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Sample records for frontolimbic serotonin 2a

  1. Familial risk for mood disorder and the personality risk factor, neuroticism, interact in their association with frontolimbic serotonin 2A receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Frokjaer, Vibe G; Vinberg, Maj; Erritzoe, David; Baaré, William; Holst, Klaus Kähler; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Arfan, Haroon; Madsen, Jacob; Jernigan, Terry L; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Knudsen, Gitte Moos

    2010-04-01

    Life stress is a robust risk factor for later development of mood disorders, particularly for individuals at familial risk. Likewise, scoring high on the personality trait neuroticism is associated with an increased risk for mood disorders. Neuroticism partly reflects stress vulnerability and is positively correlated to frontolimbic serotonin 2A (5-HT(2A)) receptor binding. Here, we investigate whether neuroticism interacts with familial risk in relation to frontolimbic 5-HT(2A) receptor binding. Twenty-one healthy twins with a co-twin history of mood disorder and 16 healthy twins without a co-twin history of mood disorder were included. They answered self-report personality questionnaires and underwent [(18)F]altanserin positron emission tomography. We found a significant interaction between neuroticism and familial risk in predicting the frontolimbic 5-HT(2A) receptor binding (p=0.026) in an analysis adjusting for age and body mass index. Within the high-risk group only, neuroticism and frontolimbic 5-HT(2A) receptor binding was positively associated (p=0.0037). In conclusion, our data indicate that familial risk and neuroticism interact in their relation to frontolimbic 5-HT(2A) receptor binding. These findings point at a plausible neurobiological link between genetic and personality risk factors and vulnerability to developing mood disorders. It contributes to our understanding of why some people at high risk develop mood disorders while others do not. We speculate that an increased stress reactivity in individuals at high familial risk for mood disorders might enhance the effect of neuroticism in shaping the impact of potential environmental stress and thereby influence serotonergic neurotransmission.

  2. The 5-HT2A receptor and serotonin transporter in Asperger’s Disorder: a PET study with [11C]MDL 100907 and [11C]DASB

    PubMed Central

    Girgis, Ragy R.; Slifstein, Mark; Xu, Xiaoyan; Frankle, W. Gordon; Anagnostou, Evdokia; Wasserman, Stacey; Pepa, Lauren; Kolevzon, Alexander; Abi-Dargham, Anissa; Laruelle, Marc; Hollander, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Evidence from biochemical, imaging, and treatment studies suggest abnormalities of the serotonin system in autism spectrum disorders, in particular in frontolimbic areas of the brain. We used the radiotracers [11C]MDL 100907 and [11C]DASB to characterize the 5-HT2A receptor and serotonin transporter in Asperger’s Disorder. 17 individuals with Asperger’s Disorder (age = 34.3 ± 11.1 yr) and 17 healthy controls (age = 33.0 ± 9.6 yr) were scanned with [11C]MDL 100907. Of the 17 patients, eight (age = 29.7 ± 7.0 yr) were also scanned with [11C]DASB, as were eight healthy controls (age = 28.7 ± 7.0 yr). Patients with Asperger’s Disorder and healthy control subjects were matched for age, gender, and ethnicity, and all had normal intelligence. Metabolite-corrected arterial plasma inputs were collected and data analyzed by 2 tissue-compartment modeling. The primary outcome measure was regional binding potential BPND. Neither regional [11C]MDL 100907 BPND nor [11C]DASB BPND were statistically different between the Asperger’s and healthy subjects. This study failed to find significant alterations in binding parameters of 5-HT2A receptors and serotonin transporters in adult subjects with Asperger’s Disorder. PMID:22079057

  3. The 5-HT(2A) receptor and serotonin transporter in Asperger's disorder: A PET study with [¹¹C]MDL 100907 and [¹¹C]DASB.

    PubMed

    Girgis, Ragy R; Slifstein, Mark; Xu, Xiaoyan; Frankle, W Gordon; Anagnostou, Evdokia; Wasserman, Stacey; Pepa, Lauren; Kolevzon, Alexander; Abi-Dargham, Anissa; Laruelle, Marc; Hollander, Eric

    2011-12-30

    Evidence from biochemical, imaging, and treatment studies suggest abnormalities of the serotonin system in autism spectrum disorders, in particular in frontolimbic areas of the brain. We used the radiotracers [(11)C]MDL 100907 and [(11)C]DASB to characterize the 5-HT(2A) receptor and serotonin transporter in Asperger's Disorder. Seventeen individuals with Asperger's Disorder (age=34.3 ± 11.1 years) and 17 healthy controls (age=33.0 ± 9.6 years) were scanned with [(11)C]MDL 100907. Of the 17 patients, eight (age=29.7 ± 7.0 years) were also scanned with [¹¹C]DASB, as were eight healthy controls (age=28.7 ± 7.0 years). Patients with Asperger's Disorder and healthy control subjects were matched for age, gender, and ethnicity, and all had normal intelligence. Metabolite-corrected arterial plasma inputs were collected and data analyzed by two-tissue compartment modeling. The primary outcome measure was regional binding potential BP(ND). Neither regional [¹¹C]MDL 100907 BP(ND) nor [¹¹C]DASB BP(ND) was statistically different between the Asperger's and healthy subjects. This study failed to find significant alterations in binding parameters of 5-HT(2A) receptors and serotonin transporters in adult subjects with Asperger's disorder.

  4. Behavioral response to emotional stress in rabbits: role of serotonin and serotonin2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Aloyo, Vincent J; Dave, Kuldip D

    2007-11-01

    Exposure to a novel environment is a stressor which modulates behavior, increases stress hormones and enhances the release of several neurotransmitters including serotonin (5-HT). Exposing rabbits to a novel environment significantly increases head-bob behavior but fails to alter either grooming or wet dog shakes compared with those observed in the home-cage. The goal of this study was to determine the role of 5-HT and its receptors in mediating novelty-elicited head-bob behavior. Reduction of central 5-HT levels after treatment with the serotonergic neurotoxin 5,7-DHT significantly decreased novelty-elicited head bobs by 40% compared with those in sham-lesioned rabbits, indicating that 5-HT mediates, in part, this behavior. Additionally, pretreatment with the 5-HT1A partial agonist and clinically used anxiolytic buspirone also significantly attenuated novelty-elicited head bobs. Pretreatment with the selective 5-HT2A antagonist M 100,907 significantly reduced novel environment-elicited head bobs by 40%. Furthermore, agonist-induced reduction of cortical 5-HT2A receptor density resulted in a significant 40% reduction in the number of head bobs elicited by the novel environment. These data demonstrate that rabbit head-bob behavior, an index of the response to novelty stress, is mediated, in part, by 5-HT activation of 5-HT2A receptors.

  5. 5-HT2A SEROTONIN RECEPTOR BIOLOGY: Interacting proteins, kinases and paradoxical regulation

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Bryan L

    2011-01-01

    5-hydroxytryptamine2A (5-HT2A) serotonin receptors are important pharmacological targets for a large number of central nervous system and peripheral serotonergic medications. In this review article I summarize work mainly from my lab regarding serotonin receptor anatomy, pharmacology, signaling and regulation. I highlight the role of serotonin receptor interacting proteins and the emerging paradigm of G-protein coupled receptor functional selectivity. PMID:21288474

  6. Positive association between a DNA sequence variant in the serotonin 2A receptor gene and schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Inayama, Y.; Yoneda, H.; Sakai, T.

    1996-02-16

    Sixty-two patients with schizophrenia and 96 normal controls were investigated for genetic association with restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) in the serotonin receptor genes. A positive association between the serotonin 2A receptor gene (HTR2A) and schizophrenia was found, but not between schizophrenia and the serotonin 1A receptor gene. The positive association we report here would suggest that the DNA region with susceptibility to schizophrenia lies in the HTR2A on the long arm of chromosome 13. 15 refs., 2 tabs.

  7. Structure and variation of three canine genes involved in serotonin binding and transport: the serotonin receptor 1A gene (htr1A), serotonin receptor 2A gene (htr2A), and serotonin transporter gene (slc6A4).

    PubMed

    van den Berg, L; Kwant, L; Hestand, M S; van Oost, B A; Leegwater, P A J

    2005-01-01

    Aggressive behavior is the most frequently encountered behavioral problem in dogs. Abnormalities in brain serotonin metabolism have been described in aggressive dogs. We studied canine serotonergic genes to investigate genetic factors underlying canine aggression. Here, we describe the characterization of three genes of the canine serotonergic system: the serotonin receptor 1A and 2A gene (htr1A and htr2A) and the serotonin transporter gene (slc6A4). We isolated canine bacterial artificial chromosome clones containing these genes and designed oligonucleotides for genomic sequencing of coding regions and intron-exon boundaries. Golden retrievers were analyzed for DNA sequence variations. We found two nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the coding sequence of htr1A; one SNP close to a splice site in htr2A; and two SNPs in slc6A4, one in the coding sequence and one close to a splice site. In addition, we identified a polymorphic microsatellite marker for each gene. Htr1A is a strong candidate for involvement in the domestication of the dog. We genotyped the htr1A SNPs in 41 dogs of seven breeds with diverse behavioral characteristics. At least three SNP haplotypes were found. Our results do not support involvement of the gene in domestication.

  8. Serotonin 2a Receptor and Serotonin 1a Receptor Interact Within the Medial Prefrontal Cortex During Recognition Memory in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Morici, Juan F.; Ciccia, Lucia; Malleret, Gaël; Gingrich, Jay A.; Bekinschtein, Pedro; Weisstaub, Noelia V.

    2015-01-01

    Episodic memory, can be defined as the memory for unique events. The serotonergic system one of the main neuromodulatory systems in the brain appears to play a role in it. The serotonin 2a receptor (5-HT2aR) one of the principal post-synaptic receptors for 5-HT in the brain, is involved in neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders associated with memory deficits. Recognition memory can be defined as the ability to recognize if a particular event or item was previously encountered and is thus considered, under certain conditions, a form of episodic memory. As human data suggest that a constitutively decrease of 5-HT2A signaling might affect episodic memory performance we decided to compare the performance of mice with disrupted 5-HT2aR signaling (htr2a−/−) with wild type (htr2a+/+) littermates in different recognition memory and working memory tasks that differed in the level of proactive interference. We found that ablation of 5-HT2aR signaling throughout development produces a deficit in tasks that cannot be solved by single item strategy suggesting that 5-HT2aR signaling is involved in interference resolution. We also found that in the absence of 5-HT2aR signaling serotonin has a deleterious effect on recognition memory retrieval through the activation of 5-HT1aR in the medial prefrontal cortex. PMID:26779016

  9. Fronto-limbic effective connectivity as possible predictor of antidepressant response to SSRI administration.

    PubMed

    Vai, Benedetta; Bulgarelli, Chiara; Godlewska, Beata R; Cowen, Philip J; Benedetti, Francesco; Harmer, Catherine J

    2016-12-01

    The timely selection of the optimal treatment for depressed patients is critical to improve remission rates. The detection of pre-treatment variables able to predict differential treatment response may provide novel approaches for treatment selection. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) modulate the fronto-limbic functional response and connectivity, an effect preceding the overt clinical antidepressant effects. Here we investigated whether the cortico-limbic connectivity associated with emotional bias measured before SSRI administration predicts the efficacy of antidepressant treatment in MDD patients. fMRI and Dynamic Causal Modeling (DCM) were combined to study if effective connectivity might differentiate healthy controls (HC) and patients affected by major depression who later responded (RMDD, n=21), or failed to respond (nRMDD, n=12), to 6 weeks of escitalopram administration. Sixteen DCMs exploring connectivity between anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC), Amygdala (Amy), and fusiform gyrus (FG) were constructed. Analyses revealed that nRMDD had reduced endogenous connectivity from Amy to VLPFC and to ACC, with an increased connectivity and modulation of the ACC to Amy connectivity when processing of fearful emotional stimuli compared to HC. RMDD and HC did not significantly differ among themselves. Pre-treatment effective connectivity in fronto-limbic circuitry could be an important factor affecting antidepressant response, and highlight the mechanisms which may be involved in recovery from depression. These results suggest that fronto-limbic connectivity might provide a neural biomarker to predict the clinical outcome to SSRIs administration in major depression.

  10. Hallucinogens and Serotonin 5-HT2A Receptor-Mediated Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    López-Giménez, Juan F; González-Maeso, Javier

    2017-07-05

    The neuropsychological effects of naturally occurring psychoactive chemicals have been recognized for millennia. Hallucinogens, which include naturally occurring chemicals such as mescaline and psilocybin, as well as synthetic compounds, such as lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), induce profound alterations of human consciousness, emotion, and cognition. The discovery of the hallucinogenic effects of LSD and the observations that LSD and the endogenous ligand serotonin share chemical and pharmacological profiles led to the suggestion that biogenic amines like serotonin were involved in the psychosis of mental disorders such as schizophrenia. Although they bind other G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) subtypes, studies indicate that several effects of hallucinogens involve agonist activity at the serotonin 5-HT2A receptor. In this chapter, we review recent advances in understanding hallucinogen drug action through characterization of structure, neuroanatomical location, and function of the 5-HT2A receptor.

  11. Insights into the regulation of 5-HT2A serotonin receptors by scaffolding proteins and kinases.

    PubMed

    Allen, John A; Yadav, Prem N; Roth, Bryan L

    2008-11-01

    5-HT(2A) serotonin receptors are essential molecular targets for the actions of LSD-like hallucinogens and atypical antipsychotic drugs. 5-HT(2A) serotonin receptors also mediate a variety of physiological processes in peripheral and central nervous systems including platelet aggregation, smooth muscle contraction, and the modulation of mood and perception. Scaffolding proteins have emerged as important regulators of 5-HT(2A) receptors and our recent studies suggest multiple scaffolds exist for 5-HT(2A) receptors including PSD95, arrestin, and caveolin. In addition, a novel interaction has emerged between p90 ribosomal S6 kinase and 5-HT(2A) receptors which attenuates receptor signaling. This article reviews our recent studies and emphasizes the role of scaffolding proteins and kinases in the regulation of 5-HT(2A) trafficking, targeting and signaling.

  12. Lack of association between serotonin-2A receptor gene (HTR2A) polymorphisms and tardive dyskinesia in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Basile, V S; Ozdemir, V; Masellis, M; Meltzer, H Y; Lieberman, J A; Potkin, S G; Macciardi, F M; Petronis, A; Kennedy, J L

    2001-03-01

    Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is a disabling neurological side effect associated with long-term treatment with typical antipsychotics. Family studies and animal models lend evidence for hereditary predisposition to TD. The newer atypical antipsychotics pose a minimal risk for TD which is in part attributed to their ability to block the serotonin-2A (5-HT(2A)) receptor. 5-HT(2A) receptors were also identified in the basal ganglia; a brain region that plays a critical role in antipsychotic-induced movement disorders. We tested the significance of variation in the 5-HT(2A) receptor gene (HTR2A) in relation to the TD phenotype. Three polymorphisms in HTR2A, one silent (C102T), one that alters the amino acid sequence (his452tyr) and one in the promoter region (A-1437G) were investigated in 136 patients refractory or intolerant to treatment with typical antipsychotics and with a DSM-IIIR diagnosis of schizophrenia. We did not find any significant difference in allele, genotype or haplotype frequencies of polymorphisms in HTR2A among patients with or without TD (P > 0.05). Further analysis using the ANCOVA statistic with a continuous measure of the TD phenotype (Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale (AIMS) score) found that the AIMS scores were not significantly influenced by HTR2A polymorphisms, despite controlling for potential confounders such as age, gender and ethnicity (P > 0.05). Theoretically, central serotonergic function can be subject to genetic control at various other mechanistic levels including the rate of serotonin synthesis (tryptophane hydroxylase gene), release, reuptake (serotonin transporter gene) and degradation (monoamine oxidase gene). Analyses of these other serotonergic genes are indicated. In summary, polymorphisms in HTR2A do not appear to influence the risk for TD. Further studies evaluating in tandem multiple candidate genes relevant for the serotonergic system are warranted to dissect the genetic basis of the complex TD phenotype.

  13. Serotonin, but not N-Methyltryptamines, activates the Serotonin 2A Receptor via a βarrestin2/Src/Akt signaling complex in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Cullen L.; Bohn, Laura M.

    2010-01-01

    Hallucinogens mediate many of their psychoactive effects by activating serotonin 2A receptors (5-HT2AR). While serotonin is the cognate endogenous neurotransmitter and is not considered hallucinogenic, metabolites of serotonin also have high affinity at 5-HT2AR and can induce hallucinations in humans. Here we report that serotonin differs from the psychoactive N-methyltryptamines by its ability to engage a βarrestin2-mediated signaling cascade in the frontal cortex. Serotonin and 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan (5-HTP) induce a head twitch response in wild-type (WT) mice which is a behavioral proxy for 5-HT2AR activation. The response in βarrestin2 knockout (βarr2-KO) mice is greatly attenuated until the doses are elevated, at which point, βarr2-KO mice display a head twitch response that can exceed that of WT mice. Direct administration of N-methyltryptamines also produces a greater response in βarr2-KO mice. Moreover, the inhibition of N-methyltransferase blocks 5-HTP-induced head twitches in βarr2-KO mice indicating that N-methyltrypatmines, rather than serotonin, primarily mediate this response. Biochemical studies demonstrate that serotonin stimulates Akt phosphorylation in the frontal cortex and in primary cortical neurons through the activation of a βarrestin2/PI3-K/Src/Akt cascade, while N-methyltryptamines do not. Further, disruption of any of the components of this cascade prevents 5-HTP-, but not N-methyltryptamine-induced, head twitches. We propose that there is a bifurcation of 5-HT2AR signaling that is neurotransmitter- and βarrestin2-dependent. This demonstration of agonist-directed 5-HT2AR signaling in vivo, may significantly impact drug discovery efforts for the treatment of disorders wherein hallucinations are part of the etiology, such as schizophrenia, or manifest as side effects of treatment, such as depression. PMID:20926677

  14. Similar serotonin-2A receptor binding in rats with different coping styles or levels of aggression.

    PubMed

    Visser, Anniek K D; Ettrup, Anders; Klein, Anders B; van Waarde, Aren; Bosker, Fokko J; Meerlo, Peter; Knudsen, Gitte M; de Boer, Sietse F

    2015-04-01

    Individual differences in coping style emerge as a function of underlying variability in the activation of a mesocorticolimbic brain circuitry. Particularly serotonin seems to play an important role. For this reason, we assessed serotonin-2A receptor (5-HT2A R) binding in the brain of rats with different coping styles. We compared proactive and reactive males of two rat strains, Wild-type Groningen (WTG) and Roman high- and low avoidance (RHA, RLA). 5-HT2A R binding in (pre)frontal cortex (FC) and hippocampus was investigated using a radiolabeled antagonist ([(3) H]MDL-100907) and agonist ([(3) H]Cimbi-36) in binding assays. No differences in 5-HT2A R binding were observed in male animals with different coping styles. [(3) H]MDL-100907 displayed a higher specific-to-nonspecific binding ratio than [(3) H]Cimbi-36. Our findings suggest that in these particular rat strains, 5-HT2A R binding is not an important molecular marker for coping style. Because neither an antagonist nor an agonist tracer showed any binding differences, it is unlikely that the affinity state of the 5-HT2A R is co-varying with levels of aggression or active avoidance in WTG, RHA and RLA. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Sleep deprivation increases cerebral serotonin 2A receptor binding in humans.

    PubMed

    Elmenhorst, David; Kroll, Tina; Matusch, Andreas; Bauer, Andreas

    2012-12-01

    Serotonin and its cerebral receptors play an important role in sleep-wake regulation. The aim of the current study is to investigate the effect of 24-h total sleep deprivation on the apparent serotonin 2A receptor (5-HT(2A)R) binding capacity in the human brain to test the hypothesis that sleep deprivation induces global molecular alterations in the cortical serotonergic receptor system. Volunteers were tested twice with the subtype-selective radiotracer [(18)F]altanserin and positron emission tomography (PET) for imaging of 5-HT(2A)Rs at baseline and after 24 h of sleep deprivation. [(18)F]Altanserin binding potentials were analyzed in 13 neocortical regions of interest. The efficacy of sleep deprivation was assessed by questionnaires, waking electroencephalography, and cognitive performance measurements. Sleep laboratory and neuroimaging center. Eighteen healthy volunteers. Sleep deprivation. A total of 24 hours of sleep deprivation led to a 9.6% increase of [(18)F]altanserin binding on neocortical 5-HT(2A) receptors. Significant region-specific increases were found in the medial inferior frontal gyrus, insula, and anterior cingulate, parietal, sensomotoric, and ventrolateral prefrontal cortices. This study demonstrates that a single night of total sleep deprivation causes significant increases of 5-HT(2A)R binding potentials in a variety of cortical regions although the increase declines as sleep deprivation continued. It provides in vivo evidence that total sleep deprivation induces adaptive processes in the serotonergic system of the human brain.

  16. Sleep Deprivation Increases Cerebral Serotonin 2A Receptor Binding in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Elmenhorst, David; Kroll, Tina; Matusch, Andreas; Bauer, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: Serotonin and its cerebral receptors play an important role in sleep-wake regulation. The aim of the current study is to investigate the effect of 24-h total sleep deprivation on the apparent serotonin 2A receptor (5-HT2AR) binding capacity in the human brain to test the hypothesis that sleep deprivation induces global molecular alterations in the cortical serotonergic receptor system. Design: Volunteers were tested twice with the subtype-selective radiotracer [18F]altanserin and positron emission tomography (PET) for imaging of 5-HT2ARs at baseline and after 24 h of sleep deprivation. [18F]Altanserin binding potentials were analyzed in 13 neocortical regions of interest. The efficacy of sleep deprivation was assessed by questionnaires, waking electroencephalography, and cognitive performance measurements. Setting: Sleep laboratory and neuroimaging center. Patients or Participants: Eighteen healthy volunteers. Interventions: Sleep deprivation. Measurements and Results: A total of 24 hours of sleep deprivation led to a 9.6% increase of [18F]altanserin binding on neocortical 5-HT2A receptors. Significant region-specific increases were found in the medial inferior frontal gyrus, insula, and anterior cingulate, parietal, sensomotoric, and ventrolateral prefrontal cortices. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that a single night of total sleep deprivation causes significant increases of 5-HT2AR binding potentials in a variety of cortical regions although the increase declines as sleep deprivation continued. It provides in vivo evidence that total sleep deprivation induces adaptive processes in the serotonergic system of the human brain. Citation: Elmenhorst D; Kroll T; Matusch A; Bauer A. Sleep Deprivation Increases Cerebral Serotonin 2A Receptor Binding in Humans. SLEEP 2012;35(12):1615-1623. PMID:23204604

  17. Serotonin-2A homodimers are needed for signalling via both phospholipase A2 and phospholipase C in transfected CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Alba; Cimadevila, Marta; Cadavid, María Isabel; Loza, María Isabel; Brea, José

    2017-04-05

    Different ligands differentially activate phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and phospholipase C (PLC) signalling pathways that are coupled to the serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptor, a class-A G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR). The serotonin 5-HT2A receptor has been shown to be expressed as a homodimer displaying some ligands negative cooperativity between protomers in the PLA2 signalling pathway. We hypothesized that the homodimeric complex is the minimum functional unit required for activation of the PLA2 and PLC pathways by the serotonin 5-HT2A receptor. To investigate this hypothesis, we partially blocked the serotonin 5-HT2A receptors with ritanserin and measured PLA2 and PLC activity simultaneously. We subsequently added the competitive antagonist spiperone to release the inactivator through a crosstalk mechanism and thus allow the dimer to return to a reactive state. Partial inactivation of the homodimer by ritanserin binding decreased the activity of the receptor by 59±13% and 70±4% in the PLA2 and PLC pathways respectively (P<0.001), with no difference in the potency of the serotonin (5-HT) was observed. The subsequent binding of spiperone released ritanserin due to the crosstalk between protomers and recovery of the receptor activity to 74±7% and 72±4%. Negative cooperativity between protomers in the dimer was maintained during arachidonic acid (AA) release after blocking ritanserin, as indicated by the biphasic inhibition curves for clozapine over 1μM serotonin (5-HT) in these conditions. These findings provide evidence that serotonin 5-HT2A receptors must be expressed as homodimers in order to activate both the PLA2 and PLC signalling pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Adult spinal V2a interneurons show increased excitability and serotonin-dependent bistability.

    PubMed

    Husch, Andreas; Dietz, Shelby B; Hong, Diana N; Harris-Warrick, Ronald M

    2015-02-15

    In mice, most studies of the organization of the spinal central pattern generator (CPG) for locomotion, and its component neuron classes, have been performed on neonatal [postnatal day (P)2-P4] animals. While the neonatal spinal cord can generate a basic locomotor pattern, it is often argued that the CPG network is in an immature form whose detailed properties mature with postnatal development. Here, we compare intrinsic properties and serotonergic modulation of the V2a class of excitatory spinal interneurons in behaviorally mature (older than P43) mice to those in neonatal mice. Using perforated patch recordings from genetically tagged V2a interneurons, we revealed an age-dependent increase in excitability. The input resistance increased, the rheobase values decreased, and the relation between injected current and firing frequency (F/I plot) showed higher excitability in the adult neurons, with almost all neurons firing tonically during a current step. The adult action potential (AP) properties became narrower and taller, and the AP threshold hyperpolarized. While in neonates the AP afterhyperpolarization was monophasic, most adult V2a interneurons showed a biphasic afterhyperpolarization. Serotonin increased excitability and depolarized most neonatal and adult V2a interneurons. However, in ∼30% of adult V2a interneurons, serotonin additionally elicited spontaneous intrinsic membrane potential bistability, resulting in alternations between hyperpolarized and depolarized states with a dramatically decreased membrane input resistance and facilitation of evoked plateau potentials. This was never seen in younger animals. Our findings indicate a significant postnatal development of the properties of locomotor-related V2a interneurons, which could alter their interpretation of synaptic inputs in the locomotor CPG.

  19. Cannabinoid 2 receptor- and beta Arrestin 2-dependent upregulation of serotonin 2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Franklin, J M; Vasiljevik, T; Prisinzano, T E; Carrasco, G A

    2013-07-01

    Recent evidence suggests that cannabinoid receptor agonists may regulate serotonin 2A (5-HT(2A)) receptor neurotransmission in the brain, although no molecular mechanism has been identified. Here, we present experimental evidence that sustained treatment with a non-selective cannabinoid agonist (CP55,940) or selective CB2 receptor agonists (JWH133 or GP1a) upregulate 5-HT(2A) receptors in a neuronal cell line. Furthermore, this cannabinoid receptor agonist-induced upregulation of 5-HT(2A) receptors was prevented in cells stably transfected with either CB2 or β-Arrestin 2 shRNA lentiviral particles. Additionally, inhibition of clathrin-mediated endocytosis also prevented the cannabinoid receptor-induced upregulation of 5-HT(2A) receptors. Our results indicate that cannabinoid agonists might upregulate 5-HT(2A) receptors by a mechanism that requires CB2 receptors and β-Arrestin 2 in cells that express both CB2 and 5-HT(2A) receptors. 5-HT(2A) receptors have been associated with several physiological functions and neuropsychiatric disorders such as stress response, anxiety and depression, and schizophrenia. Therefore, these results might provide a molecular mechanism by which activation of cannabinoid receptors might be relevant to some cognitive and mood disorders in humans.

  20. Serotonin 2A Receptor Gene Polymorphism in Korean Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Soo-Churl; Kim, Boong-Nyun; Kim, Jae-Won; Yoo, Hee-Jeong; Hwang, Jun-Won; Cho, Dae-Yeon; Chung, Un-Sun; Park, Tae-Won

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between the T102C polymorphism in the serotonin 2A receptor gene and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in Korean patients. Methods A total of 189 Korean children with ADHD as well as both parents of the ADHD children and 150 normal children participated in this study. DNA was extracted from blood samples from all of the subjects, and genotyping was conducted. Based on the allele and genotype information obtained, case-control analyses were performed to compare the ADHD and normal children, and Transmission disequilibrium tests (TDTs) were used for family-based association testing (number of trios=113). Finally, according to the significant finding which was showed in the case-control analyses, the results of behavioral characterastics and neuropsychological test were compared between ADHD children with and without the C allele. Results In the case-control analyses, statistically significant differences were detected in the frequencies of genotypes containing the C allele (χ2=4.73, p=0.030). In the family-based association study, TDTs failed to detect linkage disequilibrium of the T102C polymorphism associated with ADHD children. In the ADHD children, both the mean reaction time and the standard deviation of the reaction time in the auditory continuous performance test were longer in the group with the C allele compared to the group without the C allele. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that there is a significant genetic association between the T102C polymorphism in the serotonin 2A receptor gene and ADHD in Korean children. PMID:22993527

  1. Activation, internalization, and recycling of the serotonin 2A receptor by dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Samarjit; Raote, Ishier; Bhattacharya, Aditi; Miledi, Ricardo; Panicker, Mitradas M.

    2006-01-01

    Serotonergic and dopaminergic systems, and their functional interactions, have been implicated in the pathophysiology of various CNS disorders. Here, we use recombinant serotonin (5-HT) 2A (5-HT2A) receptors to further investigate direct interactions between dopamine and 5-HT receptors. Previous studies in Xenopus oocytes showed that dopamine, although not the cognate ligand for the 5-HT2A receptor, acts as a partial-efficacy agonist. At micromolar concentrations, dopamine also acts as a partial-efficacy agonist on 5-HT2A receptors in HEK293 cells. Like 5-HT, dopamine also induces receptor-internalization in these cells, although at significantly higher concentrations than 5-HT. Interestingly, if the receptors are first sensitized or “primed” by subthreshold concentrations of 5-HT, then dopamine-induced internalization occurs at concentrations ≈10-fold lower than when dopamine is used alone. Furthermore, unlike 5-HT-mediated internalization, dopamine-mediated receptor internalization, alone, or after sensitization by 5-HT, does not depend on PKC. Dopamine-internalized receptors recycle to the surface at rates similar to those of 5-HT-internalized receptors. Our results suggest a previously uncharacterized role for dopamine in the direct activation and internalization of 5-HT2A receptors that may have clinical relevance to the function of serotonergic systems in anxiety, depression, and schizophrenia and also to the treatment of these disorders. PMID:17005723

  2. Lysergic acid diethylamide-induced Fos expression in rat brain: role of serotonin-2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Gresch, P J; Strickland, L V; Sanders-Bush, E

    2002-01-01

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) produces altered mood and hallucinations in humans and binds with high affinity to serotonin-2A (5-HT(2A)) receptors. Although LSD interacts with other receptors, the activation of 5-HT(2A) receptors is thought to mediate the hallucinogenic properties of LSD. The goal of this study was to identify the brain sites activated by LSD and to determine the influence of 5-HT(2A) receptors in this activation. Rats were pretreated with the 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist MDL 100907 (0.3 mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle 30 min prior to LSD (500 microg/kg, i.p.) administration and killed 3 h later. Brain tissue was examined for Fos protein expression by immunohistochemistry. LSD administration produced a five- to eight-fold increase in Fos-like immunoreactivity in medial prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and central nucleus of amygdala. However, in dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens no increase in Fos-like immunoreactivity was observed. Pretreatment with MDL 100907 completely blocked LSD-induced Fos-like immunoreactivity in medial prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex, but only partially blocked LSD-induced Fos-like immunoreactivity in amygdala. Double-labeled immunohistochemistry revealed that LSD did not induce Fos-like immunoreactivity in cortical cells expressing 5-HT(2A) receptors, suggesting an indirect activation of cortical neurons. These results indicate that the LSD activation of medial prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex is mediated by 5-HT(2A) receptors, whereas in amygdala 5-HT(2A) receptor activation is a component of the response. These findings support the hypothesis that the medial prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and perhaps the amygdala, are important regions involved in the production of hallucinations. Copyright 2002 IBRO

  3. 5-HT2A receptor antagonist M100907 reduces serotonin synthesis: An autoradiographic study

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Shu; Fikre-Merid, Maraki; Diksic, Mirko

    2013-01-01

    The effects of the administration of the serotonin (5-HT)2A antagonist, M100907, on 5-HT synthesis rates, were evaluated using the α-[14C]methyl-L-tryptophan (α-MTrp) autoradiographic method. In the treatment study, M100907 (10 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally 30 min before the α-MTrp injection (30 μCi over 2 min). A single dose of M100907 caused a significant decrease in the synthesis in the anterior olfactory nucleus, accumbens nucleus, frontal cortex, sensory-motor cortex, cingulate cortex, medial caudate-putamen, dorsal thalamus, substantia nigra, inferior collicus, raphe magnus nucleus, superior olive, and raphe pallidus nucleus. These data suggest that the terminal 5-HT2A receptors are involved in the regulation of 5-HT synthesis in the entire brain. Further, 5-HT synthesis is likely regulated by the 5-HT2A antagonistic property of M100907 in the cortices, anterior olfactory nucleus, caudate putamen, and nucleus accumbens. PMID:22056993

  4. Adenosine preferentially suppresses serotonin2A receptor-enhanced excitatory postsynaptic currents in layer V neurons of the rat medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Stutzmann, G E; Marek, G J; Aghajanian, G K

    2001-01-01

    Serotonin induces 'spontaneous' (non-electrically evoked) excitatory postsynaptic currents in layer V pyramidal neurons in the prefrontal cortex. This is likely due to a serotonin2A receptor-mediated focal release of glutamate onto apical dendrites. In addition, activation of the serotonin2A receptor selectively enhances late components of electrically evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents. In this study, using in vitro intracellular and whole-cell recording in rat brain slices, we examined the role of adenosine in modulating serotonin2A-enhanced 'spontaneous' and electrically evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents in layer V pyramidal neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex. Adenosine and N6-cyclopentyladenosine, an A1 adenosine agonist, markedly suppressed the serotonin2A-induced ('spontaneous') excitatory postsynaptic currents. However, adenosine had no effect on spontaneous miniature (tetrodotoxin-insensitive) postsynaptic potentials. Adenosine also blocked the late excitatory postsynaptic currents induced by the serotonin2A/2C agonist R(-)-2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine hydrochloride. Surprisingly, in contrast to other regions, adenosine had a relatively small effect on electrically evoked fast excitatory postsynaptic currents. These findings represent a novel demonstration of adenosine's ability to preferentially modulate serotonin2A-mediated synaptic events in the medial prefrontal cortex. As the serotonin2A receptor is closely linked with the effects of atypical antipsychotics and hallucinogens, further understanding of the modulators of this receptor such as adenosine may provide useful therapeutic applications.

  5. Effects of serotonin 2A/1A receptor stimulation on social exclusion processing

    PubMed Central

    Preller, Katrin H.; Pokorny, Thomas; Hock, Andreas; Kraehenmann, Rainer; Stämpfli, Philipp; Seifritz, Erich; Scheidegger, Milan; Vollenweider, Franz X.

    2016-01-01

    Social ties are crucial for physical and mental health. However, psychiatric patients frequently encounter social rejection. Moreover, an increased reactivity to social exclusion influences the development, progression, and treatment of various psychiatric disorders. Nevertheless, the neuromodulatory substrates of rejection experiences are largely unknown. The preferential serotonin (5-HT) 2A/1A receptor agonist, psilocybin (Psi), reduces the processing of negative stimuli, but whether 5-HT2A/1A receptor stimulation modulates the processing of negative social interactions remains unclear. Therefore, this double-blind, randomized, counterbalanced, cross-over study assessed the neural response to social exclusion after the acute administration of Psi (0.215 mg/kg) or placebo (Pla) in 21 healthy volunteers by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and resting-state magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Participants reported a reduced feeling of social exclusion after Psi vs. Pla administration, and the neural response to social exclusion was decreased in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and the middle frontal gyrus, key regions for social pain processing. The reduced neural response in the dACC was significantly correlated with Psi-induced changes in self-processing and decreased aspartate (Asp) content. In conclusion, 5-HT2A/1A receptor stimulation with psilocybin seems to reduce social pain processing in association with changes in self-experience. These findings may be relevant to the normalization of negative social interaction processing in psychiatric disorders characterized by increased rejection sensitivity. The current results also emphasize the importance of 5-HT2A/1A receptor subtypes and the Asp system in the control of social functioning, and as prospective targets in the treatment of sociocognitive impairments in psychiatric illnesses. PMID:27091970

  6. Effects of serotonin 2A/1A receptor stimulation on social exclusion processing.

    PubMed

    Preller, Katrin H; Pokorny, Thomas; Hock, Andreas; Kraehenmann, Rainer; Stämpfli, Philipp; Seifritz, Erich; Scheidegger, Milan; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2016-05-03

    Social ties are crucial for physical and mental health. However, psychiatric patients frequently encounter social rejection. Moreover, an increased reactivity to social exclusion influences the development, progression, and treatment of various psychiatric disorders. Nevertheless, the neuromodulatory substrates of rejection experiences are largely unknown. The preferential serotonin (5-HT) 2A/1A receptor agonist, psilocybin (Psi), reduces the processing of negative stimuli, but whether 5-HT2A/1A receptor stimulation modulates the processing of negative social interactions remains unclear. Therefore, this double-blind, randomized, counterbalanced, cross-over study assessed the neural response to social exclusion after the acute administration of Psi (0.215 mg/kg) or placebo (Pla) in 21 healthy volunteers by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and resting-state magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Participants reported a reduced feeling of social exclusion after Psi vs. Pla administration, and the neural response to social exclusion was decreased in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and the middle frontal gyrus, key regions for social pain processing. The reduced neural response in the dACC was significantly correlated with Psi-induced changes in self-processing and decreased aspartate (Asp) content. In conclusion, 5-HT2A/1A receptor stimulation with psilocybin seems to reduce social pain processing in association with changes in self-experience. These findings may be relevant to the normalization of negative social interaction processing in psychiatric disorders characterized by increased rejection sensitivity. The current results also emphasize the importance of 5-HT2A/1A receptor subtypes and the Asp system in the control of social functioning, and as prospective targets in the treatment of sociocognitive impairments in psychiatric illnesses.

  7. Polymorphism in the Serotonin Receptor 2a (HTR2A) Gene as Possible Predisposal Factor for Aggressive Traits

    PubMed Central

    Banlaki, Zsofia; Elek, Zsuzsanna; Nanasi, Tibor; Szekely, Anna; Nemoda, Zsofia; Sasvari-Szekely, Maria; Ronai, Zsolt

    2015-01-01

    Aggressive manifestations and their consequences are a major issue of mankind, highlighting the need for understanding the contributory factors. Still, aggression-related genetic analyses have so far mainly been conducted on small population subsets such as individuals suffering from a certain psychiatric disorder or a narrow-range age cohort, but no data on the general population is yet available. In the present study, our aim was to identify polymorphisms in genes affecting neurobiological processes that might explain some of the inter-individual variation between aggression levels in the non-clinical Caucasian adult population. 55 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were simultaneously determined in 887 subjects who also filled out the self-report Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire (BPAQ). Single marker association analyses between genotypes and aggression scores indicated a significant role of rs7322347 located in the HTR2A gene encoding serotonin receptor 2a following Bonferroni correction for multiple testing (p = 0.0007) both for males and females. Taking the four BPAQ subscales individually, scores for Hostility, Anger and Physical Aggression showed significant association with rs7322347 T allele in themselves, while no association was found with Verbal Aggression. Of the subscales, relationship with rs7322347 was strongest in the case of Hostility, where statistical significance virtually equaled that observed with the whole BPAQ. In conclusion, this is the first study to our knowledge analyzing SNPs in a wide variety of genes in terms of aggression in a large sample-size non-clinical adult population, also describing a novel candidate polymorphism as predisposal to aggressive traits. PMID:25658328

  8. The role of serotonin 5-HT2A receptors in memory and cognition

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gongliang; Stackman, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin 5-HT2A receptors (5-HT2ARs) are widely distributed in the central nervous system, especially in brain region essential for learning and cognition. In addition to endogenous 5-HT, several hallucinogens, antipsychotics, and antidepressants function by targeting 5-HT2ARs. Preclinical studies show that 5-HT2AR antagonists have antipsychotic and antidepressant properties, whereas agonist ligands possess cognition-enhancing and hallucinogenic properties. Abnormal 5-HT2AR activity is associated with a number of psychiatric disorders and conditions, including depression, schizophrenia, and drug addiction. In addition to its traditional activity as a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), recent studies have defined novel operations of 5-HT2ARs. Here we review progress in the (1) receptor anatomy and biology: distribution, signaling, polymerization and allosteric modulation; and (2) receptor functions: learning and memory, hallucination and spatial cognition, and mental disorders. Based on the recent progress in basic research on the 5-HT2AR, it appears that post-training 5-HT2AR activation enhances non-spatial memory consolidation, while pre-training 5-HT2AR activation facilitates fear extinction. Further, the potential influence that 5-HT2AR-elicited visual hallucinations may have on visual cue (i.e., landmark) guided spatial cognition is discussed. We conclude that the development of selective 5-HT2AR modulators to target distinct signaling pathways and neural circuits represents a new possibility for treating emotional, neuropsychiatric, and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26500553

  9. Expression and Function of Serotonin 2A and 2B Receptors in the Mammalian Respiratory Network

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Uwe R.; Bischoff, Anna-Maria; Kron, Miriam; Bock, Nathalie; Manzke, Till

    2011-01-01

    Neurons of the respiratory network in the lower brainstem express a variety of serotonin receptors (5-HTRs) that act primarily through adenylyl cyclase. However, there is one receptor family including 5-HT2A, 5-HT2B, and 5-HT2C receptors that are directed towards protein kinase C (PKC). In contrast to 5-HT2ARs, expression and function of 5-HT2BRs within the respiratory network are still unclear. 5-HT2BR utilizes a Gq-mediated signaling cascade involving calcium and leading to activation of phospholipase C and IP3/DAG pathways. Based on previous studies, this signal pathway appears to mediate excitatory actions on respiration. In the present study, we analyzed receptor expression in pontine and medullary regions of the respiratory network both at the transcriptional and translational level using quantitative RT-PCR and self-made as well as commercially available antibodies, respectively. In addition we measured effects of selective agonists and antagonists for 5-HT2ARs and 5-HT2BRs given intra-arterially on phrenic nerve discharges in juvenile rats using the perfused brainstem preparation. The drugs caused significant changes in discharge activity. Co-administration of both agonists revealed a dominance of the 5-HT2BR. Given the nature of the signaling pathways, we investigated whether intracellular calcium may explain effects observed in the respiratory network. Taken together, the results of this study suggest a significant role of both receptors in respiratory network modulation. PMID:21789169

  10. Serotonin receptor gene (HTR2A) T102C polymorphism modulates individuals' perspective taking ability and autistic-like traits.

    PubMed

    Gong, Pingyuan; Liu, Jinting; Blue, Philip R; Li, She; Zhou, Xiaolin

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that empathic traits, such as perspective taking, are associated with the levels of serotonin in the brain and with autism spectrum conditions. Inspired by the finding that the serotonin receptor 2A gene (HTR2A) modulates the availability of serotonin, this study investigated to what extent HTR2A modulates individuals' perspective taking ability and autistic-like traits. To examine the associations of the functional HTR2A polymorphism T102C (rs6313) with individuals' perspective taking abilities and autistic-like traits, we differentiated individuals according to this polymorphism and measured empathic and autistic-like traits with Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI) and Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ) scale in 523 Chinese people. The results indicated that this polymorphism was significantly associated with the scores on Perspective Taking and Personal Distress subscales of IRI, and Communication subscale of AQ. Individuals with a greater number of the C alleles were less likely to spontaneously adopt the point of view of others, more likely to be anxious when observing the pain endured by others, and more likely to have communication problems. Moreover, the genotype effect on communication problems was mediated by individuals' perspective taking ability. These findings provide evidence that the HTR2A T102C polymorphism is a predictor of individual differences in empathic and autistic-like traits and highlight the role of the gene in the connection between perspective taking and autistic-like traits.

  11. Serotonin receptor gene (HTR2A) T102C polymorphism modulates individuals’ perspective taking ability and autistic-like traits

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Pingyuan; Liu, Jinting; Blue, Philip R.; Li, She; Zhou, Xiaolin

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that empathic traits, such as perspective taking, are associated with the levels of serotonin in the brain and with autism spectrum conditions. Inspired by the finding that the serotonin receptor 2A gene (HTR2A) modulates the availability of serotonin, this study investigated to what extent HTR2A modulates individuals’ perspective taking ability and autistic-like traits. To examine the associations of the functional HTR2A polymorphism T102C (rs6313) with individuals’ perspective taking abilities and autistic-like traits, we differentiated individuals according to this polymorphism and measured empathic and autistic-like traits with Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI) and Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ) scale in 523 Chinese people. The results indicated that this polymorphism was significantly associated with the scores on Perspective Taking and Personal Distress subscales of IRI, and Communication subscale of AQ. Individuals with a greater number of the C alleles were less likely to spontaneously adopt the point of view of others, more likely to be anxious when observing the pain endured by others, and more likely to have communication problems. Moreover, the genotype effect on communication problems was mediated by individuals’ perspective taking ability. These findings provide evidence that the HTR2A T102C polymorphism is a predictor of individual differences in empathic and autistic-like traits and highlight the role of the gene in the connection between perspective taking and autistic-like traits. PMID:26557070

  12. The antidepressant 5-HT2A receptor antagonists pizotifen and cyproheptadine inhibit serotonin-enhanced platelet function.

    PubMed

    Lin, Olivia A; Karim, Zubair A; Vemana, Hari Priya; Espinosa, Enma V P; Khasawneh, Fadi T

    2014-01-01

    There is considerable interest in defining new agents or targets for antithrombotic purposes. The 5-HT2A receptor is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) expressed on many cell types, and a known therapeutic target for many disease states. This serotonin receptor is also known to regulate platelet function. Thus, in our FDA-approved drug repurposing efforts, we investigated the antiplatelet activity of cyproheptadine and pizotifen, two antidepressant 5-HT2A Receptor antagonists. Our results revealed that cyproheptadine and pizotifen reversed serotonin-enhanced ADP-induced platelet aggregation in vitro and ex vivo. And the inhibitory effects of these two agents were found to be similar to that of EMD 281014, a 5-HT2A Receptor antagonist under development. In separate experiments, our studies revealed that these 5-HT2A receptor antagonists have the capacity to reduce serotonin-enhanced ADP-induced elevation in intracellular calcium levels and tyrosine phosphorylation. Using flow cytometry, we also observed that cyproheptadine, pizotifen, and EMD 281014 inhibited serotonin-enhanced ADP-induced phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure, P-selectin expression, and glycoprotein IIb-IIIa activation. Furthermore, using a carotid artery thrombosis model, these agents prolonged the time for thrombotic occlusion in mice in vivo. Finally, the tail-bleeding time was investigated to assess the effect of cyproheptadine and pizotifen on hemostasis. Our findings indicated prolonged bleeding time in both cyproheptadine- and pizotifen-treated mice. Notably, the increases in occlusion and bleeding times associated with these two agents were comparable to that of EMD 281014, and to clopidogrel, a commonly used antiplatelet drug, again, in a fashion comparable to clopidogrel and EMD 281014. Collectively, our data indicate that the antidepressant 5-HT2A antagonists, cyproheptadine and pizotifen do exert antiplatelet and thromboprotective effects, but similar to clopidogrel and EMD 281014, their

  13. Detection of new biased agonists for the serotonin 5-HT2A receptor: modeling and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Martí-Solano, Maria; Iglesias, Alba; de Fabritiis, Gianni; Sanz, Ferran; Brea, José; Loza, M Isabel; Pastor, Manuel; Selent, Jana

    2015-04-01

    Detection of biased agonists for the serotonin 5-HT2A receptor can guide the discovery of safer and more efficient antipsychotic drugs. However, the rational design of such drugs has been hampered by the difficulty detecting the impact of small structural changes on signaling bias. To overcome these difficulties, we characterized the dynamics of ligand-receptor interactions of known biased and balanced agonists using molecular dynamics simulations. Our analysis revealed that interactions with residues S5.46 and N6.55 discriminate compounds with different functional selectivity. Based on our computational predictions, we selected three derivatives of the natural balanced ligand serotonin and experimentally validated their ability to act as biased agonists. Remarkably, our approach yielded compounds promoting an unprecedented level of signaling bias at the 5-HT2A receptor, which could help interrogate the importance of particular pathways in conditions like schizophrenia.

  14. Effects of serotonin-2A receptor binding and gender on personality traits and suicidal behavior in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Soloff, Paul H; Chiappetta, Laurel; Mason, Neale Scott; Becker, Carl; Price, Julie C

    2014-06-30

    Impulsivity and aggressiveness are personality traits associated with a vulnerability to suicidal behavior. Behavioral expression of these traits differs by gender and has been related to central serotonergic function. We assessed the relationships between serotonin-2A receptor function, gender, and personality traits in borderline personality disorder (BPD), a disorder characterized by impulsive-aggression and recurrent suicidal behavior. Participants, who included 33 BPD patients and 27 healthy controls (HC), were assessed for Axis I and II disorders with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV and the International Personality Disorders Examination, and with the Diagnostic Interview for Borderline Patients-Revised for BPD. Depressed mood, impulsivity, aggression, and temperament were assessed with standardized measures. Positron emission tomography with [(18)F]altanserin as ligand and arterial blood sampling was used to determine the binding potentials (BPND) of serotonin-2A receptors in 11 regions of interest. Data were analyzed using Logan graphical analysis, controlling for age and non-specific binding. Among BPD subjects, aggression, Cluster B co-morbidity, antisocial PD, and childhood abuse were each related to altanserin binding. BPND values predicted impulsivity and aggression in BPD females (but not BPD males), and in HC males (but not HC females.) Altanserin binding was greater in BPD females than males in every contrast, but it did not discriminate suicide attempters from non-attempters. Region-specific differences in serotonin-2A receptor binding related to diagnosis and gender predicted clinical expression of aggression and impulsivity. Vulnerability to suicidal behavior in BPD may be related to serotonin-2A binding through expression of personality risk factors.

  15. Involvement of local serotonin-2A but not serotonin-1B receptors in the reinforcing effects of ethanol within the posterior ventral tegmental area of female Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zheng-Ming; Toalston, Jamie E.; Oster, Scott M.; McBride, William J.; Rodd, Zachary A.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Previous studies indicated that ethanol could be self-infused into the posterior ventral tegmental area (p-VTA) and that activation of local serotonin-3 (5-HT3) receptors was involved. 5-HT1B and 5-HT2A receptors are involved in the effects of 5-HT and ethanol on VTA dopamine neurons. Objective The current study used the intracranial self-administration (ICSA) procedure to determine the involvement of local 5-HT1B and 5-HT2A receptors in the self-infusion of ethanol into the p-VTA. Materials and methods Female Wistar rats were implanted unilaterally with a guide cannula aimed at the p-VTA. Seven days after surgery, rats were placed into the two-lever operant conditioning chambers for ICSA tests. The tests consisted of four acquisition sessions with self-infusion of 200 mg% ethanol alone, two or three sessions with co-infusion of the 5-HT1B antagonist GR 55562 (10, 100, or 200 μM) or the 5-HT2A antagonist R-96544 (10, 100, or 200 μM) with 200 mg% ethanol, and one final session with 200 mg% ethanol alone. Results During the acquisition sessions, all rats readily self-infused ethanol and discriminated the active from inactive lever. Co-infusion of GR 55562, at all three doses, had no effect on the self-infusion of ethanol. In contrast, co-infusion of R-96544, at the two higher doses, attenuated responding on the active lever for ethanol infusion (p<0.05). Conclusion The results suggest that the reinforcing effects of ethanol within the p-VTA are modulated, at least in part, by activation of local 5-HT2A, but not 5-HT1B, receptors. PMID:19165471

  16. Circannual variations in the binding of [3H]lysergic acid diethylamide to serotonin2A receptors and of [3H]paroxetine to serotonin uptake sites in platelets from healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Spigset, O; Allard, P; Mjörndal, T

    1998-05-15

    Circannual variations occur in several serotonergic parameters, including platelet serotonin uptake and platelet [3H]imipramine binding. Binding of [3H]lysergic acid diethylamide ([3H]LSD) to platelet serotonin (5-HT)2A receptors and binding of [3H]paroxetine to platelet serotonin uptake sites were studied longitudinally for 1 year in 12 healthy volunteers. For [3H]LSD, the number of binding sites (Bmax) showed no significant seasonal variation (two-way analysis of variance), although Bmax was significantly higher during the months October through February than during the months April through August (32.6 vs. 29.8 fmol/mg protein; p = .015). For [3H]paroxetine, Bmax showed a significant seasonal variation (p = .003) with maximum in August (1322 fmol/mg protein) and minimum in February (1168 fmol/mg protein). The affinity constant (Kd) showed a significant seasonal variation for [3H]LSD binding (p = .046), but not for [3H]paroxetine binding. The seasonal fluctuations in [3H]LSD binding and in paroxetine binding tended to be inversely correlated for Bmax (r = -.70; p = .08) and were significantly negatively correlated for Kd (r = -.88; p = .009). The present study demonstrates a seasonal effect on platelet serotonin uptake site binding and indicates a possible seasonal effect on 5-HT2A receptor binding. The results imply that circannual fluctuations should be taken into account when these platelet serotonin markers are studied.

  17. Antidepressant, Antipsychotic, and Hallucinogen Drugs for the Treatment of Psychiatric Disorders: A Convergence at the Serotonin-2A Receptor.

    PubMed

    Howland, Robert H

    2016-07-01

    Antidepressant, atypical antipsychotic, and hallucinogen drugs mediate their actions in part by interactions with the serotonin-2A (5HT2A) receptor. Serotonergic hallucinogen drugs, such as psilocybin, bind most potently as agonists at the 5HT2A receptor, producing profound changes in perception, mood, and cognition. Some of these drugs have been or are currently being investigated in small Phase 2 studies for depression, alcoholism, smoking cessation, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder. However, unlike the synergistic effects of combining antidepressant and atypical antipsychotic drugs, the potential therapeutic effects of hallucinogen drugs may be attenuated by the concurrent use of these medications because antidepressant and atypical antipsychotic drugs desensitize and/or down-regulate 5HT2A receptors. This finding has important implications for optimizing the potential therapeutic use of hallucinogen drugs in psychiatry. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 54(7), 21-24.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. 5-HT2A Serotonin Receptor Density in Adult Male Rats’ Hippocampus after Morphine-based Conditioned Place Preference

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Rabie; Jahanshahi, Mehrdad; Jameie, Seyed Behnamedin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: A close interaction exists between the brain opioid and serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmitter systems. Brain neurotransmitter 5-HT plays an important role in the regulation of reward-related processing. However, a few studies have investigated the potential role of 5-HT2A receptors in this behavior. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess the influence of morphine and Conditioned Place Preference (CPP) on the density of 5-HT2A receptor in neurons of rat hippocampal formation. Methods: Morphine (10 mg/kg, IP) was injected in male Wistar rats for 7 consecutive days (intervention group), but control rats received just normal saline (1 mL/kg, IP). We used a hotplate test of analgesia to assess induction of tolerance to analgesic effects of morphine on days 1 and 8 of injections. Later, two groups of rats were sacrificed one day after 7 days of injections, their whole brains removed, and the striatum and PFC immediately dissected. Then, the NR1 gene expression was examined with a semi-quantitative RT-PCR method. Results: Our data showed that the maximum response was obtained with 2.5 mg/kg of morphine. The density of 5-HT2A receptor in different areas of the hippocampus increased significantly at sham-morphine and CPP groups (P<0.05). On the other hand, the CPP groups had more 5-HT2A receptors than sham-morphine groups and also the sham-morphine groups had more 5-HT2A receptors than the control groups. Conclusion: We concluded that the phenomenon of conditioned place preference induced by morphine can cause a significant increase in the number of serotonin 5-HT2A receptors in neurons of all areas of hippocampus. PMID:27563418

  19. Internalization and recycling of 5-HT2A receptors activated by serotonin and protein kinase C-mediated mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Samarjit; Puri, Sapna; Miledi, Ricardo; Panicker, Mitradas M.

    2002-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT), a major neurotransmitter, has a large number of G protein-coupled receptors in mammals. On activation by exposure to their ligand, 5-HT2 receptor subtypes increase IP3 levels and undergo desensitization and internalization. To visualize the receptor in cells during these processes, we have constructed a 5-HT2A-enhanced GFP (SR2-GFP) fusion receptor. We show that this fusion receptor undergoes internalization on exposure to its natural ligand, 5-HT. Because 5-HT2A receptors activate the phospholipase C pathway, we studied the effect of protein kinase C (PKC) on the internalization process and found that activation of PKC by its specific activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, in the absence of 5-HT, leads to internalization of the receptor. Moreover, inhibition of PKC by its inhibitor sphingosine in the presence of 5-HT prevents the internalization process, suggesting that activation of PKC is sufficient and necessary for the internalization of 5-HT2A receptors. We also show that SR2-GFP recycles back to the plasma membrane after 5-HT-dependent internalization, suggesting a mechanism for resensitization. In addition, receptors that have been internalized on addition of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate in the absence of 5-HT also recycle to the surface, with a time course similar to that seen after activation of the receptors by 5-HT. Our study suggests that 5-HT2A receptors internalize and return to the surface after both serotonin- and PKC-mediated processes. This study reveals a role for PKC in receptor internalization and also shows that 5-HT2A receptors are recycled. PMID:12388782

  20. Escitalopram reduces attentional performance in anxious older adults with high-expression genetic variants at serotonin 2A and 1B receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lenze, Eric J.; Dixon, David; Nowotny, Petra; Lotrich, Francis E.; Doré, Peter M.; Pollock, Bruce G.; Hinrichs, Anthony L.; Butters, Meryl A.

    2014-01-01

    Older adults are among the most vulnerable to adverse cognitive effects of psychotropic medications and, therefore, the personalization of psychotropic treatment based on adverse drug reactions in this demographic is of great importance. We examined changes on neuropsychological tests of attention attributable to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment in anxious older adults. We also examined whether variation in serotonin receptor genes was associated with reduced attentional performance with SSRIs. We examined change from pre- to post-treatment in two attention measures – digit span and coding – in 133 adults aged ≥60 yr with generalized anxiety disorder in a 12-wk trial of escitalopram vs. placebo. We also examined attentional change in relation to genetic variability in four central serotonin receptors: the serotonin transporter and serotonin 1A, 2A and 1B receptors. Digit span scores were significantly lowered in patients receiving escitalopram relative to placebo, indicating reduced attentional performance attributable to the SSRI. Individuals with high-transcription variants in the receptors 5-HTR2A rs6311 and 5-HTR1B rs11568817 had greater reductions in attention with SSRI treatment compared to placebo. We conclude that SSRIs reduce attention in older adults, particularly in those with high-expression genetic variants at the serotonin 2A and 1B receptors. Analysing neuropsychological changes with SSRIs in relation to genetic variation in the serotonin system may be a useful strategy for detecting subgroups of older adults who are more susceptible to side-effects of SSRIs. These results, if confirmed, could lead to the personalization of SSRI use to reduce adverse neurocognitive effects. PMID:22717018

  1. Escitalopram reduces attentional performance in anxious older adults with high-expression genetic variants at serotonin 2A and 1B receptors.

    PubMed

    Lenze, Eric J; Dixon, David; Nowotny, Petra; Lotrich, Francis E; Doré, Peter M; Pollock, Bruce G; Hinrichs, Anthony L; Butters, Meryl A

    2013-03-01

    Older adults are among the most vulnerable to adverse cognitive effects of psychotropic medications and, therefore, the personalization of psychotropic treatment based on adverse drug reactions in this demographic is of great importance. We examined changes on neuropsychological tests of attention attributable to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment in anxious older adults. We also examined whether variation in serotonin receptor genes was associated with reduced attentional performance with SSRIs. We examined change from pre- to post-treatment in two attention measures - digit span and coding - in 133 adults aged ≥60 yr with generalized anxiety disorder in a 12-wk trial of escitalopram vs. placebo. We also examined attentional change in relation to genetic variability in four central serotonin receptors: the serotonin transporter and serotonin 1A, 2A and 1B receptors. Digit span scores were significantly lowered in patients receiving escitalopram relative to placebo, indicating reduced attentional performance attributable to the SSRI. Individuals with high-transcription variants in the receptors 5-HTR2A rs6311 and 5-HTR1B rs11568817 had greater reductions in attention with SSRI treatment compared to placebo. We conclude that SSRIs reduce attention in older adults, particularly in those with high-expression genetic variants at the serotonin 2A and 1B receptors. Analysing neuropsychological changes with SSRIs in relation to genetic variation in the serotonin system may be a useful strategy for detecting subgroups of older adults who are more susceptible to side-effects of SSRIs. These results, if confirmed, could lead to the personalization of SSRI use to reduce adverse neurocognitive effects.

  2. Adolescent anabolic-androgenic steroid exposure alters lateral anterior hypothalamic serotonin-2A receptors in aggressive male hamsters.

    PubMed

    Schwartzer, Jared J; Ricci, Lesley A; Melloni, Richard H

    2009-05-16

    Chronic anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS) treatment during adolescence facilitates offensive aggression in male Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus). Serotonin (5-HT) modulates aggressive behavior and has been shown to be altered after chronic treatment with AAS. Furthermore, 5-HT type 2 receptors have been implicated in the control of aggression. For example, treatment with 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonists suppress the generation of the offensive aggressive phenotype. However, it is unclear whether these receptors are sensitive to adolescent AAS exposure. The current study assessed whether treatment with AAS throughout adolescence influenced the immunohistochemical localization of 5-HT(2A) in areas of the hamster brain implicated in the control of aggression. Hamsters were administered AAS (5.0 mg/kg) each day throughout adolescence, scored for offensive aggression, and then examined for differences in 5-HT(2A)-immunoreactivity (5-HT(2A)-ir). When compared with non-aggressive oil-treated controls, aggressive AAS-treated hamsters showed significant increases in 5-HT(2A)-ir fibers in the lateral portion of the anterior hypothalamus (LAH). Further analysis revealed that AAS treatment also produced a significant increase in the number of cells expressing 5-HT(2A)-ir in the LAH. Together, these results support a role for altered 5-HT(2A) expression and further implicate the LAH as a central brain region important in the control of adolescent AAS-induced offensive aggression.

  3. Binding of [(3)H]lysergic acid diethylamide to serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptors and of [(3)H]paroxetine to serotonin uptake sites in platelets from healthy children, adolescents and adults.

    PubMed

    Sigurdh, J; Spigset, O; Allard, P; Mjörndal, T; Hägglöf, B

    1999-11-01

    Possible age effects on binding of [(3)H]lysergic acid diethylamide ([(3)H]LSD) to serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptors and of [(3)H]paroxetine to serotonin uptake sites were studied in platelets from healthy children (11-12 years of age), adolescents (16-17 years of age) and adults. Significant overall age effects were found both for the number of binding sites (B(max)) for [(3)H]LSD binding (p < 0.001), the affinity constant (K(d)) for [(3)H]LSD binding (p < 0.001), B(max) for [(3)H]paroxetine binding (p < 0.001) and K(d) for [(3)H] paroxetine binding (p = 0.006). In general, there was a decrease in B(max) with increasing age, which predominantly occurred between the ages 11-12 years and 16-17 years for the 5-HT(2A) receptor, and after 16-17 years of age for the serotonin uptake site. These developmental changes might have an impact on the effect of treatment with serotonergic drugs in children and adolescents. When the platelet serotonin variables investigated are employed in studies in children or adolescents, age matching or, alternatively, introduction of age control in the statistical analysis should be performed.

  4. Fronto-limbic volumetric changes in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Malykhin, Nikolai V; Carter, Rawle; Hegadoren, Kathleen M; Seres, Peter; Coupland, Nicholas J

    2012-02-01

    Fronto-limbic dysregulation in major depressive disorder (MDD) may be influenced by early life stress and antidepressant treatment. The present structural MRI study aimed to determine the relationship between amygdala, cingulate and subgenual prefrontal cortex volumes in MDD and their associations with child abuse and antidepressants. Right-handed subjects (21-50 years), meeting DSM-IV criteria for MDD, either with (n=19) or without (n=20) childhood sexual or physical abuse. Healthy controls (n=34) were matched for age, sex, education and smoking. 3D-MPRAGE images with a spatial resolution of 1.5 mm×1.0 mm×1.0 mm were acquired with a Siemens Sonata 1.5 T system. Volumes of subgenual prefrontal cortex, amygdala and affective, cognitive, superior and posterior divisions of cingulate cortex were analyzed using DISPLAY software using reliable volumetric protocols. Groups were compared using ANCOVA, with intracranial volume as a covariate. MDD subjects had low cingulate (cognitive division) and high amygdala volumes. Low cingulate volume was related to abuse and treatment history. Amygdala volume was predicted by subgenual prefrontal and cingulate (cognitive division) volumes and the presence of paracingulate cortex. This study was cross sectional and the sample size was limited for subgroup and correlational analyses. Our data suggest that MDD may be associated with alterations in anterior cingulate cortex and amygdala. Morphological variation, early stress and stress-protective factors may contribute to differences in fronto-limbic structures in MDD. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Lower cortical serotonin 2A receptors in major depressive disorder, suicide and in rats after administration of imipramine.

    PubMed

    Dean, Brian; Tawadros, Nahed; Seo, Myoung Suk; Jeon, Won Je; Everall, Ian; Scarr, Elizabeth; Gibbons, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    We have attempted to replicate studies showing higher levels of serotonin 2A receptors (HTR2A) in the cortex of people with mood disorders and to determine the effects of treating rats with antidepressant drugs on levels of that receptor. In situ [3H]ketanserin binding and autoradiography was used to measure levels of HTR2A in Brodmann's area (BA) 46 and 24 from people with major depressive disorders (MDD, n = 16), bipolar disorders (BD, n = 14) and healthy controls (n = 14) as well as the central nervous system (CNS) of rats (20 per treatment arm) treated for 10 or 28 d with fluoxetine (10 mg/kg/d) or imipramine (20 mg/kg/d). Compared with controls, HTR2A were lower in BA 24, but not BA 46, from people with MDD (p = 0.005); HTR2A were not changed in BD. Levels of HTR2A were lower in BA 24 (p = 0.007), but not BA 46, from people who had died by suicide. Finally, levels of HTR2A were lower in the CNS of rats treated with imipramine, but not fluoxetine, for 28 d, but not 10 d. From our current and previous data we conclude cortical HTR2A are lower in schizophrenia, MDD, people with mood disorders who died by suicide, rats treated with some antipsychotic or some antidepressant drugs. As levels of cortical HTR2A can be affected by the aetiologies of different disorders and mechanisms of action of different drugs, a better understanding of how such changes can occur needs to be elucidated.

  6. Serotonin 5-HT2A receptor gene variants influence antidepressant response to repeated total sleep deprivation in bipolar depression.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Francesco; Barbini, Barbara; Bernasconi, Alessandro; Fulgosi, Mara Cigala; Colombo, Cristina; Dallaspezia, Sara; Gavinelli, Chiara; Marino, Elena; Pirovano, Adele; Radaelli, Daniele; Smeraldi, Enrico

    2008-12-12

    5-HT2A receptor density in prefrontal cortex was associated with depression and suicide. 5-HT2A receptor gene polymorphism rs6313 was associated with 5-HT2A receptor binding potential, with the ability of individuals to use environmental support in order to prevent depression, and with sleep improvement after antidepressant treatment with mirtazapine. Studies on response to antidepressant drugs gave inconsistent results. Here we studied the effect of rs6313 on response to repeated total sleep deprivation (TSD) in 80 bipolar depressed inpatients treated with three consecutive TSD cycles (each one made of 36 h awake followed by a night of undisturbed sleep). All genotype groups showed comparable acute effects of the first TSD, but patients homozygotes for the T variant had better perceived and observed benefits from treatment than carriers of the C allele. These effects became significant after the first recovery night and during the following days, leading to a 36% higher final response rate (Hamilton depression rating<8). The higher density of postsynaptic excitatory 5-HT2A receptors in T/T homozygotes could have led to higher behavioural effects of increased 5-HT neurotransmission due to repeated TSD. Other possible mechanisms involve allostatic/homeostatic adaptation to sleep loss, and a different effect of the allele variants on epigenetic influences. Results confirm the interest for individual gene variants of the serotonin pathway in shaping clinical characteristics of depression and antidepressant response.

  7. Association Study of a Serotonin Receptor 2A Gene -1438A/G Polymorphism and Anxiety-Related Traits

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kye-Hyun; Woo, Hee-Yeon

    2008-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the -1438A/G polymorphism of serotonin receptor 2A (5HTR2A) and anxiety-related traits in Korean adolescent females. Methods A total of 174 Korean adolescent females were tested for the -1438A/G polymorphism of 5HTR2A using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods. Anxiety-related traits were evaluated using the Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI) and the trait form of the Spielberg State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (T-STAI). Results There was no difference between the genotypes with respect to scores pertaining to anxiety-related traits. Although the G allele carriers (GG or AG genotype) scored lower on the psychological subscale of the ASI (4.76±3.00 vs 5.98±4.00, p=0.038), this difference was not significant after Bonferroni correction. Conclusion These findings suggest that the -1438A/G polymorphism of 5HTR2A might not be associated with anxiety sensitivity or trait anxiety. PMID:20046345

  8. Converging translational evidence for the involvement of the serotonin 2A receptor gene in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Petit, Anne-Cécile; Quesseveur, Gaël; Gressier, Florence; Colle, Romain; David, Denis J; Gardier, Alain M; Ferreri, Florian; Lépine, Jean-Pierre; Falissard, Bruno; Verstuyft, Céline; Guiard, Bruno P; Corruble, Emmanuelle

    2014-10-03

    An association between serotonin 2A receptor (5-HT2AR), encoded by HTR2A gene, and major depressive disorder (MDD) has been suggested. Here, we combined preclinical and ecological clinical approaches to explore the impact of impaired 5-HT2AR-mediated transmission on MDD or anxio-depressive-like phenotype in mice. Htr2a knock-out mice (Htr2a(-/-)) and wild-type mice were compared for the ability of chronic corticosterone to elicit some anxio-depressive-like phenotype in three behavioral paradigms (elevated plus maze, tail suspension test and splash test). Accordingly, two single nucleotide polymorphisms of the HTR2A gene (rs6314 ie His452Tyr and rs6313 ie 102C/T), which specific allelic variants may decrease 5-HT2AR-mediated transmission (as in Htr2a(-/-)mice), were studied in a sample of 485 Caucasian patients with MDD. In response to chronic corticosterone exposure, Htr2a(-/-) mice displayed more pronounced anxiodepressive-like phenotype than wild-type mice, as shown by a significant higher "emotionality score" (p<0.01). In patients, the C allele of rs6313 was more frequent in depressed patients (p=0.019) and was also associated with a more severe major depressive episode (p=0.03). This translational and ecological study involving constitutive Htr2a(-/-) knock-out mice and related SNPs in depressed patients suggests that a lower neurotransmission at the 5-HT2AR may favor the susceptibility and severity of MDE. It also suggests that specific allelic variants of the rs6313 and rs6314 may reduce 5-HT2AR-mediated transmission.

  9. mRNA Expression and DNA Methylation Analysis of Serotonin Receptor 2A (HTR2A) in the Human Schizophrenic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Cheah, Sern-Yih; Lawford, Bruce R.; Young, Ross McD.; Morris, Charles P.; Voisey, Joanne

    2017-01-01

    Serotonin receptor 2A (HTR2A) is an important signalling factor implicated in cognitive functions and known to be associated with schizophrenia. The biological significance of HTR2A in schizophrenia remains unclear as molecular analyses including genetic association, mRNA expression and methylation studies have reported inconsistent results. In this study, we examine HTR2A expression and methylation and the interaction with HTR2A polymorphisms to identify their biological significance in schizophrenia. Subjects included 25 schizophrenia and 25 control post-mortem brain samples. Genotype and mRNA data was generated by transcriptome sequencing. DNA methylation profiles were generated for CpG sites within promoter-exon I region. Expression, genotype and methylation data were examined for association with schizophrenia. HTR2A mRNA levels were reduced by 14% (p = 0.006) in schizophrenia compared to controls. Three CpG sites were hypermethylated in schizophrenia (cg5 p = 0.028, cg7 p = 0.021, cg10 p = 0.017) and HTR2A polymorphisms rs6314 (p = 0.008) and rs6313 (p = 0.026) showed genetic association with schizophrenia. Differential DNA methylation was associated with rs6314 and rs6313. There was a strong correlation between HTR2A DNA methylation and mRNA expression. The results were nominally significant but did not survive the rigorous Benjamini-Hochberg correction for multiple testing. Differential HTR2A expression in schizophrenia in our study may be the result of the combined effect of multiple differentially methylated CpG sites. Epigenetic HTR2A regulation may alter brain function, which contributes to the development of schizophrenia. PMID:28054990

  10. mRNA Expression and DNA Methylation Analysis of Serotonin Receptor 2A (HTR2A) in the Human Schizophrenic Brain.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Sern-Yih; Lawford, Bruce R; Young, Ross McD; Morris, Charles P; Voisey, Joanne

    2017-01-04

    Serotonin receptor 2A (HTR2A) is an important signalling factor implicated in cognitive functions and known to be associated with schizophrenia. The biological significance of HTR2A in schizophrenia remains unclear as molecular analyses including genetic association, mRNA expression and methylation studies have reported inconsistent results. In this study, we examine HTR2A expression and methylation and the interaction with HTR2A polymorphisms to identify their biological significance in schizophrenia. Subjects included 25 schizophrenia and 25 control post-mortem brain samples. Genotype and mRNA data was generated by transcriptome sequencing. DNA methylation profiles were generated for CpG sites within promoter-exon I region. Expression, genotype and methylation data were examined for association with schizophrenia. HTR2A mRNA levels were reduced by 14% (p = 0.006) in schizophrenia compared to controls. Three CpG sites were hypermethylated in schizophrenia (cg5 p = 0.028, cg7 p = 0.021, cg10 p = 0.017) and HTR2A polymorphisms rs6314 (p = 0.008) and rs6313 (p = 0.026) showed genetic association with schizophrenia. Differential DNA methylation was associated with rs6314 and rs6313. There was a strong correlation between HTR2A DNA methylation and mRNA expression. The results were nominally significant but did not survive the rigorous Benjamini-Hochberg correction for multiple testing. Differential HTR2A expression in schizophrenia in our study may be the result of the combined effect of multiple differentially methylated CpG sites. Epigenetic HTR2A regulation may alter brain function, which contributes to the development of schizophrenia.

  11. Behavioral tolerance to lysergic acid diethylamide is associated with reduced serotonin-2A receptor signaling in rat cortex.

