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Sample records for fricke automorphic functions

  1. Almost automorphic solutions for some partial functional differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezzinbi, Khalil; N'guerekata, Gaston Mandata

    2007-04-01

    In this work, we study the existence of almost automorphic solutions for some partial functional differential equations. We prove that the existence of a bounded solution on implies the existence of an almost automorphic solution. Our results extend the classical known theorem by Bohr and Neugebauer on the existence of almost periodic solutions for inhomegeneous linear almost periodic differential equations. We give some applications to hyperbolic equations and Lotka-Volterra type equations used to describe the evolution of a single diffusive animal species.

  2. Automorphic instanton partition functions on Calabi-Yau threefolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    We survey recent results on quantum corrections to the hypermultiplet moduli space Script M in type IIA/B string theory on a compact Calabi-Yau threefold X, or, equivalently, the vector multiplet moduli space in type IIB/A on X × S1. Our main focus lies on the problem of resumming the infinite series of D-brane and NS5-brane instantons, using the mathematical machinery of automorphic forms. We review the proposal that when the theory in three dimensions exhibits an arithmetic "U-duality" symmetry G(Bbb Z) the total instanton partition function arises from a certain unitary automorphic representation of G, whose Fourier coefficients reproduce the BPS-degeneracies. In the case of four-dimensional Script N = 2 theories on Bbb R × S1 we argue that the relevant automorphic representation falls in the quaternionic discrete series of G, and that the partition function is a holomorphic section on the twistor space over Script M.

  3. Automorphic inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimmrigk, Rolf

    2015-09-01

    A framework of inflation is formulated based on symmetry groups and their associated automorphic functions. In this setting the inflaton multiplet takes values in a curved target space constructed from a continuous group G and a discrete subgroup Γ. The dynamics of inflationary models is essentially determined by the choice of the pair (G , Γ) and a function Φ on the group G. Automorphic inflation provides a natural structure in which the shift symmetry of large field inflation arises as one of generators of Γ. The model of j-inflation is discussed as an example of modular inflation associated with the special linear group.

  4. Spectral Automorphisms in Quantum Logics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Alexandru; Caragheorgheopol, Dan

    2010-12-01

    In quantum mechanics, the Hilbert space formalism might be physically justified in terms of some axioms based on the orthomodular lattice (OML) mathematical structure (Piron in Foundations of Quantum Physics, Benjamin, Reading, 1976). We intend to investigate the extent to which some fundamental physical facts can be described in the more general framework of OMLs, without the support of Hilbert space-specific tools. We consider the study of lattice automorphisms properties as a “substitute” for Hilbert space techniques in investigating the spectral properties of observables. This is why we introduce the notion of spectral automorphism of an OML. Properties of spectral automorphisms and of their spectra are studied. We prove that the presence of nontrivial spectral automorphisms allow us to distinguish between classical and nonclassical theories. We also prove, for finite dimensional OMLs, that for every spectral automorphism there is a basis of invariant atoms. This is an analogue of the spectral theorem for unitary operators having purely point spectrum.

  5. Splitting automorphisms of free Burnside groups

    SciTech Connect

    Atabekyan, Varuzhan S

    2013-02-28

    It is proved that, if the order of a splitting automorphism of odd period n{>=}1003 of a free Burnside group B(m,n) is a prime, then the automorphism is inner. This implies, for every prime n{>=}1009, an affirmative answer to the question on the coincidence of the splitting automorphisms of period n of the group B(m,n) with the inner automorphisms (this question was posed in the 'Kourovka Notebook' in 1990). Bibliography: 17 titles.

  6. A general framework of automorphic inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimmrigk, Rolf

    2016-05-01

    Automorphic inflation is an application of the framework of automorphic scalar field theory, based on the theory of automorphic forms and representations. In this paper the general framework of automorphic and modular inflation is described in some detail, with emphasis on the resulting stratification of the space of scalar field theories in terms of the group theoretic data associated to the shift symmetry, as well as the automorphic data that specifies the potential. The class of theories based on Eisenstein series provides a natural generalization of the model of j-inflation considered previously.

  7. Fricke xylenol gel characterization using a photoacustic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldeira, A. M. F.; de Almeida, A.; Neto, A. M.; Baesso, M. L.; Bento, A. C.; Silva, M. A.

    2007-11-01

    Fricke chemical dosimetry measurements of the absorbed dose of ionizing radiation depend on the quality and characteristics of the system that reads each dosimeter. The final accuracy is significantly dependent on the technique used for measuring the chemical concentration changes in the dosimeters. We have used a photoacoustic technique to detect the Fricke xylenol gel (FXG) optical absorbance. The FXG, a derivation of the aqueous Fricke dosimeter, is made more sensitive and stable with addition of gelatin (300 Bloom) and xylenol orange. The light intensity transmitted through an FXG sample before and after irradiation was measured with an acoustic detector. The incremental optical absorbance is directly proportional to the ionizing radiation absorbed dose. We present the optical absorbance measurements as a function of absorbed dose and of post-irradiation time. We apply our photoacoustic technique to determine absorbed dose profiles. The results show that the photoacoustic technique applied to FXG provides a new dosimetric system, as good as those already established using spectrophotometric techniques.

  8. Duality groups, automorphic forms, and higher derivative corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, Neil; West, Peter

    2007-03-15

    We study the higher derivative corrections that occur in type II superstring theories in ten dimensions or less. Assuming invariance under a discrete duality group G(Z) we show that the generic functions of the scalar fields that occur can be identified with automorphic forms. We then give a systematic method to construct automorphic forms from a given group G(Z) together with a chosen subgroup H and a linear representation of G(Z). This construction is based on the theory of nonlinear realizations and we find that the automorphic forms contain the weights of G. We also carry out the dimensional reduction of the generic higher derivative corrections of the IIB theory to three dimensions and find that the weights of E{sub 8} occur generalizing previous results of the authors on M theory. Since the automorphic forms of this theory contain the weights of E{sub 8} we can interpret the occurrence of weights in the dimensional reduction as evidence for an underlying U-duality symmetry.

  9. Infinitesimal affine automorphisms of symplectic connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Daniel J. F.

    2016-08-01

    Conditions are given under which an infinitesimal automorphism of a torsion-free connection preserving a symplectic form is necessarily a symplectic vector field. An example is given of a compact symplectic nilmanifold admitting a flat symplectic connection and an infinitesimal automorphism that is not symplectic.

  10. Fricke S-duality in CHL models

    SciTech Connect

    Persson, Daniel; Volpato, Roberto

    2015-12-23

    In this study, we consider four dimensional CHL models with sixteen spacetime supersymmetries obtained from orbifolds of type IIA superstring on K3×T2 by a ZN symmetry acting (possibly) non-geometrically on K3. We show that most of these models (in particular, for geometric symmetries) are self-dual under a weak-strong duality acting on the heterotic axio-dilaton modulus S by a “Fricke involution” S → -1/NS. This is a novel symmetry of CHL models that lies outside of the standard SL(2,Z)-symmetry of the parent theory, heterotic strings on T6. For self-dual models this implies that the lattice of purely electric charges is N-modular, i.e. isometric to its dual up to a rescaling of its quadratic form by N. We verify this prediction by determining the lattices of electric and magnetic charges in all relevant examples. We also calculate certain BPS-saturated couplings and verify that they are invariant under the Fricke S-duality. For CHL models that are not self-dual, the strong coupling limit is dual to type IIA compactified on T6/ZN, for some ZN-symmetry preserving half of the spacetime supersymmetries.

  11. Fricke S-duality in CHL models

    DOE PAGES

    Persson, Daniel; Volpato, Roberto

    2015-12-23

    In this study, we consider four dimensional CHL models with sixteen spacetime supersymmetries obtained from orbifolds of type IIA superstring on K3×T2 by a ZN symmetry acting (possibly) non-geometrically on K3. We show that most of these models (in particular, for geometric symmetries) are self-dual under a weak-strong duality acting on the heterotic axio-dilaton modulus S by a “Fricke involution” S → -1/NS. This is a novel symmetry of CHL models that lies outside of the standard SL(2,Z)-symmetry of the parent theory, heterotic strings on T6. For self-dual models this implies that the lattice of purely electric charges is N-modular,more » i.e. isometric to its dual up to a rescaling of its quadratic form by N. We verify this prediction by determining the lattices of electric and magnetic charges in all relevant examples. We also calculate certain BPS-saturated couplings and verify that they are invariant under the Fricke S-duality. For CHL models that are not self-dual, the strong coupling limit is dual to type IIA compactified on T6/ZN, for some ZN-symmetry preserving half of the spacetime supersymmetries.« less

  12. Cluster automorphism groups of cluster algebras with coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Wen; Zhu, Bin

    2016-10-01

    We study the cluster automorphism group of a skew-symmetric cluster algebra with geometric coefficients. For this, we introduce the notion of gluing free cluster algebra, and show that under a weak condition the cluster automorphism group of a gluing free cluster algebra is a subgroup of the cluster automorphism group of its principal part cluster algebra (i.e. the corresponding cluster algebra without coefficients). We show that several classes of cluster algebras with coefficients are gluing free, for example, cluster algebras with principal coefficients, cluster algebras with universal geometric coefficients, and cluster algebras from surfaces (except a 4-gon) with coefficients from boundaries. Moreover, except four kinds of surfaces, the cluster automorphism group of a cluster algebra from a surface with coefficients from boundaries is isomorphic to the cluster automorphism group of its principal part cluster algebra; for a cluster algebra with principal coefficients, its cluster automorphism group is isomorphic to the automorphism group of its initial quiver.

  13. Radiological properties of nanocomposite Fricke gel dosimeters for heavy ion beams

    PubMed Central

    Maeyama, Takuya; Fukunishi, Nobuhisa; Ishikawa, Kenichi L.; Fukasaku, Kazuaki; Fukuda, Shigekazu

    2016-01-01

    The radiological properties of nanocomposite Fricke gel (NC-FG) dosimeters prepared with different concentrations of nano-clay, perchloric acid and ferrous ions in deaerated conditions were investigated under carbon and argon ion beam irradiation covering a linear-energy-transfer (LET) range of 10 to 3000 eV/nm. We found that NC-FG exhibits radiological properties distinct from those of conventional Fricke gel. The radiation sensitivity of NC-FG is independent of the LET and is nearly constant even at very high LET (3000 eV/nm) values in the Bragg peak region of the argon ion beam. In addition, whereas conventional Fricke gel dosimeters only operate under acidic conditions, NC-FG dosimeters function under both acidic and neutral conditions. The radiation sensitivity decreases with decreasing nano-clay concentration in NC-FG, which indicates that the nano-clay plays a vital role in the radiation-induced oxidation of Fe2+. PMID:26968632

  14. Automorphisms of Hilbert space effect algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šemrl, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Let H be a Hilbert space and E (H) the effect algebra on H. A bijective map φ :E(H)\\to E(H) is called an ortho-order automorphism of E (H) if for every A,B\\in E(H) we have A≤slant B \\Longleftrightarrow φ (A)≤slant φ (B) and φ ({{A}\\bot })=φ {{(A)}\\bot }. The classical theorem of Ludwig states that every such ϕ is of the form φ (A)=UA{{U}*}, A\\in E(H), for some unitary or antiunitary operator U. It is also known that each bijective map on E (H) preserving order and coexistency in both directions is of the same form. Can we improve these two theorems by relaxing the bijectivity assumption and/or replacing the above preserving properties by the weaker assumptions of preserving above relations in one direction only and still get the same conclusion? For both characterizations of automorphisms of effect algebras we will prove the optimal versions and give counterexamples showing the optimality of the obtained results. This research was supported by a grant from ARRS, Slovenia.

  15. Heisenberg Groups and their Automorphisms over Algebras with Central Involution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Robert W.

    2015-08-01

    Heisenberg groups over algebras with central involution and their automorphism groups are constructed. The complex quaternion group algebra over a prime field is used as an example. Its subspaces provide finite models for each of the real and complex quadratic spaces with dimension 4 or less. A model for the representations of these Heisenberg groups and automorphism groups is constructed. A pseudo-differential operator enables a parallel treatment of spaces defined over finite and real fields.

  16. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Stress - energy must be singular on the Misner space horizon even for automorphic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, Claes R.; Kay, Bernard S.

    1996-12-01

    We use the image sum method to reproduce Sushkov's result that for a massless automorphic field on the initial globally hyperbolic region IGH of Misner space, one can always find a special value of the automorphic parameter 0264-9381/13/12/002/img1 such that the renormalized expectation value 0264-9381/13/12/002/img2 in the Sushkov state `0264-9381/13/12/002/img3' (i.e. the automorphic generalization of the Hiscock - Konkowski state) vanishes. However, we shall prove by elementary methods that the conclusions of a recent general theorem of Kay, Radzikowski and Wald apply in this case. That is, for any value of 0264-9381/13/12/002/img1 and any neighbourhood N of any point b on the chronology horizon there exists at least one pair of non-null related points 0264-9381/13/12/002/img5 such that the renormalized two-point function of an automorphic field 0264-9381/13/12/002/img6 in the Sushkov state is singular. In consequence 0264-9381/13/12/002/img2 (as well as other renormalized expectation values such as 0264-9381/13/12/002/img8) is necessarily singular on the chronology horizon. We point out that a similar situation (i.e. singularity on the chronology horizon) holds for states on Gott space and Grant space.

  17. The effect of mixed dopants on the stability of Fricke gel dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penev, K.; Mequanint, K.

    2013-06-01

    Auto-oxidation and fast diffusion in Fricke gels are major drawbacks to wide-spread application of these gels in 3D dosimetry. Aiming to limit both processes, we used mixed dopants: the ferric-specific ligand xylenol orange with a ferrous-specific ligand (1,10-phenanthroline) and/or a bi-functional cross-linking agent (glyoxal). Markedly improved auto-oxidation stability was observed in the xylenol orange and phenanthroline doped gel at the expense of increased background absorbance and faster diffusion. Addition of glyoxal limited the diffusion rate and led to a partial bleaching of the gel. It is conceivable that these two new compositions may find useful practical application.

  18. The Group of Hamiltonian Automorphisms of a Star Product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Fuente-Gravy, Laurent

    2016-09-01

    We deform the group of Hamiltonian diffeomorphisms into a group of Hamiltonian automorphisms, Ham( M,∗), of a formal star product ∗ on a symplectic manifold ( M, ω). We study the geometry of that group and deform the Flux morphism in the framework of deformation quantization.

  19. On Twisting Real Spectral Triples by Algebra Automorphisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, Giovanni; Martinetti, Pierre

    2016-08-01

    We systematically investigate ways to twist a real spectral triple via an algebra automorphism and in particular, we naturally define a twisted partner for any real graded spectral triple. Among other things, we investigate consequences of the twisting on the fluctuations of the metric and possible applications to the spectral approach to the Standard Model of particle physics.

  20. Automorphisms of semigroups of invertible matrices with nonnegative integer elements

    SciTech Connect

    Semenov, Pavel P

    2012-09-30

    Let G{sub n}(Z) be the subsemigroup of GL{sub n}(Z) consisting of the matrices with nonnegative integer coefficients. In the paper, the automorphisms of this semigroup are described for n{>=}2. Bibliography: 5 titles.

  1. On Twisting Real Spectral Triples by Algebra Automorphisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, Giovanni; Martinetti, Pierre

    2016-11-01

    We systematically investigate ways to twist a real spectral triple via an algebra automorphism and in particular, we naturally define a twisted partner for any real graded spectral triple. Among other things, we investigate consequences of the twisting on the fluctuations of the metric and possible applications to the spectral approach to the Standard Model of particle physics.

  2. Isotropic three-dimensional MRI-Fricke-infused gel dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Nai-Yu; Chu, Woei-Chyn; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Chung, Wen-Yuh; Guo, Wan-Yuo

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: Fricke-infused gel has been shown to be a simple and attainable method for the conformal measurement of absorbed radiation dose. Nevertheless, its accuracy is seriously hindered by the irreversible ferric ion diffusion during magnetic resonance imaging, particularly when three-dimensional (3D) dose measurement in radiosurgery is considered. In this study, the authors developed a fast three-dimensional spin-echo based Fricke gel dosimetry technique to reduce the adverse effects of ferric ion diffusion and to obtain an accurate isotropic 3D dose measurement. Methods: A skull shaped phantom containing Fricke-infused gel was irradiated using Leksell Gamma Knife. The rapid image-based dosimetry technique was applied with the use of a 3D fast spin-echo magnetic resonance imaging sequence. The authors mathematically derived and experimentally validated the correlations between dose-response characteristics and parameters of the 3D fast spin-echo MR imaging sequence. Absorbed dose profiles were assessed and compared to the calculated profiles given by the Gamma Knife treatment planning system. Coefficient of variance (CV%) and coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}) were used to evaluate the precision of dose-response curve estimation. The agreement between the measured and the planned 3D dose distributions was quantified by gamma-index analysis of two acceptance criteria. Results: Proper magnetic resonance imaging parameters were explored to render an accurate three-dimensional absorbed dose mapping with a 1 mm{sup 3} isotropic image resolution. The efficacy of the dose-response estimation was approved by an R{sup 2} > 0.99 and an average CV% of 1.6%. Average gamma pass-rate between the experimentally measured and GammaPlan calculated dose distributions were 83.8% and 99.7% for 2%/2 and 3%/3 mm criteria, respectively. Conclusions: With the designed MR imaging sequence and parameters, total 3D MR acquisition time was confined to within 20 min postirradiation

  3. A reduction of diffusion in PVA Fricke hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. T.; Masters, K. S.; Hosokawa, K.; Blinco, J.; Crowe, S. B.; Kairn, T.; Trapp, J. V.

    2015-01-01

    A modification to the PVA-FX hydrogel whereby the chelating agent, xylenol orange, was partially bonded to the gelling agent, poly-vinyl alcohol, resulted in an 8% reduction in the post irradiation Fe3+ diffusion, adding approximately 1 hour to the useful timespan between irradiation and readout. This xylenol orange functionalised poly-vinyl alcohol hydrogel had an OD dose sensitivity of 0.014 Gy-1 and a diffusion rate of 0.133 mm2 h-1. As this partial bond yields only incremental improvement, it is proposed that more efficient methods of bonding xylenol orange to poly-vinyl alcohol be investigated to further reduce the diffusion in Fricke gels.

  4. Measurements of the Fe³⁺ diffusion coefficient in Fricke xylenol gel using optical density measurements.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Lucas Nonato; Sampaio, Francisco Glaildo Almeida; Moreira, Marcos Vasques; de Almeida, Adelaide

    2014-08-01

    In Fricke dosimetry, optical density measurements are performed some time after dosimeter irradiation. Values of the diffusion coefficient of Fe(3+) in Fricke Xylenol gel (FXG) are necessary for determining the spatial distribution of the absorbed dose from measurements of the optical density. Five sets of FXG dosimeters, kept at different constant temperatures, were exposed to collimated 6 MV photons. The optical density profile, proportional to the Fe(3+) concentration, at the boundary between irradiated and non-irradiated parts of each dosimeter was measured periodically over a period of 60 h. By comparing the experimental data with a function that accounts for the unobserved initial concentration profile of Fe(3+) in the FXG, we obtained diffusion coefficients 0.30±0.05, 0.40±0.05, 0.50±0.05, 0.60±0.05 and 0.80±0.05 mm(2)/h for the temperatures 283.0±0.5, 286.0±0.5, 289.0±0.5, 292.0±0.5, and 296.0±0.5 K, respectively. The activation energy of Fe(3+) diffusion in the gel, 0.54±0.06 eV, was determined from the temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficients.

  5. Study of Fricke gel dosimeter response for different gel quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavinato, C. C.; Campos, L. L.

    2010-11-01

    The Fricke xylenol gel (FXG) dosimeter has been studied for application in radiotherapy because it is capable of to measure the spatial distribution of radiation doses. The dosimetry is based on the oxidation of ferrous (Fe2+) to ferric (Fe3+) ions radiation induced, related to the radiation dose. The gel material usually employed is the 300 Bloom gelatin, which is imported and very expensive in Brazil. Aiming to analyze the viability of to use a locally produced and low cost gel material, in this work the spectrophotometric responses of FXG solutions prepared using 270 Bloom gelatin commercially available and 300 Bloom gelatin imported were compared. The absorption spectra of solutions prepared with 5% by weight 270 and 300 Bloom gelatins non-irradiated and irradiated with 60Co gamma radiation in the dose range between 0.5 and 100 Gy were analysed, the dose-response curves were evaluated and the useful dose range was established. The obtained results indicate that the FXG solution prepared with 270 Bloom gelatin presents good performance, similar to that presented by the FXG solution prepared with 300 Bloom gelatin and its use can be recommended owing to the low cost and the availability in local market.

  6. Electron Beam Quality Determination Through Fricke Xylenol Gel Dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Petchevist, P. C. D.; Moreira, M. V.; Almeida, A. de

    2009-03-10

    According to the IAEA TRS-398 protocol, a parallel plate ionization chamber is recommended to be used in electron dosimetry. The important dosimetric parameters such as R{sub 100} and R{sub 50}, inferred from the percentage depth dose (PDD) curve, allow to obtain the electron beam average energy at the water phantom surface (material equivalent to the soft tissue). In this work, a chemical dosimeter based on the Fe(II) to Fe(III) oxidation was used to obtain the average energies from electrons beams (from nominal energies of 5, 8 and 10 MeV) and related parameters of R{sub 100}, R{sub 50} and z{sub ref}. These energies obtained through the Fricke Xylenol Gel (FXG) were compared to those with a parallel plate ionization chamber, following the cited protocol, which showed no significant differences. From these measurements one can conclude the FXG applicability for R{sub 100}, R{sub 50} and electron beam average energy determination.

  7. Adapting the neurology area of the Gustavo Fricke Hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankelen, A.; González, S.; Aguirre, L.

    2007-11-01

    Within the framework of the subject Clinical Engineering taught at Hospital Dr. Gustavo Fricke of Viña del Mar Chile, we were assigned to undertake a detailed study on the quality of the electrical power main supply of the Neurology Department, on account of reported malfunctioning of some equipment used in this unit. The study results indicated that the problems occurred only in a device for auditory evoked potentials device and, contrary to what was expected, the problem was unrelated to the quality of the electrical main supply. It was also found that the cause for the problem was electromagnetic interference (EMI) emitted from the system's very own components. To solve the problem, we built a Faraday Cage for the signal-processing unit and increased the separating distance among the various system components. This approach enhanced system performance and significantly improved the recorded signals of patients. The solution adopted from this experience was suggested to others health care centers of our country that had been experiencing similar difficulties with the same type of medical equipment.

  8. A modified Fricke gel dosimeter for fast electron blood dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Lama, L. S.; de Góes, E. G.; Sampaio, F. G. A.; Petchevist, P. C. D.; de Almeida, A.

    2014-12-01

    It has been suggested for more than forty years that blood and blood components be irradiated before allogeneic transfusions for immunosuppressed patients in order to avoid the Transfusion-Associated Graft-versus-Host Disease (TA-GVHD). Whole blood, red blood cells, platelets and granulocytes may have viable T cells and should be irradiated before transfusion for different patient clinical conditions. According to international guides, absorbed doses from 25 up to 50 Gy should be delivered to the central middle plane of each blood bag. Although gamma and X-rays from radiotherapy equipments and dedicated cell irradiators are commonly used for this purpose, electron beams from Linear Accelerators (LINACs) could be used as well. In this work, we developed a methodology able to acquire dosimetric data from blood irradiations, especially after fast electrons exposures. This was achieved using a proposed Fricke Xylenol Gel (FXGp) dosimeter, which presents closer radiological characteristics (attenuation coefficients and stopping-powers) to the whole blood, as well as complete absorbed dose range linearity. The developed methodology and the FXGp dosimeter were also able to provide isodose curves and field profiles for the irradiated samples.

  9. The Goldreich-Schubert-Fricke instability in stellar radiative zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caleo, Andrea; Balbus, Steven A.; Tognelli, Emanuele

    2016-07-01

    The Goldreich-Schubert-Fricke (GSF) instability is a rotational instability that is thought to contribute to the transfer of angular momentum in differentially rotating stars. It has been included in recent codes of stellar evolution in a diffusion-like approximation, under the assumption that the kinematic viscosity ν is unimportant for the development of the instability. As noted previously by other authors, for most stellar applications, this may not be a valid approximation. We discuss this issue in detail, solving the dispersion relation of the perturbed modes for realistic values of ν in the bulk of the radiative zone of the Sun and of three red giant stars at various evolutionary stages. We find that the GSF instability is triggered only in layers of an extremely strong shear. In a simple case study, we also investigate the effect of a small deviation from axisymmetry or a small background magnetic field. We find that, like the viscosity, these have a stabilizing effect. We conclude that this instability is probably far less efficient in transporting angular momentum than is often assumed, and may not even be present.

  10. The Fricke dosimeter as an absorbed dose to water primary standard for Ir-192 brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Gamal, Islam; Cojocaru, Claudiu; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto; McEwen, Malcolm

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this project was to develop an absorbed dose to water primary standard for Ir-192 brachytherapy based on the Fricke dosimeter. To achieve this within the framework of the existing TG-43 protocol, a determination of the absorbed dose to water at the reference position, D(r0,θ0), was undertaken. Prior to this investigation, the radiation chemical yield of the ferric ions (G-value) at the Ir-192 equivalent photon energy (0.380 MeV) was established by interpolating between G-values obtained for Co-60 and 250 kV x-rays. An irradiation geometry was developed with a cylindrical holder to contain the Fricke solution and allow irradiations in a water phantom to be conducted using a standard Nucletron microSelectron V2 HDR Ir-192 afterloader. Once the geometry and holder were optimized, the dose obtained with the Fricke system was compared to the standard method used in North America, based on air-kerma strength. Initial investigations focused on reproducible positioning of the ring-shaped holder for the Fricke solution with respect to the Ir-192 source and obtaining an acceptable type A uncertainty in the optical density measurements required to yield the absorbed dose. Source positioning was found to be reproducible to better than 0.3 mm, and a careful cleaning and control procedure reduced the variation in optical density reading due to contamination of the Fricke solution by the PMMA holder. It was found that fewer than 10 irradiations were required to yield a type A standard uncertainty of less than 0.5%. Correction factors to take account of the non-water components of the geometry and the volume averaging effect of the Fricke solution volume were obtained from Monte Carlo calculations. A sensitivity analysis showed that the dependence on the input data used (e.g. interaction cross-sections) was small with a type B uncertainty for these corrections estimated to be 0.2%. The combined standard uncertainty in the determination of absorbed dose to water

  11. The Fricke dosimeter as an absorbed dose to water primary standard for Ir-192 brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    El Gamal, Islam; Cojocaru, Claudiu; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto; McEwen, Malcolm

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this project was to develop an absorbed dose to water primary standard for Ir-192 brachytherapy based on the Fricke dosimeter. To achieve this within the framework of the existing TG-43 protocol, a determination of the absorbed dose to water at the reference position, D(r0,θ0), was undertaken. Prior to this investigation, the radiation chemical yield of the ferric ions (G-value) at the Ir-192 equivalent photon energy (0.380 MeV) was established by interpolating between G-values obtained for Co-60 and 250 kV x-rays.An irradiation geometry was developed with a cylindrical holder to contain the Fricke solution and allow irradiations in a water phantom to be conducted using a standard Nucletron microSelectron V2 HDR Ir-192 afterloader. Once the geometry and holder were optimized, the dose obtained with the Fricke system was compared to the standard method used in North America, based on air-kerma strength.Initial investigations focused on reproducible positioning of the ring-shaped holder for the Fricke solution with respect to the Ir-192 source and obtaining an acceptable type A uncertainty in the optical density measurements required to yield the absorbed dose. Source positioning was found to be reproducible to better than 0.3 mm, and a careful cleaning and control procedure reduced the variation in optical density reading due to contamination of the Fricke solution by the PMMA holder. It was found that fewer than 10 irradiations were required to yield a type A standard uncertainty of less than 0.5%.Correction factors to take account of the non-water components of the geometry and the volume averaging effect of the Fricke solution volume were obtained from Monte Carlo calculations. A sensitivity analysis showed that the dependence on the input data used (e.g. interaction cross-sections) was small with a type B uncertainty for these corrections estimated to be 0.2%.The combined standard uncertainty in the determination of absorbed dose to water at

  12. A Feasibility Study of Fricke Dosimetry as an Absorbed Dose to Water Standard for 192Ir HDR Sources

    PubMed Central

    deAlmeida, Carlos Eduardo; Ochoa, Ricardo; de Lima, Marilene Coelho; David, Mariano Gazineu; Pires, Evandro Jesus; Peixoto, José Guilherme; Salata, Camila; Bernal, Mario Antônio

    2014-01-01

    High dose rate brachytherapy (HDR) using 192Ir sources is well accepted as an important treatment option and thus requires an accurate dosimetry standard. However, a dosimetry standard for the direct measurement of the absolute dose to water for this particular source type is currently not available. An improved standard for the absorbed dose to water based on Fricke dosimetry of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources is presented in this study. The main goal of this paper is to demonstrate the potential usefulness of the Fricke dosimetry technique for the standardization of the quantity absorbed dose to water for 192Ir sources. A molded, double-walled, spherical vessel for water containing the Fricke solution was constructed based on the Fricke system. The authors measured the absorbed dose to water and compared it with the doses calculated using the AAPM TG-43 report. The overall combined uncertainty associated with the measurements using Fricke dosimetry was 1.4% for k = 1, which is better than the uncertainties reported in previous studies. These results are promising; hence, the use of Fricke dosimetry to measure the absorbed dose to water as a standard for HDR 192Ir may be possible in the future. PMID:25521914

  13. A feasibility study of Fricke dosimetry as an absorbed dose to water standard for 192Ir HDR sources.

    PubMed

    deAlmeida, Carlos Eduardo; Ochoa, Ricardo; Lima, Marilene Coelho de; David, Mariano Gazineu; Pires, Evandro Jesus; Peixoto, José Guilherme; Salata, Camila; Bernal, Mario Antônio

    2014-01-01

    High dose rate brachytherapy (HDR) using 192Ir sources is well accepted as an important treatment option and thus requires an accurate dosimetry standard. However, a dosimetry standard for the direct measurement of the absolute dose to water for this particular source type is currently not available. An improved standard for the absorbed dose to water based on Fricke dosimetry of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources is presented in this study. The main goal of this paper is to demonstrate the potential usefulness of the Fricke dosimetry technique for the standardization of the quantity absorbed dose to water for 192Ir sources. A molded, double-walled, spherical vessel for water containing the Fricke solution was constructed based on the Fricke system. The authors measured the absorbed dose to water and compared it with the doses calculated using the AAPM TG-43 report. The overall combined uncertainty associated with the measurements using Fricke dosimetry was 1.4% for k = 1, which is better than the uncertainties reported in previous studies. These results are promising; hence, the use of Fricke dosimetry to measure the absorbed dose to water as a standard for HDR 192Ir may be possible in the future. PMID:25521914

  14. A least-squares error minimization approach in the determination of ferric ion diffusion coefficient of Fricke-infused dosimeter gels

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, Y.J.; Huang, S.-C.; Chu, W.C.

    2005-04-01

    A least-squares error minimization approach was adopted to assess ferric ion diffusion coefficient of Fricke-agarose gels. Ferric ion diffusion process was modeled as a Gaussian-shaped degradation kernel operating on an initial concentration distribution. Diffusion coefficient was iteratively determined by minimizing the error function defined as the difference between the theoretically calculated and the experimentally measured dose distributions. A rapid MR image-based differential gel dosimetry technique that time resolves the evolution of the ferric ion diffusion process minimizes smearing of the dose distribution. Our results showed that for a Fricke-agarose gel contained 1 mM ammonium ferrous sulfate, 1% agarose, 1 mM sodium chloride, and 50 mM sulfuric acid, its ferric ion diffusion coefficient is (1.59{+-}0.28)x10{sup -2} cm{sup 2} h{sup -1} at room temperature. This value falls within the 1.00-2.00x10{sup -2} cm{sup 2} h{sup -1} range previously reported under varying gelling ingredients and concentrations. This method allows a quick, nondestructive evaluation of the ferric ion diffusion coefficient that can be used in conjunction with the in situ gel dosimetry experiment to provide a practical diffusion characterization of the dosimeter gel.

  15. SU-D-213-06: Dosimetry of Modulated Electron Radiation Therapy Using Fricke Gel Dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Gawad, M Abdel; Elgohary, M; Hassaan, M; Emam, M; Desouky, O; Eldib, A; Ma, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Modulated electron radiation therapy (MERT) has been proposed as an effective modality for treatment of superficial targets. MERT utilizes multiple beams of different energies which are intensity modulated to deliver optimized dose distribution. Energy independent dosimeters are thus needed for quantitative evaluations of MERT dose distributions and measurements of absolute doses delivered to patients. Thus in the current work we study the feasibility of Fricke gel dosimeters in MERT dosimetry. Methods: Batches of radiation sensitive Fricke gel is fabricated and poured into polymethyl methacrylate cuvettes. The samples were irradiated in solid water phantom and a thick layer of bolus was used as a buildup. A spectrophotometer system was used for measuring the color changes (the absorbance) before and after irradiation and then we calculate net absorbance. We constructed calibration curves to relate the measured absorbance in terms of absorbed dose for all available electron energies. Dosimetric measurements were performed for mixed electron beam delivery and we also performed measurement for segmented field delivery with the dosimeter placed at the junction of two adjacent electron beams of different energies. Dose measured by our gel dosimetry is compared to that calculation from our precise treatment planning system. We also initiated a Monte Carlo study to evaluate the water equivalence of our dosimeters. MCBEAM and MCSIM codes were used for treatment head simulation and phantom dose calculation. PDDs and profiles were calculated for electron beams incident on a phantom designed with 1cm slab of Fricke gel. Results: The calibration curves showed no observed energy dependence with all studied electron beam energies. Good agreement was obtained between dose calculated and that obtained by gel dosimetry. Monte Carlo results illustrated the tissue equivalency of our Gel dosimeters. Conclusion: Fricke Gel dosimeters represent a good option for the dosimetric

  16. Synchrotron stereotactic radiotherapy: dosimetry by Fricke gel and Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Boudou, Caroline; Biston, Marie-Claude; Corde, Stéphanie; Adam, Jean-François; Ferrero, Claudio; Estève, François; Elleaume, Hélène

    2004-11-21

    Synchrotron stereotactic radiotherapy (SSR) consists in loading the tumour with a high atomic number element (Z), and exposing it to monochromatic x-rays from a synchrotron source (50-100 keV), in stereotactic conditions. The dose distribution results from both the stereotactic monochromatic x-ray irradiation and the presence of the high Z element. The purpose of this preliminary study was to evaluate the two-dimensional dose distribution resulting solely from the irradiation geometry, using Monte Carlo simulations and a Fricke gel dosimeter. The verification of a Monte Carlo-based dosimetry was first assessed by depth dose measurements in a water tank. We thereafter used a Fricke dosimeter to compare Monte Carlo simulations with dose measurements. The Fricke dosimeter is a solution containing ferrous ions which are oxidized to ferric ions under ionizing radiation, proportionally to the absorbed dose. A cylindrical phantom filled with Fricke gel was irradiated in stereotactic conditions over several slices with a continuous beam (beam section = 0.1 x 1 cm2). The phantom and calibration vessels were then imaged by nuclear magnetic resonance. The measured doses were fairly consistent with those predicted by Monte Carlo simulations. However, the measured maximum absolute dose was 10% underestimated regarding calculation. The loss of information in the higher region of dose is explained by the diffusion of ferric ions. Monte Carlo simulation is the most accurate tool for dosimetry including complex geometries made of heterogeneous materials. Although the technique requires improvements, gel dosimetry remains an essential tool for the experimental verification of dose distribution in SSR with millimetre precision.

  17. Fricke-gel dosimetry in epithermal or thermal neutron beams of a research reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambarini, G.; Artuso, E.; Giove, D.; Volpe, L.; Agosteo, S.; Barcaglioni, L.; Campi, F.; Garlati, L.; Pola, A.; Durisi, E.; Borroni, M.; Carrara, M.; Klupak, V.; Marek, M.; Viererbl, L.; Vins, M.; d'Errico, F.

    2015-11-01

    Fricke-xylenol-orange gel has shown noticeable potentiality for in-phantom dosimetry in epithermal or thermal neutron fields with very high fluence rate, as those characteristic of nuclear research reactors. Fricke gels in form of layers give the possibility of achieving spatial distribution of gamma dose, fast neutron dose and dose due to charged particles generated by thermal neutron reactions. The thermal neutron fluence has been deduced from the dose coming from the charge particles emitted by neutron reactions with the isotope 10B. Some measurements have been performed for improving the information on the relative sensitivity of Fricke gel dosimeters to the particles produced by 10B reactions, because at present the precision of dose evaluations is limited by the scanty knowledge about the dependence of the dosimeter sensitivity on the radiation LET. For in-air measurements, the dosimeter material can produce an enhancement of thermal neutron fluence. Measurements and Monte Carlo calculations have been developed to investigate the importance of this effect.

  18. Fricke gel dosimeter with improved sensitivity for low-dose-level measurements.

    PubMed

    Valente, Mauro; Molina, Wladimir; Carrizales Silva, Lila; Figueroa, Rodolfo; Malano, Francisco; Pérez, Pedro; Santibañez, Mauricio; Vedelago, José

    2016-01-01

    Fricke solution has a wide range of applications as radiation detector and dosimetry. It is particularly appreciated in terms of relevant comparative advantages, like tissue-equivalence when prepared in aqueous media like gel matrix, continuous mapping capability, independence of dose rate and incident direction, as well as linear dose response. This work presents the development and characterization of an improved Fricke gel system, based on modified chemical compositions, making possible its application in clinical radiology due to its improved sensitivity. Properties of standard Fricke gel dosimeter for high-dose levels are used as a starting point, and suitable chemical modifications are introduced and carefully investigated in order to attain high resolution for low-dose ranges, like those corresponding to radiology interventions. The developed Fricke gel radiation dosimeter system achieves the expected typical dose-dependency, showing linear response in the dose range from 20 up to 4000 mGy. Systematic investigations including several chemical compositions are carried out in order to obtain an adequate dosimeter response for low-dose levels. A suitable composition from among those studied is selected as a good candidate for low-dose-level radiation dosimetry consisting of a modified Fricke solution fixed to a gel matrix containing benzoic acid along with sulfuric acid, ferrous sulfate, Xylenol orange, and tridistilled water. Dosimeter samples are prepared in standard vials for in-phantom irradiation and further characterization by spectrophotometry measuring visible light transmission and absorbance before and after irradiation. Samples are irradiated using typical X-ray tubes for radiology and calibrated Farmer-type ionization chamber is used as reference to measure dose rates inside phantoms at vial locations. Once sensitive material composition is optimized, dose-response curves show significant improvement regarding overall sensitivity for low dose levels

  19. Automorphisms of Order Structures of Abelian Parts of Operator Algebras and Their Role in Quantum Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamhalter, Jan; Turilova, Ekaterina

    2014-10-01

    It is shown that any order isomorphism between the structures of unital associative JB subalgebras of JB algebras is given naturally by a partially linear Jordan isomorphism. The same holds for nonunital subalgebras and order isomorphisms preserving the unital subalgebra. Finally, we recover usual action of time evolution group on a von Neumann factor from group of automorphisms of the structure of Abelian subalgebras.

  20. On discrete versions of two Accola's theorems about automorphism groups of Riemann surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limonov, Maxim; Nedela, Roman; Mednykh, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we give a few discrete versions of Robert Accola's results on Riemann surfaces with automorphism groups admitting partitions. As a consequence, we establish a condition for γ -hyperelliptic involution on a graph to be unique. Also we construct an infinite family of graphs with more than one γ -hyperelliptic involution.

  1. The Nakayama Automorphism of the Almost Calabi-Yau Algebras Associated to SU(3) Modular Invariants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, David E.; Pugh, Mathew

    2012-05-01

    We determine the Nakayama automorphism of the almost Calabi-Yau algebra A associated to the braided subfactors or nimrep graphs associated to each SU(3) modular invariant. We use this to determine a resolution of A as an A- A bimodule, which will yield a projective resolution of A.

  2. STS-110 Pilot Frick in M-113 personnel carrier during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-110 Pilot Stephen Frick waits inside the M-113 armored personnel carrier to begin training on driving the vehicle, which is part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities. TCDT includes emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. The TCDT is held at KSC prior to each Space Shuttle flight. Scheduled for launch April 4, the 11-day mission will feature Shuttle Atlantis docking with the International Space Station (ISS) and delivering the S0 truss, the centerpiece-segment of the primary truss structure that will eventually extend over 300 feet.

  3. Radiation chemistry of heavy-particle tracks. II. Fricke dosimeter system

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, A.; Magee, J.L.

    1980-12-25

    A heavy-particle-track model suggested by considerations presented in a companion paper is used in a calculation of the differential (G') and integral (G) yields of the Fricke dosimeter system for six selected particles over a wide range of energies. The particles are H, He, C, Ne, Ar, and Fm; the energy range for the first two is 10/sup -3/-10/sup 3/ MeV/n, and for the last four is 10/sup -1/-10/sup 3/ MeV/n. The calculated G' and G values are compared with experimental values as far as possible, and the heavy-particle-track model situation is discussed.

  4. Mycosis Fungoides electron beam absorbed dose distribution using Fricke xylenol gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silveira, Michely C.; Sampaio, Francisco G. A.; Petchevist, Paulo C. D.; de Oliveira, André L.; Almeida, Adelaide de

    2011-12-01

    Radiotherapy uses ionizing radiation to destroy tumor cells. The absorbed dose control in the target volume is realized through radiation sensors, such as Fricke dosimeters and radiochromic film, which permit to realize bi-dimensional evaluations at once and because of that, they will be used in this study as well. Among the several types of cancer suitable for ionizing radiation treatment, the Mycosis Fungoides, a lymphoma that spreads on the skin surface and depth, requires for its treatment total body irradiation by high-energy electrons. In this work the Fricke xylenol gel (FXG) was used in order to obtain information about the absorbed dose distribution induced by the electron interactions with the irradiated tissues and to control this type of treatment. FXG can be considered as an alternative dosimeter, since up to now only films have been used. FXG sample cuvettes, simulating two selected tomos (cranium and abdomen) of the Rando anthropomorphic phantom, were positioned along with radiochromic films for comparison. The phantom was subjected to Stanford total body irradiation using 6 MeV electrons. Tomographic images were acquired for both dosimeters and evaluated through horizontal and vertical profiles along the tomographic centers. These profiles were obtained through a Matlab routine developed for this purpose. From the obtained results, one could infer that, for a superficial and internal patient irradiation, the FXG dosimeter showed an absorbed dose distribution similar to the one of the film. These results can validate the FXG dosimeter as an alternative dosimeter for the Mycosis Fungoides treatment planning.

  5. In-phantom dosimetry for BNCT with Fricke and normoxic-polymer gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambarini, G.; Agosteo, S.; Carrara, M.; Gay, S.; Mariani, M.; Pirola, L.; Vanossi, E.

    2006-05-01

    Measurements of in-phantom dose distributions and images are important for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy treatment planning. The method for spatial determination of absorbed doses in thermal or epithermal neutron fields, based on Fricke-xylenol-orange-infused gel dosimeters in form of layers, has revealed to be very reliable, as gel layer dosimeters give the possibility of obtaining spatial dose distributions and measurements of each dose contribution in neutron fields, by means of a properly studied procedure. Quite recently, BNCT has been applied to treat liver metastases; in this work the results of in-phantom dosimetry for explanted liver in BNCT treatments are described. Moreover, polyacrylamide gel (PAG) dosimeters in which a polymerization process appears as a consequence of absorbed dose, have been recently tested, because of their characteristic absence of diffusion. In fact, due to the diffusion of ferric ions, Fricke-gel dosimeters require prompt analysis after exposure to avoid spatial information loss. In this work the preliminary results of a study about the reliability of polymer gel in BNCT dosimetry are also discussed. Gel layers have been irradiated in a phantom exposed in the thermal column of the TRIGA MARK II reactor (Pavia). The results obtained with the two kinds of gel dosimeter have been compared.

  6. A standard Fricke dosimeter compared to an ionization chamber used for dosimetric characterization of 60Co photon beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussous, Ouiza; Medjadj, Toufik

    2016-06-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the Fricke dosimeter water equivalent system for measurement of dosimetric parameters for photon beam. The parameters measured with the Fricke dosimeter were compared to those obtained with an ionization chamber. In this work characteristics for 60Co γ-rays of field sizes ranging from 5 × 5 cm2 to 20 × 20 cm2 are reported. The measurements were carried out in the secondary standard dosimetry laboratory using a collimated 60Co gamma source therapy unit. The 60Co beam output in terms of absorbed dose to water was obtained as per IAEA TRS 398 recommendations using cylindrical ionization chamber, whose ND,w has been supplied by the IAEA's reference laboratory. Specific quantities measured include: output factors, peak scatter factor, lateral beam profiles and percentage depth dose. The Fricke dosimeters were irradiated in a water phantom using the suitable poly (methyl methacrylate), PMMA stand. Our results demonstrate that Fricke dosimeter and ionization chamber agree with each other.

  7. Evaluation of the radiation-sensitizer/protector and/or antioxidant efficiencies using Fricke and PAG dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meesat, Ridthee; Jay-Gerin, Jean-Paul; Khalil, Abdelouahed; Lepage, Martin

    2009-05-01

    In this study, our aim is to assess the potential of Fricke and polyacrylamide gel (PAG) dosimeters to quantitatively evaluate the efficiency of potential radiation sensitizers/protectors and antioxidants. These compounds are of importance in radiotherapy as well as in disease prevention and promotion of health. The basic principle of the Fricke dosimeter is the radiation-induced oxidation of Fe2+ to Fe3+ in an aerated aqueous 0.4 M H2SO4. The production of ferric ions is most sensitive to the radical species produced in the radiolysis of water. Using this method, we observed that cystamine (one of the best of the known radioprotectors) can prevent oxydation of Fe2+ from reactive radiolysis species. However, one obvious disadvantage of the Fricke dosimeter is that it operates under highly acidic conditions (pH 0.46), which may degrade biological compounds. In contrast, the pH of the polyacrylamide gel (PAG) dosimeter is almost neutral, such that degradation of compounds is less probable. A change in R2-dose sensitivity was observed in the presence of radiosensitizers/radioprotectors and antioxidants. The protective effect of Trolox (a well-known antioxidant) and thiourea (a radioprotector) was readily observed using the PAG dosimeter. Incorporation of iodinated radiation sensitizers such as NaI and an iodine contrast agent led to a quantifiable sensitizer enhancement ratio. These studies suggest that the Fricke and the PAG dosimeters have the potential to evaluate the efficiency of radiation sensitizers/protectors and antioxidants.

  8. Automorphism group of nonabelian groups of order p{sup 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Barakat, Yasamin

    2014-06-19

    Let G be a nonabelian group of order p{sup 3}, where p is a prime number. Then G is a two generated group that its commutator, centre and Frattini subgroup coincide and are of order p. Hence, the quotient group of G over its centre and also Frattini quotient group of G, both are of order p{sup 2}. However, the first mentioned quotient is isomorphic to the inner group of G, which is a normal subgroup of automorphism group of G. Whereas, Frattini quotient group of G is an abelian elementary group that can be considered as a vector space of dimension two over Z{sub p}, the field of integers modulo p. In this paper, we consider to apply these properties of G to characterize the automorphism group of G.

  9. Bogomolov multiplier, double class-preserving automorphisms, and modular invariants for orbifolds

    SciTech Connect

    Davydov, Alexei

    2014-09-01

    We describe the group Aut{sub br}¹(Z(G)) of braided tensor autoequivalences of the Drinfeld centre of a finite group G isomorphic to the identity functor (just as a functor). We prove that the semi-direct product Out{sub 2₋cl}(G)⋉B(G) of the group of double class preserving automorphisms and the Bogomolov multiplier of G is a subgroup of Aut{sub br}¹(Z(G)). An automorphism of G is double class preserving if it preserves conjugacy classes of pairs of commuting elements in G. The Bogomolov multiplier B(G) is the subgroup of its Schur multiplier H²(G, k{sup *}) of classes vanishing on abelian subgroups of G. We show that elements of Aut{sub br}¹(Z(G)) give rise to different realisations of the charge conjugation modular invariant for G-orbifolds of holomorphic conformal field theories.

  10. Spectral analysis on the group of conformal automorphisms of the unit disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volchkov, V. V.; Volchkov, V. V.

    2016-07-01

    For the group G of conformal automorphisms of the unit disc the problem of spectral analysis is considered for subspaces \\mathscr{U}\\subset C(G) which are invariant under right shifts by elements of G and conjugations by elements of the rotation subgroup. It turns out that, in contrast to subspaces of C(G) which are merely invariant under right shifts, \\mathscr{U} contains a minimal subspace with the above properties. Bibliography: 26 titles.

  11. Radiation chemistry of heavy-particle tracks. 2. Fricke dosimeter system

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Aloke; Magee, John L.

    1980-12-01

    A heavy-particle track model suggested by considerations presented in a companion paper is used in a calculation of the differential (G') and integral (G) yields of the Fricke dosimeter system for six selected particles over a wide range of energies. The particles are H, He, C, Ne, Ar, and Fm; the energy range for the first two is 10{sup -3} MeV/n to 10{sup 3} MeV/n, and for the last four is 10{sup -1} MeV/n to 10{sup 3} MeV/n. The calculated G' and G values are compared with experimental values as far as possible, and the heavy-particle track model situation is discussed.

  12. Absorbed dose distribution visualization for superficial treatments through the Fricke Xylenol Gel dosimeter (FXG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alva, M.; Sampaio, F. G. A.; Moreira, M. V.; Petchevist, P. C. D.; de Almeida, A.

    2010-11-01

    Electrons, orthovoltage X-rays and betas are used for superficial treatments. It has been shown that it is practical to measure these three types of radiation using gel dosimetry, which is an accurate dosimetric tool, from which one can infer the absorbed dose. The Fricke Xylenol Gel (FXG) dosimeter has presented adequate results due to its spatial resolution, effective atomic number and density that are near to those of soft tissue. The aim of this work is to compare three types of radiation for skin treatments like orthovoltage (X-rays), brachytherapy (beta rays) and megavoltage (electrons) using the FXG-CCD dosimetric system to determine the calibration curves (CC), beam profiles (BP) and percentage depth dose curves (PDD), evidencing why for clinical applications a specific type of radiation is selected for superficial treatment. From the results obtained we can infer that the FXG-CCD system is adequate for linear, area and volume measurements.

  13. Automorphisms and Derivations of the Insertion-Elimination Algebra and Related Graded Lie Algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ondrus, Matthew; Wiesner, Emilie

    2016-07-01

    This paper addresses several structural aspects of the insertion-elimination algebra {mathfrak{g}}, a Lie algebra that can be realized in terms of tree-inserting and tree-eliminating operations on the set of rooted trees. In particular, we determine the finite-dimensional subalgebras of {mathfrak{g}}, the automorphism group of {mathfrak{g}}, the derivation Lie algebra of {mathfrak{g}}, and a generating set. Several results are stated in terms of Lie algebras admitting a triangular decomposition and can be used to reproduce results for the generalized Virasoro algebras.

