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Sample records for frozen beef burger

  1. Consumer's evaluation of the effects of gamma irradiation and natural antioxidants on general acceptance of frozen beef burger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trindade, R. A.; Lima, A.; Andrade-Wartha, E. R.; Oliveira e Silva, A. M.; Mancini-Filho, J.; Villavicencio, A. L. C. H.

    2009-04-01

    The effect of addition of rosemary and oregano extracts on the sensory quality of irradiated beef burger was investigated. Batches of beef burgers were prepared with 400 ppm of rosemary or oregano extract and a group prepared with 200 ppm of synthetic butyl-hydroxytoluene (BHT)/butyl-hydroxy-anisol (BHA) was used as a control. Half of each formulation was irradiated at the maximum dose allowed for frozen meat (7 kGy). Samples were kept under frozen conditions (-20 °C) during the whole storage period, including during irradiation. Two analyses were performed after 20 and 90 days to verify the influence of the addition of the different types of antioxidants and the effect of irradiation and storage time on the acceptance of the product. Thirty-three and thirty-four untrained panelists were invited to participate in the first and second test, respectively. A structured hedonic scale ranging from 1 to 9 points was used in both analyses. BHT/BHA formulation obtained the highest score (6.73) and regarding the natural antioxidants, oregano received better acceptance (6.36). Irradiated samples formulated with oregano received a lower score, 6.03 in the first test and 5.06 in the second one, compared to the non-irradiated sample (6.36 and 5.79). In the second test (90 days), the sample formulated with BHT/BHA and which was irradiated received a higher score (6.59) when compared to the non-irradiated one (5.85). In both tests, the irradiated samples formulated with rosemary extract obtained a better score compared to the non-irradiated one, the scores being 5.00-3.82 and 5.00-3.76 in the first and second test, respectively. Our results allowed us to conclude that the natural antioxidants, rosemary and oregano extracts, present a good alternative for replacing synthetic additives in food industries, and that the irradiation process, in some cases, may help to enhance the sensory quality of food.

  2. Sensory attributes and texture profile of beef burgers with gari.

    PubMed

    Akwetey, W Y; Knipe, C L

    2012-12-01

    Beef burgers were produced using gari to substitute beef in the product formulations at 0% (control), 10%, 15% and 20% respectively. Cooking yield increased significantly (p<0.05) with increasing use of gari. Sensory evaluation of the products revealed significant (p<0.05) differences for acceptability and texture attributes. The acceptability score for burgers produced with 15% gari was not significantly different (p>0.05) from the control without gari. Using gari had no significant (p>0.05) effect on flavor and odor attributes of beef burgers. Texture profile analysis of burgers showed significant (p<0.05) reductions in hardness, springiness, gumminess and chewiness at all levels of substituting beef with gari. Production cost of burgers reduced by 9%, 14% and 18% respectively using 10%, 15% and 20% gari in burgers. The results suggest that gari has promising potential for use in comminuted meat products. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Qualitative improvement of low meat beef burger using Aloe vera.

    PubMed

    Soltanizadeh, Nafiseh; Ghiasi-Esfahani, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Low meat beef burgers have found their niche in the food markets in developing countries because of their lower price. However, these burgers still lack an acceptable quality. This study investigates the effects of different concentrations of Aloe vera on the quality of this food product. For this purpose, beef burgers were produced with 0%, 1%, 3%, and 5% Aloe vera and the changes in their cooking parameters, lipid oxidation, texture, and appeal to consumers over 7days of refrigerated storage were evaluated. Results indicate that Aloe vera contributed to some extent to decreased cooking loss and diameter reduction in the burgers. Increased concentrations of Aloe vera led to improvements in the water absorption and texture of the burgers as well as their lipid stability. However, a concentration level of 3% led to the most acceptability of the product to the panelists. Finally, it was found that Aloe vera acts as a hydrocolloid and improves the quality of burgers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A Pilot Study to Compare a Mushroom-Soy-Beef Burger to an All-Beef Burger in School Meals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, Amber C.; Smith, Paul; Ezike, Adaora; Frutchey, Robin; Fahle, Jenna; DeVries, Eva; Taylor, Jarrett; Cheskin, Lawrence J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine if mushroom blended recipes are an acceptable option for use in the school food program. The palatability and acceptance of mushroom-soy-beef blend burgers among school-aged children was tested. Methods: Students in grades 2 through 8 were invited to participate in a taste test.…

  5. A Pilot Study to Compare a Mushroom-Soy-Beef Burger to an All-Beef Burger in School Meals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, Amber C.; Smith, Paul; Ezike, Adaora; Frutchey, Robin; Fahle, Jenna; DeVries, Eva; Taylor, Jarrett; Cheskin, Lawrence J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine if mushroom blended recipes are an acceptable option for use in the school food program. The palatability and acceptance of mushroom-soy-beef blend burgers among school-aged children was tested. Methods: Students in grades 2 through 8 were invited to participate in a taste test.…

  6. Alternative fat substitutes for beef burger: technological and sensory characteristics.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Sabrina C; Pimenta, Maria Emília S G; Pimenta, Carlos J; Reis, Tatiana A; Nunes, Cleiton A; Pinheiro, Ana Carla M; Fabrício, Luís Felipe F; Leal, Renato Silva

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to develop a type of hamburger meat product and evaluate the physical features and sensory formulations of oatmeal flour, flour of green banana pulp, flour of green banana peel, flour of apple peel and pulp of Green Banana as fat substitutes. Regarding color, the formulations containing fat substitutes based on green banana presented lower values for b* and L*. Hamburgers with added oatmeal and apple peel flour obtained high values of a* and low values of L*, producing the reddest burgers. Substitutes based on green banana differed from others, resulting in a higher yield of burgers and water-holding capacity during cooking, besides having lower toughness and less shrinkage. The sensory acceptance test for untrained consumers suggests that the flour of peel and pulp of green banana, and oatmeal flour are excellent choices for fat-substitution in beef burger. Although fat contributes to a series of physical and sensory attributes such as softness, juiciness and yield, it is possible to reduce the lipid content in beef burgers without depreciating the quality of food through the use of the following fat substitutes: oat flour, apple peel flour, green banana pulp flour, green banana peel flour and green banana pulp.

  7. Use of quantitative microbial risk assessment when investigating foodborne illness outbreaks: the example of a monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium 4,5,12:i:- outbreak implicating beef burgers.

    PubMed

    Guillier, Laurent; Danan, Corinne; Bergis, Hélène; Delignette-Muller, Marie-Laure; Granier, Sophie; Rudelle, Sylvie; Beaufort, Annie; Brisabois, Anne

    2013-09-16

    A major community outbreak of salmonellosis occurred in France in October 2010. Classical epidemiological investigations led to the identification of beef burgers as the cause of the outbreak and the presence of the emerging monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium 4,5,12:i:-. The objective of this study was to understand the events that led to this large outbreak, that is to say, what are the contributing factors associated with consumer exposure to Salmonella. To this end, intensive microbiological investigations on several beef burgers were conducted and a risk assessment model was built. The microbiological results confirm the presence of Salmonella in all analysed frozen burgers at high levels of contamination above 1000 MPN/g. These results in frozen burgers combined with a model of thermal destruction were used to estimate the dose ingested by the exposed persons. Most people that consumed cooked beef burgers were exposed from 1.6 to 3.1 log₁₀ (MPN). The number of sick people predicted with a dose-response relationship for Salmonella is consistent with the observed number of salmonellosis cases. The very high initial contamination level in frozen beef burgers is the primary cause of this large outbreak rather than bad cooking practices. Intensive investigations, modelling of the initial contamination and quantitative exposure and risk assessments are complementary to epidemiological investigation. They can be valuable elements for the assessment of missing information or the identification of the primary causes of outbreaks.

  8. Potentials of gum from Detarium microcarpum (DM) and Mucuna flagellipes (MF) seeds as raw beef burger stabilizers.

    PubMed

    Onweluzo, J C; Obanu, Z A; Okwandu, M C

    2004-01-01

    Raw beef burgers containing graded levels (0.25, 0.5, 0.75. and 1.0%) of polysaccharide gums extracted from Detarium microcarpum (DM) and Mucuna flagellipes (MF) were produced. Unstabilized beef burgers and beef burgers containing gum tragacanth (TR) were also produced simultaneously to serve as control. The raw beef burgers were evaluated for selected physicochemical and sensory properties so as to assess the stabilization potentials of DM and MF polysaccharide gums relative to the conventional TR. Beef burgers containing the polysaccharide gums had significantly (P < 0.05) lower shrinkage, higher water holding capacity (WHC), and better stability under ambient conditions (27 +/- 1 degrees C and RH 90.6%) then the unstabilized burgers. Among the stabilized burgers, DM gum burgers had lower (P < or = 0.05) shrinkage and higher WHC than MF and TR gums burgers. All the gum-stabilized beef burgers required 9-26% higher compression force indicating a less friable product than the unstabilized burgers. At 0.25 and 0.5% levels of gum incorporation DM gum burgers had comparable compression force with TR gum burgers and this was lower (P < or = 0.05) than the compression force of MF gum burgers. Sensory panel results indicated a lower score for finger feel in gum-stablized burgers than the unstabilized burgers. DM and TR gum burgers had comparable scores with TR gum burgers in all the sensory attributes tested. Overall acceptability score showed that all the gum-stabilized beef burgers were acceptable. It was evident from the study that polysaccharide gums from DM and MF seeds can serve as effective stabilizers in beef burgers without adverse effect on the quality of the product.

  9. Vaccinium meridionale Swartz extracts and their addition in beef burgers as antioxidant ingredient.

    PubMed

    López-Padilla, Alexis; Martín, Diana; Villanueva Bermejo, David; Jaime, Laura; Ruiz-Rodriguez, Alejandro; Restrepo Flórez, Claudia Estela; Rivero Barrios, Diana Marsela; Fornari, Tiziana

    2017-06-14

    Vaccinium meridionale Swartz (mortiño) constitutes a source of bioactive phytochemicals, but reports related to its efficient and green production are scarce. In this study, pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) and ultrasound-assisted extraction of mortiño were compared. Total phenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant capacity (ABTS(•+) ) were determined. Beef burgers with 20 g kg(-1) of mortiño (MM) or its PLE extract (ME) were manufactured. Lipid oxidation (TBARS) and instrumental color changes were measured after refrigerated storage. High TPC (up to 72 g gallic acid equivalent kg(-1) extract) was determined in mortiño extracts, which was positively correlated with antioxidant activity. TBARS values of beef burgers containing either MM or ME did not change after refrigerated storage, whereas lipid oxidation of control burgers increased significantly. The color of burgers with added MM or ME was different (lower b* and a* values) from that of control burgers. However, the evolution of color after storage was similar between control and ME samples. Mortiño extracts with high TPC can be obtained by PLE. Both mortiño and its PLE extract are able to control lipid oxidation of beef burgers, but the extract is preferred from the color quality point of view. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Evaluation of Frozen Beef Patties Containing Soy Protein

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-06-01

    Food Engineering Laboratory FEL·23 I ~oved tor pUblic releaseJ distribution unlimited. Citation of trade names 1n this report does not constitute...COLOR SOY STORAGE SOY PROTEIN FROZEN FOODS MEAT ACIDS MOISTURE FLAVOR FROZEN BEEF FOOD PROTEIN APPEARANCE TEXTURE 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on...were incorporated into ground beef at levels of 20 and 30$ in accord with Food Nutrition Service Notice 219. Patties prepared therefrom together with

  11. Tetraplex PCR assay involving double gene-sites discriminates beef and buffalo in Malaysian meat curry and burger products.

    PubMed

    Hossain, M A Motalib; Ali, Md Eaqub; Hamid, Sharifah Bee Abd; Hossain, S M Azad; Asing; Nizar, Nina Naquiah Ahmad; Uddin, Mohammad Nasir; Ali, Lokman; Asaduzzaman, Md; Akanda, Md Jahurul Haque

    2017-06-01

    Replacement of beef by buffalo and vice versa is frequent in global markets, but their authentication is challenging in processed foods due to the fragmentation of most biomarkers including DNA. The shortening of target sequences through use of two target sites might ameliorate assay reliability because it is highly unlikely that both targets will be lost during food processing. For the first time, we report a tetraplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay targeting two different DNA regions in beef (106 and 120-bp) and buffalo (90 and 138-bp) mitochondrial genes to discriminate beef and buffalo in processed foods. All targets were stable under boiling, autoclaving and microwave cooking conditions. A survey in Malaysian markets revealed 71% beef curries contained buffalo but there was no buffalo in beef burgers. The assay detected down to 0.01ng DNA and 1% meat in admixed and burger products.

  12. Impact of Nisin-Activated Packaging on Microbiota of Beef Burgers during Storage.

    PubMed

    Ferrocino, Ilario; Greppi, Anna; La Storia, Antonietta; Rantsiou, Kalliopi; Ercolini, Danilo; Cocolin, Luca

    2015-11-06

    Beef burgers were stored at 4°C in a vacuum in nisin-activated antimicrobial packaging. Microbial ecology analyses were performed on samples collected between days 0 and 21 of storage to discover the population diversity. Two batches were analyzed using RNA-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and pyrosequencing. The active packaging retarded the growth of the total viable bacteria and lactic acid bacteria. Culture-independent analysis by pyrosequencing of RNA extracted directly from meat showed that Photobacterium phosphoreum, Lactococcus piscium, Lactobacillus sakei, and Leuconostoc carnosum were the major operational taxonomic units (OTUs) shared between control and treated samples. Beta diversity analysis of the 16S rRNA sequence data and RNA-DGGE showed a clear separation between two batches based on the microbiota. Control samples from batch B showed a significant high abundance of some taxa sensitive to nisin, such as Kocuria rhizophila, Staphylococcus xylosus, Leuconostoc carnosum, and Carnobacterium divergens, compared to control samples from batch A. However, only from batch B was it possible to find a significant difference between controls and treated samples during storage due to the active packaging. Predicted metagenomes confirmed differences between the two batches and indicated that the use of nisin-based antimicrobial packaging can determine a reduction in the abundance of specific metabolic pathways related to spoilage. The present study aimed to assess the viable bacterial communities in beef burgers stored in nisin-based antimicrobial packaging, and it highlights the efficacy of this strategy to prolong beef burger shelf life. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Impact of Nisin-Activated Packaging on Microbiota of Beef Burgers during Storage

    PubMed Central

    Ferrocino, Ilario; Greppi, Anna; La Storia, Antonietta; Rantsiou, Kalliopi; Ercolini, Danilo

    2015-01-01

    Beef burgers were stored at 4°C in a vacuum in nisin-activated antimicrobial packaging. Microbial ecology analyses were performed on samples collected between days 0 and 21 of storage to discover the population diversity. Two batches were analyzed using RNA-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and pyrosequencing. The active packaging retarded the growth of the total viable bacteria and lactic acid bacteria. Culture-independent analysis by pyrosequencing of RNA extracted directly from meat showed that Photobacterium phosphoreum, Lactococcus piscium, Lactobacillus sakei, and Leuconostoc carnosum were the major operational taxonomic units (OTUs) shared between control and treated samples. Beta diversity analysis of the 16S rRNA sequence data and RNA-DGGE showed a clear separation between two batches based on the microbiota. Control samples from batch B showed a significant high abundance of some taxa sensitive to nisin, such as Kocuria rhizophila, Staphylococcus xylosus, Leuconostoc carnosum, and Carnobacterium divergens, compared to control samples from batch A. However, only from batch B was it possible to find a significant difference between controls and treated samples during storage due to the active packaging. Predicted metagenomes confirmed differences between the two batches and indicated that the use of nisin-based antimicrobial packaging can determine a reduction in the abundance of specific metabolic pathways related to spoilage. The present study aimed to assess the viable bacterial communities in beef burgers stored in nisin-based antimicrobial packaging, and it highlights the efficacy of this strategy to prolong beef burger shelf life. PMID:26546424

  14. Myoglobin as marker in meat adulteration: a UPLC method for determining the presence of pork meat in raw beef burger.

    PubMed

    Giaretta, Nicola; Di Giuseppe, Antonella M A; Lippert, Martina; Parente, Augusto; Di Maro, Antimo

    2013-12-01

    The identification of meat animal species used in raw burgers is very important with respect to economic and religious considerations. Therefore, international supervisory bodies have implemented procedures to control the employed meat species. In this paper we propose myoglobin as a powerful molecular marker to evaluate the presence of non-declared meat addition in raw beef burgers by using ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) for the separation and identification of edible animal species (beef, chicken, horse, ostrich, pig and water buffalo). Meat samples were pre-treated with sodium nitrite to transform oxymyoglobin and deoxymyoglobin to the more stable metmyoglobin. The developed method was validated, preparing mixtures with different percentages of pork and beef minced meat. The obtained results show that using myoglobin as marker, 5% (25 mg/500 mg) of pork or beef meat can be detected in premixed minced meat samples.

  15. Microbiological quality of Australian beef carcass meat and frozen bulk packed beef.

    PubMed

    Vanderlinde, P B; Shay, B; Murray, J

    1998-04-01

    Two studies were undertaken to determine the microbiological of beef carcass meat and frozen boneless bulk packed beef produced in Australia. Samples were collected from 1,063 beef carcasses and from 929 cartons of frozen boneless bulk packed beef over a period of approximately 12 months. Samples were collected from works processing beef carcasses for the Australian domestic market and from works targeting export markets. On carcasses processed for export markets, where bacterial counts were obtained, the log10 mean of the APC (aerobic plate count) was 3.13 CFU/cm2, the geometric mean of the coliform count was 19 MPN/cm2, and the geometric mean of Escherichia coli was 13 MPN/cm2. A small percentage (0.59%) of export samples were found positive for Listeria monocytogenes, 0.16% were positive of r coagulase-positive for Campylobacter jejuni/coli, 0.22% were positive for Salmonella spp., and 29% were positive for coagulase-positive Staphylococcus spp. Bacterial numbers were lower on carcasses processed for export markets and higher carcasses chilled for more than 24 h. Escherichia coli O157 was recovered from 4 of 893 export carcasses tested (0.45%). Of the export frozen boneless bulk packed beef samples that tested positive, the log10 mean of the APC was 2.5 CFU/g, the geometric mean of the coliform count was 15 MPN/g, and the geometric mean number of e. coli was 15 MPN/g. Three of 787 export frozen samples (0.38%) tested positive for Salmonella spp., E. coli O157 was not isolated from any of the 685 export frozen samples tested for this bacteria. Export samples tested for this bacteria. Export samples on average had lower APCs than domestic samples. Results from both surveys are compared with data from similar studies in other countries.

  16. A national survey of the microbiological quality of beef carcasses and frozen boneless beef in Australia.

    PubMed

    Phillips, David; Jordan, David; Morris, Stephen; Jenson, Ian; Sumner, John

    2006-05-01

    The third national baseline microbiological survey of Australian beef carcasses and frozen boneless beef was conducted in 2004. Carcasses (n=1155) sampled at 27 slaughter establishments had a mean aerobic plate count (at 25 degrees C) of 1.3 log CFU/cm2. Escherichia coli was isolated from 8.0% of the cacasses, with a mean count of -0.8 log CFU/cm2 for positive samples. On samples from 24 boning (fabrication) plants (n=1082), the mean aerobic plate count for frozen boneless beef was 1.3 log CFU/g, and the mean count for the 1.8% of samples with detectable E. coli was 1.5 log CFU/g. E. coli O157: H7 was isolated from 1 of 1,143 carcasses and from 0 of 1082 boneless samples. Salmonella was isolated from 0 of 1155 carcasses and from 1 of 1082 samples of boneless product. No Campylobacter spp. were isolated from carcasses or boneless beef. Coagulase-positive staphylococci were isolated from 28.7% of beef carcasses and 20.3% of boneless beef samples, and positive samples had a mean count of 0.3 log CFU/cm2 and 0.8 log CFU/g, respectively.

  17. Consumer-orientated development of hybrid beef burger and sausage analogues.

    PubMed

    Neville, Michelle; Tarrega, Amparo; Hewson, Louise; Foster, Tim

    2017-07-01

    Hybrid meat analogues, whereby a proportion of meat has been partially replaced by more sustainable protein sources, have been proposed to provide a means for more sustainable diets in the future. Consumer testing was conducted to determine consumer acceptability of different formulations of Hybrid beef burgers and pork sausages in comparison with both meat and meat-free commercial products. Acceptability data were generated using the 9-point hedonic scale. Check-all-that-apply (CATA) questioning was used to determine the sensory attributes perceived in each product as well as information on the attributes of consumers' ideal products. It was identified that Hybrid products were generally well liked among consumers and no significant differences in consumer acceptability (p > .05) were identified between Hybrid and full meat products, whereas meat-free products were found to be less accepted. However, Hybrid sausages received higher acceptability scores (6.00-6.51) than Hybrid burgers (5.84-5.92) suggesting that format may have a large impact on consumer acceptability of Hybrid products. Correspondence Analysis (CA) indicated that Hybrid products were grouped with meat products in their sensory attributes. Penalty analysis found that a "meaty flavor" was the largest factor driving consumer acceptability in both burgers and sausages. Cluster analysis of consumer acceptability data identified key differences in overall acceptability between different consumer groups (consumers who only eat meat products and consumers who eat both meat and meat-free products). The Hybrid concept was found to bridge the acceptability gap between meat and meat-free products; however, further product reformulation is required to optimize consumer acceptability.

  18. An Australian national survey of the microbiological quality of frozen boneless beef and beef primal cuts.

    PubMed

    Phillips, David; Bridger, Kathryn; Jenson, Ian; Sumner, John

    2012-10-01

    The fourth national baseline microbiological survey of Australian beef was conducted in 2011, including frozen boneless beef and, for the first time, samples from selected beef primal cuts. Cartons of frozen boneless beef (n = 1,165) sampled at 29 boning (fabrication) plants were found to have a mean total viable count of 2.2 log CFU/g, and the mean count for the 2.1% of samples with detectable Escherichia coli was 1.3 log CFU/g. The mean total viable counts for striploins (longissimus dorsi, n = 572) and outsides (biceps femoris, n = 572) were 1.3 and 1.5 log CFU/cm(2) respectively. E. coli isolates were obtained from 10.7 and 25.2% of striploins and outsides, respectively, with mean counts of -0.5 and -0.3 log CFU/cm(2) on positive samples. E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella, and Campylobacter were not isolated from any primal cut samples, and Salmonella was not isolated from any of the boneless product (E. coli O157:H7 and Campylobacter were not tested for). Listeria spp. were not detected in any of the boneless product, and one Listeria isolate was obtained on 1 (0.2%) of 572 striploin samples. Coagulase-positive staphylococci were isolated from 3.4% of boneless beef samples, 7.7% of beef striploins, and 8.4% of beef outsides, with positive samples having mean log counts of 1.9 CFU/g, 0.2 CFU/cm(2), and 0.2 CFU/cm(2), respectively.

  19. Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157 in beef and chicken burgers, and chicken carcasses in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Chinen, Isabel; Epszteyn, Sergio; Melamed, Celia L; Aguerre, Lorena; Martínez Espinosa, Estela; Motter, Mariana M; Baschkier, Ariela; Manfredi, Eduardo; Miliwebsky, Elizabeth; Rivas, Marta

    2009-06-30

    We describe the isolation and characterization of Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157:H7 from cooked and uncooked beef and chicken burgers and from chicken carcasses collected during sampling procedures in 2001 and 2002 in Buenos Aires City, Argentina. Of the 24 STEC O157:H7 strains isolated, 20 were recovered from 19 (6.8%) out of 279 samples of beef and chicken burgers, and 4 strains from 4 (10.3%) out of 39 chicken carcasses. The samples were analyzed following the USDA/FSIS 2002 method. The prevalent stx genotype was stx(2) and stx(2c) (12 strains, 50%). All strains were characterized as eae and ehxA-positive. By XbaI-PFGE, the strains yielded 10 different patterns. Eighteen out of 24 strains were grouped in four clusters: #1 (4 strains, AREXHX01.0043), #2 (4 strains, AREXHX01.0022), #3 (8 strains, AREXHX01.0139), and #4 (2 strains, AREXHX01.0200). Identical strains by phage typing, stx genotyping and PFGE were detected in uncooked and cooked beef and chicken burgers in different restaurants, which had been collected on the same or different sampling dates. These findings help to underline the importance of STEC O157 detection in meat products, to improve active surveillance, and to define control strategies in order to prevent new cases of STEC infection.

  20. The effect of partial-fat substitutions with encapsulated and unencapsulated fish oils on the technological and eating quality of beef burgers over storage.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Derek F; Resconi, Virginia C; Smyth, Thomas J; Botinestean, Cristina; Lefranc, Célio; Kerry, Joseph P; Hamill, Ruth M

    2015-09-01

    The effects of fat substitution (≤ 15%) with commercial encapsulated and unencapsulated fish oils on the technological and eating quality of beef burgers over storage [modified atmosphere packs (80% O2:20% CO2); constantly illuminated retail display at 4 °C; for 15 days] were studied using design of experiment (DOE). Burger formulations comprised beef shin (59.5%), salt (0.5%), vitamin E (0.015%) combined with varying levels of beef-fat/fish oils depending on the treatment. Increasing amounts of encapsulated and unencapsulated fish oils in burgers increased polyunsaturated fatty acid content (P < 0.001). Storage decreased (P < 0.001) a* values, which was in agreement with oxymyoglobin data. Vitamin E inclusion in burgers resulted in higher (P < 0.01) oxymyoglobin values. TBARS values increased (P < 0.001) over storage as expected. Fat substitution with unencapsulated oils increased cook loss (P < 0.001) and decreased hardness (P < 0.05) compared to other treatments. Optimisation predicted a burger formulation with 7.8% substitution in beef-fat with encapsulated fish oil. Panellists scored the optimised burger formulation (P < 0.05) lower than controls for overall acceptability. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Characteristics of restructured beef steak with different proportions of walnut during frozen storage.

    PubMed

    Serrano, A; Cofrades, S; Jiménez-Colmenero, F

    2006-01-01

    Physicochemical (thawing loss, cooking loss, surface shrinkage, texture, colour and lipid oxidation) and sensory properties of restructured beef steak with different levels of added walnut (0%, 10% and 20%) were determined at various times during frozen storage up to 128 days. Cooking loss (CL), Kramer shear force (KSF) and binding strength (BS) of restructured beef decreased (P<0.05) as the proportion of walnut increased. Walnut enhanced (P<0.05) lightness and yellowness and reduced (P<0.05) redness. Frozen storage did not affect (P>0.05) CL, KSF and BS of restructured beef steak. Redness decreased (P<0.05) over storage for all samples. Lipid oxidation of restructured beef steak containing walnut was not a limiting factor for frozen stability of meat products. Frozen storage had no effect (P>0.05) on the sensory quality of restructured beef steak.

  2. Color, sensory and physicochemical attributes of beef burger made using meat from young bulls fed levels of licuri cake.

    PubMed

    de Gouvêa, Ana Al; Oliveira, Ronaldo L; Leão, André G; Assis, Dallyson Yc; Bezerra, Leilson R; Nascimento Júnior, Nilton G; Trajano, Jaqueline S; Pereira, Elzania S

    2016-08-01

    Licuri cake is a biodiesel byproduct and has been tested as an alternative feed additive for use in cattle production. This study analyzed the color, sensory and chemical attributes of burger meat from bovines. Thirty-two young Nellore bulls were used, housed in individual pens and distributed in a randomized experimental design with four treatments: no addition or the addition of 7, 14 or 21% (w/w) licuri cake in the dry matter of the diet. Interactions between the licuri cake level and the physicochemical variables (P > 0.05) were observed. Additionally, an interaction was observed between the licuri cake level and the burger beef color parameter lightness index (L*) (P = 0.0305). The L* value was positively and linearly correlated with the proportion of licuri cake in the diet of young bulls. The level of inclusion of licuri cake did not affect (P > 0.05) the sensory characteristics; the variables were graded between 6 and 7, indicating good overall acceptance. Up to 21% (w/w) licuri cake can be included in the diet of young bulls without negatively impacting on beef burger quality. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Effects of pineapple byproduct and canola oil as fat replacers on physicochemical and sensory qualities of low-fat beef burger.

    PubMed

    Selani, Miriam M; Shirado, Giovanna A N; Margiotta, Gregório B; Saldaña, Erick; Spada, Fernanda P; Piedade, Sonia M S; Contreras-Castillo, Carmen J; Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange G

    2016-02-01

    Pineapple byproduct and canola oil were evaluated as fat replacers on physicochemical and sensory characteristics of low-fat burgers. Five treatments were performed: conventional (CN, 20% fat) and four low-fat formulations (10% fat): control (CT), pineapple byproduct (PA), canola oil (CO), pineapple byproduct and canola oil (PC). Higher water and fat retention and lower cooking loss and diameter reduction were found in burgers with byproduct addition. In raw burgers, byproduct incorporation reduced L*, a*, and C* values, but these alterations were masked after cooking, leading to products similar to CN. Low-fat treatments were harder, chewier, and more cohesive than full-fat burgers. However, in Warner Bratzler shear measurements, PA and PC were as tender as CN. In QDA, no difference was found between CN and PC. Pineapple byproducts along with canola oil are promising fat replacers in beef burgers. In order to increase the feasibility of use of pineapple byproduct in the meat industry, alternative processes of byproduct preparation should be evaluated in future studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Pineapple by-product and canola oil as partial fat replacers in low-fat beef burger: Effects on oxidative stability, cholesterol content and fatty acid profile.

    PubMed

    Selani, Miriam M; Shirado, Giovanna A N; Margiotta, Gregório B; Rasera, Mariana L; Marabesi, Amanda C; Piedade, Sonia M S; Contreras-Castillo, Carmen J; Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange G

    2016-05-01

    The effect of freeze-dried pineapple by-product and canola oil as fat replacers on the oxidative stability, cholesterol content and fatty acid profile of low-fat beef burgers was evaluated. Five treatments were performed: conventional (CN, 20% fat) and four low-fat formulations (10% fat): control (CT), pineapple by-product (PA), canola oil (CO), and pineapple by-product and canola oil (PC). Low-fat cooked burgers showed a mean cholesterol content reduction of 9.15% compared to the CN. Canola oil addition improved the fatty acid profile of the burgers, with increase in the polyunsaturated/saturated fatty acids ratio and decrease in the n-6/n-3 ratio, in the atherogenic and thrombogenic indexes. The oxidative stability of the burgers was affected by the vegetable oil addition. However, at the end of the storage time (120 days), malonaldehyde values of CO and PC were lower than the threshold for the consumer's acceptance. Canola oil, in combination with pineapple by-product, can be considered promising fat replacers in the development of healthier burgers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Frozen storage stability of antioxidant-treated raw restructured beef steaks made from mature cows.

    PubMed

    Stika, J F; Xiong, Y L; Suman, S P; Blanchard, S P; Moody, W G

    2007-12-01

    Previous research has shown that beef quality decreased with the age of cattle. In this study, beef trimmings from nine mature cows (n=9), equally representing three animal age groups (2-4, 6-8, and 10-12yr), were restructured into steaks formulated with propyl gallate, alone or in combination with a beefy flavoring agent, to enhance palatability and stability during 6months of frozen storage at -29°C. Lipid oxidation, rancidity, and loss of beefy flavor in restructured steaks during extended storage were reduced by propyl gallate. The beefy flavoring agent inclusion masked mature, forage-fed beef off-flavors, intensified beefy flavor, and improved steak tenderness, juiciness and cooking yield. Thus, the combination of propyl gallate and beefy flavoring offers an effective means to enhance the palatability and storage stability of restructured beef prepared from mature cows.

  6. Radiation Resistance of Asporogenous Bacteria in Frozen Beef

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-03-01

    temperature was indicated as -300 C the range was +100 C. The temperature was monitored by means of a thermocouple and 2 appropriate recorder. When vacuum ... packaging was employed, sealing was at 125 mm mercury pressure. ,, Isolation procedure - Samples of ground beef were packaged in flexible polyethylene

  7. Sensory and Physicochemical Studies of Thermally Micronized Chickpea (Cicer arietinum) and Green Lentil (Lens culinaris) Flours as Binders in Low-Fat Beef Burgers.

    PubMed

    Shariati-Ievari, Shiva; Ryland, Donna; Edel, Andrea; Nicholson, Tiffany; Suh, Miyoung; Aliani, Michel

    2016-05-01

    Pulses are known to be nutritious foods but are susceptible to oxidation due to the reaction of lipoxygenase (LOX) with linolenic and linoleic acids which can lead to off flavors caused by the formation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Infrared micronization at 130 and 150 °C was investigated as a heat treatment to determine its effect on LOX activity and VOCs of chickpea and green lentil flour. The pulse flours were added to low-fat beef burgers at 6% and measured for consumer acceptability and physicochemical properties. Micronization at 130 °C significantly decreased LOX activity for both flours. The lentil flour micronized at 150 °C showed a further significant decrease in LOX activity similar to that of the chickpea flour at 150 °C. The lowering of VOCs was accomplished more successfully with micronization at 130 °C for chickpea flour while micronization at 150 °C for the green lentil flour was more effective. Micronization minimally affected the characteristic fatty acid content in each flour but significantly increased omega-3 and n-6 fatty acids at 150 °C in burgers with lentil and chickpea flours, respectively. Burgers with green lentil flour micronized at 130 and 150 °C, and chickpea flour micronized at 150 °C were positively associated with acceptability. Micronization did not affect the shear force and cooking losses of the burgers made with both flours. Formulation of low-fat beef burgers containing 6% micronized gluten-free binder made from lentil and chickpea flour is possible based on favorable results for physicochemical properties and consumer acceptability.

  8. Temperature of frozen storage affects the nature and consequences of protein oxidation in beef patties.

    PubMed

    Utrera, Mariana; Morcuende, David; Estévez, Mario

    2014-03-01

    The effect of three frozen storage temperatures (-8, -18 and -80 °C) on protein oxidation in beef patties was studied through the analysis of novel oxidation markers. Additionally, the connection between lipid and protein oxidation and the impact of the latter on particular quality traits (water holding capacity, color and texture) of subsequently processed beef patties (cooking/cold-stored) were investigated. Protein oxidation was measured as the loss of tryptophan fluorescence and formation of diverse lysine oxidation products (α-aminoadipic semialdehyde, α-aminoadipic acid and Schiff bases). Lipid oxidation was assessed by levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and hexanal. A significant effect of storage temperature on protein oxidation was detected. Frozen storage increased the susceptibility of meat proteins to undergo further oxidation during processing. Timely interactions were found between lipid and protein oxidation. Plausible mechanisms by which oxidative damage to proteins may have an impact in particular quality traits are thoroughly discussed.

  9. Investigation of the Effects of Inulin and β-Glucan on the Physical and Sensory Properties of Low-Fat Beef Burgers Containing Vegetable Oils: Optimisation of the Formulation Using D-Optimal Mixture Design

    PubMed Central

    Afshari, Roya; Khaksar, Ramin; Mohammadifar, Mohammad Amin; Amiri, Zohre; Komeili, Rozita; Khaneghah, Amin Mousavi

    2015-01-01

    Summary In this study, the D-optimal mixture design methodology was applied to determine the optimised proportions of inulin, β-glucan and breadcrumbs in formulation of low-fat beef burgers containing pre-emulsified canola and olive oil blend. Also, the effect of each of the ingredients individually as well as their interactions on cooking characteristics, texture, colour and sensory properties of low-fat beef burgers were investigated. The results of this study revealed that the increase of inulin content in the formulations of burgers led to lower cooking yield, moisture retention and increased lightness, overall acceptability, mouldability and desired textural parameters. In contrast, incorporation of β-glucan increased the cooking yield, moisture retention and decreased lightness, overall acceptability, mouldability and desired textural parameters of burger patties. The interaction between inulin and β-glucan improved the cooking characteristics of the burgers without significantly negative effect on the colour or sensory properties. The results of the study clearly stated that the optimum mixture for the burger formulation consisted of (in g per 100 g): inulin 3.1, β-glucan 2.2 and breadcrumbs 2.7. The texture parameters and cooking characteristics were improved by using the mixture of inulin, β-glucan and breadcrumbs, without any negative effects on the sensory properties of the burgers. PMID:27904378

  10. Protein oxidation during frozen storage and subsequent processing of different beef muscles.

    PubMed

    Utrera, Mariana; Parra, Vita; Estévez, Mario

    2014-02-01

    This study examined the relationship between protein and lipid oxidation and the impairment of the water holding capacity (WHC), redness and instrumental hardness occurring during 20 weeks of frozen storage (-18 °C) and subsequent processing (cooking, chilled storage) of psoas major, quadriceps femoris and longissimus dorsi beef patties. Patties were analyzed at sampling times upon thawing (weeks 0, 4, 8, 12 and 20) for lipid (TBARS, hexanal) and protein oxidation products (α-aminoadipic and γ-glutamic semialdehydes, α-aminoadipic acid, Schiff bases). A significant impact of frozen storage on protein oxidation was found, which occurred concomitantly with a loss of WHC, redness and significant changes in the hardness of cooked patties. Heme-iron, endogenous antioxidant enzymes and to a lower extent, fatty acid composition, played a role in the oxidative stability of patties. Plausible mechanisms by which particular protein oxidation changes may lead to loss of WHC and impaired quality traits were discussed.

  11. Changes in Ultrastructure and Sensory Characteristics on Electro-magnetic and Air Blast Freezing of Beef during Frozen Storage.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun-Sang; Ku, Su-Kyung; Jeong, Ji-Yun; Jeon, Ki-Hong; Kim, Young-Boong

    2015-01-01

    The ultrastructure in the beef muscle of the electro-magnetic resonance and air blast freezing during the frozen storage, and the changes in the quality characteristics after thawing were evaluated. The size of ice crystal was small and evenly formed in the initial freezing period, and it showed that the size was increased as the storage period was elapsed (p<0.05). The beef stored by the electro-magnetic resonance freezing showed the size of ice crystal with a lower rate of increase than the air blast freezing during the frozen storage. The thawing loss of beef stored by the electro-magnetic resonance freezing was significantly lower than the air blast freezing during frozen storage (p<0.05), and it showed that the thawing loss of the round was higher than the loin. Water holding capacity decreased as the storage period became longer while the electro-magnetic resonance freezing was higher than the air blast on 8 month (p<0.05). As a result of sensory evaluation, the beef stored by the electro-magnetic resonance freezing did not show the difference until 4 months, and it showed higher acceptability in comparison with the beef stored by the air blast freezing. Thus, it is considered that the freezing method has an effect on the change in the ultrastructure and quality characteristics of the beef.

  12. Changes in Ultrastructure and Sensory Characteristics on Electro-magnetic and Air Blast Freezing of Beef during Frozen Storage

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The ultrastructure in the beef muscle of the electro-magnetic resonance and air blast freezing during the frozen storage, and the changes in the quality characteristics after thawing were evaluated. The size of ice crystal was small and evenly formed in the initial freezing period, and it showed that the size was increased as the storage period was elapsed (p<0.05). The beef stored by the electro-magnetic resonance freezing showed the size of ice crystal with a lower rate of increase than the air blast freezing during the frozen storage. The thawing loss of beef stored by the electro-magnetic resonance freezing was significantly lower than the air blast freezing during frozen storage (p<0.05), and it showed that the thawing loss of the round was higher than the loin. Water holding capacity decreased as the storage period became longer while the electro-magnetic resonance freezing was higher than the air blast on 8 month (p<0.05). As a result of sensory evaluation, the beef stored by the electro-magnetic resonance freezing did not show the difference until 4 months, and it showed higher acceptability in comparison with the beef stored by the air blast freezing. Thus, it is considered that the freezing method has an effect on the change in the ultrastructure and quality characteristics of the beef. PMID:26761797

  13. Oxidative damage to poultry, pork, and beef during frozen storage through the analysis of novel protein oxidation markers.

    PubMed

    Utrera, Mariana; Estévez, Mario

    2013-08-21

    The susceptibility of meats from different animal species (beef quadriceps femoris, porcine longissimus dorsi, and chicken pectoralis major) to undergo protein oxidation during frozen storage (20 weeks/-18 °C) was studied through the analysis of novel oxidation markers. Frozen storage induced protein carbonylation (α-aminoadipic and γ-glutamic semialdehydes), carboxylation (α-aminoadipic acid), and formation of Schiff bases in meat from the three species. Major rates of protein and lipid oxidation products [thiobarbituric-acid-reactive substances (TBARS) and hexanal] were found in beef patties. Among the endogenous factors having a potential influence on the susceptibility of meat to undergo protein oxidation, heme iron seemed to play a major role. The present study illustrates the severe chemical modifications induced by oxidative stress during frozen storage of ground meat and provides original insight into the underlying mechanisms and factors.

  14. Effects of soy hull pectin and insoluble fiber on physicochemical and oxidative characteristics of fresh and frozen/thawed beef patties.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Wook; Miller, Danika K; Lee, Yong Jae; Kim, Yuan H Brad

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of pectin and insoluble fiber isolated from soy hulls on water-holding capacity (WHC), texture, color, and lipid oxidation of fresh and frozen/thawed beef patties. Beef patties were formulated with no dietary fiber (control), 1% soy hull pectin, insoluble fiber, or their mixture (1:1), respectively. The addition of soy hull pectin significantly decreased display weight loss and increased cook yield of both fresh and frozen/thawed beef patties. In addition, no significant difference in hardness between fresh and frozen/thawed beef patties was observed for all dietary fiber treatments. However, incorporation of insoluble soy hull fiber decreased color and lipid oxidation stabilities of both fresh and frozen/thawed beef patties. Our results indicate that the incorporation of soy hull pectin could be an effective non-meat ingredient to minimize water loss and hardness defects of frozen beef patties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The effect of different levels of sunflower head pith addition on the properties of model system emulsions prepared from fresh and frozen beef.

    PubMed

    Sariçoban, Cemalettin; Yilmaz, Mustafa Tahsin; Karakaya, Mustafa; Tiske, Sümeyra Sultan

    2010-01-01

    The effect of sunflower head pith on the functional properties of emulsions was studied by using a model system. Oil/water (O/W) model emulsion systems were prepared from fresh and frozen beef by the addition of the pith at five concentrations. Emulsion capacity (EC), stability (ES), viscosity (EV), colour and flow properties of the prepared model system emulsions were analyzed. The pith addition increased the EC and ES and the highest EC and ES values were reached when 5% of pith added; however, further increase in the pith concentration caused an inverse trend in these values. Fresh beef emulsions had higher EC and ES values than did frozen beef emulsions. One percent pith concentration was the critic level for the EV values of fresh beef emulsions. EV values of the emulsions reached a maximum level at 5% pith level, followed by a decrease at 7% pit level.

  16. Quality Characteristics of Beef by Different Cooking Methods for Frozen Home Meal Replacements

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, In-Guk; Yoo, Seon-Mi; Min, Sang-Gi

    2015-01-01

    Blanching beef for use in home meal replacements (HMR) is an important process that determines the final quality of the beef after the cooking process. Thermal pretreatment also minimizes the change in quality during the main cooking process or storage. In this study, beef samples were washed and sliced, then treated by immersion in boiling water (1-10 min), steaming (1-10 min), or pan-frying in oil (30-240 s). The color after each thermal treatment showed higher L* and b* values and lower a* values compared with the raw beef, except for the pan-frying thermal treatment. The total color difference (∆E) and pH value were significantly increased by panfrying (p<0.05). There was no significant difference in the shear force of the beef samples, except for the sample pan-fried for 210 s. The nutritional content of beef was measured as the moisture, protein, fat, and ash contents, which were 69.96, 16.64, 3.49, and 1.13%, respectively, in raw beef. After thermal treatment, the crude protein and fat contents were increased, whereas the moisture and ash contents decreased. The mineral content, including Na, Mg, Fe, and Ca was highest after pan-frying. The heat treatment decreased microorganisms in all the samples. The total bacteria count in raw beef was 4.5-4.7 Log CFU/g, whereas the bacteria count decreased to 2.2-2.8 Log CFU/g after blanching. Thermophilic bacteria, coliform, mold, and yeast not detected in any thermally treated sample. PMID:26761864

  17. Frozen storage stability of beef patties incorporated with extracts from ulam raja leaves (Cosmos caudatus).

    PubMed

    Reihani, S F S; Tan, Thuan-Chew; Huda, Nurul; Easa, Azhar Mat

    2014-07-15

    In Malaysia, fresh ulam raja leaves (Cosmos caudatus) are eaten raw with rice. In this study, beef patties incorporated with extracts of ulam raja (UREX) and commercial green tea extract (GTE) added individually at 200 and 500 mg/kg were stored at -18°C for up to 10 weeks. Lipid oxidation, cooking yield, physicochemical properties, textural properties, proximate composition and sensory characteristics of the beef patties were compared between those incorporated with UREX, GTE and the control (pure beef patty). Incorporation of UREX or GTE at 500 mg/kg into beef patties reduced the extent of lipid oxidation significantly (P<0.05). UREX showed a strong lipid oxidation inhibitory effect, comparable with GTE. In addition, a significant improvement (P<0.05) in cooking yield and textural properties was also recorded. However, incorporation of UREX and GTE into beef patties showed no significant influence (P>0.05) on the colour, pH, proximate composition and overall sensory acceptability of the patties.

  18. Effect of sodium chloride, sodium nitrite and temperature on desorption isotherms of previously frozen beef.

    PubMed

    Kabil, Emre; Aktaş, Nesimi; Balcı, Ercan

    2012-04-01

    Moisture desorption isotherms of beef were determined in the relative humidity range of 23 to 90% at 5, 15 and 25°C and at 2.5% NaCl and 2.5% NaCl+150 ppm NaNO(2) content. Desorption isotherms were found to be typical type II sigmoid. The water content at equilibrium was higher in beef with NaCl and NaCl+NaNO(2) than control samples. Experimental data were fitted to various mathematical models and it was found that the Peleg model was best in describing the equilibrium moisture content relationship for beef samples over the entire range of temperatures. The net isosteric heat of sorption was estimated from equilibrium desorption data, using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. Isosteric heats of desorption were found to increase with decreasing moisture content.

  19. Trained sensory panel and consumer evaluation of the effects of gamma irradiation on palatability of vacuum-packaged frozen ground beef patties.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, T L; Shackelford, S D; Koohmaraie, M

    1999-12-01

    The objectives for this experiment were to determine the effects of gamma irradiation on 1) the palatability of vacuum-packaged frozen ground beef patties by trained sensory panel and 2) consumer evaluation of the taste of hamburgers made with those patties. Boxes (4.5 kg) of frozen (-28 degrees C) ground beef patties (113.4 g/patty, 19% fat) from a commercial supplier were irradiated at a commercial gamma irradiation facility at one of three levels (0, 3.0, or 4.5 kGy). All boxes were stored at 28 degrees C for 27 to 29 d after irradiation before evaluation by a trained descriptive attribute sensory panel and for 62 to 104 d after irradiation before consumer evaluation. The trained panel evaluated grilled patties for ground beef aroma intensity, off-aroma, and off-flavor on 4-point scales (4 = intense, none, and none; 1 = none, intense, and intense, respectively) and ground beef flavor intensity, tenderness, and juiciness on 8-point scales (8 = extremely intense, tender, or juicy; 1 = extremely bland, tough, or dry). Control patties had more intense (P<.05) ground beef aroma (3.1 vs 2.6), less off-aroma (3.3 vs 2.6), and more intense ground beef flavor (4.9 vs. 4.3) than irradiated patties. However, there were no differences (P>.05) in any sensory trait between frozen ground beef patties treated with 3.0 or 4.5 kGy of gamma irradiation. There were no differences (P>.05) among treatments for tenderness (6.3, 6.6, and 6.7) or juiciness ratings (5.7, 5.9, and 5.9), respectively, for 0, 3.0, and 4.5 kGy. The consumers evaluated taste of a hamburger that included their choice of condiments on a 10-point scale (10 = excellent; 1 = terrible). Hamburgers made with patties treated with 4.5 kGy were rated lower (P<.05) in taste than hamburgers made with either control patties or those treated with 3.0 kGy (6.5, 6.6, and 6.2, respectively, for 0, 3.0, and 4.5 kGy); however, all doses were rated at some level of "fair." These results imply that hamburgers made from ground

  20. Robust linear and non-linear models of NIR spectroscopy for detection and quantification of adulterants in fresh and frozen-thawed minced beef.

    PubMed

    Morsy, Noha; Sun, Da-Wen

    2013-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the potential of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) as a fast and non-destructive tool for detecting and quantifying different adulterants in fresh and frozen-thawed minced beef. Partial least squares regression (PLSR) models were built under cross validation and tested with different independent data sets, yielding determination coefficients (R(P)(2)) of 0.96, 0.94 and 0.95 with standard error of prediction (SEP) of 5.39, 5.12 and 2.08% (w/w) for minced beef adulterated by pork, fat trimming and offal, respectively. The performance of the developed models declined when the samples were in a frozen-thawed condition, yielding R(P)(2) of 0.93, 0.82 and 0.95 with simultaneous augments in the SEP of 7.11, 9.10 and 2.38% (w/w), respectively. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA), partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and non-linear regression models (logistic, probit and exponential regression) were developed at the most relevant wavelengths to discriminate between the pure (unadulterated) and adulterated minced beef. The classification accuracy resulting from both types of models was quite high, especially the LDA, PLS-DA and exponential regression models which yielded 100% accuracy. The current study demonstrated that the VIS-NIR spectroscopy can be utilized securely to detect and quantify the amount of adulterants added to the minced beef with acceptable precision and accuracy.

  1. Inactivation of non-O157:H7 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) in frozen ground beef patties

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A cluster of illnesses linked to contamination of ground beef with an E. coli serotype O26 strain, and the subsequent recall, reinforces the need for additional research on control of STEC in beef. Ground beef (percent lean:fat = 70:30 and 93:7) was inoculated with about 7.0 log CFU/g of a serotype...

