Science.gov

Sample records for freshwater bayou prospect

  1. Structural-stratigraphic setting of South Freshwater Bayou Prospect, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Cavanagh, T.; Pilger, R.H. Jr.; Bebout, D.G.; Bachman, A.L.

    1981-01-01

    The primary reservoir targets in South Freshwater Bayou Prospect are sands whose deposition appears to have been structurally controlled. The growth of a deep domal feature localized deepwater sand deposition on its flanks, thereby producing a significant thickness of subsequently geopressured sandstone. The area is, therefore, not only prospective in its own right, but provides an exploration model for other geopressured-geothermal prospects.

  2. Geopressured geothermal resource potential of Miocene Bayou Hebert Prospect, Vermilion and Iberia parishes, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    McCulloh, R.P.; Pino, M.A.; Bebout, D.G.; Bachman, A.L.

    1981-01-01

    The Bayou Hebert prospect is a fault-bounded block of lower Miocene shale and sandstone which covers a 75-square-mile area in southeastern Vermilion and southwestern Iberia parishes, southwestern Louisiana. The average depth to the top of the geopressured zone is 12,500 feet. Detailed correlation of shale resistivity patterns on well logs from this area has delineated faults, local unconformities, and changes in thickness and facies of lithologic units. Most faults revealed by this method are associated with the boundary fault zones, but the few delineated in the interior of the prospect could reduce the volume of potential reservoir units. Cross sections show that the lower Miocene section thickens across growth faults by addition of new units as well as by expansion. Of the parameters of reservoir volume, salinity, temperature, and permeability, reservoir volume shows the most significant variation and indicates that the eastern fourth of the prospect has the most geopressured geothermal potential.

  3. Arctic Freshwater Export: Prospects, Impacts, and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haine, T. W. N.; Stewart, K.

    2012-04-01

    Large freshwater anomalies clearly exist in the Arctic Ocean. They are due to enhanced melting of sea ice, increased runoff, and changes in atmospheric circulation that lead to surface convergence of freshwater. For example, freshwater has accumulated in the Beaufort Sea over the last 30 years, with an extra ≈ 5000 km3-about 25%-being stored. It is likely that this extra freshwater will be released from the Arctic via the Fram Strait and/or the Canadian Archipelago, perhaps as another "Great Salinity Anomaly". The freshwater discharge will likely have impacts on subpolar Atlantic circulation and ecosystems for several years. In light of coupled climate model forecasts, it may herald a new regime for the Arctic/sub-Arctic ocean. An unprecedented opportunity exists to anticipate and observe this discharge process. This contribution will review the state of knowledge about Arctic freshwater anomalies, and outline potential scenarios for future Arctic freshwater export. Key uncertainties in estimating the timing, rates, and pathways of freshwater export will be identified. Challenges for observing systems to monitor the progress of anomalous freshwater will also be discussed.

  4. Modelling Freshwater Resources at the Global Scale: Challenges and Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doll, Petra; Douville, Herve; Guntner, Andreas; Schmied, Hannes Muller; Wada, Yoshihide

    2015-01-01

    Quantification of spatially and temporally resolved water flows and water storage variations for all land areas of the globe is required to assess water resources, water scarcity and flood hazards, and to understand the Earth system. This quantification is done with the help of global hydrological models (GHMs). What are the challenges and prospects in the development and application of GHMs? Seven important challenges are presented. (1) Data scarcity makes quantification of human water use difficult even though significant progress has been achieved in the last decade. (2) Uncertainty of meteorological input data strongly affects model outputs. (3) The reaction of vegetation to changing climate and CO2 concentrations is uncertain and not taken into account in most GHMs that serve to estimate climate change impacts. (4) Reasons for discrepant responses of GHMs to changing climate have yet to be identified. (5) More accurate estimates of monthly time series of water availability and use are needed to provide good indicators of water scarcity. (6) Integration of gradient-based groundwater modelling into GHMs is necessary for a better simulation of groundwater-surface water interactions and capillary rise. (7) Detection and attribution of human interference with freshwater systems by using GHMs are constrained by data of insufficient quality but also GHM uncertainty itself. Regarding prospects for progress, we propose to decrease the uncertainty of GHM output by making better use of in situ and remotely sensed observations of output variables such as river discharge or total water storage variations by multi-criteria validation, calibration or data assimilation. Finally, we present an initiative that works towards the vision of hyper resolution global hydrological modelling where GHM outputs would be provided at a 1-km resolution with reasonable accuracy.

  5. Modelling Freshwater Resources at the Global Scale: Challenges and Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döll, Petra; Douville, Hervé; Güntner, Andreas; Müller Schmied, Hannes; Wada, Yoshihide

    2016-03-01

    Quantification of spatially and temporally resolved water flows and water storage variations for all land areas of the globe is required to assess water resources, water scarcity and flood hazards, and to understand the Earth system. This quantification is done with the help of global hydrological models (GHMs). What are the challenges and prospects in the development and application of GHMs? Seven important challenges are presented. (1) Data scarcity makes quantification of human water use difficult even though significant progress has been achieved in the last decade. (2) Uncertainty of meteorological input data strongly affects model outputs. (3) The reaction of vegetation to changing climate and CO2 concentrations is uncertain and not taken into account in most GHMs that serve to estimate climate change impacts. (4) Reasons for discrepant responses of GHMs to changing climate have yet to be identified. (5) More accurate estimates of monthly time series of water availability and use are needed to provide good indicators of water scarcity. (6) Integration of gradient-based groundwater modelling into GHMs is necessary for a better simulation of groundwater-surface water interactions and capillary rise. (7) Detection and attribution of human interference with freshwater systems by using GHMs are constrained by data of insufficient quality but also GHM uncertainty itself. Regarding prospects for progress, we propose to decrease the uncertainty of GHM output by making better use of in situ and remotely sensed observations of output variables such as river discharge or total water storage variations by multi-criteria validation, calibration or data assimilation. Finally, we present an initiative that works towards the vision of hyperresolution global hydrological modelling where GHM outputs would be provided at a 1-km resolution with reasonable accuracy.

  6. Modelling Freshwater Resources at the Global Scale: Challenges and Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doll, Petra; Douville, Herve; Guntner, Andreas; Schmied, Hannes Muller; Wada, Yoshihide

    2015-01-01

    Quantification of spatially and temporally resolved water flows and water storage variations for all land areas of the globe is required to assess water resources, water scarcity and flood hazards, and to understand the Earth system. This quantification is done with the help of global hydrological models (GHMs). What are the challenges and prospects in the development and application of GHMs? Seven important challenges are presented. (1) Data scarcity makes quantification of human water use difficult even though significant progress has been achieved in the last decade. (2) Uncertainty of meteorological input data strongly affects model outputs. (3) The reaction of vegetation to changing climate and CO2 concentrations is uncertain and not taken into account in most GHMs that serve to estimate climate change impacts. (4) Reasons for discrepant responses of GHMs to changing climate have yet to be identified. (5) More accurate estimates of monthly time series of water availability and use are needed to provide good indicators of water scarcity. (6) Integration of gradient-based groundwater modelling into GHMs is necessary for a better simulation of groundwater-surface water interactions and capillary rise. (7) Detection and attribution of human interference with freshwater systems by using GHMs are constrained by data of insufficient quality but also GHM uncertainty itself. Regarding prospects for progress, we propose to decrease the uncertainty of GHM output by making better use of in situ and remotely sensed observations of output variables such as river discharge or total water storage variations by multi-criteria validation, calibration or data assimilation. Finally, we present an initiative that works towards the vision of hyper resolution global hydrological modelling where GHM outputs would be provided at a 1-km resolution with reasonable accuracy.

  7. Prospects for monitoring freshwater ecosystems towards the 2010 targets

    PubMed Central

    Revenga, C; Campbell, I; Abell, R; de Villiers, P; Bryer, M

    2005-01-01

    Human activities have severely affected the condition of freshwater ecosystems worldwide. Physical alteration, habitat loss, water withdrawal, pollution, overexploitation and the introduction of non-native species all contribute to the decline in freshwater species. Today, freshwater species are, in general, at higher risk of extinction than those in forests, grasslands and coastal ecosystems. For North America alone, the projected extinction rate for freshwater fauna is five times greater than that for terrestrial fauna—a rate comparable to the species loss in tropical rainforest. Because many of these extinctions go unseen, the level of assessment and knowledge of the status and trends of freshwater species are still very poor, with species going extinct before they are even taxonomically classified. Increasing human population growth and achieving the sustainable development targets set forth in 2002 will place even higher demands on the already stressed freshwater ecosystems, unless an integrated approach to managing water for people and ecosystems is implemented by a broad constituency. To inform and implement policies that support an integrated approach to water management, as well as to measure progress in halting the rapid decline in freshwater species, basin-level indicators describing the condition and threats to freshwater ecosystems and species are required. This paper discusses the extent and quality of data available on the number and size of populations of freshwater species, as well as the change in the extent and condition of natural freshwater habitats. The paper presents indicators that can be applied at multiple scales, highlighting the usefulness of using remote sensing and geographical information systems technologies to fill some of the existing information gaps. Finally, the paper includes an analysis of major data gaps and information needs with respect to freshwater species to measure progress towards the 2010 biodiversity targets. PMID

  8. Prospects for monitoring freshwater ecosystems towards the 2010 targets.

    PubMed

    Revenga, C; Campbell, I; Abell, R; de Villiers, P; Bryer, M

    2005-02-28

    Human activities have severely affected the condition of freshwater ecosystems worldwide. Physical alteration, habitat loss, water withdrawal, pollution, overexploitation and the introduction of non-native species all contribute to the decline in freshwater species. Today, freshwater species are, in general, at higher risk of extinction than those in forests, grasslands and coastal ecosystems. For North America alone, the projected extinction rate for freshwater fauna is five times greater than that for terrestrial fauna--a rate comparable to the species loss in tropical rainforest. Because many of these extinctions go unseen, the level of assessment and knowledge of the status and trends of freshwater species are still very poor, with species going extinct before they are even taxonomically classified. Increasing human population growth and achieving the sustainable development targets set forth in 2002 will place even higher demands on the already stressed freshwater ecosystems, unless an integrated approach to managing water for people and ecosystems is implemented by a broad constituency. To inform and implement policies that support an integrated approach to water management, as well as to measure progress in halting the rapid decline in freshwater species, basin-level indicators describing the condition and threats to freshwater ecosystems and species are required. This paper discusses the extent and quality of data available on the number and size of populations of freshwater species, as well as the change in the extent and condition of natural freshwater habitats. The paper presents indicators that can be applied at multiple scales, highlighting the usefulness of using remote sensing and geographical information systems technologies to fill some of the existing information gaps. Finally, the paper includes an analysis of major data gaps and information needs with respect to freshwater species to measure progress towards the 2010 biodiversity targets.

  9. 2011 Bayou Regional

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-03-19

    Students from 38 high school teams in seven states competed for top honors during the 2011 FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Robotics Bayou Regional competition held March 17-19 in the New Orleans area. In this photo, members of the robotics team from Gulfport High School guide their robot during the annual tournament. The robotics competition is designed to help encourage students to pursue studies and careers in the areas of science, technology, engineering and mathematics. John C. Stennis Space Center is a supporter of FIRST activities and the Bayou Regional tournament.

  10. PROSPECTS ON BEHAVIORAL STUDIES OF MARINE AND FRESHWATER TOXINS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manuscript is based in large part on an invited presentation. The manuscript provides a brief overview of the growing issue of the human-health and environmental impact of a variety of toxins of marine and freshwater origin, the current (generally crude) state of behavioral...

  11. PROSPECTS ON BEHAVIORAL STUDIES OF MARINE AND FRESHWATER TOXINS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manuscript is based in large part on an invited presentation. The manuscript provides a brief overview of the growing issue of the human-health and environmental impact of a variety of toxins of marine and freshwater origin, the current (generally crude) state of behavioral...

  12. Screening of three proposed DOE geopressured-geothermal aquifer natural gas project areas for potential conflicting commercial production: Freshwater Bayou, Lake Theriot, and Kaplan, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Knutson, C.F.; Rogers, L.A.

    1982-02-01

    Three proposed DOE geopressured geothermal prospects defined by the Louisiana State University resource assessment group were screened for possible conflict with existing gas production. The analysis used the public records available at the Louisiana Department of Conservation offices in Baton Rouge and structural and statigraphic interpretations made by the L.S.U. resource assessment group. (MHR)

  13. Big Bayou Creek and Little Bayou Creek Watershed Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect

    Kszos, L.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon; Smith, J.G.

    1999-03-01

    Biological monitoring of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks, which border the Paducah Site, has been conducted since 1987. Biological monitoring was conducted by University of Kentucky from 1987 to 1991 and by staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from 1991 through March 1999. In March 1998, renewed Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (KPDES) permits were issued to the US Department of Energy (DOE) and US Enrichment Corporation. The renewed DOE permit requires that a watershed monitoring program be developed for the Paducah Site within 90 days of the effective date of the renewed permit. This plan outlines the sampling and analysis that will be conducted for the watershed monitoring program. The objectives of the watershed monitoring are to (1) determine whether discharges from the Paducah Site and the Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) associated with the Paducah Site are adversely affecting instream fauna, (2) assess the ecological health of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks, (3) assess the degree to which abatement actions ecologically benefit Big Bayou Creek and Little Bayou Creek, (4) provide guidance for remediation, (5) provide an evaluation of changes in potential human health concerns, and (6) provide data which could be used to assess the impact of inadvertent spills or fish kill. According to the cleanup will result in these watersheds [Big Bayou and Little Bayou creeks] achieving compliance with the applicable water quality criteria.

  14. Sediment, land use, and freshwater mussels: Prospects and problems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brim-Box, J.; Mossa, J.

    1999-01-01

    The decline in freshwater mussel populations in many river basins throughout North America has been attributed, in part, to land-use modifications that cause changes in sediment regimes. However, the specific associations that mussels have with stream sediments are poorly understood, making it difficult to assess the impacts of changes in sedimentation rates on unionid mussels. Both bed and suspended materials, and concomitant changes in channel form associated with changes in sediment supply, may affect mussels in numerous ways at various stages in their life cycle. Considerable debate and uncertainty remains regarding the strength of associations between sediments and mussels, including whether increased sedimentation is a cause of recent mussel declines. It is important to be aware of appropriate procedures for sampling and analyzing fluvial sediments, and the nature of sediment sources, to adequately assess relationships between unionid mussels and fluvial sediments.

  15. The Chickasaw Bayou Campaign.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-07

    maze of swamps, bayous, and old river beds. From the Yazoo juncture with the Mississippi River, the first open and dry ground suitable for a landing...division would traverse. The Union skirmish line was fifty yards away from the bayou. That fifty yards was a maze of fallen timber. One hundred yards...Third Division. Receiving fire from the direction of the Indian Mound, Abbott had his troops lay down and sent a runner to Steele for instructions. In

  16. 33 CFR 117.301 - Massalina Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Massalina Bayou. 117.301 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.301 Massalina Bayou. The draw of the Tarpon Dock bascule span bridge, Massalina Bayou, mile 0.0 at Panama City, shall open on signal;...

  17. 33 CFR 117.301 - Massalina Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Massalina Bayou. 117.301 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.301 Massalina Bayou. The draw of the Tarpon Dock bascule span bridge, Massalina Bayou, mile 0.0 at Panama City, shall open on signal;...

  18. 33 CFR 117.301 - Massalina Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Massalina Bayou. 117.301 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.301 Massalina Bayou. The draw of the Tarpon Dock bascule span bridge, Massalina Bayou, mile 0.0 at Panama City, shall open on signal;...

  19. 33 CFR 117.301 - Massalina Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Massalina Bayou. 117.301 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.301 Massalina Bayou. The draw of the Tarpon Dock bascule span bridge, Massalina Bayou, mile 0.0 at Panama City, shall open on signal;...

  20. 33 CFR 117.301 - Massalina Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Massalina Bayou. 117.301 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.301 Massalina Bayou. The draw of the Tarpon Dock bascule span bridge, Massalina Bayou, mile 0.0 at Panama City, shall open on signal;...

  1. 88. (Credit CBF) Twelve Mile Bayou Pumping Station and force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    88. (Credit CBF) Twelve Mile Bayou Pumping Station and force main for pumping water over levee and into the canal (Blind Bayou), March 1913. - McNeil Street Pumping Station, McNeil Street & Cross Bayou, Shreveport, Caddo Parish, LA

  2. 86. (Credit CBF) Canal between Twelve Mile Bayou and Cross ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    86. (Credit CBF) Canal between Twelve Mile Bayou and Cross Bayou in the bed of Blind Bayou (constructed 1901-1903). Photo taken in November of 1911. - McNeil Street Pumping Station, McNeil Street & Cross Bayou, Shreveport, Caddo Parish, LA

  3. 33 CFR 117.957 - Cedar Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cedar Bayou. 117.957 Section 117.957 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.957 Cedar Bayou. The draw of the Union Pacific...

  4. 33 CFR 117.959 - Chocolate Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chocolate Bayou. 117.959 Section 117.959 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.959 Chocolate Bayou. The draw of the Union...

  5. 33 CFR 117.965 - Cow Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cow Bayou. 117.965 Section 117.965 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.965 Cow Bayou. The draws of the Orange...

  6. 33 CFR 117.435 - Carlin Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Carlin Bayou. 117.435 Section 117.435 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.435 Carlin Bayou. (a) The draw of the...

  7. 33 CFR 117.437 - Colyell Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Colyell Bayou. 117.437 Section 117.437 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.437 Colyell Bayou. The removable...

  8. 33 CFR 117.481 - Milhomme Bayou

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Milhomme Bayou 117.481 Section 117.481 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.481 Milhomme Bayou The draw of...

  9. 33 CFR 117.479 - Macon Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Macon Bayou. 117.479 Section 117.479 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.479 Macon Bayou. The draw of the S4 bridge,...

  10. 33 CFR 117.463 - Lacombe Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lacombe Bayou. 117.463 Section 117.463 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.463 Lacombe Bayou. The draw of...

  11. 33 CFR 117.437 - Colyell Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Colyell Bayou. 117.437 Section 117.437 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.437 Colyell Bayou. The removable...

  12. 33 CFR 117.463 - Lacombe Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lacombe Bayou. 117.463 Section 117.463 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.463 Lacombe Bayou. The draw of...

  13. 33 CFR 117.279 - Coffeepot Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coffeepot Bayou. 117.279 Section 117.279 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.279 Coffeepot Bayou. The draw of...

  14. 33 CFR 117.505 - Terrebonne Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Terrebonne Bayou. 117.505 Section 117.505 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.505 Terrebonne Bayou. (a) The draw...

  15. 33 CFR 117.482 - Nezpique Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Nezpique Bayou. 117.482 Section 117.482 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.482 Nezpique Bayou. The draw of...

  16. 33 CFR 117.955 - Buffalo Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Buffalo Bayou. 117.955 Section 117.955 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.955 Buffalo Bayou. (a) The draw of...

  17. 33 CFR 117.341 - Whitcomb Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Whitcomb Bayou. 117.341 Section 117.341 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.341 Whitcomb Bayou. The draw of...

  18. 33 CFR 117.967 - Greens Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Greens Bayou. 117.967 Section 117.967 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.967 Greens Bayou. The draw of the Port...

  19. 33 CFR 117.497 - Stumpy Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stumpy Bayou. 117.497 Section 117.497 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.497 Stumpy Bayou. The removable span of...

  20. 33 CFR 117.461 - Lacassine Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lacassine Bayou. 117.461 Section 117.461 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.461 Lacassine Bayou. The draws of...

  1. 33 CFR 117.105 - Bayou Sara.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bayou Sara. 117.105 Section 117.105 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.105 Bayou Sara. The draw of the CSX...

  2. 33 CFR 117.425 - Black Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Black Bayou. 117.425 Section 117.425 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.425 Black Bayou. The draws of the...

  3. 33 CFR 117.279 - Coffeepot Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coffeepot Bayou. 117.279 Section 117.279 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.279 Coffeepot Bayou. The draw of...

  4. 33 CFR 117.497 - Stumpy Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Stumpy Bayou. 117.497 Section 117.497 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.497 Stumpy Bayou. The removable span of...

  5. 33 CFR 117.459 - Kelso Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Kelso Bayou. 117.459 Section 117.459 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.459 Kelso Bayou. The draw of the S27 bridge...

  6. 33 CFR 117.965 - Cow Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cow Bayou. 117.965 Section 117.965 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.965 Cow Bayou. The draws of the Orange...

  7. 33 CFR 117.425 - Black Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Black Bayou. 117.425 Section 117.425 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.425 Black Bayou. The draws of the...

  8. 33 CFR 117.497 - Stumpy Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Stumpy Bayou. 117.497 Section 117.497 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.497 Stumpy Bayou. The removable span of...

  9. 33 CFR 117.437 - Colyell Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Colyell Bayou. 117.437 Section 117.437 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.437 Colyell Bayou. The removable...

  10. 33 CFR 117.507 - Tigre Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tigre Bayou. 117.507 Section 117.507 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.507 Tigre Bayou. The draw of the S330...

  11. 33 CFR 117.959 - Chocolate Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Chocolate Bayou. 117.959 Section 117.959 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.959 Chocolate Bayou. The draw of the...

  12. 33 CFR 117.488 - Plaquemine Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Plaquemine Bayou. 117.488 Section 117.488 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.488 Plaquemine Bayou. (a) The draw...

  13. 33 CFR 117.435 - Carlin Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Carlin Bayou. 117.435 Section 117.435 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.435 Carlin Bayou. The draw of the S14...

  14. 33 CFR 117.955 - Buffalo Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Buffalo Bayou. 117.955 Section 117.955 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.955 Buffalo Bayou. (a) The draw of...

  15. 33 CFR 117.481 - Milhomme Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Milhomme Bayou. 117.481 Section 117.481 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.481 Milhomme Bayou. The draw of...

  16. 33 CFR 117.469 - Liberty Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Liberty Bayou. 117.469 Section 117.469 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.469 Liberty Bayou. The draw of...

  17. 33 CFR 117.987 - Taylor Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Taylor Bayou. 117.987 Section 117.987 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.987 Taylor Bayou. The draws of the Union...

  18. 33 CFR 117.479 - Macon Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Macon Bayou. 117.479 Section 117.479 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.479 Macon Bayou. The draw of the S4 bridge,...

  19. 33 CFR 117.987 - Taylor Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Taylor Bayou. 117.987 Section 117.987 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.987 Taylor Bayou. The draws of the Union...

  20. 33 CFR 117.341 - Whitcomb Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Whitcomb Bayou. 117.341 Section 117.341 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.341 Whitcomb Bayou. The draw of...

  1. 33 CFR 117.469 - Liberty Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Liberty Bayou. 117.469 Section 117.469 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.469 Liberty Bayou. The draw of...

  2. 33 CFR 117.507 - Tigre Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tigre Bayou. 117.507 Section 117.507 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.507 Tigre Bayou. The draw of the S330...

  3. 33 CFR 117.429 - Boeuf Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Boeuf Bayou. 117.429 Section 117.429 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.429 Boeuf Bayou. The draw of the S307...

  4. 33 CFR 117.479 - Macon Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Macon Bayou. 117.479 Section 117.479 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.479 Macon Bayou. The draw of the S4 bridge,...

  5. 33 CFR 117.459 - Kelso Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Kelso Bayou. 117.459 Section 117.459 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.459 Kelso Bayou. The draw of the S27 bridge...

  6. 33 CFR 117.967 - Greens Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Greens Bayou. 117.967 Section 117.967 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.967 Greens Bayou. The draw of the Port...

  7. 33 CFR 117.461 - Lacassine Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lacassine Bayou. 117.461 Section 117.461 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.461 Lacassine Bayou. The draws of...

  8. 33 CFR 117.461 - Lacassine Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lacassine Bayou. 117.461 Section 117.461 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.461 Lacassine Bayou. The draws of...

  9. 33 CFR 117.485 - Patout Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Patout Bayou. 117.485 Section 117.485 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.485 Patout Bayou. The draw of the S83...

  10. 33 CFR 117.435 - Carlin Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carlin Bayou. 117.435 Section 117.435 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.435 Carlin Bayou. The draw of the S14...

  11. 33 CFR 117.459 - Kelso Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Kelso Bayou. 117.459 Section 117.459 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.459 Kelso Bayou. The draw of the S27 bridge...

  12. 33 CFR 117.505 - Terrebonne Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Terrebonne Bayou. 117.505 Section 117.505 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.505 Terrebonne Bayou. (a) The draw...

  13. 33 CFR 117.469 - Liberty Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Liberty Bayou. 117.469 Section 117.469 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.469 Liberty Bayou. The draw of...

  14. 33 CFR 117.429 - Boeuf Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Boeuf Bayou. 117.429 Section 117.429 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.429 Boeuf Bayou. The draw of the S307...

  15. 33 CFR 117.435 - Carlin Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Carlin Bayou. 117.435 Section 117.435 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.435 Carlin Bayou. (a) The draw of the...

  16. 33 CFR 117.341 - Whitcomb Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Whitcomb Bayou. 117.341 Section 117.341 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.341 Whitcomb Bayou. The draw of...

  17. 33 CFR 117.507 - Tigre Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tigre Bayou. 117.507 Section 117.507 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.507 Tigre Bayou. The draw of the S330...

  18. 33 CFR 117.279 - Coffeepot Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coffeepot Bayou. 117.279 Section 117.279 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.279 Coffeepot Bayou. The draw of...

  19. 33 CFR 117.485 - Patout Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Patout Bayou. 117.485 Section 117.485 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.485 Patout Bayou. The draw of the S83...

  20. 33 CFR 117.429 - Boeuf Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Boeuf Bayou. 117.429 Section 117.429 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.429 Boeuf Bayou. The draw of the S307...

  1. 33 CFR 117.105 - Bayou Sara.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bayou Sara. 117.105 Section 117.105 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.105 Bayou Sara. The draw of the CSX...

  2. 33 CFR 117.965 - Cow Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cow Bayou. 117.965 Section 117.965 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.965 Cow Bayou. The draws of the Orange...

  3. 33 CFR 117.425 - Black Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Black Bayou. 117.425 Section 117.425 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.425 Black Bayou. The draws of the...

  4. 33 CFR 117.967 - Greens Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Greens Bayou. 117.967 Section 117.967 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.967 Greens Bayou. The draw of the Port...

  5. 33 CFR 117.501 - Teche Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Teche Bayou. 117.501 Section 117.501 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.501 Teche Bayou. (a) The draws of the...

  6. 33 CFR 117.497 - Stumpy Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Stumpy Bayou. 117.497 Section 117.497 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.497 Stumpy Bayou. The removable span of...

  7. 33 CFR 117.488 - Plaquemine Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Plaquemine Bayou. 117.488 Section 117.488 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.488 Plaquemine Bayou. (a) The draw...

  8. 33 CFR 117.987 - Taylor Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Taylor Bayou. 117.987 Section 117.987 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.987 Taylor Bayou. The draws of the Union...

  9. 33 CFR 117.469 - Liberty Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Liberty Bayou. 117.469 Section 117.469 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.469 Liberty Bayou. The draw of...

  10. 33 CFR 117.433 - Bonfouca Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bonfouca Bayou. 117.433 Section 117.433 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.433 Bonfouca Bayou. The draw of...

  11. 33 CFR 117.433 - Bonfouca Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bonfouca Bayou. 117.433 Section 117.433 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.433 Bonfouca Bayou. The draw of...

  12. 33 CFR 117.987 - Taylor Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Taylor Bayou. 117.987 Section 117.987 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.987 Taylor Bayou. The draws of the Union...

  13. 33 CFR 117.341 - Whitcomb Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Whitcomb Bayou. 117.341 Section 117.341 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.341 Whitcomb Bayou. The draw of...

  14. 33 CFR 117.959 - Chocolate Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Chocolate Bayou. 117.959 Section 117.959 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.959 Chocolate Bayou. The draw of the...

  15. 33 CFR 117.482 - Nezpique Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Nezpique Bayou. 117.482 Section 117.482 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.482 Nezpique Bayou. The draw of...

  16. 33 CFR 117.482 - Nezpique Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nezpique Bayou. 117.482 Section 117.482 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.482 Nezpique Bayou. The draw of...

  17. 33 CFR 117.501 - Teche Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Teche Bayou. 117.501 Section 117.501 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.501 Teche Bayou. (a) The draws of the...

  18. 33 CFR 117.987 - Taylor Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Taylor Bayou. 117.987 Section 117.987 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.987 Taylor Bayou. The draws of the Union...

  19. 33 CFR 117.429 - Boeuf Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Boeuf Bayou. 117.429 Section 117.429 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.429 Boeuf Bayou. The draw of the S307...

  20. 33 CFR 117.485 - Patout Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Patout Bayou. 117.485 Section 117.485 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.485 Patout Bayou. The draw of the S83...

  1. 33 CFR 117.279 - Coffeepot Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coffeepot Bayou. 117.279 Section 117.279 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.279 Coffeepot Bayou. The draw of...

  2. 33 CFR 117.501 - Teche Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Teche Bayou. 117.501 Section 117.501 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.501 Teche Bayou. (a) The draws of the...

  3. 33 CFR 117.437 - Colyell Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Colyell Bayou. 117.437 Section 117.437 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.437 Colyell Bayou. The removable...

  4. 33 CFR 117.481 - Milhomme Bayou

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Milhomme Bayou 117.481 Section 117.481 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.481 Milhomme Bayou The draw of...

  5. 33 CFR 117.485 - Patout Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Patout Bayou. 117.485 Section 117.485 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.485 Patout Bayou. The draw of the S83...

  6. 33 CFR 117.488 - Plaquemine Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Plaquemine Bayou. 117.488 Section 117.488 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.488 Plaquemine Bayou. (a) The draw...

  7. 33 CFR 117.435 - Carlin Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Carlin Bayou. 117.435 Section 117.435 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.435 Carlin Bayou. The draw of the S14...

  8. 33 CFR 117.105 - Bayou Sara.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bayou Sara. 117.105 Section 117.105 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.105 Bayou Sara. The draw of the CSX...

  9. 33 CFR 117.497 - Stumpy Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Stumpy Bayou. 117.497 Section 117.497 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.497 Stumpy Bayou. The removable span of...

  10. 33 CFR 117.505 - Terrebonne Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Terrebonne Bayou. 117.505 Section 117.505 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.505 Terrebonne Bayou. (a) The draw...

  11. 33 CFR 117.507 - Tigre Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tigre Bayou. 117.507 Section 117.507 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.507 Tigre Bayou. The draw of the S330...

  12. 33 CFR 117.429 - Boeuf Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Boeuf Bayou. 117.429 Section 117.429 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.429 Boeuf Bayou. The draw of the S307...

  13. 33 CFR 117.505 - Terrebonne Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Terrebonne Bayou. 117.505 Section 117.505 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.505 Terrebonne Bayou. (a) The draw...

  14. 33 CFR 117.425 - Black Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Black Bayou. 117.425 Section 117.425 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.425 Black Bayou. The draws of the...

  15. 33 CFR 117.955 - Buffalo Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Buffalo Bayou. 117.955 Section 117.955 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.955 Buffalo Bayou. (a) The draw of...

  16. 33 CFR 117.967 - Greens Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Greens Bayou. 117.967 Section 117.967 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.967 Greens Bayou. The draw of the Port...

  17. 33 CFR 117.485 - Patout Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Patout Bayou. 117.485 Section 117.485 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.485 Patout Bayou. The draw of the S83...

  18. 33 CFR 117.105 - Bayou Sara.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bayou Sara. 117.105 Section 117.105 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.105 Bayou Sara. The draw of the CSX...

  19. 33 CFR 117.965 - Cow Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cow Bayou. 117.965 Section 117.965 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.965 Cow Bayou. The draws of the Orange...

  20. 33 CFR 117.955 - Buffalo Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Buffalo Bayou. 117.955 Section 117.955 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.955 Buffalo Bayou. (a) The draw of...

  1. 33 CFR 117.505 - Terrebonne Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Terrebonne Bayou. 117.505 Section 117.505 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.505 Terrebonne Bayou. (a) The draw...

  2. 33 CFR 117.465 - Lafourche Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lafourche Bayou. 117.465 Section 117.465 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.465 Lafourche Bayou. (a) The draws...

  3. 33 CFR 117.501 - Teche Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Teche Bayou. 117.501 Section 117.501 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.501 Teche Bayou. (a) The draws of the...

  4. 33 CFR 117.482 - Nezpique Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Nezpique Bayou. 117.482 Section 117.482 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.482 Nezpique Bayou. The draw of...

  5. 33 CFR 117.433 - Bonfouca Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bonfouca Bayou. 117.433 Section 117.433 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.433 Bonfouca Bayou. The draw of...

  6. 33 CFR 117.459 - Kelso Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Kelso Bayou. 117.459 Section 117.459 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.459 Kelso Bayou. The draw of the S27 bridge...

  7. 33 CFR 117.479 - Macon Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Macon Bayou. 117.479 Section 117.479 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.479 Macon Bayou. The draw of the S4 bridge,...

  8. 33 CFR 117.463 - Lacombe Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lacombe Bayou. 117.463 Section 117.463 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.463 Lacombe Bayou. The draw of...

  9. 33 CFR 117.279 - Coffeepot Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coffeepot Bayou. 117.279 Section 117.279 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.279 Coffeepot Bayou. The draw of...

  10. 33 CFR 117.481 - Milhomme Bayou

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Milhomme Bayou 117.481 Section 117.481 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.481 Milhomme Bayou The draw of...

  11. 33 CFR 117.507 - Tigre Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tigre Bayou. 117.507 Section 117.507 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.507 Tigre Bayou. The draw of the S330...

  12. 33 CFR 117.501 - Teche Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Teche Bayou. 117.501 Section 117.501 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.501 Teche Bayou. (a) The draws of the...

  13. 33 CFR 117.488 - Plaquemine Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Plaquemine Bayou. 117.488 Section 117.488 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.488 Plaquemine Bayou. (a) The draw...

  14. 33 CFR 117.488 - Plaquemine Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Plaquemine Bayou. 117.488 Section 117.488 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.488 Plaquemine Bayou. (a) The draw...

  15. 33 CFR 117.965 - Cow Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cow Bayou. 117.965 Section 117.965 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.965 Cow Bayou. The draws of the Orange...

  16. 33 CFR 117.482 - Nezpique Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Nezpique Bayou. 117.482 Section 117.482 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.482 Nezpique Bayou. The draw of...

  17. 33 CFR 117.341 - Whitcomb Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Whitcomb Bayou. 117.341 Section 117.341 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.341 Whitcomb Bayou. The draw of...

  18. 33 CFR 117.433 - Bonfouca Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bonfouca Bayou. 117.433 Section 117.433 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.433 Bonfouca Bayou. The draw of...

  19. 33 CFR 117.433 - Bonfouca Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bonfouca Bayou. 117.433 Section 117.433 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.433 Bonfouca Bayou. The draw of...

  20. 33 CFR 117.437 - Colyell Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Colyell Bayou. 117.437 Section 117.437 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.437 Colyell Bayou. The removable...

  1. 33 CFR 117.461 - Lacassine Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lacassine Bayou. 117.461 Section 117.461 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.461 Lacassine Bayou. The draws of...

  2. 33 CFR 117.459 - Kelso Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Kelso Bayou. 117.459 Section 117.459 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.459 Kelso Bayou. The draw of the S27 bridge...