  14. Beta planar source quality assurance with the Fricke xylenol gel dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alva-Sánchez, Mirko S.; de Oliveira, Lucas N.; Petchevist, Paulo C.; Moreira, Marco V.; de Almeida, Adelaide

    2014-03-01

    Beta therapy is employed in post surgery to treat lesions such as pterygia, keloid and glioblastoma. The beta source most used for these purposes is 90/90Y, whose quality assurance is a challenge, because the detectors currently used for this evaluation do not satisfy the spatial resolution, the effective atomic number and the tissue equivalent conditions. The Fricke xylenol gel (FXG) has been used in several applications in radiotherapy due to its better characteristics. This dosimeter is associated with the Fe(II) to Fe(III) oxidation, post ionizing irradiation, being the final Fe(III) concentration linearly depended on the absorbed dose. The goal of this present work is to show that the FXG, with atomic effective number (Zeff) of 7.75 and high resolution (<1 mm), accomplishes quality assurance for rectangular and square planar 90Sr/90Y sources. In order to demonstrate the quality assurance, calibration curves, percentage depth dose and beam profile from exposed FXG samples were analyzed and from these results, we demonstrate the potential use of the FXG dosimeter for beta source quality control.

  15. Inner brane: A D3-brane in Nappi-Witten space from an inner automorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Yeuk-Kwan E.; Freidel, Laurent

    2009-06-01

    Wess-Zumino-Witten (WZW) models are abstract conformal field theories with an infinite-dimensional symmetry which accounts for their integrability, and at the same time they have a sigma-model description of closed-string propagation on group manifolds which, in turn, endows the models with an intuitive geometric meaning. We exploit this dual algebraic and geometric property of WZW models to construct an explicit example of a field-dependent reflection matrix for open strings in the Nappi-Witten model. Demanding the momentum outflow at the boundary to be zero determines a certain combination of the left and right chiral currents at the boundary. This same reflection matrix is obtained algebraically from an inner automorphism, giving rise to a space-filling D-brane. Half of the infinite-dimensional affine Kac-Moody symmetry present in the closed-string theory is preserved by this unique combination of the left and the right chiral currents. The operator-product expansions of these boundary currents are computed explicitly and they are shown to obey the same current algebra as those of the closed-string chiral currents. Different choices of the inner automorphisms correspond to different background gauge field configurations. Only those B-field configurations, and the corresponding D-branes, that preserve the diagonal part of the infinite-dimensional chiral algebras are allowed. In this way the existence of the D-branes in curved spaces is further constrained by the underlying symmetry of the ambient spacetime.

  16. A construction of F1 as automorphisms of a 196,883-dimensional algebra

    PubMed Central

    Griess, Robert L.

    1981-01-01

    In this note, I announce the construction of the finite simple group F1, whose existence was predicted independently in 1973 by Bernd Fischer and by me. The group has order 246320597611213317.19.23.29.31.41. 47.59.71 = 808,017,424,794,512,875,886,459,904,961,710,757,005,754,368,000,000,000 and is realized as a group of automorphisms of a 196,883-dimensional commutative nonassociative algebra over the rational numbers, which has an associative form. Equivalently, it is a group of automorphisms of a cubic form in 196,883 variables. It turns out that all the relevant arguments and calculations may be done by hand. Furthermore, existence of the group F1 implies the existence of a number of other sporadic simple groups for which existence proofs formerly depended on work with computers. We are beginning to look upon this group as a “friendly giant.” PMID:16592973

  17. Orbifold Construction of Holomorphic Vertex Operator Algebras Associated to Inner Automorphisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Ching Hung; Shimakura, Hiroki

    2016-03-01

    In this article, we construct three new holomorphic vertex operator algebras of central charge 24 using the {Z}2-orbifold construction associated to inner automorphisms. Their weight one subspaces have the Lie algebra structures D 7,3 A 3,1 G 2,1, E 7,3 A 5,1, and {A_{8,3}A_{2,1}^2}. In addition, we discuss the constructions of holomorphic vertex operator algebras with Lie algebras A 5,6 C 2,3 A 1,2 and {D_{6,5}A_{1,1}^2} from holomorphic vertex operator algebras with Lie algebras C 5,3 G 2,2 A 1,1 and {A_{4,5}^2}, respectively.

  18. Influence of experimental parameters on sonochemistry dosimetries: KI oxidation, Fricke reaction and H2O2 production.

    PubMed

    Merouani, Slimane; Hamdaoui, Oualid; Saoudi, Fethi; Chiha, Mahdi

    2010-06-15

    Central events of the ultrasonic action are the cavitation bubbles that can be considered as microreactors. Adiabatic collapse of cavitation bubbles leads to the formation of reactive species such as hydroxyl radicals (*OH), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and hydroperoxyl radicals (HOO*). Several chemical methods were used to detect the production of these reactive moieties in sonochemistry. In this work, the influence of several operational parameters on the sonochemistry dosimetries namely KI oxidation, Fricke reaction and H(2)O(2) production using 300 kHz ultrasound was investigated. The main experimental parameters showing significant effect in KI oxidation dosimetry were initial KI concentration, acoustic power and pH. The solution temperature showed restricted influence on KI oxidation. The acoustic power and liquid temperature highly affected Fricke reaction dosimetry. Operational conditions having important influence on H(2)O(2) formation were acoustic power, solution temperature and pH. For the three tested dosimetries, the sonochemical efficiency was independent of liquid volume. PMID:20211524

  19. Geometry of Higgs bundles over elliptic curves related to automorphisms of simple Lie algebras, Calogero-Moser systems, and KZB equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, A. M.; Olshanetsky, M. A.; Zotov, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    We construct twisted Calogero-Moser systems with spins as Hitchin systems derived from the Higgs bundles over elliptic curves, where the transition operators are defined by arbitrary finite-order automorphisms of the underlying Lie algebras. We thus obtain a spin generalization of the twisted D'Hoker-Phong and Bordner-Corrigan-Sasaki-Takasaki systems. In addition, we construct the corresponding twisted classical dynamical r-matrices and the Knizhnik-Zamolodchikov-Bernard equations related to the automorphisms of Lie algebras.

  20. Dose conversion and wall correction factors for Fricke dosimetry in high-energy photon beams: analytical model and Monte Carlo calculations.

    PubMed

    Ma, C M; Nahum, A E

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the dose conversion and wall correction factors for Fricke dosimetry in high-energy photon beams calculated using both an analytical general cavity model and Monte Carlo techniques. The conversion factor is calculated as the ratio of the absorbed dose in water to that in the Fricke dosimeter solution with a water-walled vessel. The wall correction factor accounts for the change in the absorbed dose to the dosimeter solution caused by the inhomogeneous dosimeter wall material. A usercode based on the EGS4 Monte Carlo system, with the application of a correlated sampling variance reduction technique, has been employed in the calculations of these factors and the parameters used in the cavity model. Good agreement has been achieved between the predictions of the model and that obtained by direct Monte Carlo simulation and also with other workers' experiments. It is shown that Fricke dosimeters in common use cannot be considered to be 'large' detectors and therefore 'general cavity theory' should be applied in converting the dose to water. It is confirmed that plastic dosimeter vessels have a negligible wall effect. The wall correction factor for a 1 mm thick Pyrex-walled vessel varies with incident photon energy from 1.001 +/- 0.001 for a 60Co beam to 0.983 +/- 0.001 for a 24 MV (TPR(10)20 = 0.80) photon beam. This implies that previous Fricke measurements with glass-walled vessels should be re-evaluated. PMID:8426871

  1. The Conformal Steady-State Free Precession:. a Kepplerian Approach to Automorphic Scattering Theory of Orbiton/spinon Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schempp, Walter J.

    2013-09-01

    Based on projective geometry, a quantum holographic approach to the orbiton / spinon dynamics of quantum blackholography and clinical magnetic resonance tomography is mathematically described. Crucial applications of the conformal steady-state free-precession modality and automorphic scattering theory are the evidence for a supermassive central black hole in the Milky Way galaxy and the modalities of clinical cardiovascular magnetic resonance tomography and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance tomography of non-invasive radiological diagnostics.

  2. Evaluation of all dose components in the LVR-15 reactor epithermal neutron beam using Fricke gel dosimeter layers.

    PubMed

    Bartesaghi, G; Burian, J; Gambarini, G; Marek, M; Negri, A; Viererbl, L

    2009-07-01

    Fricke gel dosimeters in the form of layers are suitable to reconstruct bidimensional distributions of the absorbed dose; in accordance with their chemical composition and applying suitably developed algorithms, they can provide dose images of the different radiation components in a BNCT field. After the description of the applied method, this work presents the results obtained at the epithermal column of the BNCT facility at the NRI in Rez (CZ). The measured dose distributions are shown in comparison with data taken by means of other dosimeters thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) and with calculations carried out with the Monte Carlo code MCNP5. The agreement with the results obtained by means of the different techniques is satisfying.

  3. Semiclassical strings in AdS5 × S5 and automorphic functions.

    PubMed

    Pawellek, Michael

    2011-06-17

    Using anti-de Sitter-space/conformal-field-theory correspondence we derive from the folded spinning string ordinary differential equations for the anomalous dimension of the dual N=4 super Yang-Mills theory twist-two operators at strong coupling. We show that for large spin the asymptotic solutions have the Gribov-Lipatov reciprocity property. To obtain this result we use a hidden modular invariance of the energy-spin relation of the folded spinning string. Furthermore, we identify the Moch-Vermaseren-Vogt relations, which were first recognized in plain QCD calculations, as the recurrence relations of the asymptotic series ansatz.

  4. Semiclassical strings in AdS5 × S5 and automorphic functions.

    PubMed

    Pawellek, Michael

    2011-06-17

    Using anti-de Sitter-space/conformal-field-theory correspondence we derive from the folded spinning string ordinary differential equations for the anomalous dimension of the dual N=4 super Yang-Mills theory twist-two operators at strong coupling. We show that for large spin the asymptotic solutions have the Gribov-Lipatov reciprocity property. To obtain this result we use a hidden modular invariance of the energy-spin relation of the folded spinning string. Furthermore, we identify the Moch-Vermaseren-Vogt relations, which were first recognized in plain QCD calculations, as the recurrence relations of the asymptotic series ansatz. PMID:21770563

  5. Study of suitability of Fricke-gel-layer dosimeters for in-air measurements to characterise epithermal/thermal neutron beams for NCT.

    PubMed

    Gambarini, G; Artuso, E; Giove, D; Felisi, M; Volpe, L; Barcaglioni, L; Agosteo, S; Garlati, L; Pola, A; Klupak, V; Viererbl, L; Vins, M; Marek, M

    2015-12-01

    The reliability of Fricke gel dosimeters in form of layers for measurements aimed at the characterization of epithermal neutron beams has been studied. By means of dosimeters of different isotopic composition (standard, containing (10)B or prepared with heavy water) placed against the collimator exit, the spatial distribution of gamma and fast neutron doses and of thermal neutron fluence are attained. In order to investigate the accuracy of the results obtained with in-air measurements, suitable MC simulations have been developed and experimental measurements have been performed utilizing Fricke gel dosimeters, thermoluminescence detectors and activation foils. The studies were related to the epithermal beam designed for BNCT irradiations at the research reactor LVR-15 (Řež). The results of calculation and measurements have revealed good consistency of gamma dose and fast neutron 2D distributions obtained with gel dosimeters in form of layers. In contrast, noticeable modification of thermal neutron fluence is caused by the neutron moderation produced by the dosimeter material. Fricke gel dosimeters in thin cylinders, with diameter not greater than 3mm, have proved to give good results for thermal neutron profiling. For greater accuracy of all results, a better knowledge of the dependence of gel dosimeter sensitivity on radiation LET is needed.

  6. Ecological and geographical regularities of changes in the biological activity of automorphic soils on the foothills and adjacent plains of the Central Caucasus region (Kabardino-Balkarian Republic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorobtsova, O. N.; Khezheva, F. V.; Uligova, T. S.; Tembotov, R. Kh.

    2015-03-01

    The biochemical properties inherent to the main types of automorphic soils developed in different bioclimatic conditions of Elbrus and Terek variants of the vertical zonality within Kabardino-Balkaria were compared. The natural-climatic conditions of these variants noticeably affect the soil cover pattern. The ratio of the oxidase and hydrolase activities is sensitive to the moisture conditions in which these soils are formed. The redox processes are more active in drier conditions, whereas hydrolytic processes are more active under higher moisture. The level of the biological activity of the automorphic soils is estimated using the integral index of the ecological-biological soil status.

  7. Dosimetric parameters for small field sizes using Fricke xylenol gel, thermoluminescent and film dosimeters, and an ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Calcina, Carmen S Guzmán; de Oliveira, Lucas N; de Almeida, Carlos E; de Almeida, Adelaide

    2007-03-01

    Dosimetric measurements in small therapeutic x-ray beam field sizes, such as those used in radiosurgery, that have dimensions comparable to or smaller than the build-up depth, require special care to avoid incorrect interpretation of measurements in regions of high gradients and electronic disequilibrium. These regions occur at the edges of any collimated field, and can extend to the centre of small fields. An inappropriate dosimeter can result in an underestimation, which would lead to an overdose to the patient. We have performed a study of square and circular small field sizes of 6 MV photons using a thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD), Fricke xylenol gel (FXG) and film dosimeters. PMMA phantoms were employed to measure lateral beam profiles (1 x 1, 3 x 3 and 5 x 5 cm2 for square fields and 1, 2 and 4 cm diameter circular fields), the percentage depth dose, the tissue maximum ratio and the output factor. An ionization chamber (IC) was used for calibration and comparison. Our results demonstrate that high resolution FXG, TLD and film dosimeters agree with each other, and that an ionization chamber, with low lateral resolution, underestimates the absorbed dose. Our results show that, when planning small field radiotherapy, dosimeters with adequate lateral spatial resolution and tissue equivalence are required to provide an accurate basic beam data set to correctly calculate the absorbed dose in regions of electronic disequilibrium.

  8. What we need to know about callous-unemotional traits: comment on Frick, Ray, Thornton, and Kahn (2014).

    PubMed

    Lahey, Benjamin B

    2014-01-01

    Frick, Ray, Thornton, and Kahn (2014) presented a comprehensive and well-articulated review of studies relevant to the validity and utility of using callous-unemotional traits to subtype the diagnosis of conduct disorder (CD). Like definitions of subtypes of CD in previous versions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, the available evidence on the validity of the new subtypes of CD in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.; DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association, 2013) based on callous-unemotional traits is thin. Nonetheless, the target article makes a compelling argument for further study of callous-unemotional and related traits to better understand the heterogeneity of CD. In particular, the possibilities that callous-unemotional traits may facilitate understanding of etiology and psychobiological mechanisms and may help predict the prognosis and treatment outcomes of children with CD deserve greater study. Future research must be stronger than previous research, however, in using more appropriate samples of children with CD along with more informative designs, and in conducting analyses to directly test the incremental validity of callous-unemotional traits as a subtyping variable beyond the severity or aggressiveness of CD. PMID:24364746

  9. Technical Note: Preliminary investigations into the use of a functionalised polymer to reduce diffusion in Fricke gel dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S. T. Masters, K.-S.; Hosokawa, K.; Blinco, J. P.; Trapp, J. V.; Crowe, S. B.; Kairn, T.

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: A modification of the existing PVA-FX hydrogel has been made to investigate the use of a functionalised polymer in a Fricke gel dosimetry system to decrease Fe{sup 3+} diffusion. Methods: The chelating agent, xylenol orange, was chemically bonded to the gelling agent, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) to create xylenol orange functionalised PVA (XO-PVA). A gel was created from the XO-PVA (20% w/v) with ferrous sulfate (0.4 mM) and sulfuric acid (50 mM). Results: This resulted in an optical density dose sensitivity of 0.014 Gy{sup −1}, an auto-oxidation rate of 0.0005 h{sup −1}, and a diffusion rate of 0.129 mm{sup 2} h{sup −1}; an 8% reduction compared to the original PVA-FX gel, which in practical terms adds approximately 1 h to the time span between irradiation and accurate read-out. Conclusions: Because this initial method of chemically bonding xylenol orange to polyvinyl alcohol has inherently low conversion, the improvement on existing gel systems is minimal when compared to the drawbacks. More efficient methods of functionalising polyvinyl alcohol with xylenol orange must be developed for this system to gain clinical relevance.

  10. Correlation of automorphism group size and topological properties with program-size complexity evaluations of graphs and complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenil, Hector; Soler-Toscano, Fernando; Dingle, Kamaludin; Louis, Ard A.

    2014-06-01

    We show that numerical approximations of Kolmogorov complexity (K) of graphs and networks capture some group-theoretic and topological properties of empirical networks, ranging from metabolic to social networks, and of small synthetic networks that we have produced. That K and the size of the group of automorphisms of a graph are correlated opens up interesting connections to problems in computational geometry, and thus connects several measures and concepts from complexity science. We derive these results via two different Kolmogorov complexity approximation methods applied to the adjacency matrices of the graphs and networks. The methods used are the traditional lossless compression approach to Kolmogorov complexity, and a normalised version of a Block Decomposition Method (BDM) based on algorithmic probability theory.

  11. Dielectric behavior of beef meat in the 1-1500kHz range: Simulation with the Fricke/Cole-Cole model.

    PubMed

    Damez, Jean-Louis; Clerjon, Sylvie; Abouelkaram, Saïd; Lepetit, Jacques

    2007-12-01

    The electrical properties of biological tissues have been researched for many years. Impedance measurements observed with increasing frequencies are mainly attributed to changes in membrane conductivity and ion and charged-molecule mobility (mainly Na(+), K(+), CL(-) ions). Equivalent circuits with passive electrical components are frequently used as a support model for presentation and analyses of the behavior of tissues submitted to electrical fields. Fricke proposed an electrical model where the elements are resistive and capacitive. The model is composed of a resistive element (Rp) representing extracellular fluids (ECF) placed in parallel with a capacitive element (Cs) representing insulating membranes in series and a resistive element (Rs) representing intracellular fluids (ICF). This model is able to describe impedance measurements: at lower frequencies, most of the current flows around the cells without being able to penetrate them, while at higher frequencies the membranes lose their insulating properties and the current flows through both the extracellular and intracellular compartments. Since meat ageing induces structural change, particularly in membrane integrity, the insulating properties of membranes decrease, and intracellular and extracellular electrolytes mix, thus driving changes in their electrical properties. We report a method combining the Fricke and Cole-Cole models that was developed to monitor and explain tissues conductivity changes in preferential directions during beef meat ageing.

  12. Sensitivity variation of doped Fricke gel irradiated with monochromatic synchrotron X rays between 33.5 and 80 keV.

    PubMed

    Corde, Stéphanie; Adam, Jean-François; Biston, Marie-Claude; Joubert, Aurélie; Charvet, Anne-Marie; Estève, François; Le Bas, Jean-François; Elleaume, Hélène; Balosso, Jacques

    2005-01-01

    An experimental binary radiotherapy proposes the concomitant use of a high-Z compound and synchrotron X rays for enhancing radiation dose selectively in tumours by a photoelectric effect. This study aimed at measuring the resulting dose enhancement in irradiated material. A doped Fricke gel dosemeter model was manufactured with 10 mg ml(-1) of iodine (Telebrix) or barium (Micropaque). Samples were irradiated with a monochromatic synchrotron beam at 33.5, 50, 65 and 80 keV. The ensuing enhancement of the sensitivity of the dosemeter was derived from the nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation rates measured at different X-ray doses. Our results demonstrate (1) the preservation of a linear relationship between relaxation rates and X-ray doses for dosemeters doped with high-Z atoms and (2) a clear energy-dependent sensitivity enhancement for barium-doped Fricke gels. This enhancement was neither reproducible with iodinated compounds nor clearly related to the expected dose enhancement factor. However 1% barium sulphate in the gel could significantly improve the gel's response when it was irradiated by low-energy X rays.

  13. Temperature dependence of the Fricke dosimeter and spur expansion time in the low-LET high-temperature radiolysis of water up to 350 °C: a Monte-Carlo simulation study.

    PubMed

    Sanguanmith, Sunuchakan; Muroya, Yusa; Tippayamontri, Thititip; Meesungnoen, Jintana; Lin, Mingzhang; Katsumura, Yosuke; Jay-Gerin, Jean-Paul

    2011-06-14

    Monte-Carlo simulations of the radiolysis of the ferrous sulfate (Fricke) dosimeter with low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation (such as (60)Co γ-rays or fast electrons) have been performed as a function of temperature from 25 to 350 °C. The predicted yields of Fe(2+) oxidation are found to increase with increasing temperature up to ∼100-150 °C, and then tend to remain essentially constant at higher temperatures, in very good agreement with experiment. By using a simple method based on the direct application of the stoichiometric relationship that exists between the ferric ion yields so obtained G(Fe(3+)) and the sum {3 [g(e(-)(aq) + H˙) + g(HO(2)˙)] + g(˙OH) + 2 g(H(2)O(2))}, where g(e(-)(aq) + H˙), g(HO(2)˙), g(˙OH), and g(H(2)O(2)) are the primary radical and molecular yields of the radiolysis of deaerated 0.4 M H(2)SO(4) aqueous solutions, the lifetime (τ(s)) of the spur and its temperature dependence have been determined. In the spirit of the spur model, τ(s) is an important indicator for overlapping spurs, giving the time required for the changeover from nonhomogeneous spur kinetics to homogeneous kinetics in the bulk solution. The calculations show that τ(s) decreases by about an order of magnitude over the 25-350 °C temperature range, going from ∼4.2 × 10(-7) s at 25 °C to ∼5.7 × 10(-8) s at 350 °C. This decrease in τ(s) with increasing temperature mainly originates from the quicker diffusion of the individual species involved. Moreover, the observed dependence of G(Fe(3+)) on temperature largely reflects the influence of temperature upon the primary free-radical product yields of the radiolysis, especially the yield of H˙ atoms. Above ∼200-250 °C, the more and more pronounced intervention of the reaction of H˙ atoms with water also contributes to the variation of G(Fe(3+)), which may decrease or increase slightly, depending on the choice made for the rate constant of this reaction. All calculations reported herein use the

  14. Temperature dependence of the Fricke dosimeter and spur expansion time in the low-LET high-temperature radiolysis of water up to 350 °C: a Monte-Carlo simulation study.

    PubMed

    Sanguanmith, Sunuchakan; Muroya, Yusa; Tippayamontri, Thititip; Meesungnoen, Jintana; Lin, Mingzhang; Katsumura, Yosuke; Jay-Gerin, Jean-Paul

    2011-06-14

    Monte-Carlo simulations of the radiolysis of the ferrous sulfate (Fricke) dosimeter with low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation (such as (60)Co γ-rays or fast electrons) have been performed as a function of temperature from 25 to 350 °C. The predicted yields of Fe(2+) oxidation are found to increase with increasing temperature up to ∼100-150 °C, and then tend to remain essentially constant at higher temperatures, in very good agreement with experiment. By using a simple method based on the direct application of the stoichiometric relationship that exists between the ferric ion yields so obtained G(Fe(3+)) and the sum {3 [g(e(-)(aq) + H˙) + g(HO(2)˙)] + g(˙OH) + 2 g(H(2)O(2))}, where g(e(-)(aq) + H˙), g(HO(2)˙), g(˙OH), and g(H(2)O(2)) are the primary radical and molecular yields of the radiolysis of deaerated 0.4 M H(2)SO(4) aqueous solutions, the lifetime (τ(s)) of the spur and its temperature dependence have been determined. In the spirit of the spur model, τ(s) is an important indicator for overlapping spurs, giving the time required for the changeover from nonhomogeneous spur kinetics to homogeneous kinetics in the bulk solution. The calculations show that τ(s) decreases by about an order of magnitude over the 25-350 °C temperature range, going from ∼4.2 × 10(-7) s at 25 °C to ∼5.7 × 10(-8) s at 350 °C. This decrease in τ(s) with increasing temperature mainly originates from the quicker diffusion of the individual species involved. Moreover, the observed dependence of G(Fe(3+)) on temperature largely reflects the influence of temperature upon the primary free-radical product yields of the radiolysis, especially the yield of H˙ atoms. Above ∼200-250 °C, the more and more pronounced intervention of the reaction of H˙ atoms with water also contributes to the variation of G(Fe(3+)), which may decrease or increase slightly, depending on the choice made for the rate constant of this reaction. All calculations reported herein use the

  15. Asymptotic free probability for arithmetic functions and factorization of Dirichlet series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Ilwoo; Gillespie, Timothy; Jorgensen, Palle E. T.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we study a free-probabilistic model on the algebra of arithmetic functions by considering their asymptotic behavior. As an application, we concentrate on arithmetic functions arising from certain representations attached to the general linear group GL_n . We then study conditions under which a Dirichlet series may be factored into a product of automorphic L-functions using asymptotic freeness.

  16. Asymptotic free probability for arithmetic functions and factorization of Dirichlet series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Ilwoo; Gillespie, Timothy; Jorgensen, Palle E. T.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we study a free-probabilistic model on the algebra of arithmetic functions by considering their asymptotic behavior. As an application, we concentrate on arithmetic functions arising from certain representations attached to the general linear group GL_n. We then study conditions under which a Dirichlet series may be factored into a product of automorphic L-functions using asymptotic freeness.

  17. Evaluation du potentiel radiosensibilisateur ou radioprotecteur/antioxydant de quelques composes selectionnes par dosimetrie par gel de polyacrylamide et dosimetre de Fricke, et utilisation de la filamentation par impulsion laser infrarouge fenitoseconde comme un nouveau et puissant faisceau pour la radiotherapie du cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meesat, Ridthee

    In radiation treatment, a sufficiently high radiation dose must be delivered to the tissue volumes containing the tumor cells while the lowest possible dose should be deposited in surrounding healthy tissue. We developed an original approach that is fast and easy to implement for the early assessment of the efficiency of radiation sensitizers and protectors. In addition, we characterized a new femtosecond laser pulse irradiation technique. We are able to deposit a considerable dose with a very high dose rate inside a well-controlled macroscopic volume without deposition of energy in front or behind the target volume. The radioprotective efficiency was measured by irradiation of the Fricke solution incorporating a compound under study and measuring the corresponding production of ferric ions G(Fe3+). The production of ferric ions is most sensitive to the radical species produced in the radiolysis of water. We studied experimentally and simulated with a full Monte-Carlo computer code the radiation-induced chemistry of Fricke/cystamine solutions. Results clearly indicate that the protective effect of cystamine originates from its radical-capturing ability, which allows this compound to compete with the ferrous ions for the various free radicals - especially ·OH radicals and H· atoms - formed during irradiation of the surrounding water. The sensitizing capacity of radiation sensitizers was measured by irradiation of a polyacrylamide gel (PAG) dosimeter incorporating a compound under study and measuring the corresponding increase in the gradient between spin-spin relaxation rate (R2) and absorbed dose. We measured an irradiation energy-dependent increase in R 2-dose sensitivity for halogenated compounds or a decrease for radioprotectors. Finally, we studied a novel laser irradiation method called "filamentation". We showed that this phenomenon results in an unprecedented deposition of energy and the dose rate thus achieved exceeds by orders of magnitude values

  18. Two-integral distribution functions for axisymmetric galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, C.; Qian, Edward

    1993-01-01

    The new method presented for finding distribution functions, which depend only on the classical integrals of energy and angular momentum for stellar systems with known axisymmetric densities, is the analog for the axisymmetric case of Eddington's classical solution for the isotropic distribution function, depending only on energy, of a known spherical density. It is required that density be expressed as a function of the potential and of a radial coordinate. Our solution is also an integral which is derived directly from the density, and hence can be used with complicated densities. A numerical quadrature is generally required to evaluate this solution, but contour integrals can be computed accurately by numerical quadrature; this is preferable to an explicit evaluation if the latter is an infinite series, such as is obtained using Fricke's method. We give several examples, including some for which our distribution functions are new. Our method can be extended simply to the related problems of finding anisotropic distribution functions for spherical or disk systems.

  19. Runge- and Walsh-type extensions of smooth subharmonic functions on open Riemann surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, A.; Gauthier, P. M.; Paramonov, P. V.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we study several settings of the C^m-subharmonic extension problem on open Riemann surfaces. The problem is completely solved (for all m\\in \\lbrack 0,+∞)) for so-called Runge-type extensions. Several (in some sense sharp) sufficient conditions and counterexamples are found also for Walsh-type extensions. As applications, these results allow us to prove the existence of C^m-subharmonic extensions, automorphic with respect to some appropriate groups of automorphisms of an open Riemann surface. Bibliography: 22 titles.

  20. Wave-function functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Xiaoyin; Slamet, Marlina; Sahni, Viraht

    2010-04-15

    We extend our prior work on the construction of variational wave functions {psi} that are functionals of functions {chi}:{psi}={psi}[{chi}] rather than simply being functions. In this manner, the space of variations is expanded over those of traditional variational wave functions. In this article we perform the constrained search over the functions {chi} chosen such that the functional {psi}[{chi}] satisfies simultaneously the constraints of normalization and the exact expectation value of an arbitrary single- or two-particle Hermitian operator, while also leading to a rigorous upper bound to the energy. As such the wave function functional is accurate not only in the region of space in which the principal contributions to the energy arise but also in the other region of the space represented by the Hermitian operator. To demonstrate the efficacy of these ideas, we apply such a constrained search to the ground state of the negative ion of atomic hydrogen H{sup -}, the helium atom He, and its positive ions Li{sup +} and Be{sup 2+}. The operators W whose expectations are obtained exactly are the sum of the single-particle operators W={Sigma}{sub i}r{sub i}{sup n},n=-2,-1,1,2, W={Sigma}{sub i{delta}}(r{sub i}), W=-(1/2){Sigma}{sub i{nabla}i}{sup 2}, and the two-particle operators W={Sigma}{sub n}u{sup n},n=-2,-1,1,2, where u=|r{sub i}-r{sub j}|. Comparisons with the method of Lagrangian multipliers and of other constructions of wave-function functionals are made. Finally, we present further insights into the construction of wave-function functionals by studying a previously proposed construction of functionals {psi}[{chi}] that lead to the exact expectation of arbitrary Hermitian operators. We discover that analogous to the solutions of the Schroedinger equation, there exist {psi}[{chi}] that are unphysical in that they lead to singular values for the expectations. We also explain the origin of the singularity.

  1. Approximating Functions with Exponential Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Sheldon P.

    2005-01-01

    The possibility of approximating a function with a linear combination of exponential functions of the form e[superscript x], e[superscript 2x], ... is considered as a parallel development to the notion of Taylor polynomials which approximate a function with a linear combination of power function terms. The sinusoidal functions sin "x" and cos "x"…

  2. Effect of land use change on soil properties and functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonutare, Tonu; Kõlli, Raimo; Köster, Tiina; Rannik, Kaire; Szajdak, Lech; Shanskiy, Merrit

    2014-05-01

    For good base of sustainable land management and ecologically sound protection of soils are researches on soil properties and functioning. Ecosystem approach to soil properties and functioning is equally important in both natural and cultivated land use conditions. Comparative analysis of natural and agro-ecosystems formed on similar soil types enables to elucidate principal changes caused by land use change (LUC) and to elaborate the best land use practices for local pedo-ecological conditions. Taken for actual analysis mineral soils' catena - rendzina → brown soils → pseudopodzolic soils → gley-podzols - represent ca 1/3 of total area of Estonian normal mineral soils. All soils of this catena differ substantially each from other by calcareousness, acidity, nutrition conditions, fabric and humus cover type. This catena (representative to Estonian pedo-ecological conditions) starts with drought-prone calcareous soils. Brown (distributed in northern and central Estonia) and pseudopodzolic soils (in southern Estonia) are the most broadly acknowledged for agricultural use medium-textured high-quality automorphic soils. Dispersedly distributed gley-podzols are permanently wet and strongly acid, low-productivity sandy soils. In presentation four complex functions of soils are treated: (1) being a suitable soil environment for plant cover productivity (expressed by annual increment, Mg ha-1 yr-1); (2) forming adequate conditions for decomposition, transformation and conversion of fresh falling litter (characterized by humus cover type); (3) deposition of humus, individual organic compounds, plant nutrition elements, air and water, and (4) forming (bio)chemically variegated active space for soil type specific edaphon. Capacity of soil cover as depositor (3) depends on it thickness, texture, calcareousness and moisture conditions. Biological activity of soil (4) is determined by fresh organic matter influx, quality and quantity of biochemical substances and humus

  3. Glycosphingolipid Functions

    PubMed Central

    Lingwood, Clifford A.

    2011-01-01

    The combination of carbohydrate and lipid generates unusual molecules in which the two distinctive halves of the glycoconjugate influence the function of each other. Membrane glycolipids can act as primary receptors for carbohydrate binding proteins to mediate transmembrane signaling despite restriction to the outer bilayer leaflet. The extensive heterogeneity of the lipid moiety plays a significant, but still largely unknown, role in glycosphingolipid function. Potential interplay between glycolipids and their fatty acid isoforms, together with their preferential interaction with cholesterol, generates a complex mechanism for the regulation of their function in cellular physiology. PMID:21555406

  4. Elementary Functions

    1986-05-01

    The ALTERNATIVE LIBRARY is a library of elementary functions prepared for use with the standard FORTRAN compiler under 4.2 BSD UNIX as an alternative to the standard system library. The library offers improved accuracy as well as additional capabilities. It includes routines ASIN, ACOS, COSH, EXP, LOG, LOG10, POW, SIN, COS, SINH, TAN, and TANH. These alternative routines have slightly modified domains and slightly different responses to invalid arguments. Four routines, not part of themore » standard library, are provided: ADX(X,N), a double-precision function that returns the double-precision argument X scaled by 2 raised to the Nth power; INTXP(X), an integer function that returns as a signed integer the exponent of the double-precision argument X; SETXP(X,N), a double-precision function that returns the double-precision argument X with its exponent replaced by N; and DCOTAN(X), a double-precision function that returns the cotangent of the double-precision argument X, where X is given in radians.« less

  5. Functional hyposplenism

    PubMed Central

    Kirkineska, L; Perifanis, V; Vasiliadis, T

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Functional hyposplenism is a condition accompanying many diseases such as sickle cell disease, celiac disease, alcoholic liver disease, hepatic cirrhosis, lymphomas and autoimmune disorders. It is characterised mostly by defective immune responses against infectious agents, especially encapsulated organisms, since the spleen is thought to play an important role in the production and maturation of B-memory lymphocytes and other substances like opsonins, both of which are considered crucial elements of the immune system for fighting infections. It is also associated with thrombocytosis, which might lead to thromboembolic events. Functional hyposplenism is diagnosed by the presence of Howell-Jolly bodies and pitted erythrocytes in the peripheral blood smear, and by nuclear imaging modalities such as spleen scintigraphy with the use of Technetium-99m and/or spleen scintigraphy with the use of heat-damaged Technetium-99m labeled erythrocytes. Severe infections accompanying functional hyposplenism can lead to the overwhelming post infection syndrome, which can often be fatal. Identifying patients with functional hyposplenism is important because simple measures such as vaccination against common infective microorganisms (e.g. Streptococcus pneumonia, Neisseria meningitides and Haemophilous influenzae) and antibiotic therapy when needed are considered beneficial in diminishing the frequency and gravity of the infections accompanying the syndrome. PMID:25125944

  6. Functional dyspepsia.

    PubMed

    Brun, Rita; Kuo, Braden

    2010-05-01

    Dyspepsia is a common term used for a heterogeneous group of abdominal symptoms. Functional dyspepsia (FD) is the focus of this review. The 2006 Rome III criteria defined FD and its subgroups, postprandial distress syndrome (PDS) and epigastric pain syndrome (EPS). FD is a very common condition with a high prevalence throughout the world, adversely affecting the quality of life of patients. The pathophysiology of FD has been under investigation during the past two decades. Multiple mechanisms such as abnormal gastric emptying, visceral hypersensitivity, impaired gastric accommodation, and central nervous system factors are likely involved. Several tests are available for the assessment of various physiologic functions possibly involved in the pathogenesis of FD, and some of these could be used in clinical practice, helping to understand the abnormalities underlining patients' complaints. Currently, the possibilities of pharmacological therapy for FD are still limited, however, experience of using prokinetics, tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs), and several alternative techniques has been accumulated. The different combinations of alterations in physiologic gastrointestinal and central nervous system functions result in the very heterogeneous nature of FD so combined approaches to these patients could be beneficial in challenging cases. PMID:21180597

  7. Executive Functions

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, Adele

    2014-01-01

    Executive functions (EFs) make possible mentally playing with ideas; taking the time to think before acting; meeting novel, unanticipated challenges; resisting temptations; and staying focused. Core EFs are inhibition [response inhibition (self-control—resisting temptations and resisting acting impulsively) and interference control (selective attention and cognitive inhibition)], working memory, and cognitive flexibility (including creatively thinking “outside the box,” seeing anything from different perspectives, and quickly and flexibly adapting to changed circumstances). The developmental progression and representative measures of each are discussed. Controversies are addressed (e.g., the relation between EFs and fluid intelligence, self-regulation, executive attention, and effortful control, and the relation between working memory and inhibition and attention). The importance of social, emotional, and physical health for cognitive health is discussed because stress, lack of sleep, loneliness, or lack of exercise each impair EFs. That EFs are trainable and can be improved with practice is addressed, including diverse methods tried thus far. PMID:23020641

  8. Maple procedures for the coupling of angular momenta. IX. Wigner D-functions and rotation matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagaran, J.; Fritzsche, S.; Gaigalas, G.

    2006-04-01

    The Wigner D-functions, Dpqj(α,β,γ), are known for their frequent use in quantum mechanics. Defined as the matrix elements of the rotation operator Rˆ(α,β,γ) in R and parametrized in terms of the three Euler angles α, β, and γ, these functions arise not only in the transformation of tensor components under the rotation of the coordinates, but also as the eigenfunctions of the spherical top. In practice, however, the use of the Wigner D-functions is not always that simple, in particular, if expressions in terms of these and other functions from the theory of angular momentum need to be simplified before some computations can be carried out in detail. To facilitate the manipulation of such Racah expressions, here we present an extension to the RACAH program [S. Fritzsche, Comput. Phys. Comm. 103 (1997) 51] in which the properties and the algebraic rules of the Wigner D-functions and reduced rotation matrices are implemented. Care has been taken to combine the standard knowledge about the rotation matrices with the previously implemented rules for the Clebsch-Gordan coefficients, Wigner n-j symbols, and the spherical harmonics. Moreover, the application of the program has been illustrated below by means of three examples. Program summaryTitle of program:RACAH Catalogue identifier:ADFv_9_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADFv_9_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADFW, ADHW, title RACAH Journal reference of previous version(s): S. Fritzsche, Comput. Phys. Comm. 103 (1997) 51; S. Fritzsche, S. Varga, D. Geschke, B. Fricke, Comput. Phys. Comm. 111 (1998) 167; S. Fritzsche, T. Inghoff, M. Tomaselli, Comput. Phys. Comm. 153 (2003) 424. Does the new version supersede the previous one: Yes, in addition to the spherical harmonics and recoupling coefficients, the program now supports also the occurrence of the Wigner rotation matrices in the algebraic

  9. Bayesian Function-on-Function Regression for Multilevel Functional Data

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Mark J.; Coull, Brent A.; Versace, Francesco; Cinciripini, Paul; Morris, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Medical and public health research increasingly involves the collection of complex and high dimensional data. In particular, functional data—where the unit of observation is a curve or set of curves that are finely sampled over a grid—is frequently obtained. Moreover, researchers often sample multiple curves per person resulting in repeated functional measures. A common question is how to analyze the relationship between two functional variables. We propose a general function-on-function regression model for repeatedly sampled functional data on a fine grid, presenting a simple model as well as a more extensive mixed model framework, and introducing various functional Bayesian inferential procedures that account for multiple testing. We examine these models via simulation and a data analysis with data from a study that used event-related potentials to examine how the brain processes various types of images. PMID:25787146

  10. Functional Training Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siff, Mel C.

    2002-01-01

    Asserts that though functional training is vital in all sporting preparation, it is only one aspect of the overall process. The paper defines functional training; discusses facets of functionality, functionality and balancing drills, and functional training and periodization; and concludes that functionality is best defined in terms of the outcome…

  11. Functional bowel disorders and functional abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, W; Longstreth, G; Drossman, D; Heaton, K; Irvine, E; Muller-Lissner, S

    1999-01-01

    The Rome diagnostic criteria for the functional bowel disorders and functional abdominal pain are used widely in research and practice. A committee consensus approach, including criticism from multinational expert reviewers, was used to revise the diagnostic criteria and update diagnosis and treatment recommendations, based on research results. The terminology was clarified and the diagnostic criteria and management recommendations were revised. A functional bowel disorder (FBD) is diagnosed by characteristic symptoms for at least 12 weeks during the preceding 12 months in the absence of a structural or biochemical explanation. The irritable bowel syndrome, functional abdominal bloating, functional constipation, and functional diarrhea are distinguished by symptom-based diagnostic criteria. Unspecified FBD lacks criteria for the other FBDs. Diagnostic testing is individualized, depending on patient age, primary symptom characteristics, and other clinical and laboratory features. Functional abdominal pain (FAP) is defined as either the FAP syndrome, which requires at least six months of pain with poor relation to gut function and loss of daily activities, or unspecified FAP, which lacks criteria for the FAP syndrome. An organic cause for the pain must be excluded, but aspects of the patient's pain behavior are of primary importance. Treatment of the FBDs relies upon confident diagnosis, explanation, and reassurance. Diet alteration, drug treatment, and psychotherapy may be beneficial, depending on the symptoms and psychological features.


Keywords: functional bowel disorder; functional constipation; functional diarrhea; irritable bowel syndrome; functional abdominal pain; functional abdominal bloating; Rome II PMID:10457044

  12. Liver Function Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... herbal supplements you are taking. What are normal ranges for liver function tests? Normal ranges for liver function tests can vary by age, ... other factors. Laboratory test results usually provide normal ranges for each liver function test with your results. ...

  13. Wave-function functionals for the density

    SciTech Connect

    Slamet, Marlina; Pan Xiaoyin; Sahni, Viraht

    2011-11-15

    We extend the idea of the constrained-search variational method for the construction of wave-function functionals {psi}[{chi}] of functions {chi}. The search is constrained to those functions {chi} such that {psi}[{chi}] reproduces the density {rho}(r) while simultaneously leading to an upper bound to the energy. The functionals are thereby normalized and automatically satisfy the electron-nucleus coalescence condition. The functionals {psi}[{chi}] are also constructed to satisfy the electron-electron coalescence condition. The method is applied to the ground state of the helium atom to construct functionals {psi}[{chi}] that reproduce the density as given by the Kinoshita correlated wave function. The expectation of single-particle operators W={Sigma}{sub i}r{sub i}{sup n}, n=-2,-1,1,2, W={Sigma}{sub i}{delta}(r{sub i}) are exact, as must be the case. The expectations of the kinetic energy operator W=-(1/2){Sigma}{sub i}{nabla}{sub i}{sup 2}, the two-particle operators W={Sigma}{sub n}u{sup n}, n=-2,-1,1,2, where u=|r{sub i}-r{sub j}|, and the energy are accurate. We note that the construction of such functionals {psi}[{chi}] is an application of the Levy-Lieb constrained-search definition of density functional theory. It is thereby possible to rigorously determine which functional {psi}[{chi}] is closer to the true wave function.

  14. Sampling functions for geophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giacaglia, G. E. O.; Lunquist, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    A set of spherical sampling functions is defined such that they are related to spherical-harmonic functions in the same way that the sampling functions of information theory are related to sine and cosine functions. An orderly distribution of (N + 1) squared sampling points on a sphere is given, for which the (N + 1) squared spherical sampling functions span the same linear manifold as do the spherical-harmonic functions through degree N. The transformations between the spherical sampling functions and the spherical-harmonic functions are given by recurrence relations. The spherical sampling functions of two arguments are extended to three arguments and to nonspherical reference surfaces. Typical applications of this formalism to geophysical topics are sketched.

  15. Functionalized boron nitride nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Sainsbury, Toby; Ikuno, Takashi; Zettl, Alexander K

    2014-04-22

    A plasma treatment has been used to modify the surface of BNNTs. In one example, the surface of the BNNT has been modified using ammonia plasma to include amine functional groups. Amine functionalization allows BNNTs to be soluble in chloroform, which had not been possible previously. Further functionalization of amine-functionalized BNNTs with thiol-terminated organic molecules has also been demonstrated. Gold nanoparticles have been self-assembled at the surface of both amine- and thiol-functionalized boron nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) in solution. This approach constitutes a basis for the preparation of highly functionalized BNNTs and for their utilization as nanoscale templates for assembly and integration with other nanoscale materials.

  16. Liver Function Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... food, store energy, and remove poisons. Liver function tests are blood tests that check to see how well your liver ... hepatitis and cirrhosis. You may have liver function tests as part of a regular checkup. Or you ...

  17. Functional Task Test (FTT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Peters, Brian T.; Rescheke, Millard F.; Wood, Scott; Lawrence, Emily; Koffman, Igor; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori; Spiering, Barry A.; Feeback, Daniel L.; Platts, Steven H.; Stenger, Michael B.; Lee, Stuart M.C.; Arzeno, Natalia; Feiveson, Alan H.; Ryder, Jeffrey; Garcia, Yamil; Guilliams, Mark E.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Functional Task Test (FTT), an interdisciplinary testing regimen that has been developed to evaluate astronaut postflight functional performance and related physiological changes. The objectives of the project are: (1) to develop a set of functional tasks that represent critical mission tasks for the Constellation Program, (2) determine the ability to perform these tasks after space flight, (3) Identify the key physiological factors that contribute to functional decrements and (4) Use this information to develop targeted countermeasures.

  18. Pain and Hand Function.

    PubMed

    Howland, Nicholas; Lopez, Mariela; Zhang, Andrew Y

    2016-02-01

    Pain is a unique somatosensory perception that can dramatically affect our ability to function. It is also a necessary perception, without which we would do irreparable damage to ourselves. In this article, the authors assess the impact of pain on function of the hand. Pain can be categorized into acute pain, chronic pain, and neuropathic pain. Hand function and objective measurements of hand function are analyzed as well as the impact of different types of pain on each of these areas.

  19. Pediatric functional gastrointestinal disorders

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders continue to be a prevalent set of conditions faced by the healthcare team and have a significant emotional and economic impact. In this review, the authors highlight some of the common functional disorders seen in pediatric patients (functional dyspepsia, irrita...

  20. Two Functions of Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Carol Fleisher

    1977-01-01

    Author advocates the view that meaning is necessarily dependent upon the communicative function of language and examines the objections, particularly those of Noam Chomsky, to this view. Argues that while Chomsky disagrees with the idea that communication is the essential function of language, he implicitly agrees that it has a function.…

  1. What Is Functionalism?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Elizabeth; MacWhinney, Brian

    A defense of functionalism in linguistics, and more specifically the competition model of linguistic performance, examines six misconceptions about the functionalist approach. Functionalism is defined as the belief that the forms of natural languages are created, governed, constrained, acquired, and used for communicative functions. Functionalism…

  2. Functioning Mathematically: 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cain, David

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the first part of the closing address given by the author to the 2007 Association of Teachers of Mathematics (ATM) Easter conference at Loughborough. In his closing address, the author focuses on functioning mathematically as opposed to functional mathematics. His view of functional mathematics is that the focus is on someone…

  3. Piecing Together Piecewise Functions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Sybrina L.

    1997-01-01

    Presents an activity to teach piecewise functions using wax paper and rectangular grids. Helps students understand the idea of different pieces by literally "piecing" together a new type of mathematical function. Also describes a followup activity and explains how piecewise functions can be graphed using graphing calculators. (NB)

  4. Measuring Attitude Functions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Deborah S.; Kristiansen, Connie M.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the Attitude Functions Inventory (AFI), which assesses the extent to which a person's attitude fulfills each of four psychological functions. Reports findings of a study, involving 249 undergraduates, that tested the construct validity of the AFI. Suggests that the AFI provides conceptually meaningful measures of the functions of…

  5. Cross-functional systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Mark

    1991-01-01

    Many companies, including Xerox and Texas Instruments, are using cross functional systems to deal with the increasingly complex and competitive business environment. However, few firms within the aerospace industry appear to be aware of the significant benefits that cross functional systems can provide. Those benefits are examined and a flexible methodology is discussed that companies can use to identify and develop cross functional systems that will help improve organizational performance. In addition, some of the managerial issues are addressed that cross functional systems may raise and specific examples are used to explore networking's contributions to cross functional systems.

  6. On genetic map functions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Hongyu; Speed, T.P.

    1996-04-01

    Various genetic map functions have been proposed to infer the unobservable genetic distance between two loci from the observable recombination fraction between them. Some map functions were found to fit data better than others. When there are more than three markers, multilocus recombination probabilities cannot be uniquely determined by the defining property of map functions, and different methods have been proposed to permit the use of map functions to analyze multilocus data. If for a given map function, there is a probability model for recombination that can give rise to it, then joint recombination probabilities can be deduced from this model. This provides another way to use map functions in multilocus analysis. In this paper we show that stationary renewal processes give rise to most of the map functions in the literature. Furthermore, we show that the interevent distributions of these renewal processes can all be approximated quite well by gamma distributions. 43 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Functional Explanation and the Function of Explanation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombrozo, Tania; Carey, Susan

    2006-01-01

    Teleological explanations (TEs) account for the existence or properties of an entity in terms of a function: we have hearts because they pump blood, and telephones for communication. While many teleological explanations seem appropriate, others are clearly not warranted--for example, that rain exists for plants to grow. Five experiments explore…

  8. Functional Visual Loss

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Beau B; Newman, Nancy J

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Neurologists frequently evaluate patients complaining of vision loss, especially when the patient has been examined by an ophthalmologist who has found no ocular disease. A significant proportion of patients presenting to the neurologist with visual complaints will have non-organic or functional visual loss. While there are examination techniques which can aid in the detection and diagnosis of functional visual loss, the frequency with which functional visual loss occurs concomitantly with organic disease warrants substantial caution on the part of the clinician. Furthermore, purely functional visual loss is never a diagnosis of exclusion, and must be supported by positive findings on examination that demonstrate normal visual function. The relationship of true psychological disease and functional visual loss is unclear and most patients respond well to simple reassurance. PMID:20638000

  9. Function photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiang-Yao; Zhang, Bai-Jun; Yang, Jing-Hai; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Ba, Nuo; Wu, Yi-Heng; Wang, Qing-Cai

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we present a new kind of function photonic crystals (PCs), whose refractive index is a function of space position. Conventional PCs structure grows from two materials, A and B, with different dielectric constants εA and εB. Based on Fermat principle, we give the motion equations of light in one-dimensional, two-dimensional and three-dimensional function photonic crystals. For one-dimensional function photonic crystals, we give the dispersion relation, band gap structure and transmissivity, and compare them with conventional photonic crystals, and we find the following: (1) For the vertical and non-vertical incidence light of function photonic crystals, there are band gap structures, and for only the vertical incidence light, the conventional PCs have band gap structures. (2) By choosing various refractive index distribution functions n( z), we can obtain more wider or more narrower band gap structure than conventional photonic crystals.

