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Sample records for ftd-3 chmp2b mutation

  1. Regulation of Postsynaptic Function by the Dementia-Related ESCRT-III Subunit CHMP2B

    PubMed Central

    Chassefeyre, Romain; Martínez-Hernández, José; Bertaso, Federica; Bouquier, Nathalie; Blot, Béatrice; Laporte, Marine; Fraboulet, Sandrine; Couté, Yohann; Devoy, Anny; Isaacs, Adrian M.; Pernet-Gallay, Karin; Fagni, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The charged multivesicular body proteins (Chmp1–7) are an evolutionarily conserved family of cytosolic proteins that transiently assembles into helical polymers that change the curvature of cellular membrane domains. Mutations in human CHMP2B cause frontotemporal dementia, suggesting that this protein may normally control some neuron-specific process. Here, we examined the function, localization, and interactions of neuronal Chmp2b. The protein was highly expressed in mouse brain and could be readily detected in neuronal dendrites and spines. Depletion of endogenous Chmp2b reduced dendritic branching of cultured hippocampal neurons, decreased excitatory synapse density in vitro and in vivo, and abolished activity-induced spine enlargement and synaptic potentiation. To understand the synaptic effects of Chmp2b, we determined its ultrastructural distribution by quantitative immuno-electron microscopy and its biochemical interactions by coimmunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry. In the hippocampus in situ, a subset of neuronal Chmp2b was shown to concentrate beneath the perisynaptic membrane of dendritic spines. In synaptoneurosome lysates, Chmp2b was stably bound to a large complex containing other members of the Chmp family, as well as postsynaptic scaffolds. The supramolecular Chmp assembly detected here corresponds to a stable form of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport-III (ESCRT-III), a ubiquitous cytoplasmic protein complex known to play a central role in remodeling of lipid membranes. We conclude that Chmp2b-containing ESCRT-III complexes are also present at dendritic spines, where they regulate synaptic plasticity. We propose that synaptic ESCRT-III filaments may function as a novel element of the submembrane cytoskeleton of spines. PMID:25698751

  2. CHMP2B mutants linked to frontotemporal dementia impair maturation of dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Belly, Agnès; Bodon, Gilles; Blot, Béatrice; Bouron, Alexandre; Sadoul, Rémy; Goldberg, Yves

    2010-01-01

    Summary The highly conserved ESCRT-III complex is responsible for deformation and cleavage of membranes during endosomal trafficking and other cellular activities. In humans, dominant mutations in the ESCRT-III subunit CHMP2B cause fronto-temporal dementia (FTD). The decade-long process leading to this cortical degeneration is not well understood. One possibility is that, akin to other neurodegenerative diseases, the pathogenic protein affects the integrity of dendritic spines and synapses before any neuronal death. Using confocal microscopy and 3D reconstruction, we examined whether expressing the FTD-linked mutants CHMP2Bintron5 and CHMP2BΔ10 in cultured hippocampal neurones modified the number or structure of spines. Both mutants induced a significant decrease in the proportion of large spines with mushroom morphology, without overt degeneration. Furthermore, CHMP2BΔ10 induced a drop in frequency and amplitude of spontaneous excitatory post-synaptic currents, suggesting that the more potent synapses were lost. These effects seemed unrelated to changes in autophagy. Depletion of endogenous CHMP2B by RNAi resulted in morphological changes similar to those induced by mutant CHMP2B, consistent with dominant negative activity of pathogenic mutants. Thus, CHMP2B is required for spine growth. Taken together, these results demonstrate that a mutant ESCRT-III subunit linked to a human neurodegenerative disease can disrupt the normal pattern of spine development. PMID:20699355

  3. Syntaxin 13, a genetic modifier of mutant CHMP2B in frontotemporal dementia, is required for autophagosome maturation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Danqiong; Sweeney, Sean T.; Gao, Fen-Biao

