Science.gov

Sample records for fsxj32 mcnp nuclear

  1. Using NJOY to Create MCNP ACE Files and Visualize Nuclear Data

    SciTech Connect

    Kahler, Albert Comstock

    2016-10-14

    We provide lecture materials that describe the input requirements to create various MCNP ACE files (Fast, Thermal, Dosimetry, Photo-nuclear and Photo-atomic) with the NJOY Nuclear Data Processing code system. Input instructions to visualize nuclear data with NJOY are also provided.

  2. Implementation of a tree algorithm in MCNP code for nuclear well logging applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Fusheng; Han, Xiaogang

    2012-07-01

    The goal of this paper is to develop some modeling capabilities that are missing in the current MCNP code. Those missing capabilities can greatly help for some certain nuclear tools designs, such as a nuclear lithology/mineralogy spectroscopy tool. The new capabilities to be developed in this paper include the following: zone tally, neutron interaction tally, gamma rays index tally and enhanced pulse-height tally. The patched MCNP code also can be used to compute neutron slowing-down length and thermal neutron diffusion length.

  3. Features of MCNP6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goorley, T.; James, M.; Booth, T.; Brown, F.; Bull, J.; Cox, L. J.; Durkee, J.; Elson, J.; Fensin, M.; Forster, R. A.; Hendricks, J.; Hughes, H. G.; Johns, R.; Kiedrowski, B.; Martz, R.; Mashnik, S.; McKinney, G.; Pelowitz, D.; Prael, R.; Sweezy, J.; Waters, L.; Wilcox, T.; Zukaitis, T.

    2014-06-01

    MCNP6 is simply and accurately described as the merger of MCNP5 and MCNPX capabilities, but it is much more than the sum of these two computer codes. MCNP6 is the result of six years of effort by the MCNP5 and MCNPX code development teams. These groups of people, residing in Los Alamos National Laboratory's X Computational Physics Division, Monte Carlo Codes Group (XCP-3) and Nuclear Engineering and Nonproliferation Division, Radiation Transport Modeling Team (NEN-5) respectively, have combined their code development efforts to produce the next evolution of MCNP. While maintenance and major bug fixes will continue for MCNP5 1.60 and MCNPX 2.7.0 for upcoming years, new code development capabilities only will be developed and released in MCNP6. In fact, the initial release of MCNP6 contains numerous new features not previously found in either code. These new features are summarized in this document. Packaged with MCNP6 is also the new production release of the ENDF/B-VII.1 nuclear data files usable by MCNP. The high quality of the overall merged code, usefulness of these new features, along with the desire in the user community to start using the merged code, have led us to make the first MCNP6 production release: MCNP6 version 1. High confidence in the MCNP6 code is based on its performance with the verification and validation test suites, comparisons to its predecessor codes, our automated nightly software debugger tests, the underlying high quality nuclear and atomic databases, and significant testing by many beta testers.

  4. Benchmarking of MCNP for calculating dose rates at an interim storage facility for nuclear waste.

    PubMed

    Heuel-Fabianek, Burkhard; Hille, Ralf

    2005-01-01

    During the operation of research facilities at Research Centre Jülich, Germany, nuclear waste is stored in drums and other vessels in an interim storage building on-site, which has a concrete shielding at the side walls. Owing to the lack of a well-defined source, measured gamma spectra were unfolded to determine the photon flux on the surface of the containers. The dose rate simulation, including the effects of skyshine, using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP is compared with the measured dosimetric data at some locations in the vicinity of the interim storage building. The MCNP data for direct radiation confirm the data calculated using a point-kernel method. However, a comparison of the modelled dose rates for direct radiation and skyshine with the measured data demonstrate the need for a more precise definition of the source. Both the measured and the modelled dose rates verified the fact that the legal limits (<1 mSv a(-1)) are met in the area outside the perimeter fence of the storage building to which members of the public have access. Using container surface data (gamma spectra) to define the source may be a useful tool for practical calculations and additionally for benchmarking of computer codes if the discussed critical aspects with respect to the source can be addressed adequately.

  5. MCNP Progress & Performance Improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Forrest B.; Bull, Jeffrey S.; Rising, Michael Evan

    2015-04-14

    Twenty-eight slides give information about the work of the US DOE/NNSA Nuclear Criticality Safety Program on MCNP6 under the following headings: MCNP6.1.1 Release, with ENDF/B-VII.1; Verification/Validation; User Support & Training; Performance Improvements; and Work in Progress. Whisper methodology will be incorporated into the code, and run speed should be increased.

  6. Methodology, verification, and performance of the continuous-energy nuclear data sensitivity capability in MCNP6

    SciTech Connect

    Kiedrowski, B. C.; Brown, F. B.

    2013-07-01

    A continuous-energy sensitivity coefficient capability has been introduced into MCNP6. The methods for generating energy-resolved and energy-integrated sensitivity profiles are discussed. Results from the verification exercises that were performed are given, and these show that MCNP6 compares favorably with analytic solutions, direct density perturbations, and comparisons to TSUNAMI-3D and MONK. Run-time and memory requirements are assessed for typical applications, and these are shown to be reasonable with modern computing resources. (authors)

  7. MCNP Super Lattice Method for VHTR ORIGEN2.2 Nuclear Library Improvement Based on ENDF/B-VII

    SciTech Connect

    G. S. Chang; J. R. Parry

    2010-10-01

    The advanced Very High Temperature gas-cooled Reactor (VHTR) achieves simplification of safety through reliance on innovative features and passive systems. One of the VHTRs innovative features is the reliance on ceramic-coated fuel particles to retain the fission products under extreme accident conditions. The effect of the random fuel kernel distribution in the fuel prismatic block creates a double-heterogeneous lattice, which needs to be addressed through the use of the newly developed prismatic super Kernel-by-Kernel Fuel (KbKF) lattice model method. Based on the new ENDF/B-VII nuclear cross section evaluated data, the developed KbKF super lattice model was then used with MCNP to calculate the material isotopes neutron reaction rates, such as, (n,?); (n,n’); (n,2n’); (n,f); (n,p); (n,?). Then, the MCNP-calculated results are rearranged to generate a set of new libraries “VHTRXS.lib,” for the ORIGEN2.2 isotopes depletion and build-up analysis code. The libraries contain one group cross section data for the structural light elements, actinides, and fission products that can be applied in the VHTR related fuel burnup and material transmutation analysis codes. The efficiency and ease of use of the MCNP method to generate and update the ORIGEN2.2 one-group spectrum weighed cross section library for VHTR was demonstrated.

  8. Verification of MCNP5-1.60 and MCNP6-Beta-2 for Criticality Safety Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Forrest B.; Kiedrowski, Brian C.; Bull, Jeffrey S.

    2012-05-01

    To verify that both MCNP5-1.60 and MCNP6-Beta-2 are performing correctly for criticality safety applications, several suites of verification/validation benchmark problems were run in early 2012. Results from these benchmark suites were compared with results from previously verified versions of MCNP5. The goals of this verification testing were: (1) Verify that MCNP5-1.60 works correctly for nuclear criticality safety applications, producing the same results as for the previous verification performed in 2010; (2) Determine the sensitivity to computer roundoff using different Fortran-90 compilers for building MCNP5 and MCNP6, to support moving to current versions of the compilers; and (3) Verify that MCNP6-Beta-2 works correctly for nuclear criticality safety applications, producing the same results as for MCNP5-1.60. This provides support for eventual migration of users and applications to MCNP6. The current production version of MCNP5 included in the RSICC release package is MCNP5-1.60. This version was first distributed by RSICC in October 2010. While there were subsequent RSICC distributions of the MCNP package in July 2011 and February 2012, no changes were made to MCNP5-1.60. The RSICC release package in February 2012 included both MCNP5-1.60 and the current beta version of MCNP6, MCNP6-Beta-2. MCNP6 is the merger of MCNP5 and MCNPX capabilities. The current release of MCNP6 available from RSICC as of February 2012 is MCNP6-Beta-2. This version includes all of the features for criticality safety calculations that are available in MCNP5-1.60, and many new features largely unrelated to nuclear criticality safety calculations. This release is a 'beta' release to allow intermediate and advanced users to begin testing the merged code in their field of expertise. It should not be used for production calculations.

  9. MCNP-DSP users manual

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, T.E.

    1997-01-01

    The Monte Carlo code MCNP-DSP was developed from the Los Alamos MCNP4a code to calculate the time and frequency response statistics obtained from the {sup 252}Cf-source-driven frequency analysis measurements. This code can be used to validate calculational methods and cross section data sets from subcritical experiments. This code provides a more general model for interpretation and planning of experiments for nuclear criticality safety, nuclear safeguards, and nuclear weapons identification and replaces the use of point kinetics models for interpreting the measurements. The use of MCNP-DSP extends the usefulness of this measurement method to systems with much lower neutron multiplication factors.

  10. High-fidelity MCNP modeling of a D-T neutron generator for active interrogation of special nuclear material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katalenich, Jeff; Flaska, Marek; Pozzi, Sara A.; Hartman, Michael R.

    2011-10-01

    Fast and robust methods for interrogation of special nuclear material (SNM) are of interest to many agencies and institutions in the United States. It is well known that passive interrogation methods are typically sufficient for plutonium identification because of a relatively high neutron production rate from 240Pu [1]. On the other hand, identification of shielded uranium requires active methods using neutron or photon sources [2]. Deuterium-deuterium (2.45 MeV) and deuterium-tritium (14.1 MeV) neutron-generator sources have been previously tested and proven to be relatively reliable instruments for active interrogation of nuclear materials [3,4]. In addition, the newest generators of this type are small enough for applications requiring portable interrogation systems. Active interrogation techniques using high-energy neutrons are being investigated as a method to detect hidden SNM in shielded containers [4,5]. Due to the thickness of some containers, penetrating radiation such as high-energy neutrons can provide a potential means of probing shielded SNM. In an effort to develop the capability to assess the signal seen from various forms of shielded nuclear materials, the University of Michigan Neutron Science Laboratory's D-T neutron generator and its shielding were accurately modeled in MCNP. The generator, while operating at nominal power, produces approximately 1×10 10 neutrons/s, a source intensity which requires a large amount of shielding to minimize the dose rates around the generator. For this reason, the existing shielding completely encompasses the generator and does not include beam ports. Therefore, several MCNP simulations were performed to estimate the yield of uncollided 14.1-MeV neutrons from the generator for active interrogation experiments. Beam port diameters of 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 cm were modeled to assess the resulting neutron fluxes. The neutron flux outside the beam ports was estimated to be approximately 2×10 4 n/cm 2 s.

  11. Use of MCNP for characterization of reactor vessel internals waste from decommissioned nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Love, E.F.; Pauley, K.A.; Reid, B.D.

    1995-09-01

    This study describes the use of the Monte Carlo Neutron-Photon (MCNP) code for determining activation levels of irradiated reactor vessel internals hardware. The purpose of the analysis is to produce data for the Department of Energy`s Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste Program. An MCNP model was developed to analyze the Yankee Rowe reactor facility. The model incorporates reactor geometry, material compositions, and operating history data acquired from Yankee Atomic Electric Company. In addition to the base activation analysis, parametric studies were performed to determine the sensitivity of activation to specific parameters. A component sampling plan was also developed to validate the model results, although the plan was not implemented. The calculations for the Yankee Rowe reactor predict that only the core baffle and the core support plates will be activated to levels above the Class C limits. The parametric calculations show, however, that the large uncertainties in the material compositions could cause errors in the estimates that could also increase the estimated activation level of the core barrel to above the Class C limits. Extrapolation of the results to other reactor facilities indicates that in addition to the baffle and support plates, core barrels may also be activated to above Class C limits; however the classification will depend on the specific operating conditions of the reactor and the specific material compositions of the metal, as well as the use of allowable concentration averaging practices in packaging and classifying the waste.

  12. MCNP6 Status

    SciTech Connect

    Goorley, John T.

    2012-06-25

    We, the development teams for MCNP, NJOY, and parts of ENDF, would like to invite you to a proposed 3 day workshop October 30, 31 and November 1 2012, to be held at Los Alamos National Laboratory. At this workshop, we will review new and developing missions that MCNP6 and the underlying nuclear data are being asked to address. LANL will also present its internal plans to address these missions and recent advances in these three capabilities and we will be interested to hear your input on these topics. Additionally we are interested in hearing from you additional technical advances, missions, concerns, and other issues that we should be considering for both short term (1-3 years) and long term (4-6 years)? What are the additional existing capabilities and methods that we should be investigating? The goal of the workshop is to refine priorities for mcnp6 transport methods, algorithms, physics, data and processing as they relate to the intersection of MCNP, NJOY and ENDF.

  13. Implementation of On-the-Fly Doppler Broadening in MCNP5 for Multiphysics Simulation of Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    William Martin

    2012-11-16

    A new method to obtain Doppler broadened cross sections has been implemented into MCNP, removing the need to generate cross sections for isotopes at problem temperatures. Previous work had established the scientific feasibility of obtaining Doppler-broadened cross sections "on-the-fly" (OTF) during the random walk of the neutron. Thus, when a neutron of energy E enters a material region that is at some temperature T, the cross sections for that material at the exact temperature T are immediately obtained by interpolation using a high order functional expansion for the temperature dependence of the Doppler-broadened cross section for that isotope at the neutron energy E. A standalone Fortran code has been developed that generates the OTF library for any isotope that can be processed by NJOY. The OTF cross sections agree with the NJOY-based cross sections for all neutron energies and all temperatures in the range specified by the user, e.g., 250K - 3200K. The OTF methodology has been successfully implemented into the MCNP Monte Carlo code and has been tested on several test problems by comparing MCNP with conventional ACE cross sections versus MCNP with OTF cross sections. The test problems include the Doppler defect reactivity benchmark suite and two full-core VHTR configurations, including one with multiphysics coupling using RELAP5-3D/ATHENA for the thermal-hydraulic analysis. The comparison has been excellent, verifying that the OTF libraries can be used in place of the conventional ACE libraries generated at problem temperatures. In addition, it has been found that using OTF cross sections greatly reduces the complexity of the input for MCNP, especially for full-core temperature feedback calculations with many temperature regions. This results in an order of magnitude decrease in the number of input lines for full-core configurations, thus simplifying input preparation and reducing the potential for input errors. Finally, for full-core problems with multiphysics

  14. MatMCNP

    SciTech Connect

    2015-10-19

    A code for generating MCNP material cards (MatMCNP) has been written and verified for naturally occurring, stable isotopes. The program allows for material specification as either atomic or weight percent (fractions). MatMCNP also permits the specification of enriched lithium, boron, and/or uranium. In addition to producing the material cards for MCNP, the code calculates the atomic (or number) density in atoms/barn-cm as well as the multiplier that should be used to convert neutron and gamma fluences into dose in the material specified.

  15. Modeling the effect in of criticality from changes in key parameters for small High Temperature Nuclear Reactor (U-BatteryTM) using MCNP4C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauzi, A. M.

    2013-06-01

    The neutron transport code, Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) which was wellkown as the gold standard in predicting nuclear reaction was used to model the small nuclear reactor core called "U-batteryTM", which was develop by the University of Manchester and Delft Institute of Technology. The paper introduces on the concept of modeling the small reactor core, a high temperature reactor (HTR) type with small coated TRISO fuel particle in graphite matrix using the MCNPv4C software. The criticality of the core were calculated using the software and analysed by changing key parameters such coolant type, fuel type and enrichment levels, cladding materials, and control rod type. The criticality results from the simulation were validated using the SCALE 5.1 software by [1] M Ding and J L Kloosterman, 2010. The data produced from these analyses would be used as part of the process of proposing initial core layout and a provisional list of materials for newly design reactor core. In the future, the criticality study would be continued with different core configurations and geometries.

  16. Lecture Notes on Criticality Safety Validation Using MCNP & Whisper

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Forrest B.; Rising, Michael Evan; Alwin, Jennifer Louise

    2016-03-11

    Training classes for nuclear criticality safety, MCNP documentation. The need for, and problems surrounding, validation of computer codes and data area considered first. Then some background for MCNP & Whisper is given--best practices for Monte Carlo criticality calculations, neutron spectra, S(α,β) thermal neutron scattering data, nuclear data sensitivities, covariance data, and correlation coefficients. Whisper is computational software designed to assist the nuclear criticality safety analyst with validation studies with the Monte Carlo radiation transport package MCNP. Whisper's methodology (benchmark selection – Ck's, weights; extreme value theory – bias, bias uncertainty; MOS for nuclear data uncertainty – GLLS) and usage are discussed.

  17. An Assessment of the Detection of Highly Enriched Uranium and its Use in an Improvised Nuclear Device using the Monte Carlo Computer Code MCNP-5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, Thomas

    2007-04-01

    In 2002 and again in 2003, an investigative journalist unit at ABC News transported a 6.8 kilogram metallic slug of depleted uranium (DU) via shipping container from Istanbul, Turkey to Brooklyn, NY and from Jakarta, Indonesia to Long Beach, CA. Targeted inspection of these shipping containers by Department of Homeland Security (DHS) personnel, included the use of gamma-ray imaging, portal monitors and hand-held radiation detectors, did not uncover the hidden DU. Monte Carlo analysis of the gamma-ray intensity and spectrum of a DU slug and one consisting of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) showed that DU was a proper surrogate for testing the ability of DHS to detect the illicit transport of HEU. Our analysis using MCNP-5 illustrated the ease of fully shielding an HEU sample to avoid detection. The assembly of an Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) -- a crude atomic bomb -- from sub-critical pieces of HEU metal was then examined via Monte Carlo criticality calculations. Nuclear explosive yields of such an IND as a function of the speed of assembly of the sub-critical HEU components were derived. A comparison was made between the more rapid assembly of sub-critical pieces of HEU in the ``Little Boy'' (Hiroshima) weapon's gun barrel and gravity assembly (i.e., dropping one sub-critical piece of HEU on another from a specified height). Based on the difficulty of detection of HEU and the straightforward construction of an IND utilizing HEU, current U.S. government policy must be modified to more urgently prioritize elimination of and securing the global inventories of HEU.

  18. Adjoint-Based Uncertainty Quantification with MCNP

    SciTech Connect

    Seifried, Jeffrey E.

    2011-09-01

    This work serves to quantify the instantaneous uncertainties in neutron transport simulations born from nuclear data and statistical counting uncertainties. Perturbation and adjoint theories are used to derive implicit sensitivity expressions. These expressions are transformed into forms that are convenient for construction with MCNP6, creating the ability to perform adjoint-based uncertainty quantification with MCNP6. These new tools are exercised on the depleted-uranium hybrid LIFE blanket, quantifying its sensitivities and uncertainties to important figures of merit. Overall, these uncertainty estimates are small (< 2%). Having quantified the sensitivities and uncertainties, physical understanding of the system is gained and some confidence in the simulation is acquired.

  19. Adjoint-Based Uncertainty Quantification with MCNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifried, Jeffrey Edwin

    This work serves to quantify the instantaneous uncertainties in neutron transport simulations born from nuclear data and statistical counting uncertainties. Perturbation and adjoint theories are used to derive implicit sensitivity expressions. These expressions are transformed into forms that are convenient for construction with MCNP6, creating the ability to perform adjoint-based uncertainty quantification with MCNP6. These new tools are exercised on the depleted-uranium hybrid LIFE blanket, quantifying its sensitivities and uncertainties to important figures of merit. Overall, these uncertainty estimates are small (< 2%). Having quantified the sensitivities and uncertainties, physical understanding of the system is gained and some confidence in the simulation is acquired.

  20. Possible Improvements to MCNP6 and its CEM/LAQGSM Event-Generators

    SciTech Connect

    Mashnik, Stepan Georgievich

    2015-08-04

    This report is intended to the MCNP6 developers and sponsors of MCNP6. It presents a set of suggested possible future improvements to MCNP6 and to its CEM03.03 and LAQGSM03.03 event-generators. A few suggested modifications of MCNP6 are quite simple, aimed at avoiding possible problems with running MCNP6 on various computers, i.e., these changes are not expected to change or improve any results, but should make the use of MCNP6 easier; such changes are expected to require limited man-power resources. On the other hand, several other suggested improvements require a serious further development of nuclear reaction models, are expected to improve significantly the predictive power of MCNP6 for a number of nuclear reactions; but, such developments require several years of work by real experts on nuclear reactions.

  1. MCNP: Multigroup/adjoint capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.C.; Redmond, E.L. II; Palmtag, S.P.; Hendricks, J.S.

    1994-04-01

    This report discusses various aspects related to the use and validity of the general purpose Monte Carlo code MCNP for multigroup/adjoint calculations. The increased desire to perform comparisons between Monte Carlo and deterministic codes, along with the ever-present desire to increase the efficiency of large MCNP calculations has produced a greater user demand for the multigroup/adjoint capabilities. To more fully utilize these capabilities, we review the applications of the Monte Carlo multigroup/adjoint method, describe how to generate multigroup cross sections for MCNP with the auxiliary CRSRD code, describe how to use the multigroup/adjoint capability in MCNP, and provide examples and results indicating the effectiveness and validity of the MCNP multigroup/adjoint treatment. This information should assist users in taking advantage of the MCNP multigroup/adjoint capabilities.

  2. Criticality Calculations with MCNP6 - Practical Lectures

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Forrest B.; Rising, Michael Evan; Alwin, Jennifer Louise

    2016-11-29

    These slides are used to teach MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) usage to nuclear criticality safety analysts. The following are the lecture topics: course information, introduction, MCNP basics, criticality calculations, advanced geometry, tallies, adjoint-weighted tallies and sensitivities, physics and nuclear data, parameter studies, NCS validation I, NCS validation II, NCS validation III, case study 1 - solution tanks, case study 2 - fuel vault, case study 3 - B&W core, case study 4 - simple TRIGA, case study 5 - fissile mat. vault, criticality accident alarm systems. After completion of this course, you should be able to: Develop an input model for MCNP; Describe how cross section data impact Monte Carlo and deterministic codes; Describe the importance of validation of computer codes and how it is accomplished; Describe the methodology supporting Monte Carlo codes and deterministic codes; Describe pitfalls of Monte Carlo calculations; Discuss the strengths and weaknesses of Monte Carlo and Discrete Ordinants codes; The diffusion theory model is not strictly valid for treating fissile systems in which neutron absorption, voids, and/or material boundaries are present. In the context of these limitations, identify a fissile system for which a diffusion theory solution would be adequate.

  3. MCNP6. Simulating Correlated Data in Fission Events

    SciTech Connect

    Rising, Michael Evan; Sood, Avneet

    2015-12-03

    This report is a series of slides discussing the MCNP6 code and its status in simulating fission. Applications of interest include global security and nuclear nonproliferation, detection of special nuclear material (SNM), passive and active interrogation techniques, and coincident neutron and photon leakage.

  4. MCNP LWR Core Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Noah A.

    2012-08-14

    The reactor core input generator allows for MCNP input files to be tailored to design specifications and generated in seconds. Full reactor models can now easily be created by specifying a small set of parameters and generating an MCNP input for a full reactor core. Axial zoning of the core will allow for density variation in the fuel and moderator, with pin-by-pin fidelity, so that BWR cores can more accurately be modeled. LWR core work in progress: (1) Reflectivity option for specifying 1/4, 1/2, or full core simulation; (2) Axial zoning for moderator densities that vary with height; (3) Generating multiple types of assemblies for different fuel enrichments; and (4) Parameters for specifying BWR box walls. Fuel pin work in progress: (1) Radial and azimuthal zoning for generating further unique materials in fuel rods; (2) Options for specifying different types of fuel for MOX or multiple burn assemblies; (3) Additional options for replacing fuel rods with burnable poison rods; and (4) Control rod/blade modeling.

  5. MCNP{trademark} Monte Carlo: A precis of MCNP

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, K.J.

    1996-06-01

    MCNP{trademark} is a general purpose three-dimensional time-dependent neutron, photon, and electron transport code. It is highly portable and user-oriented, and backed by stringent software quality assurance practices and extensive experimental benchmarks. The cross section database is based upon the best evaluations available. MCNP incorporates state-of-the-art analog and adaptive Monte Carlo techniques. The code is documented in a 600 page manual which is augmented by numerous Los Alamos technical reports which detail various aspects of the code. MCNP represents over a megahour of development and refinement over the past 50 years and an ongoing commitment to excellence.

  6. QUADRENNIAL MCNP TIMING STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    E. C. SELCOW; B. D. LANSRUD

    2000-09-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Monte Carlo N-Particle radiation transport code, MCNP, is widely used around the world for many radiation protection and shielding applications. As a well-known standard it is also an excellent vehicle for assessing the relative performance of scientific computing platforms. Every three-to-four years a new version of MCNP is released internationally by the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. For each of the past few releases, we have also done a timing study to assess the progress of scientific computing platforms and software. These quadrennial timing studies are valuable to the radiation protection and shielding community because (a) they are performed by a recognized scientific team, not a computer vendor, (b) they use an internationally recognized code for radiation protection and shielding calculations, (c) they are eminently reproducible since the code and the test problems are internationally distributed. Further, if one has a computer platform, operating system, or compiler not presented in our results, its performance is directly comparable to the ones we report because it can use the same code, data, and test problems as we used. Our results, using a single processor per platform, indicate that hardware advances during the past three years have improved performance by less than a factor of two and software improvements have had a marginal effect on performance. The most significant impacts on performance have resulted from developments in multiprocessing and multitasking. The other most significant advance in the last three years has been the accelerated improvements in personal computers. In the last timing study, the tested personal computer was approximately a factor of four slower that the fastest machine tested, a DEC Alphastation 500. In the present study, the fastest PC tested was less than a factor of two slower than the fastest platform, which is a Compaq

  7. A new MCNP{trademark} test set

    SciTech Connect

    Brockhoff, R.C.; Hendricks, J.S.

    1994-09-01

    The MCNP test set is used to test the MCNP code after installation on various computer platforms. For MCNP4 and MCNP4A this test set included 25 test problems designed to test as many features of the MCNP code as possible. A new and better test set has been devised to increase coverage of the code from 85% to 97% with 28 problems. The new test set is as fast as and shorter than the MCNP4A test set. The authors describe the methodology for devising the new test set, the features that were not covered in the MCNP4A test set, and the changes in the MCNP4A test set that have been made for MCNP4B and its developmental versions. Finally, new bugs uncovered by the new test set and a compilation of all known MCNP4A bugs are presented.

  8. Potential MCNP enhancements for NCT

    SciTech Connect

    Estes, G.P.; Taylor, W.M.

    1992-12-01

    MCNP a Monte Carlo radiation transport code, is currently widely used in the medical community for a variety of purposes including treatment planning, diagnostics, beam design, tomographic studies, and radiation protection. This is particularly true in the Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) community. The current widespread medical use of MCNP after its general public distribution in about 1980 attests to the code`s general versatility and usefulness, particularly since its development to date has not been influenced by medical applications. This paper discusses enhancements to MCNP that could be implemented at Los Alamos for the benefit of the NCT community. These enhancements generally fall into two categories, namely those that have already been developed to some extent but are not yet publicly available, and those that seem both needed based on our current understanding of NCT goals, and achievable based on our working knowledge of the MCNP code. MCNP is a general, coupled neutron/photon/electron Monte Carlo code developed and maintained by the Radiation Transport Group at Los Alamos. It has been used extensively for radiation shielding studies, reactor analysis, detector design, physics experiment interpretation, oil and gas well logging, radiation protection studies, accelerator design, etc. over the years. MCNP is a three-dimensional geometry, continuous energy physics code capable of modeling complex geometries, specifying material regions such as organs by the intersections of analytical surfaces.

  9. MCNP and GADRAS Comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Klasky, Marc Louis; Myers, Steven Charles; James, Michael R.; Mayo, Douglas R.

    2016-04-19

    To facilitate the timely execution of System Threat Reviews (STRs) for DNDO, and also to develop a methodology for performing STRs, LANL performed comparisons of several radiation transport codes (MCNP, GADRAS, and Gamma-Designer) that have been previously utilized to compute radiation signatures. While each of these codes has strengths, it is of paramount interest to determine the limitations of each of the respective codes and also to identify the most time efficient means by which to produce computational results, given the large number of parametric cases that are anticipated in performing STR's. These comparisons serve to identify regions of applicability for each code and provide estimates of uncertainty that may be anticipated. Furthermore, while performing these comparisons, examination of the sensitivity of the results to modeling assumptions was also examined. These investigations serve to enable the creation of the LANL methodology for performing STRs. Given the wide variety of radiation test sources, scenarios, and detectors, LANL calculated comparisons of the following parameters: decay data, multiplicity, device (n,γ) leakages, and radiation transport through representative scenes and shielding. This investigation was performed to understand potential limitations utilizing specific codes for different aspects of the STR challenges.

  10. Depletion analysis of the UMLRR reactor core using MCNP6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odera, Dim Udochukwu

    Accurate knowledge of the neutron flux and temporal nuclide inventory in reactor physics calculations is necessary for a variety of application in nuclear engineering such as criticality safety, safeguards, and spent fuel storage. The Monte Carlo N- Particle (MCNP6) code with integrated buildup depletion code (CINDER90) provides a high-fidelity tool that can be used to perform 3D, full core simulation to evaluate fissile material utilization, and nuclide inventory calculations as a function of burnup. The University of Massachusetts Lowell Research Reactor (UMLRR) reactor has been modeled with the deterministic based code, VENTURE and with an older version of MCNP (MCNP5). The MIT developed MCODE (MCNP ORIGEN DEPLETION CODE) was used previously to perform some limited depletion calculations. This work chronicles the use of MCNP6, released in June 2013, to perform coupled neutronics and depletion calculation. The results are compared to previously benchmarked results. Furthermore, the code is used to determine the ratio of fission products 134Cs and 137Cs (burnup indicators), and the resultant ratio is compared to the burnup of the UMLRR.

  11. Benchmarking MCNP and TRIPOLI with PGNAA measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carasco, C.; Perot, B.; Sikora, A.; Mauerhofer, E.; Havenith, A.; Payan, E.; Kettler, J.; Kring, T.; Ma, J. L.

    2014-06-01

    The French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA Cadarache), the Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH (FZJ), and the RWTH Aachen University (RWTH) are involved in a cooperation aiming at characterizing toxic and reactive elements in radioactive waste packages by means of Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA). The design of an optimized measurement system and the assessment of its performances for realistic scenarios can be conveniently studied by numerical Monte Carlo simulation, provided the model and nuclear data offer a sufficient precision. Previous studies performed with MCNP have shown that when the nuclear data libraries lack of precision, relevant results can still be obtained by performing calculations in multiple steps (by first determining the radiative capture rate, and transporting the induced gamma toward the detector) and by injecting valid gamma-ray production data in-between [1]. In such cases, it is interesting to compare the results obtained with different codes. In the present paper, we propose to compare the MCNP and TRIPOLI codes with measurements obtained in MEDINA (Multi Element Detection based on Instrumental Neutron Activation), which is the new FZJ PGNAA facility [2]. The aim of the measurement campaign is to assess capture gamma rays of toxic elements that can be found in 200 L waste drums which are expected for geological repository.

  12. MCNP(TM) Version 5.

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, L. J.; Barrett, R. F.; Booth, Thomas Edward; Briesmeister, Judith F.; Brown, F. B.; Bull, J. S.; Giesler, G. C.; Goorley, J. T.; Mosteller, R. D.; Forster, R. A.; Post, S. E.; Prael, R. E.; Selcow, Elizabeth Carol,; Sood, A.

    2002-01-01

    The Monte Carlo transport workhorse, MCNP, is undergoing a massive renovation at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in support of the Eolus Project of the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASCI) Program. MCNP Version 5 (V5) (expected to be released to RSICC in Spring, 2002) will consist of a major restructuring from FORTRAN-77 (with extensions) to ANSI-standard FORTRAN-90 with support for all of the features available in the present release (MCNP-4C2/4C3). To most users, the look-and-feel of MCNP will not change much except for the improvements (improved graphics, easier installation, better online documentation). For example, even with the major format change, full support for incremental patching will still be provided. In addition to the language and style updates, MCNP V5 will have various new user features. These include improved photon physics, neutral particle radiography, enhancements and additions to variance reduction methods, new source options, and improved parallelism support (PVM, MPI, OpenMP).

  13. SUPERIMPOSED MESH PLOTTING IN MCNP

    SciTech Connect

    J. HENDRICKS

    2001-02-01

    The capability to plot superimposed meshes has been added to MCNP{trademark}. MCNP4C featured a superimposed mesh weight window generator which enabled users to set up geometries without having to subdivide geometric cells for variance reduction. The variance reduction was performed with weight windows on a rectangular or cylindrical mesh superimposed over the physical geometry. Experience with the new capability was favorable but also indicated that a number of enhancements would be very beneficial, particularly a means of visualizing the mesh and its values. The mathematics for plotting the mesh and its values is described here along with a description of other upgrades.

  14. MCNP-DSP USERS MANUAL

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, T.E.

    2001-01-19

    The Monte Carlo code MCNP-DSP was developed from the Los Alamos MCNP4a code to calculate the time and frequency response statistics obtained from subcritical measurements. The code can be used to simulate a variety of subcritical measurements including source-driven noise analysis, Rossi-{alpha}, pulsed source, passive frequency analysis, multiplicity, and Feynman variance measurements. This code can be used to validate Monte Carlo methods and cross section data sets with subcritical measurements and replaces the use of point kinetics models for interpreting subcritical measurements.

  15. MCNP(TM) Release 6.1.1 beta: Creating and Testing the Code Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, Lawrence J.; Casswell, Laura

    2014-06-12

    This report documents the preparations for and testing of the production release of MCNP6™1.1 beta through RSICC at ORNL. It addresses tests on supported operating systems (Linux, MacOSX, Windows) with the supported compilers (Intel, Portland Group and gfortran). Verification and Validation test results are documented elsewhere. This report does not address in detail the overall packaging of the distribution. Specifically, it does not address the nuclear and atomic data collection, the other included software packages (MCNP5, MCNPX and MCNP6) and the collection of reference documents.

  16. Monte Carlo N–Particle Transport Code System Including MCNP6.1, MCNP5-1.60, MCNPX-2.7.0 and Data Libraries.

    SciTech Connect

    GOORLEY, TIM

    2013-07-16

    Version 01 US DOE 10CFR810 Jurisdiction. MCNP6™ is a general-purpose, continuous-energy, generalized-geometry, time-dependent, Monte Carlo radiation-transport code designed to track many particle types over broad ranges of energies. MCNP6 represents the culmination of a multi-year effort to merge the MCNP5™ [X-503] and MCNPX™ [PEL11] codes into a single product comprising all features of both. For those familiar with previous versions of MCNP, you will discover the code has been expanded to handle a multitude of particles and to include model physics options for energies above the cross-section table range, a material burnup feature, and delayed particle production. Expanded and/or new tally, source, and variance-reduction options are available to the user as well as an improved plotting capability. The capability to calculate keff eigenvalues for fissile systems remains a standard feature. Although MCNP6 is simply and accurately described as the merger of MCNP5 and MCNPX capabilities, the result is much more than the sum of these two computer codes. MCNP6 is the result of five years of effort by the MCNP5 and MCNPX code development teams. These groups of people, residing in the Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) X Computational Physics Division, Monte Carlo Codes Group (XCP-3), and Nuclear Engineering and Nonproliferation Division, Systems Design and Analysis Group (NEN-5, formerly D-5), have combined their code development efforts to produce the next evolution of MCNP. While maintenance and bug fixes will continue for MCNP5 v.1.60 and MCNPX v.2.7.0 for upcoming years, new code development capabilities will be developed and released only in MCNP6. In fact, this initial production release of MCNP6 (v. 1.0) contains 16 new features not previously found in either code. These new features include (among others) the abilities to import unstructured mesh geometries from the finite element code Abaqus, to transport photons down to 1.0 eV, to model complete atomic

  17. Monte Carlo N–Particle Transport Code System Including MCNP6.1, MCNP5-1.60, MCNPX-2.7.0 and Data Libraries.

    SciTech Connect

    GOORLEY, TIM

    2013-07-16

    Version 00 US DOE 10CFR810 Jurisdiction. MCNP6™ is a general-purpose, continuous-energy, generalized-geometry, time-dependent, Monte Carlo radiation-transport code designed to track many particle types over broad ranges of energies. MCNP6 represents the culmination of a multi-year effort to merge the MCNP5™ [X-503] and MCNPX™ [PEL11] codes into a single product comprising all features of both. For those familiar with previous versions of MCNP, you will discover the code has been expanded to handle a multitude of particles and to include model physics options for energies above the cross-section table range, a material burnup feature, and delayed particle production. Expanded and/or new tally, source, and variance-reduction options are available to the user as well as an improved plotting capability. The capability to calculate keff eigenvalues for fissile systems remains a standard feature. Although MCNP6 is simply and accurately described as the merger of MCNP5 and MCNPX capabilities, the result is much more than the sum of these two computer codes. MCNP6 is the result of five years of effort by the MCNP5 and MCNPX code development teams. These groups of people, residing in the Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) X Computational Physics Division, Monte Carlo Codes Group (XCP-3), and Nuclear Engineering and Nonproliferation Division, Systems Design and Analysis Group (NEN-5, formerly D-5), have combined their code development efforts to produce the next evolution of MCNP. While maintenance and bug fixes will continue for MCNP5 v.1.60 and MCNPX v.2.7.0 for upcoming years, new code development capabilities will be developed and released only in MCNP6. In fact, this initial production release of MCNP6 (v. 1.0) contains 16 new features not previously found in either code. These new features include (among others) the abilities to import unstructured mesh geometries from the finite element code Abaqus, to transport photons down to 1.0 eV, to model complete atomic

  18. On-The-Fly Neutron Doppler Broadening in MCNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, William R.; Brown, Forrest B.; Wilderman, Scott; Yesilyurt, Gokhan

    2014-06-01

    Multi-physics calculations may involve coupling continuous-energy Monte Carlo neutronics codes to CFD codes that provide many thousands or even millions of region temperatures. The traditional Monte Carlo approach - using precalculated Doppler broadened nuclear cross-sections - is not feasible for these large multiphysics problems. Instead, an On-the-Fly (OTF) Doppler broadening methodology is required, whereby neutron cross-sections are broadened during the Monte Carlo transport. To this end, we have developed a methodology for MCNP to provide OTF broadening based on cell temperatures during neutron tracking. The method enables the use of many thousands or more temperatures in MCNP Monte Carlo calculations for multiphysics applications, significantly advancing the state-of-the-art by permitting the solution of problems that were not previously possible with continuous-energy Monte Carlo codes. A production library with an extended set of isotopes has been developed for use with MCNP6. Calculations of test problems with MCNP6 and the new library demonstrate the accuracy and effectiveness of the OTF approach.

  19. Performance upgrades to the MCNP6 burnup capability for large scale depletion calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Fensin, M. L.; Galloway, J. D.; James, M. R.

    2015-04-11

    The first MCNP based inline Monte Carlo depletion capability was officially released from the Radiation Safety Information and Computational Center as MCNPX 2.6.0. With the merger of MCNPX and MCNP5, MCNP6 combined the capability of both simulation tools, as well as providing new advanced technology, in a single radiation transport code. The new MCNP6 depletion capability was first showcased at the International Congress for Advancements in Nuclear Power Plants (ICAPP) meeting in 2012. At that conference the new capabilities addressed included the combined distributive and shared memory parallel architecture for the burnup capability, improved memory management, physics enhancements, and new predictability as compared to the H.B Robinson Benchmark. At Los Alamos National Laboratory, a special purpose cluster named “tebow,” was constructed such to maximize available RAM per CPU, as well as leveraging swap space with solid state hard drives, to allow larger scale depletion calculations (allowing for significantly more burnable regions than previously examined). As the MCNP6 burnup capability was scaled to larger numbers of burnable regions, a noticeable slowdown was realized.This paper details two specific computational performance strategies for improving calculation speedup: (1) retrieving cross sections during transport; and (2) tallying mechanisms specific to burnup in MCNP. To combat this slowdown new performance upgrades were developed and integrated into MCNP6 1.2.

  20. Performance upgrades to the MCNP6 burnup capability for large scale depletion calculations

    DOE PAGES

    Fensin, M. L.; Galloway, J. D.; James, M. R.

    2015-04-11

    The first MCNP based inline Monte Carlo depletion capability was officially released from the Radiation Safety Information and Computational Center as MCNPX 2.6.0. With the merger of MCNPX and MCNP5, MCNP6 combined the capability of both simulation tools, as well as providing new advanced technology, in a single radiation transport code. The new MCNP6 depletion capability was first showcased at the International Congress for Advancements in Nuclear Power Plants (ICAPP) meeting in 2012. At that conference the new capabilities addressed included the combined distributive and shared memory parallel architecture for the burnup capability, improved memory management, physics enhancements, and newmore » predictability as compared to the H.B Robinson Benchmark. At Los Alamos National Laboratory, a special purpose cluster named “tebow,” was constructed such to maximize available RAM per CPU, as well as leveraging swap space with solid state hard drives, to allow larger scale depletion calculations (allowing for significantly more burnable regions than previously examined). As the MCNP6 burnup capability was scaled to larger numbers of burnable regions, a noticeable slowdown was realized.This paper details two specific computational performance strategies for improving calculation speedup: (1) retrieving cross sections during transport; and (2) tallying mechanisms specific to burnup in MCNP. To combat this slowdown new performance upgrades were developed and integrated into MCNP6 1.2.« less

  1. MCNP6 Cosmic-Source Option

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, Gregg W; Armstrong, Hirotatsu; James, Michael R; Clem, John; Goldhagen, Paul

    2012-06-19

    MCNP is a Monte Carlo radiation transport code that has been under development for over half a century. Over the last decade, the development team of a high-energy offshoot of MCNP, called MCNPX, has implemented several physics and algorithm improvements important for modeling galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) interactions with matter. In this presentation, we discuss the latest of these improvements, a new Cosmic-Source option, that has been implemented in MCNP6.

  2. MCNP6 Fission Multiplicity with FMULT Card

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, Trevor; Fensin, Michael Lorne; Hendricks, John S.; James, Michael R.; McKinney, Gregg W.

    2012-06-18

    With the merger of MCNPX and MCNP5 into MCNP6, MCNP6 now provides all the capabilities of both codes allowing the user to access all the fission multiplicity data sets. Detailed in this paper is: (1) the new FMULT card capabilities for accessing these different data sets; (2) benchmark calculations, as compared to experiment, detailing the results of selecting these separate data sets for thermal neutron induced fission on U-235.

  3. The MCNP{trademark}/LCS{trademark} merger project

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, H.G.; Adams, K.J.; Chadwick, M.B.

    1997-10-01

    The MCNP code is written and maintained by Group X-TM at Los Alamos National Laboratory. In response to a variety of needs, and particularly in support of the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) program, the authors have recently undertaken a major effort to expand the capabilities of MCNP to increase the set of transportable particles; to make use of newly evaluated high energy nuclear data tables for neutrons, protons, and potentially other particles; and to incorporate physics models for use where tabular data are unavailable. A preliminary version of the expanded code, called MCNPX, has now been issued for testing. The new code includes all existing LAHET physics modules, and has the ability to utilize the 150 MeV data libraries that have recently been released by LANL Group T-2.

  4. The New MCNP6 Depletion Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Fensin, Michael Lorne; James, Michael R.; Hendricks, John S.; Goorley, John T.

    2012-06-19

    The first MCNP based inline Monte Carlo depletion capability was officially released from the Radiation Safety Information and Computational Center as MCNPX 2.6.0. Both the MCNP5 and MCNPX codes have historically provided a successful combinatorial geometry based, continuous energy, Monte Carlo radiation transport solution for advanced reactor modeling and simulation. However, due to separate development pathways, useful simulation capabilities were dispersed between both codes and not unified in a single technology. MCNP6, the next evolution in the MCNP suite of codes, now combines the capability of both simulation tools, as well as providing new advanced technology, in a single radiation transport code. We describe here the new capabilities of the MCNP6 depletion code dating from the official RSICC release MCNPX 2.6.0, reported previously, to the now current state of MCNP6. NEA/OECD benchmark results are also reported. The MCNP6 depletion capability enhancements beyond MCNPX 2.6.0 reported here include: (1) new performance enhancing parallel architecture that implements both shared and distributed memory constructs; (2) enhanced memory management that maximizes calculation fidelity; and (3) improved burnup physics for better nuclide prediction. MCNP6 depletion enables complete, relatively easy-to-use depletion calculations in a single Monte Carlo code. The enhancements described here help provide a powerful capability as well as dictate a path forward for future development to improve the usefulness of the technology.

  5. The new MCNP6 depletion capability

    SciTech Connect

    Fensin, M. L.; James, M. R.; Hendricks, J. S.; Goorley, J. T.

    2012-07-01

    The first MCNP based in-line Monte Carlo depletion capability was officially released from the Radiation Safety Information and Computational Center as MCNPX 2.6.0. Both the MCNP5 and MCNPX codes have historically provided a successful combinatorial geometry based, continuous energy, Monte Carlo radiation transport solution for advanced reactor modeling and simulation. However, due to separate development pathways, useful simulation capabilities were dispersed between both codes and not unified in a single technology. MCNP6, the next evolution in the MCNP suite of codes, now combines the capability of both simulation tools, as well as providing new advanced technology, in a single radiation transport code. We describe here the new capabilities of the MCNP6 depletion code dating from the official RSICC release MCNPX 2.6.0, reported previously, to the now current state of MCNP6. NEA/OECD benchmark results are also reported. The MCNP6 depletion capability enhancements beyond MCNPX 2.6.0 reported here include: (1) new performance enhancing parallel architecture that implements both shared and distributed memory constructs; (2) enhanced memory management that maximizes calculation fidelity; and (3) improved burnup physics for better nuclide prediction. MCNP6 depletion enables complete, relatively easy-to-use depletion calculations in a single Monte Carlo code. The enhancements described here help provide a powerful capability as well as dictate a path forward for future development to improve the usefulness of the technology. (authors)

  6. MCNP capabilities at the dawn of the 21st century: Neutron-gamma applications

    SciTech Connect

    Selcow, E.C.; McKinney, G.W.

    2000-10-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Monte Carlo N-Particle radiation transport code, MCNP, has become an international standard for a wide spectrum of neutron-gamma radiation transport applications. These include nuclear criticality safety, radiation shielding, nuclear safeguards, nuclear well-logging, fission and fusion reactor design, accelerator target design, detector design and analysis, health physics, medical radiation therapy and imaging, radiography, decontamination and decommissioning, and waste storage and disposal. The latest version of the code, MCNP4C, was released to the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) in February 2000.This paper described the new features and capabilities of the code, and discusses the specific applicability to neutron-gamma problems. We will also discuss the future directions for MCNP code development, including rewriting the code in Fortran 90.

  7. MCNP4A: Features and philosophy

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, J.S.

    1993-05-01

    This paper describes MCNP, states its philosophy, introduces a number of new features becoming available with version MCNP4A, and answers a number of questions asked by participants in the workshop. MCNP is a general-purpose three-dimensional neutron, photon and electron transport code. Its philosophy is ``Quality, Value and New Features.`` Quality is exemplified by new software quality assurance practices and a program of benchmarking against experiments. Value includes a strong emphasis on documentation and code portability. New features are the third priority. MCNP4A is now available at Los Alamos. New features in MCNP4A include enhanced statistical analysis, distributed processor multitasking, new photon libraries, ENDF/B-VI capabilities, X-Windows graphics, dynamic memory allocation, expanded criticality output, periodic boundaries, plotting of particle tracks via SABRINA, and many other improvements. 23 refs.

  8. Benchmark study of TRIPOLI-4 through experiment and MCNP codes

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, M.; Coulon, R.; Normand, S.; Huot, N.; Petit, O.

    2011-07-01

    Reliability on simulation results is essential in nuclear physics. Although MCNP5 and MCNPX are the world widely used 3D Monte Carlo radiation transport codes, alternative Monte Carlo simulation tools exist to simulate neutral and charged particles' interactions with matter. Therefore, benchmark are required in order to validate these simulation codes. For instance, TRIPOLI-4.7, developed at the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission for neutron and photon transport, now also provides the user with a full feature electron-photon electromagnetic shower. Whereas the reliability of TRIPOLI-4.7 for neutron and photon transport has been validated yet, the new development regarding electron-photon matter interaction needs additional validation benchmarks. We will thus demonstrate how accurately TRIPOLI-4's 'deposited spectrum' tally can simulate gamma spectrometry problems, compared to MCNP's 'F8' tally. The experimental setup is based on an HPGe detector measuring the decay spectrum of an {sup 152}Eu source. These results are then compared with those given by MCNPX 2.6d and TRIPOLI-4 codes. This paper deals with both the experimental aspect and simulation. We will demonstrate that TRIPOLI-4 is a potential alternative to both MCNPX and MCNP5 for gamma-electron interaction simulation. (authors)

  9. MatMCNP: A Code for Producing Material Cards for MCNP

    SciTech Connect

    DePriest, Kendall Russell; Saavedra, Karen C.

    2014-09-01

    A code for generating MCNP material cards (MatMCNP) has been written and verified for naturally occurring, stable isotopes. The program allows for material specification as either atomic or weight percent (fractions). MatMCNP also permits the specification of enriched lithium, boron, and/or uranium. In addition to producing the material cards for MCNP, the code calculates the atomic (or number) density in atoms/barn-cm as well as the multiplier that should be used to convert neutron and gamma fluences into dose in the material specified.

  10. Visualizing MCNP Tally Segment Geometry and Coupling Results with ABAQUS

    SciTech Connect

    J. R. Parry; J. A. Galbraith

    2007-11-01

    The Advanced Graphite Creep test, AGC-1, is planned for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) in support of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant program. The experiment requires very detailed neutronics and thermal hydraulics analyses to show compliance with programmatic and ATR safety requirements. The MCNP model used for the neutronics analysis required hundreds of tally regions to provide the desired detail. A method for visualizing the hundreds of tally region geometries and the tally region results in 3 dimensions has been created to support the AGC-1 irradiation. Additionally, a method was created which would allow ABAQUS to access the results directly for the thermal analysis of the AGC-1 experiment.

  11. MCNP APPLICATIONS FOR THE 21ST CENTURY

    SciTech Connect

    G. MCKINNEY; T. BOOTH; ET AL

    2000-10-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Monte Carlo N-Particle radiation transport code, MCNP, has become an international standard for a wide spectrum of neutron, photon, and electron radiation transport applications. The latest version of the code, MCNP 4C, was released to the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) in February 2000. This paper describes the code development philosophy, new features and capabilities, applicability to various problems, and future directions.

  12. MCNP application for the 21 century

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, M.C.

    2000-08-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Monte Carlo N-Particle radiation transport code, MCNP, has become an international standard for a wide spectrum of neutron, photon, and electron radiation transport applications. The latest version of the code, MCNP 4C, was released to the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) in February 2000. This paper describes the code development philosophy, new features and capabilities, applicability to various problems, and future directions.

  13. Determination of neutron flux distribution in an Am-Be irradiator using the MCNP.

    PubMed

    Shtejer-Diaz, K; Zamboni, C B; Zahn, G S; Zevallos-Chávez, J Y

    2003-10-01

    A neutron irradiator has been assembled at IPEN facilities to perform qualitative-quantitative analysis of many materials using thermal and fast neutrons outside the nuclear reactor premises. To establish the prototype specifications, the neutron flux distribution and the absorbed dose rates were calculated using the MCNP computer code. These theoretical predictions then allow one to discuss the optimum irradiator design and its performance.

  14. Progress with On-The-Fly Neutron Doppler Broadening in MCNP

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Forrest B.; Martin, William R.; Yesilyurt, Gokhan; Wilderman, Scott

    2012-06-18

    The University of Michigan, ANL, and LANL have been collaborating on a US-DOE-NE University Programs project 'Implementation of On-the-Fly Doppler Broadening in MCNP5 for Multiphysics Simulation of Nuclear Reactors.' This talk describes the project and provides results from the initial implementation of On-The-Fly Doppler broadening (OTF) in MCNP and testing. The OTF methodology involves high precision fitting of Doppler broadened cross-sections over a wide temperature range (the target for reactor calculations is 250-3200K). The temperature dependent fits are then used within MCNP during the neutron transport, for OTF broadening based on cell temperatures. It is straightforward to extend this capability to cover any temperature range of interest, allowing the Monte Carlo simulation to account for a continuous distribution of temperature ranges throughout the problem geometry.

  15. Benchmark analysis of MCNP{trademark} ENDF/B-VI iron

    SciTech Connect

    Court, J.D.; Hendricks, J.S.

    1994-12-01

    The MCNP ENDF/B-VI iron cross-section data was subjected to four benchmark studies as part of the Hiroshima/Nagasaki dose re-evaluation for the National Academy of Science and the Defense Nuclear Agency. The four benchmark studies were: (1) the iron sphere benchmarks from the Lawrence Livermore Pulsed Spheres; (2) the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Fusion Reactor Shielding Benchmark; (3) a 76-cm diameter iron sphere benchmark done at the University of Illinois; (4) the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Benchmark for Neutron Transport through Iron. MCNP4A was used to model each benchmark and computational results from the ENDF/B-VI iron evaluations were compared to ENDF/B-IV, ENDF/B-V, the MCNP Recommended Data Set (which includes Los Alamos National Laboratory Group T-2 evaluations), and experimental data. The results show that the ENDF/B-VI iron evaluations are as good as, or better than, previous data sets.

  16. Validation of MCNP6 Version 1.0 with the ENDF/B-VII.1 Cross Section Library for Uranium Metal, Oxide, and Solution Systems on the High Performance Computing Platform Moonlight

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Bryan Scott; MacQuigg, Michael Robert; Wysong, Andrew Russell

    2016-04-21

    In this document, the code MCNP is validated with ENDF/B-VII.1 cross section data under the purview of ANSI/ANS-8.24-2007, for use with uranium systems. MCNP is a computer code based on Monte Carlo transport methods. While MCNP has wide reading capability in nuclear transport simulation, this validation is limited to the functionality related to neutron transport and calculation of criticality parameters such as keff.

  17. Addressing Fission Product Validation in MCNP Burnup Credit Criticality Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Don; Bowen, Douglas G; Marshall, William BJ J

    2015-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation issued Interim Staff Guidance (ISG) 8, Revision 3 in September 2012. This ISG provides guidance for NRC staff members’ review of burnup credit (BUC) analyses supporting transport and dry storage of pressurized water reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in casks. The ISG includes guidance for addressing validation of criticality (keff) calculations crediting the presence of a limited set of fission products and minor actinides (FP&MAs). Based on previous work documented in NRC Regulatory Guide (NUREG) Contractor Report (CR)-7109, the ISG recommends that NRC staff members accept the use of either 1.5 or 3% of the FP&MA worth—in addition to bias and bias uncertainty resulting from validation of keff calculations for the major actinides in SNF—to conservatively account for the bias and bias uncertainty associated with the specified unvalidated FP&MAs. The ISG recommends (1) use of 1.5% of the FP&MA worth if a modern version of SCALE and its nuclear data are used and (2) 3% of the FP&MA worth for well qualified, industry standard code systems other than SCALE with the Evaluated Nuclear Data Files, Part B (ENDF/B),-V, ENDF/B-VI, or ENDF/B-VII cross sections libraries. The work presented in this paper provides a basis for extending the use of the 1.5% of the FP&MA worth bias to BUC criticality calculations performed using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code. The extended use of the 1.5% FP&MA worth bias is shown to be acceptable by comparison of FP&MA worths calculated using SCALE and MCNP with ENDF/B-V, -VI, and -VII–based nuclear data. The comparison supports use of the 1.5% FP&MA worth bias when the MCNP code is used for criticality calculations, provided that the cask design is similar to the hypothetical generic BUC-32 cask model and that the credited FP&MA worth is no more than 0.1 Δkeff (ISG-8, Rev. 3, Recommendation 4).

