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Sample records for frizzled related protein

  1. 76 FR 63316 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Secreted Frizzled Related Protein-1 (sFRP-1) and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-12

    ... Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Secreted Frizzled Related Protein-1 (sFRP-1) and derivatives thereof... a protein designated secreted Frizzled Related Protein-1 (sFRP-1). sFRP-1, also known as SARP-2 (Secreted Apoptosis Related Protein-2). The IP covers various sFRP-1 compositions and uses thereof....

  2. Fritz: a secreted frizzled-related protein that inhibits Wnt activity.

    PubMed

    Mayr, T; Deutsch, U; Kühl, M; Drexler, H C; Lottspeich, F; Deutzmann, R; Wedlich, D; Risau, W

    1997-04-01

    Signaling molecules of the Wnt gene family are involved in the regulation of dorso-ventral, segmental and tissue polarity in Xenopus and Drosophila embryos. Members of the frizzled gene family, such as Drosophila frizzled-2 and rat frizzled-1, have been shown encode Wnt binding activity and to engage intracellular signal transduction molecules known to be part of the Wnt signaling pathway. Here we describe the cloning and characterization of Fritz, a mouse (mfiz) and human (hfiz) gene which codes for a secreted protein that is structurally related to the extracellular portion of the frizzled genes from Drosophila and vertebrates. The Fritz protein antagonizes Wnt function when both proteins are ectopically expressed in Xenopus embryos. In early gastrulation, mouse fiz mRNA is expressed in all three germ layers. Later in embryogenesis fiz mRNA is found in the central and peripheral nervous systems, nephrogenic mesenchyme and several other tissues, all of which are sites where Wnt proteins have been implicated in tissue patterning. We propose a model in which Fritz can interfere with the activity of Wnt proteins via their cognate frizzled receptors and thereby modulate the biological responses to Wnt activity in a multitude of tissue sites.

  3. Cysteine-rich domains related to Frizzled receptors and Hedgehog-interacting proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Jimin; Grishin, Nick V

    2012-01-01

    Frizzled and Smoothened are homologous seven-transmembrane proteins functioning in the Wnt and Hedgehog signaling pathways, respectively. They harbor an extracellular cysteine-rich domain (FZ-CRD), a mobile evolutionary unit that has been found in a number of other metazoan proteins and Frizzled-like proteins in Dictyostelium. Domains distantly related to FZ-CRDs, in Hedgehog-interacting proteins (HHIPs), folate receptors and riboflavin-binding proteins (FRBPs), and Niemann-Pick Type C1 proteins (NPC1s), referred to as HFN-CRDs, exhibit similar structures and disulfide connectivity patterns compared with FZ-CRDs. We used computational analyses to expand the homologous set of FZ-CRDs and HFN-CRDs, providing a better understanding of their evolution and classification. First, FZ-CRD-containing proteins with various domain compositions were identified in several major eukaryotic lineages including plants and Chromalveolata, revealing a wider phylogenetic distribution of FZ-CRDs than previously recognized. Second, two new and distinct groups of highly divergent FZ-CRDs were found by sensitive similarity searches. One of them is present in the calcium channel component Mid1 in fungi and the uncharacterized FAM155 proteins in metazoans. Members of the other new FZ-CRD group occur in the metazoan-specific RECK (reversion-inducing-cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs) proteins that are putative tumor suppressors acting as inhibitors of matrix metalloproteases. Finally, sequence and three-dimensional structural comparisons helped us uncover a divergent HFN-CRD in glypicans, which are important morphogen-binding heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Such a finding reinforces the evolutionary ties between the Wnt and Hedgehog signaling pathways and underscores the importance of gene duplications in creating essential signaling components in metazoan evolution. PMID:22693159

  4. Embryonic Dorsal-Ventral Signaling: Secreted Frizzled-Related Proteins as Inhibitors of Tolloid Proteinases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hojoon X.; Ambrosio, Andrea L.; Reversade, Bruno; De Robertis, E.M.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Here we report an unexpected role for the secreted Frizzled-related protein (sFRP) Sizzled/Ogon as an inhibitor of the extracellular proteolytic reaction that controls BMP signaling during Xenopus gastrulation. Microinjection experiments suggest that the Frizzled domain of Sizzled regulates the activity of Xolloid-related (Xlr), a metalloproteinase that degrades Chordin, through the following molecular pathway: Szl ┤ Xlr ┤ Chd ┤ BMP → P-Smad1 → Szl. In biochemical assays, the Xlr proteinase has similar affinities for its endogenous substrate Chordin and for its competitive inhibitor Sizzled, which is resistant to enzyme digestion. Extracellular levels of Sizzled and Chordin in the gastrula embryo and enzyme reaction constants were all in the 10−8 M range, consistent with a physiological role in the regulation of dorsal-ventral patterning. Sizzled is also a natural inhibitor of BMP1, a Tolloid metalloproteinase of medical interest. Furthermore, mouse sFRP2 inhibited Xlr, suggesting a wider role for this molecular mechanism. PMID:16413488

  5. Paracrine Secreted Frizzled-Related Protein 4 Inhibits Melanocytes Differentiation in Hair Follicle

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Haiying; Lei, Mingxing; Li, Yuhong; Liu, Yingxin; Tang, Yinhong; Xing, Yizhan; Deng, Fang

    2017-01-01

    Wnt signaling plays crucial role in regulating melanocyte stem cells/melanocyte differentiation in the hair follicle. However, how the Wnt signaling is balanced to be overactivated to control follicular melanocytes behavior remains unknown. Here, by using immunofluorescence staining, we showed that secreted frizzled-related protein 4 (sFRP4) is preferentially expressed in the skin epidermal cells rather than in melanocytes. By overexpression of sFRP4 in skin cells in vivo and in vitro, we found that sFRP4 attenuates activation of Wnt signaling, resulting in decrease of melanocytes differentiation in the regenerating hair follicle. Our findings unveiled a new regulator that involves modulating melanocytes differentiation through a paracrine mechanism in hair follicle, supplying a hope for potential therapeutic application to treat skin pigmentation disorders. PMID:28337220

  6. Secreted frizzled-related protein 1 modulates glucocorticoid attenuation of osteogenic activities and bone mass.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng-Sheng; Lin, Chun-Liang; Chen, Yeung-Jen; Wang, Ching-Jen; Yang, Kuender D; Huang, Yu-Ting; Sun, Yi-Chih; Huang, Hui-Chen

    2005-05-01

    Prolonged glucocorticoid treatment is known to cause osteoporosis or aseptic necrosis. Secreted frizzled-related proteins 1 (SFRP1) and low-density lipoprotein-related protein 5 (LRP5), a Wnt protein antagonist and a coreceptor, have been found to regulate skeletogenesis. Whereas recent studies have reported that excess glucocorticoid promotes bone loss, the biological role of SFRP1 and LRP5 in regulating glucocorticoid attenuation of bone formation is not fully understood. We showed that a supraphysiological level of glucocorticoid enhanced SFRP1 but not LRP5 expression of primary mesenchymal cell cultures in vitro and osteoblasts at metaphyseal trabecular endosteum and chondrocytes at calcified cartilage in vivo. Glucocorticoid augmentation of SFRP1 expression was transcriptionally mediated. The inhibitory action of glucocorticoid on osteogenic differentiation appeared to be regulated by SFRP1 mediation of beta-catenin destabilization because knocking down SFRP1 by RNA interference abrogated the supraphysiological level of glucocorticoid attenuation of osteogenesis. Recombinant human SFRP1 reduced the promoting effect of physiological level of glucocorticoid on cytosolic beta-catenin accumulation, runt-related transcription factor-2 activation, and osteogenic activities. Glucocorticoid and recombinant human SFRP1 significantly increased osteochondral cell apoptosis associated with reduced mineral density, biomechanical properties, trabecular bone volume, and midshaft cortical bone areas in rat femurs. These findings suggest that SFRP1 modulates glucocorticoid-induced bone loss. Regulation of Wnt/SFRP signal transduction can be used in the future as an alternative strategy for the prevention of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis.

  7. Secreted frizzled-related protein 3 regulates activity-dependent adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jang, Mi-Hyeon; Bonaguidi, Michael A; Kitabatake, Yasuji; Sun, Jiaqi; Song, Juan; Kang, Eunchai; Jun, Heechul; Zhong, Chun; Su, Yijing; Guo, Junjie U; Wang, Marie Xun; Sailor, Kurt A; Kim, Ju-Young; Gao, Yuan; Christian, Kimberly M; Ming, Guo-li; Song, Hongjun

    2013-02-07

    Adult neurogenesis, the process of generating mature neurons from adult neural stem cells, proceeds concurrently with ongoing neuronal circuit activity and is modulated by various physiological and pathological stimuli. The niche mechanism underlying the activity-dependent regulation of the sequential steps of adult neurogenesis remains largely unknown. Here, we report that neuronal activity decreases the expression of secreted frizzled-related protein 3 (sFRP3), a naturally secreted Wnt inhibitor highly expressed by adult dentate gyrus granule neurons. Sfrp3 deletion activates quiescent radial neural stem cells and promotes newborn neuron maturation, dendritic growth, and dendritic spine formation in the adult mouse hippocampus. Furthermore, sfrp3 reduction is essential for activity-induced adult neural progenitor proliferation and the acceleration of new neuron development. Our study identifies sFRP3 as an inhibitory niche factor from local mature dentate granule neurons that regulates multiple phases of adult hippocampal neurogenesis and suggests an interesting activity-dependent mechanism governing adult neurogenesis via the acute release of tonic inhibition.

  8. Membrane Frizzled Related Protein is necessary for the normal development and maintenance of photoreceptor outer segments

    PubMed Central

    Won, Jungyeon; Smith, Richard S.; Peachey, Neal S.; Wu, Jiang; Hicks, Wanda L.; Naggert, Jürgen K.; Nishina, Patsy M.

    2009-01-01

    A 4 base pair deletion in a splice donor site of the Mfrp (membrane-type frizzled-related protein) gene, herein referred to as Mfrprd6/rd6, is predicted to lead to the skipping of exon 4 and photoreceptor degeneration in retinal degeneration 6 (rd6) mutant mice. Little, however, is known about the function of the protein or how the mutation causes the degenerative retinal phenotype. Here we examine ultrastructural changes in the retina of Mfrprd6/rd6 mice to determine the earliest effects of the mutation. We also extend the reported observations of the expression pattern of the dicistronic Mfrp/C1qtnf5 message and the localization of these and other retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and retinal proteins during development and assess the ability of RPE cells to phagocytize outer segments in mutant and WT mice. At the ultrastructural level, outer segments do not develop normally in Mfrprd6/rd6 mutants. They are disorganized and become progressively shorter as mutant mice age. Additionally, there are focal areas in which there is a reduction of apical RPE microvilli. At P25, the rod ERG a-wave of Mfrprd6/rd6 mice is reduced in amplitude by ~50% as are ERG components generated by the RPE. Examination of β-catenin localization and Fos and Tcf-1 expression, intermediates of the canonical Wnt-pathway, showed they were not different between mutant and WT mice, suggesting that MFRP may operate through an alternative pathway. Finally, impaired outer segment phagocytosis was observed in Mfrprd6/rd6 mice both in standard ambient lighting conditions and with bright light exposure when compared to WT controls. PMID:18764959

  9. Role of secreted frizzled-related protein 3 in human renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Hiroshi; Hinoda, Yuji; Ueno, Koji; Majid, Shahana; Saini, Sharanjot; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2010-03-01

    The secreted frizzled-related protein (sFRP) family plays an important role in the inhibition of the Wnt signaling pathway in various cancers. The functional significance of Wnt antagonist sFRP3 has not been investigated in renal cancer. We performed tissue microarray and found that the level of sFRP3 protein was high in normal kidney, low in primary renal cancer tissues, and high in metastatic renal cancer tissues. Therefore, we hypothesized that sFRP3 may play an important role in metastatic renal cancer. To test this hypothesis, we performed a series of experiments to determine the role of sFRP3 using primary and metastatic renal cancer cell lines. Functional analysis showed increased numbers of viable and invaded cells and tube formation and decreased numbers of apoptotic cells in the sFRP3-transfected renal cancer cell line A498. Promotion of tumor growth was also observed in nude mice injected with sFRP3-transfected A498 cells. In contrast, the number of viable cells and invasive cells was decreased in sFRP3 mRNA knockdown metastatic cells (ACHN and Hs891.T). To investigate the mechanism of sFRP3 function, we performed microarray analysis to see which genes were upregulated or downregulated by sFRP3 expression. Among these genes, MMP-3 and ANGPT1 were significantly upregulated in sFRP3-transfected cells. In conclusion, this is the first report to show that sFRP3 expression promotes cell growth, invasion, and inhibition of apoptosis in renal cancer cells.

  10. Functional significance of secreted Frizzled-related protein 1 in metastatic renal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Saini, Sharanjot; Liu, Jan; Yamamura, Soichiro; Majid, Shahana; Kawakami, Kazumori; Hirata, Hiroshi; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2009-09-01

    The secreted Frizzled-related protein 1 (SFRP1) is a Wingless-type (Wnt) antagonist that has been associated with various malignancies, including renal cell carcinomas (RCC). However, the functional significance of SFRP1 has never been investigated in metastatic RCC. Here, we investigated the role of this molecule in kidney cancer progression and metastasis. Using Wnt pathway-focused cDNA expression profiling in normal renal, primary RCC, and metastatic RCC cell lines, we identified that SFRP1 is up-regulated in metastatic RCC. SFRP1 overexpression in metastatic RCC was confirmed by immunostaining in renal tissues. We explored the molecular mechanisms underlying SFRP1 up-regulation by analyzing DNA methylation and histone modification patterns on SFRP1 promoter. We found that this gene is unmethylated/hypomethylated and enriched in activating histone modifications in metastatic RCC. To understand the functional significance of SFRP1 overexpression in metastatic RCC with regard to tumorigenesis, we used a small interfering RNA-mediated approach to knockdown the gene and monitored cellular proliferation, apoptosis, and metastatic behavior. Proliferation was unaltered and apoptosis increased on attenuation of SFRP1 expression. Also, SFRP1 depletion decreased the invasive potential of the metastatic RCC cell line, suggesting that the overexpression of this Wnt antagonist may be related to invasiveness and metastatic behavior in RCC. We investigated the molecular basis of the role of SFRP1 in invasion and metastasis and found that matrix metalloproteinase MMP10 is regulated by SFRP1. In conclusion, our data suggest that SFRP1 plays a role in the metastatic potential of RCC. The present findings may be important in the design of treatment modalities for metastatic RCC.

  11. Oncogenic functions of secreted Frizzled-related protein 2 in human renal cancer.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Soichiro; Kawakami, Kazumori; Hirata, Hiroshi; Ueno, Koji; Saini, Sharanjot; Majid, Shahana; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2010-06-01

    The secreted Frizzled-related proteins (sFRP) are modulators of the Wnt signaling pathway, which is involved in embryonic development and tumor progression. The functions of sFRP2 have not been studied in renal cancer. Transient transfection of sFRP2 promoted cell growth in renal carcinoma cells, whereby the largest effect was observed in A498 cells. To further study the functions of sFRP2 gene in renal carcinoma cells, we established A498 renal cancer cell lines, which stably expressed sFRP2. Stably expressed sFRP2 significantly promoted cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo tumor growth. The stably expressed sFRP2 cells were also found to have reduced UV-induced apoptosis and increased G(2) phase of the cell cycle. The phosphorylation level at Ser(33/37)/Thr(41) of beta-catenin was lower in the stable sFRP2 cell lines compared with the control cell line. sFRP2 significantly activated T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor transcriptional activity. In the stable sFRP2 cell line, expression of c-Fos, Bcl2, Bcl-w, cyclin B2, and cyclin E2 genes was significantly increased and p53 expression was decreased. This is the first report documenting that sFRP2 activates the canonical Wnt pathway and promotes cell growth by evoking diverse signaling cascades in renal cancer cells. This study may provide better strategies for the management of renal cancer through regulation of sFRP2 pathways.

  12. Secreted Frizzled Related Protein 1 is a Target to Improve Fracture Healing

    PubMed Central

    Gaur, Tripti; Wixted, John J.; Hussain, Sadiq; O’Connell, Shannon; Morgan, Elise F.; Ayers, David; Komm, Barry S.; Bodine, Peter V.; Stein, Gary S.; Lian, Jane B.

    2009-01-01

    Genetic studies have identified a high bone mass of phenotype in both human and mouse when canonical Wnt signaling is increased. Secreted frizzled related protein1 (sFRP1) is one of several Wnt antagonists and among the loss-of-function mouse models in which 32-week old mice exhibit a high bone mass phenotype. Here we show that impact fracture healing is enhanced in this mouse model of increased Wnt signaling at a physiologic level in young (8 week) sFRP1−/− mice which do not yet exhibit significant increase in BMD. The loss of sFRP1 function in vivo improves fracture repair by promoting early bone union without adverse effects on the quality of bone tissue reflected by increased mechanical strength. We observe a dramatic reduction of the cartilage callous, increased intramembranous bone formation with bone bridging by 14 days, and early bone remodeling during the 28 day fracture repair process in the sFRP1−/− mice. Our molecular analyses of gene markers indicate that the effect of sFRP1 loss-of-function during fracture repair is to accelerate bone healing after formation of the initial hematoma by directing mesenchymal stem cells into the osteoblast lineage via the canonical pathway. Further evidence to support this conclusion is the observation of maximal sFRP1 levels in the cartilaginous callus of a WT mouse, hence in sFRP1−/− mouse progenitor cells are shifted directly into osteoblast lineage. Thus, developing an antagonist to specifically inhibit sFRP1 represents a safe target for stimulating fracture repair and bone formation in metabolic bone disorders, osteoporosis and aging. PMID:19301255

  13. Expression patterns of Wnt signaling component, secreted frizzled-related protein 3 in astrocytoma and glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    PEĆINA-ŠLAUS, NIVES; KAFKA, ANJA; VAROŠANEC, ANA MARIA; MARKOVIĆ, LEON; KRSNIK, ŽELJKA; NJIRIĆ, NIKO; MRAK, GORAN

    2016-01-01

    Secreted frizzled-related protein 3 (SFRP3) is a member of the family of soluble proteins, which modulate the Wnt signaling cascade. Novel research has identified aberrant expression of SFRPs in different types of cancer. In the present study the expression intensities and localizations of the SFRP3 protein across different histopathological grades of astrocytic brain tumors were investigated by immunohistochemistry, digital scanning and image analysis. The results demonstrated that the differences between expression levels and malignancy grades were statistically significant. Tumors were classified into four malignancy grades according to the World Health Organization guidelines. Moderate (P=0.014) and strong (P=0.028) nuclear expression levels were significantly different in pilocytic (grade I) and diffuse (grade II) astrocytomas demonstrating higher expression values, as compared with anaplastic astrocytoma (grade III) and glioblastoma (grade IV). When the sample was divided into two groups, the moderate and high cytoplasmic expression levels were observed to be significantly higher in glioblastomas than in the group comprising astrocytoma II and III. Furthermore, the results indicated that high grade tumors were associated with lower values of moderate (P=0.002) and strong (P=0.018) nuclear expression in comparison to low grade tumors. Analysis of cytoplasmic staining demonstrated that strong cytoplasmic expression was significantly higher in the astrocytoma III and IV group than in the astrocytoma I and II group (P=0.048). Furthermore, lower grade astrocytomas exhibited reduced membranous SFRP3 staining when compared with higher grade astrocytomas and this difference was statistically significant (P=0.036). The present results demonstrated that SFRP3 protein expression levels were decreased in the nucleus in higher grade astrocytoma (indicating the expected behavior of an antagonist of Wnt signaling), whereas when the SFRP3 was located in the cytoplasm an

  14. Optimizing ultrasound molecular imaging of secreted frizzled related protein 2 expression in angiosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Juan D.; Streeter, Jason; Dayton, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Secreted frizzled related protein 2 (SFRP2) is a tumor endothelial marker expressed in angiosarcoma. Previously, we showed ultrasound molecular imaging with SFRP2-targeted contrast increased average video pixel intensity (VI) of angiosarcoma vessels by 2.2 ± 0.6 VI versus streptavidin contrast. We hypothesized that redesigning our contrast agents would increase imaging performance. Improved molecular imaging reagents were created by combining NeutrAvidin™-functionalized microbubbles with biotinylated SFRP2 or IgY control antibodies. When angiosarcoma tumors in nude mice reached 8 mm, time-intensity, antibody loading, and microbubble dose experiments optimized molecular imaging. 10 minutes after injection, the control-subtracted time-intensity curve (TIC) for SFRP2-targeted contrast reached a maximum, after subtracting the contribution of free-flowing contrast. SFRP2 antibody-targeted VI was greater when contrast was formulated with 10-fold molar excess of maleimide-activated NeutrAvidin™ versus 3-fold (4.5 ± 0.18 vs. 0.32 ± 0.15, VI ± SEM, 5 x 106 dose, p < 0.001). Tumor vasculature returned greater average video pixel intensity using 5 x 107 versus 5 x 106 microbubbles (21.2 ± 2.5 vs. 4.5 ± 0.18, p = 0.0011). Specificity for tumor vasculature was confirmed by low VI for SFRP2-targeted, and control contrast in peri-tumoral vasculature (3.2 ± 0.52 vs. 1.6 ± 0.71, p = 0.92). After optimization, average video pixel intensity of tumor vasculature was 14.2 ± 3.0 VI units higher with SFRP2-targeted contrast versus IgY-targeted control (22.1 ± 2.5 vs. 7.9 ± 1.6, p < 0.001). After log decompression, 14.2 ΔVI was equal to ~70% higher signal, in arbitray acoustic units (AU), for SFRP2 versus IgY. This provided ~18- fold higher acoustic signal enhancement than provided previously by 2.2 ΔVI. Basing our targeted contrast on NeutrAvidin™-functionalized microbubbles, using IgY antibodies for our control contrast, and optimizing our imaging protocol

  15. Epigenetic inactivation of secreted frizzled-related protein 2 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Xiao-Wen; Zhu, Sheng-Tao; He, Yuan-Long; Li, Peng; Wang, Yong-Jun; Zhang, Shu-Tian

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression and methylation status of the secreted frizzled-related protein 2 (SFRP2) in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and explore its role in ESCC carcinogenesis. METHODS: Seven ESCC cell lines (KYSE 30, KYSE150, KYSE410, KYSE510, EC109, EC9706 and TE-1) and one immortalized human esophageal epithelial cell line (Het-1A), 20 ESCC tissue samples and 20 paired adjacent non-tumor esophageal epithelial tissues were analyzed in this study. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was employed to investigate the expression of SFRP2 in cell lines, primary ESCC tumor tissue, and paired adjacent normal tissue. Methylation status was evaluated by methylation-specific PCR and bisulfite sequencing. The correlation between expression and promoter methylation of the SFRP2 gene was confirmed with treatment of 5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine. To assess the potential role of SFRP2 in ESCC, we established stable SFRP2-transfected cells and examined them with regard to cell proliferation, colony formation, apoptosis and cell cycle in vivo and in vitro. RESULTS: SFRP2 mRNA was expressed in the immortalized normal esophageal epithelial cell line but not in seven ESCC cell lines. By methylation-specific PCR, complete methylation was detected in three cell lines with silenced SFRP2 expression, and extensive methylation was observed in the other four ESCC cell lines. 5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine could restore the expression of SFRP2 mRNA in the three ESCC cell lines lacking SFRP2 expression. SFRP2 mRNA expression was obviously lower in primary ESCC tissue than in adjacent normal tissue (0.939 ± 0.398 vs 1.51 ± 0.399, P < 0.01). SFRP2 methylation was higher in tumor tissue than in paired normal tissue (95% vs 65%, P < 0.05). The DNA methylation status of the SFRP2 correlated inversely with the SFRP2 expression. To assess the potential role of SFRP2 in ESCC, we established stable SFRP2 transfectants and control counterparts by introducing pcDNA3

  16. Secreted Frizzled-related protein-2 (sFRP2) augments canonical Wnt3a-induced signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Marschall, Zofia von; Fisher, Larry W.

    2010-09-24

    Research highlights: {yields} sFRP2 enhances the Wnt3a-induced {beta}-catenin stabilization and its nuclear translocation. {yields} sFRP2 enhances LRP6 phosphorylation and Wnt3a/{beta}-catenin transcriptional reporter activity. {yields} Dickkopf-1 (DKK1) fully antagonizes both Wnt3a/sFRP2-induced LRP6 phosphorylation and transcriptional activity. {yields} sFRP2 enhances expression of genes known to be regulated by Wnt3a signaling. -- Abstract: Secreted Frizzled-related proteins (sFRP) are involved in embryonic development as well as pathological conditions including bone and myocardial disorders and cancer. Because of their sequence homology with the Wnt-binding domain of Frizzled, they have generally been considered antagonists of canonical Wnt signaling. However, additional activities of various sFRPs including both synergism and mimicry of Wnt signaling as well as functions other than modulation of Wnt signaling have been reported. Using human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293A), we found that sFRP2 enhanced Wnt3a-dependent phosphorylation of LRP6 as well as both cytosolic {beta}-catenin levels and its nuclear translocation. While addition of recombinant sFRP2 had no activity by itself, Top/Fop luciferase reporter assays showed a dose-dependent increase of Wnt3a-mediated transcriptional activity. sFRP2 enhancement of Wnt3a signaling was abolished by treatment with the Wnt antagonist, Dickkopf-1 (DKK1). Wnt-signaling pathway qPCR arrays showed that sFRP2 enhanced the Wnt3a-mediated transcriptional up-regulation of several genes regulated by Wnt3a including its antagonists, DKK1, and Naked cuticle-1 homolog (NKD1). These results support sFRP2's role as an enhancer of Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling, a result with biological impact for both normal development and diverse pathologies such as tumorigenesis.

  17. A pan-cancer analysis of secreted Frizzled-related proteins: re-examining their proposed tumour suppressive function

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Krista Marie; Postovit, Lynne-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Secreted frizzled-related proteins (SFRPs), containing five family members (SFRPs 1–5) are putative extracellular Wnt inhibitors. Given their abilities to inhibit Wnt signalling, as well as the loss of SFRP1 in many cancers, this family is generally considered to be tumour suppressive. In this study we analyzed gene expression, promoter methylation and survival data from over 8000 tumour and normal samples from 29 cancers in order to map the context-specific associations of SFRPs 1–5 with patient survival, gene silencing and gene expression signatures. We show that only SFRP1 associates consistently with tumour suppressive functions, and that SFRP2 and SFRP4 typically associate with a poor prognosis concomitant with the expression of genes associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Moreover, our results indicate that while SFRP1 is lost in cancer cells via the process of DNA methylation, SFRP2 and 4 are likely derived from the tumour stroma, and thus tend to increase in tumours as compared to normal tissues. This in-depth analysis highlights the need to study each SFRP as a separate entity and suggests that SFRP2 and SFRP4 should be approached as complex matricellular proteins with functions that extend far beyond their putative Wnt antagonistic ability. PMID:28218291

  18. Secreted frizzled-related protein-5 is epigenetically downregulated and functions as a tumor suppressor in kidney cancer.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Kazumori; Yamamura, Soichiro; Hirata, Hiroshi; Ueno, Koji; Saini, Sharanjot; Majid, Shahana; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Kawamoto, Ken; Enokida, Hideki; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2011-02-01

    Secreted frizzled-related protein-5 (sFRP-5) has been identified as 1 of the secreted antagonists that bind Wnt protein. However, the functional significance of sFRP-5 in renal cell cancer (RCC) has not been reported. We hypothesized that sFRP-5 may be epigenetically downregulated through DNA methylation and histone modification and function as a tumor suppressor gene in RCC. Using tissue microarray and real-time RT-PCR, we found that sFRP-5 was significantly downregulated in kidney cancer tissues and cell lines, respectively. DNA bisulfite sequencing of the sFRP-5 promoter region in RCC cell lines showed it to be densely methylated, whereas there was few promoter methylation in normal kidney. The sFRP-5 expression was restored and the acetylation of H3 and H4 histones associated with the sFRP-5 promoter region were significantly increased after treatment with demethylation agent (5-Aza-dc) and histone deacetylase inhibitor (TSA). When RCC cells were transfected with the sFRP-5 gene, significant inhibition of anchorage independent colony formation and cell invasion were observed compared to controls. The sFRP-5 transfection also significantly induced apoptosis in RCC cells. In conclusion, this is the first report documenting that the sFRP-5 is downregulated by promoter methylation and histone acetylation and functions as a tumor suppressor gene by inducing apoptosis in RCC cells.

  19. Dorsal–Ventral patterning: Crescent is a dorsally secreted Frizzled-related protein that competitively inhibits Tolloid proteases

    PubMed Central

    Ploper, Diego; Lee, Hojoon X.; De Robertis, Edward M.

    2011-01-01

    In Xenopus, dorsal–ventral (D–V) patterning can self-regulate after embryo bisection. This is mediated by an extracellular network of proteins secreted by the dorsal and ventral centers of the gastrula. Different proteins of similar activity can be secreted at these two poles, but under opposite transcriptional control. Here we show that Crescent, a dorsal protein, can compensate for the loss of Sizzled, a ventral protein. Crescent is a secreted Frizzled-Related Protein (sFRP) known to regulate Wnt8 and Wnt11 activity. We now find that Crescent also regulates the BMP pathway. Crescent expression was increased by the BMP antagonist Chordin and repressed by BMP4, while the opposite was true for Sizzled. Crescent knock-down increased the expression of BMP target genes, and synergized with Sizzled morpholinos. Thus, Crescent loss-of-function is compensated by increased expression of its ventral counterpart Sizzled. Crescent overexpression dorsalized whole embryos but not ventral half-embryos, indicating that Crescent requires a dorsal component to exert its anti-BMP activity. Crescent protein lost its dorsalizing activity in Chordin-depleted embryos. When co-injected, Crescent and Chordin proteins greatly synergized in the dorsalization of Xenopus embryos. The molecular mechanism of these phenotypes is explained by the ability of Crescent to inhibit Tolloid metalloproteinases, which normally degrade Chordin. Enzyme kinetic studies showed that Crescent was a competitive inhibitor of Tolloid activity, which bound to Tolloid/BMP1 with a KD of 11 nM. In sum, Crescent is a new component of the D–V pathway, which functions as the dorsal counterpart of Sizzled, through the regulation of chordinases of the Tolloid family. PMID:21295563

  20. Secreted Frizzled Related Protein 2 is a procollagen C proteinase enhancer with a role in myocardial infarction-associated fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Koichi; Luo, Min; Zhang, Yue; Wilkes, David C.; Ge, Gaoxiang; Grieskamp, Thomas; Yamada, Chikaomi; Liu, Ting-Chun; Huang, Guorui; Basson, Craig T.; Kispert, Andreas; Greenspan, Daniel S.; Sato, Thomas N.

    2009-01-01

    Secreted frizzled related proteins (sFRPs) have emerged as key regulators of a wide range of developmental and disease processes, with virtually all known functions of mammalian sFRPs attributed to their ability to antagonize Wnt signaling. Recently however, the Xenopus and zebrafish sFRP, Sizzled, was shown to function as an antagonist of Chordin processing by Tolloid-like metalloproteinases, leading to the proposal that sFRPs may function as evolutionarily-conserved antagonists of the chordinase activities of this class of proteinases. Herein, in contrast to this proposal, we show that the mammalian sFRP, sFRP2, does not affect Chordin processing, but instead can serve as a direct enhancer of the procollagen C-proteinase activity of Tolloid-like metalloproteinases. We further show that the level of fibrosis, in which procollagen processing by Tolloid-like proteinases plays a rate-limiting role, is markedly reduced in sFRP2-null mice subjected to myocardial infarction. Importantly, this reduced level of fibrosis is accompanied by significantly improved cardiac function. This study thus uncovers a novel function for sFRP2 and a potential therapeutic application for sFRP2 antagonism in controlling fibrosis in the infarcted heart. PMID:19079247

  1. Membrane frizzled-related protein is necessary for the normal development and maintenance of photoreceptor outer segments.

    PubMed

    Won, Jungyeon; Smith, Richard S; Peachey, Neal S; Wu, Jiang; Hicks, Wanda L; Naggert, Jürgen K; Nishina, Patsy M

    2008-01-01

    A 4 base pair deletion in a splice donor site of the Mfrp (membrane-type frizzled-related protein) gene, herein referred to as Mfrprd6/rd6, is predicted to lead to the skipping of exon 4 and photoreceptor degeneration in retinal degeneration 6 (rd6) mutant mice. Little, however, is known about the function of the protein or how the mutation causes the degenerative retinal phenotype. Here we examine ultrastructural changes in the retina of Mfrprd6/rd6 mice to determine the earliest effects of the mutation. We also extend the reported observations of the expression pattern of the dicistronic Mfrp/C1qtnf5 message and the localization of these and other retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and retinal proteins during development and assess the ability of RPE cells to phagocytize outer segments (OSs) in mutant and wild-type (WT) mice. At the ultrastructural level, OSs do not develop normally in Mfrprd6/rd6 mutants. They are disorganized and become progressively shorter as mutant mice age. Additionally, there are focal areas in which there is a reduction of apical RPE microvilli. At P25, the rod electroretinogram (ERG) a-wave of Mfrprd6/rd6 mice is reduced in amplitude by ~50% as are ERG components generated by the RPE. Examination of beta-catenin localization and Fos and Tcf-1 expression, intermediates of the canonical Wnt pathway, showed that they were not different between mutant and WT mice, suggesting that MFRP may operate through an alternative pathway. Finally, impaired OS phagocytosis was observed in Mfrprd6/rd6 mice both in standard ambient lighting conditions and with bright light exposure when compared to WT controls.

  2. Secreted Frizzled related protein-4 (sFRP4) promotes epidermal differentiation and apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Maganga, Richard; Giles, Natalie; Adcroft, Katharine; Unni, Ambili; Keeney, Diane; Wood, Fiona; Fear, Mark Dharmarajan, Arunasalam

    2008-12-12

    The skin provides vital protection from infection and dehydration. Maintenance of the skin is through a constant program of proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis of epidermal cells, whereby proliferating cells in the basal layer differentiating to form the keratinized, anucleated stratum corneum. The WNT signalling pathway is known to be important in the skin. WNT signalling has been shown to be important both in epidermal development and in the maintenance and cycling of hair follicles and epidermal stem cells. However, the precise role for this pathway in epidermal differentiation remains unknown. We investigated the role of the WNT signalling inhibitor sFRP4 in epidermal differentiation. sFRP4 is expressed in both normal skin and keratinocytes in culture. Expression of sFRP4 mRNA and protein increases with keratinocyte differentiation and apoptosis, whilst exposure of keratinocytes to exogenous sFRP4 promotes apoptosis and expression of the terminal differentiation marker Involucrin. These data suggest sFRP4 promotes epidermal differentiation.

  3. Secreted Frizzled-Related Protein 4 (SFRP4) is Elevated in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Brix, J M; Krzizek, E C; Hoebaus, C; Ludvik, B; Schernthaner, G; Schernthaner, G H

    2016-05-01

    Recently, SFRP4 was identified as a molecular link between islet inflammation and defective insulin secretion. Gene co-expression analysis detected a molecule associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), elevated HbA1c, and reduced insulin secretion in mice as well as in a pilot sample of humans. To our knowledge SFRP4 has never been investigated in patients with different types of diabetes. We included 179 patients: 46 with type 1 diabetes (T1D), 30 age matched healthy controls for patients with T1D (CO-T1D), 55 with T2D, 37 with latent autoimmune diabetes of the adult (LADA) and 30 healthy controls (CO) for patients with T2D and LADA. Apart from anthropometric data, lipids and renal parameters were assessed. SFRP4 levels were measured by a commercial ELISA. Patients with diabetes had significant higher SFRP4 levels than CO: T2D vs. CO: 37.1±26.7 vs. 8.8±3.0 ng/ml, p<0.001; LADA vs. CO: 15.6±6.2 vs. 8.7±3.0 ng/ml, p<0.001; T1D vs. CO-T1D: 24.6±17.9 vs. 16.9±4.5 ng/ml, p=0.011. SFRP4 levels were correlated with age, BMI, HbA1c, HDL-cholesterol, and triglycerides. A multivariate model revealed HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides and BMI as predictors for SFRP4. This is the first study demonstrating that SFRP4 is significantly increased in patients with different types of diabetes suggesting that this protein is generally involved in islet dysfunction and potentially subclinical inflammation irrespective of type of diabetes.

  4. Sizzled Is Unique among Secreted Frizzled-related Proteins for Its Ability to Specifically Inhibit Bone Morphogenetic Protein-1 (BMP-1)/Tolloid-like Proteinases*

    PubMed Central

    Bijakowski, Cécile; Vadon-Le Goff, Sandrine; Delolme, Frédéric; Bourhis, Jean-Marie; Lécorché, Pascaline; Ruggiero, Florence; Becker-Pauly, Christoph; Yiallouros, Irene; Stöcker, Walter; Dive, Vincent; Hulmes, David J. S.; Moali, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    BMP-1/tolloid-like proteinases (BTPs) are major enzymes involved in extracellular matrix assembly and activation of bioactive molecules, both growth factors and anti-angiogenic molecules. Although the control of BTP activity by several enhancing molecules is well established, the possibility that regulation also occurs through endogenous inhibitors is still debated. Secreted frizzled-related proteins (sFRPs) have been studied as possible candidates, with highly contradictory results, after the demonstration that sizzled, a sFRP found in Xenopus and zebrafish, was a potent inhibitor of Xenopus and zebrafish tolloid-like proteases. In this study, we demonstrate that mammalian sFRP-1, -2, and -4 do not modify human BMP-1 activity on several of its known substrates including procollagen I, procollagen III, pN-collagen V, and prolysyl oxidase. In contrast, Xenopus sizzled appears as a tight binding inhibitor of human BMP-1, with a Ki of 1.5 ± 0.5 nm, and is shown to strongly inhibit other human tolloid isoforms mTLD and mTLL-1. Because sizzled is the most potent inhibitor of human tolloid-like proteinases known to date, we have studied its mechanism of action in detail and shown that the frizzled domain of sizzled is both necessary and sufficient for inhibitory activity and that it acts directly on the catalytic domain of BMP-1. Residues in sizzled required for inhibition include Asp-92, which is shared by sFRP-1 and -2, and also Phe-94, Ser-43, and Glu-44, which are specific to sizzled, thereby providing a rational basis for the absence of inhibitory activity of human sFRPs. PMID:22825851

  5. The NTR module: domains of netrins, secreted frizzled related proteins, and type I procollagen C-proteinase enhancer protein are homologous with tissue inhibitors of metalloproteases.

    PubMed Central

    Bányai, L.; Patthy, L.

    1999-01-01

    Using homology search, structure prediction, and structural characterization methods we show that the C-terminal domains of (1) netrins, (2) complement proteins C3, C4, C5, (3) secreted frizzled-related proteins, and (4) type I procollagen C-proteinase enhancer proteins (PCOLCEs) are homologous with the N-terminal domains of (5) tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). The proteins harboring this netrin module (NTR module) fulfill diverse biological roles ranging from axon guidance, regulation of Wnt signaling, to the control of the activity of metalloproteases. With the exception of TIMPs, it is not known at present what role the NTR modules play in these processes. In view of the fact that the NTR modules of TIMPs are involved in the inhibition of matrixin-type metalloproteases and that the NTR module of PCOLCEs is involved in the control of the activity of the astacin-type metalloprotease BMP1, it seems possible that interaction with metzincins could be a shared property of NTR modules and could be critical for the biological roles of the host proteins. PMID:10452607

  6. Secreted frizzled-related protein disrupts PCP in eye lens fiber cells that have polarised primary cilia

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Yuki; Stump, Richard J. W.; Nguyen, Anke; Wen, Li; Chen, Yongjuan; Wang, Yanshu; Murdoch, Jennifer N.; Lovicu, Frank J.; McAvoy, John W.

    2009-01-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling polarises cells along tissue axes. Although pathways involved are becoming better understood, outstanding issues include; (i) existence/identity of cues that orchestrate global polarisation in tissues, and (ii) the generality of the link between polarisation of primary cilia and asymmetric localisation of PCP proteins. Mammalian lenses are mainly comprised of epithelial-derived fiber cells. Concentrically arranged fibers are precisely aligned as they elongate along the anterior-posterior axis and orientate towards lens poles where they meet fibers from other segments to form characteristic sutures. We show that lens exhibits PCP, with each fiber cell having a apically situated cilium and in most cases this is polarised towards the anterior pole. Frizzled and other PCP proteins are also asymmetrically localised along the equatorial-anterior axis. Mutations in core PCP genes Van Gogh-like 2 and Celsr1 perturb oriented fiber alignment and suture formation. Suppression of the PCP pathway by overexpressing Sfrp2, shows that whilst local groups of fibers are often similarly oriented, they lack global orientation; consequently when local groups of fibers with different orientations meet they form multiple, small, ectopic suture-like configurations. This indicates that this extracellular inhibitor disrupts a global polarising signal that utilises a PCP-mediated mechanism to coordinate the global alignment and orientation of fibers to lens poles. PMID:19968984

  7. Secreted frizzled-related protein-5 (sFRP-5) is epigenetically downregulated and functions as a tumor suppressor in kidney cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Kazumori; Yamamura, Soichiro; Hirata, Hiroshi; Ueno, Koji; Saini, Sharanjot; Majid, Shahana; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Kawamoto, Ken; Enokida, Hideki; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2014-01-01

    Secreted frizzled-related protein-5 (sFRP-5) has been identified as one of the secreted antagonists that bind Wnt protein. However, the functional significance of sFRP-5 in renal cell cancer (RCC) has not been reported. We hypothesized that sFRP-5 may be epigenetically downregulated through DNA methylation and histone modification and function as a tumor suppressor gene in RCC. Using tissue microarray and real-time RT-PCR, we found that sFRP-5 was significantly downregulated in kidney cancer tissues and cell lines, respectively. DNA bisulfite sequencing of the sFRP-5 promoter region in RCC cell lines showed it to be densely methylated whereas there was few promoter methylation in normal kidney. The sFRP-5 expression was restored and the acetylation of H3 and H4 histones associated with the sFRP-5 promoter region were significantly increased after treatment with demethylation agent (5-Aza-dc) and histone deacetylase inhibitor (TSA). When RCC cells were transfected with the sFRP-5 gene, significant inhibition of anchorage independent colony formation and cell invasion were observed compared to controls. The sFRP-5 transfection also significantly induced apoptosis in RCC cells. In conclusion, this is the first report documenting that the sFRP-5 is downregulated by promoter methylation and histone acetylation and functions as a tumor suppressor gene by inducing apoptosis in RCC cells. PMID:20340127

  8. Low expression of secreted frizzled-related protein 2 and nuclear accumulation of β-catenin in aggressive nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma

    PubMed Central

    WU, YOUTU; BAI, JIWEI; HONG, LINCHUAN; LIU, CHUNHUI; YU, SHENGYUAN; YU, GUOQIANG; ZHANG, YAZHUO

    2016-01-01

    The identification of a specific molecular marker for aggressiveness of nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs) is urgently required in order to guide the clinical diagnosis and treatment of NFPAs. In the present study, low expression of secreted frizzled-related protein 2 (sFRP2) in NFPAs was demonstrated by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blot and immunohistochemical analyses. The results confirmed an abnormal accumulation of free β-catenin in the nuclei of NFPAs, which is the core step for the activation of the Wnt canonical signaling pathway. Furthermore, cyclin D1 and c-Myc, the downstream proteins of the Wnt canonical signaling pathway, were overexpressed in aggressive NFPAs. These findings demonstrated the activation of the Wnt canonical signaling pathway in aggressive NFPAs. In addition, sFRP2 expression was observed to be inversely correlated to the aggressiveness of NFPAs. Therefore, sFRP2 may act as a tumor suppressor through modulation of the cellular cytosolic pool of β-catenin in NFPAs. Furthermore, the expression of sFRP2 may serve as a biomarker for NFPAs aggressiveness and prognosis. PMID:27347125

  9. The wingless-related integration site-5a/secreted frizzled-related protein-5 system is dysregulated in human sepsis.

    PubMed

    Schulte, D M; Kragelund, D; Müller, N; Hagen, I; Elke, G; Titz, A; Schädler, D; Schumacher, J; Weiler, N; Bewig, B; Schreiber, S; Laudes, M

    2015-04-01

    Sepsis and type 2 diabetes exhibit insulin resistance as a common phenotype. In type 2 diabetes we and others have recently provided evidence that alterations of the proinflammatory wingless-related integration site (wnt)-5a/anti-inflammatory secreted frizzled-related protein (sFRP)-5 system are involved in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether this novel cytokine system is dysregulated in human sepsis, which may indicate a potential mechanism linking inflammation to metabolism. In this single-centre prospective observational study, critically ill adult septic patients were examined and proinflammatory wnt5a and wnt5a inhibitor sFRP5 were measured in serum samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) at admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) and 5 days later. Sixty sepsis patients were included, and 30 healthy individuals served as controls. Wnt5a levels were found to be increased significantly in septic patients compared to healthy controls (2·21 ± 0·33 versus 0·32 ± 0·03 ng/ml, P < 0·0001). In contrast, sFRP5 was not altered significantly in septic patients (19·72 ± 3·06 versus 17·48 ± 6·38 ng/ml, P = 0·07). On admission to the ICU, wnt5a levels exhibited a significant positive correlation with the leucocyte count (rs  = 0·3797, P = 0·004). Interestingly, in patients recovering from sepsis, wnt5a levels declined significantly within 5 days (2·17 ± 0·38-1·03 ± 0·28 ng/ml, P < 0·01). In contrast, if sepsis was worsening, wnt5a levels increased in the same time-period by trend (2·34 ± 0·59-3·25 ± 1·02 ng/ml, P > 0·05). sFRP5 levels did not change significantly throughout the study period. The wnt5a/sFRP5 system is altered in human sepsis and might therefore be of interest for future studies on molecular pathophysiology of this common human disease.

  10. Secreted frizzled-related protein 1 overexpression in gastric cancer: Relationship with radiological findings of dual-energy spectral CT and PET-CT

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Huimin; Yang, Guoyuan; Ding, Bei; Zhang, Miao; Zhang, Mingjun; Yan, Fuhua; Qu, Ying; Zhang, Huan

    2017-01-01

    We explored the role of secreted frizzled-related protein 1 (sFRP1) overexpression in gastric cancer and its relationship with radiological findings from dual-energy spectral CT(DEsCT) and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). We established mouse metastatic models using the SGC-7901/sFRP1 gastric cancer cell line. A control group was established using the SGC-7901/vector cell line. The models were then scanned with dual-energy spectral CT and PET-CT. Subsequent analysis, including immunohistochemistry and Transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate-biotin nick end labelling (TUNEL), was performed to confirm the role of sFRP1. Transwell chamber and angiogenesis assays were conducted to verify the effect of sFRP1 in vitro. We found that the control group showed negative radiological performance with successful implantation. Concurrently, the treated group showed visible lesions, a higher FDG uptake and increasing enhancement. The immunological and histological analysis confirmed the positive radiological performance with larger size, increasing proliferation, more microvessels and less apoptosis. The angiogenic up-regulation of sFRP1 overexpression were further verified with in vitro cell models. This preliminary study demonstrates that sFRP1 overexpression in gastric cancer cells leads to increased cell proliferation and angiogenesis, which may, in turn, contribute to positive PET/CT and CT performances. PMID:28169332

  11. Gene Therapy in Patient-specific Stem Cell Lines and a Preclinical Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa With Membrane Frizzled-related Protein Defects

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yao; Wu, Wen-Hsuan; Hsu, Chun-Wei; Nguyen, Huy V; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Chan, Lawrence; Nagasaki, Takayuki; Maumenee, Irene H; Yannuzzi, Lawrence A; Hoang, Quan V; Hua, Haiqing; Egli, Dieter; Tsang, Stephen H

    2014-01-01

    Defects in Membrane Frizzled-related Protein (MFRP) cause autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP). MFRP codes for a retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)-specific membrane receptor of unknown function. In patient-specific induced pluripotent stem (iPS)-derived RPE cells, precise levels of MFRP, and its dicistronic partner CTRP5, are critical to the regulation of actin organization. Overexpression of CTRP5 in naïve human RPE cells phenocopied behavior of MFRP-deficient patient RPE (iPS-RPE) cells. AAV8 (Y733F) vector expressing human MFRP rescued the actin disorganization phenotype and restored apical microvilli in patient-specific iPS-RPE cell lines. As a result, AAV-treated MFRP mutant iPS-RPE recovered pigmentation and transepithelial resistance. The efficacy of AAV-mediated gene therapy was also evaluated in Mfrprd6/Mfrprd6 mice—an established preclinical model of RP—and long-term improvement in visual function was observed in AAV-Mfrp-treated mice. This report is the first to indicate the successful use of human iPS-RPE cells as a recipient for gene therapy. The observed favorable response to gene therapy in both patient-specific cell lines, and the Mfrprd6/Mfrprd6 preclinical model suggests that this form of degeneration caused by MFRP mutations is a potential target for interventional trials. PMID:24895994

  12. Gene therapy in patient-specific stem cell lines and a preclinical model of retinitis pigmentosa with membrane frizzled-related protein defects.

    PubMed

    Li, Yao; Wu, Wen-Hsuan; Hsu, Chun-Wei; Nguyen, Huy V; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Chan, Lawrence; Nagasaki, Takayuki; Maumenee, Irene H; Yannuzzi, Lawrence A; Hoang, Quan V; Hua, Haiqing; Egli, Dieter; Tsang, Stephen H

    2014-09-01

    Defects in Membrane Frizzled-related Protein (MFRP) cause autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP). MFRP codes for a retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)-specific membrane receptor of unknown function. In patient-specific induced pluripotent stem (iPS)-derived RPE cells, precise levels of MFRP, and its dicistronic partner CTRP5, are critical to the regulation of actin organization. Overexpression of CTRP5 in naïve human RPE cells phenocopied behavior of MFRP-deficient patient RPE (iPS-RPE) cells. AAV8 (Y733F) vector expressing human MFRP rescued the actin disorganization phenotype and restored apical microvilli in patient-specific iPS-RPE cell lines. As a result, AAV-treated MFRP mutant iPS-RPE recovered pigmentation and transepithelial resistance. The efficacy of AAV-mediated gene therapy was also evaluated in Mfrp(rd6)/Mfrp(rd6) mice--an established preclinical model of RP--and long-term improvement in visual function was observed in AAV-Mfrp-treated mice. This report is the first to indicate the successful use of human iPS-RPE cells as a recipient for gene therapy. The observed favorable response to gene therapy in both patient-specific cell lines, and the Mfrp(rd6)/Mfrp(rd6) preclinical model suggests that this form of degeneration caused by MFRP mutations is a potential target for interventional trials.

  13. Hesperidin derivative-11 inhibits fibroblast-like synoviocytes proliferation by activating Secreted frizzled-related protein 2 in adjuvant arthritis rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanhui; Sun, Zhenghao; Xu, Dandan; Liu, Junda; Li, Xiaofeng; Wu, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Yilong; Wang, Qianqian; Huang, Cheng; Meng, Xiaoming; Li, Jun

    2017-01-05

    Hesperidin (HDN), a flavanone glycoside derived from the citrus cultivation, has a multitude of pharmacological properties, which include antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, hypolipidaemic and anti-carcinogenic actions, but the underlying mechanisms by which treatment of HDN attenuates Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) remain elusive. Here we engaged to determine whether Hesperidin derivative-11(HDND-11), a HDN derivative with enhanced water-solubility and bioavailability, is effective on treating arthritis in rats. In this study, results of 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetra-zolium bromide (MTT) assay and Flow cytometry indicated that administration of HDND-11 inhibited proliferation of fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS). Results of Western blot, Real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis and Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that HDND-11 was able to up-regulate the expression of Secreted frizzled-related proteins 2 (SFRP2) and diminish DNA methyltransferase 1(DNMT1) expression. We also identified that the effect of DNMT1 inhibition was completely similar to the effects of HDND-11 on SFRP2 gene expression. Furthermore, our results indicated that treatment with HDND-11 could suppress activation of Wnt pathway. Taken together, we found that the HDND-11diminished inhibitory effect of DNMT1 on SFRP2, thereby down-regulated β-catenin expression and inhibited the activation of Wnt signaling pathways to inhibit FLS growth.

  14. Loss of Secreted Frizzled-Related Protein 4 Correlates with an Aggressive Phenotype and Predicts Poor Outcome in Ovarian Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nixdorf, Sheri; Ford, Caroline E.; Olivier, Jake; Caduff, Rosmarie; Scurry, James P.; Guertler, Rea; Hornung, Daniela; Mueller, Renato; Fink, Daniel A.; Hacker, Neville F.; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Activation of the Wnt signaling pathway is implicated in aberrant cellular proliferation in various cancers. In 40% of endometrioid ovarian cancers, constitutive activation of the pathway is due to oncogenic mutations in β-catenin or other inactivating mutations in key negative regulators. Secreted frizzled-related protein 4 (SFRP4) has been proposed to have inhibitory activity through binding and sequestering Wnt ligands. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed RT-qPCR and Western-blotting in primary cultures and ovarian cell lines for SFRP4 and its key downstream regulators activated β-catenin, β-catenin and GSK3β. SFRP4 was then examined by immunohistochemistry in a cohort of 721 patients and due to its proposed secretory function, in plasma, presenting the first ELISA for SFRP4. SFRP4 was most highly expressed in tubal epithelium and decreased with malignant transformation, both on RNA and on protein level, where it was even more profound in the membrane fraction (p<0.0001). SFRP4 was expressed on the protein level in all histotypes of ovarian cancer but was decreased from borderline tumors to cancers and with loss of cellular differentiation. Loss of membrane expression was an independent predictor of poor survival in ovarian cancer patients (p = 0.02 unadjusted; p = 0.089 adjusted), which increased the risk of a patient to die from this disease by the factor 1.8. Conclusions/Significance Our results support a role for SFRP4 as a tumor suppressor gene in ovarian cancers via inhibition of the Wnt signaling pathway. This has not only predictive implications but could also facilitate a therapeutic role using epigenetic targets. PMID:22363760

  15. Induction of CXC chemokines in human mesenchymal stem cells by stimulation with secreted frizzled-related proteins through non-canonical Wnt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bischoff, David S; Zhu, Jian-Hua; Makhijani, Nalini S; Yamaguchi, Dean T

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of secreted frizzled-related proteins (sFRPs) on CXC chemokine expression in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). METHODS: CXC chemokines such as CXCL5 and CXCL8 are induced in hMSCs during differentiation with osteogenic differentiation medium (OGM) and may be involved in angiogenic stimulation during bone repair. hMSCs were treated with conditioned medium (CM) from L-cells expressing non-canonical Wnt5a protein, or with control CM from wild type L-cells, or directly with sFRPs for up to 10 d in culture. mRNA expression levels of both CXCL5 and CXCL8 were quantitated by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and secreted protein levels of these proteins determined by ELISA. Dose- (0-500 ng/mL) and time-response curves were generated for treatment with sFRP1. Signal transduction pathways were explored by western blot analysis with pan- or phosphorylation-specific antibodies, through use of specific pathway inhibitors, and through use of siRNAs targeting specific frizzled receptors (Fzd)-2 and 5 or the receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor-2 (RoR2) prior to treatment with sFRPs. RESULTS: CM from L-cells expressing Wnt5a, a non-canonical Wnt, stimulated an increase in CXCL5 mRNA expression and protein secretion in comparison to control L-cell CM. sFRP1, which should inhibit both canonical and non-canonical Wnt signaling, surprisingly enhanced the expression of CXCL5 at 7 and 10 d. Dickkopf1, an inhibitor of canonical Wnt signaling prevented the sFRP-stimulated induction of CXCL5 and actually inhibited basal levels of CXCL5 expression at 7 but not at 10 d post treatment. In addition, all four sFRPs isoforms induced CXCL8 expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner with maximum expression at 7 d with treatment at 150 ng/mL. The largest increases in CXCL5 expression were seen from stimulation with sFRP1 or sFRP2. Analysis of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways in the presence of OGM showed s

  16. Secreted Frizzled-related protein 1 (sFRP1) regulates spermatid adhesion in the testis via dephosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase and the nectin-3 adhesion protein complex

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Elissa W. P.; Lee, Will M.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2013-01-01

    Development of spermatozoa in adult mammalian testis during spermatogenesis involves extensive cell migration and differentiation. Spermatogonia that reside at the basal compartment of the seminiferous epithelium differentiate into more advanced germ cell types that migrate toward the apical compartment until elongated spermatids are released into the tubule lumen during spermiation. Apical ectoplasmic specialization (ES; a testis-specific anchoring junction) is the only cell junction that anchors and maintains the polarity of elongating/elongated spermatids (step 8–19 spermatids) in the epithelium. Little is known regarding the signaling pathways that trigger the disassembly of the apical ES at spermiation. Here, we show that secreted Frizzled-related protein 1 (sFRP1), a putative tumor suppressor gene that is frequently down-regulated in multiple carcinomas, is a crucial regulatory protein for spermiation. The expression of sFRP1 is tightly regulated in adult rat testis to control spermatid adhesion and sperm release at spermiation. Down-regulation of sFRP1 during testicular development was found to coincide with the onset of the first wave of spermiation at approximately age 45 d postpartum, implying that sFRP1 might be correlated with elongated spermatid adhesion conferred by the apical ES before spermiation. Indeed, administration of sFRP1 recombinant protein to the testis in vivo delayed spermiation, which was accompanied by down-regulation of phosphorylated (p)-focal adhesion kinase (FAK)-Tyr397 and retention of nectin-3 adhesion protein at the apical ES. To further investigate the functional relationship between p-FAK-Tyr397 and localization of nectin-3, we overexpressed sFRP1 using lentiviral vectors in the Sertoli-germ cell coculture system. Consistent with the in vivo findings, overexpression of sFRP1 induced down-regulation of p-FAK-Tyr397, leading to a decline in phosphorylation of nectin-3. In summary, this report highlights the critical role of s

  17. Membrane frizzled-related protein gene–related ophthalmological syndrome: 30-month follow-up of a sporadic case and review of genotype-phenotype correlation in the literature

    PubMed Central

    Leaci, Rosachiara; Zenteno, Juan C.; Casubolo, Cristina; Delfini, Elisabetta; Macaluso, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To report a new sporadic case of membrane frizzled-related protein gene (MFRP)-related syndrome with a 30-month follow-up, and to review the literature for genotype-phenotype correlation in MFRP mutations. Methods A complete ophthalmological evaluation was performed at presentation and 30 months later, including best-corrected visual acuity test, slit lamp examination, fundoscopy, kinetic perimetry, electroretinography, fundus imaging (color, red-free, and autofluorescence), and morphologic-biometric analysis of the eye structures with an optical biometer, anterior-segment optical coherence tomography, retinal optical coherence tomography, and a confocal scanning laser for optic nerve head study. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of DNA obtained from peripheral blood lymphocytes and nucleotide sequencing of the complete MFRP gene were performed. The literature on cases of posterior microphthalmos and retinitis pigmentosa associated with MFRP mutations was reviewed. Results A 33-year-old female patient presented with posterior microphthalmos, retinitis pigmentosa with patches of retinal pigmented epithelium atrophy and scarce pigment mobilization, foveoschisis, and optic nerve drusen. After 30 months, progression of rod-cone retinal degeneration was detected. One obligate carrier showed a normal eye phenotype. A homozygote mutation in the MFRP gene (c.492delC), predicting a truncated protein (P166fsX190), was identified with genetic analysis. To our knowledge, 17 cases of MFRP-related syndrome have been reported in the literature, including the patient described herein. The phenotype of the syndrome, expressivity, and age of onset varied among and within the affected families. However, all patients sharing homozygous mutation c.492delC (alternatively named c.498delC) showed a complete phenotype (including foveoschisis and optic nerve head drusen), and similar fundus characteristics. Conclusions A new sporadic case of MFRP-related syndrome is reported

  18. Effects of exercise training on circulating levels of Dickkpof-1 and secreted frizzled-related protein-1 in breast cancer survivors: A pilot single-blind randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyu-Sang; Park, Jeeyeon; Kim, Nahyun; Lee, Jong In; Kong, In Deok

    2017-01-01

    Background Wingless and integration site growth factor (Wnt) signaling is a tumorigenesis-related signaling pathway. Dickkpof-1 (DKK1) and secreted frizzled-related protein-1 (SFRP1) are endogenous negative regulators of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Accumulating evidence indicates that higher serum levels of DKK1 are correlated with poor prognosis of various types of cancer. Here, we investigated whether exercise training causes changes in the serum levels of DKK1 and SFRP1 in patients with breast cancer. Methods Twenty-four breast cancer survivors, after chemo- or radiotherapy, participated in this single-blind randomized, controlled pilot study. Subjects were randomized to either an exercise program or a control group for 12 weeks and completed pre- and post-training tests for health-related fitness and body composition as well as blood biomarkers. The serum levels of DKK1 and SFRP1 were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay as the primary outcome. Results Exercise training for 12 weeks remarkably increased muscle strength, endurance, and flexibility and decreased body fat percentage, waist circumference, and visceral fat area (all p < 0.05). Exercise training lowered serum insulin levels and leptin/adiponectin ratios (all p < 0.05). The levels of DKK1 and SFRP1 were also significantly decreased by exercise training in breast cancer survivors (all p < 0.01). Conclusions Our results indicate that DKK1 and SFRP1 may be potentially useful biomarkers for evaluating the beneficial effects of long-term exercise on physical fitness and metabolism as well as the prognosis of patients with cancer. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02895178 PMID:28178355

  19. Breast Cancer Stem-Like Cells Are Inhibited by Diosgenin, a Steroidal Saponin, by the Attenuation of the Wnt β-Catenin Signaling via the Wnt Antagonist Secreted Frizzled Related Protein-4

    PubMed Central

    Bhuvanalakshmi, G.; Basappa; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S.; Dharmarajan, Arun; Sethi, Gautam; Kumar, Alan P.; Warrier, Sudha

    2017-01-01

    Background: Identification of breast cancer stem cells as the chemo-resistant and tumor-initiating population represents an important milestone in approaching anticancer therapies. Targeting this minor subpopulation of chemo- and radio-resistant stem-like cells, termed as the cancer stem cells (CSCs) and their eradication could significantly enhance clinical outcomes. Most of the presently administered chemotherapeutics target the tumor bulk but are ineffective against the CSCs. We report here that diosgenin (DG), a naturally occurring steroidal saponin, could effectively inhibit CSCs from three breast cancer cell lines, MCF7, T47D and MDA-MB-231, by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting the CSC associated phenotypes. Methods: CSCs were enriched in these cells lines, characterized for CSC traits by immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry. Proliferation and apoptosis assays were performed in these breast CSCs in the presence of DG to obtain the inhibitory concentration. Apoptosis was confirmed with gene expression analysis, Western blotting and propidium iodide staining. TCF-LEF reporter assay, sFRP overexpression and RNAi silencing studies were performed to study regulation of the Wnt pathway. Statistical significance was evaluated by a two-sided Student’s t-test. Results: Using the TCF-LEF reporter system, we show the effect of DG on CSCs is predominantly through the network regulating CSC self renewal, the Wnt β-catenin pathway. Specifically, the Wnt antagonist, the secreted frizzled related protein 4, (sFRP4), had a defining role in the action of DG. Gain-of-function of sFRP4 in CSCs could improve the response to DG wherein CSC mediators were inhibited, β-catenin was down regulated and the effectors of epithelial to mesenchymal transition and pro-invasive markers were repressed. Conversely, the loss-of-function of sFRP4 had a reverse effect on the CSC population which therein became enriched, their response to DG treatment was modest, β-catenin levels increased

  20. Breast Cancer Stem-Like Cells Are Inhibited by Diosgenin, a Steroidal Saponin, by the Attenuation of the Wnt β-Catenin Signaling via the Wnt Antagonist Secreted Frizzled Related Protein-4.

    PubMed

    Bhuvanalakshmi, G; Basappa; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S; Dharmarajan, Arun; Sethi, Gautam; Kumar, Alan P; Warrier, Sudha

    2017-01-01

    Background: Identification of breast cancer stem cells as the chemo-resistant and tumor-initiating population represents an important milestone in approaching anticancer therapies. Targeting this minor subpopulation of chemo- and radio-resistant stem-like cells, termed as the cancer stem cells (CSCs) and their eradication could significantly enhance clinical outcomes. Most of the presently administered chemotherapeutics target the tumor bulk but are ineffective against the CSCs. We report here that diosgenin (DG), a naturally occurring steroidal saponin, could effectively inhibit CSCs from three breast cancer cell lines, MCF7, T47D and MDA-MB-231, by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting the CSC associated phenotypes. Methods: CSCs were enriched in these cells lines, characterized for CSC traits by immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry. Proliferation and apoptosis assays were performed in these breast CSCs in the presence of DG to obtain the inhibitory concentration. Apoptosis was confirmed with gene expression analysis, Western blotting and propidium iodide staining. TCF-LEF reporter assay, sFRP overexpression and RNAi silencing studies were performed to study regulation of the Wnt pathway. Statistical significance was evaluated by a two-sided Student's t-test. Results: Using the TCF-LEF reporter system, we show the effect of DG on CSCs is predominantly through the network regulating CSC self renewal, the Wnt β-catenin pathway. Specifically, the Wnt antagonist, the secreted frizzled related protein 4, (sFRP4), had a defining role in the action of DG. Gain-of-function of sFRP4 in CSCs could improve the response to DG wherein CSC mediators were inhibited, β-catenin was down regulated and the effectors of epithelial to mesenchymal transition and pro-invasive markers were repressed. Conversely, the loss-of-function of sFRP4 had a reverse effect on the CSC population which therein became enriched, their response to DG treatment was modest, β-catenin levels increased

  1. The ankyrin repeat protein Diego mediates Frizzled-dependent planar polarization.

    PubMed

    Feiguin, F; Hannus, M; Mlodzik, M; Eaton, S

    2001-07-01

    During planar polarization of the Drosophila wing epithelium, the homophilic adhesion molecule Flamingo localizes to proximal/distal cell boundaries in response to Frizzled signaling; perturbing Frizzled signaling alters Flamingo distribution, many cell diameters distant, by a mechanism that is not well understood. This work identifies a tissue polarity gene, diego, that comprises six ankyrin repeats and colocalizes with Flamingo at proximal/distal boundaries. Diego is specifically required for polarized accumulation of Flamingo and drives ectopic clustering of Flamingo when overexpressed. Our data suggest that Frizzled acts through Diego to promote local clustering of Flamingo, and that clustering of Diego and Flamingo in one cell nonautonomously propagates to others.

  2. Frizzled Receptors in Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanshu; Chang, Hao; Rattner, Amir; Nathans, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Frizzled proteins are the principal receptors for the Wnt family of ligands. They mediate canonical Wnt signaling together with Lrp5 and Lrp6 coreceptors. In conjunction with Celsr, Vangl, and a small number of additional membrane and membrane-associated proteins, they also play a central role in tissue polarity/planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling. Targeted mutations in 9 of the 10 mammalian Frizzled genes have revealed their roles in an extraordinarily diverse set of developmental and homeostatic processes, including morphogenetic movements responsible for palate, ventricular septum, ocular furrow, and neural tube closure; survival of thalamic neurons; bone formation; central nervous system (CNS) angiogenesis and blood–brain barrier formation and maintenance; and a wide variety of processes that orient subcellular, cellular, and multicellular structures relative to the body axes. The last group likely reflects the mammalian equivalent of tissue polarity/PCP signaling, as defined in Drosophila, and it includes CNS axon guidance, hair follicle and tongue papilla orientation, and inner ear sensory hair bundle orientation. Frizzled receptors are ubiquitous among multicellular animals and, with other signaling molecules, they very likely evolved to permit the development of the complex tissue architectures that provide multicellular animals with their enormous selective advantage. PMID:26969975

  3. Frizzled Receptors in Development and Disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanshu; Chang, Hao; Rattner, Amir; Nathans, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Frizzled proteins are the principal receptors for the Wnt family of ligands. They mediate canonical Wnt signaling together with Lrp5 and Lrp6 coreceptors. In conjunction with Celsr, Vangl, and a small number of additional membrane and membrane-associated proteins, they also play a central role in tissue polarity/planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling. Targeted mutations in 9 of the 10 mammalian Frizzled genes have revealed their roles in an extraordinarily diverse set of developmental and homeostatic processes, including morphogenetic movements responsible for palate, ventricular septum, ocular furrow, and neural tube closure; survival of thalamic neurons; bone formation; central nervous system (CNS) angiogenesis and blood-brain barrier formation and maintenance; and a wide variety of processes that orient subcellular, cellular, and multicellular structures relative to the body axes. The last group likely reflects the mammalian equivalent of tissue polarity/PCP signaling, as defined in Drosophila, and it includes CNS axon guidance, hair follicle and tongue papilla orientation, and inner ear sensory hair bundle orientation. Frizzled receptors are ubiquitous among multicellular animals and, with other signaling molecules, they very likely evolved to permit the development of the complex tissue architectures that provide multicellular animals with their enormous selective advantage.

  4. Frizzled homolog proteins, microRNAs and Wnt signaling in cancer.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Koji; Hirata, Hiroshi; Hinoda, Yuji; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2013-04-15

    Wnt signaling pathways play important roles in tumorigenesis and are initiated by binding of Wnt to various receptors including frizzleds (FZDs). FZDs are one of several families of receptors comprised of FZD/LRP/ROR2/RYK in the Wnt signaling pathway. Expression of some FZD receptors are up regulated, thereby activating the Wnt signaling pathway and is correlated with cancer malignancy and patient outcomes (recurrence and survival) in many cancers. The FZD family contains ten genes in humans and their function has not been completely examined including the regulatory mechanisms of FZD genes in cancer. Knockdown of FZDs may suppress the Wnt signaling pathway resulting in decreased cell growth, invasion, motility and metastasis of cancer cells. Recently a number of microRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified and reported to be important in several cancers. MiRNAs regulate target gene expression at both the transcription and translation levels. The study of miRNA is a newly emerging field and promises to be helpful in understanding the pathogenesis of FZDs in cancer. In addition, miRNAs may be useful in regulating FZDs in cancer cells. Therefore, the aim of this review is to discuss current knowledge of the functional mechanisms of FZDs in cancer, including regulation by miRNAs and the potential for possible use of miRNAs and FZDs in future clinical applications.

  5. Frizzled homolog proteins, microRNAs and Wnt Signaling in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Koji; Hirata, Hiroshi; Hinoda, Yuji; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2014-01-01

    Wnt signaling pathways play important roles in tumorigenesis and are initiated by binding of Wnt to various receptors including frizzleds (FZDs). FZDs are one of several families of receptors comprised of FZD/LRP/ROR2/RYK in the Wnt signaling pathway. Expression of some FZD receptors are up-regulated, thereby activating the Wnt signaling pathway and is correlated with cancer malignancy and patient outcomes (recurrence and survival) in many cancers. The FZD family contains ten genes in humans and their function has not been completely examined including the regulatory mechanisms of FZD genes in cancer. Knockdown of FZDs may suppress the Wnt signaling pathway resulting in decreased cell growth, invasion, motility and metastasis of cancer cells. Recently a number of microRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified and reported to be important in several cancers. MiRNAs regulate target gene expression at both the transcription and translation levels. The study of miRNA is a newly emerging field and promises to be helpful in understanding the pathogenesis of FZDs in cancer. Also miRNAs may be useful in regulating FZDs in cancer cells. Therefore the aim of this review is to discuss current knowledge of the functional mechanisms of FZDs in cancer, including regulation by miRNAs and the potential for possible use of miRNAs and FZDs in future clinical applications. PMID:22833265

  6. Role of the Wnt receptor Frizzled-1 in presynaptic differentiation and function

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The Wnt signaling pathway regulates several fundamental developmental processes and recently has been shown to be involved in different aspects of synaptic differentiation and plasticity. Some Wnt signaling components are localized at central synapses, and it is thus possible that this pathway could be activated at the synapse. Results We examined the distribution of the Wnt receptor Frizzled-1 in cultured hippocampal neurons and determined that this receptor is located at synaptic contacts co-localizing with presynaptic proteins. Frizzled-1 was found in functional synapses detected with FM1-43 staining and in synaptic terminals from adult rat brain. Interestingly, overexpression of Frizzled-1 increased the number of clusters of Bassoon, a component of the active zone, while treatment with the extracellular cysteine-rich domain (CRD) of Frizzled-1 decreased Bassoon clustering, suggesting a role for this receptor in presynaptic differentiation. Consistent with this, treatment with the Frizzled-1 ligand Wnt-3a induced presynaptic protein clustering and increased functional presynaptic recycling sites, and these effects were prevented by co-treatment with the CRD of Frizzled-1. Moreover, in synaptically mature neurons Wnt-3a was able to modulate the kinetics of neurotransmitter release. Conclusion Our results indicate that the activation of the Wnt pathway through Frizzled-1 occurs at the presynaptic level, and suggest that the synaptic effects of the Wnt signaling pathway could be modulated by local activation through synaptic Frizzled receptors. PMID:19883499

  7. RING finger protein PLR-1 blocks Wnt signaling by altering trafficking of Wnt Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Ryan E.

    Secreted Wnt proteins control a wide range of essential developmental processes, including axon guidance and establishment of anteroposterior neuronal polarity. We identified a transmembrane RING finger protein, PLR-1, that governs the response to Wnts by reducing the cell surface levels of Wnt receptors Frizzled, CAM-1 and LIN-18 in Caenorhabditis elegans. Frizzled, CAM-1 and LIN-18 are normally enriched at the plasma membrane where they are capable of detecting and responding to extracellular Wnts. However, when PLR-1 is expressed Frizzled, CAM-1 and LIN-18 are no longer detected at the cell surface and instead colocalize with PLR-1 in endosomes and Golgi. PLR-1 is related to a broad family of transmembrane proteins that contain a lumenal protease associated domain and a cytosolic RING finger. The RING finger is a hallmark of one type of E3 ubiquitin ligase and monoubiquitination is commonly used to regulate protein trafficking. Protease associated domains are largely thought to mediate interactions between proteins. To identify the domains responsible for PLR-1 regulation of Frizzled from the cell surface we utilized a series of fluorescently tagged fusion proteins and protein truncations containing various domains from PLR-1 and Frizzled. Our data suggests that PLR-1 and Frizzled interact and form a complex via their respective extracellular/lumenal domains, and that ubiqiuitination of Frizzled by PLR-1 targets the Frizzled/PLR-1 complex to the endosome.

  8. Structure-based Discovery of Novel Small Molecule Wnt Signaling Inhibitors by Targeting the Cysteine-rich Domain of Frizzled*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho-Jin; Bao, Ju; Miller, Ami; Zhang, Chi; Wu, Jibo; Baday, Yiressy C.; Guibao, Cristina; Li, Lin; Wu, Dianqing; Zheng, Jie J.

