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Sample records for frontolimbic serotonin 2a

  1. The 5-HT(2A) receptor and serotonin transporter in Asperger's disorder: A PET study with [¹¹C]MDL 100907 and [¹¹C]DASB.

    PubMed

    Girgis, Ragy R; Slifstein, Mark; Xu, Xiaoyan; Frankle, W Gordon; Anagnostou, Evdokia; Wasserman, Stacey; Pepa, Lauren; Kolevzon, Alexander; Abi-Dargham, Anissa; Laruelle, Marc; Hollander, Eric

    2011-12-30

    Evidence from biochemical, imaging, and treatment studies suggest abnormalities of the serotonin system in autism spectrum disorders, in particular in frontolimbic areas of the brain. We used the radiotracers [(11)C]MDL 100907 and [(11)C]DASB to characterize the 5-HT(2A) receptor and serotonin transporter in Asperger's Disorder. Seventeen individuals with Asperger's Disorder (age=34.3 ± 11.1 years) and 17 healthy controls (age=33.0 ± 9.6 years) were scanned with [(11)C]MDL 100907. Of the 17 patients, eight (age=29.7 ± 7.0 years) were also scanned with [¹¹C]DASB, as were eight healthy controls (age=28.7 ± 7.0 years). Patients with Asperger's Disorder and healthy control subjects were matched for age, gender, and ethnicity, and all had normal intelligence. Metabolite-corrected arterial plasma inputs were collected and data analyzed by two-tissue compartment modeling. The primary outcome measure was regional binding potential BP(ND). Neither regional [¹¹C]MDL 100907 BP(ND) nor [¹¹C]DASB BP(ND) was statistically different between the Asperger's and healthy subjects. This study failed to find significant alterations in binding parameters of 5-HT(2A) receptors and serotonin transporters in adult subjects with Asperger's disorder.

  2. Positive association between a DNA sequence variant in the serotonin 2A receptor gene and schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Inayama, Y.; Yoneda, H.; Sakai, T.

    1996-02-16

    Sixty-two patients with schizophrenia and 96 normal controls were investigated for genetic association with restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) in the serotonin receptor genes. A positive association between the serotonin 2A receptor gene (HTR2A) and schizophrenia was found, but not between schizophrenia and the serotonin 1A receptor gene. The positive association we report here would suggest that the DNA region with susceptibility to schizophrenia lies in the HTR2A on the long arm of chromosome 13. 15 refs., 2 tabs.

  3. Serotonin 2a Receptor and Serotonin 1a Receptor Interact Within the Medial Prefrontal Cortex During Recognition Memory in Mice.

    PubMed

    Morici, Juan F; Ciccia, Lucia; Malleret, Gaël; Gingrich, Jay A; Bekinschtein, Pedro; Weisstaub, Noelia V

    2015-01-01

    Episodic memory, can be defined as the memory for unique events. The serotonergic system one of the main neuromodulatory systems in the brain appears to play a role in it. The serotonin 2a receptor (5-HT2aR) one of the principal post-synaptic receptors for 5-HT in the brain, is involved in neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders associated with memory deficits. Recognition memory can be defined as the ability to recognize if a particular event or item was previously encountered and is thus considered, under certain conditions, a form of episodic memory. As human data suggest that a constitutively decrease of 5-HT2A signaling might affect episodic memory performance we decided to compare the performance of mice with disrupted 5-HT2aR signaling (htr2a (-/-)) with wild type (htr2a (+/+)) littermates in different recognition memory and working memory tasks that differed in the level of proactive interference. We found that ablation of 5-HT2aR signaling throughout development produces a deficit in tasks that cannot be solved by single item strategy suggesting that 5-HT2aR signaling is involved in interference resolution. We also found that in the absence of 5-HT2aR signaling serotonin has a deleterious effect on recognition memory retrieval through the activation of 5-HT1aR in the medial prefrontal cortex. PMID:26779016

  4. Serotonin 2a Receptor and Serotonin 1a Receptor Interact Within the Medial Prefrontal Cortex During Recognition Memory in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Morici, Juan F.; Ciccia, Lucia; Malleret, Gaël; Gingrich, Jay A.; Bekinschtein, Pedro; Weisstaub, Noelia V.

    2015-01-01

    Episodic memory, can be defined as the memory for unique events. The serotonergic system one of the main neuromodulatory systems in the brain appears to play a role in it. The serotonin 2a receptor (5-HT2aR) one of the principal post-synaptic receptors for 5-HT in the brain, is involved in neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders associated with memory deficits. Recognition memory can be defined as the ability to recognize if a particular event or item was previously encountered and is thus considered, under certain conditions, a form of episodic memory. As human data suggest that a constitutively decrease of 5-HT2A signaling might affect episodic memory performance we decided to compare the performance of mice with disrupted 5-HT2aR signaling (htr2a−/−) with wild type (htr2a+/+) littermates in different recognition memory and working memory tasks that differed in the level of proactive interference. We found that ablation of 5-HT2aR signaling throughout development produces a deficit in tasks that cannot be solved by single item strategy suggesting that 5-HT2aR signaling is involved in interference resolution. We also found that in the absence of 5-HT2aR signaling serotonin has a deleterious effect on recognition memory retrieval through the activation of 5-HT1aR in the medial prefrontal cortex. PMID:26779016

  5. Pharmacogenetic Study of Serotonin Transporter and 5HT2A Genotypes in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Najjar, Fedra; Owley, Thomas; Mosconi, Matthew W.; Jacob, Suma; Hur, Kwan; Guter, Stephen J.; Sweeney, John A.; Gibbons, Robert D; Bishop, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine whether polymorphisms in the serotonin transporter (SLC6A4) and serotonin-2A receptor (HTR2A) genes are associated with response to escitalopram in patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Methods: Forty-four participants with ASD were enrolled in a 6 week, forced titration, open label examination of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) escitalopram. Doses increased at weekly intervals starting at 2.5mg daily with a maximum possible dose of 20 mg daily achieved by the end of the study. If adverse events were experienced, participants subsequently received the previously tolerated dose for the duration of study. SLC6A4 (5-HTTLPR) and HTR2A (rs7997012) genotype groups were assessed in relation to treatment outcomes and drug doses. Results: Insistence on sameness and irritability symptoms significantly improved over the course of the 6 week treatment period (p<0.0001) in this open-label trial. There were no significant differences observed in the rate of symptom improvement over time across genotype groups. Similarly, dosing trajectory was not significantly associated with genotype groups. Conclusions: Previous studies have identified SLC6A4 and HTR2A associations with SSRI response in patients with depression and 5-HTTLPR (SLC6A4) associations with escitalopram response in ASD. We did not observe evidence for similar relationships in this ASD study. PMID:26262902

  6. The 5-HT2A serotonin receptor in executive function: Implications for neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Aznar, Susana; Hervig, Mona El-Sayed

    2016-05-01

    Executive function entails the interplay of a group of cognitive processes enabling the individual to anticipate consequences, attain self-control, and undertake appropriate goal-directed behaviour. Serotonin signalling at serotonin 2A receptors (5-HT2AR) has important effects on these behavioural and cognitive pathways, with the prefrontal cortex (PFC) as the central actor. Indeed, the 5-HT2ARs are highly expressed in PFC, where they modulate cortical activity and local network oscillations (brain waves). Numerous psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases result in disrupted executive function. Animal and human studies have linked these disorders with alterations in the 5-HT2AR system, making this an important pharmacological target for the treatment of disorders with impaired cognitive function. This review aims to describe the current state of knowledge on the role of 5-HT2AR signalling in components of executive function, and how 5-HT2AR systems may relate to executive dysfunctions occurring in psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases. We hope thereby to provide insight into how pharmacotherapy targeting the 5-HT2AR may ameliorate (or exacerbate) aspects of these disorders. PMID:26891819

  7. Variants at serotonin transporter and 2A receptor genes predict cooperative behavior differentially according to presence of punishment.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Kari B; McElreath, Richard; Nettle, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Punishment of free-riding has been implicated in the evolution of cooperation in humans, and yet mechanisms for punishment avoidance remain largely uninvestigated. Individual variation in these mechanisms may stem from variation in the serotonergic system, which modulates processing of aversive stimuli. Functional serotonin gene variants have been associated with variation in the processing of aversive stimuli and widely studied as risk factors for psychiatric disorders. We show that variants at the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) and serotonin 2A receptor gene (HTR2A) predict contributions to the public good in economic games, dependent upon whether contribution behavior can be punished. Participants with a variant at the serotonin transporter gene contribute more, leading to group-level differences in cooperation, but this effect dissipates in the presence of punishment. When contribution behavior can be punished, those with a variant at the serotonin 2A receptor gene contribute more than those without it. This variant also predicts a more stressful experience of the games. The diversity of institutions (including norms) that govern cooperation and punishment may create selective pressures for punishment avoidance that change rapidly across time and space. Variant-specific epigenetic regulation of these genes, as well as population-level variation in the frequencies of these variants, may facilitate adaptation to local norms of cooperation and punishment. PMID:23431136

  8. Variants at serotonin transporter and 2A receptor genes predict cooperative behavior differentially according to presence of punishment.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Kari B; McElreath, Richard; Nettle, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Punishment of free-riding has been implicated in the evolution of cooperation in humans, and yet mechanisms for punishment avoidance remain largely uninvestigated. Individual variation in these mechanisms may stem from variation in the serotonergic system, which modulates processing of aversive stimuli. Functional serotonin gene variants have been associated with variation in the processing of aversive stimuli and widely studied as risk factors for psychiatric disorders. We show that variants at the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) and serotonin 2A receptor gene (HTR2A) predict contributions to the public good in economic games, dependent upon whether contribution behavior can be punished. Participants with a variant at the serotonin transporter gene contribute more, leading to group-level differences in cooperation, but this effect dissipates in the presence of punishment. When contribution behavior can be punished, those with a variant at the serotonin 2A receptor gene contribute more than those without it. This variant also predicts a more stressful experience of the games. The diversity of institutions (including norms) that govern cooperation and punishment may create selective pressures for punishment avoidance that change rapidly across time and space. Variant-specific epigenetic regulation of these genes, as well as population-level variation in the frequencies of these variants, may facilitate adaptation to local norms of cooperation and punishment.

  9. Lack of Association between the Serotonin Transporter (5-HTT) and Serotonin Receptor (5-HT2A) Gene Polymorphisms with Smoking Behavior among Malaysian Malays

    PubMed Central

    Rozak, Nur Iwani A; Ahmad, Imran; Gan, Siew Hua; Abu Bakar, Ruzilawati

    2014-01-01

    Abstract An insertion/deletion polymorphism in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) and a polymorphism (rs6313) in the serotonin 2A receptor gene (5-HT2A) have previously been linked to smoking behavior. The objective of this study was to determine the possible association of the 5-HTTLPR and 5-HT2A gene polymorphisms with smoking behavior within a population of Malaysian male smokers (n=248) and non-smokers (n=248). The 5-HTTLPR genotypes were determined using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and were classified as short (S) alleles or long (L) alleles. The 5HT2A genotypes were determined using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (PCR-RFLP). No significant differences in the distribution frequencies of the alleles were found between the smokers and the non-smokers for the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism (x2 = 0.72, P>0.05) or the 5HT2A polymorphism (x2 = 0.73, P>0.05). This is the first study conducted on Malaysian Malay males regarding the association of 5-HTTLPR and 5HT2A polymorphisms and smoking behavior. However, the genes were not found to be associated with smoking behavior in our population. PMID:25853073

  10. Presynaptic serotonin 2A receptors modulate thalamocortical plasticity and associative learning

    PubMed Central

    Barre, Alexander; Berthoux, Coralie; De Bundel, Dimitri; Valjent, Emmanuel; Bockaert, Joël; Marin, Philippe; Bécamel, Carine

    2016-01-01

    Higher-level cognitive processes strongly depend on a complex interplay between mediodorsal thalamus nuclei and the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Alteration of thalamofrontal connectivity has been involved in cognitive deficits of schizophrenia. Prefrontal serotonin (5-HT)2A receptors play an essential role in cortical network activity, but the mechanism underlying their modulation of glutamatergic transmission and plasticity at thalamocortical synapses remains largely unexplored. Here, we show that 5-HT2A receptor activation enhances NMDA transmission and gates the induction of temporal-dependent plasticity mediated by NMDA receptors at thalamocortical synapses in acute PFC slices. Expressing 5-HT2A receptors in the mediodorsal thalamus (presynaptic site) of 5-HT2A receptor-deficient mice, but not in the PFC (postsynaptic site), using a viral gene-delivery approach, rescued the otherwise absent potentiation of NMDA transmission, induction of temporal plasticity, and deficit in associative memory. These results provide, to our knowledge, the first physiological evidence of a role of presynaptic 5-HT2A receptors located at thalamocortical synapses in the control of thalamofrontal connectivity and the associated cognitive functions. PMID:26903620

  11. Lysergic acid diethylamide-induced Fos expression in rat brain: role of serotonin-2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Gresch, P J; Strickland, L V; Sanders-Bush, E

    2002-01-01

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) produces altered mood and hallucinations in humans and binds with high affinity to serotonin-2A (5-HT(2A)) receptors. Although LSD interacts with other receptors, the activation of 5-HT(2A) receptors is thought to mediate the hallucinogenic properties of LSD. The goal of this study was to identify the brain sites activated by LSD and to determine the influence of 5-HT(2A) receptors in this activation. Rats were pretreated with the 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist MDL 100907 (0.3 mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle 30 min prior to LSD (500 microg/kg, i.p.) administration and killed 3 h later. Brain tissue was examined for Fos protein expression by immunohistochemistry. LSD administration produced a five- to eight-fold increase in Fos-like immunoreactivity in medial prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and central nucleus of amygdala. However, in dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens no increase in Fos-like immunoreactivity was observed. Pretreatment with MDL 100907 completely blocked LSD-induced Fos-like immunoreactivity in medial prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex, but only partially blocked LSD-induced Fos-like immunoreactivity in amygdala. Double-labeled immunohistochemistry revealed that LSD did not induce Fos-like immunoreactivity in cortical cells expressing 5-HT(2A) receptors, suggesting an indirect activation of cortical neurons. These results indicate that the LSD activation of medial prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex is mediated by 5-HT(2A) receptors, whereas in amygdala 5-HT(2A) receptor activation is a component of the response. These findings support the hypothesis that the medial prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and perhaps the amygdala, are important regions involved in the production of hallucinations.

  12. Serotonin 2A receptor agonist binding in the human brain with [11C]Cimbi-36

    PubMed Central

    Ettrup, Anders; da Cunha-Bang, Sophie; McMahon, Brenda; Lehel, Szabolcs; Dyssegaard, Agnete; Skibsted, Anine W; Jørgensen, Louise M; Hansen, Martin; Baandrup, Anders O; Bache, Søren; Svarer, Claus; Kristensen, Jesper L; Gillings, Nic; Madsen, Jacob; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2014-01-01

    [11C]Cimbi-36 was recently developed as a selective serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptor agonist radioligand for positron emission tomography (PET) brain imaging. Such an agonist PET radioligand may provide a novel, and more functional, measure of the serotonergic system and agonist binding is more likely than antagonist binding to reflect 5-HT levels in vivo. Here, we show data from a first-in-human clinical trial with [11C]Cimbi-36. In 29 healthy volunteers, we found high brain uptake and distribution according to 5-HT2A receptors with [11C]Cimbi-36 PET. The two-tissue compartment model using arterial input measurements provided the most optimal quantification of cerebral [11C]Cimbi-36 binding. Reference tissue modeling was feasible as it induced a negative but predictable bias in [11C]Cimbi-36 PET outcome measures. In five subjects, pretreatment with the 5-HT2A receptor antagonist ketanserin before a second PET scan significantly decreased [11C]Cimbi-36 binding in all cortical regions with no effects in cerebellum. These results confirm that [11C]Cimbi-36 binding is selective for 5-HT2A receptors in the cerebral cortex and that cerebellum is an appropriate reference tissue for quantification of 5-HT2A receptors in the human brain. Thus, we here describe [11C]Cimbi-36 as the first agonist PET radioligand to successfully image and quantify 5-HT2A receptors in the human brain. PMID:24780897

  13. Expression of serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptors in the human cerebellum and alterations in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, S L; Burnet, P W; Gittins, R; Baker, K; Harrison, P J

    2001-11-01

    The occurrence of human cerebellar serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptors (5-HT(2A)R) is equivocal and their status in schizophrenia unknown. Using a range of techniques, we investigated cerebellar 5-HT(2A)R expression in 16 healthy subjects and 16 subjects with schizophrenia. Immunocytochemistry with a monoclonal antibody showed labelling of Purkinje cell bodies and dendrites, as well as putative astrocytes. Western blots showed a major band at approximately 45 kDa. Receptor autoradiography and homogenate binding with [(3)H]ketanserin revealed cerebellar 5-HT(2A)R binding sites present at levels approximately a third of that in prefrontal cortex. 5-HT(2A)R mRNA was detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, with higher relative levels in men than women. Several aspects of 5-HT(2A)R expression were altered in schizophrenia. 5-HT(2A)R immunoreactivity in Purkinje cells was partially redistributed from soma to dendrites and was increased in white matter. 5-HT(2A)R mRNA was decreased in the male patients. 5-HT(2A)R measured by dot blots and [(3)H]ketanserin binding (B(max) and K(d)) were not significantly altered in schizophrenia. These data show that 5-HT(2A)R gene products (mRNA, protein, binding sites) are expressed in the human cerebellum at nonnegligible levels; this bears upon 5-HT(2A)R imaging studies which use the cerebellum as a reference region. 5-HT(2A)R expression is altered in schizophrenia; the shift of 5-HT(2A)R from soma to dendrites is noteworthy since atypical antipsychotics have the opposite effect. Finally, the results emphasise that expression of a receptor gene is a mutifaceted process. Measurement of multiple parameters is necessary to give a clear picture of the normal situation and to show the profile of alterations in a disease. PMID:11574947

  14. Serotonin receptor 2A (HTR2A) gene polymorphism predicts treatment response to venlafaxine XR in generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Lohoff, F W; Aquino, T D; Narasimhan, S; Multani, P K; Etemad, B; Rickels, K

    2013-02-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a chronic psychiatric disorder with significant morbidity and mortality. Antidepressant drugs are the preferred choice for treatment; however, treatment response is often variable. Several studies in major depression have implicated a role of the serotonin receptor gene (HTR2A) in treatment response to antidepressants. We tested the hypothesis that the genetic polymorphism rs7997012 in the HTR2A gene predicts treatment outcome in GAD patients treated with venlafaxine XR. Treatment response was assessed in 156 patients that participated in a 6-month open-label clinical trial of venlafaxine XR for GAD. Primary analysis included Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAM-A) reduction at 6 months. Secondary outcome measure was the Clinical Global Impression of Improvement (CGI-I) score at 6 months. Genotype and allele frequencies were compared between groups using χ(2) contingency analysis. The frequency of the G-allele differed significantly between responders (70%) and nonresponders (56%) at 6 months (P=0.05) using the HAM-A scale as outcome measure. Similarly, using the CGI-I as outcome, the G-allele was significantly associated with improvement (P=0.01). Assuming a dominant effect of the G-allele, improvement differed significantly between groups (P=0.001, odds ratio=4.72). Similar trends were observed for remission although not statistically significant. We show for the first time a pharmacogenetic effect of the HTR2A rs7997012 variant in anxiety disorders, suggesting that pharmacogenetic effects cross diagnostic categories. Our data document that individuals with the HTR2A rs7997012 single nucleotide polymorphism G-allele have better treatment outcome over time. Future studies with larger sample sizes are necessary to further characterize this effect in treatment response to antidepressants in GAD. PMID:22006095

  15. Genetic dysfunction of serotonin 2A receptor hampers response to antidepressant drugs: A translational approach.

    PubMed

    Qesseveur, Gaël; Petit, Anne Cécile; Nguyen, Hai Thanh; Dahan, Lionel; Colle, Romain; Rotenberg, Samuel; Seif, Isabelle; Robert, Pauline; David, Denis; Guilloux, Jean-Philippe; Gardier, Alain M; Verstuyft, Céline; Becquemont, Laurent; Corruble, Emmanuelle; Guiard, Bruno P

    2016-06-01

    Pharmacological studies have yielded valuable insights into the role of the serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptor in major depressive disorder (MDD) and antidepressant drugs (ADs) response. However, it is still unknown whether genetic variants in the HTR2A gene affect the therapeutic outcome of ADs and the mechanism underlying the regulation of such response remains poorly described. In this context, a translational human-mouse study offers a unique opportunity to address the possibility that variations in the HTR2A gene may represent a relevant marker to predict the efficacy of ADs. In a first part of this study, we investigated in depressed patients the effect of three HTR2A single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), selected for their potential functional consequences on 5-HT2A receptor (rs6313, rs6314 and rs7333412), on response and remission rates after 3 months of antidepressant treatments. We also explored the consequences of the constitutive genetic inactivation of the 5-HT2A receptor (i.e. in 5-HT2A(-/-) mice) on the activity of acute and prolonged administration of SSRIs. Our clinical data indicate that GG patients for the rs7333412 SNP were less prone to respond to ADs than AA/AG patients. In the preclinical study, we demonstrated that the 5-HT2A receptor exerts an inhibitory influence on the neuronal activity of the serotonergic system after acute administration of SSRIs. However, while the chronic administration of the SSRIs escitalopram or fluoxetine elicited a progressive increased in the firing rate of 5-HT neurons in 5-HT2A(+/+) mice, it failed to do so in 5-HT2A(-/-) mutants. These electrophysiological impairments were associated with a decreased ability of the chronic administration of fluoxetine to stimulate hippocampal plasticity and to produce antidepressant-like activities. Genetic loss of the 5-HT2A receptor compromised the activity of chronic treatment with SSRIs, making this receptor a putative marker to predict ADs response. PMID:26764241

  16. Effects of serotonin 2A/1A receptor stimulation on social exclusion processing.

    PubMed

    Preller, Katrin H; Pokorny, Thomas; Hock, Andreas; Kraehenmann, Rainer; Stämpfli, Philipp; Seifritz, Erich; Scheidegger, Milan; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2016-05-01

    Social ties are crucial for physical and mental health. However, psychiatric patients frequently encounter social rejection. Moreover, an increased reactivity to social exclusion influences the development, progression, and treatment of various psychiatric disorders. Nevertheless, the neuromodulatory substrates of rejection experiences are largely unknown. The preferential serotonin (5-HT) 2A/1A receptor agonist, psilocybin (Psi), reduces the processing of negative stimuli, but whether 5-HT2A/1A receptor stimulation modulates the processing of negative social interactions remains unclear. Therefore, this double-blind, randomized, counterbalanced, cross-over study assessed the neural response to social exclusion after the acute administration of Psi (0.215 mg/kg) or placebo (Pla) in 21 healthy volunteers by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and resting-state magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Participants reported a reduced feeling of social exclusion after Psi vs. Pla administration, and the neural response to social exclusion was decreased in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and the middle frontal gyrus, key regions for social pain processing. The reduced neural response in the dACC was significantly correlated with Psi-induced changes in self-processing and decreased aspartate (Asp) content. In conclusion, 5-HT2A/1A receptor stimulation with psilocybin seems to reduce social pain processing in association with changes in self-experience. These findings may be relevant to the normalization of negative social interaction processing in psychiatric disorders characterized by increased rejection sensitivity. The current results also emphasize the importance of 5-HT2A/1A receptor subtypes and the Asp system in the control of social functioning, and as prospective targets in the treatment of sociocognitive impairments in psychiatric illnesses.

  17. Effects of serotonin 2A/1A receptor stimulation on social exclusion processing.

    PubMed

    Preller, Katrin H; Pokorny, Thomas; Hock, Andreas; Kraehenmann, Rainer; Stämpfli, Philipp; Seifritz, Erich; Scheidegger, Milan; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2016-05-01

    Social ties are crucial for physical and mental health. However, psychiatric patients frequently encounter social rejection. Moreover, an increased reactivity to social exclusion influences the development, progression, and treatment of various psychiatric disorders. Nevertheless, the neuromodulatory substrates of rejection experiences are largely unknown. The preferential serotonin (5-HT) 2A/1A receptor agonist, psilocybin (Psi), reduces the processing of negative stimuli, but whether 5-HT2A/1A receptor stimulation modulates the processing of negative social interactions remains unclear. Therefore, this double-blind, randomized, counterbalanced, cross-over study assessed the neural response to social exclusion after the acute administration of Psi (0.215 mg/kg) or placebo (Pla) in 21 healthy volunteers by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and resting-state magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Participants reported a reduced feeling of social exclusion after Psi vs. Pla administration, and the neural response to social exclusion was decreased in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and the middle frontal gyrus, key regions for social pain processing. The reduced neural response in the dACC was significantly correlated with Psi-induced changes in self-processing and decreased aspartate (Asp) content. In conclusion, 5-HT2A/1A receptor stimulation with psilocybin seems to reduce social pain processing in association with changes in self-experience. These findings may be relevant to the normalization of negative social interaction processing in psychiatric disorders characterized by increased rejection sensitivity. The current results also emphasize the importance of 5-HT2A/1A receptor subtypes and the Asp system in the control of social functioning, and as prospective targets in the treatment of sociocognitive impairments in psychiatric illnesses. PMID:27091970

  18. Effects of serotonin 2A/1A receptor stimulation on social exclusion processing

    PubMed Central

    Preller, Katrin H.; Pokorny, Thomas; Hock, Andreas; Kraehenmann, Rainer; Stämpfli, Philipp; Seifritz, Erich; Scheidegger, Milan; Vollenweider, Franz X.

    2016-01-01

    Social ties are crucial for physical and mental health. However, psychiatric patients frequently encounter social rejection. Moreover, an increased reactivity to social exclusion influences the development, progression, and treatment of various psychiatric disorders. Nevertheless, the neuromodulatory substrates of rejection experiences are largely unknown. The preferential serotonin (5-HT) 2A/1A receptor agonist, psilocybin (Psi), reduces the processing of negative stimuli, but whether 5-HT2A/1A receptor stimulation modulates the processing of negative social interactions remains unclear. Therefore, this double-blind, randomized, counterbalanced, cross-over study assessed the neural response to social exclusion after the acute administration of Psi (0.215 mg/kg) or placebo (Pla) in 21 healthy volunteers by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and resting-state magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Participants reported a reduced feeling of social exclusion after Psi vs. Pla administration, and the neural response to social exclusion was decreased in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and the middle frontal gyrus, key regions for social pain processing. The reduced neural response in the dACC was significantly correlated with Psi-induced changes in self-processing and decreased aspartate (Asp) content. In conclusion, 5-HT2A/1A receptor stimulation with psilocybin seems to reduce social pain processing in association with changes in self-experience. These findings may be relevant to the normalization of negative social interaction processing in psychiatric disorders characterized by increased rejection sensitivity. The current results also emphasize the importance of 5-HT2A/1A receptor subtypes and the Asp system in the control of social functioning, and as prospective targets in the treatment of sociocognitive impairments in psychiatric illnesses. PMID:27091970

  19. Serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptor activation induces 2-arachidonoylglycerol release through a phospholipase c-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Parrish, Jason C; Nichols, David E

    2006-11-01

    To date, several studies have demonstrated that phospholipase C-coupled receptors stimulate the production of endocannabinoids, particularly 2-arachidonoylglycerol. There is now evidence that endocannabinoids are involved in phospholipase C-coupled serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptor-mediated behavioral effects in both rats and mice. The main objective of this study was to determine whether activation of the 5-HT(2A) receptor leads to the production and release of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol. NIH3T3 cells stably expressing the rat 5-HT(2A) receptor were first incubated with [(3)H]-arachidonic acid for 24 h. Following stimulation with 10 mum serotonin, lipids were extracted from the assay medium, separated by thin layer chromatography, and analyzed by liquid scintillation counting. Our results indicate that 5-HT(2A) receptor activation stimulates the formation and release of 2-arachidonoylglycerol. The 5-HT(2A) receptor-dependent release of 2-arachidonoylglycerol was partially dependent on phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C activation. Diacylglycerol produced downstream of 5-HT(2A) receptor-mediated phospholipase D or phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C activation did not appear to contribute to 2-arachidonoylglycerol formation in NIH3T3-5HT(2A) cells. In conclusion, our results support a functional model where neuromodulatory neurotransmitters such as serotonin may act as regulators of endocannabinoid tone at excitatory synapses through the activation of phospholipase C-coupled G-protein coupled receptors. PMID:17010161

  20. Polymorphism in the Serotonin Receptor 2a (HTR2A) Gene as Possible Predisposal Factor for Aggressive Traits

    PubMed Central

    Banlaki, Zsofia; Elek, Zsuzsanna; Nanasi, Tibor; Szekely, Anna; Nemoda, Zsofia; Sasvari-Szekely, Maria; Ronai, Zsolt

    2015-01-01

    Aggressive manifestations and their consequences are a major issue of mankind, highlighting the need for understanding the contributory factors. Still, aggression-related genetic analyses have so far mainly been conducted on small population subsets such as individuals suffering from a certain psychiatric disorder or a narrow-range age cohort, but no data on the general population is yet available. In the present study, our aim was to identify polymorphisms in genes affecting neurobiological processes that might explain some of the inter-individual variation between aggression levels in the non-clinical Caucasian adult population. 55 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were simultaneously determined in 887 subjects who also filled out the self-report Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire (BPAQ). Single marker association analyses between genotypes and aggression scores indicated a significant role of rs7322347 located in the HTR2A gene encoding serotonin receptor 2a following Bonferroni correction for multiple testing (p = 0.0007) both for males and females. Taking the four BPAQ subscales individually, scores for Hostility, Anger and Physical Aggression showed significant association with rs7322347 T allele in themselves, while no association was found with Verbal Aggression. Of the subscales, relationship with rs7322347 was strongest in the case of Hostility, where statistical significance virtually equaled that observed with the whole BPAQ. In conclusion, this is the first study to our knowledge analyzing SNPs in a wide variety of genes in terms of aggression in a large sample-size non-clinical adult population, also describing a novel candidate polymorphism as predisposal to aggressive traits. PMID:25658328

  1. The role of serotonin 5-HT2A receptors in memory and cognition

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gongliang; Stackman, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin 5-HT2A receptors (5-HT2ARs) are widely distributed in the central nervous system, especially in brain region essential for learning and cognition. In addition to endogenous 5-HT, several hallucinogens, antipsychotics, and antidepressants function by targeting 5-HT2ARs. Preclinical studies show that 5-HT2AR antagonists have antipsychotic and antidepressant properties, whereas agonist ligands possess cognition-enhancing and hallucinogenic properties. Abnormal 5-HT2AR activity is associated with a number of psychiatric disorders and conditions, including depression, schizophrenia, and drug addiction. In addition to its traditional activity as a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), recent studies have defined novel operations of 5-HT2ARs. Here we review progress in the (1) receptor anatomy and biology: distribution, signaling, polymerization and allosteric modulation; and (2) receptor functions: learning and memory, hallucination and spatial cognition, and mental disorders. Based on the recent progress in basic research on the 5-HT2AR, it appears that post-training 5-HT2AR activation enhances non-spatial memory consolidation, while pre-training 5-HT2AR activation facilitates fear extinction. Further, the potential influence that 5-HT2AR-elicited visual hallucinations may have on visual cue (i.e., landmark) guided spatial cognition is discussed. We conclude that the development of selective 5-HT2AR modulators to target distinct signaling pathways and neural circuits represents a new possibility for treating emotional, neuropsychiatric, and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26500553

  2. Serotonin receptor gene (HTR2A) T102C polymorphism modulates individuals’ perspective taking ability and autistic-like traits

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Pingyuan; Liu, Jinting; Blue, Philip R.; Li, She; Zhou, Xiaolin

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that empathic traits, such as perspective taking, are associated with the levels of serotonin in the brain and with autism spectrum conditions. Inspired by the finding that the serotonin receptor 2A gene (HTR2A) modulates the availability of serotonin, this study investigated to what extent HTR2A modulates individuals’ perspective taking ability and autistic-like traits. To examine the associations of the functional HTR2A polymorphism T102C (rs6313) with individuals’ perspective taking abilities and autistic-like traits, we differentiated individuals according to this polymorphism and measured empathic and autistic-like traits with Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI) and Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ) scale in 523 Chinese people. The results indicated that this polymorphism was significantly associated with the scores on Perspective Taking and Personal Distress subscales of IRI, and Communication subscale of AQ. Individuals with a greater number of the C alleles were less likely to spontaneously adopt the point of view of others, more likely to be anxious when observing the pain endured by others, and more likely to have communication problems. Moreover, the genotype effect on communication problems was mediated by individuals’ perspective taking ability. These findings provide evidence that the HTR2A T102C polymorphism is a predictor of individual differences in empathic and autistic-like traits and highlight the role of the gene in the connection between perspective taking and autistic-like traits. PMID:26557070

  3. Serotonin 2A and 2B receptor-induced phrenic motor facilitation: differential requirement for spinal NADPH oxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    MacFarlane, P.M.; Vinit, S.; Mitchell, G.S.

    2011-01-01

    Acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) facilitates phrenic motor output by a mechanism that requires spinal serotonin (type 2) receptor activation, NADPH oxidase activity and formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Episodic spinal serotonin (5-HT) receptor activation alone, without changes in oxygenation, is sufficient to elicit NADPH oxidase-dependent phrenic motor facilitation (pMF). Here we investigated: 1) whether serotonin 2A and/or 2B (5-HT2a/b) receptors are expressed in identified phrenic motor neurons, and 2) which receptor subtype is capable of eliciting NADPH-oxidase-dependent pMF. In anesthetized, artificially ventilated adult rats, episodic C4 intrathecal injections (3 × 6µl injections, 5 min intervals) of a 5-HT2a (DOI) or 5-HT2b (BW723C86) receptor agonist elicited progressive and sustained increases in integrated phrenic nerve burst amplitude (i.e. pMF), an effect lasting at least 90 minutes post-injection for both receptor subtypes. 5-HT2a and 5-HT2b receptor agonist-induced pMF were both blocked by selective antagonists (ketanserin and SB206553, respectively), but not by antagonists to the other receptor subtype. Single injections of either agonist failed to elicit pMF, demonstrating a need for episodic receptor activation. Phrenic motor neurons retrogradely labeled with cholera toxin B fragment expressed both 5-HT2a and 5-HT2b receptors. Pre-treatment with NADPH oxidase inhibitors (apocynin and DPI) blocked 5-HT2b, but not 5-HT2a-induced pMF. Thus, multiple spinal type 2 serotonin receptors elicit pMF, but they act via distinct mechanisms that differ in their requirement for NADPH oxidase activity. PMID:21223996

  4. The antidepressant 5-HT2A receptor antagonists pizotifen and cyproheptadine inhibit serotonin-enhanced platelet function.

    PubMed

    Lin, Olivia A; Karim, Zubair A; Vemana, Hari Priya; Espinosa, Enma V P; Khasawneh, Fadi T

    2014-01-01

    There is considerable interest in defining new agents or targets for antithrombotic purposes. The 5-HT2A receptor is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) expressed on many cell types, and a known therapeutic target for many disease states. This serotonin receptor is also known to regulate platelet function. Thus, in our FDA-approved drug repurposing efforts, we investigated the antiplatelet activity of cyproheptadine and pizotifen, two antidepressant 5-HT2A Receptor antagonists. Our results revealed that cyproheptadine and pizotifen reversed serotonin-enhanced ADP-induced platelet aggregation in vitro and ex vivo. And the inhibitory effects of these two agents were found to be similar to that of EMD 281014, a 5-HT2A Receptor antagonist under development. In separate experiments, our studies revealed that these 5-HT2A receptor antagonists have the capacity to reduce serotonin-enhanced ADP-induced elevation in intracellular calcium levels and tyrosine phosphorylation. Using flow cytometry, we also observed that cyproheptadine, pizotifen, and EMD 281014 inhibited serotonin-enhanced ADP-induced phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure, P-selectin expression, and glycoprotein IIb-IIIa activation. Furthermore, using a carotid artery thrombosis model, these agents prolonged the time for thrombotic occlusion in mice in vivo. Finally, the tail-bleeding time was investigated to assess the effect of cyproheptadine and pizotifen on hemostasis. Our findings indicated prolonged bleeding time in both cyproheptadine- and pizotifen-treated mice. Notably, the increases in occlusion and bleeding times associated with these two agents were comparable to that of EMD 281014, and to clopidogrel, a commonly used antiplatelet drug, again, in a fashion comparable to clopidogrel and EMD 281014. Collectively, our data indicate that the antidepressant 5-HT2A antagonists, cyproheptadine and pizotifen do exert antiplatelet and thromboprotective effects, but similar to clopidogrel and EMD 281014, their

  5. Effects of serotonin-2A receptor binding and gender on personality traits and suicidal behavior in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Soloff, Paul H; Chiappetta, Laurel; Mason, Neale Scott; Becker, Carl; Price, Julie C

    2014-06-30

    Impulsivity and aggressiveness are personality traits associated with a vulnerability to suicidal behavior. Behavioral expression of these traits differs by gender and has been related to central serotonergic function. We assessed the relationships between serotonin-2A receptor function, gender, and personality traits in borderline personality disorder (BPD), a disorder characterized by impulsive-aggression and recurrent suicidal behavior. Participants, who included 33 BPD patients and 27 healthy controls (HC), were assessed for Axis I and II disorders with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV and the International Personality Disorders Examination, and with the Diagnostic Interview for Borderline Patients-Revised for BPD. Depressed mood, impulsivity, aggression, and temperament were assessed with standardized measures. Positron emission tomography with [(18)F]altanserin as ligand and arterial blood sampling was used to determine the binding potentials (BPND) of serotonin-2A receptors in 11 regions of interest. Data were analyzed using Logan graphical analysis, controlling for age and non-specific binding. Among BPD subjects, aggression, Cluster B co-morbidity, antisocial PD, and childhood abuse were each related to altanserin binding. BPND values predicted impulsivity and aggression in BPD females (but not BPD males), and in HC males (but not HC females.) Altanserin binding was greater in BPD females than males in every contrast, but it did not discriminate suicide attempters from non-attempters. Region-specific differences in serotonin-2A receptor binding related to diagnosis and gender predicted clinical expression of aggression and impulsivity. Vulnerability to suicidal behavior in BPD may be related to serotonin-2A binding through expression of personality risk factors.

  6. Serotonin Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Volpi-Abadie, Jacqueline; Kaye, Adam M.; Kaye, Alan David

    2013-01-01

    Background Serotonin syndrome is a potentially life-threatening syndrome that is precipitated by the use of serotonergic drugs and overactivation of both the peripheral and central postsynaptic 5HT-1A and, most notably, 5HT-2A receptors. This syndrome consists of a combination of mental status changes, neuromuscular hyperactivity, and autonomic hyperactivity. Serotonin syndrome can occur via the therapeutic use of serotonergic drugs alone, an intentional overdose of serotonergic drugs, or classically, as a result of a complex drug interaction between two serotonergic drugs that work by different mechanisms. A multitude of drug combinations can result in serotonin syndrome. Methods This review describes the presentation and management of serotonin syndrome and discusses the drugs and interactions that can precipitate this syndrome with the goal of making physicians more alert and aware of this potentially fatal yet preventable syndrome. Conclusion Many commonly used medications have proven to be the culprits of serotonin syndrome. Proper education and awareness about serotonin syndrome will improve the accuracy of diagnosis and promote the institution of the appropriate treatment that may prevent significant morbidity and mortality. PMID:24358002

  7. Reelin influences the expression and function of dopamine D2 and serotonin 5-HT2A receptors: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Varela, M J; Lage, S; Caruncho, H J; Cadavid, M I; Loza, M I; Brea, J

    2015-04-01

    Reelin is an extracellular matrix protein that plays a critical role in neuronal guidance during brain neurodevelopment and in synaptic plasticity in adults and has been associated with schizophrenia. Reelin mRNA and protein levels are reduced in various structures of post-mortem schizophrenic brains, in a similar way to those found in heterozygous reeler mice (HRM). Reelin is involved in protein expression in dendritic spines that are the major location where synaptic connections are established. Thus, we hypothesized that a genetic deficit in reelin would affect the expression and function of dopamine D2 and serotonin 5-HT2A receptors that are associated with the action of current antipsychotic drugs. In this study, D2 and 5-HT2A receptor expression and function were quantitated by using radioligand binding studies in the frontal cortex and striatum of HRM and wild-type mice (WTM). We observed increased expression (p<0.05) in striatum membranes and decreased expression (p<0.05) in frontal cortex membranes for both dopamine D2 and serotonin 5-HT2A receptors from HRM compared to WTM. Our results show parallel alterations of D2 and 5-HT2A receptors that are compatible with a possible hetero-oligomeric nature of these receptors. These changes are similar to changes described in schizophrenic patients and provide further support for the suitability of using HRM as a model for studying this disease and the effects of antipsychotic drugs. PMID:25637489

  8. Antidepressant, Antipsychotic, and Hallucinogen Drugs for the Treatment of Psychiatric Disorders: A Convergence at the Serotonin-2A Receptor.

    PubMed

    Howland, Robert H

    2016-07-01

    Antidepressant, atypical antipsychotic, and hallucinogen drugs mediate their actions in part by interactions with the serotonin-2A (5HT2A) receptor. Serotonergic hallucinogen drugs, such as psilocybin, bind most potently as agonists at the 5HT2A receptor, producing profound changes in perception, mood, and cognition. Some of these drugs have been or are currently being investigated in small Phase 2 studies for depression, alcoholism, smoking cessation, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder. However, unlike the synergistic effects of combining antidepressant and atypical antipsychotic drugs, the potential therapeutic effects of hallucinogen drugs may be attenuated by the concurrent use of these medications because antidepressant and atypical antipsychotic drugs desensitize and/or down-regulate 5HT2A receptors. This finding has important implications for optimizing the potential therapeutic use of hallucinogen drugs in psychiatry. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 54(7), 21-24.]. PMID:27362381

  9. 5-HT2A Serotonin Receptor Density in Adult Male Rats’ Hippocampus after Morphine-based Conditioned Place Preference

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Rabie; Jahanshahi, Mehrdad; Jameie, Seyed Behnamedin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: A close interaction exists between the brain opioid and serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmitter systems. Brain neurotransmitter 5-HT plays an important role in the regulation of reward-related processing. However, a few studies have investigated the potential role of 5-HT2A receptors in this behavior. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess the influence of morphine and Conditioned Place Preference (CPP) on the density of 5-HT2A receptor in neurons of rat hippocampal formation. Methods: Morphine (10 mg/kg, IP) was injected in male Wistar rats for 7 consecutive days (intervention group), but control rats received just normal saline (1 mL/kg, IP). We used a hotplate test of analgesia to assess induction of tolerance to analgesic effects of morphine on days 1 and 8 of injections. Later, two groups of rats were sacrificed one day after 7 days of injections, their whole brains removed, and the striatum and PFC immediately dissected. Then, the NR1 gene expression was examined with a semi-quantitative RT-PCR method. Results: Our data showed that the maximum response was obtained with 2.5 mg/kg of morphine. The density of 5-HT2A receptor in different areas of the hippocampus increased significantly at sham-morphine and CPP groups (P<0.05). On the other hand, the CPP groups had more 5-HT2A receptors than sham-morphine groups and also the sham-morphine groups had more 5-HT2A receptors than the control groups. Conclusion: We concluded that the phenomenon of conditioned place preference induced by morphine can cause a significant increase in the number of serotonin 5-HT2A receptors in neurons of all areas of hippocampus. PMID:27563418

  10. Reduced Structural Connectivity of Frontolimbic Pathway in Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Tromp, Do P.M.; Grupe, Daniel W.; Oathes, Desmond J.; McFarlin, Daniel R.; Hernandez, Patric J.; Kral, Tammi R.A.; Lee, Jee Eun; Adams, Marie; Alexander, Andrew L.; Nitschke, Jack B.

    2012-01-01

    Context Emotion regulation deficits figure prominently in generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), as well as other anxiety and mood disorders. Research examining emotion regulation and top-down modulation has implicated reduced coupling of the amygdala with prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), suggesting altered frontolimbic white matter connectivity in GAD. Objective To investigate structural connectivity between ventral prefrontal/ACC areas and the amygdala in GAD, and to assess associations with functional connectivity between those areas. Design Participants underwent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans. Setting University magnetic resonance imaging facility. Participants Forty-nine GAD patients and 39 healthy volunteers, including a subset of 21 patients without comorbid Axis I diagnoses and 21 healthy volunteers matched for age, sex, and education. Main Outcome Measure Mean fractional anisotropy (FA) values in the left and right uncinate fasciculus, as measured by tract-based analysis for DTI data. Results Lower mean FA values in bilateral uncinate fasciculus indicated reduced frontolimbic structural connectivity in GAD. This reduction in uncinate fasciculus integrity was most pronounced for patients without comorbidity and was not observed in other white matter tracts. Across all subjects, higher FA values were associated with more negative functional coupling between the pregenual ACC and amygdala during the anticipation of aversion. Conclusions Decreased frontolimbic structural connectivity suggests a neural basis for emotion regulation deficits in GAD. The functional significance of these structural differences is underscored by decreased functional connectivity between the ACC and amygdala in subjects with reduced structural integrity of the uncinate fasciculus. PMID:22945621

  11. Binding of [(3)H]lysergic acid diethylamide to serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptors and of [(3)H]paroxetine to serotonin uptake sites in platelets from healthy children, adolescents and adults.

    PubMed

    Sigurdh, J; Spigset, O; Allard, P; Mjörndal, T; Hägglöf, B

    1999-11-01

    Possible age effects on binding of [(3)H]lysergic acid diethylamide ([(3)H]LSD) to serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptors and of [(3)H]paroxetine to serotonin uptake sites were studied in platelets from healthy children (11-12 years of age), adolescents (16-17 years of age) and adults. Significant overall age effects were found both for the number of binding sites (B(max)) for [(3)H]LSD binding (p < 0.001), the affinity constant (K(d)) for [(3)H]LSD binding (p < 0.001), B(max) for [(3)H]paroxetine binding (p < 0.001) and K(d) for [(3)H] paroxetine binding (p = 0.006). In general, there was a decrease in B(max) with increasing age, which predominantly occurred between the ages 11-12 years and 16-17 years for the 5-HT(2A) receptor, and after 16-17 years of age for the serotonin uptake site. These developmental changes might have an impact on the effect of treatment with serotonergic drugs in children and adolescents. When the platelet serotonin variables investigated are employed in studies in children or adolescents, age matching or, alternatively, introduction of age control in the statistical analysis should be performed.

  12. Serotonin 5-HT2A receptor gene variants influence antidepressant response to repeated total sleep deprivation in bipolar depression.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Francesco; Barbini, Barbara; Bernasconi, Alessandro; Fulgosi, Mara Cigala; Colombo, Cristina; Dallaspezia, Sara; Gavinelli, Chiara; Marino, Elena; Pirovano, Adele; Radaelli, Daniele; Smeraldi, Enrico

    2008-12-12

    5-HT2A receptor density in prefrontal cortex was associated with depression and suicide. 5-HT2A receptor gene polymorphism rs6313 was associated with 5-HT2A receptor binding potential, with the ability of individuals to use environmental support in order to prevent depression, and with sleep improvement after antidepressant treatment with mirtazapine. Studies on response to antidepressant drugs gave inconsistent results. Here we studied the effect of rs6313 on response to repeated total sleep deprivation (TSD) in 80 bipolar depressed inpatients treated with three consecutive TSD cycles (each one made of 36 h awake followed by a night of undisturbed sleep). All genotype groups showed comparable acute effects of the first TSD, but patients homozygotes for the T variant had better perceived and observed benefits from treatment than carriers of the C allele. These effects became significant after the first recovery night and during the following days, leading to a 36% higher final response rate (Hamilton depression rating<8). The higher density of postsynaptic excitatory 5-HT2A receptors in T/T homozygotes could have led to higher behavioural effects of increased 5-HT neurotransmission due to repeated TSD. Other possible mechanisms involve allostatic/homeostatic adaptation to sleep loss, and a different effect of the allele variants on epigenetic influences. Results confirm the interest for individual gene variants of the serotonin pathway in shaping clinical characteristics of depression and antidepressant response.

  13. The serotonin 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors interact with specific sets of PDZ proteins.

    PubMed

    Bécamel, Carine; Gavarini, Sophie; Chanrion, Benjamin; Alonso, Gérard; Galéotti, Nathalie; Dumuis, Aline; Bockaert, Joël; Marin, Philippe

    2004-05-01

    The 5-hydroxytryptamine type 2A (5-HT(2A)) receptor and the 5-HT(2C) receptor are closely related members of the G-protein-coupled receptors activated by serotonin that share very similar pharmacological profiles and cellular signaling pathways. These receptors express a canonical class I PDZ ligand (SXV) at their C-terminal extremity. Here, we have identified proteins that interact with the PDZ ligand of the 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT(2C) receptors by a proteomic approach associating affinity chromatography using immobilized synthetic peptides encompassing the PDZ ligand and mass spectrometry. We report that both receptor C termini interact with specific sets of PDZ proteins in vitro. The 5-HT(2C) receptor but not the 5-HT(2A) receptor binds to the Veli-3.CASK.Mint1 ternary complex and to SAP102. In addition, the 5-HT(2C) receptor binds more strongly to PSD-95 and MPP-3 than the 5-HT(2A) receptor. In contrast, a robust interaction between the 5-HT(2A) receptor and the channel-interacting PDZ protein CIPP was found, whereas CIPP did not significantly associate with the 5-HT(2C) receptor. We also show that residues located at the -1 position and upstream the PDZ ligand in the C terminus of the 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT(2C) receptors are major determinants in their interaction with specific PDZ proteins. Immunofluorescence and electron microscopy studies strongly suggested that these specific interactions also take place in living cells and that the 5-HT(2) receptor-PDZ protein complexes occur in intracellular compartments. The interaction of the 5-HT(2A) and the 5-HT(2C) receptor with specific sets of PDZ proteins may contribute to their different signal transduction properties.

  14. Behavioral tolerance to lysergic acid diethylamide is associated with reduced serotonin-2A receptor signaling in rat cortex.

    PubMed

    Gresch, Paul J; Smith, Randy L; Barrett, Robert J; Sanders-Bush, Elaine

    2005-09-01

    Tolerance is defined as a decrease in responsiveness to a drug after repeated administration. Tolerance to the behavioral effects of hallucinogens occurs in humans and animals. In this study, we used drug discrimination to establish a behavioral model of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) tolerance and examined whether tolerance to the stimulus properties of LSD is related to altered serotonin receptor signaling. Rats were trained to discriminate 60 microg/kg LSD from saline in a two-lever drug discrimination paradigm. Two groups of animals were assigned to either chronic saline treatment or chronic LSD treatment. For chronic treatment, rats from each group were injected once per day with either 130 microg/kg LSD or saline for 5 days. Rats were tested for their ability to discriminate either saline or 60 microg/kg LSD, 24 h after the last chronic injection. Rats receiving chronic LSD showed a 44% reduction in LSD lever selection, while rats receiving chronic vehicle showed no change in percent choice on the LSD lever. In another group of rats receiving the identical chronic LSD treatment, LSD-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding, an index of G-protein coupling, was measured in the rat brain by autoradiography. After chronic LSD, a significant reduction in LSD-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding was observed in the medial prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex. Furthermore, chronic LSD produced a significant reduction in 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding in medial prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex, which was blocked by MDL 100907, a selective 5-HT2A receptor antagonist, but not SB206553, a 5-HT2C receptor antagonist, indicating a reduction in 5-HT2A receptor signaling. 125I-LSD binding to 5-HT2A receptors was reduced in cortical regions, demonstrating a reduction in 5-HT2A receptor density. Taken together, these results indicate that adaptive changes in LSD-stimulated serotonin receptor signaling may mediate tolerance

  15. Quantitative phosphoproteomics unravels biased phosphorylation of serotonin 2A receptor at Ser280 by hallucinogenic versus nonhallucinogenic agonists.

    PubMed

    Karaki, Samah; Becamel, Carine; Murat, Samy; Mannoury la Cour, Clotilde; Millan, Mark J; Prézeau, Laurent; Bockaert, Joël; Marin, Philippe; Vandermoere, Franck

    2014-05-01

    The serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptor is a primary target of psychedelic hallucinogens such as lysergic acid diethylamine, mescaline, and psilocybin, which reproduce some of the core symptoms of schizophrenia. An incompletely resolved paradox is that only some 5-HT(2A) receptor agonists exhibit hallucinogenic activity, whereas structurally related agonists with comparable affinity and activity lack such a psychoactive activity. Using a strategy combining stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture with enrichment in phosphorylated peptides by means of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography followed by immobilized metal affinity chromatography, we compared the phosphoproteome in HEK-293 cells transiently expressing the 5-HT(2A) receptor and exposed to either vehicle or the synthetic hallucinogen 1-[2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl]-2-aminopropane (DOI) or the nonhallucinogenic 5-HT(2A) agonist lisuride. Among the 5995 identified phosphorylated peptides, 16 sites were differentially phosphorylated upon exposure of cells to DOI versus lisuride. These include a serine (Ser(280)) located in the third intracellular loop of the 5-HT(2A) receptor, a region important for its desensitization. The specific phosphorylation of Ser(280) by hallucinogens was further validated by quantitative mass spectrometry analysis of immunopurified receptor digests and by Western blotting using a phosphosite specific antibody. The administration of DOI, but not of lisuride, to mice, enhanced the phosphorylation of 5-HT(2A) receptors at Ser(280) in the prefrontal cortex. Moreover, hallucinogens induced a less pronounced desensitization of receptor-operated signaling in HEK-293 cells and neurons than did nonhallucinogenic agonists. The mutation of Ser(280) to aspartic acid (to mimic phosphorylation) reduced receptor desensitization by nonhallucinogenic agonists, whereas its mutation to alanine increased the ability of hallucinogens to desensitize the receptor. This study reveals a biased

  16. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Unravels Biased Phosphorylation of Serotonin 2A Receptor at Ser280 by Hallucinogenic versus Nonhallucinogenic Agonists*

    PubMed Central

    Karaki, Samah; Becamel, Carine; Murat, Samy; Mannoury la Cour, Clotilde; Millan, Mark J.; Prézeau, Laurent; Bockaert, Joël; Marin, Philippe; Vandermoere, Franck

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin 5-HT2A receptor is a primary target of psychedelic hallucinogens such as lysergic acid diethylamine, mescaline, and psilocybin, which reproduce some of the core symptoms of schizophrenia. An incompletely resolved paradox is that only some 5-HT2A receptor agonists exhibit hallucinogenic activity, whereas structurally related agonists with comparable affinity and activity lack such a psychoactive activity. Using a strategy combining stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture with enrichment in phosphorylated peptides by means of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography followed by immobilized metal affinity chromatography, we compared the phosphoproteome in HEK-293 cells transiently expressing the 5-HT2A receptor and exposed to either vehicle or the synthetic hallucinogen 1-[2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl]-2-aminopropane (DOI) or the nonhallucinogenic 5-HT2A agonist lisuride. Among the 5995 identified phosphorylated peptides, 16 sites were differentially phosphorylated upon exposure of cells to DOI versus lisuride. These include a serine (Ser280) located in the third intracellular loop of the 5-HT2A receptor, a region important for its desensitization. The specific phosphorylation of Ser280 by hallucinogens was further validated by quantitative mass spectrometry analysis of immunopurified receptor digests and by Western blotting using a phosphosite specific antibody. The administration of DOI, but not of lisuride, to mice, enhanced the phosphorylation of 5-HT2A receptors at Ser280 in the prefrontal cortex. Moreover, hallucinogens induced a less pronounced desensitization of receptor-operated signaling in HEK-293 cells and neurons than did nonhallucinogenic agonists. The mutation of Ser280 to aspartic acid (to mimic phosphorylation) reduced receptor desensitization by nonhallucinogenic agonists, whereas its mutation to alanine increased the ability of hallucinogens to desensitize the receptor. This study reveals a biased phosphorylation of

  17. Hyperactivity in Childhood as a Predictor of School Performance in Elementary School: Modifying Effect of a Serotonin Receptor Gene (5-HTR2A)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulkki-Raback, Laura; Pullmann, Helle; Hintsanen, Mirka; Alatupa, Saija; Ravaja, Niklas; Lehtimaki, Terho; Keltikangas-jarvinen, Liisa

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Genes have been suggested to interact with predictors of school performance, but evidence is scarce. The purpose was to examine whether a hyperactive temperament leads to different school performance, depending on variability in a serotonin receptor gene (5-HTR2A). Method: The participants were a population-based sample of 909 girls…

  18. G-protein Receptor Kinase 5 Regulates the Cannabinoid Receptor 2-induced Up-regulation of Serotonin 2A Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Jade M.; Carrasco, Gonzalo A.

    2013-01-01

    We have recently reported that cannabinoid agonists can up-regulate and enhance the activity of serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptors in the prefrontal cortex (PFCx). Increased expression and activity of cortical 5-HT2A receptors has been associated with neuropsychiatric disorders, such as anxiety and schizophrenia. Here we report that repeated CP55940 exposure selectively up-regulates GRK5 proteins in rat PFCx and in a neuronal cell culture model. We sought to examine the mechanism underlying the regulation of GRK5 and to identify the role of GRK5 in the cannabinoid agonist-induced up-regulation and enhanced activity of 5-HT2A receptors. Interestingly, we found that cannabinoid agonist-induced up-regulation of GRK5 involves CB2 receptors, β-arrestin 2, and ERK1/2 signaling because treatment with CB2 shRNA lentiviral particles, β-arrestin 2 shRNA lentiviral particles, or ERK1/2 inhibitor prevented the cannabinoid agonist-induced up-regulation of GRK5. Most importantly, we found that GRK5 shRNA lentiviral particle treatment prevented the cannabinoid agonist-induced up-regulation and enhanced 5-HT2A receptor-mediated calcium release. Repeated cannabinoid exposure was also associated with enhanced phosphorylation of CB2 receptors and increased interaction between β-arrestin 2 and ERK1/2. These latter phenomena were also significantly inhibited by GRK5 shRNA lentiviral treatment. Our results suggest that sustained activation of CB2 receptors, which up-regulates 5-HT2A receptor signaling, enhances GRK5 expression; the phosphorylation of CB2 receptors; and the β-arrestin 2/ERK interactions. These data could provide a rationale for some of the adverse effects associated with repeated cannabinoid agonist exposure. PMID:23592773

  19. Using psilocybin to investigate the relationship between attention, working memory, and the serotonin 1A and 2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Carter, Olivia L; Burr, David C; Pettigrew, John D; Wallis, Guy M; Hasler, Felix; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2005-10-01

    Increasing evidence suggests a link between attention, working memory, serotonin (5-HT), and prefrontal cortex activity. In an attempt to tease out the relationship between these elements, this study tested the effects of the hallucinogenic mixed 5-HT1A/2A receptor agonist psilocybin alone and after pretreatment with the 5-HT2A antagonist ketanserin. Eight healthy human volunteers were tested on a multiple-object tracking task and spatial working memory task under the four conditions: placebo, psilocybin (215 microg/kg), ketanserin (50 mg), and psilocybin and ketanserin. Psilocybin significantly reduced attentional tracking ability, but had no significant effect on spatial working memory, suggesting a functional dissociation between the two tasks. Pretreatment with ketanserin did not attenuate the effect of psilocybin on attentional performance, suggesting a primary involvement of the 5-HT1A receptor in the observed deficit. Based on physiological and pharmacological data, we speculate that this impaired attentional performance may reflect a reduced ability to suppress or ignore distracting stimuli rather than reduced attentional capacity. The clinical relevance of these results is also discussed.

  20. Serotonin 2A Receptors in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: a Positron Emission Tomography Study with [11C]MDL 100907

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, H. Blair; Slifstein, Mark; Bender, James; Xu, Xiaoyan; Hackett, Elizabeth; Maher, Michael J.; Abi-Dargham, Anissa

    2014-01-01

    Background Serotonergic abnormalities are hypothesized to contribute to obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). This study used positron emission tomography (PET) with the radioligand [11C]MDL 100907 to examine whether the distribution of one of the serotonin receptors, the 5-HT2A receptor, is altered in OCD. Methods Nineteen OCD subjects, free of psychiatric medications and depression, and 19 matched healthy controls underwent PET scans following injection of [11C]MDL 100907. Total distribution volumes (VT) were derived by kinetic analysis using the arterial input function. Two measures of 5-HT2A availability were computed (BPND and BPP). Groups were compared using a region of interest (ROI) analysis and voxelwise analysis of spatially normalized parametric maps. ROIs included cortical regions (orbitofrontal, dorsolateral prefrontal, medial prefrontal, anterior cingulate, temporal, parietal, occipital, and insular cortex) and limbic regions (entorhinal cortex, parahippocampal gyrus, and medial temporal lobe). Results No significant group differences were observed in [11C]MDL 100907 BPND or BPP in the ROIs or in the voxelwise analysis of BPND maps. There was a significant correlation in the orbitofrontal cortex between [11C] MDL 100907 binding and age of onset, with earlier age of onset associated with higher binding. Conclusions In contrast to prior reports, people with OCD (free of psychiatric medications and depression) are not characterized as a group by major changes in 5-HT2A availability in cortical or limbic brain regions. Further research is warranted to examine potential differences in 5-HT2A availability between early and late onset OCD and to assess 5-HT2A function in relation to other neurotransmitter systems implicated in OCD. PMID:21855857

  1. Serotonin 5-hydroxytryptamine(2A) receptor activation suppresses tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced inflammation with extraordinary potency.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bangning; Becnel, Jaime; Zerfaoui, Mourad; Rohatgi, Rasika; Boulares, A Hamid; Nichols, Charles D

    2008-11-01

    The G protein-coupled serotonin 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)(2A) receptor is primarily recognized for its role in brain neurotransmission, where it mediates a wide variety of functions, including certain aspects of cognition. However, there is significant expression of this receptor in peripheral tissues, where its importance is largely unknown. We have now discovered that activation of 5-HT(2A) receptors in primary aortic smooth muscle cells provides a previously unknown and extremely potent inhibition of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha-mediated inflammation. 5-HT(2A) receptor stimulation with the agonist (R)-1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane [(R)-DOI] rapidly inhibits a variety of TNF-alpha-mediated proinflammatory markers, including intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), vascular adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), and interleukin (IL)-6 gene expression, nitric-oxide synthase activity, and nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappaB, with IC(50) values of only 10 to 20 pM. It is significant that proinflammatory markers can also be inhibited by (R)-DOI hours after treatment with TNF-alpha. With the exception of a few natural toxins, no current drugs or small molecule therapeutics demonstrate a comparable potency for any physiological effect. TNF-alpha-mediated inflammatory pathways have been strongly implicated in a number of diseases, including atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, type II diabetes, depression, schizophrenia, and Alzheimer's disease. Our results indicate that activation of 5-HT(2A) receptors represents a novel, and extraordinarily potent, potential therapeutic avenue for the treatment of disorders involving TNF-alpha-mediated inflammation. Note that because (R)-DOI can significantly inhibit the effects of TNF-alpha many hours after the administration of TNF-alpha, potential therapies could be aimed not only at preventing inflammation but also treating inflammatory injury that has already occurred or is ongoing. PMID

  2. THE SEROTONIN (5-HT) 5-HT2A RECEPTOR: ASSOCIATION WITH INHERENT AND COCAINE-EVOKED BEHAVIORAL DISINHIBITION IN RATS

    PubMed Central

    Anastasio, Noelle C.; Stoffel, Erin C.; Fox, Robert G.; Bubar, Marcy J.; Rice, Kenner C.; Moeller, F. Gerard; Cunningham, Kathryn A.

    2011-01-01

    Alterations in the balance of functional activity within the serotonin (5-HT) system are hypothesized to underlie impulse control. Cocaine-dependent subjects consistently demonstrate greater impulsivity relative to non-drug using control subjects. Preclinical studies suggest that the 5-HT2A receptor (5-HT2AR) contributes to the regulation of impulsive behavior and also mediates some of the behavioral effects of cocaine. We hypothesized that the selective 5-HT2AR antagonist M100907 would reduce inherent levels of impulsivity and attenuate impulsive responding induced by cocaine in two animal models of impulsivity, the differential reinforcement of low rate (DRL) task and the one-choice serial reaction time (1-CSRT) task. M100907 reduced rates of responding in the DRL task and premature responding in the 1-CSRT task. Conversely, cocaine disrupted rates of responding in the DRL task and increased premature responding in the 1-CSRT task. M100907 attenuated cocaine-induced increases in specific markers of behavioral disinhibition in the DRL and 1-CSRT tasks. These results suggest that the 5-HT2AR regulates inherent impulsivity, and that blockade of the 5-HT2AR alleviates specific aspects of elevated levels of impulsivity induced by cocaine exposure. These data point to the 5-HT2AR as an important regulatory substrate in impulse control. PMID:21499079

  3. Spatiotemporal brain dynamics of emotional face processing modulations induced by the serotonin 1A/2A receptor agonist psilocybin.

    PubMed

    Bernasconi, Fosco; Schmidt, André; Pokorny, Thomas; Kometer, Michael; Seifritz, Erich; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2014-12-01

    Emotional face processing is critically modulated by the serotonergic system. For instance, emotional face processing is impaired by acute psilocybin administration, a serotonin (5-HT) 1A and 2A receptor agonist. However, the spatiotemporal brain mechanisms underlying these modulations are poorly understood. Here, we investigated the spatiotemporal brain dynamics underlying psilocybin-induced modulations during emotional face processing. Electrical neuroimaging analyses were applied to visual evoked potentials in response to emotional faces, following psilocybin and placebo administration. Our results indicate a first time period of strength (i.e., Global Field Power) modulation over the 168-189 ms poststimulus interval, induced by psilocybin. A second time period of strength modulation was identified over the 211-242 ms poststimulus interval. Source estimations over these 2 time periods further revealed decreased activity in response to both neutral and fearful faces within limbic areas, including amygdala and parahippocampal gyrus, and the right temporal cortex over the 168-189 ms interval, and reduced activity in response to happy faces within limbic and right temporo-occipital brain areas over the 211-242 ms interval. Our results indicate a selective and temporally dissociable effect of psilocybin on the neuronal correlates of emotional face processing, consistent with a modulation of the top-down control. PMID:23861318

  4. Serotonin (5-HT) and 5-HT2A receptor agonists suppress lipolysis in primary rat adipose cells.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Björn; Medina, Anya; Fryklund, Claes; Fex, Malin; Stenkula, Karin G

    2016-05-27

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a biogenic monoamine that functions both as a neurotransmitter and a circulating hormone. Recently, the metabolic effects of 5-HT have gained interest and peripheral 5-HT has been proposed to influence lipid metabolism in various ways. Here, we investigated the metabolic effects of 5-HT in isolated, primary rat adipose cells. Incubation with 5-HT suppressed β-adrenergically stimulated glycerol release and decreased phosphorylation of protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent substrates, hormone sensitive lipase (Ser563) and perilipin (Ser522). The inhibitory effect of 5-HT on lipolysis enhanced the anti-lipolytic effect of insulin, but sustained in the presence of phosphodiesterase inhibitors, OPC3911 and isobuthylmethylxanthine (IBMX). The relative expression of 5-HT1A, -2B and -4 receptor class family were significantly higher in adipose tissue compared to adipose cells, whereas 5-HT1D, -2A and -7 were highly expressed in isolated adipose cells. Similar to 5-HT, 5-HT2 receptor agonists reduced lipolysis while 5-HT1 receptor agonists rather decreased non-stimulated and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Together, these data provide evidence of a direct effect of 5-HT on adipose cells, where 5-HT suppresses lipolysis and glucose uptake, which could contribute to altered systemic lipid- and glucose metabolism. PMID:27109474

  5. Serotonin 2A Receptor SNP rs7330461 Association with Treatment Response to Pomaglumetad Methionil in Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Nisenbaum, Laura K.; Downing, AnnCatherine M.; Zhao, Fangyi; Millen, Brian A.; Munsie, Leanne; Kinon, Bruce J.; Adams, David H.; Gomez, Juan Carlos; Penny, Michelle Ann

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to confirm the initial pharmacogenetic finding observed within the clinical proof-of-concept trial of an enhanced response to treatment with pomaglumetad methionil (LY2140023 monohydrate) in Caucasian schizophrenia patients homozygous for T/T at single nucleotide polymorphism rs7330461 in the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) 2A receptor gene compared to A/A homozygous patients. The effect of the rs7330461 genotype on the response to pomaglumetad methionil treatment was assessed in three additional clinical trials and in an integrated analysis. Overall, this study includes data from 1115 Caucasian patients for whom genotyping information for rs7330461 was available, consisting of 513 A/A homozygous, 466 A/T heterozygous and 136 T/T homozygous patients. Caucasian T/T homozygous patients showed significantly (p ≤ 0.05) greater improvement in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) total scores during treatment with pomaglumetad methionil 40 mg twice daily compared to A/A homozygous patients. Additionally, T/T homozygous patients receiving pomaglumetad methionil had significantly (p ≤ 0.05) greater improvements in PANSS total scores compared to placebo and similar improvements as T/T homozygous patients receiving standard-of-care (SOC) treatment. The findings reported here in conjunction with prior reports show that in Caucasian patients with schizophrenia, the T/T genotype at rs7330461 is consistently associated with an increased treatment response to pomaglumetad methionil compared to the A/A genotype. PMID:26861400

  6. Spatiotemporal brain dynamics of emotional face processing modulations induced by the serotonin 1A/2A receptor agonist psilocybin.

    PubMed

    Bernasconi, Fosco; Schmidt, André; Pokorny, Thomas; Kometer, Michael; Seifritz, Erich; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2014-12-01

    Emotional face processing is critically modulated by the serotonergic system. For instance, emotional face processing is impaired by acute psilocybin administration, a serotonin (5-HT) 1A and 2A receptor agonist. However, the spatiotemporal brain mechanisms underlying these modulations are poorly understood. Here, we investigated the spatiotemporal brain dynamics underlying psilocybin-induced modulations during emotional face processing. Electrical neuroimaging analyses were applied to visual evoked potentials in response to emotional faces, following psilocybin and placebo administration. Our results indicate a first time period of strength (i.e., Global Field Power) modulation over the 168-189 ms poststimulus interval, induced by psilocybin. A second time period of strength modulation was identified over the 211-242 ms poststimulus interval. Source estimations over these 2 time periods further revealed decreased activity in response to both neutral and fearful faces within limbic areas, including amygdala and parahippocampal gyrus, and the right temporal cortex over the 168-189 ms interval, and reduced activity in response to happy faces within limbic and right temporo-occipital brain areas over the 211-242 ms interval. Our results indicate a selective and temporally dissociable effect of psilocybin on the neuronal correlates of emotional face processing, consistent with a modulation of the top-down control.

  7. Polymorphisms of Serotonin Receptor 2A and 2C Genes and COMT in Relation to Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kring, Sofia I. I.; Werge, Thomas; Holst, Claus; Toubro, Søren; Astrup, Arne; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Sørensen, Thorkild I. A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Candidate genes of psychological importance include 5HT2A, 5HT2C, and COMT, implicated in the serotonin, noradrenaline and dopamine pathways, which also may be involved in regulation of energy balance. We investigated the associations of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of these genes with obesity and metabolic traits. Methodology/Principal Findings In a population of 166 200 young men examined at the draft boards, obese men (n = 726, BMI≥31.0 kg/m2) and a randomly selected group (n = 831) were re-examined at two surveys at mean ages 46 and 49 years (S-46, S-49). Anthropometric, physiological and biochemical measures were available. Logistic regression analyses were used to assess age-adjusted odds ratios. No significant associations were observed of 5HT2A rs6311, 5HT2C rs3813929 and COMT rs4680 with obesity, except that COMT rs4680 GG-genotype was associated with fat-BMI (OR = 1.08, CI = 1.01–1.16). The SNPs were associated with a number of physiological variables; most importantly 5HT2C rs3813929 T-allele was associated with glucose (OR = 4.56, CI = 1.13–18.4) and acute insulin response (OR = 0.65, CI = 0.44–0.94) in S-49. COMT rs4680 GG-genotype was associated with glucose (OR = 1.04, CI = 1.00–1.09). Except for an association between 5HT2A rs6311 and total-cholesterol at both surveys, significant in S-46 (OR = 2.66, CI = 1.11–6.40), no significant associations were observed for the other phenotypes. Significant associations were obtained when combined genotype of 5HT2C rs3813929 and COMT rs4680 were examined in relation to BMI (OR = 1.12, CI = 1.03–1.21), fat-BMI (OR = 1.22, CI = 1.08–1.38), waist (OR = 1.13, CI = 1.04–1.22), and cholesterol (OR = 5.60, CI = 0.99–31.4). Analyses of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) revealed, a 12.3% increased frequency of 5HT2C rs3813929 T-allele and an 11.6% increased frequency of COMT

  8. Role for serotonin2A (5-HT2A) and 2C (5-HT2C) receptors in experimental absence seizures.

    PubMed

    Venzi, Marcello; David, François; Bellet, Joachim; Cavaccini, Anna; Bombardi, Cristiano; Crunelli, Vincenzo; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Absence seizures (ASs) are the hallmark of childhood/juvenile absence epilepsy. Monotherapy with first-line anti-absence drugs only controls ASs in 50% of patients, indicating the need for novel therapeutic targets. Since serotonin family-2 receptors (5-HT2Rs) are known to modulate neuronal activity in the cortico-thalamo-cortical loop, the main network involved in AS generation, we investigated the effect of selective 5-HT2AR and 5-HT2CR ligands on ASs in the Genetic Absence Epilepsy Rats from Strasbourg (GAERS), a well established polygenic rat model of these non-convulsive seizures. GAERS rats were implanted with fronto-parietal EEG electrodes under general anesthesia, and their ASs were later recorded under freely moving conditions before and after intraperitoneal administration of various 5-HT2AR and 5-HT2CR ligands. The 5-HT2A agonist TCB-2 dose-dependently decreased the total time spent in ASs, an effect that was blocked by the selective 5-HT2A antagonist MDL11,939. Both MDL11,939 and another selective 5-HT2A antagonist (M100,907) increased the length of individual seizures when injected alone. The 5-HT2C agonists lorcaserin and CP-809,101 dose-dependently suppressed ASs, an effect blocked by the selective 5-HT2C antagonist SB 242984. In summary, 5-HT2ARs and 5-HT2CRs negatively control the expression of experimental ASs, indicating that selective agonists at these 5-HT2R subtypes might be potential novel anti-absence drugs.

  9. Role for serotonin2A (5-HT2A) and 2C (5-HT2C) receptors in experimental absence seizures.

    PubMed

    Venzi, Marcello; David, François; Bellet, Joachim; Cavaccini, Anna; Bombardi, Cristiano; Crunelli, Vincenzo; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Absence seizures (ASs) are the hallmark of childhood/juvenile absence epilepsy. Monotherapy with first-line anti-absence drugs only controls ASs in 50% of patients, indicating the need for novel therapeutic targets. Since serotonin family-2 receptors (5-HT2Rs) are known to modulate neuronal activity in the cortico-thalamo-cortical loop, the main network involved in AS generation, we investigated the effect of selective 5-HT2AR and 5-HT2CR ligands on ASs in the Genetic Absence Epilepsy Rats from Strasbourg (GAERS), a well established polygenic rat model of these non-convulsive seizures. GAERS rats were implanted with fronto-parietal EEG electrodes under general anesthesia, and their ASs were later recorded under freely moving conditions before and after intraperitoneal administration of various 5-HT2AR and 5-HT2CR ligands. The 5-HT2A agonist TCB-2 dose-dependently decreased the total time spent in ASs, an effect that was blocked by the selective 5-HT2A antagonist MDL11,939. Both MDL11,939 and another selective 5-HT2A antagonist (M100,907) increased the length of individual seizures when injected alone. The 5-HT2C agonists lorcaserin and CP-809,101 dose-dependently suppressed ASs, an effect blocked by the selective 5-HT2C antagonist SB 242984. In summary, 5-HT2ARs and 5-HT2CRs negatively control the expression of experimental ASs, indicating that selective agonists at these 5-HT2R subtypes might be potential novel anti-absence drugs. PMID:27085605

  10. Exploring the relationship between binding modes of 9-(aminomethyl)-9,10-dihydroanthracene and cyproheptadine analogues at the 5-HT2A serotonin receptor.

    PubMed

    Westkaemper, R B; Runyon, S P; Savage, J E; Roth, B L; Glennon, R A

    2001-02-26

    Comparison of the serotonin 5-HT2A receptor affinities of a parallel series of structural analogues of the novel ligand 9-aminomethyl-9,10-dihydroanthracene (AMDA) and a structurally similar prototypical tricyclic amine cyproheptadine suggests that the two agents bind to the receptor in different fashions. Examination of ligand-receptor model complexes supports the experimental data and suggests a potential origin for the differences in binding modes.