  18. YUMMY: The Yucca Mountain MCNP-Library

    SciTech Connect

    Alpan, FA

    2004-12-10

    Point-wise libraries provided with the MCNP code contain neutron data for a limited number of temperatures. However, it is important to have the option of using data from a wide range of temperatures for transport calculations. For this purpose, a multi-temperature, ACE-format neutron library was generated for 134 nuclides, as requested by Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) staff. The library is referred to as YUMMY (YUcca Mountain MCNP-librarY). The neutron cross section data are based on ENDF/B-V or ENDF/B-VI evaluations that were requested by YMP staff. This document provides the details of the new library and its use in criticality safety benchmark problems, a Pressurized Water Reactor design and waste package models in MCNP4C.

  19. Application of MCNP{trademark} to computed tomography in medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Brockhoff, R.C.; Estes, G.P.; Hills, C.R.; Demarco, J.J.; Solberg, T.D.

    1996-03-01

    The MCNP{trademark} code has been used to simulate CT scans of the MIRD human phantom. In addition. an actual CT scan of a patient was used to create an MCNP geometry, and this geometry was computationally ``CT scanned`` using MCNP to reconstruct CT images. The results show that MCNP can be used to model the human body based on data obtained from CT scans and to simulate CT scans that are based on these or other models.

  20. SABRINA - an interactive geometry modeler for MCNP

    SciTech Connect

    West, J.T.; Murphy, J. )

    1988-01-01

    One of the most difficult tasks when analyzing a complex three-dimensional system with Monte Carlo is geometry model development. SABRINA attempts to make the modeling process more user-friendly and less of an obstacle. It accepts both combinatorial solid bodies and MCNP surfaces and produces MCNP cells. The model development process in SABRINA is highly interactive and gives the user immediate feedback on errors. Users can view their geometry from arbitrary perspectives while the model is under development and interactively find and correct modeling errors. An example of a SABRINA display is shown. It represents a complex three-dimensional shape.

  1. Preliminary Benchmarking Efforts and MCNP Simulation Results for Homeland Security

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Hayes

    2008-04-18

    It is shown in this work that basic measurements made from well defined source detector configurations can be readily converted in to benchmark quality results by which Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) input stacks can be validated. Specifically, a recent measurement made in support of national security at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) is described with sufficient detail to be submitted to the American Nuclear Society’s (ANS) Joint Benchmark Committee (JBC) for consideration as a radiation measurement benchmark. From this very basic measurement, MCNP input stacks are generated and validated both in predicted signal amplitude and spectral shape. Not modeled at this time are those perturbations from the more recent pulse height light (PHL) tally feature, although what spectral deviations are seen can be largely attributed to not including this small correction. The value of this work is as a proof-of-concept demonstration that with well documented historical testing can be converted into formal radiation measurement benchmarks. This effort would support virtual testing of algorithms and new detector configurations.

  2. MCNP analysis of the FOEHN critical experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ougouag, A.M.; Wemple, C.A.; Rubio, G.A.; Ryskamp, J.M.

    1993-10-01

    A very high fidelity MCNP model of the Franco-German FOEHN critical experiment has been developed. The results obtained show a high degree of agreement with each of the three configurations of the experiment. In particular, it is shown that the model reproduces the power density production distribution for all but a few of the experimental points internal to the core. Agreement for points of the axial ends at the core is less comprehensive. In the configurations that include boron axial core end covers, the agreement is similar within the core, but a few additional disagreement points arise at the axial ends of the core. The results remain consistent, however, with the statistical interpretation of MCNP tallies. The quantities computed also include the thermal flux in the reflector and the core multiplication factor for various critical configurations. It is found that the fluxes agree with the experiment within the experimental error bounds and two computational standard deviations. Most of the core multiplication results agree within three MCNP standard deviations. The overall conclusion of this study is that MCNP is an appropriate and valid computational tool for the static neutronic design of plate-fueled, heavy-water-moderated reactors, such as FOEHN or the Advanced Neutron Source.

  3. Testing the Delayed Gamma Capability in MCNP6

    SciTech Connect

    Weldon, Robert A.; Fensin, Michael L.; McKinney, Gregg W.

    2015-10-28

    The mission of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office is to quickly and reliably detect unauthorized attempts to import or transport special nuclear material for use against the United States. Developing detection equipment to meet this objective requires accurate simulation of both the detectable signature and detection mechanism. A delayed particle capability was initially added to MCNPX 2.6.A in 2005 to sample the radioactive fission product parents and emit decay particles resulting from the decay chain. To meet the objectives of detection scenario modeling, the capability was designed to sample a particular time for emitting particular multiplicity of a particular energy. Because the sampling process of selecting both time and energy is interdependent, to linearize the time and emission sampling, atom densities are computed at several discrete time steps, and the time-integrated production is computed by multiplying the atom density by the decay constant and time step size to produce a cumulative distribution function for sampling the emission time, energy, and multiplicity. The delayed particle capability was initially given a time-bin structure to help reasonably reproduce, from a qualitative sense, a fission benchmark by Beddingfield, which examined the delayed gamma emission. This original benchmark was only qualitative and did not contain the magnitudes of the actual measured data but did contain relative graphical representation of the spectra. A better benchmark with measured data was later provided by Hunt, Mozin, Reedy, Selpel, and Tobin at the Idaho Accelerator Center; however, because of the complexity of the benchmark setup, sizable systematic errors were expected in the modeling, and initial results compared to MCNPX 2.7.0 showed errors outside of statistical fluctuation. Presented in this paper is a more simplified approach to benchmarking, utilizing closed form analytic solutions to the granddaughter equations for particular sets of decay systems

  4. Evaluation of Geometric Progression (GP) Buildup Factors using MCNP Codes (MCNP6.1 and MCNP5-1.60)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung-O.; Roh, Gyuhong; Lee, Byungchul

    2016-02-01

    The gamma-ray buildup factors of three-dimensional point kernel code (QAD-CGGP) are re-evaluated by using MCNP codes (MCNP6.1 and MCNPX5-1.60) and ENDF/B-VI.8 photoatomic data, which cover an energy range of 0.015-15 MeV and an iron thickness of 0.5-40 Mean Free Path (MFP). These new data are fitted to the Geometric Progression (GP) fitting function and are then compared with ANS standard data equipped with QAD-CGGP. In addition, a simple benchmark calculation was performed to compare the QAD-CGGP results applied with new and existing buildup factors based on the MCNP codes. In the case of the buildup factors of low-energy gamma-rays, new data are evaluated to be about 5% higher than the existing data. In other cases, these new data present a similar trend based on the specific penetration depth, while existing data continuously increase beyond that depth. In a simple benchmark, the calculations using the existing data were slightly underestimated compared to the reference data at a deep penetration depth. On the other hand, the calculations with new data were stabilized with an increasing penetration depth, despite a slight overestimation at a shallow penetration depth.

  5. MCNP5 for proton radiography.

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, H. G.; Brown, F. B.; Bull, J. S.; Goorley, J. T.; Little, R. C.; Liu, L. C.; Mashnik, S. G.; Prael, R. E.; Selcow, Elizabeth Carol,; Sierk, A. J.; Sweezy, J. E.; Zumbro, J. D.; Mokhov, N. V.; Striganov, S.; Gudima, K. K.

    2004-01-01

    The developmental version of MCNPS has recently been extended to provide for continuous-energy transport of high-energy protons. This enhancement involves the incorporation of several significant new physics models into the code. Multiple Coulomb scattering is treated with an advanced model that takes account of projectile and nuclear target form factors. In the next version, this model will provide a coupled sampling of both angular deflection and collisional energy loss, including straggling. The proton elastic scattering model is also new, based on recent theoretical work. Charged particle transport in the presence of magnetic fields is accomplished either by using transfer maps from the COSY INFINITY code (in void regions) or by using an algorithm adapted from the MARS code (in void regions or in scattering materials). Work is underway to validate and implement the latest versions of the Cascade-Exciton Model and the Los Alamos Quark-Gluon-String Model, which will process inelastic nuclear interactions and generate secondary particles.

  6. Improved MCNP Memory Locality by Neutron Grouping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bly, Aaron

    This research presents new code for Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) to achieve an improved time during criticality calculations. Modifications implementing the grouping and sorting of neutrons takes advantage of memory locality by processing all neutrons in a group to achieve the temporal reuse of cross section data. This prevents unnecessary data lookups. Various groupings and their results are compared. The modified code utilizing neutron energy groups provided the best result of a 16.7% +/- 0.5% speedup for a criticality determination of a two slab tank experiment. This is a savings of 2 ½ hours for a system that normally takes approximately 15 ½ hours to execute. The code implemented was chosen to require minimal modifications to the MCNP program thus avoiding the need to rewrite a new version. Verification and validation is still needed in order to show that a speedup using neutron groups can be achieved in all cases.

  7. Fission Matrix Capability for MCNP Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Forrest; Carney, Sean; Kiedrowski, Brian; Martin, William

    2014-06-01

    We describe recent experience and results from implementing a fission matrix capability into the MCNP Monte Carlo code. The fission matrix can be used to provide estimates of the fundamental mode fission distribution, the dominance ratio, the eigenvalue spectrum, and higher mode forward and adjoint eigenfunctions of the fission neutron source distribution. It can also be used to accelerate the convergence of the power method iterations and to provide basis functions for higher-order perturbation theory. The higher-mode fission sources can be used in MCNP to determine higher-mode forward fluxes and tallies, and work is underway to provide higher-mode adjoint-weighted fluxes and tallies. Past difficulties and limitations of the fission matrix approach are overcome with a new sparse representation of the matrix, permitting much larger and more accurate fission matrix representations. The new fission matrix capabilities provide a significant advance in the state-of-the-art for Monte Carlo criticality calculations.

  8. An investigation of MCNP6.1 beryllium oxide S(α, β) cross sections

    DOE PAGES

    Sartor, Raymond F.; Glazener, Natasha N.

    2016-03-08

    In MCNP6.1, materials are constructed by identifying the constituent isotopes (or elements in a few cases) individually. This list selects the corresponding microscopic cross sections calculated from the free-gas model to create the material macroscopic cross sections. Furthermore, the free-gas model and the corresponding material macroscopic cross sections assume that the interactions of atoms do not affect the nuclear cross sections.

  9. JEF 2.2 Cross Section Library for the MCNP Monte Carlo Code.

    SciTech Connect

    MASSIMO,; PESCARINI,

    2003-11-24

    Version 01 This continuous energy cross-section data library for MCNP is based on the JEF-2.2 evaluated nuclear data library (ACE format). The present library was satisfactorily tested in thermal and fast criticality benchmarks. For analyses below 20 MeV, MCJEF22NEA.BOLlB was applied also in cell and core calculations dedicated to the study of the subcritical accelerator driven systems (ADS).

  10. Use of MCNP + GADRAS in Generating More Realistic Gamma-Ray Spectra for Plutonium and HEU Objects

    SciTech Connect

    Rawool-Sullivan, Mohini; Mattingly, John; Mitchell, Dean

    2012-08-07

    The ability to accurately simulate high-resolution gamma spectra from materials that emit both neutrons and gammas is very important to the analysis of special nuclear materials (SNM), e.g., uranium and plutonium. One approach under consideration has been to combine MCNP and GADRAS. This approach is expected to generate more accurate gamma ray spectra for complex three-dimensional geometries than can be obtained from one-dimensional deterministic transport simulations (e.g., ONEDANT). This presentation describes application of combining MCNP and GADRAS in simulating plutonium and uranium spectra.

  11. MCNP4B{sup {trademark}} verification and validation

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, J.S.; Court, J.D.

    1996-08-01

    Several new features and bug fixes have been incorporated into the new release of MCNP. As required by the MCNP Software Quality Assurance Plan, these changes to the code and the test set are documented here for user reference. This document summarizes the new MCNP4B features and corrections, separated into major and minor groupings. Also included are a code cleanup section and a section delineating problems identified in LA-12839 which have not been corrected. Finally, we document the MCNP4B test set modifications and explain how test set coverage has been improved.

  12. MCNP Output Data Analysis with ROOT (MODAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carasco, C.

    2010-06-01

    MCNP Output Data Analysis with ROOT (MODAR) is a tool based on CERN's ROOT software. MODAR has been designed to handle time-energy data issued by MCNP simulations of neutron inspection devices using the associated particle technique. MODAR exploits ROOT's Graphical User Interface and functionalities to visualize and process MCNP simulation results in a fast and user-friendly way. MODAR allows to take into account the detection system time resolution (which is not possible with MCNP) as well as detectors energy response function and counting statistics in a straightforward way. Program summaryProgram title: MODAR Catalogue identifier: AEGA_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEGA_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 155 373 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 14 815 461 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Computer: Most Unix workstations and PC Operating system: Most Unix systems, Linux and windows, provided the ROOT package has been installed. Examples where tested under Suse Linux and Windows XP. RAM: Depends on the size of the MCNP output file. The example presented in the article, which involves three two-dimensional 139×740 bins histograms, allocates about 60 MB. These data are running under ROOT and include consumption by ROOT itself. Classification: 17.6 External routines: ROOT version 5.24.00 ( http://root.cern.ch/drupal/) Nature of problem: The output of an MCNP simulation is an ASCII file. The data processing is usually performed by copying and pasting the relevant parts of the ASCII file into Microsoft Excel. Such an approach is satisfactory when the quantity of data is small but is not efficient when the size of the simulated data is large, for example when time

  13. MCNP output data analysis with ROOT (MODAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carasco, C.

    2010-12-01

    MCNP Output Data Analysis with ROOT (MODAR) is a tool based on CERN's ROOT software. MODAR has been designed to handle time-energy data issued by MCNP simulations of neutron inspection devices using the associated particle technique. MODAR exploits ROOT's Graphical User Interface and functionalities to visualize and process MCNP simulation results in a fast and user-friendly way. MODAR allows to take into account the detection system time resolution (which is not possible with MCNP) as well as detectors energy response function and counting statistics in a straightforward way. New version program summaryProgram title: MODAR Catalogue identifier: AEGA_v1_1 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEGA_v1_1.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 150 927 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 4 981 633 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Computer: Most Unix workstations and PCs Operating system: Most Unix systems, Linux and windows, provided the ROOT package has been installed. Examples where tested under Suse Linux and Windows XP. RAM: Depends on the size of the MCNP output file. The example presented in the article, which involves three two dimensional 139×740 bins histograms, allocates about 60 MB. These data are running under ROOT and include consumption by ROOT itself. Classification: 17.6 Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEGA_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 181 (2010) 1161 External routines: ROOT version 5.24.00 ( http://root.cern.ch/drupal/) Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: The output of a MCNP simulation is an ascii file. The data processing is usually performed by copying and pasting the relevant parts of the ascii

  14. The MCNP6 Analytic Criticality Benchmark Suite

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Forrest B.

    2016-06-16

    Analytical benchmarks provide an invaluable tool for verifying computer codes used to simulate neutron transport. Several collections of analytical benchmark problems [1-4] are used routinely in the verification of production Monte Carlo codes such as MCNP® [5,6]. Verification of a computer code is a necessary prerequisite to the more complex validation process. The verification process confirms that a code performs its intended functions correctly. The validation process involves determining the absolute accuracy of code results vs. nature. In typical validations, results are computed for a set of benchmark experiments using a particular methodology (code, cross-section data with uncertainties, and modeling) and compared to the measured results from the set of benchmark experiments. The validation process determines bias, bias uncertainty, and possibly additional margins. Verification is generally performed by the code developers, while validation is generally performed by code users for a particular application space. The VERIFICATION_KEFF suite of criticality problems [1,2] was originally a set of 75 criticality problems found in the literature for which exact analytical solutions are available. Even though the spatial and energy detail is necessarily limited in analytical benchmarks, typically to a few regions or energy groups, the exact solutions obtained can be used to verify that the basic algorithms, mathematics, and methods used in complex production codes perform correctly. The present work has focused on revisiting this benchmark suite. A thorough review of the problems resulted in discarding some of them as not suitable for MCNP benchmarking. For the remaining problems, many of them were reformulated to permit execution in either multigroup mode or in the normal continuous-energy mode for MCNP. Execution of the benchmarks in continuous-energy mode provides a significant advance to MCNP verification methods.

  15. Validation of MCNP: SPERT-D and BORAX-V fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.; Palmer, B.

    1992-11-01

    This report discusses critical experiments involving SPERT-D{sup 1,2} fuel elements and BORAX-V{sup 3-8} fuel which have been modeled and calculations performed with MCNP. MCNP is a Monte Carlo based transport code. For this study continuous-energy nuclear data from the ENDF/B-V cross section library was used. The SPERT-D experiments consisted of various arrays of fuel elements moderated and reflected with either water or a uranyl nitrate solution. Some SPERT-D experiments used cadmium as a fixed neutron poison, while others were poisoned with various concentrations of boron in the moderating/reflecting solution. ne BORAX-V experiments were arrays of either boiling fuel rod assemblies or superheater assemblies, both types of arrays were moderated and reflected with water. In one boiling fuel experiment, two fuel rods were replaced with borated stainless steel poison rods.

  16. Validation of MCNP: SPERT-D and BORAX-V fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.; Palmer, B.

    1992-11-01

    This report discusses critical experiments involving SPERT-D[sup 1,2] fuel elements and BORAX-V[sup 3-8] fuel which have been modeled and calculations performed with MCNP. MCNP is a Monte Carlo based transport code. For this study continuous-energy nuclear data from the ENDF/B-V cross section library was used. The SPERT-D experiments consisted of various arrays of fuel elements moderated and reflected with either water or a uranyl nitrate solution. Some SPERT-D experiments used cadmium as a fixed neutron poison, while others were poisoned with various concentrations of boron in the moderating/reflecting solution. ne BORAX-V experiments were arrays of either boiling fuel rod assemblies or superheater assemblies, both types of arrays were moderated and reflected with water. In one boiling fuel experiment, two fuel rods were replaced with borated stainless steel poison rods.

  17. MCNPX{trademark} -- The LAHET{trademark}/MCNP{trademark} code merger

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, H.G.; Adams, K.J.; Chadwick, M.B.

    1997-08-01

    The MCNP code is written and maintained by Group X-TM at Los Alamos National Laboratory. In response to the demands of the accelerator community, the authors have undertaken a major effort to expand the capabilities of MCNP to increase the set of transportable particles; to make use of newly evaluated high-energy nuclear data tables for neutrons, protons, and potentially other particles; and to incorporate physics models for use where tabular data are unavailable. A preliminary version of the expanded code, called MCNPX, has now been issued for testing. The new code includes all existing LAHET physics modules, and has the ability to utilize the 150-MeV data libraries that have recently been released by LANL Group T-2.

  18. MCNP simulations of material exposure experiments (u)

    SciTech Connect

    Temple, Brian A

    2010-12-08

    Simulations of proposed material exposure experiments were performed using MCNP6. The experiments will expose ampules containing different materials of interest with radiation to observe the chemical breakdown of the materials. Simulations were performed to map out dose in materials as a function of distance from the source, dose variation between materials, dose variation due to ampule orientation, and dose variation due to different source energy. This write up is an overview of the simulations and will provide guidance on how to use the data in the spreadsheet.

  19. MCNP6 Cosmic & Terrestrial Background Particle Fluxes -- Release 4

    SciTech Connect

    McMath, Garrett E.; McKinney, Gregg W.; Wilcox, Trevor

    2015-01-23

    Essentially a set of slides, the presentation begins with the MCNP6 cosmic-source option, then continues with the MCNP6 transport model (atmospheric, terrestrial) and elevation scaling. It concludes with a few slides on results, conclusions, and suggestions for future work.

  20. Validation of MCNP4A for repository scattered radiation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, M.N.; Su, S.

    1998-02-01

    Comparison is made between experimentally determined albedo (scattered) radiation and MCNP4A predictions in order to provide independent validation for repository shielding analysis. Both neutron and gamma scattered radiation fields from concrete ducts are compared in this paper. Satisfactory agreement is found between actual and calculated results with conservative values calculated by the MCNP4A code for all conditions.

  1. An assessment of the MCNP4C weight window

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher N. Culbertson; John S. Hendricks

    1999-12-01

    A new, enhanced weight window generator suite has been developed for MCNP version 4C. The new generator correctly estimates importances in either a user-specified, geometry-independent, orthogonal grid or in MCNP geometric cells. The geometry-independent option alleviates the need to subdivide the MCNP cell geometry for variance reduction purposes. In addition, the new suite corrects several pathologies in the existing MCNP weight window generator. The new generator is applied in a set of five variance reduction problems. The improved generator is compared with the weight window generator applied in MCNP4B. The benefits of the new methodology are highlighted, along with a description of its limitations. The authors also provide recommendations for utilization of the weight window generator.

  2. Semi-Analytical Benchmarks for MCNP6

    SciTech Connect

    Grechanuk, Pavel Aleksandrovi

    2016-11-07

    Code verification is an extremely important process that involves proving or disproving the validity of code algorithms by comparing them against analytical results of the underlying physics or mathematical theory on which the code is based. Monte Carlo codes such as MCNP6 must undergo verification and testing upon every release to ensure that the codes are properly simulating nature. Specifically, MCNP6 has multiple sets of problems with known analytic solutions that are used for code verification. Monte Carlo codes primarily specify either current boundary sources or a volumetric fixed source, either of which can be very complicated functions of space, energy, direction and time. Thus, most of the challenges with modeling analytic benchmark problems in Monte Carlo codes come from identifying the correct source definition to properly simulate the correct boundary conditions. The problems included in this suite all deal with mono-energetic neutron transport without energy loss, in a homogeneous material. The variables that differ between the problems are source type (isotropic/beam), medium dimensionality (infinite/semi-infinite), etc.

  3. Performance of MCNP4A on seven computing platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, J.S.; Brockhoff, R.C.

    1994-12-31

    The performance of seven computer platforms has been evaluated with the MCNP4A Monte Carlo radiation transport code. For the first time we report timing results using MCNP4A and its new test set and libraries. Comparisons are made on platforms not available to us in previous MCNP timing studies. By using MCNP4A and its 325-problem test set, a widely-used and readily-available physics production code is used; the timing comparison is not limited to a single ``typical`` problem, demonstrating the problem dependence of timing results; the results are reproducible at the more than 100 installations around the world using MCNP; comparison of performance of other computer platforms to the ones tested in this study is possible because we present raw data rather than normalized results; and a measure of the increase in performance of computer hardware and software over the past two years is possible. The computer platforms reported are the Cray-YMP 8/64, IBM RS/6000-560, Sun Sparc10, Sun Sparc2, HP/9000-735, 4 processor 100 MHz Silicon Graphics ONYX, and Gateway 2000 model 4DX2-66V PC. In 1991 a timing study of MCNP4, the predecessor to MCNP4A, was conducted using ENDF/B-V cross-section libraries, which are export protected. The new study is based upon the new MCNP 25-problem test set which utilizes internationally available data. MCNP4A, its test problems and the test data library are available from the Radiation Shielding and Information Center in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, or from the NEA Data Bank in Saclay, France. Anyone with the same workstation and compiler can get the same test problem sets, the same library files, and the same MCNP4A code from RSIC or NEA and replicate our results. And, because we report raw data, comparison of the performance of other compute platforms and compilers can be made.

  4. Fission Matrix Capability for MCNP Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Carney, Sean E.; Brown, Forrest B.; Kiedrowski, Brian C.; Martin, William R.

    2012-09-05

    In a Monte Carlo criticality calculation, before the tallying of quantities can begin, a converged fission source (the fundamental eigenvector of the fission kernel) is required. Tallies of interest may include powers, absorption rates, leakage rates, or the multiplication factor (the fundamental eigenvalue of the fission kernel, k{sub eff}). Just as in the power iteration method of linear algebra, if the dominance ratio (the ratio of the first and zeroth eigenvalues) is high, many iterations of neutron history simulations are required to isolate the fundamental mode of the problem. Optically large systems have large dominance ratios, and systems containing poor neutron communication between regions are also slow to converge. The fission matrix method, implemented into MCNP[1], addresses these problems. When Monte Carlo random walk from a source is executed, the fission kernel is stochastically applied to the source. Random numbers are used for: distances to collision, reaction types, scattering physics, fission reactions, etc. This method is used because the fission kernel is a complex, 7-dimensional operator that is not explicitly known. Deterministic methods use approximations/discretization in energy, space, and direction to the kernel. Consequently, they are faster. Monte Carlo directly simulates the physics, which necessitates the use of random sampling. Because of this statistical noise, common convergence acceleration methods used in deterministic methods do not work. In the fission matrix method, we are using the random walk information not only to build the next-iteration fission source, but also a spatially-averaged fission kernel. Just like in deterministic methods, this involves approximation and discretization. The approximation is the tallying of the spatially-discretized fission kernel with an incorrect fission source. We address this by making the spatial mesh fine enough that this error is negligible. As a consequence of discretization we get a

  5. Enhancements to the MCNP6 background source

    DOE PAGES

    McMath, Garrett E.; McKinney, Gregg W.

    2015-10-19

    The particle transport code MCNP has been used to produce a background radiation data file on a worldwide grid that can easily be sampled as a source in the code. Location-dependent cosmic showers were modeled by Monte Carlo methods to produce the resulting neutron and photon background flux at 2054 locations around Earth. An improved galactic-cosmic-ray feature was used to model the source term as well as data from multiple sources to model the transport environment through atmosphere, soil, and seawater. A new elevation scaling feature was also added to the code to increase the accuracy of the cosmic neutronmore » background for user locations with off-grid elevations. Furthermore, benchmarking has shown the neutron integral flux values to be within experimental error.« less

  6. Enhancements to the MCNP6 background source

    SciTech Connect

    McMath, Garrett E.; McKinney, Gregg W.

    2015-10-19

    The particle transport code MCNP has been used to produce a background radiation data file on a worldwide grid that can easily be sampled as a source in the code. Location-dependent cosmic showers were modeled by Monte Carlo methods to produce the resulting neutron and photon background flux at 2054 locations around Earth. An improved galactic-cosmic-ray feature was used to model the source term as well as data from multiple sources to model the transport environment through atmosphere, soil, and seawater. A new elevation scaling feature was also added to the code to increase the accuracy of the cosmic neutron background for user locations with off-grid elevations. Furthermore, benchmarking has shown the neutron integral flux values to be within experimental error.

  7. Computational radiology and imaging with the MCNP Monte Carlo code

    SciTech Connect

    Estes, G.P.; Taylor, W.M.

    1995-05-01

    MCNP, a 3D coupled neutron/photon/electron Monte Carlo radiation transport code, is currently used in medical applications such as cancer radiation treatment planning, interpretation of diagnostic radiation images, and treatment beam optimization. This paper will discuss MCNP`s current uses and capabilities, as well as envisioned improvements that would further enhance MCNP role in computational medicine. It will be demonstrated that the methodology exists to simulate medical images (e.g. SPECT). Techniques will be discussed that would enable the construction of 3D computational geometry models of individual patients for use in patient-specific studies that would improve the quality of care for patients.

  8. Validating MCNP for LEU Fuel Design via Power Distribution Comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Primm, Trent; Maldonado, G Ivan; Chandler, David

    2008-11-01

    The mission of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program is to minimize and, to the extent possible, eliminate the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in civilian nuclear applications by working to convert research and test reactors, as well as radioisotope production processes, to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel and targets. Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) is reviewing the design bases and key operating criteria including fuel operating parameters, enrichment-related safety analyses, fuel performance, and fuel fabrication in regard to converting the fuel of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from HEU to LEU. The purpose of this study is to validate Monte Carlo methods currently in use for conversion analyses. The methods have been validated for the prediction of flux values in the reactor target, reflector, and beam tubes, but this study focuses on the prediction of the power density profile in the core. A current 3-D Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) model was modified to replicate the HFIR Critical Experiment 3 (HFIRCE-3) core of 1965. In this experiment, the power profile was determined by counting the gamma activity at selected locations in the core. Foils (chunks of fuel meat and clad) were punched out of the fuel elements in HFIRCE-3 following irradiation and experimental relative power densities were obtained by measuring the activity of these foils and comparing each foil s activity to the activity of a normalizing foil. The current work consisted of calculating corresponding activities by inserting volume tallies into the modified MCNP model to represent the punchings. The average fission density was calculated for each foil location and then normalized to the normalizing foil. Power distributions were obtained for the clean core (no poison in moderator and symmetrical rod position at 17.5 inches) and fully poisoned-moderator (1.35 g B/liter in moderator and rods fully withdrawn) conditions. The observed deviations between the

  9. The comparison of two MCNP models used for prompt gamma in vivo detection of cadmium and mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanackovic, J.; Grinyer, J.; Chettle, D. R.; Byun, S. H.

    2007-10-01

    In vivo detection of trace elements is one of the most important research areas at the Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences Department at McMaster University. Prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) used for detection of cadmium and mercury takes place simultaneously at two different experimental sites; the McMaster Nuclear Reactor (MNR) and the 238Pu/Be neutron source site. This particular study consists of two parts. In the first part the water phantoms (125 mL) were used in MCNP simulations. The water phantoms were doped with different concentrations of Cd, Hg and HCl. This is done in order to compare the (n, γ) prompt gamma reaction rate; in fact, the rate of neutron capture by the nuclides of interest; 113Cd, 199Hg and 35Cl. The second part involves, the neutron and photon dosimetry calculations that were performed for both sites using MCNP compatible body builder software developed in Los Alamos. The output of this program is the actual MCNP geometry description for various human anthropomorphic phantoms (different sex and ages). This phantom geometry output is incorporated into the original MCNP geometry and the dosimetry calculations were performed for various organs at risk.

  10. MCNP-model for the OAEP Thai Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Gallmeier, F.X.; Tang, J.S.; Primm, R.T. III

    1998-06-01

    An MCNP input was prepared for the Thai Research Reactor, making extensive use of the MCNP geometry`s lattice feature that allows a flexible and easy rearrangement of the core components and the adjustment of the control elements. The geometry was checked for overdefined or undefined zones by two-dimensional plots of cuts through the core configuration with the MCNP geometry plotting capabilities, and by a three-dimensional view of the core configuration with the SABRINA code. Cross sections were defined for a hypothetical core of 67 standard fuel elements and 38 low-enriched uranium fuel elements--all filled with fresh fuel. Three test calculations were performed with the MCNP4B-code to obtain the multiplication factor for the cases with control elements fully inserted, fully withdrawn, and at a working position.

  11. ENDF/B-VI Release 3 Cross Section Library for Use with the MCNP Monte Carlo Code.

    SciTech Connect

    MASSIMO,; PESCARINI,

    2003-12-16

    Version 00 This continuous energy cross-section data library for MCNP is in ACE format. The present library was satisfactorily tested in thermal and fast criticality benchmarks. For analyses below 20 MeV, MCB63NEA.BOLlB was applied also in cell and core calculations dedicated to the study of the subcritical accelerator driven systems (ADS). This library provides users an additional ENDF/B-VI based, continuous-energy and multi-temperature library for MCNP with an important feature: there is a perfect consistency with the twin library MCJEFF22NEA.BOLIB already released, in terms of nuclear data processing calculation methodology. Both libraries are based on the NJOY-94.66 data processing system. This may be important, in particular, for the users involved in nuclear data validation who have already used the MCJEF22NEA.BOLIB library.

  12. Neutronic conceptual design of the ETRR-2 cold-neutron source using the MCNP code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, M. Y.; Shaat, M. K.; Abdelfattah, A. Y.

    2005-04-01

    A conceptual neutronic design of the cold-neutron source (CNS) for the Egyptian second research reactor (ETRR-2) was done using the MCNP code. Parametric analysis to chose the type and geometry of the moderator, and the required CNS dimensions to maximize the cold neutron production was performed. The moderator cell has a spherical annulus structure containing liquid hydrogen. The cold neutron gain and cold neutron brightness are calculated together with the nuclear heat load of the CNS. Analysis of the estimated performance of the CNS has been done regarding the effect of void fraction in the moderator cell together with the ortho: para ratio.

  13. Comparison of ENDF/B-VII.1 and ENDF/B-VII.0 Results for the Expanded Criticality Validation Suite for MCNP and for Selected Additional Criticality Benchmarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosteller, R.

    2014-04-01

    Results obtained with the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code and the ENDF/B-VII.1 and ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data libraries have been compared for the 119 benchmarks in the expanded criticality validation suite for MCNP and for 23 additional benchmarks. ENDF/B-VII.1 was found to produce improvements relative to ENDF/B-VII.0 for benchmarks that contain significant amounts of tungsten, zirconium, cadmium, or beryllium, although the results for the benchmarks with beryllium suggest that further improvement still may be needed. In addition, a number of deficiencies previously identified for ENDF/B-VII.0 still remain in ENDF/B-VII.1.

  14. Characterization of the NPOD3 Detectors in MCNP5 and MCNP6

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Kimberly L.; Hutchinson, Jesson D.; Sood, Avneet

    2014-01-21

    Researchers performed a series of measurements in May 2012 to characterize the NPOD3 detector systems. The detectors were placed in varying states of disassembly to determine the effect of individual components on detection efficiency. A 4.5 kg α-phase Pu sphere known as the Los Alamos BeRP Ball was used as the SNM source in both a bare configuration and reflected by varying thicknesses of polyethylene. A set of simulations matching the experimental setups were run and the data were compared to the measured data. The total and leakage multiplication and the inferred k values were determined for both the simulations and the measurements. Table 3 shows a comparison of the results from MCNP6 and MCNP5 with the list-mode patch to the measured results. The count rates for the calculated results were obtained by dividing the total line count in the list-mode file (equivalent to the total number of absorptions in the NPOD detectors) by the total run time. The count rates are identical for both codes, and they both produce the same multiplicity and inferred k values regardless of measurement time as expected.

  15. TRIPOLI-4® - MCNP5 ITER A-lite neutronic model benchmarking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaboulay, J.-C.; Cayla, P.-Y.; Fausser, C.; Lee, Y.-K.; Trama, J.-C.; Li-Puma, A.

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the capability of TRIPOLI-4®, the CEA Monte Carlo code, to model a large-scale fusion reactor with complex neutron source and geometry. In the past, numerous benchmarks were conducted for TRIPOLI-4® assessment on fusion applications. Experiments (KANT, OKTAVIAN, FNG) analysis and numerical benchmarks (between TRIPOLI-4® and MCNP5) on the HCLL DEMO2007 and ITER models were carried out successively. In this previous ITER benchmark, nevertheless, only the neutron wall loading was analyzed, its main purpose was to present MCAM (the FDS Team CAD import tool) extension for TRIPOLI-4®. Starting from this work a more extended benchmark has been performed about the estimation of neutron flux, nuclear heating in the shielding blankets and tritium production rate in the European TBMs (HCLL and HCPB) and it is presented in this paper. The methodology to build the TRIPOLI-4® A-lite model is based on MCAM and the MCNP A-lite model (version 4.1). Simplified TBMs (from KIT) have been integrated in the equatorial-port. Comparisons of neutron wall loading, flux, nuclear heating and tritium production rate show a good agreement between the two codes. Discrepancies are mainly included in the Monte Carlo codes statistical error.

  16. Visualization and analyses of MCNP criticality calculation results

    SciTech Connect

    Urbatsch, T.J.; Forster, R.A.; Booth, T.E.; Van Riper, K.A.; Waters, L.S.

    1995-07-01

    Careful assessment of the results of a calculation by the code itself can detect mistakes in the problem setup and execution. MCNP has over four hundred error messages that inform the user of FATAL or WARNING errors that have been discovered during processing of just the input file. MCNP4A performs a self assessment of the calculated results to aid the user in determining the quality of the Monte Carlo results. MCNP4A contains new built-in sensitivity analyses of the Monte Carlo calculation that provide the user with simple WARNING messages for both criticality and fixed source calculations. The goal of the new analyses described in this paper is to provide the MCNP criticality practitioner with enough information in the output to assess the validity of the k{sub eff} calculation and any associated tallies. The results of these checks are presented in the k{sub eff} results summary, several k{sub eff} tables and graphs, and tally tables and graphs. Plots of k{sub eff} at the workstation are also available as the problem is running or in a postprocessing mode to assess problem performance and results. Plots of the fission source by cycle supply valuable visual information, although they are not yet available in the production version of MCNP.

  17. Calculation of detection efficiency of the fiber-optic sensor to measure radioactive contamination using MCNP simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Hanyoung; Lee, Arim; Kim, Rinah; Park, Chan Hee; Moon, Joo Hyun

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, a fiber-optic radiation sensor (FORS) was developed to measure gamma rays from the radionuclides frequently found in radioactively contaminated soil. The sensing probe of the FORS was made of an inorganic (Lu,Y)2SiO5:Ce (LYSO:Ce) scintillator, a mixture of epoxy resin and hardener and a plastic fiber. The FORS was applied to measure gamma rays from Cs-137 source (1.1 μCi) in a disk shape. Also, MCNP simulation was performed for the same geometry as that in the experimental setup. Comparison between measurements by the FORS and MCNP simulation showed that the detection efficiency of the fiber-optic sensor was about 19.2%. The FORS is expected to be useful in measuring gamma rays from the radioactive soil at nuclear facility site.

  18. Recent Developments in the MCNP-POLIMI Postprocessing Code

    SciTech Connect

    Pozzi, S.A.

    2004-12-17

    The design and analysis of measurements performed with organic scintillators rely on the use of Monte Carlo codes to simulate the interaction of neutrons and photons, originating from fission and other reactions, with the materials present in the system and the radiation detectors. MCNP-PoliMi is a modification of the MCNP-4c code that models the physics of secondary particle emission from fission and other processes realistically. This characteristic allows for the simulation of the higher moments of the distribution of the number of neutrons and photons in a multiplying system. The present report describes the recent additions to the MCNP-PoliMi post-processing code. These include the simulation of detector dead time, multiplicity, and third order statistics.

  19. Verification of the pulse height tally in MCNP 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sood, Avneet; Forster, R. A.; Adams, Bryce J.; White, Morgan C.

    2004-01-01

    Pulse height tallies are commonly used in Monte Carlo codes to predict detailed measured photon spectra for spectrometry purposes. The pulse height tally is unique among the various tallies in MCNP. Unlike flux or current tallies, which are calculated as soon as the particle exits or collides in the cell, the entire set of tracks for a history must be completed before the pulse height tally can be made. The objective of this work was to verify the pulse height tally and prepare to verify the new MCNP 5 variance reduction features with the pulse height tally. In this paper, we give details to the analytic solution of the pulse height distribution using a modification to Shuttleworth's fictitious elements, report MCNP 5 results for the pulse height tally, energy deposited and current tallies for the problem.

  20. Features of MCNP6 Relevant to Medical Radiation Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, H. Grady III; Goorley, John T.

    2012-08-29

    MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) is a general-purpose Monte Carlo code for simulating the transport of neutrons, photons, electrons, positrons, and more recently other fundamental particles and heavy ions. Over many years MCNP has found a wide range of applications in many different fields, including medical radiation physics. In this presentation we will describe and illustrate a number of significant recently-developed features in the current version of the code, MCNP6, having particular utility for medical physics. Among these are major extensions of the ability to simulate large, complex geometries, improvement in memory requirements and speed for large lattices, introduction of mesh-based isotopic reaction tallies, advances in radiography simulation, expanded variance-reduction capabilities, especially for pulse-height tallies, and a large number of enhancements in photon/electron transport.

  1. MCNP speed advances for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Goorley, J.T.; McKinney, G.; Adams, K.; Estes, G.

    1998-04-01

    The Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) treatment planning process of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center-M.I.T team relies on MCNP to determine dose rates in the subject`s head for various beam orientations. In this time consuming computational process, four or five potential beams are investigated. Of these, one or two final beams are selected and thoroughly evaluated. Recent advances greatly decreased the time needed to do these MCNP calculations. Two modifications to the new MCNP4B source code, lattice tally and tracking enhancements, reduced the wall-clock run times of a typical one million source neutrons run to one hour twenty five minutes on a 200 MHz Pentium Pro computer running Linux and using the GNU FORTRAN compiler. Previously these jobs used a special version of MCNP4AB created by Everett Redmond, which completed in two hours two minutes. In addition to this 30% speedup, the MCNP4B version was adapted for use with Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM) on personal computers running the Linux operating system. MCNP, using PVM, can be run on multiple computers simultaneously, offering a factor of speedup roughly the same as the number of computers used. With two 200 MHz Pentium Pro machines, the run time was reduced to forty five minutes, a 1.9 factor of improvement over the single Linux computer. While the time of a single run was greatly reduced, the advantages associated with PVM derive from using computational power not already used. Four possible beams, currently requiring four separate runs, could be run faster when each is individually run on a single machine under Windows NT, rather than using Linux and PVM to run one after another with each multiprocessed across four computers. It would be advantageous, however, to use PVM to distribute the final two beam orientations over four computers.

  2. Gas Core Reactor Numerical Simulation Using a Coupled MHD-MCNP Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazeminezhad, F.; Anghaie, S.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis is provided in this report of using two head-on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks to achieve supercritical nuclear fission in an axially elongated cylinder filled with UF4 gas as an energy source for deep space missions. The motivation for each aspect of the design is explained and supported by theory and numerical simulations. A subsequent report will provide detail on relevant experimental work to validate the concept. Here the focus is on the theory of and simulations for the proposed gas core reactor conceptual design from the onset of shock generations to the supercritical state achieved when the shocks collide. The MHD model is coupled to a standard nuclear code (MCNP) to observe the neutron flux and fission power attributed to the supercritical state brought about by the shock collisions. Throughout the modeling, realistic parameters are used for the initial ambient gaseous state and currents to ensure a resulting supercritical state upon shock collisions.

  3. New probability table treatment in MCNP for unresolved resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, L.L.; Little, R.C.; Hendricks, J.S.; MacFarlane, R.E.

    1998-04-01

    An upgrade for MCNP has been implemented to sample the neutron cross sections in the unresolved resonance range using probability tables. These probability tables are generated with the cross section processor code NJOY, by using the evaluated statistical information about the resonances to calculate cumulative probability distribution functions for the microscopic total cross section. The elastic, fission, and radiative capture cross sections are also tabulated as the average values of each of these partials conditional upon the value of the total. This paper summarizes how the probability tables are utilized in this MCNP upgrade and compares this treatment with the approximate smooth treatment for some example problems.

  4. Accelerating Pseudo-Random Number Generator for MCNP on GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Chunye; Liu, Jie; Chi, Lihua; Hu, Qingfeng; Deng, Li; Gong, Zhenghu

    2010-09-01

    Pseudo-random number generators (PRNG) are intensively used in many stochastic algorithms in particle simulations, artificial neural networks and other scientific computation. The PRNG in Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) requires long period, high quality, flexible jump and fast enough. In this paper, we implement such a PRNG for MCNP on NVIDIA's GTX200 Graphics Processor Units (GPU) using CUDA programming model. Results shows that 3.80 to 8.10 times speedup are achieved compared with 4 to 6 cores CPUs and more than 679.18 million double precision random numbers can be generated per second on GPU.

  5. An Electron/Photon/Relaxation Data Library for MCNP6

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, III, H. Grady

    2015-08-07

    The capabilities of the MCNP6 Monte Carlo code in simulation of electron transport, photon transport, and atomic relaxation have recently been significantly expanded. The enhancements include not only the extension of existing data and methods to lower energies, but also the introduction of new categories of data and methods. Support of these new capabilities has required major additions to and redesign of the associated data tables. In this paper we present the first complete documentation of the contents and format of the new electron-photon-relaxation data library now available with the initial production release of MCNP6.

  6. Reactor physics verification of the MCNP6 unstructured mesh capability

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, T. P.; Kiedrowski, B. C.; Martz, R. L.; Martin, W. R.

    2013-07-01

    The Monte Carlo software package MCNP6 has the ability to transport particles on unstructured meshes generated from the Computed-Aided Engineering software Abaqus. Verification is performed using benchmarks with features relevant to reactor physics - Big Ten and the C5G7 computational benchmark. Various meshing strategies are tested and results are compared to reference solutions. Computational performance results are also given. The conclusions show MCNP6 is capable of producing accurate calculations for reactor physics geometries and the computational requirements for small lattice benchmarks are reasonable on modern computing platforms. (authors)

  7. Geometry creation for MCNP by Sabrina and XSM

    SciTech Connect

    Van Riper, K.A.

    1994-02-01

    The Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code MCNP is based on a surface description of 3-dimensional geometry. Cells are defined in terms of boolean operations on signed quadratic surfaces. MCNP geometry is entered as a card image file containing coefficients of the surface equations and a list of surfaces and operators describing cells. Several programs are available to assist in creation of the geometry specification, among them Sabrina and the new ``Smart Editor`` code XSM. We briefly describe geometry creation in Sabrina and then discuss XSM in detail. XSM is under development; our discussion is based on the state of XSM as of January 1, 1994.

  8. Impact of MCNP unresolved resonance probability-table treatment on uranium and plutonium benchmarks

    SciTech Connect

    Mosteller, R.D.; Little, R.C.

    1998-12-31

    Versions of MCNP up through and including 4B have not accurately modeled neutron self-shielding effects in the unresolved resonance energy region. Recently, a probability-table treatment has been incorporated into a developmental version of MCNP. This paper presents MCNP results for a variety of uranium and plutonium critical benchmarks, calculated with and without the probability-table treatment.

  9. Physics and Algorithm Enhancements for a Validated MCNP/X Monte Carlo Simulation Tool, Phase VII

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, Gregg W

    2012-07-17

    Currently the US lacks an end-to-end (i.e., source-to-detector) radiation transport simulation code with predictive capability for the broad range of DHS nuclear material detection applications. For example, gaps in the physics, along with inadequate analysis algorithms, make it difficult for Monte Carlo simulations to provide a comprehensive evaluation, design, and optimization of proposed interrogation systems. With the development and implementation of several key physics and algorithm enhancements, along with needed improvements in evaluated data and benchmark measurements, the MCNP/X Monte Carlo codes will provide designers, operators, and systems analysts with a validated tool for developing state-of-the-art active and passive detection systems. This project is currently in its seventh year (Phase VII). This presentation will review thirty enhancements that have been implemented in MCNPX over the last 3 years and were included in the 2011 release of version 2.7.0. These improvements include 12 physics enhancements, 4 source enhancements, 8 tally enhancements, and 6 other enhancements. Examples and results will be provided for each of these features. The presentation will also discuss the eight enhancements that will be migrated into MCNP6 over the upcoming year.

  10. Preliminary Benchmarking and MCNP Simulation Results for Homeland Security

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Hayes

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to create Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) input stacks for benchmarked measurements sufficient for future perturbation studies and analysis. The approach was to utilize historical experimental measurements to recreate the empirical spectral results in MCNP, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Results demonstrate that perturbation analysis of benchmarked MCNP spectra can be used to obtain a better understanding of field measurement results which may be of national interest. If one or more spectral radiation measurements are made in the field and deemed of national interest, the potential source distribution, naturally occurring radioactive material shielding, and interstitial materials can only be estimated in many circumstances. The effects from these factors on the resultant spectral radiation measurements can be very confusing. If benchmarks exist which are sufficiently similar to the suspected configuration, these benchmarks can then be compared to the suspect measurements. Having these benchmarks with validated MCNP input stacks can substantially improve the predictive capability of experts supporting these efforts.

  11. Implementation of on-the-fly doppler broadening in MCNP

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, W. R.; Wilderman, S.; Brown, F. B.; Yesilyurt, G.

    2013-07-01

    A new method to obtain Doppler broadened cross sections has been implemented into MCNP, removing the need to generate cross sections for isotopes at problem temperatures. When a neutron of energy E enters a material region that is at some temperature T, the cross sections for that material at temperature T are immediately obtained 'on-the-fly' (OTF) by interpolation using a high order functional expansion for the temperature dependence of the Doppler-broadened cross section for that isotope at the neutron energy E. The OTF cross sections agree with the NJOY-based cross sections for all neutron energies and all temperatures in the range specified by the user, e.g., 250 K - 3200 K. The OTF methodology has been successfully implemented into the MCNP Monte Carlo code and has been tested on several test problems by comparing MCNP with conventional ACE cross sections versus MCNP with OTF cross sections. The test problems include the Doppler defect reactivity benchmark suite and two full-core VHTR configurations, including one with multiphysics coupling using RELAP5-3D/ATHENA for the thermal-hydraulic analysis. The comparison has been excellent, verifying that the OTF libraries can be used in place of the conventional ACE libraries generated at problem temperatures. In addition, it has been found that the OTF methodology greatly reduces the complexity of the input for MCNP, resulting in an order of magnitude decrease in the number of input lines for full-core configurations. Finally, for full-core problems with multiphysics feedback, the memory required to store the cross section data is considerably reduced with OTF cross sections and the additional computational effort with OTF is modest, on the order of 10-15%. (authors)

  12. Benchmarking ENDF/B-VII.1, JENDL-4.0 and JEFF-3.1.1 with MCNP6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Marck, Steven C.

    2012-12-01

    Recent releases of three major world nuclear reaction data libraries, ENDF/B-VII.1, JENDL-4.0, and JEFF-3.1.1, have been tested extensively using benchmark calculations. The calculations were performed with the latest release of the continuous energy Monte Carlo neutronics code MCNP, i.e. MCNP6. Three types of benchmarks were used, viz. criticality safety benchmarks, (fusion) shielding benchmarks, and reference systems for which the effective delayed neutron fraction is reported. For criticality safety, more than 2000 benchmarks from the International Handbook of Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments were used. Benchmarks from all categories were used, ranging from low-enriched uranium, compound fuel, thermal spectrum ones (LEU-COMP-THERM), to mixed uranium-plutonium, metallic fuel, fast spectrum ones (MIX-MET-FAST). For fusion shielding many benchmarks were based on IAEA specifications for the Oktavian experiments (for Al, Co, Cr, Cu, LiF, Mn, Mo, Si, Ti, W, Zr), Fusion Neutronics Source in Japan (for Be, C, N, O, Fe, Pb), and Pulsed Sphere experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (for 6Li, 7Li, Be, C, N, O, Mg, Al, Ti, Fe, Pb, D2O, H2O, concrete, polyethylene and teflon). The new functionality in MCNP6 to calculate the effective delayed neutron fraction was tested by comparison with more than thirty measurements in widely varying systems. Among these were measurements in the Tank Critical Assembly (TCA in Japan) and IPEN/MB-01 (Brazil), both with a thermal spectrum, two cores in Masurca (France) and three cores in the Fast Critical Assembly (FCA, Japan), all with fast spectra. The performance of the three libraries, in combination with MCNP6, is shown to be good. The results for the LEU-COMP-THERM category are on average very close to the benchmark value. Also for most other categories the results are satisfactory. Deviations from the benchmark values do occur in certain benchmark series, or in isolated cases within benchmark series. Such

  13. Multi-canister overpack project -- verification and validation, MCNP 4A

    SciTech Connect

    Goldmann, L.H.

    1997-11-10

    This supporting document contains the software verification and validation (V and V) package used for Phase 2 design of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Multi-Canister Overpack. V and V packages for both ANSYS and MCNP are included. Description of Verification Run(s): This software requires that it be compiled specifically for the machine it is to be used on. Therefore to facilitate ease in the verification process the software automatically runs 25 sample problems to ensure proper installation and compilation. Once the runs are completed the software checks for verification by performing a file comparison on the new output file and the old output file. Any differences between any of the files will cause a verification error. Due to the manner in which the verification is completed a verification error does not necessarily indicate a problem. This indicates that a closer look at the output files is needed to determine the cause of the error.

  14. Comparison of discrete and continuous thermal neutron scattering treatments in MCNP5

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlou, A. T.; Brown, F. B.; Martin, W. R.; Kiedrowski, B. C.

    2012-07-01

    The standard discrete thermal neutron S({alpha},{beta}) scattering treatment in MCNP5 is compared with a continuous S({alpha},{beta}) scattering treatment using a criticality suite of 119 benchmark cases and ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data. In the analysis, six bound isotopes are considered: beryllium metal, graphite, hydrogen in water, hydrogen in polyethylene, beryllium in beryllium oxide and oxygen in beryllium oxide. Overall, there are only small changes in the eigenvalue (k{sub eff}) between discrete and continuous treatments. In the comparison of 64 cases that utilize S({alpha},{beta}) scattering, 62 agreed at the 95% confidence level, and the 2 cases with differences larger than 3 {sigma} agreed within 1 {sigma} when more neutrons were run in the calculations. The results indicate that the changes in eigenvalue between continuous and discrete treatments are random, small, and well within the uncertainty of measured data for reactor criticality experiments. (authors)

  15. MCNP-DSP calculations of measurements with uranyl nitrate solution system

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, T.E.

    1998-09-01

    The {sup 252}Cf-source-driven noise analysis method has been used to determine the subcriticality of various configurations of fissile materials. In the past, the application of this method was limited because point-kinetics models had to be used to interpret the data; however, with the development of the Monte Carlo code MCNP-DSP, the measurements can be analyzed using the more general Monte Carlo models. The results of the Monte carlo calculations will be dependent on the ability to model the experiment accurately and on the nuclear data used to perform the calculations. This paper presents a comparison of the measured and calculated ratio of spectral densities for a subset of measurements performed with a uranyl nitrate solution tank filled to various heights. The results presented are for calculations that were performed with both ENDF/B-IV and ENDF/B-V cross-section data sets.

  16. Neutron and photon shielding benchmark calculations by MCNP on the LR-0 experimental facility.

    PubMed

    Hordósy, G

    2005-01-01

    In the framework of the REDOS project, the space-energy distribution of the neutron and photon flux has been calculated over the pressure vessel simulator thickness of the LR-0 experimental reactor, Rez, Czech Republic. The results calculated by the Monte Carlo code MCNP4C are compared with the measurements performed in the Nuclear Research Institute, Rez. The spectra have been measured at the barrel, in front of, inside and behind the pressure vessel in different configurations. The neutron measurements were performed in the energy range 0.1-10 MeV. This work has been done in the frame of the 5th Frame Work Programme of the European Community 1998-2002.

  17. Electron/Photon Verification Calculations Using MCNP4B

    SciTech Connect

    D. P. Gierga; K. J. Adams

    1999-04-01

    MCNP4BW was released in February 1997 with significant enhancements to electron/photon transport methods. These enhancements have been verified against a wide range of published electron/photon experiments, spanning high energy bremsstrahlung production to electron transmission and reflection. The impact of several MCNP tally options and physics parameters was explored in detail. The agreement between experiment and simulation was usually within two standard deviations of the experimental and calculational errors. Furthermore, sub-step artifacts for bremsstrahlung production were shown to be mitigated. A detailed suite of electron depth dose calculations in water is also presented. Areas for future code development have also been explored and include the dependence of cell and detector tallies on different bremsstrahlung angular models and alternative variance reduction splitting schemes for bremsstrahlung production.

  18. A Verification of MCNP6 FMESH Tally Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, Alicia L.; McKigney, Edward A.; Schirato, Richard C.; Robinson, Alex Philip; Temple, Brian Allen

    2015-02-10

    This work serves to verify the MCNP6 FMESH capability through comparison to two types of data. FMESH tallies, binned in time, were generated on an ideal detector face for neutrons undergoing a single scatter in a graphite target. For verification, FMESH results were compared to analytic calculations of the nonrelativistic TOF for elastic and inelastic single neutron scatters (TOF for the purposes of this paper is the time for a neutron to travel from its scatter location in the graphite target to the detector face). FMESH tally results were also compared to F4 tally results, an MNCP tally that calculates fluence in the same way as the FMESH tally. The FMESH tally results agree well with the analytic results and the F4 tally; hence, it is believed that, for simple geometries, MCNP6 FMESH tallies represent the physics of neutron scattering very well.

