embedded materials. To characterize their inherent properties independent of other structural components, we isolated SFs from vascular smooth muscle cells and mechanically stretched them by in vitro manipulation while visualizing strain with fluorescent quantum dots attached along their length. SFs were elongated along their entire length, with the length being approximately 4-fold of the stress-free length. This surprisingly high extensibility was beyond that explained by the tandem connection of actin filaments and myosin II bipolar filaments present in SFs, thus suggesting the involvement of other structural components in their passive biophysical properties.

  16. Matrix-Fiber Stress Transfer in Composite Materials Elasto-Plastic Model with an Interphase Layer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    area in Figure 29). - he notches have to be rounded to avoid stress concentrations that would cause the failure of the specimen bcfore the actual shear...A9S 824 MATRIX-FIBER STRESS TRANSFER IN COMPOSITE MATERIALS iA~ELASTO-PLASTIC MODEL Ui (U) VIRGINIA TECH CENTER FOR"A7 ADHESION SCIENCE BLACKSBURG...8217%~.\\ % o 1 F1IE COPj VIRGINIA TECH CENTER FOR ADHESION SCIENCE VPI-E-87-27 December 1987 CAS/ES,-87-12 MATRIX-FIBER STRESS TRANSFER IN COMPOSITE MATERIALS

  17. Micromechanics analysis of space simulated thermal deformations and stresses in continuous fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, David E.

    1990-01-01

    Space simulated thermally induced deformations and stresses in continuous fiber reinforced composites were investigated with a micromechanics analysis. The investigation focused on two primary areas. First, available explicit expressions for predicting the effective coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) for a composite were compared with each other, and with a finite element (FE) analysis, developed specifically for this study. Analytical comparisons were made for a wide range of fiber/matrix systems, and predicted values were compared with experimental data. The second area of investigation focused on the determination of thermally induced stress fields in the individual constituents. Stresses predicted from the FE analysis were compared to those predicted from a closed-form solution to the composite cylinder (CC) model, for two carbon fiber/epoxy composites. A global-local formulation, combining laminated plate theory and FE analysis, was used to determine the stresses in multidirectional laminates. Thermally induced damage initiation predictions were also made.

  18. Research on the fiber Bragg grating sensor for the shock stress measurement

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xiangyang; Chen, Guanghua; Peng, Qixian; Li, Zeren; Meng, Jianhua; Liu, Jun

    2011-01-01

    A fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor with an unbalanced Mach-Zehnder fiber interferometer for the shock stress measurement is proposed and demonstrated. An analysis relationship between the shock stress and the central reflection wavelength shift of the FBG is firstly derived. In this sensor, the optical path difference of the unbalanced Mach-Zehnder fiber interferometer is ∼3.1 mm and the length of the FBG is 2 mm. An arctangent function reduction method, which can avoid sine function's insensitive zone where the shock stress measurement has a reduced accuracy, is presented. A shock stress measurement of water driven by one stage gun (up to 1.4 GPa), with good theoretical accuracy (∼10%), is launched. PMID:22047282

  19. Fiber optic stress-independent helical torsion sensor.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Luís A; Grenier, Jason R; Aitchison, J Stewart; Herman, Peter R

    2015-02-15

    Femtosecond laser-fabricated waveguides have been formed into helical paths throughout the cladding of single-mode optical fibers to demonstrate a strain-independent fiber torsion sensor. A comparison between a Bragg grating sensor and a Mach-Zehnder based on helical waveguides (HWs) showed a much weaker twist sensitivity of 1.5 pm/(rad/m) for the grating in contrast with a value of 261 pm/(rad/m) for the interferometer. The HW geometry provided an unambiguous determination of the rotational direction of the twist while facilitating a convenient and efficient means for optical coupling into the single-mode core of the fiber. The flexible three-dimensional writing by the femtosecond laser fabrication method enabled the direct inscription of compact and robust optical cladding devices without the need for combining or splicing multiple-fiber segments.

  20. A Study on Stress-Corrosion Cracking Using Single Fiber Model Specimen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawada, Hiroyuki; Kobiki, Akira

    Recently the crack propagation properties of GFRP on the stress corrosion cracking (S. C.C) are investigated, and the threshold stress intensity factor KICC is verified in some environmental solution. From the investigation, it was found that GFRP reinforced by C-glass fiber has a superior acid resistance. However the microscopic crack propagation mechanisms caused by the material corrosion are not verified, and the microscopic mechanisms are necessary to assure the durability. Therefore the degradation mechanisms of the inner fiber and the matrix and the fiber/matrix interface should be quantified. In this study, the degradation of the fiber strength and the fiber/matrix interfacial shear strength are investigated using a single fiber composite previously immersed into environmental solutions, distilled water and acid solution. The effects of solution diffusion into the matrix resin on the fiber strength and the interfacial shear strength have been evaluated as a function of immersion time by fragmentation test in the room air. It is found that the diffusion of distilled water influences the degradation earlier than the acid solution. And the diffusion behavior is confirmed by Fickian diffusion analysis. The calculated concentration distribution showed that the water concentration around the fiber is saturated much earlier than the saturation of the acid ion due to the lower diffusion coefficient. Furthermore the crack propagation mechanisms are discussed based on the degradation estimated by the fragmentation test.

  1. Dissecting Regional Variations in Stress Fiber Mechanics in Living Cells with Laser Nanosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, Kandice; Boudreau, Aaron; Bissell, Mina J; Kumar, Sanjay

    2010-03-02

    The ability of a cell to distribute contractile stresses across the extracellular matrix in a spatially heterogeneous fashion underlies many cellular behaviors, including motility and tissue assembly. Here we investigate the biophysical basis of this phenomenon by using femtosecond laser nanosurgery to measure the viscoelastic recoil and cell-shape contributions of contractile stress fibers (SFs) located in specific compartments of living cells. Upon photodisruption and recoil, myosin light chain kinase-dependent SFs located along the cell periphery display much lower effective elasticities and higher plateau retraction distances than Rho-associated kinase-dependent SFs located in the cell center, with severing of peripheral fibers uniquely triggering a dramatic contraction of the entire cell within minutes of fiber irradiation. Image correlation spectroscopy reveals that when one population of SFs is pharmacologically dissipated, actin density flows toward the other population. Furthermore, dissipation of peripheral fibers reduces the elasticity and increases the plateau retraction distance of central fibers, and severing central fibers under these conditions triggers cellular contraction. Together, these findings show that SFs regulated by different myosin activators exhibit different mechanical properties and cell shape contributions. They also suggest that some fibers can absorb components and assume mechanical roles of other fibers to stabilize cell shape.

  2. Protein differential expression in the elongating cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) fiber under nitrogen stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Youhua; Zheng, Mi; Gao, Xiangbin; Zhou, Zhiguo

    2012-11-01

    Nitrogen (N) is an essential macronutrient and an important factor limiting agricultural productivity. N deficient or excess conditions often occur during the cotton growth season and incorrect N application may affect cotton fiber yield and quality. Here, the influence of N stress on the cotton fiber proteome was investigated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. The results indicated that N application rate affects nitrogen accumulation in fiber cells and fiber length. The proteins differentially expressed during N stress were mainly related to plant carbohydrate metabolism, cell wall component synthesis and transportation, protein/amino acid metabolism, antioxidation and hormone metabolism. The most abundant proteins were C metabolism-related. Ten days post anthesis is a critical time for fiber cells to perceive environmental stress and most proteins were suppressed in both N deficient and N excess conditions at this sampling stage. However, several N metabolism proteins were increased to enhance N stress tolerance. Excess N may suppress carbohydrate/energy metabolism in early fiber development much like N deficiency. These results have identified some interesting proteins that can be further analyzed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of N tolerance.

  3. Action potential broadening in capsaicin-sensitive DRG neurons from frequency-dependent reduction of Kv3 current.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pin; Blair, Nathaniel T; Bean, Bruce P

    2017-09-06

    Action potential shape is a key determinant of cellular electrophysiological behavior. We found that in small-diameter capsaicin-sensitive dorsal root ganglia neurons corresponding to nociceptors (from rats of either sex), stimulation at frequencies as low as 1 Hz produced progressive broadening of the action potentials. Stimulation at 10 Hz for three seconds resulted in an increase in action potential width by an average of 76 ± 7% at 22 °C and by 38 ± 3% at 35 °C. Action potential clamp experiments showed that spike broadening results from frequency-dependent reduction of potassium current during spike repolarization. The major current responsible for frequency-dependent reduction of overall spike-repolarizing potassium current was identified as Kv3 current by its sensitivity to low concentrations of 4-aminopyridine (IC50 <100 μM) and block by the peptide inhibitor BDS-I. There was a small component of Kv1-mediated current during action potential repolarization but this current did not show frequency-dependent reduction. In a small fraction of cells, there was a component of calcium-dependent potassium current that showed frequency-dependent reduction but the contribution to overall potassium current reduction was almost always much smaller than that of Kv3-mediated current. These results show that Kv3 channels make a major contribution to spike repolarization in small diameter DRG neurons and undergo frequency-dependent reduction, leading to spike broadening at moderate firing frequencies. Spike broadening from frequency-dependent reduction in Kv3 current could underlie the frequency-dependent increases in conduction velocity typical of C-fiber axons.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTSmall-diameter dorsal root ganglion neurons mediating nociception and other sensory modalities express many types of potassium channels, but how they combine to control firing patterns and conduction is not well understood. We find that action potentials of small-diameter rat dorsal root

  4. Reduction of thermal stresses in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites with interface layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansson, S.; Leckie, F. A.

    1992-01-01

    The potential of using interface layer to reduce thermal stresses in the matrix of composites with a mismatch in coefficients of thermal expansion of fiber and matrix has been investigated. It was found that compliant layers, with properties of readily available materials, do not have the potential to reduce thermal stresses significantly. However, interface layers with high coefficient of thermal expansion can compensate for the mismatch and reduce thermal stresses in the matrix significantly.

  5. Reduction of thermal stresses in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites with interface layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansson, S.; Leckie, F. A.

    1990-01-01

    The potential of using an interface layer to reduce thermal stresses in the matrix of composites with a mismatch in coefficients of thermal expansion of fiber and matrix was investigated. It was found that compliant layers, with properties of readily available materials, do not have the potential to reduce thermal stresses significantly. However, interface layers with high coefficient of thermal expansion can compensate for the mismatch and reduce thermal stresses in the matrix significantly.

  6. Aggregation of voltage and frequency dependent electrical loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louie, Kwok-Wai

    Electrical loads play a very important role in the behaviour of an electric power system. Since there is a tremendous number of different loads in the system, representing each load with its own model becomes impractical for system level studies. This thesis deals with the issue of aggregating loads to simplify system level studies. Six new and accurate aggregate static load models, a novel EMTP based load model, and four very accurate aggregate induction machine models have been developed. The proposed aggregate load models are voltage and frequency dependent and accommodate the different data formats of individual loads. By including the information of voltage and frequency dependence, the models can be used in larger ranges of studies than the conventional aggregate static load models, thus resulting in more accurate representations. The valid voltage range of the models is about 75% to 125% of rated voltage and, the valid range of frequency of the models is about 85% to 115% of rated frequency. The proposed EMTP load model represents a load with basic circuit elements. The model consists of two varied turns ratio transformers and two varied admittance RLC circuits. It represents the voltage dependence and the frequency dependence of a load separately, resulting in a much simpler load representation than a conventional load model. The model not only improves the accuracy of load representations, bus also broadens the EMTP application in studies other than the transient analyses, such as power flow studies. The proposed aggregate induction machine models have been developed based on the specifications and circuit parameters of individual machines. Since the specification of the machines are the most basic information of the devices, they provide a natural and accurate representation of the machines. The circuit parameters of the machines reflect the behaviour of the devices, they can be used to compose the machines under high and low frequencies, resulting in a

  7. Effects of extracellular fiber architecture on cell membrane shear stress in a 3D fibrous matrix.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, John A; Boschetti, Federica; Swartz, Melody A

    2007-01-01

    Interstitial fluid flow has been shown to affect the organization and behavior of cells in 3D environments in vivo and in vitro, yet the forces driving such responses are not clear. Due to the complex architecture of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and the difficulty of measuring fluid flow near cells embedded in it, the levels of shear stress experienced by cells in this environment are typically estimated using bulk-averaged matrix parameters such as hydraulic permeability. While this is useful for estimating average stresses, it cannot yield insight into how local matrix fiber architecture-which is cell-controlled in the immediate pericellular environment-affects the local stresses imposed on the cell surface. To address this, we used computational fluid dynamics to study flow through an idealized mesh constructed of a cubic lattice of fibers simulating a typical in vitro collagen gel. We found that, in such high porosity matrices, the fibers strongly affect the flow fields near the cell, with peak shear stresses up to five times higher than those predicted by the Brinkman equation. We also found that minor remodeling of the fibers near the cell surface had major effects on the shear stress profile on the cell. These findings demonstrate the importance of fiber architecture to the fluid forces on a cell embedded in a 3D matrix, and also show how small modifications in the local ECM can lead to large changes in the mechanical environment of the cell.

  8. Improving Planck calibration by including frequency-dependent relativistic corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quartin, Miguel; Notari, Alessio

    2015-09-01

    The Planck satellite detectors are calibrated in the 2015 release using the "orbital dipole", which is the time-dependent dipole generated by the Doppler effect due to the motion of the satellite around the Sun. Such an effect has also relativistic time-dependent corrections of relative magnitude 10-3, due to coupling with the "solar dipole" (the motion of the Sun compared to the CMB rest frame), which are included in the data calibration by the Planck collaboration. We point out that such corrections are subject to a frequency-dependent multiplicative factor. This factor differs from unity especially at the highest frequencies, relevant for the HFI instrument. Since currently Planck calibration errors are dominated by systematics, to the point that polarization data is currently unreliable at large scales, such a correction can in principle be highly relevant for future data releases.

  9. A frequency dependent preconditioned wavelet method for atmospheric tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudytskiy, Mykhaylo; Helin, Tapio; Ramlau, Ronny

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric tomography, i.e. the reconstruction of the turbulence in the atmosphere, is a main task for the adaptive optics systems of the next generation telescopes. For extremely large telescopes, such as the European Extremely Large Telescope, this problem becomes overly complex and an efficient algorithm is needed to reduce numerical costs. Recently, a conjugate gradient method based on wavelet parametrization of turbulence layers was introduced [5]. An iterative algorithm can only be numerically efficient when the number of iterations required for a sufficient reconstruction is low. A way to achieve this is to design an efficient preconditioner. In this paper we propose a new frequency-dependent preconditioner for the wavelet method. In the context of a multi conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) system simulated on the official end-to-end simulation tool OCTOPUS of the European Southern Observatory we demonstrate robustness and speed of the preconditioned algorithm. We show that three iterations are sufficient for a good reconstruction.

  10. Universal frequency-dependent conduction of electron glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amir, Ariel

    2014-03-01

    Characterizing the frequency-dependent response of amorphous systems and glasses can provide important insights into their physics. Here, we study the response of an electronic glass, where Coulomb interactions are important and have previously been shown to significantly modify the conductance and lead to memory effects and aging. We propose a model which allows us to take the interactions into account in a self-consistent way, and explore the transport properties at all frequencies. Within the model, the response maps exactly to a (linear) network of resistors, self-capacitances and mutual capacitances. The response of this equivalent electric circuit is found numerically, and is shown to obey the universal scaling which is experimentally observed for a large class of amorphous solids.

  11. Drive frequency dependent phase imaging in piezoresponse force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Huifeng; Kan, Yi; Lu, Xiaomei; Liu, Yunfei; Peng, Song; Wang, Xiaofei; Cai, Wei; Xue, Ruoshi; Zhu, Jinsong

    2010-08-01

    The drive frequency dependent piezoresponse (PR) phase signal in near-stoichiometric lithium niobate crystals is studied by piezoresponse force microscopy. It is clearly shown that the local and nonlocal electrostatic forces have a great contribution to the PR phase signal. The significant PR phase difference of the antiparallel domains are observed at the contact resonances, which is related to the electrostatic dominated electromechanical interactions of the cantilever and tip-sample system. Moreover, the modulation voltage induced frequency shift at higher eigenmodes could be attributed to the change of indention force depending on the modulation amplitude with a piezoelectric origin. The PR phase of the silicon wafer is also measured for comparison. It is certificated that the electrostatic interactions are universal in voltage modulated scanning probe microscopy and could be extended to other phase imaging techniques.

  12. Frequency-dependent complex modulus of the uterus: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, Miklos Z.; Hobson, Maritza A.; Varghese, Tomy; Harter, Josephine; Kliewer, Mark A.; Hartenbach, Ellen M.; Zagzebski, James A.

    2006-08-01

    The frequency-dependent complex moduli of human uterine tissue have been characterized. Quantification of the modulus is required for developing uterine ultrasound elastography as a viable imaging modality for diagnosing and monitoring causes for abnormal uterine bleeding and enlargement, as well assessing the integrity of uterine and cervical tissue. The complex modulus was measured in samples from hysterectomies of 24 patients ranging in age from 31 to 79 years. Measurements were done under small compressions of either 1 or 2%, at low pre-compression values (either 1 or 2%), and over a frequency range of 0.1-100 Hz. Modulus values of cervical tissue monotonically increased from approximately 30-90 kPa over the frequency range. Normal uterine tissue possessed modulus values over the same range, while leiomyomas, or uterine fibroids, exhibited values ranging from approximately 60-220 kPa.

  13. Improving Planck calibration by including frequency-dependent relativistic corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Quartin, Miguel; Notari, Alessio E-mail: notari@ffn.ub.es

    2015-09-01

    The Planck satellite detectors are calibrated in the 2015 release using the 'orbital dipole', which is the time-dependent dipole generated by the Doppler effect due to the motion of the satellite around the Sun. Such an effect has also relativistic time-dependent corrections of relative magnitude 10{sup −3}, due to coupling with the 'solar dipole' (the motion of the Sun compared to the CMB rest frame), which are included in the data calibration by the Planck collaboration. We point out that such corrections are subject to a frequency-dependent multiplicative factor. This factor differs from unity especially at the highest frequencies, relevant for the HFI instrument. Since currently Planck calibration errors are dominated by systematics, to the point that polarization data is currently unreliable at large scales, such a correction can in principle be highly relevant for future data releases.

  14. Model of the Stress State of a Unidirectional Composite with Cylindrical Fibers Forming a Tetragonal Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, A. G.; Tanchik, E. A.

    2016-05-01

    A model of the stress-strain state of a unidirectional fiber composite is proposed. A cylindrical sample of an elastic material whose fibers are cylindrical inclusions is considered. The generatrix of inclusions is parallel to the axis of the sample. The distribution of fibers in the sample is modeled with sixteen inclusions forming a tetragonal structure. It is assumed that the sample is subjected to a piecewise constant normal load and the fibers are in a perfect contact with the matrix. The boundary conditions of the problem are satisfied exactly with the help of the generalized Fourier method. The problem is reduced to an infinite system of linear algebraic equations, which is solved numerically by the method of reduction. An analysis of stress distribution in the areas of their highest concentration is given.

  15. FREQUENCY DEPENDENCE OF PULSE WIDTH FOR 150 RADIO NORMAL PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J. L.; Wang, H. G.

    2014-11-01

    The frequency dependence of the pulse width is studied for 150 normal pulsars, mostly selected from the European Pulsar Network, for which the 10% multifrequency pulse widths can be well fit with the Thorsett relationship W {sub 10} = Aν{sup μ} + W {sub 10,} {sub min}. The relative fraction of pulse width change between 0.4 GHz and 4.85 GHz, η = (W {sub 4.85} – W {sub 0.4})/W {sub 0.4}, is calculated in terms of the best-fit relationship for each pulsar. It is found that 81 pulsars (54%) have η < –10% (group A), showing considerable profile narrowing at high frequencies, 40 pulsars (27%) have –10% ≤η ≤ 10% (group B), meaning a marginal change in pulse width, and 29 pulsars (19%) have η > 10% (group C), showing a remarkable profile broadening at high frequencies. The fractions of the group-A and group-C pulsars suggest that the profile narrowing phenomenon at high frequencies is more common than the profile broadening phenomenon, but a large fraction of the group-B and group-C pulsars (a total of 46%) is also revealed. The group-C pulsars, together with a portion of group-B pulsars with slight pulse broadening, can hardly be explained using the conventional radius-to-frequency mapping, which only applies to the profile narrowing phenomenon. Based on a recent version of the fan beam model, a type of broadband emission model, we propose that the diverse frequency dependence of pulse width is a consequence of different types of distribution of emission spectra across the emission region. The geometrical effect predicting a link between the emission beam shrinkage and spectrum steepening is tested but disfavored.

  16. An integrated enhancement and reconstruction strategy for the quantitative extraction of actin stress fibers from fluorescence micrographs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Xia, Shumin; Kanchanawong, Pakorn

    2017-05-22

    The stress fibers are prominent organization of actin filaments that perform important functions in cellular processes such as migration, polarization, and traction force generation, and whose collective organization reflects the physiological and mechanical activities of the cells. Easily visualized by fluorescence microscopy, the stress fibers are widely used as qualitative descriptors of cell phenotypes. However, due to the complexity of the stress fibers and the presence of other actin-containing cellular features, images of stress fibers are relatively challenging to quantitatively analyze using previously developed approaches, requiring significant user intervention. This poses a challenge for the automation of their detection, segmentation, and quantitative analysis. Here we describe an open-source software package, SFEX (Stress Fiber Extractor), which is geared for efficient enhancement, segmentation, and analysis of actin stress fibers in adherent tissue culture cells. Our method made use of a carefully chosen image filtering technique to enhance filamentous structures, effectively facilitating the detection and segmentation of stress fibers by binary thresholding. We subdivided the skeletons of stress fiber traces into piecewise-linear fragments, and used a set of geometric criteria to reconstruct the stress fiber networks by pairing appropriate fiber fragments. Our strategy enables the trajectory of a majority of stress fibers within the cells to be comprehensively extracted. We also present a method for quantifying the dimensions of the stress fibers using an image gradient-based approach. We determine the optimal parameter space using sensitivity analysis, and demonstrate the utility of our approach by analyzing actin stress fibers in cells cultured on various micropattern substrates. We present an open-source graphically-interfaced computational tool for the extraction and quantification of stress fibers in adherent cells with minimal user input. This

  17. A Fiber Optic Sensor Sensitive To Normal Pressure And Shear Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuomo, Frank W.; Kidwell, Robert S.; Hu, Andong

    1986-11-01

    A fiber optic lever sensing technique that can be used to measure normal pressure as well as shear stresses is discussed. This method uses three unequal fibers combining small size and good sensitivity. Static measurements appear to confirm the theoretical models predicted by geometrical optics and dynamic tests performed at frequencies up to 10 kHz indicate a flat response within this frequency range. These sensors are intended for use in a low speed wind tunnel environment.

  18. Thermal Stress-Induced Depolarization Loss in Conventional and Panda-Shaped Photonic Crystal Fiber Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, Seyedeh Laleh; Sabaeian, Mohammad

    2016-10-01

    We report on the modeling of the depolarization loss in the conventional and panda-shaped photonic crystal fiber lasers (PCFLs) due to the self-heating of the fiber, which we call it thermal stress-induced depolarization loss (TSIDL). We first calculated the temperature distribution over the fiber cross sections and then calculated the thermal stresses/strains as a function of heat load per meter. Thermal stress-induced birefringence (TSIB), which is defined as | n x - n y |, in the core and cladding regions was calculated. Finally, TSIDL was calculated for the conventional and panda-shaped PCFLs as a function of fiber length and, respectively, saturated values of 22 and 25 % were obtained which were independent of heat load per meter. For panda-shaped PCFLs, prior to being saturated, an oscillating and damping behavior against the fiber length was seen where in some lengths reached 35 %. The results are close to an experimental value of 30 % reported for a pulsed PCFL (Limpert et al., Opt Express 12:1313-1319, 2004) where the authors reported a degree of polarization of 70 % (i.e., a depolarization of 30 %). The most important result of this work is a saturation behavior of TSIDL at long-enough lengths of the fiber laser which is independent of heat load per meter. To our knowledge, this the first report of TSIBL for PCFLs.

  19. Frequency-doubling of an optical vortex output from a stressed Yb-doped fiber amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Mio; Shimomura, Akito; Miyamoto, Katsuhiko; Omatsu, Takashige

    2014-08-01

    The frequency-doubling of a picosecond vortex fiber laser, formed of a 1-μm picosecond master laser and a large-mode-area fiber amplifier by using a nonlinear LiB3O5, crystal, was performed. A maximum second-harmonic power of 7.7 W was achieved, corresponding to a conversion efficiency of 31 %. The second harmonic had an annular spatial form owing to a phase singularity with a doubled topological charge, and its wavefront helicity was selectively controlled by tuning the stress applied to the fiber amplifier.

  20. A fiber optic multi-stress monitoring system for power transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae-gil; Sampath, Umesh; Kim, Hyunjin; Song, Minho

    2017-04-01

    A fiber-optic multi-stress monitoring system which uses 4 FBG sensors and a fiber-optic mandrel acoustic emission sensor is proposed. FBG sensors and a mandrel sensor measure different types of stresses occurring in electrical power transformer, such as temperature and acoustic signals. The sensor system uses single broadband light source to address the outputs of both sensors using single fiber-optic circuitry. An athermal-packaged FBG is used to supply quasi-coherent light for the Sagnac interferometer demodulation which processes the mandrel sensor output. The proposed sensor system could simplify the optical circuit for the multi-stress measurements and enhance the cost-effectiveness of the sensor system.

  1. Tensile Creep and Stress-rupture Behavior of Polymer Derived Sic Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, H. M.; Goldsby, J. C.; Dicarlo, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    Tensile creep and stress-rupture studies were conducted on polymer derived Nicalon, Hi-Nicalon, and SiC/BN-coated Nicalon SiC fibers. Test conditions were temperatures from 1200 to 1400 C, stresses from 100 to 1600 MPa, stress application times up to 200 hours, and air, argon, and vacuum test environments. For all fibers, creep occurred predominantly in the primary stage. Hi-Nicalon had much higher 0.2 and 1 percent creep strengths than as-produced as well as-coated Nicalon fibers. The stress-rupture strength of Hi-Nicalon up to 100 hours was also higher than that of the coated and as-produced Nicalon fibers. SiC/BN coating on Nicalon increased only the short-term low-temperature rupture strength. Limited testing in argon and vacuum suggests that for all fiber types, creep and rupture resistances are reduced in comparison to the results in air. Possible mechanisms for the observed behavior are discussed.

  2. Effect of Simultaneous Water Deficit Stress and Meloidogyne incognita Infection on Cotton Yield and Fiber Quality.

    PubMed

    Davis, R F; Earl, H J; Timper, P

    2014-06-01

    Both water deficit stress and Meloidogyne incognita infection can reduce cotton growth and yield, and drought can affect fiber quality, but the effect of nematodes on fiber quality is not well documented. To determine whether nematode parasitism affects fiber quality and whether the combined effects of nematode and drought stress on yield and quality are additive (independent effects), synergistic, or antagonistic, we conducted a study for 7 yr in a field infested with M. incognita. A split-plot design was used with the main plot factor as one of three irrigation treatments (low [nonirrigated], moderate irrigation, and high irrigation [water-replete]) and the subplot factor as 0 or 56 l/ha 1,3-dichloropropene. We prevented water deficit stress in plots designated as water-replete by supplementing rainfall with irrigation. Plots receiving moderate irrigation received half the water applied to the water-replete treatment. The severity of root galling was greater in nonfumigated plots and in plots receiving the least irrigation, but the amount of irrigation did not influence the effect of fumigation on root galling (no irrigation × fumigation interaction). The weights of lint and seed harvested were reduced in nonfumigated plots and also decreased as the level of irrigation decreased, but fumigation did not influence the effect of irrigation. Nematodes affected fiber quality by increasing micronaire readings but typically had little or no effect on percent lint, fiber length (measured by HVI), uniformity, strength, elongation, length (based on weight or number measured by AFIS), upper quartile length, or short fiber content (based on weight or number). Micronaire also was increased by water deficit stress, but the effects from nematodes and water stress were independent. We conclude that the detrimental effects caused to cotton yield and quality by nematode parasitism and water deficit stress are independent and therefore additive.

  3. Helical conformation endows poly-l-lactic acid fibers with a piezoelectric charge under tensile stress.

    PubMed

    Harada, Yasuji; Kadono, Kunihiko; Terao, Tomohiro; Suzuki, Masakazu; Ikada, Yoshito; Tomita, Naohide

    2013-01-01

    Poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA) has been clinically used as a bioabsorbable material and attains a piezoelectric charge upon molecular orientation by the application of a shear force to the C-axis of the crystal line region. Previous studies showed that implanted drawn PLLA films or rods accelerate the ossification due to piezoelectric effect. In this study, we originally designed helically-twisted PLLA fiber to produce piezoelectricity in bioabsorbable suture upon tensile stress. The piezoelectricity of the helical PLLA fibers was evaluated using a lock-in amplifier system in vitro. The ossification induced by helical PLLA fibers was examined by implanting them in the rat patellar ligament supporting a physiological tensile load. We observed that 57° and 45° twisted PLLA fibers generated a higher piezoelectric potential than did 27° twisted fibers. The animal experiment showed that the formation of osseous tissue around helical PLLA fibers was more significant than around non-helical control fibers at 4 weeks after their implantation. These results suggest that helical PLLA fiber may be useful for the surgical suture or artificial ligament, which connects to the bone.

  4. Matrix cracking initiation stress in fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kangutkar, Pramod Balkrishna

    1991-05-01

    One of the important design parameters in CMC's in the Matrix Cracking Initiation Stress (MCIS) which corresponds to the stress at which first matrix cracks are observed. Above the MCIS, the fibers will be exposed to the oxidizing environment which may degrade the mechanical property of the fibers and thus of the composite. In this thesis a systematic study to explore the effects of matrix toughness and inherent strength, fiber diameter, stiffness and volume fraction, temperature and interfacial bonding on the MCIS was carried out. Composites were fabricated using three different matrices--borosilicate glass, aluminosilicate glass and polycrystalline zirconium silicate (or zircon), and two different reinforcing fibers--an SiC monofilament (140 micron diameter) and an SiC yarn (16 micron diameter). In-situ observations during 3-point bend test inside the SEM indicate that matrix cracking is a local phenomenon and occurs first in the matrix between widest spaced fibers. In all composites the MCIS was found to increase with fiber additions and scaled with the monolithic strength. The relative increase in MCIS over the monolithic strength with fiber volume fraction, however, was found to depend strongly on the a(sub 0)/S ratio, where a(sub 0) is the inherent unreinforced matrix flaw size and S is the inter-fiber spacing. For small ratios, the effect of fiber additions on enhancing MCIS are minimal. As the ratio approaches unity, the role of the fibers in constraining the inherent flaw increases, thereby increasing the MCIS. Thermal residual stresses were also seen to play an important role in determining the MCIS; systems with compressive residual stresses in the matrix show higher MCIS at room temperature than at a higher temperature. In systems such as the 7740/Nicalon, which had negligible thermal stresses, MCIS showed minimal changes on testing at 520 C. Several theoretical models were reviewed and the predictions were compared to the experimental results. It was

  5. Residual stresses in particulate and short fiber reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, S.J.; Cai, H.W.; Zhang, G.D.; Wu, R.J.

    1993-12-31

    Thermal residual stresses in the matrix alloy of both SiC particulate 2124 aluminum alloy and Saffil ({delta}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) short fiber Al-3.4%Cu composites in different heat treatment conditions were measured using a conventional X-ray diffractometer. A multi-exposure technique (sin{sup 2} {psi} method) was employed. Under all the heat-treated conditions, i.e. furnace cooled, quenched and aged, compressive residual stresses were detected in the surface regions of both composites. These measured stresses are the resultant of the micro and macro-stresses present in the composites. During aging the stress relaxed slowly at ambient and more rapidly at elevated temperatures (180{degree}C). In the Saffil short fiber composite the surface stress in the fiber plane was much reduced when compared with that in a perpendicular plane, when both samples were in the as-quenched condition. The pattern of stress relaxation is explained in part in terms of the precipitation reactions which take place in the two alloys during aging.

  6. Experimental study on relationship between processing parameters and stress wave propagation during automated fiber placement process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, H. Y.; Li, W. Q.; Sun, S. Z.; Han, Z. Y.

    2017-06-01

    Automated fiber placement (AFP) is an important manufacturing method of composites, which has been widely used in the field of aerospace. Unreasonable processing parameters could lead to some manufacturing defects including pores, bubbles and cracks. In this paper, the propagation characteristics of stress waves are believed to be closely related to the defects during AFP process. Experiments are conducted to collect stress wave signal under different processing parameters (pressure, velocity and temperature) during manufacturing process. And the relationship between the processing parameters and the characteristics of stress waves is explored by Control Variate Method (CVM). Finally, the effects of laying parameters on stress amplitude, response speed and duration are summarized.

  7. Time and frequency dependent rheology of reactive silica gels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Miao; Winter, H Henning; Auernhammer, Günter K

    2014-01-01

    In a mixture of sodium silicate and low concentrated sulfuric acid, nano-sized silica particles grow and may aggregate to a system spanning gel network. We studied the influence of the finite solubility of silica at high pH on the mechanical properties of the gel with classical and piezo-rheometers. Direct preparation of the gel sample in the rheometer cell avoided any pre-shear of the gel structure during the filling of the rheometer. The storage modulus of the gel grew logarithmically with time with two distinct growth laws. The system passes the gel point very quickly but still shows relaxation at low frequency, typically below 6 rad/s. We attribute this as a sign of structural rearrangements due to the finite solubility of silica at high pH. The reaction equilibrium between bond formation and dissolution maintains a relatively large bond dissolution rate, which leads to a finite life time of the bonds and behavior similar to physical gels. This interpretation is also compatible with the logarithmic time dependence of the storage modulus. The frequency dependence was more pronounced for lower water concentrations, higher temperatures and shorter reaction times. With two relaxation models (the modified Cole-Cole model and the empirical Baumgaertel-Schausberger-Winter model) we deduced characteristic times from the experimental data. Both models approximately described the data and resulted in similar relaxation times.

  8. Frequency-dependent selection at rough expanding fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhr, Jan-Timm; Stark, Holger

    2015-10-01

    Microbial colonies are experimental model systems for studying the colonization of new territory by biological species through range expansion. We study a generalization of the two-species Eden model, which incorporates local frequency-dependent selection, in order to analyze how social interactions between two species influence surface roughness of growing microbial colonies. The model includes several classical scenarios from game theory. We then concentrate on an expanding public goods game, where either cooperators or defectors take over the front depending on the system parameters. We analyze in detail the critical behavior of the nonequilibrium phase transition between global cooperation and defection and thereby identify a new universality class of phase transitions dealing with absorbing states. At the transition, the number of boundaries separating sectors decays with a novel power law in time and their superdiffusive motion crosses over from Eden scaling to a nearly ballistic regime. In parallel, the width of the front initially obeys Eden roughening and, at later times, passes over to selective roughening.

  9. Frequency-dependent acoustic properties of gassy marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, Angus I.; Tuffin, Michael D. J.; Dix, Justin K.; Bull, Jonathan M.

    2003-10-01

    Acoustic velocity and attenuation were measured during two in-situ experiments in gassy intertidal muds in Southampton Water, United Kingdom. The horizontal transmission results gave frequency-independent velocity (1431 m/s) and attenuation (4 dB/m) over the frequency range 600 to 3000 Hz, representative of the soft (non-gassy) muds shallower than about 1 m. The results from a vertical transmission experiment straddling the top of the gassy zone (about 1 m depth) showed strong frequency-dependent velocity and attenuation over 600 to 3000 Hz. They showed velocity and attenuation maxima predicted by the Anderson and Hampton model, associated with gas bubble resonance. Moreover, attenuation maxima shifted in frequency with water depth over a tidal cycle that was monitored, suggesting variations in gas bubble size with hydrostatic pressure. X-ray CT images on a sealed core from the site revealed vertically-aligned, centimeter-scale, gas-filled cracks in the muddy sediments. Ultrasonic (300 to 700 kHz) velocities and attenuations were higher in the gassy zone than in the nongassy parts of the core. Overall, the results give a fascinating insight into the acoustical behavior of gassy sediments that could be used to extract sediment physical properties information from seabed acoustic reflection data. [Work supported by NERC].

  10. Frequency-dependent energy harvesting via magnetic shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayyaadi, Hassan; Askari Farsangi, Mohammad Amin

    2015-11-01

    This paper is focused on presenting an accurate framework to describe frequency-dependent energy harvesting via magnetic shape memory alloys (MSMAs). Modeling strategy incorporates the phenomenological constitutive model developed formerly together with the magnetic diffusion equation. A hyperbolic hardening function is employed to define reorientation-induced strain hardening in the material, and the diffusion equation is used to add dynamic effects to the model. The MSMA prismatic specimen is surrounded by a pickup coil, and the induced voltage during martensite-variant reorientation is investigated with the help of Faraday’s law of magnetic field induction. It has been shown that, in order to harvest the maximum RMS voltage in the MSMA-based energy harvester, an optimum value of bias magnetic field exists, which is the corresponding magnetic field for the start of pseudoelasticity behavior. In addition, to achieve a more compact energy harvester with higher energy density, a specimen with a lower aspect ratio can be chosen. As the main novelty of the paper, it is found that the dynamic effects play a major role in determining the harvested voltage and power, especially for high excitation frequency or specimen thickness.

  11. DFT + U (ω) : Frequency-dependent Hubbard U correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Regan, David D.; Marzari, Nicola

    In contemporary first-principles atomistic simulation based on DFT, the augmentation of approximate exchange-correlation functionals with spatially or energetically localized corrections, such as DFT + U , is a successful approach for improving its applicability to strongly interacting systems. Electronic screening is a dynamical process, and since the Hubbard U parameter, in particular, is a measure of the screened Coulomb interaction, its frequency-dependent generalisation for the dynamical regime is possible. We introduce a conceptually pragmatic and computationally straightforward method, named DFT + U (ω) , for calculating and incorporating strong dynamical screening effects in spectroscopic calculations based on Kohn-Sham DFT. Our method is designed to be a minimal dynamical extension of DFT + U , one in which computing approximate dynamical Hubbard U functions only requires functionality that is widely available. We demonstrate our effective plasmon fitting and self-energy approximation scheme for DFT + U (ω) , which enables the resulting low-energy dynamical model to be solved at the G0W0 level, and beyond, efficiently and effectively.

  12. Inverse characterisation of frequency-dependent properties of adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouleau, Lucie; Deü, Jean-François; Legay, Antoine

    2016-09-01

    Traditional damping treatments are usually applied to the vibrating structure by means of adhesive layers. Environmental parameters, such as frequencies of excitation, may influence the behaviour of the bonding layer and modify the damping efficiency of the treatment. Therefore it is desired to take into account the viscoelastic behaviour of the adhesive layer in the finite element model. The goal of this work is to present a procedure to characterise and model the adhesive layer. To that purpose, an experimental-numerical method for inverse characterisation of the frequency dependent properties of the adhesive layer is applied. The proposed inverse approach is based on a four-parameter fractional derivative model whose parameters are identified by minimising the difference between the simulated and the measured dynamic response of a multi-layered structure assembled by bonding. In the finite element model used for the optimisation, the adhesive layer is modelled by interface finite elements. The influence of the adhesive layer on the efficiency of a damping treatment is evidenced by performing dynamic testing on a sandwich structure with a viscoelastic core, assembled by bonding. The proposed approach is applied to the characterisation of a pressure-sensitive adhesive.

  13. Advanced Reservoir Imaging Using Frequency-Dependent Seismic Attributes

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Hilterman; Tad Patzek; Gennady Goloshubin; Dmitriy Silin; Charlotte Sullivan; Valeri Korneev

    2007-12-31

    Our report concerning advanced imaging and interpretation technology includes the development of theory, the implementation of laboratory experiments and the verification of results using field data. We investigated a reflectivity model for porous fluid-saturated reservoirs and demonstrated that the frequency-dependent component of the reflection coefficient is asymptotically proportional to the reservoir fluid mobility. We also analyzed seismic data using different azimuths and offsets over physical models of fractures filled with air and water. By comparing our physical model synthetics to numerical data we have identified several diagnostic indicators for quantifying the fractures. Finally, we developed reflectivity transforms for predicting pore fluid and lithology using rock-property statistics from 500 reservoirs in both the shelf and deep-water Gulf of Mexico. With these transforms and seismic AVO gathers across the prospect and its down-dip water-equivalent reservoir, fluid saturation can be estimated without a calibration well that ties the seismic. Our research provides the important additional mechanisms to recognize, delineate, and validate new hydrocarbon reserves and assist in the development of producing fields.

  14. Embedded Optical Fiber Ice Stress Gauge. Phase 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-01

    20 nm. This resolution level could be improved using an optical interferometer , however, the complexity and cost of such a system would be much higher...the distance changes. the collection fiber transmits more or less light depending on the angle of entenng rays of light with respect to the numerical...decays exponentially with distance . The rays drop below the critical angle and transfer into the cladding. This is caused by the action of an external

  15. Yeh-Stratton Criterion for Stress Concentrations on Fiber-Reinforced Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Hsien-Yang; Richards, W. Lance

    1996-01-01

    This study investigated the Yeh-Stratton Failure Criterion with the stress concentrations on fiber-reinforced composites materials under tensile stresses. The Yeh-Stratton Failure Criterion was developed from the initial yielding of materials based on macromechanics. To investigate this criterion, the influence of the materials anisotropic properties and far field loading on the composite materials with central hole and normal crack were studied. Special emphasis was placed on defining the crack tip stress fields and their applications. The study of Yeh-Stratton criterion for damage zone stress fields on fiber-reinforced composites under tensile loading was compared with several fracture criteria; Tsai-Wu Theory, Hoffman Theory, Fischer Theory, and Cowin Theory. Theoretical predictions from these criteria are examined using experimental results.

  16. Microsurgery-aided in-situ force probing reveals extensibility and viscoelastic properties of individual stress fibers

    PubMed Central

    Labouesse, Céline; Gabella, Chiara; Meister, Jean-Jacques; Vianay, Benoît; Verkhovsky, Alexander B.

    2016-01-01

    Actin-myosin filament bundles (stress fibers) are critical for tension generation and cell shape, but their mechanical properties are difficult to access. Here we propose a novel approach to probe individual peripheral stress fibers in living cells through a microsurgically generated opening in the cytoplasm. By applying large deformations with a soft cantilever we were able to fully characterize the mechanical response of the fibers and evaluate their tension, extensibility, elastic and viscous properties. PMID:27025817

  17. The Effect of Void Shape and Volume Fraction of Fibers on the Stress Distribution in a Laminated Composite Plate with Triangular Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robati, H.; Haghparast, A.; Shishesaz, M.; Attarroshan, P.

    2014-05-01

    The effect of void shape and volume fraction of fibers on the distribution of stresses in a laminated composite plate subjected to a tensile load applied in the fiber direction is investigated. The cross section of all fibers is triangular. The void can simulate an internal crack or a cylindrical hole. The shear-lag model is used to derive the field equations. By using proper boundary and bonding conditions, complete load and displacement fields in the laminate are determined. The effects of physical parameters of fibers and of void shape and its location on stress concentrations and peak shear stresses in the laminate are studied. The analytical results for stress concentration factors are compared with those given by the finite-element method, and a close agreement between them is found to exist.

  18. Protein expression changes during cotton fiber elongation in response to drought stress and recovery.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Mi; Meng, Yali; Yang, Changqin; Zhou, Zhiguo; Wang, Youhua; Chen, Binglin

    2014-08-01

    An investigation to better understand the molecular mechanism of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) fiber elongation in response to drought stress and recovery was conducted using a comparative proteomics analysis. Cotton plants (cv. NuCOTN 33B) were subjected to water deprivation for 10 days followed by a recovery period (with watering) of 5 days. The temporal changes in total proteins in cotton fibers were examined using 2DE. The results revealed that 163 proteins are significantly drought responsive. MS analysis led to the identification of 132 differentially expressed proteins that include some known as well as some novel drought-responsive proteins. These drought responsive fiber proteins in NuCOTN 33B are associated with a variety of cellular functions, i.e. signal transduction, protein processing, redox homeostasis, cell wall modification, metabolisms of carbon, energy, lipid, lignin, and flavonoid. The results suggest that the enhancement of the perception of drought stress, a new balance of the metabolism of the biosynthesis of cell wall components and cytoskeleton homeostasis plays an important role in the response of cotton fibers to drought stress. Overall, the current study provides an overview of the molecular mechanism of drought response in cotton fiber cells.

  19. Unmyelinated visceral afferents exhibit frequency dependent action potential broadening while myelinated visceral afferents do not.

    PubMed

    Li, Bai-Yan; Feng, Bin; Tsu, Hwa Y; Schild, John H

    2007-06-21

    Sensory information arising from visceral organ systems is encoded into action potential trains that propagate along afferent fibers to target nuclei in the central nervous system. These information streams range from tight patterns of action potentials that are well synchronized with the sensory transduction event to irregular, patternless discharge with no clear correlation to the sensory input. In general terms these afferent pathways can be divided into unmyelinated and myelinated fiber types. Our laboratory has a long standing interest in the functional differences between these two types of afferents in terms of the preprocessing of sensory information into action potential trains (synchrony, frequency, duration, etc.), the reflexogenic consequences of this sensory input to the central nervous system and the ionic channels that give rise to the electrophysiological properties of these unique cell types. The aim of this study was to determine whether there were any functional differences in the somatic action potential characteristics of unmyelinated and myelinated vagal afferents in response to different rates of sensory nerve stimulation. Our results showed that activity and frequency-dependent widening of the somatic action potential was quite prominent in unmyelinated but not myelinated vagal afferents. Spike broadening often leads to increased influx of Ca(2+) ions that has been associated with a diverse range of modulatory mechanisms both at the cell body and central synaptic terminations (e.g. increased neurotransmitter release.) We conclude that our observations are indicative of fundamentally different mechanisms for neural integration of sensory information arising from unmyelinated and myelinated vagal afferents.

  20. Characterization of bovine cartilage by fiber Bragg grating-based stress relaxation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baier, V.; Marchi, G.; Foehr, P.; Burgkart, R.; Roths, J.

    2017-04-01

    A fiber-based device for testing mechanical properties of cartilage is presented within this study. The measurement principle is based on stepwise indentation into the tissue and observing of corresponding relaxation of the stress. The indenter tip is constituted of a cleaved optical fiber that includes a fiber Bragg grating which is used as the force sensor. Stress relaxation measurements at 25 different positions on a healthy bovine cartilage sample were performed to assess the behavior of healthy cartilage. For each indentation step a good agreement was found with a viscoelastic model that included two time constants. The model parameters showed low variability and a clear dependence with indentation depth. The parameters can be used as reference values for discriminating healthy and degenerated cartilage.

  1. Interplay between Solo and keratin filaments is crucial for mechanical force–induced stress fiber reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Sachiko; Ohashi, Kazumasa; Mashiko, Toshiya; Kondo, Hiroshi; Mizuno, Kensaku

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical force–induced cytoskeletal reorganization is essential for cell and tissue remodeling and homeostasis; however, the underlying cellular mechanisms remain elusive. Solo (ARHGEF40) is a RhoA-targeting guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) involved in cyclical stretch–induced human endothelial cell reorientation and convergent extension cell movement in zebrafish gastrula. In this study, we show that Solo binds to keratin-8/keratin-18 (K8/K18) intermediate filaments through multiple sites. Solo overexpression promotes the formation of thick actin stress fibers and keratin bundles, whereas knockdown of Solo, expression of a GEF-inactive mutant of Solo, or inhibition of ROCK suppresses stress fiber formation and leads to disorganized keratin networks, indicating that the Solo-RhoA-ROCK pathway serves to precisely organize keratin networks, as well as to promote stress fibers. Of importance, knockdown of Solo or K18 or overexpression of GEF-inactive or deletion mutants of Solo suppresses tensile force–induced stress fiber reinforcement. Furthermore, knockdown of Solo or K18 suppresses tensile force-induced RhoA activation. These results strongly suggest that the interplay between Solo and K8/K18 filaments plays a crucial role in tensile force–induced RhoA activation and consequent actin cytoskeletal reinforcement. PMID:26823019

  2. A model for cell density effect on stress fiber alignment and collective directional migration.

    PubMed

    Abeddoust, Mohammad; Shamloo, Amir

    2015-12-31

    In this study, numerical simulation of collective cell migration is presented in order to mimic the group migration of endothelial cells subjected to the concentration gradients of a biochemical factor. The developed 2D model incorporates basic elements of the cell, including both the cell membrane and the cell cytoskeleton, based on a viscoelastic cell mechanic model. Various cell processes--including cell random walk, cell-cell interactions, cell chemotaxis, and cellular cytoskeleton rearrangements--are considered and analyzed in our developed model. After validating the model by using available experimental data, the model is used to investigate various important parameters during collective cell chemotaxis, such as cell density, cytoskeleton organization, stress fiber reorientations, and intracellular forces. The results suggest that increasing the cell density causes the cell-cell interactions to affect the orientation of stress fibers throughout the cytoskeleton and makes the stress fibers more aligned in the direction of the imposed concentration gradient. This improved alignment of the stress fibers correlates with the intensification of the intracellular forces transferred in the gradient direction; this improves the cell group migration. Comparison of the obtained results with available experimental observations of collective chemotaxis of endothelial cells shows an interesting agreement.

  3. A model for cell density effect on stress fiber alignment and collective directional migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeddoust, Mohammad; Shamloo, Amir

    2015-12-01

    In this study, numerical simulation of collective cell migration is presented in order to mimic the group migration of endothelial cells subjected to the concentration gradients of a biochemical factor. The developed 2D model incorporates basic elements of the cell, including both the cell membrane and the cell cytoskeleton, based on a viscoelastic cell mechanic model. Various cell processes—including cell random walk, cell-cell interactions, cell chemotaxis, and cellular cytoskeleton rearrangements—are considered and analyzed in our developed model. After validating the model by using available experimental data, the model is used to investigate various important parameters during collective cell chemotaxis, such as cell density, cytoskeleton organization, stress fiber reorientations, and intracellular forces. The results suggest that increasing the cell density causes the cell-cell interactions to affect the orientation of stress fibers throughout the cytoskeleton and makes the stress fibers more aligned in the direction of the imposed concentration gradient. This improved alignment of the stress fibers correlates with the intensification of the intracellular forces transferred in the gradient direction; this improves the cell group migration. Comparison of the obtained results with available experimental observations of collective chemotaxis of endothelial cells shows an interesting agreement.