  10. Symbolic function network.

    PubMed

    Eskander, George S; Atiya, Amir F

    2009-05-01

    In this paper a model called symbolic function network (SFN) is introduced; that is based on using elementary functions (for example powers, the exponential function, and the logarithm) as building blocks. The proposed method uses these building blocks to synthesize a function that best fits the training data in a regression framework. The resulting network is of the form of a tree, where adding nodes horizontally means having a summation of elementary functions and adding nodes vertically means concatenating elementary functions. Several new algorithms were proposed to construct the tree based on the concepts of forward greedy search and backward greedy search, together with applying the steepest descent concept. The method is tested on a number of examples and it is shown to exhibit good performance.

  11. Time functions revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathi, Albert

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we revisit our joint work with Antonio Siconolfi on time functions. We will give a brief introduction to the subject. We will then show how to construct a Lipschitz time function in a simplified setting. We will end with a new result showing that the Aubry set is not an artifact of our proof of existence of time functions for stably causal manifolds.

  12. Balance Function Disorders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Researchers at the Balance Function Laboratory and Clinic at the Minneapolis (MN) Neuroscience Institute on the Abbot Northwestern Hospital Campus are using a rotational chair (technically a "sinusoidal harmonic acceleration system") originally developed by NASA to investigate vestibular (inner ear) function in weightlessness to diagnose and treat patients with balance function disorders. Manufactured by ICS Medical Corporation, Schaumberg, IL, the chair system turns a patient and monitors his or her responses to rotational stimulation.

  13. Photon structure function

    SciTech Connect

    Bardeen, W.A.

    1980-11-01

    Theoretical understanding of the photon structure function is reviewed. As an illustration of the pointlike component, the parton model is briefly discussed. However, the systematic study of the photon structure function is presented through the framework of the operator product expansion. Perturbative QCD is used as the theoretical basis for the calculation of leading contributions to the operator product expansion. The influence of higher order QCD effects on these results is discussed. Recent results for the polarized structure functions are discussed.

  14. THYROID FUNCTION IN DEPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Boral, G. C.; Ghosh, A. B.; Pal, S. K; Ghosh, K. K.; Nandi, D. N.

    1980-01-01

    SUMMARY Studies on thyroid functions were performed on patients suffering from depression and compared with normal control group. 31 different cases of depression were studied for their thyroid function andshowed a diminished level of T3 and T4 with a concomitant rise in TSH level. When the female population of these 31 cases was compared with their male counterparts the females showed a significantly lower thyroidal functional status than the males. PMID:22058497

  15. Functional foreign accent syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Omay; Ludwig, Lea; Davenport, Richard; Stone, Jon

    2016-10-01

    Foreign accent syndrome (FAS) is a rare disorder where the affected person speaks in an accent that the listener perceives as foreign. Although most cases have left hemisphere lesions, some may be functional. We describe a case of functional FAS and present a video of her speech. We identify characteristics that help to distinguish functional from structural cases. These include preceding motor disturbances causing the maladaptive speech response, inconsistencies in accent production, the adoption of unusual mannerisms in speech and the speech disturbances being transient and reversible. We conclude that FAS is a complex disorder encompassing both functional and structural causes. PMID:27234850

  16. Functional Nausea in Children.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Katja; Di Lorenzo, Carlo

    2016-03-01

    Chronic nausea is a highly prevalent, bothersome, and difficult-to-treat symptom among adolescents. When chronic nausea presents as the predominant symptom and is not associated with any underlying disease, it may be considered a functional gastrointestinal disorder and named "functional nausea." The clinical features of functional nausea and its association with comorbid conditions provide clues to the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. These may include gastrointestinal motor and sensory disturbances, autonomic imbalance, altered central nervous system pathways, or a combination of these. This review summarizes the current knowledge on mechanisms and treatment strategies for chronic, functional nausea in children.

  17. Renormalization group functional equations

    SciTech Connect

    Curtright, Thomas L.; Zachos, Cosmas K.

    2011-03-15

    Functional conjugation methods are used to analyze the global structure of various renormalization group trajectories and to gain insight into the interplay between continuous and discrete rescaling. With minimal assumptions, the methods produce continuous flows from step-scaling {sigma} functions and lead to exact functional relations for the local flow {beta} functions, whose solutions may have novel, exotic features, including multiple branches. As a result, fixed points of {sigma} are sometimes not true fixed points under continuous changes in scale and zeroes of {beta} do not necessarily signal fixed points of the flow but instead may only indicate turning points of the trajectories.

  18. Differential Person Functioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johanson, George; Alsmadi, Abdalla

    In many testing situations, differential item functioning (DIF) is a potentially serious problem. It occurs when a test item appears to be easier for one group of examinees than another even after controlling for overall skill level. Differential person functioning (DPF) can occur when "items" can be considered raters and the persons are the…

  19. Pulmonary Function Tests

    PubMed Central

    Ranu, Harpreet; Wilde, Michael; Madden, Brendan

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary function tests are valuable investigations in the management of patients with suspected or previously diagnosed respiratory disease. They aid diagnosis, help monitor response to treatment and can guide decisions regarding further treatment and intervention. The interpretation of pulmonary functions tests requires knowledge of respiratory physiology. In this review we describe investigations routinely used and discuss their clinical implications. PMID:22347750

  20. Program Computes Thermodynamic Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, Bonnie J.; Gordon, Sanford

    1994-01-01

    PAC91 is latest in PAC (Properties and Coefficients) series. Two principal features are to provide means of (1) generating theoretical thermodynamic functions from molecular constants and (2) least-squares fitting of these functions to empirical equations. PAC91 written in FORTRAN 77 to be machine-independent.

  1. Platelet Function Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the clotting process in the body ( in vivo ). A person with normal platelet function test results may still experience excessive bleeding or inappropriate clotting during and after a surgery. Most samples for platelet function testing are only stable for a very short period ...

  2. Immune function in PTSD.

    PubMed

    Altemus, Margaret; Dhabhar, Firdaus S; Yang, Ruirong

    2006-07-01

    Disturbed regulation of both the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and sympathoadrenomedullary system in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) suggests that immune function, which is modulated by these systems, may also be dysregulated. Two dermatologic, in vivo measures of immune function, delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) and skin barrier function recovery, were examined in female subjects with PTSD and compared to measures in healthy female comparison subjects. In addition, at the time of DTH test placement, circulating numbers of lymphocyte subtypes were assessed. In separate studies, the effects of acute psychological stress on DTH and skin barrier function recovery were examined in healthy volunteer subjects. Both DTH and barrier function recovery were enhanced in women with PTSD. These findings contrast with the effects of acute stress in healthy control subjects, which was associated with suppression of DTH responses and skin barrier function recovery. There was no difference between subjects with PTSD and healthy control subjects in proportions of circulating lymphocyte subsets or in expression of the lymphocyte markers CD62, CD25, and CD45RO/CD45RA. These results suggest that cell-mediated immune function is enhanced in individuals with PTSD, a condition that imposes chronic physiologic and mental stress on sufferers. These findings contrast with suppression of DTH and skin barrier function recovery in healthy volunteers in response to acute psychological stress.

  3. The Gamow functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castagnino, M.; Gadella, M.; Id Betán, R.; Laura, R.

    2001-04-01

    We present a formalism that represents pure states, mixtures and generalized states as functionals on an algebra containing the observables of the system. Along these states, there are other functionals that decay exponentially at all times and therefore can be used to describe resonance phenomena.

  4. The Planck Radiation Functions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Russell D.

    1985-01-01

    Blackbody radiation is used as an example to illustrate that oversimplification in teaching quantum ideas can result in later misunderstanding. Although textbooks give Planck's distribution function in terms of wavelength, there are actually 12 different radiation functions. Some of the more interesting ones are given and discussed. (JN)

  5. Mapping Cognitive Function

    PubMed Central

    Stufflebeam, Steven M.; Rosen, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Cognitive functions are fundamental to being human. Although tremendous progress has been made in the science of cognition using neuroimaging, the clinical applications of neuroimaging are just beginning to be realized. A unifying theme of this chapter is the concept that a more complete understanding of cognition only comes through integration of multimodal structural and functional imaging technologies. PMID:17983964

  6. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  7. Antigravitational Functional System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorogovtsev, V. N.

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is the description of the main components and basic functioning principles of the antigravitational functional system (AFS). Methods: literary review and theoretical analysis of the neurogenic regulation functional system. The concept of a functional system was formulated in the beginning of the 20th century. Functional system was described as dynamic, self-organizing, central-peripheral functional integration structures of the nervous system whose activity was aiming at achieving adaptive useful results. The main difference between functional system and proposed regulating principles is the physiological mechanism presence of the prospective result prediction (action result acceptor). Action is programmed for defined result receiving. This is anticipatory regulation principle. Using this principle AFS provides timely cardiovascular system preparing for its impending functional conditions changes. It seems that gravity intolerance in the beginning and after space flight is related with AFS regulation peculiarities. There is a necessity for the AFS advanced study. It is very important to create safe and comfort conditions for astronauts adaptation during gravitational loading changes as well as for certain diseases prophylaxis on the Earth.

  8. Functional Generalized Additive Models.

    PubMed

    McLean, Mathew W; Hooker, Giles; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Scheipl, Fabian; Ruppert, David

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the functional generalized additive model (FGAM), a novel regression model for association studies between a scalar response and a functional predictor. We model the link-transformed mean response as the integral with respect to t of F{X(t), t} where F(·,·) is an unknown regression function and X(t) is a functional covariate. Rather than having an additive model in a finite number of principal components as in Müller and Yao (2008), our model incorporates the functional predictor directly and thus our model can be viewed as the natural functional extension of generalized additive models. We estimate F(·,·) using tensor-product B-splines with roughness penalties. A pointwise quantile transformation of the functional predictor is also considered to ensure each tensor-product B-spline has observed data on its support. The methods are evaluated using simulated data and their predictive performance is compared with other competing scalar-on-function regression alternatives. We illustrate the usefulness of our approach through an application to brain tractography, where X(t) is a signal from diffusion tensor imaging at position, t, along a tract in the brain. In one example, the response is disease-status (case or control) and in a second example, it is the score on a cognitive test. R code for performing the simulations and fitting the FGAM can be found in supplemental materials available online.

  9. Modeling Protein Domain Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton "Buck"; Hull, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    This simple but effective laboratory exercise helps students understand the concept of protein domain function. They use foam beads, Styrofoam craft balls, and pipe cleaners to explore how domains within protein active sites interact to form a functional protein. The activity allows students to gain content mastery and an understanding of the…

  10. Functional performance of pyrovalves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.

    1996-01-01

    Following several flight and ground test failures of spacecraft systems using single-shot, 'normally closed' pyrotechnically actuated valves (pyrovalves), a Government/Industry cooperative program was initiated to assess the functional performance of five qualified designs. The goal of the program was to provide information on functional performance of pyrovalves to allow users the opportunity to improve procurement requirements. Specific objectives included the demonstration of performance test methods, the seating; these gases/particles entered the fluid path of measurement of 'blowby' (the passage of gases from the pyrotechnic energy source around the activating piston into the valve's fluid path), and the quantification of functional margins for each design. Experiments were conducted at NASA's Langley Research Center on several units for each of the five valve designs. The test methods used for this program measured the forces and energies required to actuate the valves, as well as the energies and the pressures (where possible) delivered by the pyrotechnic sources. Functional performance ranged widely among the designs. Blowby cannot be prevented by o-ring seals; metal-to-metal seals were effective. Functional margin was determined by dividing the energy delivered by the pyrotechnic sources in excess to that required to accomplish the function by the energy required for that function. Two of the five designs had inadequate functional margins with the pyrotechnic cartridges evaluated.

  11. Impact of 'functional food'.

    PubMed

    Guesry, Pierre René

    2005-01-01

    'Functional Food' is not a new concept but it became more important recently due to the collapse of most social health system because 'Functional Foods' allow low cost prevention of numerous diseases. 'Functional Foods' are different from 'Neutraceuticals' which remain drug based with poor taste whereas 'Functional Foods' remain good food which could be consumed for years, but in addition have a disease prophylactic function. They are becoming particularly important for the prevention of food allergy in 'at risk' population, obesity, osteoporosis, cardiovascular diseases and particularly high blood pressure and atherosclerosis, but also for cancer prevention. The newest trend is that governments and health authorities allow food manufacturers to make health prevention related claims on mass media.

  12. The Function of Introns

    PubMed Central

    Chorev, Michal; Carmel, Liran

    2012-01-01

    The intron–exon architecture of many eukaryotic genes raises the intriguing question of whether this unique organization serves any function, or is it simply a result of the spread of functionless introns in eukaryotic genomes. In this review, we show that introns in contemporary species fulfill a broad spectrum of functions, and are involved in virtually every step of mRNA processing. We propose that this great diversity of intronic functions supports the notion that introns were indeed selfish elements in early eukaryotes, but then independently gained numerous functions in different eukaryotic lineages. We suggest a novel criterion of evolutionary conservation, dubbed intron positional conservation, which can identify functional introns. PMID:22518112

  13. Time Functions as Utilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minguzzi, E.

    2010-09-01

    Every time function on spacetime gives a (continuous) total preordering of the spacetime events which respects the notion of causal precedence. The problem of the existence of a (semi-)time function on spacetime and the problem of recovering the causal structure starting from the set of time functions are studied. It is pointed out that these problems have an analog in the field of microeconomics known as utility theory. In a chronological spacetime the semi-time functions correspond to the utilities for the chronological relation, while in a K-causal (stably causal) spacetime the time functions correspond to the utilities for the K + relation (Seifert’s relation). By exploiting this analogy, we are able to import some mathematical results, most notably Peleg’s and Levin’s theorems, to the spacetime framework. As a consequence, we prove that a K-causal (i.e. stably causal) spacetime admits a time function and that the time or temporal functions can be used to recover the K + (or Seifert) relation which indeed turns out to be the intersection of the time or temporal orderings. This result tells us in which circumstances it is possible to recover the chronological or causal relation starting from the set of time or temporal functions allowed by the spacetime. Moreover, it is proved that a chronological spacetime in which the closure of the causal relation is transitive (for instance a reflective spacetime) admits a semi-time function. Along the way a new proof avoiding smoothing techniques is given that the existence of a time function implies stable causality, and a new short proof of the equivalence between K-causality and stable causality is given which takes advantage of Levin’s theorem and smoothing techniques.

  14. Plant functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Holtorf, Hauke; Guitton, Marie-Christine; Reski, Ralf

    2002-06-01

    Functional genome analysis of plants has entered the high-throughput stage. The complete genome information from key species such as Arabidopsis thaliana and rice is now available and will further boost the application of a range of new technologies to functional plant gene analysis. To broadly assign functions to unknown genes, different fast and multiparallel approaches are currently used and developed. These new technologies are based on known methods but are adapted and improved to accommodate for comprehensive, large-scale gene analysis, i.e. such techniques are novel in the sense that their design allows researchers to analyse many genes at the same time and at an unprecedented pace. Such methods allow analysis of the different constituents of the cell that help to deduce gene function, namely the transcripts, proteins and metabolites. Similarly the phenotypic variations of entire mutant collections can now be analysed in a much faster and more efficient way than before. The different methodologies have developed to form their own fields within the functional genomics technological platform and are termed transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics and phenomics. Gene function, however, cannot solely be inferred by using only one such approach. Rather, it is only by bringing together all the information collected by different functional genomic tools that one will be able to unequivocally assign functions to unknown plant genes. This review focuses on current technical developments and their impact on the field of plant functional genomics. The lower plant Physcomitrella is introduced as a new model system for gene function analysis, owing to its high rate of homologous recombination.

  15. Biomechanics of Cardiac Function

    PubMed Central

    Voorhees, Andrew P.; Han, Hai-Chao

    2015-01-01

    The heart pumps blood to maintain circulation and ensure the delivery of oxygenated blood to all the organs of the body. Mechanics play a critical role in governing and regulating heart function under both normal and pathological conditions. Biological processes and mechanical stress are coupled together in regulating myocyte function and extracellular matrix structure thus controlling heart function. Here we offer a brief introduction to the biomechanics of left ventricular function and then summarize recent progress in the study of the effects of mechanical stress on ventricular wall remodeling and cardiac function as well as the effects of wall mechanical properties on cardiac function in normal and dysfunctional hearts. Various mechanical models to determine wall stress and cardiac function in normal and diseased hearts with both systolic and diastolic dysfunction are discussed. The results of these studies have enhanced our understanding of the biomechanical mechanism in the development and remodeling of normal and dysfunctional hearts. Biomechanics provide a tool to understand the mechanism of left ventricular remodeling in diastolic and systolic dysfunction and guidance in designing and developing new treatments. PMID:26426462

  16. Functional Performance of Pyrovalves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.

    1996-01-01

    Following several flight and ground test failures of spacecraft systems using single-shot, 'normally closed' pyrotechnically actuated valves (pyrovalves), a government/industry cooperative program was initiated to assess the functional performance of five qualified designs. The goal of the program was to improve performance-based requirements for the procurement of pyrovalves. Specific objectives included the demonstration of performance test methods, the measurement of 'blowby' (the passage of gases from the pyrotechnic energy source around the activating piston into the valve's fluid path), and the quantification of functional margins for each design. Experiments were conducted in-house at NASA on several units each of the five valve designs. The test methods used for this program measured the forces and energies required to actuate the valves, as well as the energies and the pressures (where possible) delivered by the pyrotechnic sources. Functional performance ranged widely among the designs. Blowby cannot be prevented by o-ring seals; metal-to-metal seals were effective. Functional margin was determined by dividing the energy delivered by the pyrotechnic sources in excess to that required to accomplish the function by the energy required for that function. All but two designs had adequate functional margins with the pyrotechnic cartridges evaluated.

  17. Approximation by hinge functions

    SciTech Connect

    Faber, V.

    1997-05-01

    Breiman has defined {open_quotes}hinge functions{close_quotes} for use as basis functions in least squares approximations to data. A hinge function is the max (or min) function of two linear functions. In this paper, the author assumes the existence of smooth function f(x) and a set of samples of the form (x, f(x)) drawn from a probability distribution {rho}(x). The author hopes to find the best fitting hinge function h(x) in the least squares sense. There are two problems with this plan. First, Breiman has suggested an algorithm to perform this fit. The author shows that this algorithm is not robust and also shows how to create examples on which the algorithm diverges. Second, if the author tries to use the data to minimize the fit in the usual discrete least squares sense, the functional that must be minimized is continuous in the variables, but has a derivative which jumps at the data. This paper takes a different approach. This approach is an example of a method that the author has developed called {open_quotes}Monte Carlo Regression{close_quotes}. (A paper on the general theory is in preparation.) The author shall show that since the function f is continuous, the analytic form of the least squares equation is continuously differentiable. A local minimum is solved for by using Newton`s method, where the entries of the Hessian are estimated directly from the data by Monte Carlo. The algorithm has the desirable properties that it is quadratically convergent from any starting guess sufficiently close to a solution and that each iteration requires only a linear system solve.

  18. The Enzyme Function Initiative.

    PubMed

    Gerlt, John A; Allen, Karen N; Almo, Steven C; Armstrong, Richard N; Babbitt, Patricia C; Cronan, John E; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Imker, Heidi J; Jacobson, Matthew P; Minor, Wladek; Poulter, C Dale; Raushel, Frank M; Sali, Andrej; Shoichet, Brian K; Sweedler, Jonathan V

    2011-11-22

    The Enzyme Function Initiative (EFI) was recently established to address the challenge of assigning reliable functions to enzymes discovered in bacterial genome projects; in this Current Topic, we review the structure and operations of the EFI. The EFI includes the Superfamily/Genome, Protein, Structure, Computation, and Data/Dissemination Cores that provide the infrastructure for reliably predicting the in vitro functions of unknown enzymes. The initial targets for functional assignment are selected from five functionally diverse superfamilies (amidohydrolase, enolase, glutathione transferase, haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase, and isoprenoid synthase), with five superfamily specific Bridging Projects experimentally testing the predicted in vitro enzymatic activities. The EFI also includes the Microbiology Core that evaluates the in vivo context of in vitro enzymatic functions and confirms the functional predictions of the EFI. The deliverables of the EFI to the scientific community include (1) development of a large-scale, multidisciplinary sequence/structure-based strategy for functional assignment of unknown enzymes discovered in genome projects (target selection, protein production, structure determination, computation, experimental enzymology, microbiology, and structure-based annotation), (2) dissemination of the strategy to the community via publications, collaborations, workshops, and symposia, (3) computational and bioinformatic tools for using the strategy, (4) provision of experimental protocols and/or reagents for enzyme production and characterization, and (5) dissemination of data via the EFI's Website, http://enzymefunction.org. The realization of multidisciplinary strategies for functional assignment will begin to define the full metabolic diversity that exists in nature and will impact basic biochemical and evolutionary understanding, as well as a wide range of applications of central importance to industrial, medicinal, and pharmaceutical efforts.

  19. Quantum iterated function systems.

    PubMed

    Łoziński, Artur; Zyczkowski, Karol; Słomczyński, Wojciech

    2003-10-01

    An iterated function system (IFS) is defined by specifying a set of functions in a classical phase space, which act randomly on an initial point. In an analogous way, we define a quantum IFS (QIFS), where functions act randomly with prescribed probabilities in the Hilbert space. In a more general setting, a QIFS consists of completely positive maps acting in the space of density operators. This formalism is designed to describe certain problems of nonunitary quantum dynamics. We present exemplary classical IFSs, the invariant measure of which exhibits fractal structure, and study properties of the corresponding QIFSs and their invariant states.

  20. Restoration of Shoulder Function.

    PubMed

    Boe, Chelsea C; Elhassan, Bassem T

    2016-08-01

    Restoration of shoulder function in patients with brachial plexus injury can be challenging. Initial reported efforts were focused on stabilizing the shoulder, improving inferior subluxation and restoring abduction and flexion of the joint. Recent advancements and improved understanding of coordinated shoulder motion and the biomechanical properties of the muscles around the shoulder applicable to tendon transfer have expanded available surgical options to improve shoulder function, specifically external rotation. Despite the advances in reconstructive options, brachial plexus injury remains a serious problem that requires complex surgical solutions, prolonged recovery, and acceptance of functional loss. PMID:27387074

  1. SOME BILINEAR GENERATING FUNCTIONS*

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, H. M.

    1969-01-01

    In the present paper, the author applies some of his earlier results which extend the well-known Hille-Hardy formula for the Laguerre polynomials to certain classes of generalized hypergeometric polynomials in order to derive various generalizations of a bilinear generating function for the Jacobi polynomials proved recently by Carlitz. The corresponding results for the polynomials of Legendre, Gegenbauer (or ultraspherical), Laguerre, etc., can be obtained fairly easily as the specialized or limiting cases of the generating functions presented here. It is also shown how the formula of Carlitz follows rather rapidly from a result of Weisner involving the Gaussian hypergeometric functions. PMID:16591787

  2. Some bilinear generating functions.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, H M

    1969-10-01

    In the present paper, the author applies some of his earlier results which extend the well-known Hille-Hardy formula for the Laguerre polynomials to certain classes of generalized hypergeometric polynomials in order to derive various generalizations of a bilinear generating function for the Jacobi polynomials proved recently by Carlitz. The corresponding results for the polynomials of Legendre, Gegenbauer (or ultraspherical), Laguerre, etc., can be obtained fairly easily as the specialized or limiting cases of the generating functions presented here. It is also shown how the formula of Carlitz follows rather rapidly from a result of Weisner involving the Gaussian hypergeometric functions. PMID:16591787

  3. A universal functional object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    A scheme is presented for realizing any function, combinational or sequential, in a single universal function scheme, termed the universal function object UF. This scheme is addressed to the problem of the proliferation of the number of parts (cards, chips) necessary for conventional implementation in an LSI technology of a computer system. The UF implementation will use about ten times more circuits than a conventional implementation regardless of the size of the design. The UF approach also includes general-purpose spares for failing circuits. The procedure could be used both at manufacture to increase yields, as well as to achieve automatic repair.

  4. Functional aspects of UNIX

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, M.M.

    1983-01-01

    The author discusses the UNIX operating system which has rapidly become a widely accepted system. The author introduces UNIX and functional programming systems. The features of UNIX which have most contributed to its success are shown to be functional. In addition the author presents changes that could enhance this functional nature. UNIX provides a pipeline mechanism which is capable of routing the output of one program to the input of another concurrently executing program. The system provides all the buffering and synchronization that is required. 6 references.

  5. Nuclear function of Alus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chen; Huang, Sui

    2014-01-01

    Alus are transposable elements belonging to the short interspersed element family. They occupy over 10% of human genome and have been spreading through genomes over the past 65 million years. In the past, they were considered junk DNA with little function that took up genome volumes. Today, Alus and other transposable elements emerge to be key players in cellular function, including genomic activities, gene expression regulations, and evolution. Here we summarize the current understanding of Alu function in genome and gene expression regulation in human cell nuclei. PMID:24637839

  6. Parametric Hazard Function Estimation.

    1999-09-13

    Version 00 Phaze performs statistical inference calculations on a hazard function (also called a failure rate or intensity function) based on reported failure times of components that are repaired and restored to service. Three parametric models are allowed: the exponential, linear, and Weibull hazard models. The inference includes estimation (maximum likelihood estimators and confidence regions) of the parameters and of the hazard function itself, testing of hypotheses such as increasing failure rate, and checking ofmore » the model assumptions.« less

  7. Functionalized expanded porphyrins

    DOEpatents

    Sessler, Jonathan L; Pantos, Patricia J

    2013-11-12

    Disclosed are functionalized expanded porphyrins that can be used as spectrometric sensors for high-valent actinide cations. The disclosed functionalized expanded porphyrins have the advantage over unfunctionalized systems in that they can be immobilized via covalent attachment to a solid support comprising an inorganic or organic polymer or other common substrates. Substrates comprising the disclosed functionalized expanded porphyrins are also disclosed. Further, disclosed are methods of making the disclosed compounds (immobilized and free), methods of using them as sensors to detect high valent actinides, devices that comprise the disclosed compounds, and kits.

  8. Special Issue: "Functional Dendrimers".

    PubMed

    Tomalia, Donald A

    2016-01-01

    This special issue entitled "Functional Dendrimers" focuses on the manipulation of at least six "critical nanoscale design parameters" (CNDPs) of dendrimers including: size, shape, surface chemistry, flexibility/rigidity, architecture and elemental composition. These CNDPs collectively define properties of all "functional dendrimers". This special issue contains many interesting examples describing the manipulation of certain dendrimer CNDPs to create new emerging properties and, in some cases, predictive nanoperiodic property patterns (i.e., dendritic effects). The systematic engineering of CNDPs provides a valuable strategy for optimizing functional dendrimer properties for use in specific applications. PMID:27517890

  9. Pulmonary function tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... measured to estimate the lung volume. To measure diffusion capacity , you breathe a harmless gas, called a ... on your report after pulmonary function tests include: Diffusion capacity to carbon monoxide (DLCO) Expiratory reserve volume ( ...

  10. Normal Functioning Family

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Normal Functioning Family Page Content Article Body Is there any way ...

  11. Liver function tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... laboratory results. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods . 22nd ... liver function. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods . 22nd ...

  12. Functional Protein Microarray Technology

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shaohui; Xie, Zhi; Qian, Jiang; Blackshaw, Seth; Zhu, Heng

    2010-01-01

    Functional protein microarrays are emerging as a promising new tool for large-scale and high-throughput studies. In this article, we will review their applications in basic proteomics research, where various types of assays have been developed to probe binding activities to other biomolecules, such as proteins, DNA, RNA, small molecules, and glycans. We will also report recent progress of using functional protein microarrays in profiling protein posttranslational modifications, including phosphorylation, ubiquitylation, acetylation, and nitrosylation. Finally, we will discuss potential of functional protein microarrays in biomarker identification and clinical diagnostics. We strongly believe that functional protein microarrays will soon become an indispensible and invaluable tool in proteomics research and systems biology. PMID:20872749

  13. Kidney function tests

    MedlinePlus

    Oh MS. Evaluation of renal function, water, electrolytes and acid-base balance. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods . 22nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; ...

  14. Congenital platelet function defects

    MedlinePlus

    Platelet storage pool disorder; Glanzmann's thrombasthenia; Bernard-Soulier syndrome; Platelet function defects - congenital ... disorder may also cause severe bleeding. Platelet storage pool disorder (also called platelet secretion disorder) occurs when ...

  15. [Vascular endothelial Barrier Function].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A N; Puchinyan, D M; Norkin, I A

    2015-01-01

    Endothelium is an important regulator of selective permeability of the vascular wall for different molecules and cells. This review summarizes current data on endothelial barrier function. Endothelial glycocalyx structure, its function and role in the molecular transport and leukocytes migration across the endothelial barrier are discussed. The mechanisms of transcellular transport of macromolecules and cell migration through endothelial cells are reviewed. Special section of this article addresses the structure and function of tight and adherens endothelial junction, as well as their importance for the regulation of paracellular transport across the endothelial barrier. Particular attention is paid to the signaling mechanism of endothelial barrier function regulation and the factors that influence on the vascular permeability.

  16. Functional Task Test: Data Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, Ronita

    2014-01-01

    After space flight there are changes in multiple physiological systems including: Cardiovascular function; Sensorimotor function; and Muscle function. How do changes in these physiological system impact astronaut functional performance?

  17. Functional Molecular Ecological Networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jizhong; Deng, Ye; Luo, Feng; He, Zhili; Tu, Qichao; Zhi, Xiaoyang

    2010-01-01

    Biodiversity and its responses to environmental changes are central issues in ecology and for society. Almost all microbial biodiversity research focuses on “species” richness and abundance but not on their interactions. Although a network approach is powerful in describing ecological interactions among species, defining the network structure in a microbial community is a great challenge. Also, although the stimulating effects of elevated CO2 (eCO2) on plant growth and primary productivity are well established, its influences on belowground microbial communities, especially microbial interactions, are poorly understood. Here, a random matrix theory (RMT)-based conceptual framework for identifying functional molecular ecological networks was developed with the high-throughput functional gene array hybridization data of soil microbial communities in a long-term grassland FACE (free air, CO2 enrichment) experiment. Our results indicate that RMT is powerful in identifying functional molecular ecological networks in microbial communities. Both functional molecular ecological networks under eCO2 and ambient CO2 (aCO2) possessed the general characteristics of complex systems such as scale free, small world, modular, and hierarchical. However, the topological structures of the functional molecular ecological networks are distinctly different between eCO2 and aCO2, at the levels of the entire communities, individual functional gene categories/groups, and functional genes/sequences, suggesting that eCO2 dramatically altered the network interactions among different microbial functional genes/populations. Such a shift in network structure is also significantly correlated with soil geochemical variables. In short, elucidating network interactions in microbial communities and their responses to environmental changes is fundamentally important for research in microbial ecology, systems microbiology, and global change. PMID:20941329

  18. Testosterone and Sexual Function.

    PubMed

    Gannon, John R; Walsh, Thomas J

    2016-05-01

    Testosterone and sexual function are related. Current evidence suggests that testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) may improve sexual dysfunction. Sexual dysfunction in men who are hypogonadal, mixed, or eugonadal have all been examined through numerous studies. The most recent large analysis showed an overall improvement in sexual function outcomes in men treated with TRT. This improvement is difficult to measure and seems to differ based on the baseline hormonal status of the patient at the beginning of treatment. PMID:27132579

  19. Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    BNL

    2008-08-12

    Staff from Brookhaven's new Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) describe how this advanced facility will focus on the development and understanding of nanoscale materials. The CFN provides state-of-the-art capabilities for the fabrication and study of nanoscale materials, with an emphasis on atomic-level tailoring to achieve desired properties and functions. The overarching scientific theme of the CFN is the development and understanding of nanoscale materials that address the Nation's challenges in energy security.

  20. Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    ScienceCinema

    BNL

    2016-07-12

    Staff from Brookhaven's new Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) describe how this advanced facility will focus on the development and understanding of nanoscale materials. The CFN provides state-of-the-art capabilities for the fabrication and study of nanoscale materials, with an emphasis on atomic-level tailoring to achieve desired properties and functions. The overarching scientific theme of the CFN is the development and understanding of nanoscale materials that address the Nation's challenges in energy security.

  1. Polarized Antenna Splitting Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Peskin, Michael E.; /SLAC

    2009-10-17

    We consider parton showers based on radiation from QCD dipoles or 'antennae'. These showers are built from 2 {yields} 3 parton splitting processes. The question then arises of what functions replace the Altarelli-Parisi splitting functions in this approach. We give a detailed answer to this question, applicable to antenna showers in which partons carry definite helicity, and to both initial- and final-state emissions.

  2. A Function Machine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Dave

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a lesson he observed involving a function machine. This function machine was a box with a slot at the top of one side and a large cut-out hole at the bottom of the opposite side. A card with a number written on it (the input) was pushed into the slot and the teacher put their hand through the hole of the other…

  3. Functional neuroimaging in psychiatry.

    PubMed Central

    Fu, C H; McGuire, P K

    1999-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging is one of the most powerful means available for investigating the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders. In this review, we shall focus on the different ways that it can be employed to this end, describing the major findings in the field in the context of different methodological approaches. We will also discuss practical issues that are particular to studying psychiatric disorders and the potential contribution of functional neuroimaging to future psychiatric research. PMID:10466156

  4. Structure function monitor

    DOEpatents

    McGraw, John T.; Zimmer, Peter C.; Ackermann, Mark R.

    2012-01-24

    Methods and apparatus for a structure function monitor provide for generation of parameters characterizing a refractive medium. In an embodiment, a structure function monitor acquires images of a pupil plane and an image plane and, from these images, retrieves the phase over an aperture, unwraps the retrieved phase, and analyzes the unwrapped retrieved phase. In an embodiment, analysis yields atmospheric parameters measured at spatial scales from zero to the diameter of a telescope used to collect light from a source.

  5. Space race functional responses.

    PubMed

    Sjödin, Henrik; Brännström, Åke; Englund, Göran

    2015-02-22

    We derive functional responses under the assumption that predators and prey are engaged in a space race in which prey avoid patches with many predators and predators avoid patches with few or no prey. The resulting functional response models have a simple structure and include functions describing how the emigration of prey and predators depend on interspecific densities. As such, they provide a link between dispersal behaviours and community dynamics. The derived functional response is general but is here modelled in accordance with empirically documented emigration responses. We find that the prey emigration response to predators has stabilizing effects similar to that of the DeAngelis-Beddington functional response, and that the predator emigration response to prey has destabilizing effects similar to that of the Holling type II response. A stability criterion describing the net effect of the two emigration responses on a Lotka-Volterra predator-prey system is presented. The winner of the space race (i.e. whether predators or prey are favoured) is determined by the relationship between the slopes of the species' emigration responses. It is predicted that predators win the space race in poor habitats, where predator and prey densities are low, and that prey are more successful in richer habitats. PMID:25589602

  6. On immediate function

    PubMed Central

    Zeiler, Michael D.

    1992-01-01

    Behavior is a property of living organisms, not of inanimate matter. The problems of physical science are to understand how a phenomenon works; biological science adds the questions of what a phenomenon does and how something that does such things came to be. Exclusive dedication to cause–effect explanations ignores how behavior helps creatures cope with their internal and external environments. Laws of causation describe the precursors to behavior; laws of function describe the effects of behavior. The numerous instances of learning reflect the many ways that selective pressure for altering behavior on the basis of experience has been manifested. Little basis exists for assuming that the various forms of learning reflect either common functions or common processes. Instead, it seems that evolutionary processes have resulted in domain-specific learning. The rules of learning must be understood in terms of the function that the particular manifestation of learning serves for the organism. Evolutionary theory provides the framework for understanding function as well as relations between function and causal mechanisms. PMID:16812660

  7. Function Transformation without Reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Tonneau, François; Arreola, Fara; Martínez, Alma Gabriela

    2006-01-01

    In studies of function transformation, participants initially are taught to match stimuli in the presence of a contextual cue, X; the stimuli to be matched bear some formal relation to each other, for example, a relation of opposition or difference. In a second phase, the participants are taught to match arbitrary stimuli (say, A and B) in the presence of X. In a final test, A often displays behavioral functions that differ from those of B, and can be predicted from the nature of the relation associated with X in the initial training phase. Here we report function-transformation effects in the absence of selection responses and of their reinforcers. In three experiments with college students, exposure to relations of difference or identity modified the responses given to later stimuli. In Experiment 1, responses to a test stimulus A varied depending on preexposure to pairs of colors that were distinct from A but exemplified relations of difference or identity. In Experiment 2, a stimulus A acquired distinct functions, depending on its previous pairing with a contextual cue X that had itself been paired with identity or difference among colors. Experiment 3 confirmed the results of Experiment 2 with a modified design. Our data are consistent with the notion that relations of identity or difference can serve as stimuli for Pavlovian processes, and, in compound with other cues, produce apparent function-transformation effects. PMID:16776058

  8. Space race functional responses.

    PubMed

    Sjödin, Henrik; Brännström, Åke; Englund, Göran

    2015-02-22

    We derive functional responses under the assumption that predators and prey are engaged in a space race in which prey avoid patches with many predators and predators avoid patches with few or no prey. The resulting functional response models have a simple structure and include functions describing how the emigration of prey and predators depend on interspecific densities. As such, they provide a link between dispersal behaviours and community dynamics. The derived functional response is general but is here modelled in accordance with empirically documented emigration responses. We find that the prey emigration response to predators has stabilizing effects similar to that of the DeAngelis-Beddington functional response, and that the predator emigration response to prey has destabilizing effects similar to that of the Holling type II response. A stability criterion describing the net effect of the two emigration responses on a Lotka-Volterra predator-prey system is presented. The winner of the space race (i.e. whether predators or prey are favoured) is determined by the relationship between the slopes of the species' emigration responses. It is predicted that predators win the space race in poor habitats, where predator and prey densities are low, and that prey are more successful in richer habitats.

  9. Space race functional responses

    PubMed Central

    Sjödin, Henrik; Brännström, Åke; Englund, Göran

    2015-01-01

    We derive functional responses under the assumption that predators and prey are engaged in a space race in which prey avoid patches with many predators and predators avoid patches with few or no prey. The resulting functional response models have a simple structure and include functions describing how the emigration of prey and predators depend on interspecific densities. As such, they provide a link between dispersal behaviours and community dynamics. The derived functional response is general but is here modelled in accordance with empirically documented emigration responses. We find that the prey emigration response to predators has stabilizing effects similar to that of the DeAngelis–Beddington functional response, and that the predator emigration response to prey has destabilizing effects similar to that of the Holling type II response. A stability criterion describing the net effect of the two emigration responses on a Lotka–Volterra predator–prey system is presented. The winner of the space race (i.e. whether predators or prey are favoured) is determined by the relationship between the slopes of the species' emigration responses. It is predicted that predators win the space race in poor habitats, where predator and prey densities are low, and that prey are more successful in richer habitats. PMID:25589602

  10. Biological functions of sphingomyelins.

    PubMed

    Slotte, J Peter

    2013-10-01

    Sphingomyelin (SM) is a dominant sphingolipid in membranes of mammalian cells and this lipid class is specifically enriched in the plasma membrane, the endocytic recycling compartment, and the trans Golgi network. The distribution of SM and cholesterol among cellular compartments correlate. Sphingolipids have extensive hydrogen-bonding capabilities which together with their saturated nature facilitate the formation of sphingolipid and SM-enriched lateral domains in membranes. Cholesterol prefers to interact with SMs and this interaction has many important functional consequences. In this review, the synthesis, regulation, and intracellular distribution of SMs are discussed. The many direct roles played by membrane SM in various cellular functions and processes will also be discussed. These include involvement in the regulation of endocytosis and receptor-mediated ligand uptake, in ion channel and G-protein coupled receptor function, in protein sorting, and functioning as receptor molecules for various bacterial toxins, and for non-bacterial pore-forming toxins. SM is also an important constituent of the eye lens membrane, and is believed to participate in the regulation of various nuclear functions. SM is an independent risk factor in the development of cardiovascular disease, and new studies have shed light on possible mechanism behind its role in atherogenesis. PMID:23684760

  11. Sperm function test

    PubMed Central

    Talwar, Pankaj; Hayatnagarkar, Suryakant

    2015-01-01

    With absolute normal semen analysis parameters it may not be necessary to shift to specialized tests early but in cases with borderline parameters or with history of fertilization failure in past it becomes necessary to do a battery of tests to evaluate different parameters of spermatozoa. Various sperm function tests are proposed and endorsed by different researchers in addition to the routine evaluation of fertility. These tests detect function of a certain part of spermatozoon and give insight on the events in fertilization of the oocyte. The sperms need to get nutrition from the seminal plasma in the form of fructose and citrate (this can be assessed by fructose qualitative and quantitative estimation, citrate estimation). They should be protected from the bad effects of pus cells and reactive oxygen species (ROS) (leukocyte detection test, ROS estimation). Their number should be in sufficient in terms of (count), structure normal to be able to fertilize eggs (semen morphology). Sperms should have intact and functioning membrane to survive harsh environment of vagina and uterine fluids (vitality and hypo-osmotic swelling test), should have good mitochondrial function to be able to provide energy (mitochondrial activity index test). They should also have satisfactory acrosome function to be able to burrow a hole in zona pellucida (acrosome intactness test, zona penetration test). Finally, they should have properly packed DNA in the nucleus to be able to transfer the male genes (nuclear chromatic decondensation test) to the oocyte during fertilization. PMID:26157295

  12. Function transformation without reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Tonneau, Franćois; Arreola, Fara; Martínez, Alma Gabriela

    2006-05-01

    In studies of function transformation, participants initially are taught to match stimuli in the presence of a contextual cue, X; the stimuli to be matched bear some formal relation to each other, for example, a relation of opposition or difference. In a second phase, the participants are taught to match arbitrary stimuli (say, A and B) in the presence of X. In a final test, A often displays behavioral functions that differ from those of B, and can be predicted from the nature of the relation associated with X in the initial training phase. Here we report function-transformation effects in the absence of selection responses and of their reinforcers. In three experiments with college students, exposure to relations of difference or identity modified the responses given to later stimuli. In Experiment 1, responses to a test stimulus A varied depending on preexposure to pairs of colors that were distinct from A but exemplified relations of difference or identity. In Experiment 2, a stimulus A acquired distinct functions, depending on its previous pairing with a contextual cue X that had itself been paired with identity or difference among colors. Experiment 3 confirmed the results of Experiment 2 with a modified design. Our data are consistent with the notion that relations of identity or difference can serve as stimuli for Pavlovian processes, and, in compound with other cues, produce apparent function-transformation effects. PMID:16776058

  13. Effect of functional overreaching on executive functions.

    PubMed

    Dupuy, O; Renaud, M; Bherer, L; Bosquet, L

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether cognitive performance was a valid marker of overreaching. 10 well-trained male endurance athletes increased their training load by 100% for 2 weeks. They performed a maximal graded test, a constant speed test, a reaction time task and a computerized version of the Stroop color word-test before and after this overload period. Regarding performance results, five participants were considered as overreached and the five remaining were considered as well-trained. We found no significant differences between groups in performing the Stroop test. Noteworthy, we found a small increase in response time in the more complex condition in overreached athletes (1 188+/-261 to 1 297+/-231 ms, effect size=0.44), while it decreased moderately in the well-trained athletes (1 066+/-175 to 963+/-171 ms, effect size=-0.59). Furthermore, we found an interaction between time and group on initiation time of the reaction time task, since it increased in overreached athletes after the overload period (246+/-24 to 264+/-26 ms, p<0.05), while it remained unchanged in well-trained participants. Participants made very few anticipation errors, whatever the group or the period (error rate <2%).We concluded that an unaccustomed increase in training volume which is accompanied by a decrement in physical performance induces a deterioration of some executive functions. PMID:20544582

  14. Functional BES equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostov, Ivan; Serban, Didina; Volin, Dmytro

    2008-08-01

    We give a realization of the Beisert, Eden and Staudacher equation for the planar Script N = 4 supersymetric gauge theory which seems to be particularly useful to study the strong coupling limit. We are using a linearized version of the BES equation as two coupled equations involving an auxiliary density function. We write these equations in terms of the resolvents and we transform them into a system of functional, instead of integral, equations. We solve the functional equations perturbatively in the strong coupling limit and reproduce the recursive solution obtained by Basso, Korchemsky and Kotański. The coefficients of the strong coupling expansion are fixed by the analyticity properties obeyed by the resolvents.

  15. Algal functional annotation tool

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, D.; Casero, D.; Cokus, S. J.; Merchant, S. S.; Pellegrini, M.

    2012-07-01

    The Algal Functional Annotation Tool is a web-based comprehensive analysis suite integrating annotation data from several pathway, ontology, and protein family databases. The current version provides annotation for the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and in the future will include additional genomes. The site allows users to interpret large gene lists by identifying associated functional terms, and their enrichment. Additionally, expression data for several experimental conditions were compiled and analyzed to provide an expression-based enrichment search. A tool to search for functionally-related genes based on gene expression across these conditions is also provided. Other features include dynamic visualization of genes on KEGG pathway maps and batch gene identifier conversion.

  16. Functional cardiac tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Liau, Brian; Zhang, Donghui; Bursac, Nenad

    2013-01-01

    Heart attack remains the leading cause of death in both men and women worldwide. Stem cell-based therapies, including the use of engineered cardiac tissues, have the potential to treat the massive cell loss and pathological remodeling resulting from heart attack. Specifically, embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells are a promising source for generation of therapeutically relevant numbers of functional cardiomyocytes and engineering of cardiac tissues in vitro. This review will describe methodologies for successful differentiation of pluripotent stem cells towards the cardiovascular cell lineages as they pertain to the field of cardiac tissue engineering. The emphasis will be placed on comparing the functional maturation in engineered cardiac tissues and developing heart and on methods to quantify cardiac electrical and mechanical function at different spatial scales. PMID:22397609

  17. Velopharyngeal function and dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Jones, D L

    1991-01-01

    The concepts regarding velopharyngeal function, the production of disordered nasalization, and the management of velopharyngeal dysfunction can be summarized as follows: 1. Although the function of the velopharyngeal mechanism is critical to the control of oral-nasal balance, the configuration and function of the speech articulatory system as a whole will determine the degree of nasalized speech that is produced. 2. Velopharyngeal dysfunction can be related to one or a combination of structural and motor limitations within the velopharyngeal mechanism. 3. There are two perceptual manifestations of velopharyngeal dysfunction. One is acoustic (nasality); the other is aerodynamic (nasal emission). For any given speaker, it is possible to hear both, and it is possible to hear one and not the other. 4. Velopharyngeal dysfunction can be treated in a variety of ways. The method of treatment should be determined by the structural characteristics of the velopharyngeal mechanism and the speech-motor abilities of the patient.

  18. Fun with Type Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselyov, Oleg; Jones, Simon Peyton; Shan, Chung-Chieh

    Tony Hoare has always been a leader in writing down and proving properties of programs. To prove properties of programs automatically, the most widely used technology today is the ubiquitous type checker. Alas, static type systems inevitably exclude some good programs and allow some bad ones. Thus motivated, we describe some fun we have been having with Haskell, by making the type system more expressive without losing the benefits of automatic proof and compact expression. Specifically, we offer a programmer's tour of so-calledtype families, a recent extension to Haskell that allows functions on types to be expressed as straightforwardly as functions on values. This facility makes it easier for programmers to effectively extend the compiler by writing functional programs that execute during type checking. Source code for all the examples is available at http://research.microsoft.com/simonpj/papers/assoc-types/fun-with-type-funs.zip.

  19. Adaptive multiconfigurational wave functions

    SciTech Connect

    Evangelista, Francesco A.

    2014-03-28

    A method is suggested to build simple multiconfigurational wave functions specified uniquely by an energy cutoff Λ. These are constructed from a model space containing determinants with energy relative to that of the most stable determinant no greater than Λ. The resulting Λ-CI wave function is adaptive, being able to represent both single-reference and multireference electronic states. We also consider a more compact wave function parameterization (Λ+SD-CI), which is based on a small Λ-CI reference and adds a selection of all the singly and doubly excited determinants generated from it. We report two heuristic algorithms to build Λ-CI wave functions. The first is based on an approximate prescreening of the full configuration interaction space, while the second performs a breadth-first search coupled with pruning. The Λ-CI and Λ+SD-CI approaches are used to compute the dissociation curve of N{sub 2} and the potential energy curves for the first three singlet states of C{sub 2}. Special attention is paid to the issue of energy discontinuities caused by changes in the size of the Λ-CI wave function along the potential energy curve. This problem is shown to be solvable by smoothing the matrix elements of the Hamiltonian. Our last example, involving the Cu{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup 2+} core, illustrates an alternative use of the Λ-CI method: as a tool to both estimate the multireference character of a wave function and to create a compact model space to be used in subsequent high-level multireference coupled cluster computations.

  20. Adaptive Transfer Function Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, J.R. |

    1993-06-01

    Real-time pattern classification and time-series forecasting applications continue to drive artificial neural network (ANN) technology. As ANNs increase in complexity, the throughput of digital computer simulations decreases. A novel ANN, the Adaptive Transfer Function Network (ATF-Net), directly addresses the issue of throughput. ATF-Nets are global mapping equations generated by the superposition of ensembles of neurodes having arbitrary continuous functions receiving encoded input data. ATF-Nets may be implemented on parallel digital computers. An example is presented which illustrates a four-fold increase in computational throughput.

  1. Adaptive Transfer Function Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, J.R. Portland State Univ., OR . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1993-01-01

    Real-time pattern classification and time-series forecasting applications continue to drive artificial neural network (ANN) technology. As ANNs increase in complexity, the throughput of digital computer simulations decreases. A novel ANN, the Adaptive Transfer Function Network (ATF-Net), directly addresses the issue of throughput. ATF-Nets are global mapping equations generated by the superposition of ensembles of neurodes having arbitrary continuous functions receiving encoded input data. ATF-Nets may be implemented on parallel digital computers. An example is presented which illustrates a four-fold increase in computational throughput.