  2. Detection of adulteration in fresh and frozen beefburger products by beef offal using mid-infrared ATR spectroscopy and multivariate data analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming; Downey, Gerard; O'Donnell, Colm P

    2014-02-01

    A series of authentic and offal-adulterated beefburger samples was produced. Authentic product (36 samples) comprised either only lean meat and fat (higher quality beefburgers) or lean meat, fat, rusk and water (lower quality product). Beef offal adulterants comprised heart, liver, kidney and lung. Adulterated formulations (46 samples) were produced using a D-optimal experimental design. Fresh and frozen-then-thawed samples were modelled, separately and in combination, by a classification (partial least squares discriminant analysis) and class-modelling (soft independent modelling of class analogy) approach. With the former, 100% correct classification accuracies were obtained separately for fresh and frozen-then-thawed material. Separate class-models for fresh and frozen-then-thawed samples exhibited high sensitivities (0.94 to 1.0) but lower specificities (0.33-0.80 for fresh samples and 0.41-0.87 for frozen-then-thawed samples). When fresh and frozen-then-thawed samples were modelled together, sensitivity remained 1.0 but specificity ranged from 0.29 to 0.91. Results indicate a role for this technique in monitoring beefburger compliance to label.

  3. Identification and quantification of turkey meat adulteration in fresh, frozen-thawed and cooked minced beef by FT-NIR spectroscopy and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Alamprese, Cristina; Amigo, José Manuel; Casiraghi, Ernestina; Engelsen, Søren Balling

    2016-11-01

    This work aims at the development of a method based on FT-NIR spectroscopy and multivariate analysis for the identification and quantification of minced beef meat adulteration with turkey meat. Samples were analyzed as raw, frozen-thawed and cooked. Different multivariate regression and class-modeling strategies were evaluated. PLS regression models with R(2) in prediction higher than 0.884 and RMSEP lower than 10.8% were developed. PLS-DA applied to discriminate each type of sample in two classes (adulteration threshold=20%) showed values of sensitivity and specificity in prediction higher than 0.84 and 0.76, respectively. Thus, the study demonstrates that FT-NIR spectroscopy coupled with suitable chemometric strategies is a reliable tool for the identification and quantification of minced beef adulteration with turkey meat not only in fresh products, but also in frozen-thawed and cooked samples. This achievement is of crucial importance in the meat industry due to the increasing number of processed meat products, in which technological treatments can mask a possible inter-species adulteration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Nitrite-embedded packaging film effects on fresh and frozen beef color development and stability as influenced by meat age and muscle type.

    PubMed

    Claus, James R; Du, Chen

    2013-11-01

    Muscles (Longissimus lumborum, LL; Psoas major, PM, semitendinosus, ST) were aged (2, 9d postmortem), cut into steaks, anaerobically packaged (nitrite-embedded film, NEF), and displayed (fresh, 19d; frozen, 39d). Fresh NEF increased (P<0.05) in redness (first 48h). Upon opening fresh NEF (d 6) and overwrapping in PVC film, redness declined (P<0.05). NEF cooked LL had more red surface compared to non-NEF. Meat age influenced NEF color. Intact NEF maintained acceptable red color throughout display. Residual nitrite and nitrate associated with fresh NEF and nitrate in NEF cooked LL were found (P<0.05) in the outer layer. Consideration should be given to providing sufficient time for nitric oxide myoglobin development when using NEF which may be influenced by meat age and muscle differences. NEF packaging has potential to extend fresh beef color display life. NEF appears to offer the opportunity to display bright red beef in frozen display by limiting typical effects of photooxidation.

  5. Fixed-time AI pregnancy rate following insemination with frozen-thawed or fresh-extended semen in progesterone supplemented CO-Synch protocol in beef cows.

    PubMed

    Bucher, A; Kasimanickam, R; Hall, J B; Dejarnette, J M; Whittier, W D; Kähn, W; Xu, Z

    2009-04-15

    The objective of this study was to compare fixed-time AI pregnancy rate in Angus crossbred beef cows inseminated with frozen-thawed or fresh-extended semen. Two ejaculates from each of two Angus bulls were collected by artificial vagina and pooled for each bull. The pooled semen from each bull was divided into two aliquots; Aliquot 1 was extended using Caprogen (LIC, Hamilton, New Zealand) to a concentration of 3 x 10(6)sperm/straw and Aliquot 2 was extended using egg-yolk-glycerol extender to a concentration of 20 x 10(6)sperm/straw. Semen extended with Caprogen was maintained at ambient temperature and semen extended with egg-yolk-glycerol extender was frozen and maintained at -196 degrees C until insemination. In each of two breeding seasons (Fall 2007 and Spring 2008), Angus-crossbeef cows (N=1455) at 12 locations were randomly assigned within location to semen type [Fresh (N=736) vs. Frozen (N=719)] and sire [1 (N=731) vs. 2 (N=724)]. All cows were synchronized with 100 microg of GnRH im and a progesterone Controlled Internal Drug Release insert (CIDR) on Day 0, and on Day 7, 25mg of PGF2(alpha) im and CIDR removal. All cows received 100 microg of GnRH im and were inseminated at a fixed-time on Day 10, 66 h after CIDR removal. Timed-AI pregnancy rates were influenced by season (P<0.05), cows detected in estrus prior to and at AI (P<0.001), and dam age (P<0.01). Pregnancy rates were not affected by semen type (Fresh=51.5% vs. Frozen=50.4%; P=0.66) and there were no significant interactions of semen type by estrus expression, semen type by sire, or semen type by season (P>0.1). In conclusion, commercial beef cows inseminated with fresh-extended semen (3 x 10(6)sperm/straw) yielded comparable pregnancy rates to conventional frozen-thawed semen in a progesterone supplemented, CO-Synch fixed-time AI synchronization protocol and may provide an alternate to frozen semen for more efficient utilization of superior genetics.

  6. Effect of frozen storage, different thawing methods and cooking processes on the survival of Salmonella spp. and Escherichia coli O157:H7 in commercially shaped beef patties.

    PubMed

    Manios, Stavros G; Skandamis, Panagiotis N

    2015-03-01

    The effect of common handling practices (i.e., freezing, thawing and cooking) of beef patties on the survival of Salmonella spp. and Escherichia coli O157:H7, was evaluated. Inoculated ground beef was stored at -22 °C for 5 and 75 days. After thawing at 4 °C/16 h, 20 °C/12 h, in microwave/22-24 min, or without prior thawing, beef patties (90 g) were shaped and cooked in oven-broiler or in pan-grill to internal temperatures of 60 °C or 71 °C. Cooking in oven-broiler was more effective compared to pan-grill, especially when cooked to 71 °C. Defrosting methods did not affect significantly (P ≥ 0.05) the survival of the pathogens during subsequent cooking. Frozen storage for 75 days enhanced the survival of E. coli O157:H7, as the pathogen survived 3.1 logCFU/g when cooked in oven-broiler at 71 °C. Results may supplement the existing guidelines for the appropriate practices, associated with freezing, thawing and cooking of patties in households or catering services.

  7. Quantitative risk assessment for Escherichia coli O157:H7 in frozen ground beef patties consumed by young children in French households.

    PubMed

    Delignette-Muller, M L; Cornu, M

    2008-11-30

    A quantitative risk assessment for Escherichia coli O157:H7 in frozen ground beef patties consumed by children under 10 years of age in French households was conducted by a national study group describing an outbreak which occurred in France in 2005. Our exposure assessment model incorporates results from French surveys on consumption frequency of ground beef patties, serving size and consumption preference, microbial destruction experiments and microbial counts on patties sampled from the industrial batch which were responsible for the outbreak. Two different exposure models were proposed, respectively for children under the age of 5 and for children between 5 and 10 years. For each of these two age groups, a single-hit dose-response model was proposed to describe the probability of hemolytic and uremic syndrome (HUS) as a function of the ingested dose. For each group, the single parameter of this model was estimated by Bayesian inference, using the results of the exposure assessment and the epidemiological data collected during the outbreak. Results show that children under 5 years of age are roughly 5 times more susceptible to the pathogen than children over 5 years. Exposure and dose-response models were used in a scenario analysis in order to validate the use of the model and to propose appropriate guidelines in order to prevent new outbreaks. The impact of the cooking preference was evaluated, showing that only a well-done cooking notably reduces the HUS risk, without annulling it. For each age group, a relation between the mean individual HUS risk per serving and the contamination level in a ground beef batch was proposed, as a tool to help French risk managers.

  8. Detailed evaluation of a newly attained fungal pigment from Monascus purpureus in meat burgers.

    PubMed

    El-Kholie, Emad M; El Shaer, Magda K; Abdelreheem, Mohammed A T; Gharib, Mai A

    2012-11-01

    Beef burgers with red pigment extracted from Monascus purpureus, used as a natural colouring agent, were examined for chemical compositions, physical properties, microbiological aspects and organoleptic evaluation. Beef burgers with Monascus pigment showed higher nutritional values compared with control samples. Nutritional values were proportionally enhanced by increasing pigment concentration. Synthetic dye samples had the lowest values of nutrients. Cooking loss percentage and water holding capacity were lower in all treatments compared with control samples, and vice versa for plasticity. The initial total bacterial count, Staphylococcus aureus count and coliform count were determined. Extending storage period up to 90 days severely reduced all tested microorganisms. By increasing the M. pigment concentration, the colour was significantly increased. Insignificant differences in colours were noticed among various treatments. Flavour and body and texture scores were insignificantly different. Microbial inhibition percentage of beef burger samples was increased by increasing the Monascus pigment concentration up to 0.8 g/kg.

  9. Use of lactic acid with electron beam irradiation for control of Escherichia coli O157:H7, non-O157 VTEC E. coli, and Salmonella serovars on fresh and frozen beef.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuliu; Kundu, Devapriya; Holley, Richard A

    2015-04-01

    Lactic acid pre-treatment was examined to enhance the antimicrobial action of electron (e-) beam irradiation of beef trim. Meat samples were inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7, non-O157 VTEC E. coli or Salmonella cocktails and treated with 5% lactic acid at 55 °C. Samples were packaged aerobically or vacuum-packed, kept at 4 °C and treated with 1 kGy e-beam energy. Frozen samples were treated with 1, 3 or 7 kGy and stored at -20 °C for ≤ 5 d. Lactic acid enhanced the antimicrobial action of 1 kGy e-beam treatment against Salmonella by causing an additional <1.8 log CFU/g reduction. One kGy treatment of refrigerated samples reduced VTEC E. coli viability by 4.5 log CFU/g, and while lactic acid did not improve the reduction, after freezing additive effects were found. After 3 kGy irradiation, Salmonella was reduced by 2 and 4 log CFU/g in the irradiated and lactic acid plus irradiated samples, respectively. Lactic acid pre-treatment was of limited value with 1 kGy treatment for improving control of toxigenic E. coli in fresh beef trim, however, it would be useful with low dose irradiation for controlling both VTEC E. coli and Salmonella in frozen product. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Shiga-toxin producing 0157:H7 and non-0157:H7 Escherichia coli cells within refrigerated, frozen, or frozen then thawed ground beef patties cooked on commercial open-flame gas or clam-shell electric grills

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We evaluated the possible effect of both fat and grill type on the fate of serotype O157:H7 strains of Escherichia coli (ECOH) and non-O157:H7 Shiga toxin producing strains of E. coli (STEC) in cooked ground beef patties. Both high fat and low fat ground beef (percent lean:fat = ca. 70:30 and 93:7, ...

  11. 9 CFR 319.142 - Fresh beef sausage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fresh beef sausage. 319.142 Section... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS OF IDENTITY OR COMPOSITION Sausage Generally: Fresh Sausage § 319.142 Fresh beef sausage. “Fresh Beef Sausage” is sausage prepared with fresh beef or frozen...

  12. Management of risk of microbial cross-contamination from uncooked frozen hamburgers by alcohol-based hand sanitizer.

    PubMed

    Schaffner, Donald W; Schaffner, Kristin M

    2007-01-01

    This research was undertaken to determine the effectiveness of an alcohol-based hand sanitizer on hands contaminated with a nonpathogen surrogate for Escherichia coli O157:H7, where the source of the contamination was frozen hamburger patties. A nonpathogenic nalidixic acid-resistant food-grade strain of Enterobacter aerogenes was used to inoculate frozen hamburger patties composed of 76% lean beef and 24% fat. Thirty-two individuals participated to produce the data used in this study. Each participant handled nine patties at least three times, a sample for microbiological analysis was collected from the surface of one hand, the participant sanitized both hands, and a sample was collected from the other hand. Burger handling created perceptible and visible food debris on the hands of most participants. Computer simulations also were used to perform a variety of risk calculations. The average reduction in bacteria from the use of sanitizer on hands contaminated by frozen burgers containing E. aerogenes was 2.6 +/- 0.7 log CFU per hand. An experiment designed to simultaneously test the effect of sanitizer on E. aerogenes and E. coli O157:H7 also revealed no significant difference in sanitizer effectiveness against the two organisms. The results of the real-world risk estimation calculations (using the actual prevalence and concentration of E. coli O157:H7 in ground beef) predict that once in 1 million trials, a single pathogen cell will be transferred to a single lettuce piece. The effectiveness of this sanitizer intervention was similar to that for hand washing and glove use previously reported. The person-to-person microbial reduction variability from sanitizer use is similar to published data for glove use and was less variable than published data on hand washing effectiveness.

  13. 9 CFR 319.313 - Beef with gravy and gravy with beef.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    .... 319.313 Section 319.313 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS OF IDENTITY OR COMPOSITION Canned, Frozen, or Dehydrated Meat Food Products § 319.313 Beef with gravy and gravy with beef. “Beef with Gravy” and “Gravy...

  14. 9 CFR 319.313 - Beef with gravy and gravy with beef.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS OF IDENTITY OR COMPOSITION Canned, Frozen, or Dehydrated Meat Food Products § 319.313 Beef with gravy and gravy with beef. “Beef with Gravy” and...

  15. 9 CFR 319.313 - Beef with gravy and gravy with beef.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .... 319.313 Section 319.313 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS OF IDENTITY OR COMPOSITION Canned, Frozen, or Dehydrated Meat Food Products § 319.313 Beef with gravy and gravy with beef. “Beef with Gravy” and...

  16. 9 CFR 319.313 - Beef with gravy and gravy with beef.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... 319.313 Section 319.313 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS OF IDENTITY OR COMPOSITION Canned, Frozen, or Dehydrated Meat Food Products § 319.313 Beef with gravy and gravy with beef. “Beef with Gravy” and...

  17. 9 CFR 319.313 - Beef with gravy and gravy with beef.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... 319.313 Section 319.313 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS OF IDENTITY OR COMPOSITION Canned, Frozen, or Dehydrated Meat Food Products § 319.313 Beef with gravy and gravy with beef. “Beef with Gravy” and...

  18. Reduction operators of Burgers equation

    PubMed Central

    Pocheketa, Oleksandr A.; Popovych, Roman O.

    2013-01-01

    The solution of the problem on reduction operators and nonclassical reductions of the Burgers equation is systematically treated and completed. A new proof of the theorem on the special “no-go” case of regular reduction operators is presented, and the representation of the coefficients of operators in terms of solutions of the initial equation is constructed for this case. All possible nonclassical reductions of the Burgers equation to single ordinary differential equations are exhaustively described. Any Lie reduction of the Burgers equation proves to be equivalent via the Hopf–Cole transformation to a parameterized family of Lie reductions of the linear heat equation. PMID:23576819

  19. Reduction operators of Burgers equation.

    PubMed

    Pocheketa, Oleksandr A; Popovych, Roman O

    2013-02-01

    The solution of the problem on reduction operators and nonclassical reductions of the Burgers equation is systematically treated and completed. A new proof of the theorem on the special "no-go" case of regular reduction operators is presented, and the representation of the coefficients of operators in terms of solutions of the initial equation is constructed for this case. All possible nonclassical reductions of the Burgers equation to single ordinary differential equations are exhaustively described. Any Lie reduction of the Burgers equation proves to be equivalent via the Hopf-Cole transformation to a parameterized family of Lie reductions of the linear heat equation.

  20. Thermal inactivation of Salmonella spp. in pork burger patties.

    PubMed

    Gurman, P M; Ross, T; Holds, G L; Jarrett, R G; Kiermeier, A

    2016-02-16

    Predictive models, to estimate the reduction in Escherichia coli O157:H7 concentration in beef burgers, have been developed to inform risk management decisions; no analogous model exists for Salmonella spp. in pork burgers. In this study, "Extra Lean" and "Regular" fat pork minces were inoculated with Salmonella spp. (Salmonella 4,[5],12,i:-, Salmonella Senftenberg and Salmonella Typhimurium) and formed into pork burger patties. Patties were cooked on an electric skillet (to imitate home cooking) to one of seven internal temperatures (46, 49, 52, 55, 58, 61, 64 °C) and Salmonella enumerated. A generalised linear logistic regression model was used to develop a predictive model for the Salmonella concentration based on the internal endpoint temperature. It was estimated that in pork mince with a fat content of 6.1%, Salmonella survival will be decreased by -0.2407log10 CFU/g for a 1 °C increase in internal endpoint temperature, with a 5-log10 reduction in Salmonella concentration estimated to occur when the geometric centre temperature reaches 63 °C. The fat content influenced the rate of Salmonella inactivation (P=0.043), with Salmonella survival increasing as fat content increased, though this effect became negligible as the temperature approached 62 °C. Fat content increased the time required for patties to achieve a specified internal temperature (P=0.0106 and 0.0309 for linear and quadratic terms respectively), indicating that reduced fat pork mince may reduce the risk of salmonellosis from consumption of pork burgers. Salmonella serovar did not significantly affect the model intercepts (P=0.86) or slopes (P=0.10) of the fitted logistic curve. This predictive model can be applied to estimate the reduction in Salmonella in pork burgers after cooking to a specific endpoint temperature and hence to assess food safety risk.

  1. Quality of buffalo meat burger containing legume flours as binders.

    PubMed

    Modi, V K; Mahendrakar, N S; Narasimha Rao, D; Sachindra, N M

    2004-01-01

    The effect of addition of different decorticated legume flours, viz., soya bean, bengal gram, green gram and black gram, on the quality of buffalo meat burger was studied. The burgers consisted of optimized quantities of roasted or unroasted legume flour, spices and common salt. Inclusion of roasted black gram flour registered the highest yield of 95.7%, lowest shrinkage of 5% and lowest fat absorption of 26.6% on frying. Protein content of 18-20% was highest in the soya flour formulation. Free fatty acid (FFA) values (as% oleic) increased from 14.3 to 17.3 in freshly prepared samples (before frying) to 16.0-19.4 in 4 m frozen (-16±2 °C) stored samples and fried samples had about 25% lower FFA values. Formulations with roasted flours registered lower thiobarbituric acid (TBA) values (mg malonaldehyde/kg sample) of 0.6-1.5 as against 0.6-2.1 for unroasted flours before frying. The burgers prepared with any of these binders were organoleptically acceptable even after storage at -16±2 °C for 4 months., However, the burger with black gram dhal (dehulled split legume) flour had better sensory quality attributes compared to other legumes.

  2. Multidimensional Potential Burgers Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boritchev, Alexandre

    2016-03-01

    We consider the multidimensional generalised stochastic Burgers equation in the space-periodic setting: partial {u}/partial t+(nabla f({u}) \\cdot nabla) {u}-ν Δ {u}= nabla η, quad t ≥ 0, {x} in{T}^d=({R}/ {Z})^d, under the assumption that u is a gradient. Here f is strongly convex and satisfies a growth condition, ν is small and positive, while η is a random forcing term, smooth in space and white in time. For solutions u of this equation, we study Sobolev norms of u averaged in time and in ensemble: each of these norms behaves as a given negative power of ν. These results yield sharp upper and lower bounds for natural analogues of quantities characterising the hydrodynamical turbulence, namely the averages of the increments and of the energy spectrum. These quantities behave as a power of the norm of the relevant parameter, which is respectively the separation ℓ in the physical space and the wavenumber k in the Fourier space. Our bounds do not depend on the initial condition and hold uniformly in {ν}. We generalise the results obtained for the one-dimensional case in [10], confirming the physical predictions in [4, 30]. Note that the form of the estimates does not depend on the dimension: the powers of {ν, |{{k}}|, ℓ} are the same in the one- and the multi-dimensional setting.

  3. Fate of Shiga toxin-producing O157:H7 and non-O157:H7 Escherichia coli cells within refrigerated, frozen, or frozen then thawed ground beef patties cooked on a commercial open-flame gas or a clamshell electric grill.

    PubMed

    Luchansky, John B; Porto-Fett, Anna C S; Shoyer, Bradley A; Phillips, John; Chen, Vivian; Eblen, Denise R; Cook, L Victor; Mohr, Tim B; Esteban, Emilio; Bauer, Nathan

    2013-09-01

    Both high-fat and low-fat ground beef (percent lean:fat = ca. 70:30 and 93:7, respectively) were inoculated with a 6-strain cocktail of non-O157:H7 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) or a five-strain cocktail of E. coli O157:H7 (ca. 7.0 log CFU/g). Patties were pressed (ca. 2.54 cm thick, ca. 300 g each) and then refrigerated (4°C, 18 to 24 h), or frozen (-18°C, 3 weeks), or frozen (-18°C, 3 weeks) and then thawed (4°C for 18 h or 21°C for 10 h) before being cooked on commercial gas or electric grills to internal temperatures of 60 to 76.6°C. For E. coli O157:H7, regardless of grill type or fat level, cooking refrigerated patties to 71.1 or 76.6°C decreased E. coli O157:H7 numbers from an initial level of ca. 7.0 log CFU/g to a final level of ≤1.0 log CFU/g, whereas decreases to ca. 1.1 to 3.1 log CFU/g were observed when refrigerated patties were cooked to 60.0 or 65.5°C. For patties that were frozen or freeze-thawed and cooked to 71.1 or 76.6°C, E. coli O157:H7 numbers decreased to ca. 1.7 or ≤0.7 log CFU/g. Likewise, pathogen numbers decreased to ca. 0.7 to 3.7 log CFU/g in patties that were frozen or freeze-thawed and cooked to 60.0 or 65.5°C. For STEC, regardless of grill type or fat level, cooking refrigerated patties to 71.1 or 76.6°C decreased pathogen numbers from ca. 7.0 to ≤0.7 log CFU/g, whereas decreases to ca. 0.7 to 3.6 log CFU/g were observed when refrigerated patties were cooked to 60.0 or 65.5°C. For patties that were frozen or freeze-thawed and cooked to 71.1 or 76.6°C, STEC numbers decreased to a final level of ca. 1.5 to ≤0.7 log CFU/g. Likewise, pathogen numbers decreased from ca. 7.0 to ca. 0.8 to 4.3 log CFU/g in patties that were frozen or freeze-thawed and cooked to 60.0 or 65.5°C. Thus, cooking ground beef patties that were refrigerated, frozen, or freeze-thawed to internal temperatures of 71.1 and 76.6°C was effective for eliminating ca. 5.1 to 7.0 log CFU of E. coli O157:H7 and STEC per g.

  4. Finding horse meat in beef products--a global problem.

    PubMed

    O'Mahony, P J

    2013-06-01

    The Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI) oversees the implementation of food safety controls in Ireland which are set out in EU and Irish law. The FSAI, a science-based consumer protection organization, has nurtured a close relationship with the scientific community allowing it to utilize the best scientific advice available to underpin risk assessments. In early 2013, a 2-month long investigation in to the authenticity of beef products culminated in the publication of results that demonstrated the presence of horse meat in a frozen burger produced in Ireland. The events that followed revealed a pan-European food fraud which will likely result in significant changes in the way this small section of the meat industry will be regulated in the future in the EU. Although revelations of implicated products and food businesses have relented, the EU-wide investigation is continuing in an effort to determine how a food fraud of this scale could have occurred in such a highly regulated industry and who was involved. The FSAI initially received some criticism after publication of the results, but was also commended for its scientific approach as well as its openness and transparency. The end result of this incident is likely to be that the complexity of the food chain will be addressed again and DNA-based or similar methods will become a regular feature in verifying the authenticity of meat-based foods.

  5. Texture of Frozen Food

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wani, Kohmei

    Quantitative determination of textural quality of frozen food due to freezing and storage conditions is complicated,since the texture is consisted of multi-dimensiona1 factors. The author reviewed the importance of texture in food quality and the factors which is proposed by a priori estimation. New classification of expression words of textural properties by subjective evaluation and an application of four elements mechanical model for analysis of physical characteristics was studied on frozen meat patties. Combination of freezing-thawing condition on the subjective properties and physiochemical characteristics of beef lean meat and hamachi fish (Yellow-tail) meat was studied. Change of the plasticity and the deformability of these samples differed by freezing-thawing rate and cooking procedure. Also optimum freezing-thawing condition was differed from specimens.

  6. Frozen Frozen CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    2 October 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a view of frozen carbon dioxide in the south polar residual cap of Mars. Much of the south polar residual cap exhibits terrain that resembles stacks of sliced Swiss cheese, but this portion of the cap lacks the typical, circular depressions that characterize much of the region. Carbon dioxide on Mars freezes at a temperature of around 148 Kelvins, which is -125oC or about -193oF.

    Location near: 87.2oS, 28.4oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  7. The Vortex of Burgers in Protoplanetary Disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahamyan, M. G.

    2017-07-01

    The effect of a Burgers vortex on formation of planetesimals in a protoplanetary disc in local approach is considered. It is shown that there is not any circular orbit for rigid particles in centrifugal balance; only stable position in Burgers vortex under the influence of centrifugal, Coriolis, pressure gradient and Stokes drag forces is the center of vortex. The two-dimensional anticyclonic Burgers vortex with homogeneously rotating kernel and a converging radial stream of substance can effectively accumulate in its nuclear area the meter- sized rigid particles of total mass ˜1028g for characteristic time ˜106yr.

  8. 21 CFR 102.26 - Frozen “heat and serve” dinners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Nonstandardized Foods § 102.26 Frozen “heat and serve” dinners. (a) A frozen “heat and serve” dinner: (1) Shall... consists of all of the following: (1) The phrase “frozen ‘heat and serve’ dinner,” except that the name of... precede the word “dinner” (e.g., “frozen chicken dinner” or “frozen heat and serve beef dinner”). The...

  9. Viscosity-dependent inertial spectra of the Burgers and Korteweg–deVries–Burgers equations

    PubMed Central

    Chorin, Alexandre J.; Hald, Ole H.

    2005-01-01

    We show that the inertial range spectrum of the Burgers equation has a viscosity-dependent correction at any wave number when the viscosity is small but not zero. We also calculate the spectrum of the Korteweg–deVries–Burgers equation and show that it can be partially mapped onto the inertial spectrum of a Burgers equation with a suitable effective diffusion coefficient. These results are significant for the understanding of turbulence. PMID:15753299

  10. Frozen shoulder.

    PubMed

    Wadsworth, C T

    1986-12-01

    Widespread use of the label "frozen shoulder" as a diagnosis for any stiff and painful shoulder condition has led to its becoming a rather meaningless, catchall term. In addition to confounding both the lay public and health care professionals, this indiscriminate labeling may prevent a patient from receiving appropriate treatment. In this article, I define frozen shoulder and review its pathologic and etiologic factors, epidemiology, natural history, and diagnosis. I present this information in correlation with an examination process to assist physical therapists in identifying suspected cases of frozen shoulder. I also present the current options for treatment, including physical therapy management with physical agents and exercise.

  11. Evaluation of oxidative stability of lamb burger with Origanum vulgare extract.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, R P P; Trindade, M A; Tonin, F G; Pugine, S M P; Lima, C G; Lorenzo, J M; de Melo, M P

    2017-10-15

    The objective was to evaluate replacement of sodium erythorbate with a natural antioxidant (oregano extract) on physicochemical and sensory stability of lamb burgers, and determine the appropriate amount. Five treatments were prepared, including control (without antioxidant), sodium erythorbate, and three concentrations of oregano extract (13.32, 17.79 and 24.01mL/kg), based on antioxidant capacity determined using the Folin-Ciocalteu, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) methods, respectively. Burgers containing oregano extract, at the concentration determined by FRAP method, had higher oxidative stability, evidenced by an 80% reduction (P<0.001) in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, effective inhibition of protein oxidation (P<0.01) and less colour loss during frozen storage. Oregano extract did not impair (P>0.05) consumers' sensory acceptance of the lamb burgers. Under the conditions tested, addition of 24mL/kg of oregano extract could be recommended as a natural antioxidant in lamb burgers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Reflections on "Replicating Milgram" (Burger, 2009).

    PubMed

    Miller, Arthur G

    2009-01-01

    In "Replicating Milgram: Would People Still Obey Today?" Jerry M. Burger reported a high base rate of obedience, comparable to that observed by Stanley Milgram (1974). Another condition, involving a defiant confederate, failed to significantly reduce obedience. This commentary discusses the primary contributions of Burger's study in terms of (a) its novel methodological variation on Milgram's original paradigm (the "150-volt solution") and (b) its attention to ethical concerns so as to minimize participant discomfort and ensure institutional review board approval. Burger's technique could unlock research on behavioral aspects of obedience, which has been essentially muted for several decades. However, Burger's intensive efforts to improve the ethics of the study may be exaggerated, are uncertain in their effectiveness, and pose impractical demands. Different procedures used by Milgram and Burger in the modeled refusal condition preclude a clear explanation for the results and challenge Burger's emphasis on the comparability of his and Milgram's experiments. This study documents the complexities of extending research on destructive obedience in the context of contemporary ethical guidelines.

  13. Quality of Steak Restructured from Beef Trimmings Containing Microbial Transglutaminase and Impacted by Freezing and Grading by Fat Level.

    PubMed

    Sorapukdee, Supaluk; Tangwatcharin, Pussadee

    2017-07-17

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the physico-chemical, microbiological and sensorial qualities of restructured steaks processed from beef trimmings (grade I and II) and frozen beef (fresh beef as control and frozen beef). Method: Beef trimmings from commercial butcher were collected, designated into 4 treatments differed in beef trimmings grade and freezing, processed into restructured steaks with 1% microbial transglutaminase and then analyzed product quality. The results showed that all meat from different groups could tightly bind together via cross-linking of myosin heavy chain and actin as observed by SDS-PAGE. Microbial counts like psychrotrophic and mesophilic bacteria were not affected by treatments (p>0.05), and no detectable of thermophilic bacteria was found. Regarding effect of beef trimmings grade, steaks made from beef trimmings grade II (16.03% fat) showed some superior sensorial qualities including higher tenderness score (p<0.05) and tendency for higher scores of juiciness and overall acceptability (p<0.07) than those made from beef trimmings grade I (2.15% fat). Moreover, a hardness value from texture profile analysis was lower in steaks processed from beef trimmings grade II than those made from grade I (p<0.05). Although some inferior qualities in terms of cooking loss and discoloration after cooking were higher in steaks made from beef trimmings grade II than those made from another beef (p<0.05), these differences not affected to the sensory evaluation. Frozen beef could improve the soft texture and resulted in effective meat binding as considered by higher cohesiveness and springiness of raw restructured product as compared to fresh beef (p<0.05). The results indicated the suitable raw beef for producing restructured steaks without detrimental effect on product quality, which beef trimmings grade II containing up to 17% fat positively affected the sensory quality and frozen beef increased tenderness and meat binding of

  14. Comparison of the microbial quality of ground beef and ground beef patties from internet and local retail markets.

    PubMed

    Pao, S; Ettinger, M R

    2009-08-01

    This study evaluated the microbial quality of ground beef and ground beef patties sold at local (Virginia) and Internet (U.S.) retail markets. A total of 152 ground beef products, consisting of locally purchased raw ground beef (LRG) and frozen beef patties (LFP) and Internet-procured frozen ground beef (IFG) and frozen beef patties (IFP), were tested. Results showed that LFP had significantly lower levels of aerobic mesophiles, psychrotrophs, and coliforms than LRG, IFG, and IFP. Furthermore, IFG had greater numbers of Escherichia coli than LRG and LFP. No sample was contaminated with E. coli 0157: H7, but one duplicate set of summer LFP samples contained Salmonella. Listeria spp. were present in 25 and 29% of samples from local and Internet markets, respectively. About 5.0, 11.1, 10.5, and 7.9% of LRG, LFP, IFG, and IFP samples were contaminated with L. monocytogenes. This study identified differences in microbial quality between local and Internet products. Careful handling and thorough cooking of ground beef products, regardless of market source, are recommended to prevent foodborne illness.

  15. Frozen shoulder.

    PubMed Central

    Anton, H. A.

    1993-01-01

    The frozen shoulder is a common cause of shoulder pain and disability. Most patients slowly improve over 12 to 24 months. Some have prolonged loss of movement, pain, and associated disability. Treatments include physiotherapy, corticosteroid injections, and manipulation. Clinical trials of these treatments have produced conflicting results. PMID:8374364

  16. Thermal inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 (ECOH) in frozen ground beef patties following cooking on commerical open-flame gas and electric clam-shell grills

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Both the prevalence and levels of serotype O157:H7 strains of Escherichia coli (ECOH) are quite low, yet this pathogen continues to cause food borne illness due to consumption of undercooked ground/non-intact beef. Thus, further studies are warranted to comparatively quantify thermal destruction of ...

  17. Swan Song for the Burger Court.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayman, Robert L., Jr.; Ramarui, Cornelis O.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews a collection of decisions rendered by the Burger Court during its waning months. The decisions involve (1) criminal procedures, (2) racial bias in jury selection, (3) search and seizure, and (4) the exclusion of jurors who have reservations about the death penalty. (JDH)

  18. Swan Song for the Burger Court.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayman, Robert L., Jr.; Ramarui, Cornelis O.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews a collection of decisions rendered by the Burger Court during its waning months. The decisions involve (1) criminal procedures, (2) racial bias in jury selection, (3) search and seizure, and (4) the exclusion of jurors who have reservations about the death penalty. (JDH)

  19. Reflections on "Replicating Milgram" (Burger, 2009)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Arthur G.

    2009-01-01

    In "Replicating Milgram: Would People Still Obey Today?" Jerry M. Burger (see record 2008-19206-001) reported a high base rate of obedience, comparable to that observed by Stanley Milgram (1974). Another condition, involving a defiant confederate, failed to significantly reduce obedience. This commentary discusses the primary contributions of…

  20. Analytic Solutions of the Vector Burgers Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nerney, Steven; Schmahl, Edward J.; Musielak, Z. E.

    1996-01-01

    The well-known analytical solution of Burgers' equation is extended to curvilinear coordinate systems in three dimensions by a method that is much simpler and more suitable to practical applications than that previously used. The results obtained are applied to incompressible flow with cylindrical symmetry, and also to the decay of an initially linearly increasing wind.

  1. Reflections on "Replicating Milgram" (Burger, 2009)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Arthur G.

    2009-01-01

    In "Replicating Milgram: Would People Still Obey Today?" Jerry M. Burger (see record 2008-19206-001) reported a high base rate of obedience, comparable to that observed by Stanley Milgram (1974). Another condition, involving a defiant confederate, failed to significantly reduce obedience. This commentary discusses the primary contributions of…

  2. Burger V. Brennan: A Debate on Obscenity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Terry W.

    Two 1973 Supreme Court rulings, "Miller v. California" and "Paris Adult Theatre I v. Slaton," consider the problem of obscenity in light of the First Amendment. Chief Justice Burger's stand, which represented that of a five-man majority, was based on the presumption that obscenity is not protected by the First Amendment because…

  3. The Burger Court and the Press.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higdon, Philip R.

    This report discusses recent cases involving freedom of the press that have been heard before the Burger court of the United States Supreme Court. The report discerns a trend toward treating the press like an ordinary citizen; this is a reversal of the view of the Warren court that the First Amendment creates special rights for the press so that…

  4. Algorithm refinement for the stochastic Burgers' equation

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, John B.; Foo, Jasmine; Garcia, Alejandro L. . E-mail: algarcia@algarcia.org

    2007-04-10

    In this paper, we develop an algorithm refinement (AR) scheme for an excluded random walk model whose mean field behavior is given by the viscous Burgers' equation. AR hybrids use the adaptive mesh refinement framework to model a system using a molecular algorithm where desired while allowing a computationally faster continuum representation to be used in the remainder of the domain. The focus in this paper is the role of fluctuations on the dynamics. In particular, we demonstrate that it is necessary to include a stochastic forcing term in Burgers' equation to accurately capture the correct behavior of the system. The conclusion we draw from this study is that the fidelity of multiscale methods that couple disparate algorithms depends on the consistent modeling of fluctuations in each algorithm and on a coupling, such as algorithm refinement, that preserves this consistency.

  5. Linearized Implicit Numerical Method for Burgers' Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukundan, Vijitha; Awasthi, Ashish

    2016-12-01

    In this work, a novel numerical scheme based on method of lines (MOL) is proposed to solve the nonlinear time dependent Burgers' equation. The Burgers' equation is semi discretized in spatial direction by using MOL to yield system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations in time. The resulting system of nonlinear differential equations is integrated by an implicit finite difference method. We have not used Cole-Hopf transformation which gives less accurate solution for very small values of kinematic viscosity. Also, we have not considered nonlinear solvers that are computationally costlier and take more running time.In the proposed scheme nonlinearity is tackled by Taylor series and the use of fully discretized scheme is easy and practical. The proposed method is unconditionally stable in the linear sense. Furthermore, efficiency of the proposed scheme is demonstrated using three test problems.

  6. Optimal active control for Burgers equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikeda, Yutaka

    1994-01-01

    A method for active fluid flow control based on control theory is discussed. Dynamic programming and fixed point successive approximations are used to accommodate the nonlinear control problem. The long-term goal of this project is to establish an effective method applicable to complex flows such as turbulence and jets. However, in this report, the method is applied to stochastic Burgers equation as an intermediate step towards this goal. Numerical results are compared with those obtained by gradient search methods.

  7. Markovian Solutions of Inviscid Burgers Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabanol, Marie-Line; Duchon, Jean

    2004-01-01

    For solutions of (inviscid, forceless, one dimensional) Burgers equation with random initial condition, it is heuristically shown that a stationary Feller-Markov property (with respect to the space variable) at some time is conserved at later times, and an evolution equation is derived for the infinitesimal generator. Previously known explicit solutions such as Frachebourg-Martin's (white noise initial velocity) and Carraro-Duchon's Lévy process intrinsic-statistical solutions (including Brownian initial velocity) are recovered as special cases.

  8. R.E. Burger Plant, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Peltier, R.

    2007-10-15

    First Energy's R.E. Burger Plant at Shadyside, OH has hosted a number of R & D projects over the years, but none as large as the demonstration of Powerspan's 30-MW Electro-Catalytic Oxidation (ECO) multipollutant removal process a few years ago. Credit Powerspan for scaling up the demo unit and for adding CO{sub 2} as a target of a new pilot process called ECO{sub 2}.

  9. 9 CFR 319.312 - Pork with barbecue sauce and beef with barbecue sauce.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., Frozen, or Dehydrated Meat Food Products § 319.312 Pork with barbecue sauce and beef with barbecue sauce... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pork with barbecue sauce and beef with barbecue sauce. 319.312 Section 319.312 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION...

  10. Explicit Solutions and Conservation Laws of a Coupled Burgers' Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Bo; Li, Fang; Li, Yihao; Sun, Mingming

    2017-08-01

    Based on the gauge transformation between the corresponding 3×3 matrix spectral problems, N-fold Darboux transformation for a coupled Burgers' equation is constructed. Considering the N=1 case of the derived Darboux transformation, explicit solutions for the coupled Burgers' equation are given and their figures are plotted. Moreover, conservation laws of this integrable equation are deduced.

  11. 9 CFR 381.160 - (Kind) burgers; (Kind) patties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false (Kind) burgers; (Kind) patties. 381.160 Section 381.160 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Composition § 381.160 (Kind) burgers; (Kind) patties. Such product consists of 100 percent poultry of the...

  12. 9 CFR 381.160 - (Kind) burgers; (Kind) patties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false (Kind) burgers; (Kind) patties. 381.160 Section 381.160 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Composition § 381.160 (Kind) burgers; (Kind) patties. Such product consists of 100 percent poultry of the...

  13. 9 CFR 381.160 - (Kind) burgers; (Kind) patties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false (Kind) burgers; (Kind) patties. 381.160 Section 381.160 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Composition § 381.160 (Kind) burgers; (Kind) patties. Such product consists of 100 percent poultry of the...

  14. 9 CFR 381.160 - (Kind) burgers; (Kind) patties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false (Kind) burgers; (Kind) patties. 381.160 Section 381.160 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Composition § 381.160 (Kind) burgers; (Kind) patties. Such product consists of 100 percent poultry of the...

  15. 9 CFR 381.160 - (Kind) burgers; (Kind) patties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false (Kind) burgers; (Kind) patties. 381.160 Section 381.160 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Composition § 381.160 (Kind) burgers; (Kind) patties. Such product consists of 100 percent poultry of the...

  16. Entropic lattice Boltzmann model for Burgers's equation.

    PubMed

    Boghosian, Bruce M; Love, Peter; Yepez, Jeffrey

    2004-08-15

    Entropic lattice Boltzmann models are discrete-velocity models of hydrodynamics that possess a Lyapunov function. This feature makes them useful as nonlinearly stable numerical methods for integrating hydrodynamic equations. Over the last few years, such models have been successfully developed for the Navier-Stokes equations in two and three dimensions, and have been proposed as a new category of subgrid model of turbulence. In the present work we develop an entropic lattice Boltzmann model for Burgers's equation in one spatial dimension. In addition to its pedagogical value as a simple example of such a model, our result is actually a very effective way to simulate Burgers's equation in one dimension. At moderate to high values of viscosity, we confirm that it exhibits no trace of instability. At very small values of viscosity, however, we report the existence of oscillations of bounded amplitude in the vicinity of the shock, where gradient scale lengths become comparable with the grid size. As the viscosity decreases, the amplitude at which these oscillations saturate tends to increase. This indicates that, in spite of their nonlinear stability, entropic lattice Boltzmann models may become inaccurate when the ratio of gradient scale length to grid spacing becomes too small. Similar inaccuracies may limit the utility of the entropic lattice Boltzmann paradigm as a subgrid model of Navier-Stokes turbulence.

  17. Airborne mutagens produced by frying beef, pork and a soy-based food.

    PubMed

    Thiébaud, H P; Knize, M G; Kuzmicky, P A; Hsieh, D P; Felton, J S

    1995-10-01

    Airborne cooking by-products from frying beef (hamburgers), pork (bacon strips) and soybean-based food (tempeh burgers) were collected, extracted, tested for mutagenicity and chemically analysed. The fumes generated by frying pork and beef were mutagenic, with 4900 and 1300 revertants/g of food cooked, respectively. No mutagenicity was detected in fumes from frying tempeh burgers. Bacon fried to a well-done but non-charred state was eight times more mutagenic in a microsuspension Ames/Salmonella test (TA98 with S-9) than hamburgers and about 350 times more mutagenic than tempeh burgers. Among food samples cooked to a well-done, non-charred state, bacon strips had almost 15-fold more mass (109.5 ng/g) than that of the beef, whereas no heterocyclic amine (HCA) was detected in the fried tempeh burgers. 2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) was the most abundant HCA, followed by 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx) and 2-amino-3,4,8-trimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (DiMeIQx). No 2-amino-9H-pyrido[2,3-b]indole (A alpha C) was detected in the food samples fried at about 200 degrees C, although it was present in the collected airborne products. The total amounts of HCAs in the smoke condensates were 3 ng/g from fried bacon, 0.37 ng/g from fried beef and 0.177 ng/g from fried soy-based food. This study indicates that cooks are potentially exposed to relatively high levels of airborne mutagens and carcinogens and that long-term sampling inside restaurants and kitchens may be warranted in order to assess the potential risk of prolonged exposure.

  18. Spectrum and energy transfer in steady Burgers turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girimaji, Sharath S.; Zhou, YE

    1995-01-01

    The spectrum, energy transfer, and spectral interactions in steady Burgers turbulence are studied using numerically generated data. The velocity field is initially random and the turbulence is maintained steady by forcing the amplitude of a band of low wavenumbers to be invariant in time, while permitting the phase to change as dictated by the equation. The spectrum, as expected, is very different from that of Navier-Stokes turbulence. It is demonstrated that the far range of the spectrum scales as predicted by Burgers. Despite the difference in their spectra, in matters of the spectral energy transfer and triadic interactions Burgers turbulence is similar to Navier-Stokes turbulence.

  19. Turbulence for the generalised Burgers equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boritchev, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    This survey reviews rigorous results obtained by A. Biryuk and the author on turbulence for the generalised space-periodic Burgers equation \\displaystyle u_t+f'(u)u_x=ν uxx+η,\\qquad x \\in S^1={R}/{Z}, where f is smooth and strongly convex, and the constant 0<ν\\ll 1 corresponds to the viscosity coefficient. Both the unforced case ( η=0) and the case when η is a random force which is smooth with respect to x and irregular (kick or white noise) with respect to t are considered. In both cases sharp bounds of the form Cν-δ, δ≥slant 0, are obtained for the Sobolev norms of u averaged over time and over the ensemble, with the same value of δ for upper and lower bounds. These results yield sharp bounds for small-scale quantities characterising turbulence, confirming the physical predictions. Bibliography: 56 titles.

  20. Environmental sustainability of beef

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A national assessment of the sustainability of beef is being conducted in collaboration with the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association through the support of the Beef Checkoff. This includes surveys and visits to cattle operations throughout the U.S. to gather production information. With this infor...

  1. Burgers approximation for two-dimensional flow past an ellipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorrepaal, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    A linearization of the Navier-Stokes equation due to Burgers in which vorticity is transported by the velocity field corresponding to continuous potential flow is examined. The governing equations are solved exactly for the two dimensional steady flow past an ellipse of arbitrary aspect ratio. The requirement of no slip along the surface of the ellipse results in an infinite algebraic system of linear equations for coefficients appearing in the solution. The system is truncated at a point which gives reliable results for Reynolds numbers R in the range 0 R 5. Predictions of the Burgers approximation regarding separation, drag and boundary layer behavior are investigated. In particular, Burgers linearization gives drag coefficients which are closer to observed experimental values than those obtained from Oseen's approximation. In the special case of flow past a circular cylinder, Burgers approximation predicts a boundary layer whose thickness is roughly proportional to R-1/2.

  2. The Many Voices of the Burger Court and School Desegregation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudgins, H. C., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Unlike the Warren Court, the Burger Court has had a lack of unanimity on school desegregation cases and the court has been divided. As a result there is no clear direction evident in the court's decisions. (IRT)

  3. Shelf life of ground beef patties treated by gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Roberts, W T; Weese, J O

    1998-10-01

    The effects of irradiation on microbial populations in ground beef patties vacuum package and irradiated frozen at target doses of 0.0, 1.0, 3.0, 5.0, and 7.0 kGy were determined. Irradiated samples were stored at 4 or -18 degrees C for 42 days, and mesophilic aerobic plate counts (APCs) were periodically determined. Fresh ground beef (initial APC of 10(2) CFU/g) treated with 3.0, 5.0, and 7.0 kGy was acceptable (< 10(7) CFU/g) for 42 days at 4 degrees C. The 1.0 kGy-treated beef samples were acceptable microbiologically (< 10(7) CFU/g) after 42 days but developed an unacceptable off-odor after 21 days. Shelf life diminished in fresh ground beef patties with an initial APC of 10(4) CFU/g. Only beef patties treated with 7.0 kGy were found to be acceptable at 42 days. Beef patties treated at 1.0 and 3.0 kGy reached spoilage APC levels (> 10(7) CFU/g) by day 14 and 21, respectively, whereas patties treated at 5.0 kGy did not spoil until 42 days. The nonirradiated control samples for both batches of ground beef spoiled within 7 days. Microbial counts in ground beef patties stored at -18 degrees C did not change over the 42-day period. Shelf life of ground beef patties stored at 4 degrees C may be extended with gamma radiation, especially at 5.0 and 7.0 kGy. Initial microbial load in ground beef samples was an important shelf life factor.

  4. 7 CFR 1260.121 - Imported beef or beef products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Imported beef or beef products. 1260.121 Section 1260... SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BEEF PROMOTION AND RESEARCH Beef Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1260.121 Imported beef or...

  5. Process optimization and consumer acceptability of salted ground beef patties cooked and held hot in flavored marinade.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Subash; Cornforth, Daren; Nummer, Brian A

    2010-09-01

    Food safety is paramount for cooking hamburger. The center must reach 71 °C (or 68 °C for 15 s) to assure destruction of E. coli O157:H7 and other food pathogens. This is difficult to achieve during grilling or frying of thick burgers without overcooking the surface. Thus, the feasibility of partially or completely cooking frozen patties in liquid (93 °C water) together with hot holding in liquid was investigated. Initial studies demonstrated that compared to frying, liquid cooking decreased (P < 0.05) patty diameter (98 compared with 93 mm) and increased (P < 0.05) thickness (18.1 compared with 15.6 mm). Liquid cooked patties had greater weight loss (P < 0.05) immediately after cooking (29 compared with 21%), but reabsorbed moisture and were not different from fried patties after 1 h hot water holding (61 °C). Protein and fat content were not affected by cooking method. However, liquid cooked patties were rated lower (P < 0.05) than fried patties for appearance (5.7 compared with 7.5) and flavor (5.9 compared with 7.5). An 8-member focus group then evaluated methods to improve both appearance and flavor. Salted, grill-marked patties were preferred, and caramel coloring was needed in the marinade to obtain acceptable flavor and color during liquid cooking or hot holding. Patties with 0.75% salt that were grill-marked and then finish-cooked in hot marinade (0.75% salt, 0.3% caramel color) were rated acceptable (P < 0.05) by consumers for up to 4 h hot holding in marinade, with mean hedonic panel ratings > 7.0 (like moderately) for appearance, juiciness, flavor, and texture. Grill-marked and marinade-cooked ground beef patties reached a safe internal cooking temperature without overcooking the surface. Burgers cooked using this method maintained high consumer acceptability right after cooking and for up to 4 h of hot holding. Consumers and foodservice operations could use this method without specialized equipment, and instead use inexpensive and common equipment

  6. Personality in frozen shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, A.; Dodman, Sally; Beer, T. C.; Crown, S.