    2015-01-01

    Frizzled is the earliest discovered glycosylated Wnt protein receptor and is critical for the initiation of Wnt signaling. Antagonizing Frizzled is effective in inhibiting the growth of multiple tumor types. The extracellular N terminus of Frizzled contains a conserved cysteine-rich domain that directly interacts with Wnt ligands. Structure-based virtual screening and cell-based assays were used to identify five small molecules that can inhibit canonical Wnt signaling and have low IC50 values in the micromolar range. NMR experiments confirmed that these compounds specifically bind to the Wnt binding site on the Frizzled8 cysteine-rich domain with submicromolar dissociation constants. Our study confirms the feasibility of targeting the Frizzled cysteine-rich domain as an effective way of regulating canonical Wnt signaling. These small molecules can be further optimized into more potent therapeutic agents for regulating abnormal Wnt signaling by targeting Frizzled. PMID:26504084

  9. Structure-function dissection of the frizzled receptor in Drosophila melanogaster suggests different mechanisms of action in planar polarity and canonical Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Strutt, David; Madder, Daisy; Chaudhary, Varun; Artymiuk, Peter J

    2012-12-01

    Members of the Frizzled family of sevenpass transmembrane receptors signal via the canonical Wnt pathway and also via noncanonical pathways of which the best characterized is the planar polarity pathway. Activation of both canonical and planar polarity signaling requires interaction between Frizzled receptors and cytoplasmic proteins of the Dishevelled family; however, there has been some dispute regarding whether the Frizzled-Dishevelled interactions are the same in both cases. Studies looking at mutated forms of Dishevelled suggested that stable recruitment of Dishevelled to membranes by Frizzled was required only for planar polarity activity, implying that qualitatively different Frizzled-Dishevelled interactions underlie canonical signaling. Conversely, studies looking at the sequence requirements of Frizzled receptors in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster for canonical and planar polarity signaling have concluded that there is most likely a common mechanism of action. To understand better Frizzled receptor function, we have carried out a large-scale mutagenesis in Drosophila to isolate novel mutations in frizzled that affect planar polarity activity and have identified a group of missense mutations in cytosolic-facing regions of the Frizzled receptor that block Dishevelled recruitment. Interestingly, although some of these affect both planar polarity and canonical activity, as previously reported for similar lesions, we find a subset that affect only planar polarity activity. These results support the view that qualitatively different Frizzled-Dishevelled interactions underlie planar polarity and canonical Wnt signaling.

  10. Frizzled 7 and PIP2 binding by syntenin PDZ2 domain supports Frizzled 7 trafficking and signalling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egea-Jimenez, Antonio Luis; Gallardo, Rodrigo; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Ivarsson, Ylva; Wawrzyniak, Anna Maria; Kashyap, Rudra; Loris, Remy; Schymkowitz, Joost; Rousseau, Frederic; Zimmermann, Pascale

    2016-07-01

    PDZ domain-containing proteins work as intracellular scaffolds to control spatio-temporal aspects of cell signalling. This function is supported by the ability of their PDZ domains to bind other proteins such as receptors, but also phosphoinositide lipids important for membrane trafficking. Here we report a crystal structure of the syntenin PDZ tandem in complex with the carboxy-terminal fragment of Frizzled 7 and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). The crystal structure reveals a tripartite interaction formed via the second PDZ domain of syntenin. Biophysical and biochemical experiments establish co-operative binding of the tripartite complex and identify residues crucial for membrane PIP2-specific recognition. Experiments with cells support the importance of the syntenin-PIP2 interaction for plasma membrane targeting of Frizzled 7 and c-jun phosphorylation. This study contributes to our understanding of the biology of PDZ proteins as key players in membrane compartmentalization and dynamics.

  11. A Novel Frizzled-Based Screening Tool Identifies Genetic Modifiers of Planar Cell Polarity in Drosophila Wings

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal-Gonzalez, Jose Maria; Mulero-Navarro, Sonia; Smith, Michael; Mlodzik, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Most mutant alleles in the Fz-PCP pathway genes were discovered in classic Drosophila screens looking for recessive loss-of-function (LOF) mutations. Nonetheless, although Fz-PCP signaling is sensitive to increased doses of PCP gene products, not many screens have been performed in the wing under genetically engineered Fz overexpression conditions, mostly because the Fz phenotypes were strong and/or not easy to score and quantify. Here, we present a screen based on an unexpected mild Frizzled gain-of-function (GOF) phenotype. The leakiness of a chimeric Frizzled protein designed to be accumulated in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) generated a reproducible Frizzled GOF phenotype in Drosophila wings. Using this genotype, we first screened a genome-wide collection of large deficiencies and found 16 strongly interacting genomic regions. Next, we narrowed down seven of those regions to finally test 116 candidate genes. We were, thus, able to identify eight new loci with a potential function in the PCP context. We further analyzed and confirmed krasavietz and its interactor short-stop as new genes acting during planar cell polarity establishment with a function related to actin and microtubule dynamics. PMID:27729438

  12. Diego and Prickle regulate Frizzled planar cell polarity signalling by competing for Dishevelled binding.

    PubMed

    Jenny, Andreas; Reynolds-Kenneally, Jessica; Das, Gishnu; Burnett, Micheal; Mlodzik, Marek

    2005-07-01

    Epithelial planar cell polarity (PCP) is evident in the cellular organization of many tissues in vertebrates and invertebrates. In mammals, PCP signalling governs convergent extension during gastrulation and the organization of a wide variety of structures, including the orientation of body hair and sensory hair cells of the inner ear. In Drosophila melanogaster, PCP is manifest in adult tissues, including ommatidial arrangement in the compound eye and hair orientation in wing cells. PCP establishment requires the conserved Frizzled/Dishevelled PCP pathway. Mutations in PCP-pathway-associated genes cause aberrant orientation of body hair or inner-ear sensory cells in mice, or misorientation of ommatidia and wing hair in D. melanogaster. Here we provide mechanistic insight into Frizzled/Dishevelled signalling regulation. We show that the ankyrin-repeat protein Diego binds directly to Dishevelled and promotes Frizzled signalling. Dishevelled can also be bound by the Frizzled PCP antagonist Prickle. Strikingly, Diego and Prickle compete with one another for Dishevelled binding, thereby modulating Frizzled/Dishevelled activity and ensuring tight control over Frizzled PCP signalling.

  13. USP6 oncogene promotes Wnt signaling by deubiquitylating Frizzleds

    PubMed Central

    Madan, Babita; Walker, Matthew P.; Young, Robert; Quick, Laura; Orgel, Kelly A.; Ryan, Meagan; Gupta, Priti; Henrich, Ian C.; Ferrer, Marc; Marine, Shane; Roberts, Brian S.; Arthur, William T.; Berndt, Jason D.; Oliveira, Andre M.; Moon, Randall T.; Chou, Margaret M.; Major, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathways play pivotal roles in carcinogenesis. Modulation of the cell-surface abundance of Wnt receptors is emerging as an important mechanism for regulating sensitivity to Wnt ligands. Endocytosis and degradation of the Wnt receptors Frizzled (Fzd) and lipoprotein-related protein 6 (LRP6) are regulated by the E3 ubiquitin ligases zinc and ring finger 3 (ZNRF3) and ring finger protein 43 (RNF43), which are disrupted in cancer. In a genome-wide small interfering RNA screen, we identified the deubiquitylase ubiquitin-specific protease 6 (USP6) as a potent activator of Wnt signaling. USP6 enhances Wnt signaling by deubiquitylating Fzds, thereby increasing their cell-surface abundance. Chromosomal translocations in nodular fasciitis result in USP6 overexpression, leading to transcriptional activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Inhibition of Wnt signaling using Dickkopf-1 (DKK1) or a Porcupine (PORCN) inhibitor significantly decreased the growth of USP6-driven xenograft tumors, indicating that Wnt signaling is a key target of USP6 during tumorigenesis. Our study defines an additional route to ectopic Wnt pathway activation in human disease, and identifies a potential approach to modulate Wnt signaling for therapeutic benefit. PMID:27162353

  14. UM206, a selective Frizzled antagonist, attenuates adverse remodeling after myocardial infarction in swine.

    PubMed

    Uitterdijk, André; Hermans, Kevin C M; de Wijs-Meijler, Daphne P M; Daskalopoulos, Evangelos P; Reiss, Irwin K; Duncker, Dirk J; Matthijs Blankesteijn, W; Merkus, Daphne

    2016-02-01

    Modulation of Wnt/Frizzled signaling with UM206 reduced infarct expansion and prevented heart failure development in mice, an effect that was accompanied by increased myofibroblast presence in the infarct, suggesting that Wnt/Frizzled signaling has a key role in cardiac remodeling following myocardial infarction (MI). This study investigated the effects of modulation of Wnt/Frizzled signaling with UM206 in a swine model of reperfused MI. For this purpose, seven swine with MI were treated with continuous infusion of UM206 for 5 weeks. Six control swine were treated with vehicle. Another eight swine were sham-operated. Cardiac function was determined by echo in awake swine. Infarct mass was estimated at baseline by heart-specific fatty acid-binding protein ELISA and at follow-up using planimetry. Components of Wnt/Frizzled signaling, myofibroblast presence, and extracellular matrix were measured at follow-up with qPCR and/or histology. Results show that UM206 treatment resulted in a significant decrease in infarct mass compared with baseline (-41±10%), whereas infarct mass remained stable in the Control-MI group (+3±17%). Progressive dilation of the left ventricle occurred in the Control-MI group between 3 and 5 weeks after MI, while adverse remodeling was halted in the UM206-treated group. mRNA expression for Frizzled-4 and the Frizzled co-receptor LRP5 was increased in UM206-treated swine as compared with Control-MI swine. Myofibroblast presence was significantly lower in infarcted tissue of the UM206-treated animals (1.53±0.43% vs 3.38±0.61%) at 5 weeks follow-up. This study demonstrates that UM206 treatment attenuates adverse remodeling in a swine model of reperfused MI, indicating that Wnt/Frizzled signaling is a promising target to improve infarct healing and limit post-MI remodeling.

  15. Frizzled6 deficiency disrupts the differentiation process of nail development

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Chang-Yi; Klar, Joakim; Georgii-Heming, Patrik; Fröjmark, Anne-Sophie; Baig, Shahid M.; Schlessinger, David; Dahl’, Niklas

    2013-01-01

    Nails protect the soft tissue of the tips of digits. The molecular mechanism of nail (and claw) development is largely unknown, but we have recently identified a Wnt receptor gene, Frizzled6 (Fzd6) that is mutated in a human autosomal-recessive nail dysplasia. To investigate the action of Fzd6 in claw development at the molecular level, we compared gene expression profiles of digit tips of wild-type and Fzd6−/− mice, and show that Fzd6 regulates the transcription of a striking number of epidermal differentiation-related genes. Sixty-three genes encoding keratins, keratin associated proteins, and transglutaminases and their substrates were significantly down-regulated in the knockout mice. Among them, four hard keratins, Krt86, Krt81, Krt34 and Krt31; two epithelial keratins, Krt6a and Krt6b; and transglutaminase1 were already known to be involved in nail abnormalities when dysregulated. Immunohistochemical studies revealed decreased expression of Krt86, Krt6b and involucrin in the epidermal portion of the claw field in the knockout embryos. We further showed that Dkk4, a Wnt antagonist, was significantly down-regulated in Fzd6−/− mice along with Wnt, Bmp and Hh family genes; and Dkk4 transgenic mice showed a subtly but appreciably modified claw phenotype. Thus, Fzd6-mediated Wnt signaling likely regulates the overall differentiation process of nail/claw formation. PMID:23439395

  16. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology Review: WNT/Frizzled signalling: receptor–ligand selectivity with focus on FZD-G protein signalling and its physiological relevance: IUPHAR Review 3

    PubMed Central

    Dijksterhuis, J P; Petersen, J; Schulte, G

    2014-01-01

    The wingless/int1 (WNT)/Frizzled (FZD) signalling pathway controls numerous cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, cell-fate decisions, migration and plays a crucial role during embryonic development. Nineteen mammalian WNTs can bind to 10 FZDs thereby activating different downstream pathways such as WNT/β-catenin, WNT/planar cell polarity and WNT/Ca2+. However, the mechanisms of signalling specification and the involvement of heterotrimeric G proteins are still unclear. Disturbances in the pathways can lead to various diseases ranging from cancer, inflammatory diseases to metabolic and neurological disorders. Due to the presence of seven-transmembrane segments, evidence for coupling between FZDs and G proteins and substantial structural differences in class A, B or C GPCRs, FZDs were grouped separately in the IUPHAR GPCR database as the class FZD within the superfamily of GPCRs. Recently, important progress has been made pointing to a direct activation of G proteins after WNT stimulation. WNT/FZD and G protein coupling remain to be fully explored, although the basic observation supporting the nature of FZDs as GPCRs is compelling. Because the involvement of different (i) WNTs; (ii) FZDs; and (iii) intracellular binding partners could selectively affect signalling specification, in this review we present the current understanding of receptor/ligand selectivity of FZDs and WNTs. We pinpoint what is known about signalling specification and the physiological relevance of these interactions with special emphasis on FZD–G protein interactions. LINKED ARTICLESThis article is part of a themed section on Molecular Pharmacology of GPCRs. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-5 PMID:24032637

  17. Wnt-5a/Frizzled9 Receptor Signaling through the Gαo-Gβγ Complex Regulates Dendritic Spine Formation.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Valerie T; Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Henríquez, Juan Pablo; Lorenzo, Alfredo; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2016-09-02

    Wnt ligands play crucial roles in the development and regulation of synapse structure and function. Specifically, Wnt-5a acts as a secreted growth factor that regulates dendritic spine formation in rodent hippocampal neurons, resulting in postsynaptic development that promotes the clustering of the PSD-95 (postsynaptic density protein 95). Here, we focused on the early events occurring after the interaction between Wnt-5a and its Frizzled receptor at the neuronal cell surface. Additionally, we studied the role of heterotrimeric G proteins in Wnt-5a-dependent synaptic development. We report that FZD9 (Frizzled9), a Wnt receptor related to Williams syndrome, is localized in the postsynaptic region, where it interacts with Wnt-5a. Functionally, FZD9 is required for the Wnt-5a-mediated increase in dendritic spine density. FZD9 forms a precoupled complex with Gαo under basal conditions that dissociates after Wnt-5a stimulation. Accordingly, we found that G protein inhibition abrogates the Wnt-5a-dependent pathway in hippocampal neurons. In particular, the activation of Gαo appears to be a key factor controlling the Wnt-5a-induced dendritic spine density. In addition, we found that Gβγ is required for the Wnt-5a-mediated increase in cytosolic calcium levels and spinogenesis. Our findings reveal that FZD9 and heterotrimeric G proteins regulate Wnt-5a signaling and dendritic spines in cultured hippocampal neurons.

  18. Structure and functional properties of Norrin mimic Wnt for signalling with Frizzled4, Lrp5/6, and proteoglycan

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tao-Hsin; Hsieh, Fu-Lien; Zebisch, Matthias; Harlos, Karl; Elegheert, Jonathan; Jones, E Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    Wnt signalling regulates multiple processes including angiogenesis, inflammation, and tumorigenesis. Norrin (Norrie Disease Protein) is a cystine-knot like growth factor. Although unrelated to Wnt, Norrin activates the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Signal complex formation involves Frizzled4 (Fz4), low-density lipoprotein receptor related protein 5/6 (Lrp5/6), Tetraspanin-12 and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Here, we report crystallographic and small-angle X-ray scattering analyses of Norrin in complex with Fz4 cysteine-rich domain (Fz4CRD), of this complex bound with GAG analogues, and of unliganded Norrin and Fz4CRD. Our structural, biophysical and cellular data, map Fz4 and putative Lrp5/6 binding sites to distinct patches on Norrin, and reveal a GAG binding site spanning Norrin and Fz4CRD. These results explain numerous disease-associated mutations. Comparison with the Xenopus Wnt8–mouse Fz8CRD complex reveals Norrin mimics Wnt for Frizzled recognition. The production and characterization of wild-type and mutant Norrins reported here open new avenues for the development of therapeutics to combat abnormal Norrin/Wnt signalling. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06554.001 PMID:26158506

  19. Frizzled receptors in neurons: from growth cones to the synapse.

    PubMed

    Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Ramirez, Valerie T; Gonzalez-Billault, Christian; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2012-07-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway has been implicated in several different aspects of neural development and function, including dendrite morphogenesis, axonal growth and guidance, synaptogenesis and synaptic plasticity. Here, we studied several Frizzled Wnt receptors and determined their differential expression during hippocampal development. In cultured hippocampal neurons, the cellular distributions of Frizzleds vary greatly, some of them being localized at neurites, growth cones or synaptic sites. These findings suggest that the Wnt signaling pathway might be temporally and spatially fine tuned during the development of neuronal circuits through specific Frizzled receptors.

  20. Frizzled-7 promoter is highly active in tumors and promoter-driven Shiga-like toxin I inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma growth

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yanyan; Qu, Lili; Li, Qiwen; Pang, Lu; Si, Jin; Li, Zhiyang

    2015-01-01

    Frizzled-7 protein plays a significant role in the formation of several malignant tumors. Up regulation of the Frizzled-7 in cancer cell lines is associated with nuclear accumulation of wild-type β-catenin from the Wnt/β-catenin pathway which is frequently activated in tumors. To analyze activity of the Frizzled-7 promoter in tumor cells, we constructed two recombinant plasmid vectors in which the Frizzled-7 promoter was used to drive the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and Shiga-like toxin I (Stx1) (pFZD7-GFP/Stx1) genes. The Frizzled-7 protein was found to be expressed in the cancer cell lines but not in the normal cell lines. The GFP expression was restricted to the cancer cell lines and xenografts in the BALB/C mice but not to normal cell lines. Moreover, cell proliferation and tumor growth decreased significantly after transfection with the pFZD7-Stx1. Results from this study will help determine a highly effective strategy for gene therapy of tumors. PMID:26498690

  1. LIN-44/Wnt directs dendrite outgrowth through LIN-17/Frizzled in C. elegans Neurons.

    PubMed

    Kirszenblat, Leonie; Pattabiraman, Divya; Hilliard, Massimo A

    2011-09-01

    Nervous system function requires proper development of two functional and morphological domains of neurons, axons and dendrites. Although both these domains are equally important for signal transmission, our understanding of dendrite development remains relatively poor. Here, we show that in C. elegans the Wnt ligand, LIN-44, and its Frizzled receptor, LIN-17, regulate dendrite development of the PQR oxygen sensory neuron. In lin-44 and lin-17 mutants, PQR dendrites fail to form, display stunted growth, or are misrouted. Manipulation of temporal and spatial expression of LIN-44, combined with cell-ablation experiments, indicates that this molecule is patterned during embryogenesis and acts as an attractive cue to define the site from which the dendrite emerges. Genetic interaction between lin-44 and lin-17 suggests that the LIN-44 signal is transmitted through the LIN-17 receptor, which acts cell autonomously in PQR. Furthermore, we provide evidence that LIN-17 interacts with another Wnt molecule, EGL-20, and functions in parallel to MIG-1/Frizzled in this process. Taken together, our results reveal a crucial role for Wnt and Frizzled molecules in regulating dendrite development in vivo.

  2. Planar cell polarity genes frizzled4 and frizzled6 exert patterning influence on arterial vessel morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gosak, Marko; Horvat, Denis; Žalik, Borut; Seguy, Benjamin; Chauvel, Remi; Malandain, Gregoire; Couffinhal, Thierry; Duplàa, Cécile; Marhl, Marko

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of the vascular network anatomy is critical for the understanding of the vasculature structure and function. In this study, we have combined microcomputed tomography (microCT) and computational analysis to provide quantitative three-dimensional geometrical and topological characterization of the normal kidney vasculature, and to investigate how 2 core genes of the Wnt/planar cell polarity, Frizzled4 and Frizzled6, affect vascular network morphogenesis. Experiments were performed on frizzled4 (Fzd4-/-) and frizzled6 (Fzd6-/-) deleted mice and littermate controls (WT) perfused with a contrast medium after euthanasia and exsanguination. The kidneys were scanned with a high-resolution (16 μm) microCT imaging system, followed by 3D reconstruction of the arterial vasculature. Computational treatment includes decomposition of 3D networks based on Diameter-Defined Strahler Order (DDSO). We have calculated quantitative (i) Global scale parameters, such as the volume of the vasculature and its fractal dimension (ii) Structural parameters depending on the DDSO hierarchical levels such as hierarchical ordering, diameter, length and branching angles of the vessel segments, and (iii) Functional parameters such as estimated resistance to blood flow alongside the vascular tree and average density of terminal arterioles. In normal kidneys, fractal dimension was 2.07±0.11 (n = 7), and was significantly lower in Fzd4-/- (1.71±0.04; n = 4), and Fzd6-/- (1.54±0.09; n = 3) kidneys. The DDSO number was 5 in WT and Fzd4-/-, and only 4 in Fzd6-/-. Scaling characteristics such as diameter and length of vessel segments were altered in mutants, whereas bifurcation angles were not different from WT. Fzd4 and Fzd6 deletion increased vessel resistance, calculated using the Hagen-Poiseuille equation, for each DDSO, and decreased the density and the homogeneity of the distal vessel segments. Our results show that our methodology is suitable for 3D quantitative

  3. Wnt3-frizzled 1 chimera as a model to study canonical Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Ramesh A; Stauffer, Barbara; Della Pietra, Anthony; Bodine, Peter V N

    2010-04-01

    Wnt proteins initiate signaling by binding to seven transmembrane spanning receptors of the frizzled (Fz) family together with the members of the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) 5 and 6. A chimera of human Wnt3 and Fz1 receptor was developed that efficiently activated the TCF-luciferase reporter. Deletion of the cytoplasmic tail and point mutations in the PDZ binding region in the chimera resulted in the loss of Wnt signaling, suggesting a critical role for the Fz cytoplasmic region in Wnt signaling. The Fz CRD is also critical for Wnt signaling, as a deletion of 29 amino acids in the 2nd cysteine loop resulted in the total loss of TCF-luciferase activation. DKK-1 protein blocks upregulation of the TCF-luciferase reporter by the Wnt3-Fz1 chimera, suggesting involvement of LRP in Wnt3-Fz1 signaling. Expression of a Wnt3-Fz1 chimera in C3H10T1/2 cells resulted in the upregulation of alkaline phosphatase activity and inhibition of adipocyte formation, demonstrating that the Wnt3-Fz1 chimera is a potent activator of differentiation of C3H10T1/2 cells into osteoblasts and an inhibitor of their differentiation into the adipocyte lineage. In summary, the Wnt-Fz chimera approach has the potential to better our understanding of the mechanism of Wnt action and its role, particularly in stem cell differentiation. In addition, this methodology can be utilized to identify inhibitors of either Wnt, Fz or interactors of the canonical pathway, which may have potential therapeutic value in the treatment of cancers and other diseases.

  4. Expression profile of frizzled receptors in human medulloblastomas.

    PubMed

    Salsano, Ettore; Paterra, Rosina; Figus, Miriam; Menghi, Francesca; Maderna, Emanuela; Pollo, Bianca; Solero, Carlo Lazzaro; Massimi, Luca; Finocchiaro, Gaetano

    2012-01-01

    Secreted WNT proteins signal through ten receptors of the frizzled (FZD) family. Because of the relevance of the WNT/β-catenin (CTNNB1) signaling pathway in medulloblastomas (MBs), we investigated the expression of all ten members of the FZD gene family (FZD1-10) in 17 human MBs, four MB cell lines and in normal human cerebellum, using real-time PCR. We found that FZD2 transcript was over-expressed in all MBs and MB cell lines. Western blot analysis confirmed the expression of FZD2 at the protein level. Moreover, the levels of FZD2 transcript were found to correlate with those of ASPM transcript, a marker of mitosis essential for mitotic spindle function. Accordingly, ASPM mRNA was expressed at a very low level in the adult, post-mitotic, human cerebellum, at higher levels in fetal cerebellum and at highest levels in MB tissues and cell lines. Unlike FZD2, the other FZDs were overexpressed (e.g., FZD1, FZD3 and FZD8) or underexpressed (e.g., FZD7, FZD9 and FZD10) in a case-restricted manner. Interestingly, we did not find any nuclear immuno-reactivity to CTNNB1 in four MBs over-expressing both FZD2 and other FZD receptors, confirming the lack of nuclear CTNNB1 staining in the presence of increased FZD expression, as in other tumor types. Overall, our results indicate that altered expression of FZD2 might be associated with a proliferative status, thus playing a role in the biology of human MBs, and possibly of cerebellar progenitors from which these malignancies arise.

  5. Frizzled7: A Promising Achilles’ Heel for Targeting the Wnt Receptor Complex to Treat Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Phesse, Toby; Flanagan, Dustin; Vincan, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Frizzled7 is arguably the most studied member of the Frizzled family, which are the cognate Wnt receptors. Frizzled7 is highly conserved through evolution, from Hydra through to humans, and is expressed in diverse organisms, tissues and human disease contexts. Frizzled receptors can homo- or hetero-polymerise and associate with several co-receptors to transmit Wnt signalling. Notably, Frizzled7 can transmit signalling via multiple Wnt transduction pathways and bind to several different Wnt ligands, Frizzled receptors and co-receptors. These promiscuous binding and functional properties are thought to underlie the pivotal role Frizzled7 plays in embryonic developmental and stem cell function. Recent studies have identified that Frizzled7 is upregulated in diverse human cancers, and promotes proliferation, progression and invasion, and orchestrates cellular transitions that underscore cancer metastasis. Importantly, Frizzled7 is able to regulate Wnt signalling activity even in cancer cells which have mutations to down-stream signal transducers. In this review we discuss the various aspects of Frizzled7 signalling and function, and the implications these have for therapeutic targeting of Frizzled7 in cancer. PMID:27196929

  6. Initiation of Wnt signaling: control of Wnt coreceptor Lrp6 phosphorylation/activation via frizzled, dishevelled and axin functions

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xin; Huang, He; Tamai, Keiko; Zhang, Xinjun; Harada, Yuko; Yokota, Chika; Almeida, Karla; Wang, Jianbo; Doble, Brad; Woodgett, Jim; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony; Hsieh, Jen-Chieh; He, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling has central roles in development and diseases, and is initiated by the action of the frizzled (Fz) receptor, its coreceptor LDL receptor-related protein 6 (Lrp6), and the cytoplasmic dishevelled (Dvl) protein. The functional relationships among Fz, Lrp6 and Dvl have long been enigmatic. We demonstrated previously that Wnt-induced Lrp6 phosphorylation via glycogen synthase kinase 3 (Gsk3) initiates Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Here we show that both Fz and Dvl functions are critical for Wnt-induced Lrp6 phosphorylation through Fz-Lrp6 interaction. We also show that axin, a key scaffolding protein in the Wnt pathway, is required for Lrp6 phosphorylation via its ability to recruit Gsk3, and inhibition of Gsk3 at the plasma membrane blocks Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Our results suggest a model that upon Wnt-induced Fz-Lrp6 complex formation, Fz recruitment of Dvl in turn recruits the axin-Gsk3 complex, thereby promoting Lrp6 phosphorylation to initiate β-catenin signaling. We discuss the dual roles of the axin-Gsk3 complex and signal amplification by Lrp6-axin interaction during Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:18077588

  7. Functional and prognostic significance of the genomic amplification of frizzled 6 (FZD6) in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Corda, Gabriele; Sala, Gianluca; Lattanzio, Rossano; Iezzi, Manuela; Sallese, Michele; Fragassi, Giorgia; Lamolinara, Alessia; Mirza, Hasan; Barcaroli, Daniela; Ermler, Sibylle; Silva, Elisabete; Yasaei, Hemad; Newbold, Robert F; Vagnarelli, Paola; Mottolese, Marcella; Natali, Pier Giorgio; Perracchio, Letizia; Quist, Jelmar; Grigoriadis, Anita; Marra, Pierfrancesco; Tutt, Andrew N; Piantelli, Mauro; Iacobelli, Stefano; De Laurenzi, Vincenzo; Sala, Arturo

    2017-02-01

    Frizzled receptors mediate Wnt ligand signalling, which is crucially involved in regulating tissue development and differentiation, and is often deregulated in cancer. In this study, we found that the gene encoding the Wnt receptor frizzled 6 (FZD6) is frequently amplified in breast cancer, with an increased incidence in the triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) subtype. Ablation of FZD6 expression in mammary cancer cell lines: (1) inhibited motility and invasion; (2) induced a more symmetrical shape of organoid three-dimensional cultures; and (3) inhibited bone and liver metastasis in vivo. Mechanistically, FZD6 signalling is required for the assembly of the fibronectin matrix, interfering with the organization of the actin cytoskeleton. Ectopic delivery of fibronectin in FZD6-depleted, triple-negative MDA-MB-231 cells rearranged the actin cytoskeleton and restored epidermal growth factor-mediated invasion. In patients with localized, lymph node-negative (early) breast cancer, positivity of tumour cells for FZD6 protein identified patients with reduced distant relapse-free survival. Multivariate analysis indicated an independent prognostic significance of FZD6 expression in TNBC tumours, predicting distant, but not local, relapse. We conclude that the FZD6-fibronectin actin axis identified in our study could be exploited for drug development in highly metastatic forms of breast cancer, such as TNBC. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  8. A mutation in FRIZZLED2 impairs Wnt signaling and causes autosomal dominant omodysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Saal, Howard M.; Prows, Cynthia A.; Guerreiro, Iris; Donlin, Milene; Knudson, Luke; Sund, Kristen L.; Chang, Ching-Fang; Brugmann, Samantha A.; Stottmann, Rolf W.

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant omodysplasia is a rare skeletal dysplasia characterized by short humeri, radial head dislocation, short first metacarpals, facial dysmorphism and genitourinary anomalies. We performed next-generation whole-exome sequencing and comparative analysis of a proband with omodysplasia, her unaffected parents and her affected daughter. We identified a de novo mutation in FRIZZLED2 (FZD2) in the proband and her daughter that was not found in unaffected family members. The FZD2 mutation (c.1644G>A) changes a tryptophan residue at amino acid 548 to a premature stop (p.Trp548*). This altered protein is still produced in vitro, but we show reduced ability of this mutant form of FZD2 to interact with its downstream target DISHEVELLED. Furthermore, expressing the mutant form of FZD2 in vitro is not able to facilitate the cellular response to canonical Wnt signaling like wild-type FZD2. We therefore conclude that the FRIZZLED2 mutation is a de novo, novel cause for autosomal dominant omodysplasia. PMID:25759469

  9. Vital elements of the Wnt-Frizzled signaling pathway in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Li, Faqi; Chong, Zhao Zhong; Maiese, Kenneth

    2005-10-01

    Wnt proteins are cysteine-rich glycosylated proteins named after the Drosophilia Wingless (Wg) and the mouse Int-1 genes that play a role in embryonic cell patterning, proliferation, differentiation, orientation, adhesion, survival, and programmed cell death (PCD). Wnt proteins involve at least two intracellular signaling pathways. One pathway controls target gene transcription through beta-catenin, generally referred to as the canonical pathway and a second pathway pertains to intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) release which is termed the non-canonical or Wnt/ Ca(2+) pathway. The majority of Wnt proteins activate gene transcription through the canonical signaling pathway regulated by pathways that include the Frizzled transmembrane receptor and the co-receptor LRP-5/6, Dishevelled, glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta), adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), and beta-catenin. In contrast, the non-canonical Wnt signaling pathway has two intracellular signaling cascades that consist of the Wnt/ Ca(2+) pathway with protein kinase C (PKC) and the Wnt/PCP pathway involving Rho/Rac small GTPase and Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Through a series of signaling pathways, Wnt proteins modulate cell development, proliferation, and cell fate. In regards to cell survival and fate through PCD, Wnt may be critical for the prevention of tissue pathology that involves cytokine and growth factor control during disorders such as neuropsychiatric disease, retinal disease, and Alzheimer's disease. Elucidation of the vital elements that shape and control the Wnt-Frizzled signaling pathway may provide significant prospects for the treatment of disorders of the nervous system.

  10. Frizzled-5 receptor is involved in neuronal polarity and morphogenesis of hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Slater, Paula G; Ramirez, Valerie T; Gonzalez-Billault, Christian; Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2013-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway plays important roles during different stages of neuronal development, including neuronal polarization and dendritic and axonal outgrowth. However, little is known about the identity of the Frizzled receptors mediating these processes. In the present study, we investigated the role of Frizzled-5 (Fzd5) on neuronal development in cultured Sprague-Dawley rat hippocampal neurons. We found that Fzd5 is expressed early in cultured neurons on actin-rich structures localized at minor neurites and axonal growth cones. At 4 DIV, Fzd5 polarizes towards the axon, where its expression is detected mainly at the peripheral zone of axonal growth cones, with no obvious staining at dendrites; suggesting a role of Fzd5 in neuronal polarization. Overexpression of Fzd5 during the acquisition of neuronal polarity induces mislocalization of the receptor and a loss of polarized axonal markers. Fzd5 knock-down leads to loss of axonal proteins, suggesting an impaired neuronal polarity. In contrast, overexpression of Fzd5 in neurons that are already polarized did not alter polarity, but decreased the total length of axons and increased total dendrite length and arborization. Fzd5 activated JNK in HEK293 cells and the effects triggered by Fzd5 overexpression in neurons were partially prevented by inhibition of JNK, suggesting that a non-canonical Wnt signaling mechanism might be involved. Our results suggest that, Fzd5 has a role in the establishment of neuronal polarity, and in the morphogenesis of neuronal processes, in part through the activation of the non-canonical Wnt mechanism involving JNK.

  11. Frizzled-5 Receptor Is Involved in Neuronal Polarity and Morphogenesis of Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Slater, Paula G.; Ramirez, Valerie T.; Gonzalez-Billault, Christian; Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2013-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway plays important roles during different stages of neuronal development, including neuronal polarization and dendritic and axonal outgrowth. However, little is known about the identity of the Frizzled receptors mediating these processes. In the present study, we investigated the role of Frizzled-5 (Fzd5) on neuronal development in cultured Sprague-Dawley rat hippocampal neurons. We found that Fzd5 is expressed early in cultured neurons on actin-rich structures localized at minor neurites and axonal growth cones. At 4 DIV, Fzd5 polarizes towards the axon, where its expression is detected mainly at the peripheral zone of axonal growth cones, with no obvious staining at dendrites; suggesting a role of Fzd5 in neuronal polarization. Overexpression of Fzd5 during the acquisition of neuronal polarity induces mislocalization of the receptor and a loss of polarized axonal markers. Fzd5 knock-down leads to loss of axonal proteins, suggesting an impaired neuronal polarity. In contrast, overexpression of Fzd5 in neurons that are already polarized did not alter polarity, but decreased the total length of axons and increased total dendrite length and arborization. Fzd5 activated JNK in HEK293 cells and the effects triggered by Fzd5 overexpression in neurons were partially prevented by inhibition of JNK, suggesting that a non-canonical Wnt signaling mechanism might be involved. Our results suggest that, Fzd5 has a role in the establishment of neuronal polarity, and in the morphogenesis of neuronal processes, in part through the activation of the non-canonical Wnt mechanism involving JNK. PMID:24205342

  12. The frizzled/stan Pathway and Planar Cell Polarity in the Drosophila Wing

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Paul N.

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila has been the key model system for studies on Planar Cell Polarity (PCP). The rich morphology of the insect exoskeleton contains many structures that display PCP. Among these are the trichomes (cuticular hairs) that cover much of the exoskeleton, sensory bristles and ommatidia. Many genes have been identified that must function for the development of normal PCP. Among these are the genes that comprise the frizzled/starry night (fz/stan) and dachsous/fat pathways. The mechanisms that underlie the function of the fz/stan pathway are best understood. All of the protein products of these genes accumulate asymmetrically in wing cells and there is good evidence that this involves local intercellular signaling between protein complexes on the distal edge of one cell and the juxtaposed proximal edge of its neighbor. It is thought that a feedback system, directed transport and stabilizing protein-protein interactions mediate the formation of distal and proximal protein complexes. These complexes appear to recruit downstream proteins that function to spatially restrict the activation of the cytoskeleton in wing cells. This leads to the formation of the array of distally pointing hairs found on wings. PMID:23140623

  13. Frizzled-8 as a putative therapeutic target in human lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hua-qing; Xu, Mei-lin; Ma, Jie; Zhang, Yi; Xie, Cong-hua

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fzd-8 is over-expressed in human lung cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer shRNA knock-down of Fzd-8 inhibits proliferation and Wnt pathway in lung cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer shRNA knock-down of Fzd-8 suppresses tumor growth in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer shRNA knock-down Fzd-8 sensitizes lung cancer cells to chemotherapy Taxotere. -- Abstract: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide. It is necessary to better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in lung cancer in order to develop more effective therapeutics for the treatment of this disease. Recent reports have shown that Wnt signaling pathway is important in a number of cancer types including lung cancer. However, the role of Frizzled-8 (Fzd-8), one of the Frizzled family of receptors for the Wnt ligands, in lung cancer still remains to be elucidated. Here in this study we showed that Fzd-8 was over-expressed in human lung cancer tissue samples and cell lines. To investigate the functional importance of the Fzd-8 over-expression in lung cancer, we used shRNA to knock down Fzd-8 mRNA in lung cancer cells expressing the gene. We observed that Fzd-8 shRNA inhibited cell proliferation along with decreased activity of Wnt pathway in vitro, and also significantly suppressed A549 xenograft model in vivo (p < 0.05). Furthermore, we found that knocking down Fzd-8 by shRNA sensitized the lung cancer cells to chemotherapy Taxotere. These data suggest that Fzd-8 is a putative therapeutic target for human lung cancer and over-expression of Fzd-8 may be important for aberrant Wnt activation in lung cancer.

  14. WNT Stimulation Dissociates a Frizzled 4 Inactive-State Complex with Gα12/13

    PubMed Central

    Arthofer, Elisa; Hot, Belma; Petersen, Julian; Strakova, Katerina; Jäger, Stefan; Grundmann, Manuel; Kostenis, Evi; Gutkind, J. Silvio

    2016-01-01

    Frizzleds (FZDs) are unconventional G protein–coupled receptors that belong to the class Frizzled. They are bound and activated by the Wingless/Int-1 lipoglycoprotein (WNT) family of secreted lipoglycoproteins. To date, mechanisms of signal initiation and FZD–G protein coupling remain poorly understood. Previously, we showed that FZD6 assembles with Gαi1/Gαq (but not with Gαs, Gαo and Ga12/13), and that these inactive-state complexes are dissociated by WNTs and regulated by the phosphoprotein Dishevelled (DVL). Here, we investigated the inactive-state assembly of heterotrimeric G proteins with FZD4, a receptor important in retinal vascular development and frequently mutated in Norrie disease or familial exudative vitreoretinopathy. Live-cell imaging experiments using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching show that human FZD4 assembles—in a DVL-independent manner—with Gα12/13 but not representatives of other heterotrimeric G protein subfamilies, such as Gαi1, Gαo, Gαs, and Gαq. The FZD4–G protein complex dissociates upon stimulation with WNT-3A, WNT-5A, WNT-7A, and WNT-10B. In addition, WNT-induced dynamic mass redistribution changes in untransfected and, even more so, in FZD4 green fluorescent protein–transfected cells depend on Gα12/13. Furthermore, expression of FZD4 and Gα12 or Gα13 in human embryonic kidney 293 cells induces WNT-dependent membrane recruitment of p115-RHOGEF (RHO guanine nucleotide exchange factor, molecular weight 115 kDa), a direct target of Gα12/13 signaling, underlining the functionality of an FZD4-Gα12/13-RHO signaling axis. In summary, Gα12/13-mediated WNT/FZD4 signaling through p115-RHOGEF offers an intriguing and previously unappreciated mechanistic link of FZD4 signaling to cytoskeletal rearrangements and RHO signaling with implications for the regulation of angiogenesis during embryonic and tumor development. PMID:27458145

  15. Parathyroid hormone-related protein blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/003691.htm Parathyroid hormone-related protein blood test To use the sharing features on ... page, please enable JavaScript. The parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTH-RP) test measures the level of a ...

  16. The Myopic-Ubpy-Hrs nexus enables endosomal recycling of Frizzled

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan-Sundd, Tirthadipa; Verheyen, Esther M.

    2015-01-01

    Endosomal trafficking of signaling proteins plays an essential role in cellular homeostasis. The seven-pass transmembrane protein Frizzled (Fz) is a critical component of Wnt signaling. Although Wnt signaling is proposed to be regulated by endosomal trafficking of Fz, the molecular events that enable this regulation are not completely understood. Here we show that the endosomal protein Myopic (Mop) regulates Fz trafficking in the Drosophila wing disk by inhibiting the ubiquitination and degradation of Hrs. Deletion of Mop or Hrs results in endosomal accumulation of Fz and therefore reduced Wnt signaling. The in situ proximity ligation assay revealed a strong association between Mop and Hrs in the Drosophila wing disk. Overexpression of Hrs rescues the trafficking defect caused by mop knockdown. Mop aids in the maintenance of Ubpy, which deubiquitinates (and thus stabilizes) Hrs. In the absence of the ubiquitin ligase Cbl, Mop is dispensable. These findings support a previously unknown role for Mop in endosomal trafficking of Fz in Wnt-receiving cells. PMID:26224310

  17. A comprehensive survey of wnt and frizzled expression in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus.

    PubMed

    Robert, Nicolas; Lhomond, Guy; Schubert, Michael; Croce, Jenifer C

    2014-03-01

    WNT signaling is, in all multicellular animals, an essential intercellular communication pathway that is critical for shaping the embryo. At the molecular level, WNT signals can be transmitted by several transduction cascades, all activated chiefly by the binding of WNT ligands to receptors of the FRIZZLED family. The first step in assessing the biological functions of WNT signaling during embryogenesis is thus the establishment of the spatiotemporal expression profiles of wnt and frizzled genes in the course of embryonic development. To this end, using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, Northern blot, and in situ hybridization assays, we report here the comprehensive expression patterns of all 11 wnt and 4 frizzled genes present in the genome of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus during its embryogenesis. Our findings indicate that the expression of these wnt ligands and frizzled receptors is highly dynamic in both time and space. We further establish that all wnt genes are chiefly transcribed in the vegetal hemisphere of the embryo, whereas expression of the frizzled genes is distributed more widely across the embryonic territories. Thus, in P. lividus, WNT ligands might act both as short- and long-range signaling molecules that may operate in all cell lineages and tissues to control various developmental processes during embryogenesis.

  18. Balanced ubiquitylation and deubiquitylation of Frizzled regulate cellular responsiveness to Wg/Wnt.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Akiko; Yamamoto-Hino, Miki; Awano, Wakae; Watanabe, Wakako; Komada, Masayuki; Goto, Satoshi

    2010-07-07

    Wingless (Wg)/Wnt has been proposed to exert various functions as a morphogen depending on the levels of its signalling. Therefore, not just the concentration of Wg/Wnt, but also the responsiveness of Wg/Wnt-target cells to the ligand, must have a crucial function in controlling cellular outputs. Here, we show that a balance of ubiquitylation and deubiquitylation of the Wg/Wnt receptor Frizzled determines the cellular responsiveness to Wg/Wnt both in mammalian cells and in Drosophila, and that the cell surface level of Frizzled is regulated by deubiquitylating enzyme UBPY/ubiquitin-specific protease 8 (USP8). Although ubiquitylated Frizzled underwent lysosomal trafficking and degradation, UBPY/USP8-dependent deubiquitylation led to recycling of Frizzled to the plasma membrane, thereby elevating its surface level. Importantly, a gain and loss of UBPY/USP8 function led to up- and down-regulation, respectively, of canonical Wg/Wnt signalling. These results unveil a novel mechanism that regulates the cellular responsiveness to Wg/Wnt by controlling the cell surface level of Frizzled.

  19. An optimized split-ubiquitin cDNA-library screening system to identify novel interactors of the human Frizzled 1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Dirnberger, Dietmar; Messerschmid, Monika; Baumeister, Ralf

    2008-01-01

    The yeast split-ubiquitin system has previously been shown to be suitable to detect protein interactions of membrane proteins and of transcription factors in vivo. Therefore, this technology complements the classical split-transcription factor based yeast two-hybrid system (Y2H). Success or failure of the Y2H depends primarily on the ability to avoid false-negative and false-positive hits that become a limiting factor for the value of the system, especially in large scale proteomic analyses. We provide here a systematic assessment of parameters to help improving the quality of split-ubiquitin cDNA-library screenings. We experimentally defined the optimal 5-fluoroorotic acid (5-FOA) concentration as a key parameter to increase the reproducibility of interactions and, at the same time, to keep non-specific background growth low. Furthermore, we show that the efficacy of the 5-FOA selection is modulated by the plating density of the yeast clones. Moreover, a reporter-specific class of false-positive hits was identified, and a simple phenotypic assay for efficient de-selection was developed. We demonstrate the application of this improved system to identify novel interacting proteins of the human Frizzled 1 receptor. We identified several novel interactors with components of the Wnt-Frizzled signalling pathways and discuss their potential roles as direct mediators of Frizzled receptor signalling. The present work is the first example of a split-ubiquitin interaction screen using an in-situ expressed receptor of the serpentine class, emphasizing the suitability of the described improvements in the screening protocol. PMID:18319286

  20. Fibrinogen-related proteins in ixodid ticks

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Fibrinogen-related proteins with lectin activity are believed to be part of the tick innate immune system. Several fibrinogen-related proteins have been described and characterised mainly on the basis of their cDNA sequences while direct biochemical evidence is missing. One of them, the haemolymph lectin Dorin M from the tick Ornithodoros moubata was isolated and characterised in more depth. Results Several fibrinogen-related proteins were detected in the haemolymph of ixodid ticks Dermacentor marginatus, Rhipicephalus appendiculatus, R. pulchellus, and R. sanguineus. These proteins were recognised by sera directed against the tick lectin Dorin M and the haemagglutination activity of the ticks R. appendiculatus and D. marginatus. Cross-reactivity of the identified proteins with antibodies against the fibrinogen domain of the human ficolin was also shown. The carbohydrate-binding ability of tick haemolymph was confirmed by haemagglutination activity assays, and this activity was shown to be inhibited by neuraminic acid and sialylated glycoproteins as well as by N-acetylated hexosamines. The fibrinogen-related proteins were shown to be glycosylated and they were localised in salivary glands, midguts, and haemocytes of D. marginatus. Hemelipoglycoprotein was also recognised by sera directed against the fibrinogen-related proteins in all three Rhipicephalus species as well as in D. marginatus. However, this protein does not contain the fibrinogen domain and thus, the binding possibly results from the structure similarity between hemelipoglycoprotein and the fibrinogen domain. Conclusions The presence of fibrinogen-related proteins was shown in the haemolymph of four tick species in high abundance. Reactivity of antibodies directed against ficolin or fibrinogen-related proteins with proteins which do not contain the fibrinogen domain points out the importance of sequence analysis of the identified proteins in further studies. Previously observed expression of

  1. Expression patterns of Wnt signaling component, secreted frizzled‑related protein 3 in astrocytoma and glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Pećina-Šlaus, Nives; Kafka, Anja; Varošanec, Ana Maria; Marković, Leon; Krsnik, Željka; Njirić, Niko; Mrak, Goran

    2016-05-01

    Secreted frizzled-related protein 3 (SFRP3) is a member of the family of soluble proteins, which modulate the Wnt signaling cascade. Novel research has identified aberrant expression of SFRPs in different types of cancer. In the present study the expression intensities and localizations of the SFRP3 protein across different histopathological grades of astrocytic brain tumors were investigated by immunohistochemistry, digital scanning and image analysis. The results demonstrated that the differences between expression levels and malignancy grades were statistically significant. Tumors were classified into four malignancy grades according to the World Health Organization guidelines. Moderate (P=0.014) and strong (P=0.028) nuclear expression levels were significantly different in pilocytic (grade I) and diffuse (grade II) astrocytomas demonstrating higher expression values, as compared with anaplastic astrocytoma (grade III) and glioblastoma (grade IV). When the sample was divided into two groups, the moderate and high cytoplasmic expression levels were observed to be significantly higher in glioblastomas than in the group comprising astrocytoma II and III. Furthermore, the results indicated that high grade tumors were associated with lower values of moderate (P=0.002) and strong (P=0.018) nuclear expression in comparison to low grade tumors. Analysis of cytoplasmic staining demonstrated that strong cytoplasmic expression was significantly higher in the astrocytoma III and IV group than in the astrocytoma I and II group (P=0.048). Furthermore, lower grade astrocytomas exhibited reduced membranous SFRP3 staining when compared with higher grade astrocytomas and this difference was statistically significant (P=0.036). The present results demonstrated that SFRP3 protein expression levels were decreased in the nucleus in higher grade astrocytoma (indicating the expected behavior of an antagonist of Wnt signaling), whereas when the SFRP3 was located in the

  2. Health-Related Aspects of Milk Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Davoodi, Seyed Hossein; Shahbazi, Roghiyeh; Esmaeili, Saeideh; Sohrabvandi, Sara; Mortazavian, AmirMohamamd; Jazayeri, Sahar; Taslimi, Aghdas

    2016-01-01

    Milk is an important component of a balanced diet and contains numerous valuable constituents. Considerable acclaimed health benefits of milk are related to its proteins, not only for their nutritive value but also for their biological properties. Scientific evidence suggests that anticarcinogenic activities, antihypertensive properties, immune system modulation, and other metabolic features of milk, are affiliated with its proteins (intact proteins or its derivatives). In this article, the main health-related aspects of milk proteins, such as anticarcinogenic, immunomodulatory, antimicrobial, anticariogenic, antihypertensive, and hypocholesterolemic effects are reviewed. Collectively, the findings indicate the effectiveness of milk proteins on reduction of risk factors for cancer, cardiovascular diseases and overall improvement of health aspects. PMID:27980594

  3. Frizzled 1 and frizzled 2 genes function in palate, ventricular septum and neural tube closure: general implications for tissue fusion processes

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Huimin; Smallwood, Philip M.; Wang, Yanshu; Vidaltamayo, Roman; Reed, Randall; Nathans, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    The closure of an open anatomical structure by the directed growth and fusion of two tissue masses is a recurrent theme in mammalian embryology, and this process plays an integral role in the development of the palate, ventricular septum, neural tube, urethra, diaphragm and eye. In mice, targeted mutations of the genes encoding frizzled 1 (Fz1) and frizzled 2 (Fz2) show that these highly homologous integral membrane receptors play an essential and partially redundant role in closure of the palate and ventricular septum, and in the correct positioning of the cardiac outflow tract. When combined with a mutant allele of the planar cell polarity gene Vangl2 (Vangl2Lp), Fz1 and/or Fz2 mutations also cause defects in neural tube closure and misorientation of inner ear sensory hair cells. These observations indicate that frizzled signaling is involved in diverse tissue closure processes, defects in which account for some of the most common congenital anomalies in humans. PMID:20940229

  4. Isolation and characterization of Wnt pathway-related genes from Porifera.

    PubMed

    Adell, Teresa; Thakur, Archana N; Müller, Werner E G

    2007-09-01

    The Wnt signal acts by binding to Frizzled receptors, with the subsequent activation of two different signal transduction cascades, the canonical and the non-canonical Wnt pathways, involved in cell growth, differentiation, migration and fate. The canonical pathway functions through the translocation of beta-catenin to the nucleus and the activation of TCF/LEF transcription factors; it plays an important role in developmental patterning and cell fate decisions during embryogenesis. The non-canonical Wnt pathway is responsible for the planar cell polarity process in invertebrates, and for the convergent-extension movements during vertebrate gastrulation. The final effect of the non-canonical Wnt pathway is the rearrangement of the cell cytoskeleton, through the activation of the subfamily of Ras-like small GTPases. In a recent report we described for the first time the isolation of a Wnt-related gene, Sd-Frizzled, from the most basal animal phylum, the Porifera. In the present study we report the isolation and phylogenetic characterization of several Wnt pathway-related genes from the sponge Suberites domuncula: Sd-TCF/LEF, Sd-GSK3, a recently discovered molecule with a putative function as a Wnt regulator (Sd-LZIC), the small Rho GTPases Sd-RhoA, Sd-Cdc42, and their effector Sd-mrlc. Also the isolation of a secreted frizzled related protein sFRP from another sponge species (Lubomirskia baicalensis) is reported.

  5. Transcriptional Regulation of Frizzled-1 in Human Osteoblasts by Sp1

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shibing; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.; Chu, Yanxia; Zmuda, Joseph M.; Zhang, Yingze

    2016-01-01

    The wingless pathway has a powerful influence on bone metabolism and is a therapeutic target in skeletal disorders. Wingless signaling is mediated in part through the Frizzled (FZD) receptor family. FZD transcriptional regulation is poorly understood. Herein we tested the hypothesis that Sp1 plays an important role in the transcriptional regulation of FZD1 expression in osteoblasts and osteoblast mineralization. To test this hypothesis, we conducted FZD1 promoter assays in Saos2 cells with and without Sp1 overexpression. We found that Sp1 significantly up-regulates FZD1 promoter activity in Saos2 cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and electrophoretic mobility shift (EMSA) assays identified a novel and functional Sp1 binding site at -44 to -40 from the translation start site in the FZD1 promoter. The Sp1-dependent activation of the FZD1 promoter was abolished by mithramycin A (MMA), an antibiotic affecting both Sp1 binding and Sp1 protein levels in Saos2 cells. Similarly, down-regulation of Sp1 in hFOB cells resulted in less FZD1 expression and lower alkaline phosphatase activity. Moreover, over-expression of Sp1 increased FZD1 expression and Saos2 cell mineralization while MMA decreased Sp1 and FZD1 expression and Saos2 cell mineralization. Knockdown of FZD1 prior to Sp1 overexpression partially abolished Sp1 stimulation of osteoblast differentiation markers. Taken together, our results suggest that Sp1 plays a role in human osteoblast differentiation and mineralization, which is at least partially mediated by Sp1-dependent transactivation of FZD1. PMID:27695039

  6. Ribosome-Inactivating and Related Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Schrot, Joachim; Weng, Alexander; Melzig, Matthias F.

    2015-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are toxins that act as N-glycosidases (EC 3.2.2.22). They are mainly produced by plants and classified as type 1 RIPs and type 2 RIPs. There are also RIPs and RIP related proteins that cannot be grouped into the classical type 1 and type 2 RIPs because of their different sizes, structures or functions. In addition, there is still not a uniform nomenclature or classification existing for RIPs. In this review, we give the current status of all known plant RIPs and we make a suggestion about how to unify those RIPs and RIP related proteins that cannot be classified as type 1 or type 2 RIPs. PMID:26008228

  7. A human homologue of the Drosophila polarity gene frizzled has been identified and mapped to 17q21.1

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Z.; Lee, C.C.; Baldini, A.

    1995-05-20

    The frizzled (fz) locus in Drosophila is required for the transmission of polarity signals across the plasma membrane in epidermal cells, as well as to their neighboring cells in the developing wing. The identification of a tissue polarity gene from the fz locus in Drosophila melanogaster has been reported. The fz gene encodes a protein (Fz) with seven putative transmembrane domains, which was suggested to function as a G-protein-coupled receptor. Here the authors report the identification of a human homologue for the fz gene (FZD2). The FZD2 gene was isolated from a human ovarian cDNA library and mapped to 17q21.1 by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with a corresponding cosmid. The full-length cDNA of human FZD2 encodes a protein (FZD-2) of 565 amino acids that shares 56% sequence identity with Drosophila Fz. The expression of the FZD2 gene seems to be developmentally regulated, with high levels of expression in fetal kidney and lung and in adult colon and ovary. The structure of FZD-2 suggests that it has a role in transmembrane signal transmission, although its precise physiological function and associated pathways are yet to be determined. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  8. The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 10 is a negative regulator of the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Young-Hee; Sekiya, Manami; Hirata, Michiko; Ye, Mingjuan; Yamagishi, Azumi; Lee, Sang-Mi; Kang, Man-Jong; Hosoda, Akemi; Fukumura, Tomoe; Kim, Dong-Ho; Saeki, Shigeru

    2010-02-19

    Wnt signaling pathways play fundamental roles in the differentiation, proliferation and functions of many cells as well as developmental, growth, and homeostatic processes in animals. Low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR)-related protein (LRP) 5 and LRP6 serve as coreceptors of Wnt proteins together with Frizzled receptors, triggering activation of canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling. Here, we found that LRP10, a new member of the LDLR gene family, inhibits the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway. The {beta}-catenin/T cell factor (TCF) transcriptional activity in HEK293 cells was activated by transfection with Wnt3a or LRP6, which was then inhibited by co-transfection with LRP10. Deletion of the extracellular domain of LRP10 negated its inhibitory effect. The inhibitory effect of LRP10 was consistently conserved in HEK293 cells even when GSK3{beta} phosphorylation was inhibited by incubation with lithium chloride and co-transfection with constitutively active S33Y-mutated {beta}-catenin. Nuclear {beta}-catenin accumulation was unaffected by LRP10. The present studies suggest that LRP10 may interfere with the formation of the {beta}-catenin/TCF complex and/or its binding to target DNA in the nucleus, and that the extracellular domain of LRP10 is critical for inhibition of the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway.

  9. Performance comparison of laying hens segregating for the frizzle gene under thermoneutral and high ambient temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zerjal, T; Gourichon, D; Rivet, B; Bordas, A

    2013-06-01

    The effect on thermotolerance of the incompletely dominant frizzle (F) gene, which causes feather curling and feather mass reduction, was investigated in 281 laying hens that were homozygous for the frizzle mutation (FF), heterozygous (FN), or normally feathered (NN). One-half of the birds were kept under standard conditions (22°C) and half were exposed to high ambient temperatures (32°C) between 24 and 46 wk of age. Egg production, egg quality, feed efficiency, and dissection traits were recorded and compared. At standard conditions, egg production and quality traits did not differ among the 3 genotypes, whereas feed efficiency was lower for the homozygous birds. Under heat stress conditions, the superiority of the FF hens was evident for all egg quantity and quality traits. No significant difference was measured between heterozygous carriers and normally feathered hens, indicating that the incomplete dominant frizzle mutation behaved as a recessive mutation regarding heat tolerance. From this study, we deduced that the F mutation in its homozygous state has a beneficial effect in decreasing heat stress in poultry production, and it could be particularly advantageous in tropical countries where average temperatures are never too low to negatively affect feed efficiency.

  10. Progressive cerebellar, auditory, and esophageal dysfunction caused by targeted disruption of the frizzled-4 gene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Huso, D; Cahill, H; Ryugo, D; Nathans, J

    2001-07-01

    Wnt signaling has been implicated in the control of cell proliferation and in synapse formation during neural development, and these actions are presumed to be mediated by frizzled receptors. In this paper we report the phenotype of mice carrying a targeted deletion of the frizzled-4 (fz4) gene. fz4(-/-) mice exhibit three distinct defects: (1) progressive cerebellar degeneration associated with severe ataxia, (2) absence of a skeletal muscle sheath around the lower esophagus associated with progressive esophageal distension and dysfunction, and (3) progressive deafness caused by a defect in the peripheral auditory system unaccompanied by loss of hair cells or other auditory neurons. As assayed using a lacZ knock-in reporter, fz4 is widely expressed within the CNS. In particular, fz4 is expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells, esophageal skeletal muscle, and cochlear inner hair cells, and the absence of Fz4 in these cells is presumed to account for the fz4(-/-) phenotype. In contrast to the early cell proliferation and patterning effects classically ascribed to Wnts, the auditory and cerebellar phenotypes of fz4(-/-) mice implicate Frizzled signaling in maintaining the viability and integrity of the nervous system in later life.

  11. Predicting disease-related proteins based on clique backbone in protein-protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Zhao, Xudong; Tang, Xianglong

    2014-01-01

    Network biology integrates different kinds of data, including physical or functional networks and disease gene sets, to interpret human disease. A clique (maximal complete subgraph) in a protein-protein interaction network is a topological module and possesses inherently biological significance. A disease-related clique possibly associates with complex diseases. Fully identifying disease components in a clique is conductive to uncovering disease mechanisms. This paper proposes an approach of predicting disease proteins based on cliques in a protein-protein interaction network. To tolerate false positive and negative interactions in protein networks, extending cliques and scoring predicted disease proteins with gene ontology terms are introduced to the clique-based method. Precisions of predicted disease proteins are verified by disease phenotypes and steadily keep to more than 95%. The predicted disease proteins associated with cliques can partly complement mapping between genotype and phenotype, and provide clues for understanding the pathogenesis of serious diseases.

  12. Peptoid mimics of agouti related protein.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Darren A; Chai, Biao-Xin; Rood, Hilary L E; Siani, Michael A; Douglas, Nicholai R; Gantz, Ira; Millhauser, Glenn L

    2003-04-17

    The Agouti Related Protein (AGRP) is an endogenous antagonist of melanocortin-3 and -4 receptors, each of which plays a key role in body weight homeostasis. We designed a peptoid trimer based on AGRP 111-113 in which a single chiral atom is used to partially restrain the backbone structure. Peptoid 5 displaced both radiolabeled Nle4-alpha-MSH (IC(50)=3.1 microM) and AGRP (86-132) (IC(50)=1.9 microM) from the human melanocortin-4 receptor and functioned as an antagonist of alpha-MSH stimulated cAMP generation, thus providing an important lead in the development of AGRP mimetics.

  13. The chicken frizzle feather is due to an α-keratin (KRT75) mutation that causes a defective rachis.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chen Siang; Wu, Ping; Foley, John; Foley, Anne; McDonald, Merry-Lynn; Juan, Wen-Tau; Huang, Chih-Jen; Lai, Yu-Ting; Lo, Wen-Sui; Chen, Chih-Feng; Leal, Suzanne M; Zhang, Huanmin; Widelitz, Randall B; Patel, Pragna I; Li, Wen-Hsiung; Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Feathers have complex forms and are an excellent model to study the development and evolution of morphologies. Existing chicken feather mutants are especially useful for identifying genetic determinants of feather formation. This study focused on the gene F, underlying the frizzle feather trait that has a characteristic curled feather rachis and barbs in domestic chickens. Our developmental biology studies identified defects in feather medulla formation, and physical studies revealed that the frizzle feather curls in a stepwise manner. The frizzle gene is transmitted in an autosomal incomplete dominant mode. A whole-genome linkage scan of five pedigrees with 2678 SNPs revealed association of the frizzle locus with a keratin gene-enriched region within the linkage group E22C19W28_E50C23. Sequence analyses of the keratin gene cluster identified a 69 bp in-frame deletion in a conserved region of KRT75, an α-keratin gene. Retroviral-mediated expression of the mutated F cDNA in the wild-type rectrix qualitatively changed the bending of the rachis with some features of frizzle feathers including irregular kinks, severe bending near their distal ends, and substantially higher variations among samples in comparison to normal feathers. These results confirmed KRT75 as the F gene. This study demonstrates the potential of our approach for identifying genetic determinants of feather forms.

  14. Tumourigenic canine osteosarcoma cell lines associated with frizzled-6 up-regulation and enhanced side population cell frequency

    PubMed Central

    de Sá Rodrigues, L. C.; Holmes, K. E.; Thompson, V.; Newton, M. A.; Stein, T. J.

    2016-01-01

    An increased serum alkaline phosphatase concentration is known to be associated with a negative prognosis in canine and human osteosarcoma. To expand upon previous studies regarding the biological relevance of increased serum alkaline phosphatase as a negative prognostic factor, xenogeneic heterotopic transplants were performed using six canine primary osteosarcoma cell lines generated from patients with differing serum alkaline phosphatase concentrations (three normal and three increased). Three of the six cell lines were capable of generating tumours and tumour formation was independent of the serum alkaline phosphatase status of the cell line. Microarray analysis identified 379 genes as being differentially expressed between the tumourigenic and non-tumourigenic cell lines. Frizzled-6 was upregulated to the greatest extent (7.78-fold) in tumourigenic cell lines compared with non-tumourigenic cell lines. Frizzled-6, a co-receptor for Wnt ligands has been associated with enhanced tumour-initiating cells and poor prognosis for other tumours. The increased expression of frizzled-6 was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) and Western blot analysis. Additionally, the tumourigenic cell lines also had an increase in the percentage of side population cells compared with non-tumourigenic cell lines (5.89% versus 1.58%, respectively). There were no differences in tumourigenicity, frizzled-6 or percentage of side population cells noted between osteosarcoma cell lines generated from patients of differing serum alkaline phosphatase concentration. However, to our knowledge this is the first study to identified frizzled-6 as a possible marker of osteosarcoma cell populations with enhanced tumourigenicity and side population cells. Future work will focus on defining the role of frizzled-6 in osteosarcoma tumourigenesis and tumour-initiating cells. PMID:25689105

  15. Tumourigenic canine osteosarcoma cell lines associated with frizzled-6 up-regulation and enhanced side population cell frequency.

    PubMed

    de Sá Rodrigues, L C; Holmes, K E; Thompson, V; Newton, M A; Stein, T J

    2017-03-01

    An increased serum alkaline phosphatase concentration is known to be associated with a negative prognosis in canine and human osteosarcoma. To expand upon previous studies regarding the biological relevance of increased serum alkaline phosphatase as a negative prognostic factor, xenogeneic heterotopic transplants were performed using six canine primary osteosarcoma cell lines generated from patients with differing serum alkaline phosphatase concentrations (three normal and three increased). Three of the six cell lines were capable of generating tumours and tumour formation was independent of the serum alkaline phosphatase status of the cell line. Microarray analysis identified 379 genes as being differentially expressed between the tumourigenic and non-tumourigenic cell lines. Frizzled-6 was upregulated to the greatest extent (7.78-fold) in tumourigenic cell lines compared with non-tumourigenic cell lines. Frizzled-6, a co-receptor for Wnt ligands has been associated with enhanced tumour-initiating cells and poor prognosis for other tumours. The increased expression of frizzled-6 was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) and Western blot analysis. Additionally, the tumourigenic cell lines also had an increase in the percentage of side population cells compared with non-tumourigenic cell lines (5.89% versus 1.58%, respectively). There were no differences in tumourigenicity, frizzled-6 or percentage of side population cells noted between osteosarcoma cell lines generated from patients of differing serum alkaline phosphatase concentration. However, to our knowledge this is the first study to identified frizzled-6 as a possible marker of osteosarcoma cell populations with enhanced tumourigenicity and side population cells. Future work will focus on defining the role of frizzled-6 in osteosarcoma tumourigenesis and tumour-initiating cells.

  16. Protein function prediction using neighbor relativity in protein-protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Moosavi, Sobhan; Rahgozar, Masoud; Rahimi, Amir

    2013-04-01

    There is a large gap between the number of discovered proteins and the number of functionally annotated ones. Due to the high cost of determining protein function by wet-lab research, function prediction has become a major task for computational biology and bioinformatics. Some researches utilize the proteins interaction information to predict function for un-annotated proteins. In this paper, we propose a novel approach called "Neighbor Relativity Coefficient" (NRC) based on interaction network topology which estimates the functional similarity between two proteins. NRC is calculated for each pair of proteins based on their graph-based features including distance, common neighbors and the number of paths between them. In order to ascribe function to an un-annotated protein, NRC estimates a weight for each neighbor to transfer its annotation to the unknown protein. Finally, the unknown protein will be annotated by the top score transferred functions. We also investigate the effect of using different coefficients for various types of functions. The proposed method has been evaluated on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Homo sapiens interaction networks. The performance analysis demonstrates that NRC yields better results in comparison with previous protein function prediction approaches that utilize interaction network.

  17. Website on Protein Interaction and Protein Structure Related Work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samanta, Manoj; Liang, Shoudan; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    In today's world, three seemingly diverse fields - computer information technology, nanotechnology and biotechnology are joining forces to enlarge our scientific knowledge and solve complex technological problems. Our group is dedicated to conduct theoretical research exploring the challenges in this area. The major areas of research include: 1) Yeast Protein Interactions; 2) Protein Structures; and 3) Current Transport through Small Molecules.

  18. Parathyroid-hormone-related protein in sarcoidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Zeimer, H. J.; Greenaway, T. M.; Slavin, J.; Hards, D. K.; Zhou, H.; Doery, J. C.; Hunter, A. N.; Duffield, A.; Martin, T. J.; Grill, V.

    1998-01-01

    Parathyroid-hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is the main mediator of the humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy. It is also detected in many normal adult and fetal tissues. Altered calcium metabolism occurs in sarcoidosis, and two cases of sarcoidosis with hypercalcemia and elevated plasma PTHrP are described. An archival study of 20 lymph node biopsies with the pathological diagnosis of sarcoidosis was performed. Immunohistochemistry using a polyclonal antiserum to human PTHrP and in situ hybridization using a riboprobe to human PTHrP were performed on the lymph node biopsies. Immunohistochemistry for PTHrP was also performed on the biopsies from the two cases with elevated plasma levels. Immunohistochemical analysis detected PTHrP in macrophages within granulomata in 17 of the 20 (85%) biopsies. In situ hybridization detected a positive signal for messenger RNA in the granulomata of 11 of 19 (58%) biopsies. PTHrP immunoreactivity and PTHrP gene expression are present in sarcoid granulomata. PTHrP may contribute to the hypercalcemia of sarcoidosis. Images Figure 1 PMID:9422518

  19. Oxysterol-related-binding-protein related Protein-2 (ORP2) regulates cortisol biosynthesis and cholesterol homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Escajadillo, Tamara; Wang, Hongxia; Li, Linda; Li, Donghui; Sewer, Marion B

    2016-05-15

    Oxysterol binding protein-related protein 2 (ORP2) is a lipid binding protein that has been implicated in various cellular processes, including lipid sensing, cholesterol efflux, and endocytosis. We recently identified ORP2 as a member of a protein complex that regulates glucocorticoid biosynthesis. Herein, we examine the effect of silencing ORP2 on adrenocortical function and show that the ORP2 knockdown cells exhibit reduced amounts of multiple steroid metabolites, including progesterone, 11-deoxycortisol, and cortisol, but have increased concentrations of androgens, and estrogens. Moreover, silencing ORP2 suppresses the expression of most proteins required for cortisol production and reduces the expression of steroidogenic factor 1 (SF1). ORP2 silencing also increases cellular cholesterol, concomitant with decreased amounts of 22-hydroxycholesterol and 7-ketocholesterol, two molecules that have been shown to bind to ORP2. Further, we show that ORP2 binds to liver X receptor (LXR) and is required for nuclear LXR expression. LXR and ORP2 are recruited to the CYP11B1 promoter in response to cAMP signaling. Additionally, ORP2 is required for the expression of other LXR target genes, including ABCA1 and the LDL receptor (LDLR). In summary, we establish a novel role for ORP2 in regulating steroidogenic capacity and cholesterol homeostasis in the adrenal cortex.

  20. Frizzled signalling controls orientation of asymmetric sense organ precursor cell divisions in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Gho, M; Schweisguth, F

    1998-05-14

    During metazoan development, cell-fate diversity is brought about, in part, by asymmetric cell divisions. In Drosophila, bristle mechanosensory organs are composed of four different cells that originate from a single precursor cell, pI, after two rounds of asymmetric division. At each division, distinct fates are conferred on sister cells by the asymmetric segregation of Numb, a negative regulator of Notch signalling. Here we show that the orientation of the mitotic spindles and the localization of the Numb crescent follow a stereotyped pattern. Mitosis of pI is orientated parallel to the anteroposterior axis of the fly. We show that signalling mediated by the Frizzled receptor polarizes pI along this axis, thereby specifying the orientation of the mitotic spindle and positioning the Numb crescent. The mitoses of the two cells produced by mitosis of pI are orientated parallel and orthogonal, respectively, to the division axis of pI. This difference in cell-division orientation is largely independent of the identity of the secondary precursor cells, and is regulated by Frizzled-independent mechanisms.

  1. ECM Proteins Glycosylation and Relation to Diabetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernodet, Nadine; Bloomberg, Ayla; Sood, Vandana; Slutsky, Lenny; Ge, Shouren; Clark, Richard; Rafailovich, Miriam

    2004-03-01

    The chemical modification and crosslinking of proteins by sugar glycosylation contribute to the aging of tissue proteins, and acceleration of this reaction during hyperglycemia is implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications, such as disorder of the wound healing. Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) formation and protein crosslinking are irreversible processes that alter the structural and functional properties of proteins, lipid components and nucleic acids. And the mechanism, by which it happens, is not clear. Fibrinogen and fibronectin are plasma proteins, which play a major role in human wound healing. Fibrinogen converts to an insoluble fibrin "gel" following a cut, which eventually forms a clot to prevent blood loss, to direct cell adhesion and migration for forming scars. Fibronectin is a critical protein for cell adhesion and migration in wound healing. The effects of glucose on the binding of these plasma proteins from the extra cellular matrix (ECM) were followed at different concentrations by atomic force microscopy and lateral force modulation to measure the mechanical response of the samples. Glucose solutions (1, 2, and 3mg/mL) were incubated with the protein (100 mg/ml) and silicon (Si) substrates spun with sulfonated polystyrene (SPS) 28% for five days. Data showed that not only the organization of the protein on the surface was affected but also its mechanical properties. At 3 mg/mL glucose, Fn fibers were observed to be harder than those of the control, in good agreement with our hypothesis that glycosylation hardens tissues by crosslinking of proteins in the ECM and might cause fibers to break more easily.

  2. The chicken frizzle feather is due to an a-keratin (KRT75) mutation that causes a defective rachis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Feathers have complex forms and are an excellent model to study the development and evolution of morphologies. Existing chicken feather mutants are especially useful for identifying genetic determinants of feather formation. The present study focused on the gene, F, underlying the frizzle feather tr...

  3. Angled Growth of the Dental Lamina Is Accompanied by Asymmetrical Expression of the WNT Pathway Receptor Frizzled 6

    PubMed Central

    Putnová, Iveta; Dosedělová, Hana; Bryja, Vitezslav; Landová, Marie; Buchtová, Marcela; Štembírek, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Frizzled 6 (FZD6) belongs to a family of proteins that serve as receptors in the WNT signaling pathway. FZD6 plays an important role in the establishment of planar cell polarity in many embryonic processes such as convergent extension during gastrulation, neural tube closure, or hair patterning. Based on its role during hair development, we hypothesized that FZD6 may have similar expression pattern and function in the dental lamina, which is also a distinct epithelial protrusion growing characteristically angled into the mesenchyme. Diphyodont minipig was selected as a model species because its dentition closely resemble human ones with successional generation of teeth initiated from the dental lamina. We revealed asymmetrical expression of FZD6 in the dental lamina of early as well as late stages during its regression with stronger expression located on the labial side of the dental lamina. During lamina regression, FZD6-positive cells were found in its superficial part and the signal coincided with the upregulation of molecules involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition and increased migratory potential of epithelial cells. FZD6-expression was also turned on during differentiation of cells producing hard tissues, in which mature odontoblasts, ameloblasts, or surrounding osteoblasts were FZD6-positive. On the other hand, the tip of successional lamina and its lingual part, in which progenitor cells are located, exhibited FZD6-negativity. In conclusion, asymmetrical expression of FZD6 correlates with the growth directionality and side-specific morphological differences in the dental lamina of diphyodont species. Based on observed expression pattern, we propose that the dental lamina is other epithelial tissue, where planar cell polarity signaling is involved during its asymmetrical growth. PMID:28197104

  4. A novel Wnt5a-Frizzled4 signaling pathway mediates activity-independent dendrite morphogenesis via the distal PDZ motif of Frizzled 4.