  3. 33 CFR 117.463 - Lacombe Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lacombe Bayou. 117.463 Section 117.463 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.463 Lacombe Bayou. The draw of...

  4. 33 CFR 117.425 - Black Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Black Bayou. 117.425 Section 117.425 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.425 Black Bayou. The draws of the...

  5. 33 CFR 117.955 - Buffalo Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Buffalo Bayou. 117.955 Section 117.955 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.955 Buffalo Bayou. (a) The draw of...

  6. 33 CFR 117.105 - Bayou Sara.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bayou Sara. 117.105 Section 117.105 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.105 Bayou Sara. The draw of the CSX...

  7. 33 CFR 117.967 - Greens Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Greens Bayou. 117.967 Section 117.967 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.967 Greens Bayou. The draw of the Port...

  8. 33 CFR 117.461 - Lacassine Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lacassine Bayou. 117.461 Section 117.461 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.461 Lacassine Bayou. The draws of...

  9. 33 CFR 117.481 - Milhomme Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Milhomme Bayou. 117.481 Section 117.481 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.481 Milhomme Bayou. The draw of...

  10. 33 CFR 117.463 - Lacombe Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lacombe Bayou. 117.463 Section 117.463 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.463 Lacombe Bayou. The draw of...

  11. 33 CFR 117.959 - Chocolate Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Chocolate Bayou. 117.959 Section 117.959 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.959 Chocolate Bayou. The draw of the...

  12. 33 CFR 117.469 - Liberty Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Liberty Bayou. 117.469 Section 117.469 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.469 Liberty Bayou. The draw of...

  13. 33 CFR 117.479 - Macon Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Macon Bayou. 117.479 Section 117.479 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.479 Macon Bayou. The draw of the S4 bridge,...

  14. 33 CFR 117.959 - Chocolate Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Chocolate Bayou. 117.959 Section 117.959 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.959 Chocolate Bayou. The draw of the...

  15. 33 CFR 117.684 - Bayou Portage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bayou Portage. 117.684 Section 117.684 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Mississippi § 117.684 Bayou Portage. The draw of...

  16. 33 CFR 117.684 - Bayou Portage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bayou Portage. 117.684 Section 117.684 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Mississippi § 117.684 Bayou Portage. The draw of...

  17. 33 CFR 117.684 - Bayou Portage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bayou Portage. 117.684 Section 117.684 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Mississippi § 117.684 Bayou Portage. The draw of...

  18. 33 CFR 117.684 - Bayou Portage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bayou Portage. 117.684 Section 117.684 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Mississippi § 117.684 Bayou Portage. The draw of...

  19. 33 CFR 117.684 - Bayou Portage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bayou Portage. 117.684 Section 117.684 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Mississippi § 117.684 Bayou Portage. The draw of...

  20. Lead Transport into Bayou Trepagnier Wetlands in Louisiana, USA

    Treesearch

    Margaret S. Devall; Leonard B. Thien; Erik Ellgaard; George Flowers

    2006-01-01

    Establishment of a petroleum refinery in 1916 near the headwaters of Bayou Trepagnier with subsequent dredging of the bayou resulted in spoil banks containing high levels of Pb. A large swamp abuts the eastern bank of the bayou. Cores were taken from 15 baldcypress [Taxodium distichum (L.) Richard] trees growing in the swamp along a 610-m transect (...

  1. 77 FR 29927 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Carlin Bayou, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-21

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Carlin Bayou, LA AGENCY... Carlin Bayou in Delcambre, Iberia Parish, Louisiana. The bridge currently remains in the open-to... vertical lift span bridge crosses the Carlin Bayou at mile 6.4 in Delcambre, Iberia Parish, Louisiana....

  2. 33 CFR 117.103 - Bayou La Batre.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bayou La Batre. 117.103 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.103 Bayou La Batre. The draw of SR 188 Bridge, mile 2.3, at Bayou La Batre, will open on signal every hour on the hour daily between 4 a.m....

  3. 33 CFR 117.103 - Bayou La Batre.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bayou La Batre. 117.103 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.103 Bayou La Batre. The draw of SR 188 Bridge, mile 2.3, at Bayou La Batre, will open on signal every hour on the hour daily between 4 a.m....

  4. 77 FR 46286 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Bayou Boeuf, Amelia, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-03

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Bayou Boeuf, Amelia, LA AGENCY: Coast... that governs the Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) Railway Company swing span bridge across Bayou... temporary deviation from the operating schedule of the swing span railroad bridge across Bayou Boeuf,...

  5. 33 CFR 117.103 - Bayou La Batre.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bayou La Batre. 117.103 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.103 Bayou La Batre. The draw of SR 188 Bridge, mile 2.3, at Bayou La Batre, will open on signal every hour on the hour daily between 4 a.m....

  6. 33 CFR 117.103 - Bayou La Batre.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bayou La Batre. 117.103 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.103 Bayou La Batre. The draw of SR 188 Bridge, mile 2.3, at Bayou La Batre, will open on signal every hour on the hour daily between 4 a.m....

  7. 77 FR 22520 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Lafourche Bayou, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-16

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Lafourche Bayou, LA... changing the regulation governing six bridges across Bayou Lafourche, south of the Gulf Intracoastal... draw bridges across Lafourche Bayou that are affected by this proposed rule are described as...

  8. 77 FR 42637 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Bayou Boeuf, Amelia, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Bayou Boeuf, Amelia, LA AGENCY: Coast... (BNSF) Railway Company swing span bridge across ] Bayou Boeuf, mile 10.2, at Amelia, St. Mary Parish... across Bayou Boeuf, mile 10.2, at Amelia, St. Mary Parish, Louisiana. The bridge provides no...

  9. 77 FR 43165 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Lafourche Bayou, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-24

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Lafourche Bayou, LA... governing six bridges across Bayou Lafourche, south of the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway in Lafourche Parish... of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) entitled, ``Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Lafourche Bayou, LA,''...

  10. 76 FR 39775 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Lafourche Bayou, Lafourche, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Lafourche Bayou, Lafourche, LA AGENCY... the Cut Off vertical lift span bridge across the Lafourche Bayou, mile 36.3, at Cut Off, Lafourche... of the vertical lift span bridge across Lafourche Bayou, mile 36.3 in Cut Off, Lafourche Parish,...

  11. 77 FR 35897 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Lafourche Bayou, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-15

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Lafourche Bayou, LA... change the regulation governing the six bridges across Bayou Lafourche, south of the Gulf Intracoastal..., ``Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Lafourche Bayou, LA,'' in the Federal Register (77 FR 22520). The...

  12. 78 FR 10523 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Bayou Boeuf, Amelia, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-14

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Bayou Boeuf, Amelia, LA AGENCY: Coast... (BNSF) Railway Company swing span bridge across Bayou Boeuf, mile 10.2, at Amelia, St. Mary Parish... operating schedule of the swing span railroad bridge across Bayou Boeuf, mile 10.2, at Amelia, St....

  13. 77 FR 69564 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Bayou Boeuf, Amelia, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-20

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Bayou Boeuf, Amelia, LA AGENCY: Coast... (BNSF) Railway Company swing span bridge across Bayou Boeuf, mile 10.2, at Amelia, St. Mary Parish... across Bayou Boeuf, mile 10.2, at Amelia, St. Mary Parish, Louisiana. The bridge provides no...

  14. 76 FR 52567 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Bonfouca Bayou, Slidell, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Bonfouca Bayou, Slidell... governing the operation of the State Route (SR) 433 Swing Span Bridge across Bonfouca Bayou, mile 7.0, at... Bridge across Bonfouca Bayou, mile 7.0 at Slidell, Louisiana be changed in order to allow for...

  15. 75 FR 33505 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Teche Bayou, Morbihan, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-14

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Teche Bayou, Morbihan, LA AGENCY... the LA 44 swing span bridge across Teche Bayou, mile 56.7, at Morbihan, Iberia Parish, Louisiana. The... bridge across Teche Bayou at mile 56.7 in Morbihan, Iberia Parish, Louisiana. The closure is necessary...

  16. 33 CFR 117.103 - Bayou La Batre.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bayou La Batre. 117.103 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.103 Bayou La Batre. The draw of SR 188 Bridge, mile 2.3, at Bayou La Batre, will open on signal every hour on the hour daily between 4 a.m....

  17. 33 CFR 334.740 - Weekley Bayou, an arm of Boggy Bayou, Fla., at Eglin Air Force Base; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Bayou, Fla., at Eglin Air Force Base; restricted area. 334.740 Section 334.740 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.740 Weekley Bayou, an arm of Boggy Bayou, Fla., at Eglin Air Force Base; restricted area. (a... permission of the Commander, Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, or his authorized representative. (2)...

  18. 33 CFR 334.740 - Weekley Bayou, an arm of Boggy Bayou, Fla., at Eglin Air Force Base; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Bayou, Fla., at Eglin Air Force Base; restricted area. 334.740 Section 334.740 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.740 Weekley Bayou, an arm of Boggy Bayou, Fla., at Eglin Air Force Base; restricted area. (a... permission of the Commander, Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, or his authorized representative. (2)...

  19. 2010 FIRST Robotics Bayou Regional Tournament

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Members of the robotics team from St. Patrick Catholic High School in Biloxi, Miss., focus on guiding their robot on the 2010 Bayou Regional playing field during the annual FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Robotics competition March 5-6. The event attracted 36 teams from eight states, including 25 teams from Louisiana and Mississippi high schools. The tournament was one of dozens of FIRST tournaments scheduled around the country in advance of the national robotics championship in Atlanta in April. The Bayou Regional competition was held at the Alario Center in Westwego, La.

  20. 2010 FIRST Robotics Bayou Regional Tournament

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Members of the robotics team from St. Patrick Catholic High School in Biloxi, Miss., focus on guiding their robot on the 2010 Bayou Regional playing field during the annual FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Robotics competition March 5-6. The event attracted 36 teams from eight states, including 25 teams from Louisiana and Mississippi high schools. The tournament was one of dozens of FIRST tournaments scheduled around the country in advance of the national robotics championship in Atlanta in April. The Bayou Regional competition was held at the Alario Center in Westwego, La.

  1. Health assessment for Bayou Sorrel, Bayou Sorrel, Louisiana, Region 6. CERCLIS No. LAD980745541. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-06

    The Bayou Sorrel National Priorities List Site is located in Iberville Parish, Louisiana, 6 miles northwest of the community of Bayou Sorrel. The population near Bayou Sorrel is a seasonal one. Fishing, hunting, and vegetable gardens provide a large portion of the diet for many of the inhabitants in the area. The waste types disposed of at Bayou Sorrel included process wastes from pesticide and herbicide manufacture, sulfide-containing wastes, and spent wash solutions from boiler cleaning. The Record of Decision signed November 1986 mandated several remedial actions which included installation of: a runoff control system; caps meeting Resource Conservation and Recovery Act specifications; a sand/geofabric drainage layer and collection system; a gas ventilation system; slurry walls around the former landfill area and Pond 4; a fence around all capped areas; and a ground-water monitoring system.

  2. 75 FR 52937 - Turtle Bayou Gas Storage Company, LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-30

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Turtle Bayou Gas Storage Company, LLC; Notice of Application August 20, 2010. Take notice that on August 6, 2010, Turtle Bayou Gas Storage Company, LLC (Turtle Bayou), One Office... caverns and related facilities to be located in Chambers and Liberty Counties, Texas. Turtle Bayou...

  3. 76 FR 5685 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Bayou Tigre, Vermillion Parish, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-02

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Bayou Tigre, Vermillion Parish, LA... operation of the Bayou Tigre (LA 330) bridge across Bayou Tigre, mile 2.3, near Delcambre, Vermillion Parish... deviation from the published regulation for the Bayou Tigre (LA 330) bridge (5 feet vertical clearance...

  4. 2010 FIRST Robotics Bayou Regional Tournament

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Student-built robots maneuver the course during the 2010 Bayou Regional FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Robotics competition in Westwego on March 5-6. The annual competition drew 36 high school teams from eight states. NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center supports FIRST Robotics by providing financing, mentors and training, as well as competition judges and referees, audiovisual staff and other volunteer personnel.

  5. 2010 FIRST Robotics Bayou Regional Tournament

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Student-built robots maneuver the course during the 2010 Bayou Regional FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Robotics competition in Westwego on March 5-6. The annual competition drew 36 high school teams from eight states. NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center supports FIRST Robotics by providing financing, mentors and training, as well as competition judges and referees, audiovisual staff and other volunteer personnel.

  6. 2010 FIRST Robotics Bayou Regional Tournament

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-03-05

    Student-built robots maneuver the course during the 2010 Bayou Regional FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Robotics competition in Westwego on March 5-6. The annual competition drew 36 high school teams from eight states. NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center supports FIRST Robotics by providing financing, mentors and training, as well as competition judges and referees, audiovisual staff and other volunteer personnel.

  7. 77 FR 57020 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Carlin Bayou, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-17

    ... Louisiana and Delta Railroad (LDRR) vertical lift bridge across Carlin Bayou in Delcambre, Iberia Parish... LDRR vertical lift span bridge crosses the Carlin Bayou at mile 6.4 in Delcambre, Iberia Parish... lift span is in the closed-to-navigation position, mariners may call the LDRR Signal Supervisor at 337...

  8. 75 FR 63714 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Des Allemands Bayou, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-18

    ... Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway swing bridge across Des Allemands Bayou, mile 14.0, in St. Charles and... Transportation, West Building Ground Floor, Room W12-140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE., Washington, DC 20590... INFORMATION: The Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway swing span drawbridge across Bayou Des Allemands, mile...

  9. 95. (Credit CBF) Red River syphon line cross Cross Bayou, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    95. (Credit CBF) Red River syphon line cross Cross Bayou, March 1913. The new low service pump pit and the receiving well for the syphon are in the background. - McNeil Street Pumping Station, McNeil Street & Cross Bayou, Shreveport, Caddo Parish, LA

  10. 94. (Credit CBF) Red River syphon line crossing Cross Bayou, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    94. (Credit CBF) Red River syphon line crossing Cross Bayou, March 1913. The new low service pump pit and the receiving well for the syphon are in the background. - McNeil Street Pumping Station, McNeil Street & Cross Bayou, Shreveport, Caddo Parish, LA

  11. 33 CFR 117.471 - Little Black Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Little Black Bayou. 117.471 Section 117.471 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.471 Little Black Bayou. The draw...

  12. 33 CFR 117.489 - Plaquemine Brule Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Plaquemine Brule Bayou. 117.489 Section 117.489 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.489 Plaquemine Brule Bayou. The...

  13. 33 CFR 117.494 - Schooner Bayou Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Schooner Bayou Canal. 117.494 Section 117.494 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.494 Schooner Bayou Canal. The draw...

  14. 33 CFR 117.443 - Du Large Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Du Large Bayou. 117.443 Section 117.443 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.443 Du Large Bayou. The draw of...

  15. 33 CFR 117.460 - La Carpe Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false La Carpe Bayou. 117.460 Section 117.460 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.460 La Carpe Bayou. The draw of...

  16. 33 CFR 117.489 - Plaquemine Brule Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Plaquemine Brule Bayou. 117.489 Section 117.489 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.489 Plaquemine Brule Bayou. The...

  17. 33 CFR 117.460 - La Carpe Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false La Carpe Bayou. 117.460 Section 117.460 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.460 La Carpe Bayou. The draw of...

  18. 33 CFR 117.489 - Plaquemine Brule Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Plaquemine Brule Bayou. 117.489 Section 117.489 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.489 Plaquemine Brule Bayou. The...

  19. 33 CFR 117.494 - Schooner Bayou Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Schooner Bayou Canal. 117.494 Section 117.494 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.494 Schooner Bayou Canal. The draw...

  20. 33 CFR 117.443 - Du Large Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Du Large Bayou. 117.443 Section 117.443 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.443 Du Large Bayou. The draw of...

  1. 33 CFR 117.494 - Schooner Bayou Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Schooner Bayou Canal. 117.494 Section 117.494 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.494 Schooner Bayou Canal. The draw...

  2. 33 CFR 117.439 - Des Allemands Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Des Allemands Bayou. 117.439 Section 117.439 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.439 Des Allemands Bayou. (a) The...

  3. 33 CFR 117.494 - Schooner Bayou Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Schooner Bayou Canal. 117.494 Section 117.494 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.494 Schooner Bayou Canal. The draw...

  4. 33 CFR 117.449 - Grosse Tete Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Grosse Tete Bayou. 117.449 Section 117.449 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.449 Grosse Tete Bayou. The...

  5. 33 CFR 117.449 - Grosse Tete Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Grosse Tete Bayou. 117.449 Section 117.449 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.449 Grosse Tete Bayou. (a) The draw...

  6. 33 CFR 117.449 - Grosse Tete Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Grosse Tete Bayou. 117.449 Section 117.449 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.449 Grosse Tete Bayou. The...

  7. 33 CFR 117.443 - Du Large Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Du Large Bayou. 117.443 Section 117.443 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.443 Du Large Bayou. The draw of...

  8. 33 CFR 117.460 - La Carpe Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false La Carpe Bayou. 117.460 Section 117.460 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.460 La Carpe Bayou. The draw of...

  9. 33 CFR 117.441 - D'Inde Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false D'Inde Bayou. 117.441 Section 117.441 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.441 D'Inde Bayou. The draw of the Union...

  10. 33 CFR 117.471 - Little Black Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Little Black Bayou. 117.471 Section 117.471 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.471 Little Black Bayou. The draw...

  11. 33 CFR 117.441 - D'Inde Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false D'Inde Bayou. 117.441 Section 117.441 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.441 D'Inde Bayou. The draw of the Union...

  12. 33 CFR 117.475 - Little (Petit) Caillou Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Little (Petit) Caillou Bayou. 117.475 Section 117.475 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Bayou. (a) The draws of the S58 bridge, mile 25.7 at Sarah, and the Terrebonne Parish...

  13. 33 CFR 117.447 - Grand Cabahanosse Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Grand Cabahanosse Bayou. 117.447 Section 117.447 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.447 Grand Cabahanosse Bayou. The...

  14. 33 CFR 117.471 - Little Black Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Little Black Bayou. 117.471 Section 117.471 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.471 Little Black Bayou. The draw...

  15. 33 CFR 117.475 - Little (Petit) Caillou Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Little (Petit) Caillou Bayou. 117.475 Section 117.475 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Bayou. (a) The draws of the S58 bridge, mile 25.7 at Sarah, and the Terrebonne Parish...

  16. 33 CFR 117.447 - Grand Cabahanosse Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Grand Cabahanosse Bayou. 117.447 Section 117.447 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.447 Grand Cabahanosse Bayou. The...

  17. 33 CFR 117.441 - D'Inde Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false D'Inde Bayou. 117.441 Section 117.441 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.441 D'Inde Bayou. The draw of the Union...

  18. 77 FR 27115 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Bayou Boeuf, Amelia, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-09

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Bayou Boeuf, Amelia, LA AGENCY: Coast... (BNSF) Railway Company swing span bridge across Bayou Boeuf, mile 10.2, at Amelia, St. Mary Parish... requested a temporary deviation from the operating schedule of the swing span railroad bridge across...

  19. 33 CFR 117.471 - Little Black Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Little Black Bayou. 117.471 Section 117.471 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.471 Little Black Bayou. The draw...

  20. 33 CFR 117.441 - D'Inde Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false D'Inde Bayou. 117.441 Section 117.441 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.441 D'Inde Bayou. The draw of the Union...

  1. 33 CFR 117.489 - Plaquemine Brule Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Plaquemine Brule Bayou. 117.489 Section 117.489 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.489 Plaquemine Brule Bayou. The...

  2. 33 CFR 117.475 - Little (Petit) Caillou Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Little (Petit) Caillou Bayou. 117.475 Section 117.475 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Bayou. (a) The draws of the S58 bridge, mile 25.7 at Sarah, and the Terrebonne Parish...

  3. 33 CFR 117.447 - Grand Cabahanosse Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Grand Cabahanosse Bayou. 117.447 Section 117.447 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.447 Grand Cabahanosse Bayou. The...

  4. 33 CFR 117.439 - Des Allemands Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Des Allemands Bayou. 117.439 Section 117.439 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.439 Des Allemands Bayou. (a) The...

  5. 33 CFR 117.447 - Grand Cabahanosse Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Grand Cabahanosse Bayou. 117.447 Section 117.447 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.447 Grand Cabahanosse Bayou. The...

  6. 33 CFR 117.449 - Grosse Tete Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Grosse Tete Bayou. 117.449 Section 117.449 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.449 Grosse Tete Bayou. (a) The draw...

  7. 33 CFR 117.489 - Plaquemine Brule Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Plaquemine Brule Bayou. 117.489 Section 117.489 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.489 Plaquemine Brule Bayou. The...

  8. 33 CFR 117.449 - Grosse Tete Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Grosse Tete Bayou. 117.449 Section 117.449 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.449 Grosse Tete Bayou. (a) The draw...

  9. 33 CFR 117.460 - La Carpe Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false La Carpe Bayou. 117.460 Section 117.460 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.460 La Carpe Bayou. The draw of...

  10. 33 CFR 117.494 - Schooner Bayou Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Schooner Bayou Canal. 117.494 Section 117.494 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.494 Schooner Bayou Canal. The draw...

  11. 33 CFR 117.441 - D'Inde Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false D'Inde Bayou. 117.441 Section 117.441 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.441 D'Inde Bayou. The draw of the Union...

  12. 33 CFR 117.443 - Du Large Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Du Large Bayou. 117.443 Section 117.443 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.443 Du Large Bayou. The draw of...

  13. 33 CFR 117.439 - Des Allemands Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Des Allemands Bayou. 117.439 Section 117.439 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.439 Des Allemands Bayou. (a) The...

  14. 33 CFR 117.475 - Little (Petit) Caillou Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Little (Petit) Caillou Bayou. 117.475 Section 117.475 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Bayou. (a) The draws of the S58 bridge, mile 25.7 at Sarah, and the Terrebonne Parish...

  15. 33 CFR 117.443 - Du Large Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Du Large Bayou. 117.443 Section 117.443 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.443 Du Large Bayou. The draw of...

  16. 33 CFR 117.475 - Little (Petit) Caillou Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Little (Petit) Caillou Bayou. 117.475 Section 117.475 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Bayou. (a) The draws of the S58 bridge, mile 25.7 at Sarah, and the Terrebonne Parish...

  17. 33 CFR 117.447 - Grand Cabahanosse Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Grand Cabahanosse Bayou. 117.447 Section 117.447 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.447 Grand Cabahanosse Bayou. The...

  18. 33 CFR 117.460 - La Carpe Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false La Carpe Bayou. 117.460 Section 117.460 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.460 La Carpe Bayou. The draw of...

  19. 33 CFR 117.439 - Des Allemands Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Des Allemands Bayou. 117.439 Section 117.439 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.439 Des Allemands Bayou. (a) The...

  20. 33 CFR 117.439 - Des Allemands Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Des Allemands Bayou. 117.439 Section 117.439 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.439 Des Allemands Bayou. (a) The...

  1. 33 CFR 117.471 - Little Black Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Little Black Bayou. 117.471 Section 117.471 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.471 Little Black Bayou. The draw...

  2. 33 CFR 117.681 - Old Fort Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Old Fort Bayou. 117.681 Section 117.681 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Mississippi § 117.681 Old Fort Bayou. The draw of...

  3. 33 CFR 117.681 - Old Fort Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Old Fort Bayou. 117.681 Section 117.681 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Mississippi § 117.681 Old Fort Bayou. The draw of...

  4. 33 CFR 117.681 - Old Fort Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Old Fort Bayou. 117.681 Section 117.681 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Mississippi § 117.681 Old Fort Bayou. The draw of...

  5. 33 CFR 117.681 - Old Fort Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Old Fort Bayou. 117.681 Section 117.681 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Mississippi § 117.681 Old Fort Bayou. The draw of...

  6. 33 CFR 117.681 - Old Fort Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Old Fort Bayou. 117.681 Section 117.681 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Mississippi § 117.681 Old Fort Bayou. The draw of...

  7. Epidemiology of recreational exposure to freshwater cyanobacteria – an international prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Ian; Webb, Penelope M; Schluter, Philip J; Fleming, Lora E; Burns, John W; Gantar, Miroslav; Backer, Lorraine C; Shaw, Glen R

    2006-01-01

    Background Case studies and anecdotal reports have documented a range of acute illnesses associated with exposure to cyanobacteria and their toxins in recreational waters. The epidemiological data to date are limited; we sought to improve on the design of some previously conducted studies in order to facilitate revision and refinement of guidelines for exposure to cyanobacteria in recreational waters. Methods A prospective cohort study was conducted to investigate the incidence of acute symptoms in individuals exposed, through recreational activities, to low (cell surface area <2.4 mm2/mL), medium (2.4–12.0 mm2/mL) and high (>12.0 mm2/mL) levels of cyanobacteria in lakes and rivers in southeast Queensland, the central coast area of New South Wales, and northeast and central Florida. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were employed; models adjusted for region, age, smoking, prior history of asthma, hay fever or skin disease (eczema or dermatitis) and clustering by household. Results Of individuals approached, 3,595 met the eligibility criteria, 3,193 (89%) agreed to participate and 1,331 (37%) completed both the questionnaire and follow-up interview. Respiratory symptoms were 2.1 (95%CI: 1.1–4.0) times more likely to be reported by subjects exposed to high levels of cyanobacteria than by those exposed to low levels. Similarly, when grouping all reported symptoms, individuals exposed to high levels of cyanobacteria were 1.7 (95%CI: 1.0–2.8) times more likely to report symptoms than their low-level cyanobacteria-exposed counterparts. Conclusion A significant increase in reporting of minor self-limiting symptoms, particularly respiratory symptoms, was associated with exposure to higher levels of cyanobacteria of mixed genera. We suggest that exposure to cyanobacteria based on total cell surface area above 12 mm2/mL could result in increased incidence of symptoms. The potential for severe, life-threatening cyanobacteria-related illness is likely to be

  8. The Bayou Choctaw Oil Shipment Test

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, S.J.; Ballard, S.; Barker, G.T.

    1994-05-01

    In early October of 1993, an oil shipment of about 1 million barrels was made from the Bayou Choctaw Strategic Petroleum Reserve storage facility to St. James Terminal. During the shipment, oil temperatures and soil temperatures along the pipeline were recorded. The field data were used to make estimations of soil thermal properties, thermal conductivity and specific heat. These data were also used to validate and calibrate a heat transfer code, OILPIP, which has been used to calculate pipeline cooling of oil during a drawdown.

  9. 2. VIEW NORTHEAST AT NORTHERN BANK OF BAYOU LAFOURCHE; M/V ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW NORTHEAST AT NORTHERN BANK OF BAYOU LAFOURCHE; M/V 'FOX' LIES UNDER TREES AT CENTER OF PHOTOGRAPH - Motorized Sailing Vessel "Fox", Beached on East Bank ofBayou Lafourche, Larose, Lafourche Parish, LA

  10. 75 FR 52363 - Black Bayou Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Ouachita Parish, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-25

    ...; 40136-1265-0000-S3] Black Bayou Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Ouachita Parish, LA AGENCY: Fish and...) for the environmental assessment for Black Bayou Lake National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). In the final CCP... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION Introduction With this notice, we finalize the CCP process for Black Bayou Lake NWR...

  11. 77 FR 57492 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Grosse Tete Bayou, Iberville Parish, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-18

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Grosse Tete Bayou... existing drawbridge operation regulation for the Union Pacific railroad swing bridge over Grosse Tete Bayou... Bayou, mile 14.7, was modified into a fixed bridge in May of 2012. The modification of this bridge...

  12. 77 FR 24840 - Safety Zone; Crowley Barge 750-2, Bayou Casotte, Pascagoula, MS

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-26

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Crowley Barge 750-2, Bayou Casotte... establishing a temporary safety zone for the specified waters of Bayou Casotte, Pascagoula, Mississippi. This... facility located on Bayou Casotte in Pascagoula, Mississippi. The launching of vessels from this...

  13. Lake Brownwood Modification Pecan Bayou Watershed, Colorado River Basin, Texas.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-09-01

    MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART DRAFT ENVIROWNTAL IMPACT STATEMENT LAKE OIOWNWOO 14DDI F ICAT I ON PECAN BAYOU WATERSHED COLORADO R IVER B3AS IN. TEXAS ...cT1 U.S. AW E?0tNEER OISTRICT. FOY WORK4 TEXA SWTM 1974 .81 309 007 .No SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE ("an Data Ent.,.d) READ...Pecan Bayou Watershed’, Eniomna YPEac OFREOT PRODCO!O2 Colorado River Basin, Texas . 0 P9RFORMING ORG .REPOR NUMBER- 1 7. AUTHOR(s) 8. CONTRACT OR

  14. Bioaccumulation of human pharmaceuticals in fish across habitats of a tidally influenced urban bayou.

    PubMed

    Du, Bowen; Haddad, Samuel P; Luek, Andreas; Scott, W Casan; Saari, Gavin N; Burket, S Rebekah; Breed, Christopher S; Kelly, Martin; Broach, Linda; Rasmussen, Joseph B; Chambliss, C Kevin; Brooks, Bryan W

    2016-04-01

    Though pharmaceuticals and other contaminants of emerging concern are increasingly observed in inland water bodies, the occurrence and bioaccumulation of pharmaceuticals in estuaries and coastal ecosystems are poorly understood. In the present study, bioaccumulation of select pharmaceuticals and other contaminants of emerging concern was examined in fish from Buffalo Bayou, a tidally influenced urban ecosystem that receives effluent from a major (∼200 million gallons per day) municipal wastewater treatment plant in Houston, Texas, USA. Using isotope dilution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, various target analytes were observed in effluent, surface water, and multiple fish species. The trophic position of each species was determined using stable isotope analysis. Fish tissue levels of diphenhydramine, which represented the only pharmaceutical detected in all fish species, did not significantly differ between freshwater and marine fish predominantly inhabiting benthic habitats; however, saltwater fish with pelagic habitat preferences significantly accumulated diphenhydramine to the highest levels observed in the present study. Consistent with previous observations from an effluent-dependent freshwater river, diphenhydramine did not display trophic magnification, which suggests site-specific, pH-influenced inhalational uptake to a greater extent than dietary exposure in this tidally influenced urban ecosystem. The findings highlight the importance of understanding differential bioaccumulation and risks of ionizable contaminants of emerging concern in habitats of urbanizing coastal systems. © 2015 SETAC.

  15. Freshwater Macroinvertebrates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nalepa, T. F.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of freshwater biology particularly freshwater macroinvertebrates and their effect on water pollution, covering publications of 1976-77. A list of 158 references is also presented. (HM)

  16. Freshwater Macroinvertebrates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nalepa, T. F.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of freshwater biology particularly freshwater macroinvertebrates and their effect on water pollution, covering publications of 1976-77. A list of 158 references is also presented. (HM)

  17. Watershed delineation and nitrogen source analysis for Bayou ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Nutrient pollution in stormwater runoff from urbanized areas contributes to water quality degradation in streams and receiving waterbodies. Agriculture, population growth, and industrial activities are significant sources of nitrogen inputs for surface waters. Increased nitrogen loading stimulates eutrophication through algal blooms, which leads to an overall decrease in drinking water and aquatic habitat quality. Bayou Chico, a highly urbanized watershed in the Pensacola Bay system in northwest Florida, is a nutrient-impaired waterbody under management to reduce bacteria and nutrient loadings, in accordance with the Florida Department of Environmental Protection’s (FDEP) Basin Management Action Plan. Best management practices and green infrastructure (GI) throughout Bayou Chico help reduce nitrogen inputs by retaining and filtering water. GI can function as a nitrogen sink by sorption or infiltration into soils, sequestration into plant material, and denitrification through microbial processes. However, a better understanding of the efficiency of these systems is needed to better inform management practices on future nitrogen reduction. This project will address two issues relating to the presence of nitrogen in the Bayou Chico watershed: 1) the identification of specific nitrogen sources within urbanized areas, and 2) the potential rates of nitrogen removal and sequestration from GI and nitrogen transport throughout the bayou. To accomplish these goals, nitr

  18. Time dependent behavior of cores from the Pleasant Bayou wells

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, T.W.; Jogi, P.N.; Gray, K.E.; Richardson, J.; Bebout, D.G.; Bachman, A.L.

    1981-01-01

    Results of constant-load creep tests on sands from the Pleasant Bayou wells are reported. Significant time dependent behavior under both hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic states of stress have been fit to linear rheological models. The data and models are reported.

  19. Regulatory effectiveness study for the Armand Bayou Coastal Preserve

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, G.; Windsor, D.

    1991-12-01

    The report contains a description and evaluation of essential regulatory activities governing Christmas Bay and its watershed. The report will be used in management planning for the preserve, and will also contribute to the baseline regulatory data for developing the Galveston Bay Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan. A companion report was prepared for the Armand Bayou Coastal Preserve.

  20. Supriya Jindal visits 2009 FIRST Robotics Bayou Regionals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Louisiana First Lady Supriya Jindal takes a turn at the operating controls for a competing robot during the 2009 FIRST Robotics Bayou Regionals tournament in New Orleans on March 19-21. Jindal was hosted during her visit by the NASA Education Office at the John C. Stennis Space Center, a primary sponsor and supporter of the annual robotics competition.

  1. Supriya Jindal visits 2009 FIRST Robotics Bayou Regionals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Louisiana First Lady Supriya Jindal takes a turn at the operating controls for a competing robot during the 2009 FIRST Robotics Bayou Regionals tournament in New Orleans on March 19-21. Jindal was hosted during her visit by the NASA Education Office at the John C. Stennis Space Center, a primary sponsor and supporter of the annual robotics competition.

  2. Streamflow, specific-conductance, and temperature data for Bayou and Little Bayou Creeks near Paducah, Kentucky, August 15 and 16, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Evaldi, R.D.; McClain, D.L.

    1989-12-31

    Discharge, temperature, and specific conductance measurements were made August 15 and 16, 1989, at 74 main channel sites and seven tributaries on Bayou and Little Bayou Creeks in the vicinity of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. These measurements were made during base flow conditions to provide data for analysis of the interaction of surface and ground water. The discharge of Bayou Creek was 0.30 cubic feet per second (ft{sup 3}/s) at the most upstream site, and 5.8 ft{sup 3}/s at the most downstream site. Total measured tributary inflow of Bayou Greek was 5.7 ft{sup 3}/s. Specific conductance values in the Bayou Creek watershed ranged from 208 to 489 microsiemens per centimeter ({mu}S/cm), and water temperature ranged from 20.0 to 32.6 degrees Celsius ({degrees}C). The discharge of Little Bayou Creek was 0.65 ft{sup 3}/s at the most upstream site, and 1.8 ft{sup 3}/s at the most downstream site. Total measured tributary inflow of Little Bayou Creek was 0.38 ft{sup 3}/s. Specific conductance values in the Little Bayou Creek watershed ranged from 211 to 272 {mu}S/cm, and water temperature ranged from 14.5 to 24.9{degrees}C.

