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Sample records for frictional contact method

  1. Adaptive methods, rolling contact, and nonclassical friction laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. T.

    1989-01-01

    Results and methods on three different areas of contemporary research are outlined. These include adaptive methods, the rolling contact problem for finite deformation of a hyperelastic or viscoelastic cylinder, and non-classical friction laws for modeling dynamic friction phenomena.

  2. Alternative methods to model frictional contact surfaces using NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoang, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    Elongated (slotted) holes have been used extensively for the integration of equipment into Spacelab racks. In the past, this type of interface has been modeled assuming that there is not slippage between contact surfaces, or that there is no load transfer in the direction of the slot. Since the contact surfaces are bolted together, the contact friction provides a load path determined by the normal applied force (bolt preload) and the coefficient of friction. Three alternate methods that utilize spring elements, externally applied couples, and stress dependent elements are examined to model the contacted surfaces. Results of these methods are compared with results obtained from methods that use GAP elements and rigid elements.

  3. A Mortar Segment-to-Segment Frictional Contact Method for Large Deformations

    SciTech Connect

    Puso, M; Laursen, T

    2003-10-29

    Contact modeling is still one of the most difficult aspects of nonlinear implicit structural analysis. Most 3D contact algorithms employed today use node-on-segment approaches for contacting dissimilar meshes. Two pass node-on-segment contact approaches have the well known deficiency of locking due to over constraint. Furthermore, node-on-segment approaches suffer when individual nodes slide out of contact at contact surface boundaries or when contacting nodes slide from facet to facet. This causes jumps in the contact forces due to the discrete nature of the constraint enforcement and difficulties in convergence for implicit solution techniques. In a previous work, we developed a segment-to-segment contact approach based on the mortar method that was applicable to large deformation mechanics. The approach proved extremely robust since it eliminated the overconstraint which caused ''locking'' and provided smooth force variations in large sliding. Here, we extend this previous approach in to treat frictional contact problems. The proposed approach is then applied to several challenging frictional contact problems which demonstrate its effectiveness.

  4. A fast nonlinear conjugate gradient based method for 3D concentrated frictional contact problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jing; Vollebregt, Edwin A. H.; Oosterlee, Cornelis W.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a fast numerical solver for a nonlinear constrained optimization problem, arising from 3D concentrated frictional shift and rolling contact problems with dry Coulomb friction. The solver combines an active set strategy with a nonlinear conjugate gradient method. One novelty is to consider the tractions of each slip element in a polar coordinate system, using azimuth angles as variables instead of conventional traction variables. The new variables are scaled by the diagonal of the underlying Jacobian. The fast Fourier transform (FFT) technique accelerates all matrix-vector products encountered, exploiting the matrix' Toeplitz structure. Numerical tests demonstrate a significant reduction of the computational time compared to existing solvers for concentrated contact problems.

  5. The adapted augmented Lagrangian method: a new method for the resolution of the mechanical frictional contact problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussetta, Philippe; Marceau, Daniel; Ponthot, Jean-Philippe

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this work is to propose a new numerical method for solving the mechanical frictional contact problem in the general case of multi-bodies in a three dimensional space. This method is called adapted augmented Lagrangian method (AALM) and can be used in a multi-physical context (like thermo-electro-mechanical fields problems). This paper presents this new method and its advantages over other classical methods such as penalty method (PM), adapted penalty method (APM) and, augmented Lagrangian method (ALM). In addition, the efficiency and the reliability of the AALM are proved with some academic problems and an industrial thermo-electromechanical problem.

  6. Computational Methods for Frictional Contact With Applications to the Space Shuttle Orbiter Nose-Gear Tire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, John A.

    1996-01-01

    A computational procedure is presented for the solution of frictional contact problems for aircraft tires. A Space Shuttle nose-gear tire is modeled using a two-dimensional laminated anisotropic shell theory which includes the effects of variations in material and geometric parameters, transverse-shear deformation, and geometric nonlinearities. Contact conditions are incorporated into the formulation by using a perturbed Lagrangian approach with the fundamental unknowns consisting of the stress resultants, the generalized displacements, and the Lagrange multipliers associated with both contact and friction conditions. The contact-friction algorithm is based on a modified Coulomb friction law. A modified two-field, mixed-variational principle is used to obtain elemental arrays. This modification consists of augmenting the functional of that principle by two terms: the Lagrange multiplier vector associated with normal and tangential node contact-load intensities and a regularization term that is quadratic in the Lagrange multiplier vector. These capabilities and computational features are incorporated into an in-house computer code. Experimental measurements were taken to define the response of the Space Shuttle nose-gear tire to inflation-pressure loads and to inflation-pressure loads combined with normal static loads against a rigid flat plate. These experimental results describe the meridional growth of the tire cross section caused by inflation loading, the static load-deflection characteristics of the tire, the geometry of the tire footprint under static loading conditions, and the normal and tangential load-intensity distributions in the tire footprint for the various static vertical loading conditions. Numerical results were obtained for the Space Shuttle nose-gear tire subjected to inflation pressure loads and combined inflation pressure and contact loads against a rigid flat plate. The experimental measurements and the numerical results are compared.

  7. Frictional contact of two rotating elastic disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrik, V. I.; Ulitko, A. F.

    2007-10-01

    We study the problem of constrained uniform rotation of two precompressed elastic disks made of different materials with friction forces in the contact region taken into account. The exact solution of the problem is obtained by the Wiener-Hopf method. An important stage in the study of rolling of elastic bodies is the Hertz theory [1] of contact interaction of elastic bodies with smoothly varying curvature in the contact region under normal compression. Friction in the contact region is assumed to be negligible. If there are tangential forces and the friction in the contact region is taken into account, then the picture of contact interaction of elastic bodies changes significantly. Although the normal contact stress distribution strictly follows the Hertz theory for bodies with identical elastic properties and apparently slightly differs from the Hertz diagram for bodies made of different materials, the presence of tangential stresses results in the splitting of the contact region into the adhesion region and the slip region. This phenomenon was first established by Reynolds [2], who experimentally discovered slip regions near points of material entry in and exit from the contact region under constrained rolling of an aluminum cylinder on a rubber base. The theoretical justification of the partial slip phenomenon in the contact region, discovered by Reynolds [2], can be found in Carter [3] and Fromm [4]. Moreover, Fromm presents a complete solution of the problem of constrained uniform rotation of two identical disks. Apparently, Fromm was the first to consider the so-called "clamped" strain and postulated that slip is absent at the point at which the disk materials enter the contact region. Ishlinskii [5, 6] gave an engineering solution of the problem on slip in the contact region under rolling friction. Considering the problem on a rigid disk rolling on an elastic half-plane, we model this problem by an infinite set of elastic vertical rods using Winkler

  8. On uniqueness for frictional contact rate problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radi, E.; Bigoni, D.; Tralli, A.

    1999-02-01

    A linear elastic solid having part of the boundary in unilateral frictional contact witha stiffer constraint is considered. Bifurcations of the quasistatic velocity problem are analyzed,making use of methods developed for elastoplasticity. An exclusion principle for bifurcation isproposed which is similar, in essence, to the well-known exclusion principle given by Hill, 1958. Sufficient conditions for uniqueness are given for a broad class of contactconstitutive equations. The uniqueness criteria are based on the introduction of linear comparisoninterfaces defined both where the contact rate constitutive equation are piece-wise incrementallylinear and where these are thoroughly nonlinear. Structural examples are proposed which giveevidence to the applicability of the exclusion criteria.

  9. Effect of time derivative of contact area on dynamic friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, Kazuo

    2014-06-01

    This study investigated dynamic friction during oblique impact of a golf ball by evaluating the ball's angular velocity, contact force, and the contact area between the ball and target. The effect of the contact area on the angular velocities was evaluated, and the results indicated that the contact area plays an important role in dynamic friction. In this study, the dynamic friction force F was given by F = μN + μη dA/dt, where μ is the coefficient of friction, N is the contact force, dA/dt is the time derivative of the contact area A, and η is a coefficient associated with the contact area.

  10. The Frictional Force with Respect to the Actual Contact Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holm, Ragnar

    1944-01-01

    Hardy's statement that the frictional force is largely adhesion, and to a lesser extent, deformation energy is proved by a simple experiment. The actual contact surface of sliding contacts and hence the friction per unit of contact surface was determined in several cases. It was found for contacts in normal atmosphere to be about one-third t-one-half as high as the macroscopic tearing strength of the softest contact link, while contacts annealed in vacuum and then tested, disclosed frictional forces which are greater than the macroscopic strength.

  11. Contact Hysteresis and Friction of Alkanethiol SAMs on Au

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, J.E.; Kiely, J.D.

    1998-10-14

    Nanoindentation has been combhed with nanometer-scale friction measurements to identi~ dissipative mechanisms responsible for friction in hexadecanethiol self-assembled monolayer on Au. We have demonstrated that friction is primarily due to viscoelastic relaxations within the films, which give rise to contact hysteresis when deformation rates are within the ranges of 5 and 200 k. We observe that this contact hysteresis increases with exposure to air such that the friction coefficient increases from 0.004 to 0.075 when films are exposed to air for 40 days. Both hysteresis and friction increase with probe speed, and we present a model of friction that characterizes this speed dependence and which also predicts a linear dependence of friction on normal force in thin organic films. Finally, we identify several short-term wear regimes and identify that wear changes dramatically when fdms age.

  12. Microscopic contact area and friction between medical textiles and skin.

    PubMed

    Derler, S; Rotaru, G-M; Ke, W; El Issawi-Frischknecht, L; Kellenberger, P; Scheel-Sailer, A; Rossi, R M

    2014-10-01

    The mechanical contact between medical textiles and skin is relevant in the health care for patients with vulnerable skin or chronic wounds. In order to gain new insights into the skin-textile contact on the microscopic level, the 3D surface topography of a normal and a new hospital bed sheet with a regular surface structure was measured using a digital microscope. The topographic data was analysed concerning material distribution and real contact area against smooth surfaces as a function of surface deformations. For contact conditions that are relevant for the skin of patients lying in a hospital bed it was found that the order of magnitude of the ratio of real and apparent contact area between textiles and skin or a mechanical skin model lies between 0.02 and 0.1 and that surface deformations, i.e. penetration of the textile surface asperities into skin or a mechanical skin model, range from 10 to 50µm. The performed analyses of textile 3D surface topographies and comparisons with previous friction measurement results provided information on the relationship between microscopic surface properties and macroscopic friction behaviour of medical textiles. In particular, the new bed sheet was found to be characterised by a trend towards a smaller microscopic contact area (up to a factor of two) and by a larger free interfacial volume (more than a factor of two) in addition to a 1.5 times lower shear strength when in contact with counter-surfaces. The applied methods can be useful to develop improved and skin-adapted materials and surfaces for medical applications.

  13. Computational methods for frictional contact with applications to the Space Shuttle orbiter nose-gear tire: Comparisons of experimental measurements and analytical predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, John A.

    1996-01-01

    A computational procedure is presented for the solution of frictional contact problems for aircraft tires. A Space Shuttle nose-gear tire is modeled using a two-dimensional laminated anisotropic shell theory which includes the effects of variations in material and geometric parameters, transverse-shear deformation, and geometric nonlinearities. Contact conditions are incorporated into the formulation by using a perturbed Lagrangian approach with the fundamental unknowns consisting of the stress resultants, the generalized displacements, and the Lagrange multipliers associated with both contact and friction conditions. The contact-friction algorithm is based on a modified Coulomb friction law. A modified two-field, mixed-variational principle is used to obtain elemental arrays. This modification consists of augmenting the functional of that principle by two terms: the Lagrange multiplier vector associated with normal and tangential node contact-load intensities and a regularization term that is quadratic in the Lagrange multiplier vector. These capabilities and computational features are incorporated into an in-house computer code. Experimental measurements were taken to define the response of the Space Shuttle nose-gear tire to inflation-pressure loads and to inflation-pressure loads combined with normal static loads against a rigid flat plate. These experimental results describe the meridional growth of the tire cross section caused by inflation loading, the static load-deflection characteristics of the tire, the geometry of the tire footprint under static loading conditions, and the normal and tangential load-intensity distributions in the tire footprint for the various static vertical-loading conditions. Numerical results were obtained for the Space Shuttle nose-gear tire subjected to inflation pressure loads and combined inflation pressure and contact loads against a rigid flat plate. The experimental measurements and the numerical results are compared.

  14. The evolving quality of frictional contact with graphene.

    PubMed

    Li, Suzhi; Li, Qunyang; Carpick, Robert W; Gumbsch, Peter; Liu, Xin Z; Ding, Xiangdong; Sun, Jun; Li, Ju

    2016-11-24

    Graphite and other lamellar materials are used as dry lubricants for macroscale metallic sliding components and high-pressure contacts. It has been shown experimentally that monolayer graphene exhibits higher friction than multilayer graphene and graphite, and that this friction increases with continued sliding, but the mechanism behind this remains subject to debate. It has long been conjectured that the true contact area between two rough bodies controls interfacial friction. The true contact area, defined for example by the number of atoms within the range of interatomic forces, is difficult to visualize directly but characterizes the quantity of contact. However, there is emerging evidence that, for a given pair of materials, the quality of the contact can change, and that this can also strongly affect interfacial friction. Recently, it has been found that the frictional behaviour of two-dimensional materials exhibits traits unlike those of conventional bulk materials. This includes the abovementioned finding that for few-layer two-dimensional materials the static friction force gradually strengthens for a few initial atomic periods before reaching a constant value. Such transient behaviour, and the associated enhancement of steady-state friction, diminishes as the number of two-dimensional layers increases, and was observed only when the two-dimensional material was loosely adhering to a substrate. This layer-dependent transient phenomenon has not been captured by any simulations. Here, using atomistic simulations, we reproduce the experimental observations of layer-dependent friction and transient frictional strengthening on graphene. Atomic force analysis reveals that the evolution of static friction is a manifestation of the natural tendency for thinner and less-constrained graphene to re-adjust its configuration as a direct consequence of its greater flexibility. That is, the tip atoms become more strongly pinned, and show greater synchrony in their stick

  15. Influence of contact aging on nanoparticle friction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Feldmann, Michael; Dietzel, Dirk; Fuchs, Harald; Schirmeisen, André

    2014-04-18

    One of the oldest concepts in tribology is stick-slip dynamics, where a disruptive sequence of stick and slip phases determine the overall resistance in sliding friction. While the mechanical energy dissipates in the sudden slip phase, the stick phase has been shown to be characterized by contact strengthening mechanisms, also termed contact aging. We present experiments of sliding nanoparticles, where friction is measured as a function of sliding velocity and interface temperature. The resulting complex interdependence is in good agreement with Monte Carlo simulations, in which the energy barrier for contact breaking increases logarithmically with time, at a rate governed by thermal activation.

  16. Analysis of lumped models with contact and friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migórski, Stanisław; Ochal, Anna; Sofonea, Mircea

    2011-02-01

    We consider two mathematical models that describe the vibrations of spring-mass-damper systems with contact and friction. In the first model, both the contact and frictional boundary conditions are described with subdifferentials of nonconvex functions. In the second model, the contact is modeled with a Lipschitz continuous function, and the restitution force is described by a differential equation involving a Volterra integral term. The two models lead to second-order differential inclusions with and without an integral term, in which the unknowns are the positions of the masses. For each model, we prove the existence of a solution by using an abstract result for first-order differential inclusions in finite dimensional spaces. For the second model, in addition, we prove the uniqueness of the solution by using a fixed point argument. Finally, we provide examples of systems with contact and friction conditions for which our results are valid.

  17. Coulomb frictional contact by explicit projection in the cone for finite displacement quasi-static problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Areias, P.; Rabczuk, T.; de Melo, F. J. M. Queirós; de Sá, J. César

    2015-01-01

    We propose, in this paper, a distinct perspective on the solution of the Coulomb frictional contact problem. By combining the prediction/correction method for the contact force vector with the correction step being a cone projection and writing the friction cone surface in the quadratic form, we directly calculate the contact force. The distance along the friction cone normal is determined by solving a nonlinear problem in closed form. Numerical advantages of this projection are apparent for large values of friction coefficient. Six problems previously indicated as difficult to solve by the node-to-segment discretization and the operator split algorithm are here solved with the new projection algorithm. Discretization follows node-to segment and node-to-face derivations with gap vector defined in a global frame (without tangential and normal decomposition). In addition, we provide source codes for the 2D and 3D contact cases.

  18. Friction Reduction Through Ultrasonic Vibration: Part 1: Modelling Intermittent Contact.

    PubMed

    Vezzoli, Eric; Virdih, Zlatko; Giamundo, Vincenzo; Lemaire-Semail, Betty; Giraud, Frederic; Rodic, Tomaz; Peric, Djordje; Adams, Michael

    2017-02-17

    Ultrasonic vibration is employed to modify the friction of a finger pad in way that induces haptic sensations. A combination of intermittent contact and squeeze film levitation has been previously proposed as the most probable mechanism. In this paper, in order to understand the underlying principles that govern friction modulation by intermittent contact, numerical models based on finite element (FE) analysis and also a spring-Coulombic slider are developed. The physical input parameters for the FE model are optimised by measuring the contact phase shift between a finger pad and a vibrating plate. The spring-slider model assists in the interpretation of the FE model and leads to the identification of a dimensionless group that allows the calculated coefficient of friction to be approximately superimposed onto an exponential function of the dimensionless group. Thus, it is possible to rationalise the computed relative reduction in friction being (i) dependent on the vibrational amplitude, frequency, and the intrinsic coefficient of friction of the device, and the reciprocal of the exploration velocity, and (ii) independent of the applied normal force, and the shear and extensional elastic moduli of the finger skin provided that intermittent contact is sufficiently well developed. Experimental validation of the modelling using real and artificial fingertips will be reported in part 2 of this work, which supports the current modelling.

  19. Predicting a contact's sensitivity to initial conditions using metrics of frictional coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Flicek, Robert C.; Hills, David A.; Brake, Matthew Robert W.

    2016-09-29

    This paper presents a method for predicting how sensitive a frictional contact’s steady-state behavior is to its initial conditions. Previous research has proven that if a contact is uncoupled, i.e. if slip displacements do not influence the contact pressure distribution, then its steady-state response is independent of initial conditions, but if the contact is coupled, the steady-state response depends on initial conditions. In this paper, two metrics for quantifying coupling in discrete frictional systems are examined. These metrics suggest that coupling is dominated by material dissimilarity due to Dundurs’ composite material parameter β when β ≥ 0.2, but geometric mismatch becomes the dominant source of coupling for smaller values of β. Based on a large set of numerical simulations with different contact geometries, material combinations, and friction coefficients, a contact’s sensitivity to initial conditions is found to be correlated with the product of the coupling metric and the friction coefficient. For cyclic shear loading, this correlation is maintained for simulations with different contact geometries, material combinations, and friction coefficients. Furthermore, for cyclic bulk loading, the correlation is only maintained when the contact edge angle is held constant.

  20. Predicting a contact's sensitivity to initial conditions using metrics of frictional coupling

    DOE PAGES

    Flicek, Robert C.; Hills, David A.; Brake, Matthew Robert W.

    2016-09-29

    This paper presents a method for predicting how sensitive a frictional contact’s steady-state behavior is to its initial conditions. Previous research has proven that if a contact is uncoupled, i.e. if slip displacements do not influence the contact pressure distribution, then its steady-state response is independent of initial conditions, but if the contact is coupled, the steady-state response depends on initial conditions. In this paper, two metrics for quantifying coupling in discrete frictional systems are examined. These metrics suggest that coupling is dominated by material dissimilarity due to Dundurs’ composite material parameter β when β ≥ 0.2, but geometric mismatchmore » becomes the dominant source of coupling for smaller values of β. Based on a large set of numerical simulations with different contact geometries, material combinations, and friction coefficients, a contact’s sensitivity to initial conditions is found to be correlated with the product of the coupling metric and the friction coefficient. For cyclic shear loading, this correlation is maintained for simulations with different contact geometries, material combinations, and friction coefficients. Furthermore, for cyclic bulk loading, the correlation is only maintained when the contact edge angle is held constant.« less

  1. Spanning From Atoms to Micrometers in Simulations of Contact, Adhesion and Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, Mark

    Improved understanding of the forces between realistic solid surfaces is needed to optimize adhesion and friction. Modeling these forces is challenging because they arise from interactions between atoms separated by less than a nanometer, but the number and spatial distribution of these contacting atoms depends on surface roughness and deformation on micrometer and larger scales. There are also strong scale effects in the role of elastic deformations along the surface. The talk will first describe a seamless Greens function (GF) method that allows a full treatment of elastic deformations and atomic contact for micrometer scale surfaces and multibody potentials. Next applications of the method to calculations of the contact area, contact stiffness, adhesion and friction for a range of geometries and interactions will be described. The results can be captured with simple analytic expressions and explain why most contacting surfaces do not adhere. Theoretical and experimental studies of single nanometer-scale asperities show that the frictional shear stress depends strongly on whether surfaces are commensurate. A large constant stress is obtained for identical, aligned crystalline surfaces, but the stress averages to zero in the more common case of incommensurate surfaces. The resulting ultralow friction is called superlubricity and is found in experiments and simulations of small contacts. Our simulations reveal dramatic changes in this behavior because different parts of the surface are able to advance independently as the contact radius increases towards micrometer scales. The friction between identical surfaces drops with increasing radius and then saturates at a low value. The force between incommensurate surfaces saturates at a similar value that can be related to the Peierls stress for dislocation motion at the interface. Studies of multiasperity contacts also show that incoherent motion along the interface can lead to pronounced changes in the macroscopic

  2. Molecular dynamics investigation of the effect of copper nanoparticle on the solid contact between friction surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chengzhi; Bai, Minli; Lv, Jizu; Liu, Hao; Li, Xiaojie

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of copper (Cu) nanoparticles on the solid contact between friction surfaces by applying a molecular dynamics method to reveal the mechanisms responsible for the favorable friction properties of nanoparticles. Two models were built, which were named model A (without Cu) and model B (with Cu), respectively. The differences in the mechanical properties between these two models were compared. The simulation results demonstrated that the improvement in friction properties by Cu nanoparticles was more obvious at low velocity than at high velocity. At low velocity, a Cu nano-film was formed on the friction surface, which accommodated the velocity gradient and plastic deformation. Due to the good lubrication effect of the nano-film, the plastic deformation, defect structures and friction force of model B were improved compared with model A. Under high velocity conditions, a transfer layer appeared adjacent to the interface in both models. Because of this, the friction forces of the two models decreased with increased velocity. The fluid mechanics theory was used to explain why the friction force in model B was lower than that in model A at high velocity. The effect of the load on friction properties was also analyzed and the results showed that the mechanisms of anti-wear and friction reduction by Cu nanoparticles under a low load were the same as those under a high load.

  3. Friction and shear fracture of an adhesive contact under torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chateauminois, Antoine; Fretigny, Christian; Olanier, Ludovic

    2010-02-01

    The shear failure or stiction of an adhesive contact between a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) rubber and a glass lens has been investigated using a torsional contact configuration. As compared to linear sliding, torsion presents the advantage of inducing a shear failure under a pure mode III condition, while preserving the cylindrical symmetry of the contact. The surface of the transparent PDMS substrate was marked using a network of dots in order to monitor continuously the in-plane surface displacements during the stiction process. Using a previously developed inversion procedure (A. Chateauminois and C. Fretigny, Eur. Phys. J. E 27, 221 (2008)), the corresponding surface shear stress distributions were obtained from the displacement fields. Stiction was found to involve the progressive shrinkage of a central adhesive zone surrounded by an annular microslip region. Adhesion effects were especially evidenced from a stress overshoot at the boundary of the adhesive zone. The experimental data were analysis using an extension to torsional contact of the Maugis-Dugdale approach’s to adhesive contacts which takes into account frictional effects. This model allowed to extract an effective adhesion energy in the presence of friction, which dependence on kinetics effect is briefly discussed.

  4. New inequality and functional for contact with friction - The implicit standard material approach

    SciTech Connect

    De saxce, G.; Feng, Z.Q. Compiegne, Universite de Technologie )

    1991-09-01

    The paper is devoted to the analysis of the 2D or 3D elastic contact problem with Coulomb friction, quasi-static equilibrium, and small displacements. The classical approach is based on two minimum principles, or variational inequalities: the first for unilateral contact and the second for friction. In practical applications involve an algorithm of alternately solving the two problems until convergence is achieved. A coupled approach using one principle or one inequality only is presented. The approach, based on a model of material called implicit standard, allows for extension of the notion of a normality law to dissipative behavior with a nonassociated flow rule, such as surface friction. For numerical time integration of the laws, Moreau's implicit method is considered. Nondifferentiable potentials are regularized by means of the augmented Lagrangian technique. 41 refs.

  5. Method for Investigation of Frictional Properties at Impact Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundin, K. G.; Åhrström, B. O.

    1999-05-01

    In the assessment of lubricant performance and also in various other contact applications it is of importance to know the frictional qualities of a surface. Under quasi-static conditions, normal and frictional forces are measured using force transducers but the task is more difficult when loads are transient. The experimental method presented in this paper is based on the analysis of propagating waves in a beam, due to an impact on the end surface. The impact is oblique and therefore a transverse as well as a normal force is generated. The normal force history is measured from the axial non-dispersive wave using strain gauges. Transverse force and bending moment both generate dispersive flexural waves. From the FFT of two transverse acceleration histories, the frictional force at the end of the rod is evaluated using beam theory. The relation between normal and frictional force histories displays the frictional properties at the impact. Preliminary results are presented.

  6. Switchable static friction of piezoelectric composite—silicon wafer contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Ende, D. A.; Fischer, H. R.; Groen, W. A.; van der Zwaag, S.

    2013-04-01

    The meso-scale surface roughness of piezoelectric fiber composites can be manipulated by applying an electric field to a piezocomposite with a polished surface. In the absence of an applied voltage, the tips of the embedded piezoelectric ceramic fibers are below the surface of the piezocomposite and a silicon wafer counter surface rests solely on the matrix region of the piezocomposite surface. When actuated, the piezoelectric ceramic fibers protrude from the surface and the wafer rests solely on these protrusions. A threefold decrease in engineering static friction coefficient upon actuation of the piezocomposite was observed: from μ* = 1.65 to μ* = 0.50. These experimental results could be linked to the change in contact surface area and roughness using capillary adhesion theory, which relates the adhesive force to the number and size of the contacting asperities for the different surface states.

  7. Frictional unilateral contact for hemitropic solids in micropolar elasticity and boundary element approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwinner, Joachim

    2016-12-01

    This contribution deals with unilateral contact problems with Tresca friction (given friction model) in hemitropic mi-cropolar elasticity. Based on a boundary integral approach such problems can be reduced to boundary variational inequalities. This suggests the use of boundary element methods for their numerical treatment. With higher order approximation this leads to a nonconforming approximation what can numerically be realized by means of Gauss-Lobatto quadrature. The contribution is based on the recent papers [7, 8] of the author and on joint work [3] with A. Gachechiladze, R. Gachechi-ladze, and D. Natroshvili.

  8. Numerical techniques for rolling rubber wheels: treatment of inelastic material properties and frictional contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziefle, M.; Nackenhorst, U.

    2008-08-01

    Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) methods provide a well established basis for the numerical analysis of rolling contact problems. Whereas the theoretical framework is well developed for elastic constitutive behavior, special measures are necessary for the computation of dissipative effects like inelastic properties and friction because the path of material points is not traced inherently. In this presentation a fractional step approach is suggested for the integration of the evolution equations for internal variables. A Time-Discontinuous Galerkin (TDG) method is introduced for the numerical solution of the related advection equations. Furthermore, a mathematically sound approach for the treatment of frictional rolling within the ALE-description is suggested. By this novel and fully implicit algorithm the slip velocities are integrated along their path-lines. For dissipative effects due to both, inelastic behavior and friction, physical reliable results will be demonstrated as well as the computability of large scaled finite element tire-models.

  9. Breaking of symmetries for stabilization of rotating continua in frictional contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spelsberg-Korspeter, Gottfried

    2009-05-01

    Rotating structures subject to frictional contact are susceptible to self-excited vibrations that are responsible for noise problems. In previous work the underlying mechanism has been explained through mathematical-mechanical models. From practical experience it is known that breaking the symmetry of a rotor can have a stabilizing effect. The present paper is devoted to a mathematical justification of this phenomenon. At the same time a method for a quantitative investigation of the influence of asymmetries on the stability behavior is outlined. As an example a rotating annular Kirchhoff plate in contact with friction pads is studied serving as a minimal model for brake squeal. A possible application of the results is the support of the design process for squeal free brake rotors where currently only experimental methods yield information about the tendency of an asymmetric brake rotor to squeal.

  10. Non-Amontons-Coulomb local friction law of randomly rough contact interfaces with rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Danh Toan; Wandersman, Elie; Prevost, Alexis; Le Chenadec, Yohan; Fretigny, Christian; Chateauminois, Antoine

    2013-12-01

    We report on measurements of the local friction law at a multi-contact interface formed between a smooth rubber and statistically rough glass lenses, under steady-state friction. Using contact imaging, surface displacements are measured, and inverted to extract both distributions of frictional shear stress and contact pressure with a spatial resolution of about 10\\ \\mu\\text{m} . For a glass surface whose topography is self-affine with a Gaussian height asperity distribution, the local frictional shear stress is found to vary sub-linearly with the local contact pressure over the whole investigated pressure range. Such sub-linear behavior is also evidenced for a surface with a non-Gaussian height asperity distribution, demonstrating that, for such multi-contact interfaces, Amontons-Coulomb's friction law does not prevail at the local scale.

  11. A flexible multi-body approach for frictional contact in spur gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundvall, O.; Strömberg, N.; Klarbring, A.

    2004-12-01

    In the present paper, a large rotational approach for dynamic contact problems with friction is proposed. The approach is used for modelling a spur gear pair with shafts and bearings. The model is obtained by superposing small displacement elasticity on rigid-body motions, and postulating tribological laws on the gear flanks. The finite element method is used to model the elastic properties of the gear pair. Shafts and bearings are represented by linear springs. The tribological laws of the contact interface are Signorini's contact law and Coulomb's law of friction. An important feature of the approach is that the difficulties of impacting mass nodes are avoided. The governing equations of the model are numerically treated by use of the augmented Lagrangian approach. In such manner the geometry of the gear flanks are well represented in the numerical simulations. It is possible to study accurately the consequences of different types of profile modifications as well as flank errors. In this work, the dynamic transmission error is studied. For instance, it turns out that the effect from profile modification is less significant for the transmission error when frictional effects are included.

  12. Water-vapor effects on friction of magnetic tape in contact with nickel-zinc ferrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of humidity of moist nitrogen on the friction and deformation behavior of magnetic tape in contact with a nickel-zinc ferrite spherical pin were studied. The results indicate that the coefficient of friction is markedly dependent on the ambient relative humidity. Although the coefficient of friction remains low below 40-percent relative humidity, it increases rapidly with increasing relative humidity above 40 percent. The general ambient environment of the tape does not have any effect on the friction behavior if the area where the tape is in sliding contact with the ferrite pin is flooded with controlled nitrogen. The response time for the friction of the tape to humidity changes is about 10 sec. The effect of friction as a function of relative humidity on dehumidifying is very similar to that on humidifying. A surface softening of the tape due to water vapor increases the friction of the tape.

  13. High-vacuum adhesion and friction properties of sliding contact-mode micromachines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, H.; Komvopoulos, K.

    2013-07-01

    The evolution of adhesion and friction in contact-mode micromachines operated in high vacuum was studied by tracking changes in the adhesive pressure, interfacial shear strength, and static coefficient of friction with accumulating sliding cycles. Low adhesion and high static friction observed during the initial stage of sliding were followed by monotonically intensifying adhesion and decreasing friction until reaching an equilibrium stage at steady-state sliding. This trend revealed the existence of two friction regimes in which asperity deformation and adhesion were the dominant friction mechanisms. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy observations indicated that sliding resulted in physical and chemical surface changes. The evolution of the adhesion and friction properties with sliding cycles is attributed to the increase of both the real contact area and the work of adhesion due to nanoscale surface smoothening and the removal of contaminant adsorbents, respectively.

  14. Fundamental considerations in adhesion, friction and wear for ceramic-metal contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1990-01-01

    Fundamental studies of friction, wear and adhesion of ceramics in contact with metals are evaluated. It is shown that friction and adhesion are strongly dependent on the ductility of the metals. The surface energy, friction, adhesion and hardness of a metal are related to its Young's modulus and shear modulus, which have a marked dependence on the electron configuration of the metal. Generally, the greater the sheer modulus, the less metal transfer there is to the ceramic.

  15. The friction behavior of semiconductors Si and GaAs in contact with pure metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishina, H.

    1984-01-01

    The friction behavior of the semiconductors silicon and gallium arsenide in contact with pure metals was studied. Five transition and two nontransition metals, titanium, tantalum, nickel, palladium, platinum, copper, and silver, slid on a single crystal silicon (111) surface. Four metals, indium, nickel, copper and silver, slid on a single crystal gallium arsenide (100) surface. Experiments were conducted in room air and in a vacuum of 10 to the minus 7th power N/sq cm (10 to the minus 9th power torr). The results indicate that the sliding of silicon on the transition metals exhibits relatively higher friction than for the nontransition metals in contact with silicon. There is a clear correlation between friction and Schottky barrier height formed at the metal silicon interface for the transition metals. Transition metals with a higher barrier height on silicon had a lower friction. The same effect of barrier height was found for the friction of gallium arsenide in contact with metals.

  16. Effect of capillary-condensed water on the dynamic friction force at nanoasperity contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirghi, L.

    2003-05-01

    A single nanoasperity contact in ambient air is usually wetted by capillary condensation of water vapor and is surrounded by a water meniscus. This phenomenon strongly affects the contact friction, not only by the effect of meniscus loading force (superficial tension and capillary forces), but also by a friction force that accounts for the energy loss in the meniscus movement along with the sliding contact. Occurrence of the water-meniscus-generated friction is experimentally proved by atomic force microscopy measurements of the tip-sample friction force at minimum possible external load (before pull-off). A qualitative explanation for the observed dependence of the friction force on air humidity and solid surface wettability is proposed.

  17. Modeling of contact mechanics and friction limit surfaces for soft fingers in robotics, with experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Xydas, N.; Kao, I.

    1999-09-01

    A new theory in contact mechanics for modeling of soft fingers is proposed to define the relationship between the normal force and the radius of contact for soft fingers by considering general soft-finger materials, including linearly and nonlinearly elastic materials. The results show that the radius of contact is proportional to the normal force raised to the power of {gamma}, which ranges from 0 to 1/3. This new theory subsumes the Hertzian contact model for linear elastic materials, where {gamma} = 1/3. Experiments are conducted to validate the theory using artificial soft fingers made of various materials such as rubber and silicone. Results for human fingers are also compared. This theory provides a basis for numerically constructing friction limit surfaces. The numerical friction limit surface can be approximated by an ellipse, with the major and minor axes as the maximum friction force and the maximum moment with respect to the normal axis of contact, respectively. Combining the results of the contact-mechanics model with the contact-pressure distribution, the normalized friction limit surface can be derived for anthropomorphic soft fingers. The results of the contact-mechanics model and the pressure distribution for soft fingers facilitate the construction of numerical friction limit surfaces, and will enable us to analyze and simulate contact behaviors of grasping and manipulation in robotics.

  18. Computational Studies of Hard Disks: Contact Percolation, Fragility, Frictional Families and Basin Volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Tianqi

    This thesis presents four computational and theoretical studies of the structural, mechanical, and vibrational properties of purely repulsive disks, dimer-, and ellipse-shaped particles with and without friction. The first study investigated the formation of interparticle contact networks below jamming onset at packing fraction φJ, where the pressure of the system becomes nonzero. We generated ensembles of static packings of frictionless disks over a range of packing fraction. We find that the network of interparticle contacts forms a system spanning cluster at a critical packing fraction φP < φJ. The contact percolation transition also signals the onset of cooperative non-affine particle motion and non-trivial response to applied stress. For the second project, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of dense liquids composed of bidisperse dimer- and ellipse-shaped particles over a wide range of temperature and packing fraction. We measured structural relaxation times for the translational and rotational degrees of freedom. We find that the slow dynamics for dense liquids composed of dimer- and ellipse-shaped particles are qualitatively the same, despite the fact that zero-temperature static packings of dimers are isostatic, while static packings of ellipses are hypostatic. We also show that the fragility of the structural relaxation time decreases with increasing aspect ratio for both dimer- and ellipse-shaped particles. For the third project, we developed a novel method to calculate and predict the average contact number as a function of the static friction coefficient for disk packings. We employed a novel numerical method that allowed us to enumerate sets of packings with m = N0c -- Nc missing contacts relative to the isostatic value N0c We show that the probability Pm(micro) to obtain a static packing with m missing contacts at micro can be expressed as a power series in micro. Using Pm(micro), we find that the average contact number versus micro

  19. Method and device for frictional welding

    DOEpatents

    Peacock, H.B.

    1991-01-01

    A method for friction welding that produces a seal having essentially no gas porosity, comprises two rotationally symmetric, generally cylindrical members, spaced apart and coaxially aligned, that are rotated with respect to each other and brought together under high pressure. One member is preferably a generally cylindrical cannister that stores uranium within its hollow walls. The other member is preferably a generally cylindrical, hollow weld ring. An annular channel formed in the weld ring functions as an internal flash trap and is uniquely designed so that substantially all of the welding flash generated from the friction welding is directed into the channel`s recessed bottom. Also, the channel design limits distortion of the two members during the friction welding, process, further contributing to the complete seal that is obtained.

  20. Method and device for frictional welding

    DOEpatents

    Peacock, H.B.

    1992-10-13

    A method is described for friction welding that produces a seal having essentially no gas porosity, comprises two rotationally symmetric, generally cylindrical members, spaced apart and coaxially aligned, that are rotated with respect to each other and brought together under high pressure. One member is preferably a generally cylindrical canister that stores uranium within its hollow walls. The other member is preferably a generally cylindrical, hollow weld ring. An annular channel formed in the weld ring functions as an internal flash trap and is uniquely designed so that substantially all of the welding flash generated from the friction welding is directed into the channel's recessed bottom. Also, the channel design limits distortion of the two members during the friction welding process, further contributing to the complete seal that is obtained. 5 figs.

  1. Method and device for frictional welding

    DOEpatents

    Peacock, Harold B.

    1992-01-01

    A method for friction welding that produces a seal having essentially no gas porosity, comprises two rotationally symmetric, generally cylindrical members, spaced apart and coaxially aligned, that are rotated with respect to each other and brought together under high pressure. One member is preferably a generally cylindrical cannister that stores uranium within its hollow walls. The other member is preferably a generally cylindrical, hollow weld ring. An annular channel formed in the weld ring functions as an internal flash trap and is uniquely designed so that substantially all of the welding flash generated from the friction welding is directed into the channel's recessed bottom. Also, the channel design limits distortion of the two members during the friction welding process, further contributing to the complete seal that is obtained.

  2. Anisotropic friction and wear of single-crystal manganese-zinc ferrite in contact with itself

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with manganese-zinc ferrite (100), (110), (111), and (211) planes in contact with themselves. Mating the highest-atomic-density directions, (110), of matched crystallographic planes resulted in the lowest coefficients of friction. Mating matched (same) high-atomic-density planes and matched (same)crystallographic directions resulted in low coefficients of friction. Mating dissimilar crystallographic planes, however, did not give significantly different friction results from those with matched planes. Sliding caused cracking and the formation of hexagonal- and rectangular-platelet wear debris on ferrite surfaces, primarily from cleavage of the (110) planes.

  3. Contact-line friction of liquid drops on self-assembled monolayers: chain-length effects.

    PubMed

    Voué, M; Rioboo, R; Adao, M H; Conti, J; Bondar, A I; Ivanov, D A; Blake, T D; De Coninck, J

    2007-04-24

    The static and dynamic wetting properties of self-assembled alkanethiol monolayers of increasing chain length were studied. The molecular-kinetic theory of wetting was used to interpret the dynamic contact angle data and evaluate the contact-line friction on the microscopic scale. Although the surfaces had a similar static wettability, the coefficient of contact-line friction zeta0 increased linearly with alkyl chain length. This result supports the hypothesis of energy dissipation due to a local deformation of the nanometer-thick layer at the contact line.

  4. Contact mechanics and rubber friction for randomly rough surfaces with anisotropic statistical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, G.; Lorenz, B.; Persson, B. N. J.; Wohlers, A.

    2009-07-01

    In this paper we extend the theory of contact mechanics and rubber friction developed by one of us (B.N.J. Persson, J. Chem. Phys. 115, 3840 (2001)) to the case of surfaces with anisotropic surface roughness. As an application we calculate the viscoelastic contribution to the rubber friction. We show that the friction coefficient may depend significantly on the sliding direction, while the area of contact depends weakly on the sliding direction. We have carried out experiments for rubber blocks sliding on unidirectionally polished steel surfaces. The experimental data are in a good qualitative agreement with the theory.

  5. Friction and wear behavior of single-crystal silicon carbide in contact with titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with single crystal silicon carbide in sliding contact with titanium. Results indicate that the friction coefficient is greater in vacuum than in argon and that this is due to the greater adhesion or adhesive transfer in vacuum. Thin films of silicon carbide transferred to titanium also adhered to silicon carbide both in argon at atmospheric pressure and in high vacuum. Cohesive bonds fractured on both the silicon carbide and titanium surfaces. The wear debris of silicon carbide created by fracture plowed the silicon carbide surface in a plastic manner. The friction characteristics of titanium in contact with silicon carbide were sensitive to the surface roughness of silicon carbide, and the friction coefficients were higher for a rough surface of silicon carbide than for a smooth one. The difference in friction results was due to plastic deformation (plowing of titanium).

  6. Friction of viscoelastic elastomers with rough surfaces under torsional contact conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trejo, Miguel; Fretigny, Christian; Chateauminois, Antoine

    2013-11-01

    Frictional properties of contacts between a smooth viscoelastic rubber and rigid surfaces are investigated using a torsional contact configuration where a glass lens is continuously rotated on the rubber surface. From the inversion of the displacement field measured at the surface of the rubber, spatially resolved values of the steady state frictional shear stress are determined within the nonhomogeneous pressure and velocity fields of the contact. For contacts with a smooth lens, a velocity-dependent but pressure-independent local shear stress is retrieved from the inversion. On the other hand, the local shear stress is found to depend on both velocity and applied contact pressure when a randomly rough (sand-blasted) glass lens is rubbed against the rubber surface. As a result of changes in the density of microasperity contacts, the amount of light transmitted by the transparent multicontact interface is observed to vary locally as a function of both contact pressure and sliding velocity. Under the assumption that the intensity of light transmitted by the rough interface is proportional to the proportion of area into contact, it is found that the local frictional stress can be expressed experimentally as the product of a purely velocity-dependent term, k(v), by a term representing the pressure and velocity dependence of the actual contact area, A/A0. A comparison between k(v) and the frictional shear stress of smooth contacts suggests that nanometer scale dissipative processes occurring at the interface predominate over viscoelastic dissipation at microasperity scale.

  7. Adhesion and friction of single-crystal diamond in contact with transition metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to examine the adhesion and friction of single-crystal diamond in contact with various transition metals and the nature of metal transfer to diamond. Sliding friction experiments were conducted with diamond in sliding contact with the metals yttrium, titanium, zirconium, vanadium, iron, cobalt, nickel, tungsten, platinum, rhenium and rhodium. All experiments were conducted with loads of 0.05 to 0.3 N, at a sliding velocity of 0.003 m per minute, in a vacuum of 10 to the -8th Pa, at room temperature, and on the (111) plane of diamond with sliding in the 110 line type direction. The results of the investigation indicate that the coefficient of friction for diamond in contact with various metals is related to the relative chemical activity of the metals in high vacuum. The more active the metal, the higher the coefficient of friction. All the metals examined transferred to the surface of diamond in sliding.

  8. Asynchronous collision integrators: Explicit treatment of unilateral contact with friction and nodal restraints

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Sebastian; Bucher, Christian

    2013-01-01

    This article presents asynchronous collision integrators and a simple asynchronous method treating nodal restraints. Asynchronous discretizations allow individual time step sizes for each spatial region, improving the efficiency of explicit time stepping for finite element meshes with heterogeneous element sizes. The article first introduces asynchronous variational integration being expressed by drift and kick operators. Linear nodal restraint conditions are solved by a simple projection of the forces that is shown to be equivalent to RATTLE. Unilateral contact is solved by an asynchronous variant of decomposition contact response. Therein, velocities are modified avoiding penetrations. Although decomposition contact response is solving a large system of linear equations (being critical for the numerical efficiency of explicit time stepping schemes) and is needing special treatment regarding overconstraint and linear dependency of the contact constraints (for example from double-sided node-to-surface contact or self-contact), the asynchronous strategy handles these situations efficiently and robust. Only a single constraint involving a very small number of degrees of freedom is considered at once leading to a very efficient solution. The treatment of friction is exemplified for the Coulomb model. Special care needs the contact of nodes that are subject to restraints. Together with the aforementioned projection for restraints, a novel efficient solution scheme can be presented. The collision integrator does not influence the critical time step. Hence, the time step can be chosen independently from the underlying time-stepping scheme. The time step may be fixed or time-adaptive. New demands on global collision detection are discussed exemplified by position codes and node-to-segment integration. Numerical examples illustrate convergence and efficiency of the new contact algorithm. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. International Journal for Numerical Methods in

  9. New Micro- and Macroscopic Models of Contact and Friction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-01

    formulation of the problem which is as follows. 41 Find a displacement field u(x) EV , such that I j Eijktvi’juk,’dS1 + vi 1 NiNjujds =( Vi1 iN(W-XkN+Pok-Nk...T., and Rabinowicz , E., "The Nature of the Coefficient of Friction," .Journ. Appl. Phys., 24, 2, pp. 136-139, 1953. 23. Bush, A. W., Gibson, R. D...Nonlinear Friction Laws," International Journal of Engineering Science, Vol. 24, No. 11, pp. 1755-1768, 1986. 76. Rabinowicz , E., "The Nature of the

  10. New Micro- and Macroscopic Models of Contact and Friction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-11-29

    computationally more efficient to use a total formulation of3 the problem which is as follows. Find a displacement field u(x) EV , such thatI Jvj,,Ej1k1Uk,jdfl= v...Effect on Adhesion and Friction," Journ. of Colloid and Interface Science, 58, pp. 36-53 1977. 22. Burwell, J. T., and Rabinowicz , E., "The Nature of...Elasticity with Nonlinear Friction Laws," International Journal of Engineering Science, Vol. 24, No. 11, pp. 1755-1768, 1986. 77. Rabinowicz , E

  11. A comparison of Coulomb and pseudo-Coulomb friction implementations: Application to the table contact phase of gymnastics vaulting.

    PubMed

    Jackson, M I; Hiley, M J; Yeadon, M R

    2011-10-13

    In the table contact phase of gymnastics vaulting both dynamic and static friction act. The purpose of this study was to develop a method of simulating Coulomb friction that incorporated both dynamic and static phases and to compare the results with those obtained using a pseudo-Coulomb implementation of friction when applied to the table contact phase of gymnastics vaulting. Kinematic data were obtained from an elite level gymnast performing handspring straight somersault vaults using a Vicon optoelectronic motion capture system. An angle-driven computer model of vaulting that simulated the interaction between a seven segment gymnast and a single segment vaulting table during the table contact phase of the vault was developed. Both dynamic and static friction were incorporated within the model by switching between two implementations of the tangential frictional force. Two vaulting trials were used to determine the model parameters using a genetic algorithm to match simulations to recorded performances. A third independent trial was used to evaluate the model and close agreement was found between the simulation and the recorded performance with an overall difference of 13.5%. The two-state simulation model was found to be capable of replicating performance at take-off and also of replicating key contact phase features such as the normal and tangential motion of the hands. The results of the two-state model were compared to those using a pseudo-Coulomb friction implementation within the simulation model. The two-state model achieved similar overall results to those of the pseudo-Coulomb model but obtained solutions more rapidly.

  12. Friction and wear of metals in contact with pyrolytic graphite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Brainard, W. A.

    1975-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with gold, iron, and tantalum single crystals sliding on prismatic and basal orientations of pyrolytic graphite in various environments, including vacuum, oxygen, water vapor, nitrogen, and hydrogen bromide. Surfaces were examined in the clean state and with various adsorbates present on the graphite surfaces. Auger and LEED spectroscopy, SEM, and EDXA were used to characterize the graphite surfaces. Results indicate that the prismatic and basal orientations do not contain nor do they chemisorb oxygen, water vapor, acetylene, or hydrogen bromide. All three metals exhibited higher friction on the prismatic than on the basal orientation and these metals transferred to the atomically clean prismatic orientation of pyrolytic graphite. No metal transfer to the graphite was observed in the presence of adsorbates at 760 torr. Ion bombardment of the graphite surface with nitrogen ions resulted in the adherence of nitrogen to the surface.

  13. The adhesion, friction, and wear of binary alloys in contact with single-crystal silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with various iron-base alloys (alloying elements were Ti, Cr, Ni, Rh, and W) in contact with a single-crystal silicon carbide (0001) surface in vacuum. Results indicate atomic size misfit and concentration of alloying elements play a dominant role in controlling adhesion, friction, and wear properties of iron-base binary alloys. The controlling mechanism of the alloy properties is an intrinsic effect involving the resistance to shear fracture of cohesive bonding in the alloy. The coefficient of friction generally increases with an increase in solute concentration. The coefficient of friction increases as the solute-to-iron atomic radius ratio increases or decreases from unity. Alloys having higher solute concentration produce more transfer to silicon carbide than do alloys having low solute concentrations. The chemical activity of the alloying element is also an important parameter in controlling adhesion and friction of alloys.

  14. Adhesion and friction of iron-base binary alloys in contact with silicon carbide in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    Single pass sliding friction experiments were conducted with various iron base binary alloys (alloying elements were Ti, Cr, Mn, Ni, Rh, and W) in contact with a single crystal silicon carbide /0001/ surface in vacuum. Results indicate that atomic size and concentration of alloying elements play an important role in controlling adhesion and friction properties of iron base binary alloys. The coefficient of friction generally increases with an increase in solute concentration. The coefficient of friction increases linearly as the solute to iron atomic radius ratio increases or decreases from unity. The chemical activity of the alloying elements was also an important parameter in controlling adhesion and friction of alloys, as these latter properties are highly dependent upon the d bond character of the elements.

  15. Friction behavior of silicon in contact with titanium, nickel, silver and copper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishina, H.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments are conducted with the semiconductor silicon in contact with the metals titanium, nickel, copper, and silver. Sliding is on the (111) plane of single-crystal silicon in the 112 crystallographic direction both in dry and lubricated (mineral oil) sliding. The friction coefficient in dry sliding is controlled by adhesion and the surface chemical activity of the metal. The more active the metal the stronger the adhesion and the higher the friction. In lubricated sliding the lubricant absorbs to the surfaces and reduces the importance of metal chemical effects. In lubricated sliding, silicon ceases to behave in a brittle manner and undergoes plastic deformation under load.

  16. Friction and transfer behavior of pyrolytic boron nitride in contact with various metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with pyrolytic boron nitride in sliding contact with itself and various metals. Auger emission spectroscopy was used to monitor transfer of pyrolytic boron nitride to metals and metals to pyrolytic boron nitride. Results indicate that the friction coefficient for pyrolytic boron nitride in contact with metals can be related to the chemical activity of the metals and more particularly to the d valence bond character of the metal. Transfer was found to occur to all metals except silver and gold and the amount of transfer was less in the presence than in the absence of metal oxide. Friction was less for pyrolytic boron nitride in contact with a metal in air than in vacuum.

  17. Travelling interface waves in a brake-like system under unilateral contact and Coulomb friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Quoc Son; Oueslati, Abdelbacet; Steindl, Alois; Teufel, Andreas; Troger, Hans

    2008-01-01

    This article considers the frictional interface waves generated by the flutter instability of the sliding steady state for an elastic tube in frictional contact with a rigid and rotating shaft. According to the values of the contact pressure, the rotation velocity and the friction coefficient, several periodic dynamical responses can be found under the form of travelling surface waves. Such a periodic solution may be interesting in the study of a possible dynamic transition from the sliding steady state in the spirit of Andronov-Hopf bifurcation. Examples of stick-slip, stick-slip-separation and stick-slip-separation-reverse-slip waves propagating along the contact surface, obtained by various semi-analytical and numerical approaches, are reported here. Some results on the stability of these travelling waves are also indicated. To cite this article: Q.S. Nguyen et al., C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  18. Method for forming metal contacts

    DOEpatents

    Reddington, Erik; Sutter, Thomas C; Bu, Lujia; Cannon, Alexandra; Habas, Susan E; Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alexander; Ginley, David S; Van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria

    2013-09-17

    Methods of forming metal contacts with metal inks in the manufacture of photovoltaic devices are disclosed. The metal inks are selectively deposited on semiconductor coatings by inkjet and aerosol apparatus. The composite is heated to selective temperatures where the metal inks burn through the coating to form an electrical contact with the semiconductor. Metal layers are then deposited on the electrical contacts by light induced or light assisted plating.

  19. A constitutive law for finite element contact problems with unclassical friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plesha, M. E.; Steinetz, B. M.

    1986-01-01

    Techniques for modeling complex, unclassical contact-friction problems arising in solid and structural mechanics are discussed. A constitutive modeling concept is employed whereby analytic relations between increments of contact surface stress (i.e., traction) and contact surface deformation (i.e., relative displacement) are developed. Because of the incremental form of these relations, they are valid for arbitrary load-deformation histories. The motivation for the development of such a constitutive law is that more realistic friction idealizations can be implemented in finite element analysis software in a consistent, straightforward manner. Of particular interest is modeling of two-body (i.e., unlubricated) metal-metal, ceramic-ceramic, and metal-ceramic contact. Interfaces involving ceramics are of engineering importance and are being considered for advanced turbine engines in which higher temperature materials offer potential for higher engine fuel efficiency.

  20. Adhesion and friction of transition metals in contact with nonmetallic hard materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with the metals yttrium, titanium, tantalum, zirconium, vanadium, neodymium, iron, cobalt, nickel, tungsten, platinum, rhenium, ruthenium, and rhodium in sliding contact with single crystal diamond, silicon carbide, pyrolytic boron nitride, and ferrite. Auger electron spectroscopy analysis was conducted with the metals and nonmetals to determine the surface chemistry and the degree of surface cleanliness. The results of the investigation indicate the adhesion and friction of the transition metals in contact with diamond, silicon carbide, boron nitride, and ferrite are related to the relative chemical activity of the metals. The more chemically active the metal, the higher the coefficient of friction and the greater amount of transfer to the nonmetals.

  1. Effects of water-vapor on friction and deformation of polymeric magnetic media in contact with a ceramic oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of humidity (water-vapor) in nitrogen on the friction and deformation behavior of magnetic tape in contact with a Ni-Zn ferrite spherical pin were studied. The coefficient of friction is markedly dependent on the ambient relative humidity. In elastic contacts the coefficient of friction increased linearly with increasing humidity; it decreased linearly when humidity was lowered. This effect is the result of changes in the chemistry and interaction of tape materials such as degradation of the lubricant. In plastic contacts there was no effect of humidity on friction below 40 percent relative humidity. There is no effect on friction associated with the breakthrough of the adsorbed water-vapor film at the interface of the tape and Ni-Zn ferrite. The coefficient of friction, however, increased rapidly with increasing relative humidity above 40 percent in plastic contacts.

  2. Dynamic model for the wheel-rail contact friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, HyunWook; Sandu, Corina; Holton, Carvel

    2012-02-01

    Accurately estimating the coefficient of friction (CoF) is essential in modelling railroad dynamics, reducing maintenance costs, and increasing safety in rail operations. The typical assumption of a constant CoF is widely used in theoretical studies; however, it has been noticed that the CoF is not constant, but rather depends on various dynamic parameters and instantaneous conditions. In this paper, we present a newly developed three-dimensional nonlinear CoF model for the dry rail condition and test the CoF variation using this model with estimated dynamic parameters. The wheel-rail is modelled as a mass-spring-damper system to simulate the basic wheel-rail dynamics. Although relatively simple, this model is considered sufficient for the purpose of this study. Simulations are performed at a train speed of 20 m/s using rail roughness as an excitation source. The model captures the CoF extremes and illustrates its nonlinear behaviour and instantaneous dependence on several structural and dynamic parameters.

  3. The dryout region in frictionally heated sliding contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Braun, J.; Arp, V.; Giarratano, P. J.

    1982-01-01

    Some conditions under which boiling and two-phase flow can occur in or near a wet sliding contact are determined and illustrated. The experimental apparatus consisted of a tool pressed against an instrumented slider plate and motion picture sequences at 4000 frames/sec. The temperature and photographic data demonstrated surface conditions of boiling, drying, trapped gas evolution (solutions), and volatility of fluid mixture components. The theoretical modeling and analysis are in reasonable agreement with experimental data.

  4. Friction Reduction Through Ultrasonic Vibration Part 2: Experimental Evaluation of Intermittent Contact and Squeeze Film Levitation.

    PubMed

    Sednaoui, Thomas; Vezzoli, Eric; Dzidek, Brygida Maria; Lemaire-Semail, Betty; Chappaz, Cedrick; Adams, Michael

    2017-02-17

    In part 1 of the current study of haptic displays, a finite element (FE) model of a finger exploring a plate vibrating out-of-plane at ultrasonic frequencies was developed as well as a spring-frictional slider model. It was concluded that the reduction in friction induced by the vibrations could be ascribed to ratchet mechanism as a result of intermittent contact. The relative reduction in friction calculated using the FE model could be superimposed onto an exponential function of a dimensionless group defined from relevant parameters. The current paper presents measurements of the reduction in friction, involving real and artificial fingertips, as a function of the vibrational amplitude and frequency, the applied normal force and the exploration velocity. The results are reasonably similar to the calculated FE values and also could be superimposed using the exponential function provided that the intermittent contact was sufficiently well developed, which for the frequencies examined correspond to a minimum vibrational amplitude of 1 μm P-P. It was observed that the reduction in friction depends on the exploration velocity and is independent of the applied normal force and ambient air pressure, which is not consistent with the squeeze film mechanism. However, the modelling did not incorporate the influence of air and the effect of ambient pressure was measured under a limited range of conditions, Thus squeeze film levitation may be synergistic with the mechanical interaction.

  5. Tribo-chemical behavior of eutectoid steel during rolling contact friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Cai, Z. B.; Peng, J. F.; Cao, B. B.; Jin, X. S.; Zhu, M. H.

    2016-12-01

    The tribo-chemical behavior of the eutectoid steel during rolling contact friction is investigated via scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electron probe X-ray microanalysis. The worn surface is divided into three zones: matrix zone (without friction), tribo-film zone (formed during friction) and delamination zone (tribo-film spalling). The different chemical states of atoms between those three zones and the air were investigated using the XPS analysis. The results showed that the matrix zone is composed of Fe2O3, FeO and metallic Fe, while the tribo-film and delamination zones only contain Fe2O3 and FeO. Where the tribo-film is formed, the absorptive ability of O and C atoms on the top 2-3 atomic layers is probably weakened, while the exposed fresh metal in the delamination zone tends to be continuously oxidized and form tribo-film. The tribo-chemical reaction in the delamination zone is more activated than that in the other two zones. The protective nature of the tribo-film probably maintains a low friction coefficient under rolling contact friction condition.

  6. Friction and morphology of magnetic tapes in sliding contact with nickel-zinc ferrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.; Bhushan, B.