  19. MCNP/X Transport in the Tabular Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, H. Grady

    2007-03-01

    We review the transport capabilities of the MCNP and MCNPX Monte Carlo codes in the energy regimes in which tabular transport data are available. Giving special attention to neutron tables, we emphasize the measures taken to improve the treatment of a variety of difficult aspects of the transport problem, including unresolved resonances, thermal issues, and the availability of suitable cross sections sets. We also briefly touch on the current situation in regard to photon, electron, and proton transport tables.

  20. MCNP/X TRANSPORT IN THE TABULAR REGIME

    SciTech Connect

    HUGHES, H. GRADY

    2007-01-08

    The authors review the transport capabilities of the MCNP and MCNPX Monte Carlo codes in the energy regimes in which tabular transport data are available. Giving special attention to neutron tables, they emphasize the measures taken to improve the treatment of a variety of difficult aspects of the transport problem, including unresolved resonances, thermal issues, and the availability of suitable cross sections sets. They also briefly touch on the current situation in regard to photon, electron, and proton transport tables.

  1. Yankee Rowe isotopics benchmark using MCNP-XT

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Z.; Whitmer, C.

    2013-07-01

    The Yankee Rowe spent fuel isotopic data provides a valuable source to benchmark the burnup calculations as part of verification and validation (V and V) efforts for the TerraPower's Monte Carlo depletion code, MCNP-XT. A total of 71 fuel rods were selected in the Yankee Rowe isotopic measurements covering a burnup range up to 44 MWd/kg ({approx}4.4%) under both the asymptotic spectrum and the non-asymptotic spectrum. The MCNP-XT pin cell depletion provides a comparison against the asymptotic spectrum measurement; and full assembly depletion with 322 depletion materials provides comparisons against various non-asymptotic depletion conditions. All calculations are performed based on the recent ENDF/B-VII.O data. Furthermore, the Monte Carlo depletion uncertainties and biases were examined showing their effect as insignificant. The set of burnup calculations cover the scattered experimental measurements demonstrating excellent agreement with the measured values. This benchmark exercise demonstrates the depletion analysis capability of the MCNP-XT code and validates the low burnup range. (authors)

  2. Systems guide to MCNP (Monte Carlo Neutron and Photon Transport Code)

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, B.L.; West, J.T.

    1984-06-01

    The subject of this report is the implementation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Monte Carlo Neutron and Photon Transport Code - Version 3 (MCNP) on the different types of computer systems, especially the IBM MVS system. The report supplements the documentation of the RSIC computer code package CCC-200/MCNP. Details of the procedure to follow in executing MCNP on the IBM computers, either in batch mode or interactive mode, are provided.

  3. Use of MCNP code in energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trojek, T.; Čechák, T.

    2007-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulations enable us to improve the applicability of analytical techniques based on emission of characteristic radiation. In particular, the MCNP4C2 code was tested for interpretation of measured data obtained with the use of energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis. This paper describes MCNP outputs and compares them with the results of analytical calculations or experiments. Then the application of Monte Carlo simulations to the prediction of measurement results is shown, and the MCNP results are verified.

  4. SU-E-T-521: Investigation of the Uncertainties Involved in Secondary Neutron/gamma Production in Geant4/MCNP6 Monte Carlo Codes for Proton Therapy Application

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzakhanian, L; Enger, S; Giusti, V

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A major concern in proton therapy is the production of secondary neutrons causing secondary cancers, especially in young adults and children. Most utilized Monte Carlo codes in proton therapy are Geant4 and MCNP. However, the default versions of Geant4 and MCNP6 do not have suitable cross sections or physical models to properly handle secondary particle production in proton energy ranges used for therapy. In this study, default versions of Geant4 and MCNP6 were modified to better handle production of secondaries by adding the TENDL-2012 cross-section library. Methods: In-water proton depth-dose was measured at the “The Svedberg Laboratory” in Uppsala (Sweden). The proton beam was mono-energetic with mean energy of 178.25±0.2 MeV. The measurement set-up was simulated by Geant4 version 10.00 (default and modified version) and MCNP6. Proton depth-dose, primary and secondary particle fluence and neutron equivalent dose were calculated. In case of Geant4, the secondary particle fluence was filtered by all the physics processes to identify the main process responsible for the difference between the default and modified version. Results: The proton depth-dose curves and primary proton fluence show a good agreement between both Geant4 versions and MCNP6. With respect to the modified version, default Geant4 underestimates the production of secondary neutrons while overestimates that of gammas. The “ProtonInElastic” process was identified as the main responsible process for the difference between the two versions. MCNP6 shows higher neutron production and lower gamma production than both Geant4 versions. Conclusion: Despite the good agreement on the proton depth dose curve and primary proton fluence, there is a significant discrepancy on secondary neutron production between MCNP6 and both versions of Geant4. Further studies are thus in order to find the possible cause of this discrepancy or more accurate cross-sections/models to handle the nuclear

  5. Comparison of CAP88 and MCNP for Overhead Gamma-emitting Plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Mcnaughton, Michael; Gillis, Jessica Mcdonnel; McClory, Aysha Reede; Whicker, Jeffrey Jay; Fuehne, David Patrick

    2016-01-08

    The purpose of this paper is to use the Monte Carlo N-Particle Code (MCNP) to investigate the dose from gamma-emitting radionuclides such as Carbon-11 when a plume passes overhead. MCNP results are compared with results from the EPA program, CAP88. In some cases, typically near the source during stable conditions, the CAP88 results are less than the MCNP results. However, in the case of a receptor 800 m from a source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), the CAP88 result is greater than the MCNP result.

  6. Thorium-based mixed oxide fuel in a pressurized water reactor: A feasibility analysis with MCNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Lucas Powelson

    This dissertation investigates techniques for spent fuel monitoring, and assesses the feasibility of using a thorium-based mixed oxide fuel in a conventional pressurized water reactor for plutonium disposition. Both non-paralyzing and paralyzing dead-time calculations were performed for the Portable Spectroscopic Fast Neutron Probe (N-Probe), which can be used for spent fuel interrogation. Also, a Canberra 3He neutron detector's dead-time was estimated using a combination of subcritical assembly measurements and MCNP simulations. Next, a multitude of fission products were identified as candidates for burnup and spent fuel analysis of irradiated mixed oxide fuel. The best isotopes for these applications were identified by investigating half-life, photon energy, fission yield, branching ratios, production modes, thermal neutron absorption cross section and fuel matrix diffusivity. 132I and 97Nb were identified as good candidates for MOX fuel on-line burnup analysis. In the second, and most important, part of this work, the feasibility of utilizing ThMOX fuel in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) was first examined under steady-state, beginning of life conditions. Using a three-dimensional MCNP model of a Westinghouse-type 17x17 PWR, several fuel compositions and configurations of a one-third ThMOX core were compared to a 100% UO2 core. A blanket-type arrangement of 5.5 wt% PuO2 was determined to be the best candidate for further analysis. Next, the safety of the ThMOX configuration was evaluated through three cycles of burnup at several using the following metrics: axial and radial nuclear hot channel factors, moderator and fuel temperature coefficients, delayed neutron fraction, and shutdown margin. Additionally, the performance of the ThMOX configuration was assessed by tracking cycle length, plutonium destroyed, and fission product poison concentration.

  7. Heart simulation with surface equations for using on MCNP code

    SciTech Connect

    Rezaei-Ochbelagh, D.; Salman-Nezhad, S.; Asadi, A.; Rahimi, A.

    2011-12-26

    External photon beam radiotherapy is carried out in a way to achieve an 'as low as possible' a dose in healthy tissues surrounding the target. One of these surroundings can be heart as a vital organ of body. As it is impossible to directly determine the absorbed dose by heart, using phantoms is one way to acquire information around it. The other way is Monte Carlo method. In this work we have presented a simulation of heart geometry by introducing of different surfaces in MCNP code. We used 14 surface equations in order to determine human heart modeling. Those surfaces are borders of heart walls and contents.

  8. Heart simulation with surface equations for using on MCNP code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei-Ochbelagh, D.; Salman-Nezhad, S.; Asadi, A.; Rahimi, A.

    2011-12-01

    External photon beam radiotherapy is carried out in a way to achieve an "as low as possible" a dose in healthy tissues surrounding the target. One of these surroundings can be heart as a vital organ of body. As it is impossible to directly determine the absorbed dose by heart, using phantoms is one way to acquire information around it. The other way is Monte Carlo method. In this work we have presented a simulation of heart geometry by introducing of different surfaces in MCNP code. We used 14 surface equations in order to determine human heart modeling. Those surfaces are borders of heart walls and contents.

  9. MCNP calculations for container inspection with tagged neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boghen, G.; Donzella, A.; Filippini, V.; Fontana, A.; Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S.; Pesente, S.; Zenoni, A.

    2005-12-01

    We are developing an innovative tagged neutrons inspection system (TNIS) for cargo containers: the system will allow us to assay the chemical composition of suspect objects, previously identified by a standard X-ray radiography. The operation of the system is extensively being simulated by using the MCNP Monte Carlo code to study different inspection geometries, cargo loads and hidden threat materials. Preliminary simulations evaluating the signal and the signal over background ratio expected as a function of the system parameters are presented. The results for a selection of cases are briefly discussed and demonstrate that the system can operate successfully in different filling conditions.

  10. Production of energetic light fragments in extensions of the CEM and LAQGSM event generators of the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashnik, Stepan G.; Kerby, Leslie M.; Gudima, Konstantin K.; Sierk, Arnold J.; Bull, Jeffrey S.; James, Michael R.

    2017-03-01

    We extend the cascade-exciton model (CEM), and the Los Alamos version of the quark-gluon string model (LAQGSM), event generators of the Monte Carlo N -particle transport code version 6 (MCNP6), to describe production of energetic light fragments (LF) heavier than 4He from various nuclear reactions induced by particles and nuclei at energies up to about 1 TeV/nucleon. In these models, energetic LF can be produced via Fermi breakup, preequilibrium emission, and coalescence of cascade particles. Initially, we study several variations of the Fermi breakup model and choose the best option for these models. Then, we extend the modified exciton model (MEM) used by these codes to account for a possibility of multiple emission of up to 66 types of particles and LF (up to 28Mg) at the preequilibrium stage of reactions. Then, we expand the coalescence model to allow coalescence of LF from nucleons emitted at the intranuclear cascade stage of reactions and from lighter clusters, up to fragments with mass numbers A ≤7 , in the case of CEM, and A ≤12 , in the case of LAQGSM. Next, we modify MCNP6 to allow calculating and outputting spectra of LF and heavier products with arbitrary mass and charge numbers. The improved version of CEM is implemented into MCNP6. Finally, we test the improved versions of CEM, LAQGSM, and MCNP6 on a variety of measured nuclear reactions. The modified codes give an improved description of energetic LF from particle- and nucleus-induced reactions; showing a good agreement with a variety of available experimental data. They have an improved predictive power compared to the previous versions and can be used as reliable tools in simulating applications involving such types of reactions.

  11. MCNP modeling of a neutron generator and its shielding at Missouri University of Science and Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Manish K.; Alajo, Ayodeji Babatunde; Liu, Xin

    2014-12-01

    The shielding of a neutron generator producing fast neutrons should be sufficient to limit the dose rates to the prescribed values. A deuterium-deuterium neutron generator has been installed in the Nuclear Engineering Department at Missouri University of Science and Technology (Missouri S&T). The generator produces fast neutrons with an approximate energy of 2.5 MeV. The generator is currently shielded with different materials like lead, high-density polyethylene, and borated polyethylene. An MCNP transport simulation has been performed to estimate the dose rates at various places in and around the facility. The simulations incorporated the geometric and composition information of these shielding materials to determine neutron and photon dose rates at three central planes passing through the neutron source. Neutron and photon dose rate contour plots at these planes were provided using a MATLAB program. Furthermore, the maximum dose rates in the vicinity of the facility were used to estimate the annual limit for the generator's hours of operation. A successful operation of this generator will provide a convenient neutron source for basic and applied research at the Nuclear Engineering Department of Missouri S&T.

  12. Electron photon verification calculations using MCNP4B

    SciTech Connect

    Gierga, D.P.; Adams, K.J.

    1998-07-01

    MCNP4B was released in February 1997 with significant enhancements to electron/photon transport methods. These enhancements have been verified against a wide range of published electron/photon experiments, spanning high energy bremsstrahlung production to electron transmission and reflection. Three sets of bremsstrahlung experiments were simulated. The first verification calculations for bremsstrahlung production used the experimental results in Faddegon for 15 MeV electrons incident on lead, aluminum, and beryllium targets. The calculated integrated bremsstrahlung yields, the bremsstrahlung energy spectra, and the mean energy of the bremsstrahlung beam were compared with experiment. The impact of several MCNP tally options and physics parameters was explored in detail. The second was the experiment of O`Dell which measured the bremsstrahlung spectra from 10 and 20.9 MeV electrons incident on a gold/tungsten target. The final set was a comparison of relative experimental spectra with calculated results for 9.66 MeV electrons incident on tungsten based on the experiment of Starfelt and Koch. The transmission experiments of Ebert were also studied, including comparisons of transmission coefficients for 10.2 MeV electrons incident on carbon, silver, and uranium foils. The agreement between experiment and simulation was usually within two standard deviations of the experimental and calculational errors.

  13. Validation of the MCNP-DSP Monte Carlo code for calculating source-driven noise parameters of subcritical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, T.E.; Mihalczo, J.T.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes calculations performed to validate the modified version of the MCNP code, the MCNP-DSP, used for: the neutron and photon spectra of the spontaneous fission of californium 252; the representation of the detection processes for scattering detectors; the timing of the detection process; and the calculation of the frequency analysis parameters for the MCNP-DSP code.

  14. Sensitivity-Uncertainty Based Nuclear Criticality Safety Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Forrest B.

    2016-09-20

    These are slides from a seminar given to the University of Mexico Nuclear Engineering Department. Whisper is a statistical analysis package developed to support nuclear criticality safety validation. It uses the sensitivity profile data for an application as computed by MCNP6 along with covariance files for the nuclear data to determine a baseline upper-subcritical-limit for the application. Whisper and its associated benchmark files are developed and maintained as part of MCNP6, and will be distributed with all future releases of MCNP6. Although sensitivity-uncertainty methods for NCS validation have been under development for 20 years, continuous-energy Monte Carlo codes such as MCNP could not determine the required adjoint-weighted tallies for sensitivity profiles. The recent introduction of the iterated fission probability method into MCNP led to the rapid development of sensitivity analysis capabilities for MCNP6 and the development of Whisper. Sensitivity-uncertainty based methods represent the future for NCS validation – making full use of today’s computer power to codify past approaches based largely on expert judgment. Validation results are defensible, auditable, and repeatable as needed with different assumptions and process models. The new methods can supplement, support, and extend traditional validation approaches.

  15. Voxel2MCNP: a framework for modeling, simulation and evaluation of radiation transport scenarios for Monte Carlo codes.

    PubMed

    Pölz, Stefan; Laubersheimer, Sven; Eberhardt, Jakob S; Harrendorf, Marco A; Keck, Thomas; Benzler, Andreas; Breustedt, Bastian

    2013-08-21

    The basic idea of Voxel2MCNP is to provide a framework supporting users in modeling radiation transport scenarios using voxel phantoms and other geometric models, generating corresponding input for the Monte Carlo code MCNPX, and evaluating simulation output. Applications at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology are primarily whole and partial body counter calibration and calculation of dose conversion coefficients. A new generic data model describing data related to radiation transport, including phantom and detector geometries and their properties, sources, tallies and materials, has been developed. It is modular and generally independent of the targeted Monte Carlo code. The data model has been implemented as an XML-based file format to facilitate data exchange, and integrated with Voxel2MCNP to provide a common interface for modeling, visualization, and evaluation of data. Also, extensions to allow compatibility with several file formats, such as ENSDF for nuclear structure properties and radioactive decay data, SimpleGeo for solid geometry modeling, ImageJ for voxel lattices, and MCNPX's MCTAL for simulation results have been added. The framework is presented and discussed in this paper and example workflows for body counter calibration and calculation of dose conversion coefficients is given to illustrate its application.

  16. Fuel Element Transfer Cask Modelling Using MCNP Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Darmawan, Rosli; Topah, Budiman Naim

    2010-01-05

    After operating for more than 25 years, some of the Reaktor TRIGA Puspati (RTP) fuel elements would have been depleted. A few addition and fuel reconfiguration exercises have to be conducted in order to maintain RTP capacity. Presently, RTP spent fuels are stored at the storage area inside RTP tank. The need to transfer the fuel element outside of RTP tank may be prevalence in the near future. The preparation shall be started from now. A fuel element transfer cask has been designed according to the recommendation by the fuel manufacturer and experience of other countries. A modelling using MCNP code has been conducted to analyse the design. The result shows that the design of transfer cask fuel element is safe for handling outside the RTP tank according to recent regulatory requirement.

  17. Fuel Element Transfer Cask Modelling Using MCNP Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darmawan, Rosli; Topah, Budiman Naim

    2010-01-01

    After operating for more than 25 years, some of the Reaktor TRIGA Puspati (RTP) fuel elements would have been depleted. A few addition and fuel reconfiguration exercises have to be conducted in order to maintain RTP capacity. Presently, RTP spent fuels are stored at the storage area inside RTP tank. The need to transfer the fuel element outside of RTP tank may be prevalence in the near future. The preparation shall be started from now. A fuel element transfer cask has been designed according to the recommendation by the fuel manufacturer and experience of other countries. A modelling using MCNP code has been conducted to analyse the design. The result shows that the design of transfer cask fuel element is safe for handling outside the RTP tank according to recent regulatory requirement.

  18. Treating electron transport in MCNP{sup trademark}

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, H.G.

    1996-12-31

    The transport of electrons and other charged particles is fundamentally different from that of neutrons and photons. A neutron, in aluminum slowing down from 0.5 MeV to 0.0625 MeV will have about 30 collisions; a photon will have fewer than ten. An electron with the same energy loss will undergo 10{sup 5} individual interactions. This great increase in computational complexity makes a single- collision Monte Carlo approach to electron transport unfeasible for many situations of practical interest. Considerable theoretical work has been done to develop a variety of analytic and semi-analytic multiple-scattering theories for the transport of charged particles. The theories used in the algorithms in MCNP are the Goudsmit-Saunderson theory for angular deflections, the Landau an theory of energy-loss fluctuations, and the Blunck-Leisegang enhancements of the Landau theory. In order to follow an electron through a significant energy loss, it is necessary to break the electron`s path into many steps. These steps are chosen to be long enough to encompass many collisions (so that multiple-scattering theories are valid) but short enough that the mean energy loss in any one step is small (for the approximations in the multiple-scattering theories). The energy loss and angular deflection of the electron during each step can then be sampled from probability distributions based on the appropriate multiple- scattering theories. This subsumption of the effects of many individual collisions into single steps that are sampled probabilistically constitutes the ``condensed history`` Monte Carlo method. This method is exemplified in the ETRAN series of electron/photon transport codes. The ETRAN codes are also the basis for the Integrated TIGER Series, a system of general-purpose, application-oriented electron/photon transport codes. The electron physics in MCNP is similar to that of the Integrated TIGER Series.

  19. Validation of MCNP6.1 for Criticality Safety of Pu-Metal, -Solution, and -Oxide Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kiedrowski, Brian C.; Conlin, Jeremy Lloyd; Favorite, Jeffrey A.; Kahler, III, Albert C.; Kersting, Alyssa R.; Parsons, Donald K.; Walker, Jessie L.

    2014-05-13

    Guidance is offered to the Los Alamos National Laboratory Nuclear Criticality Safety division towards developing an Upper Subcritical Limit (USL) for MCNP6.1 calculations with ENDF/B-VII.1 nuclear data for three classes of problems: Pu-metal, -solution, and -oxide systems. A benchmark suite containing 1,086 benchmarks is prepared, and a sensitivity/uncertainty (S/U) method with a generalized linear least squares (GLLS) data adjustment is used to reject outliers, bringing the total to 959 usable benchmarks. For each class of problem, S/U methods are used to select relevant experimental benchmarks, and the calculational margin is computed using extreme value theory. A portion of the margin of sub criticality is defined considering both a detection limit for errors in codes and data and uncertainty/variability in the nuclear data library. The latter employs S/U methods with a GLLS data adjustment to find representative nuclear data covariances constrained by integral experiments, which are then used to compute uncertainties in keff from nuclear data. The USLs for the classes of problems are as follows: Pu metal, 0.980; Pu solutions, 0.973; dry Pu oxides, 0.978; dilute Pu oxide-water mixes, 0.970; and intermediate-spectrum Pu oxide-water mixes, 0.953.

  20. Impact of MCNP Unresolved Resonance Probability-Table Treatment on Uranium and Plutonium Benchmarks

    SciTech Connect

    Mosteller, R.D.; Little, R.C.

    1999-09-20

    A probability-table treatment recently has been incorporated into an intermediate version of the MCNP Monte Carlo code named MCNP4XS. This paper presents MCNP4XS results for a variety of uranium and plutonium criticality benchmarks, calculated with and without the probability-table treatment. It is shown that the probability-table treatment can produce small but significant reactivity changes for plutonium and {sup 233}U systems with intermediate spectra. More importantly, it can produce substantial reactivity increases for systems with large amounts of {sup 238}U and intermediate spectra.

  1. Comparison of EGS4 and MCNP Monte Carlo codes when calculating radiotherapy depth doses.

    PubMed

    Love, P A; Lewis, D G; Al-Affan, I A; Smith, C W

    1998-05-01

    The Monte Carlo codes EGS4 and MCNP have been compared when calculating radiotherapy depth doses in water. The aims of the work were to study (i) the differences between calculated depth doses in water for a range of monoenergetic photon energies and (ii) the relative efficiency of the two codes for different electron transport energy cut-offs. The depth doses from the two codes agree with each other within the statistical uncertainties of the calculations (1-2%). The relative depth doses also agree with data tabulated in the British Journal of Radiology Supplement 25. A discrepancy in the dose build-up region may by attributed to the different electron transport algorithims used by EGS4 and MCNP. This discrepancy is considerably reduced when the improved electron transport routines are used in the latest (4B) version of MCNP. Timing calculations show that EGS4 is at least 50% faster than MCNP for the geometries used in the simulations.

  2. Comparisons of TORT and MCNP dose calculations for BNCT treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Ingersol, D.T.; Slater, C.O.; Williams, L.R.; Redmond, E.L., II; Zamenhof, R.G.

    1996-12-31

    The relative merit of using a deterministic code to calculate dose distributions for BNCT applications were examined. The TORT discrete deterministic ordinated code was used in comparison to MCNP4A to calculate dose distributions for BNCT applications

  3. A Patch to MCNP5 for Multiplication Inference: Description and User Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, Jr., Clell J.

    2014-05-05

    A patch to MCNP5 has been written to allow generation of multiple neutrons from a spontaneous-fission event and generate list-mode output. This report documents the implementation and usage of this patch.

  4. Current status of MCNP6 as a simulation tool useful for space and accelerator applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mashnik, Stepan G; Bull, Jeffrey S; Hughes, H. Grady; Prael, Richard E; Sierk, Arnold J

    2012-07-20

    For the past several years, a major effort has been undertaken at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to develop the transport code MCNP6, the latest LANL Monte-Carlo transport code representing a merger and improvement of MCNP5 and MCNPX. We emphasize a description of the latest developments of MCNP6 at higher energies to improve its reliability in calculating rare-isotope production, high-energy cumulative particle production, and a gamut of reactions important for space-radiation shielding, cosmic-ray propagation, and accelerator applications. We present several examples of validation and verification of MCNP6 compared to a wide variety of intermediate- and high-energy experimental data on reactions induced by photons, mesons, nucleons, and nuclei at energies from tens of MeV to about 1 TeV/nucleon, and compare to results from other modern simulation tools.

  5. Verification of Unstructured Mesh Capabilities in MCNP6 for Reactor Physics Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, Timothy P.; Martz, Roger L.; Kiedrowski, Brian C.; Martin, William R.

    2012-08-22

    New unstructured mesh capabilities in MCNP6 (developmental version during summer 2012) show potential for conducting multi-physics analyses by coupling MCNP to a finite element solver such as Abaqus/CAE[2]. Before these new capabilities can be utilized, the ability of MCNP to accurately estimate eigenvalues and pin powers using an unstructured mesh must first be verified. Previous work to verify the unstructured mesh capabilities in MCNP was accomplished using the Godiva sphere [1], and this work attempts to build on that. To accomplish this, a criticality benchmark and a fuel assembly benchmark were used for calculations in MCNP using both the Constructive Solid Geometry (CSG) native to MCNP and the unstructured mesh geometry generated using Abaqus/CAE. The Big Ten criticality benchmark [3] was modeled due to its geometry being similar to that of a reactor fuel pin. The C5G7 3-D Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Assembly Benchmark [4] was modeled to test the unstructured mesh capabilities on a reactor-type problem.

  6. MCNP6 Simulation of Light and Medium Nuclei Fragmentation at Intermediate Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Mashnik, Stepan Georgievich; Kerby, Leslie Marie

    2015-05-22

    MCNP6, the latest and most advanced LANL Monte Carlo transport code, representing a merger of MCNP5 and MCNPX, is actually much more than the sum of those two computer codes; MCNP6 is available to the public via RSICC at Oak Ridge, TN, USA. In the present work, MCNP6 was validated and verified (V&V) against different experimental data on intermediate-energy fragmentation reactions, and results by several other codes, using mainly the latest modifications of the Cascade-Exciton Model (CEM) and of the Los Alamos version of the Quark-Gluon String Model (LAQGSM) event generators CEM03.03 and LAQGSM03.03. It was found that MCNP6 using CEM03.03 and LAQGSM03.03 describes well fragmentation reactions induced on light and medium target nuclei by protons and light nuclei of energies around 1 GeV/nucleon and below, and can serve as a reliable simulation tool for different applications, like cosmic-ray-induced single event upsets (SEU’s), radiation protection, and cancer therapy with proton and ion beams, to name just a few. Future improvements of the predicting capabilities of MCNP6 for such reactions are possible, and are discussed in this work.

  7. Validation and verification of MCNP6 as a new simulation tool useful for medical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mashnik, Stepan G

    2011-01-06

    MCNP6, the latest and most advanced LANL transport code, representing a merger of MCNP5 and MCNPX has been Validated and Verified (V&V) against different experimental data and results by other codes relevant to medical applications. In the present work, we V&V MCNP6 using mainly the latest modifications of the Cascade-Exciton Model (CEM) and of the Los Alamos version of the Quark-Gluon String Model (LAQGSM) event generators CEM03.02 and LAQGSM03.03. We found that MCNP6 describes well data of interest for medical applications measured on both thin and thick targets and agrees very well with similar results obtained with other codes; MCNP6 may be a very useful tool for medical applications We plan to make MCNP6 available to the public via RSICC at Oak Ridge in the middle of 2011 but we are allowed to provide it to friendly US Beta-users outside LANL already now.

  8. Validation of MCNP6 Version 1.0 with the ENDF/B-VII.1 Cross Section Library for Plutonium Metals, Oxides, and Solutions on the High Performance Computing Platform Moonlight

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Bryan Scott; Gough, Sean T.

    2016-12-05

    This report documents a validation of the MCNP6 Version 1.0 computer code on the high performance computing platform Moonlight, for operations at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) that involve plutonium metals, oxides, and solutions. The validation is conducted using the ENDF/B-VII.1 continuous energy group cross section library at room temperature. The results are for use by nuclear criticality safety personnel in performing analysis and evaluation of various facility activities involving plutonium materials.

  9. MCNP-based computational model for the Leksell Gamma Knife

    SciTech Connect

    Trnka, Jiri; Novotny, Josef Jr.; Kluson, Jaroslav

    2007-01-15

    We have focused on the usage of MCNP code for calculation of Gamma Knife radiation field parameters with a homogenous polystyrene phantom. We have investigated several parameters of the Leksell Gamma Knife radiation field and compared the results with other studies based on EGS4 and PENELOPE code as well as the Leksell Gamma Knife treatment planning system Leksell GammaPlan (LGP). The current model describes all 201 radiation beams together and simulates all the sources in the same time. Within each beam, it considers the technical construction of the source, the source holder, collimator system, the spherical phantom, and surrounding material. We have calculated output factors for various sizes of scoring volumes, relative dose distributions along basic planes including linear dose profiles, integral doses in various volumes, and differential dose volume histograms. All the parameters have been calculated for each collimator size and for the isocentric configuration of the phantom. We have found the calculated output factors to be in agreement with other authors' works except the case of 4 mm collimator size, where averaging over the scoring volume and statistical uncertainties strongly influences the calculated results. In general, all the results are dependent on the choice of the scoring volume. The calculated linear dose profiles and relative dose distributions also match independent studies and the Leksell GammaPlan, but care must be taken about the fluctuations within the plateau, which can influence the normalization, and accuracy in determining the isocenter position, which is important for comparing different dose profiles. The calculated differential dose volume histograms and integral doses have been compared with data provided by the Leksell GammaPlan. The dose volume histograms are in good agreement as well as integral doses calculated in small calculation matrix volumes. However, deviations in integral doses up to 50% can be observed for large

  10. IER-163 Post-Experiment MCNP Calculations (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Favorite, Jeffrey A.

    2012-06-04

    IER-163 has been modeled with high fidelity in MCNP6. The model k{sub eff} was high, as in other similar calculations. The fission ratio {sup 238}U(n,f)/{sup 235}U(n,f) was 12.6% too small compared with measurements; the ratio {sup 239}Pu(n,f)/{sup 235}U(n,f) was 11.5% too small compared with measurements; the iridium ratio {sup 193}Ir(n,n{prime})/{sup 191}Ir(n,{gamma}) was 16.4% too large; and the gold ratios {sup 197}Au(n,2n)/{sup 197}Au(n,{gamma}), {sup 197}Au(n,2n)/{sup 235}U(n,f), and {sup 197}Au(n,{gamma})/{sup 235}U(n,f) were within one standard deviation of the measured values. It is suggested that the calculated {sup 235}U fission rate is too large and the calculated {sup 238}U fission rate is too small.

  11. Improvement of the MCNP simulated n-gamma spectrometer response function using the new ENDF/B-VI evaluations for thermal neutron capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cywicka-Jakiel, T.; Zorski, T.

    2007-09-01

    An impact of the improved nuclear data library for thermal neutron capture (ENDF/B-VI.8) on the numerically simulated response of the spectrometric n-gamma well logging (sNGL) probe, SO-5-90-SN type, has been investigated. For this aim the MCNP simulations have been done using two kinds of data libraries for radiative capture: the commonly used ENDF/B-VI.2 (ENDF60) and the new ENDF/B-VI. 8 (ACTIA). MCNP simulations concerned the n-gamma benchmark experiment which was performed at the Polish calibration station in Zielona Góra to investigate the influence of chlorine in borehole on the tool readings and thus on the accuracy of quantitative elemental analysis for the main rock elements: Si, Ca and Fe. High quality of the nuclear data for radiative capture in Cl and Al have been of special interest as the ENDF60 library contains an imperfect data for Cl and there is no delay gamma-ray line of energy 1.7791 MeV from thermal neutron capture in Al. The last element is the main construction material for the SO-5-90-SN spectrometer. The advantage of the new ACTIA library over the ENDF60 was shown through the better matching of the experimental and simulated gamma-ray spectra from thermal neutron capture. As a consequence the Si, Ca and Fe rock contents obtained from the MCNP modeling with the use of ACTIA data, fit well their reference values regarded as "true". The accuracies for the Si, Ca and Fe determination have been improved by about 63%, 35% and 51%, respectively.

  12. Testing actinide fission yield treatment in CINDER90 for use in MCNP6 burnup calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Fensin, Michael Lorne; Umbel, Marissa

    2015-09-18

    Most of the development of the MCNPX/6 burnup capability focused on features that were applied to the Boltzman transport or used to prepare coefficients for use in CINDER90, with little change to CINDER90 or the CINDER90 data. Though a scheme exists for best solving the coupled Boltzman and Bateman equations, the most significant approximation is that the employed nuclear data are correct and complete. Thus, the CINDER90 library file contains 60 different actinide fission yields encompassing 36 fissionable actinides (thermal, fast, high energy and spontaneous fission). Fission reaction data exists for more than 60 actinides and as a result, fission yield data must be approximated for actinides that do not possess fission yield information. Several types of approximations are used for estimating fission yields for actinides which do not possess explicit fission yield data. The objective of this study is to test whether or not certain approximations of fission yield selection have any impact on predictability of major actinides and fission products. Further we assess which other fission products, available in MCNP6 Tier 3, result in the largest difference in production. Because the CINDER90 library file is in ASCII format and therefore easily amendable, we assess reasons for choosing, as well as compare actinide and major fission product prediction for the H. B. Robinson benchmark for, three separate fission yield selection methods: (1) the current CINDER90 library file method (Base); (2) the element method (Element); and (3) the isobar method (Isobar). Results show that the three methods tested result in similar prediction of major actinides, Tc-99 and Cs-137; however, certain fission products resulted in significantly different production depending on the method of choice.

  13. Testing actinide fission yield treatment in CINDER90 for use in MCNP6 burnup calculations

    DOE PAGES

    Fensin, Michael Lorne; Umbel, Marissa

    2015-09-18

    Most of the development of the MCNPX/6 burnup capability focused on features that were applied to the Boltzman transport or used to prepare coefficients for use in CINDER90, with little change to CINDER90 or the CINDER90 data. Though a scheme exists for best solving the coupled Boltzman and Bateman equations, the most significant approximation is that the employed nuclear data are correct and complete. Thus, the CINDER90 library file contains 60 different actinide fission yields encompassing 36 fissionable actinides (thermal, fast, high energy and spontaneous fission). Fission reaction data exists for more than 60 actinides and as a result, fissionmore » yield data must be approximated for actinides that do not possess fission yield information. Several types of approximations are used for estimating fission yields for actinides which do not possess explicit fission yield data. The objective of this study is to test whether or not certain approximations of fission yield selection have any impact on predictability of major actinides and fission products. Further we assess which other fission products, available in MCNP6 Tier 3, result in the largest difference in production. Because the CINDER90 library file is in ASCII format and therefore easily amendable, we assess reasons for choosing, as well as compare actinide and major fission product prediction for the H. B. Robinson benchmark for, three separate fission yield selection methods: (1) the current CINDER90 library file method (Base); (2) the element method (Element); and (3) the isobar method (Isobar). Results show that the three methods tested result in similar prediction of major actinides, Tc-99 and Cs-137; however, certain fission products resulted in significantly different production depending on the method of choice.« less

  14. MCNP-REN - A Monte Carlo Tool for Neutron Detector Design Without Using the Point Model

    SciTech Connect

    Abhold, M.E.; Baker, M.C.

    1999-07-25

    The development of neutron detectors makes extensive use of the predictions of detector response through the use of Monte Carlo techniques in conjunction with the point reactor model. Unfortunately, the point reactor model fails to accurately predict detector response in common applications. For this reason, the general Monte Carlo N-Particle code (MCNP) was modified to simulate the pulse streams that would be generated by a neutron detector and normally analyzed by a shift register. This modified code, MCNP - Random Exponentially Distributed Neutron Source (MCNP-REN), along with the Time Analysis Program (TAP) predict neutron detector response without using the point reactor model, making it unnecessary for the user to decide whether or not the assumptions of the point model are met for their application. MCNP-REN is capable of simulating standard neutron coincidence counting as well as neutron multiplicity counting. Measurements of MOX fresh fuel made using the Underwater Coincidence Counter (UWCC) as well as measurements of HEU reactor fuel using the active neutron Research Reactor Fuel Counter (RRFC) are compared with calculations. The method used in MCNP-REN is demonstrated to be fundamentally sound and shown to eliminate the need to use the point model for detector performance predictions.

  15. Development and Implementation of Photonuclear Cross-Section Data for Mutually Coupled Neutron-Photon Transport Calculations in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) Radiation Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    White, Morgan C.

    2000-07-01

    The fundamental motivation for the research presented in this dissertation was the need to development a more accurate prediction method for characterization of mixed radiation fields around medical electron accelerators (MEAs). Specifically, a model is developed for simulation of neutron and other particle production from photonuclear reactions and incorporated in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code. This extension of the capability within the MCNP code provides for the more accurate assessment of the mixed radiation fields. The Nuclear Theory and Applications group of the Los Alamos National Laboratory has recently provided first-of-a-kind evaluated photonuclear data for a select group of isotopes. These data provide the reaction probabilities as functions of incident photon energy with angular and energy distribution information for all reaction products. The availability of these data is the cornerstone of the new methodology for state-of-the-art mutually coupled photon-neutron transport simulations. The dissertation includes details of the model development and implementation necessary to use the new photonuclear data within MCNP simulations. A new data format has been developed to include tabular photonuclear data. Data are processed from the Evaluated Nuclear Data Format (ENDF) to the new class ''u'' A Compact ENDF (ACE) format using a standalone processing code. MCNP modifications have been completed to enable Monte Carlo sampling of photonuclear reactions. Note that both neutron and gamma production are included in the present model. The new capability has been subjected to extensive verification and validation (V&V) testing. Verification testing has established the expected basic functionality. Two validation projects were undertaken. First, comparisons were made to benchmark data from literature. These calculations demonstrate the accuracy of the new data and transport routines to better than 25 percent. Second, the ability to

  16. Validation of updated neutronic calculation models proposed for Atucha-II PHWR. Part II: Benchmark comparisons of PUMA core parameters with MCNP5 and improvements due to a simple cell heterogeneity correction

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, C.; Mollerach, R.; Leszczynski, F.; Serra, O.; Marconi, J.; Fink, J.

    2006-07-01

    In 2005 the Argentine Government took the decision to complete the construction of the Atucha-II nuclear power plant, which has been progressing slowly during the last ten years. Atucha-II is a 745 MWe nuclear station moderated and cooled with heavy water, of German (Siemens) design located in Argentina. It has a pressure vessel design with 451 vertical coolant channels and the fuel assemblies (FA) are clusters of 37 natural UO{sub 2} rods with an active length of 530 cm. For the reactor physics area, a revision and update of reactor physics calculation methods and models was recently carried out covering cell, supercell (control rod) and core calculations. This paper presents benchmark comparisons of core parameters of a slightly idealized model of the Atucha-I core obtained with the PUMA reactor code with MCNP5. The Atucha-I core was selected because it is smaller, similar from a neutronic point of view, more symmetric than Atucha-II, and has some experimental data available. To validate the new models benchmark comparisons of k-effective, channel power and axial power distributions obtained with PUMA and MCNP5 have been performed. In addition, a simple cell heterogeneity correction recently introduced in PUMA is presented, which improves significantly the agreement of calculated channel powers with MCNP5. To complete the validation, the calculation of some of the critical configurations of the Atucha-I reactor measured during the experiments performed at first criticality is also presented. (authors)

  17. 3D neutronic calculations: CAD-MCNP methodology applied to vessel activation in KOYO-F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herreras, Y.; Lafuente, A.; Sordo, F.; Cabellos, O.; Perlado, J. M.

    2008-05-01

    This paper presents a methodology for 3D neutronic calculations suitable for complex and extensive geometries. The geometry of the system design is first fully modelled with a CAD program, and subsequently processed through a MCNP-CAD interface in order to generate an MCNP geometry file. Neutronic irradiation results are finally achieved running the MCNPX program, where the geometry input card used is directly the MCNP-CAD interface output. This methodology enables accurate neutronic calculations for complex geometries characterised by high detail levels. This procedure will be applied to the Fast Ignition Fusion Reactor KOYO-F to determine first neutron fluxes calculations along the blanket as well as the material activation in the reduced martensitic 9Cr-1Mo steel vessel.

  18. Simulation of Photon energy Spectra Using MISC, SOURCES, MCNP and GADRAS

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Lucas P.; Shores, Erik F.; Myers, Steven C.; Felsher, Paul D.; Garner, Scott E.; Solomon, Clell J. Jr.

    2012-08-14

    The detector response functions included in the Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) are a valuable resource for simulating radioactive source emission spectra. Application of these response functions to the results of three-dimensional transport calculations is a useful modeling capability. Using a 26.2 kg shell of depleted uranium (DU) as a simple test problem, this work illustrates a method for manipulating current tally results from MCNP into the GAM file format necessary for a practical link to GADRAS detector response functions. MISC (MCNP Intrinsic Source Constructor) and SOURCES 4C were used to develop photon and neutron source terms for subsequent MCNP transport, and the resultant spectrum is shown to be in good agreement with that from GADRAS. A 1 kg DU sphere was also modeled with the method described here and showed similarly encouraging results.

  19. Hiroshima Air-Over-Ground Analysis: Comparison of DORT and MCNP Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, RT

    2001-09-04

    Monte Carlo (MCNP4B) and Discrete Ordinates (DORT) calculations were carried out to estimate {sup 60}Co and {sup 152}Eu activation as a function of ground range due to neutrons emitted from the Hiroshima A-bomb. Results of ORNL DORT and MCNP calculations using RZ cylindrical air-over-ground models are compared with LANL MCNP results obtained with an XYZ air-over-ground model. All of the calculations were carried out using ENDF/B-VI cross-section data and detailed angle and energy resolved neutron emission spectra from the weapon. Favorable agreement was achieved for the {sup 60}Co and {sup 152}Eu activation for ground ranges out to 1000m from the three calculations.

  20. Radiation Transport Analysis in Chalcogenide-Based Devices and a Neutron Howitzer Using MCNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowler, Herbert

    As photons, electrons, and neutrons traverse a medium, they impart their energy in ways that are analytically difficult to describe. Monte Carlo methods provide valuable insight into understanding this behavior, especially when the radiation source or environment is too complex to simplify. This research investigates simulating various radiation sources using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code, characterizing their impact on various materials, and comparing the simulation results to general theory and measurements. A total of five sources were of interest: two photon sources of different incident particle energies (3.83 eV and 1.25 MeV), two electron sources also of different energies (30 keV and 100 keV), and a californium-252 (Cf-252) spontaneous fission neutron source. Lateral and vertical programmable metallization cells (PMCs) were developed by other researchers for exposure to these photon and electron sources, so simplified PMC models were implemented in MCNP to estimate the doses and fluences. Dose rates measured around the neutron source and the predicted maximum activity of activation foils exposed to the neutrons were determined using MCNP and compared to experimental results obtained from gamma-ray spectroscopy. The analytical fluence calculations for the photon and electron cases agreed with MCNP results, and differences are due to MCNP considering particle movements that hand calculations do not. Doses for the photon cases agreed between the analytical and simulated results, while the electron cases differed by a factor of up to 4.8. Physical dose rate measurements taken from the neutron source agreed with MCNP within the 10% tolerance of the measurement device. The activity results had a percent error of up to 50%, which suggests a need to further evaluate the spectroscopy setup.

  1. MCNP Modeling Results for Location of Buried TRU Waste Drums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinman, D. K.; Schweitzer, J. S.

    2006-05-01

    In the 1960's, fifty-five gallon drums of TRU waste were buried in shallow pits on remote U.S. Government facilities such as the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (now split into the Idaho National Laboratory and the Idaho Completion Project [ICP]). Subsequently, it was decided to remove the drums and the material that was in them from the burial pits and send the material to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico. Several technologies have been tried to locate the drums non-intrusively with enough precision to minimize the chance for material to be spread into the environment. One of these technologies is the placement of steel probe holes in the pits into which wireline logging probes can be lowered to measure properties and concentrations of material surrounding the probe holes for evidence of TRU material. There is also a concern that large quantities of volatile organic compounds (VOC) are also present that would contaminate the environment during removal. In 2001, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) built two pulsed neutron wireline logging tools to measure TRU and VOC around the probe holes. The tools are the Prompt Fission Neutron (PFN) and the Pulsed Neutron Gamma (PNG), respectively. They were tested experimentally in surrogate test holes in 2003. The work reported here estimates the performance of the tools using Monte-Carlo modelling prior to field deployment. A MCNP model was constructed by INEEL personnel. It was modified by the authors to assess the ability of the tools to predict quantitatively the position and concentration of TRU and VOC materials disposed around the probe holes. The model was used to simulate the tools scanning the probe holes vertically in five centimetre increments. A drum was included in the model that could be placed near the probe hole and at other locations out to forty-five centimetres from the probe-hole in five centimetre increments. Scans were performed with no chlorine in the

  2. Validation of MCNP NPP Activation Simulations for Decommissioning Studies by Analysis of NPP Neutron Activation Foil Measurement Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volmert, Ben; Pantelias, Manuel; Mutnuru, R. K.; Neukaeter, Erwin; Bitterli, Beat

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, an overview of the Swiss Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) activation methodology is presented and the work towards its validation by in-situ NPP foil irradiation campaigns is outlined. Nuclear Research and consultancy Group (NRG) in The Netherlands has been given the task of performing the corresponding neutron metrology. For this purpose, small Aluminium boxes containing a set of circular-shaped neutron activation foils have been prepared. After being irradiated for one complete reactor cycle, the sets have been successfully retrieved, followed by gamma-spectrometric measurements of the individual foils at NRG. Along with the individual activities of the foils, the reaction rates and thermal, intermediate and fast neutron fluence rates at the foil locations have been determined. These determinations include appropriate corrections for gamma self-absorption and neutron self-shielding as well as corresponding measurement uncertainties. The comparison of the NPP Monte Carlo calculations with the results of the foil measurements is done by using an individual generic MCNP model functioning as an interface and allowing the simulation of individual foil activation by predetermined neutron spectra. To summarize, the comparison between calculation and measurement serve as a sound validation of the Swiss NPP activation methodology by demonstrating a satisfying agreement between measurement and calculation. Finally, the validation offers a chance for further improvements of the existing NPP models by ensuing calibration and/or modelling optimizations for key components and structures.

  3. Contribution to the validation of MCNP neutronics design of the advanced neutron source reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Rubio, G.A.; Ougouag, A.M.; Wemple, C.A.; Ryskamp, J.M. )

    1993-01-01

    In the research and development plan of the advanced neutron source (ANS) reactor, one of the steps planned for neutronics design methods validation is to compare computational model results and experimental results for a critical facility exhibiting similarities with the ANS reactor. One such facility is the FOEHN experiment. In this paper, an MCNP model of the FOEHN experiment is developed, and its results are compared with experimental data from the literature. The MCNP models reproduces measured quantities of interest with a high level of agreement.

  4. The design of a multisource americium-beryllium (Am-Be) neutron irradiation facility using MCNP for the neutronic performance calculation.

    PubMed

    Sogbadji, R B M; Abrefah, R G; Nyarko, B J B; Akaho, E H K; Odoi, H C; Attakorah-Birinkorang, S

    2014-08-01

    The americium-beryllium neutron irradiation facility at the National Nuclear Research Institute (NNRI), Ghana, was re-designed with four 20 Ci sources using Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code to investigate the maximum amount of flux that is produced by the combined sources. The results were compared with a single source Am-Be irradiation facility. The main objective was to enable us to harness the maximum amount of flux for the optimization of neutron activation analysis and to enable smaller sample sized samples to be irradiated. Using MCNP for the design construction and neutronic performance calculation, it was realized that the single-source Am-Be design produced a thermal neutron flux of (1.8±0.0007)×10(6) n/cm(2)s and the four-source Am-Be design produced a thermal neutron flux of (5.4±0.0007)×10(6) n/cm(2)s which is a factor of 3.5 fold increase compared to the single-source Am-Be design. The criticality effective, k(eff), of the single-source and the four-source Am-Be designs were found to be 0.00115±0.0008 and 0.00143±0.0008, respectively.

  5. MCNP-PoliMi: a Monte-Carlo code for correlation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzi, Sara A.; Padovani, Enrico; Marseguerra, Marzio

    2003-11-01

    The Monte-Carlo simulation of correlation measurements that rely on the detection of fast neutrons and photons from fission requires that particle interactions in each history be described as closely as possible. The MCNP-PoliMi code has been developed from the standard MCNP code to simulate each neutron-nucleus interaction as closely as possible. In particular, neutron interaction and photon production are made correlated and correct neutron and photon fission multiplicities have been implemented. The code output consists in relevant information about each collision, for example the type of collision, the collision target, the energy deposited, and the position of the interaction. A post-processing code has also been developed and can be tailored to model specific detector characteristics. These features make MCNP-PoliMi a versatile tool to simulate particle interactions and detection processes. The application of the MCNP-PoliMi code to simulate neutron and gamma ray detection in a plastic scintillator is presented. PoliMi stands for Politecnico di Milano.

  6. Validation of the MCNP computational model for neutron flux distribution with the neutron activation analysis measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiyapun, K.; Chimtin, M.; Munsorn, S.; Somchit, S.

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this work is to demonstrate the method for validating the predication of the calculation methods for neutron flux distribution in the irradiation tubes of TRIGA research reactor (TRR-1/M1) using the MCNP computer code model. The reaction rate using in the experiment includes 27Al(n, α)24Na and 197Au(n, γ)198Au reactions. Aluminium (99.9 wt%) and gold (0.1 wt%) foils and the gold foils covered with cadmium were irradiated in 9 locations in the core referred to as CT, C8, C12, F3, F12, F22, F29, G5, and G33. The experimental results were compared to the calculations performed using MCNP which consisted of the detailed geometrical model of the reactor core. The results from the experimental and calculated normalized reaction rates in the reactor core are in good agreement for both reactions showing that the material and geometrical properties of the reactor core are modelled very well. The results indicated that the difference between the experimental measurements and the calculation of the reactor core using the MCNP geometrical model was below 10%. In conclusion the MCNP computational model which was used to calculate the neutron flux and reaction rate distribution in the reactor core can be used for others reactor core parameters including neutron spectra calculation, dose rate calculation, power peaking factors calculation and optimization of research reactor utilization in the future with the confidence in the accuracy and reliability of the calculation.

  7. Application of MCNP for neutronic calculations at VR-1 training reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huml, Ondřej; Rataj, Jan; Bílý, Tomáš

    2014-06-01

    The paper presents utilization of Monte Carlo MCNP transport code for neutronic calculations of training reactor VR-1. Results of calculations are compared with results of measurements realized during last few critical experiments with various reactor core configurations. Very good agreement between calculations and measurements is observed.

  8. TORT/MCNP coupling method for the calculation of neutron flux around a core of BWR.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Masahiko

    2005-01-01

    For the analysis of BWR neutronics performance, accurate data are required for neutron flux distribution over the In-Reactor Pressure Vessel equipments taking into account the detailed geometrical arrangement. The TORT code can calculate neutron flux around a core of BWR in a three-dimensional geometry model, but has difficulties in fine geometrical modelling and lacks huge computer resource. On the other hand, the MCNP code enables the calculation of the neutron flux with a detailed geometry model, but requires very long sampling time to give enough number of particles. Therefore, a TORT/MCNP coupling method has been developed to eliminate the two problems mentioned above in each code. In this method, the TORT code calculates angular flux distribution on the core surface and the MCNP code calculates neutron spectrum at the points of interest using the flux distribution. The coupling method will be used as the DOT-DOMINO-MORSE code system. This TORT/MCNP coupling method was applied to calculate the neutron flux at points where induced radioactivity data were measured for 54Mn and 60Co and the radioactivity calculations based on the neutron flux obtained from the above method were compared with the measured data.

  9. Comparison of scientific computing platforms for MCNP4A Monte Carlo calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, J.S.; Brockhoff, R.C. . Applied Theoretical Physics Division)

    1994-04-01

    The performance of seven computer platforms is evaluated with the widely used and internationally available MCNP4A Monte Carlo radiation transport code. All results are reproducible and are presented in such a way as to enable comparison with computer platforms not in the study. The authors observed that the HP/9000-735 workstation runs MCNP 50% faster than the Cray YMP 8/64. Compared with the Cray YMP 8/64, the IBM RS/6000-560 is 68% as fast, the Sun Sparc10 is 66% as fast, the Silicon Graphics ONYX is 90% as fast, the Gateway 2000 model 4DX2-66V personal computer is 27% as fast, and the Sun Sparc2 is 24% as fast. In addition to comparing the timing performance of the seven platforms, the authors observe that changes in compilers and software over the past 2 yr have resulted in only modest performance improvements, hardware improvements have enhanced performance by less than a factor of [approximately]3, timing studies are very problem dependent, MCNP4Q runs about as fast as MCNP4.

  10. MCNP5 CRITICALITY VALIDATION AND BIAS FOR INTERMEDIATE ENRICHED URANIUM SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    FINFROCK SH

    2009-12-10

    The purpose of this analysis is to validate the Monte Carlo N-Particle 5 (MCNP5) code Version 1.40 (LA-UR-03-1987, 2005) and its cross-section database for k-code calculations of intermediate enriched uranium systems on INTEL{reg_sign} processor based PC's running any version of the WINDOWS operating system. Configurations with intermediate enriched uranium were modeled with the moderator range of 39 {le} H/Fissile {le} 1438. See Table 2-1 for brief descriptions of selected cases and Table 3-1 for the range of applicability for this validation. A total of 167 input cases were evaluated including bare and reflected systems in a single body or arrays. The 167 cases were taken directly from the previous (Version 4C [Lan 2005]) validation database. Section 2.0 list data used to calculate k-effective (k{sub eff}) for the 167 experimental criticality benchmark cases using the MCNP5 code v1.40 and its cross section database. Appendix B lists the MCNP cross-section database entries validated for use in evaluating the intermediate enriched uranium systems for criticality safety. The dimensions and atom densities for the intermediate enriched uranium experiments were taken from NEA/NSC/DOC(95)03, September 2005, which will be referred to as the benchmark handbook throughout the report. For these input values, the experimental benchmark k{sub eff} is approximately 1.0. The MCNP validation computer runs ran to an accuracy of approximately {+-} 0.001. For the cases where the reported benchmark k{sub eff} was not equal to 1.0000 the MCNP calculational results were normalized. The difference between the MCNP validation computer runs and the experimentally measured k{sub eff} is the MCNP5 v1.40 bias. The USLSTATS code (ORNL 1998) was utilized to perform the statistical analysis and generate an acceptable maximum k{sub eff} limit for calculations of the intermediate enriched uranium type systems.

  11. Bias estimates used in lieu of validation of fission products and minor actinides in MCNP Keff calculations for PWR burnup credit casks

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Don E.; Marshall, William J.; Wagner, John C.; Bowen, Douglas G.

    2015-09-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation recently issued Interim Staff Guidance (ISG) 8, Revision 3. This ISG provides guidance for burnup credit (BUC) analyses supporting transport and storage of PWR pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel in casks. Revision 3 includes guidance for addressing validation of criticality (keff) calculations crediting the presence of a limited set of fission products and minor actinides (FP&MA). Based on previous work documented in NUREG/CR-7109, recommendation 4 of ISG-8, Rev. 3, includes a recommendation to use 1.5 or 3% of the FP&MA worth to conservatively cover the bias due to the specified FP&MAs. This bias is supplementary to the bias and bias uncertainty resulting from validation of keff calculations for the major actinides in SNF and does not address extension to actinides and fission products beyond those identified herein. The work described in this report involves comparison of FP&MA worths calculated using SCALE and MCNP with ENDF/B-V, -VI, and -VII based nuclear data and supports use of the 1.5% FP&MA worth bias when either SCALE or MCNP codes are used for criticality calculations, provided the other conditions of the recommendation 4 are met. The method used in this report may also be applied to demonstrate the applicability of the 1.5% FP&MA worth bias to other codes using ENDF/B V, VI or VII based nuclear data. The method involves use of the applicant s computational method to generate FP&MA worths for a reference SNF cask model using specified spent fuel compositions. The applicant s FP&MA worths are then compared to reference values provided in this report. The applicants FP&MA worths should not exceed the reference results by more than 1.5% of the reference FP&MA worths.