  11. A Functional Selectivity Mechanism at the Serotonin-2A GPCR Involves Ligand-Dependent Conformations of Intracellular Loop 2

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    With recent progress in determination of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) structure with crystallography, a variety of other experimental approaches (e.g., NMR spectroscopy, fluorescent-based assays, mass spectrometry techniques) are also being used to characterize state-specific and ligand-specific conformational states. MD simulations offer a powerful complementary approach to elucidate the dynamic features associated with ligand-specific GPCR conformations. To shed light on the conformational elements and dynamics of the important aspect of GPCR functional selectivity, we carried out unbiased microsecond-length MD simulations of the human serotonin 2A receptor (5-HT2AR) in the absence of ligand and bound to four distinct serotonergic agonists. The 5-HT2AR is a suitable system to study the structural features involved in the ligand-dependent conformational heterogeneity of GPCRs because it is well-characterized experimentally and exhibits a strong agonist-specific phenotype in that some 5-HT2AR agonists induce LSD-like hallucinations, while others lack this psychoactive property entirely. Here we report evidence for structural and dynamic differences in 5-HT2AR interacting with such pharmacologically distinct ligands, hallucinogens, and nonhallucinogens obtained from all-atom MD simulations. Differential ligand binding contacts were identified for structurally similar hallucinogens and nonhallucinogens and found to correspond to different conformations in the intracellular loop 2 (ICL2). From the different ICL2 conformations, functional selective phenotypes are suggested through effects on dimerization and/or distinct direct interaction with effector proteins. The findings are presented in the context of currently proposed hallucinogenesis mechanisms, and ICL2 is proposed as a fine-tuning selective switch that can differentiates modes of 5-HT2AR activation. PMID:25314362

  12. Sensory gating deficits, pattern completion, and disturbed fronto-limbic balance, a model for description of hallucinations and delusions in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Javanbakht, Arash

    2006-01-01

    for the high dopamine level of amygdala despite its decreased size and abnormal anatomy is also suggested as a compensatory function which might explain the decline in positive psychotic symptoms when schizophrenics age according to amygdala burn out. Based on this model, speculations are provided for: late onset of the effects of antipsychotics on positive psychotic symptoms, mechanism for the therapeutic effect of serotonin type 2A receptor blockers and GABAergic medications in psychosis, role of smoking in diminution of psychotic symptoms, and relationship between biological and psychological issues in the formation of psychotic symptoms. Finally, based on this model, a new role for nicotinic cholinergic drugs (such as galantamine) for treatment of schizophrenia and other psychotic or psychotic-like disorders is proposed.

  13. The 5-HT{sub 2A} serotoninergic receptor is expressed in the MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line and reveals a mitogenic effect of serotonin

    SciTech Connect

    Sonier, Brigitte; Arseneault, Madeleine; Lavigne, Carole; Ouellette, Rodney J.; Vaillancourt, Cathy . E-mail: cathy.vaillancourt@iaf.inrs.ca

    2006-05-19

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) has been described as a mitogen in a variety of cell types and carcinomas. It exerts its mitogenic effect by interacting with a wide range of 5-HT receptor types. Certain studies suggest that some selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors promote breast cancer in animals and humans. This study attempts to clarify the role of serotonin in promoting the growth of neoplastic mammary cells. Expression of the 5-HT{sub 2A} serotoninergic receptor subtype in MCF-7 cells was determined by RT-PCR, Western blotting, and immunofluorescence analysis. The mitogenic effect of 5-HT on MCF-7 cells was determined by means of the MTT proliferation assay. We have demonstrated that the 5-HT{sub 2A} receptor subtype is fully expressed in the MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line, in terms of encoding mRNA and receptor protein. Automated sequencing has confirmed that the 5-HT{sub 2A} receptor present in this cell line is identical to the 5-HT{sub 2A} receptor found in human platelets and in human cerebral cortex. Furthermore, this receptor was found by immunofluorescence to be on the plasma membrane. MTT proliferation assays revealed that 5-HT and DOI, a selective 5-HT{sub 2A} receptor subtype agonist, stimulated MCF-7 cell. These results indicate that 5-HT plays a mitogenic role in neoplastic mammary cells. Our data also indicate that 5-HT exerts this positive growth effect on MCF-7 cells through, in part, the 5-HT{sub 2A} receptor subtype, which is fully expressed in this cell line.

  14. APD125, a Selective Serotonin 5-HT2A Receptor Inverse Agonist, Significantly Improves Sleep Maintenance in Primary Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Russell; Seiden, David J.; Hull, Steven G.; Erman, Milton; Schwartz, Howard; Anderson, Christen; Prosser, Warren; Shanahan, William; Sanchez, Matilde; Chuang, Emil; Roth, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    . Conclusions: APD125 produced statistically significant improvements in objective parameters of sleep maintenance and sleep consolidation and was well tolerated in adults with primary chronic insomnia. Citation: Rosenberg R; Seiden DJ; Hull SG; Erman M; Schwartz H; Anderson C; Prosser W; Shanahan W; Sanchez M; Chuang E; Roth T. APD125, a selective serotonin 5-HT2A receptor inverse agonist, significantly improves sleep maintenance in primary insomnia. SLEEP 2008;31(12):1663–1671. PMID:19090322

  15. Discovering the mechanisms underlying serotonin (5-HT)2A and 5-HT2C receptor regulation following nicotine withdrawal in rats.

    PubMed

    Zaniewska, Magdalena; Alenina, Natalia; Wydra, Karolina; Fröhler, Sebastian; Kuśmider, Maciej; McCreary, Andrew C; Chen, Wei; Bader, Michael; Filip, Małgorzata

    2015-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated that nicotine withdrawal produces depression-like behavior and that serotonin (5-HT)2A/2C receptor ligands modulate that mood-like state. In the present study we aimed to identify the mechanisms (changes in radioligand binding, transcription or RNA-editing) related to such a behavioral outcome. Rats received vehicle or nicotine (0.4 mg/kg, s.c.) for 5 days in home cages. Brain 5-HT2A/2C receptors were analyzed on day 3 of nicotine withdrawal. Nicotine withdrawal increased [(3)H]ketanserin binding to 5-HT2A receptors in the ventral tegmental area and ventral dentate gyrus, yet decreased binding in the nucleus accumbens shell. Reduction in [(3)H]mesulergine binding to 5-HT2C receptors was seen in the ventral dentate gyrus. Profound decrease in the 5-HT2A receptor transcript level was noted in the hippocampus and ventral tegmental area. Out of five 5-HT2C receptor mRNA editing sites, deep sequencing data showed a reduction in editing at the E site and a trend toward reduction at the C site in the hippocampus. In the ventral tegmental area, a reduction for the frequency of CD 5-HT2C receptor transcript was seen. These results show that the reduction in the 5-HT2A receptor transcript level may be an auto-regulatory response to the increased receptor density in the hippocampus and ventral tegmental area during nicotine withdrawal, while decreased 5-HT2C receptor mRNA editing may explain the reduction in receptor labeling in the hippocampus. Serotonin (5-HT)2A/2C receptor ligands alleviate depression-like state in nicotine-withdrawn rats. Here, we show that the reduction in 5-HT2A receptor transcript level may be an auto-regulatory response to the increased receptor number in the hippocampus and ventral tegmental area during nicotine withdrawal, while attenuated 5-HT2C receptor mRNA editing in the hippocampus might explain reduced inverse agonist binding to 5-HT2C receptor and suggest a shift toward a population of more active receptors. 5

  16. Serotonin syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Increased body temperature Loss of coordination Nausea Overactive reflexes Rapid changes in blood pressure Vomiting ... as confusion or hypomania Muscle spasms (myoclonus) Overactive reflexes ( ... Tremor Uncoordinated movements (ataxia) Serotonin syndrome ...

  17. Endocannabinoids blunt the augmentation of synaptic transmission by serotonin 2A receptors in the nucleus tractus solitarii (nTS).

    PubMed

    Austgen, James R; Kline, David D

    2013-11-01

    Serotonin (5-Hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) and the 5-HT2 receptor modulate cardiovascular and autonomic function in part through actions in the nTS, the primary termination and integration point for cardiorespiratory afferents in the brainstem. In other brain regions, 5-HT2 receptors (5-HT2R) modify synaptic transmission directly, as well as through 5-HT2AR-induced endocannabinoid release. This study examined the role of 5-HT2AR as well as their interaction with endocannabinoids on neurotransmission in the nucleus tractus solitarii (nTS). Excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) in monosynaptic nTS neurons were recorded in the horizontal brainstem slice during activation and blockade of 5-HT2ARs. 5-HT2AR activation augmented solitary tract (TS) evoked EPSC amplitude whereas 5-HT2AR blockade depressed TS-EPSC amplitude at low and high TS stimulation rates. The 5-HT2AR-induced increase in neurotransmission was reduced by endocannabinoid receptor block and increased endogenous endocannabinoids in the synaptic cleft during high frequency, but not low, TS stimulation. Endocannabinoids did not tonically modify EPSCs. These data suggest 5-HT acting through the 5-HT2AR is an excitatory neuromodulator in the nTS and its effects are modulated by the endocannabinoid system.

  18. Individual differences in frontolimbic circuitry and anxiety emerge with adolescent changes in endocannabinoid signaling across species

    PubMed Central

    Gee, Dylan G.; Fetcho, Robert N.; Jing, Deqiang; Li, Anfei; Glatt, Charles E.; Drysdale, Andrew T.; Cohen, Alexandra O.; Dellarco, Danielle V.; Yang, Rui R.; Dale, Anders M.; Jernigan, Terry L.; Lee, Francis S.; Casey, B.J.

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety disorders peak in incidence during adolescence, a developmental window that is marked by dynamic changes in gene expression, endocannabinoid signaling, and frontolimbic circuitry. We tested whether genetic alterations in endocannabinoid signaling related to a common polymorphism in fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), which alters endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) levels, would impact the development of frontolimbic circuitry implicated in anxiety disorders. In a pediatric imaging sample of over 1,000 3- to 21-y-olds, we show effects of the FAAH genotype specific to frontolimbic connectivity that emerge by ∼12 y of age and are paralleled by changes in anxiety-related behavior. Using a knock-in mouse model of the FAAH polymorphism that controls for genetic and environmental backgrounds, we confirm phenotypic differences in frontoamygdala circuitry and anxiety-related behavior by postnatal day 45 (P45), when AEA levels begin to decrease, and also, at P75 but not before. These results, which converge across species and level of analysis, highlight the importance of underlying developmental neurobiology in the emergence of genetic effects on brain circuitry and function. Moreover, the results have important implications for the identification of risk for disease and precise targeting of treatments to the biological state of the developing brain as a function of developmental changes in gene expression and neural circuit maturation. PMID:27001846

  19. 5-Hydroxytryptamine2A serotonin receptors in the primate cerebral cortex: possible site of action of hallucinogenic and antipsychotic drugs in pyramidal cell apical dendrites.

    PubMed

    Jakab, R L; Goldman-Rakic, P S

    1998-01-20

    To identify the cortical sites where 5-hydroxytryptamine2A (5-HT2A) serotonin receptors respond to the action of hallucinogens and atypical antipsychotic drugs, we have examined the cellular and subcellular distribution of these receptors in the cerebral cortex of macaque monkeys (with a focus on prefrontal areas) by using light and electron microscopic immunocytochemical techniques. 5-HT2A receptor immunoreactivity was detected in all cortical layers, among which layers II and III and layers V and VI were intensely stained, and layer IV was weakly labeled. The majority of the receptor-labeled cells were pyramidal neurons and the most intense immunolabeling was consistently confined to their parallelly aligned proximal apical dendrites that formed two intensely stained bands above and below layer IV. In double-label experiments, 5-HT2A label was found in calbindin D28k-positive, nonphosphorylated-neurofilament-positive, and immuno-negative pyramidal cells, suggesting that probably all pyramidal cells express 5-HT2A receptors. 5-HT2A label was also found in large- and medium-size interneurons, some of which were immuno-positive for calbindin. 5-HT2A receptor label was also associated with axon terminals. These findings reconcile the data on the receptor's cortical physiology and localization by (i) establishing that 5-HT2A receptors are located postsynaptically and presynaptically, (ii) demonstrating that pyramidal neurons constitute the major 5-HT2A-receptor-expressing cells in the cortex, and (iii) supporting the view that the apical dendritic field proximal to the pyramidal cell soma is the "hot spot" for 5-HT2A-receptor-mediated physiological actions relevant to normal and "psychotic" functional states of the cerebral cortex.

  20. Molecular Determinants for Ligand Binding at Serotonin 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C GPCRs: Experimental Affinity Results Analyzed by Molecular Modeling and Ligand Docking Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sakhuja, Rajeev; Kondabolu, Krishnakanth; Canal, Clinton E.; Booth, Raymond G.

    2013-01-01

    Ligands that activate the serotonin 5-HT2C G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) may be therapeutic for psychoses, addiction, and other neuropsychiatric disorders. Ligands that are antagonists at the closely related 5-HT2A GPCR also may treat neuropsychiatric disorders; in contrast, 5-HT2A activation may cause hallucinations. 5-HT2C-specific agonist drug design is challenging because 5-HT2 GPCRs share 80% transmembrane (TM) homology, same second messenger signaling, and no crystal structures are reported. To help delineate molecular determinants underlying differential binding and activation of 5-HT2 GPCRs, 5-HT2A, and 5-HT2C homology models were built from the β2-adrenergic GPCR crystal structure and equilibrated in a lipid phosphatidyl choline bilayer performing molecular dynamics simulations. Ligand docking studies at the 5-HT2 receptor models were conducted with the (2R, 4S)- and (2S, 4R)-enantiomers of the novel 5-HT2C agonist/5-HT2A/2B antagonist trans-4-phenyl-N,N-dimethyl-2-aminotetralin (PAT) and its 4′-chlorophenyl congners. Results indicate PAT–5-HT2 molecular interactions especially in TM domain V are important for the (2R, 4S) enantiomer, whereas, TM domain VI and VII interactions are more important for the (2S, 4R) enantiomer. PMID:23913978

  1. Development of a Multiplex Assay for Studying Functional Selectivity of Human Serotonin 5-HT2A Receptors and Identification of Active Compounds by High-Throughput Screening.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Alba; Lage, Sonia; Cadavid, Maria Isabel; Loza, Maria Isabel; Brea, José

    2016-09-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) exist as collections of conformations in equilibrium, and the efficacy of drugs has been proposed to be associated with their absolute and relative affinities for these different conformations. The serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptor regulates multiple physiological functions, is involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, and serves as an important target of atypical antipsychotic drugs. This receptor was one of the first GPCRs for which the functional selectivity phenomenon was observed, with its various ligands exerting differential effects on the phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and phospholipase C (PLC) signaling pathways. We aimed to develop a multiplex functional assay in 96-well plates for the simultaneous measurement of the PLA2 and PLC pathways coupled to 5-HT2A receptors; this approach enables the detection of either functional selectivity or cooperativity phenomena in early drug screening stages. The suitability of the method for running screening campaigns was tested using the Prestwick Chemical Library, and 22 confirmed hits with activities of more than 90% were identified; 11 of these hits produced statistically significant differences between the two effector pathways. Thus, we have developed a miniaturized multiplex assay in 96-well plates to measure functional selectivity for 5-HT2A receptors in the early stages of the drug discovery process. PMID:27095818

  2. Activation of serotonin 2A receptors underlies the psilocybin-induced effects on α oscillations, N170 visual-evoked potentials, and visual hallucinations.

    PubMed

    Kometer, Michael; Schmidt, André; Jäncke, Lutz; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2013-06-19

    Visual illusions and hallucinations are hallmarks of serotonergic hallucinogen-induced altered states of consciousness. Although the serotonergic hallucinogen psilocybin activates multiple serotonin (5-HT) receptors, recent evidence suggests that activation of 5-HT2A receptors may lead to the formation of visual hallucinations by increasing cortical excitability and altering visual-evoked cortical responses. To address this hypothesis, we assessed the effects of psilocybin (215 μg/kg vs placebo) on both α oscillations that regulate cortical excitability and early visual-evoked P1 and N170 potentials in healthy human subjects. To further disentangle the specific contributions of 5-HT2A receptors, subjects were additionally pretreated with the preferential 5-HT2A receptor antagonist ketanserin (50 mg vs placebo). We found that psilocybin strongly decreased prestimulus parieto-occipital α power values, thus precluding a subsequent stimulus-induced α power decrease. Furthermore, psilocybin strongly decreased N170 potentials associated with the appearance of visual perceptual alterations, including visual hallucinations. All of these effects were blocked by pretreatment with the 5-HT2A antagonist ketanserin, indicating that activation of 5-HT2A receptors by psilocybin profoundly modulates the neurophysiological and phenomenological indices of visual processing. Specifically, activation of 5-HT2A receptors may induce a processing mode in which stimulus-driven cortical excitation is overwhelmed by spontaneous neuronal excitation through the modulation of α oscillations. Furthermore, the observed reduction of N170 visual-evoked potentials may be a key mechanism underlying 5-HT2A receptor-mediated visual hallucinations. This change in N170 potentials may be important not only for psilocybin-induced states but also for understanding acute hallucinatory states seen in psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease. PMID:23785166

  3. Activation of serotonin 2A receptors underlies the psilocybin-induced effects on α oscillations, N170 visual-evoked potentials, and visual hallucinations.

    PubMed

    Kometer, Michael; Schmidt, André; Jäncke, Lutz; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2013-06-19

    Visual illusions and hallucinations are hallmarks of serotonergic hallucinogen-induced altered states of consciousness. Although the serotonergic hallucinogen psilocybin activates multiple serotonin (5-HT) receptors, recent evidence suggests that activation of 5-HT2A receptors may lead to the formation of visual hallucinations by increasing cortical excitability and altering visual-evoked cortical responses. To address this hypothesis, we assessed the effects of psilocybin (215 μg/kg vs placebo) on both α oscillations that regulate cortical excitability and early visual-evoked P1 and N170 potentials in healthy human subjects. To further disentangle the specific contributions of 5-HT2A receptors, subjects were additionally pretreated with the preferential 5-HT2A receptor antagonist ketanserin (50 mg vs placebo). We found that psilocybin strongly decreased prestimulus parieto-occipital α power values, thus precluding a subsequent stimulus-induced α power decrease. Furthermore, psilocybin strongly decreased N170 potentials associated with the appearance of visual perceptual alterations, including visual hallucinations. All of these effects were blocked by pretreatment with the 5-HT2A antagonist ketanserin, indicating that activation of 5-HT2A receptors by psilocybin profoundly modulates the neurophysiological and phenomenological indices of visual processing. Specifically, activation of 5-HT2A receptors may induce a processing mode in which stimulus-driven cortical excitation is overwhelmed by spontaneous neuronal excitation through the modulation of α oscillations. Furthermore, the observed reduction of N170 visual-evoked potentials may be a key mechanism underlying 5-HT2A receptor-mediated visual hallucinations. This change in N170 potentials may be important not only for psilocybin-induced states but also for understanding acute hallucinatory states seen in psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease.

  4. Enriched Expression of Serotonin 1B and 2A Receptor Genes in Macaque Visual Cortex and their Bidirectional Modulatory Effects on Neuronal Responses

    PubMed Central

    Watakabe, Akiya; Komatsu, Yusuke; Sadakane, Osamu; Shimegi, Satoshi; Takahata, Toru; Higo, Noriyuki; Tochitani, Shiro; Hashikawa, Tsutomu; Naito, Tomoyuki; Osaki, Hironobu; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Okamoto, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Ayako; Hara, Shin-ichiro; Akasaki, Takafumi; Sato, Hiromichi

    2009-01-01

    To study the molecular mechanism how cortical areas are specialized in adult primates, we searched for area-specific genes in macaque monkeys and found striking enrichment of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) 1B receptor mRNA, and to a lesser extent, of 5-HT2A receptor mRNA, in the primary visual area (V1). In situ hybridization analyses revealed that both mRNA species were highly concentrated in the geniculorecipient layers IVA and IVC, where they were coexpressed in the same neurons. Monocular inactivation by tetrodotoxin injection resulted in a strong and rapid (<3 h) downregulation of these mRNAs, suggesting the retinal activity dependency of their expression. Consistent with the high expression level in V1, clear modulatory effects of 5-HT1B and 5-HT2A receptor agonists on the responses of V1 neurons were observed in in vivo electrophysiological experiments. The modulatory effect of the 5-HT1B agonist was dependent on the firing rate of the recorded neurons: The effect tended to be facilitative for neurons with a high firing rate, and suppressive for those with a low firing rate. The 5-HT2A agonist showed opposite effects. These results suggest that this serotonergic system controls the visual response in V1 for optimization of information processing toward the incoming visual inputs. PMID:19056862

  5. Evidence for chronically altered cortical serotonin function in human female recreational ecstasy (MDMA) polydrug users

    PubMed Central

    Di Iorio, Christina R; Watkins, Tristan J; Dietrich, Mary S; Cao, Aize; Blackford, Jennifer U; Rogers, Baxter; Ansari, Mohammed S; Baldwin, Ronald M; Li, Rui; Kessler, Robert M; Salomon, Ronald M; Benningfield, Margaret; Cowan, Ronald L

    2012-01-01

    Context MDMA (ecstasy) is a popular recreational drug that produces loss of serotonin (5-HT) axons in animal models. Whether MDMA produces chronic reductions in 5-HT signaling in humans remains controversial. Objective To determine if MDMA use is associated with chronic reductions in serotonin signaling in female human cerebral cortex as reflected by increased 5-HT2A receptors. Design Cross sectional case-control study comparing 5-HT2A receptor levels in abstinent female MDMA polydrug users to MDMA-naive females; within-group design assessing the association of lifetime MDMA use and 5-HT2A receptors. Subjects had at least 90 days abstinence from MDMA use as verified by hair sampling. Cortical 5-HT2A receptor levels were assayed with the 5HT2A-specific Positron Emission Tomography (PET) radioligand [18F]setoperone. Setting Academic Medical Center Research Laboratory. Participants Volunteer female MDMA users (N=14) and MDMA-naive controls (N=10). Main exclusion criteria were non-drug-related DSM-IV axis I psychiatric disorders and general medical illness. Main Outcome Measure Cortical 5-HT2A receptor non-displaceable binding potential (5-HT2ABPND). Results MDMA users had increased 5-HT2ABPND in occipital-parietal (19.7%), temporal (20.5%), occipito-temporal-parietal (18.3%), frontal (16.6%), and fronto-parietal (18.5%) regions (p<0.05; corrected). Lifetime MDMA use associated positively with 5-HT2ABPND in fronto-parietal (β=0.665;p=0.007), occipito-temporal (β=0.798;p=0.002), fronto-limbic (β=0.634;p=0.024), and frontal (β=0.691;p=0.008) regions. In contrast, there were no regions in which MDMA use was inversely associated with receptor levels. There were no statistically significant effects of the duration of MDMA abstinence on 5-HT2ABPND. Conclusions Human recreational MDMA use is associated with long-lasting increases in 5-HT2A receptor density. 5-HT2A receptor levels correlate positively with lifetime MDMA use and do not decrease with abstinence. These

  6. Activation of serotonin2A receptors in the medial septum-diagonal band of Broca complex enhanced working memory in the hemiparkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Bo; Zhang, Li; Sun, Yi-Na; Han, Ling-Na; Wu, Zhong-Heng; Zhang, Qiao-Jun; Liu, Jian

    2015-04-01

    Serotonin2A (5-HT2A) receptors are highly expressed in the medial septum-diagonal band of Broca complex (MS-DB), especially in parvalbumin (PV)-positive neurons linked to hippocampal theta rhythm, which is involved in cognition. Cognitive impairments commonly occur in Parkinson's disease. Here we performed behavioral, electrophysiological, neurochemical and immunohistochemical studies in rats with complete unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) to assess the importance of dopamine (DA) depletion and MS-DB 5-HT2A receptors for working memory. The MFB lesions resulted in working memory impairment and decreases in firing rate and density of MS-DB PV-positive neurons, peak frequency of hippocampal theta rhythm, and DA levels in septohippocampal system and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) compared to control rats. Intra-MS-DB injection of high affinity 5-HT2A receptor agonist TCB-2 enhanced working memory, increased firing rate of PV-positive neurons and peak frequency of hippocampal theta rhythm, elevated DA levels in the hippocampus and mPFC, and decreased 5-HT level in the hippocampus in control and lesioned rats. Compared to control rats, the duration of the excitatory effect produced by TCB-2 on the firing rate of PV-positive neurons was markedly shortened in lesioned rats, indicating dysfunction of 5-HT2A receptors. These findings suggest that unilateral lesions of the MFB in rats induced working memory deficit, and activation of MS-DB 5-HT2A receptors enhanced working memory, which may be due to changes in the activity of septohippocampal network and monoamine levels in the hippocampus and mPFC. PMID:25486618

  7. Activation of serotonin2A receptors in the medial septum-diagonal band of Broca complex enhanced working memory in the hemiparkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Bo; Zhang, Li; Sun, Yi-Na; Han, Ling-Na; Wu, Zhong-Heng; Zhang, Qiao-Jun; Liu, Jian

    2015-04-01

    Serotonin2A (5-HT2A) receptors are highly expressed in the medial septum-diagonal band of Broca complex (MS-DB), especially in parvalbumin (PV)-positive neurons linked to hippocampal theta rhythm, which is involved in cognition. Cognitive impairments commonly occur in Parkinson's disease. Here we performed behavioral, electrophysiological, neurochemical and immunohistochemical studies in rats with complete unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) to assess the importance of dopamine (DA) depletion and MS-DB 5-HT2A receptors for working memory. The MFB lesions resulted in working memory impairment and decreases in firing rate and density of MS-DB PV-positive neurons, peak frequency of hippocampal theta rhythm, and DA levels in septohippocampal system and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) compared to control rats. Intra-MS-DB injection of high affinity 5-HT2A receptor agonist TCB-2 enhanced working memory, increased firing rate of PV-positive neurons and peak frequency of hippocampal theta rhythm, elevated DA levels in the hippocampus and mPFC, and decreased 5-HT level in the hippocampus in control and lesioned rats. Compared to control rats, the duration of the excitatory effect produced by TCB-2 on the firing rate of PV-positive neurons was markedly shortened in lesioned rats, indicating dysfunction of 5-HT2A receptors. These findings suggest that unilateral lesions of the MFB in rats induced working memory deficit, and activation of MS-DB 5-HT2A receptors enhanced working memory, which may be due to changes in the activity of septohippocampal network and monoamine levels in the hippocampus and mPFC.

  8. Differential effects of neonatal handling on anxiety, corticosterone response to stress, and hippocampal glucocorticoid and serotonin (5-HT)2A receptors in Lewis rats.

    PubMed

    Durand, M; Sarrieau, A; Aguerre, S; Mormède, P; Chaouloff, F

    1998-05-01

    Neonatal handling (during the first 3 weeks of age) has been reported by others to diminish the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) responsivity to stress in adult Long Evans rats, an effect involving a serotonin (5-HT)2A receptor-mediated increase in glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene expression in the frontal cortex and the hippocampus. In addition, handled animals may also display enduring reductions in anxiety-related behaviours, including in the elevated plus-maze. We have thus analysed the aforementioned neuroendocrine and behavioural consequences of neonatal stress in male and female adult Lewis rats, a strain characterised by its high anxiety and its hyporesponsive HPA axis. Plasma corticosterone, but not behavioural, responses to an elevated plus-maze test were decreased in handled rats. Besides, hippocampal mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and GR binding capacities were not different between handled and non-handled Lewis rats, an observation which could be extended to our adult Long Evans rats. Lastly, neither hippocampal nor cortical 5-HT2A receptor binding capacities in adult Lewis rats were affected by prior handling. In keeping with the failure to detect early handling-induced increases in hippocampal GR binding in 3-week old Lewis and Long Evans rats, the present study reinforces past findings indicating that environmental and genetic factors are crucial variables in the neonatal handling paradigm.

  9. Dorsal prefrontal cortical serotonin 2A receptor binding indices are differentially related to individual scores on harm avoidance.

    PubMed

    Baeken, Chris; Bossuyt, Axel; De Raedt, Rudi

    2014-02-28

    Although the serotonergic system has been implicated in healthy as well as in pathological emotional states, knowledge about its involvement in personality is limited. Earlier research on this topic suggests that post-synaptic 5-HT2A receptors could be involved in particular in frontal cortical areas. In drug-naïve healthy individuals, we examined the relationship between these 5-HT2A receptors and the temperament dimension harm avoidance (HA) using 123I-5-I-R91150 single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). HA is a personality feature closely related to stress, anxiety and depression proneness, and it is thought to be mediated by the serotonergic system. We focused on the prefrontal cortices as these regions are frequently implicated in cognitive processes related to a variety of affective disorders. We found a positive relationship between dorsal prefrontal cortical (DPFC) 5-HT2A receptor binding indices (BI) and individual HA scores. Further, our results suggest that those individuals with a tendency to worry or to ruminate are particularly prone to display significantly higher 5-HT2A receptor BI in the left DPFC. Although we only examined psychologically healthy individuals, this relationship suggests a possible vulnerability for affective disorders. PMID:24412555

  10. Inhibition of alpha oscillations through serotonin-2A receptor activation underlies the visual effects of ayahuasca in humans.

    PubMed

    Valle, Marta; Maqueda, Ana Elda; Rabella, Mireia; Rodríguez-Pujadas, Aina; Antonijoan, Rosa Maria; Romero, Sergio; Alonso, Joan Francesc; Mañanas, Miquel Àngel; Barker, Steven; Friedlander, Pablo; Feilding, Amanda; Riba, Jordi

    2016-07-01

    Ayahuasca is an Amazonian psychotropic plant tea typically obtained from two plants, Banisteriopsis caapi and Psychotria viridis. It contains the psychedelic 5-HT2A and sigma-1 agonist N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) plus β-carboline alkaloids with monoamine-oxidase (MAO)-inhibiting properties. Although the psychoactive effects of ayahuasca have commonly been attributed solely to agonism at the 5-HT2A receptor, the molecular target of classical psychedelics, this has not been tested experimentally. Here we wished to study the contribution of the 5-HT2A receptor to the neurophysiological and psychological effects of ayahuasca in humans. We measured drug-induced changes in spontaneous brain oscillations and subjective effects in a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled study involving the oral administration of ayahuasca (0.75mg DMT/kg body weight) and the 5-HT2A antagonist ketanserin (40mg). Twelve healthy, experienced psychedelic users (5 females) participated in four experimental sessions in which they received the following drug combinations: placebo+placebo, placebo+ayahuasca, ketanserin+placebo and ketanserin+ayahuasca. Ayahuasca induced EEG power decreases in the delta, theta and alpha frequency bands. Current density in alpha-band oscillations in parietal and occipital cortex was inversely correlated with the intensity of visual imagery induced by ayahuasca. Pretreatment with ketanserin inhibited neurophysiological modifications, reduced the correlation between alpha and visual effects, and attenuated the intensity of the subjective experience. These findings suggest that despite the chemical complexity of ayahuasca, 5-HT2A activation plays a key role in the neurophysiological and visual effects of ayahuasca in humans. PMID:27039035

  11. Inhibition of alpha oscillations through serotonin-2A receptor activation underlies the visual effects of ayahuasca in humans.

    PubMed

    Valle, Marta; Maqueda, Ana Elda; Rabella, Mireia; Rodríguez-Pujadas, Aina; Antonijoan, Rosa Maria; Romero, Sergio; Alonso, Joan Francesc; Mañanas, Miquel Àngel; Barker, Steven; Friedlander, Pablo; Feilding, Amanda; Riba, Jordi

    2016-07-01

    Ayahuasca is an Amazonian psychotropic plant tea typically obtained from two plants, Banisteriopsis caapi and Psychotria viridis. It contains the psychedelic 5-HT2A and sigma-1 agonist N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) plus β-carboline alkaloids with monoamine-oxidase (MAO)-inhibiting properties. Although the psychoactive effects of ayahuasca have commonly been attributed solely to agonism at the 5-HT2A receptor, the molecular target of classical psychedelics, this has not been tested experimentally. Here we wished to study the contribution of the 5-HT2A receptor to the neurophysiological and psychological effects of ayahuasca in humans. We measured drug-induced changes in spontaneous brain oscillations and subjective effects in a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled study involving the oral administration of ayahuasca (0.75mg DMT/kg body weight) and the 5-HT2A antagonist ketanserin (40mg). Twelve healthy, experienced psychedelic users (5 females) participated in four experimental sessions in which they received the following drug combinations: placebo+placebo, placebo+ayahuasca, ketanserin+placebo and ketanserin+ayahuasca. Ayahuasca induced EEG power decreases in the delta, theta and alpha frequency bands. Current density in alpha-band oscillations in parietal and occipital cortex was inversely correlated with the intensity of visual imagery induced by ayahuasca. Pretreatment with ketanserin inhibited neurophysiological modifications, reduced the correlation between alpha and visual effects, and attenuated the intensity of the subjective experience. These findings suggest that despite the chemical complexity of ayahuasca, 5-HT2A activation plays a key role in the neurophysiological and visual effects of ayahuasca in humans.

  12. Culture as a mediator of gene-environment interaction: Cultural consonance, childhood adversity, a 2A serotonin receptor polymorphism, and depression in urban Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dressler, William W; Balieiro, Mauro C; Ferreira de Araújo, Luiza; Silva, Wilson A; Ernesto Dos Santos, José

    2016-07-01

    Research on gene-environment interaction was facilitated by breakthroughs in molecular biology in the late 20th century, especially in the study of mental health. There is a reliable interaction between candidate genes for depression and childhood adversity in relation to mental health outcomes. The aim of this paper is to explore the role of culture in this process in an urban community in Brazil. The specific cultural factor examined is cultural consonance, or the degree to which individuals are able to successfully incorporate salient cultural models into their own beliefs and behaviors. It was hypothesized that cultural consonance in family life would mediate the interaction of genotype and childhood adversity. In a study of 402 adult Brazilians from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds, conducted from 2011 to 2014, the interaction of reported childhood adversity and a polymorphism in the 2A serotonin receptor was associated with higher depressive symptoms. Further analysis showed that the gene-environment interaction was mediated by cultural consonance in family life, and that these effects were more pronounced in lower social class neighborhoods. The findings reinforce the role of the serotonergic system in the regulation of stress response and learning and memory, and how these processes in turn interact with environmental events and circumstances. Furthermore, these results suggest that gene-environment interaction models should incorporate a wider range of environmental experience and more complex pathways to better understand how genes and the environment combine to influence mental health outcomes.

  13. Culture as a mediator of gene-environment interaction: Cultural consonance, childhood adversity, a 2A serotonin receptor polymorphism, and depression in urban Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dressler, William W; Balieiro, Mauro C; Ferreira de Araújo, Luiza; Silva, Wilson A; Ernesto Dos Santos, José

    2016-07-01

    Research on gene-environment interaction was facilitated by breakthroughs in molecular biology in the late 20th century, especially in the study of mental health. There is a reliable interaction between candidate genes for depression and childhood adversity in relation to mental health outcomes. The aim of this paper is to explore the role of culture in this process in an urban community in Brazil. The specific cultural factor examined is cultural consonance, or the degree to which individuals are able to successfully incorporate salient cultural models into their own beliefs and behaviors. It was hypothesized that cultural consonance in family life would mediate the interaction of genotype and childhood adversity. In a study of 402 adult Brazilians from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds, conducted from 2011 to 2014, the interaction of reported childhood adversity and a polymorphism in the 2A serotonin receptor was associated with higher depressive symptoms. Further analysis showed that the gene-environment interaction was mediated by cultural consonance in family life, and that these effects were more pronounced in lower social class neighborhoods. The findings reinforce the role of the serotonergic system in the regulation of stress response and learning and memory, and how these processes in turn interact with environmental events and circumstances. Furthermore, these results suggest that gene-environment interaction models should incorporate a wider range of environmental experience and more complex pathways to better understand how genes and the environment combine to influence mental health outcomes. PMID:27270123

  14. A Neurobiological Hypothesis of Treatment-Resistant Depression – Mechanisms for Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Non-Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Coplan, Jeremy D.; Gopinath, Srinath; Abdallah, Chadi G.; Berry, Benjamin R.

    2014-01-01

    First-line treatment of major depression includes administration of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), yet studies suggest that remission rates following two trials of an SSRI are <50%. The authors examine the putative biological substrates underlying “treatment resistant depression (TRD)” with the goal of elucidating novel rationales to treat TRD. We look at relevant articles from the preclinical and clinical literature combined with clinical exposure to TRD patients. A major focus was to outline pathophysiological mechanisms whereby the serotonin system becomes impervious to the desired enhancement of serotonin neurotransmission by SSRIs. A complementary focus was to dissect neurotransmitter systems, which serve to inhibit the dorsal raphe. We propose, based on a body of translational studies, TRD may not represent a simple serotonin deficit state but rather an excess of midbrain peri-raphe serotonin and subsequent deficit at key fronto-limbic projection sites, with ultimate compromise in serotonin-mediated neuroplasticity. Glutamate, serotonin, noradrenaline, and histamine are activated by stress and exert an inhibitory effect on serotonin outflow, in part by “flooding” 5-HT1A autoreceptors by serotonin itself. Certain factors putatively exacerbate this scenario – presence of the short arm of the serotonin transporter gene, early-life adversity and comorbid bipolar disorder – each of which has been associated with SSRI-treatment resistance. By utilizing an incremental approach, we provide a system for treating the TRD patient based on a strategy of rescuing serotonin neurotransmission from a state of SSRI-induced dorsal raphe stasis. This calls for “stacked” interventions, with an SSRI base, targeting, if necessary, the glutamatergic, serotonergic, noradrenergic, and histaminergic systems, thereby successively eliminating the inhibitory effects each are capable of exerting on serotonin neurons. Future studies are recommended to test

  15. Serotonin contracts the rat mesenteric artery by inhibiting 4-aminopyridine-sensitive Kv channels via the 5-HT2A receptor and Src tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Sung, Dong Jun; Noh, Hyun Ju; Kim, Jae Gon; Park, Sang Woong; Kim, Bokyung; Cho, Hana; Bae, Young Min

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)) is a neurotransmitter that regulates a variety of functions in the nervous, gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems. Despite such importance, 5-HT signaling pathways are not entirely clear. We demonstrated previously that 4-aminopyridine (4-AP)-sensitive voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channels determine the resting membrane potential of arterial smooth muscle cells and that the Kv channels are inhibited by 5-HT, which depolarizes the membranes. Therefore, we hypothesized that 5-HT contracts arteries by inhibiting Kv channels. Here we studied 5-HT signaling and the detailed role of Kv currents in rat mesenteric arteries using patch-clamp and isometric tension measurements. Our data showed that inhibiting 4-AP-sensitive Kv channels contracted arterial rings, whereas inhibiting Ca(2+)-activated K(+), inward rectifier K(+) and ATP-sensitive K(+) channels had little effect on arterial contraction, indicating a central role of Kv channels in the regulation of resting arterial tone. 5-HT-induced arterial contraction decreased significantly in the presence of high KCl or the voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel (VGCC) inhibitor nifedipine, indicating that membrane depolarization and the consequent activation of VGCCs mediate the 5-HT-induced vasoconstriction. The effects of 5-HT on Kv currents and arterial contraction were markedly prevented by the 5-HT2A receptor antagonists ketanserin and spiperone. Consistently, α-methyl 5-HT, a 5-HT2 receptor agonist, mimicked the 5-HT action on Kv channels. Pretreatment with a Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor, 4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine, prevented both the 5-HT-mediated vasoconstriction and Kv current inhibition. Our data suggest that 4-AP-sensitive Kv channels are the primary regulator of the resting tone in rat mesenteric arteries. 5-HT constricts the arteries by inhibiting Kv channels via the 5-HT2A receptor and Src tyrosine kinase pathway. PMID:24336234

  16. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (serotonin)2A receptors in rat anterior cingulate cortex mediate the discriminative stimulus properties of d-lysergic acid diethylamide.

    PubMed

    Gresch, Paul J; Barrett, Robert J; Sanders-Bush, Elaine; Smith, Randy L

    2007-02-01

    d-Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), an indoleamine hallucinogen, produces profound alterations in mood, thought, and perception in humans. The brain site(s) that mediates the effects of LSD is currently unknown. In this study, we combine the drug discrimination paradigm with intracerebral microinjections to investigate the anatomical localization of the discriminative stimulus of LSD in rats. Based on our previous findings, we targeted the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) to test its involvement in mediating the discriminative stimulus properties of LSD. Rats were trained to discriminate systemically administered LSD (0.085 mg/kg s.c.) from saline. Following acquisition of the discrimination, bilateral cannulae were implanted into the ACC (AP, +1.2 mm; ML, +/-1.0 mm; DV, -2.0 mm relative to bregma). Rats were tested for their ability to discriminate varying doses of locally infused LSD (0.1875, 0.375, and 0.75 microg/side) or artificial cerebrospinal fluid (n = 3-7). LSD locally infused into ACC dose-dependently substituted for systemically administered LSD, with 0.75 microg/side LSD substituting completely (89% correct). Systemic administration of the selective 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) (5-HT)(2A) receptor antagonist R-(+)-alpha-(2,3-dimethoxyphenyl)-1-[2-(4-fluorophenylethyl)]-4-piperidine-methanol (M100907; 0.4 mg/kg) blocked the discriminative cue of LSD (0.375 microg/side) infused into ACC (from 68 to 16% drug lever responding). Furthermore, M100907 (0.5 microg/microl/side) locally infused into ACC completely blocked the stimulus effects of systemic LSD (0.04 mg/kg; from 80 to 12% on the LSD lever). Taken together, these data indicate that 5-HT(2A) receptors in the ACC are a primary target mediating the discriminative stimulus properties of LSD.

  17. Single cell laser dissection with molecular beacon polymerase chain reaction identifies 2A as the predominant serotonin receptor subtype in hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Zhan, G; Shaheen, F; Mackiewicz, M; Fenik, P; Veasey, S C

    2002-01-01

    We hypothesize that sleep state-dependent withdrawal of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) at upper airway (UAW) dilator motoneurons contributes significantly to sleep-related suppression of dilator muscle activity in obstructive sleep apnea. Identification of 5-HT receptor subtypes involved in postsynaptic facilitation of UAW motoneuron activity may provide pharmacotherapies for this prevalent disorder. We have adapted two assays to provide semi-quantitative measurements of mRNA copy numbers for 5-HT receptor subtypes in single UAW motoneurons. Specifically, soma of 111 hypoglossal (XII) motoneurons in 10 adult male rats were captured using a laser dissection microscope, and then used individually in single round molecular beacon polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for real-time quantitation of 5-HT(2A), 5-HT(2C), 5-HT(3), 5-HT(4), 5-HT(5A), 5-HT(5B), 5-HT(6) or 5-HT(7) receptor. Receptor mRNA copy numbers from single XII motoneurons were compared to control samples from within the XII nucleus and lateral medulla. All 20 motoneuronal soma assayed for the 5-HT(2A) receptor had measurable copy numbers (7028+/-2656 copies/cell). In contrast, copy numbers for the 5-HT(2A) receptor in XII non-motoneuronal (n=17) and lateral medulla (n=15) samples were 81+/-51 copies and 83+/-35 copies, respectively, P<0.05. Seven of 13 XII motoneurons assayed had measurable 5-HT(2C) receptor copy numbers of mRNA (287+/-112 copies/cell). XII soma had minimal 5-HT(3), 5-HT(4), 5-HT(5A), 5-HT(5B), 5-HT(6) or 5-HT(7) receptor mRNA. 5-HT(2A) receptor mRNA presence within XII motoneurons was confirmed with digoxigenin-labeled in situ hybridization. In summary, combined use of laser dissection and molecular beacon PCR revealed 5-HT(2A) receptor as the predominant 5-HT receptor mRNA in XII motoneurons, and identified small quantities of 5-HT(2C) receptor. This information will allow a more complete understanding of serotonergic control of respiratory activity.

  18. Examination of the hippocampal contribution to serotonin 5-HT2A receptor-mediated facilitation of object memory in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gongliang; Cinalli, David; Cohen, Sarah J; Knapp, Kristina D; Rios, Lisa M; Martínez-Hernández, José; Luján, Rafael; Stackman, Robert W

    2016-10-01

    The rodent hippocampus supports non-spatial object memory. Serotonin 5-HT2A receptors (5-HT2AR) are widely expressed throughout the hippocampus. We previously demonstrated that the activation of 5-HT2ARs enhanced the strength of object memory assessed 24 h after a limited (i.e., weak memory) training procedure. Here, we examined the subcellular distribution of 5-HT2ARs in the hippocampal CA1 region and underlying mechanisms of 5-HT2AR-mediated object memory consolidation. Analyses with immuno-electron microscopy revealed the presence of 5-HT2ARs on the dendritic spines and shafts of hippocampal CA1 neurons, and presynaptic terminals in the CA1 region. In an object recognition memory procedure that places higher demand on the hippocampus, only post-training systemic or intrahippocampal administration of the 5-HT2AR agonist TCB-2 enhanced object memory. Object memory enhancement by TCB-2 was blocked by the 5-HT2AR antagonist, MDL 11,937. The memory-enhancing dose of systemic TCB-2 increased extracellular glutamate levels in hippocampal dialysate samples, and increased the mean in vivo firing rate of hippocampal CA1 neurons. In summary, these data indicate a pre- and post-synaptic distribution of 5-HT2ARs, and activation of 5-HT2ARs selectively enhanced the consolidation of object memory, without affecting encoding or retrieval. The 5-HT2AR-mediated facilitation of hippocampal memory may be associated with an increase in hippocampal neuronal firing and glutamate efflux during a post-training time window in which recently encoded memories undergo consolidation.

  19. The role of the 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors in the stimulus effects of hallucinogenic drugs. III: The mechanistic basis for supersensitivity to the LSD stimulus following serotonin depletion.

    PubMed

    Fiorella, D; Helsley, S; Lorrain, D S; Rabin, R A; Winter, J C

    1995-10-01

    The present study was designed to determine the effects of p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) and p-chloroamphetamine (PCA) administration on (1) the levels of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in rat brain, (2) the sensitivity of LSD-trained rats to the stimulus effects of LSD, and (3) the maximal levels of 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptor mediated phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis in rat brain. PCA and PCPA both produced a significant depletion of whole brain 5-HT and 5-HIAA concentrations. The depletion of serotonin with PCPA, but not PCA, resulted in supersensitivity of LSD-trained subjects to the stimulus effects of LSD. Neither PCPA nor PCA treatment altered the maximal level of 5-HT2A receptor-mediated PI hydrolysis. However, PCPA, but not PCA, treatment resulted in a significant upregulation (46%, P < 0.05) of the maximal level of 5-HT2C receptor mediated PI hydrolysis. These data suggest that upregulation of the 5-HT2C receptor mediates the supersensitivity to LSD discriminative stimulus which follows the depletion of central nervous system serotonin by PCPA.

  20. Synthesis and structure-affinity relationships of novel small molecule natural product derivatives capable of discriminating between serotonin 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C receptor subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, David F.; Canseco, Diana C.; Sheth, Pratikkumar; Johnson, James E.; Schetz, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Efforts to develop ligands that distinguish between clinically relevant 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C serotonin receptor subtypes have been challenging, because their sequences have high homology. Previous studies reported that a novel aplysinopsin belonging to a chemical class of natural products isolated from a marine sponge was selective for the 5-HT2C over the 5-HT2A receptor subtype. Our goal was to explore the 5-HT2A/2C receptor structure-affinity relationships of derivatives based on the aplysinopsin natural product pharmacophore. Twenty aplysinopsin derivatives were synthesized, purified and tested for their affinities for cloned human serotonin 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptor subtypes. Four compounds in this series had >30-fold selectivity for 5-HT2A or 5-HT2C receptors. The compound (E)-5-((5,6-dichloro-1H-indol-3-yl)methylene)-2-imino-1,3-dimethylimidazolidin-4-one (UNT-TWU-22, 16) had approximately 2100-fold selectivity for the serotonin 5-HT2C receptor subtype: an affinity for 5-HT2C equal to 46 nM and no detectable affinity for the 5-HT1A or 5-HT2A receptor subtypes. The two most important factors controlling 5-HT2A or 5-HT2C receptor subtype selectivity were the combined R1, R3-alkylation of the imidazolidinone ring and the type and number of halogens on the indole ring of the aplysinopsin pharmacophore. PMID:20570529

  1. Greater emotional eating scores associated with reduced frontolimbic activation to palatable taste in healthy adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Bohon, Cara

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study examined the relation between self-reported emotional eating scores and frontolimbic brain response to palatable taste in adolescents. Design and Methods Participants included 162 adolescents (Mean BMI percentile = 52.7, range 3–90). Participants completed a selfreport survey assessing emotional eating and underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while viewing pictures signaling subsequent delivery of a chocolate milkshake or a control taste and receiving the corresponding taste. Results Results revealed no significant relation between emotional eating scores and brain response to anticipation of receipt of milkshake. In response to milkshake taste receipt, emotional eating scores were negatively related to activation in the right thalamus, the left insula and orbitofrontal cortex, and bilateral putamen and caudate. These findings remained significant after controlling for body mass index and body fat percentage. Conclusions The current results are discussed in the context of findings of reduced reward activation to palatable taste receipt in obese adults and adolescents. PMID:24715468

  2. Circulating serotonin in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Maurer-Spurej, E

    2005-08-01

    The role of circulating serotonin is unclear and whether or not serotonin is present in the blood of non-mammalian species is not known. This study provides the first evidence for the presence of serotonin in thrombocytes of birds and three reptilian species, the endothermic leatherback sea turtle, the green sea turtle and the partially endothermic American alligator. Thrombocytes from a fresh water turtle, American bullfrog, Yellowfin tuna, and Chinook salmon did not contain serotonin. Serotonin is a vasoactive substance that regulates skin blood flow, a major mechanism for endothermic body temperature regulation, which could explain why circulating serotonin is present in warm-blooded species. The temperature sensitivity of human blood platelets with concomitant changes in serotonin content further supports a link between circulating serotonin and thermoregulation. Phylogenetic comparison of the presence of circulating serotonin indicated an evolutionary divergence within reptilian species that might coincide with the emergence of endothermy. PMID:16041566

  3. Dual role of serotonin in the acquisition and extinction of reward-driven learning: involvement of 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A and 5-HT3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Frick, Luciana Romina; Bernardez-Vidal, Micaela; Hocht, Christian; Zanutto, Bonifacio Silvano; Rapanelli, Maximiliano

    2015-01-15

    Serotonin (5-HT) has been proposed as a possible encoder of reward. Nevertheless, the role of this neurotransmitter in reward-based tasks is not well understood. Given that the major serotonergic circuit in the rat brain comprises the dorsal raphe nuclei and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), and because the latter structure is involved in the control of complex behaviors and expresses 1A (5-HT1A), 2A (5-HT2A), and 3 (5-HT3) receptors, the aim was to study the role of 5-HT and of these receptors in the acquisition and extinction of a reward-dependent operant conditioning task. Long Evans rats were trained in an operant conditioning task while receiving fluoxetine (serotonin reuptake inhibitor, 10mg/kg), tianeptine (serotonin reuptake enhancer, 10mg/kg), buspirone (5-HT1A partial agonist, 10mg/kg), risperidone (5-HT2A antagonist, 1mg/kg), ondansetron (5-HT3 antagonist, 2mg/kg) or vehicle. Then, animals that acquired the operant conditioning without any treatment were trained to extinct the task in the presence of the pharmacological agents. Fluoxetine impaired acquisition but improved extinction. Tianeptine administration induced the opposite effects. Buspirone induced a mild deficit in acquisition and had no effects during the extinction phase. Risperidone administration resulted in learning deficits during the acquisition phase, although it promoted improved extinction. Ondansetron treatment showed a deleterious effect in the acquisition phase and an overall improvement in the extinction phase. These data showed a differential role of 5-HT in the acquisition and extinction of an operant conditioning task, suggesting that it may have a dual function in reward encoding. PMID:24949809

  4. Effects of chronic fluoxetine treatment on catalepsy and the immune response in mice with a genetic predisposition to freezing reactions: the roles of types 1A and 2A serotonin receptors and the tph2 and SERT genes.

    PubMed

    Tikhonova, M A; Alperina, E L; Tolstikova, T G; Bazovkina, D V; Di, V Y; Idova, G V; Kulikov, A V; Popova, N K

    2010-06-01

    ASC (Antidepressant-Sensitive Catalepsy) mice, bred for a high predisposition to catalepsy, are characterized by depression-like behavior and decreased immune responses. Chronic administration of fluoxetine, which is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressant widely used in clinical practice, to mice of this strain weakened catalepsy and normalized the number of rosette-forming cells in the spleen. In mice of the parental cataleptic strain CBA/Lac, fluoxetine had no effect on the level of catalepsy or the immune response. Analysis of the effects of fluoxetine on the functional activity of 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A) receptors, and the expression of 5-HT(1A) receptor genes in the frontal cortex and midbrain and 5-HT(2A) receptors in the frontal cortex, as well as the tryptophan hydroxylase-2 and the serotonin transporter genes in the midbrain showed that the antidepressant had no effect on these parameters in ASC mice, but decreased the functional activity of 5-HT(2A) receptors in CBA/Lac mice. The possibility that the actions of fluoxetine on catalepsy and the immune response in mice with depression-like states are mediated via other serotoninergic mechanisms is discussed.

  5. Risk-taking behavior: dopamine D2/D3 receptors, feedback, and frontolimbic activity.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Milky; Ghahremani, Dara G; Morales, Angelica M; Robertson, Chelsea L; Ishibashi, Kenji; Morgan, Andrew T; Mandelkern, Mark A; London, Edythe D

    2015-01-01

    Decision-making involves frontolimbic and dopaminergic brain regions, but how prior choice outcomes, dopamine neurotransmission, and frontostriatal activity are integrated to affect choices is unclear. We tested 60 healthy volunteers using the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART) during functional magnetic resonance imaging. In the BART, participants can pump virtual balloons to increase potential monetary reward or cash out to receive accumulated reward; each pump presents greater risk and potential reward (represented by the pump number). In a separate session, we measured striatal D2/D3 dopamine receptor binding potential (BPND) with positron emission tomography in 13 of the participants. Losses were followed by fewer risky choices than wins; and during risk-taking after loss, amygdala and hippocampal activation exhibited greater modulation by pump number than after a cash-out event. Striatal D2/D3 BPND was positively related to the modulation of ventral striatal activation when participants decided to cash out and negatively to the number of pumps in the subsequent trial; but negatively related to the modulation of prefrontal cortical activation by pump number when participants took risk, and to overall earnings. These findings provide in vivo evidence for a potential mechanism by which dopaminergic neurotransmission may modulate risk-taking behavior through an interactive system of frontal and striatal activity. PMID:23966584

  6. Subjective sensitivity to monetary gradients is associated with frontolimbic activation to reward in cocaine abusers.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Rita Z; Tomasi, Dardo; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Cottone, Lisa A; Zhang, Lei; Telang, Frank; Volkow, Nora D

    2007-03-16

    Drug addiction is characterized by marked disruptions in the ability to process reward. Here we evaluated in cocaine addicted and healthy control participants the subjective sensitivity to reward gradients and its association with neural responses to sustained reward. A self-report questionnaire was used to assess the former. A functional magnetic resonance imaging task that utilized monetary reward as feedback in a blocked design was used to assess the latter. Results revealed that whereas control subjects valued high money more than low money, over half of the cocaine addicted subjects valued all monetary amounts equally. This compromised subjective sensitivity to gradients in reward value was significantly correlated with higher activations to money in the lateral orbitofrontal cortex/inferior frontal gyrus (BA 47) and amygdala, and lower activations in the middle frontal gyrus (BA 6), which together explained 85% of the variability on this rating scale in the cocaine abusers only. These results provide for the first time evidence of restricted subjective sensitivity to gradients of reward in cocaine addiction and of the involvement of frontolimbic brain regions (including the orbitofrontal cortex) in this deficit.

  7. Binding of [3H]paroxetine to serotonin uptake sites and of [3H]lysergic acid diethylamide to 5-HT2A receptors in platelets from women with premenstrual dysphoric disorder during gonadotropin releasing hormone treatment.

    PubMed

    Bixo, M; Allard, P; Bäckström, T; Mjörndal, T; Nyberg, S; Spigset, O; Sundström-Poromaa, I

    2001-08-01

    Changes in serotonergic parameters have been reported in psychiatric conditions such as depression but also in the premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). In addition, hormonal effects on serotonergic activity have been established. In the present study, binding of [3H]paroxetine to platelet serotonin uptake sites and binding of [3H]lysergic acid diethylamide ([3H]LSD) to platelet serotonin (5-HT)2A receptors were studied in patients with PMDD treated with a low dose of a gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist (buserelin) or placebo and compared to controls. The PMDD patients were relieved of premenstrual symptoms like depression and irritability during buserelin treatment. The number of [3H]paroxetine binding sites (Bmax) were significantly higher in the follicular phase in untreated PMDD patients compared to controls. When treated with buserelin the difference disappeared. No differences in [3H]LSD binding between the three groups were shown. The present study demonstrated altered platelet [3H]paroxetine binding characteristics in women with PMDD compared to controls. Furthermore, [3H]paroxetine binding was affected by PMDD treatment with a low dose of buserelin. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that changes in serotonergic transmission could be a trait in the premenstrual dysphoric disorder.

  8. Trait anxiety modulates fronto-limbic processing of emotional interference in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Holtmann, Jana; Herbort, Maike C; Wüstenberg, Torsten; Soch, Joram; Richter, Sylvia; Walter, Henrik; Roepke, Stefan; Schott, Björn H

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies of cognitive alterations in borderline personality disorder (BPD) have yielded conflicting results. Given that a core feature of BPD is affective instability, which is characterized by emotional hyperreactivity and deficits in emotion regulation, it seems conceivable that short-lasting emotional distress might exert temporary detrimental effects on cognitive performance. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate how task-irrelevant emotional stimuli (fearful faces) affect performance and fronto-limbic neural activity patterns during attention-demanding cognitive processing in 16 female, unmedicated BPD patients relative to 24 age-matched healthy controls. In a modified flanker task, emotionally negative, socially salient pictures (fearful vs. neutral faces) were presented as distracters in the background. Patients, but not controls, showed an atypical response pattern of the right amygdala with increased activation during emotional interference in the (difficult) incongruent flanker condition, but emotion-related amygdala deactivation in the congruent condition. A direct comparison of the emotional conditions between the two groups revealed that the strongest diagnosis-related differences could be observed in the dorsal and, to a lesser extent, also in the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (dACC, rACC) where patients exhibited an increased neural response to emotional relative to neutral distracters. Moreover, in the incongruent condition, both the dACC and rACC fMRI responses during emotional interference were negatively correlated with trait anxiety in the patients, but not in the healthy controls. As higher trait anxiety was also associated with longer reaction times (RTs) in the BPD patients, we suggest that in BPD patients the ACC might mediate compensatory cognitive processes during emotional interference and that such neurocognitive compensation that can be adversely affected by high levels of anxiety.

  9. Trait anxiety modulates fronto-limbic processing of emotional interference in borderline personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    Holtmann, Jana; Herbort, Maike C.; Wüstenberg, Torsten; Soch, Joram; Richter, Sylvia; Walter, Henrik; Roepke, Stefan; Schott, Björn H.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies of cognitive alterations in borderline personality disorder (BPD) have yielded conflicting results. Given that a core feature of BPD is affective instability, which is characterized by emotional hyperreactivity and deficits in emotion regulation, it seems conceivable that short-lasting emotional distress might exert temporary detrimental effects on cognitive performance. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate how task-irrelevant emotional stimuli (fearful faces) affect performance and fronto-limbic neural activity patterns during attention-demanding cognitive processing in 16 female, unmedicated BPD patients relative to 24 age-matched healthy controls. In a modified flanker task, emotionally negative, socially salient pictures (fearful vs. neutral faces) were presented as distracters in the background. Patients, but not controls, showed an atypical response pattern of the right amygdala with increased activation during emotional interference in the (difficult) incongruent flanker condition, but emotion-related amygdala deactivation in the congruent condition. A direct comparison of the emotional conditions between the two groups revealed that the strongest diagnosis-related differences could be observed in the dorsal and, to a lesser extent, also in the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (dACC, rACC) where patients exhibited an increased neural response to emotional relative to neutral distracters. Moreover, in the incongruent condition, both the dACC and rACC fMRI responses during emotional interference were negatively correlated with trait anxiety in the patients, but not in the healthy controls. As higher trait anxiety was also associated with longer reaction times (RTs) in the BPD patients, we suggest that in BPD patients the ACC might mediate compensatory cognitive processes during emotional interference and that such neurocognitive compensation that can be adversely affected by high levels of anxiety. PMID

  10. Decreased osteoclastogenesis in serotonin-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Chabbi-Achengli, Yasmine; Coudert, Amélie E.; Callebert, Jacques; Geoffroy, Valérie; Côté, Francine; Collet, Corinne; de Vernejoul, Marie-Christine

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral serotonin, synthesized by tryptophan hydroxylase-1 (TPH1), has been shown to play a key role in several physiological functions. Recently, controversy has emerged about whether peripheral serotonin has any effect on bone density and remodeling.We therefore decided to investigate in detail bone remodeling in growing and mature TPH1 knockout mice (TPH1−/−). Bone resorption in TPH1−/− mice, as assessed by biochemical markers and bone histomorphometry, was markedly decreased at both ages. Using bone marrow transplantation, we present evidence that the decrease in bone resorption in TPH1−/− mice is cell-autonomous. Cultures from TPH1−/− in the presence of macrophage colony-stimulating factor and receptor activator for NF-KB ligand (RANKL) displayed fewer osteoclasts, and the decreased differentiation could be rescued by adding serotonin. Our data also provide evidence that in the presence of RANKL, osteoclast precursors express TPH1 and synthesize serotonin. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of serotonin receptor 1B with SB224289, and of receptor 2A with ketanserin, also reduced the number of osteoclasts. Our findings reveal that serotonin has an important local action in bone, as it can amplify the effect of RANKL on osteoclastogenesis. PMID:22308416

  11. The Relationship Between Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in 5-HT2A Signal Transduction-Related Genes and the Response Efficacy to Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Treatments in Chinese Patients with Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Li, Heng-Fen; Yu, Xue; He, Cha-Ye; Kou, Shao-Jie; Cao, Su-Xia

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the possible relationship between six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs6311 and rs6305 of 5-HT2A, rs5443 of Gβ3, rs2230739 of ACDY9, rs1549870 of PDE1A and rs255163 of CREB1, which are all related with 5-HT2A the signal transduction pathway) and the response efficacy to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatments in major depressive disorder (MDD) Chinese. Methods: This study included 194 depressed patients to investigate the influence of 6 polymorphisms in 5-HT2A signal transduction-related genes on the efficacy of SSRIs assessed over 1 year. The efficacies of SSRIs on 194 MDD patients were evaluated in an 8-week open-trial study. Over 1 year, a follow-up study was completed for 174 of them to observe the long-term efficacy of SSRIs. The optimal-scaling regression analysis was used for testing the relationship between the different genotypes of five SNPs and the efficacy in MDD. Results: It showed that the patients with rs5443TT and rs2230739GG have a relatively good efficacy in response to short-term SSRIs. We also found that good efficacy appeared in depressed patients with rs2230739GG in response to long-term SSRIs. Conclusions: It suggested that different genotypes of rs5443 and rs2230739 might influence the signal transduction pathways of second message and affect therapeutic efficacy. PMID:22480177

  12. DNA Hypermethylation of the Serotonin Receptor Type-2A Gene Is Associated with a Worse Response to a Weight Loss Intervention in Subjects with Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Cornago, Aurora; Mansego, Maria L.; Zulet, María Angeles; Martinez, José Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the regulation of gene activities depending on DNA methylation has been the subject of much recent study. However, although polymorphisms of the HTR2A gene have been associated with both obesity and psychiatric disorders, the role of HTR2A gene methylation in these illnesses remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of HTR2A gene promoter methylation levels in white blood cells (WBC) with obesity traits and depressive symptoms in individuals with metabolic syndrome (MetS) enrolled in a behavioural weight loss programme. Analyses were based on 41 volunteers (mean age 49 ± 1 year) recruited within the RESMENA study. Depressive symptoms (as determined using the Beck Depression Inventory), anthropometric and biochemical measurements were analysed at the beginning and after six months of weight loss treatment. At baseline, DNA from WBC was isolated and cytosine methylation in the HTR2A gene promoter was quantified by a microarray approach. In the whole-study sample, a positive association of HTR2A gene methylation with waist circumference and insulin levels was detected at baseline. Obesity measures significantly improved after six months of dietary treatment, where a lower mean HTR2A gene methylation at baseline was associated with major reductions in body weight, BMI and fat mass after the treatment. Moreover, mean HTR2A gene methylation at baseline significantly predicted the decrease in depressive symptoms after the weight loss treatment. In conclusion, this study provides newer evidence that hypermethylation of the HTR2A gene in WBC at baseline is significantly associated with a worse response to a weight-loss intervention and with a lower decrease in depressive symptoms after the dietary treatment in subjects with MetS. PMID:24959950

  13. Extensive Rigid Analogue Design Maps the Binding Conformation of Potent N-Benzylphenethylamine 5-HT2A Serotonin Receptor Agonist Ligands

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Based on the structure of the superpotent 5-HT2A agonist 2-(4-bromo-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-N-[(2-methoxyphenyl)methyl]ethanamine, which consists of a ring-substituted phenethylamine skeleton modified with an N-benzyl group, we designed and synthesized a small library of constrained analogues to identify the optimal arrangement of the pharmacophoric elements of the ligand. Structures consisted of diversely substituted tetrahydroisoquinolines, piperidines, and one benzazepine. Based on the structure of (S,S)-9b, which showed the highest affinity of the series, we propose an optimal binding conformation. (S,S)-9b also displayed 124-fold selectivity for the 5-HT2A over the 5-HT2C receptor, making it the most selective 5-HT2A receptor agonist ligand currently known. PMID:23336049

  14. Cognitive Enhancement Therapy Improves Frontolimbic Regulation of Emotion in Alcohol and/or Cannabis Misusing Schizophrenia: A Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Wojtalik, Jessica A; Hogarty, Susan S; Cornelius, Jack R; Phillips, Mary L; Keshavan, Matcheri S; Newhill, Christina E; Eack, Shaun M

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia who misuse substances are burdened with impairments in emotion regulation. Cognitive enhancement therapy (CET) may address these problems by enhancing prefrontal brain function. A small sample of outpatients with schizophrenia and alcohol and/or cannabis substance use problems participating in an 18-month randomized trial of CET (n = 10) or usual care (n = 4) completed posttreatment functional neuroimaging using an emotion regulation task. General linear models explored CET effects on brain activity in emotional neurocircuitry. Individuals treated with CET had significantly greater activation in broad regions of the prefrontal cortex, limbic, and striatal systems implicated in emotion regulation compared to usual care. Differential activation favoring CET in prefrontal regions and the insula mediated behavioral improvements in emotional processing. Our data lend preliminary support of CET effects on neuroplasticity in frontolimbic and striatal circuitries, which mediate emotion regulation in people with schizophrenia and comorbid substance misuse problems. PMID:26793128

  15. Cognitive Enhancement Therapy Improves Frontolimbic Regulation of Emotion in Alcohol and/or Cannabis Misusing Schizophrenia: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Wojtalik, Jessica A.; Hogarty, Susan S.; Cornelius, Jack R.; Phillips, Mary L.; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Newhill, Christina E.; Eack, Shaun M.

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia who misuse substances are burdened with impairments in emotion regulation. Cognitive enhancement therapy (CET) may address these problems by enhancing prefrontal brain function. A small sample of outpatients with schizophrenia and alcohol and/or cannabis substance use problems participating in an 18-month randomized trial of CET (n = 10) or usual care (n = 4) completed posttreatment functional neuroimaging using an emotion regulation task. General linear models explored CET effects on brain activity in emotional neurocircuitry. Individuals treated with CET had significantly greater activation in broad regions of the prefrontal cortex, limbic, and striatal systems implicated in emotion regulation compared to usual care. Differential activation favoring CET in prefrontal regions and the insula mediated behavioral improvements in emotional processing. Our data lend preliminary support of CET effects on neuroplasticity in frontolimbic and striatal circuitries, which mediate emotion regulation in people with schizophrenia and comorbid substance misuse problems. PMID:26793128

  16. Right fronto-limbic atrophy is associated with reduced empathy in refractory unilateral mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Toller, Gianina; Adhimoolam, Babu; Rankin, Katherine P; Huppertz, Hans-Jürgen; Kurthen, Martin; Jokeit, Hennric

    2015-11-01

    Refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is the most frequent focal epilepsy and is often accompanied by deficits in social cognition including emotion recognition, theory of mind, and empathy. Consistent with the neuronal networks that are crucial for normal social-cognitive processing, these impairments have been associated with functional changes in fronto-temporal regions. However, although atrophy in unilateral MTLE also affects regions of the temporal and frontal lobes that underlie social cognition, little is known about the structural correlates of social-cognitive deficits in refractory MTLE. In the present study, a psychometrically validated empathy questionnaire was combined with whole-brain voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to investigate the relationship between self-reported affective and cognitive empathy and gray matter volume in 55 subjects (13 patients with right MTLE, 9 patients with left MTLE, and 33 healthy controls). Consistent with the brain regions underlying social cognition, our results show that lower affective and cognitive empathy was associated with smaller volume in predominantly right fronto-limbic regions, including the right hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus, thalamus, fusiform gyrus, inferior temporal gyrus, dorsomedial and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices, and in the bilateral midbrain. The only region that was associated with both affective and cognitive empathy was the right mesial temporal lobe. These findings indicate that patients with right MTLE are at increased risk for reduced empathy towards others' internal states and they shed new light on the structural correlates of impaired social cognition frequently accompanying refractory MTLE. In line with previous evidence from patients with neurodegenerative disease and stroke, the present study suggests that empathy depends upon the integrity of right fronto-limbic and brainstem regions and highlights the importance of the right mesial temporal lobe and midbrain

  17. Right fronto-limbic atrophy is associated with reduced empathy in refractory unilateral mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Toller, Gianina; Adhimoolam, Babu; Rankin, Katherine P; Huppertz, Hans-Jürgen; Kurthen, Martin; Jokeit, Hennric

    2015-11-01

    Refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is the most frequent focal epilepsy and is often accompanied by deficits in social cognition including emotion recognition, theory of mind, and empathy. Consistent with the neuronal networks that are crucial for normal social-cognitive processing, these impairments have been associated with functional changes in fronto-temporal regions. However, although atrophy in unilateral MTLE also affects regions of the temporal and frontal lobes that underlie social cognition, little is known about the structural correlates of social-cognitive deficits in refractory MTLE. In the present study, a psychometrically validated empathy questionnaire was combined with whole-brain voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to investigate the relationship between self-reported affective and cognitive empathy and gray matter volume in 55 subjects (13 patients with right MTLE, 9 patients with left MTLE, and 33 healthy controls). Consistent with the brain regions underlying social cognition, our results show that lower affective and cognitive empathy was associated with smaller volume in predominantly right fronto-limbic regions, including the right hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus, thalamus, fusiform gyrus, inferior temporal gyrus, dorsomedial and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices, and in the bilateral midbrain. The only region that was associated with both affective and cognitive empathy was the right mesial temporal lobe. These findings indicate that patients with right MTLE are at increased risk for reduced empathy towards others' internal states and they shed new light on the structural correlates of impaired social cognition frequently accompanying refractory MTLE. In line with previous evidence from patients with neurodegenerative disease and stroke, the present study suggests that empathy depends upon the integrity of right fronto-limbic and brainstem regions and highlights the importance of the right mesial temporal lobe and midbrain

  18. Basic advances in serotonin pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Fuller, R W

    1992-10-01

    Several advances in serotonin pharmacology have implications for psychiatry. The introduction of selective inhibitors of serotonin uptake into clinical use has established more firmly the relevance of brain serotonin neurons to depressive illness and is permitting an exploration of other therapeutic consequences of amplifying serotonergic function. A recent major advance in basic pharmacology has been the definition and characterization of multiple serotonin receptor subtypes in brain. Highly selective agonists and antagonists at these receptor subtypes are being developed as candidate drugs for therapy and as pharmacologic probes for assessing functionality of brain serotonin neurons in disease. Improved pharmacologic specificity will provide better tools for eliciting measurable responses mediated by brain serotonin receptors and for imaging key presynaptic and postsynaptic constituents of serotonin neuronal systems. Advances in serotonin pharmacology should therefore expand our understanding of serotonin's roles as a brain neurotransmitter in health and disease and lead to improved therapeutic agents.

  19. Serotonin 2A Receptors Differentially Contribute to Abuse-Related Effects of Cocaine and Cocaine-Induced Nigrostriatal and Mesolimbic Dopamine Overflow in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Murnane, Kevin S.; Winschel, Jake; Schmidt, Karl T.; Stewart, LaShaya M.; Rose, Samuel J.; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C.

    2013-01-01

    Two of the most commonly used procedures to study the abuse-related effects of drugs in laboratory animals are intravenous drug self-administration and reinstatement of extinguished behavior previously maintained by drug delivery. Intravenous self-administration is widely accepted to model ongoing drug-taking behavior, whereas reinstatement procedures are accepted to model relapse to drug taking following abstinence. Previous studies indicate that 5-HT2A receptor antagonists attenuate the reinstatement of cocaine-maintained behavior but not cocaine self-administration in rodents. Although the abuse-related effects of cocaine have been closely linked to brain dopamine systems, no previous study has determined whether this dissociation is related to differential regulation of dopamine neurotransmission. To elucidate the neuropharmacological and neuroanatomical mechanisms underlying this phenomenon, we evaluated the effects of the selective 5-HT2A receptor antagonist M100907 on intravenous cocaine self-administration and drug- and cue-primed reinstatement in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). In separate subjects, we evaluated the role of 5-HT2A receptors in cocaine-induced dopamine overflow in the nucleus accumbens (n = 4) and the caudate nucleus (n = 5) using in vivo microdialysis. Consistent with previous studies, M100907 (0.3 mg/kg, i.m.) significantly attenuated drug- and cue-induced reinstatement but had no significant effects on cocaine self-administration across a range of maintenance doses. Importantly, M100907 (0.3 mg/kg, i.m.) attenuated cocaine-induced (1.0 mg/kg, i.v.) dopamine overflow in the caudate nucleus but not in the nucleus accumbens. These data suggest that important abuse-related effects of cocaine are mediated by distinct striatal dopamine projection pathways. PMID:23946394

  20. Serotonin 2A receptors differentially contribute to abuse-related effects of cocaine and cocaine-induced nigrostriatal and mesolimbic dopamine overflow in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Murnane, Kevin S; Winschel, Jake; Schmidt, Karl T; Stewart, LaShaya M; Rose, Samuel J; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C; Howell, Leonard L

    2013-08-14

    Two of the most commonly used procedures to study the abuse-related effects of drugs in laboratory animals are intravenous drug self-administration and reinstatement of extinguished behavior previously maintained by drug delivery. Intravenous self-administration is widely accepted to model ongoing drug-taking behavior, whereas reinstatement procedures are accepted to model relapse to drug taking following abstinence. Previous studies indicate that 5-HT2A receptor antagonists attenuate the reinstatement of cocaine-maintained behavior but not cocaine self-administration in rodents. Although the abuse-related effects of cocaine have been closely linked to brain dopamine systems, no previous study has determined whether this dissociation is related to differential regulation of dopamine neurotransmission. To elucidate the neuropharmacological and neuroanatomical mechanisms underlying this phenomenon, we evaluated the effects of the selective 5-HT2A receptor antagonist M100907 on intravenous cocaine self-administration and drug- and cue-primed reinstatement in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). In separate subjects, we evaluated the role of 5-HT2A receptors in cocaine-induced dopamine overflow in the nucleus accumbens (n = 4) and the caudate nucleus (n = 5) using in vivo microdialysis. Consistent with previous studies, M100907 (0.3 mg/kg, i.m.) significantly attenuated drug- and cue-induced reinstatement but had no significant effects on cocaine self-administration across a range of maintenance doses. Importantly, M100907 (0.3 mg/kg, i.m.) attenuated cocaine-induced (1.0 mg/kg, i.v.) dopamine overflow in the caudate nucleus but not in the nucleus accumbens. These data suggest that important abuse-related effects of cocaine are mediated by distinct striatal dopamine projection pathways. PMID:23946394

  1. Association of Polymorphisms within the Serotonin Receptor Genes 5-HTR1A, 5-HTR1B, 5-HTR2A and 5-HTR2C and Migraine Susceptibility in a Turkish Population

    PubMed Central

    Yücel, Yavuz; Coşkun, Salih; Cengiz, Beyhan; Özdemir, Hasan H.; Uzar, Ertuğrul; Çim, Abdullah; Camkurt, M. Akif; Aluclu, M. Ufuk

    2016-01-01

    Objective Migraine, a highly prevelant headache disorder, is regarded as a polygenic multifactorial disease. Serotonin (5-HT) and their respective receptors have been implicated in the patogenesis. Methods We investigated the 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A, and 5-HT2C receptor gene polymorphisms and their association with migraine in Turkish patients. The rs6295, rs1300060, rs1228814, rs6311, rs6313, rs6314, rs6318, rs3813929 (−759C/T) and rs518147 polymorphisms were analyzed in 135 patients with migraine and 139 healthy subjects, using a BioMark 96.96 dynamic array system. Results We found no difference in the frequency of the analyzed eight out of nine polymorpisms between migraine and control groups. However, a significant association was found between the rs3813929 polymorphism in the promoter region of 5-HTR2C gene and migraine. Also, the allele of rs3813929 was more common in the migraine group. Conclusion This result suggests that the 5-HTR2C rs3813929 polymorphism can be a genetic risk factor for migraine in a Turkish population. PMID:27489378

  2. Cognitive Impairment Induced by Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol Occurs through Heteromers between Cannabinoid CB1 and Serotonin 5-HT2A Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lanfumey, Laurence; Cordomí, Arnau; Pastor, Antoni; de La Torre, Rafael; Gasperini, Paola; Navarro, Gemma; Howell, Lesley A.; Pardo, Leonardo; Lluís, Carmen; Canela, Enric I.; McCormick, Peter J.; Maldonado, Rafael; Robledo, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Activation of cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1R) by delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) produces a variety of negative effects with major consequences in cannabis users that constitute important drawbacks for the use of cannabinoids as therapeutic agents. For this reason, there is a tremendous medical interest in harnessing the beneficial effects of THC. Behavioral studies carried out in mice lacking 5-HT2A receptors (5-HT2AR) revealed a remarkable 5-HT2AR-dependent dissociation in the beneficial antinociceptive effects of THC and its detrimental amnesic properties. We found that specific effects of THC such as memory deficits, anxiolytic-like effects, and social interaction are under the control of 5-HT2AR, but its acute hypolocomotor, hypothermic, anxiogenic, and antinociceptive effects are not. In biochemical studies, we show that CB1R and 5-HT2AR form heteromers that are expressed and functionally active in specific brain regions involved in memory impairment. Remarkably, our functional data shows that costimulation of both receptors by agonists reduces cell signaling, antagonist binding to one receptor blocks signaling of the interacting receptor, and heteromer formation leads to a switch in G-protein coupling for 5-HT2AR from Gq to Gi proteins. Synthetic peptides with the sequence of transmembrane helices 5 and 6 of CB1R, fused to a cell-penetrating peptide, were able to disrupt receptor heteromerization in vivo, leading to a selective abrogation of memory impairments caused by exposure to THC. These data reveal a novel molecular mechanism for the functional interaction between CB1R and 5-HT2AR mediating cognitive impairment. CB1R-5-HT2AR heteromers are thus good targets to dissociate the cognitive deficits induced by THC from its beneficial antinociceptive properties. PMID:26158621

  3. Activation of mGlu2/3 metabotropic glutamate receptors negatively regulates the stimulation of inositol phospholipid hydrolysis mediated by 5-hydroxytryptamine2A serotonin receptors in the frontal cortex of living mice.