    1984-01-01

    Friction and morphological studies were conducted with magnetic tapes containing a Ni-Zn ferrite hemispherical pin in laboratory air at a relative humidity of 40 percent and at 23 C. The results indicate that the binder plays a significant role in the friction properties, morphology, and microstructure of the tape. Comparisons were made with four binders: nitrocellulose; poly (vinyledene) chloride; cellulose acetate; and hydroxyl-terminated, low molecular weight polyester added to the base polymer, polyester-polyurethane. The coefficient of friction was lowest for the tape with the nitrocellulose binder and increased in the order hydroxylterminated, low molecular weight polyester resin; poly (vinyledene) chloride; and cellulose acetate. The degree of enclosure of the oxide particles by the binder was highest for hydroxyl-terminated, low molecular weight polyester and decreased in the order cellulose acetate, poly (vinyledene) chloride, and nitrocellulose. The nature of deformation of the tape was a factor in controlling friction. The coefficient of friction under elastic contact conditions was considerably lower than under conditions that produced plastic contacts.

  7. General contact mechanics theory for randomly rough surfaces with application to rubber friction.

    PubMed

    Scaraggi, M; Persson, B N J

    2015-12-14

    We generalize the Persson contact mechanics and rubber friction theory to the case where both surfaces have surface roughness. The solids can be rigid, elastic, or viscoelastic and can be homogeneous or layered. We calculate the contact area, the viscoelastic contribution to the friction force, and the average interface separation as a function of the sliding speed and the nominal contact pressure. We illustrate the theory with numerical results for the classical case of a rubber block sliding on a road surface. We find that with increasing sliding speed, the influence of the roughness on the rubber block decreases to the extent that only the roughness of the stiff counter face needs to be considered.

  8. Method for lubricating contacting surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Dugger, Michael T [Tijeras, NM; Ohlhausen, James A [Albuquerque, NM; Asay, David B [Boalsburg, PA; Kim, Seong H [State College, PA

    2011-12-06

    A method is provided for tribological lubrication of sliding contact surfaces, where two surfaces are in contact and in motion relative to each other, operating in a vapor-phase environment containing at least one alcohol compound at a concentration sufficiently high to provide one monolayer of coverage on at least one of the surfaces, where the alcohol compound continuously reacts at the surface to provide lubrication.

  9. Boundary lubrication of heterogeneous surfaces and the onset of cavitation in frictional contacts

    PubMed Central

    Savio, Daniele; Pastewka, Lars; Gumbsch, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Surfaces can be slippery or sticky depending on surface chemistry and roughness. We demonstrate in atomistic simulations that regular and random slip patterns on a surface lead to pressure excursions within a lubricated contact that increase quadratically with decreasing contact separation. This is captured well by a simple hydrodynamic model including wall slip. We predict with this model that pressure changes for larger length scales and realistic frictional conditions can easily reach cavitation thresholds and significantly change the load-bearing capacity of a contact. Cavitation may therefore be the norm, not the exception, under boundary lubrication conditions. PMID:27051871

  10. The friction and wear of ceramic/ceramic and ceramic/metal combinations in sliding contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Dellacorte, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    The tribological characteristics of ceramics sliding on ceramics are compared to those of ceramics sliding on a nickel-based turbine alloy. The friction and wear of oxide ceramics and silicon-based ceramics in air at temperatures from room ambient to 900 C (in a few cases to 1200 C) were measured for a hemispherically-tipped pin on a flat sliding contact geometry. In general, especially at high temperature, friction and wear were lower for ceramic/metal combinations than for ceramic/ceramic combinations. The better tribological performance for ceramic/metal combinations is attributed primarily to the lubricious nature of the oxidized surface of the metal.

  11. The friction and wear of ceramic/ceramic and ceramic/metal combinations in sliding contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Dellacorte, Christopher

    1993-01-01

    The tribological characteristics of ceramics sliding on ceramics are compared to those of ceramics sliding on a nickel based turbine alloy. The friction and wear of oxide ceramics and silicon-based ceramics in air at temperatures from room ambient to 900 C (in a few cases to 1200 C) were measured for a hemispherically-tipped pin on a flat sliding contact geometry. In general, especially at high temperature, friction and wear were lower for ceramic/metal combinations than for ceramic/ceramic combinations. The better tribological performance for ceramic/metal combinations is attributed primarily to the lubricious nature of the oxidized surface of the metal.

  12. Formulations and computational methods for contact problems in solid mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirar, Anand Ramchandra

    2000-11-01

    A study of existing formulations and computational methods for contact problems is conducted. The purpose is to gain insights into the solution procedures and pinpoint their limitations so that alternate procedures can be developed. Three such procedures based on the augmented Lagrangian method (ALM) are proposed. Small-scale benchmark problems are solved analytically as well as numerically to study the existing and proposed methods. The variational inequality formulation for frictionless contact is studied using the two bar truss-wall problem in a closed form. Sub-differential formulation is investigated using the spring-wall contact and the truss-wall friction problems. A two-phase analytical procedure is developed for solving the truss-wall frictional contact benchmark problem. The variational equality formulation for contact problems is studied using the penalty method along with the Newton-Raphson procedure. Limitations of such procedures, mainly due to their dependence on the user defined parameters (i.e., the penalty values and the number of time steps), are identified. Based on the study it is concluded that alternate formulations need to be developed. Frictionless contact formulation is developed using the basic concepts of ALM from optimization theory. A new frictional contact formulation (ALM1) is then developed employing ALM. Automatic penalty update procedure is used to eliminate dependence of the solution on the penalty values. Dependence of the solution on the number of time steps in the existing as well as ALM1 formulations is attributed to a flaw in the return mapping procedure for friction. Another new frictional contact formulation (ALM2) is developed to eliminate the dependence of solution on the number of time steps along with the penalty values. Effectiveness of ALM2 is demonstrated by solving the two bar and five bar truss-wall problems. The solutions are compared with the analytical and existing formulations. Design sensitivity analysis of

  13. Methods of Calculation of a Friction Coefficient: Application to Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servantie, J.; Gaspard, P.

    2003-10-01

    In this Letter we develop theoretical and numerical methods to calculate the dynamic friction coefficient. The theoretical method is based on an adiabatic approximation which allows us to express the dynamic friction coefficient in terms of the time integral of the autocorrelation function of the force between both sliding objects. The motion of the objects and the autocorrelation function can be numerically calculated by molecular-dynamics simulations. We have successfully applied these methods to the evaluation of the dynamic friction coefficient of the relative motion of two concentric carbon nanotubes. The dynamic friction coefficient is shown to increase with the temperature.

  14. Triboelectrical charge generated by frictional sliding contact between polymeric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeghloul, T.; Neagoe, M. B.; Prawatya, Y. E.; Dascalescu, L.

    2017-02-01

    The polymers used regularly in mechanical assemblies are brought up in relative sliding. The electrostatic charges generated in these functional conditions are merely known. Many factors are involved in the triboelectric charging process: normal load, the sliding velocity. The aim of this paper is to analyse the influence of these factors in the repartition and evolution of the electric potential at the surface in contact. The tribocharging experiments are carried out with samples cut from three polymers: sample A (5 mm x 15 mm x100 mm) from Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) or Polypropylene (PP), and sample B (5 mm x 50 mm x 180 mm) from Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC). The normal load is set to four values in the range 2 to 14 N, and the sliding velocity is varied between 70 and 122 mm/s. The results point out that the variation of relative velocity between samples is not changing the average potential for the sample B. The surface potential has a linear increase with the normal load.

  15. Effects of multi-scale roughness and frictional heating on solid body contact deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komvopoulos, Kyriakos

    2008-01-01

    Solid body contact is restricted to a discrete number of randomly distributed microscopic areas resulting from the deformation of interacting surface protrusions (asperities). The deformation mode of these asperity contacts can be elastic, elastic-plastic, or fully plastic, depending on the local surface interference, asperity radius of curvature, coefficient of friction, and mechanical properties of the solid surfaces. Traditionally, the surface topography has been described by statistical models which rely on unrealistic simplifications of the shape, height, and size of the asperities. Such assumptions were avoided in contemporary contact mechanics analyses, which use fractal geometry to accomplish a surface topography description over a wide range of length scales. The main objective of this article is to provide an assessment of the role of multi-scale topography (roughness) and frictional heating in contact deformation of elastic-plastic solid bodies. Contact relationships, derived at the asperity level, which include the mechanical properties of surface layer and substrate medium, layer thickness, local surface interference, and equivalent asperity radius of curvature, are presented for different modes of deformation. These asperity-level relationships and a fractal model of the surface topography are incorporated into a numerical integration scheme to analyze multi-scale thermomechanical contact deformation over the entire real contact area of homogeneous and layered media possessing realistic surface topographies. To cite this article: K. Komvopoulos, C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  16. A comparison of two methods of measuring static coefficient of friction at low normal forces: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Seo, Na Jin; Armstrong, Thomas J; Drinkaus, Philip

    2009-01-01

    This study compares two methods for estimating static friction coefficients for skin. In the first method, referred to as the 'tilt method', a hand supporting a flat object is tilted until the object slides. The friction coefficient is estimated as the tangent of the angle of the object at the slip. The second method estimates the friction coefficient as the pull force required to begin moving a flat object over the surface of the hand, divided by object weight. Both methods were used to estimate friction coefficients for 12 subjects and three materials (cardboard, aluminium, rubber) against a flat hand and against fingertips. No differences in static friction coefficients were found between the two methods, except for that of rubber, where friction coefficient was 11% greater for the tilt method. As with previous studies, the friction coefficients varied with contact force and contact area. Static friction coefficient data are needed for analysis and design of objects that are grasped or manipulated with the hand. The tilt method described in this study can easily be used by ergonomic practitioners to estimate static friction coefficients in the field in a timely manner.

  17. Rolling-element bearings. [contact sliding friction study of solid bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. J.

    1980-01-01

    In contrast to hydrodynamic bearings, which depend for low-friction characteristics on a fluid film between the journal and the bearing surfaces, roller-element bearings employ a number of balls or rollers that roll in an annular space. The paper briefly outlines the advantages and disadvantages of roller-element bearings as compared to hydrodynamic bearings. The discussion covers bearing types, rolling friction, friction losses in rolling bearings, contact stresses, deformations, kinematics (normal and high speeds), bearing dynamics including elastohydrodynamics, load distribution, lubrication (grease, solid oil, oil-air mist), specific dynamic capacity and life, specific static capacity, and fatigue or wearout (elastohydrodynamics, wear). Rolling bearing wear factor as a function of operating environment is plotted and discussed.

  18. Friction and wear behavior of single-crystal silicon carbide in sliding contact with various metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with single-crystal silicon carbide in contact with various metals. Results indicate the coefficient of friction is related to the relative chemical activity of the metals. The more active the metal, the higher the coefficient of friction. All the metals examined transferred to silicon carbide. The chemical activity of the metal and its shear modulus may play important roles in metal transfer, the form of the wear debris and the surface roughness of the metal wear scar. The more active the metal, and the less resistance to shear, the greater the transfer to silicon carbide and the rougher the wear scar on the surface of the metal. Hexagon shaped cracking and fracturing formed by cleavage of both prismatic and basal planes is observed on the silicon carbide surface.

  19. Friction and wear behavior of single-crystal silicon carbide in sliding contact with various metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with single-crystal silicon carbide in contact with various metals. Results indicate the coefficient of friction is related to the relative chemical activity of the metals. The more active the metal, the higher the coefficient of friction. All the metals examined transferred to silicon carbide. The chemical activity of the metal and its shear modulus may play important roles in metal-transfer, the form of the wear debris and the surface roughness of the metal wear scar. The more active the metal, and the less resistance to shear, the greater the transfer to silicon carbide and the rougher the wear scar on the surface of the metal. Hexagon-shaped cracking and fracturing formed by cleavage of both prismatic and basal planes is observed on the silicon carbide surface.

  20. Friction, wear and noise of slip ring and brush contacts for synchronous satellite use.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, N. E.; Cole, S. R.; Glossbrenner, E. W.; Vest, C. E.

    1972-01-01

    A program is being conducted for testing of slip rings for synchronous orbit application. Instrumentation systems necessary for monitoring electrical noise, friction, and brush wear at atmospheric pressure and at less than 50 ntorr have been developed. A multiplex scheme necessary for the simultaneous recording of brush displacement, friction, and electrical noise has also been developed. Composite brushes consisting of silver-molybdenum disulfide-graphite and silver-niobium diselenide-graphite have been employed on rings of coin silver and rhodium plate. Four contact combinations have been tested during an ambient condition run-in at 150 rpm and a humidity sequence at 0.1 rpm. The first six months of the two year vacuum test at 0.1 rpm have been completed. Electrical noise, friction and brush wear data recorded during these periods have been analyzed.

  1. Experimental Validation of a Differential Variational Inequality-Based Approach for Handling Friction and Contact in Vehicle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-20

    Friction and Contact in Vehicle/Granular-Terrain Interaction Daniel Melanza,b, Paramsothy Jayakumara, Dan Negrutb aU.S. Army Tank Automotive Research...Handling Friction and Contact in Vehicle 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Daniel Melanz; Paramsothy...and non-homogeneity. There are multiple formulations of DEM, classified based on how the contact and impact are handled when two bodies collide. This

  2. Molecular mechanistic origin of nanoscale contact, friction, and scratch in complex particulate systems.

    PubMed

    Jalilvand, Soroosh; Shahsavari, Rouzbeh

    2015-02-11

    Nanoscale contact mechanisms, such as friction, scratch, and wear, have a profound impact on physics of technologically important particulate systems. Determining the key underlying interparticle interactions that govern the properties of the particulate systems has been long an engineering challenge. Here, we focus on particulate calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H) as a model system and use atomistic simulations to decode the interplay between crystallographic directions, structural defects, and atomic species on normal and frictional forces. By exhibiting high material inhomogeneity and low structural symmetry, C-S-H provides an excellent system to explore various contact-induced nanoscale deformation mechanisms in complex particulate systems. Our findings provide a deep fundamental understanding of the role of inherent material features, such as van der Waals versus Coulombic interactions and the role of atomic species, in controlling the nanoscale normal contact, friction, and scratch mechanisms, thereby providing de novo insight and strategies for intelligent modulation of the physics of the particulate systems. This work is the first report on atomic-scale investigation of the contact-induced nanoscale mechanisms in structurally complex C-S-H materials and can potentially open new opportunities for knowledge-based engineering of several other particulate systems such as ceramics, sands, and powders and self-assembly of colloidal systems in general.

  3. The origin of ultrasound-induced friction reduction in microscopic mechanical contacts.

    PubMed

    Hesjedal, Thorsten; Behme, Gerd

    2002-03-01

    We present a study of the origin of ultrasound-induced friction reduction in microscopic mechanical contacts. The effect of friction reduction caused by Rayleigh-type surface acoustic waves (SAWs) is demonstrated for propagating and two-dimensional, standing wave fields using lateral force microscopy (LFM). It is shown that with increasing wave amplitude, friction is completely suppressed. To detect and distinguish between the effect of lateral and vertical surface oscillation components on the cantilever movement, we employed multimode scanning acoustic force microscopy (SAFM). We found that the friction reduction effect is only due to the vertical oscillation component. Because this effect does not appear for purely in-plane polarized Love waves, we concluded that the mechanical diode effect is most probably responsible for the SAW-induced lubrication. This explanation is also supported by vertical and longitudinal SAFM measurements, which show that, in areas where friction is completely suppressed, low frequency vertical cantilever oscillations can still be observed, whereas lateral or torsional oscillations are no longer excited.

  4. An analytical elastic plastic contact model with strain hardening and frictional effects for normal and oblique impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Brake, M. R. W.

    2015-02-17

    Impact between metallic surfaces is a phenomenon that is ubiquitous in the design and analysis of mechanical systems. We found that to model this phenomenon, a new formulation for frictional elastic–plastic contact between two surfaces is developed. The formulation is developed to consider both frictional, oblique contact (of which normal, frictionless contact is a limiting case) and strain hardening effects. The constitutive model for normal contact is developed as two contiguous loading domains: the elastic regime and a transitionary region in which the plastic response of the materials develops and the elastic response abates. For unloading, the constitutive model is based on an elastic process. Moreover, the normal contact model is assumed to only couple one-way with the frictional/tangential contact model, which results in the normal contact model being independent of the frictional effects. Frictional, tangential contact is modeled using a microslip model that is developed to consider the pressure distribution that develops from the elastic–plastic normal contact. This model is validated through comparisons with experimental results reported in the literature, and is demonstrated to be significantly more accurate than 10 other normal contact models and three other tangential contact models found in the literature.

  5. An analytical elastic plastic contact model with strain hardening and frictional effects for normal and oblique impacts

    DOE PAGES

    Brake, M. R. W.

    2015-02-17

    Impact between metallic surfaces is a phenomenon that is ubiquitous in the design and analysis of mechanical systems. We found that to model this phenomenon, a new formulation for frictional elastic–plastic contact between two surfaces is developed. The formulation is developed to consider both frictional, oblique contact (of which normal, frictionless contact is a limiting case) and strain hardening effects. The constitutive model for normal contact is developed as two contiguous loading domains: the elastic regime and a transitionary region in which the plastic response of the materials develops and the elastic response abates. For unloading, the constitutive model ismore » based on an elastic process. Moreover, the normal contact model is assumed to only couple one-way with the frictional/tangential contact model, which results in the normal contact model being independent of the frictional effects. Frictional, tangential contact is modeled using a microslip model that is developed to consider the pressure distribution that develops from the elastic–plastic normal contact. This model is validated through comparisons with experimental results reported in the literature, and is demonstrated to be significantly more accurate than 10 other normal contact models and three other tangential contact models found in the literature.« less

  6. Multiscale Modeling of Stiffness, Friction and Adhesion in Mechanical Contacts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-29

    over a lateral length l scales as a power law: h  lH, where H is called the Hurst exponent . For typical experimental surfaces, H ranges from 0.5 to 0.8...surfaces with a wide range of Hurst exponents using fully atomistic calculations and the Green’s function method. A simple relation like Eq. (2...described above to explore a full range of parameter space with different rms roughness h0, rms slope h’0, Hurst exponent H, adhesion energy

  7. Bearing material. [composite material with low friction surface for rolling or sliding contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A composite material is described which will provide low friction surfaces for materials in rolling or sliding contact and is self-lubricating and oxidation resistant up to and in excess of about 930 C. The composite is comprised of a metal component which lends strength and elasticity to the structure, a fluoride salt component which provides lubrication and, lastly, a glass component which not only provides oxidation protection to the metal but may also enhance the lubrication qualities of the composite.

  8. Numerical analysis of piezoelectric active repair in the presence of frictional contact conditions.

    PubMed

    Alaimo, Andrea; Milazzo, Alberto; Orlando, Calogero; Messineo, Antonio

    2013-04-02

    The increasing development of smart materials, such as piezoelectric and shape memory alloys, has opened new opportunities for improving repair techniques. Particularly, active repairs, based on the converse piezoelectric effect, can increase the life of a structure by reducing the crack opening. A deep characterization of the electromechanical behavior of delaminated composite structures, actively repaired by piezoelectric patches, can be achieved by considering the adhesive layer between the host structure and the repair and by taking into account the frictional contact between the crack surfaces. In this paper, Boundary Element (BE) analyses performed on delaminated composite structures repaired by active piezoelectric patches are presented. A two-dimensional boundary integral formulation for piezoelectric solids based on the multi-domain technique to model the composite host damaged structures and the bonded piezoelectric patches is employed. An interface spring model is also implemented to take into account the finite stiffness of the bonding layers and to model the frictional contact between the delamination surfaces, by means of an iterative procedure. The effect of the adhesive between the plies of piezoelectric bimorph devices on the electromechanical response is first pointed out for both sensing and actuating behavior. Then, the effect of the frictional contact condition on the fracture mechanics behavior of actively repaired delaminated composite structures is investigated.

  9. Adiabatic molecular-dynamics-simulation-method studies of kinetic friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Sokoloff, J. B.

    2005-06-01

    An adiabatic molecular-dynamics method is developed and used to study the Muser-Robbins model for dry friction (i.e., nonzero kinetic friction in the slow sliding speed limit). In this model, dry friction between two crystalline surfaces rotated with respect to each other is due to mobile molecules (i.e., dirt particles) adsorbed at the interface. Our adiabatic method allows us to quickly locate interface potential-well minima, which become unstable during sliding of the surfaces. Since dissipation due to friction in the slow sliding speed limit results from mobile molecules dropping out of such unstable wells, our method provides a way to calculate dry friction, which agrees extremely well with results found by conventional molecular dynamics for the same system, but our method is more than a factor of 10 faster.

  10. Influence of the Tool Shoulder Contact Conditions on the Material Flow During Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doude, Haley R.; Schneider, Judy A.; Nunes, Arthur C.

    2014-09-01

    Friction stir welding (FSWing) is a solid-state joining process of special interest in joining alloys that are traditionally difficult to fusion weld. In order to optimize the process, various numeric modeling approaches have been pursued. Of importance to furthering modeling efforts is a better understanding of the contact conditions between the workpiece and the weld tool. Both theoretical and experimental studies indicate the contact conditions between the workpiece and weld tool are unknown, possibly varying during the FSW process. To provide insight into the contact conditions, this study characterizes the material flow in the FSW nugget by embedding a lead (Pb) wire that melted at the FSWing temperature of aluminum alloy 2195. The Pb trace provided evidence of changes in material flow characteristics which were attributed to changes in the contact conditions between the weld tool and workpiece, as driven by temperature, as the tool travels the length of a weld seam.

  11. Effect of barrier height on friction behavior of the semiconductors silicon and gallium arsenide in contact with pure metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishina, H.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    Friction experiments were conducted for the semiconductors silicon and gallium arsenide in contact with pure metals. Polycrystalline titanium, tantalum, nickel, palladium, and platinum were made to contact a single crystal silicon (111) surface. Indium, nickel, copper, and silver were made to contact a single crystal gallium arsenide (100) surface. Sliding was conducted both in room air and in a vacuum of 10 to the minus 9th power torr. The friction of semiconductors in contact with metals depended on a Schottky barrier height formed at the metal semiconductor interface. Metals with a higher barrier height on semiconductors gave lower friction. The effect of the barrier height on friction behavior for argon sputtered cleaned surfaces in vacuum was more specific than that for the surfaces containing films in room air. With a silicon surface sliding on titanium, many silicon particles back transferred. In contrast, a large quantity of indium transferred to the gallium arsenide surface.

  12. Elastic contact conditions to optimize friction drive of surface acoustic wave motor.

    PubMed

    Kuribayashi Kurosawa, M; Takahashi, M; Higuchi, T

    1998-01-01

    The optimum pressing force, namely the preload, for a slider to obtain superior operation conditions in a surface acoustic wave motor have been examined. We used steel balls as sliders. The preload was controlled using a permanent magnet. The steel balls were 0.5, 1, and 2 mm diameter, with the differences in diameter making it possible to change contact conditions, such as the contact pressure, contact area, and deformation of the stator and the slider. The stator transducer was lithium niobate, 128 degrees rotated, y-cut x-propagation substrate. The driving frequency of the Rayleigh wave was about 10 MHz. Hence, the particle vibration amplitude at the surface is as small as 10 nm. For superior friction drive conditions, a high contact pressure was required. For example, in the case of the 1 mm diameter steel ball at the sinusoidal driving voltage of 180 V(peak), the slider speed was 43 cm/sec, the thrust output force was 1 mN, and the acceleration was 23 times as large as the gravitational acceleration at a contact pressure of 390 MPa. From the Hertz theory of contact stress, the contact area radius was only 3 microm. The estimation of the friction drive performance was carried out from the transient traveling distance of the slider in a 3 msec burst drive. As a result, the deformation of the stator and the slider by the preload should be half of the vibration amplitude. This condition was independent of the ball diameter and the vibration amplitude. The output thrust per square millimeter was 50 N, and the maximum speed was 0.7 m/sec. From these results, we conclude that it is possible for the surface acoustic wave motor to have a large output force, high speed, quick response, long traveling distance, and a thin micro linear actuator.

  13. Ultrasonic Friction Reduction in Elastomer - Metal Contacts and Application to Pneumatic Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, The Minh; Twiefel, Jens

    Ultrasonic friction reduction is well known in metal-metal contacts. Due to the vibration, the stick phase in the contact phase vanishes and only sliding occurs. As long as the macroscopic relative velocity of the contact partners is much lower than vibration velocity, the necessary force to move the parts tends to (nearly) zero. If the effect also exists in material combinations with a significant difference in stiffness and damping characteristic has not been investigated in the past. This contribution shows the effect for various material combinations, which are typical for sealings in pneumatic actuators. Further, a novel integrated transducer design for a pneumatic actuator is presented. In this design the transducer also acts as moving part within the pneumatic actuator. The design challenges are the two contact areas on the moving part, where the friction reduction and consequently high vibration amplitudes are needed. The first area is fixed on the transducer geometry, the other is moving along the piston. This novel design has been implemented in the laboratory; detailed experimental results are presented in this contribution.

  14. Friction and wear of Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/ ceramic/metal couples in dynamic contact

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne, S.F.; Buljan, S.T.

    1988-01-01

    The tribological behavior of Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/ in sliding contact with itself, nodular cast iron, 316 stainless steel, and Inconel 718 is examined. The role of the environment and of the tribological characteristics breakaway friction, kinetic friction, and wear are measured in vacuum and air. The tribological behavior is shown to be strongly influenced by interactions with metallic alloys, which can lead to metal transfer, high friction, and ceramic wear. Surface oxide and adsorbed films from an air environment can stabilize the metal surfaces and reduce friction and wear. 26 references.

  15. Surface Imaging Skin Friction Instrument and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, James L. (Inventor); Naughton, Jonathan W. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A surface imaging skin friction instrument allowing 2D resolution of spatial image by a 2D Hilbert transform and 2D inverse thin-oil film solver, providing an innovation over prior art single point approaches. Incoherent, monochromatic light source can be used. The invention provides accurate, easy to use, economical measurement of larger regions of surface shear stress in a single test.

  16. Atomic-scale friction experiments reconsidered in the light of rapid contact dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krylov, S. Yu.; Frenken, J. W. M.

    2009-12-01

    We present the first fully quantitative and self-consistent analysis of atomic-scale friction, explicitly taking into account the flexibility and low effective mass of the mechanical nanocontact. In a procedure, which is free of the traditional assumptions with respect to the corrugation of the interaction potential of the contact, the basic but experimentally inaccessible system parameter, we arrive at an excellent description of recent nanotribology experiments, including the transition from stick slip to nearly frictionless sliding. We show that, contrary to original interpretation, the ultralow friction observed in some experiments has been largely due to thermal (thermolubricity) rather than mechanistic effects (superlubricity). Furthermore, we observe the manifestations of two different forms of thermally induced sliding dynamics, namely, true thermolubricity (slipperiness based on thermal excitations) and a specific, low-dissipation type of stick-slip motion.

  17. Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Yoshihiro; Clarke, Daryl D.; Ozeki, Shinichi

    Friction materials such as disk pads, brake linings, and clutch facings are widely used for automotive applications. Friction materials function during braking due to frictional resistance that transforms kinetic energy into thermal energy. There has been a rudimentary evolution, from materials like leather or wood to asbestos fabric or asbestos fabric saturated with various resins such as asphalt or resin combined with pitch. These efforts were further developed by the use of woven asbestos material saturated by either rubber solution or liquid resin binder and functioned as an internal expanding brake, similar to brake lining system. The role of asbestos continued through the use of chopped asbestos saturated by rubber, but none was entirely successful due to the poor rubber heat resistance required for increased speeds and heavy gearing demands of the automobile industry. The use of phenolic resins as binder for asbestos friction materials provided the necessary thermal resistance and performance characteristics. Thus, the utility of asbestos as the main friction component, for over 100 years, has been significantly reduced in friction materials due to asbestos identity as a carcinogen. Steel and other fibrous components have displaced asbestos in disk pads. Currently, non-asbestos organics are the predominate friction material. Phenolic resins continue to be the preferred binder, and increased amounts are necessary to meet the requirements of highly functional asbestos-free disk pads for the automotive industry. With annual automobile production exceeding 70 million vehicles and additional automobile production occurring in developing countries worldwide and increasing yearly, the amount of phenolic resin for friction material is also increasing (Fig. 14.1). Fig. 14.1 Worldwide commercial vehicle production Design and calibration of a scanning force microscope for friction, adhesion, and contact potential studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koleske, D. D.; Lee, G. U.; Gans, B. I.; Lee, K. P.; DiLella, D. P.; Wahl, K. J.; Barger, W. R.; Whitman, L. J.; Colton, R. J.

    1995-09-01

    We present the design and calibration of a scanning force microscope which can be used to study friction, adhesion, and contact potential differences between the cantilever tip and surface. The microscope uses a modular design where the laser, cantilever/sample holder, reflecting mirror, and detector are mounted directly on an optical table. The laser, reflecting mirror, and detector are mounted on translation and rotation stages. With this design the components can be rearranged to calibrate the Z piezo motion as a function of applied voltage. Using the detector micrometers, the detector response (voltage-to-distance relationship) can be determined after each series of measurements. The cantilever/sample holder is constructed such that the components are material matched and thermally compensated from a common reference point. This design feature minimizes thermal drift of the instrument. The instrument can be used in a contact scanning mode where both normal and lateral deflections of the cantilever are measured. In addition, the instrument can be used in frictional force studies, force curve mapping of the surface, and contact potential measurements. We present examples of each, including a detailed account of the instrument design and calibration.

  18. Static and kinetic friction force and surface roughness of different archwire-bracket sliding contacts.

    PubMed

    Carrion-Vilches, Francisco J; Bermudez, María-Dolores; Fructuoso, Paula

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the static and kinetic friction forces of the contact bracket-archwire with different dental material compositions in order to select those materials with lower resistance to sliding. We carried out sliding friction tests by means of a universal testing machine following an experimental procedure as described in ASTM D1894 standard. We determined the static and kinetic friction forces under dry and lubricating conditions using an artificial saliva solution at 36.5ºC. The bracket-archwire pairs studied were: stainless steel-stainless steel; stainless steel-glass fiber composite; stainless steel-Nitinol 60; sapphire-stainless steel; sapphire-glass fiber composite; and sapphire-Nitinol 60. The best performance is obtained for Nitinol 60 archwire sliding against a stainless steel bracket, both under dry and lubricated conditions. These results are in agreement with the low surface roughness of Nitinol 60 with respect to the glass fiber composite archwire. The results described here contribute to establishing selection criteria for materials for dental archwire-brackets.

  19. Control mechanism of friction by dynamic actuation of nanometer-sized contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Jun; Natori, Akiko

    2009-10-01

    We studied both the mechanism and the condition of dynamic superlubricity actuated in a dynamic way for the atomic contact of a friction force microscope, using dynamical simulation of the Tomlinson model. The superlubricity was achieved by ac modulation of the normal force acting between two contacting bodies at well-defined frequencies corresponding to normal resonances of the combined system [A. Socoliuc , Science 313, 207 (2006)]. The time-averaged friction force depends crucially on the modulation amplitude and the superlubricity occurs above the critical amplitude. The effect on the superlubricity of the corrugation amplitude of surface potential, sliding velocity, a damping coefficient, and temperature are clarified. The superlubricity at zero temperature can be induced by transit of the tip via the “turning point,” the top position of the surface potential without elastic deformation, and it is allowed at low-sliding velocities in the underdamped case. The superlubricity at a room temperature can be actuated efficiently with a much smaller critical amplitude than that at zero temperature and it can be achieved at sufficiently low-sliding velocities in both the underdamped and the overdamped cases, assisted by thermally activated hopping of the tip.

  1. Swing Friction Behavior of the Contact Interface Between CoCrMo and UHMWPE Under Dynamic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kai; Zhang, Dekun; Yang, Xuehui; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Qingliang; Qi, Jianwei

    2016-12-01

    CoCrMo alloy and UHMWPE have been widely used in knee joint prosthesis implantation materials. In this paper, swing friction behavior of the contact interface between CoCrMo alloy and UHMWPE is studied under dynamic loading. Swing friction characteristic and damage mechanism are discussed. The results show that swing friction coefficients increase with the rising of maximum normal load and swing angular amplitude. Unloading-standing could play alleviative roles in friction and wear to a large degree. As the cycle number gradually increases, the surface roughness of UHMWPE decreases, while the roughness of CoCrMo increases. During the swing friction, the main damage mechanism of CoCrMo is abrasive wear and the main damage mechanisms of UHMWPE are abrasive wear, fatigue wear and plastic deformation. Besides, it is easier to generate surface damages with small angle and heavy load.

  2. Relationship between the ideal tensile strength and the friction properties of metals in contact with nonmetals and themselves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    The adhesion and friction properties of metals in contact with diamond, boron nitride, silicon carbide, manganese-zinc ferrite, and the metals themselves in vacuum was investigated. An estimate of the ideal uniaxial tensile was obtained in terms of the equilibrium surface energy, interplanar spacing of the planes perpendicular to the tensile axis, and the Young's modulus of elasticity. The coefficient of friction for metals was found to be related to the ideal tensile strength of metals. The higher the strength of the metal, the lower the coefficient of friction.

  3. Study of adhesion and friction properties on a nanoparticle gradient surface: transition from JKR to DMT contact mechanics.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishna, Shivaprakash N; Nalam, Prathima C; Clasohm, Lucy Y; Spencer, Nicholas D

    2013-01-08

    We have previously investigated the dependence of adhesion on nanometer-scale surface roughness by employing a roughness gradient. In this study, we correlate the obtained adhesion forces on nanometer-scale rough surfaces to their frictional properties. A roughness gradient with varying silica particle (diameter ≈ 12 nm) density was prepared, and adhesion and frictional forces were measured across the gradient surface in perfluorodecalin by means of atomic force microscopy with a polyethylene colloidal probe. Similarly to the pull-off measurements, the frictional forces initially showed a reduction with decreasing particle density and later an abrupt increase as the colloidal sphere began to touch the flat substrate beneath, at very low particle densities. The friction-load relation is found to depend on the real contact area (A(real)) between the colloid probe and the underlying particles. At high particle density, the colloidal sphere undergoes large deformations over several nanoparticles, and the contact adhesion (JKR type) dominates the frictional response. However, at low particle density (before the colloidal probe is in contact with the underlying surface), the colloidal sphere is suspended by a few particles only, resulting in local deformations of the colloid sphere, with the frictional response to the applied load being dominated by long-range, noncontact (DMT-type) interactions with the substrate beneath.

  4. Contact stresses in gear teeth: A new method of analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somprakit, Paisan; Huston, Ronald L.; Oswald, Fred B.

    1991-01-01

    A new, innovative procedure called point load superposition for determining the contact stresses in mating gear teeth. It is believed that this procedure will greatly extend both the range of applicability and the accuracy of gear contact stress analysis. Point load superposition is based upon fundamental solutions from the theory of elasticity. It is an iterative numerical procedure which has distinct advantages over the classical Hertz method, the finite element method, and over existing applications with the boundary element method. Specifically, friction and sliding effects, which are either excluded from or difficult to study with the classical methods, are routinely handled with the new procedure. Presented here are the basic theory and the algorithms. Several examples are given. Results are consistent with those of the classical theories. Applications to spur gears are discussed.

  5. Contact stresses in gear teeth - A new method of analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somprakit, Paisan; Huston, Ronald L.; Oswald, Fred B.

    1991-01-01

    A new, innovative procedure called point load superposition for determining the contact stresses in mating gear teeth is presented. It is believed that this procedure will greatly extend both the range of applicability and the accuracy of gear contact stress analysis. Point load superposition is based upon fundamental solutions from the theory of elasticity. It is an iterative numerical procedure which has distinct advantages over the classical Hertz method, the finite element method, and over existing applications with the boundary element method. Specifically, friction and sliding effects, which are either excluded from or difficult to study with the classical methods, are routinely handled with the new procedure. Presented here are the basic theory and the algorithms. Several examples are given. Results are consistent with those of the classical theories. Applications to spur gears are discussed.

  6. Surface chemistry, friction and wear of Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrites in contact with metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy analysis were used in sliding friction experiments. These experiments were conducted with hot-pressed polycrystalline Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrites, and single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrite in contact with various transition metals at room temperature in both vacuum and argon. The results indicate that Ni2O3 and Fe3O4 were present on the Ni-Zn ferrite surface in addition to the nominal bulk constituents, while MnO2 and Fe3O4 were present on the Mn-Zn ferrite surface in addition to the nominal bulk constituents. The coefficients of friction for the ferrites in contact with metals were related to the relative chemical activity of these metals. The more active the metal, the higher is the coefficient of friction. The coefficients of friction for the ferrites were correlated with the free energy of formation of the lowest metal oxide. The interfacial bond can be regarded as a chemical bond between the metal atoms and the oxygen anions in the ferrite surfaces. The adsorption of oxygen on clean metal and ferrite does strengthen the metal-ferrite contact and increase the friction. The ferrites exhibit local cracking and fracture with sliding under adhesive conditions. All the metals transferred to he surfaces of the ferrites in sliding.

  7. Surface chemistry, friction, and wear of Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrites in contact with metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy analysis were used in sliding friction experiments. These experiments were conducted with hot-pressed polycrystalline Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrites, and single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrite in contact with various transition metals at room temperature in both vacuum and argon. The results indicate that Ni2O3 and Fe3O4 were present on the Ni-Zn ferrite surface in addition to the nominal bulk constituents, while MnO2 and Fe3O4 were present on the Mn-Zn ferrite surface in addition to the nominal bulk constituents. The coefficients of friction for the ferrites in contact with metals were related to the relative chemical activity of these metals. The more active the metal, the higher is the coefficient of friction. The coefficients of friction for the ferrites were correlated with the free energy of formation of the lowest metal oxide. The interfacial bond can be regarded as a chemical bond between the metal atoms and the oxygen anions in the ferrite surfaces. The adsorption of oxygen on clean metal and ferrite does strengthen the metal-ferrite contact and increase the friction. The ferrites exhibit local cracking and fracture with sliding under adhesive conditions. All the metals transferred to the surfaces of the ferrites in sliding. Previously announced in STAR as N83-19901

  8. Friction and wear of single-crystal and polycrystalline maganese-zinc ferrite in contact with various metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with single-crystal (SCF) and hot-pressed polycrystalline (HPF) manganese-zinc ferrite in contact with various metals. Results indicate that the coefficients of friction for SCF and HPF are related to the relative chemical activity of those metals in high vacuum. The more active the metal, the higher the coefficient of friction. The coefficients of friction for both SCF and HPF were the same and much higher in vacuum than in argon at atmospheric pressure. All the metals tested transferred to the surface of both SCF and HPF in sliding. Both SCF and HPF exhibited cracking and fracture with sliding. Cracking in SCF is dependent on crystallographic characteristics. In HPF, cracking depends on the orientation of the individual crystallites.

  9. Study on the friction in steel/polyamide ball on disk type contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lates, M. T.; Gavrila, C. C.; Papuc, R.

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents the experimental study of the friction in the case of steel/polyamide ball on disk type contacts by considering as testing parameters the temperature, the load and the rotational speed. The tests are performed, for two types of polyamides, on a tribometer which allows rotational motions at small and high speeds, with controlled normal loads and temperatures. The tests begin with a one hour running-in at 500 rpm, at ambient temperature. After the running-in process there are made tests, for two types of polyamides at 90°C and 120°C, at loads of 3 N, 5 N, 7 N and at rotational speeds of 5 rpm, 1500 rpm and 3000 rpm. The results are indicating the polyamides behaviour at high temperatures with different loadings, at small and high rotational speeds. The conclusions of the paper offer recommendations regarding the applications of the tested polyamide materials according to temperature, loading and rotational speeds, in the case of ball on disk type contacts.

  10. Numerical Simulation of the Friction Stir Welding Process Using Coupled Eulerian Lagrangian Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iordache, M.; Badulescu, C.; Iacomi, D.; Nitu, E.; Ciuca, C.

    2016-08-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid state joining process that relies on frictional heating and plastic deformation realized at the interaction between a non-consumable welding tool that rotates on the contact surfaces of the combined parts. The experiments are often time consuming and costly. To overcome these problems, numerical analysis has frequently been used in last years. Several simplified numerical models were designed to elucidate various aspects of the complex thermo-mechanical phenomena associated with FSW. This research investigates a thermo-mechanical finite element model based on Coupled Eulerian Lagrangian method to simulate the friction stir welding of the AA 6082-T6 alloy. Abaqus/cae software is used in order to simulate the welding stage of the Friction Stir Welding process. This paper presents the steps of the numerical simulation using the finite elements method, in order to evaluate the boundary conditions of the model and the geometry of the tools by using the Coupled Eulerian Lagrangian method.

  11. Stress-weakening effect on friction and a major revision of evolution law for contact state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, K.; Nakatani, M.; Yoshida, S.

    2009-12-01

    Rate and State Friction (RSF) law comprehensively captures important aspects of rock friction and has explained various aspects of fault motion successfully. However, existing RSF laws are clearly incorrect in describing some aspects of friction firmly established by experiments [Beeler et al., 1994]. The shortfall is that the state evolution law which aptly represents time-dependent strengthening of virtually locked faults systematically mispredicts the slip distance required to complete the state evolution caused by changed slip velocity [Marone, 1998; Nakatani, 2001]. To address the problem of evolution law, we observed state variable in RSF continuously in friction experiments on rough granite surfaces. The observation of state variable was performed in the following two independent ways; 1) by subtracting direct effect from measured shear stress 2) by using an acoustic monitoring technique [Nagata et al., 2008]. The latter method is usable even when slip velocity is so low that the former method cannot be used. The former can be regarded as “semi-direct” measurements of state variable. This method strongly depends on the value of coefficient of direct effect a. Ideally, a is observed as the instantaneous change of applied shear stress (direct effect) upon velocity step. However, the measured shear stress change is much smaller than the real direct effect in reality because the state variable changes considerably before the stress peak. Correction by inferring the change of state using an evolution law is a routine procedure, but the evolution law is in doubt. Hence, before we tackled the evolution law issue, we have designed a special step test where the change of state is minimal and have established that a >0.03. Further, with help of acoustic method, we have identified that a ~0.05. The value is surprisingly large, but agrees very well with the activation volume of silicate lattice. We compared thus observed variation of frictional strength with the

  12. The analysis of the influence of the material antifrictional layer frictional properties on the parameters of the spherical bearing contact zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenskikh, A. A.; Trufanov, N. A.

    2017-02-01

    The paper presents data on the influence of the frictional properties of a material antifrictional layer on the parameters of the spherical bearing contact zone. The dependences of the friction coefficient from the load were obtained as a result of the study. Series of numerical experiments were conducted to investigate the frictional properties of a materials contact pair in the work. Regularities of the relative contact pressure and relative contact tangential stress were obtained for seven variants of the load-friction coefficient for the spherical bearing with a layer of modified fluoroplastic. The study puts emphasis on the fact that that adhesion area of the contact surface is reduced and the load is increased taking into account the fact that the friction properties of the layer has been fixed in the study.

  13. An electric contact method to measure contact state between stator and rotor in a traveling wave ultrasonic motor.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jianjun; Zhou, Tieying

    2003-09-01

    Performances of ultrasonic motor (USM) depend considerably on contact state between stator and rotor. To measure the contact state in a traveling wave ultrasonic motor (TWUSM), a special test method is necessary. This paper develops a new method named electric contact method to measure contact state of stator and rotor in traveling wave type USM. The effects of pre-load and exciting voltage (amplitude) of stator on contact state between stator and rotor are studied with this method. By a simulating tester of friction properties of TWUSM, the variations of stalling torque and no-load speed against the pre-load and the exciting voltage have been measured. The relative contact length that describes the contact characteristic of stator and rotor is proposed. The relation between the properties of TWUSM and the contact state of stator and rotor are presented. Additionally, according to a theoretical contact model of stator and rotor in TWUSM, the contact lengths at given conditions are calculated and compared with the experimental results.

  14. Frictional behaviors of some nitrogen ceramics in conformal contact with tin coated Al-Si alloy, steel and MMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q.; Cheng, H. S.; Fine, M. E.

    1994-07-01

    The frictional behavior of certain nitrogen-containing ceramics, such as silicon nitride, alpha sialons, and beta sialons as journal materials were studied in conformal contact with a tin-coated Al-Si alloy (Al-Si/Sn), forged 1141 steel and a cast aluminum matrix composite with silicon carbide reinforcement (cast metal matrix composites (MMC)) as bearing materials while lubricated with SAE 10W30. A case-hardened 1016 steel was also tested with the Al-Si/Sn and cast MMC bearings under the same conditions. The friction values of the ceramic and the steel journal wear pairs were compared and their frictional behaviors were evaluated. Silicon nitride and one of the beta sialons exhibited higher load-supporting capacities than the others when they were in contact with the 1141 steel bearings. The journal surface roughness was found to be very important when the journals were in contact with the Al-Si/Sn bearings. The frictional behavior of the ceramics and cast MMC pairs and the steel and cast MMC pairs were controlled by different wear machanisms, namely for the former, hard particle pull-out and matrix plowing, and for the latter, iron transfer from the journal to the cast MMC bearing surface.

  15. Experimental study on seismic responses of piping systems with friction. Part 2: Simplified analysis method on the effect of friction

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, H.; Yokoi, R.; Chiba, T.; Suzuki, K.; Shimizu, N.; Minowa, C.

    1995-08-01

    Friction between pipe and support structure is generally known to reduce seismic response of the piping systems. Vibration tests using large-scale piping model with friction support were carried out to evaluate the reduction effect. The piping response was mainly governed by the first modal deformation. The simplified analysis method based on linear response spectrum analysis was developed and confirmed to be applicable. In this method, the reduction effect by friction is treated as equivalent viscous damping ratio. This paper deals with the analysis method, and the comparison between the experimental results and analytical ones.

  16. Complementary Barrier Infrared Detector (CBIRD) Contact Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.; Hill, Cory J.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2013-01-01

    The performance of the CBIRD detector is enhanced by using new device contacting methods that have been developed. The detector structure features a narrow gap adsorber sandwiched between a pair of complementary, unipolar barriers that are, in turn, surrounded by contact layers. In this innovation, the contact adjacent to the hole barrier is doped n-type, while the contact adjacent to the electron barrier is doped p-type. The contact layers can have wider bandgaps than the adsorber layer, so long as good electrical contacts are made to them. If good electrical contacts are made to either (or both) of the barriers, then one could contact the barrier(s) directly, obviating the need for additional contact layers. Both the left and right contacts can be doped either n-type or ptype. Having an n-type contact layer next to the electron barrier creates a second p-n junction (the first being the one between the hole barrier and the adsorber) over which applied bias could drop. This reduces the voltage drop over the adsorber, thereby reducing dark current generation in the adsorber region.

  17. Non-smooth Hopf-type bifurcations arising from impact–friction contact events in rotating machinery

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Karin; Budd, Chris; Glendinning, Paul; Keogh, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    We analyse the novel dynamics arising in a nonlinear rotor dynamic system by investigating the discontinuity-induced bifurcations corresponding to collisions with the rotor housing (touchdown bearing surface interactions). The simplified Föppl/Jeffcott rotor with clearance and mass unbalance is modelled by a two degree of freedom impact–friction oscillator, as appropriate for a rigid rotor levitated by magnetic bearings. Two types of motion observed in experiments are of interest in this paper: no contact and repeated instantaneous contact. We study how these are affected by damping and stiffness present in the system using analytical and numerical piecewise-smooth dynamical systems methods. By studying the impact map, we show that these types of motion arise at a novel non-smooth Hopf-type bifurcation from a boundary equilibrium bifurcation point for certain parameter values. A local analysis of this bifurcation point allows us a complete understanding of this behaviour in a general setting. The analysis identifies criteria for the existence of such smooth and non-smooth bifurcations, which is an essential step towards achieving reliable and robust controllers that can take compensating action. PMID:25383034

  18. Verification of the friction coefficients determining method for Froude pendulum self-excited vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatkowski, Tomasz; Wolski, Miroslaw

    2017-03-01

    The article presents the numerical verification of the method for the static and kinetic coefficients determination of dry friction for kinematic pairs in the conditions of self-excited vibrations occurring in the Froude pendulum. In this method, the kinetic friction coefficient should be determined first, and used later when calculating the coefficient of static friction. The friction coefficients are determined by measuring the amplitude of self-excited vibrations of the pendulum. The amplitude measurement for calculation of the kinetic friction coefficient should be carried out when the sliding friction conditions exists, and the static one - when the stick-slip phenomenon appears. The proposed method was verified in the Adams environment.

  19. Simple and Reliable Method to Estimate the Fingertip Static Coefficient of Friction in Precision Grip.

    PubMed

    Barrea, Allan; Bulens, David Cordova; Lefevre, Philippe; Thonnard, Jean-Louis

    2016-01-01

    The static coefficient of friction (µstatic) plays an important role in dexterous object manipulation. Minimal normal force (i.e., grip force) needed to avoid dropping an object is determined by the tangential force at the fingertip-object contact and the frictional properties of the skin-object contact. Although frequently assumed to be constant for all levels of normal force (NF, the force normal to the contact), µ static actually varies nonlinearly with NF and increases at low NF levels. No method is currently available to measure the relationship between µstatic and NF easily. Therefore, we propose a new method allowing the simple and reliable measurement of the fingertip µstatic at different NF levels, as well as an algorithm for determining µstatic from measured forces and torques. Our method is based on active, back-and-forth movements of a subject's finger on the surface of a fixed six-axis force and torque sensor. µstatic is computed as the ratio of the tangential to the normal force at slip onset. A negative power law captures the relationship between µstatic and NF. Our method allows the continuous estimation of µstatic as a function of NF during dexterous manipulation, based on the relationship between µstatic and NF measured before manipulation.

  20. Impact Damage Evaluation Method of Friction Disc Based on High-Speed Photography and Tooth-Root Stress Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, L.; Shao, Y. M.; Liu, J.; Zheng, H. L.

    2015-07-01

    The stability of friction disc could be seriously affected by the tooth surface damage due to poor working conditions of the wet multi-disc brake in heavy trucks. There are few current works focused on the damage of the friction disc caused by torsion-vibration impacts. Hence, it is necessary to investigate its damage mechanisms and evaluation methods. In this paper, a damage mechanism description and evaluation method of a friction disc based on the high-speed photography and tooth-root stress coupling is proposed. According to the HighSpeed Photography, the collision process between the friction disc and hub is recorded, which can be used to determine the contact position and deformation. Combined with the strain-stress data obtained by the strain gauge at the place of the tooth-root, the impact force and property are studied. In order to obtain the evaluation method, the damage surface morphology data of the friction disc extracted by 3D Super Depth Digital Microscope (VH-Z100R) is compared with the impact force and property. The quantitative relationships between the amount of deformation and collision number are obtained using a fitting analysis method. The experimental results show that the damage of the friction disc can be evaluated by the proposed impact damage evaluation method based on the high-speed photography and tooth-root stress coupling.

  1. Friction and metal transfer for single-crystal silicon carbide in contact with various metals in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with single-crystal silicon carbide in contact with transition metals (tungsten, iron, rhodium, nickel, titanium, and cobalt), copper, and aluminum. Results indicate the coefficient of friction for a silicon carbide-metal system is related to the d bond character and relative chemical activity of the metal. The more active the metal, the higher the coefficient of friction. All the metals examined transferred to the surface of silicon carbide in sliding. The chemical activity of metal to silicon and carbon and shear modulus of the metal may play important roles in metal transfer and the form of the wear debris. The less active and greater resistance to shear the metal has, with the exception of rhodium and tungsten, the less transfer to silicon carbide.

  2. Determination of time-varying contact length, friction force, torque and forces at the bearings in a helical gear system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Chinmaya; Mohanty, A. R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper deals with determining various time-varying parameters that are instrumental in introducing noise and vibration in a helical gear system. The most important parameter is the contact line variation, which subsequently induces friction force variation, frictional torque variation and variation in the forces at the bearings. The contact line variation will also give rise to gear mesh stiffness and damping variations. All these parameters are simulated for a defect-free and two defective cases of a helical gear system. The defective cases include one tooth missing and two teeth missing in the helical gear. The algorithm formulated in this paper is found to be simple and effective in determining the time-varying parameters.

  3. A 3D Contact Smoothing Method

    SciTech Connect

    Puso, M A; Laursen, T A

    2002-05-02

    Smoothing of contact surfaces can be used to eliminate the chatter typically seen with node on facet contact and give a better representation of the actual contact surface. The latter affect is well demonstrated for problems with interference fits. In this work we present two methods for the smoothing of contact surfaces for 3D finite element contact. In the first method, we employ Gregory patches to smooth the faceted surface in a node on facet implementation. In the second method, we employ a Bezier interpolation of the faceted surface in a mortar method implementation of contact. As is well known, node on facet approaches can exhibit locking due to the failure of the Babuska-Brezzi condition and in some instances fail the patch test. The mortar method implementation is stable and provides optimal convergence in the energy of error. In the this work we demonstrate the superiority of the smoothed versus the non-smoothed node on facet implementations. We also show where the node on facet method fails and some results from the smoothed mortar method implementation.

  4. Onset of frictional sliding of rubber–glass contact under dry and lubricated conditions

    PubMed Central

    Tuononen, Ari J.

    2016-01-01

    Rubber friction is critical in many applications ranging from automotive tyres to cylinder seals. The process where a static rubber sample transitions to frictional sliding is particularly poorly understood. The experimental and simulation results in this paper show a completely different detachment process from the static situation to sliding motion under dry and lubricated conditions. The results underline the contribution of the rubber bulk properties to the static friction force. In fact, simple Amontons’ law is sufficient as a local friction law to produce the correct detachment pattern when the rubber material and loading conditions are modelled properly. Simulations show that micro-sliding due to vertical loading can release initial shear stresses and lead to a high static/dynamic friction coefficient ratio, as observed in the measurements. PMID:27291939

  5. Evaluation of Contact Friction in Fracture of Rotationally Bent Nitinol Endodontic Files

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haimed, Tariq Abu

    2011-12-01

    The high flexibility of rotary Nitinol (Ni-Ti) files has helped clinicians perform root canal treatments with fewer technical errors than seen with stainless steel files. However, intracanal file fracture can occur, compromising the outcome of the treatment. Ni-Ti file fracture incidence is roughly around 4% amongst specialists and higher amongst general practitioners. Therefore, eliminating or reducing this problem should improve patient care. The aim of this project was to isolate and examine the role of friction between files and the canal walls of the glass tube model, and bending-related maximum strain amplitudes, on Ni-Ti file lifetimes-tofracture in the presence of different irrigant solutions and file coatings. A specifically designed device was used to test over 300 electropolished EndoSequenceRTM Ni-Ti files for number of cycles to failure (NCF) in smooth, bent glass tube models at 45 and 60 degrees during dry, coated and liquid-lubricated rotation at 600rpm. Fractured files were examined under Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) afterwards. Four different file sizes 25.04, 25.06, 35.04, 35.06 (diameter in mm/taper %) and six surface modification conditions were used independently. These conditions included, three solutions; (1) a surfactant-based solution, Surface-Active-Displacement-Solution (SADS), (2) a mouth wash proven to remove biofilms, Delmopinol 1%(DEL), and (3) Bleach 6% (vol.%), the most common antibacterial endodontic irrigant solution. The conditions also included two low-friction silane-based coating groups, 3-Hepta-fluoroisopropyl-propoxymethyl-dichlorosilane (3-HEPT) and Octadecyltrichlorosilane (ODS), in addition to an as-received file control group (Dry). The coefficient of friction (CF) between the file and the canal walls for each condition was measured as well as the surface tension of the irrigant solutions and the critical surface tension of the coated and uncoated files by contact angle measurements. The radius of curvature and

  6. Use of Textured Surfaces to Mitigate Sliding Friction and Wear of Lubricated and Non-Lubricated Contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian

    2012-03-01

    If properly employed, the placement of three-dimensional feature patterns, also referred to as textures, on relatively-moving, load-bearing surfaces can be beneficial to their friction and wear characteristics. For example, geometric patterns can function as lubricant supply channels or depressions in which to trap debris. They can also alter lubricant flow in a manner that produces thicker load-bearing films locally. Considering the area occupied by solid areas and spaces, textures also change the load distribution on surfaces. At least ten different attributes of textures can be specified, and their combinations offer wide latitude in surface engineering. By employing directional machining and grinding procedures, texturing has been used on bearings and seals for well over a half century, and the size scales of texturing vary widely. This report summarizes past work on the texturing of load-bearing surfaces, including past research on laser surface dimpling of ceramics done at ORNL. Textured surfaces generally show most pronounced effects when they are used in conformal or nearly conformal contacts, like that in face seals. Combining textures with other forms of surface modification and lubrication methods can offer additional benefits in surface engineering for tribology. As the literature and past work at ORNL shows, texturing does not always provide benefits. Rather, the selected pattern and arrangement of features must be matched to characteristics of the proposed application, bearing materials, and lubricants.

  7. Effect of oxygen, methyl mercaptan, and methyl chloride on friction behavior of copper-iron contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with an iron rider on a copper disk and a copper rider on an iron disk. The sputter cleaned iron and copper disk surfaces were saturated with oxygen, methyl mercaptan, and methyl chloride at atmospheric pressure. Auger emission spectroscopy was used to monitor the surfaces. Lower friction was obtained in all experiments with the copper rider sliding on the iron disk than when the couple was reversed. For both iron and copper disks, methyl mercaptan gave the best surface coverage and was most effective in reducing friction. For both iron and copper disks, methyl chloride was the least effective in reducing friction. With sliding, copper transferred to iron and iron to copper.

  8. Investigation of Wear and Friction Properties Under Sliding Conditions of Some Materials Suitable for Cages of Rolling-Contact Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Robert L; Swikert, Max A; Bisson, Edmond E

    1952-01-01

    An investigation of wear and friction properties of a number of materials sliding against SAE 52100 steel was conducted. These materials included brass, bronze, beryllium copper, monel, nichrome v, 24s-t aluminum, nodular iron, and gray cast iron. The metals investigated may be useful as possible cage (separator or retainer) materials for rolling-contact bearings of high-speed turbine engines. The ability of materials to form surface films that prevent welding is a most important factor in both dry friction and boundary lubrication. On the basis of wear and resistance to welding only, the cast irons were the most promising materials investigated; they showed the least wear and the least tendency to surface failure when run dry, and when boundary lubricated they showed the highest load capacity. On the basis of mechanical properties, nodular iron is superior to gray cast iron. Bronze had the lowest friction coefficient under dry sliding conditions. The results with brass, beryllium copper, and aluminum were poor and these materials do not appear, with regard to friction and wear, to be suitable for cages.

  9. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and friction studies of nickel-zinc and manganese-zinc ferrites in contact with metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis and sliding friction experiments were conducted with hot-pressed, polycrystalline Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrites in sliding contact with various transition metals at room temperature in a vacuum of 30 nPa. The results indicate that the coefficients of friction for Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrites in contact with metals are related to the relative chemical activity in these metals: the more active the metal, the higher is the coefficient of friction. The coefficients of friction for the ferrites correlate with the free energy of formation of the lowest metal oxide. The interfacial bond can be regarded as a chemical bond between the metal atoms and the oxygen anions in the ferrite surfaces. The adsorption of oxygen on clean metal and ferrite surfaces increases the coefficients of friction for the Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrite-metal interfaces.

  10. The friction and wear of metals and binary alloys in contact with an abrasive grit of single-crystal silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with various metals and iron-base binary alloys (alloying elements Ti, Cr, Mn, Ni, Rh and W) in contact with single crystal silicon carbide riders. Results indicate that the friction force in the plowing of metal and the groove height (corresponding to the wear volume of the groove) decrease linearly as the shear strength of the bulk metal increases. The coefficient of friction and groove height generally decrease, and the contact pressure increases with an increase in solute content of binary alloys. There appears to be very good correlation of the solute to iron atomic ratio with the decreasing rate of change of coefficient of friction, the decreasing rate of change of groove height and the increasing rate of change of contact pressure with increasing solute content. These rates of change increase as the solute to iron atomic radius ratio increases or decreases from unity.

