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Sample records for fricke automorphic functions

  1. True Bargmann transforms for rank one automorphic functions associated with Landau levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intissar, Ahmed; Ziyat, Mohammed

    2017-06-01

    For a given discrete subgroup Γ of (C ,+ ) and given real number ν >0 , we study the spectral properties of the magnetic Laplacian operator Δν acting on the Hilbert space LΓ,χ 2 ,ν(C ) of (L2,Γ ) -automorphic functions (see below for notations). We show that its spectrum is reduced to the eigenvalues ν m ; m =0 ,1 ,…. We also give a concrete description of each eigenspace in terms of the Hermite polynomials. This description will be used to characterize the range of true Bargmann transform of L2-periodic functions on the real line R .

  2. Frick on FD

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-18

    S122-E-010925 (18 Feb. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Frick, STS-122 commander, smiles for a photo while monitoring data at the commander's station on the flight deck of Space Shuttle Atlantis during flight day 12 activities.

  3. Landau automorphic functions on C{sup n} of magnitude {nu}

    SciTech Connect

    Ghanmi, A.; Intissar, A.

    2008-08-15

    We investigate the spectral theory of the invariant Landau Hamiltonian, L{sup {nu}}=-1/24{sigma}{sub j=1}{sup n}{partial_derivative}{sup 2}/{partial_derivative}z{sub j}{partial_derivative}z{sub j}+2{nu}{sigma}{sub j=1}{sup n}(z{sub j}{partial_derivative}/{partial_derivative}z{sub j}-z{sub j}{partial_derivative}/{partial_derivative}z{sub j})-{nu}{sup 2}|z|{sup 2}, acting on the space F{sub {gamma}}{sub ,{chi}}{sup {nu}} of ({gamma},{chi})-automorphic functions on C{sup n}, constituted of C{sup {infinity}} functions satisfying the functional equation f(z+{gamma})={chi}({gamma})e{sup i{nu}}{sup Imlangz,{gamma}}{sup rang}f(z); z(set-membership sign)C{sup n},{gamma}(set-membership sign){gamma}, for given real number {nu}>0, lattice {gamma} of C{sup n} and a map {chi}:{gamma}{yields}U(1) such that the triplet ({nu},{gamma},{chi}) satisfies a Riemann-Dirac quantization-type condition. More precisely, we show that the eigenspace E{sub {gamma}}{sub ,{chi}}{sup {nu}}({lambda})={l_brace}f(set-membership sign)F{sub {gamma}}{sub ,{chi}}{sup {nu}}; L{sup {nu}}f={nu}(2{lambda}+n)f{r_brace}; {lambda}(set-membership sign)C, is nontrivial if and only if {lambda}=l=0,1,2,...,. In such case, E{sub {gamma}}{sub ,{chi}}{sup {nu}}(l) is a finite dimensional vector space whose the dimension is given explicitly by dim E{sub {gamma}}{sub ,{chi}}{sup {nu}}(l)=(n+l-1; l;)({nu}/{pi}){sup n}vol(C{sup n}/{gamma}). Furthermore, we show that the eigenspace E{sub {gamma}}{sub ,{chi}}{sup {nu}}(0) associated with the lowest Landau level of L{sup {nu}} is isomorphic to the space, O{sub {gamma}}{sub ,{chi}}{sup {nu}}(C{sup n}), of holomorphic functions on C{sup n} satisfying g(z+{gamma})={chi}({gamma})e{sup {nu}}{sup /2|{gamma}}{sup |{sup 2}}{sup +{nu}}{sup }g(z= ), (*) that we can realize also as the null space of the differential operator, {sigma}{sub j=1}{sup n}(-{partial_derivative}{sup 2}/{partial_derivative}z{sub j}{partial_derivative}z{sub j}+{nu}z{sub j

  4. Automorphic Black Hole Entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimmrigk, Rolf

    2013-09-01

    Over the past few years the understanding of the microscopic theory of black hole entropy has made important conceptual progress by recognizing that the degeneracies are encoded in partition functions which are determined by higher rank automorphic representations, in particular in the context of Siegel modular forms of genus two. In this review, some of the elements of this framework are highlighted. One of the surprising aspects is that the Siegel forms that have appeared in the entropic context are geometric in origin, arising from weight two cusp forms, hence from elliptic curves.

  5. Sequences from zero entropy noncommutative toral automorphisms and Sarnak Conjecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen; Lian, Zhengxing; Shao, Song; Ye, Xiangdong

    2017-07-01

    In this paper we study C*-algebra version of Sarnak Conjecture for noncommutative toral automorphisms. Let AΘ be a noncommutative torus and αΘ be the noncommutative toral automorphism arising from a matrix S ∈ GL (d , Z). We show that if the Voiculescu-Brown entropy of αΘ is zero, then the sequence { ρ (αΘn u) } n ∈ Z is a sum of a nilsequence and a zero-density-sequence, where u ∈AΘ and ρ is any state on AΘ. Then by a result of Green and Tao [9], this sequence is linearly disjoint from the Möbius function.

  6. Ronald Fricke proposed Consent Agreement Final Order

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA is providing notice of a proposed Administrative Penalty Assessment against Ronald Fricke, regarding alleged violations at the concentrated animal feeding operation, located at 22757 170th Street, Carroll, Carroll County, Iowa 51401.

  7. Ronald Fricke - Clean Water Act Public Notice

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA is providing notice of a proposed Administrative Penalty Assessment against Ronald Fricke, regarding alleged violations at the concentrated animal feeding operation, located at 22757 170th Street, Carroll, Carroll County, Iowa 51401.

  8. Dihedral-like constructions of automorphic loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboras, Mouna

    In this dissertation we study dihedral-like constructions of automorphic loops. Automorphic loops are loops in which all inner mappings are automorphisms. We start by describing a generalization of the dihedral construction for groups. Namely, if (G, +) is an abelian group, m > 1 and alpha ∈2 Aut(G), let Dih(m, G, alpha) on Zm x G be defined by. (i, u)(j, v) = (i + j, ((--1)ju + v)alpha ij). We prove that the resulting loop is automorphic if and only if m = 2 or (alpha2 = 1 and m is even) or (m is odd, alpha = 1 and exp(G) ≤ 2). In the last case, the loop is a group. The case m = 2 was introduced by Kinyon, Kunen, Phillips, and Vojtechovsky. We study basic structural properties of dihedral-like automorphic loops. We describe certain subloops, including: nucleus, commutant, center, associator subloop and derived subloop. We prove theorems for dihedral-like automorphic loops analogous to the Cauchy and Lagrange theorems for groups, and further we discuss the coset decomposition in dihedral-like automorphic loops. We show that two finite dihedral-like automorphic loops Dih( m, G, alpha) and Dih(m¯, G¯, [special character omitted]) are isomorphic if and only if m = m¯, G ≅ G¯ and alpha is conjugate to [special character omitted] in Aut(G). We describe the automorphism group of Q and its subgroup consisting of inner mappings of Q. Finally, due to the solution to the isomorphism problem, we are interested in studying conjugacy classes of automorphism groups of finite abelian groups. Then we describe all dihedral-like automorphic loops of order < 128 up to isomorphism. We conclude with a description of all dihedral-like automorphic loops of order < 64 up to isotopism.

  9. Duality groups, automorphic forms, and higher derivative corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, Neil; West, Peter

    2007-03-15

    We study the higher derivative corrections that occur in type II superstring theories in ten dimensions or less. Assuming invariance under a discrete duality group G(Z) we show that the generic functions of the scalar fields that occur can be identified with automorphic forms. We then give a systematic method to construct automorphic forms from a given group G(Z) together with a chosen subgroup H and a linear representation of G(Z). This construction is based on the theory of nonlinear realizations and we find that the automorphic forms contain the weights of G. We also carry out the dimensional reduction of the generic higher derivative corrections of the IIB theory to three dimensions and find that the weights of E{sub 8} occur generalizing previous results of the authors on M theory. Since the automorphic forms of this theory contain the weights of E{sub 8} we can interpret the occurrence of weights in the dimensional reduction as evidence for an underlying U-duality symmetry.

  10. STS-110 Crew Interview: Stephen Frick

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-110 Pilot Stephen Frick is seen during this preflight interview, where he gives a quick overview of the mission before answering questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. Frick outlines his role in the mission in general, and specifically during the docking and extravehicular activities (EVAs). He describes the payload (S0 Truss and Mobile Transporter) and the dry run installation of the S0 truss that will take place the day before the EVA for the actual installation. Frick discusses the planned EVAs in detail and outlines what supplies will be left for the resident crew of the International Space Station (ISS). He ends with his thoughts on the most valuable aspect of the ISS.

  11. Characterization of ferric ions diffusion in Fricke gel dosimeters by using inverse problem techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedelago, J.; Quiroga, A.; Valente, M.

    2014-10-01

    Diffusion of ferric ions in ferrous sulfate (Fricke) gels represents one of the main drawbacks of some radiation detectors, such as Fricke gel dosimeters. In practice, this disadvantage can be overcome by prompt dosimeter analysis, and constraining strongly the time between irradiation and analysis, implementing special dedicated protocols aimed at minimizing signal blurring due to diffusion effects. This work presents a novel analytic modeling and numerical calculation approach of diffusion coefficients in Fricke gel radiation sensitive materials. Samples are optically analyzed by means of visible light transmission measurements by capturing images with a charge-coupled device camera provided with a monochromatic filter corresponding to the XO-infused Fricke solution absorbance peak. Dose distributions in Fricke gels are suitably delivered by assessing specific initial conditions further studied by periodical sample image acquisitions. Diffusion coefficient calculations were performed using a set of computational algorithms based on inverse problem formulation. Although 1D approaches to the diffusion equation might provide estimations of the diffusion coefficient, it should be calculated in the 2D framework due to the intrinsic bi-dimensional characteristics of Fricke gel layers here considered as radiation dosimeters. Thus a suitable 2D diffusion model capable of determining diffusion coefficients was developed by fitting the obtained algorithm numerical solutions with the corresponding experimental data. Comparisons were performed by introducing an appropriate functional in order to analyze both experimental and numerical values. Solutions to the second-order diffusion equation are calculated in the framework of a dedicated method that incorporates finite element method. Moreover, optimized solutions can be attained by gradient-type minimization algorithms. Knowledge about diffusion coefficient for a Fricke gel radiation detector is helpful in accounting for

  12. Fricke Lie algebras and the genus zero property in Moonshine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnahan, Scott

    2017-10-01

    We give a new, simpler proof that the canonical actions of finite groups on Fricke-type Monstrous Lie algebras yield genus zero functions in generalized Monstrous Moonshine, using a Borcherds–Kac–Moody Lie algebra decomposition due to Jurisich. We describe a compatibility condition, arising from the no-ghost theorem in bosonic string theory, that yields the genus zero property. We give evidence for and against the conjecture that such a compatibility for symmetries of the Monster Lie algebra gives a characterization of the Monster group.

  13. Melvin, Love, Frick and Walheim on MDDK

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-14

    S122-E-008583 (14 Feb. 2008) --- Astronauts Steve Frick (second right), STS-122 commander; Leland Melvin (left), Stanley Love (top) and Rex Walheim, all mission specialists, take a moment during flight day eight activities for a photo on the middeck of Space Shuttle Atlantis while docked with the International Space Station.

  14. Walheim, Frick, Love and Poindexter on MDDK

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-14

    S122-E-008585 (14 Feb. 2008) --- Astronauts Rex Walheim (left), STS-122 mission specialist; Steve Frick, commander; Stanley Love, mission specialist; and Alan Poindexter, pilot, take a moment during flight day eight activities for a photo on the middeck of Space Shuttle Atlantis while docked with the International Space Station.

  15. Walheim, Frick, Love and Poindexter on MDDK

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-14

    S122-E-008586 (14 Feb. 2008) --- Astronauts Rex Walheim (left), STS-122 mission specialist; Steve Frick, commander; Stanley Love, mission specialist; and Alan Poindexter, pilot, take a moment during flight day eight activities for a photo on the middeck of Space Shuttle Atlantis while docked with the International Space Station.

  16. Essential Parabolic Structures and Their Infinitesimal Automorphisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alt, Jesse

    2011-04-01

    Using the theory of Weyl structures, we give a natural generalization of the notion of essential conformal structures and conformal Killing fields to arbitrary parabolic geometries. We show that a parabolic structure is inessential whenever the automorphism group acts properly on the base space. As a corollary of the generalized Ferrand-Obata theorem proved by C. Frances, this proves a generalization of the ''Lichnérowicz conjecture'' for conformal Riemannian, strictly pseudo-convex CR, and quaternionic/octonionic contact manifolds in positive-definite signature. For an infinitesimal automorphism with a singularity, we give a generalization of the dictionary introduced by Frances for conformal Killing fields, which characterizes (local) essentiality via the so-called holonomy associated to a singularity of an infinitesimal automorphism.

  17. Fricke S-duality in CHL models

    SciTech Connect

    Persson, Daniel; Volpato, Roberto

    2015-12-23

    In this study, we consider four dimensional CHL models with sixteen spacetime supersymmetries obtained from orbifolds of type IIA superstring on K3×T2 by a ZN symmetry acting (possibly) non-geometrically on K3. We show that most of these models (in particular, for geometric symmetries) are self-dual under a weak-strong duality acting on the heterotic axio-dilaton modulus S by a “Fricke involution” S → -1/NS. This is a novel symmetry of CHL models that lies outside of the standard SL(2,Z)-symmetry of the parent theory, heterotic strings on T6. For self-dual models this implies that the lattice of purely electric charges is N-modular, i.e. isometric to its dual up to a rescaling of its quadratic form by N. We verify this prediction by determining the lattices of electric and magnetic charges in all relevant examples. We also calculate certain BPS-saturated couplings and verify that they are invariant under the Fricke S-duality. For CHL models that are not self-dual, the strong coupling limit is dual to type IIA compactified on T6/ZN, for some ZN-symmetry preserving half of the spacetime supersymmetries.

  18. Fricke S-duality in CHL models

    DOE PAGES

    Persson, Daniel; Volpato, Roberto

    2015-12-23

    In this study, we consider four dimensional CHL models with sixteen spacetime supersymmetries obtained from orbifolds of type IIA superstring on K3×T2 by a ZN symmetry acting (possibly) non-geometrically on K3. We show that most of these models (in particular, for geometric symmetries) are self-dual under a weak-strong duality acting on the heterotic axio-dilaton modulus S by a “Fricke involution” S → -1/NS. This is a novel symmetry of CHL models that lies outside of the standard SL(2,Z)-symmetry of the parent theory, heterotic strings on T6. For self-dual models this implies that the lattice of purely electric charges is N-modular,more » i.e. isometric to its dual up to a rescaling of its quadratic form by N. We verify this prediction by determining the lattices of electric and magnetic charges in all relevant examples. We also calculate certain BPS-saturated couplings and verify that they are invariant under the Fricke S-duality. For CHL models that are not self-dual, the strong coupling limit is dual to type IIA compactified on T6/ZN, for some ZN-symmetry preserving half of the spacetime supersymmetries.« less

  19. Radiological properties of nanocomposite Fricke gel dosimeters for heavy ion beams

    PubMed Central

    Maeyama, Takuya; Fukunishi, Nobuhisa; Ishikawa, Kenichi L.; Fukasaku, Kazuaki; Fukuda, Shigekazu

    2016-01-01

    The radiological properties of nanocomposite Fricke gel (NC-FG) dosimeters prepared with different concentrations of nano-clay, perchloric acid and ferrous ions in deaerated conditions were investigated under carbon and argon ion beam irradiation covering a linear-energy-transfer (LET) range of 10 to 3000 eV/nm. We found that NC-FG exhibits radiological properties distinct from those of conventional Fricke gel. The radiation sensitivity of NC-FG is independent of the LET and is nearly constant even at very high LET (3000 eV/nm) values in the Bragg peak region of the argon ion beam. In addition, whereas conventional Fricke gel dosimeters only operate under acidic conditions, NC-FG dosimeters function under both acidic and neutral conditions. The radiation sensitivity decreases with decreasing nano-clay concentration in NC-FG, which indicates that the nano-clay plays a vital role in the radiation-induced oxidation of Fe2+. PMID:26968632

  20. Discontinuous automorphisms of the proper Galilei and Euclidean groups

    SciTech Connect

    Adeleke, S.A. )

    1989-04-01

    The author shows that there are numerous discontinuous automorphisms of the three-dimensional Euclidean group and thus of the Galilei group, as numerous as the subsets of the real numbers, 2{sup aleph-null}, to be exact. These automorphisms arise from the derivations of the field of real numbers. Tits gave an example of a discontinuous automorphism for the semidirect product of the general linear group GL{sub n}(K) in n dimensions with the additive group of n {times} n matrices. He observes that if one uses the quaternion representation of the rotations and the form of Tits example, one obtains discontinuous automorphisms of the Euclidean group in three dimensions. He shows that all automorphisms of the Euclidean group in higher dimensions are continuous.

  1. Influence of sulphuric acid contaminants on Fricke dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Palm, A; Mattsson, O

    2000-09-01

    The sulphuric acid used for the preparation of the Fricke dosimeter solution may contain trace impurities that can affect the yield of ferric ions. Two methods, pre-irradiation or oxidation with hydrogen peroxide, have been proposed to reduce the influence of these impurities. Fricke users sometimes omit this treatment. In the present work Fricke solutions prepared from six different brands and qualities of sulphuric acid were compared in order to study any influences of the acid on the ferric ion yield. It was shown that the use of analytical grade sulphuric acid from one manufacturer resulted in a reduction of the ferric ion yield of about 5% at an absorbed dose of approximately 20 Gy. If this solution were to be used for an absolute dose determination together with epsilon(m) G values from the literature the absorbed dose would be underestimated by the same amount.

  2. Fricke Xylenol Gel characterization at megavoltage radiation energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Lama, Lucas Sacchini; Petchevist, Paulo César Dias; de Almeida, Adelaide

    2017-03-01

    Accurate determination of absorbed dose is of great importance in every medical application of ionizing radiation, mainly when involving biological tissues. Among different types of dosimeters, the ferrous sulfate chemical solution, known as Fricke solution, can be detached, due to its accuracy, reproducibility and linearity, been used in radiation dosimetry for over 50 years. Besides these characteristics, the Fricke Xylenol Gel (FXG), became one of the most known dosimeters for absorbed dose spatial distribution because of its high spatial resolution. In this work, we evaluated the FXG dosimeter taking into account different preparation recipes, in order to characterize its response in terms of absorbed dose range, linearity, sensitivity and fading.

  3. Automorphisms of Hilbert space effect algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šemrl, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Let H be a Hilbert space and E (H) the effect algebra on H. A bijective map φ :E(H)\\to E(H) is called an ortho-order automorphism of E (H) if for every A,B\\in E(H) we have A≤slant B \\Longleftrightarrow φ (A)≤slant φ (B) and φ ({{A}\\bot })=φ {{(A)}\\bot }. The classical theorem of Ludwig states that every such ϕ is of the form φ (A)=UA{{U}*}, A\\in E(H), for some unitary or antiunitary operator U. It is also known that each bijective map on E (H) preserving order and coexistency in both directions is of the same form. Can we improve these two theorems by relaxing the bijectivity assumption and/or replacing the above preserving properties by the weaker assumptions of preserving above relations in one direction only and still get the same conclusion? For both characterizations of automorphisms of effect algebras we will prove the optimal versions and give counterexamples showing the optimality of the obtained results. This research was supported by a grant from ARRS, Slovenia.

  4. Frick, Melvin and Love in the U.S. Lab

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-13

    S122-E-008251 (13 Feb. 2008) --- Astronauts Steve Frick (top left), STS-122 commander; Leland Melvin (bottom) and Stanley Love, both mission specialists, take a moment for a photo while working the controls of the station's robotic Canadarm2 in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station while Space Shuttle Atlantis is docked with the station.

  5. Frick and Whitson in the A/L

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-15

    S122-E-009090 (15 Feb. 2008) --- Commanders of the STS-122 Atlantis crew and the International Space Station's expedition, respectively, astronauts Steve Frick and Peggy Whitson, give a tip of the hat to the STS-122 spacewalk team of astronauts Stanley Love and Rex Walheim, who shortly afterward ingressed the station at the completion of the mission's final spacewalk.

  6. Walheim, Frick and Whitson in the A/L

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-15

    S122-E-009094 (15 Feb. 2008) --- Commanders of the STS-122 Atlantis crew and the International Space Station's expedition, respectively, astronauts Steve Frick and Peggy Whitson, assist astronaut Rex Walheim as he ingresses the station following the third and final extravehicular activity during a week in which the Atlantis was docked to the orbital outpost. Astronaut Stanley Love (out of frame), mission specialist, shared this extravehicular activity with Walheim.

  7. Fricke dosimeter gel measurements of the profiles of shielded fields.

    PubMed

    Pirani, Luis F; Moreira, Marcos V; Costa, Jhonatha J L; Oliveira, Lucas N; Caldas, Linda V E; de Almeida, Adelaide

    2013-12-01

    In radiation therapy, the shielding of normal tissue can be made using Cerrobend® blocks or a multileaf collimator. In this work, profiles of shielded fields collimated by Cerrobend blocks were obtained through the Fricke Xylenol Gel (FXG) dosimeter irradiated with 6 MV photon beams. The results show that the FXG system can be used in profile measurements of small fields in radiotherapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. STS-110 Pilot Frick and Commander Bloomfield during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- As part of emergency egress training, STS-110 Pilot Stephen N. Frick and Commander Michael J. Bloomfield head for the slidewire basket on the Fixed Service Structure. The crew is taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also include a simulated launch countdown, held at KSC prior to each Space Shuttle flight. Scheduled for launch April 4, the 11-day mission will feature Shuttle Atlantis docking with the International Space Station (ISS) and delivering the S0 truss, the centerpiece-segment of the primary truss structure that will eventually extend over 300 feet.

  9. STS-110 Pilot Frick and Commander Bloomfield in slidewire basket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-110 Pilot Stephen N. Frick and Commander Michael J. Bloomfield climb into the slidewire basket, part of emergency egress equipment on the launch pad.. The crew is taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also include a simulated launch countdown, held at KSC prior to each Space Shuttle flight. Scheduled for launch April 4, the 11-day mission will feature Shuttle Atlantis docking with the International Space Station (ISS) and delivering the S0 truss, the centerpiece-segment of the primary truss structure that will eventually extend over 300 feet.

  10. The automorphisms of Novikov algebras in low dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Chengming; Meng, Daoji

    2003-07-01

    Novikov algebras were introduced in connection with Poisson brackets of hydrodynamic type and Hamiltonian operators in the formal variational calculus. They also correspond to a class of vertex algebras. An automorphism of a Novikov algebra is a linear isomorphism varphi satisfying varphi(xy) = varphi(x)varphi(y) which keeps the algebraic structure. The set of automorphisms of a Novikov algebra is a Lie group whose Lie algebra is just the Novikov algebra's derivation algebra. The theory of automorphisms plays an important role in the study of Novikov algebras. In this paper, we study the automorphisms of Novikov algebras. We get some results on their properties and classification in low dimensions. These results are fundamental in a certain sense, and they will serve as a guide for further development. Moreover, we apply these results to classify Gel'fand-Dorfman bialgebras and Novikov-Poisson algebras. These results also can be used to study certain phase spaces and geometric classical r-matrices.

  11. Mapping spaces and automorphism groups of toric noncommutative spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Gwendolyn E.; Schenkel, Alexander; Szabo, Richard J.

    2017-09-01

    We develop a sheaf theory approach to toric noncommutative geometry which allows us to formalize the concept of mapping spaces between two toric noncommutative spaces. As an application, we study the `internalized' automorphism group of a toric noncommutative space and show that its Lie algebra has an elementary description in terms of braided derivations.

  12. Automorphisms of semigroups of invertible matrices with nonnegative integer elements

    SciTech Connect

    Semenov, Pavel P

    2012-09-30

    Let G{sub n}(Z) be the subsemigroup of GL{sub n}(Z) consisting of the matrices with nonnegative integer coefficients. In the paper, the automorphisms of this semigroup are described for n{>=}2. Bibliography: 5 titles.

  13. Thermoplastic Mask Influence with High Energy Electron Radiotherapy Evaluated by the Fricke Xylenol Gel Chemical Dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, M. V.; Petchevist, P. C. D.; Almeida, A. de

    2009-03-10

    A thermoplastic mask is used to immobilize the patient head during radiotherapy. It also enhances the absorbed dose distribution improving the radiotherapic treatment. In this work we investigate the influence of the thermoplastic material in the phantom surface and in the target volume region. For the measurements a Fricke Xylenol Gel dosimeter, based on Fe (II) to Fe (III) oxidation, was used and their values compared with those from a 0.055 cm{sup 3} PTW/Markus Parallel Plate Ionization Chamber. From the results we could infer the absorbed dose distribution as a function of depth in the water phantom from the surface up to the build-up depth for electron beam energies of 5, 8 and 10 MeV. The results show that using the mask, the surface dose distribution is not significantly alterated, and we therefore conclude that the mask is recommended and useful in head and neck cancer treatments.

  14. Isotropic three-dimensional MRI-Fricke-infused gel dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Nai-Yu; Chu, Woei-Chyn; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Chung, Wen-Yuh; Guo, Wan-Yuo

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: Fricke-infused gel has been shown to be a simple and attainable method for the conformal measurement of absorbed radiation dose. Nevertheless, its accuracy is seriously hindered by the irreversible ferric ion diffusion during magnetic resonance imaging, particularly when three-dimensional (3D) dose measurement in radiosurgery is considered. In this study, the authors developed a fast three-dimensional spin-echo based Fricke gel dosimetry technique to reduce the adverse effects of ferric ion diffusion and to obtain an accurate isotropic 3D dose measurement. Methods: A skull shaped phantom containing Fricke-infused gel was irradiated using Leksell Gamma Knife. The rapid image-based dosimetry technique was applied with the use of a 3D fast spin-echo magnetic resonance imaging sequence. The authors mathematically derived and experimentally validated the correlations between dose-response characteristics and parameters of the 3D fast spin-echo MR imaging sequence. Absorbed dose profiles were assessed and compared to the calculated profiles given by the Gamma Knife treatment planning system. Coefficient of variance (CV%) and coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}) were used to evaluate the precision of dose-response curve estimation. The agreement between the measured and the planned 3D dose distributions was quantified by gamma-index analysis of two acceptance criteria. Results: Proper magnetic resonance imaging parameters were explored to render an accurate three-dimensional absorbed dose mapping with a 1 mm{sup 3} isotropic image resolution. The efficacy of the dose-response estimation was approved by an R{sup 2} > 0.99 and an average CV% of 1.6%. Average gamma pass-rate between the experimentally measured and GammaPlan calculated dose distributions were 83.8% and 99.7% for 2%/2 and 3%/3 mm criteria, respectively. Conclusions: With the designed MR imaging sequence and parameters, total 3D MR acquisition time was confined to within 20 min postirradiation

  15. Characterization of a Fricke dosimeter at high energy photon and electron beams used in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Moussous, O; Khoudri, S; Benguerba, M

    2011-12-01

    The dosimetric features of the Fricke dosimeter in clinical linear accelerator beams are considered. Experimental data were obtained using various nominal energies 6 and 18 MV, 12 and 15 MeV, including the (60)Co γ-ray beam. The calibration of the dosimeters was performed using the ionization chamber as a reference dosimeter. Some general characteristics of Fricke dosimeter such as energy dependence, optical density (OD)-dose relationship, reproducibility, accuracy, dose rate dependence were analyzed. The Fricke solution shows linearity in OD-dose relationship, energy independence and a good reproducibility over the energy range investigated. The Fricke dosimeter was found to be suitable for carrying out absorbed dose to water measurements in the calibration of high energy electron and photon beams.

  16. Automorphic correction of the hyperbolic Kac-Moody algebra E10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Henry H.; Lee, Kyu-Hwan

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we study automorphic correction of the hyperbolic Kac-Moody algebra E10, using the Borcherds product for O(10, 2) attached to a weakly holomorphic modular form of weight -4 for SL_2({Z}). We also clarify some aspects of automorphic correction for Lorentzian Kac-Moody algebras and give heuristic reasons for the expectation that every Lorentzian Kac-Moody algebra has an automorphic correction.

  17. Fricke Gel Dosimeter Tissue-Equivalence a Monte Carlo Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, M.; Bartesaghi, G.; Gambarini, G.; Brusa, D.; Castellano, G.; Carrara, M.

    2008-06-01

    Gel dosimetry has proved to be a valuable technique for absorbed dose distribution measurements in radiotherapy. FriXy-gel dosimeters consist of Fricke (ferrous sulphate) solution infused with xylenol orange. The solution is incorporated to a gel matrix in order to fix it to a solid structure allowing good spatial resolution and is imaged with a transportable optical system, measuring visible light transmittance before and after irradiation. This paper presents an evaluation of total photon mass attenuation coefficients at energies in the range of 50 keV-10MeV for the radiochromic FriXy gel dosimeter sensitive material. Mass attenuation coefficient estimations have been performed by means of Monte Carlo (PENELOPE) simulations. These calculations have been carried out for the FriXy gel sensitive material as well as for soft tissue (ICRU) and pure liquid water; a comparison of the obtained data shows good agreement between the different materials.

  18. A reduction of diffusion in PVA Fricke hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. T.; Masters, K. S.; Hosokawa, K.; Blinco, J.; Crowe, S. B.; Kairn, T.; Trapp, J. V.

    2015-01-01

    A modification to the PVA-FX hydrogel whereby the chelating agent, xylenol orange, was partially bonded to the gelling agent, poly-vinyl alcohol, resulted in an 8% reduction in the post irradiation Fe3+ diffusion, adding approximately 1 hour to the useful timespan between irradiation and readout. This xylenol orange functionalised poly-vinyl alcohol hydrogel had an OD dose sensitivity of 0.014 Gy-1 and a diffusion rate of 0.133 mm2 h-1. As this partial bond yields only incremental improvement, it is proposed that more efficient methods of bonding xylenol orange to poly-vinyl alcohol be investigated to further reduce the diffusion in Fricke gels.

  19. Automorphism covariant representations of the holonomy-flux lowast-algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okolów, Andrzej; Lewandowski, Jerzy

    2005-02-01

    We continue the analysis of representations of cylindrical functions and fluxes which are commonly used as elementary variables of loop quantum gravity. We consider an arbitrary principal bundle of a compact connected structure group and, following Sahlmann's ideas (Sahlmann 2002 Preprint gr-qc/0207111), define a holonomy-flux lowast-algebra whose elements correspond to the elementary variables. There exists a natural action of automorphisms of the bundle on the algebra; this action generalizes the action of analytic diffeomorphisms and gauge transformations on the algebra considered in earlier works. We define the automorphism covariance of a lowast-representation of the algebra on a Hilbert space and prove that the only Hilbert space admitting such a representation is a direct sum of the spaces L2, given by a unique measure on the space of generalized connections. This result is a generalization of our previous work (Okolów and Lewandowski 2003 Class. Quantum Grav. 20 3543 67 (Preprint gr-qc/0302059)) where we assumed that the principal bundle is trivial and its base manifold is {\\bb R}^d .

  20. Measurements of the Fe³⁺ diffusion coefficient in Fricke xylenol gel using optical density measurements.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Lucas Nonato; Sampaio, Francisco Glaildo Almeida; Moreira, Marcos Vasques; de Almeida, Adelaide

    2014-08-01

    In Fricke dosimetry, optical density measurements are performed some time after dosimeter irradiation. Values of the diffusion coefficient of Fe(3+) in Fricke Xylenol gel (FXG) are necessary for determining the spatial distribution of the absorbed dose from measurements of the optical density. Five sets of FXG dosimeters, kept at different constant temperatures, were exposed to collimated 6 MV photons. The optical density profile, proportional to the Fe(3+) concentration, at the boundary between irradiated and non-irradiated parts of each dosimeter was measured periodically over a period of 60 h. By comparing the experimental data with a function that accounts for the unobserved initial concentration profile of Fe(3+) in the FXG, we obtained diffusion coefficients 0.30±0.05, 0.40±0.05, 0.50±0.05, 0.60±0.05 and 0.80±0.05 mm(2)/h for the temperatures 283.0±0.5, 286.0±0.5, 289.0±0.5, 292.0±0.5, and 296.0±0.5 K, respectively. The activation energy of Fe(3+) diffusion in the gel, 0.54±0.06 eV, was determined from the temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficients.

  1. The Goldreich-Schubert-Fricke instability in stellar radiative zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caleo, Andrea; Balbus, Steven A.; Tognelli, Emanuele

    2016-07-01

    The Goldreich-Schubert-Fricke (GSF) instability is a rotational instability that is thought to contribute to the transfer of angular momentum in differentially rotating stars. It has been included in recent codes of stellar evolution in a diffusion-like approximation, under the assumption that the kinematic viscosity ν is unimportant for the development of the instability. As noted previously by other authors, for most stellar applications, this may not be a valid approximation. We discuss this issue in detail, solving the dispersion relation of the perturbed modes for realistic values of ν in the bulk of the radiative zone of the Sun and of three red giant stars at various evolutionary stages. We find that the GSF instability is triggered only in layers of an extremely strong shear. In a simple case study, we also investigate the effect of a small deviation from axisymmetry or a small background magnetic field. We find that, like the viscosity, these have a stabilizing effect. We conclude that this instability is probably far less efficient in transporting angular momentum than is often assumed, and may not even be present.

  2. Study of Fricke gel dosimeter response for different gel quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavinato, C. C.; Campos, L. L.

    2010-11-01

    The Fricke xylenol gel (FXG) dosimeter has been studied for application in radiotherapy because it is capable of to measure the spatial distribution of radiation doses. The dosimetry is based on the oxidation of ferrous (Fe2+) to ferric (Fe3+) ions radiation induced, related to the radiation dose. The gel material usually employed is the 300 Bloom gelatin, which is imported and very expensive in Brazil. Aiming to analyze the viability of to use a locally produced and low cost gel material, in this work the spectrophotometric responses of FXG solutions prepared using 270 Bloom gelatin commercially available and 300 Bloom gelatin imported were compared. The absorption spectra of solutions prepared with 5% by weight 270 and 300 Bloom gelatins non-irradiated and irradiated with 60Co gamma radiation in the dose range between 0.5 and 100 Gy were analysed, the dose-response curves were evaluated and the useful dose range was established. The obtained results indicate that the FXG solution prepared with 270 Bloom gelatin presents good performance, similar to that presented by the FXG solution prepared with 300 Bloom gelatin and its use can be recommended owing to the low cost and the availability in local market.

  3. A modified Fricke gel dosimeter for fast electron blood dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Lama, L. S.; de Góes, E. G.; Sampaio, F. G. A.; Petchevist, P. C. D.; de Almeida, A.

    2014-12-01

    It has been suggested for more than forty years that blood and blood components be irradiated before allogeneic transfusions for immunosuppressed patients in order to avoid the Transfusion-Associated Graft-versus-Host Disease (TA-GVHD). Whole blood, red blood cells, platelets and granulocytes may have viable T cells and should be irradiated before transfusion for different patient clinical conditions. According to international guides, absorbed doses from 25 up to 50 Gy should be delivered to the central middle plane of each blood bag. Although gamma and X-rays from radiotherapy equipments and dedicated cell irradiators are commonly used for this purpose, electron beams from Linear Accelerators (LINACs) could be used as well. In this work, we developed a methodology able to acquire dosimetric data from blood irradiations, especially after fast electrons exposures. This was achieved using a proposed Fricke Xylenol Gel (FXGp) dosimeter, which presents closer radiological characteristics (attenuation coefficients and stopping-powers) to the whole blood, as well as complete absorbed dose range linearity. The developed methodology and the FXGp dosimeter were also able to provide isodose curves and field profiles for the irradiated samples.

  4. Boron dose determination for BNCT using Fricke and EPR dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Wielopolski, L.; Ciesielski, B.

    1995-02-01

    In Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) the dominant dose delivered to the tumor is due to {alpha} and {sup 7}Li charged particles resulting from a neutron capture by {sup 10}B and is referred to herein as the boron dose. Boron dose is directly attributable to the following two independent factors, one boron concentration and the neutron capture energy dependent cross section of boron, and two the energy spectrum of the neutrons that interact with boron. The neutron energy distribution at a given point is dictated by the incident neutron energy distribution, the depth in tissue, geometrical factors such as beam size and patient`s dimensions. To account for these factors can be accommodated by using Monte Carlo theoretical simulations. However, in conventional experimental BNCT dosimetry, e.g., using TLDs or ionization chambers, it is only possible to estimate the boron dose. To overcome some of the limitations in the conventional dosimetry, modifications in ferrous sulfate dosimetry (Fricke) and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) dosimetry in alanine, enable to measure specifically boron dose in a mixed gamma neutron radiation fields. The boron dose, in either of the dosimeters, is obtained as a difference between measurements with boronated and unboronated dosimeters. Since boron participates directly in the measurements, the boron dosimetry reflects the true contribution, integral of the neutron energy spectrum with boron cross section, of the boron dose to the total dose. Both methods are well established and used extensively in dosimetry, they are presented briefly here.

  5. Adapting the neurology area of the Gustavo Fricke Hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankelen, A.; González, S.; Aguirre, L.

    2007-11-01

    Within the framework of the subject Clinical Engineering taught at Hospital Dr. Gustavo Fricke of Viña del Mar Chile, we were assigned to undertake a detailed study on the quality of the electrical power main supply of the Neurology Department, on account of reported malfunctioning of some equipment used in this unit. The study results indicated that the problems occurred only in a device for auditory evoked potentials device and, contrary to what was expected, the problem was unrelated to the quality of the electrical main supply. It was also found that the cause for the problem was electromagnetic interference (EMI) emitted from the system's very own components. To solve the problem, we built a Faraday Cage for the signal-processing unit and increased the separating distance among the various system components. This approach enhanced system performance and significantly improved the recorded signals of patients. The solution adopted from this experience was suggested to others health care centers of our country that had been experiencing similar difficulties with the same type of medical equipment.

  6. Topological T-duality, automorphisms and classifying spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, Ashwin S.

    2014-08-01

    We extend the formalism of Topological T-duality to spaces which are the total space of a principal S1-bundle p:E→W with an H-flux in H3(E,Z) together with an automorphism of the continuous-trace algebra on E determined by H. The automorphism is a ‘topological approximation’ to a gerby gauge transformation of spacetime. We motivate this physically from Buscher’s Rules for T-duality. Using the Equivariant Brauer Group, we connect this problem to the C∗-algebraic formalism of Topological T-duality of Mathai and Rosenberg (2005). We show that the study of this problem leads to the study of a purely topological problem, namely, Topological T-duality of triples (p,b,H) consisting of isomorphism classes of a principal circle bundle p:X→B and classes b∈H2(X,Z) and H∈H3(X,Z). We construct a classifying space R for triples in a manner similar to the work of Bunke and Schick (2005). We characterize R up to homotopy and study some of its properties. We show that it possesses a natural self-map which induces T-duality for triples. We study some properties of this map.

  7. Study of the absorption spectra of Fricke Xylenol Orange gel dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Gambarini, Grazia; Artuso, Emanuele; Liosi, Giulia Maria; Giacobbo, Francesca; Mariani, Mari; Brambilla, Luigi; Castiglioni, Chiara; Carrara, Mauro; Pignoli, Emanuele

    2015-07-01

    A systematic study of the absorption spectra of Fricke Xylenol Orange gel dosimeters has been performed, in the wavelength range from 300 nm to 700 nm. The spectrum of Xylenol Orange (without ferrous sulphate solution) has been achieved, in order to subtract its contribution from the absorption spectra of the irradiated Fricke Xylenol Orange gel dosimeters. The absorbance due to ferric ions chelated by Xylenol Orange has been studied for various irradiation doses. Two absorbance peaks are visible, mainly at low doses: the first peak increases with the dose more slowly than the second one. This effect can explain the apparent threshold dose that was frequently evidenced. (authors)

  8. Bootstrap for Local Rigidity of Anosov Automorphisms on the 3-Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogolev, Andrey

    2017-06-01

    We establish a strong form of local rigidity for hyperbolic automorphisms of the 3-torus with real spectrum. Namely, let {L:T^3\\toT^3} be a hyperbolic automorphism of the 3-torus with real spectrum and let f be a C 1 small perturbation of L. Then f is smoothly ({C^∞}) conjugate to L if and only if obstructions to C 1 conjugacy given by the eigenvalues at periodic points of f vanish. By combining our result and a local rigidity result of Kalinin and Sadovskaya (Ergod Theory Dyn Syst 29:117-136, 2009) for conformal automorphisms this completes the local rigidity program for hyperbolic automorphisms in dimension 3. Our work extends de la Llave-Marco-Moriyón 2-dimensional local rigidity theory (Commun Math Phys 109:368-378, 1987; Ergod Theory Dyn Syst 17(3):649-662, 1997; Commun Math Phys 109(4):681-689, 1987).

  9. The Fricke dosimeter as an absorbed dose to water primary standard for Ir-192 brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    El Gamal, Islam; Cojocaru, Claudiu; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto; McEwen, Malcolm

    2015-06-07

    The aim of this project was to develop an absorbed dose to water primary standard for Ir-192 brachytherapy based on the Fricke dosimeter. To achieve this within the framework of the existing TG-43 protocol, a determination of the absorbed dose to water at the reference position, D(r0,θ0), was undertaken. Prior to this investigation, the radiation chemical yield of the ferric ions (G-value) at the Ir-192 equivalent photon energy (0.380 MeV) was established by interpolating between G-values obtained for Co-60 and 250 kV x-rays.An irradiation geometry was developed with a cylindrical holder to contain the Fricke solution and allow irradiations in a water phantom to be conducted using a standard Nucletron microSelectron V2 HDR Ir-192 afterloader. Once the geometry and holder were optimized, the dose obtained with the Fricke system was compared to the standard method used in North America, based on air-kerma strength.Initial investigations focused on reproducible positioning of the ring-shaped holder for the Fricke solution with respect to the Ir-192 source and obtaining an acceptable type A uncertainty in the optical density measurements required to yield the absorbed dose. Source positioning was found to be reproducible to better than 0.3 mm, and a careful cleaning and control procedure reduced the variation in optical density reading due to contamination of the Fricke solution by the PMMA holder. It was found that fewer than 10 irradiations were required to yield a type A standard uncertainty of less than 0.5%.Correction factors to take account of the non-water components of the geometry and the volume averaging effect of the Fricke solution volume were obtained from Monte Carlo calculations. A sensitivity analysis showed that the dependence on the input data used (e.g. interaction cross-sections) was small with a type B uncertainty for these corrections estimated to be 0.2%.The combined standard uncertainty in the determination of absorbed dose to water at

  10. The Fricke dosimeter as an absorbed dose to water primary standard for Ir-192 brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Gamal, Islam; Cojocaru, Claudiu; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto; McEwen, Malcolm

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this project was to develop an absorbed dose to water primary standard for Ir-192 brachytherapy based on the Fricke dosimeter. To achieve this within the framework of the existing TG-43 protocol, a determination of the absorbed dose to water at the reference position, D(r0,θ0), was undertaken. Prior to this investigation, the radiation chemical yield of the ferric ions (G-value) at the Ir-192 equivalent photon energy (0.380 MeV) was established by interpolating between G-values obtained for Co-60 and 250 kV x-rays. An irradiation geometry was developed with a cylindrical holder to contain the Fricke solution and allow irradiations in a water phantom to be conducted using a standard Nucletron microSelectron V2 HDR Ir-192 afterloader. Once the geometry and holder were optimized, the dose obtained with the Fricke system was compared to the standard method used in North America, based on air-kerma strength. Initial investigations focused on reproducible positioning of the ring-shaped holder for the Fricke solution with respect to the Ir-192 source and obtaining an acceptable type A uncertainty in the optical density measurements required to yield the absorbed dose. Source positioning was found to be reproducible to better than 0.3 mm, and a careful cleaning and control procedure reduced the variation in optical density reading due to contamination of the Fricke solution by the PMMA holder. It was found that fewer than 10 irradiations were required to yield a type A standard uncertainty of less than 0.5%. Correction factors to take account of the non-water components of the geometry and the volume averaging effect of the Fricke solution volume were obtained from Monte Carlo calculations. A sensitivity analysis showed that the dependence on the input data used (e.g. interaction cross-sections) was small with a type B uncertainty for these corrections estimated to be 0.2%. The combined standard uncertainty in the determination of absorbed dose to water

  11. A Feasibility Study of Fricke Dosimetry as an Absorbed Dose to Water Standard for 192Ir HDR Sources

    PubMed Central

    deAlmeida, Carlos Eduardo; Ochoa, Ricardo; de Lima, Marilene Coelho; David, Mariano Gazineu; Pires, Evandro Jesus; Peixoto, José Guilherme; Salata, Camila; Bernal, Mario Antônio

    2014-01-01

    High dose rate brachytherapy (HDR) using 192Ir sources is well accepted as an important treatment option and thus requires an accurate dosimetry standard. However, a dosimetry standard for the direct measurement of the absolute dose to water for this particular source type is currently not available. An improved standard for the absorbed dose to water based on Fricke dosimetry of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources is presented in this study. The main goal of this paper is to demonstrate the potential usefulness of the Fricke dosimetry technique for the standardization of the quantity absorbed dose to water for 192Ir sources. A molded, double-walled, spherical vessel for water containing the Fricke solution was constructed based on the Fricke system. The authors measured the absorbed dose to water and compared it with the doses calculated using the AAPM TG-43 report. The overall combined uncertainty associated with the measurements using Fricke dosimetry was 1.4% for k = 1, which is better than the uncertainties reported in previous studies. These results are promising; hence, the use of Fricke dosimetry to measure the absorbed dose to water as a standard for HDR 192Ir may be possible in the future. PMID:25521914

  12. Localization via Automorphisms of the CARs: Local Gauge Invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundling, Hendrik; Neeb, Karl-Hermann

    2010-08-01

    The classical matter fields are sections of a vector bundle E with base manifold M, and the space L 2( E) of square integrable matter fields w.r.t. a locally Lebesgue measure on M, has an important module action of {C_b^infty(M)} on it. This module action defines restriction maps and encodes the local structure of the classical fields. For the quantum context, we show that this module action defines an automorphism group on the algebra of the canonical anticommutation relations, CAR( L 2( E)), with which we can perform the analogous localization. That is, the net structure of the CAR( L 2( E)) w.r.t. appropriate subsets of M can be obtained simply from the invariance algebras of appropriate subgroups. We also identify the quantum analogues of restriction maps, and as a corollary, we prove a well-known “folk theorem,” that the CAR( L 2( E)) contains only trivial gauge invariant observables w.r.t. a local gauge group acting on E.

  13. A least-squares error minimization approach in the determination of ferric ion diffusion coefficient of Fricke-infused dosimeter gels

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, Y.J.; Huang, S.-C.; Chu, W.C.

    2005-04-01

    A least-squares error minimization approach was adopted to assess ferric ion diffusion coefficient of Fricke-agarose gels. Ferric ion diffusion process was modeled as a Gaussian-shaped degradation kernel operating on an initial concentration distribution. Diffusion coefficient was iteratively determined by minimizing the error function defined as the difference between the theoretically calculated and the experimentally measured dose distributions. A rapid MR image-based differential gel dosimetry technique that time resolves the evolution of the ferric ion diffusion process minimizes smearing of the dose distribution. Our results showed that for a Fricke-agarose gel contained 1 mM ammonium ferrous sulfate, 1% agarose, 1 mM sodium chloride, and 50 mM sulfuric acid, its ferric ion diffusion coefficient is (1.59{+-}0.28)x10{sup -2} cm{sup 2} h{sup -1} at room temperature. This value falls within the 1.00-2.00x10{sup -2} cm{sup 2} h{sup -1} range previously reported under varying gelling ingredients and concentrations. This method allows a quick, nondestructive evaluation of the ferric ion diffusion coefficient that can be used in conjunction with the in situ gel dosimetry experiment to provide a practical diffusion characterization of the dosimeter gel.

  14. SU-D-213-06: Dosimetry of Modulated Electron Radiation Therapy Using Fricke Gel Dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Gawad, M Abdel; Elgohary, M; Hassaan, M; Emam, M; Desouky, O; Eldib, A; Ma, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Modulated electron radiation therapy (MERT) has been proposed as an effective modality for treatment of superficial targets. MERT utilizes multiple beams of different energies which are intensity modulated to deliver optimized dose distribution. Energy independent dosimeters are thus needed for quantitative evaluations of MERT dose distributions and measurements of absolute doses delivered to patients. Thus in the current work we study the feasibility of Fricke gel dosimeters in MERT dosimetry. Methods: Batches of radiation sensitive Fricke gel is fabricated and poured into polymethyl methacrylate cuvettes. The samples were irradiated in solid water phantom and a thick layer of bolus was used as a buildup. A spectrophotometer system was used for measuring the color changes (the absorbance) before and after irradiation and then we calculate net absorbance. We constructed calibration curves to relate the measured absorbance in terms of absorbed dose for all available electron energies. Dosimetric measurements were performed for mixed electron beam delivery and we also performed measurement for segmented field delivery with the dosimeter placed at the junction of two adjacent electron beams of different energies. Dose measured by our gel dosimetry is compared to that calculation from our precise treatment planning system. We also initiated a Monte Carlo study to evaluate the water equivalence of our dosimeters. MCBEAM and MCSIM codes were used for treatment head simulation and phantom dose calculation. PDDs and profiles were calculated for electron beams incident on a phantom designed with 1cm slab of Fricke gel. Results: The calibration curves showed no observed energy dependence with all studied electron beam energies. Good agreement was obtained between dose calculated and that obtained by gel dosimetry. Monte Carlo results illustrated the tissue equivalency of our Gel dosimeters. Conclusion: Fricke Gel dosimeters represent a good option for the dosimetric

  15. Love, Frick and Walheim in the A/L prior to EVA 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-15

    S122-E-008897 (15 Feb. 2008) --- Astronaut Steve Frick, STS-122 commander, shares his enthusiasm and support with the two STS-122 mission specialists assigned to the mission's final spacewalk to perform work on the International Space Station. Equipped with their extravehicular mobility units (EMU) and other gear and just about ready to egress the station and begin the day's external tasks are astronauts Stanley Love (left) and Rex Walheim.

  16. Parametrization of local CR automorphisms by finite jets and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamel, Bernhard; Mir, Nordine

    2007-04-01

    For any real-analytic hypersurface Msubset {C}^N , which does not contain any complex-analytic subvariety of positive dimension, we show that for every point pin M the local real-analytic CR automorphisms of M fixing p can be parametrized real-analytically by their ell_p jets at p . As a direct application, we derive a Lie group structure for the topological group operatorname{Aut}(M,p) . Furthermore, we also show that the order ell_p of the jet space in which the group operatorname{Aut}(M,p) embeds can be chosen to depend upper-semicontinuously on p . As a first consequence, it follows that given any compact real-analytic hypersurface M in {C}^N , there exists an integer k depending only on M such that for every point pin M germs at p of CR diffeomorphisms mapping M into another real-analytic hypersurface in {C}^N are uniquely determined by their k -jet at that point. Another consequence is the following boundary version of H. Cartan's uniqueness theorem: given any bounded domain Ω with smooth real-analytic boundary, there exists an integer k depending only on partial Ω such that if H\\colon Ωto Ω is a proper holomorphic mapping extending smoothly up to partial Ω near some point pin partial Ω with the same k -jet at p with that of the identity mapping, then necessarily H=Id . Our parametrization theorem also holds for the stability group of any essentially finite minimal real-analytic CR manifold of arbitrary codimension. One of the new main tools developed in the paper, which may be of independent interest, is a parametrization theorem for invertible solutions of a certain kind of singular analytic equations, which roughly speaking consists of inverting certain families of parametrized maps with singularities.