  3. Streamflow, specific-conductance, and temperature data for Bayou and Little Bayou Creeks near Paducah, Kentucky, August 15 and 16, 1989

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evaldi, R.D.; McClain, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    Discharge, temperature, and specific conductance measurements were made August 15 and 16, 1989, at 74 main channel sites and seven flowing tributaries on Bayou and Little Bayou Creeks, Kentucky in the vicinity of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. These measurements were made during base flow conditions to provide data for analysis of the interaction of surface and groundwater. The discharge of Bayou Creek was 0.30 cfs at the most upstream site, and 5.8 cfs at the most downstream site. Total measured tributary inflow of Bayou Creek was 5.7 cfs. Specific conductance values in the Bayou Creek watershed ranged from 208 to 489 microsiemens/cm, and water temperature ranged from 20.0 to 32.6 C. The discharge of Little Bayou Creek was 0.65 cfs at the most upstream site, and 1.8 cfs at the most downstream site. Total measured tributary inflow of Little Bayou Creek was 0.38 cfs. Specific conductance values in the Little Bayou Creek watershed ranged from 211 to 272 microsiemens/cm, and water temperature ranged from 14.5 to 24.9 C. (USGS)

  4. Chemical and physical speciation of mercury in Offatts Bayou: A seasonally anoxic bayou in Galveston Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Seunghee; Lehman, Ronald D.; Choe, Key-Young; Gill, Gary A.

    2007-07-01

    A chemical equilibrium model was used to predict the solution speciation of dissolved mercury (Hg) in the stratified water column of Offatts Bayou, a subestuary in Galveston Bay, Texas, which undergoes seasonal anoxia in bottom waters. Chemical equilibrium modeling was conducted using conditional stability constants and concentrations of Hg-complexing organic ligands experimentally determined by competitive ligand equilibration methods. Dissolved Hg complexation was dominated by interactions with sulfide and dissolved organic matter (DOM) (HOHgHS0, HOHgHS(DOM), HgSHS2, and HgS 2{ 2 ) at all depths. Sulfide and glutathione competed for methylmercury (MeHg) complexation in oxic layers; in anoxic waters, sulfide complexation dominated MeHg speciation. The particle–water distribution coefficient (Kd) of Hg decreased in the anoxic layer of the water column, where the dissolved sulfide concentration increased, providing evidence that sulfide complexation influences the solubility of Hg. The solubility of MeHg was elevated in the anoxic as compared to the oxic layers, and this distributional feature was coincident with a change in the solution speciation of dissolved MeHg from glutathione/sulfide complexation in the oxic layers to a predominantly sulfide complexation in the anoxic layers. Maximum enrichment of Hg, MeHg, and iron (Fe) in suspended particulate matter was observed in the lower layer of the pycnocline, most likely resulting from formation of insoluble Fe oxide, which scavenged dissolved Hg sulfide and MeHg-sulfide species. The concomitant decrease in dissolved inorganic Hg, Fe, and sulfide in the anoxic layers is suggested to result from scavenging of inorganic Hg by FeS, which is in accordance with the Hg speciation model. Overall, Hg cycling in the water column of Offatts Bayou was associated with sulfide and DOM complexation, Fe dissolution/precipitation, water column production of MeHg, and/or efflux of MeHg from anoxic sediment.

  5. Microseismic monitoring of Chocolate Bayou Texas: the Pleasant Bayou No. 2 geopressured/geothermal energy test-well program. 1981 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Mauk, F.J.

    1982-01-01

    To investigate normal ambient seismicity as well as potentially enhanced seismic activity induced by brine production, a seismic monitoring program has been conducted in the vicinity of the Chocolate Bayou geopressured test well (the Pleasant Bayou No. 2) since September 1978. The Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well has been completed and perforated at depths of 14,467-14,707 feet (4464.4-4482.7m). The brines produced from the Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well are reinjected at a depth of 6226-6538 feet (1897.7-1992.8m) in the Pleasant Bayou No. 1 well. The seismic monitoring network and results obtained from January through November 1981 are described.

  6. Microseismic monitoring of Chocolate Bayou, Texas: The Pleasant Bayou no. 2 geopressured/geothermal energy test well program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauk, F. J.; Kimball, B.; Davis, R. A.

    The Brazoria seismic network, instrumentation, design, and specifications are described. The data analysis procedures are presented. Seismicity is described in relation to the Pleasant Bayou production history. Seismicity originating near the chemical plant east of the geopressured/geothermal well is discussed.

  7. Microseismic monitoring of Chocolate Bayou, Texas: the Pleasant Bayou No. 2 geopressured/geothermal energy test well program

    SciTech Connect

    Mauk, F.J.; Kimball, B.; Davis, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    The Brazoria seismic network, instrumentation, design, and specifications are described. The data analysis procedures are presented. Seismicity is described in relation to the Pleasant Bayou production history. Seismicity originating near the chemical plant east of the geopressured/geothermal well is discussed. (MHR)

  8. Archaeological Investigations at 3SF332: An Early Mississippian and Tenant Period Site on Cutoff Bayou, St. Francis County, Arkansas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    include Fifteenmile Bayou, Blackfish Bayou, and Cutoff Bayou, on which 3SF332 is located. SOILS The project area is situated on one of 10 major soil...on Big Creek (Dwyer 1978; LeeDecker 1979a; Klinger 1981, 1985; Klinger and Imhoff 1982; Kinger et al. 1983; McNeil 1984), Blackfish Bayou (LeeDecker...Memphis. Submitted to U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Memphis District, Memphis. Arkansas Archeological Survey AMASDA Project File No. 682. 1979b Blackfish

  9. 76 FR 28311 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Bayou Liberty, Mile 2.0, St. Tammany Parish, Slidell, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-17

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Bayou Liberty, Mile 2.0, St. Tammany... deviation from the regulation governing the operation of the S433 Bridge over Bayou Liberty, mile 2.0, St... Bayou Liberty at mile 2.0, in St. Tammany Parish. The vertical clearance is 7.59 feet (2.31m) above the...

  10. 75 FR 9404 - Turtle Bayou Gas Storage Company, LLC; Amended Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-02

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Turtle Bayou Gas Storage Company, LLC; Amended Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment for the Planned Turtle Bayou Natural Gas Storage Project and Request for... environmental assessment (EA) that will discuss the environmental impacts of the Turtle Bayou Natural...

  11. 33 CFR 334.760 - Naval Support Activity Panama City and Alligator Bayou, a tributary of St. Andrew Bay, Fla...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... City and Alligator Bayou, a tributary of St. Andrew Bay, Fla.; naval restricted area. 334.760 Section... Alligator Bayou, a tributary of St. Andrew Bay, Fla.; naval restricted area. (a) The area. The waters within... the south side of the entrance to Alligator Bayou; thence directly across the entrance to a point at...

  12. 33 CFR 334.760 - Naval Support Activity Panama City and Alligator Bayou, a tributary of St. Andrew Bay, Fla...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... City and Alligator Bayou, a tributary of St. Andrew Bay, Fla.; naval restricted area. 334.760 Section... Alligator Bayou, a tributary of St. Andrew Bay, Fla.; naval restricted area. (a) The area. The waters within... the south side of the entrance to Alligator Bayou; thence directly across the entrance to a point at...

  13. 33 CFR 334.760 - Naval Support Activity Panama City and Alligator Bayou, a tributary of St. Andrew Bay, Fla...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... City and Alligator Bayou, a tributary of St. Andrew Bay, Fla.; naval restricted area. 334.760 Section... Alligator Bayou, a tributary of St. Andrew Bay, Fla.; naval restricted area. (a) The area. The waters within... the south side of the entrance to Alligator Bayou; thence directly across the entrance to a point at...

  14. 33 CFR 334.760 - Naval Support Activity Panama City and Alligator Bayou, a tributary of St. Andrew Bay, Fla...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... City and Alligator Bayou, a tributary of St. Andrew Bay, Fla.; naval restricted area. 334.760 Section... Alligator Bayou, a tributary of St. Andrew Bay, Fla.; naval restricted area. (a) The area. The waters within... the south side of the entrance to Alligator Bayou; thence directly across the entrance to a point at...

  15. 33 CFR 334.760 - Naval Support Activity Panama City and Alligator Bayou, a tributary of St. Andrew Bay, Fla...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... City and Alligator Bayou, a tributary of St. Andrew Bay, Fla.; naval restricted area. 334.760 Section... Alligator Bayou, a tributary of St. Andrew Bay, Fla.; naval restricted area. (a) The area. The waters within... the south side of the entrance to Alligator Bayou; thence directly across the entrance to a point at...

  16. Testing of the Pleasant Bayou Well through October 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Mosca, V.L.; Anhaiser, J.L.

    1992-08-01

    Pleasant Bayou location was inactive from 1983 until the cleanout of the production and disposal wells in 1986. The surface facilities were rehabilitated and after shakedown of the system, additional repair of wellhead valves, and injection of an inhibitor pill, continuous long-term production was started in 1988. Over two years of production subsequent to that are reviewed here, including: production data, brine sampling and analysis, hydrocarbon sampling and analysis, solids sampling and analysis, scale control and corrosion monitoring and control.

  17. Brazoria County Re-Leveling Pleasant Bayou Geopressured Well Site

    SciTech Connect

    1984-07-01

    The purpose is to conduct first order leveling surveys as part of an ongoing environmental monitoring program for geopressured-geothermal test wells. The scope is to Conduct First Order, Class I, leveling to monitor subsidence of previously installed and leveled bench marks, established by the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) and Vernon F. Meyer and Associates, Inc., in the area of the Pleasant Bayou geopressured test well. All leveling surveys to conform to NGS standards and specifications.

  18. Pleasant Bayou Geopressured-Geothermal Reservoir Analysis - January 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Riney, T.D.

    1991-01-01

    Many sedimentary basins contain formations with pore fluids at pressures higher than hydrostatic value; these formations are called geopressured. The pore pressure is generally well in excess of hydrostatic and the fluids vary in scalinity, temperature, and dissolved methane. As part of its program to define the magnitude and recoverability of the geopressured-geothermal energy resource, the US Department of Energy has drilled and tested deep wells in geopressured formations in the Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coast region. Geological information for the Pleasant Bayou geopressured geothermal resource is most extensive among the reservoirs tested. Earlier testing of the DOE well (Pleasant Bayou Well No.2) was conducted in several phases during 1979-1983. Long-term testing was resumed in May 1988 and is currently in progress. This report summarizes the pertinent field and laboratory test data available through December 31, 1990. A numerical reservoir simulator is employed as a tool for synthesizing and integrating the reservoir information, formation rock and fluid properties data from laboratory tests, well data from the earlier testing (1979-1983), and the ongoing long-term production testing (1988-1990) of Pleasant Bayou Well No.2. A reservoir simulation model has been constructed which provides a detailed match to the well test history to date. This model is constructed within a geologic framework described by the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology and relies heavily on the pressure transient data from the 1980 Reservoir Limits Test in conjunction with the 1988-1990 production testing.

  19. Integrated Migratory Bird Planning in a Corps of Engineers' Irrigation Project, Bayou Meto, Arkansas

    Treesearch

    Allan J. Mueller; Hayley M. Dikeman; Thomas L. Edwards; Robert S. Holbrook; Karen L. Rowe

    2005-01-01

    The Bayou Meto Agricultural Irrigation Project, in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley, is currently being studied by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in eastern Arkansas. As part of the planning process the Arkansas Field Office of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission wrote a migratory bird management plan for the Bayou Meto...

  20. Navigation Simulation Study, Galveston Causeway, Chocolate Bayou, Texas City Wye, Intracoastal Waterway, Texas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-03-01

    Chocolate Bayou, and Texas City Wye was conducted. The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of proposed improvements on commercial tows navigating...the reaches. A numerical model of the existing channels at Galveston Causeway, Chocolate Bayou and Texas City Wye was developed. The model was

  1. 75 FR 71017 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Bayou Liberty, St. Tammany Parish, Slidell, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-22

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Bayou Liberty, St. Tammany Parish... regulation governing the operation of the S433 bridge over Bayou Liberty, mile 2.0, St. Tammany Parish... of this notice. Basis and Purpose The subject bridge is the S443 Swing Bridge across the...

  2. Freshwater Wetlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Provides descriptions about freshwater wetlands, such as marshes, swamps, and bogs. Contains three learning activities which deal with unusual wetland plants, the animals and plants in a typical marsh, and the effects of a draught on a swamp. Included are reproducible handouts and worksheets for two of the activities. (TW)

  3. Freshwater Wetlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Provides descriptions about freshwater wetlands, such as marshes, swamps, and bogs. Contains three learning activities which deal with unusual wetland plants, the animals and plants in a typical marsh, and the effects of a draught on a swamp. Included are reproducible handouts and worksheets for two of the activities. (TW)

  4. Bioavailability Assessment of a Contaminated Field Sediemtn from Patrick Bayou, Texas: TIE and Equilibrium Partitioning

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contaminated sediments are commonly found in urbanized harbors. Remediation is often necessary and diagnosing the cause of sediment toxicity becomes imperative. In the present study, sediments from Patrick Bayou, Texas were subjected to initial toxicity testing. All sediments ...

  5. Bayou Interfaith Shared Community Organizing (BISCO) Receives Gulf Guardian Award for Environmental Justice

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (July 30, 2015) The Gulf of Mexico Program recently announced Bayou Interfaith Shared Community Organizing, Inc, (BISCO) will receive a First Place Gulf Guardian Award in the Environmental Justice Category. The awards ceremony will be held

  6. Bioavailability Assessment of a Contaminated Field Sediemtn from Patrick Bayou, Texas: TIE and Equilibrium Partitioning

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contaminated sediments are commonly found in urbanized harbors. Remediation is often necessary and diagnosing the cause of sediment toxicity becomes imperative. In the present study, sediments from Patrick Bayou, Texas were subjected to initial toxicity testing. All sediments ...

  7. Bayou virus-associated hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in Eastern Texas: identification of the rice rat, Oryzomys palustris, as reservoir host.

    PubMed Central

    Torrez-Martinez, N.; Bharadwaj, M.; Goade, D.; Delury, J.; Moran, P.; Hicks, B.; Nix, B.; Davis, J. L.; Hjelle, B.

    1998-01-01

    We describe the third known case of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) due to Bayou virus, from Jefferson County, Texas. By using molecular epidemiologic methods, we show that rice rats (Oryzomys palustris) are frequently infected with Bayou virus and that viral RNA sequences from HPS patients are similar to those from nearby rice rats. Bayou virus is associated with O. palustris; this rodent appears to be its predominant reservoir host. PMID:9452404

  8. Interpretation of remote sensing data in the Bayou Lafourche Delta of south Louisiana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehurst, C. A.

    1975-01-01

    Initial efforts were directed toward a comprehensive ground truth program for the Bayou Lafourche Delta. The impact of transportation systems on the marsh environment, impounded marsh areas, proposed jetty systems at Belle Pass, Louisiana, and erosion and sediment transport in the southwestern canal, Lafourche Parish, Louisiana are studied. The use of color IR imagery for a vegetation study of spoil banks in the Bayou Lafourche Region is also discussed.

  9. Features of Bayou Choctaw SPR caverns and internal structure of the salt dome.

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, Darrell E.

    2007-07-01

    The intent of this study is to examine the internal structure of the Bayou Choctaw salt dome utilizing the information obtained from graphical representations of sonar survey data of the internal cavern surfaces. Many of the Bayou Choctaw caverns have been abandoned. Some existing caverns were purchased by the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) program and have rather convoluted histories and complex cavern geometries. In fact, these caverns are typically poorly documented and are not particularly constructive to this study. Only two Bayou Choctaw caverns, 101 and 102, which were constructed using well-controlled solutioning methods, are well documented. One of these was constructed by the SPR for their use while the other was constructed and traded for another existing cavern. Consequently, compared to the SPR caverns of the West Hackberry and Big Hill domes, it is more difficult to obtain a general impression of the stratigraphy of the dome. Indeed, caverns of Bayou Choctaw show features significantly different than those encountered in the other two SPR facilities. In the number of abandoned caverns, and some of those existing caverns purchased by the SPR, extremely irregular solutioning has occurred. The two SPR constructed caverns suggest that some sections of the caverns may have undergone very regular solutioning to form uniform cylindrical shapes. Although it is not usually productive to speculate, some suggestions that point to the behavior of the Bayou Choctaw dome are examined. Also the primary differences in the Bayou Choctaw dome and the other SPR domes are noted.

  10. Bubbles, Bubbles, Tremors & Trouble: The Bayou Corne Sinkhole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunn, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    In May 2012, thermogenic methane bubbles were first observed in Bayou Corne in Assumption Parish, Louisiana. As of July 2013, ninety one bubbling sites have been identified. Gas was also found in the top of the Mississippi River Alluvial Aquifer (MRAA) about 125 ft below the surface. Vent wells drilled into the MRAA have flared more 16 million SCF of gas. Trace amounts of hydrogen sulfide also have been detected. Bayou Corne flows above the Napoleonville salt dome which has been an active area for oil and gas exploration since the 1920s. The dome is also a site of dissolution salt mining which has produced large caverns with diameters of up to 300 ft and heights of 2000 ft. Some caverns are used for storage of natural gas. Microseismic activity was confirmed by an Earthscope seismic station in White Castle, LA in July 2012. An array of microseismic stations set up in the area recorded more than 60 microseismic events in late July and early August, 2012. These microseismic events were located on the western side of the dome. Estimated focal depths are just above the top of salt. In August 2012, a sinkhole developed overnight just to the northwest of a plugged and abandoned brine filled cavern (see figure below). The sinkhole continues to grow in area to more than 20 acres and has consumed a pipeline right of way. The sinkhole is more than 750 ft deep at its center. Microseismic activity was reduced for several months following the formation of the sinkhole. Microseismic events have reoccurred episodically since then with periods of frequent events preceding slumping of material into the sinkhole or a 'burp' where fluid levels in the sinkhole drop and then rebound followed by a decrease in microseismic activity. Some gas and/or oil may appear at the surface of the sinkhole following a 'burp'. Very long period events also have been observed which are believed to be related to subsurface fluid movement. A relief well drilled into the abandoned brine cavern found that

  11. 76 FR 45421 - Safety Zone; Houma Navigation Canal, From Waterway Mile Markers 19.0 to 20.0, Southwest of Bayou...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-29

    ... Markers 19.0 to 20.0, Southwest of Bayou Plat, Bank to Bank, Terrebonne Parish, LA AGENCY: Coast Guard... the Houma Navigation Canal, from Waterway Mile Markers 19.0 to 20.0, Southwest of Bayou Plat, bank to.../Barriers in the Houma Navigation Canal, from Waterway Mile Markers 19.0 to 20.0, southwest of Bayou Plat...

  12. 33 CFR 165.T11-0523 - Safety Zone; Houma Navigation Canal, From Waterway Mile Markers 19.0 to 20.0, Southwest of Bayou...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Canal, From Waterway Mile Markers 19.0 to 20.0, Southwest of Bayou Plat, Bank to Bank, Terrebonne Parish... Bayou Plat, Bank to Bank, Terrebonne Parish, LA. (a) Location. Houma Navigation Canal, from Waterway Mile Markers 19.0 to 20.0, Southwest of Bayou Plat, bank to bank, Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana....

  13. Compaction measurements on cores from the Pleasant Bayou wells

    SciTech Connect

    Jogi, P.N.; Gray, K.E.; Ashman, T.R.; Thompson, T.W.; Bebout, D.G.; Bachman, A.L.

    1981-01-01

    Additional measurements of compressibility, compaction coefficients, porosities, permeabilities, and resistivities have been conducted on cores from Pleasant Bayou wells No. 1 and No. 2. All rock parameters show non-linear behavior with changing reservoir or pore pressure, which is of interest in modelling reservoir performance and subsidence. Compressibilities and uniaxial compaction coefficients decline by a factor of 2 to 3 as reservoir pressure declines from geopressured to normal hydrostatic conditions. Porosity reductions are 6 to 8% while permeability reductions are on the order of 10 to 30% over that reservoir pressure range. Measured formation factors were 2 to 4 times log derived values for F. Matrix compressibilities were not insignificant relative to bulk compressibilities.

  14. Three dimensional simulation for bayou choctaw strategic petroleum reserve (SPR).

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Park, Byoung Yoon; Lee, Moo Yul

    2006-12-01

    Three dimensional finite element analyses were performed to evaluate the structural integrity of the caverns located at the Bayou Choctaw (BC) site which is considered a candidate for expansion. Fifteen active and nine abandoned caverns exist at BC, with a total cavern volume of some 164 MMB. A 3D model allowing control of each cavern individually was constructed because the location and depth of caverns and the date of excavation are irregular. The total cavern volume has practical interest, as this void space affects total creep closure in the BC salt mass. Operations including both cavern workover, where wellhead pressures are temporarily reduced to atmospheric, and cavern enlargement due to leaching during oil drawdowns that use water to displace the oil from the caverns, were modeled to account for as many as the five future oil drawdowns in the six SPR caverns. The impacts on cavern stability, underground creep closure, surface subsidence, infrastructure, and well integrity were quantified.

  15. Davis Pond Freshwater Prediversion Biomonitoring Study: Freshwater Fisheries and Eagles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenkins, Jill A.; Bourgeois, E. Beth; Jeske, Clint W.

    2008-01-01

    In January 2001, the construction of the Davis Pond freshwater diversion structure was completed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The diversion of freshwater from the Mississippi River is intended to mitigate saltwater intrusion from the Gulf of Mexico and to lessen the concomitant loss of wetland areas. In addition to the freshwater inflow, Barataria Bay basin would receive nutrients, increased flows of sediments, and water-borne and sediment-bound compounds. The purpose of this biomonitoring study was, therefore, to serve as a baseline for prediversion concentrations of selected contaminants in bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) nestlings (hereafter referred to as eaglets), representative freshwater fish, and bivalves. Samples were collected from January through June 2001. Two similarly designed postdiversion studies, as described in the biological monitoring program, are planned. Active bald eagle nests targeted for sampling eaglet blood (n = 6) were generally located southwest and south of the diversion structure. The designated sites for aquatic animal sampling were at Lake Salvador, at Lake Cataouatche, at Bayou Couba, and along the Mississippi River. Aquatic animals representative of eagle prey were collected. Fish were from three different trophic levels and have varying feeding strategies and life histories. These included herbivorous striped mullet (Mugil cephalus), omnivorous blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus), and carnivorous largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Three individuals per species were collected at each of the four sampling sites. Freshwater Atlantic rangia clams (Rangia cuneata) were collected at the downstream marsh sites, and zebra mussels (Dreissena spp.) were collected on the Mississippi River. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Biomonitoring of Environmental Status and Trends (BEST) protocols served as guides for fish sampling and health assessments. Fish are useful for monitoring aquatic ecosystems because they accumulate

  16. 77 FR 23118 - Annual Marine Events in the Eighth Coast Guard District, Blessing of the Fleet; Bayou La Batre...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-18

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 Annual Marine Events in the Eighth Coast Guard District, Blessing of the Fleet; Bayou La Batre; Bayou La Batre, AL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement of regulation. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard will enforce Special Local Regulations for the Blessing of...

  17. 76 FR 79145 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Bayou Liberty, Mile 2.0, St. Tammany Parish, Slidell, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ....0, St. Tammany Parish, Slidell, LA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Proposed rule; withdrawal... operation of the SR 433 Bridge over Bayou Liberty, mile 2.0, St. Tammany Parish, Slidell, LA. The Louisiana... Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) entitled ``Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Bayou Liberty, mile 2.0...

  18. 75 FR 71061 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Bayou Liberty, Mile 2.0, St. Tammany Parish, Slidell, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-22

    ....0, St. Tammany Parish, Slidell, LA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking... the regulation governing the operation of the S433 bridge over Bayou Liberty, mile 2.0, St. Tammany... of the S433 bridge over Bayou Liberty, mile 2.0, St. Tammany Parish, Slidell, LA. This change would...

  19. Water-quality, stream-habitat, and biological data for West Fork Double Bayou, Cotton Bayou, and Hackberry Gully, Chambers County, Texas, 2006-07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Dexter W.; Turco, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Houston-Galveston Area Council and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, collected water-quality, stream-habitat, and biological data from two sites at West Fork Double Bayou, two sites at Cotton Bayou, and one site at Hackberry Gully in Chambers County, Texas, during July 2006-August 2007. Water-quality data-collection surveys consisted of synoptic 24-hour continuous measurements of water temperature, pH, specific conductance, and dissolved oxygen at the five sites and periodically collected samples at four sites analyzed for several properties and constituents of interest. Stream-habitat data were collected at each of four sites three times during the study. At each site, a representative stream reach was selected and within this reach, five evenly spaced stream transects were determined. At each transect, stream attributes (wetted channel width, water depth, bottom material, instream cover) and riparian attributes (bank slope and erosion potential, width of natural vegetation, type of vegetation, percentage tree canopy) were measured. Benthic macroinvertebrate and fish data were collected from the same reaches identified for habitat evaluation. A total of 2,572 macroinvertebrate individuals were identified from the four reaches; insect taxa were more abundant than non-insect taxa at all reaches. A total of 1,082 fish, representing 30 species and 13 families, were collected across all reaches. Stream-habitat and aquatic biota (benthic macroinvertebrates and fish) were assessed at the four sites to evaluate aquatic life use. Habitat quality index scores generally indicated 'intermediate' aquatic life use at most reaches. Benthic macroinvertebrate metrics scores indicated generally 'intermediate' aquatic life use for the West Fork Double Bayou reaches and generally 'high' aquatic life use for the Cotton Bayou and Hackberry Gully reaches. Index of biotic integrity scores for fish indicated generally

  20. Water quality in the Dickinson Bayou watershed (Texas, Gulf of Mexico) and health issues.

    PubMed

    Quigg, Antonietta; Broach, Linda; Denton, Winston; Miranda, Roger

    2009-06-01

    The Dickinson Bayou watershed (near Houston, Texas, Gulf of Mexico) provides habitat for numerous coastally influenced communities of wildlife, including scores of birds and fish. Encroaching development and impervious surfaces are altering the habitat and degrading water quality. Herein we have defined the current health of the bayou using water quality data collected between 2000 and 2006. Elevated bacteria (fecal coliform, Escherichia coli and Enterococcus) and depressed dissolved oxygen concentrations (often <3mgl(-1)) are the two major impairments to this ecosystem. While nutrient ratios indicate primary productivity may be nitrogen limited, concerns of eutrophication persist because the bayou has a low intrinsic flushing rate. Consistent with this is the magnitude of algal blooms (ca. 100microg chll(-1)) which often occur in spring/summer. The findings of this study will assist with the understanding of the influence of urban development on small watersheds.

  1. Time of travel of solutes in Buffalo Bayou and selected tributaries, Houston, Texas, August 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    East, Jeffery W.; Schaer, Jasper D.

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, conducted a time-of-travel study in the Buffalo Bayou watershed during low flow in August 1999. The study was done as part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Environmental Monitoring for Public Access and Community Tracking (EMPACT) program. The EMPACT program was designed for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to work with communities to “make timely, accurate, and understandable environmental information available to millions of people in the largest metropolitan areas across the country.” (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2000). Buffalo Bayou, located in Houston, Texas, was chosen as a pilot project because it is a frequently used recreational water source, it has many water-treatment facilities located along its stream segments, and it has a history of water-quality problems (Houston-Galveston Area Council, 2000). One component of the pilot project is to develop a water-quality simulation model that can be used to assess the effects of noncompliance events on Buffalo Bayou. Because accurate estimates of time of travel during low flow are required to develop the model, the time of travel of solutes in Buffalo Bayou and selected tributaries was determined using dye tracing methods. The study was conducted during low flow in a 38.7-mile reach of Buffalo Bayou, a 9.6-mile reach of Whiteoak Bayou, a 5.9-mile reach of Mason Creek, and a 6.6-mile reach of Bear Creek. Efforts to determine the time of travel in a 7.5-mile reach of Horsepen Creek were unsuccessful. This report explains the approach used to conduct the study and presents the results of the study

  2. Assessing the condition of bayous and estuaries: Bayou Chico Gulf of Mexico demonstration study

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, K.; Acevedo, M.; Waller, T.; Kennedy, J.; Simons, J.; Mayer, F.; Lewis, M.; Walker, W.; Ammann, L.

    1995-12-31

    A demonstration study was conducted in May 1994 on Bayou Chico to assess the utility of various assessment and measurement endpoints in determining the condition of bayous and estuaries. Bayou Chico has water quality problems attributed to its low flushing rate and urban/industrial land use in its watershed. The sampling scheme assessed the within-sampling station and spatial variability of measurement endpoints. Fourteen sampling stations in Bayou Chico and 3 stations in Pensacola Bay were selected based on an intensified EMAP sampling grid. Time and space coordinated sampling was conducted for: sediment contaminants and properties, sediment toxicity, water quality, benthic infauna, zooplankton and phytoplankton populations. Fish and crabs were also collected and analyzed for a suite of biomarkers and organic chemical residues. Primary productivity was measured via the light bottle dark bottle oxygen method and via diurnal oxygen measurements made with continuous recording data sondes. Stream sites were evaluated for water and sediment quality, water and sediment toxicity, benthic invertebrates and fish. Watershed analyses included assessment of land use/landcover (via SPOT and TM images), soils, pollution sources (point and non-point) and hydrography. These data were coordinated via an Arc/Info GIS system for display and spatial analysis. 1994 survey data were used to parameterize environmental fate models such as SWMM (Storm Water Management Model), DYNHYD5 (WASP5 hydrodynamics model) and WASP5 (Water Quality Analysis Simulation Program) to make predictions about the dynamics and fate of chemical contaminants in Bayou Chico. This paper will present an overview, and report on the results in regards to within-site and spatial variability in Bayou Chico. Conclusions on the efficacy of the assessment and measurement endpoints in evaluating the condition (health) of Bayou Chico will be presented.

  3. Bayou Choctaw Caverns 15 and 17 web analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, B.

    1993-01-01

    The relatively thin web of salt that separates Bayou Choctaw Caverns 15 and 17 was evaluated using the finite-element method. The stability calculations provided insight as to whether or not any operationrestrictions or recommendations are necessary. Because of the uncertainty in the exact dimensions of the salt web, various web thicknesses were examined under different operating scenarios that included individual cavern workovers and drawdowns. Cavern workovers were defined by a sudden drop in the oil side pressure at the wellhead to atmospheric. Workovers represent periods of low cavern pressure. Cavern drawdowns were simulated by enlargening the cavern diameters, thus decreasing the thickness of the web. The calculations predict that Cavern 15 dominates the behavior of the web because of its larger diameter. Thus, giventhe choice of caverns, Cavern 17 should be used for oil withdrawal in order to minimize the adverse impacts on web resulting from pressure drops or cavern enlargement. From a stability point of view, maintaining normal pressures in Cavern 15 was found to be more important than operating the caverns as a gallery where both caverns are maintained at the same pressure. However, during a workover, it may be prudent to operate the caverns under similar pressures to avoid the possibility of a sudden pressure surge at the wellhead should the web fail.

  4. Public health assessment for Bayou Bonfouca, Slidell, St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana, Region 6. Cerclis No. LAD980745632. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-06

    The Bayou Bonfouca site, located in Slidell, Louisiana, is an abandoned creosote wood treating facility formerly called the American Creosote Works plant. Contamination of soils, sediments, surface water, groundwater, and the biota of the bayou has resulted from past operating methods and/or disposal practices. The main contaminants of concern are the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's) that compose creosote. Based on available data, the Bayou Bonfouca site is categorized as a public health hazard because of extensive soil, sediment, biota, surface water and groundwater contamination.

  5. Role of pressure, temperature, salinity, lithology, and structure in hydrocarbon accumulation in Constance Bayou, Deep Lake, and southeast Little Pecan Lake Fields, Cameron Parish, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, F.W. III

    1980-01-01

    Pressure, temperature, salinity, lithology, and structural studies indicate that hydrocarbons in Deep Lake, Constance Bayou, and Little Pecan Lake Fields, were generated in the shale beds of the hard geopressured zone and migrated upward along major growth faults. The hydrocarbons were originally dissolved in hot fresh pore water and came out of solution in the overlying low temperature and pressure zones, accumulating in the sand beds of the first structural traps encountered. By examining regional cross sections and anomaly maps, fluid escape routes taken by the hot pore water containing dissolved hydrocarbons can be identified. Areas below which a vertical flush of hot fresh pore water from the hard geopressured zone has occurred have 3 identifying characteristics: low fluid pressures, high formation water salinity values, and presence of residual high pressure areas. These areas are considered to be highly prospective places to search for hydrocarbon accumulations.

  6. THE EFFECT OF PRECIPITATION ON ORGANIC CARBON COMPONENTS IN BAYOU TEXAR, FLORIDA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examined the relationship between precipitation and organic carbon in Bayou Texar, part of Florida's Pensacola Bay system in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Weekly samples were collected from five stations between March to June, 1999. Additionally, samples were taken befo...

  7. 33 CFR 207.185 - Taylors Bayou, Tex., Beaumont Navigation District Lock; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Taylors Bayou, Tex., Beaumont Navigation District Lock; use, administration, and navigation. 207.185 Section 207.185 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION...

  8. 33 CFR 207.185 - Taylors Bayou, Tex., Beaumont Navigation District Lock; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Taylors Bayou, Tex., Beaumont Navigation District Lock; use, administration, and navigation. 207.185 Section 207.185 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION...

  9. Allegations of diversion and substitution of crude oil. Bayou Choctaw Storage Site, Strategic Petroleum Reserve

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-03-30

    Investigation did not substantiate allegations that crude oil destined for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve storage site at Bayou Choctaw was diverted to private use and some other material substituted in its place. However, recommendations are made for handling intermediate transport and storage systems for crude oil to tighten security aspects. (PSB)

  10. Contaminant exposure of barn swallows nesting on Bayou d'Inde, Calcasieu Estuary, Louisiana, USA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Custer, Christine M.; Goatcher, B.L.; Melancon, M.J.; Matson, C.W.; Bickham, J.W.

    2006-01-01

    Current and historical point source discharges, storm water runoff, and accidental spills have contaminated the water, sediment, and biota within the Calcasieu Estuary in southwestern Louisiana. In 2003, barn swallow (Hirundo rustica) eggs and nestlings were collected beneath two bridges that cross Bayou d'Inde, the most contaminated waterway within the Calcasieu Estuary. Samples were also collected from a bridge over Bayou Teche, a reference site in south central Louisiana. Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations in barn swallow eggs and nestlings were significantly higher at the downstream site on Bayou d'Inde (2.8 micro g/g PCBs in eggs and 1.5 micro g/g PCBs in nestlings) than at the other two sites (< 0.2 micro g/g PCBs in eggs and nestlings at both sites). Ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase activity in nestling livers was significantly higher at the downstream site on Bayou d'Inde (50 pmol/min/mg) compared to the other two locations (24 pmol/min/mg, each), probably because of exposure to PCBs. Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and polychlorinated dibenzofuran concentrations in eggs and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in nestlings were at background concentrations at all sites. Trace element concentrations in barn swallow eggs and nestling livers were at background levels and did not differ among the three sites. A biomarker of DNA damage did not differ among sites.

  11. Contaminant exposure of barn swallows nesting on Bayou d'Inde, Calcasieu Estuary, Louisiana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Custer, Christine M.; Goatcher, B.L.; Melancon, M.J.; Matson, C.W.; Bickham, J.W.