    1976-01-01

    Fleming, A., Dodman, S., Beer, T. C., and Crown, S. (1976).Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 35, 456-457. Personality in frozen shoulder. Fifty-six patients with frozen shoulder have had their personality profiles investigated by means of the Middlesex Hospital Questionnaire. Females showed significantly increased somatic anxiety compared with controls. It is suggested that this may be important both to aetiology and treatment. Males and females should be assessed separately in future studies of frozen shoulder. PMID:1234412

  7. Behaviour of non-stressed and stressed Listeria monocytogenes and Campylobacter jejuni cells on fresh chicken burger meat packaged under modified atmosphere and inoculated with protective culture.

    PubMed

    Melero, Beatriz; Diez, Ana M; Rajkovic, Andreja; Jaime, Isabel; Rovira, Jordi

    2012-08-17

    Numerous investigations have provided evidence that chicken products are a source of Listeria monocytogenes and Campylobacter jejuni. Different strategies applied in final products are needed to prevent consumers' contamination. In this work, the combination of modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) and protective culture to control the growth of freeze stressed and non-stressed L. monocytogenes and C. jejuni on fresh chicken meat burger was studied. Meat burgers were inoculated with L. monocytogenes, C. jejuni and Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides PCK 18, as protective strain against L. monocytogenes. Prior to the addition of the protective culture, half of the L. monocytogenes and C. jejuni - inoculated meat was frozen at -18°C for 48 h to subject cells to stress. Following the addition of the protective culture, meat burgers were packaged in air or MAP (50% CO(2)/50% O(2)) and stored under refrigeration conditions. L. monocytogenes counts were not reduced by the freezing temperature applied; however, the addition of Lc. pseudomesenteroides PCK 18 reduced its counts for 0.90 log cfu/g when chicken meat burgers were packaged under MAP. Furthermore, freezing stress was an effective strategy to reduce C. jejuni counts but only in combination with a high-O(2) MAP, it was completely eliminated. Chicken meat burgers' shelf-life under aerobic packaging conditions was reduced by the effect of freeze-thawing, while the use of MAP extended the product's shelf-life till 21days. Therefore, the combination of freezing, protective culture and MAP could extend the shelf-life and enhance the food safety of this kind of chicken products.

  8. Merging and fragmentation in the Burgers dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardeau, Francis; Valageas, Patrick

    2010-07-01

    We explore the noiseless Burgers dynamics in the inviscid limit, the so-called “adhesion model” in cosmology, in a regime where (almost) all the fluid particles are embedded within pointlike massive halos. Following previous works, we focus our investigations on a “geometrical” model, where the matter evolution within the shock manifold is defined from a geometrical construction. This hypothesis is at variance with the assumption that the usual continuity equation holds but, in the inviscid limit, both models agree in the regular regions. Taking advantage of the formulation of the dynamics of this “geometrical model” in terms of Legendre transforms and convex hulls, we study the evolution with time of the distribution of matter and the associated partitions of the Lagrangian and Eulerian spaces. We describe how the halo mass distribution derives from a triangulation in Lagrangian space, while the dual Voronoi-like tessellation in Eulerian space gives the boundaries of empty regions with shock nodes at their vertices. We then emphasize that this dynamics actually leads to halo fragmentations for space dimensions greater or equal to 2 (for the inviscid limit studied in this paper). This is most easily seen from the properties of the Lagrangian-space triangulation and we illustrate this process in the two-dimensional (2D) case. In particular, we explain how pointlike halos only merge through three-body collisions while two-body collisions always give rise to two new massive shock nodes (in 2D). This generalizes to higher dimensions and we briefly illustrate the three-dimensional case. This leads to a specific picture for the continuous formation of massive halos through successive halo fragmentations and mergings.

  9. Effect of Novel Quick Freezing Techniques Combined with Different Thawing Processes on Beef Quality

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Seon-Mi; Han, Gui-Jung

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of various freezing and thawing techniques on the quality of beef. Meat samples were frozen using natural convection freezing (NF), individual quick freezing (IQF), or cryogenic freezing (CF) techniques, followed by natural convection thawing (NCT) or running water thawing (RT). The meat was frozen until the core temperature reached -12℃ and then stored at -24℃, followed by thawing until the temperature reached 5℃. Quality parameters, such as the pH, water binding properties, CIE color, shear force, and microstructure of the beef were elucidated. Although the freezing and thawing combinations did not cause remarkable changes in the quality parameters, rapid freezing, in the order of CF, IQF, and NF, was found to minimize the quality deterioration. In the case of thawing methods, NCT was better than RT and the meat quality was influence on the thawing temperature rather than the thawing rate. Although the microstructure of the frozen beef exhibited an excessive loss of integrity after the freezing and thawing, it did not cause any remarkable change in the beef quality. Taken together, these results demonstrate that CF and NCT form the best combination for beef processing; however, IQF and NCT may have practical applications in the frozen food industry. PMID:26761674

  10. Effect of Novel Quick Freezing Techniques Combined with Different Thawing Processes on Beef Quality.

    PubMed

    Jo, Yeon-Ji; Jang, Min-Young; Jung, You-Kyoung; Kim, Jae-Hyeong; Sim, Jun-Bo; Chun, Ji-Yeon; Yoo, Seon-Mi; Han, Gui-Jung; Min, Sang-Gi

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of various freezing and thawing techniques on the quality of beef. Meat samples were frozen using natural convection freezing (NF), individual quick freezing (IQF), or cryogenic freezing (CF) techniques, followed by natural convection thawing (NCT) or running water thawing (RT). The meat was frozen until the core temperature reached -12℃ and then stored at -24℃, followed by thawing until the temperature reached 5℃. Quality parameters, such as the pH, water binding properties, CIE color, shear force, and microstructure of the beef were elucidated. Although the freezing and thawing combinations did not cause remarkable changes in the quality parameters, rapid freezing, in the order of CF, IQF, and NF, was found to minimize the quality deterioration. In the case of thawing methods, NCT was better than RT and the meat quality was influence on the thawing temperature rather than the thawing rate. Although the microstructure of the frozen beef exhibited an excessive loss of integrity after the freezing and thawing, it did not cause any remarkable change in the beef quality. Taken together, these results demonstrate that CF and NCT form the best combination for beef processing; however, IQF and NCT may have practical applications in the frozen food industry.

  11. Rapid detection of irradiated frozen hamburgers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delincée, Henry

    2002-03-01

    DNA comet assay can be employed as a rapid and inexpensive screening test to check whether frozen ground beef patties (hamburgers) have been irradiated as a means to increase their safety by eliminating pathogenic bacteria, e.g. E. coli O157:H7. Such a detection procedure will provide an additional check on compliance with existing regulations, e.g. enforcement of labelling and rules in international trade. Frozen ready prepared hamburgers from the market place were `electron irradiated' with doses of 0, 1.3, 2.7, 4.5 and 7.2kGy covering the range of potential commercial irradiation. DNA fragmentation in the hamburgers was made visible within a few hours using the comet assay, and non-irradiated hamburgers could be easily discerned from the irradiated ones. Even after 9 months of frozen storage, irradiated hamburgers could be identified. Since DNA fragmentation may also occur with other food processes (e.g. temperature abuse), positive screening tests shall be confirmed using a validated method to specifically prove an irradiation treatment, e.g. EN 1784 or EN 1785.

  12. A discrete model of a modified Burgers' partial differential equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickens, R. E.; Shoosmith, J. N.

    1990-01-01

    A new finite-difference scheme is constructed for a modified Burger's equation. Three special cases of the equation are considered, and the 'exact' difference schemes for the space- and time-independent forms of the equation are presented, along with the diffusion-free case of Burger's equation modeled by a difference equation. The desired difference scheme is then obtained by imposing on any difference model of the initial equation the requirement that, in the appropriate limits, its difference scheme must reduce the results of the obtained equations.

  13. Burgers' equation and the evolution of nonlinear second sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidowitz, Hananel; L'vov, Yuri; Steinberg, Victor

    A systematic, experimental and numerical search for subharmonic generation and/or amplification was conducted at intermediate times and moderate Reynolds numbers in nonlinear second sound near the superfluid transition. We found that the nonlinear acoustic waves are dynamically monotonic in the sense that only energy cascades to smaller and smaller scales (until the dissipation scale) exist. There is no indication of a decay of monochromatic waves to waves of lower wave numbers. This precludes the existence of a decay instability in Burgers' equation as has been discussed in the literature. We thus extend the theoretical proof of Sinai concerning the absence of subharmonics in the solutions of Burger's equation to intermediate times.

  14. Classification of organic beef freshness using VNIR hyperspectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Crichton, Stuart O J; Kirchner, Sascha M; Porley, Victoria; Retz, Stefanie; von Gersdorff, Gardis; Hensel, Oliver; Weygandt, Martin; Sturm, Barbara

    2017-07-01

    Consumer trust in the food industry is heavily reliant upon accurate labelling of meat products. As such, methods, which can verify whether meat is correctly labelled are of great value to producers, retailers, and consumers. This paper illustrates two approaches to classify between, fresh and frozen thawed, and in a novel manner matured and matured frozen-thawed, as well as fresh and matured beef using the 500-1010nm waveband, captured using hyperspectral imaging, and CIELAB measurements. The results show successful classification based upon CIELAB between 1) fresh and frozen-thawed (CCR=0.93), and 2) fresh and matured (CCR=0.92). With successful classification between matured and matured frozen-thawed beef using the entire spectral range (CCR=1.00). The performance of reduced spectral models is also investigated. Overall it was found that CIELAB co-ordinates can be used for successful classification for all comparisons except between matured and matured frozen-thawed. Biochemical and physical changes of the meat are thoroughly discussed for each condition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Electronic Inspection of Beef

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anselmo, Victor J.; Gammell, Paul M.; Clark, Jerry

    1987-01-01

    Two proposed methods for grading beef quality based on inspection by electronic equipment: one method uses television camera to generate image of a cut of beef as customer sees it; other uses ultrasonics to inspect live animal or unsliced carcasses. Both methods show promise for automated meat inspection.

  16. Electronic Inspection of Beef

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anselmo, Victor J.; Gammell, Paul M.; Clark, Jerry

    1987-01-01

    Two proposed methods for grading beef quality based on inspection by electronic equipment: one method uses television camera to generate image of a cut of beef as customer sees it; other uses ultrasonics to inspect live animal or unsliced carcasses. Both methods show promise for automated meat inspection.

  17. Residual triose phosphate isomerase activity and color measurements to determine adequate cooking of ground beef patties.

    PubMed

    Sair, A I; Booren, A M; Berry, B W; Smith, D M

    1999-02-01

    The objectives were to (i) compare the use of triose phosphate isomerase (TPI) activity and internal color scores for determination of cooking adequacy of beef patties and (ii) determine the effect of frozen storage and fat content on residual TPI activity in ground beef. Ground beef patties (24.4% fat) were cooked to five temperatures ranging from 60.0 to 82.2 degrees C. TPI activity decreased as beef patty cooking temperature was increased from 60.0 to 71.1 degrees C; however, no difference (P > 0.05) in activity (6.3 U/kg meat) was observed in patties cooked to 71.1 degrees C and above. Degree of doneness color scores, a* values and b* values, of ground beef patties decreased as internal temperature was increased from 60.0 to 71.1 degrees C; however, temperature had no effect on L* values. TPI activity in raw ground beef after five freeze-thaw cycles did not differ from the control. Three freeze-thaw cycles of raw ground beef resulted in a 57.2% decrease in TPI activity after cooking. TPI activity of cooked beef increased during 2 months of frozen storage, but TPI activity in ground beef stored for 3 months or longer did not differ from the unfrozen control. While past research has shown color to be a poor indicator of adequate thermal processing, our results suggest that undercooked ground beef patties could be distinguished from those that had been adequately cooked following U.S. Department of Agriculture guidelines using residual TPI activity as a marker.

  18. Improving pork burgers quality using Zingiber officinale Roscoe powder (ginger).

    PubMed

    Mancini, Simone; Paci, Gisella; Fratini, Filippo; Torracca, Beatrice; Nuvoloni, Roberta; Dal Bosco, Alessandro; Roscini, Valentina; Preziuso, Giovanna

    2017-03-08

    Pork burgers were evaluated for physical-chemical characteristics, fatty acids profile, lipid oxidation, antioxidant capacity, microbiological growth and sensory evaluation during storage time of seven days at 4°C as function of three formulations as only meat (control, B) and meat added with ginger powder at the percentage of 1 and 2% (BG1 and BG2). BG1 and BG2 were less redness than control ones with incremented yellow hue. These modifications in color parameters did not modify sensory characteristics of burgers. PUFA were incremented (both PUFAω3 and PUFAω6) by the addition of ginger. Furthermore, BG1 and BG2 burgers showed to be less sensitive to lipid oxidation and to possess an increase in antioxidant capacity. Microbial growth evaluation of total aerobic count and Pseudomonas spp. showed that ginger powder delayed in time the bacterial contamination. Results highlighted that the presence of ginger led to an enhanced shelf life and health characteristics of burgers (increasing peroxidisability, ratio hypocholesterolemic/hypercholesterolemic and ratio ω3/ω6; reducing atherogenicity and thrombogenicity).

  19. Effect of the Programmed Nutrition Beef Program on moisture retention of cooked ground beef patties and enhanced strip loins.

    PubMed

    2015-02-01

    This study evaluated the influence of the Programmed Nutrition Beef Program and exogenous growth promotants (ExGP) on water holding capacity characteristics of enhanced beef strip loins. Sixty, frozen strip loins, arranged in a 2 × 2 factorial treatment arrangement with dietary program serving as the first factor and use of ExGP as the second factor, were thawed, injected with an enhancement solution, and stored for 7 days. Loins from ExGP cattle possessed the ability to bind more (P < 0.05) water before pumping and bind less (P < 0.05) water after pumping and storage. Loin pH across treatments was similar (P > 0.10) before injection, but increased post-injection and after storage (P < 0.01). Treatments did not affect loin purge loss, steak cook loss, and expressible moisture (P > 0.10). The Programmed Nutrition Beef Program and use of ExGPs minimally impacted water holding capacity of enhanced frozen/thawed beef strip loins.

  20. Long-term red meat preservation using chilled and frozen storage combinations: A review.

    PubMed

    Coombs, Cassius E O; Holman, Benjamin W B; Friend, Michael A; Hopkins, David L

    2017-03-01

    This paper reviews current literature relating to the effects of chilled and frozen storage on the quality characteristics of red meat (lamb and beef). These characteristics include tenderness (shear force), juiciness (fluid losses), flavour (lipid oxidation), colour and microbial loading. Research suggests that chilled storage of red meat can improve certain properties, such as shear force and species-specific flavour, to threshold levels before the effects on flavour and colour become deleterious, and key microbial species proliferate to spoilage levels. For frozen red meat, the negative effects upon quality traits are prevented when stored for shorter durations, although chilled storage conditions prior to freezing and retail display post-thawing can both positively and negatively affect these traits. Here, we review the effects of different chilled, frozen and combined chilled and frozen storage practices (particularly the chilled-then-frozen combination) on meat quality and spoilage traits, in order to contribute to superior management of these traits during product distribution.

  1. 9 CFR 319.312 - Pork with barbecue sauce and beef with barbecue sauce.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... barbecue sauce. 319.312 Section 319.312 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS OF IDENTITY OR COMPOSITION Canned, Frozen, or Dehydrated Meat Food Products § 319.312 Pork with barbecue sauce and beef with barbecue sauce...

  2. Effect of rapid thawing on the meat quality attributes of USDA Select beef strip loin steaks

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to determine the meat quality effects of rapidly thawing steaks in a water bath. Frozen beef strip loins (n = 24) were cut into steaks sequentially from the rib end and identified by anatomical location (anterior, middle, posterior) within the loin. Within location,...

  3. Epidemiological and microbiological investigation of a large outbreak of monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium 4,5,12:i:- in schools associated with imported beef in Poitiers, France, October 2010.

    PubMed

    Raguenaud, M E; Le Hello, S; Salah, S; Weill, F X; Brisabois, A; Delmas, G; Germonneau, P

    2012-10-04

    An outbreak due to the emerging monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium 4,5,12:i:- occurred in four schools in Poitiers in October 2010. Food trace-back investigation led to the identification of beef burgers as the cause of the outbreak and their subsequent withdrawal. The Institute for Public Health Surveillance conducted a retrospective epidemiological investigation to assess the extent of the outbreak and describe cases. Self-administered questionnaires were completed by students and personnel attending each of the four schools affected. Clinical cases were defined as anyone having eaten at the school when the beef burgers were served and reporting diarrhoea or fever with at least one digestive symptom (nausea, vomiting or abdominal pain), within five days after the incriminated school meal or with unknown date of onset within a 15-day period after the incriminated school meal. Of 1,559 persons exposed, 554 clinical cases were identified corresponding to an overall attack rate of 35.5%. Of 554 clinical cases, a total of 286 (53%) sought medical care and 31 (6%) were hospitalised for more than 24 hours. This multi-school outbreak is one of the biggest food-borne outbreaks of monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium 4,5,12:i:- described in France. Prompt notification of cases and rapid identification and withdrawal of the incriminated batch of beef burgers was crucial to limit the extension of this outbreak.

  4. Fluesorbent FGD at the Burger and Lausche plants

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S. Jr.

    1998-04-01

    While large, capital-intensive coal-fired power plants have a number of waste-free flue gas desulfurization options available, few economical choices exist for operators of more moderately-sized industrial and institutional boilers. The Fluesorbent technology, a simple duct-injection process designed for waste-free operation and low capital costs, was designed to fill this gap. Its unique feature is the use of expanded vermiculite or perlite with the injected lime. This enables 85% SO{sub 2} removal at reasonable lime consumption rates and results in a valuable agricultural by-product, instead of a waste. A 6,500-acfm Fluesorbent pilot plant was recently tested at Ohio Edison`s Burger station with promising results. Plans are currently underway for the first permanent Fluesorbent installation on two coal-fired boilers at Ohio University`s Lausche heating plant. This paper describes the Burger plant results and the Lausche plant plans.

  5. Fluesorbent FGD at the Burger and Lausche plants

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S. Jr.

    1998-07-01

    While large, capital-intensive coal-fired power plants have a number of waste-free flue gas desulfurization options available, few economical choices exist for operators of more moderately-sized industrial and institutional boilers. The Fluesorbent technology, a single duct-injection process designed for waste-free operation and low capital costs, was designed to fill this gap. Its unique feature is the use of expanded vermiculite or perlite with the injected lime. This enables 85% SO{sub 2} removal at reasonable lime consumption rates and results in a valuable agricultural by-product, instead of a waste. A 6,500-acfm Fluesorbent pilot plant was recently tested at Ohio Edison's Burger station with promising results. Plans are currently underway for the first permanent Fluesorbent installation on two coal-fired boilers at Ohio University's Lausche heating plant. This paper describes the Burger plant results and the Lausche plant plans.

  6. A lattice Boltzmann model for the Burgers-Fisher equation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianying; Yan, Guangwu

    2010-06-01

    A lattice Boltzmann model is developed for the one- and two-dimensional Burgers-Fisher equation based on the method of the higher-order moment of equilibrium distribution functions and a series of partial differential equations in different time scales. In order to obtain the two-dimensional Burgers-Fisher equation, vector sigma(j) has been used. And in order to overcome the drawbacks of "error rebound," a new assumption of additional distribution is presented, where two additional terms, in first order and second order separately, are used. Comparisons with the results obtained by other methods reveal that the numerical solutions obtained by the proposed method converge to exact solutions. The model under new assumption gives better results than that with second order assumption.

  7. Algebraic resolution of the Burgers equation with a forcing term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinuvasan, R.; Tamizhmani, K. M.; L Leach, P. G.

    2017-05-01

    We introduce an inhomogeneous term, f( t, x), into the right-hand side of the usual Burgers equation and examine the resulting equation for those functions which admit at least one Lie point symmetry. For those functions f( t, x) which depend nontrivially on both t and x, we find that there is just one symmetry. If f is a function of only x, there are three symmetries with the algebra s l(2, R). When f is a function of only t, there are five symmetries with the algebra s l(2, R) ⊕ s 2 A 1. In all the cases, the Burgers equation is reduced to the equation for a linear oscillator with nonconstant coefficient.

  8. A Jacobi collocation approximation for nonlinear coupled viscous Burgers' equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doha, Eid H.; Bhrawy, Ali H.; Abdelkawy, Mohamed A.; Hafez, Ramy M.

    2014-02-01

    This article presents a numerical approximation of the initial-boundary nonlinear coupled viscous Burgers' equation based on spectral methods. A Jacobi-Gauss-Lobatto collocation (J-GL-C) scheme in combination with the implicit Runge-Kutta-Nyström (IRKN) scheme are employed to obtain highly accurate approximations to the mentioned problem. This J-GL-C method, based on Jacobi polynomials and Gauss-Lobatto quadrature integration, reduces solving the nonlinear coupled viscous Burgers' equation to a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equation which is far easier to solve. The given examples show, by selecting relatively few J-GL-C points, the accuracy of the approximations and the utility of the approach over other analytical or numerical methods. The illustrative examples demonstrate the accuracy, efficiency, and versatility of the proposed algorithm.

  9. Exact solutions of forced Burgers equations with time variable coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büyükaşık, Şirin A.; Pashaev, Oktay K.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we consider a forced Burgers equation with time variable coefficients of the form Ut+(μ˙(t)/μ(t))U+UUx=(1/2μ(t))Uxx-ω2(t)x, and obtain an explicit solution of the general initial value problem in terms of a corresponding second order linear ordinary differential equation. Special exact solutions such as generalized shock and multi-shock waves, triangular wave, N-wave and rational type solutions are found and discussed. Then, we introduce forced Burgers equations with constant damping and an exponentially decaying diffusion coefficient as exactly solvable models. Different type of exact solutions are obtained for the critical, over and under damping cases, and their behavior is illustrated explicitly. In particular, the existence of inelastic type of collisions is observed by constructing multi-shock wave solutions, and for the rational type solutions the motion of the pole singularities is described.

  10. Conservation laws of inviscid Burgers equation with nonlinear damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulwahhab, Muhammad Alim

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, the new conservation theorem presented in Ibragimov (2007) [14] is used to find conservation laws of the inviscid Burgers equation with nonlinear damping ut+g(u)ux+λh(u)=0. We show that this equation is both quasi self-adjoint and self-adjoint, and use these concepts to simplify conserved quantities for various choices of g(u) and h(u).

  11. Beef Quality Assurance in Feedlots.

    PubMed

    Smith, Robert A; Thomson, Daniel U; Lee, Tiffany L

    2015-07-01

    This article discusses the Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) program, which was created by beef producers and veterinarians. The program has evolved from antibiotic residue avoidance to include animal handling, cattle comfort, food safety, and much more. It provides guidance to producers and veterinarians on best management practices and allows the beef industry to be transparent about the practices used. Veterinarians are key to helping producers implement BQA in their beef operations.

  12. Enumeration of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in Outbreak-Associated Beef Patties.

    PubMed

    Gill, Alexander; Huszczynski, George

    2016-07-01

    An outbreak of five cases of Escherichia coli O157 infection that occurred in Canada in 2012 was linked to frozen beef patties seasoned with garlic and peppercorn. Unopened retail packs of beef patties from the implicated production lot were recovered and analyzed to enumerate E. coli O157, other E. coli strains, and total coliforms. E. coli O157 was not recovered by direct enumeration on selective agar media. E. coli O157 in the samples was estimated at 3.1 most probable number per 140 g of beef patty, other E. coli was 11 CFU/g, and coliforms were 120 CFU/g. These results indicate that the presence of E. coli O157 in ground beef at levels below 0.1 CFU/g may cause outbreaks. However, the roles of temperature abuse, undercooking, and crosscontamination in amplifying the risk are unknown.

  13. The Frozen Price Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alden, Lori

    2003-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the educational frozen price game she developed to teach the basic economic principle of price allocation. In addition to demonstrating the advantages of price allocation, the game also illustrates such concepts as opportunity costs, cost benefit comparisons, and the trade-off between efficiency and equity.…

  14. Fresh Frozen Plasma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    therapeutic means). FFP can be prepared either by separation from whole blood or collection via plasmapheresis . Fresh frozen plasma contains the...FFP can be further separated into cryoprecipitate and what is known as “cryo-poor plasma,” a product rarely used for therapeutic means. Plasma is the

  15. Large time behavior of elementary waves of Burgers` equation under white noise perturbation

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, H.

    1995-12-31

    One of the most thoroughly studied nonlinear partial differential equation is the inviscid Burgers` equation (1.1) u{sub t} + uu{sub x} = 0, which was often used as a prototype model for study of conservation laws. The solutions of (1.1) is characterized as the {nu} {yields} 0+ limit of solutions of Burgers` equation (1.2) u{sub t}+ uu{sub x} = {nu}u{sub xx}. Burgers` equation (1.1) and (1.2) with white noise as initial value (1.3) u(x,0) = W(x) was originally proposed by Burgers [B] as a model for turbulence. 11 refs.

  16. Formation of mutagens in beef and beef extract during cooking.

    PubMed

    Commoner, B; Vithayathil, A J; Dolara, P; Nair, S; Madyastha, P; Cuca, G C

    1978-09-08

    Mutagens, distinguishable from benzo[a]pyrene and from mutagenic amino acid and protein pyrolysis products, are formed when ground beef is cooked in a home hamburger cooking appliance or when beef stock is concentrated, by boiling, to a paste known commercially as beef extract. "Well-done" hamburgers contain about 0.14 part per million of the mutagens, and beef bouillon cubes which contain beef extract about 0.1 part per million. Since such mutagens may be potentially carcionogenic and are formed during ordinary cooking procedures, their occurrence raises questions about possible risks to human health.

  17. Validation of the use of organic acids and acidified sodium chlorite to reduce Escherichia coli O157 and Salmonella typhimurium in beef trim and ground beef in a simulated processing environment.

    PubMed

    Harris, K; Miller, M F; Loneragan, G H; Brashears, M M

    2006-08-01

    A study was conducted to determine if acidified sodium chlorite (1,200 ppm) and acetic and lactic acids (2 and 4%) were effective in reducing foodborne pathogens in beef trim prior to grinding in a simulated processing environment. The reduction of Salmonella Typhimurium and Escherichia coli O157:H7 at high (4.0 log CFU/g) and low (1.0 log CFU/g) inoculation doses was evaluated at various processing steps, including the following: (i) in trim just after treatment application, (ii) in ground beef just after grinding, (iii) in ground beef 24 h after refrigerated storage, (iv) in ground beef 5 days after refrigerated storage, and (v) in ground beef 30 days after frozen storage. All antimicrobial treatments reduced the pathogens on the trim inoculated with the lower inoculation dose to nondetectable numbers in the trim and in the ground beef. There were significant reductions of both pathogens in the trim and in the ground beef inoculated with the high inoculation doses. On the trim itself, E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium were reduced by 1.5 to 2.0 log cycles, with no differences among all treatments. In the ground beef, the organic acids were more effective in reducing both pathogens than the acidified sodium chlorite immediately after grinding, but after 1 day of storage, there were no differences among treatments. Overall, in the ground beef, there was a 2.5-log reduction of E. coli O157:H7 and a 1.5-log reduction of Salmonella Typhimurium that was sustained over time in refrigerated and frozen storage. Very few sensory differences between the control samples and the treated samples were detected by a consumer panel. Thus, antimicrobial treatments did not cause serious adverse sensory changes. Use of these antimicrobial treatments can be a promising intervention available to ground beef processors who currently have few interventions in their process.

  18. Fertility management of bulls to improve beef cattle productivity.

    PubMed

    Thundathil, Jacob C; Dance, Alysha L; Kastelic, John P

    2016-07-01

    Global demand for animal proteins is increasing, necessitating increased efficiency of global food production. Improving reproductive efficiency of beef cattle, especially bull fertility, is particularly critical, as one bull can breed thousands of females (by artificial insemination). Identifying the genetic basis of male reproductive traits that influence male and female fertility, and using this information for selection, would improve herd fertility. Early-life selection of elite bulls by genomic approaches and feeding them to optimize postpubertal reproductive potential are essential for maximizing profitability. Traditional bull breeding soundness evaluation, or systematic analysis of frozen semen, eliminates bulls or semen samples that are grossly abnormal. However, semen samples classified as satisfactory on the basis of traditional approaches differ in fertility. Advanced sperm function assays developed for assessing compensatory and noncompensatory (submicroscopic) sperm traits can predict such variations in bull fertility. New knowledge on epigenetic modulations of sperm DNA, messenger RNA, and proteins is fundamental to refine and expand sperm function assays. Sexed semen, plus advanced reproductive technologies (e.g., ovum pickup and in vitro production of embryos) can maximize the efficiency of beef cattle production. This review is focused on genetic considerations for bull selection, physiology of reproductive development, breeding soundness evaluation, recent advances in assessing frozen semen, and existing and emerging uses of sexed semen in beef cattle production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. 9 CFR 318.17 - Requirements for the production of cooked beef, roast beef, and cooked corned beef products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Requirements for the production of...; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION ENTRY INTO... production of cooked beef, roast beef, and cooked corned beef products. (a) Cooked beef, roast beef, and...

  20. 9 CFR 318.17 - Requirements for the production of cooked beef, roast beef, and cooked corned beef products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Requirements for the production of...; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION ENTRY INTO... production of cooked beef, roast beef, and cooked corned beef products. (a) Cooked beef, roast beef, and...

  1. Foods - fresh vs. frozen or canned

    MedlinePlus

    Frozen foods vs. fresh or canned; Fresh foods vs. frozen or canned; Frozen vegetables versus fresh ... a well-balanced diet. Many people wonder if frozen and canned vegetables are as healthy for you ...

  2. 9 CFR 319.102 - Corned beef round and other corned beef cuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... beef cuts. 319.102 Section 319.102 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... Meats, Unsmoked and Smoked § 319.102 Corned beef round and other corned beef cuts. In preparing “Corned Beef Round” and other corned beef cuts, except “Corned Beef Briskets,” the curing solution shall be...

  3. 9 CFR 319.102 - Corned beef round and other corned beef cuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... beef cuts. 319.102 Section 319.102 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... Meats, Unsmoked and Smoked § 319.102 Corned beef round and other corned beef cuts. In preparing “Corned Beef Round” and other corned beef cuts, except “Corned Beef Briskets,” the curing solution shall be...

  4. 7 CFR 1260.119 - Beef.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Beef. 1260.119 Section 1260.119 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BEEF PROMOTION AND RESEARCH Beef Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1260.119 Beef. Beef means flesh of cattle....

  5. 7 CFR 1260.120 - Beef products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Beef products. 1260.120 Section 1260.120 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BEEF PROMOTION AND RESEARCH Beef Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1260.120 Beef products. Beef products means edible...

  6. Curation of Frozen Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, L. A.; Allen, C. C.; Bastien, R.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) and the Astromaterials Curator are charged by NPD 7100.10D with the curation of all of NASA s extraterrestrial samples, including those from future missions. This responsibility includes the development of new sample handling and preparation techniques; therefore, the Astromaterials Curator must begin developing procedures to preserve, prepare and ship samples at sub-freezing temperatures in order to enable future sample return missions. Such missions might include the return of future frozen samples from permanently-shadowed lunar craters, the nuclei of comets, the surface of Mars, etc. We are demonstrating the ability to curate samples under cold conditions by designing, installing and testing a cold curation glovebox. This glovebox will allow us to store, document, manipulate and subdivide frozen samples while quantifying and minimizing contamination throughout the curation process.

  7. On the Burgers vector of a wave dislocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, Mark R.

    2009-09-01

    Following Nye and Berry's analogy with crystal dislocations, an approach to the Burgers vector of a wave dislocation (phase singularity, optical vortex) is proposed. It is defined to be a regularized phase gradient evaluated at the phase singularity, and is computed explicitly. The screw component of this vector is naturally related to the helicoidal twisting of wavefronts along a vortex line, and is related to the helicity of the phase gradient. The edge component is related to the nearby current flow (defined by the phase gradient) perpendicular to the vortex, and the distribution of this component is found numerically for random two-dimensional monochromatic waves.

  8. A meshless approach for solution of Burgers' equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemian, Alireza; Shodja, Hossein M.

    2008-10-01

    A new meshless method called gradient reproducing kernel particle method (GRKPM) is proposed for numerical solutions of one-dimensional Burgers' equation with various values of viscosity and different initial and boundary conditions. Discretization is first done in the space via GRKPM, and subsequently, the reduced system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations is discretized in time by the Gear's method. Comparison with the exact solutions, which are only available for restricted initial conditions and values of viscosity, approves the efficacy of the proposed method. For challenging cases involving small viscosities, comparison with the results obtained using other numerical schemes in the literature further attests the desirable features of the presented methodology.

  9. Localization of Nonlocal Symmetries and Symmetry Reductions of Burgers Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jian-Wen; Lou, Sen-Yue; Yu, Jun

    2017-05-01

    The nonlocal symmetries of the Burgers equation are explicitly given by the truncated Painlevé method. The auto-Bäcklund transformation and group invariant solutions are obtained via the localization procedure for the nonlocal residual symmetries. Furthermore, the interaction solutions of the solition-Kummer waves and the solition-Airy waves are obtained. Supported by the Global Change Research Program China under Grant No. 2015CB953904, the National Natural Science Foundations of China under Grant Nos. 11435005, 11175092, and 11205092, Shanghai Knowledge Service Platform for Trustworthy Internet of Things under Grant No. ZF1213, and K. C. Wong Magna Fund in Ningbo University

  10. Physicochemical and sensory characteristics of burger made from duck surimi-like material.

    PubMed

    Ramadhan, K; Huda, N; Ahmad, R

    2012-09-01

    Burgers were prepared using duck surimi-like material (DSLM) with polydextrose added (SL) and DSLM with sucrose-sorbitol added (SS), and the properties of these burgers were compared with those of burgers made of chicken meat (CB) and duck meat (DB). Quality characteristics such as chemical composition, cooking loss, diameter shrinkage, color, and texture were measured. The DB had a lower moisture content (55.58%) and higher fat content (21.44%) and cooking loss (11.01%) compared with other samples, whereas CB, SS, and SL did not differ significantly in moisture (65.21-66.10%) and fat (10.42-11.16%) content or cooking loss (5.32-6.15%). The SS and SL were positioned below CB and above DB in terms of hardness, chewiness, and springiness. Ten trained panelists assessed the burgers using quantitative descriptive analysis. Among the burgers, CB had the greatest brightness of color, hardness, springiness, and chewiness. The SS had greater sweetness than the other burgers. Both SL and SS had significantly less animalic odor, meaty flavor, oiliness, juiciness, and saltiness compared with DB. The physicochemical and sensory characteristics of burgers prepared from DSLM approached those of burgers made of chicken.

  11. Warren E. Burger: Editor-In-Chief Justice of the United States?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Thomas A.

    A study attempted to ascertain whether Supreme Court Justice Warren Burger demonstrated a particularly unfavorable attitude toward the press in a pattern of press-related decisions. Sixty press freedom cases located through the indexes of the official "United States Reports" were examined. Hypothesis 1 predicted that Burger assigned…

  12. Effect of erythorbate, storage and high-oxygen packaging on premature browning in ground beef.

    PubMed

    Suman, S P; Faustman, C; Lee, S; Tang, J; Sepe, H A; Vasudevan, P; Annamalai, T; Manojkumar, M; Marek, P; Venkitanarayanan, K S

    2005-02-01

    Premature browning (PMB) was investigated in ground beef patties with (0.04%, w/w) and without erythorbate. In Experiment 1, patties were stored at 4 °C for 48 h; at -18 °C for 21 days; or at -18 °C for 21 days, thawed at 4 °C for 24 h; and cooked. Bulk ground beef was stored at -18 °C for 24 days, thawed for 24 h at 4 °C, and patties prepared and cooked immediately. In Experiment 2, fresh patties were overwrapped with oxygen-permeable film or packaged in 80% O(2)/20% N(2) (MAP), and stored for 48 h at 4 °C, or at -18 °C for 21 days, and cooked. Total reducing activity and color (L*, a* and b* values) were measured immediately prior to cooking. Patties were cooked to internal temperatures of 60, 66, 71 and 77 °C and internal cooked color was measured. Total reducing activity was higher for the erythorbate treatment than controls for all storage conditions (P<0.05). a* Values of cooked patties were higher for erythorbate than control treatments under all storage and packaging conditions at 60 and 66 °C (P<0.05). The presence of erythorbate in ground beef patties appeared to maintain red color at cooked internal temperatures of 60 and 66 °C. Frozen bulk storage appeared to increase the susceptibility of ground beef to PMB when compared to fresh and frozen patties. Patties cooked directly from frozen state appeared less susceptible to PMB than frozen-thawed and bulk storage. Ground beef appeared predisposed to PMB when stored in high-oxygen MAP at 4 °C for 48 h.

  13. Beef grading by ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammell, P. M.

    1981-01-01

    Reflections in ultrasonic A-scan signatures of beef carcasses indicate USDA grade. Since reflections from within muscle are determined primarily by fat/muscle interface, richness of signals is direct indication of degree of marbling and quality. Method replaces subjective sight and feel tests by individual graders and is applicable to grade analysis of live cattle.

  14. Agriculture. Beef Livestock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

    This task-based curriculum guide for agricultural production, specifically for beef livestock, is intended to help the teacher develop a classroom management system where students learn by doing. Introductory materials include a Dictionary of Occupational Titles job code and title sheet, a task sheet for developing leadership skills, and a task…

  15. Agriculture. Beef Livestock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

    This task-based curriculum guide for agricultural production, specifically for beef livestock, is intended to help the teacher develop a classroom management system where students learn by doing. Introductory materials include a Dictionary of Occupational Titles job code and title sheet, a task sheet for developing leadership skills, and a task…

  16. Beef grading by ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammell, P. M.

    1981-01-01

    Reflections in ultrasonic A-scan signatures of beef carcasses indicate USDA grade. Since reflections from within muscle are determined primarily by fat/muscle interface, richness of signals is direct indication of degree of marbling and quality. Method replaces subjective sight and feel tests by individual graders and is applicable to grade analysis of live cattle.

  17. Was Warren Burger Richard Nixon's Revenge? A Study of the Chief Justice's Attitudes toward the News Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, James M.

    The suggestion that Warren Burger's appointment to the Supreme Court was Richard Nixon's revenge upon the press is supported by some of Burger's judicial decisions and attitudes toward the press outside the courtroom, but not all of his decisions were against the news media. Burger's decision not to allow court clerks to speak to reporters, and…

  18. The triacylglycerol preparation of conjugated linoleic acid reduces lipid oxidation in irradiated, cooked ground beef patties.

    PubMed

    Chae, S H; Keeton, J T; Miller, R K; Johnson, D; Maxim, J; Smith, S B

    2009-04-01

    It is proposed that conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) would depress the lipid oxidation caused by irradiation of cooked, aerobically stored ground beef patties. The free fatty acid (FFA-CLA) and triacylglycerol (TAG-CLA) preparations of CLA were added at 0%, 1%, 2%, or 4% during the grinding process. Patties were irradiated at 1.5-2.0kGy and frozen at -20°C. Subsequently, the patties were tempered to 4°C, cooked to 70°C and held at 4°C for 7d. Enrichment of ground beef with CLA increased the cis-9,trans-11 and CLA trans-10,cis-12 CLA isomers in ground beef patties, even after cooking. Weight loss (P=0.03) and percentage fat (P=0.05) were higher in irradiated beef patties than in control patties. Irradiation decreased the concentration of α-linolenic acid (18:3n-3) in the ground beef by over 60% (P=0.07), whereas thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) values were higher (P=0.004) in irradiated beef patties than in control patties. The 1% concentration of added TAG-CLA reduced TBARS in irradiated ground beef patties, whereas 2% and 4% FFA-CLA depressed TBARS (CLA type×percentage interaction P=0.04). Irradiation increased the cardboard and painty aromatic attributes (P⩽0.05), and FFA-CLA preparation increased the painty aromatic attribute and afterburn aftertaste, but these effects were not observed with the TAG-CLA preparation (CLA type×treatment interaction P<0.04). Adding 1% TAG-CLA to ground beef during grinding can reduce lipid oxidation in irradiated, cooked ground beef patties without the negative aftertastes associated with the FFA-CLA preparation.

  19. Survival of Microflora in Precooked, Frozen Meals During Frozen Storage,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    FOOD PRESERVATION, *FROZEN FOODS , EXPERIMENTAL DATA, BACTERIA, TEST METHODS, FREEZING, MEALS, MILITARY RESEARCH, TABLES(DATA), YEASTS, STORAGE, FOOD , CULTURES(BIOLOGY), FECES, MICROBIOLOGY, STREPTOCOCCUS, MOLDS(ORGANISMS).

  20. Technological options to control quality of fish burgers.

    PubMed

    Danza, A; Conte, A; Del Nobile, M A

    2017-06-01

    This research was focused on preservation strategies applied to develop fish burgers enriched with tomato flour and extra-virgin olive oil. The effects of three different gas mixtures (5:95 O2/CO2; 10:60:30 O2/CO2/N2 and 5:50:45 O2/CO2/N2) on burger quality were analyzed by monitoring microbial cell load of main spoilage microorganisms, pH and sensory properties. As expected, modified atmosphere packaging significantly affected mesophilic bacteria with a reduction of about 2 log cycles for samples under 5% O2 and 95% CO2. Afterward, the best gas mixture was used in combination with various natural antimicrobial compounds (thymol, grape fruit seed extract and biocitrus). The biocitrus showed the strike balance between microbial and sensory quality, thus suggesting to be adopted for dipping treatment of the entire fish fillet before the mincing process. Later all the strategies tested individually were combined and samples were monitored for microbiological and sensory quality. Results obtained showed that dipping treatment of fillet in biocitrus solution (20,000 ppm) under modified conditions extended the shelf life by 8 days compared to the control sample, without affecting the sensory acceptability.

  1. Inverting Glacial Isostatic Adjustment beyond linear viscoelasticity using Burgers rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, L.; Greff-Lefftz, M.; Fleitout, L.; Metivier, L.; Rouby, H.

    2014-12-01

    In Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) inverse modeling, the usual assumption for the mantle rheology is the Maxwell model, which exhibits constant viscosity over time. However, mineral physics experiments and post-seismic observations show evidence of a transient component in the deformation of the shallow mantle, with a short-term viscosity lower than the long-term one. In these studies, the resulting rheology is modeled by a Burgers material: such rheology is indeed expected as the mantle is a mixture of materials with different viscosities. We propose to apply this rheology for the whole viscoelastic mantle, and, using a Bayesian MCMC inverse formalism for GIA during the last glacial cycle, study its impact on estimations of viscosity values, elastic thickness of the lithosphere, and ice distribution. To perform this inversion, we use a global dataset of sea level records, the geological constraints of ice-sheet margins, and present-day GPS data as well as satellite gravimetry. Our ambition is to present not only the best fitting model, but also the range of possible solutions (within the explored space of parameters) with their respective probability of explaining the data. Our first results indicate that compared to the Maxwell models, the Burgers models involve a larger lower mantle viscosity and thicker ice over Fennoscandia and Canada.

  2. Generalized Magnetic Field Effects in Burgers' Nanofluid Model.

    PubMed

    Rashidi, M M; Yang, Z; Awais, Muhammad; Nawaz, Maria; Hayat, Tasawar

    2017-01-01

    Analysis has been conducted to present the generalized magnetic field effects on the flow of a Burgers' nanofluid over an inclined wall. Mathematical modelling for hydro-magnetics reveals that the term "[Formula: see text]" is for the Newtonian model whereas the generalized magnetic field term (as mentioned in Eq 4) is for the Burgers' model which is incorporated in the current analysis to get the real insight of the problem for hydro-magnetics. Brownian motion and thermophoresis phenomenon are presented to analyze the nanofluidics for the non-Newtonian fluid. Mathematical analysis is completed in the presence of non-uniform heat generation/absorption. The constructed set of partial differential system is converted into coupled nonlinear ordinary differential system by employing the suitable transformations. Homotopy approach is employed to construct the analytical solutions which are shown graphically for sundr5y parameters including Deborah numbers, magnetic field, thermophoresis, Brownian motion and non-uniform heat generation/absorption. A comparative study is also presented showing the comparison of present results with an already published data.

  3. Numerical simulation of Burgers' equation using cubic B-splines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmi, C.; Awasthi, Ashish

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, a numerical θ scheme is proposed for solving nonlinear Burgers' equation. By employing Hopf-Cole transformation, the nonlinear Burgers' equation is linearized to the linear Heat equation. The resulting Heat equation is further solved by cubic B-splines. The time discretization of linear Heat equation is carried out using Crank-Nicolson scheme (θ = {1 \\over 2}) as well as backward Euler scheme (θ = 1). Accuracy in temporal direction is improved by using Richardson extrapolation. This method hence possesses fourth order accuracy both in space and time. The system of matrix which arises by using cubic splines is always diagonal. Therefore, working with splines has the advantage of reduced computational cost and easy implementation. Stability of the schemes have been discussed in detail and shown to be unconditionally stable. Three examples have been examined and the L2 and L∞ error norms have been calculated to establish the performance of the method. The numerical results obtained on applying this method have shown to give more accurate results than existing works of Kutluay et al. [1], Ozis et al. [2], Dag et al. [3], Salkuyeh et al. [4] and Korkmaz et al. [5].

  4. Tapeworm infection - beef or pork

    MedlinePlus

    Teniasis; Pork tapeworm; Beef tapeworm; Tapeworm; Taenia saginata ; Taenia solium ; Taeniasis ... Tapeworm infection is caused by eating the raw or undercooked meat of infected animals. Cattle usually carry ...

  5. ULTRATHIN FROZEN SECTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Bernhard, W.; Leduc, Elizabeth H.

    1967-01-01

    A relatively simple method for obtaining ultrathin, frozen sections for electron microscopy has been developed. Tissues, cultured cells, and bacteria may be employed. They are fixed in 1.25–4% glutaraldehyde for 1–4 hr, are washed overnight in buffer at 3°C, and are embedded in 20% thiolated gelatin or pure gelatin. Before sectioning they are partially dehydrated in 50% glycerol, frozen in liquid nitrogen on a modified tissue holder, and subsequently maintained at -70°C with dry ice. Finally, they are sectioned very rapidly with glass knives on a slightly modified Porter-Blum MT-1 microtome in a commercial deep-freeze maintained at -35°C and are floated in the trough of the knife on a 40% solution of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). The sections are picked up in plastic loops and transferred to distilled water at room temperature for thawing and removal of the DMSO, placed on grids coated with Formvar and carbon, air-dried, and stained with phosphotungstic acid, sodium silicotungstate, or a triple stain of osmium tetroxide, uranyl acetate, and lead. Large flat sections are obtained in which ultrastructural preservation is good. They are particularly useful for cytochemical studies. PMID:4167504

  6. Frozen Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    1 August 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a south polar residual cap landscape, formed in frozen carbon dioxide. There is no place on Earth that one can go to visit a landscape covering thousands of square kilometers with frozen carbon dioxide, so mesas, pits, and other landforms of the martian south polar region are as alien as they are beautiful. The scarps of the south polar region are known from thousands of other MGS MOC images to retreat at a rate of about 3 meters (3 yards) per martian year, indiating that slowly, over the course of the MGS mission, the amount of carbon dioxide in the martian atmosphere has probably been increasing.

    Location near: 86.9oS, 25.5oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  7. Frozen Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    1 August 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a south polar residual cap landscape, formed in frozen carbon dioxide. There is no place on Earth that one can go to visit a landscape covering thousands of square kilometers with frozen carbon dioxide, so mesas, pits, and other landforms of the martian south polar region are as alien as they are beautiful. The scarps of the south polar region are known from thousands of other MGS MOC images to retreat at a rate of about 3 meters (3 yards) per martian year, indiating that slowly, over the course of the MGS mission, the amount of carbon dioxide in the martian atmosphere has probably been increasing.

    Location near: 86.9oS, 25.5oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  8. Conventional freezing plus high pressure-low temperature treatment: Physical properties, microbial quality and storage stability of beef meat.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Pedro P; Sanz, Pedro D; Molina-García, Antonio D; Otero, Laura; Guignon, Bérengère; Vaudagna, Sergio R

    2007-12-01

    Meat high-hydrostatic pressure treatment causes severe decolouration, preventing its commercialisation due to consumer rejection. Novel procedures involving product freezing plus low-temperature pressure processing are here investigated. Room temperature (20°C) pressurisation (650MPa/10min) and air blast freezing (-30°C) are compared to air blast freezing plus high pressure at subzero temperature (-35°C) in terms of drip loss, expressible moisture, shear force, colour, microbial quality and storage stability of fresh and salt-added beef samples (Longissimus dorsi muscle). The latter treatment induced solid water transitions among ice phases. Fresh beef high pressure treatment (650MPa/20°C/10min) increased significantly expressible moisture while it decreased in pressurised (650MPa/-35°C/10min) frozen beef. Salt addition reduced high pressure-induced water loss. Treatments studied did not change fresh or salt-added samples shear force. Frozen beef pressurised at low temperature showed L, a and b values after thawing close to fresh samples. However, these samples in frozen state, presented chromatic parameters similar to unfrozen beef pressurised at room temperature. Apparently, freezing protects meat against pressure colour deterioration, fresh colour being recovered after thawing. High pressure processing (20°C or -35°C) was very effective reducing aerobic total (2-log(10) cycles) and lactic acid bacteria counts (2.4-log(10) cycles), in fresh and salt-added samples. Frozen+pressurised beef stored at -18°C during 45 days recovered its original colour after thawing, similarly to just-treated samples while their counts remain below detection limits during storage.