    PubMed

    Gresch, Paul J; Smith, Randy L; Barrett, Robert J; Sanders-Bush, Elaine

    2005-09-01

    Tolerance is defined as a decrease in responsiveness to a drug after repeated administration. Tolerance to the behavioral effects of hallucinogens occurs in humans and animals. In this study, we used drug discrimination to establish a behavioral model of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) tolerance and examined whether tolerance to the stimulus properties of LSD is related to altered serotonin receptor signaling. Rats were trained to discriminate 60 microg/kg LSD from saline in a two-lever drug discrimination paradigm. Two groups of animals were assigned to either chronic saline treatment or chronic LSD treatment. For chronic treatment, rats from each group were injected once per day with either 130 microg/kg LSD or saline for 5 days. Rats were tested for their ability to discriminate either saline or 60 microg/kg LSD, 24 h after the last chronic injection. Rats receiving chronic LSD showed a 44% reduction in LSD lever selection, while rats receiving chronic vehicle showed no change in percent choice on the LSD lever. In another group of rats receiving the identical chronic LSD treatment, LSD-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding, an index of G-protein coupling, was measured in the rat brain by autoradiography. After chronic LSD, a significant reduction in LSD-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding was observed in the medial prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex. Furthermore, chronic LSD produced a significant reduction in 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding in medial prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex, which was blocked by MDL 100907, a selective 5-HT2A receptor antagonist, but not SB206553, a 5-HT2C receptor antagonist, indicating a reduction in 5-HT2A receptor signaling. 125I-LSD binding to 5-HT2A receptors was reduced in cortical regions, demonstrating a reduction in 5-HT2A receptor density. Taken together, these results indicate that adaptive changes in LSD-stimulated serotonin receptor signaling may mediate tolerance

  12. Quantitative phosphoproteomics unravels biased phosphorylation of serotonin 2A receptor at Ser280 by hallucinogenic versus nonhallucinogenic agonists.

    PubMed

    Karaki, Samah; Becamel, Carine; Murat, Samy; Mannoury la Cour, Clotilde; Millan, Mark J; Prézeau, Laurent; Bockaert, Joël; Marin, Philippe; Vandermoere, Franck

    2014-05-01

    The serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptor is a primary target of psychedelic hallucinogens such as lysergic acid diethylamine, mescaline, and psilocybin, which reproduce some of the core symptoms of schizophrenia. An incompletely resolved paradox is that only some 5-HT(2A) receptor agonists exhibit hallucinogenic activity, whereas structurally related agonists with comparable affinity and activity lack such a psychoactive activity. Using a strategy combining stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture with enrichment in phosphorylated peptides by means of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography followed by immobilized metal affinity chromatography, we compared the phosphoproteome in HEK-293 cells transiently expressing the 5-HT(2A) receptor and exposed to either vehicle or the synthetic hallucinogen 1-[2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl]-2-aminopropane (DOI) or the nonhallucinogenic 5-HT(2A) agonist lisuride. Among the 5995 identified phosphorylated peptides, 16 sites were differentially phosphorylated upon exposure of cells to DOI versus lisuride. These include a serine (Ser(280)) located in the third intracellular loop of the 5-HT(2A) receptor, a region important for its desensitization. The specific phosphorylation of Ser(280) by hallucinogens was further validated by quantitative mass spectrometry analysis of immunopurified receptor digests and by Western blotting using a phosphosite specific antibody. The administration of DOI, but not of lisuride, to mice, enhanced the phosphorylation of 5-HT(2A) receptors at Ser(280) in the prefrontal cortex. Moreover, hallucinogens induced a less pronounced desensitization of receptor-operated signaling in HEK-293 cells and neurons than did nonhallucinogenic agonists. The mutation of Ser(280) to aspartic acid (to mimic phosphorylation) reduced receptor desensitization by nonhallucinogenic agonists, whereas its mutation to alanine increased the ability of hallucinogens to desensitize the receptor. This study reveals a biased

  13. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Unravels Biased Phosphorylation of Serotonin 2A Receptor at Ser280 by Hallucinogenic versus Nonhallucinogenic Agonists*

    PubMed Central

    Karaki, Samah; Becamel, Carine; Murat, Samy; Mannoury la Cour, Clotilde; Millan, Mark J.; Prézeau, Laurent; Bockaert, Joël; Marin, Philippe; Vandermoere, Franck

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin 5-HT2A receptor is a primary target of psychedelic hallucinogens such as lysergic acid diethylamine, mescaline, and psilocybin, which reproduce some of the core symptoms of schizophrenia. An incompletely resolved paradox is that only some 5-HT2A receptor agonists exhibit hallucinogenic activity, whereas structurally related agonists with comparable affinity and activity lack such a psychoactive activity. Using a strategy combining stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture with enrichment in phosphorylated peptides by means of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography followed by immobilized metal affinity chromatography, we compared the phosphoproteome in HEK-293 cells transiently expressing the 5-HT2A receptor and exposed to either vehicle or the synthetic hallucinogen 1-[2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl]-2-aminopropane (DOI) or the nonhallucinogenic 5-HT2A agonist lisuride. Among the 5995 identified phosphorylated peptides, 16 sites were differentially phosphorylated upon exposure of cells to DOI versus lisuride. These include a serine (Ser280) located in the third intracellular loop of the 5-HT2A receptor, a region important for its desensitization. The specific phosphorylation of Ser280 by hallucinogens was further validated by quantitative mass spectrometry analysis of immunopurified receptor digests and by Western blotting using a phosphosite specific antibody. The administration of DOI, but not of lisuride, to mice, enhanced the phosphorylation of 5-HT2A receptors at Ser280 in the prefrontal cortex. Moreover, hallucinogens induced a less pronounced desensitization of receptor-operated signaling in HEK-293 cells and neurons than did nonhallucinogenic agonists. The mutation of Ser280 to aspartic acid (to mimic phosphorylation) reduced receptor desensitization by nonhallucinogenic agonists, whereas its mutation to alanine increased the ability of hallucinogens to desensitize the receptor. This study reveals a biased phosphorylation of

  14. The serotonin receptor 2A gene moderates the influence of parental socioeconomic status on adulthood harm avoidance.

    PubMed

    Jokela, Markus; Lehtimäki, Terho; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa

    2007-07-01

    We examined whether the T102C polymorphism of the serotonin receptor 2A gene (HTR2A) moderated the influence of childhood or adolescence parental socioeconomic status (SES) on adulthood temperament trait harm avoidance (HA) in a population-based sample of 1246 healthy Finnish men and women, who were 24-39 years of age in the last follow-up phase. High parental SES predicted low adulthood HA. In addition, the C allele of the T102C polymorphism was associated with high HA in one of the two test settings, and with the mean of the two measurements. Most importantly, we found that the T102C polymorphism moderated the influence of parental SES, such that high parental SES predicted low adulthood HA in subjects with the T/T or T/C genotypes, while this was not true for those carrying the C/C genotype. The role of the T102C polymorphism was most pronounced among those with high parental SES. We conclude that the T102C polymorphism of the HTR2A gene may be involved in the development of temperament by moderating the influence of environmental conditions.

  15. Hyperactivity in Childhood as a Predictor of School Performance in Elementary School: Modifying Effect of a Serotonin Receptor Gene (5-HTR2A)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulkki-Raback, Laura; Pullmann, Helle; Hintsanen, Mirka; Alatupa, Saija; Ravaja, Niklas; Lehtimaki, Terho; Keltikangas-jarvinen, Liisa

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Genes have been suggested to interact with predictors of school performance, but evidence is scarce. The purpose was to examine whether a hyperactive temperament leads to different school performance, depending on variability in a serotonin receptor gene (5-HTR2A). Method: The participants were a population-based sample of 909 girls…

  16. Hyperactivity in Childhood as a Predictor of School Performance in Elementary School: Modifying Effect of a Serotonin Receptor Gene (5-HTR2A)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulkki-Raback, Laura; Pullmann, Helle; Hintsanen, Mirka; Alatupa, Saija; Ravaja, Niklas; Lehtimaki, Terho; Keltikangas-jarvinen, Liisa

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Genes have been suggested to interact with predictors of school performance, but evidence is scarce. The purpose was to examine whether a hyperactive temperament leads to different school performance, depending on variability in a serotonin receptor gene (5-HTR2A). Method: The participants were a population-based sample of 909 girls…

  17. A functional selectivity mechanism at the serotonin-2A GPCR involves ligand-dependent conformations of intracellular loop 2.

    PubMed

    Perez-Aguilar, Jose Manuel; Shan, Jufang; LeVine, Michael V; Khelashvili, George; Weinstein, Harel

    2014-11-12

    With recent progress in determination of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) structure with crystallography, a variety of other experimental approaches (e.g., NMR spectroscopy, fluorescent-based assays, mass spectrometry techniques) are also being used to characterize state-specific and ligand-specific conformational states. MD simulations offer a powerful complementary approach to elucidate the dynamic features associated with ligand-specific GPCR conformations. To shed light on the conformational elements and dynamics of the important aspect of GPCR functional selectivity, we carried out unbiased microsecond-length MD simulations of the human serotonin 2A receptor (5-HT(2A)R) in the absence of ligand and bound to four distinct serotonergic agonists. The 5-HT(2A)R is a suitable system to study the structural features involved in the ligand-dependent conformational heterogeneity of GPCRs because it is well-characterized experimentally and exhibits a strong agonist-specific phenotype in that some 5-HT(2A)R agonists induce LSD-like hallucinations, while others lack this psychoactive property entirely. Here we report evidence for structural and dynamic differences in 5-HT(2A)R interacting with such pharmacologically distinct ligands, hallucinogens, and nonhallucinogens obtained from all-atom MD simulations. Differential ligand binding contacts were identified for structurally similar hallucinogens and nonhallucinogens and found to correspond to different conformations in the intracellular loop 2 (ICL2). From the different ICL2 conformations, functional selective phenotypes are suggested through effects on dimerization and/or distinct direct interaction with effector proteins. The findings are presented in the context of currently proposed hallucinogenesis mechanisms, and ICL2 is proposed as a fine-tuning selective switch that can differentiates modes of 5-HT(2A)R activation.

  18. G-protein receptor kinase 5 regulates the cannabinoid receptor 2-induced up-regulation of serotonin 2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Jade M; Carrasco, Gonzalo A

    2013-05-31

    We have recently reported that cannabinoid agonists can up-regulate and enhance the activity of serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptors in the prefrontal cortex (PFCx). Increased expression and activity of cortical 5-HT2A receptors has been associated with neuropsychiatric disorders, such as anxiety and schizophrenia. Here we report that repeated CP55940 exposure selectively up-regulates GRK5 proteins in rat PFCx and in a neuronal cell culture model. We sought to examine the mechanism underlying the regulation of GRK5 and to identify the role of GRK5 in the cannabinoid agonist-induced up-regulation and enhanced activity of 5-HT2A receptors. Interestingly, we found that cannabinoid agonist-induced up-regulation of GRK5 involves CB2 receptors, β-arrestin 2, and ERK1/2 signaling because treatment with CB2 shRNA lentiviral particles, β-arrestin 2 shRNA lentiviral particles, or ERK1/2 inhibitor prevented the cannabinoid agonist-induced up-regulation of GRK5. Most importantly, we found that GRK5 shRNA lentiviral particle treatment prevented the cannabinoid agonist-induced up-regulation and enhanced 5-HT2A receptor-mediated calcium release. Repeated cannabinoid exposure was also associated with enhanced phosphorylation of CB2 receptors and increased interaction between β-arrestin 2 and ERK1/2. These latter phenomena were also significantly inhibited by GRK5 shRNA lentiviral treatment. Our results suggest that sustained activation of CB2 receptors, which up-regulates 5-HT2A receptor signaling, enhances GRK5 expression; the phosphorylation of CB2 receptors; and the β-arrestin 2/ERK interactions. These data could provide a rationale for some of the adverse effects associated with repeated cannabinoid agonist exposure.

  19. A functional selectivity mechanism at the serotonin-2A GPCR involves ligand-dependent conformations of intracellular loop 2

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Aguilar, Jose Manuel; Shan, Jufang; LeVine, Michael V.; Khelashvili, George; Weinstein, Harel

    2014-10-14

    With recent progress in determination of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) structure with crystallography, a variety of other experimental approaches (e.g., NMR spectroscopy, fluorescent-based assays, mass spectrometry techniques) are also being used to characterize state-specific and ligand-specific conformational states. MD simulations offer a powerful complementary approach to elucidate the dynamic features associated with ligand-specific GPCR conformations. To shed light on the conformational elements and dynamics of the important aspect of GPCR functional selectivity, we carried out unbiased microsecond-length MD simulations of the human serotonin 2A receptor (5-HT2AR) in the absence of ligand and bound to four distinct serotonergic agonists. The 5-HT2AR is a suitable system to study the structural features involved in the ligand-dependent conformational heterogeneity of GPCRs because it is well-characterized experimentally and exhibits a strong agonist-specific phenotype in that some 5-HT2AR agonists induce LSD-like hallucinations, while others lack this psychoactive property entirely. Here we report evidence for structural and dynamic differences in 5-HT2AR interacting with such pharmacologically distinct ligands, hallucinogens, and nonhallucinogens obtained from all-atom MD simulations. Differential ligand binding contacts were identified for structurally similar hallucinogens and nonhallucinogens and found to correspond to different conformations in the intracellular loop 2 (ICL2). From the different ICL2 conformations, functional selective phenotypes are suggested through effects on dimerization and/or distinct direct interaction with effector proteins. Lastly, the findings are presented in the context of currently proposed hallucinogenesis mechanisms, and ICL2 is proposed as a fine-tuning selective switch that can differentiates modes of 5-HT2AR activation.

  20. Using psilocybin to investigate the relationship between attention, working memory, and the serotonin 1A and 2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Carter, Olivia L; Burr, David C; Pettigrew, John D; Wallis, Guy M; Hasler, Felix; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2005-10-01

    Increasing evidence suggests a link between attention, working memory, serotonin (5-HT), and prefrontal cortex activity. In an attempt to tease out the relationship between these elements, this study tested the effects of the hallucinogenic mixed 5-HT1A/2A receptor agonist psilocybin alone and after pretreatment with the 5-HT2A antagonist ketanserin. Eight healthy human volunteers were tested on a multiple-object tracking task and spatial working memory task under the four conditions: placebo, psilocybin (215 microg/kg), ketanserin (50 mg), and psilocybin and ketanserin. Psilocybin significantly reduced attentional tracking ability, but had no significant effect on spatial working memory, suggesting a functional dissociation between the two tasks. Pretreatment with ketanserin did not attenuate the effect of psilocybin on attentional performance, suggesting a primary involvement of the 5-HT1A receptor in the observed deficit. Based on physiological and pharmacological data, we speculate that this impaired attentional performance may reflect a reduced ability to suppress or ignore distracting stimuli rather than reduced attentional capacity. The clinical relevance of these results is also discussed.

  1. Biochemical profile of YM992, a novel selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor with 5-HT2A receptor antagonistic activity.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, K; Nomura, T; Hidaka, K; Takeuchi, H; Yatsugi, S; Fujii, M; Yamaguchi, T

    1996-01-01

    YM992, (S)-2-[[(7-fluoro-4-indanyl)oxy]methyl]morpholine monohydrochloride, exhibited the biochemical profile of a selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) with 5-HT2A receptor antagonistic activity. YM922 showed the same high affinity as fluoxetine against the 5-HT reuptake site (Ki = 21 nM) and a similar affinity to that of crazodone against the 5-HT2A receptor (Ki = 86 nM). In other receptor binding studies, an affinity for the adrenergic alpha 1 receptor (Ki = 200 nM) and 5-HT2C receptor (Ki = 680 nM) was observed. In a monoamine uptake study, YM992 showed a selective 5-HT uptake inhibition (IC50 = 0.15 microM), but only very weakly inhibited both noradrenaline (NA) and dopamine (DA) uptake (IC50 = 3.1 microM (NA), > 10 microM (DA)). YM992 was also found to potently inhibit the aggregation of human platelets (IC50 = 1.9 microM), revealing antagonistic activity for the 5-HT2A receptor in vitro. Enhanced serotonergic neurotransmission, in particular that mediated by the 5-HT1A receptor, has recently been reported to be important in the long-term treatment of depressive disorders with antidepressants. In addition, some 5-HT1A receptor-mediated responses are known to be potentiated by co-administration of 5-HT2A receptor antagonists. Thus, YM992, having both selective 5-HT reuptake inhibition and 5-HT2A antagonistic activity, might show potent therapeutic activity as a novel antidepressant in comparison with conventional SSRIs.

  2. Molecular dynamics of 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A serotonin receptors with methylated buspirone analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronowska, Agnieszka; Chilmonczyk, Zdzisław; Leś, Andrzej; Edvardsen, Øyvind; Østensen, Roy; Sylte, Ingebrigt

    2001-11-01

    In the present study experimentally determined ligand selectivity of three methylated buspirone analogues (denoted as MM2, MM5 and P55) towards 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A serotonin receptors was theoretically investigated on a molecular level. The relationships between the ligand structure and 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptor affinities were studied and the results were found to be in agreement with the available site-directed mutagenesis and binding affinity data. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of ligand-receptor complexes were performed for each investigated analogue, docked twice into the central cavity of 5-HT1A/5-HT2A, each time in a different orientation. Present results were compared with our previous theoretical results, obtained for buspirone and its non-methylated analogues. It was found that due to the presence of the methyl group in the piperazine ring the ligand position alters and the structure of the ligand-receptor complex is modified. Further, the positions of derivatives with pyrimidinyl aromatic moiety and quinolinyl moiety are significantly different at the 5-HT2A receptor. Thus, methylation of such derivatives alters the 3D structures of ligand-receptor complexes in different ways. The ligand-induced changes of the receptor structures were also analysed. The obtained results suggest, that helical domains of both receptors have different dynamical behaviour. Moreover, both location and topography of putative binding sites for buspirone analogues are different at 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors.

  3. Functional alteration in frontolimbic systems relevant to moral judgment in cocaine-dependent subjects.

    PubMed

    Verdejo-Garcia, Antonio; Contreras-Rodríguez, Oren; Fonseca, Francina; Cuenca, Aida; Soriano-Mas, Carles; Rodriguez, Joan; Pardo-Lozano, Ricardo; Blanco-Hinojo, Laura; de Sola Llopis, Susana; Farré, Magí; Torrens, Marta; Pujol, Jesús; de la Torre, Rafael

    2014-03-01

    Cocaine addiction is characterized by persistent decision-making deficits, which are linked to structural and functional abnormalities in frontolimbic systems. Moral judgment is as a special instance of decision making, in which both cognitive and emotional signals must be adequately integrated to decide how to resolve moral dilemmas. Here, we employed a moral dilemmas functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) task to explore possible alterations of frontolimbic systems in cocaine-dependent subjects. We also explored if these alterations relate to more basic deficits in functional connectivity within these systems during spontaneous resting-state activation. Ten cocaine-dependent subjects and 14 non-drug-using controls participated in the study. Cocaine-dependent subjects were carefully selected to discard potentially confounding co-morbidities, and they underwent a uniform supervised abstinence period of 10 days. Both groups were scanned, and fMRI maps were generated to identify (1) brain response to moral dilemmas; and (2) the strength of functional connectivity within frontolimbic systems during resting-state. During the moral dilemmas task, cocaine-dependent subjects showed reduced activation involving frontolimbic structures as the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), left insula and brain stem. Connectivity analyses showed that cocaine users had less resting-state functional connectivity between ACC, thalamus, insula and brain stem. These results demonstrate that cocaine-dependent subjects have functional alterations in the frontolimbic systems that support moral judgment and social decision making. © 2012 The Authors, Addiction Biology © 2012 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  4. Serotonin 2A Receptors, Citalopram and Tryptophan-Depletion: a Multimodal Imaging Study of their Interactions During Response Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Macoveanu, Julian; Hornboll, Bettina; Elliott, Rebecca; Erritzoe, David; Paulson, Olaf B; Siebner, Hartwig; Knudsen, Gitte M; Rowe, James B

    2013-01-01

    Poor behavioral inhibition is a common feature of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Successful inhibition of a prepotent response in ‘NoGo' paradigms requires the integrity of both the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and the serotonergic system. We investigated individual differences in serotonergic regulation of response inhibition. In 24 healthy adults, we used 18F-altanserin positron emission tomography to assess cerebral 5-HT2A receptors, which have been related to impulsivity. We then investigated the impact of two acute manipulations of brain serotonin levels on behavioral and neural correlates of inhibition using intravenous citalopram and acute tryptophan depletion during functional magnetic resonance imaging. We adapted the NoGo paradigm to isolate effects on inhibition per se as opposed to other aspects of the NoGo paradigm. Successful NoGo inhibition was associated with greater activation of the right IFG compared to control trials with alternative responses, indicating that the IFG is activated with inhibition in NoGo trials rather than other aspects of invoked cognitive control. Activation of the left IFG during NoGo trials was greater with citalopram than acute tryptophan depletion. Moreover, with the NoGo-type of response inhibition, the right IFG displayed an interaction between the type of serotonergic challenge and neocortical 5-HT2A receptor binding. Specifically, acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) produced a relatively larger NoGo response in the right IFG in subjects with low 5-HT2A BPP but reduced the NoGo response in those with high 5-HT2A BPP. These links between serotonergic function and response inhibition in healthy subjects may help to interpret serotonergic abnormalities underlying impulsivity in neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:23303045

  5. Hippocampal serotonin-2A receptor-immunoreactive neurons density increases after testosterone therapy in the gonadectomized male mice

    PubMed Central

    Nikmahzar, Emsehgol; Ghaemi, Amir; Naseri, Gholam Reza; Moharreri, Ali Reza; Lotfinia, Ahmad Ali

    2016-01-01

    The change of steroid levels may also exert different modulatory effects on the number and class of serotonin receptors present in the plasma membrane. The effects of chronic treatment of testosterone for anxiety were examined and expression of 5-HT2A serotonergic receptor, neuron, astrocyte, and dark neuron density in the hippocampus of gonadectomized male mice was determined. Thirty-six adult male NMRI mice were randomly divided into six groups: intact-no testosterone treatment (No T), gonadectomy (GDX)-No T, GDX-Vehicle, GDX-6.25 mg/kg testosterone (T), GDX-12.5 mg/kg T, and GDX-25 mg/kg T. Anxiety-related behavior was evaluated using elevated plus maze apparatus. The animals were anesthetized after 48 hours after behavioral testing, and decapitated and micron slices were prepared for immunohistochemical as well as histopathological assessment. Subcutaneous injection of testosterone (25 mg/kg) may induce anxiogenic-like behavior in male mice. In addition, immunohistochemical data reveal reduced expression of 5-HT2A serotonergic receptor after gonadectomy in all areas of the hippocampus. However, treatment with testosterone could increase the mean number of dark neurons as well as immunoreactive neurons in CA1 and CA3 area, dose dependently. The density of 5-HT2A receptor-immunoreactive neurons may play a crucial role in the induction of anxiety like behavior. As reduction in such receptor expression have shown to significantly enhance anxiety behaviors. However, replacement of testosterone dose dependently enhances the number of 5-HT2A receptor-immunoreactive neurons and interestingly also reduced anxiety like behaviors. PMID:28127501

  6. Effect of serotonin receptor 2A gene polymorphism on mirtazapine response in major depression.

    PubMed

    Kang, Rhee-Hun; Choi, Myoung-Jin; Paik, Jong-Woo; Hahn, Sang-Woo; Lee, Min-Soo

    2007-01-01

    The 5-HTR2A gene is a candidate gene for influencing the clinical response to treatment with antidepressants. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between the -1438A/G polymorphism of the 5-HTR2A gene and the response to mirtazapine in a Korean population with major depressive disorder. Mirtazapine was administered for eight weeks to the 101 patients who completed the study, during which we evaluated the clinical outcome using repeated-measures ANCOVA. A main effect of genotype or an effect of genotype-time interactions on the decrease in HAMD score during the eight-week follow-up was not found, which suggests that the 5-HTR2A -1438A/G polymorphism does not affect the clinical outcome to mirtazapine administration. However, significant effects of genotype and allele carriers on the decrease in the sleep score over the eight weeks were found (genotype: F = 4.093, p = 0.017; allele: F = 4.371, p = 0.037), whereas no effect of genotype-time interactions on the decrease in the HAMD score over the eight-week follow-up was found. These observations suggest that the -1438A/G polymorphism on the sleep improvement at each time period revealed significant differences in the sleep scores after two weeks of mirtazapine administration. The sleep scores were lower for carriers of the A+ allele than of the A- allele after two weeks of mirtazapine administration (p = 0.041), which means that the -1438GG genotype is associated with less improvement in sleep, and suggests that the effect of mirtazapine on improving the sleep quality differs with the 5-HTR2A -1438A/G polymorphism within two weeks of mirtazapine treatment. In conclusion, although the -1438A/G polymorphism affects the sleep improvement resulting from the administration of mirtazapine to Korean patients with major depressive disorder, our results do not support the hypothesis that this polymorphism of the 5-HTR2A gene is involved in the therapeutic response to mirtazapine.

  7. Gender, personality, and serotonin-2A receptor binding in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Soloff, Paul H.; Price, Julie C.; Mason, Neale Scott; Becker, Carl; Meltzer, Carolyn C.

    2009-01-01

    The vulnerability to mood disorders, impulsive-aggression, eating disorders, and suicidal behavior varies greatly with gender, and may reflect gender differences in central serotonergic function. We investigated the relationships of gender, mood, impulsivity, aggression and temperament to 5HT2A receptor binding in 21 healthy subjects using [18F]altanserin and PET neuro-imaging. Binding potentials in pre-defined Regions of Interest (ROI) were calculated using the Logan graphical method, corrected for partial volume effects, and compared by gender with age co-varied. SPM analysis was used for voxel level comparisons. Altanserin binding (BPp) was greater in male than female subjects in 9 ROIs: hippocampus (HIP) and Lt. HIP, lateral orbital frontal cortex (LOF) and Lt.LOF, left medial frontal cortex (Lt.MFC), left medial temporal cortex (Lt. MTC), left occipital cortex (Lt. OCC), thalamus (THL) and Lt. THL. Differences in Lt. HIP and Lt. MTL remained significant after Bonferroni correction. Gender differences were noted in the co-variation of psychological traits with BPp values in specific ROIs. Among males alone, aggression was negatively correlated with BPp values in Lt. LOF and Lt. MFC, and Suspiciousness positively correlated in LOF, Lt. LOF and Lt. MFC. Among female subjects alone, Negativism was positively correlated with BPp values in HIP, and Verbal Hostility in Lt. HIP. Altanserin binding in Lt. MTC was positively correlated with Persistence, with no significant gender effect. Gender differences in 5HT2A receptor function in specific ROIs may mediate expression of psychological characteristics such as aggression, suspiciousness and negativism. Future studies of 5HT2A receptor function and its relationship to behavior should control for gender. PMID:19959344

  8. Stimulation of serotonin 2A receptors facilitates consolidation and extinction of fear memory in C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gongliang; Asgeirsdottir, Herborg N.; Cohen, Sarah J.; Munchow, Alcira H.; Barrera, Mercy P.; Stackman, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    Excessive fear is a hallmark of several emotional and mental disorders such as phobias and panic disorders. Considerable attention is focused on defining the neurobiological mechanisms of the extinction of conditioned fear memory in an effort to identify mechanisms that may hold clinical significance for remediating aberrant fear memory. Serotonin modulates the acquisition and retention of conditioned emotional memory, and the serotonin 2A receptor (5HT2AR) may be one of the postsynaptic targets mediating such effects. Here we tested the hypothesis that the 5HT2AR regulates the consolidation and extinction of fear memory in male C57BL/6J mice. The influence of 5HT2ARs on memory consolidation was further confirmed with a novel object recognition task. With a trace fear conditioning paradigm, administration of the 5HT2AR agonist TCB-2 (1.0 mg/kg, i.p.) before the extinction test facilitated the acquisition of extinction of fear memory as compared to vehicle treatment. In contrast, administration of the 5HT2AR antagonist MDL 11,939 (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) delayed the acquisition of extinction of fear memory. Further, the post-conditioning administration of TCB-2 enhanced contextual and cued fear memory, possibly by facilitating the consolidation of fear memory. Administration of TCB-2 also facilitated the acquisition of extinction of fear memory in delay fear conditioned mice. Stimulation or blockade of 5HT2ARs did not affect the encoding or retrieval of conditioned fear memory. Finally, administration of TCB-2 right after training in an object recognition task enhanced the consolidation of object memory. These results suggest that stimulation of 5HT2ARs facilitates the consolidation and extinction of trace and delay cued fear memory and the consolidation of object memory. Blocking the 5HT2AR impairs the acquisition of fear memory extinction. The results support the view that serotonergic activation of the 5HT2AR provides an important modulatory influence on circuits

  9. Stimulation of serotonin 2A receptors facilitates consolidation and extinction of fear memory in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gongliang; Ásgeirsdóttir, Herborg N; Cohen, Sarah J; Munchow, Alcira H; Barrera, Mercy P; Stackman, Robert W

    2013-01-01

    Excessive fear is a hallmark of several emotional and mental disorders such as phobias and panic disorders. Considerable attention is focused on defining the neurobiological mechanisms of the extinction of conditioned fear memory in an effort to identify mechanisms that may hold clinical significance for remediating aberrant fear memory. Serotonin modulates the acquisition and retention of conditioned emotional memory, and the serotonin 2A receptor (5HT2AR) may be one of the postsynaptic targets mediating such effects. Here we tested the hypothesis that the 5HT2AR regulates the consolidation and extinction of fear memory in male C57BL/6J mice. The influence of 5HT2ARs on memory consolidation was further confirmed with a novel object recognition task. With a trace fear conditioning paradigm, administration of the 5HT2AR agonist TCB-2 (1.0 mg/kg, i.p.) before the extinction test facilitated the acquisition of extinction of fear memory as compared to vehicle treatment. In contrast, administration of the 5HT2AR antagonist MDL 11,939 (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) delayed the acquisition of extinction of fear memory. Further, the post-conditioning administration of TCB-2 enhanced contextual and cued fear memory, possibly by facilitating the consolidation of fear memory. Administration of TCB-2 also facilitated the acquisition of extinction of fear memory in delay fear conditioned mice. Stimulation or blockade of 5HT2ARs did not affect the encoding or retrieval of conditioned fear memory. Finally, administration of TCB-2 right after training in an object recognition task enhanced the consolidation of object memory. These results suggest that stimulation of 5HT2ARs facilitates the consolidation and extinction of trace and delay cued fear memory and the consolidation of object memory. Blocking the 5HT2AR impairs the acquisition of fear memory extinction. The results support the view that serotonergic activation of the 5HT2AR provides an important modulatory influence on circuits

  10. THE SEROTONIN (5-HT) 5-HT2A RECEPTOR: ASSOCIATION WITH INHERENT AND COCAINE-EVOKED BEHAVIORAL DISINHIBITION IN RATS

    PubMed Central

    Anastasio, Noelle C.; Stoffel, Erin C.; Fox, Robert G.; Bubar, Marcy J.; Rice, Kenner C.; Moeller, F. Gerard; Cunningham, Kathryn A.

    2011-01-01

    Alterations in the balance of functional activity within the serotonin (5-HT) system are hypothesized to underlie impulse control. Cocaine-dependent subjects consistently demonstrate greater impulsivity relative to non-drug using control subjects. Preclinical studies suggest that the 5-HT2A receptor (5-HT2AR) contributes to the regulation of impulsive behavior and also mediates some of the behavioral effects of cocaine. We hypothesized that the selective 5-HT2AR antagonist M100907 would reduce inherent levels of impulsivity and attenuate impulsive responding induced by cocaine in two animal models of impulsivity, the differential reinforcement of low rate (DRL) task and the one-choice serial reaction time (1-CSRT) task. M100907 reduced rates of responding in the DRL task and premature responding in the 1-CSRT task. Conversely, cocaine disrupted rates of responding in the DRL task and increased premature responding in the 1-CSRT task. M100907 attenuated cocaine-induced increases in specific markers of behavioral disinhibition in the DRL and 1-CSRT tasks. These results suggest that the 5-HT2AR regulates inherent impulsivity, and that blockade of the 5-HT2AR alleviates specific aspects of elevated levels of impulsivity induced by cocaine exposure. These data point to the 5-HT2AR as an important regulatory substrate in impulse control. PMID:21499079

  11. Spatiotemporal brain dynamics of emotional face processing modulations induced by the serotonin 1A/2A receptor agonist psilocybin.

    PubMed

    Bernasconi, Fosco; Schmidt, André; Pokorny, Thomas; Kometer, Michael; Seifritz, Erich; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2014-12-01

    Emotional face processing is critically modulated by the serotonergic system. For instance, emotional face processing is impaired by acute psilocybin administration, a serotonin (5-HT) 1A and 2A receptor agonist. However, the spatiotemporal brain mechanisms underlying these modulations are poorly understood. Here, we investigated the spatiotemporal brain dynamics underlying psilocybin-induced modulations during emotional face processing. Electrical neuroimaging analyses were applied to visual evoked potentials in response to emotional faces, following psilocybin and placebo administration. Our results indicate a first time period of strength (i.e., Global Field Power) modulation over the 168-189 ms poststimulus interval, induced by psilocybin. A second time period of strength modulation was identified over the 211-242 ms poststimulus interval. Source estimations over these 2 time periods further revealed decreased activity in response to both neutral and fearful faces within limbic areas, including amygdala and parahippocampal gyrus, and the right temporal cortex over the 168-189 ms interval, and reduced activity in response to happy faces within limbic and right temporo-occipital brain areas over the 211-242 ms interval. Our results indicate a selective and temporally dissociable effect of psilocybin on the neuronal correlates of emotional face processing, consistent with a modulation of the top-down control. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Agonist properties of N,N-dimethyltryptamine at serotonin 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors.

    PubMed

    Smith, R L; Canton, H; Barrett, R J; Sanders-Bush, E

    1998-11-01

    Extensive behavioral and biochemical evidence suggests an agonist role at the 5-HT2A receptor, and perhaps the 5-HT2C receptor, in the mechanism of action of hallucinogenic drugs. However the published in vitro pharmacological properties of N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), an hallucinogenic tryptamine analog, are not consistent with this hypothesis. We, therefore, undertook an extensive investigation into the properties of DMT at 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors. In fibroblasts transfected with the 5-HT2A receptor or the 5-HT2C receptor, DMT activated the major intracellular signaling pathway (phosphoinositide hydrolysis) to an extent comparable to that produced by serotonin. Because drug efficacy changes with receptor density and cellular microenvironment, we also examined the properties of DMT in native preparations using a behavioral and biochemical approach. Rats were trained to discriminate an antagonist ketanserin from an agonist 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (DOI) in a two-lever choice paradigm. Pharmacological studies showed that responding on the DOI and ketanserin lever reflected agonist and antagonist activity at 5-HT2A receptors, and hence, was a suitable model for evaluating the in vivo functional properties of DMT. Like other 5-HT2A receptor agonists, DMT substituted fully for DOI. Intact choroid plexus was used to evaluate the agonist properties at endogenous 5-HT2C receptors; DMT was a partial agonist at 5-HT2C receptors in this native preparation. Thus, we conclude that DMT behaves as an agonist at both 5-HT2A and 5-HT2A receptors. One difference was evident in that the 5-HT2C, but not the 5-HT2A, receptor showed a profound desensitization to DMT over time. This difference is interesting in light of the recent report that the hallucinogenic activity of DMT does not tolerate in humans and suggests the 5-HT2C receptor plays a less prominent role in the action of DMT.

  13. Serotonin-2C and -2A Receptor Co-expression on Cells in the Rat Medial Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Nocjar, Christine; Alex, Katherine D; Sonneborn, Alex; Abbas, Atheir I; Roth, Bryan L; Pehek, Elizabeth A

    2015-01-01

    Neural function within the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) regulates normal cognition, attention and impulse control, implicating neuroregulatory abnormalities within this region in mental dysfunction related to schizophrenia, depression and drug abuse. Both serotonin -2A (5-HT2A) and -2C (5-HT2C) receptors are known to be important in neuropsychiatric drug action and are distributed throughout the mPFC. However, their interactive role in serotonergic cortical regulation is poorly understood. While the main signal transduction mechanism for both receptors is stimulation of phosphoinositide production, they can have opposite effects downstream. 5-HT2A versus 5-HT2C receptor activation oppositely regulates behavior and can oppositely affect neurochemical release within the mPFC. These distinct receptor effects could be caused by their differential cellular distribution within the cortex and/or other areas. It is known that both receptors are located on GABAergic and pyramidal cells within the mPFC, but it is not clear whether they are expressed on the same or different cells. The present work employed immunofluorescence with confocal microscopy to examine this in layers V-VI of the prelimbic mPFC. The majority of GABA cells in the deep prelimbic mPFC expressed 5-HT2C receptor immunoreactivity. Furthermore, most cells expressing 5-HT2C receptor immunoreactivity notably co-expressed 5-HT2A receptors. However, 27% of 5-HT2C receptor immunoreactive cells were not GABAergic, indicating that a population of prelimbic pyramidal projection cells could express the 5-HT2C receptor. Indeed, some cells with 5-HT2C and 5-HT2A receptor co-labeling had a pyramidal shape and were expressed in the typical layered fashion of pyramidal cells. This indirectly demonstrates that 5-HT2C and 5-HT2A receptors may be commonly co-expressed on GABAergic cells within the deep layers of the prelimbic mPFC and perhaps co-localized on a small population of local pyramidal projection cells. Thus a

  14. A functional selectivity mechanism at the serotonin-2A GPCR involves ligand-dependent conformations of intracellular loop 2

    DOE PAGES

    Perez-Aguilar, Jose Manuel; Shan, Jufang; LeVine, Michael V.; ...

    2014-10-14

    With recent progress in determination of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) structure with crystallography, a variety of other experimental approaches (e.g., NMR spectroscopy, fluorescent-based assays, mass spectrometry techniques) are also being used to characterize state-specific and ligand-specific conformational states. MD simulations offer a powerful complementary approach to elucidate the dynamic features associated with ligand-specific GPCR conformations. To shed light on the conformational elements and dynamics of the important aspect of GPCR functional selectivity, we carried out unbiased microsecond-length MD simulations of the human serotonin 2A receptor (5-HT2AR) in the absence of ligand and bound to four distinct serotonergic agonists. The 5-HT2ARmore » is a suitable system to study the structural features involved in the ligand-dependent conformational heterogeneity of GPCRs because it is well-characterized experimentally and exhibits a strong agonist-specific phenotype in that some 5-HT2AR agonists induce LSD-like hallucinations, while others lack this psychoactive property entirely. Here we report evidence for structural and dynamic differences in 5-HT2AR interacting with such pharmacologically distinct ligands, hallucinogens, and nonhallucinogens obtained from all-atom MD simulations. Differential ligand binding contacts were identified for structurally similar hallucinogens and nonhallucinogens and found to correspond to different conformations in the intracellular loop 2 (ICL2). From the different ICL2 conformations, functional selective phenotypes are suggested through effects on dimerization and/or distinct direct interaction with effector proteins. Lastly, the findings are presented in the context of currently proposed hallucinogenesis mechanisms, and ICL2 is proposed as a fine-tuning selective switch that can differentiates modes of 5-HT2AR activation.« less

  15. Association Between SLC6A4 Serotonin Transporter Gene Lainked Polymorphic Region and ADRA2A −1291C>G and Irritable Bowel Syndrome in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Jin; Hwang, Sung Wook; Kim, Nayoung; Park, Ji Hyun; Oh, Jane C; Lee, Dong Ho

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Despite numerous studies on the relation of genetic polymorphisms with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), the results still remain inconclusive. The aim of this study was to assess the possible association between SLC6A4 serotonin transporter gene linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR), ADRA2A −1291C>G, GNB3 825C>T, CCK1R intron 779T>C and TRPV1 945G>C polymorphisms and IBS based on Rome III criteria in Korea. Methods Study subjects were prospectively recruited from visitors to Seoul National University Bundang Hospital between July 2009 and January 2014. Ninety-nine IBS patients and 171 healthy controls were enrolled. Polymorphisms of above-mentioned 5 genes were genotyped. Serum serotonin from 101 participants was measured by ELISA and compared according to SLC6A4 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms and IBS subtypes. Results Regarding SLC6A4 5-HTTLPR polymorphism, L/L genotype was significantly associated with the total IBS, constipation predominant IBS (IBS-C) and mixture of diarrhea and constipation IBS (IBS-M) (adjusted OR: 4.35, 95% CI: 1.04–16.67; adjusted OR: 11.11, 95% CI: 1.69–50.00 and adjusted OR: 5.56, 95% CI: 1.05–33.33, respectively). Carrying ADRA2A −1291G allele was significantly associated with total IBS and diarrhea predominant IBS (adjusted OR: 3.37, 95% CI: 1.16–9.77 and adjusted OR: 5.64, 95% CI: 1.18–27.01, respectively). IBS-C patients showed reduced level of serum serotonin compared to controls and patients with diarrhea predominant IBS (50.2 ng/mL vs. 69.0 ng/mL and 92.9 ng/mL, P = 0.017 and P = 0.001, respectively). Conclusions Genetic polymorphisms of SLC6A4 5-HTTLPR and ADRA2A −1291C>G could be one of the pathophysiological factors of IBS in Korea. Reduced serum serotonin shown in the IBS-C group suggested a role of serotonin in IBS, but large study is needed for confirming genotypic difference in serum serotonin level. PMID:24917480

  16. Caveolin-1 interacts with 5-HT2A serotonin receptors and profoundly modulates the signaling of selected Galphaq-coupled protein receptors.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Anushree; Sheffler, Douglas J; Kroeze, Wesley K; Compton-Toth, BethAnn; Roth, Bryan L

    2004-08-13

    5-Hydroxytryptamine 2A (5-HT(2A)) serotonin receptors are important for a variety of functions including vascular smooth muscle contraction, platelet aggregation, and the modulation of perception, cognition, and emotion. In a search for 5-HT(2A) receptor-interacting proteins, we discovered that caveolin-1 (Cav-1), a scaffolding protein enriched in caveolae, complexes with 5-HT(2A) receptors in a number of cell types including C6 glioma cells, transfected HEK-293 cells, and rat brain synaptic membrane preparations. To address the functional significance of this interaction, we performed RNA interference-mediated knockdown of Cav-1 in C6 glioma cells, a cell type that endogenously expresses both 5-HT(2A) receptors and Cav-1. We discovered that the in vitro knockdown of Cav-1 in C6 glioma cells nearly abolished 5-HT(2A) receptor-mediated signal transduction as measured by calcium flux assays. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of Cav-1 also greatly attenuated endogenous Galpha(q)-coupled P2Y purinergic receptor-mediated signaling without altering the signaling of PAR-1 thrombin receptors. Cav-1 appeared to modulate 5-HT(2A) signaling by facilitating the interaction of 5-HT(2A) receptors with Galpha(q). These studies provide compelling evidence for a prominent role of Cav-1 in regulating the functional activity of not only 5-HT(2A) serotonin receptors but also selected Galpha(q)-coupled receptors.

  17. The Effect of Traumatic Stress on Multiple Aminergic Systems in the Basolateral Amygdala and Hypothalamus: Specific Impairment of Serotonin 5 HT2A Receptor Signaling and its Pathophysiological Role in an Animal Model of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-27

    Barbarich NC, Kaye WH (2004) Altered 5-HT(2A) receptor binding after recovery from bulimia -type anorexia nervosa: relationships to harm avoidance and...Serotonin alterations in anorexia and bulimia nervosa: New insights from imaging studies. Physiology & Behavior 85:73-81. Kaye WH, Frank GK, Meltzer CC...Price JC, McConaha CW, Crossan PJ, Klump KL, Rhodes L (2001) Altered Serotonin 2A Receptor Activity in Women Who Have Recovered From Bulimia Nervosa

  18. APD125, a Selective Serotonin 5-HT2A Receptor Inverse Agonist, Significantly Improves Sleep Maintenance in Primary Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Russell; Seiden, David J.; Hull, Steven G.; Erman, Milton; Schwartz, Howard; Anderson, Christen; Prosser, Warren; Shanahan, William; Sanchez, Matilde; Chuang, Emil; Roth, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    . Conclusions: APD125 produced statistically significant improvements in objective parameters of sleep maintenance and sleep consolidation and was well tolerated in adults with primary chronic insomnia. Citation: Rosenberg R; Seiden DJ; Hull SG; Erman M; Schwartz H; Anderson C; Prosser W; Shanahan W; Sanchez M; Chuang E; Roth T. APD125, a selective serotonin 5-HT2A receptor inverse agonist, significantly improves sleep maintenance in primary insomnia. SLEEP 2008;31(12):1663–1671. PMID:19090322

  19. Serotonin potentiates high-glucose-induced endothelial injury: the role of serotonin and 5-HT(2A) receptors in promoting thrombosis in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kumi; Niki, Hisae; Nagai, Hitoshi; Nishikawa, Masakuni; Nakagawa, Haruto

    2012-01-01

    To clarify the involvement of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in promotion of thrombogenesis in diabetes, we examined the inhibitory effect of sarpogrelate, a 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist, on thrombus formation in diabetic rats. In streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, polyethylene tube-induced thrombus formation was enhanced compared with that in normal rats. The thrombogenesis was inhibited by sarpogrelate; cilostazol, a PDE3 inhibitor; and aspirin, a COX inhibitor, by 75.8%, 42.3%, and 34.3%, respectively. The inhibition by sarpogrelate was more pronounced in diabetic rats than normal ones. High glucose and 5-HT increased the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and combination of both high glucose and 5-HT further potentiated the effect. Sarpogrelate but not aspirin inhibited the increase in VCAM-1 expression induced by high glucose and 5-HT. These findings suggest that 5-HT mediates the enhanced thrombogenesis in diabetes and suggests that a 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist may have novel therapeutic potential for the treatment of diabetic complications.

  20. Discovering the mechanisms underlying serotonin (5-HT)2A and 5-HT2C receptor regulation following nicotine withdrawal in rats.

    PubMed

    Zaniewska, Magdalena; Alenina, Natalia; Wydra, Karolina; Fröhler, Sebastian; Kuśmider, Maciej; McCreary, Andrew C; Chen, Wei; Bader, Michael; Filip, Małgorzata

    2015-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated that nicotine withdrawal produces depression-like behavior and that serotonin (5-HT)2A/2C receptor ligands modulate that mood-like state. In the present study we aimed to identify the mechanisms (changes in radioligand binding, transcription or RNA-editing) related to such a behavioral outcome. Rats received vehicle or nicotine (0.4 mg/kg, s.c.) for 5 days in home cages. Brain 5-HT2A/2C receptors were analyzed on day 3 of nicotine withdrawal. Nicotine withdrawal increased [(3)H]ketanserin binding to 5-HT2A receptors in the ventral tegmental area and ventral dentate gyrus, yet decreased binding in the nucleus accumbens shell. Reduction in [(3)H]mesulergine binding to 5-HT2C receptors was seen in the ventral dentate gyrus. Profound decrease in the 5-HT2A receptor transcript level was noted in the hippocampus and ventral tegmental area. Out of five 5-HT2C receptor mRNA editing sites, deep sequencing data showed a reduction in editing at the E site and a trend toward reduction at the C site in the hippocampus. In the ventral tegmental area, a reduction for the frequency of CD 5-HT2C receptor transcript was seen. These results show that the reduction in the 5-HT2A receptor transcript level may be an auto-regulatory response to the increased receptor density in the hippocampus and ventral tegmental area during nicotine withdrawal, while decreased 5-HT2C receptor mRNA editing may explain the reduction in receptor labeling in the hippocampus. Serotonin (5-HT)2A/2C receptor ligands alleviate depression-like state in nicotine-withdrawn rats. Here, we show that the reduction in 5-HT2A receptor transcript level may be an auto-regulatory response to the increased receptor number in the hippocampus and ventral tegmental area during nicotine withdrawal, while attenuated 5-HT2C receptor mRNA editing in the hippocampus might explain reduced inverse agonist binding to 5-HT2C receptor and suggest a shift toward a population of more active receptors. 5

  1. Individual differences in frontolimbic circuitry and anxiety emerge with adolescent changes in endocannabinoid signaling across species

    PubMed Central

    Gee, Dylan G.; Fetcho, Robert N.; Jing, Deqiang; Li, Anfei; Glatt, Charles E.; Drysdale, Andrew T.; Cohen, Alexandra O.; Dellarco, Danielle V.; Yang, Rui R.; Dale, Anders M.; Jernigan, Terry L.; Lee, Francis S.; Casey, B.J.

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety disorders peak in incidence during adolescence, a developmental window that is marked by dynamic changes in gene expression, endocannabinoid signaling, and frontolimbic circuitry. We tested whether genetic alterations in endocannabinoid signaling related to a common polymorphism in fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), which alters endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) levels, would impact the development of frontolimbic circuitry implicated in anxiety disorders. In a pediatric imaging sample of over 1,000 3- to 21-y-olds, we show effects of the FAAH genotype specific to frontolimbic connectivity that emerge by ∼12 y of age and are paralleled by changes in anxiety-related behavior. Using a knock-in mouse model of the FAAH polymorphism that controls for genetic and environmental backgrounds, we confirm phenotypic differences in frontoamygdala circuitry and anxiety-related behavior by postnatal day 45 (P45), when AEA levels begin to decrease, and also, at P75 but not before. These results, which converge across species and level of analysis, highlight the importance of underlying developmental neurobiology in the emergence of genetic effects on brain circuitry and function. Moreover, the results have important implications for the identification of risk for disease and precise targeting of treatments to the biological state of the developing brain as a function of developmental changes in gene expression and neural circuit maturation. PMID:27001846

  2. The secret ingredient for social success of young males: a functional polymorphism in the 5HT2A serotonin receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, Jan Kornelis; Lindenberg, Siegwart; Zijlstra, Lieuwe; Bouma, Esther; Veenstra, René

    2013-01-01

    In adolescence, being socially successful depends to a large extent on being popular with peers. Even though some youths have what it takes to be popular, they are not, whereas others seem to have a secret ingredient that just makes the difference. In this study the G-allele of a functional polymorphism in the promotor region of the 5HT2A serotonin receptor gene (-G1438A) was identified as a secret ingredient for popularity among peers. These findings build on and extend previous work by Burt (2008, 2009). Tackling limitations from previous research, the role of the 5HT2A serotonin receptor gene was examined in adolescent males (N = 285; average age 13) using a unique sample of the TRAILS study. Carrying the G-allele enhanced the relation between aggression and popularity, particularly for those boys who have many female friends. This seems to be an "enhancer" effect of the G-allele whereby popularity relevant characteristics are made more noticeable. There is no "popularity gene", as the G-allele by itself had no effect on popularity.

  3. The relationship between the daily dose, the plasma concentration of blonanserin, and its plasma anti-dopamine D2 and anti-serotonin 5-HT2A activity.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hidenobu; Gen, Keishi

    2010-01-01

    Blonanserin (BNS) possesses anti-serotonin 5-HT(2A) activity in addition to anti-dopamine D(2) activity, which is characteristic of second-generation antipsychotics, little information is available on its pharmacologic profile in vivo. We investigated the BNS daily dose, plasma concentration, plasma anti-D(2) activity, and plasma anti-5-HT(2A) activity in schizophrenia in a total of 14 subjects. Blood samples were taken 14 days after the BNS dose was fixed, and the plasma concentration was measured by means of high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method. In addition, the plasma anti-D(2) activity and anti-5-HT(2A) activity were measured by means of radioreceptor assays in which [(3)H]-spiperone and [(3)H]-ketanserin were used. The results revealed a statistically significant correlation between the daily dose and the plasma concentration (p = 0.04). Statistically significant correlations were also observed between the plasma concentration and the anti-D(2) activity and between the plasma concentration and the anti-5-HT(2A) activity (p = 0.003 and 0.04). It is therefore believed that both the anti-D(2) activity in plasma and the anti-5-HT(2A) activity in plasma are regulated almost solely by the unchanged principal. Moreover, the mean plasma serotonin/dopamine (S/D) ratio was 0.9 and BNS exhibited both anti-D(2) activity and also anti-5-HT(2A) activity in vivo, as well, so it was clear that the in vitro pharmacological profile was retained in vivo.

  4. 25I-NBOH: a new potent serotonin 5-HT2A receptor agonist identified in blotter paper seizures in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Arantes, Luciano Chaves; Júnior, Ettore Ferrari; de Souza, Luciano Figueiredo; Cardoso, Andriele Costa; Alcântara, Thaynara Lino Fernandes; Lião, Luciano Morais; Machado, Yuri; Lordeiro, Rogério Araújo; Neto, José Coelho; Andrade, Ana Flávia B

    2017-01-01

    A new potent serotonin 5-HT2A receptor agonist was identified in blotter papers by several state level forensic laboratories in Brazil. The 25I-NBOH is a labile molecule, which fragments into 2C-I when analyzed by routine seized material screening gas chromatography (GC) methods. GC-mass spectrometry (MS), liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight-MS, and Fourier transform infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses were performed to complete molecular characterization. Individual doses range from 300 to 1000 μg. Despite its being a potent 5-HT2A receptor agonist, 25I-NBOH is neither registered in the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) nor classified as a scheduled substance in most countries. Sweden and Brazil seem to be the only countries to control 25I-NBOH. To our knowledge, this is the first scientific report dealing with identification of 25I-NBOH in actual seizures.

  5. Prophylactic and therapeutic effects of acute systemic injections of EMD 281014, a selective serotonin 2A receptor antagonist on anxiety induced by predator stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Adamec, Robert; Creamer, Katherine; Bartoszyk, Gerd D; Burton, Paul

    2004-11-03

    We examined the effect of the selective serotonin 2A (5-HT(2A)) receptor antagonist 7-[4-[2-(4-fluoro-phenyl)-ethyl]-piperazine-1-carbonyl]-1H-indole-3-carbon itrile HCl (EMD 281014) [Bartoszyk, G.D., van Amsterdam, C., Bottcher, H., Seyfried, C.A., 2003. EMD 281014, a new selective serotonin 5-HT2A receptor antagonist. Eur. J. Pharmacol. 473, 229-230.] on change in affect following predator stress. Predator stress involved a 5 min unprotected exposure of rats to a domestic cat. Behavioral effects of stress were evaluated with hole board, plus maze, light/dark box and acoustic startle tests 1 week after stress. Predator stress increased anxiety-like behavior in the plus maze, light/dark box, and elevated response to acoustic startle. EMD 281014 (0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1 or 10 mg/kg) and vehicle injection (ip) occurred either 10 min after predator stress (prophylactic testing), or 90 min prior to behavioral testing for the effects of predator stress (therapeutic testing 1 week after predator stress). In prophylactic testing, EMD 281014 prevented stress potentiation of startle in a dose dependent manner, though the most effective doses were midrange (0.01 and 0.1 mg/kg). Prophylactic administration of EMD 281014 also prevented stress-induced increase of open arm avoidance in the plus maze in a clear dose dependent manner (from 0.01 mg/kg onward). In therapeutic testing, EMD 281014 had no clear drug dependent effects on stress elevation of startle or on behavior of stressed rats in the elevated plus maze. Finally, EMD 281014 did not block the effects of stress on behavior in the light/dark box when given prophylactically or therapeutically. Findings implicate 5-HT(2A) receptors in initiation of some but not all lasting changes in anxiety-like behavior following predator stress. Potential clinical significance of findings are discussed.

  6. The Fabric of Meaning and Subjective Effects in LSD-Induced States Depend on Serotonin 2A Receptor Activation.

    PubMed

    Preller, Katrin H; Herdener, Marcus; Pokorny, Thomas; Planzer, Amanda; Kraehenmann, Rainer; Stämpfli, Philipp; Liechti, Matthias E; Seifritz, Erich; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2017-02-06

    A core aspect of the human self is the attribution of personal relevance to everyday stimuli enabling us to experience our environment as meaningful [1]. However, abnormalities in the attribution of personal relevance to sensory experiences are also critical features of many psychiatric disorders [2, 3]. Despite their clinical relevance, the neurochemical and anatomical substrates enabling meaningful experiences are largely unknown. Therefore, we investigated the neuropharmacology of personal relevance processing in humans by combining fMRI and the administration of the mixed serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine receptor (R) agonist lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), well known to alter the subjective meaning of percepts, with and without pretreatment with the 5-HT2AR antagonist ketanserin. General subjective LSD effects were fully blocked by ketanserin. In addition, ketanserin inhibited the LSD-induced attribution of personal relevance to previously meaningless stimuli and modulated the processing of meaningful stimuli in cortical midline structures. These findings point to the crucial role of the 5-HT2AR subtype and cortical midline regions in the generation and attribution of personal relevance. Our results thus increase our mechanistic understanding of personal relevance processing and reveal potential targets for the treatment of psychiatric illnesses characterized by alterations in personal relevance attribution.

  7. Serotonin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this website will be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? ... Lab Tests Online. AACC is a not-for-profit organization and does not endorse non-AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Serotonin Share ...

  8. Targeting dopamine D3 and serotonin 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors for developing effective antipsychotics: synthesis, biological characterization, and behavioral studies.

    PubMed

    Brindisi, Margherita; Butini, Stefania; Franceschini, Silvia; Brogi, Simone; Trotta, Francesco; Ros, Sindu; Cagnotto, Alfredo; Salmona, Mario; Casagni, Alice; Andreassi, Marco; Saponara, Simona; Gorelli, Beatrice; Weikop, Pia; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Scheel-Kruger, Jorgen; Sandager-Nielsen, Karin; Novellino, Ettore; Campiani, Giuseppe; Gemma, Sandra

    2014-11-26

    Combination of dopamine D3 antagonism, serotonin 5-HT1A partial agonism, and antagonism at 5-HT2A leads to a novel approach to potent atypical antipsychotics. Exploitation of the original structure-activity relationships resulted in the identification of safe and effective antipsychotics devoid of extrapyramidal symptoms liability, sedation, and catalepsy. The potential atypical antipsychotic 5bb was selected for further pharmacological investigation. The distribution of c-fos positive cells in the ventral striatum confirmed the atypical antipsychotic profile of 5bb in agreement with behavioral rodent studies. 5bb administered orally demonstrated a biphasic effect on the MK801-induced hyperactivity at dose levels not able to induce sedation, catalepsy, or learning impairment in passive avoidance. In microdialysis studies, 5bb increased the dopamine efflux in the medial prefrontal cortex. Thus, 5bb represents a valuable lead for the development of atypical antipsychotics endowed with a unique pharmacological profile for addressing negative symptoms and cognitive deficits in schizophrenia.

  9. Individual Differences in Impulsive Action Reflect Variation in the Cortical Serotonin 5-HT2A Receptor System

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Latham HL; Anastasio, Noelle C; Fox, Robert G; Rice, Kenner C; Moeller, F Gerard; Cunningham, Kathryn A

    2015-01-01

    Impulsivity is an important feature of multiple neuropsychiatric disorders, and individual variation in the degree of inherent impulsivity could play a role in the generation or exacerbation of problematic behaviors. Serotonin (5-HT) actions at the 5-HT2AR receptor (5-HT2AR) promote and 5-HT2AR antagonists suppress impulsive action (the inability to withhold premature responses; motor impulsivity) upon systemic administration or microinfusion directly into the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), a node in the corticostriatal circuit that is thought to play a role in the regulation of impulsive action. We hypothesized that the functional capacity of the 5-HT2AR, which is governed by its expression, localization, and protein/protein interactions (eg, postsynaptic density 95 (PSD95)), may drive the predisposition to inherent impulsive action. Stable high-impulsive (HI) and low-impulsive (LI) phenotypes were identified from an outbred rodent population with the 1-choice serial reaction time (1-CSRT) task. HI rats exhibited a greater head-twitch response following administration of the preferential 5-HT2AR agonist 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI) and were more sensitive to the effects of the selective 5-HT2AR antagonist M100907 to suppress impulsive action relative to LI rats. A positive correlation was observed between levels of premature responses and 5-HT2AR binding density in frontal cortex ([3H]-ketanserin radioligand binding). Elevated mPFC 5-HT2AR protein expression concomitant with augmented association of the 5-HT2AR with PSD95 differentiated HI from LI rats. The observed differential sensitivity of HI and LI rats to 5-HT2AR ligands and associated distinct 5-HT2AR protein profiles provide evidence that spontaneously occurring individual differences in impulsive action reflect variation in the cortical 5-HT2AR system. PMID:25666313

  10. Interaction between serotonin 5-HT2A receptor gene and dopamine transporter (DAT1) gene polymorphisms influences personality trait of persistence in Austrian Caucasians.

    PubMed

    Schosser, Alexandra; Fuchs, Karoline; Scharl, Theresa; Schloegelhofer, Monika; Kindler, Jochen; Mossaheb, Nilufar; Kaufmann, Rainer M; Leisch, Friedrich; Kasper, Siegfried; Sieghart, Werner; Aschauer, Harald N

    2010-03-01

    We examined 89 normal volunteers using Cloninger's Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). Genotyping the 102T/C polymorphism of the serotonin 5HT2A receptor gene and the ser9gly polymorphism in exon 1 of the dopamine D3 receptor (DRD3) gene was performed using PCR-RFLP, whereas the dopamine transporter (DAT1) gene variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) polymorphism was investigated using PCR amplification followed by electrophoresis in an 8% acrylamide gel with a set of size markers. We found a nominally significant association between gender and harm avoidance (P=0.017; women showing higher scores). There was no association of either DAT1, DRD3 or 5HT2A alleles or genotypes with any dimension of the TCI applying Kruskal-Wallis rank-sum tests. Comparing homozygote and heterozygote DAT1 genotypes, we found higher novelty seeking scores in homozygotes (P=0.054). We further found a nominally significant interaction between DAT1 and 5HT2A homo-/heterozygous gene variants (P=0.0071; DAT1 and 5HT2A genotypes P value of 0.05), performing multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA). Examining the temperamental TCI subscales, this interaction was associated with persistence (genotypes: P=0.004; homo-/heterozygous gene variants: P=0.0004). We conclude that an interaction between DAT1 and 5HT2A genes might influence the temperamental personality trait persistence.

  11. Discovery of a new class of potential multifunctional atypical antipsychotic agents targeting dopamine D3 and serotonin 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors: design, synthesis, and effects on behavior.

    PubMed

    Butini, Stefania; Gemma, Sandra; Campiani, Giuseppe; Franceschini, Silvia; Trotta, Francesco; Borriello, Marianna; Ceres, Nicoletta; Ros, Sindu; Coccone, Salvatore Sanna; Bernetti, Matteo; De Angelis, Meri; Brindisi, Margherita; Nacci, Vito; Fiorini, Isabella; Novellino, Ettore; Cagnotto, Alfredo; Mennini, Tiziana; Sandager-Nielsen, Karin; Andreasen, Jesper Tobias; Scheel-Kruger, Jorgen; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Fattorusso, Caterina

    2009-01-08

    Dopamine D(3) antagonism combined with serotonin 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A) receptor occupancy may represent a novel paradigm for developing innovative antipsychotics. The unique pharmacological features of 5i are a high affinity for dopamine D(3), serotonin 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A) receptors, together with a low affinity for dopamine D(2) receptors (to minimize extrapyramidal side effects), serotonin 5-HT(2C) receptors (to reduce the risk of obesity under chronic treatment), and for hERG channels (to reduce incidence of torsade des pointes). Pharmacological and biochemical data, including specific c-fos expression in mesocorticolimbic areas, confirmed an atypical antipsychotic profile of 5i in vivo, characterized by the absence of catalepsy at antipsychotic dose.

  12. Cerebral metabolic responses to 5-HT2A/C receptor activation in mice with genetically modified serotonin transporter (SERT) expression.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Neil; Ferrington, Linda; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Kelly, Paul A T

    2011-01-01

    Variation in the human serotonin transporter gene (hSERT; 5-HTT) resulting in a life-long alteration in SERT function influences anxiety and the risk of developing affective disorders. The mechanisms underlying the influence of the hSERT gene on these phenotypes remain unclear but may involve altered 5-HT receptor function. Here we characterise the cerebral metabolic response to 5-HT(2A/C) receptor activation in two transgenic mouse models of altered SERT function, SERT knock-out (SERT KO) and hSERT over-expressing (hSERT OE) mice, to test the hypothesis that genetically mediated variability in SERT expression alters 5-HT(2A/C) function. We found that a constitutive increase in SERT expression (hSERT OE) enhanced, whereas a constitutive decrease in SERT expression (SERT KO) attenuated, 5-HT(2A/C) function. Therefore, altered 5-HT(2A/C) receptor functioning in response to hSERT gene variation may contribute to its influence on affective phenotypes.

  13. Activation of serotonin 2A receptors underlies the psilocybin-induced effects on α oscillations, N170 visual-evoked potentials, and visual hallucinations.

    PubMed

    Kometer, Michael; Schmidt, André; Jäncke, Lutz; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2013-06-19

    Visual illusions and hallucinations are hallmarks of serotonergic hallucinogen-induced altered states of consciousness. Although the serotonergic hallucinogen psilocybin activates multiple serotonin (5-HT) receptors, recent evidence suggests that activation of 5-HT2A receptors may lead to the formation of visual hallucinations by increasing cortical excitability and altering visual-evoked cortical responses. To address this hypothesis, we assessed the effects of psilocybin (215 μg/kg vs placebo) on both α oscillations that regulate cortical excitability and early visual-evoked P1 and N170 potentials in healthy human subjects. To further disentangle the specific contributions of 5-HT2A receptors, subjects were additionally pretreated with the preferential 5-HT2A receptor antagonist ketanserin (50 mg vs placebo). We found that psilocybin strongly decreased prestimulus parieto-occipital α power values, thus precluding a subsequent stimulus-induced α power decrease. Furthermore, psilocybin strongly decreased N170 potentials associated with the appearance of visual perceptual alterations, including visual hallucinations. All of these effects were blocked by pretreatment with the 5-HT2A antagonist ketanserin, indicating that activation of 5-HT2A receptors by psilocybin profoundly modulates the neurophysiological and phenomenological indices of visual processing. Specifically, activation of 5-HT2A receptors may induce a processing mode in which stimulus-driven cortical excitation is overwhelmed by spontaneous neuronal excitation through the modulation of α oscillations. Furthermore, the observed reduction of N170 visual-evoked potentials may be a key mechanism underlying 5-HT2A receptor-mediated visual hallucinations. This change in N170 potentials may be important not only for psilocybin-induced states but also for understanding acute hallucinatory states seen in psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease.

  14. Evidence for chronically altered cortical serotonin function in human female recreational ecstasy (MDMA) polydrug users

    PubMed Central

    Di Iorio, Christina R; Watkins, Tristan J; Dietrich, Mary S; Cao, Aize; Blackford, Jennifer U; Rogers, Baxter; Ansari, Mohammed S; Baldwin, Ronald M; Li, Rui; Kessler, Robert M; Salomon, Ronald M; Benningfield, Margaret; Cowan, Ronald L

    2012-01-01

    Context MDMA (ecstasy) is a popular recreational drug that produces loss of serotonin (5-HT) axons in animal models. Whether MDMA produces chronic reductions in 5-HT signaling in humans remains controversial. Objective To determine if MDMA use is associated with chronic reductions in serotonin signaling in female human cerebral cortex as reflected by increased 5-HT2A receptors. Design Cross sectional case-control study comparing 5-HT2A receptor levels in abstinent female MDMA polydrug users to MDMA-naive females; within-group design assessing the association of lifetime MDMA use and 5-HT2A receptors. Subjects had at least 90 days abstinence from MDMA use as verified by hair sampling. Cortical 5-HT2A receptor levels were assayed with the 5HT2A-specific Positron Emission Tomography (PET) radioligand [18F]setoperone. Setting Academic Medical Center Research Laboratory. Participants Volunteer female MDMA users (N=14) and MDMA-naive controls (N=10). Main exclusion criteria were non-drug-related DSM-IV axis I psychiatric disorders and general medical illness. Main Outcome Measure Cortical 5-HT2A receptor non-displaceable binding potential (5-HT2ABPND). Results MDMA users had increased 5-HT2ABPND in occipital-parietal (19.7%), temporal (20.5%), occipito-temporal-parietal (18.3%), frontal (16.6%), and fronto-parietal (18.5%) regions (p<0.05; corrected). Lifetime MDMA use associated positively with 5-HT2ABPND in fronto-parietal (β=0.665;p=0.007), occipito-temporal (β=0.798;p=0.002), fronto-limbic (β=0.634;p=0.024), and frontal (β=0.691;p=0.008) regions. In contrast, there were no regions in which MDMA use was inversely associated with receptor levels. There were no statistically significant effects of the duration of MDMA abstinence on 5-HT2ABPND. Conclusions Human recreational MDMA use is associated with long-lasting increases in 5-HT2A receptor density. 5-HT2A receptor levels correlate positively with lifetime MDMA use and do not decrease with abstinence. These

  15. Role of serotonin 5-HT2A receptors in the development of cardiac hypertrophy in response to aortic constriction in mice.

    PubMed

    Lairez, O; Cognet, T; Schaak, S; Calise, D; Guilbeau-Frugier, C; Parini, A; Mialet-Perez, J

    2013-06-01

    Serotonin, in addition to its fundamental role as a neurotransmitter, plays a critical role in the cardiovascular system, where it is thought to be involved in the development of cardiac hypertrophy and failure. Indeed, we recently found that mice with deletion of monoamine oxidase A had enhanced levels of blood and cardiac 5-HT, which contributed to exacerbation of hypertrophy in a model of experimental pressure overload. 5-HT2A receptors are expressed in the heart and mediate a hypertrophic response to 5-HT in cardiac cells. However, their role in cardiac remodeling in vivo and the signaling pathways associated are not well understood. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of a selective 5-HT2A receptor antagonist, M100907, on the development of cardiac hypertrophy induced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC). Cardiac 5-HT2A receptor expression was transiently increased after TAC, and was recapitulated in cardiomyocytes, as observed with 5-HT2A in situ labeling by immunohistochemistry. Selective blockade of 5-HT2A receptors prevented the development of cardiac hypertrophy, as measured by echocardiography, cardiomyocyte area and heart weight-to-body weight ratio. Interestingly, activation of calmodulin kinase (CamKII), which is a core mechanism in cardiac hypertrophy, was reduced in cardiac samples from M100907-treated TAC mice compared to vehicle-treated mice. In addition, phosphorylation of histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4), a downstream partner of CamKII was significantly diminished in M100907-treated TAC mice. Thus, our results show that selective blockade of 5-HT2A receptors has beneficial effect in the development of cardiac hypertrophy through inhibition of the CamKII/HDAC4 pathway.

  16. Activation of serotonin2A receptors in the medial septum-diagonal band of Broca complex enhanced working memory in the hemiparkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Bo; Zhang, Li; Sun, Yi-Na; Han, Ling-Na; Wu, Zhong-Heng; Zhang, Qiao-Jun; Liu, Jian

    2015-04-01

    Serotonin2A (5-HT2A) receptors are highly expressed in the medial septum-diagonal band of Broca complex (MS-DB), especially in parvalbumin (PV)-positive neurons linked to hippocampal theta rhythm, which is involved in cognition. Cognitive impairments commonly occur in Parkinson's disease. Here we performed behavioral, electrophysiological, neurochemical and immunohistochemical studies in rats with complete unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) to assess the importance of dopamine (DA) depletion and MS-DB 5-HT2A receptors for working memory. The MFB lesions resulted in working memory impairment and decreases in firing rate and density of MS-DB PV-positive neurons, peak frequency of hippocampal theta rhythm, and DA levels in septohippocampal system and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) compared to control rats. Intra-MS-DB injection of high affinity 5-HT2A receptor agonist TCB-2 enhanced working memory, increased firing rate of PV-positive neurons and peak frequency of hippocampal theta rhythm, elevated DA levels in the hippocampus and mPFC, and decreased 5-HT level in the hippocampus in control and lesioned rats. Compared to control rats, the duration of the excitatory effect produced by TCB-2 on the firing rate of PV-positive neurons was markedly shortened in lesioned rats, indicating dysfunction of 5-HT2A receptors. These findings suggest that unilateral lesions of the MFB in rats induced working memory deficit, and activation of MS-DB 5-HT2A receptors enhanced working memory, which may be due to changes in the activity of septohippocampal network and monoamine levels in the hippocampus and mPFC.

  17. BDNF Val(66)Met polymorphism tunes frontolimbic circuitry during affective contextual learning.

    PubMed

    Jabbi, Mbemba; Cropp, Brett; Nash, Tiffany; Kohn, Philip; Kippenhan, J Shane; Masdeu, Joseph C; Mattay, Raghav; Kolachana, Bhaskar; Berman, Karen F

    2017-08-31

    Adaptive learning impairments are common in cognitive and behavioral disorders, but the neurogenetic mechanisms supporting human affective learning are poorly understood. We designed a higher-order contextual learning task in which healthy participants genotyped for the Val(66)Met polymorphism of the brain derived neurotropic factor gene (BDNF) were required to choose the member of a picture pair most congruent with the emotion in a previously-viewed facial expression video in order to produce an advantageous monetary outcome. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) identified frontolimbic blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) reactivity that was associated with BDNF Val(66)Met genotype during all three phases of the learning task: aversive and reward-predictive learning, contextually-challenging decision-making, and choice-related monetary loss-avoidance and gain outcomes. Relative to Val homozygotes, Met carriers showed attenuated ventromedial prefrontal response to predictive affective cues, dorsolateral prefrontal signaling that depended on decision difficulty, and enhanced ventromedial prefrontal reactivity that was specific to loss-avoidance. These findings indicate that the BDNF Val(66)Met polymorphism is associated with functional tuning of behaviorally-relevant frontolimbic circuitry, particularly involving the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, during higher-order learning. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Test-retest variability of high resolution positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of cortical serotonin (5HT2A) receptors in older, healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Position emission tomography (PET) imaging using [18F]-setoperone to quantify cortical 5-HT2A receptors has the potential to inform pharmacological treatments for geriatric depression and dementia. Prior reports indicate a significant normal aging effect on serotonin 5HT2A receptor (5HT2AR) binding potential. The purpose of this study was to assess the test-retest variability of [18F]-setoperone PET with a high resolution scanner (HRRT) for measuring 5HT2AR availability in subjects greater than 60 years old. Methods: Six healthy subjects (age range = 65–78 years) completed two [18F]-setoperone PET scans on two separate occasions 5–16 weeks apart. Results The average difference in the binding potential (BPND) as measured on the two occasions in the frontal and temporal cortical regions ranged between 2 and 12%, with the lowest intraclass correlation coefficient in anterior cingulate regions. Conclusion We conclude that the test-retest variability of [18F]-setoperone PET in elderly subjects is comparable to that of [18F]-setoperone and other 5HT2AR radiotracers in younger subject samples. PMID:19580676

  19. G protein- and agonist-bound serotonin 5-HT2A receptor model activated by steered molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Isberg, Vignir; Balle, Thomas; Sander, Tommy; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen; Gloriam, David E

    2011-02-28

    A 5-HT(2A) receptor model was constructed by homology modeling based on the β(2)-adrenergic receptor and the G protein-bound opsin crystal structures. The 5-HT(2A) receptor model was transferred into an active conformation by an agonist ligand and a G(αq) peptide in four subsequent steered molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The driving force for the transformation was the addition of several known intermolecular and receptor interhelical hydrogen bonds enforcing the necessary helical and rotameric movements. Subsquent MD simulations without constraints confirmed the stability of the activated receptor model as well as revealed new information about stabilizing residues and bonds. The active 5-HT(2A) receptor model was further validated by retrospective ligand screening of more than 9400 compounds, whereof 182 were known ligands. The results show that the model can be used in drug discovery for virtual screening and structure-based ligand design as well as in GPCR activation studies.