  4. Temperature-independent evanescent wave sensor made of a stress-released silica optical fiber taper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yongxi; Li, Yingguang; Li, Nanya

    2017-07-01

    Based on a cyclic heating-cooling treatment method, a temperature-independent silica optical fiber evanescent wave sensor is proposed. The cyclic heating-cooling treatment process could significantly release the residual stresses in the taper, achieving a high measurement accuracy in the temperature range of 20-200 °C. After the treatment, the relative light intensity

  5. A Modular Fibrinogen Model that Captures the Stress-Strain Behavior of Fibrin Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Averett, Rodney D.; Menn, Bryant; Lee, Eric H.; Helms, Christine C.; Barker, Thomas; Guthold, Martin

    2012-01-01

    We tested what to our knowledge is a new computational model for fibrin fiber mechanical behavior. The model is composed of three distinct elements: the folded fibrinogen core as seen in the crystal structure, the unstructured α-C connector, and the partially folded α-C domain. Previous studies have highlighted the importance of all three regions and how they may contribute to fibrin fiber stress-strain behavior. Yet no molecular model has been computationally tested that takes into account the individual contributions of all these regions. Constant velocity, steered molecular dynamics studies at 0.025 Å/ps were conducted on the folded fibrinogen core and the α-C domain to determine their force-displacement behavior. A wormlike chain model with a persistence length of 0.8 nm (Kuhn length = 1.6 nm) was used to model the mechanical behavior of the unfolded α-C connector. The three components were combined to calculate the total stress-strain response, which was then compared to experimental data. The results show that the three-component model successfully captures the experimentally determined stress-strain behavior of fibrin fibers. The model evinces the key contribution of the α-C domains to fibrin fiber stress-strain behavior. However, conversion of the α-helical coiled coils to β-strands, and partial unfolding of the protein, may also contribute. PMID:23062346

  6. A modular fibrinogen model that captures the stress-strain behavior of fibrin fibers.

    PubMed

    Averett, Rodney D; Menn, Bryant; Lee, Eric H; Helms, Christine C; Barker, Thomas; Guthold, Martin

    2012-10-03

    We tested what to our knowledge is a new computational model for fibrin fiber mechanical behavior. The model is composed of three distinct elements: the folded fibrinogen core as seen in the crystal structure, the unstructured α-C connector, and the partially folded α-C domain. Previous studies have highlighted the importance of all three regions and how they may contribute to fibrin fiber stress-strain behavior. Yet no molecular model has been computationally tested that takes into account the individual contributions of all these regions. Constant velocity, steered molecular dynamics studies at 0.025 Å/ps were conducted on the folded fibrinogen core and the α-C domain to determine their force-displacement behavior. A wormlike chain model with a persistence length of 0.8 nm (Kuhn length = 1.6 nm) was used to model the mechanical behavior of the unfolded α-C connector. The three components were combined to calculate the total stress-strain response, which was then compared to experimental data. The results show that the three-component model successfully captures the experimentally determined stress-strain behavior of fibrin fibers. The model evinces the key contribution of the α-C domains to fibrin fiber stress-strain behavior. However, conversion of the α-helical coiled coils to β-strands, and partial unfolding of the protein, may also contribute. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Stress-Corrosion Cracking of Silicon Carbide Fiber/Silicon Carbide Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Russell H.; Henager, Charles H.; Lewinsohn, Charles A.; Windisch, Charles F.

    2000-08-01

    Ceramic matrix composites are being developed to operate at elevated temperatures and in oxidizing environments. Considerable improvements are being made in the creep resistance of SiC fibers and hence in the high-temperature properties of SiCf/SiC composites; however, more needs to be known about the stability of these materials in oxidizing environments before they will be widely accepted. Experimental weight change (1,2) and crack growth data (3,4) supports the conclusion that O2 enhanced crack growth of SiCf/SiC occurs by more than one mechanism depending on the experimental conditions. This data suggests an oxidation embrittlement mechanism (OEM) at temperatures below 1373?K and high O2 pressures and an interphase removal mechanism (IRM) at temperatures of about 700?K and above and low O2 pressures. The OEM, as proposed by Evans et al. (3), results from the reaction of O2 with SiC to form a glass layer on the fiber or within the fiber-matrix interphase region. The fracture stress of the fiber is reduced if this layer is thicker than a critical value (d>dc) and the temperature is below a critical value (Tstress that is carried by the bridging fibers. Interphase removal contributes to subcritical crack growth by decreasing the fiber bridging stresses and, hence, increasing the crack tip stress. IRM occurs over a wide range of temperatures for dTg for d>dc. This paper summarizes the evidence for the existence of these two mechanisms and attempts to define the conditions for their operation.

  8. Voltage and frequency dependence of prestin-associated charge transfer

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Sean X.; Farrell, Brenda; Chana, Matthew S.; Oster, George; Brownell, William E.; Spector, Alexander A.

    2009-01-01

    Membrane protein prestin is a critical component of the motor complex that generates forces and dimensional changes in cells in response to changes in the cell membrane potential. In its native cochlear outer hair cell, prestin is crucial to the amplification and frequency selectivity of the mammalian ear up to frequencies of tens of kHz. Other cells transfected with prestin acquire voltage-dependent properties similar to those of the native cell. The protein performance is critically dependent on chloride ions, and intrinsic protein charges also play a role. We propose an electro-diffusion model to reveal the frequency and voltage dependence of electric charge transfer by prestin. The movement of the combined charge (i.e., anion and protein charges) across the membrane is described with a Fokker-Planck equation coupled to a kinetic equation that describes the binding of chloride ions to prestin. We found a voltage-and frequency-dependent phase shift between the transferred charge and the applied electric field that determines capacitive and resistive components of the transferred charge. The phase shift monotonically decreases from zero to -90 degree as a function of frequency. The capacitive component as a function of voltage is bell-shaped, and decreases with frequency. The resistive component is bell-shaped for both voltage and frequency. The capacitive and resistive components are similar to experimental measurements of charge transfer at high frequencies. The revealed nature of the transferred charge can help reconcile the high-frequency electrical and mechanical observations associated with prestin, and it is important for further analysis of the structure and function of this protein. PMID:19490917

  9. Microseism frequency dependent body waves related to storms and icebergs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutzmann, E.; Meschede, M.; Farra, V.; Schimmel, M.; Ardhuin, F.

    2016-12-01

    The Earth's seismic wave field is mostly generated in the oceans as a result of ocean wave interactions. We analyze microseisms recorded by the Southern California Seismic Network using a beamforming approach on 3 component seismograms. In order to enhance the detection of phase coherent signals, we stack the beams using the phase weighted stack method in the frequency domain. We detect microseism P-waves at all periods between 3 and 10 s and we show that they are often visible only in narrow frequency bands. The largest number of detected P-waves corresponds to the period of 5 s. We also detect some Sv and even fewer Sh waves. We investigate the source locations by back projecting the beam maxima. Strong sources are located in the vicinity of storms. At 5 s period, sources are both pelagic and coastal in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans but at longer period, they are mostly coastal, around Greenland and along the South American western coast. Sources detected in the South Pacific Ocean are located close to icebergs and can be explained by the interaction of ocean waves arriving and being reflected at iceberg edges. We model body waves considering sources as pressure fluctuations close to the ocean surface. These sources generate acoustic P-waves that propagate in water down to the ocean bottom where they are partly reflected, and partly transmitted into the crust to continue their propagation through the Earth. We show that the body wave amplitude variation with frequency is the result of both the source frequency content and the frequency dependent site effect. We demonstrate that body wave modeling provides independent constraints on the ocean wave model and in particular can be used to determine the amount of sources generated by coastal reflection either at the coast or along icebergs.

  10. FREQUENCY-DEPENDENT DISPERSION MEASURES AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PULSAR TIMING

    SciTech Connect

    Cordes, J. M.; Shannon, R. M.; Stinebring, D. R. E-mail: ryan.shannon@csiro.au

    2016-01-20

    The dispersion measure (DM), the column density of free electrons to a pulsar, is shown to be frequency dependent because of multipath scattering from small-scale electron-density fluctuations. DMs vary between propagation paths whose transverse extent varies strongly with frequency, yielding arrival times that deviate from the high-frequency scaling expected for a cold, uniform, unmagnetized plasma (1/frequency{sup 2}). Scaling laws for thin phase screens are verified with simulations; extended media are also analyzed. The rms DM difference across an octave band near 1.5 GHz is ∼ 4 × 10{sup −5} pc cm{sup −3} for pulsars at ∼1 kpc distance. The corresponding arrival-time variations are a few to hundreds of nanoseconds for DM ≲ 30 pc cm{sup −3} but increase rapidly to microseconds or more for larger DMs and wider frequency ranges. Chromatic DMs introduce correlated noise into timing residuals with a power spectrum of “low pass” form. The correlation time is roughly the geometric mean of the refraction times for the highest and lowest radio frequencies used, ranging from days to years, depending on the pulsar. We discuss implications for methodologies that use large frequency separations or wide bandwidth receivers for timing measurements. Chromatic DMs are partially mitigable by including an additional chromatic term in arrival time models. Without mitigation, an additional term in the noise model for pulsar timing is implied. In combination with measurement errors from radiometer noise, an arbitrarily large increase in total frequency range (or bandwidth) will yield diminishing benefits and may be detrimental to overall timing precision.

  11. Seismic noise frequency dependent P and S wave sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutzmann, E.; Schimmel, M.; Gualtieri, L.; Farra, V.; Ardhuin, F.

    2013-12-01

    Seismic noise in the period band 3-10 sec is generated in the oceans by the interaction of ocean waves. Noise signal is dominated by Rayleigh waves but body waves can be extracted using a beamforming approach. We select the TAPAS array deployed in South Spain between June 2008 and September 2009 and we use the vertical and horizontal components to extract noise P and S waves, respectively. Data are filtered in narrow frequency bands and we select beam azimuths and slownesses that correspond to the largest continuous sources per day. Our procedure automatically discard earthquakes which are localized during short time durations. Using this approach, we detect many more noise P-waves than S-waves. Source locations are determined by back-projecting the detected slowness/azimuth. P and S waves are generated in nearby areas and both source locations are frequency dependent. Long period sources are dominantly in the South Atlantic and Indian Ocean whereas shorter period sources are rather in the North Atlantic Ocean. We further show that the detected S-waves are dominantly Sv-waves. We model the observed body waves using an ocean wave model that takes into account all possible wave interactions including coastal reflection. We use the wave model to separate direct and multiply reflected phases for P and S waves respectively. We show that in the South Atlantic the complex source pattern can be explained by the existence of both coastal and pelagic sources whereas in the North Atlantic most body wave sources are pelagic. For each detected source, we determine the equivalent source magnitude which is compared to the model.

  12. Frequency-dependent selection and the evolution of assortative mating.

    PubMed

    Otto, Sarah P; Servedio, Maria R; Nuismer, Scott L

    2008-08-01

    A long-standing goal in evolutionary biology is to identify the conditions that promote the evolution of reproductive isolation and speciation. The factors promoting sympatric speciation have been of particular interest, both because it is notoriously difficult to prove empirically and because theoretical models have generated conflicting results, depending on the assumptions made. Here, we analyze the conditions under which selection favors the evolution of assortative mating, thereby reducing gene flow between sympatric groups, using a general model of selection, which allows fitness to be frequency dependent. Our analytical results are based on a two-locus diploid model, with one locus altering the trait under selection and the other locus controlling the strength of assortment (a "one-allele" model). Examining both equilibrium and nonequilibrium scenarios, we demonstrate that whenever heterozygotes are less fit, on average, than homozygotes at the trait locus, indirect selection for assortative mating is generated. While costs of assortative mating hinder the evolution of reproductive isolation, they do not prevent it unless they are sufficiently great. Assortative mating that arises because individuals mate within groups (formed in time or space) is most conducive to the evolution of complete assortative mating from random mating. Assortative mating based on female preferences is more restrictive, because the resulting sexual selection can lead to loss of the trait polymorphism and cause the relative fitness of heterozygotes to rise above homozygotes, eliminating the force favoring assortment. When assortative mating is already prevalent, however, sexual selection can itself cause low heterozygous fitness, promoting the evolution of complete reproductive isolation (akin to "reinforcement") regardless of the form of natural selection.

  13. Frequency-dependent Dispersion Measures and Implications for Pulsar Timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, J. M.; Shannon, R. M.; Stinebring, D. R.

    2016-01-01

    The dispersion measure (DM), the column density of free electrons to a pulsar, is shown to be frequency dependent because of multipath scattering from small-scale electron-density fluctuations. DMs vary between propagation paths whose transverse extent varies strongly with frequency, yielding arrival times that deviate from the high-frequency scaling expected for a cold, uniform, unmagnetized plasma (1/frequency2). Scaling laws for thin phase screens are verified with simulations; extended media are also analyzed. The rms DM difference across an octave band near 1.5 GHz is ˜ 4 × 10-5 pc cm-3 for pulsars at ˜1 kpc distance. The corresponding arrival-time variations are a few to hundreds of nanoseconds for DM ≲ 30 pc cm-3 but increase rapidly to microseconds or more for larger DMs and wider frequency ranges. Chromatic DMs introduce correlated noise into timing residuals with a power spectrum of “low pass” form. The correlation time is roughly the geometric mean of the refraction times for the highest and lowest radio frequencies used, ranging from days to years, depending on the pulsar. We discuss implications for methodologies that use large frequency separations or wide bandwidth receivers for timing measurements. Chromatic DMs are partially mitigable by including an additional chromatic term in arrival time models. Without mitigation, an additional term in the noise model for pulsar timing is implied. In combination with measurement errors from radiometer noise, an arbitrarily large increase in total frequency range (or bandwidth) will yield diminishing benefits and may be detrimental to overall timing precision.

  14. Fracture strength and stress distributions of pulpless premolars restored with fiber posts.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Yu; Huang, Shih-Hao; Takeda, Yuko; Fok, Alex; Hayashi, Mikako

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effect of glass fiber posts on increasing the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth. Extracted upper premolars with two canals in a root were divided into three groups according to the number of posts they were restored with: none, one, or two. All teeth were endodontically treated, crown-sectioned, and restored with a composite core and a metallic crown. A static oblique load was applied to the restored tooth until fracture, and the fracture pattern was recorded. Stress distributions were examined by finite element analysis (FEA). Teeth with glass fiber post(s) showed significantly higher fracture loads compared with those without posts. In the premolars without posts, von Mises and maximum principal stresses were found on the root surface alone; in premolars restored with posts, stresses were distributed on both root and post surfaces. Risk of root dentin fracture was significantly lowest in teeth restored with two posts.

  15. On the Causes of Frequency-Dependent Apparent Seismological Q

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, Igor B.

    2010-10-01

    Variability of the Earth’s structure makes a first-order impact on attenuation measurements which often does not receive adequate attention. Geometrical spreading (GS) can be used as a simple measure of the effects of such structure. The traditional simplified GS compensation is insufficiently accurate for attenuation measurements, and the residual GS appears as biases in both Q 0 and η parameters in the frequency-dependent attenuation law Q( f) = Q 0 f η . A new interpretation approach bypassing Q( f) and using the attenuation coefficient χ( f) = γ + πf/ Q e( f) resolves this problem by directly measuring the residual GS, denoted γ, and effective attenuation, Q e. The approach is illustrated by re-interpreting several published datasets, including nuclear-explosion and local-earthquake codas, Pn, and synthetic 50-300-s surface waves. Some of these examples were key to establishing the Q( f) concept. In all examples considered, χ( f) shows a linear dependence on the frequency, γ ≠ 0, and Q e can be considered frequency-independent. Short-period crustal body waves are characterized by positive γ SP values of (0.6-2.0) × 10-2 s-1 interpreted as related to the downward upper-crustal reflectivity. Long-period surface waves show negative γ LP ≈ -1.9 × 10-5 s-1, which could be caused by insufficient modeling accuracy at long periods. The above γ values also provide a simple explanation for the absorption band observed within the Earth. The band is interpreted as apparent and formed by levels of Q e ≈ 1,100 within the crust decreasing to Q e ≈ 120 within the uppermost mantle, with frequencies of its flanks corresponding to γ LP and γ SP. Therefore, the observed absorption band could be purely geometrical in nature, and relaxation or scattering models may not be necessary for explaining the observed apparent Q( f). Linearity of the attenuation coefficient suggests that at all periods, the attenuation of both Rayleigh and Love waves should be

  16. Analysis of frequency dependent attenuation in shallow water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dediu, Simona M.

    This thesis is motivated by the experiments conducted near the site of AMCOR Borehole 6010 on the New Jersey Continental Shelf in 1988 and 1993. A major objective of these experiments was the evaluation of propagation predictability in sandy shallow water environments. In this thesis we use a non-linear frequency dependence of the sediment volume attenuation to determine estimates for the site specific surficial attenuation coefficient and the power-law exponent in the uppermost sediment layer. Previous studies in the literature determined that a site specific frequency power exponent of 1.5, relative to a reference frequency of 50 Hz over the frequency interval 50-1000 Hz, provided the best comparison with the measurements. In our approach we use 1 kHz as an attenuation reference frequency and employ different parameter ranges and optimization criteria. A metric of transmission loss variation with range is an effective attenuation coefficient (EAC) that can be extracted from the range and depth averaged transmission loss, both for measurements and for calculated data with the parabolic equation. Once we have determined the EAC for both measured and calculated data, preliminary parameter ranges are found based on a normalized standard deviation analysis. Then we fit measured-computed EAC pairs by the least square fit (LS). If the agreement were perfect, then the slope of the straight line fit through all the points given by the measured-computed pairs would be one. Finally, the frequency exponent in the power-law dependance is allowed to vary until agreement between measured and calculated EACs is achieved within acceptable bounds and the hypothesis that the LS slope is one is tested. For 400-1000 Hz, this procedure leads to a power exponent, in the range 1.7-2.0, which is consistent with other sand-silt regions. The estimates are robust with respect to variations in the water and sediment sound-speed profiles and the sediment layer thickness. The influence of

  17. Smart carbon nanotube/fiber and PVA fiber-reinforced composites for stress sensing and chloride ion detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoheneder, Joshua

    Fiber reinforced composites (FRC) with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fibers and carbon nanofibers (CNF) had an excellent flexural strength in excess of 18.5 MPa compared to reference samples of 15.8 MPa. It was found that the developed, depending on applied stress and exposure to chloride solutions, composites exhibit some electrical conductivity, from 4.20×10 -4 (Ω-1m-1 to 4.13×10 -4 Ω-1m-1. These dependences can be characterized by piezioresistive and chemoresistive coefficients demonstrating that the material possesses self-sensing capabilities. The sensitivity to stain and chloride solutions can be enhanced by incorporating small amounts of carbon nanofibers (CNF) or carbon nanotube (CNT) into composite structure. Conducted research has demonstrated a strong dependency of electrical properties of composite on crack formation in moist environments. The developed procedure is scalable for industrial application in concrete structures that require nondestructive stress monitoring, integrity under high service loads and stability in harsh environments.

  18. Cotton proteomics for deciphering the mechanism of environment stress response and fiber development.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Meiliang; Sun, Guoqing; Sun, Zhanmin; Tang, Yixiong; Wu, Yanmin

    2014-06-13

    Cotton fiber is considered as the backbone of the textile industry. The productivity of cotton crop is severely hampered by the occurrence of pathogens, pests, and various environmental factors. Nevertheless, cotton plant has developed sophisticated mechanisms to respond to environment stresses to avoid detrimental effects on its growth and development. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms of cotton fiber development and environment stress response is of considerable interest for designing agriculture breeding strategies to ensure sustainable productivity. The application of proteomics technologies to advance our knowledge in cotton fiber development and abiotic/biotic stress tolerance has increased dramatically in the last 5years as evidenced by the large amount of publications in this area. This review summarizes the work which has been reported for cotton proteomics and evaluates the findings in context of the approaches that are widely employed with the aim to generate novel insight useful for cotton improvement. Cotton (Gossypium spp.) is considered as the foremost commercially important fiber crop grown all over the world and is deemed as the backbone of the textile industry. Cotton is also an important source of edible oil seed and a nutrient-rich food crop as cottonseed contains high-quality protein and oil. The growth and productivity of cotton crop are often hampered by various biotic stress factors, such as insect pests and pathogens. In addition, cotton plants are frequently subjected to unavoidable environmental factors that cause abiotic stress, such as salt, heat and drought. Proteomic techniques provide one of the best options for understanding the gene function and phenotypic changes during cotton fiber development and stress response. This review first summarizes the work which has been reported for cotton proteomics about cotton fiber development and abiotic/biotic stress tolerance, and also evaluates the findings in context of the approaches

  19. Intermediate Temperature Stress Rupture of Woven SiC Fiber, BN Interphase, SiC Matrix Composites in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Levine, Stanley (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Tensile stress-rupture experiments were performed on woven Hi-Nicalon reinforced SiC matrix composites with BN interphases in air. Modal acoustic emission (AE) was used to monitor the damage accumulation in the composites during the tests and microstructural analysis was performed to determine the amount of matrix cracking that occurred for each sample. Fiber fractograph), was also performed for individual fiber failures at the specimen fracture surface to determine the strengths at which fibers failed. The rupture strengths were significantly worse than what would have been expected front the inherent degradation of the fibers themselves when subjected to similar rupture conditions. At higher applied stresses the rate of rupture "?as larger than at lower applied stresses. It was observed that the change in rupture rate corresponded to the onset of through-thickness cracking in the composites themselves. The primary cause of the sen,ere degradation was the ease with which fibers would bond to one another at their closest separation distances, less than 100 nanometers, when exposed to the environment. The near fiber-to-fiber contact in the woven tows enabled premature fiber failure over large areas of matrix cracks due to the stress-concentrations created b), fibers bonded to one another after one or a few fibers fail. i.e. the loss of global load sharing. An@, improvement in fiber-to-fiber separation of this composite system should result in improved stress- rupture properties. A model was den,eloped in order to predict the rupture life-time for these composites based on the probabilistic nature of indin,idual fiber failure at temperature. the matrix cracking state during the rupture test, and the rate of oxidation into a matrix crack. Also incorporated into the model were estimates of the stress-concentration that would occur between the outer rim of fibers in a load-bearing bundle and the unbridged region of a matrix crack after Xia et al. For the lower stresses

  20. Failure of a fiber composite lamina under three-dimensional stresses

    SciTech Connect

    DeTeresa, S J

    1999-08-31

    The efficient use of thick-section fiber composites requires a proven three-dimensional failure model. Numerous failure criteria have been proposed, but the lack of critical experimental results makes it difficult to assess the accuracy of these models. It is shown that the various predictions for failure of a lamina due to the simple state of uniaxial stress plus superposed hydrostatic pressure are disparate. These differences are sufficient to allow evaluation of failure criteria using data that has the normal scatter found for composite materials. A high-pressure test system for fiber composites is described and results for the effects of pressure on the transverse and longitudinal compression strengths of a carbon fiber/epoxy lamina are discussed. Results are compared with a few representative failure models.

  1. Correction of Frequency-Dependent Nonlinear Errors in Direct-Conversion Transceivers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-31

    Correction of Frequency-Dependent Nonlinear Errors in Direct-Conversion Transceivers Blake James & Caleb Fulton Advanced Radar Research Center...University of Oklahoma Norman, Oklahoma, USA, 73019 pyraminxrox@ou.edu, fulton@ou.edu Abstract: Correction of nonlinear and frequency dependent...frequency-dependent nonlinear distortion in modern highly digital phased arrays. The work presented here is done in the context of calibrating the

  2. Heat-Stress effects on the myosin heavy chain phenotype of rat soleus fibers during the early stages of regeneration.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Yasuharu; Roy, Roland R; Ogata, Tomonori; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2015-12-01

    We investigated heat-stress effects on the adult myosin heavy chain (MyHC) profile of soleus muscle fibers at an early stage of regeneration. Regenerating fibers in adult rats were analyzed 2, 4, or 6 days after bupivacaine injection. Rats were heat stressed by immersion in water (42 ± 1°C) for 30 minutes 24 hours after bupivacaine injection and every other day thereafter. No adult MyHC isoforms were observed after 2 days, whereas some fibers expressed only fast MyHC after 4 days. Heat stress increased fast and slow MyHC in regenerating fibers after 6 days. Regenerating fibers expressing only slow MyHC were observed only in heat-stressed muscles. Bupivacaine injection increased the number of Pax7(+) and MyoD(+) satellite cells in regenerating fibers, more so in heat-stressed rats. The results indicate that heat stress accelerates fast-to-slow MyHC phenotype conversion in regenerating fibers via activation of satellite cells. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Residual stresses in shape memory alloy fiber reinforced aluminium matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsz Loong, Tang; Jamian, Saifulnizan; Ismail, Al Emran; Nur, Nik Hisyammudin Muhd; Watanabe, Yoshimi

    2017-01-01

    Process-induced residual stress in shape memory alloy (SMA) fiber reinforced aluminum (Al) matrix composite was simulated by ANSYS APDL. The manufacturing process of the composite named as NiTi/Al is start with loading and unloading process of nickel titanium (NiTi) wire as SMA to generate a residual plastic strain. Then, this plastic deformed NiTi wire would be embedded into Al to become a composite. Lastly, the composite is heated form 289 K to 363 K and then cooled back to 300 K. Residual stress is generated in composite because of shape memory effect of NiTi and mismatch of thermal coefficient between NiTi wire and Al matrix of composite. ANSYS APDL has been used to simulate the distribution of residual stress and strain in this process. A sensitivity test has been done to determine the optimum number of nodes and elements used. Hence, the number of nodes and elements used are 15680 and 13680, respectively. Furthermore, the distribution of residual stress and strain of nickel fiber reinforced aluminium matrix composite (Ni/Al) and titanium fiber reinforced aluminium matrix composite (Ti/Al) under same simulation process also has been simulated by ANSYS APDL as comparison to NiTi/Al. The simulation results show that compressive residual stress is generated on Al matrix of Ni/Al, Ti/Al and NiTi/Al during heating and cooling process. Besides that, they also have similar trend of residual stress distribution but difference in term of value. For Ni/Al and Ti/Al, they are 0.4% difference on their maximum compressive residual stress at 363K. At same circumstance, NiTi/Al has higher residual stress value which is about 425% higher than Ni/Al and Ti/Al composite. This implies that shape memory effect of NiTi fiber reinforced in composite able to generated higher compressive residual stress in Al matrix, hence able to enhance tensile property of the composite.

  4. [Effects of linear alkylbenzenesulfonate on oxidative stress and collagen fiber in skin tissue of mice].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wenhong; Wang, Jinhua; Wang, Kailei; Zhang, Wen

    2015-06-01

    To observe the effect of linear alkylbenzenesulfonate (LAS) on oxidative stress and collagen fiber in skin tissue of mice and to explore the correlation between oxidative stress and collagen metabolism.
 Forty healthy Kunming mice (male) were randomly divided into 4 groups: a control group, a low-, middle- and high-dose group of LAS (LD, MD and HD groups), treated with LAS at 150, 300 and 600 mg/L respectively (n=10 per group). The skin on the back of mice was smeared with distilled water or different dosage of LAS for 60 days. The measured indexes included general condition of mice, HE and Masson staining of skin, the content of hydroxyproline (Hyp) in skin tissue, the activity of super oxidase dismutase (SOD) and the content of malondialdehyde (MDA) in skin tissue and serum, and the activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in serum.
 Compared with the control group, the changes of diet, daily activities and mental state of mice with different dose of LAS were not obvious during the experiment, but the body weight of mice in the experimental groups reduced obviously after 4 weeks of experiment (P<0.01), and their skin tissue was thinner, some of epidermis of skin contained areas with cellular necrosis and abscission. Superficial layer of dermis was infiltrated by inflammatory cells. The collagen fibers were looser and dimmer. At the same time, the content of MDA and the activity of LDH increased remarkably (P<0.01), while the activity of SOD and the content of Hyp decreased obviously (P<0.01).
 LAS can induce oxidative stress in the skin tissue of mice, which can destroy the integrity of skin structure and collagen fiber and reduce the content of collagen fiber. The oxidative damage might be the primary cause for disorders of collagen fiber.
.

  5. Neural tuning matches frequency-dependent time differences between the ears

    PubMed Central

    Benichoux, Victor; Fontaine, Bertrand; Franken, Tom P; Karino, Shotaro; Joris, Philip X; Brette, Romain

    2015-01-01

    The time it takes a sound to travel from source to ear differs between the ears and creates an interaural delay. It varies systematically with spatial direction and is generally modeled as a pure time delay, independent of frequency. In acoustical recordings, we found that interaural delay varies with frequency at a fine scale. In physiological recordings of midbrain neurons sensitive to interaural delay, we found that preferred delay also varies with sound frequency. Similar observations reported earlier were not incorporated in a functional framework. We find that the frequency dependence of acoustical and physiological interaural delays are matched in key respects. This suggests that binaural neurons are tuned to acoustical features of ecological environments, rather than to fixed interaural delays. Using recordings from the nerve and brainstem we show that this tuning may emerge from neurons detecting coincidences between input fibers that are mistuned in frequency. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06072.001 PMID:25915620

  6. Intensity and frequency dependence of laryngeal afferent inputs to respiratory hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Mifflin, S W

    1997-12-01

    Inspiratory hypoglossal motoneurons (IHMs) mediate contraction of the genioglossus muscle and contribute to the regulation of upper airway patency. Intracellular recordings were obtained from antidromically identified IHMs in anesthetized, vagotomized cats, and IHM responses to electrical activation of superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) afferent fibers at various frequencies and intensities were examined. SLN stimulus frequencies <2 Hz evoked an excitatory-inhibitory postsynaptic potential (EPSP-IPSP) sequence or only an IPSP in most IHMs that did not change in amplitude as the stimulus was maintained. During sustained stimulus frequencies of 5-10 Hz, there was a reduction in the amplitude of SLN-evoked IPSPs with time with variable changes in the EPSP. At stimulus frequencies >25 Hz, the amplitude of EPSPs and IPSPs was reduced over time. At a given stimulus frequency, increasing stimulus intensity enhanced the decay of the SLN-evoked postsynaptic potentials (PSPs). Frequency-dependent attenuation of SLN inputs to IHMs also occurred in newborn kittens. These results suggest that activation of SLN afferents evokes different PSP responses in IHMs depending on the stimulus frequency. At intermediate frequencies, inhibitory inputs are selectively filtered so that excitatory inputs predominate. At higher frequencies there was no discernible SLN-evoked PSP temporally locked to the SLN stimuli. Alterations in SLN-evoked PSPs could play a role in the coordination of genioglossal contraction during respiration, swallowing, and other complex motor acts where laryngeal afferents are activated.

  7. Fiber bundle models for stress release and energy bursts during granular shearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michlmayr, Gernot; Or, Dani; Cohen, Denis

    2012-12-01

    Fiber bundle models (FBMs) offer a versatile framework for representing transitions from progressive to abrupt failure in disordered material. We report a FBM-based description of mechanical interactions and associated energy bursts during shear deformation of granular materials. For strain-controlled shearing, where elements fail in a sequential order, we present analytical expressions for strain energy release and failure statistics. Results suggest that frequency-magnitude characteristics of fiber failure vary considerably throughout progressive shearing. Predicted failure distributions were in good agreement with experimentally observed shear stress fluctuations and associated bursts of acoustic emissions. Experiments also confirm a delayed release of acoustic emission energy relative to shear stress buildup, as anticipated by the model. Combined with data-rich acoustic emission measurements, the modified FBM offers highly resolved contact-scale insights into granular media dynamics of shearing processes.

  8. Polymer optical microstructured fiber with birefringence induced by stress-applying elements.

    PubMed

    Mergo, Pawel; Martynkien, Tadeusz; Urbanczyk, Waclaw

    2014-05-15

    We report on the fabrication of a birefringent microstructured PMMA fiber with polystyrene stress-applying elements located in the solid part of the cladding. A microstructured part of the cladding composed of three rings of holes was made of a technical-grade PMMA by a drilling method. The fiber shows a relatively high birefringence of the order of 4×10(-5), which weakly depends upon wavelength in the investigated spectral range from 0.6 to 1 μm. The cross talk between polarization modes is lower than -20  dB for a 1 m long fiber, while the fiber loss is about 8  dB/m at 0.83 μm. We also studied the fiber response to temperature in the range from 20°C to 60°C. The temperature induced birefringence change is negative and shows a significant hysteresis in the first cycle, which gradually disappears in successive cycles.

  9. Interplay between Solo and keratin filaments is crucial for mechanical force-induced stress fiber reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Sachiko; Ohashi, Kazumasa; Mashiko, Toshiya; Kondo, Hiroshi; Mizuno, Kensaku

    2016-03-15

    Mechanical force-induced cytoskeletal reorganization is essential for cell and tissue remodeling and homeostasis; however, the underlying cellular mechanisms remain elusive. Solo (ARHGEF40) is a RhoA-targeting guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) involved in cyclical stretch-induced human endothelial cell reorientation and convergent extension cell movement in zebrafish gastrula. In this study, we show that Solo binds to keratin-8/keratin-18 (K8/K18) intermediate filaments through multiple sites. Solo overexpression promotes the formation of thick actin stress fibers and keratin bundles, whereas knockdown of Solo, expression of a GEF-inactive mutant of Solo, or inhibition of ROCK suppresses stress fiber formation and leads to disorganized keratin networks, indicating that the Solo-RhoA-ROCK pathway serves to precisely organize keratin networks, as well as to promote stress fibers. Of importance, knockdown of Solo or K18 or overexpression of GEF-inactive or deletion mutants of Solo suppresses tensile force-induced stress fiber reinforcement. Furthermore, knockdown of Solo or K18 suppresses tensile force-induced RhoA activation. These results strongly suggest that the interplay between Solo and K8/K18 filaments plays a crucial role in tensile force-induced RhoA activation and consequent actin cytoskeletal reinforcement. © 2016 Fujiwara et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  10. Reduced contraction stress formation obtained by a two-step cementation procedure for fiber posts.

    PubMed

    Jongsma, Leontine A; Ir, Niek de Jager; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J; Feilzer, Albert J

    2011-07-01

    In a previous study, a 60% increase in push-out strength was obtained in vitro with a two-step cementation of fiber posts, a procedure equivalent to the layering technique of composite restorations. The aim of this study is to find the rationale for this increase in push-out strength with finite element analysis (FEA). FEA models were created of the push-out test set-up of fiber posts cemented according to a one-step and two-step procedure and of the complete root with post. The failure loads of glass-fiber posts cemented with RelyX Unicem as obtained in a previous study were used as the load in the push-out FEA models. For the complete root model, a load of 100N was used. The stresses due to the shrinkage of the cement layer and the applied load were determined for the one-step and two-step procedure of the push-out test specimens and for the one-step procedure of the complete root. Even though the load in the two-step push-out model was 60% higher compared to the one-step model, the combined stresses were comparable. The stresses due to shrinkage alone in the complete root approached or exceeded the bond strength of resin cements to dentin in the coronal and apical areas. FEA of this test set-up explains the results of the in vitro study. Two-step cementation of fiber posts leads to a decrease in internal stresses in the restoration which results in higher failure loads and possibly in less microleakage. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Power scaling of a picosecond vortex laser based on a stressed Yb-doped fiber amplifier.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Mio; Hirose, Tetsuya; Okida, Masahito; Miyamoto, Katsuhiko; Omatsu, Takashige

    2011-01-17

    Power scaling of a picosecond vortex laser based on a stressed Yb-doped fiber amplifier is analyzed. An output power of 25 W was obtained for 53 W of pumping, with a peak power of 37 kW. Frequency doubling of the vortex output was demonstrated using a nonlinear PPSLT crystal. A second-harmonic output power of up to 1.5 W was measured at a fundamental power of 11.2 W.

  12. Combined-load stress-strain relationship for advanced fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sullivan, T. L.

    1975-01-01

    It was demonstrated experimentally that only one test specimen is required to determine the combined-load stress-strain relationships of a given fiber composite system. These relationships were determined using a thin angle-plied laminate tube and subjecting it to a number of combined-loading conditions. The measured data obtained are compared with theoretical predictions. Some important considerations associated with such a test are identified, and the significance of combined-load stress-strain relationships in certain practical designs are discussed.

  13. Stress generated by customized glass fiber posts and other types by photoelastic analysis.

    PubMed

    Bosso, Kátia; Gonini Júnior, Alcides; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Lopes, Murilo Baena

    2015-01-01

    Endodontic posts are necessary to provide adequate retention and support when no sufficient remaining structure is available to retain the core. There are different materials and techniques to construct post-and-core, but there is no consensus about which one promotes better stress distribution on the remaining tooth structure. This study aimed to quantify and evaluate the distribution of stress in the root produced by customized glass fiber posts compared to different endodontic posts. Twenty-five simulated roots from photoelastic resin were made and divided into 5 groups: CPC, cast post-and-core; SP, screw post; CF, carbon fiber post; GF, glass fiber post; and CGF, customized glass fiber post. After cementing CPC and SP posts with zinc phosphate cement, and CF, GF and CGF posts with resin cement, resin cores were made for groups 2-5. Specimens were evaluated with vertical or 45° oblique loading. To analyze the fringes, the root was divided into 6 parts: palatal cervical, palatal middle, palatal apical, vestibular cervical, vestibular middle, and vestibular apical. The formed fringes were photographed and quantified. Data were recorded and subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%). SP (1.95±0.60) showed higher stress (p<0.05) compared to the others (CPC-0.52±0.74; CF-0.50±0.75, GF-0.23±0.48 and CGF-0.45±0.83). All posts showed high stress in apical third (CPC-1.40±0.65; SP-2.30±0.44, CF-1.80±0.45, GF-1.20±0.45, CGF-1.70±1.03) Low stress was found in cervical third (CPC-0.20±0.45; CF-0.00±0.00, GF-0.00±0.00, CGF-0.00±0.00), except by SP (1.90±0.65), which showed statistical difference (p<0.05). Customized post showed high stress concentration at the root and conventional glass fiber posts showed more favorable biomechanical behavior.

  14. Calculation of Stress Intensity Factors for Interfacial Cracks in Fiber Metal Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, John T.

    2009-01-01

    Stress intensity factors for interfacial cracks in Fiber Metal Laminates (FML) are computed by using the displacement ratio method recently developed by Sun and Qian (1997, Int. J. Solids. Struct. 34, 2595-2609). Various FML configurations with single and multiple delaminations subjected to different loading conditions are investigated. The displacement ratio method requires the total energy release rate, bimaterial parameters, and relative crack surface displacements as input. Details of generating the energy release rates, defining bimaterial parameters with anisotropic elasticity, and selecting proper crack surface locations for obtaining relative crack surface displacements are discussed in the paper. Even though the individual energy release rates are nonconvergent, mesh-size-independent stress intensity factors can be obtained. This study also finds that the selection of reference length can affect the magnitudes and the mode mixity angles of the stress intensity factors; thus, it is important to report the reference length used with the calculated stress intensity factors.

  15. Residual internal stress optimization for EPON 828/DEA thermoset resin using fiber Bragg grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohr, Garth D.; Rasberry, Roger D.; Kaczmarowski, Amy K.; Stavig, Mark E.; Gibson, Cory S.; Udd, Eric; Roach, Allen R.; Nation, Brendan

    2015-05-01

    Internal residual stresses and overall mechanical properties of thermoset resins are largely dictated by the curing process. It is well understood that fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors can be used to evaluate temperature and cure induced strain while embedded during curing. Herein, is an extension of this work whereby we use FBGs as a probe for minimizing the internal residual stress of an unfilled and filled Epon 828/DEA resin. Variables affecting stress including cure cycle, mold (release), and adhesion promoting additives will be discussed and stress measurements from a strain gauge pop-off test will be used as comparison. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. The Yeh-Stratton Criterion for Stress Concentrations on Fiber -Reinforced Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Hsieng-Yang

    1996-01-01

    The Yeh-Stratton criterion developed from a yielding criterion is modified to a generalized failure criterion and applied to fiber-reinforced composites with a central crack or a circular cutout under tensile loadings. The purpose of a material failure criterion is to establish a theoretical margin of safety and to be validated by experiments. It is necessary to obtain the crack tip stress field before a failure criterion of composite materials is applied. However, the crack tip stress field is complicated since there are numerous factors that influence the crack tip stress distribution. The understanding of the factors that contribute to crack tip stress field is of critical importance in analyzing composite laminates.

  17. A Critique of a Phenomenological Fiber Breakage Model for Stress Rupture of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Stress rupture is not a critical failure mode for most composite structures, but there are a few applications where it can be critical. One application where stress rupture can be a critical design issue is in Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV's), where the composite material is highly and uniformly loaded for long periods of time and where very high reliability is required. COPV's are normally required to be proof loaded before being put into service to insure strength, but it is feared that the proof load may cause damage that reduces the stress rupture reliability. Recently, a fiber breakage model was proposed specifically to estimate a reduced reliability due to proof loading. The fiber breakage model attempts to model physics believed to occur at the microscopic scale, but validation of the model has not occurred. In this paper, the fiber breakage model is re-derived while highlighting assumptions that were made during the derivation. Some of the assumptions are examined to assess their effect on the final predicted reliability.

  18. Development of In-Fiber Reflective Bragg Gratings as Shear Stress Monitors in Aerodynamic Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmar, Devendra S.; Sprinkle, Danny R.; Singh, Jag J.

    1998-01-01

    Bragg gratings centered at nominal wavelengths of 1290 nm and 1300 run were inscribed in a 9/125 microns germano-silicate optical fiber, using continuous wave frequency doubled Ar+ laser radiation at 244 nm. Such gratings have been used extensively as temperature and strain monitors in smart structures. They have, however, never been used for measuring aerodynamic shear stresses. As a test of their sensitivity as shear stress monitors, a Bragg fiber attached to a metal plate was subjected to laminar flows in a glass pipe. An easily measurable large flow-induced wavelength shift (Delta Lambda(sub B)) was observed in the Bragg reflected wavelength. Thereafter, the grating was calibrated by making one time, simultaneous measurements of Delta Lambda(sub B) and the coefficient of skin friction (C(sub f)) with a skin friction balance, as a function of flow rates in a subsonic wind tunnel. Onset of fan-induced transition in the tunnel flow provided a unique flow rate for correlating Delta Lambda(sub B) and (C(sub f) values needed for computing effective modulus of rigidity (N(sub eff)) of the fiber attached to the metal plate. This value Of N(sub eff) is expected to remain constant throughout the elastic stress range expected during the Bragg grating aerodynamic tests. It has been used for calculating the value of Cf at various tunnel speeds, on the basis of measured values of Bragg wavelength shifts at those speeds.

  19. Demonstration of actin filament stress fibers in microvascular endothelial cells in situ.

    PubMed

    Nehls, V; Drenckhahn, D

    1991-07-01

    We have developed a method for immunostaining the microvascular tree of rat mesenteric windows in situ. The procedure consists of three steps, i.e., mild fixation with formaldehyde, controlled proteolytic digestion of the mesothelial layer, and permeabilization with acetone. Discrimination between different microvascular segments was possible by double-fluorescent staining with antibodies to the smooth muscle isoform of alpha-actin and to nonmuscle myosin from platelets. Antibodies to nonmuscle myosin labeled numerous longitudinally oriented cables in endothelial cells of all microvascular segments (arterioles, metarterioles, pre-, mid-, and postcapillaries, small venules). Occasionally, the myosin-containing cables displayed the interrupted sarcomere-like staining pattern that is diagnostic for stress fibers. In contrast, staining of actin filaments with phalloidin-rhodamin resulted in a noninterrupted, continuous fluorescence of the stress fibers. A possible functional role of microvascular endothelial stress fibers is to serve as a tensile cytoskeletal scaffold that stabilizes the tubular, three-dimensional geometry of microvessels and, in addition, to help the endothelium resist the shear forces created by blood flow and by collision with red and white blood cells.

  20. Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2016:chap 213. National Research Council. Dietary reference intakes for energy, carbohydrate, fiber, fat, fatty acids, cholesterol, protein, and amino acids (macronutrients). The National Academies Press. ...

  1. Nonlinear frequency-dependent synchronization in the developing hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Prida, L M; Sanchez-Andres, J V

    1999-07-01

    Synchronous population activity is present both in normal and pathological conditions such as epilepsy. In the immature hippocampus, synchronous bursting is an electrophysiological conspicuous event. These bursts, known as giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs), are generated by the synchronized activation of interneurons and pyramidal cells via GABAA, N-methyl-D-aspartate, and AMPA receptors. Nevertheless the mechanism leading to this synchronization is still controversial. We have investigated the conditions under which synchronization arises in developing hippocampal networks. By means of simultaneous intracellular recordings, we show that GDPs result from local cooperation of active cells within an integration period prior to their onset. During this time interval, an increase in the number of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) takes place building up full synchronization between cells. These EPSPs are correlated with individual action potentials simultaneously occurring in neighboring cells. We have used EPSP frequency as an indicator of the neuronal activity underlying GDP generation. By comparing EPSP frequency with the occurrence of synchronized GDPs between CA3 and the fascia dentata (FD), we found that GDPs are fired in an all-or-none manner, which is characterized by a specific threshold of EPSP frequency from which synchronous GDPs emerge. In FD, the EPSP frequency-threshold for GDP onset is 17 Hz. GDPs are triggered similarly in CA3 by appropriate periodic stimulation of mossy fibers. The frequency threshold for CA3 GDP onset is 12 Hz. These findings clarify the local mechanism of synchronization underlying bursting in the developing hippocampus, indicating that GDPs are fired when background levels of EPSPs or action potentials have built up full synchronization by firing at specific frequencies (>12 Hz). Our results also demonstrate that spontaneous EPSPs and action potentials are important for the initiation of synchronous bursts in the

  2. α-actinin1 and 4 tyrosine phosphorylation is critical for stress fiber establishment, maintenance and focal adhesion maturation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yunfeng; Ngu, Hai; Alford, Shannon K; Ward, Michael; Yin, Frank; Longmore, Gregory D

    2013-05-01

    In polarized, migrating cells, stress fibers are a highly dynamic network of contractile acto-myosin structures composed of bundles of actin filaments held together by actin cross-linking proteins such as α-actinins. As such, α-actinins influence actin cytoskeleton organization and dynamics and focal adhesion maturation. In response to environmental signals, α-actinins are tyrosine phosphorylated and this affects their binding to actin stress fibers; however, the cellular role of α-actinin tyrosine phosphorylation remains largely unknown. We found that non-muscle α-actinin1/4 are critical for the establishment of dorsal stress fibers and maintenance of transverse arc stress fibers. Analysis of cells genetically depleted of α-actinin1 and 4 reveals two distinct modes for focal adhesion maturation. An α-actinin1 or 4 dependent mode that uses dorsal stress fiber precursors as a template for establishing focal adhesions and their maturation, and an α-actinin-independent manner that uses transverse arc precursors to establish focal adhesions at both ends. Focal adhesions formed in the absence of α-actinins are delayed in their maturation, exhibit altered morphology, have decreased amounts of Zyxin and VASP, and reduced adhesiveness to extracellular matrix. Further rescue experiments demonstrate that the tyrosine phosphorylation of α-actinin1 at Y12 and α-actinin4 at Y265 is critical for dorsal stress fiber establishment, transverse arc maintenance and focal adhesion maturation.

  3. Clostridium perfringens TpeL Induces Formation of Stress Fibers via Activation of RhoA-ROCK Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Nagahama, Masahiro; Ohkubo, Akiko; Kinouchi, Yoshihito; Kobayashi, Keiko; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Takehara, Masaya; Sakurai, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens TpeL belongs to a family of large clostridial glucosylating cytotoxins. TpeL modifies Rac1 and Ras subfamily proteins. Herein we report TpeL-induced formation of stress fibers via RhoA-Rho kinase (ROCK) signaling. A recombinant protein (TpeL1-525) derived from the TpeL N-terminal catalytic domain in the presence of streptolysin O (SLO) induced the formation of actin stress fibers in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells in a dose-dependent manner. The RhoA/ROCK pathway is known to control the formation of stress fibers. We examined the role of the RhoA/ROCK pathway in TpeL-induced formation of stress fibers. TpeL1-525-induced formation of stress fibers was inhibited by the ROCK inhibitor, Y27632 and Rho protein inhibitor, C3 transferase. TpeL1-525 activated RhoA and ROCK in a dose-dependent manner. C3 transferase blocked TpeL1-525-induced activation of RhoA and ROCK whereas Y27632 inhibited TpeL-induced activation of ROCK. These results demonstrate for the first time that TpeL induces the formation of stress fibers by activating the RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway.

  4. Stress distribution of oval and circular fiber posts in amandibular premolar: a three-dimensional finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kilic, Kerem; Esim, Emir; Aslan, Tugrul; Kilinc, Halil Ibrahim; Yildirim, Sahin

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of posts with different morphologies on stress distribution in an endodontically treated mandibular premolar by using finite element models (FEMs). MATERIALS AND METHODS A mandibular premolar was modeled using the ANSYS software program. Two models were created to represent circular and oval fiber posts in this tooth model. An oblique force of 300 N was applied at an angle of 45° to the occlusal plane and oriented toward the buccal side. von Mises stress was measured in three regions each for oval and circular fiber posts. RESULTS FEM analysis showed that the von Mises stress of the circular fiber post (426.81 MPa) was greater than that of the oval fiber post (346.34 MPa). The maximum distribution of von Mises stress was in the luting agent in both groups. Additionally, von Mises stresses accumulated in the coronal third of root dentin, close to the post space in both groups. CONCLUSION Oval fiber posts are preferable to circular fiber posts in oval-shaped canals given the stress distribution at the post-dentin interface. PMID:24353882

  5. In Vivo Fiber Photometry Reveals Signature of Future Stress Susceptibility in Nucleus Accumbens.

    PubMed

    Muir, Jessie; Lorsch, Zachary S; Ramakrishnan, Charu; Deisseroth, Karl; Nestler, Eric J; Calipari, Erin S; Bagot, Rosemary C

    2017-06-07

    Recognizing why chronic stress causes only a subset of individuals to become depressed is critical to understanding depression on a basic level and, also, to developing treatments that increase resilience. Stress-induced alterations in the activity of reward-related brain regions, such as the nucleus accumbens (NAc), are linked to the pathophysiology of depression. However, it has been difficult to determine if differences in stress susceptibility are pre-existing or merely an effect of chronic stress. The NAc consists largely of medium spiny neurons (MSNs), distinguished by their predominant expression of either D1 or D2 dopamine receptors. Mice that develop depressive-like symptoms after chronic social defeat stress show distinct changes in the activity of these two cell subtypes. Until now it has not been possible to determine whether such effects are merely a consequence of stress or in fact precede stress and, thus, have utility in pre-identifying stress-susceptible individuals. The goal of this study was to define a cell-type specific signature of stress susceptibility and resilience. Using fiber photometry calcium imaging, we recorded calcium transients in NAc D1- and D2-MSNs in awake behaving mice and found that D1-MSN activity is a predictive marker of depression susceptibility: prior to stress, mice that will later become resilient had increased baseline D1- MSN activity, and increased calcium transients specific to social interaction. Differences in D2- MSN activity were not specific to social interaction. Our findings identify a pre-existing mechanism of stress-induced susceptibility, creating the potential to target preventative interventions to the most relevant populations.Neuropsychopharmacology advance online publication, 5 July 2017; doi:10.1038/npp.2017.122.