  9. 21 CFR 160.110 - Frozen eggs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Frozen eggs. 160.110 Section 160.110 Food and... CONSUMPTION EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Eggs and Egg Products § 160.110 Frozen eggs. (a) Frozen eggs, frozen whole eggs, frozen mixed eggs is the food prepared by...

  10. 21 CFR 160.110 - Frozen eggs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Frozen eggs. 160.110 Section 160.110 Food and... CONSUMPTION EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Eggs and Egg Products § 160.110 Frozen eggs. (a) Frozen eggs, frozen whole eggs, frozen mixed eggs is the food prepared by...

  11. 21 CFR 160.110 - Frozen eggs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Frozen eggs. 160.110 Section 160.110 Food and... CONSUMPTION EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Eggs and Egg Products § 160.110 Frozen eggs. (a) Frozen eggs, frozen whole eggs, frozen mixed eggs is the food prepared by...

  12. 21 CFR 160.110 - Frozen eggs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Frozen eggs. 160.110 Section 160.110 Food and... CONSUMPTION EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Eggs and Egg Products § 160.110 Frozen eggs. (a) Frozen eggs, frozen whole eggs, frozen mixed eggs is the food prepared by...

  13. 21 CFR 160.110 - Frozen eggs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Frozen eggs. 160.110 Section 160.110 Food and... CONSUMPTION EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Eggs and Egg Products § 160.110 Frozen eggs. (a) Frozen eggs, frozen whole eggs, frozen mixed eggs is the food prepared by...

  14. 21 CFR 158.170 - Frozen peas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Frozen peas. 158.170 Section 158.170 Food and... CONSUMPTION FROZEN VEGETABLES Requirements for Specific Standardized Frozen Vegetables § 158.170 Frozen peas. (a) Identity—(1) Product definition. Frozen peas is the food in “package” form as that term...

  15. Trigonometric quadratic B-spline subdomain Galerkin algorithm for the Burgers' equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ay, Buket; Dag, Idris; Gorgulu, Melis Zorsahin

    2015-12-01

    A variant of the subdomain Galerkin method has been set up to find numerical solutions of the Burgers' equation. Approximate function consists of the combination of the trigonometric B-splines. Integration of Burgers' equation has been achived by aid of the subdomain Galerkin method based on the trigonometric B-splines as an approximate functions. The resulting first order ordinary differential system has been converted into an iterative algebraic equation by use of the Crank-Nicolson method at successive two time levels. The suggested algorithm is tested on somewell-known problems for the Burgers' equation.

  16. Subensemble decomposition and Markov process analysis of Burgers turbulence.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Xiong; She, Zhen-Su

    2011-08-01

    A numerical and statistical study is performed to describe the positive and negative local subgrid energy fluxes in the one-dimensional random-force-driven Burgers turbulence (Burgulence). We use a subensemble method to decompose the field into shock wave and rarefaction wave subensembles by group velocity difference. We observe that the shock wave subensemble shows a strong intermittency which dominates the whole Burgulence field, while the rarefaction wave subensemble satisfies the Kolmogorov 1941 (K41) scaling law. We calculate the two subensemble probabilities and find that in the inertial range they maintain scale invariance, which is the important feature of turbulence self-similarity. We reveal that the interconversion of shock and rarefaction waves during the equation's evolution displays in accordance with a Markov process, which has a stationary transition probability matrix with the elements satisfying universal functions and, when the time interval is much greater than the corresponding characteristic value, exhibits the scale-invariant property.

  17. Karhunen-Loeve expansion of Burgers' model of turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, D. H.; Adrian, R. J.; Stewart, D. S.; Sung, H. J.; Moin, P.

    1988-01-01

    The properties of the Karhunen-Loeve expansion of a strongly inhomogeneous random process are examined with emphasis on applications to turbulent flow fields. The ability of the KL expansion to represent functions that have both slow and rapid variations in a relatively small number of expansion terms is tested on a one-dimensional model based on the forced Burgers' equation. The rate of the convergence of the expansion is evaluated, and its dependence on the Reynolds number is determined. It is shown that the KL eigenfunctions possess wall boundary layers attached to outer structures that are independent of the Reynolds number (at high Reynolds numbers). It is also shown that the spectrum of eigenvalues is broad at large Reynolds numbers, requiring many terms to represent higher-order derivatives of the function.

  18. [Microbiological study of spiced chicken burgers in Tripoli City, Libya].

    PubMed

    El Shrek, Y M; Ali, M R M

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the microbiological quality of uncooked and cooked spiced chicken burger in restaurants and fast food places in Tripoli city and surrounding areas. Thus 120 samples (64 cooked and 56 uncooked) were analysed microbiologically. All the samples were highly contaminated with bacteria: 66.6%, 25.9%, 29.6%, 20.3% and 12.9% of the uncooked samples were contaminated with Escherichia coli, Aeromonas spp., Staphylococcus aureus, E. coli 0157:H7 and salmonella respectively. Additionally 10.9%, 3.1%, 4.68%, 3.12% and 1.56 of the cooked samples were contaminated with E. coli, Aeromonas spp., E. coli 0157:H7, S. aureus and salmonella respectively.

  19. Nonlocal Symmetry Reductions for Bosonized Supersymmetric Burgers Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Bo; Lin, Ji; Le, Jia-Yi; Wang, Sheng; Dai, Tian-Zhao

    2017-08-01

    Based on the bosonization approach, the supersymmetric Burgers (SB) system is transformed to a coupled bosonic system. By solving the bosonized SB (BSB) equation, the difficulties caused by the anticommutative fermionic field of the SB equation can be avoided. The nonlocal symmetry for the BSB equation is obtained by the truncated Painlevé method. By introducing multiple new fields, the finite symmetry transformation for the BSB equation is derived by solving the first Lie’s principle of the prolonged systems. Some group invariant solutions are obtained with the similarity reductions related by the nonlocal symmetry. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11675146, 11305106, 11472177, 11275129, and the Natural Science Foundation of Zhejiang Province of China under Grant No. LZ15A050001

  20. Pointwise estimates for solutions of fractal Burgers equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubowski, Tomasz; Serafin, Grzegorz

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we provide two-sided estimates and uniform asymptotics for the solution of d-dimensional critical fractal Burgers equation ut -Δ α / 2 u + b ṡ ∇ (u | u|q) = 0, α ∈ (1 , 2), b ∈Rd for q = (α - 1) / d and u0 ∈L1 (Rd). We consider also q > (α - 1) / d under additional condition u0 ∈L∞ (Rd). In both cases we assume u0 ≥ 0, which implies that the solution is non-negative. The estimates are given in the terms of the function Ptu0, where Pt denotes the semigroup for the operator ∂t -Δ α / 2.

  1. Frozen waves: experimental generation.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Tarcio A; Gesualdi, Marcos R R; Zamboni-Rached, Michel

    2012-06-01

    Frozen waves (FWs) are very interesting particular cases of nondiffracting beams whose envelopes are static and whose longitudinal intensity patterns can be chosen a priori. We present here for the first time (that we know of) the experimental generation of FWs. The experimental realization of these FWs was obtained using a holographic setup for the optical reconstruction of computer generated holograms (CGH), based on a 4-f Fourier filtering system and a nematic liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM), where FW CGHs were first computationally implemented, and later electronically implemented, on the LC-SLM for optical reconstruction. The experimental results are in agreement with the corresponding theoretical analytical solutions and hold excellent prospects for implementation in scientific and technological applications.

  2. A quarter-plane problem for the modified Burgers' equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, J. A.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we address an initial-boundary value problem for the modified Burgers' equation. The normalized modified Burgers' equation considered is given by ut + up ux - uxx = 0, 0 < x < ∞, t > 0, where x and t represent dimensionless distance and time, respectively, and p (>1) is a parameter. In particular, we consider the case when the initial and boundary conditions are given by u(x, 0) = ui for 0 < x < ∞ and u(0, t) = ub for t > 0, respectively. We initially focus attention on the case when ui = 0 and ub > 0. In this case, the method of matched asymptotic coordinate expansions is used to obtain the complete large-t asymptotic structure of the solution to this problem, which exhibits the formation of a permanent form travelling wave solution propagating with speed v=ubp/p+1 (>0) and connecting u = 0 ahead of the wave-front to u = ub at the rear of the wave. Further, the asymptotic correction to the propagation speed is of O(t^{-3/2} exp (-v^2/4t)) as t → ∞, and the rate of convergence of the solution of the initial-boundary value problem to the travelling wave is O(t^{-3/2} exp (-v^2/4t)) as t → ∞. We conclude the paper with a discussion of the structure of the large-time solution to the initial-boundary value problem for general values of ub and ui (excluding the trivial case when ui = ub).

  3. High pH thresholding of beef with VNIR hyperspectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Crichton, Stuart O J; Kirchner, Sascha M; Porley, Victoria; Retz, Stefanie; von Gersdorff, Gardis; Hensel, Oliver; Sturm, Barbara

    2017-12-01

    Initial quality grading of meat is generally carried out using invasive and occasionally destructive sampling for the purposes of pH testing. Precise pH and thresholds exist to allow the classification of different statuses of meat, e.g. for detection of dry, firm, and dark (DFD) (when dealing with cattle and sheep), or pale, soft exudative meat (when dealing with pork). This paper illustrates that threshold detection for pH level in beef with different freshness levels (fresh, fresh frozen-thawed, matured, and matured frozen-thawed). Use of support vector machine (SVM) analysis allowed for the classification of beef samples with a pH above 5.9, and below 5.6, with an accuracy of 91% and 99% respectively. Biochemical and physical conditions of the meat concerning the pH are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Beef Cattle: Selection and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    Designed for secondary vocational agriculture students, this text provides an overview of selecting and evaluating beef cattle in Future Farmers of America livestock judging events. The first of four major sections addresses topics such as the ideal beef animal, selecting steers, selecting breeding animals, studying the animal systematically, and…

  5. Beef Cattle: Selection and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    Designed for secondary vocational agriculture students, this text provides an overview of selecting and evaluating beef cattle in Future Farmers of America livestock judging events. The first of four major sections addresses topics such as the ideal beef animal, selecting steers, selecting breeding animals, studying the animal systematically, and…

  6. Big Explosives Experimental Facility - BEEF

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The Big Explosives Experimental Facility or BEEF is a ten acre fenced high explosive testing facility that provides data to support stockpile stewardship and other national security programs. At BEEF conventional high explosives experiments are safely conducted providing sophisticated diagnostics such as high speed optics and x-ray radiography.

  7. Big Explosives Experimental Facility - BEEF

    SciTech Connect

    2014-10-31

    The Big Explosives Experimental Facility or BEEF is a ten acre fenced high explosive testing facility that provides data to support stockpile stewardship and other national security programs. At BEEF conventional high explosives experiments are safely conducted providing sophisticated diagnostics such as high speed optics and x-ray radiography.

  8. An explicit predictor-corrector solver with applications to Burgers' equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dey, S. K.; Dey, C.

    1983-01-01

    Forward Euler's explicit, finite-difference formula of extrapolation, is used as a predictor and a convex formula as a corrector to integrate differential equations numerically. An application has been made to Burger's equation.

  9. From Tilton to Ewing: Some Major Higher Education Decisions of the Burger Court.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chronicle of Higher Education, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Some of the major Supreme Court decisions affecting higher education during Warren E. Burger's tenure as Chief Justice are outlined. His votes and those of Associate Justice William H. Rehnquist are noted. (MLW)

  10. Thermalized solution of the Galerkin-truncated Burgers equation: From the birth of local structures to thermalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Peihua; Zhang, Jiazhong; Cao, Shengli; Prants, S. V.; Liu, Yan

    2017-04-01

    Discrepancy between truncated and exact solutions of the inviscid Burgers equation is studied by the pseudo-spectral method with setting all the Fourier modes with the wavenmubers beyond a truncated wavenumber KG to be zero. A localized short-wavelength oscillation, called as a "tyger", appears at occurrence of the shock in the truncated solution. The "tyger" shows very different shapes depending on the way of truncation of the nonlinear term. Moreover, the birth of the "tyger" is related to a period-doubling bifurcation which is illustrated by a map constructed by an iterative method at the center of the "tyger". In order to study the process of stability loss of the truncated wave solution, a perturbed wave is derived. The truncated wave solution loses its stability in every oscillator mode of the perturbed wave. Finally, the long-term process of thermalization is displayed by the perturbed wave coupled with a frozen wave profile containing a symmetric pair of shocks. Thermalization appears from the both sides of small structures around the center without symmetry breaking. The phenomenon of the birth of "a tyger" and its following thermalization can be understood from the view of stability loss of the truncated wave solution.

  11. Traveling wave solution of fractional KdV-Burger-Kuramoto equation describing nonlinear physical phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, A. K.; Ray, S. Saha

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, KdV-Burger-Kuramoto equation involving instability, dissipation, and dispersion parameters is solved numerically. The numerical solution for the fractional order KdV-Burger-Kuramoto (KBK) equation has been presented using two-dimensional Legendre wavelet method. The approximate solutions of nonlinear fractional KBK equation thus obtained by Legendre wavelet method are compared with the exact solutions. The present scheme is very simple, effective and convenient for obtaining numerical solution of the KBK equation.

  12. Laplace homotopy perturbation method for Burgers equation with space- and time-fractional order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, S. J.; Jafari, H.; Moshokoa, S. P.; Ariyan, V. M.; Baleanu, D.

    2016-01-01

    The fractional Burgers equation describes the physical processes of unidirectional propagation of weakly nonlinear acoustic waves through a gas-filled pipe. The Laplace homotopy perturbation method is discussed to obtain the approximate analytical solution of space-fractional and time-fractional Burgers equations. The method used combines the Laplace transform and the homotopy perturbation method. Numerical results show that the approach is easy to implement and accurate when applied to partial differential equations of fractional orders.

  13. [Hendrik Burger, editor-in-chief of the Dutch Journal of Medicine 1904- 1913].

    PubMed

    van't Hof, S E

    2007-07-28

    Hendrik Burger (1864-1957) became the sixth editor-in-chief of the Journal before gaining international fame as a professor of otorhinolaryngology. He was more a teacher than researcher, and his clinic in Amsterdam became an internationally renowned training centre. He advocated better public healthcare for children who were deaf/mute or had impaired hearing and founded schools for these children. A prolific writer, Burger contributed more than 400 papers to the Journal.

  14. The Canadian Beef Industry

    PubMed Central

    Fredeen, H.

    1980-01-01

    The cattle industry in Canada has changed greatly over the past several decades. Size of the national dairy herd has reduced steadily but this reduction has been more than offset by an increase in the beef herd. As the dairy herd has decreased, the role of the Holstein has increased. The genetic improvement of the Canadian Holstein, based on selection procedures emphasizing progeny performance and mediated through increasing use of artificial insemination, has earned the breed a strong international reputation. This is reflected by the increasing international demand for semen. The strongest growth of the national beef herd occurred during a period of brisk import activity. Several of the new nonBritish breeds are now well established. Their advent on the Canadian scene rekindled interest in crossbreeding and systematic crossbreeding programs designed to make controlled use of heterozygosity are in the process of development. The new breeds of major importance at this time combine rapid growth rate with desirable carcass characteristics, specifically lean content. This, coupled with the carcass grade standards inaugurated in 1972, has resulted in improved efficiency of lean meat production. Importation activity has waned and a review of the production credentials of breeds not yet in Canada suggests little likelihood that they will contribute meaningfully to Canadian production. The numerous beef breeds now in Canada are presently undergoing a process of applied evaluation and relatively few of them seem destined to make a lasting contribution. The future of the cattle industry will be determined largely by economic developments. However, the ability of the ruminant to utilize food materials that do not compete directly with human demands should ensure an enduring future. PMID:7363257

  15. Salmonella risk in imported fresh beef, beef preparations, and beef products.

    PubMed

    Tuominen, P; Ranta, J; Maijala, R

    2006-08-01

    Additional guarantees (AGs) for Salmonella in imported defined animal-derived foods were agreed on for Finland when it was admitted to the European Community. The aim of this project was to evaluate the impact of these AGs on the prevalence of Salmonella in the Finnish beef supply and the adequacy of their scope. According to the quantitative Bayesian model, the efficacy of AGs was mainly dependent on the proportions of different beef categories imported and the true prevalence in the countries of origin. According to the model, AGs were able to reach their target in the referred year 1999 and kept the true Salmonella prevalence of beef imports below 1% with quantified uncertainty. The extension of AGs to all imported fresh beef would have reduced the Salmonella prevalence of beef imports from three- to fourfold, whereas expanding the implementation of AGs to all imports of fresh beef, beef preparations, and beef products would have resulted in a sixfold decrease. If current AGs targeting fresh beef intended to be sold as fresh or to be processed by the Finnish industry with processes not achieving 70 degrees C were not implemented, the 95% credible interval of Salmonella prevalence in the Finnish beef supply would be 0.2 to 1.3% (mean, 0.6%) instead of 0.1 to 1.2% (mean, 0.5%). However, if the prevalence in the exporting countries were to rise or the main import countries and/or magnitudes were to change, AGs would be of greater importance.

  16. The equine frozen semen industry.

    PubMed

    Loomis, P R

    2001-12-03

    Recent acceptance of frozen semen as a method to produce registered foals by two of the worlds largest breed associations, the American Quarter Horse and American Paint Horse, has stimulated new interest in frozen semen technology. This review will: (a) attempt to identify the major impediments to the development of the frozen semen industry, (b) suggest alternative methods for marketing and application of frozen semen, and (c) present the results of a recent study in our laboratory. The objective of which was to compare pregnancy rates of insemination with cooled and frozen semen. Major impediments to the development of the frozen semen industry include 1. Lower fertility with frozen semen as compared to cooled semen for many stallions. 2. Increased costs associated with management of mares for AI with frozen semen using current insemination protocols. 3. Unfavorable marketing practices for frozen semen. Reports of fertility with cooled transported semen in commercial breeding programs indicate seasonal pregnancy rates ranging from 60 to 90%. We compiled data from three commercial transported cooled semen programs in which semen from 16 stallions was used for insemination of 850 mares throughout North America by local veterinarians. During the 1999 and 2000 breeding seasons, first cycle and seasonal pregnancy rates of 59.4 and 74.7% were obtained. During that same period, first cycle and seasonal pregnancy rates of 51.3 and 75.6% were obtained following insemination of 876 mares with frozen semen from 106 different stallions processed by our laboratory and distributed through our commercial distribution program. First cycle and seasonal pregnancy rates were higher for mares bred outside of North America than for mares bred within North America (53.5 and 81.9 versus 49.4 and 65.6%, respectively). Seasonal pregnancy rates were higher presumably because of the better mare management employed for mares bred with exported semen and the fact that some of the domestic

  17. Effect of ground poppy seed as a fat replacer on meat burgers.

    PubMed

    Gök, Veli; Akkaya, Levent; Obuz, Ersel; Bulut, Sait

    2011-12-01

    Poppy seed paste was used in koefte production as an animal fat replacer and efficacy of using poppy seed was investigated. The use of ground poppy seed in formulation of meat burgers had no effect on the moisture content of uncooked meat burgers; however, it did have a significant effect (p<0.05) on the fat content of meat burgers. Ground poppy seed addition significantly affected (p<0.05) cooking yield, moisture retention, and fat retention of meat burgers. Ground poppy seed addition significantly decreased (p<0.05) saturated fatty acid contents as the amount of ground poppy seed increased in meat burgers. A strong significant decrease (p<0.05) on the cholesterol content of meat burgers with ground poppy seed addition was observed. Samples having 20% ground poppy seed had significantly better texture and juiciness score (p<0.05) than any other sample which could be explained by increased moisture retention. Replacing animal fat with ground poppy seed paste is effective and may pave the way for an innovative meat product.

  18. ULTRATHIN FROZEN SECTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Leduc, Elizabeth H.; Bernhard, W.; Holt, S. J.; Tranzer, J. P.

    1967-01-01

    Endogenous enzyme activity can be readily and routinely demonstrated in ultrathin, frozen sections for electron microscopy. The procedure employed to obtain the best structural preservation as well as enzyme activity in thin sections involved fixation in glutaraldehyde, embedding in thiolated gelatin or pure gelatin, partial dehydration in glycerol, and sectioning in a cryostat at -35°C with a slightly modified Porter-Blum microtome on which the tissue is maintained at -70°C and the knife at -23°C. Kidney cortex was used as test tissue, but a few other organs were occasionally used. Thin sections were floated on the surface of several incubation media routinely employed for enzyme cytochemistry. Positive, specific reactions were obtained for alkaline phosphatase in kidney brush border, for adenosine triphosphatase in brush border and in basal membranes of distal tubules, for acid phosphatase and esterase in lysosomes, and for NADH diaphorase in mitochondria. Mitochondrial ATPase was sporadically evident only in the distal tubule of the kidney. Localizations of enzyme activity reported by other technical approaches were confirmed and in some cases somewhat improved. PMID:4293006

  19. 7 CFR 1260.315 - Qualified State Beef Councils.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ....315 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BEEF... Association Louisiana Beef Industry Council Maryland Beef Council Michigan Beef Industry Commission...

  20. The effects of freezing and thawing rates on tenderness, sensory quality, and retail display of beef subprimals.

    PubMed

    Hergenreder, J E; Hosch, J J; Varnold, K A; Haack, A L; Senaratne, L S; Pokharel, S; Beauchamp, C; Lobaugh, B; Calkins, C R

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate processing methods for frozen beef subprimals; the effects of freezing and thawing rates on tenderness, sensory properties, and retail display were evaluated. There were 6 treatments: fresh, never frozen 14 d wet aged (14D); fresh, never frozen 21 d wet aged (21D); blast frozen-fast thawed (BF); blast frozen-slow thawed (BS); conventionally frozen-fast thawed (CF); and conventionally frozen-slow thawed (CS). All frozen beef subprimals were aged for 14 d before freezing. Three beef subprimal cuts, rib eye roll (n=90), strip loin (n=90), and top sirloin butt (n=90), were used with 3 replications of 5 samples per treatment per week (total of 9 wk, n=270). Blast freezing occurred by placing spacers between the boxes of meat on pallets at -28°C with high air velocity for 3 to 5 d. Conventional freezing occurred with boxes of meat stacked on pallets and placed in a -28°C freezer with minimal air movement for at least 10 d. Fast thawing of subprimals (to an internal temperature of -1°C to 1°C) occurred by immersion in a circulating water bath (<12°C) for 21 h, and slow thawing of subprimals occurred over a 2-wk period by placing individual subprimals on tables at 0°C. Steaks (2.5 cm thick) were cut from the longissimus thoracis (LT), longissimus lumborum (LL), and gluteus medius (GM) for Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBS), trained sensory evaluation, and retail display. For LL and GM beef steaks, frozen treatments were equal or lower in WBS values to 14D and 21D beef steaks. No differences were detected in WBS among the treatments applied to GM beef steaks (P=0.08). There were no differences in sensory tenderness among the LL, LT, and GM (P>0.05). All LL and LT beef steaks had approximately 4 d to 40% discoloration, and all GM steaks had over 3 d to 40% discoloration. Steaks from the LL and LT began to discolor at about 3 d, and the GM began to discolor after 1 d. For all beef subprimals, purge loss during storage and

  1. Modified Beef Tongue Model for Fourth-Degree Laceration Repair Simulation.

    PubMed

    Illston, Jana D; Ballard, Alicia C; Ellington, David R; Richter, Holly E

    2017-03-01

    An existing model for fourth-degree laceration repair uses beef tongue with plastic or vinyl tubing. This modified model substitutes beef tripe for the anal mucosa and chicken leg muscles for the anal sphincter muscle analogs to create a realistic model. Tripe is tunneled through the body of the trimmed beef tongue and sutured like an ostomy to simulate the anal canal. The tongue is incised toward the tripe "anal canal." Chicken leg muscles are tunneled from the incision out to the cut edges of the beef tongue to create anal sphincter muscle analogs. Procedures can be repeated on the opposite side. Two double-sided models can be made per tongue. The model can be refrigerated or frozen and thawed before use. A fourth-degree laceration can be cut immediately before use. Materials were obtained at a local supermarket for $5-7 per half-tongue, double-sided model. Residents responded positively to the model and stated that animal tissue provided realistic haptic simulation. The modified beef tongue model utilizing tripe and chicken leg muscles as anal mucosa and anal sphincter muscle analogs, respectively, provided excellent perceived haptic fidelity. Moreover, it is an innovative, inexpensive, and well-received teaching tool to augment resident education.

  2. Evaluation of Physicochemical Deterioration and Lipid Oxidation of Beef Muscle Affected by Freeze-thaw Cycles

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, M. H.; Hossain, M. M.; Rahman, S. M. E.; Amin, M. R.; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to explore the deterioration of physicochemical quality of beef hind limb during frozen storage at −20℃, affected by repeated freeze-thaw cycles. The effects of three successive freeze-thaw cycles on beef hind limb were investigated comparing with unfrozen beef muscle for 80 d by keeping at −20±1℃. The freeze-thaw cycles were subjected to three thawing methods and carried out to select the best one on the basis of deterioration of physicochemical properties of beef. As the number of repeated freeze-thaw cycles increased, drip loss decreased and water holding capacity (WHC) increased (p<0.05) till two cycles and then decreased. Cooking loss increased in cycle one and three but decreased in cycle two. Moreover, drip loss, WHC and cooking loss affected (p<0.05) by thawing methods within the cycles. However, pH value decreased (p<0.05), but peroxide value (p<0.05), free fatty acids value (p<0.05) and TBARS value increased (p<0.05) significantly as the number of repeated freeze-thaw cycles increased. Moreover, significant (p<0.05) interactive effects were found among the thawing methods and repeated cycles. As a result, freeze-thaw cycles affected the physicochemical quality of beef muscle, causing the degradation of its quality. PMID:26877637

  3. Microbiological examination of ready-to-eat burgers sampled anonymously at the point of sale in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Little, C L; Gillespie, I A; Mitchell, R T

    2001-12-01

    During May and June 1999 a microbiological study of ready-to-eat burgers purchased anonymously from burger outlets (combined take-away and burger restaurants, take-away-only fixed premises, mobile vendors, temporary stalls and other burger outlets) was undertaken. The intention was to determine the microbiological quality of ready-to-eat burgers as purchased by customers of take-away premises and to ascertain, where information was available, whether the Chief Medical Officer's advice on cooking burgers was being followed. Examination of 3,128 ready-to-eat burgers found that 2,868 (92%) were of acceptable quality and 260 (8%) were of unsatisfactory quality. Unsatisfactory results were mostly due to high aerobic colony counts (ACCs). Salmonella spp., Campylobacter spp. and Escherichia coli O157 were not detected in any of the samples examined. Acceptable microbiological quality of ready-to-eat burgers was associated with outlets, such as combined take-away and burger restaurants and in particular national franchise outlets, which had management food hygiene training and hazard analysis in place. Poor microbiological quality was associated with undercooking and local outlets as indicated by Local Authority Inspectors' Consumers at Risk scores.

  4. Generalized Magnetic Field Effects in Burgers' Nanofluid Model

    PubMed Central

    Rashidi, M. M.; Yang, Z.; Awais, Muhammad; Nawaz, Maria; Hayat, Tasawar

    2017-01-01

    Analysis has been conducted to present the generalized magnetic field effects on the flow of a Burgers' nanofluid over an inclined wall. Mathematical modelling for hydro-magnetics reveals that the term “σB02u/ρ” is for the Newtonian model whereas the generalized magnetic field term (as mentioned in Eq 4) is for the Burgers’ model which is incorporated in the current analysis to get the real insight of the problem for hydro-magnetics. Brownian motion and thermophoresis phenomenon are presented to analyze the nanofluidics for the non-Newtonian fluid. Mathematical analysis is completed in the presence of non-uniform heat generation/absorption. The constructed set of partial differential system is converted into coupled nonlinear ordinary differential system by employing the suitable transformations. Homotopy approach is employed to construct the analytical solutions which are shown graphically for sundr5y parameters including Deborah numbers, magnetic field, thermophoresis, Brownian motion and non-uniform heat generation/absorption. A comparative study is also presented showing the comparison of present results with an already published data. PMID:28045965

  5. Enhanced energy fluxes via phase precession in forced Burgers equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Brendan; Bustamante, Miguel; Buzzicotti, Michele; Biferale, Luca

    2016-11-01

    We present a study of phase dynamics in the non-linear forced Burgers' equation. We uncover a connection between energy flux across scales and the evolution of triad phase combinations in Fourier space. As this energy is dissipated at small scales, real-space shock structures are associated with entangled correlations amongst the phase precession dynamics and the amplitude evolution of triads in Fourier space. We compute precession frequencies of the triad phases, which show a non-Gaussian distribution with multiple peaks and fat tails, with significant correlation between precession frequencies and amplitude growth. The observed fat tails and non-zero precession frequencies are two key criteria for enhancing energy fluxes via precession resonance. We search for this resonance by varying the forcing strength and frequency and, additionally, by modifying the dimension of the underlying system via fractal Fourier decimation. Supported by COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology, Action MP1305) and SFI (Science Foundation Ireland, research Grant No. 12/IP/1491).

  6. Dry aging of beef; Review.

    PubMed

    Dashdorj, Dashmaa; Tripathi, Vinay Kumar; Cho, Soohyun; Kim, Younghoon; Hwang, Inho

    2016-01-01

    The present review has mainly focused on the specific parameters including aging (aging days, temperature, relative humidity, and air flow), eating quality (flavor, tenderness and juiciness), microbiological quality and economic (shrinkage, retail yields and cost) involved beef dry aging process. Dry aging is the process where beef carcasses or primal cuts are hanged and aged for 28 to 55 d under controlling environment conditions in a refrigerated room with 0° to 4 °C and with relative humidity of 75 to 80 %. However there are various opinions on dry aging procedures and purveyors of such products are passionate about their programs. Recently, there has been an increased interest in dry aging process by a wider array of purveyors and retailers in the many countries. Dry aging process is very costly because of high aging shrinkage (6 to15 %), trims loss (3 to 24 %), risk of contamination and the requirement of highest grades meat with. The packaging in highly moisture-permeable bag may positively impact on safety, quality and shelf stability of dry aged beef. The key effect of dry aging is the concentration of the flavor that can only be described as "dry-aged beef". But the contribution of flavor compounds of proteolysis and lipolysis to the cooked dry aged beef flavor is not fully known. Also there are limited scientific studies of aging parameters on the quality and palatability of dry aged beef.

  7. Honey inhibits lipid oxidation in ready-to-eat ground beef patties.

    PubMed

    Johnston, J E; Sepe, H A; Miano, C L; Brannan, R G; Alderton, A L

    2005-08-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the antioxidant capabilities of clover (CH) and wildflower honeys (WH) in delaying lipid oxidation in cooked and reheated ground beef patties stored in refrigerated and frozen states. CH and WH (5%, 10%, or 15% w/w) were each mixed separately into ground beef chuck (18% fat) and formed into 30g patties mixed with 1% salt (w/w). A control (CON) with no honey and a control with sodium tripolyphosphate (STP; 0.25% w/w) were used for comparison. Patties were cooked to 71°C, overwrapped with oxygen-permeable PVC film and either stored refrigerated (4°C) for 12 days or frozen (-18°C) for 45 days. Cook yield, pH and water activity were measured on day 0. On designated sampling days, patties were reheated to 71°C. Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) and lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH) were measured spectrophotometrically to assess lipid oxidation. TBARS and LOOH of ready-to-eat (RTE) ground beef patties containing either CH or WH were lower (P<0.01) than CON patties following storage; however, STP patties had lower TBARS values than honey-containing patties (P<0.01). WH and CH at 15% were equally effective in suppressing LOOH compared to STP in refrigerated and frozen patties. All honey concentrations improved cook yield, with 10% WH being more effective than STP. Both CH and WH delayed lipid oxidation in RTE ground beef patties stored at 4°C and -18°C, with WH decreasing LOOH formation in refrigerated patties as effectively as STP. Honey may be a natural alternative to phosphates to delay lipid oxidation.

  8. Dry Zones Around Frozen Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisbano, Caitlin; Nath, Saurabh; Boreyko, Jonathan; Nature-Inspired Fluids; Interfaces Team

    2015-11-01

    The saturation pressure of water vapor above supercooled water exceeds that above ice at the same temperature. A frozen droplet will therefore grow by harvesting water vapor from neighboring supercooled condensate, which has recently been demonstrated to be a primary mechanism of in-plane frost growth on hydrophobic surfaces. The underlying physics of this source-sink interaction is still poorly understood. In this work, a deposited water droplet is frozen on a dry hydrophobic surface initially held above the dew point. We demonstrate that when the surface is then cooled beneath the dew point, the frozen droplet harvests nearby water vapor in the air. This results in an annular dry zone that forms between the frozen droplet and the forming supercooled condensation. For a given ambient temperature and humidity, the length of the dry zone varied strongly with surface temperature and weakly with droplet volume. The dependence of the dry zone on surface temperature is due to the fact that the vapor pressure gradients between the ambient and the surface and between the liquid and frozen water are both functions of temperature.

  9. Effect of grilling and baking on physicochemical and textural properties of tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) fish burger.

    PubMed

    Bainy, Eduarda Molardi; Bertan, Larissa Canhadas; Corazza, Marcos Lucio; Lenzi, Marcelo Kaminski

    2015-08-01

    The influence of two common cooking methods, grilling and baking, on chemical composition, water retention, fat retention, cooking yield, diameter reduction, expressible water, color and mechanical texture of tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) fish burgers was investigated. Texture analyses were performed using a Warner-Bratzler test. The fish burger had a softer texture with a lower shear force than other meat products reported in the literature. There were no significant differences in proximate composition, diameter reduction, fat retention and expressible water between the grilled and oven-baked fish burgers. Cooking methods did not affect the cooking times and cooking rates. Warner-Bratzler parameters and color were significantly influenced by the cooking method. Grilling contributed to a shear force and work of shearing increase due to the lower cooking yield and water retention. Raw burgers had the highest L* (69.13 ± 0.96) and lowest b* (17.50 ± 0.75) values. Results indicated that baking yielded a product with better cooking characteristics, such as a desired softer texture with lower shear values (4.01 ± 0.54) and increased water retention (95.82 ± 0.77). Additionally, the baked fish burgers were lighter (higher L*) and less red (lower a*) than the grilled ones.

  10. A Preliminary Study of the Burgers Equation with Symbolic Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derickson, Russell G.; Pielke, Roger A.

    2000-07-01

    A novel approach based on recursive symbolic computation is introduced for the approximate analytic solution of the Burgers equation. Once obtained, appropriate numerical values can be inserted into the symbolic solution to explore parametric variations. The solution is valid for both inviscid and viscous cases, covering the range of Reynolds number from 500 to infinity, whereas current direct numerical simulation (DNS) methods are limited to Reynolds numbers no greater than 4000. What further distinguishes the symbolic approach from numerical and traditional analytic techniques is the ability to reveal and examine direct nonlinear interactions between waves, including the interplay between inertia and viscosity. Thus, preliminary efforts suggest that symbolic computation may be quite effective in unveiling the “anatomy” of the myriad interactions that underlie turbulent behavior. However, due to the tendency of nonlinear symbolic operations to produce combinatorial explosion, future efforts will require the development of improved filtering processes to select and eliminate computations leading to negligible high order terms. Indeed, the initial symbolic computations present the character of turbulence as a problem in combinatorics. At present, results are limited in time evolution, but reveal the beginnings of the well-known “saw tooth” waveform that occurs in the inviscid case (i.e., Re=∞). Future efforts will explore more fully developed 1-D flows and investigate the potential to extend symbolic computations to 2-D and 3-D. Potential applications include the development of improved subgrid scale (SGS) parameterizations for large eddy simulation (LES) models, and studies that complement DNS in exploring fundamental aspects of turbulent flow behavior.

  11. Group analysis of general Burgers-Korteweg-de Vries equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opanasenko, Stanislav; Bihlo, Alexander; Popovych, Roman O.

    2017-08-01

    The complete group classification problem for the class of (1+1)-dimensional rth order general variable-coefficient Burgers-Korteweg-de Vries equations is solved for arbitrary values of r greater than or equal to two. We find the equivalence groupoids of this class and its various subclasses obtained by gauging equation coefficients with equivalence transformations. Showing that this class and certain gauged subclasses are normalized in the usual sense, we reduce the complete group classification problem for the entire class to that for the selected maximally gauged subclass, and it is the latter problem that is solved efficiently using the algebraic method of group classification. Similar studies are carried out for the two subclasses of equations with coefficients depending at most on the time or space variable, respectively. Applying an original technique, we classify Lie reductions of equations from the class under consideration with respect to its equivalence group. Studying alternative gauges for equation coefficients with equivalence transformations allows us not only to justify the choice of the most appropriate gauge for the group classification but also to construct for the first time classes of differential equations with nontrivial generalized equivalence group such that equivalence-transformation components corresponding to equation variables locally depend on nonconstant arbitrary elements of the class. For the subclass of equations with coefficients depending at most on the time variable, which is normalized in the extended generalized sense, we explicitly construct its extended generalized equivalence group in a rigorous way. The new notion of effective generalized equivalence group is introduced.

  12. Steady-state Burgers turbulence with large-scale forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Gotoh, T.; Kraichnan, R.H.

    1998-11-01

    Steady-state Burgers turbulence supported by white-in-time random forcing at low wave numbers is studied analytically and by computer simulation. The peak of the probability distribution function (pdf) Q({xi}) of velocity gradient {xi} is at {xi}=O({xi}{sub f}), where {xi}{sub f} is a forcing parameter. It is concluded that Q({xi}) displays four asymptotic regimes at Reynolds number R{gt}1: (A) Q({xi}){approximately}{xi}{sub f}{sup {minus}2}{xi}exp({minus}{xi}{sup 3}/3{xi}{sub f}{sup 3}) for {xi}{gt}{xi}{sub f} (reduction of large positive {xi} by stretching); (B) Q({xi}){approximately}{xi}{sub f}{sup 2}{vert_bar}{xi}{vert_bar}{sup {minus}3} for {xi}{sub f}{lt}{minus}{xi}{lt}R{sup 1/2}{xi}{sub f} (transient inviscid steepening of negative {xi}); (C) Q({xi}){approximately}{vert_bar}R{xi}{vert_bar}{sup {minus}1} for R{sup 1/2}{xi}{sub f}{lt}{minus}{xi}{lt}R{xi}{sub f} (shoulders of mature shocks); (D) very rapid decay of Q for {minus}{xi}{ge}O(R{xi}{sub f}) (interior of mature shocks). The typical shock width is O(1/Rk{sub f}). If R{sup {minus}1/2}{gt}rk{sub f}{gt}R{sup {minus}1}, the pdf of velocity difference across an interval r is found to be P({Delta}u,r){proportional_to}r{sup {minus}1}Q({Delta}u/r) throughout regimes A and B and into the middle of C. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Microheterogeneity in frozen protein solutions.

    PubMed

    Twomey, Alan; Kurata, Kosaku; Nagare, Yutaka; Takamatsu, Hiroshi; Aksan, Alptekin

    2015-06-20

    In frozen and lyophilized systems, the biological to be stabilized (e.g. therapeutic protein, biomarker, drug-delivery vesicle) and the cryo-/lyo-protectant should be co-localized for successful stabilization. During freezing and drying, many factors cause physical separation of the biological from the cryo-/lyo-protectant, called microheterogeneity (MH), which may result in poor stabilization efficiency. We have developed a novel technique that utilized confocal Raman microspectroscopy in combination with counter-gradient freezing to evaluate the effect of a wide range of freezing temperatures (-20frozen formulation in only a few experiments. The freezing experiments conducted with a model system (albumin and trehalose) showed the presence of different degrees of MH in the freeze-concentrated liquid (FCL) in all solutions tested. Mainly, albumin tended to accumulate near the ice interface, where it was physically separated from the cryoprotectant. In frozen 10wt% trehalose solutions, heterogeneity in FCL was relatively low at any TF. In frozen 20wt% trehalose solutions, the optimum albumin to trehalose ratio in the FCL can only be ensured if the solution was frozen within a narrow range of temperatures (-16frozen and stable formulations and freezing protocols for biological as MH is presumed to directly impact stability.

  14. Microheterogeneity in Frozen Protein Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Twomey, Alan; Kurata, Kosaku; Nagare, Yutaka; Takamatsu, Hiroshi; Aksan, Alptekin

    2015-01-01

    In frozen and lyophilized systems, the biological to be stabilized (e.g. therapeutic protein, biomarker, drug-delivery vesicle) and the cryo-/lyoprotectant should be co-localized for successful stabilization. During freezing and drying, many factors cause physical separation of the biological from the cryo-/lyoprotectant, called microheterogeneity (MH), which may result in poor stabilization efficiency. We have developed a novel technique that utilized confocal Raman microspectroscopy in combination with counter-gradient freezing to evaluate the effect of a wide range of freezing temperatures (−20 < TF < 0°C) on the MH generated within a frozen formulation in only a few experiments. The freezing experiments conducted with a model system (albumin and trehalose) showed the presence of different degrees of MH in the freeze-concentrated liquid (FCL) in all solutions tested. Mainly, albumin tended to accumulate near the ice interface, where it was physically separated from the cryoprotectant. In frozen 10 wt% trehalose solutions, heterogeneity in FCL was relatively low at any TF. In frozen 20 wt% trehalose solutions, the optimum albumin to trehalose ratio in the FCL can only be ensured if the solution was frozen within a narrow range of temperatures (−16 < TF < −10°C). In the 30 wt% trehalose solutions, freezing within a much more narrow range (−12 < TF < −10°C) was needed to ensure a fairly homogeneous FCL. The method developed here will be helpful for the development of uniformly frozen and stable formulations and freezing protocols for biological as MH is presumed to directly impact stability. PMID:25888798

  15. Pulse Transmission through Frozen Silt,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    THROUGH FROZEN SILT 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(s) 8. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(e) Steven A. Arcone 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE (When Dots Entered) PREFACE This report was prepared by Dr. Steven A. Arcone , Research Geophysicist, Snow and Ice...GRA&I A w ,.,.TAB L u :,nnr-ane’ed n --." ~~~i f teation--- - ! i . Avaii and/orC in I+ PULSE TRANSMISSION THROUGH FROZEN SILT Steven A. Arcone

  16. [Rapid frozen sections in neuropathology].

    PubMed

    Haybaeck, J; von Campe, G; Hainfellner, J A

    2012-09-01

    Neuropathological evaluation of frozen sections requires a) special expertise in neuropathological specimen assessment and neurooncology as well as b) a trustful and open communication culture with the neurosurgeons. In addition to frozen sections, cytological examinations of smear and touch preparations as supporting methods are available to reach a correct diagnosis: these additional methods should therefore be performed whenever possible. Besides evaluation of biopsy specimens, appraisal of resection specimens and resection margin controls are of high clinical relevance. In the case of diffusely infiltrating central nervous system (CNS) neoplasms, in particular gliomas, resection margin control is often not feasible in contrast to other types of solid tumor.

  17. 9 CFR 319.100 - Corned beef.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... head meat and beef heart meat may be used to the extent of 5 percent of the meat ingredient in... beef heart meat is used in preparation of this product, its presence shall be reflected in the statement of ingredients required by part 317 of this subchapter. The application of curing solution to beef...

  18. 9 CFR 319.100 - Corned beef.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Corned beef. 319.100 Section 319.100... Corned beef. “Corned Beef” shall be prepared from beef briskets, navels, clods, middle ribs, rounds... A or Subchapter B. Canned product labeled “Corned Beef” shall be prepared so that the weight of...

  19. Exact solution of an electroosmotic flow for generalized Burgers fluid in cylindrical domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Masood; Farooq, Asma; Khan, Waqar Azeem; Hussain, Mazhar

    The present paper reports a theoretical study of the dynamics of an electroosmotic flow (EOF) in cylindrical domain. The Cauchy momentum equation is first simplified by incorporating the electrostatic body force in the electric double layer and the generalized Burgers fluid constitutive model. The electric potential distribution is given by the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation. After solving the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation, the Cauchy momentum equation with electrostatic body force is solved analytically by using the temporal Fourier and finite Hankel transforms. The effects of important involved parameters are examined and presented graphically. The results obtained reveal that the magnitude of velocity increases with increase of the Debye-Huckel and electrokinetic parameters. Further, it is shown that the results presented for generalized Burgers fluid are quite general so that results for the Burgers, Oldroyd-B, Maxwell and Newtonian fluids can be obtained as limiting cases.

  20. Complex PT-symmetric nonlinear Schrödinger equation and Burgers equation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhenya

    2013-04-28

    The complex -symmetric nonlinear wave models have drawn much attention in recent years since the complex -symmetric extensions of the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation were presented in 2007. In this review, we focus on the study of the complex -symmetric nonlinear Schrödinger equation and Burgers equation. First of all, we briefly introduce the basic property of complex symmetry. We then report on exact solutions of one- and two-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equations (known as the Gross-Pitaevskii equation in Bose-Einstein condensates) with several complex -symmetric potentials. Finally, some complex -symmetric extension principles are used to generate some complex -symmetric nonlinear wave equations starting from both -symmetric (e.g. the KdV equation) and non- -symmetric (e.g. the Burgers equation) nonlinear wave equations. In particular, we discuss exact solutions of some representative ones of the complex -symmetric Burgers equation in detail.

  1. Fractional Burgers equation with nonlinear non-locality: Spectral vanishing viscosity and local discontinuous Galerkin methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Zhiping; Karniadakis, George Em

    2017-05-01

    We consider the viscous Burgers equation with a fractional nonlinear term as a model involving non-local nonlinearities in conservation laws, which, surprisingly, has an analytical solution obtained by a fractional extension of the Hopf-Cole transformation. We use this model and its inviscid limit to develop stable spectral and discontinuous Galerkin spectral element methods by employing the concept of spectral vanishing viscosity (SVV). For the global spectral method, SVV is very effective and the computational cost is O (N2), which is essentially the same as for the standard Burgers equation. We also develop a local discontinuous Galerkin (LDG) spectral element method to improve the accuracy around discontinuities, and we again stabilize the LDG method with the SVV operator. Finally, we solve numerically the inviscid fractional Burgers equation both with the spectral and the spectral element LDG methods. We study systematically the stability and convergence of both methods and determine the effectiveness of each method for different parameters.

  2. Simulation of the Burgers equation by NMR quantum-information processing

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zhiying; Cory, David G.; Yepez, Jeffrey

    2006-10-15

    We report on the implementation of Burgers equation as a type-II quantum computation on a NMR quantum-information processor. Since the flow field evolving under the Burgers equation develops sharp features over time, this is a better test of liquid-state NMR implementations of type-II quantum computers than the previous examples using the diffusion equation. In particular, we show that Fourier approximations used in the encoding step are not the dominant error. Small systematic errors in the collision operator accumulate and swamp all other errors. We propose, and demonstrate, that the accumulation of this error can be avoided to a large extent by replacing the single collision operator with a set of operators with random errors and similar fidelities. Experiments have been implemented on 16 two-qubit sites for eight successive time steps for the Burgers equation.

  3. Analytical study on the SGS force around an elliptic Burgers vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Hiromichi

    2016-11-01

    The subgrid-scale (SGS) force around an elliptic Burgers vortex is analytically examined. In turbulence, there are a lot of vortex-tubes whose cross sections are known to be approximated as the ellipse. In this study, the biaxial elliptic Burgers vortex is produced by adding the compressive and extensional background straining flow to the conventional Burgers vortex. By using a filtering operation, we revealed that the energy transfer by the Reynolds stress term applying the Bardina model exhibits negative correlation to that by the true SGS stress term. However, it has been recently reported that a combination of the Bardina Reynolds term and the eddy viscosity model gives good performance even for the coarse LES of turbulent channel flows. In order to understand that, we discuss some SGS forces: by the true SGS stress tensor, by the eddy viscosity model, by the modified Leonard term and by the Bardina Reynolds term. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 26420122.

  4. Another Look at the Burger Court and Freedom of Expression: A Textual Approach to First Amendment Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walden, Ruth

    An analysis of the Supreme Court's First Amendment decisions under Chief Justice Warren Burger does not indicate any pattern of repudiation of doctrinal advances made by earlier courts. Like its predecessors, the Burger Court has dealt most frequently with First Amendment cases requiring definition and interpretation of government abridgement. In…

  5. The Legacy of the Burger Court and the Schools, 1969-1986. NOLPE Monograph/Book Series No. 41.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vacca, Richard S.; Hudgins, H. C., Jr.