    PubMed

    Bian, Wen-Jie; Miao, Wan-Ying; He, Shun-Ji; Wan, Zong-Fang; Luo, Zhen-Ge; Yu, Xiang

    2015-08-01

    The morphology of the dendritic tree is critical to neuronal function and neural circuit wiring. Several Wnt family members have been demonstrated to play important roles in dendrite development. However, the Wnt receptors responsible for mediating this process remain largely elusive. Using primary hippocampal neuronal cultures as a model system, we report that Frizzled4 (Fzd4), a member of the Fzd family of Wnt receptors, specifically signals downstream of Wnt5a to promote dendrite branching and growth. Interestingly, the less conserved distal PDZ binding motif of Fzd4, and not its conserved proximal Dvl-interacting PDZ motif, is required for mediating this effect. We further showed that Dvl signaled parallel to and independent of Fzd4 in promoting dendrite growth. Unlike most previously described pathways, Wnt5a/Fzd4 signaling promoted dendrite development in an activity-independent and autocrine fashion. Together, these results provide the first identification of a Wnt receptor for regulating dendrite development in the mammalian system, and demonstrate a novel function of the distal PDZ motif of Fzd4 in dendrite morphogenesis, thereby expanding our knowledge of the complex roles of Wnt signaling in neural development.

  5. The spatio-temporal domains of Frizzled6 action in planar polarity control of hair follicle orientation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hao; Smallwood, Philip M; Williams, John; Nathans, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, hair follicles cover most of the body surface and exhibit precise and stereotyped orientations relative to the body axes. Follicle orientation is controlled by the planar cell polarity (PCP; or, more generally, tissue polarity) system, as determined by the follicle mis-orientation phenotypes observed in mice with PCP gene mutations. The present study uses conditional knockout alleles of the PCP genes Frizzled6 (Fz6), Vangl1, and Vangl2, together with a series of Cre drivers to interrogate the spatio-temporal domains of PCP gene action in the developing mouse epidermis required for follicle orientation. Fz6 is required starting between embryonic day (E)11.5 and E12.5. Eliminating Fz6 in either the anterior or the posterior halves of the embryo or in either the feet or the torso leads to follicle mis-orientation phenotypes that are limited to the territories associated with Fz6 loss, implying either that PCP signaling is required for communicating polarity information on a local but not a global scale, or that there are multiple independent sources of global polarity information. Eliminating Fz6 in most hair follicle cells or in the inter-follicular epidermis at E15.5 suggests that PCP signaling in developing follicles is not required to maintain their orientation. The asymmetric arrangement of Merkel cells around the base of each guard hair follicle dependents on Fz6 expression in the epidermis but not in differentiating Merkel cells. These experiments constrain current models of PCP signaling and the flow of polarity information in mammalian skin.

  6. Wnt-Frizzled/Planar Cell Polarity Signaling: Cellular Orientation by Facing the Wind (Wnt)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yingzi; Mlodzik, Marek

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of planar cell polarity (PCP) in epithelial and mesenchymal cells is a critical, evolutionarily conserved process during development and organogenesis. Analyses in Drosophila and several vertebrate model organisms have contributed a wealth of information on the regulation of PCP. A key conserved pathway regulating PCP, the so-called core Wnt-Frizzled PCP (Fz/PCP) signaling pathway, was initially identified through genetic studies of Drosophila. PCP studies in vertebrates, most notably mouse and zebrafish, have identified novel factors in PCP signaling and have also defined cellular features requiring PCP signaling input. These studies have shifted focus to the role of Van Gogh (Vang)/Vangl genes in this molecular system. This review focuses on new insights into the core Fz/Vangl/PCP pathway and recent advances in Drosophila and vertebrate PCP studies. We attempt to integrate these within the existing core Fz/Vangl/PCP signaling framework. PMID:26566118

  7. Flamingo, a seven-pass transmembrane cadherin, regulates planar cell polarity under the control of Frizzled.

    PubMed

    Usui, T; Shima, Y; Shimada, Y; Hirano, S; Burgess, R W; Schwarz, T L; Takeichi, M; Uemura, T

    1999-09-03

    We identified a seven-pass transmembrane receptor of the cadherin superfamily, designated Flamingo (Fmi), localized at cell-cell boundaries in the Drosophila wing. In the absence of Fmi, planar polarity was distorted. Before morphological polarization of wing cells along the proximal-distal (P-D) axis, Fmi was redistributed predominantly to proximal and distal cell edges. This biased localization of Fmi appears to be driven by an imbalance of the activity of Frizzled (Fz) across the proximal/distal cell boundary. These results, together with phenotypes caused by ectopic expression of fz and fmi, suggest that cells acquire the P-D polarity by way of the Fz-dependent boundary localization of Fmi.

  8. Electronegativity and intrinsic disorder of preeclampsia-related proteins.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Carlos; Castañón-González, Jorge Alberto; Uversky, Vladimir N; Buhse, Thomas; Samaniego Mendoza, José Lino; Calva, Juan J

    2017-01-01

    Preeclampsia, hemorrhage, and infection are the leading causes of maternal death in underdeveloped countries. Since several proteins associated with preeclampsia are known, we conducted a computational study which evaluated the commonness and potential functionality of intrinsic disorder of these proteins and also made an attempt to characterize their origin. The origin of the preeclampsia-related proteins was assessed with a supervised technique, a Polarity Index Method (PIM), which evaluates the electronegativity of proteins based solely on their sequence. The commonness of intrinsic disorder was evaluated using several disorder predictors from the PONDR family, the charge-hydropathy plot (CH-plot) and cumulative distribution function (CDF) analyses, and using the MobiDB web-based tool, whereas potential functionality of intrinsic disorder was studied with the D2P2 resource and ANCHOR predictor of disorder-based binding sites, and the STRING tool was used to build the interactivity networks of the preeclampsia-related proteins. Peculiarities of the PIM-derived polar profile of the group of preeclampsia-related proteins were then compared with profiles of a group of lipoproteins, antimicrobial peptides, angiogenesis-related proteins, and the intrinsically disordered proteins. Our results showed a high graphical correlation between preeclampsia proteins, lipoproteins, and the angiogenesis proteins. We also showed that many preeclampsia-related proteins contain numerous functional disordered regions. Therefore, these bioinformatics results led us to assume that the preeclampsia proteins are highly associated with the lipoproteins group, and that some preeclampsia-related proteins contain significant amounts of functional disorders.

  9. Prediction of DNA-binding proteins from relational features

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The process of protein-DNA binding has an essential role in the biological processing of genetic information. We use relational machine learning to predict DNA-binding propensity of proteins from their structures. Automatically discovered structural features are able to capture some characteristic spatial configurations of amino acids in proteins. Results Prediction based only on structural relational features already achieves competitive results to existing methods based on physicochemical properties on several protein datasets. Predictive performance is further improved when structural features are combined with physicochemical features. Moreover, the structural features provide some insights not revealed by physicochemical features. Our method is able to detect common spatial substructures. We demonstrate this in experiments with zinc finger proteins. Conclusions We introduced a novel approach for DNA-binding propensity prediction using relational machine learning which could potentially be used also for protein function prediction in general. PMID:23146001

  10. Coat and enterotoxin-related proteins in Clostridium perfringens spores.

    PubMed

    Ryu, S; Labbe, R G

    1989-11-01

    Coat proteins from mature spores of two enterotoxin-positive (Ent+) and two enterotoxin-negative (Ent-) strains of Clostridium perfringens were solubilized using 50 mM-dithiothreitol and 1% sodium dodecyl sulphate at pH 9.7, and alkylated using 110 mM-iodoacetamide to prevent aggregation. The coat proteins and C. perfringens type A enterotoxin (CPE) were separated by SDS-PAGE and analysed by Western blotting using anti-CPE antibody. As previously reported, CPE aggregated in the presence of SDS, but no aggregation occurred at concentrations below 15 micrograms CPE ml-1. Two CPE-related proteins (34 and 48 kDa) were found in the solubilized spore coat protein of Ent+ strains while only the 48 kDa CPE-related protein was found in the spore coat fraction of Ent- strains. CPE-related proteins comprised 2.7% and 0.8% of the total solubilized coat protein of Ent+ and Ent- strains respectively. CPE-related proteins could be extracted from the spores with 1% SDS alone. They could also be released by disruption of whole spores, indicating that the CPE-related proteins may be in the spore core or trapped between the core and coat layers. The results suggest that CPE is not a major structural component of the coat fraction of C. perfringens spores.

  11. Current Overview of Allergens of Plant Pathogenesis Related Protein Families

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Mau; Singh, Rashmi Prabha; Kushwaha, Gajraj Singh; Iqbal, Naseer; Singh, Avinash; Kaushik, Sanket; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P.

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenesis related (PR) proteins are one of the major sources of plant derived allergens. These proteins are induced by the plants as a defense response system in stress conditions like microbial and insect infections, wounding, exposure to harsh chemicals, and atmospheric conditions. However, some plant tissues that are more exposed to environmental conditions like UV irradiation and insect or fungal attacks express these proteins constitutively. These proteins are mostly resistant to proteases and most of them show considerable stability at low pH. Many of these plant pathogenesis related proteins are found to act as food allergens, latex allergens, and pollen allergens. Proteins having similar amino acid sequences among the members of PR proteins may be responsible for cross-reactivity among allergens from diverse plants. This review analyzes the different pathogenesis related protein families that have been reported as allergens. Proteins of these families have been characterized in regard to their biological functions, amino acid sequence, and cross-reactivity. The three-dimensional structures of some of these allergens have also been evaluated to elucidate the antigenic determinants of these molecules and to explain the cross-reactivity among the various allergens. PMID:24696647

  12. Recognition of related proteins by iterative template refinement (ITR).

    PubMed Central

    Yi, T. M.; Lander, E. S.

    1994-01-01

    Predicting the structural fold of a protein is an important and challenging problem. Available computer programs for determining whether a protein sequence is compatible with a known 3-dimensional structure fall into 2 categories: (1) structure-based methods, in which structural features such as local conformation and solvent accessibility are encoded in a template, and (2) sequence-based methods, in which aligned sequences of a set of related proteins are encoded in a template. In both cases, the programs use a static template based on a predetermined set of proteins. Here, we describe a computer-based method, called iterative template refinement (ITR), that uses templates combining structure-based and sequence-based information and employs an iterative search procedure to detect related proteins and sequentially add them to the templates. Starting from a single protein of known structure, ITR performs sequential cycles of database search to construct an expanding tree of templates with the aim of identifying subtle relationships among proteins. Evaluating the performance of ITR on 6 proteins, we found that the method automatically identified a variety of subtle structural similarities to other proteins. For example, the method identified structural similarity between arabinose-binding protein and phosphofructokinase, a relationship that has not been widely recognized. PMID:7987226

  13. Markov mean properties for cell death-related protein classification.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Lozano, Carlos; Gestal, Marcos; González-Díaz, Humberto; Dorado, Julián; Pazos, Alejandro; Munteanu, Cristian R

    2014-05-21

    The cell death (CD) is a dynamic biological function involved in physiological and pathological processes. Due to the complexity of CD, there is a demand for fast theoretical methods that can help to find new CD molecular targets. The current work presents the first classification model to predict CD-related proteins based on Markov Mean Properties. These protein descriptors have been calculated with the MInD-Prot tool using the topological information of the amino acid contact networks of the 2423 protein chains, five atom physicochemical properties and the protein 3D regions. The Machine Learning algorithms from Weka were used to find the best classification model for CD-related protein chains using all 20 attributes. The most accurate algorithm to solve this problem was K*. After several feature subset methods, the best model found is based on only 11 variables and is characterized by the Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve (AUROC) of 0.992 and the true positive rate (TP Rate) of 88.2% (validation set). 7409 protein chains labeled with "unknown function" in the PDB Databank were analyzed with the best model in order to predict the CD-related biological activity. Thus, several proteins have been predicted to have CD-related function in Homo sapiens: 3DRX-involved in virus-host interaction biological process, protein homooligomerization; 4DWF-involved in cell differentiation, chromatin modification, DNA damage response, protein stabilization; 1IUR-involved in ATP binding, chaperone binding; 1J7D-involved in DNA double-strand break processing, histone ubiquitination, nucleotide-binding oligomerization; 1UTU-linked with DNA repair, regulation of transcription; 3EEC-participating to the cellular membrane organization, egress of virus within host cell, class mediator resulting in cell cycle arrest, negative regulation of ubiquitin-protein ligase activity involved in mitotic cell cycle and apoptotic process. Other proteins from bacteria predicted as

  14. Detecting remotely related proteins by their interactions and sequence similarity

    PubMed Central

    Espadaler, Jordi; Aragüés, Ramón; Eswar, Narayanan; Marti-Renom, Marc A.; Querol, Enrique; Avilés, Francesc X.; Sali, Andrej; Oliva, Baldomero

    2005-01-01

    The function of an uncharacterized protein is usually inferred either from its homology to, or its interactions with, characterized proteins. Here, we use both sequence similarity and protein interactions to identify relationships between remotely related protein sequences. We rely on the fact that homologous sequences share similar interactions, and, therefore, the set of interacting partners of the partners of a given protein is enriched by its homologs. The approach was benchmarked by assigning the fold and functional family to test sequences of known structure. Specifically, we relied on 1,434 proteins with known folds, as defined in the Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) database, and with known interacting partners, as defined in the Database of Interacting Proteins (DIP). For this subset, the specificity of fold assignment was increased from 54% for position-specific iterative blast to 75% for our approach, with a concomitant increase in sensitivity for a few percentage points. Similarly, the specificity of family assignment at the e-value threshold of 10-8 was increased from 70% to 87%. The proposed method would be a useful tool for large-scale automated discovery of remote relationships between protein sequences, given its unique reliance on sequence similarity and protein-protein interactions. PMID:15883372

  15. Oxidative modification of proteins: age-related changes.

    PubMed

    Chakravarti, Bulbul; Chakravarti, Deb N

    2007-01-01

    Aging is a complex biological phenomenon which involves progressive loss of different physiological functions of various tissues of living organisms. It is the inevitable fate of life and is a major risk factor for death and different pathological disorders. Based on a wide variety of studies performed in humans as well as in various animal models and microbial systems, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are believed to play a key role in the aging process. The production of ROS is influenced by cellular metabolic activities as well as environmental factors. ROS can react with all major biological macromolecules such as carbohydrates, nucleic acids, lipids, and proteins. Since, in general, proteins are the key molecules that play the ultimate role in various structural and functional aspects of living organisms, this review will focus on the age-related oxidative modifications of proteins as well as on mechanism for removal or repair of the oxidized proteins. The topics covered include protein oxidation as a marker of oxidative stress, experimental evidence indicating the role of ROS in protein oxidation, protein carbonyl content, enzymatic degradation of oxidized proteins, and effects of caloric restriction on protein oxidation in the context of aging. Finally, we will discuss different strategies which have been or can be undertaken to slow down the oxidative damage of proteins and the aging process.

  16. Direct Binding of the PDZ Domain of Dishevelled to a Conserved Internal Sequence in the C-Terminal Region of Frizzled

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Hing-C.; Bourdelas, Audrey; Krauss, Anke; Lee, Ho-Jin; Shao, Youming; Wu, Dianqing; Mlodzik, Marek; Shi, De-Li; Zheng, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Summary The cytoplasmic protein Dishevelled (Dvl) and the associated membrane-bound receptor Frizzled (Fz) are essential in canonical and noncanonical Wnt signaling pathways. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this signaling are not well understood. By using NMR spectroscopy, we determined that an internal sequence of Fz binds to the conventional peptide binding site in the PDZ domain of Dvl; this type of site typically binds to C-terminal binding motifs. The C-terminal region of the Dvl inhibitor Dapper (Dpr) and Frodo bound to the same site. In Xenopus, Dvl binding peptides of Fz and Dpr/Frodo inhibited canonical Wnt signaling and blocked Wnt-induced secondary axis formation in a dose-dependent manner, but did not block noncanonical Wnt signaling mediated by the DEP domain. Together, our results identify a missing molecular connection within the Wnt pathway. Differences in the binding affinity of the Dvl PDZ domain and its binding partners may be important in regulating signal transduction by Dvl. PMID:14636582

  17. Direct binding of the PDZ domain of Dishevelled to a conserved internal sequence in the C-terminal region of Frizzled.

    PubMed

    Wong, Hing-C; Bourdelas, Audrey; Krauss, Anke; Lee, Ho-Jin; Shao, Youming; Wu, Dianqing; Mlodzik, Marek; Shi, De-Li; Zheng, Jie

    2003-11-01

    The cytoplasmic protein Dishevelled (Dvl) and the associated membrane-bound receptor Frizzled (Fz) are essential in canonical and noncanonical Wnt signaling pathways. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this signaling are not well understood. By using NMR spectroscopy, we determined that an internal sequence of Fz binds to the conventional peptide binding site in the PDZ domain of Dvl; this type of site typically binds to C-terminal binding motifs. The C-terminal region of the Dvl inhibitor Dapper (Dpr) and Frodo bound to the same site. In Xenopus, Dvl binding peptides of Fz and Dpr/Frodo inhibited canonical Wnt signaling and blocked Wnt-induced secondary axis formation in a dose-dependent manner, but did not block noncanonical Wnt signaling mediated by the DEP domain. Together, our results identify a missing molecular connection within the Wnt pathway. Differences in the binding affinity of the Dvl PDZ domain and its binding partners may be important in regulating signal transduction by Dvl.

  18. Characterization and embryonic expression of four amphioxus Frizzled genes with important functions during early embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Qian, Guanghui; Li, Guang; Chen, Xiaoying; Wang, Yiquan

    2013-12-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway plays crucial roles in the embryonic patterning of all metazoans. Recent studies on Wnt genes in amphioxus have shed important insights into the evolution of the vertebrate Wnt gene family and their functions. Nevertheless, the potential roles of Wnt family receptors encoded by Frizzled (Fz) genes in amphioxus embryonic development remain to be investigated. In the present study, we identified four amphioxus Fz genes-AmphiFz1/2/7, AmphiFz4, AmphiFz5/8, and AmphiFz9/10-and analyzed their expression patterns during amphioxus embryogenesis. We found that these four Fz genes were maternally expressed and might be involved in early animal-vegetal axis establishment. The AmphiFz1/2/7 transcripts were detected in the central dorsal neural plate, mesoderm, the Hatschek's pit, and rim of the mouth, whereas those of AmphiFz4 were detected in the mesoderm, pharyngeal endoderm, and entire gut region. AmphiFz5/8 was exclusively expressed in the anterior-most region, whereas AmphiFz9/10 was expressed in the neural plate, somites, and tail bud. The dynamic and diverse expression patterns of amphioxus Fz genes suggest that these genes are not only associated with early embryonic axis establishment but also are involved in the development of several organs in amphioxus.

  19. Norrin/Frizzled4 signalling in the preneoplastic niche blocks medulloblastoma initiation

    PubMed Central

    Bassett, Erin A; Tokarew, Nicholas; Allemano, Ema A; Mazerolle, Chantal; Morin, Katy; Mears, Alan J; McNeill, Brian; Ringuette, Randy; Campbell, Charles; Smiley, Sheila; Pokrajac, Neno T; Dubuc, Adrian M; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Northcott, Paul A; Remke, Marc; Monnier, Philippe P; Potter, David; Paes, Kim; Kirkpatrick, Laura L; Coker, Kenneth J; Rice, Dennis S; Perez-Iratxeta, Carol; Taylor, Michael D; Wallace, Valerie A

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a critical modulator of carcinogenesis; however, in many tumor types, the influence of the stroma during preneoplastic stages is unknown. Here we explored the relationship between pre-tumor cells and their surrounding stroma in malignant progression of the cerebellar tumor medulloblastoma (MB). We show that activation of the vascular regulatory signalling axis mediated by Norrin (an atypical Wnt)/Frizzled4 (Fzd4) inhibits MB initiation in the Ptch+/− mouse model. Loss of Norrin/Fzd4-mediated signalling in endothelial cells, either genetically or by short-term blockade, increases the frequency of pre-tumor lesions and creates a tumor-permissive microenvironment at the earliest, preneoplastic stages of MB. This pro-tumor stroma, characterized by angiogenic remodelling, is associated with an accelerated transition from preneoplasia to malignancy. These data expose a stromal component that regulates the earliest stages of tumorigenesis in the cerebellum, and a novel role for the Norrin/Fzd4 axis as an endogenous anti-tumor signal in the preneoplastic niche. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16764.001 PMID:27823583

  20. C. elegans MOM-5/frizzled functions in MOM-2/Wnt-independent cell polarity and is localized asymmetrically prior to cell division.

    PubMed

    Park, Frederick D; Tenlen, Jennifer R; Priess, James R

    2004-12-29

    C. elegans embryonic cells have a common anterior/posterior (a/p) polarity that is apparent in the localization of the transcription factor POP-1. The level of nuclear POP-1 remains high in the anterior daughters of dividing cells but is lowered in the posterior daughters. To generate POP-1 asymmetry, most early embryonic cells require contact with signaling cells that express the ligand MOM-2/Wnt; the point of cell contact specifies the daughter with low nuclear POP-1. In contrast, slightly older embryonic cells that have no apparent prior exposure to Wnt signaling can generate POP-1 asymmetry, provided these cells express MOM-5/Frizzled. We show here that MOM-5::GFP is enriched at the posterior pole of cells prior to division and that a similar asymmetry is observed in cultured cells with no apparent prior exposure to Wnt signaling. While depleting these latter cells of MOM-5/Frizzled causes both daughter cells to have high levels of POP-1, we show that both daughter cells have low levels of POP-1 in embryos with atypically high levels of MOM-5::GFP. These results suggest that MOM-5/Frizzled asymmetry leads to POP-1 asymmetry. In later embryogenesis, we find that MOM-5::GFP localizes to the leading edges of epidermal cells during ventral enclosure. These localization patterns suggest a parallel between MOM-5/Frizzled and the roles of Drosophila Frizzled in planar polarity and dorsal enclosure.

  1. Structural studies of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1

    SciTech Connect

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A.; Koski, Raymond A.; Bonafé, Nathalie

    2011-10-01

    Structural analysis of a truncated soluble domain of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1, a membrane protein implicated in the proliferation of aggressive brain cancer, is presented. Human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1 (GLIPR1) is a membrane protein that is highly upregulated in brain cancers but is barely detectable in normal brain tissue. GLIPR1 is composed of a signal peptide that directs its secretion, a conserved cysteine-rich CAP (cysteine-rich secretory proteins, antigen 5 and pathogenesis-related 1 proteins) domain and a transmembrane domain. GLIPR1 is currently being investigated as a candidate for prostate cancer gene therapy and for glioblastoma targeted therapy. Crystal structures of a truncated soluble domain of the human GLIPR1 protein (sGLIPR1) solved by molecular replacement using a truncated polyalanine search model of the CAP domain of stecrisp, a snake-venom cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP), are presented. The correct molecular-replacement solution could only be obtained by removing all loops from the search model. The native structure was refined to 1.85 Å resolution and that of a Zn{sup 2+} complex was refined to 2.2 Å resolution. The latter structure revealed that the putative binding cavity coordinates Zn{sup 2+} similarly to snake-venom CRISPs, which are involved in Zn{sup 2+}-dependent mechanisms of inflammatory modulation. Both sGLIPR1 structures have extensive flexible loop/turn regions and unique charge distributions that were not observed in any of the previously reported CAP protein structures. A model is also proposed for the structure of full-length membrane-bound GLIPR1.

  2. de Gennes Narrowing Describes the Relative Motion of Protein Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Liang; Smolin, Nikolai; Smith, Jeremy C.

    2014-04-01

    The relative motion of structural domains is essential for the biological function of many proteins. Here, by analyzing neutron scattering data and performing molecular dynamics simulations, we find that interdomain motion in several proteins obeys the principle of de Gennes narrowing, in which the wave vector dependence of the interdomain diffusion coefficient is inversely proportional to the interdomain structure factor. Thus, the rate of interdomain motion is inversely proportional to the probability distribution of the spatial configurations of domains.

  3. Identification of a Promoter for the Human C1q-Tumor Necrosis Factor–Related Protein-5 Gene Associated with Late-Onset Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chavali, Venkata R. M.; Sommer, Jeffrey R.; Petters, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. The Complement-1q tumor necrosis factor-related protein 5 (C1QTNF5/CTRP5) gene is located in the 3′ untranslated region of the Membrane Frizzled Related Protein (MFRP) gene, and these two genes are reported to be dicistronic. The authors examined the 5′ upstream sequence of CTRP5 for the presence of a promoter regulating the expression of this gene. Methods. The sequence upstream of the translational start site of human CTRP5 (hCTRP5) was analyzed by Promoter Inspector software. A series of plasmids containing segments of hCTRP5 putative promoter sequence (−29 bp to −3.6 kb) upstream of the luciferase gene were generated. Cells were transiently transfected with these plasmids, and luciferase activity was measured. 5′ RACE analysis was performed to determine the functional transcription start site. V5 tagged-pig CTRP5 (pCTRP5) gene, cloned downstream of the hCTRP5 putative promoter, was expressed in a human retinal cell line (ARPE-19) and a Chinese hamster ovary cell line (CHO-K1) to study the functionality of the putative promoter. Results. Bioinformatic analysis identified a putative promoter region between nt −1322 and +1 sequence of hCTRP5. 5′ RACE analysis revealed the presence of the transcriptional start site (TSS) at 62 bp upstream of the start codon in the CTRP5. The 1.3-kb sequence of the hCTRP5 predicted promoter produced higher levels of luciferase activity, indicating the strength of the cloned CTRP5 promoter. The promoter sequence between nt −1322 bp to −29 bp upstream of the first ATG of CTRP5 was found to be essential for this promoter activity. The predicted hCTRP5 promoter was found to control the expression of V5-tagged pCTRP5 and nuclear GFP, indicating that the promoter was functional. Conclusions. This study revealed the presence of a functional promoter for the CTRP5 gene located 5′ of its start site. Understanding the regulation of CTRP5 gene transcription may provide insights into the possible role of CTRP5 in

  4. Structural studies of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1.

    PubMed

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A; Koski, Raymond A; Bonafé, Nathalie

    2011-10-01

    Human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1 (GLIPR1) is a membrane protein that is highly upregulated in brain cancers but is barely detectable in normal brain tissue. GLIPR1 is composed of a signal peptide that directs its secretion, a conserved cysteine-rich CAP (cysteine-rich secretory proteins, antigen 5 and pathogenesis-related 1 proteins) domain and a transmembrane domain. GLIPR1 is currently being investigated as a candidate for prostate cancer gene therapy and for glioblastoma targeted therapy. Crystal structures of a truncated soluble domain of the human GLIPR1 protein (sGLIPR1) solved by molecular replacement using a truncated polyalanine search model of the CAP domain of stecrisp, a snake-venom cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP), are presented. The correct molecular-replacement solution could only be obtained by removing all loops from the search model. The native structure was refined to 1.85 Å resolution and that of a Zn2+ complex was refined to 2.2 Å resolution. The latter structure revealed that the putative binding cavity coordinates Zn2+ similarly to snake-venom CRISPs, which are involved in Zn2+-dependent mechanisms of inflammatory modulation. Both sGLIPR1 structures have extensive flexible loop/turn regions and unique charge distributions that were not observed in any of the previously reported CAP protein structures. A model is also proposed for the structure of full-length membrane-bound GLIPR1.

  5. Anatomy of protein disorder, flexibility and disease-related mutations

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hui-Chun; Chung, Sun Sook; Fornili, Arianna; Fraternali, Franca

    2015-01-01

    Integration of protein structural information with human genetic variation and pathogenic mutations is essential to understand molecular mechanisms associated with the effects of polymorphisms on protein interactions and cellular processes. We investigate occurrences of non-synonymous SNPs in ordered and disordered protein regions by systematic mapping of common variants and disease-related SNPs onto these regions. We show that common variants accumulate in disordered regions; conversely pathogenic variants are significantly depleted in disordered regions. These different occurrences of pathogenic and common SNPs can be attributed to a negative selection on random mutations in structurally highly constrained regions. New approaches in the study of quantitative effects of pathogenic-related mutations should effectively account for all the possible contexts and relative functional constraints in which the sequence variation occurs. PMID:26322316

  6. Benchmarking NMR experiments: A relational database of protein pulse sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthamarai, Russell R. P.; Kuprov, Ilya; Pervushin, Konstantin

    2010-03-01

    Systematic benchmarking of multi-dimensional protein NMR experiments is a critical prerequisite for optimal allocation of NMR resources for structural analysis of challenging proteins, e.g. large proteins with limited solubility or proteins prone to aggregation. We propose a set of benchmarking parameters for essential protein NMR experiments organized into a lightweight (single XML file) relational database (RDB), which includes all the necessary auxiliaries (waveforms, decoupling sequences, calibration tables, setup algorithms and an RDB management system). The database is interfaced to the Spinach library ( http://spindynamics.org), which enables accurate simulation and benchmarking of NMR experiments on large spin systems. A key feature is the ability to use a single user-specified spin system to simulate the majority of deposited solution state NMR experiments, thus providing the (hitherto unavailable) unified framework for pulse sequence evaluation. This development enables predicting relative sensitivity of deposited implementations of NMR experiments, thus providing a basis for comparison, optimization and, eventually, automation of NMR analysis. The benchmarking is demonstrated with two proteins, of 170 amino acids I domain of αXβ2 Integrin and 440 amino acids NS3 helicase.

  7. Novel Vip3-related protein from Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Rang, Cécile; Gil, Patricia; Neisner, Nathalie; Van Rie, Jeroen; Frutos, Roger

    2005-10-01

    A novel vip3-related gene was identified in Bacillus thuringiensis. This novel gene is 2,406 bp long and codes for a 91-kDa protein (801 amino acids). This novel protein exhibits between 61 and 62% similarity with Vip3A proteins and is designated Vip3Ba1. Vip3Ba1 has several specific features. Differences between Vip3Ba1 and the Vip3A proteins are spread throughout the sequence but are more frequent in the C-terminal part from amino acid 456 onward. The regions containing the two proteolytic processing sites, which are highly conserved among the Vip3A toxins, are markedly different in Vip3Ba1. The pattern DCCEE (Asp Cys Cys Glu Glu) is repeated four times between position 463 and 483 in Vip3Ba1, generating the sequence 463-DCCEEDCCEEDCCEEDCCEE-483. This sequence, which is rich in negatively charged amino acids, also contains 73% of the cysteines present in Vip3Ba1. This repeated sequence is not present in Vip3A proteins. The Vip3Ba1protein was produced in Escherichia coli and tested against Ostrinia nubilalis and Plutella xylostella, and it generated significant growth delays but had no larvicidal effect, indicating that its host range might be different than that of Vip3A proteins.

  8. Novel Vip3-Related Protein from Bacillus thuringiensis†

    PubMed Central

    Rang, Cécile; Gil, Patricia; Neisner, Nathalie; Van Rie, Jeroen; Frutos, Roger

    2005-01-01

    A novel vip3-related gene was identified in Bacillus thuringiensis. This novel gene is 2,406 bp long and codes for a 91-kDa protein (801 amino acids). This novel protein exhibits between 61 and 62% similarity with Vip3A proteins and is designated Vip3Ba1. Vip3Ba1 has several specific features. Differences between Vip3Ba1 and the Vip3A proteins are spread throughout the sequence but are more frequent in the C-terminal part from amino acid 456 onward. The regions containing the two proteolytic processing sites, which are highly conserved among the Vip3A toxins, are markedly different in Vip3Ba1. The pattern DCCEE (Asp Cys Cys Glu Glu) is repeated four times between position 463 and 483 in Vip3Ba1, generating the sequence 463-DCCEEDCCEEDCCEEDCCEE-483. This sequence, which is rich in negatively charged amino acids, also contains 73% of the cysteines present in Vip3Ba1. This repeated sequence is not present in Vip3A proteins. The Vip3Ba1protein was produced in Escherichia coli and tested against Ostrinia nubilalis and Plutella xylostella, and it generated significant growth delays but had no larvicidal effect, indicating that its host range might be different than that of Vip3A proteins. PMID:16204549

  9. Prediction of the Ebola virus infection related human genes using protein-protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Cao, HuanHuan; Zhang, YuHang; Zhao, Jia; Zhu, Liucun; Wang, Yi; Li, JiaRui; Feng, Yuanming; Zhang, Ning

    2017-03-10

    Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF) is caused by Ebola virus (EBOV). It is reported that human could be infected by EBOV with a high fatality rate. However, association factors between EBOV and host still tend to be ambiguous. According to the "guilt by association" (GBA) principle, proteins interacting with each other are very likely to function similarly or the same. Based on this assumption, we tried to obtain EBOV infection-related human genes in a protein-protein interaction network using Dijkstra algorithm. We hope it could contribute to the discovery of novel effective treatments. Finally, 15 genes were selected as potential EBOV infection-related human genes.

  10. A family of human cdc2-related protein kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Meyerson, M; Enders, G H; Wu, C L; Su, L K; Gorka, C; Nelson, C; Harlow, E; Tsai, L H

    1992-01-01

    The p34cdc2 protein kinase is known to regulate important transitions in the eukaryotic cell cycle. We have identified 10 human protein kinases based on their structural relation to p34cdc2. Seven of these kinases are novel and the products of five share greater than 50% amino acid sequence identity with p34cdc2. The seven novel genes are broadly expressed in human cell lines and tissues with each displaying some cell type or tissue specificity. The cdk3 gene, like cdc2 and cdk2, can complement cdc28 mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting that all three of these protein kinases can play roles in the regulation of the mammalian cell cycle. The identification of a large family of cdc2-related kinases opens the possibility of combinatorial regulation of the cell cycle together with the emerging large family of cyclins. Images PMID:1639063

  11. Role of Frizzled6 in the molecular mechanism of beta-carotene action in the lung.

    PubMed

    Piga, Rosaria; van Dartel, Dorien; Bunschoten, Annelies; van der Stelt, Inge; Keijer, Jaap

    2014-06-05

    β-Carotene (BC) is omnipresent in our diet, both as natural food component as well as an additive. BC and its metabolites have important biological functions. For this reason, BC is generally considered to be a health promoting compound. Two human trials, however, have described adverse effects in lung tissue, increasing the risk of lung cancer. We previously applied transcriptomic analyses in a unique animal model, beta-carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase 1 knockout (Bcmo1(-/-)) mice that are, like humans, able to accumulate intact BC. In our search to unravel the molecular action of BC in the lung, we previously identified two genes particularly strongly down-regulated by BC in lung tissue of the male Bcmo1(-/-) mice: frizzled homologue 6 (Fzd6) and collagen triple helix repeat containing 1 (Cthrc1). In the present study, our aim was to further elucidate the role of FZD6 in lung epithelial cells and to provide a mechanistic explanation for BC increased lung cancer risk in humans. We performed whole genome microarray analysis on silenced FZD6 in non-tumor human type II bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells using RNAi. To directly link FZD6 to BC-effects on the lung, we compared the FZD6-silenced BEAS-2B gene expression profile to the BC-dependent gene expression profile of Bcmo1(-/-) mouse lungs. A number of relevant genes were regulated in the same direction in FZD6(-) BEAS-2B and in BC-exposed lungs of Bcmo1(-/-) mice and revealed enrichment of the Gene Ontology terms "oncogenes", "cell proliferation" and "cell cycle", which suggests a mediating role of FZD6 in BC-induced uncontrolled proliferation of lung cells.

  12. Host-defence-related proteins in cows' milk.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, T T; Smolenski, G A; Harris, D P; Gupta, S K; Haigh, B J; Broadhurst, M K; Molenaar, A J; Stelwagen, K

    2012-03-01

    Milk is a source of bioactive molecules with wide-ranging functions. Among these, the immune properties have been the best characterised. In recent years, it has become apparent that besides the immunoglobulins, milk also contains a range of minor immune-related proteins that collectively form a significant first line of defence against pathogens, acting both within the mammary gland itself as well as in the digestive tract of the suckling neonate. We have used proteomics technologies to characterise the repertoire of host-defence-related milk proteins in detail, revealing more than 100 distinct gene products in milk, of which at least 15 are known host-defence-related proteins. Those having intrinsic antimicrobial activity likely function as effector proteins of the local mucosal immune defence (e.g. defensins, cathelicidins and the calgranulins). Here, we focus on the activities and biological roles of the cathelicidins and mammary serum amyloid A. The function of the immune-related milk proteins that do not have intrinsic antimicrobial activity is also discussed, notably lipopolysaccharide-binding protein, RNase4, RNase5/angiogenin and cartilage-glycoprotein 39 kDa. Evidence is shown that at least some of these facilitate recognition of microbes, resulting in the activation of innate immune signalling pathways in cells associated with the mammary and/or gut mucosal surface. Finally, the contribution of the bacteria in milk to its functionality is discussed. These investigations are elucidating how an effective first line of defence is achieved in the bovine mammary gland and how milk contributes to optimal digestive function in the suckling calf. This study will contribute to a better understanding of the health benefits of milk, as well as to the development of high-value ingredients from milk.

  13. Antifreeze proteins in winter rye are similar to pathogenesis-related proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Hon, W C; Griffith, M; Mlynarz, A; Kwok, Y C; Yang, D S

    1995-01-01

    The ability to control extracellular ice formation during freezing is critical to the survival of freezing-tolerant plants. Antifreeze proteins, which are proteins that have the ability to retard ice crystal growth, were recently identified as the most abundant apoplastic proteins in cold-acclimated winter rye (Secale cereale L.) leaves. In the experiments reported here, amino-terminal sequence comparisons, immuno-cross-reactions, and enzyme activity assays all indicated that these antifreeze proteins are similar to members of three classes of pathogenesis-related proteins, namely, endochitinases, endo-beta-1,3-glucanases, and thaumatin-like proteins. Apoplastic endochitinases and endo-beta-1,3-glucanases that were induced by pathogens in freezing-sensitive tobacco did not exhibit antifreeze activity. Our findings suggest that subtle structural differences may have evolved in the pathogenesis-related proteins that accumulate at cold temperatures in winter rye to confer upon these proteins the ability to bind to ice. PMID:8552719

  14. Human erythrocyte membrane proteins of zone 4.5 exist as families of related proteins.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, C F; Coleman, D B; Kay, M M; Shiffer, K A; Miller, J; Goodman, S R

    1985-01-01

    An analysis of the polypeptide composition of zone 4.5 of human erythrocyte membranes has been done by immunoautoradiographic and two-dimensional peptide mapping techniques. Results of these studies demonstrated that the Coomassie blue profile was constant, with 14 well-resolved bands present. Zone 4.5 polypeptides existed as at least four families of two or more components with closely related polypeptide backbones. The families could be distinguished on the basis of their extraction characteristics, immunological cross-reactivity, and two-dimensional peptide maps. One family was related to protein 4.1, one family was related to band 3, and two families were independent and not similar to other larger membrane proteins. The data show that all of the visualized bands in zone 4.5 do not have the same protein composition and that several closely related forms of some polypeptides are present.

  15. Finding sequence motifs in groups of functionally related proteins.

    PubMed

    Smith, H O; Annau, T M; Chandrasegaran, S

    1990-01-01

    We have developed a method for rapidly finding patterns of conserved amino acid residues (motifs) in groups of functionally related proteins. All 3-amino acid patterns in a group of proteins of the type aa1 d1 aa2 d2 aa3, where d1 and d2 are distances that can be varied in a range up to 24 residues, are accumulated into an array. Segments of the proteins containing those patterns that occur most frequently are aligned on each other by a scoring method that obtains an average relatedness value for all the amino acids in each column of the aligned sequence block based on the Dayhoff relatedness odds matrix. The automated method successfully finds and displays nearly all of the sequence motifs that have been previously reported to occur in 33 reverse transcriptases, 18 DNA integrases, and 30 DNA methyltransferases.

  16. Molecular modeling of pathogenesis-related proteins of family 5.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Claudia E; Fernandes, Cláudia L; de Souza, Osmar N; Salzano, Francisco M; Bonatto, Sandro L; Freitas, Loreta B

    2006-01-01

    The family of pathogenesis-related (PR) 5 proteins have diverse functions, and some of them are classified as thaumatins, osmotins, and inhibitors of alpha-amylase or trypsin. Although the specific function of many PR5 in plants is unknown, they are involved in the acquired systemic resistance and response to biotic stress, causing the inhibition of hyphal growth and reduction of spore germination, probably by a membrane permeabilization mechanism or by interaction with pathogen receptors. We have constructed three-dimensional models of four proteins belonging to the Rosaceae and Fagaceae botanical families by using the technique of comparative molecular modelling by homology. There are four main structural differences between all the PR5, corresponding to regions with replacements of amino acids. Folding and the secondary structures are very similar for all of them. However, the isoelectric point and charge distributions differ for each protein.

  17. Thyroid-Related Protein Expression in the Human Thymus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Do Joon; Jung, Kyeong Cheon

    2017-01-01

    Radioiodine whole body scan (WBS), related to sodium iodide symporter (NIS) function, is widely used to detect recurrence/metastasis in postoperative patients with thyroid cancer. However, the normal thymic uptake of radioiodine has occasionally been observed in young patients. We evaluated the expression of thyroid-related genes and proteins in the human thymus. Thymic tissues were obtained from 22 patients with thyroid cancer patients of all ages. The expression of NIS, thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR), thyroperoxidase (TPO), and thyroglobulin (Tg) was investigated using immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR. NIS and TSHR were expressed in 18 (81.8%) and 19 samples (86.4%), respectively, whereas TPO was expressed in five samples (22.7%). Three thyroid-related proteins were localized to Hassall's corpuscles and thymocytes. In contrast, Tg was detected in a single patient (4.5%) localized to vascular endothelial cells. The expression of thyroid-related proteins was not increased in young thymic tissues compared to that in old thymic tissues. In conclusion, the expression of NIS and TSHR was detected in the majority of normal thymus samples, whereas that of TPO was detected less frequently, and that of Tg was detected rarely. The increased thymic uptake of radioiodine in young patients is not due to the increased expression of NIS. PMID:28386277

  18. Ubiquitination-mediated degradation of cell cycle-related proteins by F-box proteins.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Nana; Wang, Zhiwei; Wei, Wenyi

    2016-04-01

    F-box proteins, subunits of SKP1-cullin 1-F-box protein (SCF) type of E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes, have been validated to play a crucial role in governing various cellular processes such as cell cycle, cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration, invasion and metastasis. Recently, a wealth of evidence has emerged that F-box proteins is critically involved in tumorigenesis in part through governing the ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of cell cycle proteins, and dysregulation of this process leads to aberrant cell cycle progression and ultimately, tumorigenesis. Therefore, in this review, we describe the critical role of F-box proteins in the timely regulation of cell cycle. Moreover, we discuss how F-box proteins involve in tumorigenesis via targeting cell cycle-related proteins using biochemistry studies, engineered mouse models, and pathological gene alternations. We conclude that inhibitors of F-box proteins could have promising therapeutic potentials in part through controlling of aberrant cell cycle progression for cancer therapies.

  19. Chimeragenesis of distantly-related proteins by noncontiguous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Matthew A; Romero, Philip A; Wu, Timothy; Brustad, Eric M; Arnold, Frances H

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a method for identifying elements of a protein structure that can be shuffled to make chimeric proteins from two or more homologous parents. Formulating recombination as a graph-partitioning problem allows us to identify noncontiguous segments of the sequence that should be inherited together in the progeny proteins. We demonstrate this noncontiguous recombination approach by constructing a chimera of β-glucosidases from two different kingdoms of life. Although the protein's alpha–beta barrel fold has no obvious subdomains for recombination, noncontiguous SCHEMA recombination generated a functional chimera that takes approximately half its structure from each parent. The X-ray crystal structure shows that the structural blocks that make up the chimera maintain the backbone conformations found in their respective parental structures. Although the chimera has lower β-glucosidase activity than the parent enzymes, the activity was easily recovered by directed evolution. This simple method, which does not rely on detailed atomic models, can be used to design chimeras that take structural, and functional, elements from distantly-related proteins. PMID:23225662

  20. Nanoparticles in relation to peptide and protein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Masihuz; Ahmad, Ejaz; Qadeer, Atiyatul; Rabbani, Gulam; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2014-01-01

    Over the past two decades, there has been considerable research interest in the use of nanoparticles in the study of protein and peptide aggregation, and of amyloid-related diseases. The influence of nanoparticles on amyloid formation yields great interest due to its small size and high surface area-to-volume ratio. Targeting nucleation kinetics by nanoparticles is one of the most searched for ways to control or induce this phenomenon. The observed effect of nanoparticles on the nucleation phase is determined by particle composition, as well as the amount and nature of the particle’s surface. Various thermodynamic parameters influence the interaction of proteins and nanoparticles in the solution, and regulate the protein assembly into fibrils, as well as the disaggregation of preformed fibrils. Metals, organic particles, inorganic particles, amino acids, peptides, proteins, and so on are more suitable candidates for nanoparticle formulation. In the present review, we attempt to explore the effects of nanoparticles on protein and peptide fibrillation processes from both perspectives (ie, as inducers and inhibitors on nucleation kinetics and in the disaggregation of preformed fibrils). Their formulation and characterization by different techniques have been also addressed, along with their toxicological effects, both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:24611007

  1. The Wnt Frizzled Receptor MOM-5 Regulates the UNC-5 Netrin Receptor through Small GTPase-Dependent Signaling to Determine the Polarity of Migrating Cells.

    PubMed

    Levy-Strumpf, Naomi; Krizus, Meghan; Zheng, Hong; Brown, Louise; Culotti, Joseph G

    2015-08-01

    Wnt and Netrin signaling regulate diverse essential functions. Using a genetic approach combined with temporal gene expression analysis, we found a regulatory link between the Wnt receptor MOM-5/Frizzled and the UNC-6/Netrin receptor UNC-5. These two receptors play key roles in guiding cell and axon migrations, including the migration of the C. elegans Distal Tip Cells (DTCs). DTCs migrate post-embryonically in three sequential phases: in the first phase along the Antero-Posterior (A/P) axis, in the second, along the Dorso-Ventral (D/V) axis, and in the third, along the A/P axis. Loss of MOM-5/Frizzled function causes third phase A/P polarity reversals of the migrating DTCs. We show that an over-expression of UNC-5 causes similar DTC A/P polarity reversals and that unc-5 deficits markedly suppress the A/P polarity reversals caused by mutations in mom-5/frizzled. This implicates MOM-5/Frizzled as a negative regulator of unc-5. We provide further evidence that small GTPases mediate MOM-5's regulation of unc-5 such that one outcome of impaired function of small GTPases like CED-10/Rac and MIG-2/RhoG is an increase in unc-5 function. The work presented here demonstrates the existence of cross talk between components of the Netrin and Wnt signaling pathways and provides further insights into the way guidance signaling mechanisms are integrated to orchestrate directed cell migration.

  2. Expression of glutamine metabolism-related proteins in thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye Min; Lee, Yu Kyung; Koo, Ja Seung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to investigate the expression of glutamine metabolism-related protein in tumor and stromal compartments among the histologic subtypes of thyroid cancer. Results GLS1 and GDH expression in tumor and stromal compartments were the highest in AC than in other subtypes. Tumoral ASCT2 expression was higher in MC but lower in FC (p < 0.001). In PTC, tumoral GLS1 and tumoral GDH expression was higher in the conventional type than in the follicular variant (p = 0.043 and 0.001, respectively), and in PTC with BRAF V600E mutation than in PTC without BRAF V600E mutation (p<0.001). Stromal GDH positivity was the independent factor associated with short overall survival (hazard ratio: 21.48, 95% confidence interval: 2.178-211.8, p = 0.009). Methods We performed tissue microarrays with 557 thyroid cancer cases (papillary thyroid carcinoma [PTC]: 344, follicular carcinoma [FC]: 112, medullary carcinoma [MC]: 70, poorly differentiated carcinoma [PDC]: 23, and anaplastic carcinoma [AC]: 8) and 152 follicular adenoma (FA) cases. We performed immunohistochemical staining of glutaminolysis-related proteins (glutaminase 1 [GLS1], glutamate dehydrogenase [GDH], and amino acid transporter-2 [ASCT-2]). Conclusion Glutamine metabolism-related protein expression differed among the histologic subtypes of thyroid cancer. PMID:27447554

  3. Normal tear protein profiles and age-related changes.

    PubMed Central

    McGill, J I; Liakos, G M; Goulding, N; Seal, D V

    1984-01-01

    The specific and non-specific tear proteins have been analysed by means of the ELISA technique to establish the normal and age-related values. There is a linear and related decline of lysozyme and lactoferrin with age, and a similar but unrelated reduction in tear volume. IgA levels gradually decline, while caeruloplasmin and IgG both increase after the fifth decade. The results suggest that tear IgG and caeruloplasmin are probably transudates from the serum, that IgA is secreted independently of tear volume, and that lysozyme and lactoferrin are secreted at the same site but independently of tear volume. PMID:6712908

  4. Models for evaluation of relative immunogenic potential of protein particles in biopharmaceutical protein formulations.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Richard; Jiskoot, Wim

    2012-10-01

    An immune response to a therapeutic protein that compromises the biopharmaceutical activity or cross-reacts with an endogenous protein is a serious clinical event. The role of protein aggregates and particles in biopharmaceutical formulations in mediating this immune response has gained considerable attention over the recent past. Model systems that could consistently and reliably predict the relative immunogenicity of biopharmaceutical protein formulations would be extremely valuable. Several approaches have been developed in an attempt to provide this insight, including in silico algorithms, in vitro tests utilizing human leukocytes and in vivo animal models. This commentary provides an update of these various approaches as well as the author's perspectives on the pros and cons of these different methods.

  5. Dynamin-related proteins and Pex11 proteins in peroxisome division and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Thoms, Sven; Erdmann, Ralf

    2005-10-01

    The abundance and size of cellular organelles vary depending on the cell type and metabolic needs. Peroxisomes constitute a class of cellular organelles renowned for their ability to adapt to cellular and environmental conditions. Together with transcriptional regulators, two groups of peroxisomal proteins have a pronounced influence on peroxisome size and abundance. Pex11-type peroxisome proliferators are involved in the proliferation of peroxisomes, defined here as an increase in size and/or number of peroxisomes. Dynamin-related proteins have recently been suggested to be required for the scission of peroxisomal membranes. This review surveys the function of Pex11-type peroxisome proliferators and dynamin-related proteins in peroxisomal proliferation and division.

  6. JAM-related proteins in mucosal homeostasis and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Luissint, Anny-Claude; Nusrat, Asma; Parkos, Charles A

    2014-03-01

    Mucosal surfaces are lined by epithelial cells that form a physical barrier protecting the body against external noxious substances and pathogens. At a molecular level, the mucosal barrier is regulated by tight junctions (TJs) that seal the paracellular space between adjacent epithelial cells. Transmembrane proteins within TJs include junctional adhesion molecules (JAMs) that belong to the cortical thymocyte marker for Xenopus family of proteins. JAM family encompasses three classical members (JAM-A, JAM-B, and JAM-C) and related molecules including JAM4, JAM-like protein, Coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR), CAR-like membrane protein and endothelial cell-selective adhesion molecule. JAMs have multiple functions that include regulation of endothelial and epithelial paracellular permeability, leukocyte recruitment during inflammation, angiogenesis, cell migration, and proliferation. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the roles of the JAM family members in the regulation of mucosal homeostasis and leukocyte trafficking with a particular emphasis on barrier function and its perturbation during pathological inflammation.

  7. JAM related proteins in mucosal homeostasis and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Luissint, Anny-Claude; Nusrat, Asma; Parkos, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    Mucosal surfaces are lined by epithelial cells that form a physical barrier protecting the body against external noxious substances and pathogens. At a molecular level, the mucosal barrier is regulated by tight junctions (TJs) that seal the paracellular space between adjacent epithelial cells. Transmembrane proteins within TJs include Junctional Adhesion Molecules (JAMs) that belong to the CTX (Cortical Thymocyte marker for Xenopus) family of proteins. JAM family encompasses three classical members (JAM-A, -B and –C) and related molecules including JAM4, JAM-Like protein (JAM-L), Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor (CAR), CAR-Like Membrane Protein (CLMP) and Endothelial cell-Selective Adhesion Molecule (ESAM). JAMs have multiple functions that include regulation of endothelial and epithelial paracellular permeability, leukocyte recruitment during inflammation, angiogenesis, cell migration and proliferation. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the roles of the JAM family members in the regulation of mucosal homeostasis and leukocyte trafficking with a particular emphasis on barrier function and its perturbation during pathological inflammation. PMID:24667924

  8. Amyloid-related serum component (protein ASC) IN LEPROSY PATIENTS.

    PubMed Central

    Kronvall, G; Husby, G; Samuel, D; Bjune, G; Wheate, H

    1975-01-01

    The presence of amyloid-related serum component, protein ASC, in serum samples from 63 leprosy patients was investigated. Protein ASC was detected in 38% of the patients. A correlation to the disease spectrum of leprosy was apparent: polar lepromatous cases, 64% positive; borderline lepromatous, 50%; borderline tuberculoid, 36%; subpolar tuberculoid, 17%; and polar tuberculoid, negative. Antibody activity against the a antigen of Mycobacterium leprae was also determined, showing a similar correlation to the disease spectrum. Serum samples from 23 apparently healthy Ethiopians serving as controls showed a protein ASC incidence of 22%. This figure is significantly higher than the frequency found by others among healthy Norwegian blood donors. Immunoglobulin M levels among patients were elevated in the borderline lepromatous and poplar lepromatous groups. The three tuberculoid groups did not differ in this respect from the control group but were all elevated as compared to a normal Caucasian serum pool. Although raised immunoglobulin M levels seemed to parallel increased frequencies of protein ASC in the patient groups as well as in controls, this correlation might be only secondary to a primary derangement in T-cell function. PMID:804451

  9. Microparticulation of whey protein: related factors affecting the solubility.

    PubMed

    Lieske, B; Konrad, G

    1994-10-01

    Solubility of Simplesse 100, the only whey-based fat substitute, was found to be good, considering the fact that technology for preparation of Simplesse 100 is a sequence of thermal steps. To characterize this phenomen, gel chromatography on Sephadex G-100, Sephacryl S-1000 and SDS-PAGE were used, supported by high-speed separation, UV studies and analytical procedures. Results show that the unusual solubility characteristic of microparticulated whey protein is related to two molecular effects: (1) optimal defolding of protein molecules and (2) stabilization of the defolded status by carbohydrate. Both effects were considered to favour non-covalent bonds, which contribute to the outstanding physico-functional and nutritive properties of microparticles.

  10. Protective Immunogenicity of Group A Streptococcal M-Related Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Niedermeyer, Shannon E.; Agbaosi, Tina; Hysmith, Nicholas D.; Penfound, Thomas A.; Hohn, Claudia M.; Pullen, Matthew; Bright, Michael I.; Murrell, Daniel S.; Shenep, Lori E.; Courtney, Harry S.

    2015-01-01

    Many previous studies have focused on the surface M proteins of group A streptococci (GAS) as virulence determinants and protective antigens. However, the majority of GAS isolates express M-related protein (Mrp) in addition to M protein, and both have been shown to be required for optimal virulence. In the current study, we evaluated the protective immunogenicity of Mrp to determine its potential as a vaccine component that may broaden the coverage of M protein-based vaccines. Sequence analyses of 33 mrp genes indicated that there are three families of structurally related Mrps (MrpI, MrpII, and MrpIII). N-terminal peptides of Mrps were cloned, expressed, and purified from M type 2 (M2) (MrpI), M4 (MrpII), and M49 (MrpIII) GAS. Rabbit antisera against the Mrps reacted at high titers with the homologous Mrp, as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and promoted bactericidal activity against GAS emm types expressing Mrps within the same family. Mice passively immunized with rabbit antisera against MrpII were protected against challenge infections with M28 GAS. Assays for Mrp antibodies in serum samples from 281 pediatric subjects aged 2 to 16 indicated that the Mrp immune response correlated with increasing age of the subjects. Affinity-purified human Mrp antibodies promoted bactericidal activity against a number of GAS representing different emm types that expressed an Mrp within the same family but showed no activity against emm types expressing an Mrp from a different family. Our results indicate that Mrps have semiconserved N-terminal sequences that contain bactericidal epitopes which are immunogenic in humans. These findings may have direct implications for the development of GAS vaccines. PMID:25630406

  11. Identifying Novel Candidate Genes Related to Apoptosis from a Protein-Protein Interaction Network

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baoman; Yuan, Fei; Kong, Xiangyin; Hu, Lan-Dian; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is the process of programmed cell death (PCD) that occurs in multicellular organisms. This process of normal cell death is required to maintain the balance of homeostasis. In addition, some diseases, such as obesity, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases, can be cured through apoptosis, which produces few side effects. An effective comprehension of the mechanisms underlying apoptosis will be helpful to prevent and treat some diseases. The identification of genes related to apoptosis is essential to uncover its underlying mechanisms. In this study, a computational method was proposed to identify novel candidate genes related to apoptosis. First, protein-protein interaction information was used to construct a weighted graph. Second, a shortest path algorithm was applied to the graph to search for new candidate genes. Finally, the obtained genes were filtered by a permutation test. As a result, 26 genes were obtained, and we discuss their likelihood of being novel apoptosis-related genes by collecting evidence from published literature. PMID:26543496

  12. Evolution of protein complexity: the blue copper-containing oxidases and related proteins.

    PubMed

    Rydén, L G; Hunt, L T

    1993-01-01

    The blue copper proteins and their relatives have been compared by sequence alignments, by comparison of three-dimensional structures, and by construction of phylogenetic trees. The group contains proteins varying in size from 100 residues to over 2,300 residues in a single chain, containing from zero to nine copper atoms, and with a broad variation in function ranging from electron carrier proteins and oxidases to the blood coagulation factors V and VIII. Difference matrices show the sequence difference to be over 90% for many pairs in the group, yet alignment scores and other evidence suggest that they all evolved from a common ancestor. We have attempted to delineate how this evolution took place and in particular to define the mechanisms by which these proteins acquired an ever-increasing complexity in structure and function. We find evidence for six such mechanisms in this group of proteins: domain enlargement, in which a single domain increases in size from about 100 residues up to 210; domain duplication, which allows for a size increase from about 170 to about 1,000 residues; segment elongation, in which a small segment undergoes multiple successive duplications that can increase the chain size 50-fold; domain recruitment, in which a domain coded elsewhere in the genome is added on to the peptide chain; subunit formation, to form multisubunit proteins; and glycosylation, which in some cases doubles the size of the protein molecule. Size increase allows for the evolution of new catalytic properties, in particular the oxidase function, and for the formation of coagulation factors with multiple interaction sites and regulatory properties. The blood coagulation system is examined as an example in which a system of interacting proteins evolved by successive duplications of larger parts of the genome. The evolution of size, functionality, and diversity is compared with the general question of increase in size and complexity in biology.

  13. Posttranslational modification of autophagy-related proteins in macroautophagy

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yangchun; Kang, Rui; Sun, Xiaofang; Zhong, Meizuo; Huang, Jin; Klionsky, Daniel J.; Tang, Daolin

    2014-01-01

    Macroautophagy is an intracellular catabolic process involved in the formation of multiple membrane structures ranging from phagophores to autophagosomes and autolysosomes. Dysfunction of macroautophagy is implicated in both physiological and pathological conditions. To date, 38 autophagy-related (ATG) genes have been identified as controlling these complicated membrane dynamics during macroautophagy in yeast; approximately half of these genes are clearly conserved up to human, and there are additional genes whose products function in autophagy in higher eukaryotes that are not found in yeast. The function of the ATG proteins, in particular their ability to interact with a number of macroautophagic regulators, is modulated by posttranslational modifications (PTMs) such as phosphorylation, glycosylation, ubiquitination, acetylation, lipidation, and proteolysis. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge of the role of ATG protein PTMs and their functional relevance in macroautophagy. Unraveling how these PTMs regulate ATG protein function during macroautophagy will not only reveal fundamental mechanistic insights into the regulatory process, but also provide new therapeutic targets for the treatment of autophagy-associated diseases. PMID:25484070

  14. Posttranslational modification of autophagy-related proteins in macroautophagy.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yangchun; Kang, Rui; Sun, Xiaofang; Zhong, Meizuo; Huang, Jin; Klionsky, Daniel J; Tang, Daolin

    2015-01-01

    Macroautophagy is an intracellular catabolic process involved in the formation of multiple membrane structures ranging from phagophores to autophagosomes and autolysosomes. Dysfunction of macroautophagy is implicated in both physiological and pathological conditions. To date, 38 autophagy-related (ATG) genes have been identified as controlling these complicated membrane dynamics during macroautophagy in yeast; approximately half of these genes are clearly conserved up to human, and there are additional genes whose products function in autophagy in higher eukaryotes that are not found in yeast. The function of the ATG proteins, in particular their ability to interact with a number of macroautophagic regulators, is modulated by posttranslational modifications (PTMs) such as phosphorylation, glycosylation, ubiquitination, acetylation, lipidation, and proteolysis. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge of the role of ATG protein PTMs and their functional relevance in macroautophagy. Unraveling how these PTMs regulate ATG protein function during macroautophagy will not only reveal fundamental mechanistic insights into the regulatory process, but also provide new therapeutic targets for the treatment of autophagy-associated diseases.

  15. Perilipin-related protein regulates lipid metabolism in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chughtai, Ahmed Ali; Kaššák, Filip; Kostrouchová, Markéta; Novotný, Jan Philipp; Krause, Michael W.; Kostrouch, Zdenek

    2015-01-01

    Perilipins are lipid droplet surface proteins that contribute to fat metabolism by controlling the access of lipids to lipolytic enzymes. Perilipins have been identified in organisms as diverse as metazoa, fungi, and amoebas but strikingly not in nematodes. Here we identify the protein encoded by the W01A8.1 gene in Caenorhabditis elegans as the closest homologue and likely orthologue of metazoan perilipin. We demonstrate that nematode W01A8.1 is a cytoplasmic protein residing on lipid droplets similarly as human perilipins 1 and 2. Downregulation or elimination of W01A8.1 affects the appearance of lipid droplets resulting in the formation of large lipid droplets localized around the dividing nucleus during the early zygotic divisions. Visualization of lipid containing structures by CARS microscopy in vivo showed that lipid-containing structures become gradually enlarged during oogenesis and relocate during the first zygotic division around the dividing nucleus. In mutant embryos, the lipid containing structures show defective intracellular distribution in subsequent embryonic divisions and become gradually smaller during further development. In contrast to embryos, lipid-containing structures in enterocytes and in epidermal cells of adult animals are smaller in mutants than in wild type animals. Our results demonstrate the existence of a perilipin-related regulation of fat metabolism in nematodes and provide new possibilities for functional studies of lipid metabolism. PMID:26357594

  16. Autophagy and Autophagy-Related Proteins in CNS Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Christian W.; Lünemann, Jan D.

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy comprises a heterogeneous group of cellular pathways that enables eukaryotic cells to deliver cytoplasmic constituents for lysosomal degradation, to recycle nutrients, and to survive during starvation. In addition to these primordial functions, autophagy has emerged as a key mechanism in orchestrating innate and adaptive immune responses and to shape CD4+ T cell immunity through delivery of peptides to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-containing compartments (MIICs). Individual autophagy proteins additionally modulate expression of MHC class I molecules for CD8+ T cell activation. The emergence and expansion of autoreactive CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are considered to play a key role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS) and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Expression of the essential autophagy-related protein 5 (Atg5), which supports T lymphocyte survival and proliferation, is increased in T cells isolated from blood or brain tissues from patients with relapsing-remitting MS. Whether Atgs contribute to the activation of autoreactive T cells through autophagy-mediated antigen presentation is incompletely understood. Here, we discuss the complex functions of autophagy proteins and pathways in regulating T cell immunity and its potential role in the development and progression of MS. PMID:28289410

  17. Equilibrium fluctuation relations for voltage coupling in membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ilsoo; Warshel, Arieh

    2015-11-01

    A general theoretical framework is developed to account for the effects of an external potential on the energetics of membrane proteins. The framework is based on the free energy relation between two (forward/backward) probability densities, which was recently generalized to non-equilibrium processes, culminating in the work-fluctuation theorem. Starting from the probability densities of the conformational states along the "voltage coupling" reaction coordinate, we investigate several interconnected free energy relations between these two conformational states, considering voltage activation of ion channels. The free energy difference between the two conformational states at zero (depolarization) membrane potential (i.e., known as the chemical component of free energy change in ion channels) is shown to be equivalent to the free energy difference between the two "equilibrium" (resting and activated) conformational states along the one-dimensional voltage couplin reaction coordinate. Furthermore, the requirement that the application of linear response approximation to the free energy functionals of voltage coupling should satisfy the general free energy relations, yields a novel closed-form expression for the gating charge in terms of other basic properties of ion channels. This connection is familiar in statistical mechanics, known as the equilibrium fluctuation-response relation. The theory is illustrated by considering the coupling of a unit charge to the external voltage in the two sites near the surface of membrane, representing the activated and resting states. This is done using a coarse-graining (CG) model of membrane proteins, which includes the membrane, the electrolytes and the electrodes. The CG model yields Marcus-type voltage dependent free energy parabolas for the response of the electrostatic environment (electrolytes etc.) to the transition from the initial to the final configuratinal states, leading to equilibrium free energy difference and free

  18. [Structure analysis of disease-related proteins using vibrational spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, Hirotsugu

    2014-01-01

    Analyses of the structure and properties of identified pathogenic proteins are important for elucidating the molecular basis of diseases and in drug discovery research. Vibrational spectroscopy has advantages over other techniques in terms of sensitivity of detection of structural changes. Spectral analysis, however, is complicated because the spectrum involves a substantial amount of information. This article includes examples of structural analysis of disease-related proteins using vibrational spectroscopy in combination with additional techniques that facilitate data acquisition and analysis. Residue-specific conformation analysis of an amyloid fibril was conducted using IR absorption spectroscopy in combination with (13)C-isotope labeling, linear dichroism measurement, and analysis of amide I band features. We reveal a pH-dependent property of the interacting segment of an amyloidogenic protein, β2-microglobulin, which causes dialysis-related amyloidosis. We also reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying pH-dependent sugar-binding activity of human galectin-1, which is involved in cell adhesion, using spectroscopic techniques including UV resonance Raman spectroscopy. The decreased activity at acidic pH was attributed to a conformational change in the sugar-binding pocket caused by protonation of His52 (pKa 6.3) and the cation-π interaction between Trp68 and the protonated His44 (pKa 5.7). In addition, we show that the peak positions of the Raman bands of the C4=C5 stretching mode at approximately 1600 cm(-1) and the Nπ-C2-Nτ bending mode at approximately 1405 cm(-1) serve as markers of the His side-chain structure. The Raman signal was enhanced 12 fold using a vertical flow apparatus.

  19. Equilibrium Fluctuation Relations for Voltage Coupling in Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ilsoo; Warshel, Arieh

    2015-01-01

    A general theoretical framework is developed to account for the effects of an external potential on the energetics of membrane proteins. The framework is based on the free energy relation between two (forward/backward) probability densities, which was recently generalized to non-equilibrium processes, culminating in the work-fluctuation theorem. Starting from the probability densities of the conformational states along the reaction coordinate of “voltage coupling”, we investigate several interconnected free energy relations between these two conformational states, considering voltage activation of ion channels. The free energy difference at zero membrane potential (i.e., between the two “non-equilibrium” conformational states) is shown to be equivalent to the free energy difference between the two “equilibrium” conformational states along the one-dimensional reaction coordinate of voltage coupling. Furthermore, the requirement that the application of linear response approximation to the free energy functions (free energies) of voltage coupling should satisfy the general free energy relations, yields a novel expression for the gating charge in terms of other experimentally measurable quantities. This connection is familiar in statistical mechanics, known as the equilibrium fluctuation-response relation. The theory is illustrated by considering the movement of a unit charge within the membrane under the influence of an external potential, using a coarse-graining (CG) model of membrane proteins, which includes the membrane, the electrolytes and the electrodes. The CG model yields Marcus–type voltage dependent free energy parabolas for the two conformational states, which allow for quantitative estimations of an equilibrium free energy difference, a free energy of barrier, and the voltage dependency of channel activation (Q-V curve) for the unit charge movement. In addition, our analysis offers a quantitative rationale for the correlation between the free

  20. Autophagy and lysosomal related protein expression patterns in human glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Giatromanolaki, Alexandra; Sivridis, Efthimios; Mitrakas, Achileas; Kalamida, Dimitra; Zois, Christos E; Haider, Syed; Piperidou, Charitomeni; Pappa, Aglaia; Gatter, Kevin C; Harris, Adrian L; Koukourakis, Michael I

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma cells are resistant to apoptotic stimuli with autophagic death prevailing under cytotoxic stress. Autophagy interfering agents may represent a new strategy to test in combination with chemo-radiation. We investigated the patterns of expression of autophagy related proteins (LC3A, LC3B, p62, Beclin 1, ULK1 and ULK2) in a series of patients treated with post-operative radiotherapy. Experiments with glioblastoma cell lines (T98 and U87) were also performed to assess autophagic response under conditions simulating the adverse intratumoral environment. Glioblastomas showed cytoplasmic overexpression of autophagic proteins in a varying extent, so that cases could be grouped into low and high expression groups. 10/23, 5/23, 13/23, 5/23, 8/23 and 9/23 cases examined showed extensive expression of LC3A, LC3B, Beclin 1, Ulk 1, Ulk 2 and p62, respectively. Lysosomal markers Cathepsin D and LAMP2a, as well as the lyososomal biogenesis transcription factor TFEB were frequently overexpressed in glioblastomas (10/23, 11/23, and 10/23 cases, respectively). TFEB was directly linked with PTEN, Cathepsin D, HIF1α, LC3B, Beclin 1 and p62 expression. PTEN was also significantly related with LC3B but not LC3A expression, in both immunohistochemistry and gene expression analysis. Confocal microscopy in T98 and U87 cell lines showed distinct identity of LC3A and LC3B autophagosomes. The previously reported stone-like structure (SLS) pattern of LC3 expression was related with prognosis. SLS were inducible in glioblastoma cell lines under exposure to acidic conditions and 2DG mediated glucose antagonism. The present study provides the basis for autophagic characterization of human glioblastoma for further translational studies and targeted therapy trials.

  1. Bacterial expansins and related proteins from the world of microbes

    DOE PAGES

    Georgelis, Nikolaos; Nikolaidis, Nikolas; Cosgrove, Daniel J.

    2015-04-02

    The discovery of microbial expansins emerged from studies of the mechanism of plant cell growth and the molecular basis of plant cell wall extensibility. Expansins are wall-loosening proteins that are universal in the plant kingdom and are also found in a small set of phylogenetically diverse bacteria, fungi, and other organisms, most of which colonize plant surfaces. They loosen plant cell walls without detectable lytic activity. Bacterial expansins have attracted considerable attention recently for their potential use in cellulosic biomass conversion for biofuel production, as a means to disaggregate cellulosic structures by nonlytic means (“amorphogenesis”). Evolutionary analysis indicates that microbialmore » expansins originated by multiple horizontal gene transfers from plants. Crystallographic analysis of BsEXLX1, the expansin from Bacillus subtilis, shows that microbial expansins consist of two tightly packed domains: the N-terminal domain D1 has a double-ψ β-barrel fold similar to glycosyl hydrolase family-45 enzymes but lacks catalytic residues usually required for hydrolysis; the C-terminal domain D2 has a unique β-sandwich fold with three co-linear aromatic residues that bind β-1,4-glucans by hydrophobic interactions. Genetic deletion of expansin in Bacillus and Clavibacter cripples their ability to colonize plant tissues. In this paper, we assess reports that expansin addition enhances cellulose breakdown by cellulase and compare expansins with distantly related proteins named swollenin, cerato-platanin, and loosenin. Finally, we end in a speculative vein about the biological roles of microbial expansins and their potential applications. Advances in this field will be aided by a deeper understanding of how these proteins modify cellulosic structures.« less

  2. Bacterial expansins and related proteins from the world of microbes

    SciTech Connect

    Georgelis, Nikolaos; Nikolaidis, Nikolas; Cosgrove, Daniel J.

    2015-04-02

    The discovery of microbial expansins emerged from studies of the mechanism of plant cell growth and the molecular basis of plant cell wall extensibility. Expansins are wall-loosening proteins that are universal in the plant kingdom and are also found in a small set of phylogenetically diverse bacteria, fungi, and other organisms, most of which colonize plant surfaces. They loosen plant cell walls without detectable lytic activity. Bacterial expansins have attracted considerable attention recently for their potential use in cellulosic biomass conversion for biofuel production, as a means to disaggregate cellulosic structures by nonlytic means (“amorphogenesis”). Evolutionary analysis indicates that microbial expansins originated by multiple horizontal gene transfers from plants. Crystallographic analysis of BsEXLX1, the expansin from Bacillus subtilis, shows that microbial expansins consist of two tightly packed domains: the N-terminal domain D1 has a double-ψ β-barrel fold similar to glycosyl hydrolase family-45 enzymes but lacks catalytic residues usually required for hydrolysis; the C-terminal domain D2 has a unique β-sandwich fold with three co-linear aromatic residues that bind β-1,4-glucans by hydrophobic interactions. Genetic deletion of expansin in Bacillus and Clavibacter cripples their ability to colonize plant tissues. In this paper, we assess reports that expansin addition enhances cellulose breakdown by cellulase and compare expansins with distantly related proteins named swollenin, cerato-platanin, and loosenin. Finally, we end in a speculative vein about the biological roles of microbial expansins and their potential applications. Advances in this field will be aided by a deeper understanding of how these proteins modify cellulosic structures.

  3. Bacterial expansins and related proteins from the world of microbes

    PubMed Central

    Georgelis, Nikolaos; Nikolaidis, Nikolas; Cosgrove, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of microbial expansins emerged from studies of the mechanism of plant cell growth and the molecular basis of plant cell wall extensibility. Expansins are wall-loosening proteins that are universal in the plant kingdom and are also found in a small set of phylogenetically diverse bacteria, fungi, and other organisms, most of which colonize plant surfaces. They loosen plant cell walls without detectable lytic activity. Bacterial expansins have attracted considerable attention recently for their potential use in cellulosic biomass conversion for biofuel production, as a means to disaggregate cellulosic structures by non-lytic means (‘amorphogenesis’). Evolutionary analysis indicates that microbial expansins originated by multiple horizontal gene transfers from plants. Crystallographic analysis of BsEXLX1, the expansin from Bacillus subtilis, shows that microbial expansins consist of two tightly-packed domains: the N-terminal domain D1 has a double-ψ β-barrel fold similar to glycosyl hydrolase family-45 enzymes, but lacks catalytic residues usually required for hydrolysis; the C-terminal domain D2 has a unique β-sandwich fold with three co-linear aromatic residues that bind β-1,4-glucans by hydrophobic interactions. Genetic deletion of expansin in Bacillus and Clavibacter cripples their ability to colonize plant tissues. We assess reports that expansin addition enhances cellulose breakdown by cellulase and compare expansins with distantly related proteins named swollenin, cerato-platanin and loosenin. We end in a speculative vein about the biological roles of microbial expansins and their potential applications. Advances in this field will be aided by a deeper understanding of how these proteins modify cellulosic structures. PMID:25833181

  4. Bacterial expansins and related proteins from the world of microbes.

    PubMed

    Georgelis, Nikolaos; Nikolaidis, Nikolas; Cosgrove, Daniel J

    2015-05-01

    The discovery of microbial expansins emerged from studies of the mechanism of plant cell growth and the molecular basis of plant cell wall extensibility. Expansins are wall-loosening proteins that are universal in the plant kingdom and are also found in a small set of phylogenetically diverse bacteria, fungi, and other organisms, most of which colonize plant surfaces. They loosen plant cell walls without detectable lytic activity. Bacterial expansins have attracted considerable attention recently for their potential use in cellulosic biomass conversion for biofuel production, as a means to disaggregate cellulosic structures by nonlytic means ("amorphogenesis"). Evolutionary analysis indicates that microbial expansins originated by multiple horizontal gene transfers from plants. Crystallographic analysis of BsEXLX1, the expansin from Bacillus subtilis, shows that microbial expansins consist of two tightly packed domains: the N-terminal domain D1 has a double-ψ β-barrel fold similar to glycosyl hydrolase family-45 enzymes but lacks catalytic residues usually required for hydrolysis; the C-terminal domain D2 has a unique β-sandwich fold with three co-linear aromatic residues that bind β-1,4-glucans by hydrophobic interactions. Genetic deletion of expansin in Bacillus and Clavibacter cripples their ability to colonize plant tissues. We assess reports that expansin addition enhances cellulose breakdown by cellulase and compare expansins with distantly related proteins named swollenin, cerato-platanin, and loosenin. We end in a speculative vein about the biological roles of microbial expansins and their potential applications. Advances in this field will be aided by a deeper understanding of how these proteins modify cellulosic structures.