    2006-01-01

    Current and historical point source discharges, storm water runoff, and accidental spills have contaminated the water, sediment, and biota within the Calcasieu Estuary in southwestern Louisiana. In 2003, barn swallow (Hirundo rustica) eggs and nestlings were collected beneath two bridges that cross Bayou d'Inde, the most contaminated waterway within the Calcasieu Estuary. Samples were also collected from a bridge over Bayou Teche, a reference site in south central Louisiana. Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations in barn swallow eggs and nestlings were significantly higher at the downstream site on Bayou d'Inde (2.8 mu g/g PCBs in eggs and 1.5 mu g/g PCBs in nestlings) than at the other two sites (< 0.2 mu g/g PCBs in eggs and nestlings at both sites). Ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase activity in nestling livers was significantly higher at the downstream site on Bayou d'Inde (50 pmol/min/mg) compared to the other two locations (24 pmol/min/mg, each), probably because of exposure to PCBs. Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and polychlorinated dibenzofuran concentrations in eggs and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in nestlings were at background concentrations at all sites. Trace element concentrations in barn swallow eggs and nestling livers were at background levels and did not differ among the three sites. A biomarker of DNA damage did not differ among sites.

  12. 33 CFR 207.185 - Taylors Bayou, Tex., Beaumont Navigation District Lock; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Taylors Bayou, Tex., Beaumont Navigation District Lock; use, administration, and navigation. 207.185 Section 207.185 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS...

  13. 33 CFR 207.185 - Taylors Bayou, Tex., Beaumont Navigation District Lock; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Taylors Bayou, Tex., Beaumont Navigation District Lock; use, administration, and navigation. 207.185 Section 207.185 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS...

  14. 33 CFR 207.185 - Taylors Bayou, Tex., Beaumont Navigation District Lock; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Taylors Bayou, Tex., Beaumont Navigation District Lock; use, administration, and navigation. 207.185 Section 207.185 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS...

  15. Freshwater Fish Communities

    EPA Science Inventory

    Freshwater fish are ecologically important in stream ecosystems, and they provide people with significant food, recreation, and conservation value as biological indicator of freshwater streams. Historically, the streams and rivers of southern New England supported moderately dive...

  16. 3-D seismic results in the discovery of significant reserves bypassed for 55 years in the Chocolate Bayou Field

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, A.; Plant, C.; Davis, C.

    1994-12-31

    The Chocolate Bayou Field is located 25 miles south of Houston, in Southeast Brazoria County, Texas. Discovered in 1938, the field has produced over 2 trillion cubic feet of natural gas and 65 million barrels of oil from approximately 30 sands and 300 wellbores. The majority of the production is from the sands of the upper and middle Frio (Oligocene) section. Accumulation is found on structural highs on both the downthrown and upthrown side of a major basinward growth fault. A 3-D seismic survey was conducted over the field in 1988 in an effort to locate bypassed reserves. Interpretation of the data revealed and unexpected paleo structure associated with a buried and previously undetected counter-regional fault located almost 3 miles south of the structural crest at the Upper Frio level. Detailed structural and isochron mapping with adequate depth conversions indicated that the structure was prospective for trapping of the Lower Frio Sand which were well developed but wet under the Upper Frio structural crest. Although the feature was located on the absolute edge of the survey, the data were adequate to locate two wells which have now been completed in the Lower Frio (RA{sub 4}) section. The sands ranged in thickness from 65 to 115 feet of net pay with porosities from 27 to 30% with sustained production rates in excess of 10,000 million cubic feet of gas and 140 barrels of oil per day per completion.

  17. Late Holocene Hurricane Activity in the Gulf of Mexico from a Bayou Sediment Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodysill, J. R.; Donnelly, J. P.; Toomey, M.; Sullivan, R.; MacDonald, D.; Evans, R. L.; Ashton, A. D.

    2012-12-01

    Hurricanes pose a considerable threat to coastal communities along the Atlantic seaboard and in the Gulf of Mexico. The complex role of ocean and atmospheric dynamics in controlling storm frequency and intensity, and how these relationships could be affected by climate change, remains uncertain. To better predict how storms will impact coastal communities, it is vital to constrain their past behavior, in particular how storm frequency and intensity and the pattern of storm tracks have been influenced by past climate conditions. In an effort to characterize past storm behavior, our work contributes to the growing network of storm records along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts by reconstructing storm-induced deposits in the northern Gulf of Mexico during the Late Holocene. Previous work on the northern Gulf coast has shown considerable centennial-scale variability in the occurrence of intense hurricanes, much like the northern Atlantic coast and in the Caribbean Sea. The timing of active and quiet intervals during the last 1000 years amongst the Gulf Coast records appears to be anti-phased with stormy intervals along the North American east coast. The sparse spatial coverage of the existing intense hurricane reconstructions provides a limited view of the natural variability of intense hurricanes. A new, high resolution reconstruction of storms along the northern Gulf Coast would be beneficial in assembling the picture of the patterns of storminess during the Late Holocene. Our study site, Basin Bayou, is situated on the north side of Choctawhatchee Bay in northwest Florida. From 1851 to 2011, 68 storms have struck the coast within 75 miles of Basin Bayou, of which 10 were Category 3 or greater, making it a prime location to reconstruct intense hurricanes. Basin Bayou openly exchanges water with Choctawhatchee Bay through a narrow channel, which acts as a conduit for propagating storm surges, and potentially coarse-grained bay sediments, into the bayou. Our record is

  18. Nutrient and sediment concentrations and loads in the Steele Bayou Basin, northwestern Mississippi, 2010–14

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hicks, Matthew B.; Murphy, Jennifer C.; Stocks, Shane J.

    2017-06-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-Vicksburg District, monitored streamflow, water quality, and sediment at two stations on the Steele Bayou in northwestern Mississippi from October 2010 through September 2014 to characterize nutrient and sediment concentrations and loads in areas where substantial implementation of conservation efforts have been implemented. The motivation for this effort was to quantify improvements, or lack thereof, in water quality in the Steele Bayou watershed as a result of implementing large- and small-scale best-management practices aimed at reducing nutrient and sediment concentrations and loads. The results of this study document the hydrologic, water-quality, and sedimentation status of these basins following over two decades of ongoing implementation of conservation practices.Results from this study indicate the two Steele Bayou stations have comparable loads and yields of total nitrogen, phosphorus, and suspended sediment when compared to other agricultural basins in the southeastern and central United States. However, nitrate plus nitrite yields from basins in the Mississippi River alluvial plain, including the Steele Bayou Basin, are generally lower than other agricultural basins in the southeastern and central United States.Seasonal variation in nutrient and sediment loads was observed at both stations and for most constituents. About 50 percent of the total annual nutrient and sediment load was observed during the spring (February through May) and between 25 and 50 percent was observed during late fall and winter (October through January). These seasonal patterns probably reflect a combination of seasonal patterns in precipitation, runoff, streamflow, and in the timing of fertilizer application.Median concentrations of total nitrogen, nitrate plus nitrite, total phosphorus, orthophosphate, and suspended sediment were slightly higher at the upstream station, Steele Bayou near Glen Allan

  19. Microseismic monitoring of Chocolate Bayou, Texas. The Pleasant Bayou No. 2 geopressured/geothermal energy test-well program. 1982 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Mauk, F.J.; Davis, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    To investigate the seismic risks associated with geopressured fluid production from the Pleasant Bayou No. 2 design well a seismic monitoring program was conducted in the vicinity of the Brazoria County design wells since 1979. The monitoring program was designed first to establish the nature of the local ambient seismicity prior to production, and second to provide continued surveillance of the area during the well tests to determine if production altered ambient seismic conditions significantly. The operation, data analyses, results and conclusions of the Brazoria seismic network during the operational period from 1 January through 31 December 1982 are described.

  20. Influence of water allocation and freshwater inflow on oyster production: a hydrodynamic-oyster population model for Galveston Bay, Texas, USA.

    PubMed

    Powell, Eric N; Klinck, John M; Hofmann, Eileen E; McManus, Margaret A

    2003-01-01

    A hydrodynamic-oyster population model was developed to assess the effect of changes in freshwater inflow on oyster populations in Galveston Bay, Texas, USA. The population model includes the effects of environmental conditions, predators, and the oyster parasite, Perkinsus marinus, on oyster populations. The hydrodynamic model includes the effects of wind stress, river runoff, tides, and oceanic exchange on the circulation of the bay. Simulations were run for low, mean, and high freshwater inflow conditions under the present (1993) hydrology and predicted hydrologies for 2024 and 2049 that include both changes in total freshwater inflow and diversions of freshwater from one primary drainage basin to another. Freshwater diversion to supply the Houston metropolitan area is predicted to negatively impact oyster production in Galveston Bay. Fecundity and larval survivorship both decline. Mortality from Perkinsus marinus increases, but to a lesser extent. A larger negative impact in 2049 relative to 2024 originates from the larger drop in fecundity under that hydrology. Changes in recruitment and mortality, resulting in lowered oyster abundance, occur because the bay volume available for mixing freshwater input from the San Jacinto and Buffalo Bayou drainage basins that drain metropolitan Houston is small in comparison to the volume of Trinity Bay that presently receives the bulk of the bay's freshwater inflow. A smaller volume for mixing results in salinities that decline more rapidly and to a greater extent under conditions of high freshwater discharge.Thus, the decline in oyster abundance results from a disequilibrium between geography and salinity brought about by freshwater diversion. Although the bay hydrology shifts, available hard substrate does not. The simulations stress the fact that it is not just the well-appreciated reduction in freshwater inflow that can result in decreased oyster production. Changing the location of freshwater inflow can also

  1. Evaluation of Magnetic Anomalies Located in Lower Bayou Teche, St. Mary Parish, Louisiana

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-01

    archeological resources (Figure 1; Goodwin, Hinks et al. 1990). The riverine survey of Bayou Teche utilized a Geometrics 806 proton precession ...Geometrics 806 proton procession magnetometer and a Linseis analog recorder; a Loran-C receiver was used to record the location of each of the identified...included relocation of each anomaly with a magnetometer : informal magnetic and fathometer survey of each anomaly and its vicinity, physical search of

  2. The Impact of Rainfall on Fecal Coliform Bacteria in Bayou Dorcheat (North Louisiana)

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Dagne D.; Owens, William E.; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2006-01-01

    Fecal coliform bacteria are the most common pollutant in rivers and streams. In Louisiana, it has been reported that 37% of surveyed river miles, 31% of lakes, and 23% of estuarine water had some level of contamination. The objective of this research was to assess the effect of surface runoff amounts and rainfall amount parameters on fecal coliform bacterial densities in Bayou Dorcheat in Louisiana. Bayou Dorcheat has been designated by the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality as a waterway that has uses such as primary contact recreation, secondary contact recreation, propagation of fish and wildlife, agriculture and as being an outstanding natural resource water. Samples from Bayou Dorcheat were collected monthly and analyzed for the presence of fecal coliforms. Fecal coliforms isolated from these samples were identified to the species level. The analysis of the bacterial levels was performed following standard test protocols as described in Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater. Information regarding the rainfall amounts and surface runoff amounts for the selected years was retrieved from the Louisiana Office of State Climatology. It was found that a significant increase in the fecal coliform numbers may be associated with average rainfall amounts. Possible sources of elevated coliform counts could include sewage discharges from municipal treatment plants and septic tanks, storm water overflows, and runoff from pastures and range lands. It can be concluded that non-point source pollution that is carried by surface runoff has a significant effect on bacterial levels in water resources. PMID:16823083

  3. Conversion of the Bayou Choctaw geological site characterization report to a three-dimensional model.

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, Joshua S.; Rautman, Christopher Arthur

    2004-02-01

    The geologic model implicit in the original site characterization report for the Bayou Choctaw Strategic Petroleum Reserve Site near Baton Rouge, Louisiana, has been converted to a numerical, computer-based three-dimensional model. The original site characterization model was successfully converted with minimal modifications and use of new information. The geometries of the salt diapir, selected adjacent sedimentary horizons, and a number of faults have been modeled. Models of a partial set of the several storage caverns that have been solution-mined within the salt mass are also included. Collectively, the converted model appears to be a relatively realistic representation of the geology of the Bayou Choctaw site as known from existing data. A small number of geometric inconsistencies and other problems inherent in 2-D vs. 3-D modeling have been noted. Most of the major inconsistencies involve faults inferred from drill hole data only. Modem computer software allows visualization of the resulting site model and its component submodels with a degree of detail and flexibility that was not possible with conventional, two-dimensional and paper-based geologic maps and cross sections. The enhanced visualizations may be of particular value in conveying geologic concepts involved in the Bayou Choctaw Strategic Petroleum Reserve site to a lay audience. A Microsoft WindowsTM PC-based viewer and user-manipulable model files illustrating selected features of the converted model are included in this report.

  4. Utilizing an urban runoff model and GIS to assess pollutant loading to Bayou Chico, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, T.T.; Simons, J.D.; Dickson, K.L.; Acevedo, M.F.; Mayer, F.L.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) analysis of the Bayou Chico watershed and its integration with the Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) as part of a watershed approach to assessing the ecological health of this sub-estuary of Pensacola Bay. Bayou Chico is the receiving water body of a small, mostly residential and urban watershed located in southern Escambia County, Florida. The transport of pollutants into the bayou is primarily a function of precipitation. SWMM models the runoff from rainfall and uses the land use, size and physical characteristics of the watershed as factors in pollutant loading. The fate and transport of pollutants is represented by the flow of water through natural channelization as well as water management practices. A GIS database and the use of remotely sensed satellite images are used to determine the location of streets, storm drainage systems, surface runoff as well as the area and slope of the watershed. SWMM mathematically represents these physical characteristics and uses this information to determine both runoff and pollutant loading. Hydrographs and pollutographs from SWMM are to be then used in a transport and fate model (WASP). The authors discuss data required for SWMM, its analysis using GIS and model linkage with special attention given to the data acquisition and modeling process. Model results and calibration techniques will also be presented.

  5. Fisheries indicators, freshwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kwak, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Freshwater fisheries exist among diverse ecosystems and fauna, provide societal benefits, and are influenced by human activities. Fisheries scientists assess the status and sustainability of fisheries by multiple approaches, including abundance and condition indices, population parameters, community indices, modeling, and surveys of habitat and human dimensions. The future sustainability of freshwater fisheries is limited not by available methods but by society’s will.

  6. Freshwater mussels of Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, James D.; Butler, Robert S.; Warren, Gary L.; Johnson, Nathan A.

    2014-01-01

    An exhaustive guide to all aspects of the freshwater mussel fauna in Florida,Freshwater Mussels of Florida covers the ecology, biology, distribution, and conservation of the many species of bivalve mollusks in the Sunshine State. In the past three decades, researchers, the public, businesses that depend on wildlife, and policy makers have given more attention to the threatened natural diversity of the Southeast, including freshwater mussels. This compendium meets the increasingly urgent need to catalog this imperiled group of aquatic organisms in the United States.

  7. Freshwater Harmful Algal Blooms

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is seeking regular and early career applications proposing innovative research on the prediction, prevention, control and mitigation of freshwater HABs as well as the drivers, life cycle patterns, and fate of and effects from from less-common, less

  8. Geomechanical testing of Bayou Choctaw 102B core for SPR analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ingraham, Mathew Duffy; Broome, Scott Thomas; Bauer, Stephen J.; Barrow, Perry Carl; Flint, Gregory Mark

    2014-02-01

    A laboratory testing program was developed to examine the short-term mechanical and time-dependent (creep) behavior of salt from the Bayou Choctaw Salt Dome. This report documents the test methodologies, and constitutive properties inferred from tests performed. These are used to extend our understanding of the mechanical behavior of the Bayou Choctaw domal salt and provide a data set for numerical analyses. The resulting information will be used to support numerical analyses of the current state of the Bayou Choctaw Dome as it relates to its crude oil storage function as part of the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Core obtained from Drill Hole BC-102B was tested under creep and quasi-static constant mean stress axisymmetric compression, and constant mean stress axisymmetric extension conditions. Creep tests were performed at 100 degrees Fahrenheit, and the axisymmetric tests were performed at ambient temperatures (72-78 degrees Fahrenheit). The testing performed indicates that the dilation criterion is pressure and stress state dependent. It was found that as the mean stress increases, the shear stress required to cause dilation increases. The results for this salt are reasonably consistent with those observed for other domal salts. Also it was observed that tests performed under extensile conditions required consistently lower shear stress to cause dilation for the same mean stress, which is consistent with other domal salts. Young's moduli ranged from 3.95 x 106 to 8.51 x 106 psi with an average of 6.44 x 106 psi, with Poisson's ratios ranging from 0.10 to 0.43 with an average of 0.30. Creep testing indicates that the BC salt is intermediate in creep resistance when compared with other bedded and domal salt steady-state behavior.

  9. The freshwater biodiversity crisis.

    PubMed

    Brautigam, A

    1999-01-01

    This article concerns the threat on freshwater ecosystems, which harbor a disproportionate amount of the world's biodiversity. In many parts of the world, freshwater ecosystems are already degraded from a range of human activities, including water extraction, pollution and physical alteration. The data that showed a biodiversity crisis in ecosystems included species loss and breakdown of the ecological processes and resources. Furthermore, several case studies were cited to illustrate the status of freshwater diversity. Numerous reasons for freshwater biodiversity loss were mentioned, which included pollution from pesticides and agricultural and mine run-off, and physical alteration through channelization and impoundments that affected the hydrology and benthic habitat. Despite the successful establishment of institutions to conserve water birds and wetland habitats, there was a lower priority for conservation of freshwater biodiversity in terms of species and habitats. This bias has had important and serious implications for allocation of resources to increase the knowledge and understanding of freshwater ecosystems, as well as for the adequacy of impact assessments for development projects affecting them.

  10. Nitrogen leak test of Strategic Petroleum Reserve Cavern Bayou Choctaw 2

    SciTech Connect

    Goin, K.L.

    1983-10-01

    A nitrogen leak test was made of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Bayou Choctaw Cavern 2. Results of the test are inadequate for estimating the cavern leak rate with a high level of confidence. The interpretation of test results believed to be the most reasonable indicates an average nitrogen loss rate of 300 bbls/yr with an 84-percent probability the loss rate does not exceed 1950 bbls/yr. With maximum oil loss rates estimated at one third of nitrogen volume loss rates, corresponding oil loss rates are 100 and 650 bbls/yr. 3 references, 8 figures.

  11. Tremors in the Bayou: The Events on the Napoleonville Salt Dome, Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellsworth, W. L.; Horton, S.; Benz, H.; Hickman, S.; Leeds, A.; Leith, W. S.; Meremonte, M.; Rubinstein, J. L.; Withers, M. M.; Herrmann, R. B.

    2012-12-01

    Beginning in early June, 2012, an extended series of earth tremors were reported by residents of Bayou Corne in Assumption Parish, Louisiana, and at well control facilities on the nearby Napoleonville salt dome. The salt dome contains numerous caverns resulting from solution mining; some are used to store LPG and natural gas while others produce saltwater brine. Residents also reported natural gas bubbling at nearby locations in Bayou Corne and Grand Bayou. Some of the tremors were large enough to produce "cracks in sheet rock and foundations" (The Advocate, Baton Rouge, July 5, 2012). It was thus quite surprising to find that no earthquakes were detected in this region by either the USGS NEIC or the USArray Array Network Facility despite the presence of Transportable Array station 544A only 10 km from Bayou Corne. Careful inspection of the seismograms at 544A did reveal multiple events characterized by virtually no body wave energy and strong surface waves at the times of reported tremors. In response to a request for assistance from the State of Louisiana six temporary seismic stations with Trillium broad band sensors were deployed in the immediate epicentral region by the USGS and University of Memphis starting on July 12. Seismograms recorded by the temporary stations revealed a variable rate of tremor activity, with several hundred events registered on active days. Even at very close distance (S-P < 0.5 s) the body waves are weak and surface waves prominent, indicating a very shallow source depth. Precise location of the events is complicated by the presence of the high-seismic velocity and steep-sided Napoleonville salt dome that reaches to within 220 m of the surface and is overlain and surrounded by very low velocity sediments. Following several repositionings of the seismic network we have determined that the source region lies on the western edge of the salt dome top at very shallow depth and in the vicinity of an abandoned brine supply cavern. Tremor

  12. Nutrient fluxes in a eutrophic coastal Louisiana freshwater lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stow, C. A.; de Laune, R. D.; Patrick, W. H.

    1985-05-01

    Nitrogen and phosphorus cycling in a eutrophic Louisiana freshwater lake system (Lac des Allemands) was studied. Nutrients from runoff entering the lake, as well as sediment-interstitial and lake water nitrogen and phosphorus fractions, were measured seasonally. Sedimentation rates in the lake were determined using137Cs dating. Phosphorus levels in the lake were found to be largely dependent on concentrations in the incoming bayou water from upland drainage. Lake water concentrations appear to respond to fluctuations in incoming waters. Laboratory equilibrium studies showed bottom sediments in the lake are a major sink for the incoming dissolved orthophosphate phosphorus. Total nitrogen concentrations in the lake water generally exceeded incoming runoff concentrations, suggesting fixation by the large blue-green algae population in the lake as being the major source of nitrogen to the system. Sedimentation ranged from 0.44 cm/year to 0.81 cm/year, depending on the proximity to the inlet bayous. Even though the lake is eutrophic the sediment served as a buffer by removing large amounts of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus through sedimentation processes. Carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus were accumulating in the sediment at rates of 60, 7.1, and 1.1 g/m2/year, respectively. The water quality of the lake is likely to continue to decline unless measures are taken to reduce municipal, industrial, and agricultural inputs of phosphorus into the lake.

  13. 77 FR 39422 - Eighth Coast Guard District Annual Safety Zones; Niceville July 4th Fireworks Show; Boggy Bayou...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-03

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Eighth Coast Guard District Annual Safety Zones; Niceville July 4th Fireworks Show; Boggy Bayou; Niceville, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement of regulation. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard will enforce a Safety Zone for the Niceville July 4th...

  14. 76 FR 43226 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Bayou Liberty, Mile 2.0, St. Tammany Parish, Slidell, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-20

    ....0, St. Tammany Parish, Slidell, LA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Supplemental notice of proposed... (S433) bridge across Liberty Bayou, mile 2.0, at Slidell, St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana. The proposed..., mile 2.0, St. Tammany Parish, Slidell, LA with a new modern swing bridge. Due to the fact that not all...

  15. Evaluation of an Educational Website for the Bayou Bend Collection and Gardens, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Ann G.; Robin, Bernard R.

    As educators increasingly integrate Web-based resources into their curriculum, there is a growing need for high quality, educationally relevant materials. This study evaluated the Bayou Bend Web site, the result of a collaboration between staff at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Texas, and faculty and graduate students at the University of…

  16. Nutrient loading and selected water-quality and biological characteristics of Dickinson Bayou near Houston, Texas, 1995-97

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    East, Jeffery W.; Paul, Edna M.; Porter, Stephen D.

    1998-01-01

    Algal samples were collected at seven stations and were analyzed for periphyton identification and enumeration, and chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b concentrations. The large relative abundance of soil algae at stations in the middle of the watershed likely indicates the cumulative effects on water quality of agricultural nonpoint sources. Farther downstream near the State Highway 3 bridge, and downstream of three major tributary inflows, the increase in abundance of soil algae to a larger-than-expected level might reflect water-quality influences from predominantly urban nonpoint sources in the drainage basins of the three major tributary inflows. Nutrient concentrations do not appear to limit algal production in the upper (non-tidal) reach of Dickinson Bayou; but nutrient concentrations could have been limiting benthicalgal production in the lower (tidal) reach of the bayou during the time of the synoptic survey. If nitrogen is the limiting resource for algal productivity in the tidal reach of Dickinson Bayou, eutrophication of the system could be (at least partially) mitigated if nonpoint-source nutrient loads into the Bayou were reduced. 

  17. Evaluation of magnetic anomalies located in Lower Bayou Teche, St. Mary Parish, Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, R. Christopher; Athens, William P.; Saltus, Allen R., Jr.

    1991-07-01

    This report presents results of testing and assessment of eleven previously recorded magnetic anomalies located in Lower Bayou Teche, St. Mary Parish, Louisiana. Maintenance dredging of Lower Bayou Teche may impact several of the eight anomalies evaluated in this study. Objectives of the study were to conduct detailed surveys and assessments of eight previously located anomalies. These were Anomalies 8, 13, 24a, 29, 30, 31, 33, and 58. Three orther anomalies, Anomaly nos. 23, 24b, and 55 were also briefly examined. Methods used during survey included relocation of each anomaly with a magnetometer; informal magnetic and fathometer survey of each anomaly and its vicinity, physical search of the river bottom at each anomaly location; use of a metal detector to assess the depth of the magnetic source of each anomaly; probing of the river bottom to locate buried structures; and limited excavation with a jet probe to document the source, nature, and research potential of each of the eight anomalies. Two of the anomalies, Anomaly nos. 30 and 58 could not be relocated. Four of the anomalies apparently are associated with modern debris: Anomaly nos. 8, 13, 29, and 31. Anomaly no. 33 appears to be an isolated object. Evidence of structure was observed 14 to 15 ft below water surface, however, it occurs below the project impact zone. One archeological site, the Anomaly no. 23/24 Complex (Site 16SMY76) was defined. It consists of two wooden barges and some twentieth century bridge remains.

  18. Threat of a sinkhole: A reevaluation of Cavern 4, Bayou Choctaw salt dome, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, J.T.; Todd, J.L.; Linn, J.K.; Magorian, T.R.

    1993-09-01

    Cavern Lake at Bayou Choctaw salt dome resulted from the failure of Cavern 7 in 1954. Uncontrolled solutioning of this cavern through the thin caprock had set the stage for overburden to collapse into the cavern below. A similar situation developed with nearby Cavern 4, but with less dissolutioning of the caprock. Because pressure loss was already a problem and because another 800 ft diameter lake would have endangered surface operations, solutioning of Cavern 4 was stopped and the cavern abandoned in 1957 in order to protect the already-small site. In 1978 the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) acquired a number of caverns at Bayou Choctaw, including Cavern 4, and the possible repeat of the Cavern 7 failure and formation of another lake thus became an issue. The cavern dimensions were re-sonared in 1980 for comparison with 1963 and 1977 surveys. Annual surface leveling between 1982--1992 showed less subsidence occurring than the site average, and a cavern monitoring system, installed in 1984, has revealed no anomalous motion. Repeat sonar surveys in 1992 showed very little, if any, change occurred since 1980 although a small amount of uncertainty exists as a result of changing sonar techniques. We conclude that significant additional solutioning or erosion of the caprock has not occurred and that there is no increased threat to SPR operations.

  19. Expansion analyses of strategic petroleum reserve in Bayou Choctaw : revised locations.

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Park, Byoung Yoon

    2010-11-01

    This report summarizes a series of three-dimensional simulations for the Bayou Choctaw Strategic Petroleum Reserve. The U.S. Department of Energy plans to leach two new caverns and convert one of the existing caverns within the Bayou Choctaw salt dome to expand its petroleum reserve storage capacity. An existing finite element mesh from previous analyses is modified by changing the locations of two caverns. The structural integrity of the three expansion caverns and the interaction between all the caverns in the dome are investigated. The impacts of the expansion on underground creep closure, surface subsidence, infrastructure, and well integrity are quantified. Two scenarios were used for the duration and timing of workover conditions where wellhead pressures are temporarily reduced to atmospheric pressure. The three expansion caverns are predicted to be structurally stable against tensile failure for both scenarios. Dilatant failure is not expected within the vicinity of the expansion caverns. Damage to surface structures is not predicted and there is not a marked increase in surface strains due to the presence of the three expansion caverns. The wells into the caverns should not undergo yield. The results show that from a structural viewpoint, the locations of the two newly proposed expansion caverns are acceptable, and all three expansion caverns can be safely constructed and operated.

  20. Freshwater Marsh. Habitat Pac.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fish and Wildlife Service (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    The materials in this educational packet are designed for use with students in grades 4 through 7. They consist of an overview, three lesson plans and student data sheets, and a poster. The overview describes how the freshwater marsh is an important natural resource for plant, animal, and human populations and how the destruction of marshes causes…

  1. Construction of hexahedral elements mesh capturing realistic geometries of Bayou Choctaw SPR site

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Byoung Yoon; Roberts, Barry L.

    2015-09-01

    The three-dimensional finite element mesh capturing realistic geometries of Bayou Choctaw site has been constructed using the sonar and seismic survey data obtained from the field. The mesh is consisting of hexahedral elements because the salt constitutive model is coded using hexahedral elements. Various ideas and techniques to construct finite element mesh capturing artificially and naturally formed geometries are provided. The techniques to reduce the number of elements as much as possible to save on computer run time with maintaining the computational accuracy is also introduced. The steps and methodologies could be applied to construct the meshes of Big Hill, Bryan Mound, and West Hackberry strategic petroleum reserve sites. The methodology could be applied to the complicated shape masses for not only various civil and geological structures but also biological applications such as artificial limbs.

  2. Turtle Bayou - 1936 to 1983: case history of a major gas field in south Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Cronquist, C.

    1983-01-01

    Turtle Bayou field, located in the middle Miocene trend in S. Louisiana, is nearing the end of a productive life which spans over 30 yr. Discovered by Shell Oil Co. in 1949 after unsuccessful attempts by 2 other majors, the field is a typical, low relief, moderately faulted Gulf Coast structure, probably associated with deep salt movement. The productive interval includes 22 separate gas-bearing sands in a regressive sequence of sands and shales from approx. 6500 to 12,000 ft. Now estimated to have contained ca 1.2 trillion scf of gas in place, cumulative production through 1982 was 702 billion scf. Cumulative condensate-gas ratio has been 20 bbl/million. Recovery mechanisms in individual reservoirs include strong bottom water drive, partial edgewater drive, and pressure depletion. Recovery efficiencies in major reservoirs range from 40 to 75% of original gas in place.

  3. Water-quality investigation of the Flat Bayou watershed, Jefferson County, Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lamb, T.E.

    1979-01-01

    The results of a 1-year study, in 1977-78, of surface-water quality in the Flat Bayou watershed, Jefferson County, Ark. are presented to document conditions before implementation of Soil Conservation Service programs. Analysis of samples collected at two sites showed that oxygen depletion, as low as 32 percent of saturation at times, and high concentrations of pesticides on the streambed were the most serious water-quality problems in the watershed. The pesticides aldrin, DDD, DDE, DDT, dieldrin, endrin, heptachlor epoxide, lindane, and toxaphene were found in samples of the bottom material. One sample of bottom material contained an unusually high toxaphene concentration of 160 micrograms per kilogram. (Woodard-USGS)

  4. Davis Pond freshwater prediversion biomonitoring study: freshwater fisheries and eagles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenkins, Jill A.; Bourgeois, E. Beth; Jeske, Clint W.

    2008-01-01

    In January 2001, the construction of the Davis Pond freshwater diversion structure was completed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The diversion of freshwater from the Mississippi River is intended to mitigate saltwater intrusion from the Gulf of Mexico and to lessen the concomitant loss of wetland areas. In addition to the freshwater inflow, Barataria Bay basin would receive nutrients, increased flows of sediments, and water-borne and sediment-bound compounds. The purpose of this biomonitoring study was, therefore, to serve as a baseline for prediversion concentrations of selected contaminants in bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) nestlings (hereafter referred to as eaglets), representative freshwater fish, and bivalves. Samples were collected from January through June 2001. Two similarly designed postdiversion studies, as described in the biological monitoring program, are planned. Active bald eagle nests targeted for sampling eaglet blood (n = 6) were generally located southwest and south of the diversion structure. The designated sites for aquatic animal sampling were at Lake Salvador, at Lake Cataouatche, at Bayou Couba, and along the Mississippi River. Aquatic animals representative of eagle prey were collected. Fish were from three different trophic levels and have varying feeding strategies and life histories. These included herbivorous striped mullet (Mugil cephalus), omnivorous blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus), and carnivorous largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Three individuals per species were collected at each of the four sampling sites. Freshwater Atlantic rangia clams (Rangia cuneata) were collected at the downstream marsh sites, and zebra mussels (Dreissena spp.) were collected on the Mississippi River. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Biomonitoring of Environmental Status and Trends (BEST) protocols served as guides for fish sampling and health assessments. Fish are useful for monitoring aquatic ecosystems because they accumulate

  5. Food chains in freshwaters.

    PubMed

    Sabo, John L; Finlay, Jacques C; Post, David M

    2009-04-01

    There are three hypothesized controls on food-chain length (FCL): energy supply (or "resource availability"), ecosystem size and disturbance (or "environmental variation"). In this article, the evidence for controls on FCL in freshwater ecosystems is evaluated. First, the various ways FCL can be measured are defined. Food-chain length typically is estimated as (1) connectance-based FCL--an average connectance between basal resources and top consumers, (2) functional FCL--by experimental determination of functionally significant effects of a top predator on lower trophic-level biomass patterns, and (3) realized FCL--an average connectance measure weighted by energy flow between basal consumers and the consumer occupying the maximum trophic position in the food web. Second, all evidence for relationships between the three hypothetical controls and FCL in freshwater ecosystems are evaluated. The review includes studies from streams, lakes, ponds, wetlands, phytotelmata, and experimental containers. Surprisingly, few studies of FCL in freshwaters that test the same suite of controls using the same methods are found. Equally compelling results arise from case studies based on functional, realized, and connectance-based measures of FCL. Third, 10 rules of thumb that could increase similarity of future studies, thereby facilitating synthesis across systems, are suggested. Fourth, it is discussed how FCL influences the concentration of contaminants in large-bodied animals (many of which are consumed by humans) as well as the efficacy of biocontrol applications in agriculture. Finally, there is a discussion of the potential relationships between global climate change, hydrology, and FCL in freshwaters.

  6. Acidification of freshwaters

    SciTech Connect

    Cresser, M.S.; Edwards, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    This volume gives an account that draws not only on the main branches of chemistry but also on soil physics, chemistry, hydrology, meteorology, geography, geology, plant physiology, soil microbiology and zoology. The author examine the numerous interacting physical, chemical, and biological, processes that regulate the acidity of freshwaters, a phenomenon that has various causes, including precipitation; acidifying pollutions; and the interaction of plants, soils and water. The relative importance of the different processes is examined.

  7. Archaeological Investigations of the Little Cypress Bayou Site (3CT50) Crittenden County, Arkansas. Volume 2 - Appendices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    by the geomorphic features around 3CT50. Their relative ages are defined by cross-cutting relationships, supported by estimates of amounts of slope...Sediments Introduction Data from the backhoe trenches, supported and extended by stra- tigraphic sections from the archaeologists’ pits, is summarized in...CYPRESS BAYOU SITE (3CT50), CRITTENDEN COUNTY, ARKANSAS by Arthur E. Bogan Analysis of animal remains recovered from archaeological excava- tions on the

  8. Feasibility Report and Environmental Impact Statement for Navigation Improvements at Bayou La Batre, Alabama. Volume 2. Appendices.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-12

    Sociology & Anthropology and Economics & Finance, University of South Alabama, Master Marine, Inc., and Messrs. Sam J. Kayser, Jr. and Art Dyas. A copy...the Gulf of Max - ico, such as white trout and croaker. The lintations an cmercial fishing and fish processing in Bayou La ftre are similar to those...37 .239185 Source: Kim M. Bloomquist, Ronald D. Webber , and Dennis P. Robinson, *An Interactive System for Generating Regional Input-output

  9. EAARL-B Topography—Big Thicket National Preserve: Little Pine Island Bayou Corridor Unit, Texas, 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fredericks, Alexandra M.; Kranenburg, Christine J.; Hardy, Matthew; Nagle, David B.