    This book is limited to a study of the education opinions of the Supreme Court during the time that Warren Earl Burger served as Chief Justice. Over 100 opinions having direct bearing on education were issued during the Burger years, a total greater than in the entire Court's history. The first chapter presents the history of the establishment of…

  6. Fronts in randomly advected and heterogeneous media and nonuniversality of Burgers turbulence: theory and numerics.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Jackson R; Kerstein, Alan R

    2008-11-01

    A recently established mathematical equivalence-between weakly perturbed Huygens fronts (e.g., flames in weak turbulence or geometrical-optics wave fronts in slightly nonuniform media) and the inviscid limit of white-noise-driven Burgers turbulence-motivates theoretical and numerical estimates of Burgers-turbulence properties for specific types of white-in-time forcing. Existing mathematical relations between Burgers turbulence and the statistical mechanics of directed polymers, allowing use of the replica method, are exploited to obtain systematic upper bounds on the Burgers energy density, corresponding to the ground-state binding energy of the directed polymer and the speedup of the Huygens front. The results are complementary to previous studies of both Burgers turbulence and directed polymers, which have focused on universal scaling properties instead of forcing-dependent parameters. The upper-bound formula can be heuristically understood in terms of renormalization of a different kind from that previously used in combustion models, and also shows that the burning velocity of an idealized turbulent flame does not diverge with increasing Reynolds number at fixed turbulence intensity, a conclusion that applies even to strong turbulence. Numerical simulations of the one-dimensional inviscid Burgers equation using a Lagrangian finite-element method confirm that the theoretical upper bounds are sharp within about 15% for various forcing spectra (corresponding to various two-dimensional random media). These computations provide a quantitative test of the replica method. The inferred nonuniversality (spectrum dependence) of the front speedup is of direct importance for combustion modeling.

  7. Determination of Burgers vectors in close-packed metals using g.b = 2 contrast.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kestenbach, H.-J.; Hren, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    Reexamination of dislocation images giving double contrast in the electron microscope for g.b = 2 as a possible means for Burgers vector determinations. In fcc foils which have been cut parallel to an active slip plane, the g.b = 2 criterion provides a quick positive Burgers vector analysis which can be carried out during observation. The method is also applicable to basal dislocations in hcp. A comparison between calculated two-beam profiles and experimental images in aluminum is discussed, and several commonly observed characteristics of g.b = 2 contrast are described.

  8. The Statistics of Burgers Turbulence Initialized with Fractional Brownian Noise Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Reade

    The statistics of the solution to the inviscid Burgers equation are investigated when the initial velocity potential is fractional Brownian motion. Using the theory of large deviations for Gaussian processes, we characterize the tails of the probability distribution functions (PDFs) of the velocity, the distance between shocks, and the shock strength. These PDFs are shown to decay like ``stretched'' exponentials of the form . Our method of proof can also be used to extend these results to a much larger class of Gaussian potentials. This work generalizes the results of Avellaneda and E [2, 3] on the inviscid Burgers equation with white-noise initial data.

  9. Determination of Burgers vectors in close-packed metals using g.b = 2 contrast.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kestenbach, H.-J.; Hren, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    Reexamination of dislocation images giving double contrast in the electron microscope for g.b = 2 as a possible means for Burgers vector determinations. In fcc foils which have been cut parallel to an active slip plane, the g.b = 2 criterion provides a quick positive Burgers vector analysis which can be carried out during observation. The method is also applicable to basal dislocations in hcp. A comparison between calculated two-beam profiles and experimental images in aluminum is discussed, and several commonly observed characteristics of g.b = 2 contrast are described.

  10. Periodic boundary conditions for KdV-Burgers equation on an interval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samokhin, Alexey

    2017-03-01

    For the KdV-Burgers equation on a finite interval the development of a regular profile starting from a constant one under a periodic perturbation on the boundary is studied. The equation describes a medium which is both dissipative and dispersive. For an appropriate combination of dispersion and dissipation the asymptotic profile looks like a periodical chain of shock fronts with a decreasing amplitude (similarly to the Burgers equation case). But due to dispersion each such front is followed by increasing oscillation leading to the next shock-like the ninth wave in rough seas. The development of such a profile is preceded by an initial shock of a constant height.

  11. Scaling Laws for the Multidimensional Burgers Equation with Quadratic External Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonenko, N. N.; Ruiz-Medina, M. D.

    2006-07-01

    The reordering of the multidimensional exponential quadratic operator in coordinate-momentum space (see X. Wang, C.H. Oh and L.C. Kwek (1998). J. Phys. A.: Math. Gen. 31:4329-4336) is applied to derive an explicit formulation of the solution to the multidimensional heat equation with quadratic external potential and random initial conditions. The solution to the multidimensional Burgers equation with quadratic external potential under Gaussian strongly dependent scenarios is also obtained via the Hopf-Cole transformation. The limiting distributions of scaling solutions to the multidimensional heat and Burgers equations with quadratic external potential are then obtained under such scenarios.

  12. Asymptotic behavior for the viscous Burgers equation with a stationary source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Jaywan; Kwon, Ohsang

    2016-10-01

    Long-time asymptotic behavior for the viscous Burgers equation on the real line is considered. When there is a non-negative and compactly supported Radon measure as a stationary source, we prove that solutions of the viscous Burgers equation converge to a positive, bounded, and nondecreasing steady state by finding an almost optimal convergence order. The non-integrability of the steady state only allows local convergence on compact subsets, hence a Véron-type argument must be modified by adopting a proper weight function.

  13. Differential abundance of sarcoplasmic proteome explains animal effect on beef Longissimus lumborum color stability.

    PubMed

    Canto, Anna C V C S; Suman, Surendranath P; Nair, Mahesh N; Li, Shuting; Rentfrow, Gregg; Beach, Carol M; Silva, Teofilo J P; Wheeler, Tommy L; Shackelford, Steven D; Grayson, Adria; McKeith, Russell O; King, D Andy

    2015-04-01

    The sarcoplasmic proteome of beef Longissimus lumborum demonstrating animal-to-animal variation in color stability was examined to correlate proteome profile with color. Longissimus lumborum (36 h post-mortem) muscles were obtained from 73 beef carcasses, aged for 13 days, and fabricated to 2.5-cm steaks. One steak was allotted to retail display, and another was immediately vacuum packaged and frozen at -80°C. Aerobically packaged steaks were stored under display, and color was evaluated on days 0 and 11. The steaks were ranked based on redness and color stability on day 11, and ten color-stable and ten color-labile carcasses were identified. Sarcoplasmic proteome of frozen steaks from the selected carcasses was analyzed. Nine proteins were differentially abundant in color-stable and color-labile steaks. Three glycolytic enzymes (phosphoglucomutase-1, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and pyruvate kinase M2) were over-abundant in color-stable steaks and positively correlated (P<0.05) to redness and color stability. These results indicated that animal variations in proteome contribute to differences in beef color.

  14. Acid phosphatase activity and color changes in consumer-style griddle-cooked ground beef patties.

    PubMed

    Lyon, B G; Davis, C E; Windham, W R; Lyon, C E

    2001-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Food and Drug Administration have issued temperature requirements to help consumers cook beef patty products that are free of pathogens. Verification of end-point temperature (EPT) is needed in cooked meat products due to concerns over outbreaks of Escherichia coli O157:H7. Acid phosphatase (ACP) activity was studied as a potential method for determination of EPT in ground beef patties cooked nonfrozen, patties frozen 7 days and thawed at room temperature 4 h in a refrigerator or by microwave, and patties made from ground beef frozen in store packages, then thawed in a refrigerator overnight. Pressed-out meat juices were analyzed from patties (n = 314) cooked to 57.2 degrees C (135 degrees F). 65.6 degrees C (150 degrees F), 71.1 degrees C (160 degrees F), and 79.4 degrees C (175 degrees F) target EPTs. Expressed meat juice and internal meat patty color decreased in redness as EPT increased. Freezing whole packs with slow refrigerator or room temperature thawing caused significantly greater loss of redness in expressed cooked meat juice than did other handling methods. Log10 ACP had a significant linear (R2 = 0.99) response to EPT. Results show that the 3- to 5-min ACP test could be used to verify EPT in griddle-cooked hamburger patties.

  15. Resolving disputes over frozen embryos.

    PubMed

    Robertson, J A

    1989-01-01

    The relation between respect for family and reproductive choice and use of IVF technology is in dispute in recent legal cases on the disposition of frozen embryos. Couples in IVF programs should be encouraged to stipulate in advance binding instructions regarding the disposition of such embryos.

  16. Frozen Scope and Grammatical Optimization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The literature on quantifier scope has repeatedly observed that some otherwise expected permutations of scope taking elements are unavailable. Various methods have been proffered explaining these facts. This thesis aims to unify three disparate areas where the scope of operators seems to be frozen: the interaction of universal quantifiers with…

  17. 'Frozen finger' in anal fissures.

    PubMed

    Chintamani; Tandon, Megha; Khandelwal, Rohan

    2009-10-01

    Acute anal fissures are usually managed by various invasive and non-invasive modalities ranging from simple lifestyle changes to chemical and surgical sphincterotomies. Frozen finger, prepared using a water-filled ordinary rubber glove, was successfully used in one hundred patients, thus providing a cost-effective and simple solution to the problem.

  18. Frozen Scope and Grammatical Optimization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The literature on quantifier scope has repeatedly observed that some otherwise expected permutations of scope taking elements are unavailable. Various methods have been proffered explaining these facts. This thesis aims to unify three disparate areas where the scope of operators seems to be frozen: the interaction of universal quantifiers with…

  19. Autophagy during beef aging

    PubMed Central

    García-Macia, Marina; Sierra, Verónica; Palanca, Ana; Vega-Naredo, Ignacio; de Gonzalo-Calvo, David; Rodríguez-González, Susana; Oliván, Mamen; Coto-Montes, Ana

    2013-01-01

    The conversion of muscle into meat is a complex process of major concern for meat scientists due to its influence on the final meat quality. The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of autophagic processes in the conversion of muscle into meat. Our findings demonstrated, for the first time, the occurrence of autophagic processes in the muscle tissue at early postmortem period (2 h to 24 h) in both beef breeds studied (Asturiana de los Valles and Asturiana de la Montaña) showing significant time-scale differences between breeds, which could indicate a role of this process in meat maturation. These breeds have different physiological features: while Asturiana de los Valles is a meat-specialized breed showing high growth rate, an elevated proportion of white fibers in the muscle and low intramuscular fat level, Asturiana de la Montaña is a small- to medium-sized rustic breed adapted to less-favored areas, showing more red fibers in the muscle and a high intramuscular fat content. PMID:24225649

  20. Autophagy during beef aging.

    PubMed

    García-Macia, Marina; Sierra, Verónica; Palanca, Ana; Vega-Naredo, Ignacio; de Gonzalo-Calvo, David; Rodríguez-González, Susana; Oliván, Mamen; Coto-Montes, Ana

    2014-01-01

    The conversion of muscle into meat is a complex process of major concern for meat scientists due to its influence on the final meat quality. The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of autophagic processes in the conversion of muscle into meat. Our findings demonstrated, for the first time, the occurrence of autophagic processes in the muscle tissue at early postmortem period (2 h to 24 h) in both beef breeds studied (Asturiana de los Valles and Asturiana de la Montaña) showing significant time-scale differences between breeds, which could indicate a role of this process in meat maturation. These breeds have different physiological features: while Asturiana de los Valles is a meat-specialized breed showing high growth rate, an elevated proportion of white fibers in the muscle and low intramuscular fat level, Asturiana de la Montaña is a small- to medium-sized rustic breed adapted to less-favored areas, showing more red fibers in the muscle and a high intramuscular fat content.

  1. The Eccentric Behavior of Nearly Frozen Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweetser, Theodore H.; Vincent, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Frozen orbits are orbits which have only short-period changes in their mean eccentricity and argument of periapse, so that they basically keep a fixed orientation within their plane of motion. Nearly frozen orbits are those whose eccentricity and argument of periapse have values close to those of a frozen orbit. We call them "nearly" frozen because their eccentricity vector (a vector whose polar coordinates are eccentricity and argument of periapse) will stay within a bounded distance from the frozen orbit eccentricity vector, circulating around it over time. For highly inclined orbits around the Earth, this distance is effectively constant over time. Furthermore, frozen orbit eccentricity values are low enough that these orbits are essentially eccentric (i.e., off center) circles, so that nearly frozen orbits around Earth are bounded above and below by frozen orbits.

  2. 7 CFR 58.327 - Frozen cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Material § 58.327 Frozen cream. To produce frozen cream eligible for official certification, the quality...

  3. 7 CFR 58.327 - Frozen cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Material § 58.327 Frozen cream. To produce frozen cream eligible for official certification, the quality...

  4. 7 CFR 58.327 - Frozen cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Material § 58.327 Frozen cream. To produce frozen cream eligible for official certification, the quality...

  5. 7 CFR 58.327 - Frozen cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Material § 58.327 Frozen cream. To produce frozen cream eligible for official certification, the quality...

  6. Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, salmonellae, and Campylobacter jejuni in raw ground beef by gamma irradiation.

    PubMed Central

    Clavero, M R; Monk, J D; Beuchat, L R; Doyle, M P; Brackett, R E

    1994-01-01

    Raw ground beef patties inoculated with stationary-phase cells of Escherichia coli O157:H7, salmonellae, or Campylobacter jejuni were subjected to gamma irradiation (60Co) treatment, with doses ranging from 0 to 2.52 kGy. The influence of two levels of fat (8 to 14% [low fat] and 27 to 28% [high fat]) and temperature (frozen [-17 to -15 degrees C] and refrigerated [3 to 5 degrees C]) on the inactivation of each pathogen by irradiation was investigated. In ascending order of irradiation resistance, the D10 values ranged from 0.175 to 0.235 kGy (C. jejuni), from 0.241 to 0.307 kGy (E. coli O157:H7), and from 0.618 to 0.800 kGy (salmonellae). Statistical analysis revealed that E. coli O157:H7 had a significantly (P < 0.05) higher D10 value when irradiated at -17 to -15 degrees C than when irradiated at 3 to 5 degrees C. Regardless of the temperature during irradiation, the level of fat did not have a significant effect on the D10 value. Salmonellae behaved like E. coli O157:H7 in low-fat beef, but temperature did not have a significant effect when the pathogen was irradiated in high-fat ground beef. Significantly higher D10 values were calculated for C. jejuni irradiated in frozen than in refrigerated low-fat beef. C. jejuni was more resistant to irradiation in low-fat beef than in high-fat beef when treatment was at -17 to -15 degrees C. Regardless of the fat level and temperature during inactivation, these pathogens were highly sensitive to gamma irradiation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8031098

  7. Application of cranberry concentrate (Vaccinium macrocarpon) to control Escherichia coli O157:H7 in ground beef and its antimicrobial mechanism related to the downregulated slp, hdeA and cfa.

    PubMed

    Wu, Vivian C H; Qiu, Xujian; de los Reyes, Benildo G; Lin, Chih-Sheng; Pan, Yingjie

    2009-02-01

    The possible use of cranberry concentrate (CC) as a natural food preservative was studied by examining its antimicrobial effect on the growth of Escherichia coli O157:H7 inoculated in ground beef, its organoleptical effect on beef patties, and its antimicrobial mechanism on the gene regulation level. Inoculated ground beef was added with CC and stored at 4 degrees C for 5 days. Bacteria were detected on day 0, 1, 3, and 5. Cranberry concentrate (2.5%, 5%, and 7.5% w/w) reduced total aerobic bacteria 1.5 log, 2.1 log, and 2.7 log CFU/g and E. coli O157:H7 0.4 log, 0.7 log, and 2.4 log CFU/g, respectively, when compared to the control on day 5. Fifty panelists evaluated the burgers supplemented with CC. No differences in appearance, flavor, and taste were found among burgers with 0%, 2.5%, and 5% CC. The expression of E. coli O157:H7 cyclopropane fatty acyl phospholipid synthase (cfa), hypothetical protein (hdeA), outer membrane porin protein C (ompC), hyperosmotically inducible periplasmic protein (osmY), and outer membrane protein induced after carbon starvation (slp) genes with or without CC (2.5% v/v) treatment was investigated by quantitative real-time PCR. Compared to the control, slp, hdeA, and cfa were markedly downregulated, ompC was slightly downregulated, while osmY was slightly affected.

  8. 7 CFR 58.327 - Frozen cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Frozen cream. 58.327 Section 58.327 Agriculture... Material § 58.327 Frozen cream. To produce frozen cream eligible for official certification, the quality of the cream used shall meet the requirements of cream acceptable for the manufacture of U.S. Grade AA...

  9. Evaluation of combined effects of ageing period and freezing rate on quality attributes of beef loins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yuan H Brad; Liesse, Charlotte; Kemp, Robert; Balan, Prabhu

    2015-12-01

    The objective of our study was to evaluate the combined effects of ageing period and different freezing rates on meat quality attributes of beef loins. Pairs of loins (M. longissimus at 1 day post mortem) from 12 carcasses were divided into four equal portions and randomly assigned to four ageing/freezing treatments (aged only, frozen only, and 3 or 4 weeks ageing at -1.5°C then frozen). Two freezing methods (fast freezing by calcium chloride immersion or slow freezing by air freezer at -18°C) were applied to the loin sections. Fast freezing had no effect on shear force (P>0.05), but significantly improved the water-holding capacity of the aged/frozen loins by reducing purge and drip losses. Ageing-then-freezing significantly improved shear force values of loins compared to both the aged only and frozen only loins. These observations suggest that fast freezing will add more value to the aged/frozen/thawed meat by minimising the amount of water-loss due to the freezing/thawing process.

  10. 9 CFR 319.81 - Roast beef parboiled and steam roasted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... tissues have been removed, and beef heart meat, exclusive of the heart cap may be used individually or... “Roast Beef Parboiled and Steam Roasted.” When beef cheek meat, beef head meat, or beef heart meat is...

  11. New Iterative Method for Fractional Gas Dynamics and Coupled Burger's Equations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the approximate analytical solutions to solve the nonlinear gas dynamics and coupled Burger's equations with fractional time derivative. By using initial values, the explicit solutions of the equations are solved by using a reliable algorithm. Numerical results show that the new iterative method is easy to implement and accurate when applied to time-fractional partial differential equations. PMID:25884018

  12. New iterative method for fractional gas dynamics and coupled Burger's equations.

    PubMed

    Al-Luhaibi, Mohamed S

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the approximate analytical solutions to solve the nonlinear gas dynamics and coupled Burger's equations with fractional time derivative. By using initial values, the explicit solutions of the equations are solved by using a reliable algorithm. Numerical results show that the new iterative method is easy to implement and accurate when applied to time-fractional partial differential equations.

  13. A control problem for Burgers' equation with bounded input/output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, John A.; Kang, Sungkwon

    1990-01-01

    A stabilization problem for Burgers' equation is considered. Using linearization, various controllers are constructed which minimize certain weighted energy functionals. These controllers produce the desired degree of stability for the closed-loop nonlinear system. A numerical scheme for computing the feedback gain functional is developed and several numerical experiments are performed to show the theoretical results.

  14. Exact solutions and conservation laws of the system of two-dimensional viscous Burgers equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulwahhab, Muhammad Alim

    2016-10-01

    Fluid turbulence is one of the phenomena that has been studied extensively for many decades. Due to its huge practical importance in fluid dynamics, various models have been developed to capture both the indispensable physical quality and the mathematical structure of turbulent fluid flow. Among the prominent equations used for gaining in-depth insight of fluid turbulence is the two-dimensional Burgers equations. Its solutions have been studied by researchers through various methods, most of which are numerical. Being a simplified form of the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations and its wide range of applicability in various fields of science and engineering, development of computationally efficient methods for the solution of the two-dimensional Burgers equations is still an active field of research. In this study, Lie symmetry method is used to perform detailed analysis on the system of two-dimensional Burgers equations. Optimal system of one-dimensional subalgebras up to conjugacy is derived and used to obtain distinct exact solutions. These solutions not only help in understanding the physical effects of the model problem but also, can serve as benchmarks for constructing algorithms and validation of numerical solutions of the system of Burgers equations under consideration at finite Reynolds numbers. Independent and nontrivial conserved vectors are also constructed.

  15. The Warren Court and the Burger Court: Some Comparisons of Education-Related Decisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faber, Charles F.

    1981-01-01

    Compares the records of the Warren Court and the Burger Court on education-related cases concerning religion and the schools, teachers' loyalty, due process and racial segregation, freedom of expression, civil rights, and equal protection under the law. Reports the voting record of individual justices. (Author/MLF)

  16. Comment on ``Connection between the Burgers equation with an elastic forcing term and a stochastic process''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbaczewski, Piotr

    2006-08-01

    In the above mentioned paper by E. Moreau and O. Vallée [Phys. Rev. E 73, 016112 (2006)], the one-dimensional Burgers equation with an elastic (attractive) forcing term has been claimed to be connected with the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. We point out that this connection is valid only in the case of repulsive forcing.

  17. Transformation of AUTO-BÄCKLUND Type for Hyperbolic Generalization of Burgers Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutafina, Ekaterina V.

    2009-12-01

    We consider the hyperbolic generalization of Burgers equation with polynomial source term. The transformation of auto-B\\"{a}cklund type was found. Application of the results is shown in the examples, where the pair of two stationary solutions produces kink and bi-kink solutions.

  18. Combined effect of MAP and active compounds on fresh blue fish burger.

    PubMed

    Del Nobile, M A; Corbo, M R; Speranza, B; Sinigaglia, M; Conte, A; Caroprese, M

    2009-11-15

    The combined effects of three essential oils [thymol, lemon extract and grapefruit seed extract (GFSE)] and modified atmosphere packaging conditions (MAP) on quality retention of blue fish burgers was studied and discussed. In particular, samples were packaged in air and in three different gas mix compositions: 30:40:30 O(2):CO(2):N(2), 50:50 O(2):CO(2) and 5:95 O(2):CO(2). During a 28-day storage period at 4 degrees C, the nutritional, microbiological and sensorial quality of the packed products was assessed. The potential development of biogenic amines was also evaluated. The obtained results highlight the possibility to improve the microbial quality of blue fish burgers by using very small amount of thymol (110ppm), GFSE (100ppm) and lemon extract (120ppm) in combination with MAP. Based primarily on microbiological results, the combined use of the tested natural preservatives and a packaging system characterized by a high CO(2)-concentration, was able to guarantee the microbial acceptability of fish burgers until the 28th day of storage at 4 degrees C. On the other hand, results from sensory analyses showed that sensorial quality was the sub-index that limited the burgers shelf life (to about 22-23days), even if the proposed strategy was also effective in minimizing the sensory quality loss of the product having no effect on its nutritional quality.

  19. Constructing "Childhood" and Creating "Children" in the 1950s: Isabel Burger and Charlotte Chorpenning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodson, Stephani Etheridge

    2000-01-01

    Examines the social construction of "childhood" and of "children" within two important theoretical texts published in the 1950s: Isabel Burger's "Creative Play Acting: Learning through Drama" and Charlotte Chorpenning's "Twenty-One Years with Children's Theatre." Finds several interrelated constructs,…

  20. The Burger Court: Its Liberal/Conservative Attitude Toward Educational Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    La Morte, Michael W.

    1977-01-01

    Examines the Burger court's liberal/conservative orientation in 65 cases grouped in the following areas: racial discrimination, separation of church and state, due process for teachers, freedom of expression, school finance, due process and equal protection for students, and school board members' liability. (Author/IRT)

  1. The Warren Court and the Burger Court: Some Comparisons of Education-Related Decisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faber, Charles F.

    1981-01-01

    Compares the records of the Warren Court and the Burger Court on education-related cases concerning religion and the schools, teachers' loyalty, due process and racial segregation, freedom of expression, civil rights, and equal protection under the law. Reports the voting record of individual justices. (Author/MLF)

  2. The Supreme Court in Transition: From Warren to Burger to Rehnquist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, David M.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews the characteristics and landmark cases of the Warren, and Burger eras of the U.S. Supreme Court. Describes the changes taking place under Chief Justice Rehnquist and assesses the future of the Supreme Court with the addition of Justice Antonin Scalia. Maintains that the trend toward judicial activism will continue. (JDH)

  3. Connection coefficients on an interval and wavelet solutions of Burgers equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, E. B.; Zhou, X.

    2001-10-01

    A definition of connection coefficients is introduced and techniques of computation are presented. We use semi-implicit time difference scheme to solve Burgers equation by applying the evaluations of connection coefficients in calculating the integrals of the variational form. Comparisons of accuracy and robustness of numerical solutions are mentioned in the examples.

  4. 21 CFR 101.95 - “Fresh,” “freshly frozen,” “fresh frozen,” “frozen fresh.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false âFresh,â âfreshly frozen,â âfresh frozen,â âfrozen... frozen,” “fresh frozen,” “frozen fresh.” The terms defined in this section may be used on the label or in... state and has not been frozen or subjected to any form of thermal processing or any other form...

  5. Suitability of selective plating media for recovering heat- or freeze-stressed Escherichia coli O157:H7 from tryptic soy broth and ground beef.

    PubMed

    Rocelle, M; Clavero, S; Beuchat, L R

    1995-09-01

    The efficacy of tryptic soy agar (TSA), modified sorbitol MacConkey agar (MSMA), modified eosin methylene blue (MEMB) agar, and modified SD-39 (MSD) agar in recovering a five-strain mixture of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 and five non-O157 strains of E. coli heated in tryptic soy broth at 52, 54, or 56 degrees C for 10, 20, and 30 min was determined. Nonselective TSA supported the highest recovery of heated cells. Significantly (P < or = 0.05) lower recovery of heat-stressed cells was observed on MSMA than on TSA, MEMB agar, or MSD agar. The suitability of MEMB agar or MSD agar for recovery of E. coli O157:H7 from heated or frozen (-20 degrees C) low- or high-fat ground beef was determined. Recovery of E. coli O157:H7 from heated ground beef was significantly (P < or = 0.05) higher on TSA than on MEMB agar, which in turn supported higher recovery than MSD agar did; MSMA was inferior. Recovery from frozen ground beef was also higher on MEMB and MSD agars than on MSMA. Higher populations were generally recovered from high-fat beef than from low-fat beef, but the relative performance of the recovery media was the same. The inability of MSMA to recover stressed cells of E. coli O157:H7 underscores the need to develop a better selective medium for enumerating E. coli O157:H7.

  6. Suitability of selective plating media for recovering heat- or freeze-stressed Escherichia coli O157:H7 from tryptic soy broth and ground beef.

    PubMed Central

    Rocelle, M; Clavero, S; Beuchat, L R

    1995-01-01

    The efficacy of tryptic soy agar (TSA), modified sorbitol MacConkey agar (MSMA), modified eosin methylene blue (MEMB) agar, and modified SD-39 (MSD) agar in recovering a five-strain mixture of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 and five non-O157 strains of E. coli heated in tryptic soy broth at 52, 54, or 56 degrees C for 10, 20, and 30 min was determined. Nonselective TSA supported the highest recovery of heated cells. Significantly (P < or = 0.05) lower recovery of heat-stressed cells was observed on MSMA than on TSA, MEMB agar, or MSD agar. The suitability of MEMB agar or MSD agar for recovery of E. coli O157:H7 from heated or frozen (-20 degrees C) low- or high-fat ground beef was determined. Recovery of E. coli O157:H7 from heated ground beef was significantly (P < or = 0.05) higher on TSA than on MEMB agar, which in turn supported higher recovery than MSD agar did; MSMA was inferior. Recovery from frozen ground beef was also higher on MEMB and MSD agars than on MSMA. Higher populations were generally recovered from high-fat beef than from low-fat beef, but the relative performance of the recovery media was the same. The inability of MSMA to recover stressed cells of E. coli O157:H7 underscores the need to develop a better selective medium for enumerating E. coli O157:H7. PMID:7574637

  7. The JLab Frozen Spin Target

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, C. D.

    2009-08-04

    A polarized, frozen spin target has been designed and constructed at Jefferson Lab for use inside the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Protons in TEMPO-doped butanol are polarized via dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to approximately 90% using microwaves and an external, 5 T solenoid magnet. The target sample is then cooled to approximately 30 mK while an internal 0.56 T superconducting magnet is used to maintain the polarization. Relaxation times in excess of 3500 hours have been observed.

  8. Acidity of frozen electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Carmen; Boxe, C S; Guzman, M I; Colussi, A J; Hoffmann, M R

    2006-04-20

    Ice is selectively intolerant to impurities. A preponderance of implanted anions or cations generates electrical imbalances in ice grown from electrolyte solutions. Since the excess charges are ultimately neutralized via interfacial (H(+)/HO(-)) transport, the acidity of the unfrozen portion can change significantly and permanently. This insufficiently recognized phenomenon should critically affect rates and equilibria in frozen media. Here we report the effective (19)F NMR chemical shift of 3-fluorobenzoic acid as in situ probe of the acidity of extensively frozen electrolyte solutions. The sign and magnitude of the acidity changes associated with freezing are largely determined by specific ion combinations, but depend also on solute concentration and/or the extent of supercooling. NaCl solutions become more basic, those of (NH(4))(2)SO(4) or Na(2)SO(4) become more acidic, while solutions of the 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid zwitterion barely change their acidity upon freezing. We discuss how acidity scales based on solid-state NMR measurements could be used to assess the degree of ionization of weak acids and bases in frozen media.

  9. Thawing of Frozen Tuna Meat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Takeo; Nishiwaki, Kôji; Kakuda, Kitonari; Tomimatsu, Takao

    Frozen southern bluefin tuna meat discolors easily and sometimes contracts when thawed caused by thaw rigor. These phenomenon often become problematic in the transaction or handling of this kind of frozen tuna. Frozen meat blocks of southern Bluefin tuna were thawed separately by air thawing, running water thawing and microwave thawing. Changes occurring during thawing were checked for meat color by met-myoglobin ratio determination and for contract by microscopic observation. Results are as follows : (1) Discoloration scarcely occurred in the process of running water thawing (at 10°C for 50 min, or at 0°C for 6 hr). (2) No contraction was observed during thawing with running water described above and air thawing (at 18-20°C for 6 hr). (3) Discoloration and contraction seemed to be minimized, as to latently contractile blocks, when meat temperature passed through rapidly between -10°C and -5°C, and slowly (for 5-6 hr) between -5°C and -1°C. When the block was originally not contractile, discloration was minimized by rising meat temperature rapidly from -10°C to -l°C.

  10. Canadian beef quality audit.

    PubMed Central

    Van Donkersgoed, J; Jewison, G; Mann, M; Cherry, B; Altwasser, B; Lower, R; Wiggins, K; Dejonge, R; Thorlakson, B; Moss, E; Mills, C; Grogan, H

    1997-01-01

    aged. Based on January 1996 prices, the economic analysis showed that the Canadian beef industry lost $70.52 per head or $189.6 million annually from quality nonconformities. Methods identified to reduce these nonconformities included improvements in management, animal identification, handling, genetic selection, marketing, grading, and information transfer. PMID:9105719

  11. Vacuum skin pack of beef--a consumer friendly alternative.

    PubMed

    Lagerstedt, Åsa; Ahnström, Maria L; Lundström, Kerstin

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess how beef quality traits are affected by skin packaging compared with vacuum and high-oxygen modified atmosphere packaging (MAP; 80% O(2) and 20% CO(2)). Both M. longissimus dorsi from 6 young bulls were cut and aged in vacuum for 7 days and then cut into 3.5-cm steaks, thereafter either frozen directly day 7 or stored in skin pack, vacuum pack or MAP for an additional 7 or 14 days and then frozen. Warner-Bratzler shear force, loss and colour were measured and sensory analysis was performed. The results showed no differences in shear force, sensory analysis and total loss between steaks packed in skin pack or vacuum, but skin packed steaks had lower purge loss. MAP steaks had lower sensory scores than the other treatments at days 14 and 21. Raw MAP-steaks were bright red, but showed signs of premature browning when cooked. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Relationship between morphological abnormalities in commercial bull frozen semen doses and conception rate.

    PubMed

    Ghirardosi, M S; Fischman, M L; Jorge, A E; Chan, D; Cisale, H

    2017-08-29

    Commercial doses of frozen bull semen for artificial insemination may have a certain percentage of morphological defects, despite being subject to prior selection. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of morphological abnormalities in commercial doses (n = 55, r = 2) of dairy and beef bulls, from AI Centers and to determine the possible existence of differences between them, regarding the percentage of abnormal spermatozoa. At least 200 spermatozoa per sample were evaluated using Bengal Rose stain (3% m/v) and light microscopy (×1000 magnification). The mean percentage of abnormal sperm samples from dairy breeds was 7.19% ± 4.91% and from beef breeds was 15.83% ± 9.28%. Significant differences between biotypes were found in the proportion of abnormal spermatozoa, abnormal heads and abnormal midpieces; it could be due to different selection pressure. It was observed that the percentage of abnormal spermatozoa was not a good fertility level predictor for the commercial samples of frozen bovine semen used in this study. In both biotypes, the midpiece abnormalities were the most frequent, mainly its distal flexion (compensable defect). This could be as a result of the effects of freezing and thawing on spermatozoa. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  13. Health Implications of Beef Intramuscular Fat Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Seon-Tea

    2016-01-01

    Despite several issues in relation to human health, beef is still a most popular meat product among large section of society due to the presence of high quality protein and other nutrients. The current paper reviews numerous studies that provide nutritional profiles and health implications of high marbled beef consumption. In relation to lipid content of beef, intramuscular fat contains high level of PUFA and MUFA compared to other beef fat. Level and composition of intramuscular fat varies depending on breed and feeding regime. Literature suggests that the marbling is more complex than the development of subcutaneous fat and marbling not only provides good fatty acids but also contributes to the higher eating quality of beef. Finally, the current work emphasize that meat plays a pivotal role in nutritious diets, high quality marbled beef is not only of excellent eating quality but also contain more beneficial fatty acids. PMID:27857532

  14. 9 CFR 319.142 - Fresh beef sausage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY... beef, or both, but not including beef byproducts, and may contain Mechanically Separated (Species)...

  15. 9 CFR 319.142 - Fresh beef sausage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY... beef, or both, but not including beef byproducts, and may contain Mechanically Separated (Species)...

  16. 9 CFR 319.142 - Fresh beef sausage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY... beef, or both, but not including beef byproducts, and may contain Mechanically Separated (Species)...

  17. 7 CFR 65.110 - Beef.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT (CONTINUED) COUNTRY OF ORIGIN LABELING OF BEEF, PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS,...

  18. 7 CFR 65.110 - Beef.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT (CONTINUED) COUNTRY OF ORIGIN LABELING OF BEEF, PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS,...

  19. 7 CFR 65.155 - Ground beef.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT (CONTINUED) COUNTRY OF ORIGIN LABELING OF BEEF, PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS,...

  20. 7 CFR 65.110 - Beef.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT (CONTINUED) COUNTRY OF ORIGIN LABELING OF BEEF, PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS,...

  1. 7 CFR 65.155 - Ground beef.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT (CONTINUED) COUNTRY OF ORIGIN LABELING OF BEEF, PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS,...

  2. 7 CFR 65.110 - Beef.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT (CONTINUED) COUNTRY OF ORIGIN LABELING OF BEEF, PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS,...

  3. 7 CFR 65.155 - Ground beef.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT (CONTINUED) COUNTRY OF ORIGIN LABELING OF BEEF, PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS,...

  4. Consumer attitudes towards beef and acceptability of enhanced beef.

    PubMed

    Robbins, K; Jensen, J; Ryan, K J; Homco-Ryan, C; McKeith, F K; Brewer, M S

    2003-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate consumer quality characteristics of enhanced steaks and roasts derived from cattle supplemented with vitamin E during finishing, and to assess the attitudes of these consumers towards beef. Twelve steers were fed either a control (E-) diet or a diet supplemented with dl-alpha tocopheryl acetate (E+). Paired strip loins and rounds were either used as controls (C) or were pumped (P) to 110% of raw weight to contain 0.4% sodium chloride and 0.4% sodium tripolyphosphate in the final product. Consumers (n=103) evaluated roasts and steaks for juiciness, tenderness, saltiness, and overall acceptability on a 9-point hedonic scale. Enhanced steaks and roasts were more acceptable than non-enhanced controls; E+ steaks were less acceptable than E- steaks. A beef quality questionnaire revealed that color, price, visible fat and cut were the most important factors underlying beef steak purchase, while tenderness, flavor and juiciness were weighted most heavily with regard to eating satisfaction.

  5. Improving the physico-chemical and sensory characteristics of camel meat burger patties using ginger extract and papain.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Naeem, Heba H S; Mohamed, Hussein M H

    2016-08-01

    The objective of the current study was to include tenderizing agents in the formulation of camel meat burger patties to improve the physico-chemical and sensory characteristics of the product. Camel meat burger patties were processed with addition of ginger extract (7%), papain (0.01%) and mixture of ginger extract (5%) and papain (0.005%) in addition to control. Addition of ginger, papain and their mixture resulted in significant (P<0.05) increase of the collagen solubility and sensory scores (juiciness, tenderness and overall acceptability) with significant (P<0.05) reduction of the shear force values. Ginger extract resulted in extensive fragmentation of myofibrils; however, papain extract caused noticeable destructive effect on connective tissue. Moreover, ginger and papain resulted in improvement of the lipid stability of treated burger patties during storage. Therefore, addition of ginger extract and papain powder during formulation of camel burger patties can improve their physico-chemical and sensory properties.

  6. K-P-Burgers equation in negative ion-rich relativistic dusty plasma including the effect of kinematic viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dev, A. N.; Deka, M. K.; Sarma, J.; Saikia, D.; Adhikary, N. C.

    2016-10-01

    The stationary solution is obtained for the K-P-Burgers equation that describes the nonlinear propagations of dust ion acoustic waves in a multi-component, collisionless, un-magnetized relativistic dusty plasma consisting of electrons, positive and negative ions in the presence of charged massive dust grains. Here, the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (K-P) equation, three-dimensional (3D) Burgers equation, and K-P-Burgers equations are derived by using the reductive perturbation method including the effects of viscosity of plasma fluid, thermal energy, ion density, and ion temperature on the structure of a dust ion acoustic shock wave (DIASW). The K-P equation predictes the existences of stationary small amplitude solitary wave, whereas the K-P-Burgers equation in the weakly relativistic regime describes the evolution of shock-like structures in such a multi-ion dusty plasma.

  7. Effect of ethanolic flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) extracts on lipid oxidation and changes in nutritive value of frozen-stored meat products.

    PubMed

    Waszkowiak, Katarzyna; Szymandera-Buszka, Krystyna; Hęś, Marzanna

    2014-01-01

    Flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum L.) is an important source of phenolic compounds, mainly lignans. Antioxidant capacities of flaxseed extracts that contain the compounds have been reported earlier. However, there is a lack of accessible information about their activity against lipid oxidation in meat products. Therefore, the effect of ethanolic flaxseed extracts (EFEs) on lipid stability and changes in nutritive value of frozen-stored meat products (pork meatballs and burgers) was determined. EFEs from three Polish flax varieties (Szafir, Oliwin, Jantarol) were applied in the study. During 150-day storage of meat products, the lipid oxidation (peroxide and TBARS value) and thiamine retention were periodically monitored, alongside with methionine and lysine availability and protein digestibility. The addition of EFEs significantly limited lipid oxidation in stored meatballs and burgers. EFE from brown seeds of Szafir var. was superior to the others from golden seeds of Jantarol and Oliwin. Moreover, the extracts reduced changes in thiamine and available lysine content, as well as protein digestibility, during storage time. The effect of EFE addition on available methionine retention was limited. The ethanolic flaxseed extracts exhibit antioxidant activity during frozen storage of meat products. They can be utilized to prolong shelf-life of the products by protecting them against lipid oxidation and deterioration of their nutritional quality. However, antioxidant efficiency of the extracts seems to depend on chemical composition of raw material (flax variety). Further investigations should be carried on to explain the issue.

  8. Measurement of muscle exudate protein composition as an indicator of beef tenderness.

    PubMed

    Bowker, Brian C; Eastridge, Janet S; Solomon, Morse B

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between the protein composition of muscle exudates and meat tenderness in beef. Frozen, intact beef strip loins (n = 24) were each divided into 3 equal portions (anterior, middle, and posterior). Steaks were removed from each portion, individually vacuum packaged, thawed at 4 °C, and aged for 0, 7, or 14 d. After the designated aging period, exudate was collected from the packaging and 1 steak from each strip loin portion was utilized for shear force measurements. Muscle exudates were analyzed for protein content (biuret assay) and composition (sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis). Shear force decreased (P < 0.0001) with aging from 0 to 14 d. The protein concentrations of the muscle exudates were not influenced by the aging period and were not related to the amount of exudate expressed. Electrophoretic analyses of the muscle exudates indicated that with aging the relative abundance of 4 proteins decreased (P < 0.01) and 10 proteins increased (P < 0.05) within the protein profiles of the exudates. The relative abundance of the 167, 97, and 47 kDa proteins in exudates at day 0 were significantly correlated (|r| = 0.57 to 0.77) to shear force at day 14. These data demonstrate that exudate protein composition changes with postmortem aging and beef tenderness. This research showed that the protein profiles of exudates that accumulate on the surface and in the packaging of beef change with meat aging and tenderness. These data suggest that muscle exudates may be a good source of protein markers that are useful in the development of rapid, noninvasive methodologies for predicting beef tenderness. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  9. Analysis of stress-induced Burgers vector anisotropy in pressurized tube specimens of irradiated ferritic-martensitic steel: JLF-1

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.; Shibayama, T.

    1998-09-01

    A procedure for determining the Burgers vector anisotropy in irradiated ferritic steels allowing identification of all a<100> and all a/2<111> dislocations in a region of interest is applied to a pressurized tube specimen of JLF-1 irradiated at 430 C to 14.3 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 0.1 MeV) or 61 dpa. Analysis of micrographs indicates large anisotropy in Burgers vector populations develop during irradiation creep.

  10. Protein oxidation in emulsified cooked burger patties with added fruit extracts: Influence on colour and texture deterioration during chill storage.

    PubMed

    Ganhão, Rui; Morcuende, David; Estévez, Mario

    2010-07-01

    The influence of protein oxidation, as measured by the dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) method, on colour and texture changes during chill storage (2 degrees C, 12days) of cooked burger patties was studied. Extracts from arbutus-berries (Arbutus unedoL., AU), common hawthorns (Crataegus monogynaL., CM), dog roses (Rosa caninaL., RC) and elm-leaf blackberries (Rubus ulmifoliusSchott., RU) were prepared, added to burger patties (3% of total weight) and evaluated as inhibitors of protein oxidation and colour and texture changes. Negative (no added extract, C) and positive control (added quercetin; 230mg/kg, Q) groups were also considered. The significant increase of protein carbonyls during chill storage of control burger patties reflect the intense oxidative degradation of the muscle proteins. Concomitantly, an intense loss of redness and increase of hardness was found to take place in burger patties throughout refrigerated storage. Most fruit extracts as well as Q significantly reduced the formation of protein carbonyls and inhibited colour and texture deterioration during chill storage. Likely mechanisms through which protein oxidation could play a major role on colour and texture changes during chill storage of burger patties are discussed. Amongst the extracts, RC was most suitable for use as a functional ingredient in processed meats since it enhanced oxidative stability, colour and texture properties of burger patties with no apparent drawbacks.

  11. Optical characterization of beef muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Gang; Xia, Jinjun

    2005-11-01

    An objective and reliable method for meat quality measurement will benefit both consumers and meat industry. Among various techniques, optical methods have the advantage of being fast, flexible, inexpensive and nondestructive, which are important characteristics for online quality control. Although there have been great progress in this area, many results are inconsistent and controversial because of the lack of fundamental understanding of in light-meat interactions. Optical measurements on meat tissues are affected by both meat scattering and absorption properties. In the project, a method based on diffuse approximation solution of light transport in tissue was used to derive meat scattering and absorption coefficients. Differentiating muscle scattering properties from absorption properties are important for muscle characterization because they represent distinctly different aspects of muscle physical and chemical components. Our preliminary results showed that scattering coefficients can detect variations in beef steak tenderness. This new technique is promising to be used as an indicator for beef tenderness. However, a more extensive study with larger sample population will be necessary to fully test the capability of using optical scattering for beef tenderness characterization.

  12. Protein changes in frozen fish.

    PubMed

    Sikorski, Z; Olley, J; Kostuch, S

    1976-09-01

    Storage of frozen fish brings about a decrease of extractability of myofibrillar proteins. There is also deterioration of the texture and functional properties of the flesh. In model systems, aggregation of myosin, actin, tropomyosin, and whole myofibrils have been described. These changes are caused by concurrent action of partial dehydration due to the freezing out of water, exposure of the proteins to inorganic salts which are concentrated in the remaining nonfrozen fluid, interactions with free fatty acids liberated from phospholipids and with lipid oxidation products, and cross-linking by formaldehyde produced in some species of fish as a result of enzymic decomposition of trimethylamine oxide. The extent of protein alterations increases with time and temperature of storage as well as with advanced disintegration of the tissues and intermixing of their components. The role played by the individual factors and the significance of different types of bonds, i.e., hydrophobic adherences, ionic bonds, and covalent cross-links in particular cases are not yet fully disclosed. Retardation of the deteriorative changes of proteins in frozen fish is possible by avoiding high storage temperatures and oxidation of lipids, removing hematin compounds and other constituents promoting cross-linking reactions, and by adding cryoprotectors like sugars, several organic acids, amino acids, or peptides.

  13. Variables affecting the propensity to buy branded beef among groups of Australian beef buyers.

    PubMed

    Morales, L Emilio; Griffith, Garry; Wright, Victor; Fleming, Euan; Umberger, Wendy; Hoang, Nam

    2013-06-01

    Australian beef consumers have different preferences given their characteristics and the effect on expected quality of cues related to health, production process and eating experience. Beef brands using Meat Standards Australia (MSA) grades can help to signal quality and reduce consumers' uncertainty when shopping. The objective of this study is to identify the characteristics of beef buyers and their perceptions about product attributes that affect the propensity to buy branded beef. Binary logistic models were applied identifying differences between all respondents and the potential target market, including buyers in medium to high income segments, and between buyers in the target market who would buy branded beef for taste and health reasons. Variables increasing the propensity to buy branded beef include previous experience, appreciation for branded cuts and concern about quality more than size. Finally, variations in preferences for marbling and cut were found between buyers who would buy branded beef for taste and health reasons. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Approximate analytical solution of the nonlinear fractional KdV-Burgers equation: A new iterative algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Ajou, Ahmad; Arqub, Omar Abu; Momani, Shaher

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, explicit and approximate solutions of the nonlinear fractional KdV-Burgers equation with time-space-fractional derivatives are presented and discussed. The solutions of our equation are calculated in the form of rabidly convergent series with easily computable components. The utilized method is a numerical technique based on the generalized Taylor series formula which constructs an analytical solution in the form of a convergent series. Five illustrative applications are given to demonstrate the effectiveness and the leverage of the present method. Graphical results and series formulas are utilized and discussed quantitatively to illustrate the solution. The results reveal that the method is very effective and simple in determination of solution of the fractional KdV-Burgers equation.

  15. Variable-Coefficient Forced Burgers System in Nonlinear Fluid Mechanics and its Possibly Observable Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yi-Tian; Xu, Xiao-Ge; Tian, Bo

    The forced Burgers equation works as a testing ground for a real turbulence, and as the qualitative model for a wide variety of problems including charge density waves, vortex lines in superconductors, disordered solids and epitaxial growth, etc. Its variable-coefficient generalizations call for better modeling of the physical situations. In this paper, we investigate a variable-coefficient generalization of the forced Burgers equation, and obtain several sets of exact soliton-like and other exact analytic solutions, via the extension of a generalized hyperbolic-function method with computerized symbolic computation. We also discuss the Wu method. We find some possibly observable effects, which might be discovered with the relevant experiments.

  16. The first bite: Imaginaries, promotional publics and the laboratory grown burger

    PubMed Central

    O’Riordan, Kate; Fotopoulou, Aristea; Stephens, Neil

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we analyse a 2013 press conference hosting the world’s first tasting of a laboratory grown hamburger. We explore this as a media event: an exceptional performative moment in which common meanings are mobilised and a connection to a shared centre of reality is offered. We develop our own theoretical contribution – the promotional public – to characterise the affirmative and partial patchwork of carefully selected actors invoked during the burger tasting. Our account draws on three areas of analysis: interview data with the scientists who developed the burger, media analysis of the streamed press conference itself and media analysis of social media during and following the event. We argue that the call to witness an experiment is a form of promotion and that such promotional material also offers an address that invokes a public with its attendant tensions. PMID:27029766

  17. An efficient method for systems of variable coefficient coupled Burgers' equation with time-fractional derivative.

    PubMed

    Aminikhah, Hossein; Malekzadeh, Nasrin

    2013-01-01

    A new homotopy perturbation method (NHPM) is applied to system of variable coefficient coupled Burgers' equation with time-fractional derivative. The fractional derivatives are described in the Caputo fractional derivative sense. The concept of new algorithm is introduced briefly, and NHPM is examined for two systems of nonlinear Burgers' equation. In this approach, the solution is considered as a power series expansion that converges rapidly to the nonlinear problem. The new approximate analytical procedure depends on two iteratives. The modified algorithm provides approximate solutions in the form of convergent series with easily computable components. Results indicate that the introduced method is promising for solving other types of systems of nonlinear fractional-order partial differential equations.

  18. Formation of misfit dislocations with in-plane Burgers vectors in boron diffused (111) silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Ning, X.J.; Pirouz, P.

    1996-05-01

    The study of different stages of boron diffusion by plan-view and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy shows that, as in the classical model of Matthews, misfit dislocation half-loops are initially generated at the surface. The Burgers vector of the dislocation half-loop is inclined with respect to the surface and thus the initial misfit dislocations are not very efficient in strain relaxation. As the diffusion proceeds, non-parallel dislocations interact and give rise to product segments that have in-plane Burgers vectors parallel to the surface. Based on the observations, a model is presented to elucidate the details of these interactions and the formation of more efficient misfit dislocations from the less-efficient inclined ones.