  6. Spatial resolution improvement for Lamb wave-based damage detection using frequency dependency compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Liang; Lin, Jing; Bao, Jingjing; Joseph, Roshan Prakash; Huang, Liping

    2017-04-01

    In Lamb wave inspection systems, the transfer functions of the transmitter and receiver, and the attenuation as Lamb wave propagates through the structure, result in frequency dependency in the amplitude of Lamb modes. This frequency dependency in amplitude also influences the testing resolution and complicates the damage evaluation. With the goal of spatial resolution improving, a frequency dependency compensation method is proposed. In this method, an accurate estimation of the frequency-dependent amplitude is firstly obtained, then a refined inverse filter is designed and applied to the raw Lamb mode signals to compensate the frequency dependency. An experimental example is introduced to illustrate the process of the proposed method. Besides, its sensitivity to the propagation distance and Taylor expansion order is thoroughly investigated. Finally, the proposed method is employed for damage detection. Its effectiveness in testing resolution improvement and damage identification could be obviously demonstrated by the imaging result of the damage.

  7. Stress-temperature-lifetime response of nicalon fiber-reinforced SiC composites in air

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Hua-Tay; Becher, P.F.

    1996-02-01

    Time-to-failure tests were conducted in four-point flexure and in air as a function of stress levels and temperatures to study the lifetime response of various Nicalon fiber-reinforced SiC (designated as Nic/SiC) composites with a graphitic interfacial coating. The results indicated that all of the Nic/SiC composites exhibit a similar stress-dependent failure at applied stress greater than a threshold value. In this case, the lifetimes of the composites increased with decrease in both stress level and test temperature. The lifetime of the composites appeared to be relatively insensitive to the thickness of graphitic interface layer and was enhanced somewhat by the addition of oxidation inhibitors. Electron microscopy and oxidation studies indicated that the life of the Nic/SiC composites was governed by the oxidation of the graphitic interfaces and the on of glass(es) in composites due to the oxidation of the fiber and matrix, inhibitor phases.

  8. Prediction of the Elastic-Plastic Stress/Strain Response for Injection-Molded Long-Fiber Thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Bapanapalli, Satish K.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Phelps, Jay; Tucker III, Charles L.

    2009-01-26

    This paper proposes a model to predict the elastic-plastic response of injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs). The model accounts for elastic fibers embedded in a thermoplastic resin that exhibits the elastic-plastic behavior obeying the Ramberg-Osgood relation and J-2 deformation theory of plasticity. It also accounts for fiber length and orientation distributions in the composite formed by the injection-molding process. Fiber orientation was predicted using the anisotropic rotary diffusion model recently developed by Phelps and Tucker for LFTs. An incremental procedure using the Eshelby’s equivalent inclusion method and the Mori-Tanaka model is proposed to compute the overall stress increment resulting from an overall strain increment for an aligned fiber composite that contains the same fiber volume fraction and length distribution as the actual composite. The incremental response of the later is then obtained from the solution for the aligned fiber composite that is averaged over all possible fiber orientations using the orientation averaging method. Failure during incremental loading is predicted using the Van Hattum-Bernado model. The elastic-plastic and strength prediction model for LFTs was validated against the experimental stress-strain results obtained for long glass fiber/polypropylene specimens.

  9. Prediction of the Elastic-Plastic Stress/Strain Response for Injection-Molded Long-Fiber Thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba N.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Phelps, Jay H; TuckerIII, Charles L.; Bapanapalli, Satish K

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes a model to predict the elastic-plastic response of injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs). The model accounts for elastic fibers embedded in a thermoplastic resin that exhibits the elastic-plastic behavior obeying the Ramberg-Osgood relation and J-2 deformation theory of plasticity. It also accounts for fiber length and orientation distributions in the composite formed by the injection-molding process. Fiber orientation was predicted using an anisotropic rotary diffusion model recently developed for LFTs. An incremental procedure using Eshelby's equivalent inclusion method and the Mori-Tanaka assumption is proposed to compute the overall stress increment resulting from an overall strain increment for an aligned-fiber composite that contains the same fiber volume fraction and length distribution as the actual composite. The incremental response of the latter is then obtained from the solution for the aligned-fiber composite by averaging over all fiber orientations. Failure during incremental loading is predicted using the Van Hattum-Bernado model. The model is validated against the experimental stress-strain results obtained for long-glass-fiber/polypropylene specimens.

  10. The Role of Stress Fibers in the Shape Determination Mechanism of Fish Keratocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nakata, Takako; Okimura, Chika; Mizuno, Takafumi; Iwadate, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Crawling cells have characteristic shapes that are a function of their cell types. How their different shapes are determined is an interesting question. Fish epithelial keratocytes are an ideal material for investigating cell shape determination, because they maintain a nearly constant fan shape during their crawling locomotion. We compared the shape and related molecular mechanisms in keratocytes from different fish species to elucidate the key mechanisms that determine cell shape. Wide keratocytes from cichlids applied large traction forces at the rear due to large focal adhesions, and showed a spatially loose gradient associated with actin retrograde flow rate, whereas round keratocytes from black tetra applied low traction forces at the rear small focal adhesions and showed a spatially steep gradient of actin retrograde flow rate. Laser ablation of stress fibers (contractile fibers connected to rear focal adhesions) in wide keratocytes from cichlids increased the actin retrograde flow rate and led to slowed leading-edge extension near the ablated region. Thus, stress fibers might play an important role in the mechanism of maintaining cell shape by regulating the actin retrograde flow rate. PMID:26789770

  11. A Model for Stress Fiber Realignment Caused by Cytoskeletal Fluidization During Cyclic Stretching.

    PubMed

    Pirentis, Athanassios P; Peruski, Elizabeth; Iordan, Andreea L; Stamenović, Dimitrije

    2011-03-01

    Uniaxial cyclic substrate stretching results in a concerted change of cytoskeletal organization such that stress fibers (SFs) realign away from the direction of stretching. Recent experiments revealed that brief transient stretch promptly ablates cellular contractile stress by means of cytoskeletal fluidization, followed by a slow stress recovery by means of resolidification. This, in turn, suggests that fluidization, resolidification and SF realignment may be linked together during stretching. We propose a mathematical model that simulates the effects of fluidization and resolidification on cytoskeletal contractile stress in order to investigate how these phenomena affect cytoskeletal realignment in response to pure uniaxial stretching of the substrate. The model comprises of individual elastic SFs anchored at the endpoints to an elastic substrate. Employing the global stability convention, the model predicts that in response to repeated stretch-unstretch cycles, SFs tend to realign in the direction perpendicular to stretching, consistent with data from the literature. The model is used to develop a computational scheme for predicting changes in cell orientation and polarity during stretching and how they relate to the underlying alterations in the cytoskeletal organization. We conclude that depletion of cytoskeletal contractile stress by means of fluidization and subsequent stress recovery by means of resolidification may play a key role in reorganization of cytoskeletal SFs in response to uniaxial stretching of the substrate.

  12. The effect of stress on ultrasonic pulses in fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemann, J. H.; Baaklini, G. Y.

    1983-01-01

    An acoustical-ultrasonic technique was used to demonstrate relationships existing between changes in attenuation of stress waves and tensile stress for an eight ply 0 degree graphite-epoxy fiber reinforced composite. All tests were conducted in the linear range of the material for which no mechanical or macroscopic damage was evident. Changes in attenuation were measured as a function of tensile stress in the frequency domain and in the time domain. Stress wave propagation in these specimens was dispersive, i.e., the wave speed depends on frequency. Wave speeds varied from 267 400 cm/sec to 680 000 cm/sec as the frequency of the signal was varied from 150 kHz to 1.9 MHz which strongly suggests that flexural/lamb wave modes of propagation exist. The magnitude of the attenuation changes depended strongly on tensile stress. It was further observed that the wave speeds increased slightly for all tested frequencies as the stress was increased.

  13. The mechanics of delamination in fiber-reinforced composite materials. I - Stress singularities and solution structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. S.; Choi, I.

    1983-01-01

    The fundamental mechanics of delamination in fiber composite laminates is studied. Mathematical formulation of the problem is based on laminate anisotropic elasticity theory and interlaminar fracture mechanics concepts. Stress singularities and complete solution structures associated with general composite delaminations are determined. For a fully open delamination with traction-free surfaces, oscillatory stress singularities always appear, leading to physically inadmissible field solutions. A refined model is introduced by considering a partially closed delamination with crack surfaces in finite-length contact. Stress singularities associated with a partially closed delamination having frictional crack-surface contact are determined, and are found to be different from the inverse square-root one of the frictionless-contact case. In the case of a delamination with very small area of crack closure, a simplified model having a square-root stress singularity is employed by taking the limit of the partially closed delamination. The possible presence of logarithmic-type stress singularity is examined; no logarithmic singularity of any kind is found in the composite delamination problem. Numerical examples of dominant stress singularities are shown for delaminations having crack-tip closure with different frictional coefficients between general (1) and (2) graphite-epoxy composites. Previously announced in STAR as N84-13221

  14. A fiber optics sensor for strain and stress measurements in superconducting accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Oort, J.M. van ); Kate, H.H.J. ten . Applied Superconductivity Centre)

    1994-07-01

    A novel cryogenic interferometric fiber optics sensor for the measurement of strain and stress in the coil windings of superconducting accelerator magnets is described. The sensor can operate with two different readout sources, monochromatic laser light and white light respectively. The sensor head is built up as an extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer formed with two cleaved fiber surfaces, and can be mounted in several configurations. When read with laser light, the sensor is an extremely sensitive relative strain or temperature detector. When read with white light the absolute strain and pressure can be measured. Results are presented of tests in several configurations at 77 K and 4.2 K, both for the relative and absolute readout method. Finally, the possible use for quench localization using the temperature sensitivity is described.

  15. A fiber optics sensor for strain and stress management in superconducting accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    van Oort, J.M.; ten Kate, H.H.J.

    1993-09-20

    A novel cryogenic interferometric fiber optics sensor for the measurement of strain and stress in the coil windings of superconducting accelerator magnets is described. The sensor can operate with two different readout sources, monochromatic laser light and white light respectively. The sensor head is built up as an extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer formed with two cleaved fiber surfaces, and can be mounted in several configurations. When read with laser light, the sensor is an extremely sensitive relative strain or temperature detector. When read with white light the absolute strain and pressure can be measured. Results are presented of tests in several configurations at 77 K and 4.2 K, both for the relative and absolute readout method. Finally, the possible use for quench localization using the temperature sensitivity is described.

  16. Action potential broadening and frequency-dependent facilitation of calcium signals in pituitary nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Jackson, M B; Konnerth, A; Augustine, G J

    1991-01-15

    Hormone release from nerve terminals in the neurohypophysis is a sensitive function of action potential frequency. We have investigated the cellular mechanisms responsible for this frequency-dependent facilitation by combining patch clamp and fluorimetric Ca2+ measurements in single neurosecretory terminals in thin slices of the rat posterior pituitary. In these terminals both action potential-induced changes in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and action potential duration were enhanced by high-frequency stimuli, all with a frequency dependence similar to that of hormone release. Furthermore, brief voltage clamp pulses inactivated a K+ current with a very similar frequency dependence. These results support a model for frequency-dependent facilitation in which the inactivation of a K+ current broadens action potentials, leading to an enhancement of [Ca2+]i signals. Further experiments tested for a causal relationship between action potential broadening and facilitation of [Ca2+]i changes. First, increasing the duration of depolarization, either by broadening action potentials with the K(+)-channel blocker tetraethylammonium or by applying longer depolarizing voltage clamp steps, increased [Ca2+]i changes. Second, eliminating frequency-dependent changes in duration, by voltage clamping the terminal with constant duration pulses, substantially reduced the frequency-dependent enhancement of [Ca2+]i changes. These results indicate that action potential broadening contributes to frequency-dependent facilitation of [Ca2+]i changes. However, the small residual frequency dependence of [Ca2+]i changes seen with constant duration stimulation suggests that a second process, distinct from action potential broadening, also contributes to facilitation. These two frequency-dependent mechanisms may also contribute to activity-dependent plasticity in synaptic terminals.

  17. Nitric Oxide Donors Enhance the Frequency Dependence of Dopamine Release in Nucleus Accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Hartung, Henrike; Threlfell, Sarah; Cragg, Stephanie J

    2011-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) is critically involved in normal as well as maladaptive motivated behaviors including drug addiction. Whether the striatal neuromodulator nitric oxide (NO) influences DA release in NAc is unknown. We investigated whether exogenous NO modulates DA transmission in NAc core and how this interaction varies depending on the frequency of presynaptic activation. We detected DA with cyclic voltammetry at carbon-fiber microelectrodes in mouse NAc in slices following stimuli spanning a full range of DA neuron firing frequencies (1–100 Hz). NO donors 3-morpholinosydnonimine hydrochloride (SIN-1) or z-1-[N-(3-ammoniopropyl)-N-(n-propyl)amino]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (PAPA/NONOate) enhanced DA release with increasing stimulus frequency. This NO-mediated enhancement of frequency sensitivity of DA release was not prevented by inhibition of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), DA transporters, or large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels, and did not require glutamatergic or GABAergic input. However, experiments to identify whether frequency-dependent NO effects were mediated via changes in powerful acetylcholine–DA interactions revealed multiple components to NO modulation of DA release. In the presence of a nicotinic receptor antagonist (dihydro-β-erythroidine), NO donors increased DA release in a frequency-independent manner. These data suggest that NO in the NAc can modulate DA release through multiple GC-independent neuronal mechanisms whose net outcome varies depending on the activity in DA neurons and accumbal cholinergic interneurons. In the presence of accumbal acetylcholine, NO promotes the sensitivity of DA release to presynaptic activation, but with reduced acetylcholine input, NO will promote DA release in an activity-independent manner through a direct action on dopaminergic terminals. PMID:21508928

  18. Frequency dependence and intensity fluctuations due to shallow water internal waves.

    PubMed

    Badiey, Mohsen; Katsnelson, Boris G; Lynch, James F; Pereselkov, Serguey

    2007-08-01

    A theory and experimental results for sound propagation through an anisotropic shallow water environment are presented to examine the frequency dependence of the scintillation index in the presence of internal waves. The theory of horizontal rays and vertical modes is used to establish the azimutal and frequency behavior of the sound intensity fluctuations, specifically for shallow water broadband acoustic signals propagating through internal waves. This theory is then used to examine the frequency dependent, anisotropic acoustic field measured during the SWARM'95 experiment. The frequency dependent modal scintillation index is described for the frequency range of 30-200 Hz on the New Jersey continental shelf.

  19. [Frequency dependence of heating of human skin exposed to millimeter waves].

    PubMed

    Alekseev, S I; Ziskin, M S; Fesenko, E E

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we studied experimentally the frequency dependence of heating of human skin exposed to millimeter waves. Theoretical modeling of obtained data was performed using the hybrid bio-heat equation. It was found that the skin heating and SAR increased with increasing the exposure frequency. The frequency dependence of heating was entirely resulted from that of reflection from the skin. Unlike temperature, the frequency dependence of the SAR was due to the increased absorption of millimeter wave energy within the thin surface layer of the skin.

  20. The study of the thermal annealing of the Bragg gratings induced in the hydrogenated birefringent optical fiber with an elliptical stress cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munko, A. S.; Varzhel', S. V.; Arkhipov, S. V.; Gribaev, A. I.; Konnov, K. A.; Belikin, M. N.

    2016-08-01

    In this work the comparative results on the dynamics of fiber Bragg gratings inscription in both the conventional and the subjected to hydrogenation birefringent optical fiber with elliptical stress cladding as well as in the same type of lightguide with the increased GeO2 concentration are presented. Also the research on the thermal impact on the fiber Bragg gratings written in the birefringent fiber with elliptical stress cladding has been carried out. The dependences of the fiber Bragg reflectance coefficient on the time of the thermal impact, obtained by annealing of the refractive index gratings, induced in the optical fibers with increased photorefractivity, are shown.

  1. Theoretical and experimental on the Shupe-like bias caused by thermal stress of fiber optic gyros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yueze; Ma, Lin; Zhao, Jingjing; Wu, Wei; Qiao, Liwei

    2016-10-01

    The fiber optic gyroscope has became to one of the most important sensors in developing due to light in quality, high accuracy, compact in dimension and long life and has played a very important role in both military and civil use. The fiber coil, as one of the most critical components in FOG, is extremely sensitive to changes in temperature. In this paper, at first, by studying the thermal stress of fiber optic gyros, the element model of the fiber coil was built based on the discrete mathematics formulae of Shupe error in FOG. Then based on the temperature distribution model mentioned above, the effects of the Shupe-like bias caused by thermal stress and the Shupe bias caused by temperature gradient are simulated. A turn-by-turn quantization bias error model is established. Theoretical analysis and experimental results show the Shupe-like bias caused by thermal stress and the Shupe bias caused by temperature gradient had seriously affected the temperature performance of FOG. By optimizing the winding method of fiber coil, the Shupe error of fiber coils can be reduced. At the same time, Shupe-like bias caused by thermal stress can be reduced too.

  2. Investigation on Stress-Rupture Behavior of a Chopped-Glass-Fiber Composite for Automotive Durability Design Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, W

    2001-08-24

    Practical and inexpensive testing methods were developed to investigate stress-rupture properties of a polymeric composite with chopped glass fiber reinforcement for automotive applications. The material was tested in representative automotive environments to generate experimental data. The results indicate that environments have substantial effects on the stress-rupture behavior. The data were analyzed and developed into stress-rupture design criteria to address one of the durability aspects of the material for automotive structural applications.

  3. Combined nonmetallic electronegativity equalisation and point-dipole interaction model for the frequency-dependent polarisability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalø, Hans S.; Åstrand, Per-Olof; Mayer, Alexandre

    2013-07-01

    A molecular mechanics model for the frequency-dependent polarisability is presented. It is a combination of a recent model for the frequency dependence in a charge-dipole model [Nanotechnology 19, 025203, 2008] and a nonmetallic modification of the electronegativity equalisation model rephrased as atom-atom charge-transfer terms [J. Chem. Phys. 131, 044101, 2009]. An accurate model for the frequency-dependent polarisability requires a more accurate partitioning into charge and dipole contributions than the static polarisability, which has resulted in several modifications of the charge-transfer model. Results are presented for hydrocarbons, including among others, alkanes, polyenes and aromatic systems. Although their responses to an electric field are quite different in terms of the importance of charge-transfer contributions, it is demonstrated that their frequency-dependent polarisabilities can be described with the same model and the same set of atom-type parameters.

  4. Frequency-dependent selection for rare genotypes promotes genetic diversity of a tropical palm.

    PubMed

    Browne, Luke; Karubian, Jordan

    2016-12-01

    Negative frequency-dependent selection among species is a key driver of community diversity in natural systems, but the degree to which negative frequency-dependent selection shapes patterns of survival and genetic diversity within species is poorly understood. In a 5-year field experiment, we show that seedlings of a tropical palm with rare genotypes had a pronounced survival advantage over seedlings with common genotypes, with effect sizes comparable to that of light availability. This 'rare genotype advantage' led to an increase in population-wide genetic diversity among seedlings compared to null expectations, as predicted by negative frequency-dependent selection, and increased reproductive success in adult trees with rare genotypes. These results suggest that within-species negative frequency-dependent selection of genotypes can shape genetic variation on ecologically relevant timescales in natural systems and may be a key, overlooked source of non-random mortality for tropical plants.

  5. Seismic dynamic monitoring in CO2 flooding based on characterization of frequency-dependent velocity factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun-Hua; Li, Jun; Xiao, Wen; Tan, Ming-You; Zhang, Yun-Ying; Cui, Shi-Ling; Qu, Zhi-Peng

    2016-06-01

    The phase velocity of seismic waves varies with the propagation frequency, and thus frequency-dependent phenomena appear when CO2 gas is injected into a reservoir. By dynamically considering these phenomena with reservoir conditions it is thus feasible to extract the frequency-dependent velocity factor with the aim of monitoring changes in the reservoir both before and after CO2 injection. In the paper, we derive a quantitative expression for the frequency-dependent factor based on the Robinson seismic convolution model. In addition, an inversion equation with a frequency-dependent velocity factor is constructed, and a procedure is implemented using the following four processing steps: decomposition of the spectrum by generalized S transform, wavelet extraction of cross-well seismic traces, spectrum equalization processing, and an extraction method for frequency-dependent velocity factor based on the damped least-square algorithm. An attenuation layered model is then established based on changes in the Q value of the viscoelastic medium, and spectra of migration profiles from forward modeling are obtained and analyzed. Frequency-dependent factors are extracted and compared, and the effectiveness of the method is then verified using a synthetic data. The frequency-dependent velocity factor is finally applied to target processing and oil displacement monitoring based on real seismic data obtained before and after CO2 injection in the G89 well block within Shengli oilfield. Profiles and slices of the frequency-dependent factor determine its ability to indicate differences in CO2 flooding, and the predicting results are highly consistent with those of practical investigations within the well block.

  6. Sensing substrate rigidity by mechanosensitive ion channels with stress fibers and focal adhesions.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Sokabe, Masahiro

    2010-10-01

    Cell motility, spreading, proliferation and differentiation are critically influenced by substrate rigidity. To sense substrate rigidity, cells apply traction forces to cell-substrate adhesions via actin stress fibers (SFs) and measure mechanical responses of the substrate. Besides mechanosensitive adaptor proteins, mechanosensitive (MS) channels are involved in the substrate rigidity sensing. MS channels located at or near focal adhesions (FAs) convert the rigidity-dependent stress generated in SF/FA system into the level of cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt) by locally altering their Ca(2+) permeability. Besides by external forces, cells spontaneously generate rigidity-dependent localized [Ca(2+)]cyt increases, implicating MS channels as intrinsic force measurement system. This mechanism may contribute to not only substrate rigidity sensing but also regulation of cell migration.

  7. Effect of asperity-scale tensile stresses on the wear behavior of normally oriented fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.P.; Ovaert, T.C.

    1994-01-01

    Wear of unidirectional continuous fiber-reinforced polymer composites with fiber orientation normal to the contact plane, sliding over scribed stainless steel disks having a controlled surface topography, is investigated in relation to the tensile stresses developed near the contact region. The composite is modeled as a transversely isotropic half-space whose effective elastic moduli are estimated from composite micro-mechanical considerations. The scribed disk is treated as a rough surface whose controlled topographical features serve as model hemispherical indenters against the composite. With friction coefficients obtained from the wear experiments, the tensile stress field at an below the composite surface is estimated. From this, an estimated of the theoretical depth of fiber-matrix separation (fiber debonding) is calculated based on the composite transverse tensile strength. A correlation between the wear rate and theoretical depth of debonding was shown for several composites.

  8. Method for Forming Fiber Reinforced Composite Bodies with Graded Composition and Stress Zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Mrityunjay (Inventor); Levine, Stanley R. (Inventor); Smialek, James A. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A near-net, complex shaped ceramic fiber reinforced silicon carbide based composite bodies with graded compositions and stress zones is disclosed. To provide the composite a fiber preform is first fabricated and an interphase is applied by chemical vapor infiltration, sol-gel or polymer processes. This first body is further infiltrated with a polymer mixture containing carbon, and/or silicon carbide, and additional oxide, carbide, or nitride phases forming a second body. One side of the second body is spray coated or infiltrated with slurries containing high thermal expansion and oxidation resistant. crack sealant phases and the other side of this second body is coated with low expansion phase materials to form a third body. This third body consisting of porous carbonaceous matrix surrounding the previously applied interphase materials, is then infiltrated with molten silicon or molten silicon-refractory metal alloys to form a fourth body. The resulting fourth body comprises dense composites consisting of fibers with the desired interphase which are surrounded by silicon carbide and other second phases materials at the outer and inner surfaces comprising material of silicon, germanium, refractory metal suicides, borides, carbides, oxides, and combinations thereof The resulting composite fourth body has different compositional patterns from one side to the other.

  9. Finite element analysis of stress transfer mechanism from matrix to the fiber in SWCN reinforced nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günay, E.

    2017-02-01

    This study defined as micromechanical finite element (FE) approach examining the stress transfer mechanism in single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCN) reinforced composites. In the modeling, 3D unit-cell method was evaluated. Carbon nanotube reinforced composites were modeled as three layers which comprises CNT, interface and matrix material. Firstly; matrix, fiber and interfacial materials all together considered as three layered cylindrical nanocomposite. Secondly, the cylindrical matrix material was assumed to be isotropic and also considered as a continuous medium. Then, fiber material was represented with zigzag type SWCNs. Finally, SWCN was combined with the elastic medium by using springs with different constants. In the FE modeling of SWCN reinforced composite model springs were modeled by using ANSYS spring damper element COMBIN14. The developed interfacial van der Waals interaction effects between the continuous matrix layer and the carbon nanotube fiber layer were simulated by applying these various spring stiffness values. In this study, the layered composite cylindrical FE model was presented as the equivalent mechanical properties of SWCN structures in terms of Young's modulus. The obtained results and literature values were presented and discussed. Figures, 16, 17, and 18 of the original article PDF file, as supplied to AIP Publishing, were affected by a PDF-processing error. Consequently, a solid diamond symbol appeared instead of a Greek tau on the y axis labels for these three figures. This article was updated on 17 March 2017 to correct the PDF-processing error, with the scientific content remaining unchanged.

  10. Fatigue surviving, fracture resistance, shear stress and finite element analysis of glass fiber posts with different diameters.

    PubMed

    Wandscher, Vinícius Felipe; Bergoli, César Dalmolin; de Oliveira, Ariele Freitas; Kaizer, Osvaldo Bazzan; Souto Borges, Alexandre Luiz; Limberguer, Inácio da Fontoura; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2015-03-01

    This study evaluated the shear stress presented in glass fiber posts with parallel fiber (0°) and different coronal diameters under fatigue, fracture resistance and FEA. 160 glass-fiber posts (N=160) with eight different coronal diameters were used (DT=double tapered, number of the post=coronal diameter and W=Wider - fiber post with coronal diameter wider than the conventional): DT1.4; DT1.8W; DT1.6; DT2W; DT1.8; DT2.2W; DT2; DT2.2. Eighty posts were submitted to mechanical cycling (3×10(6) cycles; inclination: 45°; load: 50N; frequency: 4Hz; temperature: 37°C) to assess the surviving under intermittent loading and other eighty posts were submitted to fracture resistance testing (resistance [N] and shear-stress [MPa] values were obtained). The eight posts types were 3D modeled (Rhinoceros 4.0) and the shear-stress (MPa) evaluated using FEA (Ansys 13.0). One-way ANOVA showed statistically differences to fracture resistance (DT2.2W and DT2.2 showed higher values) and shear stress values (DT1.4 showed lower values). Only the DT1.4 fiber posts failed after mechanical cycling. FEA showed similar values of shear stress between the groups and these values were similar to those obtained by shear stress testing. The failure analysis showed that 95% of specimens failed by shear. Posts with parallel fiber (0°) may suffer fractures when an oblique shear load is applied on the structure; except the thinner group, greater coronal diameters promoted the same shear stresses.

  11. Reduction in disk and fiber stresses by axial distraction is higher in cervical disk with fibers oriented toward the vertical rather than horizontal plane: a finite element model analysis.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Mozammil; Gay, Ralph E; An, Kai-Nan

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the biomechanical changes that occur in a compressed cervical disk with the application of axial distraction when the annular fiber orientation angles are varied between the horizontal and vertical planes. A 3-dimensional finite element (FE) model of a cervical motion segment was developed. From this model, 3 FE models were developed and validated corresponding to 3 different fiber angles relative to the end plate-disk interface: +/-25 degrees (oriented toward the horizontal plane), +/-45 degrees (midway between the horizontal and vertical planes), and +/-65 degrees (oriented toward the vertical plane). Compression (50N), followed by an axial distraction (17N), was simulated. Annulus and nucleus stresses, von-Mises fiber stresses, annulus radial bulging, and nucleus radial displacement were computed. Hard tissue (cortical and cancellous bones and end plate) stresses were also quantified. With increasing fiber angle (toward vertical), axial segmental stiffness increased, whereas annulus and nucleus stresses, fiber stresses, annulus radial bulging, and nucleus radial displacement decreased. Similar outcomes were observed when axial distraction was applied to the compressed segment. Hard tissues were not affected with varying fiber angles; however, their mechanics changed when axial distraction was applied on the compressed segment. We noted lower disk stress in axial distraction than in compression. The results confirmed the hypothesis that fibers oriented toward the vertical plane reduce disk and fiber stresses and disk bulging. By aligning annular fibers toward the vertical plane axial distraction may help reduce disk and fiber stresses. Axial disk stresses decrease radially from outside to inside under compressive loading and that the anterior annulus is more stressed than the posterior-lateral annulus during both compression and distraction. Stresses decreased in both the annulus tissue matrix and fibers with increasing

  12. Strain Measurement during Stress Rupture of Composite Over-Wrapped Pressure Vessel with Fiber Bragg Gratings Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Curtis E.; Grant, Joseph; Russell, Sam; Arnett, Shawn

    2008-01-01

    Fiber optic Bragg gratings were used to measure strain fields during Stress Rupture (SSM) test of Kevlar Composite Over-Wrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV). The sensors were embedded under the over-wrapped attached to the liner released from the Kevlar and attached to the Kevlar released from the liner. Additional sensors (foil gages and fiber bragg gratings) were surface mounted on the COPY liner.

  13. Time-Dependent Stress Rupture Strength Degradation of Hi-Nicalon Fiber-Reinforced Silicon Carbide Composites at Intermediate Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Roy M.

    2016-01-01

    The stress rupture strength of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composites with a boron nitride fiber coating decreases with time within the intermediate temperature range of 700 to 950 degree Celsius. Various theories have been proposed to explain the cause of the time-dependent stress rupture strength. The objective of this paper is to investigate the relative significance of the various theories for the time-dependent strength of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composites. This is achieved through the development of a numerically based progressive failure analysis routine and through the application of the routine to simulate the composite stress rupture tests. The progressive failure routine is a time-marching routine with an iterative loop between a probability of fiber survival equation and a force equilibrium equation within each time step. Failure of the composite is assumed to initiate near a matrix crack and the progression of fiber failures occurs by global load sharing. The probability of survival equation is derived from consideration of the strength of ceramic fibers with randomly occurring and slow growing flaws as well as the mechanical interaction between the fibers and matrix near a matrix crack. The force equilibrium equation follows from the global load sharing presumption. The results of progressive failure analyses of the composite tests suggest that the relationship between time and stress-rupture strength is attributed almost entirely to the slow flaw growth within the fibers. Although other mechanisms may be present, they appear to have only a minor influence on the observed time-dependent behavior.

  14. Strain measurement during stress rupture of composite over-wrapped pressure vessel with fiber Bragg gratings sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Curtis E.; Grant, Joseph; Russell, Sam; Arnett, Shawn

    2008-03-01

    Fiber optic Bragg gratings were used to measure strain fields during Stress Rupture (SSM) test of Kevlar Composite Over-Wrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs). The sensors were embedded under the over-wrapped attached to the liner released from the Kevlar and attached to the Kevlar released from the liner. Additional sensors (foil gages and fiber bragg gratings) were surface mounted on the COPV liner.

  15. Reorganization of stress fiber-like structures in spreading platelets during surface activation.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, K; Itoh, K

    1998-12-01

    Alpha-Actinin and myosin were associated into reorganized actin cable networks and partly formed stress fiber-like structures in platelets during surface activation. Double-label immunofluorescence staining using antibodies against alpha-actinin and platelet myosin heavy chain (MHC) showed that alpha-actinin and myosin were colocalized in the cell center at the early stage of activation and dynamically redistributed with shape change. In the later stage, two proteins were colocalized around the granulomeres. alpha-Actinin was also seen beneath the surface membrane while myosin was not. Occasionally, both proteins were segregated, revealed granular staining in the cell body of flattened platelets and often aligned irregular alternate arrangement in the actin cables. Immunoelectron microscopy (immunogold) employing antibodies against MHC and myosin light chain (MLC) demonstrated that myosin, associated with actin cytoskeleton was precisely filamentous (328 nm in average length, 15 nm in width) and bipolar with a central bare zone, since MLCs were located at both ends. Myosin formed a cluster composed of several filaments with repeating alignment, suggesting each cluster corresponded to the granular staining pattern of immunofluorescence. These observations indicated that the organization of alpha-actinin and myosin in actin cables in activated platelets resembled that in stress fibers in various cultured cells.

  16. Lateral communication between stress fiber sarcomeres facilitates a local remodeling response.

    PubMed

    Chapin, Laura M; Blankman, Elizabeth; Smith, Mark A; Shiu, Yan-Ting; Beckerle, Mary C

    2012-11-21

    Actin stress fibers (SFs) are load-bearing and mechanosensitive structures. To our knowledge, the mechanisms that enable SFs to sense and respond to strain have not been fully defined. Acute local strain events can involve a twofold extension of a single SF sarcomere, but how these dramatic local events affect the overall SF architecture is not believed to be understood. Here we have investigated how SF architecture adjusts to episodes of local strain that occur in the cell center. Using fluorescently tagged zyxin to track the borders of sarcomeres, we characterize the dynamics of resting sarcomeres and strain-site sarcomeres. We find that sarcomeres flanking a strain site undergo rapid shortening that directly compensates for the strain-site extension, illustrating lateral communication of mechanical information along the length of a stress fiber. When a strain-site sarcomere extends asymmetrically, its adjacent sarcomeres exhibit a parallel asymmetric shortening response, illustrating that flanking sarcomeres respond to strain magnitude. After extension, strain-site sarcomeres become locations of new sarcomere addition, highlighting mechanical strain as a trigger of sarcomere addition and revealing a, to our knowledge, novel type of SF remodeling. Our findings provide evidence to suggest SF sarcomeres act as strain sensors and are interconnected to support communication of mechanical information.

  17. A mechanical model of actin stress fiber formation and substrate elasticity sensing in adherent cells.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Sam; Sun, Sean X

    2010-04-27

    Tissue cells sense and respond to the stiffness of the surface on which they adhere. Precisely how cells sense surface stiffness remains an open question, though various biochemical pathways are critical for a proper stiffness response. Here, based on a simple mechanochemical model of biological friction, we propose a model for cell mechanosensation as opposed to previous more biochemically based models. Our model of adhesion complexes predicts that these cell-surface interactions provide a viscous drag that increases with the elastic modulus of the surface. The force-velocity relation of myosin II implies that myosin generates greater force when the adhesion complexes slide slowly. Then, using a simple cytoskeleton model, we show that an external force applied to the cytoskeleton causes actin filaments to aggregate and orient parallel to the direction of force application. The greater the external force, the faster this aggregation occurs. As the steady-state probability of forming these bundles reflects a balance between the time scale of bundle formation and destruction (because of actin turnover), more bundles are formed when the cytoskeleton time-scale is small (i.e., on stiff surfaces), in agreement with experiment. As these large bundles of actin, called stress fibers, appear preferentially on stiff surfaces, our mechanical model provides a mechanism for stress fiber formation and stiffness sensing in cells adhered to a compliant surface.

  18. Molecular identification and localization of cellular titin, a novel titin isoform in the fibroblast stress fiber.

    PubMed

    Cavnar, Peter J; Olenych, Scott G; Keller, Thomas C S

    2007-06-01

    We previously discovered a large titin-like protein-c-titin-in chicken epithelial brush border and human blood platelet extracts that binds alpha-actinin and organizes arrays of myosin II bipolar filaments in vitro. RT-PCR analysis of total RNA from human megakaryoblastic (CHRF-288-11) and mouse fibroblast (3T3) nonmuscle cells reveal sequences identical to known titin gene exon sequences that encode parts of the Z-line, I-band, PEVK domain, A-band, and M-line regions of striated muscle titins. In the nonmuscle cells, these sequences are differentially spliced in patterns not reported for any striated muscle titin isoform. Rabbit polyclonal antibodies raised against expressed protein fragments encoded by the Z-repeat and kinase domain regions react with the c-titin band in Western blot analysis of platelet extracts and immunoprecipitate c-titin in whole platelet extracts. Immunofluorescent localization demonstrates that the majority of the c-titin colocalizes with alpha-actinin and actin in 3T3 and Indian Muntjac deer skin fibroblast stress fibers. Our results suggest that differential expression of titin gene exons in nonmuscle cells yields multiple novel isoforms of the protein c-titin that are associated with the actin stress fiber structures.

  19. Carbon fiber based composites stress analysis. Experimental and computer comparative studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobek, M.; Baier, A.; Buchacz, A.; Grabowski, Ł.; Majzner, M.

    2015-11-01

    Composite materials used nowadays for the production of composites are the result of advanced research. This allows assuming that they are among the most elaborate tech products of our century. That fact is evidenced by the widespread use of them in the most demanding industries like aerospace and space industry. But the heterogeneous materials and their advantages have been known to mankind in ancient times and they have been used by nature for millions of years. Among the fibers used in the industry most commonly used are nylon, polyester, polypropylene, boron, metal, glass, carbon and aramid. Thanks to their physical properties last three fiber types deserve special attention. High strength to weight ratio allow the use of many industrial solutions. Composites based on carbon and glass fibers are widely used in the automotive. Aramid fibers ideal for the fashion industry where the fabric made from the fibers used to produce the protective clothing. In the paper presented issues of stress analysis of composite materials have been presented. The components of composite materials and principles of composition have been discussed. Particular attention was paid to the epoxy resins and the fabrics made from carbon fibers. The article also includes basic information about strain measurements performed on with a resistance strain gauge method. For the purpose of the laboratory tests a series of carbon - epoxy composite samples were made. For this purpose plain carbon textile was used with a weight of 200 g/mm2 and epoxy resin LG730. During laboratory strain tests described in the paper Tenmex's delta type strain gauge rosettes were used. They were arranged in specific locations on the surface of the samples. Data acquisition preceded using HBM measurement equipment, which included measuring amplifier and measuring head. Data acquisition was performed using the Easy Catman. In order to verify the results of laboratory tests numerical studies were carried out in a

  20. Modeling of the cooling rate effect on the residual stress formation in the cantala fiber/recycled HDPE composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Probotinanto, Yosafat C.; Raharjo, Wijang W.; Budiana, Eko P.

    2016-03-01

    Residual stress has great influence on the mechanical properties of polymer composites. Therefore, its formation during the manufacturing process needs to be investigated. The aim of this study is to investigate the influences of cooling rate on the residual stress distribution of the cantala/rHDPE composite by simulation. The simulation was done by using a SOLID227 element type of ANSYS. The cooling rates that used in this study are 0.5°C/minute, 1°C/minute, and 60°C/minute. The values of the residual stress correspond to the increasing of the cooling rate are 1171.31 kPa, 1171.42 kPa, 1172.36 kPa. In the radial direction, the residual stress was tensile inside the fibers, while in the longitudinal direction, the tensile residual stress occurred in the matrix zones and compressive in the fiber zones.

  1. Tensile properties of single stress fibers isolated from cultured vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Deguchi, Shinji; Ohashi, Toshiro; Sato, Masaaki

    2006-01-01

    Stress fibers (SFs), a contractile bundle of actin filaments, play a critical role in mechanotransduction in adherent cells; yet, the mechanical properties of SFs are poorly understood. Here, we measured tensile properties of single SFs by in vitro manipulation with cantilevers. SFs were isolated from cultured vascular smooth muscle cells with a combination of low ionic-strength extraction and detergent extraction and were stretched until breaking. The breaking force and the Young's modulus (assuming that SFs were isotropic) were, on average, 377 nN and 1.45 MPa, which were approximately 600-fold greater and three orders of magnitude lower, respectively, than those of actin filaments reported previously. Strain-induced stiffening was observed in the force-strain curve. We also found that the extracted SFs shortened to approximately 80% of the original length in an ATP-independent manner after they were dislodged from the substrate, suggesting that SFs had preexisting strain in the cytoplasm. The force required for stretching the single SFs from the zero-stress length back to the original length was approximately 10 nN, which was comparable with the traction force level applied by adherent cells at single adhesion sites to maintain cell integrity. These results suggest that SFs can bear intracellular stresses that may affect overall cell mechanical properties and will impact interpretation of intracellular stress distribution and force-transmission mechanism in adherent cells.

  2. Frequency-dependent environmental fatigue crack propagation in the 7XXX alloy/aqueous chloride system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasem, Zuhair Mattoug

    The need to predict the fatigue performance of aging aerospace structures has focused interest on environmentally assisted cracking in thick-section damage-tolerant aluminum alloys (AA). The objective of this research is to characterize and understand the time-dependent processes that govern environmental fatigue crack propagation (EFCP) in 7XXX series aluminum alloys exposed to an aggressive environment. Results are utilized to identify the rate-controlling step in growth enhancement in order to develop a mechanistic model describing the time dependency of EFCP. Aluminum alloy 7075, tested in the sensitive (SL) orientation and exposed to aqueous chloride solution, is studied. Da/dNcrit for different D K levels depends on 1/√fcrit, as predicted by process zone hydrogen-diffusion-limited crack growth modeling. A model based on hydrogen diffusion controlled growth is modified to include a stress-dependent critical hydrogen concentration normalized with the crack tip hydrogen concentration (Ccrit/CS). It is proposed that da/dNcrit for a given D K and R corresponds to the distance ahead of the crack tip where the local tensile stress associated with Kmax is maximum. The reversed plasticity estimate of this location equals da/dNcrit for two aging conditions of 7075 (SL)/NaCl at R = 0.1. The EFCP dependencies on alloy microstructure (T6 vs. T7), crack orientation (SL vs. LT), and stress ratio are measured and interpreted based on their effect on da/dN crit and fcrit as well as environmental closure. Chromate addition to the chloride solution eliminates the environmental acceleration of crack growth and reduces corrosion-product induced closure. In chromate-inhibited solution, the frequency dependence of EFCP in 7075 (SL) is unique. Da/dN is reduced at moderate and low frequencies to a value similar to crack growth rate in moist air, probably due to formation of a passive film which inhibits hydrogen uptake. Inhibition is mitigated by increasing frequency or increasing

  3. Effect of fabric structure and polymer matrix on flexural strength, interlaminar shear stress, and energy dissipation of glass fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We report the effect of glass fiber structure and the epoxy polymer system on the flexural strength, interlaminar shear stress (ILSS), and energy absorption properties of glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) composites. Four different GFRP composites were fabricated from two glass fiber textiles of...

  4. Effects of Thermal Treatment on Tensile Creep and Stress-Rupture Behavior of Hi-Nicalon SiC Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, H. M.; Goldsby, J. C.; Dicarlo, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    Tensile creep and stress-rupture studies were conducted on Hi-Nicalon SiC fibers at 1200 and 1400 C in argon and air. Examined were as-received fibers as well as fibers annealed from 1400 to 1800 C for 1 hour in argon before testing. The creep and rupture results for these annealed fibers were compared to those of the as-received fibers to determine the effects of annealing temperature, test temperature, and test environment. Argon anneals up to 1500 C degrade room temperature strength of Hi-Nicalon fibers, but improve fiber creep resistance in argon or air by as much as 100% with no significant degradation in rupture strength. Argon anneals above 1500 C continue to improve fiber creep resistance when tested in argon, but significantly degrade creep resistance and rupture strength when tested in air. Decrease in creep resistance in air is greater at 1200 C than at 1400 C. Mechanisms are suggested for the observed behavior.

  5. Differential effects of K(+) channel blockers on frequency-dependent action potential broadening in supraoptic neurons.

    PubMed

    Hlubek, M D; Cobbett, P

    2000-09-15

    Recordings were made from magnocellular neuroendocrine cells dissociated from the supraoptic nucleus of the adult guinea pig to determine the role of voltage gated K(+) channels in controlling the duration of action potentials and in mediating frequency-dependent action potential broadening exhibited by these neurons. The K(+) channel blockers charybdotoxin (ChTx), tetraethylammonium (TEA), and 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) increased the duration of individual action potentials indicating that multiple types of K(+) channel are important in controlling action potential duration. The effect of these K(+) channel blockers was almost completely reversed by simultaneous blockade of voltage gated Ca(2+) channels with Cd(2+). Frequency-dependent action potential broadening was exhibited by these neurons during trains of action potentials elicited by membrane depolarizing current pulses presented at 10 Hz but not at 1 Hz. 4-AP but not ChTx or TEA inhibited frequency-dependent action potential broadening indicating that frequency-dependent action potential broadening is dependent on increasing steady-state inactivation of A-type K(+) channels (which are blocked by 4-AP). A model of differential contributions of voltage gated K(+) channels and voltage gated Ca(2+) channels to frequency-dependent action potential broadening, in which an increase of Ca(2+) current during each successive action potential is permitted as a result of the increasing steady-state inactivation of A-type K(+) channels, is presented.

  6. Computationally efficient bioelectric field modeling and effects of frequency-dependent tissue capacitance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracey, Brian; Williams, Michael

    2011-06-01

    Standard bioelectric field models assume that the tissue is purely resistive and frequency independent, and that capacitance, induction, and propagation effects can be neglected. However, real tissue properties are frequency dependent, and tissue capacitance can be important for problems involving short stimulation pulses. A straightforward interpolation scheme is introduced here that can account for frequency-dependent effects, while reducing runtime over a direct computation by several orders of magnitude. The exact Helmholtz solution is compared to several approximate field solutions and is used to study neural stimulation. Results show that frequency-independent tissue capacitance always acts to attenuate the stimulation pulse, thereby increasing firing thresholds, while the dispersion effects introduced by frequency-dependent capacitance may decrease firing thresholds.

  7. Portable polarimetric fiber stress sensor system for visco-elastic and biomimetic material analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Mark C.; Armani, Andrea M.

    2015-05-01

    Non-destructive materials characterization methods have significantly changed our fundamental understanding of material behavior and have enabled predictive models to be developed. However, the majority of these efforts have focused on crystalline and metallic materials, and transitioning to biomaterials, such as tissue samples, is non-trivial, as there are strict sample handling requirements and environmental controls which prevent the use of conventional equipment. Additionally, the samples are smaller and more complex in composition. Therefore, more advanced sample analysis methods capable of operating in these environments are needed. In the present work, we demonstrate an all-fiber-based material analysis system based on optical polarimetry. Unlike previous polarimetric systems which relied on free-space components, our method combines an in-line polarizer, polarization-maintaining fiber, and a polarimeter to measure the arbitrary polarization state of the output, eliminating all free-space elements. Additionally, we develop a more generalized theoretical analysis which allows more information about the polarization state to be obtained via the polarimeter. We experimentally verify our system using a series of elastomer samples made from polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a commonly used biomimetic material. By adjusting the base:curing agent ratio of the PDMS, we controllably tune the Young's modulus of the samples to span over an order of magnitude. The measured results are in good agreement with those obtained using a conventional load-frame system. Our fiber-based polarimetric stress sensor shows promise for use as a simple research tool that is portable and suitable for a wide variety of applications.

  8. The long-term evolution of multilocus traits under frequency-dependent disruptive selection.

    PubMed

    van Doorn, G Sander; Dieckmann, Ulf

    2006-11-01

    Frequency-dependent disruptive selection is widely recognized as an important source of genetic variation. Its evolutionary consequences have been extensively studied using phenotypic evolutionary models, based on quantitative genetics, game theory, or adaptive dynamics. However, the genetic assumptions underlying these approaches are highly idealized and, even worse, predict different consequences of frequency-dependent disruptive selection. Population genetic models, by contrast, enable genotypic evolutionary models, but traditionally assume constant fitness values. Only a minority of these models thus addresses frequency-dependent selection, and only a few of these do so in a multilocus context. An inherent limitation of these remaining studies is that they only investigate the short-term maintenance of genetic variation. Consequently, the long-term evolution of multilocus characters under frequency-dependent disruptive selection remains poorly understood. We aim to bridge this gap between phenotypic and genotypic models by studying a multilocus version of Levene's soft-selection model. Individual-based simulations and deterministic approximations based on adaptive dynamics theory provide insights into the underlying evolutionary dynamics. Our analysis uncovers a general pattern of polymorphism formation and collapse, likely to apply to a wide variety of genetic systems: after convergence to a fitness minimum and the subsequent establishment of genetic polymorphism at multiple loci, genetic variation becomes increasingly concentrated on a few loci, until eventually only a single polymorphic locus remains. This evolutionary process combines features observed in quantitative genetics and adaptive dynamics models, and it can be explained as a consequence of changes in the selection regime that are inherent to frequency-dependent disruptive selection. Our findings demonstrate that the potential of frequency-dependent disruptive selection to maintain polygenic

  9. Frequency-dependent selection on female morphs driven by premating interactions with males.

    PubMed

    Bots, Jessica; Iserbyt, Arne; Van Gossum, Hans; Hammers, Martijn; Sherratt, Thomas N

    2015-07-01

    Species showing color polymorphisms-the presence of two or more genetically determined color morphs within a single population-are excellent systems for studying the selective forces driving the maintenance of genetic diversity. Despite a shortage of empirical evidence, it is often suggested that negative frequency-dependent mate preference by males (or diet choice by predators) results in fitness benefits for the rare female morph (or prey type). Moreover, most studies have focused on the male (or predator) behavior in these systems and largely overlooked the importance of female (or prey) resistance behavior. Here, we provide the first explicit test of the role of frequency-dependent and frequency-independent intersexual interactions in female polymorphic damselflies. We identify the stage of the mating sequence when frequency-dependent selection is likely to act by comparing indexes of male mate preference when the female has little (females presented on sticks), moderate (females in cages), and high (females free to fly in the field) ability to avoid male mating attempts. Frequency-dependent male preferences were found only in those experiments where females had little ability to resist male harassment, indicating that premating interactions most likely drive negative frequency-dependent selection in this system. In addition, by separating frequency-dependent male mating preference from the baseline frequency-independent component, we reconcile the seemingly contradictory results of previous studies and highlight the roles of both forms of selection in maintaining the polymorphism at a given equilibrium. We conclude that considering interactions among all players-here, males and females-is crucial to fully understanding the mechanisms underlying the maintenance of genetic polymorphisms in the wild.