  12. Performance of the improved version of monte Carlo code A3MCNP for large-scale shielding problems.

    PubMed

    Omura, M; Miyake, Y; Hasegawa, T; Ueki, K; Sato, O; Haghighat, A; Sjoden, G E

    2005-01-01

    A3MCNP (Automatic Adjoint Accelerated MCNP) is a revised version of the MCNP Monte Carlo code, which automatically prepares variance reduction parameters for the CADIS (Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling) methodology. Using a deterministic 'importance' (or adjoint) function, CADIS performs source and transport biasing within the weight-window technique. The current version of A3MCNP uses the three-dimensional (3-D) Sn transport TORT code to determine a 3-D importance function distribution. Based on simulation of several real-life problems, it is demonstrated that A3MCNP provides precise calculation results with a remarkably short computation time by using the proper and objective variance reduction parameters. However, since the first version of A3MCNP provided only a point source configuration option for large-scale shielding problems, such as spent-fuel transport casks, a large amount of memory may be necessary to store enough points to properly represent the source. Hence, we have developed an improved version of A3MCNP (referred to as A3MCNPV) which has a volumetric source configuration option. This paper describes the successful use of A3MCNPV for a concrete cask neutron and gamma-ray shielding problem, and a PWR dosimetry problem.

  13. Nuclear criticality research at the University of New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Busch, R.D.

    1997-06-01

    Two projects at the University of New Mexico are briefly described. The university`s Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Department has completed the final draft of a primer for MCNP4A, which it plans to publish soon. The primer was written to help an analyst who has little experience with the MCNP code to perform criticality safety analyses. In addition, the department has carried out a series of approach-to-critical experiments on the SHEBA-II, a UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} solution critical assembly at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The results obtained differed slightly from what was predicted by the TWODANT code.

  14. RADBALLTECHNOLOGY TESTING AND MCNP MODELING OF THE TUNGSTEN COLLIMATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Farfan, E.

    2010-07-08

    The United Kingdom's National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) has developed a remote, non-electrical, radiation-mapping device known as RadBall{trademark}, which can locate and quantify radioactive hazards within contaminated areas of the nuclear industry. RadBall{trademark} consists of a colander-like outer shell that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer sphere. The outer shell works to collimate radiation sources and those areas of the polymer sphere that are exposed react, becoming increasingly more opaque, in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer sphere is imaged in an optical-CT scanner, which produces a high resolution 3D map of optical attenuation coefficients. Subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation matrix provides information on the spatial distribution of sources in a given area forming a 3D characterization of the area of interest. RadBall{trademark} has no power requirements and can be positioned in tight or hard-to reach locations. The RadBall{trademark} technology has been deployed in a number of technology trials in nuclear waste reprocessing plants at Sellafield in the United Kingdom and facilities of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This study focuses on the RadBall{trademark} testing and modeling accomplished at SRNL.

  15. Comparison of Results from the MCNP™ Criticality Validation Suite Using ENDF/B-VI and Preliminary ENDF/B-VII Nuclear Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosteller, Russell D.

    2005-05-01

    The MCNP Criticality Validation Suite is a collection of 31 benchmarks taken from the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments. MCNP5 calculations clearly demonstrate that, overall, nuclear data for a preliminary version of ENDF/B-VII produce better agreement with the benchmarks in the suite than do corresponding data from ENDF/B-VI. Additional calculations identify areas where improvements in the data still are needed.

  16. Comparison of MCNP calculation and measurement of neutron fluence in a channel for short-time irradiation in the LVR-15 reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Lahodova, Z.; Flibor, S.; Klupak, V.; Kucera, J.; Marek, M.; Viererbl, L.

    2006-07-01

    The main purpose of this work was to evaluate the neutron energy distribution in a channel of the LVR-15 reactor used mostly for short-time neutron activation analysis. Twenty types of activation monitors were irradiated in this channel equipped with a pneumatic facility with a transport time of 3.5 s. The activities measured and the corresponding reaction rates were used to determinate the neutron spectrum. The reaction rates were compared with MCNP calculations to confirm the results. The second purpose of this work was to verify our nuclear data library used for the reaction rate calculations. The experiment results were also incorporated into our database system of neutron energy distribution at the reactor core. (authors)

  17. Comparative studies of actinide and sub-actinide fission cross section calculation from MCNP6 and TALYS

    SciTech Connect

    Perkasa, Y. S.; Waris, A. Kurniadi, R. Su'ud, Z.

    2014-09-30

    Comparative studies of actinide and sub-actinide fission cross section calculation from MCNP6 and TALYS have been conducted. In this work, fission cross section resulted from MCNP6 prediction will be compared with result from TALYS calculation. MCNP6 with its event generator CEM03.03 and LAQGSM03.03 have been validated and verified for several intermediate and heavy nuclides fission reaction data and also has a good agreement with experimental data for fission reaction that induced by photons, pions, and nucleons at energy from several ten of MeV to about 1 TeV. The calculation that induced within TALYS will be focused mainly to several hundred MeV for actinide and sub-actinide nuclides and will be compared with MCNP6 code and several experimental data from other evaluator.

  18. Coupling MCNP-DSP and LAHET Monte Carlo Codes for Designing Subcriticality Monitors for Accelerator-Driven Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, T.E.; Rugama, Y. Munoz-Cobos, J.; Perez, R.

    2000-10-23

    The design of reactivity monitoring systems for accelerator-driven systems must be investigated to ensure that such systems remain subcritical during operation. The Monte Carlo codes LAHET and MCNP-DSP were combined together to facilitate the design of reactivity monitoring systems. The coupling of LAHET and MCNP-DSP provides a tool that can be used to simulate a variety of subcritical measurements such as the pulsed neutron, Rossi-{alpha}, or noise analysis measurements.

  19. Comparison of KENO-VI and MCNP5 Criticality Analyses for a Lunar Regolith Clustered-Reactor System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bess, John Darrell

    2008-01-01

    The Lunar Regolith Clustered-Reactor System design has been presented as an alternative method for providing surface power to a lunar facility using a fast-fission, heatpipe-cooled nuclear reactor. The reactor system is divided into subcritical units that can be safely launched into orbit without risk of inadvertent criticality in the event of a launch accident. The reactor subunits are emplaced into the lunar surface to form a clustered-reactor system, utilizing the regolith as both radiation shielding and neutron-reflector material. Coordinated placement of multiple subunits can provision a critical reactor system proportional to localized lunar surface power demand. Reactor units assembled using proven and tested materials in radiation environments such as UO2 fuel, stainless-steel cladding and support, and compatible liquid-metal heatpipes promote safety and reliability, with ease of manufacture and testing. Reactor power levels of approximately 100 kWth per subunit significantly reduces the negative effects of elevated temperature and radiation environments associated with single nuclear power reactors operated at higher power levels. The analysis of subunit criticality in various accident scenarios differs by up to 4% (~$6 in reactivity) between results generated using conventional criticality analysis codes, MCNP5 and KENO-VI. A demonstrated trend exists between results of the two criticality codes as accident conditions approach a multiplication factor of one. Code comparison of a tri-cluster system on the lunar surface provides comparable results with calculated system reactivity within 0.5%. Iron concentration is confirmed as the dominant element in the lunar regolith influencing system reactivity.

  20. Comparison of KENO-VI and MCNP5 Criticality Analyses for a Lunar Regolith Clustered-Reactor System

    SciTech Connect

    Bess, John Darrell

    2008-01-21

    The Lunar Regolith Clustered-Reactor System design has been presented as an alternative method for providing surface power to a lunar facility using a fast-fission, heatpipe-cooled nuclear reactor. The reactor system is divided into subcritical units that can be safely launched into orbit without risk of inadvertent criticality in the event of a launch accident. The reactor subunits are emplaced into the lunar surface to form a clustered-reactor system, utilizing the regolith as both radiation shielding and neutron-reflector material. Coordinated placement of multiple subunits can provision a critical reactor system proportional to localized lunar surface power demand. Reactor units assembled using proven and tested materials in radiation environments such as UO{sub 2} fuel, stainless-steel cladding and support, and compatible liquid-metal heatpipes promote safety and reliability, with ease of manufacture and testing. Reactor power levels of approximately 100 kWth per subunit significantly reduces the negative effects of elevated temperature and radiation environments associated with single nuclear power reactors operated at higher power levels. The analysis of subunit criticality in various accident scenarios differs by up to 4% ({approx}$6 in reactivity) between results generated using conventional criticality analysis codes, MCNP5 and KENO-VI. A demonstrated trend exists between results of the two criticality codes as accident conditions approach a multiplication factor of one. Code comparison of a tri-cluster system on the lunar surface provides comparable results with calculated system reactivity within 0.5%. Iron concentration is confirmed as the dominant element in the lunar regolith influencing system reactivity.

  1. Neutron Cross Section Library Based on JEFF3.1 for Use with MCNP.

    SciTech Connect

    SARTORI, ENRICO

    2007-03-20

    Version 00 This continuous energy cross-section data library in ACE format is for shielding and criticality applications done with MCNP. In addition to the description of the NJOY processing procedure used to create the library, the included report NEA/NSC/DOC(2006)18 contains results from the benchmarking activity aimed at testing the quality of the data for criticality and shielding applications. The library at 300K has been verified: visually (no discontinuities, correct processing in all range) and with comparisons with other libraries available for the same purposes (ENDF/B-VI.8, JEF2.2, JENDL3.3, …) A set of experiments using MCNP4c are used in order to validate the processed library.

  2. MCNP6 Simulation of Light and Medium Nuclei Fragmentation at Intermediate Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Mashnik, Stepan Georgievich; Kerby, Leslie Marie

    2015-08-24

    Fragmentation reactions induced on light and medium nuclei by protons and light nuclei of energies around 1 GeV/nucleon and below are studied with the Los Alamos transport code MCNP6 and with its CEM03.03 and LAQGSM03.03 event generators. CEM and LAQGSM assume that intermediate-energy fragmentation reactions on light nuclei occur generally in two stages. The first stage is the intranuclear cascade (INC), followed by the second, Fermi breakup disintegration of light excited residual nuclei produced after the INC. CEM and LAQGSM account also for coalescence of light fragments (complex particles) up to sup>4He from energetic nucleons emitted during INC. We investigate the validity and performance of MCNP6, CEM, and LAQGSM in simulating fragmentation reactions at intermediate energies and discuss possible ways of further improving these codes.

  3. Total reaction cross sections in CEM and MCNP6 at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Kerby, Leslie M.; Mashnik, Stepan G.

    2015-05-14

    Accurate total reaction cross section models are important to achieving reliable predictions from spallation and transport codes. The latest version of the Cascade Exciton Model (CEM) as incorporated in the code CEM03.03, and the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP6), both developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), each use such cross sections. Having accurate total reaction cross section models in the intermediate energy region (50 MeV to 5 GeV) is very important for different applications, including analysis of space environments, use in medical physics, and accelerator design, to name just a few. The current inverse cross sections used in the preequilibrium and evaporation stages of CEM are based on the Dostrovsky et al. model, published in 1959. Better cross section models are now available. Implementing better cross section models in CEM and MCNP6 should yield improved predictions for particle spectra and total production cross sections, among other results.

  4. Validation and verification of MCNP6 against intermediate and high-energy experimental data and results by other codes

    SciTech Connect

    Mashnik, Stepan G

    2010-11-22

    MCNP6, the latest and most advanced LANL transport code representing a recent merger of MCNP5 and MCNPX, has been Validated and Verified (V and V) against a variety of intermediate and high-energy experimental data and against results by different versions of MCNPX and other codes. In the present work, we V andV MCNP6 using mainly the latest modifications of the Cascade-Exciton Model (CEM) and of the Los Alamos version of the Quark-Gluon String Model (LAQGSM) event generators CEM03.02 and LAQGSM03.03. We found that MCNP6 describes reasonably well various reactions induced by particles and nuclei at incident energies from 18 MeV to about 1 TeV per nucleon measured on thin and thick targets and agrees very well with similar results obtained with MCNPX and calculations by CEM03.02, LAQGSM03.01 (03.03), INCL4 + ABLA, and Bertini INC + Dresner evaporation, EPAX, ABRABLA, HIPSE, and AMD, used as stand alone codes. Most of several computational bugs and more serious physics problems observed in MCNP6/X during our V and V have been fixed; we continue our work to solve all the known problems before MCNP6 is distributed to the public.

  5. Monte Carlo calculations of thermal neutron capture in gadolinium: a comparison of GEANT4 and MCNP with measurements.

    PubMed

    Enger, Shirin A; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per; Rezaei, Arash; Lundqvist, Hans

    2006-02-01

    GEANT4 is a Monte Carlo code originally implemented for high-energy physics applications and is well known for particle transport at high energies. The capacity of GEANT4 to simulate neutron transport in the thermal energy region is not equally well known. The aim of this article is to compare MCNP, a code commonly used in low energy neutron transport calculations and GEANT4 with experimental results and select the suitable code for gadolinium neutron capture applications. To account for the thermal neutron scattering from chemically bound atoms [S(alpha,beta)] in biological materials a comparison of thermal neutron fluence in tissue-like poly(methylmethacrylate) phantom is made with MCNP4B, GEANT4 6.0 patch1, and measurements from the neutron capture therapy (NCT) facility at the Studsvik, Sweden. The fluence measurements agreed with MCNP calculated results considering S(alpha,beta). The location of the thermal neutron peak calculated with MCNP without S(alpha,beta) and GEANT4 is shifted by about 0.5 cm towards a shallower depth and is 25%-30% lower in amplitude. Dose distribution from the gadolinium neutron capture reaction is then simulated by MCNP and compared with measured data. The simulations made by MCNP agree well with experimental results. As long as thermal neutron scattering from chemically bound atoms are not included in GEANT4 it is not suitable for NCT applications.

  6. MCNP optimization of filtered neutron beams for calibration of the SIMPLE detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, C.; Giuliani, F.; Girard, T. A.; Marques, J. G.; Salgado, J.; Collar, J. I.; Morlat, T.; Limagne, D.; Waysand, G.

    2004-01-01

    We report an MCNP study of filtered monochromatic neutron beams of energies 25, 54 and 149 keV for response studies of a superheated droplet detector for the SIMPLE experiment. The results identify the importance of the detector temperature stabilizing water bath and the aqueous gel of the detector on the beam quality, in general agreement with recent measurements made on the thermal port of the Portuguese research reactor.

  7. Calculation of self-shielding factor for neutron activation experiments using GEANT4 and MCNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Barrientos, Jaime; Molina, F.; Aguilera, Pablo; Arellano, H. F.

    2016-07-01

    The neutron self-shielding factor G as a function of the neutron energy was obtained for 14 pure metallic samples in 1000 isolethargic energy bins from 1.10-5eV to 2.107eV using Monte Carlo simulations in GEANT4 and MCNP6. The comparison of these two Monte Carlo codes shows small differences in the final self-shielding factor mostly due to the different cross section databases that each program uses.

  8. SABRINA: an interactive three-dimensional geometry-mnodeling program for MCNP

    SciTech Connect

    West, J.T. III

    1986-10-01

    SABRINA is a fully interactive three-dimensional geometry-modeling program for MCNP, a Los Alamos Monte Carlo code for neutron and photon transport. In SABRINA, a user constructs either body geometry or surface geometry models and debugs spatial descriptions for the resulting objects. This enhanced capability significantly reduces effort in constructing and debugging complicated three-dimensional geometry models for Monte Carlo analysis. 2 refs., 33 figs.

  9. High Altitude Neutral Particle Transport Using the Monte Carlo Simulation Code MCNP with Variable Density Atmosphere

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    Monti Captain# USAF AFIT.’GNE/F•P/91M-6 (LO IA Approved for public release; distribution unlimited AFIT/IGNE/ENP/91M-6 HIGH ALTITUDE NEUTRAL... distribution unlimited Preface The purpose of this study was to perform Monte Carlo simulations of neutral particle transport with primary and secondary...21 4. Spatial Cell Geometry for Co-Altitude Detectors .................... .................. 44 5. MCNP vs. SMAUG Neutron Fluence at Source Co

  10. MCNP6 Simulation of Reactions of Interest to FRIB, Medical, and Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashnik, Stepan G.

    The latest production-version of the Los Alamos Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code MCNP6 has been used to simulate a variety of particle-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus reactions of academic and applied interest to research subjects at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), medical isotope production, space-radiation shielding, cosmic-ray propagation, and accelerator applications, including several reactions induced by radioactive isotopes, analyzing production of both stable and radioactive residual nuclei. Here, we discuss examples of validation and verification of MCNP6 by comparing with recent neutron spectra measured at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, Japan; spectra of light fragments from several reactions measured recently at GANIL, France; INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania, Italy; COSY of the Jülich Research Center, Germany; and cross sections of products from several reactions measured lately at GSI, Darmstadt, Germany; ITEP, Moscow, Russia; and, LANSCE, LANL, Los Alamos, U.S.A. As a rule, MCNP6 provides quite good predictions for most of the reactions we analyzed so far, allowing us to conclude that it can be used as a reliable and useful simulation tool for various applications for FRIB, medical, and space applications involving stable and radioactive isotopes.

  11. Voxel2MCNP: software for handling voxel models for Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations.

    PubMed

    Hegenbart, Lars; Pölz, Stefan; Benzler, Andreas; Urban, Manfred

    2012-02-01

    Voxel2MCNP is a program that sets up radiation protection scenarios with voxel models and generates corresponding input files for the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. Its technology is based on object-oriented programming, and the development is platform-independent. It has a user-friendly graphical interface including a two- and three-dimensional viewer. A row of equipment models is implemented in the program. Various voxel model file formats are supported. Applications include calculation of counting efficiency of in vivo measurement scenarios and calculation of dose coefficients for internal and external radiation scenarios. Moreover, anthropometric parameters of voxel models, for instance chest wall thickness, can be determined. Voxel2MCNP offers several methods for voxel model manipulations including image registration techniques. The authors demonstrate the validity of the program results and provide references for previous successful implementations. The authors illustrate the reliability of calculated dose conversion factors and specific absorbed fractions. Voxel2MCNP is used on a regular basis to generate virtual radiation protection scenarios at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology while further improvements and developments are ongoing.

  12. V&V of MCNP 6.1.1 Beta Against Intermediate and High-Energy Experimental Data

    SciTech Connect

    Mashnik, Stepan G

    2014-09-08

    This report presents a set of validation and verification (V&V) MCNP 6.1.1 beta results calculated in parallel, with MPI, obtained using its event generators at intermediate and high-energies compared against various experimental data. It also contains several examples of results using the models at energies below 150 MeV, down to 10 MeV, where data libraries are normally used. This report can be considered as the forth part of a set of MCNP6 Testing Primers, after its first, LA-UR-11-05129, and second, LA-UR-11-05627, and third, LA-UR-26944, publications, but is devoted to V&V with the latest, 1.1 beta version of MCNP6. The MCNP6 test-problems discussed here are presented in the /VALIDATION_CEM/and/VALIDATION_LAQGSM/subdirectories in the MCNP6/Testing/directory. README files that contain short descriptions of every input file, the experiment, the quantity of interest that the experiment measures and its description in the MCNP6 output files, and the publication reference of that experiment are presented for every test problem. Templates for plotting the corresponding results with xmgrace as well as pdf files with figures representing the final results of our V&V efforts are presented. Several technical “bugs” in MCNP 6.1.1 beta were discovered during our current V&V of MCNP6 while running it in parallel with MPI using its event generators. These “bugs” are to be fixed in the following version of MCNP6. Our results show that MCNP 6.1.1 beta using its CEM03.03, LAQGSM03.03, Bertini, and INCL+ABLA, event generators describes, as a rule, reasonably well different intermediate- and high-energy measured data. This primer isn’t meant to be read from cover to cover. Readers may skip some sections and go directly to any test problem in which they are interested.

  13. Evaluation of computational models and cross sections used by MCNP6 for simulation of electron backscattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poškus, Andrius

    2016-02-01

    This work evaluates the accuracy of the single-event (SE) and condensed-history (CH) models of electron transport in Monte Carlo simulations of electron backscattering from thick layers of Be, C, Al, Cu, Ag, Au and U at incident electron energies from 200 eV to 15 MeV. The CH method is used in simulations performed with MCNP6.1, and the SE method is used in simulations performed with an open-source single-event code MCNelectron written by the author of this paper. Both MCNP6.1 and MCNelectron use mainly ENDF/B-VI.8 library data, but MCNelectron allows replacing cross sections of certain types of interactions by alternative datasets from other sources. The SE method is evaluated both using only ENDF/B-VI.8 cross sections (the "SE-ENDF/B method", which is equivalent to using MCNP6.1 in SE mode) and with an alternative set of elastic scattering cross sections obtained from relativistic (Dirac) partial-wave (DPW) calculations (the "SE-DPW method"). It is shown that at energies from 200 eV to 300 keV the estimates of the backscattering coefficients obtained using the SE-DPW method are typically within 10% of the experimental data, which is approximately the same accuracy that is achieved using MCNP6.1 in CH mode. At energies below 1 keV and above 300 keV, the SE-DPW method is much more accurate than the SE-ENDF/B method due to lack of angular distribution data in the ENDF/B library in those energy ranges. At energies from 500 keV to 15 MeV, the CH approximation is roughly twice more accurate than the SE-DPW method, with the average relative errors equal 7% and 14%, respectively. The energy probability density functions (PDFs) of backscattered electrons for Al and Cu, calculated using the SE method with DPW cross sections when energy of incident electrons is 20 keV, have an average absolute error as low as 4% of the average PDF. This error is approximately twice less than the error of the corresponding PDF calculated using the CH approximation. It is concluded that the

  14. Numerical Tests for the Problem of U-Pu Fuel Burnup in Fuel Rod and Polycell Models Using the MCNP Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muratov, V. G.; Lopatkin, A. V.

    An important aspect in the verification of the engineering techniques used in the safety analysis of MOX-fuelled reactors, is the preparation of test calculations to determine nuclide composition variations under irradiation and analysis of burnup problem errors resulting from various factors, such as, for instance, the effect of nuclear data uncertainties on nuclide concentration calculations. So far, no universally recognized tests have been devised. A calculation technique has been developed for solving the problem using the up-to-date calculation tools and the latest versions of nuclear libraries. Initially, in 1997, a code was drawn up in an effort under ISTC Project No. 116 to calculate the burnup in one VVER-1000 fuel rod, using the MCNP Code. Later on, the authors developed a computation technique which allows calculating fuel burnup in models of a fuel rod, or a fuel assembly, or the whole reactor. It became possible to apply it to fuel burnup in all types of nuclear reactors and subcritical blankets.

  15. Validation of updated neutronic calculation models proposed for Atucha-II PHWR. Part I: Benchmark comparisons of WIMS-D5 and DRAGON cell and control rod parameters with MCNP5

    SciTech Connect

    Mollerach, R.; Leszczynski, F.; Fink, J.

    2006-07-01

    In 2005 the Argentine Government took the decision to complete the construction of the Atucha-II nuclear power plant, which has been progressing slowly during the last ten years. Atucha-II is a 745 MWe nuclear station moderated and cooled with heavy water, of German (Siemens) design located in Argentina. It has a pressure-vessel design with 451 vertical coolant channels, and the fuel assemblies (FA) are clusters of 37 natural UO{sub 2} rods with an active length of 530 cm. For the reactor physics area, a revision and update calculation methods and models (cell, supercell and reactor) was recently carried out covering cell, supercell (control rod) and core calculations. As a validation of the new models some benchmark comparisons were done with Monte Carlo calculations with MCNP5. This paper presents comparisons of cell and supercell benchmark problems based on a slightly idealized model of the Atucha-I core obtained with the WIMS-D5 and DRAGON codes with MCNP5 results. The Atucha-I core was selected because it is smaller, similar from a neutronic point of view, and more symmetric than Atucha-II Cell parameters compared include cell k-infinity, relative power levels of the different rings of fuel rods, and some two-group macroscopic cross sections. Supercell comparisons include supercell k-infinity changes due to the control rods (tubes) of steel and hafnium. (authors)

  16. Quantitative comparison between PGNAA measurements and MCNP calculations in view of the characterization of radioactive wastes in Germany and France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauerhofer, E.; Havenith, A.; Carasco, C.; Payan, E.; Kettler, J.; Ma, J. L.; Perot, B.

    2013-04-01

    The Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH (FZJ), together with the Aachen University Rheinisch-Westfaelische Technische Hochschule (RWTH) and the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA Cadarache) are involved in a cooperation aiming at characterizing toxic and reactive elements in radioactive waste packages by means of Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) [1]. The French and German waste management agencies have indeed defined acceptability limits concerning these elements in view of their projected geological repositories. A first measurement campaign was performed in the new Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) facility called MEDINA, at FZJ, to assess the capture gamma-ray signatures of some elements of interest in large samples up to waste drums with a volume of 200 liter. MEDINA is the acronym for Multi Element Detection based on Instrumental Neutron Activation. This paper presents MCNP calculations of the MEDINA facility and quantitative comparison between measurement and simulation. Passive gamma-ray spectra acquired with a high purity germanium detector and calibration sources are used to qualify the numerical model of the crystal. Active PGNAA spectra of a sodium chloride sample measured with MEDINA then allow for qualifying the global numerical model of the measurement cell. Chlorine indeed constitutes a usual reference with reliable capture gamma-ray production data. The goal is to characterize the entire simulation protocol (geometrical model, nuclear data, and postprocessing tools) which will be used for current measurement interpretation, extrapolation of the performances to other types of waste packages or other applications, as well as for the study of future PGNAA facilities.

  17. Quantitative comparison between PGNAA measurements and MCNP calculations in view of the characterization of radioactive wastes in Germany and France

    SciTech Connect

    Mauerhofer, E.; Havenith, A.; Kettler, J.; Carasco, C.; Payan, E.; Ma, J. L.; Perot, B.

    2013-04-19

    The Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (FZJ), together with the Aachen University Rheinisch-Westfaelische Technische Hochschule (RWTH) and the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA Cadarache) are involved in a cooperation aiming at characterizing toxic and reactive elements in radioactive waste packages by means of Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA). The French and German waste management agencies have indeed defined acceptability limits concerning these elements in view of their projected geological repositories. A first measurement campaign was performed in the new Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) facility called MEDINA, at FZJ, to assess the capture gamma-ray signatures of some elements of interest in large samples up to waste drums with a volume of 200 liter. MEDINA is the acronym for Multi Element Detection based on Instrumental Neutron Activation. This paper presents MCNP calculations of the MEDINA facility and quantitative comparison between measurement and simulation. Passive gamma-ray spectra acquired with a high purity germanium detector and calibration sources are used to qualify the numerical model of the crystal. Active PGNAA spectra of a sodium chloride sample measured with MEDINA then allow for qualifying the global numerical model of the measurement cell. Chlorine indeed constitutes a usual reference with reliable capture gamma-ray production data. The goal is to characterize the entire simulation protocol (geometrical model, nuclear data, and postprocessing tools) which will be used for current measurement interpretation, extrapolation of the performances to other types of waste packages or other applications, as well as for the study of future PGNAA facilities.

  18. PWR Facility Dose Modeling Using MCNP5 and the CADIS/ADVANTG Variance-Reduction Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Blakeman, Edward D; Peplow, Douglas E.; Wagner, John C; Murphy, Brian D; Mueller, Don

    2007-09-01

    The feasibility of modeling a pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) facility and calculating dose rates at all locations within the containment and adjoining structures using MCNP5 with mesh tallies is presented. Calculations of dose rates resulting from neutron and photon sources from the reactor (operating and shut down for various periods) and the spent fuel pool, as well as for the photon source from the primary coolant loop, were all of interest. Identification of the PWR facility, development of the MCNP-based model and automation of the run process, calculation of the various sources, and development of methods for visually examining mesh tally files and extracting dose rates were all a significant part of the project. Advanced variance reduction, which was required because of the size of the model and the large amount of shielding, was performed via the CADIS/ADVANTG approach. This methodology uses an automatically generated three-dimensional discrete ordinates model to calculate adjoint fluxes from which MCNP weight windows and source bias parameters are generated. Investigative calculations were performed using a simple block model and a simplified full-scale model of the PWR containment, in which the adjoint source was placed in various regions. In general, it was shown that placement of the adjoint source on the periphery of the model provided adequate results for regions reasonably close to the source (e.g., within the containment structure for the reactor source). A modification to the CADIS/ADVANTG methodology was also studied in which a global adjoint source is weighted by the reciprocal of the dose response calculated by an earlier forward discrete ordinates calculation. This method showed improved results over those using the standard CADIS/ADVANTG approach, and its further investigation is recommended for future efforts.

  19. New Tools to Prepare ACE Cross-section Files for MCNP Analytic Test Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Forrest B.

    2016-06-17

    Monte Carlo calculations using one-group cross sections, multigroup cross sections, or simple continuous energy cross sections are often used to: (1) verify production codes against known analytical solutions, (2) verify new methods and algorithms that do not involve detailed collision physics, (3) compare Monte Carlo calculation methods with deterministic methods, and (4) teach fundamentals to students. In this work we describe 2 new tools for preparing the ACE cross-section files to be used by MCNP® for these analytic test problems, simple_ace.pl and simple_ace_mg.pl.

  20. A system of materials composition and geometry arrangement for fast neutron beam thermalization: An MCNP study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlář, Radim; Alexa, Petr; Pištora, Jaromír

    2013-03-01

    Compact deuterium-tritium neutron generators emit fast neutrons (14.2 MeV) that have to be thermalized for neutron activation analysis experiments. To maximize thermal neutron flux and minimize epithermal and fast neutron fluxes across the output surface of the neutron generator facility, Monte Carlo calculations (MCNP5; Los Alamos National Laboratory) for different moderator types and widths and collimator and reflector designs have been performed. A thin lead layer close to the neutron generator as neutron multiplier followed by polyethylene moderator and surrounded by a massive lead and nickel collimator and reflector was obtained as the optimum setup.

  1. Input files with ORNL—mathematical phantoms of the human body for MCNP-4B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krstić, D.; Nikezić, D.

    2007-01-01

    Protection against ionizing radiation requires information on the absorbed doses in organs of the human body. Implantation of many dosimeters in the human body is undesirable (or impossible), so the doses in organs are not measurable and some kind of dose calculation has to be applied. Calculation of doses in organs requests: (a) an exact description of the geometry of organs, (b) the chemical constitution of tissues, and (c) appropriate computer programs. The first two items, (a) and (b), make a so-called "phantom". In another words, the "phantom of a human body" is a mathematical representation of the human body including all other relevant information. All organs are represented with geometrical bodies (like cylinders, ellipsoids, tori, cones etc.), which are described with suitable mathematical equations. A corresponding chemical constitution for various types of organ tissues is also defined. MCNP-4B ( Monte Carlo N- Particle) is often used as transport code. Users of this software prepare an "input file" providing all necessary information for program execution. This information includes: (a) source definition—type of ionizing radiation, energy spectrum, and geometry of the source; (b) target definition—material constitution, geometry, location in respect to the source etc.; (c) characterization of absorbing media between the source and target; (d) output tally, etc. This paper presents input files with "human phantoms" for the MCNP-4B code. The input files with "phantoms" were prepared based on publications issued by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Seven input files relating to different age groups (newborn, 1, 5, 10, 15 years, as well as, male and female adults) are presented here. A test example and comparison with other data found in literature are also given. Program summaryTitle of program: INPUT FILES, AMALE, AFEMALE, AGE15, AGE10, AGE5, AGE01, NEWB Catalogue identifier:ADYF_v1_0 Program summary URL

  2. MCNP simulation and spectrum unfolding for an NaI monitor of radioactivity in aquatic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, C.; De Lellis, C.; Van Put, P.; Tondeur, F.

    2007-09-01

    Spectrum unfolding can be implemented when the angular distribution of the radiation fluence is known, e.g. when the source-detector geometry is fixed. In the case of the system developed by Institut National des Radio-Elements (IRE) for monitoring radioactivity in aquatic systems, the source is an infinite homogenous medium surrounding the monitor, with constant density. Its response function for gamma rays is calculated with MCNP4.C2. The simulation model is validated with reference measurements of standard sources diluted in a drum. Results of unfolding with UMG 3.3 are presented for this situation, and for a measurement in sea water.

  3. SABRINA - An interactive geometry modeler for MCNP (Monte Carlo Neutron Photon)

    SciTech Connect

    West, J.T.; Murphy, J.

    1988-01-01

    SABRINA is an interactive three-dimensional geometry modeler developed to produce complicated models for the Los Alamos Monte Carlo Neutron Photon program MCNP. SABRINA produces line drawings and color-shaded drawings for a wide variety of interactive graphics terminals. It is used as a geometry preprocessor in model development and as a Monte Carlo particle-track postprocessor in the visualization of complicated particle transport problem. SABRINA is written in Fortran 77 and is based on the Los Alamos Common Graphics System, CGS. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Borehole parametric study for neutron induced capture gamma-ray spectrometry using the MCNP code.

    PubMed

    Shahriari, M; Sohrabpour, M

    2000-01-01

    The MCNP Monte Carlo code has been used to simulate neutron transport from an Am-Be source into a granite formation surrounding a borehole. The effects of the moisture and the neutron poison on the thermal neutron flux distribution and the capture by the absorbing elements has been calculated. Thermal and nonthermal captures for certain absorbers having resonance structures in the epithermal and fast energy regions such as W and Si were performed. It is shown that for those absorbers having large resonances in the epithermal regions when they are present in dry formation or when accompanied by neutron poisons the resonance captures may be significant compared to the thermal captures.

  5. In Vessel Exposure Distributions Evaluated with MCNP5 for Atucha II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhino, Juan Manuel; Blaumann, Herman; Zamonsky, Gabriel

    2009-08-01

    Preliminary assessment of the flux and neutron-induced damage was obtained for all peripheral structures in Atucha II NPP. Maximum exposure zones were identified, and four group fluxes and DPA rates were obtained for the Moderator Tank, downcomer, inner RPV, 1/4 depth in RPV and external air. MCNP5 was used for this purpose, after developing a suitable model for the transport from core to out-of-vessel positions. This model allows also further evaluation of fluxes and detector responses in ex-core positions.

  6. Efficiency of whole-body counter for various body size calculated by MCNP5 software.

    PubMed

    Krstic, D; Nikezic, D

    2012-11-01

    The efficiency of a whole-body counter for (137)Cs and (40)K was calculated using the MCNP5 code. The ORNL phantoms of a human body of different body sizes were applied in a sitting position in front of a detector. The aim was to investigate the dependence of efficiency on the body size (age) and the detector position with respect to the body and to estimate the accuracy of real measurements. The calculation work presented here is related to the NaI detector, which is available in the Serbian Whole-body Counter facility in Vinca Institute.

  7. Comparative studies on shielding properties of some steel alloys using Geant4, MCNP, WinXCOM and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vishwanath P.; Medhat, M. E.; Shirmardi, S. P.

    2015-01-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients, μ/ρ and effective atomic numbers, Zeff of some carbon steel and stainless steel alloys have been calculated by using Geant4, MCNP simulation codes for different gamma ray energies, 279.1 keV, 661.6 keV, 662 keV, 1115.5 keV, 1173 keV and 1332 keV. The simulation results of Zeff using Geant4 and MCNP codes have been compared with possible available experimental results and theoretical WinXcom, and good agreement has been observed. The simulated μ/ρ and Zeff values using Geant4 and MCNP code signifies that both the simulation process can be followed to determine the gamma ray interaction properties of the alloys for energies wherever analogous experimental results may not be available. This kind of studies can be used for various applications such as for radiation dosimetry, medical and radiation shielding.

  8. Neutrons Flux Distributions of the Pu-Be Source and its Simulation by the MCNP-4B Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faghihi, F.; Mehdizadeh, S.; Hadad, K.

    Neutron Fluence rate of a low intense Pu-Be source is measured by Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) of 197Au foils. Also, the neutron fluence rate distribution versus energy is calculated using the MCNP-4B code based on ENDF/B-V library. Theoretical simulation as well as our experimental performance are a new experience for Iranians to make reliability with the code for further researches. In our theoretical investigation, an isotropic Pu-Be source with cylindrical volume distribution is simulated and relative neutron fluence rate versus energy is calculated using MCNP-4B code. Variation of the fast and also thermal neutrons fluence rate, which are measured by NAA method and MCNP code, are compared.

  9. Comparison of TG-43 dosimetric parameters of brachytherapy sources obtained by three different versions of MCNP codes.

    PubMed

    Zaker, Neda; Zehtabian, Mehdi; Sina, Sedigheh; Koontz, Craig; Meigooni, Ali S

    2016-03-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are widely used for calculation of the dosimetric parameters of brachytherapy sources. MCNP4C2, MCNP5, MCNPX, EGS4, EGSnrc, PTRAN, and GEANT4 are among the most commonly used codes in this field. Each of these codes utilizes a cross-sectional library for the purpose of simulating different elements and materials with complex chemical compositions. The accuracies of the final outcomes of these simulations are very sensitive to the accuracies of the cross-sectional libraries. Several investigators have shown that inaccuracies of some of the cross section files have led to errors in  125I and  103Pd parameters. The purpose of this study is to compare the dosimetric parameters of sample brachytherapy sources, calculated with three different versions of the MCNP code - MCNP4C, MCNP5, and MCNPX. In these simulations for each source type, the source and phantom geometries, as well as the number of the photons, were kept identical, thus eliminating the possible uncertainties. The results of these investigations indicate that for low-energy sources such as  125I and  103Pd there are discrepancies in gL(r) values. Discrepancies up to 21.7% and 28% are observed between MCNP4C and other codes at a distance of 6 cm for  103Pd and 10 cm for  125I from the source, respectively. However, for higher energy sources, the discrepancies in gL(r) values are less than 1.1% for  192Ir and less than 1.2% for  137Cs between the three codes. PACS number(s): 87.56.bg.

  10. Comparison of TG-43 dosimetric parameters of brachytherapy sources obtained by three different versions of MCNP codes.

    PubMed

    Zaker, Neda; Zehtabian, Mehdi; Sina, Sedigheh; Koontz, Craig; Meigooni, Ali S

    2016-03-08

    Monte Carlo simulations are widely used for calculation of the dosimetric parameters of brachytherapy sources. MCNP4C2, MCNP5, MCNPX, EGS4, EGSnrc, PTRAN, and GEANT4 are among the most commonly used codes in this field. Each of these codes utilizes a cross-sectional library for the purpose of simulating different elements and materials with complex chemical compositions. The accuracies of the final outcomes of these simulations are very sensitive to the accuracies of the cross-sectional libraries. Several investigators have shown that inaccuracies of some of the cross section files have led to errors in 125I and 103Pd parameters. The purpose of this study is to compare the dosimetric parameters of sample brachytherapy sources, calculated with three different versions of the MCNP code - MCNP4C, MCNP5, and MCNPX. In these simulations for each source type, the source and phantom geometries, as well as the number of the photons, were kept identical, thus eliminating the possible uncertainties. The results of these investigations indicate that for low-energy sources such as 125I and 103Pd there are discrepancies in gL(r) values. Discrepancies up to 21.7% and 28% are observed between MCNP4C and other codes at a distance of 6 cm for 103Pd and 10 cm for 125I from the source, respectively. However, for higher energy sources, the discrepancies in gL(r) values are less than 1.1% for 192Ir and less than 1.2% for 137Cs between the three codes.

  11. Development of Monteburns: A Code That Links MCNP and ORIGEN2 in an Automated Fashion for Burnup Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Holly R. Trellue

    1998-12-01

    Monteburns is a fully automated tool that links the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP with the radioactive decay and burnup code 0RIGEN2. Monteburns produces many criticality and burnup computational parameters based on material feed/removal specifications, power(s), and time intervals. This code processes input from the user indicating the system geometry, initial material compositions, feed/removal, and other code-specific parameters. Results from MCNP, 0RIGEN2, and other calculations are then output successively as the code runs. The principle function of monteburns is to first transfer one-group cross sections and fluxes from MCNP to 0RIGEN2, and then transfer the resulting material compositions (after irradiation and/or decay) from 0RIGEN2 back to MCNP in a repeated, cyclic fashion. The main requirement of the code is that the user have a working MCNP input file and other input parameters; all interaction with 0RIGEN2 and other calculations are performed by monteburns. This report presents the results obtained from the benchmarking of monteburns to measured and previously obtained data from traditional Light Water Reactor systems. The majority of the differences seen between the two were less than five percent. These were primarily a result of variances in cross sections between MCNP, cross section libraries used by other codes, and observed values. With this understanding, this code can now be used with confidence for burnup calculations in three-dimensional systems. It was designed for use in the Accelerator Transmutation of Waste project at Los Alamos National Laboratory but is also being applied to the analysis of isotopic production/destruction of transuranic actinides in a reactor system. The code has now been shown to sufficiently support these calculations.

  12. Total reaction cross sections in CEM and MCNP6 at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerby, Leslie M.; Mashnik, Stepan G.

    2015-08-01

    Accurate total reaction cross section models are important to achieving reliable predictions from spallation and transport codes. The latest version of the Cascade Exciton Model (CEM) as incorporated in the code CEM03.03, and the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP6), both developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), each use such cross sections. Having accurate total reaction cross section models in the intermediate energy region (∼ 50 MeV to ∼ 5 GeV) is very important for different applications, including analysis of space environments, use in medical physics, and accelerator design, to name just a few. The current inverse cross sections used in the preequilibrium and evaporation stages of CEM are based on the Dostrovsky et al. model, published in 1959. Better cross section models are available now. Implementing better cross section models in CEM and MCNP6 should yield improved predictions for particle spectra and total production cross sections, among other results. Our current results indicate this is, in fact, the case.

  13. Conversion coefficients for determination of dispersed photon dose during radiotherapy: NRUrad input code for MCNP

    PubMed Central

    Krstic, D.; Nikezic, D.

    2017-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a common cancer treatment module, where a certain amount of dose will be delivered to the targeted organ. This is achieved usually by photons generated by linear accelerator units. However, radiation scattering within the patient’s body and the surrounding environment will lead to dose dispersion to healthy tissues which are not targets of the primary radiation. Determination of the dispersed dose would be important for assessing the risk and biological consequences in different organs or tissues. In the present work, the concept of conversion coefficient (F) of the dispersed dose was developed, in which F = (Dd/Dt), where Dd was the dispersed dose in a non-targeted tissue and Dt is the absorbed dose in the targeted tissue. To quantify Dd and Dt, a comprehensive model was developed using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) package to simulate the linear accelerator head, the human phantom, the treatment couch and the radiotherapy treatment room. The present work also demonstrated the feasibility and power of parallel computing through the use of the Message Passing Interface (MPI) version of MCNP5. PMID:28362837

  14. Comparison between EGSnrc, Geant4, MCNP5 and Penelope for mono-energetic electron beams.

    PubMed

    Archambault, John Paul; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto

    2015-07-07

    A simple geometry is chosen to highlight similarities and differences of current electron transport algorithms implemented in four Monte Carlo codes commonly used in radiation physics. Energy deposited in a water-filled sphere by mono-energetic electron beams was calculated using EGSnrc, Geant4, MCNP5 and Penelope as the radius of the sphere varied from 0.25 cm to 4.5 cm for beam energies of 0.5 MeV, 1.0 MeV and 5.0 MeV. The calculations were performed in single-scattering mode (where applicable) and in condensed history mode. A good agreement is found for the single-scattering calculations except for the in-air case at 0.5 MeV where differences increase with decreasing radius up to 5% between EGSnrc and Penelope. Differences between results calculated with the default user settings when compared to their own single-scattering modes are under 5% for all codes when the sphere is surrounded by vacuum, however, large differences occur for Geant4, MCNP5 and Penelope when air is introduced around the sphere. Finally, the parameters associated with the multiple scattering algorithms were tuned reducing these differences below 10% for these codes at the expense of increased computation time.

  15. Evaluation of 2-PI liquid scintillation whole body counter using MCNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mireles-Garcia, Fernando

    The 2-pi liquid scintillation whole body counter (WBC) at the University of Missouri-Columbia has been evaluated using MCNP-4A (a general Monte Carlo Neutron-Photon transport code, Version 4A). This facility is of importance to a wide variety of applications, such as determination of body fat content in human and animal subjects and measurement of radioactive tracers in animals. Phantoms and mathematical models were used in this research to upgrade the calibration procedures of the WBC. Since the existing protocol assumes a simple efficiency calibration based only upon body mass, it does not account for body shape and gives no methodology for placement of the subject below the detectors. Mathematical models were developed to calculate geometry efficiency for a variety of subjects and geometries utilizing the MCNP-4A transport code. Comparison of the results from simulation with experimental data shows excellent agreement not only in the shape of the curves as a function of subject position but also in absolute magnitude. In the case of the WBC and a phantom consisting of 40 liters of water containing 800 grams of sp+K the error in the magnitude is within 6%, which is easily attributable to the experimental calibration of the detectors. The efficiency of the WBC has been calculated for different weights for modified Adam-E through Adam-L model geometries; hence weight and shape can be modeled carefully and correction can be applied to actual human measurements based upon this work.

  16. Total reaction cross sections in CEM and MCNP6 at intermediate energies

    DOE PAGES

    Kerby, Leslie M.; Mashnik, Stepan G.

    2015-05-14

    Accurate total reaction cross section models are important to achieving reliable predictions from spallation and transport codes. The latest version of the Cascade Exciton Model (CEM) as incorporated in the code CEM03.03, and the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP6), both developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), each use such cross sections. Having accurate total reaction cross section models in the intermediate energy region (50 MeV to 5 GeV) is very important for different applications, including analysis of space environments, use in medical physics, and accelerator design, to name just a few. The current inverse cross sections used inmore » the preequilibrium and evaporation stages of CEM are based on the Dostrovsky et al. model, published in 1959. Better cross section models are now available. Implementing better cross section models in CEM and MCNP6 should yield improved predictions for particle spectra and total production cross sections, among other results.« less

  17. Conversion coefficients for determination of dispersed photon dose during radiotherapy: NRUrad input code for MCNP.

    PubMed

    Shahmohammadi Beni, Mehrdad; Ng, C Y P; Krstic, D; Nikezic, D; Yu, K N

    2017-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a common cancer treatment module, where a certain amount of dose will be delivered to the targeted organ. This is achieved usually by photons generated by linear accelerator units. However, radiation scattering within the patient's body and the surrounding environment will lead to dose dispersion to healthy tissues which are not targets of the primary radiation. Determination of the dispersed dose would be important for assessing the risk and biological consequences in different organs or tissues. In the present work, the concept of conversion coefficient (F) of the dispersed dose was developed, in which F = (Dd/Dt), where Dd was the dispersed dose in a non-targeted tissue and Dt is the absorbed dose in the targeted tissue. To quantify Dd and Dt, a comprehensive model was developed using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) package to simulate the linear accelerator head, the human phantom, the treatment couch and the radiotherapy treatment room. The present work also demonstrated the feasibility and power of parallel computing through the use of the Message Passing Interface (MPI) version of MCNP5.

  18. Criticality benchmark calculations using PARTISN: Comparisons using MENDF5 and MENDF6 nuclear data libraries.

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Ronald J.; Yugo, James J.; Frankle, S. C.; Little, R. C.

    2003-01-01

    A project was undertaken to assess the MENDF5 and MENDF6 nuclear data libraries through the analysis of 86 critical assembly benchmarks using the LANL discrete ordinates transport code PARTISN. As an initial analysis of the effects of some limitations in the MENDF libraries, this current work assesses differences in k,,a calculations between the PARTISN cases (with MENDF5 and MENDF6 nuclear data libraries) and MCNP cases, and compares these results to the experimental data.

  19. Image enhancement using MCNP5 code and MATLAB in neutron radiography.

    PubMed

    Tharwat, Montaser; Mohamed, Nader; Mongy, T

    2014-07-01

    This work presents a method that can be used to enhance the neutron radiography (NR) image for objects with high scattering materials like hydrogen, carbon and other light materials. This method used Monte Carlo code, MCNP5, to simulate the NR process and get the flux distribution for each pixel of the image and determines the scattered neutron distribution that caused image blur, and then uses MATLAB to subtract this scattered neutron distribution from the initial image to improve its quality. This work was performed before the commissioning of digital NR system in Jan. 2013. The MATLAB enhancement method is quite a good technique in the case of static based film neutron radiography, while in neutron imaging (NI) technique, image enhancement and quantitative measurement were efficient by using ImageJ software. The enhanced image quality and quantitative measurements were presented in this work.

  20. Determination of Weighting Functions and Neutron Sensitivity for C6D6 Detectors by MCNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borella, A.; Aerts, G.; Gunsing, F.; Moens, A.; Wynants, R.; Schillebeeckx, P.

    2005-05-01

    To determine capture cross sections using C6D6 detectors, the total energy detection principle in combination with the Pulse Height Weighting Technique (PHWT) is very often applied. The quality of the data deduced from such measurements depends strongly on the response of the detection system used for the calculation of the weighting function. In addition, for nuclei with small capture-to-scattering ratios, i.e., light and neutron magic nuclei, the proper determination of the capture cross section also depends on the correction for the neutron sensitivity of the capture detector. We used the MCNP code to simulate both the gamma and neutron transport of the detection system and deduce the weighting functions and neutron sensitivity.

  1. MCNP analysis of a multilayer phoswich detector for β-particle dosimetry and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farsoni, A. T.; Hamby, D. M.

    2005-12-01

    To measure and study energy deposition of β-particles at different depths, a triple-layer phoswich detector has been designed. The phoswich detector consists of BC-400/CaF2:Eu/BC-444 with decay time constants of 2.4, 940 and 264 ns, respectively, all with thicknesses corresponding to that necessary to completely stop 0.1 MeV electrons in the first layer, 1.0 MeV electrons in the second layer and 2.5 MeV electrons in the third layer. Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) version 4B was used to simulate energy deposition in each layer from monoenergetic β-particles. The simulations and measurements revealed that the traditional rise time measurement technique is not able to provide appropriate and accurate pulse shape discrimination for this type of detector.

  2. MCNP simulation of the dose distribution in liver cancer treatment for BNC therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krstic, Dragana; Jovanovic, Zoran; Markovic, Vladimir; Nikezic, Dragoslav; Urosevic, Vlade

    2014-10-01

    The Boron Neutron Capture Therapy ( BNCT) is based on selective uptake of boron in tumour tissue compared to the surrounding normal tissue. Infusion of compounds with boron is followed by irradiation with neutrons. Neutron capture on 10B, which gives rise to an alpha particle and recoiled 7Li ion, enables the therapeutic dose to be delivered to tumour tissue while healthy tissue can be spared. Here, therapeutic abilities of BNCT were studied for possible treatment of liver cancer using thermal and epithermal neutron beam. For neutron transport MCNP software was used and doses in organs of interest in ORNL phantom were evaluated. Phantom organs were filled with voxels in order to obtain depth-dose distributions in them. The result suggests that BNCT using an epithermal neutron beam could be applied for liver cancer treatment.

  3. Comparison of a laboratory spectrum of Eu-152 with results of simulation using the MCNP code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ródenas, J.; Gallardo, S.; Ortiz, J.

    2007-09-01

    Detectors used for gamma spectrometry must be calibrated for each geometry considered in environmental radioactivity laboratories. This calibration is performed using a standard solution containing gamma emitter sources. Nevertheless, the efficiency curves obtained are periodically checked using a source such as 152Eu emitting many gamma rays that cover a wide energy range (20-1500 keV). 152Eu presents a problem because it has a lot of peaks affected by True Coincidence Summing (TCS). Two experimental measures have been performed placing the source (a Marinelli beaker) at 0 and 10 cm from the detector. Both spectra are simulated by the MCNP 4C code, where the TCS is not reproduced. Therefore, the comparison between experimental and simulated peak net areas permits one to choose the most convenient peaks to check the efficiency curves of the detector.

  4. Accelerated equilibrium core composition search using a new MCNP-based simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifried, Jeffrey E.; Gorman, Phillip M.; Vujic, Jasmina L.; Greenspan, Ehud

    2014-06-01

    MocDown is a new Monte Carlo depletion and recycling simulator which couples neutron transport with MCNP and transmutation with ORIGEN. This modular approach to depletion allows for flexible operation by incorporating the accelerated progression of a complex fuel processing scheme towards equilibrium and by allowing for the online coupling of thermo-fluids feedback. MocDown also accounts for the variation of decay heat with fuel isotopics evolution. In typical cases, MocDown requires just over a day to find the equilibrium core composition for a multi-recycling fuel cycle, with a self-consistent thermo-fluids solution-a task that required between one and two weeks using previous Monte Carlo-based approaches.

  5. MCNP simulation of the dose distribution in liver cancer treatment for BNC therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krstic, Dragana; Jovanovic, Zoran; Markovic, Vladimir; Nikezic, Dragoslav; Urosevic, Vlade

    2014-10-01

    The Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is based on selective uptake of boron in tumour tissue compared to the surrounding normal tissue. Infusion of compounds with boron is followed by irradiation with neutrons. Neutron capture on 10B, which gives rise to an alpha particle and recoiled 7Li ion, enables the therapeutic dose to be delivered to tumour tissue while healthy tissue can be spared. Here, therapeutic abilities of BNCT were studied for possible treatment of liver cancer using thermal and epithermal neutron beam. For neutron transport MCNP software was used and doses in organs of interest in ORNL phantom were evaluated. Phantom organs were filled with voxels in order to obtain depth-dose distributions in them. The result suggests that BNCT using an epithermal neutron beam could be applied for liver cancer treatment.

  6. EBR-II Static Neutronic Calculations by PHISICS / MCNP6 codes

    SciTech Connect

    Paolo Balestra; Carlo Parisi; Andrea Alfonsi

    2016-02-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) launched a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Shutdown Heat Removal Tests (SHRT) performed in the '80s at the Experimental fast Breeder Reactor EBR-II, USA. The scope of the CRP is to improve and validate the simulation tools for the study and the design of the liquid metal cooled fast reactors. Moreover, training of the next generation of fast reactor analysts is being also considered the other scope of the CRP. In this framework, a static neutronic model was developed, using state-of-the art neutron transport codes like SCALE/PHISICS (deterministic solution) and MCNP6 (stochastic solution). Comparison between both solutions is briefly illustrated in this summary.

  7. Questions of modeling the non-stationary thermal neutron transport in two-zone systems with Plexiglas by means of the MCNP code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiącek, U.; Krynicka, E.; Drozdowicz, K.; Gabańska, B.

    2007-09-01

    The pulsed thermal neutron experiments have been modeled in two-zone spherical and cylindrical systems. The outer zone of Plexiglas has surrounded either hydrogenous or non-hydrogenous inner zone. The MCNP code has been used in the numerical simulations. The standard poly.01t MCNP library and its modification by the authors have been used for Plexiglas. A considerable improvement of the agreement with experimental results is observed while using the proposed modification.

  8. Uncertainty analysis in the simulation of X-ray spectra in the diagnostic range using the MCNP5 code.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, S; Querol, A; Ródenas, J; Verdú, G

    2011-01-01

    An accurate knowledge of the photonic spectra emitted by X-ray tubes in radiodiagnostics is essential to better estimate the imparted dose to patients and to improve the image quality obtained with these devices. In this work, several X-ray spectra have been simulated using the MCNP5 code to simulate X-ray production in a commercial device. To validate the Monte Carlo results, simulated spectra have been compared to those extracted from the IPEM 78 database. The uncertainty associated to some geometrical features of the tube and its effect on the simulated spectra has been analyzed using the Noether-Wilks formula. This analysis has been focused on the thickness of collimators, filters, shielding and barrel shutter. Furthermore, results show that the uncertainty due to geometrical parameters (0.98% in terms of Root Mean Squared) is higher than the statistical uncertainty associated to the MCNP5 calculations.