  11. Unilateral contact induced blade/casing vibratory interactions in impellers: Analysis for flexible casings with friction and abradable coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batailly, Alain; Legrand, Mathias

    2015-07-01

    This contribution addresses the vibratory analysis of unilateral contact induced structural interactions between a bladed impeller and its surrounding flexible casing. It extends the numerical developments exposed in a previous paper to flexible casings. The casing finite element model and the construction of the associated reduced-order model for efficient computations are first exposed in detail along with an extensive presentation of the smoothing strategy implemented on the contact interface. The proposed algorithms embedding unilateral contact conditions together with abradable coating removal are subsequently introduced and validated through a systematic analysis of (1) the nonlinear procedure for the computation of impeller/casing distances, (2) the treatment of three-dimensional friction and contact forces, (3) the correction of the displacements when unilateral contact or abradable removal arises, and (4) the possible hybrid contact scenarii involving localized total removal of the abradable coating. Finally, two illustrative case studies show that the linear interaction condition, commonly considered for the safe design of impellers and casings in turbomachinery, may be advantageously combined with the presented numerical strategy in order to assess the actual importance of predicted critical speeds.

  12. Friction, wear, and noise of slip ring and brush contacts for synchronous satellite use.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, N. E.; Cole, S. R.; Glossbrenner, E. W.; Vest, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    A program is being conducted for testing of slip rings for synchronous orbit application. Instrumentation systems necessary for monitoring electrical noise, friction, and brush wear at atmospheric pressure and at less than 50 nanotorr have been developed. A multiplex scheme necessary for the simultaneous recording of brush displacement, friction, and electrical noise has also been developed. Composite brushes consisting of silver-molybdenum disulfide-graphite and silver-niobium diselenide-graphite have been employed on rings of coin silver and rhodium plate. Brush property measurements made included measurement of density, electrical resistivity, shear strength, and microstructure.

  13. Investigation of a jointed friction oscillator using the Multiharmonic Balance Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Süß, Dominik; Willner, Kai

    2015-02-01

    This paper covers the investigation of a nonlinear jointed structure in the frequency domain. Due to frictional nonlinearities the behavior of that system is approximated using the Multiharmonic Balance Method (MHBM). Two models of different complexity are presented. The first is a simple three degree-of-freedom model which is valid because of the special design of the structure. This model enables a very fast and accurate prediction of the stationary behavior of the real system. In order to attain a more general way of modeling structures including joints, the second model is a Finite Element (FE) model. For the discretization of the contact plane, "Zero Thickness" (ZT) elements are implemented. These elements allow the application of nearly arbitrary constitutive laws for describing the dynamic joint behavior. Here a coupled three dimensional contact law including dry friction effects is applied and the needed partial derivatives for the MHBM procedure are given analytically. Using measurements from the real structure and performing a model updating process, the parameters of the two presented models are estimated. The calculation results are compared to measurements in the frequency as well as in the time domain.

  14. Models and Computational Methods for Dynamic Friction Phenomena. 1. Physical Aspects of Dynamic Friction. 2. Continuum Models and Variational Principles for Dynamic Friction. 3. Finite Element Models and Numerical Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-25

    Models and Numerical Analysis Research sponsored by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFSC) under contract F49620-84-0024. The United States...frictional forces may depend upon histories of micro-tangential displacements of particles on the contact surface . Theories describing such...frictional forces developed on the contact surface appear to depend on the sliding velocity of one surface relative to another. To obtain reproducible

  15. Numerical Modeling of Frictional Stress in the Contact Zone of Direct Extrusion of Aluminum Alloys under Starved Lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomar, P.; Pandey, R. K.; Nath, Y.

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this article is to investigate numerically frictional stress in the contact zone at the die/billet interface in the direct extrusion of aluminum alloys considering starved lubricated conditions. In the modeling, both the inlet and work zones have been investigated by coupled solution of the governing equations. The influences of the billet material's strain hardening and its heating due to the plastic deformation are accounted for in the numerical computation. The frictional shear stress at the die/billet interface is computed using three different lubricating oils. Numerical results have been presented herein for the various operating parameters viz. starvation factor ( ψ = 0.2-0.6), lubricants' viscosities ( η 0 = 0.05 Pa s-0.2 Pa s), semi die angle ( β = 10°-20°), and material parameter ( G = 0.56-2.25). It has been observed that the frictional stress increases with an increase in the severity of the lubricant's starvation for the given values of semi-die angle, extrusion speed, and material parameter.

  16. A substitute model of two-dimensional dry friction exposed to dither generated by rolling contact of wheel and rail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowski, Jerzy

    2012-10-01

    Dither generated by rolling contact of wheel and rail smoothes dry friction damping provided by the primary suspension dampers of freight wagons and it should be taken into account in numerical simulations. But numerically the problem is non-smooth and this leads to long execution time during simulation, especially when the vehicle with friction dampers is modelled in the environment of an multi-body system simulation program, whose solver has to cope with many strong non-linearities. The other difficulty is the necessity of handling within the code a number of big volume files of recorded dither sampled with high frequency. To avoid these difficulties, a substitute model of two-dimensional dry friction exposed to dither is proposed that does not need application of dither during simulation, but it behaves as if dither were applied. Due to this property of the model, the excitation of the vehicle model by track irregularities may be supplied as low-frequency input, which allows fast execution and, the necessity of handling high-volume files of recorded dither is avoided. The substitute model is numerically effective. To identify parameters of the substitute model, a pre-processing employing a sample of the realistic dither is carried-out on a simple two-degrees-of-freedom system. The substitute model is anisotropic, describing anisotropic properties of the two-dimensional friction arising in the presence of one-dimensional dither. The model may be applied in other branches of engineering, for example, in mechatronics and robotics, where application of dither may improve the accuracy of positioning devices.

  17. Friction and Morphology of Magnetic Tapes in Sliding Contact with Nickel-Zinc Ferrite.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    microstructure of the tape. Comparisons were made with four binders: nitrocellulose; poly(vinyledene) chloride; cellulose acetate ; and hydroxyl-terminated, low...nitrocellulose binder and increased in the order hydroxyl-terminated, low-molecular-weight polyester resin; poly (vinyledene) chloride; and cellulose acetate . The...order cellulose acetate , poly (vinyledene) chloride, and nitrocellulose. The nature of deformation of the tape was a factor in controlling friction. The

  18. The friction and wear of metals and binary alloys in contact with an abrasive grit of single-crystal silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with various metals and iron-base binary alloys (alloying elements Ti, Cr, Mn, Ni, Rh, and W) in contact with single-crystal silicon carbide riders. Results indicate that the coefficient of friction and groove height (corresponding to the wear volume) decrease linearly as the shear strength of the bulk metal increases. The coefficient of friction and groove height generally decrease with an increase in solute content of binary alloys. A separate correlation exists between the solute to iron atomic radius ratio and the decreasing rates of change of coefficient of friction and groove height with increasing solute content. These rates of change are minimum at a solute to iron radius ratio of unity. They increase as the atomic ratio increases or decreases linearly from unity. The correlations indicate that atomic size is an important parameter in controlling friction and wear of alloys.

  19. Friction and Wear of Solid-Lubricated Contact in Gas Turbine Engine Bearings.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    Norton Corp. Test ball of NC-!32 were provided by WPAFB from a group manufac- tured by SKF Industries, Inc. -2- taking point. A new contact position was...desired contact plane on the disc rim. The contact was carefully aligned . The ball type specimen had the inherent advantage of self- alignment but as...assembly on the load arm. Alignment of the compliant specimen to the disc surface was achieved by adjustment to the loader arm’s universal joint on the

  20. The extended wedge method: Atomic force microscope friction calibration for improved tolerance to instrument misalignments, tip offset, and blunt probes

    SciTech Connect

    Khare, H. S.; Burris, D. L.

    2013-05-15

    One of the major challenges in understanding and controlling friction is the difficulty in bridging the length and time scales of macroscale contacts and those of the single asperity interactions they comprise. While the atomic force microscope (AFM) offers a unique ability to probe tribological surfaces in a wear-free single-asperity contact, instrument calibration challenges have limited the usefulness of this technique for quantitative nanotribological studies. A number of lateral force calibration techniques have been proposed and used, but none has gained universal acceptance due to practical considerations, configuration limitations, or sensitivities to unknowable error sources. This paper describes a simple extension of the classic wedge method of AFM lateral force calibration which: (1) allows simultaneous calibration and measurement on any substrate, thus eliminating prior tip damage and confounding effects of instrument setup adjustments; (2) is insensitive to adhesion, PSD cross-talk, transducer/piezo-tube axis misalignment, and shear-center offset; (3) is applicable to integrated tips and colloidal probes; and (4) is generally applicable to any reciprocating friction coefficient measurement. The method was applied to AFM measurements of polished carbon (99.999% graphite) and single crystal MoS{sub 2} to demonstrate the technique. Carbon and single crystal MoS{sub 2} had friction coefficients of {mu}= 0.20 {+-} 0.04 and {mu}= 0.006 {+-} 0.001, respectively, against an integrated Si probe. Against a glass colloidal sphere, MoS{sub 2} had a friction coefficient of {mu}= 0.005 {+-} 0.001. Generally, the measurement uncertainties ranged from 10%-20% and were driven by the effect of actual frictional variation on the calibration rather than calibration error itself (i.e., due to misalignment, tip-offset, or probe radius).

  1. Real-time deflection and friction force imaging by bimorph-based resonance-type high-speed scanning force microscopy in the contact mode

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We report herein an alternative high-speed scanning force microscopy method in the contact mode based on a resonance-type piezoelectric bimorph scanner. The experimental setup, the modified optical beam deflection scheme suitable for smaller cantilevers, and a high-speed control program for simultaneous data capture are described in detail. The feature of the method is that the deflection and friction force images of the sample surface can be obtained simultaneously in real time. Images of various samples (e.g., a test grating, a thin gold film, and fluorine-doped tin oxide-coated glass slides) are acquired successfully. The imaging rate is 25 frames per second, and the average scan speed reaches a value of approximately 2.5 cm/s. The method combines the advantages of both observing the dynamic processes of the sample surface and monitoring the frictional properties on the nanometer scale. PACS 07.79.Lh; 07.79.Sp; 68.37.Ps PMID:25593555

  2. Experimental Study of the Rolling-Sliding Contact Conditions in a PA66/STEEL Gear Using Twin-Disc Test Rig: Friction and Wear Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbarek, Meftah; Rhaiem, Sadok; Kharrat, Mohamed; Dammak, Maher

    2015-09-01

    This study investigates the effects of sliding ratio on the tribological response of the contact between the teeth of a metal/polymer gear in the regions close to the pitch point. For this purpose, a new twin-disc test rig was developed on the basis of two discs of different diameters rotating one above the other at the same angular speed. Two different materials were used: non-alloyed structural steel (C45) and polyamide (PA66). The effect of the slip ratio (4%, 12%, 20% and 28%) was studied at a constant pressure of 34 MPa and a constant angular speed of 300 rpm. In addition, the contact conditions were controlled with measurements of the two discs surface temperatures. The results indicate that the wear and the friction are closely related to the contact temperature generated by the sliding phenomenon. At low slip ratio (4% and 12%), the coefficient of friction and the temperature are characterized by a quasi-linear increase with time, and the wear increases slowly. At higher slip ratio (20% and 28%), the coefficient of friction and the temperature presents a steady state, and the wear increases dramatically. During the test, a film of transferred PA66 is formed on the steel surface causing the development of adhesive interactions between the contacting discs which increase the friction coefficient and the contact temperature. The high thermal conductivity of steel as compared to that of the polymer can reduce enormously the contact temperature generated by the sliding process.

  3. Friction Mapping as a Tool for Measuring the Elastohydrodynamic Contact Running-in Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    lubricated gear and bearing contacts typically demonstrate a period of wear called “running-in” when they are first put into service, during which time the...values, depending on the ramp direction and extent of mapping range. 15. SUBJECT TERMS elastohydrodynamic, lubrication, wear, gears, bearings 16...1. Introduction Elastohydrodynamic lubricated contacts are common in vehicle transmission gears and bearings . The hydrodynamic pressure built up

  4. Considerations on the moving contact-line singularity, with application to frictional drag on a slender drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durbin, P. A.

    1988-01-01

    It has previously been shown that the no-slip boundary conditions leads to a singularity at a moving contact line and that this presumes some form of slip. Present considerations on the energetics of slip due to shear stress lead to a yield stress boundary condition. A model for the distortion of the liquid state near solid boundaries gives a physical basis for this boundary condition. The yield stress condition is illustrated by an analysis of a slender drop rolling down an incline. That analysis provides a formula for the frictional drag resisting the drop movement. With the present boundary condition, the length of the slip region becomes a property of the fluid flow.

  5. Frictional Contact Problems for Thin Elastic Structures and Weak Solutions of Sweeping Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, Patrick

    2010-12-01

    The linearized equilibrium equations for straight elastic strings, beams, membranes or plates do not couple tangential and normal components. In the quasi-static evolution occurring above a fixed rigid obstacle with Coulomb dry friction, the normal displacement is governed by a variational inequality, whereas the tangential displacement is seen to obey a sweeping process, the theory of which was extensively developed by Moreau in the 1970s. In some cases, the underlying moving convex set has bounded retraction and, in these cases, the sweeping process can be solved by directly applying Moreau’s results. However, in many other cases, the bounded retraction condition is not fulfilled and this is seen to be connected to the possible event of moving velocity discontinuities. In such a case, there are no strong solutions and we have to cope with weak solutions of the underlying sweeping process.

  6. A Solution Method for Large Deformation Contact Problems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    number) Contact Problem Algorithm Implicit Solution Technique 20. ANSTNACT’ (rntftae r eves aIi N yaeemy mrd identify by block numnber) P. solution...WITHOUT oL0 H! 0-CONTACT ALGORITHM Z w 00 0 ev 0.8- w kL 0.0 0 U< O0.26 U)_ * z Z OBTINE 0H53 56 59 ANGE,4 Ficure~~~~~ ~*A G RI H 17 Peitdtatoso iesi itrae...41, Division of Applied Sciences, Harvard Univ., March 1983. [20] Rabinowicz , E., Friction and Wear of Materials, J. Wiley and Sons, 1965. [21

  7. The influence of fault geometry and frictional contact properties on slip surface behavior and off-fault damage: insights from quasi-static modeling of small strike-slip faults from the Sierra Nevada, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritz, E.; Pollard, D. D.

    2011-12-01

    Geological and geophysical investigations demonstrate that faults are geometrically complex structures, and that the nature and intensity of off-fault damage is spatially correlated with geometric irregularities of the slip surfaces. Geologic observations of exhumed meter-scale strike-slip faults in the Bear Creek drainage, central Sierra Nevada, CA, provide insight into the relationship between non-planar fault geometry and frictional slip at depth. We investigate natural fault geometries in an otherwise homogeneous and isotropic elastic material with a two-dimensional displacement discontinuity method (DDM). Although the DDM is a powerful tool, frictional contact problems are beyond the scope of the elementary implementation because it allows interpenetration of the crack surfaces. By incorporating a complementarity algorithm, we are able to enforce appropriate contact boundary conditions along the model faults and include variable friction and frictional strength. This tool allows us to model quasi-static slip on non-planar faults and the resulting deformation of the surrounding rock. Both field observations and numerical investigations indicate that sliding along geometrically discontinuous or irregular faults may lead to opening of the fault and the formation of new fractures, affecting permeability in the nearby rock mass and consequently impacting pore fluid pressure. Numerical simulations of natural fault geometries provide local stress fields that are correlated to the style and spatial distribution of off-fault damage. We also show how varying the friction and frictional strength along the model faults affects slip surface behavior and consequently influences the stress distributions in the adjacent material.

  8. Enhanced Locomotion Efficiency of a Bio-inspired Walking Robot using Contact Surfaces with Frictional Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoonpong, Poramate; Petersen, Dennis; Kovalev, Alexander; Wörgötter, Florentin; Gorb, Stanislav N.; Spinner, Marlene; Heepe, Lars

    2016-12-01

    Based on the principles of morphological computation, we propose a novel approach that exploits the interaction between a passive anisotropic scale-like material (e.g., shark skin) and a non-smooth substrate to enhance locomotion efficiency of a robot walking on inclines. Real robot experiments show that passive tribologically-enhanced surfaces of the robot belly or foot allow the robot to grip on specific surfaces and move effectively with reduced energy consumption. Supplementing the robot experiments, we investigated tribological properties of the shark skin as well as its mechanical stability. It shows high frictional anisotropy due to an array of sloped denticles. The orientation of the denticles to the underlying collagenous material also strongly influences their mechanical interlocking with the substrate. This study not only opens up a new way of achieving energy-efficient legged robot locomotion but also provides a better understanding of the functionalities and mechanical properties of anisotropic surfaces. That understanding will assist developing new types of material for other real-world applications.

  9. Enhanced Locomotion Efficiency of a Bio-inspired Walking Robot using Contact Surfaces with Frictional Anisotropy

    PubMed Central

    Manoonpong, Poramate; Petersen, Dennis; Kovalev, Alexander; Wörgötter, Florentin; Gorb, Stanislav N.; Spinner, Marlene; Heepe, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Based on the principles of morphological computation, we propose a novel approach that exploits the interaction between a passive anisotropic scale-like material (e.g., shark skin) and a non-smooth substrate to enhance locomotion efficiency of a robot walking on inclines. Real robot experiments show that passive tribologically-enhanced surfaces of the robot belly or foot allow the robot to grip on specific surfaces and move effectively with reduced energy consumption. Supplementing the robot experiments, we investigated tribological properties of the shark skin as well as its mechanical stability. It shows high frictional anisotropy due to an array of sloped denticles. The orientation of the denticles to the underlying collagenous material also strongly influences their mechanical interlocking with the substrate. This study not only opens up a new way of achieving energy-efficient legged robot locomotion but also provides a better understanding of the functionalities and mechanical properties of anisotropic surfaces. That understanding will assist developing new types of material for other real-world applications. PMID:28008936

  10. The Contribution of Frictional Contacts to the Shear Strength of Coarse Glass Bead Powders and Slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Poloski, Adam P.; Bredt, Paul R.; Daniel, Richard C.; Saez, Avelino E.

    2006-12-01

    The shear strength of powders and slurries containing coarse particles using a vane impeller were examined as a function of vane size, vane immersion depth, container size, and interstitial fluid. Results show that for powders and concentrated slurry systems containing coarse particles, vane immersion depth and container diameter significantly impact the measured shear strength. An equation describing interparticle frictional and cohesive contributions to shear vane measurements was derived in an effort to describe experimental results. A Janssen stress distribution model for granular materials was the basis for this equation. The use of a Janssen stress distribution appears to explain the behavior of shear strength measurements at varying immersion depths with dry cohesionless glass beads, water saturated glass beads, and glass beads dispersed in a non-Newtonian matrix of kaolin clay slurry. The presence of the Janssen stress distribution can affect the interpretation of shear vane results. Rather than shear strength being a material property as is the case with flocculated colloid slurries and polymer solutions, shear strength becomes a process property where vane depth, container size, and container material can result in significant measurement variations. Such parameters should be considered before using the shear vane results on applications involving granular material components.

  11. Friction stir method for forming structures and materials

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Zhili; David, Stan A.; Frederick, David Alan

    2011-11-22

    Processes for forming an enhanced material or structure are disclosed. The structure typically includes a preform that has a first common surface and a recess below the first common surface. A filler is added to the recess and seams are friction stir welded, and materials may be stir mixed.

  12. A robotics-based testbed for verifying a method of identifying contact-dynamics model parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ou; Boyden, Samuel

    2006-05-01

    This paper describes a general method of identifying the key parameters of multiple-point contact-dynamics models and a robotics-based testbed for experimentally verifying the new method. Some of the current and future flight systems are required to make physical contact on orbit for on-orbit servicing such as docking, refueling, repairing, etc. Because of the high risks associated with contact operations, the design and operation of such a flight system must be thoroughly analyzed and verified in advance by hardware testing and/or high-fidelity computer simulation. Computer simulations are increasingly playing a major role in system verification because it is extreme difficult to test 6-DOF microgravity contact dynamics on the ground. However, the accuracy of computer simulation depends not only on the mathematical model (i.e., formulation, algorithms, and computer code) but also on the values of model parameters. It is, therefore, desirable to have a systematic method which can identify multiple model parameters directly from routine physical tests of the contact components. The robotics-based experiment testbed introduced in this paper is specially designed to test and verify such a method of identifying contact parameters. The method is capable of identifying the key stiffness, damping, and friction parameters of a contact dynamics model all together from hardware test of contacting components having complicated geometries and multiple contacts. It can also be used to extract contact-dynamics model parameters of a dynamic system from its routine test of complex contact hardware. The paper discusses the major design requirements of this experimental testbed and how they are met by the specific design of the system.

  13. Frictional contact behaviour of the tyre: the effect of tread slip on the in-plane structural deformation and stress field development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsotras, Achillefs; Mavros, George

    2010-08-01

    The analysis of the in-plane deformation of the tyre in relation to the frictional contact between the road and the tread is a crucial first step in the understanding of its contribution to the longitudinal dynamics of a vehicle. In this work, the physical mechanism of the generation of the two-dimensional contact pressure distribution for a non-rolling tyre is studied. Towards this aim, a physical tyre model is constructed, consisting of an analytical ring under pretension, a non-linear sidewall foundation, and a discretised foundation of viscoelastic elements representing the tread. Tread behaviour is examined first, with focus on the development of shear micro-slip. The tread simulation is enhanced with the combination of radial and tangential tread elements and the benefits of such an approach are identified. Subsequently, the contact of the complete model is examined by implementing an algorithm for transient simulations in the time domain. The effects of the imposed vertical load and sidewall non-linearity on the contact stress and strain fields are identified. The modelling approach is validated by comparison with published experimental results. The physical mechanism that couples the torsional and horizontal/vertical deformations of the carcass with the frictional forces at the tread is identified and discussed in detail. The proposed modelling approach is found appropriate for the description of the development of the two-dimensional contact pressure field as a function of the frictional potential of the contact.

  14. Non-contact method for directing electrotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Ahirwar, Dinesh K.; Nasser, Mohd W.; Jones, Travis H.; Sequin, Emily K.; West, Joseph D.; Henthorne, Timothy L.; Javor, Joshua; Kaushik, Aniruddha M.; Ganju, Ramesh K.; Subramaniam, Vish V.

    2015-01-01

    We present a method to induce electric fields and drive electrotaxis (galvanotaxis) without the need for electrodes to be in contact with the media containing the cell cultures. We report experimental results using a modification of the transmembrane assay, demonstrating the hindrance of migration of breast cancer cells (SCP2) when an induced a.c. electric field is present in the appropriate direction (i.e. in the direction of migration). Of significance is that migration of these cells is hindered at electric field strengths many orders of magnitude (5 to 6) below those previously reported for d.c. electrotaxis, and even in the presence of a chemokine (SDF-1α) or a growth factor (EGF). Induced a.c. electric fields applied in the direction of migration are also shown to hinder motility of non-transformed human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A) in the presence of the growth factor EGF. In addition, we also show how our method can be applied to other cell migration assays (scratch assay), and by changing the coil design and holder, that it is also compatible with commercially available multi-well culture plates. PMID:26055698

  15. Non-contact method for directing electrotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahirwar, Dinesh K.; Nasser, Mohd W.; Jones, Travis H.; Sequin, Emily K.; West, Joseph D.; Henthorne, Timothy L.; Javor, Joshua; Kaushik, Aniruddha M.; Ganju, Ramesh K.; Subramaniam, Vish V.

    2015-06-01

    We present a method to induce electric fields and drive electrotaxis (galvanotaxis) without the need for electrodes to be in contact with the media containing the cell cultures. We report experimental results using a modification of the transmembrane assay, demonstrating the hindrance of migration of breast cancer cells (SCP2) when an induced a.c. electric field is present in the appropriate direction (i.e. in the direction of migration). Of significance is that migration of these cells is hindered at electric field strengths many orders of magnitude (5 to 6) below those previously reported for d.c. electrotaxis, and even in the presence of a chemokine (SDF-1α) or a growth factor (EGF). Induced a.c. electric fields applied in the direction of migration are also shown to hinder motility of non-transformed human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A) in the presence of the growth factor EGF. In addition, we also show how our method can be applied to other cell migration assays (scratch assay), and by changing the coil design and holder, that it is also compatible with commercially available multi-well culture plates.

  16. Novel friction law for the static friction force based on local precursor slipping.

    PubMed

    Katano, Yu; Nakano, Ken; Otsuki, Michio; Matsukawa, Hiroshi

    2014-09-10

    The sliding of a solid object on a solid substrate requires a shear force that is larger than the maximum static friction force. It is commonly believed that the maximum static friction force is proportional to the loading force and does not depend on the apparent contact area. The ratio of the maximum static friction force to the loading force is called the static friction coefficient µM, which is considered to be a constant. Here, we conduct experiments demonstrating that the static friction force of a slider on a substrate follows a novel friction law under certain conditions. The magnitude of µM decreases as the loading force increases or as the apparent contact area decreases. This behavior is caused by the slip of local precursors before the onset of bulk sliding and is consistent with recent theory. The results of this study will develop novel methods for static friction control.

  17. Micro-beam friction liner and method of transferring energy

    DOEpatents

    Mentesana, Charles

    2007-07-17

    A micro-beam friction liner adapted to increase performance and efficiency and reduce wear in a piezoelectric motor or actuator or other device using a traveling or standing wave to transfer energy in the form of torque and momentum. The micro-beam friction liner comprises a dense array of micro-beam projections having first ends fixed relative to a rotor and second ends projecting substantially toward a plurality of teeth of a stator, wherein the micro-beam projections are compressed and bent during piezoelectric movement of the stator teeth, thereby storing the energy, and then react against the stator teeth to convert the stored energy stored to rotational energy in the rotor.

  18. Quantitative investigation of the photodegradation of polyethylene terephthalate film by friction force microscopy, contact-angle goniometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Claire R; Leggett, Graham J

    2009-08-01

    Studies of the UV-induced photodegradation of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) have been carried out using contact-angle goniometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and friction force microscopy (FFM). The advancing contact angle of water, theta, decreased following exposure of free-standing PET films to UV light. Measurements of surface friction by FFM showed that the coefficient of friction mu increased as the degradation proceeded, reaching a limiting value after ca 200 min, in agreement with the contact angle data. Using a modified form of the Cassie equation, a quantitative analysis of the extent of modification could be carried out. There was a very close correlation between the coefficient of friction determined by FFM and the value of cos theta. XPS provided more detailed information on surface bonding that also correlated closely with the FFM data. Although FFM provides quantitative data on surface modification with nanometer-scale spatial resolution, it does not provide detailed structural information such as is provided by XPS. The oxygen content at the surface was found to increase as photo-generated radicals within the PET reacted with atmospheric oxygen. Increases in both ester and carbonyl contributions within XPS data accompanied this increase. It was concluded that the photodegradation process follows mainly Norrish type I reaction pathways, following previous work by Fechine et al and Grosstete et al.

  19. Hard and low friction nitride coatings and methods for forming the same

    DOEpatents

    Erdemir, Ali; Urgen, Mustafa; Cakir, Ali Fuat; Eryilmaz, Osman Levent; Kazmanli, Kursat; Keles, Ozgul

    2007-05-01

    An improved coating material possessing super-hard and low friction properties and a method for forming the same. The improved coating material includes the use of a noble metal or soft metal homogeneously distributed within a hard nitride material. The addition of small amounts of such metals into nitrides such as molybdenum nitride, titanium nitride, and chromium nitride results in as much as increasing of the hardness of the material as well as decreasing the friction coefficient and increasing the oxidation resistance.

  20. Tribological synthesis method for producing low-friction surface film coating

    SciTech Connect

    Ajayi, Oyelayo O.; Lorenzo-Martin, Maria De La; Fenske, George R.

    2016-10-25

    An article of method of manufacture of a low friction tribological film on a substrate. The article includes a substrate of a steel or ceramic which has been tribologically processed with a lubricant containing selected additives and the additives, temperature, load and time of processing can be selectively controlled to bias formation of a film on the substrate where the film is an amorphous structure exhibiting highly advantageous low friction properties.

  1. Device and method for frictionally testing materials for ignitability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, F. J.; Shaw, R. C.; Dixon, D. S. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Test apparatus for determining ignition characteristics of various metal in oxidizer environments simulating operating conditions for materials is invented. The test apparatus has a chamber through which the oxidizing agent flows, and means for mounting a stationary test sample therein, a powered, rotating shaft in the chamber rigidly mounts a second test sample. The shaft is axially movable to bring the samples into frictional engagement and heated to the ignition point. Instrumentation connected to the apparatus provides for observation of temperatures, pressures, loads on and speeds of the rotating shaft, and torques whereby components of stressed oxygen systems can be selected which will avoid accidental fires under working conditions.

  2. Conduction electrons as dissipation channel in friction experiments at the metal-metal transition of LSMO measured by contact-resonance atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfahl, V.; Phani, M. K.; Büchsenschütz-Göbeler, M.; Kumar, A.; Moshnyaga, V.; Arnold, W.; Samwer, K.

    2017-01-01

    We report on friction measurements on a La0.6Sr0.4MnO3 (LSMO) thin film using atomic force microscopy cantilever contact-resonances. There is a contribution to the damping of the cantilever oscillations, which is caused by micro-sliding of the cantilever tip on the surface of the thin film. This frictional part decreases with temperature parallel to the increase in the resistivity of the thin film. The LSMO is well-known for a ferromagnetic to paramagnetic phase transition that occurs without changes in the rhombohedral (R-3c) crystalline structure. The magnetic transition at the Curie temperature TC ˜ 360 K is accompanied by a metal-to-metal transition with a large increase in electrical resistivity. The behavior of the cantilever damping constant demonstrates that there is a direct coupling between mechanical friction and the mobility of the electrons in the LSMO film.

  3. A computerized method to estimate friction coefficient from orientation distribution of meso-scale faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Katsushi

    2016-08-01

    The friction coefficient controls the brittle strength of the Earth's crust for deformation recorded by faults. This study proposes a computerized method to determine the friction coefficient of meso-scale faults. The method is based on the analysis of orientation distribution of faults, and the principal stress axes and the stress ratio calculated by a stress tensor inversion technique. The method assumes that faults are activated according to the cohesionless Coulomb's failure criterion, where the fluctuations of fluid pressure and the magnitude of differential stress are assumed to induce faulting. In this case, the orientation distribution of fault planes is described by a probability density function that is visualized as linear contours on a Mohr diagram. The parametric optimization of the function for an observed fault population yields the friction coefficient. A test using an artificial fault-slip dataset successfully determines the internal friction angle (the arctangent of the friction coefficient) with its confidence interval of several degrees estimated by the bootstrap resampling technique. An application to natural faults cutting a Pleistocene forearc basin fill yields a friction coefficient around 0.7 which is experimentally predicted by the Byerlee's law.

  4. Study on friction behaviour of brake shoe materials for mining hoist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungureanu, M.; Ungureanu, N. S.; Crăciun, I.

    2017-02-01

    The friction coefficient in the brake linkages has an important influence on the braking efficiency and safety of machines. The paper presents a method for the study of the friction coefficient of the friction couple brake shoe-drum for mining hoist. In this context, it is interesting to define the friction coefficient, not just according to the materials in contact, but according to the entire ensemble of tribological factors of the friction couple.

  5. Energy conversion device and method of reducing friction therein

    DOEpatents

    Solovyeva, Lyudmila Mikhaylovna; Jansson, Kyle S; Elmoursi, Alaa AbdelAzim; Zhu, Dong; Milner, Robert; Daughterty, Early Eugene; Higdon, Clifton Baxter; Elagamy, Kamel Abdel-Khalik; Hicks, Aaron Michael

    2013-10-08

    A device configured for converting energy includes a first surface, a second surface configured for moving with respect to the first surface during operation of the device, and a coating disposed on at least one of the first surface and the second surface. The coating includes a first layer of a ceramic alloy represented by the general formula AlMgB.sub.14--X, wherein X is present in an amount of from 0 to 70 parts by weight based on 100 parts by weight of the ceramic alloy and is a doping agent selected from the group of Group IV elements and borides and nitrides thereof, and a second layer disposed on the first layer and including carbon in a gradient concentration. The coating has a hardness of from 10 to 20 GPa and a coefficient of friction of less than or equal to 0.12.

  6. Development and validation of a new method for measuring friction between skin and nonwoven materials.

    PubMed

    Cottenden, A M; Wong, W K; Cottenden, D J; Farbrot, A

    2008-07-01

    A new method for measuring the coefficient of friction between nonwoven materials and the curved surface of the volar forearm has been developed and validated. The method was used to measure the coefficient of static friction for three different nonwoven materials on the normal (dry) and over-hydrated volar forearms of five female volunteers (ages 18-44). The method proved simple to run and had good repeatability: the coefficient of variation (standard deviation expressed as a percentage of the mean) for triplets of repeat measurements was usually (80 per cent of the time) less than 10 per cent. Measurements involving the geometrically simpler configuration of pulling a weighted fabric sample horizontally across a quasi-planar area of volar forearm skin proved experimentally more difficult and had poorer repeatability. However, correlations between values of coefficient of static friction derived using the two methods were good (R = 0.81 for normal (dry) skin, and 0.91 for over-hydrated skin). Measurements of the coefficient of static friction for the three nonwovens for normal (dry) and for over-hydrated skin varied in the ranges of about 0.3-0.5 and 0.9-1.3, respectively. In agreement with Amontons' law, coefficients of friction were invariant with normal pressure over the entire experimental range (0.1-8.2 kPa).

  7. Computing Contact Stresses In Gear Teeth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Somprakit, Paisan; Huston, Ronald L.

    1995-01-01

    Improved method of computing contact stresses in gear teeth accounts for complicating effects like those of static and sliding friction. Provides iterative procedure for determination of contact region and nodal contact forces along with contact stresses. Method based on equations and computational procedure incorporating these effects routinely.

  8. Friction damping studies in multiple turbine blade systems by lumped mass method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, B. B.; Dominic, R. J.; Held, T. W.

    1983-01-01

    Analytical studies were conducted on multiple turbine blade systems using the lumped mass method. Each blade was idealized by a two mass-two spring model whose modal values were determined from the known frequencies corresponding to the first two bending modes and the frequency corresponding to the platform lockup condition. Two friction damping models were considered namely, the blade-to-blade and the blade-damper-blade. The equations of motion derived on the basis of these models were solved by a method of harmonic balance, assuming, in effect, that under cyclic excitation the blades will exhibit cyclic response at the same frequency. The solutions for 8 blade, 16 blade, and 4 blade systems were obtained using the computer program BLADE. The levels of damping produced by the two friction damping models were compared and evaluated. The optimal values of the friction force, for which the tip amplitude of the blades had a minimum value, were determined.

  9. Effect of fluorocarbon self-assembled monolayer films on sidewall adhesion and friction of surface micromachines with impacting and sliding contact interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, H.; Komvopoulos, K.

    2013-06-14

    A self-assembled monolayer film consisting of fluoro-octyltrichlorosilane (FOTS) was vapor-phase deposited on Si(100) substrates and polycrystalline silicon (polysilicon) surface micromachines. The hydrophobic behavior and structural composition of the FOTS film deposited on Si(100) were investigated by goniometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The effects of contact pressure, relative humidity, temperature, and impact/sliding cycles on the adhesive and friction behavior of uncoated and FOTS-coated polysilicon micromachines (referred to as the Si and FOTS/Si micromachines, respectively) were investigated under controlled loading and environmental conditions. FOTS/Si micromachines demonstrated much lower and stable adhesion than Si micromachines due to the highly hydrophobic and conformal FOTS film. Contrary to Si micromachines, sidewall adhesion of FOTS/Si micromachines demonstrated a weak dependence on relative humidity, temperature, and impact cycles. In addition, FOTS/Si micromachines showed low and stable adhesion and low static friction for significantly more sliding cycles than Si micromachines. The adhesive and static friction characteristics of Si and FOTS/Si micromachines are interpreted in the context of physicochemical surface changes, resulting in the increase of the real area of contact and a hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic transition of the surface chemical characteristics caused by nanoscale surface smoothening and the removal of the organic residue (Si micromachines) or the FOTS film (FOTS/Si micromachines) during repetitive impact and oscillatory sliding of the sidewall surfaces.

  10. Friction phenomena and their impact on the shear behaviour of granular material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhr, Bettina; Six, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    In the discrete element simulation of granular materials, the modelling of contacts is crucial for the prediction of the macroscopic material behaviour. From the tribological point of view, friction at contacts needs to be modelled carefully, as it depends on several factors, e.g. contact normal load or temperature to name only two. In discrete element method (DEM) simulations the usage of Coulomb's law of friction is state of the art in modelling particle-particle contacts. Usually in Coulomb's law, for all contacts only one constant coefficient of friction is used, which needs to reflect all tribological effects. Thus, whenever one of the influence factors of friction varies over a wide range, it can be expected that the usage of only one constant coefficient of friction in Coulomb's law is an oversimplification of reality. For certain materials, e.g. steel, it is known that a dependency of the coefficient of friction on the contact normal load exists. A more tribological tangential contact law is implemented in DEM, where the interparticle friction coefficient depends on the averaged normal stress in the contact. Simulations of direct shear tests are conducted, using steel spheres of different size distributions. The strong influence of interparticle friction on the bulk friction is shown via a variation of the constant interparticle friction coefficient. Simulations with constant and stress-dependent interparticle friction are compared. For the stress-dependent interparticle friction, a normal stress dependency of the bulk friction is seen. In the literature, measurements of different granular materials and small normal loads also show a stress dependency of the bulk friction coefficient. With increasing applied normal stress, the bulk friction coefficient reduces both in the experiments and in the simulations.

  11. Micromachine friction test apparatus

    DOEpatents

    deBoer, Maarten P.; Redmond, James M.; Michalske, Terry A.

    2002-01-01

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) friction test apparatus is disclosed for determining static or dynamic friction in MEM devices. The friction test apparatus, formed by surface micromachining, is based on a friction pad supported at one end of a cantilevered beam, with the friction pad overlying a contact pad formed on the substrate. A first electrostatic actuator can be used to bring a lower surface of the friction pad into contact with an upper surface of the contact pad with a controlled and adjustable force of contact. A second electrostatic actuator can then be used to bend the cantilevered beam, thereby shortening its length and generating a relative motion between the two contacting surfaces. The displacement of the cantilevered beam can be measured optically and used to determine the static or dynamic friction, including frictional losses and the coefficient of friction between the surfaces. The test apparatus can also be used to assess the reliability of rubbing surfaces in MEM devices by producing and measuring wear of those surfaces. Finally, the friction test apparatus, which is small in size, can be used as an in situ process quality tool for improving the fabrication of MEM devices.

  12. Friction and wear with a single-crystal abrasive grit of silicon carbide in contact with iron base binary alloys in oil: Effects of alloying element and its content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with various iron-base binary alloys (alloying elements were Ti, Cr, Mn, Ni, Rh, and W) in contact with a rider of 0.025-millimeter-radius, single-crystal silicon carbide in mineral oil. Results indicate that atomic size and content of alloying element play a dominant role in controlling the abrasive-wear and -friction properties of iron-base binary alloys. The coefficient of friction and groove height (wear volume) general alloy decrease, and the contact pressure increases in solute content. There appears to be very good correlation of the solute to iron atomic radius ratio with the decreasing rate of coefficient of friction, the decreasing rate of groove height (wear volume), and the increasing rate of contact pressure with increasing solute content C. Those rates increase as the solute to iron atomic radius ratio increases from unity.

  13. Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Imaging of Spherical and Flat Counterfaces of Ultrananocrystalline Diamond Tribological Contacts: A Correlation of Surface Chemistry and Friction

    SciTech Connect

    A Konicek; C Jaye; M Hamilton; W Sawyer; D Fischer; R Carpick

    2011-12-31

    A recently installed synchrotron radiation near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) full field imaging electron spectrometer was used to spatially resolve the chemical changes of both counterfaces from an ultra-nanocrystalline diamond (UNCD) tribological contact. A silicon flat and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} sphere were both coated with UNCD, and employed to form two wear tracks on the flat in a linear reciprocating tribometer. The first wear track was produced using a new, unconditioned sphere whose surface was thus conditioned during this first experiment. This led to faster run-in and lower friction when producing a second wear track using the conditioned sphere. The large depth of field of the magnetically guided NEXAFS imaging detector enabled rapid, large area spectromicroscopic imaging of both the spherical and flat surfaces. Laterally resolved NEXAFS data from the tribological contact area revealed that both substrates had an as-grown surface layer that contained a higher fraction of sp{sup 2}-bonded carbon and oxygen which was mechanically removed. Unlike the flat, the film on the sphere showed evidence of having graphitic character, both before and after sliding. These results show that the graphitic character of the sphere is not solely responsible for low friction and short run-in. Rather, conditioning the sphere, likely by removing asperities and passivating dangling bonds, leads to lower friction with less chemical modification of the substrate in subsequent tests. The new NEXAFS imaging spectroscopy detector enabled a more complete understanding of the tribological phenomena by imaging, for the first time, the surface chemistry of the spherical counterface which had been in continual contact during wear track formation.

  14. Method of forming contacts for a back-contact solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Manning, Jane

    2013-07-23

    Methods of forming contacts for back-contact solar cells are described. In one embodiment, a method includes forming a thin dielectric layer on a substrate, forming a polysilicon layer on the thin dielectric layer, forming and patterning a solid-state p-type dopant source on the polysilicon layer, forming an n-type dopant source layer over exposed regions of the polysilicon layer and over a plurality of regions of the solid-state p-type dopant source, and heating the substrate to provide a plurality of n-type doped polysilicon regions among a plurality of p-type doped polysilicon regions.

  15. Numerical Simulation of Dynamic Contact Angles and Contact Lines in Multiphase Flows using Level Set Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendota, Premchand

    Many physical phenomena and industrial applications involve multiphase fluid flows and hence it is of high importance to be able to simulate various aspects of these flows accurately. The Dynamic Contact Angles (DCA) and the contact lines at the wall boundaries are a couple of such important aspects. In the past few decades, many mathematical models were developed for predicting the contact angles of the inter-face with the wall boundary under various flow conditions. These models are used to incorporate the physics of DCA and contact line motion in numerical simulations using various interface capturing/tracking techniques. In the current thesis, a simple approach to incorporate the static and dynamic contact angle boundary conditions using the level set method is developed and implemented in multiphase CFD codes, LIT (Level set Interface Tracking) (Herrmann (2008)) and NGA (flow solver) (Desjardins et al (2008)). Various DCA models and associated boundary conditions are reviewed. In addition, numerical aspects such as the occurrence of a stress singularity at the contact lines and grid convergence of macroscopic interface shape are dealt with in the context of the level set approach.

  16. Method of produce ultra-low friction carbon films

    DOEpatents

    Erdemir, Ali; Fenske, George R.; Eryilmaz, Osman Levent; Lee, Richard H.

    2003-04-15

    A method and article of manufacture of amorphous diamond-like carbon. The method involves providing a substrate in a chamber, providing a mixture of a carbon containing gas and hydrogen gas with the mixture adjusted such that the atomic molar ratio of carbon to hydrogen is less than 0.3, including all carbon atoms and all hydrogen atoms in the mixture. A plasma is formed of the mixture and the amorphous diamond-like carbon film is deposited on the substrate. To achieve optimum bonding an intervening bonding layer, such as Si or SiO.sub.2, can be formed from SiH.sub.4 with or without oxidation of the layer formed.

  17. Method and apparatus for high-efficiency direct contact condensation

    DOEpatents

    Bharathan, D.; Parent, Y.; Hassani, A.V.

    1999-07-20

    A direct contact condenser having a downward vapor flow chamber and an upward vapor flow chamber, wherein each of the vapor flow chambers includes a plurality of cooling liquid supplying pipes and a vapor-liquid contact medium disposed thereunder to facilitate contact and direct heat exchange between the vapor and cooling liquid. The contact medium includes a plurality of sheets arranged to form vertical interleaved channels or passageways for the vapor and cooling liquid streams. The upward vapor flow chamber also includes a second set of cooling liquid supplying pipes disposed beneath the vapor-liquid contact medium which operate intermittently in response to a pressure differential within the upward vapor flow chamber. The condenser further includes separate wells for collecting condensate and cooling liquid from each of the vapor flow chambers. In alternate embodiments, the condenser includes a cross-current flow chamber and an upward flow chamber, a plurality of upward flow chambers, or a single upward flow chamber. The method of use of the direct contact condenser of this invention includes passing a vapor stream sequentially through the downward and upward vapor flow chambers, where the vapor is condensed as a result of heat exchange with the cooling liquid in the contact medium. The concentration of noncondensable gases in the resulting condensate-liquid mixtures can be minimized by controlling the partial pressure of the vapor, which depends in part upon the geometry of the vapor-liquid contact medium. In another aspect of this invention, the physical and chemical performance of a direct contact condenser can be predicted based on the vapor and coolant compositions, the condensation conditions, and the geometric properties of the contact medium. 39 figs.

  18. Method and apparatus for high-efficiency direct contact condensation

    DOEpatents

    Bharathan, Desikan; Parent, Yves; Hassani, A. Vahab

    1999-01-01

    A direct contact condenser having a downward vapor flow chamber and an upward vapor flow chamber, wherein each of the vapor flow chambers includes a plurality of cooling liquid supplying pipes and a vapor-liquid contact medium disposed thereunder to facilitate contact and direct heat exchange between the vapor and cooling liquid. The contact medium includes a plurality of sheets arranged to form vertical interleaved channels or passageways for the vapor and cooling liquid streams. The upward vapor flow chamber also includes a second set of cooling liquid supplying pipes disposed beneath the vapor-liquid contact medium which operate intermittently in response to a pressure differential within the upward vapor flow chamber. The condenser further includes separate wells for collecting condensate and cooling liquid from each of the vapor flow chambers. In alternate embodiments, the condenser includes a cross-current flow chamber and an upward flow chamber, a plurality of upward flow chambers, or a single upward flow chamber. The method of use of the direct contact condenser of this invention includes passing a vapor stream sequentially through the downward and upward vapor flow chambers, where the vapor is condensed as a result of heat exchange with the cooling liquid in the contact medium. The concentration of noncondensable gases in the resulting condensate-liquid mixtures can be minimized by controlling the partial pressure of the vapor, which depends in part upon the geometry of the vapor-liquid contact medium. In another aspect of this invention, the physical and chemical performance of a direct contact condenser can be predicted based on the vapor and coolant compositions, the condensation conditions. and the geometric properties of the contact medium.

  19. The caustics method in the contact problems of anisotropic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakić, A.; Semenski, D.; Jecić, S.

    2010-06-01

    Regions with high stress gradients represent critical zones of engineering structures such as crack tip or vicinity of the contact zone. The optical method of caustics is one of the few experimental methods which provide applicable results in these locations. This method was originally developed for crack-tip measurements of stress intensity factors and J-integral for isotropic and then for anisotropic materials. Subsequently, it was extended to contact problems where the size and shape of caustics on the screen are related to the amount and the inclination of loading force. Here, the method of caustics is extended to the analysis of contact problems for mechanically anisotropic materials. This makes the caustics method widely applicable to the analysis of any high stress gradient locations in a structure.

  20. Microstructure analysis in friction welding of copper and aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wibowo, A. G. Wahyu; Ismail, Rifky; Jamari, J.

    2016-04-01

    The Friction welding is a welding method with utilizing heat generated due to friction. Surfaces of two materials to be joined, one rotates the other being idle, is contacted by a pressure force. Friction on the second contact surface is done continuously so that the heat generated by the continuous friction will continue to rise. With the heat and the pressure force on the second surface to the second meeting of the material reaches its melting temperature then there is the process of welding. This paper examines the influence of the pressure force, rotational speed and contact time on friction welding of Aluminum (Al) and Copper (Cu) to the quality of welded joints. Friction welding process is performed on a friction welding machine that is equipped with the loading mechanism. The parameters used are the pressure force, rotational speed and friction time. Determination of the quality of welding is done by testing the tensile strength, hardness, and micro structure on the weld joint areas. The results showed that the friction welding quality is very good, this is evidenced by the results of a tensile strength test where the fault occurs outside the weld joint and increased violence in the weld joint. On the results visually cuts the welding area did not reveal any porosity so that it can be concluded that each metal contacts have melted perfectly and produce a connection with good quality.

  1. Nanotribology and Nanoscale Friction

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yi; Qu, Zhihua; Braiman, Yehuda; Zhang, Zhenyu; Barhen, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    Tribology is the science and technology of contacting solid surfaces in relative motion, including the study of lubricants, lubrication, friction, wear, and bearings. It is estimated that friction and wear cost the U.S. economy 6% of the gross national product (Persson, 2000). For example, 5% of the total energy generated in an automobile engine is lost to frictional resistance. The study of nanoscale friction has a technological impact in reducing energy loss in machines, in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), and in the development of durable, low-friction surfaces and ultra-thin lubrication films.

  2. Deciphering viscous flow of frictional melts with the mini-AMS method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferré, Eric C.; Chou, Yu-Min; Kuo, Ruo Lin; Yeh, En-Chao; Leibovitz, Natalie R.; Meado, Andrea L.; Campbell, Lucy; Geissman, John W.

    2016-09-01

    The anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) is widely used to analyze magmatic flow in intrusive igneous bodies including plutons, sills and dikes. This method, owing its success to the rapid nature of measurements, provides a proxy for the orientation of markers with shape anisotropy that flow and align in a viscous medium. AMS specimens typically are 25 mm diameter right cylinders or 20 mm on-a-side cubes, representing a volume deemed statistically representative. Here, we present new AMS results, based on significantly smaller cubic specimens, which are 3.5 mm on a side, hence∼250 times volumetrically smaller than conventional specimens. We show that, in the case of frictional melts, which inherently have an extremely small grain size, this small volume is in most cases sufficient to characterize the pseudotachylyte fabric, particularly when magnetite is present. Further, we demonstrate that the mini-AMS method provides new opportunities to investigate the details of frictional melt flow in these coseismic miniature melt bodies. This new method offers significant potential to investigate frictional melt flow in pseudotachylyte veins including contributions to the lubrication of faults at shallow to moderate depths.

  3. Method to improve precision of rotating inertia and friction measurements in turbomachinery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povey, Thomas; Paniagua, Guillermo

    2012-07-01

    This short communication presents a method to determine the rotating inertia with superior measurement precision. The performance of free wheel devices requires an accurate evaluation of both friction and rotating inertia. The present methodology consists on spinning the rotor with a mass attached, then separating the mass from the rotor and allowing the rotor to spin down. The technique allows precise measurements without disassembling the rotor housing. The new approach models frictional torque as a linear function in speed, using optimization data reduction techniques to fit the experimental data to a multidimensional system of non-linear equations. Theoretical and experimental results are used to demonstrate the applicability of the technique with high accuracy.

  4. A multi-probe micro-fabrication apparatus based on the friction-induced fabrication method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhijiang; Song, Chenfei; Guo, Jian; Yu, Bingjun; Qian, Linmao

    2013-12-01

    A novel multi-probe micro-fabrication apparatus was developed based on the friction-induced fabrication method. The main parts of the apparatus include actuating device, loading system, and control system. With a motorized XY linear stage, the maximum fabrication area of 50 mm × 50 mm can be achieved, and the maximum sliding speed of probes can be as high as 10 mm/s. Through locating steel micro balls into indents array, the preparation of multi-probe array can be realized by a simple and low-cost way. The cantilever was designed as a structure of deformable parallelogram with two beams, by which the fabrication force can be precisely controlled. Combining the friction-induced scanning with selective etching in KOH solution, various micro-patterns were fabricated on Si(100) surface without any masks or exposure. As a low-cost and high efficiency fabrication device, the multi-probe micro-fabrication apparatus may encourage the development of friction-induced fabrication method and shed new light on the texture engineering.

  5. The role of friction in the measurement of slipperiness, Part 1: friction mechanisms and definition of test conditions.

    PubMed

    Chang, W R; Grönqvist, R; Leclercq, S; Myung, R; Makkonen, L; Strandberg, L; Brungraber, R J; Mattke, U; Thorpe, S C

    2001-10-20

    Friction has been widely used as a measure of slipperiness. However, controversies around friction measurements remain. The purposes of this paper are to summarize understanding about friction measurement related to slipperiness assessment of shoe and floor interface and to define test conditions based on biomechanical observations. In addition, friction mechanisms at shoe and floor interface on dry, liquid and solid contaminated, and on icy surfaces are discussed. It is concluded that static friction measurement, by the traditional use of a drag-type device, is only suitable for dry and clean surfaces, and dynamic and transition friction methods are needed to properly estimate the potential risk on contaminated surfaces. Furthermore, at least some of the conditions at the shoe/floor interface during actual slip accidents should be replicated as test conditions for friction measurements, such as sliding speed, contact pressure and normal force build-up rate.

  6. Method and apparatus for producing co-current fluid contact

    DOEpatents

    Trutna, W.R.

    1997-12-09

    An improved packing system and method are disclosed wherein a packing section includes a liquid distributor and a separator placed above the distributor so that gas rising through the liquid distributor contacts liquid in the distributor, forming a gas-liquid combination which rises in co-current flow to the separator. Liquid is collected in the separator, from which gas rises. 13 figs.

  7. Method and apparatus for producing co-current fluid contact

    DOEpatents

    Trutna, William R.

    1997-01-01

    An improved packing system and method are disclosed wherein a packing section includes a liquid distributor and a separator placed above the distributor so that gas rising through the liquid distributor contacts liquid in the distributor, forming a gas-liquid combination which rises in co-current flow to the separator. Liquid is collected in the separator, from which gas rises.

  8. Method of forming contacts for a back-contact solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, Jane

    2014-07-15

    Methods of forming contacts for solar cells are described. In one embodiment, a method includes forming a silicon layer above a substrate, forming and patterning a solid-state p-type dopant source on the silicon layer, forming an n-type dopant source layer over exposed regions of the silicon layer and over a plurality of regions of the solid-state p-type dopant source, and heating the substrate to provide a plurality of n-type doped silicon regions among a plurality of p-type doped silicon regions.

  9. Method of forming contacts for a back-contact solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Manning, Jane

    2015-10-20

    Methods of forming contacts for solar cells are described. In one embodiment, a method includes forming a silicon layer above a substrate, forming and patterning a solid-state p-type dopant source on the silicon layer, forming an n-type dopant source layer over exposed regions of the silicon layer and over a plurality of regions of the solid-state p-type dopant source, and heating the substrate to provide a plurality of n-type doped silicon regions among a plurality of p-type doped silicon regions.

  10. Driving- stress waveform and the determination of rock internal friction by the stress-strain curve method.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hsi-Ping, Liu

    1980-01-01

    Harmonic distortion in the stress-time function applied to rock specimens affects the measurement of rock internal friction in the seismic wave periods by the stress-strain hysteresis loop method. If neglected, the harmonic distortion can cause measurements of rock internal friction to be in error by 3O% in the linear range. The stress-time function therefore must be recorded and Fourier analysed for correct interpretation of the experimental data. Such a procedure would also yield a value for internal friction at the higher harmonic frequencies.-Author

  11. Friction and wear of selected metals and alloys in sliding contact with AISI 440 C stainless steel in liquid methane and in liquid natural gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisander, D. W.

    1978-01-01

    Aluminum, titanium, beryllium, nickel, iron, copper, and several copper alloys were run in sliding contact with AISI 440C in liquid methane and natural gas. All of the metals run except copper and the copper alloys of tin and tin-lead showed severely galled wear scars. Friction coefficients varied from 0.2 to 1.0, the lowest being for copper, copper-17 wt. % tin, and copper-8 wt. % tin-22 wt. % lead. The wear rate for copper was two orders of magnitude lower than that of the other metals run. An additional order of magnitude of wear reduction was achieved by the addition of tin and/or lead to copper.

  12. A measurement method for distinguishing the real contact area of rough surfaces of transparent solids using improved Otsu technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Bao-Jiang; Yan, Shao-Ze; Xiang, Wu-Wei-Kai

    2015-01-01

    An experimental method of measuring the real contact area of transparent blocks based on the principle of total internal reflection is presented, intending to support the investigation of friction characteristics, heat conduction, and energy dissipation at the contact interface. A laser sheet illuminates the contact interface, and the transmitted laser sheet is projected onto a screen. Then the contact information is acquired from the screen by a camera. An improved Otsu method is proposed to process the data of experimental images. It can compute the threshold of the overall image and filter out all the pixels one by one. Through analyzing the experimental results, we describe the relationship between the real contact area and the positive pressure during a continuous loading process, at different loading rates, with the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) material. A hysteresis phenomenon in the relationship between the real contact area and the positive pressure is found and explained. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11272171), the Beijing Natural Science Foundation, China (Grant No. 3132030), and the Education Ministry Doctoral Fund of China (Grant No. 20120002110070).

  13. A study of frictional property of the human fingertip using three-dimensional finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroaki; Tada, Mitsunori; Mochimaru, Masaaki

    2011-03-01

    Since the tactile perception detects skin deformation due to the contact of an object, it is important to understand contact mechanics, especially, frictional behavior of the human fingertip. The coefficient of friction is recently modeled as a function of the applied normal load in which case the traditional Coulomb's law does not provide a description for the skin surface. When a surface is a rubber-like material, the frictional behavior follows the frictional law of the rubber-like material. Therefore, we developed a three-dimensional Finite Element model of the fingertip and analyzed frictional behavior based on the frictional law of rubber-like material. We proposed a combined technique using both experimental and Finite Element analyses in order to investigate the frictional property of the fingertip. A three-dimensional Finite Element model of the fingertip was developed using MRI images. We hypothesized a frictional equation of the critical shear stress. Squared differences between equivalent coefficient of friction of the FE analysis and the coefficient of kinetic friction of the experiment while sliding was decreased and the Finite Element analysis iterated until the error was minimized, and thus the frictional equation was determined. We obtained the equation of the critical shear stress and simulated kinetic friction of the fingertip while sliding under arbitrary normal loading condition by using the Finite Element analysis. We think this study is an appropriate method for understanding the frictional property of the human fingertip using the Finite Element analysis.

  14. Method for producing ceramic composition having low friction coefficient at high operating temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Lankford, Jr., James

    1988-01-01

    A method for producing a stable ceramic composition having a surface with a low friction coefficient and high wear resistance at high operating temperatures. A first deposition of a thin film of a metal ion is made upon the surface of the ceramic composition and then a first ion implantation of at least a portion of the metal ion is made into the near surface region of the composition. The implantation mixes the metal ion and the ceramic composition to form a near surface composite. The near surface composite is then oxidized sufficiently at high oxidizing temperatures to form an oxide gradient layer in the surface of the ceramic composition.

  15. Contact resistance calculations based on a variational method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leong, M. S.; Choo, S. C.; Tan, L. S.; Goh, T. L.

    1988-07-01

    Noble's variational method is used to solve the contact resistance problem that arises when a circular disc source electrode is in contact with a semiconductor slab through an infinitesimally thin layer of resistive material. The method assumes that the source current density distribution J( r) has the form K 1(1 - r 2) -μ + K 2(1 - r 2) {1}/{2} + K 3(1 - r 2) {3}/{2}, where the parameters K1, K2, K3 and μ are determined by variational principles. Calculations of the source current density and the total slab resistance, performed for a wide range of contact resistivities, show that the results are practically indistinguishable from those derived from an exact mixed boundary value method proposed earlier by us. Whilst this method of using an optimised μ is very accurate, it is computationally slow. By fixing μ at a constant value of {1}/{4}, we find that we can drastically reduce the computation time for each calculation of the total slab resistance to 1.5 s on an Apple II microcomputer, and still achieve an overall accuracy of 1%. Tables of the abscissas and weights required for implementation of the numerical scheme are provided in the paper.