  2. Algal functional annotation tool

    SciTech Connect

    2012-07-12

    Abstract BACKGROUND: Progress in genome sequencing is proceeding at an exponential pace, and several new algal genomes are becoming available every year. One of the challenges facing the community is the association of protein sequences encoded in the genomes with biological function. While most genome assembly projects generate annotations for predicted protein sequences, they are usually limited and integrate functional terms from a limited number of databases. Another challenge is the use of annotations to interpret large lists of 'interesting' genes generated by genome-scale datasets. Previously, these gene lists had to be analyzed across several independent biological databases, often on a gene-by-gene basis. In contrast, several annotation databases, such as DAVID, integrate data from multiple functional databases and reveal underlying biological themes of large gene lists. While several such databases have been constructed for animals, none is currently available for the study of algae. Due to renewed interest in algae as potential sources of biofuels and the emergence of multiple algal genome sequences, a significant need has arisen for such a database to process the growing compendiums of algal genomic data. DESCRIPTION: The Algal Functional Annotation Tool is a web-based comprehensive analysis suite integrating annotation data from several pathway, ontology, and protein family databases. The current version provides annotation for the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and in the future will include additional genomes. The site allows users to interpret large gene lists by identifying associated functional terms, and their enrichment. Additionally, expression data for several experimental conditions were compiled and analyzed to provide an expression-based enrichment search. A tool to search for functionally-related genes based on gene expression across these conditions is also provided. Other features include dynamic visualization of genes on KEGG

  3. Peroxisome Biogenesis and Function

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Navneet; Reumann, Sigrun; Hu, Jianping

    2009-01-01

    Peroxisomes are small and single membrane-delimited organelles that execute numerous metabolic reactions and have pivotal roles in plant growth and development. In recent years, forward and reverse genetic studies along with biochemical and cell biological analyses in Arabidopsis have enabled researchers to identify many peroxisome proteins and elucidate their functions. This review focuses on the advances in our understanding of peroxisome biogenesis and metabolism, and further explores the contribution of large-scale analysis, such as in sillco predictions and proteomics, in augmenting our knowledge of peroxisome function In Arabidopsis. PMID:22303249

  4. Ascorbate and phagocyte function.

    PubMed Central

    Stankova, L; Gerhardt, N B; Nagel, L; Bigley, R H

    1975-01-01

    Scorbutic guinea pig neutrophils (PMN) were found to produce H2O2 and kill Staphylococcus aureus as well as control PMN, suggesting that ascorbate does not contribute significantly to phagocyte H2O2 production or bacterial killing. Total and reduced ascorbate contents of human PMN was observed to fall upon phagocytosis, whereas dehydroascorbate increased to a lesser extent. These observations are consistent with the view that ascorbate constitutes a functional part of the PMN's redox-active components and may thus function to protect cell constituents from denaturation by the oxidants produced during phagocytosis. PMID:1150324

  5. Clocks and cardiovascular function

    PubMed Central

    McLoughlin, Sarah C.; Haines, Philip; FitzGerald, Garret A.

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks in central and peripheral tissues enable the temporal synchronization and organization of molecular and physiological processes of rhythmic animals, allowing optimum functioning of cells and organisms at the most appropriate time of day. Disruption of circadian rhythms, from external or internal forces, leads to widespread biological disruption and is postulated to underlie many human conditions, such as the incidence and timing of cardiovascular disease. Here, we describe in vivo and in vitro methodology relevant to studying the role of circadian rhythms in cardiovascular function and dysfunction PMID:25707279

  6. GADRAS Detector Response Function.

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Dean J.; Harding, Lee; Thoreson, Gregory G; Horne, Steven M.

    2014-11-01

    The Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) applies a Detector Response Function (DRF) to compute the output of gamma-ray and neutron detectors when they are exposed to radiation sources. The DRF is fundamental to the ability to perform forward calculations (i.e., computation of the response of a detector to a known source), as well as the ability to analyze spectra to deduce the types and quantities of radioactive material to which the detectors are exposed. This document describes how gamma-ray spectra are computed and the significance of response function parameters that define characteristics of particular detectors.

  7. Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H2, or F2, or CnHm) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target particles are directed toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec.

  8. Functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H.sub.2 or F.sub.2 or C.sub.nH.sub.m) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target particles are directed toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec.

  9. [Functional Neuroimaging of Sweating].

    PubMed

    Kojima, Kazuho; Hirano, Shigeki

    2016-08-01

    Central mechanisms of thermal and emotional sweating has been elucidated by using functional MRI in healthy human subjects. The hypothalamus (preoptic region) was specifically activated during thermal sweating, whereas prefrontal regions, insula, and anterior cingulate were activated during emotional sweating. Both thermal and emotional sweating were associated with activation in the dorsal midbrain and in the rostral lateral medulla. These results suggested that sweating in human represents not only sympathetic activation but also integrates emotional function, internal awareness, and attentional arousal in humans. PMID:27503818

  10. Algal functional annotation tool

    2012-07-12

    Abstract BACKGROUND: Progress in genome sequencing is proceeding at an exponential pace, and several new algal genomes are becoming available every year. One of the challenges facing the community is the association of protein sequences encoded in the genomes with biological function. While most genome assembly projects generate annotations for predicted protein sequences, they are usually limited and integrate functional terms from a limited number of databases. Another challenge is the use of annotations tomore » interpret large lists of 'interesting' genes generated by genome-scale datasets. Previously, these gene lists had to be analyzed across several independent biological databases, often on a gene-by-gene basis. In contrast, several annotation databases, such as DAVID, integrate data from multiple functional databases and reveal underlying biological themes of large gene lists. While several such databases have been constructed for animals, none is currently available for the study of algae. Due to renewed interest in algae as potential sources of biofuels and the emergence of multiple algal genome sequences, a significant need has arisen for such a database to process the growing compendiums of algal genomic data. DESCRIPTION: The Algal Functional Annotation Tool is a web-based comprehensive analysis suite integrating annotation data from several pathway, ontology, and protein family databases. The current version provides annotation for the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and in the future will include additional genomes. The site allows users to interpret large gene lists by identifying associated functional terms, and their enrichment. Additionally, expression data for several experimental conditions were compiled and analyzed to provide an expression-based enrichment search. A tool to search for functionally-related genes based on gene expression across these conditions is also provided. Other features include dynamic visualization of genes on

  11. Root uptake of 137Cs by natural and semi-natural grasses as a function of texture and moisture of soils.

    PubMed

    Grytsyuk, N; Arapis, G; Davydchuk, V

    2006-01-01

    This work studies the dependence of 137Cs root uptake on the structure of landscape, especially on texture and moisture of soils, under natural conditions, on abandoned radiopolluted lands in Northern Ukraine. Researches were carried out on a wide range of landscape conditions, at various levels of 137Cs contamination (from 20 up to 5000 kBqm(-2)), with different types of soils (approx. 20 soil varieties), which differ in texture, granulometric composition, degrees of gleyization and water regime, and anthropogenic transformation. The results showed that transfer factor (TF) values of 137Cs differ 50 times for the natural grassy coenoses and 8 times for the semi-natural ones. The lowest 137Cs TF values were measured in the herbages of dry meadows at automorphous loamy soils, while the highest were observed in wetland meadows at organic soils. Finally, the correlation between 137Cs TF values and granulometric composition of soil was determined for both automorphic and hydromorphic mineral soils. PMID:16199112

  12. Advising. CAP Job Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This Job Function Book (Advising) is one of the 14 components (see note) of the Career Alert Planning (CAP) program, a set of individualized materials designed to help participants find out about themselves and about the kind of work for which they are suited. In this program, participants become acquainted with occupations that are representative…

  13. Enzyme design: Functional Frankensteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhlynets, Olga V.; Korendovych, Ivan V.

    2016-09-01

    An artificial esterase with no known natural structural analogues has been formed via the homo-heptameric self-assembly of a designed peptide. This esterase represents the first report of a functional catalytic triad rationally engineered into a de novo protein framework.

  14. Function Transformation without Reinforcement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tonneau, Francois; Arreola, Fara; Martinez, Alma Gabriela

    2006-01-01

    In studies of function transformation, participants initially are taught to match stimuli in the presence of a contextual cue, X; the stimuli to be matched bear some formal relation to each other, for example, a relation of opposition or difference. In a second phase, the participants are taught to match arbitrary stimuli (say, A and B) in the…

  15. Functional Extended Redundancy Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun; Suk, Hye Won; Lee, Jang-Han; Moskowitz, D. S.; Lim, Jooseop

    2012-01-01

    We propose a functional version of extended redundancy analysis that examines directional relationships among several sets of multivariate variables. As in extended redundancy analysis, the proposed method posits that a weighed composite of each set of exogenous variables influences a set of endogenous variables. It further considers endogenous…

  16. Educational Production Functions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polachek, Solomon W.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    A constant partial elasticity of substitution production function for academic achievement is presented and estimated with nonlinear maximum likelihood methods. We find that ability and time devoted to various aspects of the learning process are the most important determinants of students' accomplishments. (Author/CTM)

  17. Functional Handwriting Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metzger, Louise; Lehotsky, Rutheda R.

    An inservice project to review the functional handwriting being taught in the Williamsport, Pennsylvania, school district produced a handwriting manual that provides teachers and students with models of letter forms and instructional exercises leading to the development of an individualized style of handwriting. The manual describes student…

  18. Process for functionalizing alkanes

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, R.G.; Janowicz, A.H.; Periana, R.A.

    1988-05-24

    Process for functionalizing saturated hydrocarbons comprises: (a) reacting said saturated hydrocarbons of the formula: R[sub 1]H wherein H represents a hydrogen atom; and R[sub 1] represents a saturated hydrocarbon radical, with a metal complex of the formula: CpRh[P(R[sub 2])[sub 3

  19. Functional Group Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Walter T., Jr.; Patterson, John M.

    1984-01-01

    Literature on analytical methods related to the functional groups of 17 chemical compounds is reviewed. These compounds include acids, acid azides, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, amino acids, aromatic hydrocarbons, carbodiimides, carbohydrates, ethers, nitro compounds, nitrosamines, organometallic compounds, peroxides, phenols, silicon compounds,…

  20. Functions of Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Southern Coll., Statesboro.

    Intended for teachers of industrial arts in teaching the functions of industry, this course of study was compiled as a result of the EPDA Institute in Industrial and Career Development at Georgia Southern College. Contents are: (1) Introduction, (2) Organization, (3) Research and Development, (4) Production, (5) Marketing, (6) Finance and Control,…

  1. Iridescence: a functional perspective

    PubMed Central

    Doucet, Stéphanie M.; Meadows, Melissa G.

    2009-01-01

    In animals, iridescence is generated by the interaction of light with biological tissues that are nanostructured to produce thin films or diffraction gratings. Uniquely among animal visual signals, the study of iridescent coloration contributes to biological and physical sciences by enhancing our understanding of the evolution of communication strategies, and by providing insights into physical optics and inspiring biomimetic technologies useful to humans. Iridescent colours are found in a broad diversity of animal taxa ranging from diminutive marine copepods to terrestrial insects and birds. Iridescent coloration has received a surge of research interest of late, and studies have focused on both characterizing the nanostructures responsible for producing iridescence and identifying the behavioural functions of iridescent colours. In this paper, we begin with a brief description of colour production mechanisms in animals and provide a general overview of the taxonomic distribution of iridescent colours. We then highlight unique properties of iridescent signals and review the proposed functions of iridescent coloration, focusing, in particular, on the ways in which iridescent colours allow animals to communicate with conspecifics and avoid predators. We conclude with a brief overview of non-communicative functions of iridescence in animals. Despite the vast amount of recent work on animal iridescence, our review reveals that many proposed functions of iridescent coloration remain virtually unexplored, and this area is clearly ripe for future research. PMID:19336344

  2. Choreographing Patterns and Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawes, Zachary; Moss, Joan; Finch, Heather; Katz, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors begin with a description of an algebraic dance--the translation of composite linear growing patterns into choreographed movement--which was the last component of a research-based instructional unit that focused on fostering an understanding of linear functional rules through geometric growing patterns and…

  3. Empirical microeconomics action functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baaquie, Belal E.; Du, Xin; Tanputraman, Winson

    2015-06-01

    A statistical generalization of microeconomics has been made in Baaquie (2013), where the market price of every traded commodity, at each instant of time, is considered to be an independent random variable. The dynamics of commodity market prices is modeled by an action functional-and the focus of this paper is to empirically determine the action functionals for different commodities. The correlation functions of the model are defined using a Feynman path integral. The model is calibrated using the unequal time correlation of the market commodity prices as well as their cubic and quartic moments using a perturbation expansion. The consistency of the perturbation expansion is verified by a numerical evaluation of the path integral. Nine commodities drawn from the energy, metal and grain sectors are studied and their market behavior is described by the model to an accuracy of over 90% using only six parameters. The paper empirically establishes the existence of the action functional for commodity prices that was postulated to exist in Baaquie (2013).

  4. Functionalities of Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adiseshiah, Malcolm S.

    1975-01-01

    Functionality is a relationship between an independent and a dependent variable. In the article's four-part presentation, literacy is the independent variable; its relationship to the dependent variables of work, sex and age groups, justice, and individual and social values in Third World countries forms the focus of the discussion. (AG)

  5. Arranging. CAP Job Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This Job Function Booklet (Arranging) is one of the 14 components (see note) of the Career Alert Planning (CAP) program, a set of individualized materials designed to help participants find out about themselves and about the kind of work for which they are suited. In this program, participants become acquainted with occupations that are…

  6. Conjugate flow action functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Venturi, Daniele

    2013-11-15

    We present a new general framework to construct an action functional for a non-potential field theory. The key idea relies on representing the governing equations relative to a diffeomorphic flow of curvilinear coordinates which is assumed to be functionally dependent on the solution field. Such flow, which will be called the conjugate flow, evolves in space and time similarly to a physical fluid flow of classical mechanics and it can be selected in order to symmetrize the Gâteaux derivative of the field equations with respect to suitable local bilinear forms. This is equivalent to requiring that the governing equations of the field theory can be derived from a principle of stationary action on a Lie group manifold. By using a general operator framework, we obtain the determining equations of such manifold and the corresponding conjugate flow action functional. In particular, we study scalar and vector field theories governed by second-order nonlinear partial differential equations. The identification of transformation groups leaving the conjugate flow action functional invariant could lead to the discovery of new conservation laws in fluid dynamics and other disciplines.

  7. Multisensory Executive Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Amelia R.; Kingstone, Alan

    2004-01-01

    To better understand the prefrontal circuitry that putatively supports executive functions, such as those involved in switching tasks, we asked whether a current task set is open equally to receiving information from any sensory modality or if it is to some degree modality-specific. Subjects were presented with a sequence of digits to be…

  8. Objectification and Semiotic Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santi, George

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to study students' difficulties when they have to ascribe the same meaning to different representations of the same mathematical object. We address two theoretical tools that are at the core of Radford's cultural semiotic and Godino's onto-semiotic approaches: objectification and the semiotic function. The analysis…

  9. Integral inequalities under beta function and preinvex type functions.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Izhar

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper, the notion of P-preinvex function is introduced and new integral inequalities for this kind of function along with beta function are establised. The work extends the results appeared in the literature.

  10. Partition density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nafziger, Jonathan

    Partition density functional theory (PDFT) is a method for dividing a molecular electronic structure calculation into fragment calculations. The molecular density and energy corresponding to Kohn Sham density-functional theory (KS-DFT) may be exactly recovered from these fragments. Each fragment acts as an isolated system except for the influence of a global one-body 'partition' potential which deforms the fragment densities. In this work, the developments of PDFT are put into the context of other fragment-based density functional methods. We developed three numerical implementations of PDFT: One within the NWChem computational chemistry package using basis sets, and the other two developed from scratch using real-space grids. It is shown that all three of these programs can exactly reproduce a KS-DFT calculation via fragment calculations. The first of our in-house codes handles non-interacting electrons in arbitrary one-dimensional potentials with any number of fragments. This code is used to explore how the exact partition potential changes for different partitionings of the same system and also to study features which determine which systems yield non-integer PDFT occupations and which systems are locked into integer PDFT occupations. The second in-house code, CADMium, performs real-space calculations of diatomic molecules. Features of the exact partition potential are studied for a variety of cases and an analytical formula determining singularities in the partition potential is derived. We introduce an approximation for the non-additive kinetic energy and show how this quantity can be computed exactly. Finally a PDFT functional is developed to address the issues of static correlation and delocalization errors in approximations within DFT. The functional is applied to the dissociation of H2 + and H2.

  11. Pulmonary function in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, J. B.; Elliott, A. R.; Guy, H. J.; Prisk, G. K.

    1997-01-01

    The lung is exquisitely sensitive to gravity, and so it is of interest to know how its function is altered in the weightlessness of space. Studies on National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Spacelabs during the last 4 years have provided the first comprehensive data on the extensive changes in pulmonary function that occur in sustained microgravity. Measurements of pulmonary function were made on astronauts during space shuttle flights lasting 9 and 14 days and were compared with extensive ground-based measurements before and after the flights. Compared with preflight measurements, cardiac output increased by 18% during space flight, and stroke volume increased by 46%. Paradoxically, the increase in stroke volume occurred in the face of reductions in central venous pressure and circulating blood volume. Diffusing capacity increased by 28%, and the increase in the diffusing capacity of the alveolar membrane was unexpectedly large based on findings in normal gravity. The change in the alveolar membrane may reflect the effects of uniform filling of the pulmonary capillary bed. Distributions of blood flow and ventilation throughout the lung were more uniform in space, but some unevenness remained, indicating the importance of nongravitational factors. A surprising finding was that airway closing volume was approximately the same in microgravity and in normal gravity, emphasizing the importance of mechanical properties of the airways in determining whether they close. Residual volume was unexpectedly reduced by 18% in microgravity, possibly because of uniform alveolar expansion. The findings indicate that pulmonary function is greatly altered in microgravity, but none of the changes observed so far will apparently limit long-term space flight. In addition, the data help to clarify how gravity affects pulmonary function in the normal gravity environment on Earth.

  12. Engineering Living Functional Materials

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Natural materials, such as bone, integrate living cells composed of organic molecules together with inorganic components. This enables combinations of functionalities, such as mechanical strength and the ability to regenerate and remodel, which are not present in existing synthetic materials. Taking a cue from nature, we propose that engineered ‘living functional materials’ and ‘living materials synthesis platforms’ that incorporate both living systems and inorganic components could transform the performance and the manufacturing of materials. As a proof-of-concept, we recently demonstrated that synthetic gene circuits in Escherichia coli enabled biofilms to be both a functional material in its own right and a materials-synthesis platform. To demonstrate the former, we engineered E. coli biofilms into a chemical-inducer-responsive electrical switch. To demonstrate the latter, we engineered E. coli biofilms to dynamically organize biotic-abiotic materials across multiple length scales, template gold nanorods, gold nanowires, and metal/semiconductor heterostructures, and synthesize semiconductor nanoparticles (Chen, A. Y. et al. (2014) Synthesis and patterning of tunable multiscale materials with engineered cells. Nat. Mater.13, 515–523.). Thus, tools from synthetic biology, such as those for artificial gene regulation, can be used to engineer the spatiotemporal characteristics of living systems and to interface living systems with inorganic materials. Such hybrids can possess novel properties enabled by living cells while retaining desirable functionalities of inorganic systems. These systems, as living functional materials and as living materials foundries, would provide a radically different paradigm of materials performance and synthesis–materials possessing multifunctional, self-healing, adaptable, and evolvable properties that are created and organized in a distributed, bottom-up, autonomously assembled, and environmentally sustainable manner. PMID

  13. Comparisons of power transfer functions and flow transfer functions

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D.

    1987-11-15

    Transfer functions may be used to calculate component feedbacks or temperature increments by convolution of the transfer function with the appropriate fractional change in system-quantity. Power-change transfer functions have been reported. The corresponding flow transfer functions for this case, and comparison with the power transfer functions, are reported here. Results of feedback simulation of ramped flow transients using flow transfer functions are also described.

  14. Functional Performance Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenisen, Michael C.; Hayes, Judith C.; Siconolfi, Steven F.; Moore, Alan D.

    1999-01-01

    The Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP) was established to address specific issues associated with optimizing the ability of crews to complete mission tasks deemed essential to entry, landing, and egress for spaceflights lasting up to 16 days. The main objectives of this functional performance evaluation were to investigate the physiological effects of long-duration spaceflight on skeletal muscle strength and endurance, as well as aerobic capacity and orthostatic function. Long-duration exposure to a microgravity environment may produce physiological alterations that affect crew ability to complete critical tasks such as extravehicular activity (EVA), intravehicular activity (IVA), and nominal or emergency egress. Ultimately, this information will be used to develop and verify countermeasures. The answers to three specific functional performance questions were sought: (1) What are the performance decrements resulting from missions of varying durations? (2) What are the physical requirements for successful entry, landing, and emergency egress from the Shuttle? and (3) What combination of preflight fitness training and in-flight countermeasures will minimize in-flight muscle performance decrements? To answer these questions, the Exercise Countermeasures Project looked at physiological changes associated with muscle degradation as well as orthostatic intolerance. A means of ensuring motor coordination was necessary to maintain proficiency in piloting skills, EVA, and IVA tasks. In addition, it was necessary to maintain musculoskeletal strength and function to meet the rigors associated with moderate altitude bailout and with nominal or emergency egress from the landed Orbiter. Eight investigations, referred to as Detailed Supplementary Objectives (DSOs) 475, 476, 477, 606, 608, 617, 618, and 624, were conducted to study muscle degradation and the effects of exercise on exercise capacity and orthostatic function (Table 3-1). This chapter is divided into

  15. Cardiovascular function in acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Clayton, R N

    2003-06-01

    Even with modern treatment, acromegaly is associated with a 2- to 3-fold increase in mortality, mainly from vascular disease, which is probably a result of the long exposure of tissues to excess GH before diagnosis and treatment. There is accumulating evidence that effective treatment to lower serum GH levels to less than 1-2 ng/ml (glucose suppressed or random, respectively) and normalize IGF-I improves long-term outcome and survival. In addition to recognized cardiovascular risk factors of hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia, there is accumulating evidence of specific structural and functional changes in the heart in acromegaly. Along with endothelial dysfunction, these changes may contribute to the increased mortality in this disease. There are specific structural changes in the myocardium with increased myocyte size and interstitial fibrosis of both ventricles. Left ventricular hypertrophy is common even in young patients with short duration of disease. Some of these structural changes can be reversed by effective treatment. Functionally, the main consequence of these changes is impaired left ventricular diastolic function, particularly when exercising, such that exercise tolerance is reduced. Diastolic function improves with treatment, but the effect on exercise tolerance is more variable, and more longitudinal data are required to assess the benefits. What scant data there are on rhythm changes suggest an increase in complex ventricular arrhythmias, possibly as a result of the disordered left ventricular architecture. The functional consequences of these changes are unclear, but they may provide a useful early marker for the ventricular remodeling that occurs in the acromegalic heart. Endothelial dysfunction, especially flow-mediated dilatation, is an early marker of atherosclerosis, and limited data imply that this is impaired in active acromegaly and can be improved with treatment. Similarly, early arterial structural changes, such as

  16. Inverse Functions and their Derivatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snapper, Ernst

    1990-01-01

    Presented is a method of interchanging the x-axis and y-axis for viewing the graph of the inverse function. Discussed are the inverse function and the usual proofs that are used for the function. (KR)

  17. The Relationships between Weight Functions, Geometric Functions,and Compliance Functions in Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Rong

    2007-01-01

    Linear elastic fracture mechanics is widely used in industry because it established simple and explicit relationships between the permissible loading conditions and the critical crack size that is allowed in a structure. Stress intensity factors are the above-mentioned functional expressions that relate load with crack size through geometric functions or weight functions. Compliance functions are to determine the crack/flaw size in a structure when optical inspection is inconvenient. As a result, geometric functions, weight functions and compliance functions have been intensively studied to determine the stress intensity factor expressions for different geometries. However, the relations between these functions have received less attention. This work is therefore to investigate the intrinsic relationships between these functions. Theoretical derivation was carried out and the results were verified on single-edge cracked plate under tension and bending. It is found out that the geometric function is essentially the non-dimensional weight function at the loading point. The compliance function is composed of two parts: a varying part due to crack extension and a constant part from the intact structure if no crack exists. The derivative of the compliance function at any location is the product of the geometric function and the weight function at the evaluation point. Inversely, the compliance function can be acquired by the integration of the product of the geometric function and the weight function with respect to the crack size. The integral constant is just the unchanging compliance from the intact structure. Consequently, a special application of the relations is to obtain the compliance functions along a crack once the geometric function and weight functions are known. Any of the three special functions can be derived once the other two functions are known. These relations may greatly simplify the numerical process in obtaining either geometric functions, weight

  18. Nuclear functions of prefoldin

    PubMed Central

    Millán-Zambrano, Gonzalo; Chávez, Sebastián

    2014-01-01

    Prefoldin is a cochaperone, present in all eukaryotes, that cooperates with the chaperonin CCT. It is known mainly for its functional relevance in the cytoplasmic folding of actin and tubulin monomers during cytoskeleton assembly. However, both canonical and prefoldin-like subunits of this heterohexameric complex have also been found in the nucleus, and are functionally connected with nuclear processes in yeast and metazoa. Plant prefoldin has also been detected in the nucleus and physically associated with a gene regulator. In this review, we summarize the information available on the involvement of prefoldin in nuclear phenomena, place special emphasis on gene transcription, and discuss the possibility of a global coordination between gene regulation and cytoplasmic dynamics mediated by prefoldin. PMID:25008233

  19. Bioinspired Functional Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Yongmei; Wang, Jingxia; Hou, Yongping; Bai, Hao; Hu, Michael Z.

    2014-11-25

    This special issue is focused on the nanoscale or micro-/nanoscale structures similar to the biological features in multilevels or hierarchy and so on. Research by mimicking biological systems has shown more impact on many applications due to the well-designed micro-/nanostructures inspired from the biological surfaces or interfaces; therefore, the materials may achieve the fascinating functionality. In conclusion, the bioinspired functional materials may be fabricated by developing novel technology or methods such as synthesis, self-assembly, and soft lithography at micro- or nanolevel or multilevels and, in addition, the multidisciplinary procedures of physical or chemical methods and nanotechnology to mimic the biological multiscale micro-/nanostructures onto one-/two-dimensional surface materials.

  20. Bioinspired Functional Materials

    DOE PAGES

    Zheng, Yongmei; Wang, Jingxia; Hou, Yongping; Bai, Hao; Hu, Michael Z.

    2014-11-25

    This special issue is focused on the nanoscale or micro-/nanoscale structures similar to the biological features in multilevels or hierarchy and so on. Research by mimicking biological systems has shown more impact on many applications due to the well-designed micro-/nanostructures inspired from the biological surfaces or interfaces; therefore, the materials may achieve the fascinating functionality. In conclusion, the bioinspired functional materials may be fabricated by developing novel technology or methods such as synthesis, self-assembly, and soft lithography at micro- or nanolevel or multilevels and, in addition, the multidisciplinary procedures of physical or chemical methods and nanotechnology to mimic the biologicalmore » multiscale micro-/nanostructures onto one-/two-dimensional surface materials.« less

  1. Nuclear Parton Distribution Functions

    SciTech Connect

    I. Schienbein, J.Y. Yu, C. Keppel, J.G. Morfin, F. Olness, J.F. Owens

    2009-06-01

    We study nuclear effects of charged current deep inelastic neutrino-iron scattering in the framework of a {chi}{sup 2} analysis of parton distribution functions (PDFs). We extract a set of iron PDFs which are used to compute x{sub Bj}-dependent and Q{sup 2}-dependent nuclear correction factors for iron structure functions which are required in global analyses of free nucleon PDFs. We compare our results with nuclear correction factors from neutrino-nucleus scattering models and correction factors for charged-lepton--iron scattering. We find that, except for very high x{sub Bj}, our correction factors differ in both shape and magnitude from the correction factors of the models and charged-lepton scattering.

  2. Roughness and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, T. R.

    2014-01-01

    A function map is used to locate applications of roughness in separation-velocity space. The importance of roughness in contact mechanics is demonstrated and versions of the plasticity index are introduced and compared. Case studies of roughness and function are presented from tribology and the life sciences. Tribological examples are taken from the automotive industry and include the manufacture of vehicle bodies, and drive train tribology, particularly cylinder liner, cam and gearbox friction and wear. From the life sciences, problems of prosthetic fixation and tribology are shown to depend on roughness. The interaction of haptics and surface finish is described and illustrated. A number of other areas of application are listed. Finally the likely future importance of structured surfaces is discussed.

  3. Functions of Intact Carotenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britton, George

    The traditional view that carotenoids are a class of plant pigments does not do justice to their versatility. This versatility will become clear from the overview of the biological roles of carotenoids, in animals and microorganisms as well as in plants, that is given in this Chapter. It has become customary and convenient to differentiate biological effects of carotenoids into functions, actions and associations [1]. `Functions' have been defined as effects or properties that are essential for the normal well-being of the organism. Biological responses that follow the administration of carotenoids in the diet or as supplements are considered as `actions'. When an effect is seen but a causal relationship to the carotenoid has not been demonstrated, this is described as an `association'. The line between these is often not clear, however.

  4. Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H2 or F2 or CnHm) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target species particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target species particles are d irected toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target species particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec. *Discrimination against non-target species is provided by (i) use of a target species having a lifetime that is much greater than a lifetime of a non-target species and/or (2) use of an applied magnetic field to discriminate between charged particle trajectories for target species and for non-target species.

  5. Executive functions in synesthesia.

    PubMed

    Rouw, Romke; van Driel, Joram; Knip, Koen; Richard Ridderinkhof, K

    2013-03-01

    In grapheme-color synesthesia, a number or letter can evoke two different and possibly conflicting (real and synesthetic) color sensations at the same time. In this study, we investigate the relationship between synesthesia and executive control functions. First, no general skill differences were obtained between synesthetes and non-synesthetes in classic executive control paradigms. Furthermore, classic executive control effects did not interact with synesthetic behavioral effects. Third, we found support for our hypothesis that inhibition of a synesthetic color takes effort and time. Finally, individual differences analyses showed no relationship between the two skills; performance on a 'normal' Stroop task does not predict performance on a synesthetic Stroop task. Across four studies, the current results consistently show no clear relationship between executive control functions and synesthetic behavioral effects. This raises the question of which mechanisms are at play in synesthetic 'management' during the presence of two conflicting (real and synesthetic) sensations.

  6. [Physiological function of osteocytes].

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Kyoji

    2007-10-01

    Osteocytes produce DMP1 (dentin matrix protein 1), FGF23 (fibroblast growth factor 23) and sclerostin. FGF23 is a phosphate-regulating hormone that links bone to kidney. DMP1 is a matrix protein that is involved in mineralization. Patients with DMP1 mutations exhibit increased FGF23 and hypophosphatemia, suggesting that DMP1 negatively regulates FGF23 in osteocytes. Sclerostin is secreted by osteocytes and negatively regulates osteoblastic function, and its neutralizing antibody is being developed as a new treatment for osteoporosis. A mouse model that enables targeted ablation of osteocytes tells us about the physiologic and pathologic functions of osteocytes in regulating bone remodeling in response to mechanical environment. PMID:17906408

  7. Process for functionalizing alkanes

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, R.G.; Janowicz, A.H.; Periana-Pillai, R.A.

    1984-06-12

    Process for functionalizing saturated hydrocarbons selectively in the terminal position comprises: (a) reacting said saturated hydrocarbons with a metal complex CpRhPMe/sub 3/H/sub 2/ in the presence of ultraviolet radiation at -60/sup 0/ to -17/sup 0/C to form a hydridoalkyl complex CpRhPMe/sub 3/RH; (b) reacting said hydridoalkyl complex with a haloform CHX/sub 3/ at -60/sup 0/ to -17/sup 0/C to form the corresponding haloalkyl complex of step (a) CpRhPMe/sub 3/RX; and (c) reacting said haloalkyl complex with halogen -60 to 25/sup 0/C to form a functional haloalkyl compound.

  8. Functional magnetic microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Landel, Robert F. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Functional magnetic particles are formed by dissolving a mucopolysaccharide such as chitosan in acidified aqueous solution containing a mixture of ferrous chloride and ferric chloride. As the pH of the solution is raised magnetite is formed in situ in the solution by raising the pH. The dissolved chitosan is a polyelectrolyte and forms micelles surrounding the granules at pH of 8-9. The chitosan precipitates on the granules to form microspheres containing the magnetic granules. On addition of the microspheres to waste aqueous streams containing dissolved ions, the hydroxyl and amine functionality of the chitosan forms chelates binding heavy metal cations such as lead, copper, and mercury and the chelates in turn bind anions such as nitrate, fluoride, phosphate and borate.

  9. Functional Biomimetic Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Paul M.

    N-substituted glycine oligomers, or 'peptoids,' are a class of sequence--specific foldamers composed of tertiary amide linkages, engendering proteolytic stability and enhanced cellular permeability. Peptoids are notable for their facile synthesis, sequence diversity, and ability to fold into distinct secondary structures. In an effort to establish new functional peptoid architectures, we utilize the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne [3+2] cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction to generate peptidomimetic assemblies bearing bioactive ligands that specifically target and modulate Androgen Receptor (AR) activity, a major therapeutic target for prostate cancer. Additionally, we explore chemical ligation protocols to generate semi-synthetic hybrid biomacromolecules capable of exhibiting novel structures and functions not accessible to fully biosynthesized proteins.

  10. Pseudoproteases: mechanisms and function.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Simone L; Fischer, Katja

    2015-05-15

    Catalytically inactive enzymes (also known as pseudoproteases, protease homologues or paralogues, non-peptidase homologues, non-enzymes and pseudoenzymes) have traditionally been hypothesized to act as regulators of their active homologues. However, those that have been characterized demonstrate that inactive enzymes have an extensive and expanding role in biological processes, including regulation, inhibition and immune modulation. With the emergence of each new genome, more inactive enzymes are being identified, and their abundance and potential as therapeutic targets has been realized. In the light of the growing interest in this emerging field the present review focuses on the classification, structure, function and mechanism of inactive enzymes. Examples of how inactivity is defined, how this is reflected in the structure, functions of inactive enzymes in biological processes and their mode of action are discussed.

  11. Analyzing Pseudophosphatase Function.

    PubMed

    Hinton, Shantá D

    2016-01-01

    Pseudophosphatases regulate signal transduction cascades, but their mechanisms of action remain enigmatic. Reflecting this mystery, the prototypical pseudophosphatase STYX (phospho-serine-threonine/tyrosine-binding protein) was named with allusion to the river of the dead in Greek mythology to emphasize that these molecules are "dead" phosphatases. Although proteins with STYX domains do not catalyze dephosphorylation, this in no way precludes their having other functions as integral elements of signaling networks. Thus, understanding their roles in signaling pathways may mark them as potential novel drug targets. This chapter outlines common strategies used to characterize the functions of pseudophosphatases, using as an example MK-STYX [mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phospho-serine-threonine/tyrosine binding], which has been linked to tumorigenesis, apoptosis, and neuronal differentiation. We start with the importance of "restoring" (when possible) phosphatase activity in a pseudophosphatase so that the active mutant may be used as a comparison control throughout immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry analyses. To this end, we provide protocols for site-directed mutagenesis, mammalian cell transfection, co-immunoprecipitation, phosphatase activity assays, and immunoblotting that we have used to investigate MK-STYX and the active mutant MK-STYXactive. We also highlight the importance of utilizing RNA interference (RNAi) "knockdown" technology to determine a cellular phenotype in various cell lines. Therefore, we outline our protocols for introducing short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression plasmids into mammalians cells and quantifying knockdown of gene expression with real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). A combination of cellular, molecular, biochemical, and proteomic techniques has served as powerful tools in identifying novel functions of the pseudophosphatase MK-STYX. Likewise, the information provided here should be a helpful guide to elucidating the

  12. Executive Functioning in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Orellana, Gricel; Slachevsky, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The executive function (EF) is a set of abilities, which allows us to invoke voluntary control of our behavioral responses. These functions enable human beings to develop and carry out plans, make up analogies, obey social rules, solve problems, adapt to unexpected circumstances, do many tasks simultaneously, and locate episodes in time and place. EF includes divided attention and sustained attention, working memory (WM), set-shifting, flexibility, planning, and the regulation of goal directed behavior and can be defined as a brain function underlying the human faculty to act or think not only in reaction to external events but also in relation with internal goals and states. EF is mostly associated with dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (PFC). Besides EF, PFC is involved in self-regulation of behavior, i.e., the ability to regulate behavior according to internal goals and constraints, particularly in less structured situations. Self-regulation of behavior is subtended by ventral medial/orbital PFC. Impairment of EF is one of the most commonly observed deficits in schizophrenia through the various disease stages. Impairment in tasks measuring conceptualization, planning, cognitive flexibility, verbal fluency, ability to solve complex problems, and WM occur in schizophrenia. Disorders detected by executive tests are consistent with evidence from functional neuroimaging, which have shown PFC dysfunction in patients while performing these kinds of tasks. Schizophrenics also exhibit deficit in odor identifying, decision-making, and self-regulation of behavior suggesting dysfunction of the orbital PFC. However, impairment in executive tests is explained by dysfunction of prefronto-striato-thalamic, prefronto-parietal, and prefronto-temporal neural networks mainly. Disorders in EFs may be considered central facts with respect to schizophrenia and it has been suggested that negative symptoms may be explained by that executive dysfunction. PMID:23805107

  13. Vestibular Function Measurement Devices

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Richard D.; Zapala, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Vestibular function laboratories utilize a multitude of diagnostic instruments to evaluate a dizzy patient. Caloric irrigators, oculomotor stimuli, and rotational chairs produce a stimulus whose accuracy is required for the patient response to be accurate. Careful attention to everything from cleanliness of equipment to threshold adjustments determine on a daily basis if patient data are going to be correct and useful. Instrumentation specifications that change with time such as speed and temperature must periodically be checked using calibrated instruments. PMID:27516710

  14. Analyzing Pseudophosphatase Function.

    PubMed

    Hinton, Shantá D

    2016-01-01

    Pseudophosphatases regulate signal transduction cascades, but their mechanisms of action remain enigmatic. Reflecting this mystery, the prototypical pseudophosphatase STYX (phospho-serine-threonine/tyrosine-binding protein) was named with allusion to the river of the dead in Greek mythology to emphasize that these molecules are "dead" phosphatases. Although proteins with STYX domains do not catalyze dephosphorylation, this in no way precludes their having other functions as integral elements of signaling networks. Thus, understanding their roles in signaling pathways may mark them as potential novel drug targets. This chapter outlines common strategies used to characterize the functions of pseudophosphatases, using as an example MK-STYX [mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phospho-serine-threonine/tyrosine binding], which has been linked to tumorigenesis, apoptosis, and neuronal differentiation. We start with the importance of "restoring" (when possible) phosphatase activity in a pseudophosphatase so that the active mutant may be used as a comparison control throughout immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry analyses. To this end, we provide protocols for site-directed mutagenesis, mammalian cell transfection, co-immunoprecipitation, phosphatase activity assays, and immunoblotting that we have used to investigate MK-STYX and the active mutant MK-STYXactive. We also highlight the importance of utilizing RNA interference (RNAi) "knockdown" technology to determine a cellular phenotype in various cell lines. Therefore, we outline our protocols for introducing short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression plasmids into mammalians cells and quantifying knockdown of gene expression with real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). A combination of cellular, molecular, biochemical, and proteomic techniques has served as powerful tools in identifying novel functions of the pseudophosphatase MK-STYX. Likewise, the information provided here should be a helpful guide to elucidating the

  15. [Functional secondary megaduodenum].

    PubMed

    Vasile, I; Vilcea, D; Mogoş, D; Teodorescu, M; Păun, I; Iacob, T; Marinescu, Sidonia; Dragomir, T; Florescu, M

    2003-01-01

    This paper aim is to present the case of a 72 year old male, diagnosed with functional secondary megaduodenum. We intend to discuss the pathogenic and positive diagnostic difficulties (the presence or absence of a mechanical obstructive factor or the participated of the megaduodenum in an intestinal pseudo-obstruction syndrome). Also we outline the rare frequency of this disease and especially the therapeutic difficulties: inefficiency of conservatory treatment, delicate problems of surgical tactics and technique.

  16. Functional group analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.T. Jr.; Patterson, J.M.

    1986-04-01

    Analytical methods for functional group analysis are reviewed. Literature reviewed is from the period of December 1983 through November 1985 and presents methods for determining the following compounds: acids, acid halides, active hydrogen, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, amides, amines, amino acids, anhydrides, aromatic hydrocarbons, azo compounds, carbohydrates, chloramines, esters, ethers, halogen compounds, hydrazines, isothiocyanates, nitro compounds, nitroso compounds, organometallic compounds, oxiranes, peroxides, phenols, phosphorus compounds, quinones, silicon compounds, sulfates, sulfonyl chlorides, thioamides, thiols, and thiosemicarbazones. 150 references.

  17. Functional ingredients from microalgae.

    PubMed

    Buono, Silvia; Langellotti, Antonio Luca; Martello, Anna; Rinna, Francesca; Fogliano, Vincenzo

    2014-08-01

    A wide variety of natural sources are under investigation to evaluate their possible use for new functional ingredient formulation. Some records attested the traditional and ancient use of wild harvested microalgae as human food but their cultivation for different purposes started about 40 years ago. The most popular species are Arthrospira (traditional name, Spirulina), Chlorella spp., Dunaliella spp. and Haematococcus spp. Microalgae provide a bewildering array of opportunities to develop healthier food products using innovative approaches and a number of different strategies. Compared to other natural sources of bioactive ingredients, microalgae have many advantages such as their huge biodiversity, the possibility to grow in arid land and with limited fresh water consumption and the flexibility of their metabolism, which could be adapted to produce specific molecules. All these factors led to very sustainable production making microalgae eligible as one of the most promising foods for the future, particularly as source of proteins, lipids and phytochemicals. In this work, a revision of the knowledge about the use of microalgae as food and as a source of functional ingredients has been performed. The most interesting results in the field are presented and commented upon, focusing on the different species of microalgae and the activity of the nutritionally relevant compounds. A summary of the health effects obtained together with pros and cons in the adoption of this natural source as functional food ingredients is also proposed. PMID:24957182

  18. Functional Hemodynamic Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Pinsky, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Functional hemodynamic monitoring is the assessment of the dynamic interactions of hemodynamic variables in response to a defined perturbation. Dynamic tissue O2 saturation (StO2) responses to complete stop flow conditions (vascular occlusion test), which can be created by measuring hand StO2 and occluding flow with a blood pressure cuff, assesses cardiovascular sufficiency and microcirculatory blood flow distribution. Recent interest in functional hemodynamic monitoring for the bedside assessment of cardiovascular insufficiency has heightened with the documentation of its accuracy in predicting volume responsiveness using a wide variety of monitoring devices both invasive and non-invasive and across multiple patient groups and clinical conditions. Accordingly, fluid responsiveness can be predicted in a quantities fashion by measuring as arterial pulse pressure variation, left ventricular stroke volume variation or their surrogates during positive pressure breathing or the change in cardiac output response to a passive leg raising maneuver. However, volume responsiveness, though important, reflects only part of the overall spectrum of functional physiological variables that can be measured to define physiologic state and monitor response to therapy. PMID:25435480

  19. A Generalized Wall Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Povinelli, Louis A.; Liu, Nan-Suey; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Lumley, J. L.

    1999-01-01

    The asymptotic solutions, described by Tennekes and Lumley (1972), for surface flows in a channel, pipe or boundary layer at large Reynolds numbers are revisited. These solutions can be extended to more complex flows such as the flows with various pressure gradients, zero wall stress and rough surfaces, etc. In computational fluid dynamics (CFD), these solutions can be used as the boundary conditions to bridge the near-wall region of turbulent flows so that there is no need to have the fine grids near the wall unless the near-wall flow structures are required to resolve. These solutions are referred to as the wall functions. Furthermore, a generalized and unified law of the wall which is valid for whole surface layer (including viscous sublayer, buffer layer and inertial sublayer) is analytically constructed. The generalized law of the wall shows that the effect of both adverse and favorable pressure gradients on the surface flow is very significant. Such as unified wall function will be useful not only in deriving analytic expressions for surface flow properties but also bringing a great convenience for CFD methods to place accurate boundary conditions at any location away from the wall. The extended wall functions introduced in this paper can be used for complex flows with acceleration, deceleration, separation, recirculation and rough surfaces.

  20. Functional neuropeptidomics in invertebrates.

    PubMed

    De Haes, Wouter; Van Sinay, Elien; Detienne, Giel; Temmerman, Liesbet; Schoofs, Liliane; Boonen, Kurt

    2015-07-01

    Neuropeptides are key messengers in almost all physiological processes. They originate from larger precursors and are extensively processed to become bioactive. Neuropeptidomics aims to comprehensively identify the collection of neuropeptides in an organism, organ, tissue or cell. The neuropeptidome of several invertebrates is thoroughly explored since they are important model organisms (and models for human diseases), disease vectors and pest species. The charting of the neuropeptidome is the first step towards understanding peptidergic signaling. This review will first discuss the latest developments in exploring the neuropeptidome. The physiological roles and modes of action of neuropeptides can be explored in two ways, which are largely orthogonal and therefore complementary. The first way consists of inferring the functions of neuropeptides by a forward approach where neuropeptide profiles are compared under different physiological conditions. Second is the reverse approach were neuropeptide collections are used to screen for receptor-binding. This is followed by localization studies and functional tests. This review will focus on how these different functional screening methods contributed to the field of invertebrate neuropeptidomics and expanded our knowledge of peptidergic signaling. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuroproteomics: Applications in Neuroscience and Neurology.

  1. Functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Buchbinder, Bradley R

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) maps the spatiotemporal distribution of neural activity in the brain under varying cognitive conditions. Since its inception in 1991, blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI has rapidly become a vital methodology in basic and applied neuroscience research. In the clinical realm, it has become an established tool for presurgical functional brain mapping. This chapter has three principal aims. First, we review key physiologic, biophysical, and methodologic principles that underlie BOLD fMRI, regardless of its particular area of application. These principles inform a nuanced interpretation of the BOLD fMRI signal, along with its neurophysiologic significance and pitfalls. Second, we illustrate the clinical application of task-based fMRI to presurgical motor, language, and memory mapping in patients with lesions near eloquent brain areas. Integration of BOLD fMRI and diffusion tensor white-matter tractography provides a road map for presurgical planning and intraoperative navigation that helps to maximize the extent of lesion resection while minimizing the risk of postoperative neurologic deficits. Finally, we highlight several basic principles of resting-state fMRI and its emerging translational clinical applications. Resting-state fMRI represents an important paradigm shift, focusing attention on functional connectivity within intrinsic cognitive networks. PMID:27432660

  2. Development of Functional Foods

    PubMed Central

    MITSUOKA, Tomotari

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in intestinal microbiota research are the background for the appearance of functional foods. Lactic fermentation products are included in the functional foods and classified into 3 groups based on their mechanisms of action: probiotics, prebiotics and biogenics. Probiotics are viable microorganisms, such as lactobacilli and bifidobacteria, that beneficially affect the host by improving the intestinal bacterial balance. Prebiotics are nondigestible food ingredients, such as oligosaccharides and dietary fiber, that beneficially affect the host by selectively stimulating the growth or activities of beneficial intestinal bacteria in the colon and thus improve the health of the hosts. Biogenics are biologically active peptides, including immunopotentiators (biological response modifier: BRM), plant flavonoids, etc. They act directly or indirectly through modulation of intestinal microbiota on the health of the hosts. Thus, functional foods enhance bioregulation such as stresses, appetite and absorption; biodefence, such as immunity and suppression of allergies; prevent diseases, including diarrhea, constipation, cancer, cholesterolemia and diabetes; and suppress aging through immunostimulation as well as suppression of mutagenesis, carcinogenesis, oxidation processes, intestinal putrefaction, and cholesterolemia. PMID:25032085

  3. Thyroid function and obesity.

    PubMed

    Laurberg, Peter; Knudsen, Nils; Andersen, Stig; Carlé, Allan; Pedersen, Inge Bülow; Karmisholt, Jesper

    2012-10-01

    Important interaction exists between thyroid function, weight control, and obesity. Several mechanisms seem to be involved, and in studies of groups of people the pattern of thyroid function tests depends on the balance of obesity and underlying thyroid disease in the cohort studied. Obese people with a normal thyroid gland tend to have activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis with higher serum TSH and thyroid hormones in serum. On the other hand, small differences in thyroid function are associated with up to 5 kg difference in body weight. The weight loss after therapy of overt hypothyroidism is caused by excretion of water bound in tissues (myxoedema). Many patients treated for hyperthyroidism experience a gain of more weight than they lost during the active phase of the disease. The mechanism for this excessive weight gain has not been fully elucidated. New studies on the relation between L-T3 therapy and weight control are discussed. The interaction between weight control and therapy of thyroid disease is important to many patients and it should be studied in more detail. PMID:24783015

  4. Carbasugars: Synthesis and Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yoshiyuki

    It is well recognized that glycosidase inhibitors are not only tools to elucidate the mechanism of a living system manipulated by glycoconjugates but also potential clinical drugs and insecticides by inducing the failure of glycoconjugates to perform their function. In this chapter, the syntheses and functions of natural glycosidase inhibitors (cyclophelitol , allosamidine , and trehazoilin ), which possess highly oxygenated and functionalized cyclohexanes or cyclopentanes in their structures and are defined as carbasugars , and the structure and activity relationships (SAR) of their derivatives are described. Also, recently much attention has been focused on neuraminidase inhibitors as anti-influenza drugs since relenza , which was derived from sialic acid, and also, tamiflu , which is the artificial carbasugar designed as a transition state analogue in the hydrolysis pathway of substrates by neuraminidase, were launched in the market. Herein, the medicinal chemistry efforts to discover tamiflu and some efficient syntheses applicable to process chemistry are described. Finally, useful synthetic methodologies for carbasugar formation from sugars are also introduced in this chapter.

  5. Lymphocyte Functions in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellis, Neal R.; Risin, Diane; Sundaresan, A.; Cooper, D.; Dawson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    To understand the mechanism of immunity impairment in space it is important to analyze the direct effects of space-related conditions on different lymphocytes functions. Since 1992, we are investigating the effect of modeled and true microgravity (MG) on numerous lymphocyte functions. We had shown that modeled (MMG) and true microgravity inhibit lymphocyte locomotion through type I collagen. Modeled microgravity also suppresses polyclonal and antigen-specific lymphocyte activation. Polyclonal activation of lymphocytes prior to exposure to MMG abrogates the MG-induced inhibition of lymphocyte locomotion. The relationship between activation deficits and the loss of locomotion in MG was investigated using PKC activation by phorbol ester (PMA) and calcium ionophore (ionomycin). Direct activation of PKC by PMA substantially restored the MMG-inhibited lymphocyte locomotion and PHA-induced lymphocyte activation lonomycin by itself did not restore either locomotion or activation of the lymphocytes, indicating that these changes are not related to the impairment in the calcium flux in MMG. Treatment of lymphocytes with PMA before exposure to MMG prevented the loss of locomotion. It was observed that DNA synthesis is not necessary for restoration of locomotion since mitomicin C treated and untreated cells recovered their locomotion to the same level after PKC activation. Our recent data indicate that microgravity may selectively effect the expression of novel Ca2+ independent isoforms of PKC, in particularly PKC sigma and delta. This provides a new insight in understanding of the mechanisms of MG-sensitive cellular functions.