  19. The first bite: Imaginaries, promotional publics and the laboratory grown burger.

    PubMed

    O'Riordan, Kate; Fotopoulou, Aristea; Stephens, Neil

    2017-02-01

    In this article, we analyse a 2013 press conference hosting the world's first tasting of a laboratory grown hamburger. We explore this as a media event: an exceptional performative moment in which common meanings are mobilised and a connection to a shared centre of reality is offered. We develop our own theoretical contribution - the promotional public - to characterise the affirmative and partial patchwork of carefully selected actors invoked during the burger tasting. Our account draws on three areas of analysis: interview data with the scientists who developed the burger, media analysis of the streamed press conference itself and media analysis of social media during and following the event. We argue that the call to witness an experiment is a form of promotion and that such promotional material also offers an address that invokes a public with its attendant tensions.

  20. Global well-posedness of the critical Burgers equation in critical Besov spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Changxing; Wu, Gang

    We make use of the method of modulus of continuity [A. Kiselev, F. Nazarov, R. Shterenberg, Blow up and regularity for fractal Burgers equation, Dyn. Partial Differ. Equ. 5 (2008) 211-240] and Fourier localization technique [H. Abidi, T. Hmidi, On the global well-posedness of the critical quasi-geostrophic equation, SIAM J. Math. Anal. 40 (1) (2008) 167-185] [H. Abidi, T. Hmidi, On the global well-posedness of the critical quasi-geostrophic equation, SIAM J. Math. Anal. 40 (1) (2008) 167-185] to prove the global well-posedness of the critical Burgers equation ∂u+u∂u+Λu=0 in critical Besov spaces B˙p,11/p(R) with p∈[1,∞), where Λ=√{-Δ}.

  1. KdV-Burgers equation in the modified continuum model considering anticipation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huaqing; Zheng, Pengjun; Zhu, Keqiang; Ge, Hongxia

    2015-11-01

    The new continuum model mentioned in this paper is developed based on optimal velocity car-following model, which takes the drivers' anticipation effect into account. The critical condition for traffic flow is derived, and nonlinear analysis shows density waves occur in traffic flow because of the small disturbance. Near the neutral stability line, the KdV-Burgers equation is derived and one of the solutions is given. Numerical simulation is carried out to show the local cluster described by the model.

  2. Conservation laws and exact solutions of system of Boussinesq-Burgers equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbulut, Arzu; Kaplan, Melike; Taşcan, Filiz

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we study conservation laws that is one of the applications of symmetries. Conservation laws has important place for differential equations and their solutions, also in all physics applications. This study deals with conservation laws of Boussinessq-Burgers equation. We used Noether approach and conservation theorem approach for finding conservation laws for this equation. Also finally, we found exact solutions of this equation by using the modified simple equation method.

  3. Conservation laws, classical symmetries and exact solutions of the generalized KdV-Burgers-Kuramoto equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruzón, Maria S.; Recio, Elena; Garrido, Tamara M.; Márquez, Almudena P.

    2017-06-01

    For a generalized KdV-Burgers-Kuramoto equation we have studied conservation laws by using the multiplier method, and investigated its first-level and second-level potential systems. Furthermore, the Lie point symmetries of the equation and the Lie point symmetries associated with the conserved vectors are determined. We obtain travelling wave reductions depending on the form of an arbitrary function. We present some explicit solutions: soliton solutions, kinks and antikinks.

  4. Exponential Ergodicity of Stochastic Burgers Equations Driven by α-Stable Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Zhao; Xu, Lihu; Zhang, Xicheng

    2014-02-01

    In this work, we prove the strong Feller property and the exponential ergodicity of stochastic Burgers equations driven by α/2-subordinated cylindrical Brownian motions with α∈(1,2). To prove the results, we truncate the nonlinearity and use the derivative formula for SDEs driven by α-stable noises established in (Zhang in Stoch. Process. Appl. 123(4):1213-1228, 2013).

  5. Partial implicitization. [numerical stability of Burger equation model for Navier-Stokes equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, R. A., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The steady-state solution to the full Navier-Stokes equations for complicated flows is generally difficult to obtain. The Burgers (1948) equation is used as a model of the Navier-Stokes equations. The steady-state solution is obtained by a one-step explicit technique resulting from a partial implicitization of the difference equation. Stability analysis shows that the technique is unconditionally stable, and numerical tests show the technique to be accurate.

  6. Jin–Xin relaxation solution to the spatially-varying Burgers equation in one dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mungkasi, Sudi; Laras, Fioretta

    2017-01-01

    We consider the spatially-varying Burgers equation in one dimension. We take the Lax–Friedrichs finite volume method and Jin–Xin relaxation method in solving the equation. According to our research, the Jin–Xin relaxation method produces a more accurate solution, as they produce smaller error than the Lax–Friedrichs finite volume method. However, the Lax–Friedrichs finite volume method is faster in computation than the Jin–Xin method.

  7. On multi-graded-index soliton solutions for the Boussinesq-Burgers equations in optical communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Gawad, H. I.; Tantawy, M.

    2017-02-01

    Very recently, multi-solitary long waves for the homogeneous Boussinesq-Burgers equations (BBEs) were studied. Here its found that the time dependent coefficients (BBEs), shows multi-graded-index solitons waves, which are graded refractive index profile and can offer a new route for high-power lasers and transmission. They should increase data rates in low-cost telecommunications systems. Further, that (BBEs) show long periodic solitons waves in communications and television antennas.

  8. Random Field Solutions Including Boundary Condition Uncertainty for the Steady-state Generalized Burgers Equation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    uncertainty. The need for advanced uncertainty modeling is illustrated by means of a computationally inexpensive 1-D Burgers equation model. We specifically...discusses the various sources of uncertainty. The need for advanced uncertainty modeling is illustrated by means of a computationally inexpensive 1-D...two types can be caused by either “errors of ignorance” or “errors of simplification”. Note that use of the word “error” means that these

  9. Staphylococcus aureus is More Prevalent in Retail Beef Livers than in Pork and other Beef Cuts

    PubMed Central

    Abdalrahman, Lubna S.; Wells, Harrington; Fakhr, Mohamed K.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the top five pathogens contributing to acquired foodborne illnesses causing an estimated quarter million cases every year in the US. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of Methicillin Susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) and Methicillin Resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in retail beef livers, beef, and pork meats sold in Tulsa, Oklahoma and to characterize the recovered strains for their virulence and antimicrobial resistance. Ninety six chilled retail beef (50 beef livers and 46 beef other cuts), and 99 pork meat samples were collected. The prevalence in beef livers was 40/50 (80%) followed by other beef cuts 23/46 (50%) then pork 43/99 (43.3%). No isolates were positive for MRSA since none harbored the mecA or mecC gene. A total of 334 recovered S. aureus isolates (143 beef livers, 76 beef, and 115 pork isolates) were screened for their antimicrobial susceptibility against 16 different antimicrobials and their possession of 18 different toxin genes. Multidrug resistance was more prevalent in the pork isolates followed by beef then beef livers. The prevalence of enterotoxin genes such as seg, seh, and sei and the toxic shock syndrome gene tst was higher in the pork isolates than in the beef ones. The hemolysin genes, particularly hlb, were more prevalent in isolates from beef livers. Molecular typing of a subset of the recovered isolates showed that they are highly diverse where spa typing was more discriminatory than PFGE. The alarmingly high incidence of S. aureus in retail beef livers in this study should raise awareness about the food safety of such meat products. PMID:25927961

  10. Impact of essential oils on the taste acceptance of tomato juice, vegetable soup, or poultry burgers.

    PubMed

    Espina, Laura; García-Gonzalo, Diego; Pagán, Rafael

    2014-08-01

    Despite the vast body of available literature on the possibilities of essential oils (EOs) as food preservatives or functional ingredients, the sensory impact of their addition to foods has barely been approached. This work focuses on the hedonic taste acceptance of 3 food products (tomato juice, vegetable soup, and poultry burgers) when they are incorporated with potentially antimicrobial concentrations (20 to 200 μL/L) of 6 selected EOs (lemon, pennyroyal mint, thyme, and rosemary) and individual compounds (carvacrol, p-cymene). Although addition of 20 μL/L of pennyroyal mint or lemon EO did not change the taste acceptance of tomato juice, higher concentrations of these compounds or any concentration of the other 4 compounds did. In vegetable soup, the tolerance limit for rosemary EO, thyme EO, carvacrol, or p-cymene was 20 μL/L, while the addition of 200 μL/L of lemon EO was accepted. Tolerance limits in poultry burgers were established in 20 μL/L for carvacrol and thyme EOs, 100 μL/L for pennyroyal mint EO and p-cymene, and 200 μL/L for lemon and rosemary EOs. Moreover, incorporation of pennyroyal mint EO to tomato juice or poultry burgers, and enrichment of vegetable soup with lemon EO, could contribute to the development of food products with an improved sensory appeal. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  11. Cooled semen for fixed-time artificial insemination in beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Borges-Silva, Juliana C; Silva, Márcio R; Marinho, Daniel B; Nogueira, Eriklis; Sampaio, Deiler C; Oliveira, Luiz Orcírio F; Abreu, Urbano G P; Mourão, Gerson B; Sartori, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluated the use of cooled semen in a fixed-time artificial insemination (FTAI) program compared with frozen-thawed semen to improve pregnancy rates in beef cattle. Ejaculates of three bulls were collected and divided into two treatments: (1) frozen-thawed semen and (2) cooled semen. Egg-yolk extender without glycerol was used for the cooled semen treatment. Straws (25×10(6) spermatozoa) were submitted to cooling for preservation at 5°C for 24h, after which FTAI was performed. Nelore cows (n=838) submitted to FTAI were randomly inseminated using frozen-thawed semen or cooled semen. There was a 20% increase in the pregnancy per AI (P AI(-1)) using cooled semen compared with frozen-thawed semen (59.9±4.7 vs 49.4±5.0%; P<0.005). There was no difference in P AI(-1) among the bulls (P=0.40). The frozen-thawed semen had fewer functional spermatozoa than did the cooled semen when evaluated by sperm motility (61.7 vs 81.0%), slow thermoresistance test (41.7 vs 66.7%) and hypoosmotic swelling test (38.3 vs 53.7%; P<0.05). The percentage of sperm abnormalities did not differ between the freeze-thawing and cooling processes (18.6 vs 22.1%; P>0.05). Because there was less damage to spermatozoa and improvement in P AI(-1), the use of cooled semen instead of frozen-thawed semen is an interesting approach to increase reproductive efficiency in cattle submitted to a FTAI protocol.

  12. Effect of turmeric powder (Curcuma longa L.) and ascorbic acid on physical characteristics and oxidative status of fresh and stored rabbit burgers.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Simone; Preziuso, Giovanna; Dal Bosco, Alessandro; Roscini, Valentina; Szendrő, Zsolt; Fratini, Filippo; Paci, Gisella

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of Curcuma longa powder and ascorbic acid on some quality traits of rabbit burgers. The burgers (burgers control with no additives; burgers with 3.5 g of turmeric powder/100g meat; burgers with 0.1g of ascorbic acid/100g meat) were analyzed at Days 0 and 7 for pH, color, drip loss, cooking loss, fatty acid profile, TBARS, antioxidant capacity (ABTS, DPPH and FRAP) and microbial growth. The addition of turmeric powder modified the meat color, produced an antioxidant capacity similar to ascorbic acid and determined a lower cooking loss than other formulations. Turmeric powder might be considered as a useful natural antioxidant, increasing the quality and extending the shelf life of rabbit burgers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Assessing the sustainability of beef production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    As a major food source, beef production provides an important service to our economy. Production of cattle and the associated feed crops also impact our environment, and this impact is not well understood. Although several studies have assessed the carbon footprint of beef, there are other environme...

  14. People on the Farm: Raising Beef Cattle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crain, Robert L.

    This booklet provides information on raising beef cattle through profiles of two families, the Ritschards of Colorado and the Schuttes of Missouri. Through descriptions of daily life for these families, the booklet discusses the way of life on modern beef cattle farms and the problems and decisions faced by farmers. The booklet explains how…

  15. Antimicrobial resistance issues in beef production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Antimicrobial resistance threats to human health as identified have been recognized as a critical global public health concern. Linkage of some threats to beef production is discussed. The relevance to beef production of recent government actions will be examined. Prominent antimicrobial resistance ...

  16. Introduction to Beef Production. Instructor Guide [and] Student Reference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Kevin

    This packet contains an instructor guide and student reference for a course in introduction to beef production. The curriculum contains the following seven lessons: (1) introduction to the beef industry; (2) breeds of beef cattle; (3) principles of beef cattle selection; (4) production systems; (5) herd health; (6) herd management; and (7)…

  17. 7 CFR 1260.181 - Qualified State beef councils.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Qualified State beef councils. 1260.181 Section 1260... SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BEEF PROMOTION AND RESEARCH Beef Promotion and Research Order Assessments § 1260.181 Qualified State beef...

  18. The North Dakota Beef Industry Survey: Implications for Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahlen, Carl R.; Hadrich, Joleen C.; Lardy, Gregory P.

    2014-01-01

    A portion of the North Dakota Beef Industry Survey was developed to determine how educational programs can evolve to meet future needs of North Dakota beef producers. Of the 2,500 surveys mailed out to beef producers, 527 responses were completed and returned. Results highlight the level of education of North Dakota beef producers, anticipated use…

  19. 9 CFR 319.101 - Corned beef brisket.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Corned beef brisket. 319.101 Section... Smoked § 319.101 Corned beef brisket. In preparing “Corned Beef Brisket,” the application of curing solution to the beef brisket shall not result in an increase in the weight of the finished cured product...

  20. 7 CFR 1260.115 - Qualified State beef council.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Qualified State beef council. 1260.115 Section 1260... SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BEEF PROMOTION AND RESEARCH Beef Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1260.115 Qualified State beef...

  1. Introduction to Beef Production. Instructor Guide [and] Student Reference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Kevin

    This packet contains an instructor guide and student reference for a course in introduction to beef production. The curriculum contains the following seven lessons: (1) introduction to the beef industry; (2) breeds of beef cattle; (3) principles of beef cattle selection; (4) production systems; (5) herd health; (6) herd management; and (7)…

  2. The North Dakota Beef Industry Survey: Implications for Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahlen, Carl R.; Hadrich, Joleen C.; Lardy, Gregory P.

    2014-01-01

    A portion of the North Dakota Beef Industry Survey was developed to determine how educational programs can evolve to meet future needs of North Dakota beef producers. Of the 2,500 surveys mailed out to beef producers, 527 responses were completed and returned. Results highlight the level of education of North Dakota beef producers, anticipated use…

  3. Distribution of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in ground beef: Assessing the clustering intensity for an industrial-scale grinder and a low and localized initial contamination.

    PubMed

    Loukiadis, Estelle; Bièche-Terrier, Clémence; Malayrat, Catherine; Ferré, Franck; Cartier, Philippe; Augustin, Jean-Christophe

    2017-06-05

    Undercooked ground beef is regularly implicated in food-borne outbreaks involving pathogenic Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli. The dispersion of bacteria during mixing processes is of major concern for quantitative microbiological risk assessment since clustering will influence the number of bacteria the consumers might get exposed to as well as the performance of sampling plans used to detect contaminated ground beef batches. In this study, batches of 25kg of ground beef were manufactured according to a process mimicking an industrial-scale grinding with three successive steps: primary grinding, mixing and final grinding. The ground beef batches were made with 100% of chilled trims or with 2/3 of chilled trims and 1/3 of frozen trims. Prior grinding, one beef trim was contaminated with approximately 10(6)-10(7)CFU of E. coli O157:H7 on a surface of 0.5cm(2) to reach a concentration of 10-100cells/g in ground beef. The E. coli O157:H7 distribution in ground beef was characterized by enumerating 60 samples (20 samples of 5g, 20 samples of 25g and 20 samples of 100g) and fitting a Poisson-gamma model to describe the variability of bacterial counts. The shape parameter of the gamma distribution, also known as the dispersion parameter reflecting the amount of clustering, was estimated between 1.0 and 1.6. This k-value of approximately 1 expresses a moderate level of clustering of bacterial cells in the ground beef. The impact of this clustering on the performance of sampling strategies was relatively limited in comparison to the classical hypothesis of a random repartition of pathogenic cells in mixed materials (purely Poisson distribution instead of Poisson-gamma distribution). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. U. S. consumer perceptions of U. S. and Canadian beef quality grades.

    PubMed

    Tedford, J L; Rodas-González, A; Garmyn, A J; Brooks, J C; Johnson, B J; Starkey, J D; Clark, G O; Derington, A J; Collins, J A; Miller, M F

    2014-08-01

    A U.S. consumer (n = 642) study (Baltimore, MD; Phoenix, AZ; and Lubbock, TX) was conducted to compare consumer sensory scores of U.S. beef (83 USDA Choice [Choice] and 96 USDA Select [Select]) and Canadian beef (77 AAA and 82 AA) strip loins. Strip loins (n = 338) were obtained from beef processors in Canada and the United States and were wet aged until 21 d postmortem at 2°C. Marbling scores were assigned at 21 d and loins were paired according to quality grades and marbling score. Strip loins were fabricated into 2.54-cm thick steaks; steaks were vacuum packaged and frozen until further evaluations. Proximate analysis was performed to compare fat, moisture, and protein. Choice and Canadian AAA had similar marbling scores and intramuscular fat. Both Choice and Canadian AAA had greater (P < 0.05) marbling scores and intramuscular fat than Canadian AA, but Select strip loins had intermediate values that were not different from any of the other grades (P > 0.05). Consumers' opinions did not differ when comparing equivalent grades (Choice with Canadian AAA and Select with Canadian AA), but they rated Choice and Canadian AAA more palatable than Select and Canadian AA for all sensory attributes (P < 0.05). Regarding percentage of acceptability and likelihood to buy score, consumers indicated a preference and greater probability to buy (P = 0.001 and P = 0.004, respectively) strip loin steaks from higher quality grade carcasses (Choice and Canadian AAA) than lower quality grade carcasses (Select and Canada AA). Additionally, consumers gave their opinion of Canadian beef, where its quality and safety were rated as "good" to "excellent" for both attributes (76.72% and 88.36%, respectively; P < 0.05), feeling confident in beef that is imported from Canada. In the same way, consumers indicated that country-of-origin labeling was a minimal factor influencing their beef steak purchasing decisions. Results from this consumer study indicated U.S. consumers could not

  5. Interpreting Neutron Probe Readings In Frozen Soil

    Treesearch

    Richard S. Sartz

    1969-01-01

    Several factors associated with soil freezing complicate the interpretation of neutron probe readings in frozen soil. Temperature is unimportant, but the effect of vertical resolution must be considered. Because of the possibility of both gains and losses of water at the same depth during a period of measurement, interpreting changes in the water content of frozen...

  6. Pine pollens frozen five years produce seed

    Treesearch

    R.Z. Callaham; R.J. Steinhoff

    1966-01-01

    Deep-freezing of pine pollen offers a means of prolonging its storage life. Early work showed that pollen could be frozen without losing its viability. A study was started in 1958 at the Institute of Forest Genetics at Placerville to determine how long frozen pollen of several pines would remain viable. This paper reports in vitro germination and in vivo seed...

  7. A review on frozen shoulder.

    PubMed

    Wong, P L; Tan, H C

    2010-09-01

    Of all the joints in the human body, the shoulder has the greatest range of motion. This allows complex movements and functions to be carried out, and is of vital importance to the activities of daily living and work. Any restriction or pain that involves the joint puts a huge amount of strain on patients, especially those who are in their most productive years of life. Frozen shoulder, a frequently encountered disorder of the shoulder, has been well recognised since the early 1900s. Although benign, it has great impact on the quality of life of patients. This article aims to provide an overview of the nature and the widely accepted management of this condition based on other studies.

  8. Testing the frozen flow approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchin, Francesco; Matarrese, Sabino; Melott, Adrian L.; Moscardini, Lauro

    1993-01-01

    We investigate the accuracy of the frozen-flow approximation (FFA), recently proposed by Matarrese, et al. (1992), for following the nonlinear evolution of cosmological density fluctuations under gravitational instability. We compare a number of statistics between results of the FFA and n-body simulations, including those used by Melott, Pellman & Shandarin (1993) to test the Zel'dovich approximation. The FFA performs reasonably well in a statistical sense, e.g. in reproducing the counts-in-cell distribution, at small scales, but it does poorly in the crosscorrelation with n-body which means it is generally not moving mass to the right place, especially in models with high small-scale power.

  9. Stochastic heat and Burgers equations and their singularities. II. Analytical properties and limiting distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ian M.; Truman, Aubrey; Zhao, Huaizhong

    2005-04-01

    We study the inviscid limit, μ →0, of the stochastic viscous Burgers equation, for the velocity field vμ(x,t), t >0, x εRd, (∂vμ/∂t)+(vμ.∇)vμ=-∇c(x,t)-ε∇k(x,t)Ẇt+(μ2/2)Δvμ, for small ε, with vμ(x,0)≡∇S0(x) for some given S0, Ẇt representing white noise. Here we use the Hopf-Cole transformation, vμ=-μ2∇lnuμ, where uμ satisfies the stochastic heat equation of Stratonovich-type and the Feynmac-Kac Truman-Zhao formula for uμ, where dutμ(x )=[(μ2/2)Δutμ(x)+μ-2c(x,t)utμ(x)]dt+εμ-2k(x,t)utμ(x)∘dWt, with u0μ(x)=T0(x)exp(-S0(x)/μ2), S0 as before and T0 a smooth positive function. In an earlier paper, Davies, Truman, and Zhao [J. Math. Phys. 43, 3293 (2002)], an exact solution of the stochastic viscous Burgers equation was used to show how the formal "blow-up" of the Burgers velocity field occurs on random shockwaves for the vμ =0 solution of Burgers equation coinciding with the caustics of a corresponding Hamiltonian system with classical flow map Φ. Moreover, the uμ =0 solution of the stochastic heat equation has its wavefront determined by the behavior of the Hamilton principal function of the corresponding stochastic mechanics. This led in particular to the level surface of the minimizing Hamilton-Jacobi function developing cusps at points corresponding to points of intersection of the corresponding prelevel surface with the precaustic, "pre" denoting the preimage under Φ determined algebraically. These results were primarily of a geometrical nature. In this paper we consider small ε and derive the shape of the random shockwave for the inviscid limit of the stochastic Burgers velocity field and also give the equation determining the random wavefront for the stochastic heat equation both correct to first order in ε. In the case c (x,t)=1/2xTΩ2x, ∇k(x,t)=-a(t), we obtain the exact random shockwave and prove that its shape is unchanged by the addition of noise, it merely being displaced by a random Brownian vector

  10. Shopper cards data and storage practices for the investigation of an outbreak of Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli O157 infections.

    PubMed

    Barret, A-S; Charron, M; Mariani-Kurkdjian, P; Gouali, M; Loukiadis, E; Poignet-Leroux, B; Godron, A; Gault, G; Faure, M; Mailles, A

    2013-09-01

    An outbreak of shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli infections occurred in southwest France in June 2012. The outbreak was investigated to identify the source of infection, and guide control measures. Confirmed outbreak cases were patients who developed bloody diarrhoea or haemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) between 28 May and 6 July 2012, with E. coli O157 isolates showing indistinguishable patterns on pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). A standardized questionnaire was administered to patients to document food consumption and other risk exposures. Their purchase was checked through their supermarket shopper card data. Six patients (four with HUS and two with bloody diarrhea) were confirmed outbreak cases. Fresh ground beef burgers from one supermarket were the only common food exposure, identified by interviews and shopper card data. The PFGE profile of shiga toxin-producing E. coli O157 isolated from the suspected beef burgers was identical to those from the human cases. The suspected beef burgers were no longer on sale at the time of investigation but three patients confirmed as outbreak cases had deep-frozen some at home. Shopper card data was particularly useful to obtain precise and reliable information on the traceability of consumed food. Despite the expired use-by date, a recall was issued for the beef burgers. This contributed to preventing other cases among consumers who had deep-frozen the beef burgers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Functional proteomic and interactome analysis of proteins associated with beef tenderness in angus cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Beef is a source of high quality protein for the human population, and beef tenderness has significant influence on beef palatability, consumer expectation and industry profitability. To further elucidate the factors affecting beef tenderness, functional proteomics and bioinformatics interactome ana...

  12. Beef allergy and the Persian Gulf syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hollander, D H

    1995-09-01

    It is suggested that the Persian Gulf Syndrome (PGS) is caused by beef allergy. In the first symptomless phase, as a result of an energetic US Army immunizing program, using sera with adjuvants to produce detectable antibody levels, the subjects not only developed immunity to the targeted substances, but also became sensitized to one or more of the other substances in the immunizing sera, and specifically to beef protein. The subjects remained healthy while in the war zone on a restricted diet essentially free from beef, but developed PGS after they came home, and were again able to obtain steaks and hamburgers.

  13. Expression Marker-Based Strategy to Improve Beef Quality

    PubMed Central

    Cassar-Malek, Isabelle; Picard, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    For beef cattle research, a main objective is to control concomitantly the development of muscles and the qualities of beef cuts. Beef quality is a complex phenotype that is only detectable after slaughter and is highly variable. The beef industry is in need of tools to estimate beef quality of live cattle or online in abattoirs, with specific attention towards sensory attributes (tenderness, juiciness, flavour, and colour). Identification of relevant genetic and genomic markers is ongoing, especially for tenderness—a top priority quality attribute. In this paper, we describe the steps of an expression marker-based strategy to improve beef sensory quality, from the discovery of biomarkers that identify consistent beef and the biological functions governing beef tenderness to the integration of the knowledge into detection tests for desirable animals. These tools should soon be available for the management of sensory quality in the beef production chain for meeting market's demands and assuring good quality standards. PMID:27066527

  14. On a new semi-discrete integrable combination of Burgers and Sharma-Tasso-Olver equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hai-qiong

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, a new semi-discrete integrable combination of Burgers and Sharma-Tasso-Olver equation is investigated. The underlying integrable structures like the Lax pair, the infinite number of conservation laws, the Darboux-Bäcklund transformation, and the solutions are presented in the explicit form. The theory of the semi-discrete equation including integrable properties yields the corresponding theory of the continuous counterpart in the continuous limit. Finally, numerical experiments are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the developed integrable semi-discretization algorithms.

  15. Two Different Methods for Numerical Solution of the Modified Burgers' Equation

    PubMed Central

    Karakoç, Seydi Battal Gazi; Başhan, Ali; Geyikli, Turabi

    2014-01-01

    A numerical solution of the modified Burgers' equation (MBE) is obtained by using quartic B-spline subdomain finite element method (SFEM) over which the nonlinear term is locally linearized and using quartic B-spline differential quadrature (QBDQM) method. The accuracy and efficiency of the methods are discussed by computing L 2 and L ∞ error norms. Comparisons are made with those of some earlier papers. The obtained numerical results show that the methods are effective numerical schemes to solve the MBE. A linear stability analysis, based on the von Neumann scheme, shows the SFEM is unconditionally stable. A rate of convergence analysis is also given for the DQM. PMID:25162064

  16. Optimal fixed-finite-dimensional compensator for Burgers' equation with unbounded input/output operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, John A.; Marrekchi, Hamadi

    1993-01-01

    The problem of using reduced order dynamic compensators to control a class of nonlinear parabolic distributed parameter systems was considered. Concentration was on a system with unbounded input and output operators governed by Burgers' equation. A linearized model was used to compute low-order-finite-dimensional control laws by minimizing certain energy functionals. Then these laws were applied to the nonlinear model. Standard approaches to this problem employ model/controller reduction techniques in conjunction with linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) theory. The approach used is based on the finite dimensional Bernstein/Hyland optimal projection theory which yields a fixed-finite-order controller.

  17. Nonequivalent Similarity Reductions and Exact Solutions for Coupled Burgers-Type Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M. H. M., Moussa; R. A. K., Omar; Rehab, M. El-Shiekh; H. R., El-Melegy

    2012-01-01

    Using the machinery of Lie group analysis, the nonlinear system of coupled Burgers-type equations is studied. Using the infinitesimal generators in the optimal system of subalgebra of the said Lie algebras, it leads to two nonequivalent similarity transformations by using it we obtain two reductions in the form of system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The search for solutions of these systems by using the G'/G-method has yielded certain exact solutions expressed by rational functions, hyperbolic functions, and trigonometric functions. Some figures are given to show the properties of the solutions.

  18. Changes in the Burgers Vector of Perfect Dislocation Loops without Contact with the External Dislocations

    SciTech Connect

    Arakawa, K.; Hatanaka, M.; Mori, H.; Kuramoto, E.; Ono, K.

    2006-03-31

    We report the observations of a new type of changing process in the Burgers vector of dislocations by in situ transmission electron microscopy. Small interstitial-type perfect dislocation loops in bcc iron with diameters less than approximately 50 nm are transformed from a 1/2<111> loop to another 1/2<111> one or an energetically unfavorable <100> one; furthermore, a <100> loop is transformed to a 1/2<111> one. These transformations occurred on high-energy electron irradiation or simple heating without contact with external dislocations. The origin of these phenomena is discussed.

  19. Exact solutions to the KDV-Burgers equation with forcing term using Tanh-Coth method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chukkol, Yusuf Buba; Mohamad, Mohd Nor; Muminov, Mukhiddin I.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, tanh-coth method was applied to derive the exact travelling wave solutions to the Korteweg-de-Vries and Burgers equation with forcing term(fKDVB). Solutions that are linear combination of solitary and shock wave solutions, and periodic wave solutions are obtained, by reducing the equation to the homogeneous type using a wave transformation. The method with the help of symbolic computation tool box provides a systematic way of solving many physical models involving nonlinear partial differential equations in mathematical physics.

  20. Approximate Symmetry Reduction Approach: Infinite Series Reductions to the KdV-Burgers Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Xiaoyu; Yao, Ruoxia; Zhang, Shunli; Lou, Sen Y.

    2009-11-01

    For weak dispersion and weak dissipation cases, the (1+1)-dimensional KdV-Burgers equation is investigated in terms of approximate symmetry reduction approach. The formal coherence of similarity reduction solutions and similarity reduction equations of different orders enables series reduction solutions. For the weak dissipation case, zero-order similarity solutions satisfy the Painlevé II, Painlevé I, and Jacobi elliptic function equations. For the weak dispersion case, zero-order similarity solutions are in the form of Kummer, Airy, and hyperbolic tangent functions. Higher-order similarity solutions can be obtained by solving linear variable coefficients ordinary differential equations.

  1. Exact traveling wave solutions of modified KdV-Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation and viscous Burgers equation.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Hamidul; Khan, Kamruzzaman; Akbar, M Ali; Salam, Md Abdus

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of many physical systems leads to nonlinear evolution equations because most physical systems are inherently nonlinear in nature. The investigation of traveling wave solutions of nonlinear partial differential equations (NPDEs) plays a significant role in the study of nonlinear physical phenomena. In this article, we construct the traveling wave solutions of modified KDV-ZK equation and viscous Burgers equation by using an enhanced (G '/G) -expansion method. A number of traveling wave solutions in terms of unknown parameters are obtained. Derived traveling wave solutions exhibit solitary waves when special values are given to its unknown parameters. 35C07; 35C08; 35P99.

  2. A Marker Method for the Solution of the Damped Burgers' Equatio

    SciTech Connect

    Jerome L.V. Lewandowski

    2005-11-01

    A new method for the solution of the damped Burgers' equation is described. The marker method relies on the definition of a convective field associated with the underlying partial differential equation; the information about the approximate solution is associated with the response of an ensemble of markers to this convective field. Some key aspects of the method, such as the selection of the shape function and the initial loading, are discussed in some details. The marker method is applicable to a general class of nonlinear dispersive partial differential equations.

  3. Two different methods for numerical solution of the modified Burgers' equation.

    PubMed

    Karakoç, Seydi Battal Gazi; Başhan, Ali; Geyikli, Turabi

    2014-01-01

    A numerical solution of the modified Burgers' equation (MBE) is obtained by using quartic B-spline subdomain finite element method (SFEM) over which the nonlinear term is locally linearized and using quartic B-spline differential quadrature (QBDQM) method. The accuracy and efficiency of the methods are discussed by computing L 2 and L ∞ error norms. Comparisons are made with those of some earlier papers. The obtained numerical results show that the methods are effective numerical schemes to solve the MBE. A linear stability analysis, based on the von Neumann scheme, shows the SFEM is unconditionally stable. A rate of convergence analysis is also given for the DQM.

  4. Chemical Effects during Storage of Frozen Foods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powrie, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses (1) characteristics, interrelationships, and distribution of food constituents (including water) in unfrozen food systems; (2) the freezing process; and (3) chemical changes in food during frozen storage. Protein alterations and lipid oxidation are emphasized. (JN)

  5. Defective Reduction in Frozen Pie Manufacturing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nooted, Oranuch; Tangjitsitcharoen, Somkiat

    2017-06-01

    The frozen pie production has a lot of defects resulting in high production cost. Failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) technique has been applied to improve the frozen pie process. Pareto chart is also used to determine the major defects of frozen pie. There are 3 main processes that cause the defects which are the 1st freezing to glazing process, the forming process, and the folding process. The Risk Priority Number (RPN) obtained from FMEA is analyzed to reduce the defects. If RPN of each cause exceeds 45, the process will be considered to be improved and selected for the corrective and preventive actions. The results showed that RPN values decreased after the correction. Therefore, the implementation of FMEA technique can help to improve the performance of frozen pie process and reduce the defects approximately 51.9%.

  6. Use of frozen section in genitourinary pathology.

    PubMed

    Shen, Steven S; Truong, Luan D; Ro, Jae Y; Ayala, Alberto G

    2012-08-01

    Frozen section diagnosis provides critical information for immediate surgical management decision making. Over the last several years, there have been some significant advances in treatment of genitourinary cancer, particularly with regard to surgical techniques. These changes in turn impact the type and frequency of intraoperative frozen section requests. In this review, we describe the main indications and diagnostic challenges of frozen section diagnosis during surgeries of each genitourinary organ system including prostate, kidney, bladder, testis, and penis. The pitfalls and approaches to different diagnostic situations are discussed. It is also stressed that pathologists must not only be familiar with the histological diagnosis, but also understand the limitations of frozen section diagnosis and communicate with urologists during the intraoperative treatment decision making process.

  7. Chemical Effects during Storage of Frozen Foods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powrie, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses (1) characteristics, interrelationships, and distribution of food constituents (including water) in unfrozen food systems; (2) the freezing process; and (3) chemical changes in food during frozen storage. Protein alterations and lipid oxidation are emphasized. (JN)

  8. Detection and genome characterization of bovine polyomaviruses in beef muscle and ground beef samples from Germany.

    PubMed

    Gräfe, Donina; Ehlers, Bernhard; Mäde, Dietrich; Ellerbroek, Lüppo; Seidler, Tassilo; Johne, Reimar

    2017-01-16

    Polyomaviruses are small, non-enveloped, circular double-stranded DNA viruses. Some polyomaviruses can induce tumors and cancer under certain circumstances. The bovine polyomaviruses (BPyV) 1-3 have been only scarcely analyzed so far. It was hypothesized that the consumption of beef meat containing polyomaviruses could contribute to the development of cancer in humans. In order to assess the distribution of the BPyV genome in meat from Germany, 101 beef muscle samples and 10 ground beef samples were analyzed here. A specific sample preparation method combined with or without rolling circle amplification (RCA), and BPyV-specific PCRs were developed and applied. BPyV-1 DNA was detected in 1/101 (1%) samples from beef meat and in 2/10 (20%) ground beef samples. BPyV-2 DNA was detected in 3/10 (30%) ground beef samples, whereas BPyV-3 was not detected in the samples. Application of RCA did not increase the detection rate in ground beef samples. Sequence analysis of the PCR products indicated the presence of BPyV-1, BPyV-2a and BPyV-2b. The whole genome of a BPyV-1 strain from ground beef meat showed 97.8% sequence identity to the BPyV-1 reference strain and that of a BPyV-2a strain from ground beef meet showed 99.9% sequence identity to strain 2aS11. It can be concluded that BPyV genomes can be frequently detected in ground beef samples, although higher sample numbers should be investigated in future to confirm this finding. Further studies should focus on the infectivity, tumorigenicity and heat resistance of the contained viruses in order to assess the risk of cancer induction through consumption of BPyVs present in beef products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Artificial insemination of cranes with frozen semen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gee, G.F.; Sexton, T.J.; Lewis, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    For the first time (1978) artificial insemination (AI) with frozen greater sandhill crane (Grus canadensis tabida) semen resulted in fertile eggs and chicks. During the 2 year (1977-78) study, 6 of 27 eggs produced were fertile. Three chicks hatched. Semen samples used for insemination were frozen and stored in liquid nitrogen for two months or less. Recent improvements in the laboratory indicated that a more effective sample can be prepared and greater fertility rates should be expected.

  10. Management of chickenpox with frozen mother's milk.

    PubMed

    Verd, Sergio; López, Esther

    2012-08-01

    If a mother has contracted chickenpox, the antibodies in her milk confer immunity against chickenpox to her breastfed babies. This passive immunization may avoid or spare the breastfed babies' symptoms of chickenpox. It is hypothesized that frozen breast milk may shorten chickenpox duration because specific antibodies against varicella zoster have been detected in human milk and they are resistant to digestion and are stable in frozen milk. The clinical outcomes of chickenpox in a 9-year-old boy and his father on frozen breast milk are reported. The study comprised a varicella-vaccine-refusing family attending a private office of pediatrics. The boy presented with a crusted varicella rash. The medical history revealed premature cessation of the typical varicella rash on day 3. It was coincidental with a supply of frozen human milk by his mother. Next, the father (41 years old) of this patient contracted chickenpox: he was on frozen breast milk from day 2, and no new pox emerged thereafter. The rash spread and numbered 50 to 150 lesions on day 2. Instead, the typical rash was expected to appear in three successive crops of lesions throughout the first week. The disease usually numbers approximately 250-500 lesions in unvaccinated healthy persons. Frozen breast milk may shorten chickenpox duration.

  11. Salmonella in beef and produce from honduras.

    PubMed

    Maradiaga, Martha; Miller, Mark F; Thompson, Leslie; Pond, Ansen; Gragg, Sara E; Echeverry, Alejandro; Garcia, Lyda G; Loneragan, Guy H; Brashears, Mindy M

    2015-03-01

    Salmonella continues to cause a considerable number of foodborne illnesses worldwide. The sources of outbreaks include contaminated meat and produce. The purpose of this study was to establish an initial investigation of the burden of Salmonella in produce and beef from Honduras by sampling retail markets and abattoirs. Retail produce samples (cantaloupes, cilantro, cucumbers, leafy greens, peppers, and tomatoes; n = 573) were purchased in three major cities of Honduras, and retail whole-muscle beef (n = 555) samples were also purchased in four major cities. Additionally, both hide and beef carcass (n = 141) samples were collected from two Honduran abattoirs. Whole-muscle beef samples were obtained using a sponge hydrated with buffered peptone water, and 10 ml of the buffered peptone water rinsate of each produce sample was collected with a dry sponge and placed in a bag to be transported back to the United States. Salmonella was detected using a commercially available, closeplatform PCR system, and positive samples were subjected to culture on selective media to obtain isolates. Overall, the prevalence of Salmonella-positive samples, based on PCR detection in Honduras (n = 555) retail beef was 10.1% (95% confidence interval = 7.8, 12.9), whereas 7.8% (n = 141) of beef carcass and hides samples were positive in both beef plants. The overall Salmonella prevalence for all produce samples (n = 573) collected was 2.1% (95% confidence interval = 1.2, 3.6). The most common serotypes identified in Honduras were Salmonella Typhimurium followed by Derby. These results provide an indication of Salmonella contamination of beef and produce in Honduras. Developing a Salmonella baseline for Latin America through an initial investigation like the one presented here contributes to a broader global understanding of the potential exposure through food, thus providing insight into the needs for control strategies.

  12. [Scientific ethics and frozen embryos].

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, C Y

    2001-05-01

    Scientific Ethics is the theory and praxis of decisions. Philosophical Ethics is presented as the theory and praxis of the good. As the good differs among cultures, Philosophical Ethics is dependent on the endo-cultural good conception. The decision (included that one of adhesion or not to a world vision) depends on neuro-psychic specific factors: i) cognitive factors that include mostly the knowledge of the alternatives and their consequences and the ideological or religious conception of good in relation to the alternatives; ii) affective factors that make alternatives pleasant, unpleasant or neutral, attractive, repulsive or neutral; iii) emotional factors that associate to alternatives anger, peace or neutrality, sadness, happiness or neutrality; iv) value factors that assign importance, triviality or neutrality to alternatives, or assign them significance, irrelevancy or neutrality. There are unspecific factors such as the psychic energy, desire or others. Mixed factors such as attitude, motivation, intention and others. Scientific Ethics deals with the mind as a materio-energetic process which is different from the soul, eggs and embryos of any species are full individuals of that species, because, they have initiated a copy of their genome that specify, give autonomy and define them as individuals. For Scientific Ethics to leave frozen embryos like that for ever, to defrost and get rid of them or to use their cells for science are synonymous of killing them. To defrost them to use their cells as stem cells for somatic cell therapy or to implant them into uteri to continue their development is to maintain alive their cells, but only the implantation allows their maintenance as individuals, thus, being the only compatible with the Christian ethics. The compatibility of these alternatives with other ethics is discussed.

  13. 21 CFR 152.126 - Frozen cherry pie.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Frozen cherry pie. 152.126 Section 152.126 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION FRUIT PIES Requirements for Specific Standardized Fruit Pies § 152.126 Frozen cherry pie. (a) Identity. (1) Frozen cherry pie (excluding baked and then frozen) is the food prepared...

  14. 21 CFR 152.126 - Frozen cherry pie.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Frozen cherry pie. 152.126 Section 152.126 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION FRUIT PIES Requirements for Specific Standardized Fruit Pies § 152.126 Frozen cherry pie. (a) Identity. (1) Frozen cherry pie (excluding baked and then frozen) is the food prepared...

  15. 21 CFR 152.126 - Frozen cherry pie.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Frozen cherry pie. 152.126 Section 152.126 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION FRUIT PIES Requirements for Specific Standardized Fruit Pies § 152.126 Frozen cherry pie. (a) Identity. (1) Frozen cherry pie (excluding baked and then frozen) is the food prepared...

  16. 21 CFR 160.190 - Frozen egg yolks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Frozen egg yolks. 160.190 Section 160.190 Food and... CONSUMPTION EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Eggs and Egg Products § 160.190 Frozen egg yolks. (a) Frozen egg yolks, frozen yolks is the food prepared by freezing egg yolks...

  17. 21 CFR 160.190 - Frozen egg yolks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Frozen egg yolks. 160.190 Section 160.190 Food and... CONSUMPTION EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Eggs and Egg Products § 160.190 Frozen egg yolks. (a) Frozen egg yolks, frozen yolks is the food prepared by freezing egg yolks...

  18. 21 CFR 160.150 - Frozen egg whites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Frozen egg whites. 160.150 Section 160.150 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Eggs and Egg Products § 160.150 Frozen egg whites. (a) Frozen egg whites, frozen egg albumen is the food prepared by...

  19. 21 CFR 160.150 - Frozen egg whites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Frozen egg whites. 160.150 Section 160.150 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Eggs and Egg Products § 160.150 Frozen egg whites. (a) Frozen egg whites, frozen egg albumen is the food prepared by...

  20. 21 CFR 160.150 - Frozen egg whites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Frozen egg whites. 160.150 Section 160.150 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Eggs and Egg Products § 160.150 Frozen egg whites. (a) Frozen egg whites, frozen egg albumen is the food prepared by...

  1. 21 CFR 160.190 - Frozen egg yolks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Frozen egg yolks. 160.190 Section 160.190 Food and... CONSUMPTION EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Eggs and Egg Products § 160.190 Frozen egg yolks. (a) Frozen egg yolks, frozen yolks is the food prepared by freezing egg yolks...

  2. 21 CFR 160.190 - Frozen egg yolks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Frozen egg yolks. 160.190 Section 160.190 Food and... CONSUMPTION EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Eggs and Egg Products § 160.190 Frozen egg yolks. (a) Frozen egg yolks, frozen yolks is the food prepared by freezing egg yolks...

  3. 21 CFR 160.150 - Frozen egg whites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Frozen egg whites. 160.150 Section 160.150 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Eggs and Egg Products § 160.150 Frozen egg whites. (a) Frozen egg whites, frozen egg albumen is the food prepared by...

  4. 21 CFR 160.150 - Frozen egg whites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Frozen egg whites. 160.150 Section 160.150 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Eggs and Egg Products § 160.150 Frozen egg whites. (a) Frozen egg whites, frozen egg albumen is the food prepared by...

  5. 21 CFR 160.190 - Frozen egg yolks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Frozen egg yolks. 160.190 Section 160.190 Food and... CONSUMPTION EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Eggs and Egg Products § 160.190 Frozen egg yolks. (a) Frozen egg yolks, frozen yolks is the food prepared by freezing egg yolks...

  6. 21 CFR 152.126 - Frozen cherry pie.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Frozen cherry pie. 152.126 Section 152.126 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION FRUIT PIES Requirements for Specific Standardized Fruit Pies § 152.126 Frozen cherry pie. (a) Identity. (1) Frozen cherry pie (excluding baked and then frozen) is the food prepared by...

  7. 21 CFR 152.126 - Frozen cherry pie.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Frozen cherry pie. 152.126 Section 152.126 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION FRUIT PIES Requirements for Specific Standardized Fruit Pies § 152.126 Frozen cherry pie. (a) Identity. (1) Frozen cherry pie (excluding baked and then frozen) is the food prepared by...

  8. Wavelet representation of lower-atmospheric long nonlinear wave dynamics, governed by the Benjamin-Davis-Ono-Burgers equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Aime

    1995-04-01

    A modified technique is presented for projecting a large class of nonlinear partial differential equations with respect to (x, t) onto a finite number of ordinary differential equations with respect to t. Improved description compared to standard finite-difference or Fourier spectral methods involves using an orthonormal basis of wavelet functions (psi) (nu ,n)(x). Whereas Fourier projection represents the interaction between spatial scales throughout the x- domain, wavelet representation does the same locally. This technique is applied to solving the BDO-Burgers equation, extending previous results for the Burgers equation.

  9. Determination and assessment of total mercury levels in local, frozen and canned fish in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Obeid, Pierre J; El-Khoury, Bilal; Burger, Joanne; Aouad, Samer; Younis, Mira; Aoun, Amal; El-Nakat, John Hanna

    2011-01-01

    Fish is an important constituent of the Lebanese diet. However, very little attention in our area is given to bring awareness regarding the effect of the toxicity of mercury (Hg) mainly through fish consumption. This study aimed to report analytical data on total mercury levels in several fish species for the first time in thirty years and to also made individuals aware of the presence and danger from exposure to mercury through fish consumption. Fish samples were selected from local Lebanese markets and fisheries and included 94 samples of which were fresh, frozen, processed, and canned fish. All values were reported as microgram of mercury per gram of fish based on wet weight. The level of mercury ranged from 0.0190 to 0.5700 microg/g in fresh samples, 0.0059 to 0.0665 microg/g in frozen samples, and 0.0305 to 0.1190 microg/g in canned samples. The data clearly showed that higher levels of mercury were detected in local fresh fish as opposed to other types thus placing consumers at higher risk from mercury exposure. Moreover, the data revealed that Mallifa (yellowstripe barracuda/Sphyraena chrysotaenia), Sargous (white seabream/Diplodus sargus), Ghobbos (bogue/Boops boops), and shrimp (Penaeus sp.) were among the types containing the highest amounts of mercury. On the other hand, processed fish such as fish fillet, fish burger, small shrimp and crab are found to contain lower levels of mercury and are associated with lower exposure risks to mercury. Lebanese population should therefore, be aware to consume limited amounts of fresh local fish to minimize exposure to mercury.

  10. National Beef Quality Audit-2011: Survey of instrument grading assessments of beef carcass characteristics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The instrument grading assessments for the 2011 National Beef Quality Audit evaluated seasonal trends of beef carcass quality and yield attributes over the course of the year. One week of instrument grading data, HCW, gender, USDA quality grade (QG), and yield grade (YG) factors, were collected ever...

  11. 9 CFR 319.102 - Corned beef round and other corned beef cuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Corned beef round and other corned beef cuts. 319.102 Section 319.102 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS OF IDENTITY OR COMPOSITION Cured...

  12. Entropy Stable Staggered Grid Spectral Collocation for the Burgers' and Compressible Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Mark H.; Parsani, Matteo; Fisher, Travis C.; Nielsen, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Staggered grid, entropy stable discontinuous spectral collocation operators of any order are developed for Burgers' and the compressible Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured hexahedral elements. This generalization of previous entropy stable spectral collocation work [1, 2], extends the applicable set of points from tensor product, Legendre-Gauss-Lobatto (LGL) to a combination of tensor product Legendre-Gauss (LG) and LGL points. The new semi-discrete operators discretely conserve mass, momentum, energy and satisfy a mathematical entropy inequality for both Burgers' and the compressible Navier-Stokes equations in three spatial dimensions. They are valid for smooth as well as discontinuous flows. The staggered LG and conventional LGL point formulations are compared on several challenging test problems. The staggered LG operators are significantly more accurate, although more costly to implement. The LG and LGL operators exhibit similar robustness, as is demonstrated using test problems known to be problematic for operators that lack a nonlinearly stability proof for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations (e.g., discontinuous Galerkin, spectral difference, or flux reconstruction operators).

  13. Anomalous scaling at nonthermal fixed points of Burgers' and Gross-Pitaevskii turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathey, Steven; Gasenzer, Thomas; Pawlowski, Jan M.