  10. Myosin phosphorylation on stress fibers predicts contact guidance behavior across diverse breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Schneider, Ian C

    2017-03-01

    During cancer progression the extracellular matrix is remodeled, forming aligned collagen fibers that proceed radially from the tumor, resulting in invasion. We have recently shown that different invasive breast cancer cells respond to epitaxially grown, aligned collagen fibrils differently. This article develops insight into why these cells differ in their contact guidance fidelity. Small changes in contractility or adhesion dramatically alter directional persistence on aligned collagen fibrils, while migration speed remains constant. The directionality of highly contractile and adhesive MDA-MB-231 cells can be diminished by inhibiting Rho kinase or β1 integrin binding. Inversely, the directionality of less contractile and adhesive MTLn3 cells can be enhanced by activating contractility or integrins. Subtle, but quantifiable alterations in myosin II regulatory light chain phosphorylation on stress fibers explain the tuning of contact guidance fidelity, separate from migration per se indicating that the contractile and adhesive state of the cell in combination with collagen organization in the tumor microenvironment determine the efficiency of migration. Understanding how distinct cells respond to contact guidance cues will not only illuminate mechanisms for cancer invasion, but will also allow for the design of environments to separate specific subpopulations of cells from patient-derived tissues by leveraging differences in responses to directional migration cues.

  11. Implementation of thermal residual stresses in the analysis of fiber bridged matrix crack growth in titanium matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakuckas, John G., Jr.; Johnson, W. Steven

    1994-01-01

    In this research, thermal residual stresses were incorporated in an analysis of fiber-bridged matrix cracks in unidirectional and cross-ply titanium matrix composites (TMC) containing center holes or center notches. Two TMC were investigated, namely, SCS-6/Timelal-21S laminates. Experimentally, matrix crack initiation and growth were monitored during tension-tension fatigue tests conducted at room temperature and at an elevated temperature of 200 C. Analytically, thermal residual stresses were included in a fiber bridging (FB) model. The local R-ratio and stress-intensity factor in the matrix due to thermal and mechanical loadings were calculated and used to evaluate the matrix crack growth behavior in the two materials studied. The frictional shear stress term, tau, assumed in this model was used as a curve-fitting parameter to matrix crack growth data. The scatter band in the values of tau used to fit the matrix crack growth data was significantly reduced when thermal residual stresses were included in the fiber bridging analysis. For a given material system, lay-up and temperature, a single value of tau was sufficient to analyze the crack growth data. It was revealed in this study that thermal residual stresses are an important factor overlooked in the original FB models.

  12. Hydrogen-enhanced fatigue crack growth in steels and its frequency dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, Hisao; Takakuwa, Osamu; Yamabe, Junichiro; Matsuoka, Saburo

    2017-06-01

    In the context of the fatigue life design of components, particularly those destined for use in hydrogen refuelling stations and fuel cell vehicles, it is important to understand the hydrogen-induced, fatigue crack growth (FCG) acceleration in steels. As such, the mechanisms for acceleration and its influencing factors are reviewed and discussed in this paper, with a special focus on the peculiar frequency dependence of the hydrogen-induced FCG acceleration. Further, this frequency dependence is debated by introducing some potentially responsible elements, along with new experimental data obtained by the authors. This article is part of the themed issue 'The challenges of hydrogen and metals'.

  13. A mixing rule for predicting frequency dependence of material parameters in magnetic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozanov, Konstantin N.; Koledintseva, Marina Y.; Drewniak, James L.

    2012-03-01

    A number of mixing rules are proposed in the literature to predict the dependence of effective material parameters (permittivity and permeability) of composites on frequency and concentration. However, the existing mixing rules for frequency dependence of permeability in magnetic composites typically do not provide satisfactory agreement with measured data. Herein, a simple mixing rule is proposed. Its derivation is based on the Bergman-Milton spectral theory. Both the Bruggeman effective medium theory and the Maxwell Garnett approximation are included as particular cases of the proposed mixing rule. The derived mixing rule is shown to predict accurately the frequency dependence of permeability in magnetic composites, which contain nearly spherical inclusions.

  14. Dynamical gap generation in graphene with frequency-dependent renormalization effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrington, M. E.; Fischer, C. S.; von Smekal, L.; Thoma, M. H.

    2016-09-01

    We study the frequency dependencies in the renormalization of the fermion Green's function for the π -band electrons in graphene and their influence on the dynamical gap generation at sufficiently strong interaction. Adopting the effective QED-like description for the low-energy excitations within the Dirac-cone region, we self-consistently solve the fermion Dyson-Schwinger equation in various approximations for the photon propagator and the vertex function with special emphasis on frequency-dependent Lindhard screening and retardation effects.

  15. Frequency-dependent quantum capacitance and plasma wave in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Kai-Tak; Guo, Jing

    2014-03-10

    Frequency-dependent quantum capacitance C{sub Q} of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) is computed and compared to that of graphene. It is found that the frequency dependence of C{sub Q} in TMDs differs drastically from that of graphene which has a divergent point. The plasma resonance forms when the quantum capacitance is negative and has the same magnitude as the electrostatic capacitance. The calculation shows that the plasma in TMDs depends on the band-structure-limited velocity, band gap, and doping density, which can be controlled via gate biases. The plasma frequencies of TMDs are in the rage of terahertz useful for various applications.

  16. Theoretical modeling of frequency-dependent magnetoelectric effects in laminated multiferroic plates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunli; Yang, Jiashi; Chen, Weiqiu

    2009-12-01

    The recently derived 2-D equations for extensional, flexural, and thickness-shear motions of laminated plates of piezoelectric/piezomagnetic layers are employed in the analysis of the frequency dependence of magnetoelectric couplings in laminated plates of piezoelectric and piezomagnetic layers driven by time-harmonic magnetic fields. Four structures are analyzed. Two are symmetric about the middle plane and are for extensional motions. The other 2 are antisymmetric about the middle plane and are for flexural motions. Frequency-dependent magnetoelectric effects are calculated and compared. Near resonances, the time-dependent magnetoelectric coupling coefficients are found to be much larger than the static magnetoelectric coupling coefficients.

  17. The effect of fiber microstructure on evolution of residual stresses in silicon carbide/titanium aluminide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Freed, Alan D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of the morphology of the SCS6 silicon carbide fiber on the evolution of residual stresses in SiC/Ti composites. A micromechanics model based on the concentric cylinder concept is presented which is used to calculate residual stresses in a SiC/Ti composite during axisymmetric cooling by a spatially uniform temperature change. The silicon carbide fiber is modeled as a layered material with five distinct transversely isotropic and orthotropic, elastic layers, whereas the titanium matrix is taken to be isotropic, with temperature-dependent elastoplastic properties. The results arc compared with those obtained based on the assumption that the silicon carbide fiber is isotropic and homogeneous.

  18. The effect of fiber microstructure on evolution of residual stresses in silicon carbide/titanium aluminide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Freed, Alan D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of the morphology of the SCS6 silicon carbide fiber on the evolution of residual stresses in SiC/Ti composites. A micromechanics model based on the concentric cylinder concept is presented which is used to calculate residual stresses in a SiC/Ti composite during axisymmetric cooling by a spatially uniform temperature change. The silicon carbide fiber is modeled as a layered material with five distinct transversely isotropic and orthotropic, elastic layers, whereas the titanium matrix is taken to be isotropic, with temperature-dependent elastoplastic properties. The results arc compared with those obtained based on the assumption that the silicon carbide fiber is isotropic and homogeneous.

  19. Fiber-based polarimetric stress sensor for measuring the Young's modulus of biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Mark C.; Armani, Andrea M.

    2015-03-01

    Polarimetric optical fiber-based stress and pressure sensors have proven to be a robust tool for measuring and detecting changes in the Young's modulus (E) of materials in response to external stimuli, including the real-time monitoring of the structural integrity of bridges and buildings. These sensors typically work by using a pair of polarizers before and after the sensing region of the fiber, and often require precise alignment to achieve high sensitivity. The ability to perform similar measurements in natural and in engineered biomaterials could provide significant insights and enable research advancement and preventative healthcare. However, in order for this approach to be successful, it is necessary to reduce the complexity of the system by removing free-space components and the need for alignment. As the first step in this path, we have developed a new route for performing these measurements. By generalizing and expanding established theoretical analyses for these types of sensors, we have developed a predictive theoretical model. Additionally, by replacing the conventional free space components and polarization filters with a polarimeter, we have constructed a sensor system with higher sensitivity and which is semi-portable. In initial experiments, a series of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) samples with several base:curing agent ratios ranging from 5:1 up to 30:1 were prepared to simulate tissues with different stiffnesses. By simultaneously producing stress-strain curves using a load frame and monitoring the polarization change of light traveling through the samples, we verified the accuracy of our theoretical model.

  20. Calculation of Growth Stress in SiO2 Scales Formed by Oxidation of SiC Fibers (PREPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    until the oxidation product for 12 µm diameter fibers is several microns thick.1,15,28 SiO2 thickness (w) (Fig. 1) therefore obeys Deal-Grove...Oxides Grown on Polysilicon Gate. J. Electrochem. Soc. 129, 1084-1089 (1982). 24 Navi, M. & Dunham, S. T. A Viscous Compressible Model for Stress

  1. Modeling of process-induced residual stresses and resin flow behavior in resin transfer molded composites with woven fiber mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golestanian, Hossein

    This research focuses on modeling Resin Transfer Molding process for manufacture of composite parts with woven fiber mats. Models are developed to determine cure dependent stiffness matrices for composites manufactured with two types of woven fiber mats. Five-harness carbon and eight-harness fiberglass mats with EPON 826 resin composites are considered. The models presented here take into account important material/process parameters with emphasis on; (1) The effects of cure-dependent resin mechanical properties, (2) Fiber undulation due to the weave of the fiber fill and warp bundles, and (3) Resin interaction with the fiber bundles at a microscopic scale. Cure-dependent mechanical properties were then used in numerical models to determine residual stresses and deformation in the composite parts. The complete cure cycle was modeled in these analyses. Also the cool down stage after the composite cure was analyzed. The effect of 5% resin shrinkage on residual stresses and deformations was also investigated. In the second part of the study, Finite Element models were developed to simulate mold filling in RTM processes. Resin flow in the fiber mats was modeled as flow through porous media. Physical models were also developed to investigate resin flow behavior into molds of rectangular and irregular shapes. Silicone fluids of 50 and 100 centistoke viscosities as well as EPON 826 epoxy resin were used in the mold filling experiments. The reinforcements consisted of several layers of woven fiberglass and carbon fiber mats. The effects of injection pressure, fluid viscosity, type of reinforcement, and mold geometry on mold filling times were investigated. Fiber mat permeabilities were determined experimentally for both types of reinforcements. Comparison of experimental and numerical resin front positions indicated the importance of edge effects in resin flow behavior in small cavities. The resin front positions agreed well for the rectangular mold geometry.

  2. Cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and genotoxicity induced by glass fibers on human alveolar epithelial cell line A549.

    PubMed

    Rapisarda, Venerando; Loreto, Carla; Ledda, Caterina; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Bracci, Massimo; Santarelli, Lory; Renis, Marcella; Ferrante, Margherita; Cardile, Venera

    2015-04-01

    Man-made vitreous fibers have been widely used as insulation material as asbestos substitutes; however their morphology and composition raises concerns. In 1988 the International Agency for Research on Cancer classified fiberglass, rock wool, slag wool, and ceramic fibers as Group 2B, i.e. possibly carcinogenic to humans. In 2002 it reassigned fiberglass, rock and slag wool, and continuous glass filaments to Group 3, not classifiable as carcinogenic to humans. The aim of this study was to verify the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects and oxidative stress production induced by in vitro exposure of human alveolar epithelial cells A549 to glass fibers with a predominant diameter <3 μm (97%) and length >5 μm (93%). A549 cells were incubated with 5, 50, or 100 μg/ml (2.1, 21, and 42 μg/cm(2), respectively) of glass fibers for 72 h. Cytotoxicity and DNA damage were tested by the MTT and the Comet assay, respectively. Oxidative stress was determined by measuring inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression by Western blotting, production of nitric oxide (NO) with Griess reagent, and concentration of reactive oxygen species by fluorescent quantitative analysis with 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA). The results showed that glass fiber exposure significantly reduced cell viability and increased DNA damage and oxidative stress production in a concentration-dependent manner, demonstrating that glass fibers exert cytotoxic and genotoxic effects related to increased oxidative stress on the human alveolar cell line A549. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Creep and Stress-strain Behavior After Creep from Sic Fiber Reinforced, Melt-infiltrated Sic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Pujar, Vijay

    2004-01-01

    Silicon carbide fiber (Hi-Nicalon Type S, Nippon Carbon) reinforced silicon carbide matrix composites containing melt-infiltrated Si were subjected to creep at 1315 C for a number of different stress conditions, This study is aimed at understanding the time-dependent creep behavior of CMCs for desired use-conditions, and also more importantly, how the stress-strain response changes as a result of the time-temperature-stress history of the crept material. For the specimens that did not rupture, fast fracture experiments were performed at 1315 C or at room temperature immediately following tensile creep. In many cases, the stress-strain response and the resulting matrix cracking stress of the composite change due to stress-redistribution between composite constituents during tensile creep. The paper will discuss these results and its implications on applications of these materials for turbine engine components.

  4. Computational modeling for prediction of the shear stress of three-dimensional isotropic and aligned fiber networks.

    PubMed

    Park, Seungman

    2017-09-01

    Interstitial flow (IF) is a creeping flow through the interstitial space of the extracellular matrix (ECM). IF plays a key role in diverse biological functions, such as tissue homeostasis, cell function and behavior. Currently, most studies that have characterized IF have focused on the permeability of ECM or shear stress distribution on the cells, but less is known about the prediction of shear stress on the individual fibers or fiber networks despite its significance in the alignment of matrix fibers and cells observed in fibrotic or wound tissues. In this study, I developed a computational model to predict shear stress for different structured fibrous networks. To generate isotropic models, a random growth algorithm and a second-order orientation tensor were employed. Then, a three-dimensional (3D) solid model was created using computer-aided design (CAD) software for the aligned models (i.e., parallel, perpendicular and cubic models). Subsequently, a tetrahedral unstructured mesh was generated and flow solutions were calculated by solving equations for mass and momentum conservation for all models. Through the flow solutions, I estimated permeability using Darcy's law. Average shear stress (ASS) on the fibers was calculated by averaging the wall shear stress of the fibers. By using nonlinear surface fitting of permeability, viscosity, velocity, porosity and ASS, I devised new computational models. Overall, the developed models showed that higher porosity induced higher permeability, as previous empirical and theoretical models have shown. For comparison of the permeability, the present computational models were matched well with previous models, which justify our computational approach. ASS tended to increase linearly with respect to inlet velocity and dynamic viscosity, whereas permeability was almost the same. Finally, the developed model nicely predicted the ASS values that had been directly estimated from computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The present

  5. P2Y2 receptor modulates shear stress-induced cell alignment and actin stress fibers in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sathanoori, Ramasri; Bryl-Gorecka, Paulina; Müller, Christa E; Erb, Laurie; Weisman, Gary A; Olde, Björn; Erlinge, David

    2017-02-01

    Endothelial cells release ATP in response to fluid shear stress, which activates purinergic (P2) receptor-mediated signaling molecules including endothelial nitric oxide (eNOS), a regulator of vascular tone. While P2 receptor-mediated signaling in the vasculature is well studied, the role of P2Y2 receptors in shear stress-associated endothelial cell alignment, cytoskeletal alterations, and wound repair remains ill defined. To address these aspects, human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) monolayers were cultured on gelatin-coated dishes and subjected to a shear stress of 1 Pa. HUVECs exposed to either P2Y2 receptor antagonists or siRNA showed impaired fluid shear stress-induced cell alignment, and actin stress fiber formation as early as 6 h. Similarly, when compared to cells expressing the P2Y2 Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) wild-type receptors, HUVECs transiently expressing the P2Y2 Arg-Gly-Glu (RGE) mutant receptors showed reduced cell alignment and actin stress fiber formation in response to shear stress as well as to P2Y2 receptor agonists in static cultures. Additionally, we observed reduced shear stress-induced phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (Y397), and cofilin-1 (S3) with receptor knockdown as well as in cells expressing the P2Y2 RGE mutant receptors. Consistent with the role of P2Y2 receptors in vasodilation, receptor knockdown and overexpression of P2Y2 RGE mutant receptors reduced shear stress-induced phosphorylation of AKT (S473), and eNOS (S1177). Furthermore, in a scratched wound assay, shear stress-induced cell migration was reduced by both pharmacological inhibition and receptor knockdown. Together, our results suggest a novel role for P2Y2 receptor in shear stress-induced cytoskeletal alterations in HUVECs.

  6. FREQUENCY-DEPENDENT CHANGES IN GAP JUNCTION FUNCTION IN PRIMARY HEPATOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    FREQUENCY-DEPENDENT CHANGES IN GAP JUNCTION FUNCTION IN PRIMARY HEPATOCYTES. X. Wang1 *, D.E. Housel *, J. Page2, C.F. Blackmanl. 1 National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, USEPA, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27711 USA, 2Oakland, California USA
    ...

  7. FREQUENCY-DEPENDENT CHANGES IN GAP JUNCTION FUNCTION IN PRIMARY HEPATOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    FREQUENCY-DEPENDENT CHANGES IN GAP JUNCTION FUNCTION IN PRIMARY HEPATOCYTES. X. Wang1 *, D.E. Housel *, J. Page2, C.F. Blackmanl. 1 National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, USEPA, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27711 USA, 2Oakland, California USA
    ...

  8. Frequency dependent magneto-transport in charge transfer Co(II) complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Bikash Kumar; Saha, Shyamal K.

    2014-09-01

    A charge transfer chelated system containing ferromagnetic metal centers is the ideal system to investigate the magneto-transport and magneto-dielectric effects due to the presence of both electronic as well as magnetic properties and their coupling. Magneto-transport properties in materials are usually studied through dc charge transport under magnetic field. As frequency dependent conductivity is an essential tool to understand the nature of carrier wave, its spatial extension and their mutual interaction, in the present work, we have investigated frequency dependent magneto-transport along with magnetization behavior in [Co2(II)-(5-(4-PhMe)-1,3,4-oxadiazole-H+-2-thiolate)5](OAc)4 metal complex to elucidate the nature of above quantities and their response under magnetic field in the transport property. We have used the existing model for ac conduction incorporating the field dependence to explain the frequency dependent magneto-transport. It is seen that the frequency dependent magneto-transport could be well explained using the existing model for ac conduction.

  9. The influence of density on frequency-dependent selection by wild birds feeding on artificial prey

    PubMed Central

    Allen, J. A.; Raison, H. E.; Weale, M. E.

    1998-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated frequency-dependent selection by wild garden birds when feeding on green and brown pastry 'baits'. When the density of baits is low, the common colour is eaten disproportionately more than the rare colour (apostatic selection), and when the density is very high, the rare colour is eaten disproportionately more than the common (anti-apostatic selection). We explored the relationship between frequency-dependent predation and density in an experiment at 16 separate sites, using four levels of density and two frequencies of green and brown. Analysis of estimates of log-relative risk ratios showed little evidence for frequency-independent selection, but frequency-dependent selection changed gradually from apostatic at low density to anti-apostatic at high density. The validity of these conclusions in terms of individual bird behaviour was confirmed by Monte-Carlo simulations. We thus conclude that selection by wild birds feeding on green and brown artificial prey is frequency dependent, and that the strength and direction of this selection changes with prey density in a gradual and predictable manner.

  10. Negative frequency-dependent selection between Pasteuria penetrans and its host Meloidogyne arenaria

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In negative frequency-dependant selection (NFDS), parasite genotypes capable of infecting the numerically dominant host genotype are favored, while host genotypes resistant to the dominant parasite genotype are favored, creating a cyclical pattern of resistant genotypes in the host population and, a...

  11. Frequency dependence of CO2 elimination and respiratory resistance in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Watson, J W; Jackson, A C

    1985-02-01

    In dogs, respiratory system resistance (Rrs) is frequency independent, and during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFO) the relationship between CO2 elimination (VCO2) and frequency is linear. In contrast, we found in rabbits a large frequency-dependent decrease in Rrs with increasing frequency along with a nonlinear relationship between frequency and VCO2 (J. Appl. Physiol. 57: 354-359, 1984). We proposed that frequency dependent mechanical properties of the lung account for inter-species differences in the frequency dependence of gas exchange during HFO. In the current study we tested this hypothesis further by measuring VCO2 and Rrs as a function of frequency in a species of monkey (Macaca radiata). In these monkeys, Rrs decreased minimally between 4 and 8 Hz and in general increased at higher frequencies, whereas VCO2 was linearly related to frequency. This is further evidence supporting the hypothesis that nonlinear frequency-VCO2 behavior during HFO is related to frequency-dependent behavior in Rrs.

  12. Ecological genetics of the Bromus tectorum (Poaceae) - Ustilago Bullata (Ustilaginaceae): A role for frequency dependent selection?

    Treesearch

    Susan E. Meyer; David L. Nelson; Suzette Clement; Alisa Ramakrishnan

    2010-01-01

    Evolutionary processes that maintain genetic diversity in plants are likely to include selection imposed by pathogens. Negative frequency-dependent selection is a mechanism for maintenance of resistance polymorphism in plant - pathogen interactions. We explored whether such selection operates in the Bromus tectorum - Ustilago bullata pathosystem. Gene-for-gene...

  13. An exponential ESS model and its application to frequency-dependent selection.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Liu, L

    1989-10-01

    A nonlinear ESS model is put forward, that is, a nonnegative exponential ESS model. For a simple case, we discuss the existence, uniqueness, and stability of an ESS. As an application of the model, we give a quantitative analysis of frequency-dependent selection in population genetics when the rare type has an advantage.

  14. Computation of the modified magnetostriction coefficient b' corresponding to different depth ranges in ferromagnetic specimens by using a frequency dependent model for magnetic Barkhausen emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kypris, Orfeas; Nlebedim, Ikenna; Jiles, David

    2013-03-01

    We have recently shown that a linear relationship exists between the reciprocal peak voltage envelope amplitude 1 /Vpeak of the magnetic Barkhausen signal and elastic stress σ. By applying a frequency-dependent model to determine the depth of origin of the Barkhausen emissions in a uniformly stressed steel specimen, this relationship was found to be valid for different depth ranges. The linear relationship depends on a coefficient of proportionality b'. This was found to decrease with depth, indicating that the higher part of the frequency spectrum is less sensitive to changes in stress. In this study, the model equations have been applied at various depth ranges. It was found that the variation of b' with depth can be utilized in an inversion procedure to assess the stress state in ferromagnetic specimens to give stress-depth profiles. This study is useful for non-destructive characterization of stress with depth.

  15. Effect of rolling on the high temperature tensile and stress-rupture properties of tungsten fiber-superalloy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrasek, D. W.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of mechanical working on the 1093 C (2000 F) tensile and stress-rupture strength of tungsten alloy/superalloy composites. Hot pressed composites containing either conventional tungsten lamp filament wire or tungsten-1% ThO2 wire and a nickel base alloy matrix were hot rolled at 1093 C (2000 F). The hot pressed and rolled composite specimens were then tested in tension and stress-rupture at 1093 C (2000 F). Rolling decreased the degree of fiber-matrix reaction as a function of time of exposure at 1093 C (2000 F). The stress-rupture properties of the rolled composites were superior to hot pressed composites containing equivalent diameter fibers. Rolling did not appreciably affect the 1093 C (2000 F) ultimate tensile strength of the composites.

  16. Effects of mechanical properties of adhesive resin cements on stress distribution in fiber-reinforced composite adhesive fixed partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Daiichiro; Shinya, Akikazu; Gomi, Harunori; Vallittu, Pekka K; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Using finite element analysis (FEA), this study investigated the effects of the mechanical properties of adhesive resin cements on stress distributions in fiber-reinforced resin composite (FRC) adhesive fixed partial dentures (AFPDs). Two adhesive resin cements were compared: Super-Bond C&B and Panavia Fluoro Cement. The AFPD consisted of a pontic to replace a maxillary right lateral incisor and retainers on a maxillary central incisor and canine. FRC framework was made of isotropic, continuous, unidirectional E-glass fibers. Maximum principal stresses were calculated using finite element method (FEM). Test results revealed that differences in the mechanical properties of adhesive resin cements led to different stress distributions at the cement interfaces between AFPD and abutment teeth. Clinical implication of these findings suggested that the safety and longevity of an AFPD depended on choosing an adhesive resin cement with the appropriate mechanical properties.

  17. Hydrothermal and mechanical stresses degrade fiber-matrix interfacial bond strength in dental fiber-reinforced composites.

    PubMed

    Bouillaguet, Serge; Schütt, Andrea; Alander, Pasi; Schwaller, Patrick; Buerki, Gerhard; Michler, Johann; Cattani-Lorente, Maria; Vallittu, Pekka K; Krejci, Ivo

    2006-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites (FRCs) show great promise as long-term restorative materials in dentistry and medicine. Recent evidence indicates that these materials degrade in vivo, but the mechanisms are unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate mechanisms of deterioration of glass fiber-polymer matrix bond strengths in dental fiber-reinforced composites during hydrothermal and mechanical aging. Conventional three-point bending tests on dental FRCs were used to assess flexural strengths and moduli. Micro push-out tests were used to measure glass fiber-polymer matrix bond strengths, and nanoindentation tests were used to determine the modulus of elasticity of fiber and polymer matrix phases separately. Bar-shaped specimens of FRCs (EverStick, StickTech, and Vectris Pontic, Ivoclar-Vivadent) were either stored at room temperature, in water (37 and 100 degrees C) or subjected to ageing (10(6) cycles, load: 49 N), then tested by three-point bending. Thin slices were prepared for micro push-out and nanoindentation tests. The ultimate flexural strengths of both FRCs were significantly reduced after aging (p < 0.05). Both water storage and mechanical loading reduced the interfacial bond strengths of glass fibers to polymer matrices. Nanoindentation tests revealed a slight reduction in the elastic modulus of the EverStick and Vectris Pontic polymer matrix after water storage. Mechanical properties of FRC materials degrade primarily by a loss of interfacial bond strength between the glass and resin phases. This degradation is detectable by micro push-out and nanoindentation methods.

  18. Phase-Shifted Based Numerical Method for Modeling Frequency-Dependent Effects on Seismic Reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuehua; Qi, Yingkai; He, Xilei; He, Zhenhua; Chen, Hui

    2016-08-01

    The significant velocity dispersion and attenuation has often been observed when seismic waves propagate in fluid-saturated porous rocks. Both the magnitude and variation features of the velocity dispersion and attenuation are frequency-dependent and related closely to the physical properties of the fluid-saturated porous rocks. To explore the effects of frequency-dependent dispersion and attenuation on the seismic responses, in this work, we present a numerical method for seismic data modeling based on the diffusive and viscous wave equation (DVWE), which introduces the poroelastic theory and takes into account diffusive and viscous attenuation in diffusive-viscous-theory. We derive a phase-shift wave extrapolation algorithm in frequencywavenumber domain for implementing the DVWE-based simulation method that can handle the simultaneous lateral variations in velocity, diffusive coefficient and viscosity. Then, we design a distributary channels model in which a hydrocarbon-saturated sand reservoir is embedded in one of the channels. Next, we calculated the synthetic seismic data to analytically and comparatively illustrate the seismic frequency-dependent behaviors related to the hydrocarbon-saturated reservoir, by employing DVWE-based and conventional acoustic wave equation (AWE) based method, respectively. The results of the synthetic seismic data delineate the intrinsic energy loss, phase delay, lower instantaneous dominant frequency and narrower bandwidth due to the frequency-dependent dispersion and attenuation when seismic wave travels through the hydrocarbon-saturated reservoir. The numerical modeling method is expected to contribute to improve the understanding of the features and mechanism of the seismic frequency-dependent effects resulted from the hydrocarbon-saturated porous rocks.

  19. A Large-scale Finite Element Model on Micromechanical Damage and Failure of Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Composites Including Thermal Residual Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, P. F.; Li, X. K.

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study micromechanical progressive failure properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composites with thermal residual stress by finite element analysis (FEA). Composite microstructures with hexagonal fiber distribution are used for the representative volume element (RVE), where an initial fiber breakage is assumed. Fiber breakage with random fiber strength is predicted using Monte Carlo simulation, progressive matrix damage is predicted by proposing a continuum damage mechanics model and interface failure is simulated using Xu and Needleman's cohesive model. Temperature dependent thermal expansion coefficients for epoxy matrix are used. FEA by developing numerical codes using ANSYS finite element software is divided into two steps: 1. Thermal residual stresses due to mismatch between fiber and matrix are calculated; 2. Longitudinal tensile load is further exerted on the RVE to perform progressive failure analysis of carbon fiber/epoxy composites. Numerical convergence is solved by introducing the viscous damping effect properly. The extended Mori-Tanaka method that considers interface debonding is used to get homogenized mechanical responses of composites. Three main results by FEA are obtained: 1. the real-time matrix cracking, fiber breakage and interface debonding with increasing tensile strain is simulated. 2. the stress concentration coefficients on neighbouring fibers near the initial broken fiber and the axial fiber stress distribution along the broken fiber are predicted, compared with the results using the global and local load-sharing models based on the shear-lag theory. 3. the tensile strength of composite by FEA is compared with those by the shear-lag theory and experiments. Finally, the tensile stress-strain curve of composites by FEA is applied to the progressive failure analysis of composite pressure vessel.

  20. The Evolution of Interfacial Sliding Stresses During Cyclic Push-in Testing of C- and BN-Coated Hi-Nicalon Fiber-Reinforced CMCs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, J. I.; Bansal, N. P.; Bhatt, R. T.

    1998-01-01

    Interfacial debond cracks and fiber/matrix sliding stresses in ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) can evolve under cyclic fatigue conditions as well as with changes in the environment, strongly affecting the crack growth behavior, and therefore, the useful service lifetime of the composite. In this study, room temperature cyclic fiber push-in testing was applied to monitor the evolution of frictional sliding stresses and fiber sliding distances with continued cycling in both C- and BN-coated Hi-Nicalon SiC fiber-reinforced CMCs. A SiC matrix composite reinforced with C-coated Hi-Nical on fibers as well as barium strontium aluminosilicate (BSAS) matrix composites reinforced with BN-coated (four different deposition processes compared) Hi-Nicalon fibers were examined. For failure at a C interface, test results indicated progressive increases in fiber sliding distances during cycling in room air but not in nitrogen. These results suggest the presence of moisture will promote crack growth when interfacial failure occurs at a C interface. While short-term testing environmental effects were not apparent for failure at the BN interfaces, long-term exposure of partially debonded BN-coated fibers to humid air resulted in large increases in fiber sliding distances and decreases in interfacial sliding stresses for all the BN coatings, presumably due to moisture attack. A wide variation was observed in debond and frictional sliding stresses among the different BN coatings.

  1. An asymptotic preserving unified gas kinetic scheme for frequency-dependent radiative transfer equations

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Wenjun; Jiang, Song; Xu, Kun; Li, Shu

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an extension of previous work (Sun et al., 2015 [22]) of the unified gas kinetic scheme (UGKS) for the gray radiative transfer equations to the frequency-dependent (multi-group) radiative transfer system. Different from the gray radiative transfer equations, where the optical opacity is only a function of local material temperature, the simulation of frequency-dependent radiative transfer is associated with additional difficulties from the frequency-dependent opacity. For the multiple frequency radiation, the opacity depends on both the spatial location and the frequency. For example, the opacity is typically a decreasing function of frequency. At the same spatial region the transport physics can be optically thick for the low frequency photons, and optically thin for high frequency ones. Therefore, the optical thickness is not a simple function of space location. In this paper, the UGKS for frequency-dependent radiative system is developed. The UGKS is a finite volume method and the transport physics is modeled according to the ratio of the cell size to the photon's frequency-dependent mean free path. When the cell size is much larger than the photon's mean free path, a diffusion solution for such a frequency radiation will be obtained. On the other hand, when the cell size is much smaller than the photon's mean free path, a free transport mechanism will be recovered. In the regime between the above two limits, with the variation of the ratio between the local cell size and photon's mean free path, the UGKS provides a smooth transition in the physical and frequency space to capture the corresponding transport physics accurately. The seemingly straightforward extension of the UGKS from the gray to multiple frequency radiation system is due to its intrinsic consistent multiple scale transport modeling, but it still involves lots of work to properly discretize the multiple groups in order to design an asymptotic preserving (AP) scheme in all

  2. Arhgap28 Is a RhoGAP that Inactivates RhoA and Downregulates Stress Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Ching-Yan Chloé; Taylor, Susan H.; Garva, Richa; Holmes, David F.; Zeef, Leo A.; Soininen, Raija; Boot-Handford, Raymond P.; Kadler, Karl E.

    2014-01-01

    The small GTPase RhoA is a major regulator of actin reorganization during the formation of stress fibers; thus identifying molecules that regulate Rho activity is necessary for a complete understanding of the mechanisms that determine cell contractility. Here, we have identified Arhgap28 as a Rho GTPase activating protein (RhoGAP) that switches RhoA to its inactive form. We generated an Arhgap28-LacZ reporter mouse that revealed gene expression in soft tissues at E12.5, pre-bone structures of the limb at E15.5, and prominent expression restricted mostly to ribs and limb long bones at E18.5 days of development. Expression of recombinant Arhgap28-V5 in human osteosarcoma SaOS-2 cells caused a reduction in the basal level of RhoA activation and disruption of actin stress fibers. Extracellular matrix assembly studies using a 3-dimensional cell culture system showed that Arhgap28 was upregulated during Rho-dependent assembly of the ECM. Taken together, these observations led to the hypothesis that an Arhgap28 knockout mouse model would show a connective tissue phenotype, perhaps affecting bone. Arhgap28-null mice were viable and appeared normal, suggesting that there could be compensation from other RhoGAPs. Indeed, we showed that expression of Arhgap6 (a closely related RhoGAP) was upregulated in Arhgap28-null bone tissue. An upregulation in RhoA expression was also detected suggesting that Arhgap28 may be able to additionally regulate Rho signaling at a transcriptional level. Microarray analyses revealed that Col2a1, Col9a1, Matn3, and Comp that encode extracellular matrix proteins were downregulated in Arhgap28-null bone. Although mutations in these genes cause bone dysplasias no bone phenotype was detected in the Arhgap-28 null mice. Together, these data suggest that the regulation of Rho by RhoGAPs, including Arhgap28, during the assembly and development of mechanically strong tissues is complex and may involve multiple RhoGAPs. PMID:25211221

  3. Analytical calculations of frequency-dependent hypermagnetizabilities and Cotton-Mouton constants using London atomic orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorvaldsen, Andreas J.; Ruud, Kenneth; Rizzo, Antonio; Coriani, Sonia

    2008-10-01

    We present the first gauge-origin-independent, frequency-dependent calculations of the hypermagnetizability anisotropy, which determines the temperature-independent contribution to magnetic-field-induced linear birefringence, the so-called Cotton-Mouton effect. A density-matrix-based scheme for analytical calculations of frequency-dependent molecular properties for self-consistent field models has recently been developed, which is also valid with frequency- and field-dependent basis sets. Applying this scheme to Hartree-Fock wave functions and using London atomic orbitals in order to obtain gauge-origin-independent results, we have calculated the hypermagnetizability anisotropy. Our results show that the use of London orbitals leads to somewhat better basis-set convergence for the hypermagnetizability compared to conventional basis sets and that London orbitals are mandatory in order to obtain reliable magnetizability anisotropies.

  4. Audio-Band Frequency-Dependent Squeezing for Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelker, Eric; Isogai, Tomoki; Miller, John; Tse, Maggie; Barsotti, Lisa; Mavalvala, Nergis; Evans, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Quantum vacuum fluctuations impose strict limits on precision displacement measurements, those of interferometric gravitational-wave detectors among them. Introducing squeezed states into an interferometer's readout port can improve the sensitivity of the instrument, leading to richer astrophysical observations. However, optomechanical interactions dictate that the vacuum's squeezed quadrature must rotate by 90° around 50 Hz. Here we use a 2-m-long, high-finesse optical resonator to produce frequency-dependent rotation around 1.2 kHz. This demonstration of audio-band frequency-dependent squeezing uses technology and methods that are scalable to the required rotation frequency and validates previously developed theoretical models, heralding application of the technique in future gravitational-wave detectors.

  5. Time-domain representation of frequency-dependent foundation impedance functions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, E.

    2006-01-01

    Foundation impedance functions provide a simple means to account for soil-structure interaction (SSI) when studying seismic response of structures. Impedance functions represent the dynamic stiffness of the soil media surrounding the foundation. The fact that impedance functions are frequency dependent makes it difficult to incorporate SSI in standard time-history analysis software. This paper introduces a simple method to convert frequency-dependent impedance functions into time-domain filters. The method is based on the least-squares approximation of impedance functions by ratios of two complex polynomials. Such ratios are equivalent, in the time-domain, to discrete-time recursive filters, which are simple finite-difference equations giving the relationship between foundation forces and displacements. These filters can easily be incorporated into standard time-history analysis programs. Three examples are presented to show the applications of the method.

  6. Audio-Band Frequency-Dependent Squeezing for Gravitational-Wave Detectors.

    PubMed

    Oelker, Eric; Isogai, Tomoki; Miller, John; Tse, Maggie; Barsotti, Lisa; Mavalvala, Nergis; Evans, Matthew

    2016-01-29

    Quantum vacuum fluctuations impose strict limits on precision displacement measurements, those of interferometric gravitational-wave detectors among them. Introducing squeezed states into an interferometer's readout port can improve the sensitivity of the instrument, leading to richer astrophysical observations. However, optomechanical interactions dictate that the vacuum's squeezed quadrature must rotate by 90° around 50 Hz. Here we use a 2-m-long, high-finesse optical resonator to produce frequency-dependent rotation around 1.2 kHz. This demonstration of audio-band frequency-dependent squeezing uses technology and methods that are scalable to the required rotation frequency and validates previously developed theoretical models, heralding application of the technique in future gravitational-wave detectors.

  7. Frequency-dependent female genital cutting behaviour confers evolutionary fitness benefits.

    PubMed

    Howard, Janet A; Gibson, Mhairi A

    2017-02-06

    Female genital cutting (FGC) has immediate and long-term negative health consequences that are well-documented, and its elimination is a priority for policymakers. The persistence of this widespread practice also presents a puzzle for evolutionary anthropologists due to its potentially detrimental impact on survival and reproductive fitness. Using multilevel modelling on demographic health survey datasets from five West African countries, here we show that FGC behaviour is frequency-dependent; the probability that girls are cut varies in proportion to the FGC frequency found in their ethnic group. We also show that this frequency-dependent behaviour is adaptive in evolutionary fitness terms; in ethnic groups with high FGC frequency, women with FGC have significantly more surviving offspring than their uncut peers, and the reverse is found in ethnic groups with low FGC frequency. Our results demonstrate how evolutionary and cultural forces can drive the persistence of harmful behaviours.

  8. Impact of the frequency dependence of tidal Q on the evolution of planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auclair-Desrotour, P.; Le Poncin-Lafitte, C.; Mathis, S.

    2014-01-01

    Context. Tidal dissipation in planets and in stars is one of the key physical mechanisms that drive the evolution of planetary systems. Aims: Tidal dissipation properties are intrinsically linked to the internal structure and the rheology of the studied celestial bodies. The resulting dependence of the dissipation upon the tidal frequency is strongly different in the cases of solids and fluids. Methods: We computed the tidal evolution of a two-body coplanar system, using the tidal-quality factor frequency-dependencies appropriate to rocks and to convective fluids. Results: The ensuing orbital dynamics is smooth or strongly erratic, depending on the way the tidal dissipation depends upon frequency. Conclusions: We demonstrate the strong impact of the internal structure and of the rheology of the central body on the orbital evolution of the tidal perturber. A smooth frequency-dependence of the tidal dissipation causes a smooth orbital evolution, while a peaked dissipation can produce erratic orbital behaviour.

  9. Characterization of the anamorphic and frequency dependent phenomenon in Liquid Crystal on Silicon displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobato, L.; Lizana, A.; Márquez, A.; Moreno, I.; Iemmi, C.; Campos, J.; Yzuel, M. J.

    2011-04-01

    The diffractive efficiency of Liquid Crystal on Silicon (LCoS) displays can be greatly diminished by the appearance of temporal phase fluctuations in the reflected beam, depolarization effects and also because of phase modulation depths smaller than 2π. In order to maximize the efficiency of the Diffractive Optical Elements (DOEs) implemented in the LCoS device, the Minimum Euclidean Distance principle can be applied. However, not all the diffractive elements can be corrected in the same way due to the anamorphic and frequency dependent phenomenon, which is related to the LCoS response, largely dependending on the period and the spatial orientation of the generated DOE. Experimental evidence for the anamorphic and frequency dependent phenomenon is provided in this paper, as well as a comparative study between the efficiency obtained for binary gratings of different periods

  10. Negative frequency-dependent preferences and variation in male facial hair.

    PubMed

    Janif, Zinnia J; Brooks, Robert C; Dixson, Barnaby J

    2014-01-01

    Negative frequency-dependent sexual selection maintains striking polymorphisms in secondary sexual traits in several animal species. Here, we test whether frequency of beardedness modulates perceived attractiveness of men's facial hair, a secondary sexual trait subject to considerable cultural variation. We first showed participants a suite of faces, within which we manipulated the frequency of beard thicknesses and then measured preferences for four standard levels of beardedness. Women and men judged heavy stubble and full beards more attractive when presented in treatments where beards were rare than when they were common, with intermediate preferences when intermediate frequencies of beardedness were presented. Likewise, clean-shaven faces were least attractive when clean-shaven faces were most common and more attractive when rare. This pattern in preferences is consistent with negative frequency-dependent selection.

  11. Influence of damping on the frequency-dependent polarizabilities of doped quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Suvajit; Ghosh, Manas

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the profiles of diagonal components of frequency-dependent linear (αxx and αyy), and first nonlinear (βxxx and βyyy) optical response of repulsive impurity doped quantum dots. The dopant impurity potential chosen assumes Gaussian form. The study principally focuses on investigating the role of damping on the polarizability components. In view of this the dopant is considered to be propagating under damped condition which is otherwise linear inherently. The frequency-dependent polarizabilities are then analyzed by placing the doped dot to a periodically oscillating external electric field of given intensity. The damping strength, in conjunction with external oscillation frequency and confinement potentials, fabricate the polarizability components in a fascinating manner which is adorned with emergence of maximization, minimization, and saturation. The discrimination in the values of the polarizability components in x and y-directions has also been addressed in the present context.

  12. Viscoelastic properties of human and bovine articular cartilage: a comparison of frequency-dependent trends.

    PubMed

    Temple, Duncan K; Cederlund, Anna A; Lawless, Bernard M; Aspden, Richard M; Espino, Daniel M

    2016-10-06

    The purpose of this study was to compare the frequency-dependent viscoelastic properties of human and bovine cartilage. Full-depth cartilage specimens were extracted from bovine and human femoral heads. Using dynamic mechanical analysis, the viscoelastic properties of eight bovine and six human specimens were measured over the frequency range 1 Hz to 88 Hz. Significant differences between bovine and human cartilage viscoelastic properties were assessed using a Mann-Whitney test (p < 0.05). Throughout the range of frequencies tested and for both species, the storage modulus was greater than the loss modulus and both were frequency-dependent. The storage and loss moduli of all human and bovine cartilage specimens presented a logarithmic relationship with respect to frequency. The mean human storage modulus ranged from 31.9 MPa to 43.3 MPa, while the mean bovine storage modulus ranged from 54.0 MPa to 80.5 MPa; bovine storage moduli were 1.7 to 1.9 times greater than the human modulus. Similarly, the loss modulus of bovine cartilage was 2.0 to 2.1 times greater than human. The mean human loss modulus ranged from 5.3 MPa to 8.5 MPa while bovine moduli ranged from 10.6 MPa to 18.1 MPa. Frequency-dependent viscoelastic trends of bovine articular cartilage were consistent with those of human articular cartilage; this includes a similar frequency dependency and high-frequency plateau. Bovine cartilage was, however, 'stiffer' than human by a factor of approximately 2. With these provisos, bovine articular cartilage may be a suitable dynamic model for human articular cartilage.

  13. Frequency-dependent acceleration of relaxation involves decreased myofilament calcium sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Varian, Kenneth D; Janssen, Paul M L

    2007-05-01

    The force-frequency relationship is an intrinsic modulator of cardiac contractility and relaxation. Force of contraction increases with frequency, while simultaneously a frequency-dependent acceleration of relaxation occurs. While frequency dependency of calcium handling and sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium load have been well described, it remains unknown whether frequency-dependent changes in myofilament calcium sensitivity occur. We hypothesized that an increase in heart rate that results in acceleration of relaxation is accompanied by a proportional decrease in myofilament calcium sensitivity. To test our hypothesis, ultrathin right ventricular trabeculae were isolated from New Zealand White rabbit hearts and iontophorically loaded with the calcium indicator bis-fura 2. Twitch and intracellular calcium handling parameters were measured and showed a robust increase in twitch force, acceleration of relaxation, and rise in both diastolic and systolic intracellular calcium concentration with increased frequency. Steady-state force-intracellular calcium concentration relationships were measured at frequencies 1, 2, 3, and 4 Hz at 37 degrees C using potassium-induced contractures. EC(50) significantly and gradually increased with frequency, from 475 +/- 64 nM at 1 Hz to 1,004 +/- 142 nM at 4 Hz (P < 0.05) and correlated with the corresponding changes in half relaxation time. No significant changes in maximal active force development or in the myofilament cooperativity coefficient were found. Myofilament protein phosphorylation was assessed using Pro-Q Diamond staining on protein gels of trabeculae frozen at either 1 or 4 Hz, revealing troponin I and myosin light chain-2 phosphorylation associated with the myofilament desensitization. We conclude that myofilament calcium sensitivity is substantially and significantly decreased at higher frequencies, playing a prominent role in frequency-dependent acceleration of relaxation.

  14. Frequency dependent optical conductivity of strained graphene at T=0 from an effective quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shi-Jiang; Pan, Hui; Wang, Hai-Long

    2017-04-01

    An effective quantum field theory (EQFT) graphene sheet with arbitrary one dimensional strain field is derived from a microscopic effective low energy Hamiltonian. The geometric meaning of the strain-induced complex gauge field is clarified. The optical conductivity is also investigated, and a frequency dependent optical conductivity is obtained. The actual value of interband optical conductivity along the deformed direction is C0 + C1/ω2 in spite of the particular strain fields at T=0.

  15. Frequency-dependent selection acting on the widely fluctuating sex ratio of the aphid Prociphilus oriens.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Akimoto, S

    2017-07-01

    Frequency-dependent selection is a fundamental principle of adaptive sex ratio evolution in all sex ratio theories but has rarely been detected in the wild. Through long-term censuses, we confirmed large fluctuations in the population sex ratio of the aphid Prociphilus oriens and detected frequency-dependent selection acting on these fluctuations. Fluctuations in the population sex ratio were partly attributable to climatic factors during the growing season. Climatic factors likely affected the growth conditions of host plants, which in turn led to yearly fluctuations in maternal conditions and sex ratios. In the process of frequency-dependent selection, female proportion higher or lower than ca. 60% was associated with a reduction or increase in female proportion, respectively, the next year. The rearing of aphid clones in the laboratory indicated that mothers of each clone produced an increasing number of females as maternal size increased. However, the mean male number was not related to maternal size, but varied largely among clones. Given genetic variance in the ability to produce males among clones, selection should favour clones that can produce more numerous males in years with a high female proportion. Population-level sex allocation to females was on average 71%-73% for three localities and more female-biased when maternal conditions were better. This tendency was accounted for by the hypothesis of competition among foundresses rather than the hypothesis of local mate competition. We conclude that despite consistent operation of frequency-dependent selection, the sex ratio continues to fluctuate because environmental conditions always push it away from equilibrium. © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  16. Frequency-Dependent Spherical-Wave Reflection in Acoustic Media: Analysis and Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingnan; Wang, Shangxu; Wang, Jingbo; Dong, Chunhui; Yuan, Sanyi

    2017-02-01

    Spherical-wave reflectivity (SWR), which describes the seismic wave reflection in real subsurface media more accurately than plane-wave reflectivity (PWR), recently, again attracts geophysicists' attention. The recent studies mainly focus on the amplitude variation with offset/angle (AVO/AVA) attributes of SWR. For a full understanding of the reflection mechanism of spherical wave, this paper systematically investigates the frequency-dependent characteristics of SWR in a two-layer acoustic medium model with a planar interface. Two methods are used to obtain SWR. The first method is through the calculation of classical Sommerfeld integral. The other is by 3D wave equation numerical modeling. To enhance computation efficiency, we propose to perform wave equation simulation in cylindrical coordinates, wherein we for the first time implement unsplit convolutional perfectly matched layer as the absorbing boundary. Both methods yield the same results, which demonstrate the validity and accuracy of the computation. From both the numerical tests and the theoretical demonstration, we find that the necessary condition when frequency dependence of SWR occurs is that the upper and lower media have different velocities. At the precritical small angle, the SWR exhibits complicated frequency-dependent characteristics for varying medium parameters. Especially when the impedance of upper medium equals that of lower one, the PWR is zero according to geometric seismics. Whereas the SWR is nonzero: the magnitude of SWR decreases with growing frequency, and approaches that of the corresponding PWR at high frequency; the phase of SWR increases with growing frequency, but approaches 90° or -90° at high frequency. At near- and post-critical angles, large difference exists between SWR and PWR, and the difference is particularly great at low frequencies. Finally, we propose a nonlinear inversion method to estimate physical parameters and interface depth of media by utilizing the frequency-dependent

  17. Frequency Dependence of Single-Event Upset in Highly Advanced PowerPC Microprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irom, Farokh; Farmanesh, Farhad; White, Mark; Kouba, Coy K.

    2006-01-01

    Single-event upset effects from heavy ions were measured for Motorola silicon-on-insulator (SOI) microprocessor with 90 nm feature sizes at three frequencies of 500, 1066 and 1600 MHz. Frequency dependence of single-event upsets is discussed. The results of our studies suggest the single-event upset in registers and D-Cache tend to increase with frequency. This might have important implications for the overall single-event upset trend as technology moves toward higher frequencies.