  20. Behavioral Effects of Systemic, Infralimbic and Prelimbic Injections of a Serotonin 5-HT2A Antagonist in Carioca High- and Low-Conditioned Freezing Rats.

    PubMed

    León, Laura A; Castro-Gomes, Vitor; Zárate-Guerrero, Santiago; Corredor, Karen; Mello Cruz, Antonio P; Brandão, Marcus L; Cardenas, Fernando P; Landeira-Fernandez, J

    2017-01-01

    The role of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) and 5-HT2A receptors in anxiety has been extensively studied, mostly without considering individual differences in trait anxiety. Our laboratory developed two lines of animals that are bred for high and low freezing responses to contextual cues that are previously associated with footshock (Carioca High-conditioned Freezing [CHF] and Carioca Low-conditioned Freezing [CLF]). The present study investigated whether ketanserin, a preferential 5-HT2A receptor blocker, exerts distinct anxiety-like profiles in these two lines of animals. In the first experiment, the animals received a systemic injection of ketanserin and were exposed to the elevated plus maze (EPM). In the second experiment, these two lines of animals received microinjections of ketanserin in the infralimbic (IL) and prelimbic (PL) cortices and were exposed to either the EPM or a contextual fear conditioning paradigm. The two rat lines exhibited bidirectional effects on anxiety-like behavior in the EPM and opposite responses to ketanserin. Both systemic and intra-IL cortex injections of ketanserin exerted anxiolytic-like effects in CHF rats but anxiogenic-like effects in CLF rats. Microinjections of ketanserin in the PL cortex also exerted anxiolytic-like effects in CHF rats but had no effect in CLF rats. These results suggest that the behavioral effects of 5-HT2A receptor antagonism might depend on genetic variability associated with baseline reactions to threatening situations and 5-HT2A receptor expression in the IL and PL cortices. Highlights -CHF and CLF rats are two bidirectional lines that are based on contextual fear conditioning.-CHF rats have a more "anxious" phenotype than CLF rats in the EPM.-The 5-HT2A receptor antagonist ketanserin had opposite behavioral effects in CHF and CLF rats.-Systemic and IL injections either decreased (CHF) or increased (CLF) anxiety-like behavior.-PL injections either decreased (CHF) anxiety-like behavior or had no

  1. Platelet-Derived Serotonin Mediates Liver Regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesurtel, Mickael; Graf, Rolf; Aleil, Boris; Walther, Diego J.; Tian, Yinghua; Jochum, Wolfram; Gachet, Christian; Bader, Michael; Clavien, Pierre-Alain

    2006-04-01

    The liver can regenerate its volume after major tissue loss. In a mouse model of liver regeneration, thrombocytopenia, or impaired platelet activity resulted in the failure to initiate cellular proliferation in the liver. Platelets are major carriers of serotonin in the blood. In thrombocytopenic mice, a serotonin agonist reconstituted liver proliferation. The expression of 5-HT2A and 2B subtype serotonin receptors in the liver increased after hepatectomy. Antagonists of 5-HT2A and 2B receptors inhibited liver regeneration. Liver regeneration was also blunted in mice lacking tryptophan hydroxylase 1, which is the rate-limiting enzyme for the synthesis of peripheral serotonin. This failure of regeneration was rescued by reloading serotonin-free platelets with a serotonin precursor molecule. These results suggest that platelet-derived serotonin is involved in the initiation of liver regeneration.

  2. A Single Dose of LSD Does Not Alter Gene Expression of the Serotonin 2A Receptor Gene (HTR2A) or Early Growth Response Genes (EGR1-3) in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Dolder, Patrick C.; Grünblatt, Edna; Müller, Felix; Borgwardt, Stefan J.; Liechti, Matthias E.

    2017-01-01

    Rationale: Renewed interest has been seen in the use of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in psychiatric research and practice. The repeated use of LSD leads to tolerance that is believed to result from serotonin (5-HT) 5-HT2A receptor downregulation. In rats, daily LSD administration for 4 days decreased frontal cortex 5-HT2A receptor binding. Additionally, a single dose of LSD acutely increased expression of the early growth response genes EGR1 and EGR2 in rat and mouse brains through 5-HT2A receptor stimulation. No human data on the effects of LSD on gene expression has been reported. Therefore, we investigated the effects of single-dose LSD administration on the expression of the 5-HT2A receptor gene (HTR2A) and EGR1-3 genes. Methods: mRNA expression levels were analyzed in whole blood as a peripheral biomarker in 15 healthy subjects before and 1.5 and 24 h after the administration of LSD (100 μg) and placebo in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study. Results: LSD did not alter the expression of the HTR2A or EGR1-3 genes 1.5 and 24 h after administration compared with placebo. Conclusion: No changes were observed in the gene expression of LSD’s primary target receptor gene or genes that are implicated in its downstream effects. Remaining unclear is whether chronic LSD administration alters gene expression in humans. PMID:28701958

  3. Dorsal prefrontal cortical serotonin 2A receptor binding indices are differentially related to individual scores on harm avoidance.

    PubMed

    Baeken, Chris; Bossuyt, Axel; De Raedt, Rudi

    2014-02-28

    Although the serotonergic system has been implicated in healthy as well as in pathological emotional states, knowledge about its involvement in personality is limited. Earlier research on this topic suggests that post-synaptic 5-HT2A receptors could be involved in particular in frontal cortical areas. In drug-naïve healthy individuals, we examined the relationship between these 5-HT2A receptors and the temperament dimension harm avoidance (HA) using 123I-5-I-R91150 single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). HA is a personality feature closely related to stress, anxiety and depression proneness, and it is thought to be mediated by the serotonergic system. We focused on the prefrontal cortices as these regions are frequently implicated in cognitive processes related to a variety of affective disorders. We found a positive relationship between dorsal prefrontal cortical (DPFC) 5-HT2A receptor binding indices (BI) and individual HA scores. Further, our results suggest that those individuals with a tendency to worry or to ruminate are particularly prone to display significantly higher 5-HT2A receptor BI in the left DPFC. Although we only examined psychologically healthy individuals, this relationship suggests a possible vulnerability for affective disorders.

  4. Inhibition of alpha oscillations through serotonin-2A receptor activation underlies the visual effects of ayahuasca in humans.

    PubMed

    Valle, Marta; Maqueda, Ana Elda; Rabella, Mireia; Rodríguez-Pujadas, Aina; Antonijoan, Rosa Maria; Romero, Sergio; Alonso, Joan Francesc; Mañanas, Miquel Àngel; Barker, Steven; Friedlander, Pablo; Feilding, Amanda; Riba, Jordi

    2016-07-01

    Ayahuasca is an Amazonian psychotropic plant tea typically obtained from two plants, Banisteriopsis caapi and Psychotria viridis. It contains the psychedelic 5-HT2A and sigma-1 agonist N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) plus β-carboline alkaloids with monoamine-oxidase (MAO)-inhibiting properties. Although the psychoactive effects of ayahuasca have commonly been attributed solely to agonism at the 5-HT2A receptor, the molecular target of classical psychedelics, this has not been tested experimentally. Here we wished to study the contribution of the 5-HT2A receptor to the neurophysiological and psychological effects of ayahuasca in humans. We measured drug-induced changes in spontaneous brain oscillations and subjective effects in a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled study involving the oral administration of ayahuasca (0.75mg DMT/kg body weight) and the 5-HT2A antagonist ketanserin (40mg). Twelve healthy, experienced psychedelic users (5 females) participated in four experimental sessions in which they received the following drug combinations: placebo+placebo, placebo+ayahuasca, ketanserin+placebo and ketanserin+ayahuasca. Ayahuasca induced EEG power decreases in the delta, theta and alpha frequency bands. Current density in alpha-band oscillations in parietal and occipital cortex was inversely correlated with the intensity of visual imagery induced by ayahuasca. Pretreatment with ketanserin inhibited neurophysiological modifications, reduced the correlation between alpha and visual effects, and attenuated the intensity of the subjective experience. These findings suggest that despite the chemical complexity of ayahuasca, 5-HT2A activation plays a key role in the neurophysiological and visual effects of ayahuasca in humans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  5. Variation in Dopamine D2 and Serotonin 5-HT2A Receptor Genes is Associated with Working Memory Processing and Response to Treatment with Antipsychotics

    PubMed Central

    Blasi, Giuseppe; Selvaggi, Pierluigi; Fazio, Leonardo; Antonucci, Linda Antonella; Taurisano, Paolo; Masellis, Rita; Romano, Raffaella; Mancini, Marina; Zhang, Fengyu; Caforio, Grazia; Popolizio, Teresa; Apud, Jose; Weinberger, Daniel R; Bertolino, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine D2 and serotonin 5-HT2A receptors contribute to modulate prefrontal cortical physiology and response to treatment with antipsychotics in schizophrenia. Similarly, functional variation in the genes encoding these receptors is also associated with these phenotypes. In particular, the DRD2 rs1076560 T allele predicts a lower ratio of expression of D2 short/long isoforms, suboptimal working memory processing, and better response to antipsychotic treatment compared with the G allele. Furthermore, the HTR2A T allele is associated with lower 5-HT2A expression, impaired working memory processing, and poorer response to antipsychotics compared with the C allele. Here, we investigated in healthy subjects whether these functional polymorphisms have a combined effect on prefrontal cortical physiology and related cognitive behavior linked to schizophrenia as well as on response to treatment with second-generation antipsychotics in patients with schizophrenia. In a total sample of 620 healthy subjects, we found that subjects with the rs1076560 T and rs6314 T alleles have greater fMRI prefrontal activity during working memory. Similar results were obtained within the attentional domain. Also, the concomitant presence of the rs1076560 T/rs6314 T alleles also predicted lower behavioral accuracy during working memory. Moreover, we found that rs1076560 T carrier/rs6314 CC individuals had better responses to antipsychotic treatment in two independent samples of patients with schizophrenia (n=63 and n=54, respectively), consistent with the previously reported separate effects of these genotypes. These results indicate that DRD2 and HTR2A genetic variants together modulate physiological prefrontal efficiency during working memory and also modulate the response to antipsychotics. Therefore, these results suggest that further exploration is needed to better understand the clinical consequences of these genotype–phenotype relationships. PMID:25563748

  6. Culture as a mediator of gene-environment interaction: Cultural consonance, childhood adversity, a 2A serotonin receptor polymorphism, and depression in urban Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dressler, William W; Balieiro, Mauro C; Ferreira de Araújo, Luiza; Silva, Wilson A; Ernesto Dos Santos, José

    2016-07-01

    Research on gene-environment interaction was facilitated by breakthroughs in molecular biology in the late 20th century, especially in the study of mental health. There is a reliable interaction between candidate genes for depression and childhood adversity in relation to mental health outcomes. The aim of this paper is to explore the role of culture in this process in an urban community in Brazil. The specific cultural factor examined is cultural consonance, or the degree to which individuals are able to successfully incorporate salient cultural models into their own beliefs and behaviors. It was hypothesized that cultural consonance in family life would mediate the interaction of genotype and childhood adversity. In a study of 402 adult Brazilians from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds, conducted from 2011 to 2014, the interaction of reported childhood adversity and a polymorphism in the 2A serotonin receptor was associated with higher depressive symptoms. Further analysis showed that the gene-environment interaction was mediated by cultural consonance in family life, and that these effects were more pronounced in lower social class neighborhoods. The findings reinforce the role of the serotonergic system in the regulation of stress response and learning and memory, and how these processes in turn interact with environmental events and circumstances. Furthermore, these results suggest that gene-environment interaction models should incorporate a wider range of environmental experience and more complex pathways to better understand how genes and the environment combine to influence mental health outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. T102C polymorphism of serotonin-2A receptor gene in Turkish schizophrenia patients: Association with cognitive impairment and soft neurological signs

    PubMed Central

    Özçetin, Adnan; Poyraz, Burç Çağrı; Poyraz, Cana Aksoy; Bozhüyük, Erol; Bolat, Nurullah; Balcioğlu, İbrahim; Özkiliç, Anıl Çağla; Genç, Zehra Seda; Cengiz, Müjgan

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Previous studies have shown an association between the T102C polymorphism of the serotonin-2A receptor gene and schizophrenia. In addition, an association of this polymorphism with clinical phenotypes in schizophrenia such as treatment response and cognitive impairment has been observed. Materials and Methods: In this case-control study conducted in Turkish Caucasians, we compared T102C polymorphism genotype and allele frequencies in 76 schizophrenic patients and 165 healthy controls. We also investigated interaction of this polymorphism with clinical and cognitive variables in patients. Results: No significant difference was observed in the distribution of the three genotypes (T/T, T/C and C/C) and in the allele frequencies in controls and patients with schizophrenia. No evidence of association was detected at various clinical phenotypes including symptom severity, suicidality, treatment response, age of disease onset, number of hospitalizations and history of violence (in co-dominant, dominant, or recessive models). However, as compared to the C/C genotype, patients with 1 or 2 copies of the T allele were characterized by better stroop test performances and less “motor coordination” soft neurological signs. Conclusion: Further research is needed to elucidate the impact of T102C polymorphism on neurocognitive functions in both healthy and patient populations. PMID:25568476

  8. Serotonin hyperinnervation and upregulated 5-HT2A receptor expression and motor-stimulating function in nigrostriatal dopamine-deficient Pitx3 mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Qiu, Guozhen; Ding, Shengyuan; Zhou, Fu-Ming

    2013-01-23

    The striatum receives serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) innervation and expresses 5-HT2A receptors (5-HT2ARs) and other 5-HT receptors, raising the possibility that the striatal 5-HT system may undergo adaptive changes after chronic severe dopamine (DA) loss and contribute to the function and dysfunction of the striatum. Here we show that in transcription factor Pitx3 gene mutant mice with a selective, severe DA loss in the dorsal striatum mimicking the DA denervation in late Parkinson's disease (PD), both the 5-HT innervation and the 5-HT2AR mRNA expression were increased in the dorsal striatum. Functionally, while having no detectable motor effect in wild type mice, the 5-HT2R agonist 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine increased both the baseline and l-dopa-induced normal ambulatory and dyskinetic movements in Pitx3 mutant mice, whereas the selective 5-HT2AR blocker volinanserin had the opposite effects. These results demonstrate that Pitx3 mutant mice are a convenient and valid mouse model to study the compensatory 5-HT upregulation following the loss of the nigrostriatal DA projection and that the upregulated 5-HT2AR function in the DA deficient dorsal striatum may enhance both normal and dyskinetic movements. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Role of serotonin 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors on brain stimulation reward and the reward-facilitating effect of cocaine.

    PubMed

    Katsidoni, Vicky; Apazoglou, Kalliopi; Panagis, George

    2011-02-01

    The serotonin 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT(2C) receptors, which are found in abundance in the mesolimbocortical dopaminergic system, appear to modulate the behavioral effects of cocaine. The present series of studies set out to investigate the role of 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT(2C) receptors on brain reward and on the reward-facilitating effect of cocaine and localize the neural substrates within the mesolimbocortical dopaminergic system that are responsible for these effects. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with stimulating electrodes and bilateral cannulae for the experiments involving microinjections and were trained to respond to electrical stimulation. In the first study, we examined the effects of systemic administration of selective 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT(2C) receptor agonists (TCB-2 and WAY-161503) and antagonists (R-96544 and SB-242084) on intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS). In the second study, we examined the effectiveness of TCB-2, WAY-161503, R-96544, and SB-242084 in blocking the reward-facilitating effect of cocaine. In the third study, we examined the effects of intra-medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), intra-nucleus accumbens (NAC), and intra-ventral tegmental area (VTA) injection of WAY-161503 on the reward-facilitating effect of cocaine. Acute systemic administration of TCB-2 and WAY-161503 increased ICSS threshold. Systemic WAY-161503 attenuated the reward-facilitating effect of cocaine. This effect was reversed by pretreatment with SB-242084. Intracranial microinjections of WAY-161503 into the mPFC and the NAC shell/core, but not the VTA, attenuated the reward-facilitating effect of cocaine. These data indicate that 5-HT(2C) receptors within the mPFC and the NAC modulate the reinforcing effects of cocaine and provide evidence that 5-HT(2C) receptor agonists could be a possible drug discovery target for the treatment of psychostimulant addiction.

  10. Serotonin, via 5-HT2A receptors, increases EPSCs in layer V pyramidal cells of prefrontal cortex by an asynchronous mode of glutamate release.

    PubMed

    Aghajanian, G K; Marek, G J

    1999-04-17

    Previously, serotonin (5-HT) was found to induce a marked increase in glutamatergic spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) in apical dendrites of layer V pyramidal cells of prefrontal cortex; this effect was mediated by 5-HT2A receptors, a proposed site of action of hallucinogenic and atypical antipsychotic drugs. Unexpectedly, although the effect of 5-HT was Ca2+-dependent and tetrodotoxin-sensitive, it did not appear to involve the activation of excitatory afferent impulse flow. This paradox prompted us to investigate (in rat brain slices) whether 5-HT was acting through an atypical mode of excitatory transmitter release. We found that the frequency of 5-HT-induced spontaneous EPSCs was fully supported by Sr2+ in the absence of added Ca2+, implicating the mechanism of asynchronous transmitter release which has been linked to the high-affinity Ca2+-sensor synaptotagmin III. Although the early, synchronous component of electrically evoked EPSCs was reduced while 5-HT was being applied, late, nonsynchronous components were enhanced during 5-HT washout and also by the 5-HT2 partial agonist 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl-2-aminopropane (DOI); the effect of DOI was blocked by a selective 5-HT2A antagonist (MDL 100,907). This late, nonsynchronous component was distinct from conventional polysynaptic EPSCs evoked in the presence of the GABAA antagonist bicuculline, but resembled asynchronous glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) evoked in the presence of Sr2+. An enhancement of asynchronous EPSCs by a specific neurotransmitter receptor has not been reported previously. The possible role of excessive asynchronous transmission in the cerebral cortex in mediating the hallucinogenic effects of 5-HT2A agonists such as DOI is discussed. Copyright 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.

  11. Involvement of serotonin 2A receptor activation in modulating medial prefrontal cortex and amygdala neuronal activation during novelty-exposure.

    PubMed

    Hervig, Mona El-Sayed; Jensen, Nadja Cecilie Hvid; Rasmussen, Nadja Bredo; Rydbirk, Rasmus; Olesen, Mikkel Vestergaard; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Pakkenberg, Bente; Aznar, Susana

    2017-03-02

    The medial prefrontal cortex (PFC) plays a major role in executive function by exerting a top-down control onto subcortical areas. Novelty-induced frontal cortex activation is 5-HT2A receptor (5-HT2AR) dependent. Here, we further investigated how blockade of 5-HT2ARs in mice exposed to a novel open-field arena affects medial PFC activation and basolateral amygdala (BLA) reactivity. We used c-Fos immunoreactivity (IR) as a marker of neuronal activation and stereological quantification for obtaining the total number of c-Fos-IR neurons as a measure of regional activation. We further examined the impact of 5-HT2AR blockade on the striatal-projecting BLA neurons. Systemic administration of ketanserin (0.5mg/kg) prior to novel open-field exposure resulted in reduced total numbers of c-Fos-IR cells in dorsomedial PFC areas and the BLA. Moreover, there was a positive correlation between the relative time spent in the centre of the open-field and BLA c-Fos-IR in the ketanserin-treated animals. Unilateral medial PFC lesions blocked this effect, ascertaining an involvement of this frontal cortex area. On the other hand, medial PFC lesioning exacerbated the more anxiogenic-like behaviour of the ketanserin-treated animals, upholding its involvement in modulating averseness. Ketanserin did not affect the number of activated striatal-projecting BLA neurons (measured by number of Cholera Toxin b (CTb) retrograde labelled neurons also being c-Fos-IR) following CTb injection in the ventral striatum. These results support a role of 5-HT2AR activation in modulating mPFC and BLA activation during exposure to a novel environment, which may be interrelated. Conversely, 5-HT2AR blockade does not seem to affect the amygdala-striatal projection.

  12. Hallucinogen-like effects of N,N-dipropyltryptamine (DPT): possible mediation by serotonin 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Fantegrossi, William E.; Reissig, Chad J.; Katz, Elyse B.; Yarosh, Haley L.; Rice, Kenner C.; Winter, Jerrold C.

    2008-01-01

    N,N-dipropyltryptamine (DPT) is a synthetic tryptamine hallucinogen which has been used psychotherapeutically in humans, but has been studied preclinically only rarely. In the present studies, DPT was tested in a drug-elicited head twitch assay in mice, and in rats trained to discriminate lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), N,N-dimethyl-4-phosphoryloxytryptamine (psilocybin), or 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). A separate group of rats was also trained to recognize DPT itself as a discriminative stimulus, and in all cases, the behavioral effects of DPT were challenged with the selective serotonin (5-HT)2A antagonist M100907, the 5-HT1A selective antagonist WAY-100635, or their combination. In the head twitch assay, DPT elicited dose-dependent effects, producing a biphasic dose-effect curve. WAY-100635 produced a parallel rightward shift in the dose-effect curve for head twitches, indicative of surmountable antagonism, but the antagonist effects of M100907 were functionally insurmountable. DPT produced partial to full substitution when tested in rats trained to discriminate LSD, psilocybin or MDMA, and served as a discriminative stimulus. In all cases, the antagonist effects of M100907 were more profound than were those of WAY-100635. DPT is thus active in two rodent models relevant to 5-HT2 agonist activity. The effectiveness with which M100907 antagonizes the behavioral actions of this compound strongly suggests that the 5-HT2A receptor is an important site of action for DPT, but the modulatory actions of WAY-100635 also imply a 5-HT1A-mediated component to the actions of this compound. PMID:17905422

  13. Hallucinogen-like effects of N,N-dipropyltryptamine (DPT): possible mediation by serotonin 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors in rodents.

    PubMed

    Fantegrossi, William E; Reissig, Chad J; Katz, Elyse B; Yarosh, Haley L; Rice, Kenner C; Winter, Jerrold C

    2008-01-01

    N,N-dipropyltryptamine (DPT) is a synthetic tryptamine hallucinogen which has been used psychotherapeutically in humans, but has been studied preclinically only rarely. In the present studies, DPT was tested in a drug-elicited head-twitch assay in mice, and in rats trained to discriminate lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), N,N-dimethyl-4-phosphoryloxytryptamine (psilocybin), or 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). A separate group of rats was also trained to recognize DPT itself as a discriminative stimulus, and in all cases, the behavioral effects of DPT were challenged with the selective serotonin (5-HT)2A antagonist M100907, the 5-HT1A selective antagonist WAY-100635, or their combination. In the head-twitch assay, DPT elicited dose-dependent effects, producing a biphasic dose-effect curve. WAY-100635 produced a parallel rightward shift in the dose-effect curve for head twitches, indicative of surmountable antagonism, but the antagonist effects of M100907 were functionally insurmountable. DPT produced partial to full substitution when tested in rats trained to discriminate LSD, psilocybin or MDMA, and served as a discriminative stimulus. In all cases, the antagonist effects of M100907 were more profound than were those of WAY-100635. DPT is thus active in two rodent models relevant to 5-HT2 agonist activity. The effectiveness with which M100907 antagonizes the behavioral actions of this compound strongly suggest that the 5-HT2A receptor is an important site of action for DPT, but the modulatory actions of WAY-100635 also imply a 5-HT1A-mediated component to the actions of this compound.

  14. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (serotonin)2A receptors in rat anterior cingulate cortex mediate the discriminative stimulus properties of d-lysergic acid diethylamide.

    PubMed

    Gresch, Paul J; Barrett, Robert J; Sanders-Bush, Elaine; Smith, Randy L

    2007-02-01

    d-Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), an indoleamine hallucinogen, produces profound alterations in mood, thought, and perception in humans. The brain site(s) that mediates the effects of LSD is currently unknown. In this study, we combine the drug discrimination paradigm with intracerebral microinjections to investigate the anatomical localization of the discriminative stimulus of LSD in rats. Based on our previous findings, we targeted the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) to test its involvement in mediating the discriminative stimulus properties of LSD. Rats were trained to discriminate systemically administered LSD (0.085 mg/kg s.c.) from saline. Following acquisition of the discrimination, bilateral cannulae were implanted into the ACC (AP, +1.2 mm; ML, +/-1.0 mm; DV, -2.0 mm relative to bregma). Rats were tested for their ability to discriminate varying doses of locally infused LSD (0.1875, 0.375, and 0.75 microg/side) or artificial cerebrospinal fluid (n = 3-7). LSD locally infused into ACC dose-dependently substituted for systemically administered LSD, with 0.75 microg/side LSD substituting completely (89% correct). Systemic administration of the selective 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) (5-HT)(2A) receptor antagonist R-(+)-alpha-(2,3-dimethoxyphenyl)-1-[2-(4-fluorophenylethyl)]-4-piperidine-methanol (M100907; 0.4 mg/kg) blocked the discriminative cue of LSD (0.375 microg/side) infused into ACC (from 68 to 16% drug lever responding). Furthermore, M100907 (0.5 microg/microl/side) locally infused into ACC completely blocked the stimulus effects of systemic LSD (0.04 mg/kg; from 80 to 12% on the LSD lever). Taken together, these data indicate that 5-HT(2A) receptors in the ACC are a primary target mediating the discriminative stimulus properties of LSD.

  15. Effects of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) reuptake inhibition plus 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonism on the firing activity of norepinephrine neurons.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Steven T; Blier, Pierre

    2002-09-01

    YM992 [(S)-2-[[(7-fluoro-4-indanyl)oxy]methyl]morpholine monohydrochloride] is a selective serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) and a potent 5-HT(2A) antagonist. The aim of the present study was to assess, using in vivo extracellular unitary recordings, the effect of acute and sustained administration of YM992 (40 mg kg(-1) day(-1) s.c., using osmotic minipumps) on the spontaneous firing activity of locus coeruleus (LC) norepinephrine (NE) neurons. Acute intravenous injection of YM992 (4 mg kg(-1)) significantly decreased NE neuron firing activity by 29% and blocked the inhibitory effect of a subsequent injection of the 5-HT(2) agonist DOI [1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane hydrochloride]. A 2-day treatment with YM992 decreased the firing rate of NE neurons by 66%, whereas a partial recovery was observed after a 7-day treatment and a complete one after a 21-day treatment. Following the injection of the alpha(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist idazoxan (1 mg kg(-1) i.v.), NE neuron firing was equalized in controls and 2-day YM992-treated rats. This put into evidence an increased degree of activation of alpha(2)-adrenergic autoreceptors in the treated rats. The suppressant effect of the alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine was significantly decreased in long-term YM992-treated rats. The recovery of LC firing activity after long-term YM992 administration could thus be explained by a decreased sensitivity of alpha(2)-adrenergic autoreceptors. Sustained SSRI administration leads to a gradual reduction of the firing activity of NE neurons during long-term administration, whereas YM992 produced opposite effects. The exact basis for the increased synaptic availability of NE by YM992 remains to be elucidated. This NE activity, resulting from 5-HT reuptake inhibition plus 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonism, might confer additional benefits in affective and anxiety disorders.

  16. Effector pathway-dependent relative efficacy at serotonin type 2A and 2C receptors: evidence for agonist-directed trafficking of receptor stimulus.

    PubMed

    Berg, K A; Maayani, S; Goldfarb, J; Scaramellini, C; Leff, P; Clarke, W P

    1998-07-01

    There are many examples of a single receptor coupling directly to more than one cellular signal transduction pathway. Although traditional receptor theory allows for activation of multiple cellular effectors by agonists, it predicts that the relative degree of activation of each effector pathway by an agonist (relative efficacy) must be the same. In the current experiments, we demonstrate that agonists at the human serotonin2A (5-HT2A) and 5-HT2C receptors activate differentially two signal transduction pathways independently coupled to the receptors [phospholipase C (PLC)-mediated inositol phosphate (IP) accumulation and phospholipase A2 (PLA2)-mediated arachidonic acid (AA) release]. The relative efficacies of agonists differed depending on which signal transduction pathway was measured. Moreover, relative to 5-HT, some 5-HT2C agonists (e.g., 3-trifluoromethylphenyl-piperazine) preferentially activated the PLC-IP pathway, whereas others (e.g., lysergic acid diethylamide) favored the PLA2-AA pathway. In contrast, when two dependent responses were measured (IP accumulation and calcium mobilization), agonist relative efficacies were not different. These data strongly support the hypothesis termed "agonist-directed trafficking of receptor stimulus" recently proposed by Kenakin [Trends Pharmacol Sci 16:232-238 (1995)]. Concentration-response curves to 5-HT2C agonists were fit well by a three-state model of receptor activation, suggesting that two active receptor states may be sufficient to explain pathway-dependent agonist efficacy. Rational drug design that optimizes preferential effector activity within a group of receptor-selective drugs holds the promise of increased selectivity in clinically useful agents.

  17. Potent serotonin (5-HT)(2A) receptor antagonists completely prevent the development of hyperthermia in an animal model of the 5-HT syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nisijima, K; Yoshino, T; Yui, K; Katoh, S

    2001-01-26

    The serotonin (5-HT) syndrome is the most serious side effect of antidepressants, and it often necessitates pharmacotherapy. In the present study, the efficacy of several drugs was evaluated in an animal model of the 5-HT syndrome. When 2 mg/kg of clorgyline, a type-A monoamine oxidase inhibiting antidepressant, and 100 mg/kg of 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan, a precursor of 5-HT, were administered intraperitoneally to rats to induce the 5-HT syndrome, the rectal temperature of the rats increased to more than 40 degrees C, and all of the animals died by 90 min after the drug administration. The noradrenaline (NA) levels in the anterior hypothalamus, measured by microdialysis, increased to 15.9 times the preadministration level. Pretreatment with propranolol (10 mg/kg), a 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist as well as a beta-blocker, and dantrolene (20 mg/kg), a peripheral muscle relaxant, did not prevent the death of the animals, even though these two drugs suppressed the increase in rectal temperature to some extent. Chlorpromazine and cyproheptadine prevented the lethality associated with the 5-HT syndrome only at high doses. By contrast, pretreatment with ritanserin (3 mg/kg) and pipamperone (20 mg/kg), both potent 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonists, completely prevented the increase in rectal temperature and death of the animals, and the hypothalamic NA levels in these two groups increased less than that in the other groups. These results suggest that potent 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonists are the most effective drugs for treatment of the 5-HT syndrome, and that NA hyperactivity occurs in the 5-HT syndrome.

  18. A neurobiological hypothesis of treatment-resistant depression - mechanisms for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor non-efficacy.

    PubMed

    Coplan, Jeremy D; Gopinath, Srinath; Abdallah, Chadi G; Berry, Benjamin R

    2014-01-01

    First-line treatment of major depression includes administration of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), yet studies suggest that remission rates following two trials of an SSRI are <50%. The authors examine the putative biological substrates underlying "treatment resistant depression (TRD)" with the goal of elucidating novel rationales to treat TRD. We look at relevant articles from the preclinical and clinical literature combined with clinical exposure to TRD patients. A major focus was to outline pathophysiological mechanisms whereby the serotonin system becomes impervious to the desired enhancement of serotonin neurotransmission by SSRIs. A complementary focus was to dissect neurotransmitter systems, which serve to inhibit the dorsal raphe. We propose, based on a body of translational studies, TRD may not represent a simple serotonin deficit state but rather an excess of midbrain peri-raphe serotonin and subsequent deficit at key fronto-limbic projection sites, with ultimate compromise in serotonin-mediated neuroplasticity. Glutamate, serotonin, noradrenaline, and histamine are activated by stress and exert an inhibitory effect on serotonin outflow, in part by "flooding" 5-HT1A autoreceptors by serotonin itself. Certain factors putatively exacerbate this scenario - presence of the short arm of the serotonin transporter gene, early-life adversity and comorbid bipolar disorder - each of which has been associated with SSRI-treatment resistance. By utilizing an incremental approach, we provide a system for treating the TRD patient based on a strategy of rescuing serotonin neurotransmission from a state of SSRI-induced dorsal raphe stasis. This calls for "stacked" interventions, with an SSRI base, targeting, if necessary, the glutamatergic, serotonergic, noradrenergic, and histaminergic systems, thereby successively eliminating the inhibitory effects each are capable of exerting on serotonin neurons. Future studies are recommended to test this

  19. A Neurobiological Hypothesis of Treatment-Resistant Depression – Mechanisms for Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Non-Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Coplan, Jeremy D.; Gopinath, Srinath; Abdallah, Chadi G.; Berry, Benjamin R.

    2014-01-01

    First-line treatment of major depression includes administration of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), yet studies suggest that remission rates following two trials of an SSRI are <50%. The authors examine the putative biological substrates underlying “treatment resistant depression (TRD)” with the goal of elucidating novel rationales to treat TRD. We look at relevant articles from the preclinical and clinical literature combined with clinical exposure to TRD patients. A major focus was to outline pathophysiological mechanisms whereby the serotonin system becomes impervious to the desired enhancement of serotonin neurotransmission by SSRIs. A complementary focus was to dissect neurotransmitter systems, which serve to inhibit the dorsal raphe. We propose, based on a body of translational studies, TRD may not represent a simple serotonin deficit state but rather an excess of midbrain peri-raphe serotonin and subsequent deficit at key fronto-limbic projection sites, with ultimate compromise in serotonin-mediated neuroplasticity. Glutamate, serotonin, noradrenaline, and histamine are activated by stress and exert an inhibitory effect on serotonin outflow, in part by “flooding” 5-HT1A autoreceptors by serotonin itself. Certain factors putatively exacerbate this scenario – presence of the short arm of the serotonin transporter gene, early-life adversity and comorbid bipolar disorder – each of which has been associated with SSRI-treatment resistance. By utilizing an incremental approach, we provide a system for treating the TRD patient based on a strategy of rescuing serotonin neurotransmission from a state of SSRI-induced dorsal raphe stasis. This calls for “stacked” interventions, with an SSRI base, targeting, if necessary, the glutamatergic, serotonergic, noradrenergic, and histaminergic systems, thereby successively eliminating the inhibitory effects each are capable of exerting on serotonin neurons. Future studies are recommended to test

  20. Greater emotional eating scores associated with reduced frontolimbic activation to palatable taste in healthy adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Bohon, Cara

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study examined the relation between self-reported emotional eating scores and frontolimbic brain response to palatable taste in adolescents. Design and Methods Participants included 162 adolescents (Mean BMI percentile = 52.7, range 3–90). Participants completed a selfreport survey assessing emotional eating and underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while viewing pictures signaling subsequent delivery of a chocolate milkshake or a control taste and receiving the corresponding taste. Results Results revealed no significant relation between emotional eating scores and brain response to anticipation of receipt of milkshake. In response to milkshake taste receipt, emotional eating scores were negatively related to activation in the right thalamus, the left insula and orbitofrontal cortex, and bilateral putamen and caudate. These findings remained significant after controlling for body mass index and body fat percentage. Conclusions The current results are discussed in the context of findings of reduced reward activation to palatable taste receipt in obese adults and adolescents. PMID:24715468

  1. Abnormal effective fronto-limbic connectivity during emotion processing in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Potvin, Stéphane; Lungu, Ovidiu; Tikàsz, Andràs; Mendrek, Adrianna

    2017-01-04

    Schizophrenia is associated with core emotional dysfunctions. At the neural level, functional neuro-imaging studies have highlighted fronto-limbic alterations during emotion processing in schizophrenia, as well as impaired connectivity between the amygdala and the prefrontal cortex. However, the direction of the impaired fronto-limbic connections remains largely unknown. To clarify this issue, we performed an effective connectivity study on emotion processing in schizophrenia. Forty-one healthy individuals and 39 schizophrenia patients (DSM-IV criteria) viewed negative, positive and neutral images during an fMRI session. Effective connectivity between significantly activated regions was examined using Granger causality and psychophysical interaction analyses. Subjective ratings of emotionally neutral images were higher in schizophrenia patients than in controls. Across groups, significant activations were observed in the dorso-medial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) and the bilateral amygdala. The Granger connectivity from the right amygdala to the dmPFC was significantly reduced in schizophrenia patients, relative to controls, during the negative and neutral conditions. The Granger connectivity from the left amygdala to the dmPFC was significantly reduced in schizophrenia patients, relative to controls, during the positive condition. The finding of a reduced lagged connectivity from the bilateral amygdala to the dmPFC in schizophrenia suggests that the bottom-up mechanisms involved in the processing of highly arousing emotional stimuli are impaired in this disorder. The finding of an impaired lagged connectivity from the right amygdala to the dmPFC during the processing of emotionally neutral stimuli in schizophrenia is novel and may explain why these patients tend to confer emotional significance to irrelevant stimuli. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Behavioral Effects of Systemic, Infralimbic and Prelimbic Injections of a Serotonin 5-HT2A Antagonist in Carioca High- and Low-Conditioned Freezing Rats

    PubMed Central

    León, Laura A.; Castro-Gomes, Vitor; Zárate-Guerrero, Santiago; Corredor, Karen; Mello Cruz, Antonio P.; Brandão, Marcus L.; Cardenas, Fernando P.; Landeira-Fernandez, J.

    2017-01-01

    The role of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) and 5-HT2A receptors in anxiety has been extensively studied, mostly without considering individual differences in trait anxiety. Our laboratory developed two lines of animals that are bred for high and low freezing responses to contextual cues that are previously associated with footshock (Carioca High-conditioned Freezing [CHF] and Carioca Low-conditioned Freezing [CLF]). The present study investigated whether ketanserin, a preferential 5-HT2A receptor blocker, exerts distinct anxiety-like profiles in these two lines of animals. In the first experiment, the animals received a systemic injection of ketanserin and were exposed to the elevated plus maze (EPM). In the second experiment, these two lines of animals received microinjections of ketanserin in the infralimbic (IL) and prelimbic (PL) cortices and were exposed to either the EPM or a contextual fear conditioning paradigm. The two rat lines exhibited bidirectional effects on anxiety-like behavior in the EPM and opposite responses to ketanserin. Both systemic and intra-IL cortex injections of ketanserin exerted anxiolytic-like effects in CHF rats but anxiogenic-like effects in CLF rats. Microinjections of ketanserin in the PL cortex also exerted anxiolytic-like effects in CHF rats but had no effect in CLF rats. These results suggest that the behavioral effects of 5-HT2A receptor antagonism might depend on genetic variability associated with baseline reactions to threatening situations and 5-HT2A receptor expression in the IL and PL cortices. Highlights -CHF and CLF rats are two bidirectional lines that are based on contextual fear conditioning.-CHF rats have a more “anxious” phenotype than CLF rats in the EPM.-The 5-HT2A receptor antagonist ketanserin had opposite behavioral effects in CHF and CLF rats.-Systemic and IL injections either decreased (CHF) or increased (CLF) anxiety-like behavior.-PL injections either decreased (CHF) anxiety-like behavior or

  3. Blockade of Serotonin 5-HT2A Receptors Suppresses Behavioral Sensitization and Naloxone-Precipitated Withdrawal Symptoms in Morphine-Treated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Gang; Wu, Xian; Tao, Xinrong; Mao, Ruoying; Liu, Xueke; Zhang, Yong-Mei; Li, Guangwu; Stackman, Robert W.; Dong, Liuyi; Zhang, Gongliang

    2016-01-01

    The increasing prescription of opioids is fueling an epidemic of addiction and overdose deaths. Morphine is a highly addictive drug characterized by a high relapse rate – even after a long period of abstinence. Serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission participates in the development of morphine dependence, as well as the expression of morphine withdrawal. In this study, we examined the effect of blockade of 5-HT2A receptors (5-HT2ARs) on morphine-induced behavioral sensitization and withdrawal in male mice. 5-HT2AR antagonist MDL 11,939 (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) suppressed acute morphine (5.0 mg/kg, s.c.)-induced increase in locomotor activity. Mice received morphine (10 mg/kg, s.c.) twice a day for 3 days and then drug treatment was suspended for 5 days. On day 9, a challenge dose of morphine (10 mg/kg) was administered to induce the expression of behavioral sensitization. MDL 11,939 (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) pretreatment suppressed the expression of morphine-induced behavioral sensitization. Another cohort of mice received increasing doses of morphine over a 7-day period to induce morphine-dependence. MDL 11,939 (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) prevented naloxone-precipitated withdrawal in morphine-dependent mice on day 7. Moreover, chronic morphine treatment increased 5-HT2AR protein level and decreased the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases in the prefrontal cortex. Together, these results by the first time demonstrate that 5-HT2ARs modulate opioid dependence and blockade of 5-HT2AR may represent a novel strategy for the treatment of morphine use disorders. Highlights (i) Blockade of 5-HT2A receptors suppresses the expression of morphine-induced behavioral sensitization. (ii) Blockade of 5-HT2A receptors suppresses naloxone-precipitated withdrawal in morphine-treated mice. (iii) Chronic morphine exposure induces an increase in 5-HT2A receptor protein level and a decrease in ERK protein phosphorylation in prefrontal cortex. PMID:28082900

  4. Postnatal changes in the expressions of serotonin 1A, 1B, and 2A receptors in ten brain stem nuclei of the rat: implication for a sensitive period.

    PubMed

    Liu, Q; Wong-Riley, M T T

    2010-01-13

    A critical period in respiratory network development occurs in the rat around postnatal days (P) 12-13, when abrupt neurochemical, metabolic, and physiological changes were evident. As serotonin and its receptors are involved in respiratory modulation, and serotonergic abnormality is implicated in sudden infant death syndrome, we hypothesized that 5-HT receptors are significantly downregulated during the critical period. This was documented recently for 5-HT(2A)R in several respiratory nuclei. The present study represents a comprehensive analysis of postnatal development of 5-HT(1A)R and 5-HT(1B)R in 10 brain stem nuclei and 5-HT(2A)R in six nuclei not previously examined. Optical densitometric analysis of immunohistochemically-reacted neurons from P2 to P21 indicated four developmental patterns of expression: (1) Pattern I: a high level of expression at P2-P11, an abrupt and significant reduction at P12, followed by a plateau until P21 (5-HT(1A)R and 5-HT(1B)R in raphé magnus [RM], raphé obscurus [ROb], raphé pallidus [RP], pre-Bötzinger complex [PBC], nucleus ambiguus [Amb], and hypoglossal nucleus [XII; 5-HT(1A)R only]). (2) Pattern II: a high level at P2-P9, a gradual decline from P9 to P12, followed by a plateau until P21 (5-HT(1A)R and 5-HT(1B)R in the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN)/parafacial respiratory group (pFRG)). (3) Pattern III: a high level at P2-P11, followed by a gradual decline until P21 (5-HT(1A)R in the ventrolateral subnucleus of solitary tract nucleus [NTS(VL)] and the non-respiratory cuneate nucleus [CN]). (4) Pattern IV: a relatively constant level maintained from P2 to P21 (5-HT(1A)R in the commissural subnucleus of solitary tract nucleus (NTS(COM)); 5-HT(1B)R in XII, NTS(VL), NTS(COM), and CN; and 5-HT(2A)R in RM, ROb, RP, RTN/pFRG, NTS(VL), and NTS(COM)). Thus, a significant reduction in the expression of 5-HT(1A)R, 5-HT(1B)R, and 5-HT(2A)R in multiple respiratory-related nuclei at P12 is consistent with reduced serotonergic

  5. Examination of the hippocampal contribution to serotonin 5-HT2A receptor-mediated facilitation of object memory in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gongliang; Cinalli, David; Cohen, Sarah J; Knapp, Kristina D; Rios, Lisa M; Martínez-Hernández, José; Luján, Rafael; Stackman, Robert W

    2016-10-01

    The rodent hippocampus supports non-spatial object memory. Serotonin 5-HT2A receptors (5-HT2AR) are widely expressed throughout the hippocampus. We previously demonstrated that the activation of 5-HT2ARs enhanced the strength of object memory assessed 24 h after a limited (i.e., weak memory) training procedure. Here, we examined the subcellular distribution of 5-HT2ARs in the hippocampal CA1 region and underlying mechanisms of 5-HT2AR-mediated object memory consolidation. Analyses with immuno-electron microscopy revealed the presence of 5-HT2ARs on the dendritic spines and shafts of hippocampal CA1 neurons, and presynaptic terminals in the CA1 region. In an object recognition memory procedure that places higher demand on the hippocampus, only post-training systemic or intrahippocampal administration of the 5-HT2AR agonist TCB-2 enhanced object memory. Object memory enhancement by TCB-2 was blocked by the 5-HT2AR antagonist, MDL 11,937. The memory-enhancing dose of systemic TCB-2 increased extracellular glutamate levels in hippocampal dialysate samples, and increased the mean in vivo firing rate of hippocampal CA1 neurons. In summary, these data indicate a pre- and post-synaptic distribution of 5-HT2ARs, and activation of 5-HT2ARs selectively enhanced the consolidation of object memory, without affecting encoding or retrieval. The 5-HT2AR-mediated facilitation of hippocampal memory may be associated with an increase in hippocampal neuronal firing and glutamate efflux during a post-training time window in which recently encoded memories undergo consolidation.

  6. Contractile response of bovine lateral saphenous vein to ergovaline serotonin2A a2A- and a2C-adrenergic receptor agonists relative to time off endophyte-infected tall fescue

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Previous research has demonstrated differences in contractile responses to ergot alkaloids, serotonin (5HT), and adrenergic agonists by lateral saphenous veins collected from cattle that grazed either endophyte (Neotyphodium coenophialum)-infected or endophyte-free tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum),...

  7. Cognition-induced modulation of serotonin in the orbitofrontal cortex: a controlled cross-over PET study of a delayed match-to-sample task using the 5-HT2a receptor antagonist [18F]altanserin.

    PubMed

    Hautzel, Hubertus; Müller, Hans-Wilhelm; Herzog, Hans; Grandt, Rüdiger

    2011-10-01

    Behavioral and cellular studies indicate that serotonin interacting with the 5-HT2a receptor (5-HT2aR) is involved in cognitive processes supporting working memory (WM). However, 5-HT receptor neuroimaging studies directly relating WM-induced neuronal activations to concomitant changes in the availability of 5-HT receptors as a functional measure for serotonin release are lacking. This controlled cross-over PET study aimed to identify brain regions with WM-induced changes in the binding potential (BP(nd)) of the 5-HT2aR antagonist [(18)F]altanserin. Ten young males underwent a delayed match-to-sample task using photographs of faces and a control task. The BP(nd)s for both conditions were calculated by applying Ichise's noninvasive plot. Statistics were performed with the SPM toolbox statistical nonparametric mapping (SnPM3) particularly suited for analyzing whole-brain PET data in an exploratory way. A higher BP(nd) for [(18)F]altanserin during WM versus control was found in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) pointing towards an increased [(18)F]altanserin/5-HT2aR interaction in OFC while BP(nd) decreases during WM were not found. Furthermore, no BP(nd) changes in regions known from functional neuroimaging studies to be more specifically involved in WM were identified. These findings may suggest that the increased [(18)F]altanserin BP(nd) under WM challenge and hence the increased availability of 5-HT2aR reflects a decrease in local OFC serotonin. As the OFC plays a prominent role in decision-making and supports cognitive processes related to the central executive functions of WM it might be modulated by the serotoninergic system via the 5-HT2aR in order to support and optimize basic cognitive functions.

  8. Risk-Taking Behavior: Dopamine D2/D3 Receptors, Feedback, and Frontolimbic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kohno, Milky; Ghahremani, Dara G.; Morales, Angelica M.; Robertson, Chelsea L.; Ishibashi, Kenji; Morgan, Andrew T.; Mandelkern, Mark A.; London, Edythe D.

    2015-01-01

    Decision-making involves frontolimbic and dopaminergic brain regions, but how prior choice outcomes, dopamine neurotransmission, and frontostriatal activity are integrated to affect choices is unclear. We tested 60 healthy volunteers using the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART) during functional magnetic resonance imaging. In the BART, participants can pump virtual balloons to increase potential monetary reward or cash out to receive accumulated reward; each pump presents greater risk and potential reward (represented by the pump number). In a separate session, we measured striatal D2/D3 dopamine receptor binding potential (BPND) with positron emission tomography in 13 of the participants. Losses were followed by fewer risky choices than wins; and during risk-taking after loss, amygdala and hippocampal activation exhibited greater modulation by pump number than after a cash-out event. Striatal D2/D3 BPND was positively related to the modulation of ventral striatal activation when participants decided to cash out and negatively to the number of pumps in the subsequent trial; but negatively related to the modulation of prefrontal cortical activation by pump number when participants took risk, and to overall earnings. These findings provide in vivo evidence for a potential mechanism by which dopaminergic neurotransmission may modulate risk-taking behavior through an interactive system of frontal and striatal activity. PMID:23966584

  9. Cognitive vulnerability and implicit emotional processing: imbalance in frontolimbic brain areas?

    PubMed

    Groenewold, Nynke A; Roest, Annelieke M; Renken, Remco J; Opmeer, Esther M; Veltman, Dick J; van der Wee, Nic J A; de Jonge, Peter; Aleman, André; Harmer, Catherine J

    2015-03-01

    It has been proposed that the neural basis for cognitive vulnerability to depression involves an imbalance in frontolimbic activity during the processing of cues with a negative affective value. Although the question is central to cognitive theory, whether this association is amplified by diagnosis of an affective disorder or recent life stress has not been investigated. A composite cognitive vulnerability score based on questionnaire assessment was used to predict neural responses to negative emotional stimuli in N = 112 participants. Potential moderating effects of psychiatric diagnosis and negative life events were examined. Main and interaction effects were tested against a threshold of p < .05, family-wise error (FWE) corrected at the cluster level, and the results were small-volume corrected in regions of interest. Cognitive vulnerability predicted higher activation of superior parietal areas (p(FWE) < .01) for negative than for positive faces. The association was significantly stronger in healthy participants. For negative versus control stimuli, cognitive vulnerability predicted higher ventrolateral prefrontal and subgenual anterior cingulate activation (p(FWE) < .05) to equal extents in both groups. We found no evidence for an association with amygdala activation. Life events did not moderate the findings. We concluded that cognitive vulnerability was associated with higher activation of frontoparietal areas during an implicit emotional task. These higher levels of activation may potentially reflect increased effort being required to ignore irrelevant negative emotional information in vulnerable populations.

  10. Circulating serotonin in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Maurer-Spurej, E

    2005-08-01

    The role of circulating serotonin is unclear and whether or not serotonin is present in the blood of non-mammalian species is not known. This study provides the first evidence for the presence of serotonin in thrombocytes of birds and three reptilian species, the endothermic leatherback sea turtle, the green sea turtle and the partially endothermic American alligator. Thrombocytes from a fresh water turtle, American bullfrog, Yellowfin tuna, and Chinook salmon did not contain serotonin. Serotonin is a vasoactive substance that regulates skin blood flow, a major mechanism for endothermic body temperature regulation, which could explain why circulating serotonin is present in warm-blooded species. The temperature sensitivity of human blood platelets with concomitant changes in serotonin content further supports a link between circulating serotonin and thermoregulation. Phylogenetic comparison of the presence of circulating serotonin indicated an evolutionary divergence within reptilian species that might coincide with the emergence of endothermy.

  11. Dual role of serotonin in the acquisition and extinction of reward-driven learning: involvement of 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A and 5-HT3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Frick, Luciana Romina; Bernardez-Vidal, Micaela; Hocht, Christian; Zanutto, Bonifacio Silvano; Rapanelli, Maximiliano

    2015-01-15

    Serotonin (5-HT) has been proposed as a possible encoder of reward. Nevertheless, the role of this neurotransmitter in reward-based tasks is not well understood. Given that the major serotonergic circuit in the rat brain comprises the dorsal raphe nuclei and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), and because the latter structure is involved in the control of complex behaviors and expresses 1A (5-HT1A), 2A (5-HT2A), and 3 (5-HT3) receptors, the aim was to study the role of 5-HT and of these receptors in the acquisition and extinction of a reward-dependent operant conditioning task. Long Evans rats were trained in an operant conditioning task while receiving fluoxetine (serotonin reuptake inhibitor, 10mg/kg), tianeptine (serotonin reuptake enhancer, 10mg/kg), buspirone (5-HT1A partial agonist, 10mg/kg), risperidone (5-HT2A antagonist, 1mg/kg), ondansetron (5-HT3 antagonist, 2mg/kg) or vehicle. Then, animals that acquired the operant conditioning without any treatment were trained to extinct the task in the presence of the pharmacological agents. Fluoxetine impaired acquisition but improved extinction. Tianeptine administration induced the opposite effects. Buspirone induced a mild deficit in acquisition and had no effects during the extinction phase. Risperidone administration resulted in learning deficits during the acquisition phase, although it promoted improved extinction. Ondansetron treatment showed a deleterious effect in the acquisition phase and an overall improvement in the extinction phase. These data showed a differential role of 5-HT in the acquisition and extinction of an operant conditioning task, suggesting that it may have a dual function in reward encoding.

  12. Effects of chronic fluoxetine treatment on catalepsy and the immune response in mice with a genetic predisposition to freezing reactions: the roles of types 1A and 2A serotonin receptors and the tph2 and SERT genes.

    PubMed

    Tikhonova, M A; Alperina, E L; Tolstikova, T G; Bazovkina, D V; Di, V Y; Idova, G V; Kulikov, A V; Popova, N K

    2010-06-01

    ASC (Antidepressant-Sensitive Catalepsy) mice, bred for a high predisposition to catalepsy, are characterized by depression-like behavior and decreased immune responses. Chronic administration of fluoxetine, which is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressant widely used in clinical practice, to mice of this strain weakened catalepsy and normalized the number of rosette-forming cells in the spleen. In mice of the parental cataleptic strain CBA/Lac, fluoxetine had no effect on the level of catalepsy or the immune response. Analysis of the effects of fluoxetine on the functional activity of 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A) receptors, and the expression of 5-HT(1A) receptor genes in the frontal cortex and midbrain and 5-HT(2A) receptors in the frontal cortex, as well as the tryptophan hydroxylase-2 and the serotonin transporter genes in the midbrain showed that the antidepressant had no effect on these parameters in ASC mice, but decreased the functional activity of 5-HT(2A) receptors in CBA/Lac mice. The possibility that the actions of fluoxetine on catalepsy and the immune response in mice with depression-like states are mediated via other serotoninergic mechanisms is discussed.

  13. Serotonin blood test

    MedlinePlus

    5-HT level; 5-hydroxytryptamine level; Serotonin test ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) - serum or blood. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, eds. Laboratory Tests and Diagnostic Procedures . 6th ed. St Louis, MO: Elsevier ...

  14. Serotonin research: contributions to understanding psychoses.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Mark A; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2008-09-01

    The history of serotonin research is closely related to the study of hallucinogenic drugs that function as agonists at serotonin-2A receptors. The fundamental idea that psychotic states seen in psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia might be attributable, in part, to abnormalities in serotonergic systems began with the almost simultaneous discovery of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), psilocybin and serotonin. Sixty years of study have confirmed early speculations regarding the important relationship between serotonin and both drug-induced and disorder-based psychotic states. Now, modern biochemical, pharmacological, behavioral, neuroimaging, genetic and molecular biological sciences are converging to understand how serotonergic systems interact with other monoaminergic and glutamatergic systems to modulate states of consciousness and contribute to psychotic disorders such as the group of schizophrenias. This review summarizes experimental assessments of the serotonergic hallucinogen model psychosis in relation to the serotonin hypothesis of schizophrenia.

  15. Trait anxiety modulates fronto-limbic processing of emotional interference in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Holtmann, Jana; Herbort, Maike C; Wüstenberg, Torsten; Soch, Joram; Richter, Sylvia; Walter, Henrik; Roepke, Stefan; Schott, Björn H

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies of cognitive alterations in borderline personality disorder (BPD) have yielded conflicting results. Given that a core feature of BPD is affective instability, which is characterized by emotional hyperreactivity and deficits in emotion regulation, it seems conceivable that short-lasting emotional distress might exert temporary detrimental effects on cognitive performance. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate how task-irrelevant emotional stimuli (fearful faces) affect performance and fronto-limbic neural activity patterns during attention-demanding cognitive processing in 16 female, unmedicated BPD patients relative to 24 age-matched healthy controls. In a modified flanker task, emotionally negative, socially salient pictures (fearful vs. neutral faces) were presented as distracters in the background. Patients, but not controls, showed an atypical response pattern of the right amygdala with increased activation during emotional interference in the (difficult) incongruent flanker condition, but emotion-related amygdala deactivation in the congruent condition. A direct comparison of the emotional conditions between the two groups revealed that the strongest diagnosis-related differences could be observed in the dorsal and, to a lesser extent, also in the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (dACC, rACC) where patients exhibited an increased neural response to emotional relative to neutral distracters. Moreover, in the incongruent condition, both the dACC and rACC fMRI responses during emotional interference were negatively correlated with trait anxiety in the patients, but not in the healthy controls. As higher trait anxiety was also associated with longer reaction times (RTs) in the BPD patients, we suggest that in BPD patients the ACC might mediate compensatory cognitive processes during emotional interference and that such neurocognitive compensation that can be adversely affected by high levels of anxiety.

  16. Role of peripheral serotonin in glucose and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hitoshi; Rose, Michael T; Aso, Hisashi

    2011-06-01

    Two independent serotonin systems exist, one in the brain and the other in the periphery. Serotonin is a well known monoaminergic neurotransmitter in the central nervous system and it is known to regulate feeding behavior, meal size, and body weight. On the other hand, there is much less evidence for the role of serotonin as a gastrointestinal hormone, particularly with respect to its effects on glucose and lipid metabolism. This review summarizes our current understanding of the role of peripheral serotonin on glucose and lipid metabolism and the implications of this for further research. The enterochromaffin cells of the gastrointestinal tract produce peripheral serotonin postprandially. In mice, it induces a decrease in the concentration of circulating lipids as well as hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia through its action on several serotonin receptors. Further, serotonin metabolites act as endogenous agonists for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ and serotonin accelerates adipocyte differentiation via serotonin receptor 2A and 2C. Studies of serotonin are likely to provide new insights into the field of lipid accumulation and metabolism. Recent studies show new physiological functions of peripheral serotonin, linked to glucose and lipid metabolism. Peripheral serotonin may serve as an attractive new therapeutic target for the treatment of metabolic disorders in the near future.

  17. Active cyamemazine metabolites in patients treated with cyamemazine (Tercian®): influence on cerebral dopamine D2 and serotonin 5-HT (2A) receptor occupancy as measured by positron emission tomography (PET).

    PubMed

    Hodé, Yann; Benyamina, Amine; Arbus, Christophe; Reimold, Matthias

    2011-10-01

    Cyamemazine (Tercian®) is an antipsychotic agent blocking central dopamine D(2) receptors, which induces few extrapyramidal adverse effects, due to a potent antagonistic action at serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptors. In vitro studies showed that the desmethyl metabolite of cyamemazine (N-desmethyl cyamemazine) has similar affinity for 5-HT(2A) receptors as cyamemazine, whereas its D(2) receptor affinity is eight times lower (Benyamina et al. in Eur J Pharmacol 578(2-3):142-147, 2008). Moreover, cyamemazine sulfoxide showed modest affinity for 5-HT(2A) receptors. The objective of this study is to measure steady-state plasma levels of N-desmethyl cyamemazine and cyamemazine sulfoxide in patients treated with clinically relevant doses of cyamemazine and correlate them with dopamine D(2) and serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptor occupancies (RO) assessed by positron emission tomography (PET). Eight patients received Tercian® 37.5, 75, 150, or 300 mg/day according to their symptoms. Dopamine D(2) and serotonin 5-HT(2A) RO were assessed at steady-state cyamemazine plasma levels using [(11)C]raclopride and [(11)C]N-methyl-spiperone, respectively, for PET. Plasma levels of cyamemazine metabolites were determined using a validated high-performance liquid chromatography (PerkinElmer) associated with a mass spectrometry detection (API 365, PE SCIEX). The apparent equilibrium inhibition constant (K (i)) was estimated by fitting RO with plasma levels of cyamemazine metabolites at the time of the PET scan. After 6 days of cyamemazine administration, plasma N-desmethyl cyamemazine reached steady-state levels at 2 to 12 times higher than those previously found for cyamemazine (Hode et al. in Psychopharmacology (Berl) 180:377-384, 2005). Plasma levels of N-desmethyl cyamemazine were closely related to striatal D(2) RO (r (2) = 0.942) and extrastriatal 5-HT(2A) RO (r (2) = 0.901). The estimated K (i(app)) value of N-desmethyl cyamemazine for striatal D(2) receptors was about fivefold

  18. Binding of [3H]paroxetine to serotonin uptake sites and of [3H]lysergic acid diethylamide to 5-HT2A receptors in platelets from women with premenstrual dysphoric disorder during gonadotropin releasing hormone treatment.

    PubMed

    Bixo, M; Allard, P; Bäckström, T; Mjörndal, T; Nyberg, S; Spigset, O; Sundström-Poromaa, I

    2001-08-01

    Changes in serotonergic parameters have been reported in psychiatric conditions such as depression but also in the premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). In addition, hormonal effects on serotonergic activity have been established. In the present study, binding of [3H]paroxetine to platelet serotonin uptake sites and binding of [3H]lysergic acid diethylamide ([3H]LSD) to platelet serotonin (5-HT)2A receptors were studied in patients with PMDD treated with a low dose of a gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist (buserelin) or placebo and compared to controls. The PMDD patients were relieved of premenstrual symptoms like depression and irritability during buserelin treatment. The number of [3H]paroxetine binding sites (Bmax) were significantly higher in the follicular phase in untreated PMDD patients compared to controls. When treated with buserelin the difference disappeared. No differences in [3H]LSD binding between the three groups were shown. The present study demonstrated altered platelet [3H]paroxetine binding characteristics in women with PMDD compared to controls. Furthermore, [3H]paroxetine binding was affected by PMDD treatment with a low dose of buserelin. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that changes in serotonergic transmission could be a trait in the premenstrual dysphoric disorder.

  19. Mapping the binding site pocket of the serotonin 5-Hydroxytryptamine2A receptor. Ser3.36(159) provides a second interaction site for the protonated amine of serotonin but not of lysergic acid diethylamide or bufotenin.

    PubMed

    Almaula, N; Ebersole, B J; Zhang, D; Weinstein, H; Sealfon, S C

    1996-06-21

    Like other amine neurotransmitters that activate G-protein-coupled receptors, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) binds to the 5-HT2A receptor through the interaction of its cationic primary amino group with the conserved Asp3.32(155) in transmembrane helix 3. Computational experiments with a 5-HT2A receptor model suggest that the same functional group of 5-hydroxytryptamine also forms a hydrogen bond with the side chain of Ser3.36(159), which is adjacent in space to Asp3.32(155). However, other 5-HT2A receptor ligands like lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), in which the amine nitrogen is embedded in a heterocycle, or N,N-dimethyl 5-HT, in which the side chain is a tertiary amine, are found in the computational simulations to interact with the aspartate but not with the serine, due mainly to steric hindrance. The predicted difference in the interaction of various ligands in the same receptor binding pocket was tested with site-directed mutagenesis of Ser3.36(159) --> Ala and Ser3.36(159) --> Cys. The alanine substitution led to an 18-fold reduction in 5-HT affinity and the cysteine substitution to an intermediate 5-fold decrease. LSD affinity, in contrast, was unaffected by either mutation. N,N-Dimethyl 5-HT affinity was unaffected by the cysteine mutation and had a comparatively small 3-fold decrease in affinity for the alanine mutant. These findings identify a mode of ligand-receptor complexation that involves two receptor side chains interacting with the same functional group of specific serotonergic ligands. This interaction serves to orient the ligands in the binding pocket and may influence the degree of receptor activation.

  20. Serotonin (5-HT) 5-HT2A Receptor (5-HT2AR):5-HT2CR Imbalance in Medial Prefrontal Cortex Associates with Motor Impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Anastasio, Noelle C; Stutz, Sonja J; Fink, Latham H L; Swinford-Jackson, Sarah E; Sears, Robert M; DiLeone, Ralph J; Rice, Kenner C; Moeller, F Gerard; Cunningham, Kathryn A

    2015-07-15

    A feature of multiple neuropsychiatric disorders is motor impulsivity. Recent studies have implicated serotonin (5-HT) systems in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in mediating individual differences in motor impulsivity, notably the 5-HT2AR receptor (5-HT2AR) and 5-HT2CR. We investigated the hypothesis that differences in the ratio of 5-HT2AR:5-HT2CR protein expression in mPFC would predict the individual level of motor impulsivity and that the engineered loss of the 5-HT2CR would result in high motor impulsivity concomitant with elevated 5-HT2AR expression and pharmacological sensitivity to the selective 5-HT2AR antagonist M100907. High and low impulsive rats were identified in a 1-choice serial reaction time task. Native protein levels of the 5-HT2AR and the 5-HT2CR predicted the intensity of motor impulsivity and the 5-HT2AR:5-HT2CR ratio in mPFC positively correlated with levels of premature responses in individual outbred rats. The possibility that the 5-HT2AR and 5-HT2CR act in concert to control motor impulsivity is supported by the observation that high phenotypic motor impulsivity associated with a diminished mPFC synaptosomal 5-HT2AR:5-HT2CR protein:protein interaction. Knockdown of mPFC 5-HT2CR resulted in increased motor impulsivity and triggered a functional disruption of the local 5-HT2AR:5-HT2CR balance as evidenced by a compensatory upregulation of 5-HT2AR protein expression and a leftward shift in the potency of M100907 to suppress impulsive behavior. We infer that there is an interactive relationship between the mPFC 5-HT2AR and 5-HT2CR, and that a 5-HT2AR:5-HT2CR imbalance may be a functionally relevant mechanism underlying motor impulsivity.

  1. Serotonin (5-HT) 5-HT2A Receptor (5-HT2AR):5-HT2CR Imbalance in Medial Prefrontal Cortex Associates with Motor Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Anastasio, Noelle C.; Stutz, Sonja J.; Fink, Latham H. L.; Swinford-Jackson, Sarah E.; Sears, Robert M; DiLeone, Ralph J.; Rice, Kenner C.; Moeller, F. Gerard; Cunningham, Kathryn A.

    2016-01-01

    A feature of multiple neuropsychiatric disorders is motor impulsivity. Recent studies have implicated serotonin (5-HT) systems in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in mediating individual differences in motor impulsivity, notably the 5-HT2AR receptor (5-HT2AR) and 5-HT2CR. We investigated the hypothesis that differences in the ratio of 5-HT2AR:5-HT2CR protein expression in mPFC would predict the individual level of motor impulsivity and that the engineered loss of the 5-HT2CR would result in high motor impulsivity concomitant with elevated 5-HT2AR expression and pharmacological sensitivity to the selective 5-HT2AR antagonist M100907. High and low impulsive rats were identified in a 1-choice serial reaction time task. Native protein levels of the 5-HT2AR and the 5-HT2CR predicted the intensity of motor impulsivity and the 5-HT2AR:5-HT2CR ratio in mPFC positively correlated with levels of premature responses in individual outbred rats. The possibility that the 5-HT2AR and 5-HT2CR act in concert to control motor impulsivity is supported by the observation that high phenotypic motor impulsivity associated with a diminished mPFC synaptosomal 5-HT2AR:5-HT2CR protein:protein interaction. Knockdown of mPFC 5-HT2CR resulted in increased motor impulsivity and triggered a functional disruption of the local 5-HT2AR:5-HT2CR balance as evidenced by a compensatory upregulation of 5-HT2AR protein expression and a leftward shift in the potency of M100907 to suppress impulsive behavior. We infer that there is an interactive relationship between the mPFC 5-HT2AR and 5-HT2CR, and that a 5-HT2AR:5-HT2CR imbalance may be a functionally-relevant mechanism underlying motor impulsivity. PMID:26120876

  2. Cognitive Enhancement Therapy Improves Frontolimbic Regulation of Emotion in Alcohol and/or Cannabis Misusing Schizophrenia: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Wojtalik, Jessica A.; Hogarty, Susan S.; Cornelius, Jack R.; Phillips, Mary L.; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Newhill, Christina E.; Eack, Shaun M.

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia who misuse substances are burdened with impairments in emotion regulation. Cognitive enhancement therapy (CET) may address these problems by enhancing prefrontal brain function. A small sample of outpatients with schizophrenia and alcohol and/or cannabis substance use problems participating in an 18-month randomized trial of CET (n = 10) or usual care (n = 4) completed posttreatment functional neuroimaging using an emotion regulation task. General linear models explored CET effects on brain activity in emotional neurocircuitry. Individuals treated with CET had significantly greater activation in broad regions of the prefrontal cortex, limbic, and striatal systems implicated in emotion regulation compared to usual care. Differential activation favoring CET in prefrontal regions and the insula mediated behavioral improvements in emotional processing. Our data lend preliminary support of CET effects on neuroplasticity in frontolimbic and striatal circuitries, which mediate emotion regulation in people with schizophrenia and comorbid substance misuse problems. PMID:26793128

  3. Postnatal changes in the expressions of serotonin 1A, 1B, and 2A receptors in ten brain stem nuclei of the rat: implication for a sensitive period

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qiuli; Wong-Riley, Margaret T.T.

    2009-01-01

    A critical period in respiratory network development occurs in the rat around postnatal days (P)12–13, when abrupt neurochemical, metabolic, and physiological changes were evident. As serotonin (5-HT) and its receptors are involved in respiratory modulation, and serotonergic abnormality is implicated in Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, we hypothesized that 5-HT receptors are significantly down-regulated during the critical period. This was documented recently for 5-HT2AR in several respiratory nuclei. The present study represents a comprehensive analysis of postnatal development of 5-HT1AR and 5-HT1BR in ten brain stem nuclei and 5-HT2AR in six nuclei not previously examined. Optical densitometric analysis of immunohistochemically-reacted neurons from P2 to P21 indicated four developmental patterns of expression: 1) Pattern I: a high level of expression at P2–P11, an abrupt and significant reduction at P12, followed by a plateau until P21 (5-HT1AR and 5-HT1BR in raphé magnus [RM], raphé obscurus [ROb], raphé pallidus [RP], pre-Bötzinger complex [PBC], nucleus ambiguus [Amb], and hypoglossal nucleus [XII; 5-HT1AR only]). 2) Pattern II: a high level at P2–P9, a gradual decline from P9 to P12, followed by a plateau until P21 (5-HT1AR and 5-HT1BR in the retrotrapezoid nucleus [RTN]/parafacial respiratory group [pFRG]). 3) Pattern III: a high level at P2–P11, followed by a gradual decline until P21 (5-HT1AR in the ventrolateral subnucleus of solitary tract nucleus [NTSVL] and the non-respiratory cuneate nucleus [CN]). 4) Pattern IV: a relatively constant level maintained from P2 to P21 (5-HT1AR in the commissural subnucleus of solitary tract nucleus [NTSCOM]; 5-HT1BR in XII, NTSVL, NTSCOM, and CN; and 5-HT2AR in RM, ROb, RP, RTN/pFRG, NTSVL, and NTSCOM). Thus, a significant reduction in the expression of 5-HT1AR, 5-HT1BR, and 5-HT2AR in multiple respiratory-related nuclei at P12 is consistent with reduced serotonergic transmission during the critical period

  4. Frontolimbic dysfunction in response to facial emotion in borderline personality disorder: an event-related fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Minzenberg, Michael J.; Fan, Jin; New, Antonia S.; Tang, Cheuk Y.; Siever, Larry J.

    2007-01-01

    Clinical hallmarks of borderline personality disorder (BPD) include social and emotional dysregulation. We tested a model of frontolimbic dysfunction in facial emotion processing in BPD. Groups of 12 unmedicated adults with BPD by DSM-IV and 12 demographically-matched healthy controls (HC) viewed facial expressions (Conditions) of neutral emotion, fear and anger, and made gender discriminations during rapid event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Analysis of variance of Region of Interest signal change revealed a statistically significant effect of the Group-by-Region-by-Condition interaction. This was due to the BPD group exhibiting a significantly larger magnitude of deactivation (relative to HC) in the bilateral rostral/subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) to fear and in the left ACC to fear minus neutral; and significantly greater activation in the right amygdala to fear minus neutral. There were no significant between-group differences in ROI signal change in response to anger. In voxel-wise analyses constrained within these ROIs, the BPD group exhibited significant changes in the fear minus neutral contrast, with relatively less activation in the bilateral rostral/subgenual ACC, and greater activation in the right amygdala. In the anger minus neutral contrast this pattern was reversed, with the BPD group showing greater activation in the bilateral rostral/subgenual ACC and less activation in the bilateral amygdala. We conclude that adults with BPD exhibit changes in fronto-limbic activity in the processing of fear stimuli, with exaggerated amygdala response and impaired emotion-modulation of ACC activity. The neural substrates underlying processing of anger may also be altered. These changes may represent an expression of the volumetric and serotonergic deficits observed in these brain areas in BPD. PMID:17601709

  5. Right fronto-limbic atrophy is associated with reduced empathy in refractory unilateral mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Toller, Gianina; Adhimoolam, Babu; Rankin, Katherine P; Huppertz, Hans-Jürgen; Kurthen, Martin; Jokeit, Hennric

    2015-11-01

    Refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is the most frequent focal epilepsy and is often accompanied by deficits in social cognition including emotion recognition, theory of mind, and empathy. Consistent with the neuronal networks that are crucial for normal social-cognitive processing, these impairments have been associated with functional changes in fronto-temporal regions. However, although atrophy in unilateral MTLE also affects regions of the temporal and frontal lobes that underlie social cognition, little is known about the structural correlates of social-cognitive deficits in refractory MTLE. In the present study, a psychometrically validated empathy questionnaire was combined with whole-brain voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to investigate the relationship between self-reported affective and cognitive empathy and gray matter volume in 55 subjects (13 patients with right MTLE, 9 patients with left MTLE, and 33 healthy controls). Consistent with the brain regions underlying social cognition, our results show that lower affective and cognitive empathy was associated with smaller volume in predominantly right fronto-limbic regions, including the right hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus, thalamus, fusiform gyrus, inferior temporal gyrus, dorsomedial and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices, and in the bilateral midbrain. The only region that was associated with both affective and cognitive empathy was the right mesial temporal lobe. These findings indicate that patients with right MTLE are at increased risk for reduced empathy towards others' internal states and they shed new light on the structural correlates of impaired social cognition frequently accompanying refractory MTLE. In line with previous evidence from patients with neurodegenerative disease and stroke, the present study suggests that empathy depends upon the integrity of right fronto-limbic and brainstem regions and highlights the importance of the right mesial temporal lobe and midbrain

  6. Comparison of the anti-dopamine D₂ and anti-serotonin 5-HT(2A) activities of chlorpromazine, bromperidol, haloperidol and second-generation antipsychotics parent compounds and metabolites thereof.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hidenobu; Gen, Keishi; Inoue, Yuichi

    2013-04-01

    Second-generation antipsychotics, which have become the standard drug therapies for schizophrenia, are known to have a serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptor blocking effect in addition to a dopamine D₂ receptor blocking effect. However, although chlorpromazine (CPZ) has a 5-HT(2A) receptor blocking effect and has the profile of a second-generation antipsychotic in vitro, it loses this pharmacological profile in vivo. In order to elucidate the differences between the in vivo and in vitro pharmacological characteristics of CPZ, we used a radioreceptor assay to measure the anti-D₂ activity and the anti-5-HT(2A) activity of CPZ and five major metabolites of CPZ, and compared the results to the anti-D₂ activity and anti-5-HT(2A) activity of risperidone, zotepine, perospirone, the major metabolites of each of these drugs, and olanzapine, bromperidol, and haloperidol. The subjects were 182 patients who had received diagnoses of schizophrenia based on the DSM-IV criteria. The results revealed that CPZ exhibited little anti-5-HT(2A) activity, regardless of the anti-D₂ activity level, and that none of the metabolites possessed anti-5-HT(2A) activity. However, both the parent compounds and the metabolites of each of the second-generation antipsychotics possessed both anti-D₂ activity and anti-5-HT(2A) activity. This clarified that, unlike second-generation antipsychotics, the reason CPZ loses its second-generation antipsychotic profiles in vivo is because it does not have any metabolites that possess anti-5-HT(2A) activity.