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Phagophore maturation is a key step in the macroautophagy pathway, which is critical in many important physiological and pathological processes. Here we identified Drosophila N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein 2 (dNSF2) and soluble NSF attachment protein (Snap) as strong genetic modifiers of toxicity caused by mutant CHMP2B, an ESCRT-III component that causes frontotemporal dementia and autophagosome accumulation. Among several SNARE genes, Drosophila syntaxin 13 (syx13) exhibited a strong genetic interaction with mutant CHMP2B. Knockdown of syntaxin 13 (STX13) or its binding partner Vti1a in mammalian cells caused LC3-positive puncta to accumulate and blocks autophagic flux. STX13 was present on LC3-positive phagophores induced by rapamycin and was highly enriched on multilamellar structures induced by dysfunctional ESCRT-III. Loss of STX13 also caused the accumulation of Atg5-positive puncta and the formation of multilamellar structures. These results suggest STX13 is a genetic modifier of ESCRT-III dysfunction and participates in the maturation of phagophores into closed autophagosomes. PMID:24095276

  4. Charged Multivesicular Body Protein 2B (CHMP2B) of the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport-III (ESCRT-III) Polymerizes into Helical Structures Deforming the Plasma Membrane*

    PubMed Central

    Bodon, Gilles; Chassefeyre, Romain; Pernet-Gallay, Karin; Martinelli, Nicolas; Effantin, Grégory; Hulsik, David Lutje; Belly, Agnès; Goldberg, Yves; Chatellard-Causse, Christine; Blot, Béatrice; Schoehn, Guy; Weissenhorn, Winfried; Sadoul, Rémy

    2011-01-01

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT-0-III) allow membrane budding and fission away from the cytosol. This machinery is used during multivesicular endosome biogenesis, cytokinesis, and budding of some enveloped viruses. Membrane fission is catalyzed by ESCRT-III complexes made of polymers of charged multivesicular body proteins (CHMPs) and by the AAA-type ATPase VPS4. How and which of the ESCRT-III subunits sustain membrane fission from the cytoplasmic surface remain uncertain. In vitro, CHMP2 and CHMP3 recombinant proteins polymerize into tubular helical structures, which were hypothesized to drive vesicle fission. However, this model awaits the demonstration that such structures exist and can deform membranes in cellulo. Here, we show that depletion of VPS4 induces specific accumulation of endogenous CHMP2B at the plasma membrane. Unlike other CHMPs, overexpressed full-length CHMP2B polymerizes into long, rigid tubes that protrude out of the cell. CHMP4s relocalize at the base of the tubes, the formation of which depends on VPS4. Cryo-EM of the CHMP2B membrane tubes demonstrates that CHMP2B polymerizes into a tightly packed helical lattice, in close association with the inner leaflet of the membrane tube. This association is tight enough to deform the lipid bilayer in cases where the tubular CHMP2B helix varies in diameter or is closed by domes. Thus, our observation that CHMP2B polymerization scaffolds membranes in vivo represents a first step toward demonstrating its structural role during outward membrane deformation. PMID:21926173

  5. Genetics Home Reference: CHMP2B-related frontotemporal dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... dementia is a progressive brain disorder that affects personality, behavior, and language. The symptoms of this disorder ... years after the appearance of symptoms. Changes in personality and behavior are the most common early signs ...

  6. Mutation Frequency of the Major Frontotemporal Dementia Genes, MAPT, GRN and C9ORF72 in a Turkish Cohort of Dementia Patients.

    PubMed

    Guven, Gamze; Lohmann, Ebba; Bras, Jose; Gibbs, J Raphael; Gurvit, Hakan; Bilgic, Basar; Hanagasi, Hasmet; Rizzu, Patrizia; Heutink, Peter; Emre, Murat; Erginel-Unaltuna, Nihan; Just, Walter; Hardy, John; Singleton, Andrew; Guerreiro, Rita

    2016-01-01

    'Microtubule-associated protein tau' (MAPT), 'granulin' (GRN) and 'chromosome 9 open reading frame72' (C9ORF72) gene mutations are the major known genetic causes of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Recent studies suggest that mutations in these genes may also be associated with other forms of dementia. Therefore we investigated whether MAPT, GRN and C9ORF72 gene mutations are major contributors to dementia in a random, unselected Turkish cohort of dementia patients. A combination of whole-exome sequencing, Sanger sequencing and fragment analysis/Southern blot was performed in order to identify pathogenic mutations and novel variants in these genes as well as other FTD-related genes such as the 'charged multivesicular body protein 2B' (CHMP2B), the 'FUS RNA binding protein' (FUS), the 'TAR DNA binding protein' (TARDBP), the 'sequestosome1' (SQSTM1), and the 'valosin containing protein' (VCP). We determined one pathogenic MAPT mutation (c.1906C>T, p.P636L) and one novel missense variant (c.38A>G, p.D13G). In GRN we identified a probably pathogenic TGAG deletion in the splice donor site of exon 6. Three patients were found to carry the GGGGCC expansions in the non-coding region of the C9ORF72 gene. In summary, a complete screening for mutations in MAPT, GRN and C9ORF72 genes revealed a frequency of 5.4% of pathogenic mutations in a random cohort of 93 Turkish index patients with dementia. PMID:27632209