  16. Is internal friction friction?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, J.C.; Byerlee, J.D.; Lockner, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    Mogi [1974] proposed a simple model of the incipient rupture surface to explain the Coulomb failure criterion. We show here that this model can plausibly be extended to explain the Mohr failure criterion. In Mogi's model the incipient rupture surface immediately before fracture consists of areas across which material integrity is maintained (intact areas) and areas across which it is not (cracks). The strength of the incipient rupture surface is made up of the inherent strength of the intact areas plus the frictional resistance to sliding offered by the cracked areas. Although the coefficient of internal friction (slope of the strength versus normal stress curve) depends upon both the frictional and inherent strengths, the phenomenon of internal friction can be identified with the frictional part. The curvature of the Mohr failure envelope is interpreted as a consequence of differences in damage (cracking) accumulated in prefailure loading at different confining pressures.

  17. Analytical method for distribution of metallic gasket contact stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiu; Gu, Boqing; Wei, Long; Sun, Jianjun

    2008-11-01

    Metallic gasket seals have been widely used in chemical and petrochemical plants. The failure of sealing system will lead to enormous pecuniary loss, serious environment pollution and personal injury accident. The failure of sealing systems is mostly caused not by the strength of flanges or bolts but by the leakage of the connections. The leakage behavior of bolted flanged connections is related to the gasket contact stress. In particular, the non-uniform distribution of this stress in the radial direction caused by the flange rotational flexibility has a major influence on the tightness of bolted flanged connections. In this paper, based on Warters method and considering the operating pressure, the deformation of the flanges is analyzed theoretically, and the formula for calculating the angle of rotation of the flanges is derived, based on which and the mechanical property of the gasket material, the method for calculating the gasket contact stresses is put forward. The maximum stress at the gasket outer flank calculated by the analytical method is lower than that obtained by numerical simulation, but the mean stresses calculated by the two methods are nearly the same. The analytical method presented in this paper can be used as an engineering method for designing the metallic gasket connections.

  18. Influence of ligation method on friction resistance of lingual brackets with different second-order angulations: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Graziane Olímpio; Gimenez, Carla Maria Melleiro; Prieto, Lucas; Prieto, Marcos Gabriel do Lago; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate stainless steel archwire static friction in active and passive self-ligating lingual and conventional brackets with second-order angulations. Methods: Two conventional lingual brackets for canines (STb light/Ormco; PSWb/Tecnident), and two self-ligating brackets, one active (In-Ovation L/GAC) and the other passive (3D/ Forestadent), were evaluated. A stainless steel archwire was used at 0°, 3° and 5° angulations. Metal ligatures, conventional elastic ligatures, and low friction elastic ligatures were also tested. A universal testing machine applied friction between brackets and wires, simulating sliding mechanics, to produce 2-mm sliding at 3 mm/minute speed. Results: Two-way analysis of variance demonstrated a significant effect of the interaction between brackets and angulations (p < 0.001). Tukey test indicated that the highest frictional resistance values were observed at 5° angulation for In-Ovation L, PSWb bracket with non conventional ligature, and STb bracket with metal ligature. As for 3D, PSWb with conventional or metal ligatures, and STb brackets with non conventional ligature, showed significantly lower static frictional resistance with 0° angulation. At 0° angulation, STb brackets with metal ties, In-Ovation L brackets and 3D brackets had the lowest frictional resistance. Conclusions: As the angulation increased from 0° to 3°, static friction resistance increased. When angulation increased from 3° to 5°, static friction resistance increased or remained the same. Self-ligating 3D and In-Ovation L brackets, as well as conventional STb brackets, seem to be the best option when sliding mechanics is used to perform lingual orthodontic treatment. PMID:27653262

  19. Friction laws at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Mo, Yifei; Turner, Kevin T; Szlufarska, Izabela

    2009-02-26

    Macroscopic laws of friction do not generally apply to nanoscale contacts. Although continuum mechanics models have been predicted to break down at the nanoscale, they continue to be applied for lack of a better theory. An understanding of how friction force depends on applied load and contact area at these scales is essential for the design of miniaturized devices with optimal mechanical performance. Here we use large-scale molecular dynamics simulations with realistic force fields to establish friction laws in dry nanoscale contacts. We show that friction force depends linearly on the number of atoms that chemically interact across the contact. By defining the contact area as being proportional to this number of interacting atoms, we show that the macroscopically observed linear relationship between friction force and contact area can be extended to the nanoscale. Our model predicts that as the adhesion between the contacting surfaces is reduced, a transition takes place from nonlinear to linear dependence of friction force on load. This transition is consistent with the results of several nanoscale friction experiments. We demonstrate that the breakdown of continuum mechanics can be understood as a result of the rough (multi-asperity) nature of the contact, and show that roughness theories of friction can be applied at the nanoscale.

  20. A method for correlating the diameter and concentration effects on friction and heat transfer in drag-reducing flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Hyung K.; Ghajar, Afshin J.

    1988-06-01

    Friction and heat transfer data for three concentrations (100, 300, and 500 ppm) of a water-soluble polymer (Polyox WSR-301) and two pipe diameters (1.11 and 1.88 cm I.D.) are presented. The friction data are correlated by a single curve using the correlation method developed by Astarita et al. for drag reduction. This method is extended to the case of heat transfer reduction. Using the proposed method, all the heat transfer data also correlates by a single curve.

  1. Friction at small displacement.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W. E.; Aronstein, J.

    1972-01-01

    Low contact resistance between metal surfaces is often observed in spite of interposed lubricant and/or oxide films. To study this effect an apparatus is used with which normal force and tangential microdisplacement are applied between a small lead rider and a gold flat with various surface film conditions. Under nonoxidized and nonlubricated conditions, and with either oxide or stearic acid lubricant film alone, friction is high and contact resistance is low. With oxide and lubricant together, friction is much lower and slide is smooth, but contact resistance remains low and Ohm's law is obeyed. The results are consistent with Greenwood's theory of contact resistance for a cluster of minute metallic contact spots within the load-supporting area. The contact resistance of such a cluster is indistinguishable, for practical purposes, from that given by complete metallic contact.

  2. Non-contact electromagnetic exciter design with linear control method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin; Xiong, Xianzhi; Xu, Hua

    2017-01-01

    A non-contact type force actuator is necessary for studying the dynamic performance of a high-speed spindle system owing to its high-speed operating conditions. A non-contact electromagnetic exciter is designed for identifying the dynamic coefficients of journal bearings in high-speed grinding spindles. A linear force control method is developed based on PID controller. The influence of amplitude and frequency of current, misalignment and rotational speed on magnetic field and excitation force is investigated based on two-dimensional finite element analysis. The electromagnetic excitation force is measured with the auxiliary coils and calibrated by load cells. The design is validated by the experimental results. Theoretical and experimental investigations show that the proposed design can accurately generate linear excitation force with sufficiently large amplitude and higher signal to noise ratio. Moreover, the fluctuations in force amplitude are reduced to a greater extent with the designed linear control method even when the air gap changes due to the rotor vibration at high-speed conditions. Besides, it is possible to apply various types of excitations: constant, synchronous, and non-synchronous excitation forces based on the proposed linear control method. This exciter can be used as linear-force exciting and controlling system for dynamic performance study of different high-speed rotor-bearing systems.

  3. Atomistics of friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, M.

    2006-03-01

    When two solid bodies contact and slide against each other, a frictional phenomenon occurs. There have been two models for the origin of the friction forces: the surface roughness model and Tomlinson's model. The surface roughness model explains the origin of the static friction force; contacting solid surfaces are so rough that surface asperities are mechanically locked against the gravitational force. From an atomistic point of view, Tomlinson explained a mechanism of the energy dissipation for the origin of the dynamic friction force. The atomistic mechanisms are described for the origin of the static and the dynamic friction forces, based on the theoretical conclusion that Tomlinson's mechanism is unlikely to occur in realistic frictional systems. The mechanism for the origin of the static friction force resembles the mechanical locking mechanism in a surface roughness model. The origin of the dynamic friction force is formulated as a problem of how the given translational kinetic energy dissipates into the internal relative motions of constituent atoms of bodies during sliding. From studying the available phase space volume of the translational motion becomes negligibly small for a large system size, compared with that of the internal motions, it is concluded that the energy dissipation occurs irreversibly from the translational motion to the internal motions. The comparison of the atomistic mechanisms with the surface roughness model and Tomlinson's model is discussed. A phenomenon of superlubricity, where two solid bodies move relatively with no resistance, is discussed.

  4. Contact sensing from force measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bicchi, Antonio; Salisbury, J. K.; Brock, David L.

    1993-01-01

    This article addresses contact sensing (i.e., the problem of resolving the location of a contact, the force at the interface, and the moment about the contact normals). Called 'intrinsic' contact sensing for the use of internal force and torque measurements, this method allows for practical devices that provide simple, relevant contact information in practical robotic applications. Such sensors have been used in conjunction with robot hands to identify objects, determine surface friction, detect slip, augment grasp stability, measure object mass, probe surfaces, and control collision and for a variety of other useful tasks. This article describes the theoretical basis for their operation and provides a framework for future device design.

  5. A hybrid PSO-SVM-based method for predicting the friction coefficient between aircraft tire and coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Liwei; Li, Chengwei

    2017-02-01

    A hybrid PSO-SVM-based model is proposed to predict the friction coefficient between aircraft tire and coating. The presented hybrid model combines a support vector machine (SVM) with particle swarm optimization (PSO) technique. SVM has been adopted to solve regression problems successfully. Its regression accuracy is greatly related to optimizing parameters such as the regularization constant C , the parameter gamma γ corresponding to RBF kernel and the epsilon parameter \\varepsilon in the SVM training procedure. However, the friction coefficient which is predicted based on SVM has yet to be explored between aircraft tire and coating. The experiment reveals that drop height and tire rotational speed are the factors affecting friction coefficient. Bearing in mind, the friction coefficient can been predicted using the hybrid PSO-SVM-based model by the measured friction coefficient between aircraft tire and coating. To compare regression accuracy, a grid search (GS) method and a genetic algorithm (GA) are used to optimize the relevant parameters (C , γ and \\varepsilon ), respectively. The regression accuracy could be reflected by the coefficient of determination ({{R}2} ). The result shows that the hybrid PSO-RBF-SVM-based model has better accuracy compared with the GS-RBF-SVM- and GA-RBF-SVM-based models. The agreement of this model (PSO-RBF-SVM) with experiment data confirms its good performance.

  6. Low-Friction Joint for Robot Fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, C. F.

    1985-01-01

    Mechanical linkage allows adjacent parts to move relative to each other with low friction and with no chatter, slipping, or backlash. Low-friction joint of two surfaces in rolling contact, held in alinement by taut flexible bands. No sliding friction or "stick-slip" motion: Only rolling-contact and bending friction within bands. Proposed linkage intended for finger joints in mechanical hands for robots and manipulators.

  7. Application of laser ultrasonic method for on-line monitoring of friction stir spot welding process.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kuanshuang; Zhou, Zhenggan; Zhou, Jianghua

    2015-09-01

    Application of a laser ultrasonic method is developed for on-line monitoring of the friction stir spot welding (FSSW) process. Based on the technology of FSSW, laser-generated ultrasonic waves in a good weld and nonweld area are simulated by a finite element method. The reflected and transmitted waves are analyzed to disclose the properties of the welded interface. The noncontact-laser ultrasonic-inspection system was established to verify the numerical results. The reflected waves in the good-weld and nonweld area can be distinguished by time-of-flight. The transmitted waves evidently attenuate in the nonweld area in contrast to signal amplitude in the good weld area because of interfacial impedance difference. Laser ultrasonic C-scan images can sufficiently evaluate the intrinsic character of the weld area in comparison with traditional water-immersion ultrasonic testing results. The research results confirm that laser ultrasonics would be an effective method to realize the characterization of FSSW defects.

  8. Geometrical and Friction Properties of Perennial Grasses and Their Weeds in View of an Electro-Separation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalyshyn, Stepan J.; Dadak, Viktor O.; Sokolyk, Vitalij V.; Grundas, Stanisław; Stasiak, Mateusz; Tys, Jerzy

    2015-04-01

    Many seed mixtures of herbs are difficult to separate. This is confirmed by studies determining the basic geometrical and friction properties of the seeds of perennial grasses and seeds of their weeds. The results show that in most cases the value of their geometrical parameters (length, thickness, and width) and friction properties (friction coefficients for different external surfaces of internal friction coefficients) are substantially similar and differ slightly among each other. This is the evidence that these properties are impractical to use in the process of separation as signs of divisibility. In the paper, a method for electro-separation of seed mixtures of herbs based on the use of complex physical, mechanical properties and electrical components in the separation are presented. The electric field that acts as an additional working body allows considering the surface conditions and biological status of seed mixtures of particles and significantly expands the functionality of the separators. Confirmation of the effectiveness of the proposed method for separation can be seen in the example of purification of red clover and sorrel seeds. By imposition of an electric field on an inclined moving separating plane, we can completely separate weed seeds from the main crop. The results confirm the effectiveness of the electro-separating method.

  9. Paleointensities From a Baked Contact: a Multi-Method Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnel, H.; Herrero-Bervera, E.; Hill, M. J.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The baked contact test is traditionally used to prove the origin of a NRM in old rocks. It consists in the comparison of the NRM from an igneous rock with that of the rock which has been reheated by that igneous rock. In the vicinity of the City of Queretaro (Mexico) such a situation is given by an upper Tertiary lava flow which has reheated profoundly underlying lake/alluvial sediments. This situation was deemed to be ideal for testing different PI methods, as the lava flow and baked sediments are thought to have different rock magnetic properties, but should have recorded the same paleointensity. As the success of paleointensity experiments is often dependent on the rock magnetic properties, such a situation may provide information about the conditions that may be responsible for the success or failure in a particular PI method. The PI methods applied to the lava and sediment rocks are: Thellier-Coe, microwave, multi-specimen pTRM, LTD-DHT Shaw.

  10. A novel monitoring method of wet friction clutches based on the post-lockup torsional vibration signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ompusunggu, Agusmian Partogi; Papy, Jean-Michel; Vandenplas, Steve; Sas, Paul; Van Brussel, Hendrik

    2013-02-01

    Wet friction clutches play a critical role in vehicles equipped with automatic transmissions, power shift transmissions and limited slip differentials. An unexpected failure occurring in these components can therefore lead to an unexpected total breakdown of the vehicle. This undesirable situation can put human safety at risk, possibly cause long-term vehicle down times, and result in high maintenance costs. In order to minimize the negative impacts caused by the unexpected breakdown, an optimal maintenance scheme driven by accurate condition monitoring and prognostics therefore needs to be developed and implemented for wet friction clutches. In this paper, the development of a condition monitoring system that can serve as a basis for health prognostics of wet friction clutches with a focus in heavy duty vehicle applications is presented. The developed method is based on monitoring the dominant modal parameters extracted from the torsional vibration response occurring in the post-lockup phase, i.e. just after the clutch is fully engaged. These modal parameters, namely the damped torsional natural frequency fd and the decay factor σ, are computed based on the pre-filtered Hankel Total Least Squares (HTLS) method which has an excellent performance in estimating the parameters of transient signals with a relatively short duration. In order to experimentally validate the proposed monitoring method, accelerated life tests were carried out on five different paper-based wet friction clutches using a fully instrumented SAE#2 test setup. The dominant modal parameters extracted from the post-lockup velocity signals are then plotted in function of the service life (duty cycle) of the tested clutches. All the plots exhibit distinct trends that can be associated with the progression of the clutch degradation. Therefore, the proposed quantities can be seen as relevant features that may enable us to monitor and assess the condition of wet friction clutches. Since velocity sensor

  11. Friction damping of two-dimensional motion and its application in vibration control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menq, C.-H.; Chidamparam, P.; Griffin, J. H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents an approximate method for analyzing the two-dimensional friction contact problem so as to compute the dynamic response of a structure constrained by friction interfaces. The friction force at the joint is formulated based on the Coulomb model. The single-term harmonic balance scheme, together with the receptance approach of decoupling the effect of the friction force on the structure from those of the external forces has been utilized to obtain the steady state response. The computational efficiency and accuracy of the method are demonstrated by comparing the results with long-term time solutions.

  12. Nanoindentation study of buckling and friction of silicon nanolines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhiquan

    Silicon-based nanostructures are essential building blocks for nanoelectronic devices and nano-electromechanical systems (NEMS). As the silicon device size continues to scale down, the surface to volume ratio becomes larger, rendering the properties of surfaces and interfaces more important for improving the properties of the nano-devices and systems. One of those properties is the friction, which is important in controlling the functionality and reliability of the nano-device and systems. The goal of this dissertation is to investigate the deformation and friction behaviors of single crystalline silicon nanolines (SiNLs) using nanoindentation techniques. Following an introduction and a summary of the theoretical background of contact friction in Chapters 1 and 2, the results of this thesis are presented in three chapters. In Chapter 3, the fabrication of the silicon nanolines is described. The fabrication method yielded high-quality single-crystals with line width ranging from 30nm to 90nm and height to width aspect ratio ranging from 10 to 25. These SiNL structures have properties and dimensions well suited for the study of the mechanical and friction behaviors at the nanoscale. In Chapter 4, we describe the study of the mechanical properties of SiNLs using the nanoindentation method. The loading-displacement curves show that the critical load to induce the buckling of the SiNLs can be correlated to the contact friction and geometry of SiNLs. A map was built as a guideline to describe the selection of buckling modes. The map was divided into three regions where different regions correlate to different buckling modes including Mode I, Mode II and sliding-bending of SiNLs. In Chapter 5, we describe the study of the contact friction of the SiNL structures. The friction coefficient at the contact was extracted from the load-displacement curves. Subsequently, the frictional shear stress was evaluated. In addition, the effect of the interface between the indenter and

  13. Friction and wear in surface micromachined tribological test devices

    SciTech Connect

    Senft, D.C.; Dugger, M.T.

    1997-08-01

    We report on the design, construction, and initial testing of surface micromachined devices for measuring friction and wear. The devices measure friction coefficients on both horizontal deposited polysilicon surfaces and vertical etched polysilicon surfaces. The contact geometry of the rubbing surfaces is well-defined, and a method is presented for the determination of the normal and frictional forces. Initial observations on test devices which have been dried with supercritical CO{sub 2} and devices coated with octadecyltrichlorosilane suggest that the coatings increase the lifetime of the devices and the repeatability of the results.

  14. High fidelity frictional models for MEMS.

    SciTech Connect

    Carpick, Robert W.; Reedy, Earl David, Jr.; Bitsie, Fernando; de Boer, Maarten Pieter; Corwin, Alex David; Ashurst, William Robert; Jones, Reese E.; Subhash, Ghatu S.; Street, Mark D.; Sumali, Anton Hartono; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Starr, Michael James; Redmond, James Michael; Flater, Erin E.

    2004-10-01

    The primary goals of the present study are to: (1) determine how and why MEMS-scale friction differs from friction on the macro-scale, and (2) to begin to develop a capability to perform finite element simulations of MEMS materials and components that accurately predicts response in the presence of adhesion and friction. Regarding the first goal, a newly developed nanotractor actuator was used to measure friction between molecular monolayer-coated, polysilicon surfaces. Amontons law does indeed apply over a wide range of forces. However, at low loads, which are of relevance to MEMS, there is an important adhesive contribution to the normal load that cannot be neglected. More importantly, we found that at short sliding distances, the concept of a coefficient of friction is not relevant; rather, one must invoke the notion of 'pre-sliding tangential deflections' (PSTD). Results of a simple 2-D model suggests that PSTD is a cascade of small-scale slips with a roughly constant number of contacts equilibrating the applied normal load. Regarding the second goal, an Adhesion Model and a Junction Model have been implemented in PRESTO, Sandia's transient dynamics, finite element code to enable asperity-level simulations. The Junction Model includes a tangential shear traction that opposes the relative tangential motion of contacting surfaces. An atomic force microscope (AFM)-based method was used to measure nano-scale, single asperity friction forces as a function of normal force. This data is used to determine Junction Model parameters. An illustrative simulation demonstrates the use of the Junction Model in conjunction with a mesh generated directly from an atomic force microscope (AFM) image to directly predict frictional response of a sliding asperity. Also with regards to the second goal, grid-level, homogenized models were studied. One would like to perform a finite element analysis of a MEMS component assuming nominally flat surfaces and to include the effect of

  15. A method for improved accuracy in three dimensions for determining wheel/rail contact points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xinwen; Gu, Shaojie; Zhou, Shunhua; Zhou, Yu; Lian, Songliang

    2015-11-01

    Searching for the contact points between wheels and rails is important because these points represent the points of exerted contact forces. In order to obtain an accurate contact point and an in-depth description of the wheel/rail contact behaviours on a curved track or in a turnout, a method with improved accuracy in three dimensions is proposed to determine the contact points and the contact patches between the wheel and the rail when considering the effect of the yaw angle and the roll angle on the motion of the wheel set. The proposed method, with no need of the curve fitting of the wheel and rail profiles, can accurately, directly, and comprehensively determine the contact interface distances between the wheel and the rail. The range iteration algorithm is used to improve the computation efficiency and reduce the calculation required. The present computation method is applied for the analysis of the contact of rails of CHINA (CHN) 75 kg/m and wheel sets of wearing type tread of China's freight cars. In addition, it can be proved that the results of the proposed method are consistent with that of Kalker's program CONTACT, and the maximum deviation from the wheel/rail contact patch area of this two methods is approximately 5%. The proposed method, can also be used to investigate static wheel/rail contact. Some wheel/rail contact points and contact patch distributions are discussed and assessed, wheel and rail non-worn and worn profiles included.

  16. Non-contact method for characterization of a rotational table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Moure Shattuck, Judson, III; Parisi, Vincent M.; Smerdon, Arryn J.

    2007-04-01

    The United States Air Force (USAF) uses and evaluates a variety of helmet-mounted trackers for incorporation into their high performance aircraft. The primary head tracker technologies commercially available are magnetic trackers, inertial trackers, and optical trackers. Each head tracker has a unique method of determining the pilot's head position within the cockpit of the aircraft. Magnetic trackers generally have a small head mounted size and minimal head weight. Because they sense a generated magnetic field, their accuracy can be affected by other magnetic fields or ferrous components within the cockpit. Inertial trackers cover the entire head motion box but require constant motion in order to accommodate drifting of the inertial sensors or a secondary system that updates the inertial system, often referred to as a hybrid system. Although optical head trackers (OHT) are immune to magnetic fields some of their limitations may be daylight/night vision goggle (NVG) compatibility issues and, depending on system configuration, may require numerous emitters and/or receivers to cover a large head motion box and provide a wide field of regard. The Dynamic Tracker Test Fixture (DTTF) was designed by the Helmet Mounted Sensory Technology (HMST) laboratory to accurately measure azimuth rotation in both static and dynamic conditions for the purpose of determining the accuracy of a variety of head trackers. Before the DTTF could be used as an evaluation tool, it required characterization to determine the amount and location of any induced elevation or roll as the table rotated in azimuth. Optimally, the characterization method would not affect the DTTF's movement so a non-contact method was devised. This paper describes the characterization process and its results.

  17. Frictional conditions between alloy AA6060 aluminium and tool steel

    SciTech Connect

    Wideroee, Fredrik; Welo, Torgeir

    2011-05-04

    The frictional conditions in the new process of screw extrusion of aluminium have been investigated. The contact behaviour between the aluminum alloy and the tool steel in the extruder is vital for understanding the extrusion process. Using a compressive-rotational method for frictional measurements the conditions for unlubricated sticking friction between aluminum alloy AA6060 and tool steel at different combinations of temperatures and pressures have been investigated. In this method the samples in the form of disks are put under hydrostatic pressure while simultaneously being rotated at one end. Pins made from contrast material have been inserted into the samples to measure the deformation introduced. This approach along with 3D simulations form a method for determining the frictional conditions. The paper describes the test method and the results. It was found that the necessary pressure for sticking to occur between the aluminum AA6060 and the different parts of the extruder is heavily influenced by the temperature.

  18. Friction and fracture.

    PubMed

    Gerde, E; Marder, M

    2001-09-20

    Consider a block placed on a table and pushed sideways until it begins to slide. Amontons and Coulomb found that the force required to initiate sliding is proportional to the weight of the block (the constant of proportionality being the static coefficient of friction), but independent of the area of contact. This is commonly explained by asserting that, owing to the presence of asperities on the two surfaces, the actual area in physical contact is much smaller than it seems, and grows in proportion to the applied compressive force. Here we present an alternative picture of the static friction coefficient, which starts with an atomic description of surfaces in contact and then employs a multiscale analysis technique to describe how sliding occurs for large objects. We demonstrate the existence of self-healing cracks that have been postulated to solve geophysical paradoxes about heat generated by earthquakes, and we show that, when such cracks are present at the atomic scale, they result in solids that slip in accord with Coulomb's law of friction. We expect that this mechanism for friction will be found to operate at many length scales, and that our approach for connecting atomic and continuum descriptions will enable more realistic first-principles calculations of friction coefficients.

  19. Apparatus and method to reduce wear and friction between CMC-to-metal attachment and interface

    SciTech Connect

    Cairo, Ronald Ralph; Parolini, Jason Robert; Delvaux, John McConnell

    2016-11-22

    An apparatus to reduce wear and friction between CMC-to-metal attachment and interface, including a metal layer configured for insertion between a surface interface between a CMC component and a metal component. The surface interface of the metal layer is compliant relative to asperities of the surface interface of the CMC component. A coefficient of friction between the surface interface of the CMC component and the metal component is about 1.0 or less at an operating temperature between about 300.degree. C. to about 325.degree. C. and a limiting temperature of the metal component.

  20. SEMICONDUCTOR TECHNOLOGY A signal processing method for the friction-based endpoint detection system of a CMP process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Xu; Dongming, Guo; Zhuji, Jin; Renke, Kang

    2010-12-01

    A signal processing method for the friction-based endpoint detection system of a chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) process is presented. The signal process method uses the wavelet threshold denoising method to reduce the noise contained in the measured original signal, extracts the Kalman filter innovation from the denoised signal as the feature signal, and judges the CMP endpoint based on the feature of the Kalman filter innovation sequence during the CMP process. Applying the signal processing method, the endpoint detection experiments of the Cu CMP process were carried out. The results show that the signal processing method can judge the endpoint of the Cu CMP process.

  1. General theory of frictional heating with application to rubber friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortunato, G.; Ciaravola, V.; Furno, A.; Lorenz, B.; Persson, B. N. J.

    2015-05-01

    The energy dissipation in the contact regions between solids in sliding contact can result in high local temperatures which may strongly effect friction and wear. This is the case for rubber sliding on road surfaces at speeds above 1 mm s-1. We derive equations which describe the frictional heating for solids with arbitrary thermal properties. The theory is applied to rubber friction on road surfaces and we take into account that the frictional energy is partly produced inside the rubber due to the internal friction of rubber and in a thin (nanometer) interfacial layer at the rubber-road contact region. The heat transfer between the rubber and the road surface is described by a heat transfer coefficient which depends on the sliding speed. Numerical results are presented and compared to experimental data. We find that frictional heating results in a kinetic friction force which depends on the orientation of the sliding block, thus violating one of the two basic Leonardo da Vinci ‘laws’ of friction.

  2. Wildlife contact analysis: Emerging methods, questions, and challenges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cross, Paul C.; Creech, Tyler G.; Ebinger, Michael R.; Heisey, Dennis M.; Irvine, Kathryn M.; Creel, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Recent technological advances, such as proximity loggers, allow researchers to collect complete interaction histories, day and night, among sampled individuals over several months to years. Social network analyses are an obvious approach to analyzing interaction data because of their flexibility for fitting many different social structures as well as the ability to assess both direct contacts and indirect associations via intermediaries. For many network properties, however, it is not clear whether estimates based upon a sample of the network are reflective of the entire network. In wildlife applications, networks may be poorly sampled and boundary effects will be common. We present an alternative approach that utilizes a hierarchical modeling framework to assess the individual, dyadic, and environmental factors contributing to variation in the interaction rates and allows us to estimate the underlying process variation in each. In a disease control context, this approach will allow managers to focus efforts on those types of individuals and environments that contribute the most toward super-spreading events. We account for the sampling distribution of proximity loggers and the non-independence of contacts among groups by only using contact data within a group during days when the group membership of proximity loggers was known. This allows us to separate the two mechanisms responsible for a pair not contacting one another: they were not in the same group or they were in the same group but did not come within the specified contact distance. We illustrate our approach with an example dataset of female elk from northwestern Wyoming and conclude with a number of important future research directions.

  3. A method to measure internal contact angle in opaque systems by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Weiqin; Tian, Ye; Gao, Xuefeng; Jiang, Lei

    2013-07-23

    Internal contact angle is an important parameter for internal wettability characterization. However, due to the limitation of optical imaging, methods available for contact angle measurement are only suitable for transparent or open systems. For most of the practical situations that require contact angle measurement in opaque or enclosed systems, the traditional methods are not effective. Based upon the requirement, a method suitable for contact angle measurement in nontransparent systems is developed by employing MRI technology. In the Article, the method is demonstrated by measuring internal contact angles in opaque cylindrical tubes. It proves that the method also shows great feasibility in transparent situations and opaque capillary systems. By using the method, contact angle in opaque systems could be measured successfully, which is significant in understanding the wetting behaviors in nontransparent systems and calculating interfacial parameters in enclosed systems.

  4. New method for evaluation of hard contact lens materials with regard to cell injury by dynamic contact.

    PubMed

    Iguchi, I; Kamiyama, K; Ohashi, T; Wang, X; Imanishi, J

    1996-11-01

    To establish a new method for evaluation of contact lens materials, we studied the porcine endothelial cell injury caused by dynamic contact (rotatory rubbing) with three kinds of hard contact lenses (HCL). The HCLs used were 1) PMMA HCL, 2) oxygen-permeable HCL composed of a graft copolymer of dextran derivative and methylmethacrylate (MMA) (Suncon Mild II, 12 Dk), and 3) oxygen-permeable-HCL composed of a copolymer of a monomer containing silicone, a monomer containing fluorine, and MMA (RGPL-A, 216 Dk). Cell injury rates were significantly different among these HCLs (Suncon Mild II < PMMA < RGPL-A) although there were no differences in rotatory rubbing forces. The smoothness of HCL surface, the qualities of injured cell layers observed by scanning electron microscopy, and the water wettability of HCLs were not correlated with cell injury rate. These results suggest that physicochemical properties of materials other than rotatory rubbing force, smoothness, and water wettability were involved in the cell injury. Our evaluation method for biomaterials that injure the corneal endothelial cells by dynamic contact should be very useful for the development of biomaterials or medical devices, including HCLs and intracardiac and urethral catheters.

  5. Method of making a back contacted solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Gee, James M.

    1995-01-01

    A back-contacted solar cell having laser-drilled vias connecting the front-surface carrier-collector junction to an electrode grid on the back surface. The structure may also include a rear surface carrier-collector junction connected to the same grid. The substrate is connected to a second grid which is interdigitated with the first. Both grids are configured for easy series connection with neighboring cells. Several processes are disclosed to produce the cell.

  6. Method of making a back contacted solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Gee, J.M.

    1995-11-21

    A back-contacted solar cell is described having laser-drilled vias connecting the front-surface carrier-collector junction to an electrode grid on the back surface. The structure may also include a rear surface carrier-collector junction connected to the same grid. The substrate is connected to a second grid which is interdigitated with the first. Both grids are configured for easy series connection with neighboring cells. Several processes are disclosed to produce the cell. 2 figs.

  7. Dependence of friction on roughness, velocity, and temperature.

    PubMed

    Sang, Yi; Dubé, Martin; Grant, Martin

    2008-03-01

    We study the dependence of friction on surface roughness, sliding velocity, and temperature. Expanding on the classic treatment of Greenwood and Williamson, we show that the fractal nature of a surface has little influence on the real area of contact and the static friction coefficient. A simple scaling argument shows that the static friction exhibits a weak anomaly mu ~ A(0)(-chi/4), where A0 is the apparent area and chi is the roughness exponent of the surface. We then develop a method to calculate atomic-scale friction between a microscopic asperity, such as the tip of a friction force microscope (FFM) and a solid substrate. This method, based on the thermal activation of the FFM tip, allows a quantitative extraction of all the relevant microscopic parameters and reveals a universal scaling behavior of atomic friction on velocity and temperature. This method is extended to include a soft atomic substrate in order to simulate FFM scans more realistically. The tip is connected with the support of the cantilever by an ideal spring and the substrate is simulated with a ball-spring model. The tip and substrate are coupled with repulsive potentials. Simulations are done at different temperatures and scanning velocities on substrates with different elastic moduli. Stick-slip motion of the tip is observed, and the numerical results of the friction force and distribution of force maxima match the theoretical framework.

  8. Iliotibial band friction syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Published articles on iliotibial band friction syndrome have been reviewed. These articles cover the epidemiology, etiology, anatomy, pathology, prevention, and treatment of the condition. This article describes (1) the various etiological models that have been proposed to explain iliotibial band friction syndrome; (2) some of the imaging methods, research studies, and clinical experiences that support or call into question these various models; (3) commonly proposed treatment methods for iliotibial band friction syndrome; and (4) the rationale behind these methods and the clinical outcome studies that support their efficacy. PMID:21063495

  9. Solid friction between soft filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Andrew; Hilitski, Feodor; Schwenger, Walter; Welch, David; Lau, A. W. C.; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Mahadevan, L.; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-06-01

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments’ overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes’s drag, can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. Our findings demonstrate how altering a filament’s elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the properties of fibrous composite materials.

  10. Solid friction between soft filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Andrew; Hilitski, Feodor; Schwenger, Walter; Welch, David; Lau, A. W. C.; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Mahadevan, L.; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-03-02

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments’ overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes’s drag, can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate how altering a filament’s elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the properties of fibrous composite materials.

  11. Solid friction between soft filaments.

    PubMed

    Ward, Andrew; Hilitski, Feodor; Schwenger, Walter; Welch, David; Lau, A W C; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Mahadevan, L; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-06-01

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments' overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes's drag, can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. Our findings demonstrate how altering a filament's elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the properties of fibrous composite materials.

  12. A study of gas sensing behavior of metal-graphene contact with transfer length method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Quanfu; Liu, Weihua; Cao, Guiming; Li, Xin; Wang, Xiaoli

    2016-05-01

    The gas sensing behavior of a metal-graphene contact is investigated by transfer length method (TLM). By simultaneously measuring the resistance of all channels in a TLM device, the time evolution of the metal-graphene contact resistance and the graphene sheet resistance are obtained. When the device is exposed to 10 ppm ammonia, the response time of the nickel-graphene contact resistance is only one-third of the pure sheet resistance, and the sensitivity of the contact resistance is about 180% and that of the graphene sheet resistance is 100%. The results of this work indicate that the contact resistance can be an effective gas sensing parameter.

  13. Porous media characterization by the two-liquid method: effect of dynamic contact angle and inertia.

    PubMed

    Lavi, Becky; Marmur, Abraham; Bachmann, Joerg

    2008-03-04

    The validity of using the Lucas-Washburn (LW) equation for porous media characterization by the two-liquid capillary penetration method was tested numerically and experimentally. A cylindrical capillary of known radius and contact angle was used as a model system for the tests. It was found that using the LW equation (i.e., ignoring inertia and dynamic contact angle effects) may lead to very erroneous assessment of the capillary radius and the equilibrium contact angle, for a relatively wide range of capillary radii and equilibrium contact angles. A correct assessment requires the application of a penetration kinetics equation that considers inertia and the dynamic contact angle.

  14. Adhesion energy between mica surfaces: Implications for the frictional coefficient under dry and wet conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakuma, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    frictional strength of faults is a critical factor that contributes to continuous fault slip and earthquake occurrence. Frictional strength can be reduced by the presence of sheet-structured clay minerals. In this study, two important factors influencing the frictional coefficient of minerals were quantitatively analyzed by a newly developed computational method based on a combination of first-principles study and thermodynamics. One factor that helps reduce the frictional coefficient is the low adhesion energy between the layers under dry conditions. Potassium ions on mica surfaces are easily exchanged with sodium ions when brought into contact with highly concentrated sodium-halide solutions. We found that the surface ion exchange with sodium ions reduces the adhesion energy, indicating that the frictional coefficient can be reduced under dry conditions. Another factor is the lubrication caused by adsorbed water films on mineral surfaces under wet conditions. Potassium and sodium ions on mica surfaces have a strong affinity for water molecules. In order to remove the adsorbed water molecules confined between mica surfaces, a differential compressive stress of the order of tens of gigapascals was necessary at room temperature. These water molecules inhibit direct contact between mineral surfaces and reduce the frictional coefficient. Our results imply that the frictional coefficient can be modified through contact with fluids depending on their salt composition. The low adhesion energy between fault-forming minerals and the presence of an adsorbed water film is a possible reason for the low frictional coefficient observed at continuous fault slip zones.

  15. Friction plug welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeshita, Riki (Inventor); Hibbard, Terry L. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Friction plug welding (FPW) usage is advantageous for friction stir welding (FSW) hole close-outs and weld repairs in 2195 Al--Cu--Li fusion or friction stir welds. Current fusion welding methods of Al--Cu--Li have produced welds containing varied defects. These areas are found by non-destructive examination both after welding and after proof testing. Current techniques for repairing typically small (<0.25) defects weaken the weldment, rely heavily on welders' skill, and are costly. Friction plug welding repairs increase strength, ductility and resistance to cracking over initial weld quality, without requiring much time or operator skill. Friction plug welding while pulling the plug is advantageous because all hardware for performing the weld can be placed on one side of the workpiece.

  16. Static friction between rigid fractal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Marroquin, Fernando; Huang, Pengyu; Hanaor, Dorian A H; Flores-Johnson, E A; Proust, Gwénaëlle; Gan, Yixiang; Shen, Luming

    2015-09-01

    Using spheropolygon-based simulations and contact slope analysis, we investigate the effects of surface topography and atomic scale friction on the macroscopically observed friction between rigid blocks with fractal surface structures. From our mathematical derivation, the angle of macroscopic friction is the result of the sum of the angle of atomic friction and the slope angle between the contact surfaces. The latter is obtained from the determination of all possible contact slopes between the two surface profiles through an alternative signature function. Our theory is validated through numerical simulations of spheropolygons with fractal Koch surfaces and is applied to the description of frictional properties of Weierstrass-Mandelbrot surfaces. The agreement between simulations and theory suggests that for interpreting macroscopic frictional behavior, the descriptors of surface morphology should be defined from the signature function rather than from the slopes of the contacting surfaces.

  17. Static friction between rigid fractal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Marroquin, Fernando; Huang, Pengyu; Hanaor, Dorian A. H.; Flores-Johnson, E. A.; Proust, Gwénaëlle; Gan, Yixiang; Shen, Luming

    2015-09-01

    Using spheropolygon-based simulations and contact slope analysis, we investigate the effects of surface topography and atomic scale friction on the macroscopically observed friction between rigid blocks with fractal surface structures. From our mathematical derivation, the angle of macroscopic friction is the result of the sum of the angle of atomic friction and the slope angle between the contact surfaces. The latter is obtained from the determination of all possible contact slopes between the two surface profiles through an alternative signature function. Our theory is validated through numerical simulations of spheropolygons with fractal Koch surfaces and is applied to the description of frictional properties of Weierstrass-Mandelbrot surfaces. The agreement between simulations and theory suggests that for interpreting macroscopic frictional behavior, the descriptors of surface morphology should be defined from the signature function rather than from the slopes of the contacting surfaces.

  18. Allergic Contact Dermatitis to Ophthalmic Medications: Relevant Allergens and Alternative Testing Methods.

    PubMed

    Grey, Katherine R; Warshaw, Erin M

    Allergic contact dermatitis is an important cause of periorbital dermatitis. Topical ophthalmic agents are relevant sensitizers. Contact dermatitis to ophthalmic medications can be challenging to diagnose and manage given the numerous possible offending agents, including both active and inactive ingredients. Furthermore, a substantial body of literature reports false-negative patch test results to ophthalmic agents. Subsequently, numerous alternative testing methods have been described. This review outlines the periorbital manifestations, causative agents, and alternative testing methods of allergic contact dermatitis to ophthalmic medications.

  19. Static friction, differential algebraic systems and numerical stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian; Schinner, Alexander; Matuttis, Hans-Georg

    We show how Differential Algebraic Systems (Ordinary Differential Equations with algebraic constraints) in mechanics are affected by stability issues and we implement Lubich's projection method to reduce the error to practically zero. Then, we explain how the "numerically exact" implementation for static friction by Differential Algebraic Systems can be stabilized. We conclude by comparing the corresponding steps in the "Contact mechanics" introduced by Moreau.

  20. Scalar model for frictional precursors dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Taloni, Alessandro; Benassi, Andrea; Sandfeld, Stefan; Zapperi, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments indicate that frictional sliding occurs by nucleation of detachment fronts at the contact interface that may appear well before the onset of global sliding. This intriguing precursory activity is not accounted for by traditional friction theories but is extremely important for friction dominated geophysical phenomena as earthquakes, landslides or avalanches. Here we simulate the onset of slip of a three dimensional elastic body resting on a surface and show that experimentally observed frictional precursors depend in a complex non-universal way on the sample geometry and loading conditions. Our model satisfies Archard's law and Amontons' first and second laws, reproducing with remarkable precision the real contact area dynamics, the precursors' envelope dynamics prior to sliding, and the normal and shear internal stress distributions close to the interfacial surface. Moreover, it allows to assess which features can be attributed to the elastic equilibrium, and which are attributed to the out-of-equilibrium dynamics, suggesting that precursory activity is an intrinsically quasi-static physical process. A direct calculation of the evolution of the Coulomb stress before and during precursors nucleation shows large variations across the sample, explaining why earthquake forecasting methods based only on accumulated slip and Coulomb stress monitoring are often ineffective. PMID:25640079

  1. Scalar model for frictional precursors dynamics.

    PubMed

    Taloni, Alessandro; Benassi, Andrea; Sandfeld, Stefan; Zapperi, Stefano

    2015-02-02

    Recent experiments indicate that frictional sliding occurs by nucleation of detachment fronts at the contact interface that may appear well before the onset of global sliding. This intriguing precursory activity is not accounted for by traditional friction theories but is extremely important for friction dominated geophysical phenomena as earthquakes, landslides or avalanches. Here we simulate the onset of slip of a three dimensional elastic body resting on a surface and show that experimentally observed frictional precursors depend in a complex non-universal way on the sample geometry and loading conditions. Our model satisfies Archard's law and Amontons' first and second laws, reproducing with remarkable precision the real contact area dynamics, the precursors' envelope dynamics prior to sliding, and the normal and shear internal stress distributions close to the interfacial surface. Moreover, it allows to assess which features can be attributed to the elastic equilibrium, and which are attributed to the out-of-equilibrium dynamics, suggesting that precursory activity is an intrinsically quasi-static physical process. A direct calculation of the evolution of the Coulomb stress before and during precursors nucleation shows large variations across the sample, explaining why earthquake forecasting methods based only on accumulated slip and Coulomb stress monitoring are often ineffective.

  2. Friction of atomically stepped surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikken, R. J.; Thijsse, B. J.; Nicola, L.

    2017-03-01

    The friction behavior of atomically stepped metal surfaces under contact loading is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. While real rough metal surfaces involve roughness at multiple length scales, the focus of this paper is on understanding friction of the smallest scale of roughness: atomic steps. To this end, periodic stepped Al surfaces with different step geometry are brought into contact and sheared at room temperature. Contact stress that continuously tries to build up during loading, is released with fluctuating stress drops during sliding, according to the typical stick-slip behavior. Stress release occurs not only through local slip, but also by means of step motion. The steps move along the contact, concurrently resulting in normal migration of the contact. The direction of migration depends on the sign of the step, i.e., its orientation with respect to the shearing direction. If the steps are of equal sign, there is a net migration of the entire contact accompanied by significant vacancy generation at room temperature. The stick-slip behavior of the stepped contacts is found to have all the characteristic of a self-organized critical state, with statistics dictated by step density. For the studied step geometries, frictional sliding is found to involve significant atomic rearrangement through which the contact roughness is drastically changed. This leads for certain step configurations to a marked transition from jerky sliding motion to smooth sliding, making the final friction stress approximately similar to that of a flat contact.

  3. PEBBLES Simulation of Static Friction and New Static Friction Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Joshua J. Cogliati; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2010-05-01

    Pebble bed reactors contain large numbers of spherical fuel elements arranged randomly. Determining the motion and location of these fuel elements is required for calculating certain parameters of pebble bed reactor operation. This paper documents the PEBBLES static friction model. This model uses a three dimensional differential static friction approximation extended from the two dimensional Cundall and Strack model. The derivation of determining the rotational transformation of pebble to pebble static friction force is provided. A new implementation for a differential rotation method for pebble to container static friction force has been created. Previous published methods are insufficient for pebble bed reactor geometries. A new analytical static friction benchmark is documented that can be used to verify key static friction simulation parameters. This benchmark is based on determining the exact pebble to pebble and pebble to container static friction coefficients required to maintain a stable five sphere pyramid.

  4. Indirect methods to measure wetting and contact angles on spherical convex and concave surfaces.

    PubMed

    Extrand, C W; Moon, Sung In

    2012-05-22

    In this work, a method was developed for indirectly estimating contact angles of sessile liquid drops on convex and concave surfaces. Assuming that drops were sufficiently small that no gravitational distortion occurred, equations were derived to compute intrinsic contact angles from the radius of curvature of the solid surface, the volume of the liquid drop, and its contact diameter. These expressions were tested against experimental data for various liquids on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polycarbonate (PC) in the form of flat surfaces, spheres, and concave cavities. Intrinsic contact angles estimated indirectly using dimensions and volumes generally agreed with the values measured directly from flat surfaces using the traditional tangent method.

  5. Thermal contact conductance as a method of rectification in bulk materials

    DOE PAGES

    Sayer, Robert A.

    2016-08-01

    A thermal rectifier that utilizes thermal expansion to directionally control interfacial conductance between two contacting surfaces is presented. The device consists of two thermal reservoirs contacting a beam with one rough and one smooth end. When the temperature of reservoir in contact with the smooth surface is raised, a similar temperature rise will occur in the beam, causing it to expand, thus increasing the contact pressure at the rough interface and reducing the interfacial contact resistance. However, if the temperature of the reservoir in contact with the rough interface is raised, the large contact resistance will prevent a similar temperaturemore » rise in the beam. As a result, the contact pressure will be marginally affected and the contact resistance will not change appreciably. Owing to the decreased contact resistance of the first scenario compared to the second, thermal rectification occurs. A parametric analysis is used to determine optimal device parameters including surface roughness, contact pressure, and device length. Modeling predicts that rectification factors greater than 2 are possible at thermal biases as small as 3 K. Lastly, thin surface coatings are discussed as a method to control the temperature bias at which maximum rectification occurs.« less

  6. Thermal contact conductance as a method of rectification in bulk materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sayer, Robert A.

    2016-08-01

    A thermal rectifier that utilizes thermal expansion to directionally control interfacial conductance between two contacting surfaces is presented. The device consists of two thermal reservoirs contacting a beam with one rough and one smooth end. When the temperature of reservoir in contact with the smooth surface is raised, a similar temperature rise will occur in the beam, causing it to expand, thus increasing the contact pressure at the rough interface and reducing the interfacial contact resistance. However, if the temperature of the reservoir in contact with the rough interface is raised, the large contact resistance will prevent a similar temperature rise in the beam. As a result, the contact pressure will be marginally affected and the contact resistance will not change appreciably. Owing to the decreased contact resistance of the first scenario compared to the second, thermal rectification occurs. A parametric analysis is used to determine optimal device parameters including surface roughness, contact pressure, and device length. Modeling predicts that rectification factors greater than 2 are possible at thermal biases as small as 3 K. Lastly, thin surface coatings are discussed as a method to control the temperature bias at which maximum rectification occurs.

  7. Thermal contact conductance as a method of rectification in bulk materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sayer, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    A thermal rectifier that utilizes thermal expansion to directionally control interfacial conductance between two contacting surfaces is presented. The device consists of two thermal reservoirs contacting a beam with one rough and one smooth end. When the temperature of reservoir in contact with the smooth surface is raised, a similar temperature rise will occur in the beam, causing it to expand, thus increasing the contact pressure at the rough interface and reducing the interfacial contact resistance. However, if the temperature of the reservoir in contact with the rough interface is raised, the large contact resistance will prevent a similar temperature rise in the beam. As a result, the contact pressure will be marginally affected and the contact resistance will not change appreciably. Owing to the decreased contact resistance of the first scenario compared to the second, thermal rectification occurs. A parametric analysis is used to determine optimal device parameters including surface roughness, contact pressure, and device length. Modeling predicts that rectification factors greater than 2 are possible at thermal biases as small as 3 K. Lastly, thin surface coatings are discussed as a method to control the temperature bias at which maximum rectification occurs.

  8. Screenable contact structure and method for semiconductor devices

    DOEpatents

    Ross, Bernd

    1980-08-26

    An ink composition for deposition upon the surface of a semiconductor device to provide a contact area for connection to external circuitry is disclosed, the composition comprising an ink system containing a metal powder, a binder and vehicle, and a metal frit. The ink is screened onto the semiconductor surface in the desired pattern and is heated to a temperature sufficient to cause the metal frit to become liquid. The metal frit dissolves some of the metal powder and densifies the structure by transporting the dissolved metal powder in a liquid sintering process. The sintering process typically may be carried out in any type of atmosphere. A small amount of dopant or semiconductor material may be added to the ink systems to achieve particular results if desired.

  9. Fuel cell electrode interconnect contact material encapsulation and method

    DOEpatents

    Derose, Anthony J.; Haltiner, Jr., Karl J.; Gudyka, Russell A.; Bonadies, Joseph V.; Silvis, Thomas W.

    2016-05-31

    A fuel cell stack includes a plurality of fuel cell cassettes each including a fuel cell with an anode and a cathode. Each fuel cell cassette also includes an electrode interconnect adjacent to the anode or the cathode for providing electrical communication between an adjacent fuel cell cassette and the anode or the cathode. The interconnect includes a plurality of electrode interconnect protrusions defining a flow passage along the anode or the cathode for communicating oxidant or fuel to the anode or the cathode. An electrically conductive material is disposed between at least one of the electrode interconnect protrusions and the anode or the cathode in order to provide a stable electrical contact between the electrode interconnect and the anode or cathode. An encapsulating arrangement segregates the electrically conductive material from the flow passage thereby, preventing volatilization of the electrically conductive material in use of the fuel cell stack.

  10. Friction Stir Processing for Efficient Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Mr. Christopher B. Smith; Dr. Oyelayo Ajayi

    2012-01-31

    Friction at contacting surfaces in relative motion is a major source of parasitic energy loss in machine systems and manufacturing processes. Consequently, friction reduction usually translates to efficiency gain and reduction in energy consumption. Furthermore, friction at surfaces eventually leads to wear and failure of the components thereby compromising reliability and durability. In order to reduce friction and wear in tribological components, material surfaces are often hardened by a variety of methods, including conventional heat treatment, laser surface hardening, and thin-film coatings. While these surface treatments are effective when used in conjunction with lubrication to prevent failure, they are all energy intensive and could potentially add significant cost. A new concept for surface hardening of metallic materials and components is Friction Stir Processing (FSP). Compared to the current surface hardening technologies, FSP is more energy efficient has no emission or waste by products and may result in better tribological performance. FSP involves plunging a rotating tool to a predetermined depth (case layer thickness) and translating the FSP tool along the area to be processed. This action of the tool produces heating and severe plastic deformation of the processed area. For steel the temperature is high enough to cause phase transformation, ultimately forming hard martensitic phase. Indeed, FSP has been used for surface modification of several metals and alloys so as to homogenize the microstructure and refine the grain size, both of which led to improved fatigue and corrosion resistance. Based on the effect of FSP on near-surface layer material, it was expected to have beneficial effects on friction and wear performance of metallic materials. However, little or no knowledge existed on the impact of FSP concerning friction and wear performance the subject of the this project and final report. Specifically for steel, which is the most dominant

  11. A more reliable measurement method for metal/graphene contact resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaoqing; Mao, Dacheng; Jin, Zhi; Peng, Songang; Zhang, Dayong; Shi, Jingyuan; Wang, Xuanyun

    2015-10-09

    The contact resistance of metal/graphene is becoming a major limiting factor for graphene devices. Among various kinds of contact resistance test methods, the transmission line model is the most common approach to extract contact resistance in graphene devices. However, experiments show that in some cases there exists large inaccuracy and instability using this method. In this study, we added a cross-bridge structure at the terminal of the transmission line as a supporting test. This modified transmission line measurement structure can easily compare not only the transmission line and Kelvin contact resistance, getting a more reliable value, but also the other contact-related parameters, such as specific contact resistivity, transfer length and the graphene sheet resistance under and outside contact metal at the same time. The new measurement test is very helpful in enabling us to study the contact property accurately. The specific contact resistivity in our experiment is in the range of 2.0 × 10(-6) Ω · cm(2) and 3.0 × 10(-6) Ω · cm(2) at room temperature. With the temperature decreasing from 290 K to 60 K, the transfer length fluctuates around 1.7 μm, and the specific contact resistivity reduces to less than 2.0 × 10(-6) Ω · cm(2).

  12. Dual Cylindrical Wave Laser-Doppler Method for Measurement of Skin Friction in Fluid Flow.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    viscosity models based on mean quantities were the main tools for studying turbulence during the 1920’ s and 30’ s . Measurement of mean skin friction...it loses resolution at low speeds which makes it virtually ineffective for application to a typical water channel. The physical dimensions of the...expression can be non- dimensionalized by introducing the 3 following definitions: X = X/ S •x - x/y S = S /2y (2.11) t = t /u - V/Ut The following

  13. Comparison of different methods to measure contact angles of soil colloids.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jianying; Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B; Zollars, Richard L

    2008-12-15

    We compared five different methods, static sessile drop, dynamic sessile drop, Wilhelmy plate, thin-layer wicking, and column wicking, to determine the contact angle of colloids typical for soils and sediments. The colloids (smectite, kaolinite, illite, goethite, hematite) were chosen to represent 1:1 and 2:1 layered aluminosilicate clays and sesquioxides, and were either obtained in pure form or synthesized in our laboratory. Colloids were deposited as thin films on glass slides, and then used for contact angle measurements using three different test liquids (water, formamide, diiodomethane). The colloidal films could be categorized into three types: (1) films without pores and with polar-liquid interactions (smectite), (2) films with pores and with polar-liquid interactions (kaolinite, illite, goethite), and (3) films without pores and no polar-liquid interactions (hematite). The static and dynamic sessile drop methods yielded the most consistent contact angles. For porous films, the contact angles decreased with time, and we consider the initial contact angle to be the most accurate. The differences in contact angles among the different methods were large and varied considerably: the most consistent contact angles were obtained for kaolinite with water, and illite with diiodomethane (contact angles were within 3 degrees); but mostly the differences ranged from 10 degrees to 40 degrees among the different methods. The thin-layer and column wicking methods were the least consistent methods.

  14. DYNAMIC PLANE-STRAIN SHEAR RUPTURE WITH A SLIP-WEAKENING FRICTION LAW CALCULATED BY A BOUNDARY INTEGRAL METHOD.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    A numerical boundary integral method, relating slip and traction on a plane in an elastic medium by convolution with a discretized Green function, can be linked to a slip-dependent friction law on the fault plane. Such a method is developed here in two-dimensional plane-strain geometry. Spontaneous plane-strain shear ruptures can make a transition from sub-Rayleigh to near-P propagation velocity. Results from the boundary integral method agree with earlier results from a finite difference method on the location of this transition in parameter space. The methods differ in their prediction of rupture velocity following the transition. The trailing edge of the cohesive zone propagates at the P-wave velocity after the transition in the boundary integral calculations. Refs.

  15. [Bifocal contact lenses as a correction method in presbyopia].

    PubMed

    Avetisov, S E; Rybakova, E G; Egorova, G B; Churkina, M N; Borodina, N V; Boev, V I

    2003-01-01

    A study aimed at assessing the efficiency of presbyopia correction by bifocal contact lenses (BCL) was undertaken; it envisaged a comprehensive evaluation of subjective data provided by patients and measurements of a number of functional parameters of the visual quality for far and near, including mono- and binocular measurements with BCL of different constructions versus a maximal sphero-cylindrical spectacle correction for far and for near. Soft Acuvue Bifocal BCL as well as soft and rigid BCL manufactured in the optical-and-mechanical laboratory of the Research Institute for Eye Disease of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences and Russian-made and imported bifocal soft and rigid lenses, respectively, were made use of in the study. A reduced contrast sensitivity (mainly in high frequencies) to 7% with Russian-made BCL, to 12.5% with Acuvue Bifocal BCL, to 8.7% with monofocal BCL and to 13.4% with the "mono-vision" system was registered. A decreased visual working ability to 13% with soft bifocal Russian-made BCL, to 17.3% with Acuvue Bifocal BCL and to 20.7% with the "mono-vision" system was detected versus the spectacle correction. A reduction by 25% was noted in the stereoscopic vision indices with the "mono-vision" system. A study of sensitivity to dazzling did not show any statistically reliable differences between various correction types.

  16. A method for measuring skin friction drag on a flat plate in contaminated gas flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oetting, R. B.; Patterson, G. K.

    1984-01-01

    A technique for measuring friction drag in turbulent gas and gas/particle flows over flat plates is presented, and preliminary results are reported. A 0.25-in.-thick 72 x 6-in. Al plate is suspended by six horizontal support air bearings and four vertical alignment air bearings between fixed dummy plates and leading-edge and trailing-edge fairings in the 32-in.-high 48-in.-wide 11-ft-long test section of a closed-circuit atmospheric wind tunnel operating at 50-150 ft/sec. Particles of Fe and Al oxides of diameter 20-150 microns and density up to 0.3 lb particles per lb air are injected via a 6 x 0.167-in. nozzle; turbulence is induced by a roughened section of the leading-edge fairing; and friction drag is measured using a load-cell pressure transducer. Sample results are shown in a graph, demonstrating good agreement with theoretical drag calculations.

  17. A transmission line method for evaluation of vertical InAs nanowire contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, M.; Svensson, J.; Lind, E.; Wernersson, L.-E.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we present a method for metal contact characterization to vertical semiconductor nanowires using the transmission line method (TLM) on a cylindrical geometry. InAs nanowire resistors are fabricated on Si substrates using a hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ) spacer between the bottom and top contact. The thickness of the HSQ is defined by the dose of an electron beam lithography step, and by varying the separation thickness for a group of resistors, a TLM series is fabricated. Using this method, the resistivity and specific contact resistance are determined for InAs nanowires with different doping and annealing conditions. The contacts are shown to improve with annealing at temperatures up to 300 °C for 1 min, with specific contact resistance values reaching down to below 1 Ω µm2.

  18. A transmission line method for evaluation of vertical InAs nanowire contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, M. Svensson, J. Lind, E. Wernersson, L.-E.

    2015-12-07

    In this paper, we present a method for metal contact characterization to vertical semiconductor nanowires using the transmission line method (TLM) on a cylindrical geometry. InAs nanowire resistors are fabricated on Si substrates using a hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ) spacer between the bottom and top contact. The thickness of the HSQ is defined by the dose of an electron beam lithography step, and by varying the separation thickness for a group of resistors, a TLM series is fabricated. Using this method, the resistivity and specific contact resistance are determined for InAs nanowires with different doping and annealing conditions. The contacts are shown to improve with annealing at temperatures up to 300 °C for 1 min, with specific contact resistance values reaching down to below 1 Ω µm{sup 2}.

  19. Method for manufacturing electrical contacts for a thin-film semiconductor device

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.; Dickson, Charles R.; D'Aiello, Robert V.

    1988-11-08

    A method of fabricating spaced-apart back contacts on a thin film of semiconductor material by forming strips of buffer material on top of the semiconductor material in locations corresponding to the desired dividing lines between back contacts, forming a film of metal substantially covering the semiconductor material and buffer strips, and scribing portions of the metal film overlying the buffer strips with a laser without contacting the underlying semiconductor material to separate the metal layer into a plurality of back contacts. The buffer material serves to protect the underlying semiconductor material from being damaged during the laser scribing. Back contacts and multi-cell photovoltaic modules incorporating such back contacts also are disclosed.