  7. Impact of the -1438G>a polymorphism in the serotonin 2A receptor gene on anthropometric profile and obesity risk: a case-control study in a Spanish Mediterranean population.

    PubMed

    Sorlí, José V; Francés, Francesc; González, José I; Guillén, Marisa; Portolés, Olga; Sabater, Antonio; Coltell, Oscar; Corella, Dolores

    2008-01-01

    Research into the genetic factors that regulate food intake is arousing great interest. The polymorphism -1438G>A in the serotonin 2A receptor or 5-hydroxytriptamine (5-HT) type 2A receptor (5-HTR2A) gene has been associated with alterations in food intake such as anorexia and bulimia. However, its association with obesity has not been studied to the same extent. Our aim, therefore, was to estimate the association between the -1438G>A polymorphism and obesity risk and related anthropometric variables in a Spanish Mediterranean population. A case-control study including 303 cases and 606 controls paired by gender and age was undertaken. The association between the -1438G>A polymorphism and obesity and other anthropometric measures was studied. No association with obesity risk was observed. However, when only the obese group was analyzed, it was observed that AA subjects presented a lower body mass index (BMI) than G allele carriers (35.2+/-5.3 kg/m2 vs 37.5+/-7.8 kg/m2; P=0.039). Moreover, significant differences were also obtained in waist perimeter that was lower in AA subjects compared to G allele carriers (105+/-11 cm vs 112+/-17 cm; P=0.011). In conclusion, although the -1438G>A polymorphism is not a relevant marker for obesity risk, this variant may play a role in determining BMI in obese subjects.

  8. DNA Hypermethylation of the Serotonin Receptor Type-2A Gene Is Associated with a Worse Response to a Weight Loss Intervention in Subjects with Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Cornago, Aurora; Mansego, Maria L.; Zulet, María Angeles; Martinez, José Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the regulation of gene activities depending on DNA methylation has been the subject of much recent study. However, although polymorphisms of the HTR2A gene have been associated with both obesity and psychiatric disorders, the role of HTR2A gene methylation in these illnesses remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of HTR2A gene promoter methylation levels in white blood cells (WBC) with obesity traits and depressive symptoms in individuals with metabolic syndrome (MetS) enrolled in a behavioural weight loss programme. Analyses were based on 41 volunteers (mean age 49 ± 1 year) recruited within the RESMENA study. Depressive symptoms (as determined using the Beck Depression Inventory), anthropometric and biochemical measurements were analysed at the beginning and after six months of weight loss treatment. At baseline, DNA from WBC was isolated and cytosine methylation in the HTR2A gene promoter was quantified by a microarray approach. In the whole-study sample, a positive association of HTR2A gene methylation with waist circumference and insulin levels was detected at baseline. Obesity measures significantly improved after six months of dietary treatment, where a lower mean HTR2A gene methylation at baseline was associated with major reductions in body weight, BMI and fat mass after the treatment. Moreover, mean HTR2A gene methylation at baseline significantly predicted the decrease in depressive symptoms after the weight loss treatment. In conclusion, this study provides newer evidence that hypermethylation of the HTR2A gene in WBC at baseline is significantly associated with a worse response to a weight-loss intervention and with a lower decrease in depressive symptoms after the dietary treatment in subjects with MetS. PMID:24959950

  9. Serotonin Receptors in Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Berumen, Laura Cristina; Rodríguez, Angelina; Miledi, Ricardo; García-Alcocer, Guadalupe

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin is an ancient molecular signal and a recognized neurotransmitter brainwide distributed with particular presence in hippocampus. Almost all serotonin receptor subtypes are expressed in hippocampus, which implicates an intricate modulating system, considering that they can be localized as autosynaptic, presynaptic, and postsynaptic receptors, even colocalized within the same cell and being target of homo- and heterodimerization. Neurons and glia, including immune cells, integrate a functional network that uses several serotonin receptors to regulate their roles in this particular part of the limbic system. PMID:22629209

  10. Cortical serotonin 5-HT2A receptor binding and social communication in adults with Asperger's syndrome: an in vivo SPECT study.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Declan G M; Daly, Eileen; Schmitz, Nicole; Toal, Fiona; Murphy, Keiran; Curran, Sarah; Erlandsson, Kjell; Eersels, Jos; Kerwin, Robert; Ell, Peter; Travis, Michael

    2006-05-01

    The cause of autistic spectrum disorder (i.e., autism and Asperger's syndrome) is unknown. The serotonergic (5-HT) system may be especially implicated. However, cortical 5-HT2A receptor density in adults with the disorder has not been examined, to the authors' knowledge. The authors investigated cortical 5-HT2A receptor binding in eight adults with Asperger's syndrome and in 10 healthy comparison subjects with single photon emission computed tomography and the selective 5-HT2A receptor ligand 123I iodinated 4-amino-N-[1-[3-(4-fluorophenoxy)propyl]-4-methyl-4-piperidinyl]-5-iodo-2-methoxybenzamide (123I-5-I-R91150). People with Asperger's syndrome had a significant reduction in cortical 5-HT2A receptor binding in the total, anterior, and posterior cingulate; bilaterally in the frontal and superior temporal lobes; and in the left parietal lobe. Also, reduced receptor binding was significantly related to abnormal social communication. The authors' findings suggest that adults with Asperger's syndrome have abnormalities in cortical 5-HT2A receptor density and that this deficit may underlie some clinical symptoms.

  11. Use of LC/MS to assess brain tracer distribution in preclinical, in vivo receptor occupancy studies: dopamine D2, serotonin 2A and NK-1 receptors as examples.

    PubMed

    Chernet, Eyassu; Martin, Laura J; Li, Dominic; Need, Anne B; Barth, Vanessa N; Rash, Karen S; Phebus, Lee A

    2005-12-12

    High performance liquid chromatography combined with either single quad or triple quad mass spectral detectors (LC/MS) was used to measure the brain distribution of receptor occupancy tracers targeting dopamine D2, serotonin 5-HT2A and neurokinin NK-1 receptors using the ligands raclopride, MDL-100907 and GR205171, respectively. All three non-radiolabeled tracer molecules were easily detectable in discrete rat brain areas after intravenous doses of 3, 3 and 30 microg/kg, respectively. These levels showed a differential brain distribution caused by differences in receptor density, as demonstrated by the observation that pretreatment with compounds that occupy these receptors reduced this differential distribution in a dose-dependent manner. Intravenous, subcutaneous and oral dose-occupancy curves were generated for haloperidol at the dopamine D2 receptor as were oral curves for the antipsychotic drugs olanzapine and clozapine. In vivo dose-occupancy curves were also generated for orally administered clozapine, olanzapine and haloperidol at the cortical 5-HT2A binding site. In vivo occupancy at the striatal neurokinin NK-1 binding site by various doses of orally administered MK-869 was also measured. Our results demonstrate the utility of LC/MS to quantify tracer distribution in preclinical brain receptor occupancy studies.

  12. Comparative effect of lurasidone and blonanserin on cortical glutamate, dopamine, and acetylcholine efflux: role of relative serotonin (5-HT)2A and DA D2 antagonism and 5-HT1A partial agonism.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mei; Panos, John J; Kwon, Sunoh; Oyamada, Yoshihiro; Rajagopal, Lakshmi; Meltzer, Herbert Y

    2014-03-01

    Atypical antipsychotic drugs (AAPDs) have been suggested to be more effective in improving cognitive impairment in schizophrenia than typical APDs, a conclusion supported by differences in receptor affinities and neurotransmitter efflux in the cortex and the hippocampus. More potent serotonin (5-HT)2A than dopamine (DA) D2 receptors antagonism, and direct or indirect 5-HT1A agonism, characterize almost all AAPDs. Blonanserin, an AAPD, has slightly greater affinity for D2 than 5-HT2A receptors. Using microdialysis and ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry, we compared the abilities of the typical APD, haloperidol, three AAPDs, blonanserin, lurasidone, and olanzapine, and a selective 5-HT1A partial agonist, tandospirone, and all, except haloperidol, were found to ameliorate the cognitive deficits produced by the N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonist, phencyclidine, altering the efflux of neurotransmitters and metabolites in the rat cortex and nucleus accumbens. Blonanserin, lurasidone, olanzapine, and tandospirone, but not haloperidol, increased the efflux of cortical DA and its metabolites, homovanillic acid and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid. Olanzapine and lurasidone increased the efflux of acetylcholine; lurasidone increased glutamate as well. None of the compounds significantly altered the efflux of 5-HT or its metabolite, 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid, or GABA, serine, and glycine. The ability to increase cortical DA efflux was the only shared effect of the compounds which ameliorates the deficit in cognition in rodents following phencyclidine. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  13. Extensive Rigid Analogue Design Maps the Binding Conformation of Potent N-Benzylphenethylamine 5-HT2A Serotonin Receptor Agonist Ligands

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Based on the structure of the superpotent 5-HT2A agonist 2-(4-bromo-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-N-[(2-methoxyphenyl)methyl]ethanamine, which consists of a ring-substituted phenethylamine skeleton modified with an N-benzyl group, we designed and synthesized a small library of constrained analogues to identify the optimal arrangement of the pharmacophoric elements of the ligand. Structures consisted of diversely substituted tetrahydroisoquinolines, piperidines, and one benzazepine. Based on the structure of (S,S)-9b, which showed the highest affinity of the series, we propose an optimal binding conformation. (S,S)-9b also displayed 124-fold selectivity for the 5-HT2A over the 5-HT2C receptor, making it the most selective 5-HT2A receptor agonist ligand currently known. PMID:23336049

  14. Serotonin-2A receptor regulation of panic-like behavior in the rat dorsal periaqueductal gray matter: the role of GABA.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Sergio, Thatiane; de Bortoli, Valquiria Camin; Zangrossi, Helio

    2011-12-01

    Electrical stimulation of the dorsal periaqueductal gray (dPAG) evokes escape, a defensive response associated with panic attacks. Stimulation of 5-HT1A or 5-HT2A receptors in this midbrain area equally inhibits escape performance, even though at the molecular level these receptors cause opposite effects, i.e., activation of the former hyperpolarizes the cell membrane, while the latter excites it. A proposal has been made that 5-HT2A receptor agonists exert their inhibitory effect on escape by activating GABAergic interneurons located in the dPAG. In the present study, we evaluated this hypothesis by investigating whether previous intra-dPAG administration of the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline blocks the anti-escape effect caused by the local injection of different 5-HT2A/2C receptor agonists. Intra-dPAG administration of 5-HT, the preferential 5-HT2A receptor agonist DOI, the nonselective 5-HT2C receptor agonist mCPP or the 5-HT2C receptor agonist RO 60-0175 significantly inhibited the escape reaction induced by electrical stimulation of the same brain area. In all cases, this panicolytic-like effect was blocked by previous microinjection of bicuculline. This GABAA antagonist, however, failed to antagonize the anti-escape effect caused by the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT. The inhibitory effect caused by DOI, RO 60-0175, and mCPP was also blocked by previous intra-dPAG injection of the preferential 5-HT2A receptor antagonist ketanserin. Pre-administration of the 5-HT2C receptor antagonist SB-242084 in the dPAG did not block the anti-escape effect of RO 60-0175. Stimulation of 5-HT2A but not 5-HT2C receptors in the dPAG causes a panicolytic-like effect that is mediated by facilitation of GABAergic neurotransmission.

  15. Effects of the serotonin 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptor ligands on the discriminative stimulus effects of nicotine in rats.

    PubMed

    Zaniewska, Magdalena; McCreary, Andrew C; Przegaliński, Edmund; Filip, Malgorzata

    2007-10-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that serotonergic (5-HT) 5-HT2A or 5-HT2C receptors or their pharmacological stimulation modulated the discriminative stimulus effects of nicotine in male Wistar rats. To this end the selective 5-HT2A receptor antagonist R-(+)-alpha-(2,3-dimethoxyphenyl)-1-[2-(4-fluorophenyl)ethyl]-4-piperidinemethanol (M100,907; 0.5-1 mg/kg, i.p.), the functional 5-HT2A receptor agonist 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane hydrochloride (DOI; 0.1-1 mg/kg, s.c.), the selective 5-HT2C receptor antagonist 6-chloro-5-methyl-1-{[2-(2-methylpyrid-3-yloxy)pyrid-5-yl]carbamoyl}indoline (SB 242,084; 0.25-1 mg/kg, i.p.) and the 5-HT2C receptor agonists (S)-2-chloro-5-fluoro-indol-1-yl)-1-methylethylamine fumarate (Ro 60-0175; 0.3-1 mg/kg, s.c.) and (7bR, 10aR)-1,2,3,4,8,9,10,10a-octahydro-7bH-cyclopenta-[b][1,4]diazepino[6,7,1hi]indole (WAY 163,909; 0.75-1.5 mg/kg, i.p.) were used. Additionally, the effects of the selective alpha4beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtype agonist 5-iodo-3-(2(S)-azetidinylmethoxy)pyridine (5-IA; 0.01 mg/kg, s.c.) were investigated. In rats trained to discriminate (-)-nicotine (0.4 mg/kg, s.c.) from saline in a two-lever, water-reinforced fixed ratio 10 task, substitutions were not observed with 5-HT2 receptor ligands (<32% nicotine-lever responding), conversely 5-IA induced a full substitution (100% nicotine-lever responding). In combination studies, fixed doses of M100,907 (0.5-1 mg/kg) or SB 242,084 (0.25-1 mg/kg) did not alter the dose-response curve of nicotine, while DOI (0.3 mg/kg), Ro 60-0175 (1 mg/kg) and WAY 163,909 (1 and 1.5 mg/kg) attenuated the discriminative stimulus effects of nicotine. The decrease in the expression of the discriminative stimulus effects of nicotine produced by DOI was blocked by M100,907 (1 mg/kg), but not by SB 242,084 (1 mg/kg), while that evoked by Ro 60-0175 or WAY 163,909 was blocked by SB 242,084 (1 mg/kg), but not by M100,907 (1 mg/kg). Further studies showed that

  16. Effects of a Serotonin 2C Agonist and a 2A Antagonist on Actigraphy-Based Sleep Parameters Disrupted by Methamphetamine Self-Administration in Rhesus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Perez Diaz, Maylen; Andersen, Monica L; Rice, Kenner C; Howell, Leonard L

    2017-06-01

    Sleep disorders and substance abuse are highly comorbid and we have previously shown that methamphetamine self-administration significantly disrupts activity-based sleep parameters in rhesus monkeys. To the best of our knowledge, no study has evaluated the effectiveness of any pharmacological intervention to attenuate the effects of methamphetamine on nighttime activity under well-controlled conditions in laboratory animals. Thus, we examined the effects of a 5-HT2C receptor agonist, WAY163909, and a 5-HT2A receptor antagonist, M100907, given alone and in combination, on actigraphy-based sleep parameters disrupted by methamphetamine self-administration in non-human primates. Adult male/female rhesus monkeys self-administered methamphetamine (0.03 mg/kg/injection, i.v.) under a fixed-ratio 20 schedule of reinforcement (60-min sessions once a day, 5 days per week). Nighttime activity was evaluated using Actiwatch monitors. WAY163909 (0.1, 0.3, and 1.0 mg/kg), M100907 (0.03, 0.1, and 0.3 mg/kg), and a combination (0.1 mg/kg M100+0.3 mg/kg WAY) were administered i.m. before lights-out. Each dose was given for five consecutive days during which self-administration took place in the morning. Both drugs improved activity-based sleep measures disrupted by methamphetamine by decreasing sleep latency and increasing sleep efficiency compared with vehicle. By combining these drugs, their individual effects were significantly enhanced. Agonists at the 5-HT2C receptor and antagonists at the 5-HT2A receptor show promise as potential treatments for the sleep-disrupting effects of stimulants when used alone and in combination. Combining subthreshold doses of WAY and M100 produced significant improvements in nighttime activity measures while avoiding the general motor-decreasing effects of the high dose of WAY.

  17. Cognitive Impairment Induced by Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol Occurs through Heteromers between Cannabinoid CB1 and Serotonin 5-HT2A Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lanfumey, Laurence; Cordomí, Arnau; Pastor, Antoni; de La Torre, Rafael; Gasperini, Paola; Navarro, Gemma; Howell, Lesley A.; Pardo, Leonardo; Lluís, Carmen; Canela, Enric I.; McCormick, Peter J.; Maldonado, Rafael; Robledo, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Activation of cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1R) by delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) produces a variety of negative effects with major consequences in cannabis users that constitute important drawbacks for the use of cannabinoids as therapeutic agents. For this reason, there is a tremendous medical interest in harnessing the beneficial effects of THC. Behavioral studies carried out in mice lacking 5-HT2A receptors (5-HT2AR) revealed a remarkable 5-HT2AR-dependent dissociation in the beneficial antinociceptive effects of THC and its detrimental amnesic properties. We found that specific effects of THC such as memory deficits, anxiolytic-like effects, and social interaction are under the control of 5-HT2AR, but its acute hypolocomotor, hypothermic, anxiogenic, and antinociceptive effects are not. In biochemical studies, we show that CB1R and 5-HT2AR form heteromers that are expressed and functionally active in specific brain regions involved in memory impairment. Remarkably, our functional data shows that costimulation of both receptors by agonists reduces cell signaling, antagonist binding to one receptor blocks signaling of the interacting receptor, and heteromer formation leads to a switch in G-protein coupling for 5-HT2AR from Gq to Gi proteins. Synthetic peptides with the sequence of transmembrane helices 5 and 6 of CB1R, fused to a cell-penetrating peptide, were able to disrupt receptor heteromerization in vivo, leading to a selective abrogation of memory impairments caused by exposure to THC. These data reveal a novel molecular mechanism for the functional interaction between CB1R and 5-HT2AR mediating cognitive impairment. CB1R-5-HT2AR heteromers are thus good targets to dissociate the cognitive deficits induced by THC from its beneficial antinociceptive properties. PMID:26158621

  18. Cognitive Impairment Induced by Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol Occurs through Heteromers between Cannabinoid CB1 and Serotonin 5-HT2A Receptors.

    PubMed

    Viñals, Xavier; Moreno, Estefanía; Lanfumey, Laurence; Cordomí, Arnau; Pastor, Antoni; de La Torre, Rafael; Gasperini, Paola; Navarro, Gemma; Howell, Lesley A; Pardo, Leonardo; Lluís, Carmen; Canela, Enric I; McCormick, Peter J; Maldonado, Rafael; Robledo, Patricia

    2015-07-01

    Activation of cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1R) by delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) produces a variety of negative effects with major consequences in cannabis users that constitute important drawbacks for the use of cannabinoids as therapeutic agents. For this reason, there is a tremendous medical interest in harnessing the beneficial effects of THC. Behavioral studies carried out in mice lacking 5-HT2A receptors (5-HT2AR) revealed a remarkable 5-HT2AR-dependent dissociation in the beneficial antinociceptive effects of THC and its detrimental amnesic properties. We found that specific effects of THC such as memory deficits, anxiolytic-like effects, and social interaction are under the control of 5-HT2AR, but its acute hypolocomotor, hypothermic, anxiogenic, and antinociceptive effects are not. In biochemical studies, we show that CB1R and 5-HT2AR form heteromers that are expressed and functionally active in specific brain regions involved in memory impairment. Remarkably, our functional data shows that costimulation of both receptors by agonists reduces cell signaling, antagonist binding to one receptor blocks signaling of the interacting receptor, and heteromer formation leads to a switch in G-protein coupling for 5-HT2AR from Gq to Gi proteins. Synthetic peptides with the sequence of transmembrane helices 5 and 6 of CB1R, fused to a cell-penetrating peptide, were able to disrupt receptor heteromerization in vivo, leading to a selective abrogation of memory impairments caused by exposure to THC. These data reveal a novel molecular mechanism for the functional interaction between CB1R and 5-HT2AR mediating cognitive impairment. CB1R-5-HT2AR heteromers are thus good targets to dissociate the cognitive deficits induced by THC from its beneficial antinociceptive properties.

  19. Effects of olanzapine and betahistine co-treatment on serotonin transporter, 5-HT2A and dopamine D2 receptor binding density.

    PubMed

    Lian, Jiamei; Huang, Xu-Feng; Pai, Nagesh; Deng, Chao

    2013-12-02

    Olanzapine is widely used in treating multiple domains of schizophrenia symptoms but induces serious metabolic side-effects. Recent evidence has showed that co-treatment of betahistine (a histaminergic H1 receptor agonist and H3 receptor antagonist) is effective for preventing olanzapine-induced weight gain/obesity, however it is not clear whether this co-treatment affects on the primary therapeutic receptor binding sites of olanzapine such as serotonergic 5-HT2A receptors (5-HT2AR) and dopaminergic D2 receptors (D2R). Therefore, this study investigated the effects of this co-treatment on 5-HT2AR, 5-HT transporter (5-HTT) and D2R bindings in various brain regions involved in antipsychotic efficacy. Female Sprague Dawley rats were administered orally (t.i.d.) with either olanzapine (1mg/kg), betahistine (2.7 mg/kg), olanzapine plus betahistine (O+B), or vehicle (control) for 2 weeks. Quantitative autoradiography was used to detect the density of [(3)H]ketanserin, [(3)H]paroxetine and [(3)H]raclopride binding site to 5-HT2AR, 5-HTT and D2R. Compared to the controls, olanzapine significantly decreased [(3)H]ketanserin bindings to 5-HT2AR in the prefrontal cortex, cingulate cortex, and nucleus accumbens. Similar changes in 5-HT2AR bindings in these nuclei were also observed in the O+B co-treatment group. Olanzapine also significantly decreased [(3)H]paroxetine binding to 5-HTT in the ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra, however, both olanzapine only and O+B co-treatment did not affect [(3)H]raclopride binding to D2R. The results confirmed the important role of 5-HT2AR in the efficacy of olanzapine, which is not influenced by the O+B co-treatment. Therefore, betahistine co-treatment would be an effective combination therapy to reduce olanzapine-induced weight gain side-effects without affecting olanzapine's actions on 5-HT2AR transmissions.

  20. SEROTONIN BINDING TO PREPARATIONS FROM RAT BRAIN,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    BRAIN , SEROTONIN, SEROTONIN, OXIDOREDUCTASES, LYSERGIC ACIDS, RESERPINE, CHLORPROMAZINE, ACETYLCHOLINE, FATTY ACIDS, NOREPINEPHRINE, LEARNING, PERMEABILITY, MITOCHONDRIA, MORPHOLOGY(BIOLOGY), DRUGS, PHYSIOLOGY.

  1. Association of serotonin transporter (SLC6A4) & receptor (5HTR1A, 5HTR2A) polymorphisms with response to treatment with escitalopram in patients with major depressive disorder: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Aniruddha; Chadda, R.K.; Sood, Mamta; Kaur, Harpreet; Kukreti, Ritushree

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Genetic factors have potential of predicting response to antidepressants in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). In this study, an attempt was made to find an association between response to escitalopram in patients with MDD, and serotonin transporter (SLC6A4) and receptor (5HTR1A, 5HTR2A) polymorphisms. Methods: Fifty five patients diagnosed as suffering from MDD, were selected for the study. The patients were treated with escitalopram over a period of 6-8 wk. Severity of depression, response to treatment and side effects were assessed using standardised instruments. Genetic variations from HTR1A (rs6295), HTR2A (rs6311 and rs6313) and SLC6A4 (44 base-pair insertion/deletion at 5-HTTLPR) were genotyped. The genetic data of the responders and non-responders were compared to assess the role of genetic variants in therapeutic outcome. Results: Thirty six (65.5%) patients responded to treatment, and 19 (34.5%) had complete remission. No association was observed for genotype and allelic frequencies of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) among remitter/non-remitter and responder/non-responder groups, and six most common side-effects, except memory loss which was significantly associated with rs6311 (P =0.03). Interpretation & conclusions: No significant association was found between the SNPs analysed and response to escitalopram in patients with MDD though a significant association was seen between the side effect of memory loss and rs6311. Studies with larger sample are required to find out genetic basis of antidepressant response in Indian patients. PMID:26261165

  2. Density and Function of Central Serotonin (5-HT) Transporters, 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A Receptors, and Effects of their Targeting on BTBR T+tf/J Mouse Social Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Georgianna G.; Hensler, Julie G.; Burke, Teresa F.; Benno, Robert H.; Onaivi, Emmanuel S.; Daws, Lynette C.

    2010-01-01

    BTBR mice are potentially useful tools for autism research because their behavior parallels core social interaction impairments and restricted-repetitive behaviors. Altered regulation of central serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission may underlie such behavioral deficits. To test this, we compared 5-HT transporter (SERT), 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptor densities among BTBR and C57 strains. Autoradiographic [3H] cyanoimipramine (1nM) binding to SERT was 20–30% lower throughout the adult BTBR brain as compared to C57BL/10J mice. In hippocampal membrane homogenates [3H] citalopram maximal binding (Bmax) to SERT was 95 ± 13 fmol/mg protein in BTBR and 171 ± 20 fmol/mg protein in C57BL/6J mice, and the BTBR dissociation constant (KD) was 2 ± 0.3 nM vs. 1.1 ± 0.2 in C57BL/6J mice. Hippocampal 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptor binding was similar among strains. However, 8-OH-DPAT-stimulated [35S] GTPγS binding in the BTBR hippocampal CA1 region was 28% higher, indicating elevated 5-HT1A capacity to activate G-proteins. In BTBR mice, the SERT blocker, fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) and the 5-HT1A receptor partial-agonist, buspirone (2 mg/kg) enhanced social interactions. The D2/5-HT2 receptor antagonist, risperidone (0.1 mg/kg) reduced marble burying but failed to improve sociability. Overall, altered SERT and/or 5-HT1A functionality in hippocampus could contribute to the relatively low sociability of BTBR mice. PMID:21070242

  3. Fronto-limbic brain structures in suicidal and non-suicidal female patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Monkul, E S; Hatch, J P; Nicoletti, M A; Spence, S; Brambilla, P; Lacerda, A L T; Sassi, R B; Mallinger, A G; Keshavan, M S; Soares, J C

    2007-04-01

    Our knowledge about the neurobiology of suicide is limited. It has been proposed that suicidal behavior generally requires biological abnormalities concomitant with the personality trait of impulsivity/aggression, besides an acute psychiatric illness or psychosocial stressor. We investigated fronto-limbic anatomical brain abnormalities in suicidal and non-suicidal adult female patients with unipolar depression. Our sample consisted of seven suicidal unipolar patients, 10 non-suicidal unipolar patients and 17 healthy female comparison subjects. The criterion for suicidality was one or more documented lifetime suicide attempts. A 1.5T GE Signa Imaging System running version Signa 5.4.3 software was used to acquire the magnetic resonance imaging images. All anatomical structures were measured blindly, with the subjects' identities and group assignments masked. We used analysis of covariance with age and intracranial volume as covariates and the Tukey-Kramer procedure to compare suicidal patients, non-suicidal patients and healthy comparison subjects. Suicidal patients had smaller right and left orbitofrontal cortex gray matter volumes compared with healthy comparison subjects. Suicidal patients had larger right amygdala volumes than non-suicidal patients. Abnormalities in the orbitofrontal cortex and amygdala in suicidal patients may impair decision-making and predispose these patients to act more impulsively and to attempt suicide.

  4. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs)

    MedlinePlus

    ... dangerous reactions when combined with certain medications or herbal supplements. Serotonin syndrome. Rarely, an antidepressant can cause high ... antidepressants, certain pain or headache medications, and the herbal supplement St. John's wort. Signs and symptoms of serotonin ...

  5. Serotonin syndrome: fentanyl and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor interactions.

    PubMed

    Greenier, Ewa; Lukyanova, Valentina; Reede, Lynn

    2014-10-01

    Serotonin syndrome is a rare but potentially fatal adverse drug reaction associated with increased serotonergic activity in the central nervous system. It is characterized by a triad of symptoms, which include altered mental status, neuromuscular hyperactivity, and autonomic instability or hyperactivity. Due to the potential of rapid onset, it is important for clinicians to recognize the signs and symptoms of serotonin syndrome. Serotonin syndrome symptoms may resemble other conditions. Although this article focuses on serotonin syndrome as a result of an adverse interaction of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and fentanyl, it is important for not only anesthesia professionals, but all clinicians--such as those in emergency medicine and critical care--to be aware of this syndrome and its management. This article discusses the clinical manifestations of the serotonin syndrome and highlights reported cases of serotonin syndrome specifically related to an interaction between SSRIs and fentanyl, a commonly used opioid in anesthesia practice.

  6. Poorer frontolimbic white matter integrity is associated with chronic cannabis use, FAAH genotype, and increased depressive and apathy symptoms in adolescents and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Shollenbarger, Skyler G.; Price, Jenessa; Wieser, Jon; Lisdahl, Krista

    2015-01-01

    Background The heaviest period of cannabis use coincides with ongoing white matter (WM) maturation. Further, cannabis-related changes may be moderated by FAAH genotype (rs324420). We examined the association between cannabis use and FAAH genotype on frontolimbic WM integrity in adolescents and emerging adults. We then tested whether observed WM abnormalities were linked with depressive or apathy symptoms. Methods Participants included 37 cannabis users and 37 healthy controls (33 female; ages 18–25). Multiple regressions examined the independent and interactive effects of variables on WM integrity. Results Regular cannabis users demonstrated reduced WM integrity in the bilateral uncinate fasciculus (UNC) (MD, right: p = .009 and left: p = .009; FA, right: p = .04 and left: p = .03) and forceps minor (fMinor) (MD, p = .03) compared to healthy controls. Marginally reduced WM integrity in the cannabis users was found in the left anterior thalamic radiation (ATR) (FA, p = .08). Cannabis group ∗ FAAH genotype interaction predicted WM integrity in bilateral ATR (FA, right: p = .05 and left: p = .001) and fMinor (FA, p = .02). In cannabis users, poorer WM integrity was correlated with increased symptoms of depression and apathy in bilateral ATR and UNC. Conclusions Consistent with prior findings, cannabis use was associated with reduced frontolimbic WM integrity. WM integrity was also moderated by FAAH genotype, in that cannabis-using FAAH C/C carriers and A carrying controls had reduced WM integrity compared to control C/C carriers. Observed frontolimbic white matter abnormalities were linked with increased depressive and apathy symptoms in the cannabis users. PMID:26106535

  7. Poorer frontolimbic white matter integrity is associated with chronic cannabis use, FAAH genotype, and increased depressive and apathy symptoms in adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Shollenbarger, Skyler G; Price, Jenessa; Wieser, Jon; Lisdahl, Krista

    2015-01-01

    The heaviest period of cannabis use coincides with ongoing white matter (WM) maturation. Further, cannabis-related changes may be moderated by FAAH genotype (rs324420). We examined the association between cannabis use and FAAH genotype on frontolimbic WM integrity in adolescents and emerging adults. We then tested whether observed WM abnormalities were linked with depressive or apathy symptoms. Participants included 37 cannabis users and 37 healthy controls (33 female; ages 18-25). Multiple regressions examined the independent and interactive effects of variables on WM integrity. Regular cannabis users demonstrated reduced WM integrity in the bilateral uncinate fasciculus (UNC) (MD, right: p = .009 and left: p = .009; FA, right: p = .04 and left: p = .03) and forceps minor (fMinor) (MD, p = .03) compared to healthy controls. Marginally reduced WM integrity in the cannabis users was found in the left anterior thalamic radiation (ATR) (FA, p = .08). Cannabis group ∗ FAAH genotype interaction predicted WM integrity in bilateral ATR (FA, right: p = .05 and left: p = .001) and fMinor (FA, p = .02). In cannabis users, poorer WM integrity was correlated with increased symptoms of depression and apathy in bilateral ATR and UNC. Consistent with prior findings, cannabis use was associated with reduced frontolimbic WM integrity. WM integrity was also moderated by FAAH genotype, in that cannabis-using FAAH C/C carriers and A carrying controls had reduced WM integrity compared to control C/C carriers. Observed frontolimbic white matter abnormalities were linked with increased depressive and apathy symptoms in the cannabis users.

  8. Extended characterisation of the serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptor-selective PET radiotracer 11C-MDL100907 in humans: quantitative analysis, test-retest reproducibility, and vulnerability to endogenous 5-HT tone

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, Peter S.; Slifstein, Mark; Hwang, Dah-Ren; Huang, Yiyun; Scher, Erica; Abi-Dargham, Anissa; Laruelle, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Introduction scanning properties and analytic methodology of the 5-HT2A receptor-selective positron emission tomography (PET) tracer 11C-MDL100907 have been partially characterised in previous reports. We present an extended characterisation in healthy human subjects. Methods 64 11C-MDL100907 PET scans with metabolite-corrected arterial input function were performed in 39 healthy adults (18–55 yr). 12 subjects were scanned twice (duration 150 min) to provide data on plasma analysis, model order estimation, and stability and test-retest characteristics of outcome measures. All other scans were 90 min duration. 3 subjects completed scanning at baseline and following 5-HT2A receptor antagonist medication (risperidone or ciproheptadine) to provide definitive data on the suitability of the cerebellum as reference region. 10 subjects were scanned under reduced 5-HT and control conditions using rapid tryptophan depletion to investigate vulnerability to competition with endogenous 5-HT. 13 subjects were scanned as controls in clinical protocols. Pooled data were used to analyze the relationship between tracer injected mass and receptor occupancy, and age-related decline in 5-HT2A receptors. Results optimum analytic method was a 2-tissue compartment model with arterial input function. However, basis function implementation of SRTM may be suitable for measuring between-group differences non-invasively and warrants further investigation. Scan duration of 90 minutes achieved stable outcome measures in all cortical regions except orbitofrontal which required 120 minutes. Binding potential (BPP and BPND) test-retest variability was very good (7–11%) in neocortical regions other than orbitofrontal, and moderately good (14–20%) in orbitofrontal cortex and medial temporal lobe. Saturation occupancy of 5-HT2A receptors by risperidone validates the use of the cerebellum as a region devoid of specific binding for the purposes of PET. We advocate a mass limit of 4.6 µg to remain

  9. Serotonin and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Serena-Lynn; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Decreased serotonin function has consistently been shown to be highly correlated with impulsive aggression across a number of different experimental paradigms. Such lowered serotonergic indices appear to correlate with the dimension of aggression dyscontrol and/or impulsivity rather than with psychiatric diagnostic categories per se. Implications…

  10. Platelet serotonin modulates immune functions.

    PubMed

    Mauler, M; Bode, C; Duerschmied, D

    2016-01-01

    This short review addresses immune functions of platelet serotonin. Platelets transport serotonin at a high concentration in dense granules and release it upon activation. Besides haemostatic, vasotonic and developmental modulation, serotonin also influences a variety of immune functions (mediated by different serotonin receptors). First, platelet serotonergic effects are directed against invading pathogens via activation and proliferation of lymphocytes, modulation of cytokine release, and recruitment of neutrophils to sites of acute inflammation by induction of selectin expression on endothelial cells. Second, serotonin levels are elevated in autoimmune diseases, such as asthma or rheumatoid arthritis, and during tissue regeneration after ischemia of myocardium or brain. Specific antagonism of serotonin receptors appears to improve survival after myocardial infarction or sepsis and to attenuate asthmatic attacks in animal models. It will be of great clinical relevance if these findings can be translated into human applications. In conclusion, targeting immune modulatory effects of platelet serotonin may provide novel therapeutic options for common health problems.

  11. Variations in myo-inositol in fronto-limbic regions and clinical response to electroconvulsive therapy in major depression.

    PubMed

    Njau, Stephanie; Joshi, Shantanu H; Leaver, Amber M; Vasavada, Megha; Van Fleet, Jessica; Espinoza, Randall; Narr, Katherine L

    2016-09-01

    Though electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an established treatment for severe depression, the neurobiological factors accounting for the clinical effects of ECT are largely unknown. Myo-inositol, a neurometabolite linked with glial activity, is reported as reduced in fronto-limbic regions in patients with depression. Whether changes in myo-inositol relate to the antidepressant effects of ECT is unknown. Using magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS), we measured dorsomedial anterior cingulate cortex (dmACC) and left and right hippocampal myo-inositol in 50 ECT patients (mean age: 43.78, 14 SD) and 33 controls (mean age: 39.33, 12 SD) to determine cross sectional effects of diagnosis and longitudinal effects of ECT. Patients were scanned prior to treatment, after the second ECT and at completion of the ECT index series. Controls were scanned twice at intervals corresponding to patients' baseline and end of treatment scans. Myo-inositol increased over the course of ECT in the dmACC (p = 0.042). A significant hemisphere by clinical response effect was observed for the hippocampus (p = 0.003) where decreased myo-inositol related to symptom improvement in the left hippocampus. Cross-sectional differences between patients and controls at baseline were not detected. Changes in myo-inositol observed in the dmACC in association with ECT and in the hippocampus in association with ECT-related clinical response suggest the mechanisms of ECT could include gliogenesis or a reversal of gliosis that differentially affect dorsal and ventral limbic regions. Change in dmACC myo-inositol diverged from control values with ECT suggesting compensation, while hippocampal change suggested normalization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Default mode network and frontolimbic gray matter abnormalities in patients with borderline personality disorder: A voxel-based meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xun; Hu, Liyuan; Zeng, Jianguang; Tan, Ying; Cheng, Bochao

    2016-01-01

    Specific frontolimbic abnormalities are hypothesized to underlie the etiology of borderline personality disorder (BPD). However, findings from neuroimaging studies were inconsistent. In the current study, we aimed to provide a complete overview of cerebral microstructural alterations in gray matter (GM) of BPD patients. A total of 11 studies were enrolled, comprising 275 BPD patients and 290 healthy controls (HCs). A meta-analysis was conduct to quantitatively estimate regional GM abnormalities in BPD patients using the seed-based d mapping (SDM). Meta-regression was also conducted. Compared with HCs, the BPD patients exhibited increased GM mainly in bilateral supplementary motor area extending to right posterior cingulated cortex (PCC) and bilateral primary motor cortex, right middle frontal gyrus (MFG), and the bilateral precuneus extending to bilateral PCC. Decreased GM was identified in bilateral middle temporal gyri, right inferior frontal gyrus extending to right insular, left hippocampus and left superior frontal gyrus extending to left medial orbitofrontal cortex. The mean age of BPD patients were found nagativly associated with GM alterations in right MFG. Our findings suggested that BPD patients have significantly GM abnormalities in the default mode network and frontolimbic circuit. Our results provided further evidences in elucidating the underline neural mechanisms of BPD. PMID:27694955

  13. [Neuroleptics and serotonin].

    PubMed

    Hery, F; Hamon, M

    1993-01-01

    To date, there is no doubt that dopamine plays a key role in the behavioural disorders associated with schizophrenia. However, dopamine is not the only neurotransmitter involved in this syndrome, as it interacts with many neuronal systems in brain. Of special interest is the interaction between dopaminergic and serotoninergic systems with evidence from pharmacological data in animals that each of these systems may exert an inhibitory influence on the other. Furthermore, the psychotomimetic effects of drugs affecting serotoninergic neurotransmission such as LSD, psilocybin, N,N-dimethyltryptamine and 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine also contributed to draw attention onto a possible involvement of serotoninergic systems in at least some of the disorders typical of schizophrenia. This idea received strong support from recent studies on the multiple receptors for serotonin in the central nervous system. These studies not only demonstrate the existence of several classes of serotonin receptors called 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT1C, 5-HT1D, 5-HT2, 5-HT3 and 5-HT4, but led also to the development of novel agonists and antagonists for the stimulation or blockade of each of them. Pharmacological investigations with these ligands revealed that serotonin is probably involved in the behavioural disorders associated with schizophrenia through its binding to three distinct classes of receptors: 5-HT1A, 5-HT2 (or the closely related class 5-HT1C) and 5-HT3.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Serotonin and brain development.

    PubMed

    Sodhi, Monsheel S K; Sanders-Bush, Elaine

    2004-01-01

    The role of the serotonergic system in the neuroplastic events that create, repair, and degenerate the brain has been explored. Synaptic plasticity occurs throughout life and is critical during brain development. Evidence from biochemical, pharmacological, and clinical studies demonstrates the huge importance of an intact serotonergic system for normal central nervous system (CNS)function. Serotonin acts as a growth factor during embryogenesis, and serotonin receptor activity forms a crucial part of the cascade of events leading to changes in brain structure. The serotonergic system interacts with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), S100beta, and other chemical messengers, in addition to ts cross talk with the GABAergic, glutamatergic, and dopaminergic neurotransmitter systems. Disruption of these processes may contribute to CNS disorders that have been associated with impaired development. Furthermore, many psychiatric drugs alter serotonergic activity and have been shown to create changes in brain structure with long-term treatment. However, the mechanisms for their therapeutic efficacy are still unclear. Treatments for psychiatric illness are usually chronic and alleviate psychiatric symptoms, rather than cure these diseases. Therefore, greater exploration of the serotonin system during brain development and growth could lead to real progress in the discovery of treatments for mental disorders.

  15. Serotonin syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Likasitwattanakul, Surachai

    2005-07-01

    Serotonin syndrome is a rare but potentially fatal complication of drugs that have effects on central nervous system serotonin. It is characterized by sudden onset of altered mental status, increased neuromuscular activity and autonomic instability. The author reports a child with suprasellar region tumor who presented with depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder and received a combination of sertaline (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) and clomipramine (tricyclic antidepressant). Symptoms of serotonin syndrome occurred within 24 hours after increasing the dose of sertaline. The patient's symptoms resolved rapidly with discontinuation of the offending drugs and supportive care.

  16. Serotonin and emotional processing: does it help explain antidepressant drug action?

    PubMed

    Harmer, Catherine J

    2008-11-01

    There is growing interest in the effects of antidepressant drug treatment on measures of emotional processing. Such actions may help us understand the role of monoamines in emotional dysfunction in depression and how antidepressant drug treatments work. Recent studies suggest that decreasing central serotonin function with tryptophan depletion can reinstate negative biases in recovered depressed patients, even at doses insufficient to induce changes in mood. Conversely, antidepressant drug administration increases the processing of positive emotional information in healthy volunteers and acutely depressed patients early in treatment. This increase in positive bias may provide a platform for subsequent cognitive restructuring and learning which contributes to the evolution of symptom change in depression. Functional neuroimaging studies suggest that these early antidepressant effects involve fronto-limbic and extra-striate circuitry suggestive of actions on both the initial appraisal and attentional processing of affective stimuli. This approach may therefore provide a framework for linking psychological and biological processes in emotional disorders and their treatment. Antidepressants may not directly modulate mood and anxiety but rather allow a different perspective for our ongoing evaluation of our self, the world and the future.

  17. Serotonin receptors involved in antidepressant effects.

    PubMed

    Artigas, Francesc

    2013-01-01

    The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-hdroxytryptamine; 5-HT) has been implicated in the pathophysiology and treatment of major depression since the serendipitous discovery of antidepressant drugs in the 1950s. However, despite the generalised use of serotonin-enhancing drugs, such as the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and the dual serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), the exact neurobiological mechanisms involved in the therapeutic action of these drugs are poorly understood. Better knowledge of these mechanisms may help to identify new therapeutic targets and to overcome the two main limitations of current treatments: reduced efficacy and slowness of action. Here I review the preclinical and clinical evidence supporting the involvement of different 5-HT receptors in the therapeutic action of antidepressant drugs. Presynaptic 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(1B) autoreceptors play a major detrimental role in antidepressant treatments, as their activation by the excess of the active (extracellular) 5-HT fraction produced by serotonin transporter (SERT) blockade reduces presynaptic serotonergic function. Conversely, stimulation of postsynaptic 5-HT(1A) receptors in corticolimbic networks appears beneficial for the antidepressant action. The 5-HT(2) receptor family is also involved as 5-HT(2A/2C) receptor blockade improves the antidepressant action of SSRIs, and recent data suggest that 5-HT(2B) receptor activation enhances serotonergic activity. Less is known from the rest of postsynaptic 5-HT receptors. However, 5-HT(3) receptor blockade augments the 5-HT increase evoked by SERT inhibition, and 5-HT(4) receptor activation may have antidepressant effects on its own. Finally, blockade of 5-HT(6) and 5-HT(7) receptors appears also to augment the antidepressant effects of SERT inhibition.

  18. Serotonin induces peripheral mechanical antihyperalgesic effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Danielle A; Petrocchi, Júlia Alvarenga; Navarro, Larissa Caldeira; Souza, Tâmara Cristina; Castor, Marina G M; Perez, Andrea C; Duarte, Igor D G; Romero, Thiago R L

    2015-11-15

    The role of serotonin (5-HT) in nociception will vary according to the subtypes of receptors activated. When administered peripherally, it induces pain in humans and in rats by activation of 5-HT1, 5-HT2 and 5-HT3 receptors. In addition, endogenous 5-HT produced in situ, is involved in the nociceptive response induced by formalin in rat's paw inflammation, possibly via 5-HT3 receptors. Moreover, it has been shown that 5-HT released in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord by stimulation of the periaqueductal gray causes activation of inhibitory interneurons, resulting in inhibition of spinal neurons. In the present study we evaluated the effect of serotonin and its receptors at peripheral antinociception. The mice paw pressure test was used in animals that had increased sensitivity by an intraplantar injection of PGE2 (2 µg). We used selective antagonists of serotonin receptors (isamoltan 5-HT1B, BRL 15572 5-HT1D, ketanserin 5-HT2A, ondansetron 5-HT3 and SB-269970 5-HT7). Administration of serotonin into the right hind paw (62.5, 125, 250 and 500 ng and 1 µg) produced a dose-dependent peripheral mechanical antihyperalgesic effect of serotonin in mice. Selective antagonists for 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A, 5-HT3 receptors at doses of 0.1, 1 and 10 µg, reversed the antihyperalgesic effect induced by 250 ng serotonin. In contrast, selective antagonists for 5-HT1D and 5-HT7 receptors were unable to reverse the antihyperalgesic effect induced by serotonin. These results demonstrated for the first time, the peripheral mechanical antihyperalgesic effect of serotonin, and participation of 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A and 5-HT3 receptors in this event.

  19. Alpha-ethyltryptamines as dual dopamine-serotonin releasers.

    PubMed

    Blough, Bruce E; Landavazo, Antonio; Partilla, John S; Decker, Ann M; Page, Kevin M; Baumann, Michael H; Rothman, Richard B

    2014-10-01

    The dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT), and norepinephrine (NE) transporter releasing activity and serotonin-2A (5-HT2A) receptor agonist activity of a series of substituted tryptamines are reported. Three compounds, 7b, (+)-7d and 7f, were found to be potent dual DA/5-HT releasers and were >10-fold less potent as NE releasers. Additionally, these compounds had different activity profiles at the 5-HT2A receptor. The unique combination of dual DA/5-HT releasing activity and 5-HT2A receptor activity suggests that these compounds could represent a new class of neurotransmitter releasers with therapeutic potential. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Alpha-Ethyltryptamines as Dual Dopamine-Serotonin Releasers

    PubMed Central

    Blough, Bruce E.; Landavazo, Antonio; Partilla, John S.; Decker, Ann M.; Page, Kevin M.; Baumann, Michael H.; Rothman, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    The dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT), and norepinephrine (NE) transporter releasing activity and serotonin-2A (5-HT2A) receptor agonist activity of a series of substituted tryptamines are reported. Three compounds, 7b, (+)-7d and 7f, were found to be potent dual DA/5-HT releasers and were >10-fold less potent as NE releasers. Additionally, these compounds had different activity profiles at the 5-HT2A receptor. The unique combination of dual DA/5-HT releasing activity and 5-HT2A receptor activity suggests that these compounds could represent a new class of neurotransmitter releasers with therapeutic potential. PMID:25193229

  1. Ozone Exposure Alters Serotonin and Serotonin Receptor Expression in the Developing Lung

    PubMed Central

    Van Winkle, Laura S.

    2013-01-01

    Ozone, a pervasive environmental pollutant, adversely affects functional lung growth in children. Animal studies demonstrate that altered lung development is associated with modified signaling within the airway epithelial mesenchymal trophic unit, including mediators that can change nerve growth. We hypothesized that ozone exposure alters the normal pattern of serotonin, its transporter (5-HTT), and two key receptors (5-HT2A and 5-HT4), a pathway involved in postnatal airway neural, epithelial, and immune processes. We exposed monkeys to acute or episodic ozone during the first 2 or 6 months of life. There were three exposure groups/age: (1) filtered air, (2) acute ozone challenge, and (3) episodic ozone + acute ozone challenge. Lungs were prepared for compartment-specific qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and stereology. Airway epithelial serotonin immunopositive staining increased in all exposure groups with the most prominent in 2-month midlevel and 6-month distal airways. Gene expression of 5-HTT, 5-HT2AR, and 5-HT4R increased in an age-dependent manner. Overall expression was greater in distal compared with midlevel airways. Ozone exposure disrupted both 5-HT2AR and 5-HT4R protein expression in airways and enhanced immunopositive staining for 5-HT2AR (2 months) and 5-HT4R (6 months) on smooth muscle. Ozone exposure increases serotonin in airway epithelium regardless of airway level, age, and exposure history and changes the spatial pattern of serotonin receptor protein (5-HT2A and 5-HT4) and 5-HTT gene expression depending on compartment, age, and exposure history. Understanding how serotonin modulates components of reversible airway obstruction exacerbated by ozone exposure sets the foundation for developing clinically relevant therapies for airway disease. PMID:23570994

  2. Serotonin transporter and memory.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Alfredo; Perez-Garcia, Georgina; Ponce-Lopez, Teresa; Tellez, Ruth; Castillo, Carlos

    2011-09-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) has been associated to diverse functions and diseases, though seldom to memory. Therefore, we made an attempt to summarize and discuss the available publications implicating the involvement of the SERT in memory, amnesia and anti-amnesic effects. Evidence indicates that Alzheimer's disease and drugs of abuse like d-methamphetamine (METH) and (+/-)3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "ecstasy") have been associated to decrements in the SERT expression and memory deficits. Several reports have indicated that memory formation and amnesia affected the SERT expression. The SERT expression seems to be a reliable neural marker related to memory mechanisms, its alterations and potential treatment. The pharmacological, neural and molecular mechanisms associated to these changes are of great importance for investigation.

  3. Receptor mediation of exaggerated responses to serotonin-enhancing drugs in serotonin transporter (SERT)-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Fox, Meredith A; Jensen, Catherine L; Gallagher, Pamela S; Murphy, Dennis L

    2007-10-01

    Administration of serotonin-enhancing drugs induces a distinctive behavioral syndrome in rodents. We previously reported that mice with a targeted disruption of the serotonin transporter (SERT) display some of these behaviors spontaneously, in the absence of drug. In the current studies, we assessed the drug-induced serotonin syndrome in SERT wildtype (+/+), heterozygous (+/-) and knockout (-/-) mice. In SERT -/- mice, the monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) tranylcypromine (1mg/kg) or the serotonin precursor 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan (5-HTP; 80 mg/kg) led to markedly exaggerated serotonin syndrome behaviors relative to SERT +/+ mice, with an intermediate phenotype in SERT +/- mice. SERT +/+ mice developed significant serotonin syndrome behaviors only with the combination of the MAO-A/B inhibitor tranylcypromine (0.5 or 1 mg/kg) or the MAO-A-selective inhibitor clorgyline (1.2 mg/kg) plus 5-HTP. In evaluations of underlying mechanisms, pretreatment with the Htr1a receptor antagonist WAY 100635 (1 mg/kg), but not the Htr7 antagonist SB 269970 (3 mg/kg) or the Htr2a antagonist MDL 11,939 (5 mg/kg), markedly decreased the exaggerated 5-HTP-induced behaviors in SERT -/- mice. Subsequent experiments showed that the Htr1a agonist 8-OH-DPAT (1 or 2 mg/kg) elicited serotonin syndrome behaviors in a dose-dependent manner, blocked by WAY 100635 (1 mg/kg), in mice of all three genotypes, confirming the role of Htr1a receptors. The current data document markedly enhanced behavioral sensitivity to serotonin-enhancing drugs in SERT-deficient mice. These studies also show that the exaggerated behavioral responses observed in SERT +/- and -/- mice are mediated by postsynaptic Htr1a receptors, and suggest intact postsynaptic Htr1a function in SERT -/- mice.

  4. Gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 effective against serotonin syndrome in rats.

    PubMed

    Boban Blagaic, Alenka; Blagaic, Vladimir; Mirt, Mirela; Jelovac, Nikola; Dodig, Goran; Rucman, Rudolf; Petek, Marijan; Turkovic, Branko; Anic, Tomislav; Dubovecak, Miroslav; Staresinic, Mario; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2005-04-11

    Serotonin syndrome commonly follows irreversible monoamine oxidase (MAO)-inhibition and subsequent serotonin (5-HT) substrate (in rats with fore paw treading, hind limbs abduction, wet dog shake, hypothermia followed by hyperthermia). A stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 with very safe profile (inflammatory bowel disease clinical phase II, PL-10, PLD-116, PL-14736, Pliva) reduced the duration of immobility to a greater extent than imipramine, and, given peripherally, has region specific influence on brain 5-HT synthesis (alpha-[14C]methyl-L-tryptophan autoradiographic measurements) in rats, different from any other serotonergic drug. Thereby, we investigate this peptide (10 microg, 10 ng, 10 pg/kg i.p.) in (i) full serotonin syndrome in rat combining pargyline (irreversible MAO-inhibition; 75 mg/kg i.p.) and subsequent L-tryptophan (5-HT precursor; 100 mg/kg i.p.; BPC 157 as a co-treatment), or (ii, iii) using pargyline or L-tryptophan given separately, as a serotonin-substrate with (ii) pargyline (BPC 157 as a 15-min posttreatment) or as a potential serotonin syndrome inductor with (iii) L-tryptophan (BPC 157 as a 15 min-pretreatment). In all experiments, gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 contrasts with serotonin-syndrome either (i) presentation (i.e., particularly counteracted) or (ii) initiation (i.e., neither a serotonin substrate (counteraction of pargyline), nor an inductor for serotonin syndrome (no influence on L-tryptophan challenge)). Indicatively, severe serotonin syndrome in pargyline + L-tryptophan rats is considerably inhibited even by lower pentadecapeptide BPC 157 doses regimens (particularly disturbances such as hyperthermia and wet dog shake thought to be related to stimulation of 5-HT2A receptors), while the highest pentadecapeptide dose counteracts mild disturbances present in pargyline rats (mild hypothermia, feeble hind limbs abduction). Thereby, in severe serotonin syndrome, gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (alone, no behavioral or

  5. Two Distinct Central Serotonin Receptors with Different Physiological Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peroutka, Stephen J.; Lebovitz, Richard M.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    1981-05-01

    Two distinct serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) receptors designated serotonin 1 and serotonin 2 bind tritium-labeled serotonin and tritium-labeled spiroperidol, respectively. Drug potencies at serotonin 2 sites, but not at serotonin 1 sites, predict their effects on the ``serotonin behavioral syndrome,'' indicating that serotonin 2 sites mediate these behaviors. The limited correlation of drug effects with regulation by guanine nucleotides suggests that serotonin 1 sites might be linked to adenylate cyclase. Drug specificities of serotonin-elicited synaptic inhibition and excitation may reflect serotonin 1 and serotonin 2 receptor interactions, respectively.

  6. Epigenetic Mechanisms of Serotonin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Terrell; González-Maeso, Javier

    2015-07-15

    Histone modifications and DNA methylation represent central dynamic and reversible processes that regulate gene expression and contribute to cellular phenotypes. These epigenetic marks have been shown to play fundamental roles in a diverse set of signaling and behavioral outcomes. Serotonin is a monoamine that regulates numerous physiological responses including those in the central nervous system. The cardinal signal transduction mechanisms via serotonin and its receptors are well established, but fundamental questions regarding complex interactions between the serotonin system and heritable epigenetic modifications that exert control on gene function remain a topic of intense research and debate. This review focuses on recent advances and contributions to our understanding of epigenetic mechanisms of serotonin receptor-dependent signaling, with focus on psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression.

  7. Multiple receptor subtypes mediate the effects of serotonin on rat subfornical organ neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scrogin, K. E.; Johnson, A. K.; Schmid, H. A.

    1998-01-01

    The subfornical organ (SFO) receives significant serotonergic innervation. However, few reports have examined the functional effects of serotonin on SFO neurons. This study characterized the effects of serotonin on spontaneously firing SFO neurons in the rat brain slice. Of 31 neurons tested, 80% responded to serotonin (1-100 microM) with either an increase (n = 15) or decrease (n = 10) in spontaneous activity. Responses to serotonin were dose dependent and persisted after synaptic blockade. Excitatory responses could also be mimicked by the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)2A/2C receptor agonist 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI; 1-10 microM) and could be blocked by the 5-HT2A/2C-receptor antagonist LY-53,857 (10 microM). LY-53,857 unmasked inhibitory responses to serotonin in 56% of serotonin-excited cells tested. Serotonin-inhibited cells were also inhibited by the 5-HT1A-receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT; 1-10 microM; n = 7). The data indicate that SFO neurons are responsive to serotonin via postsynaptic activation of multiple receptor subtypes. The results suggest that excitatory responses to serotonin are mediated by 5-HT2A or 5-HT2C receptors and that inhibitory responses may be mediated by 5-HT1A receptors. In addition, similar percentages of serotonin-excited and -inhibited cells were also sensitive to ANG II. As such the functional relationship between serotonin and ANG II in the SFO remains unclear.

  8. Multiple receptor subtypes mediate the effects of serotonin on rat subfornical organ neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scrogin, K. E.; Johnson, A. K.; Schmid, H. A.

    1998-01-01

    The subfornical organ (SFO) receives significant serotonergic innervation. However, few reports have examined the functional effects of serotonin on SFO neurons. This study characterized the effects of serotonin on spontaneously firing SFO neurons in the rat brain slice. Of 31 neurons tested, 80% responded to serotonin (1-100 microM) with either an increase (n = 15) or decrease (n = 10) in spontaneous activity. Responses to serotonin were dose dependent and persisted after synaptic blockade. Excitatory responses could also be mimicked by the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)2A/2C receptor agonist 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI; 1-10 microM) and could be blocked by the 5-HT2A/2C-receptor antagonist LY-53,857 (10 microM). LY-53,857 unmasked inhibitory responses to serotonin in 56% of serotonin-excited cells tested. Serotonin-inhibited cells were also inhibited by the 5-HT1A-receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT; 1-10 microM; n = 7). The data indicate that SFO neurons are responsive to serotonin via postsynaptic activation of multiple receptor subtypes. The results suggest that excitatory responses to serotonin are mediated by 5-HT2A or 5-HT2C receptors and that inhibitory responses may be mediated by 5-HT1A receptors. In addition, similar percentages of serotonin-excited and -inhibited cells were also sensitive to ANG II. As such the functional relationship between serotonin and ANG II in the SFO remains unclear.

  9. Interactions of β-lactoglobulin with serotonin and arachidonyl serotonin.

    PubMed

    Taheri-Kafrani, Asghar; Choiset, Yvan; Faizullin, Dzhigangir A; Zuev, Yuri F; Bezuglov, Vladimir V; Chobert, Jean-Marc; Bordbar, Abdol-Khalegh; Haertlé, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    β-Lactoglobulin (β-LG) is a lipocalin, which is the major whey protein of cow's milk and the milk of other mammals. However, it is absent from human milk. The biological function of β-LG is not clear, but its potential role in carrying fatty acids through the digestive tract has been suggested. β-LG has been found in complexes with lipids such as butyric and oleic acids and has a high affinity for a wide variety of compounds. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT), an important compound found in animals and plants, has various functions, including the regulation of mood, appetite, sleep, muscle contraction, and some cognitive functions such as memory and learning. In this study, the interaction of serotonin and one of its derivatives, arachidonyl serotonin (AA-5HT), with β-LG was investigated using circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence intensity measurements. These two ligands interact with β-LG forming equimolar complexes. The binding constant for the serotonin/β-LG interaction is between 10⁵ and 10⁶ M(-1) , whereas for the AA-5HT/β-LG complex it is between 10⁴ and 10⁵ M(-1) as determined by measurements of either protein or ligand fluorescence. The observed binding affinities were higher in hydroethanolic media (25% EtOH). The interactions between serotonin/β-LG and AA-5HT/β-LG may compete with self-association (micellization) of both the ligand and the protein. According to far- and near-UV CD results, these ligands have no apparent influence on β-LG secondary structure, however they partially destabilize its tertiary structure. Their binding by β-LG may be one of the peripheral mechanisms of the regulation of the content of serotonin and its derivatives in the bowel of milk-fed animals.

  10. Serotonin, Inhibition, and Negative Mood

    PubMed Central

    Dayan, Peter; Huys, Quentin J. M

    2008-01-01

    Pavlovian predictions of future aversive outcomes lead to behavioral inhibition, suppression, and withdrawal. There is considerable evidence for the involvement of serotonin in both the learning of these predictions and the inhibitory consequences that ensue, although less for a causal relationship between the two. In the context of a highly simplified model of chains of affectively charged thoughts, we interpret the combined effects of serotonin in terms of pruning a tree of possible decisions, (i.e., eliminating those choices that have low or negative expected outcomes). We show how a drop in behavioral inhibition, putatively resulting from an experimentally or psychiatrically influenced drop in serotonin, could result in unexpectedly large negative prediction errors and a significant aversive shift in reinforcement statistics. We suggest an interpretation of this finding that helps dissolve the apparent contradiction between the fact that inhibition of serotonin reuptake is the first-line treatment of depression, although serotonin itself is most strongly linked with aversive rather than appetitive outcomes and predictions. PMID:18248087

  11. Serotonin neurotransmission in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Haleem, Darakhshan Jabeen

    2012-09-01

    Patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) show extreme dieting weight loss, hyperactivity, depression/anxiety, self-control, and behavioral impulsivity. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) is involved in almost all the behavioral changes observed in AN patients. Both genetic and environmental factors contribute toward the pathogenesis of AN. It is a frequent disorder among adolescent girls and young women and starts as an attempt to lose weight to look beautiful and attractive. Failure to see the turning point when fasting becomes unreasonable leads to malnutrition and AN. Tryptophan, the precursor of serotonin and an essential amino acid, is only available in the diet. It is therefore likely that excessive diet restriction and malnutrition decrease brain serotonin stores because the precursor is less available to the rate-limiting enzyme of 5-HT biosynthesis, which normally exists unsaturated with its substrate. Evidence shows that diet restriction-induced exaggerated feedback control over 5-HT synthesis and the smaller availability of tryptophan decreases serotonin neurotransmission at postsynaptic sites, leading to hyperactivity, depression, and behavioral impulsivity. A compensatory upregulation of postsynaptic 5-HT-1A receptors and hypophagic serotonin receptors may be involved in anxiety and suppression of appetite. It is suggested that tryptophan supplementation may improve pharmacotherapy in AN.

  12. Serotonin and Prefrontal Cortex Function: Neurons, Networks, and Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Puig, M. Victoria; Gulledge, Allan T.

    2012-01-01

    Higher-order executive tasks such as learning, working memory, and behavioral flexibility depend on the prefrontal cortex (PFC), the brain region most elaborated in primates. The prominent innervation by serotonin neurons and the dense expression of serotonergic receptors in the PFC suggest that serotonin is a major modulator of its function. The most abundant serotonin receptors in the PFC, 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A and 5-HT3A receptors, are selectively expressed in distinct populations of pyramidal neurons and inhibitory interneurons, and play a critical role in modulating cortical activity and neural oscillations (brain waves). Serotonergic signaling is altered in many psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression, where parallel changes in receptor expression and brain waves have been observed. Furthermore, many psychiatric drug treatments target serotonergic receptors in the PFC. Thus, understanding the role of serotonergic neurotransmission in PFC function is of major clinical importance. Here we review recent findings concerning the powerful influences of serotonin on single neurons, neural networks, and cortical circuits in the PFC of the rat, where the effects of serotonin have been most thoroughly studied. PMID:22076606

  13. Tall Fescue Alkaloids Bind Serotonin Receptors in Cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The serotonin (5HT) receptor 5HT2A is involved in the tall fescue alkaloid-induced vascular contraction in the bovine periphery. This was determined by evaluating the contractile responses of lateral saphenous veins biopsied from cattle grazing different tall fescue/endophyte combinations. The contr...

  14. Frontolimbic Neural Circuit Changes in Emotional Processing and Inhibitory Control Associated With Clinical Improvement Following Transference-Focused Psychotherapy in Borderline Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Perez, David L.; Vago, David R.; Pan, Hong; Root, James; Tuescher, Oliver; Fuchs, Benjamin H.; Leung, Lorene; Epstein, Jane; Cain, Nicole M.; Clarkin, John F.; Lenzenweger, Mark F.; Kernberg, Otto F.; Levy, Kenneth N.; Silbersweig, David A.; Stern, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Aim Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is characterized by self-regulation deficits, including impulsivity and affective lability. Transference-Focused Psychotherapy (TFP) is an evidence-based treatment proven to reduce symptoms across multiple cognitive-emotional domains in BPD. This pilot study aims to investigate neural activation associated with, and predictive of, clinical improvement in emotional and behavioral regulation in BPD following TFP. Methods BPD subjects (N=10) were scanned pre- and post-TFP treatment using a within-subjects design. A disorder-specific emotional-linguistic go/no-go fMRI paradigm was used to probe the interaction between negative emotional processing and inhibitory control. Results Analyses demonstrated significant treatment-related effects with relative increased dorsal prefrontal (dorsal anterior cingulate, dorsolateral prefrontal, and frontopolar cortices) activation, and relative decreased ventrolateral prefrontal cortex and hippocampal activation following treatment. Clinical improvement in constraint correlated positively with relative increased left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex activation. Clinical improvement in affective lability correlated positively with left posterior-medial orbitofrontal cortex/ventral striatum activation, and negatively with right amygdala/parahippocampal activation. Post-treatment improvements in constraint were predicted by pre-treatment right dorsal anterior cingulate cortex hypoactivation, and pre-treatment left posterior-medial orbitofrontal cortex/ventral striatum hypoactivation predicted improvements in affective lability. Conclusions These preliminary findings demonstrate potential TFP-associated alterations in frontolimbic circuitry and begin to identify neural mechanisms associated with a psychodynamically-oriented psychotherapy. PMID:26289141

  15. Serotonin and Blood Pressure Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Shaun F.; Davis, Robert Patrick; Barman, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) was discovered more than 60 years ago as a substance isolated from blood. The neural effects of 5-HT have been well investigated and understood, thanks in part to the pharmacological tools available to dissect the serotonergic system and the development of the frequently prescribed selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors. By contrast, our understanding of the role of 5-HT in the control and modification of blood pressure pales in comparison. Here we focus on the role of 5-HT in systemic blood pressure control. This review provides an in-depth study of the function and pharmacology of 5-HT in those tissues that can modify blood pressure (blood, vasculature, heart, adrenal gland, kidney, brain), with a focus on the autonomic nervous system that includes mechanisms of action and pharmacology of 5-HT within each system. We compare the change in blood pressure produced in different species by short- and long-term administration of 5-HT or selective serotonin receptor agonists. To further our understanding of the mechanisms through which 5-HT modifies blood pressure, we also describe the blood pressure effects of commonly used drugs that modify the actions of 5-HT. The pharmacology and physiological actions of 5-HT in modifying blood pressure are important, given its involvement in circulatory shock, orthostatic hypotension, serotonin syndrome and hypertension. PMID:22407614

  16. Serotonin and GI clinical disorders.

    PubMed

    Spiller, Robin

    2008-11-01

    Serotonin is widely distributed throughout the gut within both the enteric nerves and enterochromaffin (EC) cells. EC cells are located in the gut mucosa with maximal numbers in the duodenum and rectum where they act as signal transducers, responding to pressure and luminal substances both bacterial and dietary. Activation leads to serotonin release which acts on a range of receptors on mucosal afferent and myenteric interneurones to initiate secretomotor reflexes. These cause nausea and vomiting as well as intestinal secretion, propulsion and if pronounced, diarrhoea. Inflammation in animal models acts via T lymphocytes to increase EC cell numbers and mucosal serotonin (5-HT) content while inflammatory cytokines decrease serotonin transporter (SERT) function. Inflammation due to coeliac disease and following gastrointestinal infection increases mucosal 5-HT availability by a combination of increased EC cells and depressed SERT. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) developing after gastrointestinal infection and IBS with diarrhoea is associated with excess 5-HT. The associated diarrhoeal symptoms respond well to 5-HT(3) receptor antagonists. These drugs also inhibit the nausea and vomiting occurring in patients undergoing chemotherapy which cause a marked increase in release of 5-HT as well as other mediators. Other conditions including IBS-C and constipation may have inadequate 5-HT release and benefit from both 5-HT(3) and 5-HT(4) receptor agonists.

  17. Serotonin and Aggressiveness in Chickens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Serotonin (5-HT) regulates aggressive behavior in animals. This study examined if 5-HT regulation of aggressiveness is gene-dependent. Chickens from two divergently selected lines KGB and MBB (Kind Gentle Birds and Mean Bad Birds displaying low and high aggressiveness, respectively) and DXL (Dekalb ...

  18. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor exposure.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kevin T; Bronstein, Alvin C

    2013-02-01

    Many antidepressants inhibit serotonin or norepinephrine reuptake or both to achieve their clinical effect. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor class of antidepressants (SSRIs) includes citalopram, escitalopram (active enantiomer of citalopram), fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline. The SSRIs are as effective as tricyclic antidepressants in treatment of major depression with less significant side effects. As a result, they have become the largest class of medications prescribed to humans for depression. They are also used to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorders, alcoholism, obesity, migraines, and chronic pain. An SSRI (fluoxetine) has been approved for veterinary use in treatment of canine separation anxiety. SSRIs act specifically on synaptic serotonin concentrations by blocking its reuptake in the presynapse and increasing levels in the presynaptic membrane. Clinical signs of SSRI overdose result from excessive amounts of serotonin in the central nervous system. These signs include nausea, vomiting, mydriasis, hypersalivation, and hyperthermia. Clinical signs are dose dependent and higher dosages may result in the serotonin syndrome that manifests itself as ataxia, tremors, muscle rigidity, hyperthermia, diarrhea, and seizures. Current studies reveal no increase in appearance of any specific clinical signs of serotonin toxicity with regard to any SSRI medication. In people, citalopram has been reported to have an increased risk of electrocardiographic abnormalities. Diagnosis of SSRI poisoning is based on history, clinical signs, and response to therapy. No single clinical test is currently available to confirm SSRI toxicosis. The goals of treatment in this intoxication are to support the animal, prevent further absorption of the drug, support the central nervous system, control hyperthermia, and halt any seizure activity. The relative safety of the SSRIs in overdose despite the occurrence of serotonin syndrome makes them

  19. Serotonin release varies with brain tryptophan levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaechter, Judith D.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1990-01-01

    This study examines directly the effects on serotonin release of varying brain tryptophan levels within the physiologic range. It also addresses possible interactions between tryptophan availability and the frequency of membrane depolarization in controlling serotonin release. We demonstrate that reducing tryptophan levels in rat hypothalamic slices (by superfusing them with medium supplemented with 100 microM leucine) decreases tissue serotonin levels as well as both the spontaneous and the electrically-evoked serotonin release. Conversely, elevating tissue tryptophan levels (by superfusing slices with medium supplemented with 2 microM tryptophan) increases both the tissue serotonin levels and the serotonin release. Serotonin release was found to be affected independently by the tryptophan availability and the frequency of electrical field-stimulation (1-5 Hz), since increasing both variables produced nearly additive increases in release. These observations demonstrate for the first time that both precursor-dependent elevations and reductions in brain serotonin levels produce proportionate changes in serotonin release, and that the magnitude of the tryptophan effect is unrelated to neuronal firing frequency. The data support the hypothesis that serotonin release is proportionate to intracellular serotonin levels.

  20. Serotonin release varies with brain tryptophan levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaechter, Judith D.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1990-01-01

    This study examines directly the effects on serotonin release of varying brain tryptophan levels within the physiologic range. It also addresses possible interactions between tryptophan availability and the frequency of membrane depolarization in controlling serotonin release. We demonstrate that reducing tryptophan levels in rat hypothalamic slices (by superfusing them with medium supplemented with 100 microM leucine) decreases tissue serotonin levels as well as both the spontaneous and the electrically-evoked serotonin release. Conversely, elevating tissue tryptophan levels (by superfusing slices with medium supplemented with 2 microM tryptophan) increases both the tissue serotonin levels and the serotonin release. Serotonin release was found to be affected independently by the tryptophan availability and the frequency of electrical field-stimulation (1-5 Hz), since increasing both variables produced nearly additive increases in release. These observations demonstrate for the first time that both precursor-dependent elevations and reductions in brain serotonin levels produce proportionate changes in serotonin release, and that the magnitude of the tryptophan effect is unrelated to neuronal firing frequency. The data support the hypothesis that serotonin release is proportionate to intracellular serotonin levels.

  1. Role of serotonin in fish reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Parvathy; Ogawa, Satoshi; Parhar, Ishwar S.