  18. High temperature fiber optic microphone having a pressure-sensing reflective membrane under tensile stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Cuomo, Frank W. (Inventor); Robbins, William E. (Inventor); Hopson, Purnell, Jr. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A fiber optic microphone is provided for measuring fluctuating pressures. An optical fiber probe having at least one transmitting fiber for transmitting light to a pressure-sensing membrane and at least one receiving fiber for receiving light reflected from a stretched membrane is provided. The pressure-sensing membrane may be stretched for high frequency response. Further, a reflecting surface of the pressure-sensing membrane may have dimensions which substantially correspond to dimensions of a cross section of the optical fiber probe. Further, the fiber optic microphone can be made of materials for use in high temperature environments, for example greater than 1000 F. A fiber optic probe is also provided with a backplate for damping membrane motion. The backplate further provides a means for on-line calibration of the microphone.

  19. The effect of shape distribution of inclusions on the frequency dependence of permeability in composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozanov, K. N.; Osipov, A. V.; Petrov, D. A.; Starostenko, S. N.; Yelsukov, E. P.

    2009-04-01

    Microwave material parameters of composites filled with Fe powder are measured as a function of frequency and volume fraction of the powder. The powder is prepared by mechanical milling of Fe in argon atmosphere. The host matrix of the composites is paraffin wax. The permittivity and permeability are measured in the frequency range 0.01-3 GHz. The measured frequency dependences of the permeability is considered in terms of the Bergman-Milton theory, with no additional suggestions imposed on the volume fraction dependence of effective material parameters of composites and the frequency dependence of intrinsic permeability of magnetic powders. The Ghosh-Fuchs theory is found to provide an excellent agreement with the measured permittivity and permeability of the composites, in contrast to the theories employing averaged demagnetization factor of inclusions, such as the Maxwell Garnet approximation. Therefore, the effective material parameters of the composites are affected greatly by the shape distribution of the powder particles. From the measured frequency dependence of permittivity and permeability, the intrinsic permeability of the powder is found.

  20. The analysis of frequency-dependent characteristics for fluid detection: a physical model experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuang-Quan; Li, Xiang-Yang; Wang, Shang-Xu

    2012-06-01

    According to the Chapman multi-scale rock physical model, the seismic response characteristics vary for different fluid-saturated reservoirs. For class I AVO reservoirs and gas-saturation, the seismic response is a high-frequency bright spot as the amplitude energy shifts. However, it is a low-frequency shadow for the Class III AVO reservoirs saturated with hydrocarbons. In this paper, we verified the high-frequency bright spot results of Chapman for the Class I AVO response using the frequency-dependent analysis of a physical model dataset. The physical model is designed as inter-bedded thin sand and shale based on real field geology parameters. We observed two datasets using fixed offset and 2D geometry with different fluidsaturated conditions. Spectral and time-frequency analyses methods are applied to the seismic datasets to describe the response characteristics for gas-, water-, and oil-saturation. The results of physical model dataset processing and analysis indicate that reflection wave tuning and fluid-related dispersion are the main seismic response characteristic mechanisms. Additionally, the gas saturation model can be distinguished from water and oil saturation for Class I AVO utilizing the frequency-dependent abnormal characteristic. The frequency-dependent characteristic analysis of the physical model dataset verified the different spectral response characteristics corresponding to the different fluid-saturated models. Therefore, by careful analysis of real field seismic data, we can obtain the abnormal spectral characteristics induced by the fluid variation and implement fluid detection using seismic data directly.

  1. Frequency dependence of electron spin-lattice relaxation for semiquinones in alcohol solutions.

    PubMed

    Elajaili, Hanan B; Biller, Joshua R; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R

    2014-10-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation rates at 293 K for three anionic semiquinones (2,5-di-t-butyl-1,4-benzosemiquinone, 2,6-di-t-butyl-1,4-benzosemiquinone, and 2,3,5,6-tetramethoxy-1,4-benzosemiquinone) were studied at up to 8 frequencies between 250 MHz and 34 GHz in ethanol or methanol solution containing high concentrations of OH(-). The relaxation rates are about a factor of 2 faster at lower frequencies than at 9 or 34 GHz. However, in perdeuterated alcohols the relaxation rates exhibit little frequency dependence, which demonstrates that the dominant frequency-dependent contribution to relaxation is modulation of dipolar interactions with solvent nuclei. The relaxation rates were modeled as the sum of two frequency-independent contributions (spin rotation and a local mode) and two frequency-dependent contributions (modulation of dipolar interaction with solvent nuclei and a much smaller contribution from modulation of g anisotropy). The correlation time for modulation of the interaction with solvent nuclei is longer than the tumbling correlation time of the semiquinone and is consistent with hydrogen bonding of the alcohol to the oxygen atoms of the semiquinones.

  2. Frequency-dependent selection by wild birds promotes polymorphism in model salamanders

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Benjamin M; Shook, Kim; Izally, Reuben

    2009-01-01

    Background Co-occurrence of distinct colour forms is a classic paradox in evolutionary ecology because both selection and drift tend to remove variation from populations. Apostatic selection, the primary hypothesis for maintenance of colour polymorphism in cryptic animals, proposes that visual predators focus on common forms of prey, resulting in higher survival of rare forms. Empirical tests of this frequency-dependent foraging hypothesis are rare, and the link between predator behaviour and maintenance of variation in prey has been difficult to confirm. Here, we show that predatory birds can act as agents of frequency-dependent selection on terrestrial salamanders. Polymorphism for presence/absence of a dorsal stripe is widespread in many salamander species and its maintenance is a long-standing mystery. Results We used realistic food-bearing model salamanders to test whether selection by wild birds maintains a stripe/no-stripe polymorphism. In experimental manipulations, whichever form was most common was most likely to be attacked by ground-foraging birds, resulting in a survival advantage for the rare form. Conclusion This experiment demonstrates that frequency-dependent foraging by wild birds can maintain colour polymorphism in cryptic prey. PMID:19426509

  3. Real-time seismic intensity prediction using frequency-dependent site amplification factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogiso, Masashi; Aoki, Shigeki; Hoshiba, Mitsuyuki

    2016-05-01

    A promising approach for the next generation of earthquake early warning system is based on predicting ground motion directly from observed ground motion, without any information of hypocenter. In this study, we predicted seismic intensity at the target stations from the observed ground motion at adjacent stations, employing two different methods of correction for site amplification factors. The first method was frequency-dependent correction prediction, in which we used a digital causal filter to correct the site amplification for the observed waveform in the time domain. The second method was scalar correction, in which we used average differences in seismic intensity between two stations for the site amplification correction. Results from thousands of station pairs that covered almost all of Japan showed that seismic intensity prediction with frequency-dependent correction prediction was more accurate than prediction with scalar correction. Frequency-dependent correction for site amplification in the time domain may lead to more accurate prediction of ground motion in real time.

  4. Nonlinear and frequency-dependent transport phenomena in low-dimensional conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grüner, G.

    1983-07-01

    Nonlinear and frequency-dependent electrical conductivity is more a rule than an exception in materials with highly anisotropic electronic structure. Disorder leads to localization of the electronic wave functions, and the temperature-( T), electric field-( E), and frequency (ω)-dependent transport are due to random transfer rates between localized single particle states, a process fundamentally different from band transport. Interactions lead to collective modes, represented by a periodic modulation of the charge or spin density. The charge density wave (CDW) mode is pinned by impurities, but for small pinning forces, it can be depinned by moderate electric fields, leading to nonlinear conductivity due to a sliding CDW. Both classical and quantum models account for the field and frequency dependent response; they also describe current oscillation phenomena and effects which arise when both dc and ac excitations are applied. For strong pinning the collective mode cannot be depinned at small electric field strengths, but nonlinear (soliton) excitations of the collective modes may be responsible for the nonlinear conductivity observed. In all these cases field-and frequency-dependent transport is strongly related. This feature is reproduced by various models, and therefore a detailed study of σ( T, E,ω) is called for to distinguish between the various sources of novel transport phenomena in these new types of solids.

  5. Frequency-Dependent Amplitude Versus Offset Variations in Porous Rocks with Aligned Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaohui; Cao, Siyuan; Guo, Quanshi; Kang, Yonggan; Yu, Pengfei; Hu, Wei

    2017-03-01

    The theory of frequency-dependent amplitude versus offset (AVO) was developed for patchy-saturated model. In this work, we consider this theory in the case of an anisotropic medium based on a fractured-sandstone model. Thus, building on viscoelastic theory, we introduce a method for the computation of frequency-dependent AVO that is suitable for use in the case of an anisotropic medium. We use both analytical methods and numerical simulations to study P-P and P-S reflection coefficients, and results suggest that dispersion and anisotropy should not be neglected in AVO analysis. Indeed, for class I AVO reservoirs, the reflection magnitude of P-wave increases with frequency, while the responses of class II AVO reservoirs suggest that phase reversal occurs as frequency increases positively. In the case of class III AVO reservoirs, reflection magnitude decreases as frequency increases positively, while in the offset domain, the presence of anisotropy can distort or even reverse AVO responses. Thus, when compared to reflection coefficients for P-wave, reflection magnitude features of S-wave are more complex. The frequency-dependent AVO responses reported in this study provide insights for the interpretation of seismic anomalies in vertical transverse isotropy (VTI) dispersive reservoirs.

  6. Frequency-Dependent Amplitude Versus Offset Variations in Porous Rocks with Aligned Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaohui; Cao, Siyuan; Guo, Quanshi; Kang, Yonggan; Yu, Pengfei; Hu, Wei

    2016-11-01

    The theory of frequency-dependent amplitude versus offset (AVO) was developed for patchy-saturated model. In this work, we consider this theory in the case of an anisotropic medium based on a fractured-sandstone model. Thus, building on viscoelastic theory, we introduce a method for the computation of frequency-dependent AVO that is suitable for use in the case of an anisotropic medium. We use both analytical methods and numerical simulations to study P-P and P-S reflection coefficients, and results suggest that dispersion and anisotropy should not be neglected in AVO analysis. Indeed, for class I AVO reservoirs, the reflection magnitude of P-wave increases with frequency, while the responses of class II AVO reservoirs suggest that phase reversal occurs as frequency increases positively. In the case of class III AVO reservoirs, reflection magnitude decreases as frequency increases positively, while in the offset domain, the presence of anisotropy can distort or even reverse AVO responses. Thus, when compared to reflection coefficients for P-wave, reflection magnitude features of S-wave are more complex. The frequency-dependent AVO responses reported in this study provide insights for the interpretation of seismic anomalies in vertical transverse isotropy (VTI) dispersive reservoirs.

  7. Reflectometric frequency-modulation continuous-wave distributed fiber-optic stress sensor with forward coupled beams.

    PubMed

    Zheng, G; Campbell, M; Wallace, P

    1996-10-01

    A distributed optical-fiber stress sensor whose principle of operation is based on the frequency-modulation continuous-wave technique is reported. The sensor consists of a length of birefringent fiber with a mirror attached to one end, a diode laser, and a p-i-n photodiode detector. The intensity and the location of an applied stress are determined simultaneously by detecting the amplitude and the frequency of the beat signal, which is produced by two forward-coupled mode beams. The system was found to have a reasonable spatial resolution of 0.85 m (rms error) in a sensing range of 100 m. The advantages and limitations of the sensor are also discussed.

  8. Investigation of transverse stress measurements by using embedded fiber Bragg grating sensors subjected to Host Poisson's effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chia-Chen; LeBlanc, Michel; Vohra, Sandeep T.

    2000-06-01

    In many situations, it is desirable to measure the load acting in a specific direction by measuring the strain induced by Poisson effects in a direction perpendicular to the load direction. For this to be possible, a fixed relationship between the strains in both directions must be known. This can be useful, for example, when the geometry is such that there is not sufficient room to locate a strain gauge parallel to the load direction but a gauge can be placed in a transverse plane. In this paper, we investigate the use of a fiber Bragg grating in such an arrangement with the fiber embedded within the host material. The investigation is done by theoretical, numerical and experimental approaches and we concentrate on two aspects: (1) the non-uniform strain transfer, particular in axial strains, due to shear-lag effects, and (2) the effect of induced birefringence in the optical fiber due to a load cross to its axis. The results of these approaches indicate that the strains of an embedded fiber sensor subjected to transverse loads are dependent on the location of the embedded sensor and the material properties of the host material. The results also show that when the Young's modulus of the host material is much less than the modulus of the embedded sensor, the Bragg spectrum broadening due to induced birefringence is not significant. However, a lower host Young's modulus also results in longer sections on non-uniform axial strain near the ingress and egress sections of the optical fiber. These two factors must be balanced if we desire to use conventional methods of Bragg grating interrogation that measure only the central wavelength of the Bragg grating's spectrum. In the case investigated (Host Young's modulus of 4.83 GPa) full strain build-up requires approximately 4 mm of fiber length at each end. Likewise, the transverse stress coupling into the fiber modifies its wavelength-shift-to-axial-strain- coefficient by about 6%.

  9. Elastic-plastic stress concentrations around crack-like notches in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Bigelow, C. A.

    1987-01-01

    Continuous fiber silicon-carbide/aluminum composite laminates with slits were tested statically to failure. Five different layups were examined: (0) sub 8, (0 sub 2/ + or - 45) sub s, (0/90) sub 2s), (0/ + or - 45/90 sub s), and (+ or - 45) sub 2s. Either a 9.5 or a 19 mm slit was machined in the center of each specimen. The strain distribution ahead of the slit tip was found experimentally with a series of strain gages bonded ahead of the slit tip. A three-dimensional finite element program (PAFAC) was used to predict the strain distribution ahead of the slit tip for several layups. For all layups, except the (0) sub 8, the yielding of the metal matrix caused the fiber stress concentration factor to increase with increasing load. This is contrary to the behavior seen in homogeneous materials where yielding causes the stress concentration to drop. For the (0) sub 8 laminate, yielding of the matrix caused a decrease in the fiber stress concentration. The finite element analysis predicted these trends correctly.

  10. Elastic-plastic stress concentrations around crack-like notches in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Bigelow, C. A.

    1989-01-01

    Continuous fiber silicon-carbide/aluminum composite laminates with slits were tested statically to failure. Five different layups were examined: (0) sub 8, (0 sub 2/ + or - 45) sub s, (0/90) sub 2s), (0/ + or - 45/90 sub s), and (+ or - 45) sub 2s. Either a 9.5 or a 19 mm slit was machined in the center of each specimen. The strain distribution ahead of the slit tip was found experimentally with a series of strain gages bonded ahead of the slit tip. A three-dimensional finite element program (PAFAC) was used to predict the strain distribution ahead of the slit tip for several layups. For all layups, except the (0) sub 8, the yielding of the metal matrix caused the fiber stress concentration factor to increase with increasing load. This is contrary to the behavior seen in homogeneous materials where yielding causes the stress concentration to drop. For the (0) sub 8 laminate, yielding of the matrix caused a decrease in the fiber stress concentration. The finite element analysis predicted these trends correctly.

  11. Molecular Basis of Passive Stress Relaxation in Human Soleus Fibers: Assessment of the Role of Immunoglobulin-Like Domain Unfolding

    PubMed Central

    Trombitás, K.; Wu, Y.; McNabb, M.; Greaser, M.; Kellermayer, M. S. Z.; Labeit, S.; Granzier, H.

    2003-01-01

    Titin (also known as connectin) is the main determinant of physiological levels of passive muscle force. This force is generated by the extensible I-band region of the molecule, which is constructed of the PEVK domain and tandem-immunoglobulin segments comprising serially linked immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains. It is unresolved whether under physiological conditions Ig domains remain folded and act as “spacers” that set the sarcomere length at which the PEVK extends or whether they contribute to titin's extensibility by unfolding. Here we focused on whether Ig unfolding plays a prominent role in stress relaxation (decay of force at constant length after stretch) using mechanical and immunolabeling studies on relaxed human soleus muscle fibers and Monte Carlo simulations. Simulation experiments using Ig-domain unfolding parameters obtained in earlier single-molecule atomic force microscopy experiments recover the phenomenology of stress relaxation and predict large-scale unfolding in titin during an extended period (>∼20 min) of relaxation. By contrast, immunolabeling experiments failed to demonstrate large-scale unfolding. Thus, under physiological conditions in relaxed human soleus fibers, Ig domains are more stable than predicted by atomic force microscopy experiments. Ig-domain unfolding did not become more pronounced after gelsolin treatment, suggesting that the thin filament is unlikely to significantly contribute to the mechanical stability of the domains. We conclude that in human soleus fibers, Ig unfolding cannot solely explain stress relaxation. PMID:14581214

  12. Molecular basis of passive stress relaxation in human soleus fibers: assessment of the role of immunoglobulin-like domain unfolding.

    PubMed

    Trombitás, K; Wu, Y; McNabb, M; Greaser, M; Kellermayer, M S Z; Labeit, S; Granzier, H

    2003-11-01

    Titin (also known as connectin) is the main determinant of physiological levels of passive muscle force. This force is generated by the extensible I-band region of the molecule, which is constructed of the PEVK domain and tandem-immunoglobulin segments comprising serially linked immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains. It is unresolved whether under physiological conditions Ig domains remain folded and act as "spacers" that set the sarcomere length at which the PEVK extends or whether they contribute to titin's extensibility by unfolding. Here we focused on whether Ig unfolding plays a prominent role in stress relaxation (decay of force at constant length after stretch) using mechanical and immunolabeling studies on relaxed human soleus muscle fibers and Monte Carlo simulations. Simulation experiments using Ig-domain unfolding parameters obtained in earlier single-molecule atomic force microscopy experiments recover the phenomenology of stress relaxation and predict large-scale unfolding in titin during an extended period (> approximately 20 min) of relaxation. By contrast, immunolabeling experiments failed to demonstrate large-scale unfolding. Thus, under physiological conditions in relaxed human soleus fibers, Ig domains are more stable than predicted by atomic force microscopy experiments. Ig-domain unfolding did not become more pronounced after gelsolin treatment, suggesting that the thin filament is unlikely to significantly contribute to the mechanical stability of the domains. We conclude that in human soleus fibers, Ig unfolding cannot solely explain stress relaxation.

  13. Actin stress fiber disruption and tropomysin isoform switching in normal thyroid epithelial cells stimulated by thyrotropin and phorbol esters

    SciTech Connect

    Roger, P.P.; Rickaert, F.; Lamy, F.; Authelet, M.; Dumont, J.E. )

    1989-05-01

    Thyrotropin (TSH), through cyclic AMP, promotes both proliferation and differentiation expression in dog thyroid epithelial cells in primary culture, whereas the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) also stimulates proliferation but antagonizes differentiating effects of TSH. In this study, within 20 min both factors triggered the disruption of actin-containing stress fibers. This process preceded distinct morphological changes: cytoplasmic retraction and arborization in response to TSH and cyclic AMP, cell shape distortion, and increased motility in response to TPA and diacylglycerol. TSH and TPA also induced a marked decrease in the synthesis of three high M{sub r} tropomyosin isoforms, which were not present in dog thyroid tissue but appeared in culture during cell spreading and stress fiber formation. The tropomyosin isoform switching observed here closely resembled similar processes in various cells transformed by oncogenic viruses. However, it did not correlate with differentiation or mitogenic activation. Contrasting with current hypothesis on this process in transformed cells, tropomyosin isoform switching in normal thyroid cells was preceded and thus might be caused by early disruption of stress fibers.

  14. Elastic-plastic stress concentrations around crack-like notches in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Bigelow, C. A.

    1989-01-01

    Continuous fiber silicon-carbide/aluminum composite laminates with slits were tested statically to failure. Five different layups were examined: (0) sub 8, (0 sub 2/ + or - 45) sub s, (0/90) sub 2s), (0/ + or - 45/90 sub s), and (+ or - 45) sub 2s. Either a 9.5 or a 19 mm slit was machined in the center of each specimen. The strain distribution ahead of the slit tip was found experimentally with a series of strain gages bonded ahead of the slit tip. A three-dimensional finite element program (PAFAC) was used to predict the strain distribution ahead of the slit tip for several layups. For all layups, except the (0) sub 8, the yielding of the metal matrix caused the fiber stress concentration factor to increase with increasing load. This is contrary to the behavior seen in homogeneous materials where yielding causes the stress concentration to drop. For the (0) sub 8 laminate, yielding of the matrix caused a decrease in the fiber stress concentration. The finite element analysis predicted these trends correctly.

  15. A mutant form of the rho protein can restore stress fibers and adhesion plaques in v-src transformed fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Mayer, T; Meyer, M; Janning, A; Schiedel, A C; Barnekow, A

    1999-03-25

    The organization of polymerized actin in the mammalian cell is regulated by several members of the rho family. Three rho proteins, cdc42, rac and rho act in a cascade to organize the intracellular actin cytoskeleton. Rho proteins are involved in the formation of actin stress fibers and adhesion plaques in fibroblasts. During transformation of mammalian cells by oncogenes the cytoskeleton is rearranged and stress fibers and adhesion plaques are disintegrated. In this paper we investigate the function of the rho protein in RR1022 rat fibroblasts transformed by the Rous sarcoma virus. Two activated mutants of the rho protein, rho G14V and rho Q63L, and a dominant negative mutant, rho N1171, were stably transfected into RR1022 cells. The resulting cell lines were analysed for the organization of polymerized actin and adhesion plaques. Cells expressing rho Q63L, but not rho wt, rho G14V or rho N1171, showed an altered morphology. These cells displayed a flat, fibroblast like shape when compared with the RR1022 ancestor cells. Immunofluorescence analyses revealed that actin stress fibers and adhesion plaques were rearranged in these cells. We conclude from these data that an active rho protein can restore elements of the actin cytoskeleton in transformed cells by overriding the tyrosine kinase phosphorylation induced by the pp60(v-src).

  16. Salinomycin inhibits growth of pancreatic cancer and cancer cell migration by disruption of actin stress fiber integrity.

    PubMed

    Schenk, Miriam; Aykut, Berk; Teske, Christian; Giese, Nathalia A; Weitz, Juergen; Welsch, Thilo

    2015-03-28

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is characterized by aggressive growth, early metastasis and high resistance to chemotherapy. Salinomycin is a promising compound eliminating cancer stem cells and retarding cancer cell migration. The present study investigated the effectiveness of salinomycin against PDAC in vivo and elucidated the mechanism of PDAC growth inhibition. Salinomycin treatment was well tolerated by the mice and significantly reduced tumor growth after 19 days compared to the control group (each n = 16). There was a trend that salinomycin also impeded metastatic spread to the liver and peritoneum. Whereas salinomycin moderately induced apoptosis and retarded proliferation at 5-10 µM, it strongly inhibited cancer cell migration that was accompanied by a marked loss of actin stress fibers after 6-9 h. Salinomycin silenced RhoA activity, and loss of stress fibers could be reversed by Rho activation. Moreover, salinomycin dislocated fascin from filopodia and stimulated Rac-associated circular dorsal ruffle formation. In conclusion, salinomycin is an effective and promising compound against PDAC. Besides its known stem cell-specific cytotoxic effects, salinomycin blocks cancer cell migration by disrupting stress fiber integrity and affecting the mutual Rho-GTPase balance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Vimentin intermediate filaments control actin stress fiber assembly through GEF-H1 and RhoA

    PubMed Central

    Peränen, Johan; Schaible, Niccole; Cheng, Fang; Eriksson, John E.; Krishnan, Ramaswamy

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The actin and intermediate filament cytoskeletons contribute to numerous cellular processes, including morphogenesis, cytokinesis and migration. These two cytoskeletal systems associate with each other, but the underlying mechanisms of this interaction are incompletely understood. Here, we show that inactivation of vimentin leads to increased actin stress fiber assembly and contractility, and consequent elevation of myosin light chain phosphorylation and stabilization of tropomyosin-4.2 (see Geeves et al., 2015). The vimentin-knockout phenotypes can be rescued by re-expression of wild-type vimentin, but not by the non-filamentous ‘unit length form’ vimentin, demonstrating that intact vimentin intermediate filaments are required to facilitate the effects on the actin cytoskeleton. Finally, we provide evidence that the effects of vimentin on stress fibers are mediated by activation of RhoA through its guanine nucleotide exchange factor GEF-H1 (also known as ARHGEF2). Vimentin depletion induces phosphorylation of the microtubule-associated GEF-H1 on Ser886, and thereby promotes RhoA activity and actin stress fiber assembly. Taken together, these data reveal a new mechanism by which intermediate filaments regulate contractile actomyosin bundles, and may explain why elevated vimentin expression levels correlate with increased migration and invasion of cancer cells. PMID:28096473

  18. Raman Study of Uncoated and P-bn/sic-coated Hi-nicalon Reinforced Celsian Matrix Composites. Part 2; Residual Stress in the Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gouadec, Gwenael; Colomban, Philippe; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2000-01-01

    Band shifts on Raman spectra were used to assess, at a microscopic scale, the residual strain existing in Hi-Nicalon fibers reinforcing celsian matrix composites. Uncoated as well as p-BN/SiC- and p-B(Si)N/SiC-coated Hi-Nicalon fibers were used as the reinforcements. We unambiguously conclude that the fibers are in a state of compressive residual stress. Quantitative determination of the residual stress was made possible by taking into account the heating induced by laser probing and by using a reference line, of fixed wavenumber. We found fiber compressive residual stress values between 110 and 960 MPa depending on the fiber/matrix coating in the composite. A stress relaxation-like phenomenon was observed at the surface of p-BN/SiC-coated Hi-Nicalon fibers whereas the uncoated or p-B(Si)N/SiC-coated Hi-Nicalon fibers did not show any stress relaxation in the Celsian matrix composites.

  19. Anisotropy of human muscle via non invasive impedance measurements. Frequency dependence of the impedance changes during isometric contractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashuri, Hektor

    In this thesis we present non invasive muscle impedance measurements using rotatable probes extending the work done by Aaron et al. (1997) by measuring not only the real part of the impedance but the imaginary part as well. The results reveal orientations of underlying muscle fibers via minima in resistance and reactance versus angle curves, suggesting this method as potentially useful for studying muscle properties in clinical and physiological research. Calculations of the current distribution for a slab of material with anisotropic conductivity show that the current distribution depends strongly on the separation of two current electrodes and as well as on its conducting anisotropy. Forearm muscle impedance measurements at 50 kHz done by Shiffman et al. (2003) had shown that both resistance (R) and reactance (X) increase during isometric contraction. We have extended these measurements in the 3 to 100 kHz range and we found that resistance (R) and reactance (X) both increase and their changes increased or decreased at frequency dependent rates. Analysis based on circuit models of changes in R and X during the short contraction pulses showed that the extra cellular fluid resistance increased by 3.9 +/- 1.4 %, while the capacitance increased by 5.6 +/- 2 %. For long contraction pulses at very low frequencies: (1) there was practically no change in R during contraction, which implies that these changes are due to cellular membrane or intracellular effects with the extra cellular water component not participating, and (2) in post contraction stage there were no morphological changes which means that drifts in R can only be due to physiological changes. Following Shiffman et al. (2003) we measured impedance changes of R and X during a triangular shaped pulse of force generated via isometric forearm muscle contraction at 50 kHz. We measured these changes in 3-100 kHz frequency range for a stair case pulse of forces and the results showed that they are frequency

  20. Feeding and lying behavior of heat-stressed early lactation cows fed low fiber diets containing roughage and nonforage fiber sources.

    PubMed

    Kanjanapruthipong, J; Junlapho, W; Karnjanasirm, K

    2015-02-01

    In addition to reduced nutrient intake, an environmental thermal load may directly affect milk yield in heat-stressed dairy cows. Feeding and lying behaviors of early lactation cows fed low fiber diets containing neutral detergent fiber (NDF) from roughage and nonforage fiber sources (NFFS) were investigated under summer conditions in Thailand. Immediately after calving, 30 multiparous cows (87.5% Holstein × 12.5% Sahiwal) were randomly allocated to dietary treatments for 63 d in a completely randomized design. The dietary treatments contained 25% of dry matter (DM) as dietary NDF. The control diet consisted of 13.9% roughage NDF from rice straw (RS). Two additional treatments were created by replacing 3.9% of DM with NDF from either soy hulls (SH) or cassava (Manihot esculenta Grantz) residues (CR), so that the roughage NDF content was reduced to 10%. During the experimental period, the minimum and maximum temperature-humidity indices (THI) were 86.4±2.5 and 91.5±2.7 during the day and 74.2±2.1 and 81.0±2.5 during the night, respectively, indicating conditions appropriate for induction of extreme heat stress. The duration of feeding and lying bouts decreased linearly with increasing THI. The DM intake during the day was greater for cows fed diets containing SH and CR than for those fed the diet containing NDF from RS. The number of meals during the day and night was lower, whereas meal size and meal length during the day and night were greater for cows fed diets containing SH and CR. Cows fed diets containing SH and CR lay down less frequently and longer during the day. These results suggest that under the severe heat stress during the day, early lactation cows fed the diet containing NFFS increased DM intake by increasing meal length and meal size rather than by increasing meal frequency and they spent more time lying. Cows fed diets containing NDF from SH and CR produced more 4% fat-corrected milk, lost less body weight, and had lower rectal temperatures

  1. Endoplasmic reticulum stress induces myostatin precursor protein and NF-kappaB in cultured human muscle fibers: relevance to inclusion body myositis.

    PubMed

    Nogalska, Anna; Wojcik, Slawomir; Engel, W King; McFerrin, Janis; Askanas, Valerie

    2007-04-01

    Sporadic-inclusion body myositis (s-IBM) is the most common progressive muscle disease of older persons. It leads to pronounced muscle fiber atrophy and weakness, and there is no successful treatment. We have previously shown that myostatin precursor protein (MstnPP) and myostatin (Mstn) dimer are increased in biopsied s-IBM muscle fibers, and proposed that MstnPP/Mstn increase may contribute to muscle fiber atrophy and weakness in s-IBM patients. Mstn is known to be a negative regulator of muscle fiber mass. It is synthesized as MstnPP, which undergoes posttranslational processing in the muscle fiber to produce mature, active Mstn. To explore possible mechanisms involved in Mstn abnormalities in s-IBM, in the present study we utilized primary cultures of normal human muscle fibers and experimentally modified the intracellular micro-environment to induce endoplasmic-reticulum (ER)-stress, thereby mimicking an important aspect of the s-IBM muscle fiber milieu. ER stress was induced by treating well-differentiated cultured muscle fibers with either tunicamycin or thapsigargin, both well-established ER stress inducers. Our results indicate for the first time that the ER stress significantly increased MstnPP mRNA and protein. The results also suggest that in our system ER stress activates NF-kappaB, and we suggest that MstnPP increase occurred through the ER-stress-activated NF-kappaB. We therefore propose a novel mechanism leading to the Mstn increase in s-IBM. Accordingly, interfering with pathways inducing ER stress, NF-kappaB activation or its action on the MstnPP gene promoter might prevent Mstn increase and provide a new therapeutic approach for s-IBM and, possibly, for muscle atrophy in other neuromuscular diseases.

  2. Fiber Bragg grating sensor to monitor stress kinetics in drying process of commercial latex paints.

    PubMed

    de Lourenço, Ivo; Possetti, Gustavo R C; Muller, Marcia; Fabris, José L

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we report a study about the application of packaged fiber Bragg gratings used as strain sensors to monitor the stress kinetics during the drying process of commercial latex paints. Three stages of drying with distinct mechanical deformation and temporal behaviors were identified for the samples, with mechanical deformation from 15 μm to 21 μm in the longitudinal film dimension on time intervals from 370 to 600 minutes. Drying time tests based on human sense technique described by the Brazilian Technical Standards NBR 9558 were also done. The results obtained shows that human sense technique has a limited perception of the drying process and that the optical measurement system proposed can be used to characterize correctly the dry-through stage of paint. The influence of solvent (water) addition in the drying process was also investigated. The paint was diluted with four parts paint and one part water (80% paint), and one part paint and one part water (50% paint). It was observed that the increase of the water ratio mixed into the paint decreases both the mechanical deformation magnitude and the paint dry-through time. Contraction of 5.2 μm and 10.4 μm were measured for concentrations of 50% and 80% of paint in the mixture, respectively. For both diluted paints the dry-through time was approximately 170 minutes less than undiluted paint. The optical technique proposed in this work can contribute to the development of new standards to specify the drying time of paint coatings.

  3. Fiber Bragg Grating Sensor to Monitor Stress Kinetics in Drying Process of Commercial Latex Paints

    PubMed Central

    de Lourenço, Ivo; Possetti, Gustavo R. C.; Muller, Marcia; Fabris, José L.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we report a study about the application of packaged fiber Bragg gratings used as strain sensors to monitor the stress kinetics during the drying process of commercial latex paints. Three stages of drying with distinct mechanical deformation and temporal behaviors were identified for the samples, with mechanical deformation from 15 μm to 21 μm in the longitudinal film dimension on time intervals from 370 to 600 minutes. Drying time tests based on human sense technique described by the Brazilian Technical Standards NBR 9558 were also done. The results obtained shows that human sense technique has a limited perception of the drying process and that the optical measurement system proposed can be used to characterize correctly the dry-through stage of paint. The influence of solvent (water) addition in the drying process was also investigated. The paint was diluted with four parts paint and one part water (80% paint), and one part paint and one part water (50% paint). It was observed that the increase of the water ratio mixed into the paint decreases both the mechanical deformation magnitude and the paint dry-through time. Contraction of 5.2 μm and 10.4 μm were measured for concentrations of 50% and 80% of paint in the mixture, respectively. For both diluted paints the dry-through time was approximately 170 minutes less than undiluted paint. The optical technique proposed in this work can contribute to the development of new standards to specify the drying time of paint coatings. PMID:22399906

  4. Vinculin tension distributions of individual stress fibers within cell–matrix adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching-Wei; Kumar, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Summary Actomyosin stress fibers (SFs) enable cells to exert traction on planar extracellular matrices (ECMs) by tensing focal adhesions (FAs) at the cell–ECM interface. Although it is widely appreciated that the spatial and temporal distribution of these tensile forces play key roles in polarity, motility, fate choice, and other defining cell behaviors, virtually nothing is known about how an individual SF quantitatively contributes to tensile loads borne by specific molecules within associated FAs. We address this key open question by using femtosecond laser ablation to sever single SFs in cells while tracking tension across vinculin using a molecular optical sensor. We show that disruption of a single SF reduces tension across vinculin in FAs located throughout the cell, with enriched vinculin tension reduction in FAs oriented parallel to the targeted SF. Remarkably, however, some subpopulations of FAs exhibit enhanced vinculin tension upon SF irradiation and undergo dramatic, unexpected transitions between tension-enhanced and tension-reduced states. These changes depend strongly on the location of the severed SF, consistent with our earlier finding that different SF pools are regulated by distinct myosin activators. We critically discuss the extent to which these measurements can be interpreted in terms of whole-FA tension and traction and propose a model that relates SF tension to adhesive loads and cell shape stability. These studies represent the most direct and high-resolution intracellular measurements of SF contributions to tension on specific FA proteins to date and offer a new paradigm for investigating regulation of adhesive complexes by cytoskeletal force. PMID:23687380

  5. Frequency-dependence of psychophysical and physiological responses to hand-transmitted vibration.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    This invited paper reviews experimental studies of the frequency-dependence of absolute thresholds for the perception of vibration, equivalent comfort contours, temporary changes in sensation caused by vibration, and reductions in finger blood flow caused by hand-transmitted vibration. Absolute thresholds depend on the contact conditions but for a typical hand grip the thresholds show greatest sensitivity to acceleration around 125 Hz. The frequency-dependence of discomfort caused by hand-transmitted vibration depends on vibration magnitude: similar to absolute thresholds at low magnitudes, but the discomfort at higher magnitudes is similar when the vibration velocity is similar (at frequencies between about 16 and 400 Hz). Hand-transmitted vibration induces temporary elevations in vibrotactile thresholds that reflect the sensory mechanisms excited by the vibration and are therefore highly dependent on the frequency of vibration. Hand-transmitted vibration reduces finger blood flow during and after exposure; when the vibration velocity is similar at all frequencies there is more vasoconstriction at frequencies greater than 63 Hz than at lower frequencies. A single frequency weighting cannot provide a good indication of how all effects of hand-transmitted vibration depend on vibration frequency. Furthermore, a single frequency weighting provides only an approximate indication of any single response, because many factors influence the frequency-dependence of responses to hand-transmitted vibration, including the magnitude of vibration, contact conditions, and individual differences. Although the frequency weighting in current standards extends from 8 to 1,000 Hz, frequencies greater than 400 Hz rarely increase the weighted value on tools and there is currently little psychophysical or physiological evidence of their effects.

  6. Spatial mosaic formation through frequency-dependent selection in Müllerian mimicry complexes.

    PubMed

    Sherratt, Thomas N

    2006-05-21

    Although contemporary models of Müllerian mimicry have considered the movement of interfacial boundaries between two distinct mimetic forms, and even the possibility of polymorphisms in two patch systems, no model has considered how multiple forms of Müllerian mimics might evolve and be maintained over large geographical areas. A spatially explicit individual-based model for the evolution of Müllerian mimicry is presented, in which two unpalatable species are distributed over discrete cells within a regular lattice. Populations in each cell are capable of genetic drift and experience localized dispersal as well as frequency-dependent selection by predators. When each unpalatable prey species was introduced into a random cell and allowed to spread, then mimicry evolved throughout the system in the form of a spatial mosaic of phenotypes, separated by narrow "hybrid zones". The primary mechanism generating phenotypic diversity was the occasional establishment of new mutant forms in unoccupied cells and their subsequent maintenance (and spread) through frequency-dependent selection. The mean number of discrete clusters of the same morph that formed in the lattice was higher the higher the intensity of predation, and higher the lower the dispersal rate of unpalatable prey. Under certain conditions the hybrid zones moved, in a direction dependent on the curvature of their interfacial boundaries. However, the mimetic mosaics were highly stable when the intensity of predation was high and the rate of prey dispersal was low. Overall, this model highlights how a stable mosaic of different mimetic forms can evolve from a range of starting conditions through a combination of chance effects and localized frequency-dependent selection.

  7. Frequency-dependent dielectric function of semiconductors with application to physisorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fan; Tao, Jianmin; Rappe, Andrew M.

    2017-01-01

    The dielectric function is one of the most important quantities that describes the electrical and optical properties of solids. Accurate modeling of the frequency-dependent dielectric function has great significance in the study of the long-range van der Waals (vdW) interaction for solids and adsorption. In this work we calculate the frequency-dependent dielectric functions of semiconductors and insulators using the G W method with and without exciton effects, as well as efficient semilocal density functional theory (DFT), and compare these calculations with a model frequency-dependent dielectric function. We find that for semiconductors with moderate band gaps, the model dielectric functions, G W values, and DFT calculations all agree well with each other. However, for insulators with strong exciton effects, the model dielectric functions have a better agreement with accurate G W values than the DFT calculations, particularly in high-frequency region. To understand this, we repeat the DFT calculations with scissors correction, by shifting the DFT Kohn-Sham energy levels to match the experimental band gap. We find that scissors correction only moderately improves the DFT dielectric function in the low-frequency region. Based on the dielectric functions calculated with different methods, we make a comparative study by applying these dielectric functions to calculate the vdW coefficients (C3 and C5) for adsorption of rare-gas atoms on a variety of surfaces. We find that the vdW coefficients obtained with the nearly free electron gas-based model dielectric function agree quite well with those obtained from the G W dielectric function, in particular for adsorption on semiconductors, leading to an overall error of less than 7% for C3 and 5% for C5. This demonstrates the reliability of the model dielectric function for the study of physisorption.

  8. Sensitivity of seismic measurements to frequency-dependent attenuation and upper mantle structure: An initial approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellis, C.; Holtzman, B.

    2014-07-01

    This study addresses the sensitivity of seismic attenuation measurements to dissipative mechanisms and structure in the Earth's upper mantle. The Andrade anelastic model fits experimental attenuation data with a mild power law frequency dependence and can be scaled from laboratory to Earth conditions. We incorporate this anelastic model into 400km 1-D thermal profiles of the upper mantle. These continuous-spectrum models are approximated by multiple relaxation mechanisms that are implemented within a finite-difference scheme to perform wave propagation simulations in 1-D domains. In two sets of numerical experiments, we evaluate the measurable signature of the intrinsic attenuation structure. The two sets are defined by thermal profiles with added step functions of temperature, varying in (i) amplitude and depth or (ii) amplitude and sharpness. The corresponding synthetic data are processed using both the conventional t* approach, i.e., a linear regression of the displacement frequency spectrum, and an alternative nonlinear fit to identify the integrated value of attenuation and its frequency dependence. The measured sensitivity patterns are analyzed to assess the effects of the anelastic model and its spatial distribution on seismic data (in the absence of scattering effects). We have two straightforward results: (1) the frequency dependence power law is recoverable from the measurements; (2) t* is sensitive to both the depth and the amplitude of the step, and it is insensitive to the sharpness of the step, in the 0.25 to 2 Hz band. There is much potential for gaining information about the upper mantle thermodynamic state from careful interpretation of attenuation.

  9. Combined elevated temperature and soil waterlogging stresses inhibit cell elongation by altering osmolyte composition of the developing cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) fiber.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yinglong; Wang, Haimiao; Hu, Wei; Wang, Shanshan; Wang, Youhua; Snider, John L; Zhou, Zhiguo

    2017-03-01

    Soil waterlogging events and high temperature conditions occur frequently in the Yangtze River Valley, yet the effects of these co-occurring stresses on fiber elongation have received little attention. In the current study, the combined effect of elevated temperature (ET) and soil waterlogging (SW) more negatively affected final fiber length (reduced by 5.4%-11.3%) than either stress alone by altering the composition of osmotically active solutes (sucrose, malate, and K(+)), where SW had the most pronounced effect. High temperature accelerated early fiber development, but limited the duration of elongation, thereby limiting final fiber length. Treatment of ET alone altered fiber sucrose content mainly through decreased source strength and the expression of the sucrose transporter gene GhSUT-1, making sucrose availability the primary determinant of final fiber length under ET. Waterlogging stress alone decreased source strength, down-regulated GhSUT-1 expression and enhanced SuSy catalytic activity for sucrose reduction. Waterlogging treatment alone also limited fiber malate production by down-regulating GhPEPC-1 & -2. However, combined elevated temperature and waterlogging limited primary cell wall synthesis by affecting GhCESAs genes and showed a negative impact on all three major osmotic solutes through the regulation of GhSUT-1, GhPEPC-1 & -2 and GhKT-1 expression and altered SuSy activity, which functioned together to produce a shorter fiber length. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Influences of temperature, oxidative stress, and phosphorylation on binding of heat shock proteins in skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Larkins, Noni T; Murphy, Robyn M; Lamb, Graham D

    2012-09-15

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) help maintain cellular function in stressful situations, but the processes controlling their interactions with target proteins are not well defined. This study examined the binding of HSP72, HSP25, and αB-crystallin in skeletal muscle fibers following various stresses. Rat soleus (SOL) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles were subjected in vitro to heat stress or strongly fatiguing stimulation. Superficial fibers were "skinned" by microdissection and HSP diffusibility assessed from the extent of washout following 10- to 30 min exposure to a physiological intracellular solution. In fibers from nonstressed (control) SOL muscle, >80% of each HSP is readily diffusible. However, after heating a muscle to 40°C for 30 min ∼95% of HSP25 and αB-crystallin becomes tightly bound at nonmembranous myofibrillar sites, whereas HSP72 bound at membranous sites only after heat treatment to ≥44°C. The ratio of reduced to oxidized cytoplasmic glutathione (GSH:GSSG) decreased approximately two- and fourfold after heating muscles to 40° and 45°C, respectively. The reducing agent dithiothreitol reversed HSP72 binding in heated muscles but had no effect on the other HSPs. Intense in vitro stimulation of SOL muscles, sufficient to elicit substantial oxidation-related loss of maximum force and approximately fourfold decrease in the GSH:GSSG ratio, had no effect on diffusibility of any of the HSPs. When skinned fibers from heat-treated muscles were bathed with additional exogenous HSP72, total binding increased approximately two- and 10-fold, respectively, in SOL and EDL fibers, possibly reflective of the relative sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase pump densities in the two fiber types. Phosphorylation at Ser59 on αB-crystallin and Ser85 on HSP25 increased with heat treatment but did not appear to determine HSP binding. The findings highlight major differences in the processes controlling binding of HSP72 and the two small HSPs. Binding

  11. Determination of ferroelectric contributions to electromechanical response by frequency dependent piezoresponse force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Seol, Daehee; Park, Seongjae; Varenyk, Olexandr V.; Lee, Shinbuhm; Lee, Ho Nyung; Morozovska, Anna N.; Kim, Yunseok

    2016-07-28

    Hysteresis loop analysis via piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) is typically performed to probe the existence of ferroelectricity at the nanoscale. But, such an approach is rather complex in accurately determining the pure contribution of ferroelectricity to the PFM. We suggest a facile method to discriminate the ferroelectric effect from the electromechanical (EM) response through the use of frequency dependent ac amplitude sweep with combination of hysteresis loops in PFM. This combined study through experimental and theoretical approaches verifies that this method can be used as a new tool to differentiate the ferroelectric effect from the other factors that contribute to the EM response.

  12. Monitoring processing properties of high performance thermoplastics using frequency dependent electromagnetic sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kranbuehl, D. E.; Delos, S. E.; Hoff, M. S.; Weller, L. W.; Haverty, P. D.

    1987-01-01

    An in situ NDE dielectric impedance measurement method has been developed for ascertaining the cure processing properties of high temperature advanced thermoplastic and thermosetting resins, using continuous frequency-dependent measurements and analyses of complex permittivity over 9 orders of magnitude and 6 decades of frequency at temperatures up to 400 C. Both ionic and Debye-like dipolar relaxation processes are monitored. Attention is given to LARC-TPI, PEEK, and poly(arylene ether) resins' viscosity, glass transition temperature, recrystallization, and residual solvent content and evolution properties.

  13. Finite element modeling of truss structures with frequency-dependent material damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesieutre, George A.

    1991-01-01

    A physically motivated modelling technique for structural dynamic analysis that accommodates frequency dependent material damping was developed. Key features of the technique are the introduction of augmenting thermodynamic fields (AFT) to interact with the usual mechanical displacement field, and the treatment of the resulting coupled governing equations using finite element analysis methods. The AFT method is fully compatible with current structural finite element analysis techniques. The method is demonstrated in the dynamic analysis of a 10-bay planar truss structure, a structure representative of those contemplated for use in future space systems.

  14. Meteorological Excitations of Polar Motion for an Earth Model with Frequency-dependent Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W.; Ray, J.; Li, J.; Huang, C.; Shen, W.

    2013-12-01

    Polar motion excitation involves the mass redistributions and motions of the Earth system relative to the mantle, as well as the frequency-dependent rheology of the Earth, where the latter has recently been modeled in the form of complex and frequency-dependent Love numbers and polar motion excitation transfer functions. At seasonal and intra-seasonal time scales, polar motions are dominated by angular momentum fluctuations due to mass redistributions and relative motions in the atmosphere, oceans, and continental water, snow and ice. In this study, we compare the geophysical excitations derived from various global atmospheric, oceanic and hydrological models (NCEP, ECCO, ERA40, ERAinterim and ECMWF operational products), and construct two model sets LDC1 and LDC2 by combining the above models with a least difference method, which selects FFT coefficients of the above data series closest to those of the geodetic excitation at each frequency to build a new series. Comparisons between the geodetic excitation (derived from the polar motion series IERS EOP 08 C04) and the geophysical excitations (based on those meteorological models) imply that the atmospheric models are the most reliable while the hydrological ones suffer from significant uncertainties; that the ERAinterim is, in general, the best model set among the original ones, but the combined models LDC1 and LDC2 are much better than ERAinterim; and that applying the frequency-dependent transfer functions to LDC1 and LDC2 improves their agreements with the geodetic excitation. Thus, we conclude that the combined models LDC1 and LDC2 are reliable, and the complex and frequency-dependent Love numbers and polar motion excitation transfer functions are well modeled. This study is supported in parts by the National 973 Project of China (No. 2013CB733305), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 41174011, 41128003 and 11073044), and the Open Fund of the State Key Laboratory of Geodesy and Earth

  15. Meteorological excitations of polar motion for an Earth model with frequency-dependent responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Ray, Jim; Li, JianCheng; Shen, WenBin; Huang, ChengLi

    2014-05-01

    Polar motion excitation involves the mass redistributions and motions of the Earth system relative to the mantle, as well as the frequency-dependent rheology of the Earth, where the latter has recently been modeled in the form of complex and frequency-dependent Love numbers and polar motion excitation transfer functions. At seasonal and intra-seasonal time scales, polar motions are dominated by angular momentum fluctuations due to mass redistributions and relative motions in the atmosphere, oceans, and continental water, snow and ice. In this study, we compare the geophysical excitations derived from various global atmospheric, oceanic and hydrological models (NCEP, ECCO, ERA40, ERAinterim and ECMWF operational products), and construct two model sets LDC1 and LDC2 by combining the above models with a least difference method, which selects FFT coefficients of the above data series closest to those of the geodetic excitation at each frequency to build a new series. Comparisons between the geodetic excitation (derived from the polar motion series IERS EOP 08 C04) and the geophysical excitations (based on those meteorological models) imply that the atmospheric models are the most reliable while the hydrological ones suffer from significant uncertainties; that the ERAinterim is, in general, the best model set among the original ones, but the combined models LDC1 and LDC2 are much better than ERAinterim; and that applying the frequency-dependent transfer functions to LDC1 and LDC2 improves their agreements with the geodetic excitation. Thus, we conclude that the combined models LDC1 and LDC2 are reliable, and the complex and frequency-dependent Love numbers and polar motion excitation transfer functions are well modeled. This study is supported in parts by the National 973 Project of China (No. 2013CB733301 and 2013CB733305), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 41174011, 41128003 and 11073044), and the Open Fund of the State Key Laboratory of Geodesy

  16. Frequency-dependent tsunami-amplification factor derived from tsunami numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsushima, H.