  9. ENDF/B-V and ENDF/B-VI results for UO{sub 2} lattice benchmark problems using MCNP

    SciTech Connect

    Mosteller, R.D.

    1998-12-31

    Calculations for the ANS UO{sub 2} lattice benchmark have been performed with the MCNP Monte Carlo code and its ENDF/B-V and ENDF/B-VI continuous-energy libraries. The ENDF/B-V library produces significantly better agreement with the benchmark value for k{sub eff} than do the ENDF/B-VI libraries. However, the pin power distributions are essentially the same irrespective of the library.

  10. MCNP6 model of the University of Washington clinical neutron therapy system (CNTS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffitt, Gregory B.; Stewart, Robert D.; Sandison, George A.; Goorley, John T.; Argento, David C.; Jevremovic, Tatjana

    2016-01-01

    A MCNP6 dosimetry model is presented for the Clinical Neutron Therapy System (CNTS) at the University of Washington. In the CNTS, fast neutrons are generated by a 50.5 MeV proton beam incident on a 10.5 mm thick Be target. The production, scattering and absorption of neutrons, photons, and other particles are explicitly tracked throughout the key components of the CNTS, including the target, primary collimator, flattening filter, monitor unit ionization chamber, and multi-leaf collimator. Simulations of the open field tissue maximum ratio (TMR), percentage depth dose profiles, and lateral dose profiles in a 40 cm  ×  40 cm  ×  40 cm water phantom are in good agreement with ionization chamber measurements. For a nominal 10  ×  10 field, the measured and calculated TMR values for depths of 1.5 cm, 5 cm, 10 cm, and 20 cm (compared to the dose at 1.7 cm) are within 0.22%, 2.23%, 4.30%, and 6.27%, respectively. For the three field sizes studied, 2.8 cm  ×  2.8 cm, 10.4 cm  ×  10.3 cm, and 28.8 cm  ×  28.8 cm, a gamma test comparing the measured and simulated percent depth dose curves have pass rates of 96.4%, 100.0%, and 78.6% (depth from 1.5 to 15 cm), respectively, using a 3% or 3 mm agreement criterion. At a representative depth of 10 cm, simulated lateral dose profiles have in-field (⩾10% of central axis dose) pass rates of 89.7% (2.8 cm  ×  2.8 cm), 89.6% (10.4 cm  ×  10.3 cm), and 100.0% (28.8 cm  ×  28.8 cm) using a 3% and 3 mm criterion. The MCNP6 model of the CNTS meets the minimum requirements for use as a quality assurance tool for treatment planning and provides useful insights and information to aid in the advancement of fast neutron therapy.

  11. MCNP simulation of radiation doses distributions in a water phantoms simulating interventional radiology patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wenjun; Mah, Eugene; Huda, Walter; Selby, Bayne; Yao, Hai

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dose distributions in water cylinders simulating patients undergoing Interventional Radiological examinations. Method: The irradiation geometry consisted of an x-ray source, dose-area-product chamber, and image intensifier as currently used in Interventional Radiology. Water cylinders of diameters ranging between 17 and 30 cm were used to simulate patients weighing between 20 and 90 kg. X-ray spectra data with peak x-ray tube voltages ranging from 60 to 120 kV were generated using XCOMP3R. Radiation dose distributions inside the water cylinder (Dw) were obtained using MCNP5. The depth dose distribution along the x-ray beam central axis was normalized to free-in-air air kerma (AK) that is incident on the phantom. Scattered radiation within the water cylinders but outside the directly irradiated region was normalized to the dose at the edge of the radiation field. The total absorbed energy to the directly irradiated volume (Ep) and indirectly irradiated volume (Es) were also determined and investigated as a function of x-ray tube voltage and phantom size. Results: At 80 kV, the average Dw/AK near the x-ray entrance point was 1.3. The ratio of Dw near the entrance point to Dw near the exit point increased from ~ 26 for the 17 cm water cylinder to ~ 290 for the 30 cm water cylinder. At 80 kV, the relative dose for a 17 cm water cylinder fell to 0.1% at 49 cm away from the central ray of the x-ray beam. For a 30 cm water cylinder, the relative dose fell to 0.1% at 53 cm away from the central ray of the x-ray beam. At a fixed x-ray tube voltage of 80 kV, increasing the water cylinder diameter from 17 to 30 cm increased the Es/(Ep+Es) ratio by about 50%. At a fixed water cylinder diameter of 24 cm, increasing the tube voltage from 60 kV to 120 kV increased the Es/(Ep+Es) ratio by about 12%. The absorbed energy from scattered radiation was between 20-30% of the total energy absorbed by the water cylinder, and was affected more by patient size

  12. A benchmarked MCNP model of the in vivo detection of gadolinium by prompt gamma neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräfe, J. L.; McNeill, F. E.; Byun, S. H.; Chettle, D. R.; Noseworthy, M. D.

    2010-08-01

    Gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents are a valuable diagnostic aid for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The amount of free Gd deposited in tissues following contrast enhanced MRI is of toxicological concern. The McMaster University in vivo prompt gamma neutron activation analysis facility has been adapted for the detection of Gd in the kidney, liver, and the leg muscle. A simple model of the HPGe detector used for detection of the prompt γ-rays following Gd neutron capture has been created using Monte Carlo simulation. A separate simulation describing the neutron collimation and shielding apparatus has been modified to determine the neutron capture rate in the Gd phantoms. The MCNP simulation results have been confirmed by experimental measurement. The deviations between MCNP and the experiment were between 1% and 18%, with an average deviation of 3.8 ± 6.7%. The validated MCNP model is to be used to improve the Gd in vivo measurement sensitivity by determining the best neutron moderator/reflector arrangement.

  13. Agile High-Fidelity Mcnp Model Development Techniques for Rapid Mechanical Design Iteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulesza, Joel A.

    2009-08-01

    In order to finalize mechanical design details and perform the associated radiological analyses for the AP1000 pressurized water reactor integrated head package (IHP) in time to meet industrial obligations, a process was developed that allowed a radiological analyst to rapidly respond to changing design criteria. This process used several tools together, most of which were freely available, that enabled the analyst to rapidly re-model both geometrical and radiological details, perform a three-dimensional dose field analysis with MCNP5, examine the results, and present the results in an informative and easily understandable manner to other technical working groups. Thus far the author has used this process to study the radiological impacts of different sources due to various incore instrumentation thimble assembly (IITA) materials, different IITA shield alloys and geometrical configurations, different MP shroud thicknesses, and parameterized air duct wall thicknesses and complementary shielding. Model processing before execution will be discussed in detail. Techniques will also be described which allow for rapid spatial redistribution based on the modified source term. Post processing tools and methods will also be described that yield both qualitative and quantitative results.

  14. Utilization of MCNP for the development of spectral stripping algorithms for orthovoltage radiation therapy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Steven; Detwiler, Rebecca S.; Lu, Bo; Gopal, Arun; Samant, Sangiv; Baciak, James E.

    2011-10-01

    We are developing a Monte-Carlo based method for spectral stripping of a low-voltage X-ray detector spectrum for calibrating and performing quality assurance with orthovoltage (X-ray) radiation therapy systems. The technique involves a tungsten-based X-ray generator with limited energy spectral information of at the most two half value layers of shielding available from the manufacturer. The goal is to generate a complete energy spectrum of the source from a measured detector spectrum, by correcting for radiation losses and misplaced counts due to Compton scattering and the photoelectric effect. In this work, energy spectra were measured at generator voltages of 150-300 kVp with HPGe and Si detectors, with several optional shielding configurations. The source to detector geometry were modeled in MCNP, and the reaction rates and spatial locations of Compton scattering and photoelectric events in the detectors have been investigated as a function of source energy to gain information on where interactions occur for the given beam collimation and geometry. Photon leakage and energy flux out of the detector were also simulated, and initial spectral stripping has been performed on the HPGe and Si detector spectra.

  15. An improved MCNP version of the NORMAN voxel phantom for dosimetry studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, P.; Gualdrini, G.

    2005-09-01

    In recent years voxel phantoms have been developed on the basis of tomographic data of real individuals allowing new sets of conversion coefficients to be calculated for effective dose. Progress in radiation studies brought ICRP to revise its recommendations and a new report, already circulated in draft form, is expected to change the actual effective dose evaluation method. In the present paper the voxel phantom NORMAN developed at HPA, formerly NRPB, was employed with MCNP Monte Carlo code. A modified version of the phantom, NORMAN-05, was developed to take into account the new set of tissues and weighting factors proposed in the cited ICRP draft. Air kerma to organ equivalent dose and effective dose conversion coefficients for antero-posterior and postero-anterior parallel photon beam irradiations, from 20 keV to 10 MeV, have been calculated and compared with data obtained in other laboratories using different numerical phantoms. Obtained results are in good agreement with published data with some differences for the effective dose calculated employing the proposed new tissue weighting factors set in comparison with previous evaluations based on the ICRP 60 report.

  16. MCNP simulation of absorbed energy and dose by iodinated contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wenjun; Mah, Eugene; Huda, Walter; Yao, Hai

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the absorbed dose and energy by iodinated contrast medium in diagnostic radiology. A simulation geometry in which an inner sphere (d = 0.2cm, 1cm, 5cm) filled with iodinated contrast medium (or water) is located at the center of a 20cm diameter water sphere was used in simulations performed with MCNP5 codes. Monoenergetic x-rays with energies ranging from 40 to 80keV from a cone beam source were utilized and contrast medium concentration ranged from 100 to 1mg/ml. Absorbed dose ratio (RD) to inner sphere and total absorbed energies ratio (RE) to the whole phantom with and without iodinated contrast medium were investigated. The maximum RD was ~13 for the 0.2cm diameter sphere with 100mg/ml contrast medium. The maximum RE was ~1.05 for the 5cm diameter contrast sphere at 80keV with 100mg/ml contrast medium. Under the same incident photon energy, increasing the inner sphere size from 0.2cm to 5cm caused a ~63% increase in the RD on average. Decreasing the contrast medium concentration from 100 to 10 mg/ml caused a decrease of RD of ~ 76%. A conclusion was reached that although local absorbed dose increase caused by iodinated contrast agent could be high; the increase in total absorbed energy is negligible.

  17. Verification of the Monte Carlo differential operator technique for MCNP{trademark}

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, G.W.; Iverson, J.L.

    1996-02-01

    The differential operator perturbation technique has been incorporated into the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code MCNP and will become a standard feature of future releases. This feature includes first and second order terms of the Taylor series expansion for response perturbations related to cross-section data (i.e., density, composition, etc.). Perturbation and sensitivity analyses can benefit from this technique in that predicted changes in one or more tally responses may be obtained for multiple perturbations in a single run. The user interface is intuitive, yet flexible enough to allow for changes in a specific microscopic cross section over a specified energy range. With this technique, a precise estimate of a small change in response is easily obtained, even when the standard deviation of the unperturbed tally is greater than the change. Furthermore, results presented in this report demonstrate that first and second order terms can offer acceptable accuracy, to within a few percent, for up to 20-30% changes in a response.

  18. Performance of the MTR core with MOX fuel using the MCNP4C2 code.

    PubMed

    Shaaban, Ismail; Albarhoum, Mohamad

    2016-08-01

    The MCNP4C2 code was used to simulate the MTR-22 MW research reactor and perform the neutronic analysis for a new fuel namely: a MOX (U3O8&PuO2) fuel dispersed in an Al matrix for One Neutronic Trap (ONT) and Three Neutronic Traps (TNTs) in its core. Its new characteristics were compared to its original characteristics based on the U3O8-Al fuel. Experimental data for the neutronic parameters including criticality relative to the MTR-22 MW reactor for the original U3O8-Al fuel at nominal power were used to validate the calculated values and were found acceptable. The achieved results seem to confirm that the use of MOX fuel in the MTR-22 MW will not degrade the safe operational conditions of the reactor. In addition, the use of MOX fuel in the MTR-22 MW core leads to reduce the uranium fuel enrichment with (235)U and the amount of loaded (235)U in the core by about 34.84% and 15.21% for the ONT and TNTs cases, respectively.

  19. SU-E-T-212: Comparison of TG-43 Dosimetric Parameters of Low and High Energy Brachytherapy Sources Obtained by MCNP Code Versions of 4C, X and 5

    SciTech Connect

    Zehtabian, M; Zaker, N; Sina, S; Meigooni, A Soleimani

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Different versions of MCNP code are widely used for dosimetry purposes. The purpose of this study is to compare different versions of the MCNP codes in dosimetric evaluation of different brachytherapy sources. Methods: The TG-43 parameters such as dose rate constant, radial dose function, and anisotropy function of different brachytherapy sources, i.e. Pd-103, I-125, Ir-192, and Cs-137 were calculated in water phantom. The results obtained by three versions of Monte Carlo codes (MCNP4C, MCNPX, MCNP5) were compared for low and high energy brachytherapy sources. Then the cross section library of MCNP4C code was changed to ENDF/B-VI release 8 which is used in MCNP5 and MCNPX codes. Finally, the TG-43 parameters obtained using the MCNP4C-revised code, were compared with other codes. Results: The results of these investigations indicate that for high energy sources, the differences in TG-43 parameters between the codes are less than 1% for Ir-192 and less than 0.5% for Cs-137. However for low energy sources like I-125 and Pd-103, large discrepancies are observed in the g(r) values obtained by MCNP4C and the two other codes. The differences between g(r) values calculated using MCNP4C and MCNP5 at the distance of 6cm were found to be about 17% and 28% for I-125 and Pd-103 respectively. The results obtained with MCNP4C-revised and MCNPX were similar. However, the maximum difference between the results obtained with the MCNP5 and MCNP4C-revised codes was 2% at 6cm. Conclusion: The results indicate that using MCNP4C code for dosimetry of low energy brachytherapy sources can cause large errors in the results. Therefore it is recommended not to use this code for low energy sources, unless its cross section library is changed. Since the results obtained with MCNP4C-revised and MCNPX were similar, it is concluded that the difference between MCNP4C and MCNPX is their cross section libraries.

  20. A voxel-based mouse for internal dose calculations using Monte Carlo simulations (MCNP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitar, A.; Lisbona, A.; Thedrez, P.; Sai Maurel, C.; LeForestier, D.; Barbet, J.; Bardies, M.

    2007-02-01

    Murine models are useful for targeted radiotherapy pre-clinical experiments. These models can help to assess the potential interest of new radiopharmaceuticals. In this study, we developed a voxel-based mouse for dosimetric estimates. A female nude mouse (30 g) was frozen and cut into slices. High-resolution digital photographs were taken directly on the frozen block after each section. Images were segmented manually. Monoenergetic photon or electron sources were simulated using the MCNP4c2 Monte Carlo code for each source organ, in order to give tables of S-factors (in Gy Bq-1 s-1) for all target organs. Results obtained from monoenergetic particles were then used to generate S-factors for several radionuclides of potential interest in targeted radiotherapy. Thirteen source and 25 target regions were considered in this study. For each source region, 16 photon and 16 electron energies were simulated. Absorbed fractions, specific absorbed fractions and S-factors were calculated for 16 radionuclides of interest for targeted radiotherapy. The results obtained generally agree well with data published previously. For electron energies ranging from 0.1 to 2.5 MeV, the self-absorbed fraction varies from 0.98 to 0.376 for the liver, and from 0.89 to 0.04 for the thyroid. Electrons cannot be considered as 'non-penetrating' radiation for energies above 0.5 MeV for mouse organs. This observation can be generalized to radionuclides: for example, the beta self-absorbed fraction for the thyroid was 0.616 for I-131; absorbed fractions for Y-90 for left kidney-to-left kidney and for left kidney-to-spleen were 0.486 and 0.058, respectively. Our voxel-based mouse allowed us to generate a dosimetric database for use in preclinical targeted radiotherapy experiments.

  1. MCNP Neutron Simulations: The Effectiveness of the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory Pit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Daniel; Nguyen, Thien An; Hicks, S. F.; Rice, Ben; Vanhoy, J. R.

    2015-10-01

    The design of the Van de Graaff Particle Accelerator complex at the University of Kentucky is marked by the unique addition of a pit in the main neutron scattering room underneath the neutron source and detection shielding assembly. This pit was constructed as a neutron trap in order to decrease the amount of neutron flux within the laboratory. Such a decrease of background neutron flux effectively reduces as much noise as possible in detection of neutrons scattering off of desired samples to be studied. This project uses the Monte-Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) to model the structure of the accelerator complex, gas cell, and the detector's collimator and shielding apparatus to calculate the neutron flux in various sections of the laboratory. Simulations were completed with baseline runs of 107 neutrons of energies 4 MeV and 17 MeV, produced respectively by 3H(p,n)3He and 3H(d,n)4He source reactions. In addition, a comparison model of the complex with simply a floor and no pit was designed, and the respective neutron fluxes of both models were calculated and compared. The results of the simulations seem to affirm the validity of the pit design in significantly reducing the overall neutron flux throughout the accelerator complex, which could be used in future designs to increase the precision and reliability of data. This project was supported in part by the DOE NEUP Grant NU-12-KY-UK-0201-05 and the Donald A. Cowan Physics Institute at the University of Dallas.

  2. A calibration method for realistic neutron dosimetry in radiobiological experiments assisted by MCNP simulation

    PubMed Central

    Shahmohammadi Beni, Mehrdad; Krstic, Dragana; Nikezic, Dragoslav; Yu, Kwan Ngok

    2016-01-01

    Many studies on biological effects of neutrons involve dose responses of neutrons, which rely on accurately determined absorbed doses in the irradiated cells or living organisms. Absorbed doses are difficult to measure, and are commonly surrogated with doses measured using separate detectors. The present work describes the determination of doses absorbed in the cell layer underneath a medium column (DA) and the doses absorbed in an ionization chamber (DE) from neutrons through computer simulations using the MCNP-5 code, and the subsequent determination of the conversion coefficients R (= DA/DE). It was found that R in general decreased with increase in the medium thickness, which was due to elastic and inelastic scattering. For 2-MeV neutrons, conspicuous bulges in R values were observed at medium thicknesses of about 500, 1500, 2500 and 4000 μm, and these were attributed to carbon, oxygen and nitrogen nuclei, and were reflections of spikes in neutron interaction cross sections with these nuclei. For 0.1-MeV neutrons, no conspicuous bulges in R were observed (except one at ~2000 μm that was due to photon interactions), which was explained by the absence of prominent spikes in the interaction cross-sections with these nuclei for neutron energies <0.1 MeV. The ratio R could be increased by ~50% for small medium thickness if the incident neutron energy was reduced from 2 MeV to 0.1 MeV. As such, the absorbed doses in cells (DA) would vary with the incident neutron energies, even when the absorbed doses shown on the detector were the same. PMID:27380801

  3. Thermal neutron self-shielding correction factors for large sample instrumental neutron activation analysis using the MCNP code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzika, F.; Stamatelatos, I. E.

    2004-01-01

    Thermal neutron self-shielding within large samples was studied using the Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP. The code enabled a three-dimensional modeling of the actual source and geometry configuration including reactor core, graphite pile and sample. Neutron flux self-shielding correction factors derived for a set of materials of interest for large sample neutron activation analysis are presented and evaluated. Simulations were experimentally verified by measurements performed using activation foils. The results of this study can be applied in order to determine neutron self-shielding factors of unknown samples from the thermal neutron fluxes measured at the surface of the sample.

  4. Tally modifying of MCNP and post processing of pile-up simulation with time convolution method in PGNAA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asghar Mowlavi, Ali; Koohi-Fayegh, Rahim

    2005-11-01

    Time convolution method has been employed for pile-up simulation in prompt gamma neutron activation analysis with an Am-Be neutron source and a 137Cs gamma source. A TALLYX subroutine has been written to design a new tally in the MCNP code. This tally records gamma particle information for the detector cell into an output file to be processed later. The times at which the particles are emitted by the source have been randomly generated following an exponential decay time distribution. A time convolution program was written to process the data produced and simulate more realistic pile-up. This method can be applied in optimization studies.

  5. MCNP calculations for criticality-safety benchmarks with ENDF/B-V and ENDF/B-VI libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Iverson, J.L.; Mosteller, R.D.

    1995-07-01

    The MCNP Monte Carlo code, in conjunction with its continuous-energy ENDF/B-V and ENDF/B-VI cross-section libraries, has been benchmarked against results from 27 different critical experiments. The predicted values of k{sub eff} are in excellent agreement with the benchmarks, except for the ENDF/B-V results for solutions of plutonium nitrate and, to a lesser degree, for the ENDF/B-V and ENDF/B-VI results for a bare sphere of {sup 233}U.

  6. A comparison of results from LANCER02 and MCNP on a series of two-dimensional multiple BWR bundle configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, D.; Wehlage, E.; Sawada, A.; Zino, J.

    2006-07-01

    This paper discusses recent extensions to the LANCER02 lattice physics code that allow for the analysis of multiple bundles lying along a two-dimensional plane of a reactor core. The paper presents results from LANCER02 on a study consisting of analyses on single assemblies, 2 x 2 arrays of bundles, and 4 x 4 arrays of bundles at different operating conditions. LANCER02 eigenvalues and rod-by-rod fission rates are compared against results from corresponding MCNP analyses. Results indicate that the LANCER02 multi-bundle modelling option is equivalent in accuracy to its single-assembly capability. (authors)

  7. Calculation of thermal neutron self-shielding correction factors for aqueous bulk sample prompt gamma neutron activation analysis using the MCNP code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasrabadi, M. N.; Jalali, M.; Mohammadi, A.

    2007-10-01

    In this work thermal neutron self-shielding in aqueous bulk samples containing neutron absorbing materials is studied using bulk sample prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (BSPGNAA) with the MCNP code. The code was used to perform three dimensional simulations of a neutron source, neutron detector and sample of various material compositions. The MCNP model was validated against experimental measurements of the neutron flux performed using a BF 3 detector. Simulations were performed to predict thermal neutron self-shielding in aqueous bulk samples containing neutron absorbing solutes. In practice, the MCNP calculations are combined with experimental measurements of the relative thermal neutron flux over the sample's surface, with respect to a reference water sample, to derive the thermal neutron self-shielding within the sample. The proposed methodology can be used for the determination of the elemental concentration of unknown aqueous samples by BSPGNAA where knowledge of the average thermal neutron flux within the sample volume is required.

  8. Element analysis and calculation of the attenuation coefficients for gold, bronze and water matrixes using MCNP, WinXCom and experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfandiari, M.; Shirmardi, S. P.; Medhat, M. E.

    2014-06-01

    In this study, element analysis and the mass attenuation coefficient for matrixes of gold, bronze and water with various impurities and the concentrations of heavy metals (Cu, Mn, Pb and Zn) are evaluated and calculated by the MCNP simulation code for photons emitted from Barium-133, Americium-241 and sources with energies between 1 and 100 keV. The MCNP data are compared with the experimental data and WinXCom code simulated results by Medhat. The results showed that the obtained results of bronze and gold matrix are in good agreement with the other methods for energies above 40 and 60 keV, respectively. However for water matrixes with various impurities, there is a good agreement between the three methods MCNP, WinXCom and the experimental one in low and high energies.

  9. Impact Hazard Mitigation: Understanding the Effects of Nuclear Explosive Outputs on Comets and Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, R.

    The NASA 2007 white paper "Near-Earth Object Survey and Deflection Analysis of Alternatives" affirms deflection as the safest and most effective means of potentially hazardous object (PHO) impact prevention. It also calls for further studies of object deflection. In principle, deflection of a PHO may be accomplished by using kinetic impactors, chemical explosives, gravity tractors, solar sails, or nuclear munitions. Of the sudden impulse options, nuclear munitions are by far the most efficient in terms of yield-per-unit-mass launched and are technically mature. However, there are still significant questions about the response of a comet or asteroid to a nuclear burst. Recent and ongoing observational and experimental work is revolutionizing our understanding of the physical and chemical properties of these bodies (e.g., Ryan (2000), Fujiwara et al. (2006), and Jedicke et al. (2006)). The combination of this improved understanding of small solar-system bodies combined with current state-of-the-art modeling and simulation capabilities, which have also improved dramatically in recent years, allow for a science-based, comprehensive study of PHO mitigation techniques. Here we present an examination of the effects of radiation from a nuclear explosion on potentially hazardous asteroids and comets through Monte Carlo N-Particle code (MCNP) simulation techniques. MCNP is a general-purpose particle transport code commonly used to model neutron, photon, and electron transport for medical physics, reactor design and safety, accelerator target and detector design, and a variety of other applications including modeling the propagation of epithermal neutrons through the Martian regolith (Prettyman 2002). It is a massively parallel code that can conduct simulations in 1-3 dimensions, complicated geometries, and with extremely powerful variance reduction techniques. It uses current nuclear cross section data, where available, and fills in the gaps with analytical models where data

  10. Organ dose conversion coefficients based on a voxel mouse model and MCNP code for external photon irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Xie, Xiangdong; Cheng, Jie; Ning, Jing; Yuan, Yong; Pan, Jie; Yang, Guoshan

    2012-01-01

    A set of conversion coefficients from kerma free-in-air to the organ absorbed dose for external photon beams from 10 keV to 10 MeV are presented based on a newly developed voxel mouse model, for the purpose of radiation effect evaluation. The voxel mouse model was developed from colour images of successive cryosections of a normal nude male mouse, in which 14 organs or tissues were segmented manually and filled with different colours, while each colour was tagged by a specific ID number for implementation of mouse model in Monte Carlo N-particle code (MCNP). Monte Carlo simulation with MCNP was carried out to obtain organ dose conversion coefficients for 22 external monoenergetic photon beams between 10 keV and 10 MeV under five different irradiation geometries conditions (left lateral, right lateral, dorsal-ventral, ventral-dorsal, and isotropic). Organ dose conversion coefficients were presented in tables and compared with the published data based on a rat model to investigate the effect of body size and weight on the organ dose. The calculated and comparison results show that the organ dose conversion coefficients varying the photon energy exhibits similar trend for most organs except for the bone and skin, and the organ dose is sensitive to body size and weight at a photon energy approximately <0.1 MeV.

  11. SMITHERS: An object-oriented modular mapping methodology for MCNP-based neutronic–thermal hydraulic multiphysics

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, Joshua; Galloway, Jack; Fensin, Michael; Trellue, Holly

    2015-04-04

    A novel object-oriented modular mapping methodology for externally coupled neutronics–thermal hydraulics multiphysics simulations was developed. The Simulator using MCNP with Integrated Thermal-Hydraulics for Exploratory Reactor Studies (SMITHERS) code performs on-the-fly mapping of material-wise power distribution tallies implemented by MCNP-based neutron transport/depletion solvers for use in estimating coolant temperature and density distributions with a separate thermal-hydraulic solver. The key development of SMITHERS is that it reconstructs the hierarchical geometry structure of the material-wise power generation tallies from the depletion solver automatically, with only a modicum of additional information required from the user. In addition, it performs the basis mapping from the combinatorial geometry of the depletion solver to the required geometry of the thermal-hydraulic solver in a generalizable manner, such that it can transparently accommodate varying levels of thermal-hydraulic solver geometric fidelity, from the nodal geometry of multi-channel analysis solvers to the pin-cell level of discretization for sub-channel analysis solvers.

  12. SMITHERS: An object-oriented modular mapping methodology for MCNP-based neutronic–thermal hydraulic multiphysics

    DOE PAGES

    Richard, Joshua; Galloway, Jack; Fensin, Michael; ...

    2015-04-04

    A novel object-oriented modular mapping methodology for externally coupled neutronics–thermal hydraulics multiphysics simulations was developed. The Simulator using MCNP with Integrated Thermal-Hydraulics for Exploratory Reactor Studies (SMITHERS) code performs on-the-fly mapping of material-wise power distribution tallies implemented by MCNP-based neutron transport/depletion solvers for use in estimating coolant temperature and density distributions with a separate thermal-hydraulic solver. The key development of SMITHERS is that it reconstructs the hierarchical geometry structure of the material-wise power generation tallies from the depletion solver automatically, with only a modicum of additional information required from the user. In addition, it performs the basis mapping from themore » combinatorial geometry of the depletion solver to the required geometry of the thermal-hydraulic solver in a generalizable manner, such that it can transparently accommodate varying levels of thermal-hydraulic solver geometric fidelity, from the nodal geometry of multi-channel analysis solvers to the pin-cell level of discretization for sub-channel analysis solvers.« less

  13. Varian 2100C/D Clinac 18 MV photon phase space file characterization and modeling by using MCNP Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezzati, Ahad Ollah

    2015-07-01

    Multiple points and a spatial mesh based surface source model (MPSMBSS) was generated for 18MV Varian 2100 C/D Clinac phase space file (PSF) and implemented in MCNP code. The generated source model (SM) was benchmarked against PSF and measurements. PDDs and profiles were calculated using the SM and original PSF for different field sizes from 5 × 5 to 20 × 20 cm2. Agreement was within 2% of the maximum dose at 100cm SSD for beam profiles at the depths of 4cm and 15cm with respect to the original PSF. Differences between measured and calculated points were less than 2% of the maximum dose or 2mm distance to agreement (DTA) at 100 cm SSD. Thus it can be concluded that the modified MCNP code can be used for radiotherapy calculations including multiple source model (MSM) and using the source biasing capability of MPSMBSS can increase the simulation speed up to 3600 for field sizes smaller than 5 × 5 cm2.

  14. A MCNP-based calibration method and a voxel phantom for in vivo monitoring of 241Am in skull

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraleda, M.; Gómez-Ros, J. M.; López, M. A.; Navarro, T.; Navarro, J. F.

    2004-07-01

    Whole body counter (WBC) facilities are currently used for assessment of internal radionuclide body burdens by directly measuring the radiation emitted from the body. Previous calibration of the detection devices requires the use of specific anthropomorphic phantoms. This paper describes the MCNP-based Monte Carlo technique developed for calibration of the germanium detectors (Canberra LE Ge) used in the CIEMAT WBC for in vivo measurements of 241Am in skull. The proposed method can also be applied for in vivo counting of different radionuclides distributed in other anatomical regions as well as for other detectors. A computer software was developed to automatically generate the input files for the MCNP code starting from any segmented human anatomy data. A specific model of a human head for the assessment of 241Am was built based on the tomographic phantom VOXELMAN of Yale University. The germanium detectors were carefully modelled from data provided by the manufacturer. This numerical technique has been applied to investigate the best counting geometry and the uncertainty due to improper positioning of the detectors.

  15. Impact hazard mitigation: understanding the effects of nuclear explosive outputs on comets and asteroids

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, Ralph R C; Plesko, Catherine S; Bradley, Paul A; Conlon, Leann M

    2009-01-01

    The NASA 2007 white paper ''Near-Earth Object Survey and Deflection Analysis of Alternatives'' affirms deflection as the safest and most effective means of potentially hazardous object (PHO) impact prevention. It also calls for further studies of object deflection. In principle, deflection of a PHO may be accomplished by using kinetic impactors, chemical explosives, gravity tractors, solar sails, or nuclear munitions. Of the sudden impulse options, nuclear munitions are by far the most efficient in terms of yield-per-unit-mass launched and are technically mature. However, there are still significant questions about the response of a comet or asteroid to a nuclear burst. Recent and ongoing observational and experimental work is revolutionizing our understanding of the physical and chemical properties of these bodies (e.g ., Ryan (2000) Fujiwara et al. (2006), and Jedicke et al. (2006)). The combination of this improved understanding of small solar-system bodies combined with current state-of-the-art modeling and simulation capabilities, which have also improved dramatically in recent years, allow for a science-based, comprehensive study of PHO mitigation techniques. Here we present an examination of the effects of radiation from a nuclear explosion on potentially hazardous asteroids and comets through Monte Carlo N-Particle code (MCNP) simulation techniques. MCNP is a general-purpose particle transport code commonly used to model neutron, photon, and electron transport for medical physics reactor design and safety, accelerator target and detector design, and a variety of other applications including modeling the propagation of epithermal neutrons through the Martian regolith (Prettyman 2002). It is a massively parallel code that can conduct simulations in 1-3 dimensions, complicated geometries, and with extremely powerful variance reduction techniques. It uses current nuclear cross section data, where available, and fills in the gaps with analytical models where

  16. Monte Carlo Modeling of the Initial Radiation Emitted by a Nuclear Device in the National Capital Region

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    with fallout. The neutron and photon prompt radiation presented in this report is but one of several potentially lethal prompt effects from a nuclear...fission neutrons and gamma rays used in the HSRD MCNP model was an isotropic version of the Hiroshima device taken from spectra provided in the Radiation...Effects Research Federation (RERF) Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02)(White 2001). These neutron and gamma spectra are shown in Figure 4-1 and Figure 4-2

  17. Monte Carlo Techniques for Nuclear Systems - Theory Lectures

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Forrest B.

    2016-11-29

    These are lecture notes for a Monte Carlo class given at the University of New Mexico. The following topics are covered: course information; nuclear eng. review & MC; random numbers and sampling; computational geometry; collision physics; tallies and statistics; eigenvalue calculations I; eigenvalue calculations II; eigenvalue calculations III; variance reduction; parallel Monte Carlo; parameter studies; fission matrix and higher eigenmodes; doppler broadening; Monte Carlo depletion; HTGR modeling; coupled MC and T/H calculations; fission energy deposition. Solving particle transport problems with the Monte Carlo method is simple - just simulate the particle behavior. The devil is in the details, however. These lectures provide a balanced approach to the theory and practice of Monte Carlo simulation codes. The first lectures provide an overview of Monte Carlo simulation methods, covering the transport equation, random sampling, computational geometry, collision physics, and statistics. The next lectures focus on the state-of-the-art in Monte Carlo criticality simulations, covering the theory of eigenvalue calculations, convergence analysis, dominance ratio calculations, bias in Keff and tallies, bias in uncertainties, a case study of a realistic calculation, and Wielandt acceleration techniques. The remaining lectures cover advanced topics, including HTGR modeling and stochastic geometry, temperature dependence, fission energy deposition, depletion calculations, parallel calculations, and parameter studies. This portion of the class focuses on using MCNP to perform criticality calculations for reactor physics and criticality safety applications. It is an intermediate level class, intended for those with at least some familiarity with MCNP. Class examples provide hands-on experience at running the code, plotting both geometry and results, and understanding the code output. The class includes lectures & hands-on computer use for a variety of Monte Carlo calculations

  18. NUCLEAR REACTION MODELING FOR RIA ISOL TARGET DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    S. MASHNIK; ET AL

    2001-03-01

    Los Alamos scientists are collaborating with researchers at Argonne and Oak Ridge on the development of improved nuclear reaction physics for modeling radionuclide production in ISOL targets. This is being done in the context of the MCNPX simulation code, which is a merger of MCNP and the LAHET intranuclear cascade code, and simulates both nuclear reaction cross sections and radiation transport in the target. The CINDER code is also used to calculate the time-dependent nuclear decays for estimating induced radioactivities. They give an overview of the reaction physics improvements they are addressing, including intranuclear cascade (INC) physics, where recent high-quality inverse-kinematics residue data from GSI have led to INC spallation and fission model improvements; and preequilibrium reactions important in modeling (p,xn) and (p,xnyp) cross sections for the production of nuclides far from stability.

  19. Monte Carlo Simulation of Electron Beams for Radiotherapy - EGS4, MCNP4b and GEANT3 Intercomparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trindade, A.; Rodrigues, P.; Alves, C.; Chaves, A.; Lopes, M. C.; Oliveira, C.; Peralta, L.

    In medical radiation physics, an increasing number of Monte Carlo codes are being used, which requires intercomparison between them to evaluated the accuracy of the simulated results against benchmark experiments. The Monte Carlo code EGS4, commonly used to simulate electron beams from medical linear accelerators, was compared with GEANT3 and MCNP4b. Intercomparison of electron energy spectra, angular and spatial distribution were carried out for the Siemens KD2 linear accelerator, at beam energies of 10 and 15 MeV for a field size of 10x10 cm2. Indirect validation was performed against electron depth doses curves and beam profiles measured in a MP3-PTW water phantom using a Markus planar chamber. Monte Carlo isodose lines were reconstructed and compared to those from commercial treatment planning systems (TPS's) and with experimental data.

  20. Benchmark of Atucha-2 PHWR RELAP5-3D control rod model by Monte Carlo MCNP5 core calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Pecchia, M.; D'Auria, F.; Mazzantini, O.

    2012-07-01

    Atucha-2 is a Siemens-designed PHWR reactor under construction in the Republic of Argentina. Its geometrical complexity and peculiarities require the adoption of advanced Monte Carlo codes for performing realistic neutronic simulations. Therefore core models of Atucha-2 PHWR were developed using MCNP5. In this work a methodology was set up to collect the flux in the hexagonal mesh by which the Atucha-2 core is represented. The scope of this activity is to evaluate the effect of obliquely inserted control rod on neutron flux in order to validate the RELAP5-3D{sup C}/NESTLE three dimensional neutron kinetic coupled thermal-hydraulic model, applied by GRNSPG/UNIPI for performing selected transients of Chapter 15 FSAR of Atucha-2. (authors)

  1. Evaluation of a 50-MV Photon Therapy Beam from a Racetrack Microtron Using MCNP4B Monte Carlo Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudowska, I.; Sorcini, B.; Svensson, R.

    High energy photon therapy beam from the 50 MV racetrack microtron has been evaluated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP4B. The spatial and energy distribution of photons, radial and depth dose distributions in the phantom are calculated for the stationary and scanned photon beams from different targets. The calculated dose distributions are compared to the experimental data using a silicon diode detector. Measured and calculated depth-dose distributions are in fairly good agreement, within 2-3% for the positions in the range 2-30 cm in the phantom, whereas the larger discrepancies up to 10% are observed in the dose build-up region. For the stationary beams the differences in the calculated and measured radial dose distributions axe about 2-10%.

  2. MCNP modelling of vaginal and uterine applicators used in intracavitary brachytherapy and comparison with radiochromic film measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccolini, E.; Gerardy, I.; Ródenas, J.; van Dycke, M.; Gallardo, S.; Mostacci, D.

    Brachytherapy is an advanced cancer treatment that is minimally invasive, minimising radiation exposure to the surrounding healthy tissues. Microselectron© Nucletron devices with 192Ir source can be used for gynaecological brachytherapy, in patients with vaginal or uterine cancer. Measurements of isodose curves have been performed in a PMMA phantom and compared with Monte Carlo calculations and TPS (Plato software of Nucletron BPS 14.2) evaluation. The isodose measurements have been performed with radiochromic films (Gafchromic EBT©). The dose matrix has been obtained after digitalisation and use of a dose calibration curve obtained with a 6 MV photon beam provided by a medical linear accelerator. A comparison between the calculated and the measured matrix has been performed. The calculated dose matrix is obtained with a simulation using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code (F4MESH tally).

  3. Photon attenuation coefficients of Heavy-Metal Oxide glasses by MCNP code, XCOM program and experimental data: A comparison study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Khayatt, A. M.; Ali, A. M.; Singh, Vishwanath P.

    2014-01-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients, μ/ρ, total interaction cross-section, σt, and mean free path (MFP) of some Heavy Metal Oxides (HMO) glasses, with potential applications as gamma ray shielding materials, have been investigated using the MCNP-4C code. Appreciable variations are noted for all parameters by changing the photon energy and the chemical composition of HMO glasses. The numerical simulations parameters are compared with experimental data wherever possible. Comparisons are also made with predictions from the XCOM program in the energy region from 1 keV to 100 MeV. Good agreement noticed indicates that the chosen Monte Carlo method may be employed to make additional calculations on the photon attenuation characteristics of different glass systems, a capability particularly useful in cases where no analogous experimental data exist.

  4. Calibration with MCNP of NaI detector for the determination of natural radioactivity levels in the field.

    PubMed

    Cinelli, Giorgia; Tositti, Laura; Mostacci, Domiziano; Baré, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    In view of assessing natural radioactivity with on-site quantitative gamma spectrometry, efficiency calibration of NaI(Tl) detectors is investigated. A calibration based on Monte Carlo simulation of detector response is proposed, to render reliable quantitative analysis practicable in field campaigns. The method is developed with reference to contact geometry, in which measurements are taken placing the NaI(Tl) probe directly against the solid source to be analyzed. The Monte Carlo code used for the simulations was MCNP. Experimental verification of the calibration goodness is obtained by comparison with appropriate standards, as reported. On-site measurements yield a quick quantitative assessment of natural radioactivity levels present ((40)K, (238)U and (232)Th). On-site gamma spectrometry can prove particularly useful insofar as it provides information on materials from which samples cannot be taken.

  5. Nuclear rights - nuclear wrongs

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, E.F.; Miller, F.D.; Paul, J.; Ahrens, J.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 11 selections. The titles are: Three Ways to Kill Innocent Bystanders: Some Conundrums Concerning the Morality of War; The International Defense of Liberty; Two Concepts of Deterrence; Nuclear Deterrence and Arms Control; Ethical Issues for the 1980s; The Moral Status of Nuclear Deterrent Threats; Optimal Deterrence; Morality and Paradoxical Deterrence; Immoral Risks: A Deontological Critique of Nuclear Deterrence; No War Without Dictatorship, No Peace Without Democracy: Foreign Policy as Domestic Politics; Marxism-Leninism and its Strategic Implications for the United States; Tocqueveille War.

  6. 3D element imaging using NSECT for the detection of renal cancer: a simulation study in MCNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viana, R. S.; Agasthya, G. A.; Yoriyaz, H.; Kapadia, A. J.

    2013-09-01

    This work describes a simulation study investigating the application of neutron stimulated emission computed tomography (NSECT) for noninvasive 3D imaging of renal cancer in vivo. Using MCNP5 simulations, we describe a method of diagnosing renal cancer in the body by mapping the 3D distribution of elements present in tumors using the NSECT technique. A human phantom containing the kidneys and other major organs was modeled in MCNP5. The element composition of each organ was based on values reported in literature. The two kidneys were modeled to contain elements reported in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and healthy kidney tissue. Simulated NSECT scans were executed to determine the 3D element distribution of the phantom body. Elements specific to RCC and healthy kidney tissue were then analyzed to identify the locations of the diseased and healthy kidneys and generate tomographic images of the tumor. The extent of the RCC lesion inside the kidney was determined using 3D volume rendering. A similar procedure was used to generate images of each individual organ in the body. Six isotopes were studied in this work—32S, 12C, 23Na, 14N, 31P and 39K. The results demonstrated that through a single NSECT scan performed in vivo, it is possible to identify the location of the kidneys and other organs within the body, determine the extent of the tumor within the organ, and to quantify the differences between cancer and healthy tissue-related isotopes with p ≤ 0.05. All of the images demonstrated appropriate concentration changes between the organs, with some discrepancy observed in 31P, 39K and 23Na. The discrepancies were likely due to the low concentration of the elements in the tissue that were below the current detection sensitivity of the NSECT technique.

  7. A nuclear cross section data handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, H.O.M.

    1989-12-01

    Isotopic information, reaction data, data availability, heating numbers, and evaluation information are given for 129 neutron cross-section evaluations, which are the source of the default cross sections for the Monte Carlo code MCNP. Additionally, pie diagrams for each nuclide displaying the percent contribution of a given reaction to the total cross section are given at 14 MeV, 1 MeV, and thermal energy. Other information about the evaluations and their availability in continuous-energy, discrete-reaction, and multigroup forms is provided. The evaluations come from ENDF/B-V, ENDL85, and the Los Alamos Applied Nuclear Science Group T-2. Graphs of all neutron and photon production cross-section reactions for these nuclides have been categorized and plotted. 21 refs., 5 tabs.

  8. RadBallTM Technology Testing and MCNP Modeling of the Tungsten Collimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farfán, Eduardo B.; Foley, Trevor Q.; Rusty Coleman, J.; Jannik, G. Timothy; Holmes, Christopher J.; Oldham, Mark; Adamovics, John; Stanley, Steven J.

    2010-11-01

    The UK's National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) has developed a remote, non-electrical, radiation-mapping device known as RadBallTM, which can locate and quantify radioactive hazards within contaminated areas of the nuclear industry. RadBallTM consists of a colander-like outer shell that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer sphere. The outer shell works to collimate radiation sources and those areas of the polymer sphere that are exposed react, becoming increasingly more opaque, in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer sphere is imaged in an optical-CT scanner, which produces a high resolution 3D map of optical attenuation coefficients. Subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation matrix provides information on the spatial distribution of sources in a given area forming a 3D characterization of the area of interest. RadBallTM has no power requirements and can be positioned in tight or hard-to reach locations. The RadBallTM technology has been deployed in a number of technology trials in nuclear waste reprocessing plants at Sellafield in the UK and facilities of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This study focuses on the RadBallTM testing and modeling accomplished at SRNL.

  9. Monte Carlo Simulation Study of a Differential Calorimeter Measuring the Nuclear Heating in Material Testing Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amharrak, H.; Reynard-Carette, C.; Lyoussi, A.; Carette, M.; Brun, J.; De Vita, C.; Fourmentel, D.; Villard, J.-F.; Guimbal, P.

    2016-02-01

    The nuclear heating measurements in Material Testing Reactors (MTRs) are crucial for the study of nuclear materials and fuels under irradiation. The reference measurements of this nuclear heating are especially performed by a differential calorimeter including a graphite sample material. Then these measurements are used for other materials, other geometries, or other experimental conditions in order to predict the nuclear heating and thermal conditions induced in the irradiation devices. This paper will present new simulations with MCNP Monte-Carlo transport code to determine the gamma heating profile inside the calorimeter. The whole complex geometry of the sensor has been considered. We use as an input source in the model, the photon spectra calculated in various positions of CARMEN-1 irradiation program in OSIRIS reactor. After a description of the differential calorimeter device, the MCNP modeling used for the calculations of radial profile of nuclear heating inside the calorimeter elements will be introduced. The obtained results of different simulations will be detailed and discussed in this paper. The charged particle equilibrium inside the calorimeter elements will be studied. Then we will focus on parametric studies of the various components of the calorimeter. The influence of source type will be also took into account. Moreover the influence of the material used for the sample will be described.

  10. Nuclear Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

  11. Effect of a dual-purpose cask payload increment of spent fuel assemblies from VVER 1000 Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant on basket criticality.

    PubMed

    Rezaeian, M; Kamali, J

    2017-01-01

    Dual-purpose casks can be utilized for dry interim storage and transportation of the highly radioactive spent fuel assemblies (SFAs) of Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). Criticality safety analysis was carried out using the MCNP code for the cask containing 12, 18, or 19 SFAs. The basket materials of borated stainless steel and Boral (Al-B4C) were investigated, and the minimum required receptacle pitch of the basket was determined.

  12. Evaluation using m.c.n.p. code of the bremsstrahlung energy spectrum produced by interactions between structural materials and accelerated electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderaro, Elio

    2004-09-01

    In order to design the biological shield of industrial accelerator plants, it is needed to have a good knowledge of the bremsstrahlung energy spectrum and the intensity of the bremsstrahlung produced by electron interactions with both products (usually water equivalent) and structural materials such as concrete, iron, aluminium. Using the MCNP code, a normalized bremsstrahlung energy spectrum was obtained for materials with average atomic number lower than or equal to 13 and irradiated with 5 and 10 Mev electrons, respectively; multiplying the spectrum by suitable coefficients, it was possible to obtain the real spectrum for materials such as water, concrete, aluminium and iron. The MCNP results have been obtained with relative error less than 2%.

  13. Verification and Validation of Monte Carlo n-Particle Code 6 (MCNP6) with Neutron Protection Factor Measurements of an Iron Box

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-27

    of the vacuum-filled aluminum cylinder which forms a part of the DD108 accelerator head. The isotropic source is centered therein. The scintillator...radiation transport codes, as the excerpt below explains. 26 The shield chosen for the study was an iron box with liners of various thicknesses of...Model Design Within MCNP6, the scintillator crystal was modeled as a 4x4 mm 2 right circular cylinder (RCC) suspended in vacuum inside a 14x16 mm 2

  14. Comparison of the 3-D Deterministic Neutron Transport Code Attila® To Measure Data, MCNP And MCNPX For The Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    D. Scott Lucas; D. S. Lucas

    2005-09-01

    An LDRD (Laboratory Directed Research and Development) project is underway at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to apply the three-dimensional multi-group deterministic neutron transport code (Attila®) to criticality, flux and depletion calculations of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This paper discusses the development of Attila models for ATR, capabilities of Attila, the generation and use of different cross-section libraries, and comparisons to ATR data, MCNP, MCNPX and future applications.

  15. Characterisation of the epithermal neutron irradiation facility at the Portuguese research reactor using MCNP.

    PubMed

    Beasley, D G; Fernandes, A C; Santos, J P; Ramos, A R; Marques, J G; King, A

    2015-05-01

    The radiation field at the epithermal beamline and irradiation chamber installed at the Portuguese Research Reactor (RPI) at the Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear of Instituto Superior Técnico was characterised in the context of Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) applications. Radiographic films, activation foils and thermoluminescence dosimeters were used to measure the neutron fluence and photon dose rates in the irradiation chamber. A fixed-source MCNPX model of the beamline and chamber was developed and compared to measurements in the first step towards planning a new irradiation chamber. The high photon background from the reactor results in the saturation of the detector and the current facility configuration yields an intrinsic insensitivity to various elements of interest for PGNAA. These will be addressed in future developments.

  16. Calculation of the Fast Flux Test Facility fuel pin tests with the WIMS-E and MCNP codes

    SciTech Connect

    Schwinkendorf, K.N.; Wittekind, W.D.; Toffer, H.

    1991-10-01

    The Fuel Assembly Area (FAA) at the Fast Flux Test Facility site on the Hanford Site at Richland, Washington currently is being prepared to fabricate mixed oxide fuel (U, Pu) for the FFTF. Calculational tools are required to perform criticality safety analyses for various process locations and to establish safe limits for fissile material handling at the FAA. These codes require validation against experimental data appropriate for the compositions that will be handled. Critical array experiments performed by Bierman provide such data for mixed oxide fuel in the range Pu/(U+Pu) = 22 wt %, and with Pu-240 contents equal to 12 wt %. Both the Monte Carlo Neutron Photon (MCNP) and the Winfrith Improved Multigroup Scheme (WIMS-E) computer codes were used to calculate the neutron multiplication factor for explicit models of the various critical arrays. The W-CACTUS modules within the WIMS-E code system was used to calculate k{infinity} for the explicit array configuration, as well as few-group cross sections that were then used in a three-dimensional diffusion theory code for the calculation of k{sub eff} for the finite array. 10 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs.

  17. Optimization of Neutron Spectrum in Northwest Beam Tube of Tehran Research Reactor for BNCT, by MCNP Code

    SciTech Connect

    Zamani, M.; Kasesaz, Y.; Khalafi, H.; Shayesteh, M.

    2015-07-01

    In order to gain the neutron spectrum with proper components specification for BNCT, it is necessary to design a Beam Shape Assembling (BSA), include of moderator, collimator, reflector, gamma filter and thermal neutrons filter, in front of the initial radiation beam from the source. According to the result of MCNP4C simulation, the Northwest beam tube has the most optimized neuron flux between three north beam tubes of Tehran Research Reactor (TRR). So, it has been chosen for this purpose. Simulation of the BSA has been done in four above mentioned phases. In each stage, ten best configurations of materials with different length and width were selected as the candidates for the next stage. The last BSA configuration includes of: 78 centimeters of air as an empty space, 40 centimeters of Iron plus 52 centimeters of heavy-water as moderator, 30 centimeters of water or 90 centimeters of Aluminum-Oxide as a reflector, 1 millimeters of lithium (Li) as thermal neutrons filter and finally 3 millimeters of Bismuth (Bi) as a filter of gamma radiation. The result of Calculations shows that if we use this BSA configuration for TRR Northwest beam tube, then the best neutron flux and spectrum will be achieved for BNCT. (authors)

  18. ENDF/B-V and ENDF/B-VI results for UO-2 lattice benchmark problems using MCNP

    SciTech Connect

    Mosteller, R.D.

    1998-08-01

    Calculations for the ANS UO{sub 2} lattice benchmark have been performed with the MCNP Monte Carlo code and its ENDF/B-V and EnDF/B-VI continuous-energy libraries. Similar calculations were performed previously for the experiments upon which these benchmarks are based, using continuous-energy libraries derived from EnDF/B-V and from Release 2 of EnDF/B-VI (ENDF/B-VI.2). This study extends those calculations to the infinite-lattice configurations given in the benchmark specifications and also includes results from Release 3 of EnDF/B-VI (ENDF/B-VI.3) for both the core and infinite-lattice configurations. For this set of benchmarks, the only significant difference between the ENDF/B-VI.2 and EnDF/B-VI.3 libraries is the cross-section behavior of {sup 235}U. EnDF/B-VI.3 contains revised cross sections for {sup 235}U below 900 eV, although those changes principally affect the range below 110 eV. In particular, relative to EnDF/B-VI.2, EnDF/B-VI.3 increases the epithermal capture-to-fission ratio for {sup 235}U and slightly increases its thermal fission cross section.

  19. Radiation-Neutralization of Stored Biological Warfare Agents with Low-Yield Nuclear Warheads

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, H.

    2000-08-21

    MCNP Monte Carlo radiation transport computations were performed exploring the capability of low-yield nuclear fusion and fission warheads to neutralize biological warfare agents with the radiation dose deposited in the agent by the prompt neutron output. The calculations were done for various typical storage configurations on the ground in the open air or in a warehouse building. This application of nuclear weapons is motivated by the observation that, for some military scenarios, the nuclear collateral effects area is much smaller than the area covered with unacceptable concentrations of biological agent dispersed by the use of conventional high explosive warheads. These calculations show that biological agents can be radiation-neutralized by low-yield nuclear warheads over areas that are sufficiently large to be useful for military strikes. This report provides the calculated doses within the stored agent for various ground ranges and heights-of-burst.

  20. Experimental and MCNP simulated gamma-ray spectra for the UNCOSS neutron-based explosive detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eleon, C.; Perot, B.; Carasco, C.; Sudac, D.; Obhodas, J.; Valkovic, V.

    2011-02-01

    In the frame of the FP7 UNCOSS project (Underwater Coastal Sea Surveyor), whose aim is to develop a neutron-based explosive detection system to identify unexploded ordnance (UXO) lying on the sea bottom, the choice of the gamma-ray detector is essential to reach the optimal performances. This paper presents comparative tests between the two candidates: NaI(Tl) and LaBr 3(Ce) detectors, in favour to the 3 in.×3 in. LaBr 3(Ce); thus, confirming the choice previously performed by numerical simulation because of its higher fast timing properties, spectral resolution, and efficiency per volume unit. The gamma-ray spectra produced by 14 MeV tagged neutron beams on the elements of interest (C, O, N, Al, Fe, Si, and Ca) have also been recorded with this detector in order to unfold the spectrum of the interrogated object into elementary contributions. A qualitative comparison with the gamma-ray spectra simulated with the MCNPX computer code and the ENDFB/VII.0 nuclear library has also been performed to validate the numerical model. An additional quantitative validation has been performed with an explosive-like material (ammonium acetate).

  1. Results on the neutron energy distribution measurements at the RECH-1 Chilean nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilera, P.; Molina, F.; Romero-Barrientos, J.