    PubMed

    Molinaro, G; Traficante, A; Riozzi, B; Di Menna, L; Curto, M; Pallottino, S; Nicoletti, F; Bruno, V; Battaglia, G

    2009-08-01

    The interaction between 5-hydroxytryptamine(2A) (5-HT(2A)) serotonin receptors and metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) 2/3 receptors underlies the antipsychotic activity of mGlu2/3 receptor agonists in experimental animals and humans. The molecular nature of this interaction is only partially known. We here report for the first time that pharmacological activation of mGlu2/3 receptors attenuates the stimulation of polyphosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis mediated by 5-HT(2A) receptors in the frontal cortex of living mice. Mice were injected intracerebroventricularly with [myo-(3)H]inositol and treated with drugs 1 h after a pretreatment with lithium, which blocks the conversion of inositol monophosphate into free inositol. Systemic injection of the mGlu2/3 receptor agonist (-)-2-oxa-4-aminocyclo[3.1.0]hexane-4,6-dicarboxylic acid (LY379268) inhibited the stimulation of PI hydrolysis induced by the hallucinogenic 5-HT(2A) receptor agonist (+/-)-1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (DOI) without affecting the stimulation by mGlu1/5 or muscarinic receptors. The action of LY379268 was prevented by the preferential mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist (2S,1'S,2'S)-2-(9-xanthylmethyl)-2-(2'-carboxycyclopropyl)glycine (LY341495). N-(4'-cyano-biphenyl-3-yl)-N-(3-pyridinylmethyl)-ethanesulfonamide hydrochloride (LY566332), a selective mGlu2 receptor enhancer, also reduced DOI-stimulated PI hydrolysis when combined with subthreshold doses of LY379268. Systemic LY379268 inhibited DOI-stimulated PI hydrolysis in mice lacking either mGlu2 or mGlu3 receptors but was inactive in double mGlu2/mGlu3 receptor knockout mice, suggesting that both mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptors interact with 5-HT(2A) receptors. Surprisingly, contrasting results were obtained in cortical slice preparations, where LY379268 amplified both DOI- and 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine-stimulated PI hydrolysis. Amplification was abrogated by the mGlu5 receptor antagonist 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine, suggesting that

  4. Molecular Pharmacology and Ligand Docking Studies Reveal a Single Amino Acid Difference between Mouse and Human Serotonin 5-HT2A Receptors That Impacts Behavioral Translation of Novel 4-Phenyl-2-dimethylaminotetralin Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Cordova-Sintjago, Tania; Liu, Yue; Kim, Myong S.; Morgan, Drake; Booth, Raymond G.

    2013-01-01

    During translational studies to develop 4-phenyl-2-dimethylaminotetralin (PAT) compounds for neuropsychiatric disorders, the (2R,4S)-trans-(+)- and (2S,4R)-trans-(−)-enantiomers of the analog 6-hydroxy-7-chloro-PAT (6-OH-7-Cl-PAT) demonstrated unusual pharmacology at serotonin (5-HT) 5-HT2 G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs). The enantiomers had similar affinities (Ki) at human (h) 5-HT2A receptors (∼70 nM). In an in vivo mouse model of 5-HT2A receptor activation [(±)-(2,5)-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI)–elicited head twitch], however, (−)-6-OH-7-Cl-PAT was about 5-fold more potent than the (+)-enantiomer at attenuating the DOI-elicited response. It was discovered that (+)-6-OH-7-Cl-PAT (only) had ∼40-fold-lower affinity at mouse (m) compared with h5-HT2A receptors. Molecular modeling and computational ligand docking studies indicated that the 6-OH moiety of (+)- but not (−)-6-OH-7-Cl-PAT could form a hydrogen bond with serine residue 5.46 of the h5-HT2A receptor. The m5-HT2A as well as m5-HT2B, h5-HT2B, m5-HT2C, and h5-HT2C receptors have alanine at position 5.46, obviating this interaction; (+)-6-OH-7-Cl-PAT also showed ∼50-fold lower affinity than (−)-6-OH-7-Cl-PAT at m5-HT2C and h5-HT2C receptors. Mutagenesis studies confirmed that 5-HT2A S5.46 is critical for (+)- but not (−)-6-OH-7-Cl-PAT binding, as well as function. The (+)-6-OH-7-Cl-PAT enantiomer showed partial agonist effects at h5-HT2A wild-type (WT) and m5-HT2A A5.46S point-mutated receptors but did not activate m5-HT2A WT and h5-HT2A S5.46A point-mutated receptors, or h5-HT2B, h5-HT2C, and m5-HT2C receptors; (−)-6-OH-7-Cl-PAT did not activate any of the 5-HT2 receptors. Experiments also included the (2R,4S)-trans-(+)- and (2S,4R)-trans-(−)-enantiomers of 6-methoxy-7-chloro-PAT to validate hydrogen bonding interactions proposed for the corresponding 6-OH analogs. Results indicate that PAT ligand three-dimensional structure impacts target receptor binding and translational

  5. Psilocybin induces schizophrenia-like psychosis in humans via a serotonin-2 agonist action.

    PubMed

    Vollenweider, F X; Vollenweider-Scherpenhuyzen, M F; Bäbler, A; Vogel, H; Hell, D

    1998-12-01

    Psilocybin, an indoleamine hallucinogen, produces a psychosis-like syndrome in humans that resembles first episodes of schizophrenia. In healthy human volunteers, the psychotomimetic effects of psilocybin were blocked dose-dependently by the serotonin-2A antagonist ketanserin or the atypical antipsychotic risperidone, but were increased by the dopamine antagonist and typical antipsychotic haloperidol. These data are consistent with animal studies and provide the first evidence in humans that psilocybin-induced psychosis is due to serotonin-2A receptor activation, independently of dopamine stimulation. Thus, serotonin-2A overactivity may be involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and serotonin-2A antagonism may contribute to therapeutic effects of antipsychotics.

  6. Serotonin aggravates exercise-induced cardiac ischemia in the dog: effect of serotonin receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Guilbert, Frédérique; Lainée, Pierre; Dubreuil, Brigitte; McCort, Gary; O'Connor, Stephen E; Janiak, Philip; Herbert, Jean-Marc

    2004-08-16

    We investigated the effects of serotonin (5-HT), SL65.0472 (7-fluoro-2-oxo-4-[2-[4-thieno[3,2-c]pyridine-4-yl)piperazin-1-yl]ethyl]-1,2-dihydroquinoline-1-acetamide, a 5-HT(1B)/5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist) and ketanserin (a 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist) during exercise-induced cardiac ischemia in conscious dogs. Dogs were administered a hypercholesterolemic diet and an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthetase to produce chronic endothelial dysfunction. Myocardial ischemia was induced by a treadmill exercise test associated with limitation of left anterior descending coronary blood flow. Infusion of serotonin during exercise produced dose-related cardiovascular changes (after 10 microg/kg/min; heart rate +27+/-6 bpm, systolic blood pressure +18+/-3 mm Hg, left circumflex coronary blood flow +64+/-8 ml/min, myocardial segment length shortening in the ischemic zone -5.9+/-1.9%, P<0.05). SL65.0472 blocked serotonin-induced increases in blood pressure, rate pressure product and circumflex coronary artery flow (100 microg/kg i.v., P<0.05) and reduced serotonin-induced ischemic myocardial segment length shortening (300 microg/kg i.v., P<0.05). Ketanserin (30-300 microg/kg i.v.) had no significant effect on any serotonin-induced changes during exercise. Thus, SL65.0472 opposes serotonin-induced myocardial dysfunction in a dog model of exercise-induced ischemia.

  7. Poorer frontolimbic white matter integrity is associated with chronic cannabis use, FAAH genotype, and increased depressive and apathy symptoms in adolescents and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Shollenbarger, Skyler G.; Price, Jenessa; Wieser, Jon; Lisdahl, Krista

    2015-01-01

    Background The heaviest period of cannabis use coincides with ongoing white matter (WM) maturation. Further, cannabis-related changes may be moderated by FAAH genotype (rs324420). We examined the association between cannabis use and FAAH genotype on frontolimbic WM integrity in adolescents and emerging adults. We then tested whether observed WM abnormalities were linked with depressive or apathy symptoms. Methods Participants included 37 cannabis users and 37 healthy controls (33 female; ages 18–25). Multiple regressions examined the independent and interactive effects of variables on WM integrity. Results Regular cannabis users demonstrated reduced WM integrity in the bilateral uncinate fasciculus (UNC) (MD, right: p = .009 and left: p = .009; FA, right: p = .04 and left: p = .03) and forceps minor (fMinor) (MD, p = .03) compared to healthy controls. Marginally reduced WM integrity in the cannabis users was found in the left anterior thalamic radiation (ATR) (FA, p = .08). Cannabis group ∗ FAAH genotype interaction predicted WM integrity in bilateral ATR (FA, right: p = .05 and left: p = .001) and fMinor (FA, p = .02). In cannabis users, poorer WM integrity was correlated with increased symptoms of depression and apathy in bilateral ATR and UNC. Conclusions Consistent with prior findings, cannabis use was associated with reduced frontolimbic WM integrity. WM integrity was also moderated by FAAH genotype, in that cannabis-using FAAH C/C carriers and A carrying controls had reduced WM integrity compared to control C/C carriers. Observed frontolimbic white matter abnormalities were linked with increased depressive and apathy symptoms in the cannabis users. PMID:26106535

  8. A novel analytical brain block tool to enable functional annotation of discriminatory transcript biomarkers among discrete regions of the fronto-limbic circuit in primate brain.

    PubMed

    Dalgard, Clifton L; Jacobowitz, David M; Singh, Vijay K; Saleem, Kadharbatcha S; Ursano, Robert J; Starr, Joshua M; Pollard, Harvey B

    2015-03-10

    Fronto-limbic circuits in the primate brain are responsible for executive function, learning and memory, and emotions, including fear. Consequently, changes in gene expression in cortical and subcortical brain regions housing these circuits are associated with many important psychiatric and neurological disorders. While high quality gene expression profiles can be identified in brains from model organisms, primate brains have unique features such as Brodmann Area 25, which is absent in rodents, yet profoundly important in primates, including humans. The potential insights to be gained from studying the human brain are complicated by the fact that the post-mortem interval (PMI) is variable, and most repositories keep solid tissue in the deep frozen state. Consequently, sampling the important medial and internal regions of these brains is difficult. Here we describe a novel method for obtaining discrete regions from the fronto-limbic circuits of a 4 year old and a 5 year old, male, intact, frozen non-human primate (NHP) brain, for which the PMI is exactly known. The method also preserves high quality RNA, from which we use transcriptional profiling and a new algorithm to identify region-exclusive RNA signatures for Area 25 (NFκB and dopamine receptor signaling), the anterior cingulate cortex (LXR/RXR signaling), the amygdala (semaphorin signaling), and the hippocampus (Ca(++) and retinoic acid signaling). The RNA signatures not only reflect function of the different regions, but also include highly expressed RNAs for which function is either poorly understood, or which generate proteins presently lacking annotated functions. We suggest that this new approach will provide a useful strategy for identifying changes in fronto-limbic system biology underlying normal development, aging and disease in the human brain. PMID:25529630

  9. Serotonin induces peripheral mechanical antihyperalgesic effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Danielle A; Petrocchi, Júlia Alvarenga; Navarro, Larissa Caldeira; Souza, Tâmara Cristina; Castor, Marina G M; Perez, Andrea C; Duarte, Igor D G; Romero, Thiago R L

    2015-11-15

    The role of serotonin (5-HT) in nociception will vary according to the subtypes of receptors activated. When administered peripherally, it induces pain in humans and in rats by activation of 5-HT1, 5-HT2 and 5-HT3 receptors. In addition, endogenous 5-HT produced in situ, is involved in the nociceptive response induced by formalin in rat's paw inflammation, possibly via 5-HT3 receptors. Moreover, it has been shown that 5-HT released in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord by stimulation of the periaqueductal gray causes activation of inhibitory interneurons, resulting in inhibition of spinal neurons. In the present study we evaluated the effect of serotonin and its receptors at peripheral antinociception. The mice paw pressure test was used in animals that had increased sensitivity by an intraplantar injection of PGE2 (2 µg). We used selective antagonists of serotonin receptors (isamoltan 5-HT1B, BRL 15572 5-HT1D, ketanserin 5-HT2A, ondansetron 5-HT3 and SB-269970 5-HT7). Administration of serotonin into the right hind paw (62.5, 125, 250 and 500 ng and 1 µg) produced a dose-dependent peripheral mechanical antihyperalgesic effect of serotonin in mice. Selective antagonists for 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A, 5-HT3 receptors at doses of 0.1, 1 and 10 µg, reversed the antihyperalgesic effect induced by 250 ng serotonin. In contrast, selective antagonists for 5-HT1D and 5-HT7 receptors were unable to reverse the antihyperalgesic effect induced by serotonin. These results demonstrated for the first time, the peripheral mechanical antihyperalgesic effect of serotonin, and participation of 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A and 5-HT3 receptors in this event.

  10. Variations in myo-inositol in fronto-limbic regions and clinical response to electroconvulsive therapy in major depression.

    PubMed

    Njau, Stephanie; Joshi, Shantanu H; Leaver, Amber M; Vasavada, Megha; Van Fleet, Jessica; Espinoza, Randall; Narr, Katherine L

    2016-09-01

    Though electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an established treatment for severe depression, the neurobiological factors accounting for the clinical effects of ECT are largely unknown. Myo-inositol, a neurometabolite linked with glial activity, is reported as reduced in fronto-limbic regions in patients with depression. Whether changes in myo-inositol relate to the antidepressant effects of ECT is unknown. Using magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS), we measured dorsomedial anterior cingulate cortex (dmACC) and left and right hippocampal myo-inositol in 50 ECT patients (mean age: 43.78, 14 SD) and 33 controls (mean age: 39.33, 12 SD) to determine cross sectional effects of diagnosis and longitudinal effects of ECT. Patients were scanned prior to treatment, after the second ECT and at completion of the ECT index series. Controls were scanned twice at intervals corresponding to patients' baseline and end of treatment scans. Myo-inositol increased over the course of ECT in the dmACC (p = 0.042). A significant hemisphere by clinical response effect was observed for the hippocampus (p = 0.003) where decreased myo-inositol related to symptom improvement in the left hippocampus. Cross-sectional differences between patients and controls at baseline were not detected. Changes in myo-inositol observed in the dmACC in association with ECT and in the hippocampus in association with ECT-related clinical response suggest the mechanisms of ECT could include gliogenesis or a reversal of gliosis that differentially affect dorsal and ventral limbic regions. Change in dmACC myo-inositol diverged from control values with ECT suggesting compensation, while hippocampal change suggested normalization.

  11. Variations in myo-inositol in fronto-limbic regions and clinical response to electroconvulsive therapy in major depression.

    PubMed

    Njau, Stephanie; Joshi, Shantanu H; Leaver, Amber M; Vasavada, Megha; Van Fleet, Jessica; Espinoza, Randall; Narr, Katherine L

    2016-09-01

    Though electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an established treatment for severe depression, the neurobiological factors accounting for the clinical effects of ECT are largely unknown. Myo-inositol, a neurometabolite linked with glial activity, is reported as reduced in fronto-limbic regions in patients with depression. Whether changes in myo-inositol relate to the antidepressant effects of ECT is unknown. Using magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS), we measured dorsomedial anterior cingulate cortex (dmACC) and left and right hippocampal myo-inositol in 50 ECT patients (mean age: 43.78, 14 SD) and 33 controls (mean age: 39.33, 12 SD) to determine cross sectional effects of diagnosis and longitudinal effects of ECT. Patients were scanned prior to treatment, after the second ECT and at completion of the ECT index series. Controls were scanned twice at intervals corresponding to patients' baseline and end of treatment scans. Myo-inositol increased over the course of ECT in the dmACC (p = 0.042). A significant hemisphere by clinical response effect was observed for the hippocampus (p = 0.003) where decreased myo-inositol related to symptom improvement in the left hippocampus. Cross-sectional differences between patients and controls at baseline were not detected. Changes in myo-inositol observed in the dmACC in association with ECT and in the hippocampus in association with ECT-related clinical response suggest the mechanisms of ECT could include gliogenesis or a reversal of gliosis that differentially affect dorsal and ventral limbic regions. Change in dmACC myo-inositol diverged from control values with ECT suggesting compensation, while hippocampal change suggested normalization. PMID:27285661

  12. Serotonin in the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Laura M; Thompson, Ann M; Pollak, George D

    2002-06-01

    It has been recognized for some time that serotonin fibers originating in raphe nuclei are present in the inferior colliculi of all mammalian species studied. More recently, serotonin has been found to modulate the responses of single inferior colliculus neurons to many types of auditory stimuli, ranging from simple tone bursts to complex species-specific vocalizations. The effects of serotonin are often quite strong, and for some neurons are also highly specific. A dramatic illustration of this is that serotonin can change the selectivity of some neurons for sounds, including species-specific vocalizations. These results are discussed in light of several theories on the function of serotonin in the IC, and of outstanding issues that remain to be addressed. PMID:12117504

  13. Default mode network and frontolimbic gray matter abnormalities in patients with borderline personality disorder: A voxel-based meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xun; Hu, Liyuan; Zeng, Jianguang; Tan, Ying; Cheng, Bochao

    2016-01-01

    Specific frontolimbic abnormalities are hypothesized to underlie the etiology of borderline personality disorder (BPD). However, findings from neuroimaging studies were inconsistent. In the current study, we aimed to provide a complete overview of cerebral microstructural alterations in gray matter (GM) of BPD patients. A total of 11 studies were enrolled, comprising 275 BPD patients and 290 healthy controls (HCs). A meta-analysis was conduct to quantitatively estimate regional GM abnormalities in BPD patients using the seed-based d mapping (SDM). Meta-regression was also conducted. Compared with HCs, the BPD patients exhibited increased GM mainly in bilateral supplementary motor area extending to right posterior cingulated cortex (PCC) and bilateral primary motor cortex, right middle frontal gyrus (MFG), and the bilateral precuneus extending to bilateral PCC. Decreased GM was identified in bilateral middle temporal gyri, right inferior frontal gyrus extending to right insular, left hippocampus and left superior frontal gyrus extending to left medial orbitofrontal cortex. The mean age of BPD patients were found nagativly associated with GM alterations in right MFG. Our findings suggested that BPD patients have significantly GM abnormalities in the default mode network and frontolimbic circuit. Our results provided further evidences in elucidating the underline neural mechanisms of BPD. PMID:27694955

  14. [Serotonin hypothesis and pulmonary artery hypertension].

    PubMed

    Kloza, Monika; Baranowska-Kuczko, Marta; Pędzińska-Betiuk, Anna; Jackowski, Konrad; Kozłowska, Hanna

    2014-06-06

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive, complex disease leading to the right ventricular failure and premature death. PAH is characterized by increased pulmonary arterial pressure, increased vascular resistance, pulmonary vascular remodeling and endothelial dysfunction. Pathomechanism of this disease is still unknown. It has been suggested, that endothelial dysfunction is caused by unbalance between vasodilators and vasoconstrictors e.g. serotonin (5-HT). Previously, serotonin hypothesis was linked to the anorexigens, derivatives of fenfluramine, which are serotonin transporter (SERT) substrates. Nowadays, it has been proved that all elements of serotonergic system within pulmonary circulation participate in the developement of PAH. The tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (Tph-1) catalyses synthesis of 5-HT from tryptophan in the pulmonary arterial endothelial cells. 5-HT mediates contraction of pulmonary vessels via 5-HT1B and 5-HT2A receptors. 5-HT is also transported into pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells via SERT and through activation of reactive oxygen species and Rho-kinase may contribute to contraction or/and, via stimulation of transcription factors, lead to proliferation and remodelling. There is also increasing number of evidence about functional interaction between 5-HT1B receptor and SERT in modulation of vasoconstriction and proliferation in pulmonary arteries. This review discusses the role of 5-HT in the development of PAH and highlights possible therapeutic targets within serotonergic system.

  15. Gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 effective against serotonin syndrome in rats.

    PubMed

    Boban Blagaic, Alenka; Blagaic, Vladimir; Mirt, Mirela; Jelovac, Nikola; Dodig, Goran; Rucman, Rudolf; Petek, Marijan; Turkovic, Branko; Anic, Tomislav; Dubovecak, Miroslav; Staresinic, Mario; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2005-04-11

    Serotonin syndrome commonly follows irreversible monoamine oxidase (MAO)-inhibition and subsequent serotonin (5-HT) substrate (in rats with fore paw treading, hind limbs abduction, wet dog shake, hypothermia followed by hyperthermia). A stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 with very safe profile (inflammatory bowel disease clinical phase II, PL-10, PLD-116, PL-14736, Pliva) reduced the duration of immobility to a greater extent than imipramine, and, given peripherally, has region specific influence on brain 5-HT synthesis (alpha-[14C]methyl-L-tryptophan autoradiographic measurements) in rats, different from any other serotonergic drug. Thereby, we investigate this peptide (10 microg, 10 ng, 10 pg/kg i.p.) in (i) full serotonin syndrome in rat combining pargyline (irreversible MAO-inhibition; 75 mg/kg i.p.) and subsequent L-tryptophan (5-HT precursor; 100 mg/kg i.p.; BPC 157 as a co-treatment), or (ii, iii) using pargyline or L-tryptophan given separately, as a serotonin-substrate with (ii) pargyline (BPC 157 as a 15-min posttreatment) or as a potential serotonin syndrome inductor with (iii) L-tryptophan (BPC 157 as a 15 min-pretreatment). In all experiments, gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 contrasts with serotonin-syndrome either (i) presentation (i.e., particularly counteracted) or (ii) initiation (i.e., neither a serotonin substrate (counteraction of pargyline), nor an inductor for serotonin syndrome (no influence on L-tryptophan challenge)). Indicatively, severe serotonin syndrome in pargyline + L-tryptophan rats is considerably inhibited even by lower pentadecapeptide BPC 157 doses regimens (particularly disturbances such as hyperthermia and wet dog shake thought to be related to stimulation of 5-HT2A receptors), while the highest pentadecapeptide dose counteracts mild disturbances present in pargyline rats (mild hypothermia, feeble hind limbs abduction). Thereby, in severe serotonin syndrome, gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (alone, no behavioral or

  16. Epigenetic Mechanisms of Serotonin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Terrell; González-Maeso, Javier

    2015-07-15

    Histone modifications and DNA methylation represent central dynamic and reversible processes that regulate gene expression and contribute to cellular phenotypes. These epigenetic marks have been shown to play fundamental roles in a diverse set of signaling and behavioral outcomes. Serotonin is a monoamine that regulates numerous physiological responses including those in the central nervous system. The cardinal signal transduction mechanisms via serotonin and its receptors are well established, but fundamental questions regarding complex interactions between the serotonin system and heritable epigenetic modifications that exert control on gene function remain a topic of intense research and debate. This review focuses on recent advances and contributions to our understanding of epigenetic mechanisms of serotonin receptor-dependent signaling, with focus on psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression.

  17. Epigenetic Mechanisms of Serotonin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Terrell; González-Maeso, Javier

    2015-07-15

    Histone modifications and DNA methylation represent central dynamic and reversible processes that regulate gene expression and contribute to cellular phenotypes. These epigenetic marks have been shown to play fundamental roles in a diverse set of signaling and behavioral outcomes. Serotonin is a monoamine that regulates numerous physiological responses including those in the central nervous system. The cardinal signal transduction mechanisms via serotonin and its receptors are well established, but fundamental questions regarding complex interactions between the serotonin system and heritable epigenetic modifications that exert control on gene function remain a topic of intense research and debate. This review focuses on recent advances and contributions to our understanding of epigenetic mechanisms of serotonin receptor-dependent signaling, with focus on psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression. PMID:25734378

  18. Serotonin receptors in parasitic worms.

    PubMed

    Mansour, T E

    1984-01-01

    It is evident from the above review that during the last two decades a great deal of interest in investigating the action of serotonin in parasitic worms has been shown by parasitologists as well as by scientists from several other disciplines. What we have initially reported concerning the effect of serotonin on motility and carbohydrate metabolism of F. hepatica has been pursued on several other parasitic worms. The studies so far indicate that serotonin stimulates motility of every species tested among the phylum Platyhelminthes. The indoleamine also stimulates glycogenolysis in the few flatworm parasites that have been investigated. The information in nematodes is scanty and the role of serotonin in these parasites is still open for experimentation. Recent biochemical investigations on F. hepatica and S. mansoni demonstrated that serotonin and related compounds utilize a common class of receptors in plasma membrane particles which I designate as 'serotonin receptors'. These receptors are linked to an adenylate cyclase that catalyses the synthesis of the second messenger, cyclic 3',5'-AMP. Serotonin and its congeners increase the concentration of cyclic AMP in intact parasites whereas antagonists inhibit such an effect. Cyclic AMP stimulates glycogenolysis, glycolysis and some rate-limiting glycolytic enzymes. It activates a protein kinase that may be involved in activation of glycogen phosphorylase and phosphofructokinase. Serotonin-activated adenylate cyclase in S. mansoni is activated early in the life of the schistosomule. The possibility is discussed that the availability of cyclic AMP through serotonin activation in these parasites may be a prelude to the development processes that take place in the parasite. The different components of the serotonin-activated adenylate cyclase in the parasite are the same as those that have been previously described for the host. Binding characteristics of the receptors indicate that the receptors in F. hepatica appear to

  19. Multiple receptor subtypes mediate the effects of serotonin on rat subfornical organ neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scrogin, K. E.; Johnson, A. K.; Schmid, H. A.

    1998-01-01

    The subfornical organ (SFO) receives significant serotonergic innervation. However, few reports have examined the functional effects of serotonin on SFO neurons. This study characterized the effects of serotonin on spontaneously firing SFO neurons in the rat brain slice. Of 31 neurons tested, 80% responded to serotonin (1-100 microM) with either an increase (n = 15) or decrease (n = 10) in spontaneous activity. Responses to serotonin were dose dependent and persisted after synaptic blockade. Excitatory responses could also be mimicked by the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)2A/2C receptor agonist 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI; 1-10 microM) and could be blocked by the 5-HT2A/2C-receptor antagonist LY-53,857 (10 microM). LY-53,857 unmasked inhibitory responses to serotonin in 56% of serotonin-excited cells tested. Serotonin-inhibited cells were also inhibited by the 5-HT1A-receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT; 1-10 microM; n = 7). The data indicate that SFO neurons are responsive to serotonin via postsynaptic activation of multiple receptor subtypes. The results suggest that excitatory responses to serotonin are mediated by 5-HT2A or 5-HT2C receptors and that inhibitory responses may be mediated by 5-HT1A receptors. In addition, similar percentages of serotonin-excited and -inhibited cells were also sensitive to ANG II. As such the functional relationship between serotonin and ANG II in the SFO remains unclear.

  20. Serotonin and cancer: what is the link?

    PubMed

    Sarrouilhe, D; Clarhaut, J; Defamie, N; Mesnil, M

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is a biogenic monoamine that acts as a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, local mediator in the gut and vasoactive agent in the blood. Serotonin exerts its multiple, sometimes opposing actions through interaction with a multiplicity of receptors coupled to various signalling pathways. In addition to its well-known functions, serotonin has been shown to be a mitogenic factor for a wide range of normal and tumoral cells. Serotonin exhibits a growth stimulatory effect in aggressive cancers and carcinoids more often through 5- HT1 and 5-HT2 receptors. In contrast, low doses of serotonin can inhibit tumour growth via the decrease of blood supply to the tumour, suggesting that the role of serotonin on tumour growth is concentration-dependent. Data are also available on serotonin involvement in cancer cell migration, metastatic processes and as a mediator of angiogenesis. Moreover, the progression of some tumours is accompanied by a dysregulation of the pattern of serotonin receptor expressions. Serum serotonin level was found to be suitable for prognosis evaluation of urothelial carcinoma in the urinary bladder, adenocarcinoma of the prostate and renal cell carcinoma. In some cases, antagonists of serotonin receptors, inhibitors of selective serotonin transporter and of serotonin synthesis have been successfully used to prevent cancer cell growth. This review revaluates serotonin involvement in several types of cancer and at different stages of their progression. PMID:25601469

  1. [Serotonin and its immune and physiological effects].

    PubMed

    Sepiashvili, R I; Balmasova, I P; Staurina, L N

    2013-01-01

    Now that the neurotransmitter serotonin modulates the immune system cells, and its main sources for antigenpresenting cells and lymphocytes are enterochromaffin cells of the gut, peripheral nerves, platelets and mast cells in case of inflammation. Immune cells uptake serotonin because they express receptors for this monoamine and intracellular serotonin transporters. The dendritic cells have a mechanism to transfer serotonin to T lymphocytes during antigen presentation. The macrophages and T cells have the ability to serotonin synthesis. Serotonin can influence mobility and proliferation of lymphocytes, phagocytosis, cytolytic properties, synthesis of chemokines and cytokines. Diversity of immunomodulating effects of serotonin is determined by heterogeneity of serotoninergic receptors. Immunomodulating action of serotonin is evidence of the close relationship between nervous and immune systems.

  2. Serotonin and Blood Pressure Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Shaun F.; Davis, Robert Patrick; Barman, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) was discovered more than 60 years ago as a substance isolated from blood. The neural effects of 5-HT have been well investigated and understood, thanks in part to the pharmacological tools available to dissect the serotonergic system and the development of the frequently prescribed selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors. By contrast, our understanding of the role of 5-HT in the control and modification of blood pressure pales in comparison. Here we focus on the role of 5-HT in systemic blood pressure control. This review provides an in-depth study of the function and pharmacology of 5-HT in those tissues that can modify blood pressure (blood, vasculature, heart, adrenal gland, kidney, brain), with a focus on the autonomic nervous system that includes mechanisms of action and pharmacology of 5-HT within each system. We compare the change in blood pressure produced in different species by short- and long-term administration of 5-HT or selective serotonin receptor agonists. To further our understanding of the mechanisms through which 5-HT modifies blood pressure, we also describe the blood pressure effects of commonly used drugs that modify the actions of 5-HT. The pharmacology and physiological actions of 5-HT in modifying blood pressure are important, given its involvement in circulatory shock, orthostatic hypotension, serotonin syndrome and hypertension. PMID:22407614

  3. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor exposure.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kevin T; Bronstein, Alvin C

    2013-02-01

    Many antidepressants inhibit serotonin or norepinephrine reuptake or both to achieve their clinical effect. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor class of antidepressants (SSRIs) includes citalopram, escitalopram (active enantiomer of citalopram), fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline. The SSRIs are as effective as tricyclic antidepressants in treatment of major depression with less significant side effects. As a result, they have become the largest class of medications prescribed to humans for depression. They are also used to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorders, alcoholism, obesity, migraines, and chronic pain. An SSRI (fluoxetine) has been approved for veterinary use in treatment of canine separation anxiety. SSRIs act specifically on synaptic serotonin concentrations by blocking its reuptake in the presynapse and increasing levels in the presynaptic membrane. Clinical signs of SSRI overdose result from excessive amounts of serotonin in the central nervous system. These signs include nausea, vomiting, mydriasis, hypersalivation, and hyperthermia. Clinical signs are dose dependent and higher dosages may result in the serotonin syndrome that manifests itself as ataxia, tremors, muscle rigidity, hyperthermia, diarrhea, and seizures. Current studies reveal no increase in appearance of any specific clinical signs of serotonin toxicity with regard to any SSRI medication. In people, citalopram has been reported to have an increased risk of electrocardiographic abnormalities. Diagnosis of SSRI poisoning is based on history, clinical signs, and response to therapy. No single clinical test is currently available to confirm SSRI toxicosis. The goals of treatment in this intoxication are to support the animal, prevent further absorption of the drug, support the central nervous system, control hyperthermia, and halt any seizure activity. The relative safety of the SSRIs in overdose despite the occurrence of serotonin syndrome makes them

  4. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor exposure.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kevin T; Bronstein, Alvin C

    2013-02-01

    Many antidepressants inhibit serotonin or norepinephrine reuptake or both to achieve their clinical effect. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor class of antidepressants (SSRIs) includes citalopram, escitalopram (active enantiomer of citalopram), fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline. The SSRIs are as effective as tricyclic antidepressants in treatment of major depression with less significant side effects. As a result, they have become the largest class of medications prescribed to humans for depression. They are also used to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorders, alcoholism, obesity, migraines, and chronic pain. An SSRI (fluoxetine) has been approved for veterinary use in treatment of canine separation anxiety. SSRIs act specifically on synaptic serotonin concentrations by blocking its reuptake in the presynapse and increasing levels in the presynaptic membrane. Clinical signs of SSRI overdose result from excessive amounts of serotonin in the central nervous system. These signs include nausea, vomiting, mydriasis, hypersalivation, and hyperthermia. Clinical signs are dose dependent and higher dosages may result in the serotonin syndrome that manifests itself as ataxia, tremors, muscle rigidity, hyperthermia, diarrhea, and seizures. Current studies reveal no increase in appearance of any specific clinical signs of serotonin toxicity with regard to any SSRI medication. In people, citalopram has been reported to have an increased risk of electrocardiographic abnormalities. Diagnosis of SSRI poisoning is based on history, clinical signs, and response to therapy. No single clinical test is currently available to confirm SSRI toxicosis. The goals of treatment in this intoxication are to support the animal, prevent further absorption of the drug, support the central nervous system, control hyperthermia, and halt any seizure activity. The relative safety of the SSRIs in overdose despite the occurrence of serotonin syndrome makes them

  5. Serotonin release varies with brain tryptophan levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaechter, Judith D.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1990-01-01

    This study examines directly the effects on serotonin release of varying brain tryptophan levels within the physiologic range. It also addresses possible interactions between tryptophan availability and the frequency of membrane depolarization in controlling serotonin release. We demonstrate that reducing tryptophan levels in rat hypothalamic slices (by superfusing them with medium supplemented with 100 microM leucine) decreases tissue serotonin levels as well as both the spontaneous and the electrically-evoked serotonin release. Conversely, elevating tissue tryptophan levels (by superfusing slices with medium supplemented with 2 microM tryptophan) increases both the tissue serotonin levels and the serotonin release. Serotonin release was found to be affected independently by the tryptophan availability and the frequency of electrical field-stimulation (1-5 Hz), since increasing both variables produced nearly additive increases in release. These observations demonstrate for the first time that both precursor-dependent elevations and reductions in brain serotonin levels produce proportionate changes in serotonin release, and that the magnitude of the tryptophan effect is unrelated to neuronal firing frequency. The data support the hypothesis that serotonin release is proportionate to intracellular serotonin levels.

  6. Role of serotonin in fish reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Parvathy; Ogawa, Satoshi; Parhar, Ishwar S.

    2015-01-01

    The neuroendocrine mechanism regulates reproduction through the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis which is evolutionarily conserved in vertebrates. The HPG axis is regulated by a variety of internal as well as external factors. Serotonin, a monoamine neurotransmitter, is involved in a wide range of reproductive functions. In mammals, serotonin regulates sexual behaviors, gonadotropin release and gonadotropin-release hormone (GnRH) secretion. However, the serotonin system in teleost may also play unique role in the control of reproduction as the mechanism of reproductive control in teleosts is not always the same as in the mammalian models. In fish, the serotonin system is also regulated by natural environmental factors as well as chemical substances. In particular, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are commonly detected as pharmaceutical contaminants in the natural environment. Those factors may influence fish reproductive functions via the serotonin system. This review summarizes the functional significance of serotonin in the teleosts reproduction. PMID:26097446

  7. Serotonin in fear conditioning processes.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Elizabeth P

    2015-01-15

    This review describes the latest developments in our understanding of how the serotonergic system modulates Pavlovian fear conditioning, fear expression and fear extinction. These different phases of classical fear conditioning involve coordinated interactions between the extended amygdala, hippocampus and prefrontal cortices. Here, I first define the different stages of learning involved in cued and context fear conditioning and describe the neural circuits underlying these processes. The serotonergic system can be manipulated by administering serotonin receptor agonists and antagonists, as well as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), and these can have significant effects on emotional learning and memory. Moreover, variations in serotonergic genes can influence fear conditioning and extinction processes, and can underlie differential responses to pharmacological manipulations. This research has considerable translational significance as imbalances in the serotonergic system have been linked to anxiety and depression, while abnormalities in the mechanisms of conditioned fear contribute to anxiety disorders.

  8. Serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors: a pharmacological comparison.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Randy A; Sansone, Lori A

    2014-03-01

    The serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors are a family of antidepressants that inhibit the reuptake of both serotonin and norepinephrine. While these drugs are traditionally considered a group of inter-related antidepressants based upon reuptake inhibition, they generally display different chemical structures as well as different pharmacological properties. In this article, we discuss these and other differences among the serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, including the year of approval by the United States Food and Drug Administration, generic availability, approved clinical indications, half-lives, metabolism and excretion, presence or not of active metabolites, dosing schedules, proportionate effects on serotonin and norepinephrine, and the timing of serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake (i.e., sequential or simultaneous). Again, while serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors are grouped as a family of antidepressants, they exhibit a surprising number of differences- differences that may ultimately relate to clinical nuances in patient care. PMID:24800132

  9. Serotonin 5-HT2A receptor binding in platelets from healthy subjects as studied by [3H]-lysergic acid diethylamide ([3H]-LSD): intra- and interindividual variability.

    PubMed

    Spigset, O; Mjörndal, T

    1997-04-01

    In studies on platelet 5-HT2A receptor binding in patients with neuropsychiatric disorders, there has been a marked variability and a considerable overlap of values between patients and controls. The causes of the large variability in 5-HT2A receptor parameters is still unsettled. In the present study, we have quantified the intra- and interindividual variability of platelet 5-HT2A receptor binding in 112 healthy subjects and explored factors that may influence 5-HT2A receptor binding, using [3H]-lysergic acid diethylamide as radioligand. Age, gender, blood pressure, and metabolic capacity of the liver enzymes CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 did not influence Bmax and Kd values. Body weight and body mass index (BMI) showed a negative correlation with Kd (p = .04 and .03, respectively), but not with Bmax. Bmax was significantly lower in the light half of the year than in the dark half of the year (p = .001), and Kd was significantly lower in the fall than in the summer and winter (p < .001). In females, there was a significant increase in Bmax from week 1 to week 2 of the menstrual cycle (p = .03). Females taking contraceptive pills had significantly higher Kd than drug-free females in weeks 1 and 4 of the menstrual cycle (p = .04). This study shows that a number of factors should be taken into account when using platelet 5-HT2A receptor binding in studies of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  10. The impact of serotonin receptor 1A and 2A gene polymorphisms and interactions on suicide attempt and suicide risk in depressed patients with insufficient response to treatment--a European multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Höfer, Peter; Schosser, Alexandra; Calati, Raffaella; Serretti, Alessandro; Massat, Isabelle; Kocabas, Neslihan A; Konstantinidis, Anastasios; Mendlewicz, Julien; Souery, Daniel; Zohar, Joseph; Juven-Wetzler, Alzbeta; Montgomery, Stuart; Kasper, Siegfried

    2016-01-01

    So far, associations between serotonergic neurotransmission pathways and suicidality have been reported. The aim of our study was to investigate the role of genetic polymorphisms and gene-gene interactions of the 5-HTR1A and the 5-HTR2A gene on suicide risk and/or a personal history of suicide attempts. A total of 374 major depressive disorder patients, adequately treated with antidepressants for at least 4 weeks, were collected in the context of a European multicentre study on treatment-resistant depression. We assessed suicidality using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview and the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D). Treatment response was defined as HAM-D ≤ 17 and remission as HAM-D ≤ 7 after 4 weeks of adequate antidepressant treatment. The 5-HTR1A rs6295 (C-1019G) single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and the 5-HTR2A rs7997012, rs6313, rs643627 and rs17288723 SNPs were selected for genotyping. Using logistic regression analyses, no association (P<0.05) could be found between any SNP and neither suicide risk nor personal history of suicide attempts. Interactions between 5HTR1A rs6295 and 5HTR2A rs6313 in suicide risk, and 5HTR1A rs6295 and 5HTR2A rs643627 in a personal history of suicide attempts have been reported (P=0.027 and 0.036, respectively); however, the results did not survive multiple testing correction. In conclusion, our study shows no association between 5HTR1A or 5HTR2A gene polymorphisms and both current suicide risk and personal history of suicide attempts. In addition, epistatic effects of 5HTR1A and 5HTR2A genes on suicidal behaviour were not significant, although sample size limitations do not allow definitive conclusions.

  11. Combined serotonin (5-HT)1A agonism, 5-HT(2A) and dopamine D₂ receptor antagonism reproduces atypical antipsychotic drug effects on phencyclidine-impaired novel object recognition in rats.

    PubMed

    Oyamada, Yoshihiro; Horiguchi, Masakuni; Rajagopal, Lakshmi; Miyauchi, Masanori; Meltzer, Herbert Y

    2015-05-15

    Subchronic administration of an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist, e.g. phencyclidine (PCP), produces prolonged impairment of novel object recognition (NOR), suggesting they constitute a hypoglutamate-based model of cognitive impairment in schizophrenia (CIS). Acute administration of atypical, e.g. lurasidone, but not typical antipsychotic drugs (APDs), e.g. haloperidol, are able to restore NOR following PCP (acute reversal model). Furthermore, atypical APDs, when co-administered with PCP, have been shown to prevent development of NOR deficits (prevention model). Most atypical, but not typical APDs, are more potent 5-HT(2A) receptor inverse agonists than dopamine (DA) D2 antagonists, and have been shown to enhance cortical and hippocampal efflux and to be direct or indirect 5-HT(1A) agonists in vivo. To further clarify the importance of these actions to the restoration of NOR by atypical APDs, sub-effective or non-effective doses of combinations of the 5-HT(1A) partial agonist (tandospirone), the 5-HT(2A) inverse agonist (pimavanserin), or the D2 antagonist (haloperidol), as well as the combination of all three agents, were studied in the acute reversal and prevention PCP models of CIS. Only the combination of all three agents restored NOR and prevented the development of PCP-induced deficit. Thus, this triple combination of 5-HT(1A) agonism, 5-HT(2A) antagonism/inverse agonism, and D2 antagonism is able to mimic the ability of atypical APDs to prevent or ameliorate the PCP-induced NOR deficit, possibly by stimulating signaling cascades from D1 and 5-HT(1A) receptor stimulation, modulated by D2 and 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonism. PMID:25448429

  12. Serotonin modulates insect hemocyte phagocytosis via two different serotonin receptors.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yi-Xiang; Huang, Jia; Li, Meng-Qi; Wu, Ya-Su; Xia, Ren-Ying; Ye, Gong-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) modulates both neural and immune responses in vertebrates, but its role in insect immunity remains uncertain. We report that hemocytes in the caterpillar, Pieris rapae are able to synthesize 5-HT following activation by lipopolysaccharide. The inhibition of a serotonin-generating enzyme with either pharmacological blockade or RNAi knock-down impaired hemocyte phagocytosis. Biochemical and functional experiments showed that naive hemocytes primarily express 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B receptors. The blockade of 5-HT1B significantly reduced phagocytic ability; however, the blockade of 5-HT2B increased hemocyte phagocytosis. The 5-HT1B-null Drosophila melanogaster mutants showed higher mortality than controls when infected with bacteria, due to their decreased phagocytotic ability. Flies expressing 5-HT1B or 5-HT2B RNAi in hemocytes also showed similar sensitivity to infection. Combined, these data demonstrate that 5-HT mediates hemocyte phagocytosis through 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B receptors and serotonergic signaling performs critical modulatory functions in immune systems of animals separated by 500 million years of evolution. PMID:26974346

  13. Serotonin modulates insect hemocyte phagocytosis via two different serotonin receptors

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yi-xiang; Huang, Jia; Li, Meng-qi; Wu, Ya-su; Xia, Ren-ying; Ye, Gong-yin

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) modulates both neural and immune responses in vertebrates, but its role in insect immunity remains uncertain. We report that hemocytes in the caterpillar, Pieris rapae are able to synthesize 5-HT following activation by lipopolysaccharide. The inhibition of a serotonin-generating enzyme with either pharmacological blockade or RNAi knock-down impaired hemocyte phagocytosis. Biochemical and functional experiments showed that naive hemocytes primarily express 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B receptors. The blockade of 5-HT1B significantly reduced phagocytic ability; however, the blockade of 5-HT2B increased hemocyte phagocytosis. The 5-HT1B-null Drosophila melanogaster mutants showed higher mortality than controls when infected with bacteria, due to their decreased phagocytotic ability. Flies expressing 5-HT1B or 5-HT2B RNAi in hemocytes also showed similar sensitivity to infection. Combined, these data demonstrate that 5-HT mediates hemocyte phagocytosis through 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B receptors and serotonergic signaling performs critical modulatory functions in immune systems of animals separated by 500 million years of evolution. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12241.001 PMID:26974346

  14. Effects of central activation of serotonin 5-HT2A/2C or dopamine D2/3 receptors on the acute and repeated effects of clozapine in the conditioned avoidance response test

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Min; Gao, Jun; Sui, Nan; Li, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Acute administration of clozapine (a gold standard of atypical antipsychotics) disrupts avoidance response in rodents, while repeated administration often causes a tolerance effect. Objective: The present study investigated the neuroanatomical basis and receptor mechanisms of acute and repeated effects of clozapine treatment in the conditioned avoidance response test in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Methods: DOI (2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodo-amphetamine, a preferential 5-HT2A/2C agonist) or quinpirole (a preferential dopamine D2/3 agonist) was microinjected into the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) or nucleus accumbens shell (NAs), and their effects on the acute and long-term avoidance-disruptive effect of clozapine were tested. Results: Intra-mPFC microinjection of quinpirole enhanced the acute avoidance disruptive effect of clozapine (10 mg/kg, sc), while DOI microinjections reduced it marginally. Repeated administration of clozapine (10 mg/kg, sc) daily for 5 days caused a progressive decrease in its inhibition of avoidance responding, indicating tolerance development. Intra-mPFC microinjection of DOI at 25.0 (but not 5.0) μg/side during this period completely abolished the expression of clozapine tolerance. This was indicated by the finding that clozapine-treated rats centrally infused with 25.0 μg/side DOI did not show higher levels of avoidance responses than the vehicle-treated rats in the clozapine challenge test. Microinjection of DOI into the mPFC immediately before the challenge test also decreased the expression of clozapine tolerance. Conclusions: Acute behavioral effect of clozapine can be enhanced by activation of the D2/3 receptors in the mPFC. Clozapine tolerance expression relies on the neuroplasticity initiated by its antagonist action against 5-HT2A/2C receptors in the mPFC. PMID:25288514

  15. A Novel Aminotetralin-Type Serotonin (5-HT) 2C Receptor-Specific Agonist and 5-HT2A Competitive Antagonist/5-HT2B Inverse Agonist with Preclinical Efficacy for Psychoses

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Drake; Felsing, Daniel; Kondabolu, Krishnakanth; Rowland, Neil E.; Robertson, Kimberly L.; Sakhuja, Rajeev; Booth, Raymond G.

    2014-01-01

    Development of 5-HT2C agonists for treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders, including psychoses, substance abuse, and obesity, has been fraught with difficulties, because the vast majority of reported 5-HT2C selective agonists also activate 5-HT2A and/or 5-HT2B receptors, potentially causing hallucinations and/or cardiac valvulopathy. Herein is described a novel, potent, and efficacious human 5-HT2C receptor agonist, (−)-trans-(2S,4R)-4-(3′[meta]-bromophenyl)-N,N-dimethyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalen-2-amine (−)-MBP), that is a competitive antagonist and inverse agonist at human 5-HT2A and 5-HT2B receptors, respectively. (−)-MBP has efficacy comparable to the prototypical second-generation antipsychotic drug clozapine in three C57Bl/6 mouse models of drug-induced psychoses: the head-twitch response elicited by [2,5]-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine; hyperlocomotion induced by MK-801 [(5R,10S)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine hydrogen maleate (dizocilpine maleate)]; and hyperlocomotion induced by amphetamine. (−)-MBP, however, does not alter locomotion when administered alone, distinguishing it from clozapine, which suppresses locomotion. Finally, consumption of highly palatable food by mice was not increased by (−)-MBP at a dose that produced at least 50% maximal efficacy in the psychoses models. Compared with (−)-MBP, the enantiomer (+)-MBP was much less active across in vitro affinity and functional assays using mouse and human receptors and also translated in vivo with comparably lower potency and efficacy. Results indicate a 5-HT2C receptor-specific agonist, such as (−)-MBP, may be pharmacotherapeutic for psychoses, without liability for obesity, hallucinations, heart disease, sedation, or motoric disorders. PMID:24563531

  16. Serotonin excites hippocampal CA1 GABAergic interneurons at the stratum radiatum-stratum lacunosum moleculare border.

    PubMed

    Wyskiel, Daniel R; Andrade, Rodrigo

    2016-09-01

    The hippocampus receives robust serotonergic innervation that is thought to control the excitability of both pyramidal cells and GABAergic interneurons. Previous work has addressed serotonergic regulation of pyramidal cells but considerable gaps remain in our understanding of how serotonin regulates different interneuron subclasses. 5-HT2A receptors (5-HT2A Rs) appear to localize predominantly, if not solely, on interneurons in the hippocampus and have been implicated in the regulation of hippocampal function including mnemonic and novelty recognition processes. Interneurons are functionally diverse. Therefore in the current work, we have used a BAC transgenic mouse line expressing EGFP under the control of the 5-HT2A R promoter to identify the interneuron subtype(s) regulated by serotonin via 5-HT2A Rs. We find that EGFP expression in this mouse identifies a group of interneurons that resides predominantly along the border of the stratum radiatum (SR) and stratum lacunosum moleculare (SLM) of the CA1 region. We then show that these cells are depolarized and excited by serotonin acting through 5-HT2A Rs and appear to belong predominantly to the perforant pathway-associated and Schaffer collateral/commissural pathway-associated subtypes. These results indicate that serotonin interneurons expressing 5-HT2A Rs are localized primarily along the SR-SLM border of the CA1 region and represent a newly identified target for serotonin regulation in the hippocampus. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Serotonin excites hippocampal CA1 GABAergic interneurons at the stratum radiatum-stratum lacunosum moleculare border.

    PubMed

    Wyskiel, Daniel R; Andrade, Rodrigo

    2016-09-01

    The hippocampus receives robust serotonergic innervation that is thought to control the excitability of both pyramidal cells and GABAergic interneurons. Previous work has addressed serotonergic regulation of pyramidal cells but considerable gaps remain in our understanding of how serotonin regulates different interneuron subclasses. 5-HT2A receptors (5-HT2A Rs) appear to localize predominantly, if not solely, on interneurons in the hippocampus and have been implicated in the regulation of hippocampal function including mnemonic and novelty recognition processes. Interneurons are functionally diverse. Therefore in the current work, we have used a BAC transgenic mouse line expressing EGFP under the control of the 5-HT2A R promoter to identify the interneuron subtype(s) regulated by serotonin via 5-HT2A Rs. We find that EGFP expression in this mouse identifies a group of interneurons that resides predominantly along the border of the stratum radiatum (SR) and stratum lacunosum moleculare (SLM) of the CA1 region. We then show that these cells are depolarized and excited by serotonin acting through 5-HT2A Rs and appear to belong predominantly to the perforant pathway-associated and Schaffer collateral/commissural pathway-associated subtypes. These results indicate that serotonin interneurons expressing 5-HT2A Rs are localized primarily along the SR-SLM border of the CA1 region and represent a newly identified target for serotonin regulation in the hippocampus. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27328460

  18. Serotonin: Modulator of a Drive to Withdraw

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tops, Mattie; Russo, Sascha; Boksem, Maarten A. S.; Tucker, Don M.

    2009-01-01

    Serotonin is a fundamental neuromodulator in both vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems, with a suspected role in many human mental disorders. Yet, because of the complexity of serotonergic function, researchers have been unable to agree on a general theory. One function suggested for serotonin systems is the avoidance of threat. We propose…

  19. How serotonin shapes moral judgment and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Jenifer Z; Crockett, Molly J

    2013-01-01

    Neuroscientists are now discovering how hormones and brain chemicals shape social behavior, opening potential avenues for pharmacological manipulation of ethical values. Here, we review recent studies showing how altering brain chemistry can alter moral judgment and behavior, focusing in particular on the neuromodulator serotonin and its role in shaping values related to harm and fairness. We synthesize previous findings and consider the potential mechanisms through which serotonin could increase the aversion to harming others. We present a process model whereby serotonin influences social behavior by shifting social preferences in the positive direction, enhancing the value people place on others’ outcomes. This model may explain previous findings relating serotonin function to prosocial behavior, and makes new predictions regarding how serotonin may influence the neural computation of value in social contexts. PMID:25627116

  20. Serotonin, neural markers, and memory

    PubMed Central

    Meneses, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Diverse neuropsychiatric disorders present dysfunctional memory and no effective treatment exits for them; likely as result of the absence of neural markers associated to memory. Neurotransmitter systems and signaling pathways have been implicated in memory and dysfunctional memory; however, their role is poorly understood. Hence, neural markers and cerebral functions and dysfunctions are revised. To our knowledge no previous systematic works have been published addressing these issues. The interactions among behavioral tasks, control groups and molecular changes and/or pharmacological effects are mentioned. Neurotransmitter receptors and signaling pathways, during normal and abnormally functioning memory with an emphasis on the behavioral aspects of memory are revised. With focus on serotonin, since as it is a well characterized neurotransmitter, with multiple pharmacological tools, and well characterized downstream signaling in mammals' species. 5-HT1A, 5-HT4, 5-HT5, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7 receptors as well as SERT (serotonin transporter) seem to be useful neural markers and/or therapeutic targets. Certainly, if the mentioned evidence is replicated, then the translatability from preclinical and clinical studies to neural changes might be confirmed. Hypothesis and theories might provide appropriate limits and perspectives of evidence. PMID:26257650

  1. Immunohistochemical location of serotonin and serotonin 2B receptor in the small intestine of pigs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Han; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Lei; Teng, Kedao

    2009-01-01

    The distribution of serotonin and serotonin 2B receptor in the small intestines of pigs newborn, 5, 15 and 100 days of age were examined qualitatively and quantitatively by immunohistochemical labeling, microscopic observation and image analysis. The results showed serotonin immunopositive cells distributed diffusely among the epithelial cells of the middle and more basal parts of villi and intestinal glands in all segments of all pigs examined. Serotonin 2B receptor was first localized in the duodenum of 15-day-old pigs, whereas in 100-day-old pigs, serotonin 2B receptor was immunolabeled abundantly in all segments. Serotonin 2B receptor was distributed in the connective tissue of the small intestinal mucosa, lamina propria and in some myenteric neurons. The density of serotonin 2B receptor immunopositive cells in the duodenum of 100-day-old pigs was higher than that of 15-day-old pigs. The density of serotonin 2B receptor immunopositive cells in the duodenum was the highest among the three segments of the 100-day-old pigs. The study indicates that the distribution of serotonin 2B receptor is species different in the pig small intestine and the intensity of serotonin 2B receptor becomes stronger as the small intestine matures.

  2. Serotonin Is Involved in Autoimmune Arthritis through Th17 Immunity and Bone Resorption.

    PubMed

    Chabbi-Achengli, Yasmine; Coman, Tereza; Collet, Corinne; Callebert, Jacques; Corcelli, Michelangelo; Lin, Hilène; Rignault, Rachel; Dy, Michel; de Vernejoul, Marie-Christine; Côté, Francine

    2016-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic disease that results in a disabling and painful condition as it progresses to destruction of the articular cartilage and ankylosis of the joints. Although the cause of the disease is still unknown, evidence argues that autoimmunity plays an important part. There are increasing but contradictory views regarding serotonin being associated with activation of immunoinflammatory pathways and the onset of autoimmune reactions. We studied serotonin's involvement during collagen-induced arthritis in wild-type and Tph1(-/-) mice, which have markedly reduced peripheral serotonin levels. In wild-type mice, induction of arthritis triggered a robust increase in serotonin content in the paws combined with less inflammation. In Tph1(-/-) mice with arthritis, a marked increase in the clinical and pathologic arthritis scores was noticed. Specifically, in Tph1(-/-) mice with arthritis, a significant increase in osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption was observed with an increase in IL-17 levels in the paws and in Th17 lymphocytes in the draining lymph nodes, whereas T-regulatory cells were dampened. Ex vivo serotonin and agonists of the 5-HT2A and 5-HT2B receptors restored IL-17 secretion from splenocytes and Th17 cell differentiation in Tph1(-/-) mice. These findings indicate that serotonin plays a fundamental role in arthritis through the regulation of the Th17/T-regulatory cell balance and osteoclastogenesis.

  3. Serotonin shapes risky decision making in monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Cynthia M.; Platt, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    Some people love taking risks, while others avoid gambles at all costs. The neural mechanisms underlying individual variation in preference for risky or certain outcomes, however, remain poorly understood. Although behavioral pathologies associated with compulsive gambling, addiction and other psychiatric disorders implicate deficient serotonin signaling in pathological decision making, there is little experimental evidence demonstrating a link between serotonin and risky decision making, in part due to the lack of a good animal model. We used dietary rapid tryptophan depletion (RTD) to acutely lower brain serotonin in three macaques performing a simple gambling task for fluid rewards. To confirm the efficacy of RTD experiments, we measured total plasma tryptophan using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with electrochemical detection. Reducing brain serotonin synthesis decreased preference for the safe option in a gambling task. Moreover, lowering brain serotonin function significantly decreased the premium required for monkeys to switch their preference to the risky option, suggesting that diminished serotonin signaling enhances the relative subjective value of the risky option. These results implicate serotonin in risk-sensitive decision making and, further, suggest pharmacological therapies for treating pathological risk preferences in disorders such as problem gambling and addiction. PMID:19553236

  4. Changes in Intensity of Serotonin Syndrome Caused by Adverse Interaction between Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors and Serotonin Reuptake Blockers

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Rui; Rudacille, Mary; Zhang, Gongliang; Ma, Zhiyuan

    2014-01-01

    Drug interaction between inhibitors of monoamine oxidase (MAOIs) and selective serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) reuptake (SSRIs) induces serotonin syndrome, which is usually mild but occasionally severe in intensity. However, little is known about neural mechanisms responsible for the syndrome induction and intensification. In this study, we hypothesized that the syndrome induction and intensity utilize two different but inter-related mechanisms. Serotonin syndrome is elicited by excessive 5-HT in the brain (presynaptic mechanism), whereas syndrome intensity is attributed to neural circuits involving 5-HT2A and NMDA receptors (postsynaptic mechanism). To test this hypothesis, basal 5-HT efflux and postsynaptic circuits were pharmacologically altered in rats by once daily pretreatment of the MAOI clorgyline for 3, 6, or 13 days. Syndrome intensity was estimated by measuring 5-HT efflux, neuromuscular activity, and body-core temperature in response to challenge injection of clorgyline combined with the SSRI paroxetine. Results showed that the onset of serotonin syndrome is caused by 5-HT efflux exceeding 10-fold above baseline, confirming the presynaptic hypothesis. The neuromuscular and body-core temperature abnormalities, which were otherwise mild in drug-naive rats, were significantly intensified to a severe level in rats pretreated with daily clorgyline for 3 and 6 days but not in rats pretreated for 13 days. The intensified effect was blocked by M100907 and MK-801, suggesting that variation in syndrome intensity was mediated through a 5-HT2A and NMDA receptor-engaged circuit. Therefore, we concluded that pretreatments of MAOI pharmacologically alter the activity of postsynaptic circuits, which is responsible for changes in syndrome intensity. PMID:24577320

  5. Serotonin signaling mediates protein valuation and aging

    PubMed Central

    Ro, Jennifer; Pak, Gloria; Malec, Paige A; Lyu, Yang; Allison, David B; Kennedy, Robert T; Pletcher, Scott D

    2016-01-01

    Research into how protein restriction improves organismal health and lengthens lifespan has largely focused on cell-autonomous processes. In certain instances, however, nutrient effects on lifespan are independent of consumption, leading us to test the hypothesis that central, cell non-autonomous processes are important protein restriction regulators. We characterized a transient feeding preference for dietary protein after modest starvation in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, and identified tryptophan hydroxylase (Trh), serotonin receptor 2a (5HT2a), and the solute carrier 7-family amino acid transporter, JhI-21, as required for this preference through their role in establishing protein value. Disruption of any one of these genes increased lifespan up to 90% independent of food intake suggesting the perceived value of dietary protein is a critical determinant of its effect on lifespan. Evolutionarily conserved neuromodulatory systems that define neural states of nutrient demand and reward are therefore sufficient to control aging and physiology independent of food consumption. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16843.001 PMID:27572262

  6. Serotonin signaling mediates protein valuation and aging.

    PubMed

    Ro, Jennifer; Pak, Gloria; Malec, Paige A; Lyu, Yang; Allison, David B; Kennedy, Robert T; Pletcher, Scott D

    2016-01-01

    Research into how protein restriction improves organismal health and lengthens lifespan has largely focused on cell-autonomous processes. In certain instances, however, nutrient effects on lifespan are independent of consumption, leading us to test the hypothesis that central, cell non-autonomous processes are important protein restriction regulators. We characterized a transient feeding preference for dietary protein after modest starvation in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, and identified tryptophan hydroxylase (Trh), serotonin receptor 2a (5HT2a), and the solute carrier 7-family amino acid transporter, JhI-21, as required for this preference through their role in establishing protein value. Disruption of any one of these genes increased lifespan up to 90% independent of food intake suggesting the perceived value of dietary protein is a critical determinant of its effect on lifespan. Evolutionarily conserved neuromodulatory systems that define neural states of nutrient demand and reward are therefore sufficient to control aging and physiology independent of food consumption. PMID:27572262

  7. Serotonin in animal models of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Compagnon, P; Ernouf, D; Narcisse, G; Daoust, M

    1993-01-01

    Ethanol naive alcohol preferring rodents have low serotonin transmission. Both pharmacological, biochemical and behavioral studies show that increased serotonin transmission influence reduces ethanol consumption in animals. This paper develops the role of serotonin in different lines of ethanol preferring rats and mice, and shows a regulation of 5-HT1A receptors in alcoholised dependent mice. Different sensitivities to ethanol observed between ethanol-preferring and non-preferring rats or mice seems to be at the root of the maintenance of alcohol intake.

  8. Human serotonin transporter availability predicts fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Åhs, Fredrik; Frick, Andreas; Furmark, Tomas; Fredrikson, Mats

    2015-12-01

    Serotonin facilitates fear learning in animals. We therefore predicted that individual differences in the capacity to regulate serotonergic transmission in the human neural fear circuit would be inversely related to fear conditioning. The capacity to regulate serotonergic transmission was indexed by serotonin transporter availability measured with [(11)C]-DASB positron emission tomography. Results indicate that lower serotonin transporter availability in the amygdala, insula and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex predicts enhanced conditioned autonomic fear responses. Our finding supports serotonergic modulation of fear conditioning in humans and may aid in understanding susceptibility for developing anxiety conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder. PMID:25498766

  9. Cognitive inflexibility after prefrontal serotonin depletion.

    PubMed

    Clarke, H F; Dalley, J W; Crofts, H S; Robbins, T W; Roberts, A C

    2004-05-01

    Serotonergic dysregulation within the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is implicated in many neuropsychiatric disorders, but the precise role of serotonin within the PFC is poorly understood. Using a serial discrimination reversal paradigm, we showed that upon reversal, selective serotonin depletion of the marmoset PFC produced perseverative responding to the previously rewarded stimulus without any significant effects on either retention of a discrimination learned preoperatively or acquisition of a novel discrimination postoperatively. These results highlight the importance of prefrontal serotonin in behavioral flexibility and are highly relevant to obsessive-compulsive disorder, schizophrenia, and the cognitive sequelae of drug abuse in which perseveration is prominent.

  10. Serotonin: A New Hope in Alzheimer's Disease?

    PubMed

    Claeysen, Sylvie; Bockaert, Joël; Giannoni, Patrizia

    2015-07-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia affecting 35 million individuals worldwide. Current AD treatments provide only brief symptomatic relief. It is therefore urgent to replace this symptomatic approach with a curative one. Increasing serotonin signaling as well as developing molecules that enhance serotonin concentration in the synaptic cleft have been debated as possible therapeutic strategies to slow the progression of AD. In this Viewpoint, we discuss exciting new insights regarding the modulation of serotonin signaling for AD prevention and therapy.

  11. Human serotonin transporter availability predicts fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Åhs, Fredrik; Frick, Andreas; Furmark, Tomas; Fredrikson, Mats

    2015-12-01

    Serotonin facilitates fear learning in animals. We therefore predicted that individual differences in the capacity to regulate serotonergic transmission in the human neural fear circuit would be inversely related to fear conditioning. The capacity to regulate serotonergic transmission was indexed by serotonin transporter availability measured with [(11)C]-DASB positron emission tomography. Results indicate that lower serotonin transporter availability in the amygdala, insula and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex predicts enhanced conditioned autonomic fear responses. Our finding supports serotonergic modulation of fear conditioning in humans and may aid in understanding susceptibility for developing anxiety conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder.

  12. Serotonin syndrome: pills, thrills and shoulder aches.

    PubMed

    Proudfoot, Malcolm; Gormley, Joe

    2013-01-01

    This case demonstrates an acute presentation of unwitnessed seizure causing typical injuries. Progress in hospital was complicated by worsening autonomic disturbance and agitation, typical for serotonin syndrome, suspected in light of recent selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressant initiation. Supportive care required treatment in the intensive care unit setting but full recovery ensued. This case not only reminds clinicians of the potential pitfalls in assessing postictal injured patients, but also that serotonin syndrome requires a high-index of diagnostic suspicion given the range of presenting features. Management ranges from simple withdrawal of the offending agent to specific therapies such as a cyproheptadine. PMID:23429023

  13. Transient Serotonin Syndrome Caused by Concurrent Use of Tramadol and Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Shakoor, Muhammad Tariq; Ayub, Samia; Ahad, Abdul; Ayub, Zunaira

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Female, 44 Final Diagnosis: Serotonin syndrome Symptoms: Altered mental status • random spontaneous jerky movements in the extremities • generalized weakness • vomiting Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Holding SSRI and tramdol Specialty: Critical Care Medicine Objective: Rare disease Background: Serotonin syndrome is a potentially life-threatening adverse drug reaction that most commonly results from adverse interactions between drugs. Because serotonin syndrome can be fatal and is often difficult to diagnose, it is vital for health professionals to know about this reaction. We report a typical case of transient serotonin syndrome secondary to tramadol-Citalopram combination. This case report highlights the value of awareness of the early and subtle signs of serotonin syndrome. Case Report: A 44-year-old female with past medical history of chronic pancreatitis, back pain, and major depression was brought to the emergency room (ER) with altered mental status, jerky movements in extremities, generalized weakness, and vomiting. Conclusions: Most physicians are aware of serotonin syndrome secondary to antidepressants but do not think about other classes of medications such as analgesics. Clinicians should also be aware of the possibility of serotonin syndrome when encountering a patient taking serotonergic drugs who presents with characteristic symptoms of serotonin syndrome. PMID:25540831

  14. Immunomodulatory effects mediated by serotonin.

    PubMed

    Arreola, Rodrigo; Becerril-Villanueva, Enrique; Cruz-Fuentes, Carlos; Velasco-Velázquez, Marco Antonio; Garcés-Alvarez, María Eugenia; Hurtado-Alvarado, Gabriela; Quintero-Fabian, Saray; Pavón, Lenin

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) induces concentration-dependent metabolic effects in diverse cell types, including neurons, entherochromaffin cells, adipocytes, pancreatic beta-cells, fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, epithelial cells, and leukocytes. Three classes of genes regulating 5-HT function are constitutively expressed or induced in these cells: (a) membrane proteins that regulate the response to 5-HT, such as SERT, 5HTR-GPCR, and the 5HT3-ion channels; (b) downstream signaling transduction proteins; and (c) enzymes controlling 5-HT metabolism, such as IDO and MAO, which can generate biologically active catabolites, including melatonin, kynurenines, and kynurenamines. This review covers the clinical and experimental mechanisms involved in 5-HT-induced immunomodulation. These mechanisms are cell-specific and depend on the expression of serotonergic components in immune cells. Consequently, 5-HT can modulate several immunological events, such as chemotaxis, leukocyte activation, proliferation, cytokine secretion, anergy, and apoptosis. The effects of 5-HT on immune cells may be relevant in the clinical outcome of pathologies with an inflammatory component. Major depression, fibromyalgia, Alzheimer disease, psoriasis, arthritis, allergies, and asthma are all associated with changes in the serotonergic system associated with leukocytes. Thus, pharmacological regulation of the serotonergic system may modulate immune function and provide therapeutic alternatives for these diseases.

  15. Immunomodulatory Effects Mediated by Serotonin

    PubMed Central

    Arreola, Rodrigo; Becerril-Villanueva, Enrique; Cruz-Fuentes, Carlos; Velasco-Velázquez, Marco Antonio; Garcés-Alvarez, María Eugenia; Hurtado-Alvarado, Gabriela; Quintero-Fabian, Saray; Pavón, Lenin

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) induces concentration-dependent metabolic effects in diverse cell types, including neurons, entherochromaffin cells, adipocytes, pancreatic beta-cells, fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, epithelial cells, and leukocytes. Three classes of genes regulating 5-HT function are constitutively expressed or induced in these cells: (a) membrane proteins that regulate the response to 5-HT, such as SERT, 5HTR-GPCR, and the 5HT3-ion channels; (b) downstream signaling transduction proteins; and (c) enzymes controlling 5-HT metabolism, such as IDO and MAO, which can generate biologically active catabolites, including melatonin, kynurenines, and kynurenamines. This review covers the clinical and experimental mechanisms involved in 5-HT-induced immunomodulation. These mechanisms are cell-specific and depend on the expression of serotonergic components in immune cells. Consequently, 5-HT can modulate several immunological events, such as chemotaxis, leukocyte activation, proliferation, cytokine secretion, anergy, and apoptosis. The effects of 5-HT on immune cells may be relevant in the clinical outcome of pathologies with an inflammatory component. Major depression, fibromyalgia, Alzheimer disease, psoriasis, arthritis, allergies, and asthma are all associated with changes in the serotonergic system associated with leukocytes. Thus, pharmacological regulation of the serotonergic system may modulate immune function and provide therapeutic alternatives for these diseases. PMID:25961058

  16. Immunomodulatory effects mediated by serotonin.

    PubMed

    Arreola, Rodrigo; Becerril-Villanueva, Enrique; Cruz-Fuentes, Carlos; Velasco-Velázquez, Marco Antonio; Garcés-Alvarez, María Eugenia; Hurtado-Alvarado, Gabriela; Quintero-Fabian, Saray; Pavón, Lenin

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) induces concentration-dependent metabolic effects in diverse cell types, including neurons, entherochromaffin cells, adipocytes, pancreatic beta-cells, fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, epithelial cells, and leukocytes. Three classes of genes regulating 5-HT function are constitutively expressed or induced in these cells: (a) membrane proteins that regulate the response to 5-HT, such as SERT, 5HTR-GPCR, and the 5HT3-ion channels; (b) downstream signaling transduction proteins; and (c) enzymes controlling 5-HT metabolism, such as IDO and MAO, which can generate biologically active catabolites, including melatonin, kynurenines, and kynurenamines. This review covers the clinical and experimental mechanisms involved in 5-HT-induced immunomodulation. These mechanisms are cell-specific and depend on the expression of serotonergic components in immune cells. Consequently, 5-HT can modulate several immunological events, such as chemotaxis, leukocyte activation, proliferation, cytokine secretion, anergy, and apoptosis. The effects of 5-HT on immune cells may be relevant in the clinical outcome of pathologies with an inflammatory component. Major depression, fibromyalgia, Alzheimer disease, psoriasis, arthritis, allergies, and asthma are all associated with changes in the serotonergic system associated with leukocytes. Thus, pharmacological regulation of the serotonergic system may modulate immune function and provide therapeutic alternatives for these diseases. PMID:25961058

  17. Synapsins differentially control dopamine and serotonin release.

    PubMed

    Kile, Brian M; Guillot, Thomas S; Venton, B Jill; Wetsel, William C; Augustine, George J; Wightman, R Mark

    2010-07-21

    Synapsins are a family of synaptic vesicle proteins that are important for neurotransmitter release. Here we have used triple knock-out (TKO) mice lacking all three synapsin genes to determine the roles of synapsins in the release of two monoamine neurotransmitters, dopamine and serotonin. Serotonin release evoked by electrical stimulation was identical in substantia nigra pars reticulata slices prepared from TKO and wild-type mice. In contrast, release of dopamine in response to electrical stimulation was approximately doubled in striatum of TKO mice, both in vivo and in striatal slices, in comparison to wild-type controls. This was due to loss of synapsin III, because deletion of synapsin III alone was sufficient to increase dopamine release. Deletion of synapsins also increased the sensitivity of dopamine release to extracellular calcium ions. Although cocaine did not affect the release of serotonin from nigral tissue, this drug did enhance dopamine release. Cocaine-induced facilitation of dopamine release was a function of external calcium, an effect that was reduced in TKO mice. We conclude that synapsins play different roles in the control of release of dopamine and serotonin, with release of dopamine being negatively regulated by synapsins, specifically synapsin III, while serotonin release appears to be relatively independent of synapsins. These results provide further support for the concept that synapsin function in presynaptic terminals varies according to the neurotransmitter being released. PMID:20660258

  18. On the role of brain serotonin in expression of genetic predisposition to catalepsy in animal models

    SciTech Connect

    Popova, N.K.; Kulikov, A.V.