  17. Fricke gel dosimeter with improved sensitivity for low-dose-level measurements.

    PubMed

    Vaiente, Mauro; Molina, Wladimir; Silva, Lila Carrizales; Figueroa, Rodolfo; Malano, Francisco; Pérez, Pedro; Santibañez, Mauricio; Vedelago, José

    2016-07-01

    Fricke solution has a wide range of applications as radiation detector and dosimetry. It is particularly appreciated in terms of relevant comparative advantages, like tissue-equivalence when prepared in aqueous media like gel matrix, continuous mapping capability, independence of dose rate and incident direction, as well as linear dose response. This work presents the development and characterization of an improved Fricke gel system, based on modified chemical compositions, making possible its application in clinical radiology due to its improved sensitivity. Properties of standard Fricke gel dosimeter for high-dose levels are used as a starting point, and suitable chemical modifications are introduced and carefully investigated in order to attain high resolution for low-dose ranges, like those corresponding to radiology interventions. The developed Fricke gel radiation dosimeter system achieves the expected typical dose-dependency, showing linear response in the dose range from 20 up to 4000 mGy. Systematic investigations including several chemical compositions are carried out in order to obtain an adequate dosimeter response for low-dose levels. A suitable composition from among those studied is selected as a good candidate for low-dose-level radiation dosimetry consisting of a modified Fricke solution fixed to a gel matrix containing benzoic acid along with sulfuric acid, ferrous sulfate, Xylenol orange, and tridistilled water. Dosimeter samples are prepared in standard vials for in-phantom irradiation and further characterization by spectrophotometry measuring visible light transmission and absorbance before and after irradiation. Samples are irradiated using typical X-ray tubes for radiology and calibrated Farmer-type ionization chamber is used as reference to measure dose rates inside phantoms at vial locations. Once sensitive material composition is optimized, dose-response curves show significant improvement regarding overall sensitivity for low dose levels

  18. Fricke gel dosimeter with improved sensitivity for low-dose-level measurements.

    PubMed

    Valente, Mauro; Molina, Wladimir; Silva, Lila Carrizales; Figueroa, Rodolfo; Malano, Francisco; Pérez, Pedro; Santibañez, Mauricio; Vedelago, José

    2016-07-08

    Fricke solution has a wide range of applications as radiation detector and dosimetry. It is particularly appreciated in terms of relevant comparative advantages, like tissue-equivalence when prepared in aqueous media like gel matrix, continuous mapping capability, independence of dose rate and incident direction, as well as linear dose response. This work presents the development and characterization of an improved Fricke gel system, based on modified chemical compositions, making possible its application in clinical radiology due to its improved sensitivity. Properties of standard Fricke gel dosimeter for high-dose levels are used as a starting point, and suitable chemical modifications are introduced and carefully investigated in order to attain high resolution for low-dose ranges, like those corresponding to radiology interventions. The developed Fricke gel radiation dosimeter system achieves the expected typical dose-dependency, showing linear response in the dose range from 20 up to 4000 mGy. Systematic investigations including several chemical compositions are carried out in order to obtain an adequate dosimeter response for low-dose levels. A suitable composition from among those studied is selected as a good candidate for low-dose-level radiation dosimetry consisting of a modified Fricke solution fixed to a gel matrix containing benzoic acid along with sulfuric acid, ferrous sulfate, Xylenol orange, and tridistilled water. Dosimeter samples are prepared in standard vials for in-phantom irradiation and further characterization by spectrophotometry measuring visible light transmission and absorbance before and after irradiation. Samples are irradiated using typical X-ray tubes for radiology and calibrated Farmer-type ionization chamber is used as reference to measure dose rates inside phantoms at vial locations. Once sensitive material composition is optimized, dose-response curves show significant improvement regarding overall sensitivity for low dose levels

  19. Almost automorphic solutions for shunting inhibitory cellular neural networks with time-varying delays.

    PubMed

    Xu, Changjin; Liao, Maoxin

    2015-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the shunting inhibitory cellular neural networks with time-varying delays. Under some suitable conditions, we establish some criteria on the existence and global exponential stability of the almost automorphic solutions of the networks. Numerical simulations are given to support the theoretical findings.

  20. On discrete versions of two Accola's theorems about automorphism groups of Riemann surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limonov, Maxim; Nedela, Roman; Mednykh, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we give a few discrete versions of Robert Accola's results on Riemann surfaces with automorphism groups admitting partitions. As a consequence, we establish a condition for γ -hyperelliptic involution on a graph to be unique. Also we construct an infinite family of graphs with more than one γ -hyperelliptic involution.

  1. Radiation chemistry of heavy-particle tracks. II. Fricke dosimeter system

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, A.; Magee, J.L.

    1980-12-25

    A heavy-particle-track model suggested by considerations presented in a companion paper is used in a calculation of the differential (G') and integral (G) yields of the Fricke dosimeter system for six selected particles over a wide range of energies. The particles are H, He, C, Ne, Ar, and Fm; the energy range for the first two is 10/sup -3/-10/sup 3/ MeV/n, and for the last four is 10/sup -1/-10/sup 3/ MeV/n. The calculated G' and G values are compared with experimental values as far as possible, and the heavy-particle-track model situation is discussed.

  2. Study of Fricke-gel dosimeter calibration for attaining precise measurements of the absorbed dose

    SciTech Connect

    Liosi, Giulia Maria; Benedini, Sara; Giacobbo, Francesca; Mariani, Mario; Gambarini, Grazia; Artuso, Emanuele; Gargano, Marco; Ludwig, Nicola; Carrara, Mauro; Pignoli, Emanuele

    2015-07-01

    A method has been studied for attaining, with good precision, absolute measurements of the spatial distribution of the absorbed dose by means of the Fricke gelatin Xylenol Orange dosimetric system. With this aim, the dose response to subsequent irradiations was analyzed. In fact, the proposed modality is based on a pre-irradiation of each single dosimeter in a uniform field with a known dose, in order to extrapolate a calibration image for a subsequent non-uniform irradiation with an un-known dose to be measured. (authors)

  3. Dose Measurements at Epithermal Beams of Research Reactors with Fricke Gel and Thermoluminescence Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Gambarini, Grazia; Artuso, Emanuele; Giove, Dario; Felisi, Marco; Agosteo, Stefano; Barcaglioni, Luca; Pola, Andrea; Garlati, Luisella; Borroni, Marta; Carrara, Mauro; Klupak, Vit; Viererbl, Ladislav; Vins, Miroslav; Marek, Milan

    2015-07-01

    Suitable dosimeter methods have to be developed to measure the different dose contributions in phantoms exposed to epithermal/thermal neutron beams of a research reactor. The method based on Fricke Xylenol Orange gel dosimeter in form of layers has shown to be very effective for achieving images of the various dose components in air or in phantoms exposed to epithermal/thermal neutron beams with very high fluence rate. Another useful method is based on the use of TLD-700 chips, from whose response the gamma dose and the thermal neutron fluence can be obtained by means of appropriate parameters of the glow curve. (authors)

  4. Mycosis Fungoides electron beam absorbed dose distribution using Fricke xylenol gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silveira, Michely C.; Sampaio, Francisco G. A.; Petchevist, Paulo C. D.; de Oliveira, André L.; Almeida, Adelaide de

    2011-12-01

    Radiotherapy uses ionizing radiation to destroy tumor cells. The absorbed dose control in the target volume is realized through radiation sensors, such as Fricke dosimeters and radiochromic film, which permit to realize bi-dimensional evaluations at once and because of that, they will be used in this study as well. Among the several types of cancer suitable for ionizing radiation treatment, the Mycosis Fungoides, a lymphoma that spreads on the skin surface and depth, requires for its treatment total body irradiation by high-energy electrons. In this work the Fricke xylenol gel (FXG) was used in order to obtain information about the absorbed dose distribution induced by the electron interactions with the irradiated tissues and to control this type of treatment. FXG can be considered as an alternative dosimeter, since up to now only films have been used. FXG sample cuvettes, simulating two selected tomos (cranium and abdomen) of the Rando anthropomorphic phantom, were positioned along with radiochromic films for comparison. The phantom was subjected to Stanford total body irradiation using 6 MeV electrons. Tomographic images were acquired for both dosimeters and evaluated through horizontal and vertical profiles along the tomographic centers. These profiles were obtained through a Matlab routine developed for this purpose. From the obtained results, one could infer that, for a superficial and internal patient irradiation, the FXG dosimeter showed an absorbed dose distribution similar to the one of the film. These results can validate the FXG dosimeter as an alternative dosimeter for the Mycosis Fungoides treatment planning.

  5. Automorphism group of nonabelian groups of order p{sup 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Barakat, Yasamin

    2014-06-19

    Let G be a nonabelian group of order p{sup 3}, where p is a prime number. Then G is a two generated group that its commutator, centre and Frattini subgroup coincide and are of order p. Hence, the quotient group of G over its centre and also Frattini quotient group of G, both are of order p{sup 2}. However, the first mentioned quotient is isomorphic to the inner group of G, which is a normal subgroup of automorphism group of G. Whereas, Frattini quotient group of G is an abelian elementary group that can be considered as a vector space of dimension two over Z{sub p}, the field of integers modulo p. In this paper, we consider to apply these properties of G to characterize the automorphism group of G.

  6. Distinguished three-qubit `magicity' via automorphisms of the split Cayley hexagon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planat, Michel; Saniga, Metod; Holweck, Frédéric

    2013-07-01

    Disregarding the identity, the remaining 63 elements of the generalized three-qubit Pauli group are found to contain 12096 distinct copies of Mermin's magic pentagram. Remarkably, 12096 is also the number of automorphisms of the smallest split Cayley hexagon. We give a few solid arguments showing that this may not be a mere coincidence. These arguments are mainly tied to the structure of certain types of geometric hyperplanes of the hexagon. It is further demonstrated that also an (182, 123)-type of magic configurations, recently proposed by Waegell and Aravind (J Phys A Math Theor 45:405301, 2012), seems to be intricately linked with automorphisms of the hexagon. Finally, the entanglement properties exhibited by edges of both pentagrams and these particular Waegell-Aravind configurations are addressed.

  7. A relation between automorphic forms on GL(2) and GL(3)

    PubMed Central

    Gelbart, Stephen; Jacquet, Hervé

    1976-01-01

    Let ρn denote the standard n-dimensional representation of GL(n,C) and ρn2 its symmetric square. For each automorphic cuspidal representation π of GL(2,A) we introduce an Euler product L(s,π,ρ22) of degree 3 which we prove is entire. We also prove that there exists an automorphic representation II of GL(3)—“the lift of π”—with the property that L(s,II,ρ3) = L(s,π,ρ22). Our results confirm conjectures described in a more general context by R. P. Langlands [(1970) Lecture Notes in Mathematics, no. 170 (Springer-Verlag, Berlin-Heidelberg-New York)]. PMID:16592351

  8. Big subsets with small boundaries in a graph with a vertex-transitive group of automorphisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifter, N.; Trofimov, V. I.

    2017-02-01

    The theory of ends of finitely generated groups G and connected locally finite graphs Γ with vertex- transitive groups of automorphisms can be regarded as a theory of Boolean algebras of subsets of G or vertex set of Γ with finite boundaries (in the locally finite Cayley graph of G or in Γ respectively), considered modulo finite subsets. We develop a more general theory where infinite subsets with finite boundaries are replaced by certain `big' subsets with `small' boundaries.

  9. Spectral analysis on the group of conformal automorphisms of the unit disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volchkov, V. V.; Volchkov, V. V.

    2016-07-01

    For the group G of conformal automorphisms of the unit disc the problem of spectral analysis is considered for subspaces \\mathscr{U}\\subset C(G) which are invariant under right shifts by elements of G and conjugations by elements of the rotation subgroup. It turns out that, in contrast to subspaces of C(G) which are merely invariant under right shifts, \\mathscr{U} contains a minimal subspace with the above properties. Bibliography: 26 titles.

  10. The Non-linear Saturation of the Goldreich-Schubert-Fricke Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, Jeffrey; Burns, Keaton; Brown, Ben; Lecoanet, Daniel; Vasil, Geoffrey

    2015-11-01

    The Goldreich-Schubert-Fricke (GSF) instability is an important process in stellar interiors and possibly in exoplanetary atmospheres. While the linear phase of the instability has been explored for nearly fifty years, its non-linear saturation has not been explored in detail. The GSF is a double-diffusive instability in which Rayleigh unstable perturbations are robbed of buoyant stability by thermal diffusion. Here, we will present results from a suite of direct numerical simulations using the Spiegel-Veronis Boussinesq equations in the Dedalus framework. These DNS are designed to explore the behavior of the GSF over a range of Prandtl numbers. In stellar interiors, Pr ~=10-6 , but we are limited by computational resources to much higher values, so instead we will discuss the Pr scaling of transport and mixing. We will also discuss the impact of the Boussinesq approximation in the case where large aspect ration perturbations exceed a scale height.

  11. Evaluation of the breast absorbed dose distribution using the Fricke Xylenol Gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czelusniak, C.; Del Lama, L. S.; Moreira, M. V.; De Almeida, A.

    2010-11-01

    During a breast cancer radiotherapy treatment, several issues have to be taken into account, among them, hot spots, gradient of doses delivered over the breast, as well as in the lungs and the heart. The present work aims to apply the Fricke Xylenol Gel (FXG) dosimeter in the study of these issues, using a CCD camera to analyse the dose deposited distribution. Thus, the CCD was used to capture the images of different cuvettes that were filled with FXG and irradiated considering analogous setups employed in breast cancer radiotherapy treatments. Thereafter, these pictures where processed in a MatLab routine and the spatial dose distributions could be evaluated. These distributions were compared with the ones that were obtained from dedicated treatment planning's softwares. According to the results obtained, the FXG, allied with the CCD system, has shown to be a complementary tool in dosimetry, helping to prevent possible complications during breast cancer treatments.

  12. Commentary: Integrating callous and unemotional traits into the definition of antisocial behaviour--a commentary on Frick et al. (2014).

    PubMed

    Rowe, Richard

    2014-06-01

    Heterogeneity in the presentation, antecedents, prognosis and treatment response of antisocial behaviour has long provided a challenge to developmental psychopathology researchers. As illustrated in the incisive Frick and colleagues' Annual Research Review, there is growing evidence that the presence of high callous-unemotional (CU) traits identifies a subgroup of antisocial young people with a particularly aggressive and pervasive form of disorder. Frick and colleagues extend their developmental psychopathology approach to CU traits by linking in theories of conscience development and considering evidence on the stability of CU traits. This commentary addresses these themes and the area more generally, considering (1) comparison of a CU specifier to alternative approaches to antisocial heterogeneity (2) high CU traits in the absence of antisocial behaviour and (3) aspects of the measurement of CU traits.

  13. Measurement of Ferric Ion Diffusion Coefficient in Fricke-Infused Agarose Gel From MR Image Intensity Changes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Coefficient in Fricke-Infused Agarose Gel From MR Image Intensity Changes Contract Number Grant Number Program Element Number Author( s ) Project Number Task...Number Work Unit Number Performing Organization Name( s ) and Address(es) Institutes of Biomedical Engineering and Radiological Sciences National...Yang Ming University Pei-Tou Taipei, Taiwan, R.O.C. Performing Organization Report Number Sponsoring/Monitoring Agency Name( s ) and Address(es) US

  14. Automorphisms and Derivations of the Insertion-Elimination Algebra and Related Graded Lie Algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ondrus, Matthew; Wiesner, Emilie

    2016-07-01

    This paper addresses several structural aspects of the insertion-elimination algebra {mathfrak{g}}, a Lie algebra that can be realized in terms of tree-inserting and tree-eliminating operations on the set of rooted trees. In particular, we determine the finite-dimensional subalgebras of {mathfrak{g}}, the automorphism group of {mathfrak{g}}, the derivation Lie algebra of {mathfrak{g}}, and a generating set. Several results are stated in terms of Lie algebras admitting a triangular decomposition and can be used to reproduce results for the generalized Virasoro algebras.

  15. Utilization of the ferrous sulfate (Fricke) dosimeter for evaluating the radioprotective potential of cystamine: experiment and Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Meesat, Ridthee; Sanguanmith, Sunuchakan; Meesungnoen, Jintana; Lepage, Martin; Khalil, Abdelouahed; Jay-Gerin, Jean-Paul

    2012-06-01

    Cystamine, an organic disulfide (RSSR), is among the best of the known radiation-protective compounds and has been used to protect normal tissues in clinical radiation therapy. Recently, it has also proved to be beneficial in the treatment of disorders of the central nervous system in animal models. However, the underlying mechanism of its action at the chemical level is not yet well understood. The present study aims at using the ferrous sulfate (Fricke) dosimeter to quantitatively evaluate, both experimentally and theoretically, the radioprotective potential of this compound. The well-known radiolysis of the Fricke dosimeter by (60)Co γ rays or fast electrons, based on the oxidation of ferrous ions to ferric ions by the oxidizing species (•)OH, HO(2)(•), and H(2)O(2) produced in the radiolytic decomposition of water, forms the basis for our method. The presence of cystamine in Fricke dosimeter solutions during irradiation prevents the radiolytic oxidation of Fe(2+) and leads to decreased ferric yields (or G values). The observed decrease in G(Fe(3+)) increases upon increasing the concentration of the disulfide compound over the range 0-0.1 M under both aerated and deaerated conditions. To help assess the basic radiation-protective mechanism of this compound, a full Monte Carlo computer code is developed to simulate in complete detail the radiation-induced chemistry of the studied Fricke/cystamine solutions. Benefiting from the fact that cystamine is reasonably well characterized in terms of radiation chemistry, this computer model proposes reaction mechanisms and incorporates specific reactions describing the radiolysis of cystamine in aerated and deaerated Fricke solutions that lead to the observable quantitative chemical yields. Results clearly indicate that the protective effect of cystamine originates from its radical-capturing ability, which allows this compound to act by competing with the ferrous ions for the various free radicals--especially (

  16. A construction of F(1) as automorphisms of a 196,883-dimensional algebra.

    PubMed

    Griess, R L

    1981-02-01

    In this note, I announce the construction of the finite simple group F(1), whose existence was predicted independently in 1973 by Bernd Fischer and by me. The group has order 2(46)3(20)5(9)7(6)11(2)13(3)17.19.23.29.31.41. 47.59.71 = 808,017,424,794,512,875,886,459,904,961,710,757,005,754,368,000,000,000 and is realized as a group of automorphisms of a 196,883-dimensional commutative nonassociative algebra over the rational numbers, which has an associative form. Equivalently, it is a group of automorphisms of a cubic form in 196,883 variables. It turns out that all the relevant arguments and calculations may be done by hand. Furthermore, existence of the group F(1) implies the existence of a number of other sporadic simple groups for which existence proofs formerly depended on work with computers. We are beginning to look upon this group as a "friendly giant."

  17. Exact epidemic models on graphs using graph-automorphism driven lumping.

    PubMed

    Simon, Péter L; Taylor, Michael; Kiss, Istvan Z

    2011-04-01

    The dynamics of disease transmission strongly depends on the properties of the population contact network. Pair-approximation models and individual-based network simulation have been used extensively to model contact networks with non-trivial properties. In this paper, using a continuous time Markov chain, we start from the exact formulation of a simple epidemic model on an arbitrary contact network and rigorously derive and prove some known results that were previously mainly justified based on some biological hypotheses. The main result of the paper is the illustration of the link between graph automorphisms and the process of lumping whereby the number of equations in a system of linear differential equations can be significantly reduced. The main advantage of lumping is that the simplified lumped system is not an approximation of the original system but rather an exact version of this. For a special class of graphs, we show how the lumped system can be obtained by using graph automorphisms. Finally, we discuss the advantages and possible applications of exact epidemic models and lumping.

  18. Inner brane: A D3-brane in Nappi-Witten space from an inner automorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Yeuk-Kwan E.; Freidel, Laurent

    2009-06-01

    Wess-Zumino-Witten (WZW) models are abstract conformal field theories with an infinite-dimensional symmetry which accounts for their integrability, and at the same time they have a sigma-model description of closed-string propagation on group manifolds which, in turn, endows the models with an intuitive geometric meaning. We exploit this dual algebraic and geometric property of WZW models to construct an explicit example of a field-dependent reflection matrix for open strings in the Nappi-Witten model. Demanding the momentum outflow at the boundary to be zero determines a certain combination of the left and right chiral currents at the boundary. This same reflection matrix is obtained algebraically from an inner automorphism, giving rise to a space-filling D-brane. Half of the infinite-dimensional affine Kac-Moody symmetry present in the closed-string theory is preserved by this unique combination of the left and the right chiral currents. The operator-product expansions of these boundary currents are computed explicitly and they are shown to obey the same current algebra as those of the closed-string chiral currents. Different choices of the inner automorphisms correspond to different background gauge field configurations. Only those B-field configurations, and the corresponding D-branes, that preserve the diagonal part of the infinite-dimensional chiral algebras are allowed. In this way the existence of the D-branes in curved spaces is further constrained by the underlying symmetry of the ambient spacetime.

  19. A construction of F1 as automorphisms of a 196,883-dimensional algebra

    PubMed Central

    Griess, Robert L.

    1981-01-01

    In this note, I announce the construction of the finite simple group F1, whose existence was predicted independently in 1973 by Bernd Fischer and by me. The group has order 246320597611213317.19.23.29.31.41. 47.59.71 = 808,017,424,794,512,875,886,459,904,961,710,757,005,754,368,000,000,000 and is realized as a group of automorphisms of a 196,883-dimensional commutative nonassociative algebra over the rational numbers, which has an associative form. Equivalently, it is a group of automorphisms of a cubic form in 196,883 variables. It turns out that all the relevant arguments and calculations may be done by hand. Furthermore, existence of the group F1 implies the existence of a number of other sporadic simple groups for which existence proofs formerly depended on work with computers. We are beginning to look upon this group as a “friendly giant.” PMID:16592973

  20. Cerium nanoparticle effect on sensitivity of Fricke gel dosimeter: Initial investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebenezer Suman Babu, S.; Peace Balasingh, S. Timothy; Benedicta Pearlin, R.; Rabi Raja Singh, I.; Ravindran, B. Paul

    2017-05-01

    Fricke gel dosimeters (FXGs) have been the preferred dosimeters because of its ease in preparation and water and tissue equivalency. Visible changes happen three dimensionally in the dosimeter as the ferrous (Fe2+) ions change into ferric (Fe3+) ions upon irradiation and the measure of this change can be correlated to the dose absorbed. Nanoparticles are promising entities that can improve the sensitivity of the gel dosimeter. Cerium Oxide nanoparticle was investigated for possible enhancement of absorbed dose in the FXG. Various concentrations of the nanoparticle based gel dosimeters were prepared and irradiated for a clinical dose range of 0-3 Gy in a telegamma unit. The optimal concentration of 0.1 mM nanoparticle incorporated in the FXG enhances the radiation sensitivity of the unmodified FXG taken as reference without modifying the background absorbance prior to irradiation. The gel recipe consisted of 5% (wt) gelatin, 50 mM Sulphuric acid, 0.05 mM Xylenol Orange, 0.5 mM Ferrous Ammonium Sulphate and 0.1 mM Cerium (IV) Oxide nanoparticle (< 25 nm particle size) and triple distilled water. The FXGs with nanoparticle showed linear dose response in the dose range tested.

  1. Beta planar source quality assurance with the Fricke xylenol gel dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alva-Sánchez, Mirko S.; de Oliveira, Lucas N.; Petchevist, Paulo C.; Moreira, Marco V.; de Almeida, Adelaide

    2014-03-01

    Beta therapy is employed in post surgery to treat lesions such as pterygia, keloid and glioblastoma. The beta source most used for these purposes is 90/90Y, whose quality assurance is a challenge, because the detectors currently used for this evaluation do not satisfy the spatial resolution, the effective atomic number and the tissue equivalent conditions. The Fricke xylenol gel (FXG) has been used in several applications in radiotherapy due to its better characteristics. This dosimeter is associated with the Fe(II) to Fe(III) oxidation, post ionizing irradiation, being the final Fe(III) concentration linearly depended on the absorbed dose. The goal of this present work is to show that the FXG, with atomic effective number (Zeff) of 7.75 and high resolution (<1 mm), accomplishes quality assurance for rectangular and square planar 90Sr/90Y sources. In order to demonstrate the quality assurance, calibration curves, percentage depth dose and beam profile from exposed FXG samples were analyzed and from these results, we demonstrate the potential use of the FXG dosimeter for beta source quality control.

  2. Relative response of alanine dosemeters for high-energy electrons determined using a Fricke primary standard.

    PubMed

    Vörös, Sándor; Anton, Mathias; Boillat, Bénédicte

    2012-03-07

    A significant proportion of cancer patients is treated using MeV electron radiation. One of the measurement methods which is likely to furnish reliable dose values also under non-reference conditions is the dosimetry using alanine and read-out via electron spin resonance (ESR). The system has already proven to be suitable for QA purposes for modern radiotherapy involving megavoltage x-rays. In order to render the secondary standard measurement system of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt based on alanine/ESR useable for dosimetry in radiotherapy, the dose-to-water (D(W)) response of the dosemeter needs to be known for relevant radiation qualities. For MeV electrons, the D(W) response was determined using the Fricke primary standard of the Swiss Federal Office of Metrology. Since there were no citable detailed publications on the Swiss primary standard available, this measurement system is described in some detail. The experimental results for the D(W) response are compared to results of Monte Carlo simulations which model in detail the beams furnished by the electron accelerator as well as the geometry of the detectors. The agreement between experiment and simulation is very good, as well as the agreement with results published by the National Research Council of Canada which are based on a different primary standard. No significant dependence of the D(W) response was found in the range between 6 and 20 MeV. It is therefore suggested to use a unique correction factor k(E) for alanine for all MeV qualities of k(E) = 1.012 ± 0.010.

  3. New dualities and misleading anomaly matchings from outer-automorphism twists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Sridip; Song, Jaewon

    2017-03-01

    We study four-dimensional N=1, 2 superconformal theories in class S obtained by compactifying the 6d N=(2, 0) theory on a Riemann surface C with outer-automorphism twist lines. From the pair-of-pants decompositions of C, we find various dual descriptions for the same theory having distinct gauge groups. We show that the various configurations of the twist line give rise to dual descriptions for the identical theory. We compute the 't Hooft anomaly coefficients and the superconformal indices to test dualities. Surprisingly, we find that the class S theories with twist lines wrapping 1-cycles of C have the identical 't Hooft anomalies as the ones without the twist line, whereas the superconformal indices differ. This provides a large set of examples where the anomaly matching is insufficient to test dualities.

  4. New dualities and misleading anomaly matchings from outer-automorphism twists

    DOE PAGES

    Pal, Sridip; Song, Jaewon

    2017-03-29

    We study four-dimensional N=1, 2 superconformal theories in class S obtained by compactifying the 6d N=(2, 0) theory on a Riemann surface C with outer-automorphism twist lines. From the pair-of-pants decompositions of C, we find various dual descriptions for the same theory having distinct gauge groups. We show that the various configurations of the twist line give rise to dual descriptions for the identical theory. We compute the ’t Hooft anomaly coefficients and the superconformal indices to test dualities. Surprisingly, we find that the class S theories with twist lines wrapping 1-cycles of C have the identical ’t Hooft anomaliesmore » as the ones without the twist line, whereas the superconformal indices differ. As a result, this provides a large set of examples where the anomaly matching is insufficient to test dualities.« less

  5. Geometry of Higgs bundles over elliptic curves related to automorphisms of simple Lie algebras, Calogero-Moser systems, and KZB equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, A. M.; Olshanetsky, M. A.; Zotov, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    We construct twisted Calogero-Moser systems with spins as Hitchin systems derived from the Higgs bundles over elliptic curves, where the transition operators are defined by arbitrary finite-order automorphisms of the underlying Lie algebras. We thus obtain a spin generalization of the twisted D'Hoker-Phong and Bordner-Corrigan-Sasaki-Takasaki systems. In addition, we construct the corresponding twisted classical dynamical r-matrices and the Knizhnik-Zamolodchikov-Bernard equations related to the automorphisms of Lie algebras.

  6. Clinical application of the Fricke-glucomannan gel dosimeter for high-dose-rate 192Ir brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Hoshino, Y.; Furukawa, S.; Katoh, H.; Kurotaki, K.; Nakano, T.

    2008-07-01

    This study investigates the efficacy of a new Fricke dosimeter formulation consisting of a standard Fricke gel dosimeter gelled with glucomannan (FrGDG). FrGDG was irradiated using a 192Ir γ-ray source with a remote afterloading system based on computed tomography images. 60Co irradiation was performed for measuring the absorption of FrGDG and water. The distribution maps of T2 values from the irradiated containers were obtained by MR imaging and converted to the absorbed dose to visualize the dose distribution. We found that FrGDG was produced easily and quickly at room temperature. R2 (1/T2) values were reproducible and linearly correlated with the absorbed doses in the range from 0 to 30 Gy for irradiation with 192Ir (the correlation coefficient was 0.99). The mean deviation between the doses obtained from the MR images of the FrGDG and those calculated by the treatment planning system for doses of 37.5, 40, 50, 62.5 and 75 Gy was 4.9%, 4.8%, 3.5%, 2.3% and 2.4%, respectively. In conclusion, MR imaging of FrGDG can visualize the dose distribution successfully, and thus serves as a useful quality assurance tool for complicated three-dimensional radiotherapy treatments.

  7. Determination of absorbed dose in water at the reference point d(r0, theta0) for an 192Ir HDR brachytherapy source using a Fricke system.

    PubMed

    Austerlitz, C; Mota, H C; Sempau, J; Benhabib, S M; Campos, D; Allison, R; DeAlmeida, C E; Zhu, D; Sibata, C H

    2008-12-01

    A ring-shaped Fricke device was developed to measure the absolute dose on the transverse bisector of a 192Ir high dose rate (HDR) source at 1 cm from its center in water, D(r0, theta0). It consists of a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) rod (axial axis) with a cylindrical cavity at its center to insert the 192Ir radioactive source. A ring cavity around the source with 1.5 mm thickness and 5 mm height is centered at 1 cm from the central axis of the source. This ring cavity is etched in a disk shaped base with 2.65 cm diameter and 0.90 cm thickness. The cavity has a wall around it 0.25 cm thick. This ring is filled with Fricke solution, sealed, and the whole assembly is immersed in water during irradiations. The device takes advantage of the cylindrical geometry to measure D(r0, theta0). Irradiations were performed with a Nucletron microselectron HDR unit loaded with an 192Ir Alpha Omega radioactive source. A Spectronic 1001 spectrophotometer was used to measure the optical absorbance using a 1 mL quartz cuvette with 1.00 cm light pathlength. The PENELOPE Monte Carlo code (MC) was utilized to simulate the Fricke device and the 192Ir Alpha Omega source in detail to calculate the perturbation introduced by the PMMA material. A NIST traceable calibrated well type ionization chamber was used to determine the air-kerma strength, and a published dose-rate constant was used to determine the dose rate at the reference point. The time to deliver 30.00 Gy to the reference point was calculated. This absorbed dose was then compared to the absorbed dose measured by the Fricke solution. Based on MC simulation, the PMMA of the Fricke device increases the D(r0, theta0) by 2.0%. Applying the corresponding correction factor, the D(r0, theta0) value assessed with the Fricke device agrees within 2.0% with the expected value with a total combined uncertainty of 3.43% (k=1). The Fricke device provides a promising method towards calibration of brachytherapy radiation sources in terms of D(r0

  8. The Conformal Steady-State Free Precession:. a Kepplerian Approach to Automorphic Scattering Theory of Orbiton/spinon Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schempp, Walter J.

    2013-09-01

    Based on projective geometry, a quantum holographic approach to the orbiton / spinon dynamics of quantum blackholography and clinical magnetic resonance tomography is mathematically described. Crucial applications of the conformal steady-state free-precession modality and automorphic scattering theory are the evidence for a supermassive central black hole in the Milky Way galaxy and the modalities of clinical cardiovascular magnetic resonance tomography and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance tomography of non-invasive radiological diagnostics.

  9. Cellular basis for the automorphic curvature of rice coleoptiles on a three-dimensional clinostat: possible involvement of reorientation of cortical microtubules.

    PubMed

    Saiki, Mizue; Fujita, Hiroshi; Soga, Kouichi; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Kamisaka, Seiichiro; Yamashita, Masamichi; Hoson, Takayuki

    2005-06-01

    Coleoptiles of rice (Oryza sativa L.) show a spontaneous (automorphic) curvature toward the caryopsis under microgravity conditions. The possible involvement of the reorientation of cortical microtubules in automorphic curvature was studied in rice coleoptiles grown on a three-dimensional clinostat. When rice seedlings that had been grown in the normal gravitational field were transferred to the clinostat in the dark, cortical microtubules of epidermal cells in the dorsal side of the coleoptiles oriented more transversely than the ventral side within 0.5 h. The rotation on the clinostat also increased the cell wall extensibility in the dorsal side and decreased the extensibility in the ventral side, and induced automorphic curvature. The reorientation of cortical microtubules preceded the changes in the cell wall extensibility and the curvature. The irradiation of rice seedlings with white light from above inhibited microtubule reorientation and changes in the cell wall extensibility, as well as curvature of coleoptiles. Also, colchicine, applied to the bending region of coleoptiles, partially inhibited the automorphic curvature. These results suggest that reorientation of cortical microtubules is involved in causing automorphic curvature in rice coleoptiles on the clinostat.

  10. Semiclassical Strings in AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5} and Automorphic Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Pawellek, Michael

    2011-06-17

    Using anti-de Sitter-space/conformal-field-theory correspondence we derive from the folded spinning string ordinary differential equations for the anomalous dimension of the dual N=4 super Yang-Mills theory twist-two operators at strong coupling. We show that for large spin the asymptotic solutions have the Gribov-Lipatov reciprocity property. To obtain this result we use a hidden modular invariance of the energy-spin relation of the folded spinning string. Furthermore, we identify the Moch-Vermaseren-Vogt relations, which were first recognized in plain QCD calculations, as the recurrence relations of the asymptotic series ansatz.

  11. Semiclassical strings in AdS5 × S5 and automorphic functions.

    PubMed

    Pawellek, Michael

    2011-06-17

    Using anti-de Sitter-space/conformal-field-theory correspondence we derive from the folded spinning string ordinary differential equations for the anomalous dimension of the dual N=4 super Yang-Mills theory twist-two operators at strong coupling. We show that for large spin the asymptotic solutions have the Gribov-Lipatov reciprocity property. To obtain this result we use a hidden modular invariance of the energy-spin relation of the folded spinning string. Furthermore, we identify the Moch-Vermaseren-Vogt relations, which were first recognized in plain QCD calculations, as the recurrence relations of the asymptotic series ansatz.

  12. Ecological and geographical regularities of changes in the biological activity of automorphic soils on the foothills and adjacent plains of the Central Caucasus region (Kabardino-Balkarian Republic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorobtsova, O. N.; Khezheva, F. V.; Uligova, T. S.; Tembotov, R. Kh.

    2015-03-01

    The biochemical properties inherent to the main types of automorphic soils developed in different bioclimatic conditions of Elbrus and Terek variants of the vertical zonality within Kabardino-Balkaria were compared. The natural-climatic conditions of these variants noticeably affect the soil cover pattern. The ratio of the oxidase and hydrolase activities is sensitive to the moisture conditions in which these soils are formed. The redox processes are more active in drier conditions, whereas hydrolytic processes are more active under higher moisture. The level of the biological activity of the automorphic soils is estimated using the integral index of the ecological-biological soil status.

  13. Technical Note: Preliminary investigations into the use of a functionalised polymer to reduce diffusion in Fricke gel dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S. T. Masters, K.-S.; Hosokawa, K.; Blinco, J. P.; Trapp, J. V.; Crowe, S. B.; Kairn, T.

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: A modification of the existing PVA-FX hydrogel has been made to investigate the use of a functionalised polymer in a Fricke gel dosimetry system to decrease Fe{sup 3+} diffusion. Methods: The chelating agent, xylenol orange, was chemically bonded to the gelling agent, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) to create xylenol orange functionalised PVA (XO-PVA). A gel was created from the XO-PVA (20% w/v) with ferrous sulfate (0.4 mM) and sulfuric acid (50 mM). Results: This resulted in an optical density dose sensitivity of 0.014 Gy{sup −1}, an auto-oxidation rate of 0.0005 h{sup −1}, and a diffusion rate of 0.129 mm{sup 2} h{sup −1}; an 8% reduction compared to the original PVA-FX gel, which in practical terms adds approximately 1 h to the time span between irradiation and accurate read-out. Conclusions: Because this initial method of chemically bonding xylenol orange to polyvinyl alcohol has inherently low conversion, the improvement on existing gel systems is minimal when compared to the drawbacks. More efficient methods of functionalising polyvinyl alcohol with xylenol orange must be developed for this system to gain clinical relevance.

  14. Holomorphic projections and Ramanujan's mock theta functions.

    PubMed

    Imamoğlu, Özlem; Raum, Martin; Richter, Olav K

    2014-03-18

    We use spectral methods of automorphic forms to establish a holomorphic projection operator for tensor products of vector-valued harmonic weak Maass forms and vector-valued modular forms. We apply this operator to discover simple recursions for Fourier series coefficients of Ramanujan's mock theta functions.

  15. A preliminary empirical test of Silverthorn and Frick's delayed-onset pathway in girls using an urban, African-American, US-based sample.

    PubMed

    White, Norman A; Piquero, Alex R

    2004-01-01

    Silverthorn and Frick argued that there is no pathway to criminal activity among girls that is analogous to the early-onset/life-course-persistent-type one among boys. Instead, they argued for a female-specific theory in which even girls with the same high-risk backgrounds and criminal outcomes as early-onset/life-course-persistent boys show delayed-onset offending. To test the Silverthorn Frick model of gender-specific pathways to offending in an independent cohort. A cohort of 987 urban, African-American males and females participated in the Philadelphia portion of the National Collaborative Perinatal Project which collected biological, psychological and sociological variables. By age 18, 220 of these individuals had incurred a least one police contact, of which 64 did so under the age of 13. A criminal history follow-up was conducted in 1998 when cohort members had all reached their mid-thirties. Females and males were equally likely to experience early-onset offending (police contact by age 13), but female late-onset offenders resembled male early-onset offenders on nine of 10 risk factors. Male early-onset offenders had worse criminal outcomes compared with female and male late-onset offenders, but did not differ from female early-onset offenders. Female late-onset offenders showed many similarities on key risk factors to male late-onset offenders. Silverthorn and Frick may have over-estimated the outcome similarity of late-onset offending females to early-onset males and under-estimated occurrence of early-onset-life-course persistent offending in females. In so far as cohort studies such as these inform social policy, it is likely to be important that they are interpreted with sensitivity to minority needs.

  16. PEP in the Frick Elementary School: Interim Evaluation Report 1969-1970.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Margaret C.; And Others

    The Primary Education Project (PEP) is concerned with the development and evaluation of a model of individualized education for young children suitable for implementation in American public schools at the preschool through primary grade level. It is concerned with all aspects of school functioning: curriculum, classroom organization, teacher…

  17. Holomorphic projections and Ramanujan’s mock theta functions

    PubMed Central

    Imamoğlu, Özlem; Raum, Martin; Richter, Olav K.

    2014-01-01

    We use spectral methods of automorphic forms to establish a holomorphic projection operator for tensor products of vector-valued harmonic weak Maass forms and vector-valued modular forms. We apply this operator to discover simple recursions for Fourier series coefficients of Ramanujan’s mock theta functions. PMID:24591582

  18. The correction of time and temperature effects in MR-based 3D Fricke xylenol orange dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Mattea L.; Jaffray, David A.

    2017-04-01

    Previously developed MR-based three-dimensional (3D) Fricke-xylenol orange (FXG) dosimeters can provide end-to-end quality assurance and validation protocols for pre-clinical radiation platforms. FXG dosimeters quantify ionizing irradiation induced oxidation of Fe2+ ions using pre- and post-irradiation MR imaging methods that detect changes in spin-lattice relaxation rates (R 1  =  T1-1 ) caused by irradiation induced oxidation of Fe2+. Chemical changes in MR-based FXG dosimeters that occur over time and with changes in temperature can decrease dosimetric accuracy if they are not properly characterized and corrected. This paper describes the characterization, development and utilization of an empirical model-based correction algorithm for time and temperature effects in the context of a pre-clinical irradiator and a 7 T pre-clinical MR imaging system. Time and temperature dependent changes of R 1 values were characterized using variable TR spin-echo imaging. R 1-time and R 1-temperature dependencies were fit using non-linear least squares fitting methods. Models were validated using leave-one-out cross-validation and resampling. Subsequently, a correction algorithm was developed that employed the previously fit empirical models to predict and reduce baseline R 1 shifts that occurred in the presence of time and temperature changes. The correction algorithm was tested on R 1-dose response curves and 3D dose distributions delivered using a small animal irradiator at 225 kVp. The correction algorithm reduced baseline R 1 shifts from  -2.8  ×  10-2 s-1 to 1.5  ×  10-3 s-1. In terms of absolute dosimetric performance as assessed with traceable standards, the correction algorithm reduced dose discrepancies from approximately 3% to approximately 0.5% (2.90  ±  2.08% to 0.20  ±  0.07%, and 2.68  ±  1.84% to 0.46  ±  0.37% for the 10  ×  10 and 8  ×  12 mm2 fields, respectively). Chemical

  19. Frick Teaches Frack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filipczak, Bob

    1993-01-01

    Peer training in the workplace can be effective if it is structured; if trainers are carefully chosen, trained, and rewarded; and if transfer of training is supported. Peer training has the advantages of credibility, speed, and cost savings. (SK)

  20. SU-F-BRA-10: Fricke Dosimetry: Determination of the G-Value for Ir-192 Energy Based On the NRC Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Salata, C; David, M; Rosado, P; Almeida, C de

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Use the methodology developed by the National Research Council Canada (NRC), for Fricke Dosimetry, to determine the G-value used at Ir-192 energies. Methods: In this study the Radiology Science Laboratory of Rio de Janeiro State University (LCR),based the G-value determination on the NRC method, using polyethylene bags. Briefly, this method consists of interpolating the G-values calculated for Co-60 and 250 kV x-rays for the average energy of Ir-192 (380 keV). As the Co-60 G-value is well described at literature, and associated with low uncertainties, it wasn’t measured in this present study. The G-values for 150 kV (Effective energy of 68 keV), 250 kV (Effective energy of 132 keV)and 300 kV(Effective energy of 159 keV)were calculated using the air kerma given by a calibrated ion chamber, and making it equivalent to the absorbed to the Fricke solution, using a Monte Carlo calculated factor for this conversion. Instead of interpolations, as described by the NRC, we displayed the G-values points in a graph, and used the line equation to determine the G- value for Ir-192 (380 keV). Results: The measured G-values were 1.436 ± 0.002 µmol/J for 150 kV, 1.472 ± 0.002 µmol/J for 250 kV, 1.497 ± 0.003 µmol/J for 300 kV. The used G-value for Co-60 (1.25 MeV) was 1,613 µmol/J. The R-square of the fitted regression line among those G-value points was 0.991. Using the line equation, the calculate G-value for 380 KeV was 1.542 µmol/J. Conclusion: The Result found for Ir-192 G-value is 3,1% different (lower) from the NRC value. But it agrees with previous literature results, using different methodologies to calculate this parameter. We will continue this experiment measuring the G-value for Co-60 in order to compare with the NRC method and better understand the reasons for the found differences.

  1. Temperature dependence of the Fricke dosimeter and spur expansion time in the low-LET high-temperature radiolysis of water up to 350 °C: a Monte-Carlo simulation study.

    PubMed

    Sanguanmith, Sunuchakan; Muroya, Yusa; Tippayamontri, Thititip; Meesungnoen, Jintana; Lin, Mingzhang; Katsumura, Yosuke; Jay-Gerin, Jean-Paul

    2011-06-14

    Monte-Carlo simulations of the radiolysis of the ferrous sulfate (Fricke) dosimeter with low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation (such as (60)Co γ-rays or fast electrons) have been performed as a function of temperature from 25 to 350 °C. The predicted yields of Fe(2+) oxidation are found to increase with increasing temperature up to ∼100-150 °C, and then tend to remain essentially constant at higher temperatures, in very good agreement with experiment. By using a simple method based on the direct application of the stoichiometric relationship that exists between the ferric ion yields so obtained G(Fe(3+)) and the sum {3 [g(e(-)(aq) + H˙) + g(HO(2)˙)] + g(˙OH) + 2 g(H(2)O(2))}, where g(e(-)(aq) + H˙), g(HO(2)˙), g(˙OH), and g(H(2)O(2)) are the primary radical and molecular yields of the radiolysis of deaerated 0.4 M H(2)SO(4) aqueous solutions, the lifetime (τ(s)) of the spur and its temperature dependence have been determined. In the spirit of the spur model, τ(s) is an important indicator for overlapping spurs, giving the time required for the changeover from nonhomogeneous spur kinetics to homogeneous kinetics in the bulk solution. The calculations show that τ(s) decreases by about an order of magnitude over the 25-350 °C temperature range, going from ∼4.2 × 10(-7) s at 25 °C to ∼5.7 × 10(-8) s at 350 °C. This decrease in τ(s) with increasing temperature mainly originates from the quicker diffusion of the individual species involved. Moreover, the observed dependence of G(Fe(3+)) on temperature largely reflects the influence of temperature upon the primary free-radical product yields of the radiolysis, especially the yield of H˙ atoms. Above ∼200-250 °C, the more and more pronounced intervention of the reaction of H˙ atoms with water also contributes to the variation of G(Fe(3+)), which may decrease or increase slightly, depending on the choice made for the rate constant of this reaction. All calculations reported herein use the

  2. Lie algebra automorphisms as Lie-point symmetries and the solution space for Bianchi type I, II, IV, V vacuum geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzis, Petros A.; Christodoulakis, T.

    2012-12-01

    Lie-group symmetry analysis for systems of coupled, nonlinear ordinary differential equations is performed in order to obtain the entire solution space to Einstein’s field equations for vacuum Bianchi spacetime geometries. The symmetries used are the automorphisms of the Lie algebra of the corresponding three-dimensional isometry group acting on the hyper-surfaces of simultaneity for each Bianchi type, as well as the scaling and the time reparametrization symmetry. A detailed application of the method is presented for Bianchi type IV. The result is the acquisition of the general solution of type IV in terms of sixth Painlevé transcendent PVI, along with the known pp-wave solution. For Bianchi types I, II, V the known entire solution space is attained and very briefly listed, along with two new type V solutions of Euclidean and neutral signature and a type I pp-wave metric.

  3. Asymptotic free probability for arithmetic functions and factorization of Dirichlet series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Ilwoo; Gillespie, Timothy; Jorgensen, Palle E. T.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we study a free-probabilistic model on the algebra of arithmetic functions by considering their asymptotic behavior. As an application, we concentrate on arithmetic functions arising from certain representations attached to the general linear group GL_n. We then study conditions under which a Dirichlet series may be factored into a product of automorphic L-functions using asymptotic freeness.

  4. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, astronaut Stephen Frick and STS-114 Mission Specialist Wendy Lawrence watch as crew members work with equipment that will be used on the mission. Frick is a tile specialist, who joined the STS-114 crew during equipment familiarization at KSC. STS-114 is classified as Logistics Flight 1 to the International Space Station, delivering new supplies and replacing one of the orbital outpost’s Control Moment Gyroscopes (CMGs). STS-114 will also carry a Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module and the External Stowage Platform-2. The crew is slated to conduct at least three spacewalks: They will demonstrate repair techniques of the Shuttle’s Thermal Protection System, replace the failed CMG with one delivered by the Shuttle, and install the External Stowage Platform.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-01-27

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, astronaut Stephen Frick and STS-114 Mission Specialist Wendy Lawrence watch as crew members work with equipment that will be used on the mission. Frick is a tile specialist, who joined the STS-114 crew during equipment familiarization at KSC. STS-114 is classified as Logistics Flight 1 to the International Space Station, delivering new supplies and replacing one of the orbital outpost’s Control Moment Gyroscopes (CMGs). STS-114 will also carry a Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module and the External Stowage Platform-2. The crew is slated to conduct at least three spacewalks: They will demonstrate repair techniques of the Shuttle’s Thermal Protection System, replace the failed CMG with one delivered by the Shuttle, and install the External Stowage Platform.

  5. Evaluation du potentiel radiosensibilisateur ou radioprotecteur/antioxydant de quelques composes selectionnes par dosimetrie par gel de polyacrylamide et dosimetre de Fricke, et utilisation de la filamentation par impulsion laser infrarouge fenitoseconde comme un nouveau et puissant faisceau pour la radiotherapie du cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meesat, Ridthee

    In radiation treatment, a sufficiently high radiation dose must be delivered to the tissue volumes containing the tumor cells while the lowest possible dose should be deposited in surrounding healthy tissue. We developed an original approach that is fast and easy to implement for the early assessment of the efficiency of radiation sensitizers and protectors. In addition, we characterized a new femtosecond laser pulse irradiation technique. We are able to deposit a considerable dose with a very high dose rate inside a well-controlled macroscopic volume without deposition of energy in front or behind the target volume. The radioprotective efficiency was measured by irradiation of the Fricke solution incorporating a compound under study and measuring the corresponding production of ferric ions G(Fe3+). The production of ferric ions is most sensitive to the radical species produced in the radiolysis of water. We studied experimentally and simulated with a full Monte-Carlo computer code the radiation-induced chemistry of Fricke/cystamine solutions. Results clearly indicate that the protective effect of cystamine originates from its radical-capturing ability, which allows this compound to compete with the ferrous ions for the various free radicals - especially ·OH radicals and H· atoms - formed during irradiation of the surrounding water. The sensitizing capacity of radiation sensitizers was measured by irradiation of a polyacrylamide gel (PAG) dosimeter incorporating a compound under study and measuring the corresponding increase in the gradient between spin-spin relaxation rate (R2) and absorbed dose. We measured an irradiation energy-dependent increase in R 2-dose sensitivity for halogenated compounds or a decrease for radioprotectors. Finally, we studied a novel laser irradiation method called "filamentation". We showed that this phenomenon results in an unprecedented deposition of energy and the dose rate thus achieved exceeds by orders of magnitude values

  6. Nonvanishing of motivic L-functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowski, Andrzej; Pomykala, Jacek

    2001-03-01

    Let E be a modular elliptic curve over [open face Q] and let L(E, s) denote the associated L-function. The Birch and Swinnerton-Dyer conjecture then predicts that L(E, s) has a zero at s = 1 of order precisely equal to the rank of the Mordell-Weil group E([open face Q]). According to Waldspurger's theorem [26] we know that there exists a real quadratic character [chi] such that the twisted L-function L(E, [chi], s) does not vanish at s = 1. Recently Kolyvagin [16] has proved that E([open face Q]) is finite provided L(E, 1) [not equal] 0 and there exists a suitable real quadratic character [chi]t such that L(E, [chi]t, s) has a simple zero at s = 1. The latter condition was proved to be true for infinitely many t [4, 19]. Iwaniec [15] and Perelli and Pomykala [20] have proved quantitative results on this condition; Pomykala [21] has generalized it to the nth derivative of L(E, [chi], s).Variants and generalizations are possible. For instance, Friedberg and Hoffstein [10] established a nonvanishing theorem for quadratic twists of the L-series of an arbitrary cuspidal automorphic form on GL(2) over any number field. In some cases such a result can be applied to the construction of l-adic representations associated to modular forms over imaginary quadratic fields [25]. Further examples as well as some perspective concerning the higher rank case is discussed in an excellent survey article [5].We should also mention that there are examples of irreducible cuspidal automorphic representations of GL(2) over a number field such that the corresponding twisted L-function vanishes at the centre of the critical strip for all quadratic characters [22].Here is our contribution to the above picture.Let M be a pure motive over [open face Q], and let L(M, s) denote the corresponding L-function. In this paper we prove, under certain assumptions, (a quantitative version of) a nonvanishing theorem for n-th derivatives of quadratic twists of L(M, s) at the centre of the critical strip

  7. Quantum Spectral Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamhalter, Jan; Turilova, Ekaterina

    2017-02-01

    Quantum symmetries of spectral lattices are studied. Basic properties of spectral order on A W ∗-algebras are summarized. Connection between projection and spectral automorphisms is clarified by showing that, under mild conditions, any spectral automorphism is a composition of function calculus and Jordan ∗-automorphism. Complete description of quantum spectral symmetries on Type I and Type II A W ∗-factors are completely described.