    2016-07-01

    Neutron activations experiments has been perform at the RECH-1 Chilean Nuclear Reactor to measure its neutron flux energy distribution. Samples of pure elements was activated to obtain the saturation activities for each reaction. Using - ray spectroscopy we identify and measure the activity of the reaction product nuclei, obtaining the saturation activities of 20 reactions. GEANT4 and MCNP was used to compute the self shielding factor to correct the cross section for each element. With the Expectation-Maximization algorithm (EM) we were able to unfold the neutron flux energy distribution at dry tube position, near the RECH-1 core. In this work, we present the unfolding results using the EM algorithm.

  2. Nuclear Scans

    MedlinePlus

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  3. Nuclear Winter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrlich, Anne

    1984-01-01

    "Nuclear Winter" was recently coined to describe the climatic and biological effects of a nuclear war. These effects are discussed based on models, simulations, scenarios, and projections. Effects on human populations are also considered. (JN)

  4. Nuclear Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Provides a brief review of the latest developments in nuclear chemistry. Nuclear research today is directed toward increased activity in radiopharmaceuticals and formation of new isotopes by high-energy, heavy-ion collisions. (Author/BB)

  5. Nuclear weapons, nuclear effects, nuclear war

    SciTech Connect

    Bing, G.F.

    1991-08-20

    This paper provides a brief and mostly non-technical description of the militarily important features of nuclear weapons, of the physical phenomena associated with individual explosions, and of the expected or possible results of the use of many weapons in a nuclear war. Most emphasis is on the effects of so-called ``strategic exchanges.``

  6. Nuclear Fuels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, J. Thomas

    1983-01-01

    Trends in and factors related to the nuclear industry and nuclear fuel production are discussed. Topics addressed include nuclear reactors, survival of the U.S. uranium industry, production costs, budget cuts by the Department of Energy and U.S. Geological survey for resource studies, mining, and research/development activities. (JN)

  7. A New On-the-Fly Sampling Method for Incoherent Inelastic Thermal Neutron Scattering Data in MCNP6

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlou, Andrew Theodore; Brown, Forrest B.; Ji, Wei

    2014-09-02

    At thermal energies, the scattering of neutrons in a system is complicated by the comparable velocities of the neutron and target, resulting in competing upscattering and downscattering events. The neutron wavelength is also similar in size to the target's interatomic spacing making the scattering process a quantum mechanical problem. Because of the complicated nature of scattering at low energies, the thermal data files in ACE format used in continuous-energy Monte Carlo codes are quite large { on the order of megabytes for a single temperature and material. In this paper, a new storage and sampling method is introduced that is orders of magnitude less in size and is used to sample scattering parameters at any temperature on-the-fly. In addition to the reduction in storage, the need to pre-generate thermal scattering data tables at fine temperatures has been eliminated. This is advantageous for multiphysics simulations which may involve temperatures not known in advance. A new module was written for MCNP6 that bypasses the current S(α,β) table lookup in favor of the new format. The new on-the-fly sampling method was tested for graphite for two benchmark problems at ten temperatures: 1) an eigenvalue test with a fuel compact of uranium oxycarbide fuel homogenized into a graphite matrix, 2) a surface current test with a \\broomstick" problem with a monoenergetic point source. The largest eigenvalue difference was 152pcm for T= 1200K. For the temperatures and incident energies chosen for the broomstick problem, the secondary neutron spectrum showed good agreement with the traditional S(α,β) sampling method. These preliminary results show that sampling thermal scattering data on-the-fly is a viable option to eliminate both the storage burden of keeping thermal data at discrete temperatures and the need to know temperatures before simulation runtime.

  8. Sensitivity of MCNP5 calculations for a spherical numerical benchmark problem to the angular scattering distributions for deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Kozier, K. S.

    2006-07-01

    This paper examines the sensitivity of MCNP5 k{sub eff} results to various deuterium data files for a simple benchmark problem consisting of an 8.4-cm radius sphere of uranium surrounded by an annulus of deuterium at the nuclide number density corresponding to heavy water. This study was performed to help clarify why {Delta}k{sub eff} values of about 10 mk are obtained when different ENDF/B deuterium data files are used in simulations of critical experiments involving solutions of high-enrichment uranyl fluoride in heavy water, while simulations of low-leakage, heterogeneous critical lattices of natural-uranium fuel rods in heavy water show differences of <1 mk. The benchmark calculations were performed as a function of deuterium reflector thickness for several uranium compositions using deuterium ACE files derived from ENDF/B-VII.b1 (release beta 1), ENDF/B-VI.4 and JENDL-3.3, which differ primarily in the energy/angle distributions for elastic scattering <3.2 MeV. Calculations were also performed using modified ACE files having equiprobable cosine bin values in the centre-of-mass reference frame in a progressive manner with increasing energy. It was found that the {Delta}k{sub eff} values increased with deuterium reflector thickness and uranium enrichment. The studies using modified ACE files indicate that most of the reactivity differences arise at energies <1 MeV; hence, this energy range should be given priority if new scattering distribution measurements are undertaken. (authors)

  9. MCNPX-PoliMi for Nuclear Nonproliferation Applications

    SciTech Connect

    S. A. Pozzi; S. D. Clarke; W. Walsh; E. C. Miller; J. Dolan; M. Flaska; B. M. Wieger; A. Enqvist; E. Padovani; J. K. Mattingly; D. L. Chichester; P. Peerani

    2012-12-01

    In the past few years, efforts to develop new measurement systems to support nuclear nonproliferation and homeland security have increased substantially. Monte Carlo radiation transport is one of the simulation methods of choice for the analysis of data from existing systems and for the design of new measurement systems; it allows for accurate description of geometries, detailed modeling of particle-nucleus interactions, and event-by-event detection analysis. This paper describes the use of the Monte Carlo code MCNPX-PoliMi for nuclear-nonproliferation applications, with particular emphasis on the simulation of spontaneous and neutron-induced nuclear fission. In fact, of all possible neutron-nucleus interactions, neutron-induced fission is the most defining characteristic of special nuclear material (such as U-235 and Pu-239), which is the material of interest in nuclear-nonproliferation applications. The MCNP-PoliMi code was originally released from the Radiation Safety Shielding Center (RSSIC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 2003 [1]; the MCNPX-PoliMi code contains many enhancements and is based on MCNPX ver. 2.7.0. MCNPX-PoliMi ver. 2.0 was released through RSICC in 2012 as a patch to MCNPX ver. 2.7.0 and as an executable [2].

  10. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Simulation in NPSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belair, Michael L.; Sarmiento, Charles J.; Lavelle, Thomas L.

    2013-01-01

    Four nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) models have been created in the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) framework. The models are divided into two categories. One set is based upon the ZrC-graphite composite fuel element and tie tube-style reactor developed during the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA) project in the late 1960s and early 1970s. The other reactor set is based upon a W-UO2 ceramic- metallic (CERMET) fuel element. Within each category, a small and a large thrust engine are modeled. The small engine models utilize RL-10 turbomachinery performance maps and have a thrust of approximately 33.4 kN (7,500 lbf ). The large engine models utilize scaled RL-60 turbomachinery performance maps and have a thrust of approximately 111.2 kN (25,000 lbf ). Power deposition profiles for each reactor were obtained from a detailed Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) model of the reactor cores. Performance factors such as thermodynamic state points, thrust, specific impulse, reactor power level, and maximum fuel temperature are analyzed for each engine design.

  11. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Simulation in NPSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belair, Michael L.; Sarmiento, Charles J.; Lavelle, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Four nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) models have been created in the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) framework. The models are divided into two categories. One set is based upon the ZrC-graphite composite fuel element and tie tube-style reactor developed during the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA) project in the late 1960s and early 1970s. The other reactor set is based upon a W-UO2 ceramic-metallic (CERMET) fuel element. Within each category, a small and a large thrust engine are modeled. The small engine models utilize RL-10 turbomachinery performance maps and have a thrust of approximately 33.4 kN (7,500 lbf ). The large engine models utilize scaled RL-60 turbomachinery performance maps and have a thrust of approximately 111.2 kN (25,000 lbf ). Power deposition profiles for each reactor were obtained from a detailed Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) model of the reactor cores. Performance factors such as thermodynamic state points, thrust, specific impulse, reactor power level, and maximum fuel temperature are analyzed for each engine design.

  12. Monte Carlo MCNP-4B energy absorbed fractions in Head and Brain calculated in "The ORNL mathematical phantom series" and in "MIRD 15" mathematical phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle, Saúl H.; Lorenzo, Daniel M.; Gual, Maritza R.

    2002-08-01

    Due to the use of many new radiopharmaceuticals in Brain imaging there exists the need of predicting absorbed energy and doses during the irradiation process within the head specificity in brain. In order to evaluate the MCNP-4b capability of calculating absorbed energy in Brain and Head we calculated it first using the geometrical data from "The ORNL mathematical phantom series" and subsequently a more anthropomorphic model "current MIRD 15". The results are compared with validated data and the conclusions are shown at the end.

  13. Evaluation of computational models and cross sections used by MCNP6 for simulation of characteristic X-ray emission from thick targets bombarded by kiloelectronvolt electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poškus, A.

    2016-09-01

    This paper evaluates the accuracy of the single-event (SE) and condensed-history (CH) models of electron transport in MCNP6.1 when simulating characteristic Kα, total K (=Kα + Kβ) and Lα X-ray emission from thick targets bombarded by electrons with energies from 5 keV to 30 keV. It is shown that the MCNP6.1 implementation of the CH model for the K-shell impact ionization leads to underestimation of the K yield by 40% or more for the elements with atomic numbers Z < 15 and overestimation of the Kα yield by more than 40% for the elements with Z > 25. The Lα yields are underestimated by more than an order of magnitude in CH mode, because MCNP6.1 neglects X-ray emission caused by electron-impact ionization of L, M and higher shells in CH mode (the Lα yields calculated in CH mode reflect only X-ray fluorescence, which is mainly caused by photoelectric absorption of bremsstrahlung photons). The X-ray yields calculated by MCNP6.1 in SE mode (using ENDF/B-VII.1 library data) are more accurate: the differences of the calculated and experimental K yields are within the experimental uncertainties for the elements C, Al and Si, and the calculated Kα yields are typically underestimated by (20-30)% for the elements with Z > 25, whereas the Lα yields are underestimated by (60-70)% for the elements with Z > 49. It is also shown that agreement of the experimental X-ray yields with those calculated in SE mode is additionally improved by replacing the ENDF/B inner-shell electron-impact ionization cross sections with the set of cross sections obtained from the distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA), which are also used in the PENELOPE code system. The latter replacement causes a decrease of the average relative difference of the experimental X-ray yields and the simulation results obtained in SE mode to approximately 10%, which is similar to accuracy achieved with PENELOPE. This confirms that the DWBA inner-shell impact ionization cross sections are significantly more

  14. Comparison between MCNP and PENELOPE for the simulation of X-ray spectra in electron microscopy in the keV range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roet, D.; Ceballos, C.; Van Espen, P.

    2006-10-01

    In this paper two Monte Carlo codes, MCNP (version 4C2) and PENELOPE (version 2001), were used in a cluster environment to simulate the X-ray spectra emerging from bombarding pure element bulk targets with mono energetic electrons in the keV range (30 keV). The simulation results were compared to experimental data measured on a JEOL-6300 electron microscope with energy dispersive X-ray detector. The results from both codes were compared amongst each other as to find the best in terms of accuracy, ease of use and speed of the calculations.

  15. Parametric study of the energy deposition inside the calorimeter measuring the nuclear heating in Material Testing Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amharrak, H.; Reynard-Carette, C.; Lyoussi, A.; Carette, M.; Brun, J.; De Vita, C.; Fourmentel, D.; Villard, J.-F.

    2015-11-01

    The nuclear heating measurements in Material Testing Reactors (MTRs) are crucial for the study of nuclear materials and fuels under irradiation. The reference measurements of this nuclear heating are especially performed by a differential calorimeter including a graphite sample material and two calorimetric cells. Then these measurements are used for other experimental conditions in order to predict the nuclear heating and thermal conditions induced in the irradiation devices. This paper will present simulations with MCNP5 Monte-Carlo transport code (using ENDF/B-VI nuclear data library) to evaluate the nuclear heating inside the calorimeter during irradiation campaigns of the CARMEN-1P mock-up inside OSIRIS reactor periphery (MTR based on Saclay, France). The whole complete geometry of the sensor has been considered. The calculation method corresponds to a calculation in two steps. Consequently, we used as an input source in the model, the neutron and photon spectra calculated in various experimental locations tested during the irradiation campaign (H9, H10, H11, D9). After a description of the differential calorimeter sensor, the MCNP5 model used for the calculations of nuclear heating inside the calorimeter elements is introduced by two quantities: KERMA and energy deposition rate per mass unit. The Charged Particle Equilibrium (CPE) inside the calorimeter elements is studied. The contribution of prompt gamma and neutron is determined. A comparison between this total nuclear heating calculation and the experimental results in a graphite sample will be made. Then parametric studies performed on the influence of the various calorimeter components on the nuclear heating are presented and discussed. The studies of the influence of the nature of materials, the sensor jacket, the source type and the comparison of the results obtained for the two calorimetric cells leads to some proposals for the sensor improvement.

  16. Development of a patient-specific dosimetry estimation system in nuclear medicine examination

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, H. H.; Dong, S. L.; Yang, H. J.; Chen, S.; Shih, C. T.; Chuang, K. S.; Lin, C. H.; Yao, W. J.; Jan, M. L.

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a patient-specific dosimetry estimation system in nuclear medicine examination using a SimSET-based Monte Carlo code. We added a dose deposition routine to store the deposited energy of the photons during their flights in SimSET and developed a user-friendly interface for reading PET and CT images. Dose calculated on ORNL phantom was used to validate the accuracy of this system. The S values for {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 18}F and {sup 131}I obtained by the system were compared to those from the MCNP4C code and OLINDA. The ratios of S values computed by this system to those obtained with OLINDA for various organs were ranged from 0.93 to 1.18, which are comparable to that obtained from MCNP4C code (0.94 to 1.20). The average ratios of S value were 0.99{+-}0.04, 1.03{+-}0.05, and 1.00{+-}0.07 for isotopes {sup 131}I, {sup 18}F, and {sup 99m}Tc, respectively. The simulation time of SimSET was two times faster than MCNP4C's for various isotopes. A 3D dose calculation was also performed on a patient data set with PET/CT examination using this system. Results from the patient data showed that the estimated S values using this system differed slightly from those of OLINDA for ORNL phantom. In conclusion, this system can generate patient-specific dose distribution and display the isodose curves on top of the anatomic structure through a friendly graphic user interface. It may also provide a useful tool to establish an appropriate dose-reduction strategy to patients in nuclear medicine environments. (authors)

  17. Streaming of 14-MeV neutrons through an iron duct: comparison of measured neutron and gamma-ray energy spectra with results calculated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, R.T.; Barnes, J.M.; Soran, P.D.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.

    1982-11-01

    Neutron and gamma-ray energy spectra resulting from the streaming of 14 MeV neutrons through a 0.30-m-diameter duct (length-to-diameter ratio = 2.83) have been calculated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP. The calculated spectra are compared with measured data and data calculated previously using a combination of discrete ordinates and Monte Carlo methods. Comparisons are made at twelve detector locations on and off the duct axis for neutrons with energies above 850 keV and for gamma rays with energies above 750 keV. The neutron spectra calculated using MCNP agree with the measured data within approx. 5 to approx. 50%, depending on detector location and neutron energy. Agreement with the measured gamma-ray spectra is also within approx. 5 to approx. 50%. The spectra obtained with MCNP are also in favorable agreement with the previously calculated data and were obtained with less calculational effort.

  18. Nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, W.C.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of core-collapse supernovae is used to illustrate the many connections between nuclear astrophysics and the problems nuclear physicists study in terrestrial laboratories. Efforts to better understand the collapse and mantle ejection are also motivated by a variety of interdisciplinary issues in nuclear, particle, and astrophysics, including galactic chemical evolution, neutrino masses and mixing, and stellar cooling by the emission of new particles. The current status of theory and observations is summarized.

  19. Nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, W.C.

    1992-12-31

    The problem of core-collapse supernovae is used to illustrate the many connections between nuclear astrophysics and the problems nuclear physicists study in terrestrial laboratories. Efforts to better understand the collapse and mantle ejection are also motivated by a variety of interdisciplinary issues in nuclear, particle, and astrophysics, including galactic chemical evolution, neutrino masses and mixing, and stellar cooling by the emission of new particles. The current status of theory and observations is summarized.

  20. Rapid MCNP simulation of DNA double strand break (DSB) relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for photons, neutrons, and light ions.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Robert D; Streitmatter, Seth W; Argento, David C; Kirkby, Charles; Goorley, John T; Moffitt, Greg; Jevremovic, Tatjana; Sandison, George A

    2015-11-07

    To account for particle interactions in the extracellular (physical) environment, information from the cell-level Monte Carlo damage simulation (MCDS) for DNA double strand break (DSB) induction has been integrated into the general purpose Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) radiation transport code system. The effort to integrate these models is motivated by the need for a computationally efficient model to accurately predict particle relative biological effectiveness (RBE) in cell cultures and in vivo. To illustrate the approach and highlight the impact of the larger scale physical environment (e.g. establishing charged particle equilibrium), we examined the RBE for DSB induction (RBEDSB) of x-rays, (137)Cs γ-rays, neutrons and light ions relative to γ-rays from (60)Co in monolayer cell cultures at various depths in water. Under normoxic conditions, we found that (137)Cs γ-rays are about 1.7% more effective at creating DSB than γ-rays from (60)Co (RBEDSB  =  1.017) whereas 60-250 kV x-rays are 1.1 to 1.25 times more efficient at creating DSB than (60)Co. Under anoxic conditions, kV x-rays may have an RBEDSB up to 1.51 times as large as (60)Co γ-rays. Fission neutrons passing through monolayer cell cultures have an RBEDSB that ranges from 2.6 to 3.0 in normoxic cells, but may be as large as 9.93 for anoxic cells. For proton pencil beams, Monte Carlo simulations suggest an RBEDSB of about 1.2 at the tip of the Bragg peak and up to 1.6 a few mm beyond the Bragg peak. Bragg peak RBEDSB increases with decreasing oxygen concentration, which may create opportunities to apply proton dose painting to help address tumor hypoxia. Modeling of the particle RBE for DSB induction across multiple physical and biological scales has the potential to aid in the interpretation of laboratory experiments and provide useful information to advance the safety and effectiveness of hadron therapy in the treatment of cancer.

  1. Rapid MCNP simulation of DNA double strand break (DSB) relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for photons, neutrons, and light ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Robert D.; Streitmatter, Seth W.; Argento, David C.; Kirkby, Charles; Goorley, John T.; Moffitt, Greg; Jevremovic, Tatjana; Sandison, George A.

    2015-11-01

    To account for particle interactions in the extracellular (physical) environment, information from the cell-level Monte Carlo damage simulation (MCDS) for DNA double strand break (DSB) induction has been integrated into the general purpose Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) radiation transport code system. The effort to integrate these models is motivated by the need for a computationally efficient model to accurately predict particle relative biological effectiveness (RBE) in cell cultures and in vivo. To illustrate the approach and highlight the impact of the larger scale physical environment (e.g. establishing charged particle equilibrium), we examined the RBE for DSB induction (RBEDSB) of x-rays, 137Cs γ-rays, neutrons and light ions relative to γ-rays from 60Co in monolayer cell cultures at various depths in water. Under normoxic conditions, we found that 137Cs γ-rays are about 1.7% more effective at creating DSB than γ-rays from 60Co (RBEDSB  =  1.017) whereas 60-250 kV x-rays are 1.1 to 1.25 times more efficient at creating DSB than 60Co. Under anoxic conditions, kV x-rays may have an RBEDSB up to 1.51 times as large as 60Co γ-rays. Fission neutrons passing through monolayer cell cultures have an RBEDSB that ranges from 2.6 to 3.0 in normoxic cells, but may be as large as 9.93 for anoxic cells. For proton pencil beams, Monte Carlo simulations suggest an RBEDSB of about 1.2 at the tip of the Bragg peak and up to 1.6 a few mm beyond the Bragg peak. Bragg peak RBEDSB increases with decreasing oxygen concentration, which may create opportunities to apply proton dose painting to help address tumor hypoxia. Modeling of the particle RBE for DSB induction across multiple physical and biological scales has the potential to aid in the interpretation of laboratory experiments and provide useful information to advance the safety and effectiveness of hadron therapy in the treatment of cancer.

  2. Discrete beta dose kernel matrices for nuclides applied in targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) calculated with MCNP5

    SciTech Connect

    Reiner, Dora; Blaickner, Matthias; Rattay, Frank

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Radiopharmaceuticals administered in targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) rely to a great extent not only on beta-emitting nuclides but also on emitters of monoenergetic electrons. Recent advances like combined PET/CT devices, the consequential coregistration of both data, the concept of using beta couples for diagnosis and therapy, respectively, as well as the development of voxel models offer a great potential for developing TRT dose calculation systems similar to those available for external beam treatment planning. The deterministic algorithms in question for this task are based on the convolution of three-dimensional matrices, one representing the activity distribution and the other the dose point kernel. This study aims to report on three-dimensional kernel matrices for various nuclides used in TRT. Methods: The Monte Carlo code MCNP5 was used to calculate discrete dose kernels of beta particles including the contributions from their respective secondary radiation in soft tissue for the following nuclides: {sup 32}P, {sup 33}P, {sup 67}Cu, {sup 89}Sr, {sup 90}Y, {sup 103}Rh{sup m}, {sup 131}I, {sup 177}Lu, {sup 186}Re, and {sup 188}Re. For each nuclide a kernel cube of 10x10x10 mm{sup 3} was calculated, the dimensions of a voxel being 1 mm{sup 3}. Additional kernels with voxel sizes of 3x3x3 mm{sup 3} were simulated. Results: Comparison with the S-value data regarding {sup 32}P, {sup 89}Sr, {sup 90}Y, and {sup 131}I of the MIRD committee which were calculated with the EGS4 code showed a very good agreement, the secondary particle transport of {sup 90}Y being the only exception. Documented analytical kernels on the other side show deviations very close and very far to the source. Conclusions: The good accordance with the only discrete dose kernels published up to date justifies the method chosen. Together with the additional six nuclides, this report provides a considerable database for three-dimensional kernel matrices with regard to beta

  3. Nuclear Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denschlag, J. O.

    This chapter first gives a survey on the history of the discovery of nuclear fission. It briefly presents the liquid-drop and shell models and their application to the fission process. The most important quantities accessible to experimental determination such as mass yields, nuclear charge distribution, prompt neutron emission, kinetic energy distribution, ternary fragment yields, angular distributions, and properties of fission isomers are presented as well as the instrumentation and techniques used for their measurement. The contribution concentrates on the fundamental aspects of nuclear fission. The practical aspects of nuclear fission are discussed in http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-0720-2_57 of Vol. 6.

  4. Monte Carlo simulations of the pulsed thermal neutron flux in two-zone systems with Plexiglas - Using the MCNP code with a modified hydrogen-data library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krynicka, Ewa; Wiącek, Urszula; Drozdowicz, Krzysztof; Gabańska, Barbara; Tracz, Grzegorz

    2006-09-01

    A comparison of real and Monte Carlo simulated pulsed neutron experiments in two-zone cylindrical systems is presented. Such geometry is met when a neutron moderator surrounds a sample of the investigated material. In this study, a Plexiglas shell (hydrogenous medium) surrounds the inner zone filled with a non-hydrogenous medium: copper oxide or chrome oxide. The time decay constant of the thermal neutron flux is determined as the result of the experiment. The primary simulations have been made using the MCNP code with the attached standard thermal neutron scattering library for hydrogen in polyethylene (poly.01t). A modification of this library is proposed to obtain the data dedicated more precisely for scattering of neutrons on hydrogen in Plexiglas in the thermal energy region. Results of the simulations for two-zone cylindrical systems, using the MCNP code with the modified hydrogen-data library, show a considerably better agreement with the experimental results. The average relative deviations have decreased from about 2% (always positive) to less than 0.5% fluctuating around zero. Adequacy of the applied modification is also confirmed in simulations of the pulsed neutron experiments on homogeneous cylinders of Plexiglas.

  5. A new MCNP option: KCORR -- The use of the correlated sampling method to study reactivity effects due to changes of a reactor arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Gallmeier, F.X.

    1995-06-01

    The planned advanced neutron source (ANS) reactor has a compact core surrounded by a large pool of heavy water containing a complex arrangement of reflector experimental components. Mocking up the reactor system without the reflector components results in an azimuthally symmetric geometry for which the eigenvalue k{sub eff} can be calculated accurately with diffusion or discrete ordinates methods by using two-dimensional geometry. Here, a new option KCORR for calculating the eigenvalue k{sub eff} of fission reactor arrangements has been implemented in the MCNP Monte Carlo code. This option is based on a matrix method and has the additional feature of applying correlated sampling methods to investigate small reactivity effects that are very likely lost in the statistical uncertainties of two independent program runs with the old option KCODE. For verification of the new program option, calculations of the reactivity worths of the control rod and the safety rod of the FOEHN reactor and the reactivity effects of various components in the reflector pool of the FOEHN reactor were performed with both KCODE and KCORR and compared with measured data. The efficient of MCNP in calculating reactivity changes by using KCORR is improved not only by means of lower statistical uncertainties but also by reducing of computing time.

  6. Implementation and testing of the on-the-fly thermal scattering Monte Carlo sampling method for graphite and light water in MCNP6

    DOE PAGES

    Pavlou, Andrew T.; Ji, Wei; Brown, Forrest B.

    2016-01-23

    Here, a proper treatment of thermal neutron scattering requires accounting for chemical binding through a scattering law S(α,β,T). Monte Carlo codes sample the secondary neutron energy and angle after a thermal scattering event from probability tables generated from S(α,β,T) tables at discrete temperatures, requiring a large amount of data for multiscale and multiphysics problems with detailed temperature gradients. We have previously developed a method to handle this temperature dependence on-the-fly during the Monte Carlo random walk using polynomial expansions in 1/T to directly sample the secondary energy and angle. In this paper, the on-the-fly method is implemented into MCNP6 andmore » tested in both graphite-moderated and light water-moderated systems. The on-the-fly method is compared with the thermal ACE libraries that come standard with MCNP6, yielding good agreement with integral reactor quantities like k-eigenvalue and differential quantities like single-scatter secondary energy and angle distributions. The simulation runtimes are comparable between the two methods (on the order of 5–15% difference for the problems tested) and the on-the-fly fit coefficients only require 5–15 MB of total data storage.« less

  7. Implementation and testing of the on-the-fly thermal scattering Monte Carlo sampling method for graphite and light water in MCNP6

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlou, Andrew T.; Ji, Wei; Brown, Forrest B.

    2016-01-23

    Here, a proper treatment of thermal neutron scattering requires accounting for chemical binding through a scattering law S(α,β,T). Monte Carlo codes sample the secondary neutron energy and angle after a thermal scattering event from probability tables generated from S(α,β,T) tables at discrete temperatures, requiring a large amount of data for multiscale and multiphysics problems with detailed temperature gradients. We have previously developed a method to handle this temperature dependence on-the-fly during the Monte Carlo random walk using polynomial expansions in 1/T to directly sample the secondary energy and angle. In this paper, the on-the-fly method is implemented into MCNP6 and tested in both graphite-moderated and light water-moderated systems. The on-the-fly method is compared with the thermal ACE libraries that come standard with MCNP6, yielding good agreement with integral reactor quantities like k-eigenvalue and differential quantities like single-scatter secondary energy and angle distributions. The simulation runtimes are comparable between the two methods (on the order of 5–15% difference for the problems tested) and the on-the-fly fit coefficients only require 5–15 MB of total data storage.

  8. Neutron Monitoring Systems for the Characterisation of Nuclear Fuel and Waste - Methodology and Applications - 12055

    SciTech Connect

    Sokcic-Kostic, M.; Langer, F.; Schultheis, R.; Braehler, G.

    2012-07-01

    The most characteristic behaviour of nuclear fuel or waste contaminated by fission material or isotopes resulting from fissile processes is the emission of neutrons. At the same time because of the high penetration of the material by neutrons, they are an ideal probe for measurement by non-destructive assay. The detection and data analysis in this case is quite different compared to methods using gamma measuring techniques. Neutron detection monitors have been in routine operation for a long time, showing their excellent detection capabilities. The neutron monitors designed for different applications have demonstrated their capabilities during daily operation in the field of burned up fuel elements and for nuclear waste with alpha activity. Lately the data analysis was refined and the quality of the results was improved by using MCNP calculations. Last but not least the layout and the calibration of neutron monitors are nowadays unfeasible without support by MCNP simulations. In the field of non-destructive assay the neutron monitors are undisputed. (authors)

  9. Nuclear safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buden, D.

    1991-01-01

    Topics dealing with nuclear safety are addressed which include the following: general safety requirements; safety design requirements; terrestrial safety; SP-100 Flight System key safety requirements; potential mission accidents and hazards; key safety features; ground operations; launch operations; flight operations; disposal; safety concerns; licensing; the nuclear engine for rocket vehicle application (NERVA) design philosophy; the NERVA flight safety program; and the NERVA safety plan.

  10. Nuclear privatization

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffs, E.

    1995-11-01

    The United Kingdom government announced in May 1995 plans to privatize the country`s two nuclear generating companies, Nuclear Electric and Scottish Nuclear. Under the plan, the two companies will become operating divisions of a unified holding company, to be called British Electric, with headquarters in Scotland. Britain`s nuclear plants were left out of the initial privatization in 1989 because the government believed the financial community would be unwilling to accept the open-ended liability of decommissioning the original nine stations based on the Magnox gas-cooled reactor. Six years later, the government has found a way around this by retaining these power stations in state ownership, leaving the new nuclear company with the eight Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR) stations and the recently completed Sizewell B PWR stations. The operating Magnox stations are to be transferred to BNFL, which operates two Magnox stations of their own at Calder Hall and Chapelcross.

  11. Nuclear stress test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Persantine stress test; Thallium stress test; Stress test - nuclear; Adenosine stress test; Regadenoson stress test; CAD - nuclear stress; Coronary artery disease - nuclear stress; Angina - nuclear ...

  12. Visualization of nuclear particle trajectories in nuclear oil-well logging

    SciTech Connect

    Case, C.R.; Chiaramonte, J.M. )

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear oil-well logging measures specific properties of subsurface geological formations as a function of depth in the well. The knowledge gained is used to evaluate the hydrocarbon potential of the surrounding oil field. The measurements are made by lowering an instrument package into an oil well and slowly extracting it at a constant speed. During the extraction phase, neutrons or gamma rays are emitted from the tool, interact with the formation, and scatter back to the detectors located within the tool. Even though only a small percentage of the emitted particles ever reach the detectors, mathematical modeling has been very successful in the accurate prediction of these detector responses. The two dominant methods used to model these devices have been the two-dimensional discrete ordinates method and the three-dimensional Monte Carlo method has routinely been used to investigate the response characteristics of nuclear tools. A special Los Alamos National Laboratory version of their standard MCNP Monte carlo code retains the details of each particle history of later viewing within SABRINA, a companion three-dimensional geometry modeling and debugging code.

  13. Optimization of a Dry, Mixed Nuclear Fuel Storage Array for Nuclear Criticality Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranko, Benjamin T.

    A dry storage array of used nuclear fuel at the Idaho National Laboratory contains a mixture of more than twenty different research and test reactor fuel types in up to 636 fuel storage canisters. New analysis demonstrates that the current arrangement of the different fuel-type canisters does not minimize the system neutron multiplication factor (keff), and that the entire facility storage capacity cannot be utilized without exceeding the subcritical limit (ksafe) for ensuring nuclear criticality safety. This work determines a more optimal arrangement of the stored fuels with a goal to minimize the system keff, but with a minimum of potential fuel canister relocation movements. The solution to this multiple-objective optimization problem will allow for both an improvement in the facility utilization while also offering an enhancement in the safety margin. The solution method applies stochastic approximation and a Tabu search metaheuristic to an empirical model developed from supporting MCNP calculations. The results establish an optimal relocation of between four to sixty canisters, which will allow the current thirty-one empty canisters to be used for storage while reducing the array keff by up to 0.018 +/- 0.003 relative to the current arrangement.

  14. Nuclear reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Halley-Stott, Richard P; Pasque, Vincent; Gurdon, J B

    2013-06-01

    There is currently particular interest in the field of nuclear reprogramming, a process by which the identity of specialised cells may be changed, typically to an embryonic-like state. Reprogramming procedures provide insight into many mechanisms of fundamental cell biology and have several promising applications, most notably in healthcare through the development of human disease models and patient-specific tissue-replacement therapies. Here, we introduce the field of nuclear reprogramming and briefly discuss six of the procedures by which reprogramming may be experimentally performed: nuclear transfer to eggs or oocytes, cell fusion, extract treatment, direct reprogramming to pluripotency and transdifferentiation.

  15. Nuclear Speckles

    PubMed Central

    Spector, David L.; Lamond, Angus I.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear speckles, also known as interchromatin granule clusters, are nuclear domains enriched in pre-mRNA splicing factors, located in the interchromatin regions of the nucleoplasm of mammalian cells. When observed by immunofluorescence microscopy, they usually appear as 20–50 irregularly shaped structures that vary in size. Speckles are dynamic structures, and their constituents can exchange continuously with the nucleoplasm and other nuclear locations, including active transcription sites. Studies on the composition, structure, and dynamics of speckles have provided an important paradigm for understanding the functional organization of the nucleus and the dynamics of the gene expression machinery. PMID:20926517

  16. MCNP Simulations of Measurement of Insulation Compaction in the Cryogenic Rocket Fuel Tanks at Kennedy Space Center by Fast/Thermal Neutron Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingston, R. A.; Schweitzer, J. S.; Parsons, A. M.; Arens, E. E.

    2010-01-01

    MCNP simulations have been run to evaluate the feasibility of using a combination of fast and thermal neutrons as a nondestructive method to measure of the compaction of the perlite insulation in the liquid hydrogen and oxygen cryogenic storage tanks at John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Perlite is a feldspathic volcanic rock made up of the major elements Si, AI, Na, K and 0 along with some water. When heated it expands from four to twenty times its original volume which makes it very useful for thermal insulation. The cryogenic tanks at Kennedy Space Center are spherical with outer diameters of 69-70 feet and lined with a layer of expanded perlite with thicknesses on the order of 120 cm. There is evidence that some of the perlite has compacted over time since the tanks were built 1965, affecting the thermal properties and possibly also the structural integrity of the tanks. With commercially available portable neutron generators it is possible to produce simultaneously fluxes of neutrons in two energy ranges: fast (14 Me V) and thermal (25 me V). The two energy ranges produce complementary information. Fast neutrons produce gamma rays by inelastic scattering, which is sensitive to Fe and O. Thermal neutrons produce gamma rays by prompt gamma neutron activation (PGNA) and this is sensitive to Si, Al, Na, K and H. The compaction of the perlite can be measured by the change in gamma ray signal strength which is proportional to the atomic number densities of the constituent elements. The MCNP simulations were made to determine the magnitude of this change. The tank wall was approximated by a I-dimensional slab geometry with an 11/16" outer carbon steel wall, an inner stainless wall and 120 cm thick perlite zone. Runs were made for cases with expanded perlite, compacted perlite or with various void fractions. Runs were also made to simulate the effect of adding a moderator. Tallies were made for decay-time analysis from t=0 to 10 ms; total detected gamma

  17. (Nuclear theory). [Research in nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, W.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research in nuclear physics. Topics covered in this paper are: symmetry principles; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear structure; quark-gluon plasma; quantum chromodynamics; symmetry breaking; nuclear deformation; and cold fusion. (LSP)

  18. Nuclear battlefields

    SciTech Connect

    Arkin, W.M.; Fieldhouse, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    This book provides complete data on the nuclear operations and research facilities in the U.S.A., the U.S.S.R., France, China and the U.K. It describes detailed estimates on the U.S.S.R.'s nuclear stockpile for over 500 locations. It shows how non-nuclear countries cooperate with the world-wide war machine. And it maps the U.S. nuclear facilities from Little America, WY, and Charleston, SC, to the battleships patroling the world's oceans and subs stalking under the sea. The data were gathered from unclassified sources through the Freedom of Information Act, from data supplied to military installations, and from weapons source books. It provides guidance for policymakers, government and corporate officials.

  19. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Sherman, J.; Sharbaugh, J.E.; Fauth, W.L. Jr.; Palladino, N.J.; DeHuff, P.G.

    1962-10-23

    A nuclear reactor incorporating seed and blanket assemblies is designed. Means are provided for obtaining samples of the coolant from the blanket assemblies and for varying the flow of coolant through the blanket assemblies. (AEC)

  20. Nuclear Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... here Home » Science Education » Science Topics » Nuclear Medicine SCIENCE EDUCATION SCIENCE EDUCATION Science Topics Resource Links for ... administered by inhalation, by oral ingestion, or by direct injection into an organ. The mode of tracer ...

  1. Nuclear accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Mobley, J.A.

    1982-05-01

    A nuclear accident with radioactive contamination can happen anywhere in the world. Because expert nuclear emergency teams may take several hours to arrive at the scene, local authorities must have a plan of action for the hours immediately following an accident. The site should be left untouched except to remove casualties. Treatment of victims includes decontamination and meticulous wound debridement. Acute radiation syndrome may be an overwhelming sequela.

  2. Nuclear cardiac

    SciTech Connect

    Slutsky, R.; Ashburn, W.L.

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between nuclear medicine and cardiology has continued to produce a surfeit of interesting, illuminating, and important reports involving the analysis of cardiac function, perfusion, and metabolism. To simplify the presentation, this review is broken down into three major subheadings: analysis of myocardial perfusion; imaging of the recent myocardial infarction; and the evaluation of myocardial function. There appears to be an increasingly important relationship between cardiology, particularly cardiac physiology, and nuclear imaging techniques. (KRM)

  3. Nuclear Data

    SciTech Connect

    White, Morgan C.

    2014-01-23

    PowerPoint presentation targeted for educational use. Nuclear data comes from a variety of sources and in many flavors. Understanding where the data you use comes from and what flavor it is can be essential to understand and interpret your results. This talk will discuss the nuclear data pipeline with particular emphasis on providing links to additional resources that can be used to explore the issues you will encounter.

  4. Nuclear Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Atkins-Duffin, C E

    2008-12-10

    With an explosion equivalent of about 20kT of TNT, the Trinity test was the first demonstration of a nuclear weapon. Conducted on July 16, 1945 in Alamogordo, NM this site is now a Registered National Historic Landmark. The concept and applicability of nuclear power was demonstrated on December 20, 1951 with the Experimental Breeder Reactor Number One (EBR-1) lit four light bulbs. This reactor is now a Registered National Historic Landmark, located near Arco, ID. From that moment forward it had been clearly demonstrated that nuclear energy has both peaceful and military applications and that the civilian and military fuel cycles can overlap. For the more than fifty years since the Atoms for Peace program, a key objective of nuclear policy has been to enable the wider peaceful use of nuclear energy while preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. Volumes have been written on the impact of these two actions on the world by advocates and critics; pundits and practioners; politicians and technologists. The nations of the world have woven together a delicate balance of treaties, agreements, frameworks and handshakes that are representative of the timeframe in which they were constructed and how they have evolved in time. Collectively these vehicles attempt to keep political will, nuclear materials and technology in check. This paper captures only the briefest abstract of the more significant aspects on the Nonproliferation Regime. Of particular relevance to this discussion is the special nonproliferation sensitivity associated with the uranium isotope separation and spent fuel reprocessing aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle.

  5. Nuclear telemedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, R. T.; Szasz, I. J.

    1990-06-01

    Diagnostic nuclear medicine patient images have been transniitted for 8 years from a regional conununity hospital to a university teaching hospital 700 kiloinetres away employing slow scan TV and telephone. Transruission and interpretation were done at the end of each working day or as circumstances required in cases of emergencies. Referring physicians received the nuclear medicine procedure report at the end of the completion day or within few minutes of completion in case of emergency procedures. To date more than 25 patient studies have been transmitted for interpretation. Blinded reinterpretation of the original hard copy data of 350 patient studies resulted in 100 agreement with the interpretation of transmitted data. This technique provides high quality diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine services in remote hospitals where the services of an on-site nuclear physician is not available. 2. HISTORY Eight years ago when the nuclear medicine physician at Trail Regional Hospital left the Trail area and an other could not be recruited we examined the feasibility of image transmission by phone for interpretation since closing the department would have imposed unacceptable physical and financial hardship and medical constraints on the patient population the nearest nuclear medicine facility was at some 8 hours drive away. In hospital patients would have to be treated either based purely on physical findings or flown to Vancouver at considerable cost to the health care system (estimated cost $1500.

  6. Nuclear Reaction Data on Titanium Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, S. Y.; Kawano, T.; Kahler, S.; Cowell, S.; Dashdorj, D.

    2008-04-17

    We evaluated the nuclear data on titanium isotopes, {sup 46-50}Ti. We used GNASH, a Hauser-Feshbach reaction model code, for the threshold reactions and CoH for the total and capture cross sections. While we calculated the transmission coefficients using well-known optical potentials for the GNASH calculation, we adjusted the level density and the pre-equilibrium parameters by taking into account the LANSCE/GEANIE experiment on {sup 48}Ti reaction cross sections as well as other experiments available for (n,p), (n,{alpha}), etc. The direct inelastic scattering was also included by using the coupled-channel calculation and the DWBA method. The coupled-channels potential was assumed to be similar to the spherical potential of Koning and Delaroche with proper deformation parameters. Meanwhile we investigated the resolved resonance parameters in the energy region below several hundred keV. In essence, we adopted the parameters from the Mughabghab's 2006 compilation, making some adjustments to mainly reproduce the reference thermal cross sections. This new evaluation was validated with the MCNP calculations of k-eff's on seven hard-spectrum criticality experiments that involve Ti as a reflector or moderator.

  7. Decay of the pulsed thermal neutron flux in two-zone hydrogenous systems Monte Carlo simulations using MCNP standard data libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiącek, Urszula; Krynicka, Ewa

    2006-01-01

    Pulsed neutron experiments in two-zone spherical and cylindrical geometry has been simulated using the MCNP code. The systems are built of hydrogenous materials. The inner zone is filled with aqueous solutions of absorbers (H3BO3 or KCl). It is surrounded by the outer zone built of Plexiglas. The system is irradiated with the pulsed thermal neutron flux and the thermal neutron decay in time is observed. Standard data libraries of the thermal neutron scattering cross-sections of hydrogen in hydrogenous substances have been used to simulate the neutron transport. The time decay constant of the fundamental mode of the thermal neutron flux determined in each simulation has been compared with the corresponding result of the real pulsed neutron experiment.

  8. Verification of Compton scattering spectrum of a 662keV photon beam scattered on a cylindrical steel target using MCNP5 code.

    PubMed

    Thanh, Tran Thien; Nguyen, Vo Hoang; Chuong, Huynh Dinh; Tran, Le Bao; Tam, Hoang Duc; Binh, Nguyen Thi; Tao, Chau Van

    2015-11-01

    This article focuses on the possible application of a (137)Cs low-radioactive source (5mCi) and a NaI(Tl) detector for measuring the saturation thickness of solid cylindrical steel targets. In order to increase the reliability of the obtained experimental results and to verify the detector response function of Compton scattering spectrum, simulation using Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP5) code is performed. The obtained results are in good agreement with the response functions of the simulation scattering and experimental scattering spectra. On the basis of such spectra, the saturation depth of a steel cylinder is determined by experiment and simulation at about 27mm using gamma energy of 662keV ((137)Cs) at a scattering angle of 120°. This study aims at measuring the diameter of solid cylindrical objects by gamma-scattering technique.

  9. Computation of relative dose distribution and effective transmission around a shielded vaginal cylinder with {sup 192}Ir HDR source using MCNP4B

    SciTech Connect

    Sureka, Chandra Sekaran; Aruna, Prakasarao; Ganesan, Singaravelu; Sunny, Chirayath Sunil; Subbaiah, Kamatam Venkata

    2006-06-15

    The present work is primarily focused on the estimation of relative dose distribution and effective transmission around a shielded vaginal cylinder with an {sup 192}Ir source using the Monte Carlo technique. The MCNP4B code was used to evaluate the dose distribution around a tungsten shielded vaginal cylinder as a function of thickness and angular shielding. The dose distribution and effective transmission of {sup 192}Ir by 0.8 cm thickness tungsten were also compared with that for gold and lead. Dose distributions were evaluated for different distances starting from 1.35 cm to 10.15 cm from the center of the cylinder. Dose distributions were also evaluated sequentially from 0 deg.to 180 deg.for every 5 deg.interval. Studies show that all the shielding material at 0.8 cm thickness contribute tolerable doses to normal tissues and also protect the critical organs such as the rectum and bladder. However, the computed dose values are in good agreement with the reported experimental values. It was also inferred that the higher the shielding angles, the more the protection of the surrounding tissues. Among the three shielding materials, gold has been observed to have the highest attenuation and hence contribute lowest transmission in the shielded region. Depending upon the shielding angle and thickness, it is possible to predict the dose distribution using the MCNP4B code. In order to deliver the higher dose to the unshielded region, lead may be considered as the shielding material and further it is highly economic over other materials.

  10. An approach to design a (90)Sr radioisotope thermoelectric generator using analytical and Monte Carlo methods with ANSYS, COMSOL, and MCNP.

    PubMed

    Khajepour, Abolhasan; Rahmani, Faezeh

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a (90)Sr radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) with power of milliWatt was designed to operate in the determined temperature (300-312K). For this purpose, the combination of analytical and Monte Carlo methods with ANSYS and COMSOL software as well as the MCNP code was used. This designed RTG contains (90)Sr as a radioisotope heat source (RHS) and 127 coupled thermoelectric modules (TEMs) based on bismuth telluride. Kapton (2.45mm in thickness) and Cryotherm sheets (0.78mm in thickness) were selected as the thermal insulators of the RHS, as well as a stainless steel container was used as a generator chamber. The initial design of the RHS geometry was performed according to the amount of radioactive material (strontium titanate) as well as the heat transfer calculations and mechanical strength considerations. According to the Monte Carlo simulation performed by the MCNP code, approximately 0.35 kCi of (90)Sr is sufficient to generate heat power in the RHS. To determine the optimal design of the RTG, the distribution of temperature as well as the dissipated heat and input power to the module were calculated in different parts of the generator using the ANSYS software. Output voltage according to temperature distribution on TEM was calculated using COMSOL. Optimization of the dimension of the RHS and heat insulator was performed to adapt the average temperature of the hot plate of TEM to the determined hot temperature value. This designed RTG generates 8mW in power with an efficiency of 1%. This proposed approach of combination method can be used for the precise design of various types of RTGs.

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  12. Range of Applicability and Bias Determination for Postclosure Criticality of Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Radulescu, Georgeta; Mueller, Don; Goluoglu, Sedat; Hollenbach, Daniel F; Fox, Patricia B

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this calculation report, Range of Applicability and Bias Determination for Postclosure Criticality of Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel, is to validate the computational method used to perform postclosure criticality calculations. The validation process applies the criticality analysis methodology approach documented in Section 3.5 of the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report. The application systems for this validation consist of waste packages containing transport, aging, and disposal canisters (TAD) loaded with commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) of varying assembly types, initial enrichments, and burnup values that are expected from the waste stream and of varying degree of internal component degradation that may occur over the 10,000-year regulatory time period. The criticality computational tool being evaluated is the general-purpose Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code. The nuclear cross-section data distributed with MCNP 5.1.40 and used to model the various physical processes are based primarily on the Evaluated Nuclear Data File/B Version VI (ENDF/B-VI) library. Criticality calculation bias and bias uncertainty and lower bound tolerance limit (LBTL) functions for CSNF waste packages are determined based on the guidance in ANSI/ANS 8.1-1998 (Ref. 4) and ANSI/ANS 8.17-2004 (Ref. 5), as described in Section 3.5.3 of Ref. 1. The development of this report is consistent with Test Plan for: Range of Applicability and Bias Determination for Postclosure Criticality. This calculation report has been developed in support of licensing activities for the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and the results of the calculation may be used in the criticality evaluation for CSNF waste packages based on a conceptual TAD canister.

  13. Neutron dose estimation in a zero power nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triviño, S.; Vedelago, J.; Cantargi, F.; Keil, W.; Figueroa, R.; Mattea, F.; Chautemps, A.; Santibañez, M.; Valente, M.

    2016-10-01

    This work presents the characterization and contribution of neutron and gamma components to the absorbed dose in a zero power nuclear reactor. A dosimetric method based on Fricke gel was implemented to evaluate the separation between dose components in the mixed field. The validation of this proposed method was performed by means of direct measurements of neutron flux in different positions using Au and Mg-Ni activation foils. Monte Carlo simulations were conversely performed using the MCNP main code with a dedicated subroutine to incorporate the exact complete geometry of the nuclear reactor facility. Once nuclear fuel elements were defined, the simulations computed the different contributions to the absorbed dose in specific positions inside the core. Thermal/epithermal contributions of absorbed dose were assessed by means of Fricke gel dosimetry using different isotopic compositions aimed at modifying the sensitivity of the dosimeter for specific dose components. Clear distinctions between gamma and neutron capture dose were obtained. Both Monte Carlo simulations and experimental results provided reliable estimations about neutron flux rate as well as dose rate during the reactor operation. Simulations and experimental results are in good agreement in every positions measured and simulated in the core.

  14. Nuclear risk

    SciTech Connect

    Levenson, M.

    1989-01-01

    The title of our session, Nuclear Risk Versus Other Power Options, is provocative. It is also a title with different meanings to different people. To the utility chief executive officer, nuclear power is a high-risk financial undertaking because of political and economic barriers to cost recovery. To the utility dispatcher, it is a high-risk future power source since plant completion and start-up dates can be delayed for very long times due to uncertain legal and political issues. To the environmentalist, concerned about global effects such as greenhouse and acid rain, nuclear power is a relatively low risk energy source. To the financial people, nuclear power is a cash cow turned sour because of uncertainties as to what new plants will cost and whether they will even be allowed to operate. The statistics on risk are known and the results of probability risk assessment calculations of risks are known. The challenge is not to make nuclear power safer, it is already one of the safest, if not the safest, source of power currently available. The challenge is to find a way to communicate this to the public.

  15. Nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    This paper discusses how, as part of the Department of Energy's implementation of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, DOE is required to investigate a site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada and, if it determines that the site is suitable, recommend to the President its selection for a nuclear waste repository. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission, in considering development of the plan, issued five objections, one of which is DOE's failure to recognize the range of alternative conceptual models of the Yucca Mountain site that can be supported by the limited existing technical data. At the end of the quarter DOE directed its project offices in Washington and Texas to begin orderly phase-out of all site-specific repository activities. Costs for this phase-out are $53 million for the Deaf Smith site and $85 million for the Hanford site.

  16. Nuclear Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossión, Rubén

    2010-09-01

    The atomic nucleus is a typical example of a many-body problem. On the one hand, the number of nucleons (protons and neutrons) that constitute the nucleus is too large to allow for exact calculations. On the other hand, the number of constituent particles is too small for the individual nuclear excitation states to be explained by statistical methods. Another problem, particular for the atomic nucleus, is that the nucleon-nucleon (n-n) interaction is not one of the fundamental forces of Nature, and is hard to put in a single closed equation. The nucleon-nucleon interaction also behaves differently between two free nucleons (bare interaction) and between two nucleons in the nuclear medium (dressed interaction). Because of the above reasons, specific nuclear many-body models have been devised of which each one sheds light on some selected aspects of nuclear structure. Only combining the viewpoints of different models, a global insight of the atomic nucleus can be gained. In this chapter, we revise the the Nuclear Shell Model as an example of the microscopic approach, and the Collective Model as an example of the geometric approach. Finally, we study the statistical properties of nuclear spectra, basing on symmetry principles, to find out whether there is quantum chaos in the atomic nucleus. All three major approaches have been rewarded with the Nobel Prize of Physics. In the text, we will stress how each approach introduces its own series of approximations to reduce the prohibitingly large number of degrees of freedom of the full many-body problem to a smaller manageable number of effective degrees of freedom.

  17. Nuclear pursuits

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This table lists quantities of warheads (in stockpile, peak number per year, total number built, number of known test explosions), weapon development milestones (developers of the atomic bomb and hydrogen bomb, date of first operational ICBM, first nuclear-powered naval SSN in service, first MIRVed missile deployed), and testing milestones (first fission test, type of boosted fission weapon, multistage thermonuclear test, number of months from fission bomb to multistage thermonuclear bomb, etc.), and nuclear infrastructure (assembly plants, plutonium production reactors, uranium enrichment plants, etc.). Countries included in the tally are the United States, Soviet Union, Britain, France, and China.

  18. Reactivity impact of {sup 16}O thermal elastic-scattering nuclear data for some numerical and critical benchmark systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kozier, K. S.; Roubtsov, D.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Kopecky, S.

    2012-07-01

    The thermal neutron-elastic-scattering cross-section data for {sup 16}O used in various modern evaluated-nuclear-data libraries were reviewed and found to be generally too high compared with the best available experimental measurements. Some of the proposed revisions to the ENDF/B-VII.0 {sup 16}O data library and recent results from the TENDL system increase this discrepancy further. The reactivity impact of revising the {sup 16}O data downward to be consistent with the best measurements was tested using the JENDL-3.3 {sup 16}O cross-section values and was found to be very small in MCNP5 simulations of the UO{sub 2} and reactor-recycle MOX-fuel cases of the ANS Doppler-defect numerical benchmark. However, large reactivity differences of up to about 14 mk (1400 pcm) were observed using {sup 16}O data files from several evaluated-nuclear-data libraries in MCNP5 simulations of the Los Alamos National Laboratory HEU heavy-water solution thermal critical experiments, which were performed in the 1950's. The latter result suggests that new measurements using HEU in a heavy-water-moderated critical facility, such as the ZED-2 zero-power reactor at the Chalk River Laboratories, might help to resolve the discrepancy between the {sup 16}O thermal elastic-scattering cross-section values and thereby reduce or better define its uncertainty, although additional assessment work would be needed to confirm this. (authors)

  19. INDIVIDUAL DOSIMETRY IN DISPOSAL REPOSITORY OF HEAT-GENERATING NUCLEAR WASTE.

    PubMed

    Pang, Bo; Saurí Suárez, Héctor; Becker, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Certain working scenarios in a disposal facility of heat-generating nuclear waste might lead to an enhanced level of radiation exposure for workers in such facilities. Hence, a realistic estimation of the personal dose during individual working scenarios is desired. In this study, the general-purpose Monte Carlo N-Particle code MCNP6 (Pelowitz, D. B. (ed). MCNP6 user manual LA-CP-13-00634, Rev. 0 (2013)) was applied to simulate a representative radiation field in a disposal facility. A tool to estimate the personal dose was then proposed by taking into account the influence of individual motion sequences during working scenarios. As basis for this approach, a movable whole-body phantom was developed to describe individual body gestures of the workers during motion sequences. In this study, the proposed method was applied to the German concept of geological disposal in rock salt. The feasibility of the proposed approach was demonstrated with an example of working scenario in an emplacement drift of a rock salt mine.