    1995-06-19

    The activity of the rate-limiting enzyme of serotonin biosynthesis, tryptophan hydroxylase, in the striatum but not in the hippocampus and midbrain of rats bred for predisposition to catalepsy was higher than in nonselected rats. Mice of the highly susceptible to catalepsy CBA strain also differed from other noncataleptic mouse strains by the highest tryptophan hydroxylase activity in the striatum. Inhibition of tryptophan hydroxylase with p-chlorophenylalanine and p-chloromethamphetamine drastically decreased immobility time in hereditary predisposed to catalepsy animals. A decrease in the {sup 3}H-ketanserin specific binding in the striatum of cataleptic rats and CBA mice was found. It was suggested that this decrease in 5-HT2A serotonin receptor density represented a down regulation of the receptors due to an activation of serotonergic transmission in striatum. It is suggested that hereditary catalepsy may be resulted from genetic changes in the regulation of serotonin metabolism in striatum. 32 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Serotonin modulation of cortical neurons and networks

    PubMed Central

    Celada, Pau; Puig, M. Victoria; Artigas, Francesc

    2013-01-01

    The serotonergic pathways originating in the dorsal and median raphe nuclei (DR and MnR, respectively) are critically involved in cortical function. Serotonin (5-HT), acting on postsynaptic and presynaptic receptors, is involved in cognition, mood, impulse control and motor functions by (1) modulating the activity of different neuronal types, and (2) varying the release of other neurotransmitters, such as glutamate, GABA, acetylcholine and dopamine. Also, 5-HT seems to play an important role in cortical development. Of all cortical regions, the frontal lobe is the area most enriched in serotonergic axons and 5-HT receptors. 5-HT and selective receptor agonists modulate the excitability of cortical neurons and their discharge rate through the activation of several receptor subtypes, of which the 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A, and 5-HT3 subtypes play a major role. Little is known, however, on the role of other excitatory receptors moderately expressed in cortical areas, such as 5-HT2C, 5-HT4, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7. In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors are key players and exert opposite effects on the activity of pyramidal neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). The activation of 5-HT1A receptors in mPFC hyperpolarizes pyramidal neurons whereas that of 5-HT2A receptors results in neuronal depolarization, reduction of the afterhyperpolarization and increase of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) and of discharge rate. 5-HT can also stimulate excitatory (5-HT2A and 5-HT3) and inhibitory (5-HT1A) receptors in GABA interneurons to modulate synaptic GABA inputs onto pyramidal neurons. Likewise, the pharmacological manipulation of various 5-HT receptors alters oscillatory activity in PFC, suggesting that 5-HT is also involved in the control of cortical network activity. A better understanding of the actions of 5-HT in PFC may help to develop treatments for mood and cognitive disorders associated with an abnormal function of the frontal lobe

  20. Serotonin-Labeled CdSe Nanocrystals: Applications for Neuroscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kippeny, Tadd; Adkins, Erika; Adams, Scott; Thomlinson, Ian; Schroeter, Sally; Defelice, Louis; Blakely, Randy; Rosenthal, Sandra

    2000-03-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is an important neurotransmitter which has been linked to the regulation of critical behaviors including sleep, appetite, and mood. The serotonin transporter (SERT) is a 12-transmembrane domain protein responsible for clearance of serotonin from extracellular spaces following release. In order to assess the potential for use of ligand-conjugated nanocrystals to target cell surface receptors, ion channels, and transporters we have measured the ability of serotonin-labeled CdSe nanocrystals (SNACs) to block the uptake of tritiated serotonin by the human and Drosophila serotonin transporters (hSERT and dSERT). Estimated Ki values, the SNAC concentration at which half of the serotonin transport activity is blocked, were determined by nonlinear regression to be Ki (hSERT ) = 74uM and Ki (dSERT ) = 29uM. These values and our inability to detect free serotonin indicate that SNACs selectively interact with the serotonin recognition site of the transporter. We have also exposed the SNACs to cells containing ionotropic serotonin receptors and have measured the electrical response of the cell using a two microelectrode voltage clamp. We find that serotonin receptors do respond to the SNACs and we measure currents similar to the free serotonin response. These results indicate that ligand-conjugated nanocrystals can be used to label both receptor and transporter proteins. Initial fluorescence labeling experiments will be discussed.

  1. Dopaminergic agents: influence on serotonin in the molluscan nervous system.

    PubMed

    Stefano, G B; Catapane, E; Aiello, E

    1976-10-29

    Treatment of the mussel Mytilus edulis with 6-hydroxydopamine or with alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine decreased dopamine and increased serotonin in the nervous system. Treatment with dopamine decreased serotonin concentrations and prevented the effect of 6-hydroxydopamine. The serotonin concentration appears to be determined in part by the concentration of dopamine. PMID:973139

  2. Role of serotonin in seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A; Sharma, P K; Garg, V K; Singh, A K; Mondal, S C

    2013-01-01

    This review was prepared with an aim to show role of serotonin in seasonal affective disorder. Seasonal affective disorder, which is also called as winter depression or winter blues, is mood disorder in which persons with normal mental health throughout most of the year will show depressive symptoms in the winter or, less commonly, in the summer. Serotonin is an important endogenous neurotransmitter which also acts as neuromodulator. The least invasive, natural, and researched treatment of seasonal affective disorder is natural or otherwise is light therapy. Negative air ionization, which acts by liberating charged particles on the sleep environment, has also become effective in treatment of seasonal affective disorder.  

  3. Measuring the serotonin uptake site using (/sup 3/H)paroxetine--a new serotonin uptake inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Gleiter, C.H.; Nutt, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    Serotonin is an important neurotransmitter that may be involved in ethanol preference and dependence. It is possible to label the serotonin uptake site in brain using the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine, but this also binds to other sites. We have used the new high-affinity uptake blocker paroxetine to define binding to this site and report it to have advantages over imipramine as a ligand.

  4. Serotonin in Autism and Pediatric Epilepsies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chugani, Diane C.

    2004-01-01

    Serotonergic abnormalities have been reported in both autism and epilepsy. This association may provide insights into underlying mechanisms of these disorders because serotonin plays an important neurotrophic role during brain development--and there is evidence for abnormal cortical development in both autism and some forms of epilepsy. This…

  5. A current view of serotonin transporters

    PubMed Central

    De Felice, Louis J.

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin transporters (SERTs) are largely recognized for one aspect of their function—to transport serotonin back into the presynaptic terminal after its release. Another aspect of their function, however, may be to generate currents large enough to have physiological consequences. The standard model for electrogenic transport is the alternating access model, in which serotonin is transported with a fixed ratio of co-transported ions resulting in net charge per cycle. The alternating access model, however, cannot account for all the observed currents through SERT or other monoamine transporters.  Furthermore, SERT agonists like ecstasy or antagonists like fluoxetine generate or suppress currents that the standard model cannot support.  Here we survey evidence for a channel mode of transport in which transmitters and ions move through a pore. Available structures for dopamine and serotonin transporters, however, provide no evidence for a pore conformation, raising questions of whether the proposed channel mode actually exists or whether the structural data are perhaps missing a transient open state. PMID:27540474

  6. A current view of serotonin transporters.

    PubMed

    De Felice, Louis J

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin transporters (SERTs) are largely recognized for one aspect of their function-to transport serotonin back into the presynaptic terminal after its release. Another aspect of their function, however, may be to generate currents large enough to have physiological consequences. The standard model for electrogenic transport is the alternating access model, in which serotonin is transported with a fixed ratio of co-transported ions resulting in net charge per cycle. The alternating access model, however, cannot account for all the observed currents through SERT or other monoamine transporters.  Furthermore, SERT agonists like ecstasy or antagonists like fluoxetine generate or suppress currents that the standard model cannot support.  Here we survey evidence for a channel mode of transport in which transmitters and ions move through a pore. Available structures for dopamine and serotonin transporters, however, provide no evidence for a pore conformation, raising questions of whether the proposed channel mode actually exists or whether the structural data are perhaps missing a transient open state. PMID:27540474

  7. Serotonin toxicity: a practical approach to diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Isbister, Geoffrey K; Buckley, Nicholas A; Whyte, Ian M

    2007-09-17

    Excess serotonin in the central nervous system leads to a condition commonly referred to as the serotonin syndrome, but better described as a spectrum of toxicity - serotonin toxicity. Serotonin toxicity is characterised by neuromuscular excitation (clonus, hyperreflexia, myoclonus, rigidity), autonomic stimulation (hyperthermia, tachycardia, diaphoresis, tremor, flushing) and changed mental state (anxiety, agitation, confusion). Serotonin toxicity can be: mild (serotonergic features that may or may not concern the patient); moderate (toxicity which causes significant distress and deserves treatment, but is not life-threatening); or severe (a medical emergency characterised by rapid onset of severe hyperthermia, muscle rigidity and multiple organ failure). Diagnosis of serotonin toxicity is often made on the basis of the presence of at least three of Sternbach's 10 clinical features. However, these features have very low specificity. The Hunter Serotonin Toxicity Criteria use a smaller, more specific set of clinical features for diagnosis, including clonus, which has been found to be more specific to serotonin toxicity. There are several drug mechanisms that cause excess serotonin, but severe serotonin toxicity only occurs with combinations of drugs acting at different sites, most commonly including a monoamine oxidase inhibitor and a serotonin reuptake inhibitor. Less severe toxicity occurs with other combinations, overdoses and even single-drug therapy in susceptible individuals. Treatment should focus on cessation of the serotonergic medication and supportive care. Some antiserotonergic agents have been used in clinical practice, but the preferred agent, dose and indications are not well defined.

  8. Modern views on an ancient chemical: serotonin effects on cell proliferation, maturation, and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Azmitia, E C

    2001-11-15

    Evolutionarily, serotonin existed in plants even before the appearance of animals. Indeed, serotonin may be tied to the evolution of life itself, particularly through the role of tryptophan, its precursor molecule. Tryptophan is an indole-based, essential amino acid which is unique in its light-absorbing properties. In plants, tryptophan-based compounds capture light energy for use in metabolism of glucose and the generation of oxygen and reduced cofactors. Tryptophan, oxygen, and reduced cofactors combine to form serotonin. Serotonin-like molecules direct the growth of light-capturing structures towards the source of light. This morphogenic property also occurs in animal cells, in which serotonin alters the cytoskeleton of cells and thus influences the formation of contacts. In addition, serotonin regulates cell proliferation, migration and maturation in a variety of cell types, including lung, kidney, endothelial cells, mast cells, neurons and astrocytes). In brain, serotonin has interactions with seven families of receptors, numbering at least 14 distinct proteins. Of these, two receptors are important for the purposes of this review. These are the 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors, which in fact have opposing functions in a variety of cellular and behavioral processes. The 5-HT1A receptor develops early in the CNS and is associated with secretion of S-100beta from astrocytes and reduction of c-AMP levels in neurons. These actions provide intracellular stability for the cytoskeleton and result in cell differentiation and cessation of proliferation. Clinically, 5-HT1A receptor drugs decrease brain activity and act as anxiolytics. The 5-HT2A receptor develops more slowly and is associated with glycogenolysis in astrocytes and increased Ca(++) availability in neurons. These actions destabilize the internal cytoskeleton and result in cell proliferation, synaptogenesis, and apoptosis. In humans, 5-HT2A receptor drugs produce hallucinations. The dynamic interactions between

  9. [Involvement of calmodulin in realization of vasoconstrictive effects of serotonin and norepinephrin].

    PubMed

    Kozhevnikova, L M; Avdonin, P V

    2012-01-01

    Possible involvement ofcalmodulin in adrenergic and serotoninergic regulation of vascular contractility has been studied. Calmodulin inhibitors trifluoperazine and W-13 suppress vasoconstriction of the rat aorta in response to norepinephrine, serotonin, and serotonin 5HT1A- and 5HT2A-receptor agonists (8-OH-DPAT and DOI, respectively) and do not affect the vasodilatory effect of 5HT1B-, 5HT2B-, and 5HT4-receptors. The force of aorta contraction in response to 8-OH-DPAT increases after the activation of calcium entry through voltage-gated Ca2+-channels. This effect is not related to non-specific activation of alpha1-adrenoceptors, since it is realized in the presence of prazosin. The inhibitor of calmodulin-dependent myosin light chain kinase KN93 decreases the vasoconstrictive response in response to norepinephrine and serotonin by only 20%. Calmodulin inhibitors slightly decrease aortic constriction in response to endothelin-1, vasopressin, angiotensin II, and KCl. Trifluoperazine does not suppress vasoconstriction induced by the G-protein activator AlF4(-). It is assumed that the target of trifluoperazine and W-13 is calmodulin interacting directly with alpha1-adrenoceptors and serotonin 5HT1A- and 5HT2A-receptors.

  10. Serotonin enhances solitariness in phase transition of the migratory locust

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaojiao; Ma, Zongyuan; Kang, Le

    2013-01-01

    The behavioral plasticity of locusts is a striking trait presented during the reversible phase transition between solitary and gregarious individuals. However, the results of serotonin as a neurotransmitter from the migratory locust Locusta migratoria in phase transition showed an alternative profile compared to the results from the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria. In this study, we investigated the roles of serotonin in the brain during the phase change of the migratory locust. During the isolation of gregarious nymphs, the concentration of serotonin in the brain increased significantly, whereas serotonin receptors (i.e., 5-HT1, 5-HT2, and 5-HT7) we identified here showed invariable expression patterns. Pharmacological intervention showed that serotonin injection in the brain of gregarious nymphs did not induced the behavioral change toward solitariness, but injection of this chemical in isolated gregarious nymphs accelerated the behavioral change from gregarious to solitary phase. During the crowding of solitary nymphs, the concentration of serotonin in the brain remained unchanged, whereas 5-HT2 increased after 1 h of crowding and maintained stable expression level thereafter. Activation of serotonin-5-HT2 signaling with a pharmaceutical agonist inhibited the gregariousness of solitary nymphs in crowding treatment. These results indicate that the fluctuations of serotonin content and 5-HT2 expression are results of locust phase change. Overall, this study demonstrates that serotonin enhances the solitariness of the gregarious locusts. Serotonin may regulate the withdrawal-like behavioral pattern displayed during locust phase change and this mechanism is conserved in different locust species. PMID:24109441

  11. Serotonin syndrome presenting as pulmonary edema

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nilima Deepak; Jain, Ajay B.

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin syndrome (SS) is a potentially life-threatening condition resulting from excessive central and peripheral serotonergic activity. Clinically, it is a triad of mental-status changes, neuromuscular abnormalities, and autonomic disturbances. It can be caused by intentional self-poisoning, overdose, or inadvertent drug interactions. We report the case of a 58-year-old male with type 2 diabetes mellitus and obsessive compulsive disorder who developed pulmonary edema as a possible complication of SS. SS was caused by a combination of three specific serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, and sertraline), linezolid, and fentanyl. The hospital course was further complicated by difficult weaning from the ventilator. SS was identified and successfully treated with cyproheptadine and lorazepam. The case highlights the importance of effective consultation-liaison and prompt recognition of SS as the presentation may be complex in the presence of co-morbid medical illness. PMID:26997733

  12. Serotonin, atherosclerosis, and collateral vessel spasm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenberg, N.

    1988-01-01

    Studies on animal models demonstrate that platelet products contribute to vascular spasm in ischemic syndromes and that this is reversible with administration of ketanserin and thromboxane synthesis inhibitors. Laboratory animals (dogs, rabbits, and rats) that had femoral artery ligations exhibited supersensitivity to serotonin within days in their collateral blood vessels. This supersensitivity lasted at least 6 months. The response to serotonin was reversed by ketanserin, but not by 5HT-1 antagonists. Supersensitivity does not extend to norepinephrine, and alpha blockers do not influence the response to serotonin. It appears that platelet activation by endothelial injury contributes to ischemia through blood vessel occlusion and vascular spasm. When platelet activation occurs in vivo, blood vessel occlusion and vascular spasm are reversible in part by using ketanserin or agents that block thromboxane synthesis or its action. Combining both classes of agents reverses spasm completely. These findings support existing evidence that platelet products contribute to vascular disease, and provide an approach to improved management with currently available pharmacologic agents.

  13. Serotonin metabolism in children with kwashiorkor.

    PubMed

    Teotia, M; Teotia, S P

    1975-11-01

    Intestinal fat absorption, serum 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and 24-hour urinary excretion of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) were studied in 13 children with kwashiorkor and 10 matched healthy controls. Eight out of 13 children with kwashiorkor who had steatorrhea also showed raised plasma serotonin levels in parallel with the high urinary excretion of 5-HIAA. In five children with kwashiorkor who showed normal intestinal fat absorption, the serum 5-HT and urinary 5-HIAA levels were comparable to controls. After therapy, concurrent with clinical and biochemical recovery, the intestinal absorption of fat improved, serum 5-HT concentration and the urinary excretion of 5-HIAA returned to normal range. This suggested that the deranged serotonin metabolism in our cases was secondary to the protein-calorie deficiency. The presence of defective metabolism of serotonin (5-HT) in children with kwashiorkor has been reported and its possible role in the etiopathogenesis of steatorrhea-diarrhea, skin lesions and psychomotor changes has been suggested for further work.

  14. Generation of serotonin neurons from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jianfeng; Zhong, Xuefei; Liu, Huisheng; Hao, Ling; Huang, Cindy Tzu-Ling; Sherafat, Mohammad Amin; Jones, Jeffrey; Ayala, Melvin; Li, Lingjun; Zhang, Su-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin neurons located in the raphe nucleus of the hindbrain have crucial roles in regulating brain functions and have been implicated in various psychiatric disorders. Yet functional human serotonin neurons are not available for in vitro studies. Through manipulation of the WNT pathway, we demonstrate efficient differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) to cells resembling central serotonin neurons, primarily those located in the rhombomeric segments 2-3 of the rostral raphe, which participate in high-order brain functions. The serotonin neurons express a series of molecules essential for serotonergic development, including tryptophan hydroxylase 2, exhibit typical electrophysiological properties and release serotonin in an activity-dependent manner. When treated with the FDA-approved drugs tramadol and escitalopram oxalate, they release or uptake serotonin in a dose- and time-dependent manner, suggesting the utility of these cells for the evaluation of drug candidates.

  15. The antimalarial drug quinine interferes with serotonin biosynthesis and action.

    PubMed

    Islahudin, Farida; Tindall, Sarah M; Mellor, Ian R; Swift, Karen; Christensen, Hans E M; Fone, Kevin C F; Pleass, Richard J; Ting, Kang-Nee; Avery, Simon V

    2014-01-01

    The major antimalarial drug quinine perturbs uptake of the essential amino acid tryptophan, and patients with low plasma tryptophan are predisposed to adverse quinine reactions; symptoms of which are similar to indications of tryptophan depletion. As tryptophan is a precursor of the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT), here we test the hypothesis that quinine disrupts serotonin function. Quinine inhibited serotonin-induced proliferation of yeast as well as human (SHSY5Y) cells. One possible cause of this effect is through inhibition of 5-HT receptor activation by quinine, as we observed here. Furthermore, cells exhibited marked decreases in serotonin production during incubation with quinine. By assaying activity and kinetics of the rate-limiting enzyme for serotonin biosynthesis, tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH2), we showed that quinine competitively inhibits TPH2 in the presence of the substrate tryptophan. The study shows that quinine disrupts both serotonin biosynthesis and function, giving important new insight to the action of quinine on mammalian cells.

  16. Generation of serotonin neurons from human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jianfeng; Zhong, Xuefei; Liu, Huisheng; Hao, Ling; Huang, Cindy Tzu-Ling; Sherafat, Mohammad Amin; Jones, Jeffrey; Ayala, Melvin; Li, Lingjun; Zhang, Su-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin neurons located in the raphe nucleus of the hindbrain have crucial roles in regulating brain functions and have been implicated in various psychiatric disorders. Yet functional human serotonin neurons are not available for in vitro studies. Through manipulation of the WNT pathway, we demonstrate efficient differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) to cells resembling central serotonin neurons, primarily those located in the rhombomeric segments 2–3 of the rostral raphe, which participate in high-order brain functions. The serotonin neurons express a series of molecules essential for serotonergic development, including tryptophan hydroxylase 2, exhibit typical electrophysiological properties and release serotonin in an activity-dependent manner. When treated with the FDA-approved drugs tramadol and escitalopram oxalate, they release or uptake serotonin in a dose- and time-dependent manner, suggesting the utility of these cells for the evaluation of drug candidates. PMID:26655496

  17. Fatal serotonin syndrome precipitated by oxcarbazepine in a patient using an selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Dardis, Christopher; Omoregie, Eghosa; Ly, Vanthanh

    2012-07-01

    Oxcarbazepine, a metabolite of carbamazepine, is used as an antiepileptic, analgesic for neuropathic pain and in the treatment of affective disorders. It has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for partial seizures in adults as both adjunctive and monotherapy, and as adjunctive therapy in children aged from 2 to 16 years (http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/ac/06/briefing/2006-4254b_07_05_KP%20OxcarbazepineFDAlabel102005.pdf). We present a case of serotonin syndrome, which was precipitated by this medicine in a patient who had been predisposed by long-term treatment with sertraline, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. This is the first reported fatality due to this drug interaction and only the second case of serotonin syndrome reported with oxcarbazepine. Physicians should consider this risk when prescribing the above combination.

  18. Regulation of systemic energy homeostasis by serotonin in adipose tissues.

    PubMed

    Oh, Chang-Myung; Namkung, Jun; Go, Younghoon; Shong, Ko Eun; Kim, Kyuho; Kim, Hyeongseok; Park, Bo-Yoon; Lee, Ho Won; Jeon, Yong Hyun; Song, Junghan; Shong, Minho; Yadav, Vijay K; Karsenty, Gerard; Kajimura, Shingo; Lee, In-Kyu; Park, Sangkyu; Kim, Hail

    2015-01-01

    Central serotonin (5-HT) is an anorexigenic neurotransmitter in the brain. However, accumulating evidence suggests peripheral 5-HT may affect organismal energy homeostasis. Here we show 5-HT regulates white and brown adipose tissue function. Pharmacological inhibition of 5-HT synthesis leads to inhibition of lipogenesis in epididymal white adipose tissue (WAT), induction of browning in inguinal WAT and activation of adaptive thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT). Mice with inducible Tph1 KO in adipose tissues exhibit a similar phenotype as mice in which 5-HT synthesis is inhibited pharmacologically, suggesting 5-HT has localized effects on adipose tissues. In addition, Htr3a KO mice exhibit increased energy expenditure and reduced weight gain when fed a high-fat diet. Treatment with an Htr2a antagonist reduces lipid accumulation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. These data suggest important roles for adipocyte-derived 5-HT in controlling energy homeostasis. PMID:25864946

  19. Regulation of systemic energy homeostasis by serotonin in adipose tissues.

    PubMed

    Oh, Chang-Myung; Namkung, Jun; Go, Younghoon; Shong, Ko Eun; Kim, Kyuho; Kim, Hyeongseok; Park, Bo-Yoon; Lee, Ho Won; Jeon, Yong Hyun; Song, Junghan; Shong, Minho; Yadav, Vijay K; Karsenty, Gerard; Kajimura, Shingo; Lee, In-Kyu; Park, Sangkyu; Kim, Hail

    2015-04-13

    Central serotonin (5-HT) is an anorexigenic neurotransmitter in the brain. However, accumulating evidence suggests peripheral 5-HT may affect organismal energy homeostasis. Here we show 5-HT regulates white and brown adipose tissue function. Pharmacological inhibition of 5-HT synthesis leads to inhibition of lipogenesis in epididymal white adipose tissue (WAT), induction of browning in inguinal WAT and activation of adaptive thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT). Mice with inducible Tph1 KO in adipose tissues exhibit a similar phenotype as mice in which 5-HT synthesis is inhibited pharmacologically, suggesting 5-HT has localized effects on adipose tissues. In addition, Htr3a KO mice exhibit increased energy expenditure and reduced weight gain when fed a high-fat diet. Treatment with an Htr2a antagonist reduces lipid accumulation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. These data suggest important roles for adipocyte-derived 5-HT in controlling energy homeostasis.

  20. Methylene Blue Causing Serotonin Syndrome Following Cystocele Repair.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Kailash; Cheung, Felix; Lee, Wai; Thalappillil, Richard; Florence, F Barry; Kim, Jason

    2016-11-01

    Methylene blue is an intravenously administered agent that may potentiate serotonin syndrome. The usage of methylene blue to evaluate ureters for injuries and patency during urological surgeries is recognized as common practice. However, there is no mention of serotonin syndrome caused by methylene blue in urological literature or for urological surgery. We report the first urological case in order to raise awareness of the risk for serotonin toxicity with utilizing methylene blue. PMID:27617215

  1. Serotonin and conditioning: focus on Pavlovian psychostimulant drug conditioning.

    PubMed

    Carey, Robert J; Damianopoulos, Ernest N

    2015-04-01

    Serotonin containing neurons are located in nuclei deep in the brainstem and send axons throughout the central nervous system from the spinal cord to the cerebral cortex. The vast scope of these connections and interactions enable serotonin and serotonin analogs to have profound effects upon sensory/motor processes. In that conditioning represents a neuroplastic process that leads to new sensory/motor connections, it is apparent that the serotonin system has the potential for a critical role in conditioning. In this article we review the basics of conditioning as well as the serotonergic system and point up the number of non-associative ways in which manipulations of serotonin neurotransmission have an impact upon conditioning. We focus upon psychostimulant drug conditioning and review the contribution of drug stimuli in the use of serotonin drugs to investigate drug conditioning and the important impact drug stimuli can have on conditioning by introducing new sensory stimuli that can create or mask a CS. We also review the ways in which experimental manipulations of serotonin can disrupt conditioned behavioral effects but not the associative processes in conditioning. In addition, we propose the use of the recently developed memory re-consolidation model of conditioning as an approach to assess the possible role of serotonin in associative processes without the complexities of performance effects related to serotonin treatment induced alterations in sensory/motor systems.

  2. Serotonin modulates glutamatergic transmission to neurons in the lateral habenula

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guiqin; Zuo, Wanhong; Wu, Liangzhi; Li, Wenting; Wu, Wei; Bekker, Alex; Ye, Jiang-Hong

    2016-01-01

    The lateral habenula (LHb) is bilaterally connected with serotoninergic raphe nuclei, and expresses high density of serotonin receptors. However, actions of serotonin on the excitatory synaptic transmission to LHb neurons have not been thoroughly investigated. The LHb contains two anatomically and functionally distinct regions: lateral (LHbl) and medial (LHbm) divisions. We compared serotonin’s effects on glutamatergic transmission across the LHb in rat brains. Serotonin bi-directionally and differentially modulated glutamatergic transmission. Serotonin inhibited glutamatergic transmission in higher percentage of LHbl neurons but potentiated in higher percentage of LHbm neurons. Magnitude of potentiation was greater in LHbm than in LHbl. Type 2 and 3 serotonin receptor antagonists attenuated serotonin’s potentiation. The serotonin reuptake blocker, and the type 2 and 3 receptor agonists facilitated glutamatergic transmission in both LHbl and LHbm neurons. Thus, serotonin via activating its type 2, 3 receptors, increased glutamate release at nerve terminals in some LHb neurons. Our data demonstrated that serotonin affects both LHbm and LHbl. Serotonin might play an important role in processing information between the LHb and its downstream-targeted structures during decision-making. It may also contribute to a homeostatic balance underlying the neural circuitry between the LHb and raphe nuclei. PMID:27033153

  3. Serotonin syndrome following levodopa treatment in diffuse Lewy body disease

    PubMed Central

    Kushwaha, Suman; Panda, Akhila Kumar; Malhotra, Hardeep Singh; Kaur, Manmeet

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin syndrome results from an acute hyperserotonergic state. It is a rare and potentially fatal complication of drugs that affect the central nervous system serotonin levels. It is characterised by a triad of clinical features comprising altered sensorium, autonomic instability and neuromuscular hyperexcitability, in different combinations. We present an atypical case of serotonin syndrome related to levodopa use in a patient of probable Lewy body dementia. This case highlights the difficulty in diagnosis and management of cases with serotonin syndrome in the absence of history of a known serotonergic drug and the fact that levodopa can contribute to its occurrence. PMID:25246451

  4. Serotonin control of thermotaxis memory behavior in nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinxia; Zhao, Yunli; Huang, Xu; Lin, Xingfeng; Guo, Yuling; Wang, Daoyong; Li, Chaojun; Wang, Dayong

    2013-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is as an ideal model system for the study of mechanisms underlying learning and memory. In the present study, we employed C. elegans assay system of thermotaxis memory to investigate the possible role of serotonin neurotransmitter in memory control. Our data showed that both mutations of tph-1, bas-1, and cat-4 genes, required for serotonin synthesis, and mutations of mod-5 gene, encoding a serotonin reuptake transporter, resulted in deficits in thermotaxis memory behavior. Exogenous treatment with serotonin effectively recovered the deficits in thermotaxis memory of tph-1 and bas-1 mutants to the level of wild-type N2. Neuron-specific activity assay of TPH-1 suggests that serotonin might regulate the thermotaxis memory behavior by release from the ADF sensory neurons. Ablation of ADF sensory neurons by expressing a cell-death activator gene egl-1 decreased the thermotaxis memory, whereas activation of ADF neurons by expression of a constitutively active protein kinase C homologue (pkc-1(gf)) increased the thermotaxis memory and rescued the deficits in thermotaxis memory in tph-1 mutants. Moreover, serotonin released from the ADF sensory neurons might act through the G-protein-coupled serotonin receptors of SER-4 and SER-7 to regulate the thermotaxis memory behavior. Genetic analysis implies that serotonin might further target the insulin signaling pathway to regulate the thermotaxis memory behavior. Thus, our results suggest the possible crucial role of serotonin and ADF sensory neurons in thermotaxis memory control in C. elegans.

  5. Metabolomics Approach Reveals Integrated Metabolic Network Associated with Serotonin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Rui; Shen, Sensen; Tian, Yonglu; Burton, Casey; Xu, Xinyuan; Liu, Yi; Chang, Cuilan; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin is an important neurotransmitter that broadly participates in various biological processes. While serotonin deficiency has been associated with multiple pathological conditions such as depression, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, the serotonin-dependent mechanisms remain poorly understood. This study therefore aimed to identify novel biomarkers and metabolic pathways perturbed by serotonin deficiency using metabolomics approach in order to gain new metabolic insights into the serotonin deficiency-related molecular mechanisms. Serotonin deficiency was achieved through pharmacological inhibition of tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph) using p-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA) or genetic knockout of the neuronal specific Tph2 isoform. This dual approach improved specificity for the serotonin deficiency-associated biomarkers while minimizing nonspecific effects of pCPA treatment or Tph2 knockout (Tph2-/-). Non-targeted metabolic profiling and a targeted pCPA dose-response study identified 21 biomarkers in the pCPA-treated mice while 17 metabolites in the Tph2-/- mice were found to be significantly altered compared with the control mice. These newly identified biomarkers were associated with amino acid, energy, purine, lipid and gut microflora metabolisms. Oxidative stress was also found to be significantly increased in the serotonin deficient mice. These new biomarkers and the overall metabolic pathways may provide new understanding for the serotonin deficiency-associated mechanisms under multiple pathological states. PMID:26154191

  6. Stimulation of aortic smooth muscle cell mitogenesis by serotonin

    SciTech Connect

    Nemecek, G.M.; Coughlin, S.R.; Handley, D.A.; Moskowitz, M.A.

    1986-02-01

    Bovine aortic smooth muscle cells in vitro responded to 1 nM to 10 ..mu..M serotonin with increased incorporation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine into DNA. The mitogenic effect of serotonin was half-maximal at 80 nM and maximal above 1 ..mu..M. At a concentration of 1 ..mu..M, serotonin stimulated smooth muscle cell mitogenesis to the same extent as human platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) at 12 ng/ml. Tryptamine was approx. = 1/10th as potent as serotonin as a mitogen for smooth muscle cells. Other indoles that are structurally related to serotonin (D- and L-tryptophan, 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan, N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine, melatonin, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and 5-hydroxytryptophol) and quipazine were inactive. The stimulatory effect of serotonin on smooth muscle cell DNA synthesis required prolonged (20-24 hr) exposure to the agonist and was attenuated in the presence of serotonin D receptor antagonists. When smooth muscle cells were incubated with submaximal concentrations of serotonin and PDGF, synergistic rather than additive mitogenic responses were observed. These data indicate that serotonin has a significant mitogenic effect on smooth muscle cells in vitro, which appears to be mediated by specific plasma membrane receptors.

  7. Metabolomics Approach Reveals Integrated Metabolic Network Associated with Serotonin Deficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Rui; Shen, Sensen; Tian, Yonglu; Burton, Casey; Xu, Xinyuan; Liu, Yi; Chang, Cuilan; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2015-07-01

    Serotonin is an important neurotransmitter that broadly participates in various biological processes. While serotonin deficiency has been associated with multiple pathological conditions such as depression, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, the serotonin-dependent mechanisms remain poorly understood. This study therefore aimed to identify novel biomarkers and metabolic pathways perturbed by serotonin deficiency using metabolomics approach in order to gain new metabolic insights into the serotonin deficiency-related molecular mechanisms. Serotonin deficiency was achieved through pharmacological inhibition of tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph) using p-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA) or genetic knockout of the neuronal specific Tph2 isoform. This dual approach improved specificity for the serotonin deficiency-associated biomarkers while minimizing nonspecific effects of pCPA treatment or Tph2 knockout (Tph2-/-). Non-targeted metabolic profiling and a targeted pCPA dose-response study identified 21 biomarkers in the pCPA-treated mice while 17 metabolites in the Tph2-/- mice were found to be significantly altered compared with the control mice. These newly identified biomarkers were associated with amino acid, energy, purine, lipid and gut microflora metabolisms. Oxidative stress was also found to be significantly increased in the serotonin deficient mice. These new biomarkers and the overall metabolic pathways may provide new understanding for the serotonin deficiency-associated mechanisms under multiple pathological states.

  8. Linezolid-induced serotonin toxicity in a patient not taking monoamine oxidase inhibitors or serotonin receptor antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Jacob; Stroup, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Linezolid is an oxazolidinone antibiotic with weak monoamine oxidase (MAO) type A and MAO type B inhibitory effects. Linezolid has been associated with serotonin toxicity when used concomitantly with multiple medications that are known to increase serotonin concentrations. We report the case of a 65-year-old woman with signs and symptoms of serotonin toxicity following administration of linezolid for treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia. PMID:27034576

  9. Reduced cocaine-induced serotonin, but not dopamine and noradrenaline, release in rats with a genetic deletion of serotonin transporters.

    PubMed

    Verheij, Michel M M; Karel, Peter; Cools, Alexander R; Homberg, Judith R

    2014-11-01

    It has recently been proposed that the increased reinforcing properties of cocaine and ecstasy observed in rats with a genetic deletion of serotonin transporters are the result of a reduction in the psychostimulant-induced release of serotonin. Here we provide the neurochemical evidence in favor of this hypothesis and show that changes in synaptic levels of dopamine or noradrenaline are not very likely to play an important role in the previously reported enhanced psychostimulant intake of these serotonin transporter knockout rats. The results may very well explain why human subjects displaying a reduced expression of serotonin transporters have an increased risk to develop addiction. PMID:25261262

  10. Regulation of serotonin release from enterochromaffin cells of rat cecum mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, C.; Ternaux, J.P. )

    1990-05-01

    The release of endogenous serotonin or previously taken up tritiated serotonin from isolated strips of rat cecum mucosa containing enterochromaffin cells was studied in vitro. Release of tritiated serotonin was increased by potassium depolarization and was decreased by tetrodotoxin, veratridine and the absence of calcium. Endogenous serotonin was released at a lower rate than tritiated serotonin; endogenous serotonin release was stimulated by potassium depolarization but was unaffected by tetrodotoxin, veratridine or the absence of calcium. Carbachol, norepinephrine, clonidine and isoproterenol decreased release of tritiated serotonin but had less or reverse effect on release of endogenous serotonin. The results suggest two different serotoninergic pools within the enterochromaffin cell population.

  11. Serotonin-S2 and dopamine-D2 receptors are the same size in membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Brann, M.R.

    1985-12-31

    Target size analysis was used to compare the sizes of serotonin-S2 and dopamine-D2 receptors in rat brain membranes. The sizes of these receptors were standardized by comparison with the muscarinic receptor, a receptor of known size. The number of serotonin-S2 receptors labeled with (3H)ketanserin or (3H)spiperone in frontal cortex decreased as an exponential function of radiation dose, and receptor affinity was not affected. The number of dopamine-D2 receptors labeled with (3H)spiperone in striatum also decreased as an exponential function of radiation dose, and D2 and S2 receptors were equally sensitive to radiation. In both striatum and frontal cortex, the number of muscarinic receptors labeled with (3H)QNB decreased as an exponential function of radiation dose, and were much less sensitive to radiation than S2 and D2 receptors. These data indicate that in rat brain membranes, S2 and D2 receptors are of similar size, and both molecules are much larger than the muscarinic receptor.

  12. Serotonin dependent masking of hippocampal sharp wave ripples.

    PubMed

    ul Haq, Rizwan; Anderson, Marlene L; Hollnagel, Jan-Oliver; Worschech, Franziska; Sherkheli, Muhammad Azahr; Behrens, Christoph J; Heinemann, Uwe

    2016-02-01

    Sharp wave ripples (SPW-Rs) are thought to play an important role in memory consolidation. By rapid replay of previously stored information during slow wave sleep and consummatory behavior, they result from the formation of neural ensembles during a learning period. Serotonin (5-HT), suggested to be able to modify SPW-Rs, can affect many neurons simultaneously by volume transmission and alter network functions in an orchestrated fashion. In acute slices from dorsal hippocampus, SPW-Rs can be induced by repeated high frequency stimulation that induces long-lasting LTP. We used this model to study SPW-R appearance and modulation by 5-HT. Although stimulation in presence of 5-HT permitted LTP induction, SPW-Rs were "masked"--but appeared after 5-HT wash-out. This SPW-R masking was dose dependent with 100 nM 5-HT being sufficient--if the 5-HT re-uptake inhibitor citalopram was present. Fenfluramine, a serotonin releaser, could also mask SPW-Rs. Masking was due to 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A/C receptor activation. Neither membrane potential nor membrane conductance changes in pyramidal cells caused SPW-R blockade since both remained unaffected by combining 5-HT and citalopram. Moreover, 10 and 30 μM 5-HT mediated SPW-R masking preceded neuronal hyperpolarization and involved reduced presynaptic transmitter release. 5-HT, as well as a 5-HT1A agonist, augmented paired pulse facilitation and affected the coefficient of variance. Spontaneous SPW-Rs in mice hippocampal slices were also masked by 5-HT and fenfluramine. While neuronal ensembles can acquire long lasting LTP during higher 5-HT levels, lower 5-HT levels enable neural ensembles to replay previously stored information and thereby permit memory consolidation memory. PMID:26409781

  13. Serotonin involvement in pituitary-adrenal function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Kellar, K. J.; Kent, D.; Gonzales, C.; Berger, P. A.; Barchas, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments clarifying the effects of serotonin (5-HT) in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical system are surveyed. Lesion experiments which seek to determine functional maps of serotonergic input to areas involved in regulation are reported. Investigations of the effects of 5-HT levels on the plasma ACTH response to stress and the diurnal variation in basal plasma corticosterone are summarized, and the question of whether serotonergic transmission is involved in the regulation of all aspects of pituitary-adrenal function is considered with attention to the stimulatory and inhibitory action of 5-HT.

  14. Brain serotonin and pituitary-adrenal functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Berger, P.; Barchas, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    It had been concluded by Scapagnini et al. (1971) that brain serotonin (5-HT) was involved in the regulation of the diurnal rhythm of the pituitary-adrenal system but not in the stress response. A study was conducted to investigate these findings further by evaluating the effects of altering brain 5-HT levels on the daily fluctuation of plasma corticosterone and on the response of the pituitary-adrenal system to a stressful or noxious stimulus in the rat. In a number of experiments brain 5-HT synthesis was inhibited with parachlorophenylalanine. In other tests it was tried to raise the level of brain 5-HT with precursors.

  15. [Myocardial serotonin metabolism after local ischemia and ischemic precondition].

    PubMed

    Naumenko, S E; Latysheva, T V; Gilinskiĭ, M A

    2014-07-01

    To determine the effect of ischemic preconditioning upon myocardial serotonin and 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA) dynamic in myocardial ischemia and reperfusion. 28 male Wistar rats anesthetized with urethane were randomly divided into 2 groups. In the control group (n = 13) rats were subjected to 30 min coronary occlusion and subsequent 120 min reperfusion. In the ex- perimental group (n = 15) ischemic preconditioning (3 x 3 min ischemia + 3 x 3 min reperfusion) before prolonged ischemia was used. Myocardial interstitial serotonin and 5-HIAA were measured using a microdialysis technique. Myocardial serotonin and 5-HIAA significantly increased af- ter ischemic preconditioning (p = 0.00298; p = 0.00187). In prolonged ischemia interstitial serotonin level was lower in the experimental group vs. control up to 20 min of ischemia (p < 0.05). We conclude that ischemic preconditioning increases interstitial myocardial serotonin, but inhibit serotonin increase in subsequent prolonged myocardial ischemia. After 20 minutes of reperfusion the lack of correlation between serotonin and 5-HIAA levels appeared which may be the evidence of serotonin uptake activation.

  16. Genes Affecting Sensitivity to Serotonin in Caenorhabditis Elegans

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, W. R.; Sanchez, B. M.; Kenyon, C. J.

    1996-01-01

    Regulating the response of a postsynaptic cell to neurotransmitter is an important mechanism for controlling synaptic strength, a process critical to learning. We have begun to define and characterize genes that may control sensitivity to the neurotransmitter serotonin in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans by identifying serotonin-hypersensitive mutants. We reported previously that mutations in the gene unc-2, which encodes a putative calcium channel subunit, result in hypersensitivity to serotonin. Here we report that mutants defective in the unc-36 gene, which encodes a homologue of a calcium channel auxiliary subunit, are also serotonin-hypersensitive. Moreover, the unc-36 gene appears to be required in the same cells as unc-2 for control of the same behaviors. Mutations in several other genes, including unc-8, unc-10, unc-20, unc-35, unc-75, unc-77, and snt-1 also result in hypersensitivity to serotonin. Several of these mutations have previously been shown to confer resistance to acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, suggesting that they may affect acetylcholine release. Moreover, we found that mutations that decrease acetylcholine synthesis cause defective egg-laying and serotonin hypersensitivity. Thus, acetylcholine appears to negatively regulate the response to serotonin and may participate in the process of serotonin desensitization. PMID:8807295

  17. Brain serotonin content - Increase following ingestion of carbohydrate diet.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernstrom, J. D.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    In the rat, the injection of insulin or the consumption of carbohydrate causes sequential increases in the concentrations of tryptophan in the plasma and the brain and of serotonin in the brain. Serotonin-containing neurons may thus participate in systems whereby the rat brain integrates information about the metabolic state in its relation to control of homeostasis and behavior.

  18. Dietary Precursors of Serotonin and Newborn State Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yogman, Michael W.; Zeisel, Steven

    Although previous research with adult humans and nonhumans has suggested a relationship between sleep behavior and brain serotonin levels, no studies have been made of the relationship of normal children's or infants' sleep patterns to serotonin levels, tryptophan metabolism, or diet. This study investigates the relationship between dietary…

  19. The roles of peripheral serotonin in metabolic homeostasis.

    PubMed

    El-Merahbi, Rabih; Löffler, Mona; Mayer, Alexander; Sumara, Grzegorz

    2015-07-01

    Metabolic homeostasis in the organism is assured both by the nervous system and by hormones. Among a plethora of hormones regulating metabolism, serotonin presents a number of unique features. Unlike classical hormones serotonin is produced in different anatomical locations. In brain it acts as a neurotransmitter and in the periphery it can act as a hormone, auto- and/or paracrine factor, or intracellular signaling molecule. Serotonin does not cross the blood-brain barrier; therefore the two major pools of this bioamine remain separated. Although 95% of serotonin is produced in the periphery, its functions have been ignored until recently. Here we review the impact of the peripheral serotonin on the regulation of function of the organs involved in glucose and lipid homeostasis.

  20. Serotonin is necessary for place memory in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Sitaraman, Divya; Zars, Melissa; LaFerriere, Holly; Chen, Yin-Chieh; Sable-Smith, Alex; Kitamoto, Toshihiro; Rottinghaus, George E.; Zars, Troy

    2008-01-01

    Biogenic amines, such as serotonin and dopamine, can be important in reinforcing associative learning. This function is evident as changes in memory performance with manipulation of either of these signals. In the insects, evidence begins to argue for a common role of dopamine in negatively reinforced memory. In contrast, the role of the serotonergic system in reinforcing insect associative learning is either unclear or controversial. We investigated the role of both of these signals in operant place learning in Drosophila. By genetically altering serotonin and dopamine levels, manipulating the neurons that make serotonin and dopamine, and pharmacological treatments we provide clear evidence that serotonin, but not dopamine, is necessary for place memory. Thus, serotonin can be critical for memory formation in an insect, and dopamine is not a universal negatively reinforcing signal. PMID:18385379

  1. The platelet serotonin-release assay.

    PubMed

    Warkentin, Theodore E; Arnold, Donald M; Nazi, Ishac; Kelton, John G

    2015-06-01

    Few laboratory tests are as clinically useful as The platelet serotonin-release assay (SRA): a positive SRA in the appropriate clinical context is virtually diagnostic of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT), a life- and limb-threatening prothrombotic disorder caused by anti-platelet factor 4 (PF4)/heparin antibodies that activate platelets, thereby triggering serotonin-release. The SRA's performance characteristics include high sensitivity and specificity, although caveats include indeterminate reaction profiles (observed in ∼4% of test sera) and potential for false-positive reactions. As only a subset of anti-PF4/heparin antibodies detectable by enzyme-immunoassay (EIA) are additionally platelet-activating, the SRA has far greater diagnostic specificity than the EIA. However, requiring a positive EIA, either as an initial screening test or as an SRA adjunct, will reduce risk of a false-positive SRA (since a negative EIA in a patient with a "positive" SRA should prompt critical evaluation of the SRA reaction profile). The SRA also provides useful information on whether a HIT serum produces strong platelet activation even in the absence of heparin: such heparin-"independent" platelet activation is a marker of unusually severe HIT, including delayed-onset HIT and severe HIT complicated by consumptive coagulopathy with risk for microvascular thrombosis. PMID:25775976

  2. Serotonin in the sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Waters, Karen

    2010-11-01

    It seems likely that some infants who die from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) have a brainstem abnormality of the serotonergic system. Evidence suggests that infants who died from SIDS had defective respiratory and/or autonomic responses that led to death instead of recovery after an acute insult. The serotonergic neuromodulator system has roles in the control of cardiac autonomic and respiratory function, as well as now being identified as abnormal in infants with SIDS. This manuscript reviews the multiple roles of serotonin with reference to the functional aspects of the relevant brain regions. Correlations with pre- or postnatal exposure to stressors, or an underlying genetic process are also reviewed. Together, these studies indicate that perturbed function of the serotonin system will have significant physiological impact during early development. Understanding the functional importance of these systems assists understanding of the pathogenesis of SIDS. In conclusion, whether an infant inherits serotonergic defects and is therefore "inherently vulnerable", or whether postnatal stressors can induce the abnormalities, any functional abnormalities of the serotonergic system that result are likely to be subclinical in the majority of cases and not easily detected with current medical tools. PMID:21152449

  3. Plasma anti-serotonin and serotonin anti-idiotypic antibodies are elevated in panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Coplan, J D; Tamir, H; Calaprice, D; DeJesus, M; de la Nuez, M; Pine, D; Papp, L A; Klein, D F; Gorman, J M

    1999-04-01

    The psychoneuroimmunology of panic disorder is relatively unexplored. Alterations within brain stress systems that secondarily influence the immune system have been documented. A recent report indicated elevations of serotonin (5-HT) and ganglioside antibodies in patients with primary fibromyalgia, a condition with documented associations with panic disorder. In line with our interest in dysregulated 5-HT systems in panic disorder (PD), we wished to assess if antibodies directed at the 5-HT system were elevated in patients with PD in comparison to healthy volunteers. Sixty-three patients with panic disorder and 26 healthy volunteers were diagnosed by the SCID. Employing ELISA, we measured anti-5-HT and 5-HT anti-idiotypic antibodies (which are directed at 5-HT receptors). To include all subjects in one experiment, three different batches were run during the ELISA. Plasma serotonin anti-idiotypic antibodies: there was a significant group effect [patients > controls (p = .007)] and batch effect but no interaction. The mean effect size for the three batches was .76. Following Z-score transformation of each separate batch and then combining all scores, patients demonstrated significantly elevated levels of plasma serotonin anti-idiotypic antibodies. Neither sex nor age as covariates affected the significance of the results. There was a strong correlation between anti-serotonin antibody and serotonin anti-idiotypic antibody measures. Plasma anti-serotonin antibodies: there was a significant diagnosis effect [patients > controls (p = .037)]. Mean effect size for the three batches was .52. Upon Z-score transformation, there was a diagnosis effect with antibody elevations in patients. Covaried for sex and age, the result falls below significance to trend levels. The data raise the possibility that psychoimmune dysfunction, specifically related to the 5-HT system, may be present in PD. Potential interruption of 5-HT neurotransmission through autoimmune mechanisms may be of

  4. Two functional serotonin polymorphisms moderate the effect of food reinforcement on BMI.

    PubMed

    Carr, Katelyn A; Lin, Henry; Fletcher, Kelly D; Sucheston, Lara; Singh, Prashant K; Salis, Robbert J; Erbe, Richard W; Faith, Myles S; Allison, David B; Stice, Eric; Epstein, Leonard H

    2013-06-01

    Food reinforcement, or the motivation to eat, has been associated with increased energy intake, greater body weight, and prospective weight gain. Much of the previous research on the reinforcing value of food has focused on the role of dopamine, but it may be worthwhile to examine genetic polymorphisms in the serotonin and opioid systems as these neurotransmitters have been shown to be related to reinforcement processes and to influence energy intake. We examined the relationship among 44 candidate genetic polymorphisms in the dopamine, serotonin, and opioid systems, as well as food reinforcement and body mass index (BMI) in a sample of 245 individuals. Polymorphisms in the monoamine oxidase A (MAOA-LPR) and serotonin receptor 2A genes (rs6314) moderated the effect of food reinforcement on BMI, accounting for an additional 5-10% variance and revealed a potential role of the single nucleotide polymorphism, rs6314, in the serotonin 2A receptor as a differential susceptibility factor for obesity. Differential susceptibility describes a factor that can confer either risk or protection depending on a second variable, such that rs6314 is predictive of both high and low BMI based on the level of food reinforcement, while the diathesis stress or dual-gain model only influences one end of the outcome measure. The interaction with MAOA-LPR better fits the diathesis stress model, with the 3.5R/4R allele conferring protection for individuals low in food reinforcement. These results provide new insight into genes theoretically involved in obesity, and support the hypothesis that genetics moderate the association between food reinforcement and BMI.

  5. Interaction of psychoactive tryptamines with biogenic amine transporters and serotonin receptor subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Blough, Bruce E.; Landavazo, Antonio; Decker, Ann M.; Partilla, John S.; Baumann, Michael H.; Rothman, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Synthetic hallucinogenic tryptamines, especially those originally described by Alexander Shulgin, continue to be abused in the United States. The range of subjective experiences produced by different tryptamines suggests that multiple neurochemical mechanisms are involved in their actions, in addition to the established role of agonist activity at serotonin-2A (5-HT2A) receptors. Objectives This study evaluated the interaction of a series of synthetic tryptamines with biogenic amine neurotransmitter transporters and with serotonin (5-HT) receptor subtypes implicated in psychedelic effects. Methods Neurotransmitter transporter activity was determined in rat brain synaptosomes. Receptor activity was determined using calcium mobilization and DiscoveRx PathHunter® assays in HEK293, Gα16-CHO, and CHOk1 cells transfected with human receptors. Results Twenty-one tryptamines were analyzed in transporter uptake and release assays, and 5-HT2A, serotonin 1A (5-HT1A), and 5-HT2A β-arrestin functional assays. Eight of the compounds were found to have 5-HT-releasing activity. Thirteen compounds were found to be 5-HT uptake inhibitors or were inactive. All tryptamines were 5-HT2A agonists with a range of potencies and efficacies, but only a few compounds were 5-HT1A agonists. Most tryptamines recruited β-arrestin through 5-HT2A activation. Conclusions All psychoactive tryptamines are 5-HT2A agonists, but 5-HT transporter (SERT) activity may contribute significantly to the pharmacology of certain compounds. The in vitro transporter data confirm structure-activity trends for releasers and uptake inhibitors whereby releasers tend to be structurally smaller compounds. Interestingly, two tertiary amines were found to be selective substrates at SERT, which dispels the notion that 5-HT-releasing activity is limited only to primary or secondary amines. PMID:24800892

  6. Serotonin 2c receptors in pro-opiomelanocortin neurons regulate energy and glucose homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Energy and glucose homeostasis are regulated by central serotonin 2C receptors. These receptors are attractive pharmacological targets for the treatment of obesity; however, the identity of the serotonin 2C receptor-expressing neurons that mediate the effects of serotonin and serotonin 2C receptor a...

  7. Serotonin shifts first-spike latencies of inferior colliculus neurons.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Laura M; Pollak, George D

    2005-08-24

    Many studies of neuromodulators have focused on changes in the magnitudes of neural responses, but fewer studies have examined neuromodulator effects on response latency. Across sensory systems, response latency is important for encoding not only the temporal structure but also the identity of stimuli. In the auditory system, latency is a fundamental response property that varies with many features of sound, including intensity, frequency, and duration. To determine the extent of neuromodulatory regulation of latency within the inferior colliculus (IC), a midbrain auditory nexus, the effects of iontophoretically applied serotonin on first-spike latencies were characterized in the IC of the Mexican free-tailed bat. Serotonin significantly altered the first-spike latencies in response to tones in 24% of IC neurons, usually increasing, but sometimes decreasing, latency. Serotonin-evoked changes in latency and spike count were not always correlated but sometimes occurred independently within individual neurons. Furthermore, in some neurons, the size of serotonin-evoked latency shifts depended on the frequency or intensity of the stimulus, as reported previously for serotonin-evoked changes in spike count. These results support the general conclusion that changes in latency are an important part of the neuromodulatory repertoire of serotonin within the auditory system and show that serotonin can change latency either in conjunction with broad changes in other aspects of neuronal excitability or in highly specific ways. PMID:16120790

  8. Serotonin and the regulation of mammalian energy balance

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Michael H.; Tecott, Laurence H.

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance of energy balance requires regulation of the amount and timing of food intake. Decades of experiments utilizing pharmacological and later genetic manipulations have demonstrated the importance of serotonin signaling in this regulation. Much progress has been made in recent years in understanding how central nervous system (CNS) serotonin systems acting through a diverse array of serotonin receptors impact feeding behavior and metabolism. Particular attention has been paid to mechanisms through which serotonin impacts energy balance pathways within the hypothalamus. How upstream factors relevant to energy balance regulate the release of hypothalamic serotonin is less clear, but work addressing this issue is underway. Generally, investigation into the central serotonergic regulation of energy balance has had a predominantly “hypothalamocentric” focus, yet non-hypothalamic structures that have been implicated in energy balance regulation also receive serotonergic innervation and express multiple subtypes of serotonin receptors. Moreover, there is a growing appreciation of the diverse mechanisms through which peripheral serotonin impacts energy balance regulation. Clearly, the serotonergic regulation of energy balance is a field characterized by both rapid advances and by an extensive and diverse set of central and peripheral mechanisms yet to be delineated. PMID:23543912

  9. Brain pathology in fatal serotonin syndrome: presentation of two cases.

    PubMed

    Slettedal, Jon K; Nilssen, Dag Olav V; Magelssen, Morten; Løberg, Else Marit; Maehlen, Jan

    2011-06-01

    Serotonin syndrome is a potentially life-threatening reaction that occurs in patients using drugs that elevate the serotonin level in the body. Excess serotonergic activity in the CNS and peripheral serotonin receptors results in neuromuscular hyperactivity, mental changes and autonomic symptoms. Hyperthermia is a characteristic feature of the syndrome. We describe neuropathological findings from two cases of lethal serotonin syndrome, both patients presenting with hyperthermia and neuromuscular symptoms. One of the patients had been taking amitriptylin and mirtazapin and the other had used amitriptylin and citalopram. They died, respectively, 10 days and 2½ months after the onset of serotonin syndrome symptoms. Post-mortem examination of the brains showed subtotal loss of cerebellar Purkinje cells in both cases. In the case with shorter survival time, areas with partial loss of cerebellar granule cells were observed, whereas in the case with longer survival time general and extensive loss of granule cells was found. Cells in other areas of the brain known to be sensitive to hypoxic injury were not affected. Selective loss of Purkinje cells has previously been described in neuroleptic malignant syndrome and heatstroke, conditions that are characterized by hyperthermia. This suggests that hyperthermia may be a causative factor of brain damage in serotonin syndrome. This is the first report describing neuropathological findings in serotonin syndrome.

  10. Electrochemical quantification of serotonin in the live embryonic zebrafish intestine

    PubMed Central

    Njagi, John; Ball, Michael; Best, Marc; Wallace, Kenneth N.; Andreescu, Silvana

    2010-01-01

    We monitored real-time in vivo levels of serotonin release in the digestive system of intact zebrafish embryos during early development (5 dpf) using differential pulse voltammetry with implanted carbon fiber microelectrodes modified with carbon nanotubes dispersed in nafion. A detection limit of 1 nM, a linear range between 5 to 200 nM and a sensitivity of 83.65 nA·μM−1 were recorded. The microelectrodes were implanted at various locations in the intestine of zebrafish embryos. Serotonin levels of up to 29.9(±1.13) nM were measured in vivo in normal physiological conditions. Measurements were performed in intact live embryos without additional perturbation beyond electrode insertion. The sensor was able to quantify pharmacological alterations in serotonin release and provide the longitudinal distribution of this neurotransmitter along the intestine with high spatial resolution. In the presence of fluvoxamine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), concentrations of 54.1(±1.05) nM were recorded while in the presence of p-chloro-phenylalanine (PCPA), a tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor, the serotonin levels decreased to 7.2(±0.45) nM. The variation of serotonin levels was correlated with immunohistochemical analysis. We have demonstrated the first use of electrochemical microsensors for in vivo monitoring of intestinal serotonin levels in intact zebrafish embryos. PMID:20148518

  11. Electrochemical quantification of serotonin in the live embryonic zebrafish intestine.

    PubMed

    Njagi, John; Ball, Michael; Best, Marc; Wallace, Kenneth N; Andreescu, Silvana

    2010-03-01

    We monitored real-time in vivo levels of serotonin release in the digestive system of intact zebrafish embryos during early development (5 days postfertilization, dpf) using differential pulse voltammetry with implanted carbon fiber microelectrodes modified with carbon nanotubes dispersed in nafion. A detection limit of 1 nM, a linear range between 5 and 200 nM, and a sensitivity of 83.65 nA x microM(-1) were recorded. The microelectrodes were implanted at various locations in the intestine of zebrafish embryos. Serotonin levels of up to 29.9 (+/-1.13) nM were measured in vivo in normal physiological conditions. Measurements were performed in intact live embryos without additional perturbation beyond electrode insertion. The sensor was able to quantify pharmacological alterations in serotonin release and provide the longitudinal distribution of this neurotransmitter along the intestine with high spatial resolution. In the presence of fluvoxamine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), concentrations of 54.1 (+/-1.05) nM were recorded while in the presence of p-chloro-phenylalanine (PCPA), a tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor, the serotonin levels decreased to 7.2 (+/-0.45) nM. The variation of serotonin levels was correlated with immunohistochemical analysis. We have demonstrated the first use of electrochemical microsensors for in vivo monitoring of intestinal serotonin levels in intact zebrafish embryos. PMID:20148518

  12. Rotavirus and Serotonin Cross-Talk in Diarrhoea

    PubMed Central

    Nordgren, Johan; Karlsson, Thommie; Sharma, Sumit; Magnusson, Karl-Eric; Svensson, Lennart

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) has been shown to infect and stimulate secretion of serotonin from human enterochromaffin (EC) cells and to infect EC cells in the small intestine of mice. It remains to identify which intracellularly expressed viral protein(s) is responsible for this novel property and to further establish the clinical role of serotonin in RV infection. First, we found that siRNA specifically silencing NSP4 (siRNANSP4) significantly attenuated secretion of serotonin from Rhesus rotavirus (RRV) infected EC tumor cells compared to siRNAVP4, siRNAVP6 and siRNAVP7. Second, intracellular calcium mobilization and diarrhoeal capacity from virulent and avirulent porcine viruses correlated with the capacity to release serotonin from EC tumor cells. Third, following administration of serotonin, all (10/10) infants, but no (0/8) adult mice, responded with diarrhoea. Finally, blocking of serotonin receptors using Ondansetron significantly attenuated murine RV (strain EDIM) diarrhoea in infant mice (2.9 vs 4.5 days). Ondansetron-treated mice (n = 11) had significantly (p < 0.05) less diarrhoea, lower diarrhoea severity score and lower total diarrhoea output as compared to mock-treated mice (n = 9). Similarly, Ondansetron-treated mice had better weight gain than mock-treated animals (p < 0.05). A most surprising finding was that the serotonin receptor antagonist significantly (p < 0.05) also attenuated total viral shedding. In summary, we show that intracellularly expressed NSP4 stimulates release of serotonin from human EC tumor cells and that serotonin participates in RV diarrhoea, which can be attenuated by Ondansetron. PMID:27459372

  13. Rotavirus and Serotonin Cross-Talk in Diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Bialowas, Sonja; Hagbom, Marie; Nordgren, Johan; Karlsson, Thommie; Sharma, Sumit; Magnusson, Karl-Eric; Svensson, Lennart

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) has been shown to infect and stimulate secretion of serotonin from human enterochromaffin (EC) cells and to infect EC cells in the small intestine of mice. It remains to identify which intracellularly expressed viral protein(s) is responsible for this novel property and to further establish the clinical role of serotonin in RV infection. First, we found that siRNA specifically silencing NSP4 (siRNANSP4) significantly attenuated secretion of serotonin from Rhesus rotavirus (RRV) infected EC tumor cells compared to siRNAVP4, siRNAVP6 and siRNAVP7. Second, intracellular calcium mobilization and diarrhoeal capacity from virulent and avirulent porcine viruses correlated with the capacity to release serotonin from EC tumor cells. Third, following administration of serotonin, all (10/10) infants, but no (0/8) adult mice, responded with diarrhoea. Finally, blocking of serotonin receptors using Ondansetron significantly attenuated murine RV (strain EDIM) diarrhoea in infant mice (2.9 vs 4.5 days). Ondansetron-treated mice (n = 11) had significantly (p < 0.05) less diarrhoea, lower diarrhoea severity score and lower total diarrhoea output as compared to mock-treated mice (n = 9). Similarly, Ondansetron-treated mice had better weight gain than mock-treated animals (p < 0.05). A most surprising finding was that the serotonin receptor antagonist significantly (p < 0.05) also attenuated total viral shedding. In summary, we show that intracellularly expressed NSP4 stimulates release of serotonin from human EC tumor cells and that serotonin participates in RV diarrhoea, which can be attenuated by Ondansetron. PMID:27459372

  14. Modulation of anxiety by cortical serotonin 1A receptors

    PubMed Central

    Piszczek, Lukasz; Piszczek, Agnieszka; Kuczmanska, Joanna; Audero, Enrica; Gross, Cornelius T.

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) plays an important role in the modulation of behavior across animal species. The serotonin 1A receptor (Htr1a) is an inhibitory G-protein coupled receptor that is expressed both on serotonin and non-serotonin neurons in mammals. Mice lacking Htr1a show increased anxiety behavior suggesting that its activation by serotonin has an anxiolytic effect. This outcome can be mediated by either Htr1a population present on serotonin (auto-receptor) or non-serotonin neurons (hetero-receptor), or both. In addition, both transgenic and pharmacological studies have shown that serotonin acts on Htr1a during development to modulate anxiety in adulthood, demonstrating a function for this receptor in the maturation of anxiety circuits in the brain. However, previous studies have been equivocal about which Htr1a population modulates anxiety behavior, with some studies showing a role of Htr1a hetero-receptor and others implicating the auto-receptor. In particular, cell-type specific rescue and suppression of Htr1a expression in either forebrain principal neurons or brainstem serotonin neurons reached opposite conclusions about the role of the two populations in the anxiety phenotype of the knockout. One interpretation of these apparently contradictory findings is that the modulating role of these two populations depends on each other. Here we use a novel Cre-dependent inducible allele of Htr1a in mice to show that expression of Htr1a in cortical principal neurons is sufficient to modulate anxiety. Together with previous findings, these results support a hetero/auto-receptor interaction model for Htr1a function in anxiety. PMID:25759645

  15. Research on serotonin and suicidal behavior: neuroendocrine and molecular approaches

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, Humberto; Romano-Silva, Marco Aurélio; Duval, Fabrice; Campi-Azevedo, Ana Carolina; Lima, Vivtor; Macher, Jean-Paul

    2002-01-01

    We carried out two studies to test the hypothesis that altered central serotonergic function, as assessed by lower prolactin (PRL) response to fenfluramine (D-FEN), is more closely associated with suicidal behavior than a particular psychiatric diagnosis. A D-FEN test was performed in 85 major depressed inpatients, 33 schizophrenic inpatients, and 18 healthy controls. We showed that PRL response to D-FEN is a marker of suicidality, regardless of psychiatric disorder. We then examined the association en the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) receptor 5-HT2A gene polymorphism (T102C) and suicide in a sample of Brazilian psychiatric inpatients (95 with schizophrenia, 78 with major depression) and 52 healthy controls. No differences were found in genotypic frequencies across patients and controls. Overall, no differences were found between patients with (n=66) and without (n=107) a history of suicide attempt. We also compared patients with a history of severe suicide attempts (lethality>3; n=32) and patients without such a history (n=107), but they did not exhibit different genotypic frequencies either. These results show thai the 5-HT2A gene polymorphism (T102C) may not be involved in the genetic susceptibility to suicidal behavior. PMID:22034390

  16. Serotonin regulates osteoblast proliferation and function in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dai, S Q; Yu, L P; Shi, X; Wu, H; Shao, P; Yin, G Y; Wei, Y Z

    2014-09-01

    The monoamine serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT), a well-known neurotransmitter, also has important functions outside the central nervous system. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of 5-HT in the proliferation, differentiation, and function of osteoblasts in vitro. We treated rat primary calvarial osteoblasts with various concentrations of 5-HT (1 nM to 10 µM) and assessed the rate of osteoblast proliferation, expression levels of osteoblast-specific proteins and genes, and the ability to form mineralized nodules. Next, we detected which 5-HT receptor subtypes were expressed in rat osteoblasts at different stages of osteoblast differentiation. We found that 5-HT could inhibit osteoblast proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization at low concentrations, but this inhibitory effect was mitigated at relatively high concentrations. Six of the 5-HT receptor subtypes (5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT1D, 5-HT2A, 5-HT2B, and 5-HT2C) were found to exist in rat osteoblasts. Of these, 5-HT2A and 5-HT1B receptors had the highest expression levels, at both early and late stages of differentiation. Our results indicated that 5-HT can regulate osteoblast proliferation and function in vitro.

  17. Serotonin syndrome precipitated by fentanyl during procedural sedation.

    PubMed

    Kirschner, Ron; Donovan, J Ward

    2010-05-01

    Fentanyl is frequently used for analgesia during emergency procedures. We present the cases of 2 patients who developed agitation and delirium after intravenous fentanyl administration. These patients were chronically taking selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Both developed neuromuscular examinations consistent with serotonin syndrome, a diagnosis that must be established on the basis of clinical criteria. Although they required aggressive supportive care, including mechanical ventilation, both patients made a full recovery. Use of fentanyl for procedural sedation may precipitate serotonin syndrome in patients taking SSRIs or other serotonergic drugs. PMID:18757161

  18. 4-haloethenylphenyl tropane:serotonin transporter imaging agents

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Martarello, Laurent

    2005-01-18

    A series of compounds in the 4-fluoroalkyl-3-halophenyl nortropanes and 4-haloethenylphenyl tropane families are described as diagnostic and therapeutic agents for diseases associated with serotonin transporter dysfunction. These compounds bind to serotonin transporter protein with high affinity and selectivity. The invention provides methods of synthesis which incorporate radioisotopic halogens at a last step which permit high radiochemical yield and maximum usable product life. The radiolabeled compounds of the invention are useful as imaging agents for visualizing the location and density of serotonin transporter by PET and SPECT imaging.

  19. The serotonin irritation syndrome--a new clinical entity?

    PubMed

    Giannini, A J; Malone, D A; Piotrowski, T A

    1986-01-01

    The literature on the possible existence of a "serotonin irritation syndrome" is examined. This syndrome is an anxiety state occurring in the presence of elevated levels of atmospheric or ambient cations and is associated with elevated central and peripheral serotonin levels. Investigation of these cations' effects on microbes, insects, and mammals, including humans, shows a disruption of normal activity. It is suggested that clinicians become acquainted with the potential relationship between cation exposure and serotonin in their treatment of anxious patients. Further research exploring the etiology and diagnostic definition of this entity is urged. PMID:2416736

  20. The microwave spectrum of neurotransmitter serotonin.

    PubMed

    Cabezas, Carlos; Varela, Marcelino; Peña, Isabel; López, Juan C; Alonso, José L

    2012-10-21

    A laser ablation device in combination with a molecular beam Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer has allowed the observation of the rotational spectrum of serotonin for the first time. Three conformers of the neurotransmitter have been detected and characterized in the 4-10 GHz frequency range. The complicated hyperfine structure arising from the presence of two (14)N nuclei has been fully resolved for all conformers and used for their identification. Nuclear quadrupole coupling constants of the nitrogen atom of the side chain have been used to determine the orientation of the amino group probing the existence of N-Hπ interactions involving the amino group and the pyrrole unit in the Gauche-Phenyl conformer (GPh) or the phenyl unit in the Gauche-Pyrrole (GPy) ones.

  1. Flux coupling in the human serotonin transporter.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Scott V; DeFelice, Louis J

    2002-01-01

    The serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5HT) transporter (SERT) catalyzes the movement of 5HT across cellular membranes. In the brain, SERT clears 5HT from extracellular spaces, modulating the strength and duration of serotonergic signaling. SERT is also an important pharmacological target for antidepressants and drugs of abuse. We have studied the flux of radio-labeled 5HT through the transporter stably expressed in HEK-293 cells. Analysis of the time course of net transport, the equilibrium 5HT gradient sustained, and the ratio of the unidirectional influx to efflux of 5HT indicate that mechanistically, human SERT functions as a 5HT channel rather than a classical carrier. This is especially apparent at relatively high [5HT](out) (> or =10 microM), but is not restricted to this regime of external 5HT. PMID:12496095

  2. Origins of serotonin innervation of forebrain structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellar, K. J.; Brown, P. A.; Madrid, J.; Bernstein, M.; Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Mehler, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    The tryptophan hydroxylase activity and high-affinity uptake of (3H) serotonin ((3H)5-HT) were measured in five discrete brain regions of rats following lesions of the dorsal or median raphe nuclei. Dorsal raphe lesions reduced enzyme and uptake activity in the striatum only. Median raphe lesions reduced activities in the hippocampus, septal area, frontal cortex, and, to a lesser extent, in the hypothalamus. These data are consistent with the suggestion that the dorsal and median raphe nuclei are the origins of two separate ascending serotonergic systems - one innervating striatal structures and the other mesolimbic structures, predominantly. In addition, the data suggest that measurements of high-affinity uptake of (3H)5-HT may be a more reliable index of innervation than either 5-HT content or tryptophan hydroxylase activity.

  3. Possible involvement of serotonin in extinction.

    PubMed

    Beninger, R J; Phillips, A G

    1979-01-01

    In Experiment 1, rats were trained to leverpress for continuous reinforcement with food; half were then intubated with the serotonin synthesis inhibitor parachlorophenylalanine (PCPA: 400 mg/kg) and half with water. In extinction the PCPA-treated rats responded at a higher rate. In Experiment 2, rats were trained on a random interval schedule and then assigned to two groups, treated as in Experiment 1, and tested in extinction. There was no significant difference in the resistance to extinction of the two groups. In Experiment 3, the responding of rats trained in a punished stepdown response paradigm and then given an intragastric injection of PCPA took longer to recover than the responding of water-injected controls. These observations suggest that serotonergic neurons might play a role in extinction processes. PMID:155820

  4. Evidence that phospholipid turnover is the signal transducing system coupled to serotonin-S2 receptor sites

    SciTech Connect

    de Chaffoy de Courcelles, D.; Leysen, J.E.; De Clerck, F.; Van Belle, H.; Janssen, P.A.

    1985-06-25

    Upon stimulation with serotonin of washed human platelets prelabeled with (/sup 32/P)orthophosphate, the authors found an approximately 250% increase in (/sup 32/P)phosphatidic acid (PA) formation, a small decrease in (/sup 32/P)phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, and a concomitant increase in (/sup 32/P)phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate. Using (/sup 3/H)arachidonate for prelabeling, (/sup 3/H)diacylglycerol accumulated transiently at 10 s after addition of the agonist, (/sup 3/H)PA increased but to a lower extent compared to /sup 32/P-labeled lipid, and the formation of both (/sup 3/H)polyphosphoinositides increased. The serotonin-induced dose-dependent changes in (/sup 32/P)PA correlate with its effect on the changes in slope of aggregation of platelets. The potency of 13 drugs to antagonize the serotonin-induced PA formation closely corresponds to both their potency to inhibit platelet aggregation and their binding affinity for serotonin-S2 receptor sites. It is suggested that at least part of the signal transducing system following activation of the serotonin-S2 receptors involves phospholipase C catalyzed inositol lipid breakdown yielding diacylglycerol which is subsequently phosphorylated to PA.

  5. Neither Serotonin nor Adenosine-dependent Mechanisms Preserve Ventilatory Capacity in ALS rats

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, N.L.; Johnson, R.A.; Satriotomo, I.; Mitchell, G.S.

    2014-01-01

    In rats over-expressing SOD1G93A, ventilation is preserved despite significant loss of respiratory motor neurons. Thus, unknown forms of compensatory respiratory plasticity may offset respiratory motor neuron cell death. Although mechanisms of such compensation are unknown, other models of respiratory motor plasticity may provide a conceptual guide. Multiple cellular mechanisms give rise to phrenic motor facilitation; one mechanism requires spinal serotonin receptor and NADPH oxidase activity whereas another requires spinal adenosine receptor activation. Here, we studied whether these mechanisms contribute to compensatory respiratory plasticity in SOD1G93A rats. Using plethysmography, we assessed ventilation in end-stage SOD1G93A rats after: 1) serotonin depletion with parachlorophenylalanine (PCPA), 2) serotonin (methysergide) and A2A (MSX-3) receptor inhibition, 3) NADPH oxidase inhibition (apocynin), and 4) combined treatments. The ability to increase ventilation was not decreased by individual or combined treatments; thus, these mechanisms do not maintain breathing capacity at end-stage motor neuron disease. Possible mechanisms giving rise to enhanced breathing capacity with combined treatment in end-stage SOD1G93A rats are discussed. PMID:24681328

  6. Genetic variation in cortico-amygdala serotonin function and risk for stress-related disease

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The serotonin system is strongly implicated in the pathophysiology and therapeutic alleviation of stress-related disorders such as anxiety and depression. Serotonergic modulation of the acute response to stress and the adaptation to chronic stress is mediated by a myriad of molecules controlling serotonin neuron development (Pet-1), synthesis (tryptophan hydroxylase 1 and 2 isozymes), packaging (vesicular monoamine transporter 2), actions at presynaptic and postsynaptic receptors (5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C, 5-HT3A, 5-HT4, 5-HT5A, 5-HT6, 5-HT7), reuptake (serotonin transporter), and degradation (monoamine oxidase A). A growing body of evidence from preclinical rodents models, and especially genetically modified mice and inbred mouse strains, has provided significant insight into how genetic variation in these molecules can affect the development and function of a key neural circuit between the dorsal raphe nucleus, medial prefrontal cortex and amygdala. By extension, such variation is hypothesized to have a major influence on individual differences in the stress response and risk for stress-related disease in humans. The current article provides an update on this rapidly evolving field of research. PMID:18439676

  7. Agonist-directed signaling of serotonin 5-HT2C receptors: differences between serotonin and lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD).

    PubMed

    Backstrom, J R; Chang, M S; Chu, H; Niswender, C M; Sanders-Bush, E

    1999-08-01

    For more than 40 years the hallucinogen lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) has been known to modify serotonin neurotransmission. With the advent of molecular and cellular techniques, we are beginning to understand the complexity of LSD's actions at the serotonin 5-HT2 family of receptors. Here, we discuss evidence that signaling of LSD at 5-HT2C receptors differs from the endogenous agonist serotonin. In addition, RNA editing of the 5-HT2C receptor dramatically alters the ability of LSD to stimulate phosphatidylinositol signaling. These findings provide a unique opportunity to understand the mechanism(s) of partial agonism.