  8. On the Hard-Hexagon Model and the Theory of Modular Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, G. S.

    1988-08-01

    The mathematical properties of the exact solution of the hard-hexagon lattice gas model are investigated by using the Klein-Fricke theory of modular functions. In particular, it is shown that the order-parameter R and the reciprocal activity z' for the model can be expressed in terms of hauptmoduls that are associated with certain congruence subgroups of the full modular group Gamma . Known modular equations are then used to prove that R(z') is an algebraic function of z'. A connection is established between the singular points of this function and the geometrical properties of the icosahedron. Various algebraic and hypergeometric closed-form expressions are also derived for the order-parameter R(z') in terms of the fundamental modular invariant J. Next the simple relation Xi +6 = (z')-2[1 - 11z' - (z')2]-1R9, (0 < z' < zc') is derived, where Xi + is the grand partition function per site and zc' = 1/2(5surd 5 - 11) denotes the critical value of z'. This important result forms the basis for a detailed analysis of the properties of the mean density ρ (z') and the isothermal compressibility kappa T(z') in the ordered region. It is shown that the mean density ρ (z') is a solution of the algebraic equation 3[1 - 11z' - (z')2]ρ 4 - [1 - 66z' - 11(z')2]ρ 3 - 15z'(3 + z')ρ 2 + 3z'(4 + 3z')ρ - z'(1 + 2z') = 0. From this relation we obtain the following simple closed-form expressions for the inverse function z'(ρ ) and the isothermal compressibility kappa T(ρ ): z'(ρ ) = -1/2(2 - 3ρ )-1(1 - ρ )-3[(1 - 12ρ + 45ρ 2 - 66ρ 3 + 33ρ 4) + (-1 + 5ρ - 5ρ 2)3/2(-1 + 9ρ - 9ρ 2)1/2], and kB Tρ kappa T(ρ ) = 1/15ρ[(1 - 2ρ )(-1 + 9ρ - 9ρ 2)1/2(-1 + 5ρ - 5ρ 2)-1/2 - (-1 + 9ρ - 9ρ 2)], where ρ c < ρ <= 1/3, and ρ c = 1/10(5 - surd 5). The formula for kappa T(ρ ) is used to write the equation of state of the lattice gas pa0/kB T = ln Xi +(ρ ) equiv Gamma +(ρ) in terms of a certain pseudo-elliptic integral, which is evaluated exactly to give a further closed

  9. On the Geometry of the Hamilton-Jacobi Equation and Generating Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, Sebastián; de León, Manuel; Marrero, Juan Carlos; Martín de Diego, David; Vaquero, Miguel

    2017-10-01

    In this paper we develop a geometric version of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation in the Poisson setting. Specifically, we "geometrize" what is usually called a complete solution of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. We use some well-known results about symplectic groupoids, in particular cotangent groupoids, as a keystone for the construction of our framework. Our methodology follows the ambitious program proposed by Weinstein (In Mechanics day (Waterloo, ON, 1992), volume 7 of fields institute communications, American Mathematical Society, Providence, 1996) in order to develop geometric formulations of the dynamical behavior of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian systems on Lie algebroids and Lie groupoids. This procedure allows us to take symmetries into account, and, as a by-product, we recover results from Channell and Scovel (Phys D 50(1):80-88, 1991), Ge (Indiana Univ. Math. J. 39(3):859-876, 1990), Ge and Marsden (Phys Lett A 133(3):134-139, 1988), but even in these situations our approach is new. A theory of generating functions for the Poisson structures considered here is also developed following the same pattern, solving a longstanding problem of the area: how to obtain a generating function for the identity transformation and the nearby Poisson automorphisms of Poisson manifolds. A direct application of our results gives the construction of a family of Poisson integrators, that is, integrators that conserve the underlying Poisson geometry. These integrators are implemented in the paper in benchmark problems. Some conclusions, current and future directions of research are shown at the end of the paper.

  10. Wave-function functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Xiaoyin; Slamet, Marlina; Sahni, Viraht

    2010-04-15

    We extend our prior work on the construction of variational wave functions {psi} that are functionals of functions {chi}:{psi}={psi}[{chi}] rather than simply being functions. In this manner, the space of variations is expanded over those of traditional variational wave functions. In this article we perform the constrained search over the functions {chi} chosen such that the functional {psi}[{chi}] satisfies simultaneously the constraints of normalization and the exact expectation value of an arbitrary single- or two-particle Hermitian operator, while also leading to a rigorous upper bound to the energy. As such the wave function functional is accurate not only in the region of space in which the principal contributions to the energy arise but also in the other region of the space represented by the Hermitian operator. To demonstrate the efficacy of these ideas, we apply such a constrained search to the ground state of the negative ion of atomic hydrogen H{sup -}, the helium atom He, and its positive ions Li{sup +} and Be{sup 2+}. The operators W whose expectations are obtained exactly are the sum of the single-particle operators W={Sigma}{sub i}r{sub i}{sup n},n=-2,-1,1,2, W={Sigma}{sub i{delta}}(r{sub i}), W=-(1/2){Sigma}{sub i{nabla}i}{sup 2}, and the two-particle operators W={Sigma}{sub n}u{sup n},n=-2,-1,1,2, where u=|r{sub i}-r{sub j}|. Comparisons with the method of Lagrangian multipliers and of other constructions of wave-function functionals are made. Finally, we present further insights into the construction of wave-function functionals by studying a previously proposed construction of functionals {psi}[{chi}] that lead to the exact expectation of arbitrary Hermitian operators. We discover that analogous to the solutions of the Schroedinger equation, there exist {psi}[{chi}] that are unphysical in that they lead to singular values for the expectations. We also explain the origin of the singularity.

  11. Effect of land use change on soil properties and functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonutare, Tonu; Kõlli, Raimo; Köster, Tiina; Rannik, Kaire; Szajdak, Lech; Shanskiy, Merrit

    2014-05-01

    For good base of sustainable land management and ecologically sound protection of soils are researches on soil properties and functioning. Ecosystem approach to soil properties and functioning is equally important in both natural and cultivated land use conditions. Comparative analysis of natural and agro-ecosystems formed on similar soil types enables to elucidate principal changes caused by land use change (LUC) and to elaborate the best land use practices for local pedo-ecological conditions. Taken for actual analysis mineral soils' catena - rendzina → brown soils → pseudopodzolic soils → gley-podzols - represent ca 1/3 of total area of Estonian normal mineral soils. All soils of this catena differ substantially each from other by calcareousness, acidity, nutrition conditions, fabric and humus cover type. This catena (representative to Estonian pedo-ecological conditions) starts with drought-prone calcareous soils. Brown (distributed in northern and central Estonia) and pseudopodzolic soils (in southern Estonia) are the most broadly acknowledged for agricultural use medium-textured high-quality automorphic soils. Dispersedly distributed gley-podzols are permanently wet and strongly acid, low-productivity sandy soils. In presentation four complex functions of soils are treated: (1) being a suitable soil environment for plant cover productivity (expressed by annual increment, Mg ha-1 yr-1); (2) forming adequate conditions for decomposition, transformation and conversion of fresh falling litter (characterized by humus cover type); (3) deposition of humus, individual organic compounds, plant nutrition elements, air and water, and (4) forming (bio)chemically variegated active space for soil type specific edaphon. Capacity of soil cover as depositor (3) depends on it thickness, texture, calcareousness and moisture conditions. Biological activity of soil (4) is determined by fresh organic matter influx, quality and quantity of biochemical substances and humus

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: M83 magnetic and gaseous spiral arms images (Frick+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frick, P.; Stepanov, R.; Beck, R.; Sokoloff, D.; Shukurov, A.; Ehle, M.; Lundgren, A.

    2016-02-01

    We performed radio continuum observations of M83 with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), consisting of six parabolic dishes, each of 22m in diameter, forming an east-west radio interferometer. We observed M83 with different baseline configurations, each observation session lasting 12h to achieve maximum uv coverage. (2 data files).

  13. PEP in the Frick Elementary School: Interim Evaluation Report 1969-1970.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Margaret C.; And Others

    This book presents the evaluation of a Primary Education Project (PEP) which focused on the development and evaluation of a model of individualized education for young children. The socioeconomic background of the participating students (primarily economically disadvantaged children attending an inner-city school) is described. The PEP 1969-1970…

  14. Approximating Functions with Exponential Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Sheldon P.

    2005-01-01

    The possibility of approximating a function with a linear combination of exponential functions of the form e[superscript x], e[superscript 2x], ... is considered as a parallel development to the notion of Taylor polynomials which approximate a function with a linear combination of power function terms. The sinusoidal functions sin "x" and cos "x"…

  15. Functional Illiteracy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hovey, Sheryl

    Statistics indicating that the problem of illiteracy is lessening mask a greater problem--that of functional illiteracy. Functional illiterates may have some reading and writing skills but are not able to apply them as functioning members of society. A 1975 study using the most sophisticated instrument that had ever been used to determine…

  16. Executive functions.

    PubMed

    Miller, Karen J

    2005-04-01

    Executive functions are higher-order cognitive processes that continue to develop well into adulthood. They are critically important to behavioral self-control and task performance, and deficits can have serious effects on a student's functioning in many areas. Primary care pediatricians can play an important role by being aware of this evolving field of research, current assessment strategies, and by encouraging families, schools, and students to adopt a positive and problem-solving approach to improve executive functions.

  17. Functional coma.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, L; McWhirter, L; Williams, S; Derry, C; Stone, J

    2016-01-01

    Functional coma - here defined as a prolonged motionless dissociative attack with absent or reduced response to external stimuli - is a relatively rare presentation. In this chapter we examine a wide range of terms used to describe states of unresponsiveness in which psychologic factors are relevant to etiology, such as depressive stupor, catatonia, nonepileptic "pseudostatus," and factitious disorders, and discuss the place of functional or psychogenic coma among these. Historically, diagnosis of functional coma has sometimes been reached after prolonged investigation and exclusion of other diagnoses. However, as is the case with other functional disorders, diagnosis should preferably be made on the basis of positive findings that provide evidence of inconsistency between an apparent comatose state and normal waking nervous system functioning. In our review of physical signs, we find some evidence for the presence of firm resistance to eye opening as reasonably sensitive and specific for functional coma, as well as the eye gaze sign, in which patients tend to look to the ground when turned on to one side. Noxious stimuli such as Harvey's sign (application of high-frequency vibrating tuning fork to the nasal mucosa) can also be helpful, although patients with this disorder are often remarkably unresponsive to usually painful stimuli, particularly as more commonly applied using sternal or nail bed pressure. The use of repeated painful stimuli is therefore not recommended. We also discuss the role of general anesthesia and other physiologic triggers to functional coma. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Glycosphingolipid Functions

    PubMed Central

    Lingwood, Clifford A.

    2011-01-01

    The combination of carbohydrate and lipid generates unusual molecules in which the two distinctive halves of the glycoconjugate influence the function of each other. Membrane glycolipids can act as primary receptors for carbohydrate binding proteins to mediate transmembrane signaling despite restriction to the outer bilayer leaflet. The extensive heterogeneity of the lipid moiety plays a significant, but still largely unknown, role in glycosphingolipid function. Potential interplay between glycolipids and their fatty acid isoforms, together with their preferential interaction with cholesterol, generates a complex mechanism for the regulation of their function in cellular physiology. PMID:21555406

  19. Rhinoplasty (Functional)

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the nasal breathing. Benefits An improvement in nasal airflow is the primary benefit of a rhinoplasty performed for functional reasons. The procedure may also straighten the nose, repair post-traumatic or congenital deformities, and improve ...

  20. Cognitive Function

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because chemicals can adversely affect cognitive function in humans, considerable effort has been made to characterize their effects using animal models. Information from such models will be necessary to: evaluate whether chemicals identified as potentially neurotoxic by screenin...

  1. Cognitive Function

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because chemicals can adversely affect cognitive function in humans, considerable effort has been made to characterize their effects using animal models. Information from such models will be necessary to: evaluate whether chemicals identified as potentially neurotoxic by screenin...

  2. Transfer functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taback, I.

    1979-01-01

    The vulnerability of electronic equipment to carbon fibers is studied. The effectiveness of interfaces, such as filters, doors, window screens, and cabinets, which affect the concentration, exposure, or deposition of carbon fibers on both (internal and external) sides of the interface is examined. The transfer function of multilayer aluminum mesh, wet and dry, polyurethane foam, and window screen are determined as a function of air velocity. FIlters installed in typical traffic control boxes and air conditioners are also considered.

  3. Functional Programming.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-01

    filter, generate, map, reduce, and scan ) were added to the interpreter as built-in operations. These operations use less storage and run consider- ably...data stores to a well-controlled set of f unction-f orming operations, namely: "generate", "reduce", and " scan ,. Appl ication Programs To evaluate...brackets around a list of functions have the following meaning: f, g, h, ... I = construct( <f,g,h,...> Scan : applies a binary function between sequence

  4. Functional hyposplenism.

    PubMed

    Kirkineska, L; Perifanis, V; Vasiliadis, T

    2014-01-01

    Functional hyposplenism is a condition accompanying many diseases such as sickle cell disease, celiac disease, alcoholic liver disease, hepatic cirrhosis, lymphomas and autoimmune disorders. It is characterised mostly by defective immune responses against infectious agents, especially encapsulated organisms, since the spleen is thought to play an important role in the production and maturation of B-memory lymphocytes and other substances like opsonins, both of which are considered crucial elements of the immune system for fighting infections. It is also associated with thrombocytosis, which might lead to thromboembolic events. Functional hyposplenism is diagnosed by the presence of Howell-Jolly bodies and pitted erythrocytes in the peripheral blood smear, and by nuclear imaging modalities such as spleen scintigraphy with the use of Technetium-99m and/or spleen scintigraphy with the use of heat-damaged Technetium-99m labeled erythrocytes. Severe infections accompanying functional hyposplenism can lead to the overwhelming post infection syndrome, which can often be fatal. Identifying patients with functional hyposplenism is important because simple measures such as vaccination against common infective microorganisms (e.g. Streptococcus pneumonia, Neisseria meningitides and Haemophilous influenzae) and antibiotic therapy when needed are considered beneficial in diminishing the frequency and gravity of the infections accompanying the syndrome.

  5. Pedotransfer Functions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Often, there is a need to estimate parameters governing retention and transport of water and chemicals in soils from other, readily available data. Equations expressing relationships between soil properties were proposed to be called pedotransfer functions. This entry provides the overview of the st...

  6. Executive Functions

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, Adele

    2014-01-01

    Executive functions (EFs) make possible mentally playing with ideas; taking the time to think before acting; meeting novel, unanticipated challenges; resisting temptations; and staying focused. Core EFs are inhibition [response inhibition (self-control—resisting temptations and resisting acting impulsively) and interference control (selective attention and cognitive inhibition)], working memory, and cognitive flexibility (including creatively thinking “outside the box,” seeing anything from different perspectives, and quickly and flexibly adapting to changed circumstances). The developmental progression and representative measures of each are discussed. Controversies are addressed (e.g., the relation between EFs and fluid intelligence, self-regulation, executive attention, and effortful control, and the relation between working memory and inhibition and attention). The importance of social, emotional, and physical health for cognitive health is discussed because stress, lack of sleep, loneliness, or lack of exercise each impair EFs. That EFs are trainable and can be improved with practice is addressed, including diverse methods tried thus far. PMID:23020641

  7. PEP in the Frick Elementary School; Interim Evaluation Report of the Primary Education Project, 1968-1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Margaret C.; And Others

    The main objective of the Primary Education Project (PEP) is to develop an individualized early learning program to serve children from age three through the primary grades. The 1968-1969 school year represented the first year during which a formal PEP program was implemented. This report describes the results of this first year. The PEP early…

  8. Two-dimensional hydrodynamic calculations of the nonlinear development of the Goldreich-Schubert-Fricke instability in a rotating annulus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korycansky, D. G.

    1991-01-01

    Two-dimensional nonlinear hydrodynamic calculations are presented which may help assess the effectiveness of the instability in transporting angular momentum in the equatorial zones of stars and planets which are stably stratified with respect to convection. The calculations were made by numerically integrating the 2D axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations, including viscosity and heat conduction. The instability was followed into the nonlinear regime. The maximum rms velocity amplitude was found to correlate well with the product of the linear growth rate and radial length scale of the instability, consistent with the idea that the instability grows to an amplitude such that an eddy turnover time becomes equal to the growth time defined by the inverse of the growth rate. The time scale for angular momentum to be redistributed to a state of marginal stability was consistent with this picture. The results suggest that in physical situations a state of marginal stability will be maintained, since departures from such a state will be rapidly corrected.

  9. Two-dimensional hydrodynamic calculations of the nonlinear development of the Goldreich-Schubert-Fricke instability in a rotating annulus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korycansky, D. G.

    1991-01-01

    Two-dimensional nonlinear hydrodynamic calculations are presented which may help assess the effectiveness of the instability in transporting angular momentum in the equatorial zones of stars and planets which are stably stratified with respect to convection. The calculations were made by numerically integrating the 2D axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations, including viscosity and heat conduction. The instability was followed into the nonlinear regime. The maximum rms velocity amplitude was found to correlate well with the product of the linear growth rate and radial length scale of the instability, consistent with the idea that the instability grows to an amplitude such that an eddy turnover time becomes equal to the growth time defined by the inverse of the growth rate. The time scale for angular momentum to be redistributed to a state of marginal stability was consistent with this picture. The results suggest that in physical situations a state of marginal stability will be maintained, since departures from such a state will be rapidly corrected.

  10. Maple procedures for the coupling of angular momenta. IX. Wigner D-functions and rotation matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagaran, J.; Fritzsche, S.; Gaigalas, G.

    2006-04-01

    The Wigner D-functions, Dpqj(α,β,γ), are known for their frequent use in quantum mechanics. Defined as the matrix elements of the rotation operator Rˆ(α,β,γ) in R and parametrized in terms of the three Euler angles α, β, and γ, these functions arise not only in the transformation of tensor components under the rotation of the coordinates, but also as the eigenfunctions of the spherical top. In practice, however, the use of the Wigner D-functions is not always that simple, in particular, if expressions in terms of these and other functions from the theory of angular momentum need to be simplified before some computations can be carried out in detail. To facilitate the manipulation of such Racah expressions, here we present an extension to the RACAH program [S. Fritzsche, Comput. Phys. Comm. 103 (1997) 51] in which the properties and the algebraic rules of the Wigner D-functions and reduced rotation matrices are implemented. Care has been taken to combine the standard knowledge about the rotation matrices with the previously implemented rules for the Clebsch-Gordan coefficients, Wigner n-j symbols, and the spherical harmonics. Moreover, the application of the program has been illustrated below by means of three examples. Program summaryTitle of program:RACAH Catalogue identifier:ADFv_9_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADFv_9_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADFW, ADHW, title RACAH Journal reference of previous version(s): S. Fritzsche, Comput. Phys. Comm. 103 (1997) 51; S. Fritzsche, S. Varga, D. Geschke, B. Fricke, Comput. Phys. Comm. 111 (1998) 167; S. Fritzsche, T. Inghoff, M. Tomaselli, Comput. Phys. Comm. 153 (2003) 424. Does the new version supersede the previous one: Yes, in addition to the spherical harmonics and recoupling coefficients, the program now supports also the occurrence of the Wigner rotation matrices in the algebraic

  11. Bayesian function-on-function regression for multilevel functional data.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Mark J; Coull, Brent A; Versace, Francesco; Cinciripini, Paul; Morris, Jeffrey S

    2015-09-01

    Medical and public health research increasingly involves the collection of complex and high dimensional data. In particular, functional data-where the unit of observation is a curve or set of curves that are finely sampled over a grid-is frequently obtained. Moreover, researchers often sample multiple curves per person resulting in repeated functional measures. A common question is how to analyze the relationship between two functional variables. We propose a general function-on-function regression model for repeatedly sampled functional data on a fine grid, presenting a simple model as well as a more extensive mixed model framework, and introducing various functional Bayesian inferential procedures that account for multiple testing. We examine these models via simulation and a data analysis with data from a study that used event-related potentials to examine how the brain processes various types of images.

  12. Functional bowel disorders and functional abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, W; Longstreth, G; Drossman, D; Heaton, K; Irvine, E; Muller-Lissner, S

    1999-01-01

    The Rome diagnostic criteria for the functional bowel disorders and functional abdominal pain are used widely in research and practice. A committee consensus approach, including criticism from multinational expert reviewers, was used to revise the diagnostic criteria and update diagnosis and treatment recommendations, based on research results. The terminology was clarified and the diagnostic criteria and management recommendations were revised. A functional bowel disorder (FBD) is diagnosed by characteristic symptoms for at least 12 weeks during the preceding 12 months in the absence of a structural or biochemical explanation. The irritable bowel syndrome, functional abdominal bloating, functional constipation, and functional diarrhea are distinguished by symptom-based diagnostic criteria. Unspecified FBD lacks criteria for the other FBDs. Diagnostic testing is individualized, depending on patient age, primary symptom characteristics, and other clinical and laboratory features. Functional abdominal pain (FAP) is defined as either the FAP syndrome, which requires at least six months of pain with poor relation to gut function and loss of daily activities, or unspecified FAP, which lacks criteria for the FAP syndrome. An organic cause for the pain must be excluded, but aspects of the patient's pain behavior are of primary importance. Treatment of the FBDs relies upon confident diagnosis, explanation, and reassurance. Diet alteration, drug treatment, and psychotherapy may be beneficial, depending on the symptoms and psychological features.


Keywords: functional bowel disorder; functional constipation; functional diarrhea; irritable bowel syndrome; functional abdominal pain; functional abdominal bloating; Rome II PMID:10457044

  13. Defining Function in the Functional Medicine Model.

    PubMed

    Bland, Jeffrey

    2017-02-01

    In the functional medicine model, the word function is aligned with the evolving understanding that disease is an endpoint and function is a process. Function can move both forward and backward. The vector of change in function through time is, in part, determined by the unique interaction of an individual's genome with their environment, diet, and lifestyle. The functional medicine model for health care is concerned less with what we call the dysfunction or disease, and more about the dynamic processes that resulted in the person's dysfunction. The previous concept of functional somatic syndromes as psychosomatic in origin has now been replaced with a new concept of function that is rooted in the emerging 21st-century understanding of systems network-enabled biology.

  14. Functional eye movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Kaski, D; Bronstein, A M

    2017-01-01

    Functional (psychogenic) eye movement disorders are perhaps less established in the medical literature than other types of functional movement disorders. Patients may present with ocular symptoms (e.g., blurred vision or oscillopsia) or functional eye movements may be identified during the formal examination of the eyes in patients with other functional disorders. Convergence spasm is the most common functional eye movement disorder, but functional gaze limitation, functional eye oscillations (also termed "voluntary nystagmus"), and functional convergence paralysis may be underreported. This chapter reviews the different types of functional eye movement abnormalities and provides a practical framework for their diagnosis and management.

  15. Wave-function functionals for the density

    SciTech Connect

    Slamet, Marlina; Pan Xiaoyin; Sahni, Viraht

    2011-11-15

    We extend the idea of the constrained-search variational method for the construction of wave-function functionals {psi}[{chi}] of functions {chi}. The search is constrained to those functions {chi} such that {psi}[{chi}] reproduces the density {rho}(r) while simultaneously leading to an upper bound to the energy. The functionals are thereby normalized and automatically satisfy the electron-nucleus coalescence condition. The functionals {psi}[{chi}] are also constructed to satisfy the electron-electron coalescence condition. The method is applied to the ground state of the helium atom to construct functionals {psi}[{chi}] that reproduce the density as given by the Kinoshita correlated wave function. The expectation of single-particle operators W={Sigma}{sub i}r{sub i}{sup n}, n=-2,-1,1,2, W={Sigma}{sub i}{delta}(r{sub i}) are exact, as must be the case. The expectations of the kinetic energy operator W=-(1/2){Sigma}{sub i}{nabla}{sub i}{sup 2}, the two-particle operators W={Sigma}{sub n}u{sup n}, n=-2,-1,1,2, where u=|r{sub i}-r{sub j}|, and the energy are accurate. We note that the construction of such functionals {psi}[{chi}] is an application of the Levy-Lieb constrained-search definition of density functional theory. It is thereby possible to rigorously determine which functional {psi}[{chi}] is closer to the true wave function.

  16. Diffeomorphic functional brain surface alignment: Functional demons.

    PubMed

    Nenning, Karl-Heinz; Liu, Hesheng; Ghosh, Satrajit S; Sabuncu, Mert R; Schwartz, Ernst; Langs, Georg

    2017-08-01

    Aligning brain structures across individuals is a central prerequisite for comparative neuroimaging studies. Typically, registration approaches assume a strong association between the features used for alignment, such as macro-anatomy, and the variable observed, such as functional activation or connectivity. Here, we propose to use the structure of intrinsic resting state fMRI signal correlation patterns as a basis for alignment of the cortex in functional studies. Rather than assuming the spatial correspondence of functional structures between subjects, we have identified locations with similar connectivity profiles across subjects. We mapped functional connectivity relationships within the brain into an embedding space, and aligned the resulting maps of multiple subjects. We then performed a diffeomorphic alignment of the cortical surfaces, driven by the corresponding features in the joint embedding space. Results show that functional alignment based on resting state fMRI identifies functionally homologous regions across individuals with higher accuracy than alignment based on the spatial correspondence of anatomy. Further, functional alignment enables measurement of the strength of the anatomo-functional link across the cortex, and reveals the uneven distribution of this link. Stronger anatomo-functional dissociation was found in higher association areas compared to primary sensory- and motor areas. Functional alignment based on resting state features improves group analysis of task based functional MRI data, increasing statistical power and improving the delineation of task-specific core regions. Finally, a comparison of the anatomo-functional dissociation between cohorts is demonstrated with a group of left and right handed subjects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Functional microorganisms for functional food quality.

    PubMed

    Gobbetti, M; Cagno, R Di; De Angelis, M

    2010-09-01

    Functional microorganisms and health benefits represent a binomial with great potential for fermented functional foods. The health benefits of fermented functional foods are expressed either directly through the interactions of ingested live microorganisms with the host (probiotic effect) or indirectly as the result of the ingestion of microbial metabolites synthesized during fermentation (biogenic effect). Since the importance of high viability for probiotic effect, two major options are currently pursued for improving it--to enhance bacterial stress response and to use alternative products for incorporating probiotics (e.g., ice cream, cheeses, cereals, fruit juices, vegetables, and soy beans). Further, it seems that quorum sensing signal molecules released by probiotics may interact with human epithelial cells from intestine thus modulating several physiological functions. Under optimal processing conditions, functional microorganisms contribute to food functionality through their enzyme portfolio and the release of metabolites. Overproduction of free amino acids and vitamins are two classical examples. Besides, bioactive compounds (e.g., peptides, γ-amino butyric acid, and conjugated linoleic acid) may be released during food processing above the physiological threshold and they may exert various in vivo health benefits. Functional microorganisms are even more used in novel strategies for decreasing phenomenon of food intolerance (e.g., gluten intolerance) and allergy. By a critical approach, this review will aim at showing the potential of functional microorganisms for the quality of functional foods.

  18. On the Langlands correspondence for symplectic motives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, B. H.

    2016-08-01

    We present a refinement of the global Langlands correspondence for symplectic motives. Using the local theory of generic representations of odd orthogonal groups, we define a new vector in the associated automorphic representation, which is the tensor product of test vectors for the Whittaker functionals.

  19. Diastolic function in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Phillips, R A; Diamond, J A

    2001-11-01

    Diastolic dysfunction in patients with hypertension may present as asymptomatic findings on noninvasive testing, or as fulminant pulmonary edema, despite normal left ventricular systolic function. Up to 40% of hypertensive patients presenting with clinical signs of congestive heart failure have normal systolic left ventricular function. In this article we review the pathophysiologic factors affecting diastolic function in individuals with diastolic function, current and emerging tools for measuring diastolic function, and current concepts regarding the treatment of patients with diastolic congestive heart failure.

  20. Sampling functions for geophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giacaglia, G. E. O.; Lunquist, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    A set of spherical sampling functions is defined such that they are related to spherical-harmonic functions in the same way that the sampling functions of information theory are related to sine and cosine functions. An orderly distribution of (N + 1) squared sampling points on a sphere is given, for which the (N + 1) squared spherical sampling functions span the same linear manifold as do the spherical-harmonic functions through degree N. The transformations between the spherical sampling functions and the spherical-harmonic functions are given by recurrence relations. The spherical sampling functions of two arguments are extended to three arguments and to nonspherical reference surfaces. Typical applications of this formalism to geophysical topics are sketched.

  1. Functionalized boron nitride nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Sainsbury, Toby; Ikuno, Takashi; Zettl, Alexander K

    2014-04-22

    A plasma treatment has been used to modify the surface of BNNTs. In one example, the surface of the BNNT has been modified using ammonia plasma to include amine functional groups. Amine functionalization allows BNNTs to be soluble in chloroform, which had not been possible previously. Further functionalization of amine-functionalized BNNTs with thiol-terminated organic molecules has also been demonstrated. Gold nanoparticles have been self-assembled at the surface of both amine- and thiol-functionalized boron nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) in solution. This approach constitutes a basis for the preparation of highly functionalized BNNTs and for their utilization as nanoscale templates for assembly and integration with other nanoscale materials.

  2. Scaled density functional theory correlation functionals.

    PubMed

    Ghouri, Mohammed M; Singh, Saurabh; Ramachandran, B

    2007-10-18

    We show that a simple one-parameter scaling of the dynamical correlation energy estimated by the density functional theory (DFT) correlation functionals helps increase the overall accuracy for several local and nonlocal functionals. The approach taken here has been described as the "scaled dynamical correlation" (SDC) method [Ramachandran, J. Phys. Chem. A 2006, 110, 396], and its justification is the same as that of the scaled external correlation (SEC) method of Brown and Truhlar. We examine five local and five nonlocal (hybrid) DFT functionals, the latter group including three functionals developed specifically for kinetics by the Truhlar group. The optimum scale factors are obtained by use of a set of 98 data values consisting of molecules, ions, and transition states. The optimum scale factors, found with a linear regression relationship, are found to differ from unity with a high degree of correlation in nearly every case, indicating that the deviation of calculated results from the experimental values are systematic and proportional to the dynamic correlation energy. As a consequence, the SDC scaling of dynamical correlation decreases the mean errors (signed and unsigned) by significant amounts in an overwhelming majority of cases. These results indicate that there are gains to be realized from further parametrization of several popular exchange-correlation functionals.

  3. Kidney function tests

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney function tests are common lab tests used to evaluate how well the kidneys are working. Such tests include: ... Oh MS, Briefel G. Evaluation of renal function, water, electrolytes ... and Management by Laboratory Methods . 23rd ed. Philadelphia, ...

  4. Liver Function Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your Liver > Liver Disease Information > Liver Function Tests Liver Function Tests Explore this section to learn more ... including a description and diagnosis. Why is the liver important? The liver is the second largest organ ...

  5. Notional-Functional Syllabuses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finocchiaro, Mary

    1979-01-01

    This article discusses the value of the notional-functional approach to language teaching and considers some sociolinguistic, psycholinguistic, and linguistic features of the notional-functional syllabus. (CFM)

  6. Ego Functioning During Latency

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Milton S.

    1979-01-01

    The latency period is an extremely important transition between the preschool years and adolescence. Normal ego functioning is described, especially cognition, socialization, motor development, and defensive functions. PMID:529320

  7. Photon structure function - theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bardeen, W.A.

    1984-12-01

    The theoretical status of the photon structure function is reviewed. Particular attention is paid to the hadronic mixing problem and the ability of perturbative QCD to make definitive predictions for the photon structure function. 11 references.

  8. Liver function tests

    MedlinePlus

    Liver function tests are common tests that are used to see how well the liver is working. Tests include: ... M, Bowne WB, Bluth MH. Evaluation of liver function. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical ...

  9. Parton fragmentation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metz, A.; Vossen, A.

    2016-11-01

    The field of fragmentation functions of light quarks and gluons is reviewed. In addition to integrated fragmentation functions, attention is paid to the dependence of fragmentation functions on transverse momenta and on polarization degrees of freedom. Higher-twist and di-hadron fragmentation functions are considered as well. Moreover, the review covers both theoretical and experimental developments in hadron production in electron-positron annihilation, deep-inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering, and proton-proton collisions.

  10. Functional Task Test (FTT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Peters, Brian T.; Rescheke, Millard F.; Wood, Scott; Lawrence, Emily; Koffman, Igor; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori; Spiering, Barry A.; Feeback, Daniel L.; hide

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Functional Task Test (FTT), an interdisciplinary testing regimen that has been developed to evaluate astronaut postflight functional performance and related physiological changes. The objectives of the project are: (1) to develop a set of functional tasks that represent critical mission tasks for the Constellation Program, (2) determine the ability to perform these tasks after space flight, (3) Identify the key physiological factors that contribute to functional decrements and (4) Use this information to develop targeted countermeasures.

  11. Two Functions of Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Carol Fleisher

    1977-01-01

    Author advocates the view that meaning is necessarily dependent upon the communicative function of language and examines the objections, particularly those of Noam Chomsky, to this view. Argues that while Chomsky disagrees with the idea that communication is the essential function of language, he implicitly agrees that it has a function.…

  12. Phylogenetic molecular function annotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, Barbara E.; Jordan, Michael I.; Repo, Susanna T.; Brenner, Steven E.

    2009-07-01

    It is now easier to discover thousands of protein sequences in a new microbial genome than it is to biochemically characterize the specific activity of a single protein of unknown function. The molecular functions of protein sequences have typically been predicted using homology-based computational methods, which rely on the principle that homologous proteins share a similar function. However, some protein families include groups of proteins with different molecular functions. A phylogenetic approach for predicting molecular function (sometimes called "phylogenomics") is an effective means to predict protein molecular function. These methods incorporate functional evidence from all members of a family that have functional characterizations using the evolutionary history of the protein family to make robust predictions for the uncharacterized proteins. However, they are often difficult to apply on a genome-wide scale because of the time-consuming step of reconstructing the phylogenies of each protein to be annotated. Our automated approach for function annotation using phylogeny, the SIFTER (Statistical Inference of Function Through Evolutionary Relationships) methodology, uses a statistical graphical model to compute the probabilities of molecular functions for unannotated proteins. Our benchmark tests showed that SIFTER provides accurate functional predictions on various protein families, outperforming other available methods.

  13. Functioning Mathematically: 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cain, David

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the first part of the closing address given by the author to the 2007 Association of Teachers of Mathematics (ATM) Easter conference at Loughborough. In his closing address, the author focuses on functioning mathematically as opposed to functional mathematics. His view of functional mathematics is that the focus is on someone…

  14. Two Functions of Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Carol Fleisher

    1977-01-01

    Author advocates the view that meaning is necessarily dependent upon the communicative function of language and examines the objections, particularly those of Noam Chomsky, to this view. Argues that while Chomsky disagrees with the idea that communication is the essential function of language, he implicitly agrees that it has a function.…

  15. What Is Functionalism?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Elizabeth; MacWhinney, Brian

    A defense of functionalism in linguistics, and more specifically the competition model of linguistic performance, examines six misconceptions about the functionalist approach. Functionalism is defined as the belief that the forms of natural languages are created, governed, constrained, acquired, and used for communicative functions. Functionalism…

  16. An Exceptional Exponential Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curgus, Branko

    2006-01-01

    We show that there is a link between a standard calculus problem of finding the best view of a painting and special tangent lines to the graphs of exponential functions. Surprisingly, the exponential function with the "best view" is not the one with the base "e." A similar link is established for families of functions obtained by composing…

  17. Functioning Mathematically: 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cain, David

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the first part of the closing address given by the author to the 2007 Association of Teachers of Mathematics (ATM) Easter conference at Loughborough. In his closing address, the author focuses on functioning mathematically as opposed to functional mathematics. His view of functional mathematics is that the focus is on someone…

  18. Pediatric functional gastrointestinal disorders

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders continue to be a prevalent set of conditions faced by the healthcare team and have a significant emotional and economic impact. In this review, the authors highlight some of the common functional disorders seen in pediatric patients (functional dyspepsia, irrita...

  19. Functional neurological disorders: imaging.

    PubMed

    Voon, V

    2014-10-01

    Functional neurological disorders, also known as conversion disorder, are unexplained neurological symptoms. These symptoms are common and can be associated with significant consequences. This review covers the neuroimaging literature focusing on functional motor symptoms including motor functioning and upstream influences including self-monitoring and internal representations, voluntariness and arousal and trauma. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  20. Functional Cantor equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabat, A. B.

    2016-12-01

    We consider the class of entire functions of exponential type in relation to the scattering theory for the Schrödinger equation with a finite potential that is a finite Borel measure. These functions have a special self-similarity and satisfy q-difference functional equations. We study their asymptotic behavior and the distribution of zeros.

  1. Functional determinants from Wronski Green functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinert, H.; Chervyakov, A.

    1999-11-01

    A general technique is developed for calculating functional determinants of second-order differential operators with Dirichlet, periodic, and antiperiodic boundary conditions, without the knowledge of spectral properties. As an example, we give explicit formulas for a harmonic oscillator with an arbitrary time-dependent frequency, where our result is a generalization of the Gel'fand-Yaglom famous formula for Dirichlet boundary conditions. Our technique is based on the Wronski's construction of Green functions, which does not require spectral knowledge. Our final formula expresses the ratios of functional determinants in terms of an ordinary 2×2 determinant of a constant matrix constructed from two linearly independent solutions of the homogeneous differential equations associated with second-order differential operators. For ratios of determinants encountered in semiclassical fluctuations around a classical solution, the result can further be expressed in terms of the classical solution. Special properties of operators with a zero mode are exhibited.

  2. Cross-functional systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Mark

    1991-01-01

    Many companies, including Xerox and Texas Instruments, are using cross functional systems to deal with the increasingly complex and competitive business environment. However, few firms within the aerospace industry appear to be aware of the significant benefits that cross functional systems can provide. Those benefits are examined and a flexible methodology is discussed that companies can use to identify and develop cross functional systems that will help improve organizational performance. In addition, some of the managerial issues are addressed that cross functional systems may raise and specific examples are used to explore networking's contributions to cross functional systems.

  3. On genetic map functions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Hongyu; Speed, T.P.

    1996-04-01

    Various genetic map functions have been proposed to infer the unobservable genetic distance between two loci from the observable recombination fraction between them. Some map functions were found to fit data better than others. When there are more than three markers, multilocus recombination probabilities cannot be uniquely determined by the defining property of map functions, and different methods have been proposed to permit the use of map functions to analyze multilocus data. If for a given map function, there is a probability model for recombination that can give rise to it, then joint recombination probabilities can be deduced from this model. This provides another way to use map functions in multilocus analysis. In this paper we show that stationary renewal processes give rise to most of the map functions in the literature. Furthermore, we show that the interevent distributions of these renewal processes can all be approximated quite well by gamma distributions. 43 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Holographic tunneling wave function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Gabriele; Hertog, Thomas; van der Woerd, Ellen

    2015-12-01

    The Hartle-Hawking wave function in cosmology can be viewed as a decaying wave function with anti-de Sitter (AdS) boundary conditions. We show that the growing wave function in AdS familiar from Euclidean AdS/CFT is equivalent, semiclassically and up to surface terms, to the tunneling wave function in cosmology. The cosmological measure in the tunneling state is given by the partition function of certain relevant deformations of CFTs on a locally AdS boundary. We compute the partition function of finite constant mass deformations of the O( N ) vector model on the round three sphere and show this qualitatively reproduces the behaviour of the tunneling wave function in Einstein gravity coupled to a positive cosmological constant and a massive scalar. We find the amplitudes of inhomogeneities are not damped in the holographic tunneling state.

  5. Childhood functional gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rasquin-Weber, A; Hyman, P; Cucchiara, S; Fleisher, D; Hyams, J; Milla, P; Staiano, A

    1999-01-01

    This is the first attempt at defining criteria for functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) in infancy, childhood, and adolescence. The decision-making process was as for adults and consisted of arriving at consensus, based on clinical experience. This paper is intended to be a quick reference. The classification system selected differs from the one used in the adult population in that it is organized according to main complaints instead of being organ-targeted. Because the child is still developing, some disorders such as toddler's diarrhea (or functional diarrhea) are linked to certain physiologic stages; others may result from behavioral responses to sphincter function acquisition such as fecal retention; others will only be recognizable after the child is cognitively mature enough to report the symptoms (e.g., dyspepsia). Infant regurgitation, rumination, and cyclic vomiting constitute the vomiting disorders. Abdominal pain disorders are classified as: functional dyspepsia, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), functional abdominal pain, abdominal migraine, and aerophagia. Disorders of defecation include: infant dyschezia, functional constipation, functional fecal retention, and functional non-retentive fecal soiling. Some disorders, such as IBS and dyspepsia and functional abdominal pain, are exact replications of the adult criteria because there are enough data to confirm that they represent specific and similar disorders in pediatrics. Other disorders not included in the pediatric classification, such as functional biliary disorders, do occur in children; however, existing data are insufficient to warrant including them at the present time. For these disorders, it is suggested that, for the time being, clinicians refer to the criteria established for the adult population.


Keywords: infant vomiting; cyclic vomiting syndrome; functional dyspepsia in children; irritable bowel syndrome in children; functional abdominal pain in children; functional

  6. Functional Explanation and the Function of Explanation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombrozo, Tania; Carey, Susan

    2006-01-01

    Teleological explanations (TEs) account for the existence or properties of an entity in terms of a function: we have hearts because they pump blood, and telephones for communication. While many teleological explanations seem appropriate, others are clearly not warranted--for example, that rain exists for plants to grow. Five experiments explore…

  7. Functional Explanation and the Function of Explanation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombrozo, Tania; Carey, Susan

    2006-01-01

    Teleological explanations (TEs) account for the existence or properties of an entity in terms of a function: we have hearts because they pump blood, and telephones for communication. While many teleological explanations seem appropriate, others are clearly not warranted--for example, that rain exists for plants to grow. Five experiments explore…

  8. Bayesian Error Estimation Functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Karsten W.

    The challenge of approximating the exchange-correlation functional in Density Functional Theory (DFT) has led to the development of numerous different approximations of varying accuracy on different calculated properties. There is therefore a need for reliable estimation of prediction errors within the different approximation schemes to DFT. The Bayesian Error Estimation Functionals (BEEF) have been developed with this in mind. The functionals are constructed by fitting to experimental and high-quality computational databases for molecules and solids including chemisorption and van der Waals systems. This leads to reasonably accurate general-purpose functionals with particual focus on surface science. The fitting procedure involves considerations on how to combine different types of data, and applies Tikhonov regularization and bootstrap cross validation. The methodology has been applied to construct GGA and metaGGA functionals with and without inclusion of long-ranged van der Waals contributions. The error estimation is made possible by the generation of not only a single functional but through the construction of a probability distribution of functionals represented by a functional ensemble. The use of the functional ensemble is illustrated on compound heat of formation and by investigations of the reliability of calculated catalytic ammonia synthesis rates.

  9. Functional Visual Loss

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Beau B; Newman, Nancy J

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Neurologists frequently evaluate patients complaining of vision loss, especially when the patient has been examined by an ophthalmologist who has found no ocular disease. A significant proportion of patients presenting to the neurologist with visual complaints will have non-organic or functional visual loss. While there are examination techniques which can aid in the detection and diagnosis of functional visual loss, the frequency with which functional visual loss occurs concomitantly with organic disease warrants substantial caution on the part of the clinician. Furthermore, purely functional visual loss is never a diagnosis of exclusion, and must be supported by positive findings on examination that demonstrate normal visual function. The relationship of true psychological disease and functional visual loss is unclear and most patients respond well to simple reassurance. PMID:20638000

  10. Operator Lipschitz functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, A. B.; Peller, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    The goal of this survey is a comprehensive study of operator Lipschitz functions. A continuous function f on the real line {R} is said to be operator Lipschitz if \\Vert f(A)-f(B)\\Vert≤slant{const}\\Vert A-B\\Vert for arbitrary self-adjoint operators A and B. Sufficient conditions and necessary conditions are given for operator Lipschitzness. The class of operator differentiable functions on {R} is also studied. Further, operator Lipschitz functions on closed subsets of the plane are considered, and the class of commutator Lipschitz functions on such subsets is introduced. An important role for the study of such classes of functions is played by double operator integrals and Schur multipliers. Bibliography: 77 titles.

  11. Balance Function Disorders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Researchers at the Balance Function Laboratory and Clinic at the Minneapolis (MN) Neuroscience Institute on the Abbot Northwestern Hospital Campus are using a rotational chair (technically a "sinusoidal harmonic acceleration system") originally developed by NASA to investigate vestibular (inner ear) function in weightlessness to diagnose and treat patients with balance function disorders. Manufactured by ICS Medical Corporation, Schaumberg, IL, the chair system turns a patient and monitors his or her responses to rotational stimulation.

  12. Renormalization group functional equations

    SciTech Connect

    Curtright, Thomas L.; Zachos, Cosmas K.

    2011-03-15

    Functional conjugation methods are used to analyze the global structure of various renormalization group trajectories and to gain insight into the interplay between continuous and discrete rescaling. With minimal assumptions, the methods produce continuous flows from step-scaling {sigma} functions and lead to exact functional relations for the local flow {beta} functions, whose solutions may have novel, exotic features, including multiple branches. As a result, fixed points of {sigma} are sometimes not true fixed points under continuous changes in scale and zeroes of {beta} do not necessarily signal fixed points of the flow but instead may only indicate turning points of the trajectories.

  13. Distributed processing; distributed functions?

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Peter T.; Friston, Karl J.

    2016-01-01

    After more than twenty years busily mapping the human brain, what have we learned from neuroimaging? This review (coda) considers this question from the point of view of structure–function relationships and the two cornerstones of functional neuroimaging; functional segregation and integration. Despite remarkable advances and insights into the brain’s functional architecture, the earliest and simplest challenge in human brain mapping remains unresolved: We do not have a principled way to map brain function onto its structure in a way that speaks directly to cognitive neuroscience. Having said this, there are distinct clues about how this might be done: First, there is a growing appreciation of the role of functional integration in the distributed nature of neuronal processing. Second, there is an emerging interest in data-driven cognitive ontologies, i.e., that are internally consistent with functional anatomy. We will focus this review on the growing momentum in the fields of functional connectivity and distributed brain responses and consider this in the light of meta-analyses that use very large data sets to disclose large-scale structure–function mappings in the human brain. PMID:22245638

  14. CONMIN- CONSTRAINED FUNCTION MINIMIZATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderplaats, G. N.

    1994-01-01

    In many mathematical problems, it is necessary to determine the minimum and maximum of a function of several variables, limited by various linear and nonlinear inequality constraints. It is seldom possible, in practical applications, to solve these problems directly. In most cases, an iterative method must be used to numerically obtain a solution. The CONMIN program was developed to numerically perform the minimization of a multi-variable function subject to a set of inequality constraints. The function need not be a simple analytical equation; it may be any function which can be numerically evaluated. The basic analytic technique used by CONMIN is to minimize the function until one or more of the constraints become active. The minimization process then continues by following the constraint boundaries in a direction such that the value of the function continues to decrease. When a point is reached where no further decrease in the function can be obtained, the process is terminated. Function maximization may be achieved by minimizing the negative of the function. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on a CDC 6000 series computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 43K (octal) of 60 bit words. The CONMIN program was originally developed in 1973 and last updated in 1978.

  15. Emotions: form follows function.

    PubMed

    Farb, Norman A S; Chapman, Hanah A; Anderson, Adam K

    2013-06-01

    Emotion research has been divided by debate as to whether emotions are universal in form or cognitively constructed. We review an emerging approach that focuses on function rather than form. Functional affective science suggests that the particular origin of an emotion is relatively unimportant; instead, emotions can be understood in terms of a rapidly deployed set of mechanisms that structure perception, cognition and behavior to facilitate goal fulfillment. Evidence from this approach suggests at least three major functions of emotion: sensory gating, embodying affect, and integrating knowledge toward goal resolution. These functions appear to be universal and automatically activated, yet also moderated by conscious representation and regulatory efforts.

  16. Differential Objective Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kino, Mary M.; And Others

    Item response theory (IRT) has been used extensively to study differential item functioning (dif) and to identify potentially biased items. The use of IRT for diagnostic purposes is less prevalent and has received comparatively less attention. This study addressed differential objective function (dof) to identify potentially biased content units.…

  17. Mapping Cognitive Function

    PubMed Central

    Stufflebeam, Steven M.; Rosen, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Cognitive functions are fundamental to being human. Although tremendous progress has been made in the science of cognition using neuroimaging, the clinical applications of neuroimaging are just beginning to be realized. A unifying theme of this chapter is the concept that a more complete understanding of cognition only comes through integration of multimodal structural and functional imaging technologies. PMID:17983964

  18. Antigravitational Functional System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorogovtsev, V. N.

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is the description of the main components and basic functioning principles of the antigravitational functional system (AFS). Methods: literary review and theoretical analysis of the neurogenic regulation functional system. The concept of a functional system was formulated in the beginning of the 20th century. Functional system was described as dynamic, self-organizing, central-peripheral functional integration structures of the nervous system whose activity was aiming at achieving adaptive useful results. The main difference between functional system and proposed regulating principles is the physiological mechanism presence of the prospective result prediction (action result acceptor). Action is programmed for defined result receiving. This is anticipatory regulation principle. Using this principle AFS provides timely cardiovascular system preparing for its impending functional conditions changes. It seems that gravity intolerance in the beginning and after space flight is related with AFS regulation peculiarities. There is a necessity for the AFS advanced study. It is very important to create safe and comfort conditions for astronauts adaptation during gravitational loading changes as well as for certain diseases prophylaxis on the Earth.

  19. Surface Functionalized Polyethylene Film.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    functionality into this oxidized surface layer. 2) Explored new techniques for analyzing the surfaces of organic polymeric solids. Contact angle titration...the study of the contact angle of water on organic solids as a function of pH--has proved particularly useful and extremely surface sensitive. 3

  20. Pulmonary Function Tests

    PubMed Central

    Ranu, Harpreet; Wilde, Michael; Madden, Brendan

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary function tests are valuable investigations in the management of patients with suspected or previously diagnosed respiratory disease. They aid diagnosis, help monitor response to treatment and can guide decisions regarding further treatment and intervention. The interpretation of pulmonary functions tests requires knowledge of respiratory physiology. In this review we describe investigations routinely used and discuss their clinical implications. PMID:22347750

  1. Functional performance of pyrovalves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.

    1996-01-01

    Following several flight and ground test failures of spacecraft systems using single-shot, 'normally closed' pyrotechnically actuated valves (pyrovalves), a Government/Industry cooperative program was initiated to assess the functional performance of five qualified designs. The goal of the program was to provide information on functional performance of pyrovalves to allow users the opportunity to improve procurement requirements. Specific objectives included the demonstration of performance test methods, the seating; these gases/particles entered the fluid path of measurement of 'blowby' (the passage of gases from the pyrotechnic energy source around the activating piston into the valve's fluid path), and the quantification of functional margins for each design. Experiments were conducted at NASA's Langley Research Center on several units for each of the five valve designs. The test methods used for this program measured the forces and energies required to actuate the valves, as well as the energies and the pressures (where possible) delivered by the pyrotechnic sources. Functional performance ranged widely among the designs. Blowby cannot be prevented by o-ring seals; metal-to-metal seals were effective. Functional margin was determined by dividing the energy delivered by the pyrotechnic sources in excess to that required to accomplish the function by the energy required for that function. Two of the five designs had inadequate functional margins with the pyrotechnic cartridges evaluated.

  2. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  3. Modeling Protein Domain Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton "Buck"; Hull, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    This simple but effective laboratory exercise helps students understand the concept of protein domain function. They use foam beads, Styrofoam craft balls, and pipe cleaners to explore how domains within protein active sites interact to form a functional protein. The activity allows students to gain content mastery and an understanding of the…

  4. Functional foods innovations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The aim of the Dairy and Functional Foods Research Unit (DFFRU), ERRC, ARS, USDA, is to improve human health and well being by developing functional food and consumer products that utilize milk and fruit and vegetable processing residues of specialty crops. Major research approaches involve: biotec...

  5. Gesture Types for Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on the different gesture types employed by twenty-three Year 10 students as they endeavoured to explain their understanding of rate of change associated with the functions resulting from two different computer simulations. These gestures also have application to revealing students' understanding of functions. However,…

  6. Program Computes Thermodynamic Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, Bonnie J.; Gordon, Sanford

    1994-01-01

    PAC91 is latest in PAC (Properties and Coefficients) series. Two principal features are to provide means of (1) generating theoretical thermodynamic functions from molecular constants and (2) least-squares fitting of these functions to empirical equations. PAC91 written in FORTRAN 77 to be machine-independent.