    2015-01-01

    These mosaics, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center, provide lidar-derived first-surface and bare-earth topography for the Little Pine Island Bayou Corridor Unit of Big Thicket National Preserve in Texas. Elevation measurements were acquired by the second-generation Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL-B) on January 15, 21, 22, 26, and 30, 2014, in cooperation with the National Park Service – Gulf Coast Network.

  10. Effects of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans on nesting wood ducks (Aix sponsa) at Bayou Meto, Arkansas

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.H.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1995-05-01

    Wood ducks (Aix sponsa) nesting along Bayou Meto downstream from a hazardous waste site in central Arkansas were contaminated with polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs). Residues in eggs, based on 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin equivalents (TCDD-EQ), ranged up to 611 parts per trillion (ppt), and egg arithmetic means were 90-fold higher at the site nearest the point source compared with a reference site. We monitored productivity of wood ducks in artificial nest boxes at three sites on the bayou and at a reference site on a separate drainage during 1988-1990. Productivity was suppressed (p<0.05) at the bayou sites compared with the reference site, and egg TCDD-EQs were inversely correlated (p<0.001) with productivity in corresponding nests. The threshold range of toxicity, where reduced productivity was evident in wood ducks (based on TCDD-EQs), was >20 to 50 ppt. Oxidative stress and teratogenic effects occurred in ducklings at the more contaminated nesting sites nearest the point source. These findings suggest that wood ducks may be more sensitive to PCDD and PCDF contamination than some other aquatic birds and could serve as an indicator species for monitoring biological impacts from these contaminants. 21 refs., 4 tabs.

  11. Effects of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans on nesting wood ducks (Aix sponsa) at Bayou Meto, Arkansas.

    PubMed

    White, D H; Hoffman, D J

    1995-05-01

    Wood ducks (Aix sponsa) nesting along Bayou Meto downstream from a hazardous waste site in central Arkansas were contaminated with polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs). Residues in eggs, based on 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin equivalents (TCDD-EQ), ranged up to 611 parts per trillion (ppt), and egg arithmetic means were 90-fold higher at the site nearest the point source compared with a reference site. We monitored productivity of wood ducks in artificial nest boxes at three sites on the bayou and at a reference site on a separate drainage during 1988-1990. Productivity was suppressed (p < 0.05) at the bayou sites compared with the reference site, and egg TCDD-EQs were inversely correlated (p < 0.001) with productivity in corresponding nests. The threshold range of toxicity, where reduced productivity was evident in wood ducks (based on TCDD-EQs), was > 20 to 50 ppt. Oxidative stress and teratogenic effects occurred in ducklings at the more contaminated nesting sites nearest the point source. These findings suggest that wood ducks may be more sensitive to PCDD and PCDF contamination than some other aquatic birds and could serve as an indicator species for monitoring biological impacts from these contaminants.

  12. Effects of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans on nesting wood ducks (Aix sponsa) at Bayou Meto, Arkansas.

    PubMed Central

    White, D H; Hoffman, D J

    1995-01-01

    Wood ducks (Aix sponsa) nesting along Bayou Meto downstream from a hazardous waste site in central Arkansas were contaminated with polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs). Residues in eggs, based on 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin equivalents (TCDD-EQ), ranged up to 611 parts per trillion (ppt), and egg arithmetic means were 90-fold higher at the site nearest the point source compared with a reference site. We monitored productivity of wood ducks in artificial nest boxes at three sites on the bayou and at a reference site on a separate drainage during 1988-1990. Productivity was suppressed (p < 0.05) at the bayou sites compared with the reference site, and egg TCDD-EQs were inversely correlated (p < 0.001) with productivity in corresponding nests. The threshold range of toxicity, where reduced productivity was evident in wood ducks (based on TCDD-EQs), was > 20 to 50 ppt. Oxidative stress and teratogenic effects occurred in ducklings at the more contaminated nesting sites nearest the point source. These findings suggest that wood ducks may be more sensitive to PCDD and PCDF contamination than some other aquatic birds and could serve as an indicator species for monitoring biological impacts from these contaminants. PMID:7556022

  13. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 6): Bayou Sorrel, Louisiana, November 1986. First remedial action. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-11-14

    The Bayou Sorrel site is located in Iberville Parish, Louisiana approximately 20 miles southwest of Baton Rouge, LA. Fifty acres of the 265-acre site have been used for waste disposal. The waste-disposal areas consist of four landfills: a spent-lime cell, a crushed-drum cell, four covered liquid-waste ponds, and a land farm. The remaining acres are covered by dense brush and trees. The entire site has a marshy, bayou-type environment and is prone to flooding and poor drainage. Early in 1977, the Environmental Purification Advancement Corporation (EPAC) began operating the Bayou Sorrel site. A sister firm, Clean Land Air Water, Inc. (CLAW) operated an injection well approximately six miles south of the site. EPAC operations included landfarming, open liquid impoundments, drum burial, and landfilling of chemically fixated wastes. The fixation process is unknown but may have included lime, cement, and native soils. EPAC and CLAW were two separate operations, however, it was suggested that wastes from the injection well were diverted to EPAC when process problems at the well caused a bottleneck. In the summer of 1978, a truck driver died at the site.

  14. Effects of pollution on freshwater organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Phipps, G.L.; Harden, M.J.; Leonard, E.N.; Roush, T.H; Spehar, D.L.; Stephan, C.E.; Pickering, Q.H.; Buikema, A.L. Jr.

    1984-06-01

    This review includes subjects in last year's reviews on effects of pollution on freshwater invertebrates and effects of pollution on freshwater fish and amphibians. This review also includes information on the effects of pollution on freshwater plants. 625 references.

  15. Soil Biogeochemical Properties and Erosion Source Prediction Model Summary for the Buffalo Bayou Watershed, Houston, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, I.

    2015-12-01

    We draw conclusions on the research output and findings from a 4-year multidisciplinary USDA-CBG collaborative program in sustainable integrated monitoring of soil organic carbon (SOC) loss prediction via erosion. The underlying method uses the state-of-the-art stable isotope science of sediment tracing under uncertain hydrologic influences. The research finds are rooted in the (i) application of Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo statistical models to assess the relationship between rainfall-runoff and soil erosion in space and time, (ii) capture of the episodic nature of rainfall events and its role in the spatial distribution of SOC loss from water erosion, (iii) stable isotope composition guided fingerprinting (source and quantity) of eroded soil, and (iv) the creation of an integrated watershed scale statistical soil loss monitoring model driven by spatial and temporal correlation of flow and stable isotope composition. The research theme was successfully applied on the urbanized Buffalo Bayou Watershed in Houston, Texas. The application brought to light novel future research conceptual outlines which will also be discussed in this deliverable to the AGU meeting. These include but not limited to: regional rainfall cluster research, physics of muddy river-bank soil and suspended sediment interaction, and friction & mobility that together make up the plasticity of soil aggregates that control erosion processes and landscape changes in a riparian corridor. References: Ahmed, I., Karim, A., Boutton, T.W., and Strom, K.B. (2013a). "Monitoring Soil Organic Carbon Loss from Erosion Using Stable Isotopes." Proc., Soil Carbon Sequestration, International Conference, May 26-29, Reykjavik, Iceland. Ahmed, I, Bouttom, T.W., Strom, K. B., Karim, A., and Irvin-Smith, N. (2013b). "Soil carbon distribution and loss monitoring in the urbanized Buffalo Bayou watershed, Houston, Texas." Proc., 4th Annual All Investigators Meeting of the North American Carbon Program, February 4

  16. Hexahedral Finite Element Mesh Capturing Realistic Geometries of Bayou Choctaw Strategic Petroleum Reserve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, B. Y.; Roberts, B. L.; Sobolik, S. R.

    2016-12-01

    The U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) stores crude oil in 60 caverns located at four sites located along the Gulf Coast. As a matter of normal operation of caverns in a salt dome, the continuous mechanical creep of salt, along with the change in internal cavern and casing pressure due to cavern closure and fluid exchanges, impose several mechanical conditions on the skin, well, and casing of a cavern that could potentially create damage. Sandia, on behalf of DOE, is evaluating the structural integrity of the salt surrounding existing caverns in the Bayou Choctaw (BC) salt dome in Louisiana. In reality, the geometry, spacing, and depths of the caverns are irregular. It is not easy to realize the naturally and artificially formed cavern and salt dome for numerical analysis. It is harder to convert the geometries into the meshed mass consisting of only hexahedral finite elements. A three-dimensional (3D) finite element mesh capturing realistic geometries of the Bayou Choctaw site has been constructed using the seismic and sonar survey data obtained from the field (see Figures below). The mesh consists of hexahedral elements because the salt constitutive model is coded using hexahedral elements. Techniques to reduce the number of elements as much as possible to save on computer run time while maintaining computational accuracy are also developed. These methodologies could also be applied to construct computational meshes for the Big Hill, Bryan Mound, and West Hackberry SPR sites. The methodology could be applied to the complicated shape masses for not only various civil and geological structures but also biological applications such as artificial limbs. The newly developed mesh is expected to provide more accurate solutions of geotechnical concerns that arise due to the close proximity of the caverns to each other or to the edge of salt. Also, there are nine abandoned caverns, one of which is believed to be in a quasi-stable condition. Stability issues for these

  17. Arctic freshwater synthesis: Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prowse, T.; Bring, A.; Mârd, J.; Carmack, E.

    2015-11-01

    In response to a joint request from the World Climate Research Program's Climate and Cryosphere Project, the International Arctic Science Committee, and the Arctic Council's Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program, an updated scientific assessment has been conducted of the Arctic Freshwater System (AFS), entitled the Arctic Freshwater Synthesis (AFSΣ). The major reason for joint request was an increasing concern that changes to the AFS have produced, and could produce even greater, changes to biogeophysical and socioeconomic systems of special importance to northern residents and also produce extra-Arctic climatic effects that will have global consequences. Hence, the key objective of the AFSΣ was to produce an updated, comprehensive, and integrated review of the structure and function of the entire AFS. The AFSΣ was organized around six key thematic areas: atmosphere, oceans, terrestrial hydrology, terrestrial ecology, resources and modeling, and the review of each coauthored by an international group of scientists and published as separate manuscripts in this special issue of Journal of Geophysical Research-Biogeosciences. This AFSΣ—Introduction reviews the motivations for, and foci of, previous studies of the AFS, discusses criteria used to define the domain of the AFS, and details key characteristics of the definition adopted for the AFSΣ.

  18. Sperm in "parhenogenetic" freshwater gastrotrichs.

    PubMed

    Weiss, M J; Levy, D P

    1979-07-20

    Freshwater members of the phylum Gastrotricha have been considered obligate parthenogens. In Lepidodermelia squammata, the species for which there is most evidence for parthenogenesis, sperm have been discovered. This finding will necessitate reexamination of the nature of sexuality and life cycles and of the concept of "species" in freshwater gastrotrichs.

  19. Turtle Bayou 1936-1983: case history of a major gas field in south Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Cronquist, C.

    1984-11-01

    Turtle Bayou field, located in the middle Miocene trend in south Louisiana, is nearing the end of a productive life spanning more than 30 years. Discovered by Shell Oil Co. in 1949 after unsuccessful attempts by two other companies, the field is a typical, low-relief, moderately faulted U.S. Gulf Coast structure, probably associated with deep salt movement. The productive interval includes 22 separate gas-bearing sands in a regressive sequence of sands and shales from approximately 6,500 to 12,000 ft (1980 to 3660 m). Now estimated to have contained about 1.2 trillion scf (34 X 10/sup 9/ std m/sup 3/) of gas in place, cumulative production through 1982 was 702 billion scf (20 X 10/sup 9/ std m/sup 3/). Cumulative condensate/gas ration (CGR) has been 20 bbl/MMcf (110 X 10/sup -6/ m/sup 3//m/sup 3/. Recovery mechanisms in individual reservoirs include strong bottomwater drive, partial edgewater drive, and pressure depletion. Recovery efficiencies in major reservoirs range form 40 to 83% of original gas in place (OGIP). On decline since 1973, it is anticipated the field will be essentially depleted in the next 5 years.

  20. Reservoir Modeling and Prediction at Pleasant Bayou Geopressured-Geothermal Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Shook, Mike

    1992-03-24

    Modeling and prediction of geopressured-geothermal reservoirs is an excellent example of an engineering problem that can be solved through many different means. The problem may be approached from a purely numerical viewpoint, where a successful history match ''demonstrates'' the validity of the reservoir model, or from an analytical point of view. Each method has its own inherent limitations and weaknesses. Such limitations can be minimized by using some combination of both numerical and analytical methods, taking advantage of the strengths of each without the attendant weaknesses. This paper describes a combined numerical/analytical approach to reservoir engineering at the Pleasant Bayou geopressured-geothermal reservoir. A reservoir description had previously been developed, through which a successful history match was performed. Certain details of the reservoir can also be obtained through analysis of pressure and flow transients; these can then be used to constrain the numerical model. Methods for extracting such reservoir data are discussed, and the manner in which they can be used as constraints in the numerical models are presented.

  1. Pleasant Bayou geopressured/geothermal testing project, Brazoria County, Texas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ortego, P.K.

    1985-07-01

    Phase II-B production testing of the Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well began September 22, 1982. The test plan was designed to evaluate the capabilities of the geopressured-geothermal reservoir during an extended flow period. Tests were conducted to determine reservoir areal extent; aquifer fluid properties; fluid property change with production; information on reservoir production drive mechanism; long-term scale and corrosion control methods; and disposal well operations. Operatinal aspects of geopressured-geothermal production were also evaluated. The test was discontinued prematurely in May 1983 because of a production tubing failure. Most of the production tubing was recovered from the well and cause of the failure was determined. Plans for recompletion of the well were prepared. However, the well was not recompleted because of funding constraints and/or program rescheduling. In March 1984, the Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) directed that the site be placed in a standby-secured condition. In August 1984, the site was secured. Routine site maintenance and security was provided during the secured period.

  2. A validation test for Adagio through replication of Big Hill and Bayou Choctaw JAS3D models.

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Byoung Yoon

    2013-06-01

    JAS3D, a three dimensional iterative solid mechanics code, has been used for structural analyses for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve system since the 1990s. JAS3D is no longer supported by Sandia National Laboratories, and has been replaced by Adagio. To validate the transition from JAS3D to Adagio, the existing JAS3D input decks and user subroutines for Bayou Choctaw and Big Hill models were converted for use with Adagio. The calculation results from the Adagio runs are compared to the JAS3D. Since the Adagio results are very similar to the JAS3D results, Adagio is judged to be performing satisfactorily.

  3. Salting our freshwater lakes.

    PubMed

    Dugan, Hilary A; Bartlett, Sarah L; Burke, Samantha M; Doubek, Jonathan P; Krivak-Tetley, Flora E; Skaff, Nicholas K; Summers, Jamie C; Farrell, Kaitlin J; McCullough, Ian M; Morales-Williams, Ana M; Roberts, Derek C; Ouyang, Zutao; Scordo, Facundo; Hanson, Paul C; Weathers, Kathleen C

    2017-04-10

    The highest densities of lakes on Earth are in north temperate ecosystems, where increasing urbanization and associated chloride runoff can salinize freshwaters and threaten lake water quality and the many ecosystem services lakes provide. However, the extent to which lake salinity may be changing at broad spatial scales remains unknown, leading us to first identify spatial patterns and then investigate the drivers of these patterns. Significant decadal trends in lake salinization were identified using a dataset of long-term chloride concentrations from 371 North American lakes. Landscape and climate metrics calculated for each site demonstrated that impervious land cover was a strong predictor of chloride trends in Northeast and Midwest North American lakes. As little as 1% impervious land cover surrounding a lake increased the likelihood of long-term salinization. Considering that 27% of large lakes in the United States have >1% impervious land cover around their perimeters, the potential for steady and long-term salinization of these aquatic systems is high. This study predicts that many lakes will exceed the aquatic life threshold criterion for chronic chloride exposure (230 mg L(-1)), stipulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in the next 50 y if current trends continue.

  4. Salting our freshwater lakes

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, Sarah L.; Burke, Samantha M.; Doubek, Jonathan P.; Krivak-Tetley, Flora E.; Skaff, Nicholas K.; Summers, Jamie C.; Farrell, Kaitlin J.; McCullough, Ian M.; Morales-Williams, Ana M.; Roberts, Derek C.; Ouyang, Zutao; Scordo, Facundo; Hanson, Paul C.; Weathers, Kathleen C.

    2017-01-01

    The highest densities of lakes on Earth are in north temperate ecosystems, where increasing urbanization and associated chloride runoff can salinize freshwaters and threaten lake water quality and the many ecosystem services lakes provide. However, the extent to which lake salinity may be changing at broad spatial scales remains unknown, leading us to first identify spatial patterns and then investigate the drivers of these patterns. Significant decadal trends in lake salinization were identified using a dataset of long-term chloride concentrations from 371 North American lakes. Landscape and climate metrics calculated for each site demonstrated that impervious land cover was a strong predictor of chloride trends in Northeast and Midwest North American lakes. As little as 1% impervious land cover surrounding a lake increased the likelihood of long-term salinization. Considering that 27% of large lakes in the United States have >1% impervious land cover around their perimeters, the potential for steady and long-term salinization of these aquatic systems is high. This study predicts that many lakes will exceed the aquatic life threshold criterion for chronic chloride exposure (230 mg L−1), stipulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in the next 50 y if current trends continue. PMID:28396392

  5. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) additional geologic site characterization studies, Bayou Choctaw salt dome, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, J.T.; Magorian, T.R.; Byrne, K.O.; Denzler, S.

    1993-09-01

    This report revises and updates the geologic site characterization report that was published in 1980. Revised structure maps and sections show interpretative differences in the dome shape and caprock structural contours, especially a major east-west trending shear zone, not mapped in the 1980 report. Excessive gas influx in Caverns 18 and 20 may be associated with this shear zone. Subsidence values at Bayou Choctaw are among the lowest in the SPR system, averaging only about 10 mm/yr but measurement and interpretation issues persist, as observed values often approximate measurement accuracy. Periodic, temporary flooding is a continuing concern because of the low site elevation (less than 10 ft), and this may intensify as future subsidence lowers the surface even further. Cavern 4 was re-sonared in 1992 and the profiles suggest that significant change has not occurred since 1980, thereby reducing the uncertainty of possible overburden collapse -- as occurred at Cavern 7 in 1954. Other potential integrity issues persist, such as the proximity of Cavern 20 to the dome edge, and the narrow web separating Caverns 15 and 17. Injection wells have been used for the disposal of brine but have been only marginally effective thus far; recompletions into more permeable lower Pleistocene gravels may be a practical way of increasing injection capacity and brinefield efficiency. Cavern storage space is limited on this already crowded dome, but 15 MMBBL could be gained by enlarging Cavern 19 and by constructing a new cavern beneath and slightly north of abandoned Cavern 13. Environmental issues center on the low site elevation: the backswamp environment combined with the potential for periodic flooding create conditions that will require continuing surveillance.

  6. Soft-water zone in the Chicot Aquifer, Bayou Teche area, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hosman, R.L.

    1974-01-01

    Test drilling in the vicinity of Bayou Teche in St. Martin Parish in southern Louisiana has disclosed a zone of soft water in the basal unit of the Chicot aquifer; the Chicot aquifer system blankets all southwestern Louisiana. Fresh water, which is defined as containing 250 milligrams per liter chloride or less, in the Chicot aquifer is characteristically hard and high in iron concentration; in this area the hardness is generally 200-300 milligrams per liter. The soft-water zone, containing water with a hardness of less than 60 milligrams per liter, is anomalous and occurs in an area where the basal part of the aquifer is separated from the main body of the aquifer by a thick clay layer. The zone has been mapped in parts of St. Martin and adjoining Lafayette Parishes. Although the exact areal extent of the zone cannot be determined with available data, it appears to be sufficiently large that the soft water should prove to be an important asset to the area. The water could be used by itself or mixed with either hard or slightly salty water (more than 250 milligrams per liter chloride) to provide a blend that would require little or no treatment for most purposes. Because of the proximity of salty water in much of the area, careful planning and monitoring will be necessary to maintain the soft-water zone as a dependable supply of usable water. The soft water appears to be an exhaustible supply; however, its useful life as a resource can be maximized by proper management.

  7. Predicting diagenetic history and reservoir quality in the Frio Formation of Brazoria County, Texas and Pleasant Bayou test wells

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, W.R.; Richmann, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    Good-quality geothermal reservoirs displaying secondary porosity exist on the upper Texas coast (Brazoria County), site of the Pleasant Bayou No. 1 and No. 2 wells, and are attributed to a moderately stable mineral assemblage, normal geothermal gradients, and low in situ pH. Major authigenic minerals are calcite, quartz, and kaolinite. Detrital feldspar has been extensively albitized at depth. Major diagenetic events overlapped, occurring in the general order-precipitation of calcite, formation of quartz overgrowths, albitization, leaching of calcite to form secondary porosity, and precipitation of kaolinite. Seventeen Brazoria County water analyses including two from the Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well were thermodynamically tested. Predictions based on equilibrium thermodynamics add new insight on mineral stabilities and are consistent with the paragenetic sequence developed from petrographic data. Early precipitation of calcite at shallow depths of burial is predicted. Low temperture and low in situ pH explain the general absence of chlorite. The use of solution-mineral equilibria as a predictor of reservoir quality is inconclusive, but well-defined clustering of waters indicates that identification of regional trends will probably be possible. Shallow waters may be the key to predicting reservoir quality at depth.

  8. Effects of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans on nesting wood ducks (Aix Sponsa) at Bayou Meto, Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, D.H.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    Wood ducks (Aix sponsa) nesting along Bayou Meto downstream from a hazardous waste site in central Arkansas were contaminated with polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs). Residues in eggs, based on 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin equivalents (TCDD-EQ), ranged up to 611 parts per trillion (ppt), and egg arithmetic means were 90-fold higher at the site nearest the point source compared with a reference site. We monitored productivity of wood ducks in artificial nest boxes at three sites on the bayou and at a reference site on a separate drainage during 1988-1990. Productivity was suppressed (p 20 to 50 ppt. Oxidative stress and teratogenic effects occurred in ducklings at the more contaminated nesting sites nearest the point source. These findings suggest that wood ducks may be more sensitive to PCDD and PCDF contamination than some other aquatic birds and could serve as an indicator species for monitoring biological impacts from these contaminants.

  9. Hydrologic data for the Salt Bayou estuary near Sabine Pass, Texas, October 1984 to March 1986

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    Precipitation data were obtained from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration stations at Port Arthur, Anahuac, and Sea Rim State Park and were used to estimate the contribution of freshwater from rainfall. Evaporation data were obtained from Beaumont Research Station and were used to make estimates of water consumption from evapotranspiration. Wind speed and direction were obtained from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration weather station at Sea Rim State Park.

  10. Characterizing Micro- and Macro-Scale Seismicity from Bayou Corne, Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baig, A. M.; Urbancic, T.; Karimi, S.

    2013-12-01

    The initiation of felt seismicity in Bayou Corne, Louisiana, coupled with other phenomena detected by residents on the nearby housing development, prompted a call to install a broadband seismic network to monitor subsurface deformation. The initial deployment was in place to characterize the deformation contemporaneous with the formation of a sinkhole located in close proximity to a salt dome. Seismic events generated during this period followed a swarm-like behaviour with moment magnitudes culminating around Mw2.5. However, the seismic data recorded during this sequence suffer from poor signal to noise, onsets that are very difficult to pick, and the presence of a significant amount of energy arriving later in the waveforms. Efforts to understand the complexity in these waveforms are ongoing, and involve invoking the complexities inherent in recording in a highly attenuating swamp overlying a complex three-dimensional structure with the strong material property contrast of the salt dome. In order to understand the event character, as well as to locally lower the completeness threshold of the sequence, a downhole array of 15 Hz sensors was deployed in a newly drilled well around the salt dome. Although the deployment lasted a little over a month in duration, over 1000 events were detected down to moment magnitude -Mw3. Waveform quality tended to be excellent, with very distinct P and S wave arrivals observable across the array for most events. The highest magnitude events were seen as well on the surface network and allowed for the opportunity to observe the complexities introduced by the site effects, while overcoming the saturation effects on the higher-frequency downhole geophones. This hybrid downhole and surface array illustrates how a full picture of subsurface deformation is only made possible by combining the high-frequency downhole instrumentation to see the microseismicity complemented with a broadband array to accurately characterize the source

  11. A Possible Source Model for VLP Signals in Bayou Corne, LA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leidig, M.; Stroujkova, A. F.

    2013-12-01

    Very Long Period (VLP) signals have been recorded in the Bayou Corne area since the formation of a sinkhole resulting from failed a salt cavern. Sediment and/or water migration is hypothesized to be responsible for these signals. Some key observations regarding these signals include: 1. VLP signals are best recorded at an individual station (LA12) to the southwest of the sinkhole. 2. First VLP event detected 3 days after the sinkhole formed, months after the first seismic events. 3. VLP events increase dramatically in the days preceding sinkhole activity. 4. Natural gas migration potentially occurred for a period of time, possibly months, prior to first VLP event detection. 5. Area near LA12 has undergone at least 2 m of subsidence. 6. VLP activity has continued, even as the cavern has nearly filled with sediment. We have examined various possible source mechanisms in order to understand the origin of the VLP signals. A damped oscillator model in which a surface layer vibrates in response to external disturbances best describes the observed VLP events. The model likely represents the shallow Upper Aquitard (UA) oscillating on top of the Mississippi River Alluvial Aquifer (MRAA). In order for the clay layer of the UA to undulate, the sediments in the MRAA would need to be in a fluidized state, with a viscosity similar to tar or magma. The MRAA is fully saturated with water, and small injections of water into the MRAA could temporarily and locally fluidize the sands and disturb the UA creating a VLP event. In addition, small earthquakes can disturb the system and trigger the oscillations. Lateral movement of fluidized sediments could also disturb the UA and generate a VLP in addition to explaining subsidence near LA12. Lateral extrusion of material into the sinkhole also fits with the lack of detected VLP events prior to the sinkhole formation and the increase in VLP events prior to sinkhole activity. Repeated mappings of the sinkhole geometry indicate the maximum

  12. Inhabitants of the Fresh-Water Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorgensen, Joseph; Schroeder, Marlene

    This learner's guide is designed to assist middle school students in studying freshwater organisms. Following a brief introduction to freshwater ecology, simple line drawings facilitate the identification of plants and animals common to Florida's freshwater ecosystems. Emphasis of the short text which accompanies each illustration is upon the…

  13. Inhabitants of the Fresh-Water Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorgensen, Joseph; Schroeder, Marlene

    This learner's guide is designed to assist middle school students in studying freshwater organisms. Following a brief introduction to freshwater ecology, simple line drawings facilitate the identification of plants and animals common to Florida's freshwater ecosystems. Emphasis of the short text which accompanies each illustration is upon the…

  14. Cable Bacteria in Freshwater Sediments.

    PubMed

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Kristiansen, Michael; Frederiksen, Rasmus B; Dittmer, Anders Lindequist; Bjerg, Jesper Tataru; Trojan, Daniela; Schreiber, Lars; Damgaard, Lars Riis; Schramm, Andreas; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2015-09-01

    In marine sediments cathodic oxygen reduction at the sediment surface can be coupled to anodic sulfide oxidation in deeper anoxic layers through electrical currents mediated by filamentous, multicellular bacteria of the Desulfobulbaceae family, the so-called cable bacteria. Until now, cable bacteria have only been reported from marine environments. In this study, we demonstrate that cable bacteria also occur in freshwater sediments. In a first step, homogenized sediment collected from the freshwater stream Giber Å, Denmark, was incubated in the laboratory. After 2 weeks, pH signatures and electric fields indicated electron transfer between vertically separated anodic and cathodic half-reactions. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed the presence of Desulfobulbaceae filaments. In addition, in situ measurements of oxygen, pH, and electric potential distributions in the waterlogged banks of Giber Å demonstrated the presence of distant electric redox coupling in naturally occurring freshwater sediment. At the same site, filamentous Desulfobulbaceae with cable bacterium morphology were found to be present. Their 16S rRNA gene sequence placed them as a distinct sister group to the known marine cable bacteria, with the genus Desulfobulbus as the closest cultured lineage. The results of the present study indicate that electric currents mediated by cable bacteria could be important for the biogeochemistry in many more environments than anticipated thus far and suggest a common evolutionary origin of the cable phenotype within Desulfobulbaceae with subsequent diversification into a freshwater and a marine lineage. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Cable Bacteria in Freshwater Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Kristiansen, Michael; Frederiksen, Rasmus B.; Dittmer, Anders Lindequist; Bjerg, Jesper Tataru; Trojan, Daniela; Schreiber, Lars; Damgaard, Lars Riis; Schramm, Andreas; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2015-01-01

    In marine sediments cathodic oxygen reduction at the sediment surface can be coupled to anodic sulfide oxidation in deeper anoxic layers through electrical currents mediated by filamentous, multicellular bacteria of the Desulfobulbaceae family, the so-called cable bacteria. Until now, cable bacteria have only been reported from marine environments. In this study, we demonstrate that cable bacteria also occur in freshwater sediments. In a first step, homogenized sediment collected from the freshwater stream Giber Å, Denmark, was incubated in the laboratory. After 2 weeks, pH signatures and electric fields indicated electron transfer between vertically separated anodic and cathodic half-reactions. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed the presence of Desulfobulbaceae filaments. In addition, in situ measurements of oxygen, pH, and electric potential distributions in the waterlogged banks of Giber Å demonstrated the presence of distant electric redox coupling in naturally occurring freshwater sediment. At the same site, filamentous Desulfobulbaceae with cable bacterium morphology were found to be present. Their 16S rRNA gene sequence placed them as a distinct sister group to the known marine cable bacteria, with the genus Desulfobulbus as the closest cultured lineage. The results of the present study indicate that electric currents mediated by cable bacteria could be important for the biogeochemistry in many more environments than anticipated thus far and suggest a common evolutionary origin of the cable phenotype within Desulfobulbaceae with subsequent diversification into a freshwater and a marine lineage. PMID:26116678

  16. Freshwater sculpins: phylogenetics to ecology

    Treesearch

    Susan B. Adams; David A. Schmetterling

    2007-01-01

    Freshwater sculpins (Cottidae) are a diverse and ecologically important component of cool- and coldwater ecosystems throughout the northern hemisphere. More than 60 sculpin species occur in a variety of habitats, and sculpin distributions range from highly localized to widespread. Despite the frequently high biomass of sculpins and their numerous ecosystem functions,...

  17. Quantifying the Spatial Configuration of Impervious Cover and its Effect on Runoff Generation in the Whiteoak Bayou Watershed In Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivera, F.; Defee, B. B.

    2005-12-01

    This study examines the relationship between the developing landscape and the water flowing through it in the Whiteoak Bayou watershed located in the coastal plains in Harris County, Texas, on the northwest outskirts of Houston. The area was 223-km2 and the analysis period spanned from January 1, 1949, to December 31, 2000. Daily streamflow data for the 52 years was obtained from USGS and coincident precipitation data was obtained from NOAA. Georeferenced parcel-level land use data was obtained from the Harris County Appraisal District with sufficient detail to determine the parcel area, the year of development, and the building area. Watershed boundaries were obtained from the Harris County Flood Control District. The analysis of the flow series showed striking changes in the flow regime around years 1972 and 1985, which were not associated to changes in the somewhat steady increasing trend of the watershed total developed area or impervious cover. This study aimed at determining measures of development that could explain the flow regime changes in the Whiteoak Bayou watershed. As part of the analysis, geographic information systems (GIS) and spatial metrics were utilized to describe the changes in the broad-scale patterns of the human-developed portion of the landscape, and to relate them to changes in streamflow over time. FRAGSTATS was used to quantify spatial patterns in the developed landscape on an annual basis. It was found that models based on the spatial configuration of the developed landscape capture better the flow regime changes. In particular, it was found that the decline in the number of developed patches, caused by the filling of the gaps in the built areas, coincided with an identifiable increase in flow rates.

  18. Summary statistics and graphical comparisons of specific conductance, temperature, and dissolved oxygen data, Buffalo Bayou, Houston, Texas, April 1986-March 1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, D.W.; Paul, E.M.

    1995-01-01

    Buffalo Bayou is the major stream that drains the Houston, Texas, metropolitan area. The U.S. Geological Survey has provided specific conductance, temperature, and dissolved oxygen data to the City of Houston for three sites along a 7.7-mile reach of Buffalo Bayou since 1986. Summary statistics and graphical comparisons of the data show substantial variability in the properties during 1986-91. Specific conductance ranged from about 100 microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius at each of the three sites to 17,100 microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius at the most downstream site, at the headwaters of the Houston Ship Channel. Water temperatures ranged from 5 to 33 degrees Celsius. Temperatures were very similar at the two upstream sites and slightly warmer at the most downstream site. Dissolved oxygen ranged from zero at the most downstream site to 11.7 milligrams per liter at the most upstream site.

  19. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 6): Petro-Chemical (Turtle Bayou), Liberty County, TX. (Second remedial action), September 1991. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-06

    The 500-acre Petro-Chemical (Turtle Bayou) site is in Liberty County, Texas. Current land use in the area is divided among cropland, pasture, range, forest, and small rural communities. Since 1971, numerous undocumented disposal activities occurred onsite involving primarily petrochemical wastes. The ROD for OU2 focuses on three areas of contamination at the site affecting soil and ground water contamination, known as the main waste area, the east disposal area, and the Bayou disposal area. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil and ground water are VOCs including benzene and xylenes; other organics including PAHs; and metals including lead. The selected remedial action for the site includes treating 302,800 cubic yards of contaminated soil onsite using in-situ vapor extraction to remove VOCs, controlling vertical air infiltration using an engineered soil and synthetic liner cap; consolidating lead-contaminated soil in the Main Waste Area, followed by capping.