  6. Functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Buchbinder, Bradley R

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) maps the spatiotemporal distribution of neural activity in the brain under varying cognitive conditions. Since its inception in 1991, blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI has rapidly become a vital methodology in basic and applied neuroscience research. In the clinical realm, it has become an established tool for presurgical functional brain mapping. This chapter has three principal aims. First, we review key physiologic, biophysical, and methodologic principles that underlie BOLD fMRI, regardless of its particular area of application. These principles inform a nuanced interpretation of the BOLD fMRI signal, along with its neurophysiologic significance and pitfalls. Second, we illustrate the clinical application of task-based fMRI to presurgical motor, language, and memory mapping in patients with lesions near eloquent brain areas. Integration of BOLD fMRI and diffusion tensor white-matter tractography provides a road map for presurgical planning and intraoperative navigation that helps to maximize the extent of lesion resection while minimizing the risk of postoperative neurologic deficits. Finally, we highlight several basic principles of resting-state fMRI and its emerging translational clinical applications. Resting-state fMRI represents an important paradigm shift, focusing attention on functional connectivity within intrinsic cognitive networks.

  7. Functionalized Amorphous Aluminosilicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesgar, Milad

    Alkali treated aluminosilicate (geopolymer) was functionalized by surfactant to increase the hydrophobicity for making Pickering emulsion for the first part of this work. In the first part of this study, alkali treated metakaolin was functionalized with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide ((C16H33)N(CH 3)3Br, CTAB). The electrostatic interaction between this quaternary ammonium and the surface of the aluminosilicate which has negative charge has taken place. The particles then were used to prepare Pickering emulsion. The resulting stable dispersions, obtained very fast at very simple conditions with low ratio of aluminosilicate to liquid phase. In the second part, the interaction between geopolymer and glycerol was studied to see the covalent grafting of the geopolymer for making geopolymer composite. The composite material would be the basis material to be used as support catalyst, thin coating reagent and flame retardant material and so on, Variety of techniques, Thermogravimetric (TGA), Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE), FTIR, Solid state NMR, Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), BET surface area, Elemental analysis (CHN), TEM, SEM and Optical microscopy were used to characterize the functionalized geopolymer.

  8. [Visuospatial functions and prematurity].

    PubMed

    Miranda-Herrero, M C; Pascual-Pascual, S I; Barredo-Valderrama, E; Vazquez-Lopez, M; de Castro-De Castro, P

    2014-11-01

    Visuospatial functions are very important in learning process and development of abstract thought during childhood. Several studies show that preterm and low birth weight infants obtain lower scores in test that assess cognitive functions, specially in the first year of life. These differences are attenuated over time, but a developmental delay that affects working memory and visuospatial process still persists. It is unclear what factors are involved in development of these functions, and pre- or perinatal factors may interfere with the proper conduct of the same, but have been described anatomical and physiological differences between the preterm and term brain that could explain somewhere in these alterations. The different selective vulnerability to hypoxia between immature brain in which preoligodendrocytes and subplate neurons predominate, and mature brain, determine differences in the pattern of injury from hypoxia with greater involvement of the periventricular white matter in preterm children. This lesional pattern leaves to a dysfunction in attentional and visuospatial process, due to the increased vulnerability of the regions involved in the dorsal pathway of visual processing.

  9. Lutein and Brain Function

    PubMed Central

    Erdman, John W.; Smith, Joshua W.; Kuchan, Matthew J.; Mohn, Emily S.; Johnson, Elizabeth J.; Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Wang, Lin; Sweedler, Jonathan V.; Neuringer, Martha

    2015-01-01

    Lutein is one of the most prevalent carotenoids in nature and in the human diet. Together with zeaxanthin, it is highly concentrated as macular pigment in the foveal retina of primates, attenuating blue light exposure, providing protection from photo-oxidation and enhancing visual performance. Recently, interest in lutein has expanded beyond the retina to its possible contributions to brain development and function. Only primates accumulate lutein within the brain, but little is known about its distribution or physiological role. Our team has begun to utilize the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) model to study the uptake and bio-localization of lutein in the brain. Our overall goal has been to assess the association of lutein localization with brain function. In this review, we will first cover the evolution of the non-human primate model for lutein and brain studies, discuss prior association studies of lutein with retina and brain function, and review approaches that can be used to localize brain lutein. We also describe our approach to the biosynthesis of 13C-lutein, which will allow investigation of lutein flux, localization, metabolism and pharmacokinetics. Lastly, we describe potential future research opportunities. PMID:26566524

  10. Functions of multivector variables.

    PubMed

    Chappell, James M; Iqbal, Azhar; Gunn, Lachlan J; Abbott, Derek

    2015-01-01

    As is well known, the common elementary functions defined over the real numbers can be generalized to act not only over the complex number field but also over the skew (non-commuting) field of the quaternions. In this paper, we detail a number of elementary functions extended to act over the skew field of Clifford multivectors, in both two and three dimensions. Complex numbers, quaternions and Cartesian vectors can be described by the various components within a Clifford multivector and from our results we are able to demonstrate new inter-relationships between these algebraic systems. One key relationship that we discover is that a complex number raised to a vector power produces a quaternion thus combining these systems within a single equation. We also find a single formula that produces the square root, amplitude and inverse of a multivector over one, two and three dimensions. Finally, comparing the functions over different dimension we observe that Cl(R(3)) provides a particularly versatile algebraic framework. PMID:25774689

  11. Development of functional foods.

    PubMed

    Mitsuoka, Tomotari

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in intestinal microbiota research are the background for the appearance of functional foods. Lactic fermentation products are included in the functional foods and classified into 3 groups based on their mechanisms of action: probiotics, prebiotics and biogenics. Probiotics are viable microorganisms, such as lactobacilli and bifidobacteria, that beneficially affect the host by improving the intestinal bacterial balance. Prebiotics are nondigestible food ingredients, such as oligosaccharides and dietary fiber, that beneficially affect the host by selectively stimulating the growth or activities of beneficial intestinal bacteria in the colon and thus improve the health of the hosts. Biogenics are biologically active peptides, including immunopotentiators (biological response modifier: BRM), plant flavonoids, etc. They act directly or indirectly through modulation of intestinal microbiota on the health of the hosts. Thus, functional foods enhance bioregulation such as stresses, appetite and absorption; biodefence, such as immunity and suppression of allergies; prevent diseases, including diarrhea, constipation, cancer, cholesterolemia and diabetes; and suppress aging through immunostimulation as well as suppression of mutagenesis, carcinogenesis, oxidation processes, intestinal putrefaction, and cholesterolemia. PMID:25032085

  12. Pediatric Arm Function Test

    PubMed Central

    Uswatte, Gitendra; Taub, Edward; Griffin, Angi; Rowe, Jan; Vogtle, Laura; Barman, Joydip

    2012-01-01

    Objective Although there are several validated upper-extremity measures in young children with cerebral palsy (CP), none primarily assess capacity to carry out actions and tasks with the more-affected arm. To address this need, we developed the Pediatric Arm Function Test (PAFT), which involves behavioral observation of how children use their more-affected arm during structured play in the laboratory or clinic. This paper evaluates the reliability and validity of the PAFT Functional Ability scale. Design In Study 1, 20 children between 2–8 years with a wide range of upper-extremity hemiparesis due to CP completed the PAFT on two occasions separated by three weeks. In Study 2, 41 children between 2–6 years with similar characteristics completed the PAFT and received a grade reflecting severity of more-affected arm motor impairment. Results In Study 1, the PAFT test-retest reliability correlation coefficient was 0.74. In Study 2, convergent validity was supported by a strong, inverse correlation (r = −0.6, p < .001) between PAFT scores and grade of impairment. Conclusions The PAFT Functional Ability scale is a reliable and valid measure of more-affected arm motor capacity in children with CP between 2–6 years. It can be employed to measure upper-extremity neurorehabilitation outcome. PMID:23103486

  13. Functional ingredients from microalgae.

    PubMed

    Buono, Silvia; Langellotti, Antonio Luca; Martello, Anna; Rinna, Francesca; Fogliano, Vincenzo

    2014-08-01

    A wide variety of natural sources are under investigation to evaluate their possible use for new functional ingredient formulation. Some records attested the traditional and ancient use of wild harvested microalgae as human food but their cultivation for different purposes started about 40 years ago. The most popular species are Arthrospira (traditional name, Spirulina), Chlorella spp., Dunaliella spp. and Haematococcus spp. Microalgae provide a bewildering array of opportunities to develop healthier food products using innovative approaches and a number of different strategies. Compared to other natural sources of bioactive ingredients, microalgae have many advantages such as their huge biodiversity, the possibility to grow in arid land and with limited fresh water consumption and the flexibility of their metabolism, which could be adapted to produce specific molecules. All these factors led to very sustainable production making microalgae eligible as one of the most promising foods for the future, particularly as source of proteins, lipids and phytochemicals. In this work, a revision of the knowledge about the use of microalgae as food and as a source of functional ingredients has been performed. The most interesting results in the field are presented and commented upon, focusing on the different species of microalgae and the activity of the nutritionally relevant compounds. A summary of the health effects obtained together with pros and cons in the adoption of this natural source as functional food ingredients is also proposed.

  14. Galaxy cosmological mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Amanda R.; Iribarrem, Alvaro; Ribeiro, Marcelo B.; Stoeger, William R.

    2014-12-01

    Aims: This paper studies the galaxy cosmological mass function (GCMF) in a semi-empirical relativistic approach that uses observational data provided by recent galaxy redshift surveys. Methods: Starting from a previously presented relation between the mass-to-light ratio, the selection function obtained from the luminosity function (LF) data and the luminosity density, the average luminosity L, and the average galactic mass ℳg were computed in terms of the redshift. ℳg was also alternatively estimated by means of a method that uses the galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF). Comparison of these two forms of deriving the average galactic mass allowed us to infer a possible bias introduced by the selection criteria of the survey. We used the FORS Deep Field galaxy survey sample of 5558 galaxies in the redshift range 0.5 function, but whose fitted parameter values are different from the values found in the literature for the GSMF. Conclusions: This GCMF behavior follows the theoretical predictions from the cold dark matter models in which the less massive objects form first, followed later by more massive ones. In the range 0.5

  15. Analytical determination of thermal conductivity of W-UO2 and W-UN CERMET nuclear fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Jonathan A.; Charit, Indrajit

    2012-08-01

    The thermal conductivity of tungsten based CERMET fuels containing UO2 and UN fuel particles are determined as a function of particle geometry, stabilizer fraction and fuel-volume fraction, by using a combination of an analytical approach and experimental data collected from literature. Thermal conductivity is estimated using the Bruggeman-Fricke model. This study demonstrates that thermal conductivities of various CERMET fuels can be analytically predicted to values that are very close to the experimentally determined ones.

  16. G-identities of non-associative algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhturin, Yu A; Zaitsev, M V; Sehgal, S K

    1999-12-31

    The main class of algebras considered in this paper is the class of algebras of Lie type. This class includes, in particular, associative algebras, Lie algebras and superalgebras, Leibniz algebras, quantum Lie algebras, and many others. We prove that if a finite group G acts on such an algebra A by automorphisms and anti-automorphisms and A satisfies an essential G-identity, then A satisfies an ordinary identity of degree bounded by a function that depends on the degree of the original identity and the order of G. We show in the case of ordinary Lie algebras that if L is a Lie algebra, a finite group G acts on L by automorphisms and anti-automorphisms, and the order of G is coprime to the characteristic of the field, then the existence of an identity on skew-symmetric elements implies the existence of an identity on the whole of L, with the same kind of dependence between the degrees of the identities. Finally, we generalize Amitsur's theorem on polynomial identities in associative algebras with involution to the case of alternative algebras with involution.

  17. [Functional pathophysiology of consciousness].

    PubMed

    Jellinger, Kurt A

    2009-01-01

    Consciousness (Latin conscientia "moral conscience"), according to the English philosopher John Locke (1632-1704) [103], is the awareness of all that occurs in the mind of a person, whereas the American philosopher John Searle (2000) defined it as "inner qualitative, subjective states and processes of awareness". In modern science it is defined as a continuous state of full awareness of the Self and one's relationship to the external and internal environment, describing the degree of wakefulness in which an organism recognizes stimuli. This widely discussed biological term for complex neuronal processes that allow an individuum to recognize itself and its environment and to act accordingly, has been and still is the subject of much research in philosophy and natural/neuroscience. Its definition is often used for awareness and recognition, too. While the Egyptians in the papyrus Edwin Smith already recognized the brain as the seat of consciousness, René Descartes (1644 [36]) believed its special structure should be "a small gland in the middle", but the anatomical structures and physiological processes involved in consciousness were elucidated only in the middle of the 20th century. Neuronal substrates include several functional networks that are hierarchically organized and cooperate functionally. The lowest level is the mesencephalic formatio reticularis and its projections to the thalamus that were identified als ascending reticular system (ARAS) by the classical experiments of Moruzzi and Magoun, whereas later analyses of patients with impaired consciousness provided further insights. The mesencephalic ARAS as motor of the function of higher structures projects 1. via the reticular thalamus diffusely to the cortex, 2. via hypothalamus to the basal forebrain and limbic system, and 3. to the medial raphe of the brainstem and locus coeruleus and their diffuse cortical projections. The reticular system is stimulated directly and indirectly via numerous collaterals

  18. [Functional pathophysiology of consciousness].

    PubMed

    Jellinger, Kurt A

    2009-01-01

    Consciousness (Latin conscientia "moral conscience"), according to the English philosopher John Locke (1632-1704) [103], is the awareness of all that occurs in the mind of a person, whereas the American philosopher John Searle (2000) defined it as "inner qualitative, subjective states and processes of awareness". In modern science it is defined as a continuous state of full awareness of the Self and one's relationship to the external and internal environment, describing the degree of wakefulness in which an organism recognizes stimuli. This widely discussed biological term for complex neuronal processes that allow an individuum to recognize itself and its environment and to act accordingly, has been and still is the subject of much research in philosophy and natural/neuroscience. Its definition is often used for awareness and recognition, too. While the Egyptians in the papyrus Edwin Smith already recognized the brain as the seat of consciousness, René Descartes (1644 [36]) believed its special structure should be "a small gland in the middle", but the anatomical structures and physiological processes involved in consciousness were elucidated only in the middle of the 20th century. Neuronal substrates include several functional networks that are hierarchically organized and cooperate functionally. The lowest level is the mesencephalic formatio reticularis and its projections to the thalamus that were identified als ascending reticular system (ARAS) by the classical experiments of Moruzzi and Magoun, whereas later analyses of patients with impaired consciousness provided further insights. The mesencephalic ARAS as motor of the function of higher structures projects 1. via the reticular thalamus diffusely to the cortex, 2. via hypothalamus to the basal forebrain and limbic system, and 3. to the medial raphe of the brainstem and locus coeruleus and their diffuse cortical projections. The reticular system is stimulated directly and indirectly via numerous collaterals

  19. Generating functionals for Green's functions in gauge field theories

    SciTech Connect

    Bordag, M.; Kaschlun, L.; Matveev, V.A.; Robaschik, D.

    1987-09-01

    The structure of the generating functional of the one-particle-irreducible Green's functions in gauge field theories is investigated. Both axial as well as covariant gauge conditions are considered. For both cases, the general structure of the functionals is obtained, and a functional expansion with respect to nonlocal operators is given. The appearance of gauge-dependent operators in the case of the covariant gauge follows in a natural manner from the structure of the corresponding functional.

  20. Functional Brain Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this analysis is to review a spectrum of functional brain imaging technologies to identify whether there are any imaging modalities that are more effective than others for various brain pathology conditions. This evidence-based analysis reviews magnetoencephalography (MEG), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), positron emission tomography (PET), and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for the diagnosis or surgical management of the following conditions: Alzheimer’s disease (AD), brain tumours, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis (MS), and Parkinson’s disease (PD). Clinical Need: Target Population and Condition Alzheimer’s disease is a progressive, degenerative, neurologic condition characterized by cognitive impairment and memory loss. The Canadian Study on Health and Aging estimated that there will be 97,000 incident cases (about 60,000 women) of dementia (including AD) in Canada in 2006. In Ontario, there will be an estimated 950 new cases and 580 deaths due to brain cancer in 2006. Treatments for brain tumours include surgery and radiation therapy. However, one of the limitations of radiation therapy is that it damages tissue though necrosis and scarring. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may not distinguish between radiation effects and resistant tissue, creating a potential role for functional brain imaging. Epilepsy is a chronic disorder that provokes repetitive seizures. In Ontario, the rate of epilepsy is estimated to be 5 cases per 1,000 people. Most people with epilepsy are effectively managed with drug therapy; but about 50% do not respond to drug therapy. Surgical resection of the seizure foci may be considered in these patients, and functional brain imaging may play a role in localizing the seizure foci. Multiple sclerosis is a progressive, inflammatory, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). The cause of MS is unknown; however, it is thought to be

  1. Bioinspired, functional nanoscale materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, In-Kook

    Functional nanomaterials in nature exhibit many unique functions and optical and mechanical properties. Examples of this include the dry adhesion of a gecko's foot, the reduced drag on a shark's skin, the high strength and toughness of nacre, and the superhydrophobic self-cleaning of a lotus leaf. This dissertation is devoted to creating unique and enhanced properties by mimicking such functional materials. We have developed a novel self-pumping membrane, which does not require an applied voltage. The self-pumping membrane harvests chemical energy from a surrounding fluid and uses it for accelerated mass transport across the membrane. A device such as this has promising applications in implantable or remotely operating autonomous devices and membrane-based purification systems. Reproducible and highly active surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates were developed using a bottom-up self-assembly technology. With their high sensitivity and good reproducibility, the developed nanostructures (gold nanoparticle and nanohole arrays) as SERS substrates are very promising for applications such as ultra-sensitive detectors for chemicals and reproducible sensors for chemical and biological molecules. Binary colloidal crystals were created using a simple, fast, and scalable spin-coating technology. Although further investigation of the procedure is needed to improve the ordering of particles in the individual layers, the developed assembly technology has a promising outlook in applications such as optical integrated circuits and high-speed optical computing. Inorganic-organic nanocomposites were realized by assembling synthesized gibbsite nanoplatelets using the electrophoretic deposition and infiltration of a monomer followed by polymerization. Via surface modifications of gibbsite nanoplatelets, nanocomposites were further reinforced with covalent linkages between the inorganic platelets and organic matrix.

  2. Perioperative functional residual capacity.

    PubMed

    Wahba, R W

    1991-04-01

    The literature dealing with the magnitude, mechanism and effects of reduced FRC in the perioperative period is reviewed. During general anaesthesia FRC is reduced by approximately 20%. The reduction is greater in the obese and in patients with COPD. The most likely mechanism is the loss of inspiratory muscle tone of the muscles acting on the rib cage. Gas trapping is an additional mechanism. Lung compliance decreases and airways resistance increases, in large part, due to decreased FRC. The larynx is displaced anteriorly and elongated, making laryngoscopy and intubation more difficult. The change in FRC creates or increases intrapulmonary shunt and areas of low ventilation to perfusion. This is due to the occurrence of compression atelectasis, and to regional changes in mechanics and airway closure which tend to reduce ventilation to dependent lung zones which are still well perfused. Abdominal and thoracic operations tend to increase shunting further. Large tidal volume but not PEEP will improve oxygenation, although both increase FRC. Both FRC and vital capacity are reduced following abdominal and thoracic surgery in a predictable pattern. The mechanism is the combined effect of incisional pain and reflex dysfunction of the diaphragm. Additional effects of thoracic surgery include pleural effusion, cooling of the phrenic nerve and mediastinal widening. Postoperative hypoxaemia is a function of reduced FRC and airway closure. There is no real difference among the various methods of active lung expansion in terms of the speed of restoration of lung function, or in preventing postoperative atelectasis/pneumonia. Epidural analgesia does not influence the rate of recovery of lung function, nor does it prevent atelectasis/pneumonia. PMID:2036700

  3. Bayes multiple decision functions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wensong; Peña, Edsel A

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of simultaneously making many (M) binary decisions based on one realization of a random data matrix X. M is typically large and X will usually have M rows associated with each of the M decisions to make, but for each row the data may be low dimensional. Such problems arise in many practical areas such as the biological and medical sciences, where the available dataset is from microarrays or other high-throughput technology and with the goal being to decide which among of many genes are relevant with respect to some phenotype of interest; in the engineering and reliability sciences; in astronomy; in education; and in business. A Bayesian decision-theoretic approach to this problem is implemented with the overall loss function being a cost-weighted linear combination of Type I and Type II loss functions. The class of loss functions considered allows for use of the false discovery rate (FDR), false nondiscovery rate (FNR), and missed discovery rate (MDR) in assessing the quality of decision. Through this Bayesian paradigm, the Bayes multiple decision function (BMDF) is derived and an efficient algorithm to obtain the optimal Bayes action is described. In contrast to many works in the literature where the rows of the matrix X are assumed to be stochastically independent, we allow a dependent data structure with the associations obtained through a class of frailty-induced Archimedean copulas. In particular, non-Gaussian dependent data structure, which is typical with failure-time data, can be entertained. The numerical implementation of the determination of the Bayes optimal action is facilitated through sequential Monte Carlo techniques. The theory developed could also be extended to the problem of multiple hypotheses testing, multiple classification and prediction, and high-dimensional variable selection. The proposed procedure is illustrated for the simple versus simple hypotheses setting and for the composite hypotheses setting

  4. Design of functional metalloproteins.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi; Yeung, Natasha; Sieracki, Nathan; Marshall, Nicholas M

    2009-08-13

    Metalloproteins catalyse some of the most complex and important processes in nature, such as photosynthesis and water oxidation. An ultimate test of our knowledge of how metalloproteins work is to design new metalloproteins. Doing so not only can reveal hidden structural features that may be missing from studies of native metalloproteins and their variants, but also can result in new metalloenzymes for biotechnological and pharmaceutical applications. Although it is much more challenging to design metalloproteins than non-metalloproteins, much progress has been made in this area, particularly in functional design, owing to recent advances in areas such as computational and structural biology.

  5. Modern vestibular function testing.

    PubMed Central

    Baloh, R W; Furman, J M

    1989-01-01

    Current tests of vestibular function concentrate on the horizontal semicircular canal-ocular reflex because it is the easiest reflex to stimulate (calorically and rotationally) and record (using electro-oculography). Tests of the other vestibulo-ocular reflexes (vertical semicircular canal and otolith) and of the vestibulospinal reflexes have yet to be shown useful in the clinical setting. Digital video recording of eye movements and vestibular-evoked responses are promising new technologies that may affect clinical testing in the near future. PMID:2660408

  6. Functional properties of vinegar.

    PubMed

    Budak, Nilgün H; Aykin, Elif; Seydim, Atif C; Greene, Annel K; Guzel-Seydim, Zeynep B

    2014-05-01

    A variety of natural vinegar products are found in civilizations around the world. A review of research on these fermented products indicates numerous reports of health benefits derived by consumption of vinegar components. Therapeutic effects of vinegar arising from consuming the inherent bioactive components including acetic acid, gallic acid, catechin, ephicatechin, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, and ferulic acid cause antioxidative, antidiabetic, antimicrobial, antitumor, antiobesity, antihypertensive, and cholesterol-lowering responses. The aims of this article are to discuss vinegar history, production, varieties, acetic acid bacteria, and functional properties of vinegars.

  7. Chemically functionalized surface patterning.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaozhu; Boey, Freddy; Huo, Fengwei; Huang, Ling; Zhang, Hua

    2011-08-22

    Patterning substrates with versatile chemical functionalities from micro- to nanometer scale is a long-standing and interesting topic. This review provides an overview of a range of techniques commonly used for surface patterning. The first section briefly introduces conventional micropatterning tools, such as photolithography and microcontact printing. The second section focuses on the currently used nanolithographic techniques, for example, scanning probe lithography (SPL), and their applications in surface patterning. Their advantages and disadvantages are also demonstrated. In the last section, dip-pen nanolithography (DPN) is emphatically illustrated, with a particular stress on the patterning and applications of biomolecules.

  8. Ramanujan's mock theta functions.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Michael; Ono, Ken; Rolen, Larry

    2013-04-01

    In his famous deathbed letter, Ramanujan introduced the notion of a mock theta function, and he offered some alleged examples. Recent work by Zwegers [Zwegers S (2001) Contemp Math 291:268-277 and Zwegers S (2002) PhD thesis (Univ of Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands)] has elucidated the theory encompassing these examples. They are holomorphic parts of special harmonic weak Maass forms. Despite this understanding, little attention has been given to Ramanujan's original definition. Here, we prove that Ramanujan's examples do indeed satisfy his original definition. PMID:23536292

  9. Functional Foods for Women's Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindeman, Alice K.

    2002-01-01

    Describes functional foods for women's health (foods or food ingredients that provide health benefits beyond basic nutrition), explaining that both whole and modified foods can be included as functional foods. The paper discusses the history, regulation, and promotion of functional foods; consumer interest in functional foods; how to incorporate…

  10. A Primer on Functional Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoman, Jerome

    2008-01-01

    This article presents principles and basic steps for practitioners to complete a functional analysis of client behavior. The emphasis is on application of functional analysis to adult mental health clients. The article includes a detailed flow chart containing all major functional diagnoses and behavioral interventions, with functional assessment…

  11. Optogenetic Functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Peter; Fang, Zhongnan; Liu, Jia; Lee, Jin Hyung

    2016-01-01

    The investigation of the functional connectivity of precise neural circuits across the entire intact brain can be achieved through optogenetic functional magnetic resonance imaging (ofMRI), which is a novel technique that combines the relatively high spatial resolution of high-field fMRI with the precision of optogenetic stimulation. Fiber optics that enable delivery of specific wavelengths of light deep into the brain in vivo are implanted into regions of interest in order to specifically stimulate targeted cell types that have been genetically induced to express light-sensitive trans-membrane conductance channels, called opsins. fMRI is used to provide a non-invasive method of determining the brain's global dynamic response to optogenetic stimulation of specific neural circuits through measurement of the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal, which provides an indirect measurement of neuronal activity. This protocol describes the construction of fiber optic implants, the implantation surgeries, the imaging with photostimulation and the data analysis required to successfully perform ofMRI. In summary, the precise stimulation and whole-brain monitoring ability of ofMRI are crucial factors in making ofMRI a powerful tool for the study of the connectomics of the brain in both healthy and diseased states. PMID:27167840

  12. Mifepristone and ovarian function.

    PubMed

    Curry, T E; Nothnick, W B

    1996-06-01

    In summary, RU 486 has been a powerful instrument in delineating progesterone action on the ovary. However, early experiments using RU 486 must be interpreted with the understanding that systemic administration of the antiprogestin may have had extraovarian sites of action, such as at the hypothalamic-pituitary axis or at the adrenal, that in turn led to indirect ovarian responses. Treatment with progesterone, agonist, or antagonist at periods during which the ovary lacks progesterone receptors would further suggest extraovarian sites of action or nongenomic mechanisms of action. Furthermore, the dose of ligand or antagonist administered and the hormonal milieu at the time of administration may dictate the ovarian response (Espey L, personal communication). For example, low doses of exogenous progesterone may elicit a biologic response, whereas high doses are without effect or may inhibit the biologic effect observed at lower doses. Although RU 486 is classically described as an antiprogestin, agonist actions have been observed in addition to its the well documented antiglucocorticoid effects. All of these variables may contribute to the confounding observations of progesterone and RU 486 action on the ovary. Regardless of these caveats, experimental paradigms have demonstrated that RU 486, either indirectly or directly, regulates ovarian folliculogenesis, stimulates and/or inhibits steroidogenesis depending on the species and time of RU 486 administration, inhibits ovulation, and modulates luteal function. These findings supports a progesterone-dependent mechanism in these varied aspects of ovarian function.

  13. Process for functionalizing alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, R. G.; Janowicz, A. H.; Periana-Pillai, R. A.

    1985-04-16

    Process for functionalizing saturated hydrocarbons selectively in the terminal position comprising: (a) reacting said saturated hydrocarbons of the formula: RH where: H represents a hydrogen atom, and R represents a saturated hydrocarbon radical, with a metal complex of the formula: C /SUB p/ RhPMe/sub 3/H/sub 2/ where: C /SUB p/ represents a pentamethylated cyclopentadienyl radical, Rh represents a rhodium atom, P represents a phosphorous atom, Me represents a methyl group, H represents a hydrogen atom, in the presence of ultraviolet radiation at a temperature maintained at about -60/sup 0/ to -17/sup 0/ C. to form a hydridoalkyl complex of the formula: C /SUB p/ RhPMe/sub 3/RH (b) reacting said hydridoalkyl complex with a haloform of the formula: CHX/sub 3/ where: X represents a bromine, iodine or chlorine atom, at a temperature in the range of about -60/sup 0/ to -17/sup 0/ C. to form the corresponding haloalkyl complex of step (a) having the formula: C /SUB p/ RhMe/sub 3/RX; and, (c) reacting said haloalkyl complex formed in (b) with halogen (X/sub 2/) at a temperature in the range of about -60/sup 0/ to 25/sup 0/ C. (i.e. ambient) to form a functional haloalkyl compound.

  14. Functionalism and consciousness.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, S

    1993-01-01

    It is widely held that a mental state and the subject's introspective belief about it are always 'distinct existences' and only contingently connected. This suggests that for each sort of mental state there could be a creature that is introspectively 'blind' with respect to states of that sort, meaning that while it is capable of having such states, and of conceiving of itself as having them, it is totally without introspective access to its states of that sort. It is argued here that introspective blindness with respect to many sorts of mental states, in particular beliefs and sensory states, is not a possibility, because it is incompatible with requirements of rationality that are internal to the functional roles that are constitutive of these states. Introspective accessibility is essential to the functional roles of such mental states when the conceptual and cognitive resources of the subject of those states are sufficiently rich to make beliefs and thoughts about them a possibility. This is a version of the view that such states are necessarily self-intimating and is incompatible with the perceptual model of introspection favoured by some functionalists as well as by many non-functionalists.

  15. Modeling mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Balaban, Robert S

    2006-12-01

    The mitochondrion represents a unique opportunity to apply mathematical modeling to a complex biological system. Understanding mitochondrial function and control is important since this organelle is critical in energy metabolism as well as playing key roles in biochemical synthesis, redox control/signaling, and apoptosis. A mathematical model, or hypothesis, provides several useful insights including a rigorous test of the consensus view of the operation of a biological process as well as providing methods of testing and creating new hypotheses. The advantages of the mitochondrial system for applying a mathematical model include the relative simplicity and understanding of the matrix reactions, the ability to study the mitochondria as a independent contained organelle, and, most importantly, one can dynamically measure many of the internal reaction intermediates, on line. The developing ability to internally monitor events within the metabolic network, rather than just the inflow and outflow, is extremely useful in creating critical bounds on complex mathematical models using the individual reaction mechanisms available. However, many serious problems remain in creating a working model of mitochondrial function including the incomplete definition of metabolic pathways, the uncertainty of using in vitro enzyme kinetics, as well as regulatory data in the intact system and the unknown chemical activities of relevant molecules in the matrix. Despite these formidable limitations, the advantages of the mitochondrial system make it one of the best defined mammalian metabolic networks that can be used as a model system for understanding the application and use of mathematical models to study biological systems.

  16. Process for functionalizing alkanes

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, Robert G.; Janowicz, Andrew H.; Periana, Roy A.

    1988-01-01

    Process for functionalizing saturated hydrocarbons comprising: (a) reacting said saturated hydrocarbons of the formula: R.sub.1 H wherein H represents a hydrogen atom; and R.sub.1 represents a saturated hydrocarbon radical, with a metal complex of the formula: CpRh[P(R.sub.2).sub.3 ]H.sub.2 wherein Cp represents a cyclopentadienyl or alkylcyclopentadienyl radical; Rh represents a rhodium atom; P represents a phosphorus atom; R.sub.2 represents a hydrocarbon radical; H represents a hydrogen atom, in the presence of ultraviolet radiation to form a hydridoalkyl complex of the formula: CpRh[P(R.sub.2).sub.3 ](R.sub.1)H (b) reacting said hydridoalkyl complex with an organic halogenating agent such as a tetrahalomethane or a haloform of the formulas: CX'X''X'''X'''' or CHX'X''X''' wherein X', X'', X'", X"" represent halogens selected from bromine, iodine or chlorine atom, at a temperature in the range of about -60.degree. to -17.degree. C. to form the corresponding haloalkyl complex of step (a) having the formula: CpRhPMe.sub.3 RX; and, (c) reacting said haloalkyl complex formed in (b) with halogen (X.sub.2) at a temperature in the range of about -60.degree. to 25.degree. C. (i.e., ambient) to form a functional haloalkyl compound.

  17. Process for functionalizing alkanes

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, Robert G.; Janowicz, Andrew H.; Periana-Pillai, Roy A.

    1985-01-01

    Process for functionalizing saturated hydrocarbons selectively in the terminal position comprising: (a) reacting said saturated hydrocarbons of the formula: RH where: H represents a hydrogen atom, and R represents a saturated hydrocarbon radical, with a metal complex of the formula: CpRhPMe.sub.3 H.sub.2 where: Cp represents a pentamethylated cyclopentadienyl radical, Rh represents a rhodium atom, P represents a phosphorous atom, Me represents a methyl group, H represents a hydrogen atom, in the presence of ultraviolet radiation at a temperature maintained at about -60.degree. to -17.degree. C. to form a hydridoalkyl complex of the formula: CpRhPMe.sub.3 RH (b) reacting said hydridoalkyl complex with a haloform of the formula: CHX.sub.3 where: X represents a bromine, iodine or chlorine atom, at a temperature in the range of about -60.degree. to -17.degree. C. to form the corresponding haloalkyl complex of step (a) having the formula: CpRhPMe.sub.3 RX; and, (c) reacting said haloalkyl complex formed in (b) with halogen (X.sub.2) at a temperature in the range of about -60.degree. to 25.degree. C. (i.e. ambient) to form a functional haloalkyl compound.

  18. Chitosan functional properties.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, R; Reader, S; Falshaw, A

    1997-06-01

    Chitosan is a partially deacetylated polymer of N-acetyl glucosamine. It is essentially a natural, water-soluble, derivative of cellulose with unique properties. Chitosan is usually prepared from chitin (2 acetamido-2-deoxy beta-1,4-D-glucan) and chitin has been found in a wide range of natural sources (crustaceans, fungi, insects, annelids, molluscs, coelenterata etc.) However chitosan is only manufactured from crustaceans (crab and crayfish) primarily because a large amount of the crustacean exoskeleton is available as a by product of food processing. Squid pens (a waste byproduct of New Zealand squid processing) are a novel, renewable source of chitin and chitosan. Squid pens are currently regarded as waste and so the raw material is relatively cheap. This study was intended to assess the functional properties of squid pen chitosan. Chitosan was extracted from squid pens and assessed for composition, rheology, flocculation, film formation and antimicrobial properties. Crustacean chitosans were also assessed for comparison. Squid chitosan was colourless, had a low ash content and had significantly improved thickening and suspending properties. The flocculation capacity of squid chitosan was low in comparison with the crustacean sourced chitosans. However it should be possible to increase the flocculation capacity of squid pen chitosan by decreasing the degree of acetylation. Films made with squid chitosan were more elastic than crustacean chitosan with improved functional properties. This high quality chitosan could prove particularly suitable for medical/analytical applications.

  19. Mast Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Elaine Zayas Marcelino; Jamur, Maria Célia

    2014-01-01

    Since first described by Paul Ehrlich in 1878, mast cells have been mostly viewed as effectors of allergy. It has been only in the past two decades that mast cells have gained recognition for their involvement in other physiological and pathological processes. Mast cells have a widespread distribution and are found predominantly at the interface between the host and the external environment. Mast cell maturation, phenotype and function are a direct consequence of the local microenvironment and have a marked influence on their ability to specifically recognize and respond to various stimuli through the release of an array of biologically active mediators. These features enable mast cells to act as both first responders in harmful situations as well as to respond to changes in their environment by communicating with a variety of other cells implicated in physiological and immunological responses. Therefore, the critical role of mast cells in both innate and adaptive immunity, including immune tolerance, has gained increased prominence. Conversely, mast cell dysfunction has pointed to these cells as the main offenders in several chronic allergic/inflammatory disorders, cancer and autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes the current knowledge of mast cell function in both normal and pathological conditions with regards to their regulation, phenotype and role. PMID:25062998

  20. [Iron function and carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Akatsuka, Shinya; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2016-07-01

    Though iron is an essential micronutrient for humans, the excess state is acknowledged to be associated with oncogenesis. For example, iron overload in the liver of the patients with hereditary hemocromatosis highly increases the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. Also, as to asbestos-related mesothelioma, such kinds of asbestos with a higher iron content are considered to be more carcinogenic. Iron is a useful element, which enables fundamental functions for life such as oxygen carrying and electron transport. However, in the situation where organisms are unable to have good control of it, iron turns into a dangerous element which catalyzes generation of reactive oxygen. In this review, I first outline the relationships between iron and cancer in general, then give an explanation about iron-related animal carcinogenesis models.

  1. Functional PLC devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takiguchi, Koichi

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports recent advances in photonic functional devices. These devices are being developed for advanced optical networks and are fabricated by using planar lightwave circuit technology. After briefly summarizing the fabrication, properties, and progress of silica based planar lightwave circuits, this work describes lattice-form dynamic devices designed to compensate for unwanted fiber characteristics with respect to high-speed wavelength division multiplexing transmissions. These dynamic devices include adaptive chromatic dispersion, polarization-mode dispersion, and gain non-uniformity compensators. The paper then describes optical signal processing devices for communications use, namely an optical label recognition device, an optical encoder/decoder for time-spreading/wavelength-hopping code division multiple access, and a spectrum synthesis device.

  2. Commentary: freedom and function.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Alec

    2008-01-01

    While the question of whether our actions are determined or are the result of free will is a deep one in philosophy, it does not need to be answered for forensic psychiatrists to give evidence in court. As Stephen Morse has pointed out, the absence of free will is not named as an excusing condition. The insanity defense, for instance, requires proof of functional impairment, to which psychiatrists can usefully testify. Of the approaches available to determinism, my own preference is that of Herbert Hart: until we know that determinism is true, we will continue to prefer a system that requires persons to have made proper choices to act as they did before we hold them responsible. This seems to resemble Dr. Felthous' preferred option, that mentally responsible choices are choices made in the presence of a relatively natural ability to have decided otherwise.

  3. Functional Supramolecular Polymers*

    PubMed Central

    Aida, T.; Meijer, E.W.; Stupp, S.I.

    2012-01-01

    Supramolecular polymers can be random and entangled coils with the mechanical properties of plastics and elastomers, but with great capacity for processability, recycling, and self-healing due to their reversible monomer-to-polymer transitions. At the other extreme, supramolecular polymers can be formed by self-assembly among designed subunits to yield shape-persistent and highly ordered filaments. The use of strong and directional interactions among molecular subunits can achieve not only rich dynamic behavior but also high degrees of internal order that are not known in ordinary polymers. They can resemble, for example, the ordered and dynamic one-dimensional supramolecular assemblies of the cell cytoskeleton, and possess useful biological and electronic functions. PMID:22344437

  4. Spin structure functions

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-ping Chen, Alexandre Deur, Sebastian Kuhn, Zein-eddine Meziani

    2011-06-01

    Spin-dependent observables have been a powerful tool to probe the internal structure of the nucleon and to understand the dynamics of the strong interaction. Experiments involving spin degrees of freedom have often brought out surprises and puzzles. The so-called "spin crisis" in the 1980s revealed the limitation of naive quark-parton models and led to intensive worldwide efforts, both experimental and theoretical, to understand the nucleon spin structure. With high intensity and high polarization of both the electron beam and targets, Jefferson Lab has the world's highest polarized luminosity and the best figure-of-merit for precision spin structure measurements. It has made a strong impact in this subfield of research. This chapter will highlight Jefferson Lab's unique contributions in the measurements of valence quark spin distributions, in the moments of spin structure functions at low to intermediate Q2, and in the transverse spin structure.

  5. Thermogenesis and thyroid function.

    PubMed

    Freake, H C; Oppenheimer, J H

    1995-01-01

    The past 10 years have seen tremendous progress in the definition of the nuclear mechanism of action of thyroid hormones. Although the way in which these nuclear mechanisms underlie the 3,5,3'-triiodo-L-thyronine (T3)-dependent stimulation of metabolic rate remains to be clarified, evidence favoring non-nuclear pathways is limited. Clearly, T3 stimulates both the production and consumption of energy within cells. It also exerts a number of parallel effects that result in increased oxygen consumption, e.g. on mitochondrial structure and composition; on the metabolism of lipids, carbohydrates, and proteins, and on cardiac function. Additionally, T3 may increase the proton permeability of the inner mitochondrial membrane, which implies that it may decrease the efficiency of energy production. These metabolic effects of T3 appear to be restricted to homeothermic-animals, representing a coordinated response to the challenge of maintaining body temperature. PMID:8527221

  6. [Evaluation of sudomotor function].

    PubMed

    Asahina, Masato

    2014-01-01

    From the aspect of physiological roles, sweating on the hairy skin is an important for thermoregulation of body, and that on glabrous skin (the palm or sole) works as an anti-skid material when gripping something or performing a delicate task using the fingertips (emotional sweating). Abnormal sweating, which can be global or localized, is classified into hyperhidrosis and hypohidrosis, and detection of abnormal sweating, such as Horner's syndrome and Harlequin syndrome, is clinically useful for regional diagnosis of neurological lesions. In addition, sudomotor function tests, where sweat secretion is induced by physiological or pharmacological stimuli, are useful for diagnosis of neurological disorders. In this manuscript, clinical evaluation of abnormal sweating from the aspect of neurological diagnosis is reviewed. PMID:25672702

  7. Multi-functional windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Nagendra; Goldman, Lee M.; Balasubramanian, Sreeram; Sastri, Suri

    2013-06-01

    The requirements for modern aircraft are driving the need for conformal windows for future sensor systems. However, limitations on optical systems and the physical properties of optically transparent materials currently limit the geometry of existing windows and window assemblies to faceted assemblies of flat windows held in weight bearing frames. Novel material systems will have to be developed which combine different materials (e.g. ductile metals with transparent ceramics) into structures that combine transparency with structural integrity. Surmet's demonstrated ability to produce novel transparent ceramic/metal structures will allow us to produce such structures in the types of conformal shapes required for future aircraft applications. Furthermore, the ability to incorporate transparencies into such structures also holds out the promise of creating multi-functional windows which provide a broad range of capabilities that might include RF antennas and de-icing in addition to transparency. Recent results in this area will be presented.

  8. Skin Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Peter M.

    2010-01-01

    Like other inflammatory dermatoses, the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis (AD) has been largely attributed to abnormalities in adaptive immunity. T helper (Th) cell types 1 and 2 cell dysregulation, IgE production, mast cell hyperactivity, and dendritic cell signaling are thought to account for the chronic, pruritic, and inflammatory dermatosis that characterizes AD. Not surprisingly, therapy has been directed toward ameliorating Th2-mediated inflammation and pruritus. Here, we review emerging evidence that inflammation in AD occurs downstream to inherited and acquired insults to the barrier. Therapy based upon this new view of pathogenesis should emphasize approaches that correct the primary abnormality in barrier function, which drives downstream inflammation and allows unrestricted antigen access. PMID:18606081

  9. Evolution of catalytic function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, G. F.

    1993-01-01

    An RNA-based evolution system was constructed in the laboratory and used to develop RNA enzymes with novel catalytic function. By controlling the nature of the catalytic task that the molecules must perform in order to survive, it is possible to direct the evolving population toward the expression of some desired catalytic behavior. More recently, this system has been coupled to an in vitro translation procedure, raising the possibility of evolving protein enzymes in the laboratory to produce novel proteins with desired catalytic properties. The aim of this line of research is to reduce darwinian evolution, the fundamental process of biology, to a laboratory procedure that can be made to operate in the service of organic synthesis.

  10. [Iron function and carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Akatsuka, Shinya; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2016-07-01

    Though iron is an essential micronutrient for humans, the excess state is acknowledged to be associated with oncogenesis. For example, iron overload in the liver of the patients with hereditary hemocromatosis highly increases the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. Also, as to asbestos-related mesothelioma, such kinds of asbestos with a higher iron content are considered to be more carcinogenic. Iron is a useful element, which enables fundamental functions for life such as oxygen carrying and electron transport. However, in the situation where organisms are unable to have good control of it, iron turns into a dangerous element which catalyzes generation of reactive oxygen. In this review, I first outline the relationships between iron and cancer in general, then give an explanation about iron-related animal carcinogenesis models. PMID:27455808

  11. Pulmonary function in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guy, H. J.; Prisk, G. K.; West, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    We report the successful collection of a large quantity of human resting pulmonary function data on the SLS-1 mission. Preliminary analysis suggests that cardiac stroke volumes are high on orbit, and that an adaptive reduction takes at least several days, and in fact may still be in progress after 9 days on orbit. It also suggests that pulmonary capillary blood volumes are high, and remain high on orbit, but that the pulmonary interstitium is not significantly impacted. The data further suggest that the known large gravitational gradients of lung function have only a modest influence on single breath tests such as the SBN washout. They account for only approximately 25% of the phase III slope of nitrogen, on vital capacity SBN washouts. These gradients are only a moderate source of the cardiogenic oscillations seen in argon (bolus gas) and nitrogen (resident gas), on such tests. They may have a greater role in generating the normal CO2 oscillations, as here the phase relationship to argon and nitrogen reverses in microgravity, at least at mid exhalation in those subjects studied to date. Microgravity may become a useful tool in establishing the nature of the non-gravitational mechanisms that can now be seen to play such a large part in the generation of intra-breath gradients and oscillations of expired gas concentration. Analysis of microgravity multibreath nitrogen washouts, single breath washouts from more physiological pre-inspiratory volumes, both using our existing SLS-1 data, and data from the upcoming D-2 and SLS-2 missions, should be very fruitful in this regard.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  12. Predicting protein functions from PPI networks using functional aggregation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jingyu; Chi, Xiaoxiao

    2012-11-01

    Predicting protein functions computationally from massive protein-protein interaction (PPI) data generated by high-throughput technology is one of the challenges and fundamental problems in the post-genomic era. Although there have been many approaches developed for computationally predicting protein functions, the mutual correlations among proteins in terms of protein functions have not been thoroughly investigated and incorporated into existing prediction methods, especially in voting based prediction methods. In this paper, we propose an innovative method to predict protein functions from PPI data by aggregating the functional correlations among relevant proteins using the Choquet-Integral in fuzzy theory. This functional aggregation measures the real impact of each relevant protein function on the final prediction results, and reduces the impact of repeated functional information on the prediction. Accordingly, a new protein similarity and a new iterative prediction algorithm are proposed in this paper. The experimental evaluations on real PPI datasets demonstrate the effectiveness of our method.

  13. Density functional theory for pair correlation functions in polymeric liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yethiraj, Arun; Fynewever, Herb; Shew, Chwen-Yang

    2001-03-01

    A density functional theory is presented for the pair correlation functions in polymeric liquids. The theory uses the Yethiraj-Woodward free-energy functional for the polymeric liquid, where the ideal gas free-energy functional is treated exactly and the excess free-energy functional is obtained using a weighted density approximation with the simplest choice of the weighting function. Pair correlation functions are obtained using the Percus trick, where the external field is taken to be a single polymer molecule. The minimization of the free energy in the theory requires a two molecule simulation at each iteration. The theory is very accurate for the pair correlation functions in freely jointed tangent-hard-sphere chains and freely rotating fused-hard-sphere chains, especially at low densities and for long chains. In addition, the theory allows the calculation of the virial pressure in these systems and shows a remarkable degree of consistency between the virial and compressibility pressure.

  14. Generalized -deformed correlation functions as spectral functions of hyperbolic geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonora, L.; Bytsenko, A. A.; Guimarães, M. E. X.

    2014-08-01

    We analyze the role of vertex operator algebra and 2d amplitudes from the point of view of the representation theory of infinite-dimensional Lie algebras, MacMahon and Ruelle functions. By definition p-dimensional MacMahon function, with , is the generating function of p-dimensional partitions of integers. These functions can be represented as amplitudes of a two-dimensional c = 1 CFT, and, as such, they can be generalized to . With some abuse of language we call the latter amplitudes generalized MacMahon functions. In this paper we show that generalized p-dimensional MacMahon functions can be rewritten in terms of Ruelle spectral functions, whose spectrum is encoded in the Patterson-Selberg function of three-dimensional hyperbolic geometry.

  15. Computer Experiments for Function Approximations

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, A; Izmailov, I; Rizzo, S; Wynter, S; Alexandrov, O; Tong, C

    2007-10-15

    This research project falls in the domain of response surface methodology, which seeks cost-effective ways to accurately fit an approximate function to experimental data. Modeling and computer simulation are essential tools in modern science and engineering. A computer simulation can be viewed as a function that receives input from a given parameter space and produces an output. Running the simulation repeatedly amounts to an equivalent number of function evaluations, and for complex models, such function evaluations can be very time-consuming. It is then of paramount importance to intelligently choose a relatively small set of sample points in the parameter space at which to evaluate the given function, and then use this information to construct a surrogate function that is close to the original function and takes little time to evaluate. This study was divided into two parts. The first part consisted of comparing four sampling methods and two function approximation methods in terms of efficiency and accuracy for simple test functions. The sampling methods used were Monte Carlo, Quasi-Random LP{sub {tau}}, Maximin Latin Hypercubes, and Orthogonal-Array-Based Latin Hypercubes. The function approximation methods utilized were Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS) and Support Vector Machines (SVM). The second part of the study concerned adaptive sampling methods with a focus on creating useful sets of sample points specifically for monotonic functions, functions with a single minimum and functions with a bounded first derivative.

  16. The first juvenile specimens of Plateosaurus engelhardti from Frick, Switzerland: isolated neural arches and their implications for developmental plasticity in a basal sauropodomorph

    PubMed Central

    Sander, P. Martin

    2014-01-01

    The dinosaur Plateosaurus engelhardti is the most abundant dinosaur in the Late Triassic of Europe and the best known basal sauropodomorph. Plateosaurus engelhardti was one of the first sauropodomorph dinosaurs to display a large body size. Remains can be found in the Norian stage of the Late Triassic in over 40 localities in Central Europe (France, Germany, and Switzerland) and in Greenland. Since the first discovery of P. engelhardti no juvenile specimens of this species had been described in detail. Here we describe the first remains of juvenile individuals, isolated cervical and dorsal neural arches from Switzerland. These were separated postmortem from their respective centra because of unfused neurocentral sutures. However the specimens share the same neural arch morphology found in adults. Morphometric analysis suggests body lengths of the juvenile individuals that is greater than those of most adult specimens. This supports the hypothesis of developmental plasticity in Plateosaurus engelhardti that previously had been based on histological data only. Alternative hypotheses for explaining the poor correlation between ontogenetic stage and size in this taxon are multiple species or sexual morphs with little morphological variance or time-averaging of individuals from populations differing in body size. PMID:25071987

  17. Fifth Fundamental Catalogue (FK5). Part 1: Basic fundamental stars (Fricke, Schwan, and Lederle 1988): Documentation for the machine-readable version

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Wayne H., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The machine-readable version of the catalog, as it is currently being distributed from the Astronomical Data Center, is described. The Basic FK5 provides improved mean positions and proper motions for the 1535 classical fundamental stars that had been included in the FK3 and FK4 catalogs. The machine version of the catalog contains the positions and proper motions of the Basic FK5 stars for the epochs and equinoxes J2000.0 and B1950.0, the mean epochs of individual observed right ascensions and declinations used to determine the final positions, and the mean errors of the final positions and proper motions for the reported epochs. The cross identifications to other designations used for the FK5 stars that are given in the published catalog were not included in the original machine versions, but the Durchmusterung numbers have been added at the Astronomical Data Center.