  5. Collagen-binding proteins of Streptococcus mutans and related streptococci.

    PubMed

    Avilés-Reyes, A; Miller, J H; Lemos, J A; Abranches, J

    2017-04-01

    The ability of Streptococcus mutans to interact with collagen through the expression of collagen-binding proteins (CBPs) bestows this oral pathogen with an alternative to the sucrose-dependent mechanism of colonization classically attributed to caries development. Based on the abundance and distribution of collagen throughout the human body, stringent adherence to this molecule grants S. mutans with the opportunity to establish infection at different host sites. Surface proteins, such as SpaP, WapA, Cnm and Cbm, have been shown to bind collagen in vitro, and it has been suggested that these molecules play a role in colonization of oral and extra-oral tissues. However, robust collagen binding is not achieved by all strains of S. mutans, particularly those that lack Cnm or Cbm. These observations merit careful dissection of the contribution from these different CBPs towards tissue colonization and virulence. In this review, we will discuss the current understanding of mechanisms used by S. mutans and related streptococci to colonize collagenous tissues, and the possible contribution of CBPs to infections in different sites of the host.

  6. Oxysterol binding protein-related protein 8 mediates the cytotoxicity of 25-hydroxycholesterol[S

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiwei; Zheng, Xiuting; Lou, Ning; Zhong, Wenbin; Yan, Daoguang

    2016-01-01

    Oxysterols are 27-carbon oxidized derivatives of cholesterol or by-products of cholesterol biosynthesis that can induce cell apoptosis in addition to a number of other bioactions. However, the mechanisms underlying this cytotoxicity are not completely understood. ORP8 is a member of the oxysterol binding protein-related protein (ORP) family, implicated in cellular lipid homeostasis, migration, and organization of the microtubule cytoskeleton. Here, we report that 25-hydroxycholesterol (OHC) induced apoptosis of the hepatoma cell lines, HepG2 and Huh7, via the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response pathway, and ORP8 overexpression resulted in a similar cell response as 25-OHC, indicating a putative functional relationship between oxysterol cytotoxicity and ORP8. Further experiments demonstrated that ORP8 overexpression significantly enhanced the 25-OHC effect on ER stress and apoptosis in HepG2 cells. A truncated ORP8 construct lacking the ligand-binding domain or a closely related protein, ORP5, was devoid of this activity, evidencing for specificity of the observed effects. Importantly, ORP8 knockdown markedly dampened such responses to 25-OHC. Taken together, the present study suggests that ORP8 may mediate the cytotoxicity of 25-OHC. PMID:27530118

  7. Concept recognition for extracting protein interaction relations from biomedical text

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, William A; Lu, Zhiyong; Johnson, Helen L; Caporaso, J Gregory; Paquette, Jesse; Lindemann, Anna; White, Elizabeth K; Medvedeva, Olga; Cohen, K Bretonnel; Hunter, Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    Background: Reliable information extraction applications have been a long sought goal of the biomedical text mining community, a goal that if reached would provide valuable tools to benchside biologists in their increasingly difficult task of assimilating the knowledge contained in the biomedical literature. We present an integrated approach to concept recognition in biomedical text. Concept recognition provides key information that has been largely missing from previous biomedical information extraction efforts, namely direct links to well defined knowledge resources that explicitly cement the concept's semantics. The BioCreative II tasks discussed in this special issue have provided a unique opportunity to demonstrate the effectiveness of concept recognition in the field of biomedical language processing. Results: Through the modular construction of a protein interaction relation extraction system, we present several use cases of concept recognition in biomedical text, and relate these use cases to potential uses by the benchside biologist. Conclusion: Current information extraction technologies are approaching performance standards at which concept recognition can begin to deliver high quality data to the benchside biologist. Our system is available as part of the BioCreative Meta-Server project and on the internet . PMID:18834500

  8. Phylogeny and expression of carbonic anhydrase-related proteins

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are found in many organisms, in which they contribute to several important biological processes. The vertebrate α-CA family consists of 16 subfamilies, three of which (VIII, X and XI) consist of acatalytic proteins. These are named carbonic anhydrase related proteins (CARPs), and their inactivity is due to absence of one or more Zn-binding histidine residues. In this study, we analyzed and evaluated the distribution of genes encoding CARPs in different organisms using bioinformatic methods, and studied their expression in mouse tissues using immunohistochemistry and real-time quantitative PCR. Results We collected 84 sequences, of which 22 came from novel or improved gene models which we created from genome data. The distribution of CARP VIII covers vertebrates and deuterostomes, and CARP X appears to be universal in the animal kingdom. CA10-like genes have had a separate history of duplications in the tetrapod and fish lineages. Our phylogenetic analysis showed that duplication of CA10 into CA11 has occurred only in tetrapods (found in mammals, frogs, and lizards), whereas an independent duplication of CA10 was found in fishes. We suggest the name CA10b for the second fish isoform. Immunohistochemical analysis showed a high expression level of CARP VIII in the mouse cerebellum, cerebrum, and also moderate expression in the lung, liver, salivary gland, and stomach. These results also demonstrated low expression in the colon, kidney, and Langerhans islets. CARP X was moderately expressed in the cerebral capillaries and the lung and very weakly in the stomach and heart. Positive signals for CARP XI were observed in the cerebellum, cerebrum, liver, stomach, small intestine, colon, kidney, and testis. In addition, the results of real-time quantitative PCR confirmed a wide distribution for the Car8 and Car11 mRNAs, whereas the expression of the Car10 mRNA was restricted to the frontal cortex, parietal cortex, cerebellum, midbrain

  9. Bcl-2-related protein family gene expression during oligodendroglial differentiation.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Takayuki; Itoh, Aki; Pleasure, David

    2003-06-01

    Oligodendroglial lineage cells (OLC) vary in susceptibility to both necrosis and apoptosis depending on their developmental stages, which might be regulated by differential expression of Bcl-2-related genes. As an initial step to test this hypothesis, we examined the expression of 19 Bcl-2-related genes in purified cultures of rat oligodendroglial progenitors, immature and mature oligodendrocytes. All 'multidomain' anti-apoptotic members (Bcl-x, Bcl-2, Mcl-1, Bcl-w and Bcl2l10/Diva/Boo) except Bcl2a1/A1 are expressed in OLC. Semiquantitative and real-time RT-PCR revealed that Bcl-xL and Mcl-1 mRNAs are the dominant anti-apoptotic members and increase four- and twofold, respectively, with maturation. Bcl-2 mRNA is less abundant than Bcl-xL mRNA in progenitors and falls an additional 10-fold during differentiation. Bcl-w mRNA also increases, with significant changes in its splicing pattern, as OLC mature. Transfection studies demonstrated that Bcl-xL overexpression protects against kainate-induced excitotoxicity, whereas Bcl-2 overexpression does not. As for 'multidomain' pro-apoptotic members (Bax, Bad and Bok/Mtd), Bax and Bak are highly expressed throughout differentiation. Among 'BH3 domain-only' members examined (Bim, Biklk, DP5/Hrk, Bad, Bid, Noxa, Puma/Bbc3, Bmf, BNip3 and BNip3L), BNip3 and Bmf mRNAs increase markedly during differentiation. These results provide basic information to guide further studies on the roles for Bcl-2-related family proteins in OLC death.

  10. Long noncoding RNA AK126698 inhibits proliferation and migration of non-small cell lung cancer cells by targeting Frizzled-8 and suppressing Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiao; Li, Hui; Liu, Chunxiao; Hu, Bin; Li, Tong; Wang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent studies indicate that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play a key role in the control of cellular processes such as proliferation, metastasis, and differentiation. The lncRNA dysregulation has been identified in all types of cancer. We previously found that lncRNA AK126698 suppresses cisplatin resistance in A549 cells through the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. However, the clinical significance of lncRNA AK126698 and the molecular mechanisms through which it regulates cancer cell proliferation and migration are largely unknown. Methods We examined the expression of lncRNA AK126698 in 56 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissue samples and three NSCLC cell lines using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Gain and loss of function approaches were used to evaluate the biological function of AK126698 in NSCLC cells. The effects of lncRNA AK126698 on cell proliferation were investigated using cell counting kit-8 and 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine assays, and apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry. Protein levels of AK126698 targets were evaluated by Western blotting. Results Our results showed that lncRNA AK126698 was significantly downregulated in NSCLC tissues, compared with paired adjacent nontumor tissue samples. Furthermore, lower AK126698 expression was associated with larger tumor size and advanced tumor stage. Ectopic AK126698 expression inhibited cell proliferation and migration and induced apoptosis. Conversely, decreased AK126698 expression promoted cell proliferation and migration and inhibited cell apoptosis. Importantly, we demonstrated that Frizzled-8, a receptor of Wnt/β-catenin pathway, was a target of AK126698. Furthermore, AK126698 could inhibit the activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway, which was demonstrated by measuring the expression levels of Axin1, β-catenin, c-myc, cyclin D1, and E-cadherin. Conclusion It was found in the study that lncRNA AK126698 inhibits the proliferation and migration of NSCLC cells by

  11. Parathyroid hormone-related protein in lower vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Ingleton, P M

    2002-05-01

    The genes for parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) have been cloned in two teleost fishes, cDNA of sea bream (Sparus aurata) and genomic DNA of puffer fish (Fugu rubripes). The gene sequences show that there is significant conservation of amino acid identity, with specific domains most highly conserved. The N-terminus, responsible for bone matrix lysis in mammals and chickens, is present in the fish genes with 52% sequence identity to higher vertebrate PTHrP peptides; the nuclear transporter region shares 73% identity, and the RNA-binding sequence is 65% identical. However, the peptides are shorter then mammalian PTHrP, lacking the C-terminus responsible for inhibition of osteoclast lytic activity, but they have an additional inserted sequence between amino acids 38 and 54 that is not present in higher vertebrate PTHrPs. The N-terminus 1-38 Fugu PTHrP proved to be hypercalcaemic in larval Sparus, suggesting that it may be a physiological regulator of calcium homeostasis in fish. Using homologous nucleotide probes for in situ hybridisation and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of extracted RNA, PTHrP gene expression has been widely found in both developing and adult fish. Antiserum to the fish insert sequence demonstrated transcription of PTHrP in all stages of Sparus development, and also detected the same epitope in tissues of developing frog (Rana temporaria), indicating that this has been retained during evolution of the amphibia.

  12. Bence Jones proteins and light chains of immunoglobulins. XI. A transient Bence Jones-related protein associated with corticosteroid therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, A; McLaughlin, C L; Capra, J D

    1975-01-01

    Urine specimens from patients with multiple myeloma and Bence Jones proteinuria frequently contain low molecular weight proteins which correspond either to the amino-terminal, variant half (VL) or to the carboxyl-terminal, constant half (CL) of the Bence Jones protein. Analyses of urine specimens from such patients who had received high doses of corticosteroids as part of their treatment regimen revealed that concomitantly with a decrease in Bence Jones protein excretion was the appearance of a low molecular weight protein related to the Bence Jones protein but not identical to the VL or to the CL. Analyses of daily urine specimens obtained from one such patient over an extended time period revealed that a reproducible chain of events occurred during a treatment regimen which included oral administration of 75 mg of prednisone daily for 7 consecutive days. The amount of Bence Jones protein excreted decreased progressively, and by the 5th day was usually less than 10% of the pretreatment value. The urine specimen obtained on the 6th day of treatment was virtually devoid of Bence Jones protein but contained a newly appearing protein whose electrophoretic mobility was distinct from that of the Bence Jones protein or its VL or CL. Cessation of corticosteroid therapy resulted in a prompt disappearance of the new protein and in a progressive increase in the amount of Bence Jones protein excreted. The new protein was isolated from the urine of this patient and was purified for comparative studies with Bence Jones protein and with the VL and CL prepared by specific enzymatic cleavage of the Bence Jones protein. These studies revealed that the new protein was most related antigenically to the CL, but could be distinguished immunochemically from the CL. This new protein, a component found in vivo related to the constant half of the light polypeptide chain, was designated CL, and was structurally 25 amino acid residues longer than the CL, that is, the amino-terminus of the

  13. Cellular functions of gamma-secretase-related proteins.

    PubMed

    Haffner, Christof; Haass, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta) is generated by gamma-secretase, a membrane protein complex with an unusual aspartyl protease activity consisting of the four components presenilin, nicastrin, APH-1 and PEN-2. Presenilin is considered the catalytic subunit of this complex since it represents the prototype of the new family of intramembrane-cleaving GxGD-type aspartyl proteases. Recently, five novel members of this family and a nicastrin-like protein were identified. Whereas one of the GxGD-type proteins was shown to be identical with signal peptide peptidase (SPP), the function of the others, now called SPP-like proteins (SPPLs), is not known. We therefore analyzed SPPL2b and SPPL3 and demonstrated that they localize to different subcellular compartments suggesting nonredundant functions. This was supported by different phenotypes obtained in knockdown studies in zebrafish embryos. In addition, these phenotypes could be phenocopied by ectopic expression of putative active site mutants, providing strong evidence for a proteolytic function of SPPL2b and SPPL3. We also identified and characterized the nicastrin-like protein nicalin which, together with the 130-kDa protein NOMO (Nodal modulator), forms a membrane protein complex different from gamma-secretase. We found that during zebrafish embryogenesis this complex is involved in the patterning of the axial mesendoderm, a process controlled by the Nodal signaling pathway.

  14. A method for investigating protein-protein interactions related to Salmonella typhimurium pathogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Saiful M.; Shi, Liang; Yoon, Hyunjin; Ansong, Charles; Rommereim, Leah M.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Auberry, Kenneth J.; Moore, R. J.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Heffron, Fred; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-02-10

    We successfully modified an existing method to investigate protein-protein interactions in the pathogenic bacterium Salmonella typhimurium (STM). This method includes i) addition of a histidine-biotin-histidine tag to the bait proteins via recombinant DNA techniques; ii) in vivo cross-linking with formaldehyde; iii) tandem affinity purification of bait proteins under fully denaturing conditions; and iv) identification of the proteins cross-linked to the bait proteins by liquid-chromatography in conjunction with tandem mass-spectrometry. In vivo cross-linking stabilized protein interactions permitted the subsequent two-step purification step conducted under denaturing conditions. The two-step purification greatly reduced nonspecific binding of non-cross-linked proteins to bait proteins. Two different negative controls were employed to reduce false-positive identification. In an initial demonstration of this approach, we tagged three selected STM proteins- HimD, PduB and PhoP- with known binding partners that ranged from stable (e.g., HimD) to transient (i.e., PhoP). Distinct sets of interacting proteins were identified with each bait protein, including the known binding partners such as HimA for HimD, as well as anticipated and unexpected binding partners. Our results suggest that novel protein-protein interactions may be critical to pathogenesis by Salmonella typhimurium. .

  15. Frizzled3 is required for the development of multiple axon tracts in the mouse central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Hua, Zhong L; Jeon, Sangmin; Caterina, Michael J; Nathans, Jeremy

    2014-07-22

    Targeted mutation of the Frizzled3 (Fz3) gene in mice has been shown to disrupt the growth and guidance of a subset of peripheral and central axons. Here we used conditional deletion of Fz3 to explore the forebrain territories in which Fz3 action is required for the development of the anterior commissure and the corticothalamic, corticospinal, and thalamocortical tracts. Experiments with region-specific deletion of Fz3 using a variety of Cre lines show that proper routing of corticothalamic and thalamocortical axons in the internal capsule requires Fz3 expression in the ventral telencephalon. The pattern of defects among forebrain axon tracts that are induced by conditional deletion of Fz3 conforms closely to the pattern previously observed with analogous conditional deletion of Celsr3, implying a close mechanistic link between Fz3 and Celsr3 in axon guidance. We further found that several central nervous system axon tracts require Fz3 function as early as embryonic day 11.5, and that Fz3 is required for pathfinding by dopaminergic and serotonergic axons in the brain and by a subset of optic tract axons. In addition, conditional deletion of Fz3 in all tissues caudal to the neck eliminates the spinothalamic tract and the transmission of somatosensory information from the spinal cord to the brain, as determined by neuroanatomic tracing and behavioral testing.

  16. Inter-tissue mechanical stress affects Frizzled-mediated planar cell polarity in the Drosophila notum epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Olguín, Patricio; Glavic, Alvaro; Mlodzik, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Summary Frizzled/Planar Cell Polarity (Fz/PCP) signaling controls the orientation of sensory bristles and cellular hairs (trichomes) along the antero-posterior axis of the Drosophila thorax (notum) [1–4]. A subset of the trichome-producing notum cells differentiate as “tendon cells”, serving as attachment sites for the indirect flight muscles (IFMs) to the exoskeleton [5]. Through the analysis of chascon (chas), a gene identified by its ability to disrupt Fz/PCP signaling under overexpression conditions, and jitterbug (jbug)/filamin [6], we show that maintenance of antero-posterior planar polarization requires the notum epithelia to balance mechanical stress generated by the attachment of the IFMs. chas is expressed in notum tendon cells and its loss-of-function disturbs cellular orientation at and near the regions where IFMs attach to the epidermis. This effect is independent of the Fz/PCP and fat (ft)/dachsous (ds) systems [7]. The chas phenotype arises during normal shortening of the IFMs [8] and is suppressed by genetic ablation of the IFMs. chas acts through jbug/filamin and cooperates with MyosinII to modulate the mechano-response of notum tendon cells. These observations support the notion that the ability of epithelia to respond to mechanical stress generated by interaction(s) with other tissues during development/organogenesis influences the maintenance of its shape and PCP features. PMID:21276726

  17. Ror2/Frizzled Complex Mediates Wnt5a-Induced AP-1 Activation by Regulating Dishevelled Polymerization▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Nishita, Michiru; Itsukushima, Sumiyo; Nomachi, Akira; Endo, Mitsuharu; Wang, ZhiChao; Inaba, Daisuke; Qiao, Sen; Takada, Shinji; Kikuchi, Akira; Minami, Yasuhiro

    2010-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase Ror2 acts as a receptor or coreceptor for Wnt5a to mediate Wnt5a-induced activation of the Wnt/JNK pathway and inhibition of the β-catenin-dependent canonical Wnt pathway. However, little is known about how Ror2 cooperates with another receptor component(s) to mediate Wnt5a signaling. We show here that Ror2 regulates Wnt5a-induced polymerization of Dishevelled (Dvl) and that this Ror2-mediated regulation of Dvl is independent of the cytoplasmic region of Ror2. Ror2 can associate with Frizzled7 (Fz7) via its extracellular cysteine-rich domain to form a receptor complex that is required for the regulation of Dvl and activation of the AP-1 promoter after Wnt5a stimulation. Suppressed expression of Fz7 indeed results in the inhibition of Wnt5a-induced polymerization of Dvl and AP-1 activation. Interestingly, both the DIX and the DEP domains of Dvl are indispensable for Dvl polymerization and subsequent AP-1 activation after Wnt5a stimulation. We further show that polymerized Dvl is colocalized with Rac1 and that suppressed expression of Rac1 inhibits Wnt5a-induced AP-1 activation. Collectively, our results indicate that Ror2/Fz receptor complex plays an important role in the Wnt5a/Rac1/AP-1 pathway by regulating the polymerization of Dvl. PMID:20457807

  18. Prostacyclin reverses the cigarette smoke-induced decrease in pulmonary Frizzled 9 expression through miR-31

    PubMed Central

    Tennis, M. A.; New, M. L.; McArthur, D. G.; Merrick, D. T.; Dwyer-Nield, L. D.; Keith, R. L.

    2016-01-01

    Half of lung cancers are diagnosed in former smokers, leading to a significant treatment burden in this population. Chemoprevention in former smokers using the prostacyclin analogue iloprost reduces endobronchial dysplasia, a premalignant lung lesion. Iloprost requires the presence of the WNT receptor Frizzled 9 (Fzd9) for inhibition of transformed growth in vitro. To investigate the relationship between iloprost, cigarette smoke, and Fzd9 expression, we used human samples, mouse models, and in vitro studies. Fzd9 expression was low in human lung tumors and in progressive dysplasias. In mouse models and in vitro studies, tobacco smoke carcinogens reduced expression of Fzd9 while prostacyclin maintained or increased expression. Expression of miR-31 repressed Fzd9 expression, which was abrogated by prostacyclin. We propose a model where cigarette smoke exposure increases miR-31 expression, which leads to decreased Fzd9 expression and prevents response to iloprost. When smoke is removed miR-31 is reduced, prostacyclin can increase Fzd9 expression, and progression of dysplasia is inhibited. Fzd9 and miR-31 are candidate biomarkers for precision application of iloprost and monitoring of treatment progress. As we continue to investigate the mechanisms of prostacyclin chemoprevention and identify biomarkers for its use, we will facilitate clinical trials and speed implementation of this valuable prevention approach. PMID:27339092

  19. Different thresholds of Wnt-Frizzled 7 signaling coordinate proliferation, morphogenesis and fate of endoderm progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zheng; Rankin, Scott A.; Zorn, Aaron M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Wnt signaling has multiple dynamic roles during development of the gastrointestinal and respiratory systems. Differential Wnt signaling is thought to be a critical step in Xenopus endoderm patterning such that during late gastrula and early somite stages of embryogenesis, Wnt activity must be suppressed in the anterior to allow the specification of foregut progenitors. However, the foregut endoderm also expresses the Wnt-receptor Frizzled 7 (Fzd7) as well as several Wnt ligands suggesting that the current model may be too simple. In this study, we show that Fzd7 is required to transduce a low level of Wnt signaling that is essential to maintain foregut progenitors. Foregut-specific Fzd7-depletion from the Xenopus foregut resulted in liver and pancreas agenesis. Fzd7-depleted embryos failed to maintain the foregut progenitor marker hhex and exhibited decreased proliferation; in addition the foregut cells were enlarged with a randomized orientation. We show that in the foregut Fzd7 signals via both the Wnt/β-catenin and Wnt/JNK pathways and that different thresholds of Wnt-Fzd7 activity coordinate progenitor cell fate, proliferation and morphogenesis. PMID:23562607

  20. Heat-induced Protein Structure and Subfractions in Relation to Protein Degradation Kinetics and Intestinal Availability in Dairy Cattle

    SciTech Connect

    Doiron, K.; Yu, P; McKinnon, J; Christensen, D

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to reveal protein structures of feed tissues affected by heat processing at a cellular level, using the synchrotron-based Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy as a novel approach, and quantify protein structure in relation to protein digestive kinetics and nutritive value in the rumen and intestine in dairy cattle. The parameters assessed included (1) protein structure a-helix to e-sheet ratio; (2) protein subfractions profiles; (3) protein degradation kinetics and effective degradability; (4) predicted nutrient supply using the intestinally absorbed protein supply (DVE)/degraded protein balance (OEB) system for dairy cattle. In this study, Vimy flaxseed protein was used as a model feed protein and was autoclave-heated at 120C for 20, 40, and 60 min in treatments T1, T2, and T3, respectively. The results showed that using the synchrotron-based Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy revealed and identified the heat-induced protein structure changes. Heating at 120C for 40 and 60 min increased the protein structure a-helix to e-sheet ratio. There were linear effects of heating time on the ratio. The heating also changed chemical profiles, which showed soluble CP decreased upon heating with concomitant increases in nonprotein nitrogen, neutral, and acid detergent insoluble nitrogen. The protein subfractions with the greatest changes were PB1, which showed a dramatic reduction, and PB2, which showed a dramatic increase, demonstrating a decrease in overall protein degradability. In situ results showed a reduction in rumen-degradable protein and in rumen-degradable dry matter without differences between the treatments. Intestinal digestibility, determined using a 3-step in vitro procedure, showed no changes to rumen undegradable protein. Modeling results showed that heating increased total intestinally absorbable protein (feed DVE value) and decreased degraded protein balance (feed OEB value), but there were no differences

  1. Relating drug–protein interaction network with drug side effects

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Sayaka; Pauwels, Edouard; Stoven, Véronique; Goto, Susumu; Yamanishi, Yoshihiro

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Identifying the emergence and underlying mechanisms of drug side effects is a challenging task in the drug development process. This underscores the importance of system–wide approaches for linking different scales of drug actions; namely drug-protein interactions (molecular scale) and side effects (phenotypic scale) toward side effect prediction for uncharacterized drugs. Results: We performed a large-scale analysis to extract correlated sets of targeted proteins and side effects, based on the co-occurrence of drugs in protein-binding profiles and side effect profiles, using sparse canonical correlation analysis. The analysis of 658 drugs with the two profiles for 1368 proteins and 1339 side effects led to the extraction of 80 correlated sets. Enrichment analyses using KEGG and Gene Ontology showed that most of the correlated sets were significantly enriched with proteins that are involved in the same biological pathways, even if their molecular functions are different. This allowed for a biologically relevant interpretation regarding the relationship between drug–targeted proteins and side effects. The extracted side effects can be regarded as possible phenotypic outcomes by drugs targeting the proteins that appear in the same correlated set. The proposed method is expected to be useful for predicting potential side effects of new drug candidate compounds based on their protein-binding profiles. Supplementary information: Datasets and all results are available at http://web.kuicr.kyoto-u.ac.jp/supp/smizutan/target-effect/. Availability: Software is available at the above supplementary website. Contact: yamanishi@bioreg.kyushu-u.ac.jp, or goto@kuicr.kyoto-u.ac.jp PMID:22962476

  2. The PR5K receptor protein kinase from Arabidopsis thaliana is structurally related to a family of plant defense proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X; Zafian, P; Choudhary, M; Lawton, M

    1996-01-01

    We have isolated an Arabidopsis thaliana gene that codes for a receptor related to antifungal pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins. The PR5K gene codes for a predicted 665-amino acid polypeptide that comprises an extracellular domain related to the PR5 proteins, a central transmembrane-spanning domain, and an intracellular protein-serine/threonine kinase. The extracellular domain of PR5K (PR5-like receptor kinase) is most highly related to acidic PR5 proteins that accumulate in the extracellular spaces of plants challenged with pathogenic microorganisms. The kinase domain of PR5K is related to a family of protein-serine/threonine kinases that are involved in the expression of self-incompatibility and disease resistance. PR5K transcripts accumulate at low levels in all tissues examined, although particularly high levels are present in roots and inflorescence stems. Treatments that induce authentic PR5 proteins had no effect on the level of PR5K transcripts, suggesting that the receptor forms part of a preexisting surveillance system. When the kinase domain of PR5K was expressed in Escherichia coli, the resulting polypeptide underwent autophosphorylation, consistent with its predicted enzyme activity. These results are consistent with PR5K encoding a functional receptor kinase. Moreover, the structural similarity between the extracellular domain of PR5K and the antimicrobial PR5- proteins suggests a possible interaction with common or related microbial targets. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8637920

  3. PCE-FR: A Novel Method for Identifying Overlapping Protein Complexes in Weighted Protein-Protein Interaction Networks Using Pseudo-Clique Extension Based on Fuzzy Relation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Buwen; Luo, Jiawei; Liang, Cheng; Wang, Shulin; Ding, Pingjian

    2016-10-01

    Identifying overlapping protein complexes in protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks can provide insight into cellular functional organization and thus elucidate underlying cellular mechanisms. Recently, various algorithms for protein complexes detection have been developed for PPI networks. However, majority of algorithms primarily depend on network topological feature and/or gene expression profile, failing to consider the inherent biological meanings between protein pairs. In this paper, we propose a novel method to detect protein complexes using pseudo-clique extension based on fuzzy relation (PCE-FR). Our algorithm operates in three stages: it first forms the nonoverlapping protein substructure based on fuzzy relation and then expands each substructure by adding neighbor proteins to maximize the cohesive score. Finally, highly overlapped candidate protein complexes are merged to form the final protein complex set. Particularly, our algorithm employs the biological significance hidden in protein pairs to construct edge weight for protein interaction networks. The experiment results show that our method can not only outperform classical algorithms such as CFinder, ClusterONE, CMC, RRW, HC-PIN, and ProRank +, but also achieve ideal overall performance in most of the yeast PPI datasets in terms of composite score consisting of precision, accuracy, and separation. We further apply our method to a human PPI network from the HPRD dataset and demonstrate it is very effective in detecting protein complexes compared to other algorithms.

  4. Dietary protein-related changes in hepatic transcription correspond to modifications in hepatic protein expression in growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Junghans, Peter; Kaehne, Thilo; Beyer, Manfred; Metges, Cornelia C; Schwerin, Manfred

    2004-01-01

    In a previous investigation we showed by expression profiling based on transcription analysis using differential display RT-PCR (DDRT-PCR) and real-time RT-PCR that a soy protein diet (SPI) significantly changes the hepatic transcription pattern compared with a casein diet (CAS). The present study was conducted to determine whether the transcriptional modulation is translated into protein expression. The hepatic mRNA abundance of four genes (EP24.16, LC3, NPAP60L, RFC2) that showed diet-related expression in previous DDRT-PCR experiments was analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. Two pigs that showed the most prominent SPI-related changes of transcription and two casein-fed pigs were selected and their hepatic protein pattern was studied comparatively by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and peptide mass fingerprinting. The two-dimensional protein gel electrophoresis revealed a predominant SPI-associated upregulation of protein expression that corresponded to the results of the mRNA study. Of 380 diet-related protein spots displayed, 215 appeared exclusively or enlarged in the two SPI pigs; 10 of 39 diet-related expressed protein spots extracted could be identified by peptide mass fingerprinting and database search. Compared with the transcriptomics approach, the proteomics approach led in part to the identification of the same diet-associated expressed molecules (plasminogen, trypsin, phospholipase A2, glutathione-S-transferase alpha, retinal binding protein) or at least molecules belonging to the same metabolic pathways (protein and amino acid metabolism, oxidative stress response, lipid metabolism). The present results at the proteome level confirm SPI-related increased oxidative stress response and significant effects on protein biosynthesis already observed at the transcriptome level.

  5. BC-box protein domain-related mechanism for VHL protein degradation

    PubMed Central

    Pozzebon, Maria Elena; Varadaraj, Archana; Mattoscio, Domenico; Jaffray, Ellis G.; Miccolo, Claudia; Galimberti, Viviana; Tommasino, Massimo; Hay, Ronald T.; Chiocca, Susanna

    2013-01-01

    The tumor suppressor VHL (von Hippel–Lindau) protein is a substrate receptor for Ubiquitin Cullin Ring Ligase complexes (CRLs), containing a BC-box domain that associates to the adaptor Elongin B/C. VHL targets hypoxia-inducible factor 1α to proteasome-dependent degradation. Gam1 is an adenoviral protein, which also possesses a BC-box domain that interacts with the host Elongin B/C, thereby acting as a viral substrate receptor. Gam1 associates with both Cullin2 and Cullin5 to form CRL complexes targeting the host protein SUMO enzyme SAE1 for proteasomal degradation. We show that Gam1 protein expression induces VHL protein degradation leading to hypoxia-inducible factor 1α stabilization and induction of its downstream targets. We also characterize the CRL-dependent mechanism that drives VHL protein degradation via proteasome. Interestingly, expression of Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling (SOCS) domain-containing viral proteins and cellular BC-box proteins leads to VHL protein degradation, in a SOCS domain-containing manner. Our work underscores the exquisite ability of viral domains to uncover new regulatory mechanisms by hijacking key cellular proteins. PMID:24145437

  6. Amino acid alignment of cholinesterases, esterases, lipases, and related proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, M.K.; Doctor, B.P.

    1995-12-31

    The alignments previously published (Gentry Doctor, 1991; Cygler et al., 1993), nine and 32 sequences respectively, have been further expanded by the addition of 22 newly-found sequences. References and protein sequences were found by searching on the term acetylcholinesterase using the software package Entrez, an integrated citation and sequence retrieval system (National Center for Biotechnology Information, NLM, Bethesda, MD).

  7. Quantitative thermophoretic study of disease-related protein aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Wolff , Manuel; Mittag, Judith J.; Herling, Therese W.; Genst, Erwin De; Dobson, Christopher M.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.; Braun, Dieter; Buell, Alexander K.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are a hallmark of a range of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. A detailed understanding of the physico-chemical properties of the different aggregated forms of proteins, and of their interactions with other compounds of diagnostic or therapeutic interest, is crucial for devising effective strategies against such diseases. Protein aggregates are situated at the boundary between soluble and insoluble structures, and are challenging to study because classical biophysical techniques, such as scattering, spectroscopic and calorimetric methods, are not well adapted for their study. Here we present a detailed characterization of the thermophoretic behavior of different forms of the protein α-synuclein, whose aggregation is associated with Parkinson’s disease. Thermophoresis is the directed net diffusional flux of molecules and colloidal particles in a temperature gradient. Because of their low volume requirements and rapidity, analytical methods based on this effect have considerable potential for high throughput screening for drug discovery. In this paper we rationalize and describe in quantitative terms the thermophoretic behavior of monomeric, oligomeric and fibrillar forms of α-synuclein. Furthermore, we demonstrate that microscale thermophoresis (MST) is a valuable method for screening for ligands and binding partners of even such highly challenging samples as supramolecular protein aggregates. PMID:26984748

  8. Prediction of functional residues in water channels and related proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Froger, A.; Tallur, B.; Thomas, D.; Delamarche, C.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we present an updated classification of the ubiquitous MIP (Major Intrinsic Protein) family proteins, including 153 fully or partially sequenced members available in public databases. Presently, about 30 of these proteins have been functionally characterized, exhibiting essentially two distinct types of channel properties: (1) specific water transport by the aquaporins, and (2) small neutral solutes transport, such as glycerol by the glycerol facilitators. Sequence alignments were used to predict amino acids and motifs discriminant in channel specificity. The protein sequences were also analyzed using statistical tools (comparisons of means and correspondence analysis). Five key positions were clearly identified where the residues are specific for each functional subgroup and exhibit high dissimilar physico-chemical properties. Moreover, we have found that the putative channels for small neutral solutes clearly differ from the aquaporins by the amino acid content and the length of predicted loop regions, suggesting a substrate filter function for these loops. From these results, we propose a signature pattern for water transport. PMID:9655351

  9. Quantitative thermophoretic study of disease-related protein aggregates.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Manuel; Mittag, Judith J; Herling, Therese W; Genst, Erwin De; Dobson, Christopher M; Knowles, Tuomas P J; Braun, Dieter; Buell, Alexander K

    2016-03-17

    Amyloid fibrils are a hallmark of a range of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. A detailed understanding of the physico-chemical properties of the different aggregated forms of proteins, and of their interactions with other compounds of diagnostic or therapeutic interest, is crucial for devising effective strategies against such diseases. Protein aggregates are situated at the boundary between soluble and insoluble structures, and are challenging to study because classical biophysical techniques, such as scattering, spectroscopic and calorimetric methods, are not well adapted for their study. Here we present a detailed characterization of the thermophoretic behavior of different forms of the protein α-synuclein, whose aggregation is associated with Parkinson's disease. Thermophoresis is the directed net diffusional flux of molecules and colloidal particles in a temperature gradient. Because of their low volume requirements and rapidity, analytical methods based on this effect have considerable potential for high throughput screening for drug discovery. In this paper we rationalize and describe in quantitative terms the thermophoretic behavior of monomeric, oligomeric and fibrillar forms of α-synuclein. Furthermore, we demonstrate that microscale thermophoresis (MST) is a valuable method for screening for ligands and binding partners of even such highly challenging samples as supramolecular protein aggregates.

  10. Proteomic analysis of Clostridium thermocellum core metabolism: relative protein expression profiles and growth phase-dependent changes in protein expression

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Clostridium thermocellum produces H2 and ethanol, as well as CO2, acetate, formate, and lactate, directly from cellulosic biomass. It is therefore an attractive model for biofuel production via consolidated bioprocessing. Optimization of end-product yields and titres is crucial for making biofuel production economically feasible. Relative protein expression profiles may provide targets for metabolic engineering, while understanding changes in protein expression and metabolism in response to carbon limitation, pH, and growth phase may aid in reactor optimization. We performed shotgun 2D-HPLC-MS/MS on closed-batch cellobiose-grown exponential phase C. thermocellum cell-free extracts to determine relative protein expression profiles of core metabolic proteins involved carbohydrate utilization, energy conservation, and end-product synthesis. iTRAQ (isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation) based protein quantitation was used to determine changes in core metabolic proteins in response to growth phase. Results Relative abundance profiles revealed differential levels of putative enzymes capable of catalyzing parallel pathways. The majority of proteins involved in pyruvate catabolism and end-product synthesis were detected with high abundance, with the exception of aldehyde dehydrogenase, ferredoxin-dependent Ech-type [NiFe]-hydrogenase, and RNF-type NADH:ferredoxin oxidoreductase. Using 4-plex 2D-HPLC-MS/MS, 24% of the 144 core metabolism proteins detected demonstrated moderate changes in expression during transition from exponential to stationary phase. Notably, proteins involved in pyruvate synthesis decreased in stationary phase, whereas proteins involved in glycogen metabolism, pyruvate catabolism, and end-product synthesis increased in stationary phase. Several proteins that may directly dictate end-product synthesis patterns, including pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductases, alcohol dehydrogenases, and a putative bifurcating hydrogenase

  11. New Structural Approaches to Understand the Disease Related Forms of the Prion Protein

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    AD Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0476 TITLE: New Structural Approaches to Understand the Disease Related Forms of the Prion Protein PRINCIPAL...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER New Structural Approaches to Understand the Disease Related Forms of the Prion Protein 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17...Understanding these fundamental steps in the processes of initiation and propagation of the disease related state of the protein may lead to new

  12. The head protein D of bacterial virus lambda is related to eukaryotic chromosomal proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Witkiewicz, H; Schweiger, M

    1982-01-01

    Bacteriophage lambda structural head protein D has physiochemical properties in common with eukaryotic chromosomal proteins. It has a low affinity for hydroxylapatite, it is heat stable and acid soluble. Moreover, it cross-reacts immunologically with histones H2A and H2B. The deduced primary structure of the D protein shows striking homology to calf chromosomal high mobility group HMG-14 protein. There are two clusters of four ( LSAK , ASDE ) and one of three (APA) identical amino acid residues. Additionally the cluster ETK of protein D occurs three times in HMG-14 and 14 single identical residues are present. A mechanism for an alternative to a nucleosomal mode of nuclear DNA condensation and a possible function of HMG proteins are discussed. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:6233140

  13. apl-1, a Caenorhabditis elegans gene encoding a protein related to the human beta-amyloid protein precursor.

    PubMed Central

    Daigle, I; Li, C

    1993-01-01

    The major component of senile plaques found in the brains of Alzheimer disease patients is the beta-amyloid peptide, which is derived from a larger amyloid precursor protein (APP). Recently, a number of APP and APP-related proteins have been identified in different organisms and constitute the family of APP proteins. We have isolated several cDNAs encoding an APP-related protein in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and have designated the corresponding gene as apl-1. The apl-1 transcripts undergo two forms of posttranscriptional modification: trans-splicing and alternative polyadenylylation. In vitro translation of an apl-1 cDNA results in a protein of approximately the expected size. Similar to the Drosophila, human, and mouse APP-related proteins, APL-1 does not appear to contain the beta-amyloid peptide. Because APP-related proteins seem to be conserved through evolution, the apl-1 gene from C. elegans should be important for determining the normal function of human APP. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8265668

  14. DDRprot: a database of DNA damage response-related proteins

    PubMed Central

    Andrés-León, Eduardo; Cases, Ildefonso; Arcas, Aida; Rojas, Ana M.

    2016-01-01

    The DNA Damage Response (DDR) signalling network is an essential system that protects the genome’s integrity. The DDRprot database presented here is a resource that integrates manually curated information on the human DDR network and its sub-pathways. For each particular DDR protein, we present detailed information about its function. If involved in post-translational modifications (PTMs) with each other, we depict the position of the modified residue/s in the three-dimensional structures, when resolved structures are available for the proteins. All this information is linked to the original publication from where it was obtained. Phylogenetic information is also shown, including time of emergence and conservation across 47 selected species, family trees and sequence alignments of homologues. The DDRprot database can be queried by different criteria: pathways, species, evolutionary age or involvement in (PTM). Sequence searches using hidden Markov models can be also used. Database URL: http://ddr.cbbio.es. PMID:27577567

  15. Stability of ALS-related Superoxide Dismutase Protein variants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusebrink, Daniel; Plotkin, Steven

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD1) is a metal binding, homodimeric protein, whose misfolding is implicated in the neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Monomerization is believed to be a key step in the propagation of the disease. The dimer stability is often difficult to measure experimentally however, because it is entangled with protein unfolding and metal loss. We thus computationally investigate the dimer stability of mutants of SOD1 known to be associated with ALS. We report on systematic trends in dimer stability, as well as intriguing allosteric communication between mutations and the dimer interface. We study the dimer stabilities in molecular dynamics simulations and obtain the binding free energies of the dimers from pulling essays. Mutations are applied in silicoand we compare the differences of binding free energies compared to the wild type.

  16. Sex-specific clinicopathological significance of novel (Frizzled-7) and established (MGMT, IDH1) biomarkers in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Schiffgens, Salveena; Wilkens, Ludwig; Brandes, Alba A.; Meier, Tatiana; Franceschi, Enrico; Ermani, Mario; Hartmann, Christian; Sandalcioglu, Ibrahim Erol; Dumitru, Claudia A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Wnt receptor Frizzled-7 (FZD7) promotes tumor progression and can be currently targeted by monoclonal antibody therapy. Here, we determined the prognostic value of FZD7 for the overall survival of glioblastoma (GBM) patients, both as individual marker and taken in combination with the previously-described markers MGMT and IDH1. Additionally, we tested whether these markers (alone or in combination) exhibited sex-specific differences. Results High levels of FZD7 (FZD7high) associated with shorter survival in GBM patients; however, FZD7high was a significant predictor of poor survival only in male patients. Mutation of IDH1 significantly associated with longer survival in male but not female patients. Methylated MGMT promoter significantly associated with longer survival only in female patients. Combination of FZD7 with MGMT enhanced the prognostic accuracy and abrogated the sex differences observed upon single marker analysis. Combination of FZD7 with IDH1 was a significant predictor of survival in male GBM patients only. Materials and Methods Three independent cohorts of patients with primary GBM (n=120, n=108 and n=105, respectively) were included in this study. FZD7 and IDH1 were assessed by immunohistochemistry in tissue microarrays. MGMT promoter methylation was determined by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. Survival analysis was performed by Kaplan-Meier estimate, log-rank test and Cox proportional hazard regression. Conclusions Our study identifies novel individual and combination markers with prognostic and, possibly, therapeutic relevance in GBM. Furthermore, our findings substantiate the importance of sexual dimorphism in this type of cancer. PMID:27409829

  17. Transgenic Expression of miR-222 Disrupts Intestinal Epithelial Regeneration by Targeting Multiple Genes Including Frizzled-7.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hee Kyoung; Chen, Yu; Rao, Jaladanki N; Liu, Lan; Xiao, Lan; Turner, Douglas J; Yang, Peixin; Gorospe, Myriam; Wang, Jian-Ying

    2015-08-03

    Defects in intestinal epithelial integrity occur commonly in various pathologies. miR-222 is implicated in many aspects of cellular function and plays an important role in several diseases, but its exact biological function in the intestinal epithelium is underexplored. We generated mice with intestinal epithelial tissue-specific overexpression of miR-222 to investigate the function of miR-222 in intestinal physiology and diseases in vivo. Transgenic expression of miR-222 inhibited mucosal growth and increased susceptibility to apoptosis in the small intestine, thus leading to mucosal atrophy. The miR-222-elevated intestinal epithelium was vulnerable to pathological stress, since local overexpression of miR-222 not only delayed mucosal repair after ischemia/reperfusion-induced injury but also exacerbated gut barrier dysfunction induced by exposure to cecal ligation and puncture. miR-222 overexpression also decreased expression of the Wnt receptor Frizzled-7 (FZD7), cyclin-dependent kinase 4, and tight junctions in the mucosal tissue. Mechanistically, we identified the Fzd7 mRNA as a novel target of miR-222 and found that [miR-222/Fzd7 mRNA] association repressed Fzd7 mRNA translation. These results implicate miR-222 as a negative regulator of normal intestinal epithelial regeneration and protection by down-regulating expression of multiple genes including the Fzd7. Our findings also suggest a novel role of increased miR-222 in the pathogenesis of mucosal growth inhibition, delayed healing, and barrier dysfunction.

  18. Biologically active protein fragments containing specific binding regions of serum albumin or related proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    In accordance with the present invention, biologically active protein fragments can be constructed which contain only those specific portions of the serum albumin family of proteins such as regions known as subdomains IIA and IIIA which are primarily responsible for the binding properties of the serum albumins. The artificial serums that can be prepared from these biologically active protein fragments are advantageous in that they can be produced much more easily than serums containing the whole albumin, yet still retain all or most of the original binding potential of the full albumin proteins. In addition, since the protein fragment serums of the present invention can be made from non-natural sources using conventional recombinant DNA techniques, they are far safer than serums containing natural albumin because they do not carry the potentially harmful viruses and other contaminants that will be found in the natural substances.

  19. Can the fluorescence of green fluorescent protein chromophore be related directly to the nativity of protein structure?

    PubMed

    Melnik, B S; Povarnitsyna, T V; Melnik, T N

    2009-12-25

    In studies of green fluorescence protein (GFP) or other proteins with the use of GFP as a marker, the fluorescence of GFP is for the most part related directly to the nativity of its structure. Naturally, such a relation does exist since the chromophore of this protein is formed autocatalytically only just after GFP acquires its native structure. However, the fluorescence method may not yield reliable information on protein structure when studying renaturation and denaturation of this protein (with the formed chromophore). Using proteolysis, denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis and circular dichroism, we demonstrate herein that at major disturbances of the native structure of protein GFP-cycle3 the intensity of fluorescence of its chromophore can change insignificantly. In other words, the chromophore fluorescence does not reliably mirror alterations in protein structure. Since the main conclusions of this study are especially qualitative, it can be suggested that during renaturation/denaturation of wild-type GFP and its "multicolored" mutants their fluorescence is also not always associated with the changes in the structure of these proteins.

  20. Interactions between whey proteins and salivary proteins as related to astringency of whey protein beverages at low pH.

    PubMed

    Ye, A; Streicher, C; Singh, H

    2011-12-01

    Whey protein beverages have been shown to be astringent at low pH. In the present study, the interactions between model whey proteins (β-lactoglobulin and lactoferrin) and human saliva in the pH range from 7 to 2 were investigated using particle size, turbidity, and ζ-potential measurements and sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE. The correlation between the sensory results of astringency and the physicochemical data was discussed. Strong interactions between β-lactoglobulin and salivary proteins led to an increase in the particle size and turbidity of mixtures of both unheated and heated β-lactoglobulin and human saliva at pH ∼3.4. However, the large particle size and high turbidity that occurred at pH 2.0 were the result of aggregation of human salivary proteins. The intense astringency in whey protein beverages may result from these increases in particle size and turbidity at these pH values and from the aggregation and precipitation of human salivary proteins alone at pH <3.0. The involvement of salivary proteins in the interaction is a key factor in the perception of astringency in whey protein beverages. At any pH, the increases in particle size and turbidity were much smaller in mixtures of lactoferrin and saliva, which suggests that aggregation and precipitation may not be the only mechanism linked to the perception of astringency in whey protein.

  1. Prion protein and Aβ-related synaptic toxicity impairment

    PubMed Central

    Calella, Anna Maria; Farinelli, Mélissa; Nuvolone, Mario; Mirante, Osvaldo; Moos, Rita; Falsig, Jeppe; Mansuy, Isabelle M; Aguzzi, Adriano

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common neurodegenerative disorder, goes along with extracellular amyloid-β (Aβ) deposits. The cognitive decline observed during AD progression correlates with damaged spines, dendrites and synapses in hippocampus and cortex. Numerous studies have shown that Aβ oligomers, both synthetic and derived from cultures and AD brains, potently impair synaptic structure and functions. The cellular prion protein (PrPC) was proposed to mediate this effect. We report that ablation or overexpression of PrPC had no effect on the impairment of hippocampal synaptic plasticity in a transgenic model of AD. These findings challenge the role of PrPC as a mediator of Aβ toxicity. PMID:20665634

  2. DSP-PP Precursor Protein Cleavage by Tolloid-Related-1 Protein and by Bone Morphogenetic Protein-1

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, Helena H.; Yee, Colin T.; Tang, Xu-na; Dong, Zhihong; Fuller, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    Dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and phosphophoryn (PP), acidic proteins critical to dentin mineralization, are translated from a single transcript as a DSP-PP precursor that undergoes specific proteolytic processing to generate DSP and PP. The cleavage mechanism continues to be controversial, in part because of the difficulty of obtaining DSP-PP from mammalian cells and dentin matrix. We have infected Sf9 cells with a recombinant baculovirus to produce large amounts of secreted DSP-PP240, a variant form of rat DSP-PP. Mass spectrometric analysis shows that DSP-PP240 secreted by Sf9 cells undergoes specific cleavage at the site predicted from the N-terminal sequence of PP extracted from dentin matrix: SMQG447↓D448DPN. DSP-PP240 is cleaved after secretion by a zinc-dependent activity secreted by Sf9 cells, generating DSP430 and PP240 products that are stable in the medium. DSP-PP processing activity is constitutively secreted by Sf9 cells, but secretion is diminished 3 days after infection. Using primers corresponding to the highly conserved catalytic domain of Drosophila melanogaster tolloid (a mammalian BMP1 homolog), we isolated a partial cDNA for a Spodopotera frugiperda tolloid-related-1 protein (TLR1) that is 78% identical to Drosophila TLR1 but only 65% identical to Drosophila tolloid. Tlr1 mRNA decreased rapidly in Sf9 cells after baculovirus infection and was undetectable 4d after infection, paralleling the observed decrease in secretion of the DSP-PP240 processing activity after infection. Human BMP1 is more similar to Sf9 and Drosophila TLR1 than to tolloid, and Sf9 TLR1 is more similar to BMP1 than to other mammalian homologs. Recombinant human BMP1 correctly processed baculovirus-expressed DSP-PP240 in a dose-dependent manner. Together, these data suggest that the physiologically accurate cleavage of mammalian DSP-PP240 in the Sf9 cell system represents the action of a conserved processing enzyme and support the proposed role of BMP1 in processing DSP-PP in

  3. DSP-PP precursor protein cleavage by tolloid-related-1 protein and by bone morphogenetic protein-1.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Helena H; Yee, Colin T; Tang, Xu-Na; Dong, Zhihong; Fuller, Robert S

    2012-01-01

    Dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and phosphophoryn (PP), acidic proteins critical to dentin mineralization, are translated from a single transcript as a DSP-PP precursor that undergoes specific proteolytic processing to generate DSP and PP. The cleavage mechanism continues to be controversial, in part because of the difficulty of obtaining DSP-PP from mammalian cells and dentin matrix. We have infected Sf9 cells with a recombinant baculovirus to produce large amounts of secreted DSP-PP(240), a variant form of rat DSP-PP. Mass spectrometric analysis shows that DSP-PP(240) secreted by Sf9 cells undergoes specific cleavage at the site predicted from the N-terminal sequence of PP extracted from dentin matrix: SMQG(447)↓D(448)DPN. DSP-PP(240) is cleaved after secretion by a zinc-dependent activity secreted by Sf9 cells, generating DSP(430) and PP(240) products that are stable in the medium. DSP-PP processing activity is constitutively secreted by Sf9 cells, but secretion is diminished 3 days after infection. Using primers corresponding to the highly conserved catalytic domain of Drosophila melanogaster tolloid (a mammalian BMP1 homolog), we isolated a partial cDNA for a Spodopotera frugiperda tolloid-related-1 protein (TLR1) that is 78% identical to Drosophila TLR1 but only 65% identical to Drosophila tolloid. Tlr1 mRNA decreased rapidly in Sf9 cells after baculovirus infection and was undetectable 4d after infection, paralleling the observed decrease in secretion of the DSP-PP(240) processing activity after infection. Human BMP1 is more similar to Sf9 and Drosophila TLR1 than to tolloid, and Sf9 TLR1 is more similar to BMP1 than to other mammalian homologs. Recombinant human BMP1 correctly processed baculovirus-expressed DSP-PP(240) in a dose-dependent manner. Together, these data suggest that the physiologically accurate cleavage of mammalian DSP-PP(240) in the Sf9 cell system represents the action of a conserved processing enzyme and support the proposed role of BMP1 in

  4. Two Drosophila melanogaster proteins related to intermediate filament proteins of vertebrate cells

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were prepared against a 46,000 mol wt major cytoplasmic protein from Drosophila melanogaster Kc cells. These antibodies reacted with the 46,000 and a 40,000 mol wt protein from Kc cells. Some antibodies showed cross-reaction with 55,000 (vimentin) and 52,000 mol wt (desmin) proteins from baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells that form intermediate sized filaments in vertebrate cells. In indirect immunofluorescence, the group of cross reacting antibodies stained a filamentous meshwork in the cytoplasm of vertebrate cells. In Kc cells the fluorescence seemed to be localized in a filamentous meshwork that became more obvious after the cells had flattened out on a surface. These cytoskeletal structures are heat-labile; the proteins in Kc or BHK cells rearrange after a brief heat shock, forming juxtanuclear cap structures. PMID:6795212

  5. Large-scale identification of adverse drug reaction-related proteins through a random walk model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaowen; Shi, Hongbo; Yang, Feng; Yang, Lei; Lv, Yingli; Wang, Shuyuan; Dai, Enyu; Sun, Dianjun; Jiang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are responsible for drug failure in clinical trials and affect life quality of patients. The identification of ADRs during the early phases of drug development is an important task. Therefore, predicting potential protein targets eliciting ADRs is essential for understanding the pathogenesis of ADRs. In this study, we proposed a computational algorithm,Integrated Network for Protein-ADR relations (INPADR), to infer potential protein-ADR relations based on an integrated network. First, the integrated network was constructed by connecting the protein-protein interaction network and the ADR similarity network using known protein-ADR relations. Then, candidate protein-ADR relations were further prioritized by performing a random walk with restart on this integrated network. Leave-one-out cross validation was used to evaluate the ability of the INPADR. An AUC of 0.8486 was obtained, which was a significant improvement compared to previous methods. We also applied the INPADR to two ADRs to evaluate its accuracy. The results suggested that the INPADR is capable of finding novel protein-ADR relations. This study provides new insight to our understanding of ADRs. The predicted ADR-related proteins will provide a reference for preclinical safety pharmacology studies and facilitate the identification of ADRs during the early phases of drug development. PMID:27805066

  6. Prion protein and Abeta-related synaptic toxicity impairment.

    PubMed

    Calella, Anna Maria; Farinelli, Mélissa; Nuvolone, Mario; Mirante, Osvaldo; Moos, Rita; Falsig, Jeppe; Mansuy, Isabelle M; Aguzzi, Adriano

    2010-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common neurodegenerative disorder, goes along with extracellular amyloid-beta (Abeta) deposits. The cognitive decline observed during AD progression correlates with damaged spines, dendrites and synapses in hippocampus and cortex. Numerous studies have shown that Abeta oligomers, both synthetic and derived from cultures and AD brains, potently impair synaptic structure and functions. The cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) was proposed to mediate this effect. We report that ablation or overexpression of PrP(C) had no effect on the impairment of hippocampal synaptic plasticity in a transgenic model of AD. These findings challenge the role of PrP(C) as a mediator of Abeta toxicity.

  7. Helicobacter pylori Outer Membrane Protein-Related Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Yuichi; Kido, Yasutoshi; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2017-03-11

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes the human stomach and induces inflammation, and in some cases persistent infection can result in gastric cancer. Attachment to the gastric mucosa is the first step in establishing bacterial colonization, and outer membrane proteins (OMPs) play a pivotal role in binding to human cells. Some OMP interaction molecules are known in H. pylori, and their associated host cell responses have been gradually clarified. Many studies have demonstrated that OMPs are essential to CagA translocation into gastric cells via the Type IV secretion system of H. pylori. This review summarizes the mechanisms through which H. pylori utilizes OMPs to colonize the human stomach and how OMPs cooperate with the Type IV secretion system.

  8. A Novel Inhibitor of the Obesity-Related Protein FTO.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yan; Zhou, Bin; Zhang, Meizi; Liu, Weijia; Han, Zhifu; Song, Chuanjun; Yu, Wenquan; Yang, Qinghua; Wang, Ruiyong; Wang, Shaomin; Shi, Shuai; Zhao, Renbin; Chai, Jijie; Chang, Junbiao

    2016-03-15

    Fe(II) and α-ketoglutarate-dependent fat mass and obesity associated protein (FTO)-dependent demethylation of m⁶A is important for regulation of mRNA splicing and adipogenesis. Developing FTO-specific inhibitors can help probe the biology of FTO and unravel novel therapeutic targets for treatment of obesity or obesity-associated diseases. In the present paper, we have identified that 4-chloro-6-(6'-chloro-7'-hydroxy-2',4',4'-trimethyl-chroman-2'-yl)benzene-1,3-diol (CHTB) is an inhibitor of FTO. The crystal structure of CHTB complexed with human FTO reveals that the novel small molecule binds to FTO in a specific manner. The identification of the novel small molecule offers opportunities for further development of more selective and potent FTO inhibitors.

  9. Helicobacter pylori Outer Membrane Protein-Related Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Yuichi; Kido, Yasutoshi; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes the human stomach and induces inflammation, and in some cases persistent infection can result in gastric cancer. Attachment to the gastric mucosa is the first step in establishing bacterial colonization, and outer membrane proteins (OMPs) play a pivotal role in binding to human cells. Some OMP interaction molecules are known in H. pylori, and their associated host cell responses have been gradually clarified. Many studies have demonstrated that OMPs are essential to CagA translocation into gastric cells via the Type IV secretion system of H. pylori. This review summarizes the mechanisms through which H. pylori utilizes OMPs to colonize the human stomach and how OMPs cooperate with the Type IV secretion system. PMID:28287480

  10. Centrin protein and genes in Trichomonas vaginalis and close relatives.

    PubMed

    Brugerolle, G; Bricheux, G; Coffe, G

    2000-01-01

    Anti-centrin monoclonal antibodies 20H5 and 11B2 produced against Clamydomononas centrin decorated the group of basal bodies as well as very closely attached structures in all trichomonads studied and in the devescovinids Foaina and Devescovina. Moreover, these antibodies decorated the undulating membrane in Trichomonas vaginalis, Trichomitus batrachorum, and Tritrichomonas foetus, and the cresta in Foaina. Centrin was not demonstrated in the dividing spindle and paradesmosis. Immunogold labeling, both in pre- and post-embedding, confirmed that centrin is associated with the basal body cylinder and is a component of the nine anchoring arms between the terminal plate of flagellar bases and the plasma-membrane. Centrin is also associated with the hook-shaped fibers attached to basal bodies (F1, F3), the X-fiber, and along sigmoid fibers (F2) at the pelta-axostyle junction, which is the microtubule organizing center for pelta-axostyle microtubules. There was no labeling on the striated costa and parabasal fibers nor on microtubular pelta-axostyle, but the fibrous structure inside the undulating membrane was labeled in T. vaginalis. Two proteins of 22-20 kDa corresponding to the centrin molecular mass were recognized by immunoblotting using these antibodies in the three trichomonad species examined. By screening a T. vaginalis cDNA library with 20H5 antibody, two genes encoding identical protein sequences were found. The sequence comprises the 4 typical EF-hand Ca++-binding domains present in every known centrin. Trichomonad centrin is closer to the green algal cluster (70% identity) than to the yeast Cdc31 cluster (55% identity) or the Alveolata cluster (46% identity).

  11. Isolation and characterization of a cone snail protease with homology to CRISP proteins of the pathogenesis-related protein superfamily.

    PubMed

    Milne, Trudy J; Abbenante, Giovanni; Tyndall, Joel D A; Halliday, Judy; Lewis, Richard J

    2003-08-15

    The pathogenesis-related (PR) protein superfamily is widely distributed in the animal, plant, and fungal kingdoms and is implicated in human brain tumor growth and plant pathogenesis. The precise biological activity of PR proteins, however, has remained elusive. Here we report the characterization, cloning and structural homology modeling of Tex31 from the venom duct of Conus textile. Tex31 was isolated to >95% purity by activity-guided fractionation using a para-nitroanilide substrate based on the putative cleavage site residues found in the propeptide precursor of conotoxin TxVIA. Tex31 requires four residues including a leucine N-terminal of the cleavage site for efficient substrate processing. The sequence of Tex31 was determined using two degenerate PCR primers designed from N-terminal and tryptic digest Edman sequences. A BLAST search revealed that Tex31 was a member of the PR protein superfamily and most closely related to the CRISP family of mammalian proteins that have a cysteine-rich C-terminal tail. A homology model constructed from two PR proteins revealed that the likely catalytic residues in Tex31 fall within a structurally conserved domain found in PR proteins. Thus, it is possible that other PR proteins may also be substrate-specific proteases.

  12. Flow Cytometric Single-Cell Analysis for Quantitative in Vivo Detection of Protein-Protein Interactions via Relative Reporter Protein Expression Measurement.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lina; Wang, Xu; Zhang, Jianqiang; Luan, Tian; Bouveret, Emmanuelle; Yan, Xiaomei

    2017-03-07

    Cell-based two-hybrid assays have been key players in identifying pairwise interactions, yet quantitative measurement of protein-protein interactions in vivo remains challenging. Here, we show that by using relative reporter protein expression (RRPE), defined as the level of reporter expression normalized to that of the interacting protein, quantitative analysis of protein interactions in a bacterial adenylate cyclase two-hybrid (BACTH) system can be achieved. A multicolor flow cytometer was used to measure simultaneously the expression levels of one of the two putative interacting proteins and the β-galactosidase (β-gal) reporter protein upon dual immunofluorescence staining. Single-cell analysis revealed that there exists bistability in the BACTH system and the RRPE is an intrinsic characteristic associated with the binding strength between the two interacting proteins. The RRPE-BACTH method provides an efficient tool to confirm interacting pairs of proteins, investigate determinant residues in protein-protein interaction, and compare interaction strength of different pairs.

  13. Autophagy-related intrinsically disordered proteins in intra-nuclear compartments.

    PubMed

    Na, Insung; Meng, Fanchi; Kurgan, Lukasz; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-08-16

    Recent analyses indicated that autophagy can be regulated via some nuclear transcriptional networks and many important players in the autophagy and other forms of programmed cell death are known to be intrinsically disordered. To this end, we analyzed similarities and differences in the intrinsic disorder distribution of nuclear and non-nuclear proteins related to autophagy. We also looked at the peculiarities of the distribution of the intrinsically disordered autophagy-related proteins in various intra-nuclear organelles, such as the nucleolus, chromatin, Cajal bodies, nuclear speckles, promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies, nuclear lamina, nuclear pores, and perinucleolar compartment. This analysis revealed that the autophagy-related proteins constitute about 2.5% of the non-nuclear proteins and 3.3% of the nuclear proteins, which corresponds to a substantial enrichment by about 32% in the nucleus. Curiously, although, in general, the autophagy-related proteins share similar characteristics of disorder with a generic set of all non-nuclear proteins, chromatin and nuclear speckles are enriched in the intrinsically disordered autophagy proteins (29 and 37% of these proteins are disordered, respectively) and have high disorder content at 0.24 and 0.27, respectively. Therefore, our data suggest that some of the nuclear disordered proteins may play important roles in autophagy.

  14. PPI-IRO: a two-stage method for protein-protein interaction extraction based on interaction relation ontology.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuan-Xi; Chen, Peng; Wang, Ru-Jing; Wang, Xiu-Jie; Su, Ya-Ru; Li, Jinyan

    2014-01-01

    Mining Protein-Protein Interactions (PPIs) from the fast-growing biomedical literature resources has been proven as an effective approach for the identification of biological regulatory networks. This paper presents a novel method based on the idea of Interaction Relation Ontology (IRO), which specifies and organises words of various proteins interaction relationships. Our method is a two-stage PPI extraction method. At first, IRO is applied in a binary classifier to determine whether sentences contain a relation or not. Then, IRO is taken to guide PPI extraction by building sentence dependency parse tree. Comprehensive and quantitative evaluations and detailed analyses are used to demonstrate the significant performance of IRO on relation sentences classification and PPI extraction. Our PPI extraction method yielded a recall of around 80% and 90% and an F1 of around 54% and 66% on corpora of AIMed and BioInfer, respectively, which are superior to most existing extraction methods.

  15. Regulation of Autophagy-Related Protein and Cell Differentiation by High Mobility Group Box 1 Protein in Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Huanhuan; Zhang, Guojun; Liu, Guoyan; Yang, Can

    2016-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) is a molecule related to the development of inflammation. Autophagy is vital to maintain cellular homeostasis and protect against inflammation of adipocyte injury. Our recent work focused on the relationship of HMGB1 and autophagy in 3T3-L1 cells. In vivo experimental results showed that, compared with the normal-diet group, the high-fat diet mice displayed an increase in adipocyte size in the epididymal adipose tissues. The expression levels of HMGB1 and LC3II also increased in epididymal adipose tissues in high-fat diet group compared to the normal-diet mice. The in vitro results indicated that HMGB1 protein treatment increased LC3II formation in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes in contrast to that in the control group. Furthermore, LC3II formation was inhibited through HMGB1 knockdown by siRNA. Treatment with the HMGB1 protein enhanced LC3II expression after 2 and 4 days but decreased the expression after 8 and 10 days among various differentiation stages of adipocytes. By contrast, FABP4 expression decreased on the fourth day and increased on the eighth day. Hence, the HMGB1 protein modulated autophagy-related proteins and lipid-metabolism-related genes in adipocytes and could be a new target for treatment of obesity and related metabolic diseases. PMID:27843198

  16. Principal Component Analysis Reveals Age-Related and Muscle-Type-Related Differences in Protein Carbonyl Profiles of Muscle Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Juan; Navratil, Marian; Thompson, LaDora V.; Arriaga, Edgar A.

    2011-01-01

    Carbonyl-modified proteins are considered markers of oxidative damage caused by oxidative stress, aging, and disease. Here we use a previously developed capillary electrophoretic method for detecting femtomole (10−15 mole) carbonyl levels in mitochondrial proteins that are size separated and profiled. For protein labeling, carbonyls were tagged with Alexa 488 hydrazine and amine groups in proteins with 3-(2-furoyl)quinoline-2-carboxaldehyde. Total mitochondrial protein carbonyl levels were statistically higher in fast- than in slow-twitch muscle of young Fischer 344 rats, and statistically higher in old than in young slow-twitch muscle. Even when some statistical comparisons of the total protein carbonyl levels would not reveal differences, principal component analysis (PCA) classified the carbonyl profiles into four distinct sample groups of different age and muscle types. In addition, PCA was used to predict that most age-related or muscle-type-related changes in carbonyl levels occur in proteins with a molecular weight between 9.8 and 11.7 kD. PMID:19126840

  17. Plant-specific SR-related protein atSR45a interacts with spliceosomal proteins in plant nucleus.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Noriaki; Kimura, Ayako; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Shigeoka, Shigeru

    2009-06-01

    Serine/arginine-rich (SR) protein and its homologues (SR-related proteins) are important regulators of constitutive and/or alternative splicing and other aspects of mRNA metabolism. To clarify the contribution of a plant-specific and stress-responsive SR-related protein, atSR45a, to splicing events, here we analyzed the interaction of atSR45a with the other splicing factors by conducting a yeast two-hybrid assay and a bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis. The atSR45a-1a and -2 proteins, the presumed mature forms produced by alternative splicing of atSR45a, interacted with U1-70K and U2AF(35)b, splicing factors for the initial definition of 5' and 3' splice sites, respectively, in the early stage of spliceosome assembly. Both proteins also interacted with themselves, other SR proteins (atSR45 and atSCL28), and PRP38-like protein, a homologue of the splicing factor essential for cleavage of the 5' splice site. The mapping of deletion mutants of atSR45a proteins revealed that the C-terminal arginine/serine-rich (RS) domain of atSR45a proteins are required for the interaction with U1-70K, U2AF(35)b, atSR45, atSCL28, PRP38-like protein, and themselves, and the N-terminal RS domain enhances the interaction efficiency. Interestingly, the distinctive N-terminal extension in atSR45a-1a protein, but not atSR45a-2 protein, inhibited the interaction with these splicing factors. These findings suggest that the atSR45a proteins help to form the bridge between 5' and 3' splice sites in the spliceosome assembly and the efficiency of spliceosome formation is affected by the expression ratio of atSR45a-1a and atSR45a-2.

  18. Role of inter-alpha-inhibitor and its related proteins in urolithiasis. Purification of an inter-alpha-inhibitor related protein from the bovine kidney.

    PubMed

    Atmani, F; Khan, S R

    1999-01-01

    Urine contains several macromolecules that inhibit calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystallization. Among them is bikunin, the light chain of most of the inter-alpha-inhibitor (IalphaI) family of glycoproteins. This study aimed to verify whether bikunin and other members of the IalphaI family are synthesized in the kidneys or derived exclusively from the plasma. Proteins extracted from homogenized bovine kidney were applied successively to three chromatographic steps on DEAE-Sephacel, Sephacryl S-300, and Mono Q column. The inhibitory activity was assayed using a CaOx crystallization system. The presence of IalphaI-related proteins was determined by electrophoresis and Western blotting. The results showed that kidney extract contained a 125-kDa protein that cross-reacted with anti-IalphaI antibodies. This protein inhibited CaOx crystallization efficiently. According to its molecular weight and immunoreaction with anti-IalphaI antibody, the 125-kDa protein could be pre-alpha-inhibitor. The latter is known to encompass a heavy chain and bikunin, which may explain its inhibitory activity against CaOx crystallization. Consequently, we hypothesize that kidneys may produce some IalphaI-related proteins that are involved in the inhibition of stone formation.

  19. On the nature of a glassy state of matter in a hydrated protein: Relation to protein function.

    PubMed

    Teeter, M M; Yamano, A; Stec, B; Mohanty, U

    2001-09-25

    Diverse biochemical and biophysical experiments indicate that all proteins, regardless of size or origin, undergo a dynamic transition near 200 K. The cause of this shift in dynamic behavior, termed a "glass transition," and its relation to protein function are important open questions. One explanation postulated for the transition is solidification of correlated motions in proteins below the transition. We verified this conjecture by showing that crambin's radius of gyration (Rg) remains constant below approximately 180 K. We show that both atom position and dynamics of protein and solvent are physically coupled, leading to a novel cooperative state. This glassy state is identified by negative slopes of the Debye-Waller (B) factor vs. temperature. It is composed of multisubstate side chains and solvent. Based on generalization of Adam-Gibbs' notion of a cooperatively rearranging region and decrease of the total entropy with temperature, we calculate the slope of the Debye-Waller factor. The results are in accord with experiment.

  20. Suppression of hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation by short hairpin RNA of frizzled 2 with Sonazoid-enhanced irradiation.

    PubMed

    Tomizawa, Minoru; Shinozaki, Fuminobu; Motoyoshi, Yasufumi; Sugiyama, Takao; Yamamoto, Shigenori; Ishige, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Short-hairpin RNA of frizzled-2 (shRNA-Fz2) is known to suppress the proliferation of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells; however, its effect on HCC cell motility is unknown. In this study, suppression of HCC cell motility by shRNA-Fz2 was analyzed, and introduction of shRNA-Fz2 into HCC cells was facilitated with ultrasound (US) irradiation generated from a diagnostic US device, which was enhanced by the contrast-enhanced US reagent Sonazoid. The HCC cell lines HLF and PLC/PRF/5 that were transfected with shRNA-Fz2 were plated to form monolayers, following which the cell monolayers were scratched with a sterile razor. After 48 h, the cells were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and the distance between the growing edge of the cell layer and the scratch lines was measured. Total RNA from the cells was isolated and subjected to real-time quantitative PCR to quantify matrix metalloproteinase 9 expression at 48 h after transfection of shRNA-Fz2. Starch-iodide method was applied to analyze the generation of H2O2 following US irradiation with the addition of Sonazoid in the liquid, and cell proliferation was analyzed 72 h later. The distances between the growing edge of the cell layer and the scratch lines and MMP9 expression levels were significantly decreased with transfection of shRNA-Fz2 (P<0.05). In the starch-iodide method, absorbance significantly decreased with the addition of Sonazoid (P<0.05), which suggested that US irradiation with Sonazoid generated H2O2 and enhanced sonoporation. ShRNA-Fz2 suppressed cell proliferation of both cell lines at a mechanical index of 0.4. Motility of HLF cells and PLC/PRF/5 cells was suppressed by shRNA-FZ2. Sonazoid enhanced sonoporation of the cells with the diagnostic US device and the suppression of proliferation of both HCC cell lines by shRNA-Fz2.

  1. A Shortest Dependency Path Based Convolutional Neural Network for Protein-Protein Relation Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Chanqin

    2016-01-01

    The state-of-the-art methods for protein-protein interaction (PPI) extraction are primarily based on kernel methods, and their performances strongly depend on the handcraft features. In this paper, we tackle PPI extraction by using convolutional neural networks (CNN) and propose a shortest dependency path based CNN (sdpCNN) model. The proposed method (1) only takes the sdp and word embedding as input and (2) could avoid bias from feature selection by using CNN. We performed experiments on standard Aimed and BioInfer datasets, and the experimental results demonstrated that our approach outperformed state-of-the-art kernel based methods. In particular, by tracking the sdpCNN model, we find that sdpCNN could extract key features automatically and it is verified that pretrained word embedding is crucial in PPI task. PMID:27493967

  2. Protein Secondary Structures (alpha-helix and beta-sheet) at a Cellular Levle and Protein Fractions in Relation to Rumen Degradation Behaviours of Protein: A New Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Yu,P.