  7. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  8. Can sequence determine function?

    PubMed Central

    Gerlt, John A; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2000-01-01

    The functional annotation of proteins identified in genome sequencing projects is based on similarities to homologs in the databases. As a result of the possible strategies for divergent evolution, homologous enzymes frequently do not catalyze the same reaction, and we conclude that assignment of function from sequence information alone should be viewed with some skepticism. PMID:11178260

  9. High Functioning Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Vicki

    This paper reviews the characteristics and needs of students with high functioning autism. First, it lists 18 common characteristics of autism, then it stresses that autism is defined by the general pattern of characteristics. Next, it discusses how people with high functioning autism differ from those with autism. These differences include higher…

  10. Modeling Protein Domain Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton "Buck"; Hull, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    This simple but effective laboratory exercise helps students understand the concept of protein domain function. They use foam beads, Styrofoam craft balls, and pipe cleaners to explore how domains within protein active sites interact to form a functional protein. The activity allows students to gain content mastery and an understanding of the…

  11. LITHIUM AND RENAL FUNCTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, N.; Trivedi, J.K.; Sethi, B.B.

    1987-01-01

    SUMMARY Thirty patients of affective disorder who were on lithium for a year and thirty patients on antidepressant were studied in detail for renal functions. Our observation is that lithium therapy does not lead to any deterioration in kidney functions. The results are discussed. PMID:21927211

  12. Functional anorectal disorders.

    PubMed

    Bharucha, Adil E; Wald, Arnold; Enck, Paul; Rao, Satish

    2006-04-01

    This report defines criteria for diagnosing functional anorectal disorders (ie, fecal incontinence, anorectal pain, and disorders of defecation). Functional fecal incontinence is defined as the uncontrolled passage of fecal material recurring for > or =3 months in an individual with a developmental age of > or =4 years that is associated with: (1) abnormal functioning of normally innervated and structurally intact muscles, and/or (2) no or minor abnormalities of sphincter structure and/or innervation insufficient to explain fecal incontinence, and/or (3) normal or disordered bowel habits (ie, fecal retention or diarrhea), and/or (4) psychological causes. However, conditions wherein structural and/or neurogenic abnormalities explain the symptom, or are part of a generalized process (eg, diabetic neuropathy) are not included within functional fecal incontinence. Functional fecal incontinence is a common, but underrecognized symptom, which is equally prevalent in men and women, and can often cause considerable distress. The clinical features are useful for guiding diagnostic testing and therapy. Functional anorectal pain syndromes include proctalgia fugax (fleeting pain) and chronic proctalgia; chronic proctalgia may be subdivided into levator ani syndrome and unspecified anorectal pain, which are defined by arbitrary clinical criteria. Functional defecation disorders are characterized by 2 or more symptoms of constipation, with > or =2 of the following features during defecation: impaired evacuation, inappropriate contraction of the pelvic floor muscles, and inadequate propulsive forces. Functional disorders of defecation may be amenable to pelvic floor retraining by biofeedback therapy (such as dyssynergic defecation).

  13. Functional Generalized Additive Models.

    PubMed

    McLean, Mathew W; Hooker, Giles; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Scheipl, Fabian; Ruppert, David

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the functional generalized additive model (FGAM), a novel regression model for association studies between a scalar response and a functional predictor. We model the link-transformed mean response as the integral with respect to t of F{X(t), t} where F(·,·) is an unknown regression function and X(t) is a functional covariate. Rather than having an additive model in a finite number of principal components as in Müller and Yao (2008), our model incorporates the functional predictor directly and thus our model can be viewed as the natural functional extension of generalized additive models. We estimate F(·,·) using tensor-product B-splines with roughness penalties. A pointwise quantile transformation of the functional predictor is also considered to ensure each tensor-product B-spline has observed data on its support. The methods are evaluated using simulated data and their predictive performance is compared with other competing scalar-on-function regression alternatives. We illustrate the usefulness of our approach through an application to brain tractography, where X(t) is a signal from diffusion tensor imaging at position, t, along a tract in the brain. In one example, the response is disease-status (case or control) and in a second example, it is the score on a cognitive test. R code for performing the simulations and fitting the FGAM can be found in supplemental materials available online.

  14. Transfer-function parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Computer program fits linear-factored form transfer function to given frequency-response data. Program is based on conjugate-gradient search procedure that minimizes error between given frequency-response data and frequency response of transfer function that is supplied by user.

  15. The Function of Introns

    PubMed Central

    Chorev, Michal; Carmel, Liran

    2012-01-01

    The intron–exon architecture of many eukaryotic genes raises the intriguing question of whether this unique organization serves any function, or is it simply a result of the spread of functionless introns in eukaryotic genomes. In this review, we show that introns in contemporary species fulfill a broad spectrum of functions, and are involved in virtually every step of mRNA processing. We propose that this great diversity of intronic functions supports the notion that introns were indeed selfish elements in early eukaryotes, but then independently gained numerous functions in different eukaryotic lineages. We suggest a novel criterion of evolutionary conservation, dubbed intron positional conservation, which can identify functional introns. PMID:22518112

  16. Time Functions as Utilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minguzzi, E.

    2010-09-01

    Every time function on spacetime gives a (continuous) total preordering of the spacetime events which respects the notion of causal precedence. The problem of the existence of a (semi-)time function on spacetime and the problem of recovering the causal structure starting from the set of time functions are studied. It is pointed out that these problems have an analog in the field of microeconomics known as utility theory. In a chronological spacetime the semi-time functions correspond to the utilities for the chronological relation, while in a K-causal (stably causal) spacetime the time functions correspond to the utilities for the K + relation (Seifert’s relation). By exploiting this analogy, we are able to import some mathematical results, most notably Peleg’s and Levin’s theorems, to the spacetime framework. As a consequence, we prove that a K-causal (i.e. stably causal) spacetime admits a time function and that the time or temporal functions can be used to recover the K + (or Seifert) relation which indeed turns out to be the intersection of the time or temporal orderings. This result tells us in which circumstances it is possible to recover the chronological or causal relation starting from the set of time or temporal functions allowed by the spacetime. Moreover, it is proved that a chronological spacetime in which the closure of the causal relation is transitive (for instance a reflective spacetime) admits a semi-time function. Along the way a new proof avoiding smoothing techniques is given that the existence of a time function implies stable causality, and a new short proof of the equivalence between K-causality and stable causality is given which takes advantage of Levin’s theorem and smoothing techniques.

  17. Plant functional genomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtorf, Hauke; Guitton, Marie-Christine; Reski, Ralf

    2002-04-01

    Functional genome analysis of plants has entered the high-throughput stage. The complete genome information from key species such as Arabidopsis thaliana and rice is now available and will further boost the application of a range of new technologies to functional plant gene analysis. To broadly assign functions to unknown genes, different fast and multiparallel approaches are currently used and developed. These new technologies are based on known methods but are adapted and improved to accommodate for comprehensive, large-scale gene analysis, i.e. such techniques are novel in the sense that their design allows researchers to analyse many genes at the same time and at an unprecedented pace. Such methods allow analysis of the different constituents of the cell that help to deduce gene function, namely the transcripts, proteins and metabolites. Similarly the phenotypic variations of entire mutant collections can now be analysed in a much faster and more efficient way than before. The different methodologies have developed to form their own fields within the functional genomics technological platform and are termed transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics and phenomics. Gene function, however, cannot solely be inferred by using only one such approach. Rather, it is only by bringing together all the information collected by different functional genomic tools that one will be able to unequivocally assign functions to unknown plant genes. This review focuses on current technical developments and their impact on the field of plant functional genomics. The lower plant Physcomitrella is introduced as a new model system for gene function analysis, owing to its high rate of homologous recombination.

  18. Hantush Well Function revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veling, E. J. M.; Maas, C.

    2010-11-01

    SummaryIn this paper, we comment on some recent numerical and analytical work to evaluate the Hantush Well Function. We correct an expression found in a Comment by Nadarajah [Nadarajah, S., 2007. A comment on numerical evaluation of Theis and Hantush-Jacob well functions. Journal of Hydrology 338, 152-153] to a paper by Prodanoff et al. [Prodanoff, J.A., Mansur, W.J., Mascarenhas, F.C.B., 2006. Numerical evaluation of Theis and Hantush-Jacob well functions. Journal of Hydrology 318, 173-183]. We subsequently derived another analytic representation based on a generalized hypergeometric function in two variables and from the hydrological literature we cite an analytic representation by Hunt [Hunt, B., 1977. Calculation of the leaky aquifer function. Journal of Hydrology 33, 179-183]. We have implemented both representations and compared the results. Using a convergence accelerator Hunt's representation of Hantush Well Function is efficient and accurate. While checking our implementations we found that Bear's table of the Hantush Well Function [Bear, J., 1979. Hydraulics of Groundwater. McGraw-Hill, New York, Tables 8-6] contains a number of typographical errors that are not present in the original table published by Hantush [Hantush, M.S., 1956. Analysis of data from pumping tests in leaky aquifers. Transactions, American Geophysical Union 37, 702-714]. Finally, we offer a very fast approximation with a maximum relative error of 0.0033 for the parameter range in the table given by Bear.

  19. Functional Performance of Pyrovalves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.

    1996-01-01

    Following several flight and ground test failures of spacecraft systems using single-shot, 'normally closed' pyrotechnically actuated valves (pyrovalves), a government/industry cooperative program was initiated to assess the functional performance of five qualified designs. The goal of the program was to improve performance-based requirements for the procurement of pyrovalves. Specific objectives included the demonstration of performance test methods, the measurement of 'blowby' (the passage of gases from the pyrotechnic energy source around the activating piston into the valve's fluid path), and the quantification of functional margins for each design. Experiments were conducted in-house at NASA on several units each of the five valve designs. The test methods used for this program measured the forces and energies required to actuate the valves, as well as the energies and the pressures (where possible) delivered by the pyrotechnic sources. Functional performance ranged widely among the designs. Blowby cannot be prevented by o-ring seals; metal-to-metal seals were effective. Functional margin was determined by dividing the energy delivered by the pyrotechnic sources in excess to that required to accomplish the function by the energy required for that function. All but two designs had adequate functional margins with the pyrotechnic cartridges evaluated.

  20. Biomechanics of Cardiac Function

    PubMed Central

    Voorhees, Andrew P.; Han, Hai-Chao

    2015-01-01

    The heart pumps blood to maintain circulation and ensure the delivery of oxygenated blood to all the organs of the body. Mechanics play a critical role in governing and regulating heart function under both normal and pathological conditions. Biological processes and mechanical stress are coupled together in regulating myocyte function and extracellular matrix structure thus controlling heart function. Here we offer a brief introduction to the biomechanics of left ventricular function and then summarize recent progress in the study of the effects of mechanical stress on ventricular wall remodeling and cardiac function as well as the effects of wall mechanical properties on cardiac function in normal and dysfunctional hearts. Various mechanical models to determine wall stress and cardiac function in normal and diseased hearts with both systolic and diastolic dysfunction are discussed. The results of these studies have enhanced our understanding of the biomechanical mechanism in the development and remodeling of normal and dysfunctional hearts. Biomechanics provide a tool to understand the mechanism of left ventricular remodeling in diastolic and systolic dysfunction and guidance in designing and developing new treatments. PMID:26426462

  1. The Enzyme Function Initiative†

    PubMed Central

    Gerlt, John A.; Allen, Karen N.; Almo, Steven C.; Armstrong, Richard N.; Babbitt, Patricia C.; Cronan, John E.; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Imker, Heidi J.; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Minor, Wladek; Poulter, C. Dale; Raushel, Frank M.; Sali, Andrej; Shoichet, Brian K.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2011-01-01

    The Enzyme Function Initiative (EFI) was recently established to address the challenge of assigning reliable functions to enzymes discovered in bacterial genome projects; in this Current Topic we review the structure and operations of the EFI. The EFI includes the Superfamily/Genome, Protein, Structure, Computation, and Data/Dissemination Cores that provide the infrastructure for reliably predicting the in vitro functions of unknown enzymes. The initial targets for functional assignment are selected from five functionally diverse superfamilies (amidohydrolase, enolase, glutathione transferase, haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase, and isoprenoid synthase), with five superfamily-specific Bridging Projects experimentally testing the predicted in vitro enzymatic activities. The EFI also includes the Microbiology Core that evaluates the in vivo context of in vitro enzymatic functions and confirms the functional predictions of the EFI. The deliverables of the EFI to the scientific community include: 1) development of a large-scale, multidisciplinary sequence/structure-based strategy for functional assignment of unknown enzymes discovered in genome projects (target selection, protein production, structure determination, computation, experimental enzymology, microbiology, and structure-based annotation); 2) dissemination of the strategy to the community via publications, collaborations, workshops, and symposia; 3) computational and bioinformatic tools for using the strategy; 4) provision of experimental protocols and/or reagents for enzyme production and characterization; and 5) dissemination of data via the EFI’s website, enzymefunction.org. The realization of multidisciplinary strategies for functional assignment will begin to define the full metabolic diversity that exists in nature and will impact basic biochemical and evolutionary understanding, as well as a wide range of applications of central importance to industrial, medicinal and pharmaceutical efforts. PMID

  2. Functionalized expanded porphyrins

    DOEpatents

    Sessler, Jonathan L; Pantos, Patricia J

    2013-11-12

    Disclosed are functionalized expanded porphyrins that can be used as spectrometric sensors for high-valent actinide cations. The disclosed functionalized expanded porphyrins have the advantage over unfunctionalized systems in that they can be immobilized via covalent attachment to a solid support comprising an inorganic or organic polymer or other common substrates. Substrates comprising the disclosed functionalized expanded porphyrins are also disclosed. Further, disclosed are methods of making the disclosed compounds (immobilized and free), methods of using them as sensors to detect high valent actinides, devices that comprise the disclosed compounds, and kits.

  3. Mapping cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Stufflebeam, Steven M; Rosen, Bruce R

    2007-11-01

    Cognitive functions are fundamental to being human. Although tremendous progress has been made in the science of cognition using neuroimaging, the clinical applications of neuroimaging are just beginning to be realized. This article focuses on selected technologies, analysis techniques, and applications that have, or will soon have, direct clinical impact. The authors discuss how cognition can be imaged using MR imaging, functional MR imaging, positron emission tomography, magnetoencephalography and electroencephalography, and MR imaging diffusion tensor imaging. A unifying theme of this article is the concept that a more complete understanding of cognition only comes through integration of multimodal structural and functional imaging technologies.

  4. A universal functional object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    A scheme is presented for realizing any function, combinational or sequential, in a single universal function scheme, termed the universal function object UF. This scheme is addressed to the problem of the proliferation of the number of parts (cards, chips) necessary for conventional implementation in an LSI technology of a computer system. The UF implementation will use about ten times more circuits than a conventional implementation regardless of the size of the design. The UF approach also includes general-purpose spares for failing circuits. The procedure could be used both at manufacture to increase yields, as well as to achieve automatic repair.

  5. Functional hemodynamic monitoring.

    PubMed

    Pinsky, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Functional hemodynamic monitoring is the assessment of the dynamic interactions of hemodynamic variables in response to a defined perturbation. Recent interest in functional hemodynamic monitoring for the bedside assessment of cardiovascular insufficiency has heightened with the documentation of its accuracy in predicting volume responsiveness using a wide variety of monitoring devices, both invasive and noninvasive, and across multiple patient groups and clinical conditions. However, volume responsiveness, though important, reflects only part of the overall spectrum of functional physiologic variables that can be measured to define the physiologic state and monitor response to therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. SODA Repuslive Function Shaping

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-06-16

    SODA, Swarm Orbital Dynamics Advisor, a tool that provides the orbital maneuvers required to achieve a desired type of relative swarm motion. The SODA algorithm uses a repulsive potential that is a function of the distances between each pair of satellites. Choosing the parameters of the function is a swarm design choice, as different values can yield very different maneuvers and thus impact fuel use and mission life. This is an animation illustrating how the peaks of the repulsive potential function vary when varying certain parameters.

  7. Longitudinal Functional Data Analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, So Young; Staicu, Ana-Maria

    We consider dependent functional data that are correlated because of a longitudinal-based design: each subject is observed at repeated times and at each time a functional observation (curve) is recorded. We propose a novel parsimonious modeling framework for repeatedly observed functional observations that allows to extract low dimensional features. The proposed methodology accounts for the longitudinal design, is designed to study the dynamic behavior of the underlying process, allows prediction of full future trajectory, and is computationally fast. Theoretical properties of this framework are studied and numerical investigations confirm excellent behavior in finite samples. The proposed method is motivated by and applied to a diffusion tensor imaging study of multiple sclerosis.

  8. Reasoning about Function Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordio, Martin; Calcagno, Cristiano; Meyer, Bertrand; Müller, Peter; Tschannen, Julian

    Modern object-oriented languages support higher-order implementations through function objects such as delegates in C#, agents in Eiffel, or closures in Scala. Function objects bring a new level of abstraction to the object-oriented programming model, and require a comparable extension to specification and verification techniques. We introduce a verification methodology that extends function objects with auxiliary side-effect free (pure) methods to model logical artifacts: preconditions, postconditions and modifies clauses. These pure methods can be used to specify client code abstractly, that is, independently from specific instantiations of the function objects. To demonstrate the feasibility of our approach, we have implemented an automatic prover, which verifies several non-trivial examples.

  9. Normal Functioning Family

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Normal Functioning Family Page Content Article Body Is there any way ...

  10. Normal, Functional, and Unhealthy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Donald A.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews the various meanings of the words "normal,""functional," and "healthy," and suggests greater caution and guidelines for the use of these words to avoid ambiguity and erroneous implications. (Author)

  11. Pulmonary function tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... measured to estimate the lung volume. To measure diffusion capacity , you breathe a harmless gas, called a ... on your report after pulmonary function tests include: Diffusion capacity to carbon monoxide (DLCO) Expiratory reserve volume ( ...

  12. Exchange functionals and potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Ralf; Nobes, Ross H.; Handy, Nicholas C.

    The commonly used exchange-correlation functionals of density functional theory and their potentials are examined numerically following the first such investigation by Perdew. They are also investigated for Ne and Kr. Their behaviour for large gradients of the density and for large distances is not satisfactory. In particular, the correct asymptotic r-1 behaviour is difficult to achieve. Following van Leeuwen and Baerends, this is linked to the energy ɛmax of the highest occupied orbital arising from the Kohn-Sham equations. This deficiency is linked also with the poor prediction of molecular polarizabilities. The Becke-Roussel (BR) exchange functional is examined, which is derived by assuming a hydrogen-like exchange hole at all spatial points, and it has the attraction of being dependent on both the kinetic energy density and the Laplacian of the density and has no adjustable parameters. Becke has presented encouraging results using this functional in a hybrid manner. Fully self-consistent Kohn-Sham calculations are performed using it in combination with Perdew's 1986 correlation functional. The results are very encouraging indeed, so much so that this exchange functional is the best generalized gradient approximation (GGA) yet discovered. In particular, bond lengths of many molecular show a substantial improvement over results from other GGAs. For example, many CH bonds are now within experimental accuracy, instead of being typically 0·02 Å too long. Our ab initio understanding of non-dynamic correlation and dynamic correlation is then linked with density functional theory. It is argued that correlation functionals should pick up the local dynamic correlation, whereas exchange functionals should include non-dynamic correlation effects. For these reasons it is considered that exchange functionals are best modelled on a system for which there is effectively no non-dynamic correlation, for which the optimum example is the Ne atom. Thus, again following Becke and

  13. Health and functional efficiency.

    PubMed

    Hausman, Daniel M

    2014-12-01

    This essay argues that what is central to Christopher Boorse's biostatistical theory of disease as statistically subnormal part function (BST) are comparisons of the "functional efficiency" of parts and processes and that statistical considerations serve only to pick out a healthy level of functional efficiency. On this interpretation, the distinction between health and pathology is less important than comparisons of functional efficiency, which are entirely independent of statistical considerations. The clarifications or revisions of the BST that this essay offers are friendly amendments that render moot some of the most prominent criticisms of Boorse's account. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press, on behalf of the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy Inc. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Partition Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasserman, Adam

    2012-02-01

    Partition Density Functional Theory (PDFT) is a formally exact method for obtaining molecular properties from self-consistent calculations on isolated fragments [1,2]. For a given choice of fragmentation, PDFT outputs the (in principle exact) molecular energy and density, as well as fragment densities that sum to the correct molecular density. I describe our progress understanding the behavior of the fragment energies as a function of fragment occupations, derivative discontinuities, practical implementation, and applications of PDFT to small molecules. I also discuss implications for ground-state Density Functional Theory, such as the promise of PDFT to circumvent the delocalization error of approximate density functionals. [4pt] [1] M.H. Cohen and A. Wasserman, J. Phys. Chem. A, 111, 2229(2007).[0pt] [2] P. Elliott, K. Burke, M.H. Cohen, and A. Wasserman, Phys. Rev. A 82, 024501 (2010).

  15. The Neutron Structure Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Roy

    2013-10-01

    Knowledge of the neutron structure function is important for testing models of the nucleon, for a complete understanding of deep inelastic scattering (DIS) from nuclei, and for high energy experiments. As there exist no free neutron targets, neutron structure functions have been determined from deep inelastic scattering from the deuteron. Unfortunately, the short-range part of the deuteron wave function becomes important in extracting the neutron structure function at very high Bjorken x. New methods have been devised for Jefferson Lab experiments to mitigate this problem. The BONUS experiment involves tagging spectator neutrons in the deuteron, while the MARATHON experiment minimizes nuclear structure effects by a comparison of DIS from 3H and 3He. A summary of the status and future plans will be presented. This work supported by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  16. [Vascular endothelial Barrier Function].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A N; Puchinyan, D M; Norkin, I A

    2015-01-01

    Endothelium is an important regulator of selective permeability of the vascular wall for different molecules and cells. This review summarizes current data on endothelial barrier function. Endothelial glycocalyx structure, its function and role in the molecular transport and leukocytes migration across the endothelial barrier are discussed. The mechanisms of transcellular transport of macromolecules and cell migration through endothelial cells are reviewed. Special section of this article addresses the structure and function of tight and adherens endothelial junction, as well as their importance for the regulation of paracellular transport across the endothelial barrier. Particular attention is paid to the signaling mechanism of endothelial barrier function regulation and the factors that influence on the vascular permeability.

  17. Hepatic (Liver) Function Panel

    MedlinePlus

    ... related side effects. The hepatic function panel evaluates: Alanine aminotransferase (ALT). This enzyme, found in the liver, ... MORE ON THIS TOPIC Mononucleosis Hepatitis Blood Test: Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT, or SGPT) Blood Test: Aspartate Aminotransferase ( ...

  18. ON COMMUTING FUNCTIONS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The methods used seem to be new, and the author feels that further work in this direction may eventually yield a proof of the conjecture in the case when one of the functions is of bounded variation . (Author)

  19. Transfer-Function Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Transfer function simulator constructed from analog or both analog and digital components substitute for device that has faults that confound analysis of feedback control loop. Simulator is substitute for laser and spectrophone.

  20. Functional Task Test: Data Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, Ronita

    2014-01-01

    After space flight there are changes in multiple physiological systems including: Cardiovascular function; Sensorimotor function; and Muscle function. How do changes in these physiological system impact astronaut functional performance?

  1. Structure function monitor

    DOEpatents

    McGraw, John T [Placitas, NM; Zimmer, Peter C [Albuquerque, NM; Ackermann, Mark R [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-01-24

    Methods and apparatus for a structure function monitor provide for generation of parameters characterizing a refractive medium. In an embodiment, a structure function monitor acquires images of a pupil plane and an image plane and, from these images, retrieves the phase over an aperture, unwraps the retrieved phase, and analyzes the unwrapped retrieved phase. In an embodiment, analysis yields atmospheric parameters measured at spatial scales from zero to the diameter of a telescope used to collect light from a source.

  2. Functional Polymer Matrix Fibers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    the carbon nanofibers led to the deterioration of the polymeric cellulose structure. Extensive research on the surface treatment of carbon nanofibers...1 November 2003 - 14-Mar-05 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8655-03-1-3042 Functional Polymer Matrix Fibres 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...MARYLABONE RD LONDON NWl 5TH PERFORMANCE REPORT Project title: Functional polymer matrix fibers Period of performance: 1 November 2003 - 31 October 2004

  3. Sexual Function Across Aging.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Anita H; Harsh, Veronica

    2016-03-01

    Women experience multiple changes in social and reproductive statuses across the life span which can affect sexual functioning. Various phases of the sexual response cycle may be impacted and can lead to sexual dysfunction. Screening for sexual problems and consideration of contributing factors such as neurobiology, reproductive life events, medical problems, medication use, and depression can help guide appropriate treatment and thereby improve the sexual functioning and quality of life of affected women. Treatment options include psychotropic medications, hormone therapy, and psychotherapy.

  4. [Binocular function clarified].

    PubMed

    Pigassou-Albouy, R

    1996-01-01

    Normal binocular function is defined as the bifoveal connection of the central and peripheral structures of the visual system. Binocular function in strabismus is defined as connections, more or less strong and more or less labile, of the fovea of the fixating eye with the "pseudo-fovea" of the deviating eye including all central and peripheral structures, and this connection represents, in fact, a progress of adaptation of all parameters to the new conditions of vision.

  5. Neural Network Function Classifier

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-02-07

    neural network sets. Each of the neural networks in a particular set is trained to recognize a particular data set type. The best function representation of the data set is determined from the neural network output. The system comprises sets of trained neural networks having neural networks trained to identify different types of data. The number of neural networks within each neural network set will depend on the number of function types that are represented. The system further comprises

  6. Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    BNL

    2008-08-12

    Staff from Brookhaven's new Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) describe how this advanced facility will focus on the development and understanding of nanoscale materials. The CFN provides state-of-the-art capabilities for the fabrication and study of nanoscale materials, with an emphasis on atomic-level tailoring to achieve desired properties and functions. The overarching scientific theme of the CFN is the development and understanding of nanoscale materials that address the Nation's challenges in energy security.

  7. Functional neuroimaging in psychiatry.

    PubMed Central

    Fu, C H; McGuire, P K

    1999-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging is one of the most powerful means available for investigating the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders. In this review, we shall focus on the different ways that it can be employed to this end, describing the major findings in the field in the context of different methodological approaches. We will also discuss practical issues that are particular to studying psychiatric disorders and the potential contribution of functional neuroimaging to future psychiatric research. PMID:10466156

  8. Function, anticipation, representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bickhard, Mark. H.

    2001-06-01

    Function emerges in certain kinds of far-from-equilibrium systems. One important kind of function is that of interactive anticipation, an adaptedness to temporal complexity. Interactive anticipation is the locus of the emergence of normative representational content, and, thus, of representation in general: interactive anticipation is the naturalistic core of the evolution of cognition. Higher forms of such anticipation are involved in the subsequent macro-evolutionary sequence of learning, emotions, and reflexive consciousness.

  9. Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    ScienceCinema

    BNL

    2016-07-12

    Staff from Brookhaven's new Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) describe how this advanced facility will focus on the development and understanding of nanoscale materials. The CFN provides state-of-the-art capabilities for the fabrication and study of nanoscale materials, with an emphasis on atomic-level tailoring to achieve desired properties and functions. The overarching scientific theme of the CFN is the development and understanding of nanoscale materials that address the Nation's challenges in energy security.

  10. Functional Molecular Ecological Networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jizhong; Deng, Ye; Luo, Feng; He, Zhili; Tu, Qichao; Zhi, Xiaoyang

    2010-01-01

    Biodiversity and its responses to environmental changes are central issues in ecology and for society. Almost all microbial biodiversity research focuses on “species” richness and abundance but not on their interactions. Although a network approach is powerful in describing ecological interactions among species, defining the network structure in a microbial community is a great challenge. Also, although the stimulating effects of elevated CO2 (eCO2) on plant growth and primary productivity are well established, its influences on belowground microbial communities, especially microbial interactions, are poorly understood. Here, a random matrix theory (RMT)-based conceptual framework for identifying functional molecular ecological networks was developed with the high-throughput functional gene array hybridization data of soil microbial communities in a long-term grassland FACE (free air, CO2 enrichment) experiment. Our results indicate that RMT is powerful in identifying functional molecular ecological networks in microbial communities. Both functional molecular ecological networks under eCO2 and ambient CO2 (aCO2) possessed the general characteristics of complex systems such as scale free, small world, modular, and hierarchical. However, the topological structures of the functional molecular ecological networks are distinctly different between eCO2 and aCO2, at the levels of the entire communities, individual functional gene categories/groups, and functional genes/sequences, suggesting that eCO2 dramatically altered the network interactions among different microbial functional genes/populations. Such a shift in network structure is also significantly correlated with soil geochemical variables. In short, elucidating network interactions in microbial communities and their responses to environmental changes is fundamentally important for research in microbial ecology, systems microbiology, and global change. PMID:20941329

  11. Imaging basal ganglia function

    PubMed Central

    BROOKS, DAVID J.

    2000-01-01

    In this review, the value of functional imaging for providing insight into the role of the basal ganglia in motor control is reviewed. Brain activation findings in normal subjects and Parkinson's disease patients are examined and evidence supporting the existence for functionally independent distributed basal ganglia-frontal loops is presented. It is argued that the basal ganglia probably act to focus and filter cortical output, optimising the running of motor programs. PMID:10923986

  12. Platelet Function Tests.

    PubMed

    Lordkipanidzé, Marie

    2016-04-01

    Traditionally developed for diagnosis of bleeding disorders, platelet function assays have become increasingly used in basic research on platelet physiology, in phenotype-genotype associations in bleeding disorders, in drug development as surrogate endpoints of efficacy of new antiplatelet therapy, and to an extent, in the monitoring of antiplatelet therapy in clinical practice to predict thrombotic and bleeding risk. A multiplicity of platelet function assays is available to measure the level of platelet activity in various settings. These include assays that are restricted to a specialized laboratory as well as point-of-care instruments meant to investigate platelet function at patient bedside. Unlike tests that determine a defined quantity or measurement of a clinical biomarker (e.g., cholesterol or blood pressure), platelet function testing assesses the dynamics of living cells, which immediately presents a series of unique problems to any laboratory or clinic. This article presents currently used platelet function assays and discusses important variables to take into account when performing these assays, including preanalytical issues and difficulties in interpreting platelet function test results.

  13. Functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneva, Guzeliya

    Carbon nanotubes have unique properties that make them attractive for different engineering applications. However, because of their chemical inertness, carbon nanotubes have to be functionalized in order to acquire additional physico-chemical properties. Large multiwalled carbon nanotubes are different from fullerenes and singlewalled nanotubes because the stresses in their walls are almost relaxed while most chemical methods for fullerene functionalization exploit this effect of stressed bonds. The objective of this work is to develop new methods for functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes. This work is dedicated to study two functionalization methods. The first deals with physico-chemical functionalization by filling the nanotube interior with colloidal suspensions. Irreversible adsorption of functional nanoparticles on the nanotube wall leads to the nanotube functionalization. The second method is purely chemical functionalization, which uses the reaction of cyclopropanation to break pi-bonds in the benzene rings of the nanotubes with formation of new σ-bonds with deprotonated malonate. This so-called Bingel reaction has been used in fullerene chemistry and in this work was applied for the first time to functionalize multiwalled carbon nanotubes. While capillary filling of carbon nanotubes was known long ago, the research community was skeptical about possibility of engulfing nanoparticles into nanotubes by capillary forces. We developed and implemented capillary method to fill nanotubes with different nanoparticles. Using this method, magnetic carbon nanotubes were produced for the first time. Synthesized nanotubes have very high magnetic moment and allow to manipulate them by magnetic field. These magnetic nanotubes have been successfully used in fabrication of carbon nanotube-tipped pipettes for biological probes. The Bingel reaction was studied on three sets of multiwalled carbon nanotubes with diameters: 20nm, 100nm, and 300nm. To estimate the

  14. Fifth Fundamental Catalogue (FK5). Part 1: Basic fundamental stars (Fricke, Schwan, and Lederle 1988): Documentation for the machine-readable version

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Wayne H., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The machine-readable version of the catalog, as it is currently being distributed from the Astronomical Data Center, is described. The Basic FK5 provides improved mean positions and proper motions for the 1535 classical fundamental stars that had been included in the FK3 and FK4 catalogs. The machine version of the catalog contains the positions and proper motions of the Basic FK5 stars for the epochs and equinoxes J2000.0 and B1950.0, the mean epochs of individual observed right ascensions and declinations used to determine the final positions, and the mean errors of the final positions and proper motions for the reported epochs. The cross identifications to other designations used for the FK5 stars that are given in the published catalog were not included in the original machine versions, but the Durchmusterung numbers have been added at the Astronomical Data Center.

  15. The first juvenile specimens of Plateosaurus engelhardti from Frick, Switzerland: isolated neural arches and their implications for developmental plasticity in a basal sauropodomorph

    PubMed Central

    Sander, P. Martin

    2014-01-01

    The dinosaur Plateosaurus engelhardti is the most abundant dinosaur in the Late Triassic of Europe and the best known basal sauropodomorph. Plateosaurus engelhardti was one of the first sauropodomorph dinosaurs to display a large body size. Remains can be found in the Norian stage of the Late Triassic in over 40 localities in Central Europe (France, Germany, and Switzerland) and in Greenland. Since the first discovery of P. engelhardti no juvenile specimens of this species had been described in detail. Here we describe the first remains of juvenile individuals, isolated cervical and dorsal neural arches from Switzerland. These were separated postmortem from their respective centra because of unfused neurocentral sutures. However the specimens share the same neural arch morphology found in adults. Morphometric analysis suggests body lengths of the juvenile individuals that is greater than those of most adult specimens. This supports the hypothesis of developmental plasticity in Plateosaurus engelhardti that previously had been based on histological data only. Alternative hypotheses for explaining the poor correlation between ontogenetic stage and size in this taxon are multiple species or sexual morphs with little morphological variance or time-averaging of individuals from populations differing in body size. PMID:25071987

  16. Function Transformation without Reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Tonneau, François; Arreola, Fara; Martínez, Alma Gabriela

    2006-01-01

    In studies of function transformation, participants initially are taught to match stimuli in the presence of a contextual cue, X; the stimuli to be matched bear some formal relation to each other, for example, a relation of opposition or difference. In a second phase, the participants are taught to match arbitrary stimuli (say, A and B) in the presence of X. In a final test, A often displays behavioral functions that differ from those of B, and can be predicted from the nature of the relation associated with X in the initial training phase. Here we report function-transformation effects in the absence of selection responses and of their reinforcers. In three experiments with college students, exposure to relations of difference or identity modified the responses given to later stimuli. In Experiment 1, responses to a test stimulus A varied depending on preexposure to pairs of colors that were distinct from A but exemplified relations of difference or identity. In Experiment 2, a stimulus A acquired distinct functions, depending on its previous pairing with a contextual cue X that had itself been paired with identity or difference among colors. Experiment 3 confirmed the results of Experiment 2 with a modified design. Our data are consistent with the notion that relations of identity or difference can serve as stimuli for Pavlovian processes, and, in compound with other cues, produce apparent function-transformation effects. PMID:16776058

  17. Function transformation without reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Tonneau, Franćois; Arreola, Fara; Martínez, Alma Gabriela

    2006-05-01

    In studies of function transformation, participants initially are taught to match stimuli in the presence of a contextual cue, X; the stimuli to be matched bear some formal relation to each other, for example, a relation of opposition or difference. In a second phase, the participants are taught to match arbitrary stimuli (say, A and B) in the presence of X. In a final test, A often displays behavioral functions that differ from those of B, and can be predicted from the nature of the relation associated with X in the initial training phase. Here we report function-transformation effects in the absence of selection responses and of their reinforcers. In three experiments with college students, exposure to relations of difference or identity modified the responses given to later stimuli. In Experiment 1, responses to a test stimulus A varied depending on preexposure to pairs of colors that were distinct from A but exemplified relations of difference or identity. In Experiment 2, a stimulus A acquired distinct functions, depending on its previous pairing with a contextual cue X that had itself been paired with identity or difference among colors. Experiment 3 confirmed the results of Experiment 2 with a modified design. Our data are consistent with the notion that relations of identity or difference can serve as stimuli for Pavlovian processes, and, in compound with other cues, produce apparent function-transformation effects.

  18. Space race functional responses.

    PubMed

    Sjödin, Henrik; Brännström, Åke; Englund, Göran

    2015-02-22

    We derive functional responses under the assumption that predators and prey are engaged in a space race in which prey avoid patches with many predators and predators avoid patches with few or no prey. The resulting functional response models have a simple structure and include functions describing how the emigration of prey and predators depend on interspecific densities. As such, they provide a link between dispersal behaviours and community dynamics. The derived functional response is general but is here modelled in accordance with empirically documented emigration responses. We find that the prey emigration response to predators has stabilizing effects similar to that of the DeAngelis-Beddington functional response, and that the predator emigration response to prey has destabilizing effects similar to that of the Holling type II response. A stability criterion describing the net effect of the two emigration responses on a Lotka-Volterra predator-prey system is presented. The winner of the space race (i.e. whether predators or prey are favoured) is determined by the relationship between the slopes of the species' emigration responses. It is predicted that predators win the space race in poor habitats, where predator and prey densities are low, and that prey are more successful in richer habitats. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  19. Human fetal thyroid function.

    PubMed

    Polak, Michel

    2014-01-01

    The early steps of thyroid development that lead to its function in the human fetus and subsequently the further maturation that allows the human fetus to secrete thyroxine (T4) in a significant amount are reviewed here. We underline the importance of the transfer of T4 from the pregnant woman to her fetus, which contributes at all stages of the pregnancy to fetal thyroid function and development. In the first trimester of pregnancy, the temporal and structural correlation of thyroid hormone synthesis with folliculogenesis supported the concept that structural and functional maturations are closely related. Human thyroid terminal differentiation follows a precisely timed gene expression program. The crucial role of the sodium/iodine symporter for the onset of thyroid function in the human fetus is shown. Fetal T4 is detected by the eleventh week of gestation and progressively increases throughout. The pattern of thyroid hormones and thyroid-stimulating hormone levels in the course of pregnancy is given from fetal blood sampling data, and the mechanisms governing this maturation in the human fetus are discussed. Finally an example of primary human fetal thyroid dysfunction, such as in Down syndrome, is given. The understanding of the physiology of the human fetal thyroid function is the basis for fetal medicine in the field of thyroidology.

  20. Educating executive function.

    PubMed

    Blair, Clancy

    2017-01-01

    Executive functions are thinking skills that assist with reasoning, planning, problem solving, and managing one's life. The brain areas that underlie these skills are interconnected with and influenced by activity in many different brain areas, some of which are associated with emotion and stress. One consequence of the stress-specific connections is that executive functions, which help us to organize our thinking, tend to be disrupted when stimulation is too high and we are stressed out, or too low when we are bored and lethargic. Given their central role in reasoning and also in managing stress and emotion, scientists have conducted studies, primarily with adults, to determine whether executive functions can be improved by training. By and large, results have shown that they can be, in part through computer-based videogame-like activities. Evidence of wider, more general benefits from such computer-based training, however, is mixed. Accordingly, scientists have reasoned that training will have wider benefits if it is implemented early, with very young children as the neural circuitry of executive functions is developing, and that it will be most effective if embedded in children's everyday activities. Evidence produced by this research, however, is also mixed. In sum, much remains to be learned about executive function training. Without question, however, continued research on this important topic will yield valuable information about cognitive development. WIREs Cogn Sci 2017, 8:e1403. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1403 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  1. Power-functional network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yong; Kurths, Jürgen; Zhan, Meng

    2017-08-01

    Power grids and their properties have been studied broadly in many aspects. In this paper, we propose a novel concept, power-flow-based power grid, as a typical power-functional network, based on the calculation of power flow distribution from power electrical engineering. We compare it with structural networks based on the shortest path length and effective networks based on the effective electrical distance and study the relationship among these three kinds of networks. We find that they have roughly positive correlations with each other, indicating that in general any close nodes in the topological structure are actually connected in function. However, we do observe some counter-examples that two close nodes in a structural network can have a long distance in a power-functional network, namely, two physically connected nodes can actually be separated in function. In addition, we find that power grids in the structural network tend to be heterogeneous, whereas those in the effective and power-functional networks tend to be homogeneous. These findings are expected to be significant not only for power grids but also for various other complex networks.

  2. Sperm function test

    PubMed Central

    Talwar, Pankaj; Hayatnagarkar, Suryakant

    2015-01-01

    With absolute normal semen analysis parameters it may not be necessary to shift to specialized tests early but in cases with borderline parameters or with history of fertilization failure in past it becomes necessary to do a battery of tests to evaluate different parameters of spermatozoa. Various sperm function tests are proposed and endorsed by different researchers in addition to the routine evaluation of fertility. These tests detect function of a certain part of spermatozoon and give insight on the events in fertilization of the oocyte. The sperms need to get nutrition from the seminal plasma in the form of fructose and citrate (this can be assessed by fructose qualitative and quantitative estimation, citrate estimation). They should be protected from the bad effects of pus cells and reactive oxygen species (ROS) (leukocyte detection test, ROS estimation). Their number should be in sufficient in terms of (count), structure normal to be able to fertilize eggs (semen morphology). Sperms should have intact and functioning membrane to survive harsh environment of vagina and uterine fluids (vitality and hypo-osmotic swelling test), should have good mitochondrial function to be able to provide energy (mitochondrial activity index test). They should also have satisfactory acrosome function to be able to burrow a hole in zona pellucida (acrosome intactness test, zona penetration test). Finally, they should have properly packed DNA in the nucleus to be able to transfer the male genes (nuclear chromatic decondensation test) to the oocyte during fertilization. PMID:26157295

  3. Gastrointestinal physiology and functions.

    PubMed

    Schneeman, Barbara O

    2002-11-01

    While the health benefit of a functional food may be a metabolic response that lowers risk for disease, the actual target for the food or food component may be on the functioning of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). For example, slowing absorption from the intestine, as measured by examining the appearance of the nutrient or food component in the blood, the hormone response associated with absorption of the compound or excretion of the compound, may provide a health benefit. However, the food component may slow absorption by delaying gastric emptying, altering the mixing within the intestinal contents or decreasing the availability of digestive enzymes in the intestine. These measures of GIT function provide validation of the mechanisms by which the functional food or food components affect metabolism. Bioavailability of physiologically active compounds from foods will be determined by the digestibility of foods that contain these compounds, their subsequent absorption and utilization by tissues. The physical structure of foods contributes to the functional effects of foods as well as to the availability of compounds from foods. For example, recent studies have demonstrated that changing the viscosity of the gut contents alters absorption and GIT response. Additionally, food structures such as the plant cell wall change the availability of absorbable compounds along the gastrointestinal contents. The areas of probiotics and prebiotics have highlighted the potential importance of gut microflora in health. While evidence suggests biological activity relevant to disease risk reduction, the long-term implications of the microbial activity have yet to be established.

  4. Advanced carbon nanotubes functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setaro, A.

    2017-10-01

    Similar to graphene, carbon nanotubes are materials made of pure carbon in its sp2 form. Their extended conjugated π-network provides them with remarkable quantum optoelectronic properties. Frustratingly, it also brings drawbacks. The π–π stacking interaction makes as-produced tubes bundle together, blurring all their quantum properties. Functionalization aims at modifying and protecting the tubes while hindering π–π stacking. Several functionalization strategies have been developed to circumvent this limitation in order for nanotubes applications to thrive. In this review, we summarize the different approaches established so far, emphasizing the balance between functionalization efficacy and the preservation of the tubes’ properties. Much attention will be given to a functionalization strategy overcoming the covalent–noncovalent dichotomy and to the implementation of two advanced functionalization schemes: (a) conjugation with molecular switches, to yield hybrid nanosystems with chemo-physical properties that can be tuned in a controlled and reversible way, and; (b) plasmonic nanosystems, whose ability to concentrate and enhance the electromagnetic fields can be taken advantage of to enhance the optical response of the tubes.

  5. Column continuous transition functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yangrong

    2007-04-01

    A column continuous transition function is by definition a standard transition function P(t) whose every column is continuous for t[greater-or-equal, slanted]0 in the norm topology of bounded sequence space l[infinity]. We will prove that it has a stable q-matrix and that there exists a one-to-one relationship between column continuous transition functions and increasing integrated semigroups on l[infinity]. Using the theory of integrated semigroups, we give some necessary and sufficient conditions under which the minimal q-function is column continuous, in terms of its generator (of the Markov semigroup) as well as its q-matrix. Furthermore, we will construct all column continuous Q-functions for a conservative, single-exit and column bounded q-matrix Q. As applications, we find that many interesting continuous-time Markov chains (CTMCs), say Feller-Reuter-Riley processes, monotone processes, birth-death processes and branching processes, etc., have column continuity.

  6. On immediate function

    PubMed Central

    Zeiler, Michael D.

    1992-01-01

    Behavior is a property of living organisms, not of inanimate matter. The problems of physical science are to understand how a phenomenon works; biological science adds the questions of what a phenomenon does and how something that does such things came to be. Exclusive dedication to cause–effect explanations ignores how behavior helps creatures cope with their internal and external environments. Laws of causation describe the precursors to behavior; laws of function describe the effects of behavior. The numerous instances of learning reflect the many ways that selective pressure for altering behavior on the basis of experience has been manifested. Little basis exists for assuming that the various forms of learning reflect either common functions or common processes. Instead, it seems that evolutionary processes have resulted in domain-specific learning. The rules of learning must be understood in terms of the function that the particular manifestation of learning serves for the organism. Evolutionary theory provides the framework for understanding function as well as relations between function and causal mechanisms. PMID:16812660

  7. Algal functional annotation tool

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, D.; Casero, D.; Cokus, S. J.; Merchant, S. S.; Pellegrini, M.

    2012-07-01

    The Algal Functional Annotation Tool is a web-based comprehensive analysis suite integrating annotation data from several pathway, ontology, and protein family databases. The current version provides annotation for the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and in the future will include additional genomes. The site allows users to interpret large gene lists by identifying associated functional terms, and their enrichment. Additionally, expression data for several experimental conditions were compiled and analyzed to provide an expression-based enrichment search. A tool to search for functionally-related genes based on gene expression across these conditions is also provided. Other features include dynamic visualization of genes on KEGG pathway maps and batch gene identifier conversion.

  8. Pain and functional imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Ingvar, M

    1999-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging has fundamentally changed our knowledge about the cerebral representation of pain. For the first time it has been possible to delineate the functional anatomy of different aspects of pain in the medial and lateral pain systems in the brain. The rapid developments in imaging methods over the past years have led to a consensus in the description of the central pain responses between different studies and also to a definition of a central pain matrix with specialized subfunctions in man. In the near future we will see studies where a systems perspective allows for a better understanding of the regulatory mechanisms in the higher-order frontal and parietal cortices. Also, pending the development of experimental paradigms, the functional anatomy of the emotional aspects of pain will become better known. PMID:10466155

  9. Functional cardiac tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Liau, Brian; Zhang, Donghui; Bursac, Nenad

    2013-01-01

    Heart attack remains the leading cause of death in both men and women worldwide. Stem cell-based therapies, including the use of engineered cardiac tissues, have the potential to treat the massive cell loss and pathological remodeling resulting from heart attack. Specifically, embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells are a promising source for generation of therapeutically relevant numbers of functional cardiomyocytes and engineering of cardiac tissues in vitro. This review will describe methodologies for successful differentiation of pluripotent stem cells towards the cardiovascular cell lineages as they pertain to the field of cardiac tissue engineering. The emphasis will be placed on comparing the functional maturation in engineered cardiac tissues and developing heart and on methods to quantify cardiac electrical and mechanical function at different spatial scales. PMID:22397609

  10. Functional BES equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostov, Ivan; Serban, Didina; Volin, Dmytro

    2008-08-01

    We give a realization of the Beisert, Eden and Staudacher equation for the planar Script N = 4 supersymetric gauge theory which seems to be particularly useful to study the strong coupling limit. We are using a linearized version of the BES equation as two coupled equations involving an auxiliary density function. We write these equations in terms of the resolvents and we transform them into a system of functional, instead of integral, equations. We solve the functional equations perturbatively in the strong coupling limit and reproduce the recursive solution obtained by Basso, Korchemsky and Kotański. The coefficients of the strong coupling expansion are fixed by the analyticity properties obeyed by the resolvents.

  11. Functional biomimetic optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Rajesh R.; Brott, Lawrence L.; Kirkpatrick, Sean M.; Stone, Morley O.

    2001-11-01

    The diversity of biological sensing and biocatalysis is astounding. A considerable effort has been directed at not only understanding the mechanism of these biological processes, but also how this activity can be maintained or duplicated in an artificial environment. We will present work on the formation of functional optical devices that convert biological responses into optical signals through changes in diffraction efficiency and reflection angle. By incorporating biomolecules into monomer systems that can be cured using a two-photon polymerization mechanism, greater spatial resolution and increased biological viability can be achieved. The polymer can be nanopatterned using ultrafast nonlinear holography to create a functional BioMEMS device. Additionally, we will discuss the characterization of the biomolecules and the processing of the gratings that incorporate these functional proteins. This approach is a first step towards the development of a hybrid organic-inorganic composite device.

  12. Composing decoherence functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boës, Paul; Navascués, Miguel

    2017-02-01

    Quantum measure theory (QMT) is a generalization of quantum theory where physical predictions are computed from a matrix known as the decoherence functional (DF). Previous works have noted that, in its original formulation, QMT exhibits a problem with composability, since the composition of two decoherence functionals is, in general, not a valid decoherence functional. This does not occur when the DFs in question happen to be positive semidefinite (a condition known as strong positivity). In this paper, we study the concept of composability of DFs and its consequences for QMT. Firstly, we show that the problem of composability is much deeper than originally envisaged, since, for any n , there exists a DF that can coexist with n -1 copies of itself, but not with n . Secondly, we prove that the set of strongly positive DFs cannot be enlarged while remaining closed under composition. Furthermore, any closed set of DFs containing all quantum DFs can only contain strongly positive DFs.

  13. Microfacet distribution function for physically based bidirectional reflectance distribution functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanyuk, O. N.; Pavlov, S. V.; Dovhaliuk, R. Yu.; Babyuk, N. P.; Obidnyk, M. D.; Kisala, P.; Suleimenov, B.

    2013-01-01

    A microfacet distribution function is presented. This function can be used to calculate the microfacet distribution term in BRDF models. The function differs from other well-known microfacet distribution functions like Blinn or Beckmann distributions in that it doesn`t use special functions like acos, tan, exp, pow and thus has lower computational complexity.

  14. Tensor distribution function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leow, Alex D.; Zhu, Siwei

    2008-03-01

    Diffusion weighted MR imaging is a powerful tool that can be employed to study white matter microstructure by examining the 3D displacement profile of water molecules in brain tissue. By applying diffusion-sensitizing gradients along a minimum of 6 directions, second-order tensors (represetnted by 3-by-3 positive definiite matrices) can be computed to model dominant diffusion processes. However, it has been shown that conventional DTI is not sufficient to resolve more complicated white matter configurations, e.g. crossing fiber tracts. More recently, High Angular Resolution Diffusion Imaging (HARDI) seeks to address this issue by employing more than 6 gradient directions. To account for fiber crossing when analyzing HARDI data, several methodologies have been introduced. For example, q-ball imaging was proposed to approximate Orientation Diffusion Function (ODF). Similarly, the PAS method seeks to reslove the angular structure of displacement probability functions using the maximum entropy principle. Alternatively, deconvolution methods extract multiple fiber tracts by computing fiber orientations using a pre-specified single fiber response function. In this study, we introduce Tensor Distribution Function (TDF), a probability function defined on the space of symmetric and positive definite matrices. Using calculus of variations, we solve for the TDF that optimally describes the observed data. Here, fiber crossing is modeled as an ensemble of Gaussian diffusion processes with weights specified by the TDF. Once this optimal TDF is determined, ODF can easily be computed by analytical integration of the resulting displacement probability function. Moreover, principle fiber directions can also be directly derived from the TDF.