  20. Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) and endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in stormwater canals and Bayou St. John in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Glen R; Palmeri, Jordan M; Zhang, Shaoyuan; Grimm, Deborah A

    2004-10-15

    Samples were collected from two stormwater canals and a recreational urban waterway known as Bayou St. John in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA and analyzed for a range of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) and endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Concentrations of 7 PPCPs and EDCs were measured by a method that provides for simultaneous extraction and quantification of the following compounds: clofibric acid, naproxen, ibuprofen, fluoxetine, clorophene, triclosan, bisphenol A. The method also was used as an indicator of the occurrence of estrogenic compounds by targeting estrone and 17beta-estradiol. The two canals (Orleans and London) are used to drain a portion of the city's stormwater directly into the Mississippi River or Lake Pontchartrain. Bayou St. John is located between the two canals and supplied with water from Lake Pontchartrain. Results from the 6-month sampling period indicated the following concentration ranges for the two stormwater canals: naproxen (ND - 145 ng/l), ibuprofen (ND - 674 ng/l), triclosan (ND - 29 ng/l) and bisphenol A (1.9-158 ng/l). Concentrations of these target analytes increased with cumulative rainfall. For bayou waters, only naproxen (2.1-4.8 ng/l) and bisphenol A (0.9-44 ng/l) were detected. Estrone was detected but determined non-quantifiable for multiple sampling events at the 3 sites. None of the other target analytes (clofibric acid, fluoxetine, clorophene, and 17beta-estradiol) were detected above their method detection levels. Results of this study demonstrate the occurrence of PPCPs and EDCs in New Orleans stormwater canals and Bayou St. John. Results also demonstrate the use of this analytical technique as an indicator of non-point source sewage contamination in New Orleans stormwater canals.

  1. Subsurface geology and potential for geopressured-geothermal energy in the Turtle Bayou field-Kent Bayou field area, Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, D.R.

    1982-09-01

    A 216 square mile area approximately 65 miles southwest of New Orleans, Louisiana, has been geologically evaluated to determine its potential for geopressured-geothermal energy production. The structural and stratigraphic analyses were made with emphasis upon the Early and Middle Miocene age sediments which lie close to and within the geopressured section. Three geopressured sands, the Robulus (43) sand, Cibicides opima sand, and Cristellaria (I) sand, are evaluated for their potential of producing geothermal energy. Two of these sands, the Robulus (43) sand and the Cibicides opima sand, meet several of the United States Department of Energy's suggested minimum requirements for a prospective geopressured-geothermal energy reservoir.

  2. Tracking Freshwater from Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsdorf, D.

    2005-05-01

    River discharge as well as lake and wetland storage of water are critical elements of land surface hydrology, yet they are poorly observed globally and the prospects for improvement from in-situ networks are bleak. Considering this, a NASA Surface Water working group has been focused on answering the following science and applications questions: (1) What are the observational and data assimilation requirements for measuring natural and manmade surface storage and river discharge that will allow us to (a) understand the land surface branch of the global hydrologic cycle, (b) predict the consequences of global change, and (c) make assessments for water resources management? (2) What are the roles of wetlands, lakes, and rivers (a) as regulators of biogeochemical and constituent cycles (e.g., carbon, nutrients, and sediments) and (b) in creating or ameliorating water-related hazards of relevance to society? Global models of weather and climate could be constrained spatially and temporally by stream discharge and surface storage measurements. Yet this constraint is rarely applied, despite weather and climate modeling results showing that predicted precipitation is often inconsistent with observed discharge. Thus, as satellite missions are developed for global observations of critical hydrologic parameters such as soil moisture (i.e., HYDROS) and precipitation (i.e., GPM), the lack of concomitant measurements of runoff and surface water storage at compatible spatial and temporal scales may well result in inconsistent parameterizations of global hydrologic, weather, and climate models. Fortunately, several spaceborne methods have provided potential avenues toward answering these hydrologic questions. Among the most promising are active radar and lidar methods that measure inundation area, water heights, and changes. For example, radar altimetry is well known for its ability to measure ocean surface topography and such methods should be easily adaptable to inland waters

  3. Freshwater Biodiversity and Insect Diversification

    PubMed Central

    Dijkstra, Klaas-Douwe B.; Monaghan, Michael T.; Pauls, Steffen U.

    2016-01-01

    Inland waters cover less than one percent of Earth’s surface, but harbor more than six percent of all insect species: nearly 100,000 species from 12 orders spend one or more life stages in freshwater. Little is known about how this remarkable diversity arose, although allopatric speciation and ecological adaptation are thought to be primary mechanisms. Freshwater habitats are exceptionally susceptible to environmental change, and exhibit marked ecological gradients. The amphibiotic lifestyles of aquatic insects result in complex contributions of extinction and allopatric and non-allopatric speciation in species diversification. In contrast to the lack of evolutionary studies, the ecology and habitat preferences of aquatic insects have been intensively studied, in part because of their widespread use as bio-indicators. The combination of phylogenetics with the extensive ecological data provides a promising avenue for future research, making aquatic insects highly suitable models for the study of ecological diversification. PMID:24160433

  4. Water quality for freshwater fish

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, G. )

    1994-01-01

    This timely and up-to-date volume brings together recent critical reviews on water quality requirements for freshwater fish commissioned by the European Inland Fisheries Advisory Commission, an agency of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization. It provides a unique and authoritative source of critically evaluated water quality data concerning the effects of chromium, nickel, aluminum and nitrite on freshwater fish and includes an assessment of the toxicity of mixtures. The reports presented in this volume cover all stages of the life cycle and relevant trophic levels, including aquatic invertebrates and plants and potential bioaccumulation through the food chain. An extensive bibliography is provided for each chapter as well as a glossary of terms and a list of fish species mentioned in the text. This compilation of papers is the definitive reference volume for chemists, biologists, ecologists and toxicologists as well as for water resource managers concerned with management and control of pollution in fresh waters.

  5. Changing Arctic Ocean freshwater pathways.

    PubMed

    Morison, James; Kwok, Ron; Peralta-Ferriz, Cecilia; Alkire, Matt; Rigor, Ignatius; Andersen, Roger; Steele, Mike

    2012-01-04

    Freshening in the Canada basin of the Arctic Ocean began in the 1990s and continued to at least the end of 2008. By then, the Arctic Ocean might have gained four times as much fresh water as comprised the Great Salinity Anomaly of the 1970s, raising the spectre of slowing global ocean circulation. Freshening has been attributed to increased sea ice melting and contributions from runoff, but a leading explanation has been a strengthening of the Beaufort High--a characteristic peak in sea level atmospheric pressure--which tends to accelerate an anticyclonic (clockwise) wind pattern causing convergence of fresh surface water. Limited observations have made this explanation difficult to verify, and observations of increasing freshwater content under a weakened Beaufort High suggest that other factors must be affecting freshwater content. Here we use observations to show that during a time of record reductions in ice extent from 2005 to 2008, the dominant freshwater content changes were an increase in the Canada basin balanced by a decrease in the Eurasian basin. Observations are drawn from satellite data (sea surface height and ocean-bottom pressure) and in situ data. The freshwater changes were due to a cyclonic (anticlockwise) shift in the ocean pathway of Eurasian runoff forced by strengthening of the west-to-east Northern Hemisphere atmospheric circulation characterized by an increased Arctic Oscillation index. Our results confirm that runoff is an important influence on the Arctic Ocean and establish that the spatial and temporal manifestations of the runoff pathways are modulated by the Arctic Oscillation, rather than the strength of the wind-driven Beaufort Gyre circulation.

  6. Sulfur cycling in freshwater sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klug, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Organic sulfur containing compounds represent greater than 80% of the total sulfur in sediments of eutrophic freshwater lakes. Although sedimentary sulfur is predominantly in the form of organic compounds, more sulfur is transformed by sulfate reduction than by any other process. Rates of sulfate reduction in these sediments average 7 mmol/sq m/day. This rate is 19 times greater than the net rate of production of inorganic sulfur from organic compounds on an annual basis.

  7. The Freshwater Information Platform - an online network supporting freshwater biodiversity research and policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt-Kloiber, Astrid; De Wever, Aaike; Bremerich, Vanessa; Strackbein, Jörg; Hering, Daniel; Jähnig, Sonja; Kiesel, Jens; Martens, Koen; Tockner, Klement

    2017-04-01

    Species distribution data is crucial for improving our understanding of biodiversity and its threats. This is especially the case for freshwater environments, which are heavily affected by the global biodiversity crisis. Currently, a huge body of freshwater biodiversity data is often difficult to access, because systematic data publishing practices have not yet been adopted by the freshwater research community. The Freshwater Information Platform (FIP; www.freshwaterplatform.eu) - initiated through the BioFresh project - aims at pooling freshwater related research information from a variety of projects and initiatives to make it easily accessible for scientists, water managers and conservationists as well as the interested public. It consists of several major components, three of which we want to specifically address: (1) The Freshwater Biodiversity Data Portal aims at mobilising freshwater biodiversity data, making them online available Datasets in the portal are described and documented in the (2) Freshwater Metadatabase and published as open access articles in the Freshwater Metadata Journal. The use of collected datasets for large-scale analyses and models is demonstrated in the (3) Global Freshwater Biodiversity Atlas that publishes interactive online maps featuring research results on freshwater biodiversity, resources, threats and conservation priorities. Here we present the main components of the FIP as tools to streamline open access freshwater data publication arguing this will improve the capacity to protect and manage freshwater biodiversity in the face of global change.

  8. Freshwater bacterial lifestyles inferred from comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Livermore, Joshua A; Emrich, Scott J; Tan, John; Jones, Stuart E

    2014-03-01

    While micro-organisms actively mediate and participate in freshwater ecosystem services, we know little about freshwater microbial genetic diversity. Genome sequences are available for many bacteria from the human microbiome and the ocean (over 800 and 200, respectively), but only two freshwater genomes are currently available: the streamlined genomes of Polynucleobacter necessarius ssp. asymbioticus and the Actinobacterium AcI-B1. Here, we sequenced and analysed draft genomes of eight phylogentically diverse freshwater bacteria exhibiting a range of lifestyle characteristics. Comparative genomics of these bacteria reveals putative freshwater bacterial lifestyles based on differences in predicted growth rate, capability to respond to environmental stimuli and diversity of useable carbon substrates. Our conceptual model based on these genomic characteristics provides a foundation on which further ecophysiological and genomic studies can be built. In addition, these genomes greatly expand the diversity of existing genomic context for future studies on the ecology and genetics of freshwater bacteria.

  9. 40 CFR 35.1605-3 - Publicly owned freshwater lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Publicly owned freshwater lake. 35.1605... Owned Freshwater Lakes § 35.1605-3 Publicly owned freshwater lake. A freshwater lake that offers public... maintaining the public access and recreational facilities of this lake or other publicly owned freshwater...

  10. Freshwater fishes of northern Australia.

    PubMed

    Pusey, Bradley J; Burrows, Damien W; Kennard, Mark J; Perna, Colton N; Unmack, Peter J; Allsop, Quentin; Hammer, Michael P

    2017-04-11

    Northern Australia is biologically diverse and of national and global conservation signicance. Its ancient landscape contains the world's largest area of savannah ecosystem in good ecological condition and its rivers are largely free-flowing. Agriculture, previously confined largely to open range-land grazing, is set to expand in extent and to focus much more on irrigated cropping and horticulture. Demands on the water resources of the region are thus, inevitably increasing. Reliable information is required to guide and inform development and help plan for a sustainable future for the region which includes healthy rivers that contain diverse fish assemblages. Based on a range of information sources, including the outcomes of recent and extensive new field surveys, this study maps the distribution of the 111 freshwater fishes (excluding elasmobranches) and 42 estuarine vagrants recorded from freshwater habitats of the region. We classify the habitat use and migratory biology of each species. This study provides a comprehensive assessment of the diversity and distribution of fishes of the region within a standardised nomenclatural framework. In addition, we summarise the outcomes of recent phylogeographic and phylogenetic research using molecular technologies to identify where issues of taxonomy may need further scrutiny. The study provides an informed basis for further research on the spatial arrangement of biodiversity and its relationship to environmental factors (e.g. hydrology), conservation planning and phylogentic variation within individual taxa.

  11. Why are freshwater fish so threatened?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Closs, Gerard P.; Angermeier, Paul; Darwall, William R.T.; Balcombe, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding why so many freshwater fish species are threatened requires some understanding of their biology, diversity, distribution, biogeography and ecology, but also some appreciation of the social, economic and political forces that are causing humans to destroy the natural ecosystems upon which we all ultimately depend. To begin to understand the diversity of freshwater fishes, we first need to consider the processes that generated and continue to sustain the diversity of species we see today. Based on an understanding of how freshwater fish diversity is generated and sustained, we consider how vulnerable or resilient various freshwater fishes are to the range of anthropogenic impacts that impinge on freshwater ecosystems. Finally, we discuss how social, political and economic drivers influence human impacts on natural systems, and the changes needed to current models of development that can lead to a sustainable future for humans and the diverse range of freshwater fish species with which we share our planet. The aim of this chapter is to provide an overview of the key issues and threats driving the declines in freshwater fish diversity identified in Chapter 1; subsequent chapters provide more detail on the key issues and address our options for developing a sustainable future for freshwater fishes.

  12. Freshwater Ecology. LC Science Tracer Bullet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niskern, Diana, Comp.

    Freshwater ecosystems include lakes, ponds, streams, rivers, and certain types of wetlands. This literature and resources guide is not intended to be a comprehensive bibliography on freshwater ecology; the guide is designed--as the name of the series implies--to put the reader or student "on target." Other literature guides related to…

  13. Effects of Pollution on Freshwater Fish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brungs, W. A.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of the effects of pollution on freshwater fish, covering publications of 1976-77. This review includes: (1) water quality; (2) pesticide pollutants; (3) chemical pollutants; (4) miscellaneous pollutants; and (5) physical factors of pollution on freshwater fish. A list of 338 references is also presented. (HM)

  14. Effects of Pollution on Freshwater Fish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brungs, W. A.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of the effects of pollution on freshwater fish, covering publications of 1976-77. This review includes: (1) water quality; (2) pesticide pollutants; (3) chemical pollutants; (4) miscellaneous pollutants; and (5) physical factors of pollution on freshwater fish. A list of 338 references is also presented. (HM)

  15. Freshwater Biological Traits Database (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA announced the release of the final report, Freshwater Biological Traits Database. This report discusses the development of a database of freshwater biological traits. The database combines several existing traits databases into an online format. The database is also...

  16. Freshwater Biological Traits Database (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cover of the <span class=Freshwater Biological Traits Database Final Report"> This final report discusses the development of a database of freshwater biolo...

  17. Freshwater Biological Traits Database (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA announced the release of the final report, Freshwater Biological Traits Database. This report discusses the development of a database of freshwater biological traits. The database combines several existing traits databases into an online format. The database is also...

  18. Sonar atlas of caverns comprising the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Volume 1, Bayou Choctaw site, Louisiana.

    SciTech Connect

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Lord, Anna Snider

    2007-10-01

    Downhole sonar surveys from the four active U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites have been modeled and used to generate a four-volume sonar atlas, showing the three-dimensional geometry of each cavern. This volume 1 focuses on the Bayou Choctaw SPR site, located in southern Louisiana. Volumes 2, 3, and 4, respectively, present images for the Big Hill SPR site, Texas, the Bryan Mound SPR site, Texas, and the West Hackberry SPR site, Louisiana. The atlas uses a consistent presentation format throughout. The basic geometric measurements provided by the down-cavern surveys have also been used to generate a number of geometric attributes, the values of which have been mapped onto the geometric form of each cavern using a color-shading scheme. The intent of the various geometrical attributes is to highlight deviations of the cavern shape from the idealized cylindrical form of a carefully leached underground storage cavern in salt. The atlas format does not allow interpretation of such geometric deviations and anomalies. However, significant geometric anomalies, not directly related to the leaching history of the cavern, may provide insight into the internal structure of the relevant salt dome.

  19. Freshwater to seawater transitions in migratory fishes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zydlewski, Joseph; Michael P. Wilkie,

    2012-01-01

    The transition from freshwater to seawater is integral to the life history of many fishes. Diverse migratory fishes express anadromous, catadromous, and amphidromous life histories, while others make incomplete transits between freshwater and seawater. The physiological mechanisms of osmoregulation are widely conserved among phylogenetically diverse species. Diadromous fishes moving between freshwater and seawater develop osmoregulatory mechanisms for different environmental salinities. Freshwater to seawater transition involves hormonally mediated changes in gill ionocytes and the transport proteins associated with hypoosmoregulation, increased seawater ingestion and water absorption in the intestine, and reduced urinary water losses. Fishes attain salinity tolerance through early development, gradual acclimation, or environmentally or developmentally cued adaptations. This chapter describes adaptations in diverse taxa and the effects of salinity on growth. Identifying common strategies in diadromous fishes moving between freshwater and seawater will reveal the ecological and physiological basis for maintaining homeostasis in different salinities, and inform efforts to conserve and manage migratory euryhaline fishes.

  20. Freshwater for resilience: a shift in thinking.

    PubMed Central

    Folke, Carl

    2003-01-01

    Humanity shapes freshwater flows and biosphere dynamics from a local to a global scale. Successful management of target resources in the short term tends to alienate the social and economic development process from its ultimate dependence on the life-supporting environment. Freshwater becomes transformed into a resource for optimal management in development, neglecting the multiple functions of freshwater in dynamic landscapes and its fundamental role as the bloodstream of the biosphere. The current tension of these differences in worldview is exemplified through the recent development of modern aquaculture contrasted with examples of catchment-based stewardship of freshwater flows in dynamic landscapes. In particular, the social and institutional dimension of catchment management is highlighted and features of social-ecological systems for resilience building are presented. It is concluded that this broader view of freshwater provides the foundation for hydrosolidarity. PMID:14728796

  1. Terestrial Freshwater Lenses: Unexplored subterranean oases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laattoe, T.; Werner, A. D.; Woods, J.; Cartwright, I.

    2016-12-01

    Freshwater lenses are lenticular bodies of fresh groundwater that float above more saline groundwater due to freshwater-saltwater density differences. There is presently a dearth of information on their occurrence and controlling factors in terrestrial settings, as opposed to the widely studied situation of coastal aquifers. This is despite saltwater being a common feature of inland aquifers, particularly in arid and semi-arid settings, where limited freshwater provides critical sustenance for ecosystems and human endeavor. In this review, we identify and classify known terrestrial freshwater lenses (TFLs) according to 4 formation categories, including topography, geology, groundwater surface water interaction and primary recharge mechanism. Buoyancy forces lead to the occurrence of TFLs in otherwise unlikely situations, indicating that TFLs may be more prevalent that previous thought. We conclude the TFLs represent some of the most vulnerable and precious freshwater resources on earth, and as such, require considerably more research attention to characterize environmental dependencies and primary threats.

  2. Effects of Stormwater Pipe Size and Rainfall on Sediment and Nutrients Delivered to a Coastal Bayou.

    PubMed

    Grigas, Daniel; Lehrter, John; Cebrian, Just; Chen, Yushun; Ehmen, Brenna; Woodrey, Mark

    2015-09-01

    Pollutants discharged from stormwater pipes can cause water quality and ecosystem problems in coastal bayous. A study was conducted to characterize sediment and nutrients discharged by small and large (< 20 cm and >20 cm in internal diameters, respectively) pipes under different rainfall intensities (< 2.54 cm and > 2.54 cm, respectively). Results showed that large pipes had greater discharge than small pipes. Pollutants concentrations did not vary by pipe size. Large pipes had greater loads of TSS (138.2 vs. 24.0 mg/s), NO3(-) (5.54 vs. 2.74 mg/s), and NH4(+) (0.39 vs. 0.19 mg/s) than small pipes. Neither discharge nor constituents varied by rainfall events. Pipe size may be a useful metric for estimating loads to a system. Nutrient reduction efforts should be directed to reducing the dissolved nutrient pools, while stormwater management efforts should be directed to reducing pipe freshwater discharge volumes that drive constituent loads.

  3. Swimming in the USA: Beachgoer Characteristics and Health Outcomes at U.S. Marine and Freshwater Beaches

    EPA Science Inventory

    Swimming in lakes and oceans is popular, but tittle is known about the demographic characteristics, behaviors, and health risks of beachgoers on a national level. Data from a prospective cohort study of beachgoers at multiple marine and freshwater beaches in the USA were used to ...

  4. Swimming in the USA: Beachgoer Characteristics and Health Outcomes at U.S. Marine and Freshwater Beaches

    EPA Science Inventory

    Swimming in lakes and oceans is popular, but tittle is known about the demographic characteristics, behaviors, and health risks of beachgoers on a national level. Data from a prospective cohort study of beachgoers at multiple marine and freshwater beaches in the USA were used to ...

  5. National Water-Quality Assessment Program; summary of pesticide data collected on Whites Bayou near Anahuac, Texas, March to September 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1995-01-01

    One water-quality monitoring site was established on Whites Bayou, at the downstream end of the study area. Sampling began in March 1994 and will continue for 1 year. Sampling frequency ranges from four times per month in May and June to once per month in July. Stream-stage measurements were made three times per week from April to September. Field measurements during sampling include stream stage and discharge, water temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, and specific conductance. Laboratory analyses include major inorganic ions, nutrients, sediment, and pesticides.

  6. Pathogenic agents in freshwater resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geldreich, Edwin E.

    1996-02-01

    Numerous pathogenic agents have been found in freshwaters used as sources for water supplies, recreational bathing and irrigation. These agents include bacterial pathogens, enteric viruses, several protozoans and parasitic worms more common to tropical waters. Although infected humans are a major source of pathogens, farm animals (cattle, sheep, pigs), animal pets (dogs, cats) and wildlife serve as significant reservoirs and should not be ignored. The range of infected individuals within a given warm-blooded animal group (humans included) may range from 1 to 25%. Survival times for pathogens in the water environment may range from a few days to as much as a year (Ascaris, Taenia eggs), with infective dose levels varying from one viable cell for several primary pathogenic agents to many thousands of cells for a given opportunistic pathogen.As pathogen detection in water is complex and not readily incorporated into routine monitoring, a surrogate is necessary. In general, indicators of faecal contamination provide a positive correlation with intestinal pathogen occurrences only when appropriate sample volumes are examined by sensitive methodology.Pathways by which pathogens reach susceptible water users include ingestion of contaminated water, body contact with polluted recreational waters and consumption of salad crops irrigated by polluted freshwaters. Major contributors to the spread of various water-borne pathogens are sewage, polluted surface waters and stormwater runoff. All of these contributions are intensified during periods of major floods. Several water-borne case histories are cited as examples of breakdowns in public health protection related to water supply, recreational waters and the consumption of contaminated salad crops. In the long term, water resource management must focus on pollution prevention from point sources of waste discharges and the spread of pathogens in watershed stormwater runoff.

  7. Novel Synechococcus Genomes Reconstructed from Freshwater Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Cabello-Yeves, Pedro J.; Haro-Moreno, Jose M.; Martin-Cuadrado, Ana-Belen; Ghai, Rohit; Picazo, Antonio; Camacho, Antonio; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Freshwater picocyanobacteria including Synechococcus remain poorly studied at the genomic level, compared to their marine representatives. Here, using a metagenomic assembly approach we discovered two novel Synechococcus sp. genomes from two freshwater reservoirs Tous and Lake Lanier, both sharing 96% average nucleotide identity and displaying high abundance levels in these two lakes located at similar altitudes and temperate latitudes. These new genomes have the smallest estimated size (2.2 Mb) and average intergenic spacer length (20 bp) of any previously sequenced freshwater Synechococcus, which may contribute to their success in oligotrophic freshwater systems. Fluorescent in situ hybridization confirmed that Synechococcus sp. Tous comprises small cells (0.987 ± 0.139 μm length, 0.723 ± 0.119 μm width) that amount to 90% of the picocyanobacteria in Tous. They appear together in a phylogenomic tree with Synechococcus sp. RCC307 strain, the main representative of sub-cluster 5.3 that has itself one of the smallest marine Synechococcus genomes. We detected a type II phycobilisome (PBS) gene cluster in both genomes, which suggests that they belong to a phycoerythrin-rich pink low-light ecotype. The decrease of acidic proteins and the higher content of basic transporters and membrane proteins in the novel Synechococcus genomes, compared to marine representatives, support their freshwater specialization. A sulfate Cys transporter which is absent in marine but has been identified in many freshwater cyanobacteria was also detected in Synechococcus sp. Tous. The RuBisCo subunits from this microbe are phylogenetically close to the freshwater amoeba Paulinella chromatophora symbiont, hinting to a freshwater origin of the carboxysome operon of this protist. The novel genomes enlarge the known diversity of freshwater Synechococcus and improve the overall knowledge of the relationships among members of this genus at large. PMID:28680419

  8. Contamination of the freshwater ecosystem by pesticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cope, Oliver B.

    1966-01-01

    A large part of our disquieting present-day pesticide problem is intimately tied to the freshwater ecosystem. Economic poisons are used in so many types of terrain to control so many kinds of organisms that almost all lakes and streams are likely to be contaminated. In addition to accidental contamination many pesticides are deliberately applied directly to fresh waters for suppression of aquatic animals or plants. The problem is intensified because of the extreme susceptibility of freshwater organisms. The complexity of freshwater environments and their variety makes it difficult to comprehend the total effect of pesticides.

  9. 40 CFR 35.1605-3 - Publicly owned freshwater lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Publicly owned freshwater lake. 35.1605... Owned Freshwater Lakes § 35.1605-3 Publicly owned freshwater lake. A freshwater lake that offers public access to the lake through publicly owned contiguous land so that any person has the same opportunity to...

  10. 40 CFR 35.1605-3 - Publicly owned freshwater lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Publicly owned freshwater lake. 35.1605... Owned Freshwater Lakes § 35.1605-3 Publicly owned freshwater lake. A freshwater lake that offers public access to the lake through publicly owned contiguous land so that any person has the same opportunity to...

  11. 40 CFR 35.1605-3 - Publicly owned freshwater lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Publicly owned freshwater lake. 35.1605... Owned Freshwater Lakes § 35.1605-3 Publicly owned freshwater lake. A freshwater lake that offers public access to the lake through publicly owned contiguous land so that any person has the same opportunity to...

  12. 40 CFR 35.1605-3 - Publicly owned freshwater lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Publicly owned freshwater lake. 35.1605... Owned Freshwater Lakes § 35.1605-3 Publicly owned freshwater lake. A freshwater lake that offers public access to the lake through publicly owned contiguous land so that any person has the same opportunity to...

  13. A Method to Measure the Temporal Variation of Freshwater-Saltwater Interface and Applications to Coastal Aquifers in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, H.; Kim, Y.; Lee, S. H.; Ha, K.

    2016-12-01

    Management of coastal aquifers is becoming increasingly important with the growing population near the coast and prospects of global climate change. Therefore, many countries have installed monitoring wells along coastlines and monitor the groundwater level and electric conductivity at fixed depths. To prevent the salt water intrusion, however, it is necessary to observe the temporal variation of the freshwater-saltwater interface. In the present study, we developed a monitoring device to monitor the temporal variation of the freshwater-saltwater interface directly based on the concept of the neutral buoyancy. The devices were installed at monitoring well of the Yellow sea coast and eastern coast of Jeju island in Korea, and time series data of the freshwater-saltwater interface were obtained as well as the groundwater level. The groundwater level and freshwater-salter interface data are highly correlated with the tide level of which the lag times were 80 and 195 minute, respectively. To predict the temporal change of groundwater level and freshwater-saltwater interface, time series models based on an artificial neural network were developed. The result of the prediction shows that correlation coefficients between observed and predicted values are over 0.9 and 0.78 for groundwater level and freshwater-saltwater interface, respectively.

  14. Pipeline corridors through wetlands - impacts on plant communities: Bayou Grand Cane, De Soto Parish, Louisiana. Topical report, August 1991--July 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Shem, L.M.; Zimmerman, R.E.; Hayes, D.; Van Dyke, G.D. |

    1994-12-01

    The goal of the Gas Research Institute Wetland Corridors Program is to document impacts of existing pipeline on the wetlands they traverse. To accomplish this goal, 12 existing wetland crossings were surveyed. These sites varied in elapsed time since pipeline construction, wetland type, pipeline installation techniques, and night of-way (ROW) management practices. This report presents the results of a survey conducted over the period of August 12-13, 1991, at the Bayou Grand Cane crossing in De Soto Parish, Louisiana, where a pipeline constructed three years prior to the survey crosses the bayou through mature bottomland hardwoods. The sit was not seeded or fertilized after construction activities. At the time of sampling, a dense herb stratum (composed of mostly native species) covered the 20-m-wide ROW, except within drainage channels. As a result of the creation of the ROW, new habitat was created, plant diversity increased, and forest habitat became fragmented. The ROW must be maintained at an early stage of succession to allow access to the pipeline however, impacts to the wetland were minimized by decreasing the width of the ROW to 20 m and recreating the drainage channels across the ROW. The canopy trees on the ROW`s edge shaded part of the ROW, which helped to minimize the effects of the ROW.

  15. Simulation of the effects of groundwater withdrawals on water-level altitudes in the Sparta aquifer in the Bayou Meto-Grand Prairie area of eastern Arkansas, 2007-37

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Brian R.; Westerman, Drew A.; Fugitt, D. Todd

    2011-01-01

    A groundwater-flow model of the Mississippi embayment was used to evaluate changes in water-level altitudes before (scenario 1) and after (scenario 2) the addition of wells that simulate potential future pumping from the Sparta aquifer in the Bayou Meto-Grand Prairie area of eastern Arkansas for the 30-year period from 2007 through 2037. Water-level altitudes at six model cell locations from the two different scenarios were compared for the period 2007 through 2037. Potential future pumping wells were added to the Mississippi Embayment Regional Aquifer Study model at a rate of 13 wells per year within areas of potential future pumping. Change maps for the Bayou Meto-Grand Prairie area were constructed for each scenario and water-level hydrographs were constructed for each scenario for each of the six model cell locations. The additional pumping from wells in the Sparta aquifer created greater water-level declines in the Bayou Meto-Grand Prairie area. In scenario 1, simulated water-level altitude declines range from 20 to 40 feet from 2007 through 2037. In scenario 2, the cone of depression in Lonoke County is the deepest, with a maximum water-level decline of approximately 102 feet. Water-level altitude declines range from 40 to 50 feet over most of the remainder of the Bayou Meto-Grand Prairie area in scenario 2. Simulated water-level altitudes across the Bayou Meto-Grand Prairie area and at all six model cell locations indicate substantial declines when additional wells pumping from the Sparta aquifer are introduced into the model from 2007 through 2037.

  16. Native Freshwater Fish and Mussel Species Richness

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These data represent predicted current distributions of all native freshwater fish and freshwater mussels in the Middle-Atlantic region. The data are available for both 8-digit HUCs and EMAP hexagons and represent total species counts for each spatial unit. More information about these resources, including the variables used in this study, may be found here: https://edg.epa.gov/data/Public/ORD/NERL/ReVA/ReVA_Data.zip.

  17. Estimated freshwater withdrawals in Washington, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lane, Ron C.; Welch, Wendy B.

    2015-03-18

    The amount of public- and self-supplied water used for domestic, irrigation, livestock, aquaculture, industrial, mining, and thermoelectric power was estimated for state, county, and eastern and western regions of Washington during calendar year 2010. Withdrawals of freshwater for offstream uses were estimated to be about 4,885 million gallons per day. The total estimated freshwater withdrawals for 2010 was approximately 15 percent less than the 2005 estimate because of decreases in irrigation and thermoelectric power withdrawals.

  18. Human freshwater demand for economic activity and ecosystems in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Ferng, Jiun-Jiun

    2007-12-01

    Freshwater is necessary to economic activity, and humans depend on goods and services generated by water-dependent ecosystems. However, national freshwater management usually focuses on direct use of domestic freshwater. With an increasing scarcity of freshwater, attention has turned to two indirect uses of freshwater by humans. The first indirect use is freshwater used by foreign countries when producing products for export. The second use is freshwater required by local ecosystems: human survival and development depend on goods and services generated in these ecosystems. This work adopted Taiwan as a case study. In addition to two widely recognized ecosystem freshwater demands, evapotranspiration and reversed river flow, this study suggests that freshwater is a constituent of some abiotic components, such as groundwater in aquifers, because excessive withdrawal has already caused significant land subsidence in Taiwan. Moreover, the estimated results show that Taiwan's net imports of freshwater through trade amounts to approximately 25% of its total freshwater use for economic production. Integrating industrial policy, trade policy, and national freshwater management is a useful approach for developing strategies to limit the growing use of freshwater in Taiwan. Policy implications are then developed by further analyzing withdrawal sources of freshwater (domestic and foreign) for supporting economic production in Taiwan and identifying the factors (domestic final demand and export) driving freshwater-intensive products.

  19. Terrestrial freshwater lenses: Unexplored subterranean oases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laattoe, Tariq; Werner, Adrian D.; Woods, Juliette A.; Cartwright, Ian

    2017-10-01

    Freshwater lenses are lenticular bodies of fresh (TDS < 1000 mg/L) groundwater that develop above more saline groundwater within the same host aquifer due in part to buoyancy. In contrast to the widely studied situation of freshwater lenses in coastal aquifers, the formation, location and persistence of freshwater lenses in terrestrial settings are poorly understood. This is despite inland aquifers commonly containing saline groundwater, particularly in arid and semi-arid climates, and the local occurrences of freshwater being critical for ecosystems and human endeavour. We identify and classify known terrestrial freshwater lenses (TFLs) using four formation categories, namely topography, geology, groundwater-surface water interaction and recharge mechanisms. The resulting typology highlights the importance of buoyancy in the formation of TFLs in otherwise unlikely situations, implying that TFLs may be more prevalent than previously thought. TFLs represent some of the most vulnerable and precious freshwater resources on Earth that require considerably more research into mechanisms of formation and threats to their existence.

  20. Freshwater Commercial Bycatch: an Understated Conservation Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Raby, Graham D.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Blouin-Demers, Gabriel; Cooke, Steven J.

    2011-04-01

    Commercial fisheries bycatch in marine systems has been regarded as a global conservation concern by environmental groups, scientists, government, and the public for decades. Fortunately, some headway has been made to mitigate the negative impacts of bycatch in marine environments. In a survey of the literature, we found that despite freshwater commercial fisheries yields comprising 11% of the global commercial catch, bycatch research focusing on freshwater commercial fisheries represented only {approx}3% of the total bycatch literature. This paucity of research is particularly alarming given that freshwater animals and habitats are some of the world's most imperiled. The limited inland bycatch literature that does exist includes examples of population declines attributed to commercial bycatch (e.g., freshwater dolphins in the Yangtze River in China) and illustrates that in some systems bycatch can be substantial (e.g., lake trout bycatch in the Laurentian Great Lakes). Encouraging results from the marine realm can serve as models for bycatch research in freshwater, and lead to measurable gains in conservation of freshwater ecosystems. We summarize existing work on inland bycatch in an effort to draw attention to this understated and understudied conservation problem.

  1. Commissioned Review. Carbon: freshwater plants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keeley, J.E.; Sandquist, D.R.

    1992-01-01

    δ13C values for freshwater aquatic plant matter varies from −11 to −50‰ and is not a clear indicator of photosynthetic pathway as in terrestrial plants. Several factors affect δ13C of aquatic plant matter. These include: (1) The δ13C signature of the source carbon has been observed to range from +1‰ for HCO3− derived from limestone to −30‰ for CO2 derived from respiration. (2) Some plants assimilate HCO3−, which is –7 to –11‰ less negative than CO2. (3) C3, C4, and CAM photosynthetic pathways are present in aquatic plants. (4) Diffusional resistances are orders of magnitude greater in the aquatic environment than in the aerial environment. The greater viscosity of water acts to reduce mixing of the carbon pool in the boundary layer with that of the bulk solution. In effect, many aquatic plants draw from a finite carbon pool, and as in terrestrial plants growing in a closed system, biochemical discrimination is reduced. In standing water, this factor results in most aquatic plants having a δ13C value similar to the source carbon. Using Farquhar's equation and other physiological data, it is possible to use δ13C values to evaluate various parameters affecting photosynthesis, such as limitations imposed by CO2 diffusion and carbon source.