  18. Functional organic nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohlmeyer, Ryan R.

    focused on passive material properties such as mechanical, electrical, and thermal, there is growing interest in harnessing active material functions such as actuation, sensing, and power generation in designed CNT-polymer materials. The synergy between CNTs and the polymer matrix has been judiciously exploited to create highly desirable active material functions in smart material systems. By incorporating CNTs in a Nafion matrix, multi-shape memory healable composites capable of reversible remote, local, and chemical programming have been developed.

  19. Graphical Representation of Thermodynamic Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, A.

    1975-01-01

    Outlines a teaching method using graphs for explaining phase changes and the effect of pressure and the relationships between temperature, entropy, enthalpy, energy, Gibbs function, Helmholtz function and volume. (GS)

  20. Numerical integration of analytic functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovanović, Gradimir V.; Tošić, Dobrilo ð.; Albijanić, Miloljub

    2012-09-01

    A weighted generalized N-point Birkhoff-Young quadrature of interpolatory type for numerical integration of analytic functions is considered. Special cases of such quadratures with respect to the generalized Gegenbauer weight function are derived.

  1. Cranial functional (psychogenic) movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Kaski, Diego; Bronstein, Adolfo M; Edwards, Mark J; Stone, Jon

    2015-12-01

    Functional (psychogenic) neurological symptoms are frequently encountered in neurological practice. Cranial movement disorders--affecting the eyes, face, jaw, tongue, or palate--are an under-recognised feature of patients with functional symptoms. They can present in isolation or in the context of other functional symptoms; in particular, for functional eye movements, positive clinical signs such as convergence spasms can be triggered by the clinical examination. Although the specialty of functional neurological disorders has expanded, appreciation of cranial functional movement disorders is still insufficient. Identification of the positive features of cranial functional movement disorders such as convergence and unilateral platysmal spasm might lend diagnostic weight to a suspected functional neurological disorder. Understanding of the differential diagnosis, which is broad and includes many organic causes (eg, stroke), is essential to make an early and accurate diagnosis to prevent complications and initiate appropriate management. Increased understanding of these disorders is also crucial to drive clinical trials and studies of individually tailored therapies. PMID:26581970

  2. Universality of composite functions of periodic zeta functions

    SciTech Connect

    Laurincikas, Antanas P

    2012-11-30

    In the paper, we prove the universality, in the sense of Voronin, for some classes of composite functions F({zeta}(s;a)), where the function {zeta}(s;a) is defined by a Dirichlet series with periodic multiplicative coefficients. We also study the universality of functions of the form F({zeta}(s;a{sub 1}),...,{zeta}(s;a{sub r})). For example, it follows from general theorems that every linear combination of derivatives of the function {zeta}(s;a) and every linear combination of the functions {zeta}(s;a{sub 1}),...,{zeta}(s;a{sub r}) are universal. Bibliography: 18 titles.

  3. Changes in gastrointestinal tract function and structure in functional dyspepsia.

    PubMed

    Vanheel, Hanne; Farré, Ricard

    2013-03-01

    Functional dyspepsia is an extremely common disorder of gastrointestinal function. The disorder is thought to be heterogeneous, with different pathophysiological mechanisms underlying varied symptom patterns. A diversity of changes in gastrointestinal tract function and structure has been described in functional dyspepsia. These involve alterations in the stomach, such as impaired accommodation, delayed gastric emptying and hypersensitivity, and alterations in the duodenum, such as increased sensitivity to duodenal acid and/or lipids and low-grade inflammation. In this Review, we summarize all these abnormalities in an attempt to provide an integrated overview of the pathophysiological mechanisms in functional dyspepsia. PMID:23318268

  4. Dimethylfumarate Impairs Neutrophil Functions.

    PubMed

    Müller, Susen; Behnen, Martina; Bieber, Katja; Möller, Sonja; Hellberg, Lars; Witte, Mareike; Hänsel, Martin; Zillikens, Detlef; Solbach, Werner; Laskay, Tamás; Ludwig, Ralf J

    2016-01-01

    Host defense against pathogens relies on neutrophil activation. Inadequate neutrophil activation is often associated with chronic inflammatory diseases. Neutrophils also constitute a significant portion of infiltrating cells in chronic inflammatory diseases, for example, psoriasis and multiple sclerosis. Fumarates improve the latter diseases, which so far has been attributed to the effects on lymphocytes and dendritic cells. Here, we focused on the effects of dimethylfumarate (DMF) on neutrophils. In vitro, DMF inhibited neutrophil activation, including changes in surface marker expression, reactive oxygen species production, formation of neutrophil extracellular traps, and migration. Phagocytic ability and autoantibody-induced, neutrophil-dependent tissue injury ex vivo was also impaired by DMF. Regarding the mode of action, DMF modulates-in a stimulus-dependent manner-neutrophil activation using the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 pathways. For in vivo validation, mouse models of epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, an organ-specific autoimmune disease caused by autoantibodies to type VII collagen, were employed. In the presence of DMF, blistering induced by injection of anti-type VII collagen antibodies into mice was significantly impaired. DMF treatment of mice with clinically already-manifested epidermolysis bullosa acquisita led to disease improvement. Collectively, we demonstrate a profound inhibitory activity of DMF on neutrophil functions. These findings encourage wider use of DMF in patients with neutrophil-mediated diseases. PMID:26763431

  5. Yogurt and gut function.

    PubMed

    Adolfsson, Oskar; Meydani, Simin Nikbin; Russell, Robert M

    2004-08-01

    In recent years, numerous studies have been published on the health effects of yogurt and the bacterial cultures used in the production of yogurt. In the United States, these lactic acid-producing bacteria (LAB) include Lactobacillus and Streptococcus species. The benefits of yogurt and LAB on gastrointestinal health have been investigated in animal models and, occasionally, in human subjects. Some studies using yogurt, individual LAB species, or both showed promising health benefits for certain gastrointestinal conditions, including lactose intolerance, constipation, diarrheal diseases, colon cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, Helicobacter pylori infection, and allergies. Patients with any of these conditions could possibly benefit from the consumption of yogurt. The benefits of yogurt consumption to gastrointestinal function are most likely due to effects mediated through the gut microflora, bowel transit, and enhancement of gastrointestinal innate and adaptive immune responses. Although substantial evidence currently exists to support a beneficial effect of yogurt consumption on gastrointestinal health, there is inconsistency in reported results, which may be due to differences in the strains of LAB used, in routes of administration, or in investigational procedures or to the lack of objective definition of "gut health." Further well-designed, controlled human studies of adequate duration are needed to confirm or extend these findings.

  6. Functional electrospun membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ognibene, G.; Fragalà, M. E.; Cristaldi, D. A.; Blanco, I.; Cicala, G.

    2016-05-01

    In this study we combined electrospun PES nanofibers with ZnO nanostructures in order to obtain a hierarchical nanostructured hybrid material to be use for active water filtration membranes. It benefits of flexibility and high surface area of the polymeric nanofibers as well as of additional functionalities of ZnOnanostructures. First, randomly oriented nanofibers with diameters of 716nm ±365 nm were electrospun on a glass fibers substrate from a solution of PES and DMF-TOL(1:1). ZnO nanorods were grown onto the surface of electrospun PES fibers by a Chemical Bath Deposition (CBD) process. It was preceed by a seeding process necessary to form nucleation sites for the subsequent radially aligned growth of ZnO nanowires. The morfology of the fibers and the effect of the seeding time have been analysed by SEM. The amount of ZnO nanowires grown over electrospun nanofibers was determined as 45% by weight. The high purity and crystallinity of the asobtained products are confirmed by XRD since all reflection peaks can be indexed to hexagonal wurtzite ZnO.

  7. Hyperoxia and Functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Bulte, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen plays a fundamental role in functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI). Blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) imaging is the foundation stone of all FMRI and is still the essential workhorse of the vast majority of FMRI procedures. Hemoglobin may provide the magnetic properties that allow the technique to work, but it is oxygen that allows the contrast to effectively be switched on or off, and it is oxygen that we are interested in tracking in order to observe the oxygen metabolism changes. In general the changes in venous oxygen saturation are observed in order to infer changes in the correlated mechanisms, which can include changes in cerebral blood flow, metabolism, and the fraction of inspired oxygen. By independently manipulating the fraction of inspired oxygen it is possible to alter the amount of dissolved oxygen in the plasma, the venous saturation, or even the blood flow. The effects that these changes have on the observed MRI signal can be either a help or a hindrance depending on how well the changes induced are understood. The administration of supplemental inspired oxygen is in a unique position to provide a flexible, noninvasive, inexpensive, patient-friendly addition to the MRI toolkit to enable investigations to look beyond statistics and regions of interest, and actually produce calibrated, targeted measurements of blood flow, metabolism or pathology. PMID:27343097

  8. Function Point Analysis Depot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muniz, R.; Martinez, El; Szafran, J.; Dalton, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Function Point Analysis (FPA) Depot is a web application originally designed by one of the NE-C3 branch's engineers, Jamie Szafran, and created specifically for the Software Development team of the Launch Control Systems (LCS) project. The application consists of evaluating the work of each developer to be able to get a real estimate of the hours that is going to be assigned to a specific task of development. The Architect Team had made design change requests for the depot to change the schema of the application's information; that information, changed in the database, needed to be changed in the graphical user interface (GUI) (written in Ruby on Rails (RoR and the web service/server side in Java to match the database changes. These changes were made by two interns from NE-C, Ricardo Muniz from NE-C3, who made all the schema changes for the GUI in RoR and Edwin Martinez, from NE-C2, who made all the changes in the Java side.

  9. Cluster functional renormalization group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuther, Johannes; Thomale, Ronny

    2014-01-01

    Functional renormalization group (FRG) has become a diverse and powerful tool to derive effective low-energy scattering vertices of interacting many-body systems. Starting from a free expansion point of the action, the flow of the RG parameter Λ allows us to trace the evolution of the effective one- and two-particle vertices towards low energies by taking into account the vertex corrections between all parquet channels in an unbiased fashion. In this work, we generalize the expansion point at which the diagrammatic resummation procedure is initiated from a free UV limit to a cluster product state. We formulate a cluster FRG scheme where the noninteracting building blocks (i.e., decoupled spin clusters) are treated exactly, and the intercluster couplings are addressed via RG. As a benchmark study, we apply our cluster FRG scheme to the spin-1/2 bilayer Heisenberg model (BHM) on a square lattice where the neighboring sites in the two layers form the individual two-site clusters. Comparing with existing numerical evidence for the BHM, we obtain reasonable findings for the spin susceptibility, the spin-triplet excitation energy, and quasiparticle weight even in coupling regimes close to antiferromagnetic order. The concept of cluster FRG promises applications to a large class of interacting electron systems.

  10. Functional neuroanatomy of tics.

    PubMed

    Neuner, Irene; Schneider, Frank; Shah, N Jon

    2013-01-01

    The therapeutic success of haloperidol in the treatment of Tourette syndrome (TS) put an end to the discussion about a "hysteric" or "neurotic" origin of TS. The cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuit has been identified as an underlying neurobiological correlate of TS. In this review we explore the main findings of structural alterations in TS including cortical areas, basal ganglia, hippocampus, amygdala, midbrain, and cerebellum. Based on the structural changes we examine the functional pattern described by the findings of fMRI and (15)O-PET/(18)FDG PET investigations. From the neuroimaging findings a cortical origin of the generation of tics is indicated. Future research on the neuronal footprint of TS should be directed towards addressing the question of which patterns of connectivity distinguish individuals in whom tics disappear during early adulthood from those in whom the tics persist. The understanding of this pathomechanism could provide a key on how to influence dysconnectivity in TS, for example, by more specific pharmaceutical intervention or by individually adopted EEG and/or fMRI neurofeedback.

  11. DNA structure and function.

    PubMed

    Travers, Andrew; Muskhelishvili, Georgi

    2015-06-01

    The proposal of a double-helical structure for DNA over 60 years ago provided an eminently satisfying explanation for the heritability of genetic information. But why is DNA, and not RNA, now the dominant biological information store? We argue that, in addition to its coding function, the ability of DNA, unlike RNA, to adopt a B-DNA structure confers advantages both for information accessibility and for packaging. The information encoded by DNA is both digital - the precise base specifying, for example, amino acid sequences - and analogue. The latter determines the sequence-dependent physicochemical properties of DNA, for example, its stiffness and susceptibility to strand separation. Most importantly, DNA chirality enables the formation of supercoiling under torsional stress. We review recent evidence suggesting that DNA supercoiling, particularly that generated by DNA translocases, is a major driver of gene regulation and patterns of chromosomal gene organization, and in its guise as a promoter of DNA packaging enables DNA to act as an energy store to facilitate the passage of translocating enzymes such as RNA polymerase.

  12. Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebron, Marisabel; Mintz, Eric; Meador, Michael A.; Hull, David R.; Scheiman, Daniel A.; Willis, Peter; Smalley, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have created a great deal of excitement in the Materials Science community because of their outstanding mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties. Use of carbon nanotubes as reinforcements for polymers could lead to a new class of composite materials with properties, durability, and performance far exceeding that of conventional fiber reinforced composites. Organized arrays of carbon nanotubes, e.g., nanotube monolayers, could find applications as thermal management materials, light emitting devices, and sensor arrays. Carbon nanotubes could also be used as templates upon which nanotubes from other materials could be constructed. Successful use of carbon nanotubes in any of these potential applications requires the ability to control the interactions of nanotubes with each other and with other materials, e.g., a polymer matrix. One approach to achieving this control is to attach certain chemical groups to the ends and/or side-walls of the nanotubes. The nature of these chemical groups can be varied to achieve the desired result, such as better adhesion between the nanotubes and a polymer. Under a joint program between NASA Glenn, Clark Atlanta University, and Rice University researchers are working on developing a chemistry "tool-kit" that will enable the functionalization of carbon nanotubes with a variety of chemical groups. Recent results of this effort will be discussed.

  13. [Functional gastrointestinal disorders].

    PubMed

    Vogt, W

    2007-11-21

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders particularly dyspepsia an irritable bowel syndrome are frequent problems for the general practitioner and also for the specialist. Both are diseases and not only a kind of discomfort. The high frequency of dispepsia and irritable bowel syndrome induces very high direct and indirect charges. Both diseases depend on a number of factors or causes, for whom the evidence is not good. But there are good experimental data for the visceral hypersensitivity as one of the main factors. Gastroscopy is the most important examination in the diagnosis of dyspepsia. Endoscopy has to be done in all patients with alarm symptoms an in all patients older than 45 years. The therapy of dyspepsia is an empirical one. The eradication of Helicobacter pylori is a therapeutical option, but only 8% of the patients will have benefit for a long time. Other therapeutical options are the use of proton-pump inhibitors, prokinetics or phytotherapeutics. The therapy of the irritable bowel syndrome depends on the subtype of the disease (diarrhea, constipation, abdominal pain, bloating). First of all a good doctor-patient relationship is mandatory. Furthermore the use of dietary fibre, antidiarrhoeics, laxatives and muscle relaxants may be beneficial. And phytotherapeutics can be an additional therapeutic approach.

  14. Functional modular contact lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shum, Angela J.; Cowan, Melissa; Lähdesmäki, Ilkka; Lingley, Andrew; Otis, Brian; Parviz, Babak A.

    2009-08-01

    Tear fluid offers a potential route for non-invasive sensing of physiological parameters. Utilization of this potential depends on the ability to manufacture sensors that can be placed on the surface of the eye. A contact lens makes a natural platform for such sensors, but contact lens polymers present a challenge for sensor fabrication. This paper describes a microfabrication process for constructing sensors that can be integrated into the structure of a functional contact lens in the future. To demonstrate the capabilities of the process, an amperometric glucose sensor was fabricated on a polymer substrate. The sensor consists of platinum working and counter electrodes, as well as a region of indium-tin oxide (ITO) for glucose oxidase immobilization. An external silver-silver chloride electrode was used as the reference electrode during the characterization experiments. Sensor operation was validated by hydrogen peroxide measurements in the 10- 20 μM range and glucose measurements in the 0.125-20 mM range.

  15. Sleep and metabolic function

    PubMed Central

    Morselli, Lisa L.; Guyon, Aurore; Spiegel, Karine

    2012-01-01

    Evidence for the role of sleep on metabolic and endocrine function has been reported more than four decades ago. In the past 30 years, the prevalence of obesity and diabetes has greatly increased in industrialized countries, and self-imposed sleep curtailment, now very common, is starting to be recognized as a contributing factor, alongside with increased caloric intake and decreased physical activity. Furthermore, obstructive sleep apnea, a chronic condition characterized by recurrent upper airway obstruction leading to intermittent hypoxemia and sleep fragmentation, has also become highly prevalent as a consequence of the epidemic of obesity and has been shown to contribute, in a vicious circle, to the metabolic disturbances observed in obese patients. In this article, we summarize the current data supporting the role of sleep in the regulation of glucose homeostasis and the hormones involved in the regulation of appetite. We also review the results of the epidemiologic and laboratory studies that investigated the impact of sleep duration and quality on the risk of developing diabetes and obesity, as well as the mechanisms underlying this increased risk. Finally, we discuss how obstructive sleep apnea affects glucose metabolism and the beneficial impact of its treatment, the continuous positive airway pressure. In conclusion, the data available in the literature highlight the importance of getting enough good sleep for metabolic health. PMID:22101912

  16. Functional Symmetry of Endomembranes

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    In higher eukaryotic cells pleiomorphic compartments composed of vacuoles, tubules and vesicles move from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the plasma membrane to the cell center, operating in early biosynthetic trafficking and endocytosis, respectively. Besides transporting cargo to the Golgi apparatus and lysosomes, a major task of these compartments is to promote extensive membrane recycling. The endocytic membrane system is traditionally divided into early (sorting) endosomes, late endosomes and the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC). Recent studies on the intermediate compartment (IC) between the ER and the Golgi apparatus suggest that it also consists of peripheral (“early”) and centralized (“late”) structures, as well as a third component, designated here as the biosynthetic recycling compartment (BRC). We propose that the ERC and the BRC exist as long-lived “mirror compartments” at the cell center that also share the ability to expand and become mobilized during cell activation. These considerations emphasize the functional symmetry of endomembrane compartments, which provides a basis for the membrane rearrangements taking place during cell division, polarization, and differentiation. PMID:17267686

  17. Functionally graded boron carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, J.J.; McClellan, K.J.; Kise, C.D.; Hoover, R.C.; Scarborough, W.K.

    1998-12-31

    Lightweight body armor is important for the protection of US soldiers in the field. Here, fabrication techniques were developed for producing graded porosity B{sub 4}C, and for producing aluminum-B{sub 4}C and epoxy-B{sub 4}C functionally graded materials. The key fabrication aspect was obtaining the graded porosity B{sub 4}C. The feasibility of producing graded porosity B{sub 4}C using a grading of carbon densification aid produced from a gradient of furfuryl alcohol carbon precursor was demonstrated. This approach is quite promising, but it was not optimized in the present investigation. Graded porosity B{sub 4}C materials were produced by a layering approach using different size distributions of B{sub 4}C powders in the green state, and then densifying the layered assembly by hot pressing at 1,900 C. The hardness of uninfiltrated graded B{sub 4}C, aluminum infiltrated B{sub 4}C, and epoxy infiltrated B{sub 4}C was observed to be similar.

  18. Modelling of graphene functionalization.

    PubMed

    Pykal, Martin; Jurečka, Petr; Karlický, František; Otyepka, Michal

    2016-03-01

    Graphene has attracted great interest because of its remarkable properties and numerous potential applications. A comprehensive understanding of its structural and dynamic properties and those of its derivatives will be required to enable the design and optimization of sophisticated new nanodevices. While it is challenging to perform experimental studies on nanoscale systems at the atomistic level, this is the 'native' scale of computational chemistry. Consequently, computational methods are increasingly being used to complement experimental research in many areas of chemistry and nanotechnology. However, it is difficult for non-experts to get to grips with the plethora of computational tools that are available and their areas of application. This perspective briefly describes the available theoretical methods and models for simulating graphene functionalization based on quantum and classical mechanics. The benefits and drawbacks of the individual methods are discussed, and we provide numerous examples showing how computational methods have provided new insights into the physical and chemical features of complex systems including graphene and graphene derivatives. We believe that this overview will help non-expert readers to understand this field and its great potential. PMID:26323438

  19. Disgust: Evolved Function and Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tybur, Joshua M.; Lieberman, Debra; Kurzban, Robert; DeScioli, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Interest in and research on disgust has surged over the past few decades. The field, however, still lacks a coherent theoretical framework for understanding the evolved function or functions of disgust. Here we present such a framework, emphasizing 2 levels of analysis: that of evolved function and that of information processing. Although there is…

  20. Functional Similarity and Interpersonal Attraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neimeyer, Greg J.; Neimeyer, Robert A.

    1981-01-01

    Students participated in dyadic disclosure exercises over a five-week period. Results indicated members of high functional similarity dyads evidenced greater attraction to one another than did members of low functional similarity dyads. "Friendship" pairs of male undergraduates displayed greater functional similarity than did "nominal" pairs from…

  1. On Topological Properties of Functions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazzan, Orit

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on the understanding of the concept of function and presents discussions of the topological properties of functions and of students' mathematical thinking when they are asked to determine whether a property of a function is a topological property or not. Contains 15 references. (DDR)

  2. [Diagnosis of functional bowel diseases].

    PubMed

    Kruis, W

    2007-02-28

    Functional bowel disorders cause frequent doctor visits. The term comprises various disease entities. Most frequent are the irritable bowel syndrome, functional constipation and functional diarrhea. An exact history plays an outstanding role for the diagnosis of all these entities. History either confirms a positive diagnosis or initiates some complementary investigations. Redundant and dangerous technical procedures should be avoided in the diagnostic work up.

  3. Gamow functionals on operator algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castagnino, M.; Gadella, M.; Betán, R. Id; Laura, R.

    2001-11-01

    We obtain the precise form of two Gamow functionals representing the exponentially decaying part of a quantum resonance and its mirror image that grows exponentially, as a linear, positive and continuous functional on an algebra containing observables. These functionals do not admit normalization and, with an appropriate choice of the algebra, are time reversal of each other.

  4. Functions of the Renal Nerves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koepke, John P.; DiBona, Gerald F.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses renal neuroanatomy, renal vasculature, renal tubules, renin secretion, renorenal reflexes, and hypertension as related to renal nerve functions. Indicates that high intensitites of renal nerve stimulation have produced alterations in several renal functions. (A chart with various stimulations and resultant renal functions and 10-item,…

  5. Family Functioning in Pediatric Trichotillomania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Phoebe S.; Franklin, Martin E.; Keuthen, Nancy J.; Flessner, Christopher A.; Woods, Douglas W.; Piacentini, John A.; Stein, Dan J.; Loew, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about how pediatric trichotillomania (TTM), a clinically significant and functionally impairing disorder, is impacted by, and impacts, family functioning. We explored dimensions of family functioning and parental attitudes in a sample of children and adolescents who participated in an Internet-based survey and satisfied…

  6. Staircase and Fractional Part Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amram, Meirav; Dagan, Miriam; Ioshpe, Michael; Satianov, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    The staircase and fractional part functions are basic examples of real functions. They can be applied in several parts of mathematics, such as analysis, number theory, formulas for primes, and so on; in computer programming, the floor and ceiling functions are provided by a significant number of programming languages--they have some basic uses in…

  7. Stochastic choice of basis functions in adaptive function approximation and the functional-link net.

    PubMed

    Igelnik, B; Pao, Y H

    1995-01-01

    A theoretical justification for the random vector version of the functional-link (RVFL) net is presented in this paper, based on a general approach to adaptive function approximation. The approach consists of formulating a limit-integral representation of the function to be approximated and subsequently evaluating that integral with the Monte-Carlo method. Two main results are: (1) the RVFL is a universal approximator for continuous functions on bounded finite dimensional sets, and (2) the RVFL is an efficient universal approximator with the rate of approximation error convergence to zero of order O(C/ radicaln), where n is number of basis functions and with C independent of n. Similar results are also obtained for neural nets with hidden nodes implemented as products of univariate functions or radial basis functions. Some possible ways of enhancing the accuracy of multivariate function approximations are discussed.

  8. Program functionality and information analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, T.W.; Shipler, D.B.

    1992-04-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is executing a plan for improvement of the United States Nuclear Waste Management Program. As part of the plan, OCRWM is performing a systems engineering analysis of both the physical system, i.e., the Nuclear Waste Management System (NWMS), and the programmatic functions that must be accomplished to bring the physical system into being. The functional analysis effort is being performed by two separate teams working in parallel, one of which addresses the physical system functions and the other the programmatic functions. This paper presents information on the analysis of the programmatic functions.

  9. Interpolation via symmetric exponential functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezubik, Agata; Pošta, Severin

    2013-11-01

    Complex valued functions on the Euclidean space Bbb Rn, symmetric or antisymmetric with respect to the permutation group Sn, are often dealt with in various branches of physics, such as quantum theory or theory of integrable systems. One often needs to approximate such functions with series consisting of various special functions which satisfy nice properties. Questions of uniform convergence of such approximations are crucial for applications. In this article a family of special functions called the symmetric exponential functions are used for such approximation and the uniform convergence of their sums is considered.

  10. Nongenetic functions of the genome.

    PubMed

    Bustin, Michael; Misteli, Tom

    2016-05-01

    The primary function of the genome is to store, propagate, and express the genetic information that gives rise to a cell's architectural and functional machinery. However, the genome is also a major structural component of the cell. Besides its genetic roles, the genome affects cellular functions by nongenetic means through its physical and structural properties, particularly by exerting mechanical forces and by serving as a scaffold for binding of cellular components. Major cellular processes affected by nongenetic functions of the genome include establishment of nuclear structure, signal transduction, mechanoresponses, cell migration, and vision in nocturnal animals. We discuss the concept, mechanisms, and implications of nongenetic functions of the genome.

  11. Fragmentation function measurements at Belle

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, Ralf; Vossen, Anselm; Leitgab, Martin; Grosse-Perdekamp, Matthias; Giordano, Francesca; Ogawa, Akio

    2011-12-14

    The precision measurement of fragmentation functions is an important requirement to study the spin structure of the nucleon. Unpolarized fragmentation functions at reasonably low scale and high fractional energy are necessary to complement the measurements mostly performed at LEP in order to obtain high enough precision for measurements at semi-inclusive DIS experiments and at RHIC. Those can be obtained from the abundant data collected with the Belle detector at the e{sup +}e{sup -} collider KEKB. In addition one can cleanly measure the transversely polarized fragmentation functions such as the Collins fragmentation function and the interference fragmentation functions. Both have been obtained with great precision at Belle.

  12. Bilinear Expansion For Redistribution Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harutyunian, Haik; Alecian, Georges; Khachatryan, Knarik; Vardanyan, Ani

    2016-11-01

    We suggest here a method for construction of a bilinear expansion for an angle-averaged redistribution function. This function describes the elementary act of a photon scattering by a model two-level atom with the upper level broadened due to radiation damping. An eigenvalue and eigenvector determination problem is formulated and the relevant matrices are found analytically. Numerical procedures for their computations are elaborated as well. A simple method for the numerical calculations accuracy evaluation is suggested. It is shown that a family of redistribution functions describing the light scattering process within the spectral line frequencies can be constructed if the eigenvalue problem for the considered function is solved. It becomes possible if the eigenvalues and eigenvectors with the appropriate basic functions are used. The Voigt function and its derivatives used as basic functions are studied in detail as well.

  13. Generalizing Single Variable Functions to Two-Variable Functions, Function Machine and APOS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kabael, Tangul Uygur

    2011-01-01

    The focus of this study in which the theoretical framework of APOS was used is students' generalizing function notion from single variable to two-variable function concepts in Analysis II course in the elementary mathematics education program. In the teaching process, teaching activities that support generalizing the function notion with multiple…

  14. Functionality Improvements to Overaero

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gee, Ken; Rizk, Yehia M.

    2000-01-01

    The functionality of the overset, static aeroelasticity, Navier-Stokes flow solver OVERAERO was increased by adding capability to the flow solver and enhancing code performance. Improvements were made to the fluids/structure interface, an MLP version of the parallel OVERAERO code was developed, and the OVERAERO-MPI code was ported to the Cray T3E. The OVERFLOW-MPI and OVERAERO-MPI codes were tested successfully on the IPG testbed and a means of reducing communication overhead within OVERFLOW-MPI was investigated. To solve an aeroelastic problem computationally, a structures grid surface definition and a fluids grid surface definition are required. Typically, the structures grid surface has a lower fidelity than the fluids grid surface. Thus, the methods developed to transfer data between the two grid systems are vital to the accuracy and efficiency of the aeroelasticity code. The fluids/structures interface developed for the OVERAERO code was improved to more accurately treat fluids surfaces that bridge between two different structural surfaces. For example, the method allowed the forward portion of a flap track fairing to deform with the wing and the aft end of the fairing to deform with the flap. A tightly-coupled version of the code based on OVERFLOW-MLP was developed to improve code performance on the SGI Origin 2000. This required a new parallelization strategy to couple the fluids and structures codes. The OVERAERO-MPI code was ported to the Cray T3E to extend the usability of the code. The port required extensive use of dynamic memory management techniques to fit large problems within the memory limitations of the T3E. The OVERFLOW-MPI and OVERAERO-MPI codes were tested on the IPG testbed being developed within NASA. For small problems with minimal data transfer between grids, there was little to no performance penalty spreading the computation across two machines. For very large problems, methods were developed to minimize intermachine communication via the

  15. Radial basis function networks and complexity regularization in function learning.

    PubMed

    Krzyzak, A; Linder, T

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we apply the method of complexity regularization to derive estimation bounds for nonlinear function estimation using a single hidden layer radial basis function network. Our approach differs from previous complexity regularization neural-network function learning schemes in that we operate with random covering numbers and l(1) metric entropy, making it possible to consider much broader families of activation functions, namely functions of bounded variation. Some constraints previously imposed on the network parameters are also eliminated this way. The network is trained by means of complexity regularization involving empirical risk minimization. Bounds on the expected risk in terms of the sample size are obtained for a large class of loss functions. Rates of convergence to the optimal loss are also derived.

  16. Identifying copepod functional groups from species functional traits

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti, Fabio; Gasparini, Stéphane; Ayata, Sakina-Dorothée

    2016-01-01

    We gathered information on the functional traits of the most representative copepod species in the Mediterranean Sea. Our database includes 191 species described by 7 traits encompassing diverse ecological functions: minimal and maximal body length, trophic group, feeding type, spawning strategy, diel vertical migration and vertical habitat. Cluster analysis in the functional trait space revealed that Mediterranean copepods can be separated into groups with distinct ecological roles. PMID:26811565

  17. Transfer Function Identification Using Orthogonal Fourier Transform Modeling Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2013-01-01

    A method for transfer function identification, including both model structure determination and parameter estimation, was developed and demonstrated. The approach uses orthogonal modeling functions generated from frequency domain data obtained by Fourier transformation of time series data. The method was applied to simulation data to identify continuous-time transfer function models and unsteady aerodynamic models. Model fit error, estimated model parameters, and the associated uncertainties were used to show the effectiveness of the method for identifying accurate transfer function models from noisy data.

  18. Free Functional Muscle Transfers to Restore Upper Extremity Function.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Emily M; Tung, Thomas H; Moore, Amy M

    2016-05-01

    Free functional muscle transfer provides an option for functional restoration when nerve reconstruction and tendon transfers are not feasible. To ensure a successful outcome, many factors need to be optimized, including proper patient selection, timing of intervention, donor muscle and motor nerve selection, optimal microneurovascular technique and tension setting, proper postoperative management, and appropriate rehabilitation. Functional outcomes of various applications to the upper extremity and the authors' algorithm for the use of free functional muscle transfer are also included in this article. PMID:27094895

  19. Inheritance contradictions between functional and extra-functional requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Hochmueller, E.

    1996-12-31

    This paper discusses the tension which may arise between functional and extra-functional requirements during the process of object-oriented design. A sketch of some design conflicts in object-oriented development induced by concurrency and security requirements will serve as a basis for rather provocative prospects on an essential distinction between the core requirements for systems dealing with their proper purpose and functionality and the requirements which can be considered to be of extra-functional nature in constraining the systems solution space.

  20. Staircase and fractional part functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amram, Meirav; Dagan, Miriam; Ioshpe, Michael; Satianov, Pavel

    2016-10-01

    The staircase and fractional part functions are basic examples of real functions. They can be applied in several parts of mathematics, such as analysis, number theory, formulas for primes, and so on; in computer programming, the floor and ceiling functions are provided by a significant number of programming languages - they have some basic uses in various programming tasks. In this paper, we view the staircase and fractional part functions as a classical example of non-continuous real functions. We introduce some of their basic properties, present some interesting constructions concerning them, and explore some intriguing interpretations of such functions. Throughout the paper, we use these functions in order to explain basic concepts in a first calculus course, such as domain of definition, discontinuity, and oddness of functions. We also explain in detail how, after researching the properties of such functions, one can draw their graph; this is a crucial part in the process of understanding their nature. In the paper, we present some subjects that the first-year student in the exact sciences may not encounter. We try to clarify those subjects and show that such ideas are important in the understanding of non-continuous functions, as a part of studying analysis in general.

  1. FFTF Plant transition function analysis report

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, D.P.; FFTF Working Group

    1995-09-01

    The document contains the functions, function definitions, function interfaces, function interface definitions, Input Computer Automated Manufacturing Definition (IDEFO) diagrams, and function hierarchy charts that describe what needs to be performed to deactivate FFTF.

  2. Symmetry of cardiac function assessment.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xu-Fang; Ma, Amy X

    2016-09-01

    Both right and left ventricles are developed from two adjacent segments of the primary heart tube. Though they are different with regard to shape and power, they mirror each other in terms of behavior. This is the first level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Both cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation are active. This constructs the second level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Combination of the two levels will help to find some hidden indexes or approaches to evaluate cardiac function. In this article, four major indexes from echocardiography were analyzed under this principal, another seventeen indexes or measurement approaches came out of the shadow, which is very helpful in the assessment of cardiac function, especially for the right cardiac function and diastolic cardiac function.

  3. The relativity of biological function.

    PubMed

    Laubichler, Manfred D; Stadler, Peter F; Prohaska, Sonja J; Nowick, Katja

    2015-12-01

    Function is a central concept in biological theories and explanations. Yet discussions about function are often based on a narrow understanding of biological systems and processes, such as idealized molecular systems or simple evolutionary, i.e., selective, dynamics. Conflicting conceptions of function continue to be used in the scientific literature to support certain claims, for instance about the fraction of "functional DNA" in the human genome. Here we argue that all biologically meaningful interpretations of function are necessarily context dependent. This implies that they derive their meaning as well as their range of applicability only within a specific theoretical and measurement context. We use this framework to shed light on the current debate about functional DNA and argue that without considering explicitly the theoretical and measurement contexts all attempts to integrate biological theories are prone to fail.

  4. Symmetry of cardiac function assessment.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xu-Fang; Ma, Amy X

    2016-09-01

    Both right and left ventricles are developed from two adjacent segments of the primary heart tube. Though they are different with regard to shape and power, they mirror each other in terms of behavior. This is the first level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Both cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation are active. This constructs the second level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Combination of the two levels will help to find some hidden indexes or approaches to evaluate cardiac function. In this article, four major indexes from echocardiography were analyzed under this principal, another seventeen indexes or measurement approaches came out of the shadow, which is very helpful in the assessment of cardiac function, especially for the right cardiac function and diastolic cardiac function. PMID:27582768

  5. The relativity of biological function.

    PubMed

    Laubichler, Manfred D; Stadler, Peter F; Prohaska, Sonja J; Nowick, Katja

    2015-12-01

    Function is a central concept in biological theories and explanations. Yet discussions about function are often based on a narrow understanding of biological systems and processes, such as idealized molecular systems or simple evolutionary, i.e., selective, dynamics. Conflicting conceptions of function continue to be used in the scientific literature to support certain claims, for instance about the fraction of "functional DNA" in the human genome. Here we argue that all biologically meaningful interpretations of function are necessarily context dependent. This implies that they derive their meaning as well as their range of applicability only within a specific theoretical and measurement context. We use this framework to shed light on the current debate about functional DNA and argue that without considering explicitly the theoretical and measurement contexts all attempts to integrate biological theories are prone to fail. PMID:26449352

  6. Methods of making functionalized nanorods

    DOEpatents

    Gur, Ilan; Milliron, Delia; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Liu, Haitao

    2012-01-10

    A process for forming functionalized nanorods. The process includes providing a substrate, modifying the substrate by depositing a self-assembled monolayer of a bi-functional molecule on the substrate, wherein the monolayer is chosen such that one side of the bi-functional molecule binds to the substrate surface and the other side shows an independent affinity for binding to a nanocrystal surface, so as to form a modified substrate. The process further includes contacting the modified substrate with a solution containing nanocrystal colloids, forming a bound monolayer of nanocrystals on the substrate surface, depositing a polymer layer over the monolayer of nanocrystals to partially cover the monolayer of nanocrystals, so as to leave a layer of exposed nanocrystals, functionalizing the exposed nanocrystals, to form functionalized nanocrystals, and then releasing the functionalized nanocrystals from the substrate.

  7. Symmetry of cardiac function assessment

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xu-Fang; Ma, Amy X

    2016-01-01

    Both right and left ventricles are developed from two adjacent segments of the primary heart tube. Though they are different with regard to shape and power, they mirror each other in terms of behavior. This is the first level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Both cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation are active. This constructs the second level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Combination of the two levels will help to find some hidden indexes or approaches to evaluate cardiac function. In this article, four major indexes from echocardiography were analyzed under this principal, another seventeen indexes or measurement approaches came out of the shadow, which is very helpful in the assessment of cardiac function, especially for the right cardiac function and diastolic cardiac function. PMID:27582768

  8. Characterization of Reflection Positivity: Majoranas and Spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, Arthur; Janssens, Bas

    2016-09-01

    We study linear functionals on a Clifford algebra (algebra of Majoranas) equipped with a reflection automorphism. For Hamiltonians that are functions of Majoranas or of spins, we find necessary and sufficient conditions on the coupling constants for reflection positivity to hold. One can easily check these conditions in concrete models. We illustrate this by discussing a number of spin systems with nearest-neighbor and long-range interactions.

  9. CAMAC modular programmable function generator

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, G.W.; Suehiro, S.; Hendricks, R.W.

    1980-12-01

    A CAMAC modular programmable function generator has been developed. The device contains a 1024 word by 12-bit memory, a 12-bit digital-to-analog converter with a 600 ns settling time, an 18-bit programmable frequency register, and two programmable trigger output registers. The trigger registers can produce programmed output logic transitions at various (binary) points in the output function curve, and are used to synchronize various other data acquisition devices with the function curve.

  10. [Phylogenetic aspects of lip function].

    PubMed

    Brix, M; Ricbourg, B; Spitzer, W J

    2004-02-01

    Lips can be considered a phylogenic summary of nasolabial and facial muscle evolution. They represent the central point of facial morphogenesis. The progressive development of oral and facial functions is an elementary human necessity for feeding, suction, oral competence, swallowing, language, and mimics. Each discontinuity causes functional and anatomic disorders. Any damage to the lips creates facial unbalance. Precise knowledge of lip function is indispensable for optimal reconstruction.

  11. Benzaldehyde-functionalized Polymer Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Guorong; Fang, Huafeng; Cheng, Chong; Lu, Peng; Zhang, Ke; Walker, Amy V.; Taylor, John-Stephen A.; Wooley, Karen L.

    2009-01-01

    Polymer vesicles with diameters of ca. 100-600 nm and bearing benzaldehyde functionalities within the vesicular walls were constructed through self assembly of an amphiphilic block copolymer PEO45-b-PVBA26 in water. The reactivity of the benzaldehyde functionalities was verified by crosslinking the polymersomes, and also by a one-pot crosslinking and functionalization approach to further render the vesicles fluorescent, each via reductive amination. In vitro studies found these labelled nanostructures to undergo cell association. PMID:19309173

  12. Functionalizing Designer DNA Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekaran, Arun Richard

    nucleotides is usually pH dependent (pH < 6) four different TFOs were examined: TFO-1 was unmodified while TFOs 2-4 contained additional stabilizing analogues capable of extending triplex formation to pH 7. In addition, each of the TFOs contained a Cy5 dye at the 5'-end of the oligonucleotide to aid in characterization of TFO binding - crystals were obtained with all four variations of TFOs. Formation of DNA triplex in the motif was characterized by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), UV melting studies and FRET. Crystals containing TFO-1 (unmodified) and TFO-2 (with 2'-amino ethoxy modification) were isolated and flash-frozen in liquid nitrogen for X-ray data collection at beam line NSLS-X25. X-ray data was also collected for crystals of the 3-turn triangle without any TFO bound to it. Difference maps were done between the crystals with TFO against the one without to identify any additional electron density corresponding to the third strand in the triplex binding region. The data from the crystal containing TFO-2 was used to further analyze if the additional density can match the expected position of the TFO on the triangle motif. Since the additional density did not correspond to the entire binding region, 2Fo-Fc, 3Fo-2Fc and 4Fo-3Fc maps were done to check for missing pieces of the electron density. From the resulting 2Fo-Fc map, the asymmetric unit from the 3-turn triangle (31-bp duplex model based on previous structure 3UBI) was inserted into the density as a reference. However, the electron density corresponding to the TFO was still not continuous throughout the 13-nt triplex binding region and allowed only a partial fit of the TFO. The third nucleotide in positions 1, 3, 4, 6, 7 were fit into the density in the major groove of the underlying duplex with proper triplex configuration. The third chapter describes the triplex approach to position a functional group (the UV cross-linking agent psoralen) within a pre-formed DNA motif. Triplex formation and

  13. Adiabatic corrections to density functional theory energies and wave functions.

    PubMed

    Mohallem, José R; Coura, Thiago de O; Diniz, Leonardo G; de Castro, Gustavo; Assafrão, Denise; Heine, Thomas

    2008-09-25

    The adiabatic finite-nuclear-mass-correction (FNMC) to the electronic energies and wave functions of atoms and molecules is formulated for density-functional theory and implemented in the deMon code. The approach is tested for a series of local and gradient corrected density functionals, using MP2 results and diagonal-Born-Oppenheimer corrections from the literature for comparison. In the evaluation of absolute energy corrections of nonorganic molecules the LDA PZ81 functional works surprisingly better than the others. For organic molecules the GGA BLYP functional has the best performance. FNMC with GGA functionals, mainly BLYP, show a good performance in the evaluation of relative corrections, except for nonorganic molecules containing H atoms. The PW86 functional stands out with the best evaluation of the barrier of linearity of H2O and the isotopic dipole moment of HDO. In general, DFT functionals display an accuracy superior than the common belief and because the corrections are based on a change of the electronic kinetic energy they are here ranked in a new appropriate way. The approach is applied to obtain the adiabatic correction for full atomization of alcanes C(n)H(2n+2), n = 4-10. The barrier of 1 mHartree is approached for adiabatic corrections, justifying its insertion into DFT. PMID:18537228

  14. Speech and language functions that require a functioning Broca's area.

    PubMed

    Davis, Cameron; Kleinman, Jonathan T; Newhart, Melissa; Gingis, Leila; Pawlak, Mikolaj; Hillis, Argye E

    2008-04-01

    A number of previous studies have indicated that Broca's area has an important role in understanding and producing syntactically complex sentences and other language functions. If Broca's area is critical for these functions, then either infarction of Broca's area or temporary hypoperfusion within this region should cause impairment of these functions, at least while the neural tissue is dysfunctional. The opportunity to identify the language functions that depend on Broca's area in a particular individual was provided by a patient with hyperacute stroke who showed selective hypoperfusion, with minimal infarct, in Broca's area, and acutely impaired production of grammatical sentences, comprehension of semantically reversible (but not non-reversible) sentences, spelling, and motor planning of speech articulation. When blood flow was restored to Broca's area, as demonstrated by repeat perfusion weighted imaging, he showed immediate recovery of these language functions. The identification of language functions that were impaired when Broca's area was dysfunctional (due to low blood flow) and recovered when Broca's area was functional again, provides evidence for the critical role of Broca's area in these language functions, at least in this individual. PMID:18325581

  15. Speech and Language Functions that Require a Functioning Broca's Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Cameron; Kleinman, Jonathan T.; Newhart, Melissa; Gingis, Leila; Pawlak, Mikolaj; Hillis, Argye E.

    2008-01-01

    A number of previous studies have indicated that Broca's area has an important role in understanding and producing syntactically complex sentences and other language functions. If Broca's area is critical for these functions, then either infarction of Broca's area or temporary hypoperfusion within this region should cause impairment of these…

  16. The Relationship between Mathematical Induction, Proposition Functions, and Implication Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrew, Lane

    2010-01-01

    In this study, I explored the relationship between mathematical induction ability and proposition and implication functions through a mixed methods approach. Students from three universities (N = 78) and 6 classrooms completed a written assessment testing their conceptual and procedural capabilities with induction and functions. In addition, I…

  17. Control of functional differential equations with function space boundary conditions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.

    1972-01-01

    The results of various authors dealing with problems involving functional differential equations with terminal conditions in function space are reviewed. The review includes not only very recent results, but also some little known results of Soviet mathematicians prior to 1970. Particular attention is given to results concerning controllability, existence of optimal controls, and necessary and sufficient conditions for optimality.

  18. Differential Item Functioning Analysis Using Rasch Item Information Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyse, Adam E.; Mapuranga, Raymond

    2009-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) analysis is a statistical technique used for ensuring the equity and fairness of educational assessments. This study formulates a new DIF analysis method using the information similarity index (ISI). ISI compares item information functions when data fits the Rasch model. Through simulations and an international…

  19. Some completely monotonic functions involving polygamma functions and an application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Feng; Cui, Run-Qing; Chen, Chao-Ping; Guo, Bai-Ni

    2005-10-01

    By using the first Binet's formula the strictly completely monotonic properties of functions involving the psi and polygamma functions are obtainedE As direct consequences, two inequalities are proved. As an application, the best lower and upper bounds of the nth harmonic number are established.

  20. Localized functionalization of single nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, J; Lee, J I; Ratto, T V; Letant, S E

    2005-09-12

    We demonstrate the localization of chemical functionality at the entrance of single nanopores for the first time by using the controlled growth of an oxide ring. Nanopores were fabricated by Focused Ion Beam machining on silicon platforms, locally derivatized by ion beam assisted oxide deposition, and further functionalized with DNA probes via silane chemistry. Ionic current recorded through single nanopores at various stages of the fabrication process demonstrated that the apertures can be locally functionalized with DNA probes. Future applications for this functional platform include the selective detection of biological organisms and molecules by ionic current blockade measurements.

  1. Counselor Function in Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maser, Arthur L.

    1971-01-01

    Results of the study indicate that stated disagreements in perceptions of counselor function appear to arise from the necessity of counselors performing duties outside the counseling paradigm. (Author)

  2. Determination of pyrotechnic functional margin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.; Schimmel, Morry L.

    1993-01-01

    Following the failure of a previously qualified pyrotechnically actuated pin puller design, an investigation led to a redesign and requalification. The emphasis of the second qualification was placed on determining the functional margin of the pin puller by comparing the energy deliverable by the pyrotechnic cartridge to the energy required to accomplish the function. Also determined were the effects of functional variables. This paper describes the failure investigation, the test methods employed and the results of the evaluation, and provides a recommended approach to assure the successful functioning of pyrotechnic devices.

  3. Functional Overlay: An Illegitimate Diagnosis?

    PubMed Central

    Bromberg, Walter

    1979-01-01

    Functional overlay is not a recognized psychiatric diagnosis. Evaluating functional overlay and differentiating between this concept and organic conditions is important in medicolegal areas in which financial values are placed on pain and disability. Functional overlay is not malingering: the former is based on preconscious or unconscious mechanisms, the latter is consciously induced. In considering psychologic reactions to pain and disability, a gradient of simulation, malingering, symptom exaggeration, overvaluation, functional overlay and hysteria is useful. The dynamics of overlay are a combination of anxiety from body-image distortion and depression from decreased efficiency of the body, as well as the resulting psychosocial disruption in a patient's life. PMID:516698

  4. Television and children's executive function.

    PubMed

    Lillard, Angeline S; Li, Hui; Boguszewski, Katie

    2015-01-01

    Children spend a lot of time watching television on its many platforms: directly, online, and via videos and DVDs. Many researchers are concerned that some types of television content appear to negatively influence children's executive function. Because (1) executive function predicts key developmental outcomes, (2) executive function appears to be influenced by some television content, and (3) American children watch large quantities of television (including the content of concern), the issues discussed here comprise a crucial public health issue. Further research is needed to reveal exactly what television content is implicated, what underlies television's effect on executive function, how long the effect lasts, and who is affected.

  5. Free Flap Functional Muscle Transfers.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ryan M; Ruch, David S

    2016-08-01

    Free functional muscle transfers remain a powerful reconstructive tool to restore upper extremity function when other options such as tendon or nerve transfers are not available. This reconstructive technique is commonly used for patients following trauma, ischemic contractures, and brachial plexopathies. Variable outcomes have been reported following free functional muscle transfers that are related to motor nerve availability and reinnervation. This article highlights considerations around donor motor nerve selection, dissection, and use of the gracilis muscle, and the surgical approach to performing a free functional muscle transfer to restore elbow flexion and/or digit flexion. PMID:27387083

  6. Drivers of carabid functional diversity: abiotic environment, plant functional traits, or plant functional diversity?

    PubMed

    Pakeman, Robin J; Stockan, Jenni A

    2014-05-01

    Understanding how community assembly is controlled by the balance of abiotic drivers (environment or management) and biotic drivers (community composition of other groups) is important in predicting the response of ecosystems to environmental change. If there are strong links between plant assemblage structure and carabid beetle functional traits and functional diversity, then it is possible to predict the impact of environmental change propagating through different functional and trophic groups. Vegetation and pitfall trap beetle surveys were carried out across twenty four sites contrasting in land use, and hence productivity and disturbance regime. Plant functional traits were very successful at explaining the distribution of carabid functional traits across the habitats studied. Key carabid response traits appeared to be body length and wing type. Carabid functional richness was significantly smaller than expected, indicating strong environmental filtering, modulated by management, soil characteristics, and by plant response traits. Carabid functional divergence was negatively related to plant functional evenness, while carabid functional evenness was positively correlated to plant functional evenness and richness. The study shows that there are clear trait linkages between the plant and the carabid assemblage that act not only through the mean traits displayed, but also via their distribution in trait space; powerful evidence that both the mean and variance of traits in one trophic group structure the assemblage of another.