  20. Detection Of Special Nuclear Materials Tagged Neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Deyglun, Clement; Perot, Bertrand; Carasco, Cedric; Sannie, Guillaume; Gameiro, Jordan; Corre, Gwenole; Boudergui, Karim; Konzdrasovs, Vladimir; Normand, Stephane; Cusset, Eric

    2015-07-01

    In order to detect Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) in unattended luggage or cargo containers in the field of homeland security, fissions are induced by 14 MeV neutrons produced by an associated particle DT neutron generator, and prompt fission particles correlated with tagged neutron are detected by plastic scintillators. SMN produce high multiplicity events due to induced fissions, whereas nonnuclear materials produce low multiplicity events due to cross-talk, (n,2n) or (n,n'γ) reactions. The data acquisition electronics is made of compact FPGA boards. The coincidence window is triggered by the alpha particle detection, allowing to tag the emission date and direction of the 14 MeV interrogating neutron. The first part of the paper presents experiment vs. calculation comparisons to validate MCNP-PoliMi simulations and the post-processing tools developed with the data analysis framework ROOT. Measurements have been performed using different targets (iron, lead, graphite), first with small plastic scintillators (10 x 10 x 10 cm{sup 3}) and then with large detectors (10 x 10 x 100 cm{sup 3}) to demonstrate that nuclear materials can be differentiated from nonnuclear dense materials (iron, lead) in iron and wood matrixes. A special attention is paid on SNM detection in abandoned luggage. In the second part of the paper, the performances of a cargo container inspection system are studied by numerical simulation, following previous work reported in. Detectors dimensions and shielding against the neutron generator background are optimized for container inspection. Events not correlated to an alpha particle (uncorrelated background), counting statistics, time and energy resolutions of the data acquisition system are all taken into account in a realistic numerical model. The impact of the container matrix (iron, ceramic, wood) has been investigated by studying the system capability to detect a few kilograms of SNM in different positions in the cargo container, within 10

  1. Nuclear orbiting

    SciTech Connect

    Shapira, D.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear orbiting following collisions between sd and p shell nuclei is discussed. The dependence of this process on the real and imaginary parts of the nucleus-nucleus potential is discussed, as well as the evolution of the dinucleus toward a fully equilibrated fused system. 26 refs., 15 figs.

  2. Nuclear Misinformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Daniel F.; Kendall, Henry W.

    1975-01-01

    Many scientists feel that research into nuclear safety has been diverted or distorted, and the results of the research concealed or inaccurately reported on a large number of occasions. Of particular concern have been the emergency cooling systems which have not, as yet, been adequately tested. (Author/MA)

  3. Nuclear Terrorism.

    SciTech Connect

    Hecker, Siegfried S.

    2001-01-01

    As pointed out by several speakers, the level of violence and destruction in terrorist attacks has increased significantly during the past decade. Fortunately, few have involved weapons of mass destruction, and none have achieved mass casualties. The Aum Shinrikyo release of lethal nerve agent, sarin, in the Tokyo subway on March 20, 1995 clearly broke new ground by crossing the threshold in attempting mass casualties with chemical weapons. However, of all weapons of mass destruction, nuclear weapons still represent the most frightening threat to humankind. Nuclear weapons possess an enormous destructive force. The immediacy and scale of destruction are unmatched. In addition to destruction, terrorism also aims to create fear among the public and governments. Here also, nuclear weapons are unmatched. The public's fear of nuclear weapons or, for that matter, of all radioactivity is intense. To some extent, this fear arises from a sense of unlimited vulnerability. That is, radioactivity is seen as unbounded in three dimensions - distance, it is viewed as having unlimited reach; quantity, it is viewed as having deadly consequences in the smallest doses (the public is often told - incorrectly, of course - that one atom of plutonium will kill); and time, if it does not kill you immediately, then it will cause cancer decades hence.

  4. Nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1986-10-17

    In 1985 and 1986 nuclear medicine became more and more oriented toward in vov chemistry, chiefly as a result of advances in positron emission tomography (PET). The most important trend was the extension of PET technology into the care of patients with brain tumors, epilepsy, and heart disease. A second trend was the increasing use of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT).

  5. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1961-09-01

    A boiling-water nuclear reactor is described wherein control is effected by varying the moderator-to-fuel ratio in the reactor core. This is accomplished by providing control tubes containing a liquid control moderator in the reactor core and providing means for varying the amount of control moderatcr within the control tubes.

  6. Nuclear Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Dept. of Education, Harrisburg. Bureau of Curriculum Services.

    This document is a report on a course in nuclear science for the high school curriculum. The course is designed to provide a basic but comprehensive understanding of the atom in the light of modern knowledge, and to show how people attempt to harness the tremendous energy liberated through fission and fusion reactions. The course crosses what are…

  7. Nuclear energy.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Peter D

    2010-01-01

    The technical principles and practices of the civil nuclear industry are described with particular reference to fission and its products, natural and artificial radioactivity elements principally concerned and their relationships, main types of reactor, safety issues, the fuel cycle, waste management, issues related to weapon proliferation, environmental considerations and possible future developments.

  8. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.R.

    1962-07-24

    A fluidized bed nuclear reactor and a method of operating such a reactor are described. In the design means are provided for flowing a liquid moderator upwardly through the center of a bed of pellets of a nentron-fissionable material at such a rate as to obtain particulate fluidization while constraining the lower pontion of the bed into a conical shape. A smooth circulation of particles rising in the center and falling at the outside of the bed is thereby established. (AEC)

  9. NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Long, E.; Ashby, J.W.

    1958-09-16

    ABS>A graphite moderator structure is presented for a nuclear reactor compriscd of an assembly of similarly orientated prismatic graphite blocks arranged on spaced longitudinal axes lying in common planes wherein the planes of the walls of the blocks are positioned so as to be twisted reintive to the planes of said axes so thatthe unlmpeded dtrect paths in direction wholly across the walls of the blocks are limited to the width of the blocks plus spacing between the blocks.

  10. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Grebe, J.J.

    1959-07-14

    High temperature reactors which are uniquely adapted to serve as the heat source for nuclear pcwered rockets are described. The reactor is comprised essentially of an outer tubular heat resistant casing which provides the main coolant passageway to and away from the reactor core within the casing and in which the working fluid is preferably hydrogen or helium gas which is permitted to vaporize from a liquid storage tank. The reactor core has a generally spherical shape formed entirely of an active material comprised of fissile material and a moderator material which serves as a diluent. The active material is fabricated as a gas permeable porous material and is interlaced in a random manner with very small inter-connecting bores or capillary tubes through which the coolant gas may flow. The entire reactor is divided into successive sections along the direction of the temperature gradient or coolant flow, each section utilizing materials of construction which are most advantageous from a nuclear standpoint and which at the same time can withstand the operating temperature of that particular zone. This design results in a nuclear reactor characterized simultaneously by a minimum critiral size and mass and by the ability to heat a working fluid to an extremely high temperature.

  11. Nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    Radioactive waste is mounting at U.S. nuclear power plants at a rate of more than 2,000 metric tons a year. Pursuant to statute and anticipating that a geologic repository would be available in 1998, the Department of Energy (DOE) entered into disposal contracts with nuclear utilities. Now, however, DOE does not expect the repository to be ready before 2010. For this reason, DOE does not want to develop a facility for monitored retrievable storage (MRS) by 1998. This book is concerned about how best to store the waste until a repository is available, congressional requesters asked GAO to review the alternatives of continued storage at utilities' reactor sites or transferring waste to an MRS facility, GAO assessed the likelihood of an MRSA facility operating by 1998, legal implications if DOE is not able to take delivery of wastes in 1998, propriety of using the Nuclear Waste Fund-from which DOE's waste program costs are paid-to pay utilities for on-site storage capacity added after 1998, ability of utilities to store their waste on-site until a repository is operating, and relative costs and safety of the two storage alternatives.

  12. Validation of absolute axial neutron flux distribution calculations with MCNP with 197Au(n,γ)198Au reaction rate distribution measurements at the JSI TRIGA Mark II reactor.

    PubMed

    Radulović, Vladimir; Štancar, Žiga; Snoj, Luka; Trkov, Andrej

    2014-02-01

    The calculation of axial neutron flux distributions with the MCNP code at the JSI TRIGA Mark II reactor has been validated with experimental measurements of the (197)Au(n,γ)(198)Au reaction rate. The calculated absolute reaction rate values, scaled according to the reactor power and corrected for the flux redistribution effect, are in good agreement with the experimental results. The effect of different cross-section libraries on the calculations has been investigated and shown to be minor.

  13. Nuclear photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habs, D.; Günther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2012-07-01

    With the planned new γ-beam facilities like MEGa-ray at LLNL (USA) or ELI-NP at Bucharest (Romania) with 1013 γ/s and a band width of ΔEγ/Eγ≈10-3, a new era of γ beams with energies up to 20MeV comes into operation, compared to the present world-leading HIγS facility at Duke University (USA) with 108 γ/s and ΔEγ/Eγ≈3ṡ10-2. In the long run even a seeded quantum FEL for γ beams may become possible, with much higher brilliance and spectral flux. At the same time new exciting possibilities open up for focused γ beams. Here we describe a new experiment at the γ beam of the ILL reactor (Grenoble, France), where we observed for the first time that the index of refraction for γ beams is determined by virtual pair creation. Using a combination of refractive and reflective optics, efficient monochromators for γ beams are being developed. Thus, we have to optimize the total system: the γ-beam facility, the γ-beam optics and γ detectors. We can trade γ intensity for band width, going down to ΔEγ/Eγ≈10-6 and address individual nuclear levels. The term "nuclear photonics" stresses the importance of nuclear applications. We can address with γ-beams individual nuclear isotopes and not just elements like with X-ray beams. Compared to X rays, γ beams can penetrate much deeper into big samples like radioactive waste barrels, motors or batteries. We can perform tomography and microscopy studies by focusing down to μm resolution using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) for detection with eV resolution and high spatial resolution at the same time. We discuss the dominating M1 and E1 excitations like the scissors mode, two-phonon quadrupole octupole excitations, pygmy dipole excitations or giant dipole excitations under the new facet of applications. We find many new applications in biomedicine, green energy, radioactive waste management or homeland security. Also more brilliant secondary beams of neutrons and positrons can be produced.

  14. Nuclear photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Habs, D.; Guenther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2012-07-09

    With the planned new {gamma}-beam facilities like MEGa-ray at LLNL (USA) or ELI-NP at Bucharest (Romania) with 10{sup 13}{gamma}/s and a band width of {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -3}, a new era of {gamma} beams with energies up to 20MeV comes into operation, compared to the present world-leading HI{gamma}S facility at Duke University (USA) with 10{sup 8}{gamma}/s and {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 3 Dot-Operator 10{sup -2}. In the long run even a seeded quantum FEL for {gamma} beams may become possible, with much higher brilliance and spectral flux. At the same time new exciting possibilities open up for focused {gamma} beams. Here we describe a new experiment at the {gamma} beam of the ILL reactor (Grenoble, France), where we observed for the first time that the index of refraction for {gamma} beams is determined by virtual pair creation. Using a combination of refractive and reflective optics, efficient monochromators for {gamma} beams are being developed. Thus, we have to optimize the total system: the {gamma}-beam facility, the {gamma}-beam optics and {gamma} detectors. We can trade {gamma} intensity for band width, going down to {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -6} and address individual nuclear levels. The term 'nuclear photonics' stresses the importance of nuclear applications. We can address with {gamma}-beams individual nuclear isotopes and not just elements like with X-ray beams. Compared to X rays, {gamma} beams can penetrate much deeper into big samples like radioactive waste barrels, motors or batteries. We can perform tomography and microscopy studies by focusing down to {mu}m resolution using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) for detection with eV resolution and high spatial resolution at the same time. We discuss the dominating M1 and E1 excitations like the scissors mode, two-phonon quadrupole octupole excitations, pygmy dipole excitations or giant dipole excitations under the new facet of

  15. The Nuclear Power and Nuclear Weapons Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leventhal, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Explains problems enforcing the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) of 1968. Provides factual charts and details concerning the production of nuclear energy and arms, the processing and disposal of waste products, and outlines the nuclear fuel cycle. Discusses safeguards, the risk of nuclear terrorism, and ways to deal with these problems. (NL)

  16. The Nuclear Power/Nuclear Weapons Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Totten, Sam; Totten, Martha Wescoat

    1985-01-01

    Once they have nuclear power, most countries will divert nuclear materials from commercial to military programs. In excerpts from the book "Facing the Danger" (by Totten, S. and M. W., Crossing Press, 1984), five anti-nuclear activists explain how and why they have been addressing the nuclear connection. (RM)

  17. Nuclear energy.

    PubMed

    Grandin, Karl; Jagers, Peter; Kullander, Sven

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear energy can play a role in carbon free production of electrical energy, thus making it interesting for tomorrow's energy mix. However, several issues have to be addressed. In fission technology, the design of so-called fourth generation reactors show great promise, in particular in addressing materials efficiency and safety issues. If successfully developed, such reactors may have an important and sustainable part in future energy production. Working fusion reactors may be even more materials efficient and environmental friendly, but also need more development and research. The roadmap for development of fourth generation fission and fusion reactors, therefore, asks for attention and research in these fields must be strengthened.

  18. NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Long, E.; Ashley, J.W.

    1958-12-16

    A graphite moderator structure is described for a gas-cooled nuclear reactor having a vertical orlentation wherein the structure is physically stable with regard to dlmensional changes due to Wigner growth properties of the graphite, and leakage of coolant gas along spaces in the structure is reduced. The structure is comprised of stacks of unlform right prismatic graphite blocks positioned in layers extending in the direction of the lengths of the blocks, the adjacent end faces of the blocks being separated by pairs of tiles. The blocks and tiles have central bores which are in alignment when assembled and are provided with cooperatlng keys and keyways for physical stability.

  19. Nuclear security

    SciTech Connect

    Dingell, J.D.

    1991-02-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, located in Livermore, California, generates and controls large numbers of classified documents associated with the research and testing of nuclear weapons. Concern has been raised about the potential for espionage at the laboratory and the national security implications of classified documents being stolen. This paper determines the extent of missing classified documents at the laboratory and assesses the adequacy of accountability over classified documents in the laboratory's custody. Audit coverage was limited to the approximately 600,000 secret documents in the laboratory's custody. The adequacy of DOE's oversight of the laboratory's secret document control program was also assessed.

  20. Nuclear dualism.

    PubMed

    Karrer, Kathleen M

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear dualism is a characteristic feature of the ciliated protozoa. Tetrahymena have two different nuclei in each cell. The larger, polyploid, somatic macronucleus (MAC) is the site of transcriptional activity in the vegetatively growing cell. The smaller, diploid micronucleus (MIC) is transcriptionally inactive in vegetative cells, but is transcriptionally active in mating cells and responsible for the genetic continuity during sexual reproduction. Although the MICs and MACs develop from mitotic products of a common progenitor and reside in a common cytoplasm, they are different from one another in almost every respect.

  1. Monte Carlo calculation for the development of a BNCT neutron source (1eV-10KeV) using MCNP code.

    PubMed

    El Moussaoui, F; El Bardouni, T; Azahra, M; Kamili, A; Boukhal, H

    2008-09-01

    Different materials have been studied in order to produce the epithermal neutron beam between 1eV and 10KeV, which are extensively used to irradiate patients with brain tumors such as GBM. For this purpose, we have studied three different neutrons moderators (H(2)O, D(2)O and BeO) and their combinations, four reflectors (Al(2)O(3), C, Bi, and Pb) and two filters (Cd and Bi). Results of calculation showed that the best obtained assembly configuration corresponds to the combination of the three moderators H(2)O, BeO and D(2)O jointly to Al(2)O(3) reflector and two filter Cd+Bi optimize the spectrum of the epithermal neutron at 72%, and minimize the thermal neutron to 4% and thus it can be used to treat the deep tumor brain. The calculations have been performed by means of the Monte Carlo N (particle code MCNP 5C). Our results strongly encourage further studying of irradiation of the head with epithermal neutron fields.

  2. Investigation of neutron-induced background in Magnetic-Recoil-Spectrometer CR-39 data using a DT neutron source and MCNP simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanese, Lucio M.; Frenje, Johan; Gatu Johnson, Maria; Lahmann, Brandon; Sio, Hong; Petrasso, Richard

    2015-11-01

    The Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometers (MRS) installed on the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are routinely used to measure neutron yield, areal density and ion temperatures from DT implosions. The observed background in the lower-energy part of MRS spectra is significantly higher than expected from analysis of neutron-induced background data obtained in stand-alone CR-39 experiments at OMEGA. A possible explanation relates to the scattering of neutrons in the MRS housing vessel, which is not accounted for in current modeling. To test experimentally the impact of individual vessel components on the observed background, parts of the MRS housing have been mocked up and CR-39 data have been collected employing a DT neutron source. The experimental results are contrasted to MCNP simulations to improve our understanding of the mechanism behind the enhanced neutron background. The results will be used to correct measured spectra from OMEGA and the NIF to allow detailed analysis of lower energy data. This work was supported in part by NLUF, US DOE, and LLE.

  3. Application of the MCNP5 code to the Modeling of vaginal and intra-uterine applicators used in intracavitary brachytherapy: a first approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerardy, I.; Rodenas, J.; Van Dycke, M.; Gallardo, S.; Tondeur, F.

    2008-02-01

    Brachytherapy is a radiotherapy treatment where encapsulated radioactive sources are introduced within a patient. Depending on the technique used, such sources can produce high, medium or low local dose rates. The Monte Carlo method is a powerful tool to simulate sources and devices in order to help physicists in treatment planning. In multiple types of gynaecological cancer, intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR Ir-192 source) is used combined with other therapy treatment to give an additional local dose to the tumour. Different types of applicators are used in order to increase the dose imparted to the tumour and to limit the effect on healthy surrounding tissues. The aim of this work is to model both applicator and HDR source in order to evaluate the dose at a reference point as well as the effect of the materials constituting the applicators on the near field dose. The MCNP5 code based on the Monte Carlo method has been used for the simulation. Dose calculations have been performed with *F8 energy deposition tally, taking into account photons and electrons. Results from simulation have been compared with experimental in-phantom dose measurements. Differences between calculations and measurements are lower than 5%.The importance of the source position has been underlined.

  4. Comparison of GATE/GEANT4 with EGSnrc and MCNP for electron dose calculations at energies between 15 keV and 20 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maigne, L.; Perrot, Y.; Schaart, D. R.; Donnarieix, D.; Breton, V.

    2011-02-01

    The GATE Monte Carlo simulation platform based on the GEANT4 toolkit has come into widespread use for simulating positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging devices. Here, we explore its use for calculating electron dose distributions in water. Mono-energetic electron dose point kernels and pencil beam kernels in water are calculated for different energies between 15 keV and 20 MeV by means of GATE 6.0, which makes use of the GEANT4 version 9.2 Standard Electromagnetic Physics Package. The results are compared to the well-validated codes EGSnrc and MCNP4C. It is shown that recent improvements made to the GEANT4/GATE software result in significantly better agreement with the other codes. We furthermore illustrate several issues of general interest to GATE and GEANT4 users who wish to perform accurate simulations involving electrons. Provided that the electron step size is sufficiently restricted, GATE 6.0 and EGSnrc dose point kernels are shown to agree to within less than 3% of the maximum dose between 50 keV and 4 MeV, while pencil beam kernels are found to agree to within less than 4% of the maximum dose between 15 keV and 20 MeV.

  5. Study on the increase of inactive germanium layer in a high-purity germanium detector after a long time operation applying MCNP code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huy, N. Q.; Binh, D. Q.; An, V. X.

    2007-04-01

    This study aims at finding an explanation for the decrease in the efficiency of an HPGe detector and evaluating a change in the detector inactive germanium layer during its operation. Monte Carlo calculations using the MCNP4C2 code were performed to evaluate the detector efficiency for different values of the inactive germanium layer. Comparison of the experimental and calculated data shows that the inactive germanium layer of the detector changed its thickness from 0.35 to 1.16 mm after an operating time of 9 years. Measurements for determining the reduction of the detector efficiency were carried out two times, one after 3 years and another after 9 years of operation. Experimental result shows that the detector efficiency was reduced about 8% in this period. The increase of inactive germanium layer can be considered as the main reason for explaining the reduction of detector efficiency of about 13% at the γ energies from 200 to 1800 keV during 9 years of detector operation, in which 5% for the 3 first years and 8% for the 6 last years.

  6. Comparison of GATE/GEANT4 with EGSnrc and MCNP for electron dose calculations at energies between 15 keV and 20 MeV.

    PubMed

    Maigne, L; Perrot, Y; Schaart, D R; Donnarieix, D; Breton, V

    2011-02-07

    The GATE Monte Carlo simulation platform based on the GEANT4 toolkit has come into widespread use for simulating positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging devices. Here, we explore its use for calculating electron dose distributions in water. Mono-energetic electron dose point kernels and pencil beam kernels in water are calculated for different energies between 15 keV and 20 MeV by means of GATE 6.0, which makes use of the GEANT4 version 9.2 Standard Electromagnetic Physics Package. The results are compared to the well-validated codes EGSnrc and MCNP4C. It is shown that recent improvements made to the GEANT4/GATE software result in significantly better agreement with the other codes. We furthermore illustrate several issues of general interest to GATE and GEANT4 users who wish to perform accurate simulations involving electrons. Provided that the electron step size is sufficiently restricted, GATE 6.0 and EGSnrc dose point kernels are shown to agree to within less than 3% of the maximum dose between 50 keV and 4 MeV, while pencil beam kernels are found to agree to within less than 4% of the maximum dose between 15 keV and 20 MeV.

  7. Applications of nuclear physics.

    PubMed

    Hayes, A C

    2017-02-01

    Today the applications of nuclear physics span a very broad range of topics and fields. This review discusses a number of aspects of these applications, including selected topics and concepts in nuclear reactor physics, nuclear fusion, nuclear non-proliferation, nuclear-geophysics, and nuclear medicine. The review begins with a historic summary of the early years in applied nuclear physics, with an emphasis on the huge developments that took place around the time of World War II, and that underlie the physics involved in designs of nuclear explosions, controlled nuclear energy, and nuclear fusion. The review then moves to focus on modern applications of these concepts, including the basic concepts and diagnostics developed for the forensics of nuclear explosions, the nuclear diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility, nuclear reactor safeguards, and the detection of nuclear material production and trafficking. The review also summarizes recent developments in nuclear geophysics and nuclear medicine. The nuclear geophysics areas discussed include geo-chronology, nuclear logging for industry, the Oklo reactor, and geo-neutrinos. The section on nuclear medicine summarizes the critical advances in nuclear imaging, including PET and SPECT imaging, targeted radionuclide therapy, and the nuclear physics of medical isotope production. Each subfield discussed requires a review article unto itself, which is not the intention of the current review; rather, the current review is intended for readers who wish to get a broad understanding of applied nuclear physics.

  8. Applications of nuclear physics

    DOE PAGES

    Hayes-Sterbenz, Anna Catherine

    2017-01-10

    Today the applications of nuclear physics span a very broad range of topics and fields. This review discusses a number of aspects of these applications, including selected topics and concepts in nuclear reactor physics, nuclear fusion, nuclear non-proliferation, nuclear-geophysics, and nuclear medicine. The review begins with a historic summary of the early years in applied nuclear physics, with an emphasis on the huge developments that took place around the time of World War II, and that underlie the physics involved in designs of nuclear explosions, controlled nuclear energy, and nuclear fusion. The review then moves to focus on modern applicationsmore » of these concepts, including the basic concepts and diagnostics developed for the forensics of nuclear explosions, the nuclear diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility, nuclear reactor safeguards, and the detection of nuclear material production and trafficking. The review also summarizes recent developments in nuclear geophysics and nuclear medicine. The nuclear geophysics areas discussed include geo-chronology, nuclear logging for industry, the Oklo reactor, and geo-neutrinos. The section on nuclear medicine summarizes the critical advances in nuclear imaging, including PET and SPECT imaging, targeted radionuclide therapy, and the nuclear physics of medical isotope production. Lastly, each subfield discussed requires a review article unto itself, which is not the intention of the current review; rather, the current review is intended for readers who wish to get a broad understanding of applied nuclear physics.« less

  9. Applications of nuclear physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, A. C.

    2017-02-01

    Today the applications of nuclear physics span a very broad range of topics and fields. This review discusses a number of aspects of these applications, including selected topics and concepts in nuclear reactor physics, nuclear fusion, nuclear non-proliferation, nuclear-geophysics, and nuclear medicine. The review begins with a historic summary of the early years in applied nuclear physics, with an emphasis on the huge developments that took place around the time of World War II, and that underlie the physics involved in designs of nuclear explosions, controlled nuclear energy, and nuclear fusion. The review then moves to focus on modern applications of these concepts, including the basic concepts and diagnostics developed for the forensics of nuclear explosions, the nuclear diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility, nuclear reactor safeguards, and the detection of nuclear material production and trafficking. The review also summarizes recent developments in nuclear geophysics and nuclear medicine. The nuclear geophysics areas discussed include geo-chronology, nuclear logging for industry, the Oklo reactor, and geo-neutrinos. The section on nuclear medicine summarizes the critical advances in nuclear imaging, including PET and SPECT imaging, targeted radionuclide therapy, and the nuclear physics of medical isotope production. Each subfield discussed requires a review article unto itself, which is not the intention of the current review; rather, the current review is intended for readers who wish to get a broad understanding of applied nuclear physics.

  10. High-performance gamma spectroscopy for equipment retrieval from Hanford high-level nuclear waste tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troyer, Gary L.; Hillesand, K. E.; Goodwin, S. G.; Kessler, S. F.; Killian, E. W.; Legare, D.; Nelson, Joseph V., Jr.; Richard, R. F.; Nordquist, E. M.

    1999-01-01

    The cleanup of high level defense nuclear waste at the Hanford site presents several progressive challenges. Among these is the removal and disposal of various components from buried active waste tanks to allow new equipment insertion or hazards mitigation. A unique automated retrieval system at the tank provides for retrieval, high pressure washing, inventory measurement, and containment for disposal. Key to the inventory measurement is a three detector HPGe high performance gamma spectroscopy system capable of recovering data at up to ninety per cent saturation (200,000 counts per second). Data recovery is based on a unique embedded electronic pulser and specialized software to report the inventory. Each of the detectors have different shielding specified through Monte Carlo simulation with the MCNP program. This shielding provides performance over a dynamic range of eight orders of magnitude. System description, calibration issues and operational experiences are discussed.

  11. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Miller, H.I.; Smith, R.C.

    1958-01-21

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which use a liquid fuel, such as a solution of uranyl sulfate in ordinary water which acts as the moderator. The reactor is comprised of a spherical vessel having a diameter of about 12 inches substantially surrounded by a reflector of beryllium oxide. Conventionnl control rods and safety rods are operated in slots in the reflector outside the vessel to control the operation of the reactor. An additional means for increasing the safety factor of the reactor by raising the ratio of delayed neutrons to prompt neutrons, is provided and consists of a soluble sulfate salt of beryllium dissolved in the liquid fuel in the proper proportion to obtain the result desired.

  12. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Christy, R.F.

    1958-07-15

    A nuclear reactor of the homogeneous liquid fuel type is described wherein the fissionable isotope is suspended or dissolved in a liquid moderator such as water. The reactor core is comprised essentially of a spherical vessel for containing the reactive composition surrounded by a reflector, preferably of beryllium oxide. The reactive composition may be an ordinary water solution of a soluble salt of uranium, the quantity of fissionable isotope in solution being sufficient to provide a critical mass in the vessel. The liquid fuel is stored in a tank of non-crtttcal geometry below the reactor vessel and outside of the reflector and is passed from the tank to the vessel through a pipe connecting the two by air pressure means. Neutron absorbing control and safety rods are operated within slots in the reflector adjacent to the vessel.

  13. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Grebe, J.J.

    1959-12-15

    A reactor which is particularly adapted tu serve as a heat source for a nuclear powered alrcraft or rocket is described. The core of this reactor consists of a porous refractory modera;or body which is impregnated with fissionable nuclei. The core is designed so that its surface forms tapered inlet and outlet ducts which are separated by the porous moderator body. In operation a gaseous working fluid is circulated through the inlet ducts to the surface of the moderator, enters and passes through the porous body, and is heated therein. The hot gas emerges into the outlet ducts and is available to provide thrust. The principle advantage is that tremendous quantities of gas can be quickly heated without suffering an excessive pressure drop.

  14. Nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wade, Elman E.

    1979-01-01

    A nuclear reactor including two rotatable plugs and a positive top core holddown structure. The top core holddown structure is divided into two parts: a small core cover, and a large core cover. The small core cover, and the upper internals associated therewith, are attached to the small rotating plug, and the large core cover, with its associated upper internals, is attached to the large rotating plug. By so splitting the core holddown structures, under-the-plug refueling is accomplished without the necessity of enlarging the reactor pressure vessel to provide a storage space for the core holddown structure during refueling. Additionally, the small and large rotating plugs, and their associated core covers, are arranged such that the separation of the two core covers to permit rotation is accomplished without the installation of complex lifting mechanisms.

  15. Comparison of codes and neutron IC data used in US and Russia for the Topaz-II nuclear reactor assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Glushkov, Y.S.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N.N.; Kompanietz, G.V.; Gomin, Y.A.; Maiorov, L.V.; Lobynstev, V.A.; Polyakov, D.N.; Sapir, J.; Streetman, J.R.

    1993-11-01

    Topaz-II is a heterogeneous, epithermal reactor, fueled with highly enriched uranium-dioxide, cooled with NaK, and moderated with zirconium-hydride. The reactor core contains 37 single-cell thermionic fuel elements, and is surrounded by a radial beryllium reflector that contains 12 rotatable control drums with poison segments. For the physics analysis of TOPAZ II it is necessary to use the Monte Carlo method. The United States (US) and Russia used two different Monte Carlo codes, namely MCNP and MCU-2, respectively. The work described in this paper was aimed at comparing the codes and neutronic data used in the US and Russia for verification of Topaz-II nuclear safety. For this purpose, the US and Russia developed a joint benchmark model of the Topaz-II reactor. The American and Russian teams performed independent computations for a series of variants representing potential water immersion accidents. Comparison of the MCNP and MCU-2 codes showed somewhat different results both for the absolute values of k{sub eff} and for reactivity effects. Future calculations will be performed to obtain a detailed understanding of the reasons for such discrepancies. For these analyses it will be necessary for the US and Russian teams to exchange neutronic data on Topaz-II physics calculations.

  16. Nuclear Data Uncertainties for Typical LWR Fuel Assemblies and a Simple Reactor Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochman, D.; Leray, O.; Hursin, M.; Ferroukhi, H.; Vasiliev, A.; Aures, A.; Bostelmann, F.; Zwermann, W.; Cabellos, O.; Diez, C. J.; Dyrda, J.; Garcia-Herranz, N.; Castro, E.; van der Marck, S.; Sjöstrand, H.; Hernandez, A.; Fleming, M.; Sublet, J.-Ch.; Fiorito, L.

    2017-01-01

    The impact of the current nuclear data library covariances such as in ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.2, JENDL-4.0, SCALE and TENDL, for relevant current reactors is presented in this work. The uncertainties due to nuclear data are calculated for existing PWR and BWR fuel assemblies (with burn-up up to 40 GWd/tHM, followed by 10 years of cooling time) and for a simplified PWR full core model (without burn-up) for quantities such as k∞, macroscopic cross sections, pin power or isotope inventory. In this work, the method of propagation of uncertainties is based on random sampling of nuclear data, either from covariance files or directly from basic parameters. Additionally, possible biases on calculated quantities are investigated such as the self-shielding treatment. Different calculation schemes are used, based on CASMO, SCALE, DRAGON, MCNP or FISPACT-II, thus simulating real-life assignments for technical-support organizations. The outcome of such a study is a comparison of uncertainties with two consequences. One: although this study is not expected to lead to similar results between the involved calculation schemes, it provides an insight on what can happen when calculating uncertainties and allows to give some perspectives on the range of validity on these uncertainties. Two: it allows to dress a picture of the state of the knowledge as of today, using existing nuclear data library covariances and current methods.

  17. Verification of 235U mass content in nuclear fuel plates by an absolute method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Gammal, W.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear Safeguards is referred to a verification System by which a State can control all nuclear materials (NM) and nuclear activities under its authority. An effective and efficient Safeguards System must include a system of measurements with capabilities sufficient to verify such NM. Measurements of NM using absolute methods could eliminate the dependency on NM Standards, which are necessary for other relative or semi-absolute methods. In this work, an absolute method has been investigated to verify the 235U mass content in nuclear fuel plates of Material Testing Reactor (MTR) type. The most intense gamma-ray signature at 185.7 keV emitted after α-decay of the 235U nuclei was employed in the method. The measuring system (an HPGe-spectrometer) was mathematically calibrated for efficiency using the general Monte Carlo transport code MCNP-4B. The calibration results and the measured net count rate were used to estimate the 235U mass content in fuel plates at different detector-to-fuel plate distances. Two sets of fuel plates, containing natural and low enriched uranium, were measured at the Fuel Fabrication Facility. Average accuracies for the estimated 235U masses of about 2.62% and 0.3% are obtained for the fuel plates containing natural and low enriched uranium; respectively, with a precision of about 3%.

  18. How useful is neutron diffusion theory for nuclear rocket engine design

    SciTech Connect

    Hilsmeier, T.A.; Aithal, S.M.; Aldemir, T. )

    1992-01-01

    Correct modeling of neutron leakage and geometry effects is important in the design of a nuclear rocket engine because of the need for small reactor cores in space applications. In principle, there are generalized procedures that can account for these effects in a reliable manner (e.g., a three-dimensional, continuous-energy Monte Carlo calculation with all core components explicitly modeled). However, these generalized procedures are not usually suitable for parametric design studies because of the long computational times required, and the feasibility of using faster running, more approrimate neutronic modeling approaches needs to be investigated. Faster running neutronic models are also needed for simulator development to assess the engine performance during startup and power level changes. This paper investigates the potential of the few-group diffusion approach for nuclear rocket engine core design and optimization by comparing the k[sub eff] and power distributions obtained by the MCNP code against those obtained from the LEOPARD and 2DB codes for the particle bed reactor (PBR) concept described. The PBRs have been identified as one of the two near-term options for nuclear thermal propulsion by the joint National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/US Department of Energy/US Department of Defense program that was recently set up at the NASA Lewis Research Center to develop a flight-rated nuclear rocket engine by the 2020s.

  19. Comparison and physical interpretation of MCNP and TART neutron and γ Monte Carlo shielding calculations for a heavy-ion ICF system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainardi, E.; Premuda, F.; Lee, E.

    2004-01-01

    National Laboratory, UCRL-ID-126455, Rev. 1, November, 1997] and MCNP4B [MCNP - A General Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code, Version 4B, La-12625-m, March 1997, Los Alamos National Laboratory] for two different configurations of the system is discussed, separating the n and γ contributions, in the light of the physical interpretation of the results in terms of first flight and of scattered neutron fluxes, of primary γ and of secondary γ generated by inelastically scattered or radiatively captured neutrons. The final conclusions indicate some guidelines and suggest possible improvements for the future neutronic shielding design for a HIF facility.

  20. Dosimetric characterization of model Cs-1 Rev2 cesium-131 brachytherapy source in water phantoms and human tissues with MCNP5 Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianhua; Zhang, Hualin

    2008-04-01

    A recently developed alternative brachytherapy seed, Cs-1 Rev2 cesium-131, has begun to be used in clinical practice. The dosimetric characteristics of this source in various media, particularly in human tissues, have not been fully evaluated. The aim of this study was to calculate the dosimetric parameters for the Cs-1 Rev2 cesium-131 seed following the recommendations of the AAPM TG-43U1 report [Rivard et al., Med. Phys. 31, 633-674 (2004)] for new sources in brachytherapy applications. Dose rate constants, radial dose functions, and anisotropy functions of the source in water, Virtual Water, and relevant human soft tissues were calculated using MCNP5 Monte Carlo simulations following the TG-43U1 formalism. The results yielded dose rate constants of 1.048, 1.024, 1.041, and 1.044 cGy h(-1) U(-1) in water, Virtual Water, muscle, and prostate tissue, respectively. The conversion factor for this new source between water and Virtual Water was 1.02, between muscle and water was 1.006, and between prostate and water was 1.004. The authors' calculation of anisotropy functions in a Virtual Water phantom agreed closely with Murphy's measurements [Murphy et al., Med. Phys. 31, 1529-1538 (2004)]. Our calculations of the radial dose function in water and Virtual Water have good agreement with those in previous experimental and Monte Carlo studies. The TG-43U1 parameters for clinical applications in water, muscle, and prostate tissue are presented in this work.

  1. Nuclear war: Opposing viewpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Szumski, B.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents opposing viewpoints on nuclear war. Topics discussed include: how nuclear would begin; would humanity survive; would civil defense work; will an arms agreement work; and can space weapons reduce the risk of nuclear war.

  2. Nuclear analytical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, D.; Forkman, B.; Persson, B.

    1984-01-01

    This book covers the general theories and techniques of nuclear chemical analysis, directed at applications in analytical chemistry, nuclear medicine, radiophysics, agriculture, environmental sciences, geological exploration, industrial process control, etc. The main principles of nuclear physics and nuclear detection on which the analysis is based are briefly outlined. An attempt is made to emphasise the fundamentals of activation analysis, detection and activation methods, as well as their applications. The book provides guidance in analytical chemistry, agriculture, environmental and biomedical sciences, etc. The contents include: the nuclear periodic system; nuclear decay; nuclear reactions; nuclear radiation sources; interaction of radiation with matter; principles of radiation detectors; nuclear electronics; statistical methods and spectral analysis; methods of radiation detection; neutron activation analysis; charged particle activation analysis; photon activation analysis; sample preparation and chemical separation; nuclear chemical analysis in biological and medical research; the use of nuclear chemical analysis in the field of criminology; nuclear chemical analysis in environmental sciences, geology and mineral exploration; and radiation protection.

  3. Nuclear Quadrupole Moments and Nuclear Shell Structure

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Townes, C. H.; Foley, H. M.; Low, W.

    1950-06-23

    Describes a simple model, based on nuclear shell considerations, which leads to the proper behavior of known nuclear quadrupole moments, although predictions of the magnitudes of some quadrupole moments are seriously in error.

  4. Nuclear South Asia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    inseparable from the history of nuclear developments in both India and Pakistan. The timing of India’s tests was determined by the pronuclear stance of the...Rawalpindi, 2001), 17-18. 53 3Robert Boardman, The Politics of Fading Dreams: Britain and the Nuclear Export Business, Nuclear Exports and World Politics (New...disasters of nuclear arms race. 61 BIBLIOGRAPHY Books Boardman, Robert. The Politics of Fading Dreams: Britain and the Nuclear Export Business, Nuclear

  5. Nuclear Fuel Cycle & Vulnerabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, Brian D.

    2012-06-18

    The objective of safeguards is the timely detection of diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material from peaceful nuclear activities to the manufacture of nuclear weapons or of other nuclear explosive devices or for purposes unknown, and deterrence of such diversion by the risk of early detection. The safeguards system should be designed to provide credible assurances that there has been no diversion of declared nuclear material and no undeclared nuclear material and activities.

  6. Nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Thomson, Wallace B.

    2004-03-16

    A nuclear reactor comprising a cylindrical pressure vessel, an elongated annular core centrally disposed within and spaced from the pressure vessel, and a plurality of ducts disposed longitudinally of the pressure vessel about the periphery thereof, said core comprising an annular active portion, an annular reflector just inside the active portion, and an annular reflector just outside the active a portion, said annular active portion comprising rectangular slab, porous fuel elements radially disposed around the inner reflector and extending the length of the active portion, wedge-shaped, porous moderator elements disposed adjacent one face of each fuel element and extending the length of the fuel element, the fuel and moderator elements being oriented so that the fuel elements face each other and the moderator elements do likewise, adjacent moderator elements being spaced to provide air inlet channels, and adjacent fuel elements being spaced to provide air outlet channels which communicate with the interior of the peripheral ducts, and means for introducing air into the air inlet channels which passes through the porous moderator elements and porous fuel elements to the outlet channel.

  7. Nuclear Proliferation: A Global Nuclear Strategy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-30

    thinking about nuclear weapons as a “ Wild Card ” in this case. Finally, just as North Korea is using nuclear weapons as a “bargaining chip,” we...definite disadvantage for non-nuclear nations not to have a nuclear” Wild Card ”. So some misguided Japanese politicians are attracted to the “ Wild Card ” advantage

  8. Nuclear weapons modernizations

    SciTech Connect

    Kristensen, Hans M.

    2014-05-09

    This article reviews the nuclear weapons modernization programs underway in the world's nine nuclear weapons states. It concludes that despite significant reductions in overall weapons inventories since the end of the Cold War, the pace of reductions is slowing - four of the nuclear weapons states are even increasing their arsenals, and all the nuclear weapons states are busy modernizing their remaining arsenals in what appears to be a dynamic and counterproductive nuclear competition. The author questions whether perpetual modernization combined with no specific plan for the elimination of nuclear weapons is consistent with the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and concludes that new limits on nuclear modernizations are needed.

  9. Nuclear weapons modernizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Hans M.

    2014-05-01

    This article reviews the nuclear weapons modernization programs underway in the world's nine nuclear weapons states. It concludes that despite significant reductions in overall weapons inventories since the end of the Cold War, the pace of reductions is slowing - four of the nuclear weapons states are even increasing their arsenals, and all the nuclear weapons states are busy modernizing their remaining arsenals in what appears to be a dynamic and counterproductive nuclear competition. The author questions whether perpetual modernization combined with no specific plan for the elimination of nuclear weapons is consistent with the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and concludes that new limits on nuclear modernizations are needed.

  10. Enrichment Zoning Options for the Small Nuclear Rocket Engine (SNRE)

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce G. Schnitzler; Stanley K. Borowski

    2010-07-01

    Advancement of U.S. scientific, security, and economic interests through a robust space exploration program requires high performance propulsion systems to support a variety of robotic and crewed missions beyond low Earth orbit. In NASA’s recent Mars Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 study (NASA-SP-2009-566, July 2009), nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) was again selected over chemical propulsion as the preferred in-space transportation system option because of its high thrust and high specific impulse (-900 s) capability, increased tolerance to payload mass growth and architecture changes, and lower total initial mass in low Earth orbit. An extensive nuclear thermal rocket technology development effort was conducted from 1955-1973 under the Rover/NERVA Program. The Small Nuclear Rocket Engine (SNRE) was the last engine design studied by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during the program. At the time, this engine was a state-of-the-art design incorporating lessons learned from the very successful technology development program. Past activities at the NASA Glenn Research Center have included development of highly detailed MCNP Monte Carlo transport models of the SNRE and other small engine designs. Preliminary core configurations typically employ fuel elements with fixed fuel composition and fissile material enrichment. Uniform fuel loadings result in undesirable radial power and temperature profiles in the engines. Engine performance can be improved by some combination of propellant flow control at the fuel element level and by varying the fuel composition. Enrichment zoning at the fuel element level with lower enrichments in the higher power elements at the core center and on the core periphery is particularly effective. Power flattening by enrichment zoning typically results in more uniform propellant exit temperatures and improved engine performance. For the SNRE, element enrichment zoning provided very flat radial power profiles with 551 of the 564

  11. Nuclear Power in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yun

    2012-02-01

    In response to the Fukushima accident, China is strengthening its nuclear safety at reactors in operation, under construction and in preparation, including efforts to improve nuclear safety regulations and guidelines based on lessons learned from the accident. Although China is one of the major contributors in the global nuclear expansion, China's nuclear power industry is relatively young. Its nuclear safety regulators are less experienced compared to those in other major nuclear power countries. To realize China's resolute commitment to rapid growth of safe nuclear energy, detailed analyses of its nuclear safety regulatory system are required. This talk explains China's nuclear energy program and policy at first. It also explores China's governmental activities and future nuclear development after Fukushima accidents. At last, an overview of China's nuclear safety regulations and practices are provided. Issues and challenges are also identified for police makers, regulators, and industry professionals.

  12. Nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Pennell, William E.; Rowan, William J.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor in which the core components, including fuel-rod assemblies, control-rod assemblies, fertile rod-assemblies, and removable shielding assemblies, are supported by a plurality of separate inlet modular units. These units are referred to as inlet module units to distinguish them from the modules of the upper internals of the reactor. The modular units are supported, each removable independently of the others, in liners in the supporting structure for the lower internals of the reactor. The core assemblies are removably supported in integral receptacles or sockets of the modular units. The liners, units, sockets and assmblies have inlet openings for entry of the fluid. The modular units are each removably mounted in the liners with fluid seals interposed between the opening in the liner and inlet module into which the fluid enters and the upper and lower portion of the liner. Each assembly is similarly mounted in a corresponding receptacle with fluid seals interposed between the openings where the fluid enters and the lower portion of the receptacle or fitting closely in these regions. As fluid flows along each core assembly a pressure drop is produced along the fluid so that the fluid which emerges from each core assembly is at a lower pressure than the fluid which enters the core assembly. However because of the seals interposed in the mountings of the units and assemblies the pressures above and below the units and assemblies are balanced and the units are held in the liners and the assemblies are held in the receptacles by their weights as they have a higher specific gravity than the fluid. The low-pressure spaces between each module and its liner and between each core assembly and its module is vented to the low-pressure regions of the vessel to assure that fluid which leaks through the seals does not accumulate and destroy the hydraulic balance.

  13. Nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Yant, Howard W.; Stinebiser, Karl W.; Anzur, Gregory C.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor, particularly a liquid-metal breeder reactor, whose upper internals include outlet modules for channeling the liquid-metal coolant from selected areas of the outlet of the core vertically to the outlet plenum. The modules are composed of a highly-refractory, high corrosion-resistant alloy, for example, INCONEL-718. Each module is disposed to confine and channel generally vertically the coolant emitted from a subplurality of core-component assemblies. Each module has a grid with openings, each opening disposed to receive the coolant from an assembly of the subplurality. The grid in addition serves as a holdown for the assemblies of the corresponding subplurality preventing their excessive ejection upwardly from the core. In the region directly over the core the outlet modules are of such peripheral form that they nest forming a continuum over the core-component assemblies whose outlet coolant they confine. Each subassembly includes a chimney which confines the coolant emitted by its corresponding subassemblies to generally vertical flow between the outlet of the core and the outlet plenum. Each subplurality of assemblies whose emitted coolant is confined by an outlet module includes assemblies which emit lower-temperature coolant, for example, a control-rod assembly, or fertile assemblies, and assemblies which emit coolant of substantially higher temperature, for example, fuel-rod assemblies. The coolants of different temperatures are mixed in the chimneys reducing the effect of stripping (hot-cold temperature fluctuations) on the remainder of the upper internals which are composed typically of AISI-304 or AISI-316 stainless steel.

  14. Development of an automated core model for nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Mosteller, R.D.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to develop an automated package of computer codes that can model the steady-state behavior of nuclear-reactor cores of various designs. As an added benefit, data produced for steady-state analysis also can be used as input to the TRAC transient-analysis code for subsequent safety analysis of the reactor at any point in its operating lifetime. The basic capability to perform steady-state reactor-core analysis already existed in the combination of the HELIOS lattice-physics code and the NESTLE advanced nodal code. In this project, the automated package was completed by (1) obtaining cross-section libraries for HELIOS, (2) validating HELIOS by comparing its predictions to results from critical experiments and from the MCNP Monte Carlo code, (3) validating NESTLE by comparing its predictions to results from numerical benchmarks and to measured data from operating reactors, and (4) developing a linkage code to transform HELIOS output into NESTLE input.

  15. The New Nuclear Nations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spector, Leonard S.

    1990-01-01

    Explores the issue of nuclear proliferation, noting that the countries with nuclear capability now include Israel, South Africa, India, and Pakistan. Describes the role and problems of the United States in halting nuclearization. Supplies charts, maps, and information concerning the state of nuclear capability in each country. (NL)

  16. Nuclear air cushion vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    The state-of-the-art of the still-conceptual nuclear air cushion vehicle, particularly the nuclear powerplant is identified. Using mission studies and cost estimates, some of the advantages of nuclear power for large air cushion vehicles are described. The technology studies on mobile nuclear powerplants and conceptual ACV systems/missions studies are summarized.

  17. Nuclear energy and security

    SciTech Connect

    BLEJWAS,THOMAS E.; SANDERS,THOMAS L.; EAGAN,ROBERT J.; BAKER,ARNOLD B.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear power is an important and, the authors believe, essential component of a secure nuclear future. Although nuclear fuel cycles create materials that have some potential for use in nuclear weapons, with appropriate fuel cycles, nuclear power could reduce rather than increase real proliferation risk worldwide. Future fuel cycles could be designed to avoid plutonium production, generate minimal amounts of plutonium in proliferation-resistant amounts or configurations, and/or transparently and efficiently consume plutonium already created. Furthermore, a strong and viable US nuclear infrastructure, of which nuclear power is a large element, is essential if the US is to maintain a leadership or even participatory role in defining the global nuclear infrastructure and controlling the proliferation of nuclear weapons. By focusing on new fuel cycles and new reactor technologies, it is possible to advantageously burn and reduce nuclear materials that could be used for nuclear weapons rather than increase and/or dispose of these materials. Thus, the authors suggest that planners for a secure nuclear future use technology to design an ideal future. In this future, nuclear power creates large amounts of virtually atmospherically clean energy while significantly lowering the threat of proliferation through the thoughtful use, physical security, and agreed-upon transparency of nuclear materials. The authors must develop options for policy makers that bring them as close as practical to this ideal. Just as Atoms for Peace became the ideal for the first nuclear century, they see a potential nuclear future that contributes significantly to power for peace and prosperity.

  18. Terrorists and Nuclear Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krieger, David

    1975-01-01

    This essay explores the ways terrorist groups may gain possession of nuclear materials; the way in which they may use nuclear weapons and other nuclear technologies to their benefit; and various courses of action designed to minimize the possibilities of terrorists utilizing nuclear technology to their benefit and society's detriment. (BT)

  19. Frontiers of Nuclear Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarewicz, Witold

    1997-12-31

    Current developments in nuclear structure at the `limits` are discussed. The studies of nuclear behavior at extreme conditions provide us with invaluable information about the nature of the nuclear interaction and nucleonic correlations at various energy-distance scales. In this talk frontiers of nuclear structure are briefly reviewed from a theoretical perspective, mainly concentrating on medium-mass and heavy nuclei.

  20. Nuclear medicine annual, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, L.M.; Weissmann, H.S.

    1984-01-01

    The following topics are reviewed in this work: nuclear physicians role in planning for and handling radiation accidents; the role of nuclear medicine in evaluating the hypertensive patient; studies of the heart with radionuclides; role of radionuclide imaging in the patient undergoing chemotherapy; hematologic nuclear medicine; the role of nuclear medicine in sports related injuries; radionuclide evaluation of hepatic function with emphasis on cholestatis.

  1. Monte-Carlo Simulations of the Nuclear Energy Deposition Inside the CARMEN-1P Differential Calorimeter Irradiated into OSIRIS Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Amharrak, H.; Reynard-Carette, C.; Carette, M.; Lemaire, M.; Vaglio-Gaudard, C.; Fourmentel, D.; Lyoussi, A.

    2015-07-01

    carried out. A preliminary analysis shows that the numerical results overestimate the measurements by about 20 %. A new approach has been developed in order to estimate the nuclear heating by two methods (energy deposition or KERMA) by considering the whole complete geometry of the sensor. This new approach will contribute to the interpretation of the irradiation campaign and will be useful to improve the out-of-pile calibration procedure of the sensor and its thermal response during irradiations. The aim of this paper is to present simulations made by using MCNP5 Monte-Carlo transport code (using ENDF/B-VI nuclear data library) for the nuclear heating inside the different parts of the calorimeter (head, rod and base). Calculations into two steps will be realized. We will use as an input source in the model new spectra (neutrons, prompt-photons and delayed-photons) calculated with the Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI-4{sup R} inside different experimental channels (water) located into the OSIRIS periphery and used during the CARMEN-1P irradiation campaign. We will consider Neutrons- Photons-Electrons and Photons-Electrons modes. We will begin by a brief description of the differential-calorimeter device geometry. Then the MCNP5 model used for the calculations of nuclear heating inside the calorimeter elements will be introduced. The energy deposition due to the prompt-gamma, delayed-gamma and neutrons, the neutron-activation of the device will be considered. The different components of the nuclear heating inside the different parts of the calorimeter will be detailed. Moreover, a comparison between KERMA and nuclear energy deposition estimations will be given. Finally, a comparison between this total nuclear heating Calculation and Experiment in graphite sample will be determined. (authors)

  2. The nuclear freeze controversy

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, K.B.; Gray, C.S.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents papers on nuclear arms control. Topics considered include the background and rationale behind the nuclear freeze proposal, nuclear deterrence, national defense, arms races, arms buildup, warfare, the moral aspects of nuclear deterrence, treaty verification, the federal budget, the economy, a historical perspective on Soviet policy toward the freeze, the other side of the Soviet peace offensive, and making sense of the nuclear freeze debate.

  3. Development and validation of scale nuclear analysis methods for high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Gehin, Jess C; Jessee, Matthew Anderson; Williams, Mark L; Lee, Deokjung; Goluoglu, Sedat; Ilas, Germina; Ilas, Dan; Bowman, Steve A

    2010-01-01

    In support of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, ORNL is updating the nuclear analysis methods and data in the SCALE code system to support modeling of HTGRs. Development activities include methods used for reactor physics, criticality safety, and radiation shielding. This paper focuses on the nuclear methods in support of reactor physics, which primarily include lattice physics for cross-section processing of both prismatic and pebble-bed designs, Monte Carlo depletion methods and efficiency improvements for double heterogeneous fuels, and validation against relevant experiments. These methods enhancements are being validated using available experimental data from the HTTR and HTR-10 startup and initial criticality experiments. Results obtained with three-dimensional Monte Carlo models of the HTTR initial core critical configurations with SCALE6/KENO show excellent agreement between the continuous energy and multigroup methods and the results are consistent with results obtained by others. A three-dimensional multigroup Monte Carlo model for the initial critical core of the HTR-10 has been developed with SCALE6/KENO based on the benchmark specifications included in the IRPhE Handbook. The core eigenvalue obtained with this model is in very good agreement with the corresponding value obtained with a consistent continuous energy MCNP5 core model.

  4. Nuclear EMP simulation for large-scale urban environments. FDTD for electrically large problems.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, William S.; Bull, Jeffrey S.; Wilcox, Trevor; Bos, Randall J.; Shao, Xuan-Min; Goorley, John T.; Costigan, Keeley R.

    2012-08-13

    In case of a terrorist nuclear attack in a metropolitan area, EMP measurement could provide: (1) a prompt confirmation of the nature of the explosion (chemical or nuclear) for emergency response; and (2) and characterization parameters of the device (reaction history, yield) for technical forensics. However, urban environment could affect the fidelity of the prompt EMP measurement (as well as all other types of prompt measurement): (1) Nuclear EMP wavefront would no longer be coherent, due to incoherent production, attenuation, and propagation of gamma and electrons; and (2) EMP propagation from source region outward would undergo complicated transmission, reflection, and diffraction processes. EMP simulation for electrically-large urban environment: (1) Coupled MCNP/FDTD (Finite-difference time domain Maxwell solver) approach; and (2) FDTD tends to be limited to problems that are not 'too' large compared to the wavelengths of interest because of numerical dispersion and anisotropy. We use a higher-order low-dispersion, isotropic FDTD algorithm for EMP propagation.

  5. Nuclear Data Performance Testing Using Sensitive, but Less Frequently Used ICSBEP Benchmarks

    SciTech Connect

    J. Blair Briggs; John D. Bess

    2011-08-01

    The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) has published the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments annually since 1995. The Handbook now spans over 51,000 pages with benchmark specifications for 4,283 critical, near critical, or subcritical configurations; 24 criticality alarm placement/shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each; and 200 configurations that have been categorized as fundamental physics measurements relevant to criticality safety applications. Benchmark data in the ICSBEP Handbook were originally intended for validation of criticality safety methods and data; however, the benchmark specifications are now used extensively for nuclear data testing. There are several, less frequently used benchmarks within the Handbook that are very sensitive to thorium and certain key structural and moderating materials. Calculated results for many of those benchmarks using modern nuclear data libraries suggest there is still room for improvement. These and other highly sensitive, but rarely quoted benchmarks are highlighted and data testing results provided using the Monte Carlo N-Particle Version 5 (MCNP5) code and continuous energy ENDF/B-V, VI.8, and VII.0, JEFF-3.1, and JENDL-3.3 nuclear data libraries.