  15. Adaptive multiconfigurational wave functions.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, Francesco A

    2014-03-28

    A method is suggested to build simple multiconfigurational wave functions specified uniquely by an energy cutoff Λ. These are constructed from a model space containing determinants with energy relative to that of the most stable determinant no greater than Λ. The resulting Λ-CI wave function is adaptive, being able to represent both single-reference and multireference electronic states. We also consider a more compact wave function parameterization (Λ+SD-CI), which is based on a small Λ-CI reference and adds a selection of all the singly and doubly excited determinants generated from it. We report two heuristic algorithms to build Λ-CI wave functions. The first is based on an approximate prescreening of the full configuration interaction space, while the second performs a breadth-first search coupled with pruning. The Λ-CI and Λ+SD-CI approaches are used to compute the dissociation curve of N2 and the potential energy curves for the first three singlet states of C2. Special attention is paid to the issue of energy discontinuities caused by changes in the size of the Λ-CI wave function along the potential energy curve. This problem is shown to be solvable by smoothing the matrix elements of the Hamiltonian. Our last example, involving the Cu2O2(2+) core, illustrates an alternative use of the Λ-CI method: as a tool to both estimate the multireference character of a wave function and to create a compact model space to be used in subsequent high-level multireference coupled cluster computations.

  16. Adaptive multiconfigurational wave functions

    SciTech Connect

    Evangelista, Francesco A.

    2014-03-28

    A method is suggested to build simple multiconfigurational wave functions specified uniquely by an energy cutoff Λ. These are constructed from a model space containing determinants with energy relative to that of the most stable determinant no greater than Λ. The resulting Λ-CI wave function is adaptive, being able to represent both single-reference and multireference electronic states. We also consider a more compact wave function parameterization (Λ+SD-CI), which is based on a small Λ-CI reference and adds a selection of all the singly and doubly excited determinants generated from it. We report two heuristic algorithms to build Λ-CI wave functions. The first is based on an approximate prescreening of the full configuration interaction space, while the second performs a breadth-first search coupled with pruning. The Λ-CI and Λ+SD-CI approaches are used to compute the dissociation curve of N{sub 2} and the potential energy curves for the first three singlet states of C{sub 2}. Special attention is paid to the issue of energy discontinuities caused by changes in the size of the Λ-CI wave function along the potential energy curve. This problem is shown to be solvable by smoothing the matrix elements of the Hamiltonian. Our last example, involving the Cu{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup 2+} core, illustrates an alternative use of the Λ-CI method: as a tool to both estimate the multireference character of a wave function and to create a compact model space to be used in subsequent high-level multireference coupled cluster computations.

  17. Algal functional annotation tool

    SciTech Connect

    2012-07-12

    Abstract BACKGROUND: Progress in genome sequencing is proceeding at an exponential pace, and several new algal genomes are becoming available every year. One of the challenges facing the community is the association of protein sequences encoded in the genomes with biological function. While most genome assembly projects generate annotations for predicted protein sequences, they are usually limited and integrate functional terms from a limited number of databases. Another challenge is the use of annotations to interpret large lists of 'interesting' genes generated by genome-scale datasets. Previously, these gene lists had to be analyzed across several independent biological databases, often on a gene-by-gene basis. In contrast, several annotation databases, such as DAVID, integrate data from multiple functional databases and reveal underlying biological themes of large gene lists. While several such databases have been constructed for animals, none is currently available for the study of algae. Due to renewed interest in algae as potential sources of biofuels and the emergence of multiple algal genome sequences, a significant need has arisen for such a database to process the growing compendiums of algal genomic data. DESCRIPTION: The Algal Functional Annotation Tool is a web-based comprehensive analysis suite integrating annotation data from several pathway, ontology, and protein family databases. The current version provides annotation for the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and in the future will include additional genomes. The site allows users to interpret large gene lists by identifying associated functional terms, and their enrichment. Additionally, expression data for several experimental conditions were compiled and analyzed to provide an expression-based enrichment search. A tool to search for functionally-related genes based on gene expression across these conditions is also provided. Other features include dynamic visualization of genes on KEGG

  18. GADRAS Detector Response Function.

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Dean J.; Harding, Lee; Thoreson, Gregory G; Horne, Steven M.

    2014-11-01

    The Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) applies a Detector Response Function (DRF) to compute the output of gamma-ray and neutron detectors when they are exposed to radiation sources. The DRF is fundamental to the ability to perform forward calculations (i.e., computation of the response of a detector to a known source), as well as the ability to analyze spectra to deduce the types and quantities of radioactive material to which the detectors are exposed. This document describes how gamma-ray spectra are computed and the significance of response function parameters that define characteristics of particular detectors.

  19. Clocks and cardiovascular function

    PubMed Central

    McLoughlin, Sarah C.; Haines, Philip; FitzGerald, Garret A.

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks in central and peripheral tissues enable the temporal synchronization and organization of molecular and physiological processes of rhythmic animals, allowing optimum functioning of cells and organisms at the most appropriate time of day. Disruption of circadian rhythms, from external or internal forces, leads to widespread biological disruption and is postulated to underlie many human conditions, such as the incidence and timing of cardiovascular disease. Here, we describe in vivo and in vitro methodology relevant to studying the role of circadian rhythms in cardiovascular function and dysfunction PMID:25707279

  20. Functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H.sub.2 or F.sub.2 or C.sub.nH.sub.m) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target particles are directed toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec.

  1. Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H2, or F2, or CnHm) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target particles are directed toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec.

  2. Peroxisome Biogenesis and Function

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Navneet; Reumann, Sigrun; Hu, Jianping

    2009-01-01

    Peroxisomes are small and single membrane-delimited organelles that execute numerous metabolic reactions and have pivotal roles in plant growth and development. In recent years, forward and reverse genetic studies along with biochemical and cell biological analyses in Arabidopsis have enabled researchers to identify many peroxisome proteins and elucidate their functions. This review focuses on the advances in our understanding of peroxisome biogenesis and metabolism, and further explores the contribution of large-scale analysis, such as in sillco predictions and proteomics, in augmenting our knowledge of peroxisome function In Arabidopsis. PMID:22303249

  3. Carbohydrates: functionality in foods.

    PubMed

    Chinachoti, P

    1995-04-01

    Many functional requirements are met by the use of simple and complex carbohydrates in food. Carbohydrates offer a wide range of rheological and other properties, including solubility, cryoprotection, sweetening effect, hygroscopicity, crystallization inhibition, flavor encapsulation, and coating ability. These properties are based on chemical structure and interactions with other molecules through hydrogen bonding, ionic effect, and the formation of complexes with lipids and proteins. The ability to understand these properties directly affects the development of food products and processes. Thus, the functionality of carbohydrates in foods integrates precise knowledge of chemical structure and behavior with practical applications in the development and preparation of foods.

  4. DNA Functionalization of Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lu, Fang; Gang, Oleg

    2017-01-01

    DNA-nanoparticle conjugates are hybrid nanoscale objects that integrate different types of DNA molecules and inorganic nanoparticles with a typical architecture of a DNA shell around an inorganic core. Such incorporation provides particles with unique properties of DNA, addressability and recognition, but, at the same time, allows exploiting the properties of the particle's inorganic core. Thus, these hybrid nano-objects are advantageous for rational fabrication of functional materials and for biomedical applications. Here, we describe several established DNA functionalization procedures for different types of surface ligands and nanoparticle core materials.

  5. Functional Group Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Walter T., Jr.; Patterson, John M.

    1984-01-01

    Literature on analytical methods related to the functional groups of 17 chemical compounds is reviewed. These compounds include acids, acid azides, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, amino acids, aromatic hydrocarbons, carbodiimides, carbohydrates, ethers, nitro compounds, nitrosamines, organometallic compounds, peroxides, phenols, silicon compounds,…

  6. Conjugate flow action functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Venturi, Daniele

    2013-11-15

    We present a new general framework to construct an action functional for a non-potential field theory. The key idea relies on representing the governing equations relative to a diffeomorphic flow of curvilinear coordinates which is assumed to be functionally dependent on the solution field. Such flow, which will be called the conjugate flow, evolves in space and time similarly to a physical fluid flow of classical mechanics and it can be selected in order to symmetrize the Gâteaux derivative of the field equations with respect to suitable local bilinear forms. This is equivalent to requiring that the governing equations of the field theory can be derived from a principle of stationary action on a Lie group manifold. By using a general operator framework, we obtain the determining equations of such manifold and the corresponding conjugate flow action functional. In particular, we study scalar and vector field theories governed by second-order nonlinear partial differential equations. The identification of transformation groups leaving the conjugate flow action functional invariant could lead to the discovery of new conservation laws in fluid dynamics and other disciplines.

  7. Functional abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, P; Aziz, Q

    2005-01-01

    Functional abdominal pain or functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS) is an uncommon functional gut disorder characterised by chronic or recurrent abdominal pain attributed to the gut but poorly related to gut function. It is associated with abnormal illness behaviour and patients show psychological morbidity that is often minimised or denied in an attempt to discover an organic cause for symptoms. Thus the conventional biomedical approach to the management of such patients is unhelpful and a person's symptom experience is more usefully investigated using a biopsychosocial evaluation, which necessarily entails a multidisciplinary system of healthcare provision. Currently the pathophysiology of the disorder is poorly understood but is most likely to involve a dysfunction of central pain mechanisms either in terms of attentional bias, for example, hypervigilance or a failure of central pain modulation/inhibition. Although modern neurophysiological investigation of patients is promising and may provide important insights into the pathophysiology of FAPS, current clinical management relies on an effective physician-patient relationship in which limits on clinical investigation are set and achievable treatment goals tailored to the patient's needs are pursued. PMID:15998821

  8. Functional Group Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Walter T., Jr.; Patterson, John M.

    1984-01-01

    Literature on analytical methods related to the functional groups of 17 chemical compounds is reviewed. These compounds include acids, acid azides, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, amino acids, aromatic hydrocarbons, carbodiimides, carbohydrates, ethers, nitro compounds, nitrosamines, organometallic compounds, peroxides, phenols, silicon compounds,…

  9. Functional Extended Redundancy Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun; Suk, Hye Won; Lee, Jang-Han; Moskowitz, D. S.; Lim, Jooseop

    2012-01-01

    We propose a functional version of extended redundancy analysis that examines directional relationships among several sets of multivariate variables. As in extended redundancy analysis, the proposed method posits that a weighed composite of each set of exogenous variables influences a set of endogenous variables. It further considers endogenous…

  10. Iridescence: a functional perspective

    PubMed Central

    Doucet, Stéphanie M.; Meadows, Melissa G.

    2009-01-01

    In animals, iridescence is generated by the interaction of light with biological tissues that are nanostructured to produce thin films or diffraction gratings. Uniquely among animal visual signals, the study of iridescent coloration contributes to biological and physical sciences by enhancing our understanding of the evolution of communication strategies, and by providing insights into physical optics and inspiring biomimetic technologies useful to humans. Iridescent colours are found in a broad diversity of animal taxa ranging from diminutive marine copepods to terrestrial insects and birds. Iridescent coloration has received a surge of research interest of late, and studies have focused on both characterizing the nanostructures responsible for producing iridescence and identifying the behavioural functions of iridescent colours. In this paper, we begin with a brief description of colour production mechanisms in animals and provide a general overview of the taxonomic distribution of iridescent colours. We then highlight unique properties of iridescent signals and review the proposed functions of iridescent coloration, focusing, in particular, on the ways in which iridescent colours allow animals to communicate with conspecifics and avoid predators. We conclude with a brief overview of non-communicative functions of iridescence in animals. Despite the vast amount of recent work on animal iridescence, our review reveals that many proposed functions of iridescent coloration remain virtually unexplored, and this area is clearly ripe for future research. PMID:19336344

  11. Conjugate flow action functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturi, Daniele

    2013-11-01

    We present a new general framework to construct an action functional for a non-potential field theory. The key idea relies on representing the governing equations relative to a diffeomorphic flow of curvilinear coordinates which is assumed to be functionally dependent on the solution field. Such flow, which will be called the conjugate flow, evolves in space and time similarly to a physical fluid flow of classical mechanics and it can be selected in order to symmetrize the Gâteaux derivative of the field equations with respect to suitable local bilinear forms. This is equivalent to requiring that the governing equations of the field theory can be derived from a principle of stationary action on a Lie group manifold. By using a general operator framework, we obtain the determining equations of such manifold and the corresponding conjugate flow action functional. In particular, we study scalar and vector field theories governed by second-order nonlinear partial differential equations. The identification of transformation groups leaving the conjugate flow action functional invariant could lead to the discovery of new conservation laws in fluid dynamics and other disciplines.

  12. HRD Function in Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on the human resource development (HRD) function in organizations. In "Comparing Quality Profiles of Training Organizations--A Multi-Level Approach" (Martin Mulder), analysis of over 1,300 training projects indicates that variation in quality is almost entirely explained by the…

  13. Gaming and "Functional Democracy".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, F. L.

    An example of the way gaming can be used to bring attention to, and improve skills in, making democracy function better is presented. The game is played by seven people seated around two triangular playing boards; it involves making choices among least, intermediate, and most preferred alternatives, keeping the preferences of the majority in…

  14. Jost functions for quarkonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikh, S. S.; Lis, O. M.

    1986-05-01

    We examine the interaction in quarkonium by means of the potential V(r)=-α/r+ βr+Vo. Within the framework of the Fuda generalization of the van Leeuwen-Reiner approach, the off-shell Jost functions and the off-shell and half-off-shell T-matrices are derived.

  15. Empirical microeconomics action functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baaquie, Belal E.; Du, Xin; Tanputraman, Winson

    2015-06-01

    A statistical generalization of microeconomics has been made in Baaquie (2013), where the market price of every traded commodity, at each instant of time, is considered to be an independent random variable. The dynamics of commodity market prices is modeled by an action functional-and the focus of this paper is to empirically determine the action functionals for different commodities. The correlation functions of the model are defined using a Feynman path integral. The model is calibrated using the unequal time correlation of the market commodity prices as well as their cubic and quartic moments using a perturbation expansion. The consistency of the perturbation expansion is verified by a numerical evaluation of the path integral. Nine commodities drawn from the energy, metal and grain sectors are studied and their market behavior is described by the model to an accuracy of over 90% using only six parameters. The paper empirically establishes the existence of the action functional for commodity prices that was postulated to exist in Baaquie (2013).

  16. Caveolae structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Candice M; Smart, Eric J

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Studies on the structure and function of caveolae have revealed how this versatile subcellular organelle can influence numerous signalling pathways. This brief review will discuss a few of the key features of caveolae as it relates to signalling and disease processes. PMID:18315571

  17. Chromosome structure and function

    SciTech Connect

    Risley, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents topics in chromosome structure and function. Topics covered include: the structure of interphase chromatin; chromatin structure, gene expression and differentiation; organization of mitotic chromosomes; organization of meiotic chromosomes and synaptonimal complexes; the lampbrush chromsome of animal oocytes; dosage compensation in mammals: x chromosome inactivation; and polytene chromosomes.

  18. Functional Communication Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durand, V. Mark; Moskowitz, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Thirty years ago, the first experimental demonstration was published showing that educators could improve significant challenging behavior in children with disabilities by replacing these behaviors with forms of communication that served the same purpose, a procedure called functional communication training (FCT). Since the publication of that…

  19. Optical linear discriminant functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casasent, David; Song, Jian-Zhong

    1989-01-01

    The use of computer generated holograms to implement feature extraction operations has been achieved. The optical realization and use of multiple linear discriminant functions on a high-dimensionality feature space for large class pattern recognition is described and initial experimental results are provided.

  20. Increasing optical metamaterials functionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Nigel P.; Khokhar, Ali Z.; Chong, Harold M.; Jin, Chongjun; Mandel, Jharna; McMeekin, Scott; De La Rue, R. M.

    2005-09-01

    Gold Split Ring Resonators (SRRs) were fabricated on silicon substrates by electron beam lithography and lift-off, with overall dimensions of approximately 200 nm. Reflectance spectra from the SRRs are similar to those published elsewhere. New devices are proposed based on the additional functionality afforded by the use of a silicon substrate.

  1. Choreographing Patterns and Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawes, Zachary; Moss, Joan; Finch, Heather; Katz, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors begin with a description of an algebraic dance--the translation of composite linear growing patterns into choreographed movement--which was the last component of a research-based instructional unit that focused on fostering an understanding of linear functional rules through geometric growing patterns and…

  2. Functional Age and Retirement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaie, K. Warner

    Mandatory retirement because of chronological age is coming under increasing attack and, at least in the United States, it is likely that there may soon be legislative prohibitions against forcing individuals to retire because of age. As a consequence there is renewed interest in redefining retirement criteria in terms of a functional age concept…

  3. Functional Business Games.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggs, William D.

    1987-01-01

    Defines computerized functional business games as those focusing on decision making and integration in the areas of accounting/finance, marketing, personnel/human resources, and production/operations. Nine currently available games are reviewed and evaluated in the context of a learning model. (Author/LRW)

  4. Process for functionalizing alkanes

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, R.G.; Janowicz, A.H.; Periana, R.A.

    1988-05-24

    Process for functionalizing saturated hydrocarbons comprises: (a) reacting said saturated hydrocarbons of the formula: R[sub 1]H wherein H represents a hydrogen atom; and R[sub 1] represents a saturated hydrocarbon radical, with a metal complex of the formula: CpRh[P(R[sub 2])[sub 3

  5. Balance functions reexamined

    SciTech Connect

    Bialas, A.

    2011-02-15

    The idea of glue clusters, i.e., short-range correlations in the quark-gluon plasma close to freeze-out, is used to estimate the width of balance functions in momentum space. A good agreement is found with the recent measurements of the STAR Collaboration for central Au-Au collisions.

  6. Mapping functional connectivity

    Treesearch

    Peter Vogt; Joseph R. Ferrari; Todd R. Lookingbill; Robert H. Gardner; Kurt H. Riitters; Katarzyna Ostapowicz

    2009-01-01

    An objective and reliable assessment of wildlife movement is important in theoretical and applied ecology. The identification and mapping of landscape elements that may enhance functional connectivity is usually a subjective process based on visual interpretations of species movement patterns. New methods based on mathematical morphology provide a generic, flexible,...

  7. Functional Communication Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durand, V. Mark; Moskowitz, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Thirty years ago, the first experimental demonstration was published showing that educators could improve significant challenging behavior in children with disabilities by replacing these behaviors with forms of communication that served the same purpose, a procedure called functional communication training (FCT). Since the publication of that…

  8. Farmers Functional Literacy Programme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Education and Social Welfare, New Delhi (India).

    The Farmers Training and Functional Literacy Programme, initiated by the government of India in 1968, was an effort to translate into practice the concept of linking education (not only vocational training) to development, particularly for increasing production. The project, a joint enterprise of three government ministries, provides participating…

  9. Functions of Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Southern Coll., Statesboro.

    Intended for teachers of industrial arts in teaching the functions of industry, this course of study was compiled as a result of the EPDA Institute in Industrial and Career Development at Georgia Southern College. Contents are: (1) Introduction, (2) Organization, (3) Research and Development, (4) Production, (5) Marketing, (6) Finance and Control,…

  10. Split Brain Functioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassel, Russell N.

    1978-01-01

    Summarizing recent research, this article defines the functions performed by the left and right sides of the human brain. Attention is given to the right side, or the nondominant side, of the brain and its potential in terms of perception of the environment, music, art, geometry, and the aesthetics. (JC)

  11. Objectification and Semiotic Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santi, George

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to study students' difficulties when they have to ascribe the same meaning to different representations of the same mathematical object. We address two theoretical tools that are at the core of Radford's cultural semiotic and Godino's onto-semiotic approaches: objectification and the semiotic function. The analysis…

  12. Distinct functions for ERKs?

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Alison C

    2006-01-01

    The Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK signaling pathway is one of the best understood signal routes in cells. Recent studies add complexity to this cascade by indicating that the two ERK kinases, ERK1 (p44ERK1) and ERK2 (p42ERK2), may have distinct functions. PMID:16879721

  13. Gluing Nekrasov Partition Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jian; Tizzano, Luigi; Winding, Jacob; Zabzine, Maxim

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we summarise the localisation calculation of 5D super Yang-Mills on simply connected toric Sasaki-Einstein (SE) manifolds. We show how various aspects of the computation, including the equivariant index, the asymptotic behaviour and the factorisation property are governed by the combinatorial data of the toric geometry. We prove that the perturbative partition function on a simply connected SE manifold corresponding to an n-gon toric diagram factorises to n copies of perturbative part (zero instanton sector) of the Nekrasov partition function. This leads us to conjecture a prescription for the computation of the complete partition function, by gluing n copies of the full Nekrasov partition functions. This work is a generalisation of some earlier computation carried out on Y p, q manifolds, whose moment map cone has a quadrangle base and our result is valid for manifolds whose moment map cones have pentagon base, hexagon base, etc. The algorithm we used for dealing with general cones may also be of independent interest.

  14. Split Brain Functioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassel, Russell N.

    1978-01-01

    Summarizing recent research, this article defines the functions performed by the left and right sides of the human brain. Attention is given to the right side, or the nondominant side, of the brain and its potential in terms of perception of the environment, music, art, geometry, and the aesthetics. (JC)

  15. Enzyme design: Functional Frankensteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhlynets, Olga V.; Korendovych, Ivan V.

    2016-09-01

    An artificial esterase with no known natural structural analogues has been formed via the homo-heptameric self-assembly of a designed peptide. This esterase represents the first report of a functional catalytic triad rationally engineered into a de novo protein framework.

  16. Transfer function matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, H.

    1987-01-01

    Given a multivariable system, it is proved that the numerator matrix N(s) of the transfer function evaluated at any system pole either has unity rank or is a null matrix. It is also shown that N(s) evaluated at any transmission zero of the system has rank deficiency. Examples are given for illustration.

  17. Functional Extended Redundancy Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun; Suk, Hye Won; Lee, Jang-Han; Moskowitz, D. S.; Lim, Jooseop

    2012-01-01

    We propose a functional version of extended redundancy analysis that examines directional relationships among several sets of multivariate variables. As in extended redundancy analysis, the proposed method posits that a weighed composite of each set of exogenous variables influences a set of endogenous variables. It further considers endogenous…

  18. THE PROTOSTELLAR MASS FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    McKee, Christopher F.; Offner, Stella S. R. E-mail: soffner@cfa.harvard.ed

    2010-06-10

    The protostellar mass function (PMF) is the present-day mass function of the protostars in a region of star formation. It is determined by the initial mass function weighted by the accretion time. The PMF thus depends on the accretion history of protostars and in principle provides a powerful tool for observationally distinguishing different protostellar accretion models. We consider three basic models here: the isothermal sphere model, the turbulent core model, and an approximate representation of the competitive accretion model. We also consider modified versions of these accretion models, in which the accretion rate tapers off linearly in time. Finally, we allow for an overall acceleration in the rate of star formation. At present, it is not possible to directly determine the PMF since protostellar masses are not currently measurable. We carry out an approximate comparison of predicted PMFs with observation by using the theory to infer the conditions in the ambient medium in several star-forming regions. Tapered and accelerating models generally agree better with observed star formation times than models without tapering or acceleration, but uncertainties in the accretion models and in the observations do not allow one to rule out any of the proposed models at present. The PMF is essential for the calculation of the protostellar luminosity function, however, and this enables stronger conclusions to be drawn.

  19. Graphical functions in parametric space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golz, Marcel; Panzer, Erik; Schnetz, Oliver

    2016-12-01

    Graphical functions are positive functions on the punctured complex plane Csetminus {0,1} which arise in quantum field theory. We generalize a parametric integral representation for graphical functions due to Lam, Lebrun and Nakanishi, which implies the real analyticity of graphical functions. Moreover, we prove a formula that relates graphical functions of planar dual graphs.

  20. Comparisons of power transfer functions and flow transfer functions

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D.

    1987-11-15

    Transfer functions may be used to calculate component feedbacks or temperature increments by convolution of the transfer function with the appropriate fractional change in system-quantity. Power-change transfer functions have been reported. The corresponding flow transfer functions for this case, and comparison with the power transfer functions, are reported here. Results of feedback simulation of ramped flow transients using flow transfer functions are also described.

  1. Engineering living functional materials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Allen Y; Zhong, Chao; Lu, Timothy K

    2015-01-16

    Natural materials, such as bone, integrate living cells composed of organic molecules together with inorganic components. This enables combinations of functionalities, such as mechanical strength and the ability to regenerate and remodel, which are not present in existing synthetic materials. Taking a cue from nature, we propose that engineered 'living functional materials' and 'living materials synthesis platforms' that incorporate both living systems and inorganic components could transform the performance and the manufacturing of materials. As a proof-of-concept, we recently demonstrated that synthetic gene circuits in Escherichia coli enabled biofilms to be both a functional material in its own right and a materials-synthesis platform. To demonstrate the former, we engineered E. coli biofilms into a chemical-inducer-responsive electrical switch. To demonstrate the latter, we engineered E. coli biofilms to dynamically organize biotic-abiotic materials across multiple length scales, template gold nanorods, gold nanowires, and metal/semiconductor heterostructures, and synthesize semiconductor nanoparticles (Chen, A. Y. et al. (2014) Synthesis and patterning of tunable multiscale materials with engineered cells. Nat. Mater. 13, 515-523.). Thus, tools from synthetic biology, such as those for artificial gene regulation, can be used to engineer the spatiotemporal characteristics of living systems and to interface living systems with inorganic materials. Such hybrids can possess novel properties enabled by living cells while retaining desirable functionalities of inorganic systems. These systems, as living functional materials and as living materials foundries, would provide a radically different paradigm of materials performance and synthesis-materials possessing multifunctional, self-healing, adaptable, and evolvable properties that are created and organized in a distributed, bottom-up, autonomously assembled, and environmentally sustainable manner.

  2. Pulmonary function in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, J. B.; Elliott, A. R.; Guy, H. J.; Prisk, G. K.

    1997-01-01

    The lung is exquisitely sensitive to gravity, and so it is of interest to know how its function is altered in the weightlessness of space. Studies on National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Spacelabs during the last 4 years have provided the first comprehensive data on the extensive changes in pulmonary function that occur in sustained microgravity. Measurements of pulmonary function were made on astronauts during space shuttle flights lasting 9 and 14 days and were compared with extensive ground-based measurements before and after the flights. Compared with preflight measurements, cardiac output increased by 18% during space flight, and stroke volume increased by 46%. Paradoxically, the increase in stroke volume occurred in the face of reductions in central venous pressure and circulating blood volume. Diffusing capacity increased by 28%, and the increase in the diffusing capacity of the alveolar membrane was unexpectedly large based on findings in normal gravity. The change in the alveolar membrane may reflect the effects of uniform filling of the pulmonary capillary bed. Distributions of blood flow and ventilation throughout the lung were more uniform in space, but some unevenness remained, indicating the importance of nongravitational factors. A surprising finding was that airway closing volume was approximately the same in microgravity and in normal gravity, emphasizing the importance of mechanical properties of the airways in determining whether they close. Residual volume was unexpectedly reduced by 18% in microgravity, possibly because of uniform alveolar expansion. The findings indicate that pulmonary function is greatly altered in microgravity, but none of the changes observed so far will apparently limit long-term space flight. In addition, the data help to clarify how gravity affects pulmonary function in the normal gravity environment on Earth.

  3. Engineering Living Functional Materials

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Natural materials, such as bone, integrate living cells composed of organic molecules together with inorganic components. This enables combinations of functionalities, such as mechanical strength and the ability to regenerate and remodel, which are not present in existing synthetic materials. Taking a cue from nature, we propose that engineered ‘living functional materials’ and ‘living materials synthesis platforms’ that incorporate both living systems and inorganic components could transform the performance and the manufacturing of materials. As a proof-of-concept, we recently demonstrated that synthetic gene circuits in Escherichia coli enabled biofilms to be both a functional material in its own right and a materials-synthesis platform. To demonstrate the former, we engineered E. coli biofilms into a chemical-inducer-responsive electrical switch. To demonstrate the latter, we engineered E. coli biofilms to dynamically organize biotic-abiotic materials across multiple length scales, template gold nanorods, gold nanowires, and metal/semiconductor heterostructures, and synthesize semiconductor nanoparticles (Chen, A. Y. et al. (2014) Synthesis and patterning of tunable multiscale materials with engineered cells. Nat. Mater.13, 515–523.). Thus, tools from synthetic biology, such as those for artificial gene regulation, can be used to engineer the spatiotemporal characteristics of living systems and to interface living systems with inorganic materials. Such hybrids can possess novel properties enabled by living cells while retaining desirable functionalities of inorganic systems. These systems, as living functional materials and as living materials foundries, would provide a radically different paradigm of materials performance and synthesis–materials possessing multifunctional, self-healing, adaptable, and evolvable properties that are created and organized in a distributed, bottom-up, autonomously assembled, and environmentally sustainable manner. PMID

  4. Partition density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nafziger, Jonathan

    Partition density functional theory (PDFT) is a method for dividing a molecular electronic structure calculation into fragment calculations. The molecular density and energy corresponding to Kohn Sham density-functional theory (KS-DFT) may be exactly recovered from these fragments. Each fragment acts as an isolated system except for the influence of a global one-body 'partition' potential which deforms the fragment densities. In this work, the developments of PDFT are put into the context of other fragment-based density functional methods. We developed three numerical implementations of PDFT: One within the NWChem computational chemistry package using basis sets, and the other two developed from scratch using real-space grids. It is shown that all three of these programs can exactly reproduce a KS-DFT calculation via fragment calculations. The first of our in-house codes handles non-interacting electrons in arbitrary one-dimensional potentials with any number of fragments. This code is used to explore how the exact partition potential changes for different partitionings of the same system and also to study features which determine which systems yield non-integer PDFT occupations and which systems are locked into integer PDFT occupations. The second in-house code, CADMium, performs real-space calculations of diatomic molecules. Features of the exact partition potential are studied for a variety of cases and an analytical formula determining singularities in the partition potential is derived. We introduce an approximation for the non-additive kinetic energy and show how this quantity can be computed exactly. Finally a PDFT functional is developed to address the issues of static correlation and delocalization errors in approximations within DFT. The functional is applied to the dissociation of H2 + and H2.

  5. Functional Performance Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenisen, Michael C.; Hayes, Judith C.; Siconolfi, Steven F.; Moore, Alan D.

    1999-01-01

    The Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP) was established to address specific issues associated with optimizing the ability of crews to complete mission tasks deemed essential to entry, landing, and egress for spaceflights lasting up to 16 days. The main objectives of this functional performance evaluation were to investigate the physiological effects of long-duration spaceflight on skeletal muscle strength and endurance, as well as aerobic capacity and orthostatic function. Long-duration exposure to a microgravity environment may produce physiological alterations that affect crew ability to complete critical tasks such as extravehicular activity (EVA), intravehicular activity (IVA), and nominal or emergency egress. Ultimately, this information will be used to develop and verify countermeasures. The answers to three specific functional performance questions were sought: (1) What are the performance decrements resulting from missions of varying durations? (2) What are the physical requirements for successful entry, landing, and emergency egress from the Shuttle? and (3) What combination of preflight fitness training and in-flight countermeasures will minimize in-flight muscle performance decrements? To answer these questions, the Exercise Countermeasures Project looked at physiological changes associated with muscle degradation as well as orthostatic intolerance. A means of ensuring motor coordination was necessary to maintain proficiency in piloting skills, EVA, and IVA tasks. In addition, it was necessary to maintain musculoskeletal strength and function to meet the rigors associated with moderate altitude bailout and with nominal or emergency egress from the landed Orbiter. Eight investigations, referred to as Detailed Supplementary Objectives (DSOs) 475, 476, 477, 606, 608, 617, 618, and 624, were conducted to study muscle degradation and the effects of exercise on exercise capacity and orthostatic function (Table 3-1). This chapter is divided into

  6. Inverse Functions and their Derivatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snapper, Ernst

    1990-01-01

    Presented is a method of interchanging the x-axis and y-axis for viewing the graph of the inverse function. Discussed are the inverse function and the usual proofs that are used for the function. (KR)

  7. Functional CAR models for large spatially correlated functional datasets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Baladandayuthapani, Veerabhadran; Zhu, Hongxiao; Baggerly, Keith A; Majewski, Tadeusz; Czerniak, Bogdan A; Morris, Jeffrey S

    2016-01-01

    We develop a functional conditional autoregressive (CAR) model for spatially correlated data for which functions are collected on areal units of a lattice. Our model performs functional response regression while accounting for spatial correlations with potentially nonseparable and nonstationary covariance structure, in both the space and functional domains. We show theoretically that our construction leads to a CAR model at each functional location, with spatial covariance parameters varying and borrowing strength across the functional domain. Using basis transformation strategies, the nonseparable spatial-functional model is computationally scalable to enormous functional datasets, generalizable to different basis functions, and can be used on functions defined on higher dimensional domains such as images. Through simulation studies, we demonstrate that accounting for the spatial correlation in our modeling leads to improved functional regression performance. Applied to a high-throughput spatially correlated copy number dataset, the model identifies genetic markers not identified by comparable methods that ignore spatial correlations.

  8. The Relationships between Weight Functions, Geometric Functions,and Compliance Functions in Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Rong

    2007-01-01

    Linear elastic fracture mechanics is widely used in industry because it established simple and explicit relationships between the permissible loading conditions and the critical crack size that is allowed in a structure. Stress intensity factors are the above-mentioned functional expressions that relate load with crack size through geometric functions or weight functions. Compliance functions are to determine the crack/flaw size in a structure when optical inspection is inconvenient. As a result, geometric functions, weight functions and compliance functions have been intensively studied to determine the stress intensity factor expressions for different geometries. However, the relations between these functions have received less attention. This work is therefore to investigate the intrinsic relationships between these functions. Theoretical derivation was carried out and the results were verified on single-edge cracked plate under tension and bending. It is found out that the geometric function is essentially the non-dimensional weight function at the loading point. The compliance function is composed of two parts: a varying part due to crack extension and a constant part from the intact structure if no crack exists. The derivative of the compliance function at any location is the product of the geometric function and the weight function at the evaluation point. Inversely, the compliance function can be acquired by the integration of the product of the geometric function and the weight function with respect to the crack size. The integral constant is just the unchanging compliance from the intact structure. Consequently, a special application of the relations is to obtain the compliance functions along a crack once the geometric function and weight functions are known. Any of the three special functions can be derived once the other two functions are known. These relations may greatly simplify the numerical process in obtaining either geometric functions, weight

  9. Superconducting combined function magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, H.; Fernow, R.C.

    1983-01-01

    Superconducting accelerators and storage rings, presently under construction or in the design phase, are based on separate dipole and quadrupole magnets. It is here suggested that a hybrid lattice configuration consisting of dipoles and combined function gradient magnets would: (1) reduce the number of magnet units and their total cost; and (2) increase the filling factor and thus the energy at a given field. Coil cross sections are presented for the example of the Brookhaven Colliding Beam Accelerator. An asymmetric two-layer cable gradient magnet would have transfer functions of 10.42 G/A and 0.628 G cm/sup -1//A versus 15.77 G/A and 2.03 G cm/sup -1//A of the present separate dipoles and quadrupoles.

  10. Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H2 or F2 or CnHm) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target species particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target species particles are d irected toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target species particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec. *Discrimination against non-target species is provided by (i) use of a target species having a lifetime that is much greater than a lifetime of a non-target species and/or (2) use of an applied magnetic field to discriminate between charged particle trajectories for target species and for non-target species.

  11. Roughness and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, T. R.

    2014-01-01

    A function map is used to locate applications of roughness in separation-velocity space. The importance of roughness in contact mechanics is demonstrated and versions of the plasticity index are introduced and compared. Case studies of roughness and function are presented from tribology and the life sciences. Tribological examples are taken from the automotive industry and include the manufacture of vehicle bodies, and drive train tribology, particularly cylinder liner, cam and gearbox friction and wear. From the life sciences, problems of prosthetic fixation and tribology are shown to depend on roughness. The interaction of haptics and surface finish is described and illustrated. A number of other areas of application are listed. Finally the likely future importance of structured surfaces is discussed.

  12. Mitochondrial Function in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Arulkumaran, Nishkantha; Deutschman, Clifford S.; Pinsky, Michael R.; Zuckerbraun, Brian; Schumacker, Paul T.; Gomez, Hernando; Gomez, Alonso; Murray, Patrick; Kellum, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are an essential part of the cellular infrastructure, being the primary site for high energy adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production through oxidative phosphorylation. Clearly, in severe systemic inflammatory states, like sepsis, cellular metabolism is usually altered and end organ dysfunction not only common but predictive of long term morbidity and mortality. Clearly, interest is mitochondrial function both as a target for intracellular injury and response to extrinsic stress have been a major focus of basic science and clinical research into the pathophysiology of acute illness. However, mitochondria have multiple metabolic and signaling functions that may be central in both the expression of sepsis and its ultimate outcome. In this review, the authors address five primary questions centered on the role of mitochondria in sepsis. This review should be used as both a summary source in placing mitochondrial physiology within the context of acute illness and as a focal point for addressing new research into diagnostic and treatment opportunities these insights provide. PMID:26871665

  13. Bioinspired Functional Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Yongmei; Wang, Jingxia; Hou, Yongping; Bai, Hao; Hu, Michael Z.

    2014-11-25

    This special issue is focused on the nanoscale or micro-/nanoscale structures similar to the biological features in multilevels or hierarchy and so on. Research by mimicking biological systems has shown more impact on many applications due to the well-designed micro-/nanostructures inspired from the biological surfaces or interfaces; therefore, the materials may achieve the fascinating functionality. In conclusion, the bioinspired functional materials may be fabricated by developing novel technology or methods such as synthesis, self-assembly, and soft lithography at micro- or nanolevel or multilevels and, in addition, the multidisciplinary procedures of physical or chemical methods and nanotechnology to mimic the biological multiscale micro-/nanostructures onto one-/two-dimensional surface materials.

  14. Executive functions in synesthesia.

    PubMed

    Rouw, Romke; van Driel, Joram; Knip, Koen; Richard Ridderinkhof, K

    2013-03-01

    In grapheme-color synesthesia, a number or letter can evoke two different and possibly conflicting (real and synesthetic) color sensations at the same time. In this study, we investigate the relationship between synesthesia and executive control functions. First, no general skill differences were obtained between synesthetes and non-synesthetes in classic executive control paradigms. Furthermore, classic executive control effects did not interact with synesthetic behavioral effects. Third, we found support for our hypothesis that inhibition of a synesthetic color takes effort and time. Finally, individual differences analyses showed no relationship between the two skills; performance on a 'normal' Stroop task does not predict performance on a synesthetic Stroop task. Across four studies, the current results consistently show no clear relationship between executive control functions and synesthetic behavioral effects. This raises the question of which mechanisms are at play in synesthetic 'management' during the presence of two conflicting (real and synesthetic) sensations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Pancreatic exocrine function testing

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, J.S.

    1981-11-01

    It is important to understand which pancreatic function tests are available and how to interpret them when evaluating patients with malabsorption. Available direct tests are the secretin stimulation test, the Lundh test meal, and measurement of serum or fecal enzymes. Indirect tests assess pancreatic exocrine function by measuring the effect of pancreatic secretion on various nutrients. These include triglycerides labeled with carbon 14, cobalamin labeled with cobalt 57 and cobalt 58, and para-aminobenzoic acid bound to a dipeptide. Of all these tests the secretin stimulation test is the most accurate and reliable if done by experienced personnel. However, the indirect tests are simpler to do and appear to be comparable to the secretin test at detecting pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. These indirect tests are becoming clinically available and clinicians should familiarize themselves with the strengths and weaknesses of each.

  16. Bioinspired Functional Materials

    DOE PAGES

    Zheng, Yongmei; Wang, Jingxia; Hou, Yongping; ...

    2014-11-25

    This special issue is focused on the nanoscale or micro-/nanoscale structures similar to the biological features in multilevels or hierarchy and so on. Research by mimicking biological systems has shown more impact on many applications due to the well-designed micro-/nanostructures inspired from the biological surfaces or interfaces; therefore, the materials may achieve the fascinating functionality. In conclusion, the bioinspired functional materials may be fabricated by developing novel technology or methods such as synthesis, self-assembly, and soft lithography at micro- or nanolevel or multilevels and, in addition, the multidisciplinary procedures of physical or chemical methods and nanotechnology to mimic the biologicalmore » multiscale micro-/nanostructures onto one-/two-dimensional surface materials.« less

  17. Functional GPCR microarrays.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yulong; Webb, Brian L; Su, Hui; Mozdy, Eric J; Fang, Ye; Wu, Qi; Liu, Li; Beck, Jonathan; Ferrie, Ann M; Raghavan, Srikanth; Mauro, John; Carre, Alain; Müeller, Dirk; Lai, Fang; Rasnow, Brian; Johnson, Michael; Min, Hosung; Salon, John; Lahiri, Joydeep

    2005-11-09

    This paper describes G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) microarrays on porous glass substrates and functional assays based on the binding of a europium-labeled GTP analogue. The porous glass slides were made by casting a glass frit on impermeable glass slides and then coating with gamma-aminopropyl silane (GAPS). The emitted fluorescence was captured on an imager with a time-gated intensified CCD detector. Microarrays of the neurotensin receptor 1, the cholinergic receptor muscarinic 2, the opioid receptor mu, and the cannabinoid receptor 1 were fabricated by pin printing. The selective agonism of each of the receptors was observed. The screening of potential antagonists was demonstrated using a cocktail of agonists. The amount of activation observed was sufficient to permit determinations of EC50 and IC50. Such microarrays could potentially streamline drug discovery by helping integrate primary screening with selectivity and safety screening without compromising the essential functional information obtainable from cellular assays.

  18. Functional Biomimetic Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Paul M.

    N-substituted glycine oligomers, or 'peptoids,' are a class of sequence--specific foldamers composed of tertiary amide linkages, engendering proteolytic stability and enhanced cellular permeability. Peptoids are notable for their facile synthesis, sequence diversity, and ability to fold into distinct secondary structures. In an effort to establish new functional peptoid architectures, we utilize the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne [3+2] cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction to generate peptidomimetic assemblies bearing bioactive ligands that specifically target and modulate Androgen Receptor (AR) activity, a major therapeutic target for prostate cancer. Additionally, we explore chemical ligation protocols to generate semi-synthetic hybrid biomacromolecules capable of exhibiting novel structures and functions not accessible to fully biosynthesized proteins.

  19. Functional magnetic microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Landel, Robert F. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Functional magnetic particles are formed by dissolving a mucopolysaccharide such as chitosan in acidified aqueous solution containing a mixture of ferrous chloride and ferric chloride. As the pH of the solution is raised magnetite is formed in situ in the solution by raising the pH. The dissolved chitosan is a polyelectrolyte and forms micelles surrounding the granules at pH of 8-9. The chitosan precipitates on the granules to form microspheres containing the magnetic granules. On addition of the microspheres to waste aqueous streams containing dissolved ions, the hydroxyl and amine functionality of the chitosan forms chelates binding heavy metal cations such as lead, copper, and mercury and the chelates in turn bind anions such as nitrate, fluoride, phosphate and borate.

  20. Functions of Intact Carotenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britton, George

    The traditional view that carotenoids are a class of plant pigments does not do justice to their versatility. This versatility will become clear from the overview of the biological roles of carotenoids, in animals and microorganisms as well as in plants, that is given in this Chapter. It has become customary and convenient to differentiate biological effects of carotenoids into functions, actions and associations [1]. `Functions' have been defined as effects or properties that are essential for the normal well-being of the organism. Biological responses that follow the administration of carotenoids in the diet or as supplements are considered as `actions'. When an effect is seen but a causal relationship to the carotenoid has not been demonstrated, this is described as an `association'. The line between these is often not clear, however.

  1. Process for functionalizing alkanes

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, R.G.; Janowicz, A.H.; Periana-Pillai, R.A.

    1984-06-12

    Process for functionalizing saturated hydrocarbons selectively in the terminal position comprises: (a) reacting said saturated hydrocarbons with a metal complex CpRhPMe/sub 3/H/sub 2/ in the presence of ultraviolet radiation at -60/sup 0/ to -17/sup 0/C to form a hydridoalkyl complex CpRhPMe/sub 3/RH; (b) reacting said hydridoalkyl complex with a haloform CHX/sub 3/ at -60/sup 0/ to -17/sup 0/C to form the corresponding haloalkyl complex of step (a) CpRhPMe/sub 3/RX; and (c) reacting said haloalkyl complex with halogen -60 to 25/sup 0/C to form a functional haloalkyl compound.

  2. Parkin structure and function.

    PubMed

    Seirafi, Marjan; Kozlov, Guennadi; Gehring, Kalle

    2015-06-01

    Mutations in the parkin or PINK1 genes are the leading cause of the autosomal recessive form of Parkinson's disease. The gene products, the E3 ubiquitin ligase parkin and the serine/threonine kinase PINK1, are neuroprotective proteins, which act together in a mitochondrial quality control pathway. Here, we review the structure of parkin and mechanisms of its autoinhibition and function as a ubiquitin ligase. We present a model for the recruitment and activation of parkin as a key regulatory step in the clearance of depolarized or damaged mitochondria by autophagy (mitophagy). We conclude with a brief overview of other functions of parkin and considerations for drug discovery in the mitochondrial quality control pathway. © 2015 The Authors. FEBS Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of FEBS.

  3. Nuclear functions of prefoldin

    PubMed Central

    Millán-Zambrano, Gonzalo; Chávez, Sebastián

    2014-01-01

    Prefoldin is a cochaperone, present in all eukaryotes, that cooperates with the chaperonin CCT. It is known mainly for its functional relevance in the cytoplasmic folding of actin and tubulin monomers during cytoskeleton assembly. However, both canonical and prefoldin-like subunits of this heterohexameric complex have also been found in the nucleus, and are functionally connected with nuclear processes in yeast and metazoa. Plant prefoldin has also been detected in the nucleus and physically associated with a gene regulator. In this review, we summarize the information available on the involvement of prefoldin in nuclear phenomena, place special emphasis on gene transcription, and discuss the possibility of a global coordination between gene regulation and cytoplasmic dynamics mediated by prefoldin. PMID:25008233

  4. Nuclear Parton Distribution Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Schienbein, I.; Yu, J.-Y.; Keppel, Cynthia; Morfin, Jorge; Olness, F.; Owens, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    We study nuclear effects of charged current deep inelastic neutrino-iron scattering in the framework of a chi^2 analysis of parton distribution functions (PDFs). We extract a set of iron PDFs which are used to compute x_Bj-dependent and Q^2-dependent nuclear correction factors for iron structure functions which are required in global analyses of free nucleon PDFs. We compare our results with nuclear correction factors from neutrino-nucleus scattering models and correction factors for charged-lepton--iron scattering. We find that, except for very high x_Bj, our correction factors differ in both shape and magnitude from the correction factors of the models and charged-lepton scattering.

  5. Nuclear Parton Distribution Functions

    SciTech Connect

    I. Schienbein, J.Y. Yu, C. Keppel, J.G. Morfin, F. Olness, J.F. Owens

    2009-06-01

    We study nuclear effects of charged current deep inelastic neutrino-iron scattering in the framework of a {chi}{sup 2} analysis of parton distribution functions (PDFs). We extract a set of iron PDFs which are used to compute x{sub Bj}-dependent and Q{sup 2}-dependent nuclear correction factors for iron structure functions which are required in global analyses of free nucleon PDFs. We compare our results with nuclear correction factors from neutrino-nucleus scattering models and correction factors for charged-lepton--iron scattering. We find that, except for very high x{sub Bj}, our correction factors differ in both shape and magnitude from the correction factors of the models and charged-lepton scattering.

  6. Scattering functions of polyhedra

    SciTech Connect

    Senesi, Andrew; Lee, Byeongdu

    2015-04-01

    Herein, a general method to calculate the scattering functions of polyhedra, including both regular and semi-regular polyhedra, is presented. These calculations may be achieved by breaking a polyhedron into sets of congruent pieces, thereby reducing computation time by taking advantage of Fourier transforms and inversion symmetry. Each piece belonging to a set or subunit can be generated by either rotation or translation. Further, general strategies to compute truncated, concave and stellated polyhedra are provided. Using this method, the asymptotic behaviors of the polyhedral scattering functions are compared with that of a sphere. It is shown that, for a regular polyhedron, the form factor oscillation at high q is correlated with the face-to-face distance. In addition, polydispersity affects the Porod constant. The ideas presented herein will be important for the characterization of nanomaterials using small-angle scattering.

  7. Functional Esophageal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Qasim; Fass, Ronnie; Gyawali, C Prakash; Miwa, Hiroto; Pandolfino, John E; Zerbib, Frank

    2016-02-15

    Functional esophageal disorders consist of a disease category that present with esophageal symptoms (heartburn, chest pain, dysphagia, globus) not explained by mechanical obstruction (stricture, tumor, eosinophilic esophagitis), major motor disorders (achalasia, EGJ outflow obstruction, absent contractility, distal esophageal spasm, jackhammer esophagus), or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). While mechanisms responsible are unclear, it is theorized that visceral hypersensitivity and hypervigilance play an important role in symptom generation, in the context of normal or borderline function. Treatments directed at improving borderline motor dysfunction or reducing reflux burden to sub-normal levels have limited success in symptom improvement. In contrast, strategies focused on modulating peripheral triggering and central perception are mechanistically viable and clinically meaningful. However, outcome data from these treatment options are limited. Future research needs to focus on understanding mechanisms underlying visceral hypersensitivity and hypervigilance so that appropriate targets and therapies can be developed.

  8. Sleep and immune function.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Freda DeKeyser

    2012-04-01

    Scientists are only beginning to fully understand the purpose of sleep and its underlying mechanisms. Lack of sleep is associated with many diseases, including infection, and with increased mortality. Lack of proper sleep is an important problem in the intensive care unit, and interventions have been designed to improve it. Sleep is associated with immune function, and this relationship is partially based on the physiological basis of sleep, sleep architecture, the sleep-wake cycle, cytokines and the hypothalamic-pituitary axis.

  9. [Bradykinin and ventricular function].

    PubMed

    Trochu, J N

    2002-03-01

    Kinins are vasodilator peptides implicated in many physiological and physiopathological processes such as blood pressure regulation and that of the coronary circulation and inflammatory reactions. Kinins play an essential role in ventricular function as they counteract the effects of angiotensin II during myocardial ischaemia, ventricular remodelling and severe cardiac failure, emphasising the value of treatment favouring local endogenic production of bradykinin such as ACE inhibitors, neutral endopeptidase inhibitors and antagonists of AT1 receptors of angiotensin II.