  8. Exposure to serotonin adversely affects oligodendrocyte development and myelination in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lir-Wan; Bhatt, Abhay; Tien, Lu-Tai; Zheng, Baoying; Simpson, Kimberly L; Lin, Rick C S; Cai, Zhengwei; Kumar, Praveen; Pang, Yi

    2015-05-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) has been implicated to play critical roles in early neural development. Recent reports have suggested that perinatal exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) resulted in cortical network miswiring, abnormal social behavior, callosal myelin malformation, as well as oligodendrocyte (OL) pathology in rats. To gain further insight into the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying SSRIs-induced OL and myelin abnormalities, we investigated the effect of 5-HT exposure on OL development, cell death, and myelination in cell culture models. First, we showed that 5-HT receptor 1A and 2A subtypes were expressed in OL lineages, using immunocytochemistry, Western blot, as well as intracellular Ca(2+) measurement. We then assessed the effect of serotonin exposure on the lineage development, expression of myelin proteins, cell death, and myelination, in purified OL and neuron-OL myelination cultures. For pure OL cultures, our results showed that 5-HT exposure led to disturbance of OL development, as indicated by aberrant process outgrowth and reduced myelin proteins expression. At higher doses, such exposure triggered a development-dependent cell death, as immature OLs exhibited increasing susceptibility to 5-HT treatment compared to OL progenitor cells (OPC). We showed further that 5-HT-induced immature OL death was mediated at least partially via 5-HT2A receptor, since cell death could be mimicked by 5-HT2A receptor agonist 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane hydrochloride, (±)-2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine hydrochloride, but atten-uated by pre-treatment with 5-HT2A receptor antagonist ritanserin. Utilizing a neuron-OL myelination co-culture model, our data showed that 5-HT exposure significantly reduced the number of myelinated internodes. In contrast to cell injury observed in pure OL cultures, 5-HT exposure did not lead to OL death or reduced OL density in neuron-OL co-cultures. However, abnormal

  9. Serotonin blockade delays learning performance in a cooperative fish.

    PubMed

    Soares, Marta C; Paula, José R; Bshary, Redouan

    2016-09-01

    Animals use learning and memorizing to gather information that will help them to make ecologically relevant decisions. Neuro-modulatory adjustments enable them to make associations between stimuli and appropriate behavior. A key candidate for the modulation of cooperative behavior is serotonin. Previous research has shown that modulation of the serotonergic system spontaneously affects the behavior of the cleaner wrasse Labroides dimidiatus during interactions with so-called 'client' reef fish. Here, we asked whether shifts in serotonin function affect the cleaners' associative learning abilities when faced with the task to distinguish two artificial clients that differ in their value as a food source. We found that the administration of serotonin 1A receptor antagonist significantly slowed learning speed in comparison with saline treated fish. As reduced serotonergic signaling typically enhances fear, we discuss the possibility that serotonin may affect how cleaners appraise, acquire information and respond to client-derived stimuli via manipulation of the perception of danger. PMID:27107861

  10. (/sup 3/)tetrahydrotrazodone binding. Association with serotonin binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Kendall, D.A.; Taylor, D.P.; Enna, S.J.

    1983-05-01

    High (17 nM) and low (603 nM) affinity binding sites for (/sup 3/)tetrahydrotrazodone ((/sup 3/) THT), a biologically active analogue of trazodone, have been identified in rat brain membranes. The substrate specificity, concentration, and subcellular and regional distributions of these sites suggest that they may represent a component of the serotonin transmitter system. Pharmacological analysis of (/sup 3/)THT binding, coupled with brain lesion and drug treatment experiments, revealed that, unlike other antidepressants, (/sup 3/) THT does not attach to either a biogenic amine transporter or serotonin binding sites. Rather, it would appear that (/sup 3/)THT may be an antagonist ligand for the serotonin binding site. This probe may prove of value in defining the mechanism of action of trazodone and in further characterizing serotonin receptors.

  11. Plasma serotonin in horses undergoing surgery for small intestinal colic.

    PubMed

    Torfs, Sara C; Maes, An A; Delesalle, Catherine J; Pardon, Bart; Croubels, Siska M; Deprez, Piet

    2015-02-01

    This study compared serotonin concentrations in platelet poor plasma (PPP) from healthy horses and horses with surgical small intestinal (SI) colic, and evaluated their association with postoperative ileus, strangulation and non-survival. Plasma samples (with EDTA) from 33 horses with surgical SI colic were collected at several pre- and post-operative time points. Serotonin concentrations were determined using liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Results were compared with those for 24 healthy control animals. The serotonin concentrations in PPP were significantly lower (P < 0.01) in pre- and post-operative samples from surgical SI colic horses compared to controls. However, no association with postoperative ileus or non-survival could be demonstrated at any time point. In this clinical study, plasma serotonin was not a suitable prognostic factor in horses with SI surgical colic.

  12. Serotonin Affects Movement Gain Control in the Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Joshua I.; Deng, Linna; Thompson, Christopher K.; Stevenson, Ian H.; Wang, Qining; Hornby, Thomas George; Heckman, Charles J.; Kording, Konrad P.

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental challenge for the nervous system is to encode signals spanning many orders of magnitude with neurons of limited bandwidth. To meet this challenge, perceptual systems use gain control. However, whether the motor system uses an analogous mechanism is essentially unknown. Neuromodulators, such as serotonin, are prime candidates for gain control signals during force production. Serotonergic neurons project diffusely to motor pools, and, therefore, force production by one muscle should change the gain of others. Here we present behavioral and pharmaceutical evidence that serotonin modulates the input–output gain of motoneurons in humans. By selectively changing the efficacy of serotonin with drugs, we systematically modulated the amplitude of spinal reflexes. More importantly, force production in different limbs interacts systematically, as predicted by a spinal gain control mechanism. Psychophysics and pharmacology suggest that the motor system adopts gain control mechanisms, and serotonin is a primary driver for their implementation in force production. PMID:25232107

  13. [Serotonin syndrome and pain medication : What is relevant for practice?].

    PubMed

    Schenk, M; Wirz, S

    2015-04-01

    Serotonin syndrome is a dangerous and rare complication of a pharmacotherapy and can lead to death. Caused by unwanted interactions of serotonergic drugs, it is characterised by a neuroexcitatory triad of mental changes, neuromuscular hyperactivity and autonomic instability. Opioids with serotonergic effects include the phenylpiperidine series opioids fentanyl, methadone, meperidine and tramadol and the morphine analogues oxycodone and codeine. In combination with certain serotonergic drugs, e.g. antidepressants, they can provoke serotonin syndrome. In patients with such combinations, special attention should be paid to clinical signs of serotonergic hyperactivity. Higher risk combinations (e.g. monoamine oxidase inhibitors with tramadol) must be avoided. Treatment with serotonergic agents must be stopped in moderate or severe serotonin syndrome. Patients with a severe serotonin syndrome require symptomatic intensive care and specifically a pharmacological antagonism with cyproheptadine or chlorpromazine.

  14. Plasma serotonin in horses undergoing surgery for small intestinal colic

    PubMed Central

    Torfs, Sara C.; Maes, An A.; Delesalle, Catherine J.; Pardon, Bart; Croubels, Siska M.; Deprez, Piet

    2015-01-01

    This study compared serotonin concentrations in platelet poor plasma (PPP) from healthy horses and horses with surgical small intestinal (SI) colic, and evaluated their association with postoperative ileus, strangulation and non-survival. Plasma samples (with EDTA) from 33 horses with surgical SI colic were collected at several pre- and post-operative time points. Serotonin concentrations were determined using liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Results were compared with those for 24 healthy control animals. The serotonin concentrations in PPP were significantly lower (P < 0.01) in pre- and post-operative samples from surgical SI colic horses compared to controls. However, no association with postoperative ileus or non-survival could be demonstrated at any time point. In this clinical study, plasma serotonin was not a suitable prognostic factor in horses with SI surgical colic. PMID:25694668

  15. Multiple messengers in descending serotonin neurons: localization and functional implications.

    PubMed

    Hökfelt, T; Arvidsson, U; Cullheim, S; Millhorn, D; Nicholas, A P; Pieribone, V; Seroogy, K; Ulfhake, B

    2000-02-01

    In the present review article we summarize mainly histochemical work dealing with descending bulbospinal serotonin neurons which also express a number of neuropeptides, in particular substance P and thyrotropin releasing hormone. Such neurons have been observed both in rat, cat and monkey, and may preferentially innervate the ventral horns of the spinal cord, whereas the serotonin projections to the dorsal horn seem to lack these coexisting peptides. More recent studies indicate that a small population of medullary raphe serotonin neurons, especially at rostral levels, also synthesize the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA). Many serotonin neurons contain the glutamate synthesizing enzyme glutaminase and can be labelled with antibodies raised against glutamate, suggesting that one and the same neuron may release several signalling substances, causing a wide spectrum of post- (and pre-) synaptic actions. PMID:10708921

  16. Structural specificity of serotonin effect on human erythrocyte fragility.

    PubMed

    Gilboa-Garber, N; Kirstein-Segal, R

    1998-08-01

    Serotonin, a neurotransmitter and vasoconstrictor, affects various cell properties. We have analyzed the importance of its structural components for its extensive effect on human erythrocyte fragility, using its O- and N-linked derivatives and related compounds. The results presented in this communication indicate that the amino group, free of adjacent negative charges, and the hydroxyl group are indispensable for the serotonin-induced increase in red blood cell fragility. PMID:9758719

  17. Determination of serotonin released from coffee wax by liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kele, M; Ohmacht, R

    1996-04-12

    A simple hydrolysis and extraction method was developed for the release of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) from a coffee wax sample obtained from decaffeination of coffee beans. The recoverable amount of serotonin was determined by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with gradient elution and UV detection, using the standard addition method. Different type of basic deactivated chromatographic columns were used for the separation.

  18. Halogenated naphthyl methoxy piperidines for mapping serotonin transporter sites

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Faraj, Bahjat

    1999-01-01

    Halogenated naphthyl methoxy piperidines having a strong affinity for the serotonin transporter are disclosed. Those compounds can be labeled with positron-emitting and/or gamma emitting halogen isotopes by a late step synthesis that maximizes the useable lifeterm of the label. The labeled compounds are useful for localizing serotonin transporter sites by positron emission tomography and/or single photon emission computed tomography.

  19. Tryptophan availability modulates serotonin release from rat hypothalamic slices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaechter, Judith D.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between the tryptophan availability and serononin release from rat hypothalamus was investigated using a new in vitro technique for estimating rates at which endogenous serotonin is released spontaneously or upon electrical depolarization from hypothalamic slices superfused with a solution containing various amounts of tryptophan. It was found that the spontaneous, as well as electrically induced, release of serotonin from the brain slices exhibited a dose-dependent relationship with the tryptophan concentration of the superfusion medium.

  20. Halogenated naphthyl methoxy piperidines for mapping serotonin transporter sites

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, M.M.; Faraj, B.

    1999-07-06

    Halogenated naphthyl methoxy piperidines having a strong affinity for the serotonin transporter are disclosed. Those compounds can be labeled with positron-emitting and/or gamma emitting halogen isotopes by a late step synthesis that maximizes the useable lifeterm of the label. The labeled compounds are useful for localizing serotonin transporter sites by positron emission tomography and/or single photon emission computed tomography.

  1. Determination of serotonin released from coffee wax by liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kele, M; Ohmacht, R

    1996-04-12

    A simple hydrolysis and extraction method was developed for the release of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) from a coffee wax sample obtained from decaffeination of coffee beans. The recoverable amount of serotonin was determined by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with gradient elution and UV detection, using the standard addition method. Different type of basic deactivated chromatographic columns were used for the separation. PMID:8680597

  2. Lung damage and pulmonary uptake of serotonin in intact dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, C.A.; Christensen, C.W.; Rickaby, D.A.; Linehan, J.H.; Johnston, M.R.

    1985-06-01

    The authors examined the influence of glass bead embolization and oleic acid, dextran, and imipramine infusion on the pulmonary uptake of trace doses of (/sup 3/H)serotonin and the extravascular volume accessible to (/sup 14/C)antipyrine in anesthetized dogs. Embolization and imipramine decreased serotonin uptake by 53 and 61%, respectively, but no change was observed with oleic acid or dextran infusion. The extravascular volume accessible to the antipyrine was reduced by 77% after embolization and increased by 177 and approximately 44% after oleic acid and dextran infusion, respectively. The results suggest that when the perfused endothelial surface is sufficiently reduced, as with embolization, the uptake of trace doses of serotonin will be depressed. In addition, decreases in serotonin uptake in response to imipramine in this study and in response to certain endothelial toxins in other studies suggest that serotonin uptake can reveal certain kinds of changes in endothelial function. However, the lack of a response to oleic acid-induced damage in the present study suggests that serotonin uptake is not sensitive to all forms of endothelial damage.

  3. Expression of serotonin receptor genes in cranial ganglia.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Naohiro; Ohmoto, Makoto; Yamamoto, Kurumi; Kurokawa, Azusa; Narukawa, Masataka; Ishimaru, Yoshiro; Misaka, Takumi; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Abe, Keiko

    2016-03-23

    Taste cells release neurotransmitters to gustatory neurons to transmit chemical information they received. Sweet, umami, and bitter taste cells use ATP as a neurotransmitter. However, ATP release from sour taste cells has not been observed so far. Instead, they release serotonin when they are activated by sour/acid stimuli. Thus it is still controversial whether sour taste cells use ATP, serotonin, or both. By reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and subsequent in situ hybridization (ISH) analyses, we revealed that of 14 serotonin receptor genes only 5-HT3A and 5-HT3B showed significant/clear signals in a subset of neurons of cranial sensory ganglia in which gustatory neurons reside. Double-fluorescent labeling analyses of ISH for serotonin receptor genes with wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) in cranial sensory ganglia of pkd1l3-WGA mice whose sour neural pathway is visualized by the distribution of WGA originating from sour taste cells in the posterior region of the tongue revealed that WGA-positive cranial sensory neurons rarely express either of serotonin receptor gene. These results suggest that serotonin receptors expressed in cranial sensory neurons do not play any role as neurotransmitter receptor from sour taste cells. PMID:26854841

  4. Noninvasive measurement of lung carbon-11-serotonin extraction in man

    SciTech Connect

    Coates, G.; Firnau, G.; Meyer, G.J.; Gratz, K.F. )

    1991-04-01

    The fraction of serotonin extracted on a single passage through the lungs is being used as an early indicator of lung endothelial damage but the existing techniques require multiple arterial blood samples. We have developed a noninvasive technique to measure lung serotonin uptake in man. We utilized the double indicator diffusion principle, a positron camera, {sup 11}C-serotonin as the substrate, and {sup 11}CO-erythrocytes as the vascular marker. From regions of interest around each lung, we recorded time-activity curves in 0.5-sec frames for 30 sec after a bolus injection of first the vascular marker {sup 11}CO-erythrocytes and 10 min later {sup 11}C-serotonin. A second uptake measurement was made after imipramine 25-35 mg was infused intravenously. In three normal volunteers, the single-pass uptake of {sup 11}C-serotonin was 63.9% +/- 3.6%. This decreased in all subjects to a mean of 53.6% +/- 1.4% after imipramine. The rate of lung washout of {sup 11}C was also significantly prolonged after imipramine. This noninvasive technique can be used to measure lung serotonin uptake to detect early changes in a variety of conditions that alter the integrity of the pulmonary endothelium.

  5. Serotonin Improves High Fat Diet Induced Obesity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hitoshi; Nakano, Tatsuya; Saito, Ryo; Akasaka, Daisuke; Saito, Kazuki; Ogasawara, Hideki; Minashima, Takeshi; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Kanaya, Takashi; Takakura, Ikuro; Inoue, Nao; Ikeda, Ikuo; Chen, Xiangning; Miyake, Masato; Kitazawa, Haruki; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Sato, Kan; Tahara, Kohji; Nagasawa, Yuya; Rose, Michael T; Ohwada, Shyuichi; Watanabe, Kouichi; Aso, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    There are two independent serotonin (5-HT) systems of organization: one in the central nervous system and the other in the periphery. 5-HT affects feeding behavior and obesity in the central nervous system. On the other hand, peripheral 5-HT also may play an important role in obesity, as it has been reported that 5-HT regulates glucose and lipid metabolism. Here we show that the intraperitoneal injection of 5-HT to mice inhibits weight gain, hyperglycemia and insulin resistance and completely prevented the enlargement of intra-abdominal adipocytes without having any effect on food intake when on a high fat diet, but not on a chow diet. 5-HT increased energy expenditure, O2 consumption and CO2 production. This novel metabolic effect of peripheral 5-HT is critically related to a shift in the profile of muscle fiber type from fast/glycolytic to slow/oxidative in soleus muscle. Additionally, 5-HT dramatically induced an increase in the mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator 1α (PGC-1α)-b and PGC-1α-c in soleus muscle. The elevation of these gene mRNA expressions by 5-HT injection was inhibited by treatment with 5-HT receptor (5HTR) 2A or 7 antagonists. Our results demonstrate that peripheral 5-HT may play an important role in the relief of obesity and other metabolic disorders by accelerating energy consumption in skeletal muscle. PMID:26766570

  6. Serotonin Improves High Fat Diet Induced Obesity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Akasaka, Daisuke; Saito, Kazuki; Ogasawara, Hideki; Minashima, Takeshi; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Kanaya, Takashi; Takakura, Ikuro; Inoue, Nao; Ikeda, Ikuo; Chen, Xiangning; Miyake, Masato; Kitazawa, Haruki; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Sato, Kan; Tahara, Kohji; Nagasawa, Yuya; Rose, Michael T.; Ohwada, Shyuichi; Watanabe, Kouichi; Aso, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    There are two independent serotonin (5-HT) systems of organization: one in the central nervous system and the other in the periphery. 5-HT affects feeding behavior and obesity in the central nervous system. On the other hand, peripheral 5-HT also may play an important role in obesity, as it has been reported that 5-HT regulates glucose and lipid metabolism. Here we show that the intraperitoneal injection of 5-HT to mice inhibits weight gain, hyperglycemia and insulin resistance and completely prevented the enlargement of intra-abdominal adipocytes without having any effect on food intake when on a high fat diet, but not on a chow diet. 5-HT increased energy expenditure, O2 consumption and CO2 production. This novel metabolic effect of peripheral 5-HT is critically related to a shift in the profile of muscle fiber type from fast/glycolytic to slow/oxidative in soleus muscle. Additionally, 5-HT dramatically induced an increase in the mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator 1α (PGC-1α)-b and PGC-1α-c in soleus muscle. The elevation of these gene mRNA expressions by 5-HT injection was inhibited by treatment with 5-HT receptor (5HTR) 2A or 7 antagonists. Our results demonstrate that peripheral 5-HT may play an important role in the relief of obesity and other metabolic disorders by accelerating energy consumption in skeletal muscle. PMID:26766570

  7. Neurochemical, behavioral and physiological effects of pharmacologically enhanced serotonin levels in serotonin transporter (SERT)-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Meredith A.; Jensen, Catherine L.; French, Helen T.; Stein, Alison R.; Huang, Su-Jan; Tolliver, Teresa J.; Murphy, Dennis L.

    2008-01-01

    Rationale Serotonin transporter (SERT) knockout (−/−) mice have an altered phenotype in adulthood, including high baseline anxiety and depressive-like behaviors, associated with increased baseline extracellular serotonin levels throughout life. Objectives To examine the effects of increases in serotonin following administration of the serotonin precursor 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan (5-HTP) in SERT wildtype (+/+), heterozygous (+/−) and −/− mice. Results 5-HTP increased serotonin in all five brain areas examined, with ~2–5-fold increases in SERT +/+ and +/− mice, and greater 4.5–11.7-fold increases in SERT −/− mice. Behaviorally, 5-HTP induced exaggerated serotonin syndrome behaviors in SERT −/− mice, with similar effects in male and female mice. Studies suggest promiscuous serotonin uptake by the dopamine transporter (DAT) in SERT −/− mice, and here, the DAT blocker GBR 12909 enhanced 5-HTP-induced behaviors in SERT −/− mice. Physiologically, 5-HTP induced exaggerated temperature effects in SERT-deficient mice. The 5-HT1A antagonist WAY 100635 decreased 5-HTP-induced hypothermia in SERT +/+ and +/− mice, with no effect in SERT −/− mice, whereas the 5-HT7 antagonist SB 269970 decreased this exaggerated response in SERT −/− mice only. WAY 100635 and SB 269970 together completely blocked 5-HTP-induced hypothermia in SERT +/− and −/− mice. Conclusions These studies demonstrate that SERT −/− mice have exaggerated neurochemical, behavioral and physiological responses to further increases in serotonin, and provide the first evidence of intact 5-HT7 receptor function in SERT −/− mice, with interesting interactions between 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptors. As roles for 5-HT7 receptors in anxiety and depression were recently established, the current findings have implications for understanding the high anxiety and depressive-like phenotype of SERT-deficient mice. PMID:18712364

  8. [5-HT1B serotonin receptors and antidepressant effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors ].

    PubMed

    Gardier, A M; Trillat, A C; Malagié, I; David, D; Hascoët, M; Colombel, M C; Jolliet, P; Jacquot, C; Hen, R; Bourin, M

    2001-05-01

    We used knockout mice and receptor antagonist strategies to investigate the contribution of the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) 5-HT1B receptor subtype in mediating the effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Using in vivo intracerebral microdialysis in awake mice, we show that a single systemic administration of paroxetine (1 or 5 mg/kg, i.p.) increased extracellular serotonin levels [5-HT]ext in the ventral hippocampus and frontal cortex of wild-type and mutant mice. However, in the ventral hippocampus, paroxetine at the two doses studied induced a larger increase in [5-HT]ext in knockout than in wild-type mice. In the frontal cortex, the effect of paroxetine was larger in mutants than in wild-type mice at the 1 mg/kg dose but not at 5 mg/kg. In addition, either the absence of the 5-HT1B receptor or its blockade with the mixed 5-HT1B/1D receptor antagonist, GR 127935, potentiates the effect of a single administration of paroxetine on [5-HT]ext more in the ventral hippocampus than in the frontal cortex. Furthermore, we demonstrate that SSRIs decrease immobility in the forced swimming test; this effect is absent in 5-HT1B knockout mice and blocked by GR 127935 in wild-type suggesting therefore that activation of 5-HT1B receptors mediate the antidepressant-like effects of SSRIs. Taken together these data demonstrate that 5-HT1B autoreceptors appear to limit the effects of SSRI on dialysate 5-HT levels particularly in the hippocampus while presynaptic 5-HT1B heteroreceptors are likely to be required for the antidepressant activity of SSRIs.

  9. Serotonin depresses feeding behaviour in ants.

    PubMed

    Falibene, Agustina; Rössler, Wolfgang; Josens, Roxana

    2012-01-01

    Feeding behaviour is a complex functional system that relies on external signals and the physiological state of the animal. This is also the case in ants as they vary their feeding behaviour according to food characteristics, environmental conditions and - as they are social insects - to the colony's requirements. The biogenic amine serotonin (5-HT) was shown to be involved in the control and modulation of many actions and processes related to feeding in both vertebrates and invertebrates. In this study, we investigated whether 5-HT affects nectar feeding in ants by analysing its effect on the sucking-pump activity. Furthermore, we studied 5-HT association with tissues and neuronal ganglia involved in feeding regulation. Our results show that 5-HT promotes a dose-dependent depression of sucrose feeding in Camponotus mus ants. Orally administered 5-HT diminished the intake rate by mainly decreasing the volume of solution taken per pump contraction, without modifying the sucrose acceptance threshold. Immunohistochemical studies all along the alimentary canal revealed 5-HT-like immunoreactive processes on the foregut (oesophagus, crop and proventriculus), while the midgut and hindgut lacked 5-HT innervation. Although the frontal and suboesophageal ganglia contained 5-HT immunoreactive cell bodies, serotonergic innervation in the sucking-pump muscles was absent. The results are discussed in the frame of a role of 5-HT in feeding control in ants.

  10. Selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors: an update.

    PubMed

    Masand, P S; Gupta, S

    1999-01-01

    Selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), including fluoxetine, sertraline, paroxetine, fluvoxamine, and citalopram, represent an important advance in the pharmacotherapy of mood and other disorders. They are chemically unrelated to tricyclic, heterocyclic, and other first-generation antidepressants. SSRIs are the treatment of choice for many indications, including major depression, dysthymia, panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, eating disorders, and premenstrual dysphoric disorder, because of their efficacy, good side-effect profile, tolerability, and safety in overdose, as well as patient compliance. A review of the literature was conducted using Medline and the terms "SSRIs," "fluoxetine," "sertraline," "paroxetine," "fluvoxamine," and "citalopram." Articles were limited to those published in English within the last 15 years. The search revealed that indications for antidepressants include unipolar depression, dysthymia, bipolar depression, treatment-resistant depression, depression in the medically ill, panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, eating disorders, social phobia, and premenstrual dysphoric disorder. One SSRI, fluoxetine, has demonstrated safety in pregnancy. Side effects of SSRIs include gastrointestinal disturbances, headache, sedation, insomnia, activation, weight gain, impaired memory, excessive perspiration, paresthesia, and sexual dysfunction.

  11. Probing the diversity of serotonin neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar, Patricia; Lillesaar, Christina

    2012-01-01

    The serotonin (5-HT) system is generally considered as a single modulatory system, with broad and diffuse projections. However, accumulating evidence points to the existence of distinct cell groups in the raphe. Here, we review prior evidence for raphe cell heterogeneity, considering different properties of 5-HT neurons, from metabolism to anatomy, and neurochemistry to physiology. We then summarize more recent data in mice and zebrafish that support a genetic diversity of 5-HT neurons, based on differential transcription factor requirements for the acquisition of the 5-HT identity. In both species, PET1 plays a major role in the acquisition and maintenance of 5-HT identity in the hindbrain, although some 5-HT neurons do not require PET1 for their differentiation, indicating the existence of several transcriptional routes to become serotoninergic. In mice, both PET1-dependent and -independent 5-HT neurons are located in the raphe, but have distinct anatomical features, such as the morphology of axon terminals and projection patterns. In zebrafish, all raphe neurons express pet1, but Pet1-independent 5-HT cell groups are present in the forebrain. Overall, these observations support the view that there are a number of distinct 5-HT subsystems, including within the raphe nuclei, with unique genetic programming and functions. PMID:22826339

  12. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Gershon, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Although the gut contains most of the body’s 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), many of its most important functions have recently been discovered. This review summarizes and directs attention to this new burst of knowledge. Recent findings Enteroendocrine cells have classically been regarded as pressure sensors, which secrete 5-HT to initiate peristaltic reflexes; nevertheless, recent data obtained from studies of mice that selectively lack 5-HT either in enterochromaffin cells (deletion of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 knockout; TPH1KO) or neurons (TPH2KO) imply that neuronal 5-HT is more important for constitutive gastrointestinal transit than that of enteroendocrine cells. The enteric nervous system of TPH2KO mice, however, also lacks a full complement of neurons; therefore, it is not clear whether slow transit in TPH2KO animals is due to their neuronal deficiency or absence of serotonergic neurotransmission. Neuronal 5-HT promotes the growth/maintenance of the mucosa as well as neurogenesis. Enteroendocrine cell derived 5-HT is an essential component of the gastrointestinal inflammatory response; thus, deletion of the serotonin transporter increases, whereas TPH1KO decreases the severity of intestinal inflammation. Enteroendocrine cell derived 5-HT, moreover, is also a hormone, which inhibits osteoblast proliferation and promotes hepatic regeneration. Summary New studies show that enteric 5-HT is a polyfunctional signalling molecule, acting both in developing and mature animals as a neurotransmitter paracrine factor, endocrine hormone and growth factor. PMID:23222853

  13. Pulmonary serotonin and histamine in experimental asbestosis

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, I.M.; Day, R.; Lemaire, S.

    1986-03-01

    Adult male Wistar rats were treated once with tracheal instillation of 5 mg Crysotile B asbestos fibers in 0.5 ml saline under ketamine/xylaxine anesthesia. Control rats (n = 37) received 0.5 ml saline. Test and control rats were killed at 7 and 14 d., and 1, 3 and 6 mo. post instillation. Serotonin (5-HT) was quantitated in lung tissue homogenate from all rats using HPLC and electrochemical detection. Among rats killed at 1, 3 and 6 mo., lung tissue histamine-o-phthaldialdehyde complex was quantitated using reverse phase HPLC coupled to a fluorometric detector. Furthermore, 5-HT was quantitated in the cytoplasm of grouped (NEB) and individual (NEC) neuroendocrine cells and in mast cells using formaldehyde-vapor-induced fluorescence and microspectrofluorometry, and mast cell numbers were determined. Test rats had higher pulmonary 5-HT and histamine levels than controls at 1, 3 and 6 mo. Test rats also had higher cellular 5-HT compared to controls in NEB's at 1 mo., but not in NECs, and tended to have higher 5-HT-levels in mast cells at 6 mo. Mast cell numbers were higher among tests at 1 and 3 mo. The authors results suggest that NEBs may contribute to the early asbestos induced rise in 5-HT, and that the major source of 5-HT and histamine is from the increased numbers of mast cells.

  14. Modulation of antigen-induced responses by serotonin and prostaglandin E2 via EP1 and EP4 receptors in the peripheral rat lung.

    PubMed

    Larsson-Callerfelt, Anna-Karin; Dahlén, Sven-Erik; Kühl, Anna-Rebekka; Lex, Dennis; Uhlig, Stefan; Martin, Christian

    2013-01-15

    The cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway and prostanoids may critically contribute to the early allergic airway response. In the rat lung, serotonin (5-HT) is a major mediator of antigen-induced contractions. The aim of this study was therefore to examine the relative role of the COX pathway and serotonin for antigen-induced contractions in the rat lung. Airway responses were studied in rat precision-cut lung slices (PCLS). Lung slices were stimulated with ovalbumin or serotonin after pretreatment with COX inhibitors or specific TP or EP receptor antagonists. Changes in airway size (contractions/relaxations) were measured by a digital video camera. The supernatants were analysed for changes in prostaglandin and serotonin release. Airway contractions to ovalbumin were attenuated by the unselective COX inhibitor indomethacin, the selective COX-1 inhibitor FR-122047 and COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib. The EP(1) receptor antagonist ONO-8713 reduced the contractions, whereas the EP(4) receptor antagonist L-161,982 significantly increased the contractile response to ovalbumin. The 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist ketanserin completely inhibited the ovalbumin-induced contractions. The different COX inhibitors decreased the production of prostaglandins but did not affect the synthesis of serotonin. The serotonin-induced bronchoconstriction was attenuated by celecoxib and ONO-8713, but not by methacholine. Taken together, our data indicate that PGE(2) is the main prostanoid involved in the early allergic airway response in the rat lung. PGE(2) appears to act both as a primary mediator of antigen-induced airway contraction via the EP(4) receptor and as a downstream modulator of serotonin-induced bronchoconstriction via the EP(1) receptor.

  15. Myocardial serotonin exchange: negligible uptake by capillary endothelium

    SciTech Connect

    Moffett, T.C.; Chan, I.S.; Bassingthwaighte, J.B.

    1988-03-01

    The extraction of serotonin from the blood during transorgan passage through the heart was studied using Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts. Outflow dilution curves of /sup 131/I- or /sup 125/I-labeled albumin, (/sup 14/C)sucrose, and (3H)serotonin injected simultaneously into the inflow were fitted with an axially distributed blood-tissue exchange model to examine the extraction process. The model fits of the albumin and sucrose outflow dilution curves were used to define flow heterogeneity, intravascular dispersion, capillary permeability, and the volume of the interstitial space, which reduced the degrees of freedom in fitting the model to the serotonin curves. Serotonin extractions, measured against albumin, during single transcapillary passage, ranged from 24 to 64%. The ratio of the capillary permeability-surface area products for serotonin and sucrose, based on the maximum instantaneous extraction, was 1.37 +/- 0.2 (n = 18), very close to the predicted value of 1.39, the ratio of free diffusion coefficients calculated from the molecular weights. This result shows that the observed uptake of serotonin can be accounted for solely on the basis of diffusion between endothelial cells into the interstitial space. Thus it appears that the permeability of the luminal surface of the endothelial cell is negligible in comparison to diffusion through the clefts between endothelial cells. In 18 sets of dilution curves, with and without receptor and transport blockers or competitors (ketanserin, desipramine, imipramine, serotonin), the extractions and estimates of the capillary permeability-surface area product were not reduced, nor were the volumes of distribution. The apparent absence of transporters and receptors in rabbit myocardial capillary endothelium contrasts with their known abundance in the pulmonary vasculature.

  16. Rapid In Situ Hybridization using Oligonucleotide Probes on Paraformaldehyde-prefixed Brain of Rats with Serotonin Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shokry, Ibrahim M; Callanan, John J; Sousa, John; Tao, Rui

    2015-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; ecstasy) toxicity may cause region-specific changes in serotonergic mRNA expression due to acute serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) syndrome. This hypothesis can be tested using in situ hybridization to detect the serotonin 5-HT2A receptor gene htr2a. In the past, such procedures, utilizing radioactive riboprobe, were difficult because of the complicated workflow that needs several days to perform and the added difficulty that the technique required the use of fresh frozen tissues maintained in an RNase-free environment. Recently, the development of short oligonucleotide probes has simplified in situ hybridization procedures and allowed the use of paraformaldehyde-prefixed brain sections, which are more widely available in laboratories. Here, we describe a detailed protocol using non-radioactive oligonucleotide probes on the prefixed brain tissues. Hybridization probes used for this study include dapB (a bacterial gene coding for dihydrodipicolinate reductase), ppiB (a housekeeping gene coding for peptidylprolyl isomerase B), and htr2a (a serotonin gene coding for 5-HT2A receptors). This method is relatively simply, cheap, reproducible and requires less than two days to complete. PMID:26437182

  17. Serotonin-induced platelet aggregation predicts the antihypertensive response to serotonin receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Gleerup, G; Persson, B; Hedner, T; Winther, K

    1993-01-01

    The 5-HT2-receptor antagonist ketanserin (20-40 mg b.i.d.) was administered to 62 patients of both sexes with uncomplicated primary hypertension. After 4 weeks of treatment about 50% of the patients had reached the target diastolic blood pressure of 90 mm Hg or below. Interindividual variability was large. In a retrospective analysis the variability could not be explained by sex or the dose of ketanserin. There was a weak association between age and systolic blood pressure response (r = 0.24; P = 0.06), which could be entirely accounted for by the higher base line blood pressure in the elderly patients. In one group of patients (n = 12), the ex vivo aggregation to serotonin (10(-6) M) was studied during treatment with placebo and ketanserin. Ketanserin completely inhibited 5-HT-induced aggregation in all patients. There was a close correlation between the area under the 5-HT-induced platelet aggregation curve during placebo and the subsequent reduction in diastolic blood pressure after 4 weeks of treatment with ketanserin. The present data suggest that the blood pressure response to ketanserin can be predicted from the ex vivo sensitivity of platelets to serotonin. By implication, they also support a role for serotonergic mechanisms in hypertension.

  18. Fluoxetine-induced alterations in human platelet serotonin transporter expression: serotonin transporter polymorphism effects

    PubMed Central

    Little, Karley Y.; Zhang, Lian; Cook, Edwin

    2006-01-01

    Objective Long-term antidepressant drug exposure may regulate its target molecule — the serotonin transporter (SERT). This effect could be related to an individual's genotype for an SERT promoter polymorphism (human serotonin transporter coding [5-HTTLPR]). We aimed to determine the effects of fluoxetine exposure on human platelet SERT levels. Method We harvested platelet samples from 21 healthy control subjects. The platelets were maintained alive ex vivo for 24 hours while being treated with 0.1 μM fluoxetine or vehicle. The effects on SERT immunoreactivity (IR) were then compared. Each individual's SERT promoter genotype was also determined to evaluate whether fluoxetine effects on SERT were related to genotype. Results Fluoxetine exposure replicably altered SERT IR within individuals. Both the magnitude and the direction of effect were related to a person's SERT genotype. People who were homozygous for the short gene (SS) displayed decreased SERT IR, whereas those who were homozygous for the long gene (LL) demonstrated increased SERT IR. A mechanistic experiment suggested that some individuals with the LL genotype might experience increased conversion of complexed SERT to primary SERT during treatment. Conclusions These preliminary results suggest that antidepressant effects after longer-term use may include changes in SERT expression levels and that the type and degree of effect may be related to the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism. PMID:16951736

  19. Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 is an Intermediate Modulator of Serotonin Neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Polter, Abigail M.; Li, Xiaohua

    2011-01-01

    Serotonin is a neurotransmitter with broad functions in brain development, neuronal activity, and behaviors; and serotonin is the prominent drug target in several major neuropsychiatric diseases. The multiple actions of serotonin are mediated by diverse serotonin receptor subtypes and associated signaling pathways. However, the key signaling components that mediate specific function of serotonin neurotransmission have not been fully identified. This review will provide evidence from biochemical, pharmacological, and animal behavioral studies showing that serotonin regulates the activation states of brain glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) via type 1 and type 2 serotonin receptors. In return, GSK3 directly interacts with serotonin receptors in a highly selective manner, with a prominent effect on modulating serotonin 1B receptor activity. Therefore, GSK3 acts as an intermediate modulator in the serotonin neurotransmission system, and balanced GSK3 activity is essential for serotonin-regulated brain function and behaviors. Particularly important, several classes of serotonin-modulating drugs, such as antidepressants and atypical antipsychotics, regulate GSK3 by inhibiting its activity in brain, which reinforces the importance of GSK3 as a potential therapeutic target in neuropsychiatric diseases associated with abnormal serotonin function. PMID:22028682

  20. Increased brain serotonin turnover in panic disorder patients in the absence of a panic attack: reduction by a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Esler, Murray; Lambert, Elisabeth; Alvarenga, Marlies; Socratous, Florentia; Richards, Jeff; Barton, David; Pier, Ciaran; Brenchley, Celia; Dawood, Tye; Hastings, Jacqueline; Guo, Ling; Haikerwal, Deepak; Kaye, David; Jennings, Garry; Kalff, Victor; Kelly, Michael; Wiesner, Glen; Lambert, Gavin

    2007-08-01

    Since the brain neurotransmitter changes characterising panic disorder remain uncertain, we quantified brain noradrenaline and serotonin turnover in patients with panic disorder, in the absence of a panic attack. Thirty-four untreated patients with panic disorder and 24 matched healthy volunteers were studied. A novel method utilising internal jugular venous sampling, with thermodilution measurement of jugular blood flow, was used to directly quantify brain monoamine turnover, by measuring the overflow of noradrenaline and serotonin metabolites from the brain. Radiographic depiction of brain venous sinuses allowed differential venous sampling from cortical and subcortical regions. The relation of brain serotonin turnover to serotonin transporter genotype and panic disorder severity were evaluated, and the influence of an SSRI drug, citalopram, on serotonin turnover investigated. Brain noradrenaline turnover in panic disorder patients was similar to that in healthy subjects. In contrast, brain serotonin turnover, estimated from jugular venous overflow of the metabolite, 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid, was increased approximately 4-fold in subcortical brain regions and in the cerebral cortex (P < 0.01). Serotonin turnover was highest in patients with the most severe disease, was unrelated to serotonin transporter genotype, and was reduced by citalopram (P < 0.01). Normal brain noradrenaline turnover in panic disorder patients argues against primary importance of the locus coeruleus in this condition. The marked increase in serotonin turnover, in the absence of a panic attack, possibly represents an important underlying neurotransmitter substrate for the disorder, although this point remains uncertain. Support for this interpretation comes from the direct relationship which existed between serotonin turnover and illness severity, and the finding that SSRI administration reduced serotonin turnover. Serotonin transporter genotyping suggested that increased whole brain

  1. Genetic linkage study of bipolar disorder and the serotonin transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsoe, J.R.; Morison, M.; Mroczkowski-Parker, Z.; Bergesch, P.; Rapaport, M.H.; Mirow, A.L.

    1996-04-09

    The serotonin transporter (HTT) is an important candidate gene for the genetic transmission of bipolar disorder. It is the site of action of many antidepressants, and plays a key role in the regulation of serotonin neurotransmission. Many studies of affectively ill patients have found abnormalities in serotonin metabolism, and dysregulation of the transporter itself. The human serotonin transporter has been recently cloned and mapped to chromosome 17. We have identified a PstI RFLP at the HTT locus, and here report our examination of this polymorphism for possible linkage to bipolar disorder. Eighteen families were examined from three populations: the Old Order Amish, Iceland, and the general North American population. In addition to HTT, three other microsatellite markers were examined, which span an interval known to contain HTT. Linkage analyses were conducted under both dominant and recessive models, as well as both narrow (bipolar only) and broad (bipolar + recurrent unipolar) diagnostic models. Linkage could be excluded to HTT under all models examined. Linkage to the interval spanned by the microsatellites was similarly excluded under the dominant models. In two individual families, maximum lod scores of 1.02 and 0.84 were obtained at D17S798 and HTT, respectively. However, these data overall do not support the presence of a susceptibility locus for bipolar disorder near the serotonin transporter. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  2. A Theoretical Study of the Conformational Landscape of Serotonin

    SciTech Connect

    Mourik, Van Tonja; Emson, Laura E.

    2002-10-25

    The conformational landscape of neutral serotonin has been investigated by several theoretical methods. The potential energy surface was scanned by systematically varying the three dihedral angles that determine the conformation of the alkyl side chain. In addition, the two possible conformations of the phenol hydroxyl group (anti and syn with respect to the indole NH) were considered. The OH-anti stationary points located with SCF/6-31G* have been re-optimized with B3LYP/6-31+G*, which resulted in twelve true minima. Eleven of these have a corresponding OH-syn conformer that is 1-4 kJ/mol higher in energy. IR vibrational spectra of all twenty-three serotonin conformers, computed at the B3LYP/6-31+G* level f theory, are presented. The initial scan of the serotonin potential energy surface has been repeated with several computationally cheaper methods, to assess their reliability for locating the correct serotonin conformers. It is found that the semi-empirical methods AM1 and PM3 do no t yield sufficiently accurate results, due to their inability to account for subtle intramolecular interactions within the serotonin molecule. On the other hand, SCF in combination with the 3-21G* basis set is ascertained to be a good alternative to SCF/6-31G* for performing the initial scan of the potential energy surface of flexible molecules.

  3. Serotonin deficiency exacerbates acetaminophen-induced liver toxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingyao; Song, Sidong; Pang, Qing; Zhang, Ruiyao; Zhou, Lei; Liu, Sushun; Meng, Fandi; Wu, Qifei; Liu, Chang

    2015-01-29

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is a major cause of acute liver failure. Peripheral 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin, 5-HT) is a cytoprotective neurotransmitter which is also involved in the hepatic physiological and pathological process. This study seeks to investigate the mechanisms involved in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, as well as the role of 5-HT in the liver's response to APAP toxicity. We induced APAP hepatotoxicity in mice either sufficient of serotonin (wild-type mice and TPH1-/- plus 5- Hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP)) or lacking peripheral serotonin (Tph1-/- and wild-type mice plus p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA)). Mice with sufficient 5-HT exposed to acetaminophen have a significantly lower mortality rate and a better outcome compared with mice deficient of 5-HT. This difference is at least partially attributable to a decreased level of inflammation, oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, Glutathione (GSH) depletion, peroxynitrite formation, hepatocyte apoptosis, elevated hepatocyte proliferation, activation of 5-HT2B receptor, less activated c-Jun NH₂-terminal kinase (JNK) and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α in the mice sufficient of 5-HT versus mice deficient of 5-HT. We thus propose a physiological function of serotonin that serotonin could ameliorate APAP-induced liver injury mainly through inhibiting hepatocyte apoptosis ER stress and promoting liver regeneration.

  4. Behavioral, hormonal and central serotonin modulating effects of injected leptin.

    PubMed

    Haleem, Darakhshan J; Haque, Zeba; Inam, Qurrat-ul-Aen; Ikram, Huma; Haleem, Muhammad Abdul

    2015-12-01

    Leptin is viewed as an important target for developing novel therapeutics for obesity, depression/anxiety and cognitive dysfunctions. The present study therefore concerns behavioral, hormonal and central serotonin modulating effects of systemically injected leptin. Pharmacological doses (100 and 500 μg/kg) of leptin injected systemically decreased 24h cumulative food intake and body weight in freely feeding rats and improved acquisition and retention of memory in Morris water maze test. Potential anxiety reducing, hormonal and serotonin modulating effects of the peptide hormone were determined in a separate experiment. Animals injected with 100 or 500 μg/kg leptin were tested for anxiety in an elevated plus maze test 1h later. A significant increase in the number of entries and time passed in open arm of the elevated plus maze in leptin injected animals suggested pronounced anxiety reducing effect. Moreover, circulating levels of leptin correlated significantly with anxiety reducing effects of the peptide hormone. Serum serotonin increased and ghrelin decreased in leptin injected animals and correlated, positively and negatively respectively, with circulating leptin. Corticosterone increased at low dose and levels were normal at higher dose. Serotonin metabolism in the hypothalamus and hippocampus decreased only at higher dose of leptin. The results support a role of leptin in the treatment of obesity, anxiety and cognitive dysfunctions. It is suggested that hormonal and serotonin modulating effects of leptin can alter treatment efficacy in particularly comorbid conditions.

  5. A case study of delayed serotonin syndrome: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Shannon; Ahned, Nasiva; Varas, Grace M

    2009-01-01

    Serotonin syndrome is a potentially life-threatening condition that results from excessive serotonin agonism of the central and peripheral nervous system. Though serotonin syndrome is most often associated with ingestion of more than one serotonergic drug, many other mechanisms have been associated with serotonergic excess. This case study presents a 79-year-old African-American female, an assisted living resident, who presented to the emergency department with altered mental status, acute onset of "chills," reduced appetite, urinary incontinence, and an elevated temperature of 103 degrees F (39.4 degrees C). Extensive initial diagnostic findings were negative for urinary tract infection, systemic infection, pneumonia, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Despite aggressive medical management, including intravenous hydration and broad-spectrum antibiotics, the patient continued to become more confused, agitated, and despondent over the subsequent 24 hours. The initial working diagnosis did not include serotonin syndrome, but once other studies did not reveal an etiology of the symptoms and the patient continued to be delirious, paroxetine was discontinued and all symptoms resolved within 48 hours of last dose. Voluntary reporting, postmarketing surveillance, and implementation of well-designed randomized clinical trials are all mechanisms to gather data on serotonin syndrome. These practices will provide future researchers with needed information to solidify diagnostic criteria, educate health care professionals, and safeguard the public against this preventable and potentially lethal drug-drug interaction. PMID:19275460

  6. Interactions of melatonin and serotonin with lactoperoxidase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Şişecioğlu, Melda; Çankaya, Murat; Gülçin, İlhami; Özdemir, Hasan

    2010-12-01

    Melatonin is the chief secretory product of the pineal gland and is synthesized enzymatically from serotonin. These indoleamine derivatives play an important role in the prevention of oxidative damage. Lactoperoxidase (LPO; EC 1.11.1.7) was purified from bovine milk with three purification steps: Amberlite CG-50 resin, CM-Sephadex C-50 ion-exchange, and Sephadex G-100 gel filtration chromatography, respectively. LPO was purified with a yield of 21.6%, a specific activity of 34.0 EU/mg protein, and 14.7-fold purification. To determine the enzyme purity, SDS-PAGE was performed and a single band was observed. The R(z) (A(412)/A(280)) value for LPO was 0.9. The effect of melatonin and serotonin on lactoperoxidase was determined using ABTS as chromogenic substrate. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) values for melatonin and serotonin were found to be 1.46 and 1.29 μM, respectively. Also, the inhibition constants (K(i)) for melatonin and serotonin were 0.82 ± 0.28 and 0.26 ± 0.04 μM, respectively. Both melatonin and serotonin were found to be competitive inhibitors.

  7. Pharmacometabolomics reveals that serotonin is implicated in aspirin response variability.

    PubMed

    Ellero-Simatos, S; Lewis, J P; Georgiades, A; Yerges-Armstrong, L M; Beitelshees, A L; Horenstein, R B; Dane, A; Harms, A C; Ramaker, R; Vreeken, R J; Perry, C G; Zhu, H; Sànchez, C L; Kuhn, C; Ortel, T L; Shuldiner, A R; Hankemeier, T; Kaddurah-Daouk, R

    2014-01-01

    While aspirin is generally effective for prevention of cardiovascular disease, considerable variation in drug response exists, resulting in some individuals displaying high on-treatment platelet reactivity. We used pharmacometabolomics to define pathways implicated in variation of response to treatment. We profiled serum samples from healthy subjects pre- and postaspirin (14 days, 81 mg/day) using mass spectrometry. We established a strong signature of aspirin exposure independent of response (15/34 metabolites changed). In our discovery (N = 80) and replication (N = 125) cohorts, higher serotonin levels pre- and postaspirin correlated with high, postaspirin, collagen-induced platelet aggregation. In a third cohort, platelets from subjects with the highest levels of serotonin preaspirin retained higher reactivity after incubation with aspirin than platelets from subjects with the lowest serotonin levels preaspirin (72 ± 8 vs. 61 ± 11%, P = 0.02, N = 20). Finally, ex vivo, serotonin strongly increased platelet reactivity after platelet incubation with aspirin (+20%, P = 4.9 × 10(-4), N = 12). These results suggest that serotonin is implicated in aspirin response variability. PMID:25029353

  8. Structure and Function of Serotonin G protein Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    McCorvy, John D.; Roth, Bryan L.

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin receptors are prevalent throughout the nervous system and the periphery, and remain one of the most lucrative and promising drug discovery targets for disorders ranging from migraine headaches to neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression. There are 14 distinct serotonin receptors, of which 13 are G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are targets for approximately 40% of the approved medicines. Recent crystallographic and biochemical evidence has provided a converging understanding of the basic structure and functional mechanics of GPCR activation. Currently, two GPCR crystal structures exist for the serotonin family, the 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B receptor, with the antimigraine and valvulopathic drug ergotamine bound. The first serotonin crystal structures not only provide the first evidence of serotonin receptor topography but also provide mechanistic explanations into functional selectivity or biased agonism. This review will detail the findings of these crystal structures from a molecular and mutagenesis perspective for driving rational drug design for novel therapeutics incorporating biased signaling. PMID:25601315

  9. Aggravation of viral hepatitis by platelet-derived serotonin.

    PubMed

    Lang, Philipp A; Contaldo, Claudio; Georgiev, Panco; El-Badry, Ashraf Mohammad; Recher, Mike; Kurrer, Michael; Cervantes-Barragan, Luisa; Ludewig, Burkhard; Calzascia, Thomas; Bolinger, Beatrice; Merkler, Doron; Odermatt, Bernhard; Bader, Michael; Graf, Rolf; Clavien, Pierre-Alain; Hegazy, Ahmed N; Löhning, Max; Harris, Nicola L; Ohashi, Pamela S; Hengartner, Hans; Zinkernagel, Rolf M; Lang, Karl S

    2008-07-01

    More than 500 million people worldwide are persistently infected with hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus. Although both viruses are poorly cytopathic, persistence of either virus carries a risk of chronic liver inflammation, potentially resulting in liver steatosis, liver cirrhosis, end-stage liver failure or hepatocellular carcinoma. Virus-specific T cells are a major determinant of the outcome of hepatitis, as they contribute to the early control of chronic hepatitis viruses, but they also mediate immunopathology during persistent virus infection. We have analyzed the role of platelet-derived vasoactive serotonin during virus-induced CD8(+) T cell-dependent immunopathological hepatitis in mice infected with the noncytopathic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. After virus infection, platelets were recruited to the liver, and their activation correlated with severely reduced sinusoidal microcirculation, delayed virus elimination and increased immunopathological liver cell damage. Lack of platelet-derived serotonin in serotonin-deficient mice normalized hepatic microcirculatory dysfunction, accelerated virus clearance in the liver and reduced CD8(+) T cell-dependent liver cell damage. In keeping with these observations, serotonin treatment of infected mice delayed entry of activated CD8(+) T cells into the liver, delayed virus control and aggravated immunopathological hepatitis. Thus, vasoactive serotonin supports virus persistence in the liver and aggravates virus-induced immunopathology.

  10. Serotonin autoreceptor function and antidepressant drug action.

    PubMed

    Hjorth, S; Bengtsson, H J; Kullberg, A; Carlzon, D; Peilot, H; Auerbach, S B

    2000-06-01

    This article briefly summarizes, within the context of a brief review of the relevant literature, the outcome of our recent rat microdialysis studies on (1) the relative importance of serotonin (5-HT)1A versus 5-HT1B autoreceptors in the mechanism of action of 5-HT reuptake blocking agents, including putative regional differences in this regard, and (2) autoreceptor responsiveness following chronic SSRI administration. First, our data are consistent with the primacy of 5-HT1A autoreceptors in restraining the elevation of 5-HT levels induced by SSRIs, whereas nerve terminal 5-HT1B autoreceptors appear to have an accessory role in this regard. Second, there is an important interplay between cell body and nerve terminal 5-HT autoreceptors, and recent findings suggest that this interplay may potentially be exploited to obtain regionally preferential effects on 5-HT neurotransmission in the central nervous system, even upon systemic drug administration. In particular, emerging data suggest that somatodendritic 5-HT1A autoreceptor- and nerve terminal 5-HT1B autoreceptor-mediated feedback may be relatively more important in the control of 5-HT output in dorsal raphe-frontal cortex and median raphe-dorsal hippocampus systems, respectively. Third, 5-HT autoreceptors evidently retain the capability to limit the 5-HT transmission-promoting effect of SSRIs after chronic treatment. Thus, although the responsiveness of these sites is probably somewhat reduced, residual autoreceptor capacity still remains an effective restraint on large increases in extracellular 5-HT, even after prolonged treatment. If a further increase in extracellular 5-HT is crucial to the remission of depression in patients responding only partially to prolonged administration of antidepressants, then sustained adjunctive treatment with autoreceptor-blocking drugs may consequently prove useful in the long term.

  11. Serotonin in the regulation of brain microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Z; Bonvento, G; Lacombe, P; Hamel, E

    1996-11-01

    Manipulation of brainstem serotonin (5-HT) raphe neurons induces significant alterations in local cerebral metabolism and perfusion. The vascular consequences of intracerebrally released 5-HT point to a major vasoconstrictor role, resulting in cerebral blood flow (CBF) decreases in several brain regions such as the neocortex. However, vasodilatations, as well as changes in blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, which are blocked by 5-HT receptor antagonists also can be observed. A lack of relationship between the changes in flow and metabolism indicates uncoupling between the two variables and is suggestive of a direct neurogenic control by brain intrinsic 5-HT neurons on the microvascular bed. In line with these functional data are the close associations that exist between 5-HT neurons and the microarterioles, capillaries and perivascular astrocytes of various regions but more intimately and/or more frequently so in those where CBF is altered significantly following manipulation of 5-HT neurons. The ability of the microvascular bed to respond directly to intracerebrally released 5-HT is underscored by the expression of distinct 5-HT receptors in the various cellular compartments of the microvascular bed. Thus, it appears that while some 5-HT-mediated microvascular functions involve directly the blood vessel wall, others would be relayed through the perivascular astrocyte. The strategic localization of perivascular astrocytes and the different 5-HT receptors that they harbor strongly emphasize their putative pivotal role in transmitting information between 5-HT neurons and microvessels. It is concluded that the cerebral circulation has full capacity to adequately and locally adapt brain perfusion to changes in central 5-HT neurotransmission either directly or indirectly via the neuronal-astrocytic-vascular tripartite functional unit. Dysfunctions in these neurovascular interactions might result in perfusion deficits and might be involved in specific pathological

  12. Serotonin regulation of the human stress response.

    PubMed

    Hood, Sean D; Hince, Dana A; Robinson, Hayley; Cirillo, Melita; Christmas, David; Kaye, Joey M

    2006-10-01

    Acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) is a technique that has been used to evaluate the effects on humans of acutely reducing serotonin neurotransmission. We have developed a model using a single breath of 35% CO(2) that activates the hormonal axis and produces autonomic and behavioural arousal, thus modelling a stress response. This study combines ATD and single breath 35% CO(2) inhalation to study stress responses in volunteers. A randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial involving 14 healthy adult volunteers aged between 18 and 65 years was undertaken. Subjects underwent double-blind tryptophan depletion over 2 days and were then crossed over 1 week later. During each study day, at the time of peak depletion, participants were single blinded to receive a single breath of 35% CO(2) or air. This was followed 40 min later by the other gas. Psychological outcomes were assessed with the Spielberger State Anxiety Inventory (SSAI), Visual Analogue Scales (VAS), Panic Inventory (PI), Panic and Agoraphobia Scale (PSI) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Physiological outcome was measured by serial plasma cortisol, prolactin and tryptophan levels, pulse and blood pressure. Tryptophan depletion did not exacerbate 35% CO(2) inhalation effects on anxiety symptoms. Single breath CO(2) robustly increased plasma cortisol levels in comparison to an air inhalation; this was less certain for prolactin levels. ATD influenced the HPA axis (associated with higher cortisol levels), apparently independent of CO(2) or air inhalation stressors. ATD and 35% CO(2) inhalation both induced a pressor response and bradycardia in these normal volunteers. Thirty-five percent CO(2) inhalation and ATD independently activate the human stress response, but do not appear to produce synergistic effects when combined, at least for the conditions produced in this study.

  13. Serotonin-immunoreactive neural system and contractile system in the hydroid Cladonema (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa).

    PubMed

    Mayorova, T D; Kosevich, I A

    2013-12-01

    Serotonin is a widespread neurotransmitter which is present in almost all animal phyla including lower metazoans such as Cnidaria. Serotonin detected in the polyps of several cnidarian species participates in the functioning of a neural system. It was suggested that serotonin coordinates polyp behavior. For example, serotonin may be involved in muscle contraction and/or cnidocyte discharge. However, the role of serotonin in cnidarians is not revealed completely yet. The aim of this study was to investigate the neural system of Cladonema radiatum polyps. We detected the net of serotonin-positive processes within the whole hydranth body using anti-serotonin antibodies. The hypostome and tentacles had denser neural net in comparison with the gastric region. Electron microscopy revealed muscle processes throughout the hydranth body. Neural processes with specific vesicles and neurotubules in their cytoplasm were also shown at an ultrastructural level. This work demonstrates the structure of serotonin-positive neural system and smooth muscle layer in C. radiatum hydranths.

  14. Serotonin and Early Cognitive Development: Variation in the Tryptophan Hydroxylase 2 Gene Is Associated with Visual Attention in 7-Month-Old Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leppanen, Jukka M.; Peltola, Mikko J.; Puura, Kaija; Mantymaa, Mirjami; Mononen, Nina; Lehtimaki, Terho

    2011-01-01

    Background: Allelic variation in the promoter region of a gene that encodes tryptophan hydroxylase isoform 2 (TPH2), a rate-limiting enzyme of serotonin synthesis in the central nervous system, has been associated with variations in cognitive function and vulnerability to affective spectrum disorders. Little is known about the effects of this gene…

  15. Sex Differences in Serotonin 1 Receptor Binding in Rat Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischette, Christine T.; Biegon, Anat; McEwen, Bruce S.

    1983-10-01

    Male and female rats exhibit sex differences in binding by serotonin 1 receptors in discrete areas of the brain, some of which have been implicated in the control of ovulation and of gonadotropin release. The sex-specific changes in binding, which occur in response to the same hormonal (estrogenic) stimulus, are due to changes in the number of binding sites. Castration alone also affects the number of binding sites in certain areas. The results lead to the conclusion that peripheral hormones modulate binding by serotonin 1 receptors. The status of the serotonin receptor system may affect the reproductive capacity of an organism and may be related to sex-linked emotional disturbances in humans.

  16. Neuronal serotonin in the regulation of maternal behavior in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Angoa-Pérez, Mariana; Kuhn, Donald M.

    2016-01-01

    Maternal behavior is probably the most important pro-social behavior in female mammals, ensuring both the development and survival of her offspring. Signals driving maternal behaviors are complex and involve several brain areas, most of which are innervated by serotonin. Serotonin transmission influences maternal processes indirectly through release of maternally-relevant hormones such as prolactin, oxytocin and vasopressin, but it can also have more direct effects on survival and the growth rate of offspring, as well as on maternal care, aggression and pup killing. This article aims to examine the basics of the components of maternal behaviors in rodents and the neural systems underpinning these maternal responses with special emphasis on the role of neural serotonin in the regulation of these behaviors. PMID:27148594

  17. Serotonin, noradrenaline, dopamine metabolites in transcendental meditation-technique.

    PubMed

    Bujatti, M; Riederer, P

    1976-01-01

    The highly significant increase of 5-HIAA (5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid) in Transcendental Meditation technique suggests systemic serotonin as "rest and fulfillment hormone" of deactivation-relaxation. Furthermore 5-HT (5-hydroxytryptamine, serotonin) is considered to be the EC-cell (enterochromaffine-cell) hormone requested by Fujita and Kobayashi and its role for EEG synchronisation via area postrema chemoreceptor as anti arousal agent is being discussed. The significant decrease of the catecholamine metabolite VMA (vanillic-mandelic acid) in meditators, that is associated with a reciprocal increase of 5-HIAA supports as a feedback necessity the "rest and fulfillment response" versus "fight and flight". As the adreno medullary tissue serves for hormonal reinforcement of orthosympathetic activity, the Enterochromaffine Cell System (having taken the form of distinct organs in some species as octopus and discoglossus) is suggested to serve via serotonin for humoral reinforcement of parasympathetic activity in deep relaxation.

  18. Soy and social stress affect serotonin neurotransmission in primates.

    PubMed

    Shively, C A; Mirkes, S J; Lu, N Z; Henderson, J A; Bethea, C L

    2003-01-01

    Stress and sex steroidal milieu can each influence mood in women. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of long-term conjugated equine estrogen (CEE), soy phytoestrogen (SPE), and social subordination stress on dorsal raphe serotonin neurotransmission of ovariectomized cynomolgus monkeys. Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) and serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) protein content were determined, and the in vitro degradation of macaque SERT protein was examined in the presence and absence of protease inhibitors, serotonin (5-HT), and citalopram. Like CEE, SPE increased TPH protein levels. Social subordinates had markedly lower TPH protein levels than dominants regardless of hormone replacement. Therefore, these two variables had independent and additive effects. CEE and SPE increased SERT, and social status had no effect. Thus, the hormone-induced increase in SERT was accompanied by increased 5-HT synthesis and neuronal firing, which appears biologically reasonable as 5-HT prevented SERT degradation in vitro. PMID:12746737

  19. [Serotonin dysfunctions in the background of the seven deadly sins].

    PubMed

    Janka, Zoltán

    2003-11-20

    The symbolic characters of the Seven Deadly Sins can be traced from time to time in the cultural history of human mankind, being directly specified in certain artistic products. Such are, among others, the painting entitled "The Seven Deadly Sins and the Four Lost Things" by Hieronymus Bosch and the poems Divina Commedia and The Foerie Queene by Dante Alighieri and Edmund Spenser, respectively. However, there are several paragraphs referring to these behaviours of the Seven Deadly Sins in the Bible and in the dramas of William Shakespeare. The objective of the present review is to propose that dysfunctions in the central serotonergic system might be involved in the neurobiology of these 'sinful' behaviour patterns. Evidences indicate that behaviour traits such as Accidia (Sloth), Luxuria (Lust, Lechery), Superbia (Pride), Ira (Wrath, Anger), Invidia (Envy), Avaritia (Greed, Avarice), and Gula (Gluttony) can relate to the functional alterations of serotonin in the brain. Results of biochemical and molecular genetic (polymorphism) studies on the human serotonergic system (receptor, transporter, enzyme), findings of functional imaging techniques, effects of depletion (or supplementation) of the serotonin precursor tryptophan, data of challenge probe investigations directed to testing central serotonergic functions, alterations in the peripheral serotonin measures (platelet), and the changes in the CSF 5-hydroxy-indoleacetic acid content indicate such serotonergic involvement. Furthermore, results of animal experiments on behaviour change (aggressive, dominant or submissive, appetite, alcohol preference) attributed to serotonin status modification and the clinically evidenced therapeutic efficacy of pharmacological interventions, based on the modulation and perturbation of the serotonergic system (e.g. selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors), in treating the 'sinful' behaviour forms and analogous pathological states reaching the severity of psychiatric disorders

  20. [Serotonin dysfunctions in the background of the seven deadly sins].

    PubMed

    Janka, Zoltán

    2003-11-20

    The symbolic characters of the Seven Deadly Sins can be traced from time to time in the cultural history of human mankind, being directly specified in certain artistic products. Such are, among others, the painting entitled "The Seven Deadly Sins and the Four Lost Things" by Hieronymus Bosch and the poems Divina Commedia and The Foerie Queene by Dante Alighieri and Edmund Spenser, respectively. However, there are several paragraphs referring to these behaviours of the Seven Deadly Sins in the Bible and in the dramas of William Shakespeare. The objective of the present review is to propose that dysfunctions in the central serotonergic system might be involved in the neurobiology of these 'sinful' behaviour patterns. Evidences indicate that behaviour traits such as Accidia (Sloth), Luxuria (Lust, Lechery), Superbia (Pride), Ira (Wrath, Anger), Invidia (Envy), Avaritia (Greed, Avarice), and Gula (Gluttony) can relate to the functional alterations of serotonin in the brain. Results of biochemical and molecular genetic (polymorphism) studies on the human serotonergic system (receptor, transporter, enzyme), findings of functional imaging techniques, effects of depletion (or supplementation) of the serotonin precursor tryptophan, data of challenge probe investigations directed to testing central serotonergic functions, alterations in the peripheral serotonin measures (platelet), and the changes in the CSF 5-hydroxy-indoleacetic acid content indicate such serotonergic involvement. Furthermore, results of animal experiments on behaviour change (aggressive, dominant or submissive, appetite, alcohol preference) attributed to serotonin status modification and the clinically evidenced therapeutic efficacy of pharmacological interventions, based on the modulation and perturbation of the serotonergic system (e.g. selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors), in treating the 'sinful' behaviour forms and analogous pathological states reaching the severity of psychiatric disorders

  1. Striatal serotonin depletion facilitates rat egocentric learning via dopamine modulation.

    PubMed

    Anguiano-Rodríguez, Patricia B; Gaytán-Tocavén, Lorena; Olvera-Cortés, María Esther

    2007-02-01

    Egocentric spatial learning has been defined as the ability to navigate in an environment using only proprioceptive information, thereby performing a motor response based on one's own movement. This form of learning has been associated with the neural memory system, including the striatum body. Cerebral serotonin depletion induces better performance, both in tasks with strong egocentric components and in egocentric navigation in the Morris' maze. Based on this, we propose that the striatal serotonergic depletion must facilitate egocentric learning. Fifteen female Sprague Dawley rats weighing 250-350 g and maintained under standard conditions were chronically implanted with infusion cannulas for bilateral application of drugs into the striatum. The animals were evaluated for egocentric navigation using the Morris' maze, under different conditions: saline solution infusion, serotonin depletion by infusion of 5,7-Dihydroxytryptamine (25 microg of free base solved in 2.5 microl of ascorbic acid 1% in saline solution), infusion of mixed dopamine D(1) and D(2) receptor antagonists (0.5 microl/min during 5 min of mixed spiperone 20 microM and SCH23390 10 microM), or serotonin depletion and dopamine blockade simultaneously. Striatal serotonin depletion facilitated egocentric learning, which was demonstrated as shorter escape latencies and the display of a defined sequence of movements for reaching the platform. The facilitation was not observed under condition of simultaneous dopamine blockade. Striatal serotonin depletion produced a dopamine-dependent facilitation of egocentric learning. A role for serotonin in the inhibition of striatal-mediated learning strategies is proposed. PMID:17126827

  2. Protracted effects of chronic stress on serotonin dependent thermoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Reka; Northrop, Nicole A.; Yamamoto, Bryan K.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic stress is known to affect serotonin (5HT) neurotransmission in the brain and to alter body temperature. Body temperature is controlled in part, by the medial preoptic area of the hypothalamus (mPOA). To investigate the effect of chronic stress on 5HT and how it affects body temperature regulation, we examined whether exposure to a chronic unpredictable stress paradigm (CUS) produces long-term alterations in thermoregulatory function of the mPOA through decreased 5HT neurotransmission. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 21 days of CUS. Four days after last stress exposure, basal body temperature in the home cage and body temperature in a cold room maintained at 10°C were recorded. CUS rats had significantly higher subcutaneous basal body temperature at 13:00 h compared to unstressed (NoStress) rats. Whereas the NoStress rats were able to significantly elevate body temperature from basal levels at 30 and 60 min of exposure to the cold room, the CUS rats showed a hypothermic response to the cold. Treatment during CUS with metyrapone, a corticosterone synthesis inhibitor, blocked stress-induced decrease in body temperature in response to the cold challenge. CUS also decreased 5HT transporter protein immunoreactivity in the mPOA and 5HT2A/C agonist injection into the mPOA after CUS exposure caused stressed rats to exhibit a sensitized hyperthermic response to cold. These results indicate that CUS induced changes to the 5HTergic system alters mPOA function in thermoregulation. These findings help explain mechanisms underlying chronic stress induced disorders such as chronic fatigue syndrome wherein long lasting thermoregulatory deficits are observed. PMID:26414686

  3. Protracted effects of chronic stress on serotonin-dependent thermoregulation.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Reka; Northrop, Nicole A; Yamamoto, Bryan K

    2015-01-01

    Chronic stress is known to affect serotonin (5HT) neurotransmission in the brain and to alter body temperature. The body temperature is controlled in part, by the medial preoptic area (mPOA) of the hypothalamus. To investigate the effect of chronic stress on 5HT and how it affects body temperature regulation, we examined whether exposure to a chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) paradigm produces long-term alterations in thermoregulatory function of the mPOA through decreased 5HT neurotransmission. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 21 d of CUS. Four days after the last stress exposure, basal body temperature in the home cage and body temperature in a cold room maintained at 10 °C were recorded. The CUS rats had significantly higher subcutaneous basal body temperature at 13:00 h compared to unstressed (NoStress) rats. Whereas the NoStress rats were able to significantly elevate body temperature from basal levels at 30 and 60 min of exposure to the cold room, the CUS rats showed a hypothermic response to the cold. Treatment during CUS with metyrapone, a corticosterone synthesis inhibitor, blocked stress-induced decrease in body temperature in response to the cold challenge. CUS also decreased 5HT transporter protein immunoreactivity in the mPOA and 5HT2A/C agonist injection into the mPOA after CUS exposure caused stressed rats to exhibit a sensitized hyperthermic response to cold. These results indicate that the CUS induced changes to the 5HTergic system alter mPOA function in thermoregulation. These findings help us to explain the mechanisms underlying chronic stress-induced disorders such as chronic fatigue syndrome wherein long lasting thermoregulatory deficits are observed.

  4. Association of Serotonin Concentration to Behavior and IQ in Autistic Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuperman, Samuel; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The IQ and behavior patterns on the Autism Behavior Checklist (ABC) of 25 boys were compared to blood concentrations of platelet rich plasma (PRP) serotonin. Although no correlations were found between serotonin levels and IQ or ABC scales, four individual ABC items did correlate with serotonin concentrations. (Author/DB)

  5. Coaction of Stress and Serotonin Transporter Genotype in Predicting Aggression at the Transition to Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Christopher C.; Keenan-Miller, Danielle; Hammen, Constance; Lind, Penelope A.; Najman, Jake M.; Brennan, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite consistent evidence that serotonin functioning affects stress reactivity and vulnerability to aggression, research on serotonin gene-stress interactions (G x E) in the development of aggression remains limited. The present study investigated variation in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) as a moderator of the…

  6. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN WHOLE BLOOD SEROTONIN AND REPETITIVE BEHAVIORS IN AUTISM

    PubMed Central

    Kolevzon, Alexander; Newcorn, Jeffrey H.; Kryzak, Lauren; Chaplin, William; Watner, Dryden; Hollander, Eric; Smith, Christopher J.; Cook, Edwin H.; Silverman, Jeremy M.

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the relationship between whole blood serotonin level and behavioral symptoms in 78 subjects with autism. No significant associations were found between serotonin level and the primary behavioral outcome measures. However, a significant inverse relationship between serotonin level and self-injury was demonstrated. PMID:20044143

  7. 21 CFR 862.1390 - 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system... Test Systems § 862.1390 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system. (a) Identification. A 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system is a device intended to measure 5-hydroxyindole acetic...

  8. 21 CFR 862.1390 - 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system... Test Systems § 862.1390 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system. (a) Identification. A 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system is a device intended to measure 5-hydroxyindole acetic...

  9. 21 CFR 862.1390 - 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system... Test Systems § 862.1390 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system. (a) Identification. A 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system is a device intended to measure 5-hydroxyindole acetic...

  10. 21 CFR 862.1390 - 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system... Test Systems § 862.1390 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system. (a) Identification. A 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system is a device intended to measure 5-hydroxyindole acetic...

  11. Serotonin syndrome in patients with peripheral neuropathy: a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Sanjay; Gosai, Falgun; Brahmbhatt, Jit; Shah, Chintan

    2014-01-01

    According to the Hunter Serotonin Toxicity Criteria, the presence of either clonus or hyperreflexia is a must for making a diagnosis of serotonin syndrome (SS). We report five patients with SS who had areflexia because of associated polyneuropathy. None of the patients fulfilled the Hunter criteria for SS. However, all five patients had features suggestive of neuromuscular hyperactivity, autonomic hyperactivity and altered mental status and fulfilled the Sternbach criteria for SS. All patients responded to cyproheptadine within 5 days to 2 weeks duration. These cases highlight the limitations of the Hunter criteria for SS in patients with associated polyneuropathy.

  12. Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Risk of Abnormal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan; Sharma, Eesha

    2016-09-01

    Serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) increase the risk of abnormal bleeding by lowering platelet serotonin and hence the efficiency of platelet-driven hemostasis; by increasing gastric acidity and possibly gastric ulceration; and by other mechanisms. The upper gastrointestinal tract is the commonest site of SRI-related abnormal bleeding; bleeding at this location may be increased by concurrent nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy and by treatment with antiplatelet or anticoagulant drugs. Bleeding at this location may be reduced by concurrent administration of acid-suppressing drugs. PMID:27514297

  13. Serotonin, Amygdala and Fear: Assembling the Puzzle

    PubMed Central

    Bocchio, Marco; McHugh, Stephen B.; Bannerman, David M.; Sharp, Trevor; Capogna, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The fear circuitry orchestrates defense mechanisms in response to environmental threats. This circuitry is evolutionarily crucial for survival, but its dysregulation is thought to play a major role in the pathophysiology of psychiatric conditions in humans. The amygdala is a key player in the processing of fear. This brain area is prominently modulated by the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT). The 5-HT input to the amygdala has drawn particular interest because genetic and pharmacological alterations of the 5-HT transporter (5-HTT) affect amygdala activation in response to emotional stimuli. Nonetheless, the impact of 5-HT on fear processing remains poorly understood.The aim of this review is to elucidate the physiological role of 5-HT in fear learning via its action on the neuronal circuits of the amygdala. Since 5-HT release increases in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) during both fear memory acquisition and expression, we examine whether and how 5-HT neurons encode aversive stimuli and aversive cues. Next, we describe pharmacological and genetic alterations of 5-HT neurotransmission that, in both rodents and humans, lead to altered fear learning. To explore the mechanisms through which 5-HT could modulate conditioned fear, we focus on the rodent BLA. We propose that a circuit-based approach taking into account the localization of specific 5-HT receptors on neurochemically-defined neurons in the BLA may be essential to decipher the role of 5-HT in emotional behavior. In keeping with a 5-HT control of fear learning, we review electrophysiological data suggesting that 5-HT regulates synaptic plasticity, spike synchrony and theta oscillations in the BLA via actions on different subcellular compartments of principal neurons and distinct GABAergic interneuron populations. Finally, we discuss how recently developed optogenetic tools combined with electrophysiological recordings and behavior could progress the knowledge of the mechanisms underlying 5

  14. Serotonin's role in piglet mortality and thriftiness.

    PubMed

    Dennis, R L; McMunn, K A; Cheng, H W; Marchant-Forde, J N; Lay, D C

    2014-11-01

    Improving piglet survivability rates is of high priority for swine production as well as for piglet well-being. Dysfunction in the serotonin (5-HT) system has been associated with growth deficiencies, infant mortalities, or failure to thrive in human infants. The aim of this research was to determine if a relationship exists between infant mortality and failure to thrive (or unthriftiness), and umbilical 5-HT concentration in piglets. Umbilical blood was collected from a total of 60 piglets from 15 litters for analysis of 5-HT and tryptophan (Trp; the AA precursor to 5-HT) concentrations. Behavior was scan sampled for the first 2 days after birth. Brain samples were also taken at 8 h after birth from healthy and unthrifty piglets (n = 4/group). The raphe nucleus was dissected out and analyzed for 5-HT and dopamine concentrations as well as their major metabolites 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) and homovanillic acid (HVA), respectively. Data were analyzed by ANOVA. Piglets that died within 48 h of birth (n = 14) had significantly lower umbilical blood 5-HT concentrations at the time of their birth compared to their healthy counterparts (n = 46, P = 0.003). However, no difference in Trp was detected (P 0.38). Time spent under the heat lamp and sleeping were positively correlated with umbilical 5-HT levels (P = 0.004 and P = 0.02, respectively), while inactivity had a negative correlation with 5-HT levels (P = 0.04). In the raphe nucleus, the center for brain 5-HT biosynthesis, unthrifty piglets had a greater concentration of 5-HIAA (P = 0.02) and a trend for higher concentrations of 5-HT (P = 0.07) compared with healthy piglets. Dopamine levels did not differ between thrifty and unthrifty piglets (P = 0.45); however, its metabolite HVA tended to be greater in unthrifty piglets (P = 0.05). Our results show evidence of serotonergic dysfunction, at both the central and peripheral levels, accompanying early piglet mortalities. These data suggest a possible route for

  15. Neuroimmunomodulatory interactions of norepinephrine and serotonin.

    PubMed

    Walker, R F; Codd, E E

    1985-11-01

    Monoamine neuroleptics alter rodents responses to immunization, suggesting that norepinephrine (NE) and serotonin (5HT) are neuroimmunomodulatory in these animals. Although endocrine factors participate in their mechanism(s) of action, recent studies suggest that NE and 5HT also interact more directly with immunocompetent cells. This review provides an overview of evidence for a direct regulatory link between the nervous and immune systems and further speculates on the process by which NE and 5HT realize in part, their neuroimmunomodulatory potential. Anatomical data show that noradrenergic fibers of the sympathetic nervous system innervate lymphoid organs providing a channel of communication between neurons and lymphocytes. Presumably neural signals transmitted by NE are received by platelets that in turn, transduce them via 5HT into immunomodulatory messages. It is proposed that NE alters the capacity of platelets to sequester and/or catabolize 5HT, thus regulating its physiologically active pool in the plasma. Macrophages possess a 5HT uptake system, the kinetic properties of which make them sensitive to changes in plasma levels of the amine. Thus, through its ability to regulate plasma levels of 5HT, an immunosuppressive amine with access to macrophages, the nervous system can influence cells involved in antigen recognition. Support for this hypothetical immunomodulatory mechanism is gleaned from clinical and experimental studies. For example, individuals suffering emotional trauma are more susceptible than others to developing physical illness. It is of interest that platelet 5HT pharmacodynamics are often abnormal in patients with psychological disorders characterized by catecholamine deficits. Similar platelet changes have been achieved experimentally by treating rats with catecholamine antimetabolites. Additional support for the hypothesis derives from aging research since 'monoamine imbalance' and immune dysfunction are co-characteristics of senescence. In

  16. Serotonin, Amygdala and Fear: Assembling the Puzzle.

    PubMed

    Bocchio, Marco; McHugh, Stephen B; Bannerman, David M; Sharp, Trevor; Capogna, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The fear circuitry orchestrates defense mechanisms in response to environmental threats. This circuitry is evolutionarily crucial for survival, but its dysregulation is thought to play a major role in the pathophysiology of psychiatric conditions in humans. The amygdala is a key player in the processing of fear. This brain area is prominently modulated by the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT). The 5-HT input to the amygdala has drawn particular interest because genetic and pharmacological alterations of the 5-HT transporter (5-HTT) affect amygdala activation in response to emotional stimuli. Nonetheless, the impact of 5-HT on fear processing remains poorly understood.The aim of this review is to elucidate the physiological role of 5-HT in fear learning via its action on the neuronal circuits of the amygdala. Since 5-HT release increases in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) during both fear memory acquisition and expression, we examine whether and how 5-HT neurons encode aversive stimuli and aversive cues. Next, we describe pharmacological and genetic alterations of 5-HT neurotransmission that, in both rodents and humans, lead to altered fear learning. To explore the mechanisms through which 5-HT could modulate conditioned fear, we focus on the rodent BLA. We propose that a circuit-based approach taking into account the localization of specific 5-HT receptors on neurochemically-defined neurons in the BLA may be essential to decipher the role of 5-HT in emotional behavior. In keeping with a 5-HT control of fear learning, we review electrophysiological data suggesting that 5-HT regulates synaptic plasticity, spike synchrony and theta oscillations in the BLA via actions on different subcellular compartments of principal neurons and distinct GABAergic interneuron populations. Finally, we discuss how recently developed optogenetic tools combined with electrophysiological recordings and behavior could progress the knowledge of the mechanisms underlying 5

  17. Two allelic isoforms of the serotonin transporter from Schistosoma mansoni display electrogenic transport and high selectivity for serotonin

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Andréia C. K.; Sonders, Mark S.; Pereira-Junior, Olavo S.; Knight, Matty; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Rodrigues, Vanderlei; Amara, Susan G.; Mortensen, Ole V.