    2016-12-01

    I develop frequency-dependent tsunami-amplification factor for real-time correction of tsunami site response for tsunami early warning. A tsunami waveform at an observing point can be modeled by convolution of source, path and site effects in time domain. When we compare tsunami waveforms at observing points between outside and inside a bay, source and path effects can be regarded as equal. Thus, spectral ratio of the two waveforms gives frequency-dependent tsunami-amplification factor. If such amplification factor is prepared in advance of earthquake, its real-time convolution to offshore tsunami waveform provides tsunami prediction at coastal site. In this study, numerical tsunami simulations from many earthquakes were performed to synthesize tsunami waveforms that were used in spectral-ratio analysis. Then, I calculate average of the resulted spectral ratios to obtain frequency-dependent tsunami-amplification factor. Source models of magnitude 7.5-8.7 interplate earthquakes were assumed at 26 locations along the Japan-Kuril trenches, and then the resultant tsunamis were calculated numerically to synthesize 4-hour tsunami waveforms at observing points along the Japanese coast. Two tsunami simulations were performed for each source: one is based on nonlinear long wave theory, and the other is based on linear long wave theory. I focus on tsunami-amplification factor at Miyako bay, northeastern Japan. The resultant tsunami-height spectral ratio between the center of Miyako bay and the outside show two peaks at wave-periods of 20 and 40 min. These peak amplitudes derived from the nonlinear tsunami simulations are smaller than those from the linear simulations. It may be caused by energy attenuation due to bottom friction. On the other hand, in the spectral ratio between the closed-off section of the bay and the outside, peak at 20-min period cannot be seen. This indicates that frequency-dependent amplification factor may depend on location even in the same bay. These

  17. Frequency dependence of arrival direction and polarization of low-latitude whistlers and their ducted propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, K. ); Hayakawa, M. ); Shimakura, S. )

    1989-06-01

    The combined use of digital recorders and a fast Fourier transform analyzer made it possible for them to carry out wideband field analysis direction finding measurements of whistlers at low latitude (geomagnetic latitude 25{degree}N). It is found that there is a negligibly small frequency dependence of the ionospheric exit point and polarization of daytime whistlers during each occurrence peak with duration of about 2 hours, which lends further support to their propagation in a field-aligned duct in the magnetosphere for each occurrence peak.

  18. Frequency dependence of optical third-harmonic generation from doped graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulis, Vl. A.; Muryumin, E. E.; Gaiduk, E. A.

    2016-01-01

    In connection with the controversial question about the frequency dependence of the optical third-harmonic generation (THG) from doped graphene, which has recently been discussed in the literature, we develop an analytical theory for the THG susceptibility of doped graphene by using the original Genkin-Mednis nonlinear-conductivity-theory formalism including mixed intra- and interband terms. The theory is free of any nonphysical divergences at zero frequency, and it predicts the main resonant peak in the THG spectrum to be located at the photon energy ħω equal to two thirds of the Fermi energy EF of charge carriers in doped graphene.

  19. Determination of ferroelectric contributions to electromechanical response by frequency dependent piezoresponse force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Seol, Daehee; Park, Seongjae; Varenyk, Olexandr V; Lee, Shinbuhm; Lee, Ho Nyung; Morozovska, Anna N; Kim, Yunseok

    2016-07-28

    Hysteresis loop analysis via piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) is typically performed to probe the existence of ferroelectricity at the nanoscale. However, such an approach is rather complex in accurately determining the pure contribution of ferroelectricity to the PFM. Here, we suggest a facile method to discriminate the ferroelectric effect from the electromechanical (EM) response through the use of frequency dependent ac amplitude sweep with combination of hysteresis loops in PFM. Our combined study through experimental and theoretical approaches verifies that this method can be used as a new tool to differentiate the ferroelectric effect from the other factors that contribute to the EM response.

  20. Determination of ferroelectric contributions to electromechanical response by frequency dependent piezoresponse force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Seol, Daehee; Park, Seongjae; Varenyk, Olexandr V.; Lee, Shinbuhm; Lee, Ho Nyung; Morozovska, Anna N.; Kim, Yunseok

    2016-01-01

    Hysteresis loop analysis via piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) is typically performed to probe the existence of ferroelectricity at the nanoscale. However, such an approach is rather complex in accurately determining the pure contribution of ferroelectricity to the PFM. Here, we suggest a facile method to discriminate the ferroelectric effect from the electromechanical (EM) response through the use of frequency dependent ac amplitude sweep with combination of hysteresis loops in PFM. Our combined study through experimental and theoretical approaches verifies that this method can be used as a new tool to differentiate the ferroelectric effect from the other factors that contribute to the EM response. PMID:27466086

  1. KARAT-LAMBDA - frequency dependent ray-traced troposphere delays for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobiger, Thomas; Baron, Philippe

    2014-05-01

    Space-geodetic microwave techniques work under the assumption that the only dispersive, i.e. frequency dependent delay contribution is caused by the ionosphere. In general, the refractivity, even for the troposphere, is a complex quantity which can be denoted as N = N0 + (N'(f) + i N''(f)) where N0 is a frequency independent term, and N'(f) and N''(f) represent the complex frequency dependence. Thereby, the imaginary part can be used to derive the loss of energy (absorption) and the real part can be assigned to the changes in the propagation velocity (refraction) and thus describes the delay of an electromagnetic wave which propagates through that medium. Although the frequency dependent delay contribution appears to be of small order, one has to consider that signals are propagating through few kilometers of troposphere at high elevations to hundredths of kilometers at low elevations. Therefore, the Kashima Ray-Tracing package (Hobiger et al., 2008) has been modified (and named KARAT-LAMBDA) to enable the consideration of a frequency dependent refractivity. By using this tool, it was studied if and to which extent future space geodetic instruments are affected from dispersive troposphere delays. Moreover, a semi-empirical correction model for the microwave link of the Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space (ACES) has been developed, based on ray-tracing calculations with KARAT-LAMBDA. The proposed model (Hobiger et al., 2013) has been tested with simulated ISS overflights at different potential ACES ground station sites and it could be demonstrated that this model is capable to remove biases and elevation dependent features caused by the dispersive troposphere delay difference between the up-link and down-link. References: T. Hobiger, R. Ichikawa, T. Kondo, and Y. Koyama (2008), Fast and accurate ray-tracing algorithms for real-time space geodetic applications using numerical weather models, Journal of Geophysical Research, vol. 113, iss. D203027, pp. 1-14. T. Hobiger, D

  2. Determination of ferroelectric contributions to electromechanical response by frequency dependent piezoresponse force microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Seol, Daehee; Park, Seongjae; Varenyk, Olexandr V.; ...

    2016-07-28

    Hysteresis loop analysis via piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) is typically performed to probe the existence of ferroelectricity at the nanoscale. But, such an approach is rather complex in accurately determining the pure contribution of ferroelectricity to the PFM. We suggest a facile method to discriminate the ferroelectric effect from the electromechanical (EM) response through the use of frequency dependent ac amplitude sweep with combination of hysteresis loops in PFM. This combined study through experimental and theoretical approaches verifies that this method can be used as a new tool to differentiate the ferroelectric effect from the other factors that contribute tomore » the EM response.« less

  3. Frequency dependent directivity of guided waves excited by circular transducers in anisotropic composite plates.

    PubMed

    Glushkov, Evgeny; Glushkova, Natalia; Eremin, Artem; Lammering, Rolf; Neumann, Mirko

    2012-08-01

    Lamb wave propagation in fiber-reinforced composite plates is featured by a pronounced directivity of wave energy transfer along the fibers from a point surface source. In the case of non-point (sized) source, the main lobe of radiation diagram may turn with frequency up to the orthogonal to the fibers direction. This effect has been theoretically studied and physically explained in the context of semi-analytical integral-equation based mathematical model. The present paper gives its experimental verification.

  4. Polarization-dependent transverse-stress sensing based on photonic crystal fiber with gold-coated air-holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hai; Zhu, Chenghao; Wang, Yan; Tan, Ce; Li, Hongwei; Cheng, Deqiang

    2017-05-01

    A transverse-stress sensor with polarization filtering function based on a specially designed photonic crystal fiber (PCF) is proposed. Four ultralarge side-holes are introduced into the cladding layer, and two of them are gold-coated to enhance the stress sensitivity. The finite element method is applied to study the polarization-dependent wavelength-selective sensing characteristics at the optical communication wavelength. Results reveal that the sensor can achieve a high sensitivity in either direction that can be divided into an x-direction component and a y-direction component. Combining the advantages of side-hole structure and surface plasmon resonance technology, the proposed sensor is believed to be an excellent candidate for the transverse-stress measurement.

  5. Human Commercial Models' Eye Colour Shows Negative Frequency-Dependent Selection.

    PubMed

    Forti, Isabela Rodrigues Nogueira; Young, Robert John

    2016-01-01

    In this study we investigated the eye colour of human commercial models registered in the UK (400 female and 400 male) and Brazil (400 female and 400 male) to test the hypothesis that model eye colour frequency was the result of negative frequency-dependent selection. The eye colours of the models were classified as: blue, brown or intermediate. Chi-square analyses of data for countries separated by sex showed that in the United Kingdom brown eyes and intermediate colours were significantly more frequent than expected in comparison to the general United Kingdom population (P<0.001). In Brazil, the most frequent eye colour brown was significantly less frequent than expected in comparison to the general Brazilian population. These results support the hypothesis that model eye colour is the result of negative frequency-dependent selection. This could be the result of people using eye colour as a marker of genetic diversity and finding rarer eye colours more attractive because of the potential advantage more genetically diverse offspring that could result from such a choice. Eye colour may be important because in comparison to many other physical traits (e.g., hair colour) it is hard to modify, hide or disguise, and it is highly polymorphic.

  6. MODELING THE FREQUENCY DEPENDENCE OF RADIO BEAMS FOR CONE-DOMINANT PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P. F.; Han, J. L.; Wang, C. E-mail: hjl@nao.cas.cn

    2013-05-10

    Beam radii for cone-dominant pulsars follow a power-law relation with frequency, thetav = ({nu}/{nu}{sub 0}) {sup k} + thetav{sub 0}, which has not been well explained in previous works. We study this frequency dependence of beam radius (FDB) for cone-dominant pulsars by using the curvature radiation mechanism. Considering various density and energy distributions of particles in the pulsar open field-line region, we numerically simulate the emission intensity distribution across emission height and rotation phase, get integrated profiles at different frequencies, and obtain the FDB curves. For the density model of a conal-like distribution, the simulated profiles always shrink to one component at high frequencies. In the density model with two separated density patches, the profiles generally have two distinct components, and the power-law indices k are found to be in the range from -0.1 to -2.5, consistent with observational results. Energy distributions of streaming particles have significant influence on the frequency-dependence behavior. Radial energy decay of particles is desired to get proper thetav{sub 0} in models. We conclude that by using the curvature radiation mechanism, the observed FDB for the cone-dominant pulsars can only be explained by the emission model of particles in two density patches with a Gaussian energy distribution and a radial energy loss.

  7. Frequency-Dependent Altered Functional Connections of Default Mode Network in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Youjun; Yao, Hongxiang; Lin, Pan; Zheng, Liang; Li, Chenxi; Zhou, Bo; Wang, Pan; Zhang, Zengqiang; Wang, Luning; An, Ningyu; Wang, Jue; Zhang, Xi

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder associated with the progressive dysfunction of cognitive ability. Previous research has indicated that the default mode network (DMN) is closely related to cognition and is impaired in Alzheimer's disease. Because recent studies have shown that different frequency bands represent specific physiological functions, DMN functional connectivity studies of the different frequency bands based on resting state fMRI (RS-fMRI) data may provide new insight into AD pathophysiology. In this study, we explored the functional connectivity based on well-defined DMN regions of interest (ROIs) from the five frequency bands: slow-5 (0.01-0.027 Hz), slow-4 (0.027-0.073 Hz), slow-3 (0.073-0.198 Hz), slow-2 (0.198-0.25 Hzs) and standard low-frequency oscillations (LFO) (0.01-0.08 Hz). We found that the altered functional connectivity patterns are mainly in the frequency band of slow-5 and slow-4 and that the decreased connections are long distance, but some relatively short connections are increased. In addition, the altered functional connections of the DMN in AD are frequency dependent and differ between the slow-5 and slow-4 bands. Mini-Mental State Examination scores were significantly correlated with the altered functional connectivity patterns in the slow-5 and slow-4 bands. These results indicate that frequency-dependent functional connectivity changes might provide potential biomarkers for AD pathophysiology.

  8. Frequency-dependent damping in propagating slow magneto-acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, S. Krishna; Banerjee, D.; Van Doorsselaere, T.

    2014-07-10

    Propagating slow magneto-acoustic waves are often observed in polar plumes and active region fan loops. The observed periodicities of these waves range from a few minutes to a few tens of minutes and their amplitudes were found to decay rapidly as they travel along the supporting structure. Previously, thermal conduction, compressive viscosity, radiation, density stratification, and area divergence were identified to be some of the causes for change in the slow wave amplitude. Our recent studies indicate that the observed damping in these waves is frequency-dependent. We used imaging data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly to study this dependence in detail and for the first time via observations we attempted to deduce a quantitative relation between the damping length and frequency of these oscillations. We developed a new analysis method to obtain this relation. The observed frequency dependence does not seem to agree with the current linear wave theory and it was found that the waves observed in the polar regions show a different dependence from those observed in the on-disk loop structures despite the similarity in their properties.

  9. Estimate error of frequency-dependent Q introduced by linear regression and its nonlinear implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guofa; Huang, Wei; Zheng, Hao; Zhang, Baoqing

    2016-02-01

    The spectral ratio method (SRM) is widely used to estimate quality factor Q via the linear regression of seismic attenuation under the assumption of a constant Q. However, the estimate error will be introduced when this assumption is violated. For the frequency-dependent Q described by a power-law function, we derived the analytical expression of estimate error as a function of the power-law exponent γ and the ratio of the bandwidth to the central frequency σ . Based on the theoretical analysis, we found that the estimate errors are mainly dominated by the exponent γ , and less affected by the ratio σ . This phenomenon implies that the accuracy of the Q estimate can hardly be improved by adjusting the width and range of the frequency band. Hence, we proposed a two-parameter regression method to estimate the frequency-dependent Q from the nonlinear seismic attenuation. The proposed method was tested using the direct waves acquired by a near-surface cross-hole survey, and its reliability was evaluated in comparison with the result of SRM.

  10. Maxwell-Wagner polarization and frequency-dependent injection at aqueous electrical interfaces.

    PubMed

    Desmond, Mitchell; Mavrogiannis, Nicholas; Gagnon, Zachary

    2012-11-02

    We demonstrate a new type of alternating current (ac) interfacial polarization and frequency-dependent fluid displacement phenomenon at a liquid-liquid electrical interface. Two fluid streams--one with a greater electrical conductivity and the other a greater dielectric constant--are made to flow side by side in a microfluidic channel. An ac electric field is applied perpendicular to the interface formed between the liquid lamellae, and fluid is observed to displace across the liquid-liquid interface. The direction and magnitude of this displacement is frequency dependent. At low ac frequency, below the interfacial inverse charge relaxation time, the high-conductivity fluid displaces into the high-dielectric stream. At high frequency the direction of liquid displacement reverses, and the high-dielectric stream injects into the high-conductivity stream. The interfacial crossover frequency where the liquid displacement direction reverses is dependent on differences in electrical properties between the two fluid streams, and is well explained by Maxwell-Wagner polarization mechanics.

  11. Frequency-dependent social dominance in a color polymorphic cichlid fish.

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, Peter D; Lindström, Jan; Metcalfe, Neil B; Hemelrijk, Charlotte K; Brendel, Mischa; Seehausen, Ole; Groothuis, Ton G G

    2010-10-01

    A mechanism commonly suggested to explain the persistence of color polymorphisms in animals is negative frequency-dependent selection. It could result from a social dominance advantage to rare morphs. We tested for this in males of red and blue color morphs of the Lake Victoria cichlid, Pundamilia. Earlier work has shown that males preferentially attack the males of their own morph, while red males are more likely to win dyadic contests with blue males. In order to study the potential contribution of both factors to the morph co-existence, we manipulated the proportion of red and blue males in experimental assemblages and studied its effect on social dominance. We then tried to disentangle the effects of the own-morph attack bias and social dominance of red using simulations. In the experiment, we found that red males were indeed socially dominant to the blue ones, but only when rare. However, blue males were not socially dominant when rare. The simulation results suggest that an own-morph attack bias reduces the social dominance of red males when they are more abundant. Thus, there is no evidence of symmetric negative frequency-dependent selection acting on social dominance, suggesting that additional fitness costs to the red morph must explain their co-existence.

  12. Mechanism of frequency-dependent broadening of molluscan neurone soma spikes.

    PubMed

    Aldrich, R W; Getting, P A; Thompson, S H

    1979-06-01

    1. Action potentials recorded from isolated dorid neurone somata increase in duration, i.e. broaden, during low frequency repetitive firing. Spike broadening is substantially reduced by external Co ions and implicates an inward Ca current. 2. During repetitive voltage clamp steps at frequencies slower than 1 Hz, in 100 mM-tetraethyl ammonium ions (TEA) inward Ca currents do not increase in amplitude. 3. Repetitive action potentials result in inactivation of delayed outward current. Likewise, repetitive voltage clamp steps which cause inactivation of delayed outward current also result in longer duration action potentials. 4. The frequency dependence of spike broadening and inactivation of the voltage dependent component (IK) of delayed outward current are similar. 5. Inactivation of IK is observed in all cells, however, only cells with relative large inward Ca currents show significant spike broadening. Spike broadening apparently results from the frequency dependent inactivation of IK which increases the expression of inward Ca current as a prominent shoulder on the repolarizing phase of the action potential. In addition, the presence of a prolonged Ca current increases the duration of the first action potential thereby allowing sufficient time for inactivation of IK.

  13. Microdomain organization and frequency-dependence of CREB-dependent transcriptional signaling in heart cells

    PubMed Central

    Kobrinsky, Evgeny; Duong, Son Q.; Sheydina, Anna; Soldatov, Nikolai M.

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated Cav1.2 calcium channels couple membrane depolarization to cAMP response-element-binding protein (CREB)-dependent transcriptional activation. To investigate the spatial and temporal organization of CREB-dependent transcriptional nuclear microdomains, we combined perforated patch-clamp technique and FRET microscopy for monitoring CREB and CREB-binding protein interaction in the nuclei of live cells. The experimental approach to the quantitative assessment of CREB-dependent transcriptional signaling evoked by cAMP- and Cav1.2-dependent mechanisms was devised in COS1 cells expressing recombinant Cav1.2 calcium channels. Using continuous 2-dimensional wavelet transform and time series analyses, we found that nuclear CREB-dependent transcriptional signaling is organized differentially in spatially and temporally separated microdomains of 4 distinct types. In rat neonatal cardiomyocytes, CREB-dependent transcription is mediated by the cAMP-initiated CaMKII-sensitive and Cav1.2-initiated CaMKII-insensitive mechanisms. The latter microdomains show a tendency to exhibit periodic behavior correlated with spontaneous contraction of myocytes suggestive of frequency-dependent CREB-dependent transcriptional regulation in the heart.—Kobrinsky, E., Duong, S.Q., Sheydina, A., Soldatov, N. M. Microdomain organization and frequency-dependence of CREB-dependent transcriptional signaling in heart cells. PMID:21248242

  14. Pulsed arrays: A new method of flaw detection by generating a frequency dependent angle of propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, S. J.; Dixon, S. M.

    2012-05-01

    A new method of using an array of generation sources, pulsed simultaneously to generate a wavefront with a frequency dependant angle of propagation, has been developed. If pulsed arrays are used to generate a wave with a frequency dependent angle of propagation, the angle at which the wave was launched can be identified by measuring the frequency of the detected wave. In an isotropic material this means that it is possible use a second transducer to locate the position of the scatterer, whereas with a conventional single element generator method, it can only be located onto an ellipse. In addition to an increased scan speed, the resolution of detection should also be improved. A theoretical framework is put forward to explain how the wavefront is created from the superposition of the waves from the individual elements, and how the frequency varies along the wavefront. Finite element models and experimental measurements were also carried out, and both agreed with the analytic model. This method will have applications within NDE, but could also extend to sonar and radar techniques.

  15. Finite Element Prediction of Loss Factors for Structures with Frequency-dependent Damping Treatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everstine, G. C.; Marcus, M. S.

    1985-01-01

    A finite element procedure is described for calculating the loss factors for elastic structures to which frequency-dependent viscoelastic damping treatments were applied. The frequency dependence of the viscoelastic damping material is treated by approximating its shear modulus with a second-order polynomial so that the stiffnesses associated with the constant, linear, and quadratic terms can be combined, respectively, with the stiffness, damping, and mass matrices assembled for the rest of the structure. A single complex eigenvalue analysis is then performed in which the eigenvalues are purely imaginary. The loss factor is computed by the modal strain energy (MSE) approach. In the the MSE approach, the loss factor of a composite structure vibrating in one of its natural modes may be visualized as a weighted average of the loss factors of the component parts, with the relative stored energies as weighting constants. The finite element procedure, which can treat very general geometries, is illustrated for the case of a vibrating constrained-layer damped plate.

  16. Tissue characterization by imaging the local frequency dependent relative backscatter coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenderka, Klaus V.; Gaertner, Tilio; Cobet, Ulrich; Zacharias, Mario; Heynemann, Hans

    2000-04-01

    Conventional B-scan systems only use the amplitude information of the backscattered signals for imaging. By imaging the local frequency dependent relative backscatter coefficient it is possible to improve the image contrast and to reduce system effects. Based on spectral analysis of rf echo signals, a procedure was developed to correct for system specific effects and to determine the relative backscatter coefficient. A new image with improved contrast results from grayscale or color coding of the frequency components of the relative backscatter coefficient. The method was applied to in vivo measurements of human prostate and transplanted kidney. For cancerous prostate tissue the relative backscatter coefficient is about 8 dB lower than for normal tissue regions. The results of the investigations on kidneys show no correlation to the current function of the organ. Certainly the different course of the frequency dependence of the relative backscatter coefficient of renal cortex and calices regions allows a contrast improvement. The method provides a system independent imaging procedure with improved image contrast for tissues with different scattering behavior and slightly reduced spatial resolution. Imaging the relative backscatter coefficient will not substitute the conventional B-mode image, but it is a useful tool providing additional information about the tissue state.

  17. On the frequency dependence and spatial coherence of PKP precursor amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancinelli, Nicholas; Shearer, Peter; Thomas, Christine

    2016-03-01

    Studies now agree that small-scale (˜10 km) weak (˜0.1%) velocity perturbations throughout the lowermost mantle generate the globally averaged amplitudes of 1 Hz precursors to the core phase, . The possible frequency dependence and spatial coherence of this scattered phase, however, has been given less attention. Using a large global data set of ˜150,000 PKP precursor recordings, we characterize the frequency dependence of PKP precursors at central frequencies ranging from 0.5 to 4 Hz. At greater frequencies, we observe more scattered energy (relative to the reference phase PKPdf), particularly at shorter ranges. We model this observation by invoking heterogeneity at length scales from 2 to 30 km. Amplitudes at 0.5 Hz, in particular, suggest the presence of more heterogeneity at scales >8 km than present in previously published models. Using a regional bootstrap approach, we identify large (>20°), spatially coherent regions of anomalously strong scattering beneath the West Pacific, Central/North America, and—to a lesser extent—East Africa. Finally, as proof of concept, we use array processing techniques to locate the origin of scattered energy observed in Southern California by the Anza and Southern California Seismic Networks. The energy appears to come primarily from out-of-plane scattering on the receiver side. We suggest that such improvised arrays can increase global coverage and may reveal whether a majority of precursor energy comes from localized heterogeneity in the lowermost mantle.

  18. Experimental methods for the characterization of the frequency-dependent viscoelastic properties of soft materials

    PubMed Central

    Kazemirad, Siavash; K. Heris, Hossein; Mongeau, Luc

    2013-01-01

    A characterization method based on Rayleigh wave propagation was developed for the quantification of the frequency-dependent viscoelastic properties of soft materials at high frequencies; i.e., up to 4 kHz. Planar harmonic surface waves were produced on the surface of silicone rubber samples. The phase and amplitude of the propagating waves were measured at different locations along the propagation direction, which allowed the calculation of the complex Rayleigh wavenumbers at each excitation frequency using a transfer function method. An inverse wave propagation problem was then solved to obtain the complex shear/elastic moduli from the measured wavenumbers. In a separate, related investigation, dynamic indentation tests using atomic force microscopy (AFM) were performed at frequencies up to 300 Hz. No systematic verification study is available for the AFM-based method, which can be used when the dimensions of the test samples are too small for other existing testing methods. The results obtained from the Rayleigh wave propagation and AFM-based indentation methods were compared with those from a well-established method, which involves the generation of standing longitudinal compression waves in rod-shaped test specimens. The results were cross validated and qualitatively confirmed theoretical expectations presented in the literature for the frequency-dependence of polymers. PMID:23654420

  19. Fracture characterization using frequency-dependent shear wave anisotropy analysis of microseismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Harrasi, O. H.; Kendall, J.-M.; Chapman, M.

    2011-05-01

    The presence of fractures in hydrocarbon reservoirs can enhance porosity and permeability, and consequently increase production. The use of seismic anisotropy to characterize fracture systems has gained much interest in the last two decades. However, estimating fracture sizes from observations of seismic anisotropy has not been possible. Recent work has shown that frequency-dependent anisotropy (FDA) is very sensitive to the length-scale of the causative mechanism for the anisotropy. In this study, we observe FDA in a microseismic data set acquired from a carbonate gas field in Oman. The frequency-dependent shear wave anisotropy observations are modelled using a poroelastic model, which considers fluid communication between grain size pore spaces and larger scale fractures. A grid search is performed over fracture parameters (radius, density and strike) to find the model that best fits the real data. The results show that fracture size varies from the microscale within the shale cap rocks, to the metre-scale within the gas reservoir, to the centimetre-scale within the non-producing part of the carbonate formation. The lateral variation in fracture density agrees with previous conclusions from ordinary shear wave splitting (SWS) analysis. Cumulatively, the results show the potential for characterizing fracture systems using observations of FDA.

  20. Frequency-dependent attenuation of the Hispaniola Island region of the Caribbean Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McNamara, D.; Meremonte, M.; Maharrey, J.Z.; Mildor, S-L.; Altidore, J.R.; Anglade, D.; Hough, S.E.; Given, D.; Benz, H.; Gee, L.; Frankel, A.

    2012-01-01

    We determine frequency-dependent attenuation 1/Q(f) for the Hispaniola region using direct S and Lg waves over five distinct passbands from 0.5 to 16 Hz. Data consist of 832 high-quality vertical and horizontal component waveforms recorded on short-period and broadband seismometers from the devastating 12 January 2010 M 7.0 Haiti earthquake and the rich sequence of aftershocks. For the distance range 250–700 km, we estimate an average frequency-dependent Q(f)=224(±27)f0.64(±0.073) using horizontal components of motion and note that Q(f) estimated with Lg at regional distances is very consistent across vertical and horizontal components. We also determine a Q(f)=142(±21)f0.71(±0.11) for direct S waves at local distances, ≤100 km. The strong attenuation observed on both vertical and horizontal components of motion is consistent with expectations for a tectonically active region.

  1. Human Commercial Models’ Eye Colour Shows Negative Frequency-Dependent Selection

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In this study we investigated the eye colour of human commercial models registered in the UK (400 female and 400 male) and Brazil (400 female and 400 male) to test the hypothesis that model eye colour frequency was the result of negative frequency-dependent selection. The eye colours of the models were classified as: blue, brown or intermediate. Chi-square analyses of data for countries separated by sex showed that in the United Kingdom brown eyes and intermediate colours were significantly more frequent than expected in comparison to the general United Kingdom population (P<0.001). In Brazil, the most frequent eye colour brown was significantly less frequent than expected in comparison to the general Brazilian population. These results support the hypothesis that model eye colour is the result of negative frequency-dependent selection. This could be the result of people using eye colour as a marker of genetic diversity and finding rarer eye colours more attractive because of the potential advantage more genetically diverse offspring that could result from such a choice. Eye colour may be important because in comparison to many other physical traits (e.g., hair colour) it is hard to modify, hide or disguise, and it is highly polymorphic. PMID:28005995

  2. The mechanics of delamination in fiber-reinforced composite materials. Part 1: Stress singularities and solution structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. S.; Choi, I.

    1983-01-01

    The fundamental mechanics of delamination in fiber composite laminates is studied. Mathematical formulation of the problem is based on laminate anisotropic elasticity theory and interlaminar fracture mechanics concepts. Stress singularities and complete solution structures associated with general composite delaminations are determined. For a fully open delamination with traction-free surfaces, oscillatory stress singularities always appear, leading to physically inadmissible field solutions. A refined model is introduced by considering a partially closed delamination with crack surfaces in finite-length contact. Stress singularities associated with a partially closed delamination having frictional crack-surface contact are determined, and are found to be diferent from the inverse square-root one of the frictionless-contact case. In the case of a delamination with very small area of crack closure, a simplified model having a square-root stress singularity is employed by taking the limit of the partially closed delamination. The possible presence of logarithmic-type stress singularity is examined; no logarithmic singularity of any kind is found in the composite delamination problem. Numerical examples of dominant stress singularities are shown for delaminations having crack-tip closure with different frictional coefficients between general (1) and (2) graphite-epoxy composites.

  3. Visualization of fiber Bragg gratings of type II induced by radiation of an ArF excimer laser in an anisotropic single-mode optical fiber with an elliptical stress cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribaev, A. I.; Varzhel, S. V.; Petrov, A. A.; Palandzhyan, D. A.; Konnov, K. A.

    2017-07-01

    results in visualization of fiber Bragg gratings of type II recorded in birefringent single-mode optical fibers with an elliptical stress cladding with a high concentration of germanium dioxide are shown. Periodic structures of the induced refractive index are inscribed by a single pulse of an excimer laser with a working- gas mixture of ArF using the phase mask. Fiber Bragg gratings into anisotropic optical fiber were investigated by optical and scanning-probe microscopes. It is shown that single-pulse recording by ArF excimer laser creates in the fiber, both inside and on the surface of the quartz cladding, periodic structures, the spatial period of which corresponds to the period of the phase mask, optimized for the +1/-1 diffraction order.

  4. Low-threshold mechanoreceptors play a frequency-dependent, dual role in subjective ratings of mechanical allodynia.

    PubMed

    Loken, Line Sofie; Duff, Eugene; Tracey, Irene

    2017-09-27

    In the setting of injury, myelinated primary afferent fibers that normally signal light touch, are thought to switch modality and instead signal pain. In the absence of injury, touch is perceived as more intense when firing rates of Aβ afferents increase. However, it is not known if varying the firing rates of Aβ afferents have any consequence to perception of dynamic mechanical allodynia (DMA). We hypothesized that, in the setting of injury, the unpleasantness of DMA would be intensified as the firing rates of Aβ afferents increase. Using a stimulus-response protocol established in normal skin, where increased brush velocity results in an increase of Aβ afferent firing rates, we tested if brush velocity modulated the unpleasantness of capsaicin-induced DMA. We analyzed how changes in estimated mechanoreceptor firing activity influenced perception and brain activity (fMRI) of DMA. Brushing on normal skin was perceived as pleasant, but brushing on sensitized skin produced both painful and pleasant sensations. Surprisingly, there was an inverse relationship between Aβ firing rates and unpleasantness, such that brush stimuli that produced low firing rates were most painful and those that elicited high firing rates were rated as pleasant. Concurrently, we found increased cortical activity in response to low Aβ firing rates in regions previously implicated in pain processing while brushing sensitized skin. We suggest that Aβ signals do not merely switch modality to signal pain during injury. Instead, they exert a high and low frequency-dependent dual role in the injured state, with respectively both pleasant and unpleasant consequences. Copyright © 2016, Journal of Neurophysiology.

  5. RhoA regulates Activin B-induced stress fiber formation and migration of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cell through distinct signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueer; Tang, Pei; Guo, Fukun; Zhang, Min; Chen, Yinghua; Yan, Yuan; Tian, Zhihui; Xu, Pengcheng; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Lin

    2017-01-01

    In our previous study, Activin B induced actin stress fiber formation and cell migration in Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) in vitro. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well studied. RhoA is recognized to play a critical role in the regulation of actomyosin cytoskeletal organization and cell migration. Pull-down assay was performed to investigate the activity of RhoA. The dominant-negative mutants of RhoA (RhoA(N19)) was used to determine whether RhoA has a role in Activin B-induced cytoskeleton organization and cell migration in BMSCs. Cytoskeleton organization was examined by fluorescence Rhodamine-phalloidin staining, and cell migration by transwell and cell scratching assay. Western blot was carried out to investigate downstream signaling cascade of RhoA. Inhibitor and siRNAs were used to detect the role of downstream signaling in stress fiber formation and/or cell migration. RhoA was activated by Activin B in BMSCs. RhoA(N19) blocked Activin B-induced stress fiber formation and cell migration. ROCK inhibitor blocked Activin B-induced stress fiber formation but enhanced BMSCs migration. Activin B induced phosphorylation of LIMK2 and Cofilin, which was abolished by ROCK inhibition. Both of siRNA LIMK2 and siRNA Cofilin inhibited Activin B-induced stress fiber formation. RhoA regulates Activin B-induced stress fiber formation and migration of BMSCs. A RhoA-ROCK-LIMK2-Cofilin signaling node exists and regulates actin stress fiber formation. RhoA regulates Activin B-induced cell migration independent of ROCK. Better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of BMSCs migration will help optimize therapeutic strategy to target BMSCs at injured tissues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Hygrothermomechanical fracture stress criteria for fiber composites with sense-parity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Ginty, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    Hygrothermomechanical fracture stress criteria are developed and evaluated for unidirectional composites (plies) with sense-parity. These criteria explicity quantify the individual contributions of applied, hygral and thermal stresses as well as couplings among these stresses. The criteria are for maximum stress, maximum strain, internal friction, work-to-fracture and combined-stress fracture. Predicted results obtained indicate that first ply failure will occur at stress levels lower than those predicted using criteria currently available in the literature. Also, the contribution of the various stress couplings (predictable only by fracture criteria with sense-parity) is significant to first ply failure and attendant fracture modes.

  7. Synergistic Effects of Stress-Rupture and Cyclic Loading on Strain Response of Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites at Elevated Temperature in Oxidizing Atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Li, Longbiao

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the synergistic effects of stress rupture and cyclic loading on the strain response of fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) at elevated temperature in air have been investigated. The stress-strain relationships considering interface wear and interface oxidation in the interface debonded region under stress rupture and cyclic loading have been developed to establish the relationship between the peak strain, the interface debonded length, the interface oxidation length and the interface slip lengths. The effects of the stress rupture time, stress levels, matrix crack spacing, fiber volume fraction and oxidation temperature on the peak strain and the interface slip lengths have been investigated. The experimental fatigue hysteresis loops, interface slip lengths, peak strain and interface oxidation length of cross-ply SiC/MAS (magnesium alumino-silicate, MAS) composite under cyclic fatigue and stress rupture at 566 and 1093 °C in air have been predicted. PMID:28772544

  8. Frequency-dependent Effects of Rupture for the 2004 Parkfield, California, Mainshock at UPSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    We processed the accelerograms for the Sept. 28, 2004 Parkfield mainshock (M6) from the Parkfield Dense Seismograph Array (UPSAR) using beam forming techniques to determine coherence and slowness of incoming arrivals and we found that the frequency-dependent effects of rupture propagation of can be seen in the acceleration records in at least two ways. The first is the effect of directivity. During the 4-6s interval after nucleation, UPSAR lies in the forward azimuth of the rupture front and coherence and amplitudes are relatively high. In this interval, the records are rich in frequencies as high as 40 Hz. As the rupture front progresses, UPSAR becomes perpendicular to the location of the rupture front on the fault and then passes into the back azimuth. During this 5-7s interval, the coherence drops off, amplitudes are typically smaller and the traces are depleted in high frequencies compared to when UPSAR was in the forward azimuth. We model the rupture process of the Parkfield mainshock using realistic distributions of slip and show that they also have significant changes in frequency as the rupture passes from the forward to the back azimuth. The second effect is the frequency dependence of the rupture front. That is observations at UPSAR were used to address the question of whether low frequency energy emerges from the same parts of the fault as high frequency energy. Acceleration records of the Parkfield mainshock from UPSAR were filtered in 5 different narrow frequency bands (0.25-0.5 Hz, 0.5-1 Hz, 1-2 Hz, 2-4 Hz, and 4-8 Hz) and beam forming was repeated. Above 1 Hz the estimates of back azimuth and apparent velocity are about the same and are independent of frequency. Below 1 Hz, however, the estimates appear to be significantly different with a change of about of 0.34 km/s in apparent velocity and 22 degrees in back azimuth at 2s after the S wave arrival, for example, between the middle and lowest band. From previous work on mapping values of apparent

  9. Frequency dependent attenuation characteristics of coda waves in the Northwestern Himalayan (India) region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sushil; Singh, Priyamvada; Singh, Pitam; Biswal, Shubhasmita; Parija, Mahesh Prasad

    2016-03-01

    Digital seismogram data of 82 earthquakes from the Northwestern Himalayan (India) region recorded at different stations during 2004-2006 were analyzed to study the seismic coda wave attenuation characteristics in this region. We used 132 seismic observations from local earthquakes with a hypocentral distance <240 km and a magnitude range of 1.2-4.9 to study the coda QC using the single isotropic scattering model. These earthquakes were recorded at 20 temporary seismic stations installed in the Northwestern Himalayas (India) by the Wadia institute of Himalayan Geology, Dehradun. The QC values were estimated at 10 central frequencies: 1.5, 3, 5, 7, 9, 12, 16, 20, 24, and 28 Hz using starting lapse-times of 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 s and coda window-lengths of 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 s. The QC fits the frequency dependent power-law, QC =Q0fn . For a 10 s lapse time with a 10-s coda window length QC = 47.42f1.012 and for a 50 s lapse time with a 50 s coda window length, QC = 204.1f0.934 . Q0 (QC at 1 Hz) varied from ∼47 for a 10 s lapse time and a 10 s window length, to ∼204 for a 50 s lapse time and a 50 s window length. An average frequency dependent power law fit for the study region may be given as QC = 116.716f0.9943 . The exponent of the frequency dependence law n ranged from 1.08 to 0.9, which correlates well with values obtained in other seismically and tectonically active and heterogeneous regions of the world. In our study region, QC increases both with respect to lapse time and frequency, i.e., the attenuation decreases as the quality factor is inversely proportional to attenuation. The low QC values or high attenuation at lower frequencies and high QC values or low attenuation at higher frequencies suggest that the heterogeneity decreases with increasing depth in our study region.

  10. Accurate density functional calculations on frequency-dependent hyperpolarizabilities of small molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Gisbergen, S. J. A.; Snijders, J. G.; Baerends, E. J.

    1998-12-01

    In this paper we present time-dependent density functional calculations on frequency-dependent first (β) and second (γ) hyperpolarizabilities for the set of small molecules, N2, CO2, CS2, C2H4, NH3, CO, HF, H2O, and CH4, and compare them to Hartree-Fock and correlated ab initio calculations, as well as to experimental results. Both the static hyperpolarizabilities and the frequency dispersion are studied. Three approximations to the exchange-correlation (xc) potential are used: the widely used Local Density Approximation (LDA), the Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr (BLYP) Generalized Gradient Approximation (GGA), as well as the asymptotically correct Van Leeuwen-Baerends (LB94) potential. For the functional derivatives of the xc potential the Adiabatic Local Density Approximation (ALDA) is used. We have attempted to estimate the intrinsic quality of these methods by using large basis sets, augmented with several diffuse functions, yielding good agreement with recent numerical static LDA results. Contrary to claims which have appeared in the literature on the basis of smaller studies involving basis sets of lesser quality, we find that the static LDA results for β and γ are severely overestimated, and do not improve upon the (underestimated) Hartree-Fock results. No improvement is provided by the BLYP potential which suffers from the same incorrect asymptotic behavior as the LDA potential. The results are however clearly improved upon by the LB94 potential, which leads to underestimated results, slightly improving the Hartree-Fock results. The LDA and BLYP potentials overestimate the frequency dependence as well, which is once again improved by the LB94 potential. Future improvements are expected to come from improved models for asymptotically correct exchange-correlation potentials. Apart from the LB94 potential used in this work, several other asymptotically correct potentials have recently been suggested in the literature and can also be expected to improve considerably

  11. Frequency-dependent action potential prolongation in Aplysia pleural sensory neurones.

    PubMed

    Edstrom, J P; Lukowiak, K D

    1985-10-01

    The effects of repetitive activity on action-potential shape in Aplysia californica pleural sensory cells are described. Action potentials were evoked by intracellular current injection at frequencies between 7.41 and 0.2 Hz. In contrast to other molluscan neurons having brief action potentials, it was found that at these firing rates the normally brief action potential develops a prominent shoulder or plateau during the repolarization phase. Higher stimulus rates broaden the action potential more rapidly and to a greater extent than lower stimulus rates. Inactivation is slow relative to activation; effects of 3-s 6-Hz trains are detectable after 1 min rest. The amplitude of the plateau voltage reaches a maximum of 50-70 mV at the highest stimulus rates tested. Frequency-dependent increases in action-potential duration measured at half-amplitude normally range between 6 and 15 ms. Cadmium, at concentrations between 0.05 and 0.5 mM, antagonizes frequency-dependent broadening. The increases in duration induced by repetitive activity are more sensitive to cadmium than are the increases in plateau amplitude. Tetraethylammonium, at concentrations between 0.5 and 10 mM, slightly increases the duration and amplitude of single action potentials. During repetitive activity at high stimulus rates the maximum duration and rate of broadening are both increased but the amplitude of the plateau potential is not affected by these tetraethylammonium concentrations. Above 10 mM, tetraethylammonium greatly increases the duration and amplitude of single action potentials as well as the rates of action-potential duration and amplitude increase during repetitive activity. These high tetraethylammonium concentrations also cause the normally smoothly increasing duration and amplitude to reach a maximum value early in a train and then decline slowly during the remainder of the train. The consequences of frequency-dependent spike broadening in these neurons have not yet been investigated

  12. Method for Estimating Harmonic Frequency Dependence of Diffusion Coefficient and Convective Velocity in Heat Pulse Propagation Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Itoh, Kimitaka; Ida, Katsumi; Inagaki, Sigeru; Itoh, Sanae-I.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper we propose a new set of formulae for estimating the harmonic frequency dependence of the diffusion coefficient and the convective velocity in the heat pulse propagation experiment in order to investigate the transport hysteresis. The assumptions that are used to derive the formulae can result in dummy frequency dependences of the transport coefficients. It is shown that these dummy frequency dependences of the transport coefficients can be distinguished from the true frequency dependence due to the transport hysteresis by using a bidirectional heat pulse propagation manner, in which both the outward propagating heat pulse and the inward propagating heat pulse are analyzed. The validity of the new formulae are examined in a simple numerical calculation.

  13. Development of a fiber Bragg grating sensor for in-shoe shear stress measurement: design and preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulaxouzidis, Andreas V.; Roberts, V. C.; Holmes, Melanie J.; Handerek, Vincent A.

    2000-08-01

    In-shoe shear stress sensors are a required tool for the investigation of plantar ulcer development after the onset of diabetes. Recently, several transducers have been developed for measuring in-shoe shear stress using magneto- resistive technology, light intensity modulation, and copolymer piezoelectric materials. Common drawbacks in the previous methods are the relatively large size of the sensors and the difficulty in interrogating many sensors simultaneously in order to achieve distributed sensing. In this paper we demonstrate for the first time a shear stress sensor using Fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs). The small size and the multiplexing capability of FBGs enables quasi- distributed sensing of shear stress on the plantar surface by interrogating a large number of identical sensors. The sensor design is based on the theory of elastic bending of columns. The sensor consists of two FBGs fitted inside a metallic structure which is able to deform elastically under shear stress. This elastic deformation produces strain on the FBGs, which can be detected by measuring the Bragg wavelength shift of the reflected light of each FBG using a CCD spectrometer. Preliminary results on an enlarged version of the sensor have shown the applicability of FBGs for the implementation of the in-shoe sensor.

  14. Frequency dependent piecewise fractional-order modelling of ultracapacitors using hybrid optimization and fuzzy clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mano Ranjan; Ghosh, Subhojit; Das, Shantanu

    2016-12-01

    The usage of ultracapacitors for development of energy storage devices and alternative power sources is increasing at a very rapid rate. However accuracy in selection of ultracapacitor model parameter plays key role in the design of such devices, especially in applications involving wide operating frequency. Ultracapacitors are known to exhibit fractional dynamics and the model parameters vary significantly with frequency. This paper proposes a piecewise modelling and parameter estimation approach for ultracapacitors using a hybrid optimization and fuzzy clustering approach. The proposed modelling technique has been applied over impedance frequency response data acquired from a commercially available ultracapacitor. The model is able to represent the experimental data over different operating points with reduced number of model parameters. Comparative numerical simulations have been carried out to validate the benefits of the proposed approach. The estimated parameters revealed the disparity in the frequency dependent behavior of ultracapacitors and standard electrolytic capacitors.

  15. Frequency-Dependent Local Magnitude Scales for the Central U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Q.; Langston, C. A.

    2005-12-01

    Frequency-dependent local magnitude scales were developed for the study of seismic wave propagation and attenuation with frequency in the central U.S. within 600 km distance from the source. This is done by empirically modeling narrow frequency band filtered ground motion data from the CERI Cooperative Network and the United States National Seismograph Network (USNSN) to derive source size (local magnitude) and distance attenuation relationships for seismic wave propagation. The frequencies selected for this study are between 0.1 and 10.0 Hz. The obtained distance-correction functions show that the propagation of seismic waves at frequencies below 1.0 Hz do not attenuation with distance. Results show that the currently used MD scale may measure a narrow frequency band of seismic waves, while ML scale measures a relatively wide frequency band, which explained the differences between the MD and ML values in the central U.S.

  16. Evaluation of frequency-dependent ultrasound attenuation in transparent medium using focused shadowgraph technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iijima, Yukina; Kudo, Nobuki

    2017-07-01

    Acoustic fields of a short-pulsed ultrasound propagating through a transparent medium with ultrasound attenuation were visualized by the focused shadowgraph technique. A brightness waveform and its spatial integrations were derived from a visualized field image and compared with a pressure waveform measured by a membrane hydrophone. The experimental results showed that first-order integration of the brightness wave has good agreement with the pressure waveforms. Frequency-dependent attenuation of the pulse propagating through castor oil was derived from brightness and pressure waveforms, and attenuation coefficients determined from focused shadowgraphy and hydrophone techniques showed good agreement. The results suggest the usefulness of the shadowgraph technique not only for the visualization of ultrasound fields but also for noncontact estimation of rough pressure waveforms and correct ultrasound attenuation.

  17. Frequency dependent optical and dielectric properties of zinc sulfide in Terahertz regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganti, Satya R.; Sundaram, S. K.; McCloy, John S.

    2014-07-01

    Frequency dependent optical and dielectric properties for several grades of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) zinc sulfide (standard, elemental, and multi-spectral) was performed using a terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) system in the frequency range from 0.15 THz to 2.5 THz. Zinc sulfide exhibits low frequency vibrational modes characterized by the THz-TDS. Two low-frequency phonon resonance lines were revealed at 0.78 THz and 2.20 THz. These samples were also characterized in the GHz range using a backward wave oscillator (BWO) source quasi-optical spectrometer, and the data obtained by both approaches were compared. Experimental data were also compared with an undamped harmonic oscillator model. These results compare well with the literature values obtained using other methods.

  18. A study of frequency dependent electrical and dielectric properties of NiO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usha, V.; Kalyanaraman, S.; Vettumperumal, R.; Thangavel, R.

    2017-01-01

    Nickel oxide nanoparticles were synthesized using low cost sol-gel method. The structure of as prepared NiO nanoparticles has been confirmed from X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive X-ray (SEM and EDX) spectroscopic analysis. The electrical and dielectric properties were characterized by complex impedance spectroscopy as a function of frequency at different temperatures. To study the dielectric behavior of the nanoparticles different plots like Nyquist plot, modulus plot and Bode plot were used. Also the frequency dependent ac conductivity is analyzed and the activation energy is calculated. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss as a function of frequency at various temperatures are also studied.

  19. Domain wall dynamics and relaxation through the frequency dependence of hysteresis loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyot, M.; Merceron, T.; Cagan, V.

    1985-04-01

    The frequency dependence of hysteresis loops of high purity yttrium iron garnet (YIG) polycrystals has been measured over the range of temperature and frequency where the permeability spectrum has evidenced significant dispersion. Very close to Tc, the effect of domain wall damping results in elliptical loops when the wall relaxation frequency is approached. The observed increase in losses with frequency implies values of the wall damping parameter β which agree with previous determinations from permeability data. In the 150 K range, migrating electrons due to the voluntary slight iron deficiency of the studied sample cannot follow fast wall motions and relax, which in turn produce more rectangular loops for frequencies above the diffusion relaxation frequency. The corresponding increase in hysteresis losses is due to an increase in the wall energy γ and possible dynamical changes of the domain wall configuration in the sample.

  20. Frequency dependent detection in a STED microscope using modulated excitation light.

    PubMed

    Ronzitti, Emiliano; Harke, Benjamin; Diaspro, Alberto

    2013-01-14

    We present a novel concept adaptable to any kind of STED microscope in order to expand the limited number of compatible dyes for performing super resolution imaging. The approach is based on an intensity modulated excitation beam in combination with a frequency dependent detection in the form of a standard lock-in amplifier. This enables to unmix fluorescence signal originated by the excitation beam from the fluorescence caused by the STED beam. The benefit of this concept is demonstrated by imaging biological samples as well as fluorescent spheres, whose spectrum does not allow STED imaging in the conventional way. Our concept is suitable with CW or pulsed STED microscope and can thereby be seen as a general improvement adaptable to any existing setup.

  1. Sibling genes as environment: Sibling dopamine genotypes and adolescent health support frequency dependent selection.

    PubMed

    Rauscher, Emily; Conley, Dalton; Siegal, Mark L

    2015-11-01

    While research consistently suggests siblings matter for individual outcomes, it remains unclear why. At the same time, studies of genetic effects on health typically correlate variants of a gene with the average level of behavioral or health measures, ignoring more complicated genetic dynamics. Using National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health data, we investigate whether sibling genes moderate individual genetic expression. We compare twin variation in health-related absences and self-rated health by genetic differences at three locations related to dopamine regulation and transport to test sibship-level cross-person gene-gene interactions. Results suggest effects of variation at these genetic locations are moderated by sibling genes. Although the mechanism remains unclear, this evidence is consistent with frequency dependent selection and suggests much genetic research may violate the stable unit treatment value assumption.

  2. Effect of diffusion and surface recombination on the frequency-dependent characteristics of an OPFET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vinaya K.

    1993-02-01

    Analytical studies have been made on the effect of diffusion and surface recombination on the frequency dependent characteristics of an ion-implanted GaAs optical field effect transistor. Modulated optical generation and voltage dependent depletion layer width in the active region have been considered whereas photovoltaic effect is ignored in this analysis. Result shows that drain-source current decreases with the increases of modulated signal frequency but diffusion effect increases the modulating frequency range from c.m. to m.m. wavelength. Moreover, I- V changes significantly with the trap center density only when Nr >= 1023/m2 with diffusion effect and >= 1020/m2 without diffusion effect at a particular dimension of the device. This model may be very much useful to measure the sensitivity of the device in terms of trap center density and modulating frequency.