  2. Evolution of the freshwater eels.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, J; Tsukamoto, K

    1997-01-01

    The freshwater anguillid eels have an unusual life history and world-wide distribution. Questions about the phylogenetic relationships of this group and how their long spawning migrations and larval phase may contribute to their global distribution have not been addressed. This paper is first presentation of molecular phylogeny of Anguilla species, and based on this phylogenetic tree we suggest new aspect of the evolution of this group. Namely, ancestral eels originated during the Eocene or earlier, in the western Pacific Ocean near present-day Indonesia. A group derived from this ancestor dispersed westward, probably by larval transport in the global circum-equatorial current through the northern edge of the Tethys Sea. This group split into the ancestor of the European and American eels, which entered into the Atlantic Ocean, and a second group, which dispersed southward and split into the east African species and Australian species. Thus the world-wide distribution of the eel family can be understood from knowledge of continental drift, ocean currents, a specialized larva and evolutionary forces favoring dispersal and speciation of segregated gene pool.

  3. Global estimation of freshwater fluxes and freshwater oceanic transport from satellite data

    SciTech Connect

    Gautier, C.; Peterson, P.; Jones, C.

    1996-12-01

    The exchange of moisture and heat fluxes across the ocean-atmosphere interface exerts a strong influence on the oceanic and atmospheric circulations, and therefore on the maintenance of the climate system equilibrium. Observational measurements of these fluxes over large areas of the ocean`s surface are limited by the lack of in-situ data. This paper reports research efforts to estimate the freshwater budget and freshwater oceanic transport using remotely sensed data. Six years (1988--1993) of surface evaporation estimated with satellite and in-situ data re combined with satellite-derived precipitation to compute the freshwater budget and freshwater oceanic transport. The interannual variability of the freshwater budget and oceanic transport eliminates are examined for two contrasting events: the La Nina of 1988--89 and the El Nino condition during 1991--92, one of the longest El Nino episodes on record. Possible implications for future climate change are discussed.

  4. Streamflow and nutrient data for the Yazoo River below Steele Bayou near Long Lake, Mississippi, 1996-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runner, Michael S.; Turnipseed, D. Phil; Coupe, Richard H.

    2002-01-01

    Increased nutrient loading to the Gulf of Mexico from off-continent flux has been identified as contributing to the increase in the areal extent of the low dissolved-oxygen zone that develops annually off the Louisiana and Texas coast. The proximity of the Yazoo River Basin in northwestern Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico, and the intensive agricultural activities in the basin have led to speculation that the Yazoo River Basin contributes a disproportionate amount of nitrogen and phosphorus to the Mississippi River and ultimately to the Gulf of Mexico. An empirical measurement of the flux of nitrogen and phosphorus from the Yazoo Basin has not been possible due to the hydrology of the lower Yazoo River Basin. Streamflow for the Yazoo River below Steele Bayou is affected by backwater from the Mississippi River. Flow at the gage is non-uniform and varying, with bi-directional and reverse flows possible. Streamflow was computed by using remote sensing and acoustic and conventional discharge and velocity measurement techniques. Streamflow from the Yazoo River for the 1996-2000 period accounted for 2.8 percent of the flow of the Mississippi River for the same period. Water samples from the Yazoo River were collected from February 1996 through December 2000 and were analyzed for total nitrogen, nitrate, total phosphorus, and orthophosphorus as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program. These data were used to compute annual loads of nitrogen and phosphorus discharged from the Yazoo River for the period 1996-2000. Annual loads of nitrogen and phosphorus were calculated by two methods. The first method used multivariate regression and the second method multiplied the mean annual concentration by the total annual flow. Load estimates based on the product of the mean annual concentration and the total annual flow were within the 95 percent confidence interval for the load calculated by multivariate regression in 10 of 20 cases. The Yazoo

  5. 33 CFR 80.835 - Point Au Fer, LA to Calcasieu Pass, LA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Point. (b) Lines following the general trend of the highwater shoreline drawn across the bayou and canal... across Southwest Pass. (d) A line drawn across the seaward extremity of the Freshwater Bayou...

  6. 33 CFR 80.835 - Point Au Fer, LA to Calcasieu Pass, LA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... general trend of the highwater shoreline drawn across the bayou and canal inlets from the Gulf of Mexico... drawn across the seaward extremity of the Freshwater Bayou Canal Entrance Jetties. (e) A line drawn...

  7. 33 CFR 80.835 - Point Au Fer, LA to Calcasieu Pass, LA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... general trend of the highwater shoreline drawn across the bayou and canal inlets from the Gulf of Mexico... drawn across the seaward extremity of the Freshwater Bayou Canal Entrance Jetties. (e) A line drawn...

  8. 33 CFR 80.835 - Point Au Fer, LA to Calcasieu Pass, LA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Point. (b) Lines following the general trend of the highwater shoreline drawn across the bayou and canal... across Southwest Pass. (d) A line drawn across the seaward extremity of the Freshwater Bayou...

  9. Growth efficiencies of freshwater bacterioplankton.

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, K; Nielsen, H; Riemann, B; Fuhrman, J A

    1992-09-01

    The growth efficiency of freshwater bacteria was examined in continuous cultures. One series of experiments was carried out using generation times from 50 to 200 hours and aged, normal, and enriched media, all of natural origin. Another series of experiments examined the bacterial growth efficiency during the growth season in eutrophic Frederiksborg Slotssø, in relation to changes in the planktonic communities and to factors controlling the bacterial incorporation of (3)H-thymidine. Attachment of bacteria to the inner surfaces of the experimental flasks was examined using various types of bottles, adding glass tubes to the bottles, and measuring (3)H-thymidine incorporation and direct cell counts of attached and free-living bacteria. Attachment of bacteria varied, and in one example up to 36% of the thymidine incorporation was by attached bacteria after 4 days. It was calculated that 36% of attached bacteria caused an underestimation of the growth efficiency of 11%. The mean growth efficiency tended to decrease with generation time using enriched medium (47 to 19%) and aged medium (35 to 12%), and tended to decrease with medium quality (enriched > normal > aged media) from 37% to 27%. The only significant difference in growth efficiency occurred in relation to generation time, in samples with enriched medium (unpaired t-test, P < 0.05). The overall mean value for all generation times and media was 30% (SEM = 3%, n = 24). From April to October, the growth efficiency was determined 5 times in samples from Frederiksborg Slotssø. The overall mean value was 31% (SEM = 3%, n = 30), and there was no significant change in the growth efficiency during the period measured. In June, three bioassay experiments revealed that carbon limitation controlled bacterial incorporation of (3)H-thymidine, whereas additions of phosphate and nitrate did not change the incorporation rates. The narrow range of growth efficiencies obtained in this study (mean 31%, SEM = 2%, n = 54) suggests

  10. Factors controlling porosity and permeability in geopressured Frio sandstone reservoirs, general crude oil/Department of Energy Pleasant Bayou test wells, Brazoria County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Loucks, R.G.; Richman, D.L.; Milliken, K.L.

    1980-06-01

    Reservoir characteristics of Frio sandstones in the GCO/DOE Pleasant Bayou No. 1 and No. 2 wells are influenced by depositional environment, sandstone composition, and diagenetic history. The sandstones and shales were deposited in deltaic and continental slope environments. Fluvial channel and distributary-mouth bar sandstones are most favorable for development and preservation of the porosity needed for a geothermal reservoir. Sandstones in the geopressured zone are lithic arkoses and feldspathic litharenites. Depositional matric (detrital material less than 20 micrometers in size) occluded most or all of the potential primary porosity between grains in many of the fine-grained sandstones at the time of deposition. Even if cements are present, dissolution of grains and development of secondary porosity do take place. Permeable geopressured sandstone reservoirs are characterized by porosity that is dominantly secondary. 12 references.

  11. Final report for the geothermal well site restoration and plug and abandonment of wells: DOE Pleasant Bayou test site, Brazoria County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Rinehart, Ben N.; Seigel, Ben H.

    1994-03-13

    For a variety of reasons, thousands of oil and gas wells have been abandoned in the Gulf Coast Region of the United States. Many of these wells penetrated geopressured zones whose resource potential for power generation was undervalued or ignored. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geopressured-Geothermal Research Program was chartered to improve geothermal technology to the point where electricity could be commercially produced from a substantial number of geopressured resource sites. This research program focused on relatively narrow technical issues that are unique to geopressured resources such as the ability to predict reservoir production capacity based on preliminary flow tests. Three well sites were selected for the research program. These are the Willis Hulin and Gladys McCall sites in Louisiana, and the Pleasant Bayou site in Texas. The final phase of this research project consists of plug and abandonment (P&A) of the wells and site restoration.

  12. Environmental baseline monitoring in the area of general crude oil - Department of Energy Pleasant Bayou Number 2: a geopressured geothermal test well, 1979. Annual report, Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Gustavson, T.C.; Howard, R.C.; McGookey, D.

    1980-01-01

    A program to monitor baseline air and water quality, subsidence, microseismic activity, and noise in the vicinity of Brazoria County geopressured geothermal test wells, Pleasant Bayou No. 1 and No. 2, has been underway since March 1978. The initial report on environmental baseline monitoring at the test well contained descriptions of baseline air and water quality, a noise survey, an inventory of microseismic activity, and a discussion of the installation of a liquid tilt meter (Gustavson, 1979). The following report continues the description of baseline air and water quality of the test well site, includes an inventory of microseismic activity during 1979 with interpretations of the origin of the events, and discusses the installation and monitoring of a liquid tilt meter at the test well site. In addition, a brief description of flooding at the test site is presented.

  13. National Water-Quality Assessment Program; summary of pesticide data collected on East Fork Double Bayou, near Anahuac, Texas, March to September 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1995-01-01

    The Trinity River Basin study-unit assessment began in October 1991, with 2 years dedicated to planning, analyzing existing information, and designing data-collection networks, surveys, and studies. Then, a 3-year intensive data-collection program was initiated. The assessment followed guidelines provided by the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program National Synthesis team and considered suggestions made by the study unit's liaison committee. One of the issues selected for study concerned the quality of runoff in the coastal prairie. The study includes collecting streamflow, water-quality and watershed data on three streams, each representing watersheds in different parts of the coastal prairie. This fact sheet presents a summary of the pesticide data collected on East Fork Double Bayou from March to September 1994.

  14. Water-quality, sediment-quality, stream-habitat, and biological data for Mustang Bayou near Houston, Texas, 2004-05

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sneck-Fahrer, Debra A.; East, Jeffery W.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Houston-Galveston Area Council and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, collected water-quality, stream-habitat, and biological data from six sites (downstream order M6-M1) primarily in Brazoria County southeast of Houston, Texas, during September 2004-August 2005 and collected bed sediment data from one site in September 2005. Water-quality data collection consisted of continuously monitored (for periods of 24 hours to several days, six times) water temperature, pH, specific conductance, and dissolved oxygen and periodically collected samples of several properties and constituents. Monitored dissolved oxygen measurements were below minimum and 24-hour criteria at all sites except M2. Nitrogen compounds, phosphorus, biochemical oxygen demand, chlorophyll-a, E. coli, chloride, sulfate, solids, suspended sediment concentration, and pesticides were assessed at all sites. Concentrations of nitrogen compounds and phosphorus did not exceed Texas State screening levels. Biochemical oxygen demand was less than 4.0 milligrams per liter at all sites except M6, where the maximum concentration was 8.1 milligrams per liter. Concentrations of chlorophyll-a were less than the State screening level at all sites except M6, where four of eight samples equaled or exceeded the screening level. Twenty of 48 samples from Mustang Bayou had E. coli densities that exceeded the State single-sample water-quality standard. Median chloride concentrations from each site were between 42.2 and 123 milligrams per liter. Fifteen pesticide compounds (six herbicides and nine insecticides) were detected in 24 water samples. The most frequently detected pesticide was atrazine, which was found in every sample. Other frequently detected pesticides were 2-chloro-4-isopropylamino-6-amino-s-triazine (CIAT), prometon, tebuthiuron, fipronil, and the pesticide degradates, fipronil sulfide and fipronil sulfone. Sediment samples were collected from

  15. Dispersion Of Crude Oil And Petroleum Products In Freshwater

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this research was to investigate the relationship between dispersion effectiveness in freshwater and the surfactant composition for fresh and weathered crude oil. Although limited research on the chemical dispersion of crude oil and petroleum products in freshwat...

  16. Dispersion Of Crude Oil And Petroleum Products In Freshwater

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this research was to investigate the relationship between dispersion effectiveness in freshwater and the surfactant composition for fresh and weathered crude oil. Although limited research on the chemical dispersion of crude oil and petroleum products in freshwat...

  17. Freshwater resources in the insular Caribbean: an environmental perspective

    Treesearch

    T. Heartsill Scalley

    2012-01-01

    From islands with no permanent flowing streams to those with navigable inland waters, the insular Caribbean contains a great range of conditions regarding the access to freshwater resources. Because of the variation in topography and size, the ability of islands to retain freshwater also varies widely. The usage of freshwater in this region is being led by two major...

  18. 40 CFR 35.1605-2 - Freshwater lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Freshwater lake. 35.1605-2 Section 35... STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Cooperative Agreements for Protecting and Restoring Publicly Owned Freshwater Lakes § 35.1605-2 Freshwater lake. Any inland pond, reservoir, impoundment, or other similar body of...

  19. 2008 NWFSC Tidal Freshwater Genetics Results

    SciTech Connect

    David Teel

    2009-05-01

    Genetic Analysis of Juvenile Chinook Salmon for inclusion in 'Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2008. Annual Report to Bonneville Power Administration, Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830.'

  20. Effects of Pollution on Freshwater Invertebrates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buikema, A. L., Jr.; Herricks, E. E.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of the effects of pollution on freshwater invertebrates, covering publications of 1976-77. Some of the areas covered are: (1) toxicant effects on invertebrates; (2) microcosm and community effects, and (3) biological control of aquatic life. A list of 123 references is also presented. (HM)

  1. Freshwater savings from marine protein consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gephart, Jessica A.; Pace, Michael L.; D'Odorico, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Marine fisheries provide an essential source of protein for many people around the world. Unlike alternative terrestrial sources of protein, marine fish production requires little to no freshwater inputs. Consuming marine fish protein instead of terrestrial protein therefore represents freshwater savings (equivalent to an avoided water cost) and contributes to a low water footprint diet. These water savings are realized by the producers of alternative protein sources, rather than the consumers of marine protein. This study quantifies freshwater savings from marine fish consumption around the world by estimating the water footprint of replacing marine fish with terrestrial protein based on current consumption patterns. An estimated 7 600 km3 yr-1 of water is used for human food production. Replacing marine protein with terrestrial protein would require an additional 350 km3 yr-1 of water, meaning that marine protein provides current water savings of 4.6%. The importance of these freshwater savings is highly uneven around the globe, with savings ranging from as little as 0 to as much as 50%. The largest savings as a per cent of current water footprints occur in Asia, Oceania, and several coastal African nations. The greatest national water savings from marine fish protein occur in Southeast Asia and the United States. As the human population increases, future water savings from marine fish consumption will be increasingly important to food and water security and depend on sustainable harvest of capture fisheries and low water footprint growth of marine aquaculture.

  2. Thiaminase activity in native freshwater mussels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blakeslee, Carrie J.; Sweet, Stephanie; Galbraith, Heather S.; Honeyfield, Dale C.

    2015-01-01

    Thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency in the Great Lakes has been attributed to elevated levels of thiaminase I enzyme activity in invasive prey species; however, few studies have investigated thiaminase activity in native prey species. Some of the highest levels of thiaminase activity have been measured in invasive dreissenid mussels with little understanding of background levels contributed by native freshwater mussels (Bivalvia: Unionidae). In this study, thiaminase activity was measured in two freshwater mussel species, Elliptio complanata and Strophitus undulatus, from the Delaware and Susquehanna River drainage basins located in north eastern United States. Thiaminase activity was also measured in gravid and non-gravid S. undulatus. Average thiaminase activity differed significantly between species (7.2 and 42.4 μmol/g/min, for E. complanata and S. undulatus respectively) with no differences observed between drainage basins. Gravid S. undulatus had significantly lower thiaminase activity (28.0 μmol/g/min) than non-gravid mussels (42.4 μmol/g/min). Our results suggest that a suite of factors may regulate thiaminase activity in freshwater mussels and that native freshwater mussel thiaminase activity is within the range observed for invasive dreissenids. These results add to our understanding of the complexities in identifying the ecological conditions that set the stage for thiamine deficiency.

  3. Mathematical Explorations: Freshwater Scarcity: A Proportional Representation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Middle school students' mathematical understanding benefits from connecting mathematics to other content areas in the curriculum. This month's activity explores the issue of the scarcity of freshwater, a natural resource (activity sheets are included). This activity concentrates on the critical areas mentioned in the Common Core State…

  4. Mathematical Explorations: Freshwater Scarcity: A Proportional Representation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Middle school students' mathematical understanding benefits from connecting mathematics to other content areas in the curriculum. This month's activity explores the issue of the scarcity of freshwater, a natural resource (activity sheets are included). This activity concentrates on the critical areas mentioned in the Common Core State…

  5. Macrophytes: Freshwater Forests of Lakes and Rivers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermid, Karla J.; Naiman, Robert J.

    1983-01-01

    Physical, chemical, and biological effects on macrophytes (aquatic plants) on the freshwater ecosystem are discussed. Research questions and issues related to these organisms are also discussed, including adaptations for survival in a wet environment, ecological consequences of large-scale macrophyte eradication, seasonal changes in plant…

  6. Effects of pollution on freshwater invertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Buikema

    1982-06-01

    The biological effects of acid rain, chlorination, heavy metals and other forms of pollution on freshwater invertebrates are examined in this review. Several methods for evaluating chronic toxicity to pesticide residues and synthetic fuels components are reviewed. The effects of pollutants is reviewed in detail for cladocera, amphipods, isopods, decapods, aquatic insects, molluscs, worms, and protozoa.(KRM)

  7. Ocean Freshwater Lenses: Prevalence and Persistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schanze, Julian; Lagerloef, Gary; Schmitt, Raymond

    2017-04-01

    During the Salinity Processes in the Upper Ocean Regional Study II (SPURS-II), a novel dataset was collected from an underway system sampling seawater at the surface, 2m, 3m and 5m. The surface measurements are performed using a boom-mounted suction hose and a peristaltic pump, as well as a shipboard apparatus with multiple de-bubbling stages. The data collected during this cruise reveal approximately fifty freshwater lenses in the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), sampled between August 15 and September 20 under several different wind- and precipitation-regimes. Preliminary analysis shows that that the persistence of oceanic freshwater lenses is strongly dependent on the evolution of wind speed as well as the total amount of precipitated water. The results are analyzed in a number of case studies of different types of freshwater lenses, in which the balance between precipitation and wind-driven mixing is elucidated. While the limited sample size restricts the validity of the findings to the SPURS-II region, centered around 125°W, 10°N, during the late boreal summer of 2016, it has important consequences for modelling of freshwater lenses and their impact on satellite retrievals of salinity.

  8. Effects of Pollution on Freshwater Invertebrates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buikema, A. L., Jr.; Herricks, E. E.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of the effects of pollution on freshwater invertebrates, covering publications of 1976-77. Some of the areas covered are: (1) toxicant effects on invertebrates; (2) microcosm and community effects, and (3) biological control of aquatic life. A list of 123 references is also presented. (HM)

  9. In Brief: Europe's freshwater fish threatened

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2007-11-01

    Two hundred of Europe's 522 freshwater fish species are threatened with extinction and 12 are already extinct, according to the Handbook of European Freshwater Fishes, published in collaboration with the World Conservation Union (IUCN) and released on 1 November 2007. IUCN notes that the main threats to fish species stem from development and population growth and include water withdrawals, large dams, and inappropriate fisheries management that has led to overfishing and the introduction of alien species. Authors Maurice Kottelat, former president of the European Ichthyological Society, and Jörg Freyhof, scientist from Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology, noted that fish conservation should be managed by agencies in charge of conservation, and not as a crop by agencies in charge of agriculture. William Darwall, senior program officer with IUCN's Species Program, said the species ``are critical to the freshwater ecosystems upon which we do depend, such as for water purification and flood control.'' For more information, visit the Web site: http://www.iucn.org.

  10. Toxicity of vanadium to different freshwater organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Beusen, J.M.; Neven, B.

    1987-08-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the acute and subchronic toxicity of vanadium for various species of freshwater fish. The long-term toxicity and the effect of vanadium on the reproduction of Daphnia magna is also evaluated and compared with the toxicity of other metals.

  11. Macrophytes: Freshwater Forests of Lakes and Rivers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermid, Karla J.; Naiman, Robert J.

    1983-01-01

    Physical, chemical, and biological effects on macrophytes (aquatic plants) on the freshwater ecosystem are discussed. Research questions and issues related to these organisms are also discussed, including adaptations for survival in a wet environment, ecological consequences of large-scale macrophyte eradication, seasonal changes in plant…

  12. Continental Shelf Freshwater Water Resources and Enhanced Oil Recovery By Low Salinity Water Flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Person, M. A.; Morrow, N.; Wilson, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    This study investigates the prospects of utilizing offshore freshwater in continental shelf oil production. Petroleum engineers have recently shown that tertiary water floods using freshwater can enhance oil recovery by as much as 18% (Morrow and Buckley, 2011). Hydrogeologists recently estimated that up to 5x105 km3of fresh to brackish water are sequestered in shallow ( < 500 m) permeable sands and carbonate reservoirs within 80 km of the present-day coastline around the world (Post et al., 2013). Most of the offshore freshwater was emplaced during the Pleistocene during periods of sea level low stands and when ice sheets over ran passive margins at high latitudes. We have analyzed a series of continental shelf cross sections from around the world estimating the average freshwater volume emplaced with distance offshore. We compare the distribution of fresh-brackish water with distance from the coastline to oil platform locations in order to assess the economic viability of this energy-water nexus. We also discuss a project that is currently underway within the North Sea (Clair Ridge) to field validate this concept. We present a series of variable-density groundwater flow and solute transport simulations that are intended to assess how long freshwater resources could be produced in an offshore environment using horizontal drilling technologies before seawater invades the well. We considered a 100m thick freshwater reservoir sandwiched between two 200-300m thick confining units. We pumped the horizontal well at a rate of 5.4 m3/day (1 gpm per meter of well). The resulting drawdown was less than 5 m at the well head (r=0.15 m). For a 1000 m long horizontal well, this resulted in the production of 5455 m3/day of fresh water (over 34,000 barrels per day). Concentrations increased at the wellhead by about 5000 mg/l after 20 years of continuous pumping using a reservoir permeability of 10-13 m2. This simulation demonstrates that where freshwater is available it is likely

  13. Biodiversity Prospecting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sittenfeld, Ana; Lovejoy, Annie

    1994-01-01

    Examines the use of biodiversity prospecting as a method for tropical countries to value biodiversity and contribute to conservation upkeep costs. Discusses the first agreement between a public interest organization and pharmaceutical company for the extraction of plant and animal materials in Costa Rica. (LZ)

  14. Mesozooplankton affinities in a recovering freshwater estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambord, Sophie; Maris, Tom; Colas, Fanny; Van Engeland, Tom; Sossou, Akoko-C.; Azémar, Frédéric; Le Coz, Maïwen; Cox, Tom; Buisson, Laetitia; Souissi, Sami; Meire, Patrick; Tackx, Michèle

    2016-08-01

    Water quality of the Scheldt estuary (Belgium/The Netherlands) has considerably improved in recent years, especially in the upstream, freshwater reaches. Within the zooplankton community, the copepod Eurytemora affinis, typically abundant in brackish water and quasi-absent from freshwater before 2007, has since substantially developed in the latter, where it now represents 90% of the crustacean mesozooplankton community. Simultaneously, cyclopoid copepod abundance has greatly decreased, while cladoceran abundance did not change. The study aim was: 1) to verify if the zooplankton community described for the period 2007-2009 by Mialet et al. (2011) has stabilized until present, and 2) to look for the environmental conditions favouring E. affinis development and causing changes in the upstream freshwater zooplankton community. The 2002-2012 temporal evolution of the zooplankton distribution at three stations in the upstream freshwater Scheldt estuary was analyzed. Water quality remained better after 2007 than before, and some factors revealed continuous improvement in annual mean concentrations (e.g. increase in O2, decrease in BOD5 and NH4sbnd N concentration). The increase in oxygen and the decrease in NH4sbnd N concentration, together with low discharge during summer were the main environmental factors explaining the development and timing of E. affinis in the upstream freshwater reach. In this reach, E. affinis maximal abundance is shifted to higher temperatures (summer) compared to its typical maximum spring abundance peak in the brackish zone of the Scheldt estuary and in most temperate estuaries. The changes in zooplankton community followed a temporal and spatial gradient induced by the spatio-temporal evolution of water quality improvement. The most downstream station (3) allowed E. affinis development (oxygen concentration > 4 mg L-1; NH4sbnd N concentration < 2 mg L-1, discharge (Q) < 50 m3 s-1) from 2007 onwards, and this station showed the highest E

  15. Biological effects and toxicity of diluted bitumen and its constituents in freshwater systems.

    PubMed

    Dew, William A; Hontela, Alice; Rood, Stewart B; Pyle, Greg G

    2015-11-01

    Approximately 50 billion cubic meters of bitumen resides within the oil sands region of Alberta, Canada. To facilitate the transport of bitumen from where it is extracted to where it is processed, the bitumen is diluted with natural gas condensate ('dilbit'), synthetic crude from hydrocracking bitumen ('synbit'), or a mixture of both ('dilsynbit'). A primary consideration for the effects of diluted bitumen products on freshwater organisms and ecosystems is whether it will float on the water surface or sink and interact with the stream or lake sediments. Evidence from a spill near Kalamazoo, MI, in 2010 and laboratory testing demonstrate that the nature of the spill and weathering of the dilbit, synbit or dilsynbit prior to and during contact with water will dictate whether the product floats or sinks. Subsequent toxicological data on the effects of dilbit and other diluted bitumen products on freshwater organisms and ecosystems are scarce. However, the current literature indicates that dilbit or bitumen can have significant effects on a wide variety of toxicological endpoints. This review synthesizes the currently available literature concerning the fate and effects of dilbit and synbit spilled into freshwater, and the effects of bitumen and bitumen products on aquatic organisms and ecosystems. Dilbit is likely to provide ecological impacts that are similar to and extend from those that follow from exposure to lighter crude oil, but the prospect of bitumen settling after binding to suspended sediments elevates the risk for benthic impacts in streams and lakes.

  16. Superhydrophobic resistance to dynamic freshwater biofouling inception.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, K Ghokulla; Malm, Peter; Loth, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Superhydrophobic nanotextured surfaces have gained increased usage in various applications due to their non-wetting and self-cleaning abilities. The aim of this study was to investigate nanotextured surfaces with respect to their resistance to the inception of freshwater biofouling at transitional flow conditions. Several coatings were tested including industry standard polyurethane (PUR), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), capstone mixed polyurethane (PUR + CAP) and nanocomposite infused polyurethane (PUR + NC). Each surface was exposed to freshwater conditions in a lake at 4 m s(-1) for a duration of 45 min. The polyurethane exhibited the greatest fouling elements, in terms of both height and number of elements, with the superhydrophobic nanocomposite based polyurethane (PUR + NC) showing very little to no fouling. A correlation between the surface characteristics and the degree of fouling inception was observed.

  17. Luminescence properties of a nanoporous freshwater diatom.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Bondita; Choudhury, Amarjyoti; Buragohain, Alak K

    2012-01-01

    Freshwater diatom frustules show special optical properties. In this paper we observed luminescence properties of the freshwater diatom Cyclotella meneghiniana. To confirm the morphological properties we present scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were carried out to visualize the structural properties of the frustules, confirming that silica present in diatom frustules crystallizes in an α-quartz structure. Study of the optical properties of the silica frustules of diatoms using ultra-violet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy confirmed that the diatom C. meneghiniana shows luminescence in the blue region of the electromagnetic spectrum when irradiated with UV light. This property of diatoms can be exploited to obtain many applications in day-to-day life. Also, using time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy (TRPL) it was confirmed that this species of diatom shows bi-exponential decay. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Freshwater aquatic plant biomass production in Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, K.R.; Sutton, D.L.; Bowes, G.

    1983-01-01

    About 8% (1.2 million ha) of the total surface area of Florida is occupied by freshwater. Many of these water bodies are eutrophic. Nutrients present in these water bodies can be potentially used to culture aquatic plants as a possible feedstock for methane production. This paper summarizes the results of known research findings on biomass production potential of freshwater aquatic plants in Florida and identifies key research needs to improve the quality and quantity of biomass yields. Among floating aquatic plants, biomass yield potential was in the order of water-hyacinth > water lettuce > pennywort > salvinia > duckweed > azolla. Pennywort, duckweed, and azolla appear to perform well during the cooler months compared to other aquatic plants. Among emergent plants, biomass yield potential was in the order of southern wild rice > cattails > soft rush > bulrush. Cultural techniques, nutrient management, and environmental factors influencing the biomass yields were discussed. 68 references.

  19. Freshwater biodiversity and aquatic insect diversification.

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, Klaas-Douwe B; Monaghan, Michael T; Pauls, Steffen U

    2014-01-01

    Inland waters cover less than 1% of Earth's surface but harbor more than 6% of all insect species: Nearly 100,000 species from 12 orders spend one or more life stages in freshwater. Little is known about how this remarkable diversity arose, although allopatric speciation and ecological adaptation are thought to be primary mechanisms. Freshwater habitats are highly susceptible to environmental change and exhibit marked ecological gradients. Standing waters appear to harbor more dispersive species than running waters, but there is little understanding of how this fundamental ecological difference has affected diversification. In contrast to the lack of evolutionary studies, the ecology and habitat preferences of aquatic insects have been intensively studied, in part because of their widespread use as bioindicators. The combination of phylogenetics with the extensive ecological data provides a promising avenue for future research, making aquatic insects highly suitable models for the study of ecological diversification.

  20. Estimated freshwater withdrawals in Texas, 1990

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lurry, Dee L.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents 1990 freshwater withdrawal estimates for Texas by source and category. Withdrawal source is either ground water or surface water. Withdrawal categories include: self-supplied irrigation, thermoelectric-power generation, water supply, industrial and mining, and other (domestic, commercial, livestock). Withdrawal data are aggregated by county, major aquifer, and principal river basin. Only the four major categories of irrigation, thermoelectric-power generation, water supply, and industrial and mining are illustrated in this report, although all data are tabulated.

  1. Fatigue Crack Propagation in Freshwater Ice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-01

    Dempsey, J.P., and Wei, Y. (1989). Fracture toughness K,and fractography of SI type freshwater ice. Advances in Fracture Research, (K. Salama , K. Ravi...188-200. Perez , J., Mai, C., Tatibouet, J. and Vassoille, R. (1980). Dynamic Behaviour of Dislocations in HF-Doped Ice Ih. Journal of Glaciology, vol...Denmark, pp. 351-362. Tatibouet, J., Perez , J. and Vassoille, R. (1987). Study of Grain Boundaries in Ice by Internal Friction. J. Phys. Colloq. C1

  2. Environmental Habitat Conditions Associated with Freshwater Dreissenids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    American Zoologist 36: 339-363. McMahon, R. E, M. A. Matthews, T. H. Ussery, R. Chase, and M. Clarke. 1994. Further studies of heat tolerance in zebra...quagga mussel (Dreissena bugensis), a second species of freshwater dreissenid introduced to North America. American Zoologist 36:271-286. Mills, E. L...America. American Zoologist 36:311-325. O’Neill, C. R., Jr. 1997. Economic impact of zebra mussels - Results of the 1995 National Zebra mussel

  3. Urban growth, climate change, and freshwater availability

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Robert I.; Green, Pamela; Balk, Deborah; Fekete, Balazs M.; Revenga, Carmen; Todd, Megan; Montgomery, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Nearly 3 billion additional urban dwellers are forecasted by 2050, an unprecedented wave of urban growth. While cities struggle to provide water to these new residents, they will also face equally unprecedented hydrologic changes due to global climate change. Here we use a detailed hydrologic model, demographic projections, and climate change scenarios to estimate per-capita water availability for major cities in the developing world, where urban growth is the fastest. We estimate the amount of water physically available near cities and do not account for problems with adequate water delivery or quality. Modeled results show that currently 150 million people live in cities with perennial water shortage, defined as having less than 100 L per person per day of sustainable surface and groundwater flow within their urban extent. By 2050, demographic growth will increase this figure to almost 1 billion people. Climate change will cause water shortage for an additional 100 million urbanites. Freshwater ecosystems in river basins with large populations of urbanites with insufficient water will likely experience flows insufficient to maintain ecological process. Freshwater fish populations will likely be impacted, an issue of special importance in regions such as India's Western Ghats, where there is both rapid urbanization and high levels of fish endemism. Cities in certain regions will struggle to find enough water for the needs of their residents and will need significant investment if they are to secure adequate water supplies and safeguard functioning freshwater ecosystems for future generations. PMID:21444797

  4. Monitoring Global Freshwater Resources with GRACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodell, Matt; Famiglietti, Jay; Velicogna, Isabella; Swenson, Sean; Chambers, Don

    2011-01-01

    Freshwater resources include surface waters, groundwater, and seasonal snowpack. Given adequate ground based measurements, all of these can be monitored effectively, however, outside of the developed world such measurements often are not systematic and the data not centralized, and as a result reports of freshwater availability may be largely anecdotal. Even in the developed world it can be difficult to quantify changes in groundwater storage over large scales. Owing to its global coverage, satellite remote sensing has become a valuable tool for freshwater resources assessment. In particular, the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) has demonstrated an unequaled ability to monitor total terrestrial water storage including groundwater at regional to continental scales. In this presentation we will identify apparent trends in terrestrial water storage observed by GRACE over the past nine years and attempt to explain their origins and predict whether they are likely to continue. Trends in certain regions where groundwater extraction has significantly depleted aquifers, including northern India and California, will be discussed in detail.