  10. Executive Functioning in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Orellana, Gricel; Slachevsky, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The executive function (EF) is a set of abilities, which allows us to invoke voluntary control of our behavioral responses. These functions enable human beings to develop and carry out plans, make up analogies, obey social rules, solve problems, adapt to unexpected circumstances, do many tasks simultaneously, and locate episodes in time and place. EF includes divided attention and sustained attention, working memory (WM), set-shifting, flexibility, planning, and the regulation of goal directed behavior and can be defined as a brain function underlying the human faculty to act or think not only in reaction to external events but also in relation with internal goals and states. EF is mostly associated with dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (PFC). Besides EF, PFC is involved in self-regulation of behavior, i.e., the ability to regulate behavior according to internal goals and constraints, particularly in less structured situations. Self-regulation of behavior is subtended by ventral medial/orbital PFC. Impairment of EF is one of the most commonly observed deficits in schizophrenia through the various disease stages. Impairment in tasks measuring conceptualization, planning, cognitive flexibility, verbal fluency, ability to solve complex problems, and WM occur in schizophrenia. Disorders detected by executive tests are consistent with evidence from functional neuroimaging, which have shown PFC dysfunction in patients while performing these kinds of tasks. Schizophrenics also exhibit deficit in odor identifying, decision-making, and self-regulation of behavior suggesting dysfunction of the orbital PFC. However, impairment in executive tests is explained by dysfunction of prefronto-striato-thalamic, prefronto-parietal, and prefronto-temporal neural networks mainly. Disorders in EFs may be considered central facts with respect to schizophrenia and it has been suggested that negative symptoms may be explained by that executive dysfunction. PMID:23805107

  11. Vestibular Function Measurement Devices

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Richard D.; Zapala, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Vestibular function laboratories utilize a multitude of diagnostic instruments to evaluate a dizzy patient. Caloric irrigators, oculomotor stimuli, and rotational chairs produce a stimulus whose accuracy is required for the patient response to be accurate. Careful attention to everything from cleanliness of equipment to threshold adjustments determine on a daily basis if patient data are going to be correct and useful. Instrumentation specifications that change with time such as speed and temperature must periodically be checked using calibrated instruments. PMID:27516710

  12. Engineering functional bladder tissues.

    PubMed

    Horst, Maya; Madduri, Srinivas; Gobet, Rita; Sulser, Tullio; Milleret, Vinzent; Hall, Heike; Atala, Anthony; Eberli, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    End stage bladder disease can seriously affect patient quality of life and often requires surgical reconstruction with bowel tissue, which is associated with numerous complications. Bioengineering of functional bladder tissue using tissue-engineering techniques could provide new functional tissues for reconstruction. In this review, we discuss the current state of this field and address different approaches to enable physiologic voiding in engineered bladder tissues in the near future. In a collaborative effort, we gathered researchers from four institutions to discuss the current state of functional bladder engineering. A MEDLINE® and PubMed® search was conducted for articles related to tissue engineering of the bladder, with special focus on the cells and biomaterials employed as well as the microenvironment, vascularisation and innervation strategies used. Over the last decade, advances in tissue engineering technology have laid the groundwork for the development of a biological substitute for bladder tissue that can support storage of urine and restore physiologic voiding. Although many researchers have been able to demonstrate the formation of engineered tissue with a structure similar to that of native bladder tissue, restoration of physiologic voiding using these constructs has never been demonstrated. The main issues hindering the development of larger contractile tissues that allow physiologic voiding include the development of correct muscle alignment, proper innervation and vascularization. Tissue engineering of a construct that will support the contractile properties that allow physiologic voiding is a complex process. The combination of smart scaffolds with controlled topography, the ability to deliver multiple trophic factors and an optimal cell source will allow for the engineering of functional bladder tissues in the near future. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Functional group analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.T. Jr.; Patterson, J.M.

    1986-04-01

    Analytical methods for functional group analysis are reviewed. Literature reviewed is from the period of December 1983 through November 1985 and presents methods for determining the following compounds: acids, acid halides, active hydrogen, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, amides, amines, amino acids, anhydrides, aromatic hydrocarbons, azo compounds, carbohydrates, chloramines, esters, ethers, halogen compounds, hydrazines, isothiocyanates, nitro compounds, nitroso compounds, organometallic compounds, oxiranes, peroxides, phenols, phosphorus compounds, quinones, silicon compounds, sulfates, sulfonyl chlorides, thioamides, thiols, and thiosemicarbazones. 150 references.

  14. Functional consequences of hemispherectomy.

    PubMed

    van Empelen, R; Jennekens-Schinkel, A; Buskens, E; Helders, P J M; van Nieuwenhuizen, O

    2004-09-01

    Using the International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health (ICF) (WHO, 2001), impairments, activities and social participation are reported in 12 children (mean age at surgery 5.9 years) who were investigated before and three times over a 2-year period after hemispherectomy. Impairments were assessed (i) in terms of seizure frequency (Engel classification) and seizure severity (HASS) and (ii) with respect to muscle strength (MRC), range of motion (JAM score) and muscle tone (modified Ashworth scale). Activities were assessed in terms of gross motor functioning (GMFM) and self-care, mobility and social function (PEDI). Participation was assessed in terms of epilepsy-related restrictions and quantified by means of the Hague Restrictions in Childhood Epilepsy Scale (HARCES). Nine out of 12 children could be classified as free of seizures (Engel class I), and in the remaining three seizure frequency was Engel class III. HASS scores showed maximum improvement in 10 out of 12 children and near-maximum improvement in the two remaining children. Muscle strength and muscle tone on the side of the body contralateral to the hemispherectomy, which were already decreased preoperatively, decreased even further in the first 6 months after surgery, but returned to the presurgical baseline thereafter, except for the distal part of the arm. Range of motion was abnormal prior to operation and remained so after operation. Mean GMFM increase was 20% after 2 years (95% confidence interval 10-33); all five dimensions improved statistically significantly (P < 0.05). Mean PEDI increase was more than 20 scale points (95% confidence interval 10-35); again, all domains improved significantly (P < 0.05). In nearly all children, HARCES scores had normalized 2 years after surgery. In conclusion, decrease of seizure frequency and severity widens the scope of motor and social functioning, which overrides the effects of remaining motor impairments.

  15. Executive functioning in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Gricel; Slachevsky, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The executive function (EF) is a set of abilities, which allows us to invoke voluntary control of our behavioral responses. These functions enable human beings to develop and carry out plans, make up analogies, obey social rules, solve problems, adapt to unexpected circumstances, do many tasks simultaneously, and locate episodes in time and place. EF includes divided attention and sustained attention, working memory (WM), set-shifting, flexibility, planning, and the regulation of goal directed behavior and can be defined as a brain function underlying the human faculty to act or think not only in reaction to external events but also in relation with internal goals and states. EF is mostly associated with dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (PFC). Besides EF, PFC is involved in self-regulation of behavior, i.e., the ability to regulate behavior according to internal goals and constraints, particularly in less structured situations. Self-regulation of behavior is subtended by ventral medial/orbital PFC. Impairment of EF is one of the most commonly observed deficits in schizophrenia through the various disease stages. Impairment in tasks measuring conceptualization, planning, cognitive flexibility, verbal fluency, ability to solve complex problems, and WM occur in schizophrenia. Disorders detected by executive tests are consistent with evidence from functional neuroimaging, which have shown PFC dysfunction in patients while performing these kinds of tasks. Schizophrenics also exhibit deficit in odor identifying, decision-making, and self-regulation of behavior suggesting dysfunction of the orbital PFC. However, impairment in executive tests is explained by dysfunction of prefronto-striato-thalamic, prefronto-parietal, and prefronto-temporal neural networks mainly. Disorders in EFs may be considered central facts with respect to schizophrenia and it has been suggested that negative symptoms may be explained by that executive dysfunction.

  16. Should a Function Continue?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    calculus for Scheme. In Proc. of Conf. LISP and Functional Programming , pages 72-85, ACM, July 1988. [7] Matthias Felleisen , Daniel P. Friedman...City; State, and ZIP Code) 545 Technology Square Information Systems Program Cambridge, MA 02139 Arlington, VA 22217 Sa. NAME OF FUNDING /SPONSORING...SOURCE OF FUNDING NUMBERS PROGRAM PROJECT TASK WORK UNIT 1400 Wilson Blvd. ELEMENT NO. NO. NO. ACCESSION NO. Arlington, VA 22217 I 11. TITLE (Include

  17. The Protostellar Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offner, Stella S. R.; McKee, Christopher F.

    2011-07-01

    The protostellar luminosity function (PLF) is the present-day luminosity function of the protostars in a region of star formation. It is determined using the protostellar mass function in combination with a stellar evolutionary model that provides the luminosity as a function of instantaneous and final stellar mass. In 2010, McKee & Offner considered three main accretion models: the isothermal sphere (IS) model, the turbulent core (TC) model, and an approximation of the competitive accretion (CA) model. We also consider the effect of an accretion rate that tapers off linearly in time and an accelerating star formation rate. For each model, we characterize the luminosity distribution using the mean, median, maximum, ratio of the median to the mean, standard deviation of the logarithm of the luminosity, and the fraction of very low luminosity objects. We compare the models with bolometric luminosities observed in local star-forming regions and find that models with an approximately constant accretion time, such as the TC and CA models, appear to agree better with observation than those with a constant accretion rate, such as the IS model. We show that observations of the mean protostellar luminosity in these nearby regions of low-mass star formation suggest a mean star formation time of 0.3 ± 0.1 Myr. Such a timescale, together with some accretion that occurs non-radiatively and some that occurs in high-accretion, episodic bursts, resolves the classical "luminosity problem" in low-mass star formation, in which observed protostellar luminosities are significantly less than predicted. An accelerating star formation rate is one possible way of reconciling the observed star formation time and mean luminosity. Future observations will place tighter constraints on the observed luminosities, star formation time, and episodic accretion, enabling better discrimination between star formation models and clarifying the influence of variable accretion on the PLF.

  18. THE PROTOSTELLAR LUMINOSITY FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Offner, Stella S. R.; McKee, Christopher F. E-mail: cmckee@astro.berkeley.edu

    2011-07-20

    The protostellar luminosity function (PLF) is the present-day luminosity function of the protostars in a region of star formation. It is determined using the protostellar mass function in combination with a stellar evolutionary model that provides the luminosity as a function of instantaneous and final stellar mass. In 2010, McKee and Offner considered three main accretion models: the isothermal sphere (IS) model, the turbulent core (TC) model, and an approximation of the competitive accretion (CA) model. We also consider the effect of an accretion rate that tapers off linearly in time and an accelerating star formation rate. For each model, we characterize the luminosity distribution using the mean, median, maximum, ratio of the median to the mean, standard deviation of the logarithm of the luminosity, and the fraction of very low luminosity objects. We compare the models with bolometric luminosities observed in local star-forming regions and find that models with an approximately constant accretion time, such as the TC and CA models, appear to agree better with observation than those with a constant accretion rate, such as the IS model. We show that observations of the mean protostellar luminosity in these nearby regions of low-mass star formation suggest a mean star formation time of 0.3 {+-} 0.1 Myr. Such a timescale, together with some accretion that occurs non-radiatively and some that occurs in high-accretion, episodic bursts, resolves the classical 'luminosity problem' in low-mass star formation, in which observed protostellar luminosities are significantly less than predicted. An accelerating star formation rate is one possible way of reconciling the observed star formation time and mean luminosity. Future observations will place tighter constraints on the observed luminosities, star formation time, and episodic accretion, enabling better discrimination between star formation models and clarifying the influence of variable accretion on the PLF.

  19. [Endocrine function in obesity].

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Castro, Paula; Sangiao-Alvarellos, Susana; Brandón-Sandá, Iria; Cordido, Fernando

    2011-10-01

    Obesity is associated to significant disturbances in endocrine function. Hyper insulinemia and insulin resistance are the best known changes in obesity, but their mechanisms and clinical significance are not clearly established. Adipose tissue is considered to be a hormone-secreting endocrine organ; and increased leptin secretion from the adipocyte, a satiety signal, is a well-established endocrine change in obesity. In obesity there is a decreased GH secretion. Impairment of somatotropic function in obesity is functional and may be reversed in certain circumstances. The pathophysiological mechanism responsible for low GH secretion in obesity is probably multifactorial. There are many data suggesting that a chronic state of somatostatin hypersecretion results in inhibition of GH release. Increased FFA levels, as well as a deficient ghrelin secretion, probably contribute to the impaired GH secretion. In women, abdominal obesity is associated to hyperandrogenism and low sex hormone-binding globulin levels. Obese men, particularly those with morbid obesity, have decreased testosterone and gonadotropin levels. Obesity is associated to an increased cortisol production rate, which is compensated for by a higher cortisol clearance, resulting in plasma free cortisol levels that do not change when body weight increases. Ghrelin is the only known circulating orexigenic factor, and has been found to be decreased in obese people. In obesity there is also a trend to increased TSH and free T3 levels. Copyright © 2011 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Buchbinder, Bradley R

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) maps the spatiotemporal distribution of neural activity in the brain under varying cognitive conditions. Since its inception in 1991, blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI has rapidly become a vital methodology in basic and applied neuroscience research. In the clinical realm, it has become an established tool for presurgical functional brain mapping. This chapter has three principal aims. First, we review key physiologic, biophysical, and methodologic principles that underlie BOLD fMRI, regardless of its particular area of application. These principles inform a nuanced interpretation of the BOLD fMRI signal, along with its neurophysiologic significance and pitfalls. Second, we illustrate the clinical application of task-based fMRI to presurgical motor, language, and memory mapping in patients with lesions near eloquent brain areas. Integration of BOLD fMRI and diffusion tensor white-matter tractography provides a road map for presurgical planning and intraoperative navigation that helps to maximize the extent of lesion resection while minimizing the risk of postoperative neurologic deficits. Finally, we highlight several basic principles of resting-state fMRI and its emerging translational clinical applications. Resting-state fMRI represents an important paradigm shift, focusing attention on functional connectivity within intrinsic cognitive networks.

  1. Pulmonary function testing.

    PubMed

    Ruppel, Gregg L; Enright, Paul L

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary function testing is often considered the basis for diagnosis in many categories of pulmonary disease. Although most of the testing methodologies are well established and widely employed, there are still many questions regarding how tests should be performed, how to ensure that reliable data are produced, what reference values and rules should be used, and how pulmonary function tests (PFTs) should be interpreted to best support clinical decision making. This conference was organized around a set of questions aimed at many of these issues. Each presenter was asked to address a specific topic regarding what tests should be done, how those test should be performed to answer a particular clinical question, and to relate test results to an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment of the patient. These topics included testing of adults and children, with concentration on important disease entities such as COPD, asthma, and unexplained dyspnea. Special emphasis was given to discussing reference values, lower limits of normal, interpretive strategies to optimize disease classification, and those factors directly affecting data quality. Established techniques for spirometry, lung volumes, diffusing capacity, exercise testing, and bronchial challenges were compared and contrasted with new technologies, and with technologies that might be part of pulmonary function laboratories in the near future.

  2. Lipids and immune function.

    PubMed

    Vitale, J J; Broitman, S A

    1981-09-01

    There is in vitro and in vivo evidence to suggest that dietary lipids play a role in modulating immune function. A review of the current literature on the interrelationships among dietary lipids, blood cholesterol levels, immunosuppression, and tumorigenesis makes for a very strong argument that (a) immunosuppression may be causally related to lymphoproliferative disorders, as well as to tumorigenesis and (b) diets high in polyunsaturated fat, relative to diets high in saturated fat, are more immunosuppressive and are better promotors of tumorigenesis. The effects of dietary fat on immune function seem to be mediated though its component parts, the unsaturated fatty acids, specially linoleic, linolenic, and arachidonic. It is not clear how these components affect immune function. Several studies suggest that one effect is mediated by altering the lipid component of the cell membrane and thus its fluidity; the more fluid the membrane, the less responsive it is. Thus, fluidity of both immune cells and those to be destroyed or protected may be affected. The effects of saturated as well as unsaturated fatty acids may be mediated by modulating serum lipoprotein levels, prostaglandin metabolism, and cholesterol concentrations and metabolism.

  3. [Tracheobronchoplasty for functional restoration].

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, K; Maeda, M; Nakamura, K; Tsubota, N; Taniguchi, K; Kawaguchi, H; Hayashi, E

    1991-09-01

    We have experienced 10 cases of terminal mediastinal tracheostomy (TMT), 7 cases of laryngotracheal anastomosis with subtotal resection of cricoid cartilage (LTT), 5 cases of sleeve or wedge segmentectomy (SS, WS) for lung cancer with low pulmonary function, and 5 cases of carinal reconstructions (CR) with one stomal anastomosis between left lobar bronchus and trachea after partial resection of carina for tuberculous stenosis of left main bronchus. Modified TMT which stomaplasty was constructed with cervical and anterior chest skin flap different from primary procedure by Grillo was performed in 3 cases without innominate artery rupture nor cicatricial stomal stenosis. LTT by Pearson's procedure caused telescoped anastomosis. Pulmonary function was reserved in all 5 cases of SS and WS. Salvaged left lung by single stomal CR in the cases of tuberculous stenosis functioned well. Two different approaches for subaortic arch anastomosis, namely Pull-down and Pull-up, were proposed in single stomal CR. Pull-down provided excellent exposure of the carina without sacrifice of intercostal arteries. Indication of plasty was extended by TMT and LTT for upper limits of airway resection, SS and WS for limited operation against lung cancer, and single stomal CR for tuberculous stenosis of left main bronchus.

  4. Functionalized Amorphous Aluminosilicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesgar, Milad

    Alkali treated aluminosilicate (geopolymer) was functionalized by surfactant to increase the hydrophobicity for making Pickering emulsion for the first part of this work. In the first part of this study, alkali treated metakaolin was functionalized with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide ((C16H33)N(CH 3)3Br, CTAB). The electrostatic interaction between this quaternary ammonium and the surface of the aluminosilicate which has negative charge has taken place. The particles then were used to prepare Pickering emulsion. The resulting stable dispersions, obtained very fast at very simple conditions with low ratio of aluminosilicate to liquid phase. In the second part, the interaction between geopolymer and glycerol was studied to see the covalent grafting of the geopolymer for making geopolymer composite. The composite material would be the basis material to be used as support catalyst, thin coating reagent and flame retardant material and so on, Variety of techniques, Thermogravimetric (TGA), Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE), FTIR, Solid state NMR, Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), BET surface area, Elemental analysis (CHN), TEM, SEM and Optical microscopy were used to characterize the functionalized geopolymer.

  5. Posttraumatic functional movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Ganos, C; Edwards, M J; Bhatia, K P

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic injury to the nervous system may account for a range of neurologic symptoms. Trauma location and severity are important determinants of the resulting symptoms. In severe head injury with structural brain abnormalities, the occurrence of trauma-induced movement disorders, most commonly hyperkinesias such as tremor and dystonia, is well recognized and its diagnosis straightforward. However, the association of minor traumatic events, which do not lead to significant persistent structural brain damage, with the onset of movement disorders is more contentious. The lack of clear clinical-neuroanatomic (or symptom lesion) correlations in these cases, the variable timing between traumatic event and symptom onset, but also the presence of unusual clinical features in a number of such patients, which overlap with signs encountered in patients with functional neurologic disorders, contribute to this controversy. The purpose of this chapter is to provide an overview of the movement disorders, most notably dystonia, that have been associated with peripheral trauma and focus on their unusual characteristics, as well as their overlap with functional neurologic disorders. We will then provide details on pathophysiologic views that relate minor peripheral injuries to the development of movement disorders and compare them to knowledge from primary organic and functional movement disorders. Finally, we will comment on the appropriate management of these disorders.

  6. Lymphocyte Functions in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellis, Neal R.; Risin, Diane; Sundaresan, A.; Cooper, D.; Dawson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    To understand the mechanism of immunity impairment in space it is important to analyze the direct effects of space-related conditions on different lymphocytes functions. Since 1992, we are investigating the effect of modeled and true microgravity (MG) on numerous lymphocyte functions. We had shown that modeled (MMG) and true microgravity inhibit lymphocyte locomotion through type I collagen. Modeled microgravity also suppresses polyclonal and antigen-specific lymphocyte activation. Polyclonal activation of lymphocytes prior to exposure to MMG abrogates the MG-induced inhibition of lymphocyte locomotion. The relationship between activation deficits and the loss of locomotion in MG was investigated using PKC activation by phorbol ester (PMA) and calcium ionophore (ionomycin). Direct activation of PKC by PMA substantially restored the MMG-inhibited lymphocyte locomotion and PHA-induced lymphocyte activation lonomycin by itself did not restore either locomotion or activation of the lymphocytes, indicating that these changes are not related to the impairment in the calcium flux in MMG. Treatment of lymphocytes with PMA before exposure to MMG prevented the loss of locomotion. It was observed that DNA synthesis is not necessary for restoration of locomotion since mitomicin C treated and untreated cells recovered their locomotion to the same level after PKC activation. Our recent data indicate that microgravity may selectively effect the expression of novel Ca2+ independent isoforms of PKC, in particularly PKC sigma and delta. This provides a new insight in understanding of the mechanisms of MG-sensitive cellular functions.

  7. Functions of multivector variables.

    PubMed

    Chappell, James M; Iqbal, Azhar; Gunn, Lachlan J; Abbott, Derek

    2015-01-01

    As is well known, the common elementary functions defined over the real numbers can be generalized to act not only over the complex number field but also over the skew (non-commuting) field of the quaternions. In this paper, we detail a number of elementary functions extended to act over the skew field of Clifford multivectors, in both two and three dimensions. Complex numbers, quaternions and Cartesian vectors can be described by the various components within a Clifford multivector and from our results we are able to demonstrate new inter-relationships between these algebraic systems. One key relationship that we discover is that a complex number raised to a vector power produces a quaternion thus combining these systems within a single equation. We also find a single formula that produces the square root, amplitude and inverse of a multivector over one, two and three dimensions. Finally, comparing the functions over different dimension we observe that Cl(R(3)) provides a particularly versatile algebraic framework.

  8. Genetics of thyroid function.

    PubMed

    Medici, Marco; Visser, Theo J; Peeters, Robin P

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies show that subtle variations in thyroid function, including subclinical thyroid dysfunction, and even variation in thyroid function within the normal range, are associated with morbidity and mortality. It is estimated that 40-65% of the inter-individual variation in serum TSH and FT4 levels is determined by genetic factors. To identify these factors, various linkage and candidate gene studies have been performed in the past, which have identified only a few genes. In the last decade, genome-wide association studies identified many new genes, while recent whole-genome sequencing efforts have also been proven to be effective. In the current review, we provide a systematic overview of these studies, including strengths and limitations. We discuss new techniques which will further clarify the genetic basis of thyroid function in the near future, as well as the potential use of these genetic markers in personalizing the management of thyroid disease patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [Chewing and cognitive function].

    PubMed

    Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Onozuka, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    Chewing does not only crush food to aid swallowing and digestion; it also helps to relieve stress and regulate cognitive functions, including alertness and executive function. It is well known that chewing gum is used for sleepiness prevention during work, learning, and driving. In addition, it has been shown in the elderly that a decrease in the number of residual teeth is related to dementia onset. These findings suggest a link between chewing and maintaining memory and attention. Recently, many studies regarding the effects of chewing on memory and attention were conducted using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electroencephalography (EEG). When a working memory task was used, the middle frontal gyrus in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex showed greater activation in addition to producing higher alertness after chewing. Furthermore, using an attentional network test, reaction time shortened, and the anterior cingulate cortex and left frontal gyrus were both activated for the executive network. From these results, it is suggested that chewing elevates alertness, consequently leading to improvements in cognitive performance. In this review, we introduce findings concerning the effects of chewing on cognitive performance, and discuss the neuronal mechanisms underlying these effects.

  10. Lymphocyte Functions in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellis, Neal R.; Risin, Diane; Sundaresan, A.; Cooper, D.; Dawson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    To understand the mechanism of immunity impairment in space it is important to analyze the direct effects of space-related conditions on different lymphocytes functions. Since 1992, we are investigating the effect of modeled and true microgravity (MG) on numerous lymphocyte functions. We had shown that modeled (MMG) and true microgravity inhibit lymphocyte locomotion through type I collagen. Modeled microgravity also suppresses polyclonal and antigen-specific lymphocyte activation. Polyclonal activation of lymphocytes prior to exposure to MMG abrogates the MG-induced inhibition of lymphocyte locomotion. The relationship between activation deficits and the loss of locomotion in MG was investigated using PKC activation by phorbol ester (PMA) and calcium ionophore (ionomycin). Direct activation of PKC by PMA substantially restored the MMG-inhibited lymphocyte locomotion and PHA-induced lymphocyte activation lonomycin by itself did not restore either locomotion or activation of the lymphocytes, indicating that these changes are not related to the impairment in the calcium flux in MMG. Treatment of lymphocytes with PMA before exposure to MMG prevented the loss of locomotion. It was observed that DNA synthesis is not necessary for restoration of locomotion since mitomicin C treated and untreated cells recovered their locomotion to the same level after PKC activation. Our recent data indicate that microgravity may selectively effect the expression of novel Ca2+ independent isoforms of PKC, in particularly PKC sigma and delta. This provides a new insight in understanding of the mechanisms of MG-sensitive cellular functions.

  11. [Functional hypothalamic amenorrhea].

    PubMed

    Stárka, Luboslav; Dušková, Michaela

    2015-10-01

    Functional hypothalamic amenorrhea (FHA) besides pregnancy and syndrome of polycystic ovary is one of the most common causes of secondary amenorrhea. FHA results from the aberrations in pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion, which in turn causes impairment of the gonadotropins (follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone). FHA is a form of the defence of organism in situations where life functions are more important than reproductive function. FHA is reversible; it can be normalized after ceasing the stress situation. There are three types of FHA: weight loss related, stress-related, and exercise-related amenorrhea. The final consequences are complex hormonal changes manifested by profound hypoestrogenism. Additionally, these patients present mild hypercortisolemia, low serum insulin levels, low insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and low total triiodothyronine. Women health in this disorder is disturbed in several aspects including the skeletal system, cardiovascular system, and mental problems. Patients manifest a decrease in bone mass density, which is related to an increase in fracture risk. Therefore, osteopenia and osteoporosis are the main long-term complications of FHA. Cardiovascular complications include endothelial dysfunction and abnormal changes in the lipid profile. FHA patients present significantly higher depression and anxiety and also sexual problems compared to healthy subjects.

  12. [Visuospatial functions and prematurity].

    PubMed

    Miranda-Herrero, M C; Pascual-Pascual, S I; Barredo-Valderrama, E; Vazquez-Lopez, M; de Castro-De Castro, P

    2014-11-01

    Visuospatial functions are very important in learning process and development of abstract thought during childhood. Several studies show that preterm and low birth weight infants obtain lower scores in test that assess cognitive functions, specially in the first year of life. These differences are attenuated over time, but a developmental delay that affects working memory and visuospatial process still persists. It is unclear what factors are involved in development of these functions, and pre- or perinatal factors may interfere with the proper conduct of the same, but have been described anatomical and physiological differences between the preterm and term brain that could explain somewhere in these alterations. The different selective vulnerability to hypoxia between immature brain in which preoligodendrocytes and subplate neurons predominate, and mature brain, determine differences in the pattern of injury from hypoxia with greater involvement of the periventricular white matter in preterm children. This lesional pattern leaves to a dysfunction in attentional and visuospatial process, due to the increased vulnerability of the regions involved in the dorsal pathway of visual processing.

  13. Profiling posttraumatic functional impairment.

    PubMed

    Norman, Sonya B; Stein, Murray B; Davidson, Jonathan R T

    2007-01-01

    Many individuals who have been exposed to psychological trauma suffer from impaired functioning, regardless of whether they have PTSD. Our purpose was to identify a subset of PTSD symptoms linked to functional impairment to a) improve the likelihood that individuals with posttraumatic impairment receive treatment, and b) offer a method to assess cost-burden of trauma history in epidemiological studies. We examined patterns of trauma-related symptoms in two independent community surveys (N=1002 and 630). Rank ordering of symptoms and their associations with impairment guided construction of an impairment-related profile in the first data set. The profile was then tested in the second data set. The derived symptom profile, consisting of intense recollections and/or emotional symptoms upon exposure to reminders, plus one or more of numbing/detachment, avoidance, sleep problems, concentration problems, or hypervigilance, detected the majority (88% and 74%) of persons with posttraumatic functional impairment. The symptom profile can help identify traumatized individuals who may benefit from treatment but do not necessarily meet criteria for PTSD.

  14. Carbasugars: Synthesis and Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yoshiyuki

    It is well recognized that glycosidase inhibitors are not only tools to elucidate the mechanism of a living system manipulated by glycoconjugates but also potential clinical drugs and insecticides by inducing the failure of glycoconjugates to perform their function. In this chapter, the syntheses and functions of natural glycosidase inhibitors (cyclophelitol , allosamidine , and trehazoilin ), which possess highly oxygenated and functionalized cyclohexanes or cyclopentanes in their structures and are defined as carbasugars , and the structure and activity relationships (SAR) of their derivatives are described. Also, recently much attention has been focused on neuraminidase inhibitors as anti-influenza drugs since relenza , which was derived from sialic acid, and also, tamiflu , which is the artificial carbasugar designed as a transition state analogue in the hydrolysis pathway of substrates by neuraminidase, were launched in the market. Herein, the medicinal chemistry efforts to discover tamiflu and some efficient syntheses applicable to process chemistry are described. Finally, useful synthetic methodologies for carbasugar formation from sugars are also introduced in this chapter.

  15. Functional neuropeptidomics in invertebrates.

    PubMed

    De Haes, Wouter; Van Sinay, Elien; Detienne, Giel; Temmerman, Liesbet; Schoofs, Liliane; Boonen, Kurt

    2015-07-01

    Neuropeptides are key messengers in almost all physiological processes. They originate from larger precursors and are extensively processed to become bioactive. Neuropeptidomics aims to comprehensively identify the collection of neuropeptides in an organism, organ, tissue or cell. The neuropeptidome of several invertebrates is thoroughly explored since they are important model organisms (and models for human diseases), disease vectors and pest species. The charting of the neuropeptidome is the first step towards understanding peptidergic signaling. This review will first discuss the latest developments in exploring the neuropeptidome. The physiological roles and modes of action of neuropeptides can be explored in two ways, which are largely orthogonal and therefore complementary. The first way consists of inferring the functions of neuropeptides by a forward approach where neuropeptide profiles are compared under different physiological conditions. Second is the reverse approach were neuropeptide collections are used to screen for receptor-binding. This is followed by localization studies and functional tests. This review will focus on how these different functional screening methods contributed to the field of invertebrate neuropeptidomics and expanded our knowledge of peptidergic signaling. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuroproteomics: Applications in Neuroscience and Neurology.

  16. Surface Functionalized Nanocoax Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizal, Binod; Archibald, Michelle; McMahon, Gregory; Erdman, Natasha; Shepard, Stephen; Burns, Michael J.; Chiles, Thomas C.; Naughton, Michael J.

    2012-02-01

    We have adapted the nanocoax array architecture for high sensitivity, all-electronic chemical and biological sensing. We previously demonstrated ppb concentration level detection sensitivity to volatile organic compounds in dry air using the nanocoax array with nanoporous coax annuli [1]. Here, we report progress toward modifying/functionalizing the coax metal surfaces to enable specific binding of target molecules (e.g. proteins, toxins, pathogenic organisms), followed by electronic interrogation via capacitance/impedance spectroscopy. As a proxy for target molecules, and in order to confirm the ability to selectively functionalize desired surfaces in our nanopillar / nanocoax geometry, we have selectively attached strepavidin-functionalized core-shell CdSe/ZnS quantum dots to gold nanopillars. Next steps will include substituting antibodies for the quantum dots, and measuring the capacitance and impedance response to the introduction of protein (PSA , CA-125, etc.) in serum. Ref. [1]: H.Z. Zhao, B. Rizal, G. McMahon, H. Wang, P. Dhakal, T. Kirkpatrick, Z.F. Ren, T.C. Chiles, D. Cai and M.J. Naughton (submitted).

  17. Lutein and Brain Function

    PubMed Central

    Erdman, John W.; Smith, Joshua W.; Kuchan, Matthew J.; Mohn, Emily S.; Johnson, Elizabeth J.; Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Wang, Lin; Sweedler, Jonathan V.; Neuringer, Martha

    2015-01-01

    Lutein is one of the most prevalent carotenoids in nature and in the human diet. Together with zeaxanthin, it is highly concentrated as macular pigment in the foveal retina of primates, attenuating blue light exposure, providing protection from photo-oxidation and enhancing visual performance. Recently, interest in lutein has expanded beyond the retina to its possible contributions to brain development and function. Only primates accumulate lutein within the brain, but little is known about its distribution or physiological role. Our team has begun to utilize the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) model to study the uptake and bio-localization of lutein in the brain. Our overall goal has been to assess the association of lutein localization with brain function. In this review, we will first cover the evolution of the non-human primate model for lutein and brain studies, discuss prior association studies of lutein with retina and brain function, and review approaches that can be used to localize brain lutein. We also describe our approach to the biosynthesis of 13C-lutein, which will allow investigation of lutein flux, localization, metabolism and pharmacokinetics. Lastly, we describe potential future research opportunities. PMID:26566524

  18. A Generalized Wall Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Povinelli, Louis A.; Liu, Nan-Suey; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Lumley, J. L.

    1999-01-01

    The asymptotic solutions, described by Tennekes and Lumley (1972), for surface flows in a channel, pipe or boundary layer at large Reynolds numbers are revisited. These solutions can be extended to more complex flows such as the flows with various pressure gradients, zero wall stress and rough surfaces, etc. In computational fluid dynamics (CFD), these solutions can be used as the boundary conditions to bridge the near-wall region of turbulent flows so that there is no need to have the fine grids near the wall unless the near-wall flow structures are required to resolve. These solutions are referred to as the wall functions. Furthermore, a generalized and unified law of the wall which is valid for whole surface layer (including viscous sublayer, buffer layer and inertial sublayer) is analytically constructed. The generalized law of the wall shows that the effect of both adverse and favorable pressure gradients on the surface flow is very significant. Such as unified wall function will be useful not only in deriving analytic expressions for surface flow properties but also bringing a great convenience for CFD methods to place accurate boundary conditions at any location away from the wall. The extended wall functions introduced in this paper can be used for complex flows with acceleration, deceleration, separation, recirculation and rough surfaces.

  19. Development of Functional Foods

    PubMed Central

    MITSUOKA, Tomotari

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in intestinal microbiota research are the background for the appearance of functional foods. Lactic fermentation products are included in the functional foods and classified into 3 groups based on their mechanisms of action: probiotics, prebiotics and biogenics. Probiotics are viable microorganisms, such as lactobacilli and bifidobacteria, that beneficially affect the host by improving the intestinal bacterial balance. Prebiotics are nondigestible food ingredients, such as oligosaccharides and dietary fiber, that beneficially affect the host by selectively stimulating the growth or activities of beneficial intestinal bacteria in the colon and thus improve the health of the hosts. Biogenics are biologically active peptides, including immunopotentiators (biological response modifier: BRM), plant flavonoids, etc. They act directly or indirectly through modulation of intestinal microbiota on the health of the hosts. Thus, functional foods enhance bioregulation such as stresses, appetite and absorption; biodefence, such as immunity and suppression of allergies; prevent diseases, including diarrhea, constipation, cancer, cholesterolemia and diabetes; and suppress aging through immunostimulation as well as suppression of mutagenesis, carcinogenesis, oxidation processes, intestinal putrefaction, and cholesterolemia. PMID:25032085

  20. Microglia Development and function*

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Debasis; Roth, Theodore L.; McGavern, Dorian B.

    2016-01-01

    Proper development and function of the mammalian central nervous system (CNS) depend critically on the activity of parenchymal sentinels referred to as microglia. Although microglia were first described as ramified brain-resident phagocytes, research conducted over the past century has expanded considerably upon this narrow view and ascribed many functions to these dynamic CNS inhabitants. Microglia are now considered among the most versatile cells in the body, possessing the capacity to morphologically and functionally adapt to their ever-changing surroundings. Even in a resting state, the processes of microglia are highly dynamic and perpetually scan the CNS. Microglia are in fact vital participants in CNS homeostasis, and dysregulation of these sentinels can give rise to neurological disease. In this review, we discuss the exciting developments in our understanding of microglial biology, from their developmental origin to their participation in CNS homeostasis and pathophysiological states such as neuropsychiatric disorders, neurodegeneration, sterile injury responses, and infectious diseases. We also delve into the world of microglial dynamics recently uncovered using real-time imaging techniques. PMID:24471431

  1. Functions of Multivector Variables

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, James M.; Iqbal, Azhar; Gunn, Lachlan J.; Abbott, Derek

    2015-01-01

    As is well known, the common elementary functions defined over the real numbers can be generalized to act not only over the complex number field but also over the skew (non-commuting) field of the quaternions. In this paper, we detail a number of elementary functions extended to act over the skew field of Clifford multivectors, in both two and three dimensions. Complex numbers, quaternions and Cartesian vectors can be described by the various components within a Clifford multivector and from our results we are able to demonstrate new inter-relationships between these algebraic systems. One key relationship that we discover is that a complex number raised to a vector power produces a quaternion thus combining these systems within a single equation. We also find a single formula that produces the square root, amplitude and inverse of a multivector over one, two and three dimensions. Finally, comparing the functions over different dimension we observe that Cℓ(ℜ3) provides a particularly versatile algebraic framework. PMID:25774689

  2. Hexagonalization of correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Thiago; Komatsu, Shota

    2017-01-01

    We propose a nonperturbative framework to study general correlation functions of single-trace operators in N = 4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory at large N . The basic strategy is to decompose them into fundamental building blocks called the hexagon form factors, which were introduced earlier to study structure constants using integrability. The decomposition is akin to a triangulation of a Riemann surface, and we thus call it hexagonalization. We propose a set of rules to glue the hexagons together based on symmetry, which naturally incorporate the dependence on the conformal and the R-symmetry cross ratios. Our method is conceptually different from the conventional operator product expansion and automatically takes into account multi-trace operators exchanged in OPE channels. To illustrate the idea in simple set-ups, we compute four-point functions of BPS operators of arbitrary lengths and correlation functions of one Konishi operator and three short BPS operators, all at one loop. In all cases, the results are in perfect agreement with the perturbative data. We also suggest that our method can be a useful tool to study conformal integrals, and show it explicitly for the case of ladder integrals.

  3. Functional relations for the density-functional exchange and correlation functionals connecting functionals at three densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joubert, Daniel P.

    2012-03-01

    It is shown that the density-functional-theory exchange and correlation functionals satisfy 0=γEhx[ρN]+2Ecγ[ρN]-γEhx[ρN-1γ]-2Ecγ[ρN-1γ]+2∫d3r'[ρN-10(r)-ρN-1γ(r)]v0([ρN];r)+∫d3r'[ρN-10(r)-ρN-1γ(r)]r·∇v0([ρN];r)+∫d3r'ρN(r)r·∇vcγ([ρN];r)-∫d3r'ρN-1γ(r)r·∇vcγ([ρN-1γ];r)-∫d3r'fγ(r)r·∇vhxcγ([ρN];r)-2∫d3r'fγ(r)vhxcγ([ρN];r). In the derivation of this equation the adiabatic connection formulation is used, where the ground-state density of an N-electron system ρN is kept constant independent of the electron-electron coupling strength γ. Here Ehx[ρ] is the Hartree plus exchange energy, Ecγ[ρ] is the correlation energy, vhxcγ[ρ] is the Hartree plus exchange-correlation potential, vc[ρ] is the correlation potential, and v0[ρ]is the Kohn-Sham potential. The charge densities ρN and ρN-1γ are the N- and (N-1)-electron ground-state densities of the same Hamiltonian at electron-electron coupling strength γ. fγ(r)=ρN(r)-ρN-1γ(r) is the Fukui function. This equation can be useful in testing the internal self-consistency of approximations to the exchange and correlation functionals. As an example the identity is tested on the analytical Hooke's atom charge density for some frequently used approximate functionals.

  4. Galaxy cosmological mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Amanda R.; Iribarrem, Alvaro; Ribeiro, Marcelo B.; Stoeger, William R.

    2014-12-01

    Aims: This paper studies the galaxy cosmological mass function (GCMF) in a semi-empirical relativistic approach that uses observational data provided by recent galaxy redshift surveys. Methods: Starting from a previously presented relation between the mass-to-light ratio, the selection function obtained from the luminosity function (LF) data and the luminosity density, the average luminosity L, and the average galactic mass ℳg were computed in terms of the redshift. ℳg was also alternatively estimated by means of a method that uses the galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF). Comparison of these two forms of deriving the average galactic mass allowed us to infer a possible bias introduced by the selection criteria of the survey. We used the FORS Deep Field galaxy survey sample of 5558 galaxies in the redshift range 0.5 function, but whose fitted parameter values are different from the values found in the literature for the GSMF. Conclusions: This GCMF behavior follows the theoretical predictions from the cold dark matter models in which the less massive objects form first, followed later by more massive ones. In the range 0.5

  5. [Functional pathophysiology of consciousness].

    PubMed

    Jellinger, Kurt A

    2009-01-01

    Consciousness (Latin conscientia "moral conscience"), according to the English philosopher John Locke (1632-1704) [103], is the awareness of all that occurs in the mind of a person, whereas the American philosopher John Searle (2000) defined it as "inner qualitative, subjective states and processes of awareness". In modern science it is defined as a continuous state of full awareness of the Self and one's relationship to the external and internal environment, describing the degree of wakefulness in which an organism recognizes stimuli. This widely discussed biological term for complex neuronal processes that allow an individuum to recognize itself and its environment and to act accordingly, has been and still is the subject of much research in philosophy and natural/neuroscience. Its definition is often used for awareness and recognition, too. While the Egyptians in the papyrus Edwin Smith already recognized the brain as the seat of consciousness, René Descartes (1644 [36]) believed its special structure should be "a small gland in the middle", but the anatomical structures and physiological processes involved in consciousness were elucidated only in the middle of the 20th century. Neuronal substrates include several functional networks that are hierarchically organized and cooperate functionally. The lowest level is the mesencephalic formatio reticularis and its projections to the thalamus that were identified als ascending reticular system (ARAS) by the classical experiments of Moruzzi and Magoun, whereas later analyses of patients with impaired consciousness provided further insights. The mesencephalic ARAS as motor of the function of higher structures projects 1. via the reticular thalamus diffusely to the cortex, 2. via hypothalamus to the basal forebrain and limbic system, and 3. to the medial raphe of the brainstem and locus coeruleus and their diffuse cortical projections. The reticular system is stimulated directly and indirectly via numerous collaterals

  6. Generating functionals for Green's functions in gauge field theories

    SciTech Connect

    Bordag, M.; Kaschlun, L.; Matveev, V.A.; Robaschik, D.

    1987-09-01

    The structure of the generating functional of the one-particle-irreducible Green's functions in gauge field theories is investigated. Both axial as well as covariant gauge conditions are considered. For both cases, the general structure of the functionals is obtained, and a functional expansion with respect to nonlocal operators is given. The appearance of gauge-dependent operators in the case of the covariant gauge follows in a natural manner from the structure of the corresponding functional.

  7. Defining functional dyspepsia.

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Calleja, José Luis

    2011-12-01

    Dyspepsia and functional dyspepsia represent a highly significant public health issue. A good definition of dyspepsia is key for helping us to better approach symptoms, decision making, and therapy indications.During the last few years many attempts were made at establishing a definition of dyspepsia. Results were little successful on most occasions, and clear discrepancies arose on whether symptoms should be associated with digestion, which types of symptoms were to be included, which anatomic location should symptoms have, etc.The Rome III Committee defined dyspepsia as "a symptom or set of symptoms that most physicians consider to originate from the gastroduodenal area", including the following: postprandial heaviness, early satiety, and epigastric pain or burning. Two new entities were defined: a) food-induced dyspeptic symptoms (postprandial distress syndrome); and b) epigastric pain (epigastric pain syndrome). These and other definitions have shown both strengths and weaknesses. At times they have been much too complex, at times much too simple; furthermore, they have commonly erred on the side of being inaccurate and impractical. On the other hand, some (the most recent ones) are difficult to translate into the Spanish language. In a meeting of gastroenterologists with a special interest in digestive functional disorders, the various aspects of dyspepsia definition were discussed and put to the vote, and the following conclusions were arrived at: dyspepsia is defined as a set of symptoms, either related or unrelated to food ingestion, localized on the upper half of the abdomen. They include: a) epigastric discomfort (as a category of severity) or pain; b) postprandial heaviness; and c) early satiety. Associated complaints include: nausea, belching, bloating, and epigastric burn (heartburn). All these must be scored according to severity and frequency. Furthermore, psychological factors may be involved in the origin of functional dyspepsia. On the other hand

  8. Functional fractionation of platelets.

    PubMed

    Haver, V M; Gear, A R

    1981-02-01

    Studies of platelet populations suggest that they are heterogeneous in size, age, and metabolic parameters. In an attempt to correlate these parameters with efficiency of aggregation, a new technique, functional fractionation, was developed. Platelet populations are separated by their differential reactivity to aggregating agents. For example, low doses of ADP (0.1 to 0.7 microM) are added to stirred PRP, after which gentle centrifugation is used to remove aggregates from single unreacted platelets. The loose aggregates can be readily dispersed for comparison of the physical or biochemical properties of the reacted versus unreacted platelets. It was found that reactive platelets were larger (6.5 micrometer3) than unreacted platelets (5.51 micrometer3). No significant difference in density existed between the two populations, and no release of [14C]serotonin from prelabeled platelets occurred during functional fractionation. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy confirmed the size difference and revealed that in both populations platelets were structurally intact with a normal discoid shape and no significant difference in organelle content. Human platelets most reactive to ADP were also enriched in glycogen (3.6-fold), ATP (1.6-fold), and ADP (twofold), compared with less reactive cells. These "reactive" cells took up more 51[Cr] and contained 1.9 times more surface sialic acid. In an in vivo aging experiment, rats were injected with 75[Se]methionine. Shortly after labeling (1 day), the most reactive platelets possessed the highest amount of 75[Se]. These results reveal that functionally active platelets, which are also larger, are more active metabolically than less reactive platelets, possess a higher negative surface charge, and may be a younger population.

  9. Cytokines and thyroid function.

    PubMed

    Ajjan, R A; Watson, P F; Weetman, A P

    1996-01-01

    Cytokines play a crucial role in autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) through various mechanisms. They are produced in the thyroid by intrathyroidal inflammatory cells, in particular lymphocytes, as well as by the thyroid follicular cells (TFC) themselves and may thus act in a cascade to enhance the autoimmune process (Fig. 1). Cytokines upregulate the inflammatory reaction through stimulation of both T and B cells, resulting in antibody production and tissue injury. In addition, intrathyroidal cytokines induce immunological changes in TFC including enhancement of both major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II molecule expression, and upregulation of adhesion and complement regulatory molecule expression. Cytokines can also modulate both growth and function of TFC and have a role in extrathyroidal complications of ATD, most importantly thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy (TAO), where they induce fibroblast proliferation and enhance the production of glycosaminoglycans (GAG), resulting in proptosis and the other clinical features of the disease. In addition to these effects, exogenous administration of cytokines has been associated with impairment of thyroid function ranging from the appearance of autoantibodies alone to the development of frank thyroid dysfunction. Cytokines have also been implicated in subacute thyroiditis (SAT) and amiodarone-induced thyroid dysfunction, as well as in thyroid function abnormalities occurring in patients with non-thyroidal illnesses (NTI). Genetic variations in cytokine genes represent potential risk factors for ATD, and disease associations have been described for polymorphisms in IL-1ra and TNF beta genes. Recent experimental evidence suggests the possibility of novel cytokine-based therapeutic approaches for ATD and its complications, in particular TAO.

  10. SAMe and sexual functioning.

    PubMed

    Dording, C M; Mischoulon, D; Shyu, I; Alpert, J E; Papakostas, G I

    2012-08-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a known side effect of antidepressant treatment (ADT), affecting up to 58-73% of those who receive ADT, potentially affecting antidepressant adherence. Consequently, it is vital to develop novel treatments that target antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction. We examined whether adjunctive S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAMe) is associated with greater improvement in sexual functioning than adjunctive placebo by measuring changes in sexual functioning using the Massachusetts General Hospital-Sexual Functioning Questionnaire (MGH-SFQ) during a 6-week, single-center, randomized, double-blind trial of SAMe augmentation for SSRI/SNRI- nonresponders. Controlling for the degree of arousal dysfunction at baseline as well as the degree of change in HDRS-17 scale scores during the course of the study, men treated with adjunctive SAMe demonstrated significantly lower arousal dysfunction at endpoint than those treated with adjunctive placebo. In addition, controlling for the degree of erectile dysfunction at baseline as well as the degree of change in HDRS-17 scale scores, men treated with adjunctive SAMe demonstrated significantly lower erectile dysfunction at endpoint than those treated with adjunctive placebo. In the present study, we have observed that adjunctive SAMe can have positive benefit on male arousal and erectile dysfunction, independent of improvement in depressive symptoms. These findings are preliminary, and warrant replication. CLINICAL TRIALS.GOV IDENTIFIER: NCT00093847; titled 'Optimizing the Effectiveness of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) in Treatment-Resistant Depression', accessible at: http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00093847. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Gastrointestinal Physiology and Function.

    PubMed

    Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley; Johnson, Anthony C; Grundy, David

    2017-02-08

    The gastrointestinal (GI) system is responsible for the digestion and absorption of ingested food and liquids. Due to the complexity of the GI tract and the substantial volume of material that could be covered under the scope of GI physiology, this chapter briefly reviews the overall function of the GI tract, and discusses the major factors affecting GI physiology and function, including the intestinal microbiota, chronic stress, inflammation, and aging with a focus on the neural regulation of the GI tract and an emphasis on basic brain-gut interactions that serve to modulate the GI tract. GI diseases refer to diseases of the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, colon, and rectum. The major symptoms of common GI disorders include recurrent abdominal pain and bloating, heartburn, indigestion/dyspepsia, nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, and constipation. GI disorders rank among the most prevalent disorders, with the most common including esophageal and swallowing disorders, gastric and peptic ulcer disease, gastroparesis or delayed gastric emptying, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Many GI disorders are difficult to diagnose and their symptoms are not effectively managed. Thus, basic research is required to drive the development of novel therapeutics which are urgently needed. One approach is to enhance our understanding of gut physiology and pathophysiology especially as it relates to gut-brain communications since they have clinical relevance to a number of GI complaints and represent a therapeutic target for the treatment of conditions including inflammatory diseases of the GI tract such as IBD and functional gut disorders such as IBS.

  12. Functional DNA Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhao

    The discovery of DNA helical structure opened the door of modern molecular biology. Ned Seeman utilized DNA as building block to construct different nanoscale materials, and introduced a new field, know as DNA nanotechnology. After several decades of development, different DNA structures had been created, with different dimension, different morphology and even with complex curvatures. In addition, after construction of enough amounts DNA structure candidates, DNA structure template, with excellent spatial addressability, had been used to direct the assembly of different nanomaterials, including nanoparticles and proteins, to produce different functional nanomaterials. However there are still many challenges to fabricate functional DNA nanostructures. The first difficulty is that the present finite sized template dimension is still very small, usually smaller than 100nm, which will limit the application for large amount of nanomaterials assembly or large sized nanomaterials assembly. Here we tried to solve this problem through developing a new method, superorigami, to construct finite sized DNA structure with much larger dimension, which can be as large as 500nm. The second problem will be explored the ability of DNA structure to assemble inorganic nanomaterials for novel photonic or electronic properties. Here we tried to utilize DNA Origami method to assemble AuNPs with controlled 3D spacial position for possible chiral photonic complex. We also tried to assemble SWNT with discrete length for possible field effect transistor device. In addition, we tried to mimic in vivo compartment with DNA structure to study internalized enzyme behavior. From our results, constructed DNA cage origami can protect encapsulated enzyme from degradation, and internalized enzyme activity can be boosted for up to 10 folds. In summary, DNA structure can serve as an ideal template for construction of functional nanomaterials with lots of possibilities to be explored.