    2009-01-01

    The human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni is the primary cause of schistosomiasis, a debilitating disease that affects 200 million individuals in over 70 countries. The biogenic amine serotonin is essential for the survival of the parasite and serotonergic proteins are potential novel drug targets for treating schistosomiasis. Here we characterize two novel serotonin transporter gene transcripts, SmSERT-A and SmSERT-B, from Schistosoma mansoni. Southern blot analysis shows that the two mRNAs are the products of different alleles of a single SmSERT gene locus. The two SmSERT forms differ in three amino acid positions near the N-terminus of the protein. Both SmSERTs are expressed in the adult form and in the sporocyst form (infected snails) of the parasite, but are absent from all other stages of the parasite’s complex life cycle. Heterologous expression of the two cDNAs in mammalian cells resulted in saturable, sodium-dependent serotonin transport activity with an apparent affinity for serotonin comparable to that of the human serotonin transporter. Although the two SmSERTs are pharmacologically indistinguishable from each other, efflux experiments reveal notably higher substrate selectivity for serotonin compared with their mammalian counterparts. Several well-established substrates for human SERT including (±)MDMA, S-(+)amphetamine, RU 24969, and m-CPP are not transported by SmSERTs, underscoring the higher selectivity of the schistosomal isoforms. Voltage clamp recordings of SmSERT substrate-elicited currents confirm the substrate selectivity observed in efflux experiments and suggest that it may be possible to exploit the electrogenic nature of SmSERT to screen for compounds that target the parasite in vivo. PMID:19549517

  18. The serotonin transporter: Examination of the changes in transporter affinity induced by ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, C.J.

    1989-01-01

    The plasmalemmal serotonin transporter uses transmembrane gradients of Na{sup +}, Cl{sup {minus}} and K{sup +} to accumulate serotonin within blood platelets. Transport is competitively inhibited by the antidepressant imipramine. Like serotonin transport, imipramine binding requires Na{sup +}. Unlike serotonin, however, imipramine does not appear to be transported. To gain insight into the mechanism of serotonin transport the author have analyzed the influences of Na{sup +} and Cl{sup {minus}}, the two ions cotransported with serotonin, on both serotonin transport and the interaction of imipramine and other antidepressant drugs with the plasmalemmal serotonin transporter of human platelets. Additionally, the author have synthesized, purified and characterized the binding of 2-iodoimipramine to the serotonin transporter. Finally, the author have conducted a preliminary study of the inhibition of serotonin transport and imipramine binding produced by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. My results reveal many instances of positive heterotropic cooperativity in ligand binding to the serotonin transporter. Na{sup +} binding enhances the transporters affinity for imipramine and several other antidepressant drugs, and also increases the affinity for Cl{sup {minus}}. Cl{sup {minus}} enhances the transporters affinity for imipramine, as well as for Na{sup +}. At concentrations in the range of its K{sub M} for transport serotonin is a competitive inhibitor of imipramine binding. At much higher concentrations, however, serotonin also inhibits imipramines dissociation rate constant. This latter effect which is Na{sup +}-independent and species specific, is apparently produced by serotonin binding at a second, low affinity site on, or near, the transporter complex. Iodoimipramine competitively inhibit both ({sup 3}H)imipramine binding and ({sup 3}H)serotonin transport.

  19. Nutraceutical up-regulation of serotonin paradoxically induces compulsive behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The role of diet in either the etiology or treatment of complex mental disorder is highly controversial in psychiatry. However, physiological mechanisms by which diet can influence brain chemistry – particularly that of serotonin – are well established. Here we show that dietary up-regulation of br...

  20. The effect of ageing on human platelet sensitivity to serotonin.

    PubMed

    Gleerup, G; Winther, K

    1988-10-01

    Twelve healthy young volunteers (mean age 21, range 18-27 years) and 12 elderly people (mean age 77, range 72-86 years) were tested regarding platelet aggregation induced by adrenaline, ADP and serotonin. The serum levels of thromboxane B2 (TXB2) and serum 6-keto-PGF1 alpha and the plasma level of adrenaline and cyclic AMP (cAMP) were also measured. Platelet aggregation induced by adrenaline and ADP increased significantly in the elderly compared with the young group (P less than 0.05 and P less than 0.02, respectively). There was a substantial and highly significant increase in the response of platelets from elderly people to serotonin (P less than 0.01). No alteration was observed in the serum level of TXB2 or 6-keto-PGF1 alpha. Plasma adrenaline increased in the old group, but plasma cAMP was unaffected. As serotonin is known to amplify adrenaline- and ADR-induced platelet aggregation, the considerable increase in platelet sensitivity to serotonin could be an important factor in the increased adrenaline and ADP-induced platelet aggregability of elderly people.

  1. A role for serotonin in piglet preweaning mortality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improving piglet survivability rate is of high priority for swine production as well as for piglet well-being. Dysfunction in the serotonin system has been associated with growth deficiencies, infant mortality or failure to thrive (FTT) in human infants. The aim of this study was to examine the role...

  2. Platelet Serotonin, A Possible Marker for Familial Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piven, Joseph; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Platelet serotonin (5HT) levels of 5 autistic subjects (ages 16-37) who had siblings with either autism or pervasive developmental disorder were significantly higher than levels of 23 autistic subjects without affected siblings. Autistic subjects without affected siblings had 5HT levels significantly higher than 10 normal controls. Sex, age, and…

  3. Linezolid and Rasagiline – A culprit for serotonin syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hisham, Mohamed; Sivakumar, Mundalipalayam N.; Nandakumar, V.; Lakshmikanthcharan, S.

    2016-01-01

    A 65-year-old female patient was admitted to the hospital for cellulitis. She had a history of diabetes mellitus and parkinsonism on levodopa/carbidopa, rasagiline, ropinirole, trihexyphenidyl, amantadine, metformin, and glipizide. We present here a case of rare incidence of serotonin syndrome associated with linezolid and rasagiline. PMID:26997732

  4. Brief Report: Platelet-Poor Plasma Serotonin in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, George M.; Hertzig, Margaret E.; McBride, P. A.

    2012-01-01

    Possible explanations for the well-replicated platelet hyperserotonemia of autism include an alteration in the platelet's handling of serotonin (5-hydroxyserotonin, 5-HT) or an increased exposure of the platelet to 5-HT. Measurement of platelet-poor plasma (PPP) levels of 5-HT appears to provide the best available index of in vivo exposure of the…

  5. Perinatal vs Genetic Programming of Serotonin States Associated with Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Altieri, Stefanie C; Yang, Hongyan; O'Brien, Hannah J; Redwine, Hannah M; Senturk, Damla; Hensler, Julie G; Andrews, Anne M

    2015-01-01

    Large numbers of women undergo antidepressant treatment during pregnancy; however, long-term consequences for their offspring remain largely unknown. Rodents exposed to serotonin transporter (SERT)-inhibiting antidepressants during development show changes in adult emotion-like behavior. These changes have been equated with behavioral alterations arising from genetic reductions in SERT. Both models are highly relevant to humans yet they vary in their time frames of SERT disruption. We find that anxiety-related behavior and, importantly, underlying serotonin neurotransmission diverge between the two models. In mice, constitutive loss of SERT causes life-long increases in anxiety-related behavior and hyperserotonemia. Conversely, early exposure to the antidepressant escitalopram (ESC; Lexapro) results in decreased anxiety-related behavior beginning in adolescence, which is associated with adult serotonin system hypofunction in the ventral hippocampus. Adult behavioral changes resulting from early fluoxetine (Prozac) exposure were different from those of ESC and, although somewhat similar to SERT deficiency, were not associated with changes in hippocampal serotonin transmission in late adulthood. These findings reveal dissimilarities in adult behavior and neurotransmission arising from developmental exposure to different widely prescribed antidepressants that are not recapitulated by genetic SERT insufficiency. Moreover, they support a pivotal role for serotonergic modulation of anxiety-related behavior. PMID:25523893

  6. Perinatal vs genetic programming of serotonin states associated with anxiety.

    PubMed

    Altieri, Stefanie C; Yang, Hongyan; O'Brien, Hannah J; Redwine, Hannah M; Senturk, Damla; Hensler, Julie G; Andrews, Anne M

    2015-05-01

    Large numbers of women undergo antidepressant treatment during pregnancy; however, long-term consequences for their offspring remain largely unknown. Rodents exposed to serotonin transporter (SERT)-inhibiting antidepressants during development show changes in adult emotion-like behavior. These changes have been equated with behavioral alterations arising from genetic reductions in SERT. Both models are highly relevant to humans yet they vary in their time frames of SERT disruption. We find that anxiety-related behavior and, importantly, underlying serotonin neurotransmission diverge between the two models. In mice, constitutive loss of SERT causes life-long increases in anxiety-related behavior and hyperserotonemia. Conversely, early exposure to the antidepressant escitalopram (ESC; Lexapro) results in decreased anxiety-related behavior beginning in adolescence, which is associated with adult serotonin system hypofunction in the ventral hippocampus. Adult behavioral changes resulting from early fluoxetine (Prozac) exposure were different from those of ESC and, although somewhat similar to SERT deficiency, were not associated with changes in hippocampal serotonin transmission in late adulthood. These findings reveal dissimilarities in adult behavior and neurotransmission arising from developmental exposure to different widely prescribed antidepressants that are not recapitulated by genetic SERT insufficiency. Moreover, they support a pivotal role for serotonergic modulation of anxiety-related behavior.

  7. Role of the serotonin transporter gene in temperament and character.

    PubMed

    Hamer, D H; Greenberg, B D; Sabol, S Z; Murphy, D L

    1999-01-01

    The biosocial model postulates that personality is comprised of two broad domains: temperament, which is largely due to inherited variations in specific monoamine neurotransmitter systems; and character, which arises from socioculturally learned differences in values, goals, and self-concepts and is the strongest predictor of personality disorders. The model also proposes that serotonin modulates the temperament trait of harm avoidance. We analyzed the association of temperament and character traits with the 5-HTTLPR, an inherited variation that modulates serotonin transporter gene expression, in 634 volunteer subjects. Contrary to theory, the 5-HTTLPR was most strongly associated with the character traits of cooperativeness and self-directedness. Associations with the temperament traits of reward dependence and harm avoidance were weaker and could be attributable largely to cross-correlations with the character traits and demographic variables. Psychometric analysis indicated that the serotonin transporter influences two broad areas of personality, negative affect and social disaffiliation, that are consistent across inventories but are more concisely described by the 5-factor model of personality than by the biosocial model. These results suggest that there is no fundamental mechanistic distinction between character and temperament in regard to the serotonin transporter gene, and that a single neurotransmitter can influence multiple personality traits.

  8. The role of melatonin and serotonin in aging: update.

    PubMed

    Grad, B R; Rozencwaig, R

    1993-01-01

    It has been proposed that aging occurs because of a failure of the pineal gland to produce melatonin from serotonin each day beginning at sunset and throughout the night. This lack leads to a nighttime deficiency of melatonin both absolutely and also relatively to serotonin. As melatonin has wide-spread integrative and regenerative effects, its lack may lead to disturbances normally associated with aging. The present paper reviews the pertinent literature which appeared since our first publication, but earlier articles are also included. Evidence is presented for a role of melatonin and serotonin in controlling the neuroendocrine and immune networks and in inhibiting the development of ischemic heart and Alzheimer's disease, tumor formation and other degenerative processes associated with aging. The possible role of melatonin in the favourable effects of dietary restriction on aging is also discussed. This paper provides additional evidence that a melatonin deficiency, especially in relation to serotonin, may be responsible for the promotion of aging in the organism. PMID:8292130

  9. Alterations to embryonic serotonin change aggression and fearfulness

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prenatal environment, including maternal hormones, affects the development of the serotonin (5-HT) system, with long-lasting effects on mood and behavioral exhibition in children and adults. The chicken provides a unique animal model to study the effects of embryonic development on childhood and ado...

  10. Effects of Postnatal Serotonin Agonism on Fear Response and Memory

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) also acts as a neurogenic compound in the developing brain. Early administration of a 5-HT agonist could alter the development of the serotonergic circuitry, altering behaviors mediated by 5-HT signaling, such as memory, fear and aggression. White leghorn chicks...

  11. The serotonin transporter gene and startle response during nicotine deprivation.

    PubMed

    Minnix, Jennifer A; Robinson, Jason D; Lam, Cho Y; Carter, Brian L; Foreman, Jennifer E; Vandenbergh, David J; Tomlinson, Gail E; Wetter, David W; Cinciripini, Paul M

    2011-01-01

    Affective startle probe methodology was used to examine the effects of nicotine administration and deprivation on emotional processes among individuals carrying at least one s allele versus those with the l/l genotype of the 5-Hydroxytryptamine (Serotonin) Transporter Linked Polymorphic Region, 5-HTTLPR in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene [solute ligand carrier family 6 member A4 (SLC6A4) or SERT]. Smokers (n=84) completed four laboratory sessions crossing deprivation (12-h deprived vs. non-deprived) with nicotine spray (nicotine vs. placebo). Participants viewed affective pictures (positive, negative, neutral) while acoustic startle probes were administered. We found that smokers with the l/l genotype showed significantly greater suppression of the startle response when provided with nicotine vs. placebo than those with the s/s or s/l genotypes. The results suggest that l/l smokers, who may have higher levels of the serotonin transporter and more rapid synaptic serotonin clearance, experience substantial reduction in activation of the defensive system when exposed to nicotine.

  12. Serotonin and calcium homeostasis during the transition period.

    PubMed

    Weaver, S R; Laporta, J; Moore, S A E; Hernandez, L L

    2016-07-01

    The transition from pregnancy to lactation puts significant, sudden demands on maternal energy and calcium reserves. Although most mammals are able to effectively manage these metabolic adaptations, the lactating dairy cow is acutely susceptible to transition-related disorders because of the high amounts of milk being produced. Hypocalcemia is a common metabolic disorder that occurs at the onset of lactation. Hypocalcemia is also known to result in poor animal welfare conditions. In addition, cows that develop hypocalcemia are more susceptible to a host of other negative health outcomes. Different feeding tactics, including manipulating the dietary cation-anion difference and administering low-calcium diets, are commonly used preventative strategies. Despite these interventions, the incidence of hypocalcemia in the subclinical form is still as high as 25% to 30% in the United States dairy cow population, with a 5% to 10% incidence of clinical hypocalcemia. In addition, although there are various effective treatments in place, they are administered only after the cow has become noticeably ill, at which point there is already significant metabolic damage. This emphasizes the need for developing alternative prevention strategies, with the monoamine serotonin implicated as a potential therapeutic target. Our research in rodents has shown that serotonin is critical for the induction of mammary parathyroid hormone-related protein, which is necessary for the mobilization of bone tissue and subsequent restoration of maternal calcium stores during lactation. We have shown that circulating serotonin concentrations are positively correlated with serum total calcium on the first day of lactation in dairy cattle. Administration of serotonin's immediate precursor through feeding, injection, or infusion to various mammalian species has been shown to increase circulating serotonin concentrations, with positive effects on other components of maternal metabolism. Most recently

  13. A voltammetric and mathematical analysis of histaminergic modulation of serotonin in the mouse hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Samaranayake, Srimal; Abdalla, Aya; Robke, Rhiannon; Nijhout, H Frederik; Reed, Michael C; Best, Janet; Hashemi, Parastoo

    2016-08-01

    Histamine and serotonin are neuromodulators which facilitate numerous, diverse neurological functions. Being co-localized in many brain regions, these two neurotransmitters are thought to modulate one another's chemistry and are often implicated in the etiology of disease. Thus, it is desirable to interpret the in vivo chemistry underlying neurotransmission of these two molecules to better define their roles in health and disease. In this work, we describe a voltammetric approach to monitoring serotonin and histamine simultaneously in real time. Via electrical stimulation of the axonal bundles in the medial forebrain bundle, histamine release was evoked in the mouse premammillary nucleus. We found that histamine release was accompanied by a rapid, potent inhibition of serotonin in a concentration-dependent manner. We developed mathematical models to capture the experimental time courses of histamine and serotonin, which necessitated incorporation of an inhibitory receptor on serotonin neurons. We employed pharmacological experiments to verify that this serotonin inhibition was mediated by H3 receptors. Our novel approach provides fundamental mechanistic insights that can be used to examine the full extent of interconnectivity between histamine and serotonin in the brain. Histamine and serotonin are co-implicated in many of the brain's functions. In this paper, we develop a novel voltammetric method for simultaneous real-time monitoring of histamine and serotonin in the mouse premammillary nucleus. Electrical stimulation of the medial forebrain bundle evokes histamine and inhibits serotonin release. We show voltammetrically, mathematically, and pharmacologically that this serotonin inhibition is H3 receptor mediated. PMID:27167463

  14. A voltammetric and mathematical analysis of histaminergic modulation of serotonin in the mouse hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Samaranayake, Srimal; Abdalla, Aya; Robke, Rhiannon; Nijhout, H Frederik; Reed, Michael C; Best, Janet; Hashemi, Parastoo

    2016-08-01

    Histamine and serotonin are neuromodulators which facilitate numerous, diverse neurological functions. Being co-localized in many brain regions, these two neurotransmitters are thought to modulate one another's chemistry and are often implicated in the etiology of disease. Thus, it is desirable to interpret the in vivo chemistry underlying neurotransmission of these two molecules to better define their roles in health and disease. In this work, we describe a voltammetric approach to monitoring serotonin and histamine simultaneously in real time. Via electrical stimulation of the axonal bundles in the medial forebrain bundle, histamine release was evoked in the mouse premammillary nucleus. We found that histamine release was accompanied by a rapid, potent inhibition of serotonin in a concentration-dependent manner. We developed mathematical models to capture the experimental time courses of histamine and serotonin, which necessitated incorporation of an inhibitory receptor on serotonin neurons. We employed pharmacological experiments to verify that this serotonin inhibition was mediated by H3 receptors. Our novel approach provides fundamental mechanistic insights that can be used to examine the full extent of interconnectivity between histamine and serotonin in the brain. Histamine and serotonin are co-implicated in many of the brain's functions. In this paper, we develop a novel voltammetric method for simultaneous real-time monitoring of histamine and serotonin in the mouse premammillary nucleus. Electrical stimulation of the medial forebrain bundle evokes histamine and inhibits serotonin release. We show voltammetrically, mathematically, and pharmacologically that this serotonin inhibition is H3 receptor mediated.

  15. Lithium carbonate therapy for cluster headache. Changes in number of platelets, and serotonin and histamine levels.

    PubMed

    Medina, J L; Fareed, J; Diamond, S

    1980-09-01

    Three groups of patients were studied: Group A consisted of 12 patients with cluster headache that was treated with lithium carbonate. Group B consisted of six patients with cluster headache that was managed with other drugs. Group C consisted of five patients with muscle contraction headache who received lithium. Serum lithium levels, platelet count, platelet serotonin levels, and platelet-rich plasma histamine levels were determined before and during therapy. The frequency of the headache and levels of serotonin and histamine tended to follow a parallel course in groups A and B: as the headache frequency dropped, serotonin and histamine levels fell. The stable period was characterized by little change in serotonin and histamine levels. Recurrences of headaches were accompanied by a return of serotonin and histamine to pretreatment levels. The course of cluster headache is related to changes in serotonin and histamine levels. Lithium, by modifying the headache course, changes serotonin and histamine levels. PMID:7417056

  16. Exercise and sleep in aging: emphasis on serotonin.

    PubMed

    Melancon, M O; Lorrain, D; Dionne, I J

    2014-10-01

    Reductions in central serotonin activity with aging might be involved in sleep-related disorders in later life. Although the beneficial effects of aerobic exercise on sleep are not new, sleep represents a complex recurring state of unconsciousness involving many lines of transmitters which remains only partly clear despite intense ongoing research. It is known that serotonin released into diencephalon and cerebrum might play a key inhibitory role to help promote sleep, likely through an active inhibition of supraspinal neural networks. Several lines of evidence support the stimulatory effects of exercise on higher serotonergic pathways. Hence, exercise has proved to elicit acute elevations in forebrain serotonin concentrations, an effect that waned upon cessation of exercise. While adequate exercise training might lead to adaptations in higher serotonergic networks (desensitization of forebrain receptors), excessive training has been linked to serious brain serotonergic maladaptations accompanied by insomnia. Dietary supplementation of tryptophan (the only serotonin precursor) is known to stimulate serotonergic activity and promote sleep, whereas acute tryptophan depletion causes deleterious effects on sleep. Regarding sleep-wake regulation, exercise has proved to accelerate resynchronization of the biological clock to new light-dark cycles following imposition of phase shifts in laboratory animals. Noteworthy, the effect of increased serotonergic transmission on wake state appears to be biphasic, i.e. promote wake and thereafter drowsiness. Therefore, it might be possible that acute aerobic exercise would act on sleep by increasing activity of ascending brain serotonergic projections, though additional work is warranted to better understand the implication of serotonin in the exercise-sleep axis.

  17. Association between serotonin transporter gene polymorphism and recurrent aphthous stomatitis

    PubMed Central

    Manchanda, Aastha; Iyengar, Asha R.; Patil, Seema

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anxiety-related traits have been attributed to sequence variability in the genes coding for serotonin transmission in  the brain. Two alleles, termed long (L) and short (S) differing by 44 base pairs, are found in a polymorphism identified in the promoter region of serotonin transporter gene. The presence of the short allele  and SS and LS genotypes is found to be associated with the reduced expression of this gene decreasing the uptake of serotonin in the brain leading to various anxiety-related traits. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is an oral mucosal disease with varied etiology including the presence of stress, anxiety, and genetic influences. The present study aimed to determine this serotonin transporter gene polymorphism in patients with RAS and compare it with normal individuals. Materials and Methods: This study included 20 subjects with various forms of RAS and 20 normal healthy age- and gender-matched individuals. Desquamated oral mucosal cells were collected for DNA extraction and subjected to polymerase chain reaction for studying insertion/deletion in the 5-HTT gene-linked polymorphic region. Cross tabulations followed by Chi-square tests were performed to compare the significance of findings, P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The LS genotype was the most common genotype found in the subjects with aphthous stomatitis (60%) and controls (40%). The total percentage of LS and SS genotypes and the frequency of S allele were found to be higher in the subjects with aphthous stomatitis as compared to the control group although a statistically significant correlation could not be established, P = 0.144 and 0.371, respectively. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, occurrence of RAS was not found to be associated with polymorphic promoter region in serotonin transporter gene. PMID:27274339

  18. Exercise and sleep in aging: emphasis on serotonin.

    PubMed

    Melancon, M O; Lorrain, D; Dionne, I J

    2014-10-01

    Reductions in central serotonin activity with aging might be involved in sleep-related disorders in later life. Although the beneficial effects of aerobic exercise on sleep are not new, sleep represents a complex recurring state of unconsciousness involving many lines of transmitters which remains only partly clear despite intense ongoing research. It is known that serotonin released into diencephalon and cerebrum might play a key inhibitory role to help promote sleep, likely through an active inhibition of supraspinal neural networks. Several lines of evidence support the stimulatory effects of exercise on higher serotonergic pathways. Hence, exercise has proved to elicit acute elevations in forebrain serotonin concentrations, an effect that waned upon cessation of exercise. While adequate exercise training might lead to adaptations in higher serotonergic networks (desensitization of forebrain receptors), excessive training has been linked to serious brain serotonergic maladaptations accompanied by insomnia. Dietary supplementation of tryptophan (the only serotonin precursor) is known to stimulate serotonergic activity and promote sleep, whereas acute tryptophan depletion causes deleterious effects on sleep. Regarding sleep-wake regulation, exercise has proved to accelerate resynchronization of the biological clock to new light-dark cycles following imposition of phase shifts in laboratory animals. Noteworthy, the effect of increased serotonergic transmission on wake state appears to be biphasic, i.e. promote wake and thereafter drowsiness. Therefore, it might be possible that acute aerobic exercise would act on sleep by increasing activity of ascending brain serotonergic projections, though additional work is warranted to better understand the implication of serotonin in the exercise-sleep axis. PMID:25104243

  19. Serotonin syndrome probably triggered by a morphine-phenelzine interaction.

    PubMed

    Mateo-Carrasco, Hector; Muñoz-Aguilera, Eva María; García-Torrecillas, Juan Manuel; Abu Al-Robb, Hiba

    2015-06-01

    Serotonin syndrome is a potentially life-threatening condition caused by excessive central and peripheral stimulation of serotonin brainstem receptors, usually triggered by inadvertent interactions between agents with serotonergic activity. Evidence supporting an association between nonserotonergic opiates, such as oxycodone or morphine, and serotonin syndrome is very limited and even contradictory. In this case report, we describe a patient who developed serotonergic-adverse effects likely precipitated by an interaction between morphine and phenelzine. A 57-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with complaints of increasing visual hallucinations, restlessness, photophobia, dizziness, neck stiffness, occipital headache, confusion, sweating, tachycardia, and nausea over the previous week. On admission, her blood pressure was 185/65 mm Hg, and clonus was noted in the lower extremities. The patient was hospitalized 10 days earlier for cellulitis of the left breast secondary to a left mastectomy 5 months earlier, and a short course of oral morphine was prescribed for pain control. Her routine medications consisted of aspirin, atorvastatin, bisoprolol, clopidogrel, gabapentin, omeprazole, phenelzine, and ramipril. Supportive measures were initiated on admission. Phenelzine and morphine were discontinued immediately, leading to a progressive resolution of symptoms over the next 48 hours. Phenelzine was restarted on discharge without further complications. Use of the Drug Interaction Probability Scale indicated a probable relationship (score of 6) between the patient's development of serotonin syndrome and the combination of morphine and phenelzine. The mechanism underlying this interaction, however, remains unclear and warrants further investigation. Clinicians should carefully weigh the risk and benefits of initiating morphine in patients taking monoamine oxidase inhibitors or any other serotonin-enhancing drugs.

  20. Optogenetic Control of Serotonin and Dopamine Release in Drosophila Larvae

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Optogenetic control of neurotransmitter release is an elegant method to investigate neurobiological mechanisms with millisecond precision and cell type-specific resolution. Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) can be expressed in specific neurons, and blue light used to activate those neurons. Previously, in Drosophila, neurotransmitter release and uptake have been studied after continuous optical illumination. In this study, we investigated the effects of pulsed optical stimulation trains on serotonin or dopamine release in larval ventral nerve cords. In larvae with ChR2 expressed in serotonergic neurons, low-frequency stimulations produced a distinct, steady-state response while high-frequency patterns were peak shaped. Evoked serotonin release increased with increasing stimulation frequency and then plateaued. The steady-state response and the frequency dependence disappeared after administering the uptake inhibitor fluoxetine, indicating that uptake plays a significant role in regulating the extracellular serotonin concentration. Pulsed stimulations were also used to evoke dopamine release in flies expressing ChR2 in dopaminergic neurons and similar frequency dependence was observed. Release due to pulsed optical stimulations was modeled to determine the uptake kinetics. For serotonin, Vmax was 0.54 ± 0.07 μM/s and Km was 0.61 ± 0.04 μM; and for dopamine, Vmax was 0.12 ± 0.03 μM/s and Km was 0.45 ± 0.13 μM. The amount of serotonin released per stimulation pulse was 4.4 ± 1.0 nM, and the amount of dopamine was 1.6 ± 0.3 nM. Thus, pulsed optical stimulations can be used to mimic neuronal firing patterns and will allow Drosophila to be used as a model system for studying mechanisms underlying neurotransmission. PMID:24849718

  1. Optogenetic control of serotonin and dopamine release in Drosophila larvae.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ning; Privman, Eve; Venton, B Jill

    2014-08-20

    Optogenetic control of neurotransmitter release is an elegant method to investigate neurobiological mechanisms with millisecond precision and cell type-specific resolution. Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) can be expressed in specific neurons, and blue light used to activate those neurons. Previously, in Drosophila, neurotransmitter release and uptake have been studied after continuous optical illumination. In this study, we investigated the effects of pulsed optical stimulation trains on serotonin or dopamine release in larval ventral nerve cords. In larvae with ChR2 expressed in serotonergic neurons, low-frequency stimulations produced a distinct, steady-state response while high-frequency patterns were peak shaped. Evoked serotonin release increased with increasing stimulation frequency and then plateaued. The steady-state response and the frequency dependence disappeared after administering the uptake inhibitor fluoxetine, indicating that uptake plays a significant role in regulating the extracellular serotonin concentration. Pulsed stimulations were also used to evoke dopamine release in flies expressing ChR2 in dopaminergic neurons and similar frequency dependence was observed. Release due to pulsed optical stimulations was modeled to determine the uptake kinetics. For serotonin, Vmax was 0.54 ± 0.07 μM/s and Km was 0.61 ± 0.04 μM; and for dopamine, Vmax was 0.12 ± 0.03 μM/s and Km was 0.45 ± 0.13 μM. The amount of serotonin released per stimulation pulse was 4.4 ± 1.0 nM, and the amount of dopamine was 1.6 ± 0.3 nM. Thus, pulsed optical stimulations can be used to mimic neuronal firing patterns and will allow Drosophila to be used as a model system for studying mechanisms underlying neurotransmission.

  2. On the possible quantum role of serotonin in consciousness.

    PubMed

    Tonello, Lucio; Cocchi, Massimo; Gabrielli, Fabio; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2015-09-01

    Cell membrane's fatty acids (FAs) have been carefully investigated in neurons and platelets in order to study a possible connection to psychopathologies. An important link between the FA distribution and membrane dynamics appears to emerge with the cytoskeleton dynamics. Microtubules (MTs) in particular have been implicated in some recent quantum consciousness models and analyses. The recently proposed quantum model of Craddock et al. (2014) states that MTs possess structural and functional characteristics that are consistent with collective quantum coherent excitations in the aromatic groups of their tryptophan residues. These excitations are consistent with a clocking mechanism on a sub-nanosecond scale. This mechanism and analogous phenomena in light-harvesting complexes in plants and bacteria, are induced by photons and have been touted as evidence of quantum processes in biology. A possible source of intra-cellular photons could be membrane lipid peroxidation processes, so the FA profile could then be linked to the bio-photon emission. The model presented here suggests new ways to understand the role serotonin plays in relation to FAs. In plants, tryptophan conversion of light to exciton energy can participate in the directional orientation of leaves toward sunlight. Since serotonin is structurally similar to tryptophan, in the human brain, neurons could use tryptophan to capture photons and also use serotonin to initiate movement toward the source of light. Hence, we postulate two possible new roles for serotonin: (1) as an antioxidant, in order to counter-balance the oxidative effect of FAs, and (2) to participate in quantum interactions with MTs, in the same way as anesthetics and psychoactive compounds have been recently shown to act. In this latter case, the FA profile could provide an indirect measure of serotonin levels.

  3. Serotonin, tryptophan metabolism and the brain-gut-microbiome axis.

    PubMed

    O'Mahony, S M; Clarke, G; Borre, Y E; Dinan, T G; Cryan, J F

    2015-01-15

    The brain-gut axis is a bidirectional communication system between the central nervous system and the gastrointestinal tract. Serotonin functions as a key neurotransmitter at both terminals of this network. Accumulating evidence points to a critical role for the gut microbiome in regulating normal functioning of this axis. In particular, it is becoming clear that the microbial influence on tryptophan metabolism and the serotonergic system may be an important node in such regulation. There is also substantial overlap between behaviours influenced by the gut microbiota and those which rely on intact serotonergic neurotransmission. The developing serotonergic system may be vulnerable to differential microbial colonisation patterns prior to the emergence of a stable adult-like gut microbiota. At the other extreme of life, the decreased diversity and stability of the gut microbiota may dictate serotonin-related health problems in the elderly. The mechanisms underpinning this crosstalk require further elaboration but may be related to the ability of the gut microbiota to control host tryptophan metabolism along the kynurenine pathway, thereby simultaneously reducing the fraction available for serotonin synthesis and increasing the production of neuroactive metabolites. The enzymes of this pathway are immune and stress-responsive, both systems which buttress the brain-gut axis. In addition, there are neural processes in the gastrointestinal tract which can be influenced by local alterations in serotonin concentrations with subsequent relay of signals along the scaffolding of the brain-gut axis to influence CNS neurotransmission. Therapeutic targeting of the gut microbiota might be a viable treatment strategy for serotonin-related brain-gut axis disorders.

  4. Serotonin, serotonin 5-HT(1A) receptors and dopamine in blood peripheral lymphocytes of major depression patients.

    PubMed

    Fajardo, O; Galeno, J; Urbina, M; Carreira, I; Lima, L

    2003-09-01

    There are increasing evidences of cell markers present in the immune and the nervous systems. These include neurotransmitter receptors and transporters. Serotonin receptor subtypes are related to depression and also have been shown to be present in certain cells of the immune system. In the present report, we determined the presence of 5-HT(1A) receptors by the binding of the selective agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propyl-amino)tetralin in lymphocytes of peripheral blood isolated by Ficoll/Hypaque gradients from controls and depressed patients. The capacity of these receptors was around 24 fmol/10(6) cells in both groups of subjects, without significant difference among them. The affinity was in the nM range and either differ between controls and patients. Serotonin, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid were determined by HPLC with electrochemical detector. There were no significant differences between controls and major depression patients in the values obtained for rich and poor platelet plasma or in the isolated cells. However, there was a reduction in serotonin turnover rate indicated by an increase in the ratio serotonin/5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, but not in that of dopamine, in lymphocytes of major depression patients. Thus, there is a serotonergic dysfunction in immune circulating cells of major depression patients, without changes in the number of 5-HT(1A) receptors, although the coupling of these receptors to transduction mechanisms could be affected and may be related to the alteration of 5-HT turnover rate.

  5. Functional Selectivity and Antidepressant Activity of Serotonin 1A Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Chilmonczyk, Zdzisław; Bojarski, Andrzej Jacek; Pilc, Andrzej; Sylte, Ingebrigt

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a monoamine neurotransmitter that plays an important role in physiological functions. 5-HT has been implicated in sleep, feeding, sexual behavior, temperature regulation, pain, and cognition as well as in pathological states including disorders connected to mood, anxiety, psychosis and pain. 5-HT1A receptors have for a long time been considered as an interesting target for the action of antidepressant drugs. It was postulated that postsynaptic 5-HT1A agonists could form a new class of antidepressant drugs, and mixed 5-HT1A receptor ligands/serotonin transporter (SERT) inhibitors seem to possess an interesting pharmacological profile. It should, however, be noted that 5-HT1A receptors can activate several different biochemical pathways and signal through both G protein-dependent and G protein-independent pathways. The variables that affect the multiplicity of 5-HT1A receptor signaling pathways would thus result from the summation of effects specific to the host cell milieu. Moreover, receptor trafficking appears different at pre- and postsynaptic sites. It should also be noted that the 5-HT1A receptor cooperates with other signal transduction systems (like the 5-HT1B or 5-HT2A/2B/2C receptors, the GABAergic and the glutaminergic systems), which also contribute to its antidepressant and/or anxiolytic activity. Thus identifying brain specific molecular targets for 5-HT1A receptor ligands may result in a better targeting, raising a hope for more effective medicines for various pathologies. PMID:26262615

  6. Serotonin alterations in anorexia and bulimia nervosa: new insights from imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Kaye, Walter H; Frank, Guido K; Bailer, Ursula F; Henry, Shannan E; Meltzer, Carolyn C; Price, Julie C; Mathis, Chester A; Wagner, Angela

    2005-05-19

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) are related disorders with relatively homogenous presentations such as age of onset and gender distribution. In addition, they share symptoms, such as extremes of food consumption, body image distortion, anxiety and obsessions, and ego-syntonic neglect, raises the possibility that these symptoms reflect disturbed brain function that contributes to the pathophysiology of this illness. Recent brain imaging studies have identified altered activity in frontal, cingulate, temporal, and parietal cortical regions in AN and BN. Importantly, such disturbances are present when subjects are ill and persist after recovery, suggesting that these may be traits that are independent of the state of the illness. Emerging data point to a dysregulation of serotonin pathways in cortical and limbic structures that may be related to anxiety, behavioral inhibition, and body image distortions. In specific, recent studies using PET with serotonin specific radioligands implicate alterations of 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors and the 5-HT transporter. Alterations of these circuits may affect mood and impulse control as well as the motivating and hedonic aspects of feeding behavior. Such imaging studies may offer insights into new pharmacology and psychotherapy approaches.

  7. Functional Selectivity and Antidepressant Activity of Serotonin 1A Receptor Ligands.

    PubMed

    Chilmonczyk, Zdzisław; Bojarski, Andrzej Jacek; Pilc, Andrzej; Sylte, Ingebrigt

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a monoamine neurotransmitter that plays an important role in physiological functions. 5-HT has been implicated in sleep, feeding, sexual behavior, temperature regulation, pain, and cognition as well as in pathological states including disorders connected to mood, anxiety, psychosis and pain. 5-HT1A receptors have for a long time been considered as an interesting target for the action of antidepressant drugs. It was postulated that postsynaptic 5-HT1A agonists could form a new class of antidepressant drugs, and mixed 5-HT1A receptor ligands/serotonin transporter (SERT) inhibitors seem to possess an interesting pharmacological profile. It should, however, be noted that 5-HT1A receptors can activate several different biochemical pathways and signal through both G protein-dependent and G protein-independent pathways. The variables that affect the multiplicity of 5-HT1A receptor signaling pathways would thus result from the summation of effects specific to the host cell milieu. Moreover, receptor trafficking appears different at pre- and postsynaptic sites. It should also be noted that the 5-HT1A receptor cooperates with other signal transduction systems (like the 5-HT1B or 5-HT2A/2B/2C receptors, the GABAergic and the glutaminergic systems), which also contribute to its antidepressant and/or anxiolytic activity. Thus identifying brain specific molecular targets for 5-HT1A receptor ligands may result in a better targeting, raising a hope for more effective medicines for various pathologies. PMID:26262615

  8. Serotonin biosynthesis as a predictive marker of serotonin pharmacodynamics and disease-induced dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Welford, Richard W. D.; Vercauteren, Magali; Trébaul, Annette; Cattaneo, Christophe; Eckert, Doriane; Garzotti, Marco; Sieber, Patrick; Segrestaa, Jérôme; Studer, Rolf; Groenen, Peter M. A.; Nayler, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    The biogenic amine serotonin (5-HT) is a multi-faceted hormone that is synthesized from dietary tryptophan with the rate limiting step being catalyzed by the enzyme tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH). The therapeutic potential of peripheral 5-HT synthesis inhibitors has been demonstrated in a number of clinical and pre-clinical studies in diseases including carcinoid syndrome, lung fibrosis, ulcerative colitis and obesity. Due to the long half-life of 5-HT in blood and lung, changes in steady-state levels are slow to manifest themselves. Here, the administration of stable isotope labeled tryptophan (heavy “h-Trp”) and resultant in vivo conversion to h-5-HT is used to monitor 5-HT synthesis in rats. Dose responses for the blockade of h-5-HT appearance in blood with the TPH inhibitors L-para-chlorophenylalanine (30 and 100 mg/kg) and telotristat etiprate (6, 20 and 60 mg/kg), demonstrated that the method enables robust quantification of pharmacodynamic effects on a short time-scale, opening the possibility for rapid screening of TPH1 inhibitors in vivo. In the bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis rat model, the mechanism of lung 5-HT increase was investigated using a combination of synthesis and steady state 5-HT measurement. Elevated 5-HT synthesis measured in the injured lungs was an early predictor of disease induced increases in total 5-HT. PMID:27444653

  9. Intra- and Interhemispheric Propagation of Electrophysiological Synchronous Activity and Its Modulation by Serotonin in the Cingulate Cortex of Juvenile Mice.

    PubMed

    Rovira, Víctor; Geijo-Barrientos, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Disinhibition of the cortex (e.g., by GABA -receptor blockade) generates synchronous and oscillatory electrophysiological activity that propagates along the cortex. We have studied, in brain slices of the cingulate cortex of mice (postnatal age 14-20 days), the propagation along layer 2/3 as well as the interhemispheric propagation through the corpus callosum of synchronous discharges recorded extracellularly and evoked in the presence of 10 μM bicuculline by electrical stimulation of layer 1. The latency of the responses obtained at the same distance from the stimulus electrode was longer in anterior cingulate cortex (ACC: 39.53 ± 2.83 ms, n = 7) than in retrosplenial cortex slices (RSC: 21.99 ± 2.75 ms, n = 5; p<0.05), which is equivalent to a lower propagation velocity in the dorso-ventral direction in ACC than in RSC slices (43.0 mm/s vs 72.9 mm/s). We studied the modulation of this propagation by serotonin. Serotonin significantly increased the latency of the intracortical synchronous discharges (18.9% in the ipsilateral hemisphere and 40.2% in the contralateral hemisphere), and also increased the interhemispheric propagation time by 86.4%. These actions of serotonin were mimicked by the activation of either 5-HT1B or 5-HT2A receptors, but not by the activation of the 5-HT1A subtype. These findings provide further knowledge about the propagation of synchronic electrical activity in the cerebral cortex, including its modulation by serotonin, and suggest the presence of deep differences between the ACC and RSC in the structure of the local cortical microcircuits underlying the propagation of synchronous discharges.

  10. The study of genetic polymorphisms related to serotonin in Alzheimer's disease: a new perspective in a heterogenic disorder.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, J R; Zatz, M

    1999-04-01

    Genetic and environmental factors have been implicated in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of dementia in the elderly. Mutations in 3 genes mapped on chromosomes 21, 14 and 1 are related to the rare early onset forms of AD while the epsilon 4 allele of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene (on chromosome 19) is the major susceptibility locus for the most common late onset AD (LOAD). Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine or 5-HT) is a key neurotransmitter implicated in the control of mood, sleep, appetite and a variety of traits and behaviors. Recently, a polymorphism in the transcriptional control region upstream of the 5-HT transporter (5-HTT) gene has been studied in several psychiatric diseases and personality traits. It has been demonstrated that the short variant(s) of this 5-HTT gene-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) is associated with a different transcriptional efficiency of the 5-HTT gene promoter resulting in decreased 5-HTT expression and 5-HT uptake in lymphocytes. An increased frequency of this 5-HTTLPR short variant polymorphism in LOAD was recently reported. In addition, another common polymorphic variation in the 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C serotonin receptor genes previously analyzed in schizophrenic patients was associated with auditory and visual hallucinations in AD. These observations suggest that the involvement of the serotonin pathway might provide an explanation for some aspects of the affective symptoms commonly observed in AD patients. In summary, research on genetic polymorphisms related to AD and involved in receptors, transporter proteins and the enzymatic machinery of serotonin might enhance our understanding of this devastating neurodegenerative disorder.

  11. Intra- and Interhemispheric Propagation of Electrophysiological Synchronous Activity and Its Modulation by Serotonin in the Cingulate Cortex of Juvenile Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rovira, Víctor; Geijo-Barrientos, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Disinhibition of the cortex (e.g., by GABA -receptor blockade) generates synchronous and oscillatory electrophysiological activity that propagates along the cortex. We have studied, in brain slices of the cingulate cortex of mice (postnatal age 14–20 days), the propagation along layer 2/3 as well as the interhemispheric propagation through the corpus callosum of synchronous discharges recorded extracellularly and evoked in the presence of 10 μM bicuculline by electrical stimulation of layer 1. The latency of the responses obtained at the same distance from the stimulus electrode was longer in anterior cingulate cortex (ACC: 39.53 ± 2.83 ms, n = 7) than in retrosplenial cortex slices (RSC: 21.99 ± 2.75 ms, n = 5; p<0.05), which is equivalent to a lower propagation velocity in the dorso-ventral direction in ACC than in RSC slices (43.0 mm/s vs 72.9 mm/s). We studied the modulation of this propagation by serotonin. Serotonin significantly increased the latency of the intracortical synchronous discharges (18.9% in the ipsilateral hemisphere and 40.2% in the contralateral hemisphere), and also increased the interhemispheric propagation time by 86.4%. These actions of serotonin were mimicked by the activation of either 5-HT1B or 5-HT2A receptors, but not by the activation of the 5-HT1A subtype. These findings provide further knowledge about the propagation of synchronic electrical activity in the cerebral cortex, including its modulation by serotonin, and suggest the presence of deep differences between the ACC and RSC in the structure of the local cortical microcircuits underlying the propagation of synchronous discharges. PMID:26930051

  12. Intra- and Interhemispheric Propagation of Electrophysiological Synchronous Activity and Its Modulation by Serotonin in the Cingulate Cortex of Juvenile Mice.

    PubMed

    Rovira, Víctor; Geijo-Barrientos, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Disinhibition of the cortex (e.g., by GABA -receptor blockade) generates synchronous and oscillatory electrophysiological activity that propagates along the cortex. We have studied, in brain slices of the cingulate cortex of mice (postnatal age 14-20 days), the propagation along layer 2/3 as well as the interhemispheric propagation through the corpus callosum of synchronous discharges recorded extracellularly and evoked in the presence of 10 μM bicuculline by electrical stimulation of layer 1. The latency of the responses obtained at the same distance from the stimulus electrode was longer in anterior cingulate cortex (ACC: 39.53 ± 2.83 ms, n = 7) than in retrosplenial cortex slices (RSC: 21.99 ± 2.75 ms, n = 5; p<0.05), which is equivalent to a lower propagation velocity in the dorso-ventral direction in ACC than in RSC slices (43.0 mm/s vs 72.9 mm/s). We studied the modulation of this propagation by serotonin. Serotonin significantly increased the latency of the intracortical synchronous discharges (18.9% in the ipsilateral hemisphere and 40.2% in the contralateral hemisphere), and also increased the interhemispheric propagation time by 86.4%. These actions of serotonin were mimicked by the activation of either 5-HT1B or 5-HT2A receptors, but not by the activation of the 5-HT1A subtype. These findings provide further knowledge about the propagation of synchronic electrical activity in the cerebral cortex, including its modulation by serotonin, and suggest the presence of deep differences between the ACC and RSC in the structure of the local cortical microcircuits underlying the propagation of synchronous discharges. PMID:26930051

  13. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for fibromyalgia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Walitt, Brian; Urrútia, Gerard; Nishishinya, María Betina; Cantrell, Sarah E; Häuser, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    Background Fibromyalgia is a clinically well-defined chronic condition with a biopsychosocial aetiology. Fibromyalgia is characterized by chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain, sleep problems, cognitive dysfunction, and fatigue. Patients often report high disability levels and poor quality of life. Since there is no specific treatment that alters the pathogenesis of fibromyalgia, drug therapy focuses on pain reduction and improvement of other aversive symptoms. Objectives The objective was to assess the benefits and harms of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in the treatment of fibromyalgia. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 5), MEDLINE (1966 to June 2014), EMBASE (1946 to June 2014), and the reference lists of reviewed articles. Selection criteria We selected all randomized, double-blind trials of SSRIs used for the treatment of fibromyalgia symptoms in adult participants. We considered the following SSRIs in this review: citalopram, fluoxetine, escitalopram, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline. Data collection and analysis Three authors extracted the data of all included studies and assessed the risks of bias of the studies. We resolved discrepancies by discussion. Main results The quality of evidence was very low for each outcome. We downgraded the quality of evidence to very low due to concerns about risk of bias and studies with few participants. We included seven placebo-controlled studies, two with citalopram, three with fluoxetine and two with paroxetine, with a median study duration of eight weeks (4 to 16 weeks) and 383 participants, who were pooled together. All studies had one or more sources of potential major bias. There was a small (10%) difference in patients who reported a 30% pain reduction between SSRIs (56/172 (32.6%)) and placebo (39/171 (22.8%)) risk difference (RD) 0.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.01 to 0.20; number needed to treat for an additional

  14. The serotonin releaser fenfluramine alters the auditory responses of inferior colliculus neurons.

    PubMed

    Hall, Ian C; Hurley, Laura M

    2007-06-01

    Local direct application of the neuromodulator serotonin strongly influences auditory response properties of neurons in the inferior colliculus (IC), but endogenous stores of serotonin may be released in a distinct spatial or temporal pattern. To explore this issue, the serotonin releaser fenfluramine was iontophoretically applied to extracellularly recorded neurons in the IC of the Mexican free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis). Fenfluramine mimicked the effects of serotonin on spike count and first spike latency in most neurons, and its effects could be blocked by co-application of serotonin receptor antagonists, consistent with fenfluramine-evoked serotonin release. Responses to fenfluramine did not vary during single applications or across multiple applications, suggesting that fenfluramine did not deplete serotonin stores. A predicted gradient in the effects of fenfluramine with serotonin fiber density was not observed, but neurons with fenfluramine-evoked increases in latency occurred at relatively greater recording depths compared to other neurons with similar characteristic frequencies. These findings support the conclusion that there may be spatial differences in the effects of exogenous and endogenous sources of serotonin, but that other factors such as the identities and locations of serotonin receptors are also likely to play a role in determining the dynamics of serotonergic effects. PMID:17339086

  15. Platelet serotonin promotes the recruitment of neutrophils to sites of acute inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Duerschmied, Daniel; Suidan, Georgette L; Demers, Melanie; Herr, Nadine; Carbo, Carla; Brill, Alexander; Cifuni, Stephen M; Mauler, Maximilian; Cicko, Sanja; Bader, Michael; Idzko, Marco; Bode, Christoph; Wagner, Denisa D

    2013-02-01

    The majority of peripheral serotonin is stored in platelets, which secrete it on activation. Serotonin releases Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs) and we asked whether absence of platelet serotonin affects neutrophil recruitment in inflammatory responses. Tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph)1–deficient mice, lacking non-neuronal serotonin, showed mild leukocytosis compared with wild-type (WT), primarily driven by an elevated neutrophil count. Despite this, 50% fewer leukocytes rolled on unstimulated mesenteric venous endothelium of Tph1(-/-) mice. The velocity of rolling leukocytes was higher in Tph1(-/-) mice, indicating fewer selectin-mediated interactions with endothelium. Stimulation of endothelium with histamine, a secretagogue of WPBs, or injection of serotonin normalized the rolling in Tph1(-/-) mice. Diminished rolling in Tph1(-/-) mice resulted in reduced firm adhesion of leukocytes after lipopolysaccharide treatment. Blocking platelet serotonin uptake with fluoxetine in WT mice reduced serum serotonin by > 80% and similarly reduced leukocyte rolling and adhesion. Four hours after inflammatory stimulation, neutrophil extravasation into lung, peritoneum, and skin wounds was reduced in Tph1(-/-) mice, whereas in vitro neutrophil chemotaxis was independent of serotonin. Survival of lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxic shock was improved in Tph1(-/-) mice. In conclusion, platelet serotonin promotes the recruitment of neutrophils in acute inflammation, supporting an important role for platelet serotonin in innate immunity. PMID:23243271

  16. Effects of Aromatase Inhibition and Androgen Activity on Serotonin and Behavior in Male Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Bethea, Cynthia L.; Reddy, Arubala P.; Robertson, Nicola; Colemen, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    Aggression in humans and animals has been linked to androgens and serotonin function. To further our understanding of the effect of androgens on serotonin and aggression in male macaques, we sought to manipulate circulating androgens and the activity of aromatase; and to then determine behavior and the endogenous availability of serotonin. Male Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) were castrated for 5-7 months and then treated for 3 months with [1] placebo, [2] testosterone (T), [3] T+Dutasteride (5a reductase inhibitor; AvodartTM), [4] T+Letrozole (non-steroidal aromatase inhibitor; FemeraTM), [5] Flutamide+ATD (androgen antagonist plus steroidal aromatase inhibitor) or [6] dihydrotestosterone (DHT)+ATD (n=5/group). Behavioral observations were made during treatments. At the end of the treatment period, each animal was sedated with propofol and administered a bolus of fenfluramine (5 mg/kg). Fenfluramine causes the release of serotonin proportional to endogenous availability and in turn, serotonin stimulates the secretion of prolactin. Therefore, serum prolactin concentrations reflect endogenous serotonin. Fenfluramine significantly increased serotonin/prolactin in all groups (p <0.0001). Fenfluramine-induced serotonin/prolactin in the T-treated group was significantly higher than the other groups (p<0.0001). Castration partially reduced the serotonin/prolactin response; and Letrozole partially blocked the effect of T. Complete inhibition of aromatase with ATD, a non-competitve inhibitor, significantly and similarly reduced the fenfluramine-induced serotonin/prolactin response in the presence or absence of DHT. Neither aggressive behavior nor yawning (indicators of androgen activity) correlated with serotonin/prolactin, but posited aromatase activity correlated significantly with prolactin (p<0.0008; r2 =0.95). In summary, androgens induced aggressive behavior but they did not regulate serotonin. Altogether, the data suggest that aromatase activity supports

  17. Effects of aromatase inhibition and androgen activity on serotonin and behavior in male macaques.

    PubMed

    Bethea, Cynthia L; Reddy, Arubala P; Robertson, Nicola; Coleman, Kristine

    2013-06-01

    Aggression in humans and animals has been linked to androgens and serotonin function. To further our understanding of the effect of androgens on serotonin and aggression in male macaques, we sought to manipulate circulating androgens and the activity of aromatase; and to then determine behavior and the endogenous availability of serotonin. Male Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) were castrated for 5-7 months and then treated for 3 months with (a) placebo; (b) testosterone (T); (c) T + Dutasteride (5a reductase inhibitor; AvodartTM); (d) T + Letrozole (nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor; FemeraTM); (e) Flutamide + ATD (androgen antagonist plus steroidal aromatase inhibitor); or (f) dihydrotestosterone (DHT) + ATD (n = 5/group). Behavioral observations were made during treatments. At the end of the treatment period, each animal was sedated with propofol and administered a bolus of fenfluramine (5 mg/kg). Fenfluramine causes the release of serotonin proportional to endogenous availability and in turn, serotonin stimulates the secretion of prolactin. Therefore, serum prolactin concentrations reflect endogenous serotonin. Fenfluramine significantly increased serotonin/prolactin in all groups (p < .0001). Fenfluramine-induced serotonin/prolactin in the T-treated group was significantly higher than the other groups (p < .0001). Castration partially reduced the serotonin/prolactin response and Letrozole partially blocked the effect of T. Complete inhibition of aromatase with ATD, a noncompetitive inhibitor, significantly and similarly reduced the fenfluramine-induced serotonin/prolactin response in the presence or absence of DHT. Neither aggressive behavior nor yawning (indicators of androgen activity) correlated with serotonin/prolactin, but posited aromatase activity correlated significantly with prolactin (p < .0008; r² = 0.95). In summary, androgens induced aggressive behavior but they did not regulate serotonin. Altogether, the data suggest that aromatase activity

  18. Anorectic activities of serotonin uptake inhibitors: correlation with their potencies at inhibiting serotonin uptake in vivo and /sup 3/H-mazindol binding in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, I.; Taranger, M.A.; Claustre, Y.; Scatton, B.; Langer, S.Z.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism of anorectic action of several serotonin uptake inhibitors was investigated by comparing their anorectic potencies with several biochemical and pharmacological properties and in reference to the novel compound SL 81.0385. The anorectic effect of the potent serotonin uptake inhibitor SL 81.0385 was potentiated by pretreatment with 5-hydroxytryptophan and blocked by the serotonin receptor antagonist metergoline. A good correlation was obtained between the ED/sub 50/ values of anorectic action and the ED/sub 50/ values of serotonin uptake inhibition in vivo (but not in vitro) for several specific serotonin uptake inhibitors. Most of the drugs tested displaced (/sup 3/H)-mazindol from its binding to the anorectic recognition site in the hypothalamus, except the pro-drug zimelidine which was inactive. Excluding zimelidine, a good correlation was obtained between the affinities of these drugs for (/sup 3/H)-mazindol binding and their anorectic action indicating that their anorectic activity may be associated with an effect mediated through this site. Taken together these results suggest that the anorectic action of serotonin uptake inhibitors is directly associated to their ability to inhibit serotonin uptake and thus increasing the synaptic levels of serotonin. The interactions of these drugs with the anorectic recognition site labelled with (/sup 3/H)-mazindol is discussed in connection with the serotonergic regulation of carbohydrate intake.

  19. Rationality and emotionality: serotonin transporter genotype influences reasoning bias.

    PubMed

    Stollstorff, Melanie; Bean, Stephanie E; Anderson, Lindsay M; Devaney, Joseph M; Vaidya, Chandan J

    2013-04-01

    Reasoning often occurs under emotionally charged, opinion-laden circumstances. The belief-bias effect indexes the extent to which reasoning is based upon beliefs rather than logical structure. We examined whether emotional content increases this effect, particularly for adults genetically predisposed to be more emotionally reactive. SS/SL(G) carriers of the serotonin transporter genotype (5-HTTLPR) were less accurate selectively for evaluating emotional relational reasoning problems with belief-logic conflict relative to L(A)L(A) carriers. Trait anxiety was positively associated with emotional belief-bias, and the 5-HTTLPR genotype significantly accounted for the variance in this association. Thus, deductive reasoning, a higher cognitive ability, is sensitive to differences in emotionality rooted in serotonin neurotransmitter function.

  20. Serotonin syndrome versus neuroleptic malignant syndrome: a challenging clinical quandary.

    PubMed

    Dosi, Rupal; Ambaliya, Annirudh; Joshi, Harshal; Patell, Rushad

    2014-06-23

    Serotonin syndrome and neuroleptic malignant syndrome are two drug toxidromes that have often overlapping and confusing clinical pictures. We report a case of a young man who presented with alteration of mental status, autonomic instability and neuromuscular hyperexcitability following ingestion of multiple psychiatric and antiepileptic medications. The patient satisfied criteria for serotonin syndrome and neuroleptic malignant syndrome, and based on the characteristic clinical features, laboratory findings and clinical course it was concluded that the patient had both toxidromes. The patient was managed with cyproheptadine and supportive measures, and recovered over the course of 3 weeks. A brief review of literature highlighting the diagnostic clues as well as the importance of recognising and distinguishing the often missed and confounding diagnoses follows.

  1. Serotonin syndrome versus neuroleptic malignant syndrome: a challenging clinical quandary

    PubMed Central

    Dosi, Rupal; Ambaliya, Annirudh; Joshi, Harshal; Patell, Rushad

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin syndrome and neuroleptic malignant syndrome are two drug toxidromes that have often overlapping and confusing clinical pictures. We report a case of a young man who presented with alteration of mental status, autonomic instability and neuromuscular hyperexcitability following ingestion of multiple psychiatric and antiepileptic medications. The patient satisfied criteria for serotonin syndrome and neuroleptic malignant syndrome, and based on the characteristic clinical features, laboratory findings and clinical course it was concluded that the patient had both toxidromes. The patient was managed with cyproheptadine and supportive measures, and recovered over the course of 3 weeks. A brief review of literature highlighting the diagnostic clues as well as the importance of recognising and distinguishing the often missed and confounding diagnoses follows. PMID:24957740

  2. Rationality and emotionality: serotonin transporter genotype influences reasoning bias

    PubMed Central

    Bean, Stephanie E.; Anderson, Lindsay M.; Devaney, Joseph M.; Vaidya, Chandan J.

    2013-01-01

    Reasoning often occurs under emotionally charged, opinion-laden circumstances. The belief-bias effect indexes the extent to which reasoning is based upon beliefs rather than logical structure. We examined whether emotional content increases this effect, particularly for adults genetically predisposed to be more emotionally reactive. SS/SLG carriers of the serotonin transporter genotype (5-HTTLPR) were less accurate selectively for evaluating emotional relational reasoning problems with belief-logic conflict relative to LALA carriers. Trait anxiety was positively associated with emotional belief-bias, and the 5-HTTLPR genotype significantly accounted for the variance in this association. Thus, deductive reasoning, a higher cognitive ability, is sensitive to differences in emotionality rooted in serotonin neurotransmitter function. PMID:22275169

  3. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension, bone marrow, endothelial cell precursors and serotonin].

    PubMed

    Ayme-Dietrich, Estelle; Banas, Sophie M; Monassier, Laurent; Maroteaux, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin and bone-marrow-derived stem cells participate together in triggering pulmonary hypertension. Our work has shown that the absence of 5-HT2B receptors generates permanent changes in the composition of the blood and bone-marrow in the myeloid lineages, particularly in endothelial cell progenitors. The initial functions of 5-HT2B receptors in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) are restricted to bone-marrow cells. They contribute to the differentiation/proliferation/mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells from the bone-marrow. Those bone-marrow-derived cells have a critical role in the development of pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary vascular remodeling. These data indicate that bone-marrow derived endothelial progenitors play a key role in the pathogenesis of PAH and suggest that interactions involving serotonin and bone morphogenic protein type 2 receptor (BMPR2) could take place at the level of the bone-marrow. PMID:27687599

  4. Opponency Revisited: Competition and Cooperation Between Dopamine and Serotonin

    PubMed Central

    Boureau, Y-Lan; Dayan, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Affective valence lies on a spectrum ranging from punishment to reward. The coding of such spectra in the brain almost always involves opponency between pairs of systems or structures. There is ample evidence for the role of dopamine in the appetitive half of this spectrum, but little agreement about the existence, nature, or role of putative aversive opponents such as serotonin. In this review, we consider the structure of opponency in terms of previous biases about the nature of the decision problems that animals face, the conflicts that may thus arise between Pavlovian and instrumental responses, and an additional spectrum joining invigoration to inhibition. We use this analysis to shed light on aspects of the role of serotonin and its interactions with dopamine. PMID:20881948

  5. Serotonin competence of mouse beta cells during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Goyvaerts, Lotte; Schraenen, Anica; Schuit, Frans

    2016-07-01

    Pregnancy is a key mammalian reproductive event in which growth and differentiation of the fetus imposes extra metabolic and hormonal demands on the mother. Its successful outcome depends on major changes in maternal blood circulation, metabolism and endocrine function. One example is the endocrine pancreas, where beta cells undergo a number of changes in pregnancy that result in enhanced functional beta cell mass in order to compensate for the rising metabolic needs for maternal insulin. During the last 5 years, a series of studies have increased our understanding of the molecular events involved in this functional adaptation. In the mouse, a prominent functional change during pregnancy is the capacity of some beta cells to produce serotonin. In this review we will discuss the mechanism and potential effects of pregnancy-related serotonin production in beta cells, considering functional consequences at the local intra-islet and systemic level. PMID:27056372

  6. Expression analysis for inverted effects of serotonin transporter inactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, Manabu |; Okamura-Oho, Yuko Shimokawa, Kazuro; Kondo, Shinji; Nakamura, Sakiko; Yokota, Hideo |; Himeno, Ryutaro; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide |

    2008-03-28

    Inactivation of serotonin transporter (HTT) by pharmacologically in the neonate or genetically increases risk for depression in adulthood, whereas pharmacological inhibition of HTT ameliorates symptoms in depressed patients. The differing role of HTT function during early development and in adult brain plasticity in causing or reversing depression remains an unexplained paradox. To address this we profiled the gene expression of adult Htt knockout (Htt KO) mice and HTT inhibitor-treated mice. Inverted profile changes between the two experimental conditions were seen in 30 genes. Consistent results of the upstream regulatory element search and the co-localization search of these genes indicated that the regulation may be executed by Pax5, Pax7 and Gata3, known to be involved in the survival, proliferation, and migration of serotonergic neurons in the developing brain, and these factors are supposed to keep functioning to regulate downstream genes related to serotonin system in the adult brain.

  7. Oestradiol modulation of serotonin reuptake transporter and serotonin metabolism in the brain of monkeys.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, M G; Morissette, M; Di Paolo, T

    2013-06-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) is an important brain neurotransmitter that is implicated in mental and neurodegenerative diseases and is modulated by ovarian hormones. Nevertheless, the effect of oestrogens on 5-HT neurotransmission in the primate caudate nucleus, putamen and nucleus accumbens, which are major components of the basal ganglia, and the anterior cerebral cortex, mainly the frontal and cingulate gyrus, is not well documented. The present study evaluated 5-HT reuptake transporter (SERT) and 5-HT metabolism in these brain regions in response to 1-month treatment with 17β-oestradiol in short-term (1 month) ovariectomised (OVX) monkeys (Macaca fascicularis). SERT-specific binding was measured by autoradiography using the radioligand [³H]citalopram. Biogenic amine concentrations were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography. 17β-Oestradiol increased SERT in the superior frontal cortex and in the anterior cingulate cortex, in the nucleus accumbens, and in subregions of the caudate nucleus of OVX monkeys. 17β-Oestradiol left [³H]citalopram-specific binding unchanged in the putamen, as well as the dorsal and medial raphe nucleus. 17β-Oestradiol treatment decreased striatal concentrations of the precursor of 5-HT, 5-hydroxytryptophan, and increased 5-HT, dopamine and 3-methoxytyramine concentrations in the nucleus accumbens, caudate nucleus and putamen, whereas the concentrations of the metabolites 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid remained unchanged. No effect of 17β-oestradiol treatment was observed for biogenic amine concentrations in the cortical regions. A significant positive correlation was observed between [³H]citalopram-specific binding and 5-HT concentrations in the caudate nucleus, putamen and nucleus accumbens, suggesting their link. These results have translational value for women with low oestrogen, such as those in surgical menopause or perimenopause. PMID:23414342

  8. Platelet Serotonin Transporter Function Predicts Default-Mode Network Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kasess, Christian H.; Meyer, Bernhard M.; Hofmaier, Tina; Diers, Kersten; Bartova, Lucie; Pail, Gerald; Huf, Wolfgang; Uzelac, Zeljko; Hartinger, Beate; Kalcher, Klaudius; Perkmann, Thomas; Haslacher, Helmuth; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Kasper, Siegfried; Freissmuth, Michael; Windischberger, Christian; Willeit, Matthäus; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Esterbauer, Harald; Brocke, Burkhard; Moser, Ewald; Sitte, Harald H.; Pezawas, Lukas

    2014-01-01

    Background The serotonin transporter (5-HTT) is abundantly expressed in humans by the serotonin transporter gene SLC6A4 and removes serotonin (5-HT) from extracellular space. A blood-brain relationship between platelet and synaptosomal 5-HT reuptake has been suggested, but it is unknown today, if platelet 5-HT uptake can predict neural activation of human brain networks that are known to be under serotonergic influence. Methods A functional magnetic resonance study was performed in 48 healthy subjects and maximal 5-HT uptake velocity (Vmax) was assessed in blood platelets. We used a mixed-effects multilevel analysis technique (MEMA) to test for linear relationships between whole-brain, blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) activity and platelet Vmax. Results The present study demonstrates that increases in platelet Vmax significantly predict default-mode network (DMN) suppression in healthy subjects independent of genetic variation within SLC6A4. Furthermore, functional connectivity analyses indicate that platelet Vmax is related to global DMN activation and not intrinsic DMN connectivity. Conclusion This study provides evidence that platelet Vmax predicts global DMN activation changes in healthy subjects. Given previous reports on platelet-synaptosomal Vmax coupling, results further suggest an important role of neuronal 5-HT reuptake in DMN regulation. PMID:24667541

  9. Ventilatory adaptation to hypoxia occurs in serotonin-depleted rats.

    PubMed

    Olson, E B

    1987-08-01

    To test the hypothesis that serotonin mediated respiratory activity is involved in ventilatory adaptation to hypoxia, rats were treated with parachlorophenylalanine (PCPA), a potent, long-acting inhibitor of tryptophan hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of serotonin. In normoxia, a single, intraperitoneal injection of 300 mg PCPA/kg body weight decreased the Paco2 from a control level at 39.1 +/- 0.6 Torr (mean +/- 95% confidence limits) to 34.0 +/- 0.6 Torr measured during a period from 1 to 48 h following PCPA treatment. This PCPA-produced hyperventilation corresponds to an increase of 3.7 +/- 0.5 in the VA (BTPS)/Vco2 (STPD) ratio. Hyperventilation during ventilatory adaptation to hypoxia (PIO2 approximately equal to 90 Torr) was superimposed in an additive fashion on the underlying hyperventilation due to PCPA pretreatment. Specifically, PCPA pretreatment caused an average 3.5 +/- 1.2 increase in the VA/VCO2 ratio determined in acute (1 h) hypoxia, chronic (24 h) hypoxia and acute return to normoxia following chronic hypoxia. Since ventilatory adaptation to hypoxia occurred in rats treated with PCPA, the prolonged, serotonin mediated respiratory activity described by Millhorn et al. (1980b) is probably not important in ventilatory acclimatization to - or deacclimatization from - hypoxia. PMID:2957766

  10. Serotonin 6 receptor controls Alzheimer's disease and depression.

    PubMed

    Yun, Hyung-Mun; Park, Kyung-Ran; Kim, Eun-Cheol; Kim, Sanghyeon; Hong, Jin Tae

    2015-09-29

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and depression in late life are one of the most severe health problems in the world disorders. Serotonin 6 receptor (5-HT6R) has caused much interest for potential roles in AD and depression. However, a causative role of perturbed 5-HT6R function between two diseases was poorly defined. In the present study, we found that a 5-HT6R antagonist, SB271036 rescued memory impairment by attenuating the generation of Aβ via the inhibition of γ-secretase activity and the inactivation of astrocytes and microglia in the AD mouse model. It was found that the reduction of serotonin level was significantly recovered by SB271036, which was mediated by an indirect regulation of serotonergic neurons via GABA. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), fluoxetine significantly improved cognitive impairment and behavioral changes. In human brain of depression patients, we then identified the potential genes, amyloid beta (A4) precursor protein-binding, family A, member 2 (APBA2), well known AD modulators by integrating datasets from neuropathology, microarray, and RNA seq. studies with correlation analysis tools. And also, it was demonstrated in mouse models and patients of AD. These data indicate functional network of 5-HT6R between AD and depression. PMID:26449188

  11. Associations between Central Nervous System Serotonin, Fasting Glucose and Hostility in African American Females

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Stephen H.; Georgiades, Anastasia; Brummett, Beverly H.; Barefoot, John C.; Siegler, Ilene C.; Matson, Wayne R.; Kuhn, Cynthia M.; Grichnik, Katherine; Stafford-Smith, Mark; Williams, Redford B.; Kaddurah-Daouk, Rima; Surwit, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous research has shown an association between hostility and fasting glucose in African American women. Central nervous system serotonin activity is implicated both in metabolic processes and in hostility related traits. Purpose To determine whether central nervous system serotonin influences the association between hostility and fasting glucose in African American women. Methods The study consisted of 119 healthy volunteers (36 African American women, 27 white women, 21 white males, and 35 African American males, mean age 34±8.5 years). Serotonin metabolites were measured in cerebrospinal fluid. Hostility was measured by the Cook-Medley Hostility Scale. Results Hostility was associated with fasting glucose and central nervous system serotonin metabolites in African American women only. Controlling for the serotonin metabolites significantly reduced the association of hostility to glucose. Conclusions The positive correlation between hostility and fasting glucose in African American women can partly be explained by central nervous system serotonin function. PMID:24806470

  12. The calcium-dependent neuronal release of serotonin and its antagonism by lithium.

    PubMed

    Stefano, G B; Catapane, E J; Aiello, E; Hiripi, L

    1980-03-01

    The cilio-excitatory serotonergic innervation of lateral gill cilia of Mytilus edulis was studied in vivo. Peripheral serotonin release was dependent on the external calcium concentration. Serotonin release was inhibited by autodialyzing calcium from the tissue or by increasing the calcium concentration in the medium, as determined by measuring ciliary activity stroboscopically and by biochemical and radioassays of serotonin. Lithium also inhibited serotonin release when added to the external bathing medium. Concomitantly, altering calcium concentrations altered the degree of inhibition of serotonin release caused by lithium. The study demonstrates that the terminal release of the monoamine serotonin is a calcium-dependent mechanism. The pharmacological effects of lithium in this system appear to be interrelated with the calcium-dependent releasing mechanism. PMID:7381459

  13. Characterization and regulation of (/sup 3/H)-serotonin uptake and release in rodent spinal

    SciTech Connect

    Stauderman, K.A.

    1986-01-01

    The uptake and release of (/sup 3/H)-serotonin were investigated in rat spinal cord synaptosomes. In the uptake experiments, sodium-dependent and sodium-independent (/sup 3/H)-serotonin accumulation processes were found. Sodium-dependent (/sup 3/H)-serotonin accumulation was: linear with sodium concentrations up to 180 mM; decreased by disruption of membrane integrity or ionic gradients; associated with purified synaptosomal fractions; and reduced after description of descending serotonergic neurons in the spinal cord. Of the uptake inhibitors tested, the most potent was fluoxetine (IC/sub 50/ 75 nM), followed by desipramine (IC/sub 50/ 430 nM) and nomifensine (IC/sub 50/ 950 nM). The sodium-independent (/sup 3/H)-serotonin accumulation process was insensitive to most treatments and probably represents nonspecific membrane binding. Thus, only sodium-dependent (/sup 3/H)-serotonin uptake represents the uptake process of serotonergic nerve terminals in rat spinal cord homogenates. In the release experiments, K/sup +/-induced release of previously accumulated (/sup 3/H)-serotonin was Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent, and originated from serotonergic synaptosomes. Exogenous serotonin and 5-methyoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine inhibited (/sup 3/H)-serotonin release in a concentration-dependent way. Of the antagonists tested, only methiothepin effectively blocked the effect of serotonin. These data support the existence of presynaptic serotonin autoreceptors on serotonergic nerve terminals in the rat spinal cord that act to inhibit a voltage and Ca/sup 2 +/-sensitive process linked to serotonin release. Alteration of spinai cord serotonergic function may therefore be possible by drugs acting on presynaptic serotonin autoreceptors in the spinal cord.

  14. Prostaglandin synthesis inhibitors reduce Cannabis and restraint stress induced increase in rat brain serotonin concentrations.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, S K; Bhattacharya, D

    1983-01-01

    Cannabis resin (CI) produced a dose-related increase in rat brain serotonin concentrations, whereas restraint stress produced maximal rise of the neurotransmitter concentrations at 1 h, followed by a tendency to normalise by 4 h. The prostaglandin (PG) synthesis inhibitors, diclofenac and paracetamol, antagonized CI and restraint stress induced rise in serotonin concentrations. The findings lend credence to earlier reports that PG synthesis inhibitors antagonize serotonin-mediated neuropharmacological actions of CI and restraint stress in rats.