  6. Detailed Burnup Calculations for Testing Nuclear Data

    SciTech Connect

    Leszczynski, F.

    2005-05-24

    A general method (MCQ) has been developed by introducing a microscopic burnup scheme that uses the Monte Carlo calculated fluxes and microscopic reaction rates of a complex system and a depletion code for burnup calculations as a basis for solving nuclide material balance equations for each spatial region in which the system is divided. Continuous energy-dependent cross-section libraries and full 3D geometry of the system can be input for the calculations. The resulting predictions for the system at successive burnup time steps are thus based on a calculation route where both geometry and cross sections are accurately represented, without geometry simplifications and with continuous energy data, providing an independent approach for benchmarking other methods and nuclear data of actinides, fission products, and other burnable absorbers. The main advantage of this method over the classical deterministic methods currently used is that the MCQ System is a direct 3D method without the limitations and errors introduced on the homogenization of geometry and condensation of energy of deterministic methods. The Monte Carlo and burnup codes adopted until now are the widely used MCNP and ORIGEN codes, but other codes can be used also. For using this method, there is need of a well-known set of nuclear data for isotopes involved in burnup chains, including burnable poisons, fission products, and actinides. For fixing the data to be included in this set, a study of the present status of nuclear data is performed, as part of the development of the MCQ method. This study begins with a review of the available cross-section data of isotopes involved in burnup chains for power and research nuclear reactors. The main data needs for burnup calculations are neutron cross sections, decay constants, branching ratios, fission energy, and yields. The present work includes results of selected experimental benchmarks and conclusions about the sensitivity of different sets of cross

  7. Reconstruction of the activity of point sources for the accurate characterization of nuclear waste drums by segmented gamma scanning.

    PubMed

    Krings, Thomas; Mauerhofer, Eric

    2011-06-01

    This work improves the reliability and accuracy in the reconstruction of the total isotope activity content in heterogeneous nuclear waste drums containing point sources. The method is based on χ(2)-fits of the angular dependent count rate distribution measured during a drum rotation in segmented gamma scanning. A new description of the analytical calculation of the angular count rate distribution is introduced based on a more precise model of the collimated detector. The new description is validated and compared to the old description using MCNP5 simulations of angular dependent count rate distributions of Co-60 and Cs-137 point sources. It is shown that the new model describes the angular dependent count rate distribution significantly more accurate compared to the old model. Hence, the reconstruction of the activity is more accurate and the errors are considerably reduced that lead to more reliable results. Furthermore, the results are compared to the conventional reconstruction method assuming a homogeneous matrix and activity distribution.

  8. Nuclear Waste Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, Glendon W.; Meyer, Philip D.; Ward, Andy L.

    2005-01-12

    Nuclear wastes are by-products of nuclear weapons production and nuclear power generation, plus residuals of radioactive materials used by industry, medicine, agriculture, and academia. Their distinctive nature and potential hazard make nuclear wastes not only the most dangerous waste ever created by mankind, but also one of the most controversial and regulated with respect to disposal. Nuclear waste issues, related to uncertainties in geologic disposal and long-term protection, combined with potential misuse by terrorist groups, have created uneasiness and fear in the general public and remain stumbling blocks for further development of a nuclear industry in a world that may soon be facing a global energy crisis.

  9. Neutron Transport and Nuclear Burnup Analysis for the Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion-Fission Energy (LIFE) Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, K J; Latkowski, J F; Abbott, R P; Boyd, J K; Powers, J J; Seifried, J E

    2008-10-24

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is currently developing a hybrid fusion-fission nuclear energy system, called LIFE, to generate power and burn nuclear waste. We utilize inertial confinement fusion to drive a subcritical fission blanket surrounding the fusion chamber. It is composed of TRISO-based fuel cooled by the molten salt flibe. Low-yield (37.5 MJ) targets and a repetition rate of 13.3 Hz produce a 500 MW fusion source that is coupled to the subcritical blanket, which provides an additional gain of 4-8, depending on the fuel. In the present work, we describe the neutron transport and nuclear burnup analysis. We utilize standard analysis tools including, the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code, ORIGEN2 and Monteburns to perform the nuclear design. These analyses focus primarily on a fuel composed of depleted uranium not requiring chemical reprocessing or enrichment. However, other fuels such as weapons grade plutonium and highly-enriched uranium are also under consideration. In addition, we have developed a methodology using {sup 6}Li as a burnable poison to replace the tritium burned in the fusion targets and to maintain constant power over the lifetime of the engine. The results from depleted uranium analyses suggest up to 99% burnup of actinides is attainable while maintaining full power at 2GW for more than five decades.

  10. Nuclear Security for Floating Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Skiba, James M.; Scherer, Carolynn P.

    2015-10-13

    Recently there has been a lot of interest in small modular reactors. A specific type of these small modular reactors (SMR,) are marine based power plants called floating nuclear power plants (FNPP). These FNPPs are typically built by countries with extensive knowledge of nuclear energy, such as Russia, France, China and the US. These FNPPs are built in one country and then sent to countries in need of power and/or seawater desalination. Fifteen countries have expressed interest in acquiring such power stations. Some designs for such power stations are briefly summarized. Several different avenues for cooperation in FNPP technology are proposed, including IAEA nuclear security (i.e. safeguards), multilateral or bilateral agreements, and working with Russian design that incorporates nuclear safeguards for IAEA inspections in non-nuclear weapons states

  11. Nuclear radiation actuated valve

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Schively, Dixon P.

    1985-01-01

    A nuclear radiation actuated valve for a nuclear reactor. The valve has a valve first part (such as a valve rod with piston) and a valve second part (such as a valve tube surrounding the valve rod, with the valve tube having side slots surrounding the piston). Both valve parts have known nuclear radiation swelling characteristics. The valve's first part is positioned to receive nuclear radiation from the nuclear reactor's fuel region. The valve's second part is positioned so that its nuclear radiation induced swelling is different from that of the valve's first part. The valve's second part also is positioned so that the valve's first and second parts create a valve orifice which changes in size due to the different nuclear radiation caused swelling of the valve's first part compared to the valve's second part. The valve may be used in a nuclear reactor's core coolant system.

  12. RBC nuclear scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003835.htm RBC nuclear scan To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An RBC nuclear scan uses small amounts of radioactive material to ...

  13. Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP)

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's history with nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) technology goes back to the earliest days of the Agency. The Manned Lunar Rover Vehicle and the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Applications p...

  14. Nuclear disarmament verification

    SciTech Connect

    DeVolpi, A.

    1993-12-31

    Arms control treaties, unilateral actions, and cooperative activities -- reflecting the defusing of East-West tensions -- are causing nuclear weapons to be disarmed and dismantled worldwide. In order to provide for future reductions and to build confidence in the permanency of this disarmament, verification procedures and technologies would play an important role. This paper outlines arms-control objectives, treaty organization, and actions that could be undertaken. For the purposes of this Workshop on Verification, nuclear disarmament has been divided into five topical subareas: Converting nuclear-weapons production complexes, Eliminating and monitoring nuclear-weapons delivery systems, Disabling and destroying nuclear warheads, Demilitarizing or non-military utilization of special nuclear materials, and Inhibiting nuclear arms in non-nuclear-weapons states. This paper concludes with an overview of potential methods for verification.

  15. Nuclear fear revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2010-10-01

    In 1988 the science historian Spencer Weart published a groundbreaking book called Nuclear Fear: A History of Images, which examined visions of radiation damage and nuclear disaster in newspapers, television, film, literature, advertisements and popular culture.

  16. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This report contains brief papers that discusses the following topics: Fundamental Symmetries in the Nucleus; Internucleon Interactions; Dynamics of Very Light Nuclei; Facets of the Nuclear Many-Body Problem; and Nuclear Instruments and Methods.

  17. Teaching "The Nuclear Predicament."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carman, Philip; Kneeshaw, Stephen

    1987-01-01

    Contends that courses on nuclear war must help students examine the political, social, religious, philosophical, economic, and moral assumptions which characterized the dilemma of nuclear armament/disarmament. Describes the upper level undergraduate course taught by the authors. (JDH)

  18. Nuclear Energy Policy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-27

    small modular reactors and extend the lives and improve the operation of existing commercial nuclear power plants. 40 Interdisciplinary MIT Study, The Future of Nuclear Power, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2003, p. 79. 41 Gronlund, Lisbeth, David Lochbaum, and Edwin Lyman, Nuclear Power in a Warming World, Union of Concerned Scientists, December 2007. 42 Travis Madsen, Tony Dutzik, and Bernadette Del Chiaro, et al., Generating Failure: How Building Nuclear Power Plants

  19. JPRS Report, Nuclear Developments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-24

    of efforts to improve the safety of nuclear reactors that were started together with the USSR. These efforts are focused in particular on...characteristics of these reactors are quite encouraging. With their improved safety and low radiation effect on environment they ensure the possi...Nuclear Power [KYODO] 3 Fukushima Nuclear Reactor Reports Leak [KYODO] 3 NORTH KOREA Nuclear Weapons Capability Discussed by ROK Paper

  20. Nuclear power browning out

    SciTech Connect

    Flavin, C.; Lenssen, N.

    1996-05-01

    When the sad history of nuclear power is written, April 26, 1986, will be recorded as the day the dream died. The explosion at the Chernobyl plant was a terrible human tragedy- and it delivered a stark verdict on the hope that nuclear power will one day replace fossil fuel-based energy systems. Nuclear advocates may soldier on, but a decade after Chernobyl it is clear that nuclear power is no longer a viable energy option for the twenty-first century.

  1. JPRS Report Nuclear Developments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    release; Distribution Unlimited | -—fb 40 Nuclear Developments JPRS-TND-88-016 CONTENTS 2 SEPTEMBER 1988 CHINA Nuclear Power Chief Seeks...Foreign Cooperation [Yuan Zhou; CHINA DAILY (BUSINESS WEEKLY) 1 Aug 88] 1 Nuclear Fusion Study Reaches Advanced Level [Xiao Longlian; Beijing...Government ’Welcomes’ Group [Beijing XINHUA 12 Aug 88] 4 No Decision on Disposal of Daya Nuclear Waste [Andy Ho; Hong Kong SOUTH CHINA MORNING POST

  2. Nuclear air cushion vehicles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    This paper serves several functions. It identifies the 'state-of-the-art' of the still-conceptual nuclear air cushion vehicle, particularly the nuclear powerplant. Using mission studies and cost estimates, the report describes some of the advantages of nuclear power for large air cushion vehicles. The paper also summarizes the technology studies on mobile nuclear powerplants and conceptual ACV systems/missions studies that have been performed at NASA Lewis Research Center.

  3. NUCLEAR REACTOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Epler, E.P.; Hanauer, S.H.; Oakes, L.C.

    1959-11-01

    A control system is described for a nuclear reactor using enriched uranium fuel of the type of the swimming pool and other heterogeneous nuclear reactors. Circuits are included for automatically removing and inserting the control rods during the course of normal operation. Appropriate safety circuits close down the nuclear reactor in the event of emergency.

  4. Revitalizing Nuclear Safety Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC.

    This report covers the general issues involved in nuclear safety research and points out the areas needing detailed consideration. Topics included are: (1) "Principles of Nuclear Safety Research" (examining who should fund, who should conduct, and who should set the agenda for nuclear safety research); (2) "Elements of a Future…

  5. Nuclear energy technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buden, David

    1992-01-01

    An overview of space nuclear energy technologies is presented. The development and characteristics of radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG's) and space nuclear power reactors are discussed. In addition, the policy and issues related to public safety and the use of nuclear power sources in space are addressed.

  6. JPRS Report, Nuclear Developments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-24

    a new generation of nuclear Because of the significant improvements in radiation read- reactors with an increased degree of safety are developed...With USSR [Moscow PRA VDA 14 Aug] ...................... 14 Future Nuclear Reactor Plans Detailed fIslamnahad Radio...July Stoppages /Moscow International] ........................................... 19 Suspension of Nuclear Reactor Construction Urged ITASS

  7. JPRS Report, Nuclear Developments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-24

    extraction plant in collaboration with the Fer- Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR). tilizers and Chemicals , Travancore (FACT) at Eloor near Cochin...Nuclear Reactor Shut Down After Malfunction [KYODO] ................................................................ 8 PHILIPPINES Proposal To Operate...Nuclear Reactor in Algeria [TELAM] .............................................................. 10 Nuclear Official Returns From Algeria [TELAM

  8. Teaching Nuclear History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holl, Jack M.; Convis, Sheila C.

    1991-01-01

    Presents results of a survey of the teaching about nuclear history at U.S. colleges and universities. Reports the existence of a well-established and extensive literature, a focus on nuclear weapons or warfare, and a concentration on nuclear citizenship, therapy, or eschatology for courses outside of history departments. Discusses individual…

  9. Nuclear Medicine Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... necesita saber acerca de... Estudios de Imagen de Medicina Nuclear Un procedimiento de medicina nuclear se describe algunas veces como unos rayos- ... través del cuerpo del paciente. Los procedimientos de medicina nuclear utilizan pequeñas cantidades de mate- riales radiactivos, ...

  10. Nuclear fact book

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, O. F.; Platt, A. M.; Robinson, J. V.

    1983-05-01

    This reference provides significant highlights and summary facts in the following areas: general energy; nuclear energy; nuclear fuel cycle; uranium supply and enrichment; nuclear reactors; spent fuel and advanced repacking concepts; reprocessing; high-level waste; gaseous waste; transuranic waste; low-level waste; remedial action; transportation; disposal; radiation information; environment; legislation; socio-political aspects; conversion factors; and a glossary. (GHT)

  11. Effects of Nuclear Weapons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sartori, Leo

    1983-01-01

    Fundamental principles governing nuclear explosions and their effects are discussed, including three components of a nuclear explosion (thermal radiation, shock wave, nuclear radiation). Describes how effects of these components depend on the weapon's yield, its height of burst, and distance of detonation point. Includes effects of three…

  12. Basic Nuclear Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Naval Personnel, Washington, DC.

    Basic concepts of nuclear structures, radiation, nuclear reactions, and health physics are presented in this text, prepared for naval officers. Applications to the area of nuclear power are described in connection with pressurized water reactors, experimental boiling water reactors, homogeneous reactor experiments, and experimental breeder…

  13. History of Nuclear India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaturvedi, Ram

    2000-04-01

    India emerged as a free and democratic country in 1947, and entered into the nuclear age in 1948 by establishing the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), with Homi Bhabha as the chairman. Later on the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) was created under the Office of the Prime Minister Jawahar Lal Nehru. Initially the AEC and DAE received international cooperation, and by 1963 India had two research reactors and four nuclear power reactors. In spite of the humiliating defeat in the border war by China in 1962 and China's nuclear testing in 1964, India continued to adhere to the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. On May 18, 1974 India performed a 15 kt Peaceful Nuclear Explosion (PNE). The western powers considered it nuclear weapons proliferation and cut off all financial and technical help, even for the production of nuclear power. However, India used existing infrastructure to build nuclear power reactors and exploded both fission and fusion devices on May 11 and 13, 1998. The international community viewed the later activity as a serious road block for the Non-Proliferation Treaty and the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty; both deemed essential to stop the spread of nuclear weapons. India considers these treaties favoring nuclear states and is prepared to sign if genuine nuclear disarmament is included as an integral part of these treaties.

  14. Commercial nuclear power 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-28

    This report presents the status at the end of 1989 and the outlook for commercial nuclear capacity and generation for all countries in the world with free market economies (FME). The report provides documentation of the US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 2030. The long-term projections of US nuclear capacity and generation are provided to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for use in estimating nuclear waste fund revenues and to aid in planning the disposal of nuclear waste. These projections also support the Energy Information Administration's annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment, and are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The foreign nuclear capacity projections are used by the DOE uranium enrichment program in assessing potential markets for future enrichment contracts. The two major sections of this report discuss US and foreign commercial nuclear power. The US section (Chapters 2 and 3) deals with (1) the status of nuclear power as of the end of 1989; (2) projections of nuclear capacity and generation at 5-year intervals from 1990 through 2030; and (3) a discussion of institutional and technical issues that affect nuclear power. The nuclear capacity projections are discussed in terms of two projection periods: the intermediate term through 2010 and the long term through 2030. A No New Orders case is presented for each of the projection periods, as well as Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

  15. The nuclear symmetry energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldo, M.; Burgio, G. F.

    2016-11-01

    The nuclear symmetry energy characterizes the variation of the binding energy as the neutron to proton ratio of a nuclear system is varied. This is one of the most important features of nuclear physics in general, since it is just related to the two component nature of the nuclear systems. As such it is one of the most relevant physical parameters that affect the physics of many phenomena and nuclear processes. This review paper presents a survey of the role and relevance of the nuclear symmetry energy in different fields of research and of the accuracy of its determination from the phenomenology and from the microscopic many-body theory. In recent years, a great interest was devoted not only to the Nuclear Matter symmetry energy at saturation density but also to its whole density dependence, which is an essential ingredient for our understanding of many phenomena. We analyze the nuclear symmetry energy in different realms of nuclear physics and astrophysics. In particular we consider the nuclear symmetry energy in relation to nuclear structure, astrophysics of Neutron Stars and supernovae, and heavy ion collision experiments, trying to elucidate the connections of these different fields on the basis of the symmetry energy peculiarities. The interplay between experimental and observational data and theoretical developments is stressed. The expected future developments and improvements are schematically addressed, together with most demanded experimental and theoretical advances for the next few years.

  16. Thermodynamics of nuclear transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ching-Hao; Mehta, Pankaj; Elbaum, Michael

    Molecular transport across the nuclear envelope is important for eukaryotes for gene expression and signaling. Experimental studies have revealed that nuclear transport is inherently a nonequilibrium process and actively consumes energy. In this work we present a thermodynamics theory of nuclear transport for a major class of nuclear transporters that are mediated by the small GTPase Ran. We identify the molecular elements responsible for powering nuclear transport, which we term the ``Ran battery'' and find that the efficiency of transport, measured by the cargo nuclear localization ratio, is limited by competition between cargo molecules and RanGTP to bind transport receptors, as well as the amount of NTF2 (i.e. RanGDP carrier) available to circulate the energy flow. This picture complements our current understanding of nuclear transport by providing a comprehensive thermodynamics framework to decipher the underlying biochemical machinery. Pm and CHW were supported by a Simons Investigator in the Mathematical Modeling in Living Systems grant (to PM).

  17. 75 FR 30078 - Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.; Entergy Nuclear Vermont Yankee, LLC; Vermont Yankee Nuclear...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-28

    ... Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR). By letter dated May 20, 2010, the Director denied the... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.; Entergy Nuclear Vermont Yankee, LLC; Vermont Yankee...

  18. Mixed Source Interrogation of Steel Shielded Special Nuclear Material Using an Intense Pulsed Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, C.; Clemett, C. D.; Campbell, B.; Martin, P. N.; Threadgold, J.; O'Malley, J.

    This paper explores the benefits of using a mixed photon and neutron radiation source for active detection of special nuclear material. More than fifty irradiations were performed using an 8 MV electron accelerator employing and induction voltage adder (IVA). The experiments used a high atomic number converter to produce a Bremsstrahlung photon spectrum which was then used to create a neutron source via a nuclear interaction with heavy water (deuterium oxide, D2O). This mixed particle source was used to irradiate a depleted uranium (DU) sample, inducing fission in the sample. Several thicknesses of steel shielding were tested in order to compare the performance of the mixed photon and neutron source to a Bremsstrahlung-only source. An array of detectors were fielded to record both photons and neutrons emitted by the fission reactions. A correlation between steel shielding and a detection figure-of-merit can be seen in all cases where the Bremsstrahlung-only source was used. The same relationship for the mixed photon-neutron source is less consistent. The data collected from the fielded detectors is compared to MCNP6 calculations and good agreement is found.

  19. Fuel Burnup and Fuel Pool Shielding Analysis for Bushehr Nuclear Reactor VVER-1000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadad, Kamal; Ayobian, Navid

    Bushehr Nuclear power plant (BNPP) is currently under construction. The VVER-1000 reactor will be loaded with 126 tons of about 4% enriched fuel having 3-years life cycle. The spent fuel (SF) will be transferred into the spent fuel pool (SPF), where it stays for 8 years before being transferred to Russia. The SPF plays a crucial role during 8 years when the SP resides in there. This paper investigates the shielding of this structure as it is designed to shield the SF radiation. In this study, the SF isotope inventory, for different cycles and with different burnups, was calculated using WIMS/4D transport code. Using MCNP4C nuclear code, the intensity of γ rays was obtained in different layers of SFP shields. These layers include the water above fuel assemblies (FA) in pool, concrete wall of the pool and water laid above transferring fuels. Results show that γ rays leakage from the shield in the mentioned layers are in agreement with the plant's PSAR data. Finally we analyzed an accident were the water height above the FA in the pool drops to 47 cm. In this case it was observed that exposure dose above pool, 10 and 30 days from the accident, are still high and in the levels of 1000 and 758 R/hr.

  20. An Integrated Analysis of a NERVA Based Nuclear Thermal Propulsion System

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewig, Hans; Cheng, L.-Y.; Ecker, Lynne; Todosow, Michael

    2006-01-20

    This paper presents results and conclusions derived from an integrated analysis of a NERVA based Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) system. The NTP system is sized to generate a thrust of 70,000 N (15,000 lbf), and have a specific impulse (Isp) of 860 s. This implies a reactor that operates at 350 MWth and has a mixed mean propellant outlet temperature of 2760 K. The integrated analysis will require that self-consistent neutronic/thermal-hydraulic/stress analyses be carried out. The major code packages used in this analysis are MCNP, RELAP, and ANSYS. Results from this analysis indicate that nuclear data will have to be re-generated to cover the wide temperature range, zone loading will be necessary to avoid entering the liquidus region for the fuel, and the effectiveness of the ZrC insulator will have implications for bi-modal applications. These results suggest a path forward in the development of a viable NTP system based on a NERVA reactor should initially concentrate on fuel and structural materials and associated coating development. A series of safety related criticality determinations were carried out addressing water immersion following a launch incident.

  1. British nuclear policymaking

    SciTech Connect

    Bowie, C.J.; Platt, A.

    1984-01-01

    This study analyzes the domestic political, economic, and bureaucratic factors that affect the nuclear policymaking process in Great Britain. Its major conclusion is that, although there have been changes in that process in recent years (notably the current involvement of a segment of the British public in the debate about the deployment of intermediate-range nuclear forces), future British nuclear policymaking will remain much what it has been in the past. Three ideas are central to understanding British thinking on the subject: (1) Britain's long-standing resolve to have her own national nuclear force is largely traceable to her desire to maintain first-rank standing among the nations of the world in spite of loss of empire. (2) Financial considerations have always been important--so much so that they have usually dominated issues of nuclear policy. (3) The executive branch of government dominates the nuclear policymaking process but does not always present a united front. The United States heavily influences British nuclear policy through having supplied Britain since the late 1950s with nuclear data and components of nuclear weapon systems such as Polaris and Trident. The relationship works both ways since the U.S. depends on Britain as a base for deployment of both conventional and nuclear systems.

  2. Upgrade of the MIT Linear Electrostatic Ion Accelerator (LEIA) for nuclear diagnostics development for Omega, Z and the NIF.

    PubMed

    Sinenian, N; Manuel, M J-E; Zylstra, A B; Rosenberg, M; Waugh, C J; Rinderknecht, H G; Casey, D T; Sio, H; Ruszczynski, J K; Zhou, L; Gatu Johnson, M; Frenje, J A; Séguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Ruiz, C L; Leeper, R J

    2012-04-01

    The MIT Linear Electrostatic Ion Accelerator (LEIA) generates DD and D(3)He fusion products for the development of nuclear diagnostics for Omega, Z, and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Significant improvements to the system in recent years are presented. Fusion reaction rates, as high as 10(7) s(-1) and 10(6) s(-1) for DD and D(3)He, respectively, are now well regulated with a new ion source and electronic gas control system. Charged fusion products are more accurately characterized, which allows for better calibration of existing nuclear diagnostics. In addition, in situ measurements of the on-target beam profile, made with a CCD camera, are used to determine the metrology of the fusion-product source for particle-counting applications. Finally, neutron diagnostics development has been facilitated by detailed Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport (MCNP) modeling of neutrons in the accelerator target chamber, which is used to correct for scattering within the system. These recent improvements have resulted in a versatile platform, which continues to support the existing nuclear diagnostics while simultaneously facilitating the development of new diagnostics in aid of the National Ignition Campaign at the National Ignition Facility.

  3. Economics of nuclear power.

    PubMed

    Rossin, A D; Rieck, T A

    1978-08-18

    With 12 percent of U.S. electricity now being supplied by nuclear power, Commonwealth Edison has found nuclear plants to be good investments relative to other base load energy sources. The country's largest user of nuclear power, Commonwealth Edison, estimates that its commitment to nuclear saved its customers about 10 percent on their electric bills in 1977, compared to the cost with the next best alternative, coal. This advantage is seen as continuing, contrary to criticisms of the economics and reliability of nuclear power and claims that it has hidden subsidies. It is concluded that there is a need for both nuclear and coal and that government policy precluding or restricting either would be unwise.

  4. Nuclear Science References Database

    SciTech Connect

    Pritychenko, B.; Běták, E.; Singh, B.; Totans, J.

    2014-06-15

    The Nuclear Science References (NSR) database together with its associated Web interface, is the world's only comprehensive source of easily accessible low- and intermediate-energy nuclear physics bibliographic information for more than 210,000 articles since the beginning of nuclear science. The weekly-updated NSR database provides essential support for nuclear data evaluation, compilation and research activities. The principles of the database and Web application development and maintenance are described. Examples of nuclear structure, reaction and decay applications are specifically included. The complete NSR database is freely available at the websites of the National Nuclear Data Center (http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/nsr) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (http://www-nds.iaea.org/nsr)

  5. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  6. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  7. Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Levesque, Stephen

    2013-04-05

    This report summarizes the activities undertaken by EWI while under contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for the management and operation of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium (NFC). The NFC was established by EWI to independently develop, evaluate, and deploy fabrication approaches and data that support the re-establishment of the U.S. nuclear industry: ensuring that the supply chain will be competitive on a global stage, enabling more cost-effective and reliable nuclear power in a carbon constrained environment. The NFC provided a forum for member original equipment manufactures (OEM), fabricators, manufacturers, and materials suppliers to effectively engage with each other and rebuild the capacity of this supply chain by : Identifying and removing impediments to the implementation of new construction and fabrication techniques and approaches for nuclear equipment, including system components and nuclear plants. Providing and facilitating detailed scientific-based studies on new approaches and technologies that will have positive impacts on the cost of building of nuclear plants. Analyzing and disseminating information about future nuclear fabrication technologies and how they could impact the North American and the International Nuclear Marketplace. Facilitating dialog and initiate alignment among fabricators, owners, trade associations, and government agencies. Supporting industry in helping to create a larger qualified nuclear supplier network. Acting as an unbiased technology resource to evaluate, develop, and demonstrate new manufacturing technologies. Creating welder and inspector training programs to help enable the necessary workforce for the upcoming construction work. Serving as a focal point for technology, policy, and politically interested parties to share ideas and concepts associated with fabrication across the nuclear industry. The report the objectives and summaries of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

  8. Pakistans Nuclear Weapons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-12

    2004 revelations about a procurement network run by former Pakistani nuclear official A. Q. Khan, Islamabad has taken a number of steps to improve ...strengthened export control laws, improved personnel security, and international nuclear security cooperation programs, have improved Pakistan’s...context where these broader tensions and conflicts are present. 1 Pakistani efforts to improve the security of its nuclear weapons have been ongoing

  9. Nuclear Proliferation Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Professor William Potter

    2005-11-28

    William C. Potter, Director of the Center for Non Proliferation Studies and the Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at the Monterey Institute of International Studies, will present nuclear proliferation challenges following the 2005 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) Review Conference. In addition to elucidating reasons for, and implications of, the conference’s failure, Dr. Potter will discuss common ground between nuclear proliferation and terrorism issues and whether corrective action can be taken.

  10. Nuclear imaging in pediatrics

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, A.R.

    1985-01-01

    The author's intent is to familiarize practicing radiologists with the technical aspects and interpretation of nuclear medicine procedures in children and to illustrate the indications for nuclear medicine procedures in pediatric problems. Pediatric doses, dosimetry, sedation, and injection techniques, organ systems, oncology and infection, testicular scanning and nuclear crystography, pediatric endocrine and skeletal systems, ventilation and perfusion imaging of both congenital and acquired pediatric disorders, cardiovascular problems, gastrointestinal, hepatobiliary, reticuloendothelial studies, and central nervous system are all topics which are included and discussed.

  11. Nuclear Politics in Iran

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    system. States with prestige are recognized by other actors as having a high 21 Nuclear Politics in Iran standing either generally or with regard to...Nuclear Politics in Iran Edited by Judith S. Yaphe MIDDLE EAST STRATEGIC PERSPECTIVES 1 Center for Strategic Research Institute for National...OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE MAY 2010 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Nuclear Politics in

  12. Nonstrategic Nuclear Weapons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-03

    William Potter , and Nikolai Sokov, Reducing and Regulating Tactical (Nonstrategic) Nuclear Weapons in Europe, The James Martin Center For...See William C. Potter and Nikolai Sokov, “Nuclear Weapons that People Forget,” International Herald Tribune, May 31, 2000. 87 Sam Nunn, Igor...their security.97 94 Kent Harris , “NATO Allies Want U.S. Nuclear Weapons out of Europe

  13. Nuclear reactor apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Wade, Elman E.

    1978-01-01

    A lifting, rotating and sealing apparatus for nuclear reactors utilizing rotating plugs above the nuclear reactor core. This apparatus permits rotation of the plugs to provide under the plug refueling of a nuclear core. It also provides a means by which positive top core holddown can be utilized. Both of these operations are accomplished by means of the apparatus lifting the top core holddown structure off the nuclear core while stationary, and maintaining this structure in its elevated position during plug rotation. During both of these operations, the interface between the rotating member and its supporting member is sealingly maintained.

  14. Comprehensive Nuclear Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Konings, Dr. Rudy J. M.; Allen, Todd R.; Stoller, Roger E; Yamanaka, Prof. Shinsuke

    2012-01-01

    This book encompasses a rich seam of current information on the vast and multidisciplinary field of nuclear materials employed in fission and prototype fusion systems. Discussion includes both historical and contemporary international research in nuclear materials, from Actinides to Zirconium alloys, from the worlds leading scientists and engineers. Synthesizes pertinent current science to support the selection, assessment, validation and engineering of materials in extreme nuclear environments. The work discusses the major classes of materials suitable for usage in nuclear fission, fusion reactors and high power accelerators, and for diverse functions in fuels, cladding, moderator and control materials, structural, functional, and waste materials.

  15. [Nuclear families in Turkey].

    PubMed

    Unalan, T

    1988-01-01

    This study examines the household or family types in Turkey in 1983, especially nuclear families. Nuclear families constitute 61.6% of all households in Turkey, and the majority of them are in the West and the Central regions. The highest % of nuclear families was found in the Mediterranean regions, and the lowest in the Black Sea region. Among all nuclear families, 87% of them consist of husband, wife and children, whereas 13% of them have only husband and wife. Nuclear families without children are common in urban areas and in the West while nuclear families with children are mostly found in rural areas and in the East and the Black Sea regions. Nuclear families with 3 or more children constitute 32% of all nuclear households in the West. On the other hand, the corresponding % is 73 for the Eastern region. As a result, it is concluded that nuclear families have significant regional and residential differentiations and households with the same formation in a developed and a less developed region should have different social, economic, and cultural characteristics.

  16. Technologists for Nuclear Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Huey D.

    1974-01-01

    Physicians need support personnel for work with radioisotopes in diagnosing dangerous diseases. The Nuclear Medicine Technology (NMT) Program at Hillsborough Community College in Tampa, Florida, is described. (MW)

  17. Nuclear criticality safety guide

    SciTech Connect

    Pruvost, N.L.; Paxton, H.C.

    1996-09-01

    This technical reference document cites information related to nuclear criticality safety principles, experience, and practice. The document also provides general guidance for criticality safety personnel and regulators.

  18. REACTOR PHYSICS MODELING OF SPENT NUCLEAR RESEARCH REACTOR FUEL FOR SNM ATTRIBUTION AND NUCLEAR FORENSICS

    SciTech Connect

    Sternat, M.; Beals, D.; Webb, R.; Nichols, T.

    2010-06-09

    Nuclear research reactors are the least safeguarded type of reactor; in some cases this may be attributed to low risk and in most cases it is due to difficulty from dynamic operation. Research reactors vary greatly in size, fuel type, enrichment, power and burnup providing a significant challenge to any standardized safeguard system. If a whole fuel assembly was interdicted, based on geometry and other traditional forensics work, one could identify the material's origin fairly accurately. If the material has been dispersed or reprocessed, in-depth reactor physics models may be used to help with the identification. Should there be a need to attribute research reactor fuel material, the Savannah River National Laboratory would perform radiochemical analysis of samples of the material as well as other non-destructive measurements. In depth reactor physics modeling would then be performed to compare to these measured results in an attempt to associate the measured results with various reactor parameters. Several reactor physics codes are being used and considered for this purpose, including: MONTEBURNS/ORIGEN/MCNP5, CINDER/MCNPX and WIMS. In attempt to identify reactor characteristics, such as time since shutdown, burnup, or power, various isotopes are used. Complexities arise when the inherent assumptions embedded in different reactor physics codes handle the isotopes differently and may quantify them to different levels of accuracy. A technical approach to modeling spent research reactor fuel begins at the assembly level upon acquiring detailed information of the reactor to be modeled. A single assembly is run using periodic boundary conditions to simulate an infinite lattice which may be repeatedly burned to produce input fuel isotopic vectors of various burnups for a core level model. A core level model will then be constructed using the assembly level results as inputs for the specific fuel shuffling pattern in an attempt to establish an equilibrium cycle. The

  19. Nuclear Energy and the Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria).

    "Nuclear Energy and the Environment" is a pocket folder of removable leaflets concerned with two major topics: Nuclear energy and Nuclear Techniques. Under Nuclear Energy, leaflets concerning the topics of "Radiation--A Fact of Life,""The Impact of a Fact: 1963 Test Ban Treaty,""Energy Needs and Nuclear Power,""Power Reactor Safety,""Transport,"…

  20. Gordon Conference on Nuclear Research

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, S.M.

    1983-09-01

    Session topics were: quarks and nuclear physics; anomalons and anti-protons; the independent particle structure of nuclei; relativistic descriptions of nuclear structure and scattering; nuclear structure at high excitation; advances in nuclear astrophysics; properties of nuclear material; the earliest moments of the universe; and pions and spin excitations in nuclei.

  1. Nuclear fuel cycle information workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    This overview of the nuclear fuel cycle is divided into three parts. First, is a brief discussion of the basic principles of how nuclear reactors work; second, is a look at the major types of nuclear reactors being used and world-wide nuclear capacity; and third, is an overview of the nuclear fuel cycle and the present industrial capability in the US.

  2. Vented nuclear fuel element

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Leonard N.; Kaznoff, Alexis I.

    1979-01-01

    A nuclear fuel cell for use in a thermionic nuclear reactor in which a small conduit extends from the outside surface of the emitter to the center of the fuel mass of the emitter body to permit escape of volatile and gaseous fission products collected in the center thereof by virtue of molecular migration of the gases to the hotter region of the fuel.

  3. Under the Nuclear Umbrella.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Leon F.

    1987-01-01

    Entertains the thesis that social work has a stake in the technological-humanistic debate and should greet the recent and spectacular technological failures with protest and alarm. Discusses relationship of nuclear issue and social work, effects of nuclear issue on children, and Chernobyl. Advocates pacifism, activism, and a coherent conception of…

  4. Vertical nuclear proliferation.

    PubMed

    Sidel, Victor W

    2007-01-01

    All the nuclear-weapon states are working to develop new nuclear-weapon systems and upgrade their existing ones. Although the US Congress has recently blocked further development of small nuclear weapons and earth-penetrating nuclear weapons, the United States is planning a range of new warheads under the Reliable Replacement Warhead programme, and renewing its nuclear weapons infrastructure. The United Kingdom is spending 1 billion pounds sterling on updating the Atomic Weapons Establishment at Aldermaston, and about 20 billion pounds sterling on replacing its Vanguard submarines and maintaining its Trident warhead stockpile. The US has withdrawn from the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty and plans to install missile defence systems in Poland and the Czech Republic; Russia threatens to upgrade its nuclear countermeasures. The nuclear-weapon states should comply with their obligations under Article VI of the Non-Proliferation Treaty, as summarised in the 13-point plan agreed at the 2000 NPT Review Conference, and they should negotiate a Nuclear Weapons Convention.

  5. Nuclear physics and cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Coc, Alain

    2014-05-09

    There are important aspects of Cosmology, the scientific study of the large scale properties of the universe as a whole, for which nuclear physics can provide insights. Here, we will focus on Standard Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis and we refer to the previous edition of the School [1] for the aspects concerning the variations of constants in nuclear cosmo-physics.

  6. Nuclear Taskforce Summation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1979

    At the end of 1978, there were approximately 230 nuclear-fueled electric generating plants around the world; 72 of these were in the United States. Each plant requires an operations-and-maintenance workforce of 92 people, and attrition occurs at a rate of 8% per year. Requirements for a nuclear taskforce and job training, in view of current…

  7. JPRS Report, Nuclear Developments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-24

    7 Scientists Term Nuclear Reactor ’Satisfactory’ [XINHUA] ............................................................... 7 Neutron Velocity...PAULO 29 Oct] .................................... 14 Details of Secret Army Graphite Reactor Disclosed [FOLHA DE SAO PAULO 24 Oct] .............. 14...Corporation Plans To Expand Production [THE HINDU 2 Oct] .................................. 28 ISRAEL Request for Canadian Nuclear Reactor Confirmed

  8. Nuclear-Powered Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arce, Gary

    1992-01-01

    Describes an exercise to develop interest and understanding about nuclear energy in which students make presentations regarding a proposal to build a hypothetical nuclear power plant. Students spend two weeks researching the topic; give testimony before a "Senate Energy Committee"; and vote on the proposal. Background information is…

  9. Talk About Nuclear Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tremlett, Lewis

    1976-01-01

    Presents an overview of the relation of nuclear power to human health and the environment, and discusses the advantages and disadvantages of nuclear power as an energy source urging technical educators to inculcate an awareness of the problems associated with the production of energy. Describes the fission reaction process, the hazards of…

  10. Nuclear Age Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    The primary goal of the Oregon nuclear age education curriculum is to develop in students the knowledge and skills needed to meet the challenges of living in a nuclear age. This curriculum is developed around five general themes, each corresponding to a specific unit. The general goals for the units are: (Unit 1) to increase students' exposure to…

  11. Nuclear Power Plants. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyerly, Ray L.; Mitchell, Walter, III

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. Among the topics discussed are: Why Use Nuclear Power?; From Atoms to Electricity; Reactor Types; Typical Plant Design Features; The Cost of Nuclear Power; Plants in the United States; Developments in Foreign…

  12. Nuclear Shuttle Logistics Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    This 1971 artist's concept shows the Nuclear Shuttle in both its lunar logistics configuraton and geosynchronous station configuration. As envisioned by Marshall Space Flight Center Program Development persornel, the Nuclear Shuttle would deliver payloads to lunar orbits or other destinations then return to Earth orbit for refueling and additional missions.

  13. High energy nuclear structures

    SciTech Connect

    Boguta, J.; Kunz, J.

    1984-03-09

    In conventional nuclear physics the nucleus is described as a non-relativistic many-body system, which is governed by the Schroedinger equation. Nucleons interact in this framework via static two-body potentials, mesonic degrees of freedom are neglected. An alternative description of nuclear physics in terms of a relativistic field theory has been developed by Walecka. The model Lagrangian containing baryons, sigma-mesons and ..omega..-mesons was subsequently extended to include also ..pi..-mesons and rho-mesons. An essential feature of such a nuclear Lagrangian is its renormalizability. In addition to the description of known nuclear structure the field theoretical approach may reveal entirely new nuclear phenomena, based on the explicit treatment of mesonic degrees of freedom. The existence of such abnormal nuclear states was proposed by Lee and Wick employing the sigma-model Lagrangian. There the non-linearity of the meson field equations allows for soliton solutions in the presence of nucleons, in particular the sigma-field may exhibit a kink. Different types of soliton solutions occur in gauge theories with hidden symmetries. In the phenomenological Lagrangian the rho-meson is described by a non-abelian gauge field, that acquires its mass spontaneously due to the non-vanishing vacuum expectation value of a Higgs field. A general ansatz for soliton solutions of such a gauge theory was given by Dashen et al. A specific solution and its possible implications for nuclear physics like anomalous nuclear states were discussed by Boguta.

  14. Nuclear Weapons and Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howie, David I.

    1984-01-01

    The growing debate on nuclear weapons in recent years has begun to make inroads into school curricula. Elementary and secondary school teachers now face the important task of educating their students on issues relating to nuclear war without indoctrinating them to a particular point of view. (JBM)

  15. Nuclear effects at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1996-07-01

    The development of a nuclear beam facility at HERA would allow the study of fundamental features of quark and gluon interactions in QCD. I briefly review the physics underlying nuclear shadowing and anti-shadowing as well as other diffractive and jet fragmentation processes that can be studies in high energy electron-nucleus collisions.

  16. TRAINING NUCLEAR TECHNICIANS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KOVNER, EDGAR A.

    PROBLEMS CONFRONTED BY PLANNERS OF NUCLEAR PROGRAMS AT THE TECHNICIAN LEVEL INCLUDE (1) LACK OF PRECEDENT IN CURRICULUM, COURSE OUTLINES, AND GRADUATE PLACEMENT, (2) DIFFICULTY IN DETERMINING COSTS OF LABORATORY CONSTRUCTION, EQUIPMENT, AND OPERATION, AND (3) REQUIREMENT OF ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION LICENSES IN NUCLEAR OCCUPATIONS. A 92-SEMESTER…

  17. Nuclear Power Plant Technician

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randall, George A.

    1975-01-01

    The author recognizes a body of basic knowledge in nuclear power plant technoogy that can be taught in school programs, and lists the various courses, aiming to fill the anticipated need for nuclear-trained manpower--persons holding an associate degree in engineering technology. (Author/BP)

  18. Nuclear energy related research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rintamaa, R.

    1992-05-01

    The annual Research Program Plan describes publicly funded nuclear energy related research to be carried out mainly at the Technical Research Center of Finland (VTT) in 1992. The research is financed primarily by the Ministry of Trade and Industry (KTM), the Finnish Center for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK), and VTT itself. Other research institutes, utilities, and industry also contribute to many projects.

  19. World nuclear outlook 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-01

    As part of the EIA program to provide energy information, this analysis report presents the current status and projections through 2010 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the uranium market. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for three different scenarios through 2040 are developed for the Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). In turn, the OCRWM provides partial funding for preparation of this report. The projections of uranium requirements are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for preparation of the Nuclear Energy Agency/OECD report, Summary of Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data in OECD Member Countries.

  20. World nuclear outlook 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-29

    As part of the EIA program to provide energy information, this analysis report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the uranium market. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed for the Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). In turn, the OCRWM provides partial funding for preparation of this report. The projections of uranium requirements are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for preparation of the Nuclear Energy Agency/OECD report, Summary of Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data in OECD Member Countries.

  1. Nuclear transfer in rodents.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Linda J; Wilmut, Ian; Mullins, John J

    2004-01-01

    Cloning is the asexual reproduction of an individual, such that the offspring have an essentially identical nuclear genome. Nuclear transfer and cloning have been achieved in a number of species, namely sheep, cows, goats, rabbits, cats and mice, but have been largely unsuccessful, so far, in dogs, primates and rats. Clearly, contributory factors which affect the outcome of successful cloning experiments are not universally applicable to all species. One theme common to all cloning experiments, however, is the overall inefficiency of the process, typically 0-4%. A number of factors contribute to nuclear transfer inefficiency, and we will review mouse cloning experiments, which address these problems, highlighting the importance of donor nucleus choice (somatic or ES cell, fetal or adult, quiescent or actively dividing). Finally, we will summarize the emerging principles which appear to govern nuclear reprogramming and production of clones, and will consider the application of nuclear transfer to the rat.

  2. Nuclear physics: Macroscopic aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Swiatecki, W.J.

    1993-12-01

    A systematic macroscopic, leptodermous approach to nuclear statics and dynamics is described, based formally on the assumptions {h_bar} {yields} 0 and b/R << 1, where b is the surface diffuseness and R the nuclear radius. The resulting static model of shell-corrected nuclear binding energies and deformabilities is accurate to better than 1 part in a thousand and yields a firm determination of the principal properties of the nuclear fluid. As regards dynamics, the above approach suggests that nuclear shape evolutions will often be dominated by dissipation, but quantitative comparisons with experimental data are more difficult than in the case of statics. In its simplest liquid drop version the model exhibits interesting formal connections to the classic astronomical problem of rotating gravitating masses.

  3. Nuclear Powerplant Safety: Source Terms. Nuclear Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Nuclear Energy Office.

    There has been increased public interest in the potential effects of nuclear powerplant accidents since the Soviet reactor accident at Chernobyl. People have begun to look for more information about the amount of radioactivity that might be released into the environment as a result of such an accident. When this issue is discussed by people…

  4. Nuclear war, nuclear proliferation, and their consequences

    SciTech Connect

    Sanruddin, A.K.

    1986-01-01

    The proceedings of a colloquium convened by the Groupe de Bellerive offers the contributions of Carl Sagan, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Kenneth Galbraith, Pierre Trudeau, Edward Kennedy, and other eminent scientists, politicians, and strategists on the subject of the proliferation of nuclear weaponry and its potential ramifications.

  5. Nuclear excitation and precompound nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    De, A.; Ray, S.; Ghosh, S.K.

    1988-06-01

    The angular distribution of nucleons emitted in nucleon-induced precompound nuclear reactions are calculated taking into account the effect of excitation on the kinematics of nucleon-nucleon scattering inside the target-plus-projectile system. The results are compared with quantum mechanical calculations and those of reaction models based on a pure nucleon-nucleon collision picture.

  6. Nuclear data verification based on Monte Carlo simulations of the LLNL pulsed-sphere benchmark experiments (1979 & 1986) using the Mercury code

    SciTech Connect

    Descalle, M; Pruet, J

    2008-06-09

    Livermore's nuclear data group developed a new verification and validation test suite to ensure the quality of data used in application codes. This is based on models of LLNL's pulsed sphere fusion shielding benchmark experiments. Simulations were done with Mercury, a 3D particle transport Monte Carlo code using continuous-energy cross-section libraries. Results were compared to measurements of neutron leakage spectra generated by 14MeV neutrons in 17 target assemblies (for a blank target assembly, H{sub 2}O, Teflon, C, N{sub 2}, Al, Si, Ti, Fe, Cu, Ta, W, Au, Pb, {sup 232}Th, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, and {sup 239}Pu). We also tested the fidelity of simulations for photon production associated with neutron interactions in the different materials. Gamma-ray leakage energy per neutron was obtained from a simple 1D spherical geometry assembly and compared to three codes (TART, COG, MCNP5) and several versions of the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF) and Evaluated Nuclear Data Libraries (ENDL) cross-section libraries. These tests uncovered a number of errors in photon production cross-sections, and were instrumental to the V&V of different cross-section libraries. Development of the pulsed sphere tests also uncovered the need for new Mercury capabilities. To enable simulations of neutron time-of-flight experiments the nuclear data group implemented an improved treatment of biased angular scattering in MCAPM.

  7. US nuclear weapons policy

    SciTech Connect

    May, M.

    1990-12-05

    We are closing chapter one'' of the nuclear age. Whatever happens to the Soviet Union and to Europe, some of the major determinants of nuclear policy will not be what they have been for the last forty-five years. Part of the task for US nuclear weapons policy is to adapt its nuclear forces and the oganizations managing them to the present, highly uncertain, but not urgently competitive situation between the US and the Soviet Union. Containment is no longer the appropriate watchword. Stabilization in the face of uncertainty, a more complicated and politically less readily communicable goal, may come closer. A second and more difficult part of the task is to deal with what may be the greatest potential source of danger to come out of the end of the cold war: the breakup of some of the cooperative institutions that managed the nuclear threat and were created by the cold war. These cooperative institutions, principally the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), the Warsaw Pact, the US-Japan alliance, were not created specifically to manage the nuclear threat, but manage it they did. A third task for nuclear weapons policy is that of dealing with nuclear proliferation under modern conditions when the technologies needed to field effective nuclear weapons systems and their command and control apparatus are ever more widely available, and the leverage over some potential proliferators, which stemmed from superpower military support, is likely to be on the wane. This paper will make some suggestions regarding these tasks, bearing in mind that the unsettled nature of that part of the world most likely to become involved in nuclear weapons decisions today must make any suggestions tentative and the allowance for surprise more than usually important.

  8. The nuclear dynamo; Can a nuclear tornado annihilate nations

    SciTech Connect

    McNally, J.R. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of the hypothesis of a nuclear dynamo for a controlled nuclear fusion reactor. This dynamo hypothesis suggests properties for a nuclear tornado that could annihilate nations if accidentally triggered by a single high yield to weight nuclear weapon detonation. The formerly classified reports on ignition of the atmosphere, the properties of a nuclear dynamo, methods to achieve a nuclear dynamo in the laboratory, and the analogy of a nuclear dynamo to a nuclear tornado are discussed. An unclassified international study of this question is urged.

  9. 75 FR 39057 - Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.; Entergy Nuclear Vermont Yankee, LLC; Vermont Yankee Nuclear...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.; Entergy Nuclear Vermont Yankee, LLC; Vermont Yankee Nuclear... CFR), Section 2.206, ``Requests for Action under this Subpart,'' the U.S. Nuclear...

  10. 77 FR 7184 - Entergy Nuclear Indian Point 2, LLC; Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.; Indian Point Nuclear...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Entergy Nuclear Indian Point 2, LLC; Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.; Indian Point Nuclear Generating Unit No. 2; Exemption 1.0 Background Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc. (Entergy or the licensee)...

  11. 75 FR 3497 - Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc., Entergy Nuclear Indian Point 2, LLC, Entergy Nuclear Indian...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc., Entergy Nuclear Indian Point 2, LLC, Entergy Nuclear Indian Point 3, LLC,: Indian Point Nuclear Generating Unit Nos. 2 and 3; Notice of Consideration of Issuance of Amendment to Facility Operating License...

  12. 76 FR 15001 - Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc,. Entergy Nuclear Vermont Yankee, LLC, Vermont Yankee Nuclear...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc,. Entergy Nuclear Vermont Yankee, LLC, Vermont Yankee Nuclear... Regulations (10 CFR) 2.206, ``Requests for Action under this Subpart,'' the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory...

  13. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org ... I’d like to talk to you about nuclear medicine. Nuclear medicine offers the potential to identify ...

  14. Supporting Our Nation's Nuclear Industry

    ScienceCinema

    Lyons, Peter

    2016-07-12

    On the 60th anniversary of the world's first nuclear power plant to produce electricity, Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy Peter Lyons discusses the Energy Department's and the Administration's commitment to promoting a nuclear renaissance in the United States.

  15. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello! ... d like to talk to you about nuclear medicine. Nuclear medicine offers the potential to identify disease ...

  16. Supporting Our Nation's Nuclear Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, Peter

    2011-01-01

    On the 60th anniversary of the world's first nuclear power plant to produce electricity, Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy Peter Lyons discusses the Energy Department's and the Administration's commitment to promoting a nuclear renaissance in the United States.

  17. Radiological Effects of Nuclear War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Charles S.

    1988-01-01

    Described are the global effects of nuclear war. Discussed are radiation dosages, limited nuclear attacks, strategic arms reductions, and other results reported at the workshop on nuclear war issues in Moscow in March 1988. (CW)

  18. The new nuclear nations

    SciTech Connect

    Spector, L.

    1985-01-01

    Using 251 pages of text, 66 pages of references and 26 pages of appendixes, Spector delves into a world of new nuclear suppliers whose voracious hunger for profits may lead them to provide unwise assistance to countries that are unduly interested in nuclear weaponry. He assails a new dragon, a 'nuclear netherworld' that would illicitly supply such items for profit or political gain. Spector's book tells of covert dealings in nuclear technologies and materials. For him, the buyers have but one goal: '... to gain possession of the knowledge and materials necessary for development of nuclear weapons'. He warns of dangers from this illicit trade, of the loopholes in existing controls and the need to close them. His warnings come wrapped in stories of undercover transactions, many about Pakistan's efforts to get what it needs for its centrifuge enrichment plant. Recognizing the tightening of controls over nuclear trade since the 1970s, including those for dual-use items, Spector is nonetheless pessimistic that these efforts are sufficient to irradicate the nuclear netherworld or to deter newcomers from it.

  19. Nuclear forensics: Soil content

    SciTech Connect

    Beebe, Merilyn Amy

    2015-08-31

    Nuclear Forensics is a growing field that is concerned with all stages of the process of creating and detonating a nuclear weapon. The main goal is to prevent nuclear attack by locating and securing nuclear material before it can be used in an aggressive manner. This stage of the process is mostly paperwork; laws, regulations, treaties, and declarations made by individual countries or by the UN Security Council. There is some preliminary leg work done in the form of field testing detection equipment and tracking down orphan materials; however, none of these have yielded any spectacular or useful results. In the event of a nuclear attack, the first step is to analyze the post detonation debris to aid in the identification of the responsible party. This aspect of the nuclear forensics process, while reactive in nature, is more scientific. A rock sample taken from the detonation site can be dissolved into liquid form and analyzed to determine its chemical composition. The chemical analysis of spent nuclear material can provide valuable information if properly processed and analyzed. In order to accurately evaluate the results, scientists require information on the natural occurring elements in the detonation zone. From this information, scientists can determine what percentage of the element originated in the bomb itself rather than the environment. To this end, element concentrations in soils from sixty-nine different cities are given, along with activity concentrations for uranium, thorium, potassium, and radium in various building materials. These data are used in the analysis program Python.

  20. Evaluated Nuclear Data

    SciTech Connect

    Oblozinsky, P.; Oblozinsky,P.; Herman,M.; Mughabghab,S.F.

    2010-10-01

    This chapter describes the current status of evaluated nuclear data for nuclear technology applications. We start with evaluation procedures for neutron-induced reactions focusing on incident energies from the thermal energy up to 20 MeV, though higher energies are also mentioned. This is followed by examining the status of evaluated neutron data for actinides that play dominant role in most of the applications, followed by coolants/moderators, structural materials and fission products. We then discuss neutron covariance data that characterize uncertainties and correlations. We explain how modern nuclear evaluated data libraries are validated against an extensive set of integral benchmark experiments. Afterwards, we briefly examine other data of importance for nuclear technology, including fission yields, thermal neutron scattering and decay data. A description of three major evaluated nuclear data libraries is provided, including the latest version of the US library ENDF/B-VII.0, European JEFF-3.1 and Japanese JENDL-3.3. A brief introduction is made to current web retrieval systems that allow easy access to a vast amount of up-to-date evaluated nuclear data for nuclear technology applications.