    2007-01-01

    Studying the secondary structure of proteins leads to an understanding of the components that make up a whole protein, and such an understanding of the structure of the whole protein is often vital to understanding its digestive behaviour and nutritive value in animals. The main protein secondary structures are the {alpha}-helix and {beta}-sheet. The percentage of these two structures in protein secondary structures influences protein nutritive value, quality and digestive behaviour. A high percentage of {beta}-sheet structure may partly cause a low access to gastrointestinal digestive enzymes, which results in a low protein value. The objectives of the present study were to use advanced synchrotron-based Fourier transform IR (S-FTIR) microspectroscopy as a new approach to reveal the molecular chemistry of the protein secondary structures of feed tissues affected by heat-processing within intact tissue at a cellular level, and to quantify protein secondary structures using multicomponent peak modelling Gaussian and Lorentzian methods, in relation to protein digestive behaviours and nutritive value in the rumen, which was determined using the Cornell Net Carbohydrate Protein System. The synchrotron-based molecular chemistry research experiment was performed at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory, US Department of Energy. The results showed that, with S-FTIR microspectroscopy, the molecular chemistry, ultrastructural chemical make-up and nutritive characteristics could be revealed at a high ultraspatial resolution ({approx}10 {mu}m). S-FTIR microspectroscopy revealed that the secondary structure of protein differed between raw and roasted golden flaxseeds in terms of the percentages and ratio of {alpha}-helixes and {beta}-sheets in the mid-IR range at the cellular level. By using multicomponent peak modelling, the results show that the roasting reduced (P <0.05) the percentage of {alpha}-helixes (from 47.1% to 36.1%: S

  3. p300/CREB Binding Protein-Related Protein p270 Is a Component of Mammalian SWI/SNF Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Dallas, Peter B.; Cheney, Ian Wayne; Liao, Da-Wei; Bowrin, Valerie; Byam, Whitney; Pacchione, Stephen; Kobayashi, Ryuji; Yaciuk, Peter; Moran, Elizabeth

    1998-01-01

    p300 and the closely related CREB binding protein (CBP) are transcriptional adaptors that are present in intracellular complexes with TATA binding protein (TBP) and bind to upstream activators including p53 and nuclear hormone receptors. They have intrinsic and associated histone acetyltransferase activity, suggesting that chromatin modification is an essential part of their role in regulating transcription. Detailed characterization of a panel of antibodies raised against p300/CBP has revealed the existence of a 270-kDa cellular protein, p270, distinct from p300 and CBP but sharing at least two independent epitopes with p300. The subset of p300/CBP-derived antibodies that cross-reacts with p270 consistently coprecipitates a series a cellular proteins with relative molecular masses ranging from 44 to 190 kDa. Purification and analysis of various proteins in this group reveals that they are components of the human SWI/SNF complex and that p270 is an integral member of this complex. PMID:9584200

  4. Proteomic analysis of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-related proteins in rice roots.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Gon; Kim, Sun Tae; Kang, Sun Young; Wang, Yiming; Kim, Wook; Kang, Kyu Young

    2008-02-01

    To investigate the rice root proteome, we applied the PEG fractionation technique combined with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis which rendered more well-separated protein spots. Out of the 295 chosen proteins, 93 were identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The proteins were classified as relating to metabolism (38.7%), reactive oxygen species (ROS)-related proteins (22.5%), protein processing/degradation (8.6%), stress/defense (7.5%), energy (6.5%) and signal transduction (5.4%). The high percentage of ROS-related proteins found in rice root brings us to assess the roles of ROS on rice root growth. Treatment with ROS quenching chemicals such as reduced glutathione (GSH), diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) and ascorbate inhibited root growth dose-dependently. Forty-nine proteins identified were either up- or down-regulated by GSH treatment, of which 14 were ROS-related proteins, such noticeably modulated ones as glutathione-S-transferase (GST), superoxide dismutases (SOD) and L-ascorbate peroxidases. The protein levels of four GSTs (NS4, 8, 56 and 57), three APXs (NS46, 49 and 50) and MnSOD (NS45) were strongly reduced by GSH treatment but slightly reduced by ascorbate and DPI. Ascorbate and DPI strongly inhibited expression levels of a catalase A (NP23) and an APX (NS65) but did not affect APXs (NS46, 49 and 50) protein levels. Northern analysis demonstrated that changes in transcript levels of five genes--GST (NS4), GST (NS43), Mn-SOD (NS45), APX (NS50) and APX (NS46/49) in response to ROS quenching chemicals were coherent with patterns shown in two-dimensional electrophoresis analyses. Taken together, we suggest that these proteins may take part in an important role in maintaining cellular redox homeostasis during rice root growth.

  5. Gray matter–related proteins are associated with childhood-onset multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vaibhav; van Pelt, E. Daniëlle; Stoop, Marcel P.; Stingl, Christoph; Ketelslegers, Immy A.; Neuteboom, Rinze F.; Catsman-Berrevoets, Coriene E.; Luider, Theo M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify CSF biomarkers for multiple sclerosis (MS) in children with an initial acquired CNS demyelinating syndrome (ADS). Methods: CSF was collected from a cohort of 39 children with initial ADS, 18 of whom were diagnosed with MS and 21 of whom had a monophasic disease course. Proteomic analysis of trypsinized CSF (20 μL) was performed by nano-liquid chromatography Orbitrap mass spectrometry. Univariate statistical analysis was used to identify differentially abundant proteins between childhood-onset MS and monophasic ADS. Results: A total of 2,260 peptides corresponding to 318 proteins were identified in the total set of samples. Of these 2,260 peptides, 88 were identified as being most distinctive between MS and ADS. Fifty-three peptides, corresponding to 14 proteins, had higher abundance in children with MS compared to children with monophasic ADS. Twelve of these 14 proteins were linked to neuronal functions and structures, such as synapses, axons, and CNS proteases (e.g., neurofascin, carboxypeptidase E, brevican core protein, and contactin-2). The other 2 were functionally related to immune function. The 35 peptides identified with decreased abundance in children with MS corresponded to 7 proteins. Six of them were linked to innate immune function (e.g., haptoglobin, haptoglobin-related protein, C4b-binding protein alpha chain, and monocyte differentiation antigen CD14) and 1 was linked to cellular adhesion (protein diaphanous homolog 1). Conclusion: At first onset of ADS, CSF of children diagnosed with MS showed increased abundance of CNS gray matter–related proteins, whereas CSF of children with a monophasic disease course showed increased abundance of innate immunity–related proteins. PMID:26445729

  6. Defense-related proteins involved in sugarcane responses to biotic stress.

    PubMed

    Souza, Thais P; Dias, Renata O; Silva-Filho, Marcio C

    2017-02-20

    Sugarcane is one of the most important agricultural crops in the world. However, pathogen infection and herbivore attack cause constant losses in yield. Plants respond to pathogen infection by inducing the expression of several protein types, such as glucanases, chitinases, thaumatins, peptidase inhibitors, defensins, catalases and glycoproteins. Proteins induced by pathogenesis are directly or indirectly involved in plant defense, leading to pathogen death or inducing other plant defense responses. Several of these proteins are induced in sugarcane by different pathogens or insects and have antifungal or insecticidal activity. In this review, defense-related proteins in sugarcane are described, with their putative mechanisms of action, pathogen targets and biotechnological perspectives.

  7. Human immune response directed against Plasmodium falciparum heat shock-related proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, N; Zhao, Y; Graves, P; Perez Folgar, J; Maloy, L; Zheng, H

    1990-01-01

    Heat shock-related stress proteins present in all eucaryotes and procaryotes have been shown to be immune targets in a broad range of infections. We have analyzed sera from people exposed primarily to Plasmodium falciparum for specific antibodies against two heat shock-related proteins (proteins similar to the heat shock protein with a molecular weight of 75,000 [Pfhsp] and a glucose-regulated protein with a molecular weight of 72,000 [Pfgrp]). In an immunoprecipitation analysis with metabolically labeled parasites and synthetic peptides in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, specific antibodies against Pfhsp and Pfgrp were detected in the sera of these individuals. Sera from people exposed to a different human malarial parasite, Plasmodium vivax, did not react with the peptides in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Southern blot analysis with DNA isolated from P. falciparum from different geographical locations showed a conservation of genes for these stress proteins; thus, they are likely to be immune targets in various endemic areas. Lymphocytes from two tested immune donors responded in proliferation assays to purified Pfhsp and Pfgrp and purified recombinant proteins. However, a similar response was also seen in lymphocytes from nonimmune individuals and has raised questions pertaining to a generalized responsiveness of lymphocytes to some common determinants present in heat shock-related proteins in various pathogens. Images PMID:1691147

  8. Sequence-related human proteins cluster by degree of evolutionary conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrowka, Ralf; Patzak, Andreas; Herzel, Hanspeter; Holste, Dirk

    2004-11-01

    Gene duplication followed by adaptive evolution is thought to be a central mechanism for the emergence of novel genes. To illuminate the contribution of duplicated protein-coding sequences to the complexity of the human genome, we study the connectivity of pairwise sequence-related human proteins and construct a network (N) of linked protein sequences with shared similarities. We find that (i) the connectivity distribution P(k) for k sequence-related proteins decays as a power law P(k)˜k-γ with γ≈1.2 , (ii) the top rank of N consists of a single large cluster of proteins (≈70%) , while bottom ranks consist of multiple isolated clusters, and (iii) structural characteristics of N show both a high degree of clustering and an intermediate connectivity (“small-world” features). We gain further insight into structural properties of N by studying the relationship between the connectivity distribution and the phylogenetic conservation of proteins in bacteria, plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates. We find that (iv) the proportion of sequence-related proteins increases with increasing extent of evolutionary conservation. Our results support that small-world network properties constitute a footprint of an evolutionary mechanism and extend the traditional interpretation of protein families.

  9. Macroevolutionary trends of atomic composition and related functional group proportion in eukaryotic and prokaryotic proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Juan; Yang, Chun-Lin; Hao, You-Jin; Li, Ying; Chen, Bin; Wen, Jian-Fan

    2014-01-25

    To fully explore the trends of atomic composition during the macroevolution from prokaryote to eukaryote, five atoms (oxygen, sulfur, nitrogen, carbon, hydrogen) and related functional groups in prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins were surveyed and compared. Genome-wide analysis showed that eukaryotic proteins have more oxygen, sulfur and nitrogen atoms than prokaryotes do. Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG) analysis revealed that oxygen, sulfur, carbon and hydrogen frequencies are higher in eukaryotic proteins than in their prokaryotic orthologs. Furthermore, functional group analysis demonstrated that eukaryotic proteins tend to have higher proportions of sulfhydryl, hydroxyl and acylamino, but lower of sulfide and carboxyl. Taken together, an apparent trend of increase was observed for oxygen and sulfur atoms in the macroevolution; the variation of oxygen and sulfur compositions and their related functional groups in macroevolution made eukaryotic proteins carry more useful functional groups. These results will be helpful for better understanding the functional significances of atomic composition evolution.

  10. Clinical spectrum and diagnostic value of antibodies against the potassium channel-related protein complex☆

    PubMed Central

    Montojo, M.T.; Petit-Pedrol, M.; Graus, F.; Dalmau, J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Antibodies against a protein complex that includes voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKC) have been reported in patients with limbic encephalitis, peripheral nerve hyperexcitability, Morvan's syndrome, and a large variety of neurological syndromes. Review summary In this article, a review is presented of the syndromes associated with antibodies against VGKC-related proteins and the main antigens of this protein complex, the proteins LGI1 (leucine rich glioma inactivated protein 1) and Caspr2 (contactin-associated protein-like 2). The conceptual problems and clinical implications of the description of antibodies against VGKC-related proteins other than LGI1 and Caspr2 are also discussed. Although initial studies indicated the occurrence of antibodies against VGKC, recent investigations have shown that the main antigens are a neuronal secreted protein known as LGI1 which modulates synaptic excitability, and a protein called Caspr2 located on the cell surface and processes of neurons of different brain regions, and at the juxtaparanodal region of myelinated axons. While antibodies against LGI1 preferentially associate with classical limbic encephalitis, antibodies against Caspr2 associate with a wider spectrum of symptoms, including Morvan's syndrome, peripheral nerve hyperexcitability or neuromyotonia, and limbic or more extensive encephalitis. In addition there are reports of patients with antibodies against VGKC-related proteins that are different from LGI1 or Caspr2. In these cases, the identity and location of the antigens are unknown, the syndrome association is not specific, and the response to treatment uncertain. Conclusions The discovery of antigens such as LGI1 and Caspr2 has resulted in a clinical and molecular definition of the broad group of diseases previously attributed to antibodies against VGKC. Considering the literature that describes the presence of antibodies against VGKC other than LGI1 and Caspr2 proteins, we propose a practical

  11. The Dishevelled Protein Family: Still Rather a Mystery After Over 20 Years of Molecular Studies

    PubMed Central

    Mlodzik, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Dishevelled (Dsh) is a key component of Wnt-signaling pathways and possibly also has other functional requirements. Dsh appears to be a key factor to interpret Wnt signals coming via the Wnt-receptor family, the Frizzled proteins, from the plasma membrane and route them into the correct intracellular pathways. However, how Dsh is regulated to relay signal flow to specific and distinct cellular responses upon interaction with the same Wnt-receptor family remains very poorly understood. PMID:26969973

  12. WDR76 Co-Localizes with Heterochromatin Related Proteins and Rapidly Responds to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, Joshua M.; Sardiu, Mihaela E.; Groppe, Brad D.; Thornton, Janet L.; Liu, Xingyu; Dayebgadoh, Gerald; Banks, Charles A.; Slaughter, Brian D.; Unruh, Jay R.; Workman, Jerry L.; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins that respond to DNA damage play critical roles in normal and diseased states in human biology. Studies have suggested that the S. cerevisiae protein CMR1/YDL156w is associated with histones and is possibly associated with DNA repair and replication processes. Through a quantitative proteomic analysis of affinity purifications here we show that the human homologue of this protein, WDR76, shares multiple protein associations with the histones H2A, H2B, and H4. Furthermore, our quantitative proteomic analysis of WDR76 associated proteins demonstrated links to proteins in the DNA damage response like PARP1 and XRCC5 and heterochromatin related proteins like CBX1, CBX3, and CBX5. Co-immunoprecipitation studies validated these interactions. Next, quantitative imaging studies demonstrated that WDR76 was recruited to laser induced DNA damage immediately after induction, and we compared the recruitment of WDR76 to laser induced DNA damage to known DNA damage proteins like PARP1, XRCC5, and RPA1. In addition, WDR76 co-localizes to puncta with the heterochromatin proteins CBX1 and CBX5, which are also recruited to DNA damage but much less intensely than WDR76. This work demonstrates the chromatin and DNA damage protein associations of WDR76 and demonstrates the rapid response of WDR76 to laser induced DNA damage. PMID:27248496

  13. Cilia/Ift protein and motor-related bone diseases and mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xue; Yang, Shuying

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are essential cellular organelles projecting from the cell surface to sense and transduce developmental signaling. They are tiny but have complicated structures containing microtubule (MT)-based internal structures (the axoneme) and mother centriole formed basal body. Intraflagellar transport (Ift) operated by Ift proteins and motors are indispensable for cilia formation and function. Mutations in Ift proteins or Ift motors cause various human diseases, some of which have severe bone defects. Over the last few decades, major advances have occurred in understanding the roles of these proteins and cilia in bone development and remodeling by examining cilia/Ift protein-related human diseases and establishing mouse transgenic models. In this review, we describe current advances in the understanding of the cilia/Ift structure and function. We further summarize cilia/Ift-related human diseases and current mouse models with an emphasis on bone-related phenotypes, cilia morphology, and signaling pathways. PMID:25553465

  14. Cilia/Ift protein and motor -related bone diseases and mouse models.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xue; Yang, Shuying

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are essential cellular organelles projecting from the cell surface to sense and transduce developmental signaling. They are tiny but have complicated structures containing microtubule (MT)-based internal structures (the axoneme) and mother centriole formed basal body. Intraflagellar transport (Ift) operated by Ift proteins and motors are indispensable for cilia formation and function. Mutations in Ift proteins or Ift motors cause various human diseases, some of which have severe bone defects. Over the last few decades, major advances have occurred in understanding the roles of these proteins and cilia in bone development and remodeling by examining cilia/Ift protein-related human diseases and establishing mouse transgenic models. In this review, we describe current advances in the understanding of the cilia/Ift structure and function. We further summarize cilia/Ift-related human diseases and current mouse models with an emphasis on bone-related phenotypes, cilia morphology, and signaling pathways.

  15. Muscle Protein Alterations in LGMD2I Patients With Different Mutations in the Fukutin-related Protein Gene

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Lydia U.; Velloso, Fernando J.; Lima, Bruno L.; Fogaça, Luciana L.Q.; de Paula, Flávia; Vieira, Natássia M.; Zatz, Mayana; Vainzof, Mariz

    2008-01-01

    Fukutin-related protein (FKRP) is a protein involved in the glycosylation of cell surface molecules. Pathogenic mutations in the FKRP gene cause both the more severe congenital muscular dystrophy Type 1C and the milder Limb-Girdle Type 2I form (LGMD2I). Here we report muscle histological alterations and the analysis of 11 muscle proteins: dystrophin, four sarcoglycans, calpain 3, dysferlin, telethonin, collagen VI, α-DG, and α2-laminin, in muscle biopsies from 13 unrelated LGMD2I patients with 10 different FKRP mutations. In all, a typical dystrophic pattern was observed. In eight patients, a high frequency of rimmed vacuoles was also found. A variable degree of α2-laminin deficiency was detected in 12 patients through immunofluorescence analysis, and 10 patients presented α-DG deficiency on sarcolemmal membranes. Additionally, through Western blot analysis, deficiency of calpain 3 and dystrophin bands was found in four and two patients, respectively. All the remaining proteins showed a similar pattern to normal controls. These results suggest that, in our population of LGMD2I patients, different mutations in the FKRP gene are associated with several secondary muscle protein reductions, and the deficiencies of α2-laminin and α-DG on sections are prevalent, independently of mutation type or clinical severity. (J Histochem Cytochem 56:995–1001, 2008) PMID:18645206

  16. Are ancient proteins responsible for the age-related decline in health and fitness?

    PubMed

    Truscott, Roger John Willis

    2010-02-01

    There are a number of sites in the body where proteins are present for decades and sometimes for all of our lives. Over a period of many years, such proteins are subject to two types of modifications. The first results from the intrinsic instability of certain amino acid residues and leads to deamidation, racemization, and truncation. The second type can be traced to relentless covalent modification of such ancient proteins by reactive biochemicals produced during cellular metabolism.The accumulation of both types of posttranslational modifications over time may have important consequences for the properties of tissues that contain such proteins. It is proposed that the age-related decline in function of organs such as the eye, heart, brain, and lung, as well as skeletal components, comes about, in part, from the posttranslational modification of these long-lived proteins. Examples are provided in which this may be an important factor in the etiology of age-related conditions. As the properties of these proteins alter inexorably over time, the molecular changes contribute to a gradual decline in the function of individual organs and also tissues such as joints. This cumulative degeneration of old proteins at multiple sites in the body may also constrain the ultimate life span of the individual. The human lens may be particularly useful for discovering which reactive metabolites in the body are of most importance for posttranslational modification of long-lived proteins.

  17. Prion Protein M129V Polymorphism Affects Retrieval-Related Brain Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchmann, Andreas; Mondadori, Christian R. A.; Hanggi, Jurgen; Aerni, Amanda; Vrticka, Pascal; Luechinger, Roger; Boesiger, Peter; Hock, Christoph; Nitsch, Roger M.; de Quervain, Dominique J.-F.; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; Henke, Katharina

    2008-01-01

    The prion protein Met129Val polymorphism has recently been related to human long-term memory with carriers of either the 129[superscript MM] or the 129[superscript MV] genotype recalling 17% more words than 129[superscript VV] carriers at 24 h following learning. Here, we sampled genotype differences in retrieval-related brain activity at 30 min…

  18. Expression of Autophagy and Reactive Oxygen Species-Related Proteins in Lacrimal Gland Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Ja Seung; Kim, Ji Won

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the difference of expression of autophagy and reactive oxygen species (ROS) related proteins in adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) of lacrimal gland in comparison with ACC of salivary gland. Materials and Methods Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples from patients pathologically diagnosed as lacrimal gland ACC (n=11) and salivary gland ACC (n=64) were used. Immunochemistry was used to measure expression of autophagy related proteins [beclin-1, light chain (LC) 3A, LC3B, p62, and BCL2/adenovirus E1B 19 kDa protein-interacting protein 3 (BNIP3)] and ROS related proteins [catalase, thioredoxinreductase, glutathione S-transferasepi (GSTpi), thioredoxin interacting protein, and manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD)]. The prognostic factors related to disease-free and overall survival (OS) in lacrimal gland ACC by log-rank tests, were determined. Results GSTpi in stromal cells was more highly expressed in lacrimal gland ACC (p=0.006), however, MnSOD in epithelial cells was expressed more in salivary gland ACC (p=0.046). LC3B positivity and BNIP3 positivity in epithelial component were associated with shorter disease-free survival (both p=0.002), and LC3A positivity in stromal component was the factor related to shorter OS (p=0.005). Conclusion This is the first study to demonstrate the expression of autophagy and ROS related proteins in lacrimal gland ACC in comparison with the salivary gland ACC, which would provide a basis for further study of autophagy and ROS mechanism as novel therapeutic targets in lacrimal gland ACC. PMID:26847304

  19. A mathematically related singularity and the maximum size of protein domains.

    PubMed

    Szilágyi, András

    2008-06-01

    In a paper titled "A topologically related singularity suggests a maximum preferred size for protein domains" (Zbilut et al., Proteins 2007;66:621-629), Zbilut et al. claim to have found a singularity in certain geometrical properties of protein structures, and suggest that this singularity may limit the maximum size of protein domains. They find further support for the singularity in their analysis of G-factors calculated by the PROCHECK program. Here, we show that the claimed singularity is a mathematical artifact with no physical meaning, and we reanalyze the G-factors to show that Zbilut et al.'s results are due to a single outlier in the data. Thus, the existence of an actual singularity in the topological properties of proteins is not supported by the findings of Zbilut et al.

  20. Arabidopsis dynamin-related protein 1A polymers bind, but do not tubulate, liposomes

    SciTech Connect

    Backues, Steven K.; Bednarek, Sebastian Y.

    2010-03-19

    The Arabidopsis dynamin-related protein 1A (AtDRP1A) is involved in endocytosis and cell plate maturation in Arabidopsis. Unlike dynamin, AtDRP1A does not have any recognized membrane binding or protein-protein interaction domains. We report that GTPase active AtDRP1A purified from Escherichia coli as a fusion to maltose binding protein forms homopolymers visible by negative staining electron microscopy. These polymers interact with protein-free liposomes whose lipid composition mimics that of the inner leaflet of the Arabidopsis plasma membrane, suggesting that lipid-binding may play a role in AtDRP1A function. However, AtDRP1A polymers do not appear to assemble and disassemble in a dynamic fashion and do not have the ability to tubulate liposomes in vitro, suggesting that additional factors or modifications are necessary for AtDRP1A's in vivo function.

  1. Probing the relation between protein-protein interactions and DNA binding for a linker mutant of the bacterial nucleoid protein H-NS.

    PubMed

    Giangrossi, Mara; Wintraecken, Kathelijne; Spurio, Roberto; de Vries, Renko

    2014-02-01

    We have investigated the relationship between oligomerization in solution and DNA binding for the bacterial nucleoid protein H-NS. This was done by comparing oligomerization and DNA binding of H-NS with that of a H-NS D68V-D71V linker mutant. The double linker mutation D68V-D71V, that makes the linker significantly more hydrophobic, leads to a dramatically enhanced and strongly temperature-dependent H-NS oligomerization in solution, as detected by dynamic light scattering. The DNA binding affinity of H-NS D68V-D71V for the hns promoter region is lower and has stronger temperature dependence than that of H-NS. DNase I footprinting experiments show that at high concentrations, regions protected by H-NS D68V-D71V are larger and less defined than for H-NS. In vitro transcription assays show that the enhanced protection also leads to enhanced transcriptional repression. Whereas the lower affinity of the H-NS D68V-D71V for DNA could be caused by competition between oligomerization in solution and oligomerization on DNA, the larger size of protected regions clearly confirms the notion that cooperative binding of H-NS to DNA is related to protein-protein interactions. These results emphasize the relative contributions of protein-protein interactions and substrate-dependent oligomerization in the control of gene repression operated by H-NS.

  2. On the nature of a glassy state of matter in a hydrated protein: Relation to protein function

    PubMed Central

    Teeter, M. M.; Yamano, A.; Stec, B.; Mohanty, U.

    2001-01-01

    Diverse biochemical and biophysical experiments indicate that all proteins, regardless of size or origin, undergo a dynamic transition near 200 K. The cause of this shift in dynamic behavior, termed a “glass transition,” and its relation to protein function are important open questions. One explanation postulated for the transition is solidification of correlated motions in proteins below the transition. We verified this conjecture by showing that crambin's radius of gyration (Rg) remains constant below ≈180 K. We show that both atom position and dynamics of protein and solvent are physically coupled, leading to a novel cooperative state. This glassy state is identified by negative slopes of the Debye-Waller (B) factor vs. temperature. It is composed of multisubstate side chains and solvent. Based on generalization of Adam-Gibbs' notion of a cooperatively rearranging region and decrease of the total entropy with temperature, we calculate the slope of the Debye-Waller factor. The results are in accord with experiment. PMID:11572978

  3. Characterization of globulin storage proteins of a low prolamin cereal species in relation to celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Gell, Gyöngyvér; Kovács, Krisztina; Veres, Gábor; Korponay-Szabó, Ilma R.; Juhász, Angéla

    2017-01-01

    Brachypodium distachyon, a small annual grass with seed storage globulins as primary protein reserves was used in our study to analyse the toxic nature of non-prolamin seed storage proteins related to celiac disease. The main storage proteins of B. distachyon are the 7S globulin type proteins and the 11S, 12S seed storage globulins similar to oat and rice. Immunoblot analyses using serum samples from celiac disease patients were carried out followed by the identification of immune-responsive proteins using mass spectrometry. Serum samples from celiac patients on a gluten-free diet, from patients with Crohn’s disease and healthy subjects, were used as controls. The identified proteins with intense serum-IgA reactivity belong to the 7S and 11–12S seed globulin family. Structure prediction and epitope predictions analyses confirmed the presence of celiac disease-related linear B cell epitope homologs and the presence of peptide regions with strong HLA-DQ8 and DQ2 binding capabilities. These results highlight that both MHC-II presentation and B cell response may be developed not only to prolamins but also to seed storage globulins. This is the first study of the non-prolamin type seed storage proteins of Brachypodium from the aspect of the celiac disease. PMID:28051174

  4. pFlexAna: detecting conformational changes in remotely related proteins

    PubMed Central

    Nigham, Anshul; Tucker-Kellogg, Lisa; Mihalek, Ivana; Verma, Chandra; Hsu, David

    2008-01-01

    The pFlexAna (protein flexibility analyzer) web server detects and displays conformational changes in remotely related proteins, without relying on sequence homology. To do so, it first applies a reliable statistical test to align core protein fragments that are structurally similar and then clusters these aligned fragment pairs into ‘super-alignments’, according to the similarity of geometric transformations that align them. The result is that the dominant conformational changes occur between the clusters, while the smaller conformational changes occur within a cluster. pFlexAna is available at http://bigbird.comp.nus.edu.sg/pfa2/. PMID:18477634

  5. Hexapeptide libraries for enhanced protein PTM identification and relative abundance profiling in whole human saliva.

    PubMed

    Bandhakavi, Sricharan; Van Riper, Susan K; Tawfik, Pierre N; Stone, Matthew D; Haddad, Tufia; Rhodus, Nelson L; Carlis, John V; Griffin, Timothy J

    2011-03-04

    Dynamic range compression (DRC) by hexapeptide libraries increases MS/MS-based identification of lower-abundance proteins in complex mixtures. However, two unanswered questions impede fully realizing DRC's potential in shotgun proteomics. First, does DRC enhance identification of post-translationally modified proteins? Second, can DRC be incorporated into a workflow enabling relative protein abundance profiling? We sought to answer both questions analyzing human whole saliva. Addressing question one, we coupled DRC with covalent glycopeptide enrichment and MS/MS. With DRC we identified ∼2 times more N-linked glycoproteins and their glycosylation sites than without DRC, dramatically increasing the known salivary glycoprotein catalog. Addressing question two, we compared differentially stable isotope-labeled saliva samples pooled from healthy and metastatic breast cancer women using a multidimensional peptide fractionation-based workflow, analyzing in parallel one sample portion with DRC and one portion without. Our workflow categorizes proteins with higher absolute abundance, whose relative abundance ratios are altered by DRC, from proteins of lower absolute abundance detected only after DRC. Within each of these salivary protein categories, we identified novel abundance changes putatively associated with breast cancer, demonstrating feasibility and benefits of DRC for relative abundance profiling. Collectively, our results bring us closer to realizing the full potential of DRC for proteomic studies.

  6. Calculation of the relative metastabilities of proteins in subcellular compartments of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Jeffrey M

    2009-01-01

    Background Protein subcellular localization and differences in oxidation state between subcellular compartments are two well-studied features of the the cellular organization of S. cerevisiae (yeast). Theories about the origin of subcellular organization are assisted by computational models that can integrate data from observations of compositional and chemical properties of the system. Presentation and implications of the hypothesis I adopt the hypothesis that the state of yeast subcellular organization is in a local energy minimum. This hypothesis implies that equilibrium thermodynamic models can yield predictions about the interdependence between populations of proteins and their subcellular chemical environments. Testing the hypothesis Three types of tests are proposed. First, there should be correlations between modeled and observed oxidation states for different compartments. Second, there should be a correspondence between the energy requirements of protein formation and the order the appearance of organelles during cellular development. Third, there should be correlations between the predicted and observed relative abundances of interacting proteins within compartments. Results The relative metastability fields of subcellular homologs of glutaredoxin and thioredoxin indicate a trend from less to more oxidizing as mitochondrion – cytoplasm – nucleus. Representing the overall amino acid compositions of proteins in 23 different compartments each with a single reference model protein suggests that the formation reactions for proteins in the vacuole (in relatively oxidizing conditions), ER and early Golgi (in relatively reducing conditions) are relatively highly favored, while that for the microtubule is the most costly. The relative abundances of model proteins for each compartment inferred from experimental data were found in some cases to correlate with the predicted abundances, and both positive and negative correlations were found for some assemblages

  7. Detection of proteins related to starch synthase activity in the developing mungbean (Vigna radiata L.).

    PubMed

    Ko, Yuan-Tih; Pan, Chun-Hsu; Lee, Ya-Ting; Chang, Jin-Yi

    2005-06-15

    Proteins associated with starch synthase (SS) activities were identified in immature mungbeans (Vigna radiata L. cv KPS1). Seed soluble extract was separated by native-PAGE and subjected to in situ activity staining. The gel zymogram located starch-enzyme complex bands. The soluble extract was also partitioned by preparative-IEF and screened for SS activity using radioactive assay. IEF fractions eluted within pH 4-6 revealed enriched SS activity of 145-fold. Parallel comparison of the protein profiles among the activity stained enzyme complex and the active isoelectric focused fractions on SDS-PAGE depicted three SS-activity-related proteins with molecular size of 32, 53, and 85 kDa. The 85 kDa protein, however, was identified to be methionine synthase by MALDI-TOF analysis and should be a protein physically associated with the active SS. Polyclonal antibodies raised from eluted native enzyme complex neutralized up to 90% activity and antigenically recognize the other 53 and 32 kDa proteins on Western blot. Antibodies raised from the two individual denatured proteins were able to neutralize SS activities near 60% separately, indicating that the 53 kDa and 32 proteins associated with SS activity are potentially involved in starch biosynthesis during mungbean seed development.

  8. A cytoskeleton-related gene, uso1, is required for intracellular protein transport in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant strains blocked in the protein secretion pathway are not able to induce sexual aggregation. We have utilized the defect of aggregation to concentrate the secretion- deficient cells and identified a new gene which functions in the process of intracellular protein transport. The new mutant, uso1, is temperature sensitive for growth and protein secretion. At the restrictive temperature (37 degrees C), uso1 mutant accumulated the core-glycosylated precursor form of the exported protein invertase in the cells. Ultrastructural study of the mutant fixed by the freeze- substitution method revealed expansion of the nuclear envelope lumen and accumulation of the ER at the restrictive temperature. Abnormally oriented bundles of microtubules were often found in the nucleus. The USO1 gene was cloned by complementation of the uso1 temperature- sensitive growth defect. DNA sequence analysis revealed a hydrophilic protein of 1790 amino acids with a COOH-terminal 1,100-amino acid-long alpha-helical structure characteristic of the coiled-coil rod region of the cytoskeleton-related proteins. These observations suggest that Uso1 protein plays a role as a cytoskeletal component in the protein transport from the ER to the later secretory compartments. PMID:2010462

  9. Intake of Meat Proteins Substantially Increased the Relative Abundance of Genus Lactobacillus in Rat Feces.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingying; Lin, Xisha; Li, He; Li, Yingqiu; Shi, Xuebin; Zhao, Fan; Xu, Xinglian; Li, Chunbao; Zhou, Guanghong

    2016-01-01

    Diet has been shown to have a critical influence on gut bacteria and host health, and high levels of red meat in diet have been shown to increase colonic DNA damage and thus be harmful to gut health. However, previous studies focused more on the effects of meat than of meat proteins. In order to investigate whether intake of meat proteins affects the composition and metabolic activities of gut microbiota, feces were collected from growing rats that were fed with either meat proteins (from beef, pork or fish) or non-meat proteins (casein or soy) for 14 days. The resulting composition of gut microbiota was profiled by sequencing the V4-V5 region of the 16S ribosomal RNA genes and the short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) were analyzed using gas chromatography. The composition of gut microbiota and SCFA levels were significantly different between the five diet groups. At a recommended dose of 20% protein in the diet, meat protein-fed rats had a higher relative abundance of the beneficial genus Lactobacillus, but lower levels of SCFAs and SCFA-producing bacteria including Fusobacterium, Bacteroides and Prevotella, compared with the soy protein-fed group. Further work is needed on the regulatory pathways linking dietary protein intake to gut microbiota.

  10. Protein markers for identification of Yersinia pestis and their variation related to culture

    SciTech Connect

    Wunschel, David S.; Engelmann, Heather E.; Victry, Kristin D.; Clowers, Brian H.; Sorensen, Christina M.; Valentine, Nancy B.; Mahoney Fahey, Christine M.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Wahl, Karen L.

    2013-12-11

    The detection of high consequence pathogens, such as Yersinia pestis, is well established in biodefense laboratories for bioterror situations. Laboratory protocols are well established using specified culture media and a growth temperature of 37 °C for expression of specific antigens. Direct detection of Y. pestis protein markers, without prior culture, depends on their expression. Unfortunately protein expression can be impacted by the culture medium which cannot be predicted ahead of time. Furthermore, higher biomass yields are obtained at the optimal growth temperature (i.e. 28 °C–30 °C) and therefore are more likely to be used for bulk production. Analysis of Y. pestis grown on several types of media at 30 °C showed that several protein markers were found to be differentially detected in different media. Analysis of the identified proteins against a comprehensive database provided an additional level of organism identification. Peptides corresponding to variable regions of some proteins could separate large groups of strains and aid in organism identification. This work illustrates the need to understand variability of protein expression for detection targets. The potential for relating expression changes of known proteins to specific media factors, even in nutrient rich and chemically complex culture medium, may provide the opportunity to draw forensic information from protein profiles.

  11. Dataset of eye disease-related proteins analyzed using the unfolding mutation screen

    PubMed Central

    McCafferty, Caitlyn L.; Sergeev, Yuri V.

    2016-01-01

    A number of genetic diseases are a result of missense mutations in protein structure. These mutations can lead to severe protein destabilization and misfolding. The unfolding mutation screen (UMS) is a computational method that calculates unfolding propensities for every possible missense mutation in a protein structure. The UMS validation demonstrated a good agreement with experimental and phenotypical data. 15 protein structures (a combination of homology models and crystal structures) were analyzed using UMS. The standard and clustered heat maps, and patterned protein structure from the analysis were stored in a UMS library. The library is currently composed of 15 protein structures from 14 inherited eye diseases including retina degenerations, glaucoma, and cataracts, and contains data for 181,110 mutations. The UMS protein library introduces 13 new human models of eye disease related proteins and is the first collection of the consistently calculated unfolding propensities, which could be used as a tool for the express analysis of novel mutations in clinical practice, next generation sequencing, and genotype-to-phenotype relationships in inherited eye disease. PMID:27922631

  12. Electrophoresis and spectrometric analyses of adaptation-related proteins in thermally stressed Chromobacterium violaceum.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, I B; Castro, D P; Nogueira, P P O; Angelo, P C S; Nogueira, P A; Gonçalves, J F C; Pereira, A M R F; Garcia, J S; Souza, G H M F; Arruda, M A Z; Eberlin, M N; Astolfi-Filho, S; Andrade, E V; López-Lozano, J L

    2013-10-29

    Chromobacterium violaceum is a Gram-negative proteobacteria found in water and soil; it is widely distributed in tropical and subtropical regions, such as the Amazon rainforest. We examined protein expression changes that occur in C. violaceum at different growth temperatures using electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. The total number of spots detected was 1985; the number ranged from 99 to 380 in each assay. The proteins that were identified spectrometrically were categorized as chaperones, proteins expressed exclusively under heat stress, enzymes involved in the respiratory and fermentation cycles, ribosomal proteins, and proteins related to transport and secretion. Controlling inverted repeat of chaperone expression and inverted repeat DNA binding sequences, as well as regions recognized by sigma factor 32, elements involved in the genetic regulation of the bacterial stress response, were identified in the promoter regions of several of the genes coding proteins, involved in the C. violaceum stress response. We found that 30 °C is the optimal growth temperature for C. violaceum, whereas 25, 35, and 40 °C are stressful temperatures that trigger the expression of chaperones, superoxide dismutase, a probable small heat shock protein, a probable phasing, ferrichrome-iron receptor protein, elongation factor P, and an ornithine carbamoyltransferase catabolite. This information improves our comprehension of the mechanisms involved in stress adaptation by C. violaceum.

  13. Incorporating significant amino acid pairs and protein domains to predict RNA splicing-related proteins with functional roles.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Justin Bo-Kai; Huang, Kai-Yao; Weng, Tzu-Ya; Huang, Chien-Hsun; Lee, Tzong-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Machinery of pre-mRNA splicing is carried out through the interaction of RNA sequence elements and a variety of RNA splicing-related proteins (SRPs) (e.g. spliceosome and splicing factors). Alternative splicing, which is an important post-transcriptional regulation in eukaryotes, gives rise to multiple mature mRNA isoforms, which encodes proteins with functional diversities. However, the regulation of RNA splicing is not yet fully elucidated, partly because SRPs have not yet been exhaustively identified and the experimental identification is labor-intensive. Therefore, we are motivated to design a new method for identifying SRPs with their functional roles in the regulation of RNA splicing. The experimentally verified SRPs were manually curated from research articles. According to the functional annotation of Splicing Related Gene Database, the collected SRPs were further categorized into four functional groups including small nuclear Ribonucleoprotein, Splicing Factor, Splicing Regulation Factor and Novel Spliceosome Protein. The composition of amino acid pairs indicates that there are remarkable differences among four functional groups of SRPs. Then, support vector machines (SVMs) were utilized to learn the predictive models for identifying SRPs as well as their functional roles. The cross-validation evaluation presents that the SVM models trained with significant amino acid pairs and functional domains could provide a better predictive performance. In addition, the independent testing demonstrates that the proposed method could accurately identify SRPs in mammals/plants as well as effectively distinguish between SRPs and RNA-binding proteins. This investigation provides a practical means to identifying potential SRPs and a perspective for exploring the regulation of RNA splicing.

  14. Incorporating significant amino acid pairs and protein domains to predict RNA splicing-related proteins with functional roles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Justin Bo-Kai; Huang, Kai-Yao; Weng, Tzu-Ya; Huang, Chien-Hsun; Lee, Tzong-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Machinery of pre-mRNA splicing is carried out through the interaction of RNA sequence elements and a variety of RNA splicing-related proteins (SRPs) (e.g. spliceosome and splicing factors). Alternative splicing, which is an important post-transcriptional regulation in eukaryotes, gives rise to multiple mature mRNA isoforms, which encodes proteins with functional diversities. However, the regulation of RNA splicing is not yet fully elucidated, partly because SRPs have not yet been exhaustively identified and the experimental identification is labor-intensive. Therefore, we are motivated to design a new method for identifying SRPs with their functional roles in the regulation of RNA splicing. The experimentally verified SRPs were manually curated from research articles. According to the functional annotation of Splicing Related Gene Database, the collected SRPs were further categorized into four functional groups including small nuclear Ribonucleoprotein, Splicing Factor, Splicing Regulation Factor and Novel Spliceosome Protein. The composition of amino acid pairs indicates that there are remarkable differences among four functional groups of SRPs. Then, support vector machines (SVMs) were utilized to learn the predictive models for identifying SRPs as well as their functional roles. The cross-validation evaluation presents that the SVM models trained with significant amino acid pairs and functional domains could provide a better predictive performance. In addition, the independent testing demonstrates that the proposed method could accurately identify SRPs in mammals/plants as well as effectively distinguish between SRPs and RNA-binding proteins. This investigation provides a practical means to identifying potential SRPs and a perspective for exploring the regulation of RNA splicing.

  15. The Diversity of Yellow-Related Proteins in Sand Flies (Diptera: Psychodidae)

    PubMed Central

    Sima, Michal; Novotny, Marian; Pravda, Lukas; Sumova, Petra; Rohousova, Iva; Volf, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Yellow-related proteins (YRPs) present in sand fly saliva act as affinity binders of bioamines, and help the fly to complete a bloodmeal by scavenging the physiological signals of damaged cells. They are also the main antigens in sand fly saliva and their recombinant form is used as a marker of host exposure to sand flies. Moreover, several salivary proteins and plasmids coding these proteins induce strong immune response in hosts bitten by sand flies and are being used to design protecting vaccines against Leishmania parasites. In this study, thirty two 3D models of different yellow-related proteins from thirteen sand fly species of two genera were constructed based on the known protein structure from Lutzomyia longipalpis. We also studied evolutionary relationships among species based on protein sequences as well as sequence and structural variability of their ligand-binding site. All of these 33 sand fly YRPs shared a similar structure, including a unique tunnel that connects the ligand-binding site with the solvent by two independent paths. However, intraspecific modifications found among these proteins affects the charges of the entrances to the tunnel, the length of the tunnel and its hydrophobicity. We suggest that these structural and sequential differences influence the ligand-binding abilities of these proteins and provide sand flies with a greater number of YRP paralogs with more nuanced answers to bioamines. All these characteristics allow us to better evaluate these proteins with respect to their potential use as part of anti-Leishmania vaccines or as an antigen to measure host exposure to sand flies. PMID:27812196

  16. Modified spectral count index (mSCI) for estimation of protein abundance by protein relative identification possibility (RIPpro): a new proteomic technological parameter.

    PubMed

    Sun, Aihua; Zhang, Jiyang; Wang, Chunping; Yang, Dong; Wei, Handong; Zhu, Yunping; Jiang, Ying; He, Fuchu

    2009-11-01

    Peptides Count (SC) was widely used for protein abundance estimation in proteomics. On the basis of that, Mann and co-workers corrected the SC by dividing spectrum counts by the number of observable peptides per protein and named it PAI. Here we present modified spectral count index (mSCI) for protein abundance estimation, which was defined as the number of observed peptides divided by protein relative identification possibility (RIPpro). RIPpro was derived from 6788 mRNA and protein expression data (collected from human liver samples) and related to proteins' three physical and chemical properties (MW/pI/Hp). For 46 proteins in mouse neuro2a cells, mSCI shows a linear relationship with the actual protein concentration, similar or better than PAI abundance. Also, multiple linear regressions were performed to quantitative assess several factors' impact on the mRNA/protein abundance correlation. Our results shown that the primary factor affecting protein levels was mRNA abundance (32-37%), followed by variability in protein measurement, MW and protein turnover (7-12%,7-9% and 2-3%, respectively). Interestingly, we found that the concordance between mRNA transcripts and protein expression was not consistent among all protein functional categories. This correlation was lower for signaling proteins as compared to metabolism genes. It was determined that RIPpro was the primary factor affecting signaling protein abundance (23% on average), followed by mRNA abundance (17%). In contrast, only 5% (on average) of the variability of metabolic protein abundance was explained by RIPpro, much lower than mRNA abundance (40%). These results provide the impetus for further investigation of the biological significance of mechanisms regulating the mRNA/protein abundance correlation and provide additional insight into the relative importance of the technological parameter (RIPpro) in mRNA/protein correlation research.

  17. Myotubularin-related proteins 3 and 4 interact with polo-like kinase 1 and centrosomal protein of 55 kDa to ensure proper abscission.

    PubMed

    St-Denis, Nicole; Gupta, Gagan D; Lin, Zhen Yuan; Gonzalez-Badillo, Beatriz; Pelletier, Laurence; Gingras, Anne-Claude

    2015-04-01

    The myotubularins are a family of phosphatases that dephosphorylate the phosphatidylinositols phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol-3,5-phosphate. Several family members are mutated in disease, yet the biological functions of the majority of myotubularins remain unknown. To gain insight into the roles of the individual enzymes, we have used affinity purification coupled to mass spectrometry to identify protein-protein interactions for the myotubularins. The myotubularin interactome comprises 66 high confidence (false discovery rate ≤1%) interactions, including 18 pairwise interactions between individual myotubularins. The results reveal a number of potential signaling contexts for this family of enzymes, including an intriguing, novel role for myotubularin-related protein 3 and myotubularin-related protein 4 in the regulation of abscission, the final step of mitosis in which the membrane bridge remaining between two daughter cells is cleaved. Both depletion and overexpression of either myotubularin-related protein 3 or myotubularin-related protein 4 result in abnormal midbody morphology and cytokinesis failure. Interestingly, myotubularin-related protein 3 and myotubularin-related protein 4 do not exert their effects through lipid regulation at the midbody, but regulate abscission during early mitosis, by interacting with the mitotic kinase polo-like kinase 1, and with centrosomal protein of 55 kDa (CEP55), an important regulator of abscission. Structure-function analysis reveals that, consistent with known intramyotubularin interactions, myotubularin-related protein 3 and myotubularin-related protein 4 interact through their respective coiled coil domains. The interaction between myotubularin-related protein 3 and polo-like kinase 1 relies on the divergent, nonlipid binding Fab1, YOTB, Vac1, and EEA1 domain of myotubularin-related protein 3, and myotubularin-related protein 4 interacts with CEP55 through a short GPPXXXY motif, analogous to

  18. PPInterFinder--a mining tool for extracting causal relations on human proteins from literature.

    PubMed

    Raja, Kalpana; Subramani, Suresh; Natarajan, Jeyakumar

    2013-01-01

    One of the most common and challenging problem in biomedical text mining is to mine protein-protein interactions (PPIs) from MEDLINE abstracts and full-text research articles because PPIs play a major role in understanding the various biological processes and the impact of proteins in diseases. We implemented, PPInterFinder--a web-based text mining tool to extract human PPIs from biomedical literature. PPInterFinder uses relation keyword co-occurrences with protein names to extract information on PPIs from MEDLINE abstracts and consists of three phases. First, it identifies the relation keyword using a parser with Tregex and a relation keyword dictionary. Next, it automatically identifies the candidate PPI pairs with a set of rules related to PPI recognition. Finally, it extracts the relations by matching the sentence with a set of 11 specific patterns based on the syntactic nature of PPI pair. We find that PPInterFinder is capable of predicting PPIs with the accuracy of 66.05% on AIMED corpus and outperforms most of the existing systems. DATABASE URL: http://www.biomining-bu.in/ppinterfinder/

  19. C-reactive protein is a biomarker of AFP-negative HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    She, Sha; Xiang, Yi; Yang, Min; Ding, Xiangchun; Liu, Xiaoyan; Ma, Lina; Liu, Qing; Liu, Bin; Lu, Zhenhui; Li, Shiying; Liu, Yi; Ran, Xiaoping; Xu, Xiaoming; Hu, Huaidong; Hu, Peng; Zhang, Dazhi; Ren, Hong; Yang, Yixuan

    2015-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most aggressive cancers worldwide and is associated with the high rates of morbidity and mortality. α-fetoprotein (AFP) is common used in diagnosis of HCC; however, a growing body of research is questioning the diagnostic power of AFP. There is, therefore, an urgent need to develop additional novel non-invasive techniques for the early diagnosis of HCC, particularly for patients with AFP-negative [AFP(-)] HCC. Accordingly, in the present study, we employed iTRAQ-based mass spectro-metry to analyze the plasma proteins of subjects with AFP(-) HBV-related HCC, AFP(+) HBV-related HCC and non-malignant cirrhosis. We identified 14 aberrantly expressed proteins specific to the HCC patients, including 10 upregulated and 4 downregulated proteins. We verified C-reactive protein (CRP) overexpression by ELISA and immunohistochemical staining of clinical samples. Per ROC curve analyses, CRP was positive in 73.3% of patients with HBV-related HCC, and CRP overexpression had significant diagnostic power for AFP(-) HBV-related HCC. Furthermore, we found that silencing CRP caused a >2-fold decease in HBV replication. Additionally, we determined that this reduction in HBV replication involved the interferon-signaling pathway. However, silencing CRP also promoted HCC invasion and migration in vitro. In conclusion, we demonstrated that CRP can serve as a diagnostic biomarker for AFP(-) HBV-related HCC.

  20. Nutritional and functional properties of Vicia faba protein isolates and related fractions.

    PubMed

    Vioque, Javier; Alaiz, Manuel; Girón-Calle, Julio

    2012-05-01

    The goal of this research was the characterisation of Vicia faba (broadbean) protein isolates and related fractions in order to determine whether this grain legume could be used for production of high quality protein products and other fractions rich in functional components. Alkaline extraction of the defatted seed flour, followed by precipitation at the isoelectric pH, yielded a 92% protein isolate with a high oil absorption capacity. The contents of the favism-inducing glycosides, vicine and convicine, in the isolate were reduced by more than 99% as compared to the original flour, although the amino acid composition was similar to that of the flour. Some of the by-products of protein isolate production may also be of interest from a nutritional and functional point of view. Thus, the oil resulting from hexane extraction of the flour is rich in unsaturated fatty acids, and polyphenols (resulting from extraction of the defatted flour with acetone) showed a high ABTS radical-scavenging activity. In addition, the solid residue (resulting from protein solubilisation) was high in fibre and showed good water absorption. These results show good nutritional and functional properties in V. faba protein isolates and related fractions, which may favour the revalorisation of this traditional bean crop.

  1. Contaminant loading in remote Arctic lakes affects cellular stress-related proteins expression in feral charr.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiseman, Steve; Jorgensen, Even H.; Maule, Alec G.; Vijayan, Mathilakath M.

    2011-01-01

    The remote Arctic lakes on Bjornoya Island, Norway, offer a unique opportunity to study possible affect of lifelong contaminant exposure in wild populations of landlocked Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus). This is because Lake Ellasjoen has persistent organic pollutant (POP) levels that are significantly greater than in the nearby Lake Oyangen. We examined whether this differential contaminant loading was reflected in the expression of protein markers of exposure and effect in the native fish. We assessed the expressions of cellular stress markers, including cytochrome P4501A (Cyp1A), heat shock protein 70 (hsp70), and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in feral charr from the two lakes. The average polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) load in the charr liver from Ellasjoen was approximately 25-fold higher than in individuals from Oyangen. Liver Cyp1A protein expression was significantly higher in individuals from Ellasjoen compared with Oyangen, confirming differential PCB exposure. There was no significant difference in hsp70 protein expression in charr liver between the two lakes. However, brain hsp70 protein expression was significantly elevated in charr from Ellasjoen compared with Oyangen. Also, liver GR protein expression was significantly higher in the Ellasjoen charr compared with Oyangen charr. Taken together, our results suggest changes to cellular stress-related protein expression as a possible adaptation to chronic-contaminant exposure in feral charr in the Norwegian high-Arctic.

  2. Clustering of protein families into functional subtypes using Relative Complexity Measure with reduced amino acid alphabets

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Phylogenetic analysis can be used to divide a protein family into subfamilies in the absence of experimental information. Most phylogenetic analysis methods utilize multiple alignment of sequences and are based on an evolutionary model. However, multiple alignment is not an automated procedure and requires human intervention to maintain alignment integrity and to produce phylogenies consistent with the functional splits in underlying sequences. To address this problem, we propose to use the alignment-free Relative Complexity Measure (RCM) combined with reduced amino acid alphabets to cluster protein families into functional subtypes purely on sequence criteria. Comparison with an alignment-based approach was also carried out to test the quality of the clustering. Results We demonstrate the robustness of RCM with reduced alphabets in clustering of protein sequences into families in a simulated dataset and seven well-characterized protein datasets. On protein datasets, crotonases, mandelate racemases, nucleotidyl cyclases and glycoside hydrolase family 2 were clustered into subfamilies with 100% accuracy whereas acyl transferase domains, haloacid dehalogenases, and vicinal oxygen chelates could be assigned to subfamilies with 97.2%, 96.9% and 92.2% accuracies, respectively. Conclusions The overall combination of methods in this paper is useful for clustering protein families into subtypes based on solely protein sequence information. The method is also flexible and computationally fast because it does not require multiple alignment of sequences. PMID:20718947

  3. Food choice by Blue-gray Tanagers in relation to protein content.

    PubMed

    Bosque, Carlos; Calchi, Rosanna

    2003-06-01

    We tested discriminatory ability and food choice in relation to protein content of the diet in wild-caught Blue-gray Tanagers (Thraupis episcopus), a generalist tropical frugivorous bird. In two sets of experiments we offered to five individual birds in pair-wise choice trials two nearly iso-caloric experimental diets differing in their protein content only. Protein contents of the experimental diets were 4.6 vs. 1.4% in the first experiment and 3.2 and 1.5% (dry matter basis) in the second experiment. Response varied among individual tanagers, but 6 of the 10 birds showed a clear preference for the food highest in protein. Two individuals displayed a strong positional preference. When testing each treatment group, birds ate daily significantly more of the food that had higher protein content. We conclude that Blue-gray Tanagers prefer richer nitrogen foods. Our results also demonstrate that Blue-gray Tanagers have remarkable discriminatory abilities, they reacted to differences in protein content as small as 0.09% fresh matter. We show for the first time discriminatory ability and preference of wild frugivorous birds for foods richer in protein under controlled conditions. Our findings support the hypothesis that frugivorous birds can act as selective agents for fruit pulp composition.

  4. Bisphenol-A Affects Male Fertility via Fertility-related Proteins in Spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Md Saidur; Kwon, Woo-Sung; Lee, June-Sub; Yoon, Sung-Jae; Ryu, Buom-Yong; Pang, Myung-Geol

    2015-01-01

    The xenoestrogen bisphenol-A (BPA) is a widespread environmental contaminant that has been studied for its impact on male fertility in several species of animals and humans. Growing evidence suggests that xenoestrogens can bind to receptors on spermatozoa and thus alter sperm function. The objective of the study was to investigate the effects of varying concentrations of BPA (0.0001, 0.01, 1, and 100 μM for 6 h) on sperm function, fertilization, embryonic development, and on selected fertility-related proteins in spermatozoa. Our results showed that high concentrations of BPA inhibited sperm motility and motion kinematics by significantly decreasing ATP levels in spermatozoa. High BPA concentrations also increased the phosphorylation of tyrosine residues on sperm proteins involved in protein kinase A-dependent regulation and induced a precocious acrosome reaction, which resulted in poor fertilization and compromised embryonic development. In addition, BPA induced the down-regulation of β-actin and up-regulated peroxiredoxin-5, glutathione peroxidase 4, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and succinate dehydrogenase. Our results suggest that high concentrations of BPA alter sperm function, fertilization, and embryonic development via regulation and/or phosphorylation of fertility-related proteins in spermatozoa. We conclude that BPA-induced changes in fertility-related protein levels in spermatozoa may be provided a potential cue of BPA-mediated disease conditions. PMID:25772901

  5. Immunochemical detection of proteins related to the human c-myc exon 1.

    PubMed Central

    Gazin, C; Rigolet, M; Briand, J P; Van Regenmortel, M H; Galibert, F

    1986-01-01

    Published sequence data of the human c-myc gene indicate the presence of a coding capacity for a polypeptide of 188 residues within the first exon. Using antibodies raised against five synthetic peptides corresponding to different non-over-lapping parts of this polypeptide, two proteins of 32 kd and 58 kd antigenically related to the synthetic peptides have been detected in extracts of human cells. The confidence of this detection has been reinforced by showing that epitopes corresponding to different peptides were indeed located on the same molecule and that the 58 kd protein appears to be a dimeric form of the 32 kd protein. That these proteins originate from the first exon was indicated by: hybrid-arrested translation experiments followed by immunodetection of the translation products; in vitro translation of messenger RNA derived from cloned exon 1 by SP6 polymerase transcription. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:2430795

  6. CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid synthetase interacts with fragile X related protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yun; Tian, Shuai; Wang, Zongbao; Wang, Changbo; Chen, Xiaowei; Li, Wei; Yang, Yang; He, Shuya

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), fragile X related 1 protein (FXR1P) and FXR2P are the members of the FMR protein family. These proteins contain two KH domains and a RGG box, which are characteristic of RNA binding proteins. The absence of FMRP, causes fragile X syndrome (FXS), the leading cause of hereditary mental retardation. FXR1P is expressed throughout the body and important for normal muscle development, and its absence causes cardiac abnormality. To investigate the functions of FXR1P, a screen was performed to identify FXR1P-interacting proteins and determine the biological effect of the interaction. The current study identified CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid synthetase (CMAS) as an interacting protein using the yeast two-hybrid system, and the interaction between FXR1P and CMAS was validated in yeast using a β-galactosidase assay and growth studies with selective media. Furthermore, co-immunoprecipitation was used to analyze the FXR1P/CMAS association and immunofluorescence microscopy was performed to detect expression and intracellular localization of the proteins. The results of the current study indicated that FXR1P and CMAS interact, and colocalize in the cytoplasm and the nucleus of HEK293T and HeLa cells. Accordingly, a fragile X related 1 (FXR1) gene overexpression vector was constructed to investigate the effect of FXR1 overexpression on the level of monosialotetrahexosylganglioside 1 (GM1). The results of the current study suggested that FXR1P is a tissue-specific regulator of GM1 levels in SH-SY5Y cells, but not in HEK293T cells. Taken together, the results initially indicate that FXR1P interacts with CMAS, and that FXR1P may enhance the activation of sialic acid via interaction with CMAS, and increase GM1 levels to affect the development of the nervous system, thus providing evidence for further research into the pathogenesis of FXS. PMID:27357083

  7. Age-related changes of protein- and RNA-synthetic processes in experimental hyper- and hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Gromakova, I A; Zilberman, S T; Konovalenko, O A

    2001-07-01

    The rate of liver and plasma protein synthesis and the activity of liver RNA polymerases 1 and 2 were investigated in rats of various age under experimental hyper- and hypothyroidism. The rate of plasma protein synthesis decreased with age more dramatically than that of liver proteins. Hyper- and hypothyroidism exerted opposite effects on protein synthesis in rats: stimulation and inhibition, respectively. The manifestation of these effects was age related. The thyroid status of animals also influenced the balance of protein synthesis. Thyroxin administration caused preferential incorporation of a label into blood plasma proteins. Changes of thyroid status of old animals insignificantly affected the absolute values of the label incorporation into proteins and the ratio of the label incorporation into local and secreted liver proteins. Age-related decrease of total hepatic nuclear RNA-polymerase activity was due to reduction of the template-bound functionally active forms of RNA-polymerases 1 and 2. Administration of thyroxin caused initial redistribution of the enzyme activity between template-bound and free fractions accompanied by the increase of template bound RNA-polymerases. Prolonged hormonal stimulus also caused an increase of free RNA-polymerases, which reflects the increased synthesis of these enzymes. Mecrazolyl administration reduced the activity of RNA-polymerase 1 and 2. All age groups were characterized by preferential reduction of the bound form. RNA-polymerase 2 activity decreased to a greater extent than that of RNA-polymerase 1. The data suggest age-determined reactions of the body to altered thyroid status.

  8. Expression of Iron-Related Proteins Differentiate Non-Cancerous and Cancerous Breast Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Pizzamiglio, Sara; De Bortoli, Maida; Taverna, Elena; Signore, Michele; Veneroni, Silvia; Chi-shing Cho, William; Orlandi, Rosaria; Verderio, Paolo; Bongarzone, Italia

    2017-01-01

    We have previously reported hepcidin and ferritin increases in the plasma of breast cancer patients, but not in patients with benign breast disease. We hypothesized that these differences in systemic iron homeostasis may reflect alterations in different iron-related proteins also play a key biochemical and regulatory role in breast cancer. Thus, here we explored the expression of a bundle of molecules involved in both iron homeostasis and tumorigenesis in tissue samples. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or reverse-phase protein array (RPPA), were used to measure the expression of 20 proteins linked to iron processes in 24 non-cancerous, and 56 cancerous, breast tumors. We found that cancerous tissues had higher level of hepcidin than benign lesions (p = 0.012). The univariate analysis of RPPA data highlighted the following seven proteins differentially expressed between non-cancerous and cancerous breast tissue: signal transducer and transcriptional activator 5 (STAT5), signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), bone morphogenetic protein 6 (BMP6), cluster of differentiation 74 (CD74), transferrin receptor (TFRC), inhibin alpha (INHA), and STAT5_pY694. These findings were confirmed for STAT5, STAT3, BMP6, CD74 and INHA when adjusting for age. The multivariate statistical analysis indicated an iron-related 10-protein panel effective in separating non-cancerous from cancerous lesions including STAT5, STAT5_pY694, myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MYD88), CD74, iron exporter ferroportin (FPN), high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), STAT3_pS727, TFRC, ferritin heavy chain (FTH), and ferritin light chain (FTL). Our results showed an association between some iron-related proteins and the type of tumor tissue, which may provide insight in strategies for using iron chelators to treat breast cancer. PMID:28216608

  9. Arabidopsis thaliana AUCSIA-1 Regulates Auxin Biology and Physically Interacts with a Kinesin-Related Protein

    PubMed Central

    Pii, Youry; Korte, Arthur; Spena, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    Aucsia is a green plant gene family encoding 44–54 amino acids long miniproteins. The sequenced genomes of most land plants contain two Aucsia genes. RNA interference of both tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) Aucsia genes (SlAucsia-1 and SlAucsia-2) altered auxin sensitivity, auxin transport and distribution; it caused parthenocarpic development of the fruit and other auxin-related morphological changes. Here we present data showing that the Aucsia-1 gene of Arabidopsis thaliana alters, by itself, root auxin biology and that the AtAUCSIA-1 miniprotein physically interacts with a kinesin-related protein. The AtAucsia-1 gene is ubiquitously expressed, although its expression is higher in roots and inflorescences in comparison to stems and leaves. Two allelic mutants for AtAucsia-1 gene did not display visible root morphological alterations; however both basipetal and acropetal indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) root transport was reduced as compared with wild-type plants. The transcript steady state levels of the auxin efflux transporters ATP BINDING CASSETTE subfamily B (ABCB) ABCB1, ABCB4 and ABCB19 were reduced in ataucsia-1 plants. In ataucsia-1 mutant, lateral root growth showed an altered response to i) exogenous auxin, ii) an inhibitor of polar auxin transport and iii) ethylene. Overexpression of AtAucsia-1 inhibited primary root growth. In vitro and in vivo protein-protein interaction experiments showed that AtAUCSIA-1 interacts with a 185 amino acids long fragment belonging to a 2712 amino acids long protein of unknown function (At4g31570). Bioinformatics analysis indicates that the AtAUCSIA-1 interacting protein (AtAUCSIA-1IP) clusters with a group of CENP-E kinesin-related proteins. Gene ontology predictions for the two proteins are consistent with the hypothesis that the AtAUCSIA-1/AtAUCSIA-1IP complex is involved in the regulation of the cytoskeleton dynamics underlying auxin biology. PMID:22911780

  10. Yeast hnRNP-related proteins contribute to the maintenance of telomeres

    SciTech Connect

    Lee-Soety, Julia Y.; Jones, Jennifer; MacGibeny, Margaret A.; Remaly, Erin C.; Daniels, Lynsey; Ito, Andrea; Jean, Jessica; Radecki, Hannah; Spencer, Shannon

    2012-09-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Yeast hnRNP-related proteins are able to prevent faster senescence in telomerase-null cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The conserved RRMs in Npl3 are important for telomere maintenance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Human hnRNP A1 is unable to complement the lack of NPL3 in yeast. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Npl3 and Cbc2 may work as telomere capping proteins. -- Abstract: Telomeres protect the ends of linear chromosomes, which if eroded to a critical length can become uncapped and lead to replicative senescence. Telomerase maintains telomere length in some cells, but inappropriate expression facilitates the immortality of cancer cells. Recently, proteins involved in RNA processing and ribosome assembly, such as hnRNP (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein) A1, have been found to participate in telomere maintenance in mammals. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein Npl3 shares significant amino acid sequence similarities with hnRNP A1. We found that deleting NPL3 accelerated the senescence of telomerase null cells. The highly conserved RNA recognition motifs (RRM) in Npl3 appear to be important for preventing faster senescence. Npl3 preferentially binds telomere sequences in vitro, suggesting that Npl3 may affect telomeres directly. Despite similarities between the two proteins, human hnRNP A1 is unable to complement the lack of Npl3 to rescue accelerated senescence in tlc1 npl3 cells. Deletion of CBC2, which encodes another hnRNP-related protein that associates with Npl3, also accelerates senescence. Potential mechanisms by which hnRNP-related proteins maintain telomeres are discussed.

  11. PACSY, a relational database management system for protein structure and chemical shift analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woonghee; Yu, Wookyung; Kim, Suhkmann; Chang, Iksoo; Lee, Weontae; Markley, John L

    2012-10-01

    PACSY (Protein structure And Chemical Shift NMR spectroscopY) is a relational database management system that integrates information from the Protein Data Bank, the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank, and the Structural Classification of Proteins database. PACSY provides three-dimensional coordinates and chemical shifts of atoms along with derived information such as torsion angles, solvent accessible surface areas, and hydrophobicity scales. PACSY consists of six relational table types linked to one another for coherence by key identification numbers. Database queries are enabled by advanced search functions supported by an RDBMS server such as MySQL or PostgreSQL. PACSY enables users to search for combinations of information from different database sources in support of their research. Two software packages, PACSY Maker for database creation and PACSY Analyzer for database analysis, are available from http://pacsy.nmrfam.wisc.edu.

  12. Low density lipoprotein receptor related protein 1 variant interacts with saturated fatty acids in Puerto Ricans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low density lipoprotein related receptor protein 1 (LRP1) is a multi-functional endocytic receptor that is highly expressed in adipocytes and the hypothalamus. Animal models and in vitro studies support a role for LRP1 in adipocyte metabolism and leptin signaling, but genetic polymorphisms have not ...

  13. [Distribution and environmental function of glomalin-related soil protein: A review].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Zhou, Zi-yan; Ling, Wan-ting

    2016-02-01

    Glomalin-related soil protein (GRSP), a glycoprotein secreted by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), is abundant in soil. GRSP can be fractionated into total glomalin-related soil protein (TG), easily extracted glomalin-related soil protein (EEG), immunoreactive total glomalin (IRTG) and immunoreactive easily extracted glomalin (IREEG). The content of GRSP in soil differed with different soil use type, fertilization condition, AMF and host plant species, and environmental conditions. GRSP significantly positively correlates to the aggregate water stability. GRSP may reduce the release of CO2 in agro-ecosystem, benefit the soil carbon fixation, and reduce the bioavailability and plant toxicity of heavy metals in soil. The extraction and characterization of GRSP are of great importance to understanding the basic behaviors of GRSP in soil environments. Further studies are needed to clarify the molecular biology function of GRSP in agro-ecosystem based on the knowledge of proteins and related genes, and impacts of GRSP on the environmental behavior of organic pollutants in soil.

  14. APL-1, a Caenorhabditis elegans protein related to the human β-amyloid precursor protein, is essential for viability

    PubMed Central

    Hornsten, Angela; Lieberthal, Jason; Fadia, Shruti; Malins, Richard; Ha, Lawrence; Xu, Xiaomeng; Daigle, Isabelle; Markowitz, Mindy; O'Connor, Gregory; Plasterk, Ronald; Li, Chris

    2007-01-01

    Dominant mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene are associated with rare cases of familial Alzheimer's disease; however, the normal functions of APP and related proteins remain unclear. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has a single APP-related gene, apl-1, that is expressed in multiple tissues. Loss of apl-1 disrupts several developmental processes, including molting and morphogenesis, and results in larval lethality. The apl-1 lethality can be rescued by neuronal expression of the extracellular domain of APL-1. These data highlight the importance of the extracellular domain of an APP family member and suggest that APL-1 acts noncell-autonomously during development. Overexpression of APL-1 also causes several defects, including a high level of larval lethality. Decreased activity of sel-12, a C. elegans homologue of the human γ-secretase component presenilin 1, partially rescues the lethality associated with APL-1 overexpression, suggesting that SEL-12 activity regulates APL-1 activity either directly or indirectly. PMID:17267616

  15. Functions of oligochitosan induced protein kinase in tobacco mosaic virus resistance and pathogenesis related proteins in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Yafei, Chen; Yong, Zhan; Xiaoming, Zhao; Peng, Guo; Hailong, An; Yuguang, Du; Yingrong, Han; Hui, Liu; Yuhong, Zhang

    2009-08-01

    Oligochitosan (OC) can regulate plant defense responses in many aspects, but the basic signal transduction pathway is still unclear. In this study, we used transgenic (TG) tobacco (Nicotiana Tabacum var. Samsun NN) as plant material whose oligochitosan induced protein kinase (OIPK) gene was inhibited by antisense transformation, to study the role of OIPK in tobacco defense reactions. The results showed that OIPK could increase tobacco resistance against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), in that wild-type (WT) tobacco showed longer lesion appearance time, higher lesion inhibition ratio, smaller average final lesion diameter and lower average final lesion area percent to whole leaf area. It led us to analyze some pathogenesis related (PR) enzymes' activities and mRNA level, which played roles in tobacco resistance against TMV. We found that phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and peroxidase (POD) activities were positively related to OIPK, but not polyphenol oxidase (PPO). It was also demonstrated that OIPK mRNA could be induced by OC, wound and TMV infection. In addition, OIPK could up-regulated three PR genes, PAL, chitinase (CHI) and beta-1, 3-glucanase (GLU) mRNA level to different extent. Taken together, these results implied that OIPK could function in tobacco resistance against both biotic and abiotic stress, possibly via various PR proteins.

  16. Ovalbumin-related Protein X Is a Heparin-binding Ov-Serpin Exhibiting Antimicrobial Activities*

    PubMed Central

    Réhault-Godbert, Sophie; Labas, Valérie; Helloin, Emmanuelle; Hervé-Grépinet, Virginie; Slugocki, Cindy; Berges, Magali; Bourin, Marie-Christine; Brionne, Aurélien; Poirier, Jean-Claude; Gautron, Joël; Coste, Franck; Nys, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Ovalbumin family contains three proteins with high sequence similarity: ovalbumin, ovalbumin-related protein Y (OVAY), and ovalbumin-related protein X (OVAX). Ovalbumin is the major egg white protein with still undefined function, whereas the biological activity of OVAX and OVAY has not yet been explored. Similar to ovalbumin and OVAY, OVAX belongs to the ovalbumin serine protease inhibitor family (ov-serpin). We show that OVAX is specifically expressed by the magnum tissue, which is responsible for egg white formation. OVAX is also the main heparin-binding protein of egg white. This glycoprotein with a predicted reactive site at Lys367-His368 is not able to inhibit trypsin, plasmin, or cathepsin G with or without heparin as a cofactor. Secondary structure of OVAX is similar to that of ovalbumin, but the three-dimensional model of OVAX reveals the presence of a cluster of exposed positive charges, which potentially explains the affinity of this ov-serpin for heparin, as opposed to ovalbumin. Interestingly, OVAX, unlike ovalbumin, displays antibacterial activities against both Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica sv. Enteritidis. These properties partly involve heparin-binding site(s) of the molecule as the presence of heparin reverses its anti-Salmonella but not its anti-Listeria potential. Altogether, these results suggest that OVAX and ovalbumin, although highly similar in sequence, have peculiar sequential and/or structural features that are likely to impact their respective biological functions. PMID:23615912

  17. A Wnt1 regulated Frizzled-1/β-Catenin signaling pathway as a candidate regulatory circuit controlling mesencephalic dopaminergic neuron-astrocyte crosstalk: Therapeutical relevance for neuron survival and neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dopamine-synthesizing (dopaminergic, DA) neurons in the ventral midbrain (VM) constitute a pivotal neuronal population controlling motor behaviors, cognitive and affective brain functions, which generation critically relies on the activation of Wingless-type MMTV integration site (Wnt)/β-catenin pathway in their progenitors. In Parkinson's disease, DA cell bodies within the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) progressively degenerate, with causes and mechanisms poorly understood. Emerging evidence suggests that Wnt signaling via Frizzled (Fzd) receptors may play a role in different degenerative states, but little is known about Wnt signaling in the adult midbrain. Using in vitro and in vivo model systems of DA degeneration, along with functional studies in both intact and SN lesioned mice, we herein highlight an intrinsic Wnt1/Fzd-1/β-catenin tone critically contributing to the survival and protection of adult midbrain DA neurons. Results In vitro experiments identifie Fzd-1 receptor expression at a mRNA and protein levels in dopamine transporter (DAT) expressing neurons, and demonstrate the ability of exogenous Wnt1 to exert robust neuroprotective effects against Caspase-3 activation, the loss of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive (TH+) neurons and [3H] dopamine uptake induced by different DA-specific insults, including serum and growth factor deprivation, 6-hydroxydopamine and MPTP/MPP+. Co-culture of DA neurons with midbrain astrocytes phenocopies Wnt1 neuroprotective effects, whereas RNA interference-mediated knockdown of Wnt1 in midbrain astrocytes markedly reduces astrocyte-induced TH+ neuroprotection. Likewise, silencing β-catenin mRNA or knocking down Fzd-1 receptor expression in mesencephalic neurons counteract astrocyte-induced TH+ neuroprotection. In vivo experiments document Fzd-1 co-localization with TH+ neurons within the intact SNpc and blockade of Fzd/β-catenin signaling by unilateral infusion of a Fzd/β-catenin antagonist within the SN

  18. Reevaluation of the role of Pex1 and dynamin-related proteins in peroxisome membrane biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Motley, Alison M.; Galvin, Paul C.; Ekal, Lakhan; Nuttall, James M.