  5. Urban growth, climate change, and freshwater availability.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Robert I; Green, Pamela; Balk, Deborah; Fekete, Balazs M; Revenga, Carmen; Todd, Megan; Montgomery, Mark

    2011-04-12

    Nearly 3 billion additional urban dwellers are forecasted by 2050, an unprecedented wave of urban growth. While cities struggle to provide water to these new residents, they will also face equally unprecedented hydrologic changes due to global climate change. Here we use a detailed hydrologic model, demographic projections, and climate change scenarios to estimate per-capita water availability for major cities in the developing world, where urban growth is the fastest. We estimate the amount of water physically available near cities and do not account for problems with adequate water delivery or quality. Modeled results show that currently 150 million people live in cities with perennial water shortage, defined as having less than 100 L per person per day of sustainable surface and groundwater flow within their urban extent. By 2050, demographic growth will increase this figure to almost 1 billion people. Climate change will cause water shortage for an additional 100 million urbanites. Freshwater ecosystems in river basins with large populations of urbanites with insufficient water will likely experience flows insufficient to maintain ecological process. Freshwater fish populations will likely be impacted, an issue of special importance in regions such as India's Western Ghats, where there is both rapid urbanization and high levels of fish endemism. Cities in certain regions will struggle to find enough water for the needs of their residents and will need significant investment if they are to secure adequate water supplies and safeguard functioning freshwater ecosystems for future generations.

  6. Vegetative community control of freshwater availability: Phoenix Islands case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engels, M.; Heinse, R.

    2014-12-01

    On small low islands with limited freshwater resources, terrestrial plant communities play a large role in moderating freshwater availability. Freshwater demands of vegetative communities are variable depending on the composition of the community. Hence, changes to community structure from production crop introductions, non-native species invasions, and climate change, may have significant implications for freshwater availability. Understanding how vegetative community changes impact freshwater availability will allow for better management and forecasting of limited freshwater supplies. To better understand these dynamics, we investigated three small tropical atolls in the Phoenix Island Protected Area, Kiribati. Despite their close proximity, these islands receive varying amounts of rainfall, are host to different plant communities and two of the islands have abandoned coconut plantations. Using electromagnetic induction, ground penetrating radar, soil samples, climate and satellite data, we present preliminary estimates of vegetative water demand for different tropical plant communities.

  7. Prospective Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Poizner, Howard; Lynch, Gary; Gepshtein, Sergei; Greenspan, Ralph J.

    2014-01-01

    Human performance approaches that of an ideal observer and optimal actor in some perceptual and motor tasks. These optimal abilities depend on the capacity of the cerebral cortex to store an immense amount of information and to flexibly make rapid decisions. However, behavior only approaches these limits after a long period of learning while the cerebral cortex interacts with the basal ganglia, an ancient part of the vertebrate brain that is responsible for learning sequences of actions directed toward achieving goals. Progress has been made in understanding the algorithms used by the brain during reinforcement learning, which is an online approximation of dynamic programming. Humans also make plans that depend on past experience by simulating different scenarios, which is called prospective optimization. The same brain structures in the cortex and basal ganglia that are active online during optimal behavior are also active offline during prospective optimization. The emergence of general principles and algorithms for goal-directed behavior has consequences for the development of autonomous devices in engineering applications. PMID:25328167

  8. Prospective Optimization.

    PubMed

    Sejnowski, Terrence J; Poizner, Howard; Lynch, Gary; Gepshtein, Sergei; Greenspan, Ralph J

    2014-05-01

    Human performance approaches that of an ideal observer and optimal actor in some perceptual and motor tasks. These optimal abilities depend on the capacity of the cerebral cortex to store an immense amount of information and to flexibly make rapid decisions. However, behavior only approaches these limits after a long period of learning while the cerebral cortex interacts with the basal ganglia, an ancient part of the vertebrate brain that is responsible for learning sequences of actions directed toward achieving goals. Progress has been made in understanding the algorithms used by the brain during reinforcement learning, which is an online approximation of dynamic programming. Humans also make plans that depend on past experience by simulating different scenarios, which is called prospective optimization. The same brain structures in the cortex and basal ganglia that are active online during optimal behavior are also active offline during prospective optimization. The emergence of general principles and algorithms for goal-directed behavior has consequences for the development of autonomous devices in engineering applications.

  9. Early Student Support for Process Studies of Surface Freshwater Dispersal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-24

    research. (1) Submesoscale processes in a freshwater influenced region - the Bay of Bengal. The vorticity, strain rate and divergence of the upper ocean ... ocean circulation, surface freshwater dispersal 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. UMITATION OF a. REPORT b. ABSTRACT c. THIS PAGE ABSTRACT u u u...a freshwater influenced region- the Bay of Bengal. The vorticity, strain rate and divergence of the upper ocean circulation were analyzed through a

  10. Katrina: boon or bust for freshwater fish communities?

    Treesearch

    Susan B. Adams

    2005-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina was the most damaging storm to hit the Mississippi Gulf Coast in recent history. Although catastrophic in human terms, was Katrina a disaster for freshwater ecosystems? Were the storm and its impacts on freshwater fish communities “natural”? The naturalness of the storm’s effects on freshwater communities varies depending on previous anthropogenic...

  11. Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research; project: hazardous materials in aquatic environments; subproject: biomarkers and risk assessment in Bayou Trepagnier, LA

    SciTech Connect

    Ide, C.

    1996-12-31

    Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and beyond the year 2000. the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR) was established in 1989 as the umbrella organization to coordinate environmental research at both universities. CBR projects funded by the DOE under the Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments grant are defining the following: (1) the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants through wetlands environments, (2) the actual and potential impact of contaminants on ecological systems and health, (3) the mechanisms and new technologies through which these impacts might be remediated, and (4) new programs aimed at educating and training environmental workers of the future. The subproject described in this report, `Biomarkers and Risk Assessment in Bayou Trepagnier, LN`, is particularly relevant to the US Department of Energy`s Environmental Restoration and Waste Management program aimed at solving problems related to hazard monitoring and clean-up prioritization at sites with aquatic pollution problems in the DOE complex.

  12. Interactions of Freshwater Cyanobacteria with Bacterial Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Beier, Sara; Grabherr, Manfred

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cyanobacterial and algal mass development, or blooms, have severe effects on freshwater and marine systems around the world. Many of these phototrophs produce a variety of potent toxins, contribute to oxygen depletion, and affect water quality in several ways. Coexisting antagonists, such as cyanolytic bacteria, hold the potential to suppress, or even terminate, such blooms, yet the nature of this interaction is not well studied. We isolated 31 cyanolytic bacteria affiliated with the genera Pseudomonas, Stenotrophomonas, Acinetobacter, and Delftia from three eutrophic freshwater lakes in Sweden and selected four phylogenetically diverse bacterial strains with strong-to-moderate lytic activity. To characterize their functional responses to the presence of cyanobacteria, we performed RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) experiments on coculture incubations, with an initial predator-prey ratio of 1:1. Genes involved in central cellular pathways, stress-related heat or cold shock proteins, and antitoxin genes were highly expressed in both heterotrophs and cyanobacteria. Heterotrophs in coculture expressed genes involved in cell motility, signal transduction, and putative lytic activity. l,d-Transpeptidase was the only significantly upregulated lytic gene in Stenotrophomonas rhizophila EK20. Heterotrophs also shifted their central metabolism from the tricarboxylic acid cycle to the glyoxylate shunt. Concurrently, cyanobacteria clearly show contrasting antagonistic interactions with the four tested heterotrophic strains, which is also reflected in the physical attachment to their cells. In conclusion, antagonistic interactions with cyanobacteria were initiated within 24 h, and expression profiles suggest varied responses for the different cyanobacteria and studied cyanolytes. IMPORTANCE Here, we present how gene expression profiles can be used to reveal interactions between bloom-forming freshwater cyanobacteria and antagonistic heterotrophic bacteria. Species

  13. Interactions of Freshwater Cyanobacteria with Bacterial Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Osman, Omneya Ahmed; Beier, Sara; Grabherr, Manfred; Bertilsson, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Cyanobacterial and algal mass development, or blooms, have severe effects on freshwater and marine systems around the world. Many of these phototrophs produce a variety of potent toxins, contribute to oxygen depletion, and affect water quality in several ways. Coexisting antagonists, such as cyanolytic bacteria, hold the potential to suppress, or even terminate, such blooms, yet the nature of this interaction is not well studied. We isolated 31 cyanolytic bacteria affiliated with the genera Pseudomonas, Stenotrophomonas, Acinetobacter, and Delftia from three eutrophic freshwater lakes in Sweden and selected four phylogenetically diverse bacterial strains with strong-to-moderate lytic activity. To characterize their functional responses to the presence of cyanobacteria, we performed RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) experiments on coculture incubations, with an initial predator-prey ratio of 1:1. Genes involved in central cellular pathways, stress-related heat or cold shock proteins, and antitoxin genes were highly expressed in both heterotrophs and cyanobacteria. Heterotrophs in coculture expressed genes involved in cell motility, signal transduction, and putative lytic activity. l,d-Transpeptidase was the only significantly upregulated lytic gene in Stenotrophomonas rhizophila EK20. Heterotrophs also shifted their central metabolism from the tricarboxylic acid cycle to the glyoxylate shunt. Concurrently, cyanobacteria clearly show contrasting antagonistic interactions with the four tested heterotrophic strains, which is also reflected in the physical attachment to their cells. In conclusion, antagonistic interactions with cyanobacteria were initiated within 24 h, and expression profiles suggest varied responses for the different cyanobacteria and studied cyanolytes.IMPORTANCE Here, we present how gene expression profiles can be used to reveal interactions between bloom-forming freshwater cyanobacteria and antagonistic heterotrophic bacteria. Species-specific responses in

  14. Thiols in a Connecticut Stratified Freshwater Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, H.; Mylon, S. E.; Benoit, G.

    2003-12-01

    Thiols are an important class of dissolved reduced sulfur (DRS) species in aquatic environments. They are generally formed from biological processes or during diagenesis of biogenic matter. Thiols can affect the biogeochemistry of B-type metals as they form strong complexes that influence trace metal speciation, bioavailability and toxicity. While current literature focuses on the biogeochemistry of thiols in marine systems, little is known about the biogeochemistry of thiols in oxic freshwaters. We chose to study thiols in Linsley Pond a stratified freshwater lake that has been extensively studied by Hutchinson. Our goals were to identify and quantify the range of thiols present throughout this small lake. Additionally, we hoped to discern the environmental factors that influence the production and distribution of thiols in the water column, and to evaluate importance of thiols in trace metal speciation. To identify and quantify various thiols in freshwaters, we adopted a sensitive and selective analytical method, which involves precolumn fluorometric labeling coupled to high performance liquid chromatography and sensitive fluorescence detection. Using this method, our analytical detection limit is below one nanomolar. Among others, two thiol species were observed in Linsley Pond: 3-mercaptopropionic acid (3-MPA) and glutathione (GSH). 3-MPA exists in both oxic and anoxic water layers at nanomolar levels, and increases from surface to bottom. GSH is only detected in subsurface layer and co-varies with Chl a, indicating possible biological sources of GSH in these layers. There is a third, unidentified thiol species which is currently under investigation. The unidentified thiol species appears only in anoxic lake waters, and tests indicate that it is not PC2 (phytochelatin with 2 glutamic acid-cysteine units). Throughout the water column, concentrations of all three thiols are greater in whole water samples than in the dissolved phase (0.45 um).

  15. Opisthorchis viverrini metacercaria in Thai freshwater fish.

    PubMed

    Waikagul, J

    1998-06-01

    Examination for metacercaria in freshwater fish, the common intermediate hosts of Opisthorchis viverrini was carried out during 1992-1996. The 4-year survey of fish from markets in 14 provinces revealed that metacercariae of O. viverrini were found in fish from Udon Thani, Sa Kaeo and Prachin Buri Provinces; fish from Aranyaprathet district had the highest positive rates (25-28%). Fish from 12 provinces were found to be positive with heterophyid metacercariae, namely: Haplorchis pumilio, H. taichui, H. yokogawai, Stellantchasmus falcatus, Centrocestus formosanus and Haplorchoides cahirinus. It was also observed that the prevalence of O. viverrini metacercaria in fish decreased markedly during the last 10 years.

  16. A bioaccumulation bioassay for freshwater sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mac, Michael J.; Noguchi, George E.; Hesselberg, Robert J.; Edsall, Carol C.; Shoesmith, John A.; Bowker, James D.

    1990-01-01

    A laboratory bioassay is described for determining the bioavailability of contaminants from freshwater sediments. The bioassay consists of 10-d exposures to whole sediments under flow-through conditions. After testing five species, the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and the earthworm (Lubricus terrestris) were recommended for use in the test. When the availability of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), Hg and Zn from Great Lakes sediments was examined in laboratory exposures, only the PCBs were accumulated. A field validation study demonstrated that the magnitude of accumulation in laboratory exposures was similar to that in organisms caged in the field. A protocol is recommended for using the test as a standardized bioaccumulation bioassay.

  17. Freshwater aspects of anadromous salmonid enhancement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gould, Rowan W.

    1982-01-01

    Freshwater enhancement of anadromous salmonid populations has been practiced in the United States and Canada since the late 1800's. Reduction of natural spawning habitat and increasing fishing pressure make artificial enhancement a possible alternative to declining populations. Enhancement of anadromous salmonids involved improvement of the natural environment and reducing natural mortality. Methods of enhancement include fishways, spawning and rearing channels, stream rehabilitation, lake fertilization, environmental management, and artificial propagation techniques. Five Pacific salmon species and steelhead trout are commonly enhanced, primarily in watershed entering the Pacific Ocean and Great Lakes. Enhancement efforts contribute heavily to a commercial and sport industry realizing over $1.5 billion.

  18. Management and the conservation of freshwater ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wipfli, Mark S.; Richardson, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Riparian and freshwater ecosystems are typically tightly coupled, especially in their natural states, and the linkages that couple them frequently exert strong influence on their associated invertebrate and fish fauna (e.g. Gregory et al., 1991; Naiman et al., 2010). Riparian habitats, and the condition of these habitats, further plays a key role in the ecology of these fresh waters, influencing critical processes such as water, nutrient and sediment delivery and dynamics; prey resources for fish and other consumers, and other organic materials exchanged between aquatic and terrestrial habitats (Nakano et al., 1999; Naiman et al., 2010); light and water temperature dynamics that in turn affect food web processes and fish metabolism and growth; aquatic physical habitat (wood); and terrestrial consumers that prey upon fishes (Bisson & Bilby, 1998; Naiman et al., 2010; Wipfli & Baxter, 2010). These processes in turn directly or indirectly influence fishes in freshwater systems (Wang et al., 2001; Pusey & Arthington, 2003; Allan, 2004; Richardson et al., 2010a).

  19. Reclaiming freshwater sustainability in the Cadillac Desert

    PubMed Central

    Sabo, John L.; Sinha, Tushar; Bowling, Laura C.; Schoups, Gerrit H. W.; Wallender, Wesley W.; Campana, Michael E.; Cherkauer, Keith A.; Fuller, Pam L.; Graf, William L.; Hopmans, Jan W.; Kominoski, John S.; Taylor, Carissa; Trimble, Stanley W.; Webb, Robert H.; Wohl, Ellen E.

    2010-01-01

    Increasing human appropriation of freshwater resources presents a tangible limit to the sustainability of cities, agriculture, and ecosystems in the western United States. Marc Reisner tackles this theme in his 1986 classic Cadillac Desert: The American West and Its Disappearing Water. Reisner's analysis paints a portrait of region-wide hydrologic dysfunction in the western United States, suggesting that the storage capacity of reservoirs will be impaired by sediment infilling, croplands will be rendered infertile by salt, and water scarcity will pit growing desert cities against agribusiness in the face of dwindling water resources. Here we evaluate these claims using the best available data and scientific tools. Our analysis provides strong scientific support for many of Reisner's claims, except the notion that reservoir storage is imminently threatened by sediment. More broadly, we estimate that the equivalent of nearly 76% of streamflow in the Cadillac Desert region is currently appropriated by humans, and this figure could rise to nearly 86% under a doubling of the region's population. Thus, Reisner's incisive journalism led him to the same conclusions as those rendered by copious data, modern scientific tools, and the application of a more genuine scientific method. We close with a prospectus for reclaiming freshwater sustainability in the Cadillac Desert, including a suite of recommendations for reducing region-wide human appropriation of streamflow to a target level of 60%. PMID:21149727

  20. Climate and local abundance in freshwater fishes

    PubMed Central

    Knouft, Jason H.; Anthony, Melissa M.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying factors regulating variation in numbers of individuals among populations across a species' distribution is a fundamental goal in ecology. A common prediction, often referred to as the abundant-centre hypothesis, suggests that abundance is highest near the centre of a species' range. However, because of the primary focus on the geographical position of a population, this framework provides little insight into the environmental factors regulating local abundance. While range-wide variation in population abundance associated with environmental conditions has been investigated in terrestrial species, the relationship between climate and local abundance in freshwater taxa across species' distributions is not well understood. We used GIS-based temperature and precipitation data to determine the relationships between climatic conditions and range-wide variation in local abundance for 19 species of North American freshwater fishes. Climate predicted a portion of the variation in local abundance among populations for 18 species. In addition, the relationship between climatic conditions and local abundance varied among species, which is expected as lineages partition the environment across geographical space. The influence of local habitat quality on species persistence is well documented; however, our results also indicate the importance of climate in regulating population sizes across a species geographical range, even in aquatic taxa. PMID:27429769

  1. Ecogeomorphological feedbacks in a tidal freshwater marsh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palinkas, C. M.; Engelhardt, K.

    2013-12-01

    Tidal freshwater marshes are critical components of fluvial and estuarine ecosystems. However, ecogeomorphological feedbacks (i.e., feedbacks between sediment dynamics and the vegetation community) in freshwater marshes have not received as much attention as within their saltwater counterparts. This study evaluates the role of these feedbacks in stabilizing marsh-surface elevation, relative to sea-level rise, in Dyke Marsh Preserve (Potomac River, USA). Specifically, we relate the composition of the vegetation community to current and historical patterns of sedimentation that occur on bimonthly to decadal time scales. Along with a ~3-year time series of bimonthly and seasonal-scale observations, 210Pb (half-life 22.3 y) profiles are used to identify sites with relatively steady sediment accumulation (i.e., stable sediments) and those with numerous deposition/erosion events (i.e., unstable sediments). Differences in the vegetation community (e.g., composition, stem density) and sediment character (e.g., organic content, grain size) among sites in each of these stability categories are examined with statistical techniques and compared to observations of marsh-surface elevation change. The resulting insights are placed into a geomorphological context to assess the potential response of this marsh to rapid global environmental change.

  2. Heart Rate Sensor for Freshwater Mussels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Just, C. L.; Vial, D. P.; Kruger, A.; Niemeier, J. J.; Lee, H. W.; Schroer, H. W.

    2014-12-01

    Researchers have long been interested the cardiac activity of mollusks. First, it is important as a basic measure of the animal's metabolism. Further, activities such as feeding and burrowing affect heart rate, as do environmental factors such as water salinity, water temperature, exposure, and predation. We have developed a small, noninvasive sensor for measuring freshwater mussel heart rate. Its working principle is as follows. An infrared (IR) light-emitting diode is placed in contact with the mussel shell. Some of the IR penetrates through the shell, reflects off internal organs, and traverses back. A photodetector detects this IR, and electronics condition the signal. The heartbeat of the animal modulates the IR, allowing one to measure the heart rate. The technique is widely-used in finger heart-rate monitors in humans. The sensors do not have to be positioned above the heart and several locations on the mussel shell work well. The sensor is small (8 mm × 10 mm) and consumes less than 1 mA, and has a simple one-wire interface that allows for easy integration into data acquisition hardware. We present heart rate measurements for the common pocketbook (lampsilis cardium) freshwater mussel.

  3. Climate and local abundance in freshwater fishes.

    PubMed

    Knouft, Jason H; Anthony, Melissa M

    2016-06-01

    Identifying factors regulating variation in numbers of individuals among populations across a species' distribution is a fundamental goal in ecology. A common prediction, often referred to as the abundant-centre hypothesis, suggests that abundance is highest near the centre of a species' range. However, because of the primary focus on the geographical position of a population, this framework provides little insight into the environmental factors regulating local abundance. While range-wide variation in population abundance associated with environmental conditions has been investigated in terrestrial species, the relationship between climate and local abundance in freshwater taxa across species' distributions is not well understood. We used GIS-based temperature and precipitation data to determine the relationships between climatic conditions and range-wide variation in local abundance for 19 species of North American freshwater fishes. Climate predicted a portion of the variation in local abundance among populations for 18 species. In addition, the relationship between climatic conditions and local abundance varied among species, which is expected as lineages partition the environment across geographical space. The influence of local habitat quality on species persistence is well documented; however, our results also indicate the importance of climate in regulating population sizes across a species geographical range, even in aquatic taxa.

  4. Reclaiming freshwater sustainability in the Cadillac Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sabo, John L.; Sinha, Tushar; Bowling, Laura C.; Schoups, Gerrit H.W.; Wallender, Wesley W.; Campana, Michael E.; Cherkauer, Keith A.; Fuller, Pam L.; Graf, William L.; Hopmans, Jan W.; Kominoski, John S.; Taylor, Carissa; Trimble, Stanley W.; Webb, Robert H.; Wohl, Ellen E.

    2010-01-01

    Increasing human appropriation of freshwater resources presents a tangible limit to the sustainability of cities, agriculture, and ecosystems in the western United States. Marc Reisner tackles this theme in his 1986 classic Cadillac Desert: The American West and Its Disappearing Water. Reisner's analysis paints a portrait of region-wide hydrologic dysfunction in the western United States, suggesting that the storage capacity of reservoirs will be impaired by sediment infilling, croplands will be rendered infertile by salt, and water scarcity will pit growing desert cities against agribusiness in the face of dwindling water resources. Here we evaluate these claims using the best available data and scientific tools. Our analysis provides strong scientific support for many of Reisner's claims, except the notion that reservoir storage is imminently threatened by sediment. More broadly, we estimate that the equivalent of nearly 76% of streamflow in the Cadillac Desert region is currently appropriated by humans, and this figure could rise to nearly 86% under a doubling of the region's population. Thus, Reisner's incisive journalism led him to the same conclusions as those rendered by copious data, modern scientific tools, and the application of a more genuine scientific method. We close with a prospectus for reclaiming freshwater sustainability in the Cadillac Desert, including a suite of recommendations for reducing region-wide human appropriation of streamflow to a target level of 60%.

  5. Tracking salinity intrusions in a coastal forested freshwater wetland system

    Treesearch

    Anand D. Jayakaran; Thomas M. Williams; William H. Conner

    2016-01-01

    Coastal forested freshwater wetlands are sentinel sites for salinity intrusions associated with large, tidally influenced, storm-driven or drought-induced incursions of estuarine waters into freshwater ecosystems. These incursions may also be exacerbated by rising sea levels associated with climate change.

  6. A subtropical fate awaited freshwater discharged from glacial Lake Agassiz

    SciTech Connect

    Condron, Alan; Winsor, Peter

    2011-02-10

    The 8.2 kyr event is the largest abrupt climatic change recorded in the last 10,000 years, and is widely hypothesized to have been triggered by the release of thousands of kilometers cubed of freshwater into the North Atlantic Ocean. Using a high-resolution (1/6°) global, ocean-ice circulation model we present an alternative view that freshwater discharged from glacial Lake Agassiz would have remained on the continental shelf as a narrow, buoyant, coastal current, and would have been transported south into the subtropical North Atlantic. The pathway we describe is in contrast to the conceptual idea that freshwater from this lake outburst spread over most of the sub-polar North Atlantic, and covered the deep, open-ocean, convection regions. This coastally confined freshwater pathway is consistent with the present-day routing of freshwater from Hudson Bay, as well as paleoceanographic evidence of this event. In this study, using a coarse-resolution (2.6°) version of the same model, we demonstrate that the previously reported spreading of freshwater across the sub-polar North Atlantic results from the inability of numerical models of this resolution to accurately resolve narrow coastal flows, producing instead a diffuse circulation that advects freshwater away from the boundaries. To understand the climatic impact of freshwater released in the past or future (e.g. Greenland and Antarctica), the ocean needs to be modeled at a resolution sufficient to resolve the dynamics of narrow, coastal buoyant flows.

  7. 40 CFR 35.1605-2 - Freshwater lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Freshwater lake. 35.1605-2 Section 35.1605-2 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE... Lakes § 35.1605-2 Freshwater lake. Any inland pond, reservoir, impoundment, or other similar body of...

  8. 40 CFR 35.1605-2 - Freshwater lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Freshwater lake. 35.1605-2 Section 35.1605-2 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE... Lakes § 35.1605-2 Freshwater lake. Any inland pond, reservoir, impoundment, or other similar body of...

  9. 40 CFR 35.1605-2 - Freshwater lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Freshwater lake. 35.1605-2 Section 35.1605-2 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE... Lakes § 35.1605-2 Freshwater lake. Any inland pond, reservoir, impoundment, or other similar body of...

  10. 40 CFR 35.1605-2 - Freshwater lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Freshwater lake. 35.1605-2 Section 35.1605-2 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE... Lakes § 35.1605-2 Freshwater lake. Any inland pond, reservoir, impoundment, or other similar body of...

  11. North American freshwater mussels: natural history, ecology, and conservation

    Treesearch

    Wendell R. Haag

    2012-01-01

    Interest in freshwater mussels is growing for two important reasons. First, freshwater mussels are among the most endangered organisms on Earth, and many species are already extinct or face imminent extinction. Their desperate conservation plight has gained intense interest from natural resource agencies, nongovernmental conservation organizations, academia, and...

  12. Prospect redux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacquemoud, S.; Ustin, S. L.; Verdebout, J.; Schmuck, G.; Andreoli, G.; Hosgood, B.

    1995-01-01

    The remote estimation of leaf biochemical content from spaceborne platforms has been the subject of many studies aimed at better understanding of terrestrial ecosystem functioning. The major ecological processes involved in exchange of matter and energy, like photosynthesis, primary production, evaportranspiration, respiration, and decomposition can be related to plant properties e.g., chlorophyll, water, protein, cellulose and lignin contents. As leaves represent the most important plant surfaces interacting with solar energy, a top priority has been to relate optical properties to biochemical constituents. Two different approaches have been considered: first, statistical correlations between the leaf reflectance (or transmittance) and biochemical content, and second, physically based models of leaf scattering and absorption developed using the laws of optics. Recently reviewed by Verdebout et al., the development of models of leaf optical properties has resulted in better understanding of the interaction of light with plant leaves. Present radiative transfer models mainly use chlorophyll and/or water contents as input parameters to calculate leaf reflectance. Inversion of these models allows to retrieve these constituents from spectrophotometric measurements. Conel et al. recently proposed a two-stream Kubelka-Munk model to analyze the influence of protein, cellulose, lignin, and starch on leaf reflectance, but in fact, the estimation of leaf biochemistry from remote sensing is still an open question. In order to clarify it, a laboratory experiment associating visible/infrared spectra of plan leaves both with physical measurements and biochemical analyses was conducted at the Joint Research Center during the summer of 1993. This unique data set has been used to upgrade the PROSPECT model, by including leaf biochemistry.

  13. Pesticide toxicity index for freshwater aquatic organisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munn, Mark D.; Gilliom, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program is designed to assess current water-quality conditions, changes in water quality over time, and the effects of natural and human factors on water quality for the Nation's streams and ground-water resources. For streams, one of the most difficult parts of the assessment is to link chemical conditions to effects on aquatic biota, particularly for pesticides, which tend to occur in streams as complex mixtures with strong seasonal patterns. A Pesticide Toxicity Index (PTI) was developed that combines pesticide exposure of aquatic biota (measured concentrations of pesticides in stream water) with toxicity estimates (standard endpoints from laboratory bioassays) to produce a single index value for a sample or site. The development of the PTI was limited to pesticide compounds routinely measured in NAWQA studies and to toxicity data readily available from existing databases. Qualifying toxicity data were found for one or more types of test organisms for 75 of the 83 pesticide compounds measured in NAWQA samples, but with a wide range of bioassays per compound (1 to 65). There were a total of 2,824 bioassays for the 75 compounds, including 287 48-hour EC50 values (concentration at which 50 percent of test organisms exhibit a nonlethal response) for freshwater cladocerans, 585 96-hour LC50 values (concentration lethal to 50 percent of test organisms) for freshwater benthic invertebrates, and 1,952 96-hour LC50 values for freshwater fish. The PTI for a particular sample is the sum of toxicity quotients (measured concentration divided by the median toxicity concentration from bioassays) for each detected pesticide. The PTI can be calculated for specific groups of pesticides and for specific taxonomic groups.While the PTI does not determine whether water in a sample is toxic, its values can be used to rank or compare the toxicity of samples or sites on a relative basis for use in further analysis or

  14. Identifying Canadian Freshwater Fishes through DNA Barcodes

    PubMed Central

    Hubert, Nicolas; Hanner, Robert; Holm, Erling; Mandrak, Nicholas E.; Taylor, Eric; Burridge, Mary; Watkinson, Douglas; Dumont, Pierre; Curry, Allen; Bentzen, Paul; Zhang, Junbin; April, Julien; Bernatchez, Louis

    2008-01-01

    Background DNA barcoding aims to provide an efficient method for species-level identifications using an array of species specific molecular tags derived from the 5′ region of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) gene. The efficiency of the method hinges on the degree of sequence divergence among species and species-level identifications are relatively straightforward when the average genetic distance among individuals within a species does not exceed the average genetic distance between sister species. Fishes constitute a highly diverse group of vertebrates that exhibit deep phenotypic changes during development. In this context, the identification of fish species is challenging and DNA barcoding provide new perspectives in ecology and systematics of fishes. Here we examined the degree to which DNA barcoding discriminate freshwater fish species from the well-known Canadian fauna, which currently encompasses nearly 200 species, some which are of high economic value like salmons and sturgeons. Methodology/Principal Findings We bi-directionally sequenced the standard 652 bp “barcode” region of COI for 1360 individuals belonging to 190 of the 203 Canadian freshwater fish species (95%). Most species were represented by multiple individuals (7.6 on average), the majority of which were retained as voucher specimens. The average genetic distance was 27 fold higher between species than within species, as K2P distance estimates averaged 8.3% among congeners and only 0.3% among concpecifics. However, shared polymorphism between sister-species was detected in 15 species (8% of the cases). The distribution of K2P distance between individuals and species overlapped and identifications were only possible to species group using DNA barcodes in these cases. Conversely, deep hidden genetic divergence was revealed within two species, suggesting the presence of cryptic species. Conclusions/Significance The present study evidenced that freshwater fish species can be

  15. Freshwater bryozoa of Tonle Sap, Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Masato; Mawatari, Shunsuke F

    2007-06-01

    We identified a collection of freshwater bryozoans from Tonle Sap (meaning Tonle Lake), Cambodia, a body of water fed by the Mekong River and characterized by extreme fluctuations in water level between the wet and dry seasons. The collection also included specimens from the moat of Angkor Wat, located at the north end of the lake. We found four phylactolaemate species (Plumatella bombayensis, Plumatella casmiana, Plumatella vorstmani, Hyalinella lendenfeldi) and one ctenostome species (Hislopia cambodgiensis) from the lake, and only a single, additional phylactolaemate species (Plumatella javanica) from the moat. We provide brief descriptions of these species, photographs of colonies for some, and photomicrographs by light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of statoblasts. None of the species encountered in this study is endemic to Cambodia, and the wide distributions of the species are possibly related to the dispersability of floatoblasts by birds. We briefly discuss some of the taxonomic problems surrounding Hislopia cambodgiensis.

  16. Estimated Freshwater Withdrawals in Oklahoma, 1990

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lurry, Dee L.; Tortorelli, Robert L.

    1996-01-01

    This report presents 1990 freshwater withdrawal estimates for Oklahoma by source and category. Withdrawal source is either ground water or surface water. Withdrawal categories include: irrigation, water supply, livestock, thermoelectric-power generation, domestic and commercial, and industrial and mining. Withdrawal data are aggregated by county, major aquifer, and principal river basin. Only the four major categories of irrigation, water supply, livestock, and thermoelectric-power generation are illustrated in this report, although data for all categories are tabulated. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) established the National Water-Use Information Program in 1977 to collect uniform, current, and reliable information on water use. The Oklahoma District of the USGS and the Oklahoma Water Resources Board participate in a cooperative program to collect and publish water-use information for Oklahoma. Data contained in this report were made available through the cooperative program.

  17. Carcinogens and cancers in freshwater fishes.

    PubMed Central

    Black, J J; Baumann, P C

    1991-01-01

    Epizootics of neoplasms in freshwater fish species are considered in relation to circumstantial and experimental evidence that suggest that some epizootics of neoplasia of hepatocellular, cholangiocellular, epidermal, and oral epithelial origin may be causally related to contaminant exposure. Although there is concern for the safety of consuming fish affected with neoplasms, this concern may be misdirected as direct transmission of cancer by ingesting cancerous tissue would seem unlikely. Of greater concern is the matter of toxic and cancer-causing chemicals present in edible fish that exhibit neoplasia as a symptom of past exposure via residence in a polluted waterway. There is ample evidence to suggest that contaminant chemicals ingested via contaminated Great Lakes fish may already be affecting both human and ecosystem health, but these effects are subtle and may require new approaches to the study of the affected systems. PMID:2050071

  18. The decline of North American freshwater fishes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walsh, Stephen J.; Jelks, Howard L.; Burkhead, Noel M.

    2009-01-01

    North America has a broad array of freshwater ecosystems because of the continent's complex geography and geological history. Within a multitude of habitats—that include streams, large rivers, natural lakes, springs, and wetlands—rich assemblages of fishes reside, representing diverse taxonomic groups with unique ecological requirements. They face an unprecedented conservation crisis.1 In the last few decades, the proportion of inland fishes of North America, which are considered imperiled or extinct, increased from 20 to 40%.2 Although extinctions have occurred, many species and populations are declining in range size and abundance. The fish biota of the continent as a whole remains diverse; however, we can take action to stem any further declines.

  19. Eutrophication of freshwater and marine ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Val H.; Joye, Samantha B.; Howarth, Robert W.

    2006-01-01

    Initial understanding of the links between nutrients and aquatic productivity originated in Europe in the early 1900s, and our knowledge base has expanded greatly during the past 40 yr. This explosion of eutrophication-related research has made it unequivocally clear that a comprehensive strategy to prevent excessive amounts of nitrogen and phosphorus from entering our waterways is needed to protect our lakes, rivers, and coasts from water quality deterioration. However, despite these very significant advances, cultural eutrophication remains one of the foremost problems for protecting our valuable surface water resources. The papers in this special issue provide a valuable cross section and synthesis of our current understanding of both freshwater and marine eutrophication science. They also serve to identify gaps in our knowledge and will help to guide future research.

  20. Carcinogens and cancers in freshwater fishes

    SciTech Connect

    Black, J.J. ); Baumann, P.C. )

    1991-01-01

    Epizootics of neoplasms in freshwater fish species are considered in relation to circumstantial and experimental evidence that suggest that some epizootics of neoplasia of hepatocellular, cholangiocellular, epidermal, and oral epithelial origin may be causally related to contaminant exposure. Although there is concern for the safety of consuming fish affected with neoplasms, this concern may be misdirected as direct transmission of cancer by ingesting cancerous tissue would seem unlikely. Of greater concern is the matter of toxic and cancer-causing chemicals present in edible fish that exhibit neoplasia as a symptom of past exposure via residence in a polluted waterway. There is ample evidence to suggest that contaminant chemicals ingested via contaminated Great Lakes fish may already be affecting both human and ecosystem health, but these effects are subtle and may require new approaches to the study of the affected systems.