  15. Inhibition of FAAH, TRPV1, and COX2 by NSAID-serotonin conjugates.

    PubMed

    Rose, Tyler M; Reilly, Christopher A; Deering-Rice, Cassandra E; Brewster, Clinton; Brewster, Chelsea

    2014-12-15

    Serotonin was linked by amidation to the carboxylic acid groups of a series of structurally diverse NSAIDs. The resulting NSAID-serotonin conjugates were tested in vitro for their ability to inhibit FAAH, TRPV1, and COX2. Ibuprofen-5-HT and Flurbiprofen-5-HT inhibited all three targets with approximately the same potency as N-arachidonoyl serotonin (AA-5-HT), while Fenoprofen-5-HT and Naproxen-5-HT showed activity as dual inhibitors of TRPV1 and COX2.

  16. Inhibition of FAAH, TRPV1, and COX2 by NSAID-Serotonin Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Tyler M.; Reilly, Christopher A.; Deering-Rice, Cassandra E.; Brewster, Clinton; Brewster, Chelsea

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin was linked by amidation to the carboxylic acid groups of a series of structurally diverse NSAIDs. The resulting NSAID-serotonin conjugates were tested in vitro for their ability to inhibit FAAH, TRPV1, and COX2. Ibuprofen-5-HT and Flurbiprofen-5-HT inhibited all three targets with approximately the same potency as N-arachidonoyl serotonin (AA-5-HT), while Fenoprofen-5-HT and Naproxen-5-HT showed activity as dual inhibitors of TRPV1 and COX2. PMID:25467164

  17. Nutrient-induced glucagon like peptide-1 release is modulated by serotonin.

    PubMed

    Ripken, Dina; van der Wielen, Nikkie; Wortelboer, Heleen M; Meijerink, Jocelijn; Witkamp, Renger F; Hendriks, Henk F J

    2016-06-01

    Glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and serotonin are both involved in food intake regulation. GLP-1 release is stimulated upon nutrient interaction with G-protein coupled receptors by enteroendocrine cells (EEC), whereas serotonin is released from enterochromaffin cells (ECC). The central hypothesis for the current study was that nutrient-induced GLP-1 release from EECs is modulated by serotonin through a process involving serotonin receptor interaction. This was studied by assessing the effects of serotonin reuptake inhibition by fluoxetine on nutrient-induced GLP-1, PYY and CCK release from isolated pig intestinal segments. Next, serotonin-induced GLP-1 release was studied in enteroendocrine STC-1 cells, where effects of serotonin receptor inhibition were studied using specific and non-specific antagonists. Casein (1% w/v), safflower oil (3.35% w/v), sucrose (50mM) and rebaudioside A (12.5mM) stimulated GLP-1 release from intestinal segments, whereas casein only stimulated PYY and CCK release. Combining nutrients with fluoxetine further increased nutrient-induced GLP-1, PYY and CCK release. Serotonin release from intestinal tissue segments was stimulated by casein and safflower oil while sucrose and rebaudioside A had no effect. The combination with fluoxetine (0.155μM) further enhanced casein and safflower oil induced-serotonin release. Exposure of ileal tissue segments to serotonin (30μM) stimulated GLP-1 release whereas it did not induce PYY and CCK release. Serotonin (30 and 100μM) also stimulated GLP-1 release from STC-1 cells, which was inhibited by the non-specific 5HT receptor antagonist asenapine (1 and 10μM). These data suggest that nutrient-induced GLP-1 release is modulated by serotonin through a receptor mediated process. PMID:27142747

  18. Exocytosis of serotonin from the neuronal soma is sustained by a serotonin and calcium-dependent feedback loop

    PubMed Central

    Leon-Pinzon, Carolina; Cercós, Montserrat G.; Noguez, Paula; Trueta, Citlali; De-Miguel, Francisco F.

    2014-01-01

    The soma of many neurons releases large amounts of transmitter molecules through an exocytosis process that continues for hundreds of seconds after the end of the triggering stimulus. Transmitters released in this way modulate the activity of neurons, glia and blood vessels over vast volumes of the nervous system. Here we studied how somatic exocytosis is maintained for such long periods in the absence of electrical stimulation and transmembrane Ca2+ entry. Somatic exocytosis of serotonin from dense core vesicles could be triggered by a train of 10 action potentials at 20 Hz in Retzius neurons of the leech. However, the same number of action potentials produced at 1 Hz failed to evoke any exocytosis. The 20-Hz train evoked exocytosis through a sequence of intracellular Ca2+ transients, with each transient having a different origin, timing and intracellular distribution. Upon electrical stimulation, transmembrane Ca2+ entry through L-type channels activated Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release. A resulting fast Ca2+ transient evoked an early exocytosis of serotonin from sparse vesicles resting close to the plasma membrane. This Ca2+ transient also triggered the transport of distant clusters of vesicles toward the plasma membrane. Upon exocytosis, the released serotonin activated autoreceptors coupled to phospholipase C, which in turn produced an intracellular Ca2+ increase in the submembrane shell. This localized Ca2+ increase evoked new exocytosis as the vesicles in the clusters arrived gradually at the plasma membrane. In this way, the extracellular serotonin elevated the intracellular Ca2+ and this Ca2+ evoked more exocytosis. The resulting positive feedback loop maintained exocytosis for the following hundreds of seconds until the last vesicles in the clusters fused. Since somatic exocytosis displays similar kinetics in neurons releasing different types of transmitters, the data presented here contributes to understand the cellular basis of paracrine neurotransmission

  19. Adverse effects of serotonin depletion in developing zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Airhart, Mark J; Lee, Deborah H; Wilson, Tracy D; Miller, Barney E; Miller, Merry N; Skalko, Richard G; Monaco, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    In this study, p-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA), an inhibitor of tryptophan hydroxylase (the rate limiting enzyme of serotonin synthesis), was used to reduce serotonin (5HT) levels during early development in zebrafish embryos. One day old dechorionated embryos were treated with 25 μM pCPA for 24h and subsequently rescued. Immunohistological studies using a 5HT antibody confirmed that 5HT neurons in the brain and spinal cord were depleted of transmitter by 2 days post fertilization (dpf). Twenty four hours after pCPA exposure embryos were unable to burst swim and were nearly paralyzed. Movement began to improve at 4 dpf, and by 7 dpf, larvae exhibited swimming activity. Rescued larvae continued to grow in rostrocaudal length over 5 days post-rescue, but their length was always 16-21% below controls. Surprisingly, both groups displayed the same number of myotomes. To examine whether hypertonicity of myotomes in treated embryos played a role in their shorter rostrocaudal lengths, 1 dpf embryos were exposed to a combination of 25 μM pCPA and 0.6 mM of the sodium channel blocker ethyl 3-aminobenzoate methanesulfonate (MS-222). After a 24 hour exposure, the embryos exhibited the same rostrocaudal length as control embryos suggesting that myotome hypertonicity plays a major role in the decreased axial length of the treated larvae. In addition, pCPA treated 2 dpf embryos exhibited abnormal notochordal morphology that persisted throughout recovery. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to determine the relative levels of the serotonin 1A receptor (5HT(1A)) transcript and the serotonin transporter (SERT) transcript in the brain and spinal cord of control and treated embryos. Transcripts were present in both brain and spinal cord as early as 1 dpf and reached maximal concentrations by 3 dpf. Embryos treated with pCPA demonstrated a decrease in the concentration of 5HT(1A) transcript in both brain and spinal cord. While SERT transcript levels

  20. Peripheral serotonin-mediated system suppresses bone development and regeneration via serotonin 6 G-protein-coupled receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Hyung-Mun; Park, Kyung-Ran; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin is important in brain functions and involved in neurological diseases. It is also drawn considerable attention in bone disease since it mainly produced by the gut. Serotonin 6 G-protein-coupled receptor (5-HT6R) is clinical targets for the treatment of neurological diseases. However, 5-HT6R as a therapeutic target in bone has not been reported. Herein, we found that 5-HT6R showed higher expression in bone, and its expression was increased during bone remodeling and osteoblast differentiation. The activation of 5-HT6R by ST1936 caused the inhibition of ALP activity and mineralization in primary osteoblast cultures, which was antagonized by SB258585, an antagonist and by the knockdown of 5-HT6R. Further investigation indicated that 5-HT6R inhibited osteoblast differentiation via Jab1 in BMP2 signaling but not PKA and ERK1/2. In vivo studies showed that the activation of 5-HT6R inhibited bone regeneration in the calvarial defect mice and also delayed bone development in newborn mice; this response was antagonized by SB258585. Therefore, our findings indicate a key role of 5-HT6R in bone formation through serotonin originating in the peripheral system, and suggest that it is a novel therapeutic target for drug development in the bone repair and bone diseases. PMID:27581523

  1. Peripheral serotonin-mediated system suppresses bone development and regeneration via serotonin 6 G-protein-coupled receptor.

    PubMed

    Yun, Hyung-Mun; Park, Kyung-Ran; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin is important in brain functions and involved in neurological diseases. It is also drawn considerable attention in bone disease since it mainly produced by the gut. Serotonin 6 G-protein-coupled receptor (5-HT6R) is clinical targets for the treatment of neurological diseases. However, 5-HT6R as a therapeutic target in bone has not been reported. Herein, we found that 5-HT6R showed higher expression in bone, and its expression was increased during bone remodeling and osteoblast differentiation. The activation of 5-HT6R by ST1936 caused the inhibition of ALP activity and mineralization in primary osteoblast cultures, which was antagonized by SB258585, an antagonist and by the knockdown of 5-HT6R. Further investigation indicated that 5-HT6R inhibited osteoblast differentiation via Jab1 in BMP2 signaling but not PKA and ERK1/2. In vivo studies showed that the activation of 5-HT6R inhibited bone regeneration in the calvarial defect mice and also delayed bone development in newborn mice; this response was antagonized by SB258585. Therefore, our findings indicate a key role of 5-HT6R in bone formation through serotonin originating in the peripheral system, and suggest that it is a novel therapeutic target for drug development in the bone repair and bone diseases. PMID:27581523

  2. Serotonin modulates responses to species-specific vocalizations in the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Laura M; Pollak, George D

    2005-06-01

    Neuromodulators such as serotonin are capable of altering the neural processing of stimuli across many sensory modalities. In the inferior colliculus, a major midbrain auditory gateway, serotonin alters the way that individual neurons respond to simple tone bursts and linear frequency modulated sweeps. The effects of serotonin are complex, and vary among neurons. How serotonin transforms the responses to spectrotemporally complex sounds of the type normally heard in natural settings has been poorly examined. To explore this issue further, the effects of iontophoretically applied serotonin on the responses of individual inferior colliculus neurons to a variety of recorded species-specific vocalizations were examined. These experiments were performed in the Mexican free-tailed bat, a species that uses a rich repertoire of vocalizations for the purposes of communication as well as echolocation. Serotonin frequently changed the number of recorded calls that were capable of evoking a response from individual neurons, sometimes increasing (15% of serotonin-responsive neurons), but usually decreasing (62% of serotonin-responsive neurons), this number. A functional consequence of these serotonin-evoked changes would be to change the population response to species-specific vocalizations. PMID:15830241

  3. Sex- and SERT-mediated differences in stimulated serotonin revealed by fast microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongyan; Sampson, Maureen M; Senturk, Damla; Andrews, Anne M

    2015-08-19

    In vivo microdialysis is widely used to investigate how neurotransmitter levels in the brain respond to biologically relevant challenges. Here, we combined recent improvements in the temporal resolution of online sampling and analysis for serotonin with a brief high-K(+) stimulus paradigm to study the dynamics of evoked release. We observed stimulated serotonin overflow with high-K(+) pulses as short as 1 min when determined with 2-min dialysate sampling in ventral striatum. Stimulated serotonin levels in female mice during the high estrogen period of the estrous cycle were similar to serotonin levels in male mice. By contrast, stimulated serotonin overflow during the low estrogen period in female mice was increased to levels similar to those in male mice with local serotonin transporter (SERT) inhibition. Stimulated serotonin levels in mice with constitutive loss of SERT were considerably higher yet, pointing to neuroadaptive potentiation of serotonin release. When combined with brief K(+) stimulation, fast microdialysis reveals dynamic changes in extracellular serotonin levels associated with normal hormonal cycles and pharmacologic vs genetic loss of SERT function.

  4. Radioenzymatic microassay for picogram quantities of serotonin or acetylserotonin in biological fluids and tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, M.N.; Benedict, C.R.

    1987-06-01

    This paper describes several modifications of the original radioenzymatic assay for serotonin which increase the sensitivity of the assay 20-fold as well as enhance its reliability. Using this method serotonin concentrations can be directly measured in biological examples without precleaning the sample. When compared to currently available methods this assay is specific and sensitive to approximately 1 pg of serotonin and can be used to measure serotonin levels in individual brain nuclei or microliter quantities of biological fluids. This assay can be easily adapted for the direct measurement of N-acetylserotonin. A large number of samples can be assayed in a single working day.

  5. Serotonin syndrome caused by fentanyl and methadone in a burn injury.

    PubMed

    Hillman, Ashley D; Witenko, Corey J; Sultan, Said M; Gala, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin syndrome is a syndrome identified by a triad of altered mental status, neuromuscular overactivity, and autonomic instability caused by the overstimulation of serotonin in the central nervous system and periphery. Serotonin syndrome may be provoked with the addition or increase in serotonergic agents such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants, and monoamine oxidase inhibitors as well as other agents with serotonergic properties. Some narcotics, including fentanyl and methadone, have these properties and may be associated with the development of serotonin syndrome when used in conjunction with other agents. Currently, there are no identified case reports of narcotics as the sole agent causing serotonin syndrome. This report provides a brief overview of serotonin syndrome, particularly with cases involving administration of narcotics such as fentanyl and methadone. The case described is the first report associated with fentanyl and methadone without the coadministration of other serotonergic agents, and a possible drug interaction with voriconazole is discussed. This raises awareness of using multiple serotonergic narcotics and the potential precipitation of serotonin syndrome.

  6. Effects of 60-Hz electric fields on serotonin metabolism in the rat pineal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.E.; Hilton, D.I.; Phillips, R.D.; Wilson, B.W.; Chess, E.K.

    1982-06-01

    Serotonin and two of its metabolites, melatonin and 5-methoxytryptophol, exhibit circadian rhythmicity in the pineal gland. We recently reported a marked reduction in the normal night-time increase in melatonin concentration in the pineal glands of rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. Concomitant with the apparent abolition of melatonin rhythmicity, serotonin-N-acetyl transferase (SNAT) activity was suppressed. We have now conducted studies to determine if abolition of the rhythm in melatonin production in electric-field-exposed rats arises solely from interference in SNAT activity, or if the availability of pineal serotonin is a factor that is affected by exposure. Pineal serotonin concentrations were compared in rats that were either exposed or sham exposed to 65 kV/m for 30 days. Sham-exposed animals exhibited normal diurnal rhythmicity for pineal concentrations of both melatonin and serotonin; melatonin levels increased markedly during the dark phase with a concurrent decrease in serotonin levels. In the exposed animals, however, normal serotonin rhythmicity was abolished; serotonin levels in these animals did not increase during the light period. The conclusion that electric field exposure results in a biochemical alteration in SNAT enzyme activity can be inferred from the loss of both serotonin and melatonin rhythmicity, as well as by direct measurement of SNAT activity itself. 35 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  7. Depressing Antidepressant: Fluoxetine Affects Serotonin Neurons Causing Adverse Reproductive Responses in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Campos, Bruno; Rivetti, Claudia; Kress, Timm; Barata, Carlos; Dircksen, Heinrich

    2016-06-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are widely used antidepressants. As endocrine disruptive contaminants in the environment, SSRIs affect reproduction in aquatic organisms. In the water flea Daphnia magna, SSRIs increase offspring production in a food ration-dependent manner. At limiting food conditions, females exposed to SSRIs produce more but smaller offspring, which is a maladaptive life-history strategy. We asked whether increased serotonin levels in newly identified serotonin-neurons in the Daphnia brain mediate these effects. We provide strong evidence that exogenous SSRI fluoxetine selectively increases serotonin-immunoreactivity in identified brain neurons under limiting food conditions thereby leading to maladaptive offspring production. Fluoxetine increases serotonin-immunoreactivity at low food conditions to similar maximal levels as observed under high food conditions and concomitantly enhances offspring production. Sublethal amounts of the neurotoxin 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine known to specifically ablate serotonin-neurons markedly decrease serotonin-immunoreactivity and offspring production, strongly supporting the effect to be serotonin-specific by reversing the reproductive phenotype attained under fluoxetine. Thus, SSRIs impair serotonin-regulation of reproductive investment in a planktonic key organism causing inappropriately increased reproduction with potentially severe ecological impact. PMID:27128505

  8. Serotonin content of platelets in inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Correlation with clinical activity.

    PubMed

    Zeller, J; Weissbarth, E; Baruth, B; Mielke, H; Deicher, H

    1983-04-01

    Significantly decreased platelet serotonin contents were measured in rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), progressive systemic sclerosis, and mixed connective tissue disease. An inverse relationship between platelet serotonin levels and clinical disease activity was observed in both rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. SLE patients with multiple organ involvement showed the lowest platelet serotonin values. No correlation was observed between platelet serotonin contents and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug treatment, presence of circulating platelet reactive IgG, or the amount of circulating immune complexes. The results are interpreted as indicating platelet release occurring in vivo during inflammatory episodes of the rheumatic disorders investigated. PMID:6838676

  9. [The role of serotonin in the immune system development and functioning during ontogenesis].

    PubMed

    Mel'nikova, V I; Izvol'skaia, M S; Voronova, S N; Zakharova, L A

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the influence of serotonin on the development and functioning of T- and B-cell-mediated immunity during ontogenesis using the pharmacological model of serotonin depletion in rat fetuses. It has been demonstrated that prenatal serotonin deficiency resulted in a decrease in thymus and spleen weights, changes in their cellular composition, and long-lasting disturbances in cell-mediated and humoral immunity in postnatal ontogenesis. The data obtained suggest that serotonin may be considered a morphogenic factor in development of the immune system. PMID:22834312

  10. Sex- and SERT-mediated differences in stimulated serotonin revealed by fast microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongyan; Sampson, Maureen M; Senturk, Damla; Andrews, Anne M

    2015-08-19

    In vivo microdialysis is widely used to investigate how neurotransmitter levels in the brain respond to biologically relevant challenges. Here, we combined recent improvements in the temporal resolution of online sampling and analysis for serotonin with a brief high-K(+) stimulus paradigm to study the dynamics of evoked release. We observed stimulated serotonin overflow with high-K(+) pulses as short as 1 min when determined with 2-min dialysate sampling in ventral striatum. Stimulated serotonin levels in female mice during the high estrogen period of the estrous cycle were similar to serotonin levels in male mice. By contrast, stimulated serotonin overflow during the low estrogen period in female mice was increased to levels similar to those in male mice with local serotonin transporter (SERT) inhibition. Stimulated serotonin levels in mice with constitutive loss of SERT were considerably higher yet, pointing to neuroadaptive potentiation of serotonin release. When combined with brief K(+) stimulation, fast microdialysis reveals dynamic changes in extracellular serotonin levels associated with normal hormonal cycles and pharmacologic vs genetic loss of SERT function. PMID:26167657

  11. Interference of paracetamol (acetaminophen) with a commercially available high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of serotonin leading to falsely low serotonin levels.

    PubMed

    Pfäfflin, Albrecht; Müssig, Karsten; Schleicher, Erwin

    2009-03-01

    Serotonin is frequently analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with electrochemical detection. However, the accuracy of these methods may be affected by the presence of certain drugs. We describe for the first time the interference of paracetamol in therapeutic dosages in a routine HPLC method for serotonin determination in vivo and in vitro. The retention time coincides with N-methylserotonin used as an internal standard in this method. Erroneous increases of the internal standard will lead, if not recognized and corrected, to falsely low serotonin determinations.

  12. Seasonal difference in brain serotonin transporter binding predicts symptom severity in patients with seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Mc Mahon, Brenda; Andersen, Sofie B; Madsen, Martin K; Hjordt, Liv V; Hageman, Ida; Dam, Henrik; Svarer, Claus; da Cunha-Bang, Sofi; Baaré, William; Madsen, Jacob; Hasholt, Lis; Holst, Klaus; Frokjaer, Vibe G; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2016-05-01

    Cross-sectional neuroimaging studies in non-depressed individuals have demonstrated an inverse relationship between daylight minutes and cerebral serotonin transporter; this relationship is modified by serotonin-transporter-linked polymorphic region short allele carrier status. We here present data from the first longitudinal investigation of seasonal serotonin transporter fluctuations in both patients with seasonal affective disorder and in healthy individuals. Eighty (11)C-DASB positron emission tomography scans were conducted to quantify cerebral serotonin transporter binding; 23 healthy controls with low seasonality scores and 17 patients diagnosed with seasonal affective disorder were scanned in both summer and winter to investigate differences in cerebral serotonin transporter binding across groups and across seasons. The two groups had similar cerebral serotonin transporter binding in the summer but in their symptomatic phase during winter, patients with seasonal affective disorder had higher serotonin transporter than the healthy control subjects (P = 0.01). Compared to the healthy controls, patients with seasonal affective disorder changed their serotonin transporter significantly less between summer and winter (P < 0.001). Further, the change in serotonin transporter was sex- (P = 0.02) and genotype- (P = 0.04) dependent. In the patients with seasonal affective disorder, the seasonal change in serotonin transporter binding was positively associated with change in depressive symptom severity, as indexed by Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression - Seasonal Affective Disorder version scores (P = 0.01). Our findings suggest that the development of depressive symptoms in winter is associated with a failure to downregulate serotonin transporter levels appropriately during exposure to the environmental stress of winter, especially in individuals with high predisposition to affective disorders.media-1vid110.1093/brain/aww043_video_abstractaww043_video

  13. Seasonal difference in brain serotonin transporter binding predicts symptom severity in patients with seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Mc Mahon, Brenda; Andersen, Sofie B; Madsen, Martin K; Hjordt, Liv V; Hageman, Ida; Dam, Henrik; Svarer, Claus; da Cunha-Bang, Sofi; Baaré, William; Madsen, Jacob; Hasholt, Lis; Holst, Klaus; Frokjaer, Vibe G; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2016-05-01

    Cross-sectional neuroimaging studies in non-depressed individuals have demonstrated an inverse relationship between daylight minutes and cerebral serotonin transporter; this relationship is modified by serotonin-transporter-linked polymorphic region short allele carrier status. We here present data from the first longitudinal investigation of seasonal serotonin transporter fluctuations in both patients with seasonal affective disorder and in healthy individuals. Eighty (11)C-DASB positron emission tomography scans were conducted to quantify cerebral serotonin transporter binding; 23 healthy controls with low seasonality scores and 17 patients diagnosed with seasonal affective disorder were scanned in both summer and winter to investigate differences in cerebral serotonin transporter binding across groups and across seasons. The two groups had similar cerebral serotonin transporter binding in the summer but in their symptomatic phase during winter, patients with seasonal affective disorder had higher serotonin transporter than the healthy control subjects (P = 0.01). Compared to the healthy controls, patients with seasonal affective disorder changed their serotonin transporter significantly less between summer and winter (P < 0.001). Further, the change in serotonin transporter was sex- (P = 0.02) and genotype- (P = 0.04) dependent. In the patients with seasonal affective disorder, the seasonal change in serotonin transporter binding was positively associated with change in depressive symptom severity, as indexed by Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression - Seasonal Affective Disorder version scores (P = 0.01). Our findings suggest that the development of depressive symptoms in winter is associated with a failure to downregulate serotonin transporter levels appropriately during exposure to the environmental stress of winter, especially in individuals with high predisposition to affective disorders.media-1vid110.1093/brain/aww043_video_abstractaww043_video_abstract.

  14. Melatonin Supports CYP2D-Mediated Serotonin Synthesis in the Brain.

    PubMed

    Haduch, Anna; Bromek, Ewa; Wójcikowski, Jacek; Gołembiowska, Krystyna; Daniel, Władysława A

    2016-03-01

    Melatonin is used in the therapy of sleep and mood disorders and as a neuroprotective agent. The aim of our study was to demonstrate that melatonin supported (via its deacetylation to 5-methoxytryptamine) CYP2D-mediated synthesis of serotonin from 5-methoxytryptamine. We measured serotonin tissue content in some brain regions (the cortex, hippocampus, nucleus accumbens, striatum, thalamus, hypothalamus, brain stem, medulla oblongata, and cerebellum) (model A), as well as its extracellular concentration in the striatum using an in vivo microdialysis (model B) after melatonin injection (100 mg/kg i.p.) to male Wistar rats. Melatonin increased the tissue concentration of serotonin in the brain structures studied of naïve, sham-operated, or serotonergic neurotoxin (5,7-dihydroxytryptamine)-lesioned rats (model A). Intracerebroventricular quinine (a CYP2D inhibitor) prevented the melatonin-induced increase in serotonin concentration. In the presence of pargyline (a monoaminoxidase inhibitor), the effect of melatonin was not visible in the majority of the brain structures studied but could be seen in all of them in 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine-lesioned animals when serotonin storage and synthesis via a classic tryptophan pathway was diminished. Melatonin alone did not significantly increase extracellular serotonin concentration in the striatum of naïve rats but raised its content in pargyline-pretreated animals (model B). The CYP2D inhibitor propafenone given intrastructurally prevented the melatonin-induced increase in striatal serotonin in those animals. The obtained results indicate that melatonin supports CYP2D-catalyzed serotonin synthesis from 5-methoxytryptamine in the brain in vivo, which closes the serotonin-melatonin-serotonin biochemical cycle. The metabolism of exogenous melatonin to the neurotransmitter serotonin may be regarded as a newly recognized additional component of its pharmacological action.

  15. Alcohol misuse in emerging adulthood: Association of dopamine and serotonin receptor genes with impulsivity-related cognition.

    PubMed

    Leamy, Talia E; Connor, Jason P; Voisey, Joanne; Young, Ross McD; Gullo, Matthew J

    2016-12-01

    Impulsivity predicts alcohol misuse and risk for alcohol use disorder. Cognition mediates much of this association. Genes also account for a large amount of variance in alcohol misuse, with dopamine and serotonin receptor genes of particular interest, because of their role in motivated behavior. The precise psychological mechanisms through which such genes confer risk is unclear. Trait impulsivity conveys risk for alcohol misuse by influencing two distinct domains of cognition: beliefs about the reinforcing effects of alcohol consumption (positive alcohol expectancy) and the perceived ability to resist it (drinking refusal self-efficacy). This study investigated the effect of the dopamine-related polymorphism in the DRD2/ANKK1 gene (rs1800497) and a serotonin-related polymorphism in the HTR2A gene (rs6313) on associations between impulsivity, cognition, and alcohol misuse in 120 emerging adults (18-21years). HTR2A predicted lower positive alcohol expectancy, higher refusal self-efficacy, and lower alcohol misuse. However, neither polymorphism moderated the linkages between impulsivity, cognition, and alcohol misuse. This is the first report of an association between HTR2A and alcohol-related cognition. Theoretically-driven biopsychosocial models have potential to elucidate the specific cognitive mechanisms through which distal risk factors like genes and temperament affect alcohol misuse in emerging adulthood. PMID:27399274

  16. Brain serotonin determines maternal behavior and offspring survival

    PubMed Central

    Angoa-Pérez, M.; Kane, M. J.; Sykes, C. E.; Perrine, S. A.; Church, M. W.; Kuhn, D. M.

    2016-01-01

    Maternal care is an indispensable component of offspring survival and development in all mammals and necessary for reproductive success. Although brain areas regulating maternal behaviors are innervated by serotonergic afferents, very little is known about the role of this neuro-transmitter in these behaviors. To evaluate the contribution of serotonin to maternal care, we used mice with a null mutation in the gene for tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (TPH2), which results in a genetic depletion of brain serotonin, and tested them in a wide range of maternal behavior paradigms. We found that litters born to and reared by TPH2−/− mothers showed decreased survival, lower weaning weights and increased cannibalization. In addition, TPH2−/− mothers performed poorly in pup retrieval, huddling, nest construction and high-arched back nursing. Aggression in TPH2−/− dams was not triggered by lactation and was steadily high. Survival and weaning weight deficits of TPH2−/− pups were rescued by cross-fostering and in litters of mixed genotype (TPH2−/− and TPH2−/+). However, the maternal behaviors of TPH2−/− dams did not improve when rearing either TPH2+/+ pups or mixed-genotype litters. In addition, TPH2−/− pups significantly worsened the behavior of TPH2+/+ dams with respect to cannibalism, weaning weight and latency to attack. Olfactory and auditory functions of TPH2−/− females or anxiety-like behaviors did not account for these maternal alterations as they were equal to their TPH2+/+ counterparts. These findings illustrate a profound influence of brain serotonin on virtually all elements of maternal behavior and establish that TPH2−/− pups can engender maladaptive mothering in dams of both genotypes. PMID:25077934

  17. Serotonin transporter gene polymorphisms and treatment-resistant depression.

    PubMed

    Bonvicini, Cristian; Minelli, Alessandra; Scassellati, Catia; Bortolomasi, Marco; Segala, Matilde; Sartori, Riccardo; Giacopuzzi, Mario; Gennarelli, Massimo

    2010-08-16

    Major Depression Disorder (MDD) is a serious mental illness that is one of the most disabling diseases worldwide. In addition, approximately 15% of depression patients are defined treatment-resistant (TRD). Preclinical and genetic studies show that serotonin modulation dysfunction exists in patients with TRD. Some polymorphisms in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) are likely to be involved in the pathogenesis/treatment of MDD; however, no data are available concerning TRD. Therefore, in order to investigate the possible influence of SLC6A4 polymorphisms on the risk of TRD, we genotyped 310 DSM-IV MDD treatment-resistant patients and 284 healthy volunteers. We analysed the most studied polymorphism 5-HTTLPR (L/S) and a single nucleotide substitution, rs25531 (A/G), in relation to different functional haplotype combinations. However the correct mapping of rs25531 is still debated whether it is within or outside the insertion. Our sequencing analysis showed that rs25531 is immediately outside of the 5-HTTLPR segment. Differences in 5-HTTLPR allele (p=0.04) and in L allele carriers (p<0.05) were observed between the two groups. Concerning the estimated haplotype analyses, L(A)L(A) homozygote haplotype was more represented among the control subjects (p=0.01, OR=0.64 95%CI: 0.45-0.91). In conclusion, this study reports a protective effect of the L(A)L(A) haplotype on TRD, supporting the hypothesis that lower serotonin transporter transcription alleles are correlated to a common resistant depression mechanism.

  18. Serotonin neurones have anti-convulsant effects and reduce seizure-induced mortality

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Gordon F; Murray, Nicholas M; Hajek, Michael A; Richerson, George B

    2014-01-01

    Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is the leading cause of death in patients with refractory epilepsy. Defects in central control of breathing are important contributors to the pathophysiology of SUDEP, and serotonin (5-HT) system dysfunction may be involved. Here we examined the effect of 5-HT neurone elimination or 5-HT reduction on seizure risk and seizure-induced mortality. Adult Lmx1bf/f/p mice, which lack >99% of 5-HT neurones in the CNS, and littermate controls (Lmx1bf/f) were subjected to acute seizure induction by maximal electroshock (MES) or pilocarpine, variably including electroencephalography, electrocardiography, plethysmography, mechanical ventilation or pharmacological therapy. Lmx1bf/f/p mice had a lower seizure threshold and increased seizure-induced mortality. Breathing ceased during most seizures without recovery, whereas cardiac activity persisted for up to 9 min before terminal arrest. The mortality rate of mice of both genotypes was reduced by mechanical ventilation during the seizure or 5-HT2A receptor agonist pretreatment. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram reduced mortality of Lmx1bf/f but not of Lmx1bf/f/p mice. In C57BL/6N mice, reduction of 5-HT synthesis with para-chlorophenylalanine increased MES-induced seizure severity but not mortality. We conclude that 5-HT neurones raise seizure threshold and decrease seizure-related mortality. Death ensued from respiratory failure, followed by terminal asystole. Given that SUDEP often occurs in association with generalised seizures, some mechanisms causing death in our model might be shared with those leading to SUDEP. This model may help determine the relationship between seizures, 5-HT system dysfunction, breathing and death, which may lead to novel ways to prevent SUDEP. PMID:25107926

  19. Perioperative Diagnosis and Treatment of Serotonin Syndrome Following Administration of Methylene Blue

    PubMed Central

    Francescangeli, James; Vaida, Sonia; Bonavia, Anthony S.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 67 Final Diagnosis: Serotonin syndrome Symptoms: Agitation • muscular spasticity, deficient muscular control • nystygmus • sweating • tachycardia Medication: Methylene Blue Clinical Procedure: Total abdominal colectomy Specialty: Anesthesiology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Serotonin syndrome (SS) involves serotonergic hyperactivity caused by excessive activation of 5-HT2A receptors. As the use of antidepressants increases, so does the population of patients at risk for developing this complication. The diagnosis is made based on current serotonergic medication use in conjunction with certain clinical signs. The severity of the clinical presentation may vary, especially when the complication occurs while the patient is under general anesthesia. As a result, the incidence of SS is likely underreported and treatment may be delayed, leading to life-threatening complications. Case Report: A 67-year-old, American Society of Anesthesiologist physical status 3 male with multiple medical comorbidities, including anxiety/depression and chronic neck pain, presented for an elective laparoscopic total abdominal colectomy for colonic inertia. His intraoperative course was significant for SS likely triggered by the administration of methylene blue, which only became clinically apparent during anesthetic emergence. We considered and systematically ruled out other potential causes of his clinical condition. His management was primarily supportive, using hydration and benzodiazepine administration, and resulted in full neurologic recovery. Conclusions: SS is an underdiagnosed condition with limited treatment options beyond symptom management. Thus, vigilance, early diagnosis, and cessation of offending medications are of utmost importance. Anesthesiologists managing at-risk surgical patients must have a high clinical suspicion of perioperative SS if their patients exhibit tachycardia, hypertension, and hyperthermia together with clonus

  20. Differential contributions of serotonin receptors to the behavioral effects of indoleamine hallucinogens in mice.

    PubMed

    Halberstadt, Adam L; Koedood, Liselore; Powell, Susan B; Geyer, Mark A

    2011-11-01

    Psilocin (4-hydroxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine) is a hallucinogen that acts as an agonist at 5-HT(1A), 5-HT(2A), and 5-HT(2C) receptors. Psilocin is the active metabolite of psilocybin, a hallucinogen that is currently being investigated clinically as a potential therapeutic agent. In the present investigation, we used a combination of genetic and pharmacological approaches to identify the serotonin (5-HT) receptor subtypes responsible for mediating the effects of psilocin on head twitch response (HTR) and the behavioral pattern monitor (BPM) in C57BL/6J mice. We also compared the effects of psilocin with those of the putative 5-HT(2C) receptor-selective agonist 1-methylpsilocin and the hallucinogen and non-selective serotonin receptor agonist 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT). Psilocin, 1-methylpsilocin, and 5-MeO-DMT induced the HTR, effects that were absent in mice lacking the 5-HT(2A) receptor gene. When tested in the BPM, psilocin decreased locomotor activity, holepoking, and time spent in the center of the chamber, effects that were blocked by the selective 5-HT(1A) antagonist WAY-100635 but were not altered by the selective 5-HT(2C) antagonist SB 242,084 or by 5-HT(2A) receptor gene deletion. 5-MeO-DMT produced similar effects when tested in the BPM, and the action of 5-MeO-DMT was significantly attenuated by WAY-100635. Psilocin and 5-MeO-DMT also decreased the linearity of locomotor paths, effects that were mediated by 5-HT(2C) and 5-HT(1A) receptors, respectively. In contrast to psilocin and 5-MeO-DMT, 1-methylpsilocin (0.6-9.6 mg/kg) was completely inactive in the BPM. These findings confirm that psilocin acts as an agonist at 5-HT(1A), 5-HT(2A), and 5-HT(2C) receptors in mice, whereas the behavioral effects of 1-methylpsilocin indicate that this compound is acting at 5-HT(2A) sites but is inactive at the 5-HT(1A) receptor. The fact that 1-methylpsilocin displays greater pharmacological selectivity than psilocin indicates that 1-methylpsilocin

  1. Selecting a Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor: Clinically Important Distinguishing Features

    PubMed Central

    Marken, Patricia A.; Munro, J. Stuart

    2000-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are widely prescribed to treat depression. Although these drugs presumably have the same mechanism of action, they vary in several clinically important ways, including how long they remain in the body and the extent to which they interfere with the metabolism of other medications. This article reviews the pharmacologic differences among SSRIs and how these differences may affect various aspects of treatment, such as dosing, administration, and discontinuation. Understanding the distinct properties of SSRIs may help primary care physicians to design the most appropriate therapeutic plan for individual patients. PMID:15014630

  2. Discovery of a Potent, Dual Serotonin and Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the described research effort was to identify a novel serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) with improved norepinephrine transporter activity and acceptable metabolic stability and exhibiting minimal drug–drug interaction. We describe herein the discovery of a series of 3-substituted pyrrolidines, exemplified by compound 1. Compound 1 is a selective SNRI in vitro and in vivo, has favorable ADME properties, and retains inhibitory activity in the formalin model of pain behavior. Compound 1 thus represents a potential new probe to explore utility of SNRIs in central nervous system disorders, including chronic pain conditions. PMID:24900709

  3. Autoradiographic location of multiple serotonin receptors. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.L.G.

    1983-02-01

    Autoradiographic localization of receptors in an attempt to determine the locations of different populations of serotonin (5HT) receptors in the CNS was examined. Data confirmed that the auto radiographic technique for visualizing ligand-binding sites can be used to localize 5HT-1 receptors within very small regions of the brain. The hypothesis that it should be possible to use this technique to localize different populations of the 5HT-1 sites based on their differential sensitivities to drugs was also confirmed.

  4. Histamine, norepinephrine and serotonin content of nasal polyps.

    PubMed

    Bumsted, R M; El-Ackad, T; Smith, J M; Brody, M J

    1979-05-01

    Histamine, norepinephrine and serotonin were assayed and localized by fluorescence histochemistry in normal mucosa and nasal polyps because of their possible role in the development of inflammation and edema. Histamine was present in greater concentration in nasal polyps than in normal mucosa. Norepinephrine was present primarily in the base of nasal polyps and in greater concentration than in normal mucosa. Patients with aspirin sensitivity and asthma had much lower histamine concentrations in their nasal polyps than all other patients with nasal polyps. A proposal for a possible mechanism of formation of nasal polyps based on vascular and inflammatory mechanisms and incorporative roles for histamine and norepinephrine is presented.

  5. Induction of depersonalization by the serotonin agonist meta-chlorophenylpiperazine.

    PubMed

    Simeon, D; Hollander, E; Stein, D J; DeCaria, C; Cohen, L J; Saoud, J B; Islam, N; Hwang, M

    1995-09-29

    Sixty-seven subjects, including normal volunteers and patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder, social phobia, and borderline personality disorder, received ratings of depersonalization after double-blind, placebo-controlled challenges with the partial serotonin agonist meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (m-CPP). Challenge with m-CPP induced depersonalization significantly more than did placebo. Subjects who became depersonalized did not differ in age, sex, or diagnosis from those who did not experience depersonalization. There was a significant correlation between the induction of depersonalization and increase in panic, but not nervousness, anxiety, sadness, depression, or drowsiness. This report suggests that serotonergic dysregulation may in part underlie depersonalization.

  6. Different serotonin receptor agonists have distinct effects on sound-evoked responses in inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Laura M

    2006-11-01

    The neuromodulator serotonin has a complex set of effects on the auditory responses of neurons within the inferior colliculus (IC), a midbrain auditory nucleus that integrates a wide range of inputs from auditory and nonauditory sources. To determine whether activation of different types of serotonin receptors is a source of the variability in serotonergic effects, four selective agonists of serotonin receptors in the serotonin (5-HT) 1 and 5-HT2 families were iontophoretically applied to IC neurons, which were monitored for changes in their responses to auditory stimuli. Different agonists had different effects on neural responses. The 5-HT1A agonist had mixed facilitatory and depressive effects, whereas 5-HT1B and 5-HT2C agonists were both largely facilitatory. Different agonists changed threshold and frequency tuning in ways that reflected their effects on spike count. When pairs of agonists were applied sequentially to the same neurons, selective agonists sometimes affected neurons in ways that were similar to serotonin, but not to other selective agonists tested. Different agonists also differentially affected groups of neurons classified by the shapes of their frequency-tuning curves, with serotonin and the 5-HT1 receptors affecting proportionally more non-V-type neurons relative to the other agonists tested. In all, evidence suggests that the diversity of serotonin receptor subtypes in the IC is likely to account for at least some of the variability of the effects of serotonin and that receptor subtypes fulfill specialized roles in auditory processing. PMID:16870843

  7. Brief Report: Whole Blood Serotonin Levels and Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marler, Sarah; Ferguson, Bradley J.; Lee, Evon Batey; Peters, Brittany; Williams, Kent C.; McDonnell, Erin; Macklin, Eric A.; Levitt, Pat; Gillespie, Catherine Hagan; Anderson, George M.; Margolis, Kara Gross; Beversdorf, David Q.; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Elevated whole blood serotonin levels are observed in more than 25% of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Co-occurring gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms are also common in ASD but have not previously been examined in relationship with hyperserotonemia, despite the synthesis of serotonin in the gut. In 82 children and adolescents with ASD,…

  8. The neurotransmitters serotonin and glutamate accelerate the heart rate of the mosquito Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Hillyer, Julián F; Estévez-Lao, Tania Y; Mirzai, Homa E

    2015-10-01

    Serotonin and glutamate are neurotransmitters that in insects are involved in diverse physiological processes. Both serotonin and glutamate have been shown to modulate the physiology of the dorsal vessel of some insects, yet until the present study, their activity in mosquitoes remained unknown. To test whether serotonin or glutamate regulate dorsal vessel physiology in the African malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae, live mosquitoes were restrained, and a video of the contracting heart (the abdominal portion of the dorsal vessel) was acquired. These adult female mosquitoes were then injected with various amounts of serotonin, glutamate, or a control vehicle solution, and additional videos were acquired at 2 and 10 min post-treatment. Comparison of the videos taken before and after treatment revealed that serotonin accelerates the frequency of heart contractions, with the cardioacceleration being significantly more pronounced when the wave-like contractions of cardiac muscle propagate in the anterograde direction (toward the head). Comparison of the videos taken before and after treatment with glutamate revealed that this molecule is also cardioacceleratory. However, unlike serotonin, the activity of glutamate does not depend on whether the contractions propagate in the anterograde or the retrograde (toward the posterior of the abdomen) directions. Serotonin or glutamate induces a minor change or no change in the percentage of contractions and the percentage of the time that the heart contracts in the anterograde or the retrograde directions. In summary, this study shows that the neurotransmitters serotonin and glutamate increase the heart contraction rate of mosquitoes. PMID:26099947

  9. The neurotransmitters serotonin and glutamate accelerate the heart rate of the mosquito Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Hillyer, Julián F; Estévez-Lao, Tania Y; Mirzai, Homa E

    2015-10-01

    Serotonin and glutamate are neurotransmitters that in insects are involved in diverse physiological processes. Both serotonin and glutamate have been shown to modulate the physiology of the dorsal vessel of some insects, yet until the present study, their activity in mosquitoes remained unknown. To test whether serotonin or glutamate regulate dorsal vessel physiology in the African malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae, live mosquitoes were restrained, and a video of the contracting heart (the abdominal portion of the dorsal vessel) was acquired. These adult female mosquitoes were then injected with various amounts of serotonin, glutamate, or a control vehicle solution, and additional videos were acquired at 2 and 10 min post-treatment. Comparison of the videos taken before and after treatment revealed that serotonin accelerates the frequency of heart contractions, with the cardioacceleration being significantly more pronounced when the wave-like contractions of cardiac muscle propagate in the anterograde direction (toward the head). Comparison of the videos taken before and after treatment with glutamate revealed that this molecule is also cardioacceleratory. However, unlike serotonin, the activity of glutamate does not depend on whether the contractions propagate in the anterograde or the retrograde (toward the posterior of the abdomen) directions. Serotonin or glutamate induces a minor change or no change in the percentage of contractions and the percentage of the time that the heart contracts in the anterograde or the retrograde directions. In summary, this study shows that the neurotransmitters serotonin and glutamate increase the heart contraction rate of mosquitoes.

  10. Effect of epinephrine and serotonin on hepatic poly(A)/sup +/ RNA synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, A.K.; Bhadra, R.; Datta, A.G.

    1985-06-17

    In vivo administration of epinephrine or serotonin has been shown to stimulate the incorporation of /sup 14/C-orotic acid into Poly(A)/sup +/ RNA. However, only epinephrine and not serotonin could stimulate DNA dependent RNA polymerase activity of isolated hepatic nuclei in in vitro experiments. 21 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

  11. Asthma Medication and the Role of Serotonin in the Development of Cognitive and Psychological Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pretorius, E.

    2005-01-01

    This literature review will focus on the discussion of asthma and how it affects the sufferer. The role of serotonin and its physiological working at a neural level will follow, as well as the effects of corticosteroids on the brain and how low serotonin levels are linked to depression and corticosteroid use.

  12. Effects of early serotonin programming on behavior and central monoamine concentrations in an avian model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serotonin (5-HT) acts as a neurogenic compound in the developing brain; however serotonin altering drugs such as SSRIs are often prescribed to pregnant and lactating mothers. Early agonism of 5-HT receptors could alter the development of serotonergic circuitry, altering neurotransmission and behavio...

  13. Activation of dorsal raphe serotonin neurons underlies waiting for delayed rewards.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Katsuhiko; Miyazaki, Kayoko W; Doya, Kenji

    2011-01-12

    The serotonergic system plays a key role in the control of impulsive behaviors. Forebrain serotonin depletion leads to premature actions and steepens discounting of delayed rewards. However, there has been no direct evidence for serotonin neuron activity in relation to actions for delayed rewards. Here we show that serotonin neurons increase their tonic firing while rats wait for food and water rewards and conditioned reinforcement tones. The rate of tonic firing during the delay period was significantly higher for rewards than for tones, for which rats could not wait as long. When the delay was extended, tonic firing persisted until reward or tone delivery. When rats gave up waiting because of extended delay or reward omission, serotonin neuron firing dropped preceding the exit from reward sites. Serotonin neurons did not show significant response when an expected reward was omitted, which was predicted by the theory that serotonin signals negative reward prediction errors. These results suggest that increased serotonin neuron firing facilitates a rat's waiting behavior in prospect of forthcoming rewards and that higher serotonin activation enables longer waiting.

  14. Serotonin binds specifically and saturably to an actin-like protein isolated from rat brain synaptosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Small, D H; Wurtman, R J

    1984-01-01

    A soluble serotonin-binding protein was identified in a high-speed supernatant fraction of an osmotically shocked rat brain synaptosome (P2) preparation. The binding of serotonin was saturable (Bmax = 6.0 nmol per mg of protein) and was specific for serotonin and a few structurally related compounds including dopamine and norepinephrine. Binding of serotonin (1 microM) was inhibited approximately equal to 40% by chlorpromazine (10 microM). The affinity of serotonin for the binding protein was low in the crude extract (Kd = 1.7 X 10(-3)M). However, on purification by chromatography on a column of phenothiazine agarose, a higher affinity (Kd = 10(-5) M) binding component was also observed. The purified protein was greatly enriched in a polypeptide of Mr of 43,000 that comigrated on polyacrylamide gel with skeletal muscle actin. Muscle actin also bound serotonin, and the binding to actin was similar to that of the purified protein in both the specificity of the binding and the affinity for serotonin. It is likely that the serotonin-binding protein is identical to cytoplasmic G-actin or an actin-like protein of similar molecular weight. PMID:6583691

  15. Activation of dorsal raphe serotonin neurons underlies waiting for delayed rewards.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Katsuhiko; Miyazaki, Kayoko W; Doya, Kenji

    2011-01-12

    The serotonergic system plays a key role in the control of impulsive behaviors. Forebrain serotonin depletion leads to premature actions and steepens discounting of delayed rewards. However, there has been no direct evidence for serotonin neuron activity in relation to actions for delayed rewards. Here we show that serotonin neurons increase their tonic firing while rats wait for food and water rewards and conditioned reinforcement tones. The rate of tonic firing during the delay period was significantly higher for rewards than for tones, for which rats could not wait as long. When the delay was extended, tonic firing persisted until reward or tone delivery. When rats gave up waiting because of extended delay or reward omission, serotonin neuron firing dropped preceding the exit from reward sites. Serotonin neurons did not show significant response when an expected reward was omitted, which was predicted by the theory that serotonin signals negative reward prediction errors. These results suggest that increased serotonin neuron firing facilitates a rat's waiting behavior in prospect of forthcoming rewards and that higher serotonin activation enables longer waiting. PMID:21228157

  16. Activation of serotonin receptors promotes microglial injury-induced motility but attenuates phagocytic activity.

    PubMed

    Krabbe, Grietje; Matyash, Vitali; Pannasch, Ulrike; Mamer, Lauren; Boddeke, Hendrikus W G M; Kettenmann, Helmut

    2012-03-01

    Microglia, the brain immune cell, express several neurotransmitter receptors which modulate microglial functions. In this project we studied the impact of serotonin receptor activation on distinct microglial properties as serotonin deficiency not only has been linked to a number of psychiatric disease like depression and anxiety but may also permeate from the periphery through blood-brain barrier openings seen in neurodegenerative disease. First, we tested the impact of serotonin on the microglial response to an insult caused by a laser lesion in the cortex of acute slices from Cx3Cr1-GFP-/+ mice. In the presence of serotonin the microglial processes moved more rapidly towards the laser lesion which is considered to be a chemotactic response to ATP. Similarly, the chemotactic response of cultured microglia to ATP was also enhanced by serotonin. Quantification of phagocytic activity by determining the uptake of microspheres showed that the amoeboid microglia in slices from early postnatal animals or microglia in culture respond to serotonin application with a decreased phagocytic activity whereas we could not detect any significant change in ramified microglia in situ. The presence of microglial serotonin receptors was confirmed by patch-clamp experiments in culture and amoeboid microglia and by qPCR analysis of RNA isolated from primary cultured and acutely isolated adult microglia. These data suggest that microglia express functional serotonin receptors linked to distinct microglial properties. PMID:22198120

  17. Serotonin 2B receptor: upregulated with age and hearing loss in mouse auditory system.

    PubMed

    Tadros, Sherif F; D'Souza, Mary; Zettel, Martha L; Zhu, XiaoXia; Lynch-Erhardt, Martha; Frisina, Robert D

    2007-07-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a monoamine neurotransmitter. Serotonin may modulate afferent fiber discharges in the cochlea, inferior colliculus (IC) and auditory cortex. Specific functions of serotonin are exerted upon its interaction with specific receptors; one of those receptors is the serotonin 2B receptor. The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in gene expression of serotonin 2B receptors with age in cochlea and IC, and the possible correlation between gene expression and functional hearing measurements in CBA/CaJ mice. Immunohistochemical examinations of protein expression of IC in mice of different age groups were also performed. Gene expression results showed that serotonin 2B receptor gene was upregulated with age in both cochlea and IC. A significant correlation between gene expression and functional hearing results was established. Immunohistochemical protein expression studies of IC showed more serotonin 2B receptor cells in old mice relative to young adult mice, particularly in the external nucleus. We conclude that serotonin 2B receptors may play a role in the pathogenesis of age-related hearing loss.

  18. Relationships Between Androgens, Serotonin Gene Expression and Innervation in Male Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Bethea, Cynthia L.; Coleman, Kristine; Phu, Kenny; Reddy, Arubala P.; Phu, Andy

    2014-01-01

    Androgen administration to castrated individuals was purported to decrease activity in the serotonin system. However, we found that androgen administration to castrated male macaques increased fenfluramine-induced serotonin release as reflected by increased prolactin secretion. In this study, we sought to define the effects of androgens and aromatase inhibition on serotonin-related gene expression in the dorsal raphe, as well as serotonergic innervation of the LC. Male Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) were castrated for 5–7 months and then treated for 3 months with [1] placebo, [2] testosterone (T), [3] dihydrotestosterone (DHT; non- aromatizable androgen) and ATD (steroidal aromatase inhibitor), or [4] Flutamide (FLUT; androgen antagonist) and ATD (n=5/group). This study reports the expression of serotonin-related genes: tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2), serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) and the serotonin 1A autoreceptor (5HT1A) using digoxigenin-ISH and image analysis. To examine the production of serotonin and the serotonergic innervation of a target area underlying arousal and vigilance, we measured the serotonin axon density entering the LC with ICC and image analysis. TPH2 and SERT expression were significantly elevated in T- and DHT+ATD- treated groups over placebo- and FLUT+ATD- treated groups in the dorsal raphe (p<0.007). There was no difference in 5HT1A expression between the groups. There was a significant decrease in the pixel area of serotonin axons and in the number of varicosities in the LC across the treatment groups with T > placebo >DHT+ATD = FLUT+ATD treatments. Comparatively, T- and DHT+ATD -treated groups had elevated TPH2 and SERT gene expression, but the DHT+ATD group had markedly suppressed serotonin axon density relative to the T-treated group. Further comparison with previously published data indicated that TPH2 and SERT expression reflected yawning and basal prolactin secretion. The serotonin axon density in the LC agreed with the

  19. Brief Report: Whole Blood Serotonin Levels and Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Marler, Sarah; Ferguson, Bradley J.; Lee, Evon Batey; Peters, Brittany; Williams, Kent C.; McDonnell, Erin; Macklin, Eric A.; Levitt, Pat; Gillespie, Catherine Hagan; Anderson, George M.; Margolis, Kara Gross; Beversdorf, David Q.; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Elevated whole blood serotonin levels are observed in more than 25 % of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Co-occurring gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms are also common in ASD but have not previously been examined in relationship with hyperserotonemia, despite the synthesis of serotonin in the gut. In 82 children and adolescents with ASD, we observed a correlation between a quantitative measure of lower GI symptoms and whole blood serotonin levels. No significant association was seen between functional constipation diagnosis and serotonin levels in the hyperserotonemia range, suggesting that this correlation is not driven by a single subgroup. More specific assessment of gut function, including the microbiome, will be necessary to evaluate the contribution of gut physiology to serotonin levels in ASD. PMID:26527110

  20. Evidence for serotonin function as a neurochemical difference between fear and anxiety disorders in humans?

    PubMed

    Corchs, Felipe; Nutt, David J; Hince, Dana A; Davies, Simon J C; Bernik, Marcio; Hood, Sean D

    2015-10-01

    The relationships between serotonin and fear and anxiety disorders have been much studied yet many important questions remain, despite selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors having been the primary treatments for these disorders for some time. In order to explore this issue we performed a pooled analysis of six of our studies in remitted patients with a fear/anxiety disorder who were exposed to syndrome-specific aversive stimulation under acute tryptophan depletion. We based our analysis on the hypothesis that the inconsistencies observed in the studies could be predicted by Deakin and Graeff's theory about the dual role of serotonin in responses to threats, whereby serotonin is critical to prevent fear (panic) but not anxiety. In accordance with this view, our results give support to a dissociation of the disorders traditionally grouped under fear and anxiety-related disorders in terms of different roles of serotonin in modulation of responses to aversive stimulation. Implications for future studies and psychiatric nosology are discussed.

  1. Serotonin Promotes Development and Regeneration of Spinal Motor Neurons in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Barreiro-Iglesias, Antón; Mysiak, Karolina S; Scott, Angela L; Reimer, Michell M; Yang, Yujie; Becker, Catherina G; Becker, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    In contrast to mammals, zebrafish regenerate spinal motor neurons. During regeneration, developmental signals are re-deployed. Here, we show that, during development, diffuse serotonin promotes spinal motor neuron generation from pMN progenitor cells, leaving interneuron numbers unchanged. Pharmacological manipulations and receptor knockdown indicate that serotonin acts at least in part via 5-HT1A receptors. In adults, serotonin is supplied to the spinal cord mainly (90%) by descending axons from the brain. After a spinal lesion, serotonergic axons degenerate caudal to the lesion but sprout rostral to it. Toxin-mediated ablation of serotonergic axons also rostral to the lesion impaired regeneration of motor neurons only there. Conversely, intraperitoneal serotonin injections doubled numbers of new motor neurons and proliferating pMN-like progenitors caudal to the lesion. Regeneration of spinal-intrinsic serotonergic interneurons was unaltered by these manipulations. Hence, serotonin selectively promotes the development and adult regeneration of motor neurons in zebrafish.

  2. Intact coding region of the serotonin transporter gene in obsessive-compulsive disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Altemus, M.; Murphy, D.L.; Greenberg, B.; Lesch, K.P.

    1996-07-26

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that obsessive-compulsive disorder is genetically transmitted in some families, although no genetic abnormalities have been identified in individuals with this disorder. The selective response of obsessive-compulsive disorder to treatment with agents which block serotonin reuptake suggests the gene coding for the serotonin transporter as a candidate gene. The primary structure of the serotonin-transporter coding region was sequenced in 22 patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder, using direct PCR sequencing of cDNA synthesized from platelet serotonin-transporter mRNA. No variations in amino acid sequence were found among the obsessive-compulsive disorder patients or healthy controls. These results do not support a role for alteration in the primary structure of the coding region of the serotonin-transporter gene in the pathogenesis of obsessive-compulsive disorder. 27 refs.

  3. Brief Report: Whole Blood Serotonin Levels and Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Marler, Sarah; Ferguson, Bradley J; Lee, Evon Batey; Peters, Brittany; Williams, Kent C; McDonnell, Erin; Macklin, Eric A; Levitt, Pat; Gillespie, Catherine Hagan; Anderson, George M; Margolis, Kara Gross; Beversdorf, David Q; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy

    2016-03-01

    Elevated whole blood serotonin levels are observed in more than 25% of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Co-occurring gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms are also common in ASD but have not previously been examined in relationship with hyperserotonemia, despite the synthesis of serotonin in the gut. In 82 children and adolescents with ASD, we observed a correlation between a quantitative measure of lower GI symptoms and whole blood serotonin levels. No significant association was seen between functional constipation diagnosis and serotonin levels in the hyperserotonemia range, suggesting that this correlation is not driven by a single subgroup. More specific assessment of gut function, including the microbiome, will be necessary to evaluate the contribution of gut physiology to serotonin levels in ASD.

  4. Effect of chronic D-fenfluramine administration on rat hypothalamic serotonin levels and release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaechter, Judith D.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of administering to rats (in doses of 1.25, 2.5, 5, or 10 mg/kg/day for 10 days) of an anorectic agent, D-fenfluramine, on the serotonin levels in hypothalamic tissue and on the in vitro release of serotonin by hypothalamic slices was investigated in rats which were sacrificed six days after the end of treatment. It was found that D-fenfuramine had no effect on tissue serotonin in doses from 1.25 to 5 mg/kg. However, given at 10 mg/kg level, serotonin led to a 22 percent decrease. The release of serotonin was found to be not affected by D-fenfluramine.

  5. Serotonin-related pathways and developmental plasticity: relevance for psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Dayer, Alexandre

    2014-03-01

    Risk for adult psychiatric disorders is partially determined by early-life alterations occurring during neural circuit formation and maturation. In this perspective, recent data show that the serotonin system regulates key cellular processes involved in the construction of cortical circuits. Translational data for rodents indicate that early-life serotonin dysregulation leads to a wide range of behavioral alterations, ranging from stress-related phenotypes to social deficits. Studies in humans have revealed that serotonin-related genetic variants interact with early-life stress to regulate stress-induced cortisol responsiveness and activate the neural circuits involved in mood and anxiety disorders. Emerging data demonstrate that early-life adversity induces epigenetic modifications in serotonin-related genes. Finally, recent findings reveal that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors can reinstate juvenile-like forms of neural plasticity, thus allowing the erasure of long-lasting fear memories. These approaches are providing new insights on the biological mechanisms and clinical application of antidepressants.

  6. A new balancing act: The many roles of melatonin and serotonin in plant growth and development.

    PubMed

    Erland, Lauren A E; Murch, Susan J; Reiter, Russel J; Saxena, Praveen K

    2015-01-01

    Melatonin and serotonin are indoleamines first identified as neurotransmitters in vertebrates; they have now been found to be ubiquitously present across all forms of life. Both melatonin and serotonin were discovered in plants several years after their discovery in mammals, but their presence has now been confirmed in almost all plant families. The mechanisms of action of melatonin and serotonin are still poorly defined. Melatonin and serotonin possess important roles in plant growth and development, including functions in chronoregulation and modulation of reproductive development, control of root and shoot organogenesis, maintenance of plant tissues, delay of senescence, and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. This review focuses on the roles of melatonin and serotonin as a novel class of plant growth regulators. Their roles in reproductive and vegetative plant growth will be examined including an overview of current hypotheses and knowledge regarding their mechanisms of action in specific responses.

  7. Serotonin Promotes Development and Regeneration of Spinal Motor Neurons in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Barreiro-Iglesias, Antón; Mysiak, Karolina S.; Scott, Angela L.; Reimer, Michell M.; Yang (杨宇婕), Yujie; Becker, Catherina G.; Becker, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Summary In contrast to mammals, zebrafish regenerate spinal motor neurons. During regeneration, developmental signals are re-deployed. Here, we show that, during development, diffuse serotonin promotes spinal motor neuron generation from pMN progenitor cells, leaving interneuron numbers unchanged. Pharmacological manipulations and receptor knockdown indicate that serotonin acts at least in part via 5-HT1A receptors. In adults, serotonin is supplied to the spinal cord mainly (90%) by descending axons from the brain. After a spinal lesion, serotonergic axons degenerate caudal to the lesion but sprout rostral to it. Toxin-mediated ablation of serotonergic axons also rostral to the lesion impaired regeneration of motor neurons only there. Conversely, intraperitoneal serotonin injections doubled numbers of new motor neurons and proliferating pMN-like progenitors caudal to the lesion. Regeneration of spinal-intrinsic serotonergic interneurons was unaltered by these manipulations. Hence, serotonin selectively promotes the development and adult regeneration of motor neurons in zebrafish. PMID:26565906

  8. A new balancing act: The many roles of melatonin and serotonin in plant growth and development

    PubMed Central

    Erland, Lauren A E; Murch, Susan J; Reiter, Russel J; Saxena, Praveen K

    2015-01-01

    Melatonin and serotonin are indoleamines first identified as neurotransmitters in vertebrates; they have now been found to be ubiquitously present across all forms of life. Both melatonin and serotonin were discovered in plants several years after their discovery in mammals, but their presence has now been confirmed in almost all plant families. The mechanisms of action of melatonin and serotonin are still poorly defined. Melatonin and serotonin possess important roles in plant growth and development, including functions in chronoregulation and modulation of reproductive development, control of root and shoot organogenesis, maintenance of plant tissues, delay of senescence, and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. This review focuses on the roles of melatonin and serotonin as a novel class of plant growth regulators. Their roles in reproductive and vegetative plant growth will be examined including an overview of current hypotheses and knowledge regarding their mechanisms of action in specific responses. PMID:26418957

  9. Down-regulation of the serotonin transporter in hyperreactive platelets counteracts the pro-thrombotic effect of serotonin

    PubMed Central

    Ziu, Endrit; Mercado, Charles P.; Li, Yicong; Singh, Preeti; Ahmed, Billow A.; Freyaldenhoven, Samuel; Lensing, Shelly; Ware, Jerry; Kilic, Fusun

    2012-01-01

    An elevated plasma concentration of serotonin ([5-HT]) is a common feature of cardiovascular disease often associated with enhanced platelet activation and thrombosis. Whether elevated in vivo plasma 5-HT per se represents an independent risk factor for platelet hyperreactivity or only is an epiphenomenon of cardiovascular disease is poorly understood. We examined in vitro and in vivo platelet function following a 24 hr elevation of plasma [5-HT] in mice. In vivo administration of 5-HT using osmotic minipumps increased plasma [5-HT] in treated mice compared to control mice instrumented with saline loaded pumps. 5-HT infusion did not increase systolic blood pressure, but markers of platelet activation including P-selectin and PEJon/A staining were increased and these findings coincided with the enhanced aggregation of isolated platelets in response to type I fibrillar collagen. Tail bleeding times and the time to occlusion following chemical damage to the carotid artery were shortened in 5-HT-infused mice. 5-HT-infused mice were treated with paroxetine (Prx) to block 5-HT uptake via the serotonin transporter (SERT). Prx lowered platelet [5-HT] and attenuated platelet activation and aggregation. These results and our biochemical indices of enhanced 5-HT intracellular signaling in the platelets of 5-HT-infused mice reveal a mechanistic link between elevated plasma [5-HT], abnormal intracellular 5-HT signaling and accentuated platelet aggregation. Although a down-regulation of the serotonin transporter (SERT) on the platelet surface may counteract the pro-thrombotic influence of elevated plasma [5HT], this compensatory mechanism may fail to prevent the increased thrombotic risk caused by elevated plasma [5-HT]. PMID:22366712

  10. Interaction between Serotonin Transporter and Serotonin Receptor 1 B genes polymorphisms may be associated with antisocial alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Several studies have hypothesized that genes regulating the components of the serotonin system, including serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR) and serotonin 1 B receptor (5-HT1B), may be associated with alcoholism, but their results are contradictory because of alcoholism’s heterogeneity. Therefore, we examined whether the 5-HTTLPR gene and 5-HT1B gene G861C polymorphism are susceptibility factors for a specific subtype of alcoholism, antisocial alcoholism in Han Chinese in Taiwan. Methods We recruited 273 Han Chinese male inmates with antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) [antisocial alcoholism (AS-ALC) group (n = 120) and antisocial non-alcoholism (AS-N-ALC) group (n = 153)] and 191 healthy male controls from the community. Genotyping was done using PCR-RFLP. Results There were no significant differences in the genotypic frequency of the 5-HT1B G861C polymorphism between the 3 groups. Although AS-ALC group members more frequently carried the 5-HTTLPR S/S, S/LG, and LG/LG genotypes than controls, the difference became non-significant after controlling for the covarying effects of age. However, the 5-HTTLPR S/S, S/LG, and LG/LG genotypes may have interacted with the 5-HT1B G861C C/C polymorphism and increased the risk of becoming antisocial alcoholism. Conclusion Our study suggests that neither the 5-HTTLPR gene nor the 5-HT1B G861C polymorphism alone is a risk factor for antisocial alcoholism in Taiwan’s Han Chinese population, but that the interaction between both genes may increase susceptibility to antisocial alcoholism. PMID:22550993

  11. Glucocorticoids Inhibit Basal and Hormone-Induced Serotonin Synthesis in Pancreatic Beta Cells.

    PubMed

    Hasni Ebou, Moina; Singh-Estivalet, Amrit; Launay, Jean-Marie; Callebert, Jacques; Tronche, François; Ferré, Pascal; Gautier, Jean-François; Guillemain, Ghislaine; Bréant, Bernadette; Blondeau, Bertrand; Riveline, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a major complication of chronic Glucocorticoids (GCs) treatment. GCs induce insulin resistance and also inhibit insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells. Yet, a full understanding of this negative regulation remains to be deciphered. In the present study, we investigated whether GCs could inhibit serotonin synthesis in beta cell since this neurotransmitter has been shown to be involved in the regulation of insulin secretion. To this aim, serotonin synthesis was evaluated in vitro after treatment with GCs of either islets from CD1 mice or MIN6 cells, a beta-cell line. We also explored the effect of GCs on the stimulation of serotonin synthesis by several hormones such as prolactin and GLP 1. We finally studied this regulation in islet in two in vivo models: mice treated with GCs and with liraglutide, a GLP1 analog, and mice deleted for the glucocorticoid receptor in the pancreas. We showed in isolated islets and MIN6 cells that GCs decreased expression and activity of the two key enzymes of serotonin synthesis, Tryptophan Hydroxylase 1 (Tph1) and 2 (Tph2), leading to reduced serotonin contents. GCs also blocked the induction of serotonin synthesis by prolactin or by a previously unknown serotonin activator, the GLP-1 analog exendin-4. In vivo, activation of the Glucagon-like-Peptide-1 receptor with liraglutide during 4 weeks increased islet serotonin contents and GCs treatment prevented this increase. Finally, islets from mice deleted for the GR in the pancreas displayed an increased expression of Tph1 and Tph2 and a strong increased serotonin content per islet. In conclusion, our results demonstrate an original inhibition of serotonin synthesis by GCs, both in basal condition and after stimulation by prolactin or activators of the GLP-1 receptor. This regulation may contribute to the deleterious effects of GCs on beta cells.

  12. Senescence-induced serotonin biosynthesis and its role in delaying senescence in rice leaves.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kiyoon; Kim, Young-Soon; Park, Sangkyu; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2009-07-01

    Serotonin, which is well known as a pineal hormone in mammals, plays a key role in conditions such as mood, eating disorders, and alcoholism. In plants, although serotonin has been suggested to be involved in several physiological roles, including flowering, morphogenesis, and adaptation to environmental changes, its regulation and functional roles are as yet not characterized at the molecular level. In this study, we found that serotonin is greatly accumulated in rice (Oryza sativa) leaves undergoing senescence induced by either nutrient deprivation or detachment, and its synthesis is closely coupled with transcriptional and enzymatic induction of the tryptophan biosynthetic genes as well as tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC). Transgenic rice plants that overexpressed TDC accumulated higher levels of serotonin than the wild type and showed delayed senescence of rice leaves. However, transgenic rice plants, in which expression of TDC was suppressed through an RNA interference (RNAi) system, produced less serotonin and senesced faster than the wild type, suggesting that serotonin is involved in attenuating leaf senescence. The senescence-retarding activity of serotonin is associated with its high antioxidant activity compared to either tryptophan or chlorogenic acid. Results of TDC overexpression and TDC RNAi plants suggest that TDC plays a rate-limiting role for serotonin accumulation, but the synthesis of serotonin depends on an absolute amount of tryptophan accumulation by the coordinate induction of the tryptophan biosynthetic genes. In addition, immunolocalization analysis revealed that serotonin was abundant in the vascular parenchyma cells, including companion cells and xylem-parenchyma cells, suggestive of its involvement in maintaining the cellular integrity of these cells for facilitating efficient nutrient recycling from senescing leaves to sink tissues during senescence.

  13. Glucocorticoids Inhibit Basal and Hormone-Induced Serotonin Synthesis in Pancreatic Beta Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hasni Ebou, Moina; Singh-Estivalet, Amrit; Launay, Jean-Marie; Callebert, Jacques; Tronche, François; Ferré, Pascal; Gautier, Jean-François; Guillemain, Ghislaine; Bréant, Bernadette

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a major complication of chronic Glucocorticoids (GCs) treatment. GCs induce insulin resistance and also inhibit insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells. Yet, a full understanding of this negative regulation remains to be deciphered. In the present study, we investigated whether GCs could inhibit serotonin synthesis in beta cell since this neurotransmitter has been shown to be involved in the regulation of insulin secretion. To this aim, serotonin synthesis was evaluated in vitro after treatment with GCs of either islets from CD1 mice or MIN6 cells, a beta-cell line. We also explored the effect of GCs on the stimulation of serotonin synthesis by several hormones such as prolactin and GLP 1. We finally studied this regulation in islet in two in vivo models: mice treated with GCs and with liraglutide, a GLP1 analog, and mice deleted for the glucocorticoid receptor in the pancreas. We showed in isolated islets and MIN6 cells that GCs decreased expression and activity of the two key enzymes of serotonin synthesis, Tryptophan Hydroxylase 1 (Tph1) and 2 (Tph2), leading to reduced serotonin contents. GCs also blocked the induction of serotonin synthesis by prolactin or by a previously unknown serotonin activator, the GLP-1 analog exendin-4. In vivo, activation of the Glucagon-like-Peptide-1 receptor with liraglutide during 4 weeks increased islet serotonin contents and GCs treatment prevented this increase. Finally, islets from mice deleted for the GR in the pancreas displayed an increased expression of Tph1 and Tph2 and a strong increased serotonin content per islet. In conclusion, our results demonstrate an original inhibition of serotonin synthesis by GCs, both in basal condition and after stimulation by prolactin or activators of the GLP-1 receptor. This regulation may contribute to the deleterious effects of GCs on beta cells. PMID:26901633

  14. PET quantification of serotonin transporter in suicide attempters with major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jeffrey M.; Hesselgrave, Natalie; Ogden, R. Todd; Sullivan, Gregory M.; Oquendo, Maria A.; Mann, J. John; Parsey, Ramin V.

    2013-01-01

    Background Several lines of evidence implicate abnormal serotonergic function in suicidal behavior and completed suicide, including low serotonin transporter binding in postmortem studies of completed suicide. We have also reported low in vivo serotonin transporter binding in major depressive disorder (MDD) during a major depressive episode using positron emission tomography with [11C]McN5652. We quantified regional brain serotonin transporter binding in vivo in depressed suicide attempters, depressed non-attempters, and healthy controls using positron emission tomography and a superior radiotracer, [11C]DASB. Methods 51 subjects with DSM-IV current MDD, 15 of whom were past suicide attempters, and 32 healthy controls underwent PET scanning with [11C]DASB to quantify in vivo regional brain serotonin transporter binding. Metabolite-corrected arterial input functions and plasma free-fraction were acquired to improve quantification. Results Depressed suicide attempters had lower serotonin transporter binding in midbrain compared with depressed non-attempters (p=0.031) and controls (p=0.0093). There was no difference in serotonin transporter binding comparing all depressed subjects to healthy controls considering six a priori regions of interest simultaneously (p=0.41). Conclusions Low midbrain serotonin transporter binding appears to be related to the pathophysiology of suicidal behavior rather than of major depressive disorder. This is consistent with postmortem work showing low midbrain serotonin transporter binding capacity in depressed suicides, and may partially explain discrepant in vivo findings quantifying serotonin transporter in depression. Future studies should investigate midbrain serotonin transporter binding as a predictor of suicidal behavior in MDD, and determine the cause of low binding. PMID:23453288

  15. Reducing central serotonin in adulthood promotes hippocampal neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ning-Ning; Jia, Yun-Fang; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Qiong; Huang, Ying; Liu, Xiao-Zhen; Hu, Ling; Lan, Wei; Chen, Ling; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Chen, Xiaoyan; Xu, Lin; Ding, Yu-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Chronic administration of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), which up-regulates central serotonin (5-HT) system function, enhances adult hippocampal neurogenesis. However, the relationship between central 5-HT system and adult neurogenesis has not fully been understood. Here, we report that lowering 5-HT level in adulthood is also able to enhance adult hippocampal neurogenesis. We used tamoxifen (TM)-induced Cre in Pet1-CreERT2 mice to either deplete central serotonergic (5-HTergic) neurons or inactivate 5-HT synthesis in adulthood and explore the role of central 5-HT in adult hippocampal neurogenesis. A dramatic increase in hippocampal neurogenesis is present in these two central 5-HT-deficient mice and it is largely prevented by administration of agonist for 5-HTR2c receptor. In addition, the survival of new-born neurons in the hippocampus is enhanced. Furthermore, the adult 5-HT-deficient mice showed reduced depression-like behaviors but enhanced contextual fear memory. These findings demonstrate that lowering central 5-HT function in adulthood can also enhance adult hippocampal neurogenesis, thus revealing a new aspect of central 5-HT in regulating adult neurogenesis. PMID:26839004

  16. Hindbrain serotonin and the rapid induction of sodium appetite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menani, J. V.; De Luca, L. A. Jr; Thunhorst, R. L.; Johnson, A. K.

    2000-01-01

    Both systemically administered furosemide and isoproterenol produce water intake (i.e., thirst). Curiously, however, in light of the endocrine and hemodynamic effects produced by these treatments, they are remarkably ineffective in eliciting intake of hypertonic saline solutions (i.e., operationally defined as sodium appetite). Recent work indicates that bilateral injections of the serotonin receptor antagonist methysergide into the lateral parabrachial nuclei (LPBN) markedly enhance a preexisting sodium appetite. The present studies establish that a de novo sodium appetite can be induced with LPBN-methysergide treatment under experimental conditions in which only water is typically ingested. The effects of bilateral LPBN injections of methysergide were studied on the intake of water and 0. 3 M NaCl following acute (beginning 1 h after treatment) diuretic (furosemide)-induced sodium and water depletion and following subcutaneous isoproterenol treatment. With vehicle injected into the LPBN, furosemide treatment and isoproterenol injection both caused water drinking but essentially no intake of hypertonic saline. In contrast, bilateral treatment of the LPBN with methysergide induced the intake of 0.3 M NaCl after subcutaneous furosemide and isoproterenol. Water intake induced by subcutaneous furosemide or isoproterenol was not changed by LPBN-methysergide injections. The results indicate that blockade of LPBN-serotonin receptors produces a marked intake of hypertonic NaCl (i.e., a de novo sodium appetite) after furosemide treatment as well as subcutaneous isoproterenol.

  17. Purification and reconstitution of serotonin receptors from bovine brain

    SciTech Connect

    Gallaher, T.K.; Wang, H.H. )

    1988-04-01

    An affinity-chromatography column was used to isolate and purify 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin, 5-HT) receptors from bovine brain frontal cortex. The affinity ligand lysergic acid ethylamidoethylbromide was synthesized and coupled to an agarose matrix via a thioether bond. Receptors in the crude cortical membrane fragments were solubilized using 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)-dimethylammonio)-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS) affinity purified, and reconstituted into lipid vesicles. ({sup 3}H)5-HT binding analysis indicates a single class of high-affinity binding site that was reconstituted. 5-Methoxytryptamine, a competitor for high-affinity serotonin sites, inhibited this binding and showed a K{sub i} of 27.4 nM. Ketanserin, a high-affinity ligand for 5-HT{sub 2} type receptors, was ineffective in displacing ({sup 3}H)5-HT binding at concentrations up to 4 {mu}M indicating a 5-HT{sub 1} receptor as the primary receptor type isolated. The average specific activity of 359 pmol/mg in the reconstituted fractions is an enrichment of 1,062-fold over crude membrane fragments. Sodium dodecylsulfate electrophoresis showed the presence of four proteins in the reconstituted vesicles with approximate relative M{sub r} values of 63,000, 70,000, 81,000, and 94,000.