  3. Frequency-dependent Effects of Vibration on Physiological Systems: Experiments with Animals and other Human Surrogates

    PubMed Central

    KRAJNAK, Kristine; RILEY, Danny A.; WU, John; MCDOWELL, Thomas; WELCOME, Daniel E.; XU, Xueyan S.; DONG, Ren G.

    2015-01-01

    Occupational exposure to vibration through the use of power- and pneumatic hand-tools results in cold-induced vasospasms, finger blanching, and alterations in sensorineural function. Collectively, these symptoms are referred to as hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS). Currently the International Standards Organization (ISO) standard ISO 5349-1 contains a frequency-weighting curve to help workers and employers predict the risk of developing HAVS with exposure to vibration of different frequencies. However, recent epidemiological and experimental evidence suggests that this curve under-represents the risk of injuries to the hands and fingers induced by exposure to vibration at higher frequencies (>100 Hz). To improve the curve, better exposure-response data need to be collected. The goal of this review is to summarize the results of animal and computational modeling studies that have examined the frequency-dependent effects of vibration, and discuss where additional research would be beneficial to fill these research gaps. PMID:23060248

  4. Frequency-dependent compressibility in emulsions: Probing interfaces using Isakovich's sound absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemar, Y.; Hocquart, R.; Palierne, J. F.

    1998-05-01

    The average compressibility of an emulsion acquires a frequency-dependent, relaxing behavior due to the thermoconduction between adjacent phases heated through thermo-mechanical coupling. Introducing the relaxing compressibility into the sound propagation equations, we extend Isakovitch's theory of sound absorption to emulsions of an arbitrary number of liquids with the same density. The sound propagation speed and attenuation are found to be isotropic, even if the emulsion morphology is anisotropic. In the limit of frequencies greater than the inverse heat diffusion time, both the relaxing part of the compressibility and the sound attenuation are proportional to a single parameter depending linearly on the emulsion interfacial area per unit volume, thus giving easy access to this quantity in non-transparent systems.

  5. Picosecond laser-induced breakdown at 5321 and 5347 A - Observation of frequency-dependent behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. L.; Bechtel, J. H.; Bloembergen, N.

    1977-01-01

    A study is presented of picosecond laser-induced breakdown at 3547 and 5321 A of several materials. The thresholds obtained for breakdown at 5321 A are compared to previous results obtained at 1.064 microns using the same laser system. This comparison illustrates the transition of bulk laser-induced breakdown as it becomes increasingly frequency dependent. UV picosecond pulses are obtained by mixing 5321 A and 1.064 micron pulses in a KH2PO4 crystal. Upper and lower bounds on the 3547 A breakdown threshold are defined, although some effects of walk-off distortion and self-focusing are observed. The results are discussed with reference to models for the intrinsic processes involved in the breakdown, i.e., avalanche and multiphoton ionization.

  6. Single-lobed frequency-dependent beam shape in an echolocating false killer whale (Pseudorca crassidens).

    PubMed

    Kloepper, Laura N; Nachtigall, Paul E; Quintos, Christopher; Vlachos, Stephanie A

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies indicate some odontocetes may produce echolocation beams with a dual-lobed vertical structure. The shape of the odontocete echolocation beam was further investigated in a false killer whale performing an echolocation discrimination task. Clicks were recorded with an array of 16 hydrophones and frequency-dependent amplitude plots were constructed to assess beam shape. The majority of the echolocation clicks were single-lobed in structure with most energy located between 20 and 80 kHz. These data indicate the false killer whale does not produce a dual-lobed structure, as has been shown in bottlenose dolphins, which may be a function of lowered frequencies in the emitted signal due to hearing loss.

  7. Frequency-dependent dielectric analysis - Monitoring the chemistry and rheology of thermosets during cure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kranbuehl, D.; Delos, S.; Hoff, M.; Weller, L.; Haverty, P.

    1988-01-01

    Frequency-dependent dielectric measurements in a curing resin sample were performed using an impedance analyzer and a permittivity sensor, to separate and measure the ionic (sigma) and dipolar (tau) mobilities, used as molecular probes of the cure reaction in the resin. The resin samples were tetraglycidyl 4,4-prime-diaminodiphenylmethane epoxy resins which included catalyzed (Hercules 3501-6) and uncatalyzed l3502 resin samples. The values of sigma and tau were used to quantitatively determine the viscosity, the degree of cure, and the T(g) of the resin. It is shown that the values of the Arrhenius and WLF constants during the cure process reflect the buildup of the crosslink network.

  8. Bards, poets, and cliques: frequency-dependent selection and the evolution of language genes.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Reed A

    2011-09-01

    The ability of humans to communicate via language is a complex, adapted phenotype, which undoubtedly has a recently evolved genetic component. However, the evolutionary dynamics of language-associated alleles are poorly understood. To improve our knowledge of such systems, a population-genetics model for language-associated genes is developed. (The model is general and applicable to social interactions other than communication.) When an allele arises that potentially improves the ability of individuals to communicate, it will experience positive frequency-dependent selection because its fitness will depend on how many other individuals communicate the same way. Consequently, new and rare alleles are selected against, posing a problem for the evolutionary origin of language. However, the model shows that if individuals form language-based cliques, then novel language-associated alleles can sweep through a population. Thus, the origin of language ability can be sufficiently explained by Darwinian processes operating on genetic diversity in a finite population of human ancestors.

  9. Frequency-dependent polarizabilities and shielding factors for confined one-electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, H. E., Jr.; Pupyshev, Vladimir I.

    2017-01-01

    Frequency-dependent dipole polarizabilities and shielding factors are calculated for the ground state of spherically symmetric screened one-electron systems embedded in an impenetrable spherical cavity. Coulomb, Yukawa, Hulthén and exponential cosine-screened Coulomb potentials are considered. In contrast to free systems, Dirichlet boundary conditions introduce a contribution to the shielding factor that results from an integral over the surface of the confining boundary. This is a fundamental difference between free and confined systems and results in unexpected modifications to some of the classic relations for free systems. The methods derived also give a simple expression for the polarizability of the confined harmonic oscillator as an example of extending the methods of this work to potentials beyond the four studied.

  10. Frequency dependent plasma characteristics in a capacitively coupled 300 mm wafer plasma processing chamber.

    SciTech Connect

    Hebner, Gregory Albert; Holland, J.P.; Paterson, A.M.; Barnat, Edward V.; Miller, Paul Albert

    2006-01-01

    Argon plasma characteristics in a dual-frequency, capacitively coupled, 300 mm-wafer plasma processing system were investigated for rf drive frequencies between 10 and 190 MHz. We report spatial and frequency dependent changes in plasma parameters such as line-integrated electron density, ion saturation current, optical emission and argon metastable density. For the conditions investigated, the line-integrated electron density was a nonlinear function of drive frequency at constant rf power. In addition, the spatial distribution of the positive ions changed from uniform to peaked in the centre as the frequency was increased. Spatially resolved optical emission increased with frequency and the relative optical emission at several spectral lines depended on frequency. Argon metastable density and spatial distribution were not a strong function of drive frequency. Metastable temperature was approximately 400 K.

  11. Frequency-dependent dielectric permittivity of salt-free charged lamellar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotenberg, B.; Dufrêche, J.-F.; Turq, P.

    2005-10-01

    We present a new model to analyze dielectric spectroscopy measurements on charged lamellar systems, with the following improvements with respect to the hitherto available models: (i) it does not rely on the hypothesis of local electro-neutrality, and allows to treat the salt-free case; (ii) the chemical exchange governing the partition between free and bound ions is properly taken into account; (iii) a fully analytical solution is provided. The variation of the frequency-dependent dielectric permittivity with both thermodynamic and kinetic characteristics of the free-bound ion equilibrium is presented. In particular, the relative weights of both relaxation modes (exchange and transport), and their characteristic frequencies are discussed. This study opens the way to the analysis of systems for which the usual models are irrelevant, such as salt-free clay gels or membranes.

  12. Frequency-dependent dielectric analysis - Monitoring the chemistry and rheology of thermosets during cure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kranbuehl, D.; Delos, S.; Hoff, M.; Weller, L.; Haverty, P.

    1988-01-01

    Frequency-dependent dielectric measurements in a curing resin sample were performed using an impedance analyzer and a permittivity sensor, to separate and measure the ionic (sigma) and dipolar (tau) mobilities, used as molecular probes of the cure reaction in the resin. The resin samples were tetraglycidyl 4,4-prime-diaminodiphenylmethane epoxy resins which included catalyzed (Hercules 3501-6) and uncatalyzed l3502 resin samples. The values of sigma and tau were used to quantitatively determine the viscosity, the degree of cure, and the T(g) of the resin. It is shown that the values of the Arrhenius and WLF constants during the cure process reflect the buildup of the crosslink network.

  13. Characterization of Frequency-Dependent Responses of the Vascular System to Repetitive Vibration

    PubMed Central

    Krajnak, Kristine; Miller, G. Roger; Waugh, Stacey; Johnson, Claud; Kashon, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Occupational exposure to hand-transmitted vibration can result in damage to nerves and sensory loss. The goal of this study was to assess the frequency-dependent effects of repeated bouts of vibration on sensory nerve function and associated changes in nerves. Methods The tails of rats were exposed to vibration at 62.5, 125, or 250 Hz (constant acceleration of 49m/s2) for 10 days. The effects on sensory nerve function, nerve morphology, and transcript expression in ventral tail nerves were measured. Results Vibration at all frequencies had effects on nerve function and physiology. However, the effects tended to be more prominent with exposure at 250 Hz. Conclusion Exposure to vibration has detrimental effects on sensory nerve function and physiology. However, many of these changes are more prominent at 250-Hz exposure than at lower frequencies. PMID:22785326

  14. Full frequency-dependent phase-domain modelling of transmission lines and corona phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, Fernando

    This thesis presents two main developments in the modelling of power transmission lines for the simulation of electric networks. The first one is wide bandwidth circuit corona model and the second a phase-domain multiphase full frequency-dependent line model. The latter can be easily used in connection with the former. Both models have been developed for implementation in time domain simulation computer programs, such as the ElectroMagnetic Transients Program (EMTP). Corona in overhead transmission lines is a highly nonlinear and non deterministic phenomenon. Circuit models have been developed in the past to represent its behaviour, but the response of these models is usually limited to a narrow band of frequencies. The corona model presented in this thesis overcomes this problem by: (1) matching closely the topology of the circuit to the topology of the physical system, and (2) duplicating the high-order dynamic response of the phenomenon with a high-order transient circuit response. The resulting model is valid for a wide range of frequencies and is able to represent waveshapes from switching to lightning surges. A unique set of model parameters can be obtained directly from test-cage measurements, and the same set can be used directly for an arbitrary overhead line configuration. The model uses only standard EMTP circuit elements and requires no iterations. Simulations of corona charge-voltage (q-v) curves and of travelling surges were performed and compared to existing field test measurements. The proposed new transmission line model (z-line) can be used for the representation of multicircuit transmission lines in time-domain transient solutions. The model includes a full representation of the frequency-dependent line parameters and is formulated directly in phase coordinates. The solution in phase coordinates, as opposed to modal coordinates, avoids the problems associated with the representation of the frequency-dependent transformation matrices that relate

  15. Frequency dependent power and energy flux density equations of the electromagnetic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhibbullah, M.; Haleem, Ashraf M. Abdel; Ikuma, Yasuro

    The calculation of the power and energy of the electromagnetic wave is important for numerous applications. There are some equations to compute the power and energy density of the electromagnetic wave radiation. For instance, the Poynting vector is frequently used to calculate the power density. However those including the Poynting vector are not perfect to represent the actual values because the equations are frequency independent. In the present study we have derived the frequency-dependent equations to calculate the power and energy flux density of the electromagnetic wave by help of the classical electromagnetic theories. It is seems that the Poynting vector with a certain electric and magnetic fields is correct only for a specific frequency. However our equations are perfect to calculate the values of the power and energy flux density for all frequencies of the electromagnetic radiation. The equations may help to develop the applications of the electromagnetic wave radiation.

  16. Stress distribution of endodontically treated teeth with titanium alloy post and carbon fiber post with different alveolar bone height: A three-dimensional finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Singh, S Vijay; Bhat, Manohar; Gupta, Saurabh; Sharma, Deepak; Satija, Harsha; Sharma, Sumeet

    2015-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis (FEA) on the stress distribution of endodontically treated teeth with titanium alloy post and carbon fiber post with different alveolar bone height. The 3D model was fabricated using software to represent an endodontically treated mandibular second premolar with post and restored with a full ceramic crown restoration, which was then analyzed using FEA using FEA ANSYS Workbench V13.0 (ANSYS Inc., Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, U.S.A) software. The FEA showed the maximum stresses of 137.43 Mpa in dentin with alveolar bone height of 4 mm when the titanium post was used, 138.48 Mpa when carbon fiber post was used as compared to 105.91 Mpa in the model with alveolar bone height of 2 mm from the cement enamel junction (CEJ) when the titanium post was used and 107.37 Mpa when the carbon fiber post was used. Stress was observed more in alveolar bone height level of 4 mm from CEJ than 2 mm from CEJ. Stresses in the dentin were almost similar when the carbon fiber post was compared to titanium post. However, stresses in the post and the cement were much higher when titanium post was used as compared to carbon fiber post.

  17. Three-dimensional finite element analysis of stress distribution in a tooth restored with metal and fiber posts of varying diameters: An in-vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pradeep; Rao, R. Nageswar

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare stress distribution in a tooth restored with metal and fiber posts of varying diameters (1.2 and 1.4 mm) by means of three-dimensional finite element analysis (3D-FEA). Materials and Methods: Four 3D-FEA models were constructed: (1) fiber post (1.2 and 1.4 mm) and (2) metal post (1.2 and 1.4 mm). The material properties were assigned and a force of 100 N was applied at 45° angle to the longitudinal axis of the tooth onto the palatal surface incisal to the cingulum. Analysis was run and stress distribution pattern was studied. Results: Maximum stresses in the radicular tooth structure for fiber post were higher than that for metal post. In the former models, stresses in the tooth structure were slightly reduced with increase in fiber post diameter. Conclusions: To reduce stress in the remaining radicular tooth structure, it is better to use a fiber post of a large diameter. PMID:25829685

  18. Stress distribution of endodontically treated teeth with titanium alloy post and carbon fiber post with different alveolar bone height: A three-dimensional finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, S. Vijay; Bhat, Manohar; Gupta, Saurabh; Sharma, Deepak; Satija, Harsha; Sharma, Sumeet

    2015-01-01

    Objective: A three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis (FEA) on the stress distribution of endodontically treated teeth with titanium alloy post and carbon fiber post with different alveolar bone height. Materials and Methods: The 3D model was fabricated using software to represent an endodontically treated mandibular second premolar with post and restored with a full ceramic crown restoration, which was then analyzed using FEA using FEA ANSYS Workbench V13.0 (ANSYS Inc., Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, U.S.A) software. Results: The FEA showed the maximum stresses of 137.43 Mpa in dentin with alveolar bone height of 4 mm when the titanium post was used, 138.48 Mpa when carbon fiber post was used as compared to 105.91 Mpa in the model with alveolar bone height of 2 mm from the cement enamel junction (CEJ) when the titanium post was used and 107.37 Mpa when the carbon fiber post was used. Conclusions: Stress was observed more in alveolar bone height level of 4 mm from CEJ than 2 mm from CEJ. Stresses in the dentin were almost similar when the carbon fiber post was compared to titanium post. However, stresses in the post and the cement were much higher when titanium post was used as compared to carbon fiber post. PMID:26430375

  19. Frequency-dependent traveltime tomography using fat rays: application to near-surface seismic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordi, Claudio; Schmelzbach, Cedric; Greenhalgh, Stewart

    2016-08-01

    Frequency-dependent traveltime tomography does not rely on the high frequency assumption made in classical ray-based tomography. By incorporating the effects of velocity structures in the first Fresnel volume around the central ray, it offers a more realistic and accurate representation of the actual physics of seismic wave propagation and thus, enhanced imaging of near-surface structures is expected. The objective of this work was to apply frequency-dependent first arrival traveltime tomography to surface seismic data that were acquired for exploration scale and near-surface seismic imaging. We adapted a fat ray tomography algorithm from global-earth seismology that calculates the Fresnel volumes based on source and receiver (adjoint source) traveltime fields. The fat ray tomography algorithm was tested on synthetic model data that mimics the dimensions of two field data sets. The field data sets are presented as two case studies where fat ray tomography was applied for near-surface seismic imaging. The data set of the first case study was recorded for high-resolution near-surface imaging of a Quaternary valley (profile length < 1 km); the second data set was acquired for hydrocarbon search (profile length > 10 km). All results of fat ray tomography are compared against the results of classical ray-based tomography. We show that fat ray tomography can provide enhanced tomograms and that it is possible to recover more information on the subsurface when compared to ray tomography. However, model assessment based on the column sum of the Jacobian matrix revealed that especially the deep parts of the structure in the fat ray tomograms might not be adequately covered by fat rays. Furthermore, the performance of the fat ray tomography depends on the chosen input frequency in relation to the scale of the seismic survey. Synthetic data testing revealed that the best results were obtained when the frequency was chosen to correspond to an approximate wavelength

  20. Frequency-dependent tactile responses in rat brain by fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G.; Herman, Peter; Hyder, Fahmeed

    2009-01-01

    We measured frequency-dependent fMRI activations (at 11.7T) in the somatosensory cortex with whisker and forepaw stimuli in the same α-chloralose anesthetized rats. Whisker and forepaw stimuli were attained by computer-controlled pulses of air puffs and electrical currents, respectively. Air puffs deflected (±2 mm) the chosen whisker(s) in the right snout in the rostral and caudal direction, whereas electrical currents (2 mA amplitude, 0.3 ms duration) stimulated the left forepaw with subcutaneous copper electrodes placed between the second and fourth digits. In the same subject, unimodal stimulation of whisker and forepaw gave rise to significant BOLD signal increases in corresponding contralateral somatosensory areas of whisker barrel field (S1BF) and forelimb (S1FL), respectively, with no significant spatial overlap between these regions. The BOLD responses in S1BF and S1FL regions were found to be differentially variable with frequency of each stimulus type. In the S1BF, a linear increase in the BOLD response was observed with whisker stimulation frequency of up to ~12 Hz, beyond which the response seemed to saturate (and/or slightly attenuate) up to the maximum frequency studied (i.e., 30 Hz). In the S1FL, the magnitude of the BOLD response was largest at forepaw stimulation frequency between 1.5 and 3 Hz, beyond which the response diminished with little or no activity at frequencies higher than 20 Hz. The volume of tissue activated by each stimulus type followed a similar pattern as the stimulation frequency dependence. These results of bimodal whisker and forepaw stimuli in the same subject may provide a framework to study interactions of different tactile modules, both with fMRI and neurophysiology (i.e., inside and outside the magnet). PMID:18435491

  1. Hubbard interactions in iron-based pnictides and chalcogenides: Slater parametrization, screening channels, and frequency dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Roekeghem, Ambroise; Vaugier, Loïg; Jiang, Hong; Biermann, Silke

    2016-09-01

    We calculate the strength of the frequency-dependent on-site electronic interactions in the iron pnictides LaFeAsO, BaFe2As2 , BaRu2As2 , and LiFeAs and the chalcogenide FeSe from first principles within the constrained random phase approximation. We discuss the accuracy of an atomiclike parametrization of the two-index density-density interaction matrices based on the calculation of an optimal set of three independent Slater integrals, assuming that the angular part of the Fe d localized orbitals can be described within spherical harmonics as for isolated Fe atoms. We show that its quality depends on the ligand-metal bonding character rather than on the dimensionality of the lattice: it is excellent for ionic-like Fe-Se (FeSe) chalcogenides and a more severe approximation for more covalent Fe-As (LaFeAsO, BaFe2As2 ) pnictides. We furthermore analyze the relative importance of different screening channels, with similar conclusions for the different pnictides but a somewhat different picture for the benchmark oxide SrVO3: the ligand channel does not appear to be dominant in the pnictides, while oxygen screening is the most important process in the oxide. Finally, we analyze the frequency dependence of the interaction. In contrast to simple oxides, in iron pnictides its functional form cannot be simply modeled by a single plasmon, and the actual density of modes enters the construction of an effective Hamiltonian determining the low-energy properties.

  2. Frequency dependence of loss tangent of thermally annealed undoped lead iodide crystals in the dark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Mahmoud A.; Abdul-Gader Jafar, Mousa M.

    2006-10-01

    The effect of isothermal annealing ( T⩽120 °C) on the frequency dependence of the loss tangent, tan δ, of undoped lead iodide (PbI 2) crystals in the dark has been investigated in the range 0.1-15 kHz at different ambient temperatures ( T=15-120 °C) without and with DC biasing ( V⩽2 V). Thermal annealing of as-grown PbI 2 crystals modified both the magnitude and frequency dependence of their tan δ. The tan δ-ƒ data ( T=17 °C) of unbiased as-grown crystals were found to fit a tan δ∝ƒ - m dependence, with m˜0.94 in the range 100 Hz <ƒ<10 kHz. After annealing these crystals at T=70 °C for 1 h, the tan δ∝ƒ - m relation was obeyed for unbiased samples at any T over most of the frequency range studied, with the exponent m being reduced to around 0.55; a behavior that was also found for isothermally annealed PbI 2 crystals when were DC biased, but at high ambient temperatures. The tan δ- T data (ƒ=1 kHz) of the unbiased prolonged annealed ( T=120 °C) PbI 2 crystals exhibited two different thermally activated regimes, with activation energies Ea˜0.23 and 0.087 eV in the ranges 75-120 °C and 15-75 °C, respectively, which were related to trapping cationic Pb +2-vacancies/hole-impurity levels in the crystal band gap. An interpolytypic phase transformation of the 2H-PbI 2 upon isothermal annealing may not, however, be entirely excluded.

  3. Negative frequency-dependent selection or alternative reproductive tactics: maintenance of female polymorphism in natural populations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sex-limited polymorphisms have long intrigued evolutionary biologists and have been the subject of long-standing debates. The coexistence of multiple male and/or female morphs is widely believed to be maintained through negative frequency-dependent selection imposed by social interactions. However, remarkably few empirical studies have evaluated how social interactions, morph frequencies and fitness parameters relate to one another under natural conditions. Here, we test two hypotheses proposed to explain the maintenance of a female polymorphism in a species with extreme geographical variation in morph frequencies. We first elucidate how fecundity traits of the morphs vary in relation to the frequencies and densities of males and female morphs in multiple sites over multiple years. Second, we evaluate whether the two female morphs differ in resource allocation among fecundity traits, indicating alternative tactics to maximize reproductive output. Results We present some of the first empirical evidence collected under natural conditions that egg number and clutch mass was higher in the rarer female morph. This morph-specific fecundity advantage gradually switched with the population morph frequency. Our results further indicate that all investigated fecundity traits are negatively affected by relative male density (i.e. operational sex ratio), which confirms male harassment as selective agent. Finally, we show a clear trade-off between qualitative (egg mass) and quantitative (egg number) fecundity traits. This trade-off, however, is not morph-specific. Conclusion Our reported frequency- and density-dependent fecundity patterns are consistent with the hypothesis that the polymorphism is driven by a conflict between sexes over optimal mating rate, with costly male sexual harassment driving negative frequency-dependent selection on morph fecundity. PMID:23822745

  4. The Frequency-Dependent Neuronal Length Constant in Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ilmoniemi, Risto J.; Mäki, Hanna; Saari, Jukka; Salvador, Ricardo; Miranda, Pedro C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The behavior of the dendritic or axonal membrane voltage due to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is often modeled with the one-dimensional cable equation. For the cable equation, a length constant λ0 is defined; λ0 describes the axial decay of the membrane voltage in the case of constant applied electric field. In TMS, however, the induced electric field waveform is typically a segment of a sinusoidal wave, with characteristic frequencies of the order of several kHz. Objective: To show that the high frequency content of the stimulation pulse causes deviations in the spatial profile of the membrane voltage as compared to the steady state. Methods: We derive the cable equation in complex form utilizing the complex frequency-dependent representation of the membrane conductivity. In addition, we define an effective length constant λeff, which governs the spatial decay of the membrane voltage. We model the behavior of a dendrite in an applied electric field oscillating at 3.9 kHz with the complex cable equation and by solving the traditional cable equation numerically. Results: The effective length constant decreases as a function of frequency. For a model dendrite or axon, for which λ0 = 1.5 mm, the effective length constant at 3.9 kHz is decreased by a factor 10 to 0.13 mm. Conclusion: The frequency dependency of the neuronal length constant has to be taken into account when predicting the spatial behavior of the membrane voltage as a response to TMS. PMID:27555808

  5. Is it possible to infer the frequency-dependent seismic attenuation of fractured materials from high-strain creep tests?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    mallet, celine; quintal, beatriz; caspari, eva; holliger, klaus

    2016-04-01

    The seismic and hydraulic characterization of fractured rocks is an important objective for reservoir development in general and the production of geothermal energy in particular. The attenuation of seismic waves in saturated fractured media is governed by local displacements of the fluid relative to the solid induced by the compressions and extensions associated with the passing wavefield. This phenomenon is generally referred to as wave-induced fluid flow (WIFF). Recent evidence suggests that this energy dissipation mechanism is sensitive to the interconnectivity of the fractures, which offers the perspective of linking seismic observations to the hydraulic properties of fractured rocks. Here, we consider the results of laboratory experiments, which are referred to as creep tests. Such tests consist of applying a constant stress to a water-saturated thermally cracked glass sample and recording the resulting strain response as a function of time. The primary advantages of the considered material are (i) that the fracture network is well documented and (ii) that the homogeneous and non-porous glass matrix limits WIFF to the fracture network. Due to the high stress levels as well as other technical issues, creep tests are not commonly used for laboratory-based measurements of energy dissipation. Therefore, an objective of this study is to explore whether and to what extent such data can be interpreted in terms of the seismic attenuation characteristics of the probed samples, as this might open access to a vast reservoir of corresponding data, notably for cracked materials. Transforming the observed time-dependent stress-strain relation into the Fourier domain, allows us to infer the corresponding frequency-dependent attenuation characteristics, which we then seek to interpret through numerical simulations based on Biot's quasi-static poroelastic equations. The 2D geometry of the fracture network considered in these simulations is derived from a scanning electron

  6. Effect of controlling recrystallization from the melt on the residual stress and structural properties of the Silica-clad Ge core fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ziwen; Cheng, Xueli; He, Ting; Xue, Fei; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Na; Wen, Jianxiang; Zeng, Xianglong; Wang, Tingyun

    2017-09-01

    Effect of controlling recrystallization from the melt (1000 °C) on the residual stress and structural properties of a Ge core fiber via molten core drawing (MCD) method is investigated. Ge core fibers is investigated using Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Compared with the as-drawn Ge fiber, the Raman peak of the recrystallized Ge fiber shift from 300 cm-1 to 300.6 cm-1 and full width at half maximum (FWHM) decreased from 5.36 cm-1 to 4.48 cm-1. The Ge crystal grains which sizes are of 200-600 nm were formed during the process of recrystallization; the XRD peak of (1 1 1) plane is observed after recrystallization. These results show that controlling recrystallization allows the release of the thermal stress, and improvement of the crystal quality of Ge core.

  7. Mild heat stress enhances differentiation and proliferation of Japanese quail myoblasts and enhances slow muscle fiber characteristics.

    PubMed

    Choi, Y M; Chen, P R; Shin, S; Zhang, J; Hwang, S; Lee, K

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of mild heat stress on muscle fiber hyperplastic and hypertrophic growth in quail primary myogenic cells to better understand the mechanisms leading to increased skeletal muscle development in avian embryos incubated at a higher temperature. Compared to control cultures maintained at 37°C, incubation at 39°C enhanced myotube length (P < 0.01) and diameter (P < 0.001) at 3 days after differentiation (D3). This enlargement of the myotubes incubated at 39°C can be explained by differences in the fusion index (56.7 vs. 46.2%, P < 0.05) and nuclei number per myotube (18.1 vs. 10.8, P < 0.001) compared to the control cells at D3. Additionally, a higher density of myotubes at D3 in cultures exposed to a higher temperature were related to higher levels of Pax-7 (P < 0.05) compared to the control cells incubated continuously at 37°C. These results indicated a higher proliferative capacity in cells exposed to mild heat stress compared to the control cells. On the other hand, mild heat stress enhanced protein levels of slow myosin heavy chain isoform (P < 0.01) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV (P < 0.01) compared to the control cells at D3. These discrepancies in protein expression indicated maintenance of slow muscle fiber type characteristics in myotubes incubated at 39°C. Our results suggest that mild heat stress plays a significant role in myogenic mechanisms related to muscle mass and development.

  8. Fiber post cementation strategies: effect of mechanical cycling on push-out bond strength and cement polymerization stress.

    PubMed

    Bergoli, Cesar Dalmolin; Amaral, Marina; Boaro, Leticia Cristina; Braga, Roberto Ruggiero; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of mechanical cycling and cementation strategies on the push-out bond strength between fiber posts and root dentin and the polymerization stresses produced using three resin cements. Eighty bovine mandibular teeth were sectioned to a length of 16 mm, prepared to 12 mm, and embedded in self-curing acrylic resin. The specimens were then distributed into 8 groups (n = 10): Gr1 - Scotchbond Multi Purpose + RelyX ARC; Gr2 - Scotchbond Multi Purpose + RelyX ARC + mechanical cycling; Gr3 - AdheSE + Multilink Automix; Gr4 - AdheSE + Multilink Automix + mechanical cycling; Gr5 - phosphoric acid + RelyX U100 (self-adhesive cement); Gr6 - phosphoric acid+ RelyX U100 + mechanical cycling; Gr7 - RelyX U100; Gr8 - RelyX U100 + mechanical cycling. The values obtained from the push-out bond strength test were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p = 0.05), while the values obtained from the polymerization stress test were subjected to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). Mechanical cycling did not affect the bond strength values (p = 0.236), while cementation strategies affected the push-out bond strength (p < 0.001). Luting with RelyX U100 and Scotch Bond Multi Purpose + RelyX ARC yielded higher push-out bond strength values. The polymerization stress results were affected by the factor "cement" (p = 0.0104): the self-adhesive cement RelyX U100 exhibited the lowest values, RelyX ARC resulted in the highest values, while Multilink Automix presented values statistically similar to the other two cements. The self-adhesive cement appears to be a good alternative for luting fiber posts due to the high push-out bond strengths and lower polymerization stress values.

  9. ON INTRINSIC STRESS FIBER CONTRACTILE FORCES IN SEMILUNAR HEART VALVE INTERSTITIAL CELLS USING A CONTINUUM MIXTURE MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Yusuke; Buchanan, Rachel M.; Sacks, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Heart valve interstitial cells (VICs) play a critical role in the maintenance and pathophysiology of heart valve tissues. Normally quiescent in the adult, VICs can become activated in periods of growth and disease. When activated, VICs exhibit increased levels of cytokines and extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis, and upregulated expression and strong contraction of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) fibers. However, it remains unknown how expression and contraction of the α-SMA fibers, which vary among different VIC types, contribute to the overall VIC mechanical responses, including the nucleus and cytoskeleton contributions. In the present study, we developed a novel solid-mixture model for VIC biomechanical behavior that incorporated 1) the underlying cytoskeletal network, 2) the oriented α-SMA stress fibers with passive elastic and active contractile responses, 3) a finite deformable elastic nucleus. We implemented the model in a full 3D finite element simulation of a VIC based on known geometry. Moreover, we examined the respective mechanical responses of aortic and pulmonary VICs (AVICs and PVICs, respectively), which are known to have different levels of α-SMA expression levels and contractile behaviors. To calibrate the model, we simulated the combined mechanical responses of VICs in both micropipette aspiration (MA) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments. These two states were chosen as the VICs were under significantly different mechanical loading conditions and activation states, with the α-SMA fibers inactivated in the MA studies while fully activated in the AFM studies. We also used the AFM to study the mechanical property of the nucleus. Our model predicted that the substantial differences found in stiffening of the AVIC compared to the PVICs was due to a 9 to 16 times stronger intrinsic AVIC α-SMA stress fiber contractile force. Model validation was done by simulating a traction force microscopy experiment to estimate the forces the VICs

  10. Residual surface stresses in laminated cross-ply fiber-epoxy composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gascoigne, Harold E.

    Residual (curing) stresses in cross-ply laminated panels are related to the strains released when individual plies are separated. Released strains are determined using high-sensitivity moire interferometry. Elastic orthotropic stress-strain relations are used to calculate residual stresses. Residual strains and stresses are determined on the lateral surface and at the free-edge of a cross-ply panel. The circumferential and radial residual stresses near the outer surface of a thick-walled cross-ply cylinder are determined.

  11. Numerical analysis of stress distribution in embedded highly birefringent PANDA fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesiak, Piotr; Woliński, Tomasz

    2015-09-01

    The paper presents numerical analysis compared with experimental data of influence of polymerization shrinkage on highly birefringent (HB) PANDA optical fibers embedded in a composite material. Since polymerization is a chemical process consisting in combining single molecules in a macromolecular compound [1], principal directions of the polymerization shrinkage depend on a number of the composite layers associated with this process. In this paper a detailed analysis of the piezo-optic effects occurring in HB optical fibers before and after the lamination process answers the question to what extent a degree of the material degradation can be properly estimated.

  12. Impaired Autophagy in Sporadic Inclusion-Body Myositis and in Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Provoked Cultured Human Muscle Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Nogalska, Anna; D'Agostino, Carla; Terracciano, Chiara; Engel, W. King; Askanas, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    The hallmark pathologies of sporadic inclusion-body myositis (s-IBM) muscle fibers are autophagic vacuoles and accumulation of ubiquitin-positive multiprotein aggregates that contain amyloid-β or phosphorylated tau in a β-pleated sheet amyloid configuration. Endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) and 26S proteasome inhibition, also associated with s-IBM, putatively aggrandize the accumulation of misfolded proteins. However, autophagosomal-lysosomal pathway formation and function, indicated by autophagosome maturation, have not been previously analyzed in this system. Here we studied the autophagosomal-lysosomal pathway using 14 s-IBM and 30 disease control and normal control muscle biopsy samples and our cultured human muscle fibers in a microenvironment modified to resemble aspects of s-IBM pathology. We report for the first time that in s-IBM, lysosomal enzyme activities of cathepsin D and B were decreased 60% (P < 0.01) and 40% (P < 0.05), respectively. We also detected two indicators of increased autophagosome maturation, the presence of LC3-II and decreased mammalian target of rapamycin-mediated phosphorylation of p70S6 kinase. Moreover, in cultured human muscle fibers, ERS induction significantly decreased activities of cathepsins D and B, increased levels of LC3-II, decreased phosphorylation of p70S6 kinase, and decreased expression of VMA21, a chaperone for assembly of lysosomal V-ATPase. We conclude that in s-IBM muscle, decreased lysosomal proteolytic activity might enhance accumulation of misfolded proteins, despite increased maturation of autophagosomes, and that ERS is a possible cause of s-IBM-impaired lysosomal function. Thus, unblocking protein degradation in s-IBM muscle fibers may be a desirable therapeutic strategy. PMID:20616343

  13. Fracture Mechanisms For SiC Fibers And SiC/SiC Composites Under Stress-Rupture Conditions at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, James A.; Yun, Hee Mann; Hurst, Janet B.; Viterna, L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The successful application of SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites as high-temperature structural materials depends strongly on maximizing the fracture or rupture life of the load-bearing fiber and matrix constituents. Using high-temperature data measured under stress-rupture test conditions, this study examines in a mechanistic manner the effects of various intrinsic and extrinsic factors on the creep and fracture behavior of a variety of SiC fiber types. It is shown that although some fiber types fracture during a large primary creep stage, the fiber creep rate just prior to fracture plays a key role in determining fiber rupture time (Monkman-Grant theory). If it is assumed that SiC matrices rupture in a similar manner as fibers with the same microstructures, one can develop simple mechanistic models to analyze and optimize the stress-rupture behavior of SiC/SiC composites for applied stresses that are initially below matrix cracking.

  14. Contact stresses modeling at the Panda-type fiber single-layer winding and evaluation of their impact on the fiber optic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesnikova, Yu I.; Smetannikov, O. Yu; Trufanov, A. N.; Trufanov, N. A.

    2017-02-01

    The impact of contact transverse forces on the birefringence of the single-mode polarization-maintaining Panda-type fiber is numerically modeled. It has been established that with a single-row power winding on a cylindrical mandrel, the fiber tension at winding is the principal factor that influences birefringence. When coiling the fiber based on the local defect microbending, the birefringence at the microbending point differs from that of the free fiber by 1.3%.

  15. Functional analyses of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) immature fiber (im) mutant reveal that fiber cell wall development is associated with sensitivity to stress.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Cotton fiber maturity refers the degree of fiber cell wall development and is an important factor for determining commercial value of cotton. The molecular mechanism regulating the fiber cell wall development has not been well characterized. Microscopic image analysis of the cross-sect...

  16. Cav1.1 controls frequency-dependent events regulating adult skeletal muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Jorquera, Gonzalo; Altamirano, Francisco; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Almarza, Gonzalo; Buvinic, Sonja; Jacquemond, Vincent; Jaimovich, Enrique; Casas, Mariana

    2013-03-01

    An important pending question in neuromuscular biology is how skeletal muscle cells decipher the stimulation pattern coming from motoneurons to define their phenotype as slow or fast twitch muscle fibers. We have previously shown that voltage-gated L-type calcium channel (Cav1.1) acts as a voltage sensor for activation of inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P₃]-dependent Ca(2+) signals that regulates gene expression. ATP released by muscle cells after electrical stimulation through pannexin-1 channels plays a key role in this process. We show now that stimulation frequency determines both ATP release and Ins(1,4,5)P₃ production in adult skeletal muscle and that Cav1.1 and pannexin-1 colocalize in the transverse tubules. Both ATP release and increased Ins(1,4,5)P₃ was seen in flexor digitorum brevis fibers stimulated with 270 pulses at 20 Hz, but not at 90 Hz. 20 Hz stimulation induced transcriptional changes related to fast-to-slow muscle fiber phenotype transition that required ATP release. Addition of 30 µM ATP to fibers induced the same transcriptional changes observed after 20 Hz stimulation. Myotubes lacking the Cav1.1-α1 subunit released almost no ATP after electrical stimulation, showing that Cav1.1 has a central role in this process. In adult muscle fibers, ATP release and the transcriptional changes produced by 20 Hz stimulation were blocked by both the Cav1.1 antagonist nifedipine (25 µM) and by the Cav1.1 agonist (-)S-BayK 8644 (10 µM). We propose a new role for Cav1.1, independent of its calcium channel activity, in the activation of signaling pathways allowing muscle fibers to decipher the frequency of electrical stimulation and to activate specific transcriptional programs that define their phenotype.

  17. Effect of Environment on Stress-Rupture Behavior of a Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Silicon Carbide (C/SiC) Ceramic Matrix Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verrilli, Michael J.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Calomino, Anthony; Kiser, J. Douglas

    2002-01-01

    Stress-rupture tests were conducted in air, vacuum, and steam-containing environments to identify the failure modes and degradation mechanisms of a carbon fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC) composite at two temperatures, 600 and 1200 C. Stress-rupture lives in air and steam containing environments (50 - 80% steam with argon) are similar for a composite stress of 69 MPa at 1200 C. Lives of specimens tested in a 20% steam/argon environment were about twice as long. For tests conducted at 600 C, composite life in 20% steam/argon was 20 times longer than life in air. Thermogravimetric analysis of the carbon fibers was conducted under similar conditions to the stress-rupture tests. The oxidation rate of the fibers in the various environments correlated with the composite stress-rupture lives. Examination of the failed specimens indicated that oxidation of the carbon fibers was the primary damage mode for specimens tested in air and steam environments at both temperatures.

  18. Effect of Environment on Stress-Rupture Behavior of a Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Silicon Carbide (C/SiC) Ceramic Matrix Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verrilli, Michael J.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Calomino, Anthony; Kiser, J. Douglas

    2002-01-01

    Stress-rupture tests were conducted in air, vacuum, and steam-containing environments to identify the failure modes and degradation mechanisms of a carbon fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC) composite at two temperatures, 600 and 1200 C. Stress-rupture lives in air and steam containing environments (50 - 80% steam with argon) are similar for a composite stress of 69 MPa at 1200 C. Lives of specimens tested in a 20% steam/argon environment were about twice as long. For tests conducted at 600 C, composite life in 20% steam/argon was 20 times longer than life in air. Thermogravimetric analysis of the carbon fibers was conducted under similar conditions to the stress-rupture tests. The oxidation rate of the fibers in the various environments correlated with the composite stress-rupture lives. Examination of the failed specimens indicated that oxidation of the carbon fibers was the primary damage mode for specimens tested in air and steam environments at both temperatures.

  19. Hemispheric asymmetry of frequency-dependent suppression in the ipsilateral primary motor cortex during finger movement: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masamichi J; Saito, Daisuke N; Aramaki, Yu; Asai, Tatsuya; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa; Sadato, Norihiro

    2008-12-01

    Electrophysiological studies have suggested that the activity of the primary motor cortex (M1) during ipsilateral hand movement reflects both the ipsilateral innervation and the transcallosal inhibitory control from its counterpart in the opposite hemisphere, and that their asymmetry might cause hand dominancy. To examine the asymmetry of the involvement of the ipsilateral motor cortex during a unimanual motor task under frequency stress, we conducted block-design functional magnetic resonance imaging with 22 normal right-handed subjects. The task involved visually cued unimanual opponent finger movement at various rates. The contralateral M1 showed symmetric frequency-dependent activation. The ipsilateral M1 showed task-related deactivation at low frequencies without laterality. As the frequency of the left-hand movement increased, the left M1 showed a gradual decrease in the deactivation. This data suggests a frequency-dependent increased involvement of the left M1 in ipsilateral hand control. By contrast, the right M1 showed more prominent deactivation as the frequency of the right-hand movement increased. This suggests that there is an increased transcallosal inhibition from the left M1 to the right M1, which overwhelms the right M1 activation during ipsilateral hand movement. These results demonstrate the dominance of the left M1 in both ipsilateral innervation and transcallosal inhibition in right-handed individuals.

  20. Residual stress stability in fiber textured stoichiometric AlN film grown using rf magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Sah, R. E.; Kirste, L.; Baeumler, M.; Hiesinger, P.; Cimalla, V.; Lebedev, V.; Baumann, H.; Zschau, H.-E.

    2010-05-15

    The authors report on the stability of mechanical stress with aging and thermal cycling for columnar structured stoichiometric and homogeneous aluminum nitride thin films grown using radio frequency magnetron sputtering technique. The set of deposition parameters were optimized for the best possible orientation of crystallites in the c axis of compositionally stoichiometric films. The as-grown stress in the slightly nitrogen-rich film does not change when exposed to the atmosphere following deposition, while that in the nitrogen-deficient film, it changes due to oxidation. Additionally, the magnitude of as-grown stress has been found to depend on the substrate material in addition to the deposition parameters. The stress in the film grown on a Si(001) substrate was more tensile than in the film grown on a semi-insulating (si) GaAs(001) substrate for a given set of deposition parameters. Furthermore, the stress in the film grown on Si decreased with temperature, while that on si GaAs increased, indicating the thermally induced stress component to be the major component in the residual stress. Upon subsequent cooling the stress changes in both substrates followed the same path as of heating, thus exhibiting no hysteresis with thermal cycles between room temperature and 400 deg. C.

  1. Compressive sensing of frequency-dependent seismic radiation from subduction zone megathrust ruptures

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Huajian; Shearer, Peter M.; Gerstoft, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Megathrust earthquakes rupture a broad zone of the subducting plate interface in both along-strike and along-dip directions. The along-dip rupture characteristics of megathrust events, e.g., their slip and energy radiation distribution, reflect depth-varying frictional properties of the slab interface. Here, we report high-resolution frequency-dependent seismic radiation of the four largest megathrust earthquakes in the past 10 y using a compressive-sensing (sparse source recovery) technique, resolving generally low-frequency radiation closer to the trench at shallower depths and high-frequency radiation farther from the trench at greater depths. Together with coseismic slip models and early aftershock locations, our results suggest depth-varying frictional properties at the subducting plate interfaces. The shallower portion of the slab interface (above ∼15 km) is frictionally stable or conditionally stable and is the source region for tsunami earthquakes with large coseismic slip, deficient high-frequency radiation, and few early aftershocks. The slab interface at intermediate depths (∼15–35 km) is the main unstable seismogenic zone for the nucleation of megathrust quakes, typically with large coseismic slip, abundant early aftershocks, and intermediate- to high-frequency radiation. The deeper portion of the slab interface (∼35–45 km) is seismically unstable, however with small coseismic slip, dominant high-frequency radiation, and relatively fewer aftershocks.

  2. The Frequency-dependent Damping of Slow Magnetoacoustic Waves in a Sunspot Umbral Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Prasad, S.; Jess, D. B.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Verth, G.; Morton, R. J.; Fedun, V.; Erdélyi, R.; Christian, D. J.

    2017-09-01

    High spatial and temporal resolution images of a sunspot, obtained simultaneously in multiple optical and UV wavelengths, are employed to study the propagation and damping characteristics of slow magnetoacoustic waves up to transition region heights. Power spectra are generated from intensity oscillations in sunspot umbra, across multiple atmospheric heights, for frequencies up to a few hundred mHz. It is observed that the power spectra display a power-law dependence over the entire frequency range, with a significant enhancement around 5.5 mHz found for the chromospheric channels. The phase difference spectra reveal a cutoff frequency near 3 mHz, up to which the oscillations are evanescent, while those with higher frequencies propagate upward. The power-law index appears to increase with atmospheric height. Also, shorter damping lengths are observed for oscillations with higher frequencies suggesting frequency-dependent damping. Using the relative amplitudes of the 5.5 mHz (3 minute) oscillations, we estimate the energy flux at different heights, which seems to decay gradually from the photosphere, in agreement with recent numerical simulations. Furthermore, a comparison of power spectra across the umbral radius highlights an enhancement of high-frequency waves near the umbral center, which does not seem to be related to magnetic field inclination angle effects.

  3. Frequency dependent changes in mechanosensitivity of rat knee joint afferents after antidromic saphenous nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Just, S; Heppelmann, B

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of electrical saphenous nerve stimulation (14 V, 1-10 Hz) on the mechanosensitivity of rat knee joint afferents. The responses to passive joint rotations at defined torque were recorded from slowly conducting knee joint afferent nerve fibres (0.6-20.0 m/s). After repeated nerve stimulation with 1 Hz, the mechanosensitivity of about 79% of the units was significantly affected. The effects were most prominent at a torque close to the mechanical threshold. In about 46% of the examined nerve fibres a significant increase was obtained, whereas about 33% reduced their mechanosensitivity. The sensitisation was prevented by an application of 5 microM phentolamine, an alpha-adrenergic receptor blocker, together with a neuropeptide Y receptor blocker. An inhibition of N-type Ca(2+) channels by an application of 1 microM omega-conotoxin GVIA caused comparable changes of the mechanosensitivity during the electrical stimulation. Electrical nerve stimulation with higher frequencies resulted in a further reduction of the mean response to joint rotations. After stimulation with 10 Hz, there was a nearly complete loss of mechanosensitivity.In conclusion, antidromic electrical nerve stimulation leads to a frequency dependent transient decrease of the mechanosensitivity. A sensitisation was only obtained at 1 Hz, but this effect may be based on the influence of sympathetic nerve fibres.

  4. Frequency-dependent inhibition of antidromic hippocampal compound action potentials by anti-convulsants.

    PubMed

    Teriakidis, Adrianna; Brown, Jon T; Randall, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Using rat hippocampal slices, extracellularly recorded antidromic compound action potentials (cAP) were produced in CA1 pyramidal cell populations by electrical stimulation of the alveus at 0.5 Hz. These responses were additionally examined across a range of stimulus frequencies between 0.5 and 100 Hz. Anticonvulsant drugs in clinical use were applied via perfusion of the recording chamber. Three anticonvulsants produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of the cAP evoked at low frequency (0.5 Hz). The following IC(50) values were observed: lamotrigine, 210 microM (interpolated); carbamazepine, 210 microM (interpolated); phenytoin, 400 microM (extrapolated). The extent of inhibition produced was increased when trains of 30 cAPs were evoked at frequencies > or 30 Hz. This frequency dependence was quantified by measuring a response integral for a range of compound concentrations. Three other compounds valproate (5 mM), topiramate (500 microM) and levetiracetam (500 microM) produced no clear effect at any stimulus frequency tested. Using this simple neurophysiological assay it has been possible to compare the use-dependent inhibition of hippocampal action potentials by a range of anticonvulsants, providing a useful adjunct to patch clamp studies of such molecules at Na(+) channels. There is no clear correlation between the activity in this model and the clinical efficacy of these drugs in different forms of epilepsy.

  5. Frequency-dependent fitness of hybrids between oilseed rape (Brassica napus) and weedy B. rapa (Brassicaceae).

    PubMed

    Hauser, Thure P; Damgaard, Christian; Jørgensen, Rikke B

    2003-04-01

    Fitness of interspecific hybrids is sometimes high relative to their parents, despite the conventional belief that they are mostly unfit. F(1) hybrids between oilseed rape (Brassica napus) and weedy B. rapa can be significantly more fit than their weedy parents under some conditions; however, under other conditions they are less fit. To understand the reasons, we measured the seed production of B. napus, B. rapa, and different generations of hybrid plants at three different densities and in mixtures of different frequencies (including pure stands). Brassica napus, B. rapa, and backcross plants (F(1) ♀ × B. rapa) produced many more seeds per plant in pure plots than in mixtures and more seeds in plots when each was present at high frequency. The opposite was true for F(1) plants that produced many more seeds than B. rapa in mixtures, but fewer in pure stands. Both vegetative and reproductive interactions may be responsible for these effects. Our results show that the fitness of both parents and hybrids is strongly frequency-dependent and that the likelihood of introgression of genes between the species thus may depend on the numbers and densities of parents and their various hybrid offspring in the population.