  7. On the origin and functions of the term functional analysis.

    PubMed

    Schlinger, Henry D; Normand, Matthew P

    2013-01-01

    In this essay, we note that although Iwata, Dorsey, Slifer, Bauman, and Richman (1982) established the standard framework for conducting functional analyses of problem behavior, the term functional analysis was probably first used in behavior analysis by B. F. Skinner in 1948. We also remind readers that a functional analysis is really an experimental analysis, words that were contained in the title of Skinner's first book, The Behavior of Organisms: An Experimental Analysis (1938). We further describe how Skinner initially applied the concept of functional analysis to an understanding of verbal behavior, and we suggest that the same tactic be applied to the verbal behavior of behavior analysts, in the present case, to the term functional analysis. PMID:24114100

  8. Variation is function: Are single cell differences functionally important?

    PubMed Central

    Dueck, Hannah; Eberwine, James

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing appreciation of the extent of transcriptome variation across individual cells of the same cell type. While expression variation may be a byproduct of, for example, dynamic or homeostatic processes, here we consider whether single‐cell molecular variation per se might be crucial for population‐level function. Under this hypothesis, molecular variation indicates a diversity of hidden functional capacities within an ensemble of “identical” cells, and this functional diversity facilitates collective behavior that would be inaccessible to a homogenous population. In reviewing this topic, we explore possible functions that might be carried by a heterogeneous ensemble of cells; however, this question has proven difficult to test, both because methods to manipulate molecular variation are limited and because it is complicated to define, and measure, population‐level function. We consider several possible methods to further pursue the hypothesis that “variation is function” through the use of comparative analysis and novel experimental techniques. PMID:26625861

  9. Technical Rebuilding of Movement Function Using Functional Electrical Stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gföhler, Margit

    To rebuild lost movement functions, neuroprostheses based on functional electrical stimulation (FES) artificially activate skeletal muscles in corresponding sequences, using both residual body functions and artificial signals for control. Besides the functional gain, FES training also brings physiological and psychological benefits for spinal cord-injured subjects. In this chapter, current stimulation technology and the main components of FES-based neuroprostheses including enhanced control systems are presented. Technology and application of FES cycling and rowing, both approaches that enable spinal cord-injured subjects to participate in mainstream activities and improve their health and fitness by exercising like able-bodied subjects, are discussed in detail, and an overview of neuroprostheses that aim at restoring movement functions for daily life as walking or grasping is given.

  10. Kidney function decline and physical function in women

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Julie; Curhan, Gary C.

    2008-01-01

    Background. Cross-sectional analyses of kidney function and physical function have identified profound quality of life impairments in people with advanced kidney dysfunction. No data are currently available, however, on how kidney function decline may be associated with physical function. Methods. We undertook a study of kidney function decline and physical function in 2544 women participating in the Nurses’ Health Study. Glomerular filtration rates (GFR) were estimated using the four-variable MDRD equation from plasma creatinine measured in blood collected in 1989 and 2000. Physical function was assessed by the Physical Function Sub-Scale (PFS) score of the Short Form 36 (SF-36) in a questionnaire administered in the year 2000. PFS scores have been shown to correlate well with direct measures of physical function. Results. In the year 2000, the median age was 67 years, median body mass index (BMI) was 25.6 kg/m2, 48.5% had hypertension and 5.8% had diabetes. There were 427 women (16.8%) who experienced an ≥25% decline in eGFR between 1989 and 2000. Median PFS in 2000 for those with an eGFR decline of ≥25% was 80 compared to a PFS score of 85 for those without (P < 0.001). In fully adjusted models, the presence of an eGFR decline of ≥25% was independently associated with a 3.5-point lower PFS score (95% CI −5.4 to −1.5). Also, an eGFR decline of ≥25% was independently associated with an increased odds ratio of being in the lowest quartile of PFS score (OR 1.37; 95% CI 1.04–1.81). Conclusions. We conclude that an eGFR decline of ≥25% over 11 years is independently associated with lower physical function in women. PMID:18398018

  11. Classification of current scoring functions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Wang, Renxiao

    2015-03-23

    Scoring functions are a class of computational methods widely applied in structure-based drug design for evaluating protein-ligand interactions. Dozens of scoring functions have been published since the early 1990s. In literature, scoring functions are typically classified as force-field-based, empirical, and knowledge-based. This classification scheme has been quoted for more than a decade and is still repeatedly quoted by some recent publications. Unfortunately, it does not reflect the recent progress in this field. Besides, the naming convention used for describing different types of scoring functions has been somewhat jumbled in literature, which could be confusing for newcomers to this field. Here, we express our viewpoint on an up-to-date classification scheme and appropriate naming convention for current scoring functions. We propose that they can be classified into physics-based methods, empirical scoring functions, knowledge-based potentials, and descriptor-based scoring functions. We also outline the major difference and connections between different categories of scoring functions. PMID:25647463

  12. Can nitrones functionalize carbon nanotubes?

    PubMed

    Ghini, Giacomo; Luconi, Lapo; Rossin, Andrea; Bianchini, Claudio; Giambastiani, Giuliano; Cicchi, Stefano; Lascialfari, Luisa; Brandi, Alberto; Giannasi, Alessandra

    2010-01-14

    An unprecedented functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) has been conveniently achieved by the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of a cyclic nitrone. This organic functionalization yields materials with a great solubility in DMF (close to 10 mg per mL of DMF) preferentially occurring at the defects of the MWCNT sp(2) network. PMID:20024342

  13. Functionalism in Second Language Acquisition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomlin, Russell S.

    1990-01-01

    Examines the role of functional approaches to linguistics in understanding second-language acquisition (SLA), focusing on central premises, tenets, and theoretical problems. It is concluded that functional universals are too insufficiently grounded theoretically and empirically to contribute more than heuristic guidance to SLA theory. (141…

  14. The Functional Properties of Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garvin, Paul L.

    This paper asks whether the imprecision and complexity of natural language, as opposed to the language of science or logic, represent flaws or essential functional properties. It is argued that ambiguity can be manipulated by the speaker through environmentally derived characteristics. A discussion follows on the study of the functions of language…

  15. Lung function and airway diseases.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Scott T

    2010-01-01

    Two studies report genome-wide association studies for lung function, using cross-sectional spirometric measurements in healthy individuals. They identify six genetic loci newly associated to natural variation in lung function, which may have implications for the related airway diseases of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:20037613

  16. Functional keratin as structural platforms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wool with up to 95% keratin by weight is a rich and pure source of proteinous biomaterial. As polymeric polyamide it exhibits high functionality through amide, carboxyl, sulfoxide, sulfide, and thiosulfide functions. Solubilized wool was transformed into keratin morphologies with the unique characte...

  17. Microencapsulation and functional bioactive foods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Food, the essential unit of human nutrition has been both wholesome and safe through human history ensuring the continuity of the human race. Functionalized foods are the rediscovery of the need to provide all nutrients through foods without adulteration. The functional components of foods include...

  18. Functional Segments in Tongue Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Maureen; Epstein, Melissa A.; Iskarous, Khalil

    2004-01-01

    The tongue is a deformable object, and moves by compressing or expanding local functional segments. For any single phoneme, these functional tongue segments may move in similar or opposite directions, and may reach target maximum synchronously or not. This paper will discuss the independence of five proposed segments in the production of speech.…

  19. Fourier Series and Elliptic Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2003-01-01

    Non-linear second-order differential equations whose solutions are the elliptic functions "sn"("t, k"), "cn"("t, k") and "dn"("t, k") are investigated. Using "Mathematica", high precision numerical solutions are generated. From these data, Fourier coefficients are determined yielding approximate formulas for these non-elementary functions that are…

  20. Central Auditory Function in Stutterers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, James W.; Jerger, James

    1978-01-01

    Central auditory function was assessed in 10 stutterers and 10 nonstutterers between the ages of 10 and 35 years, and the performance of the two groups compared for seven audiometric procedures, including acoustic reflex threshold and acoustic reflex amplitude function. (Author)

  1. Sperm function in affective illness.

    PubMed

    Amsterdam, J; Winokur, A; Levin, R

    1981-04-01

    There is evidence for functional changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis of patients with affective disorders. Little is known concerning spermatogenesis or sperm function in depressed men. We systematically evaluated the sperm indices in a group of depressed males complaining of diminished libido, and a healthy control group. No differences were noted in sperm parameters between the groups.

  2. Dual function conducting polymer diodes

    DOEpatents

    Heeger, Alan J.; Yu, Gang

    1996-01-01

    Dual function diodes based on conjugated organic polymer active layers are disclosed. When positively biased the diodes function as light emitters. When negatively biased they are highly efficient photodiodes. Methods of preparation and use of these diodes in displays and input/output devices are also disclosed.

  3. Multi-functional composite structures

    DOEpatents

    Mulligan, Anthony C.; Halloran, John; Popovich, Dragan; Rigali, Mark J.; Sutaria, Manish P.; Vaidyanathan, K. Ranji; Fulcher, Michael L.; Knittel, Kenneth L.

    2010-04-27

    Fibrous monolith processing techniques to fabricate multifunctional structures capable of performing more than one discrete function such as structures capable of bearing structural loads and mechanical stresses in service and also capable of performing at least one additional non-structural function.

  4. Pharmacologic Effects on Mitochondrial Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Bruce H.

    2010-01-01

    The vast majority of energy necessary for cellular function is produced in mitochondria. Free-radical production and apoptosis are other critical mitochondrial functions. The complex structure, electrochemical properties of the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM), and genetic control from both mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and nuclear DNA (nDNA) are…

  5. Feedback: How Does It Function?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardwell, Rebecca

    1981-01-01

    A study of feedback delay, expectation, and development was conducted in grades four, six, and eight, to assess whether feedback on a school related learning task serves an informational or reinforcing function. Results indicate that feedback serves an informational function and delayed feedback facilitates retention, contrary to reinforcement…

  6. Mahler's Expansion and Boolean Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michon, Jean-Francis; Valarcher, Pierre; YunÈs, Jean-Baptiste

    2007-03-01

    The substitution of X by X^2 in binomial polynomials generates sequences of integers by Mahler's expansion. We give some properties of these integers and a combinatorial interpretation with covers by projection. We also give applications to the classification of boolean functions. This sequence arose from our previous research on classification and complexity of Binary Decision Diagrams (BDD) associated with boolean functions.

  7. Functions in Biological Kind Classification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombrozo, Tania; Rehder, Bob

    2012-01-01

    Biological traits that serve functions, such as a zebra's coloration (for camouflage) or a kangaroo's tail (for balance), seem to have a special role in conceptual representations for biological kinds. In five experiments, we investigate whether and why functional features are privileged in biological kind classification. Experiment 1…

  8. Space station functional relationships analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tullis, Thomas S.; Bied, Barbra R.

    1988-01-01

    A systems engineering process is developed to assist Space Station designers to understand the underlying operational system of the facility so that it can be physically arranged and configured to support crew productivity. The study analyzes the operational system proposed for the Space Station in terms of mission functions, crew activities, and functional relationships in order to develop a quantitative model for evaluation of interior layouts, configuration, and traffic analysis for any Station configuration. Development of the model involved identification of crew functions, required support equipment, criteria of assessing functional relationships, and tools for analyzing functional relationship matrices, as well as analyses of crew transition frequency, sequential dependencies, support equipment requirements, potential for noise interference, need for privacy, and overall compatability of functions. The model can be used for analyzing crew functions for the Initial Operating Capability of the Station and for detecting relationships among these functions. Note: This process (FRA) was used during Phase B design studies to test optional layouts of the Space Station habitat module. The process is now being automated as a computer model for use in layout testing of the Space Station laboratory modules during Phase C.

  9. Developmental Changes in Executive Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Kerry; Bull, Rebecca; Ho, Ringo M. H.

    2013-01-01

    Although early studies of executive functioning in children supported Miyake et al.'s (2000) three-factor model, more recent findings supported a variety of undifferentiated or two-factor structures. Using a cohort-sequential design, this study examined whether there were age-related differences in the structure of executive functioning among…

  10. Radial distribution function in polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przygocki, Wladyslaw

    1997-02-01

    Radial distribution function is a very useful tool for determination of the polymer structure. The connection between the scattered X-ray intensity and radial distribution function is presented. Some examples of RDF for polyethylene and for poly(ethylene terephtalate).

  11. Continuous Problem of Function Continuity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jayakody, Gaya; Zazkis, Rina

    2015-01-01

    We examine different definitions presented in textbooks and other mathematical sources for "continuity of a function at a point" and "continuous function" in the context of introductory level Calculus. We then identify problematic issues related to definitions of continuity and discontinuity: inconsistency and absence of…

  12. Function variational principles and coercivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turinici, Mihai

    2005-04-01

    The function type extension of Ekeland's variational principle [J. Math. Anal. Appl. 47 (1974) 324-353] due to Zhong [Nonlinear Anal. 29 (1997) 1421-1431] is deductible in a simplified manner and in a larger functional context. This is also true for his (normed) coercivity result, based on Palais-Smale techniques.

  13. The Statistics of a Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Sheldon P.; Gordon, Florence S.

    2010-01-01

    One of the most important applications of the definite integral in a modern calculus course is the mean value of a function. Thus, if a function "f" is defined on an interval ["a", "b"], then the mean, or average value, of "f" is given by [image omitted]. In this note, we will investigate the meaning of other statistics associated with a function…

  14. Multi-functional composite structures

    DOEpatents

    Mulligan, Anthony C.; Halloran, John; Popovich, Dragan; Rigali, Mark J.; Sutaria, Manish P.; Vaidyanathan, K. Ranji; Fulcher, Michael L.; Knittel, Kenneth L.

    2004-10-19

    Fibrous monolith processing techniques to fabricate multifunctional structures capable of performing more than one discrete function such as structures capable of bearing structural loads and mechanical stresses in service and also capable of performing at least one additional non-structural function.

  15. Thyroid Function in Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pueschel, Siegfried M.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This study investigated the thyroid function of 181 patients (mean age 14 years) with Down's syndrome and found more thyroid dysfunctions than in the general population. Periodic thyroid hormone function tests are recommended for Down's syndrome individuals, especially as they get older. (Author/DB)

  16. Medical Spanish: A Functional Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, James M.

    A functional approach to language teaching begins with knowing how students intend to use the foreign language for specific purposes and in specific situations. Instructors of medical Spanish can begin by determining the specific language functions that their students must be able to express when communicating with Hispanic patients, by means of a…

  17. Classification of current scoring functions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Wang, Renxiao

    2015-03-23

    Scoring functions are a class of computational methods widely applied in structure-based drug design for evaluating protein-ligand interactions. Dozens of scoring functions have been published since the early 1990s. In literature, scoring functions are typically classified as force-field-based, empirical, and knowledge-based. This classification scheme has been quoted for more than a decade and is still repeatedly quoted by some recent publications. Unfortunately, it does not reflect the recent progress in this field. Besides, the naming convention used for describing different types of scoring functions has been somewhat jumbled in literature, which could be confusing for newcomers to this field. Here, we express our viewpoint on an up-to-date classification scheme and appropriate naming convention for current scoring functions. We propose that they can be classified into physics-based methods, empirical scoring functions, knowledge-based potentials, and descriptor-based scoring functions. We also outline the major difference and connections between different categories of scoring functions.

  18. Chain functions and scoring functions in genetic networks.

    PubMed

    Gat-Viks, I; Shamir, R

    2003-01-01

    One of the grand challenges of system biology is to reconstruct the network of regulatory control among genes and proteins. High throughput data, particularly from expression experiments, may gradually make this possible in the future. Here we address two key ingredients in any such 'reverse engineering' effort: The choice of a biologically relevant, yet restricted, set of potential regulation functions, and the appropriate score to evaluate candidate regulatory relations. We propose a set of regulation functions which we call chain functions, and argue for their ubiquity in biological networks. We analyze their complexity and show that their number is exponentially smaller than all boolean functions of the same dimension. We define two new scores: one evaluating the fitness of a candidate set of regulators of a particular gene, and the other evaluating a candidate function. Both scores use established statistical methods. Finally, we test our methods on experimental gene expression data from the yeast galactose pathway. We show the utility of using chain functions and the improved inference using our scores in comparison to several extant scores. We demonstrate that the combined use of the two scores gives an extra advantage. We expect both chain functions and the new scores to be helpful in future attempts to infer regulatory networks. PMID:12855446

  19. Protein function prediction based on data fusion and functional interrelationship.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jun; Wekesa, Jael-Sanyanda; Shi, Guan-Li; Luan, Yu-Shi

    2016-04-01

    One of the challenging tasks of bioinformatics is to predict more accurate and confident protein functions from genomics and proteomics datasets. Computational approaches use a variety of high throughput experimental data, such as protein-protein interaction (PPI), protein sequences and phylogenetic profiles, to predict protein functions. This paper presents a method that uses transductive multi-label learning algorithm by integrating multiple data sources for classification. Multiple proteomics datasets are integrated to make inferences about functions of unknown proteins and use a directed bi-relational graph to assign labels to unannotated proteins. Our method, bi-relational graph based transductive multi-label function annotation (Bi-TMF) uses functional correlation and topological PPI network properties on both the training and testing datasets to predict protein functions through data fusion of the individual kernel result. The main purpose of our proposed method is to enhance the performance of classifier integration for protein function prediction algorithms. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of Bi-TMF on multi-sources datasets in yeast, human and mouse benchmarks. Bi-TMF outperforms other recently proposed methods. PMID:26869536

  20. CP function: an alpha spending function based on conditional power.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhiwei; Wang, Ling; Li, Chanjuan; Xia, Jielai; Wang, William

    2014-11-20

    Alpha spending function and stochastic curtailment are two frequently used methods in group sequential design. In the stochastic curtailment approach, the actual type I error probability cannot be well controlled within the specified significance level. But conditional power (CP) in stochastic curtailment is easier to be accepted and understood by clinicians. In this paper, we develop a spending function based on the concept of conditional power, named CP function, which combines desirable features of alpha spending and stochastic curtailment. Like other two-parameter functions, CP function is flexible to fit the needs of the trial. A simulation study is conducted to explore the choice of CP boundary in CP function that maximizes the trial power. It is equivalent to, even better than, classical Pocock, O'Brien-Fleming, and quadratic spending function as long as a proper ρ0 is given, which is pre-specified CP threshold for efficacy. It also well controls the overall type I error type I error rate and overcomes the disadvantage of stochastic curtailment.

  1. Hexagon functions and the three-loop remainder function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Lance J.; Drummond, James M.; von Hippel, Matt; Pennington, Jeffrey

    2013-12-01

    We present the three-loop remainder function, which describes the scattering of six gluons in the maximally-helicity-violating configuration in planar = 4 super-Yang-Mills theory, as a function of the three dual conformal cross ratios. The result can be expressed in terms of multiple Goncharov polylogarithms. We also employ a more restricted class of hexagon functions which have the correct branch cuts and certain other restrictions on their symbols. We classify all the hexagon functions through transcendental weight five, using the coproduct for their Hopf algebra iteratively, which amounts to a set of first-order differential equations. The three-loop remainder function is a particular weight-six hexagon function, whose symbol was determined previously. The differential equations can be integrated numerically for generic values of the cross ratios, or analytically in certain kinematic limits, including the near-collinear and multi-Regge limits. These limits allow us to impose constraints from the operator product expansion and multi-Regge factorization directly at the function level, and thereby to fix uniquely a set of Riemann ζ valued constants that could not be fixed at the level of the symbol. The near-collinear limits agree precisely with recent predictions by Basso, Sever and Vieira based on integrability. The multi-Regge limits agree with the factorization formula of Fadin and Lipatov, and determine three constants entering the impact factor at this order. We plot the three-loop remainder function for various slices of the Euclidean region of positive cross ratios, and compare it to the two-loop one. For large ranges of the cross ratios, the ratio of the three-loop to the two-loop remainder function is relatively constant, and close to -7.

  2. [Relationships between venomous function and innate immune function].

    PubMed

    Goyffon, Max; Saul, Frederick; Faure, Grazyna

    2015-01-01

    Venomous function is investigated in relation to innate immune function in two cases selected from scorpion venom and serpent venom. In the first case, structural analysis of scorpion toxins and defensins reveals a close interrelation between both functions (toxic and innate immune system function). In the second case, structural and functional studies of natural inhibitors of toxic snake venom phospholipases A2 reveal homology with components of the innate immune system, leading to a similar conclusion. Although there is a clear functional distinction between neurotoxins, which act by targeting membrane ion channels, and the circulating defensins which protect the organism from pathogens, the scorpion short toxins and defensins share a common protein folding scaffold with a conserved cysteine-stabilized alpha-beta motif of three disulfide bridges linking a short alpha helix and an antiparallel beta sheet. Genomic analysis suggests that these proteins share a common ancestor (long venom toxins were separated from an early gene family which gave rise to separate short toxin and defensin families). Furthermore, a scorpion toxin has been experimentally synthetized from an insect defensin, and an antibacterial scorpion peptide, androctonin (whose structure is similar to that of a cone snail venom toxin), was shown to have a similar high affinity for the postsynaptic acetylcholine receptor of Torpedo sp. Natural inhibitors of phospholipase A2 found in the blood of snakes are associated with the resistance of venomous snakes to their own highly neurotoxic venom proteins. Three classes of phospholipases A2 inhibitors (PLI-α, PLI-β, PLI-γ) have been identified. These inhibitors display diverse structural motifs related to innate immune proteins including carbohydrate recognition domains (CRD), leucine rich repeat domains (found in Toll-like receptors) and three finger domains, which clearly differentiate them from components of the adaptive immune system. Thus, in

  3. New generalized gradient approximation functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boese, A. Daniel; Doltsinis, Nikos L.; Handy, Nicholas C.; Sprik, Michiel

    2000-01-01

    New generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functionals are reported, using the expansion form of A. D. Becke, J. Chem. Phys. 107, 8554 (1997), with 15 linear parameters. Our original such GGA functional, called HCTH, was determined through a least squares refinement to data of 93 systems. Here, the data are extended to 120 systems and 147 systems, introducing electron and proton affinities, and weakly bound dimers to give the new functionals HCTH/120 and HCTH/147. HCTH/120 has already been shown to give high quality predictions for weakly bound systems. The functionals are applied in a comparative study of the addition reaction of water to formaldehyde and sulfur trioxide, respectively. Furthermore, the performance of the HCTH/120 functional in Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations of liquid water is encouraging.

  4. A functional perspective on personality.

    PubMed

    Perugini, Marco; Costantini, Giulio; Hughes, Sean; De Houwer, Jan

    2016-02-01

    Personality psychology has made enormous progresses over the years by accumulating empirical evidence on how patterns of stable individual differences in behaviours can be clustered systematically at different levels of abstraction (i.e. traits and facets) and how they can predict important consequential outcomes. At the same time, functionally orientated researchers have accumulated a vast body of knowledge on environment-behaviour relations and the underlying behavioural principles, that is, abstract descriptions of the way in which behaviour is a function of elements in the past and present environment. We explore a functional perspective on personality that attempts to bridge the two domains and to exploit the best of both worlds. From this functional perspective, personality refers to the impact of the individual on different types of environment-behaviour relations as well as on the way other factors moderate those relations. We discuss the potential of this functional perspective on personality to organise existing scientific knowledge and inspire future research.

  5. Clinical evaluation of functional dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Monday, L A

    1983-10-01

    Functional dysphonia is a voice impairment without any organic lesion of the phonating system. It may be classified into two categories: functional dysphonia itself where no lesions are found and functional laryngopathies where vocal cord lesions may be attributed to vocal abuse or misuse. The clinical evaluation of a dysphonic patient is performed in three steps: history taking, vocal evaluation, and examination. History taking helps the diagnosis and may be considered also as a therapeutic procedure. Vocal evaluation is oriented toward the voice itself and how it is produced. Then an ENT examination is performed with special attention to the larynx. In functional dysphonia, usually, everything looks normal but there may be signs of inflammation, hyperkinetism, hypokinetism, excessive laryngeal movements, etc. Functional laryngopathies include vocal nodules, laryngitis, polyps, and contact ulcer.

  6. Fractal calculus involving gauge function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golmankhaneh, Alireza K.; Baleanu, Dumitru

    2016-08-01

    Henstock-Kurzweil integral or gauge integral is the generalization of the Riemann integral. The functions which are not integrable because of singularity in the senses of Lebesgue or Riemann are gauge integrable. In this manuscript, we have generalized Fα-calculus using the gauge integral method for the integrating of the functions on fractal set subset of real-line where they have singularities. The suggested new method leads to the wider class of functions on the fractal subset of real-line that are *Fα-integrable. Using gauge function we define *Fα-derivative of functions their Fα-derivative is not exist. The reported results can be used for generalizing the fundamental theorem of Fα-calculus.

  7. Functional Neuroanatomy and Neurophysiology of Functional Neurological Disorders (Conversion Disorder).

    PubMed

    Voon, Valerie; Cavanna, Andrea E; Coburn, Kerry; Sampson, Shirlene; Reeve, Alya; LaFrance, W Curt

    2016-01-01

    Much is known regarding the physical characteristics, comorbid symptoms, psychological makeup, and neuropsychological performance of patients with functional neurological disorders (FNDs)/conversion disorders. Gross neurostructural deficits do not account for the patients' deficits or symptoms. This review describes the literature focusing on potential neurobiological (i.e. functional neuroanatomic/neurophysiological) findings among individuals with FND, examining neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies of patients with the various forms of motor and sensory FND. In summary, neural networks and neurophysiologic mechanisms may mediate "functional" symptoms, reflecting neurobiological and intrapsychic processes.

  8. Functional Neuroanatomy and Neurophysiology of Functional Neurological Disorders (Conversion Disorder).

    PubMed

    Voon, Valerie; Cavanna, Andrea E; Coburn, Kerry; Sampson, Shirlene; Reeve, Alya; LaFrance, W Curt

    2016-01-01

    Much is known regarding the physical characteristics, comorbid symptoms, psychological makeup, and neuropsychological performance of patients with functional neurological disorders (FNDs)/conversion disorders. Gross neurostructural deficits do not account for the patients' deficits or symptoms. This review describes the literature focusing on potential neurobiological (i.e. functional neuroanatomic/neurophysiological) findings among individuals with FND, examining neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies of patients with the various forms of motor and sensory FND. In summary, neural networks and neurophysiologic mechanisms may mediate "functional" symptoms, reflecting neurobiological and intrapsychic processes. PMID:26900733

  9. Functional principal components analysis of workload capacity functions

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Devin M.; Houpt, Joseph W.; Townsend, James T.; Endres, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Workload capacity, an important concept in many areas of psychology, describes processing efficiency across changes in workload. The capacity coefficient is a function across time that provides a useful measure of this construct. Until now, most analyses of the capacity coefficient have focused on the magnitude of this function, and often only in terms of a qualitative comparison (greater than or less than one). This work explains how a functional extension of principal components analysis can capture the time-extended information of these functional data, using a small number of scalar values chosen to emphasize the variance between participants and conditions. This approach provides many possibilities for a more fine-grained study of differences in workload capacity across tasks and individuals. PMID:23475829

  10. Functional Abdominal Pain: "Get" the Function, Loose the Pain.

    PubMed

    Draeger-Muenke, Reinhild

    2015-07-01

    Functional abdominal pain is a mind-body, psychosocial, and self-reinforcing experience with significant consequences for the sufferer and the surrounding support network. The occurrence of unpredictable symptoms and their severity add an element of dread and feeling out-of-control to daily life and often reduce overall functioning in a downward spiral. Two clinical presentations of functional abdominal pain are offered in this article (composites to protect confidentiality) dealing with abdominal pain syndrome and abdominal migraines. The treatment demonstrates the use of hypnotic principles for self-regulation, exploration, and meaning-making. Hypnosis treatment is conducted in combination with mindfulness-based interventions and Traditional Chinese Medicine's (TCM) teachings regarding abdominal health and illness. The clinical examples illustrate medical findings that suggest children with early life stress and an early onset of gastrointestinal somatization may not simply outgrow their functional abdominal pain but may suffer into adulthood. PMID:26046716

  11. Monotonicity and Logarithmic Concavity of Two Functions Involving Exponential Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Ai-Qi; Li, Guo-Fu; Guo, Bai-Ni; Qi, Feng

    2008-01-01

    The function 1 divided by "x"[superscript 2] minus "e"[superscript"-x"] divided by (1 minus "e"[superscript"-x"])[superscript 2] for "x" greater than 0 is proved to be strictly decreasing. As an application of this monotonicity, the logarithmic concavity of the function "t" divided by "e"[superscript "at"] minus "e"[superscript"(a-1)""t"] for "a"…

  12. Attention, psychomotor functions and age.

    PubMed

    Kallus, Konrad Wolfgang; Schmitt, Jeroen A J; Benton, David

    2005-12-01

    Nutrition might play an important role to ameliorate or to buffer age-related declines in attention and psychomotor functions. The assessment of nutritional effects in aged subjects has to take into account that attention and psychomotor functions can be subdivided in different functions that are differentially affected by age. This paper gives an overview of changes in different facets of attention and psychomotor functions beyond fifty as well as assessment methods for attention and psychomotor performance. It also provides a review of models to explain the pattern of changes with increasing age, and discusses the problems of high performance variance and of age related confounding variables like health status. Two different approaches are discussed that analyse a performance profile and an experimentally oriented functional microanalysis of changes in performance with respect to the effects of nutrition on attention and psychomotor functions. Addressed are examples of missing age-related deficits or even age-related superiority. Caffeine and Ginseng are considered as examples to enhance performance in older persons. Results are in accordance with data on the positive role of physical fitness for mental performance in older persons. Performance of older persons can well be enhanced by functional food components or nutritional supplementation. The effects are comparable to the effects obtained in younger groups, while there is only weak evidence for specific compensatory effects in aged persons. Finally the role of nutrition for the processes of healthy aging is discussed.

  13. General performance of density functionals.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Sérgio Filipe; Fernandes, Pedro Alexandrino; Ramos, Maria João

    2007-10-25

    The density functional theory (DFT) foundations date from the 1920s with the work of Thomas and Fermi, but it was after the work of Hohenberg, Kohn, and Sham in the 1960s, and particularly with the appearance of the B3LYP functional in the early 1990s, that the widespread application of DFT has become a reality. DFT is less computationally demanding than other computational methods with a similar accuracy, being able to include electron correlation in the calculations at a fraction of time of post-Hartree-Fock methodologies. In this review we provide a brief outline of the density functional theory and of the historic development of the field, focusing later on the several types of density functionals currently available, and finishing with a detailed analysis of the performance of DFT across a wide range of chemical properties and system types, reviewed from the most recent benchmarking studies, which encompass several well-established density functionals together with the most recent efforts in the field. Globally, an overall picture of the level of performance of the plethora of currently available density functionals for each chemical property is drawn, with particular attention being dedicated to the relative performance of the popular B3LYP density functional.

  14. Functional assessment of nutrition status.

    PubMed

    Russell, Mary Krystofiak

    2015-04-01

    Functional status assessment has been recommended as a part of a complete nutrition assessment for decades, but the specific components of this assessment have eluded a consensus definition. The recent Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics/American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition consensus criteria for identification of malnutrition include functional assessment determined by handgrip dynamometry, with the understanding that this technique is not practical for use in some patient populations. Other techniques for functional assessment include physical performance measures such as timed gait and chair stands, as well as activities of daily living tools such as the Katz Index, Lawton Scale, and Karnofsky Scale Index. Manual muscle testing and computed tomography scan assessment of lean tissue are other tools that show promise in correlating functional and nutrition assessments. Functional assessment parameters may be least well correlated with nutrition status in older individuals. Despite a number of scientific studies of a variety of tools for functional assessment, there is to date no definitive tool for use in all individuals in all settings. Nutrition scientists and clinicians must continue to collaborate with colleagues in physical and occupational therapy, geriatrics, and nursing to refine current functional assessment tools to more effectively correlate with nutrition and malnutrition assessment parameters.

  15. Neural modeling and functional neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Horwitz, B; Sporns, O

    1994-01-01

    Two research areas that so far have had little interaction with one another are functional neuroimaging and computational neuroscience. The application of computational models and techniques to the inherently rich data sets generated by "standard" neurophysiological methods has proven useful for interpreting these data sets and for providing predictions and hypotheses for further experiments. We suggest that both theory- and data-driven computational modeling of neuronal systems can help to interpret data generated by functional neuroimaging methods, especially those used with human subjects. In this article, we point out four sets of questions, addressable by computational neuroscientists whose answere would be of value and interest to those who perform functional neuroimaging. The first set consist of determining the neurobiological substrate of the signals measured by functional neuroimaging. The second set concerns developing systems-level models of functional neuroimaging data. The third set of questions involves integrating functional neuroimaging data across modalities, with a particular emphasis on relating electromagnetic with hemodynamic data. The last set asks how one can relate systems-level models to those at the neuronal and neural ensemble levels. We feel that there are ample reasons to link functional neuroimaging and neural modeling, and that combining the results from the two disciplines will result in furthering our understanding of the central nervous system. © 1994 Wiley-Liss, Inc. This Article is a US Goverment work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United State of America.

  16. Model-based Utility Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibbard, Bill

    2012-05-01

    Orseau and Ring, as well as Dewey, have recently described problems, including self-delusion, with the behavior of agents using various definitions of utility functions. An agent's utility function is defined in terms of the agent's history of interactions with its environment. This paper argues, via two examples, that the behavior problems can be avoided by formulating the utility function in two steps: 1) inferring a model of the environment from interactions, and 2) computing utility as a function of the environment model. Basing a utility function on a model that the agent must learn implies that the utility function must initially be expressed in terms of specifications to be matched to structures in the learned model. These specifications constitute prior assumptions about the environment so this approach will not work with arbitrary environments. But the approach should work for agents designed by humans to act in the physical world. The paper also addresses the issue of self-modifying agents and shows that if provided with the possibility to modify their utility functions agents will not choose to do so, under some usual assumptions.

  17. Dietary manipulation of platelet function.

    PubMed

    Bachmair, E M; Ostertag, L M; Zhang, X; de Roos, B

    2014-11-01

    Activated platelets contribute to plaque formation within blood vessels in the early and late stages of atherogenesis, and therefore they have been proposed as risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Anti-platelet drugs, such as aspirin, are now the most prescribed pharmacological treatment in Europe. Certain dietary bioactives also beneficially affect platelet function, and with less side effects, albeit that effects are generally more subtle. Therefore, consumption of dietary bioactives could play a role in the prevention of atherothrombotic vascular disease. Here we review the efficacy of dietary treatment strategies, especially those involving certain dietary fatty acids and polyphenols, to modulate platelet function in healthy subjects or in patients with cardiovascular disease. Variation in study populations, small study sizes and lack of comparability between methods to assess platelet function currently limit robust evidence on the efficacy of dietary bioactives in healthy subjects or specific patient groups. Also, limited knowledge of the metabolism of dietary bioactives, and therefore of the bioavailability of bioactive ingredients, restricts our ability to identify the most effective dietary regimes to improve platelet function. Implementation of uniform point-of-care tests to assess platelet function, and enhanced knowledge of the efficacy by which specific dietary compounds and their metabolites affect platelet function, may enable the identification of functional anti-platelet ingredients that are eligible for a health claim, or combined treatment strategies, including both pharmacological anti-platelet treatment as well as dietary intervention, to tackle atherothrombotic vascular disease. PMID:24858060

  18. Functional Food Science in Europe.

    PubMed

    Contor, L

    2001-08-01

    The goal of the Functional Food Science in Europe (FUFOSE) concerted action was to reach consensus on scientific concepts of functional foods in Europe by using the science base that supports evidence that specific nutrients positively affect physiological functions. The outcome proposes "a working definition" of functional foods: foods can be regarded as functional if they can be satisfactorily demonstrated to affect beneficially one or more target functions in the body, beyond adequate nutritional effects, in a way relevant to an improved state of health and well-being and/or reduction of risk of disease. Functional foods must remain foods and they must achieve their effects in amounts normally consumed in a diet. Evidence from human studies, based on markers relating to biological response or on intermediate endpoint markers of disease, could provide a sound scientific basis for messages and claims about the functional food products. Two types of claims are proposed that relate directly to these two categories of markers: Enhanced function claims (type A) and reduced risk of disease claims (type B). A new EU Concerted Action will start with, and build upon, the principles defined within FUFOSE. This project PASSCLAIM will (i) produce a consensus on principles for the scientific substantiation of health-related claims for food and food components, (ii) select common criteria for how markers should be identified, validated and used in well-designed studies to explore the links between diet and health and (iii) to evaluate critically the existing schemes which assess the scientific substantiation of claims.

  19. Crystal engineering using functionalized adamantane.

    PubMed

    Garcia, J C; Assali, L V C; Machado, W V M; Justo, J F

    2010-08-11

    We performed a first-principles investigation on the structural, electronic and optical properties of crystals made of chemically functionalized adamantane molecules. Several molecular building blocks, formed by boron and nitrogen substitutional functionalizations, were considered to build zinc blende and wurtzite crystals, and the resulting structures presented large bulk moduli and cohesive energies, wide and direct bandgaps, and low dielectric constants (low-κ materials). Those properties provide stability for such structures up to room temperature, superior to those of typical molecular crystals. This indicates a possible road map for crystal engineering using functionalized diamondoids, with potential applications ranging from space filling between conducting wires in nanodevices to nano-electromechanical systems.

  20. Computational Models for Neuromuscular Function

    PubMed Central

    Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J.; Hoffmann, Heiko; Kurse, Manish U.; Kutch, Jason J.; Theodorou, Evangelos A.

    2011-01-01

    Computational models of the neuromuscular system hold the potential to allow us to reach a deeper understanding of neuromuscular function and clinical rehabilitation by complementing experimentation. By serving as a means to distill and explore specific hypotheses, computational models emerge from prior experimental data and motivate future experimental work. Here we review computational tools used to understand neuromuscular function including musculoskeletal modeling, machine learning, control theory, and statistical model analysis. We conclude that these tools, when used in combination, have the potential to further our understanding of neuromuscular function by serving as a rigorous means to test scientific hypotheses in ways that complement and leverage experimental data. PMID:21687779

  1. Structured Functional Principal Component Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shou, Haochang; Zipunnikov, Vadim; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M.; Greven, Sonja

    2015-01-01

    Summary Motivated by modern observational studies, we introduce a class of functional models that expand nested and crossed designs. These models account for the natural inheritance of the correlation structures from sampling designs in studies where the fundamental unit is a function or image. Inference is based on functional quadratics and their relationship with the underlying covariance structure of the latent processes. A computationally fast and scalable estimation procedure is developed for high-dimensional data. Methods are used in applications including high-frequency accelerometer data for daily activity, pitch linguistic data for phonetic analysis, and EEG data for studying electrical brain activity during sleep. PMID:25327216

  2. The Function of Fish Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Jun; Secombes, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    What is known about the biological activity of fish cytokines is reviewed. Most of the functional studies performed to date have been in teleost fish, and have focused on the induced effects of cytokine recombinant proteins, or have used loss- and gain-of-function experiments in zebrafish. Such studies begin to tell us about the role of these molecules in the regulation of fish immune responses and whether they are similar or divergent to the well-characterised functions of mammalian cytokines. This knowledge will aid our ability to determine and modulate the pathways leading to protective immunity, to improve fish health in aquaculture. PMID:27231948

  3. Crystal engineering using functionalized adamantane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, J. C.; Assali, L. V. C.; Machado, W. V. M.; Justo, J. F.

    2010-08-01

    We performed a first-principles investigation on the structural, electronic and optical properties of crystals made of chemically functionalized adamantane molecules. Several molecular building blocks, formed by boron and nitrogen substitutional functionalizations, were considered to build zinc blende and wurtzite crystals, and the resulting structures presented large bulk moduli and cohesive energies, wide and direct bandgaps, and low dielectric constants (low-κ materials). Those properties provide stability for such structures up to room temperature, superior to those of typical molecular crystals. This indicates a possible road map for crystal engineering using functionalized diamondoids, with potential applications ranging from space filling between conducting wires in nanodevices to nano-electromechanical systems.

  4. Biosynthetic Polymers as Functional Materials

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of functional polymers encoded with biomolecules has been an extensive area of research for decades. As such, a diverse toolbox of polymerization techniques and bioconjugation methods has been developed. The greatest impact of this work has been in biomedicine and biotechnology, where fully synthetic and naturally derived biomolecules are used cooperatively. Despite significant improvements in biocompatible and functionally diverse polymers, our success in the field is constrained by recognized limitations in polymer architecture control, structural dynamics, and biostabilization. This Perspective discusses the current status of functional biosynthetic polymers and highlights innovative strategies reported within the past five years that have made great strides in overcoming the aforementioned barriers. PMID:27375299

  5. Hypnosis for functional abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Gottsegen, David

    2011-07-01

    Chronic abdominal pain is a common pediatric condition affecting 20% of the pediatric population worldwide. Most children with this disorder are found to have no specific organic etiology and are given the diagnosis of functional abdominal pain. Well-designed clinical trials have found hypnotherapy and guided imagery to be the most efficacious treatments for this condition. Hypnotic techniques used for other somatic symptoms are easily adaptable for use with functional abdominal pain. The author discusses 2 contrasting hypnotic approaches to functional abdominal pain and provides implications for further research. These approaches may provide new insights into this common and complex disorder. PMID:21922712

  6. Chromatin organization: form to function.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, Carolyn A; van Steensel, Bas

    2013-04-01

    Recent developments in technology have made it possible to create high resolution genome-wide maps of histone marks, DNA binding proteins and physical interactions along genomic regions. Chromatin features are found together in different combinations, dividing the genome up into domains with distinct functional properties. Microscopy and chromatin conformation capture techniques have shown that the 3D structure of chromosomes is constrained by nuclear features and functional links between different parts of chromatin. These results provide insights about the 3D and domain organization of the genome and their connection to gene regulation and other nuclear functions. PMID:23274160

  7. Work function of binary alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Ryusuke; Matsumura, Katsunori; Sakai, Akira; Sakata, Toyo

    2001-01-01

    By utilizing the field emission method, we have studied the composition dependence of work function in NiCu and PtRh alloys. In PtRh alloys, we find that the work function falls below the linear interpolation, in agreement with the experimental results on AgAu alloys [Fain and McDavid, Phys. Rev. B 9 (1974) 5099]. On the other hand, the work function of NiCu alloys is found to show little systematic deviation from the linear interpolation. The observed negative deviation in PtRh alloys is not compatible with a simple theoretical prediction based on the electronic density of states.

  8. Software Systems: Consequence versus Functionality

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Ray; Winter, Victor L.

    1999-08-05

    The purpose of this panel is to present different perspectives and opinions regarding the issues surrounding why software should or shouldn't be entrusted with critical (high consequence) functionality.

  9. Kupffer Cell Metabolism and Function

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen-Lefebvre, Anh Thu; Horuzsko, Anatolij

    2015-01-01

    Kupffer cells are resident liver macrophages and play a critical role in maintaining liver functions. Under physiological conditions, they are the first innate immune cells and protect the liver from bacterial infections. Under pathological conditions, they are activated by different components and can differentiate into M1-like (classical) or M2-like (alternative) macrophages. The metabolism of classical or alternative activated Kupffer cells will determine their functions in liver damage. Special functions and metabolism of Kupffer cells suggest that they are an attractive target for therapy of liver inflammation and related diseases, including cancer and infectious diseases. Here we review the different types of Kupffer cells and their metabolism and functions in physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:26937490

  10. Functionalized carbon nanotubes: biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Vardharajula, Sandhya; Ali, Sk Z; Tiwari, Pooja M; Eroğlu, Erdal; Vig, Komal; Dennis, Vida A; Singh, Shree R

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are emerging as novel nanomaterials for various biomedical applications. CNTs can be used to deliver a variety of therapeutic agents, including biomolecules, to the target disease sites. In addition, their unparalleled optical and electrical properties make them excellent candidates for bioimaging and other biomedical applications. However, the high cytotoxicity of CNTs limits their use in humans and many biological systems. The biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity of CNTs are attributed to size, dose, duration, testing systems, and surface functionalization. The functionalization of CNTs improves their solubility and biocompatibility and alters their cellular interaction pathways, resulting in much-reduced cytotoxic effects. Functionalized CNTs are promising novel materials for a variety of biomedical applications. These potential applications are particularly enhanced by their ability to penetrate biological membranes with relatively low cytotoxicity. This review is directed towards the overview of CNTs and their functionalization for biomedical applications with minimal cytotoxicity. PMID:23091380

  11. Bacterial Exopolysaccharides: Functionality and Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Nwodo, Uchechukwu U.; Green, Ezekiel; Okoh, Anthony I.

    2012-01-01

    Diverse structural, functional and valuable polysaccharides are synthesized by bacteria of all taxa and secreted into the external environment. These polysaccharides are referred to as exopolysaccharides and they may either be homopolymeric or heteropolymeric in composition and of diverse high molecular weights (10 to 1000 kDa). The material properties of exopolysaccharides have revolutionized the industrial and medical sectors due to their retinue of functional applications and prospects. These applications have been extensive in areas such as pharmacological, nutraceutical, functional food, cosmeceutical, herbicides and insecticides among others, while prospects includes uses as anticoagulant, antithrombotic, immunomodulation, anticancer and as bioflocculants. Due to the extensive applications of bacterial exopolysaccharides, this overview provides basic information on their physiologic and morphologic functions as well as their applications and prospects in the medical and industrial sectors. PMID:23203046

  12. Neural computation of arithmetic functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siu, Kai-Yeung; Bruck, Jehoshua

    1990-01-01

    An area of application of neural networks is considered. A neuron is modeled as a linear threshold gate, and the network architecture considered is the layered feedforward network. It is shown how common arithmetic functions such as multiplication and sorting can be efficiently computed in a shallow neural network. Some known results are improved by showing that the product of two n-bit numbers and sorting of n n-bit numbers can be computed by a polynomial-size neural network using only four and five unit delays, respectively. Moreover, the weights of each threshold element in the neural networks require O(log n)-bit (instead of n-bit) accuracy. These results can be extended to more complicated functions such as multiple products, division, rational functions, and approximation of analytic functions.

  13. Remote functionalization through alkene isomerization.

    PubMed

    Vasseur, Alexandre; Bruffaerts, Jeffrey; Marek, Ilan

    2016-03-01

    Exploiting the reactivity of one functional group within a molecule to generate a reaction at a different position is an ongoing challenge in organic synthesis. Effective remote functionalization protocols have the potential to provide access to almost any derivatives but are difficult to achieve. The difficulty is more pronounced for acyclic systems where flexible alkyl chains are present between the initiating functional group and the desired reactive centres. In this Review, we discuss the concept of remote functionalization of alkenes using metal complexes, leading to a selective reaction at a position distal to the initial double bond. We aim to show the vast opportunity provided by this growing field through selected and representative examples. Our aim is to demonstrate that using a double bond as a chemical handle, metal-assisted long-distance activation could be used as a powerful synthetic strategy. PMID:26892551

  14. Functional brain mapping of psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    Honey, G; Fletcher, P; Bullmore, E

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the impact that the novel functional neuroimaging techniques may have upon psychiatric illness. Functional neuroimaging has rapidly developed as a powerful tool in cognitive neuroscience and, in recent years, has seen widespread application in psychiatry. Although such studies have produced evidence for abnormal patterns of brain response in association with some pathological conditions, the core pathophysiologies remain unresolved. Although imaging techniques provide an unprecedented opportunity for investigation of physiological function of the living human brain, there are fundamental questions and assumptions which remain to be addressed. In this review we examine these conceptual issues under three broad sections: (1) characterising the clinical population of interest, (2) defining appropriate levels of description of normal brain function, and (3) relating these models to pathophysiological conditions. Parallel advances in each of these questions will be required before imaging techniques can impact on clinical decisions in psychiatry. PMID:11909899

  15. Intraoperative MRI and functional mapping.

    PubMed

    Gasser, Thomas; Szelenyi, Andrea; Senft, Christian; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Sandalcioglu, I Erol; Sure, Ulrich; Nimsky, Christopher; Seifert, Volker

    2011-01-01

    The integration of functional and anatomical data into neuronavigation is an established standard of care in many neurosurgical departments. Yet, this method has limitations as in most cases the data are acquired prior to surgery. Due to brain-shift the accurate presentation of functional as well as anatomical structures declines in the course of surgery. In consequence, the acquisition of information during surgery about the brain's current functional state is of specific interest. The advancement of imaging technologies (e.g. fMRI, MEG, Intraoperative Optical Intrinsic Signal Imaging--IOIS) and neurophysiological techniques and the advent of intraoperative MRI all had a major impact on neurosurgery. The combination of modalities such as neurophysiology and intraoperative MRI (ioMRI), as well as the acquisition of functional MRI during surgery (ifMRI) are in the focus of this work. Especially the technical aspects and safety issues are elucidated.

  16. Pulmonary Function Testing in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... are s pirometry and airway resistance tests . What is spirometry? Spirometry is the most common lung function test done. ... follow very specific instructions. Most children can do spirometry by age 6, though some preschoolers are able ...