    2015-08-01

    Scaling in the dynamical properties of complex many-body systems has been of strong interest since turbulence phenomena became the subject of systematic mathematical studies. In this article, dynamical critical phenomena far from equilibrium are investigated with functional renormalization-group equations. The focus is set on scaling solutions of the stochastic driven-dissipative Burgers equation and their relation to solutions known in the literature for Burgers' and Kardar-Parisi-Zhang dynamics. We furthermore relate superfluid as well as acoustic turbulence described by the Gross-Pitaevskii model to known analytic and numerical results for scaling solutions. In this way, the canonical Kolmogorov exponent 5/3 for the energy cascade in superfluid turbulence is obtained analytically. We also get results for anomalous exponents of acoustic and quantum turbulence. These are consistent with existing experimental data. Our results should be relevant for future experiments with, e.g., exciton-polariton condensates in solid-state systems as well as with ultracold atomic gases.

  14. The KdV—Burgers equation in a modified speed gradient continuum model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Ling-Ling; Cheng, Rong-Jun; Li, Zhi-Peng; Ge, Hong-Xia

    2013-06-01

    Based on the full velocity difference model, Jiang et al. put forward the speed gradient model through the micro-macro linkage (Jiang R, Wu Q S and Zhu Z J 2001 Chin. Sci. Bull. 46 345 and Jiang R, Wu Q S and Zhu Z J 2002 Trans. Res. B 36 405). In this paper, the Taylor expansion is adopted to modify the model. The backward travel problem is overcome by our model, which exists in many higher-order continuum models. The neutral stability condition of the model is obtained through the linear stability analysis. Nonlinear analysis shows clearly that the density fluctuation in traffic flow leads to a variety of density waves. Moreover, the Korteweg-de Vries—Burgers (KdV—Burgers) equation is derived to describe the traffic flow near the neutral stability line and the corresponding solution for traffic density wave is derived. The numerical simulation is carried out to investigate the local cluster effects. The results are consistent with the realistic traffic flow and also further verify the results of nonlinear analysis.

  15. Burgers equation with no-flux boundary conditions and its application for complete fluid separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Shinya; Matsumoto, Sohei; Higurashi, Tomohiro; Ono, Naoki

    2016-09-01

    Burgers equation in a one-dimensional bounded domain with no-flux boundary conditions at both ends is proven to be exactly solvable. Cole-Hopf transformation converts not only the governing equation to the heat equation with an extra damping but also the nonlinear mixed boundary conditions to Dirichlet boundary conditions. The average of the solution v bar is conserved. Consequently, from an arbitrary initial condition, solutions converge to the equilibrium solution which is unique for the given v bar. The problem arises naturally as a continuum limit of a network of certain micro-devices. Each micro-device imperfectly separates a target fluid component from a mixture of more than one component, and its input-output concentration relationships are modeled by a pair of quadratic maps. The solvability of the initial boundary value problem is used to demonstrate that such a network acts as an ideal macro-separator, separating out the target component almost completely. Another network is also proposed which leads to a modified Burgers equation with a nonlinear diffusion coefficient.

  16. Inverting Glacial Isostatic Adjustment beyond linear viscoelasticity using the Burgers rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, Lambert; Greff-Lefftz, Marianne; Fleitout, Luce; Métivier, Laurent; Rouby, Hélène

    2015-04-01

    In Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) inverse modeling, the usual assumption for the mantle rheology is the Maxwell model, which exhibits constant viscosity over time. However, mineral physics experiments and post-seismic observations show evidence of a transient component in the deformation of the shallow mantle, with a short-term viscosity lower than the long-term one. In these studies, the resulting rheology is modeled by a Burgers material: such rheology is indeed expected as the mantle is a mixture of materials with different viscosities. We propose to apply this rheology for the whole viscoelastic mantle, and, using a Bayesian MCMC inverse formalism for GIA during the last glacial cycle, study its impact on estimations of viscosity values, elastic thickness of the lithosphere, and ice distribution. To perform this inversion, we use a global dataset of sea level records, the geological constraints of ice-sheet margins, and present-day GPS data as well as satellite gravimetry. Our ambition is to present not only the best fitting model, but also the range of possible solutions (within the explored space of parameters) with their respective probability of explaining the data. Our results show that the Burgers model is able to fit the dataset as well as the Maxwell model, but would imply a larger lower mantle viscosity, thicker ice sheets over Fennoscandia and Canada, and thinner ice sheets over Antarctica and Greenland.

  17. Soliton-like solutions to the generalized Burgers-Huxley equation with variable coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triki, Houria; Wazwaz, Abdul-Majid

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we consider the generalized Burgers-Huxley equation with arbitrary power of nonlinearity and timedependent coefficients. We analyze the traveling wave problem and explicitly find new soliton-like solutions for this extended equation by using the ansatz of Zhao et al. [X. Zhao, D. Tang, L. Wang, Phys. Lett. A 346 (2005) 288-291]. We also employ the solitary wave ansatz method to derive the exact bright and dark soliton solutions for the considered evolution equation. The physical parameters in the soliton solutions are obtained as function of the time-dependent model coefficients. The conditions of existence of solitons are presented. As a result, rich exact travelling wave solutions, which contain new soliton-like solutions, bell-shaped solitons and kink-shaped solitons for the generalized Burgers-Huxley equation with time-dependent coefficients, are obtained. The methods employed here can also be used to solve a large class of nonlinear evolution equations with variable coefficients.

  18. New analytical method for solving Burgers' and nonlinear heat transfer equations and comparison with HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidi, M. M.; Erfani, E.

    2009-09-01

    In this study, we present a numerical comparison between the differential transform method (DTM) and the homotopy analysis method (HAM) for solving Burgers' and nonlinear heat transfer problems. The first differential equation is the Burgers' equation serves as a useful model for many interesting problems in applied mathematics. The second one is the modeling equation of a straight fin with a temperature dependent thermal conductivity. In order to show the effectiveness of the DTM, the results obtained from the DTM is compared with available solutions obtained using the HAM [M.M. Rashidi, G. Domairry, S. Dinarvand, Commun. Nonlinear Sci. Numer. Simul. 14 (2009) 708-717; G. Domairry, M. Fazeli, Commun. Nonlinear Sci. Numer. Simul. 14 (2009) 489-499] and whit exact solutions. The method can easily be applied to many linear and nonlinear problems. It illustrates the validity and the great potential of the differential transform method in solving nonlinear partial differential equations. The obtained results reveal that the technique introduced here is very effective and convenient for solving nonlinear partial differential equations and nonlinear ordinary differential equations that we are found to be in good agreement with the exact solutions.

  19. Numerical analysis of the Burgers' equation in the presence of uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Pettersson, Per Iaccarino, Gianluca Nordstroem, Jan

    2009-12-01

    The Burgers' equation with uncertain initial and boundary conditions is investigated using a polynomial chaos (PC) expansion approach where the solution is represented as a truncated series of stochastic, orthogonal polynomials. The analysis of well-posedness for the system resulting after Galerkin projection is presented and follows the pattern of the corresponding deterministic Burgers equation. The numerical discretization is based on spatial derivative operators satisfying the summation by parts property and weak boundary conditions to ensure stability. Similarly to the deterministic case, the explicit time step for the hyperbolic stochastic problem is proportional to the inverse of the largest eigenvalue of the system matrix. The time step naturally decreases compared to the deterministic case since the spectral radius of the continuous problem grows with the number of polynomial chaos coefficients. An estimate of the eigenvalues is provided. A characteristic analysis of the truncated PC system is presented and gives a qualitative description of the development of the system over time for different initial and boundary conditions. It is shown that a precise statistical characterization of the input uncertainty is required and partial information, e.g. the expected values and the variance, are not sufficient to obtain a solution. An analytical solution is derived and the coefficients of the infinite PC expansion are shown to be smooth, while the corresponding coefficients of the truncated expansion are discontinuous.

  20. 21 CFR 146.137 - Frozen orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Frozen orange juice. 146.137 Section 146.137 Food... Beverages § 146.137 Frozen orange juice. (a) Frozen orange juice is orange juice as defined in § 146.135, except that it is frozen. (b) The name of the food is “Frozen orange juice”. Such name may be preceded...

  1. 21 CFR 146.137 - Frozen orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Frozen orange juice. 146.137 Section 146.137 Food... Beverages § 146.137 Frozen orange juice. (a) Frozen orange juice is orange juice as defined in § 146.135, except that it is frozen. (b) The name of the food is “Frozen orange juice”. Such name may be preceded...

  2. 21 CFR 146.137 - Frozen orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Frozen orange juice. 146.137 Section 146.137 Food... Beverages § 146.137 Frozen orange juice. (a) Frozen orange juice is orange juice as defined in § 146.135, except that it is frozen. (b) The name of the food is “Frozen orange juice”. Such name may be preceded on...

  3. 21 CFR 146.137 - Frozen orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Frozen orange juice. 146.137 Section 146.137 Food... Beverages § 146.137 Frozen orange juice. (a) Frozen orange juice is orange juice as defined in § 146.135, except that it is frozen. (b) The name of the food is “Frozen orange juice”. Such name may be preceded on...

  4. 21 CFR 146.137 - Frozen orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Frozen orange juice. 146.137 Section 146.137 Food... Beverages § 146.137 Frozen orange juice. (a) Frozen orange juice is orange juice as defined in § 146.135, except that it is frozen. (b) The name of the food is “Frozen orange juice”. Such name may be preceded on...

  5. Consumer impressions of Tender Select beef.

    PubMed

    Shackelford, S D; Wheeler, T L; Meade, M K; Reagan, J O; Byrnes, B L; Koohmaraie, M

    2001-10-01

    With the recent development of technology to classify beef for tenderness, it is now possible for packers and retailers to market brands of beef known to be consistently tender. The present experiment was conducted to determine consumer impressions of Tender Select, a model beef brand comprised of cuts from tender U.S. Select carcasses. A telephone survey was conducted in metropolitan Denver, CO, to recruit consumers (n = 1,036) for this study. Consumers who met minimal limits for household income, age, and beef consumption were invited to participate in a beef shopping and usage study in a local supermarket. Point-of-purchase material was developed that described Tender Select as "the only steak guaranteed tender and lean." When shown a copy of the Tender Select concept card, 89% of participating consumers (n = 759) indicated that they would definitely or probably buy that product. Of those consumers that said they would buy the product, 35% indicated that their purchases of Tender Select would be in addition to their current fresh meat purchases. Most consumers (54.1%) indicated that if Tender Select was available at their grocery store, 1 or 2 of their next 10 purchases of beef cuts would be Tender Select. Sixty-five percent of consumers indicated that if a grocery store carried a line of beef cuts guaranteed to be tender, they would buy all of their beef at that store. Both strip loins from 104 U.S. Select beef carcasses, representing a broad range (8.7 to 43.4 kg; CV = 42%) in slice shear force (SSF) at 14 d postmortem, were used to determine the effect of SSF classification on consumer satisfaction and the correlation among trained sensory panel descriptive attribute ratings and in-home consumer ratings of beef longissimus steaks. Both trained sensory panelists and consumers rated low-SSF steaks higher than the high-SSF steaks for all traits (P < 0.001). All consumer traits (like, tenderness, juiciness, flavor like, flavor amount, and overall satisfaction

  6. Mineralization of cellulose in frozen boreal soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oquist, Mats G.; Segura, Javier; Sparrman, Tobias; Nilsson, Mats; Schleucher, Jurgen

    2015-04-01

    Soils of high-latitude ecosystems store a large fraction of the global soil carbon. In boreal forests, the microbial mineralization of soil organic matter (SOM) during winter can affect the ecosystems net carbon balance. Recent research has shown that microorganisms in the organic surface layer of boreal forest soil can mineralize and grow on simple, soluble monomeric substrates under frozen conditions. However, any substantial impacts of microbial activity in frozen soils on long-term soil carbon balances ultimately depends on whether soil microorganisms can utilize and grow the more complex, polymeric constituents of SOM. In order to evaluate the potential for soil microorganisms to metabolize carbon polymers at low temperatures, we incubated boreal forest soil samples amended with [13C]-cellulose and studied the microbial catabolic and anabolic utilization of the substrate under frozen and unfrozen conditions (-4 and +4°C). Freezing of the soil markedly reduced microbial utilization of the cellulose. The [13C]-CO2 production rate in the samples at +4°C were 0.52 mg CO2 SOM -1 day-1 while rates in the frozen samples (-4°C) were 0.01 mg CO2 SOM -1 day-1. However, newly synthetized [13C]-enriched cell membrane lipids, PLFAs, were detected in soil samples incubated both above and below freezing, confirming that cellulose can sustain also anabolic activity of the microbial populations under frozen conditions. The reduced metabolic rates induced by freezing indicate constraints on exoenzymatic activity, as well as substrate diffusion rates that we can attribute to reduced liquid water content of the frozen soil. We conclude that the microbial population in boreal forest soil has the capacity to metabolize, and grow, on polymeric substrates at temperatures below zero, which involves maintaining exoenzymatic activity in frozen soils. This capacity manifests the importance of SOM mineralization during the winter season and its importance for the net carbon balance of

  7. Dietary PUFA Intervention Affects Fatty Acid- and Micronutrient Profiles of Beef and Related Beef Products.

    PubMed

    Dannenberger, Dirk; Nuernberg, Karin; Herdmann, Andrea; Nuernberg, Gerd; Hagemann, Elke; Kienast, Walter

    2013-07-09

    The study investigated the dietary impact of 18:3n-3 vs. 18:2n-6 on fatty acid- and micronutrient concentration of beef muscle and the extent of diet- and processing-induced changes of lipid- and micronutrient concentrations of beef products made thereof (German Corned beef (GCB), tea sausage spread (TSS), scalded sausage (SS)). Beef and beef products were obtained from German Holstein bulls which either received a control diet consisting of maize silage and concentrate with soybean meal (41%), or an experimental diet of grass silage and concentrate plus rapeseed cake (12%) and linseed oil (3%). The study revealed that upon an 18:3n-3 vs. 18:2n-6 intervention the amounts of 18:3n-3, EPA and Σn-3 LC-PUFA were significantly increased by 2.6, 2.3 and 1.7 fold, respectively. Experimental diet significantly increased β-carotene contents, and the γ-tocopherol contents were decreased. During beef processing, n-3 PUFA from beef were found to be product-specifically transferred into the corresponding beef products. 18:3n-3 and Σn-3 LC-PUFA contents were found to be 1.4 and 1.5 times higher in GCB from grass silage- than maize silage-fed bulls. The trace element contents in GCB (iron, copper, zinc, selenium) were not affected by the diet; however γ-tocopherol contents were decreased by experimental diet. In conclusion, dietary n-3 PUFA were completely transferred into beef products unaffected by beef processing conditions.

  8. Dietary PUFA Intervention Affects Fatty Acid- and Micronutrient Profiles of Beef and Related Beef Products

    PubMed Central

    Dannenberger, Dirk; Nuernberg, Karin; Herdmann, Andrea; Nuernberg, Gerd; Hagemann, Elke; Kienast, Walter

    2013-01-01

    The study investigated the dietary impact of 18:3n-3 vs. 18:2n-6 on fatty acid- and micronutrient concentration of beef muscle and the extent of diet- and processing-induced changes of lipid- and micronutrient concentrations of beef products made thereof (German Corned beef (GCB), tea sausage spread (TSS), scalded sausage (SS)). Beef and beef products were obtained from German Holstein bulls which either received a control diet consisting of maize silage and concentrate with soybean meal (41%), or an experimental diet of grass silage and concentrate plus rapeseed cake (12%) and linseed oil (3%). The study revealed that upon an 18:3n-3 vs. 18:2n-6 intervention the amounts of 18:3n-3, EPA and Σn-3 LC-PUFA were significantly increased by 2.6, 2.3 and 1.7 fold, respectively. Experimental diet significantly increased β-carotene contents, and the γ-tocopherol contents were decreased. During beef processing, n-3 PUFA from beef were found to be product-specifically transferred into the corresponding beef products. 18:3n-3 and Σn-3 LC-PUFA contents were found to be 1.4 and 1.5 times higher in GCB from grass silage- than maize silage-fed bulls. The trace element contents in GCB (iron, copper, zinc, selenium) were not affected by the diet; however γ-tocopherol contents were decreased by experimental diet. In conclusion, dietary n-3 PUFA were completely transferred into beef products unaffected by beef processing conditions. PMID:28239116

  9. 9 CFR 319.15 - Miscellaneous beef products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... more than 30 percent fat and shall not contain added water or extenders. Transglutaminase enzyme at... beef byproduct derived from the low temperature rendering (not exceeding 120 °F.) of fresh beef fatty...

  10. 9 CFR 319.15 - Miscellaneous beef products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... more than 30 percent fat and shall not contain added water or extenders. Transglutaminase enzyme at... beef byproduct derived from the low temperature rendering (not exceeding 120 °F.) of fresh beef fatty...

  11. 9 CFR 319.15 - Miscellaneous beef products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... more than 30 percent fat and shall not contain added water or extenders. Transglutaminase enzyme at... beef byproduct derived from the low temperature rendering (not exceeding 120 °F.) of fresh beef fatty...

  12. Effect of rapid thawing on the meat quality attributes of USDA select beef strip loin steaks.

    PubMed

    Eastridge, Janet S; Bowker, Brian C

    2011-03-01

    The objective was to determine the meat quality effects of rapidly thawing beef steaks in a water bath. Frozen beef strip loins (n = 24) were cut into steaks sequentially from the rib end and identified by anatomical location (anterior, middle, posterior) within the loin. Within location, steaks were randomly assigned to conventional (C; 18 to 20 h, 4 °C) or rapid thawing methods. Rapid thawing methods, fast (20 min, 20 °C) or very fast (11 min, 39 °C), were conducted in a circulating water bath. The physical, thawing, cooking, color, and texture characteristics of each steak were recorded. Data were analyzed as a randomized complete block design with a 3 thawing treatments × 3 locations factorial analysis with loin as a block. No location by thawing method interaction was detected (P > 0.05) for the measured variables. Compared to C steaks, rapidly thawed steaks exhibited lower thaw drip loss (P < 0.001) and higher a* values (P < 0.001). Thawing treatment did not influence L*, b*, cook yield, or shear force. Steaks from the posterior end had higher (P < 0.001) surface to volume ratios that may have contributed to the higher thaw loss (P < 0.01), longer cooking time (P < 0.001), lower cooking yield (P < 0.001), and higher shear force (P < 0.02) compared to steaks from the anterior and middle portions of the loins. These data indicate that beef steaks taken from the entire length of the loin can be rapidly thawed in a water bath following food safety guidelines with minimal impact on meat quality. Practical Application:  Freezing rate and frozen storage effects on meat quality have been well documented; however, there is comparatively little information on the meat quality effects of rapid thawing within food safety guidelines. This study demonstrates that beef strip loin steaks can be rapidly thawed in as few as 11 min without affecting texture or cooking yield, while reducing thaw drip loss. Thus, rapid thawing may enhance the apparent juiciness of steaks

  13. Fall Speeds of Freezing and Frozen Raindrops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, A. M.; Rahman, K. M.; Testik, F. Y.

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the fall speeds of freezing and frozen raindrops through field observations. While there have been many studies on the fall speed of warm raindrops (i.e. raindrops that are in liquid state during fall and after impact on a surface), yielding a number of parameterizations to predict the terminal fall speed of warm raindrops, such studies are limited for freezing and frozen raindrops. Moreover, the parameterizations developed for predicting the terminal fall speeds of warm raindrops are not applicable to freezing and frozen raindrops. The information on freezing and frozen raindrop fall speeds has important meteorological applications: for example, identification of precipitation type and radar retrieval of precipitation rates during such events. In this study, field data was collected using a new instrument called the High-speed Optical Disdrometer (HOD) that we recently developed. This data provided valuable insights into fall speeds of freezing and frozen raindrops, which will be discussed in our presentation. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants No. AGS-1144846 and AGS-1612681.

  14. r-modified Crank-Nicholson difference schemes for one dimensional nonlinear viscous Burgers' equation for an incompressible flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashyralyev, Allaberen; Gambo, Yusuf Ya'u.

    2016-08-01

    The nonlocal boundary value problem for viscous Burgers' equation is considered. Solutions to the 1-D equation are presented numerically by Rothe, Crank-Nicholson and r-modified Crank-Nicholson difference schemes. Matlab codes for all the three schemes are designed based on the idea of fixed-point iteration procedure and modified Gauss elimination method. The numerical results are compared.

  15. Promise and Ontological Ambiguity in the In vitro Meat Imagescape: From Laboratory Myotubes to the Cultured Burger

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Neil; Ruivenkamp, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In vitro meat (IVM), also known as cultured meat, involves growing cells into muscle tissue to be eaten as food. The technology had its most high-profile moment in 2013 when a cultured burger was cooked and tasted in a press conference. Images of the burger featured in the international media and were circulated across the Internet. These images—literally marks on a two-dimensional surface—do important work in establishing what IVM is and what it can do. A combination of visual semiotics and narrative analysis shows that images of IVM afford readings of their story that are co-created by the viewer. Before the cultured burger, during 2011, images of IVM fell into four distinct categories: cell images, tissue images, flowcharts, and meat in a dish images. The narrative infrastructure of each image type affords different interpretations of what IVM can accomplish and what it is. The 2013 cultured burger images both draw upon and depart from these image types in an attempt to present IVM as a normal food stuff, and as ‘matter in place’ when placed on the plate. The analysis of individual images and the collection of images about a certain object or subject—known as the imagescape—is a productive approach to understanding the ontology and promise of IVM and is applicable to other areas of social life. PMID:27695202

  16. Travelling wave solutions and conservation laws of a generalized (2+1)-dimensional Burgers-Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mhlanga, Isaiah Elvis; Khalique, Chaudry Masood

    2017-07-01

    In this paper we study a generalized (2+1)-dimensional Burgers-Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation. Travelling wave solutions are obtained using Lie symmetry method along with the (G'/G)- expansion method. Finally, conservation laws are constructed by employing the new conservation theorem due to Ibragimov.

  17. Bell-shaped and kink-shaped solutions of the generalized Benjamin-Bona-Mahony-Burgers equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jin Hyuk; Kim, Hyunsoo

    We consider the generalized Benjamin-Bona-Mahony-Burgers equation to construct exact solutions by employing the improved system technique. We believe that the improved system technique is effective and stable to find exact solutions of nonlinear partial differential equations as well as the considered equation. Moreover, we perform meaningfully the behaviors of the obtained solutions under suitable physical variable coefficients.

  18. Promise and Ontological Ambiguity in the In vitro Meat Imagescape: From Laboratory Myotubes to the Cultured Burger.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Neil; Ruivenkamp, Martin

    2016-07-02

    In vitro meat (IVM), also known as cultured meat, involves growing cells into muscle tissue to be eaten as food. The technology had its most high-profile moment in 2013 when a cultured burger was cooked and tasted in a press conference. Images of the burger featured in the international media and were circulated across the Internet. These images-literally marks on a two-dimensional surface-do important work in establishing what IVM is and what it can do. A combination of visual semiotics and narrative analysis shows that images of IVM afford readings of their story that are co-created by the viewer. Before the cultured burger, during 2011, images of IVM fell into four distinct categories: cell images, tissue images, flowcharts, and meat in a dish images. The narrative infrastructure of each image type affords different interpretations of what IVM can accomplish and what it is. The 2013 cultured burger images both draw upon and depart from these image types in an attempt to present IVM as a normal food stuff, and as 'matter in place' when placed on the plate. The analysis of individual images and the collection of images about a certain object or subject-known as the imagescape-is a productive approach to understanding the ontology and promise of IVM and is applicable to other areas of social life.

  19. Teaching Consumer Selection of Market Quality Beef by Observable Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halvorson, Dorothy; Jacobson, Marion

    1977-01-01

    Through a series of five tests, a slide-tape instructional presentation on the identification of beef quality was developed. It was determined that the slide-tape instruction can enable consumers to score more accurately characteristics of raw beef in relation to the characteristics of cooked beef. (Editor/TA)

  20. The relevancy of forage quality to beef production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Low cost and abundant fossil fuels have driven the USA beef industry toward greater dependence on feed grains as the major feedstuff for finished beef cattle production and has lead to a centralized beef cattle feeding and processing system concentrated in the High Plains states. Low cost fuel and m...

  1. Teaching Consumer Selection of Market Quality Beef by Observable Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halvorson, Dorothy; Jacobson, Marion

    1977-01-01

    Through a series of five tests, a slide-tape instructional presentation on the identification of beef quality was developed. It was determined that the slide-tape instruction can enable consumers to score more accurately characteristics of raw beef in relation to the characteristics of cooked beef. (Editor/TA)

  2. Food safety issues and the microbiology of beef

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    World demand for high-quality animal protein presents opportunities for growth and expanded trade which is predicted to increase more than 6% for major beef producing countries and their beef industries. Contingent upon an increased consumer demand for beef is the production of high quality and mic...

  3. Comprehensive national assessment of the sustainability of beef production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A national assessment is being conducted by the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, a contractor to the beef checkoff, to develop better scientific understanding of the sustainability of beef. This includes a life cycle assessment (LCA) of greenhouse gas emissions along with other environmental, ...

  4. Microbial quality of frozen Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus) meat samples from three selected farms in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Makanyanga, Tsitsi B; Mutema, Gideon; Mukarati, Norman L; Chikerema, Sylvester M; Makaya, Pious V; Musari, Shuvai; Matope, Gift

    2014-01-17

    Microbial quality of frozen Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus) meat from three farms in Zimbabwe was assessed based on 2051 samples collected for pre-export testing during 2006 to 2011. Data were perused by season and year in terms of aerobic plate (APC), coliform (CC), Escherichia coli (ECC) and Listeria monocytogenes (LMC) counts and the presence of Salmonella spp. The log10-transformed data were compared among the farms and seasons using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Microbial quality of the samples was graded based on the EC No. 2073.2005 criteria for beef. The mean APC and CC for the crocodile meat differed significantly (P=0.000) among the farms with the highest APC (3.2±0.05 log10 cfu/g) and the lowest (2.7±0.05 log10 cfu/g) recorded from farms A and C, respectively. There were no significant differences (P>0.05) in ECC and LMC among the farms, while Salmonella spp. were only isolated from one farm. Although the microbial quality of frozen crocodile meat from these farms was generally within acceptable limits, the isolation of E. coli and Salmonella spp. is of public health concern. Thus, implementing of measures to control the pasteurizing process and to minimize bacterial contamination of crocodile meat after pasteurization need to be carefully considered. © 2013.

  5. Soil organic matter mineralization in frozen soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrysson Drotz, S.; Sparrman, T.; Schleucher, J.; Nilsson, M.; Öquist, M. G.

    2009-12-01

    Boreal forest soils are frozen for a large part of the year and soil organic matter mineralization during this period has been shown to significantly influence the C balance of boreal forest ecosystems. Mineralization proceeds through heterotrophic microbial activity, but the understanding of the environmental controls regulating soil organic matter mineralization under frozen conditions is poor. Through a series of investigations we have addressed this issue in order to elucidate to what extent a range of environmental factors control mineralization processes in frozen soils and also the microbial communities potential to oxidize organic substrates and grow under such conditions. The unfrozen water content in the frozen soils was shown to be an integral control on the temperature response of biogenic CO2 production across the freezing point of bulk soil water. We found that osmotic potential was an important contributor to the total water potential and, hence, the unfrozen water content of frozen soil. From being low and negligible in an unfrozen soil, the osmotic potential was found to contribute up to 70% of the total water potential in frozen soil, greatly influencing the volume of liquid water. The specific factors of how soil organic matter composition affected the unfrozen water content and CO2 production of frozen soil were studied by CP-MAS NMR. We concluded that abundance of aromatics and recalcitrant compounds showed a significant positive correlation with unfrozen water content and these were also the major soil organic fractions that similarly correlated with the microbial CO2 production of the frozen soils. Thus, the hierarchy of environmental factors controlling SOM mineralization changes as soils freeze and environmental controls elucidated from studies of unfrozen systems can not be added on frozen conditions. We have also investigated the potential activity of soil microbial communities under frozen conditions in order to elucidate temperature

  6. Where's the beef? Retail channel choice and beef preferences in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Colella, Florencia; Ortega, David L

    2017-11-01

    Argentinean beef is recognized and demanded internationally. Locally, consumers are often unable to afford certified beef products, and may rely on external cues to determine beef quality. Uncovering demand for beef attributes and marketing them accordingly, may require an understanding of consumers' product purchasing strategies, which involves retailer choice. We develop a framework utilizing latent class analysis to identify consumer groups with different retailer preferences, and separately estimate their demand for beef product attributes. This framework accounts for the interrelationship between consumers' choice of retail outlets and beef product preferences. Our analysis of data from the city of Buenos Aires identifies two groups of consumers, a convenience- (67%) and a service- (33%) oriented group. We find significant differences in demand for beef attributes across these groups, and find that the service oriented group, while not willing to pay for credence attributes, relies on a service-providing retailer-namely a butcher-as a source of product quality assurance. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. BeefTracker: Spatial Tracking and Geodatabase for Beef Herd Sustainability and Lifecycle Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oltjen, J. W.; Stackhouse, J.; Forero, L.; Stackhouse-Lawson, K.

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a web-based mapping platform named "BeefTracker" to provide beef cattle ranchers a tool to determine how cattle production fits within sustainable ecosystems and to provide regional data to update beef sustainability lifecycle analysis. After initial identification and mapping of pastures, herd data (class and number of animals) are input on a mobile device in the field with a graphical pasture interface, stored in the cloud, and linked via the web to a personal computer for inventory tracking and analysis. Pasture use calculated on an animal basis provides quantifiable data regarding carrying capacity and subsequent beef production to provide more accurate data inputs for beef sustainability lifecycle analysis. After initial testing by university range scientists and ranchers we have enhanced the BeefTracker application to work when cell service is unavailable and to improve automation for increased ease of use. Thus far experiences with BeefTracker have been largely positive, due to livestock producers' perception of the need for this type of software application and its intuitive interface. We are now in the process of education to increase its use throughout the U.S.

  8. Isolation and characterization of Clostridium difficile associated with beef cattle and commercially produced ground beef.

    PubMed

    Kalchayanand, Norasak; Arthur, Terrance M; Bosilevac, Joseph M; Brichta-Harhay, Dayna M; Shackelford, Steven D; Wells, James E; Wheeler, Tommy L; Koohmaraie, Mohammad

    2013-02-01

    The incidence of Clostridium difficile infection has recently increased in North American and European countries. This pathogen has been isolated from retail pork, turkey, and beef products and reported associated with human illness. This increase in infections has been attributed to the emergence of a toxigenic strain designated North America pulsed-field gel electrophoresis type 1 (NAP1). The NAP1 strain has been isolated from calves as well as ground meat products, leading to speculation of illness from consumption of contaminated meat products. However, information on C. difficile associated with beef cattle during processing and commercially produced ground beef is limited. To address this data gap, samples from various steps during beef production were collected. Samples from hides (n = 525), preevisceration carcasses (n = 475), postintervention carcasses (n = 471), and 956 commercial ground beef samples were collected from across the United States. The prevalence of C. difficile spores on hides was 3.2%. C. difficile spores were not detected on preevisceration and postintervention carcasses or in commercially produced ground beef. Phenotypic and genetic characterizations were carried out for all 18 isolates collected from hide samples. Twenty-two percent of the isolates were nontoxigenic strains, while 78% of the isolates were toxigenic. Toxinotyping and PCR ribotyping patterns revealed that 6 and 33% of the isolates were identified as NAP1 and NAP7 strains, respectively. This article evidences that the prevalence of C. difficile, specifically pathogenic strains, in the U.S. beef production chain is low.

  9. Inverting Glacial Isostatic Adjustment with Paleo Sea Level Records using Bayesian Framework and Burgers Rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, L.; Metivier, L.; Greff-Lefftz, M.; Fleitout, L.; Rouby, H.

    2015-12-01

    Glacial Isostatic Adjustment models most often assume a mantle with a viscoelastic Maxwell rheology and a given ice history model. Here we use a Bayesian Monte Carlo with Markov Chains formalism to invert the global GIA signal simultaneously for the mechanical properties of the mantle and for the volume of the various ice-sheets using as starting ice models two distinct previously published ice histories. Burgers as well as Maxwell rheologies are considered.The fitted data consist of 5720 paleo sea level records from the last 35kyrs, with a world-wide distribution. Our ambition is to present not only the best fitting model, but also the range of possible solutions (within the explored space of parameters) with their respective probability of explaining the data, and thus reveal the trade-off effects and range of uncertainty affecting the parameters. Our a posteriori probality maps exhibit in all cases two distinct peaks: both are characterized by an upper mantle viscosity around 5.1020Pa.s but one of the peaks features a lower mantle viscosity around 3.1021Pa.s while the other indicates lower mantle viscosity of more than 1.1022Pa.s. The global maximum depends upon the starting ice history and the chosen rheology: the first peak (P1) has the highest probability only in the case with a Maxwell rheology and ice history based on ICE-5G, while the second peak (P2) is favored when using ANU-based ice history or Burgers rheology, and is our preferred solution as it is also consistent with long-term geodynamics and gravity gradients anomalies over Laurentide. P2 is associated with larger volumes for the Laurentian and Fennoscandian ice-sheets and as a consequence of total ice volume balance, smaller volumes for the Antactic ice-sheet. This last point interfers with the estimate of present-day ice-melting in Antarctica from GRACE data. Finally, we find that P2 with Burgers rheology favors the existence of a tectosphere, i.e. a viscous sublithospheric layer.

  10. Resonance phenomenon for the Galerkin-truncated Burgers and Euler equations.

    PubMed

    Ray, Samriddhi Sankar; Frisch, Uriel; Nazarenko, Sergei; Matsumoto, Takeshi

    2011-07-01

    It is shown that the solutions of inviscid hydrodynamical equations with suppression of all spatial Fourier modes having wave numbers in excess of a threshold K(G) exhibit unexpected features. The study is carried out for both the one-dimensional Burgers equation and the two-dimensional incompressible Euler equation. For large K(G) and smooth initial conditions, the first symptom of truncation, a localized short-wavelength oscillation which we call a "tyger," is caused by a resonant interaction between fluid particle motion and truncation waves generated by small-scale features (shocks, layers with strong vorticity gradients, etc.). These tygers appear when complex-space singularities come within one Galerkin wavelength λ(G)=2π/K(G) from the real domain and typically arise far away from preexisting small-scale structures at locations whose velocities match that of such structures. Tygers are weak and strongly localized at first-in the Burgers case at the time of appearance of the first shock their amplitudes and widths are proportional to K(G)(-2/3) and K(G)(-1/3), respectively-but grow and eventually invade the whole flow. They are thus the first manifestations of the thermalization predicted by T. D. Lee [Q. J. Appl. Math. 10, 69 (1952)]. The sudden dissipative anomaly-the presence of a finite dissipation in the limit of vanishing viscosity after a finite time t(⋆)-which is well known for the Burgers equation and sometimes conjectured for the three-dimensional Euler equation, has as counterpart, in the truncated case, the ability of tygers to store a finite amount of energy in the limit K(G)→∞. This leads to Reynolds stresses acting on scales larger than the Galerkin wavelength and thus prevents the flow from converging to the inviscid-limit solution. There are indications that it may eventually be possible to purge the tygers and thereby to recover the correct inviscid-limit behavior.

  11. Preference mapping of frozen and fresh raspberries.

    PubMed

    Villamor, R R; Daniels, C H; Moore, P P; Ross, C F

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify key sensory attributes that influence consumer liking for frozen and fresh red raspberries using preference mapping. Sensory profiling of different raspberry cultivars and selections from the Washington State Univ. and Oregon State Univ. breeding programs was carried out using a trained panel (frozen, n = 12 and fresh, n = 10). In addition, a subset of frozen and fresh raspberries of each cultivar was assessed by consumers for sensory acceptability (n = 105 and n = 100, respectively). Based on overall hedonic ratings, cluster analysis identified 3 clusters of frozen raspberry consumers from day 1 (41% "nondistinguishers," 34% "likers," and 25% "nonlikers") and day 2 (41% "group 1 likers," 26% "nonlikers," and 34% and 33% group 2 likers"). For fresh raspberry consumers, 2 clusters were detected from day 1 (54% "likers" and 46% nondistinguishers") and day 2 (54% "group 1 likers" and 46% "group 2 likers"). Preference mapping was applied on the descriptive sensory and acceptability of clustered consumer data. Partial least squares regression results showed that liking of frozen raspberries was driven by high raspberry flavor, firmness, and sweetness. Conversely, disliking of frozen raspberries was related to high sour and aftertaste intensity. In the case of fresh raspberries, high color uniformity, raspberry aroma, raspberry flavor, floral aroma, green flavor, bitter, astringency, and aftertaste increased the acceptability, whereas high color intensity and green aroma were associated with negative drivers of liking. The information obtained in this study can be a useful guide for breeders in the selection of characteristics for growing superior quality raspberries. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  12. Beef cow-calf production.

    PubMed

    Feuz, Dillon M; Umberger, Wendy J

    2003-07-01

    Cow-calf production occurs in all 50 states over varied resource bases and under vastly different environmental conditions. Multiple breeds exist and management styles and objectives are as numerous as the number of cow-calf producers. There is not one area of the country, one breed of cattle, or one management style that is most profitable for producing cows and calves. There are, however, some common strategies that can be employed by cow-calf producers to enhance profitability. Costs need to be controlled without jeopardizing cow herd productivity or net returns. It appears that the cost associated with purchased and harvested feeds varies considerably across operations. Understanding cyclic and seasonal price patterns, weight-price slides, cattle shrink, and other marketing costs can help producers enhance their profit by marketing (and not by just selling) their cattle. Producers with superior cattle genetics can become part of a specific alliance or, at a minimum, document the performance of their cattle so that they can get paid for the superior genetics. The beef industry is changing and will likely continue to change. Cow-calf producers will need to examine their own management practices to determine whether they are optimal for the current industry. Those producers who are most adept at matching their management abilities to their cattle type, their resource base, and the appropriate market outlet will be the most successful in the future.

  13. Reduction of Added Nitrite in Corned Beef Preserved by Irradiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-10-01

    WITH SCIENCE WE DEFEND TECHNICAL REPORT AD NATICK/TR-99/002 REDUCTION OF ADDED NITRITE IN CORNED BEEF PRESERVED BY IRRADIATION by Gary W. Shults...SUBTITLE 5. FIDING NMBERS REDUCTION OF ADDED NITRITE IN CORNED BEEF PRESERVED BY IRRADIATION C 8AB81A N 3122 6. AUTHOR(S) Gary W. Shults, Eugen...Color Evaluation of Corned Beef 3 2. Sensory Evaluation of Corned Beef 4 3. Color Evaluation of Corned Beef After 18-Month Storage 5 4. Sensory

  14. Impact of thermophoresis particle deposition on three-dimensional radiative flow of Burgers fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Waqar Azeem; Khan, Masood

    This paper explores the analytical solution to heat and mass transfer of a three-dimensional steady flow of Burgers fluid over a bidirectional stretching surface. Additionally, analysis is carried out in the presence of thermal radiation, heat generation/absorption and thermophoretic effects. The governing non-linear problem is developed and transformed into self-similar form by utilizing similarity approach. The resulting non-linear problem is solved analytically by employing the homotpy analysis method (HAM). The obtained results are plotted and discussed in detail for interesting physical parameters. It is seen that increasing values of the thermophoretic parameter leads to a decrease in the concentration field and the corresponding concentration boundary layer thickness. Also, it is noticed that the concentration field decays quickly corresponding with thermophoretic parameter in comparison to Schmidt number.

  15. Forced convection analysis for generalized Burgers nanofluid flow over a stretching sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Masood; Khan, Waqar Azeem

    2015-10-01

    This article reports the two-dimensional forced convective flow of a generalized Burgers fluid over a linearly stretched sheet under the impacts of nano-sized material particles. Utilizing appropriate similarity transformations the coupled nonlinear partial differential equations are converted into a set of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The analytic results are carried out through the homotopy analysis method (HAM) to investigate the impact of various pertinent parameters for the velocity, temperature and concentration fields. The obtained results are presented in tabular form as well as graphically and discussed in detail. The presented results show that the rate of heat transfer at the wall and rate of nanoparticle volume fraction diminish with each increment of the thermophoresis parameter. While incremented values of the Brownian motion parameter lead to a quite opposite effect on the rates of heat transfer and nanoparticle volume fraction at the wall.

  16. Structure of Shocks in Burgers Turbulence with Lévy Noise Initial Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramson, Joshua

    2013-08-01

    We study the structure of the shocks for the inviscid Burgers equation in dimension 1 when the initial velocity is given by Lévy noise, or equivalently when the initial potential is a two-sided Lévy process ψ 0. When ψ 0 is abrupt in the sense of Vigon or has bounded variation with lim sup| h|↓0 h -2 ψ 0( h)=∞, we prove that the set of points with zero velocity is regenerative, and that in the latter case this set is equal to the set of Lagrangian regular points, which is non-empty. When ψ 0 is abrupt we show that the shock structure is discrete. When ψ 0 is eroded we show that there are no rarefaction intervals.

  17. A generalized simplest equation method and its application to the Boussinesq-Burgers equation.

    PubMed

    Sudao, Bilige; Wang, Xiaomin

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a generalized simplest equation method is proposed to seek exact solutions of nonlinear evolution equations (NLEEs). In the method, we chose a solution expression with a variable coefficient and a variable coefficient ordinary differential auxiliary equation. This method can yield a Bäcklund transformation between NLEEs and a related constraint equation. By dealing with the constraint equation, we can derive infinite number of exact solutions for NLEEs. These solutions include the traveling wave solutions, non-traveling wave solutions, multi-soliton solutions, rational solutions, and other types of solutions. As applications, we obtained wide classes of exact solutions for the Boussinesq-Burgers equation by using the generalized simplest equation method.

  18. Lie symmetry analysis, conservation laws, solitary and periodic waves for a coupled Burger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mei-Juan; Tian, Shou-Fu; Tu, Jian-Min; Zhang, Tian-Tian

    2017-01-01

    Under investigation in this paper is a generalized (2 + 1)-dimensional coupled Burger equation with variable coefficients, which describes lots of nonlinear physical phenomena in geophysical fluid dynamics, condense matter physics and lattice dynamics. By employing the Lie group method, the symmetry reductions and exact explicit solutions are obtained, respectively. Based on a direct method, the conservations laws of the equation are also derived. Furthermore, by virtue of the Painlevé analysis, we successfully obtain the integrable condition on the variable coefficients, which plays an important role in further studying the integrability of the equation. Finally, its auto-Bäcklund transformation as well as some new analytic solutions including solitary and periodic waves are also presented via algebraic and differential manipulation.

  19. The onset of thermalization in finite-dimensional equations of hydrodynamics: insights from the Burgers equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataraman, Divya; Sankar Ray, Samriddhi

    2017-01-01

    Solutions to finite-dimensional (all spatial Fourier modes set to zero beyond a finite wavenumber KG ), inviscid equations of hydrodynamics at long times are known to be at variance with those obtained for the original infinite dimensional partial differential equations or their viscous counterparts. Surprisingly, the solutions to such Galerkin-truncated equations develop sharp localized structures, called tygers (Ray et al. 2011 Phys. Rev. E 84, 016301 (doi:10.1103/PhysRevE.84.016301)), which eventually lead to completely thermalized states associated with an equipartition energy spectrum. We now obtain, by using the analytically tractable Burgers equation, precise estimates, theoretically and via direct numerical simulations, of the time τc at which thermalization is triggered and show that τc∼KGξ, with ξ =-4/9 . Our results have several implications, including for the analyticity strip method, to numerically obtain evidence for or against blow-ups of the three-dimensional incompressible Euler equations.

  20. Nonlinear propagation of ion-acoustic waves through the Burgers equation in weakly relativistic plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafez, M. G.; Talukder, M. R.; Ali, M. Hossain

    2017-03-01

    The Burgers equation is obtained to study the characteristics of nonlinear propagation of ion-acoustic shock, singular kink, and periodic waves in weakly relativistic plasmas containing relativistic thermal ions, nonextensive distributed electrons, Boltzmann distributed positrons, and kinematic viscosity of ions using the well-known reductive perturbation technique. This equation is solved by employing the (G'/G)-expansion method taking unperturbed positron-to-electron concentration ratio, electron-to-positron temperature ratio, strength of electrons nonextensivity, ion kinematic viscosity, and weakly relativistic streaming factor. The influences of plasma parameters on nonlinear propagation of ion-acoustic shock, periodic, and singular kink waves are displayed graphically and the relevant physical explanations are described. It is found that these parameters extensively modify the shock structures excitation. The obtained results may be useful in understanding the features of small but finite amplitude localized relativistic ion-acoustic shock waves in an unmagnetized plasma system for some astrophysical compact objects and space plasmas.

  1. Madelung representation of damped parametric quantum oscillator and exactly solvable Schroedinger-Burgers equations

    SciTech Connect

    Bueyuekasik, Sirin A.; Pashaev, Oktay K.

    2010-12-15

    We construct a Madelung fluid model with time variable parameters as a dissipative quantum fluid and linearize it in terms of Schroedinger equation with time-dependent parameters. It allows us to find exact solutions of the nonlinear Madelung system in terms of solutions of the Schroedinger equation and the corresponding classical linear ordinary differential equation with variable frequency and damping. For the complex velocity field, the Madelung system takes the form of a nonlinear complex Schroedinger-Burgers equation, for which we obtain exact solutions using complex Cole-Hopf transformation. In particular, we give exact results for nonlinear Madelung systems related with Caldirola-Kanai-type dissipative harmonic oscillator. Collapse of the wave function in dissipative models and possible implications for the quantum cosmology are discussed.

  2. On the statistical solution of the Riemann equation and its implications for Burgers turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    E, W.; Vanden Eijnden, E.

    1999-08-01

    The statistics of the multivalued solutions of the forced Riemann equation, u{sub t}+uu{sub x}=f, is considered. An exact equation for the signed probability density function of these solutions and their gradient {xi}=u{sub x} is derived, and some properties of this equation are analyzed. It is shown in particular that the tails of the signed probability density function generally decay as {vert_bar}{xi}{vert_bar}{sup {minus}3} for large {vert_bar}{xi}{vert_bar}. Further considerations give bounds on the cumulative probability density function for the velocity gradient of the solution of Burgers equation. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Averaging and renormalization for the Korteveg–deVries–Burgers equation

    PubMed Central

    Chorin, Alexandre J.

    2003-01-01

    We consider traveling wave solutions of the Korteveg–deVries–Burgers equation and set up an analogy between the spatial averaging of these traveling waves and real-space renormalization for Hamiltonian systems. The result is an effective equation that reproduces means of the unaveraged, highly oscillatory, solution. The averaging enhances the apparent diffusion, creating an “eddy” (or renormalized) diffusion coefficient; the relation between the eddy diffusion coefficient and the original diffusion coefficient is found numerically to be one of incomplete similarity, setting up an instance of Barenblatt's renormalization group. The results suggest a relation between self-similar solutions of differential equations on one hand and renormalization groups and optimal prediction algorithms on the other. An analogy with hydrodynamics is pointed out. PMID:12913126

  4. Averaging and renormalization for the Korteveg-deVries-Burgers equation.

    PubMed

    Chorin, Alexandre J

    2003-08-19

    We consider traveling wave solutions of the Korteveg-deVries-Burgers equation and set up an analogy between the spatial averaging of these traveling waves and real-space renormalization for Hamiltonian systems. The result is an effective equation that reproduces means of the unaveraged, highly oscillatory, solution. The averaging enhances the apparent diffusion, creating an "eddy" (or renormalized) diffusion coefficient; the relation between the eddy diffusion coefficient and the original diffusion coefficient is found numerically to be one of incomplete similarity, setting up an instance of Barenblatt's renormalization group. The results suggest a relation between self-similar solutions of differential equations on one hand and renormalization groups and optimal prediction algorithms on the other. An analogy with hydrodynamics is pointed out.

  5. Nonlinear propagation of ion-acoustic waves through the Burgers equation in weakly relativistic plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafez, M. G.; Talukder, M. R.; Hossain Ali, M.

    2017-04-01

    The Burgers equation is obtained to study the characteristics of nonlinear propagation of ionacoustic shock, singular kink, and periodic waves in weakly relativistic plasmas containing relativistic thermal ions, nonextensive distributed electrons, Boltzmann distributed positrons, and kinematic viscosity of ions using the well-known reductive perturbation technique. This equation is solved by employing the ( G'/ G)-expansion method taking unperturbed positron-to-electron concentration ratio, electron-to-positron temperature ratio, strength of electrons nonextensivity, ion kinematic viscosity, and weakly relativistic streaming factor. The influences of plasma parameters on nonlinear propagation of ion-acoustic shock, periodic, and singular kink waves are displayed graphically and the relevant physical explanations are described. It is found that these parameters extensively modify the shock structures excitation. The obtained results may be useful in understanding the features of small but finite amplitude localized relativistic ion-acoustic shock waves in an unmagnetized plasma system for some astrophysical compact objects and space plasmas.

  6. Korteweg-de Vries Burgers equation for magnetosonic wave in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, S.; Mahmood, S.

    2011-05-15

    Korteweg-de Vries Burgers (KdVB) equation for magnetosonic wave propagating in the perpendicular direction of the magnetic field is derived for homogeneous electron-ion magneto-plasmas. The dissipation in the system is taken into account through the kinematic viscosity of the ions. The effects of kinematic viscosity of ions, plasma density, and magnetic field strength on the formation of magnetosonic shocks are investigated. It is found that the shock strength is enhanced with the increase in the plasma density of the system. However, the increase in magnetic field strength decreases the amplitude of magnetosonic shock wave. The critical value of the dissipative coefficient to form oscillatory profile and monotonic shock is also discussed. The numerical results have also been plotted by taking the parameters from laboratory plasma experiments.