  20. Earthquake friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulargia, Francesco; Bizzarri, Andrea

    2016-12-01

    Laboratory friction slip experiments on rocks provide firm evidence that the static friction coefficient μ has values ∼0.7. This would imply large amounts of heat produced by seismically active faults, but no heat flow anomaly is observed, and mineralogic evidence of frictional heating is virtually absent. This stands for lower μ values ∼0.2, as also required by the observed orientation of faults with respect to the maximum compressive stress. We show that accounting for the thermal and mechanical energy balance of the system removes this inconsistence, implying a multi-stage strain release process. The first stage consists of a small and slow aseismic slip at high friction on pre-existent stress concentrators within the fault volume but angled with the main fault as Riedel cracks. This introduces a second stage dominated by frictional temperature increase inducing local pressurization of pore fluids around the slip patches, which is in turn followed by a third stage in which thermal diffusion extends the frictionally heated zones making them coalesce into a connected pressurized region oriented as the fault plane. Then, the system enters a state of equivalent low static friction in which it can undergo the fast elastic radiation slip prescribed by dislocation earthquake models.

  1. Quantitative Analysis of Intra-chromosomal Contacts: The 3C-qPCR Method.

    PubMed

    Ea, Vuthy; Court, Franck; Forné, Thierry

    2017-01-01

    The chromosome conformation capture (3C) technique is fundamental to many population-based methods investigating chromatin dynamics and organization in eukaryotes. Here, we provide a modified quantitative 3C (3C-qPCR) protocol for improved quantitative analyses of intra-chromosomal contacts. We also describe an algorithm for data normalization which allows more accurate comparisons between contact profiles.

  2. Method of making cascaded die mountings with springs-loaded contact-bond options

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.; Adams, Donald J.; Su, Gui-Jia; Marlino, Laura D.; Ayers, Curtis W.; Coomer, Chester

    2007-06-19

    A cascaded die mounting device and method using spring contacts for die attachment, with or without metallic bonds between the contacts and the dies, is disclosed. One embodiment is for the direct refrigerant cooling of an inverter/converter carrying higher power levels than most of the low power circuits previously taught, and does not require using a heat sink.

  3. Method for characterizing the contact resistance of metal-vanadium dioxide thin film interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Percy, R.; Stan, M.; Weikle, R. M.; Kittiwatanakul, S.; Lu, J.; Wolf, S.

    2014-07-14

    The standard method for determining the contact resistance of planar metal-semiconductor interfaces can underestimate the true contact resistance under normal operating conditions, as it relies on the resistivity of the semiconductor material remaining constant during measurement. However, the strong temperature dependence of the resistivity of VO{sub 2} requires a modified approach that maintains a constant power density dissipated within the film to account for Joule heating. We develop a method for measuring contact resistance in semiconductors with a high thermal coefficient of resistivity, demonstrate this method with an example, and compare the results with the standard technique.

  4. Investigation of the effect of a diamine-based friction modifier on micropitting and the properties of tribofilms in rolling-sliding contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltanahmadi, Siavash; Morina, Ardian; van Eijk, Marcel C. P.; Nedelcu, Ileana; Neville, Anne

    2016-12-01

    The effect of N-tallow-1,3-diaminopropane (TDP) on friction, rolling wear and micropitting has been investigated with the ultimate objective of developing lubricants with no or minimal environmental impact. A mini traction machine (MTM-SLIM) has been utilised in order to generate tribofilms and observe the effect of TDP on anti-wear tribofilm formation and friction. Micropitting was induced on the surface of specimens using a micropitting rig (MPR). The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) surface analytical technique has been employed to investigate the effect of TDP on the chemical composition of the tribofilm while atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to generate high resolution topographical images of the tribofilms formed on the MTM discs. Experimental and analytical results showed that TDP delays the zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP) anti-wear tribofilm formation. TDP in combination with ZDDP induces a thinner and smoother anti-wear tribofilm with a modified chemical structure composed of mixed Fe/Zn (poly)phosphates. The sulphide contribution to the tribofilm and oxygen-to-phosphorous atomic concentration ratio are greater in the bulk of the tribofilm derived from a combination of TDP and ZDDP compared to a tribofilm derived from ZDDP alone. Surface analyses showed that utilising TDP effectively mitigates micropitting wear in the test conditions used in this study. Reduction of micropitting, relevant to rolling bearing applications, can be attributed to the improved running-in procedure, reduced friction, formation of a smoother tribofilm and modification of the tribofilm composition induced by TDP.

  5. The formulation of dynamical contact problems with friction in the case of systems of rigid bodies and general discrete mechanical systems—Painlevé and Kane paradoxes revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Alexandre; Ballard, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of mechanical systems with a finite number of degrees of freedom (discrete mechanical systems) is governed by the Lagrange equation which is a second-order differential equation on a Riemannian manifold (the configuration manifold). The handling of perfect (frictionless) unilateral constraints in this framework (that of Lagrange's analytical dynamics) was undertaken by Schatzman and Moreau at the beginning of the 1980s. A mathematically sound and consistent evolution problem was obtained, paving the road for many subsequent theoretical investigations. In this general evolution problem, the only reaction force which is involved is a generalized reaction force, consistently with the virtual power philosophy of Lagrange. Surprisingly, such a general formulation was never derived in the case of frictional unilateral multibody dynamics. Instead, the paradigm of the Coulomb law applying to reaction forces in the real world is generally invoked. So far, this paradigm has only enabled to obtain a consistent evolution problem in only some very few specific examples and to suggest numerical algorithms to produce computational examples (numerical modeling). In particular, it is not clear what is the evolution problem underlying the computational examples. Moreover, some of the few specific cases in which this paradigm enables to write down a precise evolution problem are known to show paradoxes: the Painlevé paradox (indeterminacy) and the Kane paradox (increase in kinetic energy due to friction). In this paper, we follow Lagrange's philosophy and formulate the frictional unilateral multibody dynamics in terms of the generalized reaction force and not in terms of the real-world reaction force. A general evolution problem that governs the dynamics is obtained for the first time. We prove that all the solutions are dissipative; that is, this new formulation is free of Kane paradox. We also prove that some indeterminacy of the Painlevé paradox is fixed in this

  6. Pose and motion from contact

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Y.B.; Erdmann, M.

    1999-05-01

    In the absence of vision, grasping an object often relies on tactile feedback from the fingertips. As the finger pushes the object, the fingertip can feel the contact point move. If the object is known in advance, from this motion the finger may infer the location of the contact point on the object, and thereby, the object pose. This paper primarily investigates the problem of determining the pose (orientation and position) and motion (velocity and angular velocity) of a planar object with known geometry from such contact motion generated by pushing. A dynamic analysis of pushing yields a nonlinear system that relates through contact the object pose and motion to the finger motion. The contact motion on the fingertip thus encodes certain information about the object pose. Nonlinear observability theory is employed to show that such information is sufficient for the finger to observe not only the pose, but also the motion of the object. Therefore, a sensing strategy can be realized as an observer of the nonlinear dynamic system. Two observers are subsequently introduced. The first observer, based on the work of Gautheir, Hammouri, and Othman (1992), has its gain determined by the solution of a Lyapunov-like equation; it can be activated at any time instant during a push. The second observer, based on Newton`s method, solves for the initial (motionless) object pose from three intermediate contact points during a push. Under the Coulomb-friction model, the paper deals with support friction in the plane and/or contact friction between the finger and the object. Extensive simulations have been done to demonstrate the feasibility of the two observers. Preliminary experiments (with an Adept robot) have also been conducted. A contact sensor has been implemented using strain gauges.

  7. Laser method for forming low-resistance ohmic contacts on semiconducting oxides

    DOEpatents

    Narayan, Jagdish

    1981-01-01

    This invention is a new method for the formation of high-quality ohmic contacts on wide-band-gap semiconducting oxides. As exemplified by the formation of an ohmic contact on n-type BaTiO.sub.3 containing a p-n junction, the invention entails depositing a film of a metallic electroding material on the BaTiO.sub.3 surface and irradiating the film with a Q-switched laser pulse effecting complete melting of the film and localized melting of the surface layer of oxide immediately underlying the film. The resulting solidified metallic contact is ohmic, has unusually low contact resistance, and is thermally stable, even at elevated temperatures. The contact does not require cleaning before attachment of any suitable electrical lead. This method is safe, rapid, reproducible, and relatively inexpensive.

  8. Method for forming low-resistance ohmic contacts on semiconducting oxides

    DOEpatents

    Narayan, J.

    1979-10-01

    The invention provides a new method for the formation of high-quality ohmic contacts on wide-band-gap semiconducting oxides. As exemplified by the formation of an ohmic contact on n-type BaTiO/sub 3/ containing a p-n junction, the invention entails depositing a film of a metallic electroding material on the BaTiO/sub 3/ surface and irradiating the film with a Q-switched laser pulse effecting complete melting of the film and localized melting of the surface layer of oxide immediately underlying the film. The resulting solidified metallic contact is ohmic, has unusually low contact resistance, and is thermally stable, even at elevated temmperatures. The contact does not require cleaning before attachment of any suitable electrical lead. This method is safe, rapid, reproducible, and relatively inexpensive.

  9. Methods to Investigate the Role of Toll-Like Receptors in Allergic Contact Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Marc; Goebeler, Matthias; Martin, Stefan F

    2016-01-01

    Allergic contact disease is a common inflammatory skin disease resulting from hyperresponsiveness to harmless nonprotein substances such as metals, fragrances, or rubber. Recent research has highlighted a prominent role of Toll-like receptors, particularly TLR4 in contact allergen-induced innate immune activation that crucially contributes to the pathogenesis of this disease. Here we describe several methods to investigate the role of Toll-like receptors in contact allergen-induced pro-inflammatory responses. These include expansion of disease-relevant human primary cells including endothelial cells and keratinocytes and their manipulation of TLR signaling by transfection, retroviral infection and RNA interference, basic methods to induce contact hypersensitivity in mice, and protocols for adoptive transfer of hapten-stimulated dendritic cells and T cells from TLR-deficient mice to wild-type mice and vice versa wild-type mice to TLR-deficient mice in order to explore cell-specific roles of TLRs in contact hypersensitivity responses.

  10. Method for contact resistivity measurements on photovoltaic cells and cell adapted for such measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, Dale R. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A method is disclosed for scribing at least three grid contacts of a photovoltaic cell to electrically isolate them from the grid contact pattern used to collect solar current generated by the cell, and using the scribed segments for determining parameters of the cell by a combination of contact end resistance (CER) measurements using a minimum of three equally or unequally spaced lines, and transmission line modal (TLM) measurements using a minimum of four unequally spaced lines. TLM measurements may be used to determine sheet resistance under the contact, R.sub.sk, while CER measurements are used to determine contact resistivity, .rho..sub.c, from a nomograph of contact resistivity as a function of contact end resistance and sheet resistivity under the contact. In some cases, such as the case of silicon photovoltaic cells, sheet resistivity under the contact may be assumed to be equal to the known sheet resistance, R.sub.s, of the semiconductor material, thereby obviating the need for TLM measurements to determine R.sub.sk.

  11. Investigation of the Dynamic Contact Angle Using a Direct Numerical Simulation Method.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guangpu; Yao, Jun; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Hai; Li, Aifen; Shams, Bilal

    2016-11-15

    A large amount of residual oil, which exists as isolated oil slugs, remains trapped in reservoirs after water flooding. Numerous numerical studies are performed to investigate the fundamental flow mechanism of oil slugs to improve flooding efficiency. Dynamic contact angle models are usually introduced to simulate an accurate contact angle and meniscus displacement of oil slugs under a high capillary number. Nevertheless, in the oil slug flow simulation process, it is unnecessary to introduce the dynamic contact angle model because of a negligible change in the meniscus displacement after using the dynamic contact angle model when the capillary number is small. Therefore, a critical capillary number should be introduced to judge whether the dynamic contact model should be incorporated into simulations. In this study, a direct numerical simulation method is employed to simulate the oil slug flow in a capillary tube at the pore scale. The position of the interface between water and the oil slug is determined using the phase-field method. The capacity and accuracy of the model are validated using a classical benchmark: a dynamic capillary filling process. Then, different dynamic contact angle models and the factors that affect the dynamic contact angle are analyzed. The meniscus displacements of oil slugs with a dynamic contact angle and a static contact angle (SCA) are obtained during simulations, and the relative error between them is calculated automatically. The relative error limit has been defined to be 5%, beyond which the dynamic contact angle model needs to be incorporated into the simulation to approach the realistic displacement. Thus, the desired critical capillary number can be determined. A three-dimensional universal chart of critical capillary number, which functions as static contact angle and viscosity ratio, is given to provide a guideline for oil slug simulation. Also, a fitting formula is presented for ease of use.

  12. Method of manufacturing a hybrid emitter all back contact solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Loscutoff, Paul; Rim, Seung

    2017-02-07

    A method of manufacturing an all back contact solar cell which has a hybrid emitter design. The solar cell has a thin dielectric layer formed on a backside surface of a single crystalline silicon substrate. One emitter of the solar cell is made of doped polycrystalline silicon that is formed on the thin dielectric layer. A second emitter of the solar cell is formed in the single crystalline silicon substrate and is made of doped single crystalline silicon. The method further includes forming contact holes that allow metal contacts to connect to corresponding emitters.

  13. Non-contact capacitance based image sensing method and system

    DOEpatents

    Novak, J.L.; Wiczer, J.J.

    1994-01-25

    A system and a method for imaging desired surfaces of a workpiece is described. A sensor having first and second sensing electrodes which are electrically isolated from the workpiece is positioned above and in proximity to the desired surfaces of the workpiece. An electric field is developed between the first and second sensing electrodes of the sensor in response to input signals being applied thereto and capacitance signals are developed which are indicative of any disturbances in the electric field as a result of the workpiece. An image signal of the workpiece may be developed by processing the capacitance signals. The image signals may provide necessary control information to a machining device for machining the desired surfaces of the workpiece in processes such as deburring or chamfering. Also, the method and system may be used to image dimensions of weld pools on a workpiece and surfaces of glass vials. The sensor may include first and second preview sensors used to determine the feed rate of a workpiece with respect to the machining device. 18 figures.

  14. Non-contact capacitance based image sensing method and system

    DOEpatents

    Novak, James L.; Wiczer, James J.

    1994-01-01

    A system and a method for imaging desired surfaces of a workpiece. A sensor having first and second sensing electrodes which are electrically isolated from the workpiece is positioned above and in proximity to the desired surfaces of the workpiece. An electric field is developed between the first and second sensing electrodes of the sensor in response to input signals being applied thereto and capacitance signals are developed which are indicative of any disturbances in the electric field as a result of the workpiece. An image signal of the workpiece may be developed by processing the capacitance signals. The image signals may provide necessary control information to a machining device for machining the desired surfaces of the workpiece in processes such as deburring or chamfering. Also, the method and system may be used to image dimensions of weld pools on a workpiece and surfaces of glass vials. The sensor may include first and second preview sensors used to determine the feed rate of a workpiece with respect to the machining device.

  15. Non-contact capacitance based image sensing method and system

    DOEpatents

    Novak, J.L.; Wiczer, J.J.

    1995-01-03

    A system and a method is provided for imaging desired surfaces of a workpiece. A sensor having first and second sensing electrodes which are electrically isolated from the workpiece is positioned above and in proximity to the desired surfaces of the workpiece. An electric field is developed between the first and second sensing electrodes of the sensor in response to input signals being applied thereto and capacitance signals are developed which are indicative of any disturbances in the electric field as a result of the workpiece. An image signal of the workpiece may be developed by processing the capacitance signals. The image signals may provide necessary control information to a machining device for machining the desired surfaces of the workpiece in processes such as deburring or chamfering. Also, the method and system may be used to image dimensions of weld pools on a workpiece and surfaces of glass vials. The sensor may include first and second preview sensors used to determine the feed rate of a workpiece with respect to the machining device. 18 figures.

  16. Non-contact capacitance based image sensing method and system

    DOEpatents

    Novak, James L.; Wiczer, James J.

    1995-01-01

    A system and a method is provided for imaging desired surfaces of a workpiece. A sensor having first and second sensing electrodes which are electrically isolated from the workpiece is positioned above and in proximity to the desired surfaces of the workpiece. An electric field is developed between the first and second sensing electrodes of the sensor in response to input signals being applied thereto and capacitance signals are developed which are indicative of any disturbances in the electric field as a result of the workpiece. An image signal of the workpiece may be developed by processing the capacitance signals. The image signals may provide necessary control information to a machining device for machining the desired surfaces of the workpiece in processes such as deburring or chamfering. Also, the method and system may be used to image dimensions of weld pools on a workpiece and surfaces of glass vials. The sensor may include first and second preview sensors used to determine the feed rate of a workpiece with respect to the machining device.

  17. Dynamic measurements of gear tooth friction and load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebbechi, Brian; Oswald, Fred B.; Townsend, Dennis P.

    1991-01-01

    As part of a program to study fundamental mechanisms of gear noise, static and dynamic gear tooth strain measurements were made on the NASA gear-noise rig. Tooth-fillet strains from low-contact ratio-spur gears were recorded for 28 operating conditions. A method is introduced whereby strain gage measurements taken from both the tension and compression sides of a gear tooth can be transformed into the normal and frictional loads on the tooth. This technique was applied to both the static and dynamic strain data. The static case results showed close agreement with expected results. For the dynamic case, the normal-force computation produced very good results, but the friction results, although promising, were not as accurate. Tooth sliding friction strongly affected the signal from the strain gage on the tensionside of the tooth. The compression gage was affected by friction to a much lesser degree. The potential of the method to measure friction force was demonstrated, but further refinement will be required before this technique can be used to measure friction forces dynamically with an acceptable degree of accuracy.

  18. Corrosion effects on friction factors

    SciTech Connect

    Magleby, H.L.; Shaffer, S.J.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents the results of NRC-sponsored material specimen tests that were performed to determine if corrosion increases the friction factors of sliding surfaces of motor-operated gate valves, which could require higher forces to close and open safety-related valves when subjected to their design basis differential pressures. Friction tests were performed with uncorroded specimens and specimens subjected to accelerated corrosion. Preliminary tests at ambient conditions showed that corrosion increased the friction factors, indicating the need for additional tests duplicating valve operating parameters at hot conditions. The additional tests showed friction factors of corroded specimens were 0.1 to 0.2 higher than for uncorroded specimens, and that the friction factors of the corroded specimens were not very dependent on contact stress or corrosion film thickness. The measured values of friction factors for the three corrosion films tested (simulating three operating times) were in the range of 0.3 to 0.4. The friction factor for even the shortest simulated operating time was essentially the same as the others, indicating that the friction factors appear to reach a plateau and that the plateau is reached quickly.

  19. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: Solid-solid thermal contact problems: current understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesnyankin, Sergei Yu; Vikulov, Aleksei G.; Vikulov, Dmitrii G.

    2009-09-01

    The past 40 years of theoretical and experimental research on contact heat transfer are reviewed. Thermophysical and mechanical processes involved in heat flow propagation through various kinds of solid-solid joints are considered. Analytical and semiempirical expressions are presented, which simulate these processes both under vacuum conditions and in the presence of a heat-conducting medium in gaps. Reasons for the experimentally examined heat flux rectification are explained. Studies on thermal contact under a nonstationary regime are covered, as is the possibility of applying classical heat conduction theory to describing the contact thermal properties. A thermodynamic interpretation of the thermal contact resistance is suggested and basic approaches to the study of contact phenomena are described. The heat conduction in nanosystems is briefly reviewed. Theoretical problems yet to be solved are pointed out and possible solution methods suggested.

  20. Interferometer and analysis methods for the in vitro characterization of dynamic fluid layers on contact lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primeau, Brian C.; Greivenkamp, John E.

    2012-06-01

    The anterior refracting surface of the eye when wearing a contact lens is the thin fluid layer that forms on the surface of the contact lens. Under normal conditions, this fluid layer is less than 10 μm thick. The fluid layer thickness and topography change over time and are affected by the material properties of the contact lens and may affect vision quality and comfort. An in vitro method of characterizing dynamic fluid layers applied to contact lenses mounted on mechanical substrates has been developed by use of a phase-shifting Twyman-Green interferometer. This interferometer continuously measures light reflected from the surface of the fluid layer, allowing precision analysis of the dynamic fluid layer. Movies showing this fluid layer behavior can be generated. Quantitative analysis beyond typical contact angle or visual inspection methods is provided. Different fluid and contact lens material combinations have been evaluated, and variations in fluid layer properties have been observed. This paper discusses the interferometer design and analysis methods used. Example measurement results of different contact lens are presented.

  1. A modified captive bubble method for determining advancing and receding contact angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Jian; Shi, Pan; Zhu, Lin; Ding, Jianfu; Chen, Qingmin; Wang, Qingjun

    2014-03-01

    In this work, a modification to the captive bubble method was proposed to test the advancing and receding contact angle. This modification is done by adding a pressure chamber with a pressure control system to the original experimental system equipped with an optical angle mater equipped with a high speed CCD camera, a temperature control system and a computer. A series of samples with highly hydrophilic, hydrophilic, hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces were prepared. The advancing and receding contact angles of these samples with highly hydrophilic, hydrophilic, and hydrophobic surfaces through the new methods was comparable to the result tested by the traditional sessile drop method. It is proved that this method overcomes the limitation of the traditional captive bubble method and the modified captive bubble method allows a smaller error from the test. However, due to the nature of the captive bubble technique, this method is also only suitable for testing the surface with advancing or receding contact angle below 130°.

  2. Contact resistance extraction methods for short- and long-channel carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco-Sanchez, Anibal; Claus, Martin; Mothes, Sven; Schröter, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Three different methods for the extraction of the contact resistance based on both the well-known transfer length method (TLM) and two variants of the Y-function method have been applied to simulation and experimental data of short- and long-channel CNTFETs. While for TLM special CNT test structures are mandatory, standard electrical device characteristics are sufficient for the Y-function methods. The methods have been applied to CNTFETs with low and high channel resistance. It turned out that the standard Y-function method fails to deliver the correct contact resistance in case of a relatively high channel resistance compared to the contact resistances. A physics-based validation is also given for the application of these methods based on applying traditional Si MOSFET theory to quasi-ballistic CNTFETs.

  3. Three Three-Axis IEPE Accelerometers on the Inner Liner of a Tire for Finding the Tire-Road Friction Potential Indicators †

    PubMed Central

    Niskanen, Arto; Tuononen, Ari J.

    2015-01-01

    Direct tire-road contact friction estimation is essential for future autonomous cars and active safety systems. Friction estimation methods have been proposed earlier for driving conditions in the presence of a slip angle or slip ratio. However, the estimation of the friction from a freely-rolling tire is still an unsolved topic. Knowing the existing friction potential would be beneficial since vehicle control systems could be adjusted before any remarkable tire force has been produced. Since accelerometers are well-known and robust, and thus a promising sensor type for intelligent tires, this study uses three three-axis IEPE accelerometers on the inner liner of a tire to detect friction potential indicators on two equally smooth surfaces with different friction levels. The equal roughness was chosen for both surfaces in order to study the friction phenomena by neglecting the effect of surface texture on vibrations. The acceleration data before the contact is used to differentiate the two friction levels between the tire and the road. In addition, the contact lengths from the three accelerometers are used to validate the acceleration data. A method to differentiate the friction levels on the basis of the acceleration signal is also introduced. PMID:26251914

  4. On the Importance of Displacement History in Soft-Body Contact Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-10

    On the Importance of Displacement History in Soft-Body Contact Models Jonathan Fleischmann∗, Radu Serban, Dan Negrut Simulation Based Engineering...paramsothy.jayakumar.civ@mail.mil Two approaches are commonly used for handling fric- tional contact within the framework of the Discrete Ele- ment Method (DEM). One...in mutual contact . The second approach, called the Penalty Method (PM), invokes an elasticity argument to pro- duce a frictional contact force that

  5. Thick Low-Friction nc-MeC/a-C Nanocomposite Coatings on Ti-6Al-4V Alloy: Microstructure and Tribological Properties in Sliding Contact with a Ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimowski, Sławomir; Moskalewicz, Tomasz; Wendler, Bogdan; Kot, Marcin; Czyrska-Filemonowicz, Aleksandra

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we show that duplex surface treatment, combining oxygen diffusion hardening with the subsequent deposition of thick, low-friction nanocomposite nc-MeC/a-C coatings to improve the tribological properties of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy. We have synthesized, in a magnetron sputtering process, the nanocomposite nc-MeC/a-C coatings (where Me denotes W or Ti transition metal) consisting of two dissimilar materials (nanocrystallites of transition metal carbides MeC and an amorphous carbon matrix a-C). The nano and microstructure of the substrate material and coatings were examined with the use of scanning and transmission electron microscopy as well as by X-ray diffractometry. It was found that different carbide nanocrystals of the same transition metal were embedded in an amorphous carbon matrix of both coatings. The HRTEM analysis indicated that the volume fraction of tungsten carbides in the nc-WC/a-C coating was equal to 13 pct, whereas in the nc-TiC/a-C one the volume fraction of the titanium carbides was equal to just 3 pct. The tribological properties, hardness, and scratch resistance of the coatings were investigated as well. The coefficient of friction (COF) of the coatings during dry sliding against 6 mm diameter alumina ball reached very low value, 0.05, in comparison with an oxygen-hardened alloy, whose COF was equal to 0.8. This low-friction effect of the coatings has been attributed to the formation of a self-lubricating film in sliding contact. The coatings exhibited similar failure morphology in the scratch tests. Even though the hardness was rather low, the coatings exhibited a very good wear resistance during sliding friction. The wear rate of the nc-WC/a-C coating was equal to 0.08 × 10-6 mm3 N-1 m-1 and for the nc-TiC/a-C one it was 0.28 × 10-6 mm3 N-1 m-1.

  6. Friction Anisotropy with Respect to Topographic Orientation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chengjiao; Wang, Q. Jane

    2012-01-01

    Friction characteristics with respect to surface topographic orientation were investigated using surfaces of different materials and fabricated with grooves of different scales. Scratching friction tests were conducted using a nano-indentation-scratching system with the tip motion parallel or perpendicular to the groove orientation. Similar friction anisotropy trends were observed for all the surfaces studied, which are (1) under a light load and for surfaces with narrow grooves, the tip motion parallel to the grooves offers higher friction coefficients than does that perpendicular to them, (2) otherwise, equal or lower friction coefficients are found under this motion. The influences of groove size relative to the diameter of the mating tip (as a representative asperity), surface contact stiffness, contact area, and the characteristic stiction length are discussed. The appearance of this friction anisotropy is independent of material; however, the boundary and the point of trend transition depend on material properties. PMID:23248751

  7. The use of laboratory methods in contact dermatitis induced by composite materials.

    PubMed

    Ayala, F; Lembo, G; Balato, N; Patruno, C; Scognamiglio, G; Strazzullo, G; de Stefano, S

    1990-05-01

    Thin-layer chromatography, column chromatography, mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance were used to investigate the chemical constituents and haptens responsible in 2 different circumstances where allergic contact dermatitis from composite materials was suspected. In an aircraft factory where epoxy resins were used, tetraglycidyl-4,4'-dimethyl dianiline and phenylglycidyl ether were identified as the haptens responsible for an outbreak of contact dermatitis. The role of abietic acid as the main sensitizer in colophony was confirmed in a case of contact dermatitis occurring in a sportsman with an acute eczematous reaction due to a leg bandage. Identification of the chemical sensitizers was possible only by using the aforementioned laboratory methods.

  8. Aid for electrical contacting of high-temperature fuel cells and method for production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Ines; Schillig, Cora

    2014-03-18

    A double-sided adhesive metal-based tape for use as contacting aid for SOFC fuel cells is provided. The double-sided metal-based adhesive tape is suitable for simplifying the construction of cell bundles. The double-sided metal-based adhesive tape is used for electrical contacting of the cell connector with the anode and for electrical contacting of the interconnector of the fuel cells with the cell connector. A method for producing the double-sided adhesive metal-base tape is also provided.

  9. Low-frequency internal friction as express-method for identification of cryocrystals in pores of the solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erenburg, A. I.; Zakharov, A. Yu.; Leont'eva, A. V.; Prokhorov, A. Yu.

    2016-09-01

    We show that studying of low-frequency internal friction (LFIF) of solid samples at low temperatures allows determining the presence of various gases absorbed, for some reasons, in pores and caverns of the solids. The gases come over to a solid state (cryocrystals) and exist in the pores under corresponding thermodynamic conditions giving an additional contribution to the LFIF spectra. The spectra reflect the special points of the gases (temperatures of melting or phase transitions). This information gives a real opportunity for identification of gas in the matrix, i.e. the studied solids. This may be of great importance for investigations of cosmic or geological samples, for instance, asteroids, meteorites, rock formations, etc. The LFIF method allows identification of gas media surrounding the studied sample.

  10. A simple method for measuring the superhydrophobic contact angle with high accuracy.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yi-Lin; Chang, Yao-Yuan; Wang, Meng-Jiy; Lin, Shi-Yow

    2010-06-01

    A modified selected-plane method for contact angle (theta) measurement is proposed in this study that avoids the difficulty of finding the real contact point and image-distortion effects adjacent to the contact point. This method is particularly suitable for superhydrophobic surfaces. The sessile-drop method coupled with the tangent line is the most popular method to find the contact angle in literature, but it entails unavoidable errors in determining the air-solid base line due to the smoothness problem and substrate tilting. In addition, the tangent-line technique requires finding the actual contact point. The measurement error due to the base line problem becomes more profound for superhydrophobic surfaces. A larger theta deviation results from a more superhydrophobic surface with a fixed base line error. The proposed modified selected-plane method requires only four data points (droplet apex, droplet height, and two interfacial loci close to the air-solid interface), avoiding the problem of the sessile-drop-tangent method in finding the contact point and saving the trouble of the sessile-drop-fitting method for best fitting of the numerous edge points with the theoretical profile. A careful error analysis was performed, and a user-friendly program was provided in this work. This method resulted in an accurate theta measurement and a method that was much improved over the classical selected plane and the sessile-drop-tangent methods. The theta difference between this method and the sessile-drop-fitting method was found to be less than three degrees.

  11. A simple method for measuring the superhydrophobic contact angle with high accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Yi-Lin; Chang, Yao-Yuan; Wang, Meng-Jiy; Lin, Shi-Yow

    2010-06-01

    A modified selected-plane method for contact angle (θ) measurement is proposed in this study that avoids the difficulty of finding the real contact point and image-distortion effects adjacent to the contact point. This method is particularly suitable for superhydrophobic surfaces. The sessile-drop method coupled with the tangent line is the most popular method to find the contact angle in literature, but it entails unavoidable errors in determining the air-solid base line due to the smoothness problem and substrate tilting. In addition, the tangent-line technique requires finding the actual contact point. The measurement error due to the base line problem becomes more profound for superhydrophobic surfaces. A larger θ deviation results from a more superhydrophobic surface with a fixed base line error. The proposed modified selected-plane method requires only four data points (droplet apex, droplet height, and two interfacial loci close to the air-solid interface), avoiding the problem of the sessile-drop-tangent method in finding the contact point and saving the trouble of the sessile-drop-fitting method for best fitting of the numerous edge points with the theoretical profile. A careful error analysis was performed, and a user-friendly program was provided in this work. This method resulted in an accurate θ measurement and a method that was much improved over the classical selected plane and the sessile-drop-tangent methods. The θ difference between this method and the sessile-drop-fitting method was found to be less than three degrees.

  12. A simple method for measuring the superhydrophobic contact angle with high accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, Yi-Lin; Chang, Yao-Yuan; Wang, Meng-Jiy; Lin, Shi-Yow

    2010-06-15

    A modified selected-plane method for contact angle ({theta}) measurement is proposed in this study that avoids the difficulty of finding the real contact point and image-distortion effects adjacent to the contact point. This method is particularly suitable for superhydrophobic surfaces. The sessile-drop method coupled with the tangent line is the most popular method to find the contact angle in literature, but it entails unavoidable errors in determining the air-solid base line due to the smoothness problem and substrate tilting. In addition, the tangent-line technique requires finding the actual contact point. The measurement error due to the base line problem becomes more profound for superhydrophobic surfaces. A larger {theta} deviation results from a more superhydrophobic surface with a fixed base line error. The proposed modified selected-plane method requires only four data points (droplet apex, droplet height, and two interfacial loci close to the air-solid interface), avoiding the problem of the sessile-drop-tangent method in finding the contact point and saving the trouble of the sessile-drop-fitting method for best fitting of the numerous edge points with the theoretical profile. A careful error analysis was performed, and a user-friendly program was provided in this work. This method resulted in an accurate {theta} measurement and a method that was much improved over the classical selected plane and the sessile-drop-tangent methods. The {theta} difference between this method and the sessile-drop-fitting method was found to be less than three degrees.

  13. The Interpretation of Dynamic Contact Angles Measured by the Wilhelmy Plate Method

    PubMed

    Ramé

    1997-01-01

    We present an analysis for properly interpreting apparent dynamic contact angles measured using the Wilhelmy plate method at low capillary numbers, Ca. This analysis removes the ambiguity in current dynamic measurements which interpret data with the same formula as static measurements. We properly account for all forces, including viscous forces, acting on the plate as it moves into or out of a liquid bath. Our main result, valid at O(1) as Ca --> 0, relates the apparent dynamic contact angle to material-dependent, geometry-independent parameters necessary for describing dynamic wetting of a system. The special case of the apparent contact angle = pi/2 was solved to O(Ca). This O(Ca) solution can guide numerical work necessary for higher Ca's and arbitrary values of the apparent contact angle. These results make the Wilhelmy plate a viable method for determining material parameters for dynamic spreading.

  14. Multiscale physics-based modeling of friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriten, Melih

    Frictional contacts between solids exist in nature and in a wide range of engineering applications. Friction causes energy loss, and it is the main source of wear and surface degradation which limits the lifetime of mechanical systems. Yet, friction is needed to walk, run, accelerate, slow down or stop moving systems. Whether desirable or not, friction is a very complex physical phenomenon. The behavior of systems with friction is nonlinear, and the physical mechanisms governing friction behavior span a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. A thorough study of friction should employ experimentalists and theoreticians in chemistry, materials science, tribology, mechanics, dynamics, and structural engineering. High spatial and temporal resolutions are required to capture and model essential physics of a frictional contact. However, such a detailed model is impractical in large-scale structural dynamics simulations; especially since frictional contacts can be numerous in a given application. Reduced-order models (ROMs) achieve broader applicability by compromising several aspects and accounting for the important physics. Hence, rather simple Coulomb friction is still the most ubiquitous model in the modeling and simulation literature. As an alternative, a reduced-order friction model built-up from micromechanics of surfaces is proposed in this work. Continuum-scale formulation of pre-sliding friction behavior is combined with material-strength-based friction coefficients to develop a physics-based friction model at asperity-scale. Then, the statistical summation technique is utilized to build a multiscale modeling framework. A novel joint fretting setup is designed for friction experiments in a practical setting, and the developed models are tested. Both asperity and rough surface friction models show good agreement with experimental data. The influences of materials, surface roughness and contact contamination on the friction are also studied. Finally, the

  15. Friction and wear of TPS fibers: A study of the adhesion and friction of high modulus fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bascom, Willard D.; Lee, Ilzoo

    1990-01-01

    The adhesional and frictional forces between filaments in a woven fabric or felt, strongly influenced the processability of the fiber and the mechanical durability of the final product. Even though the contact loads between fibers are low, the area of contact is extremely small giving rise to very high stresses; principally shear stresses. One consequence of these strong adhesional and frictional forces is the resistance of fibers to slide past each other during weaving or when processed into nonwoven mats or felts. Furthermore, the interfiber frictional forces may cause surface damage and thereby reduce the fiber strength. Once formed into fabrics, flexural handling and manipulation of the material again causes individual filaments to rub against each other resulting in modulus, brittle fibers such as those used in thermal protection systems (TPS). The adhesion and friction of organic fibers, notably polyethylene terephthalate (PET) fibers, have been extensively studied, but there has been very little work reported on high modulus inorganic fibers. An extensive study was made of the adhesion and friction of flame drawn silica fibers in order to develop experimental techniques and a scientific basis for data interpretation. Subsequently, these methods were applied to fibers of interest in TPS materials.

  16. Perception and Haptic Rendering of Friction Moments.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, H; Ohtuka, Y; Koide, S; Mouri, T

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers moments due to friction forces on the human fingertip. A computational technique called the friction moment arc method is presented. The method computes the static and/or dynamic friction moment independent of a friction force calculation. In addition, a new finger holder to display friction moment is presented. This device incorporates a small brushless motor and disk, and connects the human's finger to an interface finger of the five-fingered haptic interface robot HIRO II. Subjects' perception of friction moment while wearing the finger holder, as well as perceptions during object manipulation in a virtual reality environment, were evaluated experimentally.

  17. Frictional properties of jointed welded tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Teufel, L.W.

    1981-07-01

    The results of the experiments on simulated joints in welded tuff from the Grouse Canyon Member of the Belted Range Tuff warrant the following conclusions: (1) The coefficient of friction of the joints is independent of normal stress at a given sliding velocity. (2) The coefficient of friction increases with both increasing time of stationary contact and decreasing sliding velocity. (3) Time and velocity dependence of friction is due to an increase in the real area of contact on the sliding surface, caused by asperity creep. (4) Joints in water-saturated tuff show a greater time and velocity dependence of friction than those in dehydrated tuff. (5) The enhanced time and velocity dependence of friction with water saturation is a result of increased creep at asperity contacts, which is in turn due to a reduction in the surface indentation hardness by hydrolytic weakening and/or stress corrosion cracking.

  18. A Model for Static and Dry Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, Christopher

    2005-03-01

    It will be shown that the Muser-Robbins (MR) model, consisting of mobile molecules trapped between two incommensurate crystalline solids, exhibits many of the qualitative features of friction between macroscopic solids, such as the result that the static friction is greater than the kinetic friction, stick-slip motion and a force of static friction which increases as a function of the time that the two solids are in contact and stationary. At zero temperature, the kinetic friction is highly sensitive to the direction of sliding, but this sensitivity decreases markedly as the temperature rises. At low temperatures (with the surfaces stationary for a relatively long time), the model gives a static friction approximately 3 times larger than the kinetic friction for sufficiently slow velocities, but this ratio decreases steadily as the temperature is increased.

  19. Computational Methods for Nonlinear Dynamics Problems in Solid and Structural Mechanics: Models of Dynamic Frictional Phenomena in Metallic Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-31

    generation, and the resulting thermomechanical response. Examine role of thermomechanical effects in damage processes such as fatigue and wear. 4.) Conduct...deformations, rotations, large strains, and thermomechanical inter- actions, with due consideration of frictional resistance. 2.) Conduct preliminary...studies of simple quasi-static problems with the characteristics listed above. 3.) Investigate dynamic friction mechanisms, their role in heat

  20. On the dependency of friction on load: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, O. M.; Steenwyk, B.; Warhadpande, A.; Persson, B. N. J.

    2016-03-01

    In rubber friction studies it is often observed that the kinetic friction coefficient depends on the nominal contact pressure. This is usually due to frictional heating, which softens the rubber, increases the area of contact, and (in most cases) reduces the viscoelastic contribution to the friction. In this paper we present experimental results showing that the rubber friction also depends on the nominal contact pressure at such low sliding speed that frictional heating is negligible. This effect has important implications for rubber sliding dynamics, e.g., in the context of the tire-road grip. We attribute this effect to the viscoelastic coupling between the macroasperity contact regions, and present a simple earthquakelike model and numerical simulations supporting this picture. The mechanism for the dependency of the friction coefficient on the load considered is very general, and is relevant for non-rubber materials as well.

  1. Humidity-conditioned gravimetric method to measure the water content of hydrogel contact lens materials.

    PubMed

    Galas, S L; Enns, J B

    1993-07-01

    A method to determine the humidity-conditioned gravimetric water content of hydrogel contact lens materials has been developed, in which errors due to blotting have been eliminated by conditioning the lens in a series of relative humidity (RH) environments before measuring the water content gravimetrically, and then extrapolating the water content to 100% RH. This method has been used to determine the water contents of representative materials from each of the four FDA lens groups, which were compared with their labeled values, as well as with values obtained from refractive index measurements. The deviation of the water content of soft contact lenses as measured by refractive index from that obtained gravimetrically increased as the water content decreased. The humidity-conditioned gravimetric method to determine water content of hydrophilic contact lenses is being proposed as an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standard, as an improvement over the gravimetric and refractive index methods.

  2. A simple criterion for determining the static friction force between nanowires and flat substrates using the most-bent-state method.

    PubMed

    Hou, Lizhen; Wang, Shiliang; Huang, Han

    2015-04-24

    A simple criterion was developed to assess the appropriateness of the currently available models that estimate the static friction force between nanowires and substrates using the 'most-bent-state' method. Our experimental testing of the static friction force between Al2O3 nanowires and Si substrate verified our theoretical analysis, as well as the establishment of the criterion. It was found that the models are valid only for the bent nanowires with the ratio of wire length over the minimum curvature radius [Formula: see text] no greater than 1. For the cases with [Formula: see text] greater than 1, the static friction force was overestimated as it neglected the effect of its tangential component.

  3. A Parallel Multigrid Method for the Finite Element Analysis of Mechanical Contact

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, J D; Parsons, I D

    2002-03-21

    A geometrical multigrid method for solving the linearized matrix equations arising from node-on-face three-dimensional finite element contact is described. The development of an efficient implementation of this combination that minimizes both the memory requirements and the computational cost requires careful construction and storage of the portion of the coarse mesh stiffness matrices that are associated with the contact stiffness on the fine mesh. The multigrid contact algorithm is parallelized in a manner suitable for distributed memory architectures: results are presented that demonstrates the scheme's scalability. The solution of a large contact problem derived from an analysis of the factory joints present in the Space Shuttle reusable solid rocket motor demonstrates the usefulness of the general approach.

  4. A novel modelling and simulation method of hip joint surface contact stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Monan; Wang, Lei; Li, Pengcheng; Fu, Yili

    2017-01-02

    Understanding the hip joint surface contact stress distribution characteristics is helpful to determine hip joint biomechanical features and abnormal pathological behavior. Firstly, a 3-dimensional static hip joint biomechanical model is built using analytical method of model in order to study biomechanical properties including bearing area, stress distribution and the peak value of the contact stress of the femoral head, which reveals the relationship between the biomechanical properties and its geometric parameters. Secondly, based on the finite element analysis of the hip joint model, the contact stress distribution on the surface of femoral head is acquired under the condition of the different joint force and the acetabulum coverage rate. Finally, according to the evaluation of the femoral head surface stress and contact stress peak under different load distribution, accuracy and universality of the biomechanical model is verified.

  5. Nondestructive evaluation and characterization of GFRP using non-contact ultrasound and complementary method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigmann, R.; Iftimie, N.; Dobrescu, G. S.; Barsanescu, P. D.; Curtu, I.; Stanciu, M. D.; Savin, A.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents two methods, non-contact low frequency ultrasound method and fiber Bragg gratings, and their application to nondestructive testing of glass fiber reinforced composites used in wind turbine blades. Theoretical models are used and experimental results are in good concordance with destructive testing results.

  6. Method of forming emitters for a back-contact solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Li, Bo; Cousins, Peter J.; Smith, David D.

    2015-09-29

    Methods of forming emitters for back-contact solar cells are described. In one embodiment, a method includes forming a first solid-state dopant source above a substrate. The first solid-state dopant source includes a plurality of regions separated by gaps. Regions of a second solid-state dopant source are formed above the substrate by printing.

  7. Method of forming emitters for a back-contact solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Li, Bo; Cousins, Peter J; Smith, David D

    2014-12-16

    Methods of forming emitters for back-contact solar cells are described. In one embodiment, a method includes forming a first solid-state dopant source above a substrate. The first solid-state dopant source includes a plurality of regions separated by gaps. Regions of a second solid-state dopant source are formed above the substrate by printing.

  8. Method or forming emitters for a back-contact solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Li, Bo; Cousins, Peter J.; Smith, David D.

    2014-08-12

    Methods of forming emitters for back-contact solar cells are described. In one embodiment, a method includes forming a first solid-state dopant source above a substrate. The first solid-state dopant source includes a plurality of regions separated by gaps. Regions of a second solid-state dopant source are formed above the substrate by printing.

  9. A Study of the Tribological Behavior of TiAl-10 wt.%Ag Composite Based on the Contact Stress Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kang; Shi, Xiaoliang; Huang, Yuchun; Zou, Jialiang; Shen, Qiao; Zhang, Qiaoxin

    2017-02-01

    The contact stresses of materials in moving mechanical assemblies are rather important for minimizing friction and decreasing machinery energy dissipation. In this study, the effect of contact stresses on the friction and wear behaviors of TiAl-10 wt.%Ag was studied at 0-240 min using the united methods of experiment research, numerical simulation and theoretical analysis. The results showed that the high contact stresses led to the plastic deformation of TiAl-10 wt.%Ag at 0-50 min. The friction coefficients and wear rates decreased rapidly with the lowering of contact stresses from 1034.28 to 710.52 MPa. At elastic deformation stage (50-240 min), the forming of lubricating film was beneficial to the decrease in friction coefficients and wear rates at 50-150 min, whereas the lower contact stresses caused the increasing of friction coefficients and wear rates. The competition between film lubrication and contact stresses caused the lowering of friction coefficients and wear rates at 50-150 min. At 150-240 min, the lubricating film maintained the equivalent lubricating behaviors, whereas the lowering of contact stresses led to the slight improving of friction coefficients and wear rates. This study was meaningful for optimizing applied loads to realize the excellent contact stress state and tribological behavior of mechanical parts.

  10. A Study of the Tribological Behavior of TiAl-10 wt.%Ag Composite Based on the Contact Stress Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kang; Shi, Xiaoliang; Huang, Yuchun; Zou, Jialiang; Shen, Qiao; Zhang, Qiaoxin

    2017-03-01

    The contact stresses of materials in moving mechanical assemblies are rather important for minimizing friction and decreasing machinery energy dissipation. In this study, the effect of contact stresses on the friction and wear behaviors of TiAl-10 wt.%Ag was studied at 0-240 min using the united methods of experiment research, numerical simulation and theoretical analysis. The results showed that the high contact stresses led to the plastic deformation of TiAl-10 wt.%Ag at 0-50 min. The friction coefficients and wear rates decreased rapidly with the lowering of contact stresses from 1034.28 to 710.52 MPa. At elastic deformation stage (50-240 min), the forming of lubricating film was beneficial to the decrease in friction coefficients and wear rates at 50-150 min, whereas the lower contact stresses caused the increasing of friction coefficients and wear rates. The competition between film lubrication and contact stresses caused the lowering of friction coefficients and wear rates at 50-150 min. At 150-240 min, the lubricating film maintained the equivalent lubricating behaviors, whereas the lowering of contact stresses led to the slight improving of friction coefficients and wear rates. This study was meaningful for optimizing applied loads to realize the excellent contact stress state and tribological behavior of mechanical parts.

  11. Diamond-Dispersed Fiber-Reinforced Composite for Superior Friction and Wear Properties in Extreme Environments and Method for Fabricating the Same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Street, Kenneth (Inventor); Voronov, Oleg A (Inventor); Kear, Bernard H (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Systems, methods, and articles of manufacture related to composite materials are discussed herein. These materials can be based on a mixture of diamond particles with a matrix and fibers or fabrics. The matrix can be formed into the composite material through optional pressurization and via heat treatment. These materials display exceptionally low friction coefficient and superior wear resistance in extreme environments.

  12. Studying the Transient Thermal Contact Conductance Between the Exhaust Valve and Its Seat Using the Inverse Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nezhad, Mohsen Motahari; Shojaeefard, Mohammad Hassan; Shahraki, Saeid

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the experiments aimed at analyzing thermally the exhaust valve in an air-cooled internal combustion engine and estimating the thermal contact conductance in fixed and periodic contacts. Due to the nature of internal combustion engines, the duration of contact between the valve and its seat is too short, and much time is needed to reach the quasi-steady state in the periodic contact between the exhaust valve and its seat. Using the methods of linear extrapolation and the inverse solution, the surface contact temperatures and the fixed and periodic thermal contact conductance were calculated. The results of linear extrapolation and inverse methods have similar trends, and based on the error analysis, they are accurate enough to estimate the thermal contact conductance. Moreover, due to the error analysis, a linear extrapolation method using inverse ratio is preferred. The effects of pressure, contact frequency, heat flux, and cooling air speed on thermal contact conductance have been investigated. The results show that by increasing the contact pressure the thermal contact conductance increases substantially. In addition, by increasing the engine speed the thermal contact conductance decreases. On the other hand, by boosting the air speed the thermal contact conductance increases, and by raising the heat flux the thermal contact conductance reduces. The average calculated error equals to 12.9 %.

  13. Contacting organic molecules by soft methods: towards molecule-based electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Haick, Hossam; Cahen, David

    2008-03-01

    Can we put organic molecules to use as electronic components? The answer to this question is to no small degree limited by the ability to contact them electrically without damaging the molecules. In this Account, we present some of the methods for contacting molecules that do not or minimally damage them and that allow formation of electronic junctions that can become compatible with electronics from the submicrometer to the macroscale. In "Linnaean" fashion, we have grouped contacting methods according to the following main criteria: (a) is a chemical bond is required between contact and molecule, and (b) is the contact "ready-made", that is, preformed, or prepared in situ? Contacting methods that, so far, seem to require a chemical bond include spin-coating a conductive polymer and transfer printing. In the latter, a metallic pattern on an elastomeric polymer is mechanically transferred to molecules with an exposed terminal group that can react chemically with the metal. These methods allow one to define structures from several tens of nanometers size upwards and to fabricate devices on flexible substrates, which is very difficult by conventional techniques. However, the requirement for bifunctionality severely restricts the type of molecules that can be used and can complicate their self-assembly into monolayers. Methods that rely on prior formation of the contact pad are represented by two approaches: (a) use of a liquid metal as electrode (e.g., Hg, Ga, various alloys), where molecules can be adsorbed on the liquid metal and the molecularly modified drop is brought into contact with the second electrode, the molecules can be adsorbed on the second electrode and then the liquid metal brought into contact with them, or bilayers are used, with a layer on both the metal and the second electrode and (b) use of preformed metal pads from a solid substrate and subsequent pad deposition on the molecules with the help of a liquid. These methods allow formation of

  14. Methods and mechanisms for contact feedback in a robot-assisted minimally invasive environment.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli, M; Aziminejad, A; Patel, R V; Moallem, M

    2006-10-01

    Providing a surgeon with information regarding contacts made between instruments and tissue during robot-assisted interventions can improve task efficiency and reliability. In this report, different methods for feedback of such information to the surgeon are discussed. It is hypothesized that various methods of contact feedback have the potential to enhance performance in a robot-assisted minimally invasive environment. To verify the hypothesis, novel mechanisms needed for incorporating contact feedback were designed, including a surgeon-robot interface with full force feedback capabilities and a surgical end-effector with full force sensing capabilities, that are suitable for minimally invasive applications. These two mechanisms were used to form a robotic "master-slave" test bed for studying the effect of contact feedback on the system and user performance. Using the master-slave system, experiments for surgical tasks involving soft tissue palpation were conducted. The performance of the master-slave system was validated in terms of criteria that assess the accurate transmission of task-related information to the surgeon, which is critical in the context of soft tissue surgical applications. Moreover, using a set of experiments involving human subjects, the performance of several users in carrying out the task was compared among different methods of contact feedback.

  15. New Method to Determine the Schottky Barrier in Few-Layer Black Phosphorus Metal Contacts.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su Yeong; Yun, Won Seok; Lee, J D

    2017-03-01

    Schottky barrier height and carrier polarity are seminal concepts for a practical device application of the interface between semiconductor and metal electrode. Investigation of those concepts is usually made by a conventional method such as the Schottky-Mott rule, incorporating the metal work function and semiconductor electron affinity, or the Fermi level pinning effect, resulting from the metal-induced gap states. Both manners are, however, basically applied to the bulk semiconductor metal contacts. To explore few-layer black phosphorus metal contacts far from the realm of bulk, we propose a new method to determine the Schottky barrier by scrutinizing the layer-by-layer phosphorus electronic structure from the first-principles calculation combined with the state-of-the-art band unfolding technique. In this study, using the new method, we calculate the Schottky barrier height and determine the contact polarity of Ti, Sc, and Al metal contacts to few-layer (mono-, bi-, tri-, and quadlayer) black phosphorus. This gives a significant physical insight toward the utmost layer-by-layer manipulation of electronic properties of few-layer semiconductor metal contacts.

  16. Method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell and device thereof

    DOEpatents

    Li, Bo; Smith, David; Cousins, Peter

    2014-07-29

    Methods of fabricating back-contact solar cells and devices thereof are described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming an N-type dopant source layer and a P-type dopant source layer above a material layer disposed above a substrate. The N-type dopant source layer is spaced apart from the P-type dopant source layer. The N-type dopant source layer and the P-type dopant source layer are heated. Subsequently, a trench is formed in the material layer, between the N-type and P-type dopant source layers.

  17. Method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell and device thereof

    DOEpatents

    Li, Bo; Smith, David; Cousins, Peter

    2016-08-02

    Methods of fabricating back-contact solar cells and devices thereof are described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming an N-type dopant source layer and a P-type dopant source layer above a material layer disposed above a substrate. The N-type dopant source layer is spaced apart from the P-type dopant source layer. The N-type dopant source layer and the P-type dopant source layer are heated. Subsequently, a trench is formed in the material layer, between the N-type and P-type dopant source layers.

  18. A new method of making ohmic contacts to p-GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Gutierrez, C. A.; Kudriavtsev, Yu.; Mota, Esteban; Hernández, A. G.; Escobosa-Echavarría, A.; Sánchez-Resendiz, V.; Casallas-Moreno, Y. L.; López-López, M.

    2016-12-01

    The structural, chemical, and electrical characteristics of In+ ion-implanted Au/Ni, Au/Nb and Au/W ohmic contacts to p-GaN were investigated. After the preparation of Ni, Nb and W electrode on the surface of p-GaN, the metal/p-GaN contact interface was implanted by 30 keV In+ ions with an implantation dose of 5 × 1015 ions/cm2 at room temperature to form a thin layer of InxGa1-xN located at the metal-semiconductor interface, achieved to reduce the specific contact resistance due to the improving quantum tunneling transport trough to the structure. The characterization was carried out by high-resolution X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry to investigate the formation of ternary alloy, re-crystallization by rapid thermal annealing process after In+ implantation, and the redistribution of elements. The specific contact resistance was extracted by current-voltage (I-V) curves using transmission line method; the lowest specific contact resistance of 2.5 × 10-4 Ωcm2 was achieved for Au/Ni/p-InxGa1-xN/p-GaN ohmic contacts.

  19. New Method Developed to Measure Contact Angles of a Sessile Drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, David F.; Zhang, Nengli

    2002-01-01

    The spreading of an evaporating liquid on a solid surface occurs in many practical processes and is of importance in a number of practical situations such as painting, textile dyeing, coating, gluing, and thermal engineering. Typical processes involving heat transfer where the contact angle plays an important role are film cooling, boiling, and the heat transfer through heat pipes. The biological phenomenon of cell spreading also is analogous to a drop spreading (ref. 1). In the study of spreading, the dynamic contact angle describes the interfacial properties on solid substrates and, therefore, has been studied by physicists and fluid mechanics investigators. The dynamic contact angle of a spreading nonvolatile liquid drop provides a simple tool in the study of the free-boundary problem, but the study of the spreading of a volatile liquid drop is of more practical interest because the evaporation of common liquids is inevitable in practical processes. The most common method to measure the contact angle, the contact radius, and the height of a sessile drop on a solid surface is to view the drop from its edge through an optical microscope. However, this method gives only local information in the view direction. Zhang and Yang (ref. 2) developed a laser shadowgraphy method to investigate the evaporation of sessile drop on a glass plate. As described here, Zhang and Chao (refs. 3 and 4) improved the method and suggested a new optical arrangement to measure the dynamic contact angle and the instant evaporation rate of a sessile drop with much higher accuracy (less than 1 percent). With this method, any fluid motion in the evaporating drop can be visualized through shadowgraphy without using a tracer, which often affects the field under investigation.

  20. On the renormalization of contact interactions for the configuration-interaction method in two-dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rontani, Massimo; Eriksson, G.; Åberg, S.; Reimann, S. M.

    2017-03-01

    The configuration interaction (CI) method for calculating the exact eigenstates of a quantum-mechanical few-body system is problematic when applied to particles interacting through contact forces. In dimensions higher than one the approach fails due to the pathology of the Dirac δ-potential, making it impossible to reach convergence by gradually increasing the size of the Hilbert space. However, this problem may be cured in a rather simple manner by renormalizing the strength of the contact potential when diagonalizing in a truncated Hilbert space. One hereby relies on the comparison of the CI results to the two-body ground-state energy obtained by the exact solution of the Schrödinger equation for a regularized contact interaction. We discuss here a scheme that provides cutoff-independent few-body physical observables. The method is applied to a few-body system of ultracold atoms confined by a two-dimensional harmonic oscillator.

  1. Thermodynamics of a Block Sliding across a Frictional Surface

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2007-01-01

    The following idealized problem is intended to illustrate some basic thermodynamic concepts involved in kinetic friction. A block of mass m is sliding on top of a frictional, flat-topped table of mass M. The table is magnetically levitated, so that it can move without thermal contact and friction across a horizontal floor. The table is initially…

  2. Computational Methods for Nonlinear Dynamic Problems in Solid and Structural Mechanics: Progress in the Theory and Modeling of Friction and in the Control of Dynamical Systems with Frictional Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-31

    Background ....... ........................ 8 2.2 Time Dependence or Rate Dependence of the Coefficient of Static Friction ............................ 13...2.3 The Steady-State Coefficient of Kinetic Friction ............... 16 2.4 The Coefficient of Kinetic Firction During the Slip Phase of Stick-Slip...the Coefficient of Friction ................ 130 2.6 Dynamic Interlocking of Imperfections ..... ................ 130 3. General Presentation and

  3. Measurement of Gear Tooth Dynamic Friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebbechi, Brian; Oswald, Fred B.; Townsend, Dennis P.

    1996-01-01

    Measurements of dynamic friction forces at the gear tooth contact were undertaken using strain gages at the root fillets of two successive teeth. Results are presented from two gear sets over a range of speeds and loads. The results demonstrate that the friction coefficient does not appear to be significantly influenced by the sliding reversal at the pitch point, and that the friction coefficient values found are in accord with those in general use. The friction coefficient was found to increase at low sliding speeds. This agrees with the results of disc machine testing.

  4. Evaluation of Non-Ozone-Depleting-Chemical Cleaning Methods for Space Mechanisms Using a Vacuum Spiral Orbit Rolling Contact Tribometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansen, Mark J.; Jones, William R., Jr.; Wheeler, Donald R.; Keller, Dennis J.