    2015-01-01

    The neuroendocrine mechanism regulates reproduction through the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis which is evolutionarily conserved in vertebrates. The HPG axis is regulated by a variety of internal as well as external factors. Serotonin, a monoamine neurotransmitter, is involved in a wide range of reproductive functions. In mammals, serotonin regulates sexual behaviors, gonadotropin release and gonadotropin-release hormone (GnRH) secretion. However, the serotonin system in teleost may also play unique role in the control of reproduction as the mechanism of reproductive control in teleosts is not always the same as in the mammalian models. In fish, the serotonin system is also regulated by natural environmental factors as well as chemical substances. In particular, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are commonly detected as pharmaceutical contaminants in the natural environment. Those factors may influence fish reproductive functions via the serotonin system. This review summarizes the functional significance of serotonin in the teleosts reproduction. PMID:26097446

  2. Role of serotonin in fish reproduction.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Parvathy; Ogawa, Satoshi; Parhar, Ishwar S

    2015-01-01

    The neuroendocrine mechanism regulates reproduction through the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis which is evolutionarily conserved in vertebrates. The HPG axis is regulated by a variety of internal as well as external factors. Serotonin, a monoamine neurotransmitter, is involved in a wide range of reproductive functions. In mammals, serotonin regulates sexual behaviors, gonadotropin release and gonadotropin-release hormone (GnRH) secretion. However, the serotonin system in teleost may also play unique role in the control of reproduction as the mechanism of reproductive control in teleosts is not always the same as in the mammalian models. In fish, the serotonin system is also regulated by natural environmental factors as well as chemical substances. In particular, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are commonly detected as pharmaceutical contaminants in the natural environment. Those factors may influence fish reproductive functions via the serotonin system. This review summarizes the functional significance of serotonin in the teleosts reproduction.

  3. A new class of arylpiperazine derivatives: the library synthesis on SynPhase lanterns and biological evaluation on serotonin 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Zajdel, Paweł; Subra, Gilles; Bojarski, Andrzej J; Duszyńska, Beata; Pawłowski, Maciej; Martinez, Jean

    2004-01-01

    An efficient solid-supported method for the synthesis of a new class of arylpiperazine derivatives containing amino acid residues has been developed. A 72-membered library was synthesized on SynPhase Lanterns functionalized by a BAL linker. A one-pot cleavage/cyclization step of aspartic and glutamic acid derivatives yielded succinimide- and pyroglutamyl-containing ligands (chemsets 9 and 10). The library representatives under study showed different levels of affinity for 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A) receptors (estimated K(i) = 24-4000 and 1-2130 nM, respectively). Several dual 5-HT(1A)/5-HT(2A) ligands were found, of which two (9(3,3) and 9(3,5)) displayed high 5-HT(2A) affinity comparable to that of the reference drug ritanserin. A set of individual fragment contributions for the prediction of 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A) affinity of all the library members were defined on the basis of the Free-Wilson analysis of 26 compounds. An alkylarylpiperazine fragment had essentially the same impact on the affinity for both receptors, whereas different terminal amide fragments were preferred by 5-HT(1A) (chemset 17, R(2) = adamantyl) and 5-HT(2A) (chemset 9, R(2) = norborn-2-ylmethyl) binding sites.

  4. Serotonin 5-HT2A receptor binding in platelets from healthy subjects as studied by [3H]-lysergic acid diethylamide ([3H]-LSD): intra- and interindividual variability.

    PubMed

    Spigset, O; Mjörndal, T

    1997-04-01

    In studies on platelet 5-HT2A receptor binding in patients with neuropsychiatric disorders, there has been a marked variability and a considerable overlap of values between patients and controls. The causes of the large variability in 5-HT2A receptor parameters is still unsettled. In the present study, we have quantified the intra- and interindividual variability of platelet 5-HT2A receptor binding in 112 healthy subjects and explored factors that may influence 5-HT2A receptor binding, using [3H]-lysergic acid diethylamide as radioligand. Age, gender, blood pressure, and metabolic capacity of the liver enzymes CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 did not influence Bmax and Kd values. Body weight and body mass index (BMI) showed a negative correlation with Kd (p = .04 and .03, respectively), but not with Bmax. Bmax was significantly lower in the light half of the year than in the dark half of the year (p = .001), and Kd was significantly lower in the fall than in the summer and winter (p < .001). In females, there was a significant increase in Bmax from week 1 to week 2 of the menstrual cycle (p = .03). Females taking contraceptive pills had significantly higher Kd than drug-free females in weeks 1 and 4 of the menstrual cycle (p = .04). This study shows that a number of factors should be taken into account when using platelet 5-HT2A receptor binding in studies of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  5. Serotonin syndrome after concomitant treatment with linezolid and meperidine.

    PubMed

    Das, Prabodh K; Warkentin, Dawn I; Hewko, Robert; Forrest, Donna L

    2008-01-15

    Serotonin syndrome has been reported with administration of linezolid and serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Meperidine blocks the neuronal reuptake of serotonin. Serotonin syndrome after concomitant linezolid and meperidine therapy has not been described. We describe serotonin syndrome after concomitant use of linezolid and meperidine in a 27-year-old man with acute leukemia.

  6. New arylpiperazinylalkyl derivatives of 8-alkoxy-purine-2,6-dione and dihydro[1,3]oxazolo[2,3-f]purinedione targeting the serotonin 5-HT1A /5-HT2A /5-HT7 and dopamine D2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Chłoń-Rzepa, Grażyna; Zagórska, Agnieszka; Bucki, Adam; Kołaczkowski, Marcin; Pawłowski, Maciej; Satała, Grzegorz; Bojarski, Andrzej J; Partyka, Anna; Wesołowska, Anna; Pękala, Elżbieta; Słoczyńska, Karolina

    2015-04-01

    To obtain potential antidepressants and/or antipsychotics, a series of new long-chain arylpiperazine derivatives of 8-alkoxy-purine-2,6-dione (10-24) and dihydro[1,3]oxazolo[2,3-f]purinedione (30-34) were synthesized and their serotonin (5-HT1A , 5-HT2A , 5-HT6 , 5-HT7 ) and dopamine (D2 ) receptor affinities were determined. The study allowed the identification of some potent 5-HT1A /5-HT7 /D2 ligands with moderate affinity for 5-HT2A sites. The binding mode of representative compounds from both chemical classes (11 and 31) in the site of 5-HT1A receptor was analyzed in computational studies. In functional in vitro studies, the selected compounds 15 and 16 showed antagonistic properties for the evaluated receptors. 8-Methoxy-7-{4-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-piperazin-1-yl]-butyl}-1,3-dimethyl-purine-2,6-dione (15) showed a lack of activity in terms and under the conditions of the forced swim, four plate and amphetamine-induced hyperactivity tests in mice, probably as a result of its high first pass effect in the liver.

  7. Frontolimbic neural circuit changes in emotional processing and inhibitory control associated with clinical improvement following transference-focused psychotherapy in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Perez, David L; Vago, David R; Pan, Hong; Root, James; Tuescher, Oliver; Fuchs, Benjamin H; Leung, Lorene; Epstein, Jane; Cain, Nicole M; Clarkin, John F; Lenzenweger, Mark F; Kernberg, Otto F; Levy, Kenneth N; Silbersweig, David A; Stern, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is characterized by self-regulation deficits, including impulsivity and affective lability. Transference-focused psychotherapy (TFP) is an evidence-based treatment proven to reduce symptoms across multiple cognitive-emotional domains in BPD. This pilot study aimed to investigate neural activation associated with, and predictive of, clinical improvement in emotional and behavioral regulation in BPD following TFP. BPD subjects (n = 10) were scanned pre- and post-TFP treatment using a within-subjects design. A disorder-specific emotional-linguistic go/no-go functional magnetic resonance imaging paradigm was used to probe the interaction between negative emotional processing and inhibitory control. Analyses demonstrated significant treatment-related effects with relative increased dorsal prefrontal (dorsal anterior cingulate, dorsolateral prefrontal, and frontopolar cortices) activation, and relative decreased ventrolateral prefrontal cortex and hippocampal activation following treatment. Clinical improvement in constraint correlated positively with relative increased left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex activation. Clinical improvement in affective lability correlated positively with left posterior-medial orbitofrontal cortex/ventral striatum activation, and negatively with right amygdala/parahippocampal activation. Post-treatment improvements in constraint were predicted by pre-treatment right dorsal anterior cingulate cortex hypoactivation, and pre-treatment left posterior-medial orbitofrontal cortex/ventral striatum hypoactivation predicted improvements in affective lability. These preliminary findings demonstrate potential TFP-associated alterations in frontolimbic circuitry and begin to identify neural mechanisms associated with a psychodynamically oriented psychotherapy. © 2015 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2015 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  8. Serotonin and Serotonin Transporter Gene Variant in Rotating Shift Workers

    PubMed Central

    Sookoian, Silvia; Gemma, Carolina; Gianotti, Tomas Fernández; Burgueño, Adriana; Alvarez, Azucena; González, Claudio Daniel; Pirola, Carlos Jose

    2007-01-01

    Study Objectives: Because serotonin (5-HT) is a neurotransmitter associated with circadian rhythm regulation, we explored a possible relation among 5-HT, serotonin metabolite, 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA), and the functional polymorphism of the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) promoter with rotating shift work. Design and Participants: 683 men were included in this study: 437 day workers were compared with 246 rotating shift workers. Results: Platelet 5-HT content differed significantly (P = 0.002) between day workers (41.28±1.99 pg/mg) and rotating shift workers (37.91±4.16 pg/mg); 5-HIAA content was also significantly (P = 0.00004) higher in day workers (11.40±0.82 pg/mg) than in rotating shift workers (9.33±1.02 pg/mg). We looked for further differences in SLC6A4 promoter (5-HTTLPR, 44 bp insertion: long (L)/deletion: short (S) alleles). We found a significant (P = 0.016) difference in genotype distribution between day workers LL: 126 (28.8%), LS: 202 (46.2%), and SS: 109 (24.9%), and rotating shift workers LL: 47 (19.1%), LS: 124 (50.4%), and SS: 75 (30.5%). When we divided the subjects between workers with less and more than 60 month rotating shift-work exposure, the difference in SLC6A4 genotypes frequency was only significant in the group with ≥60 months (P = 0.011). In addition, there was a significantly lower content of platelet 5-HIM in S allele carriers in comparison with the other genotypes (SS: 9.2±1.0 pg/mg vs. SL/LL: 11.0±0.8 pg/mg, P <0.02). Conclusions: Platelet 5-HT and 5-HIM contents were significantly lower in rotating shift workers than day workers, and there was a significant association between the S variant of SLC6A4 promoter and shift work. These findings may be important for targeting effective therapeutic strategies to ameliorate the associated comorbidities and behavioral problems in rotating shift workers. Citation: Sookoian S; Gemma C; Gianotti TF; Burgueño A; Alvarez A; Gonzalez CD; Pirola CJ. Serotonin and serotonin

  9. Serotonin in fear conditioning processes.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Elizabeth P

    2015-01-15

    This review describes the latest developments in our understanding of how the serotonergic system modulates Pavlovian fear conditioning, fear expression and fear extinction. These different phases of classical fear conditioning involve coordinated interactions between the extended amygdala, hippocampus and prefrontal cortices. Here, I first define the different stages of learning involved in cued and context fear conditioning and describe the neural circuits underlying these processes. The serotonergic system can be manipulated by administering serotonin receptor agonists and antagonists, as well as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), and these can have significant effects on emotional learning and memory. Moreover, variations in serotonergic genes can influence fear conditioning and extinction processes, and can underlie differential responses to pharmacological manipulations. This research has considerable translational significance as imbalances in the serotonergic system have been linked to anxiety and depression, while abnormalities in the mechanisms of conditioned fear contribute to anxiety disorders.

  10. Serotonin Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors: A Pharmacological Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Sansone, Lori A.

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors are a family of antidepressants that inhibit the reuptake of both serotonin and norepinephrine. While these drugs are traditionally considered a group of inter-related antidepressants based upon reuptake inhibition, they generally display different chemical structures as well as different pharmacological properties. In this article, we discuss these and other differences among the serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, including the year of approval by the United States Food and Drug Administration, generic availability, approved clinical indications, half-lives, metabolism and excretion, presence or not of active metabolites, dosing schedules, proportionate effects on serotonin and norepinephrine, and the timing of serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake (i.e., sequential or simultaneous). Again, while serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors are grouped as a family of antidepressants, they exhibit a surprising number of differences— differences that may ultimately relate to clinical nuances in patient care. PMID:24800132

  11. The presence of a serotonin uptake inhibitor alters pharmacological manipulations of serotonin release.

    PubMed

    Kreiss, D S; Wieland, S; Lucki, I

    1993-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of the presence of the serotonin uptake inhibitor citalopram in the perfusion medium on pharmacological manipulations which increased and decreased striatal serotonin release using in vivo microdialysis. A high performance liquid chromatography detection system equipped with a microbore column was used which reduced the detection limit to 0.5 fmol serotonin/5 microliters sample and enabled basal striatal serotonin release to be measured without the addition of a serotonin uptake inhibitor to the perfusion medium. Although serotonin uptake inhibitors have frequently been used to enhance the serotonin content of dialysate samples, the effects of the presence of serotonin uptake inhibitors on pharmacological manipulations which increased and decreased the release of serotonin have not yet been characterized. Serotonin release was reduced by the systemic administration of the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT). Although 5-HT release was reduced by 8-OH-DPAT after the addition of citalopram, the 5-HT1A receptor agonist did not reduce absolute levels of extracellular serotonin below basal values of serotonin measured in the absence of citalopram. In addition, citalopram dramatically prevented the four-fold increase in the release of serotonin produced by the systemic administration of the serotonin-releasing agent fenfluramine. The blockade of fenfluramine's effects by citalopram supports the hypothesis that transport of fenfluramine into serotonergic neurons is necessary to increase serotonin release. This study demonstrates that the use of an HPLC detection system equipped with a microbore column can reliably measure basal serotonin release using in vivo microdialysis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. The alpha2 adrenergic receptor antagonist idazoxan, but not the serotonin-2A receptor antagonist M100907, partially attenuated reward deficits associated with nicotine, but not amphetamine, withdrawal in rats.

    PubMed

    Semenova, Svetlana; Markou, Athina

    2010-10-01

    Based on phenomenological similarities between anhedonia (reward deficits) associated with drug withdrawal and the negative symptoms of schizophrenia, we showed previously that the atypical antipsychotic clozapine attenuated reward deficits associated with psychostimulant withdrawal. Antagonism of alpha(2) adrenergic and 5-HT(2A) receptors may contribute to these effects of clozapine. We investigated here whether blockade of alpha(2) or 5-HT(2A) receptors by idazoxan and M100907, respectively, would reverse anhedonic aspects of psychostimulant withdrawal. Idazoxan treatment facilitated recovery from spontaneous nicotine, but not amphetamine, withdrawal by attenuating reward deficits and increase the number of somatic signs. Thus, alpha(2) adrenoceptor blockade may have beneficial effects against nicotine withdrawal and may be involved in the effects of clozapine previously observed. M100907 worsened the anhedonia associated with nicotine and amphetamine withdrawal, suggesting that monotherapy with M100907 may exacerbate the expression of the negative symptoms of schizophrenia or nicotine withdrawal symptoms in people, including schizophrenia patients, attempting to quit smoking.

  13. Combined serotonin (5-HT)1A agonism, 5-HT(2A) and dopamine D₂ receptor antagonism reproduces atypical antipsychotic drug effects on phencyclidine-impaired novel object recognition in rats.

    PubMed

    Oyamada, Yoshihiro; Horiguchi, Masakuni; Rajagopal, Lakshmi; Miyauchi, Masanori; Meltzer, Herbert Y

    2015-05-15

    Subchronic administration of an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist, e.g. phencyclidine (PCP), produces prolonged impairment of novel object recognition (NOR), suggesting they constitute a hypoglutamate-based model of cognitive impairment in schizophrenia (CIS). Acute administration of atypical, e.g. lurasidone, but not typical antipsychotic drugs (APDs), e.g. haloperidol, are able to restore NOR following PCP (acute reversal model). Furthermore, atypical APDs, when co-administered with PCP, have been shown to prevent development of NOR deficits (prevention model). Most atypical, but not typical APDs, are more potent 5-HT(2A) receptor inverse agonists than dopamine (DA) D2 antagonists, and have been shown to enhance cortical and hippocampal efflux and to be direct or indirect 5-HT(1A) agonists in vivo. To further clarify the importance of these actions to the restoration of NOR by atypical APDs, sub-effective or non-effective doses of combinations of the 5-HT(1A) partial agonist (tandospirone), the 5-HT(2A) inverse agonist (pimavanserin), or the D2 antagonist (haloperidol), as well as the combination of all three agents, were studied in the acute reversal and prevention PCP models of CIS. Only the combination of all three agents restored NOR and prevented the development of PCP-induced deficit. Thus, this triple combination of 5-HT(1A) agonism, 5-HT(2A) antagonism/inverse agonism, and D2 antagonism is able to mimic the ability of atypical APDs to prevent or ameliorate the PCP-induced NOR deficit, possibly by stimulating signaling cascades from D1 and 5-HT(1A) receptor stimulation, modulated by D2 and 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonism.

  14. Serotonin 5-HT2A but not 5-HT2C receptor antagonism reduces hyperlocomotor activity induced in dopamine-depleted rats by striatal administration of the D1 agonist SKF 82958.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Christopher; Daut, Gregory S; Walker, Paul D

    2005-09-01

    While recent work has indicated that D1 receptor agonist-induced hyperlocomotion in DA-depleted rats is reduced by striatal 5-HT2 receptor antagonism, the 5-HT receptor(s) subtypes mediating these effects are not yet known. In the present study, we examined the influence(s) of striatal 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors on locomotor behavior induced by D1 agonism in neonatal DA-depleted rats. On postnatal day 3, male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=68) were treated with either vehicle or 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA; 60 microg) which produced >98% DA depletion. Sixty days later, all rats were fitted with bilateral striatal cannulae. A subset of control and 6-OHDA-lesioned rats (n=20) was tested for locomotor responses to striatal infusion of the D1 agonist SKF 82958 (0, 0.1, 1.0, 10 microg/side). The remaining rats (n=48) were tested for locomotor responses to intrastriatal SKF 82958 (2.0 microg/side) alone or in combination with the 5-HT2A- or 5-HT2C-preferring antagonists M100907 or RS102221 (0.1 or 1.0 microg/side), respectively. Intrastriatal SKF 82958 dose-dependently increased measures of motor activity within DA-depleted rats. This hyperlocomotor activity was suppressed by co-infusion of M100907, but not RS102221. These results indicate that DA depletion strengthens striatal 5-HT2A/D1 receptor interactions and suggest that 5-HT2A receptor antagonists may prove useful in reducing D1-related movements.

  15. Modulation of motoneuron activity by serotonin.

    PubMed

    Perrier, Jean-François

    2016-02-01

    Serotonin is a major neuromodulator in the central nervous system involved in most physiological functions including appetite regulation, sexual arousal, sleep regulation and motor control. The activity of neurons from the raphe spinal tract, which release serotonin on motoneurons, is positively correlated with motor behaviour. During moderate physical activity, serotonin is released from synaptic terminals onto the dendrites and cell bodies of motoneurons. Serotonin increases the excitability of motoneurons and thereby facilitate muscle contraction by acting on several parallel intracellular pathways. By activating 5-HT1A receptors, serotonin inhibits TWIK-related acid-sensitive potassium channels and small conductance calcium-activated potassium channels. In parallel, serotonin binds to 5-HT2 receptors, which promotes the low-threshold L-type Ca(2+) channels. During intense physical activity, more serotonin is released. The reuptake systems saturate and serotonin spills over to reach extrasynaptic 5-HT1A receptors located on the axon initial segment of motoneurons. This in turn induces the inhibition of the Na(+) channels responsible for the initiation of action potentials. Fewer nerve impulses are generated and muscle contraction becomes weaker. By decreasing the gain of motoneurons, serotonin triggers central fatigue.

  16. Assessment of the roles of serines 5.43(239) and 5.46(242) for binding and potency of agonist ligands at the human serotonin 5-HT2A receptor.

    PubMed

    Braden, Michael R; Nichols, David E

    2007-11-01

    We assessed the relative importance of two serine residues located near the top of transmembrane helix 5 of the human 5-HT(2A) receptor, comparing the wild type with S5.43(239)A or S5.46(242)A mutations. Using the ergoline lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), and a series of substituted tryptamine and phenethylamine 5-HT(2A) receptor agonists, we found that Ser5.43(239) is more critical for agonist binding and function than Ser5.46(242). Ser5.43(239) seems to engage oxygen substituents at either the 4- or 5-position of tryptamine ligands and the 5-position of phenylalkylamine ligands. Even when a direct binding interaction cannot occur, our data suggest that Ser5.43(239) is still important for receptor activation. Polar ring-substituted tryptamine ligands also seem to engage Ser5.46(242), but tryptamines lacking such a substituent may adopt an alternate binding orientation that does not engage this residue. Our results are consistent with the role of Ser5.43(239) as a hydrogen bond donor, whereas Ser5.46(242) seems to serve as a hydrogen bond acceptor. These results are consistent with the functional topography and utility of our in silico-activated homology model of the h5-HT(2A) receptor. In addition, being more distal from the absolutely conserved Pro5.50, a strong interaction with Ser5.43(239) may be more effective in straightening the kink in helix 5, a feature that is possibly common to all type A GPCRs that have polar residues at position 5.43.

  17. The relationship between the plasma concentration of blonanserin, and its plasma anti-serotonin 5-HT(2A) activity/anti-dopamine D₂ activity ratio and drug-induced extrapyramidal symptoms.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hidenobu; Gen, Keishi

    2012-03-01

     Blonanserin is a second-generation antipsychotic that was developed in Japan. We investigated the relationships between plasma concentration, the plasma anti-5-HT(2A) activity/anti-D₂ activity (S/D) ratio and extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) in blonanserin dosing.  The subjects were 29 outpatients with schizophrenia. We assessed EPS using the Drug-Induced Extrapyramidal Symptoms Scale (DIEPSS). The plasma concentrations were measured by high performance liquid chromatography, and the plasma anti-D₂ and anti-5-HT(2A) activities were measured by [³H]-spiperone and [³H]-ketanserin radioreceptor assays. The results revealed that there were significant correlations between both the plasma concentration and the DIEPSS total score (P<0.05). A negative correlative tendency was found between the S/D ratio and the DIEPSS total score. Furthermore, the plasma concentrations were divided into a low plasma concentration group and a high plasma concentration group, and the S/D ratios were divided into a low S/D ratio group and a high S/D ratio group. We then compared each group based on the DIEPSS total scores. The score in the high plasma concentration-low S/D ratio group was significantly higher than in the high plasma concentration-high S/D ratio, low plasma concentration-high S/D ratio and low plasma concentration-low S/D ratio groups (P<0.05 for all).  These findings indicate that the incidence of EPS during treatment with blonanserin is mainly determined by plasma concentration, but the incidence of EPS may be inhibited when anti-5HT(2A) activity is predominant over anti-D₂ activity. © 2012 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2012 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  18. The α2 adrenergic receptor antagonist idazoxan, but not the serotonin-2A receptor antagonist M100907, partially attenuated reward deficits associated with nicotine, but not amphetamine, withdrawal in rats

    PubMed Central

    Markou, Athina

    2013-01-01

    Based on phenomenological similarities between anhedonia (reward deficits) associated with drug withdrawal and the negative symptoms of schizophrenia, we showed previously that the atypical antipsychotic clozapine attenuated reward deficits associated with psychostimulant withdrawal. Antagonism of α2 adrenergic and 5-HT2A receptors may contribute to these effects of clozapine. We investigated here whether blockade of α2 or 5-HT2A receptors by idazoxan and M100907, respectively, would reverse anhedonic aspects of psychostimulant withdrawal. Idazoxan treatment facilitated recovery from spontaneous nicotine, but not amphetamine, withdrawal by attenuating reward deficits and increased number of somatic signs. Thus, α2 adrenoceptor blockade may have beneficial effects against nicotine withdrawal and may be involved in the effects of clozapine previously observed. M100907 worsened the anhedonia associated with nicotine and amphetamine withdrawal suggesting that monotherapy with M100907 may exacerbate the expression of the negative symptoms of schizophrenia or nicotine withdrawal symptoms in people, including schizophrenia patients, attempting to quit smoking. PMID:20627663

  19. Effects of central activation of serotonin 5-HT2A/2C or dopamine D2/3 receptors on the acute and repeated effects of clozapine in the conditioned avoidance response test

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Min; Gao, Jun; Sui, Nan; Li, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Acute administration of clozapine (a gold standard of atypical antipsychotics) disrupts avoidance response in rodents, while repeated administration often causes a tolerance effect. Objective: The present study investigated the neuroanatomical basis and receptor mechanisms of acute and repeated effects of clozapine treatment in the conditioned avoidance response test in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Methods: DOI (2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodo-amphetamine, a preferential 5-HT2A/2C agonist) or quinpirole (a preferential dopamine D2/3 agonist) was microinjected into the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) or nucleus accumbens shell (NAs), and their effects on the acute and long-term avoidance-disruptive effect of clozapine were tested. Results: Intra-mPFC microinjection of quinpirole enhanced the acute avoidance disruptive effect of clozapine (10 mg/kg, sc), while DOI microinjections reduced it marginally. Repeated administration of clozapine (10 mg/kg, sc) daily for 5 days caused a progressive decrease in its inhibition of avoidance responding, indicating tolerance development. Intra-mPFC microinjection of DOI at 25.0 (but not 5.0) μg/side during this period completely abolished the expression of clozapine tolerance. This was indicated by the finding that clozapine-treated rats centrally infused with 25.0 μg/side DOI did not show higher levels of avoidance responses than the vehicle-treated rats in the clozapine challenge test. Microinjection of DOI into the mPFC immediately before the challenge test also decreased the expression of clozapine tolerance. Conclusions: Acute behavioral effect of clozapine can be enhanced by activation of the D2/3 receptors in the mPFC. Clozapine tolerance expression relies on the neuroplasticity initiated by its antagonist action against 5-HT2A/2C receptors in the mPFC. PMID:25288514

  20. Current status of positron emission tomography radiotracers for serotonin receptors in humans.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Luc; Le Bars, Didier

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission plays a key modulatory role in the brain. This system is critical for pathophysiological processes and many drug treatments for brain disorders interact with its 14 subtypes of receptors. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a unique tool for the study of the living brain in translational studies from animal models to patients in neurology or psychiatry. This short review is intended to cover the current status of PET radioligands used for imaging human brain 5-HT receptors. Here, we describe the available PET radioligands for the 5-HT1A , 5-HT1B , 5-HT2A , 5-HT4 and 5-HT6 receptors. Finally, we highlight the future challenges for a functional PET imaging of serotonin receptors, including the research towards specific PET radiotracers for yet unexplored serotonin receptors, the need of radiotracers for endogenous serotonin level measurement and the contribution of agonist radiotracers for functional imaging of 5-HT neurotransmission.

  1. Serotonin modulates insect hemocyte phagocytosis via two different serotonin receptors

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yi-xiang; Huang, Jia; Li, Meng-qi; Wu, Ya-su; Xia, Ren-ying; Ye, Gong-yin

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) modulates both neural and immune responses in vertebrates, but its role in insect immunity remains uncertain. We report that hemocytes in the caterpillar, Pieris rapae are able to synthesize 5-HT following activation by lipopolysaccharide. The inhibition of a serotonin-generating enzyme with either pharmacological blockade or RNAi knock-down impaired hemocyte phagocytosis. Biochemical and functional experiments showed that naive hemocytes primarily express 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B receptors. The blockade of 5-HT1B significantly reduced phagocytic ability; however, the blockade of 5-HT2B increased hemocyte phagocytosis. The 5-HT1B-null Drosophila melanogaster mutants showed higher mortality than controls when infected with bacteria, due to their decreased phagocytotic ability. Flies expressing 5-HT1B or 5-HT2B RNAi in hemocytes also showed similar sensitivity to infection. Combined, these data demonstrate that 5-HT mediates hemocyte phagocytosis through 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B receptors and serotonergic signaling performs critical modulatory functions in immune systems of animals separated by 500 million years of evolution. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12241.001 PMID:26974346

  2. Serotonin modulates insect hemocyte phagocytosis via two different serotonin receptors.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yi-Xiang; Huang, Jia; Li, Meng-Qi; Wu, Ya-Su; Xia, Ren-Ying; Ye, Gong-Yin

    2016-03-14

    Serotonin (5-HT) modulates both neural and immune responses in vertebrates, but its role in insect immunity remains uncertain. We report that hemocytes in the caterpillar, Pieris rapae are able to synthesize 5-HT following activation by lipopolysaccharide. The inhibition of a serotonin-generating enzyme with either pharmacological blockade or RNAi knock-down impaired hemocyte phagocytosis. Biochemical and functional experiments showed that naive hemocytes primarily express 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B receptors. The blockade of 5-HT1B significantly reduced phagocytic ability; however, the blockade of 5-HT2B increased hemocyte phagocytosis. The 5-HT1B-null Drosophila melanogaster mutants showed higher mortality than controls when infected with bacteria, due to their decreased phagocytotic ability. Flies expressing 5-HT1B or 5-HT2B RNAi in hemocytes also showed similar sensitivity to infection. Combined, these data demonstrate that 5-HT mediates hemocyte phagocytosis through 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B receptors and serotonergic signaling performs critical modulatory functions in immune systems of animals separated by 500 million years of evolution.

  3. Serotonin: Modulator of a Drive to Withdraw

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tops, Mattie; Russo, Sascha; Boksem, Maarten A. S.; Tucker, Don M.

    2009-01-01

    Serotonin is a fundamental neuromodulator in both vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems, with a suspected role in many human mental disorders. Yet, because of the complexity of serotonergic function, researchers have been unable to agree on a general theory. One function suggested for serotonin systems is the avoidance of threat. We propose…

  4. [Increased spontaneous uterine motility with serotonin].

    PubMed

    Lechner, W; Sölder, E; Sölder, B; Kölle, D; Huter, O

    1992-01-01

    The influence of serotonine, a vasoactive neurotransmitter, on the spontaneous motility of uterine strips was investigated. A highly significant (p less than 0.001) increase of uterine activity was observed when serotonine 10(-6) M was added to the perfusing medium.

  5. Serotonin: Modulator of a Drive to Withdraw

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tops, Mattie; Russo, Sascha; Boksem, Maarten A. S.; Tucker, Don M.

    2009-01-01

    Serotonin is a fundamental neuromodulator in both vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems, with a suspected role in many human mental disorders. Yet, because of the complexity of serotonergic function, researchers have been unable to agree on a general theory. One function suggested for serotonin systems is the avoidance of threat. We propose…

  6. Synthesis, affinity at 5-HT2A, 5-HT2B and 5-HT2C serotonin receptors and structure-activity relationships of a series of cyproheptadine analogues.

    PubMed

    Honrubia, M A; Rodriguez, J; Dominguez, R; Lozoya, E; Manaut, F; Seijas, J A; Villaverde, M C; Calleja, J M; Cadavid, M I; Maayani, S; Sanz, F; Loza, M I

    1997-05-01

    Cyproheptadine is a drug that shows high affinity for type 2 (5-HT2) receptors. We studied a series of compounds obtained by modification of the tricyclic system of Cyp (dibenzocycloheptadiene): 2f (thioxanthene), 2g (xanthene), 2h (dihydrodibenzocycloheptadiene), 2j (diphenyl), 2i (fluorene), and 3b (phenylmethyl). Their activities at the rat cerebral cortex 5-HT2A receptor were (pKi +/- S.E.M.): 8.80 +/- 0.11 (Cyp), 8.60 +/- 0.07 (2f), 8.40 +/- 0.02 (2g), 8.05 +/- 0.03 (2h), 7.87 +/- 0.12 (2j), 6.70 +/- 0.02 (2i) and 6.45 +/- 0.02 (3b); those at the rat stomach fundus 5-HT2B receptor (pA2 +/- S.E.M.) were: 9.14 +/- 0.25 (Cyp), 8.49 +/- 0.07 (2f), 7.58 +/- 0.58 (2g), 7.02 +/- 0.14 (2h), 6.07 +/- 0.20 (2j), and undetectable (2i, 3b): and those at the pig choroidal plexus 5-HT2C receptor (pKi +/- S.E.M.) were: 8.71 +/- 0.08 (Cyp), 8.68 +/- 0.01 (2f), 8.58 +/- 0.20 (2g), 7.95 +/- 0.05 (2h), 7.57 +/- 0.04 (2j), 6.98 +/- 0.04 (2i) and 6.63 +/- 0.20 (3b). The slopes did not differ significantly from unity. The compounds exhibited the same order of activities at every type of receptor, and the most active molecules presented certain steric (butterfly conformation of the tricyclic system) and electrostatic (proton affinity on the top of the central rings) patterns. It is concluded that the activity of cyproheptadine derivatives at 5-HT2 receptors is related to these molecular features, which make feasible a common disposition to interact with all three 5-HT2 subtypes.

  7. How serotonin shapes moral judgment and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Jenifer Z; Crockett, Molly J

    2013-01-01

    Neuroscientists are now discovering how hormones and brain chemicals shape social behavior, opening potential avenues for pharmacological manipulation of ethical values. Here, we review recent studies showing how altering brain chemistry can alter moral judgment and behavior, focusing in particular on the neuromodulator serotonin and its role in shaping values related to harm and fairness. We synthesize previous findings and consider the potential mechanisms through which serotonin could increase the aversion to harming others. We present a process model whereby serotonin influences social behavior by shifting social preferences in the positive direction, enhancing the value people place on others’ outcomes. This model may explain previous findings relating serotonin function to prosocial behavior, and makes new predictions regarding how serotonin may influence the neural computation of value in social contexts. PMID:25627116

  8. Serotonin, neural markers, and memory.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Diverse neuropsychiatric disorders present dysfunctional memory and no effective treatment exits for them; likely as result of the absence of neural markers associated to memory. Neurotransmitter systems and signaling pathways have been implicated in memory and dysfunctional memory; however, their role is poorly understood. Hence, neural markers and cerebral functions and dysfunctions are revised. To our knowledge no previous systematic works have been published addressing these issues. The interactions among behavioral tasks, control groups and molecular changes and/or pharmacological effects are mentioned. Neurotransmitter receptors and signaling pathways, during normal and abnormally functioning memory with an emphasis on the behavioral aspects of memory are revised. With focus on serotonin, since as it is a well characterized neurotransmitter, with multiple pharmacological tools, and well characterized downstream signaling in mammals' species. 5-HT1A, 5-HT4, 5-HT5, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7 receptors as well as SERT (serotonin transporter) seem to be useful neural markers and/or therapeutic targets. Certainly, if the mentioned evidence is replicated, then the translatability from preclinical and clinical studies to neural changes might be confirmed. Hypothesis and theories might provide appropriate limits and perspectives of evidence.

  9. Serotonin, neural markers, and memory

    PubMed Central

    Meneses, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Diverse neuropsychiatric disorders present dysfunctional memory and no effective treatment exits for them; likely as result of the absence of neural markers associated to memory. Neurotransmitter systems and signaling pathways have been implicated in memory and dysfunctional memory; however, their role is poorly understood. Hence, neural markers and cerebral functions and dysfunctions are revised. To our knowledge no previous systematic works have been published addressing these issues. The interactions among behavioral tasks, control groups and molecular changes and/or pharmacological effects are mentioned. Neurotransmitter receptors and signaling pathways, during normal and abnormally functioning memory with an emphasis on the behavioral aspects of memory are revised. With focus on serotonin, since as it is a well characterized neurotransmitter, with multiple pharmacological tools, and well characterized downstream signaling in mammals' species. 5-HT1A, 5-HT4, 5-HT5, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7 receptors as well as SERT (serotonin transporter) seem to be useful neural markers and/or therapeutic targets. Certainly, if the mentioned evidence is replicated, then the translatability from preclinical and clinical studies to neural changes might be confirmed. Hypothesis and theories might provide appropriate limits and perspectives of evidence. PMID:26257650

  10. Serotonin Is Involved in Autoimmune Arthritis through Th17 Immunity and Bone Resorption.

    PubMed

    Chabbi-Achengli, Yasmine; Coman, Tereza; Collet, Corinne; Callebert, Jacques; Corcelli, Michelangelo; Lin, Hilène; Rignault, Rachel; Dy, Michel; de Vernejoul, Marie-Christine; Côté, Francine

    2016-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic disease that results in a disabling and painful condition as it progresses to destruction of the articular cartilage and ankylosis of the joints. Although the cause of the disease is still unknown, evidence argues that autoimmunity plays an important part. There are increasing but contradictory views regarding serotonin being associated with activation of immunoinflammatory pathways and the onset of autoimmune reactions. We studied serotonin's involvement during collagen-induced arthritis in wild-type and Tph1(-/-) mice, which have markedly reduced peripheral serotonin levels. In wild-type mice, induction of arthritis triggered a robust increase in serotonin content in the paws combined with less inflammation. In Tph1(-/-) mice with arthritis, a marked increase in the clinical and pathologic arthritis scores was noticed. Specifically, in Tph1(-/-) mice with arthritis, a significant increase in osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption was observed with an increase in IL-17 levels in the paws and in Th17 lymphocytes in the draining lymph nodes, whereas T-regulatory cells were dampened. Ex vivo serotonin and agonists of the 5-HT2A and 5-HT2B receptors restored IL-17 secretion from splenocytes and Th17 cell differentiation in Tph1(-/-) mice. These findings indicate that serotonin plays a fundamental role in arthritis through the regulation of the Th17/T-regulatory cell balance and osteoclastogenesis.

  11. [Serum serotonin in patients with tension headaches].

    PubMed

    Karaulova, Iu V; Shutov, A A

    2005-01-01

    Tension headache (TH) is one of the most frequent types of idiopathic headaches. The leading role in its pathogenesis is played by depression and dysmetabolism of the neurotransmitter serotonin. The subjects were 100 patients with TH. The examination included study of headache intensity, complex psychometric testing, and immune-enzyme measurement of serotonin serum level, performed before and after treatment with the anti-depressant prodep. All the patients had moderate pain syndrome, depression, and moderate or severe anxiety, which demonstrated negative correlation with serotonin serum level. In particular, the intensity of episodic THs (n = 24) was 52 mm visual analogue scale, reactive anxiety level was as high as 51.08 +/- 4.2, the level of depression was moderate (12.9 Beck scale); serotonin blood level showed a tendency to fall (205.72 +/- 6.74 ng/ml). In 76 patients, suffering from chronic THs with a cephalgia intensity of 62 mm visual analogue scale, high indexes of reactive and personal anxiety (46.81 -/+ 2.68 and 54.2 +/- 3.64, respectively), and high depression level were associated with a prominent decrease of serotonin blood concentration (119.38 +/- 9.42 ng/ml). A course of treatment with prodep led to significant decrease of headache intensity and improved depression, while an increase of serum serotonin level was observed. Thus, serotonin serum level may be used as a marker of pain intensity and the level of depression, and an objective indicator of anti-depressive therapy.

  12. Changes in intensity of serotonin syndrome caused by adverse interaction between monoamine oxidase inhibitors and serotonin reuptake blockers.

    PubMed

    Tao, Rui; Rudacille, Mary; Zhang, Gongliang; Ma, Zhiyuan

    2014-07-01

    Drug interaction between inhibitors of monoamine oxidase (MAOIs) and selective serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) reuptake (SSRIs) induces serotonin syndrome, which is usually mild but occasionally severe in intensity. However, little is known about neural mechanisms responsible for the syndrome induction and intensification. In this study, we hypothesized that the syndrome induction and intensity utilize two different but inter-related mechanisms. Serotonin syndrome is elicited by excessive 5-HT in the brain (presynaptic mechanism), whereas syndrome intensity is attributed to neural circuits involving 5-HT2A and NMDA receptors (postsynaptic mechanism). To test this hypothesis, basal 5-HT efflux and postsynaptic circuits were pharmacologically altered in rats by once daily pretreatment of the MAOI clorgyline for 3, 6, or 13 days. Syndrome intensity was estimated by measuring 5-HT efflux, neuromuscular activity, and body-core temperature in response to challenge injection of clorgyline combined with the SSRI paroxetine. Results showed that the onset of serotonin syndrome is caused by 5-HT efflux exceeding 10-fold above baseline, confirming the presynaptic hypothesis. The neuromuscular and body-core temperature abnormalities, which were otherwise mild in drug-naive rats, were significantly intensified to a severe level in rats pretreated with daily clorgyline for 3 and 6 days but not in rats pretreated for 13 days. The intensified effect was blocked by M100907 and MK-801, suggesting that variation in syndrome intensity was mediated through a 5-HT2A and NMDA receptor-engaged circuit. Therefore, we concluded that pretreatments of MAOI pharmacologically alter the activity of postsynaptic circuits, which is responsible for changes in syndrome intensity.

  13. Serotonin signaling mediates protein valuation and aging

    PubMed Central

    Ro, Jennifer; Pak, Gloria; Malec, Paige A; Lyu, Yang; Allison, David B; Kennedy, Robert T; Pletcher, Scott D

    2016-01-01

    Research into how protein restriction improves organismal health and lengthens lifespan has largely focused on cell-autonomous processes. In certain instances, however, nutrient effects on lifespan are independent of consumption, leading us to test the hypothesis that central, cell non-autonomous processes are important protein restriction regulators. We characterized a transient feeding preference for dietary protein after modest starvation in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, and identified tryptophan hydroxylase (Trh), serotonin receptor 2a (5HT2a), and the solute carrier 7-family amino acid transporter, JhI-21, as required for this preference through their role in establishing protein value. Disruption of any one of these genes increased lifespan up to 90% independent of food intake suggesting the perceived value of dietary protein is a critical determinant of its effect on lifespan. Evolutionarily conserved neuromodulatory systems that define neural states of nutrient demand and reward are therefore sufficient to control aging and physiology independent of food consumption. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16843.001 PMID:27572262

  14. Serotonin Syndrome With Fluoxetine: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Dipen Dineshkumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Serotonin syndrome is a rare but serious complication of treatment with serotonergic agents. In its severe manifestations, death can ensue. Early recognition and aggressive management are crucial to mitigating the syndrome. Often the presentation can be subtle and easy to miss. Case Reports: We present 2 cases of serotonin syndrome seen in the psychiatric consultation service of a busy academic hospital. Both patients had favorable outcomes because of early recognition and aggressive management. Conclusion: Physicians should carefully consider and rule out the clinical diagnosis of serotonin syndrome when presented with an agitated or confused patient who is taking serotonergic agents. PMID:27999518

  15. Serotonin: A New Hope in Alzheimer's Disease?

    PubMed

    Claeysen, Sylvie; Bockaert, Joël; Giannoni, Patrizia

    2015-07-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia affecting 35 million individuals worldwide. Current AD treatments provide only brief symptomatic relief. It is therefore urgent to replace this symptomatic approach with a curative one. Increasing serotonin signaling as well as developing molecules that enhance serotonin concentration in the synaptic cleft have been debated as possible therapeutic strategies to slow the progression of AD. In this Viewpoint, we discuss exciting new insights regarding the modulation of serotonin signaling for AD prevention and therapy.

  16. Metoclopramide-induced Serotonin Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Harada, Taku; Hirosawa, Takanobu; Morinaga, Kouhei; Shimizu, Taro

    2017-01-01

    A 40-year-old woman with bipolar disorder who was taking mirtazapine presented with mydriasis, abnormal diaphoresis, myoclonus and muscle rigidity after taking metocloplamide. Her medical history, which included the use of serotonergic agents, and the presence of symptoms including myoclonus and muscle rigidity were consistent with a diagnosis of serotonin syndrome (SS) according to the Hunter criteria. The symptoms diminished following three days of treatment with oral lorazepam and cyproheptadine and a reduced dose of mirtazapine. Metoclopramide is frequently used to various gastric symptom. Metoclopramide is not widely known to induce SS. This potentially fatal condition should be avoided by exercising care in the use of drugs that have the potential to cause drug-drug interactions.

  17. Metoclopramide-induced Serotonin Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Taku; Hirosawa, Takanobu; Morinaga, Kouhei; Shimizu, Taro

    2017-01-01

    A 40-year-old woman with bipolar disorder who was taking mirtazapine presented with mydriasis, abnormal diaphoresis, myoclonus and muscle rigidity after taking metocloplamide. Her medical history, which included the use of serotonergic agents, and the presence of symptoms including myoclonus and muscle rigidity were consistent with a diagnosis of serotonin syndrome (SS) according to the Hunter criteria. The symptoms diminished following three days of treatment with oral lorazepam and cyproheptadine and a reduced dose of mirtazapine. Metoclopramide is frequently used to various gastric symptom. Metoclopramide is not widely known to induce SS. This potentially fatal condition should be avoided by exercising care in the use of drugs that have the potential to cause drug-drug interactions. PMID:28321081

  18. Decreased Serotonin Levels and Serotonin-Mediated Osteoblastic Inhibitory Signaling in Patients With Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Klavdianou, Kalliopi; Liossis, Stamatis-Nick; Papachristou, Dionysios J; Theocharis, Georgios; Sirinian, Chaido; Kottorou, Anastasia; Filippopoulou, Alexandra; Andonopoulos, Andrew P; Daoussis, Dimitrios

    2016-03-01

    Evidence suggests that serotonin is an inhibitor of bone formation. We aimed to assess: 1) serum serotonin levels in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), a prototype bone-forming disease, compared with patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and healthy subjects; 2) the effect(s) of TNFα blockers on serum serotonin levels in patients with AS and RA; and 3) the effect(s) of serum of AS patients on serotonin signaling. Serum serotonin levels were measured in 47 patients with AS, 28 patients with RA, and 40 healthy subjects by radioimmunoassay; t test was used to assess differences between groups. The effect of serum on serotonin signaling was assessed using the human osteoblastic cell line Saos2, evaluating levels of phospho-CREB by Western immunoblots. Serotonin serum levels were significantly lower in patients with AS compared with healthy subjects (mean ± SEM ng/mL 122.9 ± 11.6 versus 177.4 ± 24.58, p = 0.038) and patients with RA (mean ± SEM ng/mL 244.8 ± 37.5, p = 0.0004). Patients with AS receiving TNFα blockers had significantly lower serotonin levels compared with patients with AS not on such treatment (mean ± SEM ng/mL 95.8 ± 14.9 versus 149.2 ± 16.0, p = 0.019). Serotonin serum levels were inversely correlated with pCREB induction in osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells. Serotonin levels are low in patients with AS and decrease even further during anti-TNFα treatment. Differences in serotonin levels are shown to have a functional impact on osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells. Therefore, serotonin may be involved in new bone formation in AS.

  19. Peripheral Serotonin 1B Receptor Transcription Predicts the Effect of Acute Tryptophan Depletion on Risky Decision-Making

    PubMed Central

    Mancinelli, Federico; Lockwood, Patricia L; Matarin, Mar; Dolan, Raymond J; Wood, Nick W; Dayan, Peter; Roiser, Jonathan P

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background The effects of acute tryptophan depletion on human decision-making suggest that serotonin modulates the processing of rewards and punishments. However, few studies have assessed which of the many types of serotonin receptors are responsible. Methods Using a within-subject, double-blind, sham-controlled design in 26 subjects, we examined whether individual differences in serotonin system gene transcription, measured in peripheral blood, predicted the effect of acute tryptophan depletion on decision-making. Participants performed a task in which they chose between successive pairs of fixed, lower-stakes (control) and variable, higher-stakes (experimental) gambles, each involving wins or losses. In 21 participants, mRNA from 9 serotonin system genes was measured in whole blood prior to acute tryptophan depletion: 5-HT1B, 5-HT1F, 5-HT2A, 5-HT2B, 5-HT3A, 5-HT3E, 5-HT7 (serotonin receptors), 5-HTT (the serotonin transporter), and tryptophan hydroxylase 1. Results Acute tryptophan depletion did not significantly influence participants’ sensitivity to probability, wins, or losses, although there was a trend for a lower tendency to choose experimental gambles overall following depletion. Significant positive correlations, which survived correction for multiple comparisons, were detected between baseline 5-HT1B mRNA levels and acute tryptophan depletion-induced increases in both the overall tendency to choose the experimental gamble and sensitivity to wins. No significant relationship was observed with any other peripheral serotonin system markers. Computational analyses of decision-making data provided results consistent with these findings. Conclusions These results suggest that the 5-HT1B receptor may modulate the effects of acute tryptophan depletion on risky decision-making. Peripheral levels of serotonin markers may predict response to treatments that act upon the serotonin system, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. PMID:27638901

  20. Serotonin hypothesis of autism: implications for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor use during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Rebecca A; Lee, Li-Ching; Crum, Rosa M; Zimmerman, Andrew W; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva

    2013-06-01

    Serotonin, a neurotransmitter found throughout the brain and body, has long been of interest in autism. Repeated findings of elevated platelet serotonin levels in approximately one third of children with autism has led some to believe that dysfunctional serotonin signaling may be a causal mechanism for the disorder. Because serotonin is critical to fetal brain development, concerns have arisen regarding prenatal exposure to substances that manipulate serotonin levels, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). This review examines evidence regarding the serotonin system and autism spectrum disorders (ASD), as well as what the literature has reported thus far on developmental effects of prenatal exposure to SSRIs. Possible mechanisms by which SSRIs could affect the fetus during pregnancy and clinical implications are also discussed. Though the majority of studies conducted in infants and children suggest prenatal exposure to SSRIs does not affect neurodevelopment, interpretation must be tempered given small sample sizes. The only published study that focused on prenatal SSRI exposure and ASD found an increased risk with exposure to SSRIs, especially during the first trimester. Obstacles that will be faced in future research are isolating medication effects from maternal depression and, given the infrequent occurrence of exposure and outcome, obtaining an adequate sample size. Whether serotonin is an etiologic factor in ASD, and what it points to as a marker for subgrouping, remains unclear. Understanding how the development of ASD might be affected by prenatal factors that influence serotonin levels, such as SSRIs, could identify modifiable targets for prevention.

  1. The influence of serotonin on fear learning.

    PubMed

    Hindi Attar, Catherine; Finckh, Barbara; Büchel, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Learning of associations between aversive stimuli and predictive cues is the basis of Pavlovian fear conditioning and is driven by a mismatch between expectation and outcome. To investigate whether serotonin modulates the formation of such aversive cue-outcome associations, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and dietary tryptophan depletion to reduce brain serotonin (5-HT) levels in healthy human subjects. In a Pavlovian fear conditioning paradigm, 5-HT depleted subjects compared to a non-depleted control group exhibited attenuated autonomic responses to cues indicating the upcoming of an aversive event. These results were closely paralleled by reduced aversive learning signals in the amygdala and the orbitofrontal cortex, two prominent structures of the neural fear circuit. In agreement with current theories of serotonin as a motivational opponent system to dopamine in fear learning, our data provide first empirical evidence for a role of serotonin in representing formally derived learning signals for aversive events.

  2. Serotonin Syndrome: Prophylactic Treatment With Cyproheptadine.

    PubMed

    Deardorff, O Greg; Khan, Talha; Kulkarni, Gaurav; Doisy, Richard; Loehr, Colleen

    2016-08-25

    Despite the numerous advantages of linezolid therapy, one disadvantage continuing to hinder its use is the risk of serotonin syndrome when coadministered with other serotonergic agents. Developing a better understanding of serotonin syndrome is essential for the prevention and management of this potentially life-threatening condition. This report describes a patient with schizophrenia, depression, and severe, acute osteomyelitis. The patient was taking multiple serotonergic agents and required the use of linezolid without the possibility of a sufficient washout period. The severity of the patient's condition in conjunction with increased risk for serotonin syndrome warranted prophylactic treatment with cyproheptadine. The complex pathophysiology of prophylactic treatment of serotonin syndrome with cyproheptadine is worthy of discussion.

  3. Serotonin and Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors (SNRIs)

    MedlinePlus

    Serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) Antidepressant SNRIs help relieve depression symptoms, such as irritability and sadness, but some are also used for anxiety disorders and nerve pain. Here's ...

  4. The role of serotonin in cerebellar development.

    PubMed

    Oostland, M; van Hooft, J A

    2013-09-17

    In adult animals, the cerebellum is richly innervated by serotonin: serotonergic fibres are the third main afferent fibres into the cerebellum. However, the physiology of the serotonergic system and its functional significance are not fully known during development in the cerebellum. In this review we will focus on the serotonergic regulation of the cerebellum during postnatal development. We hypothesize a powerful role for serotonin in the physiology of the developing cerebellum. A presumably tonic activation of serotonin receptors by binding of serotonin becomes specific by temporally and spatially restricted expression of different serotonin receptors, each with their own (sometimes antagonizing) functions. During the first postnatal week, activation of 5-HT₁ receptors expressed by both granule cells and Purkinje cells stimulates dendritic growth and synapse formation. Later, activation of 5-HT₃ receptors expressed by granule cells limits dendritic growth of Purkinje cells via mediating the secretion of reelin, influences physiological maturation of Purkinje cells, modulates synaptic plasticity at parallel fibre-Purkinje cell synapses and thereby affects competition with the climbing fibres on Purkinje cell dendrites resulting in proper climbing fibre elimination. Last, activation of 5-HT₂ receptors expressed by granule cells and Purkinje cells both during late postnatal development and in the mature cerebellum promotes the stability of synaptic activity. Thus, we propose that serotonin controls cerebellar development in three phases: (1) stimulation of dendritic growth and formation of synapses, (2) hard-wiring of neuronal connections with limits to dendritic growth but ensuring synaptic plasticity, and (3) stabilization of synapses. Taken together, serotonin receptors expressed by different cells in the cerebellum have a specialized role during postnatal development, but with some similar main effects. Distinct spatial and temporal expression of these

  5. Immunomodulatory effects mediated by serotonin.

    PubMed

    Arreola, Rodrigo; Becerril-Villanueva, Enrique; Cruz-Fuentes, Carlos; Velasco-Velázquez, Marco Antonio; Garcés-Alvarez, María Eugenia; Hurtado-Alvarado, Gabriela; Quintero-Fabian, Saray; Pavón, Lenin

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) induces concentration-dependent metabolic effects in diverse cell types, including neurons, entherochromaffin cells, adipocytes, pancreatic beta-cells, fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, epithelial cells, and leukocytes. Three classes of genes regulating 5-HT function are constitutively expressed or induced in these cells: (a) membrane proteins that regulate the response to 5-HT, such as SERT, 5HTR-GPCR, and the 5HT3-ion channels; (b) downstream signaling transduction proteins; and (c) enzymes controlling 5-HT metabolism, such as IDO and MAO, which can generate biologically active catabolites, including melatonin, kynurenines, and kynurenamines. This review covers the clinical and experimental mechanisms involved in 5-HT-induced immunomodulation. These mechanisms are cell-specific and depend on the expression of serotonergic components in immune cells. Consequently, 5-HT can modulate several immunological events, such as chemotaxis, leukocyte activation, proliferation, cytokine secretion, anergy, and apoptosis. The effects of 5-HT on immune cells may be relevant in the clinical outcome of pathologies with an inflammatory component. Major depression, fibromyalgia, Alzheimer disease, psoriasis, arthritis, allergies, and asthma are all associated with changes in the serotonergic system associated with leukocytes. Thus, pharmacological regulation of the serotonergic system may modulate immune function and provide therapeutic alternatives for these diseases.

  6. Immunomodulatory Effects Mediated by Serotonin

    PubMed Central

    Arreola, Rodrigo; Becerril-Villanueva, Enrique; Cruz-Fuentes, Carlos; Velasco-Velázquez, Marco Antonio; Garcés-Alvarez, María Eugenia; Hurtado-Alvarado, Gabriela; Quintero-Fabian, Saray; Pavón, Lenin

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) induces concentration-dependent metabolic effects in diverse cell types, including neurons, entherochromaffin cells, adipocytes, pancreatic beta-cells, fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, epithelial cells, and leukocytes. Three classes of genes regulating 5-HT function are constitutively expressed or induced in these cells: (a) membrane proteins that regulate the response to 5-HT, such as SERT, 5HTR-GPCR, and the 5HT3-ion channels; (b) downstream signaling transduction proteins; and (c) enzymes controlling 5-HT metabolism, such as IDO and MAO, which can generate biologically active catabolites, including melatonin, kynurenines, and kynurenamines. This review covers the clinical and experimental mechanisms involved in 5-HT-induced immunomodulation. These mechanisms are cell-specific and depend on the expression of serotonergic components in immune cells. Consequently, 5-HT can modulate several immunological events, such as chemotaxis, leukocyte activation, proliferation, cytokine secretion, anergy, and apoptosis. The effects of 5-HT on immune cells may be relevant in the clinical outcome of pathologies with an inflammatory component. Major depression, fibromyalgia, Alzheimer disease, psoriasis, arthritis, allergies, and asthma are all associated with changes in the serotonergic system associated with leukocytes. Thus, pharmacological regulation of the serotonergic system may modulate immune function and provide therapeutic alternatives for these diseases. PMID:25961058

  7. Serotonin as a homeostatic regulator of lactation.

    PubMed

    Collier, R J; Hernandez, L L; Horseman, N D

    2012-08-01

    Serotonin (5-HT), a neurotransmitter produced in mammary epithelial cells (MECs), acts via autocrine-paracrine mechanisms on MECs to regulate milk secretion in a variety of species. Recent studies in dairy cows reported that 5-HT ligands affect milk yield and composition. We determined the mRNA expression of bovine 5-HT receptor (5-HTR) subtypes in bovine mammary tissue (BMT) and cultured bovine MECs. We then used pharmacologic agents to evaluate functional activities of 5-HTR subtypes. The mRNAs for five receptor isoforms (5-HTR1B, 5-HTR2A, 5-HTR2B, 5-HTR4, and 5-HTR7) were identified by conventional reverse transcription PCR, real-time PCR, and in situ hybridization in BMT. In addition to luminal MEC expression, 5-HTR4 was expressed in myoepithelium, and 5-HTR1B, HTR2A, and HTR2B were expressed in small mammary blood vessels. Studies to date report that there are multiple 5-HTR isoforms in mammary tissue of rodents, humans, and cattle. Inhibition of the 5-HT reuptake transporter with selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) disrupted tight junctions and decreased milk protein mRNA expression in mouse, human, and bovine mammary cells. Selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitors act to increase the cellular exposure to 5-HT by preventing reuptake of 5-HT by the cell and eventual degradation. Increasing 5-HT concentration in milk via inhibiting its reuptake (SSRI), or by increasing the precursor for 5-HT synthesis 5-hydroxytryptophan, accelerated decline in milk synthesis at dry-off. We conclude that the 5-HT system in mammary tissue acts as a homeostatic regulator of lactation.

  8. Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 and Its Analogs Act in the Dorsal Raphe and Modulate Central Serotonin to Reduce Appetite and Body Weight.

    PubMed

    Anderberg, Rozita H; Richard, Jennifer E; Eerola, Kim; López-Ferreras, Lorena; Banke, Elin; Hansson, Caroline; Nissbrandt, Hans; Berqquist, Filip; Gribble, Fiona M; Reimann, Frank; Wernstedt Asterholm, Ingrid; Lamy, Christophe M; Skibicka, Karolina P

    2017-04-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and serotonin play critical roles in energy balance regulation. Both systems are exploited clinically as antiobesity strategies. Surprisingly, whether they interact in order to regulate energy balance is poorly understood. Here we investigated mechanisms by which GLP-1 and serotonin interact at the level of the central nervous system. Serotonin depletion impaired the ability of exendin-4, a clinically used GLP-1 analog, to reduce body weight in rats, suggesting that serotonin is a critical mediator of the energy balance impact of GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) activation. Serotonin turnover and expression of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) 2A (5-HT2A) and 5-HT2C serotonin receptors in the hypothalamus were altered by GLP-1R activation. We demonstrate that the 5-HT2A, but surprisingly not the 5-HT2C, receptor is critical for weight loss, anorexia, and fat mass reduction induced by central GLP-1R activation. Importantly, central 5-HT2A receptors are also required for peripherally injected liraglutide to reduce feeding and weight. Dorsal raphe (DR) harbors cell bodies of serotonin-producing neurons that supply serotonin to the hypothalamic nuclei. We show that GLP-1R stimulation in DR is sufficient to induce hypophagia and increase the electrical activity of the DR serotonin neurons. Finally, our results disassociate brain metabolic and emotionality pathways impacted by GLP-1R activation. This study identifies serotonin as a new critical neural substrate for GLP-1 impact on energy homeostasis and expands the current map of brain areas impacted by GLP-1R activation.

  9. Effects of calcium antagonists on serotonin-dependent aggregation and serotonin transport in platelets of patients with migraine.

    PubMed

    Pukhal'skaya, T G; Kolosova, O A; Men'shikov, M Y; Vein, A M

    2000-07-01

    Flunarizine and cinnarizine (IC50 6.8x10(-6) and 2.8x10(-5) M, respectively) inhibited 3H-serotonin uptake by platelets. In higher doses, they blocked serotonin-induced platelet aggregation and stimulated 3H-serotonin release from these cells. Imipramine did not affect serotonin-releasing effects of preparations. In all patients cinnarizine was more potent in inhibiting serotonin uptake, and in half of the patients cinnarizine displayed higher activity as an inductor of serotonin release.

  10. Acute selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors regulate the dorsal raphe nucleus causing amplification of terminal serotonin release.

    PubMed

    Dankoski, Elyse C; Carroll, Susan; Wightman, Robert Mark

    2016-01-09

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) were designed to treat depression by increasing serotonin levels throughout the brain via inhibition of clearance from the extracellular space. Although increases in serotonin levels are observed after acute SSRI exposure, 3-6 weeks of continuous use is required for relief from the symptoms of depression. Thus, it is now believed that plasticity in multiple brain systems that are downstream of serotonergic inputs contributes to the therapeutic efficacy of SSRIs. The onset of antidepressant effects also coincides with desensitization of somatodendritic serotonin autoreceptors in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), suggesting that disrupting inhibitory feedback within the serotonin system may contribute to the therapeutic effects of SSRIs. Previously, we showed that chronic SSRI treatment caused a frequency-dependent facilitation of serotonin signaling that persisted in the absence of uptake inhibition. In this work, we use in vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in mice to investigate a similar facilitation after a single treatment of the SSRI citalopram hydrobromide. Acute citalopram hydrobromide treatment resulted in frequency-dependent increases of evoked serotonin release in the substantia nigra pars reticulata. These increases were independent of changes in uptake velocity, but required SERT expression. Using microinjections, we show that the frequency-dependent enhancement in release is because of SERT inhibition in the DRN, demonstrating that SSRIs can enhance serotonin release by inhibiting uptake in a location distal to the terminal release site. The novel finding that SERT inhibition can disrupt modulatory mechanisms at the level of the DRN to facilitate serotonin release will help future studies investigate serotonin's role in depression and motivated behavior. In this work, stimulations of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) evoke serotonin release that is recorded in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNpr) using

  11. Synapsins Differentially Control Dopamine and Serotonin Release

    PubMed Central

    Kile, Brian M.; Guillot, Thomas S.; Venton, B. Jill; Wetsel, William C.; Augustine, George J.; Wightman, R. Mark

    2010-01-01

    Synapsins are a family of synaptic vesicle proteins that are important for neurotransmitter release. Here we have used triple knockout (TKO) mice lacking all three synapsin genes to determine the roles of synapsins in the release of two monoamine neurotransmitters, dopamine and serotonin. Serotonin release evoked by electrical stimulation was identical in substantia nigra pars reticulata slices prepared from TKO and wild-type mice. In contrast, release of dopamine in response to electrical stimulation was approximately doubled in striatum of TKO mice, both in vivo and in striatal slices, in comparison to wild-type controls. This was due to loss of synapsin III, because deletion of synapsin III alone was sufficient to increase dopamine release. Deletion of synapsins also increased the sensitivity of dopamine release to extracellular calcium ions. Although cocaine did not affect the release of serotonin from nigral tissue, this drug did enhance dopamine release. Cocaine-induced facilitation of dopamine release was a function of external calcium, an effect that was reduced in TKO mice. We conclude that synapsins play different roles in the control of release of dopamine and serotonin, with release of dopamine being negatively regulated by synapsins, specifically synapsin III, while serotonin release appears to be relatively independent of synapsins. These results provide further support for the concept that synapsin function in presynaptic terminals varies according to the neurotransmitter being released. PMID:20660258

  12. Synapsins differentially control dopamine and serotonin release.

    PubMed

    Kile, Brian M; Guillot, Thomas S; Venton, B Jill; Wetsel, William C; Augustine, George J; Wightman, R Mark

    2010-07-21

    Synapsins are a family of synaptic vesicle proteins that are important for neurotransmitter release. Here we have used triple knock-out (TKO) mice lacking all three synapsin genes to determine the roles of synapsins in the release of two monoamine neurotransmitters, dopamine and serotonin. Serotonin release evoked by electrical stimulation was identical in substantia nigra pars reticulata slices prepared from TKO and wild-type mice. In contrast, release of dopamine in response to electrical stimulation was approximately doubled in striatum of TKO mice, both in vivo and in striatal slices, in comparison to wild-type controls. This was due to loss of synapsin III, because deletion of synapsin III alone was sufficient to increase dopamine release. Deletion of synapsins also increased the sensitivity of dopamine release to extracellular calcium ions. Although cocaine did not affect the release of serotonin from nigral tissue, this drug did enhance dopamine release. Cocaine-induced facilitation of dopamine release was a function of external calcium, an effect that was reduced in TKO mice. We conclude that synapsins play different roles in the control of release of dopamine and serotonin, with release of dopamine being negatively regulated by synapsins, specifically synapsin III, while serotonin release appears to be relatively independent of synapsins. These results provide further support for the concept that synapsin function in presynaptic terminals varies according to the neurotransmitter being released.

  13. Convulsive ergotism: epidemics of the serotonin syndrome?

    PubMed

    Eadie, Mervyn J

    2003-07-01

    Between 1085 and 1927, epidemics of "convulsive ergotism" were widespread east of the Rhine in Europe due to consumption of grain contaminated with ergot, which is produced by the fungus Claviceps purpurea. West of the Rhine, consumption of ergot-contaminated food caused epidemics of gangrenous ergotism. The clinical features of convulsive ergotism--muscle twitching and spasms, changes in mental state, hallucinations, sweating, and fever lasting for several weeks--suggest serotonergic overstimulation of the CNS (ie, the serotonin syndrome). The ergot alkaloids are serotonin agonists. Dihydroergotamine binds to serotonin receptors in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, which is the site of neuropathological changes in convulsive ergotism. Dihydroergotamine given to human beings can cause the serotonin syndrome. Ergots produced by different strains of Claviceps purpurea, and those growing in different soils, may have different ergot alkaloid compositions. An alkaloid, present in high concentrations in ergots from east of the Rhine, may have caused convulsive ergotism at a circulating concentration insufficient to produce peripheral ischaemia. The serotonin syndrome may, therefore, have been a public-health problem long before it was recognised as a complication of modern psychopharmacology.

  14. Ascending serotonin neuron diversity under two umbrellas.

    PubMed

    Commons, Kathryn G

    2016-09-01

    Forebrain serotonin relevant for many psychological disorders arises in the hindbrain, primarily within the dorsal and median raphe nuclei (DR and MR). These nuclei are heterogeneous, containing several distinct groups of serotonin neurons. Here, new insight into the afferent and efferent connectivity of these areas is reviewed in correlation with their developmental origin. These data suggest that the caudal third of the DR, the area originally designated B6, may be misidentified as part of the DR as it shares many features of connectivity with the MR. By considering the rostral DR independently and affiliating the B6 to the MR, the diverse subgroups of serotonin neurons can be arranged with more coherence into two umbrella groups, each with distinctive domains of influence. Serotonin neurons within the rostral DR are uniquely interconnected with brain areas associated with emotion and motivation such as the amygdala, accumbens and ventral pallidum. In contrast serotonin neurons in the B6 and MR are characterized by their dominion over the septum and hippocampus. This distinction between the DR and B6/MR parallels their developmental origin and likely impacts their role in both behavior and psychopathology. Implications and further subdivisions within these areas are discussed.

  15. Organizational effects of oxytocin on serotonin innervation.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Jennifer L; Roache, Laura; Nguyen, Khanhbao N; Cushing, Bruce S; Troyer, Emma; Papademetriou, Eros; Raghanti, Mary Ann

    2012-01-01

    Oxytocin (OT) has an organizational effect within the central nervous system and can have long-lasting effects on the expression of social behavior. OT has recently been implicated in modulating the release of serotonin through activation of receptors in the raphe nuclei. Here we test the hypothesis that OT can have an organizational effect on the serotonergic system. Male prairie voles received an intraperitoneal injection on postnatal day 1 with 3.0 or .3 µg OT, an OT antagonist, or a saline control. Brains were collected on day 21 and immunostained for serotonin. Serotonin axons were quantified in the anterior hypothalamus, cortical amygdala, medial amygdala, paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, and ventromedial hypothalamus. Males treated with 3.0 µg OT displayed significantly higher serotonin axon length densities in the anterior hypothalamus, cortical amygdala, and the ventromedial hypothalamus than control males. These results support the hypothesis that OT has an organizational effect on the serotonin system during the neonatal period, and that these effects are site-specific.

  16. Serotonin increases synaptic activity in olfactory bulb glomeruli.

    PubMed

    Brill, Julia; Shao, Zuoyi; Puche, Adam C; Wachowiak, Matt; Shipley, Michael T

    2016-03-01

    Serotoninergic fibers densely innervate olfactory bulb glomeruli, the first sites of synaptic integration in the olfactory system. Acting through 5HT2A receptors, serotonin (5HT) directly excites external tufted cells (ETCs), key excitatory glomerular neurons, and depolarizes some mitral cells (MCs), the olfactory bulb's main output neurons. We further investigated 5HT action on MCs and determined its effects on the two major classes of glomerular interneurons: GABAergic/dopaminergic short axon cells (SACs) and GABAergic periglomerular cells (PGCs). In SACs, 5HT evoked a depolarizing current mediated by 5HT2C receptors but did not significantly impact spike rate. 5HT had no measurable direct effect in PGCs. Serotonin increased spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs and sIPSCs) in PGCs and SACs. Increased sEPSCs were mediated by 5HT2A receptors, suggesting that they are primarily due to enhanced excitatory drive from ETCs. Increased sIPSCs resulted from elevated excitatory drive onto GABAergic interneurons and augmented GABA release from SACs. Serotonin-mediated GABA release from SACs was action potential independent and significantly increased miniature IPSC frequency in glomerular neurons. When focally applied to a glomerulus, 5HT increased MC spontaneous firing greater than twofold but did not increase olfactory nerve-evoked responses. Taken together, 5HT modulates glomerular network activity in several ways: 1) it increases ETC-mediated feed-forward excitation onto MCs, SACs, and PGCs; 2) it increases inhibition of glomerular interneurons; 3) it directly triggers action potential-independent GABA release from SACs; and 4) these network actions increase spontaneous MC firing without enhancing responses to suprathreshold sensory input. This may enhance MC sensitivity while maintaining dynamic range.

  17. Oscillatory Serotonin Function in Depression

    PubMed Central

    Salomon, Ronald M.; Cowan, Ronald L.

    2013-01-01

    Oscillations in brain activities with periods of minutes to hours may be critical for normal mood behaviors. Ultradian (faster than circadian) rhythms of mood behaviors and associated central nervous system activities are altered in depression. Recent data suggest that ultradian rhythms in serotonin (5HT) function also change in depression. In two separate studies, 5HT metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were measured every 10 m for 24 h before and after chronic antidepressant treatment. Antidepressant treatments were associated with enhanced ultradian amplitudes of CSF metabolite levels. Another study used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)to measure amplitudes of dorsal raphé activation cycles following sham or active dietary depletions of the 5HT precursor (tryptophan). During depletion, amplitudes of dorsal raphé activation cycles increased with rapid 6 s periods (about 0.18 Hz)while functional connectivity weakened between dorsal raphé and thalamus at slower periods of 20 s (0.05 Hz). A third approach studied MDMA (ecstasy) users because of their chronically diminished 5HT function compared to non-MDMA polysubstance users (Karageorgiou et al., 2009). Compared to a non-MDMA using cohort, MDMA users showed diminished fMRI intra-regional coherence in motor regions along with altered functional connectivity, again suggesting effects of altered 5HT oscillatory function. These data support a hypothesis that qualities of ultradian oscillations in 5HT function may critically influence moods and behaviors. Dysfunctional 5HT rhythms in depression may be a common endpoint and biomarker for depression, linking dysfunction of slow brain network oscillators to 5HT mechanisms affected by commonly available treatments. 5HT oscillatory dysfunction may define illness subtypes and predict responses to serotonergic agents. Further studies of 5HT oscillations in depression are indicated. PMID:23592367

  18. Brain neurochemistry and macronutrient selection: a role for serotonin feedback?

    PubMed

    1992-01-01

    Experimental manipulations that clearly affected brain serotonin concentrations had no effect on diet selection. These findings challenge the importance of serotonin as part of a negative-feedback loop modulating macronutrient selection.

  19. On the role of brain serotonin in expression of genetic predisposition to catalepsy in animal models

    SciTech Connect

    Popova, N.K.; Kulikov, A.V.

    1995-06-19

    The activity of the rate-limiting enzyme of serotonin biosynthesis, tryptophan hydroxylase, in the striatum but not in the hippocampus and midbrain of rats bred for predisposition to catalepsy was higher than in nonselected rats. Mice of the highly susceptible to catalepsy CBA strain also differed from other noncataleptic mouse strains by the highest tryptophan hydroxylase activity in the striatum. Inhibition of tryptophan hydroxylase with p-chlorophenylalanine and p-chloromethamphetamine drastically decreased immobility time in hereditary predisposed to catalepsy animals. A decrease in the {sup 3}H-ketanserin specific binding in the striatum of cataleptic rats and CBA mice was found. It was suggested that this decrease in 5-HT2A serotonin receptor density represented a down regulation of the receptors due to an activation of serotonergic transmission in striatum. It is suggested that hereditary catalepsy may be resulted from genetic changes in the regulation of serotonin metabolism in striatum. 32 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Future directions for serotonin and antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Artigas, Francesc

    2013-01-16

    Despite the widespread use of antidepressant medications that block serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) and/or norepinephrine (NE) transporters, such as SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors) or SNRIs (serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors), the underlying neurobiological basis of action of these agents is poorly understood. Increases in serotonergic function are hypothesized to have beneficial effects on depressive symptoms. However, which of the 14 different neuronal receptors sensitive to 5-HT accounts for the therapeutic effects of SSRIs and SNRIs remains undetermined. The development of drugs that activate or block specific 5-HT receptors may help to circumvent the two main limitations of current antidepressants: low efficacy and delayed onset of therapeutic action. What follows is a short summary of the author's views on this matter.