  17. Moonlighting Peptides with Emerging Function

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez Plaza, Jonathan G.; Villalón Rojas, Amanda; Herrera, Sur; Garza-Ramos, Georgina; Torres Larios, Alfredo; Amero, Carlos; Zarraga Granados, Gabriela; Gutiérrez Aguilar, Manuel; Lara Ortiz, María Teresa; Polanco Gonzalez, Carlos; Uribe Carvajal, Salvador; Coria, Roberto; Peña Díaz, Antonio; Bredesen, Dale E.; Castro-Obregon, Susana; del Rio, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Hunter-killer peptides combine two activities in a single polypeptide that work in an independent fashion like many other multi-functional, multi-domain proteins. We hypothesize that emergent functions may result from the combination of two or more activities in a single protein domain and that could be a mechanism selected in nature to form moonlighting proteins. We designed moonlighting peptides using the two mechanisms proposed to be involved in the evolution of such molecules (i.e., to mutate non-functional residues and the use of natively unfolded peptides). We observed that our moonlighting peptides exhibited two activities that together rendered a new function that induces cell death in yeast. Thus, we propose that moonlighting in proteins promotes emergent properties providing a further level of complexity in living organisms so far unappreciated. PMID:22808104

  18. Dual-Functionalized Theranostic Nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Mo, Alexander H; Zhang, Chen; Landon, Preston B; Janetanakit, Woraphong; Hwang, Michael T; Santacruz Gomez, Karla; Colburn, David A; Dossou, Samuel M; Lu, Tianyi; Cao, Yue; Sant, Vrinda; Sud, Paul L; Akkiraju, Siddhartha; Shubayev, Veronica I; Glinsky, Gennadi; Lal, Ratnesh

    2016-06-15

    Nanocarriers with the ability to spatially organize chemically distinct multiple bioactive moieties will have wide combinatory therapeutic and diagnostic (theranostic) applications. We have designed dual-functionalized, 100 nm to 1 μm sized scalable nanocarriers comprising a silica golf ball with amine or quaternary ammonium functional groups located in its pits and hydroxyl groups located on its nonpit surface. These functionalized golf balls selectively captured 10-40 nm charged gold nanoparticles (GNPs) into their pits. The selective capture of GNPs in the golf ball pits is visualized by scanning electron microscopy. ζ potential measurements and analytical modeling indicate that the GNP capture involves its proximity to and the electric charge on the surface of the golf balls. Potential applications of these dual-functionalized carriers include distinct attachment of multiple agents for multifunctional theranostic applications, selective scavenging, and clearance of harmful substances. PMID:27144808

  19. Sexual function and male cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Quality of life in general and sexual functioning in particular have become very important in cancer patients. Biological factors such as anatomic alterations, physiological changes and secondary effect of medical interventions may preclude normal sexual functioning even when sexual desire is intact. In spite of modern surgical techniques, improved chemotherapeutical drugs and sophisticated radiation techniques, still many patients complain of impaired sexual function after cancer treatment. A large number of instruments already exist to assess quality of life in cancer patients. It is important to standardize procedures and to use validated questionnaires. Collecting data on an ongoing basis before and long after treatment is mandatory, and control groups must be used. Patients should be offered sexual counselling and informed about the availability of therapies for sexual dysfunctions. In this paper we review the topic of sexual functioning after treatment (predominantly after radiotherapy) of the most common malignancies in men and give suggestions for treatment. PMID:26816727

  20. Series with Inverse Function Terms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ovchinnikov, Sergei

    2011-01-01

    Finding the sum of a series in the form of a closed expression has always been a challenging problem in analysis. The paper presents an elementary method for summation of series with terms generated by functions satisfying subtraction identities.

  1. Teacher Praise: A Functional Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brophy, Jere

    1981-01-01

    Teacher praise typically does not function as a reinforcer. Rather, it is reactive to and under the control of student behavior. Its effects must be understood using concepts from attribution and social learning/reinforcement theories. (Author/GK)

  2. Remote functionalization through alkene isomerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, Alexandre; Bruffaerts, Jeffrey; Marek, Ilan

    2016-03-01

    Exploiting the reactivity of one functional group within a molecule to generate a reaction at a different position is an ongoing challenge in organic synthesis. Effective remote functionalization protocols have the potential to provide access to almost any derivatives but are difficult to achieve. The difficulty is more pronounced for acyclic systems where flexible alkyl chains are present between the initiating functional group and the desired reactive centres. In this Review, we discuss the concept of remote functionalization of alkenes using metal complexes, leading to a selective reaction at a position distal to the initial double bond. We aim to show the vast opportunity provided by this growing field through selected and representative examples. Our aim is to demonstrate that using a double bond as a chemical handle, metal-assisted long-distance activation could be used as a powerful synthetic strategy.

  3. Simple Fixed Functional Space Maintainer

    PubMed Central

    Sarawgi, Aditi; Marwah, Nikhil; Gumber, Parvind; Dutta, Samir

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT% Premature loss of a primary tooth is one of the most common etiology for malocclusion. Space maintainers are employed to prevent this complication. In anterior region, esthetics is an important concern along with function and space management. Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) retained space maintainer solves all these purposes ef ficiently and ef fectively. In addition, the technique is simple and the appliance is very comfortable inside the oral cavity. Here is a case of premature loss of anterior primary tooth which was replaced by FRC retained esthetic functional space maintainer. The appliance was found to be functioning satisfactorily inside the oral cavity till the last visit (1 Year). How to cite this article: Goenka P, Sarawgi A, Marwah N, Gumber P, Dutta S. Simple Fixed Functional Space Maintainer. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(3):225-228. PMID:25709309

  4. Probiotics in functional bowel disorders.

    PubMed

    Hod, Keren; Ringel, Yehuda

    2016-02-01

    Functional bowel disorders (FBDs) are the most common gastrointestinal (GI) disorders seen by gastroenterologists and primary care physicians. The disorders affect patients functioning and quality of life (QOL) and are associated with significant healthcare burden. The current theory regarding the development of FBDs suggests brain-gut axis dysfunctions associated abnormal GI motility and sensation. Recent data suggest that alterations in the intestinal microbiota may have a role in the pathogenesis of FBDs; or at least have the potential to affect intestinal functions that are thought to be relevant to the development of functional GI symptoms. This has led to growing interest of healthcare providers and patients in targeting the intestinal microbiota for the treatment of FBDs. In this article we discuss the potential role probiotic interventions in the treatment of FBDs. We review the evidence from pre-clinical and clinical studies and discuss the current recommendations for the use of probiotics for FBDs in clinical practice. PMID:27048900

  5. The Functions of Multiple Representations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ainsworth, Shaaron

    1999-01-01

    Discusses multiple representations and multimedia learning environments; describes a functional taxonomy of MERs (multiple external representations); and considers how MERs are used to support cognitive processes in learning and problem solving with computers. (Contains 41 references.) (Author/LRW)

  6. COMPARING EXTRACTIONS OF SIVERS FUNCTIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    VOGELSANG, W.

    2005-09-07

    A comparison is given of the various recently published extractions of the Sivers functions from the HERMES and COMPASS data on single-transverse spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive deeply inelastic scattering.

  7. Caustic ingestion and esophageal function

    SciTech Connect

    Cadranel, S.; Di Lorenzo, C.; Rodesch, P.; Piepsz, A.; Ham, H.R. )

    1990-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate esophageal motor function by means of krypton-81m esophageal transit scintigraphy and to compare the results with the functional and morphological data obtained by means of triple lumen manometry and endoscopy. In acute and subacute stages of the disease, all clinical, anatomical, and functional parameters were in good agreement, revealing significant impairment. In chronic stages, the severity of the dysphagia was not correlated to the importance of the residual stenosis. Conversely, 81mKr esophageal transit and manometric's findings were in good agreement with the clinical symptoms, during the entire follow-up period ranging between 3 months to 7 years. The 81mKr test is undoubtedly the easiest and probably the most physiological technique currently available for long-term functional evaluation of caustic esophagitis.

  8. Systems security and functional readiness

    SciTech Connect

    Bruckner, D.G.

    1988-01-01

    In Protective Programming Planning, it is important that every facility or installation be configured to support the basic functions and mission of the using organization. This paper addresses the process of identifying the key functional operations of our facilities in Europe and providing the security necessary to keep them operating in natural and man-made threat environments. Functional Readiness is important since many of our existing facilities in Europe were not constructed to meet the demands of today's requirements. There are increased requirements for real-time systems with classified terminals and stringent access control, tempest and other electronic protection devices. One must prioritize the operations of these systems so that essential functions are provided even when the facilities are affected by overt or covert hostile activities.

  9. Making the Tent Function Complex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprows, David J.

    2010-01-01

    This note can be used to illustrate to the student such concepts as periodicity in the complex plane. The basic construction makes use of the Tent function which requires only that the student have some working knowledge of binary arithmetic.

  10. Remote functionalization through alkene isomerization.

    PubMed

    Vasseur, Alexandre; Bruffaerts, Jeffrey; Marek, Ilan

    2016-03-01

    Exploiting the reactivity of one functional group within a molecule to generate a reaction at a different position is an ongoing challenge in organic synthesis. Effective remote functionalization protocols have the potential to provide access to almost any derivatives but are difficult to achieve. The difficulty is more pronounced for acyclic systems where flexible alkyl chains are present between the initiating functional group and the desired reactive centres. In this Review, we discuss the concept of remote functionalization of alkenes using metal complexes, leading to a selective reaction at a position distal to the initial double bond. We aim to show the vast opportunity provided by this growing field through selected and representative examples. Our aim is to demonstrate that using a double bond as a chemical handle, metal-assisted long-distance activation could be used as a powerful synthetic strategy.

  11. Functional group diversity in dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Sivanandan, Kulandaivelu; Vutukuri, Dharmarao; Thayumanavan, S

    2002-10-17

    [structure: see text] A methodology for synthesizing dendrons with different peripheral functionalities is described. The benzyl ether-based dendrons reported here were synthesized using allyl and methoxymethyl ether-based protection-deprotection strategies.

  12. Sociable Sequences and Diminishing Functions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprows, David

    1989-01-01

    A FORTRAN program is provided for use with computer projects for a course in number theory. Uses diminishing functions and the speed of the computer to quickly determine possible solutions to problems. (MVL)

  13. Simple fixed functional space maintainer.

    PubMed

    Goenka, Puneet; Sarawgi, Aditi; Marwah, Nikhil; Gumber, Parvind; Dutta, Samir

    2014-01-01

    Premature loss of a primary tooth is one of the most common etiology for malocclusion. Space maintainers are employed to prevent this complication. In anterior region, esthetics is an important concern along with function and space management. Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) retained space maintainer solves all these purposes ef ficiently and ef fectively. In addition, the technique is simple and the appliance is very comfortable inside the oral cavity. Here is a case of premature loss of anterior primary tooth which was replaced by FRC retained esthetic functional space maintainer. The appliance was found to be functioning satisfactorily inside the oral cavity till the last visit (1 Year). How to cite this article: Goenka P, Sarawgi A, Marwah N, Gumber P, Dutta S. Simple Fixed Functional Space Maintainer. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(3):225-228.

  14. Are Human Translated Pseudogenes Functional?

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinrui; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2016-03-01

    By definition, pseudogenes are relics of former genes that no longer possess biological functions. Operationally, they are identified based on disruptions of open reading frames (ORFs) or presumed losses of promoter activities. Intriguingly, a recent human proteomic study reported peptides encoded by 107 pseudogenes. These peptides may play currently unrecognized physiological roles. Alternatively, they may have resulted from accidental translations of pseudogene transcripts and possess no function. Comparing between human and macaque orthologs, we show that the nonsynonymous to synonymous substitution rate ratio (ω) is significantly smaller for translated pseudogenes than other pseudogenes. In particular, five of 34 translated pseudogenes amenable to evolutionary analysis have ω values significantly lower than 1, indicative of the action of purifying selection. This and other findings demonstrate that some but not all translated pseudogenes have selected functions at the protein level. Hence, neither ORF disruption nor presence of protein product disproves or proves gene functionality at the protein level.

  15. Hox Targets and Cellular Functions

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Herrero, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    Hox genes are a group of genes that specify structures along the anteroposterior axis in bilaterians. Although in many cases they do so by modifying a homologous structure with a different (or no) Hox input, there are also examples of Hox genes constructing new organs with no homology in other regions of the body. Hox genes determine structures though the regulation of targets implementing cellular functions and by coordinating cell behavior. The genetic organization to construct or modify a certain organ involves both a genetic cascade through intermediate transcription factors and a direct regulation of targets carrying out cellular functions. In this review I discuss new data from genome-wide techniques, as well as previous genetic and developmental information, to describe some examples of Hox regulation of different cell functions. I also discuss the organization of genetic cascades leading to the development of new organs, mainly using Drosophila melanogaster as the model to analyze Hox function. PMID:24490109

  16. Parental reflective functioning: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Slade, Arietta

    2005-09-01

    Reflective functioning refers to the essential human capacity to understand behavior in light of underlying mental states and intentions. The construct, introduced by Fonagy, Steele, Steele, Moran, and Higgitt in 1991, and elaborated by Fonagy and his colleagues over the course of the next decade, has had an enormous impact on developmental theory and clinical practice. This paper introduces the construct of parental reflective functioning, which refers to the parent's capacity to hold the child's mental states in mind, and begins with a review of Fonagy and his colleagues' essential ideas regarding the reflective function. Next, the applicability of this construct to parental representations of the child and the parent-child relationship is considered. A system for coding parental reflective functioning, which will serve as the organizing framework for this special issue, is described. Finally, the three papers that make up this special section are introduced.

  17. Functional Abdominal Pain in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... At low doses, these medicines can be excellent pain relievers for some children. A fearful, anxious, or depressed child however should be fully assessed by a psychiatrist or psychologist. Some psychological treatments that help children cope with functional abdominal pain ...

  18. Q (Alpha) Function and Squeezing Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yunjie, Xia; Xianghe, Kong; Kezhu, Yan; Wanping, Chen

    1996-01-01

    The relation of squeezing and Q(alpha) function is discussed in this paper. By means of Q function, the squeezing of field with gaussian Q(alpha) function or negative P(a)function is also discussed in detail.

  19. Formalism and functionalism in linguistics.

    PubMed

    Newmeyer, Frederick J

    2010-05-01

    Formalism and functionalism in linguistics are often taken to be diametrically opposed approaches. However, close examination of the relevant phenomena reveals that the two are complementary, rather than being irrevocably in opposition to each other. One can be a formal linguist and a functional linguist at the same time, without there being any contradiction. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  20. Automatic computation of transfer functions

    SciTech Connect

    Atcitty, Stanley; Watson, Luke Dale

    2015-04-14

    Technologies pertaining to the automatic computation of transfer functions for a physical system are described herein. The physical system is one of an electrical system, a mechanical system, an electromechanical system, an electrochemical system, or an electromagnetic system. A netlist in the form of a matrix comprises data that is indicative of elements in the physical system, values for the elements in the physical system, and structure of the physical system. Transfer functions for the physical system are computed based upon the netlist.

  1. Selective functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strano, Michael S. (Inventor); Usrey, Monica (Inventor); Barone, Paul (Inventor); Dyke, Christopher A. (Inventor); Tour, James M. (Inventor); Kittrell, W. Carter (Inventor); Hauge, Robert H. (Inventor); Smalley, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward methods of selectively functionalizing carbon nanotubes of a specific type or range of types, based on their electronic properties, using diazonium chemistry. The present invention is also directed toward methods of separating carbon nanotubes into populations of specific types or range(s) of types via selective functionalization and electrophoresis, and also to the novel compositions generated by such separations.

  2. Luminosity function for galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajan, K.; Biernacka, M.; Flin, P.; Godłowski, W.; Panko, E.; Popiela, J.

    2016-10-01

    We constructed and studied the luminosity function of 6188 galaxyclusters. This was performed by counting brightness of galaxiesbelonging to clusters in the PF catalogue, taking galaxy data fromMRSS. Our result shows that the investigated structures arecharacterized by a luminosity function different from that ofoptical galaxies and radiogalaxies (Machalski & Godłowski2000). The implications of this result for theoriesof galaxy formation are briefly discussed.

  3. Assessment of postural balance function.

    PubMed

    Kostiukow, Anna; Rostkowska, Elzbieta; Samborski, Włodzimierz

    2009-01-01

    Postural balance is defined as the ability to stand unassisted without falling. Examination of the patient's postural balance function is a difficult diagnostic task. Most of the balance tests used in medicine provide incomplete information on this coordination ability of the human body. The aim of this study was to review methods of assessment of the patient's postural balance function, including various tests used in medical diagnostics centers. PMID:20698188

  4. Functional Techniques for Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomlinson, John R.

    1997-01-01

    This dissertation develops a new general method of solving Prony's problem. Two special cases of this new method have been developed previously. They are the Matrix Pencil and the Osculatory Interpolation. The dissertation shows that they are instances of a more general solution type which allows a wide ranging class of linear functional to be used in the solution of the problem. This class provides a continuum of functionals which provide new methods that can be used to solve Prony's problem.

  5. Cardiopulmonary function and laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Wahba, R W; Béïque, F; Kleiman, S J

    1995-01-01

    This review analyzes the literature dealing with cardiopulmonary function during and pulmonary function following laparoscopic cholecystectomy in order to describe the patterns of changes in these functions and the mechanisms involved as well as to identify areas of concern and lacunae in our knowledge. Information was obtained from a Medline literature search and the annual meeting supplements of Anesthesiology, Anesth Analg, Br J Anaesth, and Can J Anaesth. The principal findings were that changes in cardiovascular function due to the insufflation are characterized by an immediate decrease in cardiac index and an increase in mean arterial blood pressure and systemic vascular resistance. In the next few minutes there is partial restoration of cardiac index and resistance but blood pressure and heart rate do not change. The pattern is the result of the interaction between increased abdominal pressure, neurohumoral responses and absorbed CO2. Pulmonary function changes are characterized by reduced compliance without large alterations in PaO2, but tissue oxygenation can be adversely affected due to reduced O2 delivery. A major difficulty in maintaining normocarbia is due to the abdominal distention reducing pulmonary compliance and to CO2 absorption. End tidal CO2 tension is not a reliable index of PaCO2, particularly in ASA III-IV patients. The pattern of lung function following LC is characterized by a transient reduction in lung volumes and capacities with a restrictive breathing pattern and the loss of the abdominal contribution to breathing. Atelectasis also occurs. These changes are qualitatively similar to but of a lesser magnitude than those following "open" abdominal operations. It is concluded that the changes in cardiopulmonary function during laparoscopic upper abdominal surgery lead us to suggest judicious invasive monitoring and careful interpretation in ASA III-IV patients. Lung function following extensive procedures in sick patients has not been

  6. Precision linear ramp function generator

    DOEpatents

    Jatko, W.B.; McNeilly, D.R.; Thacker, L.H.

    1984-08-01

    A ramp function generator is provided which produces a precise linear ramp function which is repeatable and highly stable. A derivative feedback loop is used to stabilize the output of an integrator in the forward loop and control the ramp rate. The ramp may be started from a selected baseline voltage level and the desired ramp rate is selected by applying an appropriate constant voltage to the input of the integrator.

  7. Functionalized magnetic nanoparticle analyte sensor

    DOEpatents

    Yantasee, Wassana; Warner, Maryin G; Warner, Cynthia L; Addleman, Raymond S; Fryxell, Glen E; Timchalk, Charles; Toloczko, Mychailo B

    2014-03-25

    A method and system for simply and efficiently determining quantities of a preselected material in a particular solution by the placement of at least one superparamagnetic nanoparticle having a specified functionalized organic material connected thereto into a particular sample solution, wherein preselected analytes attach to the functionalized organic groups, these superparamagnetic nanoparticles are then collected at a collection site and analyzed for the presence of a particular analyte.

  8. Assessment of postural balance function.

    PubMed

    Kostiukow, Anna; Rostkowska, Elzbieta; Samborski, Włodzimierz

    2009-01-01

    Postural balance is defined as the ability to stand unassisted without falling. Examination of the patient's postural balance function is a difficult diagnostic task. Most of the balance tests used in medicine provide incomplete information on this coordination ability of the human body. The aim of this study was to review methods of assessment of the patient's postural balance function, including various tests used in medical diagnostics centers.

  9. Distribution functions of probabilistic automata

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatan, F.

    2001-01-01

    Each probabilistic automaton M over an alphabet A defines a probability measure Prob sub(M) on the set of all finite and infinite words over A. We can identify a k letter alphabet A with the set {0, 1,..., k-1}, and, hence, we can consider every finite or infinite word w over A as a radix k expansion of a real number X(w) in the interval [0, 1]. This makes X(w) a random variable and the distribution function of M is defined as usual: F(x) := Prob sub(M) { w: X(w) < x }. Utilizing the fixed-point semantics (denotational semantics), extended to probabilistic computations, we investigate the distribution functions of probabilistic automata in detail. Automata with continuous distribution functions are characterized. By a new, and much more easier method, it is shown that the distribution function F(x) is an analytic function if it is a polynomial. Finally, answering a question posed by D. Knuth and A. Yao, we show that a polynomial distribution function F(x) on [0, 1] can be generated by a prob abilistic automaton iff all the roots of F'(x) = 0 in this interval, if any, are rational numbers. For this, we define two dynamical systems on the set of polynomial distributions and study attracting fixed points of random composition of these two systems.

  10. Trance, functional psychosis, and culture.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Richard J

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses the hypothesis that the symptoms of functional psychoses can be caused by culturally structured spontaneous trances that may be reactions to environmental stress and psychological trauma. Findings are reviewed of anthropological studies of meditative trance experiences in Indian yogis characterized by divided consciousness (dissociation), religious auditory and visual hallucinations, and beliefs in their own spiritual powers. An explanation of the psychological mechanisms of meditative trance is also provided, highlighting trance-related alteration of consciousness within an Indian cultural context. It is suggested that the psychological mechanisms of meditative trance are similar in structure to spontaneous trances underlying the symptoms of some functional psychoses. Findings from cross-cultural studies are also reviewed, highlighting the effects of culture on the symptoms, indigenous diagnoses, treatments, and outcomes of functional psychoses. In non-Western cultures, transient functional psychoses with complete recovery are 10 times more common than in Western cultures. It is suggested that egocentrism and a loss of spiritual explanations for psychosis in Western cultures constructs a clinical situation in which persons with functional psychoses are treated for a biogenetic (incurable) brain disease rather than a curable spiritual illness. This difference in cultural belief systems leads to poorer outcomes for Western patients compared to non-Western patients. Recognizing cultural differences in symptoms, indigenous diagnoses, and treatment for functional psychoses can help explain the dramatic cross-cultural differences in outcome.

  11. Streamflow forecasting using functional regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masselot, Pierre; Dabo-Niang, Sophie; Chebana, Fateh; Ouarda, Taha B. M. J.

    2016-07-01

    Streamflow, as a natural phenomenon, is continuous in time and so are the meteorological variables which influence its variability. In practice, it can be of interest to forecast the whole flow curve instead of points (daily or hourly). To this end, this paper introduces the functional linear models and adapts it to hydrological forecasting. More precisely, functional linear models are regression models based on curves instead of single values. They allow to consider the whole process instead of a limited number of time points or features. We apply these models to analyse the flow volume and the whole streamflow curve during a given period by using precipitations curves. The functional model is shown to lead to encouraging results. The potential of functional linear models to detect special features that would have been hard to see otherwise is pointed out. The functional model is also compared to the artificial neural network approach and the advantages and disadvantages of both models are discussed. Finally, future research directions involving the functional model in hydrology are presented.

  12. Executive Function in Nephropathic Cystinosis

    PubMed Central

    Ballantyne, Angela O.; Spilkin, Amy M.; Trauner, Doris A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We studied executive function in children and adolescents with cystinosis. Background Cystinosis is a genetic metabolic disorder in which the amino acid cystine accumulates in all organs of the body, including the brain. Previous research has shown that individuals with cystinosis have visuospatial deficits, but normal intelligence and intact verbal abilities. Better understanding of the behavioral phenotype associated with cystinosis could have important implications for treatment. Methods Twenty-eight children with cystinosis and 24 control participants (age range 8-17 years) underwent selected Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System (D-KEFS) tests for neuropsychological assessment of executive function, and the participants’ parents completed the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF). Results Participants with cystinosis performed significantly more poorly than controls on all D-KEFS indices examined and on the BRIEF Metacognition Index and Global Executive Composite. Conclusions Executive function is an area of potential risk in cystinosis. Our data have implications not only for the function of affected children and adolescents in school and daily life, but also for disease management and treatment adherence. Our findings can aid in the design and implementation of interventions and lead to a greater understanding of brain-behavior relationships in cystinosis. PMID:23538568

  13. Hartree potential dependent exchange functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin, Lucian A.; Fabiano, Eduardo; Della Sala, Fabio

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a novel non-local ingredient for the construction of exchange density functionals: the reduced Hartree parameter, which is invariant under the uniform scaling of the density and represents the exact exchange enhancement factor for one- and two-electron systems. The reduced Hartree parameter is used together with the conventional meta-generalized gradient approximation (meta-GGA) semilocal ingredients (i.e., the electron density, its gradient, and the kinetic energy density) to construct a new generation exchange functional, termed u-meta-GGA. This u-meta-GGA functional is exact for the exchange of any one- and two-electron systems, is size-consistent and non-empirical, satisfies the uniform density scaling relation, and recovers the modified gradient expansion derived from the semiclassical atom theory. For atoms, ions, jellium spheres, and molecules, it shows a good accuracy, being often better than meta-GGA exchange functionals. Our construction validates the use of the reduced Hartree ingredient in exchange-correlation functional development, opening the way to an additional rung in the Jacob's ladder classification of non-empirical density functionals.

  14. Boolean networks with veto functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebadi, Haleh; Klemm, Konstantin

    2014-08-01

    Boolean networks are discrete dynamical systems for modeling regulation and signaling in living cells. We investigate a particular class of Boolean functions with inhibiting inputs exerting a veto (forced zero) on the output. We give analytical expressions for the sensitivity of these functions and provide evidence for their role in natural systems. In an intracellular signal transduction network [Helikar et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 105, 1913 (2008), 10.1073/pnas.0705088105], the functions with veto are over-represented by a factor exceeding the over-representation of threshold functions and canalyzing functions in the same system. In Boolean networks for control of the yeast cell cycle [Li et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 101, 4781 (2004), 10.1073/pnas.0305937101; Davidich et al., PLoS ONE 3, e1672 (2008), 10.1371/journal.pone.0001672], no or minimal changes to the wiring diagrams are necessary to formulate their dynamics in terms of the veto functions introduced here.

  15. The functions of medical care.

    PubMed Central

    Childs, A W

    1975-01-01

    Medical care has several important functions other than restoring or maintaining health. These other functions are assessment and certification of health status, prognostication, segregation of the ill to limit communication of illness, and helping to cope with the problems of illness--the caring function. Medical care serving these "paracurative" functions may legitimately be given indepedently, without associated curing or preventive intent of the provider of care. Although such services do not result in benefits to health, such as extension of life or reduction of disability, they do have other valued outcomes, outcomes not measurable as a gain in personal health status. For example, caring activities may result in satisfaction, comfort, or desirable affective states, even while the patient's health status deteriorates during an incurable illness. The physician's approach to patients, the economist's analysis of the benefits of health services, the planner's decisions about health programs, the evaluator's judgments about the quality of care, or the patient's expectations about treatment are strongly influenced by his assumptions about the purpose of medical care or the proper outcome of the process. When the health worker assumes that the only useful outcome is health, he may consider the paracurative services to be ineffective, inefficient, or undesirable. In contrast, when he recognizes and understands the paracurative functions of medical care, he may better perform his function in the medical care system. PMID:803689

  16. Dynamic Forms. Part 1: Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, George; Smith, G. Allan

    1993-01-01

    The formalism of dynamic forms is developed as a means for organizing and systematizing the design control systems. The formalism allows the designer to easily compute derivatives to various orders of large composite functions that occur in flight-control design. Such functions involve many function-of-a-function calls that may be nested to many levels. The component functions may be multiaxis, nonlinear, and they may include rotation transformations. A dynamic form is defined as a variable together with its time derivatives up to some fixed but arbitrary order. The variable may be a scalar, a vector, a matrix, a direction cosine matrix, Euler angles, or Euler parameters. Algorithms for standard elementary functions and operations of scalar dynamic forms are developed first. Then vector and matrix operations and transformations between parameterization of rotations are developed in the next level in the hierarchy. Commonly occurring algorithms in control-system design, including inversion of pure feedback systems, are developed in the third level. A large-angle, three-axis attitude servo and other examples are included to illustrate the effectiveness of the developed formalism. All algorithms were implemented in FORTRAN code. Practical experience shows that the proposed formalism may significantly improve the productivity of the design and coding process.

  17. Hartree potential dependent exchange functional.

    PubMed

    Constantin, Lucian A; Fabiano, Eduardo; Della Sala, Fabio

    2016-08-28

    We introduce a novel non-local ingredient for the construction of exchange density functionals: the reduced Hartree parameter, which is invariant under the uniform scaling of the density and represents the exact exchange enhancement factor for one- and two-electron systems. The reduced Hartree parameter is used together with the conventional meta-generalized gradient approximation (meta-GGA) semilocal ingredients (i.e., the electron density, its gradient, and the kinetic energy density) to construct a new generation exchange functional, termed u-meta-GGA. This u-meta-GGA functional is exact for the exchange of any one- and two-electron systems, is size-consistent and non-empirical, satisfies the uniform density scaling relation, and recovers the modified gradient expansion derived from the semiclassical atom theory. For atoms, ions, jellium spheres, and molecules, it shows a good accuracy, being often better than meta-GGA exchange functionals. Our construction validates the use of the reduced Hartree ingredient in exchange-correlation functional development, opening the way to an additional rung in the Jacob's ladder classification of non-empirical density functionals. PMID:27586907

  18. Elementary Functions, Student's Text, Unit 21.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Frank B.; And Others

    Unit 21 in the SMSG secondary school mathematics series is a student text covering the following topics in elementary functions: functions, polynomial functions, tangents to graphs of polynomial functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, and circular functions. Appendices discuss set notation, mathematical induction, significance of…

  19. Diastolic Function in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, Sándor J

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure has reached epidemic proportions, and diastolic heart failure or heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) constitutes about 50% of all heart failure admissions. Long-term prognosis of both reduced ejection fraction heart failure and HFpEF are similarly dismal. No pharmacologic agent has been developed that actually treats or repairs the physiologic deficit(s) responsible for HFpEF. Because the physiology of diastole is both subtle and counterintuitive, its role in heart failure has received insufficient attention. In this review, the focus is on the physiology of diastole in heart failure, the dominant physiologic laws that govern the process in all hearts, how all hearts work as a suction pump, and, therefore, the elucidation and characterization of what actually is meant by “diastolic function”. The intent is for the reader to understand what diastolic function actually is, what it is not, and how to measure it. Proper measurement of diastolic function requires one to go beyond the usual E/A, E/E′, etc. phenomenological metrics and employ more rigorous causality (mathematical modeling) based parameters of diastolic function. The method simultaneously provides new physiologic insight into the meaning of in vivo “equilibrium volume” of the left ventricle (LV), longitudinal versus transverse volume accommodation of the chamber, diastatic “ringing” of the mitral annulus, and the mechanism of L-wave generation, as well as availability of a load-independent index of diastolic function (LIIDF). One important consequence of understanding what diastolic function is, is the recognition that all that current therapies can do is basically alter the load, rather than actually “repair” the functional components (chamber stiffness, chamber relaxation). If beneficial (biological/structural/metabolic) remodeling due to therapy does manifest ultimately as improved diastolic function, it is due to resumption of normal physiology (as in

  20. Fold modulating function: bacterial toxins to functional amyloids

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Adnan K.; Boles, Blaise R.

    2014-01-01

    Many bacteria produce cytolytic toxins that target host cells or other competing microbes. It is well known that environmental factors control toxin expression, however, recent work suggests that some bacteria manipulate the fold of these protein toxins to control their function. The β-sheet rich amyloid fold is a highly stable ordered aggregate that many toxins form in response to specific environmental conditions. When in the amyloid state, toxins become inert, losing the cytolytic activity they display in the soluble form. Emerging evidence suggest that some amyloids function as toxin storage systems until they are again needed, while other bacteria utilize amyloids as a structural matrix component of biofilms. This amyloid matrix component facilitates resistance to biofilm disruptive challenges. The bacterial amyloids discussed in this review reveal an elegant system where changes in protein fold and solubility dictate the function of proteins in response to the environment. PMID:25136340

  1. [Functional cramps or functional dystonias in writers and musicians].

    PubMed

    Chamagne, P

    1986-01-01

    The clinical evaluation in the "dystonies of function" or "impaired dexterity" reveals certain physical anomalies which either appear spontaneously or are triggered by specific tests: abnormal postures involving the trunck, head, and upper limb. During the professional gesture the physiological "pulley effect" on flexor tendons is accompanied with an interference effect produced by the displacement of the segments; this, adds up to an unbalance of the digital kinetic chain, building a locked functional system. The antagonist muscles begin to supply the deficiency of the agonist muscles. In addition, patients with a characteristic psychological ground suffer a more acute "disorganization" or a performing career.

  2. Detecting aquaporin function and regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madeira, Ana; Moura, Teresa; Soveral, Graça

    2016-02-01

    Water is the major component of cells and tissues throughout all forms of life. Fluxes of water and solutes through cell membranes and epithelia are essential for osmoregulation and energy homeostasis. Aquaporins are membrane channels expressed in almost every organism and involved in the bidirectional transfer of water and small solutes across cell membranes. Aquaporins have important biological roles and have been implicated in several pathophysiological conditions suggesting a great translational potential in aquaporin-based diagnostic and therapeutics. Detecting aquaporin function is critical for assessing regulation and screening for new activity modulators that can prompt the development of efficient medicines. Appropriate methods for functional analysis comprising suitable cell models and techniques to accurately evaluate water and solute membrane permeability are essential to validate aquaporin function and assess short-term regulation. The present review describes established assays commonly used to assess aquaporin function in cells and tissues, as well as the experimental biophysical strategies required to reveal functional regulation and identify modulators, the first step for aquaporin drug discovery.

  3. Detecting Aquaporin Function and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Madeira, Ana; Moura, Teresa F.; Soveral, Graça

    2016-01-01

    Water is the major component of cells and tissues throughout all forms of life. Fluxes of water and solutes through cell membranes and epithelia are essential for osmoregulation and energy homeostasis. Aquaporins are membrane channels expressed in almost every organism and involved in the bidirectional transfer of water and small solutes across cell membranes. Aquaporins have important biological roles and have been implicated in several pathophysiological conditions suggesting a great translational potential in aquaporin-based diagnostics and therapeutics. Detecting aquaporin function is critical for assessing regulation and screening for new activity modulators that can prompt the development of efficient medicines. Appropriate methods for functional analysis comprising suitable cell models and techniques to accurately evaluate water and solute membrane permeability are essential to validate aquaporin function and assess short-term regulation. The present review describes established assays commonly used to assess aquaporin function in cells and tissues, as well as the experimental biophysical strategies required to reveal functional regulation and identify modulators, the first step for aquaporin drug discovery. PMID:26870725

  4. Neutrophil functional disorder in childhood.

    PubMed

    Mironska, K

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil functional disorders thought to be uncommon, yet important as a cause of morbidity and mortality in infants and children. During the first years of life, when the immune system is still not completely mature, when the viral infections are frequent and antibiotic overuse can damage and alter the immune response, the inadequate nutrition followed with iron deficient anemia and malnutrition can lead the child`s organism in state of immunodeficiency. Sometimes is difficult to distinguish at the beginning weather the cause of patient suffering from frequent infections is existing of primary immunodeficiency disorder or the cause of the immunodeficiency state is just from exogenous factors. Fortunately, primary immune deficiencies are rare diseases and only 6-7% of all of them, due to the neutrophilic functional disorders. Unfortunately, many exogenous and environmental factors have influence to the immune system, and the percentage of secondary caused neutrophilic functional disorders is much higher and should be considered when children are investigated for immunodeficiency. So, when to suspect neutrophil functional disorder? The hallmarks for diseases related to the neutrophilic functional disorders are discussed in this article.

  5. Phytoalexin-enriched functional foods.

    PubMed

    Boue, Stephen M; Cleveland, Thomas E; Carter-Wientjes, Carol; Shih, Betty Y; Bhatnagar, Deepak; McLachlan, John M; Burow, Matthew E

    2009-04-01

    Functional foods have been a developing area of food science research for the past decade. Many foods are derived from plants that naturally contain compounds beneficial to human health and can often prevent certain diseases. Plants containing phytochemicals with potent anticancer and antioxidant activities have spurred development of many new functional foods. This has led to the creation of functional foods to target health problems such as obesity and inflammation. More recent research into the use of plant phytoalexins as nutritional components has opened up a new area of food science. Phytoalexins are produced by plants in response to stress, fungal attack, or elicitor treatment and are often antifungal or antibacterial compounds. Although phytoalexins have been investigated for their possible role in plant defense, until recently they have gone unexplored as nutritional components in human foods. These underutilized plant compounds may possess key beneficial properties including antioxidant activity, anti-inflammation activity, cholesterol-lowering ability, and even anticancer activity. For these reasons, phytoalexin-enriched foods would be classified as functional foods. These phytoalexin-enriched functional foods would benefit the consumer by providing "health-enhanced" food choices and would also benefit many underutilized crops that may produce phytoalexins that may not have been considered to be beneficial health-promoting foods.

  6. Multiprocessor execution of functional programs

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, B. )

    1988-10-01

    Functional languages have recently gained attention as vehicles for programming in a concise and element manner. In addition, it has been suggested that functional programming provides a natural methodology for programming multiprocessor computers. This paper describes research that was performed to demonstrate that multiprocessor execution of functional programs on current multiprocessors is feasible, and results in a significant reduction in their execution times. Two implementations of the functional language ALFL were built on commercially available multiprocessors. Alfalfa is an implementation on the Intel iPSC hypercube multiprocessor, and Buckwheat is an implementation on the Encore Multimax shared-memory multiprocessor. Each implementation includes a compiler that performs automatic decomposition of ALFL programs and a run-time system that supports their execution. The compiler is responsible for detecting the inherent parallelism in a program, and decomposing the program into a collection of tasks, called serial combinators, that can be executed in parallel. The abstract machine model supported by Alfalfa and Buckwheat is called heterogeneous graph reduction, which is a hybrid of graph reduction and conventional stack-oriented execution. This model supports parallelism, lazy evaluation, and higher order functions while at the same time making efficient use of the processors in the system. The Alfalfa and Buckwheat runtime systems support dynamic load balancing, interprocessor communication (if required), and storage management. A large number of experiments were performed on Alfalfa and Buckwheat for a variety of programs. The results of these experiments, as well as the conclusions drawn from them, are presented.

  7. Exercise, nutrition and immune function.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Michael; Nieman, David C; Pedersen, Bente K

    2004-01-01

    Strenuous bouts of prolonged exercise and heavy training are associated with depressed immune cell function. Furthermore, inadequate or inappropriate nutrition can compound the negative influence of heavy exertion on immunocompetence. Dietary deficiencies of protein and specific micronutrients have long been associated with immune dysfunction. An adequate intake of iron, zinc and vitamins A, E, B6 and B12 is particularly important for the maintenance of immune function, but excess intakes of some micronutrients can also impair immune function and have other adverse effects on health. Immune system depression has also been associated with an excess intake of fat. To maintain immune function, athletes should eat a well-balanced diet sufficient to meet their energy requirements. An athlete exercising in a carbohydrate-depleted state experiences larger increases in circulating stress hormones and a greater perturbation of several immune function indices. Conversely, consuming 30-60 g carbohydrate x h(-1) during sustained intensive exercise attenuates rises in stress hormones such as cortisol and appears to limit the degree of exercise-induced immune depression. Convincing evidence that so-called 'immune-boosting' supplements, including high doses of antioxidant vitamins, glutamine, zinc, probiotics and Echinacea, prevent exercise-induced immune impairment is currently lacking. PMID:14971437

  8. Facile surface functionalization of nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Chang, In Pin; Hwang, Kuo Chu; Ho, Ja-an Annie; Lin, Chun-Cheng; Hwu, Reuben J-R; Horng, Jia-Cherng

    2010-03-01

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) have versatile applications in electro-optical devices, sensors, and biomedicine. Owing to the difficulty in activation of the inert sp(3) C-H bonds on the surface of NDs, it is not trivial to modify the surface functionalities on NDs. A few functionalization methods have been reported in the literature for surface modification of NDs. Many of them, however, are either multiple steps/time-consuming, or require the use of highly toxic/environmentally unfriendly reagents, such as fluorine gas and sulfuric acid. It is necessary to develop a simple process for surface functionalization of NDs to have both hydrophobic and hydrophilic functional groups. In this report, a facile process was developed to allow easy and rapid surface modification of NDs to become dispersible in either water or organic solvents using the same process. The process involves surface graphitization of NDs, followed by radical initiated surface grafting of oligomers with various functionalities, including -C(=O)OCH(3), -COOH, -NH(2), or aliphatic moieties.

  9. Detecting Aquaporin Function and Regulation.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Ana; Moura, Teresa F; Soveral, Graça

    2016-01-01

    Water is the major component of cells and tissues throughout all forms of life. Fluxes of water and solutes through cell membranes and epithelia are essential for osmoregulation and energy homeostasis. Aquaporins are membrane channels expressed in almost every organism and involved in the bidirectional transfer of water and small solutes across cell membranes. Aquaporins have important biological roles and have been implicated in several pathophysiological conditions suggesting a great translational potential in aquaporin-based diagnostics and therapeutics. Detecting aquaporin function is critical for assessing regulation and screening for new activity modulators that can prompt the development of efficient medicines. Appropriate methods for functional analysis comprising suitable cell models and techniques to accurately evaluate water and solute membrane permeability are essential to validate aquaporin function and assess short-term regulation. The present review describes established assays commonly used to assess aquaporin function in cells and tissues, as well as the experimental biophysical strategies required to reveal functional regulation and identify modulators, the first step for aquaporin drug discovery. PMID:26870725

  10. ``Backpack'' Functionalized Living Immune Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swiston, Albert; Um, Soong Ho; Irvine, Darrell; Cohen, Robert; Rubner, Michael

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate that functional polymeric ``backpacks'' built from polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) can be attached to a fraction of the surface area of living, individual lymphocytes. Backpacks containing fluorescent polymers, superparamagnetic nanoparticles, and commercially available quantum dots have been attached to B and T-cells, which may be spatially manipulated using a magnetic field. Since the backpack does not occlude the entire cellular surface from the environment, this technique allows functional synthetic payloads to be attached to a cell that is free to perform its native functions, thereby synergistically utilizing both biological and synthetic functionalities. For instance, we have shown that backpack-modified T-cells are able to migrate on surfaces for several hours following backpack attachment. Possible payloads within the PEM backpack include drugs, vaccine antigens, thermally responsive polymers, nanoparticles, and imaging agents. We will discuss how this approach has broad potential for applications in bioimaging, single-cell functionalization, immune system and tissue engineering, and cell-based therapeutics where cell-environment interactions are critical.

  11. Consequences of CKD on Functioning.

    PubMed

    Kittiskulnam, Piyawan; Sheshadri, Anoop; Johansen, Kirsten L

    2016-07-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is highly prevalent in the United States and throughout the world,(1) with approximately 13% of adults affected.(2) In addition, according to recent estimates, almost half of patients with CKD stages 3 to 5 are 70 years of age and older.(2) In the United States, the number of prevalent end-stage renal disease cases continues to increase in patients older than age 65. In light of the demographic characteristics of patients with CKD and ESRD, there has been considerable focus on associations between CKD and cardiovascular outcomes.(3) Until recently, less attention had been paid to other consequences of CKD in general and among older individuals with CKD in particular, but there is now solid evidence linking CKD with impairments of physical function, cognitive function, and emotional function and quality of life. This review summarizes available literature on these topics, focusing specifically on physical functioning and frailty, cognitive function, emotional health, including depression and anxiety, and health-related quality of life. PMID:27475661

  12. Aging and functional brain networks

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasi D.; Tomasi, D.; Volkow, N.D.

    2011-07-11

    Aging is associated with changes in human brain anatomy and function and cognitive decline. Recent studies suggest the aging decline of major functional connectivity hubs in the 'default-mode' network (DMN). Aging effects on other networks, however, are largely unknown. We hypothesized that aging would be associated with a decline of short- and long-range functional connectivity density (FCD) hubs in the DMN. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated resting-state data sets corresponding to 913 healthy subjects from a public magnetic resonance imaging database using functional connectivity density mapping (FCDM), a voxelwise and data-driven approach, together with parallel computing. Aging was associated with pronounced long-range FCD decreases in DMN and dorsal attention network (DAN) and with increases in somatosensory and subcortical networks. Aging effects in these networks were stronger for long-range than for short-range FCD and were also detected at the level of the main functional hubs. Females had higher short- and long-range FCD in DMN and lower FCD in the somatosensory network than males, but the gender by age interaction effects were not significant for any of the networks or hubs. These findings suggest that long-range connections may be more vulnerable to aging effects than short-range connections and that, in addition to the DMN, the DAN is also sensitive to aging effects, which could underlie the deterioration of attention processes that occurs with aging.

  13. Exercise, nutrition and immune function.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Michael; Nieman, David C; Pedersen, Bente K

    2004-01-01

    Strenuous bouts of prolonged exercise and heavy training are associated with depressed immune cell function. Furthermore, inadequate or inappropriate nutrition can compound the negative influence of heavy exertion on immunocompetence. Dietary deficiencies of protein and specific micronutrients have long been associated with immune dysfunction. An adequate intake of iron, zinc and vitamins A, E, B6 and B12 is particularly important for the maintenance of immune function, but excess intakes of some micronutrients can also impair immune function and have other adverse effects on health. Immune system depression has also been associated with an excess intake of fat. To maintain immune function, athletes should eat a well-balanced diet sufficient to meet their energy requirements. An athlete exercising in a carbohydrate-depleted state experiences larger increases in circulating stress hormones and a greater perturbation of several immune function indices. Conversely, consuming 30-60 g carbohydrate x h(-1) during sustained intensive exercise attenuates rises in stress hormones such as cortisol and appears to limit the degree of exercise-induced immune depression. Convincing evidence that so-called 'immune-boosting' supplements, including high doses of antioxidant vitamins, glutamine, zinc, probiotics and Echinacea, prevent exercise-induced immune impairment is currently lacking.

  14. Factor XIII: Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Verena; Kohler, Hans P

    2016-06-01

    Over the last two decades, it became evident that factor XIII (FXIII) is not only a crucial determinant of clot characteristics but also has potentially important functions in many various fields such as bone biology, immunity, and adipogenesis. In this review, we aim to summarize the latest findings regarding structure and function of FXIII. In regard to FXIII structure, much progress has been made recently to understand how its subunits are held together. In the A subunit, the activation peptide has a crucial role in the formation of FXIII-A2 dimers. In the B subunit, Sushi domains that are involved in binding to the A subunit and in B2 dimer formation have been identified. In regard to FXIII function, interactions with immune cells and the complement system have been described. A novel function of FXIII-A in adipogenesis has been suggested. The role of FXIII-A in osteoblast differentiation has been further investigated; however, a novel double knockout mouse deficient in both FXIII-A and transglutaminase 2 showed normal bone formation. Thus, more research, in particular, into the cellular functions of FXIII-A is still required. PMID:27019464

  15. Melatonin regulation of biliary functions

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Shannon; Han, Yuyan; Francis, Heather

    2014-01-01

    The intrahepatic biliary epithelium is a three-dimensional tubular system lined by cholangiocytes, epithelial cells that in addition to modify ductal bile are also the targets of vanishing bile duct syndromes (i.e., cholangiopathies) such as primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) that are characterized by the damage/proliferation of cholangiocytes. Cholangiocyte proliferation is critical for the maintenance of the biliary mass and secretory function during the pathogenesis of cholangiopathies. Proliferating cholangiocytes serve as a neuroendocrine compartment during the progression of cholangiopathies, and as such secrete and respond to hormones, neurotransmitters and neuropeptides contributing to the autocrine and paracrine pathways that regulate biliary homeostasis. The focus of this review is to summarize the recent findings related to the role of melatonin in the modulation of biliary functions and liver damage in response to a number of insults. We first provide a general background on the general function of cholangiocytes including their anatomic characteristics, their innervation and vascularization as well the role of these cells on secretory and proliferation events. After a background on the synthesis and regulation of melatonin and its role on the maintenance of circadian rhythm, we will describe the specific effects of melatonin on biliary functions and liver damage. After a summary of the topics discussed, we provide a paragraph on the future perspectives related to melatonin and liver functions. PMID:24696836

  16. Adaptive memory: thinking about function.

    PubMed

    Bell, Raoul; Röer, Jan P; Buchner, Axel

    2015-07-01

    Rating the relevance of words for the imagined situation of being stranded in the grasslands without survival material leads to exceptionally good memory for these words. This survival processing effect has received much attention because it promises to elucidate the evolutionary foundations of memory. However, the proximate mechanisms of the survival processing effect have to be identified before informed speculations about its adaptive function are possible. Here, we test and contrast 2 promising accounts of the survival processing effect. According to the 1st account, the effect is the consequence of the prioritized processing of threat-related information. According to the 2nd account, thinking about the relevance of items for survival stimulates thinking about object function, which is a particularly elaborate form of encoding. Experiment 1 showed that the emotional properties of the survival scenario, as manipulated by the negative or positive framing of the scenario, did not influence recall. A focus on threat at encoding led to worse recall than a focus on function. The latter finding was replicated in Experiment 2, which further showed that focusing on threat did not lead to a memory advantage over a pleasantness control condition. The beneficial effect of inducing a functional focus at encoding even surpasses that of the standard survival processing instruction. Together, the results support the theory that thinking about function is an important component of the survival processing effect. PMID:25419817

  17. Function-ing in a World of Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Juli K.; Glickman, Cynthia L.; Wright, Terri L.; Nimer, Michelle T.

    2000-01-01

    Presents a lesson designed to give teachers the know-how to offer secondary school students opportunities to model real-world phenomena through a variety of functions and construct and draw inferences from tables and graphs summarizing data from these situations. Investigates the roller-coaster questions in a graduate class on methods of teaching…

  18. Towards a comprehensive Functional Capacity Evaluation for hand function.

    PubMed

    Hollak, N; Soer, R; van der Woude, L H; Reneman, M F

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a more efficient (i.e. shortened) protocol for hand function capacity evaluation and to test the agreement of the protocol compared to the original protocol. 643 Healthy subjects performed tests for hand function. Agreement between two shortened protocols was compared with an existing protocol. The original protocol was performed once and the proposed shortened protocol differed in the number of trials which were reduced by statistical elimination. Agreement was determined with Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICC) and Limits of Agreement (LoA). Excellent ICCs (≥0.91) were observed in all proposed protocols except for the one trial purdue pegboard test protocol. For all tests of hand function, shorter protocols are valid to determine hand function. For Tip Pinch Strength testing, Palmar Pinch Strength testing and the Purdue Pegboard test, a two-trial protocol is recommended, because the LoA were considerable, which could affect decision-making with regards to hand capacity. For the Hand Grip strength test, the Key Pinch Strength test and the Complete Minnesota Dexterity Test, a one-trial protocol is recommended, because the LoA were acceptable. It was concluded that for healthy subjects, this shorter protocol is a reliable measure. Further testing of the short form hand FCE protocols should be completed on patients with disabling conditions prior to widespread use of these protocols among clinical samples.

  19. Contextual Control by Function and Form of Transfer of Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, David R.; Dougher, Michael J.; Greenway, David E.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated conditions leading to contextual control by stimulus topography over transfer of functions. Three 4-member stimulus equivalence classes, each consisting of four (A, B, C, D) topographically distinct visual stimuli, were established for 5 college students. Across classes, designated A stimuli were open-ended linear figures,…

  20. Functional roles of low calorie sweeteners on gut function.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Gerspach, A C; Wölnerhanssen, B; Beglinger, C

    2016-10-01

    This short review summarizes the effects of low calorie sweeteners (fructose, non-nutritive low calorie sweeteners) on gut functions focusing on the gut sweet taste receptor system. The effects of these molecules on secretion of gut peptides associated with glycemic homeostasis and appetite regulation is reviewed as well as effects on gastric emptying and glucose absorption.