    2000-01-01

    Because CFC 113, an ozone depleting chemical (ODC), can no longer be produced, alternative bearing cleaning methods must be studied. The objective of this work was to study the effect of the new cleaning methods on lubricant lifetime using a vacuum bearing simulator (spiral orbit rolling contact tribometer). Four alternative cleaning methods were studied: ultra-violet (UV) ozone, aqueous levigated alumina slurry (ALAS), super critical fluid (SCF) CO2 and aqueous Brulin 815GD. Baseline tests were done using CFC 113. Test conditions were the following: a vacuum of at least 1.3 x 10(exp -6) Pa, 440C steel components, a rotational speed of 10 RPM, a lubricant charge of between 60-75 micrograms, a perfluoropolyalkylether lubricant (Z-25), and a load of 200N (44.6 lbs., a mean Hertzian stress of 1.5 GPa). Normalized lubricant lifetime was determined by dividing the total number of ball orbits by the amount of lubricant. The failure condition was a friction coefficient of 0.38. Post-test XPS analysis was also performed, showing slight variations in post-cleaning surface chemistry. Statistical analysis of the resultant data was conducted and it was determined that the data sets were most directly comparable when subjected to a natural log transformation. The natural log life (NL-Life) data for each cleaning method were reasonably normally (statistically) distributed and yielded standard deviations that were not significantly different among the five cleaning methods investigated. This made comparison of their NL-Life means very straightforward using a Bonferroni multiple comparison of means procedure. This procedure showed that the ALAS, UV-ozone and CFC 113 methods were not statistically significantly different from one another with respect to mean NL-Life. It also found that the SCF CO2 method yielded a significantly higher mean NL-Life than the mean NL-Lives of the ALAS, UV-ozone and CFC 113 methods. It also determined that the aqueous Brulin 815GD method yielded a mean

  5. A kinematic method to detect foot contact during running for all foot strike patterns.

    PubMed

    Milner, Clare E; Paquette, Max R

    2015-09-18

    The biomechanics of distance running are studied in relation to both understanding injury mechanisms and improving performance. Kinematic methods must be used to identify the stance phase of running when data are recorded during running on a standard treadmill or outside the laboratory. Recently, a focus on foot strike patterns has emerged in the field. Thus, there is a need for a kinematic method to identify foot contact that is equally effective for both rearfoot and non-rearfoot strike patterns. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a new kinematic method could accurately determine foot contact during running in both rearfoot and non-rearfoot strikers. Overground gait data were collected at on 22 runners, 11 with a rearfoot strike pattern and 11 with a non-rearfoot strike pattern. Data were processed to identify foot contact from: vertical ground reaction force, two previously published kinematic methods, and our new kinematic method. Limits of agreement were used to determine bias and random error of each kinematic method compared to ground reaction force onset. The new method had comparable random error at 200 Hz sampling frequency (5 ms per frame) to the previous methods (7 frames vs 6-9 frames) and produced the same offset for both strike patterns (3 frames), while the existing methods had different offsets for different strike patterns (4 or 7 frames). Study findings support use of this new method, as it can be applied to all running strike patterns without adjusting the frame offset, simplifying data processing.

  6. Friction in surface micromachined microengines

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.L.; Sniegowski, J.J.; LaVigne, G.; McWhorter, P.J.

    1996-03-01

    Understanding the frictional properties of advanced Micro-Electro- Mechanical Systems (MEMS) is essential in order to develop optimized designs and fabrication processes, as well as to qualify devices for commercial applications. We develop and demonstrate a method to experimentally measure the forces associated with sliding friction of devices rotating on a hub. The method is demonstrated on the rotating output gear of the microengine recently developed at Sandia National Laboratories. In-situ measurements of an engine running at 18300 rpm give a coefficient of friction of 0.5 for radial (normal) forces less than 4 {mu}N. For larger forces the effective coefficient of friction abruptly increases, suggesting a fundamental change in the basic nature of the interaction between the gear and hub. The experimental approach we have developed to measure the frictional forces associated with the microengine is generically applicable to other MEMS devices.

  7. A Mixed-Method Study of Language-Learning Motivation and Intercultural Contact of International Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kormos, Judit; Csizér, Kata; Iwaniec, Janina

    2014-01-01

    The mixed-method study presented in this paper investigates the changes in direct and indirect intercultural contact and language-learning attitudes and effort of international students in the United Kingdom. Seventy international learners of English were asked to fill in a questionnaire three times during one academic year in an international…

  8. OMPcontact: An Outer Membrane Protein Inter-Barrel Residue Contact Prediction Method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Wang, Han; Yan, Lun; Su, Lingtao; Xu, Dong

    2017-03-01

    In the two transmembrane protein types, outer membrane proteins (OMPs) perform diverse important biochemical functions, including substrate transport and passive nutrient uptake and intake. Hence their 3D structures are expected to reveal these functions. Because experimental structures are scarce, predicted 3D structures are more adapted to OMP research instead, and the inter-barrel residue contact is becoming one of the most remarkable features, improving prediction accuracy by describing the structural information of OMPs. To predict OMP structures accurately, we explored an OMP inter-barrel residue contact prediction method: OMPcontact. Multiple OMP-specific features were integrated in the method, including residue evolutionary covariation, topology-based transmembrane segment relative residue position, OMP lipid layer accessibility, and residue evolution conservation. These features describe the properties of a residue pair in different respects: sequential, structural, evolutionary, and biochemical. Within a 3-residues slide window, a Support Vector Machine (SVM) could accurately determinate the inter-barrel contact residue pair using above features. A 5-fold cross-valuation process was applied in testing the OMPcontact performance against a non-redundant OMP set with 75 samples inside. The tests compared four evolutionary covariation methods and screen analyzed the adaptive ones for inter-barrel contact prediction. The results showed our method not only efficiently realized the prediction, but also scored the possibility for residue pairs reliably. This is expected to improve OMP tertiary structure prediction. Therefore, OMPcontact will be helpful in compiling a structural census of outer membrane protein.

  9. Spur gears: Optimal geometry, methods for generation and Tooth Contact Analysis (TCA) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, Faydor L.; Zhang, Jiao

    1988-01-01

    The contents of this report include the following: (1) development of optimal geometry for crowned spur gears; (2) methods for their generation; and (3) tooth contact analysis (TCA) computer programs for the analysis of meshing and bearing contact on the crowned spur gears. The method developed for synthesis is used for the determination of the optimal geometry for crowned pinion surface and is directed to reduce the sensitivity of the gears to misalignment, localize the bearing contact, and guarantee the favorable shape and low level of the transmission errors. A new method for the generation of the crowned pinion surface has been proposed. This method is based on application of the tool with a surface of revolution that slightly deviates from a regular cone surface. The tool can be used as a grinding wheel or as a shaver. The crowned pinion surface can also be generated by a generating plane whose motion is provided by an automatic grinding machine controlled by a computer. The TCA program simulates the meshing and bearing contact of the misaligned gears. The transmission errors are also determined.

  10. A robust post-processing method to determine skin friction in turbulent boundary layers from the velocity profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-López, Eduardo; Bruce, Paul J. K.; Buxton, Oliver R. H.

    2015-04-01

    The present paper describes a method to extrapolate the mean wall shear stress, , and the accurate relative position of a velocity probe with respect to the wall, , from an experimentally measured mean velocity profile in a turbulent boundary layer. Validation is made between experimental and direct numerical simulation data of turbulent boundary layer flows with independent measurement of the shear stress. The set of parameters which minimize the residual error with respect to the canonical description of the boundary layer profile is taken as the solution. Several methods are compared, testing different descriptions of the canonical mean velocity profile (with and without overshoot over the logarithmic law) and different definitions of the residual function of the optimization. The von Kármán constant is used as a parameter of the fitting process in order to avoid any hypothesis regarding its value that may be affected by different initial or boundary conditions of the flow. Results show that the best method provides an accuracy of for the estimation of the friction velocity and for the position of the wall. The robustness of the method is tested including unconverged near-wall measurements, pressure gradient, and reduced number of points; the importance of the location of the first point is also tested, and it is shown that the method presents a high robustness even in highly distorted flows, keeping the aforementioned accuracies if one acquires at least one data point in . The wake component and the thickness of the boundary layer are also simultaneously extrapolated from the mean velocity profile. This results in the first study, to the knowledge of the authors, where a five-parameter fitting is carried out without any assumption on the von Kármán constant and the limits of the logarithmic layer further from its existence.

  11. 77 FR 43087 - Nomination of an In Vitro Test Method for the Identification of Contact Allergens: Request for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Nomination of an In Vitro Test Method for the Identification of Contact Allergens... identify electrophilic substances that have the potential to produce allergic contact dermatitis (ACD... CONTACT: Dr. William S. Stokes, Director, NICEATM, NIEHS, P.O. Box 12233, Mail Stop: K2-16,...

  12. Calculation of Contact Pressures and Frictional Effects on Mechanical Contact Surfaces by Finite Element Methods with Application to Fretting Damage Prediction,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    RIGIDINTERFERENCE 00 STRSS-00 SHRINKFT ~ ---...... RIGID EV INTERFERENCEJCNATGPEMNS 0.03" CNATGPEEET APPROX Jf AXISYMMETRIC RING ELEMENTS FE N SYMMETRY...Carolina State University 1 ONR LONDON, ENGLAND 1 Prof. E. Rabinowicz MIT 1 ONR PASADENA 1 Dr. H. D. Hibbitt 3 NRL Hibbit, Karlsson and Sorensen, Inc

  13. Obtaining macroscopic quantities for the contact line problem from Density Functional Theory using asymptotic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibley, David; Nold, Andreas; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2015-11-01

    Density Functional Theory (DFT), a statistical mechanics of fluids approach, captures microscopic details of the fluid density structure in the vicinity of contact lines, as seen in computations in our recent study. Contact lines describe the location where interfaces between two fluids meet solid substrates, and have stimulated a wealth of research due to both their ubiquity in nature and technological applications and also due to their rich multiscale behaviour. Whilst progress can be made computationally to capture the microscopic to mesoscopic structure from DFT, complete analytical results to fully bridge to the macroscale are lacking. In this work, we describe our efforts to bring asymptotic methods to DFT to obtain results for contact angles and other macroscopic quantities in various parameter regimes. We acknowledge financial support from European Research Council via Advanced Grant No. 247031.

  14. Scheme for contact angle and its hysteresis in a multiphase lattice Boltzmann method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Huang, Hai-bo; Lu, Xi-Yun

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a scheme for specifying contact angle and its hysteresis is incorporated into a multiphase lattice Boltzmann method. The scheme is validated through investigations of the dynamic behaviors of a droplet sliding along two kinds of walls: a smooth (ideal) wall and a rough or chemically inhomogeneous (nonideal) wall. For an ideal wall, the wettability of solid substrates is able to be prescribed. For a nonideal wall, arbitrary contact angle hysteresis can be obtained through adjusting advancing and receding angles. Significantly different phenomena can be recovered for the two kinds of walls. For instance, a droplet on an inclined ideal wall under gravity is impossible to stay stationary. However, the droplet on a nonideal wall may be pinned due to contact angle hysteresis. The steady interface shapes of the droplet on an inclined nonideal wall under gravity or in a shear flow quantitatively agree well with the previous numerical studies. Besides, the complex motion of a droplet creeping like an inchworm could be simulated. The scheme is found suitable for the study of contact line problems with and without contact angle hysteresis.

  15. Non-contact method for characterization of small size thermoelectric modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manno, Michael; Yang, Bao; Bar-Cohen, Avram

    2015-08-01

    Conventional techniques for characterization of thermoelectric performance require bringing measurement equipment into direct contact with the thermoelectric device, which is increasingly error prone as device size decreases. Therefore, the novel work presented here describes a non-contact technique, capable of accurately measuring the maximum ΔT and maximum heat pumping of mini to micro sized thin film thermoelectric coolers. The non-contact characterization method eliminates the measurement errors associated with using thermocouples and traditional heat flux sensors to test small samples and large heat fluxes. Using the non-contact approach, an infrared camera, rather than thermocouples, measures the temperature of the hot and cold sides of the device to determine the device ΔT and a laser is used to heat to the cold side of the thermoelectric module to characterize its heat pumping capacity. As a demonstration of the general applicability of the non-contact characterization technique, testing of a thin film thermoelectric module is presented and the results agree well with those published in the literature.

  16. Friction coefficient dependence on electrostatic tribocharging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgo, Thiago A. L.; Silva, Cristiane A.; Balestrin, Lia B. S.; Galembeck, Fernando

    2013-08-01

    Friction between dielectric surfaces produces patterns of fixed, stable electric charges that in turn contribute electrostatic components to surface interactions between the contacting solids. The literature presents a wealth of information on the electronic contributions to friction in metals and semiconductors but the effect of triboelectricity on friction coefficients of dielectrics is as yet poorly defined and understood. In this work, friction coefficients were measured on tribocharged polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), using three different techniques. As a result, friction coefficients at the macro- and nanoscales increase many-fold when PTFE surfaces are tribocharged, but this effect is eliminated by silanization of glass spheres rolling on PTFE. In conclusion, tribocharging may supersede all other contributions to macro- and nanoscale friction coefficients in PTFE and probably in other insulating polymers.

  17. Friction coefficient dependence on electrostatic tribocharging.

    PubMed

    Burgo, Thiago A L; Silva, Cristiane A; Balestrin, Lia B S; Galembeck, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Friction between dielectric surfaces produces patterns of fixed, stable electric charges that in turn contribute electrostatic components to surface interactions between the contacting solids. The literature presents a wealth of information on the electronic contributions to friction in metals and semiconductors but the effect of triboelectricity on friction coefficients of dielectrics is as yet poorly defined and understood. In this work, friction coefficients were measured on tribocharged polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), using three different techniques. As a result, friction coefficients at the macro- and nanoscales increase many-fold when PTFE surfaces are tribocharged, but this effect is eliminated by silanization of glass spheres rolling on PTFE. In conclusion, tribocharging may supersede all other contributions to macro- and nanoscale friction coefficients in PTFE and probably in other insulating polymers.

  18. Robust and general method for determining surface fluid flow boundary conditions in articular cartilage contact mechanics modeling.

    PubMed

    Pawaskar, Sainath Shrikant; Fisher, John; Jin, Zhongmin

    2010-03-01

    Contact detection in cartilage contact mechanics is an important feature of any analytical or computational modeling investigation when the biphasic nature of cartilage and the corresponding tribology are taken into account. The fluid flow boundary conditions will change based on whether the surface is in contact or not, which will affect the interstitial fluid pressurization. This in turn will increase or decrease the load sustained by the fluid phase, with a direct effect on friction, wear, and lubrication. In laboratory experiments or clinical hemiarthroplasty, when a rigid indenter or metallic prosthesis is used to apply load to the cartilage, there will not be any fluid flow normal to the surface in the contact region due to the impermeable nature of the indenter/prosthesis. In the natural joint, on the other hand, where two cartilage surfaces interact, flow will depend on the pressure difference across the interface. Furthermore, in both these cases, the fluid would flow freely in non-contacting regions. However, it should be pointed out that the contact area is generally unknown in advance in both cases and can only be determined as part of the solution. In the present finite element study, a general and robust algorithm was proposed to decide nodes in contact on the cartilage surface and, accordingly, impose the fluid flow boundary conditions. The algorithm was first tested for a rigid indenter against cartilage model. The algorithm worked well for two-dimensional four-noded and eight-noded axisymmetric element models as well as three-dimensional models. It was then extended to include two cartilages in contact. The results were in excellent agreement with the previous studies reported in the literature.

  19. Submerged Friction-Stir Welding (SFSW) Underwater and Under Liquid Nitrogen: An Improved Method to Join Al Alloys to Mg Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mofid, Mohammad Ammar; Abdollah-Zadeh, Amir; Ghaini, Farshid Malek; Gür, Cemil Hakan

    2012-12-01

    Submerged friction-stir welding (SFSW) underwater and under liquid nitrogen is demonstrated as an alternative and improved method for creating fine-grained welds in dissimilar metals. Plates of AZ31 (Mg alloy) and AA5083 H34 were joined by friction-stir welding in three different environments, i.e., in air, water, and liquid nitrogen at 400 rpm and 50 mm/min. The temperature profile, microstructure, scanning electron microscopy (SEM)-energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), hardness, and tensile testing results were evaluated. In the stir zone of an air-welded specimen, formation of brittle intermetallic compounds of Al3Mg2, Al12Mg17, and Al2Mg3 contributed to cracking in the weld nugget. These phases were formed because of constitutional liquation. Friction-stir welding underwater and under liquid nitrogen significantly suppresses the formation of intermetallic compounds because of the lower peak temperature. Furthermore, the temperature profiles plotted during this investigation indicate that the largest amount of ∆ T is generated by the weld under liquid nitrogen, which is performed at the lowest temperature. It is shown that in low-temperature FSW, the flow stress is higher, plastic contribution increases, and so adiabatic heating, a result of high strain and high strain-rate deformation, drives the recrystallization process beside frictional heat.

  20. Solid friction between soft filaments

    DOE PAGES

    Ward, Andrew; Hilitski, Feodor; Schwenger, Walter; ...

    2015-03-02

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments’ overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes’s drag,more » can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate how altering a filament’s elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the properties of fibrous composite materials.« less

  1. Local friction in polyolefin blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luettmer-Strathmann, Jutta

    2005-07-01

    Processes on different length scales affect the dynamics of chain molecules. The friction experienced by a short chain segment depends on both small-scale chain properties and on the local environment of the segment. As a consequence, the (monomeric) friction coefficients of the two components of a binary polymer blend will, in general, differ from each other and from the friction coefficients of the corresponding melts. In this work, we investigate local friction in polyolefin blends with the aid of a small-scale simulation approach. The polymer chains, in united atom representation, are assumed to occupy the sites of a partially filled simple cubic lattice. The simulation focuses on short chain sections with straight backbones and enumerates all possible binary contacts and relative movements of such sections. By evaluating the exact enumeration results in conjunction with equations of state for the blends, we are able to make predictions about the variation of the friction coefficients with local chain architecture and thermodynamic state (temperature, pressure, and composition). We calculate relative values of friction coefficients at temperatures well above the glass transition for blends of PEP, an alternating copolymer of polyethylene and polypropylene, with polyethylene and polyisobutylene and for blends of polyethylene and atactic polypropylene. We also investigate a blend of PEP with head-to-head polypropylene and compare our results with experimental data.

  2. Solid friction between soft filaments

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Andrew; Hilitski, Feodor; Schwenger, Walter; Welch, David; Lau, A.W. C.; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Mahadevan, L.; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-01-01

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments1,2. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments’ overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes’s drag, can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. Our findings demonstrate how altering a filament’s elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the properties of fibrous composite materials. PMID:25730393

  3. Noncontact friction via capillary shear interaction at nanoscale

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Manhee; Kim, Bongsu; Kim, Jongwoo; Jhe, Wonho

    2015-01-01

    Friction in an ambient condition involves highly nonlinear interactions of capillary force, induced by the capillary-condensed water nanobridges between contact or noncontact asperities of two sliding surfaces. Since the real contact area of sliding solids is much smaller than the apparent contact area, the nanobridges formed on the distant asperities can contribute significantly to the overall friction. Therefore, it is essential to understand how the water nanobridges mediate the ‘noncontact' friction, which helps narrow the gap between our knowledge of friction on the microscopic and macroscopic scales. Here we show, by using noncontact dynamic force spectroscopy, the single capillary bridge generates noncontact friction via its shear interaction. The pinning–depinning dynamics of the nanobridge's contact line produces nonviscous damping, which occurs even without normal load and dominates the capillary-induced hydrodynamic damping. The novel nanofriction mechanism may provide a deeper microscopic view of macroscopic friction in air where numerous asperities exist. PMID:26066909

  4. Noncontact friction via capillary shear interaction at nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Lee, Manhee; Kim, Bongsu; Kim, Jongwoo; Jhe, Wonho

    2015-06-12

    Friction in an ambient condition involves highly nonlinear interactions of capillary force, induced by the capillary-condensed water nanobridges between contact or noncontact asperities of two sliding surfaces. Since the real contact area of sliding solids is much smaller than the apparent contact area, the nanobridges formed on the distant asperities can contribute significantly to the overall friction. Therefore, it is essential to understand how the water nanobridges mediate the 'noncontact' friction, which helps narrow the gap between our knowledge of friction on the microscopic and macroscopic scales. Here we show, by using noncontact dynamic force spectroscopy, the single capillary bridge generates noncontact friction via its shear interaction. The pinning-depinning dynamics of the nanobridge's contact line produces nonviscous damping, which occurs even without normal load and dominates the capillary-induced hydrodynamic damping. The novel nanofriction mechanism may provide a deeper microscopic view of macroscopic friction in air where numerous asperities exist.

  5. The effect of friction in coulombian damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahad, H. S.; Tudor, A.; Vlase, M.; Cerbu, N.; Subhi, K. A.

    2017-02-01

    The study aimed to analyze the damping phenomenon in a system with variable friction, Stribeck type. Shock absorbers with limit and dry friction, is called coulombian shock-absorbers. The physical damping vibration phenomenon, in equipment, is based on friction between the cushioning gasket and the output regulator of the shock-absorber. Friction between them can be dry, limit, mixture or fluid. The friction is depending on the contact pressure and lubricant presence. It is defined dimensionless form for the Striebeck curve (µ friction coefficient - sliding speed v). The friction may damp a vibratory movement or can maintain it (self-vibration), depending on the µ with v (it can increase / decrease or it can be relative constant). The solutions of differential equation of movement are obtained for some work condition of one damper for automatic washing machine. The friction force can transfer partial or total energy or generates excitation energy in damper. The damping efficiency is defined and is determined analytical for the constant friction coefficient and for the parabolic friction coefficient.

  6. A partly-contacted epitaxial lateral overgrowth method applied to GaN material

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Ming; Zhang, Jincheng; Duan, Xiaoling; Shan, Hengsheng; Yu, Ting; Ning, Jing; Hao, Yue

    2016-01-01

    We have discussed a new crystal epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) method, partly-contacted ELO (PC-ELO) method, of which the overgrowth layer partly-contacts with underlying seed layer. The passage also illustrates special mask structures with and without lithography and provides three essential conditions to achieve the PC-ELO method. What is remarkable in PC-ELO method is that the tilt angle of overgrowth stripes could be eliminated by contacting with seed layer. Moreover, we report an improved monolayer microsphere mask method without lithography of PC-ELO method, which was used to grow GaN. From the results of scanning electron microscopy, cathodoluminescence, x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscope (AFM), overgrowth layer shows no tilt angle relative to the seed layer and high quality coalescence front (with average linear dislocation density <6.4 × 103 cm−1). Wing stripes peak splitting of the XRD rocking curve due to tilt is no longer detectable. After coalescence, surface steps of AFM show rare discontinuities due to the low misorientation of the overgrowth regions. PMID:27033154

  7. Friction experiments with a capstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Eugene

    1991-01-01

    The force of static friction on a cord wrapped through an angle θ around a rough-surfaced cylinder increases exponentially with θ. A small tension T1 at one end of the cord, maintaining contact between cord and cylinder, provides the condition for a substantially larger tension, of maximum value T2=T1 exp(μsθ), at the other end. The validity of this relationship is studied for the kinetic friction case. The suitability of this system for an undergraduate experiment is discussed, together with practical applications—the donkey engine and the capstan—with a digression on sea chanties.

  8. Friction welding method of hot isostatic press can closure for the ICPP calcine immobilization program

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, S.M.; Reed, T.R.; Swainston, R.C

    1993-09-01

    An investigation of various closure techniques was performed in an effort to meet requirements for closure of evacuated waste cans to be used at Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company`s Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. Although other sealing techniques are available, welding was considered to be the best for sealing the cans. For various reasons. techniques other than welding are not suitable for cans that are subject to the Hot Isostatic Press (HIP) process. For example. elastomeric seals. solders. and brazing would,not withstand the temperature associated (approximately 1000 degrees centigrade) with the HIP process. Mechanical joining techniques such as threading, crimping, and swaging could result in the joint opening as the can wall is deformed during HIP process. Unlike the above joint methods, welding results in physical joining of the lid or plug to the can itself, thus the wall would have to be ruptured before leakage would occur. This document investigates welding techniques for application to the can closure.

  9. Evaluation of the occlusal contact of crowns fabricated with the bite impression method.

    PubMed

    Makino, Sachi; Okada, Daizo; Shin, Chiharu; Ogura, Reiko; Ikeda, Masaomi; Miura, Hiroyuki

    2013-09-30

    In prosthodontic treatment, reconstruction of a proper occlusal contact relationship is very important as well as reconstruction of a proper interproximal relationship and marginal fitness. Unfortunately, occlusal relationships are sometimes lost in the process of occlusal adjustment of crowns. The purpose of this study was to compare the occlusal contacts of single crown fabricated by two different types of impression techniques. Nine subjects, whose molars required treatment with crown restoration, were enrolled in this study. Full cast crowns were fabricated using two types of impression techniques: the conventional impression method (CIM) and the bite impression method (BIM). The occlusal contacts of crowns were precisely evaluated at the following stages: after occlusal adjustment on the articulator (Step 0), before occlusal adjustment in the mouth (Step 1), after occlusal adjustment at the intercuspal position (Step 2), and after occlusal adjustment during lateral and protrusive excursions (Step 3). The number of occlusal contacts of the crowns on the functional cusps fabricated with BIM was significantly greater than that with CIM after occlusal adjustment. For this reason, the crowns fabricated with BIM might have a more functionally desirable occlusal surface compared to the crowns fabricated with CIM.

  10. Real data assimilation for optimization of frictional parameters and prediction of afterslip in the 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake inferred from slip velocity by an adjoint method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Masayuki; Miyazaki, Shin'ichi; Ishikawa, Yoichi; Hiyoshi, Yoshihisa; Ito, Kosuke; Hirahara, Kazuro

    2015-10-01

    Data assimilation is a technique that optimizes the parameters used in a numerical model with a constraint of model dynamics achieving the better fit to observations. Optimized parameters can be utilized for the subsequent prediction with a numerical model and predicted physical variables are presumably closer to observations that will be available in the future, at least, comparing to those obtained without the optimization through data assimilation. In this work, an adjoint data assimilation system is developed for optimizing a relatively large number of spatially inhomogeneous frictional parameters during the afterslip period in which the physical constraints are a quasi-dynamic equation of motion and a laboratory derived rate and state dependent friction law that describe the temporal evolution of slip velocity at subduction zones. The observed variable is estimated slip velocity on the plate interface. Before applying this method to the real data assimilation for the afterslip of the 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake, a synthetic data assimilation experiment is conducted to examine the feasibility of optimizing the frictional parameters in the afterslip area. It is confirmed that the current system is capable of optimizing the frictional parameters A-B, A and L by adopting the physical constraint based on a numerical model if observations capture the acceleration and decaying phases of slip on the plate interface. On the other hand, it is unlikely to constrain the frictional parameters in the region where the amplitude of afterslip is less than 1.0 cm d-1. Next, real data assimilation for the 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake is conducted to incorporate slip velocity data inferred from time dependent inversion of Global Navigation Satellite System time-series. The optimized values of A-B, A and L are O(10 kPa), O(102 kPa) and O(10 mm), respectively. The optimized frictional parameters yield the better fit to the observations and the better prediction skill of slip

  11. Comparison of two methods for calculating the frictional properties of articular cartilage using a simple pendulum and intact mouse knee joints.

    PubMed

    Drewniak, Elizabeth I; Jay, Gregory D; Fleming, Braden C; Crisco, Joseph J

    2009-08-25

    In attempts to better understand the etiology of osteoarthritis, a debilitating joint disease that results in the degeneration of articular cartilage (AC) in synovial joints, researchers have focused on joint tribology, the study of joint friction, lubrication, and wear. Several different approaches have been used to investigate the frictional properties of articular cartilage. In this study, we examined two analysis methods for calculating the coefficient of friction (micro) using a simple pendulum system and BL6 murine knee joints (n=10) as the fulcrum. A Stanton linear decay model (Lin micro) and an exponential model that accounts for viscous damping (Exp micro) were fit to the decaying pendulum oscillations. Root mean square error (RMSE), asymptotic standard error (ASE), and coefficient of variation (CV) were calculated to evaluate the fit and measurement precision of each model. This investigation demonstrated that while Lin micro was more repeatable, based on CV (5.0% for Lin micro; 18% for Exp micro), Exp micro provided a better fitting model, based on RMSE (0.165 degrees for Exp micro; 0.391 degrees for Lin micro) and ASE (0.033 for Exp micro; 0.185 for Lin micro), and had a significantly lower coefficient of friction value (0.022+/-0.007 for Exp micro; 0.042+/-0.016 for Lin micro) (p=0.001). This study details the use of a simple pendulum for examining cartilage properties in situ that will have applications investigating cartilage mechanics in a variety of species. The Exp mu model provided a more accurate fit to the experimental data for predicting the frictional properties of intact joints in pendulum systems.

  12. Note: A rigid piezo motor with large output force and an effective method to reduce sliding friction force

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Ying; Lu, Qingyou; Hou, Yubin

    2014-05-15

    We present a completely practical TunaDrive piezo motor. It consists of a central piezo stack sandwiched by two arm piezo stacks and two leg piezo stacks, respectively, which is then sandwiched and spring-clamped by a pair of parallel polished sapphire rods. It works by alternatively fast expanding and contracting the arm/leg stacks while slowly expanding/contracting the central stack simultaneously. The key point is that sufficiently fast expanding and contracting a limb stack can make its two sliding friction forces well cancel, resulting in the total sliding friction force is <10% of the total static friction force, which can help increase output force greatly. The piezo motor's high compactness, precision, and output force make it perfect in building a high-quality harsh-condition (vibration resistant) atomic resolution scanning probe microscope.

  13. Changes in the structure of the surface layer of metal materials upon friction and electric current loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadin, V. V.

    2013-09-01

    Dependences of the electric conductivity of a contact and wear intensity of metal materials on the electric current density in sliding friction are obtained. It is established that alloying of the material basis leads to faster damage of the friction surface. The presence of about 40 аt.% oxygen in the surface layer is detected by the Auger spectrometry method. It is demonstrated by the x-ray diffraction method that FeO formed in the surface layer leads to an increase in the electric conductivity of the contact.

  14. An improved method for simultaneous determination of frictional pressure drop and vapor volume fraction in vertical flow boiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klausner, J. F.; Chao, B. T.; Soo, S. L.

    1990-01-01

    The two-phase frictional pressure drop and vapor volume fraction in the vertical boiling and adiabatic flow of the refrigerant, R11, have been simultaneously measured by a liquid balancing column and differential magnetic reluctance pressure transducers. An account is given of the experimental apparatus and procedure, data acquisition and analysis, and error estimation employed. All values of two-phase multipliers evaluated on the basis of the measured frictional pressure drop data in vertical upflow fall in the range bounded by the predictions of the Chisholm correlation and the homogeneous model.

  15. Contact stresses in meshing spur gear teeth: Use of an incremental finite element procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, Chih-Ming; Huston, Ronald L.; Oswald, Fred B.

    1992-01-01

    Contact stresses in meshing spur gear teeth are examined. The analysis is based upon an incremental finite element procedure that simultaneously determines the stresses in the contact region between the meshing teeth. The teeth themselves are modeled by two dimensional plain strain elements. Friction effects are included, with the friction forces assumed to obey Coulomb's law. The analysis assumes that the displacements are small and that the tooth materials are linearly elastic. The analysis procedure is validated by comparing its results with those for the classical two contacting semicylinders obtained from the Hertz method. Agreement is excellent.

  16. Non-contact radio frequency shielding and wave guiding by multi-folded transformation optics method

    PubMed Central

    Madni, Hamza Ahmad; Zheng, Bin; Yang, Yihao; Wang, Huaping; Zhang, Xianmin; Yin, Wenyan; Li, Erping; Chen, Hongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Compared with conventional radio frequency (RF) shielding methods in which the conductive coating material encloses the circuits design and the leakage problem occurs due to the gap in such conductive material, non-contact RF shielding at a distance is very promising but still impossible to achieve so far. In this paper, a multi-folded transformation optics method is proposed to design a non-contact device for RF shielding. This “open-shielded” device can shield any object at a distance from the electromagnetic waves at the operating frequency, while the object is still physically open to the outer space. Based on this, an open-carpet cloak is proposed and the functionality of the open-carpet cloak is demonstrated. Furthermore, we investigate a scheme of non-contact wave guiding to remotely control the propagation of surface waves over any obstacles. The flexibilities of such multi-folded transformation optics method demonstrate the powerfulness of the method in the design of novel remote devices with impressive new functionalities. PMID:27841358

  17. Method for analyzing the chemical composition of liquid effluent from a direct contact condenser

    DOEpatents

    Bharathan, Desikan; Parent, Yves; Hassani, A. Vahab

    2001-01-01

    A computational modeling method for predicting the chemical, physical, and thermodynamic performance of a condenser using calculations based on equations of physics for heat, momentum and mass transfer and equations of equilibrium thermodynamics to determine steady state profiles of parameters throughout the condenser. The method includes providing a set of input values relating to a condenser including liquid loading, vapor loading, and geometric characteristics of the contact medium in the condenser. The geometric and packing characteristics of the contact medium include the dimensions and orientation of a channel in the contact medium. The method further includes simulating performance of the condenser using the set of input values to determine a related set of output values such as outlet liquid temperature, outlet flow rates, pressures, and the concentration(s) of one or more dissolved noncondensable gas species in the outlet liquid. The method may also include iteratively performing the above computation steps using a plurality of sets of input values and then determining whether each of the resulting output values and performance profiles satisfies acceptance criteria.

  18. Non-contact radio frequency shielding and wave guiding by multi-folded transformation optics method.

    PubMed

    Madni, Hamza Ahmad; Zheng, Bin; Yang, Yihao; Wang, Huaping; Zhang, Xianmin; Yin, Wenyan; Li, Erping; Chen, Hongsheng

    2016-11-14

    Compared with conventional radio frequency (RF) shielding methods in which the conductive coating material encloses the circuits design and the leakage problem occurs due to the gap in such conductive material, non-contact RF shielding at a distance is very promising but still impossible to achieve so far. In this paper, a multi-folded transformation optics method is proposed to design a non-contact device for RF shielding. This "open-shielded" device can shield any object at a distance from the electromagnetic waves at the operating frequency, while the object is still physically open to the outer space. Based on this, an open-carpet cloak is proposed and the functionality of the open-carpet cloak is demonstrated. Furthermore, we investigate a scheme of non-contact wave guiding to remotely control the propagation of surface waves over any obstacles. The flexibilities of such multi-folded transformation optics method demonstrate the powerfulness of the method in the design of novel remote devices with impressive new functionalities.

  19. Influence of dynamic load on friction behavior of human articular cartilage, stainless steel and polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel as artificial cartilage.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Su, Yonglin; Wang, Jianping; Wu, Gang; Wang, Chengtao

    2010-01-01

    Many biomaterials are being developed to be used for cartilage substitution and hemiarthroplasty implants. The lubrication property is a key feature of the artificial cartilage. The frictional behavior of human articular cartilage, stainless steel and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) hydrogel were investigated under cartilage-on-PVA hydrogel contact, cartilage-on-cartilage contact and cartilage-on-stainless steel contact using pin-on-plate method. Tests under static load, cyclic load and 1 min load change were used to evaluate friction variations in reciprocating motion. The results showed that the lubrication property of cartilage-on-PVA hydrogel contact and cartilage-on-stainless steel contact were restored in both 1 min load change and cyclic load tests. The friction coefficient of PVA hydrogel decreased from 0.178 to 0.076 in 60 min, which was almost one-third of the value under static load in continuous sliding tests. In each test, the friction coefficient of cartilage-on-cartilage contact maintained far lower value than other contacts. It is indicated that a key feature of artificial cartilage is the biphasic lubrication properties.

  20. Effect of nature of oxygen interactions on friction of titanium, aluminum, and molybdenum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    Friction studies were conducted with a gold pin contacting titanium, aluminum, and molybdenum surfaces after exposure to oxygen with various methods. Oxygen was adsorbed on the surface, it reacted with the surface, and the surface was ion bombarded with oxygen. The presence of oxygen was monitored with Auger spectroscopy. Titanium friction varied with the mode of the metal-oxygen interaction. It was highest with the adsorbed oxygen and least with ion bombardment using oxygen. Aluminum exhibited lower friction values for the reacted and the ion bombarded surfaces than for the surface having the adsorbed layer. With molybdenum the friction coefficients were generally the same despite the nature of the surface treatment with oxygen.

  1. Methods of determining the contact between a probe and a surface under scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nien, C.-H.; Tsai, C. H.; Shin, K. Y.; Jian, W. B.

    2006-10-15

    Based on the charging effect common to various kinds of electron microscopy, we have developed novel methods of determining 'when' and 'where' a probe starts to contact an electrically isolated surface. The touchdown of an electrically grounded probe leads to an acute change in the imaging contrast of the contacted surface, which also causes a rapid jump (ranging from a few to tens of picoamperes) of the grounding current. Thus, the detection of contact can be carried out in both qualitative and quantitative manners, providing a basis for establishing relevant standard procedures. In addition, we have achieved the spatial mapping of the contact point(s) using a specially designed lithographical pattern with two mutually vertical sets of parallel conductive lines. The precision of this mapping technique is simply determined by the pitch of parallel lines, which can be as small as the capability achievable in e-beam lithography. A possible 'one-probe' version of the electrical characterization is also discussed with the same underlying principle, which may turn out to be indispensable for various studies and applications of nanostructures. Further development along this track is promising to realize an instrumentally simple version of 'scanning electron spectroscopy' with various modes.

  2. Wettability Tests of Polymer Films and Fabrics and Determination of Their Surface Energy by Contact-Angle Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    of two methods described in this section. For films, a static contact - angle setup using the sessile drop method was utilized. The setup consists...can’t be used, as fabric roughness causes absorption of the single drop . To measure the liquid-solid contact angle for fabrics, we use the Wilhelmy...polyethylene film. Prior to plasma exposure, a drop of water was placed on the film and the contact angle was 98°. In this case, the surface can be

  3. The Study of Layer-by-Layer Ultrathin Films by the Dynamic Contact Angle Method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinyu; Luo, Guobin; Cao, Weixiao

    2001-06-01

    The self-assembly film fabricated via the layer-by-layer technique was studied by the dynamic contact angle (DCA) method (wilhelmy plate method). The used polyelectrolytes are poly(diallyl-dimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA), poly(etheleneimine) (PEI), diphenylamine-4-diazonium-formaldehyde resin (DR), 2-nitro-N-methyl-4-diazonium-formaldehyde resin (NDR), and poly(sodium-p-styrenesulfonate) (PSS). For the self-assembly systems of PDDA/PSS, PEI/PSS, DR/PSS, and NDR/PSS, their individual contact angle fluctuates regularly with the fabrication of each layer, while the magnitude of different systems' contact angle depends on the participant polycation. The re-organization of components and the adjacent layer interpenetration are presented here to explain this phenomena. We also found that DR or NDR can adsorb itself via the layer-by-layer method to form multilayer film, and the hydrophobic interaction is put forward to effect this process. Moreover, the procedure of washing and drying after adsorption was studied and considered as a prerequisite for the successful fabrication, especially of the same charge carried components. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  4. On laminar and turbulent friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Karman, TH

    1946-01-01

    Report deals, first with the theory of the laminar friction flow, where the basic concepts of Prandtl's boundary layer theory are represented from mathematical and physical points of view, and a method is indicated by means of which even more complicated cases can be treated with simple mathematical means, at least approximately. An attempt is also made to secure a basis for the computation of the turbulent friction by means of formulas through which the empirical laws of the turbulent pipe resistance can be applied to other problems on friction drag. (author)

  5. A novel method to study contact inhibition of locomotion using micropatterned substrates

    PubMed Central

    Scarpa, Elena; Roycroft, Alice; Theveneau, Eric; Terriac, Emmanuel; Piel, Matthieu; Mayor, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Summary The concept of contact inhibition of locomotion (CIL) describes the ability of a cell to change the direction of its movement after contact with another cell. It has been shown to be responsible for physiological and developmental processes such as wound healing, macrophage dispersion and neural crest cell migration; whereas its loss facilitates cancer cell invasion and metastatic dissemination. Different assays have been developed to analyze CIL in tissue culture models. However, these methods have several caveats. Collisions happen at low frequency between freely migrating cells and the orientation of the cells at the time of contact is not predictable. Moreover, the computational analysis required by these assays is often complicated and it retains a certain degree of discretion. Here, we show that confinement of neural crest cell migration on a single dimension by using a micropatterned substrate allows standardized and predictable cell–cell collision. CIL can thus easily be quantified by direct measurement of simple cellular parameters such as the distance between nuclei after collision. We tested some of the signaling pathways previously identified as involved in CIL, such as small GTPases and non-canonical Wnt signaling, using this new method for CIL analysis. The restricted directionality of migration of cells in lines is a powerful strategy to obtain higher predictability and higher efficiency of the CIL response upon cell–cell collisions. PMID:24143276

  6. Nondestructive Method for Mapping Metal Contact Diffusion in In2O3 Thin-Film Transistors

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The channel width-to-length ratio is an important transistor parameter for integrated circuit design. Contact diffusion into the channel during fabrication or operation alters the channel width and this important parameter. A novel methodology combining atomic force microscopy and scanning Kelvin probe microscopy (SKPM) with self-consistent modeling is developed for the nondestructive detection of contact diffusion on active devices. Scans of the surface potential are modeled using physically based Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) simulations when the transistor terminals are grounded and under biased conditions. The simulations also incorporate the tip geometry to investigate its effect on the measurements due to electrostatic tip–sample interactions. The method is particularly useful for semiconductor– and metal–semiconductor interfaces where the potential contrast resulting from dopant diffusion is below that usually detectable with scanning probe microscopy. PMID:27581104

  7. A hierarchical estimator development for estimation of tire-road friction coefficient

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xudong; Göhlich, Dietmar

    2017-01-01

    The effect of vehicle active safety systems is subject to the friction force arising from the contact of tires and the road surface. Therefore, an adequate knowledge of the tire-road friction coefficient is of great importance to achieve a good performance of these control systems. This paper presents a tire-road friction coefficient estimation method for an advanced vehicle configuration, four-motorized-wheel electric vehicles, in which the longitudinal tire force is easily obtained. A hierarchical structure is adopted for the proposed estimation design. An upper estimator is developed based on unscented Kalman filter to estimate vehicle state information, while a hybrid estimation method is applied as the lower estimator to identify the tire-road friction coefficient using general regression neural network (GRNN) and Bayes' theorem. GRNN aims at detecting road friction coefficient under small excitations, which are the most common situations in daily driving. GRNN is able to accurately create a mapping from input parameters to the friction coefficient, avoiding storing an entire complex tire model. As for large excitations, the estimation algorithm is based on Bayes' theorem and a simplified “magic formula” tire model. The integrated estimation method is established by the combination of the above-mentioned estimators. Finally, the simulations based on a high-fidelity CarSim vehicle model are carried out on different road surfaces and driving maneuvers to verify the effectiveness of the proposed estimation method. PMID:28178332

  8. A hierarchical estimator development for estimation of tire-road friction coefficient.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xudong; Göhlich, Dietmar

    2017-01-01

    The effect of vehicle active safety systems is subject to the friction force arising from the contact of tires and the road surface. Therefore, an adequate knowledge of the tire-road friction coefficient is of great importance to achieve a good performance of these control systems. This paper presents a tire-road friction coefficient estimation method for an advanced vehicle configuration, four-motorized-wheel electric vehicles, in which the longitudinal tire force is easily obtained. A hierarchical structure is adopted for the proposed estimation design. An upper estimator is developed based on unscented Kalman filter to estimate vehicle state information, while a hybrid estimation method is applied as the lower estimator to identify the tire-road friction coefficient using general regression neural network (GRNN) and Bayes' theorem. GRNN aims at detecting road friction coefficient under small excitations, which are the most common situations in daily driving. GRNN is able to accurately create a mapping from input parameters to the friction coefficient, avoiding storing an entire complex tire model. As for large excitations, the estimation algorithm is based on Bayes' theorem and a simplified "magic formula" tire model. The integrated estimation method is established by the combination of the above-mentioned estimators. Finally, the simulations based on a high-fidelity CarSim vehicle model are carried out on different road surfaces and driving maneuvers to verify the effectiveness of the proposed estimation method.

  9. Mesh Size Control of Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitenis, Angela; Uruena, Juan Manuel; Schulze, Kyle D.; Cooper, Andrew C.; Angelini, Thomas E.; Sawyer, W. Gregory

    Soft, permeable sliding interfaces in aqueous environments are ubiquitous in nature but their ability to maintain high lubricity in a poor lubricant (water) has not been well understood. Hydrogels are excellent materials for fundamental soft matter and biotribology studies due to their high water content. While mesh size controls the material and transport properties of a hydrogel, its effects on friction were only recently explored. Polyacrylamide hydrogels slid in a Gemini (self-mated) interface produced low friction under low speeds, low pressures, macroscopic contact areas, and room temperature aqueous environments. The friction coefficients at these interfaces are lowest at low speeds and are speed-independent. This behavior is due to thermal fluctuations at the interface separating the surfaces, with water shearing in this region being the main source of dissipation. We found that mesh size had an inverse correlation with friction. We further investigated a transition from this behavior at higher speeds, and found that the transition speed correlated with the mesh size and relaxation time of the polymer network. Very soft and correspondingly large mesh size Gemini hydrogels show superlubricity under specific conditions with friction being less than 0.005.

  10. Characterization of Thermoelectric Materials and Contacts by an Enhanced Harman Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Eduardo

    This work develops a strategy for thermoelectric characterization by transient Harman method under non-ideal contact and boundary conditions. A thermoelectric transport model is presented that accounts for the effects of thermal and electrical contact resistances and heat transport through electrodes and supporting substrate. Parasitic effects play a large role in controlling the temperature difference across thin thermoelectric films on substrate. Analytical expressions for the temperature difference across the thermoelectric sample are provided to aid in the separate determination of the Seebeck coefficient, and thermal conductivity of the sample, and to quantify the parasitic effects. An electrical scanning probe technique was used to extract the intrinsic electrical resistivity of the sample as well as to study the electrical contact resistance between the sample and its electrodes and copper pad. A thermal characterization experimental setup employs the Harman method under bipolar current excitation over a wide range of currents, to allow Peltier only, and combined Peltier and Joule heating effects to control the temperature difference across the sample. Proof of concept experiments were performed on commercial thermoelectric pellets mounted on the original ceramic substrate. Excellent results were obtained for the thermoelectric properties of the samples with higher thickness, compared with the manufacturer values. On another hand, assuming these properties for the smaller samples, the thermal and electrical contact resistivities calculated with this technique were very consistent, in the order of 10 -7 m2 K/W and 10-10 m2 O, respectively. Additionally, a comparable theoretical approach was employed to predict the cooling power or to design a thermoelectric nanowire heat pump for cooling hot spots in thermal management applications.

  11. Fingerprints are unlikely to increase the friction of primate fingerpads.

    PubMed

    Warman, Peter H; Ennos, A Roland

    2009-07-01

    It is generally assumed that fingerprints improve the grip of primates, but the efficiency of their ridging will depend on the type of frictional behaviour the skin exhibits. Ridges would be effective at increasing friction for hard materials, but in a rubbery material they would reduce friction because they would reduce contact area. In this study we investigated the frictional performance of human fingertips on dry acrylic glass using a modified universal mechanical testing machine, measuring friction at a range of normal loads while also measuring the contact area. Tests were carried out on different fingers, fingers at different angles and against different widths of acrylic sheet to separate the effects of normal force and contact area. The results showed that fingertips behaved more like rubbers than hard solids; their coefficients of friction fell at higher normal forces and friction was higher when fingers were held flatter against wider sheets and hence when contact area was greater. The shear stress was greater at higher pressures, suggesting the presence of a biofilm between the skin and the surface. Fingerprints reduced contact area by a factor of one-third compared with flat skin, however, which would have reduced the friction; this casts severe doubt on their supposed frictional function.

  12. An elastography method based on the scanning contact resonance of a piezoelectric cantilever

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Ji; Li, Faxin

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Most tissues may become significantly stiffer than their normal states when there are lesions inside. The tissue's modulus can then act as an identification parameter for clinic diagnosis of tumors or fibrosis, which leads to elastography. This study introduces a novel elastography method that can be used for modulus imaging of superficial organs. Methods: This method is based on the scanning contact-resonance of a unimorph piezoelectric cantilever. The cantilever vibrates in its bending mode with the tip pressed tightly on the sample. The contact resonance frequency of the cantilever-sample system is tracked at each scanning point, from which the sample's modulus can be derived based on a beam dynamic model and a contact mechanics model. Scanning is performed by a three-dimensional motorized stage and the whole system is controlled by a homemade software program based on LabVIEW. Results: Testing onin vitro beef tissues indicates that the fat and the muscle can be easily distinguished using this system, and the accuracy of the modulus measurement can be comparable with that of nanoindentation. Imaging on homemade gelatin phantoms shows that the depth information of the abnormalities can be qualitatively obtained by varying the pressing force. The detection limit of this elastography method is specially examined both experimentally and numerically. Results show that it can detect the typical lesions in superficial organs with the depth of several centimeters. The lateral resolution of this elastography method/system is better than 0.5 mm, and could be further enhanced by using more scanning points. Conclusions: The proposed elastography system can be regarded as a sensitive palpation robot, which may be very promising in early diagnosis of tumors in superficial organs such as breast and thyroid.

  13. Linking microstructural evolution and macro-scale friction behavior in metals [Predicting the friction behavior of metals using a microstructural evolution model

    DOE PAGES

    Argibay, N.; Chandross, M.; Cheng, S.; ...

    2016-11-21

    A correlation is established between the macro-scale friction regimes of metals and a transition between two dominant atomistic mechanisms of deformation. Metals tend to exhibit bi-stable friction behavior—low and converging or high and diverging. These general trends in behavior are shown to be largely explained using a simplified model based on grain size evolution, as a function of contact stress and temperature, and are demonstrated for self-mated pure copper and gold sliding contacts. Specifically, the low-friction regime (where µ < 0.5) is linked to the formation of ultra-nanocrystalline surface films (10–20 nm), driving toward shear accommodation by grain boundary sliding.more » Above a critical combination of stress and temperature—demonstrated to be a material property—shear accommodation transitions to dislocation dominated plasticity and high friction, with µ > 0.5. We utilize a combination of experimental and computational methods to develop and validate the proposed structure–property relationship. As a result, this quantitative framework provides a shift from phenomenological to mechanistic and predictive fundamental understanding of friction for crystalline materials, including engineering alloys.« less

  14. Linking microstructural evolution and macro-scale friction behavior in metals [Predicting the friction behavior of metals using a microstructural evolution model

    SciTech Connect

    Argibay, N.; Chandross, M.; Cheng, S.; Michael, J. R.

    2016-11-21

    A correlation is established between the macro-scale friction regimes of metals and a transition between two dominant atomistic mechanisms of deformation. Metals tend to exhibit bi-stable friction behavior—low and converging or high and diverging. These general trends in behavior are shown to be largely explained using a simplified model based on grain size evolution, as a function of contact stress and temperature, and are demonstrated for self-mated pure copper and gold sliding contacts. Specifically, the low-friction regime (where µ < 0.5) is linked to the formation of ultra-nanocrystalline surface films (10–20 nm), driving toward shear accommodation by grain boundary sliding. Above a critical combination of stress and temperature—demonstrated to be a material property—shear accommodation transitions to dislocation dominated plasticity and high friction, with µ > 0.5. We utilize a combination of experimental and computational methods to develop and validate the proposed structure–property relationship. As a result, this quantitative framework provides a shift from phenomenological to mechanistic and predictive fundamental understanding of friction for crystalline materials, including engineering alloys.

  15. Adjustments to local friction in multifinger prehension.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Tomoko; Latash, Mark L; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M

    2007-07-01

    The authors studied the effects of surface friction at the digit-object interface on digit forces and moments when 12 participants statically held an object in a 5-digit grasp. The authors changed low-friction contact (LFC) with rayon and high-friction contact (HFC) with sandpaper independently for each digit in all 32 possible combinations. Normal forces of the thumb and virtual finger (VF), an imagined finger with a mechanical effect equal to that of the 4 fingers, increased with the thumb at LFC or with an increase in the number of fingers at LFC. When the thumb was at LFC, the thumb tangential force decreased. The VF tangential force decreased when the number of fingers at LFC increased. The interaction of the local responses to friction and the synergic responses necessary to maintain the equilibrium explain the coordination of individual digit forces.

  16. Rheological effects on friction in elastohydrodynamic lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trachman, E. G.; Cheng, H. S.

    1973-01-01

    An analytical and experimental investigation is presented of the friction in a rolling and sliding elastohydrodynamic lubricated contact. The rheological behavior of the lubricant is described in terms of two viscoelastic models. These models represent the separate effects of non-Newtonian behavior and the transient response of the fluid. A unified description of the non-Newtonian shear rate dependence of the viscosity is presented as a new hyperbolic liquid model. The transient response of viscosity, following the rapid pressure rise encountered in the contact, is described by a compressional viscoelastic model of the volume response of a liquid to an applied pressure step. The resulting momentum and energy equations are solved by an iterative numerical technique, and a friction coefficient is calculated. The experimental study was performed, with two synthetic paraffinic lubricants, to verify the friction predictions of the analysis. The values of friction coefficient from theory and experiment are in close agreement.

  17. Adjustments to Local Friction in Multifinger Prehension

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Tomoko; Latash, Mark L.; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2010-01-01

    The authors studied the effects of surface friction at the digit–object interface on digit forces and moments when 12 participants statically held an object in a 5-digit grasp. The authors changed low-friction contact (LFC) with rayon and high-friction contact (HFC) with sandpaper independently for each digit in all 32 possible combinations. Normal forces of the thumb and virtual finger (VF), an imagined finger with a mechanical effect equal to that of the 4 fingers, increased with the thumb at LFC or with an increase in the number of fingers at LFC. When the thumb was at LFC, the thumb tangential force decreased. The VF tangential force decreased when the number of fingers at LFC increased. The interaction of the local responses to friction and the synergic responses necessary to maintain the equilibrium explain the coordination of individual digit forces. PMID:17664170

  18. Influence of Particle Velocity of Copper on Emitter Contact by Cold-Spray Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Byungjun; Lee, Kyung Dong; Lee, Jong-gun; Choi, Jae-Wook; Yoon, Sam S.; Kang, Yoonmook; Lee, Hae-seok; Kim, Donghwan

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we investigated cold-sprayed copper as a front contact for crystalline silicon solar cells. Copper powder was deposited on a monocrystalline silicon wafer with variation of the particle velocity during deposition. The particle velocity was varied by varying the heating temperature from 250 to 400 °C using a gas pressure of 0.45 MPa. The particle velocities were calculated using empirical equations, and were found to increase with an increase in the carrier gas temperature. Grid patterns were formed on a phosphorus-doped n-type emitter of a p-type silicon substrate. The electrode thickness increased with increasing particle velocity. The electrical properties of the grids were evaluated using the transfer length method. The specific contact resistance of the n-type emitter was in the range of 2.6-26.4 mΩ-cm2. Damage to the p- n junction was investigated via minority carrier lifetime measurement of the substrate. The copper-silicon interface was evaluated using transmission electron microscopy. The contact properties were affected by the interface conditions.

  19. Measuring stream discharge by non-contact methods: A proof-of-concept experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Costa, J.E.; Spicer, K.R.; Cheng, R.T.; Haeni, F.P.; Melcher, N.B.; Thurman, E.M.; Plant, W.J.; Keller, W.C.

    2000-01-01

    This report describes an experiment to make a completely non-contact open-channel discharge measurement. A van-mounted, pulsed doppler (10GHz) radar collected surface-velocity data across the 183-m wide Skagit River, Washington at a USGS streamgaging station using Bragg scattering from short waves produced by turbulent boils on the surface of the river. Surface velocities were converted to mean velocities for 25 sub-sections by assuming a normal open-channel velocity profile (surface velocity times 0.85). Channel cross-sectional area was measured using a 100 MHz ground-penetrating radar antenna suspended from a cableway car over the river. Seven acoustic doppler current profiler discharge measurements and a conventional current-meter discharge measurement were also made. Three non-contact discharge measurements completed in about a 1-hour period were within 1 % of the gaging station rating curve discharge values. With further refinements, it is thought that open-channel flow can be measured reliably by non-contact methods.

  20. Friction Phenomenon in Contact Stress Problems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    specimen. A virtual reference grating created by interference of two coherent beams A and B is superimposed on the specimen grating. The specimen and...where f is the frequency of the virtual reference grating, x is the wavelength of the light employed, a is the angle of incidence (Fig. 3), N is the...orders the test case was run again. This corresponds to a similar order of interpolation error which might occur with a virtual reference grating of 240

  1. Internally mounted thin-liquid-film skin-friction meter - Comparison with floating element method with and without pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornung, Hans; Seto, Jeffrey

    1991-01-01

    A new, robust oil film skin friction meter was designed and constructed. This enables skin friction measurements remotely and from within the model, as well as avoiding the need to know the location of the leading edge of the film. The instrument was tested by comparing measurements with those given by a floating element gage in a zero pressure gradient flat plate turbulent boundary layer. Both instruments agreed satisfactorily with the well-known curve for this case. Significant discrepancies between the two instruments were observed in the case of adverse and favorable pressure gradients. The discrepancies were of opposite sign for opposite-sign pressure gradients as is consistent with the error expected from floating-element gages. Additional confidence in the oil film technique is supplied by the good agreement of the behavior of the film profile with predictions from lubrication theory.

  2. Characteristics of Friction Welding Between Solid Bar of 6061 Al Alloy and Pipe of Al-Si12CuNi Al Cast Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, M.; Sakaguchi, H.; Kusaka, M.; Kaizu, K.; Takahashi, T.

    2015-11-01

    This paper describes the characteristics of friction welding between a solid bar of 6061 Al alloy and a pipe of Al-Si12CuNi (AC8A) Al cast alloy. When the joint was made by a continuous drive friction welding machine (conventional method), the AC8A portion of the joint showed heavy deformation and the AA6061 showed minimal deformation. In particular, the joint could not be successfully made with following conditions, because AC8A pipe side crushed due to insufficient friction heat or high pressure: a short friction time such as 0.3 s, high friction pressure such as 100 MPa, or high forge pressure such as 150 MPa. The heavy deformation of AC8A side was caused by increasing friction torque during braking. To prevent braking deformation until rotation stops, a joint was made by a continuous drive friction welding machine that has an electromagnetic clutch. When the clutch was released, the relative speed between both specimens simultaneously decreased to zero. When the joint was made with friction pressure of 25 MPa, friction time of 0.3 s, and forge pressure of 125 MPa, the joining could be successfully achieved and that had approximately 16% efficiency. In addition, when the joint was made with friction pressure of 25 MPa, friction time of 0.7 s, and forge pressure of 125 MPa, it had approximately 54% efficiency. However, all joints showed the fracture between the traveled weld interface and the AC8A side, because the weld interface traveled in the longitudinal direction of AC8A side from the first contacted position of both weld faying surfaces. Hence, it was clarified that the friction welding between a solid bar of AA6061 and a cast pipe of AC8A was not desirable since the traveling phenomena of the weld interface were caused by the combination of the shapes of the friction welding specimens.

  3. Tactile texture and friction of soft sponge surfaces.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Akira; Suzuki, Makoto; Imai, Yumi; Nonomura, Yoshimune

    2015-06-01

    We evaluated the tactile texture and frictional properties of five soft sponges with various cell sizes. The frictional forces were measured by a friction meter containing a contact probe with human-finger-like geometry and mechanical properties. When the subjects touched these sponges with their fingers, hard-textured sponges were deemed unpleasant. This tactile feeling changed with friction factors including friction coefficients, their temporal patterns, as well as mechanical and shape factors. These findings provide useful information on how to control the tactile textures of various sponges.

  4. Friction and plasticity between self-affine surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Binquan; Robbins, Mark; Harrison, Judith

    2006-03-01

    Simulations are used to study the contact area and adhesion between two amorphous solids with self-affine fractal surfaces, and the results are compared to continuum calculations. The friction between non-adhesive surfaces is proportional to load, but the coefficient of friction increases with roughness. The friction is much higher than expected for elasticallly deforming surfaces,^* and substantial plastic deformation is observed. Indeed, friction forces for different surface roughness collapse when plotted against the number of plastic rearrangements per unit sliding distance. Including adhesion leads to an increase in both friction and plasticity. ^* M. H. Müser, L. Wenning, and M. O. Robbins, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 1295 (2001).