  1. Future Directions for Serotonin and Antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of antidepressant medications that block serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) and/or norepinephrine (NE) transporters, such as SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors) or SNRIs (serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors), the underlying neurobiological basis of action of these agents is poorly understood. Increases in serotonergic function are hypothesized to have beneficial effects on depressive symptoms. However, which of the 14 different neuronal receptors sensitive to 5-HT accounts for the therapeutic effects of SSRIs and SNRIs remains undetermined. The development of drugs that activate or block specific 5-HT receptors may help to circumvent the two main limitations of current antidepressants: low efficacy and delayed onset of therapeutic action. What follows is a short summary of the author’s views on this matter. PMID:23336036

  2. Serotonin modulation of cortical neurons and networks.

    PubMed

    Celada, Pau; Puig, M Victoria; Artigas, Francesc

    2013-01-01

    The serotonergic pathways originating in the dorsal and median raphe nuclei (DR and MnR, respectively) are critically involved in cortical function. Serotonin (5-HT), acting on postsynaptic and presynaptic receptors, is involved in cognition, mood, impulse control and motor functions by (1) modulating the activity of different neuronal types, and (2) varying the release of other neurotransmitters, such as glutamate, GABA, acetylcholine and dopamine. Also, 5-HT seems to play an important role in cortical development. Of all cortical regions, the frontal lobe is the area most enriched in serotonergic axons and 5-HT receptors. 5-HT and selective receptor agonists modulate the excitability of cortical neurons and their discharge rate through the activation of several receptor subtypes, of which the 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A, and 5-HT3 subtypes play a major role. Little is known, however, on the role of other excitatory receptors moderately expressed in cortical areas, such as 5-HT2C, 5-HT4, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7. In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors are key players and exert opposite effects on the activity of pyramidal neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). The activation of 5-HT1A receptors in mPFC hyperpolarizes pyramidal neurons whereas that of 5-HT2A receptors results in neuronal depolarization, reduction of the afterhyperpolarization and increase of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) and of discharge rate. 5-HT can also stimulate excitatory (5-HT2A and 5-HT3) and inhibitory (5-HT1A) receptors in GABA interneurons to modulate synaptic GABA inputs onto pyramidal neurons. Likewise, the pharmacological manipulation of various 5-HT receptors alters oscillatory activity in PFC, suggesting that 5-HT is also involved in the control of cortical network activity. A better understanding of the actions of 5-HT in PFC may help to develop treatments for mood and cognitive disorders associated with an abnormal function of the frontal lobe.

  3. Serotonin modulation of cortical neurons and networks

    PubMed Central

    Celada, Pau; Puig, M. Victoria; Artigas, Francesc

    2013-01-01

    The serotonergic pathways originating in the dorsal and median raphe nuclei (DR and MnR, respectively) are critically involved in cortical function. Serotonin (5-HT), acting on postsynaptic and presynaptic receptors, is involved in cognition, mood, impulse control and motor functions by (1) modulating the activity of different neuronal types, and (2) varying the release of other neurotransmitters, such as glutamate, GABA, acetylcholine and dopamine. Also, 5-HT seems to play an important role in cortical development. Of all cortical regions, the frontal lobe is the area most enriched in serotonergic axons and 5-HT receptors. 5-HT and selective receptor agonists modulate the excitability of cortical neurons and their discharge rate through the activation of several receptor subtypes, of which the 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A, and 5-HT3 subtypes play a major role. Little is known, however, on the role of other excitatory receptors moderately expressed in cortical areas, such as 5-HT2C, 5-HT4, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7. In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors are key players and exert opposite effects on the activity of pyramidal neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). The activation of 5-HT1A receptors in mPFC hyperpolarizes pyramidal neurons whereas that of 5-HT2A receptors results in neuronal depolarization, reduction of the afterhyperpolarization and increase of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) and of discharge rate. 5-HT can also stimulate excitatory (5-HT2A and 5-HT3) and inhibitory (5-HT1A) receptors in GABA interneurons to modulate synaptic GABA inputs onto pyramidal neurons. Likewise, the pharmacological manipulation of various 5-HT receptors alters oscillatory activity in PFC, suggesting that 5-HT is also involved in the control of cortical network activity. A better understanding of the actions of 5-HT in PFC may help to develop treatments for mood and cognitive disorders associated with an abnormal function of the frontal lobe

  4. Resequencing of serotonin-related genes and association of tagging SNPs to citalopram response

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Eric J.; Slager, Susan L.; Jenkins, Greg D.; Reinalda, Megan S.; Garriock, Holly A.; Shyn, Stanley I.; Kraft, Jeffrey B.; McGrath, Patrick J.; Hamilton, Steven P.

    2010-01-01

    Several reports have been published investigating the relationship between common variants in serotonin-related candidate genes and antidepressant response, and most of the results have been equivocal. We previously reported a significant association between variants in serotonin-related genes and response to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine. Here, we attempt to expand upon and replicate these results by (i) resequencing the exonic and putatively regulatory regions of five serotonin-related candidate genes (HTR1A, HTR2A, TPH1, TPH2, and MAOA) in our fluoxetine-treated sample to uncover novel variants; (ii) selecting tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for these genes from the resequencing data; and (iii) evaluating these tagging SNPs for association with response to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram in an independent sample of participants who are enrolled in the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) clinical study (N=1953). None of the variants associated previously with fluoxetine response were found to be associated with citalopram response in the STAR*D sample set. Nor were any of the additional tagging SNPs found to be associated with citalopram response. An additional SNP in HTR2A (rs7997012), previously reported to be associated with outcome of citalopram treatment in this sample, but not well tagged by any of the other SNPs we studied, was also genotyped, and was associated with citalopram response (P=0.0002), strongly supporting the previous observation in the same STAR*D sample. Our results suggest that resequencing the serotonin-related genes did not identify any additional common SNPs that have not been identified previously. It appears that genetic variation in these five genes has a marginal effect on response to citalopram, although a previously observed association was supported and awaits replication in an independent sample. PMID:19077664

  5. Association between serotonin transporter gene polymorphisms and childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Farjadian, Shirin; Moghtaderi, Mozhgan; Fakhraei, Bahareh; Nasiri, Mahboubeh; Farjam, Mojtaba

    2013-12-01

    Asthma is a common chronic inflammatory disease of the airways in which genetic factors play a major role in its pathogenesis. High serotonin serum levels in patients with asthma suggest that serotonin is involved in the pathophysiology of the disease. Serotonin clearance is mediated by the serotonin reuptake transporter, and functional polymorphisms in this gene lead to altered serotonin reuptake efficiency. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between serotonin transporter gene polymorphisms and asthma. Serotonin transporter gene polymorphisms (5-HTTLPR, rs35521 and STin2.VNTR) were assessed by PCR-based methods in 100 children with mild to moderate persistent asthma and compared with 100 healthy controls. There were no significant differences in allele, genotype or haplotype frequencies between patients and controls. No association was observed between SERT gene polymorphisms after stratification of patients for sex, age, spirometry indices, family history, passive smoking behavior and concomitant allergic rhinitis. Significant differences were observed in the distribution of 5-HTTLPR alleles (p = 0.025) and genotypes (p = 0.021) between patients with and without atopic dermatitis. Despite strong evidence suggesting the role of serotonin in the pathophysiology of asthma, we found no association between serotonin transporter gene polymorphisms and mild to moderate persistent asthma. Further serotonin transporter gene analyses in patients with severe asthma may open up new horizons in the utilization of common serotonin regulators to treat asthma, based on their pharmacogenetic effects. However, serotonin may also be indirectly influenced by emotional stress during asthma attacks.

  6. Serotonin Signal Transduction in Two Groups of Autistic Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: TITLE: Serotonin Signal Transduction in Two Groups of Autistic ...Serotonin Signal Transduction in Two Groups of Autistic Patients 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0820 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...Furthermore, while treatment with selective serotonin uptake inhibitors (SSRI) is routine for autistic patients, therapeutic benefit is variable and

  7. [Serotonin and its receptors in the cardiovascular system].

    PubMed

    Nadeev, A D; Zharkikh, I L; Avdonin, P V; Goncharov, N V

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin in cardiovascular system plays an important role in blood coagulation, allergy, and inflammation, as well as in blood vessel tone regulation. In this review, the mechanisms of serotonin effects upon the cells of blood vessels are considered and the list of main agonists and antagonists is presented. The signaling pathways activated by serotonin and their interaction in normal and pathological states are described.

  8. Serotonin-Labeled CdSe Nanocrystals: Applications for Neuroscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kippeny, Tadd; Adkins, Erika; Adams, Scott; Thomlinson, Ian; Schroeter, Sally; Defelice, Louis; Blakely, Randy; Rosenthal, Sandra

    2000-03-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is an important neurotransmitter which has been linked to the regulation of critical behaviors including sleep, appetite, and mood. The serotonin transporter (SERT) is a 12-transmembrane domain protein responsible for clearance of serotonin from extracellular spaces following release. In order to assess the potential for use of ligand-conjugated nanocrystals to target cell surface receptors, ion channels, and transporters we have measured the ability of serotonin-labeled CdSe nanocrystals (SNACs) to block the uptake of tritiated serotonin by the human and Drosophila serotonin transporters (hSERT and dSERT). Estimated Ki values, the SNAC concentration at which half of the serotonin transport activity is blocked, were determined by nonlinear regression to be Ki (hSERT ) = 74uM and Ki (dSERT ) = 29uM. These values and our inability to detect free serotonin indicate that SNACs selectively interact with the serotonin recognition site of the transporter. We have also exposed the SNACs to cells containing ionotropic serotonin receptors and have measured the electrical response of the cell using a two microelectrode voltage clamp. We find that serotonin receptors do respond to the SNACs and we measure currents similar to the free serotonin response. These results indicate that ligand-conjugated nanocrystals can be used to label both receptor and transporter proteins. Initial fluorescence labeling experiments will be discussed.

  9. Role of serotonin in seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A; Sharma, P K; Garg, V K; Singh, A K; Mondal, S C

    2013-01-01

    This review was prepared with an aim to show role of serotonin in seasonal affective disorder. Seasonal affective disorder, which is also called as winter depression or winter blues, is mood disorder in which persons with normal mental health throughout most of the year will show depressive symptoms in the winter or, less commonly, in the summer. Serotonin is an important endogenous neurotransmitter which also acts as neuromodulator. The least invasive, natural, and researched treatment of seasonal affective disorder is natural or otherwise is light therapy. Negative air ionization, which acts by liberating charged particles on the sleep environment, has also become effective in treatment of seasonal affective disorder.  

  10. [Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and gastrointestinal hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takatsugu; Abe, Koichiro; Kuyama, Yasushi

    2013-04-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) are widely used antidepressants characterized by less-frequent adverse effects compared with classical anti-depressive agents. On the other hand, SSRI can cause hemorrhagic events more due to impaired platelet aggregation induced by a depletion of serotonin in the peripheral platelet. Epidemiological studies have indicated that patients taking SSRI are predisposed to gastrointestinal hemorrhage, especially in case that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are prescribed concomitantly. Here we describe a risk of the gastrointestinal hemorrhage in patients taking SSRI.

  11. A novel mechanism for regulating hepatic glycogen synthesis involving serotonin and cyclin-dependent kinase-5.

    PubMed

    Tudhope, Susan J; Wang, Chung-Chi; Petrie, John L; Potts, Lloyd; Malcomson, Fiona; Kieswich, Julius; Yaqoob, Muhammad M; Arden, Catherine; Hampson, Laura J; Agius, Loranne

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic autonomic nerves regulate postprandial hepatic glucose uptake, but the signaling pathways remain unknown. We tested the hypothesis that serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) exerts stimulatory and inhibitory effects on hepatic glucose disposal. Ligands of diverse 5-HT receptors were used to identify signaling pathway(s) regulating glucose metabolism in hepatocytes. 5-HT had stimulatory and inhibitory effects on glycogen synthesis in hepatocytes mediated by 5-HT1/2A and 5-HT2B receptors, respectively. Agonists of 5-HT1/2A receptors lowered blood glucose and increased hepatic glycogen after oral glucose loading and also stimulated glycogen synthesis in freshly isolated hepatocytes with greater efficacy than 5-HT. This effect was blocked by olanzapine, an antagonist of 5-HT1/2A receptors. It was mediated by activation of phosphorylase phosphatase, inactivation of glycogen phosphorylase, and activation of glycogen synthase. Unlike insulin action, it was not associated with stimulation of glycolysis and was counteracted by cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) inhibitors. A role for cdk5 was supported by adaptive changes in the coactivator protein p35 and by elevated glycogen synthesis during overexpression of p35/cdk5. These results support a novel mechanism for serotonin stimulation of hepatic glycogenesis involving cdk5. The opposing effects of serotonin, mediated by distinct 5-HT receptors, could explain why drugs targeting serotonin function can cause either diabetes or hypoglycemia in humans.

  12. Serotonin and brain function: a tale of two receptors

    PubMed Central

    Carhart-Harris, RL; Nutt, DJ

    2017-01-01

    Previous attempts to identify a unified theory of brain serotonin function have largely failed to achieve consensus. In this present synthesis, we integrate previous perspectives with new and older data to create a novel bipartite model centred on the view that serotonin neurotransmission enhances two distinct adaptive responses to adversity, mediated in large part by its two most prevalent and researched brain receptors: the 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors. We propose that passive coping (i.e. tolerating a source of stress) is mediated by postsynaptic 5-HT1AR signalling and characterised by stress moderation. Conversely, we argue that active coping (i.e. actively addressing a source of stress) is mediated by 5-HT2AR signalling and characterised by enhanced plasticity (defined as capacity for change). We propose that 5-HT1AR-mediated stress moderation may be the brain’s default response to adversity but that an improved ability to change one’s situation and/or relationship to it via 5-HT2AR-mediated plasticity may also be important – and increasingly so as the level of adversity reaches a critical point. We propose that the 5-HT1AR pathway is enhanced by conventional 5-HT reuptake blocking antidepressants such as the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), whereas the 5-HT2AR pathway is enhanced by 5-HT2AR-agonist psychedelics. This bipartite model purports to explain how different drugs (SSRIs and psychedelics) that modulate the serotonergic system in different ways, can achieve complementary adaptive and potentially therapeutic outcomes. PMID:28858536

  13. Serotonin syndrome associated with polypharmacy in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Poeschla, Brian D; Bartle, Pauline; Hansen, Karen P

    2011-01-01

    The increasing use of serotonergic agents, alone and in combination, across multiple disciplines, makes it likely that the prevalence of serotonin syndrome will rise. Caution should be used, especially in the elderly, to avoid unnecessary and potentially harmful polypharmacy. We describe a case of serotonin syndrome in a 79-year-old man taking mirtazapine, venlafaxine and quetiapine. As this case illustrates, serotonin syndrome can be caused by combinations of direct serotonin agonists (e.g., serotonergic antidepressants) and indirect serotonin agonists (e.g., atypical antipsychotics).

  14. Uremic anorexia: a consequence of persistently high brain serotonin levels? The tryptophan/serotonin disorder hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, A; Selgas, R; Codoceo, R; Bajo, A

    2000-01-01

    Anorexia is a frequent part of uremic syndrome, contributing to malnutrition in dialysis patients. Many factors have been suggested as responsible for uremic anorexia. In this paper we formulate a new hypothesis to explain the appetite disorders in dialysis patients: "the tryptophan/serotonin disorder hypothesis." We review current knowledge of normal hunger-satiety cycle control and the disorders described in uremic patients. There are four phases in food intake regulation: (1) the gastric phase, during which food induces satiety through gastric distention and satiety peptide release; (2) the post absorptive phase, during which circulating compounds, including glucose and amino acids, cause satiety by hepatic receptors via the vagus nerve; (3) the hepatic phase, during which adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration is the main stimulus inducing hunger or satiety, with cytokines inhibiting ATP production; and (4) the central phase, during which appetite is regulated through peripheral (circulating plasma substances and neurotransmitters) and brain stimuli. Brain serotonin is the final target for peripheral mechanisms controlling appetite. High brain serotonin levels and a lower serotonin/dopamine ratio cause anorexia. Plasma and brain amino acid concentrations are recognized factors involved in neurotransmitter synthesis and appetite control. Tryptophan is the substrate of serotonin synthesis. High plasma levels of anorectics such as tryptophan (plasma and brain), cholecystokinin, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1, and leptin, and deficiencies of nitric oxide and neuropeptide Y have been described in uremia; all increase intracerebral serotonin. We suggest that brain serotonin hyperproduction due to a uremic-dependent excess of tryptophan may be the final common pathway involved in the genesis of uremic anorexia. Various methods of ameliorating anorexia by decreasing the central effects of serotonin are proposed.

  15. Measuring the serotonin uptake site using (/sup 3/H)paroxetine--a new serotonin uptake inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Gleiter, C.H.; Nutt, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    Serotonin is an important neurotransmitter that may be involved in ethanol preference and dependence. It is possible to label the serotonin uptake site in brain using the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine, but this also binds to other sites. We have used the new high-affinity uptake blocker paroxetine to define binding to this site and report it to have advantages over imipramine as a ligand.

  16. Serotonin and emotion, learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Alfredo; Liy-Salmeron, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamien, 5-HT) has been linked to emotional and motivational aspects of human behavior, including anxiety, depression, impulsivity, etc. Several clinically effective drugs exert effects via 5-HT systems. Growing evidence suggests that those effects play an important role in learning and memory. Whether the role of serotonin is related to memory and/or behavioral or emotional aspects remains an important question. A key question that remains is whether 5-HT markers (e.g., receptors) directly or indirectly participate and/or contribute to the physiological and pharmacological basis of memory and its pathogenesis. The major aim of this paper is to re-examine some recent advances regarding mammalian 5-HT receptors and transporter in light of their physiological, pathophysiological and therapeutic implications for memory. We particularly address evidence involving 5-HT systems in behavioral, pharmacological, molecular, genetic and imaging results and memory. Finally, this paper aims to summarize a portion of the evidence about serotonin, memory and emotion from animal and human studies and provide an overview of potential tools, markers and cellular and molecular candidate mechanisms. It should be noted that there are several subjects that this paper only briefly touches upon, presenting only what may be the most salient findings in the context of memory, emotion and serotonin.

  17. [The role of serotonin in behavior modulation].

    PubMed

    Baumgarten, H G; Grozdanovic, Z

    1995-06-01

    The central projection systems represent an expansive and important component of the brainstem reticular core which provide modulatory input into multiple target networks throughout the entire vertebrate neuraxis. Most of the afferent input into the cranial raphe originates within sensory uni- and polymodal, associative and limbic cortices suggesting that serotonin modulates preprocessed information. The serotonergic neurons discharge in a remarkably stable and tonic fashion during wakefulness. Some 5-HT neurons increase their discharge rate phasically in association with the activation of central rhythmic pattern generators involved in consummatory and grooming behaviour. In concert with enhancing motor functions, the serotonergic systems discretely deamplify sensory attentiveness and pain processing, thereby establishing an essential and protective filter mechanism against distracting and irritating noise effects of sensory afferent input level. In addition, serotonin restrains the latency to responding, i.e. impulsivity. These effects of serotonin are mediated by multiple receptor subtypes with distinct pre- and postsynaptic localisation and regional distribution pattern, acting via amplifying (5-HT2 receptors) or desamplifying (5-HT1 receptors) G-protein-dependent transduction mechanisms. The breakdown of these protective and adaptive functions of 5-HT in complex behaviour and in basic aspects of sensorimotor integration may have a pathogenetic role in disorders of impulse control (e.g. bulimia nervosa and OCD) which have been found to respond to high-dose, long-term treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

  18. Serotonin in Autism and Pediatric Epilepsies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chugani, Diane C.

    2004-01-01

    Serotonergic abnormalities have been reported in both autism and epilepsy. This association may provide insights into underlying mechanisms of these disorders because serotonin plays an important neurotrophic role during brain development--and there is evidence for abnormal cortical development in both autism and some forms of epilepsy. This…

  19. A circannual rhythm in bovine pineal serotonin.

    PubMed

    Philo, R; Reiter, R J

    1980-06-15

    Bovine pineal serotonin (5-HT) was analyzed at the time of the solstices and equinoxes from December, 1975 until June, 1978. The highest values of 5-HT were detected at the winter solstices and lowest values at the summer solstices of each year examined. The peaks in bovine pineal 5-HT correspond with a lessened fertility in cattle reported during the winter months.

  20. A current view of serotonin transporters

    PubMed Central

    De Felice, Louis J.

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin transporters (SERTs) are largely recognized for one aspect of their function—to transport serotonin back into the presynaptic terminal after its release. Another aspect of their function, however, may be to generate currents large enough to have physiological consequences. The standard model for electrogenic transport is the alternating access model, in which serotonin is transported with a fixed ratio of co-transported ions resulting in net charge per cycle. The alternating access model, however, cannot account for all the observed currents through SERT or other monoamine transporters.  Furthermore, SERT agonists like ecstasy or antagonists like fluoxetine generate or suppress currents that the standard model cannot support.  Here we survey evidence for a channel mode of transport in which transmitters and ions move through a pore. Available structures for dopamine and serotonin transporters, however, provide no evidence for a pore conformation, raising questions of whether the proposed channel mode actually exists or whether the structural data are perhaps missing a transient open state. PMID:27540474

  1. Modulation of auditory brainstem responses by serotonin and specific serotonin receptors.

    PubMed

    Papesh, Melissa A; Hurley, Laura M

    2016-02-01

    The neuromodulator serotonin is found throughout the auditory system from the cochlea to the cortex. Although effects of serotonin have been reported at the level of single neurons in many brainstem nuclei, how these effects correspond to more integrated measures of auditory processing has not been well-explored. In the present study, we aimed to characterize the effects of serotonin on far-field auditory brainstem responses (ABR) across a wide range of stimulus frequencies and intensities. Using a mouse model, we investigated the consequences of systemic serotonin depletion, as well as the selective stimulation and suppression of the 5-HT1 and 5-HT2 receptors, on ABR latency and amplitude. Stimuli included tone pips spanning four octaves presented over a forty dB range. Depletion of serotonin reduced the ABR latencies in Wave II and later waves, suggesting that serotonergic effects occur as early as the cochlear nucleus. Further, agonists and antagonists of specific serotonergic receptors had different profiles of effects on ABR latencies and amplitudes across waves and frequencies, suggestive of distinct effects of these agents on auditory processing. Finally, most serotonergic effects were more pronounced at lower ABR frequencies, suggesting larger or more directional modulation of low-frequency processing. This is the first study to describe the effects of serotonin on ABR responses across a wide range of stimulus frequencies and amplitudes, and it presents an important step in understanding how serotonergic modulation of auditory brainstem processing may contribute to modulation of auditory perception.

  2. Serotonin receptors in suicide victims with major depression.

    PubMed

    Stockmeier, C A; Dilley, G E; Shapiro, L A; Overholser, J C; Thompson, P A; Meltzer, H Y

    1997-02-01

    Serotonin1A (5-HT1A) and serotonin2A (5-HT2A) receptors in the brain have been implicated in the pathophysiology of suicide. Brain samples were collected at autopsy from suicide victims with a current episode of major depression and matched comparison subjects who died of natural or accidental causes. Retrospective psychiatric assessments were collected from knowledgeable informants for all suicide victims and most of the comparison subjects. Psychiatric diagnoses were determined according to DSM-III-R criteria. Any subjects with current psychoactive substance use disorders were excluded. Quantitative receptor autoradiography was used in serial sections of the right prefrontal cortex (area 10) and hippocampus to measure the binding of [3H]8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propyl)-aminotetralin ([3H]8-OH-DPAT) to 5-HT1A receptors and [3H]ketanserin to 5-HT2A receptors. Analysis of covariance was used to compare control subjects and suicide victims with major depression. The age of subjects, the time from death to freezing the tissue (postmortem interval), and the storage time of tissues in the freezer were used as covariates in the analyses. There were no significant differences between suicide victims with major depression and comparison subjects in 5-HT1A or 5-HT2A receptors in area 10 of the right prefrontal cortex or the hippocampus. The current results suggest that the number of 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors in the right prefrontal cortex (area 10) or hippocampus are not different in suicide victims with major depression.

  3. Modulation of defensive reflex conditioning in snails by serotonin

    PubMed Central

    Andrianov, Vyatcheslav V.; Bogodvid, Tatiana K.; Deryabina, Irina B.; Golovchenko, Aleksandra N.; Muranova, Lyudmila N.; Tagirova, Roza R.; Vinarskaya, Aliya K.; Gainutdinov, Khalil L.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights Daily injection of serotonin before a training session accelerated defensive reflex conditioning in snails.Daily injection of 5-hydroxytryptophan before a training session in snails with a deficiency of serotonin induced by the “neurotoxic” analog of serotonin 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine, restored the ability of snails to learn.After injection of the “neurotoxic” analogs of serotonin 5,6- and 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine as well as serotonin, depolarization of the membrane and decrease of the threshold potential of premotor interneurons was observed. We studied the role of serotonin in the mechanisms of learning in terrestrial snails. To produce a serotonin deficit, the “neurotoxic” analogs of serotonin, 5,6- or 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,6/5,7-DHT) were used. Injection of 5,6/5,7-DHT was found to disrupt defensive reflex conditioning. Within 2 weeks of neurotoxin application, the ability to learn had recovered. Daily injection of serotonin before a training session accelerated defensive reflex conditioning and daily injections of 5-HTP in snails with a deficiency of serotonin induced by 5,7-DHT restored the snail's ability to learn. We discovered that injections of the neurotoxins 5,6/5,7-DHT as well as serotonin, caused a decrease in the resting and threshold potentials of the premotor interneurons LPa3 and RPa3. PMID:26557063

  4. Peripheral serotonin enhances lipid metabolism by accelerating bile acid turnover.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hitoshi; Akasaka, Daisuke; Ogasawara, Hideki; Sato, Kan; Miyake, Masato; Saito, Kazuki; Takahashi, Yu; Kanaya, Takashi; Takakura, Ikuro; Hondo, Tetsuya; Chao, Guozheng; Rose, Michael T; Ohwada, Shyuichi; Watanabe, Kouichi; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Aso, Hisashi

    2010-10-01

    Serotonin is synthesized by two distinct tryptophan hydroxylases, one in the brain and one in the periphery. The latter is known to be unable to cross the blood-brain barrier. These two serotonin systems have apparently independent functions, although the functions of peripheral serotonin have yet to be fully elucidated. In this study, we have investigated the physiological effect of peripheral serotonin on the concentrations of metabolites in the circulation and in the liver. After fasting, mice were ip injected with 1 mg serotonin. The plasma glucose concentration was significantly elevated between 60 and 270 min after the injection. In contrast, plasma triglyceride, cholesterol, and nonesterified fatty acid concentrations were decreased. The hepatic glycogen synthesis and concentrations were significantly higher at 240 min. At the same time, the hepatic triglyceride content was significantly lower than the basal levels noted before the serotonin injection, whereas the hepatic cholesterol content was significantly higher by 60 min after the injection. Furthermore, serotonin stimulated the contraction of the gallbladder and the excretion of bile. After the serotonin injection, there was a significant induction of apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter expression, resulting in a decrease in the concentration of bile acids in the feces. Additionally, data are presented to show that the functions of serotonin are mediated through diverse serotonin receptor subtypes. These data indicate that peripheral serotonin accelerates the metabolism of lipid by increasing the concentration of bile acids in circulation.

  5. Serotonin modulates glutamatergic transmission to neurons in the lateral habenula.

    PubMed

    Xie, Guiqin; Zuo, Wanhong; Wu, Liangzhi; Li, Wenting; Wu, Wei; Bekker, Alex; Ye, Jiang-Hong

    2016-04-01

    The lateral habenula (LHb) is bilaterally connected with serotoninergic raphe nuclei, and expresses high density of serotonin receptors. However, actions of serotonin on the excitatory synaptic transmission to LHb neurons have not been thoroughly investigated. The LHb contains two anatomically and functionally distinct regions: lateral (LHbl) and medial (LHbm) divisions. We compared serotonin's effects on glutamatergic transmission across the LHb in rat brains. Serotonin bi-directionally and differentially modulated glutamatergic transmission. Serotonin inhibited glutamatergic transmission in higher percentage of LHbl neurons but potentiated in higher percentage of LHbm neurons. Magnitude of potentiation was greater in LHbm than in LHbl. Type 2 and 3 serotonin receptor antagonists attenuated serotonin's potentiation. The serotonin reuptake blocker, and the type 2 and 3 receptor agonists facilitated glutamatergic transmission in both LHbl and LHbm neurons. Thus, serotonin via activating its type 2, 3 receptors, increased glutamate release at nerve terminals in some LHb neurons. Our data demonstrated that serotonin affects both LHbm and LHbl. Serotonin might play an important role in processing information between the LHb and its downstream-targeted structures during decision-making. It may also contribute to a homeostatic balance underlying the neural circuitry between the LHb and raphe nuclei.

  6. Projections and interconnections of genetically defined serotonin neurons in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Sun Jung; Jensen, Patricia; Dymecki, Susan M; Commons, Kathryn G.

    2012-01-01

    Brain serotonin neurons are heterogeneous and can be distinguished by several anatomical and physiological characteristics. Toward resolving this heterogeneity into classes of functional relevance, subtypes of mature serotonin neurons were previously identified based on gene expression differences initiated during development in different rhombomeric (r) segments of the hindbrain. This redefinition of mature serotonin neuron subtypes based on the criteria of genetic lineage, along with the enabling genetic fate mapping tools, now allows various functional properties, such as axonal projections, to be allocated onto these identified subtypes. Furthermore, our approach uniquely enables interconnections between the different serotonin neuron subtypes to be determined; this is especially relevant because serotonin neuron activity is regulated by several feedback mechanisms. We used intersectional and subtractive genetic fate mapping tools to generate three independent lines of mice in which serotonin neurons arising in different rhombomeric segments, either r1, r2 or both r3 and r5, were uniquely distinguished from all other serotonin neurons by their expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein. Each of these subgroups of serotonergic neurons had a unique combination of forebrain projection targets. Typically more than one subgroup innervated an individual target area. Unique patterns of interconnections between the different groups of serotonin neurons were also observed and these pathways could subserve feedback regulatory circuits. Overall, the current findings suggest that activation of subsets of serotonin neurons could result in topographic serotonin release in the forebrain coupled with feedback inhibition of serotonin neurons with alternative projection targets. PMID:22151329

  7. Serotonin receptors contribute to the promnesic effects of P. olacoides (Marapuama).

    PubMed

    da Silva, Adriana Lourenço; Ferreira, Juliana G; da Silva Martins, Bárbara; Oliveira, Sabrina; Mai, Nathalia; Nunes, Domingos S; Elisabetsky, Elaine

    2008-09-03

    Nootropic, antioxidant, and neuroprotective properties have been shown in a standardized ethanol extract of Ptychopetalum olacoides (POEE), a medicinal plant traditionally used by the Amazonian elderly population. It has been revealed that POEE mechanisms of action include anticholinesterase effects, and involve beta-adrenergic and dopamine D(1) receptors. The purpose of this study was to verify the role of serotonin receptors in the promnesic effects of this standardized extract. The step-down task in mice and selective serotonin antagonists were used. The study reveals that POEE promnesic effects on short-term (acquisition, consolidation and retrieval) and long-term (retrieval) declarative aversive memories are increased by 5HT(2A) (but not 5HT(1A)) serotonin antagonists (spiperone and pindolol, respectively). The observed synergism between POEE and spiperone can be interpreted as the combined effects of two subeffective doses of two 5HT antagonists, or the known synergism between an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (POEE) and a 5HT antagonist. In conclusion it is suggested that 5HT(2A) serotonin receptors are relevant for the promnesic effects of this extract, adding to its multiple mechanisms of action.

  8. Serotonin stimulates secretion of exosomes from microglia cells.

    PubMed

    Glebov, Konstantin; Löchner, Marie; Jabs, Ronald; Lau, Thorsten; Merkel, Olaf; Schloss, Patrick; Steinhäuser, Christian; Walter, Jochen

    2015-04-01

    Microglia are resident immune cells in the brain and exert important functions in the regulation of inflammatory processes during infection or cellular damage. Upon activation, microglia undergo complex morphological and functional transitions, including increased motility, phagocytosis and cytokine secretion. Recent findings indicate that exosomes, small vesicles that derive from fusion of multivesicular bodies with the plasma membrane, are involved in secretion of certain cytokines. The presence of specific receptors on the surface of microglia suggests communication with neurons by neurotransmitters. Here, we demonstrate expression of serotonin receptors, including 5-HT2a,b and 5-HT4 in microglial cells and their functional involvement in the modulation of exosome release by serotonin. Our data demonstrate the involvement of cAMP and Ca(2+) dependent signaling pathways in the regulation of exosome secretion. Co-culture of microglia with embryonic stem cell-derived serotonergic neurons further demonstrated functional signaling between neurons and microglia. Together, these data provide evidence for neurotransmitter-dependent signaling pathways in microglial cells that regulate exosome release.

  9. Involvement of serotonin receptor subtypes in the antidepressant-like effect of beta receptor agonist Amibegron (SR 58611A): an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Tanyeri, Pelin; Buyukokuroglu, Mehmet Emin; Mutlu, Oguz; Ulak, Güner; Yıldız Akar, Füruzan; Komsuoglu Celikyurt, Ipek; Erden, Bekir Faruk

    2013-04-01

    New therapeutic strategies against depression, with less side effects and thus greater efficacy in larger proportion of depressed patients, are needed. Amibegron (SR58611A) is the first selective β3 adrenergic agent that has been shown to possess a profile of antidepressant activity in rodents. To investigate the involvement of serotonin receptors in the effects of amibegron, we used the serotonin 5HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635 (WAY) or serotonin 5HT2A-2C receptor antagonist ketanserin or serotonin 5HT3 receptor antagonist ondansetron in mice forced swimming test (FST). The locomotor activity was evaluated by measuring the total distance moved in the apparatus and the speed of the animals in the open field test. Imipramine (30mg/kg) significantly reduced immobility time compared to vehicle-treated group while amibegron (5 and 10mg/kg) dose dependently reduced immobility time in the FST. WAY(0.1mg/kg), ondansetron (1mg/kg), ketanserin(5mg/kg) had no effect on immobility time in naive mice while all of the drugs partially and significantly reversed amibegron (10mg/kg) induced decreasement in the immobility time in FST. None of the drugs alter locomotor activity in the open field test. The antidepressant-like effect of amibegron in the FST seems to be mediated by an interaction with serotonin 5-HT1A, serotonin 5-HT2A-2C and serotonin 5-HT3 receptors.

  10. Platelet serotonin level predicts survival in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, Luc; Spreux-Varoquaux, Odile; Bensimon, Gilbert; Jullien, Philippe; Lacomblez, Lucette; Salachas, François; Bruneteau, Gaëlle; Pradat, Pierre-François; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe; Meininger, Vincent

    2010-10-13

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a life-threatening neurodegenerative disease involving upper and lower motor neurons loss. Clinical features are highly variable among patients and there are currently few known disease-modifying factors underlying this heterogeneity. Serotonin is involved in a range of functions altered in ALS, including motor neuron excitability and energy metabolism. However, whether serotoninergic activity represents a disease modifier of ALS natural history remains unknown. Platelet and plasma unconjugated concentrations of serotonin and plasma 5-HIAA, the major serotonin metabolite, levels were measured using HPLC with coulometric detection in a cohort of 85 patients with ALS all followed-up until death and compared to a control group of 29 subjects. Platelet serotonin levels were significantly decreased in ALS patients. Platelet serotonin levels did not correlate with disease duration but were positively correlated with survival of the patients. Univariate Cox model analysis showed a 57% decreased risk of death for patients with platelet serotonin levels in the normal range relative to patients with abnormally low platelet serotonin (p = 0.0195). This protective effect remained significant after adjustment with age, gender or site of onset in multivariate analysis. Plasma unconjugated serotonin and 5-HIAA levels were unchanged in ALS patients compared to controls and did not correlate with clinical parameters. The positive correlation between platelet serotonin levels and survival strongly suggests that serotonin influences the course of ALS disease.

  11. Serotonin syndrome presenting as pulmonary edema

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nilima Deepak; Jain, Ajay B.

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin syndrome (SS) is a potentially life-threatening condition resulting from excessive central and peripheral serotonergic activity. Clinically, it is a triad of mental-status changes, neuromuscular abnormalities, and autonomic disturbances. It can be caused by intentional self-poisoning, overdose, or inadvertent drug interactions. We report the case of a 58-year-old male with type 2 diabetes mellitus and obsessive compulsive disorder who developed pulmonary edema as a possible complication of SS. SS was caused by a combination of three specific serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, and sertraline), linezolid, and fentanyl. The hospital course was further complicated by difficult weaning from the ventilator. SS was identified and successfully treated with cyproheptadine and lorazepam. The case highlights the importance of effective consultation-liaison and prompt recognition of SS as the presentation may be complex in the presence of co-morbid medical illness. PMID:26997733

  12. Serotonin: a never-ending story.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Berend

    2015-04-15

    The neurotransmitter serotonin is an evolutionary ancient molecule that has remarkable modulatory effects in almost all central nervous system integrative functions, such as mood, anxiety, stress, aggression, feeding, cognition and sexual behavior. After giving a short outline of the serotonergic system (anatomy, receptors, transporter) the author's contributions over the last 40 years in the role of serotonin in depression, aggression, anxiety, stress and sexual behavior is outlined. Each area delineates the work performed on animal model development, drug discovery and development. Most of the research work described has started from an industrial perspective, aimed at developing animals models for psychiatric diseases and leading to putative new innovative psychotropic drugs, like in the cases of the SSRI fluvoxamine, the serenic eltoprazine and the anxiolytic flesinoxan. Later this research work mainly focused on developing translational animal models for psychiatric diseases and implicating them in the search for mechanisms involved in normal and diseased brains and finding new concepts for appropriate drugs.

  13. Serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants (SSRIs) against atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Wozniak, Greta; Toska, Aikaterini; Saridi, Maria; Mouzas, Odysseas

    2011-01-01

    Summary Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are a class of drug widely used for treatment of mood disorders, including depression and cardiovascular disease. A search for related articles in the PubMed database was attempted. It covered studies, reports, reviews and editorials of the last 5 years. Pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, IL-1 and IL-6, stimulate central serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission and are over-expressed in depression, which has been linked with hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) hyperactivity. They have also been implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of other stress-induced disorders, like myocardial infarction (MI) and coronary heart disease (CHD), as they seem to modulate cardiovascular function by a variety of mechanisms. Biological mechanisms like these may explain the link between depression and CHD. There are a variety of environmental factors as well as genetic factors that might influence the pharmacogenetics of antidepressant drugs. New generation selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants (SSRIs) causing a reduced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality may be related to serotonin platelet abnormalities in depressed patients that are effectively treated by SSRIs. SSRIs such as fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline and citalopram are not only considered to be free from the cardiotoxicity of their predecessors but also to function as safe and efficacious agents against depression, platelet activation, atherosclerosis and development and prognosis of coronary heart disease. However, there is a need for more studies in order to establish the exact biochemical mechanisms that are responsible for these diseases and the immunoregulatory effects of chronic use of SSRI medications. PMID:21873959

  14. Serotonin, atherosclerosis, and collateral vessel spasm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenberg, N.

    1988-01-01

    Studies on animal models demonstrate that platelet products contribute to vascular spasm in ischemic syndromes and that this is reversible with administration of ketanserin and thromboxane synthesis inhibitors. Laboratory animals (dogs, rabbits, and rats) that had femoral artery ligations exhibited supersensitivity to serotonin within days in their collateral blood vessels. This supersensitivity lasted at least 6 months. The response to serotonin was reversed by ketanserin, but not by 5HT-1 antagonists. Supersensitivity does not extend to norepinephrine, and alpha blockers do not influence the response to serotonin. It appears that platelet activation by endothelial injury contributes to ischemia through blood vessel occlusion and vascular spasm. When platelet activation occurs in vivo, blood vessel occlusion and vascular spasm are reversible in part by using ketanserin or agents that block thromboxane synthesis or its action. Combining both classes of agents reverses spasm completely. These findings support existing evidence that platelet products contribute to vascular disease, and provide an approach to improved management with currently available pharmacologic agents.

  15. Neurotransmitter alterations in PTSD: catecholamines and serotonin.

    PubMed

    Southwick, S M; Paige, S; Morgan, C A; Bremner, J D; Krystal, J H; Charney, D S

    1999-10-01

    In this chapter we review trauma-related studies involving epinephrine (E), norepinephrine (NE), and serotonin (5-HT). Central catecholamine neurons seem to play a critical role in level of alertness, vigilance, orienting, selective attention, memory, fear conditioning, and cardiovascular responses to life-threatening stimuli. Evidence of catecholamine dysregulation in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) includes exaggerated increases in heart rate and blood pressure when exposed to visual and auditory reminders of trauma, elevated 24-hour urine catecholamine excretion, decreased platelet alpha-2 adrenergic receptor number, exaggerated behavioral, cardiovascular, and biochemical responses to IY yohimbine, decreased cortical brain metabolism secondary to IV yohimbine, and clinical efficacy of adrenergic blocking agents. Serotonin seems to play numerous roles in the central nervous system, including regulation of sleep, aggression, appetite, cardiovascular and respiratory activity, motor output, anxiety, mood, neuroendocrine secretion, and analgesia. Evidence of serotonergic dysregulation in PTSD includes frequent symptoms of aggression, impulsivity, depression and suicidality, decreased platelet paroxetine binding, blunted prolactin response to fenfluramine, exaggerated reactivity to m-chloro-phenyl-piperazine, and clinical efficacy of serotonin reuptake inhibitors. It has been suggested that alterations in NE, E, and 5-HT may have relevance for symptoms commonly seen in survivors with PTSD, including hypervigilance, exaggerated startle, irritability, impulsivity, aggression, intrusive memories, depressed mood, and suicidality.

  16. The serotonin system and spiritual experiences.

    PubMed

    Borg, Jacqueline; Andrée, Bengt; Soderstrom, Henrik; Farde, Lars

    2003-11-01

    The serotonin system has long been of interest in biological models of human personality. The purpose of this positron emission tomography (PET) study was to search for relationships between serotonin 5-HT(1A) receptor density and personality traits. Fifteen normal male subjects, ages 20-45 years, were examined with PET and the radioligand [(11)C]WAY100635. Personality traits were assessed with the Swedish version of the Temperament and Character Inventory self-report questionnaire. Binding potential, an index for the density of available 5-HT(1A) receptors, was calculated for the dorsal raphe nuclei, the hippocampal formation, and the neocortex. For each region, correlation coefficients between 5-HT(1A) receptor binding potential and Temperament and Character Inventory personality dimensions were calculated and analyzed in two-tailed tests for significance. The authors found that the binding potential correlated inversely with scores for self-transcendence, a personality trait covering religious behavior and attitudes. No correlations were found for any of the other six Temperament and Character Inventory dimensions. The self-transcendence dimension consists of three distinct subscales, and further analysis showed that the subscale for spiritual acceptance correlated significantly with binding potential but not with the other two subscales. This finding in normal male subjects indicated that the serotonin system may serve as a biological basis for spiritual experiences. The authors speculated that the several-fold variability in 5-HT(1A) receptor density may explain why people vary greatly in spiritual zeal.

  17. Does serotonin deficit mediate susceptibility to ADHD?

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Emili; Nandagopal, Krishnadas

    2015-03-01

    The onset of attention-deficit-hyperactivity-disorder (ADHD) in childhood is characterized by developmentally inappropriate levels of hyperactivity, impulsivity and inattention. A chronic deficit of serotonin (5-HT) at the synapse may trigger symptoms of ADHD. This review focuses on neuro-anatomical, experimental and clinical pharmacological evidence, as well as the genetic underpinnings of serotoninergic involvement in the etiology of ADHD. Neuro-anatomical investigations suggest that serotonin through the orbitofrontal-striatal circuitry may regulate behavioral domains of hyperactivity and impulsivity in ADHD. Studies from animal models of ADHD indicate intimate interplay between 5-HT and dopaminergic neurotransmission. Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors, as also non-stimulant drugs acting on the 5-HT system are, however, clinically effective. They impart less severe side effects in patients with no risk of addiction. Oral administration of l-tryptophan, the amino acid precursor of 5-HT, significantly alleviates ADHD symptoms. Given the multifactorial nature of ADHD, candidate gene and genome-wide association studies have suggested that serotoninergic gene variants are associated with increased risk of ADHD with each locus individually exerting a modest effect on overall risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Activity patterns of serotonin neurons underlying cognitive flexibility.

    PubMed

    Matias, Sara; Lottem, Eran; Dugué, Guillaume P; Mainen, Zachary F

    2017-03-21

    Serotonin is implicated in mood and affective disorders. However, growing evidence suggests that a core endogenous role is to promote flexible adaptation to changes in the causal structure of the environment, through behavioral inhibition and enhanced plasticity. We used long-term photometric recordings in mice to study a population of dorsal raphe serotonin neurons, whose activity we could link to normal reversal learning using pharmacogenetics. We found that these neurons are activated by both positive and negative prediction errors, and thus report signals similar to those proposed to promote learning in conditions of uncertainty. Furthermore, by comparing the cue responses of serotonin and dopamine neurons, we found differences in learning rates that could explain the importance of serotonin in inhibiting perseverative responding. Our findings show how the activity patterns of serotonin neurons support a role in cognitive flexibility, and suggest a revised model of dopamine-serotonin opponency with potential clinical implications.

  19. Generation of serotonin neurons from human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jianfeng; Zhong, Xuefei; Liu, Huisheng; Hao, Ling; Huang, Cindy Tzu-Ling; Sherafat, Mohammad Amin; Jones, Jeffrey; Ayala, Melvin; Li, Lingjun; Zhang, Su-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin neurons located in the raphe nucleus of the hindbrain have crucial roles in regulating brain functions and have been implicated in various psychiatric disorders. Yet functional human serotonin neurons are not available for in vitro studies. Through manipulation of the WNT pathway, we demonstrate efficient differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) to cells resembling central serotonin neurons, primarily those located in the rhombomeric segments 2–3 of the rostral raphe, which participate in high-order brain functions. The serotonin neurons express a series of molecules essential for serotonergic development, including tryptophan hydroxylase 2, exhibit typical electrophysiological properties and release serotonin in an activity-dependent manner. When treated with the FDA-approved drugs tramadol and escitalopram oxalate, they release or uptake serotonin in a dose- and time-dependent manner, suggesting the utility of these cells for the evaluation of drug candidates. PMID:26655496

  20. Generation of serotonin neurons from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jianfeng; Zhong, Xuefei; Liu, Huisheng; Hao, Ling; Huang, Cindy Tzu-Ling; Sherafat, Mohammad Amin; Jones, Jeffrey; Ayala, Melvin; Li, Lingjun; Zhang, Su-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin neurons located in the raphe nucleus of the hindbrain have crucial roles in regulating brain functions and have been implicated in various psychiatric disorders. Yet functional human serotonin neurons are not available for in vitro studies. Through manipulation of the WNT pathway, we demonstrate efficient differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) to cells resembling central serotonin neurons, primarily those located in the rhombomeric segments 2-3 of the rostral raphe, which participate in high-order brain functions. The serotonin neurons express a series of molecules essential for serotonergic development, including tryptophan hydroxylase 2, exhibit typical electrophysiological properties and release serotonin in an activity-dependent manner. When treated with the FDA-approved drugs tramadol and escitalopram oxalate, they release or uptake serotonin in a dose- and time-dependent manner, suggesting the utility of these cells for the evaluation of drug candidates.

  1. Serotonin: a regulator of neuronal morphology and circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Daubert, Elizabeth A.; Condron, Barry G.

    2010-01-01

    Serotonin is an important neuromodulator associated with a wide range of physiological effects in the central nervous system. The exact mechanisms for how serotonin influences brain development are not well understood, although studies in invertebrate and vertebrate model organisms are beginning to unravel a regulatory role for serotonin in neuronal morphology and circuit formation. Recent data suggests a developmental window during which altered serotonin levels permanently impact circuitry, however, the temporal constraints and molecular mechanisms responsible are still under investigation. Growing evidence suggests that alterations in early serotonin signaling contribute to a number of neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. Thus, understanding how altered serotonin signaling affects neuronal morphology and plasticity, and ultimately animal physiology and pathophysiology, will be of great significance. PMID:20561690

  2. Peripheral Serotonin: a New Player in Systemic Energy Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Namkung, Jun; Kim, Hail; Park, Sangkyu

    2015-12-01

    Whole body energy balance is achieved through the coordinated regulation of energy intake and energy expenditure in various tissues including liver, muscle and adipose tissues. A positive energy imbalance by excessive energy intake or insufficient energy expenditure results in obesity and related metabolic diseases. Although there have been many obesity treatment trials aimed at the reduction of energy intake, these strategies have achieved only limited success because of their associated adverse effects. An ancient neurotransmitter, serotonin is among those traditional pharmacological targets for anti-obesity treatment because it exhibits strong anorectic effect in the brain. However, recent studies suggest the new functions of peripheral serotonin in energy homeostasis ranging from the endocrine regulation by gut-derived serotonin to the autocrine/paracrine regulation by adipocyte-derived serotonin. Here, we discuss the role of serotonin in the regulation of energy homeostasis and introduce peripheral serotonin as a possible target for anti-obesity treatment.

  3. Fluoxetine (Prozac) and Serotonin Act on Excitatory Synaptic Transmission to Suppress Single Layer 2/3 Pyramidal Neuron-Triggered Cell Assemblies in the Human Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Komlósi, Gergely; Molnár, Gábor; Rózsa, Márton; Oláh, Szabolcs; Barzó, Pál

    2012-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are the most widely prescribed drugs targeting the CNS with acute and chronic effects in cognitive, emotional and behavioral processes. This suggests that microcircuits of the human cerebral cortex are powerfully modulated by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, however, direct measurements of serotonergic regulation on human synaptic interactions are missing. Using multiple whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from neurons in acute cortical slices derived from nonpathological human samples of the prefrontal cortex, we show that neuronal assemblies triggered by single action potentials of individual neurons in the human cortex are suppressed by therapeutic doses of fluoxetine (Prozac). This effect is boosted and can be mimicked by physiological concentrations of serotonin through 5HT-2A and 5HT-1A receptors. Monosynaptic excitatory connections from pyramidal cells to interneurons were suppressed by application of serotonin leaving the monosynaptic output of GABAergic cells unaffected. Changes in failure rate, in paired-pulse ratio, and in the coefficient of variation of the amplitude of EPSPs suggest a presynaptic action of serotonin. In conclusion, activation of neuronal assemblies, which were suggested as building blocks of high order cognitive processes, are effectively downregulated by the acute action of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or serotonin at the site of pyramidal output in human microcircuits. PMID:23152619

  4. Fatal serotonin syndrome precipitated by oxcarbazepine in a patient using an selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Dardis, Christopher; Omoregie, Eghosa; Ly, Vanthanh

    2012-07-01

    Oxcarbazepine, a metabolite of carbamazepine, is used as an antiepileptic, analgesic for neuropathic pain and in the treatment of affective disorders. It has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for partial seizures in adults as both adjunctive and monotherapy, and as adjunctive therapy in children aged from 2 to 16 years (http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/ac/06/briefing/2006-4254b_07_05_KP%20OxcarbazepineFDAlabel102005.pdf). We present a case of serotonin syndrome, which was precipitated by this medicine in a patient who had been predisposed by long-term treatment with sertraline, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. This is the first reported fatality due to this drug interaction and only the second case of serotonin syndrome reported with oxcarbazepine. Physicians should consider this risk when prescribing the above combination.

  5. Regulation of systemic energy homeostasis by serotonin in adipose tissues

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Chang-Myung; Namkung, Jun; Go, Younghoon; Shong, Ko Eun; Kim, Kyuho; Kim, Hyeongseok; Park, Bo-Yoon; Lee, Ho Won; Jeon, Yong Hyun; Song, Junghan; Shong, Minho; Yadav, Vijay K.; Karsenty, Gerard; Kajimura, Shingo; Lee, In-Kyu; Park, Sangkyu; Kim, Hail

    2015-01-01

    Central serotonin (5-HT) is an anorexigenic neurotransmitter in the brain. However, accumulating evidence suggests peripheral 5-HT may affect organismal energy homeostasis. Here we show 5-HT regulates white and brown adipose tissue function. Pharmacological inhibition of 5-HT synthesis leads to inhibition of lipogenesis in epididymal white adipose tissue (WAT), induction of browning in inguinal WAT and activation of adaptive thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT). Mice with inducible Tph1 KO in adipose tissues exhibit a similar phenotype as mice in which 5-HT synthesis is inhibited pharmacologically, suggesting 5-HT has localized effects on adipose tissues. In addition, Htr3a KO mice exhibit increased energy expenditure and reduced weight gain when fed a high-fat diet. Treatment with an Htr2a antagonist reduces lipid accumulation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. These data suggest important roles for adipocyte-derived 5-HT in controlling energy homeostasis. PMID:25864946

  6. Regulation of systemic energy homeostasis by serotonin in adipose tissues.

    PubMed

    Oh, Chang-Myung; Namkung, Jun; Go, Younghoon; Shong, Ko Eun; Kim, Kyuho; Kim, Hyeongseok; Park, Bo-Yoon; Lee, Ho Won; Jeon, Yong Hyun; Song, Junghan; Shong, Minho; Yadav, Vijay K; Karsenty, Gerard; Kajimura, Shingo; Lee, In-Kyu; Park, Sangkyu; Kim, Hail

    2015-04-13

    Central serotonin (5-HT) is an anorexigenic neurotransmitter in the brain. However, accumulating evidence suggests peripheral 5-HT may affect organismal energy homeostasis. Here we show 5-HT regulates white and brown adipose tissue function. Pharmacological inhibition of 5-HT synthesis leads to inhibition of lipogenesis in epididymal white adipose tissue (WAT), induction of browning in inguinal WAT and activation of adaptive thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT). Mice with inducible Tph1 KO in adipose tissues exhibit a similar phenotype as mice in which 5-HT synthesis is inhibited pharmacologically, suggesting 5-HT has localized effects on adipose tissues. In addition, Htr3a KO mice exhibit increased energy expenditure and reduced weight gain when fed a high-fat diet. Treatment with an Htr2a antagonist reduces lipid accumulation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. These data suggest important roles for adipocyte-derived 5-HT in controlling energy homeostasis.

  7. Methylene Blue Causing Serotonin Syndrome Following Cystocele Repair.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Kailash; Cheung, Felix; Lee, Wai; Thalappillil, Richard; Florence, F Barry; Kim, Jason

    2016-11-01

    Methylene blue is an intravenously administered agent that may potentiate serotonin syndrome. The usage of methylene blue to evaluate ureters for injuries and patency during urological surgeries is recognized as common practice. However, there is no mention of serotonin syndrome caused by methylene blue in urological literature or for urological surgery. We report the first urological case in order to raise awareness of the risk for serotonin toxicity with utilizing methylene blue.

  8. Serotonin control of sleep-wake behavior.

    PubMed

    Monti, Jaime M

    2011-08-01

    Based on electrophysiological, neurochemical, genetic and neuropharmacological approaches, it is currently accepted that serotonin (5-HT) functions predominantly to promote wakefulness (W) and to inhibit REM (rapid eye movement) sleep (REMS). Yet, under certain circumstances the neurotransmitter contributes to the increase in sleep propensity. Most of the serotonergic innervation of the cerebral cortex, amygdala, basal forebrain (BFB), thalamus, preoptic and hypothalamic areas, raphe nuclei, locus coeruleus and pontine reticular formation comes from the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). The 5-HT receptors can be classified into at least seven classes, designated 5-HT(1-7). The 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(1B) receptor subtypes are linked to the inhibition of adenylate cyclase, and their activation evokes a membrane hyperpolarization. The actions of the 5-HT(2A), 5-HT(2B) and 5-HT(2C) receptor subtypes are mediated by the activation of phospholipase C, with a resulting depolarization of the host cell. The 5-HT(3) receptor directly activates a 5-HT-gated cation channel which leads to the depolarization of monoaminergic, aminoacidergic and cholinergic cells. The primary signal transduction pathway of 5-HT(6) and 5-HT(7) receptors is the stimulation of adenylate cyclase which results in the depolarization of the follower neurons. Mutant mice that do not express 5-HT(1A) or 5-HT(1B) receptor exhibit greater amounts of REMS than their wild-type counterparts, which could be related to the absence of a postsynaptic inhibitory effect on REM-on neurons of the laterodorsal and pedunculopontine tegmental nuclei (LDT/PPT). 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT(2C) receptor knock-out mice show a significant increase of W and a reduction of slow wave sleep (SWS) which has been ascribed to the increase of catecholaminergic neurotransmission involving mainly the noradrenergic and dopaminergic systems. Sleep variables have been characterized, in addition, in 5-HT(7) receptor knock-out mice; the mutants spend less time

  9. Serotonin 5-HT7 Receptor in the Ventral Hippocampus Modulates the Retrieval of Fear Memory and Stress-Induced Defecation

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Takayuki; Konno, Kohtarou; Minami, Masabumi; Watanabe, Masahiko; Yoshioka, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with posttraumatic stress disorder or panic disorder are often troubled by inappropriate retrieval of fear memory. Moreover, these disorders are often comorbid with irritable bowel syndrome. The main aim of the present study is to elucidate the involvement of hippocampal serotonergic systems in fear memory retrieval and stress-induced defecation. Methods and Results: Microinjection of serotonin7 receptor antagonist, but not other serotonin receptor antagonists (serotonin 1A, 2A, 2C, 3, 4, and 6), into the rat ventral hippocampus significantly suppressed the expression of freezing behavior, an index of fear memory retrieval, and decreased the amount of feces, an index of stress-induced defecation, in the contextual fear conditioning test. Electrophysiological data indicated that the serotonin7 receptor agonist increased the frequency of action potentials in the ventral hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neuron via the activation of the hyperpolarization-activated nonselective cation current Ih. Moreover, in situ hybridization demonstrated that Htr7 mRNA was abundantly expressed in the CA3 compared with other subregions of the hippocampus and that these Htr7 mRNA-positive cells coexpressed hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 2 and 4 mRNAs, which are components of the Ih channel. Conclusions: These results indicated that the released serotonin activates the serotonin7 receptor in the CA3 ventral hippocampus subregion, enhances the sensitivity to inputs via hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide 2 and 4 channels, and thereby facilitates fear memory retrieval. The serotonin7 receptor might be a target of drug development for the treatment of mental disorders involving fear memory and gastrointestinal problems. PMID:26647382

  10. Metabolomics Approach Reveals Integrated Metabolic Network Associated with Serotonin Deficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Rui; Shen, Sensen; Tian, Yonglu; Burton, Casey; Xu, Xinyuan; Liu, Yi; Chang, Cuilan; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2015-07-01

    Serotonin is an important neurotransmitter that broadly participates in various biological processes. While serotonin deficiency has been associated with multiple pathological conditions such as depression, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, the serotonin-dependent mechanisms remain poorly understood. This study therefore aimed to identify novel biomarkers and metabolic pathways perturbed by serotonin deficiency using metabolomics approach in order to gain new metabolic insights into the serotonin deficiency-related molecular mechanisms. Serotonin deficiency was achieved through pharmacological inhibition of tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph) using p-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA) or genetic knockout of the neuronal specific Tph2 isoform. This dual approach improved specificity for the serotonin deficiency-associated biomarkers while minimizing nonspecific effects of pCPA treatment or Tph2 knockout (Tph2-/-). Non-targeted metabolic profiling and a targeted pCPA dose-response study identified 21 biomarkers in the pCPA-treated mice while 17 metabolites in the Tph2-/- mice were found to be significantly altered compared with the control mice. These newly identified biomarkers were associated with amino acid, energy, purine, lipid and gut microflora metabolisms. Oxidative stress was also found to be significantly increased in the serotonin deficient mice. These new biomarkers and the overall metabolic pathways may provide new understanding for the serotonin deficiency-associated mechanisms under multiple pathological states.

  11. SEROTONIN AND OTHER VASOACTIVE AGENTS IN EXPERIMENTAL DECOMPRESSION SICKNESS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    SEROTONIN, DECOMPRESSION SICKNESS), (*VASOACTIVE AGENTS, DECOMPRESSION SICKNESS), RATS, EXERCISE(PHYSIOLOGY), DOSAGE, CHEMOTHERAPEUTIC AGENTS, BLOOD ANALYSIS, TOXICITY, BLOOD CIRCULATION, MORTALITY RATES , CANADA

  12. Molecular imaging of serotonin degeneration in mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gwenn S; Barrett, Frederick S; Joo, Jin Hui; Nassery, Najlla; Savonenko, Alena; Sodums, Devin J; Marano, Christopher M; Munro, Cynthia A; Brandt, Jason; Kraut, Michael A; Zhou, Yun; Wong, Dean F; Workman, Clifford I

    2017-09-01

    Neuropathological and neuroimaging studies have consistently demonstrated degeneration of monoamine systems, especially the serotonin system, in normal aging and Alzheimer's disease. The evidence for degeneration of the serotonin system in mild cognitive impairment is limited. Thus, the goal of the present study was to measure the serotonin transporter in vivo in mild cognitive impairment and healthy controls. The serotonin transporter is a selective marker of serotonin terminals and of the integrity of serotonin projections to cortical, subcortical and limbic regions and is found in high concentrations in the serotonergic cell bodies of origin of these projections (raphe nuclei). Twenty-eight participants with mild cognitive impairment (age 66.6±6.9, 16 males) and 28 healthy, cognitively normal, demographically matched controls (age 66.2±7.1, 15 males) underwent magnetic resonance imaging for measurement of grey matter volumes and high-resolution positron emission tomography with well-established radiotracers for the serotonin transporter and regional cerebral blood flow. Beta-amyloid imaging was performed to evaluate, in combination with the neuropsychological testing, the likelihood of subsequent cognitive decline in the participants with mild cognitive impairment. The following hypotheses were tested: 1) the serotonin transporter would be lower in mild cognitive impairment compared to controls in cortical and limbic regions, 2) in mild cognitive impairment relative to controls, the serotonin transporter would be lower to a greater extent and observed in a more widespread pattern than lower grey matter volumes or lower regional cerebral blood flow and 3) lower cortical and limbic serotonin transporters would be correlated with greater deficits in auditory-verbal and visual-spatial memory in mild cognitive impairment, not in controls. Reduced serotonin transporter availability was observed in mild cognitive impairment compared to controls in cortical and limbic

  13. Metabolomics Approach Reveals Integrated Metabolic Network Associated with Serotonin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Rui; Shen, Sensen; Tian, Yonglu; Burton, Casey; Xu, Xinyuan; Liu, Yi; Chang, Cuilan; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin is an important neurotransmitter that broadly participates in various biological processes. While serotonin deficiency has been associated with multiple pathological conditions such as depression, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, the serotonin-dependent mechanisms remain poorly understood. This study therefore aimed to identify novel biomarkers and metabolic pathways perturbed by serotonin deficiency using metabolomics approach in order to gain new metabolic insights into the serotonin deficiency-related molecular mechanisms. Serotonin deficiency was achieved through pharmacological inhibition of tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph) using p-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA) or genetic knockout of the neuronal specific Tph2 isoform. This dual approach improved specificity for the serotonin deficiency-associated biomarkers while minimizing nonspecific effects of pCPA treatment or Tph2 knockout (Tph2-/-). Non-targeted metabolic profiling and a targeted pCPA dose-response study identified 21 biomarkers in the pCPA-treated mice while 17 metabolites in the Tph2-/- mice were found to be significantly altered compared with the control mice. These newly identified biomarkers were associated with amino acid, energy, purine, lipid and gut microflora metabolisms. Oxidative stress was also found to be significantly increased in the serotonin deficient mice. These new biomarkers and the overall metabolic pathways may provide new understanding for the serotonin deficiency-associated mechanisms under multiple pathological states. PMID:26154191

  14. Serotonin and conditioning: focus on Pavlovian psychostimulant drug conditioning.

    PubMed

    Carey, Robert J; Damianopoulos, Ernest N

    2015-04-01

    Serotonin containing neurons are located in nuclei deep in the brainstem and send axons throughout the central nervous system from the spinal cord to the cerebral cortex. The vast scope of these connections and interactions enable serotonin and serotonin analogs to have profound effects upon sensory/motor processes. In that conditioning represents a neuroplastic process that leads to new sensory/motor connections, it is apparent that the serotonin system has the potential for a critical role in conditioning. In this article we review the basics of conditioning as well as the serotonergic system and point up the number of non-associative ways in which manipulations of serotonin neurotransmission have an impact upon conditioning. We focus upon psychostimulant drug conditioning and review the contribution of drug stimuli in the use of serotonin drugs to investigate drug conditioning and the important impact drug stimuli can have on conditioning by introducing new sensory stimuli that can create or mask a CS. We also review the ways in which experimental manipulations of serotonin can disrupt conditioned behavioral effects but not the associative processes in conditioning. In addition, we propose the use of the recently developed memory re-consolidation model of conditioning as an approach to assess the possible role of serotonin in associative processes without the complexities of performance effects related to serotonin treatment induced alterations in sensory/motor systems.

  15. Serotonin modulates glutamatergic transmission to neurons in the lateral habenula

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guiqin; Zuo, Wanhong; Wu, Liangzhi; Li, Wenting; Wu, Wei; Bekker, Alex; Ye, Jiang-Hong

    2016-01-01

    The lateral habenula (LHb) is bilaterally connected with serotoninergic raphe nuclei, and expresses high density of serotonin receptors. However, actions of serotonin on the excitatory synaptic transmission to LHb neurons have not been thoroughly investigated. The LHb contains two anatomically and functionally distinct regions: lateral (LHbl) and medial (LHbm) divisions. We compared serotonin’s effects on glutamatergic transmission across the LHb in rat brains. Serotonin bi-directionally and differentially modulated glutamatergic transmission. Serotonin inhibited glutamatergic transmission in higher percentage of LHbl neurons but potentiated in higher percentage of LHbm neurons. Magnitude of potentiation was greater in LHbm than in LHbl. Type 2 and 3 serotonin receptor antagonists attenuated serotonin’s potentiation. The serotonin reuptake blocker, and the type 2 and 3 receptor agonists facilitated glutamatergic transmission in both LHbl and LHbm neurons. Thus, serotonin via activating its type 2, 3 receptors, increased glutamate release at nerve terminals in some LHb neurons. Our data demonstrated that serotonin affects both LHbm and LHbl. Serotonin might play an important role in processing information between the LHb and its downstream-targeted structures during decision-making. It may also contribute to a homeostatic balance underlying the neural circuitry between the LHb and raphe nuclei. PMID:27033153

  16. Stimulation of aortic smooth muscle cell mitogenesis by serotonin

    SciTech Connect

    Nemecek, G.M.; Coughlin, S.R.; Handley, D.A.; Moskowitz, M.A.

    1986-02-01

    Bovine aortic smooth muscle cells in vitro responded to 1 nM to 10 ..mu..M serotonin with increased incorporation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine into DNA. The mitogenic effect of serotonin was half-maximal at 80 nM and maximal above 1 ..mu..M. At a concentration of 1 ..mu..M, serotonin stimulated smooth muscle cell mitogenesis to the same extent as human platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) at 12 ng/ml. Tryptamine was approx. = 1/10th as potent as serotonin as a mitogen for smooth muscle cells. Other indoles that are structurally related to serotonin (D- and L-tryptophan, 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan, N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine, melatonin, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and 5-hydroxytryptophol) and quipazine were inactive. The stimulatory effect of serotonin on smooth muscle cell DNA synthesis required prolonged (20-24 hr) exposure to the agonist and was attenuated in the presence of serotonin D receptor antagonists. When smooth muscle cells were incubated with submaximal concentrations of serotonin and PDGF, synergistic rather than additive mitogenic responses were observed. These data indicate that serotonin has a significant mitogenic effect on smooth muscle cells in vitro, which appears to be mediated by specific plasma membrane receptors.

  17. Linezolid-induced serotonin toxicity in a patient not taking monoamine oxidase inhibitors or serotonin receptor antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Jacob; Stroup, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Linezolid is an oxazolidinone antibiotic with weak monoamine oxidase (MAO) type A and MAO type B inhibitory effects. Linezolid has been associated with serotonin toxicity when used concomitantly with multiple medications that are known to increase serotonin concentrations. We report the case of a 65-year-old woman with signs and symptoms of serotonin toxicity following administration of linezolid for treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia. PMID:27034576

  18. Hypothesis: is infantile autism a hypoglutamatergic disorder? Relevance of glutamate - serotonin interactions for pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, M L

    1998-01-01

    Based on 1) neuroanatomical and neuroimaging studies indicating aberrations in brain regions that are rich in glutamate neurons and 2) similarities between symptoms produced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists in healthy subjects and those seen in autism, it is proposed in the present paper that infantile autism is a hypoglutamatergic disorder. Possible future pharmacological interventions in autism are discussed in the light of the intimate interplay between central glutamate and serotonin, notably the serotonin (5-HT) 2A receptor. The possible benefit of treatment with glutamate agonists [e.g. agents acting on the modulatory glycine site of the NMDA receptor, or so-called ampakines acting on the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptor] is discussed, as well as the potential usefulness of a selective 5-HT2A receptor antagonist.

  19. Regulation of serotonin release from enterochromaffin cells of rat cecum mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, C.; Ternaux, J.P. )

    1990-05-01

    The release of endogenous serotonin or previously taken up tritiated serotonin from isolated strips of rat cecum mucosa containing enterochromaffin cells was studied in vitro. Release of tritiated serotonin was increased by potassium depolarization and was decreased by tetrodotoxin, veratridine and the absence of calcium. Endogenous serotonin was released at a lower rate than tritiated serotonin; endogenous serotonin release was stimulated by potassium depolarization but was unaffected by tetrodotoxin, veratridine or the absence of calcium. Carbachol, norepinephrine, clonidine and isoproterenol decreased release of tritiated serotonin but had less or reverse effect on release of endogenous serotonin. The results suggest two different serotoninergic pools within the enterochromaffin cell population.

  20. Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 exert opposite effects on the contractile response induced by serotonin in mouse colon: role of serotonin receptors.

    PubMed

    Forcén, R; Latorre, E; Pardo, J; Alcalde, A I; Murillo, M D; Grasa, L

    2016-08-01

    What is the central question of this study? The action of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 2 and 4 on the motor response to serotonin in mouse colon has not previously been reported. What is the main finding and its importance? Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 modulate the serotonin-induced contractile response in mouse colon by modifying the expression of serotonin (5-HT) receptors. Alterations in 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors explain the increase of the response to serotonin in TLR2(-/-) mice. Alterations in 5-HT2C and 5-HT4 receptors explain the suppression of the response to serotonin in TLR4(-/-) mice. The microbiota, through Toll-like receptors (TLRs), may regulate gastrointestinal motility by activating neuroendocrine mechanisms. We evaluated the influence of TLR2 and TLR4 in spontaneous contractions and in the serotonin (5-HT)-induced motor response in mouse colon, and assessed the 5-HT receptors involved. Muscle contractility studies to evaluate the intestinal spontaneous motility and the response to 5-HT were performed in the colon from wild-type (WT), TLR2(-/-) , TLR4(-/-) and TLR2/4 double knockout (DKO) mice. The 5-HT receptor mRNA expression was determined by real-time PCR. The amplitude and frequency of the spontaneous contractions of the colon were smaller in TLR4(-/-) and TLR2/4 DKO mice with respect to WT mice. In WT, TLR2(-/-) and TLR2/4 DKO mice, 100 μm 5-HT evoked a contractile response. The contractile response induced by 5-HT was significantly higher in TLR2(-/-) than in WT mice. In TLR4(-/-) mice, 5-HT did not evoke any contractile response. The mRNA expression of 5-HT2A was increased in TLR2(-/-) and TLR2/4 DKO mice. The 5-HT2C and 5-HT4 mRNA expressions were increased in TLR4(-/-) and TLR2/4 DKO mice. The 5-HT2C mRNA expression was diminished in TLR2(-/-) mice. The 5-HT3 mRNA expression was increased in TLR2(-/-) , TLR4(-/-) and TLR2/4 DKO mice. The 5-HT7 mRNA expression was diminished in TLR2/4 DKO mice. In WT, TLR2(-/-) and TLR2/4 DKO mice, 5-HT2

  1. Serotonin-S2 and dopamine-D2 receptors are the same size in membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Brann, M.R.

    1985-12-31

    Target size analysis was used to compare the sizes of serotonin-S2 and dopamine-D2 receptors in rat brain membranes. The sizes of these receptors were standardized by comparison with the muscarinic receptor, a receptor of known size. The number of serotonin-S2 receptors labeled with (3H)ketanserin or (3H)spiperone in frontal cortex decreased as an exponential function of radiation dose, and receptor affinity was not affected. The number of dopamine-D2 receptors labeled with (3H)spiperone in striatum also decreased as an exponential function of radiation dose, and D2 and S2 receptors were equally sensitive to radiation. In both striatum and frontal cortex, the number of muscarinic receptors labeled with (3H)QNB decreased as an exponential function of radiation dose, and were much less sensitive to radiation than S2 and D2 receptors. These data indicate that in rat brain membranes, S2 and D2 receptors are of similar size, and both molecules are much larger than the muscarinic receptor.

  2. Serotonin dependent masking of hippocampal sharp wave ripples.

    PubMed

    ul Haq, Rizwan; Anderson, Marlene L; Hollnagel, Jan-Oliver; Worschech, Franziska; Sherkheli, Muhammad Azahr; Behrens, Christoph J; Heinemann, Uwe

    2016-02-01

    Sharp wave ripples (SPW-Rs) are thought to play an important role in memory consolidation. By rapid replay of previously stored information during slow wave sleep and consummatory behavior, they result from the formation of neural ensembles during a learning period. Serotonin (5-HT), suggested to be able to modify SPW-Rs, can affect many neurons simultaneously by volume transmission and alter network functions in an orchestrated fashion. In acute slices from dorsal hippocampus, SPW-Rs can be induced by repeated high frequency stimulation that induces long-lasting LTP. We used this model to study SPW-R appearance and modulation by 5-HT. Although stimulation in presence of 5-HT permitted LTP induction, SPW-Rs were "masked"--but appeared after 5-HT wash-out. This SPW-R masking was dose dependent with 100 nM 5-HT being sufficient--if the 5-HT re-uptake inhibitor citalopram was present. Fenfluramine, a serotonin releaser, could also mask SPW-Rs. Masking was due to 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A/C receptor activation. Neither membrane potential nor membrane conductance changes in pyramidal cells caused SPW-R blockade since both remained unaffected by combining 5-HT and citalopram. Moreover, 10 and 30 μM 5-HT mediated SPW-R masking preceded neuronal hyperpolarization and involved reduced presynaptic transmitter release. 5-HT, as well as a 5-HT1A agonist, augmented paired pulse facilitation and affected the coefficient of variance. Spontaneous SPW-Rs in mice hippocampal slices were also masked by 5-HT and fenfluramine. While neuronal ensembles can acquire long lasting LTP during higher 5-HT levels, lower 5-HT levels enable neural ensembles to replay previously stored information and thereby permit memory consolidation memory.