    2015-01-01

    A recent model for peroxisome biogenesis postulates that peroxisomes form de novo continuously in wild-type cells by heterotypic fusion of endoplasmic reticulum–derived vesicles containing distinct sets of peroxisomal membrane proteins. This model proposes a role in vesicle fusion for the Pex1/Pex6 complex, which has an established role in matrix protein import. The growth and division model proposes that peroxisomes derive from existing peroxisomes. We tested these models by reexamining the role of Pex1/Pex6 and dynamin-related proteins in peroxisome biogenesis. We found that induced depletion of Pex1 blocks the import of matrix proteins but does not affect membrane protein delivery to peroxisomes; markers for the previously reported distinct vesicles colocalize in pex1 and pex6 cells; peroxisomes undergo continued growth if fission is blocked. Our data are compatible with the established primary role of the Pex1/Pex6 complex in matrix protein import and show that peroxisomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae multiply mainly by growth and division. PMID:26644516

  19. Identification of the proteins related to SET-mediated hepatic cytotoxicity of trichloroethylene by proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaohu; Yang, Xifei; Hong, Wen-Xu; Huang, Peiwu; Wang, Yong; Liu, Wei; Ye, Jinbo; Huang, Haiyan; Huang, Xinfeng; Shen, Liming; Yang, Linqing; Zhuang, Zhixiong; Liu, Jianjun

    2014-05-16

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is an effective solvent for a variety of organic materials. Since the wide use of TCE as industrial degreasing of metals, adhesive paint and polyvinyl chloride production, TCE has turned into an environmental and occupational toxicant. Exposure to TCE could cause severe hepatotoxicity; however, the toxic mechanisms of TCE remain poorly understood. Recently, we reported that SET protein mediated TCE-induced cytotoxicity in L-02 cells. Here, we further identified the proteins related to SET-mediated hepatic cytotoxicity of TCE using the techniques of DIGE (differential gel electrophoresis) and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS. Among the 20 differential proteins identified, 8 were found to be modulated by SET in TCE-induced cytotoxicity and three of them (cofilin-1, peroxiredoxin-2 and S100-A11) were validated by Western-blot analysis. The functional analysis revealed that most of the identified SET-modulated proteins are apoptosis-associated proteins. These data indicated that these proteins may be involved in SET-mediated hepatic cytotoxicity of TCE in L-02 cells.

  20. CD spectra show the relational style between Zic-, Gli-, Glis-zinc finger protein and DNA.

    PubMed

    Sakai-Kato, Kumiko; Ishiguro, Akira; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Aruga, Jun; Utsunomiya-Tate, Naoko

    2008-01-01

    Zic family proteins have five C2H2-type zinc finger motifs. The Zic-zinc finger domains show high homology to the corresponding domains of the Gli and Glis families, which also contain five C2H2-type zinc finger motifs. The zinc finger motifs of the proteins of these three protein families form an alpha-helix conformation in solution. The addition of oligo DNA that included a Gli-binding sequence increased the alpha-helix content estimated by using circular dichroism spectroscopy. Comparison of the Zic-, Gli-, and Glis-zinc fingers indicated that the alpha-helix content after the addition of oligo DNA correlated well with the affinity of each zinc finger for the oligo DNA (correlation coefficient, 0.85). The importance of the zinc ion for protein folding was reflected in a reduction in the alpha-helix content upon removal of the zinc ion. Owing to the compact globular structure, the alpha-helix structure of the proteins of these three protein families is extremely thermally stable. These results suggest that the alpha-helix structure is important for DNA binding and profoundly related to functional and structural diversity among the three families.

  1. Molecular cloning of ADIR, a novel interferon responsive gene encoding a protein related to the torsins.

    PubMed

    Dron, Michel; Meritet, Jean François; Dandoy-Dron, Françoise; Meyniel, Jean-Philippe; Maury, Chantal; Tovey, Michael G

    2002-03-01

    The expression of the previously uncharacterized gene Adir (for ATP dependent interferon responsive gene) was increased by 5- to 15-fold in tissue of the oral cavity or in spleen and liver of mice treated orally or intraperitoneally with IFN-alpha, and in mouse cells treated in vitro with IFN-alpha or IFN-gamma. The level of Adir mRNA was also increased 20- to 40-fold in the brains of animals infected with encephalomyocarditis virus. Adir is expressed ubiquitously in mouse tissues as 1.9-, 2.4-, and 3.5-kb mRNA transcripts encoding a 385-amino-acid protein with a conserved ATP binding domain containing typical nucleotide and Mg(2+) binding sites. We also characterized the human ortholog, ADIR, which is located on chromosome 1q25-q31 and contains six exons encoding a 397-amino-acid protein with 80% homology to the mouse protein. A single 2.3-kb mRNA was detected in all human tissues examined, except for placenta, which also contained a 1.25-kb tissue-specific transcript generated by alternative splicing and encoding a putative 336-amino-acid protein. Although ADIR exhibits low homology to DYT1 and TOR1B, the deduced ADIR protein sequences are highly homologous to torsin A and torsin B and more distantly related to members of the Clp/HSP100 family of proteins, suggesting that ADIR, like torsins, is related to the AAA chaperone-like family of ATPases. An ADIR-EGFP fusion protein expressed in HeLa cells was shown to be associated with the endoplasmic reticulum.

  2. Improved Identification and Relative Quantification of Sites of Peptide and Protein Oxidation for Hydroxyl Radical Footprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoyan; Li, Zixuan; Xie, Boer; Sharp, Joshua S.

    2013-11-01

    Protein oxidation is typically associated with oxidative stress and aging and affects protein function in normal and pathological processes. Additionally, deliberate oxidative labeling is used to probe protein structure and protein-ligand interactions in hydroxyl radical protein footprinting (HRPF). Oxidation often occurs at multiple sites, leading to mixtures of oxidation isomers that differ only by the site of modification. We utilized sets of synthetic, isomeric "oxidized" peptides to test and compare the ability of electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID), as well as nano-ultra high performance liquid chromatography (nanoUPLC) separation, to quantitate oxidation isomers with one oxidation at multiple adjacent sites in mixtures of peptides. Tandem mass spectrometry by ETD generates fragment ion ratios that accurately report on relative oxidative modification extent on specific sites, regardless of the charge state of the precursor ion. Conversely, CID was found to generate quantitative MS/MS product ions only at the higher precursor charge state. Oxidized isomers having multiple sites of oxidation in each of two peptide sequences in HRPF product of protein Robo-1 Ig1-2, a protein involved in nervous system axon guidance, were also identified and the oxidation extent at each residue was quantified by ETD without prior liquid chromatography (LC) separation. ETD has proven to be a reliable technique for simultaneous identification and relative quantification of a variety of functionally different oxidation isomers, and is a valuable tool for the study of oxidative stress, as well as for improving spatial resolution for HRPF studies.

  3. Structure–Function Relationships of Pre-Fibrillar Protein Assemblies in Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, F.; Shanmugam, A.; Bitan, G.

    2010-01-01

    Several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's and prion diseases, are characterized pathognomonically by the presence of intra- and/or extracellular lesions containing proteinaceous aggregates, and by extensive neuronal loss in selective brain regions. Related non-neuropathic systemic diseases, e.g., light-chain and senile systemic amyloidoses, and other organ-specific diseases, such as dialysis-related amyloidosis and type-2 diabetes mellitus, also are characterized by deposition of aberrantly folded, insoluble proteins. It is debated whether the hallmark pathologic lesions are causative. Substantial evidence suggests that these aggregates are the end state of aberrant protein folding whereas the actual culprits likely are transient, pre-fibrillar assemblies preceding the aggregates. In the context of neurodegenerative amyloidoses, the proteinaceous aggregates may eventuate as potentially neuroprotective sinks for the neurotoxic, oligomeric protein assemblies. The pre-fibrillar, oligomeric assemblies are believed to initiate the pathogenic mechanisms that lead to synaptic dysfunction, neuronal loss, and disease-specific regional brain atrophy. The amyloid β-protein (Aβ), which is believed to cause Alzheimer's disease (AD), is considered an archetypal amyloidogenic protein. Intense studies have led to nominal, functional, and structural descriptions of oligomeric Aβ assemblies. However, the dynamic and metastable nature of Aβ oligomers renders their study difficult. Different results generated using different methodologies under different experimental settings further complicate this complex area of research and identification of the exact pathogenic assemblies in vivo seems daunting. Here we review structural, functional, and biological experiments used to produce and study pre-fibrillar Aβ assemblies, and highlight similar studies of proteins involved in related diseases. We discuss challenges that contemporary

  4. Distribution of language-related Cntnap2 protein in neural circuits critical for vocal learning.

    PubMed

    Condro, Michael C; White, Stephanie A

    2014-01-01

    Variants of the contactin associated protein-like 2 (Cntnap2) gene are risk factors for language-related disorders including autism spectrum disorder, specific language impairment, and stuttering. Songbirds are useful models for study of human speech disorders due to their shared capacity for vocal learning, which relies on similar cortico-basal ganglia circuitry and genetic factors. Here we investigate Cntnap2 protein expression in the brain of the zebra finch, a songbird species in which males, but not females, learn their courtship songs. We hypothesize that Cntnap2 has overlapping functions in vocal learning species, and expect to find protein expression in song-related areas of the zebra finch brain. We further expect that the distribution of this membrane-bound protein may not completely mirror its mRNA distribution due to the distinct subcellular localization of the two molecular species. We find that Cntnap2 protein is enriched in several song control regions relative to surrounding tissues, particularly within the adult male, but not female, robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA), a cortical song control region analogous to human layer 5 primary motor cortex. The onset of this sexually dimorphic expression coincides with the onset of sensorimotor learning in developing males. Enrichment in male RA appears due to expression in projection neurons within the nucleus, as well as to additional expression in nerve terminals of cortical projections to RA from the lateral magnocellular nucleus of the nidopallium. Cntnap2 protein expression in zebra finch brain supports the hypothesis that this molecule affects neural connectivity critical for vocal learning across taxonomic classes.

  5. Structure-function relationships of pre-fibrillar protein assemblies in Alzheimer's disease and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, F; Shanmugam, A; Bitan, G

    2008-06-01

    Several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's and prion diseases, are characterized pathognomonically by the presence of intra- and/or extracellular lesions containing proteinaceous aggregates, and by extensive neuronal loss in selective brain regions. Related non-neuropathic systemic diseases, e.g., light-chain and senile systemic amyloidoses, and other organ-specific diseases, such as dialysis-related amyloidosis and type-2 diabetes mellitus, also are characterized by deposition of aberrantly folded, insoluble proteins. It is debated whether the hallmark pathologic lesions are causative. Substantial evidence suggests that these aggregates are the end state of aberrant protein folding whereas the actual culprits likely are transient, pre-fibrillar assemblies preceding the aggregates. In the context of neurodegenerative amyloidoses, the proteinaceous aggregates may eventuate as potentially neuroprotective sinks for the neurotoxic, oligomeric protein assemblies. The pre-fibrillar, oligomeric assemblies are believed to initiate the pathogenic mechanisms that lead to synaptic dysfunction, neuronal loss, and disease-specific regional brain atrophy. The amyloid beta-protein (Abeta), which is believed to cause Alzheimer's disease (AD), is considered an archetypal amyloidogenic protein. Intense studies have led to nominal, functional, and structural descriptions of oligomeric Abeta assemblies. However, the dynamic and metastable nature of Abeta oligomers renders their study difficult. Different results generated using different methodologies under different experimental settings further complicate this complex area of research and identification of the exact pathogenic assemblies in vivo seems daunting. Here we review structural, functional, and biological experiments used to produce and study pre-fibrillar Abeta assemblies, and highlight similar studies of proteins involved in related diseases. We discuss challenges that

  6. Overexpression of a Pathogenesis-Related Protein 10 Enhances Biotic and Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jingni; Kim, Sang Gon; Kang, Kyu Young; Kim, Ju-Gon; Park, Sang-Ryeol; Gupta, Ravi; Kim, Yong Hwan; Wang, Yiming; Kim, Sun Tae

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenesis-related proteins play multiple roles in plant development and biotic and abiotic stress tolerance. Here, we characterize a rice defense related gene named “jasmonic acid inducible pathogenesis-related class 10” (JIOsPR10) to gain an insight into its functional properties. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed up-regulation of JIOsPR10 under salt and drought stress conditions. Constitutive over-expression JIOsPR10 in rice promoted shoot and root development in transgenic plants, however, their productivity was unaltered. Further experiments exhibited that the transgenic plants showed reduced susceptibility to rice blast fungus, and enhanced salt and drought stress tolerance as compared to the wild type. A comparative proteomic profiling of wild type and transgenic plants showed that overexpression of JIOsPR10 led to the differential modulation of several proteins mainly related with oxidative stresses, carbohydrate metabolism, and plant defense. Taken together, our findings suggest that JIOsPR10 plays important roles in biotic and abiotic stresses tolerance probably by activation of stress related proteins. PMID:27904462

  7. Silencing myotubularin related protein 7 enhances proliferation and early differentiation of C2C12 myoblast.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhuning; Chen, Yaosheng; Zhang, Xumeng; Zhou, Xingyu; Li, Mingsen; Chen, Hu; Wu, Ming; Zhang, Ying; Mo, Delin

    2017-03-11

    Myotubularin related protein 7 (MTMR7) is a key member of the highly conserved myotubularin related proteins (MTMRs) family, which has phosphatase activity. MTMR7 was increased during myoblast differentiation and exhibited high expression level at primary fibers formation stages in pigs. This suggests that MTMR7 may be involved in myogenesis. In our study, we investigated the roles of MTMR7 on proliferation and differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts. Knocking down MTMR7 not only enhanced myoblast early differentiation via altering the expression of Myf5, but also promoted myoblast proliferation through increasing cyclinA2 expression. The improved proliferation capacity was related to the increased phosphorylation of AKT. Taken together, our research demonstrates that MTMR7 plays an important role in proliferation and early differentiation of C2C12 myoblast.

  8. Cross-talk of membrane lipids and Alzheimer-related proteins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is neuropathologically characterized by the combined occurrence of extracellular β-amyloid plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles in the brain. While plaques contain aggregated forms of the amyloid β-peptide (Aβ), tangles are formed by fibrillar forms of the microtubule associated protein tau. All mutations identified so far to cause familial forms of early onset AD (FAD) are localized close to or within the Aβ domain of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) or in the presenilin proteins that are essential components of a protease complex involved in the generation of Aβ. Mutations in the tau gene are not associated with FAD, but can cause other forms of dementia. The genetics of FAD together with biochemical and cell biological data, led to the formulation of the amyloid hypothesis, stating that accumulation and aggregation of Aβ is the primary event in the pathogenesis of AD, while tau might mediate its toxicity and neurodegeneration. The generation of Aβ involves sequential proteolytic cleavages of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by enzymes called β-and γ-secretases. Notably, APP itself as well as the secretases are integral membrane proteins. Thus, it is very likely that membrane lipids are involved in the regulation of subcellular transport, activity, and metabolism of AD related proteins. Indeed, several studies indicate that membrane lipids, including cholesterol and sphingolipids (SLs) affect Aβ generation and aggregation. Interestingly, APP and other AD associated proteins, including β-and γ-secretases can, in turn, influence lipid metabolic pathways. Here, we review the close connection of cellular lipid metabolism and AD associated proteins and discuss potential mechanisms that could contribute to initiation and progression of AD. PMID:24148205

  9. The effect of propofol on the expression of rabbit ischemia reperfusion injury-related proteins.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhanhong; Dong, Min; Fang, Lihua; Dong, Ran; Li, Shuyan

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the effect of propofol on the expression of rabbit ischemia-reperfusion injury-related proteins and the mechanism involved. Thirty healthy adult New Zealand rabbit were selected. After establishment of liver I/R model, the rabbits were divided into group A (sham operation group), group B (control group using saline), and group C (propofol group) with ten rabbits in each group. The total protein concentration, differentially expressed protein spots and the difference of apoptotic proteins expression levels among the three groups were compared. The total protein concentrations in group A, B, and C were 0.778, 0.835, and 0.765 μg/μl, respectively, and the protein concentration in group B was significantly higher than group A and C (p < 0.05), with no significant difference between group A and C (p > 0.05); results analyzed by PDQuest software showed that the average number of protein spots and matching ratio had no significant difference among the three groups (p > 0.05); MALDI-TOF-MS mass spectrometry identified 16 differentially expressed protein spots; the numbers of Caspase-3 positive cells in group B and C were significantly higher than those in group A, and the numbers of Bcl-2 and Bax positive cells in group B and C were significantly lower than those in group A (p < 0.05); the number of Capase-3 positive cells in group C was significantly higher than those in group B, and the number of Bcl-2 positive cells in group C was significantly lower than those in group B (p < 0.05). The numbers of Bax positive cells had no significant difference between group B and C (p > 0.05); densities of Caspase-3, Bcl-2 and Bax in group B and C were significantly higher than those in group A (p < 0.05); Western blotting results from the comparison of the number of positive cells between group B and C was in accordance to the result obtained from immunohistochemistry. After I/R injury in rabbit, there was deregulation of various proteins such as Caspase-3, Bcl-2

  10. Expression of Lipid Metabolism-Related Proteins Differs between Invasive Lobular Carcinoma and Invasive Ductal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Yoon Jin; Kim, Hye Min; Koo, Ja Seung

    2017-01-01

    We comparatively investigated the expression and clinical implications of lipid metabolism-related proteins in invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast. A total of 584 breast cancers (108 ILC and 476 IDC) were subjected to tissue microarray and immunohistochemical analysis for lipid metabolism-related proteins including hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), perilipin A, fatty acid binding protein (FABP)4, carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT)-1, acyl-CoA oxidase 1, and fatty acid synthetase (FASN). HSL, perilipin A, and FABP4 expression (all p < 0.001) differed significantly: HSL and FABP4 were more frequently present in ILC, whereas perilipin A was more frequently detected in IDC. Among all invasive cancers, HSL and FABP4 were highly expressed in luminal A-type ILC (p < 0.001) and perilipin A in luminal A-type IDC (p = 0.007). Among luminal B-type cancers, HSL and FABP4 were more highly expressed in ILC (p < 0.001). Univariate analysis found associations of shorter disease-free survival with CPT-1 positivity (p = 0.004) and acyl-CoA oxidase 1 positivity (p = 0.032) and of shorter overall survival with acyl-CoA oxidase 1 positivity (p = 0.027). In conclusion, ILC and IDC exhibited different immunohistochemical lipid metabolism-related protein expression profiles. Notably, ILC exhibited high HSL and FABP4 and low perilipin A expression. PMID:28124996

  11. Expression of human bone-related proteins in the hematopoietic microenvironment.

    PubMed Central

    Long, M W; Williams, J L; Mann, K G

    1990-01-01

    Given the intimate relationship between bone and bone marrow, we hypothesized that the human bone marrow may function as a source (or reservoir) of bone-forming progenitor cells. We observed a population of cells within the bone marrow which produce bone-specific or bone-related proteins. The production of these proteins was developmentally regulated in human long-term bone marrow cell cultures; the bone protein-producing cells (BPPC) are observed under serum-free, short-term culture conditions, respond to bone-related and not hematopoietic growth factors, and are derived from a population of low-density, nonadherent, My10-negative (or low My10 density), marrow cells (My10 is an antigen found on most hematopoietic progenitor cells). Cultivation of marrow-derived BPPC in secondary, serum-containing cultures results in their differentiation into osteoblastlike cells. At this stage of development, BPPC produce an extracellular matrix which incorporates both bone-related proteins and radiolabeled calcium. Human bone marrow BPPC thus represent a newly described cell phenotype important to both bone and hematopoietic cell biology. Images PMID:2243119

  12. Analysis of the protein related receptor GPR92 in G-cells

    PubMed Central

    Rettenberger, Amelie T.; Schulze, Waltraud; Breer, Heinz; Haid, Désireé

    2015-01-01

    A continuous assessment of ingested food in the gastric lumen is essential for fine-tuning the digestive activities, including the secretion of the regulatory hormones such as gastrin. It has been proposed that G-cells may be able to sense the amount of ingested proteins and adjust the secretion of gastrin accordingly. Our previous studies have shown that G-cells express suitable receptor types, most notably the peptone-receptor GPR92 and the amino acid receptors GPRC6A and CaSR; however, their relative importance remained unclear. To determine the relative quantity of each receptor type, individual G-cells isolated from the transgenic mouse line mGas-EGFP were analyzed by means of a Liquid Chromatography Tandem-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) procedure. The results indicate that the relative amount of receptor protein for GPR92 was much higher than for the receptor types GPRC6A and CaSR. These findings support the notion that the peptone-receptor GPR92 may be particularly relevant for sensing partially digested protein products. This view was supported by the finding that a high-protein diet affected the expression level of the peptone-receptor GPR92 in the gastric antrum as well as in the circumvallate papillae. PMID:26441680

  13. Characterization of the gene encoding a fibrinogen-related protein expressed in Crassostrea gigas hemocytes.

    PubMed

    Skazina, M A; Gorbushin, A M

    2016-07-01

    Four exons of the CgFrep1 gene (3333 bp long) encode a putative fibrinogen-related protein (324 aa) bearing a single C-terminal FBG domain. Transcripts of the gene obtained from hemocytes of different Pacific oysters show prominent individual variation based on SNP and indels of tandem repeats resulted in polymorphism of N-terminus of the putative CgFrep1 polypeptide. The polypeptide chain bears N-terminal coiled-coil region potentially acting as inter-subunit interface in the protein oligomerization. It is suggested that CgFrep1 gene encodes the oligomeric lectin composed of at least two subunits.

  14. Building and analysis of protein-protein interactions related to diabetes mellitus using support vector machine, biomedical text mining and network analysis.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Renu; Bapat, Sanket; Jain, Esha; Karthikeyan, Muthukumarasamy; Tambe, Sanjeev; Kulkarni, Bhaskar D

    2016-12-01

    In order to understand the molecular mechanism underlying any disease, knowledge about the interacting proteins in the disease pathway is essential. The number of revealed protein-protein interactions (PPI) is still very limited compared to the available protein sequences of different organisms. Experiment based high-throughput technologies though provide some data about these interactions, those are often fairly noisy. Computational techniques for predicting protein-protein interactions therefore assume significance. 1296 binary fingerprints that encode a combination of structural and geometric properties were developed using the crystallographic data of 15,000 protein complexes in the pdb server. In a case study, these fingerprints were created for proteins implicated in the Type 2 diabetes mellitus disease. The fingerprints were input into a SVM based model for discriminating disease proteins from non disease proteins yielding a classification accuracy of 78.2% (AUC value of 0.78) on an external data set composed of proteins retrieved via text mining of diabetes related literature. A PPI network was constructed and analysed to explore new disease targets. The integrated approach exemplified here has a potential for identifying disease related proteins, functional annotation and other proteomics studies.

  15. Isolation of proteins related to the Rh polypeptides from nonhuman erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Saboori, A M; Denker, B M; Agre, P

    1989-01-01

    It is thought that the Rh antigens may be important in maintaining normal erythrocyte membrane integrity. Despite their name, Rh antigens are serologically present only on human erythrocytes. Rh structural polymorphisms are known to reside within a family of nonglycosylated Mr 32,000 integral membrane proteins that can be purified by hydroxylapatite chromatography. Mr 32,000 integral membrane proteins were purified similarly from erythrocyte membrane vesicles prepared from rhesus monkeys, cows, cats, and rats, but could not be purified from human Rhmod erythrocytes, a rare syndrome lacking Rh antigens. The purified Mr 32,000 polypeptides were labeled with 125I, digested with chymotrypsin, and found to be 30-60% identical to human Rh polypeptides when compared by two-dimensional iodopeptide mapping. The physiologic function of the Rh polypeptides remains to be identified; however, the existence of related proteins in nonhuman erythrocytes supports the concept that the Rh polypeptides are erythrocyte membrane components of fundamental significance. Images PMID:2492035

  16. Comparative proteomic analysis reveals mite (Varroa destructor) resistance-related proteins in Eastern honeybees (Apis cerana).

    PubMed

    Ji, T; Shen, F; Liu, Z; Yin, L; Shen, J; Liang, Q; Luo, Y X

    2015-08-21

    The mite (Varroa destructor) has become the greatest threat to apiculture worldwide. As the original host of the mite, Apis cerana can effectively resist the mite. An increased understanding of the resistance mechanisms of Eastern honeybees against V. destructor may help researchers to protect other species against these parasites. In this study, the proteomes of 4 Apis cerana colonies were analyzed using an isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation technology. We determined the differences in gene and protein expression between susceptible and resistant colonies that were either unchallenged or challenged by V. destructor. The results showed that a total of 1532 proteins were identified. Gene Ontology enrichment analysis suggested that the transcription factors and basic metabolic and respiratory processes were efficient and feasible factors controlling this resistance, and 12 differentially expressed proteins were identified in Venn analysis. The results were validated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. This study may provide insight into the genetic mechanisms underlying the resistance of honeybee to mites.

  17. Age-related changes in nucleic acids and protein in Callosobruchus maculatus Fabr. (Coleoptera).

    PubMed

    Sharma, S P; Jit, I; Rai, N

    1984-01-01

    The mean life span of Callosobruchus maculatus male is 7 days and female is 5 days at 30 +/- 1 degrees C. Age-related study on C. maculatus shows that RNA and protein contents gradually decline with age in male bruchids, whereas in females initially these increase up to the second day of post-emergent life and subsequently decrease. DNA increases up to the third day in males and the fourth day in females representing post-emergent growth, and then declines sharply on the sixth day. The RNA and protein contents per unit DNA decrease steadily in males; however, in females both are highest during the first 2 days, which synchronizes the egg-laying peak. These observations have been found to be statistically significant (p less than 0.01) and suggest that aging is accompanied by a decrease in both RNA and protein synthesis potential.

  18. Apolar and polar solvation thermodynamics related to the protein unfolding process.

    PubMed Central

    Bakk, Audun; Høye, Johan S; Hansen, Alex

    2002-01-01

    Thermodynamics related to hydrated water upon protein unfolding is studied over a broad temperature range (5-125 degrees C). The hydration effect arising from the apolar interior is modeled as an increased number of hydrogen bonds between water molecules compared with bulk water. The corresponding contribution from the polar interior is modeled as a two-step process. First, the polar interior breaks hydrogen bonds in bulk water upon unfolding. Second, due to strong bonds between the polar surface and the nearest water molecules, we assume quantization using a simplified two-state picture. The heat capacity change upon hydration is compared with model compound data evaluated previously for 20 different proteins. We obtain good correspondence with the data for both the apolar and the polar interior. We note that the effective coupling constants for both models have small variations among the proteins we have investigated. PMID:11806913

  19. Differential Site-Based Expression of Pentose Phosphate Pathway-Related Proteins among Breast Cancer Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Yoon Jin; Jung, Woo Hee

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. We aimed to investigate the expression of pentose phosphate pathway- (PPP-) related proteins in metastatic breast cancer and its relationship with clinicopathologic factors. Methods. Tissue samples from 126 metastatic breast cancers were included in a tissue microarray. Expression of PPP-related proteins [glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), 6-phosphogluconolactonase (6PGL), 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH), and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (NRF2)] was determined by immunohistochemistry. Results. G6PDH (p = 0.011) and cytoplasmic NRF2 (p = 0.001) showed the highest expression in brain metastases. Human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER-2) positivity was associated with G6PDH (p < 0.001) and cytoplasmic NRF2 (p = 0.015) positivity. A high Ki-67 labeling index (LI) was correlated with nuclear NRF2 positivity (p = 0.037), and HER-2-positive luminal B type was associated with G6PDH positivity (p = 0.001). On multivariate Cox analysis, independent risk factors of short overall survival were 6PGL positivity in bone metastasis (HR 4.180, 95% CI 1.160–15.06, p = 0.029) and low Ki-67 LI in lung metastasis (HR 11.853, 95% CI 1.841–76.30, p = 0.009). Conclusion. Differential expression of PPP-related proteins correlated with different prognoses and metastatic sites, with the highest expression in brain metastases, and could be a potential therapeutic target. PMID:28260828

  20. Inference of Functional Relations in Predicted Protein Networks with a Machine Learning Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ezkurdia, Iakes; Andrés-León, Eduardo; Valencia, Alfonso

    2010-01-01

    Background Molecular biology is currently facing the challenging task of functionally characterizing the proteome. The large number of possible protein-protein interactions and complexes, the variety of environmental conditions and cellular states in which these interactions can be reorganized, and the multiple ways in which a protein can influence the function of others, requires the development of experimental and computational approaches to analyze and predict functional associations between proteins as part of their activity in the interactome. Methodology/Principal Findings We have studied the possibility of constructing a classifier in order to combine the output of the several protein interaction prediction methods. The AODE (Averaged One-Dependence Estimators) machine learning algorithm is a suitable choice in this case and it provides better results than the individual prediction methods, and it has better performances than other tested alternative methods in this experimental set up. To illustrate the potential use of this new AODE-based Predictor of Protein InterActions (APPIA), when analyzing high-throughput experimental data, we show how it helps to filter the results of published High-Throughput proteomic studies, ranking in a significant way functionally related pairs. Availability: All the predictions of the individual methods and of the combined APPIA predictor, together with the used datasets of functional associations are available at http://ecid.bioinfo.cnio.es/. Conclusions We propose a strategy that integrates the main current computational techniques used to predict functional associations into a unified classifier system, specifically focusing on the evaluation of poorly characterized protein pairs. We selected the AODE classifier as the appropriate tool to perform this task. AODE is particularly useful to extract valuable information from large unbalanced and heterogeneous data sets. The combination of the information provided by five

  1. Cerebrovascular expression of proteins related to inflammation, oxidative stress and neurotoxicity is altered with aging

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Most neurodegenerative diseases are age-related disorders; however, how aging predisposes the brain to disease has not been adequately addressed. The objective of this study is to determine whether expression of proteins in the cerebromicrovasculature related to inflammation, oxidative stress and neurotoxicity is altered with aging. Methods Brain microvessels are isolated from Fischer 344 rats at 6, 12, 18 and 24 months of age. Levels of interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 RNA are determined by RT-PCR and release of cytokines into the media by ELISA. Vessel conditioned media are also screened by ELISA for IL-1α, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), tumor necrosis factor-α, (TNFα), and interferon γ (IFNγ). Immunofluorescent analysis of brain sections for IL-1β and IL-6 is performed. Results Expression of IL-1β and IL-6, both at RNA and protein levels, significantly (p < 0.01) decreases with age. Levels of MCP-1, TNFα, IL-1α, and IFNγ are significantly (p < 0.05-0.01) lower in 24 month old rats compared to 6 month old animals. Immunofluorescent analysis of brain vessels also shows a decline in IL-1β and IL-6 in aged rats. An increase in oxidative stress, assessed by increased carbonyl formation, as well as a decrease in the antioxidant protein manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is evident in vessels of aged animals. Finally, addition of microvessel conditioned media from aged rats to neuronal cultures evokes significant (p < 0.001) neurotoxicity. Conclusions These data demonstrate that cerebrovascular expression of proteins related to inflammation, oxidative stress and neurotoxicity is altered with aging and suggest that the microvasculature may contribute to functional changes in the aging brain. PMID:20937133

  2. Mgm101 is a Rad52-related protein required for mitochondrial DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Mbantenkhu, MacMillan; Wang, Xiaowen; Nardozzi, Jonathan D; Wilkens, Stephan; Hoffman, Elizabeth; Patel, Anamika; Cosgrove, Michael S; Chen, Xin Jie

    2011-12-09

    Homologous recombination is a conserved molecular process that has primarily evolved for the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks and stalled replication forks. However, the recombination machinery in mitochondria is poorly understood. Here, we show that the yeast mitochondrial nucleoid protein, Mgm101, is related to the Rad52-type recombination proteins that are widespread in organisms from bacteriophage to humans. Mgm101 is required for repeat-mediated recombination and suppression of mtDNA fragmentation in vivo. It preferentially binds to single-stranded DNA and catalyzes the annealing of ssDNA precomplexed with the mitochondrial ssDNA-binding protein, Rim1. Transmission electron microscopy showed that Mgm101 forms large oligomeric rings of ∼14-fold symmetry and highly compressed helical filaments. Specific mutations affecting ring formation reduce protein stability in vitro. The data suggest that the ring structure may provide a scaffold for stabilization of Mgm101 by preventing the aggregation of the otherwise unstable monomeric conformation. Upon binding to ssDNA, Mgm101 is remobilized from the rings to form distinct nucleoprotein filaments. These studies reveal a recombination protein of likely bacteriophage origin in mitochondria and support the notion that recombination is indispensable for mtDNA integrity.

  3. Actin, actin-related proteins and profilin in diatoms: a comparative genomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Aumeier, Charlotte; Polinski, Ellen; Menzel, Diedrik

    2015-10-01

    Diatoms are heterokont unicellular algae with a widespread distribution throughout all aquatic habitats. Research on diatoms has advanced significantly over the last decade due to available genetic transformation methods and publicly available genome databases. Yet up to now, proteins involved in the regulation of the cytoskeleton in diatoms are largely unknown. Consequently, this work focuses on actin and actin-related proteins (ARPs) encoded in the diatom genomes of Thalassiosira pseudonana, Thalassiosira oceanica, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Fragilariopsis cylindrus and Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries. Our comparative genomic study revealed that most diatoms possess only a single conventional actin and a small set of ARPs. Among these are the highly conserved cytoplasmic Arp1 protein and the nuclear Arp4 as well as Arp6. Diatom genomes contain genes coding for two structurally different homologues of Arp4 that might serve specific functions. All diatom species examined here lack ARP2 and ARP3 proteins, suggesting that diatoms are not capable of forming the Arp2/3 complex, which is essential in most eukaryotes for actin filament branching and plus-end dynamics. Interestingly, none of the sequenced representatives of the Bacillariophyta phylum code for profilin. Profilin is an essential actin-binding protein regulating the monomer actin pool and is involved in filament plus-end dynamics. This is the first report of organisms not containing profilin.

  4. [Analysis of gingival crevicular fluid. Relation of isoelectric focusing protein patterns to clinical evaluation].

    PubMed

    Aoki, Y; Yoshinaga, E; Tamazawa, O

    1988-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the protein patterns in gingival crevicular fluid relation to the isoelectric focusing protein patterns of GCF and to clinical evaluations. GCF was collected with filter paper from 105 subjects. The probing depth, the gingival index (Löe & Silness) and the plaque index (Silness & Löe) as clinical evaluations The results follow: 1. The main isoelectric focusing protein patterns of GCF were between pH 5.5 and 7.5. In comparison, the GCF and the serum from the same patients showed patterns to similar serum albumin. 2. Between of GCF pH 5.5 and 7.5 the protein patterns that ranged over 60% was pI 5.65, 6.45, 6.55, 6.75 and 7.00. The frequencies of the ranges of protein patterns and clinical evaluation were compared by the X2 test. pI 5.65, 6.45, 6.55 and 6.75 and PD were significant different, as were pI 6.45, 6.55 and 6.75 and GI. But each pI and PIl. were not significantly different.

  5. Structure and axon outgrowth inhibitor binding of the Nogo-66 receptor and related proteins

    PubMed Central

    Barton, William A.; Liu, Betty P.; Tzvetkova, Dorothea; Jeffrey, Philip D.; Fournier, Alyson E.; Sah, Dinah; Cate, Richard; Strittmatter, Stephen M.; Nikolov, Dimitar B.

    2003-01-01

    The myelin-derived proteins Nogo, MAG and OMgp limit axonal regeneration after injury of the spinal cord and brain. These cell-surface proteins signal through multi-subunit neuronal receptors that contain a common ligand-binding glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored subunit termed the Nogo-66 receptor (NgR). By deletion analysis, we show that the binding of soluble fragments of Nogo, MAG and NgR to cell-surface NgR requires the entire leucine-rich repeat (LRR) region of NgR, but not other portions of the protein. Despite sharing extensive sequence similarity with NgR, two related proteins, NgR2 and NgR3, which we have identified, do not bind Nogo, MAG, OMgp or NgR. To investigate NgR specificity and multi-ligand binding, we determined the crystal structure of the biologically active ligand-binding soluble ectodomain of NgR. The molecule is banana shaped with elongation and curvature arising from eight LRRs flanked by an N-terminal cap and a small C-terminal subdomain. The NgR structure analysis, as well as a comparison of NgR surface residues not conserved in NgR2 and NgR3, identifies potential protein interaction sites important in the assembly of a functional signaling complex. PMID:12839991

  6. Retinol status and expression of retinol-related proteins in methionine-choline deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Takitani, Kimitaka; Koh, Maki; Inoue, Akiko; Kishi, Kanta; Tamai, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Retinol and its derivative, retinoic acid, have pleiotropic functions including vision, immunity, hematopoiesis, reproduction, cell differentiation/growth, and development. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common diseases in developed countries and encompasses a broad spectrum of forms, ranging from steatosis to steatohepatitis, which develops further to cirrhosis. Retinol status has an important role in liver homeostasis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the retinol status and expression of retinol-related proteins, including enzymes and binding proteins, in methionine-choline deficient (MCD) rats as a model of NAFLD. We examined retinol levels in the plasma and liver and gene expression for β-carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase (BCMO), lecithIn: retinol acyltransferase (LRAT), aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1), ALDH1A2, and cellular retinol binding protein (CRBP)-I in MCD rats. The plasma retinol levels in MCD rats were lower than those in the controls, whereas hepatic retinol levels in MCD rats were higher. BCMO expression in the intestine and liver in MCD rats was lower, whereas that in the testes and the kidneys was higher than in control rats. Expression of LRAT, CRBP-I, ALDH1A1, and ALDH1A2 in the liver of MCD rats was also higher. Altered expression of retinol-related proteins may affect retinol status in NAFLD.

  7. Evidences for a role of protein cross-links in transglutaminase-related disease.

    PubMed

    Tabolacci, Claudio; Lentini, Alessandro; Provenzano, Bruno; Beninati, Simone

    2012-02-01

    Transglutaminases (TGs) are a large family of related and ubiquitous enzymes that catalyze the cross-linking of a glutaminyl residue of a protein/peptide substrate to a lysyl residue of a protein/peptide co-substrate. Considerable and intense progress has been made in the understanding of the chemistry, molecular biology and cell biology of TGs. The knowledge that very different physiological and pathological processes are dependent on the presence of adequate levels of these cross-linking enzymes and on the amount of both free and protein-conjugated polyamines by TG, has generated an incredible amount of original research and review articles. It is clear that TG-mediated reactions are essential for some biological processes, such as blood coagulation, skin barrier formation and extracellular matrix assembly, but may also be involved in pathogenetic mechanisms responsible for several human diseases, such as cancer, AIDS, neurodegenerative disorders, celiac disease, and eye lens opacification. We present here a comprehensive review of recent insights into the pathophysiology of TGs related to their protein cross-linking activity.

  8. Glomalin related soil protein as indicator of fire severity: a laboratory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano, Elena; Chrenková, Katarina; Arcenegui, Victoria; Jiménez-Pinilla, Patricia; Mataix-Solera, Jorge; Mataix-Beneyto, Jorge

    2015-04-01

    Glomalin Related Soil Protein (GRSP), a glycoprotein produced by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Wright and Upadhyaya, 1996), was studied to determinate its effectiveness as an indicator of fire severity. Laboratory heating treatments were carried out at 180, 200, 250, 300, 400 and 500°C in soil samples from eight different sites of E Spain with different soil characteristics. Soil water repellency (SWR) and soil organic carbon (SOC) content were also studied to compare their sensitivity to temperature between certain parameters. Results showed that GRSP was affected even at low temperature, contrary to SOC, whose concentrations remained without changes at below 250°C. SWR did not appear in wettable soils after heating and disappeared in water repellent ones at temperatures over 200°C. GRSP behavior to temperature was different between soils. Redundancy Analyses divided sandy soils from the others. Silt, SOC, total content of aggregates (TCA) and initial GRSP concentrations were the significant properties explaining the response of GRSP to temperature. GRSP was more sensitive to temperature than SWR and SOC at low temperatures. Our results indicate that GRSP could be a useful indicator of fire severity. Key words: Arbuscular mycorrizhal fungi; Glomalin related soil protein; Soil water repellency; Soil aggregates. References: Wright, S.F, Upadhyaya, A., 1996. Extraction of an abundant and unusual protein from soil and comparison with hyphal protein of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Soil Sciences 161, 575-586

  9. Molecular Physiology of SPAK and OSR1: Two Ste20-Related Protein Kinases Regulating Ion Transport

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Kenneth B.; Delpire, Eric

    2015-01-01

    SPAK (Ste20-related proline alanine rich kinase) and OSR1 (oxidative stress responsive kinase) are members of the germinal center kinase VI sub-family of the mammalian Ste20 (Sterile20)-related protein kinase family. Although there are 30 enzymes in this protein kinase family, their conservation across the fungi, plant and animal kingdom confirms their evolutionary importance. Already, a large volume of work has accumulated on the tissue distribution, binding partners, signaling cascades, and physiological roles of mammalian SPAK and OSR1 in multiple organ systems. After reviewing this basic information, we will examine newer studies that demonstrate the pathophysiological consequences to SPAK and/or OSR1 disruption, discuss the development and analysis of genetically-engineered mouse models, and address the possible role these serine/threonine kinases might have in cancer proliferation and migration. PMID:23073627

  10. Repurposing of conserved autophagy-related protein ATG8 in a divergent eukaryote

    PubMed Central

    Lévêque, Maude F.; Nguyen, Hoa Mai; Besteiro, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Toxoplasma gondii and other apicomplexan parasites contain a peculiar non-photosynthetic plastid called the apicoplast, which is essential for their survival. The localization of autophagy-related protein ATG8 to the apicoplast in several apicomplexan species and life stages has recently been described, and we have shown this protein is essential for proper inheritance of this complex plastid into daughter cells during cell division. Although the mechanism behind ATG8 association to the apicoplast in T. gondii is related to the canonical conjugation system leading to autophagosome formation, its singular role seems independent from the initial catabolic purpose of autophagy. Here we also discuss further the functional evolution and innovative adaptations of the autophagy machinery to maintain this organelle during parasite division. PMID:27574540

  11. [Diagnosis of central nervous system diseases. Multivariate analysis of the serum-cerebrospinal fluid- protein relation].

    PubMed

    Neu, I S; Pelka, R B; Fateh-Moghadam, A

    1983-09-22

    In a population comprising 197 patients serum and CSF proteins were assayed using the radial immunodiffusion technique devised by Mancini. Multiple discriminant analysis was applied to investigate whether the measured CSF/serum protein relations and their ratios could be regarded as an indicator of specific neurologic diseases. One significant finding was that the slope angle alpha of the regression line between the serum/CSF relation and molecular weight may represent an important indicative parameter. A small angle is suggestive of enhanced permeability of the blood-brain barrier, a large angle of a correspondingly lowered permeability. Further, the analyses demonstrated that the combined use several predictors can markedly improve differential diagnosis. The study also demonstrates the potential of a statistical analytic technique that is still rarely applied in medicine.

  12. CMP‑N‑acetylneuraminic acid synthetase interacts with fragile X related protein 1.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yun; Tian, Shuai; Wang, Zongbao; Wang, Changbo; Chen, Xiaowei; Li, Wei; Yang, Yang; He, Shuya

    2016-08-01

    Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), fragile X related 1 protein (FXR1P) and FXR2P are the members of the FMR protein family. These proteins contain two KH domains and a RGG box, which are characteristic of RNA binding proteins. The absence of FMRP, causes fragile X syndrome (FXS), the leading cause of hereditary mental retardation. FXR1P is expressed throughout the body and important for normal muscle development, and its absence causes cardiac abnormality. To investigate the functions of FXR1P, a screen was performed to identify FXR1P‑interacting proteins and determine the biological effect of the interaction. The current study identified CMP‑N‑acetylneuraminic acid synthetase (CMAS) as an interacting protein using the yeast two‑hybrid system, and the interaction between FXR1P and CMAS was validated in yeast using a β‑galactosidase assay and growth studies with selective media. Furthermore, co‑immunoprecipitation was used to analyze the FXR1P/CMAS association and immunofluorescence microscopy was performed to detect expression and intracellular localization of the proteins. The results of the current study indicated that FXR1P and CMAS interact, and colocalize in the cytoplasm and the nucleus of HEK293T and HeLa cells. Accordingly, a fragile X related 1 (FXR1) gene overexpression vector was constructed to investigate the effect of FXR1 overexpression on the level of monosialotetrahexosylganglioside 1 (GM1). The results of the current study suggested that FXR1P is a tissue‑specific regulator of GM1 levels in SH‑SY5Y cells, but not in HEK293T cells. Taken together, the results initially indicate that FXR1P interacts with CMAS, and that FXR1P may enhance the activation of sialic acid via interaction with CMAS, and increase GM1 levels to affect the development of the nervous system, thus providing evidence for further research into the pathogenesis of FXS.

  13. Protein v. carbohydrate intake differentially affects liking- and wanting-related brain signalling.

    PubMed

    Born, Jurriaan M; Martens, Mieke J I; Lemmens, Sofie G T; Goebel, Rainer; Westerterp-Plantenga, Margriet S

    2013-01-28

    Extreme macronutrient intakes possibly lead to different brain signalling. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of ingesting high-protein v. high-carbohydrate food on liking and wanting task-related brain signalling (TRS) and subsequent macronutrient intake. A total of thirty female subjects (21.6 (SD 2.2) years, BMI 25.0 (SD 3.7) kg/m²) completed four functional MRI scans: two fasted and two satiated on two different days. During the scans, subjects rated all food items for liking and wanting, thereby choosing the subsequent meal. The results show that high-protein (PROT) v. high-carbohydrate (CARB) conditions were generated using protein or carbohydrate drinks at the first meal. Energy intake and hunger were recorded. PROT (protein: 53.7 (SD 2.1) percentage of energy (En%); carbohydrate: 6.4 (SD 1.3) En%) and CARB conditions (protein: 11.8 (SD 0.6) En%; carbohydrate: 70.0 (SD 2.4) En%) were achieved during the first meal, while the second meals were not different between the conditions. Hunger, energy intake, and behavioural liking and wanting ratings were decreased after the first meal (P< 0.001). Comparing the first with the second meal, the macronutrient content changed: carbohydrate -26.9 En% in the CARB condition, protein -37.8 En% in the PROT condition. After the first meal in the CARB condition, wanting TRS was increased in the hypothalamus. After the first meal in the PROT condition, liking TRS was decreased in the putamen (P< 0.05). The change in energy intake from the first to the second meal was inversely related to the change in liking TRS in the striatum and hypothalamus in the CARB condition and positively related in the PROT condition (P< 0.05). In conclusion, wanting and liking TRS were affected differentially with a change in carbohydrate or protein intake, underscoring subsequent energy intake and shift in macronutrient composition.

  14. Frizzled 2 is a key component in the regulation of TOR signaling-mediated egg production in the mosquito Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Weng, Shih-Che; Shiao, Shin-Hong

    2015-06-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway was first discovered as a key event in embryonic development and cell polarity in Drosophila. Recently, several reports have shown that Wnt stimulates translation and cell growth by activating the mTOR pathway in mammals. Previous studies have demonstrated that the Target of Rapamycin (TOR) pathway plays an important role in mosquito vitellogenesis. However, the interactions between these two pathways are poorly understood in the mosquito. In this study, we hypothesized that factors from the TOR and Wnt signaling pathways interacted synergistically in mosquito vitellogenesis. Our results showed that silencing Aedes aegypti Frizzled 2 (AaFz2), a transmembrane receptor of the Wnt signaling pathway, decreased the fecundity of mosquitoes. We showed that AaFz2 was highly expressed at the transcriptional and translational levels in the female mosquito 6 h after a blood meal, indicating amino acid-stimulated expression of AaFz2. Notably, the phosphorylation of S6K, a downstream target of the TOR pathway, and the expression of vitellogenin were inhibited in the absence of AaFz2. A direct link was found in this study between Wnt and TOR signaling in the regulation of mosquito reproduction.

  15. Frizzled2 signaling regulates growth of high-risk neuroblastomas by interfering with β-catenin-dependent and β-catenin-independent signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zins, Karin; Schäfer, Romana; Paulus, Patrick; Dobler, Silvia; Fakhari, Nazak; Sioud, Mouldy; Aharinejad, Seyedhossein; Abraham, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    Frizzled2 (FZD2) is a receptor for Wnts and may activate both canonical and non-canonical Wnt signaling pathways in cancer. However, no studies have reported an association between FZD2 signaling and high-risk NB so far. Here we report that FZD2 signaling pathways are critical to NB growth in MYCN-single copy SK-N-AS and MYCN-amplified SK-N-DZ high-risk NB cells. We demonstrate that stimulation of FZD2 by Wnt3a and Wnt5a regulates β-catenin-dependent and –independent Wnt signaling factors. FZD2 blockade suppressed β-catenin-dependent signaling activity and increased phosphorylation of PKC, AKT and ERK in vitro, consistent with upregulation of β-catenin-independent signaling activity. Finally, FZD2 small interfering RNA knockdown suppressed tumor growth in murine NB xenograft models associated with suppressed β-catenin-dependent signaling and a less vascularized phenotype in both NB xenografts. Together, our study suggests a role for FZD2 in high-risk NB cell growth and provides a potential candidate for therapeutic inhibition in FZD2-expressing NB patients. PMID:27323822

  16. Reverse transcriptase-related proteins in telomeres and in certain chromosomal loci of Rhynchosciara (Diptera: Sciaridae).

    PubMed

    Gorab, Eduardo

    2003-04-01

    The localization of reverse transcriptase-related proteins in polytene chromosomes of dipterans was investigated using previously characterized antibodies to a recombinant polypeptide containing conserved motifs of insect reverse transcriptases. The immunoreactions were carried out with polytene chromosome squashes of eight sciarids, one chironomid and three Drosophila species. Telomeric staining was regularly observed on chromosomes of the sciarid Rhynchosciara americana under normal growth conditions. Five of eight chromosomal tips were labelled except for the heterochromatic ends that are occasionally found associated forming a chromocentre in the salivary gland. Reverse transcriptase-related proteins were detected at chromosomal tips of young larvae and remained bound to the telomeres throughout larval development. As in salivary gland chromosomes, five non-telocentric ends of the chromosomes from Malpighian tubules of R. americana appeared clearly stained with anti-reverse transcriptase. The occurrence of telomeric reverse transcriptase in R. americana correlates with the presence of RNA in addition to an unusual enrichment with homopolymeric dA/dT DNA associated with the telomeric heterochromatin. The antibodies also reacted with a few interstitial sites in chromosomes of four Rhynchosciara species, one band overlapping the histone gene locus of three species in the americana -like group. The results provide evidence for a reverse transcriptase-related protein as a constitutive component in telomeres of R. americana and also in certain interstitial loci of Rhynchosciara species in which RNA was immunologically detected in the form of RNA:DNA hybrids.

  17. Levels of metacaspase1 and chaperones related to protein quality control in alcoholic and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Alejandro S; Dorce, Jacques; Peng, Yue; French, Barbara A; Tillman, Brittany; Li, Jun; French, Samuel W

    2015-02-01

    Efficient management of misfolded or aggregated proteins in ASH and NASH is crucial for continued hepatic viability. Cellular protein quality control systems play an important role in the pathogenesis and progression of ASH and NASH. In a recent study, elevated Mca1 expression counteracted aggregation and accumulation of misfolded proteins and extended the life span of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Hill et al, 2014). Mca1 may also associate with Ssa1 and Hsp104 in disaggregation and fragmentation of aggregated proteins and their subsequent degradation through the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway. If degradation is not available, protection of the cellular environment from a misfolded protein is accomplished by its sequestration into two distinct inclusion bodies (Kaganovich et al., 2008) called the JUNQ (JUxta Nuclear Quality control compartment) and the IPOD (Insoluble Protein Deposit). Mca1, Hsp104, Hsp40, Ydj1, Ssa1, VCP/p97, and p62 all play important roles in protein quality control systems. This study aims to measure the expression of Mca1 and related chaperones involved in protein quality control in alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH), and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) compared with normal control liver biopsies. Mca1, Hsp104, Hsp40, Ydj1, Ssa1, VCP/p97, and p62 expressions were measured in three to six formalin-fixed paraffin embedded ASH and NASH liver biopsies and control normal liver specimens by immunofluorescence staining and quantified by immunofluorescence intensity. Mca1, Hsp104, Ydj1 and p62 were significantly upregulated compared to control (p<0.05) in ASH specimens. Hsp40 and VCP/p97 were also uptrending in ASH. In NASH, the only significant difference was the increased expression of Hsp104 compared to control (p<0.05). Ssa1 levels were uptrending in both ASH and NASH specimens. The upregulation of Mca1, Hsp104, Ydj1 and p62 in ASH may be elicited as a response to the chronic exposure of the hepatocytes to the toxicity of alcohol

  18. Glycation of Lysozyme by Glycolaldehyde Provides New Mechanistic Insights in Diabetes-Related Protein Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Mariño, Laura; Maya-Aguirre, Carlos Andrés; Pauwels, Kris; Vilanova, Bartolomé; Ortega-Castro, Joaquin; Frau, Juan; Donoso, Josefa; Adrover, Miquel

    2017-03-14

    Glycation occurs in vivo as a result of the nonenzymatic reaction of carbohydrates (and/or their autoxidation products) with proteins, DNA, or lipids. Protein glycation causes loss-of-function and, consequently, the development of diabetic-related diseases. Glycation also boosts protein aggregation, which can be directly related with the higher prevalence of aggregating diseases in diabetic people. However, the molecular mechanism connecting glycation with aggregation still remains unclear. Previously we described mechanistically how glycation of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) with ribose induced its aggregation. Here we address the question of whether the ribose-induced aggregation is a general process or it depends on the chemical nature of the glycating agent. Glycation of HEWL with glycolaldehyde occurs through two different scenarios depending on the HEWL concentration regime (both within the micromolar range). At low HEWL concentration, non-cross-linking fluorescent advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are formed on Lys side chains, which do not change the protein structure but inhibit its enzymatic activity. These AGEs have little impact on HEWL surface hydrophobicity and, therefore, a negligible effect on its aggregation propensity. Upon increasing HEWL concentration, the glycation mechanism shifts toward the formation of intermolecular cross-links, which triggers a polymerization cascade involving the formation of insoluble spherical-like aggregates. These results notably differ with the aggregation-modulation mechanism of ribosylated HEWL directed by hydrophobic interactions. Additionally, their comparison constitutes the first experimental evidence showing that the mechanism underlying the aggregation of a glycated protein depends on the chemical nature of the glycating agent.

  19. Dynamin-Related Protein 1 and Mitochondrial Fragmentation in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, P. Hemachandra; Reddy, Tejaswini P.; Manczak, Maria; Calkins, Marcus J.; Shirendeb, Ulziibat; Mao, Peizhong

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the recent developments of abnormal mitochondrial dynamics, mitochondrial fragmentation, and neuronal damage in neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The GTPase family of proteins, including fission proteins, dynamin related protein 1 (Drp1), mitochondrial fission 1 (Fis1), and fusion proteins (Mfn1, Mfn2 and Opa1) are essential to maintain mitochondrial fission and fusion balance, and to provide necessary adenosine triphosphate to neurons. Among these, Drp1 is involved in several important aspects of mitochondria, including shape, size, distribution, remodeling, and maintenance of X in mammalian cells. In addition, recent advancements in molecular, cellular, electron microscopy, and confocal imaging studies revealed that Drp1 is associated with several cellular functions, including mitochondrial and peroxisomal fragmentation, phosphorylation, SUMOylation, ubiquitination, and cell death. In the last two decades, tremendous progress has been made in researching mitochondrial dynamics, in yeast, worms, and mammalian cells; and this research has provided evidence linking Drp1 to neurodegenerative diseases. Researchers in the neurodegenerative disease field are beginning to recognize the possible involvement of Drp1 in causing mitochondrial fragmentation and abnormal mitochondrial dynamics in neurodegenerative diseases. This article summarizes research findings relating Drp1 to mitochondrial fission and fusion, in yeast, worms, and mammals. Based on findings from the Reddy laboratory and others’, we propose that mutant proteins of neurodegenerative diseases, including AD, PD, HD, and ALS, interact with Drp1, activate mitochondrial fission machinery, fragment mitochondria excessively, and impair mitochondrial transport and mitochondrial dynamics, ultimately causing mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal damage. PMID:21145355

  20. Trivalent M-related protein as a component of next generation group A streptococcal vaccines

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Purpose There is a need to broaden protective coverage of M protein–based vaccines against group A streptococci (GAS) because coverage of the current 30-valent M protein vaccine does not extend to all emm types. An additional GAS antigen and virulence factor that could potentially extend vaccine coverage is M-related protein (Mrp). Previous work indicated that there are three structurally related families of Mrp (MrpI, MrpII, and MrpIII) and peptides of all three elicited bactericidal antibodies against multiple emm types. The purpose of this study was to determine if a recombinant form containing Mrp from the three families would evoke bactericidal antiserum and to determine if this antiserum could enhance the effectiveness of antisera to the 30-valent M protein vaccine. Materials and Methods A trivalent recombinant Mrp (trMrp) protein containing N-terminal fragments from the three families (trMrp) was constructed, purified and used to immunize rabbits. Anti-trMrp sera contained high titers of antibodies against the trMrp immunogen and recombinant forms representing MrpI, MrpII, and MrpIII. Results The antisera opsonized emm types of GAS representing each Mrp family and also opsonized emm types not covered by the 30-valent M protein–based vaccine. Importantly, a combination of trMrp and 30-valent M protein antiserum resulted in higher levels of opsonization of GAS than either antiserum alone. Conclusion These findings suggest that trMrp may be an effective addition to future constructs of GAS vaccines. PMID:28168173

  1. The presence of GPI-linked protein(s) in an archaeobacterium, Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, closely related to eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Nishizaki, R; Ikezawa, H

    1997-02-11

    GPI-anchored proteins are distributed ubiquitously in eukaryotes, but not in procaryotes. By metabolic-labeling of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius cells, 14C-radiolabeled precursors of GPI and caldarchaetidylinositol were incorporated into 120, 143 and 185 kDa proteins. The 185 kDa protein was specifically solubilized by bacterial phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C. Therefore, Sulfolobus proved to contain at least one GPI-anchored proteins.

  2. The role of higher protein diets in weight control and obesity-related comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Astrup, A; Raben, A; Geiker, N

    2015-01-01

    The importance of the relative dietary content of protein, carbohydrate and the type of carbohydrate (that is, glycemic index (GI)) for weight control under ad libitum conditions has been controversial owing to the lack of large scale studies with high diet adherence. The Diet, Obesity and Genes (DioGenes) European multicentre trial examined the importance of a slight increase in dietary protein content, reduction in carbohydrate and the importance of choosing low (LGI) vs high GI (HGI) carbohydrates for weight control in 932 obese families. Only the adults underwent a diet of 800 kcal per day for 8 weeks, and after losing ~11kg they were randomized to one of five energy ad libitum diets for 6 months. The diets differed in protein content and GI. The high-protein (HP) diet groups consumed 5.4% points more energy from protein than the normal protein (NP) groups, and the LGI diet groups achieved 5.1% lower GI than the HGI groups. The effect of HP and LGI was additive on weight loss and maintenance, and the combination was successful in preventing weight regain and reducing drop-out rate among the adults after the 11kg weight loss. This diet also reduced body fatness and prevalence of overweight and obesity among their children and had consistent beneficial effects on blood pressure, blood lipids and inflammation in both parents and children. After 1 year, mainly the HP effects were maintained. Putative genes have been identified that suggest this diet to be particularly effective in 67% of the population. In conclusion, the DioGenes diet has shown to be effective for prevention of weight regain and for weight reduction in overweight children under ad libitum conditions. The less-restrictive dietary approach fits into a normal food culture, and has been translated into popular diet and cook books in several languages. PMID:25540980

  3. The role of higher protein diets in weight control and obesity-related comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Astrup, A; Raben, A; Geiker, N

    2015-05-01

    The importance of the relative dietary content of protein, carbohydrate and the type of carbohydrate (that is, glycemic index (GI)) for weight control under ad libitum conditions has been controversial owing to the lack of large scale studies with high diet adherence. The Diet, Obesity and Genes (DioGenes) European multicentre trial examined the importance of a slight increase in dietary protein content, reduction in carbohydrate and the importance of choosing low (LGI) vs high GI (HGI) carbohydrates for weight control in 932 obese families. Only the adults underwent a diet of 800 kcal per day for 8 weeks, and after losing ~11kg they were randomized to one of five energy ad libitum diets for 6 months. The diets differed in protein content and GI. The high-protein (HP) diet groups consumed 5.4% points more energy from protein than the normal protein (NP) groups, and the LGI diet groups achieved 5.1% lower GI than the HGI groups. The effect of HP and LGI was additive on weight loss and maintenance, and the combination was successful in preventing weight regain and reducing drop-out rate among the adults after the 11kg weight loss. This diet also reduced body fatness and prevalence of overweight and obesity among their children and had consistent beneficial effects on blood pressure, blood lipids and inflammation in both parents and children. After 1 year, mainly the HP effects were maintained. Putative genes have been identified that suggest this diet to be particularly effective in 67% of the population. In conclusion, the DioGenes diet has shown to be effective for prevention of weight regain and for weight reduction in overweight children under ad libitum conditions. The less-restrictive dietary approach fits into a normal food culture, and has been translated into popular diet and cook books in several languages.

  4. Andrographolide inhibits hepatoma cells growth and affects the expression of cell cycle related proteins.

    PubMed

    Shen, Kai-Kai; Liu, Tian-Yu; Xu, Chong; Ji, Li-Li; Wang, Zheng-Tao

    2009-09-01

    The present study is aimed to investigate the toxic effects of andrographolide (Andro) on hepatoma cells and elucidate its preliminary mechanisms. After cells were treated with different concentrations of Andro (0-50 micromol x L(-1)) for 24 h, cell viability was evaluated with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl) 2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Furthermore, after hepatoma cells (Hep3B and HepG2) were treated with different concentrations of Andro (0-30 micromol x L(-1)) for 14 d, the number of colony formation was accounted under microscope. Cell cycle related proteins such as Cdc-2, phosphorylated-Cdc-2, Cyclin B and Cyclin D1 were detected with Western blotting assay and the cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry using propidium iodide staining. MTT results showed that Andro induced growth inhibition of hepatoma cells in a concentration-dependent manner but had no significant effects on human normal liver L-02 cells. Andro dramatically decreased the colony formation of hepatoma cells in the concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, Andro induced a decrease of Hep3B cells at the G0-G1 phase and a concomitant accumulation of cells at G2-M phase. At the molecular level, Western blotting results showed that Andro decreased the expression of Cdc-2, phosphorylated-Cdc-2, Cyclin D1 and Cyclin B proteins in a time-dependent manner, which are all cell cycle related proteins. Taken together, the results demonstrated that Andro specifically inhibited the growth of hepatoma cells and cellular cell cycle related proteins were possibly involved in this process.

  5. Genotoxicity assessment of peptide/protein-related biotherapeutics: points to consider before testing.

    PubMed

    Thybaud, Veronique; Kasper, Peter; Sobol, Zhanna; Elhajouji, Azeddine; Fellows, Mick; Guerard, Melanie; Lynch, Anthony M; Sutter, Andreas; Tanir, Jennifer Y

    2016-07-01

    The ICH S6(R1) recommendations on safety evaluation of biotherapeutics have led to uncertainty in determining what would constitute a cause for concern that would require genotoxicity testing. A Health and Environmental Sciences Institute's Genetic Toxicology Technical Committee Workgroup was formed to review the current practice of genotoxicity assessment of peptide/protein-related biotherapeutics. There are a number of properties of peptide/protein-related biotherapeutics that distinguish such products from traditional 'small molecule' drugs and need to be taken into consideration when assessing whether genotoxicity testing may be warranted and if so, how to do it appropriately. Case examples were provided by participating companies and decision trees were elaborated to determine whether and when genotoxicity evaluation is needed for peptides containing natural amino acids, non-natural amino acids and other chemical entities and for unconjugated and conjugated proteins. From a scientific point of view, there is no reason for testing peptides containing exclusively natural amino acids irrespective of the manufacturing process. If non-natural amino acids, organic linkers and other non-linker chemical components have already been tested for genotoxicity, there is no need to re-evaluate them when used in different peptide/protein-related biotherapeutics. Unless the peptides have been modified to be able to enter the cells, it is generally more appropriate to evaluate the peptides containing the non-natural amino acids and other non-linker chemical moieties in vivo where the cleavage products can be formed. For linkers, it is important to determine if exposure to reactive forms are likely to occur and from which origin. When the linkers are anticipated to be potential mutagenic impurities they should be evaluated according to ICH M7. If linkers are expected to be catabolic products, it is recommended to test the entire conjugate in vivo, as this would ensure that the

  6. Regulation of a plant SNF1-related protein kinase by glucose-6-phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Toroser, D.; Plaut, Z.; Huber, S.C.

    2000-05-01

    One of the major protein kinases (PK{sub III}) that phosphorylates serine-158 of spinach sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS), which is responsible for light/dark modulation of activity, is known to be a member of the SNF1-related family of protein kinases. In the present study, the authors have developed a fluorescence-based continuous assay for measurement of PK{sub III} activity. Using the continuous assay, along with the fixed-time-point {sup 32}P-incorporation assay, they demonstrate that PK{sub III} activity is inhibited by glucose-6-phosphate (Glc-6-P). Relative inhibition by Glc-6-P was increased by decreasing pH from 8.5 to 5.5 and by reducing the concentration of Mg{sup 2+} in the assay from 10 to 2 nM. Under likely physiological conditions (PH 7.0 and 2 mM Mg{sup 2+}), 10 nM Glc-6-P inhibited kinase activity approximately 70%. Inhibition by Glc-6-P could not be ascribed to contaminants in the commercial preparations. Other metabolites inhibited PK{sub III} in the following order: Glc-6-P > mannose-6-P, fructose-1,6P{sub 2} > ribose-5-P, 3-PGA, fructose-6-P. Inorganic phosphate, Glc, and AMP were not inhibitory, and free Glc did not reverse the inhibition by Glc-6-P. Because SNF1-related protein kinases are thought to function broadly in the regulation of enzyme activity and gene expression, Glc-6-P inhibition of PK{sub III} activity potentially provides a mechanism for metabolic regulation of the reactions catalyzed by these important protein kinases.

  7. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 facilitates heme scavenging after intracerebral hemorrhage in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gaiqing; Manaenko, Anatol; Shao, Anwen; Ou, Yibo; Yang, Peng; Budbazar, Enkhjargal; Nowrangi, Derek; Zhang, John H; Tang, Jiping

    2016-06-17

    Heme-degradation after erythrocyte lysis plays an important role in the pathophysiology of intracerebral hemorrhage. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 is a receptor expressed predominately at the neurovascular interface, which facilitates the clearance of the hemopexin and heme complex. In the present study, we investigated the role of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 in heme removal and neuroprotection in a mouse model of intracerebral hemorrhage. Endogenous low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 and hemopexin were increased in ipsilateral brain after intracerebral hemorrhage, accompanied by increased hemoglobin levels, brain water content, blood-brain barrier permeability and neurological deficits. Exogenous human recombinant low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 protein reduced hematoma volume, brain water content surrounding hematoma, blood-brain barrier permeability and improved neurological function three days after intracerebral hemorrhage. The expression of malondialdehyde, fluoro-Jade C positive cells and cleaved caspase 3 was increased three days after intracerebral hemorrhage in the ipsilateral brain tissues and decreased with recombinant low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1. Intracerebral hemorrhage decreased and recombinant low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 increased the levels of superoxide dismutase 1. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 siRNA reduced the effect of human recombinant low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 on all outcomes measured. Collectively, our findings suggest that low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 contributed to heme clearance and blood-brain barrier protection after intracerebral hemorrhage. The use of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 as supplement provides a novel approach to ameliorating intracerebral hemorrhage brain injury via its pleiotropic neuroprotective effects.

  8. Quantitative proteomic analysis of age-related subventricular zone proteins associated with neurodegenerative disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianli; Dong, Chuanming; Sun, Lixin; Zhu, Liang; Sun, Chenxi; Ma, Rongjie; Ning, ke; Lu, Bing; Zhang, Jinfu; Xu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Aging is characterized by a progressive decline in the function of adult tissues which can lead to neurodegenerative disorders. However, little is known about the correlation between protein changes in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and neurodegenerative diseases with age. In the present study, neural stem cells (NSCs) were derived from the SVZ on postnatal 7 d, 1 m, and 12 m-old mice. With age, NSCs exhibited increased SA-β-gal activity and decreased proliferation and pool size in the SVZ zone, and were associated with elevated inflammatory chemokines and cytokines. Furthermore, quantitative proteomics and ingenuity pathway analysis were used to evaluate the significant age-related alterations in proteins and their functions. Some downregulated proteins such as DPYSL2, TPI1, ALDH, and UCHL1 were found to play critical roles in the neurological disease and PSMA1, PSMA3, PSMC2, PSMD11, and UCHL1 in protein homeostasis. Taken together, we have provided valuable insight into the cellular and molecular processes that underlie aging-associated declines in SVZ neurogenesis for the early detection of differences in gene expression and the potential risk of neurological disease, which is beneficial in the prevention of the diseases. PMID:27857231

  9. The Caenorhabditis elegans odr-2 gene encodes a novel Ly-6-related protein required for olfaction.

    PubMed Central

    Chou, J H; Bargmann, C I; Sengupta, P

    2001-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans odr-2 mutants are defective in the ability to chemotax to odorants that are recognized by the two AWC olfactory neurons. Like many other olfactory mutants, they retain responses to high concentrations of AWC-sensed odors; we show here that these residual responses are caused by the ability of other olfactory neurons (the AWA neurons) to be recruited at high odor concentrations. odr-2 encodes a membrane-associated protein related to the Ly-6 superfamily of GPI-linked signaling proteins and is the founding member of a C. elegans gene family with at least seven other members. Alternative splicing of odr-2 yields three predicted proteins that differ only at the extreme amino terminus. The three isoforms have different promoters, and one isoform may have a unique role in olfaction. An epitope-tagged ODR-2 protein is expressed at high levels in sensory neurons, motor neurons, and interneurons and is enriched in axons. The AWC neurons are superficially normal in their development and structure in odr-2 mutants, but their function is impaired. Our results suggest that ODR-2 may regulate AWC signaling within the neuronal network required for chemotaxis. PMID:11139503

  10. Pim-1 preserves mitochondrial morphology by inhibiting dynamin-related protein 1 translocation.

    PubMed

    Din, Shabana; Mason, Matthew; Völkers, Mirko; Johnson, Bevan; Cottage, Christopher T; Wang, Zeping; Joyo, Anya Y; Quijada, Pearl; Erhardt, Peter; Magnuson, Nancy S; Konstandin, Mathias H; Sussman, Mark A

    2013-04-09

    Mitochondrial morphological dynamics affect the outcome of ischemic heart damage and pathogenesis. Recently, mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) has been identified as a mediator of mitochondrial morphological changes and cell death during cardiac ischemic injury. In this study, we report a unique relationship between Pim-1 activity and Drp1 regulation of mitochondrial morphology in cardiomyocytes challenged by ischemic stress. Transgenic hearts overexpressing cardiac Pim-1 display reduction of total Drp1 protein levels, increased phosphorylation of Drp1-(S637), and inhibition of Drp1 localization to the mitochondria. Consistent with these findings, adenoviral-induced Pim-1 neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCMs) retain a reticular mitochondrial phenotype after simulated ischemia (sI) and decreased Drp1 mitochondrial sequestration. Interestingly, adenovirus Pim-dominant negative NRCMs show increased expression of Bcl-2 homology 3 (BH3)-only protein p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA), which has been previously shown to induce Drp1 accumulation at mitochondria and increase sensitivity to apoptotic stimuli. Overexpression of the p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis-dominant negative adenovirus attenuates localization of Drp1 to mitochondria in adenovirus Pim-dominant negative NRCMs promotes reticular mitochondrial morphology and inhibits cell death during sI. Therefore, Pim-1 activity prevents Drp1 compartmentalization to the mitochondria and preserves reticular mitochondrial morphology in response to sI.

  11. OSBP-Related Protein Family in Lipid Transport Over Membrane Contact Sites

    PubMed Central

    Olkkonen, Vesa M.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that oxysterol-binding protein-related proteins (ORPs) localize at membrane contact sites, which are high-capacity platforms for inter-organelle exchange of small molecules and information. ORPs can simultaneously associate with the two apposed membranes and transfer lipids across the interbilayer gap. Oxysterol-binding protein moves cholesterol from the endoplasmic reticulum to trans-Golgi, driven by the retrograde transport of phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PI4P). Analogously, yeast Osh6p mediates the transport of phosphatidylserine from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane in exchange for PI4P, and ORP5 and -8 are suggested to execute similar functions in mammalian cells. ORPs may share the capacity to bind PI4P within their ligand-binding domain, prompting the hypothesis that bidirectional transport of a phosphoinositide and another lipid may be a common theme among the protein family. This model, however, needs more experimental support and does not exclude a function of ORPs in lipid signaling. PMID:26715851

  12. Sequence and Comparative Genomic Analysis of Actin-related ProteinsD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Jean; Oma, Yukako; Vallar, Laurent; Friederich, Evelyne; Poch, Olivier; Winsor, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    Actin-related proteins (ARPs) are key players in cytoskeleton activities and nuclear functions. Two complexes, ARP2/3 and ARP1/11, also known as dynactin, are implicated in actin dynamics and in microtubule-based trafficking, respectively. ARP4 to ARP9 are components of many chromatin-modulating complexes. Conventional actins and ARPs codefine a large family of homologous proteins, the actin superfamily, with a tertiary structure known as the actin fold. Because ARPs and actin share high sequence conservation, clear family definition requires distinct features to easily and systematically identify each subfamily. In this study we performed an in depth sequence and comparative genomic analysis of ARP subfamilies. A high-quality multiple alignment of ∼700 complete protein sequences homologous to actin, including 148 ARP sequences, allowed us to extend the ARP classification to new organisms. Sequence alignments revealed conserved residues, motifs, and inserted sequence signatures to define each ARP subfamily. These discriminative characteristics allowed us to develop ARPAnno (http://bips.u-strasbg.fr/ARPAnno), a new web server dedicated to the annotation of ARP sequences. Analyses of sequence conservation among actins and ARPs highlight part of the actin fold and suggest interactions between ARPs and actin-binding proteins. Finally, analysis of ARP distribution across eukaryotic phyla emphasizes the central importance of nuclear ARPs, particularly the multifunctional ARP4. PMID:16195354

  13. Heat shock protein 10 (Hsp10) in immune-related diseases: one coin, two sides

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Haibo; Halilou, Amadou I.; Hu, Liang; Cai, Wenqian; Liu, Jing; Huang, Bo

    2011-01-01

    Heat shock protein 10 (Hsp10) in eukaryotes, originally identified as a mitochondrial chaperone, now is also known to be present in cytosol, cell surface, extracellular space and peripheral blood. Functionally besides participating in mitochondrial protein folding in association with Hsp60, Hsp10 appears to be related to pregnancy, cancer and autoimmune inhibition. Hsp10 can be released to peripheral blood at very early time point of pregnancy and given another name called early pregnancy factor (EPF), which seems to play a critical role in developing a pregnant niche. In malignant disorders, Hsp10 is usually abnormally expressed in the cytosol of malignant cells and further released to extracellular space, resulting in tumor-promoting effect from various aspects. Furthermore, distinct from other heat shock protein members, whose soluble form is recognized as danger signal by immune cells and triggers immune responses, Hsp10 after release, however, is designed to be an inhibitory signal by limiting immune response. This review discusses how Hsp10 participates in various physiological and pathological processes from basic protein molecule folding to pregnancy, cancer and autoimmune diseases, and emphasizes how important the location is for the function exertion of a molecule. PMID:21969171

  14. Novel roles of plant RETINOBLASTOMA-RELATED (RBR) protein in cell proliferation and asymmetric cell division.

    PubMed

    Desvoyes, Bénédicte; de Mendoza, Alex; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki; Gutierrez, Crisanto

    2014-06-01

    The retinoblastoma (Rb) protein was identified as a human tumour suppressor protein that controls various stages of cell proliferation through the interaction with members of the E2F family of transcription factors. It was originally thought to be specific to animals but plants contain homologues of Rb, called RETINOBLASTOMA-RELATED (RBR). In fact, the Rb-E2F module seems to be a very early acquisition of eukaryotes. The activity of RBR depends on phosphorylation of certain amino acid residues, which in most cases are well conserved between plant and animal proteins. In addition to its role in cell-cycle progression, RBR has been shown to participate in various cellular processes such as endoreplication, transcriptional regulation, chromatin remodelling, cell growth, stem cell biology, and differentiation. Here, we discuss the most recent advances to define the role of RBR in cell proliferation and asymmetric cell division. These and other reports clearly support the idea that RBR is used as a landing platform of a plethora of cellular proteins and complexes to control various aspects of cell physiology and plant development.