  5. Friction of ice measured using lateral force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bluhm, Hendrik; Inoue, Takahito; Salmeron, Miquel

    2000-03-15

    The friction of nanometer thin ice films grown on mica substrates is investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Friction was found to be of similar magnitude as the static friction of ice reported in macroscopic experiments. The possible existence of a lubricating film of water due to pressure melting, frictional heating, and surface premelting is discussed based on the experimental results using noncontact, contact, and lateral force microscopy. We conclude that AFM measures the dry friction of ice due to the low scan speed and the squeezing out of the water layer between the sharp AFM tip and the ice surface. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  6. A new method for measuring low resistivity contacts between silver and YBa2Cu3O(7-x) superconductor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsi, Chi-Shiung; Haertling, Gene H.; Sherrill, Max D.

    1991-01-01

    Several methods of measuring contact resistivity between silver electrodes and YBa2Cu3O(7-x) superconductors were investigated; including the two-point, the three point, and the lap-joint methods. The lap-joint method was found to yield the most consistent and reliable results and is proposed as a new technique for this measurement. Painting, embedding, and melting methods were used to apply the electrodes to the superconductor. Silver electrodes produced good ohmic contacts to YBa2Cu3O(7-x) superconductors with contact resistivities as low as 1.9 x 10 to the -9th ohm sq cm.

  7. REDUCED ENGINE FRICTION AND WEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Ron Matthews

    2005-05-01

    This Final Technical Report discusses the progress was made on the experimental and numerical tasks over the duration of this project regarding a new technique for decreasing engine friction and wear via liner rotation. The experimental subtasks involved quantifying the reduction in engine friction for a prototype rotating liner engine relative to a comparable baseline engine. Both engine were single cylinder conversions of nominally identical production four-cylinder engines. Hot motoring tests were conducted initially and revealed that liner rotation decreased engine friction by 20% under motoring conditions. A well-established model was used to estimate that liner rotation should decrease the friction of a four-cylinder engine by 40% under hot motoring conditions. Hot motoring tear-down tests revealed that the crankshaft and valve train frictional losses were essentially the same for the two engines, as expected. However, the rotating liner engine had much lower (>70%) piston assembly friction compared to the conventional engine. Finally, we used the Instantaneous IMEP method to compare the crank-angle resolved piston assembly friction for the two engines. Under hot motoring conditions, these measurements revealed a significant reduction in piston assembly friction, especially in the vicinity of compression TDC when the lubrication regime transitions from hydrodynamic through mixed and into boundary friction. We have some remaining problems with these measurements that we expect to solve during the next few weeks. We will then perform these measurements under firing conditions. We also proposed to improve the state-of-the-art of numerical modeling of piston assembly friction for conventional engines and then to extend this model to rotating liner engines. Our research team first modeled a single ring in the Purdue ring-liner test rig. Our model showed good agreement with the test rig data for a range of speeds and loads. We then modeled a complete piston

  8. An approach to directional drilling simulation: finite element and finite segment methods with contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbatani, Siamak; Callejo, Alfonso; Kövecses, József; Kalantari, Masoud; Marchand, Nick R.; Dargahi, Javad

    2016-06-01

    Directional drilling is a popular technique for oil well drilling. Accurate prediction of the directional performance is critical in order to achieve the desired well profile. Simplified geometry methods are, to date, the industry standard for predicting directional performance. A comprehensive, high-fidelity method for the simulation of directional drilling is presented here. It consists of a detailed discretization of the actual geometry and a rigorous application of two modeling techniques: the finite element and the finite segment methods. By doing so, the dynamic problem is addressed from two different yet complementary perspectives: structural mechanics and rigid-body motion. Collision detection and contact dynamics algorithms are also presented. Results show that both methods agree in terms of the dynamic response, and that the build rate estimations are consistent with available experimental data. Owing to the framework efficiency and physics-based nature, the presented tools are very well-suited for design engineering and real-time simulation.

  9. A frictional sliding algorithm for liquid droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, Roger A.

    2016-12-01

    This work presents a new frictional sliding algorithm for liquid menisci in contact with solid substrates. In contrast to solid-solid contact, the liquid-solid contact behavior is governed by the contact line, where a contact angle forms and undergoes hysteresis. The new algorithm admits arbitrary meniscus shapes and arbitrary substrate roughness, heterogeneity and compliance. It is discussed and analyzed in the context of droplet contact, but it also applies to liquid films and solids with surface tension. The droplet is modeled as a stabilized membrane enclosing an incompressible medium. The contact formulation is considered rate-independent such that hydrostatic conditions apply. Three distinct contact algorithms are needed to describe the cases of frictionless surface contact, frictionless line contact and frictional line contact. For the latter, a predictor-corrector algorithm is proposed in order to enforce the contact conditions at the contact line and thus distinguish between the cases of advancing, pinning and receding. The algorithms are discretized within a monolithic finite element formulation. Several numerical examples are presented to illustrate the numerical and physical behavior of sliding droplets.

  10. Coordinated Water Under Confinement Eases Sliding Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defante, Adrian; Dhopotkar, Nishad; Dhinojwala, Ali

    Water is essential to a number of interfacial phenomena such as the lubrication of knee joints, protein folding, mass transport, and adsorption processes. We have used a biaxial friction cell to quantify underwater friction between a hydrophobic elastomeric lens and a hydrophobic self-assembled monolayer in the presence of surfactant solutions. To gain an understanding of the role of water in these processes we have coupled this measurement with surface sensitive sum frequency generation to directly probe the molecular constitution of the confined contact interface. We observe that role of confined coordinated water between two hydrophobic substrates covered with surfactants is the key to obtaining a low coefficient of friction.

  11. Load-Dependent Friction Hysteresis on Graphene.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhijiang; Egberts, Philip; Han, Gang Hee; Johnson, A T Charlie; Carpick, Robert W; Martini, Ashlie

    2016-05-24

    Nanoscale friction often exhibits hysteresis when load is increased (loading) and then decreased (unloading) and is manifested as larger friction measured during unloading compared to loading for a given load. In this work, the origins of load-dependent friction hysteresis were explored through atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments of a silicon tip sliding on chemical vapor deposited graphene in air, and molecular dynamics simulations of a model AFM tip on graphene, mimicking both vacuum and humid air environmental conditions. It was found that only simulations with water at the tip-graphene contact reproduced the experimentally observed hysteresis. The mechanisms underlying this friction hysteresis were then investigated in the simulations by varying the graphene-water interaction strength. The size of the water-graphene interface exhibited hysteresis trends consistent with the friction, while measures of other previously proposed mechanisms, such as out-of-plane deformation of the graphene film and irreversible reorganization of the water molecules at the shearing interface, were less correlated to the friction hysteresis. The relationship between the size of the sliding interface and friction observed in the simulations was explained in terms of the varying contact angles in front of and behind the sliding tip, which were larger during loading than unloading.

  12. A STUDY OF AUTOPHOBIC LIQUIDS ON PLATINUM BY THE CONTACT POTENTIAL METHOD,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Several nonspreading liquids were investigated on a platinum surface using contact potential and contact angle measurements to determine whether or...three chlorinated biphenyls. Each liquid was shown to be autophobic by the contact potential difference and contact angle data for adsorbed monolayers...mechanisms of surface interaction with the metal surface. It was also found that raising the relative humidity affects the autophobic contact angle of

  13. Low friction wear resistant graphene films

    DOEpatents

    Sumant, Anirudha V.; Berman, Diana; Erdemir, Ali

    2017-02-07

    A low friction wear surface with a coefficient of friction in the superlubric regime including graphene and nanoparticles on the wear surface is provided, and methods of producing the low friction wear surface are also provided. A long lifetime wear resistant surface including graphene exposed to hydrogen is provided, including methods of increasing the lifetime of graphene containing wear surfaces by providing hydrogen to the wear surface.

  14. Method for growing a back surface contact on an imaging detector used in conjunction with back illumination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blacksberg, Jordana (Inventor); Hoenk, Michael Eugene (Inventor); Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method is provided for growing a back surface contact on an imaging detector used in conjunction with back illumination. In operation, an imaging detector is provided. Additionally, a back surface contact (e.g. a delta-doped layer, etc.) is grown on the imaging detector utilizing a process that is performed at a temperature less than 450 degrees Celsius.

  15. A new method to scan genomes for introgression in a secondary contact model.

    PubMed

    Geneva, Anthony J; Muirhead, Christina A; Kingan, Sarah B; Garrigan, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Secondary contact between divergent populations or incipient species may result in the exchange and introgression of genomic material. We develop a simple DNA sequence measure, called Gmin, which is designed to identify genomic regions experiencing introgression in a secondary contact model. Gmin is defined as the ratio of the minimum between-population number of nucleotide differences in a genomic window to the average number of between-population differences. Although it is conceptually simple, one advantage of Gmin is that it is computationally inexpensive relative to model-based methods for detecting gene flow and it scales easily to the level of whole-genome analysis. We compare the sensitivity and specificity of Gmin to those of the widely used index of population differentiation, FST, and suggest a simple statistical test for identifying genomic outliers. Extensive computer simulations demonstrate that Gmin has both greater sensitivity and specificity for detecting recent introgression than does FST. Furthermore, we find that the sensitivity of Gmin is robust with respect to both the population mutation and recombination rates. Finally, a scan of Gmin across the X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster identifies candidate regions of introgression between sub-Saharan African and cosmopolitan populations that were previously missed by other methods. These results show that Gmin is a biologically straightforward, yet powerful, alternative to FST, as well as to more computationally intensive model-based methods for detecting gene flow.

  16. Development of an in vitro method to estimate the sensitization induction level of contact allergens.

    PubMed

    Galbiati, Valentina; Papale, Angela; Marinovich, Marina; Gibbs, Sue; Roggen, Erwin; Corsini, Emanuela

    2017-04-05

    No standardized in vitro methods to assess potency of skin sensitizers are available. Recently, we standardized a procedure which combines the epidermal equivalent potency assay with assessment of IL-18 to provide a single test for identification and classification of skin sensitizers. This current study aimed to extend tested chemicals, and to provide a simple in vitro method for estimation of the expected sensitization induction level interpolating in vitro EC50 and IL-18 SI2 values to predict LLNA EC3 and/or human NOEL from standards curves generated using reference contact allergens. Reconstituted human epidermis was challenged with 14 chemicals not previously tested benzoquinone, chlorpromazine, chloramine T, benzyl salicylate, diethyl maleate, dihydroeugenol, 2,4-dichloronitrobenzene, benzyl cinnamate, imidazolidinyl urea, and limonene as contact sensitizers while benzyl alcohol, isopropanol, dimethyl isophthalate and 4-aminobenzoic acid as non-sensitizers in the LLNA. Where for benzyl salicylate and benzyl cinnamate no sensitization was observed in human predictive studies, positive responses to benzyl alcohol and dimethyl isophthalate were reported. The proposed method correlates better with human data, correctly predicting substances incorrectly classified by LLNA. With the exception of benzoquinone (interference with both MTT and IL-18 ELISA), and chloramine T (underestimated in the interpolation), a good estimation of LLNA EC3 and in vivo available human NOEL values was obtained.

  17. A New Method to Scan Genomes for Introgression in a Secondary Contact Model

    PubMed Central

    Geneva, Anthony J.; Muirhead, Christina A.; Kingan, Sarah B.; Garrigan, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Secondary contact between divergent populations or incipient species may result in the exchange and introgression of genomic material. We develop a simple DNA sequence measure, called Gmin, which is designed to identify genomic regions experiencing introgression in a secondary contact model. Gmin is defined as the ratio of the minimum between-population number of nucleotide differences in a genomic window to the average number of between-population differences. Although it is conceptually simple, one advantage of Gmin is that it is computationally inexpensive relative to model-based methods for detecting gene flow and it scales easily to the level of whole-genome analysis. We compare the sensitivity and specificity of Gmin to those of the widely used index of population differentiation, FST, and suggest a simple statistical test for identifying genomic outliers. Extensive computer simulations demonstrate that Gmin has both greater sensitivity and specificity for detecting recent introgression than does FST. Furthermore, we find that the sensitivity of Gmin is robust with respect to both the population mutation and recombination rates. Finally, a scan of Gmin across the X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster identifies candidate regions of introgression between sub-Saharan African and cosmopolitan populations that were previously missed by other methods. These results show that Gmin is a biologically straightforward, yet powerful, alternative to FST, as well as to more computationally intensive model-based methods for detecting gene flow. PMID:25874895

  18. A study on high-speed rolling contact between a wheel and a contaminated rail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xin; Wen, Zefeng; Zhu, Minhao; Jin, Xuesong

    2014-10-01

    A 3-D explicit finite element model is developed to investigate the transient wheel-rail rolling contact in the presence of rail contamination or short low adhesion zones (LAZs). A transient analysis is required because the wheel passes by a short LAZ very quickly, especially at high speeds. A surface-to-surface contact algorithm (by the penalty method) is employed to solve the frictional rolling contact between the wheel and the rail meshed by solid elements. The LAZ is simulated by a varying coefficient of friction along the rail. Different traction efforts and action of the traction control system triggered by the LAZ are simulated by applying a time-dependent driving torque to the wheel axle. Structural flexibilities of the vehicle-track system are considered properly. Analysis focuses on the contact forces, creepage, contact stresses and the derived frictional work and plastic deformation. It is found that the longitudinal contact force and the maximum surface shear stress in the contact patch become obviously lower in the LAZ and much higher as the wheel re-enters the dry rail section. Consequently, a higher wear rate and larger plastic flow are expected at the location where the dry contact starts to be rebuilt. In other words, contact surface damages such as wheel flats and rail burns may come into being because of the LAZ. Length of the LAZ, the traction level, etc. are varied. The results also show that local contact surface damages may still occur as the traction control system acts.

  19. Bilateral Teleoperation Method Using an Autonomous Control Based on Information on Contact Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Keiichi; Ohnishi, Kouhei

    In procedures that involve remote control, such as remote surgery, it is necessary to operate a robot in a remote location in a sensitive environment; the treatment of internal organs is an example of such a procedure. In this paper, we propose a method for autonomous hazard avoidance control that is based on information on the contact environment. The proposed method involves the use of bilateral control. During safe operations, systems are controlled by bilateral control. During dangerous operations, a slave system is controlled autonomously so as to avoid dangerous operations. In order to determine the degree of operation risk, fuzzy set theory is applied to the force exerted on the environment. Further, variable compliance control based on the force exerted on the environment is utilized to avoid the risk. The effectiveness of the proposed method is confirmed by experimental results.

  20. Graphene based composite grease for elastohydrodynamic lubricated point contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jayant; Anand, Gautam; Kumar, Deepak; Tandon, Naresh

    2016-09-01

    This paper present tribological and dynamic evaluation of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets as an additive in lithium grease. Highly dispersion mixing method is used to mix rGO in commercial lithium grease to prepare composite grease. Tribological contact under investigation is established by ball-on-disc configuration. Friction, noise and vibration responses are recorded for the point contact lubricated with composite grease and base lithium grease in rolling and sliding- induced-rolling conditions. Relative speed of disc with the speed of ball is varied in order to get sliding-induced-rolling contact. Observations are performed at different nornal loads and fixed speed in elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) regime. Results show existence of an optimum concentration (0.4% w/w) of rGO in commercial lithium grease. Friction, noise and vibration are recorded minimum for concentration of 0.4% w/w of rGO in commercial lithium grease. Reduction in friction coefficient is recorded up to 30% and 20% for rolling contact and sliding-induced-rolling contact respectively at optimum concentration of rGO in lithium grease. The lamellar structure of rGO in base grease controls the lubricity of concentrated point contact.

  1. Differences in glenohumeral translations calculated with three methods: Comparison of relative positions and contact point.

    PubMed

    Matsuki, Keisuke; Kenmoku, Tomonori; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Sugaya, Hiroyuki; Banks, Scott A

    2016-06-14

    Several published articles have reported 3-dimensional glenohumeral kinematics using model-image registration techniques. However, different methods to compute the translations were used in these articles. The purpose of this study was to compare glenohumeral translations calculated with three different methods. Fifteen healthy males with a mean age of 31 years (range, 27-36 years old) were enrolled in this study. Fluoroscopic images during scapular plane elevation were recorded at 30 frames per second for the right shoulder in each subject, and CT-derived models of the humerus and the scapula were matched with the silhouette of the bones in the fluoroscopic images using model-image registration techniques. Glenohumeral translations were computed with three methods: relative position of the origins of the humeral and scapular models, contact points of the two models, and relative positions based upon the calculated glenohumeral center of rotation (CoR). In the supero-inferior direction, translations calculated with the three methods were roughly parallel, with the maximum difference of 1.6mm (P<0.001). In the antero-posterior direction, translations with the origins and CoR were parallel; however, translations computed with the origins and contact point describe arcs that differ by almost 2mm at low humeral elevation angles and converge at higher degrees of humeral elevation (P<0.001). Glenohumeral translations calculated using three methods showed statistically significant differences that may be important when comparing detailed results of different studies. However, these relatively small differences are likely subclinical, so that all three methods can reasonably be used for description of glenohumeral translations.

  2. Approach of semi-infinite dynamic lattice Green's function and energy dissipation due to phonons in solid friction between commensurate surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajita, Seiji; Washizu, Hitoshi; Ohmori, Toshihide

    2010-09-01

    To investigate the relationship between solid friction and energy dissipation due to phonon, we developed a coupled-oscillator surface model that consists of an infinitely large number of bulk atoms in a solid. This method is formulated using a dynamic lattice Green’s function. A self-consistent scheme used for achieving a steady state and a fast convolution method that reduces the high computational overhead are also presented. Furthermore, a methodology to decompose the friction coefficient with the surface phonon modes is obtained. The energy absorption band corresponding to the wave number of the surface phonon is found. These approaches clarify the role of the energy-dissipation mechanism in sliding friction. Two-dimensional friction models in which both surfaces have same lattice constant, i.e., commensurate surfaces, are used to demonstrate these methods. In the analysis of a friction system between flat surfaces, energy transfer from the kinetic energy of a sliding solid to low-frequency surface phonons in the counter solid occurs in the presence of bulk atoms. The energy dissipation into the bulk system leads to friction. We also investigate a friction system between periodically contacting surfaces. It is found that surface phonons with nonzero wave number act as channels for energy dissipation and alter the friction profile depending on the size of the contact area. When the contact size is so large that a sufficient number of the nonzero wave number modes act as the energy-dissipation channels, the profile of the friction decomposition with the nonzero wave number modes exhibits good agreement with that estimated by a simple continuum model.

  3. [Enhanced bio-contact oxidation method to treat petrochemical wastewater by tourmaline].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Kan; Ma, Fang; Sun, Tie-Heng; Feng, Zhi-Yun

    2009-06-15

    Aiming at the complexity and poor biochemical degradability of petrochemical wastewater, the effect of tourmaline on bio-contact oxidation method was investigated. The influent and effluent of petrochemical wastewater were analyzed by GC-MS, and the carrier was observed in reactor by scanning electron microscope (SEM). As the loading rates of influent were COD 0.64-0.72 kg/(m3 x d) and NH4(+) -N 0.058-0.072 kg/(m3 x d), the start up of pilot system supported tourmaline were improved, and the removal rate of COD and NH4(+) -N of effluent was increased 8.7% and 6.4%, respectively. Organic pollutants of 100 kinds were detected in influent, mainly including aromatic hydrocarbon, acids, lipids, phenols, alcohols, and alkanes compounds. The removal efficiency of organic pollutant of reactor 1 with tourmaline was higher than reactor 2 without tourmaline. The number of organic pollutant in effluent from reactor 1 and 2 were 14 and 28, respectively. Zoogloea can be observed on carrier supported tourmaline, and the biomass of bacteria was predominant. The efficiency of bio-contact oxidation method on petrochemical wastewater treatment can be enhanced by tourmaline.

  4. Gas desorption during friction of amorphous carbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusanov, A.; Fontaine, J.; Martin, J.-M.; Mogne, T. L.; Nevshupa, R.

    2008-03-01

    Gas desorption induced by friction of solids, i.e. tribodesorption, is one of the numerous physical and chemical phenomena, which arise during friction as result of thermal and structural activation of material in a friction zone. Tribodesorption of carbon oxides, hydrocarbons, and water vapours may lead to significant deterioration of ultra high vacuum conditions in modern technological equipment in electronic, optoelectronic industries. Therefore, knowledge of tribodesorption is crucial for the performance and lifetime of vacuum tribosystems. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings are interesting materials for vacuum tribological systems due to their high wear resistance and low friction. Highly hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films are known to exhibit extremely low friction coefficient under high vacuum or inert environment, known as 'superlubricity' or 'superlow friction'. However, the superlow friction period is not always stable and then tends to spontaneous transition to high friction. It is supposed that hydrogen supply from the bulk to the surface is crucial for establishing and maintaining superlow friction. Thus, tribodesorption can serve also as a new technique to determine the role of gases in superlow friction mechanisms. Desorption of various a-C:H films, deposited by PECVD, ion-beam deposition and deposition using diode system, has been studied by means of ultra-high vacuum tribometer equipped with a mass spectrometer. It was found that in superlow friction period desorption rate was below the detection limit in the 0-85 mass range. However, transition from superlow friction to high friction was accompanied by desorption of various gases, mainly of H2 and CH4. During friction transition, surfaces were heavily damaged. In experiments with DLC films with low hydrogen content tribodesorption was significant during the whole experiment, while low friction was not observed. From estimation of maximum surface temperature during sliding contact it was

  5. Novel experimental methods for investigating high speed friction of titanium-aluminum-vanadium/tool steel interface and dynamic failure of extrinsically toughened DRA composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irfan, Mohammad Abdulaziz

    Dynamic deformation, flow, and failure are integral parts of all dynamic processes in materials. Invariably, dynamic failure also involves the relative sliding of one component of the material over the other. Advances in elucidation of these failure mechanisms under high loading rates has been of great interest to scientists working in this area. The need to develop new dynamic mechanical property tests for materials under well characterized and controllable loading conditions has always been a challenge to experimentalists. The current study focuses on the development of two experimental methods to study some aspects of dynamic material response. The first part focuses on the development of a single stage gas gun facility for investigating high-speed metal to metal interfacial friction with applications to high speed machining. During the course of this investigation a gas gun was designed and built capable of accelerating projectiles upto velocities of 1 km/s. Using this gas gun pressure-shear plate impact friction experiments were conducted to simulate conditions similar to high speed machining at the tool-workpiece interface. The impacting plates were fabricated from materials representing the tribo-pair of interest. Accurate measurements of the interfacial tractions, i.e. the normal pressure and the frictional stress at the tribo-pair interface, and the interfacial slip velocity could be made by employing laser interferometry. Normal pressures of the order of 1-2 MPa were generated and slipping velocities of the order of 50 m/s were obtained. In order to illustrate the structure of the constitutive law governing friction, the study included experimental investigation of frictional response to step changes in normal pressure and interfacial shear stress. The results of these experiments indicate that sliding resistance for Ti6Al4V/CH steel interface is much lower than measured under quasi-static sliding conditions. Also the temperature at the interface strongly

  6. A three-dimensional volume-of-fluid method for reconstructing and advecting three-material interfaces forming contact lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Ashish; Raessi, Mehdi

    2016-02-01

    We introduce a piecewise-linear, volume-of-fluid method for reconstructing and advecting three-dimensional interfaces and contact lines formed by three materials. The new method employs a set of geometric constructs that can be used in conjunction with any volume-tracking scheme. In this work, we used the mass-conserving scheme of Youngs to handle two-material cells, perform interface reconstruction in three-material cells, and resolve the contact line. The only information required by the method is the available volume fraction field. Although the proposed method is order dependent and requires a priori information on material ordering, it is suitable for typical contact line applications, where the material representing the contact surface is always known. Following the reconstruction of the contact surface, to compute the interface orientation in a three-material cell, the proposed method minimizes an error function that is based on volume fraction distribution around that cell. As an option, the minimization procedure also allows the user to impose a contact angle. Performance of the proposed method is assessed via both static and advection test cases. The tests show that the new method preserves the accuracy and mass-conserving property of the Youngs method in volume-tracking three materials.

  7. Stress evaluations under rolling/sliding contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kannel, J. W.; Tevaarwerk, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    The state of stress beneath traction drive type of contacts were analyzed. Computing stresses and stress reversals on various planes for points beneath the surface were examined. The effect of tangential and axial friction under gross slip conditions is evaluated with the models. Evaluations were performed on an RC (rolling contact) tester configuration and it is indicated that the classical fatigue stresses are not altered by friction forces typical of lubricated contact. Higher values of friction can result in surface shear reversal that exceeds the stresses at the depth of maximum shear reversal under rolling contact.

  8. DOE assay methods used for characterization of contact-handled transuranic waste

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, F.J. ); Caldwell, J.T. )

    1991-08-01

    US Department of Energy methods used for characterization of contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste prior to shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) are described and listed by contractor site. The methods described are part of the certification process. All CH-TRU waste must be assayed for determination of fissile material content and decay heat values prior to shipment and prior to storage on-site. Both nondestructive assay (NDA) and destructive assay methods are discussed, and new NDA developments such as passive-action neutron (PAN) crate counter improvements and neutron imaging are detailed. Specifically addressed are assay method physics; applicability to CH-TRU wastes; calibration standards and implementation; operator training requirements and practices; assay procedures; assay precision, bias, and limit of detection; and assay limitation. While PAN is a new technique and does not yet have established American Society for Testing and Materials. American National Standards Institute, or Nuclear Regulatory Commission guidelines or methods describing proper calibration procedures, equipment setup, etc., comparisons of PAN data with the more established assay methods (e.g., segmented gamma scanning) have demonstrated its reliability and accuracy. Assay methods employed by DOE have been shown to reliable and accurate in determining fissile, radionuclide, alpha-curie content, and decay heat values of CH-TRU wastes. These parameters are therefore used to characterize packaged waste for use in certification programs such as that used in shipment of CH-TRU waste to the WIPP. 36 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  9. Laser surgery in dermatology with application of superthin optical fiber by contact and noncontact method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garipova, A.; Denissov, I. A.; Solodovnikov, Vladimir; Digilova, I.

    1999-06-01

    At present nobody doubts the advantages of minor laser surgery over the conventional one.Bloodless manipulations, ablation, minor injury to the tissues while using laser equipment ensures its wide application in such fields as dermatology and cosmetology, especially since the semiconductor lasers because available at the technological market. No doubt CO2 and solid laser are still playing an important role, however, their imperfect fiber optic qualities limit their use in these field,s where advantages of diode lasers with flexible and fine quartz-polymeric optical fiber are obvious. The elaboration of new diode surgical lasers made it possible to invent new surgical equipment for solving many medical problems in the optimal way. Application of contact and noncontact laser methods in dermatology, gynecological plastic surgery and otolaryngology is discussed. A combined use of these methods demonstrates a positive effect on therapy results and healing time.

  10. Research of non-contact measurement method for outline dimensions of some special workpiece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Qiaoling; Guo, Yongcai

    2016-11-01

    In industrial production, machine vision is widely used in a variety of automated testing industry, because of its non-contact, high precision, fast detection time, etc. This paper introduces a nondestructive detection system for the outline dimensions of a kind of special workpiece. For the purpose of controlling the quality of image, an ultra-high-resolution monochrome CCD image sensor is adopted to capture source image. Then it's image preprocessing, including image clipping processing, grey scale processing, image denoising, etc. Then it was the progress of edge extraction, using gradient operator to get its contour edge, then a piecewise fitting method to get the dimensions. This method achieves once measuring multiple outline dimensions without moving the workpiece. It has been used in industrial production. The result sees its practical value for meeting the production needs, with the advantages of high accuracy, fast speed high stability of the measurement system through experiments.

  11. A technique to determine friction at the fingertips.

    PubMed

    Savescu, Adriana V; Latash, Mark L; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M

    2008-02-01

    This article proposes a technique to calculate the coefficient of friction for the fingertip- object interface. Twelve subjects (6 males and 6 females) participated in two experiments. During the first experiment (the imposed displacement method), a 3-D force sensor was moved horizontally while the subjects applied a specified normal force (4 N, 8 N, 12 N) on the surface of a sensor covered with different materials (sandpaper, cotton, rayon, polyester, and silk). The normal force and the tangential force (i.e., the force due to the sensor motion) were recorded. The coefficient of friction (mu(d)) was calculated as the ratio between the tangential force and the normal force. In the second experiment (the beginning slip method), a small instrumented object was gripped between the index finger and the thumb, held stationary in the air, and then allowed to drop. The weight (200 g, 500 g, and 1,000 g) and the surface (sandpaper, cotton, rayon, polyester, and silk) in contact with the digits varied across trials. The same sensor as in the first experiment was used to record the normal force (in a horizontal direction) and the tangential force (in the vertical direction). The slip force (i.e., the minimal normal force or grip force necessary to prevent slipping) was estimated as the force at the moment when the object just began to slip. The coefficient of friction was calculated as the ratio between the tangential force and the slip force. The results show that (1) the imposed displacement method is reliable; (2) except sandpaper, for all other materials the coefficient of friction did not depend on the normal force; (3) the skin-sandpaper coefficient of friction was the highest mu(d) =0.96+/-0.09 (for 4-N normal force) and the skin-rayon rayon coefficient of friction was the smallest mu(d) =0.36+/-0.10; (4) no significant difference between the coefficients of friction determined with the imposed displacement method and the beginning slip method was observed. We view

  12. An evaluation and adjustment method for natural proximal contacts of crowns using diamond dental strips: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daniel S; Rothchild, John A; Suh, Kyu-Won

    2013-08-01

    The best way to adjust proximal contacts of newly fabricated indirect restorations has been a long-standing unresolved issue in dentistry. Excessively tight contacts cause incomplete seating of indirect restorations and intrusion of adjacent teeth, which leads to patient discomfort, hypersensitivity, and recurrent dental caries at the crown margins. When seating indirect restorations, interproximal relief should be restored as it exists in natural dentition. This article presents an innovative method of crown seating using diamond strips. This simple, consistent, method makes it easier for clinicians to provide comfortable and long-lasting restorations with minimal time and effort. Laboratory technicians utilize diamond strips to provide properly fitting indirect restorations that require minimal adjustment upon clinical delivery. Diamond strips also allow for accurate determination of heavier proximal contacts, allowing dentists to adjust the proximal contact properly in the patients' mouths. Clinically, restoring natural proximal contacts is a critical factor to the success of indirect restorations. Using this method standardizes proper proximal contact adjustments of laboratory-fabricated indirect restorations between dental labs and dental offices. The method also helps to limit or eliminate the lingering proximal contact issue between clinicians and laboratory technicians.

  13. An Accurate Method to Extract Specific Contact Resistivity Using Cross Bridge Kelvin Resistors,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    of current crowding. This pC is independent of I and w--in other words, only dependent on the material parameters such as sur- face doping, surface ... cleanliness and contact metal type. As contacts shrink, the total resistance contributed by the contact becomes pC 1A in the limit[8] which agrees with

  14. Looking to the Future: Non-contact Methods for Measuring Streamflow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Costa, J.E.; Cheng, R.T.; Haeni, F.P.; Melcher, N.B.; Spicer, K.R.; Plant, J.; Keller, W.C.; Hayes, K.; Wahl, T.L.; Pugh, C.A.; Oberg, K.A.; Vermeyen, T.B.

    2002-01-01

    We have conducted a series of proof-of-concept experiments to demonstrate whether it is possible to make completely non-contact open-channel discharge measurements. After an extensive evaluation of potential technologies, we concluded a combination of high-frequency (microwave) radar (for measuring surface velocity) and low-frequency radar (ground-penetrating radar) for measuring channel cross-section, had the best chance for success. The first experiment in 1999 on the Skagit River, Washington, using non-contact methods, produced a discharge value nearly exactly the same as from an ADCP and current meter. Surface-velocity data were converted to mean velocity based on measurements of the velocity profile (multiplied by 0.85), and radar signal speed in impure fresh water was measured to be 0.11-0.12 ft/ns. The weak link was thought to be the requirement to suspend the GPR antenna over the water, which required a bridge or cableway. Two contractors, expert with radar, were unsuccessful in field experiments to measure channel cross-section from the riverbank. Another series of experiments were designed to demonstrate whether both radar systems could be mounted on a helicopter, flown back and forth across a river, and provide data to compute flow. In Sept. 2000 and May 2001, a series of helicopter flights with mounted radar systems successfully measured surface velocity and channel cross-section of the Cowlitz River, Washington.

  15. Numerical analysis of tire/contact pressure using finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pranoto, Sarwo Edy; Hidayat, Royan; Tauviqirrahman, Mohammad; Bayuseno, Athanasius P.

    2016-04-01

    The interaction between the road surface and vehicle's tire may significantly determine the stability of a vehicle. We could study the tire contact-pressure to road surfaces through a numerical simulation in this present study. In particular, the main purpose of the study was to present an illustration of the effect of the varied loads to the tire, which would affect the contact pressure on the road surface sand stress distribution on the tire by employing a commercial ABAQUS software, based on the finite element method. To make the process of data analysis easier, the tire was assumed to be made from natural rubber which composition consisted of 2 layers of the inner tire and 1 layer of carcass. In pre-conditions, the tire was given air pressure as much as 17 psi, and loads as much as 2 KN, 6 KN, and 10 KN; then, the air pressure was increased to be 30 psi; consequently, the simulation results of stress distribution and deformation on each of loads condition would be acquired. The simulation results indicated that the loads carried by the tire on the vehicle were an important factor to determine the tire-stress profile.

  16. Universal Aging Mechanism for Static and Sliding Friction of Metallic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Feldmann, Michael; Dietzel, Dirk; Tekiel, Antoni; Topple, Jessica; Grütter, Peter; Schirmeisen, André

    2016-07-08

    The term "contact aging" refers to the temporal evolution of the interface between a slider and a substrate usually resulting in increasing friction with time. Current phenomenological models for multiasperity contacts anticipate that such aging is not only the driving force behind the transition from static to sliding friction, but at the same time influences the general dynamics of the sliding friction process. To correlate static and sliding friction on the nanoscale, we show experimental evidence of stick-slip friction for nanoparticles sliding on graphite over a wide dynamic range. We can assign defined periods of aging to the stick phases of the particles, which agree with simulations explicitly including contact aging. Additional slide-hold-slide experiments for the same system allow linking the sliding friction results to static friction measurements, where both friction mechanisms can be universally described by a common aging formalism.

  17. [Study on Chaotic Detection Method of Pacemaker Contact-Less Power Supply].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chenghu; Huang, Mingming; Li, Songtao

    2015-12-01

    In order to improve the reliability of cardiac pacemaker contact-less power supply technology, this paper proposes a novel application of wireless feedback voltage stabilizing technology to adjust heart disease patients with inner power supply filter circuit output voltage and current control method, to keep the output voltage stability, and to ensure that the super capacitor and cardiac pacemaker to get a stable power supply. To implement the real-time accurate voltage control with considering the primary and secondary side inductance coupling coefficient changes, the change of the external power supply voltage and load, it is necessary to test thee real-time and accurate output voltage and current value after rectifying filtering. Therefore, based on the chaotic control theory, we adopted method of phase diagram on the basis of the quick observation after rectifying filtering, so that the method of voltage and current could improve the detection time of the circuit. The phase diagram of proposed control method can be divided into 8 segments, and we got 7 zero-extreme points. When these zero-extreme points are detected, according to extreme points of the zero instantaneous values, the corresponding average values of voltage and current were obtained. Simulation and experimental results showed that using the above method can shorten the response time to less than switch devices 1/2 switching cycles, thus validating the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed detection algorithm.

  18. Calculation of contact angles at triple phase boundary in solid oxide fuel cell anode using the level set method

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiaojun; Hasegawa, Yosuke; Kohno, Haruhiko; Jiao, Zhenjun; Hayakawa, Koji; Okita, Kohei; Shikazono, Naoki

    2014-10-15

    A level set method is applied to characterize the three dimensional structures of nickel, yttria stabilized zirconia and pore phases in solid oxide fuel cell anode reconstructed by focused ion beam-scanning electron microscope. A numerical algorithm is developed to evaluate the contact angles at the triple phase boundary based on interfacial normal vectors which can be calculated from the signed distance functions defined for each of the three phases. Furthermore, surface tension force is estimated from the contact angles by assuming the interfacial force balance at the triple phase boundary. The average contact angle values of nickel, yttria stabilized zirconia and pore are found to be 143°–156°, 83°–138° and 82°–123°, respectively. The mean contact angles remained nearly unchanged after 100 hour operation. However, the contact angles just after reduction are different for the cells with different sintering temperatures. In addition, standard deviations of the contact angles are very large especially for yttria stabilized zirconia and pore phases. The calculated surface tension forces from mean contact angles were close to the experimental values found in the literature. Slight increase of surface tensions of nickel/pore and nickel/yttria stabilized zirconia were observed after operation. Present data are expected to be used not only for the understanding of the degradation mechanism, but also for the quantitative prediction of the microstructural temporal evolution of solid oxide fuel cell anode. - Highlights: • A level set method is applied to characterize the 3D structures of SOFC anode. • A numerical algorithm is developed to evaluate the contact angles at the TPB. • Surface tension force is estimated from the contact angles. • The average contact angle values are found to be 143o-156o, 83o-138o and 82o-123o. • Present data are expected to understand degradation and predict evolution of SOFC.

  19. PREFACE: The International Conference on Science of Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Kouji; Matsukawa, Hiroshi

    2007-07-01

    The first international conference on the science of friction in Japan was held at Irago, Aichi on 9-13 September 2007. The conference focused on the elementary process of friction phenomena from the atomic and molecular scale view. Topics covered in the conference are shown below.:

  20. Superlubricity and friction>
  21. Electronic and phononic contributions to friction>
  22. Friction on the atomic and molecular scales
  23. van der Waals friction and Casimir force
  24. Molecular motor and friction>
  25. Friction and adhesion in soft matter systems
  26. Wear and crack on the nanoscale
  27. Theoretical studies on the atomic scale friction and energy dissipation
  28. Friction and chaos
  29. Mechanical properties of nanoscale contacts
  30. Friction of powder
  31. The number of participants in the conference was approximately 100, registered from 11 countries. 48 oral and 29 poster talks were presented at the conference. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 23 papers devoted to the above topics of friction. The successful organization of the conference was made possible by the contribution of the members of the Organizing Committee and International Advisory Committee. The conference was made possible thanks to the financial support from Aichi University of Education and the Taihokogyo Tribology Research Foundation (TTRF), and moreover thanks to the approval societies of The Physical Society of Japan, The Surface Science Society of Japan, The Japanese Society of Tribologists and Toyota Physical and Chemical Research Institute. The details of the conference are available at http://www.science-of-friction.com . Finally we want to thank the speakers for the high quality of their talks and all participants for coming to Irago, Japan and actively contributing to the conference. Kouji Miura and Hiroshi Matsukawa Editors

  32. Apparatus and method for non-contact surface voltage probing by scanning photoelectron emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flesner, Larry D.

    1992-09-01

    An apparatus and method for non-contact sensing electrical potentials of selected regions on the surface of a sample are provided. A typical sample is an integrated circuit, electronic device, or semiconductor material. The sample is positioned within a vacuum chamber and irradiated with an ultraviolet light beam so that the material emits electrons by the photoelectric effect. The electrons have kinetic energies which are variable according to the electrical potential of the surface of the material. Emitted electrons having kinetic energies within a predetermined range are selected by an electron energy analyzer. An electron detector receives the selected electrons and produces electrical signals corresponding to the energies of said selected electrons. In another embodiment of the invention, a modulated light beam other than the ultraviolet light probe beam irradiates the material in order to produce time varying modulation of the photoelectron energy spectrum.

  1. Application of the contact transformation method to torsional problems in methyl silane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moazzen-Ahmadi, N.; Ozier, I.

    1987-11-01

    The effect of the torsional degree of freedom on redundancies in the Hamiltonian and on the dipole operator has been investigated for methyl silane-like molecules. By applying a rotational contact transformation to the torsion-rotation Hamiltonian HTR for the ground vibrational state, a systematic method is demonstrated for treating the redundancies that relate different terms in HTR. In general, with this method, the experimentally accessible molecular parameters in the reduced Hamiltonian can be related to the physically significant molecular parameters in the untransformed Hamiltonian. It is shown that HTR contains a new term which has matrix elements with selection rules (Δ K = ±3), (Δ σ = 0), and Δ vT arbitrary, where vT and σ label the torsional levels and sublevels, respectively. As a result of this term, the distortion dipole constant μD which characterizes (Δ K = ±3) matrix elements in C3 v molecules cannot, in systems like CH 3SiH 3, be ascribed entirely to centrifugal distortion but can contain a significant contribution from torsional effects. Furthermore, new transitions can appear in the pure torsional bands which may be strong enough to observe in low barrier molecules. By applying a vibrational contact transformation, the form is derived of the leading torsional terms in the dipole moment expansion. The four dipole distortion constants μ0T, μ2T, μ|;T, and μΛT which characterize these terms are related to the molecular parameters that enter the Coriolis, centrifugal distortion, and anharmonicity contributions to the vibration-torsion-rotation Hamiltonian.

  2. A numerical investigation of curve squeal in the case of constant wheel/rail friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieringer, A.

    2014-09-01

    Curve squeal is commonly attributed to self-excited vibrations of the railway wheel, which arise due to a large lateral creepage of the wheel tyre on the top of the rail during curving. The phenomenon involves stick/slip oscillations in the wheel/rail contact and is therefore strongly dependent on the prevailing friction conditions. The mechanism causing the instability is, however, still a subject of controversial discussion. Most authors introduce the negative slope of the friction characteristic as a source of the instability, while others have found that squeal can also occur in the case of constant friction due to the coupling between normal and tangential dynamics. As a contribution to this discussion, a detailed model for high-frequency wheel/rail interaction during curving is presented in this paper and evaluated in the case of constant friction. The interaction model is formulated in the time domain and includes the coupling between normal and tangential directions. Track and wheel are described as linear systems using pre-calculated impulse response functions that are derived from detailed finite element models. The nonlinear, non-steady state contact model is based on an influence function method for the elastic half-space. Real measured wheel and rail profiles are used. Numerical results from the interaction model confirm that stick/slip oscillations occur also in the case of constant friction. The choice of the lateral creepage, the value of the friction coefficient and the lateral contact position on the wheel tread are seen to have a strong influence on the occurrence and amplitude of the stick/slip oscillations. The results from the interaction model are in good qualitative agreement with previously published findings on curve squeal.

  3. Reduction of friction using piezoelectrically excited ultrasonic vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littmann, Walter; Storck, Heiner; Wallaschek, Joerg

    2001-07-01

    Piezoelectric materials are an important class of smart materials for the generation of mechanical ultrasonic vibrations. In industrial applications (for example ultrasonic cutting) the frictional contact of the vibrating tool with the workpiece is of special importance. A common observation at the contact zone is that frictional forces can be significantly reduced by superposition of ultrasonic vibrations. In this report we present a theoretical explanation for the reduction of friction. A basic system, consisting of a longitudinal ultrasonic vibrator sliding on a plane, is investigated. It is shown that a modification of Coulomb's friction law can be applied to this kind of vibrating friction contact. The macroscopically observed friction-force with ultrasonic vibration depends on the sliding velocity and the velocity of vibration: For sliding velocities higher than the vibration-amplitude the frictional force is not changed by vibration. But for small sliding velocities the friction-coefficient is significantly reduced and almost approaches zero for very slow sliding-velocity. The theoretical results were confirmed systematically by experimental investigations done on a specially designed test-rig. Energy considerations are used to calculate the ultrasonic energy which is required to achieve a prescribed reduction of the frictional forces. The model is also used for sensing the vibration-amplitude as well as the sliding-velocity without an additional sensor.

  4. Artificial tear adsorption on soft contact lenses: methods to test surfactant efficacy.

    PubMed

    Rebeix, V; Sommer, F; Marchin, B; Baude, D; Tran, M D

    2000-06-01

    Spoilage is a primary factor in the biocompatibility of soft contact lenses (SCL) within the lacrimal fluid. Tears are a complex mixture of proteins, lipids, natural surfactants and salts. The spoilation process is due to a contribution of all these components and of the nature of SCL materials themselves. The aim of this study was to set up methods to observe and quantify lacrimal deposits and to select efficient surfactants for preventing protein deposits. The present study was performed on PMMA-NVP SCL. The behaviour of SCL in presence of tears was studied by means of an in vitro artificial tear model consisting of the main tears components and quantified by a colorimetric technique (BCA) performed directly on the lenses. The nature of the deposit was observed directly by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in a liquid medium showing the same adsorption trend noticed in the quantitative results and identifying specific adsorption sites. The assessment of surfactant adsorption was performed using Maron's method, as a mean to evaluate the affinity of surfactant to the surface, while the action of selected surfactants on pre-treated SCL was assessed using the BCA method. Promising results were obtained with these two different methods which can be used easily for the pre-selection of surfactants for further cleaning solution formulation studies.

  5. Single-asperity friction during quasi-static sliding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Tristan; Pastewka, Lars; Robbins, Mark

    2015-03-01

    The static friction of an asperity is investigated using atomic-scale simulations. We explore scale effects by varying the sphere radius R and the contact radius a from nanometers to micrometers. We first consider commensurate contact between bare lattices with repulsive interactions across the interface. In small contacts, all contacting atoms move coherently and the friction coefficient μ is independent of contact radius and load. In larger contacts, interfacial slip is mediated by localized dislocations, and the static friction coefficient μ ~ (Ra0/a2) 2 / 3 , where a0 is the nearest-neighbor spacing. In very large contacts μ stops decreasing and begins to increase with a, at fixed R. The results are in sharp contrast to Cattaneo-Mindlin continuum theory where μ is independent of contact size. Separate simulations are performed to connect the results to the dislocation-based models of contact-size effects due to Hurtado and Kim, and Gao, which assume adhesive interactions between surfaces and find μ ~ (a0/a)1/2. Simulations for incommensurate contacts show a transition from superlubricity for rigid contacts to a finite friction associated with the Peierls stress in very large contacts. Support from: DMR-1006805; NSF IGERT-0801471; OCI-0963185; CMMI-0923018

  6. A Simple Measurement of the Sliding Friction Coefficient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gratton, Luigi M.; Defrancesco, Silvia

    2006-01-01

    We present a simple computer-aided experiment for investigating Coulomb's law of sliding friction in a classroom. It provides a way of testing the possible dependence of the friction coefficient on various parameters, such as types of materials, normal force, apparent area of contact and sliding velocity.

  7. Frictional Properties of Single Crystalline and Quasicrystalline Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gellman, Andrew

    2000-03-01

    The use of ultra-high vacuum surface science methods has been aplied to the problem of studying friction between single srystalline and quasicrystalline metal surfaces. A experimental apparatus has been developed that combines the ability to perform surface preparation and analysis with the ability to make measurements of macroscopic friction forces between surfaces in sliding contact. This UHV chamber allows simultaneous preparation and characterization of two sample surfaces. These are usually single crystalline samples of the same metal and can be either perfectly clean or modified by adsorbed species such as atoms or molecules. Once prepared these two surfaces can be brought into contact under an applied normal load (Fn = 0.001 0.1 N) and sheared relative to one another at constant velocity (vs = 1 100 mm/s). Both normal and shear forces are measured simultaneously enabling one to determine a coefficient of friction. This unique apparatus has been used to study a number of problems in tribology. Adsorbed species on metal surfaces serve as a lubricants and prevent direct metal-metal contact. We have addressed the issue of surface coverage effects on interfacial friction. Surfaces have been prepared with adsorbed species ranging continuously in coverage from zero monolayers to many ( 100) monolayers. These experiments have been performed with pairs of both Ni(100) and Cu(111) surfaces. The interesting observation has been that adsorbed layers of atoms have little or no influence on friction coefficients between the two surfaces at coverages below one monolayer. Adsorbed molecules such as ethanol or trifluoroethanol are more interesting in this regard. They also have little influence on friction when adsorbed at coverages of < 1 monolayer, however, once the coverage exceeds 1 monolayer the coefficient of friction drops substantially. Friction reaches its limit at coverages of 5 10 monolayer. It is quite interesting to note that these metal single crystal surface

  8. Friction Pull Plug and Material Configuration for Anti-Chatter Friction Pull Plug Weld

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littell, Justin Anderson (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A friction pull plug is provided for use in forming a plug weld in a hole in a material. The friction pull plug includes a shank and a series of three frustoconical sections. The relative sizes of the sections assure that a central one of the sections defines the initial contact point between the hole's sides. The angle defined by the central one of the sections reduces or eliminates chatter as the plug is pulled into the hole.

  9. IR-Sensography™—expanding the scope of contact-free sensing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Jens; Schunk, Stephan A.

    2005-01-01

    Capturing the response of one or more sensor materials is conventionally performed by the direct transformation of a chemical or physico-chemical signal into an electrical one. With an increasing number of sensor materials within an arrangement of sensor elements or a sensor array, problems such as contacting each single sensor, signal processing and resistance against cross-talk, harsh conditions such as corrosive atmospheres, etc are limiting factors for the further development of so-called 'chemical noses'. State-of-the-art and commercially available are arrays of eight different sensor materials, literature known in another context are sensor arrays with 256 materials on a silicon wafer, which are contacted via electrical conduits. We present here the concept of the IR-Sensography™, the use of an IR-camera as an external detector system for sensor libraries. Acting like an optical detection method, the IR-camera detects small temperature changes due to physisorption, chemisorption or other forms of interaction or reaction as an output signal in the form of radiation emitted by the multiplicity of sensor materials simultaneously. The temperature resolution of commercially available IR-camera systems can be tuned to the range below 0.1 K. Due to the separation of sensors and the detector device, reaction conditions at the sensor locus can be adapted to the analytical problem and do not need to take care of other boundary conditions which come into play with the analytical device, e.g. the IR-camera. Calibration or regeneration steps can as well be performed over the multiplicity of all sensor materials. Any given chemical compound that comes into contact with the sensor through the passing fluids will result in a specific activity pattern on a spatially fixed library of sensor materials that is unique for the given compound. While the pattern therefore serves as an identifier, the intensity of the pattern represents the quantitative amount of this compound in

  10. Solution of dynamic contact problems by implicit/explicit methods. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Salveson, M.W.; Taylor, R.L.

    1996-10-14

    The solution of dynamic contact problems within an explicit finite element program such as the LLNL DYNA programs is addressed in the report. The approach is to represent the solution for the deformation of bodies using the explicit algorithm but to solve the contact part of the problem using an implicit approach. Thus, the contact conditions at the next solution state are considered when computing the acceleration state for each explicit time step.

  11. Effects of antimony trisulfide (Sb2S3) on sliding friction of automotive brake friction materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wan Kyu; Rhee, Tae Hee; Kim, Hyun Seong; Jang, Ho

    2013-09-01

    The effect of antimony trisulfide (Sb2S3) on the tribological properties of automotive brake friction materials was investigated using a Krauss type tribometer and a 1/5 scale dynamometer with a rigid caliper. Results showed that Sb2S3 improved fade resistance by developing transfer films on the disc surface at elevated temperatures. On the other hand, the rubbing surfaces of the friction material exhibited contact plateaus with a broader height distribution when it contained Sb2S3, indicating fewer contact junctions compared to the friction material with graphite. The friction material with Sb2S3 also exhibited a lower stick-slip propensity than the friction material with graphite. The improved fade resistance with Sb2S3 is attributed to its lubricating capability sustained at high temperatures, while the lower stick-slip propensity of the friction material with Sb2S3 is associated with the slight difference between its static and kinetic coefficients of friction and high normal stiffness.

  12. Instantaneous engine frictional torque, its components and piston assembly friction

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, F.A. ); Henein, N.A. . Center for Automotive Research)

    1992-05-01

    The overall goal of this report is to document the work done to determine the instantaneous frictional torque of internal combustion engine by using a new approach known as (P-[omega]) method developed at Wayne State University. The emphasis has been to improve the accuracy of the method, and apply it to both diesel and gasoline engines under different operating conditions. Also work included an investigation to determine the effect of using advanced materials and techniques to coat the piston rings on the instantaneous engine frictional torque and the piston assembly friction. The errors in measuring the angular velocity, [omega], have been determined and found to be caused by variations in the divisions within one encoder, encoder-to-encoder variations, misalignment within the encoder itself and misalignment between the encoder and crankshaft. The errors in measuring the cylinder gas pressure, P, have been determined and found to be caused by transducer-to-transducer variations, zero drift, thermal stresses and lack of linearity. The ability of the (P-[omega]) method in determining the frictional torque of many engine components has been demonstrated. These components include valve train, fuel injection pump with and without fuel injection, and piston with and without different ring combinations. The emphasis in this part of the research program has been on the piston-ring assembly friction. The effects of load and other operating variables on IFT have been determined. The motoring test, which is widely used in industry to measure engine friction has been found to be inaccurate. The errors have been determined at different loads.

  13. Frictional characteristics of nano-scale mesoporous SiO2 thin film formed by sol-gel and self-assembly method.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gyu-Sun; Shin, Yun-Ha; Kim, Ji-Man; Kim, Tae-Sung; Lee, Young-Ze

    2009-12-01

    The pores on the surface function as an outlet for wear particles and enhance the storage of lubricants, which improves lubrication effectiveness. Mesoporous SiO2 thin films were formed by the sol-gel and self-assembly methods to have a porous structure. One of the important issues in the manufacturing of the films involves the control of the porous structure to ensure proper mechanical properties. Mesoporous materials were manufactured with two surfactants, Pluronid Polyol (F127) and Cetyltrimethylammonium Bromide (CTABr). The pores were then exposed on the surface by chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) and plasma-etching. Ball-on-disk tests with mesoporous SiO2 thin films on glass specimens were conducted. The results show that the friction coefficient and wear volume of a specimen with F127, which has a 8 nm pore size, are far lower than those of CTABr, which has a 3 nm pore size at both the dry condition and at boundary lubricated condition. This proves a significant dependency of friction and wear on pore size of mesoporous SiO2 thin films.

  14. Molecular origin of friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Zhang, Tao; Hu, Yuanzhong

    2004-01-01

    The wearless friction originating from molecular interactions has been discussed in this paper. We find that the frictional properties are closely related to the structural match of two surfaces in relative motion. For the surfaces with incommensurate structure and week inter-surface interaction, zero static and kinetic friction can be achieved. In a sliding considered as in a quasi-static state, the energy dissipation initiates when interfacial particles move in a discontinuous fashion, which gives rise to a finite kinetic friction. The state of superlubricity is a result of computer simulations, but the prediction will encourage people to look for a technical approach to realizing the state of super low friction.

  15. Novel microscopy-based screening method reveals regulators of contact-dependent intercellular transfer

    PubMed Central

    Michael Frei, Dominik; Hodneland, Erlend; Rios-Mondragon, Ivan; Burtey, Anne; Neumann, Beate; Bulkescher, Jutta; Schölermann, Julia; Pepperkok, Rainer; Gerdes, Hans-Hermann; Kögel, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Contact-dependent intercellular transfer (codeIT) of cellular constituents can have functional consequences for recipient cells, such as enhanced survival and drug resistance. Pathogenic viruses, prions and bacteria can also utilize this mechanism to spread to adjacent cells and potentially evade immune detection. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism underlying this intercellular transfer process. Here, we present a novel microscopy-based screening method to identify regulators and cargo of codeIT. Single donor cells, carrying fluorescently labelled endocytic organelles or proteins, are co-cultured with excess acceptor cells. CodeIT is quantified by confocal microscopy and image analysis in 3D, preserving spatial information. An siRNA-based screening using this method revealed the involvement of several myosins and small GTPases as codeIT regulators. Our data indicates that cellular protrusions and tubular recycling endosomes are important for codeIT. We automated image acquisition and analysis to facilitate large-scale chemical and genetic screening efforts to identify key regulators of codeIT. PMID:26271723

  16. A novel method for discovering local spatial clusters of genomic regions with functional relationships from DNA contact maps

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xihao; Shi, Christina Huan; Yip, Kevin Y.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: The three-dimensional structure of genomes makes it possible for genomic regions not adjacent in the primary sequence to be spatially proximal. These DNA contacts have been found to be related to various molecular activities. Previous methods for analyzing DNA contact maps obtained from Hi-C experiments have largely focused on studying individual interactions, forming spatial clusters composed of contiguous blocks of genomic locations, or classifying these clusters into general categories based on some global properties of the contact maps. Results: Here, we describe a novel computational method that can flexibly identify small clusters of spatially proximal genomic regions based on their local contact patterns. Using simulated data that highly resemble Hi-C data obtained from real genome structures, we demonstrate that our method identifies spatial clusters that are more compact than methods previously used for clustering genomic regions based on DNA contact maps. The clusters identified by our method enable us to confirm functionally related genomic regions previously reported to be spatially proximal in different species. We further show that each genomic region can be assigned a numeric affinity value that indicates its degree of participation in each local cluster, and these affinity values correlate quantitatively with DNase I hypersensitivity, gene expression, super enhancer activities and replication timing in a cell type specific manner. We also show that these cluster affinity values can precisely define boundaries of reported topologically associating domains, and further define local sub-domains within each domain. Availability and implementation: The source code of BNMF and tutorials on how to use the software to extract local clusters from contact maps are available at http://yiplab.cse.cuhk.edu.hk/bnmf/. Contact: kevinyip@cse.cuhk.edu.hk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27307607

  17. A frictional work predictive method for the initiation of solid high explosives from low-pressure impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Chidester, S.K.; Green, L.G.; Lee, C.G.

    1993-07-01

    The goal of these tests was to provide information that would aid in the prediction of HE response in accident situations where the initiating stimulus was less than that required for direct shock initiation. Before these tests were run, a prediction of threshold impact velocity was made (70m/s) using a rough average of previously reported threshold factional work from skid tests (1 cal/cm{sub 2}) and the experimental value for coefficient of friction of 0.5({plus_minus}) measured in the same tests for PBX-9404. The actual testing proved the threshold impact velocity to be much less, and the pretest prediction was not only wrong, it was not conservative. This work presents a methodology for more accurately predicting the reaction threshold for HE involved in an accident such as an airplane crash or a severe land transportation accident. The main focus of this work is on LX-10-1 (94.5% 5.5% Viton A binder, density 1.86g/cm{sup 3}). Additional work was done on LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% KelF binder, density 1.90g/cm{sub 3}), a very insensitive explosive. The explicit two-dimensional finite element code, DYNA2D, was used to model the tests and predict the HE response. The finite element mesh of the projectile and target were generated using MAZE. The post-processing of the DYNA2D analysis was done with ORION.

  18. AFRODITE - passive flow control for skin-friction drag reduction using the method of spanwise mean velocity gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallenius, Bengt; Sattarzadeh, Sohrab; Downs, Robert; Shahinfar, Shahab; Fransson, Jens

    2015-11-01

    Over the last decade wind tunnel experiments and numerical simulations have shown that steady spanwise mean velocity gradients are able to attenuate the growth of different types of boundary layer disturbances. Within the AFRODITE research program different techniques to setup the spanwise mean velocity variations have been studied and their stabilizing effect leading to transition delay quantified. A successful boundary-layer modulator for transition delay has turned out to be the miniature-vortex generator and has been well documented during the past years. More recent ideas of setting up spanwise mean velocity gradients will be presented here. We show that, the non-linear interaction between a pair of oblique disturbance waves creating a streaky base flow, as well as the direct surface modulation by means of applying wavy surfaces in the spanwise direction, can both successfully be utilized for transition delay and hence skin-friction drag reduction. The European Research Council is gratefully acknowledged (ERC-StG-2010- 258339).

  19. Noise of sliding rough contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bot, Alain

    2017-01-01

    This article is a discussion about the origin of friction noise produced when rubbing solids having rough surfaces. We show that noise emerges from numerous impacts into the contact between antagonist asperities of surfaces. Prediction of sound sources reduces to a statistical problem of contact mechanics. On the other hand, contact is also responsible of dissipation of vibration. This leads to the paradoxical result that the noise may not be proportional to the number of sources.

  20. A new procedure for calculating contact stresses in gear teeth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somprakit, Paisan; Huston, Ronald L.