  13. Functional Burden of Strabismus

    PubMed Central

    Pineles, Stacy L.; Velez, Federico G.; Isenberg, Sherwin J.; Fenoglio, Zachary; Birch, Eileen; Nusinowitz, Steven; Demer, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Binocular summation (BiS) is defined as the superiority of visual function for binocular over monocular viewing. Binocular summation decreases with age and large interocular differences in visual acuity. To our knowledge, BiS has not heretofore been well studied as a functional measure of binocularity in strabismus. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effect of strabismus on BiS using a battery of psychophysical tasks that are clinically relevant and easy to use and to determine whether strabismus is associated with binocular inhibition in extreme cases. DESIGN Case-control study. SETTING University-based eye institute. PARTICIPANTS Strabismic patients recruited during 2010 to 2012 from a preoperative clinic and control participants with no history of eye disease other than refractive error. INTERVENTION A battery of psychophysical and electrophysiological tests including Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study visual acuity, Sloan low-contrast acuity (LCA) (2.5% and 1.25%), Pelli-Robson contrast sensitivity, and sweep visual evoked potential contrast sensitivity. MAIN OUTCOME AND MEASURE Binocular summation was calculated as the ratio between binocular and better-eye individual scores. RESULTS Sixty strabismic and 80 control participants were prospectively examined (age range, 8–60 years). Mean BiS was significantly lower in the strabismic patients than controls for LCA (2.5% and 1.25%, P = .005 and <.001, respectively). For 1.25% LCA, strabismic patients had a mean BiS score less than 1, indicating binocular inhibition (ie, the binocular score was less than that of the better eye’s monocular score). There was no significant difference in BiS for contrast thresholds on Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study visual acuity, Pelli-Robson contrast sensitivity, or sweep visual evoked potential contrast sensitivity. Regression analysis revealed a significant worsening of BiS with strabismus for 2.5% (P = .009) and 1.25% (P = .002) LCA, after accounting for

  14. Pavement Functional Condition Indicators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-02-01

    Diagonal Braked Vehicle 6M 65 Correlation olC alitornia >kKl lesier and Pennsyl’ ania State Drag Skid Jester 70 66 Correlation Betvuvn the Wei Dry...aj Paw- matt Frolili’ | Pennsylvania Department of Trans - portation. I%9|.) ’. I’he i-iiunl valui-s appcarin)! i" the AH) liibulalion rt’liiti...applieri to the autocorrelation function R(T) of a sample funciion y(x). The resulting Fourier trans - form ol R(T) is also the power spectral density

  15. ADAM function in embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Alfandari, Dominique; McCusker, Catherine; Cousin, Hélène

    2009-01-01

    Cleavage of proteins inserted into the plasma membrane (shedding) is an essential process controlling many biological functions including cell signaling, cell adhesion and migration as well as proliferation and differentiation. ADAM surface metalloproteases have been shown to play an essential role in these processes. Gene inactivation during embryonic development have provided evidence of the central role of ADAM proteins in nematodes, flies, frogs, birds and mammals. The relative contribution of four subfamilies of ADAM proteins to developmental processes is the focus of this review. PMID:18935966

  16. Functional Dyspepsia Today

    PubMed Central

    VOIOSU, Theodor Alexandru; GIURCAN, Roxana; VOIOSU, Andrei Mihai; VOIOSU, Mihail Radu

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Functional dyspepsia (FD) is a disorder presenting with symptoms such as postprandial fullness, early satiety or epigastric pain. Although there is a 10 to 30% reported prevalence worldwide, there is currently no clear explanation of the pathophysiology behind this condition. Motility disorders, visceral hypersensitivity, acid disorders, Helicobacter pylori infection or psychosocial factors have all been reported to play a part in the pathophysiology of FD. The diagnosis of FD is one of exclusion, based on the Rome III criteria. The main therapeutic modalities include lifestyle changes, eradicating Helicobacter pylori infection and treatment with either proton pump inhibitors, prokinetics or antidepressants. PMID:24023602

  17. Modern vestibular function testing.

    PubMed Central

    Baloh, R W; Furman, J M

    1989-01-01

    Current tests of vestibular function concentrate on the horizontal semicircular canal-ocular reflex because it is the easiest reflex to stimulate (calorically and rotationally) and record (using electro-oculography). Tests of the other vestibulo-ocular reflexes (vertical semicircular canal and otolith) and of the vestibulospinal reflexes have yet to be shown useful in the clinical setting. Digital video recording of eye movements and vestibular-evoked responses are promising new technologies that may affect clinical testing in the near future. PMID:2660408

  18. Functional properties of vinegar.

    PubMed

    Budak, Nilgün H; Aykin, Elif; Seydim, Atif C; Greene, Annel K; Guzel-Seydim, Zeynep B

    2014-05-01

    A variety of natural vinegar products are found in civilizations around the world. A review of research on these fermented products indicates numerous reports of health benefits derived by consumption of vinegar components. Therapeutic effects of vinegar arising from consuming the inherent bioactive components including acetic acid, gallic acid, catechin, ephicatechin, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, and ferulic acid cause antioxidative, antidiabetic, antimicrobial, antitumor, antiobesity, antihypertensive, and cholesterol-lowering responses. The aims of this article are to discuss vinegar history, production, varieties, acetic acid bacteria, and functional properties of vinegars. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  19. New Functions in GCN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthelmy, Scott Douglas

    2010-03-01

    The Gamma-ray Coordinates Network (GCN) is continually being modified and enhanced to serve the world community for real-time transient astronomy. We will discuss the new features, functionality, and notice types that have been added to the system in the last two years. This includes a new filtering scheme which goes from 6 filtering parameters to 14 parameters. This will allow the follow-up user community more flexibility in selecting which notices they receive. This is important given the ever increasing array of notice types available. The VOEvent email format and socket format will also be described.

  20. A Primer on Functional Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoman, Jerome

    2008-01-01

    This article presents principles and basic steps for practitioners to complete a functional analysis of client behavior. The emphasis is on application of functional analysis to adult mental health clients. The article includes a detailed flow chart containing all major functional diagnoses and behavioral interventions, with functional assessment…

  1. A Primer on Functional Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoman, Jerome

    2008-01-01

    This article presents principles and basic steps for practitioners to complete a functional analysis of client behavior. The emphasis is on application of functional analysis to adult mental health clients. The article includes a detailed flow chart containing all major functional diagnoses and behavioral interventions, with functional assessment…

  2. Functional Foods for Women's Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindeman, Alice K.

    2002-01-01

    Describes functional foods for women's health (foods or food ingredients that provide health benefits beyond basic nutrition), explaining that both whole and modified foods can be included as functional foods. The paper discusses the history, regulation, and promotion of functional foods; consumer interest in functional foods; how to incorporate…

  3. Functional Foods for Women's Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindeman, Alice K.

    2002-01-01

    Describes functional foods for women's health (foods or food ingredients that provide health benefits beyond basic nutrition), explaining that both whole and modified foods can be included as functional foods. The paper discusses the history, regulation, and promotion of functional foods; consumer interest in functional foods; how to incorporate…

  4. Fukui function and response function for nonlocal and fractional systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Degao; Yang, Weitao

    2013-05-01

    We present extensions to our previous work on Fukui functions and linear-response functions [W. Yang, A. J. Cohen, F. D. Proft, and P. Geerlings, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 144110 (2012), 10.1063/1.3701562]. Viewed as energy derivatives with respect to the number of electrons and the external potential, all second-order derivatives (the linear-response function, the Fukui function, and the chemical hardness) are extended to fractional systems, and all third-order derivatives (the second-order response function, the Fukui response function, the dual descriptor, and the hyperhardness) for integer systems are also obtained. These analytical derivatives are verified by finite difference numerical derivatives. In the context of the exact linearity condition and the constancy condition, these analytical derivatives enrich greatly the information of the exact conditions on the energy functional through establishing real-space dependency. The introduction of an external nonlocal potential defines the nonlocal Fukui function and the nonlocal linear-response function. The nonlocal linear-response function so defined also provides the precise meaning for the time-dependent linear-response density-functional theory calculations with generalized Kohn-Sham functionals. These extensions will be useful to conceptual density-functional theory and density functional development.

  5. Sleep and immune function.

    PubMed

    Besedovsky, Luciana; Lange, Tanja; Born, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Sleep and the circadian system exert a strong regulatory influence on immune functions. Investigations of the normal sleep-wake cycle showed that immune parameters like numbers of undifferentiated naïve T cells and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines exhibit peaks during early nocturnal sleep whereas circulating numbers of immune cells with immediate effector functions, like cytotoxic natural killer cells, as well as anti-inflammatory cytokine activity peak during daytime wakefulness. Although it is difficult to entirely dissect the influence of sleep from that of the circadian rhythm, comparisons of the effects of nocturnal sleep with those of 24-h periods of wakefulness suggest that sleep facilitates the extravasation of T cells and their possible redistribution to lymph nodes. Moreover, such studies revealed a selectively enhancing influence of sleep on cytokines promoting the interaction between antigen presenting cells and T helper cells, like interleukin-12. Sleep on the night after experimental vaccinations against hepatitis A produced a strong and persistent increase in the number of antigen-specific Th cells and antibody titres. Together these findings indicate a specific role of sleep in the formation of immunological memory. This role appears to be associated in particular with the stage of slow wave sleep and the accompanying pro-inflammatory endocrine milieu that is hallmarked by high growth hormone and prolactin levels and low cortisol and catecholamine concentrations.

  6. Verbal Functions in Psychopathy.

    PubMed

    de Almeida Brites, José; Ladera, Valentina; Perea, Victoria; García, Ricardo

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the verbal functions and language skills of male psychopathic individuals (in prison and outside) with non-psychopaths. The purpose was therefore to analyze phonological processing, reading and writing skills, the meaning of words and images, and the understanding of sentences. Ninety individuals with an average age of 38.19 (SD = 7.67) voluntarily participated in this study. The data were collected in different settings: prisons, a private charitable organization, and private clinics and health centers. All participants completed the Psychopathy Checklist Revised and the Psycholinguistic Assessment of Language Processing in Aphasia, to assess psychopathy traits and language skills, respectively. Participants were allocated into four different groups: incarcerated psychopathic offenders (n = 13), non-incarcerated psychopathic non-offenders living in the community (n = 13), incarcerated non-psychopathic offenders (n = 25), and non-psychopathic non-offenders living in the community (n = 39). The results showed that the verbal functions and language skills between psychopaths and non-psychopaths are very similar, showing a common profile. The data presented indicate the need for more specific work opportunities for both groups within the correctional setting, with the use of appropriate language and individualized programs as necessary.

  7. Modeling mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Balaban, Robert S

    2006-12-01

    The mitochondrion represents a unique opportunity to apply mathematical modeling to a complex biological system. Understanding mitochondrial function and control is important since this organelle is critical in energy metabolism as well as playing key roles in biochemical synthesis, redox control/signaling, and apoptosis. A mathematical model, or hypothesis, provides several useful insights including a rigorous test of the consensus view of the operation of a biological process as well as providing methods of testing and creating new hypotheses. The advantages of the mitochondrial system for applying a mathematical model include the relative simplicity and understanding of the matrix reactions, the ability to study the mitochondria as a independent contained organelle, and, most importantly, one can dynamically measure many of the internal reaction intermediates, on line. The developing ability to internally monitor events within the metabolic network, rather than just the inflow and outflow, is extremely useful in creating critical bounds on complex mathematical models using the individual reaction mechanisms available. However, many serious problems remain in creating a working model of mitochondrial function including the incomplete definition of metabolic pathways, the uncertainty of using in vitro enzyme kinetics, as well as regulatory data in the intact system and the unknown chemical activities of relevant molecules in the matrix. Despite these formidable limitations, the advantages of the mitochondrial system make it one of the best defined mammalian metabolic networks that can be used as a model system for understanding the application and use of mathematical models to study biological systems.

  8. Functional diversity of laminins.

    PubMed

    Domogatskaya, Anna; Rodin, Sergey; Tryggvason, Karl

    2012-01-01

    Laminins are a large family of conserved, multidomain trimeric basement membrane proteins that contribute to the structure of extracellular matrix and influence the behavior of associated cells, such as adhesion, differentiation, migration, phenotype stability, and resistance to anoikis. In lower organisms such as Hydra there is only one isoform of laminin, but higher organisms have at least 16 trimeric isoforms with varying degrees of cell/tissue specificity. In vitro protein and cell culture studies, gene manipulation in animals, and laminin gene mutations in human diseases have provided insight into the specific functions of some laminins, but the biological roles of many isoforms are still largely unexplored, mainly owing to difficulties in isolating them in pure form from tissues or cells. In this review, we elucidate the evolution of laminins, describe their molecular complexity, and explore the current knowledge of their diversity and functional aspects, including laminin-mediated signaling via membrane receptors, in vitro cell biology, and involvement in various tissues gained from animal model and human disease studies. The potential use of laminins in cell biology research and biotechnology is discussed.

  9. Functional hemodynamic monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Pinsky, Michael R; Payen, Didier

    2005-01-01

    Hemodynamic monitoring is a central component of intensive care. Patterns of hemodynamic variables often suggest cardiogenic, hypovolemic, obstructive, or distributive (septic) etiologies to cardiovascular insufficiency, thus defining the specific treatments required. Monitoring increases in invasiveness, as required, as the risk for cardiovascular instability-induced morbidity increases because of the need to define more accurately the diagnosis and monitor the response to therapy. Monitoring is also context specific: requirements during cardiac surgery will be different from those in the intensive care unit or emergency department. Solitary hemodynamic values are useful as threshold monitors (e.g. hypotension is always pathological, central venous pressure is only elevated in disease). Some hemodynamic values can only be interpreted relative to metabolic demand, whereas others have multiple meanings. Functional hemodynamic monitoring implies a therapeutic application, independent of diagnosis such as a therapeutic trial of fluid challenge to assess preload responsiveness. Newer methods for assessing preload responsiveness include monitoring changes in central venous pressure during spontaneous inspiration, and variations in arterial pulse pressure, systolic pressure, and aortic flow variation in response to vena caval collapse during positive pressure ventilation or passive leg raising. Defining preload responsiveness using these functional measures, coupled to treatment protocols, can improve outcome from critical illness. Potentially, as these and newer, less invasive hemodynamic measures are validated, they could be incorporated into such protocolized care in a cost-effective manner. PMID:16356240

  10. Amusia and musical functioning.

    PubMed

    Alossa, Nicoletta; Castelli, Lorys

    2009-01-01

    Music, as language, is a universal and specific trait to humans; it is a complex ability with characteristics that are unique compared to other cognitive abilities. Nevertheless, several issues are still open to debate, such as, for example, whether music is a faculty that is independent from the rest of the cognitive system, and whether musical skills are mediated by a single mechanism or by a combination of processes that are independent from one another. Moreover, the anatomical correlations of music have yet to be clarified. The goal of this review is to illustrate the current condition of the neuropsychology of music and to describe different approaches to the study of the musical functions. Hereby, we will describe the neuropsychological findings, suggesting that music is a special function carried out by different and dedicated processes that are probably subserved by different anatomical regions of the brain. Moreover, we will review the evidence obtained by working with brain-damaged patients suffering from music agnosia, a selective impairment in music recognition. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Functionalism and consciousness.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, S

    1993-01-01

    It is widely held that a mental state and the subject's introspective belief about it are always 'distinct existences' and only contingently connected. This suggests that for each sort of mental state there could be a creature that is introspectively 'blind' with respect to states of that sort, meaning that while it is capable of having such states, and of conceiving of itself as having them, it is totally without introspective access to its states of that sort. It is argued here that introspective blindness with respect to many sorts of mental states, in particular beliefs and sensory states, is not a possibility, because it is incompatible with requirements of rationality that are internal to the functional roles that are constitutive of these states. Introspective accessibility is essential to the functional roles of such mental states when the conceptual and cognitive resources of the subject of those states are sufficiently rich to make beliefs and thoughts about them a possibility. This is a version of the view that such states are necessarily self-intimating and is incompatible with the perceptual model of introspection favoured by some functionalists as well as by many non-functionalists.

  12. Optogenetic Functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Peter; Fang, Zhongnan; Liu, Jia; Lee, Jin Hyung

    2016-01-01

    The investigation of the functional connectivity of precise neural circuits across the entire intact brain can be achieved through optogenetic functional magnetic resonance imaging (ofMRI), which is a novel technique that combines the relatively high spatial resolution of high-field fMRI with the precision of optogenetic stimulation. Fiber optics that enable delivery of specific wavelengths of light deep into the brain in vivo are implanted into regions of interest in order to specifically stimulate targeted cell types that have been genetically induced to express light-sensitive trans-membrane conductance channels, called opsins. fMRI is used to provide a non-invasive method of determining the brain's global dynamic response to optogenetic stimulation of specific neural circuits through measurement of the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal, which provides an indirect measurement of neuronal activity. This protocol describes the construction of fiber optic implants, the implantation surgeries, the imaging with photostimulation and the data analysis required to successfully perform ofMRI. In summary, the precise stimulation and whole-brain monitoring ability of ofMRI are crucial factors in making ofMRI a powerful tool for the study of the connectomics of the brain in both healthy and diseased states. PMID:27167840

  13. Sexual function after strokes.

    PubMed

    Boller, François; Agrawal, Kunal; Romano, Alissa

    2015-01-01

    Strokes are the second leading cause of death and the third leading cause of disability worldwide. Thanks in part to better and more available diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation, the vast majority of stroke patients tend to survive strokes, particularly in the industrialized world. Motor disability and cognitive changes such as aphasia and visuospatial disorders are most often considered among the major contributors to stroke burden. This chapter discusses disorders of sexual functions as another frequent sequel of strokes. Strokes generally induce hyposexuality, but in some instances they may be followed by hypersexuality. There is some evidence suggesting that lesions of either hemisphere affect sexual activities, but for different reasons: aphasia and depression after left-hemisphere lesions, a deficit in arousal and perhaps visuospatial disorders after right-hemisphere lesions. Psychologic, psychosocial, and physical factors, as well as medications, play an important role. A better understanding of the psychosocial and physiologic mechanisms underlying sexual functioning can provide insight into improving sexual activity and therefore quality of life in patients affected by strokes and other brain lesions.

  14. Process for functionalizing alkanes

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, Robert G.; Janowicz, Andrew H.; Periana, Roy A.

    1988-01-01

    Process for functionalizing saturated hydrocarbons comprising: (a) reacting said saturated hydrocarbons of the formula: R.sub.1 H wherein H represents a hydrogen atom; and R.sub.1 represents a saturated hydrocarbon radical, with a metal complex of the formula: CpRh[P(R.sub.2).sub.3 ]H.sub.2 wherein Cp represents a cyclopentadienyl or alkylcyclopentadienyl radical; Rh represents a rhodium atom; P represents a phosphorus atom; R.sub.2 represents a hydrocarbon radical; H represents a hydrogen atom, in the presence of ultraviolet radiation to form a hydridoalkyl complex of the formula: CpRh[P(R.sub.2).sub.3 ](R.sub.1)H (b) reacting said hydridoalkyl complex with an organic halogenating agent such as a tetrahalomethane or a haloform of the formulas: CX'X''X'''X'''' or CHX'X''X''' wherein X', X'', X'", X"" represent halogens selected from bromine, iodine or chlorine atom, at a temperature in the range of about -60.degree. to -17.degree. C. to form the corresponding haloalkyl complex of step (a) having the formula: CpRhPMe.sub.3 RX; and, (c) reacting said haloalkyl complex formed in (b) with halogen (X.sub.2) at a temperature in the range of about -60.degree. to 25.degree. C. (i.e., ambient) to form a functional haloalkyl compound.

  15. Process for functionalizing alkanes

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, Robert G.; Janowicz, Andrew H.; Periana-Pillai, Roy A.

    1985-01-01

    Process for functionalizing saturated hydrocarbons selectively in the terminal position comprising: (a) reacting said saturated hydrocarbons of the formula: RH where: H represents a hydrogen atom, and R represents a saturated hydrocarbon radical, with a metal complex of the formula: CpRhPMe.sub.3 H.sub.2 where: Cp represents a pentamethylated cyclopentadienyl radical, Rh represents a rhodium atom, P represents a phosphorous atom, Me represents a methyl group, H represents a hydrogen atom, in the presence of ultraviolet radiation at a temperature maintained at about -60.degree. to -17.degree. C. to form a hydridoalkyl complex of the formula: CpRhPMe.sub.3 RH (b) reacting said hydridoalkyl complex with a haloform of the formula: CHX.sub.3 where: X represents a bromine, iodine or chlorine atom, at a temperature in the range of about -60.degree. to -17.degree. C. to form the corresponding haloalkyl complex of step (a) having the formula: CpRhPMe.sub.3 RX; and, (c) reacting said haloalkyl complex formed in (b) with halogen (X.sub.2) at a temperature in the range of about -60.degree. to 25.degree. C. (i.e. ambient) to form a functional haloalkyl compound.

  16. Mast Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Elaine Zayas Marcelino; Jamur, Maria Célia

    2014-01-01

    Since first described by Paul Ehrlich in 1878, mast cells have been mostly viewed as effectors of allergy. It has been only in the past two decades that mast cells have gained recognition for their involvement in other physiological and pathological processes. Mast cells have a widespread distribution and are found predominantly at the interface between the host and the external environment. Mast cell maturation, phenotype and function are a direct consequence of the local microenvironment and have a marked influence on their ability to specifically recognize and respond to various stimuli through the release of an array of biologically active mediators. These features enable mast cells to act as both first responders in harmful situations as well as to respond to changes in their environment by communicating with a variety of other cells implicated in physiological and immunological responses. Therefore, the critical role of mast cells in both innate and adaptive immunity, including immune tolerance, has gained increased prominence. Conversely, mast cell dysfunction has pointed to these cells as the main offenders in several chronic allergic/inflammatory disorders, cancer and autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes the current knowledge of mast cell function in both normal and pathological conditions with regards to their regulation, phenotype and role. PMID:25062998

  17. Sildenafil affects olfactory function.

    PubMed

    Gudziol, V; Mück-Weymann, M; Seizinger, O; Rauh, R; Siffert, W; Hummel, T

    2007-01-01

    Sildenafil is the first member of a new class of oral drugs effective for erectile dysfunction. However, approximately 20% of patients complain about nasal congestion after sildenafil administration. Because nasal airflow and olfaction are closely linked, the sense of smell was evaluated in 20 young, healthy volunteers after the administration of 50 and 100 mg sildenafil, and placebo in a double-blinded, crossover study. Olfactory function was evaluated using a standardized and validated test (Sniffin' Sticks). To investigate a possible impact of G-protein beta3 subunit C825T polymorphism on the effect of sildenafil on olfaction the genotype of all subjects was determined. The effect of sildenafil on olfaction was only present at a dose of 100 mg but not at a dose of 50 mg sildenafil. The genotypes TT, CC and TC of the G-protein beta3 C825T polymorphism had no impact on the change in olfactory function. Higher sildenafil doses may produce decreased olfactory sensitivity.

  18. [Abnormality of thyroid function].

    PubMed

    Masamune, Taishi; Matsukawa, Takashi

    2010-07-01

    The thyroid hormones are synthesized by iodine. Thyroid dysfunction can develop in patients who have received treatment with iodine-containing contrast media or treatment with amiodarone. Thyrotoxicosis is a symptom due to high levels of thyroid hormone. The entity most threatened is the cardiovascular system. beta-adrenergic receptor blockade can control the heart rate. And a decreasing heart rate may improve heart-pumping function. We should aim to avoid surgery on any patients whose thyroid function is abnormal. The avoidance of a thyroid storm is the goal in managing hyperthyroid patients. Suppression of the sympathetic tone and maintenance of a deep level of surgical anesthesia are prudent. Thyroid storm is rare nowadays but still carries a high mortality. Precipitating factors include infection, surgery, childbirth or trauma, et al. Hypothyroid patients are sensitive to the effects of anesthetic agents and many drugs, including opioids. Mild hypothyroidism may have little perioperative significance. However, overt hypothyroidism can develop in a high percentage of patients with history of subclinical hypothyroidism. An untreated patient with hypothyroidism may present as an emergency with myxedema coma. Myxedema coma is rare but carries a high mortality. Precipitating factors include hypothermia, surgery, trauma, sedative drugs, et al.

  19. [Functions of plant apyrases].

    PubMed

    Wujak, Magdalena; Komoszyński, Michał

    2011-01-01

    This publication presents results of the recent studies on plant NTPDases (apyrases). The structure and major physicochemical properties of this enzymes are reviewed. The attention has been paid to metabolic functions of apyrases from Solanum tuberosum and Arabidopsis thaliana. Apyrases constitute a family of proteins hydrolyzing phosphoanhydride bonds of nucleoside tri- and di-phosphates. They share common features like a similar structure, broad nucleotide substrate specificity and divalent cation requirement for their catalytic activity. The presence of plant NTPDases was detected in various cellular compartments. They are soluble or membrane-bound proteins. In hydrolytic processes catalyzed by activity of apoplastic apyrases and other ectoenzymes, adenine, ribose and orthophosphate are produced. These compounds are transported to the cell. Apyrases have been speculated to be involved in the regulation of starch synthesis and signal transmission. Their activity is necessary for development and growth of tubers and roots. Enzymes from leguminous plants activate the symbiosis with root nodule bacteria. Considering the fact, that NTPDases change the nucleotide concentration in cells and tissues, most of described functions may be related to the regulation of the energy charge of cell.

  20. [Dehydroepiandrosterone and brain functioning].

    PubMed

    Goncharov, N P; Katsiia, G V; Nizhnik, A N

    2005-01-01

    The adrenal glands synthesize dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulphate form (DHEAS) more intensively than they do other steroid hormones. Researchers are interested in these hormones for several reasons. Firstly, for some years they have been trying to find the reason for DHEA and DHEAS to be synthesized and present in the organism in such high concentrations. Secondly, their attention have been attracted by age-dependent regression of DHEA, which is strictly determined. Thirdly, despite longstanding efforts of scientists, the physiological role and spectrum of the biological activity of DHEA is still unclear. Evidence of that DHEA and DHEAS can be synthesized in situ in the brain tissue, received in rat experiments, urged researchers to clarify the role of these neurosteroids in the CNS. The presented review covers ways of neurosteroid synthesis, possible mechanisms of the regulation of these processes, and their dynamics under the condition of stress. The authors analyze experimental and clinical observations undertaken with a goal to clarify a possible role of DHEA in the manifestation of various brain functions. Special attention is payed to ambiguous results of modern studies, dedicated to replacement therapy of various disorders of CNS functioning (Alzheimer's disease, depression, age-specific memory impairment, sleep disturbance etc.) with DHEAS.

  1. From mechanistic to functional behaviorism.

    PubMed

    Moxley, R A

    1992-11-01

    A shift from mechanistic behaviorism to functional behaviorism is presented against the background of two historical traditions, one with an emphasis on form, the other with an emphasis on function. Skinner's work, which made more contributions to a functional behaviorism than to a mechanistic behaviorism, exemplifies this shift. The two traditions and an account of Skinner's development of functional relations are presented in order to show Skinner's contributions to aligning modern behavior analysis with the functional tradition.

  2. ENUMERATION OF REGULAR TRUTH FUNCTIONS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    IN A PREVIOUS WORK, (Lockheed Missiles and Space Company, 6-90-61-26, Jan 1961) the classification problem of the linearly separable truth functions...was reduced to the enumeration of some special kind of linearly separable truth functions called canonical truth functions. A canonical truth ...function F of n variables has an important property: if x F and y x in the canonical partial order of Qn, then y F. Any truth function F of n

  3. Lyapunov function as potential function: A dynamical equivalence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ruo-Shi; Ma, Yi-An; Yuan, Bo; Ao, Ping

    2014-01-01

    For a physical system, regardless of time reversal symmetry, a potential function serves also as a Lyapunov function, providing convergence and stability information. In this paper, the converse is constructively proved that any dynamics with a Lyapunov function has a corresponding physical realization: a friction force, a Lorentz force, and a potential function. Such construction establishes a set of equations with physical meaning for Lyapunov function and suggests new approaches on the significant unsolved problem namely to construct Lyapunov functions for general nonlinear systems. In addition, a connection is found that the Lyapunov equation is a reduced form of a generalized Einstein relation for linear systems, revealing further insights of the construction.

  4. Pulmonary Function after Adenotonsillectomy

    PubMed Central

    Rogha, Mehrdad; Amini, Jaleh; Raisi, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Adenotonsillar hypertrophy is a common disorder among children which, without proper treatment, may lead to considerable problems. Although the consequences of this disorder have been studied in other articles, we decided to evaluate the changes in pulmonary function tests in these children after adenotonsillectomy, and the correlation between clinical and spirometric parameters. Materials and Methods: We conducted a before- and after- clinical trial. Forty children (17 females and 23 males) with a diagnosis of upper airway obstruction due to adenotonsillar hypertrophy were enrolled in this study. Mean age of the participants was 6.9±1.9 years. Eight spirometric parameters were selected for evaluation pre-operatively and 40 days postoperatively. Besides, symptom scores were defined for each patient to assess their disease severity, pre- and postoperatively. Data were analyzed statistically. Results: Forced vital capacity (FVC) increased from 1.28±0.26% pre-operatively to 1.33±0.24%postoperatively (P=0.05). Peak expiratory flow increased from 2.74±0.65% pre-operatively to 2.84±0.51% postoperatively (P=0.02) and mid expiratory forced expiratory flow (FEF25–75) was 1.81±0.48% pre-operatively, increasing to 1.91±0.50% postoperatively (P=0.02). Maximal expiratory flow at 25% of FVC (MEF25) increased from 1.09±0.36% pre-operatively to 1.21±0.34% postoperatively (P=0.02). There was no correlation among the other spirometric parameters (FEV1, FEV1/FVC, MEF50 and MEF75) pre- and post-operatively (P>0.05). Despite some improvements in pulmonary function indices, there was no correlation between changes in spirometric parameters and severity of the snoring (P>0.05). Conclusion: Although our findings reveal that adenotonsillectomy had a positive effect on pulmonary function tests, we found no significant correlation between alterations in spirometric parameters and severity of snoring. However, performing a spirometric examination in children with

  5. [Iron function and carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Akatsuka, Shinya; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2016-07-01

    Though iron is an essential micronutrient for humans, the excess state is acknowledged to be associated with oncogenesis. For example, iron overload in the liver of the patients with hereditary hemocromatosis highly increases the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. Also, as to asbestos-related mesothelioma, such kinds of asbestos with a higher iron content are considered to be more carcinogenic. Iron is a useful element, which enables fundamental functions for life such as oxygen carrying and electron transport. However, in the situation where organisms are unable to have good control of it, iron turns into a dangerous element which catalyzes generation of reactive oxygen. In this review, I first outline the relationships between iron and cancer in general, then give an explanation about iron-related animal carcinogenesis models.

  6. Functional replacements for gluten.

    PubMed

    Zannini, Emanuele; Jones, Julie Miller; Renzetti, Stefano; Arendt, Elke K

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated disease triggered in genetically susceptible individuals by ingested gluten from wheat, rye, barley, and other closely related cereal grains. Currently, the only therapy able to normalize the clinical and histological manifestation of the disease is a strict and life-long gluten-free (GF) diet. The replacement of gluten presents a significant technological challenge, as it is an essential structure-building protein, which is necessary for formulating high-quality baked goods. The objective of this paper is to review some basics about CD, its current prevalence, and the recent advances in the preparation of high-quality GF breads using GF flours, starches, hydrocolloids, gums, and novel functional ingredients and technologies.

  7. Corrosion Damage Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Russell H.

    2002-11-30

    Corrosion damage can lead to reduced operational lifetimes. Often this damage is not as obvious as general corrosion but takes the form of pits, intergranular corrosion, crevice corrosion and hydrogen absorption. These types of corrosion damage lead to stress corrosion cracking, hydrogen induced cracking and corrosion fatigue. A critical step in defining a corrosion damage function is determining the relationship between the corrosion damage, the resulting crack propagation mechanism and component lifetimes. The sequence of events is often some localized corrosion event such as pitting, transition of the pit to a planar crack, propagation of this short crack, transition of the short crack to long crack conditions and continued propagation through Stage I, II, and III of the long crack SCC regimes. A description of critical corrosion damage processes and examples of the transition to long crack SCC conditions will be discussed.

  8. Temperature and neuromuscular function.

    PubMed

    Racinais, S; Oksa, J

    2010-10-01

    This review focuses on the effects of different environmental temperatures on the neuromuscular system. During short duration exercise, performance improves from 2% to 5% with a 1 °C increase in muscle temperature. However, if central temperature increases (i.e., hyperthermia), this positive relation ceases and performance becomes impaired. Performance impairments in both cold and hot environment are related to a modification in neural drive due to protective adaptations, central and peripheral failures. This review highlights, to some extent, the different effects of hot and cold environments on the supraspinal, spinal and peripheral components of the neural drive involved in the up- and down-regulation of neuromuscular function and shows that temperature also affects the neural drive transmission to the muscle and the excitation-contraction coupling.

  9. Nostalgia: content, triggers, functions.

    PubMed

    Wildschut, Tim; Sedikides, Constantine; Arndt, Jamie; Routledge, Clay

    2006-11-01

    Seven methodologically diverse studies addressed 3 fundamental questions about nostalgia. Studies 1 and 2 examined the content of nostalgic experiences. Descriptions of nostalgic experiences typically featured the self as a protagonist in interactions with close others (e.g., friends) or in momentous events (e.g., weddings). Also, the descriptions contained more expressions of positive than negative affect and often depicted the redemption of negative life scenes by subsequent triumphs. Studies 3 and 4 examined triggers of nostalgia and revealed that nostalgia occurs in response to negative mood and the discrete affective state of loneliness. Studies 5, 6, and 7 investigated the functional utility of nostalgia and established that nostalgia bolsters social bonds, increases positive self-regard, and generates positive affect. These findings demarcate key landmarks in the hitherto uncharted research domain of nostalgia.

  10. Functional Specialization of Ribosomes?

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Wendy V.

    2011-01-01

    Ribosomes are highly conserved macromolecular machines responsible for protein synthesis in all living organisms. Work published in the past year shows that changes to the ribosome core can affect the mechanism of translation initiation that is favored in the cell, potentially leading to specific changes in the relative efficiencies with which different proteins are made. Here I examine recent data from expression and proteomic studies suggesting that cells make slightly different ribosomes under different growth conditions and discuss genetic evidence that such differences are functional. In particular, I will argue that eukaryotic cells likely produce ribosomes that lack one or more ‘core’ ribosomal proteins (RPs) under some conditions, and that ‘core’ RPs contribute differentially to translation of distinct subpopulations of mRNAs. PMID:21242088

  11. Skin Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Peter M.

    2010-01-01

    Like other inflammatory dermatoses, the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis (AD) has been largely attributed to abnormalities in adaptive immunity. T helper (Th) cell types 1 and 2 cell dysregulation, IgE production, mast cell hyperactivity, and dendritic cell signaling are thought to account for the chronic, pruritic, and inflammatory dermatosis that characterizes AD. Not surprisingly, therapy has been directed toward ameliorating Th2-mediated inflammation and pruritus. Here, we review emerging evidence that inflammation in AD occurs downstream to inherited and acquired insults to the barrier. Therapy based upon this new view of pathogenesis should emphasize approaches that correct the primary abnormality in barrier function, which drives downstream inflammation and allows unrestricted antigen access. PMID:18606081

  12. Evolution of catalytic function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, G. F.

    1993-01-01

    An RNA-based evolution system was constructed in the laboratory and used to develop RNA enzymes with novel catalytic function. By controlling the nature of the catalytic task that the molecules must perform in order to survive, it is possible to direct the evolving population toward the expression of some desired catalytic behavior. More recently, this system has been coupled to an in vitro translation procedure, raising the possibility of evolving protein enzymes in the laboratory to produce novel proteins with desired catalytic properties. The aim of this line of research is to reduce darwinian evolution, the fundamental process of biology, to a laboratory procedure that can be made to operate in the service of organic synthesis.

  13. Baryons with functional methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Christian S.

    2017-01-01

    We summarise recent results on the spectrum of ground-state and excited baryons and their form factors in the framework of functional methods. As an improvement upon similar approaches we explicitly take into account the underlying momentum-dependent dynamics of the quark-gluon interaction that leads to dynamical chiral symmetry breaking. For light octet and decuplet baryons we find a spectrum in very good agreement with experiment, including the level ordering between the positive- and negative-parity nucleon states. Comparing the three-body framework with the quark-diquark approximation, we do not find significant differences in the spectrum for those states that have been calculated in both frameworks. This situation is different in the electromagnetic form factor of the Δ, which may serve to distinguish both pictures by comparison with experiment and lattice QCD.

  14. [Functional neurology of blepharospasm].

    PubMed

    León-Sarmiento, Fidias E; Gutiérrez, Claudia; Bayona-Prieto, Jaime

    2008-01-01

    Benign essential blepharospasm is characterized by abnormal repetitive movements of lid closure and spasm of the orbiculari oculi muscles. Modern theories postulate that this movement disorder originates by abnormal processing of afferent information with further disintegration of the sensorimotor neural program at central levels of the nervous system all of which is seen as dystonic movements in genetically susceptible people. Different investigations including neuroimagin, genetic and neurophysiological studies have discovered new findings on what structures are involved and how this abnormal movement is generated. Among these research is noteworthy the study of electrically elicited blink reflex. It consists of three responses called non-nociceptive (R1), nociceptive (R2) and ultranociceptive (R3). Such blink reflexes, mostly the ultranociceptive response (R3), seem to be very useful to understand more deeply the pathophysiology of this focal dystonia, to perform the functional endophenotyping and to do a more appropriate follow-up of this complex neurological problem.

  15. Evolution of catalytic function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, G. F.

    1993-01-01

    An RNA-based evolution system was constructed in the laboratory and used to develop RNA enzymes with novel catalytic function. By controlling the nature of the catalytic task that the molecules must perform in order to survive, it is possible to direct the evolving population toward the expression of some desired catalytic behavior. More recently, this system has been coupled to an in vitro translation procedure, raising the possibility of evolving protein enzymes in the laboratory to produce novel proteins with desired catalytic properties. The aim of this line of research is to reduce darwinian evolution, the fundamental process of biology, to a laboratory procedure that can be made to operate in the service of organic synthesis.

  16. Commentary: freedom and function.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Alec

    2008-01-01

    While the question of whether our actions are determined or are the result of free will is a deep one in philosophy, it does not need to be answered for forensic psychiatrists to give evidence in court. As Stephen Morse has pointed out, the absence of free will is not named as an excusing condition. The insanity defense, for instance, requires proof of functional impairment, to which psychiatrists can usefully testify. Of the approaches available to determinism, my own preference is that of Herbert Hart: until we know that determinism is true, we will continue to prefer a system that requires persons to have made proper choices to act as they did before we hold them responsible. This seems to resemble Dr. Felthous' preferred option, that mentally responsible choices are choices made in the presence of a relatively natural ability to have decided otherwise.

  17. Brain Dynamics Promotes Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lourenço, Carlos

    Dynamical structure in the brain promotes biological function. Natural scientists look for correlations between measured electrical signals and behavior or mental states. Computational scientists have new opportunities to receive ’algorithmic’ inspiration from brain processes and propose computational paradigms. Thus a tradition which dates back to the 1940s with neural nets research is renewed. Real processes in the brain are ’complex’ and withstand trivial descriptions. However, dynamical complexity need not be at odds with a computational description of the phenomena and with the inspiration for algorithms that actually compute something in an engineering sense. We engage this complexity from a computational viewpoint, not excluding dynamical regimes that a number of authors are willing to label as chaos. The key question is: what may we be missing computation-wise if we overlook brain dynamics? At this point in brain research, we are happy if we can at least provide a partial answer.

  18. Pulmonary function in acromegaly.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, C C; Hipkin, L J; Murray, G M

    1977-01-01

    The lung volumes of 12 female and eight male patients with acromegaly, chosen because of the absence of associated cardiorespiratory disease, were determined physiologically and radiographically. Enlarged lung volumes were found in half the males but in none of the females, due allowance being made for the presence of a significant thoracic kyphosis. Upper airway narrowing was suggested by an increase in the expiratory-inspiratory flow rate ratio in six patients, four of whom were male, and acromegaly of the larynx was confirmed in the three subjects who consented to laryngoscopy. Upper airway obstruction is more likely to account for respiratory death in acromegaly than disordered pulmonary function in enlarged acromegalic lungs. Neither of these respiratory findings could be correlated with the fasting level of growth hormone but there was a suggestion that they were more likely to occur when the duration of the disorder was longer. PMID:882947

  19. Multi-functional windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Nagendra; Goldman, Lee M.; Balasubramanian, Sreeram; Sastri, Suri

    2013-06-01

    The requirements for modern aircraft are driving the need for conformal windows for future sensor systems. However, limitations on optical systems and the physical properties of optically transparent materials currently limit the geometry of existing windows and window assemblies to faceted assemblies of flat windows held in weight bearing frames. Novel material systems will have to be developed which combine different materials (e.g. ductile metals with transparent ceramics) into structures that combine transparency with structural integrity. Surmet's demonstrated ability to produce novel transparent ceramic/metal structures will allow us to produce such structures in the types of conformal shapes required for future aircraft applications. Furthermore, the ability to incorporate transparencies into such structures also holds out the promise of creating multi-functional windows which provide a broad range of capabilities that might include RF antennas and de-icing in addition to transparency. Recent results in this area will be presented.

  20. Pulmonary function in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guy, H. J.; Prisk, G. K.; West, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    We report the successful collection of a large quantity of human resting pulmonary function data on the SLS-1 mission. Preliminary analysis suggests that cardiac stroke volumes are high on orbit, and that an adaptive reduction takes at least several days, and in fact may still be in progress after 9 days on orbit. It also suggests that pulmonary capillary blood volumes are high, and remain high on orbit, but that the pulmonary interstitium is not significantly impacted. The data further suggest that the known large gravitational gradients of lung function have only a modest influence on single breath tests such as the SBN washout. They account for only approximately 25% of the phase III slope of nitrogen, on vital capacity SBN washouts. These gradients are only a moderate source of the cardiogenic oscillations seen in argon (bolus gas) and nitrogen (resident gas), on such tests. They may have a greater role in generating the normal CO2 oscillations, as here the phase relationship to argon and nitrogen reverses in microgravity, at least at mid exhalation in those subjects studied to date. Microgravity may become a useful tool in establishing the nature of the non-gravitational mechanisms that can now be seen to play such a large part in the generation of intra-breath gradients and oscillations of expired gas concentration. Analysis of microgravity multibreath nitrogen washouts, single breath washouts from more physiological pre-inspiratory volumes, both using our existing SLS-1 data, and data from the upcoming D-2 and SLS-2 missions, should be very fruitful in this regard.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  1. Learning Pullback HMM Distances.

    PubMed

    Cuzzolin, Fabio; Sapienza, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Recent work in action recognition has exposed the limitations of methods which directly classify local features extracted from spatio-temporal video volumes. In opposition, encoding the actions' dynamics via generative dynamical models has a number of attractive features: however, using all-purpose distances for their classification does not necessarily deliver good results. We propose a general framework for learning distance functions for generative dynamical models, given a training set of labelled videos. The optimal distance function is selected among a family of pullback ones, induced by a parametrised automorphism of the space of models. We focus here on hidden Markov models and their model space, and design an appropriate automorphism there. Experimental results are presented which show how pullback learning greatly improves action recognition performances with respect to base distances.

  2. Van der Waals density functional: An appropriate exchange functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Valentino R.

    2010-04-01

    In this Rapid Communication, an exchange functional which is compatible with the nonlocal Rutgers-Chalmers correlation functional [van der Waals density functional (vdW-DF)] is presented. This functional, when employed with vdW-DF, demonstrates remarkable improvements on intermolecular separation distances while further improving the accuracy of vdW-DF interaction energies. The key to the success of this three-parameter functional is its reduction in short-range exchange repulsion through matching to the gradient expansion approximation in the slowly varying/high-density limit while recovering the large reduced gradient, s , limit set in the revised Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (revPBE) exchange functional. This augmented exchange functional could be a solution to long-standing issues of vdW-DF lending to further applicability of density-functional theory to the study of relatively large, dispersion bound (van der Waals) complexes.

  3. Functions as Data Objects: The Implementation of Functions in LISP,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-01-01

    Evaluation routine forWORD 0 SCALL 4. this function type. WORD 1 I I (Information needed to execute the function) rigure 1 A complicated function may consist...This is an important consideration when one is deciding between deep and shallow binding in a LISP system. Shallow binding allows fast and easy lookup...of values, while deep binding allows fast and easy changes of environments. K’ 30 Jan 1979 Functions as Data Objects 39 9. How to Build an Association

  4. Emotional function in dementia patients.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Masahiko; Butler, James P; Sasaki, Hidetada

    2014-09-01

    Behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia, which can be considered as hyperreactivity of the emotional functioning of dementia, can be alleviated or aggravated by the behavioural and psychological symptoms of the caregiver. Comfortable stimulations of emotional function through sensory stimulations are effective methods for alleviating behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia. Although cognitive function deteriorates with age, emotional function is often retained even in advanced years. Thus, it is recommended that care in patients with dementia be focused mainly on the stimulation of emotional function (e.g. sympathy and empathy, which are human traits), rather than relying solely on the stimulation of cognitive function.

  5. Computer Experiments for Function Approximations

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, A; Izmailov, I; Rizzo, S; Wynter, S; Alexandrov, O; Tong, C

    2007-10-15

    This research project falls in the domain of response surface methodology, which seeks cost-effective ways to accurately fit an approximate function to experimental data. Modeling and computer simulation are essential tools in modern science and engineering. A computer simulation can be viewed as a function that receives input from a given parameter space and produces an output. Running the simulation repeatedly amounts to an equivalent number of function evaluations, and for complex models, such function evaluations can be very time-consuming. It is then of paramount importance to intelligently choose a relatively small set of sample points in the parameter space at which to evaluate the given function, and then use this information to construct a surrogate function that is close to the original function and takes little time to evaluate. This study was divided into two parts. The first part consisted of comparing four sampling methods and two function approximation methods in terms of efficiency and accuracy for simple test functions. The sampling methods used were Monte Carlo, Quasi-Random LP{sub {tau}}, Maximin Latin Hypercubes, and Orthogonal-Array-Based Latin Hypercubes. The function approximation methods utilized were Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS) and Support Vector Machines (SVM). The second part of the study concerned adaptive sampling methods with a focus on creating useful sets of sample points specifically for monotonic functions, functions with a single minimum and functions with a bounded first derivative.

  6. From data to function: functional modeling of poultry genomics data.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, F M; Lyons, E

    2013-09-01

    One of the challenges of functional genomics is to create a better understanding of the biological system being studied so that the data produced are leveraged to provide gains for agriculture, human health, and the environment. Functional modeling enables researchers to make sense of these data as it reframes a long list of genes or gene products (mRNA, ncRNA, and proteins) by grouping based upon function, be it individual molecular functions or interactions between these molecules or broader biological processes, including metabolic and signaling pathways. However, poultry researchers have been hampered by a lack of functional annotation data, tools, and training to use these data and tools. Moreover, this lack is becoming more critical as new sequencing technologies enable us to generate data not only for an increasingly diverse range of species but also individual genomes and populations of individuals. We discuss the impact of these new sequencing technologies on poultry research, with a specific focus on what functional modeling resources are available for poultry researchers. We also describe key strategies for researchers who wish to functionally model their own data, providing background information about functional modeling approaches, the data and tools to support these approaches, and the strengths and limitations of each. Specifically, we describe methods for functional analysis using Gene Ontology (GO) functional summaries, functional enrichment analysis, and pathways and network modeling. As annotation efforts begin to provide the fundamental data that underpin poultry functional modeling (such as improved gene identification, standardized gene nomenclature, temporal and spatial expression data and gene product function), tool developers are incorporating these data into new and existing tools that are used for functional modeling, and cyberinfrastructure is being developed to provide the necessary extendibility and scalability for storing and

  7. Functional organic nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohlmeyer, Ryan R.

    focused on passive material properties such as mechanical, electrical, and thermal, there is growing interest in harnessing active material functions such as actuation, sensing, and power generation in designed CNT-polymer materials. The synergy between CNTs and the polymer matrix has been judiciously exploited to create highly desirable active material functions in smart material systems. By incorporating CNTs in a Nafion matrix, multi-shape memory healable composites capable of reversible remote, local, and chemical programming have been developed.

  8. Visual Perception versus Visual Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Laurence M.

    1984-01-01

    Disfunctions are drawn between visual perception and visual function, and four optometrists respond with further analysis of the visual perception-visual function controversy and its implications for children with learning problems. (CL)

  9. Graphical Representation of Thermodynamic Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, A.

    1975-01-01

    Outlines a teaching method using graphs for explaining phase changes and the effect of pressure and the relationships between temperature, entropy, enthalpy, energy, Gibbs function, Helmholtz function and volume. (GS)

  10. Graphical Representation of Thermodynamic Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, A.

    1975-01-01

    Outlines a teaching method using graphs for explaining phase changes and the effect of pressure and the relationships between temperature, entropy, enthalpy, energy, Gibbs function, Helmholtz function and volume. (GS)

  11. Cranial functional (psychogenic) movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Kaski, Diego; Bronstein, Adolfo M; Edwards, Mark J; Stone, Jon

    2015-12-01

    Functional (psychogenic) neurological symptoms are frequently encountered in neurological practice. Cranial movement disorders--affecting the eyes, face, jaw, tongue, or palate--are an under-recognised feature of patients with functional symptoms. They can present in isolation or in the context of other functional symptoms; in particular, for functional eye movements, positive clinical signs such as convergence spasms can be triggered by the clinical examination. Although the specialty of functional neurological disorders has expanded, appreciation of cranial functional movement disorders is still insufficient. Identification of the positive features of cranial functional movement disorders such as convergence and unilateral platysmal spasm might lend diagnostic weight to a suspected functional neurological disorder. Understanding of the differential diagnosis, which is broad and includes many organic causes (eg, stroke), is essential to make an early and accurate diagnosis to prevent complications and initiate appropriate management. Increased understanding of these disorders is also crucial to drive clinical trials and studies of individually tailored therapies.

  12. Reptilian neurology: anatomy and function.

    PubMed

    Wyneken, Jeanette

    2007-09-01

    The reptilian nervous system is relatively simple in structure yet is characterized by great functional diversity. This article describes the reptilian nervous system, highlighting the similarities and differences among species in structures and functions.

  13. Universality of composite functions of periodic zeta functions

    SciTech Connect

    Laurincikas, Antanas P

    2012-11-30

    In the paper, we prove the universality, in the sense of Voronin, for some classes of composite functions F({zeta}(s;a)), where the function {zeta}(s;a) is defined by a Dirichlet series with periodic multiplicative coefficients. We also study the universality of functions of the form F({zeta}(s;a{sub 1}),...,{zeta}(s;a{sub r})). For example, it follows from general theorems that every linear combination of derivatives of the function {zeta}(s;a) and every linear combination of the functions {zeta}(s;a{sub 1}),...,{zeta}(s;a{sub r}) are universal. Bibliography: 18 titles.

  14. Yogurt and gut function.

    PubMed

    Adolfsson, Oskar; Meydani, Simin Nikbin; Russell, Robert M

    2004-08-01

    In recent years, numerous studies have been published on the health effects of yogurt and the bacterial cultures used in the production of yogurt. In the United States, these lactic acid-producing bacteria (LAB) include Lactobacillus and Streptococcus species. The benefits of yogurt and LAB on gastrointestinal health have been investigated in animal models and, occasionally, in human subjects. Some studies using yogurt, individual LAB species, or both showed promising health benefits for certain gastrointestinal conditions, including lactose intolerance, constipation, diarrheal diseases, colon cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, Helicobacter pylori infection, and allergies. Patients with any of these conditions could possibly benefit from the consumption of yogurt. The benefits of yogurt consumption to gastrointestinal function are most likely due to effects mediated through the gut microflora, bowel transit, and enhancement of gastrointestinal innate and adaptive immune responses. Although substantial evidence currently exists to support a beneficial effect of yogurt consumption on gastrointestinal health, there is inconsistency in reported results, which may be due to differences in the strains of LAB used, in routes of administration, or in investigational procedures or to the lack of objective definition of "gut health." Further well-designed, controlled human studies of adequate duration are needed to confirm or extend these findings.

  15. Functional Symmetry of Endomembranes

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    In higher eukaryotic cells pleiomorphic compartments composed of vacuoles, tubules and vesicles move from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the plasma membrane to the cell center, operating in early biosynthetic trafficking and endocytosis, respectively. Besides transporting cargo to the Golgi apparatus and lysosomes, a major task of these compartments is to promote extensive membrane recycling. The endocytic membrane system is traditionally divided into early (sorting) endosomes, late endosomes and the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC). Recent studies on the intermediate compartment (IC) between the ER and the Golgi apparatus suggest that it also consists of peripheral (“early”) and centralized (“late”) structures, as well as a third component, designated here as the biosynthetic recycling compartment (BRC). We propose that the ERC and the BRC exist as long-lived “mirror compartments” at the cell center that also share the ability to expand and become mobilized during cell activation. These considerations emphasize the functional symmetry of endomembrane compartments, which provides a basis for the membrane rearrangements taking place during cell division, polarization, and differentiation. PMID:17267686

  16. Functionally graded boron carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, J.J.; McClellan, K.J.; Kise, C.D.; Hoover, R.C.; Scarborough, W.K.

    1998-12-31

    Lightweight body armor is important for the protection of US soldiers in the field. Here, fabrication techniques were developed for producing graded porosity B{sub 4}C, and for producing aluminum-B{sub 4}C and epoxy-B{sub 4}C functionally graded materials. The key fabrication aspect was obtaining the graded porosity B{sub 4}C. The feasibility of producing graded porosity B{sub 4}C using a grading of carbon densification aid produced from a gradient of furfuryl alcohol carbon precursor was demonstrated. This approach is quite promising, but it was not optimized in the present investigation. Graded porosity B{sub 4}C materials were produced by a layering approach using different size distributions of B{sub 4}C powders in the green state, and then densifying the layered assembly by hot pressing at 1,900 C. The hardness of uninfiltrated graded B{sub 4}C, aluminum infiltrated B{sub 4}C, and epoxy infiltrated B{sub 4}C was observed to be similar.