  15. LYZL6, an acidic, bacteriolytic, human sperm-related protein, plays a role in fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Peng; Li, Wenshu; Yang, Zhifang; Zhang, Ning; Xu, Yixin; Bao, Jianying; Jiang, Deke; Dong, Xianping

    2017-01-01

    Lysozyme-like proteins (LYZLs) belong to the c-type lysozyme/α-lactalbumin family and are selectively expressed in the mammalian male reproductive tract. Two members, human sperm lysozyme-like protein (SLLP) -1 and mouse LYZL4, have been reported to contribute to fertilization but show no bacteriolytic activity. Here, we focused on the possible contribution of LYZL6 to immunity and fertilization. In humans, LYZL6 was selectively expressed by the testis and epididymis and became concentrated on spermatozoa. Native LYZL6 isolated from sperm extracts exhibited bacteriolytic activity against Micrococcus lysodeikticus. Recombinant LYZL6 (rLYZL6) reached its peak activity at pH 5.6 and 15 mM of Na+, and could inhibit the growth of Gram-positive, but not Gram-negative bacteria. Nevertheless, the bacteriolytic activity of rLYZL6 proved to be much lower than that of human lysozyme under physiological conditions. Immunodetection with a specific antiserum localized the LYZL6 protein on the postacrosomal membrane of mature spermatozoa. Immunoneutralization of LYZL6 significantly decreased the numbers of human spermatozoa fused with zona-free hamster eggs in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. Thus, we report here for the first time that LYZL6, an acidic, bacteriolytic and human sperm-related protein, is likely important for fertilization but not for the innate immunity of the male reproductive tract. PMID:28182716

  16. Purification and characterization of Ras related protein, Rab5a from Tinospora cordifolia.

    PubMed

    Amir, Mohd; Wahiduzzaman; Dar, Mohammad Aasif; Haque, Md Anzarul; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2016-01-01

    Ras related protein (Rab5a) is one of the most important member of the Rab family which regulates the early endosome fusion in endocytosis, and it also helps in the regulation of the budding process. Here, for the first time we report a simple and reproducible method for the purification of the Rab5a from a medicinal plant Tinospora cordifolia. We have used weak cation-exchange (CM-Sepharose-FF) followed by gel-filtration chromatography. A purified protein of 22-kDa was observed on SDS-PAGE which was identified as Rab5a using MALDI-TOF/MS. Our purification procedure is fast and simple with high yield. The purified protein was characterized using circular dichroism for the measurement of secondary structure followed by GdmCl- and urea-induced denaturation to calculate the values of Gibbs free energy change (ΔGD), ΔGD°, midpoint of the denaturation Cm, i.e. molar GdmCl [GdmCl] and molar urea [Urea] concentration at which ΔGD=0; and m, the slope (=∂ΔGD/∂[d]) values. Furthermore, thermodynamic properties of Rab5a were also measured by differential scanning calorimeter. Here, using isothermal calorimeteric measurements we further showed that Rab5a binds with the GTP. This is a first report on the purification and biophysical characterization of Rab5a protein from T. cordifolia.

  17. Defective sorting of the thrombospondin-related anonymous protein (TRAP) inhibits Plasmodium infectivity.

    PubMed

    Bhanot, Purnima; Frevert, Ute; Nussenzweig, Victor; Persson, Cathrine

    2003-02-01

    Thrombospondin-related anonymous protein (TRAP) is a type 1 transmembrane protein that plays an essential role in gliding motility and cell invasion by Plasmodium sporozoites. It is stored in micronemes-secretory organelles located primarily in the apical end of the parasites and is also found on the parasite surface. The mechanisms that target TRAP and other sporozoite proteins to micronemes and subsequently to the parasite surface are not known. Here we report that the micronemal and surface localization of TRAP requires a tyrosine-based motif located in its cytoplasmic tail. This motif is analogous to the YXXphi motif (Y: tyrosine, X: any amino acid; phi: hydrophobic amino acid) that targets eukaryotic proteins to certain sub-cellular compartments and to the plasma membrane. Abrogating the Y motif substantially reduces micronemal and cell surface localization of TRAP. The infectivity of mutant parasites is substantially inhibited. However, there is no significant difference in the amounts of TRAP secreted into the culture medium by wild type and mutant parasites, suggesting that TRAP destined for secretion bypasses micronemal localization.

  18. Proteolytic Characteristics of Cathepsin D Related to the Recognition and Cleavage of Its Target Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Huiying; Lou, Xiaomin; Shan, Qiang; Zhang, Ju; Zhu, Xu; Zhang, Jia; Wang, Yang; Xie, Yingying; Xu, Ningzhi; Liu, Siqi

    2013-01-01

    Cathepsin D (CD) plays an important role in both biological and pathological processes, although the cleavage characteristics and substrate selection of CD have yet to be fully explored. We employed liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to identify the CD cleavage sites in bovine serum albumin (BSA). We found that the hydrophobic residues at P1 were not only a preferential factor for CD cleavage but that the hydrophobicity at P1’ also contributed to CD recognition. The concept of hydrophobic scores of neighbors (HSN) was proposed to describe the hydrophobic microenvironment of CD recognition sites. The survey of CD cleavage characteristics in several proteins suggested that the HSN was a sensitive indicator for judging the favorable sites in peptides for CD cleavage, with HSN values of 0.5–1.0 representing a likely threshold. Ovalbumin (OVA), a protein resistant to CD cleavage in its native state, was easily cleaved by CD after denaturation, and the features of the cleaved peptides were quite similar to those found in BSA, where a higher HSN value indicated greater cleavability. We further conducted two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) to find more proteins that were insensitive to CD cleavage in CD-knockdown cells. Based on an analysis of secondary and three-dimensional structures, we postulated that intact proteins with a structure consisting of all α-helices would be relatively accessible to CD cleavage. PMID:23840360

  19. Pancreatic lipase and pancreatic lipase-related protein 2, but not pancreatic lipase-related protein 1, hydrolyze retinyl palmitate in physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Reboul, Emmanuelle; Berton, Amélie; Moussa, Myriam; Kreuzer, Corinne; Crenon, Isabelle; Borel, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    The major sources of vitamin A in the human diet are retinyl esters (mainly retinyl palmitate) and provitamin A carotenoids. It has been shown that classical pancreatic lipase (PL) is involved in the luminal hydrolysis of retinyl palmitate (RP), but it is not known whether pancreatic lipase-related proteins 1 (PLRP1) and 2 (PLRP2), two other lipases recovered in the human pancreatic juice, are also involved. The aim of this study was to assess whether RP acts a substrate for these lipase-related proteins. Pure horse PL, horse PLRP2 and dog PLRP1 were incubated with RP solubilized in its physiological vehicles, i.e., triglyceride-rich lipid droplets, mixed micelles and vesicles. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to assess RP hydrolysis by the free retinol released in the incubation medium. Incubation of RP-containing emulsions with horse PL and colipase resulted in RP hydrolysis (0.051+/-0.01 micromol/min/mg). This hydrolysis was abolished when colipase was not added to the medium. PLRP2 and PLRP1 were unable to hydrolyze RP solubilized in emulsions, regardless of whether colipase was added to the medium. PL hydrolyzed RP solubilized in mixed micelles as well (0.074+/-0.014 micromol/min/mg). Again, this hydrolysis was abolished in the absence of colipase. PLRP2 hydrolyzed RP solubilized in micelles but less efficiently than PL (0.023+/-0.005 micromol/min/mg). Colipase had no effect on this hydrolysis. PLRP1 was unable to hydrolyze RP solubilized in micelles, regardless of whether colipase was present or absent. Both PL and PLRP2 hydrolyzed RP solubilized in a vesicle rich-solution, and a synergic phenomenon between the two lipases was enlighten. Taken together, these results show that (1) PL hydrolyzes RP whether RP is solubilized in emulsions or in mixed micelles, (2) PLRP2 hydrolyzes RP only when RP is solubilized in mixed micelles, and (3) PLRP1 is unable to hydrolyze RP regardless of whether RP is solubilized in emulsions or in mixed

  20. Genomic Analysis of Storage Protein Deficiency in Genetically Related Lines of Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)

    PubMed Central

    Pandurangan, Sudhakar; Diapari, Marwan; Yin, Fuqiang; Munholland, Seth; Perry, Gregory E.; Chapman, B. Patrick; Huang, Shangzhi; Sparvoli, Francesca; Bollini, Roberto; Crosby, William L.; Pauls, Karl P.; Marsolais, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    A series of genetically related lines of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) integrate a progressive deficiency in major storage proteins, the 7S globulin phaseolin and lectins. SARC1 integrates a lectin-like protein, arcelin-1 from a wild common bean accession. SMARC1N-PN1 is deficient in major lectins, including erythroagglutinating phytohemagglutinin (PHA-E) but not α-amylase inhibitor, and incorporates also a deficiency in phaseolin. SMARC1-PN1 is intermediate and shares the phaseolin deficiency. Sanilac is the parental background. To understand the genomic basis for variations in protein profiles previously determined by proteomics, the genotypes were submitted to short-fragment genome sequencing using an Illumina HiSeq 2000/2500 platform. Reads were aligned to reference sequences and subjected to de novo assembly. The results of the analyses identified polymorphisms responsible for the lack of specific storage proteins, as well as those associated with large differences in storage protein expression. SMARC1N-PN1 lacks the lectin genes pha-E and lec4-B17, and has the pseudogene pdlec1 in place of the functional pha-L gene. While the α-phaseolin gene appears absent, an approximately 20-fold decrease in β-phaseolin accumulation is associated with a single nucleotide polymorphism converting a G-box to an ACGT motif in the proximal promoter. Among residual lectins compensating for storage protein deficiency, mannose lectin FRIL and α-amylase inhibitor 1 genes are uniquely present in SMARC1N-PN1. An approximately 50-fold increase in α-amylase inhibitor like protein accumulation is associated with multiple polymorphisms introducing up to eight potential positive cis-regulatory elements in the proximal promoter specific to SMARC1N-PN1. An approximately 7-fold increase in accumulation of 11S globulin legumin is not associated with variation in proximal promoter sequence, suggesting that the identity of individual proteins involved in proteome rebalancing might

  1. Biochemical characterization of fruit-specific pathogenesis-related antifungal protein from basrai banana.

    PubMed

    Yasmin, Nusrat; Saleem, Mahjabeen

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenesis-related/thaumatin like (PR-5/TL) antifungal protein from basrai banana was purified by using a simple protocol consisting of ammonium sulphate precipitation, affinity chromatography (Affi-gel blue gel), Q-Sepharose chromatography and gel filtration on Sephadex G-75. The purified protein with acidic character (pI 6.67) has molecular weight of 21.155 kDa, as determined by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The purified protein shared N-terminal sequence homology with other TLPs. Crude banana extract inhibited the growth of Fusarium oxysporum, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus fumigatus and Trichoderma viride with IC₅₀ values (determined by Probit analysis) 15 μM (slope=0.086, χ(2)=17.843, P=0.033), 17 μM (slope=0.183, χ(2)=61.533, P=0.011), 6.5 μM (slope=0.211, χ(2)=14.380, P=0.023) and 29.11 μM (slope=0.072, χ(2)=45.768, P=0.014). The purified antifungal protein repressed the growth of F. oxysporum, A. niger, A. fumigatus and T. viride with IC₅₀ values 9.7 μM (slope=0.056, χ(2)=11.538, P=0.021), 11.83 μM (slope=0.127, χ(2)=42.82, P=0.00), 4.61 μM (slope=0.150, χ(2)=10.199, P=0.017) and 21.43 μM (slope=0.053, χ(2)=33.693, P=0.00), respectively. The IC50 values of antifungal activity of crude banana extract were higher than the purified antifungal protein. It indicated that proteins in crude banana extract have antagonistic effect on the fungal growth. White bread is particularly vulnerable by fungal pathogens. Purified antifungal protein suppressed the growth of Aspergillus phoenicis and Aspergillus flavus on white bread suggesting that this protein can be used as a preservative in the bakery industry as well as in other relevant food processing industries.

  2. On the relation of necrosis and inflammation to denaturation of proteins.

    PubMed

    OPIE, E L

    1962-03-01

    Necrosis of the skin was produced by the injection of measured quantities of electrolytes and of amino compounds into the dermis, and the relative ability of these substances to produce it was determined. Inflammation characterized by edema and accumulation of leucocytes accompanied necrosis. The ability of electrolytes to produce necrosis was found to increase with the valence of their basic ion, and in this respect was in accord with their ability to denature proteins. The quantity of different electrolytes needed to produce necrosis varied in the same order as the molar concentration of these electrolytes, that is isotonic with liver or kidney cells. Necrosis caused by amino compounds occurred with similar relation to the isotonicity of liver cells. In this as in other relations the cells acted as osmometers. The foregoing relations indicate that denaturation of proteins, necrosis of living tissue, and osmotic activity of liver or kidney cells are determined by molecular weight, valence, and ion-dissociation of electrolytes, that is, by the factors that determine the colligative properties of electrolytes. Agents such as turpentine, mustard, or croton oil and some halogen substitution compounds of methyl that are insoluble in water and soluble in lipoids have produced skin necrosis and inflammation.

  3. Discovery of new candidate genes related to brain development using protein interaction information.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Chu, Chen; Kong, Xiangyin; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Human brain development is a dramatic process composed of a series of complex and fine-tuned spatiotemporal gene expressions. A good comprehension of this process can assist us in developing the potential of our brain. However, we have only limited knowledge about the genes and gene functions that are involved in this biological process. Therefore, a substantial demand remains to discover new brain development-related genes and identify their biological functions. In this study, we aimed to discover new brain-development related genes by building a computational method. We referred to a series of computational methods used to discover new disease-related genes and developed a similar method. In this method, the shortest path algorithm was executed on a weighted graph that was constructed using protein-protein interactions. New candidate genes fell on at least one of the shortest paths connecting two known genes that are related to brain development. A randomization test was then adopted to filter positive discoveries. Of the final identified genes, several have been reported to be associated with brain development, indicating the effectiveness of the method, whereas several of the others may have potential roles in brain development.

  4. Lack of Apobec2-related proteins causes a dystrophic muscle phenotype in zebrafish embryos

    PubMed Central

    Etard, Christelle; Roostalu, Urmas; Strähle, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    The chaperones Unc45b and Hsp90a are essential for folding of myosin in organisms ranging from worms to humans. We show here that zebrafish Unc45b, but not Hsp90a, binds to the putative cytidine deaminase Apobec2 (Apo2) in an interaction that requires the Unc45/Cro1p/She4p-related (UCS) and central domains of Unc45b. Morpholino oligonucleotide-mediated knockdown of the two related proteins Apo2a and Apo2b causes a dystrophic phenotype in the zebrafish skeletal musculature and impairs heart function. These phenotypic traits are shared with mutants of unc45b, but not with hsp90a mutants. Apo2a and -2b act nonredundantly and bind to each other in vitro, which suggests a heteromeric functional complex. Our results demonstrate that Unc45b and Apo2 proteins act in a Hsp90a-independent pathway that is required for integrity of the myosepta and myofiber attachment. Because the only known function of Unc45b is that of a chaperone, Apo2 proteins may be clients of Unc45b but other yet unidentified processes cannot be excluded. PMID:20440001

  5. Design, pharmacology, and NMR structure of a minimized cystine knot with agouti-related protein activity.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Pilgrim J; McNulty, Joseph C; Yang, Ying-Kui; Thompson, Darren A; Chai, Biaoxin; Gantz, Ira; Barsh, Gregory S; Millhauser, Glenn L

    2002-06-18

    The agouti-related protein (AGRP) is an endogenous antagonist of the melanocortin receptors MC3R and MC4R found in the hypothalamus and exhibits potent orexigenic activity. The cysteine-rich C-terminal domain of this protein, corresponding to AGRP(87-132), exhibits receptor binding affinity and antagonism equivalent to that of the full-length protein. The NMR structure of this active domain was recently determined and suggested that melanocortin receptor contacts were made primarily by two loops presented by a well-structured cystine knot domain within AGRP(87-132) [McNulty et al. (2001) Biochemistry 40, 15520-15527]. This hypothesis is tested here with NMR structure and activity studies of a 34-residue AGRP analogue designed to contain only the cystine knot domain. The designed miniprotein folds to a homogeneous product, retains the desired cystine knot architecture, functions as an antagonist, and maintains the melanocortin receptor pharmacological profile of AGRP(87-132). The AGRP-like activity of this molecule supports the hypothesis that indeed the cystine knot region possesses the melanocortin receptor contact points. Moreover, this potent AGRP analogue is synthetically accessible, may serve in the development of therapeutics for the treatment of diseases related to energy balance. and may also find use as a new reagent for probing melanocortin receptor structure and function.

  6. Reversible Inhibition of Mitochondrial Protein Synthesis during Linezolid-Related Hyperlactatemia▿

    PubMed Central

    Garrabou, Glòria; Soriano, Alejandro; López, Sònia; Guallar, Jordi P.; Giralt, Marta; Villarroya, Francesc; Martínez, Jose A.; Casademont, Jordi; Cardellach, Francesc; Mensa, Josep; Miró, Òscar

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the mitochondrial toxicity mechanisms of linezolid-related hyperlactatemia. Five patients on a long-term schedule of linezolid treatment were studied during the acute phase of hyperlactatemia and after clinical recovery and lactate normalization following linezolid withdrawal. Mitochondrial studies were performed with peripheral blood mononuclear cells and consisted of measurement of mitochondrial mass, mitochondrial protein synthesis homeostasis (cytochrome c oxidase [COX] activity, COX-II subunit expression, COX-II mRNA abundance, and mitochondrial DNA [mtDNA] content), and overall mitochondrial function (mitochondrial membrane potential and intact-cell oxidative capacity). During linezolid-induced hyperlactatemia, we found extremely reduced protein expression (16% of the remaining content compared to control values [100%], P < 0.001) for the mitochondrially coded, transcribed, and translated COX-II subunit. Accordingly, COX activity was also found to be decreased (51% of the remaining activity, P < 0.05). These reductions were observed despite the numbers of COX-II mitochondrial RNA transcripts being abnormally increased (297%, P = 0.10 [not significant]) and the mitochondrial DNA content remaining stable. These abnormalities persisted even after the correction for mitochondrial mass, which was mildly decreased during the hyperlactatemic phase. Most of the mitochondrial abnormalities returned to control ranges after linezolid withdrawal, lactate normalization, and clinical recovery. Linezolid inhibits mitochondrial protein synthesis, leading to decreased mitochondrial enzymatic activity, which causes linezolid-related hyperlactatemia, which resolves upon discontinuation of linezolid treatment. PMID:17194826

  7. Evolution of vertebrate genes related to prion and Shadoo proteins--clues from comparative genomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Premzl, Marko; Gready, Jill E; Jermiin, Lars S; Simonic, Tatjana; Marshall Graves, Jennifer A

    2004-12-01

    Recent findings of new genes in fish related to the prion protein (PrP) gene PRNP, including our recent report of SPRN coding for Shadoo (Sho) protein found also in mammals, raise issues of their function and evolution. Here we report additional novel fish genes found in public databases, including a duplicated SPRN gene, SPRNB, in Fugu, Tetraodon, carp, and zebrafish encoding the Sho2 protein, and we use comparative genomic analysis to analyze the evolutionary relationships and to infer evolutionary trajectories of the complete data set. Phylogenetic footprinting performed on aligned human, mouse, and Fugu SPRN genes to define candidate regulatory promoter regions, detected 16 conserved motifs, three of which are known transcription factor-binding sites for a receptor and transcription factors specific to or associated with expression in brain. This result and other homology-based (VISTA global genomic alignment; protein sequence alignment and phylogenetics) and context-dependent (genomic context; relative gene order and orientation) criteria indicate fish and mammalian SPRN genes are orthologous and suggest a strongly conserved basic function in brain. Whereas tetrapod PRNPs share context with the analogous stPrP-2-coding gene in fish, their sequences are diverged, suggesting that the tetrapod and fish genes are likely to have significantly different functions. Phylogenetic analysis predicts the SPRN/SPRNB duplication occurred before divergence of fish from tetrapods, whereas that of stPrP-1 and stPrP-2 occurred in fish. Whereas Sho appears to have a conserved function in vertebrate brain, PrP seems to have an adaptive role fine-tuned in a lineage-specific fashion. An evolutionary model consistent with our findings and literature knowledge is proposed that has an ancestral prevertebrate SPRN-like gene leading to all vertebrate PrP-related and Sho-related genes. This provides a new framework for exploring the evolution of this unusual family of proteins and for

  8. Isolation and characterization of adrenoleukodystrophy protein (ALDP) related sequences in the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Geraghty, M.T.; Stetten, G.; Kearns, W.

    1994-09-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) is a disorder of peroxisomal {beta}-oxidation of very long chain fatty acids. It presents either as progressive dementia in childhood or as progressive paraparesis in later years. Adrenal insufficiency occurs in both phenotypes. The gene of the ALD protein has been mapped to Xq28 and has recently been cloned and characterized. The ALD protein has significant homology to the peroxisomal membrane protein, PMP70 and belongs to the ATP binding cassette superfamily of transporters. We screened a human genomic library with an ALDP cDNA and isolated 5 different but highly similar clones containing sequences corresponding to the 3{prime} end of the ALDP gene. Comparison of the sequences over the region corresponding to exon 9 through the 3{prime} end of the ALDP gene reveals {approximately}96% nucleotide identity in both exonic and intronic regions. Splice sites and open reading frames are maintained. Using both FISH and human-rodent DNA mapping panels, we positively assign these ALDP-related sequences to chromosomes 2, 16 and 22, and provisionally to 1 and 20. Southern blot of primate DNA probed with a partial ALDP cDNA (exon 2-10) shows that expansion of ALDP-related sequences occurred in higher primates (chimp, gorilla and human). Although Northern blots show multiple ALDP-hybridizing transcripts in certain tissues, we have no evidence to date for expression of these ALDP-related sequences. In conclusion, our data show there has been an unusual and recent dispersal to multiple chromosomes of structural gene sequences related to the ALDP gene. The functional significance of these sequences remains to be determined but their existence complicates PCR and mutation analysis of the ALDP gene.

  9. Energy, protein, and zinc nutriture of rural African children in relation to some anthropometric indices

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, E.L.; Gibson, R.S.; Osei-Opare, F.; Opare-Obisaw, C.; Thompson, L.U. Univ. of Ghana, Legon Univ. of Toronto, Ontario )

    1991-03-11

    Heights, weights, arm circumferences, and triceps skinfold thicknesses of 66 Malawian and 148 Ghanaian preschool children were measured during 3 seasons. Their seasonal energy, protein, Ca, Zn, dietary fiber and phytate intakes were estimated from 3-day weighed records, using analyzed and literature food composition values. Seasonal hair Zn concentrations were analyzed by instrumental neutron activation analyses, The mean annual intakes for Malawian compared to Ghanaian children were higher for energy protein, and Zn. Cereals contributed a higher proportion of the total energy intake in the Malawian compared to the Ghanaian diets. A higher percentage of the Malawian children had height-for-age Z-scores below {minus}2SD, but a lower percentage had weight-for-height Z-scores below {minus}1SD compared to their Ghanaian counterparts. These differences may, in part be related to the high cereal intakes of the Malawian children.

  10. The La-Related Proteins, a Family with Connections to Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stavraka, Chara; Blagden, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionarily-conserved La-related protein (LARP) family currently comprises Genuine La, LARP1, LARP1b, LARP4, LARP4b, LARP6 and LARP7. Emerging evidence suggests each LARP has a distinct role in transcription and/or mRNA translation that is attributable to subtle sequence variations within their La modules and specific C-terminal domains. As emerging research uncovers the function of each LARP, it is evident that La, LARP1, LARP6, LARP7 and possibly LARP4a and 4b are dysregulated in cancer. Of these, LARP1 is the first to be demonstrated to drive oncogenesis. Here, we review the role of each LARP and the evidence linking it to malignancy. We discuss a future strategy of targeting members of this protein family as cancer therapy. PMID:26501340

  11. Structure of Protein Related to DAN and Cerberus (PRDC): Insights into the Mechanism of BMP Antagonism

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Kristof; Kattamuri, Chandramohan; Luedeke, David M.; Deng, Andy; Jagpal, Amrita; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert; Kenny, Alan P.; Zorn, Aaron M.; Thompson, Thomas B.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMP) are secreted ligands largely known for their functional roles in embryogenesis and tissue development. A number of structurally diverse extracellular antagonists inhibit BMP ligands to regulate signaling. The DAN family of antagonists represents the largest group of BMP inhibitors, however, little is known for how they mechanistically inhibit BMP ligands. Here, we present the structure of the DAN family member Protein Related to Dan and Cerberus (PRDC) solved by X-ray crystallography. The structure reveals an unexpected growth factor-like appearance with a novel dimerization mechanism that is formed through extensive β-strand contacts. Using site-directed mutagenesis coupled with in vitro and in vivo activity assays, we identified a BMP binding epitope on PRDC. We also determined that PRDC binds heparin with high affinity and that heparin binding to PRDC interferes with BMP antagonism. These results offer insight for how DAN family antagonists functionally inhibit BMP ligands. PMID:23850456

  12. Relative binding affinities of chlorophylls in peridinin-chlorophyll-protein reconstituted with heterochlorophyllous mixtures.

    PubMed

    Brotosudarmo, T H P; Mackowski, S; Hofmann, E; Hiller, R G; Bräuchle, C; Scheer, H

    2008-01-01

    Peridinin-chlorophyll-protein (PCP), containing differently absorbing chlorophyll derivatives, are good models with which to study energy transfer among monomeric chlorophylls (Chls) by both bulk and single-molecule spectroscopy. They can be obtained by reconstituting the N-terminal domain of the protein (N-PCP) with peridinin and chlorophyll mixtures. Upon dimerization of these "half-mers", homo- and heterochlorophyllous complexes are generated, that correspond structurally to monomeric protomers of native PCP from Amphidinium carterae. Heterochlorophyllous complexes contain two different Chls in the two halves of the complete structure. Here, we report reconstitution of N-PCP with binary mixtures of Chl a, Chl b, and [3-acetyl]-Chl a. The ratios of the pigments were varied in the reconstitution mixture, and relative binding constants were determined from quantification of these pigments in the reconstituted PCPs. We find higher affinities for both Chl b and [3-acetyl]-Chl a than for the native pigment, Chl a.

  13. Stability of whey protein hydrolysate powders: effects of relative humidity and temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peng; Liu, Dasong; Chen, Xiaoxia; Chen, Yingjia; Labuza, Theodore P

    2014-05-01

    Whey protein hydrolysate (WPH) is now considered as an important and special dairy protein ingredient for its nutritional and functional properties. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the effect of environmental relative humidity (RH) and storage temperature on the physicochemical stability of three WPH powders with hydrolysis degrees (DH) of 5.2%, 8.8% and 14.9%, respectively. The water sorption isotherms of the three WPH powders fitted the Guggenheim-Andersson-DeBoer model well. An increase in water content leaded to a decrease in glass transition temperature (Tg), following a linear Tg vs log water content relationship. Moreover, an increase in DH caused the decrease in Tg at the same water content. Changes in microstructure and colour occurred significantly when the WPH powders were stored at high environmental RH or temperature, especially for those with high DH.

  14. Identification of Capsid/Coat Related Protein Folds and Their Utility for Virus Classification

    PubMed Central

    Nasir, Arshan; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    The viral supergroup includes the entire collection of known and unknown viruses that roam our planet and infect life forms. The supergroup is remarkably diverse both in its genetics and morphology and has historically remained difficult to study and classify. The accumulation of protein structure data in the past few years now provides an excellent opportunity to re-examine the classification and evolution of viruses. Here we scan completely sequenced viral proteomes from all genome types and identify protein folds involved in the formation of viral capsids and virion architectures. Viruses encoding similar capsid/coat related folds were pooled into lineages, after benchmarking against published literature. Remarkably, the in silico exercise reproduced all previously described members of known structure-based viral lineages, along with several proposals for new additions, suggesting it could be a useful supplement to experimental approaches and to aid qualitative assessment of viral diversity in metagenome samples. PMID:28344575

  15. How Phosphotransferase System-Related Protein Phosphorylation Regulates Carbohydrate Metabolism in Bacteria†

    PubMed Central

    Deutscher, Josef; Francke, Christof; Postma, Pieter W.

    2006-01-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate(PEP):carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) is found only in bacteria, where it catalyzes the transport and phosphorylation of numerous monosaccharides, disaccharides, amino sugars, polyols, and other sugar derivatives. To carry out its catalytic function in sugar transport and phosphorylation, the PTS uses PEP as an energy source and phosphoryl donor. The phosphoryl group of PEP is usually transferred via four distinct proteins (domains) to the transported sugar bound to the respective membrane component(s) (EIIC and EIID) of the PTS. The organization of the PTS as a four-step phosphoryl transfer system, in which all P derivatives exhibit similar energy (phosphorylation occurs at histidyl or cysteyl residues), is surprising, as a single protein (or domain) coupling energy transfer and sugar phosphorylation would be sufficient for PTS function. A possible explanation for the complexity of the PTS was provided by the discovery that the PTS also carries out numerous regulatory functions. Depending on their phosphorylation state, the four proteins (domains) forming the PTS phosphorylation cascade (EI, HPr, EIIA, and EIIB) can phosphorylate or interact with numerous non-PTS proteins and thereby regulate their activity. In addition, in certain bacteria, one of the PTS components (HPr) is phosphorylated by ATP at a seryl residue, which increases the complexity of PTS-mediated regulation. In this review, we try to summarize the known protein phosphorylation-related regulatory functions of the PTS. As we shall see, the PTS regulation network not only controls carbohydrate uptake and metabolism but also interferes with the utilization of nitrogen and phosphorus and the virulence of certain pathogens. PMID:17158705

  16. Helminth infection alters IgE responses to allergens structurally related to parasite proteins.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Helton da Costa; Ribeiro-Gomes, Flávia L; Bennuru, Sasisekhar; Nutman, Thomas B

    2015-01-01

    Immunological cross-reactivity between environmental allergens and helminth proteins has been demonstrated, although the clinically related implications of this cross-reactivity have not been addressed. To investigate the impact of molecular similarity among allergens and cross-reactive homologous helminth proteins in IgE-based serologic assessment of allergic disorders in a helminth-infected population, we performed ImmunoCAP tests in filarial-infected and noninfected individuals for IgE measurements to allergen extracts that contained proteins with high levels of homology with helminth proteins as well as IgE against representative recombinant allergens with and without helminth homologs. The impact of helminth infection on the levels and function of the IgE to these specific homologous and nonhomologous allergens was corroborated in an animal model. We found that having a tissue-invasive filarial infection increased the serological prevalence of ImmunoCAP-identified IgE directed against house dust mite and cockroach, but not against timothy grass, the latter with few allergens with homologs in helminth infection. IgE ELISA confirmed that filaria-infected individuals had higher IgE prevalences to those recombinant allergens that had homologs in helminths. Mice infected with the helminth Heligmosomoides polygyrus displayed increased levels of IgE and positive skin tests to allergens with homologs in the parasite. These results show that cross-reactivity among allergens and helminth proteins can have practical implications, altering serologic approaches to allergen testing and bringing a new perspective to the "hygiene hypothesis."

  17. Nonstructural Proteins Are Preferential Positive Selection Targets in Zika Virus and Related Flaviviruses

    PubMed Central

    Sironi, Manuela; Forni, Diego; Clerici, Mario; Cagliani, Rachele

    2016-01-01

    The Flavivirus genus comprises several human pathogens such as dengue virus (DENV), Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), and Zika virus (ZIKV). Although ZIKV usually causes mild symptoms, growing evidence is linking it to congenital birth defects and to increased risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome. ZIKV encodes a polyprotein that is processed to produce three structural and seven nonstructural (NS) proteins. We investigated the evolution of the viral polyprotein in ZIKV and in related flaviviruses (DENV, Spondweni virus, and Kedougou virus). After accounting for saturation issues, alignment uncertainties, and recombination, we found evidence of episodic positive selection on the branch that separates DENV from the other flaviviruses. NS1 emerged as the major selection target, and selected sites were located in immune epitopes or in functionally important protein regions. Three of these sites are located in an NS1 region that interacts with structural proteins and is essential for virion biogenesis. Analysis of the more recent evolutionary history of ZIKV lineages indicated that positive selection acted on NS5 and NS4B, this latter representing the preferential target. All selected sites were located in the N-terminal portion of NS4B, which inhibits interferon response. One of the positively selected sites (26M/I/T/V) in ZIKV also represents a selection target in sylvatic DENV2 isolates, and a nearby residue evolves adaptively in JEV. Two additional positively selected sites are within a protein region that interacts with host (e.g. STING) and viral (i.e. NS1, NS4A) proteins. Notably, mutations in the NS4B region of other flaviviruses modulate neurovirulence and/or neuroinvasiveness. These results suggest that the positively selected sites we identified modulate viral replication and contribute to immune evasion. These sites should be prioritized in future experimental studies. However, analyses herein detected no selective events associated to the spread of the Asian

  18. A fibrinogen-related protein identified from hepatopancreas of crayfish is a potential pattern recognition receptor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiming; Bai, Suhua; Dong, Chaohua

    2016-09-01

    Fibrinogen-related protein (FREP) family is a large group of proteins containing fibrinogen-like (FBG) domain and plays multiple physiological roles in animals. However, their immune functions in crayfish are not fully explored. In the present study, a novel fibrinogen-like protein (designated as PcFBN1) was identified and characterized from hepatopancreas of red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii. The cDNA sequence of PcFBN1 contains an open reading frame (ORF) of 1353 bp encoding a protein of 450 amino acids. Sequence and structural analysis indicated that PcFBN1 contains an FBG domain in C-terminal and a putative signal peptide of 19 amino acids in N-terminal. Semi-quantitative PCR revealed that the main expression of PcFBN1 was observed in hepatopancreas and hemocyte. Temporal expression analysis exhibited that PcFBN1 expression could be significantly induced by heat-killed Aeromonas hydrophila. Tissue distribution and temporal change of PcFBN1 suggested that PcFBN1 may be involved in immune responses of red swamp crayfish. Recombinant PcFBN1 protein binds and agglutinates both gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and gram-positive bacteria Micrococcus lysodeikticus. Moreover, binding and agglutination is Ca(2+) dependent. Further analysis indicated that PcFBN1 recognizes some acetyl group-containing substance LPS and PGN. RNAi experiment revealed that PcFBN1 is required for bacterial clearance and survival from A. hydrophila infection. Reduction of PcFBN1 expression significantly decreased the survival and enhanced the number of A. hydrophila in the hemolymph. These results indicated that PcFBN1 plays an important role in the innate immunity of red swamp crayfish as a potential pattern recognition receptor.

  19. p120, a p120-related protein (p100), and the cadherin/catenin complex

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Cadherins and catenins play an important role in cell-cell adhesion. Two of the catenins, beta and gamma, are members of a group of proteins that contains a repeating amino acid motif originally described for the Drosophila segment polarity gene armadillo. Another member of this group is a 120-kD protein termed p120, originally identified as a substrate of the tyrosine kinase pp60src. In this paper, we show that endothelial and epithelial cells express p120 and p100, a 100-kD, p120- related protein. Peptide sequencing of p100 establishes it as highly related to p120. p120 and p100 both appear associated with the cadherin/catenin complex, but independent p120/catenin and p100/catenin complexes can be isolated. This association is shown by coimmunoprecipitation of cadherins and catenins with an anti-p120/p100 antibody, and of p120/p100 with cadherin or catenin antibodies. Immunocytochemical analysis with a p120-specific antibody reveals junctional colocalization of p120 and beta-catenin in epithelial cells. Catenins and p120/p100 also colocalize in endothelial and epithelial cells in culture and in tissue sections. The cellular content of p120/p100 and beta-catenin is similar in MDCK cells, but only approximately 20% of the p120/p100 pool associates with the cadherin/catenin complex. Our data provide further evidence for interactions among the different arm proteins and suggest that p120/p100 may participate in regulating the function of cadherins and, thereby, other processes influenced by cell-cell adhesion. PMID:7615637

  20. Advanced oxidation protein products are more related to metabolic syndrome components than biomarkers of lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Venturini, Danielle; Simão, Andréa Name Colado; Dichi, Isaias

    2015-09-01

    Although advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) have been reported as the most appropriate parameter for determination of oxidative stress in patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS), a direct comparison between protein and lipid peroxidation has not been performed yet. The aim of this study was to compare protein peroxidation with lipid peroxidation measured by 2 different methodologies (tert-butyl hydroperoxide-initiated chemiluminescence and ferrous oxidation-xylenol orange assay). The hypothesis of this study was that AOPPs would be more related to MetS than to oxidative markers of lipid peroxidation. This cross-sectional study evaluated 76 patients with MetS and 20 healthy subjects. Prooxidant-antioxidant index (PAI) assessed as AOPP/total radical-trapping antioxidant parameter ratio progressively increased (P < .05) according to the number of MetS components, whereas AOPPs and total radical-trapping antioxidant parameter increased (P < .05) when 5 components were compared with 3 components. Spearman test showed a positive correlation between AOPPs and waist circumference (r = 0.318, P < .01), fasting glucose (r = 0.250, P < .05), homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance (r = 0.043, P < .01), triacylglycerol (r = 0.713, P < .0001), highly sensitive C-reactive protein (r = 0.275, P < .05), and uric acid (r = 0.356, P < .01), whereas there was an inverse correlation with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r = -0.399, P < .001). Prooxidant-antioxidant index demonstrated a positive correlation with waist circumference (r = 0.386, P < .01), fasting glucose (r = 0.388, P < .01), fasting insulin (r = 0.344, P < .05), homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance (r = 0.519, P < .001), triacylglycerol (r = 0.687, P < .0001), highly sensitive C-reactive protein (r = 0.278, P < .05), and uric acid (r = 0.557, P < .0001), whereas there was an inverse correlation with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r = -0.480, P < .0001). In conclusion, protein

  1. The glassy state of crambin and the THz time scale protein-solvent fluctuations possibly related to protein function

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background THz experiments have been used to characterize the picosecond time scale fluctuations taking place in the model, globular protein crambin. Results Using both hydration and temperature as an experimental parameter, we have identified collective fluctuations (<= 200 cm−1) in the protein. Observation of the protein dynamics in the THz spectrum from both below and above the glass transition temperature (Tg) has provided unique insight into the microscopic interactions and modes that permit the solvent to effectively couple to the protein thermal fluctuations. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the solvent dynamics on the picosecond time scale not only contribute to protein flexibility but may also delineate the types of fluctuations that are able to form within the protein structure. PMID:25184036

  2. Phylogenetic and functional analyses of a plant protein related to human B-cell receptor-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Atabekova, Anastasia K; Pankratenko, Anna V; Makarova, Svetlana S; Lazareva, Ekaterina A; Owens, Robert A; Solovyev, Andrey G; Morozov, Sergey Y

    2017-01-01

    Human B-cell receptor-associated protein BAP31 (HsBAP31) is the endoplasmic reticulum-resident protein involved in protein sorting and transport as well as pro-apoptotic signaling. Plant orthologs of HsBAP31 termed 'plant BAP-like proteins' (PBL proteins) have thus far remained unstudied. Recently, the PBL protein from Nicotiana tabacum (NtPBL) was identified as an interactor of Nt-4/1, a plant protein known to interact with plant virus movement proteins and affect the long-distance transport of potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) via the phloem. Here, we have compared the sequences of PBL proteins and studied the biochemical properties of NtPBL. Analysis of a number of fully sequenced plant genomes revealed that PBL-encoding genes represent a small multigene family with up to six members per genome. Two conserved motifs were identified in the C-terminal region of PBL proteins. The NtPBL C-terminal hydrophilic region (NtPBL-C) was expressed in bacterial cells, purified, and used for analysis of its RNA binding properties in vitro. In gel shift experiments, NtPBL-C was found to bind several tested RNAs, showing the most efficient binding to microRNA precursors (pre-miRNA) and less efficient interaction with PSTVd. Mutational analysis suggested that NtPBL-C has a composite RNA-binding site, with two conserved lysine residues in the most C-terminal protein region being involved in binding of pre-miRNA but not PSTVd RNA. Virus-mediated transient expression of NtPBL-C in plants resulted in stunting and leaf malformation, developmental abnormalities similar to those described previously for blockage of miRNA biogenesis/function. We hypothesize that the NtPBL protein represents a previously undiscovered component of the miRNA pathway.

  3. Age-related variations of protein carbonyls in human saliva and plasma: is saliva protein carbonyls an alternative biomarker of aging?

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhihui; Wang, Yanyi; Liu, Hongchen; Che, Yuwei; Xu, Yingying; E, Lingling

    2015-06-01

    Free radical hypothesis which is one of the most acknowledged aging theories was developed into oxidative stress hypothesis. Protein carbonylation is by far one of the most widely used markers of protein oxidation. We studied the role of age and gender in protein carbonyl content of saliva and plasma among 273 Chinese healthy subjects (137 females and 136 males aged between 20 and 79) and discussed the correlation between protein carbonyl content of saliva and plasma. Protein carbonyl content of saliva and plasma were, respectively, 2.391 ± 0.639 and 0.838 ± 0.274 nmol/mg. Variations of saliva and plasma different age groups all reached significant differences in both male and female (all p < 0.05) while both saliva and plasma protein carbonyls were found to be significantly correlated with age (r = 0.6582 and r = 0.5176, all p < 0.001). Gender was discovered to be unrelated to saliva and plasma protein carbonyl levels (all p > 0.05). Saliva and plasma protein carbonyls were positively related (r = 0.4405, p < 0.001). Surprisingly, saliva and plasma protein carbonyls/ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) ratios were proved to be significantly correlated with age (r = 0.7796 and r = 0.6938, all p < 0.001) while saliva protein carbonyls/FRAP ratio and plasma protein carbonyls/FRAP ratio were also correlated (r = 0.5573, p < 0.001). We concluded that saliva protein carbonyls seem to be an alternative biomarker of aging while the mechanisms of protein carbonylation and oxidative stress and the relationship between saliva protein carbonyls and diseases need to be further investigated.

  4. Gadd45 proteins: Relevance to aging, longevity and age-related pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Moskalev, Alexey A.; Smit-McBride, Zeljka; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail V.; Plyusnina, Ekaterina N.; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Budovsky, Arie; Tacutu, Robi; Fraifeld, Vadim E.

    2013-01-01

    The Gadd45 proteins have been intensively studied, in view of their important role in key cellular processes. Indeed, the Gadd45 proteins stand at the crossroad of the cell fates by controlling the balance between cell (DNA) repair, eliminating (apoptosis) or preventing the expansion of potentially dangerous cells (cell cycle arrest, cellular senescence), and maintaining the stem cell pool. However, the biogerontological aspects have not thus far received sufficient attention. Here we analyzed the pathways and modes of action by which Gadd45 members are involved in aging, longevity and age-related diseases. Because of their pleiotropic action, a decreased inducibility of Gadd45 members may have far-reaching consequences including genome instability, accumulation of DNA damage, and disorders in cellular homeostasis – all of which may eventually contribute to the aging process and age-related disorders (promotion of tumorigenesis, immune disorders, insulin resistance and reduced responsiveness to stress). Most recently, the dGadd45 gene has been identified as a longevity regulator in Drosophila. Although further wide-scale research is warranted, it is becoming increasingly clear that Gadd45s are highly relevant to aging, age-related diseases (ARDs) and to the control of life span, suggesting them as potential therapeutic targets in ARDs and pro-longevity interventions. PMID:21986581

  5. Chemogenomics knowledgebased polypharmacology analyses of drug abuse related G-protein coupled receptors and their ligands

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xiang-Qun; Wang, Lirong; Liu, Haibin; Ouyang, Qin; Fang, Cheng; Su, Weiwei

    2013-01-01

    Drug abuse (DA) and addiction is a complex illness, broadly viewed as a neurobiological impairment with genetic and environmental factors that influence its development and manifestation. Abused substances can disrupt the activity of neurons by interacting with many proteins, particularly G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). A few medicines that target the central nervous system (CNS) can also modulate DA related proteins, such as GPCRs, which can act in conjunction with the controlled psychoactive substance(s) and increase side effects. To fully explore the molecular interaction networks that underlie DA and to effectively modulate the GPCRs in these networks with small molecules for DA treatment, we built a drug-abuse domain specific chemogenomics knowledgebase (DA-KB) to centralize the reported chemogenomics research information related to DA and CNS disorders in an effort to benefit researchers across a broad range of disciplines. We then focus on the analysis of GPCRs as many of them are closely related with DA. Their distribution in human tissues was also analyzed for the study of side effects caused by abused drugs. We further implement our computational algorithms/tools to explore DA targets, DA mechanisms and pathways involved in polydrug addiction and to explore polypharmacological effects of the GPCR ligands. Finally, the polypharmacology effects of GPCRs-targeted medicines for DA treatment were investigated and such effects can be exploited for the development of drugs with polypharmacophore for DA intervention. The chemogenomics database and the analysis tools will help us better understand the mechanism of drugs abuse and facilitate to design new medications for system pharmacotherapy of DA. PMID:24567719

  6. Differential expression of epidermal growth factor-related proteins in human colorectal tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Ciardiello, F; Kim, N; Saeki, T; Dono, R; Persico, M G; Plowman, G D; Garrigues, J; Radke, S; Todaro, G J; Salomon, D S

    1991-01-01

    Amphiregulin (AR) and cripto are proteins that are structurally related to epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha). AR is also functionally related to this family of growth regulatory molecules and is able to bind and activate the 170-kDa EGF receptor (EGFR). Human EGFR-3 (HER3)/ERBB3 is a recently identified protein related to the EGFR that is widely expressed in breast carcinomas and is a candidate receptor for EGF-like growth factors. Differential expression of these putative ligands and receptors in transformed cells suggests that they may function in an autocrine manner to regulate tumor cell growth. Specific mRNA transcripts for TGF-alpha [4.8 kilobases (kb)], AR (1.4 kb), cripto (2.2 kb), and HER3 (6.2 kb) were expressed in a majority of human colon cancer cell lines. HER3 mRNA was detected in 55% of primary or metastatic human colorectal carcinomas but in only 22% of normal colon mucosa and 32% of normal liver samples. In contrast, cripto and AR mRNA were expressed in 60-70% of primary or metastatic human colorectal cancers but in only 2-7% of normal human colonic mucosa. Immunostaining also detected AR protein in primary and metastatic colorectal tumors but not in normal colon or uninvolved liver. These findings suggest that cripto and AR may be useful markers to discriminate between normal and malignant colonic epithelium and may provide a selective growth advantage for colorectal carcinomas. Images PMID:1715580

  7. Topologically Conserved Residues Direct Heme Transport in HRG-1-related Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xiaojing; Protchenko, Olga; Philpott, Caroline C.; Hamza, Iqbal

    2012-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans and human HRG-1-related proteins are conserved, membrane-bound permeases that bind and translocate heme in metazoan cells via a currently uncharacterized mechanism. Here, we show that cellular import of heme by HRG-1-related proteins from worms and humans requires strategically located amino acids that are topologically conserved across species. We exploit a heme synthesis-defective Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant to model the heme auxotrophy of C. elegans and demonstrate that, under heme-deplete conditions, the endosomal CeHRG-1 requires both a specific histidine in the predicted second transmembrane domain (TMD2) and the FARKY motif in the C terminus tail for heme transport. By contrast, the plasma membrane CeHRG-4 transports heme by utilizing a histidine in the exoplasmic (E2) loop and the FARKY motif. Optimal activity under heme-limiting conditions, however, requires histidine in the E2 loop of CeHRG-1 and tyrosine in TMD2 of CeHRG-4. An analogous system exists in humans, because mutation of the synonymous histidine in TMD2 of hHRG-1 eliminates heme transport activity, implying an evolutionary conserved heme transport mechanism that predates vertebrate origins. Our results support a model in which heme is translocated across membranes facilitated by conserved amino acids positioned on the exoplasmic, cytoplasmic, and transmembrane regions of HRG-1-related proteins. These findings may provide a framework for understanding the structural basis of heme transport in eukaryotes and human parasites, which rely on host heme for survival. PMID:22174408

  8. Expression of Autophagy-Related Proteins in Different Types of Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye Min; Kim, Eun-Sol; Koo, Ja Seung

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is common type of malignant tumor in humans, and the autophagy status of such tumors may vary according to subtype. This study aimed to investigate the expression and implications of the major autophagy-related molecules light chain (LC) 3A, LC3B, p62, and BNIP-3 in human thyroid carcinoma. Tissue microarrays were constructed from 555 thyroid cancers (papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC): 342; follicular carcinoma (FC): 112; medullary carcinoma (MC): 70; poorly differentiated carcinoma (PDC): 23; and anaplastic carcinoma (AC): 8) and 152 follicular adenomas (FAs). Expression of autophagy-related molecules (LC3A, LC3B, p62, and BNIP-3) was detected immunohistochemically, and the results were analyzed via comparison with clinicopathologic parameters. Tumoral LC3A and LC3B expressions were the highest in MC (p < 0.001), whereas stromal LC3A expression was higher in AC and PTC (p < 0.001). BNIP-3 expression was absent in MC and AC (p = 0.013). Tumoral LC3A, LC3B, and p62 expressions were higher in conventional type PTC, compared with those in the follicular variant. PTC with the BRAF V600E mutation exhibited higher expression of all autophagy-related proteins relative to PTC without this mutation (p < 0.05). BNIP-3 negativity was associated with capsular invasion in FC (p = 0.001), and p62 negativity was associated with lymph node metastasis in MC (p = 0.006). In a univariate analysis, LC3B negativity was associated with shorter disease-free survival in PTC with the BRAF V600E mutation (p = 0.024). We conclude that the expression of autophagy-related proteins differs according to thyroid cancer subtype. PMID:28257096

  9. Interactions of protein content and globulin subunit composition of soybean proteins in relation to tofu gel properties.

    PubMed

    James, Andrew T; Yang, Aijun

    2016-03-01

    The content and globulin subunit composition of soybean proteins are known to affect tofu quality and food-grade soybeans usually have higher levels of proteins. We studied the tofu quality of soybeans with high (44.8%) or low (39.1%) protein content and with or without the 11S globulin polypeptide, 11SA4. Both protein content and 11SA4 significantly affected tofu gel properties. Soybeans containing more protein had smaller seeds which produced significantly firmer (0.663 vs.0.557 N, p<0.001) tofu gels with creamier colour. The absence of 11SA4 was positively correlated with seed size, tofu hardness and water holding capacity and led to significant changes to the profile of storage protein subunits, which may have contributed to the improvement in tofu gel properties. These results suggest that, in combination with higher protein content, certain protein subunits or their polypeptides can also be targeted in selecting soybeans to further improve soy food quality.

  10. Sub-synaptic, multiplexed analysis of proteins reveals Fragile X related protein 2 is mislocalized in Fmr1 KO synapses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gordon X; Smith, Stephen J; Mourrain, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The distribution of proteins within sub-synaptic compartments is an essential aspect of their neurological function. Current methodologies, such as electron microscopy (EM) and super-resolution imaging techniques, can provide the precise localization of proteins, but are often limited to a small number of one-time observations with narrow spatial and molecular coverage. The diversity of synaptic proteins and synapse types demands synapse analysis on a scale that is prohibitive with current methods. Here, we demonstrate SubSynMAP, a fast, multiplexed sub-synaptic protein analysis method using wide-field data from deconvolution array tomography (ATD). SubSynMAP generates probability distributions for that reveal the functional range of proteins within the averaged synapse of a particular class. This enables the differentiation of closely juxtaposed proteins. Using this method, we analyzed 15 synaptic proteins in normal and Fragile X mental retardation syndrome (FXS) model mouse cortex, and revealed disease-specific modifications of sub-synaptic protein distributions across synapse classes and cortical layers. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20560.001 PMID:27770568

  11. Sensing HIV related protein using epitope imprinted hydrophilic polymer coated quartz crystal microbalance.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chun-Hua; Zhang, Yan; Tang, Shui-Fen; Fang, Zhi-Bin; Yang, Huang-Hao; Chen, Xi; Chen, Guo-Nan

    2012-01-15

    We have developed a biomimetic sensor for the detection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) related protein (glycoprotein 41, gp41) based on epitope imprinting technique. gp41 is the transmembrane protein of HIV-1 and plays an important role in membrane fusion between viruses and infected cells. It is an important index for determining the extent of HIV-1 disease progression and the efficacy of therapeutic intervention. In this work, dopamine was used as the functional monomer and polymerized on the surface of quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) chip in the presence of template, a synthetic peptide with 35 amino acid residues, analogous to residues 579-613 of the gp41. This process resulted in grafting a hydrophilic molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) film on the QCM chip. QCM measurement showed that the resulting MIP film not only had a great affinity towards the template peptide, but also could bind the corresponding gp41 protein specifically. The dissociation constant (K(d)) of MIP for the template peptide was calculated to be 3.17 nM through Scatchard analysis, which was similar to those of monoclonal antibodies. Direct detection of the gp41 was achieved quantitatively using the resulting MIP-based biomimetic sensor. The detection limit of gp41 was 2 ng/mL, which was comparable to the reported ELISA method. In addition, the practical analytical performance of the sensor was examined by evaluating the detection of gp41 in human urine samples with satisfactory results.

  12. Proliferation related acidic leucine-rich protein PAL31 functions as a caspase-3 inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Weiyong; Kimura, Hiromichi; Shiota, Kunio . E-mail: ashiota@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2006-04-14

    Proliferation related acidic leucine-rich protein PAL31 (PAL31) is expressed in proliferating cells and consists of 272 amino acids with a tandem structure of leucine-rich repeats in the N-terminus and a highly acidic region with a putative nuclear localization signal in the C-terminus. We previously reported that PAL31 is required for cell cycle progression. In the present study, we found that the antisense oligonucleotide of PAL31 induced apoptosis to the transfected Nb2 cells. Stable transfectants, in which PAL31 was regulated by an inducible promoter, were generated to gain further insight into the signaling role of PAL31 in the regulation of apoptosis. Expression of PAL31 resulted in the marked rescue of Rat1 cells from etoposide and UV radiation-induced apoptosis and the cytoprotection was correlated with the levels of PAL31 protein. Thus, cytoprotection from apoptosis is a physiological function of PAL31. PAL31 can suppress caspase-3 activity but not cytochrome c release in vitro, indicating that PAL31 is a direct caspase-3 inhibitor. In conclusion, PAL31 is a multifunctional protein working as a cell cycle progression factor as well as a cell survival factor.

  13. Dynamin-related protein 1 as a therapeutic target in cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Willard W

    2015-03-01

    Despite improvements in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) quality, defibrillation technologies, and implementation of therapeutic hypothermia, less than 10 % of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) victims survive to hospital discharge. New resuscitation therapies have been slow to develop, in part, because the pathophysiologic mechanisms critical for resuscitation are not understood. During cardiac arrest, systemic cessation of blood flow results in whole body ischemia. CPR and the restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), both result in immediate reperfusion injury of the heart that is characterized by severe contractile dysfunction. Unlike diseases of localized ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury (myocardial infarction and stroke), global IR injury of organs results in profound organ dysfunction with far shorter ischemic times. The two most commonly injured organs following cardiac arrest resuscitation, the heart and brain, are critically dependent on mitochondrial function. New insights into mitochondrial dynamics and the role of the mitochondrial fission protein Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) in apoptosis have made targeting these mechanisms attractive for IR therapy. In animal models, inhibiting Drp1 following IR injury or cardiac arrest confers protection to both the heart and brain. In this review, the relationship of the major mitochondrial fission protein Drp1 to ischemic changes in the heart and its targeting as a new therapeutic target following cardiac arrest are discussed.

  14. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae actin-related protein Arp2 is involved in the actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Arp2p is an essential yeast actin-related protein. Disruption of the corresponding ARP2 gene leads to a terminal phenotype characterized by the presence of a single large bud. Thus, Arp2p may be important for a late stage of the cell cycle (Schwob, E., and R.P. Martin, 1992. Nature (Lond.). 355:179-182). We have localized Arp2p by indirect immunofluorescence. Specific peptide antibodies revealed punctate staining under the plasma membrane, which partially colocalizes with actin. Temperature-sensitive arp2 mutations were created by PCR mutagenesis and selected by an ade2/SUP11 sectoring screen. One temperature-sensitive mutant that was characterized, arp2-H330L, was osmosensitive and had an altered actin cytoskeleton at a nonpermissive temperature, suggesting a role of Arp2p in the actin cytoskeleton. Random budding patterns were observed in both haploid and diploid arp2- H330L mutant cells. Endocytosis, as judged by Lucifer yellow uptake, was severely reduced in the mutant, at all temperatures. In addition, genetic interaction was observed between temperature-sensitive alleles arp2-H330L and cdc10-1. CDC10 is a gene encoding a neck filament- associated protein that is necessary for polarized growth and cytokinesis. Overall, the immunolocalization, mutant phenotypes, and genetic interaction suggest that the Arp2 protein is an essential component of the actin cytoskeleton that is involved in membrane growth and polarity, as well as in endocytosis. PMID:8698808

  15. The keratin-related Ouroboros proteins function as immune antigens mediating tail regression in Xenopus metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Mukaigasa, Katsuki; Hanasaki, Akira; Maéno, Mitsugu; Fujii, Hiroshi; Hayashida, Shin-ichiro; Itoh, Mari; Kobayashi, Makoto; Tochinai, Shin; Hatta, Masayuki; Iwabuchi, Kazuya; Taira, Masanori; Onoé, Kazunori; Izutsu, Yumi

    2009-10-27

    Tail resorption during amphibian metamorphosis has been thought to be controlled mainly by a cell-autonomous mechanism of programmed cell death triggered by thyroid hormone. However, we have proposed a role for the immune response in metamorphosis, based on the finding that syngeneic grafts of tadpole tail skin into adult Xenopus animals are rejected by T cells. To test this, we identified two tail antigen genes called ouro1 and ouro2 that encode keratin-related proteins. Recombinant Ouro1 and Ouro2 proteins generated proliferative responses in vitro in T cells isolated from naive adult Xenopus animals. These genes were expressed specifically in the tail skin at the climax of metamorphosis. Overexpression of ouro1 and ouro2 induced T-cell accumulation and precocious tail degeneration after full differentiation of adult-type T cells when overexpressed in the tail region. When the expression of ouro1 and ouro2 were knocked down, tail skin tissue remained even after metamorphosis was complete. Our findings indicate that Ouro proteins participate in the process of tail regression as immune antigens and highlight the possibility that the acquired immune system contributes not only to self-defense but also to remodeling processes in vertebrate morphogenesis.

  16. Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein and Apolipoprotein E Expression is Altered in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Andrew Stuart; Thomas, Elizabeth A.; Scarr, Elizabeth; Dean, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Our recent microarray study reported altered mRNA expression of several low density lipoprotein receptor-related proteins (LRP) associated with the first 4 years following diagnosis with schizophrenia. Whilst this finding is novel, apolipoprotein E (APOE), which mediates its activity through LRPs, has been reported by several studies to be altered in brains of subjects with schizophrenia. We used qPCR to measure the expression of LRP2, LRP4, LRP6, LRP8, LRP10 and LRP12 mRNA in Brodmann's area (BA) 46 of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in 15 subjects with short duration of illness schizophrenia (SDS) and 15 pair matched controls. We also used Western blotting to measure APOE protein expression in BA46 from these subjects. Amongst the LRPs examined, LRP10 expression was significantly increased (P = 0.03) and LRP12 was significantly decreased (P < 0.01) in SDS. APOE protein expression was also increased in SDS (P = 0.01). No other marker examined in this study was altered with diagnosis. Our data supports a role for distinct members of the LRP family in the pathology of schizophrenia and adds weight to the hypothesis that aberrant apolipoprotein signaling is involved in the early stages of schizophrenia. PMID:21423430

  17. Characterization and localization of a 77 kDa protein related to the dystrophin gene family.

    PubMed

    Fabbrizio, E; Nudel, U; Hugon, G; Robert, A; Pons, F; Mornet, D

    1994-04-15

    The Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene gives rise to transcripts of several lengths. These mRNAs differ in their coding content and tissue distribution. The 14 kb mRNA encodes dystrophin, a 427 kDa protein found in muscle and brain, and the short transcripts described encode DP71, a 77 kDa protein found in various organs. These short transcripts have many features common to the deduced primary structure of dystrophin, especially in the cysteine-rich specific C-terminal domains. The dystrophin C-terminal domain could be involved in membrane anchorage via the glycoprotein complex, but such a functional role for these short transcript products has yet to be demonstrated. Here we report the first isolation of a short transcript product from saponin-solubilized cardiac muscle membranes using alkaline buffer and affinity chromatography procedures. This molecule was found to be glycosylated and could be easily dissociated from cardiac muscle and other non-muscle tissues such as brain and liver. DP71-specific monoclonal antibody helped to identify this molecule as being related to the dystrophin gene family. Immunofluorescence analysis of bovine or chicken cardiac muscle showed a periodic distribution of DP71 in transverse T tubules and this protein was co-localized with the dystrophin glycoprotein complex in the Z-disk area.

  18. StAR-related lipid transfer domain protein 5 binds primary bile acids[S

    PubMed Central

    Létourneau, Danny; Lorin, Aurélien; Lefebvre, Andrée; Frappier, Vincent; Gaudreault, Francis; Najmanovich, Rafael; Lavigne, Pierre; LeHoux, Jean-Guy

    2012-01-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory-related lipid transfer (START) domain proteins are involved in the nonvesicular intracellular transport of lipids and sterols. The STARD1 (STARD1 and STARD3) and STARD4 subfamilies (STARD4–6) have an internal cavity large enough to accommodate sterols. To provide a deeper understanding on the structural biology of this domain, the binding of sterols to STARD5, a member of the STARD4 subfamily, was monitored. The SAR by NMR [1H-15N heteronuclear single-quantum coherence (HSQC)] approach, complemented by circular dichroism (CD) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), was used. Titration of STARD5 with cholic (CA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), ligands of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), leads to drastic perturbation of the 1H-15N HSQC spectra and the identification of the residues in contact with those ligands. The most perturbed residues in presence of ligands are lining the internal cavity of the protein. Ka values of 1.8·10−4 M−1 and 6.3·104 M−1 were measured for CA and CDCA, respectively. This is the first report of a START domain protein in complex with a sterol ligand. Our original findings indicate that STARD5 may be involved in the transport of bile acids rather than cholesterol. PMID:23018617

  19. Myotubularin-related protein 7 inhibits insulin signaling in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gutting, Tobias; Friedrich, Teresa; Gaiser, Timo; Magdeburg, Julia; Kienle, Peter; Ruh, Hermelindis; Hopf, Carsten; Behrens, Hans-Michael; Röcken, Christoph; Hanoch, Tamar; Seger, Rony; Ebert, Matthias P.A.; Burgermeister, Elke

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoinositide (PIP) phosphatases such as myotubularins (MTMs) inhibit growth factor receptor signaling. However, the function of myotubularin-related protein 7 (MTMR7) in cancer is unknown. We show that MTMR7 protein was down-regulated with increasing tumor grade (G), size (T) and stage (UICC) in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) (n=1786). The presence of MTMR7 in the stroma correlated with poor prognosis, whereas MTMR7 expression in the tumor was not predictive for patients' survival. Insulin reduced MTMR7 protein levels in human CRC cell lines, and CRC patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) or loss of imprinting (LOI) of insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) had an increased risk for MTMR7 loss. Mechanistically, MTMR7 lowered PIPs and inhibited insulin-mediated AKT-ERK1/2 signaling and proliferation in human CRC cell lines. MTMR7 provides a novel link between growth factor signaling and cancer, and may thus constitute a potential marker or drug target for human CRC. PMID:27409167

  20. Immunochemical detection of parathyroid hormone-related protein in the saccus vasculosus of a teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Devlin, A J; Danks, J A; Faulkner, M K; Power, D M; Canario, A V; Martin, T J; Ingleton, P M

    1996-01-01

    Using antisera to regions of human parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) the saccus vasculosus (SV) of the sea bream (Sparus aurata) has been shown to contain immunoreactive PTHrP. By immunohistochemistry (IHC) the epithelial coronet cells in fixed and wax-embedded SV tissue reacted with antisera to the prepro region of human PTHrP (-13 to +2), the N-terminus PTHrP (1-16), and the midmolecule PTHrP (50-69). Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of saccus extracts and incubation media contained two major proteins of 14.3 and 15 kDa. By Western blotting these two proteins both reacted with the three antisera used for IHC, suggesting that they are immunochemically similar to human PTHrP (1-84). Ultrastructurally the coronet cells of Sparus saccus vasculosus resembled coronet cells described for other teleosts, with an abundant smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) which was more highly organized in the coronets. IHC at EM level showed reaction mainly with the membranes of the SER. These results suggest that S. aurata saccus vasculosus may produce a PTHrP-like molecule similar to human PTHrP.

  1. Characterization of genes encoding proteins containing HD-related output domain in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsien-Ming; Liao, Chao-Tsai; Chiang, Ying-Chuan; Chang, Yu-Yin; Yeh, Yu-Tzu; Du, Shin-Chiao; Hsiao, Yi-Min

    2016-04-01

    The Gram-negative plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) is the causative agent of black rot in crucifers. The production of Xcc virulence factors is regulated by Clp and RpfF. HD-related output domain (HDOD) is a protein domain of unknown biochemical function. The genome of Xcc encodes three proteins (GsmR, HdpA, and HdpB) with an HDOD. The GsmR has been reported to play a role in the general stress response and cell motility and its expression is positively regulated by Clp. Here, the function and transcription of hdpA and hdpB were characterized. Mutation of hdpA resulted in enhanced bacterial attachment. In addition, the expression of hdpA was positively regulated by RpfF but not by Clp, subject to catabolite repression and affected by several stress conditions. However, mutational analysis and reporter assay showed that hdpB had no effect on the production of a range of virulence factors and its expression was independent of Clp and RpfF. The results shown here not only extend the previous work on RpfF regulation to show that it influences the expression of hdpA in Xcc, but also expand knowledge of the function of the HDOD containing proteins in bacteria.

  2. Evolutionary Characteristics of Missing Proteins: Insights into the Evolution of Human Chromosomes Related to Missing-Protein-Encoding Genes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Aishi; Li, Guang; Yang, Dong; Wu, Songfeng; Ouyang, Hongsheng; Xu, Ping; He, Fuchu

    2015-12-04

    Although the "missing protein" is a temporary concept in C-HPP, the biological information for their "missing" could be an important clue in evolutionary studies. Here we classified missing-protein-encoding genes into two groups, the genes encoding PE2 proteins (with transcript evidence) and the genes encoding PE3/4 proteins (with no transcript evidence). These missing-protein-encoding genes distribute unevenly among different chromosomes, chromosomal regions, or gene clusters. In the view of evolutionary features, PE3/4 genes tend to be young, spreading at the nonhomology chromosomal regions and evolving at higher rates. Interestingly, there is a higher proportion of singletons in PE3/4 genes than the proportion of singletons in all genes (background) and OTCSGs (organ, tissue, cell type-specific genes). More importantly, most of the paralogous PE3/4 genes belong to the newly duplicated members of the paralogous gene groups, which mainly contribute to special biological functions, such as "smell perception". These functions are heavily restricted into specific type of cells, tissues, or specific developmental stages, acting as the new functional requirements that facilitated the emergence of the missing-protein-encoding genes during evolution. In addition, the criteria for the extremely special physical-chemical proteins were first set up based on the properties of PE2 proteins, and the evolutionary characteristics of those proteins were explored. Overall, the evolutionary analyses of missing-protein-encoding genes are expected to be highly instructive for proteomics and functional studies in the future.

  3. Autophagy-Related Protein ATG8 Has a Noncanonical Function for Apicoplast Inheritance in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Lévêque, Maude F.; Berry, Laurence; Cipriano, Michael J.; Nguyen, Hoa-Mai; Striepen, Boris

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autophagy is a catabolic process widely conserved among eukaryotes that permits the rapid degradation of unwanted proteins and organelles through the lysosomal pathway. This mechanism involves the formation of a double-membrane structure called the autophagosome that sequesters cellular components to be degraded. To orchestrate this process, yeasts and animals rely on a conserved set of autophagy-related proteins (ATGs). Key among these factors is ATG8, a cytoplasmic protein that is recruited to nascent autophagosomal membranes upon the induction of autophagy. Toxoplasma gondii is a potentially harmful human pathogen in which only a subset of ATGs appears to be present. Although this eukaryotic parasite seems able to generate autophagosomes upon stresses such as nutrient starvation, the full functionality and biological relevance of a canonical autophagy pathway are as yet unclear. Intriguingly, in T. gondii, ATG8 localizes to the apicoplast under normal intracellular growth conditions. The apicoplast is a nonphotosynthetic plastid enclosed by four membranes resulting from a secondary endosymbiosis. Using superresolution microscopy and biochemical techniques, we show that TgATG8 localizes to the outermost membrane of this organelle. We investigated the unusual function of TgATG8 at the apicoplast by generating a conditional knockdown mutant. Depletion of TgATG8 led to rapid loss of the organelle and subsequent intracellular replication defects, indicating that the protein is essential for maintaining apicoplast homeostasis and thus for survival of the tachyzoite stage. More precisely, loss of TgATG8 led to abnormal segregation of the apicoplast into the progeny because of a loss of physical interactions of the organelle with the centrosomes. PMID:26507233

  4. OSBP-Related Protein Family: Mediators of Lipid Transport and Signaling at Membrane Contact Sites.

    PubMed

    Kentala, Henriikka; Weber-Boyvat, Marion; Olkkonen, Vesa M

    2016-01-01

    Oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP) and its related protein homologs, ORPs, constitute a conserved family of lipid-binding/transfer proteins (LTPs) expressed ubiquitously in eukaryotes. The ligand-binding domain of ORPs accommodates cholesterol and oxysterols, but also glycerophospholipids, particularly phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PI4P). ORPs have been implicated as intracellular lipid sensors or transporters. Most ORPs carry targeting determinants for the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and non-ER organelle membrane. ORPs are located and function at membrane contact sites (MCSs), at which ER is closely apposed with other organelle limiting membranes. Such sites have roles in lipid transport and metabolism, control of Ca(2+) fluxes, and signaling events. ORPs are postulated either to transport lipids over MCSs to maintain the distinct lipid compositions of organelle membranes, or to control the activity of enzymes/protein complexes with functions in signaling and lipid metabolism. ORPs may transfer PI4P and another lipid class bidirectionally. Transport of PI4P followed by its hydrolysis would in this model provide the energy for transfer of the other lipid against its concentration gradient. Control of organelle lipid compositions by OSBP/ORPs is important for the life cycles of several pathogenic viruses. Targeting ORPs with small-molecular antagonists is proposed as a new strategy to combat viral infections. Several ORPs are reported to modulate vesicle transport along the secretory or endocytic pathways. Moreover, antagonists of certain ORPs inhibit cancer cell proliferation. Thus, ORPs are LTPs, which mediate interorganelle lipid transport and coordinate lipid signals with a variety of cellular regimes.

  5. Relation Between Changes in Pigments' Spectral Properties and Structural Distortions of Pigment Protein Complexes (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoitchkova, Katerina; Andreeva, Atanaska; Busheva, Mira

    2009-04-01

    Scientists continue to investigate photosynthesis-nature's process to efficiently regulate and store energy. To explore the mechanisms of regulation we used fluorescence, resonance Raman spectroscopy, and biochemical preparative methods. For detailed analysis we applied decomposition of the low temperature steady-state fluorescence spectra. This allowed us to estimate the emission of distinct pigment protein complexes (PPC) and evaluate the fluorescence of various aggregation forms of the main light harvesting complex (LHCII), which plays a major role in the studied mechanisms. Resonance Raman spectroscopy revealed with precision the relation between changes in pigments' spectral properties and structural distortions of PPC. It was shown that aggregation of LHCII led to out-of-plane distortion, not only of neoxanthin, but also of lutein molecules. This was enhanced when the complex was embedded in thylakoid membranes (TM). It was suggested that lutein molecules are more closely related to the process of aggregation of LHCII in TM than neoxanthin.

  6. Ion-exchange chromatography used to isolate a spermadhesin-related protein from domestic goat (Capra hircus) seminal plasma.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Dárcio Italo Alves; Melo, Luciana Magalhães; Gadelha, Carlos Alberto de Almeida; Cunha, Rodrigo Maranguape Silva da; Bloch, Carlos; Rádis-Baptista, Gandhi; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; Freitas, Vicente José de Figueirêdo

    2006-03-31

    Mammalian seminal plasma contains among others, proteins called spermadhesins, which are the major proteins of boar and stallion seminal plasma. These proteins appear to be involved in capacitation and sperm-egg interaction. Previously, we reported the presence of a protein related to spermadhesins in goat seminal plasma. In the present study, we have further characterized this protein, and we propose ion-exchange chromatography to isolate this seminal protein. Semen was obtained from four adult Saanen bucks. Seminal plasma was pooled, dialyzed against distilled water and freeze-dried. Lyophilized proteins were loaded onto an ion-exchange chromatography column. Dialyzed-lyophilized proteins from the main peak of DEAE-Sephacel were applied to a C2/C18 column coupled to an RP-HPLC system, and the eluted proteins were lyophilized for electrophoresis. The N-terminal was sequenced and amino acid sequence similarity was determined using CLUSTAL W. Additionally, proteins from DEAE-Sephacel chromatography step were dialyzed and submitted to a heparin-Sepharose high-performance liquid chromatography. Goat seminal plasma after ion-exchange chromatography yielded 6.47 +/- 0.63 mg (mean +/- SEM) of the major retained fraction. The protein was designated BSFP (buck seminal fluid protein). BSFP exhibited N-terminal sequence homology to boar, stallion and bull spermadhesins. BSFP showed no heparin-binding capabilities. These results together with our previous data indicate that goat seminal plasma contains a protein that is structurally related to proteins of the spermadhesin family. Finally, this protein can be efficiently isolated by ion-exchange and reverse-phase chromatography.

  7. Two additional human serum proteins structurally related to complement factor H: Evidence for a family of factor H-related genes

    SciTech Connect

    Skerka, C.; Timmann, C.; Horstmann, R.D. ); Zipfel, P.F.