    1991-01-01

    A numerical procedure for evaluating and monitoring contact stresses in meshing gear teeth is discussed. The procedure is intended to extend the range of applicability and to improve the accuracy of gear contact stress analysis. The procedure is based upon fundamental solution from the theory of elasticity. It is an iterative numerical procedure. The method is believed to have distinct advantages over the classical Hertz method, the finite-element method, and over existing approaches with the boundary element method. Unlike many classical contact stress analyses, friction effects and sliding are included. Slipping and sticking in the contact region are studied. Several examples are discussed. The results are in agreement with classical results. Applications are presented for spur gears.

  1. Hydrodynamic skin-friction reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Jason C. (Inventor); Bushnell, Dennis M. (Inventor); Weinstein, Leonard M. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A process for reducing skin friction, inhibiting the effects of liquid turbulence, and decreasing heat transfer in a system involving flow of a liquid along a surface of a body includes applying a substantially integral sheet of a gas, e.g., air, immediately adjacent to the surface of the body, e.g., a marine vehicle, which has a longitudinally grooved surface in proximity with the liquid and with a surface material having high contact angle between the liquid and said wall to reduce interaction of the liquid, e.g., water, with the surface of the body, e.g., the hull of the marine vehicle.

  2. Phagocytosis and hydrophobicity: a method of calculating contact angles based on the diameter of sessile drops.

    PubMed

    Dahlgren, C; Sunqvist, T

    1981-01-01

    The correlation between the contact angle and degree of phagocytosis of different yeast particles has been investigated. To facilitate the estimation of the contact angle, we have tested the hypothesis that the shape of a small liquid drop put on a flat surface is that of a truncated sphere. By making this approximation it is possible to calculate the contact angle, i.e. the tangent to the drop in the 3-phase liquid/solid/air meeting point, by measuring the drop diameter. Known volumes of saline were put on different surfaces and the diameters of the drops were measured from above. Calculation of the contact angle with drops of different volumes, and comparison between expected and measured height of 10 microl drops, indicated that the assumption that the shape of a drop is that of a truncated sphere is valid. Monolayers of leukocytes was shown to give rise to a contact angle of 17.9 degrees. Particles with a lower contact angle than the phagocytic cells resisted phagocytosis, but opsonization of the particles with normal human serum rendered them susceptible to phagocytosis, conferring a higher contact angle than that of the phagocytic cells.

  3. A 3D model for rubber tyres contact, based on Kalker's methods through the STRIPES model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chollet, Hugues

    2012-01-01

    A project on the pavement-rutting evolution under the effect of a tram on tyre, led the author to make a link between road and railway approaches to the problem of rolling contact. A simplified model is proposed with a fine description of the contact patch between a tyre and the road, and a more realistic pressure and shear stresses distribution than that available from basic models previously available. Experimental measurements are used to identify some characteristics of the force description, while the geometric shape of the tyre-road section are used, like in the traditional rail-wheel contact models, to build the 3D model. The last part validates a plausible contact pressure shape from self-aligning torque measurements and from Kalker's contact stresses gradient applied to the real tyre used in the project. The final result is a brush model extended from the wheel-rail STRIPES one, applicable to dynamics or contact studies of real tyres, with a physical coupling between longitudinal, lateral and spin effects, and a relatively fine description of the contact stresses along each strip of each tyre of the vehicle on an uneven road.

  4. On direct-writing methods for electrically contacting GaAs and Ge nanowire devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guannan; Gallo, Eric M.; Burger, Joan; Nabet, Bahram; Cola, Adriano; Prete, Paola; Lovergine, Nico; Spanier, Jonathan E.

    2010-05-01

    The electronic transport and gating characteristics in GaAs and Ge nanowires (NWs) are altered significantly following either indirect or direct exposure to a focused Ga+ ion beam (FIB), such as that used to produce Pt electrical contacts to NWs. While these results challenge the assumptions made in some previously reported work relating to the electronic properties of semiconductor NWs using FIB-assisted production of contacts and/or their leads, local electron beam induced deposition is shown to be a reliable and facile route for producing robust electrical contacts to individual vapor phase-grown NWs in a manner that enables study of their actual carrier transport properties.

  5. Method for non-contact particle manipulation and control of particle spacing along an axis

    DOEpatents

    Goddard, Gregory Russ; Kaduchak, Gregory; Jett, James Hubert; Graves, Steven Wayde

    2013-09-10

    One or more of the embodiments of the present invention provide for a method of non-contact particle manipulation and control of particle spacing along an axis which includes axial and radial acoustic standing wave fields. Particles are suspended in an aqueous solution, and this solution then flows into the cylindrical flow channel. While the solution flows through the flow channel, the outer structure of the flow channel is vibrated at a resonant frequency, causing a radial acoustic standing wave field to form inside the flow channel in the solution. These radial acoustic standing waves focus the particles suspended in the solution to the center axis of the cylindrical flow channel. At the same time, a transducer is used to create an axial acoustic standing wave field in the flow channel parallel to the axis of the flow channel. This drives the particles, which are already being focused to the center axis of the flow channel, to nodes or anti-nodes of the axial standing wave at half-wavelength intervals, depending on whether the particles are more or less dense and more or less compressible than the surrounding fluid.

  6. An Impulse-Momentum Method for Calculating Landing-Gear Contact Conditions in Eccentric Landings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yntema, Robert T; Milwitzky, Benjamin

    1952-01-01

    An impulse-momentum method for determining impact conditions for landing gears in eccentric landings is presented. The analysis is primarily concerned with the determination of contact velocities for impacts subsequent to initial touchdown in eccentric landings and with the determination of the effective mass acting on each landing gear. These parameters determine the energy-absorption requirements for the landing gear and, in conjunction with the particular characteristics of the landing gear, govern the magnitude of the ground loads. Changes in airplane angular and linear velocities and the magnitude of landing-gear vertical, drag, and side impulses resulting from a landing impact are determined by means of impulse-momentum relationships without the necessity for considering detailed force-time variations. The effective mass acting on each gear is also determined from the calculated landing-gear impulses. General equations applicable to any type of eccentric landing are written and solutions are obtained for the particular cases of an impact on one gear, a simultaneous impact on any two gears, and a symmetrical impact. In addition a solution is presented for a simplified two-degree-of-freedom system which allows rapid qualitative evaluation of the effects of certain principal parameters. The general analysis permits evaluation of the importance of such initial conditions at ground contact as vertical, horizontal, and side drift velocities, wing lift, roll and pitch angles, and rolling and pitching velocities, as well as the effects of such factors as landing gear location, airplane inertia, landing-gear length, energy-absorption efficiency, and wheel angular inertia on the severity of landing impacts. -A brief supplementary study which permits a limited evaluation of variable aerodynamic effects neglected in the analysis is presented in the appendix. Application of the analysis indicates that landing-gear impacts in eccentric landings can be appreciably more

  7. Friction. Macroscale superlubricity enabled by graphene nanoscroll formation.

    PubMed

    Berman, Diana; Deshmukh, Sanket A; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K R S; Erdemir, Ali; Sumant, Anirudha V

    2015-06-05

    Friction and wear remain as the primary modes of mechanical energy dissipation in moving mechanical assemblies; thus, it is desirable to minimize friction in a number of applications. We demonstrate that superlubricity can be realized at engineering scale when graphene is used in combination with nanodiamond particles and diamondlike carbon (DLC). Macroscopic superlubricity originates because graphene patches at a sliding interface wrap around nanodiamonds to form nanoscrolls with reduced contact area that slide against the DLC surface, achieving an incommensurate contact and substantially reduced coefficient of friction (~0.004). Atomistic simulations elucidate the overall mechanism and mesoscopic link bridging the nanoscale mechanics and macroscopic experimental observations.

  8. Application of the critical angle method to refractive index measurement of human skin in vivo under partial contact.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kenichiro; Ohkubo, Kohji; Ojima, Nobutoshi; Iwata, Kayoko

    2013-03-01

    We adapted the critical angle method for measuring rough surfaces under partial contact to acquire an in vivo skin refractive index (RI). Assuming that the total reflection is the simple sum of reflection from areas that are in contact and reflection from those that are not in contact, the RI can be estimated even for partial contact with a rough surface. We found that cheek skin is sufficiently soft that a sufficiently large area can be in contact and that the critical angle was detectable. The RIs of the cheeks of adult females were measured. The RI range was about 1.51 to 1.53, at a wavelength of 550 nm, without considering systematic errors. The RIs of cheeks are significantly correlated with their conductance, which corresponds to their water content. We determined the relationship between the RI and conductance within the variation of skin under normal conditions; this relationship was theoretically obtained in previous studies. In the present study, a direct in vivo measurement method was developed that enabled us to measure the RI in daily life, although this method contains errors for several reasons, including disregarding absorption.

  9. Influence of the ARC patterning method and annealing on the contact adhesion of Ni/Cu-plated solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baik, Jong Wook; Lee, Sang Hee; Lee, Doo Won; Lee, Soo Hong

    2016-05-01

    Ni/Cu two-step plating is a promising metallization technique because low contact resistance and improved contact adhesion can be achieved after the Ni annealing process. Also, narrow fingers, which are required for high-efficiency solar cells, can be formed by plating. However, the reliability of contact adhesion is still considered one obstacle to industrializing solar cells with plated metal contacts. In this experiment, the influence of ARC opening methods on plated contact adhesion was investigated because the roughnesses of the Si surfaces produced by using pico-second laser ablation and photolithography may be different. Also, the annealing process was conducted before and after plating Cu/Ag metal stacks. The sequence of the annealing can be significant for efficient production because plating is a wet process while annealing is a dry process. The contact adhesion was measured by using a peel-off test. The test was conducted on a 1.5-mm-wide by a 60 ~ 70- mm-long bus bar area. A 3.2-N/mm adhesion force was recorded as a highest average value along the bus bar.

  10. Method for formation of high quality back contact with screen-printed local back surface field

    DOEpatents

    Rohatgi, Ajeet; Meemongkolkiat, Vichai

    2010-11-30

    A thin silicon solar cell having a back dielectric passivation and rear contact with local back surface field is described. Specifically, the solar cell may be fabricated from a crystalline silicon wafer having a thickness from 50 to 500 micrometers. A barrier layer and a dielectric layer are applied at least to the back surface of the silicon wafer to protect the silicon wafer from deformation when the rear contact is formed. At least one opening is made to the dielectric layer. An aluminum contact that provides a back surface field is formed in the opening and on the dielectric layer. The aluminum contact may be applied by screen printing an aluminum paste having from one to 12 atomic percent silicon and then applying a heat treatment at 750 degrees Celsius.

  11. A systems based experimental approach to tactile friction.

    PubMed

    Masen, M A

    2011-11-01

    This work focuses on the friction in contacts where the human finger pad is one of the interacting surfaces. This 'tactile friction' requires a full understanding of the contact mechanics and the behaviour of human skin. The coefficient of friction cannot be considered as a property of the skin alone, but depends on the entire tribo-system. In this work, frictional forces were measured using a commercially available load cell. Parameters such as the hydration of the skin, the normal load on the contact and the roughness of the contacting surfaces were varied, whilst keeping the other parameters constant. The tests were performed under controlled environmental conditions. The total friction force is a combination of forces related to adhesion and to deformation. A commonly made assumption is that, to describe the friction of human skin, the deformation component can be ignored and only the adhesive behaviour has to be taken into account. However, in this study it was found that the forces related to the (micro-scale) deformation of skin can have a significant contribution to the total friction force; this is valid both for dry conditions and in the presence of water, when hydration of the skin causes softening.

  12. The friction and wear of TPS fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bascom, W. D.; Wong, S.

    1987-01-01

    The sliding friction behavior of single filaments of SiO2, SiC, and an aluminoborosilicate has been determined. These fibers are used in thermal protection systems (TPS) and are subject to damage during weaving and aero-maneuvering. All fibers exhibited stick-slip friction indicating the successive formation and rupture of strong junctions between the contacting filaments. The static frictional resistance of the sized SiC filament was 4X greater than for the same filament after heat cleaning. This result suggests that the sizing is an organic polymer with a high shear yield strength. Heat cleaning exposes the SiC surface and/or leaves an inorganic residue so that the adhesional contact between filaments has a low fracture energy and frictional sliding occurs by brittle fracture. The frictional resistances of the sized and heat cleaned SiO2 and glass filaments were all comparable to that of the heat cleaned SiC. It would appear that the sizings as well as the heat cleaned surfaces of the silica and glass have low fracture energies so that the sliding resistance is determined by brittle fracture.

  13. METHOD FOR PRODUCING WETTABLE SURFACES ON CONTACT LENSES BY CHEMICAL FORMATION OF INORGANIC FILMS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Wettable surfaces of a permanent nature can be produced on contact lenses by means of the technic of chemical deposition of an inorganic film on the...immersion resistance. Stepwise instructions are given for the preparation of hydrophilic surfaces on contact lenses . The equipment developed for this work is relatively simple and inexpensive. (Author)...lens surface. The process is simpler, both in apparatus and procedure, than the vacuum deposition technic designed earlier for producing wettable

  14. Physicochemical processes of frictional healing: Effects of water on stick-slip stress drop and friction of granular fault gouge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scuderi, Marco M.; Carpenter, Brett M.; Marone, Chris

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the micromechanical processes that dictate the evolution of fault strength during the seismic cycle is a fundamental problem in earthquake physics. We report on laboratory experiments that investigate the role of water during repetitive stick-slip frictional sliding, with particular emphasis on the grain-scale and atomic-scale mechanisms of frictional restrengthening (healing). Our experiments are designed to test underlying concepts of rate and state friction laws. We sheared layers of soda-lime glass beads in a double direct shear configuration at a constant normal stress of 5 MPa. Shear stress was applied via a constant displacement rate from 0.3 to 300 µm/s. During each experiment, relative air humidity (RH) was kept constant at values of 5, 50, or 100%. Our data show a systematic increase in maximum friction (μmax), stick-slip friction drop (Δμ), and frictional healing rate, with increasing RH. The highest values of interevent dilation occur at 100% RH. Postexperiment scanning electron microscope observations reveal details of contact junction processes, showing a larger grain-to-grain contact area at higher RH. We find that the evolution of contact area depends inversely on slip velocity and directly on RH. Our results illuminate the fundamental processes that dictate stick-slip frictional sliding and provide important constraints on the mechanisms of rate and state friction.

  15. Transition from stick-slip to continuous sliding in atomic friction: entering a new regime of ultralow friction.

    PubMed

    Socoliuc, A; Bennewitz, R; Gnecco, E; Meyer, E

    2004-04-02

    A transition from stick-slip to continuous sliding is observed for atomically modulated friction by means of a friction force microscope. When the stick-slip instabilities cease to exist, a new regime of ultralow friction is encountered. The transition is described in the framework of the Tomlinson model using a parameter eta which relates the strength of the lateral atomic surface potential and the stiffness of the contact under study. Experimentally, this parameter can be tuned by varying the normal load on the contact. We compare our results to a recently discussed concept called superlubricity.

  16. Transition from Stick-Slip to Continuous Sliding in Atomic Friction: Entering a New Regime of Ultralow Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socoliuc, A.; Bennewitz, R.; Gnecco, E.; Meyer, E.

    2004-04-01

    A transition from stick-slip to continuous sliding is observed for atomically modulated friction by means of a friction force microscope. When the stick-slip instabilities cease to exist, a new regime of ultralow friction is encountered. The transition is described in the framework of the Tomlinson model using a parameter η which relates the strength of the lateral atomic surface potential and the stiffness of the contact under study. Experimentally, this parameter can be tuned by varying the normal load on the contact. We compare our results to a recently discussed concept called superlubricity.

  17. Origin of Subglacial Debris-bed Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, D. O.; Byers, J.; Iverson, N. R.

    2011-12-01

    Numerical models of glaciers sliding on hard beds assume that basal flow resistance is controlled entirely by viscous drag on bedrock bumps. However, observations and measurements indicate that basal ice can contain large concentrations of rock debris that exert significant frictional resistance: for example, locally high shear stress (˜500 kPa) was measured below 200 m of ice on a smooth rock tablet at the bed of Engabreen, Norway. This value of shear stress is an order of magnitude greater than estimated by leading theories. To better understand the origin of debris-bed friction, we built a new laboratory apparatus that recorded the contact force between a clast and a hard bed as a function of ice velocity toward the bed. An independent experiment with the same apparatus in which the clast is isolated from the bed was used to obtain the ice viscosity. After correcting for cavity formation and ice flow geometry, results indicate that the contact force between a clast and a hard bed is about twice the drag force on the same clast estimated using Stokes's law. This value is insufficient to explain the high debris-bed friction measured beneath Engabreen. An alternative explanation is that longitudinal ice extension caused by ice flowing over the rough topography near the smooth rock tablet increased the rate of ice convergence with the bed by a factor of 5. Our measurements confirm that debris-bed friction is controlled by contact forces caused by flow of ice towards the bed due to basal melting and longitudinal ice extension. This form of frictional drag has yet to be included in models of ice flow. Inclusion of debris-bed friction may prove important to properly estimating rates of basal sliding, energy dissipation and meltwater production at the bed, and, more importantly, to quantifying the stick-slip behavior of hard-bedded glaciers.

  18. Modeling of rock friction 1. Experimental results and constitutive equations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieterich, J.H.

    1979-01-01

    Direct shear experiments on ground surfaces of a granodiorite from Raymond, California, at normal stresses of ??6 MPa demonstrate that competing time, displacement, and velocity effects control rock friction. It is proposed that the strength of the population of points of contacts between sliding surfaces determines frictional strength and that the population of contacts changes continuously with displacements. Previous experiments demonstrate that the strength of the contacts increases with the age of the contacts. The present experiments establish that a characteristic displacement, proportional to surface roughness, is required to change the population of contacts. Hence during slip the average age of the points of contact and therefore frictional strength decrease as slip velocity increases. Displacement weakening and consequently the potential for unstable slip occur whenever displacement reduces the average age of the contacts. In addition to this velocity dependency, which arises from displacement dependency and time dependency, the experiments also show a competing but transient increase in friction whenever slip velocity increases. Creep of the sliding surface at stresses below that for steady state slip is also observed. Constitutive relationships are developed that permit quantitative simulation of the friction versus displacement data as a function of surface roughness and for different time and velocity histories. Unstable slip in experiments is controlled by these constitutive effects and by the stiffness of the experimental system. It is argued that analogous properties control earthquake instability. Copyright ?? 1979 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. Friction-Stir Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    fatigue results for friction stir welded 2219 aluminum in the following conditions: 1) milled, 2) milled + LPB, 3) milled + 100 hours in a salt...same alloy following friction stir processing. Increased fatigue life in 5083-H321 aluminum fusion welds It will not be possible to friction...fine grain and weld defects near the surface will be eliminated. Potential benefits include both increased corrosion resistance and fatigue life

  20. Friction of rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byerlee, J.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental results in the published literature show that at low normal stress the shear stress required to slide one rock over another varies widely between experiments. This is because at low stress rock friction is strongly dependent on surface roughness. At high normal stress that effect is diminished and the friction is nearly independent of rock type. If the sliding surfaces are separated by gouge composed of Montmorillonite or vermiculite the friction can be very low. ?? 1978 Birkha??user Verlag.

  1. An analytical model of dynamic sliding friction during impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, Kazuo

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic sliding friction was studied based on the angular velocity of a golf ball during an oblique impact. This study used the analytical model proposed for the dynamic sliding friction on lubricated and non-lubricated inclines. The contact area A and sliding velocity u of the ball during impact were used to describe the dynamic friction force Fd = λAu, where λ is a parameter related to the wear of the contact area. A comparison with experimental results revealed that the model agreed well with the observed changes in the angular velocity during impact, and λAu is qualitatively equivalent to the empirical relationship, μN + μη‧dA/dt, given by the product between the frictional coefficient μ and the contact force N, and the additional term related to factor η‧ for the surface condition and the time derivative of A.

  2. An analytical model of dynamic sliding friction during impact

    PubMed Central

    Arakawa, Kazuo

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic sliding friction was studied based on the angular velocity of a golf ball during an oblique impact. This study used the analytical model proposed for the dynamic sliding friction on lubricated and non-lubricated inclines. The contact area A and sliding velocity u of the ball during impact were used to describe the dynamic friction force Fd = λAu, where λ is a parameter related to the wear of the contact area. A comparison with experimental results revealed that the model agreed well with the observed changes in the angular velocity during impact, and λAu is qualitatively equivalent to the empirical relationship, μN + μη′dA/dt, given by the product between the frictional coefficient μ and the contact force N, and the additional term related to factor η′ for the surface condition and the time derivative of A. PMID:28054668

  3. Rubber friction directional asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, A.; Dorogin, L.; Steenwyk, B.; Warhadpande, A.; Motamedi, M.; Fortunato, G.; Ciaravola, V.; Persson, B. N. J.

    2016-12-01

    In rubber friction studies it is usually assumed that the friction force does not depend on the sliding direction, unless the substrate has anisotropic properties, like a steel surface grinded in one direction. Here we will present experimental results for rubber friction, where we observe a strong asymmetry between forward and backward sliding, where forward and backward refer to the run-in direction of the rubber block. The observed effect could be very important in tire applications, where directional properties of the rubber friction could be induced during braking.

  4. Evaluation of antibacterial effects of pulp capping agents with direct contact test method

    PubMed Central

    Yalcin, Muhammet; Arslan, Ugur; Dundar, Ayse

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Calcium hydroxide has been used in dentistry as a major capping material having the capacity to introduce the formation of a mineralized dentin bridge, but it has no direct inducing effect to the pulp cells. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial properties of three different pulp capping agents using a direct contact test (DCT). Materials and Methods: The antibacterial properties of three pulp capping agents were evaluated a DCT. For the DCT, wells (n = 12) of 96-microtiter plates were coated with the tested cements (Dycal, Dentsply, USA; DiaRoot BioAggregate, Diadent, Holland; Calcimol LC, Voco, Germany) and Kalzinol (zinc oxide/eugenol cement, Dentsply, USA) was used as control material. A Lactobacillus casei suspension was placed on the surface of each specimen for 1 h at 37°C. Bacterial growth was monitored for 16 h with a temperature-controlled microplate spectrophotometer. The kinetics of the outgrowth in each well were recorded continuously at 650 nm every 30 min. The data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA, and Tamhane's T2 multiple comparison test. The level of significance was determined as P < 0.05. Results: All pulp capping agents showed an increase in the logarithmic growth rate of L. casei when compared with the control group (P < 0.05). Therefore, all pulp capping agents did not show antibacterial activity. Conclusions: The tested pulp capping agents haven't got antibacterial properties. Therefore, they should be used carefully when pulp is exposed or only very thin dentin remained over the pulp to avoid bacterial contamination. PMID:24966754

  5. Quantifying the Frictional Forces between Skin and Nonwoven Fabrics

    PubMed Central

    Jayawardana, Kavinda; Ovenden, Nicholas C.; Cottenden, Alan

    2017-01-01

    When a compliant sheet of material is dragged over a curved surface of a body, the frictional forces generated can be many times greater than they would be for a planar interface. This phenomenon is known to contribute to the abrasion damage to skin often suffered by wearers of incontinence pads and bed/chairbound people susceptible to pressure sores. Experiments that attempt to quantify these forces often use a simple capstan-type equation to obtain a characteristic coefficient of friction. In general, the capstan approach assumes the ratio of applied tensions depends only on the arc of contact and the coefficient of friction, and ignores other geometric and physical considerations; this approach makes it straightforward to obtain explicitly a coefficient of friction from the tensions measured. In this paper, two mathematical models are presented that compute the material displacements and surface forces generated by, firstly, a membrane under tension in moving contact with a rigid obstacle and, secondly, a shell-membrane under tension in contact with a deformable substrate. The results show that, while the use of a capstan equation remains fairly robust in some cases, effects such as the curvature and flaccidness of the underlying body, and the mass density of the fabric can lead to significant variations in stresses generated in the contact region. Thus, the coefficient of friction determined by a capstan model may not be an accurate reflection of the true frictional behavior of the contact region. PMID:28321192

  6. Linking microstructural evolution and macro-scale friction behavior in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argibay, N.; Chandross, M.; Cheng, S.; Michael, J. R.

    2017-03-01

    A correlation is established between the macro-scale friction regimes of metals and a transition between two dominant atomistic mechanisms of deformation. Metals tend to exhibit bi-stable friction behavior -- low and converging or high and diverging. These general trends in behavior are shown to be largely explained using a simplified model based on grain size evolution, as a function of contact stress and temperature, and are demonstrated for pure copper and gold. Specifically, the low friction regime is linked to the formation of ultra-nanocrystalline surface films (10 to 20 nm), driving toward shear accommodation by grain boundary sliding. Above a critical combination of stress and temperature -- demonstrated to be a material property -- shear accommodation transitions to dislocation dominated plasticity and high friction. We utilize a combination of experimental and computational methods to develop and validate the proposed structure-property relationship. This quantitative framework provides a shift from phenomenological to mechanistic and predictive fundamental understanding of friction for crystalline materials, including engineering alloys.

  7. Nondestructive, in-process inspection of inertia friction welding : an investigation into a new sensing technique.

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, D. A.; Cola, M. J.; Dave, V. R.; Dozhier, N. G.; Carpenter, R. W.

    2002-01-01

    This paper investigates the capabilities of a new sensor for in-process monitoring of quality during friction welding. The non-contact sensor is composed of microphones that are mounted in an aluminum ring which surrounds the weld joint. The sensor collects the acoustical energy (in the form of sound pressure) that is emitted during the plastic deformation and phase transformations (if applicable) in friction welding processes. The focus in this preliminary investigation is to search for and identify features within the acoustical emission that are indicative of bond quality. Bar-to-bar inertia friction welding (one form of friction welding) of copper to 304L stainless steel is used in this proof-of-concept study. This material combination exhibits only marginal weldability and is ideally suited for validating the capabilities of this new sensing technique. A probabilistic neural network is employed in this work to analyze the acoustical emission's frequency spectrum in an attempt to classify acceptable, conditional, and unacceptable welds. Our preliminary findings indicate that quality-based process features do exist within the frequency spectrum of the acoustical signature. The results from this analysis are presented. Future work in improving the sensing and interpretation of the data is discussed in an effort to develop a robust method of quality-based, in-process monitoring of friction welds.

  8. Friction and wear evaluation of high-strength gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameyama, Toshiki; Wada, Masato; Makino, Masato; Kawakami, Masaru; Furukawa, Hidemitsu

    2016-04-01

    In the last decade, several innovative polymer gel materials with enhanced mechanical proper ties have been invented by Japanese researches. In 2003, a most effective but simple way was proposed to synthesize double network gels, with compression fracture stress of about 30MPa, compared to several tens of kPa for common gels. In this study, we evaluate the wear of a double network gel, both with and without water lubrication. In the un-lubricated experiment, the gel surface is worn with a stainless steel ball. In the other experiment with water lubrication, the gel surface is worn by different counter surfaces because the stainless steel ball was too smooth to wear. It was found that frictional vibration of wear gel is transitioning to steady sliding in lubricated. As conventional reduction method of the friction by the contact between general solids, there are surface processing such as the texturing, attachment of lubrication materials. In the case of gel, the minute processing to the surface such as the texturing is difficult, because the gel is soft in comparison with the hard materials such as the metal. By proceeding with this study, the surface processing of low-frictional gels will be enabled.

  9. Contact dermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Dermatitis - contact; Allergic dermatitis; Dermatitis - allergic; Irritant contact dermatitis; Skin rash - contact dermatitis ... There are 2 types of contact dermatitis. Irritant dermatitis: This ... can be by contact with acids, alkaline materials such as soaps ...

  10. Skin friction drag measurements by LDV.

    PubMed

    Mazumder, M K; Wanchoo, S; McLeod, P C; Ballard, G S; Mozumdar, S; Caraballo, N

    1981-08-15

    A laser Doppler velocimeter employing a microscope objective as the receiving lens has been developed for measuring fluid velocity inside the boundary layer flow field with a spatial resolution of 40 microm. The method was applied for direct measurement of aerodynamic skin friction drag from the measured velocity gradient at the wall. Experimental results obtained on skin friction and on velocity components in a turbulent boundary layer on a low speed wind tunnel showed good agreement with previously reported data using conventional instruments such as hot-wire anemometers and Preston tubes. The method thus provides a tool for measurement and control of skin friction on aerodynamic bodies without perturbing the flow field.

  11. Sulfur passivation and contact methods for GaAs nanowire solar cells.

    PubMed

    Tajik, N; Peng, Z; Kuyanov, P; LaPierre, R R

    2011-06-03

    The effect of sulfur passivation on core-shell p-n junction GaAs nanowire (NW) solar cells has been investigated. Devices of two types were investigated, consisting of indium tin oxide contact dots or opaque Au finger electrodes. Lateral carrier transport from the NWs to the contact fingers was achieved via a p-doped GaAs surface conduction layer. NWs between the opaque contact fingers had sidewall surfaces exposed for passivation by sulfur. The relative cell efficiency increased by 19% upon passivation. The contribution of the thin film grown between the NWs to the total cell efficiency was estimated by removing the NWs using a sonication procedure. Mechanisms of carrier transport and photovoltaic effects are discussed on the basis of spatially resolved laser scanning measurements.

  12. Drop shape analysis for determination of dynamic contact angles by double sided elliptical fitting method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korsgaard Andersen, Nis; Taboryski, Rafael

    2017-04-01

    Contact angle measurements are a fast and simple way to measure surface properties and is therefore widely used to measure surface energy and quantify wetting of a solid surface by a liquid substance. In common praxis contact angle measurements are done with sessile drops on a horizontal surface fitted to a drop profile derived from the Young-Laplace equation. When measuring the wetting behaviour by tilting experiments this is not possible since it involves moving drops that are not in equilibrium. Here we present a fitting technique capable of determining the contact angle of asymmetric drops with very high accuracy even with blurry or noisy images. We do this by splitting the trace of a drop into a left and right part at the apex and then fit each side to an ellipse.

  13. A Method to Estimate the Contact Angle of a Drop Spread upon a Flat Surface When It Is Otherwise Too Flat to Measure.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A method of estimating the contact angle of a sissle drop on a clean, level surface, is developed for drops whose profiles are so low that the...contact angles are too small to measure. A simple geometric relationship between the drop’s volume and its contact angle is demonstrated, both

  14. Experimental Measurement of the Static Coefficient of Friction at the Ti-Ti Taper Connection in Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bitter, T; Khan, I; Marriott, T; Schreurs, B W; Verdonschot, N; Janssen, D

    2016-03-01

    The modular taper junction in total hip replacements has been implicated as a possible source of wear. The finite-element (FE) method can be used to study the wear potential at the taper junction. For such simulations it is important to implement representative contact parameters, in order to achieve accurate results. One of the main parameters in FE simulations is the coefficient of friction. However, in current literature, there is quite a wide spread in coefficient of friction values (0.15 - 0.8), which has a significant effect on the outcome of the FE simulations. Therefore, to obtain more accurate results, one should use a coefficient of friction that is determined for the specific material couple being analyzed. In this study, the static coefficient of friction was determined for two types of titanium-on-titanium stem-adaptor couples, using actual cut-outs of the final implants, to ensure that the coefficient of friction was determined consistently for the actual implant material and surface finish characteristics. Two types of tapers were examined, Biomet type-1 and 12/14, where type-1 has a polished surface finish and the 12/14 is a microgrooved system. We found static coefficients of friction of 0.19 and 0.29 for the 12/14 and type-1 stem-adaptor couples, respectively.

  15. Validation of a Method for Combining Biplanar Radiography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Estimate Knee Cartilage Contact

    PubMed Central

    Thorhauer, Eric; Tashman, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Combining accurate bone kinematics data from biplane radiography with cartilage models from magnetic resonance imaging, it is possible to estimate tibiofemoral cartilage contact area and centroid location. Proper validation of such estimates, however, has not been performed under loading conditions approximating functional tasks, such as gait, squatting, and stair descent. The goal of this study was to perform an in vitro validation to resolve the accuracy of cartilage contact estimations in comparison to a laser scanning gold standard. Results demonstrated acceptable reliability and accuracy for both contact area and centroid location estimates. Root mean square errors in contact area averaged 8.4% and 4.4% of the medial and lateral compartmental areas, respectively. Modified Sorensen-Dice agreement scores of contact regions averaged 0.81 ± 0.07 for medial and 0.83 ± 0.07 for lateral compartments. These validated methods have applications for in vivo assessment of a variety of patient populations and physical activities, and may lead to greater understanding of the relationships between knee cartilage function, effects of joint injury and treatment, and the development of osteoarthritis. PMID:26304232

  16. Effect of Surface Roughness on Contact Angle Measurement of Nanofluid on Surface of Stainless Steel 304 by Sessile Drop Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajitno, D. H.; Maulana, A.; Syarif, D. G.

    2016-08-01

    Contact angles play an important role in the mass and heat transfer. Stainless steel 304 has been used for nuclear power plan structure material until now. An experiment to measure contact angle of demineralized aqua and nanofluid containing nano particle of zirconia on metal surface of stainless steel 304 with sessile drop method was conducted. The measurement to measure the static contact angle and drop of nano fluid containing nano particle zirconia on stainless steel with different surface roughness was carried out. It was observed that stainless steel 304 was good hydrophylic properties with decreasing surface roughness of stainless steel during drop of aqua demineralized and nano fluid respectively. As a result the contact angle of demineralized aqua is decreased from 97.39 to 78.42 and contact angle of nano fluid from 94.3 to 67.50, respectively with decreasing surface roughness of stainless stee 304. Wettability of nanofluid on surface stainless steel 304 is better than aqua demineralized.

  17. Locating of normal transitions in a Bi2223 high temperature superconducting coil by non-contact voltage measurement method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanato, N.; Nishiyama, K.

    2015-12-01

    Locating of normal transitions in high temperature superconducting (HTS) coils is important for protection and safety design of HTS apparatus. A general method to locate the normal transitions is to measure resistive voltages along HTS windings by many voltage taps directly soldered to the HTS coils. However, electrical insulation characteristics of the HTS coils are deteriorated because it is necessary to remove electrical insulations of the HTS wires for the soldering. It is a serious problem especially for AC HTS coils to which high voltages are applied. Therefore the authors have presented a non-contact voltage measurement method that can detect the resistive voltages without removing the insulations by voltage dividing capacitors. So far the authors have verified the principle of the non-contact method. In this paper, a method to locate the normal transitions in a Bi2223 HTS coil based on the non-contact method is proposed. The proposed method can not only detect the normal transitions but also locate their positions. It is experimentally confirmed that the proposed method is useful for locating the normal transitions.

  18. Calibration of measurement sensitivities of multiple micro-cantilever dynamic modes in atomic force microscopy using a contact detection method

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zhen; Jeong, Younkoo; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2013-02-15

    An accurate experimental method is proposed for on-spot calibration of the measurement sensitivities of multiple micro-cantilever dynamic modes in atomic force microscopy. One of the key techniques devised for this method is a reliable contact detection mechanism that detects the tip-surface contact instantly. At the contact instant, the oscillation amplitude of the tip deflection, converted to that of the deflection signal in laser reading through the measurement sensitivity, exactly equals to the distance between the sample surface and the cantilever base position. Therefore, the proposed method utilizes the recorded oscillation amplitude of the deflection signal and the base position of the cantilever at the contact instant for the measurement sensitivity calibration. Experimental apparatus along with various signal processing and control modules was realized to enable automatic and rapid acquisition of multiple sets of data, with which the calibration of a single dynamic mode could be completed in less than 1 s to suppress the effect of thermal drift and measurement noise. Calibration of the measurement sensitivities of the first and second dynamic modes of three micro-cantilevers having distinct geometries was successfully demonstrated. The dependence of the measurement sensitivity on laser spot location was also experimentally investigated. Finally, an experiment was performed to validate the calibrated measurement sensitivity of the second dynamic mode of a micro-cantilever.

  19. Calibration of measurement sensitivities of multiple micro-cantilever dynamic modes in atomic force microscopy using a contact detection method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Jeong, Younkoo; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2013-02-01

    An accurate experimental method is proposed for on-spot calibration of the measurement sensitivities of multiple micro-cantilever dynamic modes in atomic force microscopy. One of the key techniques devised for this method is a reliable contact detection mechanism that detects the tip-surface contact instantly. At the contact instant, the oscillation amplitude of the tip deflection, converted to that of the deflection signal in laser reading through the measurement sensitivity, exactly equals to the distance between the sample surface and the cantilever base position. Therefore, the proposed method utilizes the recorded oscillation amplitude of the deflection signal and the base position of the cantilever at the contact instant for the measurement sensitivity calibration. Experimental apparatus along with various signal processing and control modules was realized to enable automatic and rapid acquisition of multiple sets of data, with which the calibration of a single dynamic mode could be completed in less than 1 s to suppress the effect of thermal drift and measurement noise. Calibration of the measurement sensitivities of the first and second dynamic modes of three micro-cantilevers having distinct geometries was successfully demonstrated. The dependence of the measurement sensitivity on laser spot location was also experimentally investigated. Finally, an experiment was performed to validate the calibrated measurement sensitivity of the second dynamic mode of a micro-cantilever.

  20. Experiments and numerical simulations of nonlinear vibration responses of an assembly with friction joints - Application on a test structure named "Harmony"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claeys, M.; Sinou, J.-J.; Lambelin, J.-P.; Todeschini, R.

    2016-03-01

    In presence of friction, the frequency response function of a metallic assembly is strongly dependent on the excitation level. The local stick-slip behavior at the friction interfaces induces energy dissipation and local stiffness softening. These phenomena are studied both experimentally and numerically on a test structure named "Harmony". Concerning the numerical part, a classical complete methodology from the finite element and friction modeling to the prediction of the nonlinear vibrational response is implemented. The well-known Harmonic Balance Method with a specific condensation process on the nonlinear frictional elements is achieved. Also, vibration experiments are performed to validate not only the finite element model of the test structure named "Harmony" at low excitation levels but also to investigate the nonlinear behavior of the system on several excitation levels. A scanning laser vibrometer is used to measure the nonlinear behavior and the local stick-slip movement near the contacts.

  1. Turbine blade friction damping study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominic, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    A lumped parameter method, implemented on a VAX 11/780 computer shows that the primary parameters affecting the performance of the friction damper of the first stage turbine of the SSME high pressure fuel pump are: the damper-blade coefficient of friction; the normal force applied to the friction interface; the amplitude of the periodic forcing function; the relative phase angle of the forcing functions for adjacent blades bridged by a damper (effectively, the engine order of the forcing function); and the amount of hysteretic damping that acts to limit the vibration amplitude of the blade in its resonance modes. The low order flexural resonance vibration modes of HPFTP blades without dampers, with production dampers, and with two types of lightweight experimental dampers were evaluated in high speed spin pit tests. Results agree with those of the analytical study in that blades fitted with production friction dampers experienced the airfoil-alone flexural resonance mode, while those without dampers or with lighter weight dampers did not. No blades fitted with dampers experienced the whole blade flexural resonance mode during high speed tests, while those without dampers did.

  2. Friction induced rail vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kralov, Ivan; Sinapov, Petko; Nedelchev, Krasimir; Ignatov, Ignat

    2012-11-01

    A model of rail, considered as multiple supported beam, subjected on friction induced vibration is studied in this work using FEM. The model is presented as continuous system and the mass and elastic properties of a real object are taken into account. The friction forces are nonlinear functions of the relative velocity during slipping. The problem is solved using Matlab Simulink.

  3. Friction reduction using discrete surface textures: principle and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Stephen M.; Jing, Yang; Hua, Diann; Zhang, Huan

    2014-08-01

    There have been many reports on the use of dimples, grooves, and other surface textures to control friction in sliding interfaces. The effectiveness of surface textures in friction reduction has been demonstrated in conformal contacts under high speed low load applications such as mechanical seals and automotive water pump seals, etc., resulting in reduced friction and longer durability. For sliding components with higher contact pressures or lower speeds, conflicting results were reported. Reasons for the inconsistency may be due to the differences in texture fabrication techniques, lack of dimple size and shape uniformity, and different tester used. This paper examines the basic principles on which surface textural patterns influence friction under the three principle lubrication regimes: hydrodynamic, elastohydrodynamic, and boundary lubrication regimes. Our findings suggest that each regime requires specific dimple size, shape, depth, and areal density to achieve friction reduction. Control experiments were also conducted to explore mechanisms of friction reduction. The dimple geometric shape and the dimple's orientation with respect to the sliding direction influence friction significantly. The underlying mechanisms for friction control via textures are discussed.

  4. Debris-bed friction of hard-bedded glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, D.; Iverson, N. R.; Hooyer, T. S.; Fischer, U. H.; Jackson, M.; Moore, P. L.

    2005-06-01

    Field measurements of debris-bed friction on a smooth rock tablet at the bed of Engabreen, a hard-bedded, temperate glacier in northern Norway, indicated that basal ice containing 10% debris by volume exerted local shear traction of up to 500 kPa. The corresponding bulk friction coefficient between the dirty basal ice and the tablet was between 0.05 and 0.08. A model of friction in which nonrotating spherical rock particles are held in frictional contact with the bed by bed-normal ice flow can account for these measurements if the power law exponent for ice flowing past large clasts is 1. A small exponent (n < 2) is likely because stresses in ice are small and flow is transient. Numerical calculations of the bed-normal drag force on a sphere in contact with a flat bed using n = 1 show that this force can reach values several hundred times that on a sphere isolated from the bed, thus drastically increasing frictional resistance. Various estimates of basal friction are obtained from this model. For example, the shear traction at the bed of a glacier sliding at 20 m a-1 with a geothermally induced melt rate of 0.006 m a-1 and an effective pressure of 300 kPa can exceed 100 kPa. Debris-bed friction can therefore be a major component of sliding resistance, contradicting the common assumption that debris-bed friction is negligible.

  5. Debris-Bed Friction of Hard-Bedded Glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, D.; Iverson, N. R.; Hooyer, T. S.; Fischer, U. H.; Jackson, M.; Moore, P. L.

    2004-12-01

    Field measurements of debris-bed friction on a smooth rock tablet at the bed of Engabreen, a hard-bedded, temperate glacier in northern Norway, indicated that basal ice containing 10% debris by volume exerted local shear traction of up to 500~kPa. The corresponding bulk friction coefficient between the dirty basal ice and the tablet was between 0.05 and 0.08. A model of friction in which non-rotating spherical rock particles are held in frictional contact with the bed by bed-normal ice flow can account for these measurements if ice is Newtonian. Numerical calculations of the bed-normal drag force on a sphere in contact with a flat bed show that this force can reach values several hundred times that on a sphere isolated from the bed, thus drastically increasing frictional resistance. Various estimates of basal friction are obtained from this model. For example, the shear traction at the bed of a 200~m thick glacier sliding at 20~m a-1 with a geothermally induced melt rate of 0.006~m a-1 can exceed 100~kPa. Debris-bed friction can, therefore, be a major component of sliding resistance, contradicting the common assumption that debris-bed friction is negligible.

  6. Finger pad friction and its role in grip and touch.

    PubMed

    Adams, Michael J; Johnson, Simon A; Lefèvre, Philippe; Lévesque, Vincent; Hayward, Vincent; André, Thibaut; Thonnard, Jean-Louis

    2013-03-06

    Many aspects of both grip function and tactile perception depend on complex frictional interactions occurring in the contact zone of the finger pad, which is the subject of the current review. While it is well established that friction plays a crucial role in grip function, its exact contribution for discriminatory touch involving the sliding of a finger pad is more elusive. For texture discrimination, it is clear that vibrotaction plays an important role in the discriminatory mechanisms. Among other factors, friction impacts the nature of the vibrations generated by the relative movement of the fingertip skin against a probed object. Friction also has a major influence on the perceived tactile pleasantness of a surface. The contact mechanics of a finger pad is governed by the fingerprint ridges and the sweat that is exuded from pores located on these ridges. Counterintuitively, the coefficient of friction can increase by an order of magnitude in a period of tens of seconds when in contact with an impermeably smooth surface, such as glass. In contrast, the value will decrease for a porous surface, such as paper. The increase in friction is attributed to an occlusion mechanism and can be described by first-order kinetics. Surprisingly, the sensitivity of the coefficient of friction to the normal load and sliding velocity is comparatively of second order, yet these dependencies provide the main basis of theoretical models which, to-date, largely ignore the time evolution of the frictional dynamics. One well-known effect on taction is the possibility of inducing stick-slip if the friction decreases with increasing sliding velocity. Moreover, the initial slip of a finger pad occurs by the propagation of an annulus of failure from the perimeter of the contact zone and this phenomenon could be important in tactile perception and grip function.

  7. Finger pad friction and its role in grip and touch

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Michael J.; Johnson, Simon A.; Lefèvre, Philippe; Lévesque, Vincent; Hayward, Vincent; André, Thibaut; Thonnard, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-01

    Many aspects of both grip function and tactile perception depend on complex frictional interactions occurring in the contact zone of the finger pad, which is the subject of the current review. While it is well established that friction plays a crucial role in grip function, its exact contribution for discriminatory touch involving the sliding of a finger pad is more elusive. For texture discrimination, it is clear that vibrotaction plays an important role in the discriminatory mechanisms. Among other factors, friction impacts the nature of the vibrations generated by the relative movement of the fingertip skin against a probed object. Friction also has a major influence on the perceived tactile pleasantness of a surface. The contact mechanics of a finger pad is governed by the fingerprint ridges and the sweat that is exuded from pores located on these ridges. Counterintuitively, the coefficient of friction can increase by an order of magnitude in a period of tens of seconds when in contact with an impermeably smooth surface, such as glass. In contrast, the value will decrease for a porous surface, such as paper. The increase in friction is attributed to an occlusion mechanism and can be described by first-order kinetics. Surprisingly, the sensitivity of the coefficient of friction to the normal load and sliding velocity is comparatively of second order, yet these dependencies provide the main basis of theoretical models which, to-date, largely ignore the time evolution of the frictional dynamics. One well-known effect on taction is the possibility of inducing stick–slip if the friction decreases with increasing sliding velocity. Moreover, the initial slip of a finger pad occurs by the propagation of an annulus of failure from the perimeter of the contact zone and this phenomenon could be important in tactile perception and grip function. PMID:23256185

  8. Adhesion and friction of thin metal films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted in vacuum with thin films of titanium, chromium, iron, and platinum sputter deposited on quartz or mica substrates. A single crystal hemispherically tipped gold slider was used in contact with the films at loads of 1.0 to 30.0 and at a sliding velocity of 0.7 mm/min at 23 C. Test results indicate that the friction coefficient is dependent on the adhesion of two interfaces, that between the film and its substrate and the slider and the film. There exists a relationship between the percent d bond character of metals in bulk and in thin film form and the friction coefficient. Oxygen can increase adhesive bonding of a metal film (platinum) to a substrate.

  9. Scaling of micro-slip in tangentially loaded rock contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzemba, Birthe; Pohrt, Roman; Teidelt, Elena; Popov, Valentin L.

    2014-05-01

    A dry contact between randomly rough surfaces is examined which is loaded in normal and tangential direction. If the tangential load is below the friction force, no macroscopic tangential movement takes place. Nevertheless, some part of the contact area will be in sticking and some will be in sliding state depending on the local stress configuration. This effect will be called micro-slip. The maximum value of this micro-slip is reached when the last contacting spot goes into sliding state. The maximum micro-slip is a core characteristic of the contact problem. It appears in rock friction laws as a characteristic length parameter, which is often empirically determined. It can be interpreted as the characteristic size of micro-contacts appearing in rate-and-state friction theory (1). The scaling behavior of this characteristic length parameter is not yet clarified (2). It is of special interest for geophysical applications, where laboratory experiments and real systems differ in size by several orders of magnitude. In former works many suggestions have been made on the scaling context of this length parameter: surface roughness, total slip length, shear strain and system size ((1),(3),(4),(5)) are some of the proposed connected parameters. We recently presented a theoretical estimation of the maximum micro-slip for randomly rough surfaces, which is based on the iterrelation of the normal and tangential contact problem. Using recent finding concerning the normal contact problem of randomly rough surfaces (6) we were able to suggest a scaling law for the maximum micro-slip. It suggests a power-law scaling with the present normal force (7). A numerical contact model using the boundary element method was implemented for comparison, both results coincide perfectly. In addition we will present experiments with rock-rock contact in the preface of instable sliding. The set-up is a single-block slider model. From high resolution measurements, we were able to capture the micro

  10. Modelling of contact angle hysteresis on rough, non-uniform and superhydrophobic surfaces with lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubiak, K. J.; Wilson, M. C. T.; Castrejón-Pita, J. R.; Hutchings, I. M.

    2011-11-01

    Contact Angle Hysteresis (CAH) is usually attributed to surface heterogeneity, contact line pinning, adsorption or interdiffusion. A model of CAH developed recently by Kubiak & Wilson is demonstrated using the lattice Boltzmann method. The model is based on the dynamic surface heterogeneity, reorientation of surface molecules under wetting liquid, physical roughness, chemical heterogeneity and liquid adhesion and evaporation. Once the surface is wetted, the local static contact angle (CA) changes from its advancing value to match the receding static CA over time Ta. When the contact line retracts, the surface recovers its initial properties corresponding to the advancing static CA over time period Te, which corresponds to the physical evaporation. Further development of the model to include surface roughness and chemical heterogeneity is presented. The model shows good agreement with experimental results for several practical configurations i.e. droplet impact and coalescence, drops on tilted surface, and drops on superhydrophobic and non-uniform surfaces etc. The extended model exhibits great potential for predictive modelling using the lattice Boltzmann method, but can be also implemented in other schemes. Research supported by EPSRC EP/F065019/1 and EP/H018913/1.

  11. A non-contact method for imaging the posterior chest using magnetic induction principles that allows to monitor pulmonary oedema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giirsoy, D.; Scharfetter, H.

    2010-04-01

    Real time monitoring of lung function is of particular importance for the patients who are in the intensive care unit, and thus spend long durations of time in a supine position. This kind of recumbent positioning of the patients gives rise to a markedly increased fluid accumulation in the posterior lung regions associated with the gravity dependency. In order to monitor the temporal behavior of the accumulation, we proposed a non-contact semi-tomography method which uses magnetic induction principles. In the proposed method, an eddy current density is induced within the dorsal tissues including the posterior lungs via the transmitter coils which are embedded into the patient bed, and the magnetic field strength is measured similarly using an array of sensor coils in a non-contact manner. For the assessment of the method, we used a patient specific, MRI-guided realistic chest model and presented the reconstructed time-differential images.

  12. A comparison of cyst age and assay method of the efficacy of contact lens disinfectants against Acanthamoeba

    PubMed Central

    Kilvington, S.; Anger, C.

    2001-01-01

    AIMS—(i) To determine effect of Acanthamoeba cyst age, method of production, and (ii) to assay technique on the efficacy of multipurpose solutions (MPS) and hydrogen peroxide based contact lens disinfectants. (iii) To establish if MPS can remove mature cysts from contact lenses according to the ISO/DIS 14729 regimen test for microbe removal.
METHODS—Immature and mature cysts of A polyphaga were tested against the MPS Opti-Free express and the hydrogen peroxide based solutions Oxysept 1Step and Oxysept 1 using two assay methods. Simulated patient regimen testing was performed with the Opti-Free express and Complete using mature cysts inoculated on to group I or group IV lenses.
RESULTS—Immature cysts were sensitive to disinfection by all solutions. No killing was observed with mature cysts with Opti-Free express, while immature cysts yielded a 1-2 log reduction in viability. Oxysept 1Step gave a 1.1 (SD 0.3) log reduction in mature cysts after 6 hours. Oxysept 1 gave a 2.4 (0.3) log reduction in mature cysts after 4 hours and a 3.8 (0.5) log reduction after 6 hours. Patient regimen testing using Opti-Free express and Complete resulted in no recovery of viable mature cysts from the contact lenses or from the soaking solutions.
CONCLUSION—Cyst age but not method of production used in this study influences the efficacy of contact lens disinfectants against Acanthamoeba. MPS are effective in removing cysts from contact lens surfaces and may have a role in the prevention of acanthamoeba keratitis.

 PMID:11222342

  13. Preface: Friction at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fusc, Claudio; Smith, Roger; Urbakh, Michael; Vanossi, Andrea

    2008-09-01

    Interfacial friction is one of the oldest problems in physics and chemistry, and certainly one of the most important from a practical point of view. Everyday operations on a broad range of scales, from nanometer and up, depend upon the smooth and satisfactory functioning of countless tribological systems. Friction imposes serious constraints and limitations on the performance and lifetime of micro-machines and, undoubtedly, will impose even more severe constraints on the emerging technology of nano-machines. Standard lubrication techniques used for large objects are expected to be less effective in the nano-world. Novel methods for control and manipulation are therefore needed. What has been missing is a molecular level understanding of processes occurring between and close to interacting surfaces to help understand, and later manipulate friction. Friction is intimately related to both adhesion and wear, and all three require an understanding of highly non-equilibrium processes occurring at the molecular level to determine what happens at the macroscopic level. Due to its practical importance and the relevance to basic scientific questions there has been major increase in activity in the study of interfacial friction on the microscopic level during the last decade. Intriguing structural and dynamical features have been observed experimentally. These observations have motivated theoretical efforts, both numerical and analytical. This special issue focusses primarily on discussion of microscopic mechanisms of friction and adhesion at the nanoscale level. The contributions cover many important aspects of frictional behaviour, including the origin of stick-slip motion, the dependence of measured forces on the material properties, effects of thermal fluctuations, surface roughness and instabilities in boundary lubricants on both static and kinetic friction. An important problem that has been raised in this issue, and which has still to be resolved, concerns the

  14. Multiscale physics of rubber-ice friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuononen, Ari J.; Kriston, András; Persson, Bo

    2016-09-01

    Ice friction plays an important role in many engineering applications, e.g., tires on icy roads, ice breaker ship motion, or winter sports equipment. Although numerous experiments have already been performed to understand the effect of various conditions on ice friction, to reveal the fundamental frictional mechanisms is still a challenging task. This study uses in situ white light interferometry to analyze ice surface topography during linear friction testing with a rubber slider. The method helps to provide an understanding of the link between changes in the surface topography and the friction coefficient through direct visualization and quantitative measurement of the morphologies of the ice surface at different length scales. Besides surface polishing and scratching, it was found that ice melts locally even after one sweep showing the refrozen droplets. A multi-scale rubber friction theory was also applied to study the contribution of viscoelasticity to the total friction coefficient, which showed a significant level with respect to the smoothness of the ice; furthermore, the theory also confirmed the possibility of local ice melting.

  15. Temperature-Dependent Friction and Wear Behavior of PTFE and MoS2

    SciTech Connect

    Babuska, T. F.; Pitenis, A. A.; Jones, M. R.; Nation, B. L.; Sawyer, W. G.; Argibay, N.

    2016-06-16

    We present an investigation of the temperature-dependent friction behavior of PTFE, MoS2, and PTFE-on- MoS2. Friction behavior was measured while continuously varying contact temperature in the range -150 to 175°C while sliding in dry nitrogen, as well as for self-mated PTFE immersed in liquid nitrogen. These results contrast with previous reports of monotonic inverse temperature dependent friction behavior, as well as reported high-friction transitions and plateaus at temperatures below about -20°C that were not observed, providing new insights about the molecular mechanisms of macro-scale friction. The temperature-dependent friction behavior characteristic of self-mated PTFE was found also on the PTFE-on-MoS2 sliding contact, suggesting that PTFE friction was defined by sub-surface deformation mechanisms and internal friction even when sliding against a lamellar lubricant with extremely low friction coefficient (μ ~ 0.02). The various relaxation temperatures of PTFE were found in the temperature-dependent friction behavior, showing excellent agreement with reported values acquired using torsional techniques measuring internal friction. Additionally, hysteresis in friction behavior suggests an increase in near-surface crystallinity at upon exceeding the high temperature relaxation, Tα~ 116°C.

  16. Temperature-Dependent Friction and Wear Behavior of PTFE and MoS2

    DOE PAGES

    Babuska, T. F.; Pitenis, A. A.; Jones, M. R.; ...

    2016-06-16

    We present an investigation of the temperature-dependent friction behavior of PTFE, MoS2, and PTFE-on- MoS2. Friction behavior was measured while continuously varying contact temperature in the range -150 to 175°C while sliding in dry nitrogen, as well as for self-mated PTFE immersed in liquid nitrogen. These results contrast with previous reports of monotonic inverse temperature dependent friction behavior, as well as reported high-friction transitions and plateaus at temperatures below about -20°C that were not observed, providing new insights about the molecular mechanisms of macro-scale friction. The temperature-dependent friction behavior characteristic of self-mated PTFE was found also on the PTFE-on-MoS2 slidingmore » contact, suggesting that PTFE friction was defined by sub-surface deformation mechanisms and internal friction even when sliding against a lamellar lubricant with extremely low friction coefficient (μ ~ 0.02). The various relaxation temperatures of PTFE were found in the temperature-dependent friction behavior, showing excellent agreement with reported values acquired using torsional techniques measuring internal friction. Additionally, hysteresis in friction behavior suggests an increase in near-surface crystallinity at upon exceeding the high temperature relaxation, Tα~ 116°C.« less

  17. The 3-Omega Method for the Measurement of Fouling Thickness, the Liquid Flow Rate, and Surface Contact

    PubMed Central

    Clausen, Casper; Pedersen, Tim; Bentien, Anders

    2017-01-01

    The 3-omega method is conventionally used for the measurement of thermal conductivity in solid samples. The present work includes the experimental characterization and proof-of-concept measurements of sensor concepts, based on the 3-omega method. It is shown that this method can be used to measure fouling layers with a thickness of 10 to 400 µm, to conduct the measurement of flow rates with a high precision, and finally, as a simple on-off contact sensor with a fast response time. PMID:28282949

  18. The 3-Omega Method for the Measurement of Fouling Thickness, the Liquid Flow Rate, and Surface Contact.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Casper; Pedersen, Tim; Bentien, Anders

    2017-03-09

    The 3-omega method is conventionally used for the measurement of thermal conductivity in solid samples. The present work includes the experimental characterization and proof-of-concept measurements of sensor concepts, based on the 3-omega method. It is shown that this method can be used to measure fouling layers with a thickness of 10 to 400 μm, to conduct the measurement of flow rates with a high precision, and finally, as a simple on-off contact sensor with a fast response time.

  19. Effect of friction on dense suspension flows of hard particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trulsson, M.; DeGiuli, E.; Wyart, M.

    2017-01-01

    We use numerical simulations to study the effect of particle friction on suspension flows of non-Brownian hard particles. By systematically varying the microscopic friction coefficient μp and the viscous number J , we build a phase diagram that identifies three regimes of flow: frictionless, frictional sliding, and rolling. Using energy balance in flow, we predict relations between kinetic observables, confirmed by numerical simulations. For realistic friction coefficients and small viscous numbers (below J ˜10-3 ), we show that the dominating dissipative mechanism is sliding of frictional contacts, and we characterize asymptotic behaviors as jamming is approached. Outside this regime, our observations support the idea that flow belongs to the universality class of frictionless particles. We discuss recent experiments in the context of our phase diagram.

  20. Friction and deformation behavior of single-crystal silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Friction and deformation studies were conducted with single-crystal silicon carbide in sliding contact with diamond. When the radius of curvature of the spherical diamond rider was large (0.3), deformation of silicon carbide was primarily elastic. Under these conditions the friction coefficient was low and did not show a dependence on the silicon carbide orientation. Further, there was no detectable cracking of the silicon carbide surfaces. When smaller radii of curvature of the spherical diamond riders (0.15 and 0.02 mm) or a conical diamond rider was used, plastic grooving occured and the silicon carbide exhibited anisotropic friction and deformation behavior. Under these conditions the friction coefficient depended on load. Anisotropic friction and deformation of the basal plane of silicon carbide was controlled by the slip system. 10101120and cleavage of1010.