  18. Serotonin Syndrome Induced by Fentanyl in a Child: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Robles, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin syndrome (SS) is a potentially fatal condition associated with increased serotonergic activity in the central nervous system that can be attributed to certain drugs or interactions between drugs. There are some published articles reporting this syndrome caused by the combination of fentanyl and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors antidepressants in adult patients; however, there are no reports of SS associated to the use of fentanyl as a single causative agent. The author reports a case of a 7-year-old boy who was admitted to the emergency department with neurological deterioration secondary to an intracerebral hemorrhage. The patient was operated to remove the bleeding. Postoperatively, he experienced a diversity of progressive neurological signs (shivering, tremor, hypertonia, hyperreflexia, clonus, bilateral mydriasis, and intracranial hypertension), which were initially considered to be signs of neurological deterioration, but finally, it was proved that they were part of a SS caused by fentanyl.The absence of concomitant use of another medications known to induce SS and the dramatic improving observed after stopping fentanyl strongly indicates that fentanyl was the causative agent in this case of SS.Fentanyl is a medication used frequently, and therefore, clinicians should be aware of this potential adverse effect when this drug is administered.

  19. Involvement of TRPV4 in serotonin-evoked scratching

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Tasuku; Ivanov, Margaret; Nagamine, Masaki; Davoodi, Auva; Carstens, Mirela Iodi; Ikoma, Akihiko; Cevikbas, Ferda; Kempkes, Cordula; Buddenkotte, Joerg; Steinhoff, Martin; Carstens, E.

    2015-01-01

    Several thermo-sensitive TRP channels (TRPV1, -3; TRPA1) have been implicated in itch. In contrast, the role of transient receptor potential vanilloid type-4 (TRPV4) in itch is unknown. Therefore, we investigated if TRPV4, a temperature-sensitive cation channel, plays an important role in acute itch in mice. Four different pruritogens including serotonin (5-hydroxytrytamine, 5-HT), histamine, SLIGRL (PAR2/MrgprC11 agonist) and chloroquine (MrgprA3 agonist) were intradermally injected and itch-related scratching behavior was assessed. TRPV4 knockout (TRPV4KO) mice exhibited significantly fewer 5-HT-evoked scratching bouts compared to wild-type (WT) mice. Notably, no differences between TRPV4KO and WT mice were observed in the number of scratch bouts elicited by SLIGRL and histamine. Pretreatment with a TRPV4 antagonist significantly attenuated 5-HT-evoked scratching in vivo. Using calcium imaging in cultured primary murine dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, the response of neurons after 5-HT application, but not other pruritogens, was significantly lower in TRPV4KO compared to WT mice. A TRPV4 antagonist significantly suppressed 5-HT-evoked responses in DRG cells from WT mice. Approximately 90% of 5-HT-sensitive DRG neurons were immunoreactive for an antibody to TRPV4, as assessed by calcium imaging. These results indicate that serotonin-induced itch is linked to TRPV4. PMID:26763435

  20. Serotonin transporter gene: will epigenetics prove less depressing than genetics?

    PubMed

    de Geus, Eco J C; Middeldorp, Christel M

    2013-01-01

    The serotonin transporter gene has been hypothesized to influence, possibly in interaction with environmental factors, the vulnerability for depression. So far, genetic studies have tested the association of the repeat polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) with depression and whether it is moderated by exposure to stressful events. This has not yielded unequivocal results, even across meta-analyses. However, environmental factors may induce epigenetic changes in the structure of DNA that can influence gene expression. These epigenetic effects may be independent of the genetic polymorphisms in the gene region. This editorial reviews an article in this issue that compared the intrapair differences in depressive symptoms in monozygotic twin pairs with the intrapair differences of methylation at cytosine-guanine dinucleotide sites in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene. Differences in depressive symptoms were correlated with differences in methylation status, such that higher methylation, which, in this sample of identical twins, must be environmental in origin, is associated with more depressive symptoms. Noteworthy is the fact that the epigenetic effects were independent of the 5-HTTLPR. These results should encourage genome-wide testing of the contribution of epigenetic effects to depression. PMID:23788696

  1. Light Activated Serotonin for Exploring Its Action in Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Rea, Adam C.; Vandenberg, Laura N.; Ball, Rebecca E.; Snouffer, Ashley A.; Hudson, Alicia G.; Zhu, Yue; McLain, Duncan E.; Johnston, Lindsey L.; Lauderdale, James D.; Levin, Michael; Dore, Timothy M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Serotonin (5-HT) is a neuromodulator involved in regulating mood, appetite, memory, learning, pain, and establishment of left-right (LR) asymmetry in embryonic development. To explore the role of 5-HT in a variety of physiological contexts, we have created two forms of “caged” 5-HT, BHQ-O-5HT and BHQ-N-5HT. When exposed to 365- or 740-nm light, BHQ-O-5HT releases 5-HT through 1- or 2-photon excitation, respectively. BHQ-O-5HT mediated changes in neural activity in cultured primary sensory neurons from mouse and the trigeminal ganglion and optic tectum of intact zebrafish larvae in the form of high amplitude spiking in response to light. In Xenopus laevis embryos, 5-HT released from BHQ-O-5HT upon exposure to light increased the occurrence of LR patterning defects. Maximal rates of LR defects were observed when 5-HT was released at stage 5 compared to stage 8. These experiments show the potential for BHQ-caged serotonins in studying 5-HT-regulated physiological processes. PMID:24333002

  2. Serotonin Transporter Gene Polymorphisms and Chronic Illness of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Myung, Woojae; Lim, Shinn-Won; Kim, Jinwoo; Lee, Yujin; Song, Jihye; Chang, Ki-won

    2010-01-01

    Clinical course of depression is variable. The serotonin transporter gene is one of the most studied genes for depression. We examined the association of serotonin transporter gene polymorphisms with chronicity and recurrent tendency of depression in Korean subjects. This cross-sectional study involved 252 patients with major depression. Patients were genotyped for s/l polymorphisms in 5-HTT promoter region (5-HTTLPR), s/l variation in second intron of the 5-HTT gene (5-HTT VNTR intron2). Chronicity was associated with 5-HTTLPR. Patients with l/l had higher rate of chronicity than the other patients (l/l vs s/l or s/s; odds ratio, 4.45; 95% confidence interval, 1.59-12.46; P=0.005; logistic regression analysis). Recurrent tendency was not associated with 5-HTTLPR. Chronicity and recurrent tendency were not associated with 5-HTT VNTR intron2. These results suggest that chronic depression is associated with 5-HTTLPR. PMID:21165304

  3. Pharmacogenetic study of antipsychotic induced acute extrapyramidal symptoms in a first episode psychosis cohort: role of dopamine, serotonin and glutamate candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Mas, S; Gassó, P; Lafuente, A; Bioque, M; Lobo, A; Gonzàlez-Pinto, A; Olmeda, M S; Corripio, I; Llerena, A; Cabrera, B; Saiz-Ruiz, J; Bernardo, M

    2016-10-01

    This study investigated whether the risk of presenting antipsychotic (AP)-induced extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) could be related to single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a naturalistic cohort of first episode psychosis (FEP) patients. Two hundred and two SNPs in 31 candidate genes (involved in dopamine, serotonin and glutamate pathways) were analyzed in the present study. One hundred and thirteen FEP patients (43 presenting EPS and 70 non-presenting EPS) treated with high-potency AP (amisulpride, paliperidone, risperidone and ziprasidone) were included in the analysis. The statistical analysis was adjusted by age, gender, AP dosage, AP combinations and concomitant treatments as covariates. Four SNPs in different genes (DRD2, SLC18A2, HTR2A and GRIK3) contributed significantly to the risk of EPS after correction for multiple testing (P<1 × 10(-4)). These findings support the involvement of dopamine, serotonin and glutamate pathways in AP-induced EPS.

  4. Pharmacogenetic study of antipsychotic induced acute extrapyramidal symptoms in a first episode psychosis cohort: role of dopamine, serotonin and glutamate candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Mas, S; Gassó, P; Lafuente, A; Bioque, M; Lobo, A; Gonzàlez-Pinto, A; Olmeda, M S; Corripio, I; Llerena, A; Cabrera, B; Saiz-Ruiz, J; Bernardo, M

    2016-10-01

    This study investigated whether the risk of presenting antipsychotic (AP)-induced extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) could be related to single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a naturalistic cohort of first episode psychosis (FEP) patients. Two hundred and two SNPs in 31 candidate genes (involved in dopamine, serotonin and glutamate pathways) were analyzed in the present study. One hundred and thirteen FEP patients (43 presenting EPS and 70 non-presenting EPS) treated with high-potency AP (amisulpride, paliperidone, risperidone and ziprasidone) were included in the analysis. The statistical analysis was adjusted by age, gender, AP dosage, AP combinations and concomitant treatments as covariates. Four SNPs in different genes (DRD2, SLC18A2, HTR2A and GRIK3) contributed significantly to the risk of EPS after correction for multiple testing (P<1 × 10(-4)). These findings support the involvement of dopamine, serotonin and glutamate pathways in AP-induced EPS. PMID:27272046

  5. The serotonin 2C receptor potently modulates the head-twitch response in mice induced by a phenethylamine hallucinogen

    PubMed Central

    Canal, Clinton E.; Olaghere da Silva, Uade B.; Gresch, Paul J.; Watt, Erin E.; Sanders-Bush, Elaine

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Hallucinogenic serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptor partial agonists, such as (±)-1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodo-phenyl)-2-aminopropane hydrochloride (DOI), induce a frontal cortex-dependent head-twitch response (HTR) in rodents, a behavioral proxy of a hallucinogenic response that is blocked by 5-HT2A receptor antagonists. In addition to 5-HT2A receptors, DOI and most other serotonin-like hallucinogens have high affinity and potency as partial agonists at 5-HT2C receptors. Objectives We tested for involvement of 5-HT2C receptors in the HTR induced by DOI. Results Comparison of 5-HT2C receptor knockout and wild-type littermates revealed an approximately 50% reduction in DOI-induced HTR in knockout mice. Also, pretreatment with either the 5-HT2C receptor antagonist SB206553 or SB242084 eradicated a twofold difference in DOI-induced HTR between the standard inbred mouse strains C57BL/6J and DBA/2J, and decreased the DOI-induced HTR by at least 50% in both strains. None of several measures of 5-HT2A receptors in frontal cortex explained the strain difference, including 5-HT2A receptor density, Gαq or Gαi/o protein levels, phospholipase C activity, or DOI-induced expression of Egr1 and Egr2. 5-HT2C receptor density in the brains of C57BL/6J and DBA/2J was also equivalent, suggesting that 5-HT2C receptor-mediated intracellular signaling or other physiological modulators of the HTR may explain the strain difference in response to DOI. Conclusions We conclude that the HTR to DOI in mice is strongly modulated by 5-HT2C receptor activity. This novel finding invites reassessment of hallucinogenic mechanisms involving 5-HT2 receptors. PMID:20165943

  6. Radioimmunoassay of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) in cerebrospinal fluid, plasma, and serum

    SciTech Connect

    Engbaek, F.; Voldby, B

    1982-04-01

    A direct radioimmunoassay is described for serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) in cerebrospinal fluid, platelet-poor plasma, and serum. Antisera in rabbits was raised against serotonin diazotized to a conjugate of bovine albumin and D,L-p-aminophenylalanine. Polyethylene glycol, alone or in combination with anti-rabbit immunoglobulins, is used to separate bound and unbound tritiated serotonin. The minimum concentration of serotonin detectable is 2 nmol/L in a 200-..mu..L sample. Within-day precision (CV) is 4.3% between-day precision 7.7%. Analytical recoveries of serotonin are 109% and 101% for cerebrospinal fluid and plasma, respectively. Tryptophan, 5-hydroxytryptophan, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and 5-hydroxytryptophol do not interfere with the assay. However, 5-methoxytryptamine and tryptamine cross react. Of samples of cerebrospinal fluid from patients with disc herniations (n=21) or low-pressure hydrocephalus (n=10), one-third had concentrations of 2-4 nmol/L and two-thirds were below the minimum detectable concentration. The observed range for the concentration of serotonin in plasma of 14 normal subjects was 5-14 nmol/L (mean +/- SD, 9 +/- 3 nmol/L). The observed ranges for serotonin in serum were: for 10 women 520-900 (mean +/- SD: 695 +/- 110) nmol/L and for 10 men 380-680 (520 +/- 94) nmol/L.

  7. Serotonin transporter polyadenylation polymorphism modulates the retention of fear extinction memory.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Catherine A; McKenna, Morgan C; Salman, Rabia; Holmes, Andrew; Casey, B J; Phelps, Elizabeth A; Glatt, Charles E

    2012-04-01

    Growing evidence suggests serotonin's role in anxiety and depression is mediated by its effects on learned fear associations. Pharmacological and genetic manipulations of serotonin signaling in mice alter the retention of fear extinction learning, which is inversely associated with anxious temperament in mice and humans. Here, we test whether genetic variation in serotonin signaling in the form of a common human serotonin transporter polyadenylation polymorphism (STPP/rs3813034) is associated with spontaneous fear recovery after extinction. We show that the risk allele of this polymorphism is associated with impaired retention of fear extinction memory and heightened anxiety and depressive symptoms. These STPP associations in humans mirror the phenotypic effects of serotonin transporter knockout in mice, highlighting the STPP as a potential genetic locus underlying interindividual differences in serotonin transporter function in humans. Furthermore, we show that the serotonin transporter polyadenylation profile associated with the STPP risk allele is altered through the chronic administration of fluoxetine, a treatment that also facilitates retention of extinction learning. The propensity to form persistent fear associations due to poor extinction recall may be an intermediate phenotype mediating the effects of genetic variation in serotonergic function on anxiety and depression. The consistency and specificity of these data across species provide robust support for this hypothesis and suggest that the little-studied STPP may be an important risk factor for mood and anxiety disorders in humans.

  8. The role of phosphatidylinositol signaling pathway in regulating serotonin-induced oocyte maturation in Mercenaria mercenaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qing; Zhang, Tao

    2011-05-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) has been found to stimulate meiotic maturation of oocytes in many molluscs. During maturation, several signaling pathways are involved, especially the phosphatidylinositol and cAMP pathways. In order to examine the possible role of the phosphatidylinositol signaling pathway in regulating oocyte maturation in Mercenaria mercenaria, the effects of the activator/inhibitor of phospholipase (PLC) and protein kinase C (PKC) on serotonin-induced maturation were studied. Results show that high-concentrations of neomycin (inhibitor of PLC) blocked oocyte maturation, while 9, 10-dimethyl-1, 2-benzanthracene (DMBA, activator of PLC) promoted oocyte maturation in the presence of serotonin. It was also found that in the presence of serotonin, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, activator of PKC) inhibited oocyte maturation, while sphingosine (inhibitor of PKC) stimulated oocyte maturation. These results indicate that serotonin-induced oocyte maturation requires the activation of the phosphatidylinositol pathway. Decrease of PLC inhibited serotonin-induced oocyte maturation, whereas a decrease of PKC stimulated the maturation. Thus, our study indicates that serotonin promotes maturation of M. mercenaria oocytes through PLC stimulated increase in calcium ion concentration via inositol-1, 4, 5-trisphosphate (IP3) but not PKC.

  9. Correlation of 125I-LSD autoradiographic labeling with serotonin voltage clamp responses in Aplysia neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, M.L.; Kadan, M.J.; Hartig, P.R.; Carpenter, D.O. )

    1991-05-01

    Autoradiographic receptor binding studies using 125I-LSD (2-(125I)lysergic acid diethyamide) revealed intense labelling on the soma of a symmetrically located pair of cells in the abdominal ganglion of Aplysia californica. This binding was blocked by micromolar concentrations of serotonin and lower concentrations of the serotonergic antagonists, cyproheptadine and mianserin. Electrophysiological investigation of responses to serotonin of neurons in the left upper quadrant, where one of the labeled neurons is located, revealed a range of serotonin responses. Cells L3 and L6 have a K+ conductance increase in response to serotonin that is not blocked by cyproheptadine or mianserin. Cells L2 and L4 have a biphasic response to serotonin: a Na+ conductance increase, which can be blocked by cyproheptadine and mianserin, followed by a voltage dependent Ca2+ conductance which is blocked by Co2+ but not the serotonergic antagonists. Cell L1, and its symmetrical pair, R1, have in addition to the Na+ and Ca2+ responses observed in L2 and L4, a Cl- conductance increase blocked by LSD, cyproheptadine and mianserin. LSD had little effect on the other responses. The authors conclude that the symmetrically located cells L1 and R1 have a Cl- channel linked to a cyproheptadine- and mianserin-sensitive serotonin receptor that is selectively labelled by 125I-LSD. This receptor has many properties in common with the mammalian serotonin 1C receptor.

  10. Serotonin modulates worker responsiveness to trail pheromone in the ant Pheidole dentata.

    PubMed

    Muscedere, Mario L; Johnson, Natalie; Gillis, Brendan C; Kamhi, J Frances; Traniello, James F A

    2012-03-01

    As social insect workers mature, outside-nest tasks associated with foraging and defense are typically performed at higher frequencies. Foraging in ants is often a pheromonally mediated collective action performed by mature workers; age-dependent differences in olfactory response thresholds may therefore proximately regulate task repertoire development. In the ant Pheidole dentata, foraging activity increases with chronological age in minor workers, and is chemically controlled. The onset of foraging in minor workers is accompanied by marked neuroanatomical and neurochemical changes, including synaptic remodeling in olfactory regions of the brain, proliferation of serotonergic neurons, and increased brain titers of monoamines, notably serotonin. We examined the linkage of serotonin and olfactory responsiveness by assaying trail-following performance in mature P. dentata minor workers with normal serotonin levels, or serotonin levels experimentally lowered by oral administration of the serotonin synthesis inhibitor α-methyltryptophan (AMTP). By assessing responsiveness to standardized pheromone trails, we demonstrate that trail-following behaviors are significantly reduced in serotonin-depleted workers. AMTP-treated individuals were less likely to initiate trail following, and oriented along pheromone trails for significantly shorter distances than untreated, similar-age workers. These results demonstrate for the first time that serotonin modulates olfactory processes and/or motor functions associated with cooperative foraging in ants. PMID:22134381

  11. The role of glutamatergic and GABAergic systems on serotonin- induced feeding behavior in chicken.

    PubMed

    Mortezaei, Sepideh Seyedali; Zendehdel, Morteza; Babapour, Vahab; Hasani, Keyvan

    2013-12-01

    It has been reported that serotonin can modulate glutamate and GABA release in central nervous system (CNS). The present study was designed to examine the role of glutamatergic and GABAergic systems on serotonin- induced feeding behavior in chickens. In Experiment 1 intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of MK- 801(NMDA receptor antagonist, 15 nmol) performed followed by serotonin (10 μg). In experiments 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 prior to serotonin injection, chickens received CNQX (AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist, 390 nmol), AIDA (mGluR1 antagonist, 2 nmol), LY341495 (mGluR2 antagonist, 150 nmol), UBP1112 (mGluR3 antagonist, 2 nmol), picrotoxin (GABA A receptor antagonist, 0.5 μg), CGP54626 (GABAB receptor antagonist, 20 ng) respectively. Cumulative food intake was determined at 3 h post injection. The results of this study showed that the hypophagic effect of serotonin was significantly attenuated by pretreatment with MK- 801 and CNQX (p < 0.05) but AIDA, LY341495 and UBP1112 had no effect (p > 0.05). Also, the inhibitory effect of serotonin on food intake was amplified by picrotoxin (p < 0.05) while CGP54626 had no effect (p > 0.05). These results suggest that serotonin as a modulator probably interacts with glutamatergic (via NMDA and AMPA/Kainate receptors) and GABAergic (via GABAA receptor) systems on feeding behavior in chicken.

  12. Regulation of serotonin transporter gene expression in human glial cells by growth factors.

    PubMed

    Kubota, N; Kiuchi, Y; Nemoto, M; Oyamada, H; Ohno, M; Funahashi, H; Shioda, S; Oguchi, K

    2001-04-01

    The aims of this study were to identify monoamine transporters expressed in human glial cells, and to examine the regulation of their expression by stress-related growth factors. The expression of serotonin transporter mRNA was detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction in normal human astrocytes, whereas the dopamine transporter (DAT) and the norepinephrine transporter (NET) were not detected. The cDNA sequence of the "glial" serotonin transporter in astrocytes was consistent with that reported for the "neuronal" serotonin transporter (SERT). Moreover, we also demonstrated SERT expression in glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive cells by immunocytochemical staining in normal human astrocytes. Serotonin transporter gene expression was also detected in glioma-derived cell lines (A172, KG-1-C and KGK). Addition of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) or epidermal growth factor (EGF) for 2 days increased serotonin transporter gene expression in astrocytes and JAR (human choriocarcinoma cell line). Basic fibroblast growth factor, but not epidermal growth factor, increased specific [3H]serotonin uptake in astrocytes in a time (1-4 days)- and concentration (20-100 ng/ml)-dependent manner. The expression of genes for basic fibroblast growth factor and epidermal growth factor receptors was detected in astrocytes. These findings suggest that the expression of the serotonin transporter in human glial cells is positively regulated by basic fibroblast growth factor. PMID:11301061

  13. Distribution and ontogeny of gastrin- and serotonin-immunoreactive cells in the proventriculus of developing chick, Gallus gallus domestica

    PubMed Central

    Cinar, Kenan

    2009-01-01

    The ontogeny and distribution of gastrin- and serotonin-immunoreactive (IR) cell in the proventriculus of chicks (Gallus gallus domestica, n = 60) in different growth periods was examined immunohistochemically using antisera specific to gastrin and serotonin. Gastrin and serotonin-IR cells were detected in chick proventriculus. Gastrin-IR cells were first evident after 12 days of incubation in lamina epithelialis and compound glands, while serotonin-IR cells were observed only in compound glands at that same time. Gastrin-IR and serotonin-IR cells increased in frequency on incubation day 14 and 16, respectively. Towards the end of incubation, gastrin- and serotonin-IR cell numbers decreased. In adult chicken, both IR cells were present but not lower numbers. The observations demonstrate the presence of gastrin- and serotonin-IR cells in the proventriculus of developing chicks in temporally changing frequencies. PMID:19255518

  14. INSIGHTS INTO THE REGULATION OF 5-HT2A RECEPTORS BY SCAFFOLDING PROTEINS AND KINASES

    PubMed Central

    Allen, John A.; Yadav, Prem N.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY 5-HT2A serotonin receptors are essential molecular targets for the actions of LSD-like hallucinogens and atypical antipsychotic drugs. 5-HT2A serotonin receptors also mediate a variety of physiological processes in peripheral and central nervous systems including platelet aggregation, smooth muscle contraction, and the modulation of mood and perception. Scaffolding proteins have emerged as important regulators of 5-HT2A receptors and our recent studies suggest multiple scaffolds exist for 5-HT2A receptors including PSD95, arrestin, and caveolin. In addition, a novel interaction has emerged between p90 ribosomal S6 kinase and 5-HT2A receptors which attenuates receptor signaling. This article reviews our recent studies and emphasizes the role of scaffolding proteins and kinases in the regulation of 5-HT2A trafficking, targeting and signaling. PMID:18640136

  15. Optogenetic activation of dorsal raphe serotonin neurons enhances patience for future rewards.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Kayoko W; Miyazaki, Katsuhiko; Tanaka, Kenji F; Yamanaka, Akihiro; Takahashi, Aki; Tabuchi, Sawako; Doya, Kenji

    2014-09-01

    Serotonin is a neuromodulator that is involved extensively in behavioral, affective, and cognitive functions in the brain. Previous recording studies of the midbrain dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) revealed that the activation of putative serotonin neurons correlates with the levels of behavioral arousal [1], rhythmic motor outputs [2], salient sensory stimuli [3-6], reward, and conditioned cues [5-8]. The classic theory on serotonin states that it opposes dopamine and inhibits behaviors when aversive events are predicted [9-14]. However, the therapeutic effects of serotonin signal-enhancing medications have been difficult to reconcile with this theory [15, 16]. In contrast, a more recent theory states that serotonin facilitates long-term optimal behaviors and suppresses impulsive behaviors [17-21]. To test these theories, we developed optogenetic mice that selectively express channelrhodopsin in serotonin neurons and tested how the activation of serotonergic neurons in the DRN affects animal behavior during a delayed reward task. The activation of serotonin neurons reduced the premature cessation of waiting for conditioned cues and food rewards. In reward omission trials, serotonin neuron stimulation prolonged the time animals spent waiting. This effect was observed specifically when the animal was engaged in deciding whether to keep waiting and was not due to motor inhibition. Control experiments showed that the prolonged waiting times observed with optogenetic stimulation were not due to behavioral inhibition or the reinforcing effects of serotonergic activation. These results show, for the first time, that the timed activation of serotonin neurons during waiting promotes animals' patience to wait for a delayed reward.

  16. On the Mechanism of Serotonin-Induced Dipsogenesis in the Rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kikta, Dianne C.; Barney, Christopher C.; Threatte, Rose M.; Fregly, Melvin J.; Rowland, Neil E.; Greenleaf, John E.

    1983-01-01

    Subcutaneous administration of 1-5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), the precursor of serotonin, to female rats induces copious drinking accompanied by activation of the renin-angiotensin system. Neither a reduction in blood pressure nor body temperature accompanied administration of 5-HTP. The objective of the present study was to determine whether serotonin-induced dipsogenesis, like that of 5-HTP, is mediated via the renin-angiotensin system. Serotonin (2 mg/kg, SC)-induced drinking was inhibited by the dopaminergic antagonist, haloperidol (150 /micro g/kg, IP), which also inhibits angiotensin II-induced drinking, Both captopril (35 mg/kg, IP), an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, and propranolol (6 micro g/kg, IP), a beta-adrenergic antagonist, blocked serotonin-induced dipsogenesis. The alpha(sub a),-adrenergic agonist, clonidine (6.25 micro g/kg, SC), which suppresses renin release from the kidney, attenuated serotonin-induced water intake. The dipsogenic responses to submaximal concentrations of both serotonin (1 mg/kg, SC) and isoproterenol (8 micro g/kg, SC) were additive rather than interactive suggesting that similar pathways mediate both responses. The serotonergic receptor antagonist, methysergide (3 mg/kg, IP), inhibited serotonin-induced drinking but had no effect on isoproterenol (25micro g/kg, SC)-induced dipsogenesis. However, neither serotonin (2 mg/kg, SC) nor isoproterenol (25 micro g/kg, SC)-induced drinking was inhibited by cinansefin (25 micro g/kg, IP). These data indicate that serotonin induces drinking in rats via the renin-angiotensin system. However, the results of the studies using methysergide suggest that scrotonin appears to act at a point prior to activation of beta-adrenoceptors in the pathway leading to release of renin from the kidneys.

  17. Relations between peripheral and brain serotonin measures and behavioural responses in a novelty test in pigs.

    PubMed

    Ursinus, Winanda W; Bolhuis, J Elizabeth; Zonderland, Johan J; Rodenburg, T Bas; de Souza, Adriana S; Koopmanschap, Rudie E; Kemp, Bas; Korte-Bouws, Gerdien A H; Korte, S Mechiel; van Reenen, Cornelis G

    2013-06-13

    Pigs differ in their behavioural responses towards environmental challenges. Individual variation in maladaptive responses such as tail biting, may partly originate from underlying biological characteristics related to (emotional) reactivity to challenges and serotonergic system functioning. Assessing relations between behavioural responses and brain and blood serotonin parameters may help in understanding susceptibility to the development of maladaptive responses. The objective of the current study was, therefore, to assess the relationship between the pigs' serotonergic parameters measured in both blood and brain, and the behaviour of pigs during a novelty test. Pigs (n=31) were subjected to a novelty test at 11weeks of age, consisting of 5-min novel environment exposure after which a novel object (a bucket) was introduced for 5min. Whole blood serotonin, platelet serotonin level, and platelet serotonin uptake were determined at 13weeks of age. Levels of serotonin, its metabolite and serotonin turnover were determined at 19weeks of age in the frontal cortex, hypothalamus and hippocampus. The behaviour of the pigs was different during exposure to a novel object compared to the novel environment only, with more fear-related behaviours exhibited during novel object exposure. Platelet serotonin level and brain serotonergic parameters in the hippocampus were interrelated. Notably, the time spent exploring the test arena was significantly correlated with both platelet serotonin level and right hippocampal serotonin activity (turnover and concentration). In conclusion, the existence of an underlying biological trait - possibly fearfulness - may be involved in the pig's behavioural responses toward environmental challenges, and this is also reflected in serotonergic parameters. PMID:23685231

  18. Placenta-derived hypo-serotonin situations in the developing forebrain cause autism.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kohji

    2013-04-01

    Autism is a pervasive developmental disorder that is characterized by the behavioral traits of impaired social cognition and communication, and repetitive and/or obsessive behavior and interests. Although there are many theories and speculations about the pathogenetic causes of autism, the disruption of the serotonergic system is one of the most consistent and well-replicated findings. Recently, it has been reported that placenta-derived serotonin is the main source in embryonic day (E) 10-15 mouse forebrain, after that period, the serotonergic fibers start to supply serotonin into the forebrain. E 10-15 is the very important developing period, when cortical neurogenesis, migration and initial axon targeting are processed. Since all these events have been considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of autism and they are highly controlled by serotonin signals, the paucity of placenta-derived serotonin should have potential importance when the pathogenesis of autism is considered. I, thus, postulate a hypothesis that placenta-derived hypo-serotonin situations in the developing forebrain cause autism. The hypothesis is as follows. Various factors, such as inflammation, dysfunction of the placenta, together with genetic predispositions cause a decrease of placenta-derived serotonin levels. The decrease of placenta-derived serotonin levels leads to hypo-serotonergic situations in the forebrain of the fetus. The paucity of serotonin in the forebrain leads to mis-wiring in important regions which are responsible for the theory of mind. The paucity of serotonin in the forebrain also causes over-growth of serotonergic fibers. These disturbances result in network deficiency and aberration of the serotonergic system, leading to the autistic phenotypes.

  19. Reactions between beta-casomorphins-7 and 5-HT2-serotonin receptors.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, O Yu; Pryanikova, N A; Kost, N V; Zolotarev, Yu A; Ryukert, E N; Zozulya, A A

    2005-11-01

    Radioreceptor analysis showed that human beta-casomorphin-7 displaced 3H-spiperone from 5-HT2-serotonin receptors of the rat cerebral frontal cortex: EC50 8 +/- 1 microM. Human and bovine beta-casomorphin-7 dose-dependently blocked serotonin-induced human platelet aggregation: IC50 5 +/- 1 and 20 +/- 4 microM, respectively. It was proved that beta-casomorphins-7 act as 5-HT2-serotonin receptor antagonists; one of the mechanisms of their biological effects is presumably associated with modulation of the serotoninergic system.

  20. Serotonin and the evaluation of future rewards: theory, experiments, and possible neural mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Schweighofer, Nicolas; Tanaka, Saori C; Doya, Kenji

    2007-05-01

    The ability to select an action by considering both delays and amount of reward outcome is critical for survival and well-being of animals and humans. Previous animal experiments suggest a role of serotonin in action choice by modulating the evaluation of delayed rewards. It remains unclear, however, through which neural circuits, and through what receptors and intracellular mechanisms, serotonin affects the evaluation of delayed rewards. Here, we review experimental studies and computational theory of decisions under delayed rewards, and propose that serotonin controls the timescale of reward prediction by regulating neural activity in the basal ganglia.

  1. Antidepressant action of tianeptine is connected with acceleration of serotonin turnover in the synapse: a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Uzbekov, Marat G

    2009-06-01

    Based on the results of our investigation of patients with anxious depression under the treatment with serotonergic antidepressants with different mechanism of action on serotonin reuptake we, the first time in the literature, propose the hypothesis about neurochemical mechanism of tianeptine action. According to this hypothesis tianeptine not only activates serotonin reuptake into the synaptic ending but also activates its release from the ending into the synaptic cleft thus accelerating serotonin turnover rate in the synapse. Proposed mechanism mainly refers the first, acute phase of its action directed to the normalization of serotonergic neurotransmission.

  2. The Effects of Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3beta in Serotonin Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wenjun; Chen, Ligong; Paul, Jodi; Yang, Sufen; Li, Fuzeng; Sampson, Karen; Woodgett, Jim R.; Beaulieu, Jean Martin; Gamble, Karen L.; Li, Xiaohua

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) is a constitutively active protein kinase in brain. Increasing evidence has shown that GSK3 acts as a modulator in the serotonin neurotransmission system, including direct interaction with serotonin 1B (5-HT1B) receptors in a highly selective manner and prominent modulating effect on 5-HT1B receptor activity. In this study, we utilized the serotonin neuron-selective GSK3β knockout (snGSK3β-KO) mice to test if GSK3β in serotonin neurons selectively modulates 5-HT1B autoreceptor activity and function. The snGSK3β-KO mice were generated by crossbreeding GSK3β-floxed mice and ePet1-Cre mice. These mice had normal growth and physiological characteristics, similar numbers of tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (TpH2)-expressing serotonin neurons, and the same brain serotonin content as in littermate wild type mice. However, the expression of GSK3β in snGSK3β-KO mice was diminished in TpH2-expressing serotonin neurons. Compared to littermate wild type mice, snGSK3β-KO mice had a reduced response to the 5-HT1B receptor agonist anpirtoline in the regulation of serotonergic neuron firing, cAMP production, and serotonin release, whereas these animals displayed a normal response to the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT. The effect of anpirtoline on the horizontal, center, and vertical activities in the open field test was differentially affected by GSK3β depletion in serotonin neurons, wherein vertical activity, but not horizontal activity, was significantly altered in snGSK3β-KO mice. In addition, there was an enhanced anti-immobility response to anpirtoline in the tail suspension test in snGSK3β-KO mice. Therefore, results of this study demonstrated a serotonin neuron-targeting function of GSK3β by regulating 5-HT1B autoreceptors, which impacts serotonergic neuron firing, serotonin release, and serotonin-regulated behaviors. PMID:22912839

  3. Antihistamine effect on synaptosomal uptake of serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, P. A.; Vernikos, J.

    1980-01-01

    A study on the effects of five H1 and H2 antihistamines on the synaptosomal uptake of serotonin (5HT), norepinephrine (NE), and dopamine (DA) is presented. Brain homogenates from female rats were incubated in Krebs-Ringer phosphate buffer solution in the presence of one of three radioactive neurotransmitters, and one of the five antihistamines. Low concentrations of pyrilamine competitively inhibited 5HT uptake, had little effect on NE uptake, and no effect on DA uptake. Promethazine, diphenhydramine, metiamide, and cimetidine had no effect on 5HT or DA uptake at the same concentration. Diphenhydramine had a small inhibitory effect on NE uptake. It is concluded that pyrilamine is a selective and potent competitive inhibitor of 5HT uptake at concentrations between .05 and .5 micromolars.

  4. Platelet serotonin levels in schizophrenia: relationship to race and psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Jackman, H; Luchins, D; Meltzer, H Y

    1983-08-01

    To explore the possible role of serotonin (5-HT) in the etiology of schizophrenia, platelet 5-HT concentrations were determined in 41 schizophrenic (and schizoaffective, mainly schizophrenic) patients diagnosed by the RDC and 34 normal controls. There was a significant difference between the patient and control groups with the 16 paranoid, 11 undifferentiated, and 8 schizo-affective depressed patients having significantly higher mean platelet 5-HT concentrations than the controls. An analysis of variance considering the effect of race, sex, and diagnosis demonstrated a significant difference between black patients and black controls but no significant difference between white patients and white controls. Within the patient sample, platelet 5-HT concentrations were positively correlated with severity of auditory hallucinations (on the PSE) and negatively correlated with lack of insight (on the PSE) and conceptual disorganization (on the BPRS). In a subsample of 21 patients, there was no relationship between platelet 5-HT and CT findings of either enlarged ventricles or cortical atrophy.

  5. Use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors reduces fertility in men.

    PubMed

    Nørr, L; Bennedsen, B; Fedder, J; Larsen, E R

    2016-05-01

    Clinical review of the present data on the effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) on male fertility was the objective of the study. PubMed and Scopus were searched for publications in English or Danish and reviewed. Human trials, animal studies and in vitro studies were included. Use of SSRIs negatively affects semen parameters in most studies. In some studies, SSRIs are also shown to reduce DNA integrity. SSRIs can also delay ejaculation. Depression and anxiety can cause reduced libido, erectile dysfunction and delayed ejaculation as well. The use of SSRIs seems to reduce male fertility by affecting semen parameters, although most studies have a degree of confounding by indication caused by the underlying depression. PMID:27019308

  6. Serotonin neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus encode reward signals.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Zhong, Weixin; Wang, Daqing; Feng, Qiru; Liu, Zhixiang; Zhou, Jingfeng; Jia, Chunying; Hu, Fei; Zeng, Jiawei; Guo, Qingchun; Fu, Ling; Luo, Minmin

    2016-01-28

    The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is involved in organizing reward-related behaviours; however, it remains unclear how genetically defined neurons in the DRN of a freely behaving animal respond to various natural rewards. Here we addressed this question using fibre photometry and single-unit recording from serotonin (5-HT) neurons and GABA neurons in the DRN of behaving mice. Rewards including sucrose, food, sex and social interaction rapidly activate 5-HT neurons, but aversive stimuli including quinine and footshock do not. Both expected and unexpected rewards activate 5-HT neurons. After mice learn to wait for sucrose delivery, most 5-HT neurons fire tonically during waiting and then phasically on reward acquisition. Finally, GABA neurons are activated by aversive stimuli but inhibited when mice seek rewards. Thus, DRN 5-HT neurons positively encode a wide range of reward signals during anticipatory and consummatory phases of reward responses. Moreover, GABA neurons play a complementary role in reward processing.

  7. Depletion of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors during sewage sludge composting.

    PubMed

    Vasskog, Terje; Bergersen, Ove; Anderssen, Trude; Jensen, Einar; Eggen, Trine

    2009-11-01

    Sewage and sewage sludge is known to contain pharmaceuticals, and since sewage sludge is often used as fertilizer within agriculture, the reduction of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) Citalopram, Sertraline, Paroxetine, Fluvoxamine and Fluoxetine during composting has been investigated. Sewage sludge was spiked with the SSRIs before the composting experiment started, and the concentration of the SSRIs in the sludge during a 21 day composting period was measured by liquid phase microextraction (LPME) and high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. All the SSRIs had a significant decrease in concentration during the composting process. The highest reduction rates were measured for Fluoxetine and Paroxetine and the lowest for Citalopram. In addition three out of four known SSRI metabolites were found in all the samples, and two of them showed a significant increase in concentration during the composting period. PMID:19595585

  8. Serotonin neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus encode reward signals

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Zhong, Weixin; Wang, Daqing; Feng, Qiru; Liu, Zhixiang; Zhou, Jingfeng; Jia, Chunying; Hu, Fei; Zeng, Jiawei; Guo, Qingchun; Fu, Ling; Luo, Minmin

    2016-01-01

    The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is involved in organizing reward-related behaviours; however, it remains unclear how genetically defined neurons in the DRN of a freely behaving animal respond to various natural rewards. Here we addressed this question using fibre photometry and single-unit recording from serotonin (5-HT) neurons and GABA neurons in the DRN of behaving mice. Rewards including sucrose, food, sex and social interaction rapidly activate 5-HT neurons, but aversive stimuli including quinine and footshock do not. Both expected and unexpected rewards activate 5-HT neurons. After mice learn to wait for sucrose delivery, most 5-HT neurons fire tonically during waiting and then phasically on reward acquisition. Finally, GABA neurons are activated by aversive stimuli but inhibited when mice seek rewards. Thus, DRN 5-HT neurons positively encode a wide range of reward signals during anticipatory and consummatory phases of reward responses. Moreover, GABA neurons play a complementary role in reward processing. PMID:26818705

  9. The serotonin axis: Shared mechanisms in seizures, depression, and SUDEP.

    PubMed

    Richerson, George B; Buchanan, Gordon F

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing appreciation that patients with seizures are also affected by a number of comorbid conditions, including an increase in prevalence of depression (Kanner, 2009), sleep apnea (Chihorek et al., 2007), and sudden death (Ryvlin et al., 2006; Tomson et al., 2008). The mechanisms responsible for these associations are unclear. Herein we discuss the possibility that underlying pathology in the serotonin (5-HT) system of patients with epilepsy lowers the threshold for seizures, while also increasing the risk of depression and sudden death. We propose that postictal dysfunction of 5-HT neurons causes depression of breathing and arousal in some epilepsy patients, and this can lead to sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). We further draw parallels between SUDEP and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), which may share pathophysiologic mechanisms, and which have both been linked to defects in the 5-HT system. PMID:21214537

  10. Serotonin uptake in blood platelets of psychiatric patients

    SciTech Connect

    Meltzer, H.Y.; Arora, R.C.; Baber, R.; Tricou, B.J.

    1981-12-01

    Platelet serotonin (5-HT) uptake was determined in 72 newly admitted, unmedicated psychiatric patients. Decreased maximum velocity (Vmax) of 5-HT uptake was present in unipolar and bipolar depressed patients as well as schizoaffective depressed patients. The apparent Michaelis constant (km) of 5-HT uptake was normal in these groups, as was Vmax and Km in manic-depressive and chronic schizophrenic patients. Treatment of depressed patients with notriptyline hydrochloride or imipramine hydrochloride increased Km significantly. There was a trend for the increase in Km in the nortriptyline-treated patients to correlate with clinical improvement. Decreased 5-HT uptake in platelets provides additional evidence for the role of 5-HT in the pathophysiologic process of some forms of depression.

  11. Serotonin and NMDA receptors in respiratory long-term facilitation

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Liming

    2008-01-01

    Some have postulated that long-term facilitation (LTF), a persistent augmentation of respiratory activity after episodic hypoxia, may play a beneficial role in helping stabilize upper airway patency in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. However, the neuronal and cellular mechanisms underlying this plasticity of respiratory motor behavior are still poorly understood. The main purpose of this review is to summarize recent findings about serotonin and NMDA receptors involved in both LTF and its enhancement after chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH). The potential roles of these receptors in the initiation, formation and/or maintenance of LTF, as well as the CIH effect on LTF, will be discussed. As background, different paradigms for the stimulus protocol, different patterns of LTF expression and their mechanistic implications in LTF will also be discussed. PMID:18606575

  12. Serotonin Syndrome after Clomipramine Overdose in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Direk, Meltem Çobanoğulları; Yıldırım, Veli; Güneş, Serkan; Bozlu, Gülçin; Okuyaz, Çetin

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin syndrome (SS) is a potentially life-threatening condition associated with increased serotonergic activity in central nervous system and may occur during the use of serotonergic drugs. Although increasing frequency of serotonergic drug use in children, pediatricians, emergency medicine and pediatric intensive care specialists have not enough knowledge and experience about SS that is a potentially life-threatening condition. A 12-year-old girl patient was admitted to our emergency room with the history of involuntary contractions on her extremities and alteration of consciousness. Her physical examination showed agitation, hyperthermia, dilated pupils, tremor, increased deep tendon reflexes, positive spontaneous clonus, agitation, flushed skin and diaphoresis, excessive perspiration, and continuous horizontal ocular movements. The patient diagnosed as SS by clinical history, physical and laboratory findings. In this paper, we will discuss SS occurred in a 12-year-old girl after concurrent clomipramine and risperidone use. PMID:27776393

  13. Phosphoinositide system-linked serotonin receptor subtypes and their pharmacological properties and clinical correlates.

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, S C; Davis, J M; Pandey, G N

    1995-01-01

    Serotonergic neurotransmission represents a complex mechanism involving pre- and post-synaptic events and distinct 5-HT receptor subtypes. Serotonin (5-HT) receptors have been classified into several categories, and they are termed as 5-HT1, 5-HT2, 5-HT3, 5-HT4, 5-HT5, 5-HT6 and 5-HT7 type receptors. 5-HT1 receptors have been further subdivided into 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT1D, 5-HT1E and 5-HT1F. 5-HT2 receptors have been divided into 5-HT2A, 5-HT2B and 5-HT2C receptors. All 5-HT2 receptor subtypes are linked to the multifunctional phosphoinositide (PI) signalling system. 5-HT3 receptors are considered ion-gated receptors and are also linked to the PI signalling system by an unknown mechanism. The 5-HT2A receptor subtype is the most widely studied of the 5-HT receptors in psychiatric disorders (for example, suicide, depression and schizophrenia) as well as in relation to the mechanism of action of antidepressant drugs. The roles of 5-HT2C and 5-HT3 receptors in psychiatric disorders are less clear. These 5-HT receptors also play an important role in alcoholism. It has been shown that 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C and 5-HT3 antagonists cause attenuation of alcohol intake in animals and humans. However, the exact mechanisms are unknown. The recent cloning of the cDNAs for 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C and 5-HT3 receptors provides the opportunity to explore the molecular mechanisms responsible for the alterations in these receptors during illness as well as pharmacotherapy. This review article will focus on the current research into the pharmacological properties, molecular biology, and clinical correlates of 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C and 5-HT3 receptors. PMID:7786883

  14. Serotonin storage pools in basophil leukemia and mast cells: characterization of two types of serotonin binding protein and radioautographic analysis of the intracellular distribution of (/sup 3/H)serotonin

    SciTech Connect

    Tamir, H.; Theoharides, T.C.; Gershon, M.D.; Askenase, P.W.

    1982-06-01

    The binding of serotonin to protein(s) derived from rat basophil leukemia (RBL) cells and mast cells was studied. Two types of serotonin binding protein in RBL cells was found. These proteins differed from one another in molecular weight and eluted in separate peaks from sephadex G-200 columns. Peak I protein (KD = 1.9 x 10/sup -6/ M) was a glycoprotein that bound to concanavalin A (Con A); Peak II protein (KD/sub 1/ = 4.5 x 10/sup -/8 M; KD/sub 2/ = 3.9 x 10/sup -6/ M) did not bind to Con A. Moreover, binding of (/sup 3/H)serotonin to protein of Peak I was sensitive to inhibition by reserpine, while binding of (/sup 3/H)serotonin to protein of Peak II resisted inhibition by that drug. Other differences between the two types of binding protein were found, the most significant of which was the far more vigorous conditions of homogenization required to extract Peak I than Peak II protein. Electron microscope radioautographic analysis of the intracellular distribution of (/sup 3/H) serotonin taken up in vitro by RBL cells or in vivo by murine mast cells indicated that essentially all of the labeled amine was located in cytoplasmic granules.No evidence for a pool in the cytosol was found and all granules were capable of becoming labeled. The presence of two types of intracellular serotonin binding proteins in these cells may indicate that there are two intracellular storage compartments for the amine. Both may be intragranular, but Peak I protein may be associated with the granular membrane while Peak II protein may be more free within the granular core. Different storage proteins may help to explain the differential release of amines from mast cell granules.

  15. Desvenlafaxine succinate: A new serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Deecher, Darlene C; Beyer, Chad E; Johnston, Grace; Bray, Jenifer; Shah, S; Abou-Gharbia, M; Andree, Terrance H

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize a new chemical entity, desvenlafaxine succinate (DVS). DVS is a novel salt form of the isolated major active metabolite of venlafaxine. Competitive radioligand binding assays were performed using cells expressing either the human serotonin (5-HT) transporter (hSERT) or norepinephrine (NE) transporter (hNET) with K(i) values for DVS of 40.2 +/- 1.6 and 558.4 +/- 121.6 nM, respectively. DVS showed weak binding affinity (62% inhibition at 100 microM) at the human dopamine (DA) transporter. Inhibition of [3H]5-HT or [3H]NE uptake by DVS for the hSERT or hNET produced IC50 values of 47.3 +/- 19.4 and 531.3 +/- 113.0 nM, respectively. DVS (10 microM), examined at a large number of nontransporter targets, showed no significant activity. DVS (30 mg/kg orally) rapidly penetrated the male rat brain and hypothalamus. DVS (30 mg/kg orally) significantly increased extracellular NE levels compared with baseline in the male rat hypothalamus but had no effect on DA levels using microdialysis. To mimic chronic selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment and to block the inhibitory 5-HT(1A) autoreceptors, a 5-HT(1A) antagonist, N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-N-2-pyridinylcyclo hexanecarboxamide maleate salt (WAY-100635) (0.3 mg/kg s.c.), was administered with DVS (30 mg/kg orally). 5-HT increased 78% compared with baseline with no additional increase in NE or DA levels. In conclusion, DVS is a new 5-HT and NE reuptake inhibitor in vitro and in vivo that demonstrates good brain-to-plasma ratios, suggesting utility in a variety of central nervous system-related disorders.

  16. Stereoselective inhibition of serotonin transporters by antimalarial compounds.

    PubMed

    Beckman, Matthew L; Pramod, Akula Bala; Perley, Danielle; Henry, L Keith

    2014-07-01

    The serotonin (5-HT) transporter (SERT) is an integral membrane protein that functions to reuptake 5-HT released into the synapse following neurotransmission. This role serves an important regulatory mechanism in neuronal homeostasis. Previous studies have demonstrated that several clinically important antimalarial compounds inhibit serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) reuptake. In this study, we examined the details of antimalarial inhibition of 5-HT transport in both Drosophila (dSERT) and human SERT (hSERT) using electrophysiologic, biochemical and computational approaches. We found that the cinchona alkaloids quinidine and cinchonine, which have identical stereochemistry about carbons 8 and 9, exhibited the greatest inhibition of dSERT and hSERT transporter function whereas quinine and cinchonidine, enantiomers of quinidine and cinchonine, respectively, were weaker inhibitors of dSERT and hSERT. Furthermore, SERT mutations known to decrease the binding affinity of many antidepressants affected the cinchona alkaloids in a stereo-specific manner where the similar inhibitory profiles for quinine and cinchonidine (8S,9R) were distinct from quinidine and cinchonine (8R,9S). Small molecule docking studies with hSERT homology models predict that quinine and cinchonidine bind to the central 5-HT binding site (S1) whereas quinidine and cinchonine bind to the S2 site. Taken together, the data presented here support binding of cinchona alkaloids to two different sites on SERT defined by their stereochemistry which implies separate modes of transporter inhibition. Notably, the most potent antimalarial inhibitors of SERT appear to preferentially bind to the S2 site. Our findings provide important insight related to how this class of drugs can modulate the serotonergic system as well as identify compounds that may discriminate between the S1 and S2 binding sites and serve as lead compounds for novel SERT inhibitors.

  17. Insomnia Caused by Serotonin Depletion is Due to Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Nicholas M.; Buchanan, Gordon F.; Richerson, George B.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective: Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) neurons are now thought to promote wakefulness. Early experiments using the tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor para-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) had led to the opposite conclusion, that 5-HT causes sleep, but those studies were subsequently contradicted by electrophysiological and behavioral data. Here we tested the hypothesis that the difference in conclusions was due to failure of early PCPA experiments to control for the recently recognized role of 5-HT in thermoregulation. Design: Adult male C57BL/6N mice were treated with PCPA (800 mg/kg intraperitoneally for 5 d; n = 15) or saline (n = 15), and housed at 20°C (normal room temperature) or at 33°C (thermoneutral for mice) for 24 h. In a separate set of experiments, mice were exposed to 4°C for 4 h to characterize their ability to thermoregulate. Measurements and Results: PCPA treatment reduced brain 5-HT to less than 12% of that of controls. PCPA-treated mice housed at 20°C spent significantly more time awake than controls. However, core body temperature decreased from 36.5°C to 35.1°C. When housed at 33°C, body temperature remained normal, and total sleep duration, sleep architecture, and time in each vigilance state were the same as controls. When challenged with 4°C, PCPA-treated mice experienced a precipitous drop in body temperature, whereas control mice maintained a normal body temperature. Conclusions: These results indicate that early experiments using para-chlorophenylalanine that led to the conclusion that 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) causes sleep were likely confounded by hypothermia. Temperature controls should be considered in experiments using 5-HT depletion. Citation: Murray NM, Buchanan GF, Richerson GB. Insomnia caused by serotonin depletion is due to hypothermia. SLEEP 2015;38(12):1985–1993. PMID:26194567

  18. Enhanced responsiveness to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors during lactation.

    PubMed

    Jury, Nicholas J; McCormick, Betsy A; Horseman, Nelson D; Benoit, Stephen C; Gregerson, Karen A

    2015-01-01

    The physiology of mood regulation in the postpartum is poorly understood despite the fact that postpartum depression (PPD) is a common pathology. Serotonergic mechanisms and their dysfunction are widely presumed to be involved, which has led us to investigate whether lactation induces changes in central or peripheral serotonin (5-HT) systems and related affective behaviors. Brain sections from lactating (day 10 postpartum) and age-matched nulliparous (non-pregnant) C57BL/6J mice were processed for 5-HT immunohistochemistry. The total number of 5-HT immunostained cells and optical density were measured. Lactating mice exhibited lower immunoreactive 5-HT and intensity in the dorsal raphe nucleus when compared with nulliparous controls. Serum 5-HT was quantified from lactating and nulliparous mice using radioimmunoassay. Serum 5-HT concentrations were higher in lactating mice than in nulliparous controls. Affective behavior was assessed in lactating and non-lactating females ten days postpartum, as well as in nulliparous controls using the forced swim test (FST) and marble burying task (MBT). Animals were treated for the preceding five days with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI, citalopram, 5mg/kg/day) or vehicle. Lactating mice exhibited a lower baseline immobility time during the FST and buried fewer marbles during the MBT as compared to nulliparous controls. Citalopram treatment changed these behaviors in lactating mice with further reductions in immobility during the FST and decreased marble burying. In contrast, the same regimen of citalopram treatment had no effect on these behaviors in either non-lactating postpartum or nulliparous females. Our findings demonstrate changes in both central and peripheral 5-HT systems associated with lactation, independent of pregnancy. They also demonstrate a significant interaction of lactation and responsiveness to SSRI treatment, which has important implications in the treatment of PPD. Although recent evidence

  19. Chronic effects of antidepressants on serotonin release in rat raphe slice cultures: high potency of milnacipran in the augmentation of serotonin release.

    PubMed

    Nagayasu, Kazuki; Kitaichi, Maiko; Nishitani, Naoya; Asaoka, Nozomi; Shirakawa, Hisashi; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Kaneko, Shuji

    2013-11-01

    Most clinically-used antidepressants acutely increase monoamine levels in synaptic clefts, while their therapeutic effects often require several weeks of administration. Slow neuroadaptive changes in serotonergic neurons are considered to underlie this delayed onset of beneficial actions. Recently, we reported that sustained exposure of rat organotypic raphe slice cultures containing abundant serotonergic neurons to selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (citalopram, fluoxetine and paroxetine) caused the augmentation of exocytotic serotonin release. However, the ability of other classes of antidepressants to evoke a similar outcome has not been clarified. In this study, we investigated the sustained actions of two tricyclic antidepressants (imipramine and desipramine), one tetracyclic antidepressant (mianserin), three 5-HT and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (milnacipran, duloxetine and venlafaxine) and one noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant (mirtazapine) on serotonin release in the slice cultures. For seven of nine antidepressants, sustained exposure to the agents at concentrations of 0.1-100 μ m augmented the level of increase in extracellular serotonin. The rank order of their potency was as follows: milnacipran>duloxetine>citalopram>venlafaxine>imipramine>fluoxetine>desipramine. Neither mirtazapine nor mianserin caused any augmentation. The highest augmentation by sustained exposure to milnacipran was partially attenuated by an α 1-adrenoceptor antagonist, benoxathian, while the duloxetine-, venlafaxine- and citalopram-mediated increases were not affected. These results suggest that inhibition of the 5-HT transporter is required for the enhancement of serotonin release. Furthermore, the potent augmentation by milnacipran is apparently due to the accompanied activation of the α 1-adrenoceptor.

  20. Gut-derived serotonin induced by depression promotes breast cancer bone metastasis through the RUNX2/PTHrP/RANKL pathway in mice.

    PubMed

    Zong, Jian-Chun; Wang, Xing; Zhou, Xiang; Wang, Chen; Chen, Liang; Yin, Liang-Jun; He, Bai-Cheng; Deng, Zhong-Liang

    2016-02-01

    Breast cancer metastasizes to the bone in a majority of patients with advanced disease resulting in bone destruction. The underlying mechanisms are complex, and both processes are controlled by an interaction between locally and systemically derived signals. Clinically, breast cancer patients with depression have a higher risk of bone metastasis, yet the etiology and mechanisms are yet to be elucidated. MDA‑MB‑231 breast cancer cells were used to establish a bone metastasis model by using intracardiac injection in nude mice. Chronic mild stress (CMS) was chosen as a model of depression in mice before and after inoculation of the cells. Knockdown of the RUNX‑2 gene was performed by transfection of the cells with shRNA silencing vectors against human RUNX‑2. A co‑culture system was used to test the effect of the MDA‑MB‑231 cells on osteoclasts and osteoblasts. RT‑PCR and western blotting were used to test gene and protein expression, respectively. We confirmed that depression induced bone metastasis by promoting osteoclast activity while inhibiting osteoblast differentiation. Free serotonin led to an increase in the expression of RUNX2 in breast cancer cells (MDA‑MB‑231), which directly inhibited osteoblast differentiation and stimulated osteoclast differentiation by the PTHrP/RANKL pathway, which caused bone destruction and formed osteolytic bone lesions. Additionally, the interaction between depression and breast cancer cells was interrupted by LP533401 or RUNX2 knockdown. In conclusion, depression promotes breast cancer bone metastasis partly through increasing levels of gut‑derived serotonin. Activation of RUNX2 in breast cancer cells by circulating serotonin appears to dissociate coupling between osteoblasts and osteoclasts, suggesting that the suppression of gut‑derived serotonin decreases the rate of breast cancer bone metastasis induced by depression.

  1. [Homozygote mice deficient in serotonin 5-HT1B receptor and antidepressant effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Trillat, A C; Malagié, I; Bourin, M; Jacquot, C; Hen, R; Gardier, A M

    1998-01-01

    We use the knockout mice strategy to investigate the contribution of the 5-HT1B receptor in mediating the effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI). Using microdialysis in awake 129/Sv mice, we show that the absence of the 5-HT1B receptor in mutant mice (KO 1B -/-) potentiated the effect of paroxetine on extracellular 5-HT levels in the ventral hippocampus, but not in the frontal cortex compared to wild-type mice (WT). Furthermore, using the forced swimming test, we demonstrate that SSRIs decreased immobility of WT mice, and this effect is absent in KO 1B -/- mice showing therefore that activation of 5-HT1B receptors mediate the antidepressant-like effects of SSRIs. Taken together these findings suggest that 5-HT1B autoreceptors limit the effects of SSRI particularly in the hippocampus while postsynaptic 5-HT1B receptors are required for the antidepressant activity of SSRIs.

  2. Displacement of specific serotonin and lysergic acid diethylamide binding by Ergalgin, a new antiserotonin drug.

    PubMed

    Oelszner, W

    1980-01-01

    [3H]-serotonin and [3H]-lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) bind with a high affinity, KD = 12 nM and 6 nM, respectively, to distinct receptors of rat caudate membranes in vitro. Displacement experiments with unlabeled serotonin and LSD support the hypothesis of serotonin receptors existing in an agonist and antagonist state. Methysergide and Ergalgin display quite similar potencies in displacing [3H]-serotonin and [3H]-LSD from their specific binding sites (Ki = 46,7 and 53,4 nM; 22,3 and 36,5 nM, respectively). Contrary to pharmacological findings these binding results are in favour of mixed agonist/antagonist properties of these compounds.

  3. Serotonin mediated immunoregulation and neural functions: Complicity in the aetiology of autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Preeti; Mohanakumar, Kochupurackal P; Rajamma, Usha

    2015-08-01

    Serotonergic system has long been implicated in the aetiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), since platelet hyperserotonemia is consistently observed in a subset of autistic patients, who respond well to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Apart from being a neurotransmitter, serotonin functions as a neurotrophic factor directing brain development and as an immunoregulator modulating immune responses. Serotonin transporter (SERT) regulates serotonin level in lymphoid tissues to ensure its proper functioning in innate and adaptive responses. Immunological molecules such as cytokines in turn regulate the transcription and activity of SERT. Dysregulation of serotonergic system could trigger signalling cascades that affect normal neural-immune interactions culminating in neurodevelopmental and neural connectivity defects precipitating behavioural abnormalities, or the disease phenotypes. Therefore, we suggest that a better understanding of the cross talk between serotonergic genes, immune systems and serotonergic neurotransmission will open wider avenues to develop pharmacological leads for addressing the core ASD behavioural deficits.

  4. Suppression of serum gonadal steroids in rats by chronic treatment with dopamine and serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rehavi, M; Attali, G; Gil-Ad, I; Weizman, A

    2000-05-01

    The impact of chronic administration (3 weeks) of dopamine and serotonin reuptake inhibitors on serum gonadal steroid hormones and prolactin was studied in intact male and female rats. Both the dopamine and the serotonin reuptake inhibitors lowered serum estradiol and progesterone levels in the female rats. The dopamine transporter blockers suppressed testosterone serum levels in the male rats, whereas serotonin reuptake inhibitors induced only a non-significant reduction (30%) of this hormone. In contrast to the decrease in gonadal steroids, none of the serotonin or the dopamine reuptake blockers altered prolactin serum levels in either the male or female rats. It seems that the effect of these agents on ovarian and testicular hormones is related to the impact of the monoamine reuptake inhibitors on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

  5. Distinct effects of the serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors milnacipran and venlafaxine on rat pineal monoamines.

    PubMed

    Muneoka, Katsumasa; Kuwagata, Makiko; Ogawa, Tetsuo; Shioda, Seiji

    2015-06-17

    Monoamine systems are involved in the pathology and therapeutic mechanism of depression. The pineal gland contains large amounts of serotonin as a precursor for melatonin, and its activity is controlled by noradrenergic sympathetic nerves. Pineal diurnal activity and its release of melatonin are relevant to aberrant states observed in depression. We investigated the effects on pineal monoamines of serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors, which are widely used antidepressants. Four days of milnacipran treatment led to an increase in noradrenaline and serotonin levels, whereas 4 days of venlafaxine treatment reduced 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels; both agents induced an increase in dopamine levels. Our data suggest that milnacipran increases levels of the precursor for melatonin synthesis by facilitating the noradrenergic regulation of pineal activity and that venlafaxine inhibits serotonin reuptake into noradrenergic terminals on the pineal gland. PMID:26016648

  6. Genetic polymorphism of serotonin transporter 5-HTTLPR: involvement in smoking behaviour.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Maria Angelica Ehara; Nunes, Sandra Odebrecht Vargas; Nunes, Sandra Odebrechet Vargas; Amarante, Marla Karine; Guembarovski, Roberta Losi; Oda, Julie Massayo Maeda; Lima, Kalil William Alves De; Fungaro, Maria Helena Pelegrinelli

    2011-04-01

    Data suggest that the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) system is implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple neuropsychiatric disorders and may also be involved in smoking behaviour since nicotine increases brain serotonin secretion. It is known that smoking behaviour is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. The present review examines the role of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTT) in smoking behaviour and investigating studies that showed association of 5-HTT gene with smoking. This study discusses a polymorphism which has been investigated by many researchers, as the bi-allelic insertion/deletion polymorphism in the 5'- flanking promoter region (5-HTTLPR). This gene has received considerable attention in attempts to understand the molecular determinants of smoking. Therefore, in the present study, the relationship between genetic polymorphism of serotonin transporter in smoking behaviour is reviewed considering the interactive effect of genetic factors.

  7. Effect of sunlight and season on serotonin turnover in the brain.

    PubMed

    Lambert, G W; Reid, C; Kaye, D M; Jennings, G L; Esler, M D

    2002-12-01

    Alterations in monoaminergic neurotransmission in the brain are thought to underlie seasonal variations in mood, behaviour, and affective disorders. We took blood samples from internal jugular veins in 101 healthy men, to assess the relation between concentration of serotonin metabolite in these samples and weather conditions and season. We showed that turnover of serotonin by the brain was lowest in winter (p=0.013). Moreover, the rate of production of serotonin by the brain was directly related to the prevailing duration of bright sunlight (r=0.294, p=0.010), and rose rapidly with increased luminosity. Our findings are further evidence for the notion that changes in release of serotonin by the brain underlie mood seasonality and seasonal affective disorder.

  8. Ethanol intake and sup 3 H-serotonin uptake I: A study in Fawn-Hooded rats

    SciTech Connect

    Daoust, M.; Compagnon, P.; Legrand, E.; Boucly, P. )

    1991-01-01

    Ethanol intake and synaptosomal {sup 3}H-serotonin uptake were studied in male Fawn-Hooded and Sprague-Dawley rats. Fawn-Hooded rats consumed more alcohol and more water than Sprague-Dawley rats. Plasma alcohol levels of Sprague-Dawley rats were not detectable but were about 5 mg/dl in Fawn-Hooded rats. Ethanol intake increased the Vmax of serotonin uptake in Fawn-Hooded rats in hippocampus and cortex, but not in thalamus. In Fawn-Hooded rats, serotonin uptake (Vmax) was higher than in Sprague-Dawley rats cortex. Ethanol intake reduced the Vmax of serotonin uptake in Fawn-Hooded rats in hippocampus and cortex. In cortex, the carrier affinity for serotonin was increased in alcoholized Fawn-Hooded rats. These results indicate that synaptosomal {sup 3}H-serotonin uptake is affected by ethanol intake. In Fawn-Hooded rats, high ethanol consumption is associated with high serotonin uptake. In rats presenting high serotonin uptake, alcoholization reduces {sup 3}H-serotonin internalization in synaptosomes, indicating a specific sensitivity to alcohol intake of serotonin uptake system.

  9. Oral branched-chain amino acid supplements that reduce brain serotonin during exercise in rats also lower brain catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sujean; Disilvio, Briana; Fernstrom, Madelyn H; Fernstrom, John D

    2013-11-01

    Exercise raises brain serotonin release and is postulated to cause fatigue in athletes; ingestion of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA), by competitively inhibiting tryptophan transport into brain, lowers brain tryptophan uptake and serotonin synthesis and release in rats, and reputedly in humans prevents exercise-induced increases in serotonin and fatigue. This latter effect in humans is disputed. But BCAA also competitively inhibit tyrosine uptake into brain, and thus catecholamine synthesis and release. Since increasing brain catecholamines enhances physical performance, BCAA ingestion could lower catecholamines, reduce performance and thus negate any serotonin-linked benefit. We therefore examined in rats whether BCAA would reduce both brain tryptophan and tyrosine concentrations and serotonin and catecholamine synthesis. Sedentary and exercising rats received BCAA or vehicle orally; tryptophan and tyrosine concentrations and serotonin and catecholamine synthesis rates were measured 1 h later in brain. BCAA reduced brain tryptophan and tyrosine concentrations, and serotonin and catecholamine synthesis. These reductions in tyrosine concentrations and catecholamine synthesis, but not tryptophan or serotonin synthesis, could be prevented by co-administering tyrosine with BCAA. Complete essential amino acid mixtures, used to maintain or build muscle mass, were also studied, and produced different effects on brain tryptophan and tyrosine concentrations and serotonin and catecholamine synthesis. Since pharmacologically increasing brain catecholamine function improves physical performance, the finding that BCAA reduce catecholamine synthesis may explain why this treatment does not enhance physical performance in humans, despite reducing serotonin synthesis. If so, adding tyrosine to BCAA supplements might allow a positive action on performance to emerge.

  10. Identification, functional characterization, and pharmacological profile of a serotonin type-2b receptor in the medically important insect, Rhodnius prolixus

    PubMed Central

    Paluzzi, Jean-Paul V.; Bhatt, Garima; Wang, Chang-Hui J.; Zandawala, Meet; Lange, Angela B.; Orchard, Ian

    2015-01-01

    In the Chagas disease vector, Rhodnius prolixus, two diuretic hormones act synergistically to dramatically increase fluid secretion by the Malpighian tubules (MTs) during the rapid diuresis that is initiated upon engorgement of vertebrate blood. One of these diuretic hormones is the biogenic amine, serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT), which controls a variety of additional activities including cuticle plasticization, salivary gland secretion, anterior midgut absorption, cardioacceleratory activity, and myotropic activities on a number of visceral tissues. To better understand the regulatory mechanisms linked to these various physiological actions of serotonin, we have isolated and characterized a serotonin type 2b receptor in R. prolixus, Rhopr5HTR2b, which shares sequence similarity to the vertebrate serotonin type 2 receptors. Rhopr5HTR2b transcript is enriched in well-recognized physiological targets of serotonin, including the MTs, salivary glands and dorsal vessel (i.e., insect heart). Notably, Rhopr5HTR2b was not enriched in the anterior midgut where serotonin stimulates absorption and elicits myotropic control. Using a heterologous functional receptor assay, we examined Rhopr5HTR2b activation characteristics and its sensitivity to potential agonists, antagonists, and other biogenic amines. Rhopr5HTR2b is dose-dependently activated by serotonin with an EC50 in the nanomolar range. Rhopr5HTR2b is sensitive to alpha-methyl serotonin and is inhibited by a variety of serotonin receptor antagonists, including propranolol, spiperone, ketanserin, mianserin, and cyproheptadine. In contrast, the cardioacceleratory activity of serotonin revealed a unique pharmacological profile, with no significant response induced by alpha-methyl serotonin and insensitivity to ketanserin and mianserin. This distinct agonist/antagonist profile indicates that a separate serotonin receptor type may mediate cardiomodulatory effects controlled by serotonin in R. prolixus. PMID:26041983

  11. Symptoms of depression and anxiety in anorexia nervosa: links with plasma tryptophan and serotonin metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Claire; Hassler, Christine; Mattar, Lama; Launay, Jean-Marie; Callebert, Jacques; Steiger, Howard; Melchior, Jean-Claude; Falissard, Bruno; Berthoz, Sylvie; Mourier-Soleillant, Virginie; Lang, François; Delorme, Marc; Pommereau, Xavier; Gerardin, Priscille; Bioulac, Stephanie; Bouvard, Manuel; Godart, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Depressive, anxiety and obsessive symptoms frequently co-occur with anorexia nervosa (AN). The relationship between these clinical manifestations and the biological changes caused by starvation is not well understood. It has been hypothesised that reduced availability of tryptophan (TRP) could reduce serotonin activity and thus trigger these comorbid symptoms. The aim of this study, during re-feeding in individuals with AN, was to analyse covariations across measures of nutritional status, depressive and anxiety symptoms, and peripheral serotonin markers. Depressive and anxiety symptoms, nutritional status and serotonin markers--whole blood serotonin content, plasma TRP and the ratio between TRP and large neutral amino acids--were assessed for 42 AN participants at admission to inpatient treatment and after re-feeding. Biological measures were compared to those obtained in 42 non-eating disordered subjects. For those with AN, psychological, nutritional and biological parameters improved significantly during hospitalisation. Levels of serotonin markers were significantly lower in the AN group compared to the control group, at admission and at discharge. Increase in the TRP/LNAA ratio was correlated with a decrease in depressive symptoms. In addition, there was a positive correlation between serotonin levels and symptoms of both anxiety and depression at discharge. We speculate that enhanced TRP availability during re-feeding, as a result of the increase in the TRP/LNAA ratio, could restore serotonin neurotransmission and lead to a decrease in depressive symptoms. The association between serotonin and anxiety and depressive symptoms would be consistent with numerous observations indicating abnormal functioning of the serotoninergic system in AN. PMID:24135616

  12. Serotonin promotes acinar dedifferentiation following pancreatitis-induced regeneration in the adult pancreas.

    PubMed

    Saponara, Enrica; Grabliauskaite, Kamile; Bombardo, Marta; Buzzi, Raphael; Silva, Alberto B; Malagola, Ermanno; Tian, Yinghua; Hehl, Adrian B; Schraner, Elisabeth M; Seleznik, Gitta M; Zabel, Anja; Reding, Theresia; Sonda, Sabrina; Graf, Rolf

    2015-12-01

    The exocrine pancreas exhibits a distinctive capacity for tissue regeneration and renewal following injury. This regenerative ability has important implications for a variety of disorders, including pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, diseases associated with high morbidity and mortality. Thus, understanding its underlying mechanisms may help in developing therapeutic interventions. Serotonin has been recognized as a potent mitogen for a variety of cells and tissues. Here we investigated whether serotonin exerts a mitogenic effect in pancreatic acinar cells in three regenerative models, inflammatory tissue injury following pancreatitis, tissue loss following partial pancreatectomy, and thyroid hormone-stimulated acinar proliferation. Genetic and pharmacological techniques were used to modulate serotonin levels in vivo. Acinar dedifferentiation and cell cycle progression during the regenerative phase were investigated over the course of 2 weeks. By comparing acinar proliferation in the different murine models of regeneration, we found that serotonin did not affect the clonal regeneration of mature acinar cells. Serotonin was, however, required for acinar dedifferentiation following inflammation-mediated tissue injury. Specifically, lack of serotonin resulted in delayed up-regulation of progenitor genes and delayed the formation of acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and defective acinar cell proliferation. We identified serotonin-dependent acinar secretion as a key step in progenitor-based regeneration, as it promoted acinar cell dedifferentiation and the recruitment of type 2 macrophages. Finally, we identified a regulatory Hes1-Ptfa axis in the uninjured adult pancreas, activated by zymogen secretion. Our findings indicated that serotonin plays a critical role in the regeneration of the adult pancreas following pancreatitis by promoting the dedifferentiation of acinar cells.

  13. Platelet serotonin release by human polymorphonuclear leucocytes stimulated by cotton dust bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Holt, P. G.; Holt, Barbara J.; Beijer, Lena; Rylander, R.

    1983-01-01

    The release of serotonin from platelets was examined using polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) from normal volunteers. The stimulating agents emplyed were zymosan and heat-killed bacteria from Enterobacter agglomerans, which is commonly found in cotton dust. Optimal conditions for release were established. Both zymosan and E. agglomerans yielded a release of serotonin of an equal magnitude. The data are discussed in relation to the pathogenesis of respiratory disease associated with occupational exposure to cotton dust. PMID:6831770

  14. Relationships between serum serotonin and serum lipid levels, and aggression in horses.

    PubMed

    Meral, Y; Cakiroğlu, D; Sancak, A A; Cýftcý, G; Karabacak, A

    2007-01-01

    Levels of serum serotonin and serum lipids--triglyceride, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, high-density lipoprotein and very low-density lipoprotein, were determined in normal horses and horses diagnosed with aggression on the basis of a questionnaire survey. Blood serotonin levels in aggressive horses were found to be significantly lower than in non-aggressive horses (P < 0.01), but no association was found with respect to blood lipids. PMID:17252934

  15. Effects of fentanyl on serotonin syndrome-like behaviors in rats.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Sonoe; Kawano, Takashi; Kaminaga, Satomi; Yamanaka, Daiki; Tateiwa, Hiroki; Locatelli, Fabricio M; Yokoyama, Masataka

    2016-02-01

    Emerging evidence from case reports suggests that fentanyl may precipitate potentially life-threatening serotonin syndrome in patients taking serotonergic drugs. However, the underlying mechanism of the association between serotonin syndrome and fentanyl remains under investigation. We therefore investigated the pharmacological effects of an analgesic dose of fentanyl (0.2 mg/kg) injected subcutaneously (s.c.) on serotonergic toxicity-like responses in rats. Rats were s.c. injected with 0.75 mg/kg 8-OH-DPAT, a full 5-HT1A agonist, as an animal model of serotonin syndrome. The 8-OH-DPAT-treated rats showed well-characterized serotonin syndrome-like behaviors (low body posture, forepaw treading), hyperlocomotion, and decreased body temperature. Rats injected s.c. with fentanyl alone showed no significant changes in any of the parameters measured, while concomitant administration of fentanyl + 8-OH-DPAT resulted in exaggerated 8-OH-DPAT-induced serototoxic responses. A separate dose-response experiment showed that the serototoxic effect of fentanyl was dose-dependent. Pretreatment with naloxone [2.0 mg/kg, intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection], an opioid receptor antagonist, failed to antagonize the fentanyl-induced exaggerated serotonin syndrome-like behaviors. In contrast, pretreatment with WAY-100653, a serotonin 5-HT1A receptor antagonist (0.5 mg/kg, i.p. injection) completely inhibited all responses. Our findings provide preclinical proof-of-concept that an analgesic dose of fentanyl enhances serotonin toxicity, likely via its serotonin-reuptake inhibitory activity, independently of interaction with the opioid receptors.

  16. Role of serotonin in the regulation of renal proximal tubular epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Erikci, Acelya; Ucar, Gulberk; Yabanoglu-Ciftci, Samiye

    2016-08-01

    In various renal injuries, tissue damage occurs and platelet activation is observed. Recent studies suggest that some factors, such as serotonin, are released into microenvironment