    1992-05-15

    The authors identify and characterize two human serum proteins with an apparent molecular mass of 24 and 29 kDa, which are antigenically related to complement factor H. These proteins represent differently glycosylated forms and are encoded by the same mRNA. The corresponding cDNA clone is 1051 bp in size and hybridized to a 1.4-kb mRNA derived from human liver. The predicted translation product represents a protein of 270 amino acids, which displays a hydrophobic leader sequence, indicative of a secreted protein. The secreted part is organized in four short consensus repeats (SCR) and has a single putative N-linked glycosylation site. The predicted sequence is closely related to that of the previously described factor H-related proteins h37 and h42, which are also derived from a 1.4-kb mRNA. Amino acid comparison of these factor H-related proteins showed identical leader sequences, an exchange of three amino acids in SCR1, identical sequences of SCR2, and a lower degree of homology between SCR3-4 (h24 and h29) and SCR4-5 (h37 and h42). In addition, SCR3-4 of h24 and h29 display homology to SCR19-20 of human complement factor H. The relatedness of structural elements of the factor H-related proteins h24, h29, h37, and h42 and of factor H, suggests a function common to these proteins and indicates the existence of a gene family consisting of factor H and at least two factor H-related genes. 28 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Proton magnetic resonance characterization of phoratoxins and homologous proteins related to crambin

    SciTech Connect

    Lecomte, J.T.J.; Kaplan, D.; Llinas, M.; Thunberg, E.; Samuelsson, G.

    1987-02-24

    The mistletoe protein toxins, phoratoxins A and B, viscotoxins A3 and B have been investigated by /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy at 300 and 600 MHz. The five polypeptides define a set of closely related homologues, containing 46 amino acid residues each, in a structure constrained by three cystine bridges. Their methyl and aromatic spectra were analyzed and a number of signals identified and assigned via comparative criteria, two-dimensional chemical-shift correlated spectroscopy, acid-base titration, and proton Overhauser experiments in /sup 1/H/sub 2/O. The spectra indicate a compact globular conformation and a common folding pattern for the toxins. In particular, use was made of well-resolved aliphatic and aromatic resonances in order to compare the mistletoe proteins with the thionins, a set of homologous toxins from gramineae, and with crambin, a closely related polypeptide from a crucifer. The authors observe that while all the investigated proteins have very similar secondary and tertiary structures, they differ widely in their dynamic characteristics as probed by the amide NH /sup 1/H-/sup 2/H exchange kinetics in deuteriated solvents. The temperature dependence of the /sup 1/H NMR spectrum also indicates that the toxins are endowed with a thermally very stable native (ground-state) structure, with little evidence of large amplitude structural breathings up to approx.370 K, although irreversible chemical degradation (denaturation) becomes evident at temperatures greater than or equal to 350 K. It is concluded that the mistletoe toxins afford valuable rigid structures for NMR conformation studies.

  9. Involvement of impaired desmosome-related proteins in hypertrophic scar intraepidermal blister formation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jianglin; He, Weifeng; Luo, Gaoxing; Wu, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Hypertrophic scar is one of the unique fibrotic diseases in human. Intraepidermal blister is a common clinical symptom following the hypertrophic scar formation. However, little is known about the reason of blister creation. In this study, we selected three patients with hypertrophic scar as manifested by raised, erythematous, pruritic, blister and thickened appearance undergoing scar resection. The first scar sample was 6 months after burn from the neck of a 3 years old male patient with 10 score by Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS). The second scar sample was 12 months after burn from the dorsal foot of a 16 years old female patient with 13 score by VSS. The third one was 9 months after burn from the elbow of a 34 years old male patients with 13 score by VSS. In order to understand the molecular mechanism of blister formation, we screened the different protein expression between hypertrophic scar and normal skin tissue by means of isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling technology and high throughput 2D LC-MS/MS. There were 48 proteins found to be downregulated in hypertrophic scar. Among the downregulated ones, plakophilin1 (PKP1), plakophilin3 (PKP3) and desmoplakin (DSP) were the desmosome-related proteins which were validated by immunohistochemistry and western blotting assay. Transmission electron microscopy further showed the considerably reduced size and intensity of hemidesmosome and desmosome in hypertrophic scar tissue, compared to control normal skin. Our data indicted for the first time that downregulation of DSP, PKP1 and PKP3 in hypertrophic scar might be responsible for intraepidermal blister formation.

  10. Age-related obesity and type 2 diabetes dysregulate neuronal associated genes and proteins in humans.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Mehran; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Daghighi, Mojtaba; Özcan, Behiye; Akbarkhanzadeh, Vishtaseb; Sheedfar, Fareeba; Amini, Marzyeh; Mazza, Tommaso; Pazienza, Valerio; Motazacker, Mahdi M; Mahmoudi, Morteza; De Rooij, Felix W M; Sijbrands, Eric; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Rezaee, Farhad

    2015-10-06

    Despite numerous developed drugs based on glucose metabolism interventions for treatment of age-related diseases such as diabetes neuropathies (DNs), DNs are still increasing in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes (T1D, T2D). We aimed to identify novel candidates in adipose tissue (AT) and pancreas with T2D for targeting to develop new drugs for DNs therapy. AT-T2D displayed 15 (e.g. SYT4 up-regulated and VGF down-regulated) and pancreas-T2D showed 10 (e.g. BAG3 up-regulated, VAV3 and APOA1 down-regulated) highly differentially expressed genes with neuronal functions as compared to control tissues. ELISA was blindly performed to measure proteins of 5 most differentially expressed genes in 41 human subjects. SYT4 protein was upregulated, VAV3 and APOA1 were down-regulated, and BAG3 remained unchanged in 1- Obese and 2- Obese-T2D without insulin, VGF protein was higher in these two groups as well as in group 3- Obese-T2D receiving insulin than 4-lean subjects. Interaction networks analysis of these 5 genes showed several metabolic pathways (e.g. lipid metabolism and insulin signaling). Pancreas is a novel site for APOA1 synthesis. VGF is synthesized in AT and could be considered as good diagnostic, and even prognostic, marker for age-induced diseases obesity and T2D. This study provides new targets for rational drugs development for the therapy of age-related DNs.

  11. Age-related obesity and type 2 diabetes dysregulate neuronal associated genes and proteins in humans

    PubMed Central

    Daghighi, Mojtaba; Özcan, Behiye; Akbarkhanzadeh, Vishtaseb; Sheedfar, Fareeba; Amini, Marzyeh; Mazza, Tommaso; Pazienza, Valerio; Motazacker, Mahdi M.; Mahmoudi, Morteza; De Rooij, Felix W. M.; Sijbrands, Eric; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Rezaee, Farhad

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous developed drugs based on glucose metabolism interventions for treatment of age-related diseases such as diabetes neuropathies (DNs), DNs are still increasing in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes (T1D, T2D). We aimed to identify novel candidates in adipose tissue (AT) and pancreas with T2D for targeting to develop new drugs for DNs therapy. AT-T2D displayed 15 (e.g. SYT4 up-regulated and VGF down-regulated) and pancreas-T2D showed 10 (e.g. BAG3 up-regulated, VAV3 and APOA1 down-regulated) highly differentially expressed genes with neuronal functions as compared to control tissues. ELISA was blindly performed to measure proteins of 5 most differentially expressed genes in 41 human subjects. SYT4 protein was upregulated, VAV3 and APOA1 were down-regulated, and BAG3 remained unchanged in 1- Obese and 2- Obese-T2D without insulin, VGF protein was higher in these two groups as well as in group 3- Obese-T2D receiving insulin than 4-lean subjects. Interaction networks analysis of these 5 genes showed several metabolic pathways (e.g. lipid metabolism and insulin signaling). Pancreas is a novel site for APOA1 synthesis. VGF is synthesized in AT and could be considered as good diagnostic, and even prognostic, marker for age-induced diseases obesity and T2D. This study provides new targets for rational drugs development for the therapy of age-related DNs. PMID:26337083

  12. Elevation of C-reactive protein levels in patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Kapur, Rick; Kim, Michael; Rondina, Matthew T.; Porcelijn, Leendert; Semple, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion-related fatalities and is characterized by the onset of acute respiratory distress within six hours following blood transfusion. In most cases, donor antibodies are suggested to be involved, however, the pathogenesis is poorly understood. A two-hit model is generally assumed to underlie TRALI pathogenesis where the first hit consists of a patient predisposing factor such as inflammation and the second hit is due to donor antibodies present in the transfused blood. We recently demonstrated that the acute phase protein C-reactive protein (CRP) could enhance murine anti-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-mediated TRALI. Whether CRP is increased in human TRALI patients which would support its role as a risk factor for human TRALI, is currently unknown. For that purpose, we measured CRP levels in the plasma of human TRALI patients and found CRP levels to be significantly elevated compared to transfused control patients. These data support the notion that CRP may be a novel first hit risk factor in human TRALI and that modulation of CRP levels could be an effective therapeutic strategy for this serious adverse event of transfusion. PMID:27793007

  13. Expression of CAF-Related Proteins Is Associated with Histologic Grade of Breast Phyllodes Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye Min; Lee, Yu Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of cancer-associated fibroblast- (CAF-) related proteins and the implications in breast phyllodes tumor (PT). Methods. Tissue microarrays of 194 PT cases (151 benign PT, 27 borderline PT, and 16 malignant PT) were constructed. We performed immunohistochemical staining for CAF-related proteins (podoplanin, prolyl 4-hydroxylase, FAPα, S100A4, PDGFR α/β, and NG2) and analyzed the results according to clinicopathologic parameters. Results. Expression of PDGFRα and PDGFRβ in the stromal component increased with increasing histologic grade of PT (p = 0.003 and p = 0.034, resp.). Among clinicopathologic parameters, only expression of FAPα in stroma was associated with distant metastasis (p = 0.002). In univariate analysis, stromal expression of PDGFRα was associated with shorter overall survival (p = 0.002). In Cox multivariate analysis, stromal overgrowth and PDGFRα stromal positivity were associated with shorter overall survival (p = 0.006 and p = 0.050, resp.). Furthermore, expression of PDGFRβ in stroma was associated with shorter overall survival in patients with malignant PT (p = 0.041). Conclusion. Stromal expression of PDGFRα and PDGFRβ increased with increasing histologic grade of PT. In addition, PDGFR stromal positivity was associated with shorter overall survival. These results suggest that CAFs are associated with breast PT progression. PMID:27881889

  14. Expression of CAF-Related Proteins Is Associated with Histologic Grade of Breast Phyllodes Tumor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye Min; Lee, Yu Kyung; Koo, Ja Seung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of cancer-associated fibroblast- (CAF-) related proteins and the implications in breast phyllodes tumor (PT). Methods. Tissue microarrays of 194 PT cases (151 benign PT, 27 borderline PT, and 16 malignant PT) were constructed. We performed immunohistochemical staining for CAF-related proteins (podoplanin, prolyl 4-hydroxylase, FAPα, S100A4, PDGFR α/β, and NG2) and analyzed the results according to clinicopathologic parameters. Results. Expression of PDGFRα and PDGFRβ in the stromal component increased with increasing histologic grade of PT (p = 0.003 and p = 0.034, resp.). Among clinicopathologic parameters, only expression of FAPα in stroma was associated with distant metastasis (p = 0.002). In univariate analysis, stromal expression of PDGFRα was associated with shorter overall survival (p = 0.002). In Cox multivariate analysis, stromal overgrowth and PDGFRα stromal positivity were associated with shorter overall survival (p = 0.006 and p = 0.050, resp.). Furthermore, expression of PDGFRβ in stroma was associated with shorter overall survival in patients with malignant PT (p = 0.041). Conclusion. Stromal expression of PDGFRα and PDGFRβ increased with increasing histologic grade of PT. In addition, PDGFR stromal positivity was associated with shorter overall survival. These results suggest that CAFs are associated with breast PT progression.

  15. Melanocytic galectin-3 is associated with tyrosinase-related protein-1 and pigment biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Chalupa, Allison; Koshoffer, Amy; Galan, Emily; Yu, Lan; Liu, Fu-Tong; Boissy, Raymond E

    2015-01-01

    Galectin-3 is a family member of the carbohydrate-binding proteins widely expressed by many cell types and exhibits multiple cellular functions. We demonstrate that melanocytes express galectin-3, which is predominantly localized to the cell body peripherally along the Golgi zone. Downregulation of galectin-3 in human melanocytes using short hairpin RNA technology resulted in the reduction of both melanin synthesis and expression/activity of tyrosinase-related protein-1 (Tyrp-1). In the cell body, galectin-3 colocalizes with melanosome-destined cargo, specifically tyrosinase and Tyrp-1. We studied melanocytes cultured from patients with forms of Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) containing defects in trafficking steps governed by biogenesis of lysosome-related organelle complex-2 (BLOC-2) (HPS-5), BLOC-3 (HPS-1), and adaptin-3 (HPS-2). We found that galectin-3 expression mimicked the defective expression of the tyrosinase cargo in dendrites of HPS-5 melanocytes, but it was not altered in HPS-1 or HPS-2 melanocytes. In addition, galectin-3 colocalized predominantly with the HPS-5 component of BLOC-2 in normal human melanocytes. These data indicate that galectin-3 is a regulatory component in melanin synthesis affecting the expression of Tyrp-1.

  16. Mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways promote low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1-mediated internalization of beta-amyloid protein in primary cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei-Na; Ma, Kai-Ge; Qian, Yi-Hua; Zhang, Jian-Shui; Feng, Gai-Feng; Shi, Li-Li; Zhang, Zhi-Chao; Liu, Zhao-Hui

    2015-07-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are caused by the intraneuronal accumulation of beta-amyloid protein (Aβ). Reuptake of extracellular Aβ is believed to contribute significantly to the intraneuronal Aβ pool in the early stages of AD. Published reports have claimed that the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) mediates Aβ1-42 uptake and lysosomal trafficking in GT1-7 neuronal cells and mouse embryonic fibroblast non-neuronal cells. However, there is no direct evidence supporting the role of LRP1 in Aβ internalization in primary neurons. Our recent study indicated that p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling pathways are involved in regulating α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR)-mediated Aβ1-42 uptake in SH-SY5Y cells. This study was designed to explore the regulation of MAPK signaling pathways on LRP1-mediated Aβ internalization in neurons. We found that extracellular Aβ1-42 oligomers could be internalized into endosomes/lysosomes and mitochondria in cortical neurons. Aβ1-42 and LRP1 were also found co-localized in neurons during Aβ1-42 internalization, and they could form Aβ1-42-LRP1 complex. Knockdown of LRP1 expression significantly decreased neuronal Aβ1-42 internalization. Finally, we identified that p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling pathways regulated the internalization of Aβ1-42 via LRP1. Therefore, these results demonstrated that LRP1, p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 mediated the internalization of Aβ1-42 in neurons and provided evidence that blockade of LRP1 or inhibitions of MAPK signaling pathways might be a potential approach to lowering brain Aβ levels and served a potential therapeutic target for AD.

  17. [Evaluation of the relations between serum proteins electrophoresis and other laboratory tests in monoclonal gammopathies (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Ramacciotti, P G; Lazzari, L; Minardi, P

    1976-03-01

    We have considered interesting to determine monoclonal gammopathies incidence, in 2191 serum proteins electrophoresis performed in our laboratory from January to December 1974. We have found 15 cases of monoclonal gammopathies, some cases combined with Mieloma (3 cases), some other with other with non specific diseases. We have considered the relations between type of gammopathy and other laboratory tests useful for any other diagnose: they are: immunochemical analysis, E.S.R., red and white count, total proteins, Bence Jones protein.

  18. TTC26/DYF13 is an intraflagellar transport protein required for transport of motility-related proteins into flagella.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Ide, Takahiro; Yagi, Toshiki; Jiang, Xue; Hirono, Masafumi; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Yanagisawa, Haruaki; Wemmer, Kimberly A; Stainier, Didier Yr; Qin, Hongmin; Kamiya, Ritsu; Marshall, Wallace F

    2014-01-01

    Cilia/flagella are assembled and maintained by the process of intraflagellar transport (IFT), a highly conserved mechanism involving more than 20 IFT proteins. However, the functions of individual IFT proteins are mostly unclear. To help address this issue, we focused on a putative IFT protein TTC26/DYF13. Using live imaging and biochemical approaches we show that TTC26/DYF13 is an IFT complex B protein in mammalian cells and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Knockdown of TTC26/DYF13 in zebrafish embryos or mutation of TTC26/DYF13 in C. reinhardtii, produced short cilia with abnormal motility. Surprisingly, IFT particle assembly and speed were normal in dyf13 mutant flagella, unlike in other IFT complex B mutants. Proteomic and biochemical analyses indicated a particular set of proteins involved in motility was specifically depleted in the dyf13 mutant. These results support the concept that different IFT proteins are responsible for different cargo subsets, providing a possible explanation for the complexity of the IFT machinery. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01566.001.

  19. Target and resistance-related proteins of recombinant mutant human tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand on myeloma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Jian, Yuan; Chen, Yuling; Geng, Chuanying; Liu, Nian; Yang, Guangzhong; Liu, Jinwei; Li, Xin; Deng, Haiteng; Chen, Wenming

    2016-06-01

    Recombinant mutant human tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (rmhTRAIL) has become a potential therapeutic drug for multiple myeloma (MM). However, the exact targets and resistance mechanisms of rmhTRAIL on MM cells remain to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the target and resistance-related proteins of rmhTRAIL on myeloma cell lines. A TRAIL-sensitive myeloma cell line, RPMI 8226, and a TRAIL-resistance one, U266, were chosen and the differentially expressed proteins between the two cell lines were analyzed prior and subsequent to rmhTRAIL administration by a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. The results showed that following TRAIL treatment, 6 apoptosis-related proteins, calpain small subunit 1 (CPNS1), peflin (PEF1), B-cell receptor-associated protein 31 (BAP31), apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing CARD (ASC), BAG family molecular chaperone regulator 2 (BAG2) and chromobox protein homolog 3 (CBX3), were upregulated in RPMI 8226 cells while no change was identified in the U266 cells. Furthermore, small ubiquitin-related modifier 1 and several other ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP)-related proteins expressed higher levels in TRAIL-resistant cells U266 compared to the RPMI-8226 cells prior and subsequent to rmhTRAIL treatment. These results suggested that CPNS1, PEF1, BAP31, ASC, BAG2 and CBX3 were possibly target proteins of rmhTRAIL on RPMI 8226 cells, while UPP may have a vital role in mediating TRAIL-resistance in U266 cells.

  20. Target and resistance-related proteins of recombinant mutant human tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand on myeloma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    JIAN, YUAN; CHEN, YULING; GENG, CHUANYING; LIU, NIAN; YANG, GUANGZHONG; LIU, JINWEI; LI, XIN; DENG, HAITENG; CHEN, WENMING

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant mutant human tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (rmhTRAIL) has become a potential therapeutic drug for multiple myeloma (MM). However, the exact targets and resistance mechanisms of rmhTRAIL on MM cells remain to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the target and resistance-related proteins of rmhTRAIL on myeloma cell lines. A TRAIL-sensitive myeloma cell line, RPMI 8226, and a TRAIL-resistance one, U266, were chosen and the differentially expressed proteins between the two cell lines were analyzed prior and subsequent to rmhTRAIL administration by a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. The results showed that following TRAIL treatment, 6 apoptosis-related proteins, calpain small subunit 1 (CPNS1), peflin (PEF1), B-cell receptor-associated protein 31 (BAP31), apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing CARD (ASC), BAG family molecular chaperone regulator 2 (BAG2) and chromobox protein homolog 3 (CBX3), were upregulated in RPMI 8226 cells while no change was identified in the U266 cells. Furthermore, small ubiquitin-related modifier 1 and several other ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP)-related proteins expressed higher levels in TRAIL-resistant cells U266 compared to the RPMI-8226 cells prior and subsequent to rmhTRAIL treatment. These results suggested that CPNS1, PEF1, BAP31, ASC, BAG2 and CBX3 were possibly target proteins of rmhTRAIL on RPMI 8226 cells, while UPP may have a vital role in mediating TRAIL-resistance in U266 cells. PMID:27284413

  1. Plasma Protein Binding Structure-Activity Relationships Related to the N-Terminus of Daptomycin.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Elena K; Huang, Johnny X; Carbone, Vincenzo; Han, Meiling; Zhu, Yan; Nang, Sue; Khoo, Keith K; Mak, Johnson; Cooper, Matthew A; Li, Jian; Velkov, Tony

    2017-03-10

    Daptomycin is a lipopeptide antibiotic that is highly bound to plasma proteins. To date, the plasma components and structure-activity relationships responsible for the plasma protein binding profile of daptomycin remain uncharacterized. In the present study we have employed a surface plasmon resonance assay together with molecular docking techniques to investigate the plasma protein binding structure-activity relationships related to the N-terminal fatty acyl of daptomycin. Three compounds were investigated: (1) native daptomycin, which displays an N-terminal n-decanoyl fatty acid side chain, and two analogues with modifications to the N-terminal fatty acyl chain; (2) des-acyl daptomycin; and (3) acetyl-daptomycin. The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) data showed that the binding profile of native daptomycin was in the rank order human serum albumin (HSA) ≫ α-1-antitrypsin > low-density lipoprotein ≥ hemoglobin > sex hormone binding globulin > α-1-acid-glycoprotein (AGP) > hemopexin > fibrinogen > α-2-macroglobulin > β2-microglobulin > high-density lipoprotein > fibronectin > haptoglobulin > transferrin > immunoglobulin G. Notably, binding to fatty acid free HSA was greater than binding to nondelipidated HSA. SPR and ultrafiltration studies also indicated that physiological concentrations of calcium increase binding of daptomycin and acetyl-daptomycin to HSA and AGP. A molecular model of the daptomycin-human serum albumin A complex is presented that illustrates the pivotal role of the N-terminal fatty acyl chain of daptomycin for binding to drug site 1 of HSA. In proof-of-concept, the capacity of physiological cocktails of the identified plasma proteins to inhibit the antibacterial activity of daptomycin was assessed with in vitro microbiological assays. We show that HSA, α-1-antitrypsin, low-density lipoprotein, sex hormone binding globulin, α-1-acid-glycoprotein, and hemopexin are responsible for the majority of the sequestering activity in human plasma

  2. Multivariate Modeling of Proteins Related to Trapezius Myalgia, a Comparative Study of Female Cleaners with or without Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hadrevi, Jenny; Ghafouri, Bijar; Larsson, Britt; Gerdle, Björn; Hellström, Fredrik

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic trapezius myalgia is high in women with high exposure to awkward working positions, repetitive movements and movements with high precision demands. The mechanisms behind chronic trapezius myalgia are not fully understood. The purpose of this study was to explore the differences in protein content between healthy and myalgic trapezius muscle using proteomics. Muscle biopsies from 12 female cleaners with work-related trapezius myalgia and 12 pain free female cleaners were obtained from the descending part of the trapezius. Proteins were separated with two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and selected proteins were identified with mass spectrometry. In order to discriminate the two groups, quantified proteins were fitted to a multivariate analysis: partial least square discriminate analysis. The model separated 28 unique proteins which were related to glycolysis, the tricaboxylic acid cycle, to the contractile apparatus, the cytoskeleton and to acute response proteins. The results suggest altered metabolism, a higher abundance of proteins related to inflammation in myalgic cleaners compared to healthy, and a possible alteration of the contractile apparatus. This explorative proteomic screening of proteins related to chronic pain in the trapezius muscle provides new important aspects of the pathophysiology behind chronic trapezius myalgia. PMID:24023854

  3. Signaling Pathways Related to Protein Synthesis and Amino Acid Concentration in Pig Skeletal Muscles Depend on the Dietary Protein Level, Genotype and Developmental Stages.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingying; Li, Fengna; Kong, Xiangfeng; Tan, Bie; Li, Yinghui; Duan, Yehui; Blachier, François; Hu, Chien-An A; Yin, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    Muscle growth is regulated by the homeostatic balance of the biosynthesis and degradation of muscle proteins. To elucidate the molecular interactions among diet, pig genotype, and physiological stage, we examined the effect of dietary protein concentration, pig genotype, and physiological stages on amino acid (AA) pools, protein deposition, and related signaling pathways in different types of skeletal muscles. The study used 48 Landrace pigs and 48 pure-bred Bama mini-pigs assigned to each of 2 dietary treatments: lower/GB (Chinese conventional diet)- or higher/NRC (National Research Council)-protein diet. Diets were fed from 5 weeks of age to respective market weights of each genotype. Samples of biceps femoris muscle (BFM, type I) and longissimus dorsi muscle (LDM, type II) were collected at nursery, growing, and finishing phases according to the physiological stage of each genotype, to determine the AA concentrations, mRNA levels for growth-related genes in muscles, and protein abundances of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. Our data showed that the concentrations of most AAs in LDM and BFM of pigs increased (P<0.05) gradually with increasing age. Bama mini-pigs had generally higher (P<0.05) muscle concentrations of flavor-related AA, including Met, Phe, Tyr, Pro, and Ser, compared with Landrace pigs. The mRNA levels for myogenic determining factor, myogenin, myocyte-specific enhancer binding factor 2 A, and myostatin of Bama mini-pigs were higher (P<0.05) than those of Landrace pigs, while total and phosphorylated protein levels for protein kinase B, mTOR, and p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinases (p70S6K), and ratios of p-mTOR/mTOR, p-AKT/AKT, and p-p70S6K/p70S6K were lower (P<0.05). There was a significant pig genotype-dependent effect of dietary protein on the levels for mTOR and p70S6K. When compared with the higher protein-NRC diet, the lower protein-GB diet increased (P<0.05) the levels for mTOR and p70S6K in Bama mini-pigs, but

  4. Proteins Related to the Type I Secretion System Are Associated with Secondary SecA_DEAD Domain Proteins in Some Species of Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, Proteobacteria, Nitrospirae and Chlorobi

    PubMed Central

    Kamneva, Olga K.; Poudel, Saroj; Ward, Naomi L.

    2015-01-01

    A number of bacteria belonging to the PVC (Planctomycetes-Verrucomicrobia-Chlamydiae) super-phylum contain unusual ribosome-bearing intracellular membranes. The evolutionary origins and functions of these membranes are unknown. Some proteins putatively associated with the presence of intracellular membranes in PVC bacteria contain signal peptides. Signal peptides mark proteins for translocation across the cytoplasmic membrane in prokaryotes, and the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum in eukaryotes, by highly conserved Sec machinery. This suggests that proteins might be targeted to intracellular membranes in PVC bacteria via the Sec pathway. Here, we show that canonical signal peptides are significantly over-represented in proteins preferentially present in PVC bacteria possessing intracellular membranes, indicating involvement of Sec translocase in their cellular targeting. We also characterized Sec proteins using comparative genomics approaches, focusing on the PVC super-phylum. While we were unable to detect unique changes in Sec proteins conserved among membrane-bearing PVC species, we identified (1) SecA ATPase domain re-arrangements in some Planctomycetes, and (2) secondary SecA_DEAD domain proteins in the genomes of some Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, Proteobacteria, Nitrospirae and Chlorobi. This is the first report of potentially duplicated SecA in Gram-negative bacteria. The phylogenetic distribution of secondary SecA_DEAD domain proteins suggests that the presence of these proteins is not related to the occurrence of PVC endomembranes. Further genomic analysis showed that secondary SecA_DEAD domain proteins are located within genomic neighborhoods that also encode three proteins possessing domains specific for the Type I secretion system. PMID:26030905

  5. Degradation of Cry1Ab protein from genetically modified maize (MON810) in relation to total dietary feed proteins in dairy cow digestion.

    PubMed

    Paul, Vijay; Guertler, Patrick; Wiedemann, Steffi; Meyer, Heinrich H D

    2010-08-01

    To investigate the relative degradation and fragmentation pattern of the recombinant Cry1Ab protein from genetically modified (GM) maize MON810 throughout the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of dairy cows, a 25 months GM maize feeding study was conducted on 36 lactating Bavarian Fleckvieh cows allocated into two groups (18 cows per group) fed diets containing either GM maize MON810 or nearly isogenic non-GM maize as the respective diet components. All cows were fed a partial total mixed ration (pTMR). During the feeding trial, 8 feed (4 transgenic (T) and 4 non-transgenic (NT) pTMR) and 42 feces (26 T and 18 NT) samples from the subset of cows fed T and NT diets, and at the end of the feeding trial, digesta contents of rumen, abomasum, small intestine, large intestine and cecum were collected after the slaughter of six cows of each feeding group. Samples were analyzed for Cry1Ab protein and total protein using Cry1Ab specific ELISA and bicinchoninic acid assay, respectively. Immunoblot analyses were performed to evaluate the integrity of Cry1Ab protein in feed, digesta and feces samples. A decrease to 44% in Cry1Ab protein concentration from T pTMR to the voided feces (9.40 versus 4.18 mug/g of total proteins) was recorded. Concentrations of Cry1Ab protein in GIT digesta of cows fed T diets varied between the lowest 0.38 mug/g of total proteins in abomasum to the highest 3.84 mug/g of total proteins in rumen. Immunoblot analysis revealed the extensive degradation of recombinant Cry1Ab protein into a smaller fragment of around 34 kDa in GIT. The results of the present study indicate that the recombinant Cry1Ab protein from MON810 is increasingly degraded into a small fragment during dairy cow digestion.

  6. Proteins Related to the Type I Secretion System Are Associated with Secondary SecA_DEAD Domain Proteins in Some Species of Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, Proteobacteria, Nitrospirae and Chlorobi.

    PubMed

    Kamneva, Olga K; Poudel, Saroj; Ward, Naomi L

    2015-01-01

    A number of bacteria belonging to the PVC (Planctomycetes-Verrucomicrobia-Chlamydiae) super-phylum contain unusual ribosome-bearing intracellular membranes. The evolutionary origins and functions of these membranes are unknown. Some proteins putatively associated with the presence of intracellular membranes in PVC bacteria contain signal peptides. Signal peptides mark proteins for translocation across the cytoplasmic membrane in prokaryotes, and the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum in eukaryotes, by highly conserved Sec machinery. This suggests that proteins might be targeted to intracellular membranes in PVC bacteria via the Sec pathway. Here, we show that canonical signal peptides are significantly over-represented in proteins preferentially present in PVC bacteria possessing intracellular membranes, indicating involvement of Sec translocase in their cellular targeting. We also characterized Sec proteins using comparative genomics approaches, focusing on the PVC super-phylum. While we were unable to detect unique changes in Sec proteins conserved among membrane-bearing PVC species, we identified (1) SecA ATPase domain re-arrangements in some Planctomycetes, and (2) secondary SecA_DEAD domain proteins in the genomes of some Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, Proteobacteria, Nitrospirae and Chlorobi. This is the first report of potentially duplicated SecA in Gram-negative bacteria. The phylogenetic distribution of secondary SecA_DEAD domain proteins suggests that the presence of these proteins is not related to the occurrence of PVC endomembranes. Further genomic analysis showed that secondary SecA_DEAD domain proteins are located within genomic neighborhoods that also encode three proteins possessing domains specific for the Type I secretion system.

  7. Proteomic analysis of stress-related proteins in transgenic broccoli harboring a gene for cytokinin production during postharvest senescence.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mao-Sen; Li, Hui-Chun; Chang, You-Min; Wu, Min-Tze; Chen, Long-Fang Oliver

    2011-09-01

    Our previous study revealed a cytokinin-related retardation of post-harvest floret yellowing in transgenic broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) that harbored the bacterial isopentenyltransferase (ipt) gene. We aimed to investigate the underlining mechanism of this delayed post-harvest senescence. We used 2D electrophoresis and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry for a proteomics analysis of heads of ipt-transgenic and non-transgenic inbred lines of broccoli at harvest and after four days post-harvest storage. At harvest, we found an accumulation of stress-responsive proteins involved in maintenance of protein folding (putative protein disulfide isomerase, peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase and chaperonins), scavenging of reactive oxygen species (Mn superoxide dismutase), and stress protection [myrosinase-binding protein, jasmonate inducible protein, dynamin-like protein, NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) Fe-S protein 1 and stress-inducible tetratricopeptide repeat-containing protein]. After four days' post-harvest storage of non-transgenic broccoli florets, the levels of proteins involved in protein folding and carbon fixation were decreased, which indicates cellular degradation and a change in metabolism toward senescence. In addition, staining for antioxidant enzyme activity of non-transgenic plants after post-harvest storage revealed a marked decrease in activity of Fe-superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidase. Thus, the accumulation of stress-responsive proteins and antioxidant enzyme activity in ipt-transgenic broccoli are most likely associated with retardation of post-harvest senescence.

  8. Ageing has no effect on the regulation of the ubiquitin proteasome-related genes and proteins following resistance exercise

    PubMed Central

    Stefanetti, Renae J.; Zacharewicz, Evelyn; Della Gatta, Paul; Garnham, Andrew; Russell, Aaron P.; Lamon, Séverine

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is a critical component of the ageing process. Age-related muscle wasting is due to disrupted muscle protein turnover, a process mediated in part by the ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP). Additionally, older subjects have been observed to have an attenuated anabolic response, at both the molecular and physiological levels, following a single-bout of resistance exercise (RE). We investigated the expression levels of the UPP-related genes and proteins involved in muscle protein degradation in 10 older (60–75 years) vs. 10 younger (18–30 years) healthy male subjects at basal as well as 2 h after a single-bout of RE. MURF1, atrogin-1 and FBXO40, their substrate targets PKM2, myogenin, MYOD, MHC and EIF3F as well as MURF1 and atrogin-1 transcriptional regulators FOXO1 and FOXO3 gene and/or protein expression levels were measured via real time PCR and western blotting, respectively. At basal, no age-related difference was observed in the gene/protein levels of atrogin-1, MURF1, myogenin, MYOD and FOXO1/3. However, a decrease in FBXO40 mRNA and protein levels was observed in older subjects, while PKM2 protein was increased. In response to RE, MURF1, atrogin-1 and FBXO40 mRNA were upregulated in both the younger and older subjects, with changes observed in protein levels. In conclusion, UPP-related gene/protein expression is comparably regulated in healthy young and old male subjects at basal and following RE. These findings suggest that UPP signaling plays a limited role in the process of age-related muscle wasting. Future studies are required to investigate additional proteolytic mechanisms in conjunction with skeletal muscle protein breakdown (MPB) measurements following RE in older vs. younger subjects. PMID:24550841

  9. Structural Basis for Small G Protein Effector Interaction of Ras-related Protein 1 (Rap1) and Adaptor Protein Krev Interaction Trapped 1 (KRIT1)

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Rong; Draheim, Kyle M.; Liu, Weizhi; Calderwood, David A.; Boggon, Titus J.

    2012-09-17

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) affect 0.1-0.5% of the population resulting in leaky vasculature and severe neurological defects. KRIT1 (Krev interaction trapped-1) mutations associate with {approx}40% of familial CCMs. KRIT1 is an effector of Ras-related protein 1 (Rap1) GTPase. Rap1 relocalizes KRIT1 from microtubules to cell membranes to impact integrin activation, potentially important for CCM pathology. We report the 1.95 {angstrom} co-crystal structure of KRIT1 FERM domain in complex with Rap1. Rap1-KRIT1 interaction encompasses an extended surface, including Rap1 Switch I and II and KRIT1 FERM F1 and F2 lobes. Rap1 binds KRIT1-F1 lobe using a GTPase-ubiquitin-like fold interaction but binds KRIT1-F2 lobe by a novel interaction. Point mutagenesis confirms the interaction. High similarity between KRIT1-F2/F3 and talin is revealed. Additionally, the mechanism for FERM domains acting as GTPase effectors is suggested. Finally, structure-based alignment of each lobe suggests classification of FERM domains as ERM-like and TMFK-like (talin-myosin-FAK-KRIT-like) and that FERM lobes resemble domain 'modules.'

  10. Biosynthesis of defense-related proteins in transformed root cultures of Trichosanthes kirilowii Maxim. var japonicum (Kitam.).

    PubMed Central

    Savary, B J; Flores, H E

    1994-01-01

    We have established transformed ("hairy") root cultures from Trichosanthes kirilowii Maxim. var japonicum Kitam. (Cucurbitaceae) and four related species to study the biosynthesis of the ribosome-inactivating protein trichosanthin (TCN) and other root-specific defense-related plant proteins. Stable, fast-growing root clones were obtained for each species by infecting in vitro grown plantlets with Agrobacterium rhizogenes American Type Culture Collection strain 15834. Each species accumulated reproducibly a discrete protein pattern in the culture medium. Analysis of the extracellular proteins from T. kirilowii var japonicum root cultures showed differential protein accumulation in the medium during the time course of growth in batch cultures. Maximum protein accumulation, approaching 20 micrograms/mL, was observed at mid-exponential phase, followed by a degradation of a specific protein subset that coincided with the onset of stationary phase. Two major extracellular proteins and one intracellular protein, purified by ion-exchange and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, were identified as class III chitinases (EC 3.2.1.14) based on N-terminal amino acid sequence and amino acid composition homologies with other class III chitinases. The Trichosanthes chitinases also showed reactivity with a cucumber class III chitinase antiserum and chitinolytic activity in a glycol chitin gel assay. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and western blot analysis of intracellular proteins showed that normal and transformed T. kirilowii var japonicum roots accumulated only low levels of TCN (approximately 0.5% total soluble protein). Storage roots from the plant displayed protein and antigen patterns different from root cultures and produced TCN as the dominant protein. Roots undergoing secondary growth and differentiation exhibited patterns similar to those of storage roots, including increased TCN levels, indicating that high production of TCN

  11. Regulation of the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of viral and cellular proteins by ubiquitin and small ubiquitin-related modifiers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yao E.; Pernet, Olivier; Lee, Benhur

    2013-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of many cellular proteins is regulated by nuclear import/export signals as well as post-translational modifications such as covalent conjugation of ubiquitin and small ubiquitin-related modifiers (SUMOs). Ubiquitination and SUMOylation are rapid and reversible ways to modulate the intracellular localisation and function of substrate proteins. These pathways have been co-opted by some viruses, which depend on the host cell machinery to transport their proteins in and out of the nucleus. In this review, we will summarise our current knowledge on the ubiquitin/SUMO-regulated nuclear/subnuclear trafficking of cellular proteins and describe examples of viral exploitation of these pathways. PMID:22188262

  12. Archaeal surface layer proteins contain beta propeller, PKD, and beta helix domains and are related to metazoan cell surface proteins.

    PubMed

    Jing, Hua; Takagi, Junichi; Liu, Jin-huan; Lindgren, Sara; Zhang, Rong-guang; Joachimiak, A; Wang, Jia-huai; Springer, Timothy A

    2002-10-01

    The surface layer of archaeobacteria protects cells from extreme environments and, in Methanosarcina, may regulate cell adhesion. We identify three domain types that account for the complete architecture of numerous Methanosarcina surface layer proteins (SLPs). We solve the crystal structure for two of these domains, which correspond to the two N-terminal domains of an M. mazei SLP. One domain displays a unique, highly symmetrical, seven-bladed beta propeller fold, and the other belongs to the polycystic kidney disease (PKD) superfamily fold. The third domain is predicted to adopt a beta helix fold. These domains have homologs in metazoan cell surface proteins, suggesting remarkable relationships between domains in archaeal SLPs and metazoan cell surface proteins.

  13. Electrochemical aptasensor for lung cancer-related protein detection in crude blood plasma samples

    PubMed Central

    Zamay, Galina S.; Zamay, Tatiana N.; Kolovskii, Vasilii A.; Shabanov, Alexandr V.; Glazyrin, Yury E.; Veprintsev, Dmitry V.; Krat, Alexey V.; Zamay, Sergey S.; Kolovskaya, Olga S.; Gargaun, Ana; Sokolov, Alexey E.; Modestov, Andrey A.; Artyukhov, Ivan P.; Chesnokov, Nikolay V.; Petrova, Marina M.; Berezovski, Maxim V.; Zamay, Anna S.

    2016-01-01

    The development of an aptamer-based electrochemical sensor for lung cancer detection is presented in this work. A highly specific DNA-aptamer, LC-18, selected to postoperative lung cancer tissues was immobilized onto a gold microelectrode and electrochemical measurements were performed in a solution containing the redox marker ferrocyanide/ferricyanide. The aptamer protein targets were harvested from blood plasma of lung cancer patients by using streptavidin paramagnetic beads and square wave voltammetry of the samples was performed at various concentrations. In order to enhance the sensitivity of the aptasensor, silica-coated iron oxide magnetic beads grafted with hydrophobic C8 and C4 alkyl groups were used in a sandwich detection approach. Addition of hydrophobic beads increased the detection limit by 100 times. The detection limit of the LC-18 aptasensor was enhanced by the beads to 0.023 ng/mL. The formation of the aptamer – protein – bead sandwich on the electrode surface was visualized by electron microcopy. As a result, the electrochemical aptasensor was able to detect cancer-related targets in crude blood plasma of lung cancer patients. PMID:27694916

  14. Carbohydrate and protein contents of grain dusts in relation to dust morphology.

    PubMed Central

    Dashek, W V; Olenchock, S A; Mayfield, J E; Wirtz, G H; Wolz, D E; Young, C A

    1986-01-01

    Grain dusts contain a variety of materials which are potentially hazardous to the health of workers in the grain industry. Because the characterization of grain dusts is incomplete, we are defining the botanical, chemical, and microbial contents of several grain dusts collected from grain elevators in the Duluth-Superior regions of the U.S. Here, we report certain of the carbohydrate and protein contents of dusts in relation to dust morphology. Examination of the gross morphologies of the dusts revealed that, except for corn, each dust contained either husk or pericarp (seed coat in the case of flax) fragments in addition to respirable particles. When viewed with the light microscope, the fragments appeared as elongated, pointed structures. The possibility that certain of the fragments within corn, settled, and spring wheat were derived from cell walls was suggested by the detection of pentoses following colorimetric assay of neutralized 2 N trifluoroacetic acid hydrolyzates of these dusts. The presence of pentoses together with the occurrence of proteins within water washings of grain dusts suggests that glycoproteins may be present within the dusts. With scanning electron microscopy, each dust was found to consist of a distinct assortment of particles in addition to respirable particles. Small husk fragments and "trichome-like" objects were common to all but corn dust. Images FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. PMID:3709476

  15. The subcellular distribution of chromosome 6-encoded dystrophin-related protein in the brain

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Chromosome 6-encoded dystrophin-related-protein (DRP) shows significant structural similarities to dystrophin at the carboxyl terminus, though the two proteins are encoded on different chromosomes. Both DRP and dystrophin are expressed in muscle and brain and show some similarity in their subcellular localization. For example, in skeletal muscle both are expressed at neuromuscular and myotendinous junctions. However, while dystrophin is absent or severely reduced in Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy, DRP continues to be expressed. Within the brain, dystrophin is enriched at the postsynaptic regions of specific subsets of neurons, while the distribution of DRP is yet to be described. In this study we demonstrate a distinct though highly specific pattern of distribution of DRP in the brain. DRP is enriched in the choroid plexus, pia mater, intracerebral vasculature, and ependymal lining. Within the parenchyma proper, DRP is located at the inner plasma face of astrocytic foot processes at the abluminal aspect of the blood-brain barrier. The distribution of DRP is conserved across a large evolutionary distance, from mammals to elasmobranchs, suggesting that DRP may play a role in the maintenance of regional specializations in the brain. PMID:1400579

  16. Ring-like oligomers of Synaptotagmins and related C2 domain proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zanetti, Maria N; Bello, Oscar D; Wang, Jing; Coleman, Jeff; Cai, Yiying; Sindelar, Charles V; Rothman, James E; Krishnakumar, Shyam S

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported that the C2AB portion of Synaptotagmin 1 (Syt1) could self-assemble into Ca2+-sensitive ring-like oligomers on membranes, which could potentially regulate neurotransmitter release. Here we report that analogous ring-like oligomers assemble from the C2AB domains of other Syt isoforms (Syt2, Syt7, Syt9) as well as related C2 domain containing protein, Doc2B and extended Synaptotagmins (E-Syts). Evidently, circular oligomerization is a general and conserved structural aspect of many C2 domain proteins, including Synaptotagmins. Further, using electron microscopy combined with targeted mutations, we show that under physiologically relevant conditions, both the Syt1 ring assembly and its rapid disruption by Ca2+ involve the well-established functional surfaces on the C2B domain that are important for synaptic transmission. Our data suggests that ring formation may be triggered at an early step in synaptic vesicle docking and positions Syt1 to synchronize neurotransmitter release to Ca2+ influx. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17262.001 PMID:27434670

  17. Huntingtin-interacting protein 1-related is required for accurate congression and segregation of chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Park, Sun Joo

    2010-12-01

    Huntingtin-interacting protein 1-related (HIP1r) is known to function in clathrin-mediated endocytosis and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, which occurs continuously in non-dividing cells. This study reports a new function for HIP1r in mitosis. Green fluorescent protein-fused HIP1r localizes to the mitotic spindles. Depletion of HIP1r by RNA interference induces misalignment of chromosomes and prolonged mitosis, which is associated with decreased proliferation of HIP1r-deficeint cells. Chromosome misalignment leads to missegregation and ultimately production of multinucleated cells. Depletion of HIP1r causes persistent activation of the spindle checkpoint in misaligned chromosomes. These findings suggest that HIP1r plays an important role in regulating the attachment of spindle microtubules to chromosomes during mitosis, an event that is required for accurate congression and segregation of chromosomes. This finding may provide new insights that improve the understanding of various human diseases involving HIP1r as well as its fusion genes.

  18. Specific N-terminal cleavage of ribosomal protein L27 in Staphylococcus aureus and related bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Erin A.; Caufield, J. Harry; Lyons, Charles E.; Manning, Keith A.; Dokland, Terje; Christie, Gail E.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Ribosomal protein L27 is a component of the eubacterial large ribosomal subunit that has been shown to play a critical role in substrate stabilization during protein synthesis. This function is mediated by the L27 N-terminus, which protrudes into the peptidyl transferase center. In this report we demonstrate that L27 in Staphylococcus aureus and other Firmicutes is encoded with an N-terminal extension that is not present in most Gram-negative organisms, and is absent from mature ribosomes. We have identified a cysteine protease, conserved among bacteria containing the L27 N-terminal extension, which performs post-translational cleavage of L27. Ribosomal biology in eubacteria has largely been studied in the Gram negative bacterium Escherichia coli; our findings indicate that there are aspects of the basic biology of the ribosome in S. aureus and other related bacteria that differ substantially from that of the E. coli ribosome. This research lays the foundation for the development of new therapeutic approaches that target this novel pathway. PMID:25388641

  19. Quercetin ameliorates Aβ toxicity in Drosophila AD model by modulating cell cycle-related protein expression

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Yan; Li, Ke; Fu, Tingting; Wan, Chao; Zhang, Dongdong; Song, Hang; Zhang, Yao; Liu, Na; Gan, Zhenji; Yuan, Liudi

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a prevalent neurodegenerative disorder characterized by β amyloid (Aβ) deposition and neurofibril tangles. It has been reported that a bioflavonoid, quercetin, could ameliorate AD phenotypes in C. elegans and mice. However, the mechanism underlying the ameliorative effect of quercetin is not fully understood yet. Drosophila models could recapitulate AD-like phenotypes, such as shortened lifespan, impaired locomotive ability as well as defects in learning and memory. So in this study, we investigated the effects of quercetin on AD in Drosophila model and explored the underlying mechanisms. We found quercetin could effectively intervene in AD pathogenesis in vivo. Mechanism study showed quercetin could restore the expression of genes perturbed by Aβ accumulation, such as those involved in cell cycle and DNA replication. Cyclin B, an important cell cycle protein, was chosen to test whether it participated in the AD ameliorative effects of quercetin. We found that cyclin B RNAi in the brain could alleviate AD phenotypes. Taken together, the current study suggested that the neuroprotective effects of quercetin were mediated at least partially by targeting cell cycle-related proteins. PMID:27626494

  20. Quercetin ameliorates Aβ toxicity in Drosophila AD model by modulating cell cycle-related protein expression.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yan; Li, Ke; Fu, Tingting; Wan, Chao; Zhang, Dongdong; Song, Hang; Zhang, Yao; Liu, Na; Gan, Zhenji; Yuan, Liudi

    2016-10-18

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a prevalent neurodegenerative disorder characterized by β amyloid (Aβ) deposition and neurofibril tangles. It has been reported that a bioflavonoid, quercetin, could ameliorate AD phenotypes in C. elegans and mice. However, the mechanism underlying the ameliorative effect of quercetin is not fully understood yet. Drosophila models could recapitulate AD-like phenotypes, such as shortened lifespan, impaired locomotive ability as well as defects in learning and memory. So in this study, we investigated the effects of quercetin on AD in Drosophila model and explored the underlying mechanisms. We found quercetin could effectively intervene in AD pathogenesis in vivo. Mechanism study showed quercetin could restore the expression of genes perturbed by Aβ accumulation, such as those involved in cell cycle and DNA replication. Cyclin B, an important cell cycle protein, was chosen to test whether it participated in the AD ameliorative effects of quercetin. We found that cyclin B RNAi in the brain could alleviate AD phenotypes. Taken together, the current study suggested that the neuroprotective effects of quercetin were mediated at least partially by targeting cell cycle-related proteins.

  1. Lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 is required for parathyroid hormone-induced Sost suppression.

    PubMed

    Li, Changjun; Wang, Weishan; Xie, Liang; Luo, Xianghang; Cao, Xu; Wan, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) suppresses the expression of the bone formation inhibitor sclerostin (Sost) in osteocytes by inducing nuclear accumulation of histone deacetylases (HDACs) to inhibit the myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2)-dependent Sost bone enhancer. Previous studies revealed that lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6) mediates the intracellular signaling activation and the anabolic bone effect of PTH. Here, we investigated whether LRP6 mediates the inhibitory effect of PTH on Sost using an osteoblast-specific Lrp6-knockout (LRP6-KO) mouse model. An increased level of Sost mRNA expression was detected in femur tissue from LRP6-KO mice, compared to wild-type littermates. The number of osteocytes expressing sclerostin protein was also increased in bone tissue of LRP6-KO littermates, indicating a negative regulatory role of LRP6 on Sost/sclerostin. In wild-type littermates, intermittent PTH treatment significantly suppressed Sost mRNA expression in bone and the number of sclerostin(+) osteocytes, while the effect of PTH was much less significant in LRP6-KO mice. Additionally, PTH-induced downregulation of MEF2C and 2D, as well as HDAC changes in osteocytes, were abrogated in LRP6-KO mice. These data indicate that LRP6 is required for PTH suppression of Sost expression.

  2. Identifying biological concepts from a protein-related corpus with a probabilistic topic model

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Bin; McLean, David C; Lu, Xinghua

    2006-01-01

    Background Biomedical literature, e.g., MEDLINE, contains a wealth of knowledge regarding functions of proteins. Major recurring biological concepts within such text corpora represent the domains of this body of knowledge. The goal of this research is to identify the major biological topics/concepts from a corpus of protein-related MEDLINE© titles and abstracts by applying a probabilistic topic model. Results The latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA) model was applied to the corpus. Based on the Bayesian model selection, 300 major topics were extracted from the corpus. The majority of identified topics/concepts was found to be semantically coherent and most represented biological objects or concepts. The identified topics/concepts were further mapped to the controlled vocabulary of the Gene Ontology (GO) terms based on mutual information. Conclusion The major and recurring biological concepts within a collection of MEDLINE documents can be extracted by the LDA model. The identified topics/concepts provide parsimonious and semantically-enriched representation of the texts in a semantic space with reduced dimensionality and can be used to index text. PMID:16466569

  3. Alzheimer-related protein APL-1 modulates lifespan through heterochronic gene regulation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Ewald, Collin Y; Marfil, Vanessa; Li, Chris

    2016-08-24

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-associated disease. Mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) may be causative or protective of AD. The presence of two functionally redundant APP-like genes (APLP1/2) has made it difficult to unravel the biological function of APP during aging. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans contains a single APP family member, apl-1. Here, we assessed the function of APL-1 on C. elegans' lifespan and found tissue-specific effects on lifespan by overexpression of APL-1. Overexpression of APL-1 in neurons causes lifespan reduction, whereas overexpression of APL-1 in the hypodermis causes lifespan extension by repressing the function of the heterochronic transcription factor LIN-14 to preserve youthfulness. APL-1 lifespan extension also requires signaling through the FOXO transcription factor DAF-16, heat-shock factor HSF-1, and vitamin D-like nuclear hormone receptor DAF-12. We propose that reinforcing APL-1 expression in the hypodermis preserves the regulation of heterochronic lin-14 gene network to improve maintenance of somatic tissues via DAF-16/FOXO and HSF-1 to promote healthy aging. Our work reveals a mechanistic link of how a conserved APP-related protein modulates aging.

  4. MELANOCYTIC GALECTIN-3 IS ASSOCIATED WITH TYROSINASE RELATED PROTEIN-1 AND PIGMENT BIOSYNTHESIS

    PubMed Central

    Chalupa, Allison; Koshoffer, Amy; Galan, Emily; Yu, Lan; Liu, Fu-Tong; Boissy, Raymond E.

    2014-01-01

    Galectin-3 is a family member of the carbohydrate binding proteins widely expressed by many cell types and exhibits multiple cellular functions. We demonstrate that melanocytes express galectin-3, which is predominantly localized to the cell body peripherally along the Golgi zone. Downregulation of galectin-3 in human melanocytes using shRNA technology resulted in reduction of both melanin synthesis and expression/activity of Tyrp-1. In the cell body, galectin-3 co-localizes with melanosome destined cargo, specifically tyrosinase and tyrosinase-related protein-1. We studied melanocytes cultured from patients with forms of Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome containing defects in trafficking steps governed by BLOC-2 (HPS5), BLOC-3 (HPS1) and adaptin-3 (HPS2). We found galectin-3 expression mimicked the defective expression of the tyrosinase cargo in dendrites of HPS-5 melanocytes, but was not altered in HPS1 or HPS2 melanocytes. In addition, galectin-3 co-localized predominantly with the HPS-5 component of BLOC-2 in normal human melanocytes. These data indicate that galectin-3 is a regulatory component in melanin synthesis affecting the expression of Tyrp-1. PMID:25054620

  5. Phosphorylation Regulates the Endocytic Function of the Yeast Dynamin-Related Protein Vps1.

    PubMed

    Smaczynska-de Rooij, Iwona I; Marklew, Christopher J; Allwood, Ellen G; Palmer, Sarah E; Booth, Wesley I; Mishra, Ritu; Goldberg, Martin W; Ayscough, Kathryn R

    2015-12-28

    The family of dynamin proteins is known to function in many eukaryotic membrane fusion and fission events. The yeast dynamin-related protein Vps1 functions at several stages of membrane trafficking, including Golgi apparatus to endosome and vacuole, peroxisomal fission, and endocytic scission. We have previously shown that in its endocytic role, Vps1 functions with the amphiphysin heterodimer Rvs161/Rvs167 to facilitate scission and release of vesicles. Phosphoproteome studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have identified a phosphorylation site in Vps1 at serine 599. In this study, we confirmed this phosphorylation event, and we reveal that, like Rvs167, Vps1 can be phosphorylated by the yeast cyclin-associated kinase Pho85 in vivo and in vitro. The importance of this posttranslational modification was revealed when mutagenesis of S599 to a phosphomimetic or nonphosphorylatable form caused defects in endocytosis but not in other functions associated with Vps1. Mutation to nonphosphorylatable valine inhibited the Rvs167 interaction, while both S599V and S599D caused defects in vesicle scission, as shown by both live-cell imaging and electron microscopy of endocytic invaginations. Our data support a model in which phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of Vps1 promote distinct interactions and highlight the importance of such regulatory events in facilitating sequential progression of the endocytic process.

  6. Sites of interaction between aldolase and thrombospondin-related anonymous protein in plasmodium.

    PubMed

    Buscaglia, Carlos A; Coppens, Isabelle; Hol, Wim G J; Nussenzweig, Victor

    2003-12-01

    Gliding motility and host cell invasion by apicomplexan parasites are empowered by an acto-myosin motor located underneath the parasite plasma membrane. The motor is connected to host cell receptors through trans-membrane invasins belonging to the thrombospondin-related anonymous protein (TRAP) family. A recent study indicates that aldolase bridges the cytoplasmic tail of MIC2, the homologous TRAP protein in Toxoplasma, and actin. Here, we confirm these unexpected findings in Plasmodium sporozoites and identify conserved features of the TRAP family cytoplasmic tail required to bind aldolase: a subterminal tryptophan residue and two noncontiguous stretches of negatively charged amino acids. The aldolase substrate and other compounds that bind to the active site inhibit its interaction with TRAP and with F-actin, suggesting that the function of the motor is metabolically regulated. Ultrastructural studies in salivary gland sporozoites localize aldolase to the periphery of the secretory micronemes containing TRAP. Thus, the interaction between aldolase and the TRAP tail takes place during or preceding the biogenesis of the micronemes. The release of their contents in the anterior pole of the parasite upon contact with the target cells should bring simultaneously aldolase, TRAP and perhaps F-actin to the proper subcellular location where the motor is engaged.

  7. Toxicological relevance of the multidrug resistance protein 1, MRP1 (ABCC1) and related transporters.

    PubMed

    Leslie, E M; Deeley, R G; Cole, S P

    2001-10-05

    The 190 kDa multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1) is a founding member of a subfamily of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of transport proteins and was originally identified on the basis of its elevated expression in multidrug resistant lung cancer cells. In addition to its ability to confer resistance in tumour cells, MRP1 is ubiquitously expressed in normal tissues and is a primary active transporter of GSH, glucuronate and sulfate conjugated and unconjugated organic anions of toxicological relevance. Substrates include lipid peroxidation products, herbicides, tobacco specific nitrosamines, mycotoxins, heavy metals, and natural product and antifolate anti-cancer agents. MRP1 also transports unmodified xenobiotics but often requires GSH to do so. Active efflux is generally an important aspect of cellular detoxification since it prevents the accumulation of conjugated and unconjugated compounds that have the potential to be directly toxic. The related transporters MRP2 and MRP3 have overlapping substrate specificities with MRP1 but different tissue distributions, and evidence that they also have chemoprotective functions are discussed. Finally, MRP homologues have been described in other species including yeast and nematodes. Those isolated from the vascular plant Arabidopsis thaliana (AtMRPs) decrease the cytoplasmic concentration of conjugated toxins through sequestration in vacuoles and are implicated in providing herbicide resistance to plants.

  8. Electrochemical aptasensor for lung cancer-related protein detection in crude blood plasma samples.

    PubMed

    Zamay, Galina S; Zamay, Tatiana N; Kolovskii, Vasilii A; Shabanov, Alexandr V; Glazyrin, Yury E; Veprintsev, Dmitry V; Krat, Alexey V; Zamay, Sergey S; Kolovskaya, Olga S; Gargaun, Ana; Sokolov, Alexey E; Modestov, Andrey A; Artyukhov, Ivan P; Chesnokov, Nikolay V; Petrova, Marina M; Berezovski, Maxim V; Zamay, Anna S

    2016-10-03

    The development of an aptamer-based electrochemical sensor for lung cancer detection is presented in this work. A highly specific DNA-aptamer, LC-18, selected to postoperative lung cancer tissues was immobilized onto a gold microelectrode and electrochemical measurements were performed in a solution containing the redox marker ferrocyanide/ferricyanide. The aptamer protein targets were harvested from blood plasma of lung cancer patients by using streptavidin paramagnetic beads and square wave voltammetry of the samples was performed at various concentrations. In order to enhance the sensitivity of the aptasensor, silica-coated iron oxide magnetic beads grafted with hydrophobic C8 and C4 alkyl groups were used in a sandwich detection approach. Addition of hydrophobic beads increased the detection limit by 100 times. The detection limit of the LC-18 aptasensor was enhanced by the beads to 0.023 ng/mL. The formation of the aptamer - protein - bead sandwich on the electrode surface was visualized by electron microcopy. As a result, the electrochemical aptasensor was able to detect cancer-related targets in crude blood plasma of lung cancer patients.

  9. Haptoglobin (HP) and Haptoglobin-related protein (HPR) copy number variation, natural selection, and trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Hardwick, Robert J; Ménard, Anne; Sironi, Manuela; Milet, Jacqueline; Garcia, André; Sese, Claude; Yang, Fengtang; Fu, Beiyuan; Courtin, David; Hollox, Edward J

    2014-01-01

    Haptoglobin, coded by the HP gene, is a plasma protein that acts as a scavenger for free heme, and haptoglobin-related protein (coded by the HPR gene) forms part of the trypanolytic factor TLF-1, together with apolipoprotein L1 (ApoL1). We analyse the polymorphic small intragenic duplication of the HP gene, with alleles Hp1 and Hp2, in 52 populations, and find no evidence for natural selection either from extended haplotype analysis or from correlation with pathogen richness matrices. Using fiber-FISH, the paralog ratio test, and array-CGH data, we also confirm that the HPR gene is copy number variable, with duplication of the whole HPR gene at polymorphic frequencies in west and central Africa, up to an allele frequency of 15 %. The geographical distribution of the HPR duplication allele overlaps the region where the pathogen causing chronic human African trypanosomiasis, Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, is endemic. The HPR duplication has occurred on one SNP haplotype, but there is no strong evidence of extended homozygosity, a characteristic of recent natural selection. The HPR duplication shows a slight, non-significant undertransmission to human African trypanosomiasis-affected children of unaffected parents in the Democratic Republic of Congo. However, taken together with alleles of APOL1, there is an overall significant undertransmission of putative protective alleles to human African trypanosomiasis-affected children.

  10. Plasma soluble prion protein, a potential biomarker for sport-related concussions: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Pham, Nam; Akonasu, Hungbo; Shishkin, Rhonda; Taghibiglou, Changiz

    2015-01-01

    Sport-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) or concussion is a significant health concern to athletes with potential long-term consequences. The diagnosis of sport concussion and return to sport decision making is one of the greatest challenges facing health care clinicians working in sports. Blood biomarkers have recently demonstrated their potential in assisting the detection of brain injury particularly, in those cases with no obvious physical injury. We have recently discovered plasma soluble cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) as a potential reliable biomarker for blast induced TBI (bTBI) in a rodent animal model. In order to explore the application of this novel TBI biomarker to sport-related concussion, we conducted a pilot study at the University of Saskatchewan (U of S) by recruiting athlete and non-athlete 18 to 30 year-old students. Using a modified quantitative ELISA method, we first established normal values for the plasma soluble PrP(C) in male and female students. The measured plasma soluble PrP(C) in confirmed concussion cases demonstrated a significant elevation of this analyte in post-concussion samples. Data collected from our pilot study indicates that the plasma soluble PrP(C) is a potential biomarker for sport-related concussion, which may be further developed into a clinical diagnostic tool to assist clinicians in the assessment of sport concussion and return-to-play decision making.

  11. Initiation of zebrafish hematopoiesis by the TATA-box-binding protein-related factor, Trf3

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Daniel O.; Raha, Tamal; Lawson, Nathan D.; Green, Michael R.

    2007-01-01

    TATA-box-binding protein (TBP)-related factor 3, TRF3 (also called TBP2), is a vertebrate-specific member of the TBP family that has a conserved C-terminal region and DNA binding domain virtually identical to that of TBP1. TRF3 is highly expressed during embryonic development, and studies in zebrafish and Xenopus have shown that TRF3 is required for normal embryogenesis2,3. Here we show that Trf3-depleted zebrafish embryos exhibit multiple developmental defects and, in particular, fail to undergo hematopoiesis. Expression profiling for Trf3-dependent genes identified mespa, which encodes a transcription factor whose murine orthologue is required for mesoderm specification4, and chromatin immunoprecipitation verified that Trf3 binds to the mespa promoter. Depletion of Mespa resulted in developmental and hematopoietic defects strikingly similar to those induced by Trf3 depletion. Injection of mespa mRNA restored normal development to a Trf3-depleted embryo, indicating mespa is the single Trf3 target gene required for zebrafish embryogenesis. Zebrafish embryos depleted of Trf3 or Mespa also failed to express cdx4, a caudal-related gene required for hematopoiesis. Mespa binds to the cdx4 promoter, and epistasis analysis revealed an ordered trf3-mespa-cdx4 pathway. Thus, in zebrafish commitment of mesoderm to the hematopoietic lineage occurs through a transcription factor pathway initiated by a TBP-related factor. PMID:18046332

  12. Overexpression of a stress-responsive U-box protein gene VaPUB affects the accumulation of resistance related proteins in Vitis vinifera 'Thompson Seedless'.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Li; Zhang, Yali; Lu, Jiang

    2017-03-01

    Many U-box proteins have been identified and characterized as important factors against environmental stresses such as chilling, heat, salinity and pathogen attack in plant. Our previous research reported the cloning of a novel U-box protein gene VaPUB from Vitis amurensis 'Zuoshanyi' grape and suggested a function of it in related to cold stress in the model plant Arabidopsis system. In this study, the role of VaPUB in response to biotic and abiotic stress was further analyzed in the homologous grapevine system by studying the transcript regulation and the protein accumulation in VaPUB transgenic vines. The expression analysis assay shown that VaPUB was significantly up-regulated 6 h after cold treatment and as early as 2 h post inoculation with Plasmopara viticola, a pathogen causing downy mildew disease in grapevine. Over-expressing VaPUB in V. Vinifera 'Thompson Seedless' affected the microstructure of leaves. The proteome assay shown that the accumulation of pathogenesis-related protein PR10 and many proteins involved in carbon and energy metabolism, oxidation reaction and protein metabolism were significantly altered in transgenic vines. In comparison with wild type plants, the expression level of PR10 family genes was significantly decreased in VaPUB transgenic vines under P. viticola treatment or cold stress. Results from this study showed that the U-box protein gene PUB quickly responded to both biotic stress and abiotic stress and significantly influenced the accumulation of resistance related proteins in grapevine.

  13. Structural and Molecular Evolutionary Analysis of Agouti and Agouti-Related Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Pilgrim J.; Douglas, Nick R.; Chai, Biaoxin; Binkley, Jonathan; Sidow, Arend; Barsh, Gregory S.; Millhauser, Glenn L.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Agouti (ASIP) and Agouti-related protein (AgRP) are endogenous antagonists of melanocortin receptors that play critical roles in the regulation of pigmentation and energy balance, respectively, and which arose from a common ancestral gene early in vertebrate evolution. The N-terminal domain of ASIP facilitates antagonism by binding to an accessory receptor, but here we show that the N-terminal domain of AgRP has the opposite effect and acts as a prodomain that negatively regulates antagonist function. Computational analysis reveals similar patterns of evolutionary constraint in the ASIP and AgRP C-terminal domains, but fundamental differences between the N-terminal domains. These studies shed light on the relationships between regulation of pigmentation and body weight, and they illustrate how evolutionary structure function analysis can reveal both unique and common mechanisms of action for paralogous gene products. PMID:17185225

  14. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of human myotubularin-related protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Bong, Seoung Min; Yang, Seung Won; Choi, Ji-Woong; Kim, Seung Jun; Lee, Byung Il

    2015-01-01

    Myotubularin-related protein 1 is a phosphatase that dephosphorylates phospholipids such as phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate or phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate. In this study, human MTMR1 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized at 277 K using polyethylene glycol 20 000 as a precipitant. Diffraction data were collected to 2.0 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. The crystals belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 67.219, b = 96.587, c = 97.581 Å, α = 87.597, β = 86.072, γ = 77.327°. Assuming the presence of four molecules in the asymmetric unit, the calculated Matthews coefficient value was 2.61 Å3 Da−1 and the corresponding solvent content was 52.9%. PMID:25760698

  15. Actin-related proteins localized in the nucleus: from discovery to novel roles in nuclear organization.

    PubMed

    Oma, Yukako; Harata, Masahiko

    2011-01-01

    The actin family consists of conventional actin and actin-related proteins (ARPs), and the members show moderate similarity and share the same basal structure. Following the finding of various ARPs in the cytoplasm in the 1990s, multiple subfamilies that are localized predominantly in the nucleus were identified. Consistent with these cytological observations, subsequent biochemical analyses revealed the involvement of the nuclear ARPs in ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling and histone acetyltransferase complexes. In addition to their contribution to chromatin remodeling, recent studies have shown that nuclear ARPs have roles in the organization of the nucleus that are independent of the activity of the above-mentioned complexes. Therefore, nuclear ARPs are recognized as novel key regulators of genome function, and affect not only the remodeling of chromatin but also the spatial arrangement and dynamics of chromatin within the nucleus.

  16. Negative regulation of parathyroid hormone-related protein expression by steroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Kajitani, Takashi; Tamamori-Adachi, Mimi; Okinaga, Hiroko; Chikamori, Minoru; Iizuka, Masayoshi; Okazaki, Tomoki

    2011-04-15

    Elevated parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is responsible for humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy (HHM), which is of clinical significance in treatment of terminal patients with malignancies. Steroid hormones were known to cause suppression of PTHrP expression. However, detailed studies linking multiple steroid hormones to PTHrP expression are lacking. Here we studied PTHrP expression in response to steroid hormones in four cell lines with excessive PTHrP production. Our study established that steroid hormones negatively regulate PTHrP expression. Vitamin D receptor, estrogen receptor α, glucocorticoid receptor, and progesterone receptor, were required for repression of PTHrP expression by the cognate ligands. A notable exception was the androgen receptor, which was dispensable for suppression of PTHrP expression in androgen-treated cells. We propose a pathway(s) involving nuclear receptors to suppress PTHrP expression.

  17. Thioredoxin-related protein 32 (TRP32) specifically reduces oxidized phosphatase of regenerating liver (PRL).

    PubMed

    Ishii, Tasuku; Funato, Yosuke; Miki, Hiroaki

    2013-03-08

    PRL family constitutes a unique class of phosphatases associated with metastasis. The phosphatase activity of PRL has been reported to be important for promoting metastasis, and it is inactivated by reversible oxidation of its catalytic cysteine. Here, we show that TRP32 specifically reduces PRL. Reduction of oxidized PRL in cells is inhibited by 2,4-dinitro-1-chlorobenzene, an inhibitor of TRX reductase. In vitro assays for the reduction of PRL show that only TRP32 can potently reduce oxidized PRL, whereas other TRX-related proteins linked to TRX reductase show little or no reducing activity. Indeed, TRP32 knockdown significantly prolongs the H2O2-induced oxidation of PRL. Binding analyses reveal that the unique C-terminal domain of TRP32 is required and sufficient for its direct interaction with PRL. These results suggest that TRP32 maintains the reduced state of PRL and thus regulates the biological function of PRL.

  18. Mass Spectrometric Immunoassay for Parathyroid Hormone Related Protein (PTHrP)

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, K.; Rivera, J.D.; Vogel, J.S.; Buchholz, B.A.; Burton, D.W.; Deftos, L.J.; Herold, D.A.; Fitzgerald, R.L.

    2000-06-16

    Many cancers, including prostate, breast and lung express parathyroid hormone related protein (PTHrP). Despite the common tumor overexpression of PTHrP, serum levels of PTHrP are not commonly elevated in affected patients. They postulate that the reasons for the discrepancy between tissue and serum measurements of PTHrP are the inadequate sensitivity and specificity of current PTHrP serum assays. To improve the clinical value of PTHrP serum assays for the cancer patient, they are developing a new generation of novel and ultrasensitive PTHrP serum immunoassays based on immunoaffinity purification, nanospray liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS).

  19. Molecular Characterization, Antioxidant and Protein Solubility-Related Properties of Polyphenolic Compounds from Walnut (Juglans regia).

    PubMed

    Labuckas, Diana; Maestri, Damián; Lamarque, Alicia

    2016-05-01

    Aqueous ethanol extraction of partially defatted walnut flours provides a simple and reliable method to obtain extracts with high content of polyphenolic compounds. These were characterized by means of HPLC-ESI-MS/MS analytical techniques and molecular parameters. Considering the whole set of polyphenolic compounds identified, a high average number of phenolic-OH groups was found. Although these represent potential hydrogen-atom transfer sites, which are associated with high free-radical scavenging capacity, results show that such a property could be strongly limited by the low lipophilicity of polyphenols affecting the accessibility of these molecules to lipid substrates. Variations in pH values were found to change the ionization behavior of phenolic compounds. These changes, however, had minor effects on walnut protein solubility-related properties. The results obtained in this study highlight the importance of molecular characterization of walnut phenolic compounds in order to assess better their bioactive properties.

  20. Separation of human, bovine, and porcine insulins, three very closely related proteins, by micellar electrokinetic chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lamalle, Caroline; Roland, Diane; Crommen, Jacques; Servais, Anne-Catherine; Fillet, Marianne

    2015-10-01

    Human, bovine, and porcine insulins are small proteins with very closely related amino acid sequences, which makes their separation challenging. In this study, we took advantage of the high-resolution power of CE, and more particularly of micellar electrokinetic chromatography, to separate those biomolecules. Among several surfactants, perfluorooctanoic acid ammonium salt was selected. Then, using a design of experiments approach, the optimal BGE composition was found to consist of 50 mM ammonium acetate pH 9.0, 65 mM perfluorooctanoic acid ammonium salt, and 4% MeOH. The three insulins could be separated within 12 min with a satisfactory resolution. This method could be useful to detect possible counterfeit pharmaceutical formulations. Indeed, it would be easy to determine if human insulin was replaced by bovine or porcine insulin.

  1. COL18A1 is highly expressed during human adipocyte differentiation and the SNP c.1136C > T in its "frizzled" motif is associated with obesity in diabetes type 2 patients.

    PubMed

    Errera, Flavia I V; Canani, Luís H; Yeh, Erika; Kague, Erika; Armelin-Corrêa, Lucia M; Suzuki, Oscar T; Tschiedel, Balduíno; Silva, Maria Elizabeth R; Sertié, Andréa L; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2008-03-01

    Collagen XVIII can generate two fragments, NC11-728 containing a frizzled motif which possibly acts in Wnt signaling and Endostatin, which is cleaved from the NC1 and is a potent inhibitor of angiogenesis. Collagen XVIII and Wnt signaling have recently been associated with adipogenic differentiation and obesity in some animal models, but not in humans. In the present report, we have shown that COL18A1 expression increases during human adipogenic differentiation. We also tested if polymorphisms in the Frizzled (c.1136C>T; Thr379Met) and Endostatin (c.4349G>A; Asp1437Asn) regions contribute towards susceptibility to obesity in patients with type 2 diabetes (113 obese, BMI > or =30; 232 non-obese, BMI < 30) of European ancestry. No evidence of association was observed between the allele c.4349G>A and obesity, but we observed a significantly higher frequency of homozygotes c.1136TT in obese (19.5%) than in non-obese individuals (10.9%) [P = 0.02; OR = 2.0 (95%CI: 1.07-3.73)], suggesting that the allele c.1136T is associated to obesity in a recessive model. This genotype, after controlling for cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides, was independently associated with obesity (P = 0.048), and increases the chance of obesity in 2.8 times. Therefore, our data suggest the involvement of collagen XVIII in human adipogenesis and susceptibility to obesity.

  2. Molecular and Insecticidal Characterization of a Novel Cry-Related Protein from Bacillus Thuringiensis Toxic against Myzus persicae

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Leopoldo; Muñoz, Delia; Berry, Colin; Murillo, Jesús; Ruiz de Escudero, Iñigo; Caballero, Primitivo

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the insecticidal activity of a novel Bacillus thuringiensis Cry-related protein with a deduced 799 amino acid sequence (~89 kDa) and ~19% pairwise identity to the 95-kDa-aphidicidal protein (sequence number 204) from patent US 8318900 and ~40% pairwise identity to the cancer cell killing Cry proteins (parasporins Cry41Ab1 and Cry41Aa1), respectively. This novel Cry-related protein contained the five conserved amino acid blocks and the three conserved domains commonly found in 3-domain Cry proteins. The protein exhibited toxic activity against the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer) (Homopt