  3. Brain serotonin and pituitary-adrenal functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Berger, P.; Barchas, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    It had been concluded by Scapagnini et al. (1971) that brain serotonin (5-HT) was involved in the regulation of the diurnal rhythm of the pituitary-adrenal system but not in the stress response. A study was conducted to investigate these findings further by evaluating the effects of altering brain 5-HT levels on the daily fluctuation of plasma corticosterone and on the response of the pituitary-adrenal system to a stressful or noxious stimulus in the rat. In a number of experiments brain 5-HT synthesis was inhibited with parachlorophenylalanine. In other tests it was tried to raise the level of brain 5-HT with precursors.

  4. Serotonin involvement in pituitary-adrenal function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Kellar, K. J.; Kent, D.; Gonzales, C.; Berger, P. A.; Barchas, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments clarifying the effects of serotonin (5-HT) in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical system are surveyed. Lesion experiments which seek to determine functional maps of serotonergic input to areas involved in regulation are reported. Investigations of the effects of 5-HT levels on the plasma ACTH response to stress and the diurnal variation in basal plasma corticosterone are summarized, and the question of whether serotonergic transmission is involved in the regulation of all aspects of pituitary-adrenal function is considered with attention to the stimulatory and inhibitory action of 5-HT.

  5. Postmortem evidence for serotonin's role in suicide.

    PubMed

    Stanley, M; Stanley, B

    1990-04-01

    Despite major advances in psychiatry in the past three decades, the rate of suicide has not declined. In an effort to better understand suicide, recent research has examined the importance of biochemical factors in this behavior. Biochemical studies of suicide victims and attempters have indicated that either serotonin (5-HT) or its metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) is reduced in this population when compared with individuals who do not exhibit suicidal behavior. Also, alterations in 5-HT receptors have been observed in suicide victims. While the biochemical findings are promising, it appears that an approach that combines psychosocial and biochemical factors offers the greatest promise for improved identification of suicide risk.

  6. [Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Fétique-Will, Anne-Catherine; Chevalley, Thierry; Rizzoli, René

    2011-06-15

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) represent the first-line treatment of depression. Several studies demonstrate that use of therapeutical doses of SSRI is associated with a decreased bone mineral density (BMD) and an increased risk of fracture. Mechanisms of action of SSRI on bone tissue are not totally clarified. These treatments would be associated with an increased risk of falls and would also have a direct effect on bone metabolism. Regarding proofs existing of the implication of SSRI on osteoporosis, while waiting for larger-scale prospective studies, it appears reasonable that practitioners assess bone loss within risk groups of patients treated with SSRI.

  7. Brain serotonin and pituitary-adrenal functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Berger, P.; Barchas, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    It had been concluded by Scapagnini et al. (1971) that brain serotonin (5-HT) was involved in the regulation of the diurnal rhythm of the pituitary-adrenal system but not in the stress response. A study was conducted to investigate these findings further by evaluating the effects of altering brain 5-HT levels on the daily fluctuation of plasma corticosterone and on the response of the pituitary-adrenal system to a stressful or noxious stimulus in the rat. In a number of experiments brain 5-HT synthesis was inhibited with parachlorophenylalanine. In other tests it was tried to raise the level of brain 5-HT with precursors.

  8. Dietary Precursors of Serotonin and Newborn State Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yogman, Michael W.; Zeisel, Steven

    Although previous research with adult humans and nonhumans has suggested a relationship between sleep behavior and brain serotonin levels, no studies have been made of the relationship of normal children's or infants' sleep patterns to serotonin levels, tryptophan metabolism, or diet. This study investigates the relationship between dietary…

  9. Dietary Precursors of Serotonin and Newborn State Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yogman, Michael W.; Zeisel, Steven

    Although previous research with adult humans and nonhumans has suggested a relationship between sleep behavior and brain serotonin levels, no studies have been made of the relationship of normal children's or infants' sleep patterns to serotonin levels, tryptophan metabolism, or diet. This study investigates the relationship between dietary…

  10. Brain serotonin content - Increase following ingestion of carbohydrate diet.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernstrom, J. D.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    In the rat, the injection of insulin or the consumption of carbohydrate causes sequential increases in the concentrations of tryptophan in the plasma and the brain and of serotonin in the brain. Serotonin-containing neurons may thus participate in systems whereby the rat brain integrates information about the metabolic state in its relation to control of homeostasis and behavior.

  11. Maternal serotonin is crucial for murine embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    Côté, Francine; Fligny, Cécile; Bayard, Elisa; Launay, Jean-Marie; Gershon, Michael D.; Mallet, Jacques; Vodjdani, Guilan

    2007-01-01

    The early appearance of serotonin and its receptors during prenatal development, together with the many effects serotonin exerts during CNS morphogenesis, strongly suggest that serotonin influences the development and maturation of the mammalian brain before it becomes a neuromodulator/neurotransmitter. Sites of early serotonin biosynthesis, however, have not been detected in mouse embryos or extraembryonic structures, suggesting that the main source of serotonin could be of maternal origin. This hypothesis was tested by using knockout mice lacking the tph1 gene, which is responsible for the synthesis of peripheral serotonin. Genetic crosses were performed to compare the phenotype of pups born from homozygous and heterozygous mothers. Observations provide the first clear evidence that (i) maternal serotonin is involved in the control of morphogenesis during developmental stages that precede the appearance of serotonergic neurons and (ii) serotonin is critical for normal murine development. Most strikingly, the phenotype of tph1−/− embryos depends more on the maternal genotype than on that of the concepti. Consideration of the maternal genotype may thus help to clarify the influence of other genes in complex diseases, such as mental illness. PMID:17182745

  12. Obesity, whole blood serotonin and sex differences in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Hodge, Stephanie; Bunting, Brendan P; Carr, Edwin; Strain, J J; Stewart-Knox, Barbara J

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a growing problem throughout Europe, where the rate has more than doubled over the past 20 years. Reduced circulating serotonin may contribute to the development of obesity. This study aimed to explore associations between whole blood (WB) serotonin concentrations and anthropometric measures. Healthy adult volunteers (N = 68) gave whole blood samples for measurement of WB serotonin, and underwent BMI waist circumference (WC) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) assessment as well as DEXA (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry) scans for anthropometric parameters. Student's t-tests determined differences in WB serotonin and anthropometric measures between sexes. Partial Pearson's correlations were carried out on anthropometric measures and WB serotonin. For the whole sample, WB serotonin was significantly negatively correlated with BMI, WC, WHR as well as android, gynoid and total % body fat. Analysis by sex showed significant negative correlations between WB serotonin and android, gynoid as well as total fat in males, but not in females. This dichotomy between the sexes implies that there may be sex differences in the way that serotonin interplays with the development of obesity and body fat distribution.

  13. Meperidine-induced serotonin syndrome in a susceptible patient.

    PubMed

    Guo, S-L; Wu, T-J; Liu, C-C; Ng, C-C; Chien, C-C; Sun, H-L

    2009-09-01

    We present a patient with a history of clomipramine-induced serotonin syndrome 5 yr prior who developed serotonin syndrome after a single dose of meperidine. This report heightens appreciation of population at risk and also recognition of potential toxicity in meperidine.

  14. Brain serotonin content - Increase following ingestion of carbohydrate diet.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernstrom, J. D.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    In the rat, the injection of insulin or the consumption of carbohydrate causes sequential increases in the concentrations of tryptophan in the plasma and the brain and of serotonin in the brain. Serotonin-containing neurons may thus participate in systems whereby the rat brain integrates information about the metabolic state in its relation to control of homeostasis and behavior.

  15. Serotonin is necessary for place memory in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Sitaraman, Divya; Zars, Melissa; LaFerriere, Holly; Chen, Yin-Chieh; Sable-Smith, Alex; Kitamoto, Toshihiro; Rottinghaus, George E.; Zars, Troy

    2008-01-01

    Biogenic amines, such as serotonin and dopamine, can be important in reinforcing associative learning. This function is evident as changes in memory performance with manipulation of either of these signals. In the insects, evidence begins to argue for a common role of dopamine in negatively reinforced memory. In contrast, the role of the serotonergic system in reinforcing insect associative learning is either unclear or controversial. We investigated the role of both of these signals in operant place learning in Drosophila. By genetically altering serotonin and dopamine levels, manipulating the neurons that make serotonin and dopamine, and pharmacological treatments we provide clear evidence that serotonin, but not dopamine, is necessary for place memory. Thus, serotonin can be critical for memory formation in an insect, and dopamine is not a universal negatively reinforcing signal. PMID:18385379

  16. Possible serotonin syndrome associated with tramadol and sertraline coadministration.

    PubMed

    Mason, B J; Blackburn, K H

    1997-02-01

    To report a possible case of serotonin syndrome associated with coadministration of tramadol hydrochloride and sertraline hydrochloride. A 42-year-old woman developed atypical chest pain, sinus tachycardia, confusion, psychosis, sundowning, agitation, diaphoresis, and tremor. She was taking multiple medications, including tramadol and sertraline. The tramadol dosage had recently been increased, resulting in what was believed to be serotonergic syndrome. Serotonin syndrome is a toxic hyperserotonergic state that develops soon after initiation or dosage increments of the offending agent. Patients may differ in their susceptibility to the development of serotonin syndrome. The (+) enantiomer of tramadol inhibits serotonin uptake. Tramadol is metabolized to an active metabolite, M1, by the CYP2D6 enzyme. If this metabolite has less serotonergic activity than tramadol, inhibition of CYP2D6 by sertraline could have been a factor in the interaction. Clinicians should be aware of the potential for serotonin syndrome with concomitant administration of sertraline and tramadol.

  17. The roles of peripheral serotonin in metabolic homeostasis.

    PubMed

    El-Merahbi, Rabih; Löffler, Mona; Mayer, Alexander; Sumara, Grzegorz

    2015-07-08

    Metabolic homeostasis in the organism is assured both by the nervous system and by hormones. Among a plethora of hormones regulating metabolism, serotonin presents a number of unique features. Unlike classical hormones serotonin is produced in different anatomical locations. In brain it acts as a neurotransmitter and in the periphery it can act as a hormone, auto- and/or paracrine factor, or intracellular signaling molecule. Serotonin does not cross the blood-brain barrier; therefore the two major pools of this bioamine remain separated. Although 95% of serotonin is produced in the periphery, its functions have been ignored until recently. Here we review the impact of the peripheral serotonin on the regulation of function of the organs involved in glucose and lipid homeostasis. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Label-Free Ratiometric Imaging of Serotonin in Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Das, Anand Kant; Maity, Barun Kumar; Surendran, Dayana; Tripathy, Umakanta; Maiti, Sudipta

    2017-08-24

    Ratiometric imaging can quantitatively measure changes in cellular analyte concentrations using specially designed fluorescent labels. We describe a label-free ratiometric imaging technique for direct detection of changes in intravesicular serotonin concentration in live cells. At higher concentrations, serotonin forms transient oligomers whose ultraviolet emission is shifted to longer wavelengths. We access the ultraviolet/blue emission using relatively benign three-photon excitation and split it into two imaging channels, whose ratio reports the concentration. The technique is sensitive at a physiologically relevant concentration range (10-150 mM serotonin). As a proof of principle, we measure the increase of intravesicular serotonin concentration with the addition of external serotonin. In general, since emission spectra of molecules are often sensitive to concentration, our method may be applicable to other natively fluorescent intracellular molecules which are present at high concentrations.

  19. Serotonin syndrome triggered by a single dose of suboxone.

    PubMed

    Isenberg, Derek; Wong, Stella C; Curtis, John A

    2008-09-01

    Suboxone (buprenorphine/naloxone) is an oral medication used for the treatment of opiate dependence. Because of its mixed properties at the opiate receptors, buprenorphine has a ceiling on its euphoric effects. We report the first case of serotonin syndrome caused by buprenorphine and review other medications implicated in serotonin syndrome. A 54-year-old man on tricyclic antidepressants took an unprescribed dose of buprenorphine/naloxone. He presented to the emergency department with signs and symptoms of severe serotonin syndrome including clonus, agitation, and altered mental status. His agitation was not controlled with benzodiazepines and was electively intubated. At the recommendation of the toxicology service, cyproheptadine, a serotonin receptor antagonist, was administered with improvement in the patient's symptoms. Emergency physicians should be aware of the potential of buprenorphine/naloxone to trigger serotonin syndrome.

  20. A specific role for serotonin in overcoming effort cost.

    PubMed

    Meyniel, Florent; Goodwin, Guy M; Deakin, Jf William; Klinge, Corinna; MacFadyen, Christine; Milligan, Holly; Mullings, Emma; Pessiglione, Mathias; Gaillard, Raphaël

    2016-11-08

    Serotonin is implicated in many aspects of behavioral regulation. Theoretical attempts to unify the multiple roles assigned to serotonin proposed that it regulates the impact of costs, such as delay or punishment, on action selection. Here, we show that serotonin also regulates other types of action costs such as effort. We compared behavioral performance in 58 healthy humans treated during 8 weeks with either placebo or the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor escitalopram. The task involved trading handgrip force production against monetary benefits. Participants in the escitalopram group produced more effort and thereby achieved a higher payoff. Crucially, our computational analysis showed that this effect was underpinned by a specific reduction of effort cost, and not by any change in the weight of monetary incentives. This specific computational effect sheds new light on the physiological role of serotonin in behavioral regulation and on the clinical effect of drugs for depression.

  1. A Dualistic Conformational Response to Substrate Binding in the Human Serotonin Transporter Reveals a High Affinity State for Serotonin*

    PubMed Central

    Bjerregaard, Henriette; Severinsen, Kasper; Said, Saida; Wiborg, Ove; Sinning, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Serotonergic neurotransmission is modulated by the membrane-embedded serotonin transporter (SERT). SERT mediates the reuptake of serotonin into the presynaptic neurons. Conformational changes in SERT occur upon binding of ions and substrate and are crucial for translocation of serotonin across the membrane. Our understanding of these conformational changes is mainly based on crystal structures of a bacterial homolog in various conformations, derived homology models of eukaryotic neurotransmitter transporters, and substituted cysteine accessibility method of SERT. However, the dynamic changes that occur in the human SERT upon binding of ions, the translocation of substrate, and the role of cholesterol in this interplay are not fully elucidated. Here we show that serotonin induces a dualistic conformational response in SERT. We exploited the substituted cysteine scanning method under conditions that were sensitized to detect a more outward-facing conformation of SERT. We found a novel high affinity outward-facing conformational state of the human SERT induced by serotonin. The ionic requirements for this new conformational response to serotonin mirror the ionic requirements for translocation. Furthermore, we found that membrane cholesterol plays a role in the dualistic conformational response in SERT induced by serotonin. Our results indicate the existence of a subpopulation of SERT responding differently to serotonin binding than hitherto believed and that membrane cholesterol plays a role in this subpopulation of SERT. PMID:25614630

  2. A dualistic conformational response to substrate binding in the human serotonin transporter reveals a high affinity state for serotonin.

    PubMed

    Bjerregaard, Henriette; Severinsen, Kasper; Said, Saida; Wiborg, Ove; Sinning, Steffen

    2015-03-20

    Serotonergic neurotransmission is modulated by the membrane-embedded serotonin transporter (SERT). SERT mediates the reuptake of serotonin into the presynaptic neurons. Conformational changes in SERT occur upon binding of ions and substrate and are crucial for translocation of serotonin across the membrane. Our understanding of these conformational changes is mainly based on crystal structures of a bacterial homolog in various conformations, derived homology models of eukaryotic neurotransmitter transporters, and substituted cysteine accessibility method of SERT. However, the dynamic changes that occur in the human SERT upon binding of ions, the translocation of substrate, and the role of cholesterol in this interplay are not fully elucidated. Here we show that serotonin induces a dualistic conformational response in SERT. We exploited the substituted cysteine scanning method under conditions that were sensitized to detect a more outward-facing conformation of SERT. We found a novel high affinity outward-facing conformational state of the human SERT induced by serotonin. The ionic requirements for this new conformational response to serotonin mirror the ionic requirements for translocation. Furthermore, we found that membrane cholesterol plays a role in the dualistic conformational response in SERT induced by serotonin. Our results indicate the existence of a subpopulation of SERT responding differently to serotonin binding than hitherto believed and that membrane cholesterol plays a role in this subpopulation of SERT.

  3. A Serotonin Circuit Acts as an Environmental Sensor to Mediate Midline Axon Crossing through EphrinB2

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Lingyan; Son, Jong-Hyun; Stevenson, Tamara J.; Lillesaar, Christina; Bally-Cuif, Laure; Dahl, Tiffanie

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of connectivity formation in the developing brain in response to external stimuli is poorly understood. Here, we show that the raphe nucleus and its serotonergic projections regulate pathfinding of commissural axons in zebrafish. We found that the raphe neurons extend projections toward midline-crossing axons and that when serotonergic signaling is blocked by pharmacological inhibition or by raphe neuron ablation, commissural pathfinding is disrupted. We demonstrate that the serotonin receptor htr2a is expressed on these commissural axons and that genetic knock-down of htr2a disrupts crossing. We further show that knock-down of htr2a or ablation of the raphe neurons increases ephrinB2a protein levels in commissural axons. An ephrinB2a mutant can rescue midline crossing when serotonergic signaling is blocked. Furthermore, we found that regulation of serotonin expression in the raphe neurons is modulated in response to the developmental environment. Hypoxia causes the raphe to decrease serotonin levels, leading to a reduction in midline crossing. Increasing serotonin in the setting of hypoxia restored midline crossing. Our findings demonstrate an instructive role for serotonin in axon guidance acting through ephrinB2a and reveal a novel mechanism for developmental interpretation of the environmental milieu in the generation of mature neural circuitry. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We show here that serotonin has a novel role in regulating connectivity in response to the developmental environment. We demonstrate that serotonergic projections from raphe neurons regulate pathfinding of crossing axons. The neurons modulate their serotonin levels, and thus alter crossing, in response to the developmental environment including hypoxia. The findings suggest that modification of the serotonergic system by early exposures may contribute to permanent CNS connectivity alterations. This has important ramifications because of the association between premature birth and

  4. Prenatal depression and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Field, Tiffany

    2010-03-01

    A review of the literature suggests mixed findings on the effects of prenatal antidepressants. Although the critical question is the relative effects of depression versus antidepressants during pregnancy, randomized control studies do not exist for this comparison. Instead, nondepressed, nontreated control groups have been used for comparisons. Separate studies suggest that both untreated depression and exposure to antidepressants have been associated in some cases with unfavorable outcomes. Studies on long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes for children have also been inconclusive. Another problem for the mother and fetus is the discontinuation of antidepressants. Research on the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) suggests that late pregnancy exposure may have worse effects than first and second trimester exposure, leading to the neonatal abstinence syndrome. Still other data suggest a dual syndrome of abstinence/withdrawal and of serotonergic overstimulation, with symptoms of the two syndromes being very similar. Several confounding factors have contributed to this mixed literature including the already mentioned lack of a depressed, nonantidepressant control group as well as group variability on the types of SSRIs taken and severity of their effects, and limited longitudinal follow-up data. Future research would not only need to correct these problems but also further explore the different trimester effects and the withdrawal versus serotonin activity effects on the infant. In addition, alternative therapies need to be explored for their potential antidepression effects on the pregnant woman, the fetus, and the neonate.

  5. Serotonin and beyond: therapeutics for major depression

    PubMed Central

    Blier, Pierre; El Mansari, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    The serotonin (5-HT, 5-hydroxytryptamine) system has been implicated in the pathogenesis of major depressive disorder (MDD). The case for its contribution to the therapeutic efficacy of a wide variety of antidepressant treatments is, however, much stronger. All antidepressant strategies have been shown to enhance 5-HT transmission in the brain of laboratory animals. Catecholamines, norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA) can also play a pivotal role in the mechanism of action of certain antidepressant strategies. The enhancement of 5-HT transmission by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, which leads to a dampening of the activity of NE and DA neurons, may account in part for the low remission rate achieved with these medications and/or the residuals symptoms after remission is achieved. The functional connectivity between the 5-HT, NE and DA systems can be used to understand the mechanism of action of a wide variety of augmentation strategies in treatment-resistant MDD. Proof-of-concept studies have shown that antidepressant medications with complementary mechanisms of action on monoaminergic systems can double the remission rate achieved in a trial of standard duration. Novel approaches are also being used to treat MDD, which also appear to involve the monoaminergic system(s) to a varying extent. PMID:23440470

  6. [Interaction effect of serotonin transporter gene and brain-derived neurotrophic factor on the platelet serotonin content in stroke patients].

    PubMed

    Golimbet, V E; Brusov, O S; Factor, M I; Zlobina, G P; Lezheĭko, T V; Lavrushina, O M; Petrova, E A; Savina, M A; Skvortsova, V I

    2010-01-01

    Platelet serotonin content in patients in the acute period of stroke is an important index of clinical changes during the post stroke period as well as a predictor of development of mental disorders. We studied the association between two polymorphisms (5-HTTLPR and Val66Met BDNF) and the platelet serotonin content in 47 patients with stroke. We also investigated the moderating effect of genetic variants on the association between platelet serotonin content and development of affective and anxiety disorders in stroke patients in the acute period of stroke. The interaction effect of two polymorphisms on levels of platelet serotonin was found. The lowest level was observed in patients with the diplotype LL*ValVal, the highest level--in the group of patients with the LL genotype and genotypes containing at least one copy of a Met allele. No moderating effect of genetic variants on the relationship between serotonin content and affective or anxiety disorder was found.

  7. Plasma anti-serotonin and serotonin anti-idiotypic antibodies are elevated in panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Coplan, J D; Tamir, H; Calaprice, D; DeJesus, M; de la Nuez, M; Pine, D; Papp, L A; Klein, D F; Gorman, J M

    1999-04-01

    The psychoneuroimmunology of panic disorder is relatively unexplored. Alterations within brain stress systems that secondarily influence the immune system have been documented. A recent report indicated elevations of serotonin (5-HT) and ganglioside antibodies in patients with primary fibromyalgia, a condition with documented associations with panic disorder. In line with our interest in dysregulated 5-HT systems in panic disorder (PD), we wished to assess if antibodies directed at the 5-HT system were elevated in patients with PD in comparison to healthy volunteers. Sixty-three patients with panic disorder and 26 healthy volunteers were diagnosed by the SCID. Employing ELISA, we measured anti-5-HT and 5-HT anti-idiotypic antibodies (which are directed at 5-HT receptors). To include all subjects in one experiment, three different batches were run during the ELISA. Plasma serotonin anti-idiotypic antibodies: there was a significant group effect [patients > controls (p = .007)] and batch effect but no interaction. The mean effect size for the three batches was .76. Following Z-score transformation of each separate batch and then combining all scores, patients demonstrated significantly elevated levels of plasma serotonin anti-idiotypic antibodies. Neither sex nor age as covariates affected the significance of the results. There was a strong correlation between anti-serotonin antibody and serotonin anti-idiotypic antibody measures. Plasma anti-serotonin antibodies: there was a significant diagnosis effect [patients > controls (p = .037)]. Mean effect size for the three batches was .52. Upon Z-score transformation, there was a diagnosis effect with antibody elevations in patients. Covaried for sex and age, the result falls below significance to trend levels. The data raise the possibility that psychoimmune dysfunction, specifically related to the 5-HT system, may be present in PD. Potential interruption of 5-HT neurotransmission through autoimmune mechanisms may be of

  8. Two functional serotonin polymorphisms moderate the effect of food reinforcement on BMI

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Katelyn A.; Lin, Henry; Fletcher, Kelly D.; Sucheston, Lara; Singh, Prashant K.; Salis, Robbert; Erbe, Richard; Faith, Myles; Allison, David; Stice, Eric; Epstein, Leonard H.

    2014-01-01

    Food reinforcement, or the motivation to eat, has been associated with increased energy intake, greater body weight and prospective weight gain. Much of the previous research on the reinforcing value of food has focused on the role of dopamine, but it may be worthwhile to examine genetic polymorphisms in the serotonin and opioid systems as these neurotransmitters have been shown to be related to reinforcement processes and to influence energy intake. We examined the relationship among 44 candidate genetic polymorphisms in the dopamine, serotonin and opioid systems, and food reinforcement and body mass index (BMI) in a sample of 245 individuals. Polymorphisms in the Monoamine oxidase A (MAOA-LPR) and serotonin receptor 2A genes (rs6314) moderated the effect of food reinforcement on BMI, accounting for an additional 5-10% variance and revealed a potential role of the single nucleotide polymorphism, rs6314 in the serotonin 2A receptor as a differential susceptibility factor for obesity. Differential susceptibility describes a factor that can confer either risk or protection depending on a second variable, such that rs6314 is predictive of both high and low BMI based on the level of food reinforcement, while the diathesis stress or dual-gain model influences only one end of the outcome measure. The interaction with MAOA-LPR better fit the dual-risk or diathesis stress model, with the 3.5R/4R allele conferring protection for individuals low in food reinforcement. These results provide new insight into genes theoretically involved in obesity and support the hypothesis that genetics moderate the association between food reinforcement on BMI. PMID:23544600

  9. Two functional serotonin polymorphisms moderate the effect of food reinforcement on BMI.

    PubMed

    Carr, Katelyn A; Lin, Henry; Fletcher, Kelly D; Sucheston, Lara; Singh, Prashant K; Salis, Robbert J; Erbe, Richard W; Faith, Myles S; Allison, David B; Stice, Eric; Epstein, Leonard H

    2013-06-01

    Food reinforcement, or the motivation to eat, has been associated with increased energy intake, greater body weight, and prospective weight gain. Much of the previous research on the reinforcing value of food has focused on the role of dopamine, but it may be worthwhile to examine genetic polymorphisms in the serotonin and opioid systems as these neurotransmitters have been shown to be related to reinforcement processes and to influence energy intake. We examined the relationship among 44 candidate genetic polymorphisms in the dopamine, serotonin, and opioid systems, as well as food reinforcement and body mass index (BMI) in a sample of 245 individuals. Polymorphisms in the monoamine oxidase A (MAOA-LPR) and serotonin receptor 2A genes (rs6314) moderated the effect of food reinforcement on BMI, accounting for an additional 5-10% variance and revealed a potential role of the single nucleotide polymorphism, rs6314, in the serotonin 2A receptor as a differential susceptibility factor for obesity. Differential susceptibility describes a factor that can confer either risk or protection depending on a second variable, such that rs6314 is predictive of both high and low BMI based on the level of food reinforcement, while the diathesis stress or dual-gain model only influences one end of the outcome measure. The interaction with MAOA-LPR better fits the diathesis stress model, with the 3.5R/4R allele conferring protection for individuals low in food reinforcement. These results provide new insight into genes theoretically involved in obesity, and support the hypothesis that genetics moderate the association between food reinforcement and BMI.

  10. Interaction of psychoactive tryptamines with biogenic amine transporters and serotonin receptor subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Blough, Bruce E.; Landavazo, Antonio; Decker, Ann M.; Partilla, John S.; Baumann, Michael H.; Rothman, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Synthetic hallucinogenic tryptamines, especially those originally described by Alexander Shulgin, continue to be abused in the United States. The range of subjective experiences produced by different tryptamines suggests that multiple neurochemical mechanisms are involved in their actions, in addition to the established role of agonist activity at serotonin-2A (5-HT2A) receptors. Objectives This study evaluated the interaction of a series of synthetic tryptamines with biogenic amine neurotransmitter transporters and with serotonin (5-HT) receptor subtypes implicated in psychedelic effects. Methods Neurotransmitter transporter activity was determined in rat brain synaptosomes. Receptor activity was determined using calcium mobilization and DiscoveRx PathHunter® assays in HEK293, Gα16-CHO, and CHOk1 cells transfected with human receptors. Results Twenty-one tryptamines were analyzed in transporter uptake and release assays, and 5-HT2A, serotonin 1A (5-HT1A), and 5-HT2A β-arrestin functional assays. Eight of the compounds were found to have 5-HT-releasing activity. Thirteen compounds were found to be 5-HT uptake inhibitors or were inactive. All tryptamines were 5-HT2A agonists with a range of potencies and efficacies, but only a few compounds were 5-HT1A agonists. Most tryptamines recruited β-arrestin through 5-HT2A activation. Conclusions All psychoactive tryptamines are 5-HT2A agonists, but 5-HT transporter (SERT) activity may contribute significantly to the pharmacology of certain compounds. The in vitro transporter data confirm structure-activity trends for releasers and uptake inhibitors whereby releasers tend to be structurally smaller compounds. Interestingly, two tertiary amines were found to be selective substrates at SERT, which dispels the notion that 5-HT-releasing activity is limited only to primary or secondary amines. PMID:24800892

  11. Serotonin 2c receptors in pro-opiomelanocortin neurons regulate energy and glucose homeostasis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Energy and glucose homeostasis are regulated by central serotonin 2C receptors. These receptors are attractive pharmacological targets for the treatment of obesity; however, the identity of the serotonin 2C receptor-expressing neurons that mediate the effects of serotonin and serotonin 2C receptor a...

  12. Serotonin and suicidality: the impact of acute fluoxetine administration. I: Serotonin and suicide.

    PubMed

    King, R A; Segman, R H; Anderson, G M

    1994-01-01

    The general enhancement of central serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission following long-term administration of serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) appears to play an important role in these drugs' anti-depressant efficacy. Because suicide and/or aggression appear linked to diminished levels of brain 5-HT and its metabolites, it has been suggested that SSRIs may be particularly effective in reducing suicidality. Case reports of increased or new suicidal ideation following administration of fluoxetine and other SSRIs, however, raise questions about how these potential side effects may relate to the SSRI's acute effects on 5-HT transmission. Part I of this review examines fluoxetine's effects on suicidality and related behaviors and reviews the relationship of suicidality to serotonergic dysregulation.

  13. Down-regulation of the rat serotonin transporter upon exposure to a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Horschitz, S; Hummerich, R; Schloss, P

    2001-07-20

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) terminates serotonergic neurotransmission by rapid reuptake of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) into the nerve terminal or axonal varicosities. SERT represents the target of various antidepressants which inhibit 5-HT transport and are widely used for the pharmacotherapy of depression. Here, we have analyzed the function of SERT stably expressed in HEK 293 cells upon exposure to citalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), with respect to 5-HT transport activity and protein expression as estimated by ligand binding experiments. Our results show that long-term exposure to an SSRI causes a down-regulation of transport activity as revealed by a reduction of the maximal transport rate, without affecting substrate affinity, accompanied by a decrease in ligand binding sites.

  14. Serotonin transporter gene polymorphisms: Relation with platelet serotonin level in patients with primary Sjogren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Markeljevic, J; Sarac, H; Bozina, N; Henigsberg, N; Simic, M; Cicin Sain, L

    2015-05-15

    Significantly lower platelet serotonin level (PSL) in patients with primary Sjogren's syndrome (pSS) than in healthy controls has been reported in our prior studies. In the present report, we demonstrated effect of functional polymorphisms in the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTT) on PSL. We describe a group of 61 pSS patients and 100 healthy individuals subjects, who received PSL measurement in our prior study. All subjects were genotyped for the promoter 5-HTTLPR (L/S), rs25531 (A/G) and intronic 5-HTTVNTRin2 (l/s) polymorphisms. Overall, the presence of 5-HTTVNTRin2 ss genotype was associated with significantly lower PSL in pSS patients, not in healthy controls. Reduced PSL in pSS patients is in line with hypothesis of association between chronic immunoinflammation and 5-HT system dysregulation, identifying additional mechanisms such as altered 5-HT transport as potential genetic factor contributing to PSL depletion.

  15. Serotonin and the regulation of mammalian energy balance

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Michael H.; Tecott, Laurence H.

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance of energy balance requires regulation of the amount and timing of food intake. Decades of experiments utilizing pharmacological and later genetic manipulations have demonstrated the importance of serotonin signaling in this regulation. Much progress has been made in recent years in understanding how central nervous system (CNS) serotonin systems acting through a diverse array of serotonin receptors impact feeding behavior and metabolism. Particular attention has been paid to mechanisms through which serotonin impacts energy balance pathways within the hypothalamus. How upstream factors relevant to energy balance regulate the release of hypothalamic serotonin is less clear, but work addressing this issue is underway. Generally, investigation into the central serotonergic regulation of energy balance has had a predominantly “hypothalamocentric” focus, yet non-hypothalamic structures that have been implicated in energy balance regulation also receive serotonergic innervation and express multiple subtypes of serotonin receptors. Moreover, there is a growing appreciation of the diverse mechanisms through which peripheral serotonin impacts energy balance regulation. Clearly, the serotonergic regulation of energy balance is a field characterized by both rapid advances and by an extensive and diverse set of central and peripheral mechanisms yet to be delineated. PMID:23543912

  16. Association between salivary serotonin and the social sharing of happiness.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Masahiro; Ishii, Keiko; Ohtsubo, Yohsuke; Noguchi, Yasuki; Ochi, Misaki; Yamasue, Hidenori

    2017-01-01

    Although human saliva contains the monoamine serotonin, which plays a key role in the modulation of emotional states, the association between salivary serotonin and empathic ability remains unclear. In order to elucidate the associations between salivary serotonin levels, trait empathy, and the sharing effect of emotions (i.e., sharing emotional experiences with others), we performed a vignette-based study. Participants were asked to evaluate their happiness when they experience several hypothetical life events, whereby we manipulated the valence of the imagined event (positive, neutral, or negative), as well as the presence of a friend (absent, positive, or negative). Results indicated that the presence of a happy friend significantly enhanced participants' happiness. Correlation analysis demonstrated that salivary serotonin levels were negatively correlated with happiness when both the self and friend conditions were positive. Correlation analysis also indicated a negative relationship between salivary serotonin levels and trait empathy (particularly in perspective taking), which was measured by the Interpersonal Reactivity Index. Furthermore, an exploratory multiple regression analysis suggested that mothers' attention during childhood predicted salivary serotonin levels. Our findings indicate that empathic abilities and the social sharing of happiness decreases as a function of salivary serotonin levels.

  17. Serotonin syndrome following methylene blue administration during cardiothoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Smith, Christina J; Wang, Dorothy; Sgambelluri, Anna; Kramer, Robert S; Gagnon, David J

    2015-04-01

    Despite its favorable safety profile, there have been reports of methylene blue-induced encephalopathy and serotonin syndrome in patients undergoing parathyroidectomy. We report a case of serotonin syndrome following methylene blue administration in a cardiothoracic surgery patient. A 59-year-old woman taking preoperative venlafaxine and trazodone was given a single dose of 2 mg/kg methylene blue (167 mg) during a planned coronary artery bypass and mitral valve repair. Postoperatively, she was febrile to 38.7°C and developed full-body tremors, rhythmic twitching of the perioral muscles, slow conjugate roving eye movements, and spontaneous movements of the upper extremities. Electroencephalography revealed generalized diffuse slowing consistent with toxic encephalopathy, and a computed tomography scan showed no acute process. The patient's symptoms were most consistent with a methylene blue-induced serotonin syndrome. Her motor symptoms resolved within 48 hours and she was eventually discharged home. Only 2 cases of methylene blue-induced serotonin syndrome during cardiothoracic surgery have been described in the literature, with this report representing the third case. Methylene blue and its metabolite, azure B, are potent, reversible inhibitors of monoamine oxidase A which is responsible for serotonin metabolism. Concomitant administration of methylene blue with serotonin-modulating agents may precipitate serotonin syndrome. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Platelet serotonin concentration and depressive symptoms in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Peitl, Vjekoslav; Vidrih, Branka; Karlović, Zoran; Getaldić, Biserka; Peitl, Milena; Karlović, Dalibor

    2016-05-30

    Depressive symptoms seem to be frequent in schizophrenia, but so far they have received less attention than other symptom domains. Impaired serotonergic neurotransmission has been implicated in the pathogenesis of depression and schizophrenia. The objectives of this study were to investigate platelet serotonin concentrations in schizophrenic patients with and without depressive symptoms, and to investigate the association between platelet serotonin concentrations and symptoms of schizophrenia, mostly depressive symptoms. A total of 364 patients were included in the study, 237 of which had significant depressive symptoms. Significant depressive symptoms were defined by the cut-off score of 7 or more on Calgary Depression Rating Scale (CDSS). Platelet serotonin concentrations were assessed by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Prevalence of depression in patients with schizophrenia was 65.1%. Schizophrenic patients with depressive symptoms showed lower platelet serotonin concentrations (mean±SD; 490.6±401.2) compared to schizophrenic patients without depressive symptoms (mean±SD; 660.9±471.5). An inverse correlation was established between platelet serotonin concentration and depressive symptoms, with more severe symptoms being associated with lower platelet serotonin concentrations. Depressive symptoms in schizophrenic patients may be associated with reduced concentrations of platelet serotonin.

  19. Rotavirus and Serotonin Cross-Talk in Diarrhoea

    PubMed Central

    Nordgren, Johan; Karlsson, Thommie; Sharma, Sumit; Magnusson, Karl-Eric; Svensson, Lennart

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) has been shown to infect and stimulate secretion of serotonin from human enterochromaffin (EC) cells and to infect EC cells in the small intestine of mice. It remains to identify which intracellularly expressed viral protein(s) is responsible for this novel property and to further establish the clinical role of serotonin in RV infection. First, we found that siRNA specifically silencing NSP4 (siRNANSP4) significantly attenuated secretion of serotonin from Rhesus rotavirus (RRV) infected EC tumor cells compared to siRNAVP4, siRNAVP6 and siRNAVP7. Second, intracellular calcium mobilization and diarrhoeal capacity from virulent and avirulent porcine viruses correlated with the capacity to release serotonin from EC tumor cells. Third, following administration of serotonin, all (10/10) infants, but no (0/8) adult mice, responded with diarrhoea. Finally, blocking of serotonin receptors using Ondansetron significantly attenuated murine RV (strain EDIM) diarrhoea in infant mice (2.9 vs 4.5 days). Ondansetron-treated mice (n = 11) had significantly (p < 0.05) less diarrhoea, lower diarrhoea severity score and lower total diarrhoea output as compared to mock-treated mice (n = 9). Similarly, Ondansetron-treated mice had better weight gain than mock-treated animals (p < 0.05). A most surprising finding was that the serotonin receptor antagonist significantly (p < 0.05) also attenuated total viral shedding. In summary, we show that intracellularly expressed NSP4 stimulates release of serotonin from human EC tumor cells and that serotonin participates in RV diarrhoea, which can be attenuated by Ondansetron. PMID:27459372

  20. Modulation of anxiety by cortical serotonin 1A receptors

    PubMed Central

    Piszczek, Lukasz; Piszczek, Agnieszka; Kuczmanska, Joanna; Audero, Enrica; Gross, Cornelius T.

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) plays an important role in the modulation of behavior across animal species. The serotonin 1A receptor (Htr1a) is an inhibitory G-protein coupled receptor that is expressed both on serotonin and non-serotonin neurons in mammals. Mice lacking Htr1a show increased anxiety behavior suggesting that its activation by serotonin has an anxiolytic effect. This outcome can be mediated by either Htr1a population present on serotonin (auto-receptor) or non-serotonin neurons (hetero-receptor), or both. In addition, both transgenic and pharmacological studies have shown that serotonin acts on Htr1a during development to modulate anxiety in adulthood, demonstrating a function for this receptor in the maturation of anxiety circuits in the brain. However, previous studies have been equivocal about which Htr1a population modulates anxiety behavior, with some studies showing a role of Htr1a hetero-receptor and others implicating the auto-receptor. In particular, cell-type specific rescue and suppression of Htr1a expression in either forebrain principal neurons or brainstem serotonin neurons reached opposite conclusions about the role of the two populations in the anxiety phenotype of the knockout. One interpretation of these apparently contradictory findings is that the modulating role of these two populations depends on each other. Here we use a novel Cre-dependent inducible allele of Htr1a in mice to show that expression of Htr1a in cortical principal neurons is sufficient to modulate anxiety. Together with previous findings, these results support a hetero/auto-receptor interaction model for Htr1a function in anxiety. PMID:25759645

  1. Rotavirus and Serotonin Cross-Talk in Diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Bialowas, Sonja; Hagbom, Marie; Nordgren, Johan; Karlsson, Thommie; Sharma, Sumit; Magnusson, Karl-Eric; Svensson, Lennart

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) has been shown to infect and stimulate secretion of serotonin from human enterochromaffin (EC) cells and to infect EC cells in the small intestine of mice. It remains to identify which intracellularly expressed viral protein(s) is responsible for this novel property and to further establish the clinical role of serotonin in RV infection. First, we found that siRNA specifically silencing NSP4 (siRNANSP4) significantly attenuated secretion of serotonin from Rhesus rotavirus (RRV) infected EC tumor cells compared to siRNAVP4, siRNAVP6 and siRNAVP7. Second, intracellular calcium mobilization and diarrhoeal capacity from virulent and avirulent porcine viruses correlated with the capacity to release serotonin from EC tumor cells. Third, following administration of serotonin, all (10/10) infants, but no (0/8) adult mice, responded with diarrhoea. Finally, blocking of serotonin receptors using Ondansetron significantly attenuated murine RV (strain EDIM) diarrhoea in infant mice (2.9 vs 4.5 days). Ondansetron-treated mice (n = 11) had significantly (p < 0.05) less diarrhoea, lower diarrhoea severity score and lower total diarrhoea output as compared to mock-treated mice (n = 9). Similarly, Ondansetron-treated mice had better weight gain than mock-treated animals (p < 0.05). A most surprising finding was that the serotonin receptor antagonist significantly (p < 0.05) also attenuated total viral shedding. In summary, we show that intracellularly expressed NSP4 stimulates release of serotonin from human EC tumor cells and that serotonin participates in RV diarrhoea, which can be attenuated by Ondansetron.

  2. Serotonin uptake blockers and the treatment of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, D A

    1989-01-01

    There is growing research and clinical interest in the role of brain serotonin in regulating alcohol consumption, based on two lines of evidence: negative correlations between brain serotonin levels and spontaneous alcohol consumption in rodents, and decreased alcohol intake produced by drug-induced increases in brain serotonin activity in rodents and humans. Specific blockers of neuronal serotonin uptake, such as citalopram, fluoxetine, and zimelidine, are the major drugs used in such studies. More than a dozen studies have consistently found that such specific serotonin uptake blockers reduce alcohol preference and intake in rodents, whereas nonspecific monoamine uptake blockers (e.g., amitriptyline, doxepin) do not. The effect begins within 1 hr of administration, wears off within several days of stopping drug, and often shows tolerance after 4-10 days of daily administration (the opposite time course from antidepressant action in humans). In four human, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies, citalopram (40 mg but not 20 mg daily), fluoxetine (80 mg daily), and zimelidine (200 mg more than 300 mg daily) significantly reduced alcohol intake 10-26% in social drinkers, early problem drinkers, and chronic alcoholics. The effect occurred within a few days, wore off within several days of stopping drug, and lasted throughout the 2-4 weeks of drug administration, except that in the fluoxetine study with chronic alcoholics the effect was significant only during the first week. The reduced alcohol intake was not due to sedation, antidepression, or antianxiety effects, or an aversive drug-alcohol interaction, but could be explained in part by decreased appetitive behavior (two studies found that subjects lost weight) or a conditioned (taste) aversion to alcohol promoted by serotonin (as occurs in animals). Further research is also needed to clarify the neuropharmacological mechanism of action, since the alcohol intake-reducing effects in rodents are not blocked by

  3. 4-haloethenylphenyl tropane:serotonin transporter imaging agents

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Martarello, Laurent

    2005-01-18

    A series of compounds in the 4-fluoroalkyl-3-halophenyl nortropanes and 4-haloethenylphenyl tropane families are described as diagnostic and therapeutic agents for diseases associated with serotonin transporter dysfunction. These compounds bind to serotonin transporter protein with high affinity and selectivity. The invention provides methods of synthesis which incorporate radioisotopic halogens at a last step which permit high radiochemical yield and maximum usable product life. The radiolabeled compounds of the invention are useful as imaging agents for visualizing the location and density of serotonin transporter by PET and SPECT imaging.

  4. The serotonin irritation syndrome--a new clinical entity?

    PubMed

    Giannini, A J; Malone, D A; Piotrowski, T A

    1986-01-01

    The literature on the possible existence of a "serotonin irritation syndrome" is examined. This syndrome is an anxiety state occurring in the presence of elevated levels of atmospheric or ambient cations and is associated with elevated central and peripheral serotonin levels. Investigation of these cations' effects on microbes, insects, and mammals, including humans, shows a disruption of normal activity. It is suggested that clinicians become acquainted with the potential relationship between cation exposure and serotonin in their treatment of anxious patients. Further research exploring the etiology and diagnostic definition of this entity is urged.

  5. Serotonin syndrome associated with MDPV use: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mugele, Josh; Nañagas, Kristine A; Tormoehlen, Laura M

    2012-07-01

    Serotonin syndrome is associated with use of certain street drugs, including methamphetamine, cocaine, and ecstasy. We describe a case of a woman who developed clinical findings consistent with serotonin syndrome after insufflation of 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), a synthetic amphetamine. MDPV belongs to a group of substances called phenylethylamines, which are β-ketone analogs of other drugs of abuse, such as amphetamines and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine. She also received fentanyl initially during her hospitalization, which has also been associated with serotonin syndrome. In addition to benzodiazepines and supportive care, she was treated with cyproheptadine for 8 days, with slow resolution of her symptoms. Copyright © 2011. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  6. Origins of serotonin innervation of forebrain structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellar, K. J.; Brown, P. A.; Madrid, J.; Bernstein, M.; Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Mehler, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    The tryptophan hydroxylase activity and high-affinity uptake of (3H) serotonin ((3H)5-HT) were measured in five discrete brain regions of rats following lesions of the dorsal or median raphe nuclei. Dorsal raphe lesions reduced enzyme and uptake activity in the striatum only. Median raphe lesions reduced activities in the hippocampus, septal area, frontal cortex, and, to a lesser extent, in the hypothalamus. These data are consistent with the suggestion that the dorsal and median raphe nuclei are the origins of two separate ascending serotonergic systems - one innervating striatal structures and the other mesolimbic structures, predominantly. In addition, the data suggest that measurements of high-affinity uptake of (3H)5-HT may be a more reliable index of innervation than either 5-HT content or tryptophan hydroxylase activity.

  7. Serotonin binding sites of human blood platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B.K.; Steiner, M.; Baldini, M.G.

    1980-07-15

    The possible use of formaldehyde-fixed platelets to characterize and enumerate the specific receptor sites for 5-hydroxytryptamine was investigated. Equilibrium, pH-dependent capacity and specificity of 5-hydroxytryptamine binding by formaldehyde-fixed platelets were demonstrated. Analysis of binding data revealed two different sites: (1) high affinity with low capacity, and (2) low affinity with high capacity. The results of binding studies using nonfixed control platelets were comparable with those of formaldehyde-fixed platelets. The versatility of formaldehyde fixation for studies of surface receptors was also shown by demonstrating nearly equal binding affinity for PGE/sub 1/ in control and formaldehyde-treated platelets. Our results indicate that formaldehyde fixation is a useful tool for the study of membrane receptor sites especially when active transport of the ligand such as serotonin is a problem.

  8. Possible involvement of serotonin in extinction.

    PubMed

    Beninger, R J; Phillips, A G

    1979-01-01

    In Experiment 1, rats were trained to leverpress for continuous reinforcement with food; half were then intubated with the serotonin synthesis inhibitor parachlorophenylalanine (PCPA: 400 mg/kg) and half with water. In extinction the PCPA-treated rats responded at a higher rate. In Experiment 2, rats were trained on a random interval schedule and then assigned to two groups, treated as in Experiment 1, and tested in extinction. There was no significant difference in the resistance to extinction of the two groups. In Experiment 3, the responding of rats trained in a punished stepdown response paradigm and then given an intragastric injection of PCPA took longer to recover than the responding of water-injected controls. These observations suggest that serotonergic neurons might play a role in extinction processes.

  9. Association between serotonin transporter genotype and extraversion.

    PubMed

    Gillihan, Seth J; Farah, Martha J; Sankoorikal, Geena Mary V; Breland, Jessica; Brodkin, Edward S

    2007-12-01

    Despite the long-standing recognition that extraversion is partially heritable, few specific genes have been found to be associated significantly with this personality trait. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between a functional genetic polymorphism of the serotonin transporter promoter region (5-HTTLPR) and extraversion. Caucasian participants (N=183) were genotyped for the 5-HTTLPR; extraversion scores for participants homozygous for the short allele (s/s) were compared with those participants carrying at least one long allele (s/l and l/l). An s/s genotype at 5-HTTLPR was significantly associated with self ratings of reduced extraversion (P=0.012); presence versus absence of the long allele explained 3.4% of the variance in extraversion. These findings provide support for the effect of the 5-HTTLPR, and for the serotonergic system more broadly, on behaviors related to extraversion.

  10. A Visible-Light-Sensitive Caged Serotonin.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Ricardo; Filevich, Oscar; García-Acosta, Beatriz; Athilingam, Jegath; Bender, Kevin J; Poskanzer, Kira E; Etchenique, Roberto

    2017-05-17

    Serotonin, or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT), is an important neurotransmitter in the nervous system of both vertebrates and invertebrates. Deficits in 5HT signaling are responsible for many disabling psychiatric conditions, and its molecular machinery is the target of many pharmaceuticals. We present a new 5HT phototrigger, the compound [Ru(bpy)2(PMe3)(5HT)](2+), where PMe3 is trimethylphosphine. As with other ruthenium-bipyridyl based caged compounds, [Ru(bpy)2(PMe3)(5HT)](2+) presents activity in the visible region of the spectrum. We characterize and discuss the photochemical properties of the caged compound, and demonstrate its use by modulating the excitability of mouse prefrontal principal neurons.

  11. Origins of serotonin innervation of forebrain structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellar, K. J.; Brown, P. A.; Madrid, J.; Bernstein, M.; Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Mehler, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    The tryptophan hydroxylase activity and high-affinity uptake of (3H) serotonin ((3H)5-HT) were measured in five discrete brain regions of rats following lesions of the dorsal or median raphe nuclei. Dorsal raphe lesions reduced enzyme and uptake activity in the striatum only. Median raphe lesions reduced activities in the hippocampus, septal area, frontal cortex, and, to a lesser extent, in the hypothalamus. These data are consistent with the suggestion that the dorsal and median raphe nuclei are the origins of two separate ascending serotonergic systems - one innervating striatal structures and the other mesolimbic structures, predominantly. In addition, the data suggest that measurements of high-affinity uptake of (3H)5-HT may be a more reliable index of innervation than either 5-HT content or tryptophan hydroxylase activity.

  12. Serotonin receptor expression along the dorsal–ventral axis of mouse hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Kenji F.; Samuels, Benjamin Adam; Hen, René

    2012-01-01

    Using in situ hybridization, we describe, for the first time, the profiles of expression of serotonin receptors (Htr/5-HTR) along the dorsal–ventral axis of mouse hippocampus. cRNA probes for most Htrs, excluding Htr6, were used. All hippocampal subregions and the entorhinal cortex cells providing input into the hippocampus were examined. The study shows that some, but not all, Htrs are expressed in the cells of the hippocampal circuitry. At both the subfield and the cell type levels, a somewhat overlapping pattern is observed. Four serotonin receptors, Htr1a, Htr2a, Htr2c and Htr7, display an expression pattern that changes along the dorsal–ventral axis of the hippocampus. Given the proposed functional differentiation of the hippocampus along its long axis, with the dorsal pole more involved in cognitive functions and the ventral pole more involved in mood and anxiety, our results suggest that serotonin receptors enriched in the ventral pole probably contribute to mood- and anxiety-related behaviours. PMID:22826340

  13. Agonist-directed signaling of serotonin 5-HT2C receptors: differences between serotonin and lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD).

    PubMed

    Backstrom, J R; Chang, M S; Chu, H; Niswender, C M; Sanders-Bush, E

    1999-08-01

    For more than 40 years the hallucinogen lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) has been known to modify serotonin neurotransmission. With the advent of molecular and cellular techniques, we are beginning to understand the complexity of LSD's actions at the serotonin 5-HT2 family of receptors. Here, we discuss evidence that signaling of LSD at 5-HT2C receptors differs from the endogenous agonist serotonin. In addition, RNA editing of the 5-HT2C receptor dramatically alters the ability of LSD to stimulate phosphatidylinositol signaling. These findings provide a unique opportunity to understand the mechanism(s) of partial agonism.

  14. Serotonin-Sensitive Adenylate Cyclase in Neural Tissue and Its Similarity to the Serotonin Receptor: A Possible Site of Action of Lysergic Acid Diethylamide

    PubMed Central

    Nathanson, James A.; Greengard, Paul

    1974-01-01

    An adenylate cyclase (EC 4.6.1.1) that is activated specifically by low concentrations of serotonin has been identified in homogenates of the thoracic ganglia of an insect nervous system. The activation of this enzyme by serotonin was selectively inhibited by extremely low concentrations of D-lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), 2-bromo-LSD, and cyproheptadine, agents which are known to block certain serotonin receptors in vivo. The inhibition was competitive with respect to serotonin, and the calculated inhibitory constant of LSD for this serotonin-sensitive adenylate cyclase was 5 nM. The data are consistent with a model in which the serotonin receptor of neural tissue is intimately associated with a serotonin-sensitive adenylate cyclase which mediates serotonergic neurotransmission. The results are also compatible with the possibility that some of the physiological effects of LSD may be mediated through interaction with serotonin-sensitive adenylate cyclase. PMID:4595572

  15. Exposure to serotonin adversely affects oligodendrocyte development and myelination in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lir-Wan; Bhatt, Abhay; Tien, Lu-Tai; Zheng, Baoying; Simpson, Kimberly L; Lin, Rick C S; Cai, Zhengwei; Kumar, Praveen; Pang, Yi

    2015-05-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) has been implicated to play critical roles in early neural development. Recent reports have suggested that perinatal exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) resulted in cortical network miswiring, abnormal social behavior, callosal myelin malformation, as well as oligodendrocyte (OL) pathology in rats. To gain further insight into the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying SSRIs-induced OL and myelin abnormalities, we investigated the effect of 5-HT exposure on OL development, cell death, and myelination in cell culture models. First, we showed that 5-HT receptor 1A and 2A subtypes were expressed in OL lineages, using immunocytochemistry, Western blot, as well as intracellular Ca(2+) measurement. We then assessed the effect of serotonin exposure on the lineage development, expression of myelin proteins, cell death, and myelination, in purified OL and neuron-OL myelination cultures. For pure OL cultures, our results showed that 5-HT exposure led to disturbance of OL development, as indicated by aberrant process outgrowth and reduced myelin proteins expression. At higher doses, such exposure triggered a development-dependent cell death, as immature OLs exhibited increasing susceptibility to 5-HT treatment compared to OL progenitor cells (OPC). We showed further that 5-HT-induced immature OL death was mediated at least partially via 5-HT2A receptor, since cell death could be mimicked by 5-HT2A receptor agonist 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane hydrochloride, (±)-2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine hydrochloride, but atten-uated by pre-treatment with 5-HT2A receptor antagonist ritanserin. Utilizing a neuron-OL myelination co-culture model, our data showed that 5-HT exposure significantly reduced the number of myelinated internodes. In contrast to cell injury observed in pure OL cultures, 5-HT exposure did not lead to OL death or reduced OL density in neuron-OL co-cultures. However, abnormal

  16. Serotonin blockade delays learning performance in a cooperative fish.

    PubMed

    Soares, Marta C; Paula, José R; Bshary, Redouan

    2016-09-01

    Animals use learning and memorizing to gather information that will help them to make ecologically relevant decisions. Neuro-modulatory adjustments enable them to make associations between stimuli and appropriate behavior. A key candidate for the modulation of cooperative behavior is serotonin. Previous research has shown that modulation of the serotonergic system spontaneously affects the behavior of the cleaner wrasse Labroides dimidiatus during interactions with so-called 'client' reef fish. Here, we asked whether shifts in serotonin function affect the cleaners' associative learning abilities when faced with the task to distinguish two artificial clients that differ in their value as a food source. We found that the administration of serotonin 1A receptor antagonist significantly slowed learning speed in comparison with saline treated fish. As reduced serotonergic signaling typically enhances fear, we discuss the possibility that serotonin may affect how cleaners appraise, acquire information and respond to client-derived stimuli via manipulation of the perception of danger.

  17. Relationships of Whole Blood Serotonin and Plasma Norepinephrine within Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leventhal, Bennett L.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This study of 47 families of autistic probands found that whole blood serotonin was positively correlated between autistic children and their mothers, fathers, and siblings, but plasma norepinephrine levels were not. (Author/JDD)

  18. [Effect of phenibut on the respiratory arrest caused by serotonin].

    PubMed

    Tarakanov, I A; Tarasova, N N; Belova, E A; Safonov, V A

    2006-01-01

    The role of the GABAergic system in mechanisms of the respiratory arrest caused by serotonin administration was studied in anaesthetized rats. Under normal conditions, the systemic administration of serotonin (20-60 mg/kg, i.v.) resulted in drastic changes of the respiratory pattern, whereby the initial phase of increased respiratory rate was followed by the respiratory arrest. The preliminary injection of phenibut (400 mg/kg, i.p.) abolished or sharply reduced the duration of the respiratory arrest phase induced by serotonin. Bilateral vagotomy following the phenibut injection potentiated the anti-apnoesic effect of phenibut, which was evidence of the additive action of vagotomy and phenibut administration. The mechanism of apnea caused by serotonin administration is suggested to include a central GABAergic element, which is activated by phenibut so as to counteract the respiratory arrest.

  19. Plasma serotonin in horses undergoing surgery for small intestinal colic

    PubMed Central

    Torfs, Sara C.; Maes, An A.; Delesalle, Catherine J.; Pardon, Bart; Croubels, Siska M.; Deprez, Piet

    2015-01-01

    This study compared serotonin concentrations in platelet poor plasma (PPP) from healthy horses and horses with surgical small intestinal (SI) colic, and evaluated their association with postoperative ileus, strangulation and non-survival. Plasma samples (with EDTA) from 33 horses with surgical SI colic were collected at several pre- and post-operative time points. Serotonin concentrations were determined using liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Results were compared with those for 24 healthy control animals. The serotonin concentrations in PPP were significantly lower (P < 0.01) in pre- and post-operative samples from surgical SI colic horses compared to controls. However, no association with postoperative ileus or non-survival could be demonstrated at any time point. In this clinical study, plasma serotonin was not a suitable prognostic factor in horses with SI surgical colic. PMID:25694668

  20. Serotonin Affects Movement Gain Control in the Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Joshua I.; Deng, Linna; Thompson, Christopher K.; Stevenson, Ian H.; Wang, Qining; Hornby, Thomas George; Heckman, Charles J.; Kording, Konrad P.

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental challenge for the nervous system is to encode signals spanning many orders of magnitude with neurons of limited bandwidth. To meet this challenge, perceptual systems use gain control. However, whether the motor system uses an analogous mechanism is essentially unknown. Neuromodulators, such as serotonin, are prime candidates for gain control signals during force production. Serotonergic neurons project diffusely to motor pools, and, therefore, force production by one muscle should change the gain of others. Here we present behavioral and pharmaceutical evidence that serotonin modulates the input–output gain of motoneurons in humans. By selectively changing the efficacy of serotonin with drugs, we systematically modulated the amplitude of spinal reflexes. More importantly, force production in different limbs interacts systematically, as predicted by a spinal gain control mechanism. Psychophysics and pharmacology suggest that the motor system adopts gain control mechanisms, and serotonin is a primary driver for their implementation in force production. PMID:25232107

  1. (/sup 3/)tetrahydrotrazodone binding. Association with serotonin binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Kendall, D.A.; Taylor, D.P.; Enna, S.J.

    1983-05-01

    High (17 nM) and low (603 nM) affinity binding sites for (/sup 3/)tetrahydrotrazodone ((/sup 3/) THT), a biologically active analogue of trazodone, have been identified in rat brain membranes. The substrate specificity, concentration, and subcellular and regional distributions of these sites suggest that they may represent a component of the serotonin transmitter system. Pharmacological analysis of (/sup 3/)THT binding, coupled with brain lesion and drug treatment experiments, revealed that, unlike other antidepressants, (/sup 3/) THT does not attach to either a biogenic amine transporter or serotonin binding sites. Rather, it would appear that (/sup 3/)THT may be an antagonist ligand for the serotonin binding site. This probe may prove of value in defining the mechanism of action of trazodone and in further characterizing serotonin receptors.

  2. [Tyramine and serotonin syndromes. Pharmacological, medical and legal remarks].

    PubMed

    Toro-Martínez, Esteban

    2005-01-01

    The tyramine syndrome and the serotonin syndrome are a complex of signs and symptoms that are thought to be largely attributable to drug - drug interactions or drug - food interactions that enhances norepinephrine o serotonin activity. This article reviews: pharmacological basis of those syndromes; clinical features; forbidden foods, drug-drug interactions, and treatment options. Finally a set of legal recommendations are proposed to avoid liability litigations.

  3. Serotonin and pituitary-adrenal function. [in rat under stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, P. A.; Barchas, J. D.; Vernikos-Danellis, J.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation is conducted to evaluate the response of the pituitary-adrenal system to a stress stimulus in the rat. In the investigation brain serotonin synthesis was inhibited with p-chlorophenylalanine. In other tests the concentration of serotonin was enhanced with precursors such as tryptophan or 5-hydroxytryptophan. On the basis of the results obtained in the study it is speculated that in some disease states there is a defect in serotonergic neuronal processes which impairs pituitary-adrenal feedback mechanisms.

  4. Halogenated naphthyl methoxy piperidines for mapping serotonin transporter sites

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, M.M.; Faraj, B.

    1999-07-06

    Halogenated naphthyl methoxy piperidines having a strong affinity for the serotonin transporter are disclosed. Those compounds can be labeled with positron-emitting and/or gamma emitting halogen isotopes by a late step synthesis that maximizes the useable lifeterm of the label. The labeled compounds are useful for localizing serotonin transporter sites by positron emission tomography and/or single photon emission computed tomography.

  5. Determination of serotonin released from coffee wax by liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kele, M; Ohmacht, R

    1996-04-12

    A simple hydrolysis and extraction method was developed for the release of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) from a coffee wax sample obtained from decaffeination of coffee beans. The recoverable amount of serotonin was determined by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with gradient elution and UV detection, using the standard addition method. Different type of basic deactivated chromatographic columns were used for the separation.

  6. Halogenated naphthyl methoxy piperidines for mapping serotonin transporter sites

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Faraj, Bahjat

    1999-01-01

    Halogenated naphthyl methoxy piperidines having a strong affinity for the serotonin transporter are disclosed. Those compounds can be labeled with positron-emitting and/or gamma emitting halogen isotopes by a late step synthesis that maximizes the useable lifeterm of the label. The labeled compounds are useful for localizing serotonin transporter sites by positron emission tomography and/or single photon emission computed tomography.

  7. Tryptophan availability modulates serotonin release from rat hypothalamic slices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaechter, Judith D.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between the tryptophan availability and serononin release from rat hypothalamus was investigated using a new in vitro technique for estimating rates at which endogenous serotonin is released spontaneously or upon electrical depolarization from hypothalamic slices superfused with a solution containing various amounts of tryptophan. It was found that the spontaneous, as well as electrically induced, release of serotonin from the brain slices exhibited a dose-dependent relationship with the tryptophan concentration of the superfusion medium.

  8. Tryptophan availability modulates serotonin release from rat hypothalamic slices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaechter, Judith D.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between the tryptophan availability and serononin release from rat hypothalamus was investigated using a new in vitro technique for estimating rates at which endogenous serotonin is released spontaneously or upon electrical depolarization from hypothalamic slices superfused with a solution containing various amounts of tryptophan. It was found that the spontaneous, as well as electrically induced, release of serotonin from the brain slices exhibited a dose-dependent relationship with the tryptophan concentration of the superfusion medium.

  9. Altered coronary microvascular serotonin receptor expression after coronary artery bypass grafting utilizing cardiopulmonary bypass

    PubMed Central

    Robich, Michael P.; Araujo, Eugenio G.; Feng, Jun; Osipov, Robert M.; Clements, Richard T.; Bianchi, Cesario; Sellke, Frank W.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Evaluate the role of serotonin receptors 1B and 2A, thromboxane synthase and receptor and phospholipases A2 and C in response to cardiopulmonary bypass in patients. Methods Atrial tissue was harvested from patients before and after cardiopulmonary bypass with cardioplegia (n=13). Coronary microvessels were assessed for vasoactive response to serotonin with and without inhibitors of 5-HT1B and 5-HT2A receceptors, phospholipase A2 and C. Expression of 5-HT1B and 5-HT2A mRNA was determined by RT-PCR. Expression of 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A, Thromboxane A2 receptor and synthase protein was determined by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. Results Exposure of microvessels to serotonin elicited a 7.3 ± 2% relaxation response pre-bypass, changing to a strong contraction response of -19.2 ± 2% after bypass (p<0.001). Addition of either a specific 5-HT1B antagonist or inhibitor of PLA2 resulted in a significant decrease in the contractile response to -8.6 ±1% (p<0.001) and 2.8 ± 3% (p= 0.001), respectively. 5-HT1B receptor mRNA expression increased 1.82 ± 0.34 fold after bypass (p=0.044), while 5-HT2A mRNA expression did not change. 5-HT1B receptor, but not 5-HT2A, protein expression increased after bypass by 1.35 ± 0.7 fold (p=0.0413). Neither thromboxane synthase nor thromboxane receptor expression changed after bypass. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated 5-HT1B receptor increased mainly in the arterial smooth muscle. There was no appreciable difference in arterial expression of either thromboxane synthase or receptor. Conclusion These data indicate that 5-HT-induced vascular dysfunction after cardiopulmonary bypass with cardioplegia may be mediated by increased expression of 5-HT1B receptor and subsequent PLA2 activation in myocardial coronary smooth muscle. Mini Abstract The expression of 5-HT1B receptor protein and mRNA were increased in the atrial myocardium after cardioplegia and cardiopulmonary bypass (CP-CPB). Serotonin elicited a strong contraction

  10. Serotonin receptors in depression: from A to B

    PubMed Central

    Nautiyal, Katherine M.; Hen, René

    2017-01-01

    The role of serotonin in major depressive disorder (MDD) is the focus of accumulating clinical and preclinical research. The results of these studies reflect the complexity of serotonin signaling through many receptors, in a large number of brain regions, and throughout the lifespan. The role of the serotonin transporter in MDD has been highlighted in gene by environment association studies as well as its role as a critical player in the mechanism of the most effective antidepressant treatments – selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. While the majority of the 15 known receptors for serotonin have been implicated in depression or depressive-like behavior, the serotonin 1A (5-HT 1A) and 1B (5-HT 1B) receptors are among the most studied. Human brain imaging and genetic studies point to the involvement of 5-HT 1A and 5-HT 1B receptors in MDD and the response to antidepressant treatment. In rodents, the availability of tissue-specific and inducible knockout mouse lines has made possible the identification of the involvement of 5-HT 1A and 5-HT 1B receptors throughout development and in a cell-type specific manner. This, and other preclinical pharmacology work, shows that autoreceptor and heteroreceptor populations of these receptors have divergent roles in modulating depression-related behavior as well as responses to antidepressants and also have different functions during early postnatal development compared to during adulthood. PMID:28232871

  11. Serotonin effects on sleep and emotional disorders in adolescent migraine.

    PubMed

    Pakalnis, Ann; Splaingard, Mark; Splaingard, Deborah; Kring, Donna; Colvin, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    To determine frequency of emotional disorders and sleep disturbances in adolescent migraineurs with episodic and chronic headaches. To determine the relationship of whole blood serotonin, caffeine consumption, and frequency of sleep and mood disorders. The neurotransmitter serotonin has been implicated to play a role in the initiation and maintenance of sleep and in modulating mood. A putative role in migraine pathophysiology is also known. Adolescents from 13 to 17 years of age were identified from our headache clinic with episodic or chronic migraine (according to International Classification of Headache Disorders-Second Edition criteria) and healthy controls enrolled. Psychological rating scales were completed, including Adolescent Symptom Inventory (4th Edition) and Child Depression Inventory. Sleep questionnaires (Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire and Child Sleep Habit Questionnaire) were completed by the teenager's parents/guardian. Whole blood serotonin levels were drawn and analyzed and caffeine consumption obtained by history. A total of 18 controls (8 girls) and 15 patients each with episodic migraines (9 girls) and chronic migraine (10 girls) were studied. Patients with headache had significantly more sleep problems than controls. Patients with chronic migraines had increased daytime sleepiness and dysthymia compared with teenagers with episodic migraines. Serotonin levels were not significantly different, and no association was noted between serotonin levels and sleep abnormalities or emotional rating scales. Increased caffeine intake was related to sleep and depressive complaints. Sleep and emotional disorders were common in adolescents with migraine. Sleep disorders and dysthymia were more prevalent with increased headache frequency. No correlation was noted with whole blood serotonin levels.

  12. Activity patterns of serotonin neurons underlying cognitive flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Matias, Sara; Lottem, Eran; Dugué, Guillaume P; Mainen, Zachary F

    2017-01-01

    Serotonin is implicated in mood and affective disorders. However, growing evidence suggests that a core endogenous role is to promote flexible adaptation to changes in the causal structure of the environment, through behavioral inhibition and enhanced plasticity. We used long-term photometric recordings in mice to study a population of dorsal raphe serotonin neurons, whose activity we could link to normal reversal learning using pharmacogenetics. We found that these neurons are activated by both positive and negative prediction errors, and thus report signals similar to those proposed to promote learning in conditions of uncertainty. Furthermore, by comparing the cue responses of serotonin and dopamine neurons, we found differences in learning rates that could explain the importance of serotonin in inhibiting perseverative responding. Our findings show how the activity patterns of serotonin neurons support a role in cognitive flexibility, and suggest a revised model of dopamine–serotonin opponency with potential clinical implications. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20552.001 PMID:28322190

  13. Monitoring serotonin signaling on a subsecond time scale

    PubMed Central

    Dankoski, Elyse C.; Wightman, R. Mark

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin modulates a variety of processes throughout the brain, but it is perhaps best known for its involvement in the etiology and treatment of depressive disorders. Microdialysis studies have provided a clear picture of how ambient serotonin levels fluctuate with regard to behavioral states and pharmacological manipulation, and anatomical and electrophysiological studies describe the location and activity of serotonin and its targets. However, few techniques combine the temporal resolution, spatial precision, and chemical selectivity to directly evaluate serotonin release and uptake. Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is an electrochemical method that can detect minute changes in neurotransmitter concentration on the same temporal and spatial dimensions as extrasynaptic neurotransmission. Subsecond measurements both in vivo and in brain slice preparations enable us to tease apart the processes of release and uptake. These studies have particularly highlighted the significance of regulatory mechanisms to proper functioning of the serotonin system. This article will review the findings of FSCV investigations of serotonergic neurotransmission and discuss this technique's potential in future studies of the serotonin system. PMID:23760548

  14. Serotonin: a local regulator in the mammary gland epithelium.

    PubMed

    Horseman, Nelson D; Collier, Robert J

    2014-02-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is a very simple molecule that plays key roles in complex communication mechanisms within the animal body. In the mammary glands, serotonin biosynthesis and secretion are induced in response to dilation of the alveolar spaces. Since its discovery several years ago, mammary 5-HT has been demonstrated to perform two homeostatic functions. First, serotonin regulates lactation and initiates the transition into the earliest phases of involution. Second, serotonin is a local signal that induces parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP), which allows the mammary gland to drive the mobilization of calcium from the skeleton. These processes use different receptor types, 5-HT7 and 5-HT2, respectively. In this review, we provide synthetic perspectives on the fundamental processes of lactation homeostasis and the adaptation of calcium homeostasis for lactation. We analyze the role of the intrinsic serotonin system in the physiological regulation of the mammary glands. We also consider the importance of the mammary serotonin system in pathologies and therapies associated with lactation and breast cancer.

  15. Lung damage and pulmonary uptake of serotonin in intact dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, C.A.; Christensen, C.W.; Rickaby, D.A.; Linehan, J.H.; Johnston, M.R.

    1985-06-01

    The authors examined the influence of glass bead embolization and oleic acid, dextran, and imipramine infusion on the pulmonary uptake of trace doses of (/sup 3/H)serotonin and the extravascular volume accessible to (/sup 14/C)antipyrine in anesthetized dogs. Embolization and imipramine decreased serotonin uptake by 53 and 61%, respectively, but no change was observed with oleic acid or dextran infusion. The extravascular volume accessible to the antipyrine was reduced by 77% after embolization and increased by 177 and approximately 44% after oleic acid and dextran infusion, respectively. The results suggest that when the perfused endothelial surface is sufficiently reduced, as with embolization, the uptake of trace doses of serotonin will be depressed. In addition, decreases in serotonin uptake in response to imipramine in this study and in response to certain endothelial toxins in other studies suggest that serotonin uptake can reveal certain kinds of changes in endothelial function. However, the lack of a response to oleic acid-induced damage in the present study suggests that serotonin uptake is not sensitive to all forms of endothelial damage.

  16. Noninvasive measurement of lung carbon-11-serotonin extraction in man

    SciTech Connect

    Coates, G.; Firnau, G.; Meyer, G.J.; Gratz, K.F. )

    1991-04-01

    The fraction of serotonin extracted on a single passage through the lungs is being used as an early indicator of lung endothelial damage but the existing techniques require multiple arterial blood samples. We have developed a noninvasive technique to measure lung serotonin uptake in man. We utilized the double indicator diffusion principle, a positron camera, {sup 11}C-serotonin as the substrate, and {sup 11}CO-erythrocytes as the vascular marker. From regions of interest around each lung, we recorded time-activity curves in 0.5-sec frames for 30 sec after a bolus injection of first the vascular marker {sup 11}CO-erythrocytes and 10 min later {sup 11}C-serotonin. A second uptake measurement was made after imipramine 25-35 mg was infused intravenously. In three normal volunteers, the single-pass uptake of {sup 11}C-serotonin was 63.9% +/- 3.6%. This decreased in all subjects to a mean of 53.6% +/- 1.4% after imipramine. The rate of lung washout of {sup 11}C was also significantly prolonged after imipramine. This noninvasive technique can be used to measure lung serotonin uptake to detect early changes in a variety of conditions that alter the integrity of the pulmonary endothelium.