  7. Critical Keller-Segel meets Burgers on {{{S}}^{1}} : large-time smooth solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burczak, Jan; Granero-Belinchón, Rafael

    2016-12-01

    We show that solutions to the parabolic-elliptic Keller-Segel system on {{{S}}1} with critical fractional diffusion (- Δ ){{}\\frac{1{2}}} remain smooth for any initial data and any positive time. This disproves, at least in the periodic setting, the large-data-blowup conjecture by Bournaveas and Calvez [15]. As a tool, we show smoothness of solutions to a modified critical Burgers equation via a generalization of the ingenious method of moduli of continuity by Kiselev, Nazarov and Shterenberg [35] over a setting where the considered equation has no scaling. This auxiliary result may be interesting by itself. Finally, we study the asymptotic behavior of global solutions corresponding to small initial data, improving the existing results.

  8. Copepods' Response to Burgers' Vortex: Deconstructing Interactions of Copepods with Turbulence.

    PubMed

    Webster, D R; Young, D L; Yen, J

    2015-10-01

    This study examined the behavioral response of two marine copepods, Acartia tonsa and Temora longicornis, to a Burgers' vortex intended to mimic the characteristics of a turbulent vortex that a copepod is likely to encounter in the coastal or near-surface zone. Behavioral assays of copepods were conducted for two vortices that correspond to turbulent conditions with mean dissipation rates of turbulence of 0.009 and 0.096 cm(2) s(-3) (denoted turbulence level 2 and level 3, respectively). In particular, the Burgers' vortex parameters (i.e., circulation and rate of axial strain rate) were specified to match a vortex corresponding to the median rate of dissipation due to viscosity for each target level of turbulence. Three-dimensional trajectories were quantified for analysis of swimming kinematics and response to hydrodynamic cues. Acartia tonsa did not significantly respond to the vortex corresponding to turbulence level 2. In contrast, A. tonsa significantly altered their swimming behavior in the turbulence-level-3 vortex, including increased relative speed of swimming, angle of alignment of the trajectory with the axis of the vortex, ratio of net-to-gross displacement, and acceleration during escape, along with decreased turn frequency (relative to stagnant control conditions). Further, the location of A. tonsa escapes was preferentially in the core of the stronger vortex, indicating that the hydrodynamic cue triggering the distinctive escape behavior was vorticity. In contrast, T. longicornis did not reveal a behavioral response to either the turbulence level 2 or the level 3 vortex. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. On the response of Burgers' fluid and its generalizations with pressure dependent moduli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muliana, Anastasia; Rajagopal, K. R.; Wineman, Alan

    2013-05-01

    This manuscript presents a systematic investigation of the response of a Burgers' viscoelastic fluid model with stress-dependent material parameters. Such a model has been used extensively in geomechanics as well as to describe the response of materials like asphalt. The stress, strain, and time relation of Burgers' fluid model is expressed with second order differential operators applied to the stress and strain. The nonlinearity is due to the stress dependence of the material parameters, i.e., the fluid viscosity and the parameter related to the characteristic time. We impose discontinuity conditions, whose necessity was not recognized until the recent work of Prusa and Rajagopal (2011), for the stress and strain and also for the stress- and strain rates such that we satisfy the following assumptions: if there is a jump discontinuity in strain there should be a jump discontinuity in the corresponding stress, and if there is a small change in strain there ought to be a small change in the corresponding stress. These assumptions are also applied when a stress history is considered as input. We present constraints on the stress-dependent material functions in order to obtain a physically meaningful solution that describes the viscoelastic response of materials. We also allow different responses for tension and compression and perform parametric studies geared towards obtaining an understanding of the effect of nonlinear stress-dependent functions on the stress-relaxation and creep deformation under various loading histories. It is important to recognize that methods such as time-temperature superposition or the use of Laplace transforms that are useful in the case of the classical linear viscoelastic material will not work in the case of the non-linear model considered in this paper.

  10. Genomewide association study of liver abscess in beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Keele, J W; Kuehn, L A; McDaneld, T G; Tait, R G; Jones, S A; Keel, B N; Snelling, W M

    2016-02-01

    Fourteen percent of U.S. cattle slaughtered in 2011 had liver abscesses, resulting in reduced carcass weight, quality, and value. Liver abscesses can result from a common bacterial cause, , which inhabits rumen lesions caused by acidosis and subsequently escapes into the blood stream, is filtered by the liver, and causes abscesses in the liver. Our aim was to identify SNP associated with liver abscesses in beef cattle. We used lung samples as a DNA source because they have low economic value, they have abundant DNA, and we had unrestricted access to sample them. We collected 2,304 lung samples from a beef processing plant: 1,152 from animals with liver abscess and 1,152 from animals without liver abscess. Lung tissue from pairs of animals, 1 with abscesses and another without, were collected from near one another on the viscera table to ensure that pairs of phenotypically extreme animals came from the same lot. Within each phenotype (abscess or no abscess), cattle were pooled by slaughter sequence into 12 pools of 96 cattle for each phenotype for a total of 24 pools. The pools were constructed by equal volume of frozen lung tissue from each animal. The DNA needed to allelotype each pool was then extracted from pooled lung tissue and the BovineHD Bead Array (777,962 SNP) was run on all 24 pools. Total intensity (TI), an indicator of copy number variants, was the sum of intensities from red and green dyes. Pooling allele frequency (PAF) was red dye intensity divided TI. Total intensity and PAF were weighted by the inverse of their respective genomic covariance matrices computed over all SNP across the genome. A false discovery rate ≤ 5% was achieved for 15 SNP for PAF and 20 SNP for TI. Genes within 50 kbp from significant SNP were in diverse pathways including maintenance of pH homeostasis in the gastrointestinal tract, maintain immune defenses in the liver, migration of leukocytes from the blood into infected tissues, transport of glutamine into the kidney in

  11. Composition and quality of Mexican and imported retail beef in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Delgado, E J; Rubio, M S; Iturbe, F A; Méndez, R D; Cassís, L; Rosiles, R

    2005-03-01

    Randomly selected New York steaks from domestic and imported beef were purchased in three major Mexican cities, comparing Mexican beef (from northern, central, and southern regions of the country) and American beef (USDA-Choice and ungraded No Roll). The meat was analyzed for chemical composition, Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF), cooking loss, color and consumer acceptability. All sources of Mexican beef and No Roll US beef had similar chemical composition. USDA-Choice beef had a higher fat content and a lower moisture and total collagen content. Mexican beef from the northern region and USDA-Choice beef had lower WBSF and redness values than the other beef sources. Overall desirability was high regarding all Mexican beef sources, and USDA-Choice beef. No Roll US beef had the lowest overall desirability score. Results indicate Mexican beef is in an advantageous position when competing with imports in the current open market.

  12. The influence of forage diets and aging on beef palatability.

    PubMed

    Jiang, T; Busboom, J R; Nelson, M L; O'Fallon, J; Ringkob, T P; Rogers-Klette, K R; Joos, D; Piper, K

    2010-11-01

    To investigate the influence of diet and aging on beef palatability, lipid oxidative stability, and fatty acid composition, crossbred steers were assigned to Feedlot S (alfalfa and grain), Forage TR (triticale and annual ryegrass), Forage TK (triticale and kale), or Forage+Feedlot (grazing ryegrass, fescue and orchardgrass, finished on alfalfa and grain) dietary treatments. Heifers were finished on Feedlot H (alfalfa and grain). Longissimus and tricep muscles were sampled from these animals for steaks and ground beef, respectively. Steaks were either dry- or wet-aged for 14 d. Ground beef was dry-aged, wet-aged for 14 d, or not aged. Trained sensory panelists evaluated palatability attributes of steaks and ground beef. Diet did not influence sensory attributes of steaks or ground beef. Aging impacted (P<0.05) sensory attributes of ground beef. Diet and aging had no impact on lipid oxidative stability but affected fatty acid composition of raw ground beef.

  13. Quantitative distribution of Salmonella spp. and Escherichia coli on beef carcasses and raw beef at retail establishments.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Chávez, L; Cabrera-Diaz, E; Pérez-Montaño, J A; Garay-Martínez, L E; Varela-Hernández, J J; Castillo, A; Lucia, L; Ávila-Novoa, M G; Cardona-López, M A; Gutiérrez-González, P; Martínez-Gonzáles, N E

    2015-10-01

    Salmonella is a foodborne pathogen that commonly inhabits the gastrointestinal tract of a healthy feedlot cattle and can be transferred to the carcass surface during hide removal and evisceration procedures. Numerous investigations on Salmonella prevalence throughout different stages of the beef chain have been conducted. In contrast, limited studies are available on quantitative determinations of Salmonella at different steps in raw meat production. Quantitative data, particularly for pathogenic bacteria such as Salmonella are important for quantitative risk assessment. Salmonella spp. and Escherichia coli populations were enumerated on beef carcass samples collected at abattoirs and also in beef chunks and ground beef samples collected from butcher's shops at retail in Jalisco State, Mexico. Sponge samples from beef carcass sides (n=142) were collected immediately after final water wash and before chilling at three non-federally inspected abattoirs following USDA-FSIS sampling protocols. Beef chunks (n=84) and ground beef (n=65) samples were obtained from 86 butcher's shops. Salmonella enumeration was conducted by the Most Probable Number method and E. coli counts were determined using Petrifilm plates. Salmonella was isolated from 18% of beef carcasses, 39% of beef chunks and 71% of ground beef samples. Salmonella mean counts were 1.3±0.9 Log MPN/300 cm(2) on beef carcasses, 1.9±0.9 and 2.3±1.1 Log MPN/25 g in beef chunks and ground beef samples, respectively. Twenty-six Salmonella serotypes and 11 serogroups were identified among 432 isolates recovered. Salmonella typhimurium (14%), Salmonella sinstorf (12%) and S. Group E1 monophasic (10%) were the most frequent. Escherichia coli was present on 97, 84 and 100% of beef carcasses, beef chunks and ground beef samples, respectively. Escherichia coli mean counts were 3.2±0.7 Log CFU/300 cm(2), 3.9±1.1 and 4.5±1.2 Log CFU/25 g on beef carcasses, beef chunks and ground beef, respectively. Salmonella prevalence

  14. Exclusion of Nitrate from Frozen Aqueous Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrocco, H. A.; Michelsen, R. R.

    2013-12-01

    Reactions occurring at the surface of ice, sea ice, and snow in Earth's cryosphere have an impact on the composition of the overlying atmosphere. In order to elucidate reaction mechanisms and model their contributions to atmospheric processes, the morphology of frozen aqueous surfaces and amounts of reactants contained therein must be determined. To this end, the exclusion of nitrate ions to the surface of frozen aqueous solutions has been studied by attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR). In this technique the near-surface region of the frozen films are interrogated to a depth of a few hundred nanometers from the film-crystal interface. Aqueous solutions (0.001 to 0.01 M) of sodium nitrate (NaNO3), magnesium nitrate (Mg(NO3)2), and nitric acid (HNO3) were quickly frozen on the germanium ATR crystal and observed at a constant temperature of about -18°C. In addition to ice and the solutes, liquid water in varying amounts was observed in the spectra. The amount of nitrate in the surface liquid is three to four orders of magnitude higher than in the unfrozen solution. While all the nitrate salts exhibit exclusion to the unfrozen surface, the dynamics are different for different counter-ions. Results are compared to freezing point depression data and the predictions of equilibrium thermodynamics.

  15. Frozen yogurt with added inulin and isomalt.

    PubMed

    Isik, U; Boyacioglu, D; Capanoglu, E; Erdil, D Nilufer

    2011-04-01

    The objective of this study was to produce a frozen yogurt containing low fat and no added sugar. Samples containing 5% polydextrose, 0.065% aspartame and acesulfame-K mixture, and different levels of inulin and isomalt (5.0, 6.5, and 8.0%) were produced at pilot scale and analyzed for their physical and chemical properties including proximate composition, viscosity, acidity, overrun, melting rate, heat shock stability, as well as sensory characteristics, and viability of lactic acid bacteria. With the addition of inulin and isomalt, viscosity increased by 19 to 52% compared with that of sample B (reduced-fat control). The average calorie values of samples substituted with sweeteners were about 43% lower than that of original sample. Low-calorie frozen yogurt samples melted about 33 to 48% slower than the reduced-fat control sample at 45 min. Based on quantitative descriptive profile test results, statistically significant differences among products were observed for hardness, iciness, foamy melting, whey separation, and sweetness characteristics. The results of principal component analysis showed that the sensory properties of the sample containing 6.5% inulin and 6.5% isomalt were similar to those of control. Lactic acid bacteria counts of frozen yogurt were found to be between 8.12 and 8.49 log values, 3 mo after the production. The overall results showed that it is possible to produce an attractive frozen yogurt product with the incorporation of inulin and isomalt with no added sugar and reduced fat.

  16. Frozen water waves over rough topographical bottoms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang-Shan; Ye, Zhen

    2004-09-01

    The propagation of surface water waves over rough topographical bottoms is investigated by the multiple scattering theory. It is shown that the waves can be localized spatially through the process of multiple scattering and wave interference, a peculiar wave phenomenon which has been previously discussed for frozen light in optical systems [Nature 390, 661 (1997)

  17. Sewage Effluent Infiltrates Frozen Forest Soil

    Treesearch

    Alfred Ray Harris

    1976-01-01

    Secondarily treated sewage effluent, applied at the rate of 1 and 2 inches per week, infiltrated a frozen Sparta sand soil forested with jack pine and scrub oak. Maximum frost depth in treated plots averaged 60 cm and in check plots averages 35 cm. Nitrogen was mobile with some accumulation. Phosphorus was absorbed.

  18. Using frozen sugarcane for alcohol production

    SciTech Connect

    Irvine, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    The three areas that produce sugarcane in the mainland US are subject to crop-damaging freezes. Florida has fewer freezes. Texas and Louisiana are hurt frequently. Hard freezes end processing for sugar production when dextrans form and prevent crystallization. Dextran is formed from sugar by bacteria. Work at the Audubon Sugar Institute, LSU, has shown that crystallization of sucrose can be achieved with juice from frozen sugarcane when enzymes are used to reduce the size of the dextran molecule. Frozen cane may also be processed for alcohol production. How long the cane would be suitable as feedstock was questioned; its use would depend on sugar content. Sugarcane has been tested for post-freeze deterioration at the US Sugarcane Field Laboratory for over 50 years, and the emphasis has been on the response of varieties selected for sugar production in post-freeze deterioration. The data indicated that juice from frozen sugarcane in any of the tests would be adequate for alcohol production; fermentation based on mash with a sugar content of 9 to 11% for rum, and 15% for industrial alcohol. Total fermentable carbohydrates in frozen cane would be even higher since the data did not include invert sugars or starch. 1 table. (DP)

  19. 7 CFR 58.349 - Frozen cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Products Bearing Usda Official Identification § 58.349 Frozen cream. The flavor shall be sweet, pleasing and desirable, but may possess the following flavors to a slight degree: Aged, bitter, flat, smothered, storage; and cooked and feed flavors to a definite degree. It shall be free from rancid, oxidized or...

  20. 9 CFR 319.102 - Corned beef round and other corned beef cuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS OF IDENTITY OR COMPOSITION Cured... increased weight of the cured beef product of more than 10 percent over the weight of the fresh uncured...

  1. 9 CFR 319.102 - Corned beef round and other corned beef cuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS OF IDENTITY OR COMPOSITION Cured... increased weight of the cured beef product of more than 10 percent over the weight of the fresh uncured...

  2. Effect of temperature (-5 to 130 degrees C) and fiber direction on the dielectric properties of beef Semitendinosus at radio frequency and microwave frequencies.

    PubMed

    Basaran-Akgul, N; Basaran, P; Rasco, B A

    2008-08-01

    The dielectric properties must be defined to design efficient radio frequency (RF) and microwave (MW) processes by the food manufacturers. The objective of this study was to understand how frequency, temperature, and muscle fiber orientation influence the dielectric properties. The eye of round (Semitendinosus) muscle was selected because it contains large, relatively uniform muscle cells with similar muscle fiber orientation and relatively uniform chemical composition throughout the tissue. Dielectric properties were measured using an open-ended coaxial probe technique at 27, 915, and 1800 MHz and temperatures between -5 and 130 degrees C. Power penetration depth was calculated. Since many commercially prepared, thermally processed, ready-to-eat entrees are made with frozen meat, dielectric property measurements were started from -5 degrees C. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss factors were often higher for muscle with the muscle fiber measured in a parallel orientation to the probe compared to samples of the same treatment (for example, fresh or frozen) in a perpendicular tissue orientation at the same frequency and temperature. Dielectric constant and loss values for frozen beef tended to be higher than fresh beef at the same temperature and frequency. Tissue orientation appeared to have a greater effect on dielectric loss values at lower frequencies. Penetration depth tended to be greater when the direction of propagation was perpendicular to the muscle fiber.

  3. Microbiological characterization of imported and domestic boneless beef trim used for ground beef.

    PubMed

    Bosilevac, Joseph M; Guerini, Michael N; Brichta-Harhay, Dayna M; Arthur, Terrance M; Koohmaraie, Mohammad

    2007-02-01

    The United States imports lean boneless beef trim from Australia (AUS), New Zealand (NZL), and Uruguay (URY) to meet demand for ground beef production. The reported incidence of and etiological agents responsible for foodborne diseases differ between these countries and the United States. Our objective was to determine whether current U.S. microbiological profiling adequately addresses the potential differences between foreign and domestic beef trim. We compared the hygienic status of imported and domestic (USA) beef trim by enumeration of aerobic bacteria, Enterobacteriaceae, coliforms, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus. We also compared the prevalence of pathogens between imported and domestic samples by screening for the presence of Salmonella, Campylobacter spp., Listeria spp., and non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC). A total of 1,186 samples (487 USA, 220 AUS, 223 NZL, and 256 URY) of boneless beef trim were analyzed. Results of enumeration revealed significant differences between samples from all countries, with the lowest pathogen numbers in samples from AUS and the highest in samples from URY. Six Salmonella isolates (1 NZL, 1 URY, and 4 USA), 79 L. monocytogenes isolates (4 AUS, 5 NZL, 53 URY, and 17 USA), and 7 Campylobacter isolates (1 NZL, 1 URY, 5 USA) were found among the trim samples tested. Non-O157 STEC prevalence was 10% in NZL samples and about 30% in all of the other samples; 99 STEC strains were isolated. Serotyping of these isolates revealed that serotypes associated with hemolytic uremic syndrome were not different in prevalence between imported and domestic beef trim. Although it may be tempting to do so, these data cannot be used to compare the microbiological quality of beef trim between the countries examined. However, these results indicate that the current pathogen monitoring procedures in the United States are adequate for evaluation of imported beef trim.

  4. Dielectric properties of beef, beef liver, chicken and salmon at frequencies from 100 to 2500 MHz.

    PubMed

    Tran, V N; Stuchly, S S

    1987-01-01

    The dielectric properties of uncooked beef, beef liver, chicken and salmon meat were measured at frequencies between 100 and 2500 MHz and at selected temperatures between 1.2 degrees C and 65 degrees C. Experimental method and the sample holder are briefly described. The results for the dielectric constant and the dielectric loss factor are presented as a function of frequency at selected temperatures and show a trend consistent with theoretical expectation.

  5. Effects of ionizing irradiation and hydrostatic pressure on Escherichia coli O157:H7 inactivation, chemical composition, and sensory acceptability of ground beef patties.

    PubMed

    Schilling, M W; Yoon, Y; Tokarskyy, O; Pham, A J; Williams, R C; Marshall, D L

    2009-04-01

    A randomized complete block design with three replications was utilized to determine the effects of ionizing irradiation and hydrostatic pressure on the inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, volatile composition, and consumer acceptability (n=155) of frozen ground beef patties. E-beam and X-ray irradiation (2kGy) inactivated E. coli O157:H7 below the limit of detection, while hydrostatic pressure treatment (300mPa for 5min at 4°C) did not inactivate this pathogen. Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) was used to extract volatile compounds from treated ground beef patties. Irradiation and hydrostatic pressure altered the volatile composition (P<0.05) of the ground beef patties in respect to radiolytic products. However, results were inconclusive on whether these differences were great enough to use this method to differentiate between irradiated and non-irradiated samples in a commercial setting. Irradiation did not affect (P>0.05) consumer acceptability of ground beef patties when compared to untreated samples, but hydrostatic pressure caused decreased acceptability (P<0.05) when compared to other treatments.

  6. High pressure treatments combined with sodium lactate to inactivate Escherichia coli O157:H7 and spoilage microbiota in cured beef carpaccio.

    PubMed

    Masana, Marcelo Oscar; Barrio, Yanina Ximena; Palladino, Pablo Martín; Sancho, Ana Maria; Vaudagna, Sergio Ramón

    2015-04-01

    High-pressure treatments (400 and 600 MPa) combined with the addition of sodium lactate (1 and 3%) were tested to reduce Escherichia coli O157:H7 (STEC O157) and spoilage microbiota contamination in a manufactured cured beef carpaccio in fresh or frozen conditions. Counts of spoilage microorganisms and STEC O157 were also examined during the curing step to prepare the carpaccio. STEC O157 counts remained almost unchanged through the curing process performed at 1 ± 1 °C for 12 days, with a small decrease in samples with 3% of sodium lactate. High-pressure treatments at 600 MPa for 5 min achieved an immediate reduction of up to 2 logarithmic units of STEC O157 in frozen carpaccio, and up to 1.19 log in fresh condition. Counts of spoilage bacteria diminished below detection limits in fresh or frozen carpaccio added with sodium lactate by the application of 400 and 600 MPa. Maximum injury on STEC O157 cells was observed at 600 MPa in carpaccio in fresh condition without added sodium lactate. Lethality of high-pressure treatments on STEC O157 was enhanced in frozen carpaccio, while the addition of sodium lactate at 3% reduced the lethality on STEC O157 in frozen samples, and the degree of injury in fresh carpaccio.

  7. National Beef Tenderness Survey-1998.

    PubMed

    Brooks, J C; Belew, J B; Griffin, D B; Gwartney, B L; Hale, D S; Henning, W R; Johnson, D D; Morgan, J B; Parrish, F C; Reagan, J O; Savell, J W

    2000-07-01

    Fifty-six retail stores representing 15 retail chains and 14 foodservice facilities in eight U.S. cities were sampled to determine the tenderness of beef steaks at retail and foodservice levels based on Warner-Bratzler shear (WBS) values and consumer evaluation panels. Retail consumer panels were conducted at five universities. Each retail and foodservice steak was evaluated using 10-point scales. Steaks were divided into the following quality groups for statistical analysis: Prime, Top Choice, Choice, Select, and Lean or No Roll. Quality group had no effect on WBS values of retail clod, chuck roll, top round, bottom round, eye of round, top loin, top sirloin, or ribeye steaks but did (P < .05) affect values for the T-bone/porterhouse. The percentages of retail top round, eye of round, and bottom round steaks with a WBS force > 3.9 kg were 39.6, 55.9, and 68.0, respectively. Foodservice ribeye, top loin, and top sirloin steaks had WBS values less than 3.4 kg for all quality groups, with Prime ribeye steaks having lower (P < .05) WBS values than ribeyes from the other quality groups. With the exception of the retail ribeye steak, quality group did not affect consumer sensory ratings of retail and foodservice steaks. Average postfabrication aging times were 32 d for foodservice subprimals and 19 d for retail cut subprimals. These data indicate that improvements in the tenderness of retail cuts from the round are needed. Finally, quality group had little or no effect on consumer sensory evaluations and WBS values of retail and foodservice steaks used in this study.

  8. [Microbiological studies of beef tartar].

    PubMed

    Beumer, R R; Tamminga, S K; Kampelmacher, E H

    1982-11-15

    Two hundred lots of 'filet américain' (a mixture of minced meat, acid sauce, condiments, salt, etc., meant to be eaten raw) were sampled from retailers and examined for several types of micro-organism; 185 lots had been prepared by the retailer, fifteen on an 'industrial' scale. Pork had been used in seventy-three lots (including fourteen 'industrial' lots); beef was present in all lots, horse meat in none of them. On the whole, the bacterial state of the meats in which pork had been used was found to be considerably inferior to that of samples not containing this ingredient. The aerobic bacterial count and number of yeasts, as well as Enterobacteriaceae and group D. streptococci were at least 10 times higher on an average in this case than they were in lots not containing pork. In the case of Lactobacillus, Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium perfringens the picture was similar, though the counts of the two lastnamed species were smaller. Salmonella was detected in 84 per cent of the pork-containing lots and in 13 per cent of the other lots. For Yersinia enterocolitica, these figures were 44 per cent and 5 per cent, and for Campylobacter fetus, subsp, jejuni 18 per cent and 6 per cent. The pH varied from 5 to 6. Lots containing pork averaged a higher pH. Addition of acid sauce had only a slight effect on pH levels. A number of these results were related to each other. It is concluded that the use of raw pork in meat products meant for raw consumption should be avoided.

  9. Alternative BSE risk assessment methodology for beef and beef offal imported into Japan.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Yasuhiro; Horiuchi, Motohiro; Ishiguro, Naotaka; Kadohira, Mutsuyo; Kai, Satoshi; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Nagata, Chisato; Onodera, Takashi; Sata, Tetsutaro; Tsutsui, Toshiyuki; Yamada, Masahito; Yamamoto, Shigeki

    2012-08-01

    The Food Safety Commission (FSC) of Japan, established in July 2003, has its own initiative to conduct risk assessments on food stuffs known as "self-tasking assessment". Within this framework, the FSC decided to conduct a risk assessment of beef and beef offal imported into Japan from countries with no previous BSE reports; thus, a methodology was formed to suit to this purpose. This methodology was partly based on the previous assessments of Japanese domestic beef and beef imported from U.S.A./Canada, but some modifications were made. Other organizations' assessment methods, such as those used for BSE status assessment in live cattle by the OIE and EFSA's GBR, were also consulted. In this review, the authors introduce this alternative methodology, which reflects (1) the risk of live cattle in the assessed country including temporal risks of BSE invasion and domestic propagation, with the assessment results verified by surveillance data, and (2) the risk of beef and beef offal consisting of cumulative BSE risk by types of slaughtering and meat production processes implemented and the status of mechanically recovered meat production. Other possible influencing factors such as atypical BSE cases were also reviewed. The key characteristic of the current assessment is a combination of the time-sequential risk level of live cattle and qualitative risk level of meat production at present in an assessed country.

  10. 21 CFR 161.176 - Frozen raw lightly breaded shrimp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Frozen raw lightly breaded shrimp. 161.176 Section 161.176 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Shellfish § 161.176 Frozen raw lightly breaded shrimp. Frozen raw lightly breaded shrimp complies with...

  11. 7 CFR 58.650 - Requirements for frozen custard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirements for frozen custard. 58.650 Section 58.650... Products Bearing Usda Official Identification § 58.650 Requirements for frozen custard. The same requirements apply as for ice cream except plain frozen custard shall have a minimum egg yolk solids content...

  12. 48 CFR 870.111-5 - Frozen processed food products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frozen processed food... DEPARTMENT SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS SPECIAL PROCUREMENT CONTROLS Controls 870.111-5 Frozen processed food products. (a) The following frozen processed food products must have a label complying with the Federal...

  13. 48 CFR 846.302-72 - Frozen processed foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frozen processed foods... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT QUALITY ASSURANCE Contract Clauses 846.302-72 Frozen processed foods. The contracting officer shall insert the clause at 852.246-72, Frozen processed foods, in solicitations and contracts for...

  14. 48 CFR 852.246-72 - Frozen processed foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frozen processed foods. 852.246-72 Section 852.246-72 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... Frozen processed foods. As prescribed in 846.302-72, insert the following clause: Frozen Processed Foods...

  15. 48 CFR 846.302-72 - Frozen processed foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frozen processed foods... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT QUALITY ASSURANCE Contract Clauses 846.302-72 Frozen processed foods. The contracting officer shall insert the clause at 852.246-72, Frozen processed foods, in solicitations and contracts for...

  16. 48 CFR 870.111-5 - Frozen processed food products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frozen processed food... DEPARTMENT SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS SPECIAL PROCUREMENT CONTROLS Controls 870.111-5 Frozen processed food products. (a) The following frozen processed food products must have a label complying with the Federal...

  17. 48 CFR 852.246-72 - Frozen processed foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frozen processed foods. 852.246-72 Section 852.246-72 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... Frozen processed foods. As prescribed in 846.302-72, insert the following clause: Frozen Processed Foods...

  18. 21 CFR 146.146 - Frozen concentrated orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Frozen concentrated orange juice. 146.146 Section... Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.146 Frozen concentrated orange juice. (a) Frozen concentrated orange juice is the food prepared by removing water from the juice of mature oranges as provided in §...

  19. 21 CFR 146.146 - Frozen concentrated orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Frozen concentrated orange juice. 146.146 Section... Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.146 Frozen concentrated orange juice. (a) Frozen concentrated orange juice is the food prepared by removing water from the juice of mature oranges as provided in §...

  20. 21 CFR 146.146 - Frozen concentrated orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Frozen concentrated orange juice. 146.146 Section... Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.146 Frozen concentrated orange juice. (a) Frozen concentrated orange juice is the food prepared by removing water from the juice of mature oranges as provided in §...

  1. 21 CFR 146.146 - Frozen concentrated orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Frozen concentrated orange juice. 146.146 Section... Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.146 Frozen concentrated orange juice. (a) Frozen concentrated orange juice is the food prepared by removing water from the juice of mature oranges as provided in §...

  2. 21 CFR 146.146 - Frozen concentrated orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Frozen concentrated orange juice. 146.146 Section... Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.146 Frozen concentrated orange juice. (a) Frozen concentrated orange juice is the food prepared by removing water from the juice of mature oranges as provided in §...

  3. 48 CFR 846.302-72 - Frozen processed foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frozen processed foods... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT QUALITY ASSURANCE Contract Clauses 846.302-72 Frozen processed foods. The contracting officer shall insert the clause at 852.246-72, Frozen processed foods, in solicitations and contracts...

  4. 48 CFR 870.111-5 - Frozen processed food products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frozen processed food... DEPARTMENT SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS SPECIAL PROCUREMENT CONTROLS Controls 870.111-5 Frozen processed food products. (a) The following frozen processed food products must have a label complying with the...

  5. 48 CFR 852.246-72 - Frozen processed foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frozen processed foods. 852.246-72 Section 852.246-72 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... Frozen processed foods. As prescribed in 846.302-72, insert the following clause: Frozen Processed...

  6. 48 CFR 852.246-72 - Frozen processed foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frozen processed foods. 852.246-72 Section 852.246-72 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... Frozen processed foods. As prescribed in 846.302-72, insert the following clause: Frozen Processed...

  7. 48 CFR 870.111-5 - Frozen processed food products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frozen processed food... DEPARTMENT SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS SPECIAL PROCUREMENT CONTROLS Controls 870.111-5 Frozen processed food products. (a) The following frozen processed food products must have a label complying with the...

  8. 48 CFR 846.302-72 - Frozen processed foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frozen processed foods... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT QUALITY ASSURANCE Contract Clauses 846.302-72 Frozen processed foods. The contracting officer shall insert the clause at 852.246-72, Frozen processed foods, in solicitations and contracts...

  9. 48 CFR 852.246-72 - Frozen processed foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frozen processed foods. 852.246-72 Section 852.246-72 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... Frozen processed foods. As prescribed in 846.302-72, insert the following clause: Frozen Processed...

  10. 48 CFR 846.302-72 - Frozen processed foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frozen processed foods... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT QUALITY ASSURANCE Contract Clauses 846.302-72 Frozen processed foods. The contracting officer shall insert the clause at 852.246-72, Frozen processed foods, in solicitations and contracts...

  11. 48 CFR 870.111-5 - Frozen processed food products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... DEPARTMENT SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS SPECIAL PROCUREMENT CONTROLS Controls 870.111-5 Frozen processed food products. (a) The following frozen processed food products must have a label complying with the Federal... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frozen processed...

  12. 21 CFR 146.120 - Frozen concentrate for lemonade.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... lemonade is the frozen food prepared from one or both of the lemon juice ingredients specified in paragraph... percent by weight. (b) The lemon juice ingredients referred to in paragraph (a) of this section are: (1) Lemon juice or frozen lemon juice or a mixture of these. (2) Concentrated lemon juice or frozen...

  13. 21 CFR 161.176 - Frozen raw lightly breaded shrimp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Frozen raw lightly breaded shrimp. 161.176 Section... Shellfish § 161.176 Frozen raw lightly breaded shrimp. Frozen raw lightly breaded shrimp complies with the provisions of § 161.175, except that it contains not less than 65 percent of shrimp material, as...

  14. 21 CFR 161.176 - Frozen raw lightly breaded shrimp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Frozen raw lightly breaded shrimp. 161.176 Section... Shellfish § 161.176 Frozen raw lightly breaded shrimp. Frozen raw lightly breaded shrimp complies with the provisions of § 161.175, except that it contains not less than 65 percent of shrimp material, as...

  15. 21 CFR 161.176 - Frozen raw lightly breaded shrimp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Frozen raw lightly breaded shrimp. 161.176 Section... Shellfish § 161.176 Frozen raw lightly breaded shrimp. Frozen raw lightly breaded shrimp complies with the provisions of § 161.175, except that it contains not less than 65 percent of shrimp material, as...

  16. 21 CFR 161.176 - Frozen raw lightly breaded shrimp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Frozen raw lightly breaded shrimp. 161.176 Section... Shellfish § 161.176 Frozen raw lightly breaded shrimp. Frozen raw lightly breaded shrimp complies with the provisions of § 161.175, except that it contains not less than 65 percent of shrimp material, as...

  17. Frozen O2 layer revealed by neutron reflectometry

    DOE PAGES

    Steffen, A.; Glavic, A.; Holderer, O.; ...

    2016-05-27

    We investigated a 63 thick film originating from frozen air on a solid substrate via neutron reflectometry. Furthermore, the experiment shows that neutron reflectometry allows performing chemical surface analysis by quantifying the composition of this frozen layer and identifies the film to be frozen oxygen.

  18. 21 CFR 135.110 - Ice cream and frozen custard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ice cream and frozen custard. 135.110 Section 135.110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FROZEN DESSERTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Frozen Desserts § 135...

  19. 21 CFR 135.110 - Ice cream and frozen custard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ice cream and frozen custard. 135.110 Section 135.110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FROZEN DESSERTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Frozen Desserts § 135...

  20. 21 CFR 135.110 - Ice cream and frozen custard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ice cream and frozen custard. 135.110 Section 135.110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FROZEN DESSERTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Frozen Desserts § 135...

  1. 21 CFR 135.110 - Ice cream and frozen custard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ice cream and frozen custard. 135.110 Section 135.110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FROZEN DESSERTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Frozen Desserts § 135...

  2. Effect of freezing prior to aging on myoglobin redox forms and CIE color of beef from Nellore and Aberdeen Angus cattle.

    PubMed

    Aroeira, Carolina Naves; de Almeida Torres Filho, Robledo; Fontes, Paulo Rogério; de Lemos Souza Ramos, Alcinéia; de Miranda Gomide, Lúcio Alberto; Ladeira, Márcio Machado; Ramos, Eduardo Mendes

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of freezing prior to wet aging on the color of Nellore and Aberdeen Angus cattle meat. Samples of the Longissimus thoracis muscle were subjected to two treatments: conventional aging (0, 7, 14 and 21days); and freezing (-20°C for 40days) followed by thawing and aging. Freezing promoted (P<0.05) formation of metmyoglobin during aging, especially in Nellore beef. Frozen meats showed (P<0.05) lower lightness (L*) values and higher redness (a*), chroma (C*) and hue angle (h*) values at the first day of storage, deteriorating quickly with aging time. The color of the Nellore meat was less (P<0.05) stable to freezing, being lighter, yellower and less red than Angus meat. The results suggest that color stability in vacuum-packed beef is reduced by freezing prior to aging and that reduction depends on the animal breed.

  3. Genetic relationships among breeds of beef cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective was to estimate genetic distance among 16 populations of beef cattle from within the U.S. Thirty-three microsatellite markers representing 26 autosomes were used. MicroSatellite Analyzer 3.15 (MSA) program was used to quantify number of alleles per marker, and observed and expected het...

  4. 9 CFR 319.100 - Corned beef.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., rumps, or similar cuts using one or a combination of the curing ingredients specified in a regulation... finished product, excluding cure, salt, and flavoring material, shall not exceed 70 percent of the fresh... head meat and beef heart meat may be used to the extent of 5 percent of the meat ingredient...

  5. 9 CFR 319.100 - Corned beef.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., rumps, or similar cuts using one or a combination of the curing ingredients specified in a regulation... finished product, excluding cure, salt, and flavoring material, shall not exceed 70 percent of the fresh... head meat and beef heart meat may be used to the extent of 5 percent of the meat ingredient...

  6. Enhance beef cattle improvement by embryo biotechnologies.

    PubMed

    Wu, B; Zan, L

    2012-10-01

    Embryo biotechnology has become one of the prominent high businesses worldwide. This technology has evolved through three major changes, that is, traditional embryo transfer (in vivo embryo production by donor superovulation), in vitro embryo production by ovum pick up with in vitro fertilization and notably current cloning technique by somatic cell nuclear transfer and transgenic animal production. Embryo biotechnology has widely been used in dairy and beef cattle industry and commercial bovine embryo transfer has become a large international business. Currently, many developed biotechnologies during the period from early oocyte stage to pre-implantation embryos can be used to create new animal breeds and accelerate genetic progression. Based on recent advances in embryo biotechnologies and authors current studies, this review will focus on a description of the application of this technology to beef cattle improvement and discuss how to use this technology to accelerate beef cattle breeding and production. The main topics of this presentation include the following: (i) how to increase calf production numbers from gametes including sperm and oocyte; (ii) multiple ovulation and embryo transfer breeding schemes; (iii) in vitro fertilization and intracytoplasm sperm injection in bovine; (iv) pronuclear development and transgenic animals; (v) sex selection from sperm and embryos; (vi) cloning and androgenesis; (vii) blastocyst development and embryonic stem cells; (viii) preservation of beef cattle genetic resources; and (ix) conclusions. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  7. An alternative animal protein source: cultured beef.

    PubMed

    Post, Mark J

    2014-11-01

    Alternative sources of animal proteins are needed that can be produced efficiently, thereby providing food security with diminished ecological burden. It is feasible to culture beef from bovine skeletal muscle stem cells, but the technology is still under development. The aim is to create a beef mimic with equivalent taste, texture, and appearance and with the same nutritional value as livestock-produced beef. More specifically, there is a need for optimization of protein content and fat content. In addition, scalability of production requires modification of current small-scale bioreactors to the largest possible scale. The necessary steps and current progress suggest that this aim is achievable, but formal evidence is still required. Similarly, we can be optimistic about consumer acceptance based on initial data, but detailed studies are needed to gain more insight into potential psychological obstacles that could lead to rejection. These challenges are formidable but likely surmountable. The severity of upcoming food-security threats warrants serious research and development efforts to address the challenges that come with bringing cultured beef to the market. © 2014 New York Academy of Sciences.

  8. Whole Genome Analysis for Beef Tenderness

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Meat tenderness is the single most important trait affecting palatability and consumer satisfaction with beef products. Current breeding values for meat tenderness traits have low accuracy because progeny phenotypes are not generally recorded. Selection for this trait could be accelerated by DNA m...

  9. Reactive N emissions from beef cattle feedlots

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Large amounts of nitrogen (N) are fed to meet the nutritional needs of beef cattle in feedlots. However, only from 10 to 15% of fed N is retained in animals. Most N is excreted. Chemical and biological processes transform manure N into ammonia, nitrous oxide and nitrate. These reactive forms of ...

  10. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards. Beef Production Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    This document, which is intended as a guide for workforce preparation program providers, details the Illinois occupational skill standards for programs preparing students for employment in occupations in the beef production cluster. The document begins with a brief overview of the Illinois perspective on occupational skill standards and…

  11. Batch testing for noroviruses in frozen raspberries.

    PubMed

    De Keuckelaere, Ann; Li, Dan; Deliens, Bart; Stals, Ambroos; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2015-01-02

    Berries, in particular raspberries, have been associated with multiple recalls due to norovirus contamination and were linked to a number of norovirus (NoV) outbreaks. In the present study a total of 130 samples of frozen raspberries were collected from 26 batches in four different raspberry processing companies. In two companies the samples consisted of bulk frozen raspberries serving as raw material for the production of raspberry puree (an intermediate food product in a business to business setting). In two other companies, the samples consisted of bulk individually quick frozen (IQF) raspberries serving as raw material for the production of frozen fruit mixes (as a final food product for consumer). Enumeration of Escherichia coli and coliforms was performed as well as real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-qPCR) detection of GI and GII NoV (in 2 × 10 g). In addition, in cases where positive NoV GI or GII RT-qPCR signals were obtained, an attempt to sequence the amplicons was undertaken. Six out of 70 samples taken from the 14 batches of frozen raspberries serving raspberry puree production provided a NoV RT-qPCR signal confirmed by sequencing. Four of these six positive samples clustered in one batch whereas the other two positive samples clustered in another batch from the same company. All six positive samples showed NoV RT-qPCR signals above the limit of quantification of the RT-qPCR assay. These two positive batches of frozen raspberries can be classified as being of insufficient sanitary quality. The mean NoV level in 20 g of these raspberry samples was 4.3 log genomic copies NoV GI/20 g. The concern for public health is uncertain as NoV RT-qPCR detection is unable to discriminate between infectious and non-infectious virus particles. For the IQF raspberries, one batch out of 12 tested NoV positive, but only 1 out of the 5 samples analyzed in this batch showed a positive RT-qPCR GI NoV signal confirmed by sequencing. The RT-qPCR signal was below the

  12. A portable detection instrument based on DSP for beef marbling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tong; Peng, Yankun

    2014-05-01

    Beef marbling is one of the most important indices to assess beef quality. Beef marbling is graded by the measurement of the fat distribution density in the rib-eye region. However quality grades of beef in most of the beef slaughtering houses and businesses depend on trainees using their visual senses or comparing the beef slice to the Chinese standard sample cards. Manual grading demands not only great labor but it also lacks objectivity and accuracy. Aiming at the necessity of beef slaughtering houses and businesses, a beef marbling detection instrument was designed. The instrument employs Charge-coupled Device (CCD) imaging techniques, digital image processing, Digital Signal Processor (DSP) control and processing techniques and Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) screen display techniques. The TMS320DM642 digital signal processor of Texas Instruments (TI) is the core that combines high-speed data processing capabilities and real-time processing features. All processes such as image acquisition, data transmission, image processing algorithms and display were implemented on this instrument for a quick, efficient, and non-invasive detection of beef marbling. Structure of the system, working principle, hardware and software are introduced in detail. The device is compact and easy to transport. The instrument can determine the grade of beef marbling reliably and correctly.

  13. Temperature Effects on Free Radicals in Gamma-sterilized Beef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramanik, S. I.; Jahan, M. S.

    1999-11-01

    Gamma irradiation has become the method of choice for sterilizing frozen meat and their products to reduce levels of food-borne pathogens and to extend shelf life. In this report we have employed ESR technique for detection of free radicals in sterilized and non-sterilized dry beef without bone. We have also determined the heating effects on free radicals at temperatures 176^°C and 250^°C. Meat samples were dried in a food dehydrator at 60^°C and were packaged in dry N_2. They were then sterilized by γ-irradiation (2.5 MRad), ground into powder, and placed in ESR sample tubes. Non-sterilized powder samples were used as control. While all powder samples, sterilized or not, produced a broad single line in the ESR spectra with (Δ H_pp ~ 9 G) and g = 2.013, the radical concentration in the sterilized samples increased by a factor of five. Heat treatment at 176^°C produced similar radicals. But, when samples were heated 250^°C different radical species were formed which are characterized by narrow width (Δ H_pp ~ 6 G) and lower g-value (g =2.010). In contrast with previous work, where free radicals in chicken bones were reduced by heating [1], we observed an increase in concentration. Results of structural analyses of the radicals will be presented. Ref.[1]: Radiat. Phys. Chem., 49, 477-481, 1997. Work supported by Grants from the University of Memphis

  14. 9 CFR 319.81 - Roast beef parboiled and steam roasted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... in such product. Beef cheek meat and beef head meat from which the overlying glandular and connective tissues have been removed, and beef heart meat, exclusive of the heart cap may be used individually...

  15. 9 CFR 319.81 - Roast beef parboiled and steam roasted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... in such product. Beef cheek meat and beef head meat from which the overlying glandular and connective tissues have been removed, and beef heart meat, exclusive of the heart cap may be used individually...

  16. 9 CFR 319.81 - Roast beef parboiled and steam roasted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... in such product. Beef cheek meat and beef head meat from which the overlying glandular and connective tissues have been removed, and beef heart meat, exclusive of the heart cap may be used individually...

  17. Frozen shoulder and the Big Five personality traits.

    PubMed

    Debeer, Philippe; Franssens, Fien; Roosen, Isabelle; Dankaerts, Wim; Claes, Laurence

    2014-02-01

    In the past, several studies have suggested the existence of a "periarthritic personality" in patients with frozen shoulder. We conducted a study to determine differences in personality traits in patients with primary and secondary frozen shoulders. We prospectively evaluated 118 patients (84 women and 34 men; mean age, 53.8 years; SD 7.56) with a frozen shoulder. Of these patients, 48 had an idiopathic frozen shoulder and 70 had a secondary frozen shoulder. Personality traits were determined by the NEO Five-Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI) scale. This questionnaire measures the 5 major personality traits and is based on the norms determined in a neutral test situation for 2415 controls. Compared with healthy controls, no differences in personality traits were found in patients with primary and secondary frozen shoulder, except for Conscientiousness and Extraversion, for which patients with secondary frozen shoulder scored significantly higher than healthy controls. Patients with primary frozen shoulder scored significantly higher on Openness to Experience than did patients with secondary frozen shoulder; on the other 4 Big Five personality traits, no significant differences were found between patients with primary and secondary frozen shoulder. More specifically, patients with idiopathic frozen shoulder did not score higher on the trait Neuroticism as would be expected from previous publications. Our study results do not indicate that patients with an idiopathic frozen shoulder have a specific personality compared with healthy controls. Only a few differences were found in personality traits when the entire frozen shoulder group was compared with healthy controls and between patients with primary and secondary frozen shoulders. The results of this study suggest that these differences are not sufficient to speak about a specific "frozen shoulder personality." Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights

  18. Ion acoustic shock and periodic waves through Burgers equation in weakly and highly relativistic plasmas with nonextensivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M, G. Hafez; N, C. Roy; M, R. Talukder; M Hossain, Ali

    2017-01-01

    A comparative study is carried out for the nonlinear propagation of ion acoustic shock waves both for the weakly and highly relativistic plasmas consisting of relativistic ions and q-distributed electrons and positions. The Burgers equation is derived to reveal the physical phenomena using the well known reductive perturbation technique. The integration of the Burgers equation is performed by the (G\\prime /G)-expansion method. The effects of positron concentration, ion-electron temperature ratio, electron-positron temperature ratio, ion viscosity coefficient, relativistic streaming factor and the strength of the electron and positron nonextensivity on the nonlinear propagation of ion acoustic shock and periodic waves are presented graphically and the relevant physical explanations are provided.

  19. Modified cubic B-spline differential quadrature method for numerical solution of three-dimensional coupled viscous Burger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, H. S.; Tamsir, Mohammad; Srivastava, Vineet K.; Rashidi, Mohammad Mehdi

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a modified cubic B-spline differential quadrature method (MCB-DQM) to solve three-dimensional (3D) coupled viscous Burger equation with appropriate initial and boundary conditions. In this method, modified cubic B-spline is treated as a basis function in the differential quadrature method (DQM) to compute the weighting coefficients. In this way, the Burger equation is reduced into a system of ordinary differential equations. An optimal strong stability-preserving Runge-Kutta (SSP-RK) method is employed to solve the resulting system of ordinary differential equations. In order to illustrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method, a numerical problem is considered. From the numerical experiment, it is found that the computed result is in good agreement with the exact solution. Stability analysis of the method is also carried out using the matrix stability analysis method and found to be unconditionally stable.

  20. Postcooking temperature changes in beef patties.

    PubMed

    Berry, B W; Bigner-George, M E

    2001-09-01

    Beef patties (86 and 143 g) formed from high-fat (20 to 29%) and low-fat (6 to 10%) ground beef obtained in eight different selections for both high and low fat content were cooked by either a gas grill or an electric griddle. Patties were cooked to either 66.1 or 68.3 degrees C as determined in the thickest section, and internal temperatures were recorded after cooking at 1-s intervals for 180 s in both thick and thin sections of patties. Time-temperature curves (after cooking) were evaluated for compliance with regulatory requirements for classifying patties as fully cooked. For patties cooked to 66.1 degrees C, the maximum highest temperature in the thickest patty section often did not reach 71.1 degrees C (recommended for cooking of beef patties by consumers). Although thin sections of patties had higher temperatures than thick sections at the termination of cooking, temperature variability was greater and declines in temperature occurred sooner in thin patty sections. Failure to meet fully cooked, time-temperature requirements was greater in thin than thick sections. Thicker (143-g) patties possessed longer postcooking times before declining in temperature than thinner (86-g) patties. Although many beef patties cooked in this study achieved regulatory time requirements for maintaining 66.1 or 68.3 degrees C (as well as attaining 71.1 degrees C), some patties did not meet these requirements. Because of the considerable temperature variability that can exist within patties at the conclusion of cooking, use of end point temperatures of less than 71.1 degrees C is not recommended for consumers. Consumers should allow several minutes of holding following cooking before consumption to maximize the increases in postcooking temperature. Further research is required to establish cooking procedures that will improve temperature uniformity and eliminate "cold spots" during cooking of beef patties.