  6. Role of acoustic phonons in frequency dependent electronic thermal conductivity of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Pankaj

    2017-03-01

    We study the effect of the electron-phonon interaction on the finite frequency dependent electronic thermal conductivity of two dimensional graphene. We calculate it for various acoustic phonons present in graphene and characterized by different dispersion relations using the memory function approach. It is found that the electronic thermal conductivity κe (T) in the zero frequency limit follows different power law for the longitudinal/transverse and the flexural acoustic phonons. For the longitudinal/transverse phonons, κe (T) ∼T-1 at the low temperature and saturates at the high temperature. These signatures qualitatively agree with the results calculated by solving the Boltzmann equation analytically and numerically. Similarly, for the flexural phonons, we find that κe (T) shows T 1 / 2 law at the low temperature and then saturates at the high temperature. In the finite frequency regime, we observe that the real part of the electronic thermal conductivity, Re [κe (ω , T) ] follows ω-2 behavior at the low frequency and becomes frequency independent at the high frequency.

  7. Frequency-dependent photothermal measurement of transverse thermal diffusivity of organic semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Brill, J. W.; Shahi, Maryam; Yao, Y.; Payne, Marcia M.; Anthony, J. E.; Edberg, Jesper; Crispin, Xavier

    2015-12-21

    We have used a photothermal technique, in which chopped light heats the front surface of a small (∼1 mm{sup 2}) sample and the chopping frequency dependence of thermal radiation from the back surface is measured with a liquid-nitrogen-cooled infrared detector. In our system, the sample is placed directly in front of the detector within its dewar. Because the detector is also sensitive to some of the incident light, which leaks around or through the sample, measurements are made for the detector signal that is in quadrature with the chopped light. Results are presented for layered crystals of semiconducting 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl) pentacene (TIPS-pn) and for papers of cellulose nanofibrils coated with semiconducting poly(3,4-ethylene-dioxythiophene):poly(styrene-sulfonate) (NFC-PEDOT). For NFC-PEDOT, we have found that the transverse diffusivity, smaller than the in-plane value, varies inversely with thickness, suggesting that texturing of the papers varies with thickness. For TIPS-pn, we have found that the interlayer diffusivity is an order of magnitude larger than the in-plane value, consistent with previous estimates, suggesting that low-frequency optical phonons, presumably associated with librations in the TIPS side groups, carry most of the heat.

  8. Direction of information flow in large-scale resting-state networks is frequency-dependent.

    PubMed

    Hillebrand, Arjan; Tewarie, Prejaas; van Dellen, Edwin; Yu, Meichen; Carbo, Ellen W S; Douw, Linda; Gouw, Alida A; van Straaten, Elisabeth C W; Stam, Cornelis J

    2016-04-05

    Normal brain function requires interactions between spatially separated, and functionally specialized, macroscopic regions, yet the directionality of these interactions in large-scale functional networks is unknown. Magnetoencephalography was used to determine the directionality of these interactions, where directionality was inferred from time series of beamformer-reconstructed estimates of neuronal activation, using a recently proposed measure of phase transfer entropy. We observed well-organized posterior-to-anterior patterns of information flow in the higher-frequency bands (alpha1, alpha2, and beta band), dominated by regions in the visual cortex and posterior default mode network. Opposite patterns of anterior-to-posterior flow were found in the theta band, involving mainly regions in the frontal lobe that were sending information to a more distributed network. Many strong information senders in the theta band were also frequent receivers in the alpha2 band, and vice versa. Our results provide evidence that large-scale resting-state patterns of information flow in the human brain form frequency-dependent reentry loops that are dominated by flow from parieto-occipital cortex to integrative frontal areas in the higher-frequency bands, which is mirrored by a theta band anterior-to-posterior flow.

  9. Finite element analysis of the dynamic behavior of a laminated windscreen with frequency dependent viscoelastic core.

    PubMed

    Bouayed, Kaïss; Hamdi, Mohamed-Ali

    2012-08-01

    This paper presents numerical and experimental validation of results obtained by a shell finite element, which has been developed for modeling of the dynamic behavior of sandwich multilayered structures with a viscoelastic core. The proposed shell finite element is very easy to implement in existing finite element solvers, since it uses only the displacements as degrees of freedom at external faces and at inter-layer interfaces. The displacement field is linearly interpolated in the thickness direction of each layer, and analytical integration is made in the thickness direction in order to avoid meshing of each sandwich layer by solid elements. Only the two dimensional mid-surface of reference is meshed, facilitating the mesh generation task. A simplified modal approach using a real modal basis is also proposed to efficiently calculate the dynamic response of the sandwich structure. The proposed method reduces the memory size and computing time and takes into account the frequency-dependence of the polymer core mechanical properties. Results obtained by the proposed element in conjunction with the simplified modal method have been numerically and experimentally validated by comparison to results obtained by commercial software codes (MSC/NASTRAN and ESI/RAYON-VTM), and to measurements done on automobile windscreens.

  10. Microscopic theoretical study of frequency dependent dielectric constant of heavy fermion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadangi, Keshab Chandra; Rout, G. C.

    2017-05-01

    The dielectric polarization and the dielectric constant plays a vital role in the deciding the properties of the Heavy Fermion Systems. In the present communication we consider the periodic Anderson's Model which consists of conduction electron kinetic energy, localized f-electron kinetic energy and the hybridization between the conduction and localized electrons, besides the Coulomb correlation energy. We calculate dielectric polarization which involves two particle Green's functions which are calculated by using Zubarev's Green's function technique. Using the equations of motion of the fermion electron operators. Finally, the temperature and frequency dependent dielectric constant is calculated from the dielectric polarization function. The charge susceptibility and dielectric constant are computed numerically for different physical parameters like the position (Ef) of the f-electron level with respect to fermi level, the strength of the hybridization (V) between the conduction and localized f-electrons, Coulomb correlation potential temperature and optical phonon wave vector (q). The results will be discussed in a reference to the experimental observations of the dielectric constants.

  11. Evolution of learned strategy choice in a frequency-dependent game.

    PubMed

    Katsnelson, Edith; Motro, Uzi; Feldman, Marcus W; Lotem, Arnon

    2012-03-22

    In frequency-dependent games, strategy choice may be innate or learned. While experimental evidence in the producer-scrounger game suggests that learned strategy choice may be common, a recent theoretical analysis demonstrated that learning by only some individuals prevents learning from evolving in others. Here, however, we model learning explicitly, and demonstrate that learning can easily evolve in the whole population. We used an agent-based evolutionary simulation of the producer-scrounger game to test the success of two general learning rules for strategy choice. We found that learning was eventually acquired by all individuals under a sufficient degree of environmental fluctuation, and when players were phenotypically asymmetric. In the absence of sufficient environmental change or phenotypic asymmetries, the correct target for learning seems to be confounded by game dynamics, and innate strategy choice is likely to be fixed in the population. The results demonstrate that under biologically plausible conditions, learning can easily evolve in the whole population and that phenotypic asymmetry is important for the evolution of learned strategy choice, especially in a stable or mildly changing environment.

  12. Understanding the modulation frequency dependence of continuous wave optically/electrically detected magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Yun; Paik, Seoyoung; McCamey, Dane R.; Boehme, Christoph

    2011-03-01

    Continuous wave optically and electrically detected magnetic resonance spectroscopy (cwODMR/cwEDMR) are powerful methods which allow the investigation of the microscopic nature of paramagnetic states involved in spin-dependent transitions, like recombination and transport. Although experimentally similar to conventional electron spin resonance (ESR), there exist limitations when applying conventional theoretical models originally developed for ESR to explain how the observables (luminescence and electric current) of cwODMR and cwEDMR behave under the influences of various experimental parameters. Here we present closed-form solutions for the modulation frequency dependence of cwODMR and cw EDMR based on an intermediate pair recombination model and discuss ambiguities which arise when attempting to distinguishing the dominant spin-dependent processes underlying experimental data. These include: 1) a large number of quantitatively different models cannot be differentiated, 2) signs of signal are determined not only by recombination, but also by other processes like dissociation, intersystem-crossing, pair generation, and even an experimental parameter, modulation frequency.

  13. Frequency-Dependent Scattering Observed in P- and Surface-Wave Arrivals From South India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, A. K.

    2017-03-01

    Anomalies in polarization angles of teleseismic waves have been used to understand effect of scattered arrivals from subsurface heterogeneities. Seismological data recorded in southern India show polarization anomalies up to 5° for several stations. These anomalies are most pronounced for earthquakes from western and southern azimuths. Furthermore, stations located near the boundary of Dharwar craton and southern Granulites are more affected by scattered waves. Considering that many of the nearby stations show similar patterns of polarization anomalies, it is likely that the source of scattered energy is located at shallower depths. The non-stationary nature of seismic arrivals warrants determination of frequency-dependent polarization. Result obtained using multi-taper spectral analysis method indicates that data are contaminated at frequencies greater than 2 Hz for most of the stations. Furthermore, surface-wave records also indicate off-azimuth arrivals, and quasi-Love waves indicating heterogeneities or anisotropy in the subsurface. These small-scale heterogeneities that may be located in crust may be important for studies using converted phases and ground motion prediction studies.

  14. Frequency dependence of electrical and magnetic properties of Li-Ni-Mn-Co ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maisnam, Mamata; Phanjoubam, Sumitra

    2012-02-01

    Substituted Li-ferrites with compositional formula Li 0.45- x/2 Ni 0.1Mn 0.1Co xFe 2.35- x/2 O 4 with x ranging from 0 to 0.1 in steps of 0.02 were prepared by the conventional ceramic technique. The single-phase spinel structure of the samples was confirmed by XRD analysis. The lattice constant was observed to increase with the increase of the Co 2+ substitution. The dielectric constant, ɛ' and dielectric loss tangent, tan δ was studied as a function of frequency in the range 100 Hz to 1 MHz. A decrease is observed in the value of ɛ' with substitution at lower frequencies. ɛ' showed a dispersive behavior with frequency for all the samples. The frequency dependence of tan δ showed a resonance peak. The magnetic properties viz initial permeability and magnetic loss were also studied as a function of frequency. The possible mechanisms contributing to the results have been discussed.

  15. Frequency dependent electrical properties of nano-CdS/Ag junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanta, D.; Choudhury, A.

    2005-05-01

    Polymer embedded cadmium sulfide nanoparticles/quantum dots were synthesized by a chemical route using polyvinyl alcohol (lmw) as the desired matrix. In an attempt to measure the electrical properties of nano-CdS/Ag samples, we propose that contribution from surface traps are mainly responsible in determining the I˜ V and C˜ V characteristics in high frequency ranges. To be specific, beyond 1.2 MHz, the carrier injection from the trap centers of the embedded quantum dots is ensured by large current establishment even at negative biasing condition of the junction. The unexpected nonlinear signature of C˜ V response is believed to be due to the fact that while trying to follow very high signal frequency (at least 10-3 of recombination frequency), there is complete abruptness in carrier trapping (charging) or/and detrapping (decay) in a given CdS nanoparticle assembly. The frequency dependent unique role of the trap carriers certainly find application in nanoelectronic devices at a desirable frequency of operation.

  16. Frequency-Dependent Scattering Observed in P- and Surface-Wave Arrivals From South India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, A. K.

    2016-12-01

    Anomalies in polarization angles of teleseismic waves have been used to understand effect of scattered arrivals from subsurface heterogeneities. Seismological data recorded in southern India show polarization anomalies up to 5° for several stations. These anomalies are most pronounced for earthquakes from western and southern azimuths. Furthermore, stations located near the boundary of Dharwar craton and southern Granulites are more affected by scattered waves. Considering that many of the nearby stations show similar patterns of polarization anomalies, it is likely that the source of scattered energy is located at shallower depths. The non-stationary nature of seismic arrivals warrants determination of frequency-dependent polarization. Result obtained using multi-taper spectral analysis method indicates that data are contaminated at frequencies greater than 2 Hz for most of the stations. Furthermore, surface-wave records also indicate off-azimuth arrivals, and quasi-Love waves indicating heterogeneities or anisotropy in the subsurface. These small-scale heterogeneities that may be located in crust may be important for studies using converted phases and ground motion prediction studies.

  17. Frequency-dependent streaming potential of porous media: Experimental approaches and apparatus design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, Paul W. J.; Ruel, Jean; Tardif, Eric

    2013-04-01

    Electro-kinetic phenomena link fluid flow and electrical flow in porous and fractured media such that a hydraulic flow will generate an electrical current and vice versa. Although such a link is likely to be extremely useful, especially in the development of the electro-seismic method, surprisingly few experimental measurements have been carried out, particularly as a function of frequency because of their difficulty. We have carried out a study that considers six different approaches to making laboratory determinations of the frequency-dependent streaming potential coefficient of geomaterials. These are (i) motor and scotch yoke, (ii) motor and cam, (iii) pneumatic drive, (iv) hydraulic drive, (v) electro-magnetic drive, and (vi) piezo-electric drive. In each case, we have analysed the mechanical, electrical, and other technical difficulties involved. We conclude that the electro-magnetic drive is currently the only approach that is practicable, while the piezo-electric drive may be useful for low permeability samples and at specified high frequencies. We have used the electro-magnetic drive approach to design, build, and test an apparatus for measuring the streaming potential coefficient of unconsolidated and disaggregated samples such as sands, gravels, and soils with a diameter of 25.4 mm and lengths between 50 mm and 300 mm.

  18. Polymorphism at a mimicry supergene maintained by opposing frequency-dependent selection pressures.

    PubMed

    Chouteau, Mathieu; Llaurens, Violaine; Piron-Prunier, Florence; Joron, Mathieu

    2017-08-01

    Explaining the maintenance of adaptive diversity within populations is a long-standing goal in evolutionary biology, with important implications for conservation, medicine, and agriculture. Adaptation often leads to the fixation of beneficial alleles, and therefore it erodes local diversity so that understanding the coexistence of multiple adaptive phenotypes requires deciphering the ecological mechanisms that determine their respective benefits. Here, we show how antagonistic frequency-dependent selection (FDS), generated by natural and sexual selection acting on the same trait, maintains mimicry polymorphism in the toxic butterfly Heliconius numata Positive FDS imposed by predators on mimetic signals favors the fixation of the most abundant and best-protected wing-pattern morph, thereby limiting polymorphism. However, by using mate-choice experiments, we reveal disassortative mate preferences of the different wing-pattern morphs. The resulting negative FDS on wing-pattern alleles is consistent with the excess of heterozygote genotypes at the supergene locus controlling wing-pattern variation in natural populations of H. numata The combined effect of positive and negative FDS on visual signals is sufficient to maintain a diversity of morphs displaying accurate mimicry with other local prey, although some of the forms only provide moderate protection against predators. Our findings help understand how alternative adaptive phenotypes can be maintained within populations and emphasize the need to investigate interactions between selective pressures in other cases of puzzling adaptive polymorphism.

  19. A General Model of Negative Frequency Dependent Selection Explains Global Patterns of Human ABO Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Villanea, Fernando A.; Safi, Kristin N.; Busch, Jeremiah W.

    2015-01-01

    The ABO locus in humans is characterized by elevated heterozygosity and very similar allele frequencies among populations scattered across the globe. Using knowledge of ABO protein function, we generated a simple model of asymmetric negative frequency dependent selection and genetic drift to explain the maintenance of ABO polymorphism and its loss in human populations. In our models, regardless of the strength of selection, models with large effective population sizes result in ABO allele frequencies that closely match those observed in most continental populations. Populations must be moderately small to fall out of equilibrium and lose either the A or B allele (Ne ≤ 50) and much smaller (Ne ≤ 25) for the complete loss of diversity, which nearly always involved the fixation of the O allele. A pattern of low heterozygosity at the ABO locus where loss of polymorphism occurs in our model is consistent with small populations, such as Native American populations. This study provides a general evolutionary model to explain the observed global patterns of polymorphism at the ABO locus and the pattern of allele loss in small populations. Moreover, these results inform the range of population sizes associated with the recent human colonization of the Americas. PMID:25946124

  20. Complete FDTD analysis of microwave heating processes in frequency-dependent and temperature dependent media

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, F.; Jecko, B.

    1997-01-01

    It is well known that the temperature rise in a material modifies its physical properties and, particularly, its dielectric permittivity. The dissipated electromagnetic power involved in microwave heating processes depending on {var_epsilon}({omega}), the electrical characteristics of the heated media must vary with the temperature to achieve realistic simulations. In this paper, the authors present a fast and accurate algorithm allowing, through a combined electromagnetic and thermal procedure, to take into account the influence of the temperature on the electrical properties of materials. First, the temperature dependence of the complex permittivity ruled by a Debye relaxation equation is investigated, and a realistic model is proposed and validated. Then, a frequency-dependent finite-differences time-domain ((FD){sup 2}TD) method is used to assess the instantaneous electromagnetic power lost by dielectric hysteresis. Within the same iteration, a time-scaled form of the heat transfer equation allows one to calculate the temperature distribution in the heated medium and then to correct the dielectric properties of the material using the proposed model. These new characteristics will be taken into account by the EM solver at the next iteration. This combined algorithm allows a significant reduction of computation time. An application to a microwave oven is proposed.

  1. Frequency dependent steering with backward leaky waves via photonic crystal interface layer.

    PubMed

    Colak, Evrim; Caglayan, Humeyra; Cakmak, Atilla O; Villa, Alessandro D; Capolino, Filippo; Ozbay, Ekmel

    2009-06-08

    A Photonic Crystal (PC) with a surface defect layer (made of dimers) is studied in the microwave regime. The dispersion diagram is obtained with the Plane Wave Expansion Method. The dispersion diagram reveals that the dimer-layer supports a surface mode with negative slope. Two facts are noted: First, a guided (bounded) wave is present, propagating along the surface of the dimer-layer. Second, above the light line, the fast traveling mode couple to the propagating spectra and as a result a directive (narrow beam) radiation with backward characteristics is observed and measured. In this leaky mode regime, symmetrical radiation patterns with respect to the normal to the PC surface are attained. Beam steering is observed and measured in a 70 degrees angular range when frequency ranges in the 11.88-13.69 GHz interval. Thus, a PC based surface wave structure that acts as a frequency dependent leaky wave antenna is presented. Angular radiation pattern measurements are in agreement with those obtained via numerical simulations that employ the Finite Difference Time Domain Method (FDTD). Finally, the backward radiation characteristics that in turn suggest the existence of a backward leaky mode in the dimer-layer are experimentally verified using a halved dimer-layer structure.

  2. Sensitivity to a frequency-dependent circular polarization in an isotropic stochastic gravitational wave background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Tristan L.; Caldwell, Robert

    2017-02-01

    We calculate the sensitivity to a circular polarization of an isotropic stochastic gravitational wave background (ISGWB) as a function of frequency for ground- and space-based interferometers and observations of the cosmic microwave background. The origin of a circularly polarized ISGWB may be due to exotic primordial physics (i.e., parity violation in the early universe) and may be strongly frequency dependent. We present calculations within a coherent framework which clarifies the basic requirements for sensitivity to circular polarization, in distinction from previous work which focused on each of these techniques separately. We find that the addition of an interferometer with the sensitivity of the Einstein Telescope in the southern hemisphere improves the sensitivity of the ground-based network to circular polarization by about a factor of two. The sensitivity curves presented in this paper make clear that the wide range in frequencies of current and planned observations (10-18 Hz ≲f ≲100 Hz ) will be critical to determining the physics that underlies any positive detection of circular polarization in the ISGWB. We also identify a desert in circular polarization sensitivity for frequencies between 10-15 Hz ≲f ≲10-3 Hz , given the inability for pulsar timing arrays and indirect-detection methods to distinguish the gravitational wave polarization.

  3. Shear wave anisotropy from aligned inclusions: ultrasonic frequency dependence of velocity and attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Figueiredo, J. J. S.; Schleicher, J.; Stewart, R. R.; Dayur, N.; Omoboya, B.; Wiley, R.; William, A.

    2013-04-01

    To understand their influence on elastic wave propagation, anisotropic cracked media have been widely investigated in many theoretical and experimental studies. In this work, we report on laboratory ultrasound measurements carried out to investigate the effect of source frequency on the elastic parameters (wave velocities and the Thomsen parameter γ) and shear wave attenuation) of fractured anisotropic media. Under controlled conditions, we prepared anisotropic model samples containing penny-shaped rubber inclusions in a solid epoxy resin matrix with crack densities ranging from 0 to 6.2 per cent. Two of the three cracked samples have 10 layers and one has 17 layers. The number of uniform rubber inclusions per layer ranges from 0 to 100. S-wave splitting measurements have shown that scattering effects are more prominent in samples where the seismic wavelength to crack aperture ratio ranges from 1.6 to 1.64 than in others where the ratio varied from 2.72 to 2.85. The sample with the largest cracks showed a magnitude of scattering attenuation three times higher compared with another sample that had small inclusions. Our S-wave ultrasound results demonstrate that elastic scattering, scattering and anelastic attenuation, velocity dispersion and crack size interfere directly in shear wave splitting in a source-frequency dependent manner, resulting in an increase of scattering attenuation and a reduction of shear wave anisotropy with increasing frequency.

  4. Warning signals are under positive frequency-dependent selection in nature.

    PubMed

    Chouteau, Mathieu; Arias, Mónica; Joron, Mathieu

    2016-02-23

    Positive frequency-dependent selection (FDS) is a selection regime where the fitness of a phenotype increases with its frequency, and it is thought to underlie important adaptive strategies resting on signaling and communication. However, whether and how positive FDS truly operates in nature remains unknown, which hampers our understanding of signal diversity. Here, we test for positive FDS operating on the warning color patterns of chemically defended butterflies forming multiple coexisting mimicry assemblages in the Amazon. Using malleable prey models placed in localities showing differences in the relative frequencies of warningly colored prey, we demonstrate that the efficiency of a warning signal increases steadily with its local frequency in the natural community, up to a threshold where protection stabilizes. The shape of this relationship is consistent with the direct effect of the local abundance of each warning signal on the corresponding avoidance knowledge of the local predator community. This relationship, which differs from purifying selection acting on each mimetic pattern, indicates that predator knowledge, integrated over the entire community, is saturated only for the most common warning signals. In contrast, among the well-established warning signals present in local prey assemblages, most are incompletely known to local predators and enjoy incomplete protection. This incomplete predator knowledge should generate strong benefits to life history traits that enhance warning efficiency by increasing the effective frequency of prey visible to predators. Strategies such as gregariousness or niche convergence between comimics may therefore readily evolve through their effects on predator knowledge and warning efficiency.

  5. Temperature and frequency dependent conductivity of lithium doped bismuth zinc vanadate semiconducting glassy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahiya, S.; Punia, R.; Murugavel, S.; Maan, A. S.

    2014-11-01

    The ac conductivity of bismuth zinc vanadate glasses of compositions x Li2O (100 - x) (50V2O5·20 Bi2O3·30 ZnO); x = 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8 has been studied in the frequency range 10-1 Hzb-2 MHz and in temperature range 313-533 K. The temperature and frequency dependent conductivity is found to obey Almond-West universal power law for all the studied lithium doped bismuth zinc vanadate glassy systems. Various parameters such as dc conductivity ( σ dc ), crossover frequency ( ω H ) and frequency exponent ( s) have been estimated by fitting the experimental data of ac conductivity to Almond-West universal power law. It has been observed that the ac conductivity of bismuth zinc vanadate glass system decreases with the increase in Li2O content. The ac conductivity and its frequency exponent have been analyzed in the frame work of various theoretical models. The ac conduction seems to take place via tunneling of overlapping large polarons in all the compositions.

  6. Frequency-dependent performance and handedness in professional baseball players (Homo sapiens).

    PubMed

    Clotfelter, Ethan D

    2008-02-01

    I used data on handedness and pitching and hitting performance in annual cohorts of professional baseball players (1957-2005) to test the hypothesis that handedness among pitchers was subject to negative frequency-dependent selection. As predicted by this hypothesis, right-handed pitchers were more successful (i.e., opposing batters hit more poorly against them) when they were relatively rare in the population. Contrary to the predictions of this hypothesis, however, left-handed pitchers were more successful when they were relatively common. Both right- and left-handed batters performed better in years dominated by right-handed pitchers, despite the fact that right-handed batters perform relatively poorly against right-handed pitchers. I suggest that batters form cognitive representations based on pitcher handedness, and that these representations are strengthened by repeated exposure or priming. When the pitcher handedness polymorphism is more balanced (e.g., 67% right-handed, 33% left-handed), these cognitive representations are less effective, which leads to decreased batting averages and improved performance by all pitchers. Furthermore, these cognitive representations are likely to be more critical to the success of right-handed hitters, who have reduced visuomotor skills relative to left-handed hitters. (c) 2008 APA.

  7. FREQUENCY DEPENDENCE OF POLARIZATION OF ZEBRA PATTERN IN TYPE-IV SOLAR RADIO BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneda, Kazutaka; Misawa, H.; Tsuchiya, F.; Obara, T.; Iwai, K.

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the polarization characteristics of a zebra pattern (ZP) in a type-IV solar radio burst observed with AMATERAS on 2011 June 21 for the purpose of evaluating the generation processes of ZPs. Analyzing highly resolved spectral and polarization data revealed the frequency dependence of the degree of circular polarization and the delay between two polarized components for the first time. The degree of circular polarization was 50%–70% right-handed and it varied little as a function of frequency. Cross-correlation analysis determined that the left-handed circularly polarized component was delayed by 50–70 ms relative to the right-handed component over the entire frequency range of the ZP and this delay increased with the frequency. We examined the obtained polarization characteristics by using pre-existing ZP models and concluded that the ZP was generated by the double-plasma-resonance process. Our results suggest that the ZP emission was originally generated in a completely polarized state in the O-mode and was partly converted into the X-mode near the source. Subsequently, the difference between the group velocities of the O-mode and X-mode caused the temporal delay.

  8. Plant-soil feedbacks promote negative frequency dependence in the coexistence of two aridland grasses.

    PubMed

    Chung, Y Anny; Rudgers, Jennifer A

    2016-07-27

    Understanding the mechanisms of species coexistence is key to predicting patterns of species diversity. Historically, the ecological paradigm has been that species coexist by partitioning resources: as a species increases in abundance, self-limitation kicks in, because species-specific resources decline. However, determining coexistence mechanisms has been a particular puzzle for sedentary organisms with high overlap in their resource requirements, such as plants. Recent evidence suggests that plant-associated microbes could generate the stabilizing self-limitation (negative frequency dependence) that is required for species coexistence. Here, we test the key assumption that plant-microbe feedbacks cause such self-limitation. We used competition experiments and modelling to evaluate how two common groups of soil microbes (rhizospheric microbes and biological soil crusts) influenced the self-limitation of two competing desert grass species. Negative feedbacks between the dominant plant competitor and its rhizospheric microbes magnified self-limitation, whereas beneficial interactions between both plant species and biological soil crusts partly counteracted this stabilizing effect. Plant-microbe interactions have received relatively little attention as drivers of vegetation dynamics in dry land ecosystems. Our results suggest that microbial mechanisms can contribute to patterns of plant coexistence in arid grasslands.

  9. Frequency-dependent scaling from mesoscale to macroscale in viscoelastic random composites

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the scaling from a statistical volume element (SVE; i.e. mesoscale level) to representative volume element (RVE; i.e. macroscale level) of spatially random linear viscoelastic materials, focusing on the quasi-static properties in the frequency domain. Requiring the material statistics to be spatially homogeneous and ergodic, the mesoscale bounds on the RVE response are developed from the Hill–Mandel homogenization condition adapted to viscoelastic materials. The bounds are obtained from two stochastic initial-boundary value problems set up, respectively, under uniform kinematic and traction boundary conditions. The frequency and scale dependencies of mesoscale bounds are obtained through computational mechanics for composites with planar random chessboard microstructures. In general, the frequency-dependent scaling to RVE can be described through a complex-valued scaling function, which generalizes the concept originally developed for linear elastic random composites. This scaling function is shown to apply for all different phase combinations on random chessboards and, essentially, is only a function of the microstructure and mesoscale. PMID:27274689

  10. Frequency-dependent variation in mimetic fidelity in an intraspecific mimicry system

    PubMed Central

    Iserbyt, Arne; Bots, Jessica; Van Dongen, Stefan; Ting, Janice J.; Van Gossum, Hans; Sherratt, Thomas N.

    2011-01-01

    Contemporary theory predicts that the degree of mimetic similarity of mimics towards their model should increase as the mimic/model ratio increases. Thus, when the mimic/model ratio is high, then the mimic has to resemble the model very closely to still gain protection from the signal receiver. To date, empirical evidence of this effect is limited to a single example where mimicry occurs between species. Here, for the first time, we test whether mimetic fidelity varies with mimic/model ratios in an intraspecific mimicry system, in which signal receivers are the same species as the mimics and models. To this end, we studied a polymorphic damselfly with a single male phenotype and two female morphs, in which one morph resembles the male phenotype while the other does not. Phenotypic similarity of males to both female morphs was quantified using morphometric data for multiple populations with varying mimic/model ratios repeated over a 3 year period. Our results demonstrate that male-like females were overall closer in size to males than the other female morph. Furthermore, the extent of morphological similarity between male-like females and males, measured as Mahalanobis distances, was frequency-dependent in the direction predicted. Hence, this study provides direct quantitative support for the prediction that the mimetic similarity of mimics to their models increases as the mimic/model ratio increases. We suggest that the phenomenon may be widespread in a range of mimicry systems. PMID:21367784

  11. Frequency-dependent alterations in the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations in social anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Youxue; Zhu, Chunyan; Chen, Heng; Duan, Xujun; Lu, Fengmei; Li, Meiling; Liu, Feng; Ma, Xujing; Wang, Yifeng; Zeng, Ling; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Huafu

    2015-03-15

    Recent studies on resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have found an abnormal temporal correlation between low-frequency oscillations (LFO) in social anxiety disorder (SAD). However, alterations in the amplitudes of these LFO remain unclear. This study included 20 SAD patients and 20 age-, gender-, and education-matched healthy controls. Resting-state fMRI data were acquired using a gradient-echo echo-planar imaging sequence, and the amplitudes of LFO were investigated using the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) approach. Two frequency bands (slow-5: 0.01-0.027Hz; slow-4: 0.027-0.073Hz) were analyzed. Significant differences in ALFF were observed between the two bands in widespread regions including the postcentral gyrus, precentral gyrus, medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), orbitofrontal cortex, hippocampus, thalamus, caudate, putamen, and insula. Compared with the healthy controls, the SAD patients showed lower ALFF in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), MPFC, superior temporal gyrus, and insula but higher ALFF in the middle occipital gyrus. Furthermore, we found that the SAD patients had reduced ALFF in the MPFC in the slow-5 band. The small sample size may decrease the statistical power of the results. SAD patients had frequency-dependent alteration in intrinsic brain activity. This finding may provide insights into the understanding of the pathophysiology of SAD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Evolution of learned strategy choice in a frequency-dependent game

    PubMed Central

    Katsnelson, Edith; Motro, Uzi; Feldman, Marcus W.; Lotem, Arnon

    2012-01-01

    In frequency-dependent games, strategy choice may be innate or learned. While experimental evidence in the producer–scrounger game suggests that learned strategy choice may be common, a recent theoretical analysis demonstrated that learning by only some individuals prevents learning from evolving in others. Here, however, we model learning explicitly, and demonstrate that learning can easily evolve in the whole population. We used an agent-based evolutionary simulation of the producer–scrounger game to test the success of two general learning rules for strategy choice. We found that learning was eventually acquired by all individuals under a sufficient degree of environmental fluctuation, and when players were phenotypically asymmetric. In the absence of sufficient environmental change or phenotypic asymmetries, the correct target for learning seems to be confounded by game dynamics, and innate strategy choice is likely to be fixed in the population. The results demonstrate that under biologically plausible conditions, learning can easily evolve in the whole population and that phenotypic asymmetry is important for the evolution of learned strategy choice, especially in a stable or mildly changing environment. PMID:21937494

  13. Warning signals are under positive frequency-dependent selection in nature

    PubMed Central

    Chouteau, Mathieu; Arias, Mónica; Joron, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Positive frequency-dependent selection (FDS) is a selection regime where the fitness of a phenotype increases with its frequency, and it is thought to underlie important adaptive strategies resting on signaling and communication. However, whether and how positive FDS truly operates in nature remains unknown, which hampers our understanding of signal diversity. Here, we test for positive FDS operating on the warning color patterns of chemically defended butterflies forming multiple coexisting mimicry assemblages in the Amazon. Using malleable prey models placed in localities showing differences in the relative frequencies of warningly colored prey, we demonstrate that the efficiency of a warning signal increases steadily with its local frequency in the natural community, up to a threshold where protection stabilizes. The shape of this relationship is consistent with the direct effect of the local abundance of each warning signal on the corresponding avoidance knowledge of the local predator community. This relationship, which differs from purifying selection acting on each mimetic pattern, indicates that predator knowledge, integrated over the entire community, is saturated only for the most common warning signals. In contrast, among the well-established warning signals present in local prey assemblages, most are incompletely known to local predators and enjoy incomplete protection. This incomplete predator knowledge should generate strong benefits to life history traits that enhance warning efficiency by increasing the effective frequency of prey visible to predators. Strategies such as gregariousness or niche convergence between comimics may therefore readily evolve through their effects on predator knowledge and warning efficiency. PMID:26858416

  14. Interacting coexistence mechanisms in annual plant communities: Frequency-dependent predation and the storage effect.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Jessica J; Chesson, Peter

    2010-02-01

    We study frequency-dependent seed predation (FDP) in a model of competing annual plant species in a variable environment. The combination of a variable environment and competition leads to the storage-effect coexistence mechanism (SE), which is a leading hypothesis for coexistence of desert annual plants. However, seed predation in such systems demands attention to coexistence mechanisms associated with predation. FDP is one such mechanism, which promotes coexistence by shifting predation to more abundant plant species, facilitating the recovery of species perturbed to low density. When present together, FDP and SE interact, undermining each other's effects. Predation weakens competition, and therefore weakens mechanisms associated with competition: here SE. However, the direct effect of FDP in promoting coexistence can compensate or more than compensate for this weakening of SE. On the other hand, the environmental variation necessary for SE weakens FDP. With high survival of dormant seeds, SE can be strong enough to compensate, or overcompensate, for the decline in FDP, provided predation is not too strong. Although FDP and SE may simultaneously contribute to coexistence, their combined effect is less than the sum of their separate effects, and is often less than the effect of the stronger mechanism when present alone. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Positive frequency-dependent selection on warning color in Alpine leaf beetles.

    PubMed

    Borer, Matthias; Van Noort, Tom; Rahier, Martine; Naisbit, Russell E

    2010-12-01

    Müller's theory of warning color and mimicry, despite forming a textbook example of frequency-dependent selection, has rarely been demonstrated in the wild. This may be largely due to the practical and statistical difficulties of measuring natural selection on mobile prey species. Here we demonstrate that this selection acts in alpine beetle communities by using tethered beetles exposed to natural predators. Oreina gloriosa leaf beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) possess chemical defense in the form of cardenolides, accompanied by what appears to be warning color in bright metallic blues and greens. Individuals that match the locally predominant color morph have increased survival, with odds of week-long survival increased by a factor of 1.67 over those that do not match. This corresponds to selection of 13% against foreign morphs. Such selection, acting in concert with variation in community composition, could be responsible for geographic variation in warning color. However, in the face of this purifying selection, the within-population polymorphism seen in many Oreina species remains paradoxical.

  16. Self-consistent modeling of terahertz waveguide and cavity with frequency-dependent conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. J.; Chu, K. R.; Thumm, M.

    2015-01-01

    The surface resistance of metals, and hence the Ohmic dissipation per unit area, scales with the square root of the frequency of an incident electromagnetic wave. As is well recognized, this can lead to excessive wall losses at terahertz (THz) frequencies. On the other hand, high-frequency oscillatory motion of conduction electrons tends to mitigate the collisional damping. As a result, the classical theory predicts that metals behave more like a transparent medium at frequencies above the ultraviolet. Such a behavior difference is inherent in the AC conductivity, a frequency-dependent complex quantity commonly used to treat electromagnetics of metals at optical frequencies. The THz region falls in the gap between microwave and optical frequencies. However, metals are still commonly modeled by the DC conductivity in currently active vacuum electronics research aimed at the development of high-power THz sources (notably the gyrotron), although a small reduction of the DC conductivity due to surface roughness is sometimes included. In this study, we present a self-consistent modeling of the gyrotron interaction structures (a metallic waveguide or cavity) with the AC conductivity. The resulting waveguide attenuation constants and cavity quality factors are compared with those of the DC-conductivity model. The reduction in Ohmic losses under the AC-conductivity model is shown to be increasingly significant as the frequency reaches deeper into the THz region. Such effects are of considerable importance to THz gyrotrons for which the minimization of Ohmic losses constitutes a major design consideration.

  17. Direction of information flow in large-scale resting-state networks is frequency-dependent

    PubMed Central

    Hillebrand, Arjan; Tewarie, Prejaas; van Dellen, Edwin; Yu, Meichen; Carbo, Ellen W. S.; Douw, Linda; Gouw, Alida A.; van Straaten, Elisabeth C. W.; Stam, Cornelis J.

    2016-01-01

    Normal brain function requires interactions between spatially separated, and functionally specialized, macroscopic regions, yet the directionality of these interactions in large-scale functional networks is unknown. Magnetoencephalography was used to determine the directionality of these interactions, where directionality was inferred from time series of beamformer-reconstructed estimates of neuronal activation, using a recently proposed measure of phase transfer entropy. We observed well-organized posterior-to-anterior patterns of information flow in the higher-frequency bands (alpha1, alpha2, and beta band), dominated by regions in the visual cortex and posterior default mode network. Opposite patterns of anterior-to-posterior flow were found in the theta band, involving mainly regions in the frontal lobe that were sending information to a more distributed network. Many strong information senders in the theta band were also frequent receivers in the alpha2 band, and vice versa. Our results provide evidence that large-scale resting-state patterns of information flow in the human brain form frequency-dependent reentry loops that are dominated by flow from parieto-occipital cortex to integrative frontal areas in the higher-frequency bands, which is mirrored by a theta band anterior-to-posterior flow. PMID:27001844

  18. Alkali-silica reaction (ASR) detection in concrete from frequency dependent ultrasonic attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Peng; Patton, Mark E.; Greve, David W.; Harley, Joel B.; Liu, Chang; Oppenheim, Irving J.

    2014-02-01

    The alkali-silica reaction (ASR) occurs between the reactive aggregates and the alkaline cement paste in concrete, eventually producing damage such as swelling and cracking. This research uses mechanical tests and ultrasonic tests to detect ASR onset in concrete specimens. The test specimens are fabricated in pairs, one specimen typically subjected to an accelerated ASR environment (immersion in 1 N NaOH solution at 80°C) and the second specimen comparable but not exposed to the accelerated ASR environment. In mechanical tests, the transverse and longitudinal resonant frequencies are measured. Results show that ASR damage would lower the resonant frequencies. In the ultrasonic test, broadband excitations are used and pitch-catch records are obtained. The presence of ASR damage in concrete is shown to cause frequency dependent ultrasonic attenuation. Signals from ASR damaged specimens show strong attenuation at high frequencies and weak attenuation at low frequencies. In contrast, signals frompaired non-ASR specimens show comparable energy over the entire range of measured frequencies. The cumulative distribution function of frequency components (CDF) is used to characterize the ultrasonic passband changes caused by ASR damage and detect the existence of ASR damage in frequency domain.

  19. Viscoelastic characterization of compacted pharmaceutical excipient materials by analysis of frequency-dependent mechanical relaxation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, K.; Mousavi, S.; Lundberg, B.; Strømme, M.

    2005-09-01

    A newly developed method for determining the frequency-dependent complex Young's modulus was employed to analyze the mechanical response of compacted microcrystalline cellulose, sorbitol, ethyl cellulose and starch for frequencies up to 20 kHz. A Debye-like relaxation was observed in all the studied pharmaceutical excipient materials and a comparison with corresponding dielectric spectroscopy data was made. The location in frequency of the relaxation peak was shown to correlate to the measured tensile strength of the tablets, and the relaxation was interpreted as the vibrational response of the interparticle hydrogen and van der Waals bindings in the tablets. Further, the measured relaxation strength, holding information about the energy loss involved in the relaxation processes, showed that the weakest material in terms of tensile strength, starch, is the material among the four tested ones that is able to absorb the most energy within its structure when exposed to external perturbations inducing vibrations in the studied frequency range. The results indicate that mechanical relaxation analysis performed over relatively broad frequency ranges should be useful for predicting material properties of importance for the functionality of a material in applications such as, e.g., drug delivery, drug storage and handling, and also for clarifying the origin of hitherto unexplained molecular processes.

  20. A General Model of Negative Frequency Dependent Selection Explains Global Patterns of Human ABO Polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Villanea, Fernando A; Safi, Kristin N; Busch, Jeremiah W

    2015-01-01

    The ABO locus in humans is characterized by elevated heterozygosity and very similar allele frequencies among populations scattered across the globe. Using knowledge of ABO protein function, we generated a simple model of asymmetric negative frequency dependent selection and genetic drift to explain the maintenance of ABO polymorphism and its loss in human populations. In our models, regardless of the strength of selection, models with large effective population sizes result in ABO allele frequencies that closely match those observed in most continental populations. Populations must be moderately small to fall out of equilibrium and lose either the A or B allele (N(e) ≤ 50) and much smaller (N(e) ≤ 25) for the complete loss of diversity, which nearly always involved the fixation of the O allele. A pattern of low heterozygosity at the ABO locus where loss of polymorphism occurs in our model is consistent with small populations, such as Native American populations. This study provides a general evolutionary model to explain the observed global patterns of polymorphism at the ABO locus and the pattern of allele loss in small populations. Moreover, these results inform the range of population sizes associated with the recent human colonization of the Americas.

  1. Frequency-dependent scaling from mesoscale to macroscale in viscoelastic random composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates the scaling from a statistical volume element (SVE; i.e. mesoscale level) to representative volume element (RVE; i.e. macroscale level) of spatially random linear viscoelastic materials, focusing on the quasi-static properties in the frequency domain. Requiring the material statistics to be spatially homogeneous and ergodic, the mesoscale bounds on the RVE response are developed from the Hill-Mandel homogenization condition adapted to viscoelastic materials. The bounds are obtained from two stochastic initial-boundary value problems set up, respectively, under uniform kinematic and traction boundary conditions. The frequency and scale dependencies of mesoscale bounds are obtained through computational mechanics for composites with planar random chessboard microstructures. In general, the frequency-dependent scaling to RVE can be described through a complex-valued scaling function, which generalizes the concept originally developed for linear elastic random composites. This scaling function is shown to apply for all different phase combinations on random chessboards and, essentially, is only a function of the microstructure and mesoscale.

  2. Electromagnetic millimeter wave induced hypoalgesia: frequency dependence and involvement of endogenous opioids.

    PubMed

    Radzievsky, A A; Gordiienko, O V; Alekseev, S; Szabo, I; Cowan, A; Ziskin, M C

    2008-05-01

    Millimeter wave treatment (MMWT) is based on the systemic biological effects that develop following local skin exposure to low power electromagnetic waves in the millimeter range. In the present set of experiments, the hypoalgesic effect of this treatment was analyzed in mice. The murine nose area was exposed to MMW of "therapeutic" frequencies: 42.25, 53.57, and 61.22 GHz. MMWT-induced hypoalgesia was shown to be frequency dependent in two experimental models: (1) the cold water tail-flick test (chronic non-neuropathic pain), and (2) the wire surface test (chronic neuropathic pain following unilateral constriction injury to the sciatic nerve). Maximum hypoalgesic effect was obtained when the frequency was 61.22 GHz. Other exposure parameters were: incident power density = 13.3 mW/cm(2), duration of each exposure = 15 min. Involvement of delta and kappa endogenous opioids in the MMWT-induced hypoalgesia was demonstrated using selective blockers of delta- and kappa-opioid receptors and the direct ELISA measurement of endogenous opioids in CNS tissue. Possible mechanisms of the effect and the perspectives of the clinical application of MMWT are discussed.

  3. FORWARD MODELING OF PROPAGATING SLOW WAVES IN CORONAL LOOPS AND THEIR FREQUENCY-DEPENDENT DAMPING

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, Sudip; Banerjee, Dipankar; Magyar, Norbert; Yuan, Ding; Doorsselaere, Tom Van

    2016-03-20

    Propagating slow waves in coronal loops exhibit a damping that depends upon the frequency of the waves. In this study we aim to investigate the relationship of the damping length (L{sub d}) with the frequency of the propagating wave. We present a 3D coronal loop model with uniform density and temperature and investigate the frequency-dependent damping mechanism for the four chosen wave periods. We include the thermal conduction to damp the waves as they propagate through the loop. The numerical model output has been forward modeled to generate synthetic images of SDO/AIA 171 and 193 Å channels. The use of forward modeling, which incorporates the atomic emission properties into the intensity images, allows us to directly compare our results with the real observations. The results show that the damping lengths vary linearly with the periods. We also measure the contributions of the emission properties on the damping lengths by using density values from the simulation. In addition to that we have also calculated the theoretical dependence of L{sub d} with wave periods and showed that it is consistent with the results we obtained from the numerical modeling and earlier observations.

  4. Frequency-dependent photothermal measurement of transverse thermal diffusivity of organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brill, J. W.; Shahi, Maryam; Payne, Marcia M.; Edberg, Jesper; Yao, Y.; Crispin, Xavier; Anthony, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    We have used a photothermal technique, in which chopped light heats the front surface of a small (˜1 mm2) sample and the chopping frequency dependence of thermal radiation from the back surface is measured with a liquid-nitrogen-cooled infrared detector. In our system, the sample is placed directly in front of the detector within its dewar. Because the detector is also sensitive to some of the incident light, which leaks around or through the sample, measurements are made for the detector signal that is in quadrature with the chopped light. Results are presented for layered crystals of semiconducting 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl) pentacene (TIPS-pn) and for papers of cellulose nanofibrils coated with semiconducting poly(3,4-ethylene-dioxythiophene):poly(styrene-sulfonate) (NFC-PEDOT). For NFC-PEDOT, we have found that the transverse diffusivity, smaller than the in-plane value, varies inversely with thickness, suggesting that texturing of the papers varies with thickness. For TIPS-pn, we have found that the interlayer diffusivity is an order of magnitude larger than the in-plane value, consistent with previous estimates, suggesting that low-frequency optical phonons, presumably associated with librations in the TIPS side groups, carry most of the heat.

  5. Frequency-Dependent Gating of Synaptic Transmission and Plasticity by Dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hiroshi T.; Schuman, Erin M.

    2007-01-01

    The neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) plays an important role in learning by enhancing the saliency of behaviorally relevant stimuli. How this stimulus selection is achieved on the cellular level, however, is not known. Here, in recordings from hippocampal slices, we show that DA acts specifically at the direct cortical input to hippocampal area CA1 (the temporoammonic (TA) pathway) to filter the excitatory drive onto pyramidal neurons based on the input frequency. During low-frequency patterns of stimulation, DA depressed excitatory TA inputs to both CA1 pyramidal neurons and local inhibitory GABAergic interneurons via presynaptic inhibition. In contrast, during high-frequency patterns of stimulation, DA potently facilitated the TA excitatory drive onto CA1 pyramidal neurons, owing to diminished feedforward inhibition. Analysis of DA's effects over a broad range of stimulus frequencies indicates that it acts as a high-pass filter, augmenting the response to high-frequency inputs while diminishing the impact of low-frequency inputs. These modulatory effects of DA exert a profound influence on activity-dependent forms of synaptic plasticity at both TA-CA1 and Schaffer-collateral (SC)-CA1 synapses. Taken together, our data demonstrate that DA acts as a gate on the direct cortical input to the hippocampus, modulating information flow and synaptic plasticity in a frequency-dependent manner. PMID:18946543

  6. Development of a self-stressing NiTiNb shape memory alloy (SMA)/fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) patch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Tahan, M.; Dawood, M.; Song, G.

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this research is to develop a self-stressing patch using a combination of shape memory alloys (SMAs) and fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites. Prestressed carbon FRP patches are emerging as a promising alternative to traditional methods to repair cracked steel structures and civil infrastructure. However, prestressing these patches typically requires heavy and complex fixtures, which is impractical in many applications. This paper presents a new approach in which the prestressing force is applied by restraining the shape memory effect of NiTiNb SMA wires. The wires are subsequently embedded in an FRP overlay patch. This method overcomes the practical challenges associated with conventional prestressing. This paper presents the conceptual development of the self-stressing patch with the support of experimental observations. The bond between the SMA wires and the FRP is evaluated using pull-out tests. The paper concludes with an experimental study that evaluates the patch response during activation subsequent monotonic tensile loading. The results demonstrate that the self-stressing patch with NiTiNb SMA is capable of generating a significant prestressing force with minimal tool and labor requirements.

  7. High-fat diet induces skeletal muscle oxidative stress in a fiber type-dependent manner in rats.

    PubMed

    Pinho, Ricardo A; Sepa-Kishi, Diane M; Bikopoulos, George; Wu, Michelle V; Uthayakumar, Abinas; Mohasses, Arta; Hughes, Meghan C; Perry, Christopher G R; Ceddia, Rolando B

    2017-09-01

    This study investigated the effects of high-fat (HF) diet on parameters of oxidative stress among muscles with distinct fiber type composition and oxidative capacities. To accomplish that, male Wistar rats were fed either a low-fat standard chow (SC) or a HF diet for 8 weeks. Soleus, extensor digitorum longus (EDL), and epitrochlearis muscles were collected and mitochondrial H2O2 (mtH2O2) emission, palmitate oxidation, and gene expression and antioxidant system were measured. Chronic HF feeding enhanced fat oxidation in oxidative and glycolytic muscles. It also caused a significant reduction in mtH2O2 emission in the EDL muscle, although a tendency towards a reduction was also found in the soleus and epitrochlearis muscles. In the epitrochlearis, HF diet increased mRNA expression of the NADPH oxidase complex; however, this muscle also showed an increase in the expression of antioxidant proteins, suggesting a higher capacity to generate and buffer ROS. The soleus muscle, despite being highly oxidative, elicited H2O2 emission rates equivalent to only 20% and 35% of the values obtained for EDL and epitrochlearis muscles, respectively. Furthermore, the Epi muscle with the lowest oxidative capacity was the second highest in H2O2 emission. In conclusion, it appears that intrinsic differences related to the distribution of type I and type II fibers, rather than oxidative capacity, drove the activity of the anti- and pro-oxidant systems and determine ROS production in different skeletal muscles. This also suggests that the impact of potentially deleterious effects of ROS production on skeletal muscle metabolism/function under lipotoxic conditions is fiber type-specific. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Three-dimensional finite element analysis of the stress distribution in the endodontically treated maxillary central incisor by glass fiber post and dentin post

    PubMed Central

    Memon, Sarfaraz; Mehta, Sonal; Malik, Salim; Nirmal, Narendra; Sharma, Deeksha; Arora, Himanshu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: From the point of dent