  17. Increased hypothalamic serotonin turnover in inflammation-induced anorexia.

    PubMed

    Dwarkasing, J T; Witkamp, R F; Boekschoten, M V; Ter Laak, M C; Heins, M S; van Norren, K

    2016-05-20

    Anorexia can occur as a serious complication of disease. Increasing evidence suggests that inflammation plays a major role, along with a hypothalamic dysregulation characterized by locally elevated serotonin levels. The present study was undertaken to further explore the connections between peripheral inflammation, anorexia and hypothalamic serotonin metabolism and signaling pathways. First, we investigated the response of two hypothalamic neuronal cell lines to TNFα, IL-6 and LPS. Next, we studied transcriptomic changes and serotonergic activity in the hypothalamus of mice after intraperitoneal injection with TNFα, IL-6 or a combination of TNFα and IL-6. In vitro, we showed that hypothalamic neurons responded to inflammatory mediators by releasing cytokines. This inflammatory response was associated with an increased serotonin release. Mice injected with TNFα and IL-6 showed decreased food intake, associated with altered expression of inflammation-related genes in the hypothalamus. In addition, hypothalamic serotonin turnover showed to be elevated in treated mice. Overall, our results underline that peripheral inflammation reaches the hypothalamus where it affects hypothalamic serotoninergic metabolism. These hypothalamic changes in serotonin pathways are associated with decreased food intake, providing evidence for a role of serotonin in inflammation-induced anorexia.

  18. [The role of the glycoprotein gp130 in serotonin mediator system in mouse brain].

    PubMed

    Kulikov, A V; Naumenko, V S; Tsybko, A S; Siniakova, N A; Bazovkina, D V; Popova, N K

    2010-01-01

    Glycoprotein gp130 is involved in signaling out of significant cytokine receptors as interleukin-6 (IL-6), leukemia inhibitory factor and ciliary neurotrophic factor, which play critical role in immunity, inflammation and neurogenesis. IL-6 and brain neurotransmitter serotonin are involved in the mechanism of depression. The aim of this work was to investigat the role of protein gp130 in the regulation of expression of genes, coding the key enzyme of serotonin synthesis--tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2), 5-HT-transporter, 5-HT(1A)- and 5-HT(2A)-receptors of serotonin. The study was carried out on adult mouse males of AKR and congenic AKR.CBA-D13Mit76 strains, created by transfer of the fragment of chromosome 13 containing the gene coding gp130 protein from CBA/Lac strain to the genome of AKR/J strain. Decreased expression of 5-HT(1A) - 5-HT(2A)-receptor genes in hippocampus midbrain and TPH2 gene in midbrain in AKR.CBA-D13Mit76 mice compared with AKR mice were shown. Activation of nonspecific immunity by bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration did not affect the genes expression in AKR mice, but increased 5-HT(2A)-receptor expression in midbrain and decreased 5-HT(1A)-receptor expression in cortex in AKR.CBA-D13Mit76 mice. The results indicate: 1) the participation of gp130 in the regulation of TPH2, 5-HT(1A)- and 5-HT(2A)-receptor genes and 2) association of this protein in the genetically determined sensitivity to LPS.

  19. Serotonin-induced brain glycogenolysis in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Pérez-Maceira, Jorge J; Mancebo, María J; Aldegunde, Manuel

    2012-09-01

    In this study, we evaluated the serotonin-mediated control of cerebral glycogen levels in the rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of serotonin (5-HT) to normoglycemic trout (time and dose response) decreased glycogen levels in the brain and increased brain glycogen phosphorylase activity (time response). In hypoglycemic fish (that had been fasted for 5 and 10 days), there was a time-dependent decrease in brain glycogen levels; under these conditions, i.c.v. administration of 5-HT also reduced the brain glycogen content in fish that had been fasted for 5 days. In fish with local cerebral hypoglycemia (induced by 2-DG administration), the glycogen levels decreased and, as above, i.c.v. administration of 5-HT also lowered the glycogen content. In hyperglycemic fish, 5-HT did not affect glycogen levels. Administration of receptor agonists 5-HT1A (8-OH-DPAT), 5-HT1B (anpirtoline and CP93129) or 5-HT2 (α-m-5-HT) decreased the brain glycogen levels. This effect was antagonized by the administration of receptor antagonists 5-HT1A (WAY100135 and NAN190), 5-HT1B (NAS181) and 5-HT2B/C (SB206553). Administration of the receptor agonists (±)-DOI (5-HT2A/2C), m-CPP (5-HT2B/2C), BW723C86 (5-HT2B) and WAY 161503 (5-HT2C) led to decreases in the levels of brain glycogen. We found that 5-HT is involved in the modulation of brain glycogen homeostasis in the rainbow trout, causing a glycogenolytic effect when fish are in a normoglycemic or hypoglycemic state, but not when they are in a hyperglycemic state. 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5HT2B and 5-HT2C-like receptors appeared to be involved in the glycogenolytic action of 5-HT, although the effect mediated by 5-HT1A or 5-HT1B was apparently stronger.

  20. Different serotonin receptor types participate in 5-hydroxytryptophan-induced gonadotropins and prolactin release in the female infantile rat.

    PubMed

    Lacau-Mengido, I M; Libertun, C; Becú-Villalobos, D

    1996-05-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) receptors can be classified into at least three, possibly up to seven, classes of receptors. They comprise the 5-HT1, 5-HT2, and 5-HT3 classes, the "uncloned' 5-HT4 receptor and the recombinant receptors 5-ht5, 5-ht6 and 5-ht7. We investigated the role of different serotonin receptor types in a neuroendocrine response to the activation of the serotonergic system. Female immature rats were chosen as an experimental model as it has been shown that during the 3rd week of life, and not at later developmental stages, 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP, a serotonin precursor) induces gonadotropin release in females and not in males. Besides, at this age, serotonin releases prolactin in both sexes. 5-HTP (50 mg/kg) released prolactin, luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) as expected. Ketanserin (5-HT2A antagonist) and methysergide (5-HT2C antagonist) blocked 5-HTP-induced prolactin release, but did not block the LH or FSH responses. Ondansetron (5-HT3 receptor antagonist) did not modify prolactin response to 5-HTP, whereas it blocked 5-HTP-induced LH and FSH release. Propranolol (5-HT1 and beta-adrenergic antagonist) blocked prolactin, LH and FSH release induced by 5-HTP. The 5-HT2C agonist 1-(3-chlorophenyl)piperazine dihydrochloride released prolactin, without modifying LH or FSH release. Methyl-quipazine and phenylbiguanide (5-HT3 agonists) increased both LH and FSH levels, without altering prolactin secretion. The present experiments indicate that serotonin acting at the 5-HT3 receptor mediates LH and FSH release in infantile female rats, whereas 5-HT2C or 2A receptor types participate in the release of prolactin at this age. 5-HT1 receptor type may be involved in the release of the three hormones, though a beta-adrenergic component of the response cannot be discarded.

  1. Serotonin Improves High Fat Diet Induced Obesity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Akasaka, Daisuke; Saito, Kazuki; Ogasawara, Hideki; Minashima, Takeshi; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Kanaya, Takashi; Takakura, Ikuro; Inoue, Nao; Ikeda, Ikuo; Chen, Xiangning; Miyake, Masato; Kitazawa, Haruki; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Sato, Kan; Tahara, Kohji; Nagasawa, Yuya; Rose, Michael T.; Ohwada, Shyuichi; Watanabe, Kouichi; Aso, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    There are two independent serotonin (5-HT) systems of organization: one in the central nervous system and the other in the periphery. 5-HT affects feeding behavior and obesity in the central nervous system. On the other hand, peripheral 5-HT also may play an important role in obesity, as it has been reported that 5-HT regulates glucose and lipid metabolism. Here we show that the intraperitoneal injection of 5-HT to mice inhibits weight gain, hyperglycemia and insulin resistance and completely prevented the enlargement of intra-abdominal adipocytes without having any effect on food intake when on a high fat diet, but not on a chow diet. 5-HT increased energy expenditure, O2 consumption and CO2 production. This novel metabolic effect of peripheral 5-HT is critically related to a shift in the profile of muscle fiber type from fast/glycolytic to slow/oxidative in soleus muscle. Additionally, 5-HT dramatically induced an increase in the mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator 1α (PGC-1α)-b and PGC-1α-c in soleus muscle. The elevation of these gene mRNA expressions by 5-HT injection was inhibited by treatment with 5-HT receptor (5HTR) 2A or 7 antagonists. Our results demonstrate that peripheral 5-HT may play an important role in the relief of obesity and other metabolic disorders by accelerating energy consumption in skeletal muscle. PMID:26766570

  2. Serotonin Improves High Fat Diet Induced Obesity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hitoshi; Nakano, Tatsuya; Saito, Ryo; Akasaka, Daisuke; Saito, Kazuki; Ogasawara, Hideki; Minashima, Takeshi; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Kanaya, Takashi; Takakura, Ikuro; Inoue, Nao; Ikeda, Ikuo; Chen, Xiangning; Miyake, Masato; Kitazawa, Haruki; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Sato, Kan; Tahara, Kohji; Nagasawa, Yuya; Rose, Michael T; Ohwada, Shyuichi; Watanabe, Kouichi; Aso, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    There are two independent serotonin (5-HT) systems of organization: one in the central nervous system and the other in the periphery. 5-HT affects feeding behavior and obesity in the central nervous system. On the other hand, peripheral 5-HT also may play an important role in obesity, as it has been reported that 5-HT regulates glucose and lipid metabolism. Here we show that the intraperitoneal injection of 5-HT to mice inhibits weight gain, hyperglycemia and insulin resistance and completely prevented the enlargement of intra-abdominal adipocytes without having any effect on food intake when on a high fat diet, but not on a chow diet. 5-HT increased energy expenditure, O2 consumption and CO2 production. This novel metabolic effect of peripheral 5-HT is critically related to a shift in the profile of muscle fiber type from fast/glycolytic to slow/oxidative in soleus muscle. Additionally, 5-HT dramatically induced an increase in the mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator 1α (PGC-1α)-b and PGC-1α-c in soleus muscle. The elevation of these gene mRNA expressions by 5-HT injection was inhibited by treatment with 5-HT receptor (5HTR) 2A or 7 antagonists. Our results demonstrate that peripheral 5-HT may play an important role in the relief of obesity and other metabolic disorders by accelerating energy consumption in skeletal muscle.

  3. Neurochemical, behavioral and physiological effects of pharmacologically enhanced serotonin levels in serotonin transporter (SERT)-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Meredith A.; Jensen, Catherine L.; French, Helen T.; Stein, Alison R.; Huang, Su-Jan; Tolliver, Teresa J.; Murphy, Dennis L.

    2008-01-01

    Rationale Serotonin transporter (SERT) knockout (−/−) mice have an altered phenotype in adulthood, including high baseline anxiety and depressive-like behaviors, associated with increased baseline extracellular serotonin levels throughout life. Objectives To examine the effects of increases in serotonin following administration of the serotonin precursor 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan (5-HTP) in SERT wildtype (+/+), heterozygous (+/−) and −/− mice. Results 5-HTP increased serotonin in all five brain areas examined, with ~2–5-fold increases in SERT +/+ and +/− mice, and greater 4.5–11.7-fold increases in SERT −/− mice. Behaviorally, 5-HTP induced exaggerated serotonin syndrome behaviors in SERT −/− mice, with similar effects in male and female mice. Studies suggest promiscuous serotonin uptake by the dopamine transporter (DAT) in SERT −/− mice, and here, the DAT blocker GBR 12909 enhanced 5-HTP-induced behaviors in SERT −/− mice. Physiologically, 5-HTP induced exaggerated temperature effects in SERT-deficient mice. The 5-HT1A antagonist WAY 100635 decreased 5-HTP-induced hypothermia in SERT +/+ and +/− mice, with no effect in SERT −/− mice, whereas the 5-HT7 antagonist SB 269970 decreased this exaggerated response in SERT −/− mice only. WAY 100635 and SB 269970 together completely blocked 5-HTP-induced hypothermia in SERT +/− and −/− mice. Conclusions These studies demonstrate that SERT −/− mice have exaggerated neurochemical, behavioral and physiological responses to further increases in serotonin, and provide the first evidence of intact 5-HT7 receptor function in SERT −/− mice, with interesting interactions between 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptors. As roles for 5-HT7 receptors in anxiety and depression were recently established, the current findings have implications for understanding the high anxiety and depressive-like phenotype of SERT-deficient mice. PMID:18712364

  4. Sex differences in the serotonin 1A receptor and serotonin transporter binding in the human brain measured by PET.

    PubMed

    Jovanovic, Hristina; Lundberg, Johan; Karlsson, Per; Cerin, Asta; Saijo, Tomoyuki; Varrone, Andrea; Halldin, Christer; Nordström, Anna-Lena

    2008-02-01

    Women and men differ in serotonin associated psychiatric conditions, such as depression, anxiety and suicide. Despite this, very few studies focus on sex differences in the serotonin system. Of the biomarkers in the serotonin system, serotonin(1A) (5-HT(1A)) receptor is implicated in depression, and anxiety and serotonin transporter (5-HTT) is a target for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, psychotropic drugs used in the treatment of these disorders. The objective of the present study was to study sex related differences in the 5-HT(1A) receptor and 5-HTT binding potentials (BP(ND)s) in healthy humans, in vivo. Positron emission tomography and selective radioligands [(11)C]WAY100635 and [(11)C]MADAM were used to evaluate binding potentials for 5-HT(1A) receptors (14 women and 14 men) and 5-HTT (8 women and 10 men). The binding potentials were estimated both on the level of anatomical regions and voxel wise, derived by the simplified reference tissue model and wavelet/Logan plot parametric image techniques respectively. Compared to men, women had significantly higher 5-HT(1A) receptor and lower 5-HTT binding potentials in a wide array of cortical and subcortical brain regions. In women, there was a positive correlation between 5-HT(1A) receptor and 5-HTT binding potentials for the region of hippocampus. Sex differences in 5-HT(1A) receptor and 5-HTT BP(ND) may reflect biological distinctions in the serotonin system contributing to sex differences in the prevalence of psychiatric disorders such as depression and anxiety. The result of the present study may help in understanding sex differences in drug treatment responses to drugs affecting the serotonin system.

  5. Effects of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors on Interregional Relation of Serotonin Transporter Availability in Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    James, Gregory M.; Baldinger-Melich, Pia; Philippe, Cecile; Kranz, Georg S.; Vanicek, Thomas; Hahn, Andreas; Gryglewski, Gregor; Hienert, Marius; Spies, Marie; Traub-Weidinger, Tatjana; Mitterhauser, Markus; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Hacker, Marcus; Kasper, Siegfried; Lanzenberger, Rupert

    2017-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) modulate serotonergic neurotransmission by blocking reuptake of serotonin from the extracellular space. Up to now, it remains unclear how SSRIs achieve their antidepressant effect. However, task-based and resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging studies, have demonstrated connectivity changes between brain regions. Here, we use positron emission tomography (PET) to quantify SSRI’s main target, the serotonin transporter (SERT), and assess treatment-induced molecular changes in the interregional relation of SERT binding potential (BPND). Nineteen out-patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and 19 healthy controls (HC) were included in this study. Patients underwent three PET measurements with the radioligand [11C]DASB: (1) at baseline, (2) after a first SSRI dose; and (3) following at least 3 weeks of daily intake. Controls were measured once with PET. Correlation analyses were restricted to brain regions repeatedly implicated in MDD pathophysiology. After 3 weeks of daily SSRI administration a significant increase in SERT BPND correlations of anterior cingulate cortex and insula with the amygdala, midbrain, hippocampus, pallidum and putamen (p < 0.05; false discovery rate, FDR corrected) was revealed. No significant differences were found when comparing MDD patients and HC at baseline. These findings are in line with the clinical observation that treatment response to SSRIs is often achieved only after a latency of several weeks. The elevated associations in interregional SERT associations may be more closely connected to clinical outcomes than regional SERT occupancy measures and could reflect a change in the regional interaction of serotonergic neurotransmission during antidepressant treatment. PMID:28220069

  6. Serotonin Transporter Gene (SLC6A4) Polymorphism and Mucosal Serotonin Levels in Southeastern Iranian Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Mojgan; Tahmasebi Abdar, Hossein; Mollaei, Hamid Reza; Hajghani, Hossein; Baneshi, Mohammad Reza; Hayatbakhsh, Mohammad Mahdi

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a digestive system disorder with an unknown etiology. Serotonin has a key role in the secretion and motility of the intestine. Polymorphism in serotonin re-uptake transporter (SERT or SLC6A4) gene may have a functional role in the gut of patients with IBS. The aims of the present study were to investigate the association between SLC6A4 gene polymorphism and IBS and to detect the correlation between rectal serotonin levels and IBS sub-types. METHODS SLC6A4 gene polymorphism in 131 patients with IBS and 211 healthy controls were analysed using the quantitative polymerase chain reaction high-resolution melting (qPCR-HRM) curve technique. Serotonin was measured in rectal biopsies of patients with IBS using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. RESULTS The patients were categorized into three groups: IBS with diarrhoea (IBS-D): 70 patients, IBS with constipation (IBS-C): 18 patients, and IBS with mixed symptoms (IBS-M): 43 patients. The frequency of SLC6A4 s/s and l/s genotypes was significantly higher in IBS-C than IBS-D, IBS-M, and controls (p=0.036). Serotonin levels were similar in IBS sub-types. CONCLUSION SLC6A4 polymorphism is a possible candidate gene associated with the pathogenesis of IBS-C. Although serotonin levels did not differ in rectal biopsies of IBS sub-types, further investigation is recommended.

  7. Serotonin depresses feeding behaviour in ants.

    PubMed

    Falibene, Agustina; Rössler, Wolfgang; Josens, Roxana

    2012-01-01

    Feeding behaviour is a complex functional system that relies on external signals and the physiological state of the animal. This is also the case in ants as they vary their feeding behaviour according to food characteristics, environmental conditions and - as they are social insects - to the colony's requirements. The biogenic amine serotonin (5-HT) was shown to be involved in the control and modulation of many actions and processes related to feeding in both vertebrates and invertebrates. In this study, we investigated whether 5-HT affects nectar feeding in ants by analysing its effect on the sucking-pump activity. Furthermore, we studied 5-HT association with tissues and neuronal ganglia involved in feeding regulation. Our results show that 5-HT promotes a dose-dependent depression of sucrose feeding in Camponotus mus ants. Orally administered 5-HT diminished the intake rate by mainly decreasing the volume of solution taken per pump contraction, without modifying the sucrose acceptance threshold. Immunohistochemical studies all along the alimentary canal revealed 5-HT-like immunoreactive processes on the foregut (oesophagus, crop and proventriculus), while the midgut and hindgut lacked 5-HT innervation. Although the frontal and suboesophageal ganglia contained 5-HT immunoreactive cell bodies, serotonergic innervation in the sucking-pump muscles was absent. The results are discussed in the frame of a role of 5-HT in feeding control in ants.

  8. Pulmonary serotonin and histamine in experimental asbestosis

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, I.M.; Day, R.; Lemaire, S.

    1986-03-01

    Adult male Wistar rats were treated once with tracheal instillation of 5 mg Crysotile B asbestos fibers in 0.5 ml saline under ketamine/xylaxine anesthesia. Control rats (n = 37) received 0.5 ml saline. Test and control rats were killed at 7 and 14 d., and 1, 3 and 6 mo. post instillation. Serotonin (5-HT) was quantitated in lung tissue homogenate from all rats using HPLC and electrochemical detection. Among rats killed at 1, 3 and 6 mo., lung tissue histamine-o-phthaldialdehyde complex was quantitated using reverse phase HPLC coupled to a fluorometric detector. Furthermore, 5-HT was quantitated in the cytoplasm of grouped (NEB) and individual (NEC) neuroendocrine cells and in mast cells using formaldehyde-vapor-induced fluorescence and microspectrofluorometry, and mast cell numbers were determined. Test rats had higher pulmonary 5-HT and histamine levels than controls at 1, 3 and 6 mo. Test rats also had higher cellular 5-HT compared to controls in NEB's at 1 mo., but not in NECs, and tended to have higher 5-HT-levels in mast cells at 6 mo. Mast cell numbers were higher among tests at 1 and 3 mo. The authors results suggest that NEBs may contribute to the early asbestos induced rise in 5-HT, and that the major source of 5-HT and histamine is from the increased numbers of mast cells.

  9. Modulation for emergent networks: serotonin and dopamine.

    PubMed

    Weng, Juyang; Paslaski, Stephen; Daly, James; VanDam, Courtland; Brown, Jacob

    2013-05-01

    In autonomous learning, value-sensitive experiences can improve the efficiency of learning. A learning network needs be motivated so that the limited computational resources and the limited lifetime are devoted to events that are of high value for the agent to compete in its environment. The neuromodulatory system of the brain is mainly responsible for developing such a motivation system. Although reinforcement learning has been extensively studied, many existing models are symbolic whose internal nodes or modules have preset meanings. Neural networks have been used to automatically generate internal emergent representations. However, modeling an emergent motivational system for neural networks is still a great challenge. By emergent, we mean that the internal representations emerge autonomously through interactions with the external environments. This work proposes a generic emergent modulatory system for emergent networks, which includes two subsystems - the serotonin system and the dopamine system. The former signals a large class of stimuli that are intrinsically aversive (e.g., stress or pain). The latter signals a large class of stimuli that are intrinsically appetitive (e.g., pleasure or sweet). We experimented with this motivational system for two settings. The first is a visual recognition setting to investigate how such a system can learn through interactions with a teacher, who does not directly give answers, but only punishments and rewards. The second is a setting for wandering in the presence of a friend and a foe.

  10. Pharmacology of serotonin and female sexual behavior.

    PubMed

    Uphouse, Lynda

    2014-06-01

    In this review, first a historical perspective of serotonin's (5-HT) involvement in female sexual behavior is presented. Then an overview of studies implicating 5-HT is presented. The effect of drugs that increase or decrease CNS levels of 5-HT is reviewed. Evidence is presented that drugs which increase 5-HT have negative effects on female sexual behavior while a decrease in 5-HT is associated with facilitation of sexual behavior. Studies with compounds that act on 5-HT₁, 5-HT₂ or 5-HT₃ receptors are discussed. Most evidence indicates that 5-HT₁A receptor agonists inhibit sexual behavior while 5-HT₂ or 5-HT₃ receptors may exert a positive influence. There is substantial evidence to support a role for 5-HT in the modulation of female consummatory sexual behavior, but studies on the role of 5-HT in other elements of female sexual behavior (e.g. desire, motivation, sexual appetite) are few. Future studies should be directed at determining if these additional components of female sexual behavior are also modulated by 5-HT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Serotonin-dopamine interaction: electrophysiological evidence.

    PubMed

    Di Giovanni, Giuseppe; Di Matteo, Vincenzo; Pierucci, Massimo; Esposito, Ennio

    2008-01-01

    In this review, the most relevant data regarding serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT)/dopamine (DA) interaction in the brain, as studied by both in vivo and in vitro electrophysiological methods, are reported and discussed. The bulk of neuroanatomical data available clearly indicate that DA-containing neurons in the brain receive a prominent innervation from 5-HT originating in the raphe nuclei of the brainstem. Furthermore, this modulation seems to be reciprocal; DA neurons innervate the raphe nuclei and exert a tonic excitatory effect on them. Compelling electrophysiological data show that 5-HT can exert complex effects on the electrical activity of midbrain DA neurons mediated by the various receptor subtypes. The main control seems to be inhibitory, this effect being more marked in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) as compared to the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). In spite of a direct effect of 5-HT by its receptors located on DA cells, 5-HT can modulate their activity indirectly, modifying gamma-amino-n-butyric acid (GABA)-ergic and glutamatergic input to the VTA and SNc. Although 5-HT/DA interaction in the brain has been extensively studied, much work remains to be done to clarify this issue. The recent development of subtype-selective ligands for 5-HT receptors will not only allow a detailed understanding of this interaction but also lead to development of new treatment strategies, appropriate for those neuropsychiatric disorders in which an alteration of the 5-HT/DA balance is supposed.

  12. Adult neurogenesis in serotonin transporter deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, A; Benninghoff, J; Moessner, R; Rizzi, M; Paizanis, E; Doenitz, C; Gross, S; Hermann, M; Gritti, A; Lanfumey, L; Fritzen, S; Reif, A; Hamon, M; Murphy, D L; Vescovi, A; Lesch, K-P

    2007-09-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a regulator of morphogenetic activities during early brain development and neurogenesis, including cell proliferation, migration, differentiation, and synaptogenesis. The 5-HT transporter (5-HTT, SLC6A4) mediates high-affinity reuptake of 5-HT into presynaptic terminals and thereby fine-tunes serotonergic neurotransmission. Inactivation of the 5-HTT gene in mice reduces 5-HT clearance resulting in persistently increased concentrations of synaptic 5-HT. In the present study, we investigated the effects of elevated 5-HT levels on adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus of 5-HTT deficient mice, including stem cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation. Using an in vivo approach, we showed an increase in proliferative capacity of hippocampal adult neural stem cells in aged 5-HTT knockout mice (approximately 14.5 months) compared to wildtype controls. In contrast, in vivo and additional in vitro analyses of younger adult 5-HTT knockout mice (approximately 7 weeks and approximately 3.0 months) did not reveal significant changes in proliferation of neural stem cells or survival of newborn cells. We showed that the cellular fate of newly generated cells in 5-HTT knockout mice is not different with respect to the total number and percentage of neurons or glial cells from wildtype controls. Our findings indicate that elevated synaptic 5-HT concentration throughout early development and later life of 5-HTT deficient mice does not induce adult neurogenesis in adult mice, but that elevated 5-HT levels in aged mice influence stem cell proliferation.

  13. 4-Iodotomoxetine: a novel ligand for serotonin uptake sites.

    PubMed

    Kung, M P; Chumpradit, S; Billings, J; Kung, H

    1992-01-01

    The tomoxetine analog, R-4-iodotomoxetine, binds in vitro to a single site of rat cortical membranes with high affinity (Kd = 0.03 +/- 0.01 nM, n = 4) and can be blocked by a selective serotonin reuptake site inhibitor, paroxetine. The [125I]R-4-iodotomoxetine binding at equilibrium is saturable and is temperature- and Na(+)-dependent. The number of specific [125I]R-4-iodotomoxetine binding sites (Bmax = 356 +/- 20 fmol/mg protein) is similar to that of [3H]citalopram (329 +/- 30 fmol/mg protein), a known serotonin uptake inhibitor. The binding of [125I]R-4-iodotomoxetine is selectively inhibited by several serotonin uptake blockers, and a good correlation is demonstrated between the potency of various drugs to inhibit in vitro binding of [125I]R-4-iodotomoxetine and [3H]citalopram. In addition, lesions performed with the neurotoxin p-chloroamphetamine, which destroys monoamine neurons, including serotonergic neuronal system, result in a 90% reduction of [125I]R-4-iodotomoxetine binding when compared to sham controls. These results indicate that the binding sites labeled by [125I]R-4-iodotomoxetine are associated with the neuronal serotonin uptake sites. However, the in vivo and ex vivo results do not show regional localization corresponding to the distribution of serotonin uptake sites. The nonspecific uptake may be related to this compound's high lipophilicity (octanol-buffer partition coefficient = 1100 - 1400 at pH 7). Although the in vivo properties of [125I]R-4-iodotomoxetine make it an unlikely candidate for mapping serotonin uptake sites with SPECT, the high affinity and selectivity should make it a useful tool for in vitro studies of the serotonin uptake sites.

  14. Myocardial serotonin exchange: negligible uptake by capillary endothelium

    PubMed Central

    MOFFETT, T. C.; CHAN, I. S.; BASSINGTHWAIGHTE, J. B.

    2010-01-01

    The extraction of serotonin from the blood during transorgan passage through the heart was studied using Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts. Outflow dilution curves of 131I- or 125I-labeled albumin, [14C]sucrose, and [3H]serotonin injected simultaneously into the inflow were fitted with an axially distributed blood-tissue exchange model to examine the extraction process. The model fits of the albumin and sucrose outflow dilution curves were used to define flow heterogeneity, intravascular dispersion, capillary permeability, and the volume of the interstitial space, which reduced the degrees of freedom in fitting the model to the serotonin curves. Serotonin extractions, measured against albumin, during single transcapillary passage, ranged from 24 to 64%. The ratio of the capillary permeability-surface area products for serotonin and sucrose, based on the maximum instantaneous extraction, was 1.37 ± 0.2 (n = 18), very close to the predicted value of 1.39, the ratio of free diffusion coefficients calculated from the molecular weights. This result shows that the observed uptake of serotonin can be accounted for solely on the basis of diffusion between endothelial cells into the interstitial space. Thus it appears that the permeability of the luminal surface of the endothelial cell is negligible in comparison to diffusion through the clefts between endothelial cells. In 18 sets of dilution curves, with and without receptor and transport blockers or competitors (ketanserin, desipramine, imipramine, serotonin), the extractions and estimates of the capillary permeability-surface area product were not reduced, nor were the volumes of distribution. The apparent absence of transporters and receptors in rabbit myocardial capillary endothelium contrasts with their known abundance in the pulmonary vasculature. PMID:3279823

  15. Immunohistochemical Evaluation of Role of Serotonin in Pathogenesis of Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Bakry, Ola Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Psoriasis is a common skin disorder characterized by erythaematosquamous papules and plaques. It is known to be associated with stressful and depressive disorders. Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that plays a role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory skin disorders. Aim To evaluate the role of serotonin in pathogenesis of psoriasis. Materials and Methods Using standard immunohistochemical techniques, 24 biopsies from patients with chronic plaque psoriasis were examined together with 12 biopsies from age and gender-matched healthy subjects as a control group. Results Both the percentage of positive cells (p=0.018) and H-score values (p=0.015) of serotonin expression were significantly higher in psoriasis compared to normal skin. H score of serotonin expression was significantly higher in cases with totally absent Granular Cell Layer (GCL) as opposed to those with thin/focally absent GCL (p=0.011), and in cases with moderate/strong epidermal inflammation compared to cases with mild inflammation (p=0.035). No significant correlation was detected between H score of cases and age, disease duration or Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) score. Conclusion Serotonin might play a role in development of psoriasis through its role as a growth factor promoting keratinocyte proliferation, and as mediator of inflammation and stimulant of T cell activation. It recruits T cells to sites of cutaneous inflammation and potentiate macrophage accessory function for T cell activation. Its expression is not related to the disease severity. Future large-scaled research on population of different ethnicities including other disease variants is needed. The use of serotonin receptor antagonists and serotonin reuptake inhibitors may be evaluated on wide-based studies to put the current observation into action. PMID:27891342

  16. Regulation of Serotonin-Induced Trafficking and Migration of Eosinophils

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Bit Na; Ha, Sung Gil; Bahaie, Nooshin S.; Hosseinkhani, M. Reza; Ge, Xiao Na; Blumenthal, Malcolm N.; Rao, Savita P.; Sriramarao, P.

    2013-01-01

    Association of the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) with the pathogenesis of allergic asthma is well recognized and its role as a chemoattractant for eosinophils (Eos) in vitro and in vivo has been previously demonstrated. Here we have examined the regulation of 5-HT-induced human and murine Eos trafficking and migration at a cellular and molecular level. Eos from allergic donors and bone marrow-derived murine Eos (BM-Eos) were found to predominantly express the 5-HT2A receptor. Exposure to 5-HT or 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI), a 5-HT2A/C selective agonist, induced rolling of human Eos and AML14.3D10 human Eos-like cells on vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 under conditions of flow in vitro coupled with distinct cytoskeletal and cell shape changes as well as phosphorylation of MAPK. Blockade of 5-HT2A or of ROCK MAPK, PI3K, PKC and calmodulin, but not Gαi-proteins, with specific inhibitors inhibited DOI-induced rolling, actin polymerization and changes in morphology of VCAM-1-adherent AML14.3D10 cells. More extensive studies with murine BM-Eos demonstrated the role of 5-HT in promoting rolling in vivo within inflamed post-capillary venules of the mouse cremaster microcirculation and confirmed that down-stream signaling of 5-HT2A activation involves ROCK, MAPK, PI3K, PKC and calmodulin similar to AML14.3D10 cells. DOI-induced migration of BM-Eos is also dependent on these signaling molecules and requires Ca2+. Further, activation of 5-HT2A with DOI led to an increase in intracellular Ca2+ levels in murine BM-Eos. Overall, these data demonstrate that 5-HT (or DOI)/5-HT2A interaction regulates Eos trafficking and migration by promoting actin polymerization associated with changes in cell shape/morphology that favor cellular trafficking and recruitment via activation of specific intracellular signaling molecules (ROCK, MAPK, PI3K and the PKC-calmodulin pathway). PMID:23372779

  17. Relationship between brain serotonin transporter binding, plasma concentration and behavioural effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Kazufumi; Kimura, Ryohei; Sugimoto, Yumi; Yamada, Jun; Uchida, Shinya; Kato, Yasuhiro; Hashimoto, Hisakuni; Yamada, Shizuo

    2005-03-01

    1. The present study was undertaken to characterise the relationship between in vivo brain serotonin transporter (SERT) binding, plasma concentration and pharmacological effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in mice. Oral administration of fluvoxamine, fluoxetine, paroxetine and sertraline at pharmacologically relevant doses exerted dose- and time-dependent binding activity of brain SERT as revealed by significant increases in KD for specific [3H]paroxetine binding, and the in vivo SERT-binding potency was in the order of paroxetine>fluoxetine, sertraline>fluvoxamine. 2. The time courses of brain SERT binding by SSRIs in mice were mostly in parallel to those of their plasma concentrations. Also, norfluoxetine (active metabolite) has been suggested to contribute largely to the long-lasting binding activity of brain SERT after the fluoxetine administration. 3. Oral administration of each SSRI suppressed significantly the marble-burying behaviour with no change in locomotor activity in mice, and the extent and time course of suppression agreed well with those of brain SERT binding. Thus, the pharmacological potencies of SSRIs in the attenuation of marble-burying behaviour correlated significantly with their brain SERT binding activities. 4. In conclusion, the present study has provided the first in vivo evidences to support that fluvoxamine, fluoxetine, paroxetine and sertraline orally administered bind to the pharmacologically relevant brain SERT in mice and that their SERT-binding characteristics is closely associated with the pharmacokinetics and inhibition of marble-burying behaviour.

  18. A Xanthine-Derivative K+-Channel Opener Protects against Serotonin-Induced Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy via the Modulation of Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Hsuan-Fu; Lai, Yan-Jie; Wu, Jung-Chou; Lee, Kun-Tai; Chu, Chih-Sheng; Chen, Ing-Jun; Wu, Jiunn-Ren; Wu, Bin-Nan

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated whether KMUP-1, a xanthine-derivative K+ channel opener, could prevent serotonin-induced hypertrophy in H9c2 cardiomyocytes via L-type Ca2+ channels (LTCCs). Rat heart-derived H9c2 cells were incubated with serotonin (10 μM) for 4 days. The cell size increased by 155.5%, and this was reversed by KMUP-1 (≥1 μM), and attenuated by the LTCC blocker verapamil (1 μM) and the 5-HT2A antagonist ketanserin (0.1 μM), but unaffected by the 5-HT2B antagonist SB206553. A perforated whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to investigate Ca2+ currents through LTCCs in serotonin-induced H9c2 hypertrophy, in which cell capacitance and current density were increased. The LTCC current (ICa,L) increased ~2.9-fold in serotonin-elicited H9c2 hypertrophy, which was attenuated by verapamil and ketanserin, but not affected by SB206553 (0.1 μM). Serotonin-increased ICa,L was reduced by KMUP-1, PKA and PKC inhibitors (H-89, 1 μM and chelerythrine, 1 μM) while the current was enhanced by the PKC activator PMA, (1 μM) but not the PKA activator 8-Br-cAMP (100 μM), and was abolished by KMUP-1. In contrast, serotonin-increased ICa,L was blunted by the PKG activator 8-Br-cGMP (100 μM), but unaffected by the PKG inhibitor KT5823 (1 μM). Notably, KMUP-1 blocked serotonin-increased ICa,L but this was partially reversed by KT5823. In conclusion, serotonin-increased ICa,L could be due to activated 5-HT2A receptor-mediated PKA and PKC cascades, and/or indirect interaction with PKG. KMUP-1 prevents serotonin-induced H9c2 cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, which can be attributed to its PKA and PKC inhibition, and/or PKG stimulation. PMID:24391452

  19. Serotonin released from amacrine neurons is scavenged and degraded in bipolar neurons in the retina

    PubMed Central

    Ghai, Kanika; Zelinka, Christopher; Fischer, Andy J.

    2009-01-01

    The neurotransmitter serotonin is synthesized in the retina by one type of amacrine neuron but accumulates in bipolar neurons in many vertebrates. The mechanisms, functions and purpose underlying of serotonin in bipolar cells remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that exogenous serotonin transiently accumulates in a distinct type of bipolar neuron. KCl-mediated depolarization causes the depletion of serotonin from amacrine neurons and, subsequently, serotonin is taken-up by bipolar neurons. The accumulation of endogenous or exogenous serotonin by bipolar neurons is blocked by selective reuptake inhibitors. Exogenous serotonin is specifically taken-up by bipolar neurons even when serotonin-synthesizing amacrine neurons are destroyed; excluding the possibility that serotonin diffuses through gap junctions from amacrine into bipolar neurons. Further, inhibition of monoamine oxidase (A) prevents the degradation of serotonin in bipolar neurons, suggesting that MAO(A) is present in these neurons. However, the vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT2) is present only in amacrine cells suggesting that serotonin is not transported into synaptic vesicles and re-used as a transmitter in the bipolar neurons. We conclude that the serotonin-accumulating bipolar neurons perform glial functions in the retina by actively transporting and degrading serotonin that is synthesized in neighboring amacrine cells. PMID:19619137

  20. Voltammetric and mathematical evidence for dual transport mediation of serotonin clearance in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wood, Kevin M; Zeqja, Anisa; Nijhout, H Frederik; Reed, Michael C; Best, Janet; Hashemi, Parastoo

    2014-08-01

    The neurotransmitter serotonin underlies many of the brain's functions. Understanding serotonin neurochemistry is important for improving treatments for neuropsychiatric disorders such as depression. Antidepressants commonly target serotonin clearance via serotonin transporters and have variable clinical effects. Adjunctive therapies, targeting other systems including serotonin autoreceptors, also vary clinically and carry adverse consequences. Fast scan cyclic voltammetry is particularly well suited for studying antidepressant effects on serotonin clearance and autoreceptors by providing real-time chemical information on serotonin kinetics in vivo. However, the complex nature of in vivo serotonin responses makes it difficult to interpret experimental data with established kinetic models. Here, we electrically stimulated the mouse medial forebrain bundle to provoke and detect terminal serotonin in the substantia nigra reticulata. In response to medial forebrain bundle stimulation we found three dynamically distinct serotonin signals. To interpret these signals we developed a computational model that supports two independent serotonin reuptake mechanisms (high affinity, low efficiency reuptake mechanism, and low affinity, high efficiency reuptake system) and bolsters an important inhibitory role for the serotonin autoreceptors. Our data and analysis, afforded by the powerful combination of voltammetric and theoretical methods, gives new understanding of the chemical heterogeneity of serotonin dynamics in the brain. This diverse serotonergic matrix likely contributes to clinical variability of antidepressants. © 2014 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  1. Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 is an Intermediate Modulator of Serotonin Neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Polter, Abigail M.; Li, Xiaohua

    2011-01-01

    Serotonin is a neurotransmitter with broad functions in brain development, neuronal activity, and behaviors; and serotonin is the prominent drug target in several major neuropsychiatric diseases. The multiple actions of serotonin are mediated by diverse serotonin receptor subtypes and associated signaling pathways. However, the key signaling components that mediate specific function of serotonin neurotransmission have not been fully identified. This review will provide evidence from biochemical, pharmacological, and animal behavioral studies showing that serotonin regulates the activation states of brain glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) via type 1 and type 2 serotonin receptors. In return, GSK3 directly interacts with serotonin receptors in a highly selective manner, with a prominent effect on modulating serotonin 1B receptor activity. Therefore, GSK3 acts as an intermediate modulator in the serotonin neurotransmission system, and balanced GSK3 activity is essential for serotonin-regulated brain function and behaviors. Particularly important, several classes of serotonin-modulating drugs, such as antidepressants and atypical antipsychotics, regulate GSK3 by inhibiting its activity in brain, which reinforces the importance of GSK3 as a potential therapeutic target in neuropsychiatric diseases associated with abnormal serotonin function. PMID:22028682

  2. Serotonin enhances the impact of health information on food choice.

    PubMed

    Vlaev, Ivo; Crockett, Molly J; Clark, Luke; Müller, Ulrich; Robbins, Trevor W

    2017-01-23

    Serotonin has been implicated in promoting self-control, regulation of hunger and physiological homeostasis, and regulation of caloric intake. However, it remains unclear whether the effects of serotonin on caloric intake reflect purely homeostatic mechanisms, or whether serotonin also modulates cognitive processes involved in dietary decision making. We investigated the effects of an acute dose of the serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram on choices between food items that differed along taste and health attributes, compared with placebo and the noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor atomoxetine. Twenty-seven participants attended three sessions and received single doses of atomoxetine, citalopram, and placebo in a double-blind randomised cross-over design. Relative to placebo, citalopram increased choices of more healthy foods over less healthy foods. Citalopram also increased the emphasis on health considerations in decisions. Atomoxetine did not affect decision making relative to placebo. The results support the hypothesis that serotonin may influence food choice by enhancing a focus on long-term goals. The findings are relevant for understanding decisions about food consumption and also for treating health conditions such as eating disorders and obesity.

  3. Probable Serotonin Syndrome and Withdrawal Symptoms Caused by Milnacipran.

    PubMed

    Koshiishi, Toru; Okuyama, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

     A 70-year-old woman, residing in a nursing home, was admitted to our hospital because of cerebral hemorrhage. She had excessive sweating, a temperature above 37°C, and intermittent muscle spasm such as myoclonus, since the time of admission. We suspected that these symptoms were related to side effects caused by the milnacipran she was taking for depression, prior to hospitalization. After we discontinued milnacipran, the patient began exhibiting withdrawal symptoms such as excitement and insomnia. When we substituted milnacipran with mianserin, the withdrawal symptoms diminished and the excessive sweating and involuntary movement disappeared. Serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) have been widely utilized in the clinic to treat depression; serious side effects such as serotonin syndrome and withdrawal syndrome associated with their discontinuation, have been reported. However, it is unlikely that serotonin syndrome and withdrawal syndrome due to a precedent use of milnacipran would have been reported. This case was suspected to be related to serotonin syndrome and withdrawal syndrome from the course of treatment. This case provides valuable information for addressing new similar cases caused by milnacipran.

  4. Serotonin Deficiency Exacerbates Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Toxicity In Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingyao; Song, Sidong; Pang, Qing; Zhang, Ruiyao; Zhou, Lei; Liu, Sushun; Meng, Fandi; Wu, Qifei; Liu, Chang

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is a major cause of acute liver failure. Peripheral 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin, 5-HT) is a cytoprotective neurotransmitter which is also involved in the hepatic physiological and pathological process. This study seeks to investigate the mechanisms involved in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, as well as the role of 5-HT in the liver's response to APAP toxicity. We induced APAP hepatotoxicity in mice either sufficient of serotonin (wild-type mice and TPH1-/- plus 5- Hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP)) or lacking peripheral serotonin (Tph1-/- and wild-type mice plus p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA)).Mice with sufficient 5-HT exposed to acetaminophen have a significantly lower mortality rate and a better outcome compared with mice deficient of 5-HT. This difference is at least partially attributable to a decreased level of inflammation, oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, Glutathione (GSH) depletion, peroxynitrite formation, hepatocyte apoptosis, elevated hepatocyte proliferation, activation of 5-HT2B receptor, less activated c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α in the mice sufficient of 5-HT versus mice deficient of 5-HT. We thus propose a physiological function of serotonin that serotonin could ameliorate APAP-induced liver injury mainly through inhibiting hepatocyte apoptosis ER stress and promoting liver regeneration. PMID:25631548

  5. A specific role for serotonin in overcoming effort cost

    PubMed Central

    Meyniel, Florent; Goodwin, Guy M; Deakin, JF William; Klinge, Corinna; MacFadyen, Christine; Milligan, Holly; Mullings, Emma; Pessiglione, Mathias; Gaillard, Raphaël

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin is implicated in many aspects of behavioral regulation. Theoretical attempts to unify the multiple roles assigned to serotonin proposed that it regulates the impact of costs, such as delay or punishment, on action selection. Here, we show that serotonin also regulates other types of action costs such as effort. We compared behavioral performance in 58 healthy humans treated during 8 weeks with either placebo or the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor escitalopram. The task involved trading handgrip force production against monetary benefits. Participants in the escitalopram group produced more effort and thereby achieved a higher payoff. Crucially, our computational analysis showed that this effect was underpinned by a specific reduction of effort cost, and not by any change in the weight of monetary incentives. This specific computational effect sheds new light on the physiological role of serotonin in behavioral regulation and on the clinical effect of drugs for depression. Clinical trial Registration: ISRCTN75872983 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17282.001 PMID:27824554

  6. A case of serotonin syndrome associated with methadone overdose.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Terry T; Martinez, Daniel N

    2008-01-01

    A chronic pain patient prescribed 20 mg of methadone per day was seen at the Emergency Department within one hour following a witnessed intentional 200 mg ingestion. In addition, he was taking the serotonin re-uptake inhibitor antidepressant drugs, sertraline and venlafaxine as prescribed. Methadone is also a serotonin re-uptake inhibitor which has been involved in serotonin toxicity reactions. Initially, no symptoms of narcotic overdose (depressed central nervous system, respiration, or blood pressure) could be distinguished, and the standard narcotic urine screen was negative. No decontamination or antagonist therapy was given, and the patient was discharged to a psychiatric unit for observation. At 5 hours post-ingestion he presented in a panic with hallucinations and elevated blood pressure, pulse, and respiration. These symptoms are characteristic of serotonin syndrome which is often described as mental status changes, autonomic hyperactivity, and neuromuscular abnormalities. At 10 hours post-ingestion the patient was found unconscious. He had aspirated stomach contents into his lungs. His respiration, blood pressure, and pulse were all severely depressed. He never regained conciousness, and he died 5 days later. The medical examiner's finding was probable acute methadone intoxication. In this case serotonin syndrome appears to have opposed and delayed typical narcotic symptoms. Methadone has additional pharmacologic and toxicologic properties which may complicate the assessment and treatment in overdose situations.

  7. Serotonin regulates pancreatic beta cell mass during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hail; Toyofuku, Yukiko; Lynn, Francis C; Chak, Eric; Uchida, Toyoyoshi; Mizukami, Hiroki; Fujitani, Yoshio; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Miyatsuka, Takeshi; Kosaka, Yasuhiro; Yang, Katherine; Honig, Gerard; van der Hart, Marieke; Kishimoto, Nina; Wang, Juehu; Yagihashi, Soroku; Tecott, Laurence H; Watada, Hirotaka; German, Michael S

    2010-07-01

    During pregnancy, the energy requirements of the fetus impose changes in maternal metabolism. Increasing insulin resistance in the mother maintains nutrient flow to the growing fetus, whereas prolactin and placental lactogen counterbalance this resistance and prevent maternal hyperglycemia by driving expansion of the maternal population of insulin-producing beta cells. However, the exact mechanisms by which the lactogenic hormones drive beta cell expansion remain uncertain. Here we show that serotonin acts downstream of lactogen signaling to stimulate beta cell proliferation. Expression of serotonin synthetic enzyme tryptophan hydroxylase-1 (Tph1) and serotonin production rose sharply in beta cells during pregnancy or after treatment with lactogens in vitro. Inhibition of serotonin synthesis by dietary tryptophan restriction or Tph inhibition blocked beta cell expansion and induced glucose intolerance in pregnant mice without affecting insulin sensitivity. Expression of the G alpha(q)-linked serotonin receptor 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor-2b (Htr2b) in maternal islets increased during pregnancy and normalized just before parturition, whereas expression of the G alpha(i)-linked receptor Htr1d increased at the end of pregnancy and postpartum. Blocking Htr2b signaling in pregnant mice also blocked beta cell expansion and caused glucose intolerance. These studies reveal an integrated signaling pathway linking beta cell mass to anticipated insulin need during pregnancy. Modulators of this pathway, including medications and diet, may affect the risk of gestational diabetes.

  8. Serotonin modulation of cerebral glucose metabolism: sex and age effects.

    PubMed

    Munro, Cynthia A; Workman, Clifford I; Kramer, Elisse; Hermann, Carol; Ma, Yilong; Dhawan, Vijay; Chaly, Thomas; Eidelberg, David; Smith, Gwenn S

    2012-11-01

    The serotonin system is implicated in a variety of psychiatric disorders whose clinical presentation and response to treatment differ between males and females, as well as with aging. However, human neurobiological studies are limited. Sex differences in the cerebral metabolic response to an increase in serotonin concentrations were measured, as well as the effect of aging, in men compared to women. Thirty-three normal healthy individuals (14 men/19 women, age range 20-79 years) underwent two resting positron emission tomography studies with the radiotracer [18F]-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose ([(18)F]-FDG) after placebo and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI, citalopram) infusions on two separate days. Results indicated that women demonstrated widespread areas of increased cortical glucose metabolism with fewer areas of decrease in metabolism in response to citalopram. Men, in contrast, demonstrated several regions of decreased cortical metabolism, but no regions of increased metabolism. Age was associated with greater increases in women and greater decreases in men in most brain regions. These results support prior studies indicating that serotonin function differs in men and women across the lifespan. Future studies aimed at characterizing the influences of age and sex on the serotonin system in patients with psychiatric disorders are needed to elucidate the relationship between sex and age differences in brain chemistry and associated differences in symptom presentation and treatment response. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. SEROTONIN MODULATION OF CEREBRAL GLUCOSE METABOLISM: SEX AND AGE EFFECTS

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Cynthia A.; Workman, Clifford; Kramer, Elisse; Hermann, Carol; Ma, Yilong; Dhawan, Vijay; Chaly, Thomas; Eidelberg, David; Smith, Gwenn S.

    2012-01-01

    The serotonin system is implicated in a variety of psychiatric disorders whose clinical presentation and response to treatment differ between males and females, as well as with aging. However, human neurobiological studies are limited. Sex differences in the cerebral metabolic response to an increase in serotonin concentrations were measured, as well as the effect of aging, in men compared to women. Thirty-three normal healthy individuals (14 men/19 women, age range 20–79 years) underwent two resting positron emission tomography (PET) studies with the radiotracer [18F]-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose ([18F]-FDG) after placebo and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI, citalopram) infusions on two separate days. Results indicated that women demonstrated widespread areas of increased cortical glucose metabolism with fewer areas of decrease in metabolism in response to citalopram. Men, in contrast, demonstrated several regions of decreased cortical metabolism, but no regions of increased metabolism. Age was associated with greater increases in women and greater decreases in men in most brain regions. These results support prior studies indicating that serotonin function differs in men and women across the lifespan. Future studies aimed at characterizing the influences of age and sex on the serotonin system in patients with psychiatric disorders are needed to elucidate the relationship between sex and age differences in brain chemistry and associated differences in symptom presentation and treatment response. PMID:22836227

  10. The reciprocal interaction between serotonin and social behaviour.

    PubMed

    Kiser, Dominik; Steemers, Ben; Branchi, Igor; Homberg, Judith R

    2012-02-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is an ancient molecule directing behavioural responses to environmental stimuli. The social environment is the most powerful environmental factor. It is well recognized that 5-HT plays a key role in shaping social responses, and that the serotonergic system itself is highly responsive to social influences. This review aims to provide an overview of a selection of representative papers that significantly contribute to a coherent view on the role of serotonin in reciprocal social interactions. The studies here reviewed, selected using the pubmed search terms "social behaviour" and "serotonin", describe the effects of serotonergic gene variation and pharmacological manipulations in humans, monkeys, and rodents, and involve parental attachment and caregiving, social play, aggressiveness, cooperation, and sexual behaviour. We conclude that serotonin is positively correlated with sensitivity to social factors and modulates social behaviour in a 'for-better-and-for-worse' manner, depending on the nature of social factors. Simultaneously, these behavioural responses influence the serotonergic system, leading to highly complex bidirectional serotonin×environment interaction.

  11. Serotonin Regulates Pancreatic β-Cell Mass during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hail; Toyofuku, Yukiko; Lynn, Francis C.; Chak, Eric; Uchida, Toyoyoshi; Mizukami, Hirok i; Fujitani, Yoshio; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Miyatsuka, Takeshi; Kosaka, Yasuhiro; Yang, Katherine; Honig, Gerard; van der Hart, Marieke; Kishimoto, Nina; Wang, Juehu; Yagihashi, Soroku; Tecott, Laurence H.; Watada, Hirotaka; German, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    During pregnancy, the energy requirements of the fetus impose changes in maternal metabolism. Increasing insulin resistance in the mother maintains nutrient flow to the growing fetus, while prolactin and placental lactogen counterbalance this resistance and prevent maternal hyperglycemia by driving expansion of the maternal population of insulin-producing β-cells1–3. However, the exact mechanisms by which the lactogenic hormones drive β-cell expansion remain uncertain. Here we show that serotonin acts downstream of lactogen signaling to drive β-cell proliferation. Serotonin synthetic enzyme Tph1 and serotonin production increased sharply in β-cells during pregnancy or after treatment with lactogens in vitro. Inhibition of serotonin synthesis by dietary tryptophan restriction or Tph inhibition blocked β-cell expansion and induced glucose intolerance in pregnant mice without affecting insulin sensitivity. Expression of the Gαq-linked serotonin receptor Htr2b in maternal islets increased during pregnancy and normalized just prior to parturition, while expression of the Gαi-linked receptor Htr1d increased at the end of pregnancy and postpartum. Blocking Htr2b signaling in pregnant mice also blocked β-cell expansion and caused glucose intolerance. These studies reveal an integrated signaling pathway linking β-cell mass to anticipated insulin need during pregnancy. Modulators of this pathway, including medications and diet, may affect the risk of gestational diabetes4. PMID:20581837

  12. Structure and Function of Serotonin G protein Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    McCorvy, John D.; Roth, Bryan L.

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin receptors are prevalent throughout the nervous system and the periphery, and remain one of the most lucrative and promising drug discovery targets for disorders ranging from migraine headaches to neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression. There are 14 distinct serotonin receptors, of which 13 are G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are targets for approximately 40% of the approved medicines. Recent crystallographic and biochemical evidence has provided a converging understanding of the basic structure and functional mechanics of GPCR activation. Currently, two GPCR crystal structures exist for the serotonin family, the 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B receptor, with the antimigraine and valvulopathic drug ergotamine bound. The first serotonin crystal structures not only provide the first evidence of serotonin receptor topography but also provide mechanistic explanations into functional selectivity or biased agonism. This review will detail the findings of these crystal structures from a molecular and mutagenesis perspective for driving rational drug design for novel therapeutics incorporating biased signaling. PMID:25601315

  13. Behavioral, hormonal and central serotonin modulating effects of injected leptin.

    PubMed

    Haleem, Darakhshan J; Haque, Zeba; Inam, Qurrat-ul-Aen; Ikram, Huma; Haleem, Muhammad Abdul

    2015-12-01

    Leptin is viewed as an important target for developing novel therapeutics for obesity, depression/anxiety and cognitive dysfunctions. The present study therefore concerns behavioral, hormonal and central serotonin modulating effects of systemically injected leptin. Pharmacological doses (100 and 500 μg/kg) of leptin injected systemically decreased 24h cumulative food intake and body weight in freely feeding rats and improved acquisition and retention of memory in Morris water maze test. Potential anxiety reducing, hormonal and serotonin modulating effects of the peptide hormone were determined in a separate experiment. Animals injected with 100 or 500 μg/kg leptin were tested for anxiety in an elevated plus maze test 1h later. A significant increase in the number of entries and time passed in open arm of the elevated plus maze in leptin injected animals suggested pronounced anxiety reducing effect. Moreover, circulating levels of leptin correlated significantly with anxiety reducing effects of the peptide hormone. Serum serotonin increased and ghrelin decreased in leptin injected animals and correlated, positively and negatively respectively, with circulating leptin. Corticosterone increased at low dose and levels were normal at higher dose. Serotonin metabolism in the hypothalamus and hippocampus decreased only at higher dose of leptin. The results support a role of leptin in the treatment of obesity, anxiety and cognitive dysfunctions. It is suggested that hormonal and serotonin modulating effects of leptin can alter treatment efficacy in particularly comorbid conditions.

  14. Major depressive disorder and diabetes: does serotonin bridge the gap?

    PubMed

    De Long, Nicole E; Stepita, Rebecca A; Taylor, Valerie H; Holloway, Alison C

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is one of the most common psychiatric illnesses worldwide, with reported prevalence rates ranging between 10% and 19%. Pharmacotherapy is a first-line option for the management of MDD and, as a result, the use of antidepressants has increased 4 fold in the last 20 years. Serotonin is the most commonly dysregulated neurotransmitter in the etiology of MDD and this system is the primary focus of most medications used in the treatment of illness. Although antidepressant use in adults increases the risk of developing new onset type 2 diabetes, the mechanisms underlying this association are poorly defined. This review will focus on 1) the evidence from human and animal studies suggesting a link between the use of antidepressants that target serotonin signaling (i.e., SSRIs, serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), serotonin antagonist and reuptake inhibitors (SARIs), and noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressants (NaSSAs)) and increased risk of diabetes, and 2) the mechanisms by which alterations in serotonin signalling by antidepressants can affect glucose homeostasis.

  15. The serotonin 5-HT7 receptors: two decades of research.

    PubMed

    Gellynck, Evelien; Heyninck, Karen; Andressen, Kjetil W; Haegeman, Guy; Levy, Finn Olav; Vanhoenacker, Peter; Van Craenenbroeck, Kathleen

    2013-10-01

    Like most neurotransmitters, serotonin possesses a simple structure. However, the pharmacological consequences are more complex and diverse. Serotonin is involved in numerous functions in the human body including the control of appetite, sleep, memory and learning, temperature regulation, mood, behavior, cardiovascular function, muscle contraction, endocrine regulation, and depression. Low levels of serotonin may be associated with several disorders, namely increase in aggressive and angry behaviors, clinical depression, Parkinson's disease, obsessive-compulsive disorder, eating disorders, migraine, irritable bowel syndrome, tinnitus, and bipolar disease. These effects are mediated via different serotonin (5-HT) receptors. In this review, we will focus on the last discovered member of this serotonin receptor family, the 5-HT7 receptor. This receptor belongs to the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily and was cloned two decades ago. Later, different splice variants were described but no major functional differences have been described so far. All 5-HT7 receptor variants are coupled to Gαs proteins and stimulate cAMP formation. Recently, several interacting proteins have been reported, which can influence receptor signaling and trafficking.

  16. Serotonin deficiency exacerbates acetaminophen-induced liver toxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingyao; Song, Sidong; Pang, Qing; Zhang, Ruiyao; Zhou, Lei; Liu, Sushun; Meng, Fandi; Wu, Qifei; Liu, Chang

    2015-01-29

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is a major cause of acute liver failure. Peripheral 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin, 5-HT) is a cytoprotective neurotransmitter which is also involved in the hepatic physiological and pathological process. This study seeks to investigate the mechanisms involved in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, as well as the role of 5-HT in the liver's response to APAP toxicity. We induced APAP hepatotoxicity in mice either sufficient of serotonin (wild-type mice and TPH1-/- plus 5- Hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP)) or lacking peripheral serotonin (Tph1-/- and wild-type mice plus p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA)). Mice with sufficient 5-HT exposed to acetaminophen have a significantly lower mortality rate and a better outcome compared with mice deficient of 5-HT. This difference is at least partially attributable to a decreased level of inflammation, oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, Glutathione (GSH) depletion, peroxynitrite formation, hepatocyte apoptosis, elevated hepatocyte proliferation, activation of 5-HT2B receptor, less activated c-Jun NH₂-terminal kinase (JNK) and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α in the mice sufficient of 5-HT versus mice deficient of 5-HT. We thus propose a physiological function of serotonin that serotonin could ameliorate APAP-induced liver injury mainly through inhibiting hepatocyte apoptosis ER stress and promoting liver regeneration.

  17. Genetic linkage study of bipolar disorder and the serotonin transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsoe, J.R.; Morison, M.; Mroczkowski-Parker, Z.; Bergesch, P.; Rapaport, M.H.; Mirow, A.L.

    1996-04-09

    The serotonin transporter (HTT) is an important candidate gene for the genetic transmission of bipolar disorder. It is the site of action of many antidepressants, and plays a key role in the regulation of serotonin neurotransmission. Many studies of affectively ill patients have found abnormalities in serotonin metabolism, and dysregulation of the transporter itself. The human serotonin transporter has been recently cloned and mapped to chromosome 17. We have identified a PstI RFLP at the HTT locus, and here report our examination of this polymorphism for possible linkage to bipolar disorder. Eighteen families were examined from three populations: the Old Order Amish, Iceland, and the general North American population. In addition to HTT, three other microsatellite markers were examined, which span an interval known to contain HTT. Linkage analyses were conducted under both dominant and recessive models, as well as both narrow (bipolar only) and broad (bipolar + recurrent unipolar) diagnostic models. Linkage could be excluded to HTT under all models examined. Linkage to the interval spanned by the microsatellites was similarly excluded under the dominant models. In two individual families, maximum lod scores of 1.02 and 0.84 were obtained at D17S798 and HTT, respectively. However, these data overall do not support the presence of a susceptibility locus for bipolar disorder near the serotonin transporter. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  18. The molecular interactions of buspirone analogues with the serotonin transporter.

    PubMed

    Jarończyk, Małgorzata; Chilmonczyk, Zdzisław; Mazurek, Aleksander P; Nowak, Gabriel; Ravna, Aina W; Kristiansen, Kurt; Sylte, Ingebrigt

    2008-10-15

    A major problem with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) is the delayed onset of action. A reason for that may be that the initial SSRI-induced increase in serotonin levels activates somatodendritic 5-HT(1A) autoreceptors, causing a decrease in serotonin release in major forebrain areas. It has been suggested that compounds combining inhibition of the serotonin transport protein with antagonistic effects on the 5-HT(1A) receptor will shorten the onset time. The anxiolytic drug buspirone is known as 5-HT(1A) partial agonist. In the present work, we are studying the inhibition of the serotonin transporter protein by a series of buspirone analogues by molecular modelling and by experimental affinity measurements. Models of the transporter protein were constructed using the crystal structure of the Escherichia coli major facilitator family transporter-LacY and the X-ray structure of the neurotransmitter symporter family (NSS) transporter-LeuT(Aa) as templates. The buspirone analogues were docked into both SERT models and the interactions with amino acids within the protein were analyzed. Two putative binding sites were identified on the LeuT(Aa) based model, one suggested to be a high-affinity site, and the other suggested to be a low-affinity binding site. Molecular dynamic simulations of the LacY based model in complex with ligands did not induce a helical architecture of the LacY based model into an arrangement more similar to that of the LeuT(Aa) based model.

  19. Effect of dopamine and serotonin receptor antagonists on fencamfamine-induced abolition of latent inhibition.

    PubMed

    de Aguiar, Cilene Rejane Ramos Alves; de Aguiar, Marlison José Lima; DeLucia, Roberto; Silva, Maria Teresa Araujo

    2013-01-05

    The purpose of this investigation was to verify the role of dopamine and serotonin receptors in the effect of fencamfamine (FCF) on latent inhibition. FCF is a psychomotor stimulant with an indirect dopaminergic action. Latent inhibition is a model of attention. Latent inhibition is blocked by dopaminergic agents and facilitated by dopamine receptor agonists. FCF has been shown to abolish latent inhibition. The serotonergic system may also participate in the neurochemical mediation of latent inhibition. The selective dopamine D(1) receptor antagonist SCH 23390 (7-chloro-3-methyl-1-phenyl-1,2,4,5-tetrahydro-3-benzazepin-8-ol), D(2) receptor antagonists pimozide (PIM) and methoclopramide (METH), and serotonin 5-HT(2A/C) receptor antagonist ritanserin (RIT) were used in the present study. Latent inhibition was evaluated using a conditioned emotional response procedure. Male Wistar rats that were water-restricted were subjected to a three-phase procedure: preexposure to a tone, tone-shock conditioning, and a test of the effect of the tone on licking frequency. All of the drugs were administered before the preexposure and conditioning phases. The results showed that FCF abolished latent inhibition, and this effect was clearly antagonized by PIM and METH and moderately attenuated by SCH 23390. At the doses used in the present study, RIT pretreatment did not affect latent inhibition and did not eliminate the effect of FCF, suggesting that the FCF-induced abolition of latent inhibition is not mediated by serotonin 5-HT(2A/C) receptors. These results suggest that the effect of FCF on latent inhibition is predominantly related to dopamine D(2) receptors and that dopamine D(2) receptors participate in attention processes.

  20. Serotonin Transporter and Receptor Expression in Osteocytic MLO-Y4 Cells

    PubMed Central

    BLIZIOTES, M.; ESHLEMAN, A.; BURT-PICHAT, B.; ZHANG, X.-W.; HASHIMOTO, J.; WIREN, K.; CHENU, C.

    2006-01-01

    Neurotransmitter regulation of bone metabolism has been a subject of increasing interest and investigation. We reported previously that osteoblastic cells express a functional serotonin (5-HT) signal transduction system, with mechanisms for responding to and regulating uptake of 5-HT. The clonal murine osteocytic cell line, MLO-Y4, demonstrates expression of the serotonin transporter (5-HTT), and the 5-HT1A, and 5-HT2A receptors by real-time RT-PCR and immunoblot analysis. Immunohistochemistry using antibodies for the 5-HTT, and the 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors reveals expression of all three proteins in both osteoblasts and osteocytes in rat tibia. 5-HTT binding sites were demonstrated in the MLO-Y4 cells with nanomolar affinity for the stable cocaine analog [125I]RTI-55. Imipramine and fluoxetine, antagonists with specificity for 5-HTT, show the highest potency to antagonize [125I]RTI-55 binding in the MLO-Y4 cells. GBR-12935, a relatively selective dopamine transporter antagonist, had a much lower potency, as did desipramine, a selective norepinephrine transporter antagonist. The maximal [3H]5-HT uptake rate in MLO-Y4 cells was 2.85 pmol/15 min/well, with a Km value of 290 nM. Imipramine and fluoxetine inhibited specific [3H]5-HT uptake with IC50 values in the nanomolar range. 5-HT rapidly stimulated PGE2 release from MLO-Y4 cells; the EC50 for 5-HT was 0.1 μM, with a 3-fold increase seen at 60 min. The rate limiting enzyme for serotonin synthesis, tryptophan hydroxylase, is expressed in MLO-Y4 cells as well as osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells. Thus, osteocytes, as well as osteoblasts, are capable of 5-HT synthesis, and express functional receptor and transporter components of the 5-HT signal transduction system. PMID:16884969

  1. Pulmonary vascular effects of serotonin and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in the late-gestation ovine fetus.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Cassidy; Gien, Jason; Grover, Theresa R; Roe, Gates; Abman, Steven H

    2011-12-01

    Maternal use of selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) is associated with an increased risk for persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN), but little is known about 5-HT signaling in the developing lung. We hypothesize that 5-HT plays a key role in maintaining high pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) in the fetus and that fetal exposure to SSRIs increases 5-HT activity and causes pulmonary hypertension. We studied the hemodynamic effects of 5-HT, 5-HT receptor antagonists, and SSRIs in chronically prepared fetal sheep. Brief infusions of 5-HT (3-20 μg) increased PVR in a dose-related fashion. Ketanserin, a 5-HT 2A receptor antagonist, caused pulmonary vasodilation and inhibited 5-HT-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction. In contrast, intrapulmonary infusions of GR127945 and SB206553, 5-HT 1B and 5-HT 2B receptor antagonists, respectively, had no effect on basal PVR or 5-HT-induced vasoconstriction. Pretreatment with fasudil, a Rho kinase inhibitor, blunted the effects of 5-HT infusion. Brief infusions of the SSRIs, sertraline and fluoxetine, caused potent and sustained elevations of PVR, which was sustained for over 60 min after the infusion. SSRI-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction was reversed by infusion of ketanserin and did not affect the acute vasodilator effects of acetylcholine. We conclude that 5-HT causes pulmonary vasoconstriction, contributes to maintenance of high PVR in the normal fetus through stimulation of 5-HT 2A receptors and Rho kinase activation, and mediates the hypertensive effects of SSRIs. We speculate that prolonged exposure to SSRIs can induce PPHN through direct effects on the fetal pulmonary circulation.

  2. The Role of Serotonin beyond the Central Nervous System during Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Junhua; Liu, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Serotonin, or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), is a well-known neurotransmitter that plays vital roles in neural activities and social behaviors. Clinically, deficiency of serotonin is linked with many psychiatric disorders. Interestingly, a large proportion of serotonin is also produced outside the central nervous system (CNS). There is increasing evidence demonstrating important roles of serotonin in the peripheral tissues. Here, we will describe the multiple biological functions of serotonin in hematopoietic system, such as development of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs), differentiation of hematopoietic cells, maintenance of vascular system, and relationship with hematological diseases. The roles of serotonin in inflammatory responses mediated by hematopoietic cells as well as in liver regeneration are also discussed. Our recent understandings of the impact of serotonin on hematopoietic system, immune responses, and tissue regeneration support utilization of serotonin as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of hematological diseases and organ repair in clinic. PMID:28348520

  3. Serotonin-immunoreactive neural system and contractile system in the hydroid Cladonema (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa).

    PubMed

    Mayorova, T D; Kosevich, I A

    2013-12-01

    Serotonin is a widespread neurotransmitter which is present in almost all animal phyla including lower metazoans such as Cnidaria. Serotonin detected in the polyps of several cnidarian species participates in the functioning of a neural system. It was suggested that serotonin coordinates polyp behavior. For example, serotonin may be involved in muscle contraction and/or cnidocyte discharge. However, the role of serotonin in cnidarians is not revealed completely yet. The aim of this study was to investigate the neural system of Cladonema radiatum polyps. We detected the net of serotonin-positive processes within the whole hydranth body using anti-serotonin antibodies. The hypostome and tentacles had denser neural net in comparison with the gastric region. Electron microscopy revealed muscle processes throughout the hydranth body. Neural processes with specific vesicles and neurotubules in their cytoplasm were also shown at an ultrastructural level. This work demonstrates the structure of serotonin-positive neural system and smooth muscle layer in C. radiatum hydranths.

  4. Hypothalamic serotonin-insulin signaling cross-talk and alterations in a type 2 diabetic model.

    PubMed

    Papazoglou, Ioannis; Berthou, Flavien; Vicaire, Nicolas; Rouch, Claude; Markaki, Eirini M; Bailbe, Danielle; Portha, Bernard; Taouis, Mohammed; Gerozissis, Kyriaki

    2012-03-05

    Serotonin and insulin are key regulators of homeostatic mechanisms in the hypothalamus. However, in type 2 diabetes, the hypothalamic responsiveness to serotonin is not clearly established. We used a diabetic model, the Goto Kakizaki (GK) rats, to explore insulin receptor expression, insulin and serotonin efficiency in the hypothalamus and liver by means of Akt phosphorylation. Insulin or dexfenfluramine (stimulator of serotonin) treatment induced Akt phosphorylation in Wistar rats but not in GK rats that exhibit down-regulated insulin receptor. Studies in a neuroblastoma cell line showed that serotonin-induced Akt phosphorylation is PI3-kinase dependent. Finally, in response to food intake, hypothalamic serotonin release was reduced in GK rats, indicating impaired responsiveness of this neurotransmitter. In conclusion, hypothalamic serotonin as insulin efficiency is impaired in diabetic GK rats. The insulin-serotonin cross-talk and impairment observed is one potential key modification in the brain during the onset of diabetes.

  5. Effect of clozapine on the metabolism of serotonin in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ruch, W; Asper, H; Bürki, H R

    1976-01-01

    Clozapine, but not chlorpromazine, haloperidol, thioridazine, or loxapine, increases the concentrations of tryptophan, serotonin, and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in the brain of the rat. This effect of clozapine is due to an increased serotonin synthesis as demonstrated by an enhanced accumulation of 3H-serotonin in the brain after i.v. infusion of 3H-tryptophan. Clozapine also elevates the plasma concentration of free tryptophan, and reduces the plasma concentration of total tryptophan. Therefore, clozapine may increase the brain serotonin concentration by enhancing the availability of tryptophan in the brain, thereby promoting serotonin synthesis. Measurement of the rate of disappearance from the brain of 3H-serotonin or of endogenous serotonin after synthesis inhibition with 6-fluorotryptophan shows that clozapine has no direct effect on the release and degradation of serotonin. The effect of clozapine on brain serotonergic systems may possibly be related to the pronounced sedative and sleep-inducing properties of this drug.

  6. Serotonin and Early Cognitive Development: Variation in the Tryptophan Hydroxylase 2 Gene Is Associated with Visual Attention in 7-Month-Old Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leppanen, Jukka M.; Peltola, Mikko J.; Puura, Kaija; Mantymaa, Mirjami; Mononen, Nina; Lehtimaki, Terho

    2011-01-01

    Background: Allelic variation in the promoter region of a gene that encodes tryptophan hydroxylase isoform 2 (TPH2), a rate-limiting enzyme of serotonin synthesis in the central nervous system, has been associated with variations in cognitive function and vulnerability to affective spectrum disorders. Little is known about the effects of this gene…

  7. Serotonin and Early Cognitive Development: Variation in the Tryptophan Hydroxylase 2 Gene Is Associated with Visual Attention in 7-Month-Old Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leppanen, Jukka M.; Peltola, Mikko J.; Puura, Kaija; Mantymaa, Mirjami; Mononen, Nina; Lehtimaki, Terho

    2011-01-01

    Background: Allelic variation in the promoter region of a gene that encodes tryptophan hydroxylase isoform 2 (TPH2), a rate-limiting enzyme of serotonin synthesis in the central nervous system, has been associated with variations in cognitive function and vulnerability to affective spectrum disorders. Little is known about the effects of this gene…

  8. A study of blood serotonin and serotonin transporter promoter variant (5-HTTLPR) polymorphism in Egyptian autistic children

    PubMed Central

    Meguid, Nagwa A.; Gebril, Ola H.; Khalil, Rehab O.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex, heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorder with onset during early childhood. Most studies have reported an elevation in platelet serotonin in persons with autism. The serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) transporter in the brain uptakes 5-HT from extracellular spaces. It is also present in platelets, where it takes up 5-HT from plasma. Polymorphisms in serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) were frequently studied in many neuropsychiatric disorders. Materials and Methods: We have measured the plasma 5-HT levels in 20 autistic male children and 20 control male children by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. In addition, the SLC6A4 promoter region (5-HTTLPR) insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism was studied, using whole genomic DNA. Results: Plasma serotonin was significantly low in autistic children compared to control (P = 0.001), although correlation to severity of autism was not significant. The frequency of short (S) allele in autism cases was 10% and in the control group it was absent. Conclusion: Our study demonstrated an increased prevalence of 5-HTTLPR S allele in autism subjects. Significantly decreased plasma serotonin was detected in autism subjects, with no significant relationship between 5-HTTLPR genotype and plasma 5-HT being evident. PMID:26015920

  9. [Effect of domestication of the silver fox on the main enzy