  17. Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebron, Marisabel; Mintz, Eric; Meador, Michael A.; Hull, David R.; Scheiman, Daniel A.; Willis, Peter; Smalley, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have created a great deal of excitement in the Materials Science community because of their outstanding mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties. Use of carbon nanotubes as reinforcements for polymers could lead to a new class of composite materials with properties, durability, and performance far exceeding that of conventional fiber reinforced composites. Organized arrays of carbon nanotubes, e.g., nanotube monolayers, could find applications as thermal management materials, light emitting devices, and sensor arrays. Carbon nanotubes could also be used as templates upon which nanotubes from other materials could be constructed. Successful use of carbon nanotubes in any of these potential applications requires the ability to control the interactions of nanotubes with each other and with other materials, e.g., a polymer matrix. One approach to achieving this control is to attach certain chemical groups to the ends and/or side-walls of the nanotubes. The nature of these chemical groups can be varied to achieve the desired result, such as better adhesion between the nanotubes and a polymer. Under a joint program between NASA Glenn, Clark Atlanta University, and Rice University researchers are working on developing a chemistry "tool-kit" that will enable the functionalization of carbon nanotubes with a variety of chemical groups. Recent results of this effort will be discussed.

  18. DNA structure and function.

    PubMed

    Travers, Andrew; Muskhelishvili, Georgi

    2015-06-01

    The proposal of a double-helical structure for DNA over 60 years ago provided an eminently satisfying explanation for the heritability of genetic information. But why is DNA, and not RNA, now the dominant biological information store? We argue that, in addition to its coding function, the ability of DNA, unlike RNA, to adopt a B-DNA structure confers advantages both for information accessibility and for packaging. The information encoded by DNA is both digital - the precise base specifying, for example, amino acid sequences - and analogue. The latter determines the sequence-dependent physicochemical properties of DNA, for example, its stiffness and susceptibility to strand separation. Most importantly, DNA chirality enables the formation of supercoiling under torsional stress. We review recent evidence suggesting that DNA supercoiling, particularly that generated by DNA translocases, is a major driver of gene regulation and patterns of chromosomal gene organization, and in its guise as a promoter of DNA packaging enables DNA to act as an energy store to facilitate the passage of translocating enzymes such as RNA polymerase.

  19. Maleimide Functionalized Siloxane Resins

    SciTech Connect

    Loy, D.A.; Shaltout, R.M.

    1999-04-01

    Polyorganosiloxanes are a commercially important class of compounds. They exhibit many important properties, including very low glass transition temperatures, making them useful over a wide temperature range. In practice, the polysiloxane polymer is often mixed with a filler material to help improve its mechanical properties. An alternative method for increasing polymer mechanical strength is through the incorporation of certain substituents on the polymer backbone. Hard substituents such as carbonates and imides generally result in improved mechanical properties of polysiloxanes. In this paper, we present the preparation of novel polysiloxane resins modified with hard maleimide substituents. Protected ethoxysilyl-substituted propyl-maleimides were prepared. The maleimide substituent was protected with a furanyl group and the monomer polymerized under aqueous acidic conditions. At elevated temperatures (>120 C), the polymer undergoes retro Diels-Alder reaction with release of foran (Equation 1). The deprotected polymer can then be selectively crosslinked by a forward Diels-Alder reaction (in the presence of a co-reactant having two or more dime functionalities).

  20. Functional (dissociative) retrograde amnesia.

    PubMed

    Markowitsch, H J; Staniloiu, A

    2017-01-01

    Retrograde amnesia is described as condition which can occur after direct brain damage, but which occurs more frequently as a result of a psychiatric illness. In order to understand the amnesic condition, content-based divisions of memory are defined. The measurement of retrograde memory is discussed and the dichotomy between "organic" and "psychogenic" retrograde amnesia is questioned. Briefly, brain damage-related etiologies of retrograde amnesia are mentioned. The major portion of the review is devoted to dissociative amnesia (also named psychogenic or functional amnesia) and to the discussion of an overlap between psychogenic and "brain organic" forms of amnesia. The "inability of access hypothesis" is proposed to account for most of both the organic and psychogenic (dissociative) patients with primarily retrograde amnesia. Questions such as why recovery from retrograde amnesia can occur in retrograde (dissociative) amnesia, and why long-term new learning of episodic-autobiographic episodes is possible, are addressed. It is concluded that research on retrograde amnesia research is still in its infancy, as the neural correlates of memory storage are still unknown. It is argued that the recollection of episodic-autobiographic episodes most likely involves frontotemporal regions of the right hemisphere, a region which appears to be hypometabolic in patients with dissociative amnesia.

  1. Functional electrospun membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ognibene, G.; Fragalà, M. E.; Cristaldi, D. A.; Blanco, I.; Cicala, G.

    2016-05-01

    In this study we combined electrospun PES nanofibers with ZnO nanostructures in order to obtain a hierarchical nanostructured hybrid material to be use for active water filtration membranes. It benefits of flexibility and high surface area of the polymeric nanofibers as well as of additional functionalities of ZnOnanostructures. First, randomly oriented nanofibers with diameters of 716nm ±365 nm were electrospun on a glass fibers substrate from a solution of PES and DMF-TOL(1:1). ZnO nanorods were grown onto the surface of electrospun PES fibers by a Chemical Bath Deposition (CBD) process. It was preceed by a seeding process necessary to form nucleation sites for the subsequent radially aligned growth of ZnO nanowires. The morfology of the fibers and the effect of the seeding time have been analysed by SEM. The amount of ZnO nanowires grown over electrospun nanofibers was determined as 45% by weight. The high purity and crystallinity of the asobtained products are confirmed by XRD since all reflection peaks can be indexed to hexagonal wurtzite ZnO.

  2. Cluster functional renormalization group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuther, Johannes; Thomale, Ronny

    2014-01-01

    Functional renormalization group (FRG) has become a diverse and powerful tool to derive effective low-energy scattering vertices of interacting many-body systems. Starting from a free expansion point of the action, the flow of the RG parameter Λ allows us to trace the evolution of the effective one- and two-particle vertices towards low energies by taking into account the vertex corrections between all parquet channels in an unbiased fashion. In this work, we generalize the expansion point at which the diagrammatic resummation procedure is initiated from a free UV limit to a cluster product state. We formulate a cluster FRG scheme where the noninteracting building blocks (i.e., decoupled spin clusters) are treated exactly, and the intercluster couplings are addressed via RG. As a benchmark study, we apply our cluster FRG scheme to the spin-1/2 bilayer Heisenberg model (BHM) on a square lattice where the neighboring sites in the two layers form the individual two-site clusters. Comparing with existing numerical evidence for the BHM, we obtain reasonable findings for the spin susceptibility, the spin-triplet excitation energy, and quasiparticle weight even in coupling regimes close to antiferromagnetic order. The concept of cluster FRG promises applications to a large class of interacting electron systems.

  3. Functional neuroanatomy of tics.

    PubMed

    Neuner, Irene; Schneider, Frank; Shah, N Jon

    2013-01-01

    The therapeutic success of haloperidol in the treatment of Tourette syndrome (TS) put an end to the discussion about a "hysteric" or "neurotic" origin of TS. The cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuit has been identified as an underlying neurobiological correlate of TS. In this review we explore the main findings of structural alterations in TS including cortical areas, basal ganglia, hippocampus, amygdala, midbrain, and cerebellum. Based on the structural changes we examine the functional pattern described by the findings of fMRI and (15)O-PET/(18)FDG PET investigations. From the neuroimaging findings a cortical origin of the generation of tics is indicated. Future research on the neuronal footprint of TS should be directed towards addressing the question of which patterns of connectivity distinguish individuals in whom tics disappear during early adulthood from those in whom the tics persist. The understanding of this pathomechanism could provide a key on how to influence dysconnectivity in TS, for example, by more specific pharmaceutical intervention or by individually adopted EEG and/or fMRI neurofeedback.

  4. Function Point Analysis Depot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muniz, R.; Martinez, El; Szafran, J.; Dalton, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Function Point Analysis (FPA) Depot is a web application originally designed by one of the NE-C3 branch's engineers, Jamie Szafran, and created specifically for the Software Development team of the Launch Control Systems (LCS) project. The application consists of evaluating the work of each developer to be able to get a real estimate of the hours that is going to be assigned to a specific task of development. The Architect Team had made design change requests for the depot to change the schema of the application's information; that information, changed in the database, needed to be changed in the graphical user interface (GUI) (written in Ruby on Rails (RoR and the web service/server side in Java to match the database changes. These changes were made by two interns from NE-C, Ricardo Muniz from NE-C3, who made all the schema changes for the GUI in RoR and Edwin Martinez, from NE-C2, who made all the changes in the Java side.

  5. Sleep and metabolic function

    PubMed Central

    Morselli, Lisa L.; Guyon, Aurore; Spiegel, Karine

    2012-01-01

    Evidence for the role of sleep on metabolic and endocrine function has been reported more than four decades ago. In the past 30 years, the prevalence of obesity and diabetes has greatly increased in industrialized countries, and self-imposed sleep curtailment, now very common, is starting to be recognized as a contributing factor, alongside with increased caloric intake and decreased physical activity. Furthermore, obstructive sleep apnea, a chronic condition characterized by recurrent upper airway obstruction leading to intermittent hypoxemia and sleep fragmentation, has also become highly prevalent as a consequence of the epidemic of obesity and has been shown to contribute, in a vicious circle, to the metabolic disturbances observed in obese patients. In this article, we summarize the current data supporting the role of sleep in the regulation of glucose homeostasis and the hormones involved in the regulation of appetite. We also review the results of the epidemiologic and laboratory studies that investigated the impact of sleep duration and quality on the risk of developing diabetes and obesity, as well as the mechanisms underlying this increased risk. Finally, we discuss how obstructive sleep apnea affects glucose metabolism and the beneficial impact of its treatment, the continuous positive airway pressure. In conclusion, the data available in the literature highlight the importance of getting enough good sleep for metabolic health. PMID:22101912

  6. Functional amyloids in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Romero, Diego; Kolter, Roberto

    2014-06-01

    The term amyloidosis is used to refer to a family of pathologies altering the homeostasis of human organs. Despite having a name that alludes to starch content, the amyloid accumulations are made up of proteins that polymerize as long and rigid fibers. Amyloid proteins vary widely with respect to their amino acid sequences but they share similarities in their quaternary structure; the amyloid fibers are enriched in β-sheets arranged perpendicular to the axis of the fiber. This structural feature provides great robustness, remarkable stability, and insolubility. In addition, amyloid proteins specifically stain with certain dyes such as Congo red and thioflavin-T. The aggregation into amyloid fibers, however, it is not restricted to pathogenic processes, rather it seems to be widely distributed among proteins and polypeptides. Amyloid fibers are present in insects, fungi and bacteria, and they are important in maintaining the homeostasis of the organism. Such findings have motivated the use of the term "functional amyloid" to differentiate these amyloid proteins from their toxic siblings. This review focuses on systems that have evolved in bacteria that control the expression and assembly of amyloid proteins on cell surfaces, such that the robustness of amyloid proteins are used towards a beneficial end.

  7. Covering Numbers for Semicontinuous Functions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-29

    Covering Numbers for Semicontinuous Functions Johannes O. Royset Operations Research Department Naval Postgraduate School joroyset@nps.edu Abstract...Considering the metric space of extended real-valued lower semicontinuous functions under the epi-distance, the paper gives an upper bound on the...covering numbers of bounded subsets of such functions . No assumptions about continuity, smoothness, variation, and even finiteness of the functions are

  8. Electromagnetic scaling functions within the Green's function Monte Carlo approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocco, N.; Alvarez-Ruso, L.; Lovato, A.; Nieves, J.

    2017-07-01

    We have studied the scaling properties of the electromagnetic response functions of 4He and 12C nuclei computed by the Green's function Monte Carlo approach, retaining only the one-body current contribution. Longitudinal and transverse scaling functions have been obtained in the relativistic and nonrelativistic cases and compared to experiment for various kinematics. The characteristic asymmetric shape of the scaling function exhibited by data emerges in the calculations in spite of the nonrelativistic nature of the model. The results are mostly consistent with scaling of zeroth, first, and second kinds. Our analysis reveals a direct correspondence between the scaling and the nucleon-density response functions. The scaling function obtained from the proton-density response displays scaling of the first kind, even more evidently than the longitudinal and transverse scaling functions.

  9. Psychopathology, cognitive function, and social functioning of patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Santosh, S; Dutta Roy, D; Kundu, P S

    2013-06-01

    OBJECTIVES. To explore the relationship between cognitive functions, social functioning, and psychopathology in schizophrenia. METHODS. Patients diagnosed with schizophrenia, according to the ICD-10 criteria, were enrolled from the Department of Psychiatry of 2 postgraduate hospitals in Kolkata, India. The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale for Schizophrenia, Schizophrenia Research Foundation India-Social Functioning Index, and a cognitive test battery were administered. RESULTS. Regarding the 100 patients recruited into the study, 4 subtests (self-care, occupational role, social role, and family role) of the social functioning were found to be significantly correlated with cognitive functions. Cognitive function battery performance scores were more inversely correlated with negative symptoms than with positive symptoms. CONCLUSION. Positive and negative symptoms along with verbal fluency were able to predict social functioning.

  10. Staircase and Fractional Part Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amram, Meirav; Dagan, Miriam; Ioshpe, Michael; Satianov, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    The staircase and fractional part functions are basic examples of real functions. They can be applied in several parts of mathematics, such as analysis, number theory, formulas for primes, and so on; in computer programming, the floor and ceiling functions are provided by a significant number of programming languages--they have some basic uses in…

  11. Functions of the Renal Nerves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koepke, John P.; DiBona, Gerald F.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses renal neuroanatomy, renal vasculature, renal tubules, renin secretion, renorenal reflexes, and hypertension as related to renal nerve functions. Indicates that high intensitites of renal nerve stimulation have produced alterations in several renal functions. (A chart with various stimulations and resultant renal functions and 10-item,…

  12. Functional Similarity and Interpersonal Attraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neimeyer, Greg J.; Neimeyer, Robert A.

    1981-01-01

    Students participated in dyadic disclosure exercises over a five-week period. Results indicated members of high functional similarity dyads evidenced greater attraction to one another than did members of low functional similarity dyads. "Friendship" pairs of male undergraduates displayed greater functional similarity than did…

  13. Functions of the Renal Nerves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koepke, John P.; DiBona, Gerald F.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses renal neuroanatomy, renal vasculature, renal tubules, renin secretion, renorenal reflexes, and hypertension as related to renal nerve functions. Indicates that high intensitites of renal nerve stimulation have produced alterations in several renal functions. (A chart with various stimulations and resultant renal functions and 10-item,…

  14. Staircase and Fractional Part Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amram, Meirav; Dagan, Miriam; Ioshpe, Michael; Satianov, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    The staircase and fractional part functions are basic examples of real functions. They can be applied in several parts of mathematics, such as analysis, number theory, formulas for primes, and so on; in computer programming, the floor and ceiling functions are provided by a significant number of programming languages--they have some basic uses in…

  15. Family Functioning in Pediatric Trichotillomania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Phoebe S.; Franklin, Martin E.; Keuthen, Nancy J.; Flessner, Christopher A.; Woods, Douglas W.; Piacentini, John A.; Stein, Dan J.; Loew, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about how pediatric trichotillomania (TTM), a clinically significant and functionally impairing disorder, is impacted by, and impacts, family functioning. We explored dimensions of family functioning and parental attitudes in a sample of children and adolescents who participated in an Internet-based survey and satisfied…

  16. Family Functioning in Pediatric Trichotillomania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Phoebe S.; Franklin, Martin E.; Keuthen, Nancy J.; Flessner, Christopher A.; Woods, Douglas W.; Piacentini, John A.; Stein, Dan J.; Loew, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about how pediatric trichotillomania (TTM), a clinically significant and functionally impairing disorder, is impacted by, and impacts, family functioning. We explored dimensions of family functioning and parental attitudes in a sample of children and adolescents who participated in an Internet-based survey and satisfied…

  17. Disgust: Evolved Function and Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tybur, Joshua M.; Lieberman, Debra; Kurzban, Robert; DeScioli, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Interest in and research on disgust has surged over the past few decades. The field, however, still lacks a coherent theoretical framework for understanding the evolved function or functions of disgust. Here we present such a framework, emphasizing 2 levels of analysis: that of evolved function and that of information processing. Although there is…

  18. Extended screened exchange functional derived from transcorrelated density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umezawa, Naoto

    2017-09-01

    We propose a new formulation of the correlation energy functional derived from the transcorrelated method in use in density functional theory (TC-DFT). An effective Hamiltonian, HTC, is introduced by a similarity transformation of a many-body Hamiltonian, H , with respect to a complex function F: HTC=1/F H F . It is proved that an expectation value of HTC for a normalized single Slater determinant, Dn, corresponds to the total energy: E [n ] = ⟨Ψn|H |Ψn ⟩ /⟨Ψn|Ψn ⟩ = ⟨Dn|HTC|Dn ⟩ under the two assumptions: (1) The electron density n (r ) associated with a trial wave function Ψn = DnF is v -representable and (2) Ψn and Dn give rise to the same electron density n (r ). This formulation, therefore, provides an alternative expression of the total energy that is useful for the development of novel correlation energy functionals. By substituting a specific function for F, we successfully derived a model correlation energy functional, which resembles the functional form of the screened exchange method. The proposed functional, named the extended screened exchange (ESX) functional, is described within two-body integrals and is parametrized for a numerically exact correlation energy of the homogeneous electron gas. The ESX functional does not contain any ingredients of (semi-)local functionals and thus is totally free from self-interactions. The computational cost for solving the self-consistent-field equation is comparable to that of the Hartree-Fock method. We apply the ESX functional to electronic structure calculations for a solid silicon, H- ion, and small atoms. The results demonstrate that the TC-DFT formulation is promising for the systematic improvement of the correlation energy functional.

  19. Extended screened exchange functional derived from transcorrelated density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Umezawa, Naoto

    2017-09-14

    We propose a new formulation of the correlation energy functional derived from the transcorrelated method in use in density functional theory (TC-DFT). An effective Hamiltonian, HTC, is introduced by a similarity transformation of a many-body Hamiltonian, H, with respect to a complex function F: HTC=1FHF. It is proved that an expectation value of HTC for a normalized single Slater determinant, D(n), corresponds to the total energy: E[n] = ⟨Ψ(n)|H|Ψ(n)⟩/⟨Ψ(n)|Ψ(n)⟩ = ⟨D(n)|HTC|D(n)⟩ under the two assumptions: (1) The electron density nr associated with a trial wave function Ψ(n) = D(n)F is v-representable and (2) Ψ(n) and D(n) give rise to the same electron density nr. This formulation, therefore, provides an alternative expression of the total energy that is useful for the development of novel correlation energy functionals. By substituting a specific function for F, we successfully derived a model correlation energy functional, which resembles the functional form of the screened exchange method. The proposed functional, named the extended screened exchange (ESX) functional, is described within two-body integrals and is parametrized for a numerically exact correlation energy of the homogeneous electron gas. The ESX functional does not contain any ingredients of (semi-)local functionals and thus is totally free from self-interactions. The computational cost for solving the self-consistent-field equation is comparable to that of the Hartree-Fock method. We apply the ESX functional to electronic structure calculations for a solid silicon, H(-) ion, and small atoms. The results demonstrate that the TC-DFT formulation is promising for the systematic improvement of the correlation energy functional.

  20. Ferroptosis: process and function.

    PubMed

    Xie, Y; Hou, W; Song, X; Yu, Y; Huang, J; Sun, X; Kang, R; Tang, D

    2016-03-01

    Ferroptosis is a recently recognized form of regulated cell death. It is characterized morphologically by the presence of smaller than normal mitochondria with condensed mitochondrial membrane densities, reduction or vanishing of mitochondria crista, and outer mitochondrial membrane rupture. It can be induced by experimental compounds (e.g., erastin, Ras-selective lethal small molecule 3, and buthionine sulfoximine) or clinical drugs (e.g., sulfasalazine, sorafenib, and artesunate) in cancer cells and certain normal cells (e.g., kidney tubule cells, neurons, fibroblasts, and T cells). Activation of mitochondrial voltage-dependent anion channels and mitogen-activated protein kinases, upregulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress, and inhibition of cystine/glutamate antiporter is involved in the induction of ferroptosis. This process is characterized by the accumulation of lipid peroxidation products and lethal reactive oxygen species (ROS) derived from iron metabolism and can be pharmacologically inhibited by iron chelators (e.g., deferoxamine and desferrioxamine mesylate) and lipid peroxidation inhibitors (e.g., ferrostatin, liproxstatin, and zileuton). Glutathione peroxidase 4, heat shock protein beta-1, and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 function as negative regulators of ferroptosis by limiting ROS production and reducing cellular iron uptake, respectively. In contrast, NADPH oxidase and p53 (especially acetylation-defective mutant p53) act as positive regulators of ferroptosis by promotion of ROS production and inhibition of expression of SLC7A11 (a specific light-chain subunit of the cystine/glutamate antiporter), respectively. Misregulated ferroptosis has been implicated in multiple physiological and pathological processes, including cancer cell death, neurotoxicity, neurodegenerative diseases, acute renal failure, drug-induced hepatotoxicity, hepatic and heart ischemia/reperfusion injury, and T-cell immunity. In this review, we summarize the

  1. Ferroptosis: process and function

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Y; Hou, W; Song, X; Yu, Y; Huang, J; Sun, X; Kang, R; Tang, D

    2016-01-01

    Ferroptosis is a recently recognized form of regulated cell death. It is characterized morphologically by the presence of smaller than normal mitochondria with condensed mitochondrial membrane densities, reduction or vanishing of mitochondria crista, and outer mitochondrial membrane rupture. It can be induced by experimental compounds (e.g., erastin, Ras-selective lethal small molecule 3, and buthionine sulfoximine) or clinical drugs (e.g., sulfasalazine, sorafenib, and artesunate) in cancer cells and certain normal cells (e.g., kidney tubule cells, neurons, fibroblasts, and T cells). Activation of mitochondrial voltage-dependent anion channels and mitogen-activated protein kinases, upregulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress, and inhibition of cystine/glutamate antiporter is involved in the induction of ferroptosis. This process is characterized by the accumulation of lipid peroxidation products and lethal reactive oxygen species (ROS) derived from iron metabolism and can be pharmacologically inhibited by iron chelators (e.g., deferoxamine and desferrioxamine mesylate) and lipid peroxidation inhibitors (e.g., ferrostatin, liproxstatin, and zileuton). Glutathione peroxidase 4, heat shock protein beta-1, and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 function as negative regulators of ferroptosis by limiting ROS production and reducing cellular iron uptake, respectively. In contrast, NADPH oxidase and p53 (especially acetylation-defective mutant p53) act as positive regulators of ferroptosis by promotion of ROS production and inhibition of expression of SLC7A11 (a specific light-chain subunit of the cystine/glutamate antiporter), respectively. Misregulated ferroptosis has been implicated in multiple physiological and pathological processes, including cancer cell death, neurotoxicity, neurodegenerative diseases, acute renal failure, drug-induced hepatotoxicity, hepatic and heart ischemia/reperfusion injury, and T-cell immunity. In this review, we summarize the

  2. Properties of resonance wave functions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    More, R. M.; Gerjuoy, E.

    1973-01-01

    Construction and study of resonance wave functions corresponding to poles of the Green's function for several illustrative models of theoretical interest. Resonance wave functions obtained from the Siegert and Kapur-Peierls definitions of the resonance energies are compared. The comparison especially clarifies the meaning of the normalization constant of the resonance wave functions. It is shown that the wave functions may be considered renormalized in a sense analogous to that of quantum field theory. However, this renormalization is entirely automatic, and the theory has neither ad hoc procedures nor infinite quantities.

  3. Nongenetic functions of the genome.

    PubMed

    Bustin, Michael; Misteli, Tom

    2016-05-06

    The primary function of the genome is to store, propagate, and express the genetic information that gives rise to a cell's architectural and functional machinery. However, the genome is also a major structural component of the cell. Besides its genetic roles, the genome affects cellular functions by nongenetic means through its physical and structural properties, particularly by exerting mechanical forces and by serving as a scaffold for binding of cellular components. Major cellular processes affected by nongenetic functions of the genome include establishment of nuclear structure, signal transduction, mechanoresponses, cell migration, and vision in nocturnal animals. We discuss the concept, mechanisms, and implications of nongenetic functions of the genome.

  4. Functional Programming in Computer Science

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Loren James; Davis, Marion Kei

    2016-01-19

    We explore functional programming through a 16-week internship at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Functional programming is a branch of computer science that has exploded in popularity over the past decade due to its high-level syntax, ease of parallelization, and abundant applications. First, we summarize functional programming by listing the advantages of functional programming languages over the usual imperative languages, and we introduce the concept of parsing. Second, we discuss the importance of lambda calculus in the theory of functional programming. Lambda calculus was invented by Alonzo Church in the 1930s to formalize the concept of effective computability, and every functional language is essentially some implementation of lambda calculus. Finally, we display the lasting products of the internship: additions to a compiler and runtime system for the pure functional language STG, including both a set of tests that indicate the validity of updates to the compiler and a compiler pass that checks for illegal instances of duplicate names.

  5. Functional Generalized Structured Component Analysis.

    PubMed

    Suk, Hye Won; Hwang, Heungsun

    2016-12-01

    An extension of Generalized Structured Component Analysis (GSCA), called Functional GSCA, is proposed to analyze functional data that are considered to arise from an underlying smooth curve varying over time or other continua. GSCA has been geared for the analysis of multivariate data. Accordingly, it cannot deal with functional data that often involve different measurement occasions across participants and a large number of measurement occasions that exceed the number of participants. Functional GSCA addresses these issues by integrating GSCA with spline basis function expansions that represent infinite-dimensional curves onto a finite-dimensional space. For parameter estimation, functional GSCA minimizes a penalized least squares criterion by using an alternating penalized least squares estimation algorithm. The usefulness of functional GSCA is illustrated with gait data.

  6. Generalizing Single Variable Functions to Two-Variable Functions, Function Machine and APOS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kabael, Tangul Uygur

    2011-01-01

    The focus of this study in which the theoretical framework of APOS was used is students' generalizing function notion from single variable to two-variable function concepts in Analysis II course in the elementary mathematics education program. In the teaching process, teaching activities that support generalizing the function notion with multiple…

  7. Functionality Improvements to Overaero

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gee, Ken; Rizk, Yehia M.

    2000-01-01

    The functionality of the overset, static aeroelasticity, Navier-Stokes flow solver OVERAERO was increased by adding capability to the flow solver and enhancing code performance. Improvements were made to the fluids/structure interface, an MLP version of the parallel OVERAERO code was developed, and the OVERAERO-MPI code was ported to the Cray T3E. The OVERFLOW-MPI and OVERAERO-MPI codes were tested successfully on the IPG testbed and a means of reducing communication overhead within OVERFLOW-MPI was investigated. To solve an aeroelastic problem computationally, a structures grid surface definition and a fluids grid surface definition are required. Typically, the structures grid surface has a lower fidelity than the fluids grid surface. Thus, the methods developed to transfer data between the two grid systems are vital to the accuracy and efficiency of the aeroelasticity code. The fluids/structures interface developed for the OVERAERO code was improved to more accurately treat fluids surfaces that bridge between two different structural surfaces. For example, the method allowed the forward portion of a flap track fairing to deform with the wing and the aft end of the fairing to deform with the flap. A tightly-coupled version of the code based on OVERFLOW-MLP was developed to improve code performance on the SGI Origin 2000. This required a new parallelization strategy to couple the fluids and structures codes. The OVERAERO-MPI code was ported to the Cray T3E to extend the usability of the code. The port required extensive use of dynamic memory management techniques to fit large problems within the memory limitations of the T3E. The OVERFLOW-MPI and OVERAERO-MPI codes were tested on the IPG testbed being developed within NASA. For small problems with minimal data transfer between grids, there was little to no performance penalty spreading the computation across two machines. For very large problems, methods were developed to minimize intermachine communication via the

  8. Radial basis function networks and complexity regularization in function learning.

    PubMed

    Krzyzak, A; Linder, T

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we apply the method of complexity regularization to derive estimation bounds for nonlinear function estimation using a single hidden layer radial basis function network. Our approach differs from previous complexity regularization neural-network function learning schemes in that we operate with random covering numbers and l(1) metric entropy, making it possible to consider much broader families of activation functions, namely functions of bounded variation. Some constraints previously imposed on the network parameters are also eliminated this way. The network is trained by means of complexity regularization involving empirical risk minimization. Bounds on the expected risk in terms of the sample size are obtained for a large class of loss functions. Rates of convergence to the optimal loss are also derived.

  9. Identifying copepod functional groups from species functional traits

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti, Fabio; Gasparini, Stéphane; Ayata, Sakina-Dorothée

    2016-01-01

    We gathered information on the functional traits of the most representative copepod species in the Mediterranean Sea. Our database includes 191 species described by 7 traits encompassing diverse ecological functions: minimal and maximal body length, trophic group, feeding type, spawning strategy, diel vertical migration and vertical habitat. Cluster analysis in the functional trait space revealed that Mediterranean copepods can be separated into groups with distinct ecological roles. PMID:26811565

  10. Heterotic string on the CHL orbifold of K3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Shouvik; David, Justin R.; Lüst, Dieter

    2016-02-01

    We study {N}=2 compactifications of heterotic string theory on the CHL orbifold (K3× {T}^2)/{{Z}}_N with N = 2, 3, 5, 7. {{Z}}_N acts as an automorphism on K3 together with a shift of 1/ N along one of the circles of T 2. These compactifications generalize the example of the heterotic string on K3 × T 2 studied in the context of dualities in {N}=2 string theories. We evaluate the new supersymmetric index for these theories and show that their expansion can be written in terms of the McKay-Thompson series associated with the {{Z}}_N automorphism embedded in the Mathieu group M 24. We then evaluate the difference in one-loop threshold corrections to the non-Abelian gauge couplings with Wilson lines and show that their moduli dependence is captured by Siegel modular forms related to dyon partition functions of {N}=4 string theories.

  11. Functional recovery following stroke: Capturing changes in upper extremity function

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Lisa A

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Augmenting changes in recovery is core to the rehabilitation process following a stroke. Hence, it is essential that outcome measures are able to detect change as it occurs; a property known as responsiveness. This paper critically reviewed the responsiveness of functional outcome measures following stroke, specifically examining tools that captured upper extremity functional recovery. Methods A systematic search of the literature was undertaken to identify articles providing responsiveness data for three types of change (observed, detectable, important). Results Data from 68 articles for 14 upper extremity functional outcome measures were retrieved. Larger percent changes were required to be considered important when obtained through anchor-based methods (eg. based on patient opinion or comparative measure) compared to distribution methods (eg. statistical estimates). Larger percent changes were required to surpass the measurement error for patient-perceived functional measures (eg. Motor Activity Log) compared to lab-based performance measures (eg. Action Research Arm Test). The majority of rehabilitation interventions have similarly sized effects on patient-perceived upper extremity function versus lab-based upper extremity function. Conclusions The magnitude of important change or change that surpasses measurement error can vary substantially depending on the method of calculation. Rehabilitation treatments can affect patient perceptions of functional change as effectively as lab-based functional measures; however higher sample sizes may be required to account for the larger measurement error associated with patient-perceived functional measures. PMID:23077144

  12. Function Analysis and Decomposistion using Function Analysis Systems Technique

    SciTech Connect

    J. R. Wixson

    1999-06-01

    The "Father of Value Analysis", Lawrence D. Miles, was a design engineer for General Electric in Schenectady, New York. Miles developed the concept of function analysis to address difficulties in satisfying the requirements to fill shortages of high demand manufactured parts and electrical components during World War II. His concept of function analysis was further developed in the 1960s by Charles W. Bytheway, a design engineer at Sperry Univac in Salt Lake City, Utah. Charles Bytheway extended Mile's function analysis concepts and introduced the methodology called Function Analysis Systems Techniques (FAST) to the Society of American Value Engineers (SAVE) at their International Convention in 1965 (Bytheway 1965). FAST uses intuitive logic to decompose a high level, or objective function into secondary and lower level functions that are displayed in a logic diagram called a FAST model. Other techniques can then be applied to allocate functions to components, individuals, processes, or other entities that accomplish the functions. FAST is best applied in a team setting and proves to be an effective methodology for functional decomposition, allocation, and alternative development.

  13. Function Analysis and Decomposistion using Function Analysis Systems Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Wixson, James Robert

    1999-06-01

    The "Father of Value Analysis", Lawrence D. Miles, was a design engineer for General Electric in Schenectady, New York. Miles developed the concept of function analysis to address difficulties in satisfying the requirements to fill shortages of high demand manufactured parts and electrical components during World War II. His concept of function analysis was further developed in the 1960s by Charles W. Bytheway, a design engineer at Sperry Univac in Salt Lake City, Utah. Charles Bytheway extended Mile's function analysis concepts and introduced the methodology called Function Analysis Systems Technique (FAST) to the Society of American Value Engineers (SAVE) at their International Convention in 1965 (Bytheway 1965). FAST uses intuitive logic to decompose a high level, or objective function into secondary and lower level functions that are displayed in a logic diagram called a FAST model. Other techniques can then be applied to allocate functions to components, individuals, processes, or other entities that accomplish the functions. FAST is best applied in a team setting and proves to be an effective methodology for functional decomposition, allocation, and alternative development.

  14. Transfer Function Identification Using Orthogonal Fourier Transform Modeling Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2013-01-01

    A method for transfer function identification, including both model structure determination and parameter estimation, was developed and demonstrated. The approach uses orthogonal modeling functions generated from frequency domain data obtained by Fourier transformation of time series data. The method was applied to simulation data to identify continuous-time transfer function models and unsteady aerodynamic models. Model fit error, estimated model parameters, and the associated uncertainties were used to show the effectiveness of the method for identifying accurate transfer function models from noisy data.

  15. Inheritance contradictions between functional and extra-functional requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Hochmueller, E.

    1996-12-31

    This paper discusses the tension which may arise between functional and extra-functional requirements during the process of object-oriented design. A sketch of some design conflicts in object-oriented development induced by concurrency and security requirements will serve as a basis for rather provocative prospects on an essential distinction between the core requirements for systems dealing with their proper purpose and functionality and the requirements which can be considered to be of extra-functional nature in constraining the systems solution space.

  16. Staircase and fractional part functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amram, Meirav; Dagan, Miriam; Ioshpe, Michael; Satianov, Pavel

    2016-10-01

    The staircase and fractional part functions are basic examples of real functions. They can be applied in several parts of mathematics, such as analysis, number theory, formulas for primes, and so on; in computer programming, the floor and ceiling functions are provided by a significant number of programming languages - they have some basic uses in various programming tasks. In this paper, we view the staircase and fractional part functions as a classical example of non-continuous real functions. We introduce some of their basic properties, present some interesting constructions concerning them, and explore some intriguing interpretations of such functions. Throughout the paper, we use these functions in order to explain basic concepts in a first calculus course, such as domain of definition, discontinuity, and oddness of functions. We also explain in detail how, after researching the properties of such functions, one can draw their graph; this is a crucial part in the process of understanding their nature. In the paper, we present some subjects that the first-year student in the exact sciences may not encounter. We try to clarify those subjects and show that such ideas are important in the understanding of non-continuous functions, as a part of studying analysis in general.

  17. PUREX Plant deactivation function analysis report

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, D.P.; PUREX Working Group

    1995-09-01

    The document contains the functions, function definitions, function interfaces, function interface definitions, Input Computer Automated Manufacturing Definition (IDEFO) diagrams, and a function hierarchy chart that describe what needs to be performed to deactivate PUREX.

  18. FFTF Plant transition function analysis report

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, D.P.; FFTF Working Group

    1995-09-01

    The document contains the functions, function definitions, function interfaces, function interface definitions, Input Computer Automated Manufacturing Definition (IDEFO) diagrams, and function hierarchy charts that describe what needs to be performed to deactivate FFTF.

  19. The structure of rigid functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balka, Richárd; Elekes, Márton

    2008-09-01

    A function is called vertically rigid if graph(cf) is isometric to graph(f) for all c[not equal to]0. We prove Jankovic's conjecture by showing that a continuous function is vertically rigid if and only if it is of the form a+bx or a+bekx (). We answer the question of Cain, Clark and Rose by showing that there exists a Borel measurable vertically rigid function which is not of the above form. We discuss the Lebesgue and Baire measurable case, consider functions bounded on some interval and functions with at least one point of continuity. We also introduce horizontally rigid functions, and show that a certain structure theorem can be proved without assuming any regularity.

  20. Symmetry of cardiac function assessment

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xu-Fang; Ma, Amy X

    2016-01-01

    Both right and left ventricles are developed from two adjacent segments of the primary heart tube. Though they are different with regard to shape and power, they mirror each other in terms of behavior. This is the first level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Both cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation are active. This constructs the second level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Combination of the two levels will help to find some hidden indexes or approaches to evaluate cardiac function. In this article, four major indexes from echocardiography were analyzed under this principal, another seventeen indexes or measurement approaches came out of the shadow, which is very helpful in the assessment of cardiac function, especially for the right cardiac function and diastolic cardiac function. PMID:27582768

  1. Methods of making functionalized nanorods

    DOEpatents

    Gur, Ilan [San Francisco, CA; Milliron, Delia [Berkeley, CA; Alivisatos, A Paul [Oakland, CA; Liu, Haitao [Berkeley, CA

    2012-01-10

    A process for forming functionalized nanorods. The process includes providing a substrate, modifying the substrate by depositing a self-assembled monolayer of a bi-functional molecule on the substrate, wherein the monolayer is chosen such that one side of the bi-functional molecule binds to the substrate surface and the other side shows an independent affinity for binding to a nanocrystal surface, so as to form a modified substrate. The process further includes contacting the modified substrate with a solution containing nanocrystal colloids, forming a bound monolayer of nanocrystals on the substrate surface, depositing a polymer layer over the monolayer of nanocrystals to partially cover the monolayer of nanocrystals, so as to leave a layer of exposed nanocrystals, functionalizing the exposed nanocrystals, to form functionalized nanocrystals, and then releasing the functionalized nanocrystals from the substrate.

  2. Phylogenetic constraints on ecosystem functioning.

    PubMed

    Gravel, Dominique; Bell, Thomas; Barbera, Claire; Combe, Marine; Pommier, Thomas; Mouquet, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    There is consensus that biodiversity losses will result in declining ecosystem functioning if species have different functional traits. Phylogenetic diversity has recently been suggested as a predictor of ecosystem functioning because it could approximate the functional complementarity among species. Here we describe an experiment that takes advantage of the rapid evolutionary response of bacteria to disentangle the role of phylogenetic and species diversity. We impose a strong selection regime on marine bacterial lineages and assemble the ancestral and evolved lines in microcosms of varying lineage and phylogenetic diversity. We find that the relationship between phylogenetic diversity and productivity is strong for the ancestral lineages but brakes down for the evolved lineages. Our results not only emphasize the potential of using phylogeny to evaluate ecosystem functioning, but also they warn against using phylogenetics as a proxy for functional diversity without good information on species evolutionary history.

  3. Functional Connectivity of Human Chewing

    PubMed Central

    Quintero, A.; Ichesco, E.; Schutt, R.; Myers, C.; Peltier, S.; Gerstner, G.E.

    2013-01-01

    Mastication is one of the most important orofacial functions. The neurobiological mechanisms of masticatory control have been investigated in animal models, but less so in humans. This project used functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) to assess the positive temporal correlations among activated brain areas during a gum-chewing task. Twenty-nine healthy young-adults underwent an fcMRI scanning protocol while they chewed gum. Seed-based fcMRI analyses were performed with the motor cortex and cerebellum as regions of interest. Both left and right motor cortices were reciprocally functionally connected and functionally connected with the post-central gyrus, cerebellum, cingulate cortex, and precuneus. The cerebellar seeds showed functional connections with the contralateral cerebellar hemispheres, bilateral sensorimotor cortices, left superior temporal gyrus, and left cingulate cortex. These results are the first to identify functional central networks engaged during mastication. PMID:23355525

  4. The relativity of biological function.

    PubMed

    Laubichler, Manfred D; Stadler, Peter F; Prohaska, Sonja J; Nowick, Katja

    2015-12-01

    Function is a central concept in biological theories and explanations. Yet discussions about function are often based on a narrow understanding of biological systems and processes, such as idealized molecular systems or simple evolutionary, i.e., selective, dynamics. Conflicting conceptions of function continue to be used in the scientific literature to support certain claims, for instance about the fraction of "functional DNA" in the human genome. Here we argue that all biologically meaningful interpretations of function are necessarily context dependent. This implies that they derive their meaning as well as their range of applicability only within a specific theoretical and measurement context. We use this framework to shed light on the current debate about functional DNA and argue that without considering explicitly the theoretical and measurement contexts all attempts to integrate biological theories are prone to fail.

  5. Permutation symmetry for theta functions

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, B.C.

    2011-01-21

    This paper does for combinations of theta functions most of what Carlson (2004) [1] did for Jacobian elliptic functions. In each case the starting point is the symmetric elliptic integral R{sub F} of the first kind. Its three arguments (formerly squared Jacobian elliptic functions but now squared combinations of theta functions) differ by constants. Symbols designating the constants can often be used to replace 12 equations by three with permutation symmetry (formerly in the letters c, d, n for the Jacobian case but now in the subscripts 2, 3, 4 for theta functions). Such equations include derivatives and differential equations, bisection and duplication relations, addition formulas (apparently new for theta functions), and an example of pseudoaddition formulas.

  6. Tensor species and symmetric functions.

    PubMed Central

    Méndez, M

    1991-01-01

    An equivariant representation of the symmetric group Sn (equivariant representation from here on) is defined as a particular type of tensor species. For any tensor species R the characteristic generating function of R is defined in a way that generalizes the Frobenius characters of representations of the symmetric groups. If R is an equivariant representation, then the characteristic is a homogeneous symmetric function. The combinatorial operations on equivariant representations correspond to formal operations on the respective characteristic functions. In particular, substitution of equivariant representations corresponds to plethysm of symmetric functions. Equivariant representations are constructed that have as characteristic the elementary, complete, and Schur functions. Bijective proofs are given for the formulas that connect them with the monomial symmetric functions. PMID:11607233

  7. CMAC with General Basis Functions.

    PubMed

    Chun-Shin, Lin; Ching-Tsan, Chiang

    1996-10-01

    The cerebellar model articulation controller (CMAC) is often used in learning control. It can be viewed as a basis function network (BFN). The conventional CMAC uses local constant basis functions. A disadvantage is that its output is constant within each quantized state and the derivative information is not preserved. If the constant basis functions are replaced by non-constant differentiable basis functions, the derivative information will be able to be stored into the structure as well. In this paper, the generalized scheme that uses general basis functions is investigated. The conventional CMAC is a special case of the generalized technique. The mathematical foundation for the modified scheme is derived and the convergence of learning is proved. Simulations for the CMAC with Gaussian basis functions (GBFs) are performed to demonstrate the improvement of accuracy in modeling, and the capability in providing derivative information. Copyright 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd

  8. Biomolecule-functionalized polymer brushes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hui; Xu, Fu-Jian

    2013-04-21

    Functional polymer brushes have been utilized extensively for the immobilization of biomolecules, which is of crucial importance for the development of biosensors and biotechnology. Recent progress in polymerization methods, in particular surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), has provided a unique means for the design and synthesis of new biomolecule-functionalized polymer brushes. This current review summarizes such recent research activities. The different preparation strategies for biomolecule immobilization through polymer brush spacers are described in detail. The functional groups of the polymer brushes used for biomolecule immobilization include epoxide, carboxylic acid, hydroxyl, aldehyde, and amine groups. The recent research activities indicate that functional polymer brushes become versatile and powerful spacers for immobilization of various biomolecules to maximize their functionalities. This review also demonstrates that surface-initiated ATRP is used more frequently than other polymerization methods in the designs of new biomolecule-functionalized polymer brushes.

  9. Assessing executive function in preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Peter J; Reidy, Natalie

    2012-12-01

    Executive function develops at an unprecedented rate during the preschool period, yet few clinicians attempt to assess executive processes in young children. The primary objective of this article is to demonstrate that executive function can be assessed in preschoolers, and to highlight the importance of detecting executive dysfunction as early as possible. Following a description of executive function and the underlying neural systems, this article outlines some of the challenges in assessing executive function in young children. The various assessment paradigms used for assessing executive function in preschoolers are presented, and based on studies that have applied these measurement tools normal development of executive domains is described. Finally, the benefits and opportunities for executive function intervention in the preschool period are considered.

  10. Functional footprinting of regulatory DNA

    PubMed Central

    Vierstra, Jeff; Reik, Andreas; Chang, Kai-Hsin; Stehling-Sun, Sandra; Zhou, Yuan-Yue; Hinkley, Sarah J.; Paschon, David E.; Zhang, L.; Psatha, Nikoletta; Bendana, Yuri R.; O'Neill, Colleen M.; Song, Alex H.; Mich, Andrea; Liu, Pei-Qi; Lee, Gary; Bauer, Daniel E.; Holmes, Michael C.; Orkin, Stuart H.; Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Stamatoyannopoulos, George; Rebar, Edward J.; Gregory, Philip D.; Urnov, Fyodor D.; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Regulatory regions harbor multiple transcription factor recognition sites; however, the contribution of individual sites to regulatory function remains challenging to define. We describe a facile approach that exploits the error-prone nature of genome editing-induced double-strand break repair to map functional elements within regulatory DNA at nucleotide resolution. We demonstrate the approach on a human erythroid enhancer, revealing single TF recognition sites that gate the majority of downstream regulatory function. PMID:26322838

  11. Benzaldehyde-functionalized Polymer Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Guorong; Fang, Huafeng; Cheng, Chong; Lu, Peng; Zhang, Ke; Walker, Amy V.; Taylor, John-Stephen A.; Wooley, Karen L.

    2009-01-01

    Polymer vesicles with diameters of ca. 100-600 nm and bearing benzaldehyde functionalities within the vesicular walls were constructed through self assembly of an amphiphilic block copolymer PEO45-b-PVBA26 in water. The reactivity of the benzaldehyde functionalities was verified by crosslinking the polymersomes, and also by a one-pot crosslinking and functionalization approach to further render the vesicles fluorescent, each via reductive amination. In vitro studies found these labelled nanostructures to undergo cell association. PMID:19309173

  12. Functional imaging in the fetus.

    PubMed

    Schöpf, Veronika; Kasprian, Gregor; Prayer, Daniela

    2011-06-01

    This review focuses on the application of magnetic resonance imaging methods in utero studying functional brain development of spontaneous brain activity generated under resting conditions and of task-evoked activity using stimulation. These imaging approaches have been useful to explore the brain's functional organization during development, as already shown in different substantial resting-state studies in preterms. We also discuss emerging future directions regarding analyzing methods and combination of functional and structural connectivity approaches.

  13. PHAZE. Parametric Hazard Function Estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, C.L.

    1990-09-01

    Phaze performs statistical inference calculations on a hazard function ( also called a failure rate or intensity function) based on reported failure times of components that are repaired and restored to service. Three parametric models are allowed: the exponential, linear, and Weibull hazard models. The inference includes estimation (maximum likelihood estimators and confidence regions) of the parameters and of the hazard function itself, testing of hypotheses such as increasing failure rate, and checking of the model assumptions.

  14. CAMAC modular programmable function generator

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, G.W.; Suehiro, S.; Hendricks, R.W.

    1980-12-01

    A CAMAC modular programmable function generator has been developed. The device contains a 1024 word by 12-bit memory, a 12-bit digital-to-analog converter with a 600 ns settling time, an 18-bit programmable frequency register, and two programmable trigger output registers. The trigger registers can produce programmed output logic transitions at various (binary) points in the output function curve, and are used to synchronize various other data acquisition devices with the function curve.

  15. Differential Item Functioning Analysis Using Rasch Item Information Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyse, Adam E.; Mapuranga, Raymond

    2009-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) analysis is a statistical technique used for ensuring the equity and fairness of educational assessments. This study formulates a new DIF analysis method using the information similarity index (ISI). ISI compares item information functions when data fits the Rasch model. Through simulations and an international…

  16. Behaviors and Corresponding Functions Addressed via Functional Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matson, Johnny L.; Sipes, Megan; Horovitz, Max; Worley, Julie A.; Shoemaker, Mary E.; Kozlowski, Alison M.

    2011-01-01

    One-hundred seventy-three studies that employed functional assessment were evaluated with respect to types of challenging behaviors studied and the functions identified that maintained those behaviors. For most studies, two to three behaviors were targeted. Of the 38 different challenging behaviors identified, self-injurious behavior (SIB) and…

  17. Fabrication of functional nanofibers through post-nanoparticle functionalization

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Tyler; Kushida, Takashi; Wang, Li-Sheng; Mout, Rubul; Li, Xiaoning; Saha, Krishnendu; Gupta, Akash; Tonga, Gülen Y.; Lannutti, John J.; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2015-01-01

    A facile method has been developed to functionalize nanofiber surfaces with nanoparticles through dithiocaramate chemistry. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and quantum dots (QDs) have been immobilized on nanofiber surface. These surfaces provide scaffolds for further supramolecular functionalization, as demonstrated through FRET pairing of QD-decorated fibers and fluorescent proteins. PMID:25737273

  18. The Relationship between Mathematical Induction, Proposition Functions, and Implication Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrew, Lane

    2010-01-01

    In this study, I explored the relationship between mathematical induction ability and proposition and implication functions through a mixed methods approach. Students from three universities (N = 78) and 6 classrooms completed a written assessment testing their conceptual and procedural capabilities with induction and functions. In addition, I…

  19. Speech and language functions that require a functioning Broca's area.

    PubMed

    Davis, Cameron; Kleinman, Jonathan T; Newhart, Melissa; Gingis, Leila; Pawlak, Mikolaj; Hillis, Argye E

    2008-04-01

    A number of previous studies have indicated that Broca's area has an important role in understanding and producing syntactically complex sentences and other language functions. If Broca's area is critical for these functions, then either infarction of Broca's area or temporary hypoperfusion within this region should cause impairment of these functions, at least while the neural tissue is dysfunctional. The opportunity to identify the language functions that depend on Broca's area in a particular individual was provided by a patient with hyperacute stroke who showed selective hypoperfusion, with minimal infarct, in Broca's area, and acutely impaired production of grammatical sentences, comprehension of semantically reversible (but not non-reversible) sentences, spelling, and motor planning of speech articulation. When blood flow was restored to Broca's area, as demonstrated by repeat perfusion weighted imaging, he showed immediate recovery of these language functions. The identification of language functions that were impaired when Broca's area was dysfunctional (due to low blood flow) and recovered when Broca's area was functional again, provides evidence for the critical role of Broca's area in these language functions, at least in this individual.

  20. Adiabatic corrections to density functional theory energies and wave functions.

    PubMed

    Mohallem, José R; Coura, Thiago de O; Diniz, Leonardo G; de Castro, Gustavo; Assafrão, Denise; Heine, Thomas

    2008-09-25

    The adiabatic finite-nuclear-mass-correction (FNMC) to the electronic energies and wave functions of atoms and molecules is formulated for density-functional theory and implemented in the deMon code. The approach is tested for a series of local and gradient corrected density functionals, using MP2 results and diagonal-Born-Oppenheimer corrections from the literature for comparison. In the evaluation of absolute energy corrections of nonorganic molecules the LDA PZ81 functional works surprisingly better than the others. For organic molecules the GGA BLYP functional has the best performance. FNMC with GGA functionals, mainly BLYP, show a good performance in the evaluation of relative corrections, except for nonorganic molecules containing H atoms. The PW86 functional stands out with the best evaluation of the barrier of linearity of H2O and the isotopic dipole moment of HDO. In general, DFT functionals display an accuracy superior than the common belief and because the corrections are based on a change of the electronic kinetic energy they are here ranked in a new appropriate way. The approach is applied to obtain the adiabatic correction for full atomization of alcanes C(n)H(2n+2), n = 4-10. The barrier of 1 mHartree is approached for adiabatic corrections, justifying its insertion into DFT.