  7. Mutation Frequency of the Major Frontotemporal Dementia Genes, MAPT, GRN and C9ORF72 in a Turkish Cohort of Dementia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Guven, Gamze; Lohmann, Ebba; Bras, Jose; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Gurvit, Hakan; Bilgic, Basar; Hanagasi, Hasmet; Rizzu, Patrizia; Heutink, Peter; Emre, Murat; Erginel-Unaltuna, Nihan; Just, Walter; Hardy, John; Singleton, Andrew; Guerreiro, Rita

    2016-01-01

    ‘Microtubule-associated protein tau’ (MAPT), ‘granulin’ (GRN) and ‘chromosome 9 open reading frame72’ (C9ORF72) gene mutations are the major known genetic causes of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Recent studies suggest that mutations in these genes may also be associated with other forms of dementia. Therefore we investigated whether MAPT, GRN and C9ORF72 gene mutations are major contributors to dementia in a random, unselected Turkish cohort of dementia patients. A combination of whole-exome sequencing, Sanger sequencing and fragment analysis/Southern blot was performed in order to identify pathogenic mutations and novel variants in these genes as well as other FTD-related genes such as the ‘charged multivesicular body protein 2B’ (CHMP2B), the ‘FUS RNA binding protein’ (FUS), the ‘TAR DNA binding protein’ (TARDBP), the ‘sequestosome1’ (SQSTM1), and the ‘valosin containing protein’ (VCP). We determined one pathogenic MAPT mutation (c.1906C>T, p.P636L) and one novel missense variant (c.38A>G, p.D13G). In GRN we identified a probably pathogenic TGAG deletion in the splice donor site of exon 6. Three patients were found to carry the GGGGCC expansions in the non-coding region of the C9ORF72 gene. In summary, a complete screening for mutations in MAPT, GRN and C9ORF72 genes revealed a frequency of 5.4% of pathogenic mutations in a random cohort of 93 Turkish index patients with dementia. PMID:27632209

  8. Do mutator mutations fuel tumorigenesis?

    PubMed

    Fox, Edward J; Prindle, Marc J; Loeb, Lawrence A

    2013-12-01

    The mutator phenotype hypothesis proposes that the mutation rate of normal cells is insufficient to account for the large number of mutations found in human cancers. Consequently, human tumors exhibit an elevated mutation rate that increases the likelihood of a tumor acquiring advantageous mutations. The hypothesis predicts that tumors are composed of cells harboring hundreds of thousands of mutations, as opposed to a small number of specific driver mutations, and that malignant cells within a tumor therefore constitute a highly heterogeneous population. As a result, drugs targeting specific mutated driver genes or even pathways of mutated driver genes will have only limited anticancer potential. In addition, because the tumor is composed of such a diverse cell population, tumor cells harboring drug-resistant mutations will exist prior to the administration of any chemotherapeutic agent. We present recent evidence in support of the mutator phenotype hypothesis, major arguments against this concept, and discuss the clinical consequences of tumor evolution fueled by an elevated mutation rate. We also consider the therapeutic possibility of altering the rate of mutation accumulation. Most significantly, we contend that there is a need to fundamentally reconsider current approaches to personalized cancer therapy. We propose that targeting cellular pathways that alter the rate of mutation accumulation in tumors will ultimately prove more effective than attempting to identify and target mutant driver genes or driver pathways.

  9. Frontotemporal Dementia: Implications for Understanding Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Goedert, Michel; Ghetti, Bernardino; Spillantini, Maria Grazia

    2012-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) comprises a group of behavioral, language, and movement disorders. On the basis of the nature of the characteristic protein inclusions, frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) can be subdivided into the common FTLD-tau and FTLD-TDP as well as the less common FTLD-FUS and FTLD-UPS. Approximately 10% of cases of FTD are inherited in an autosomal-dominant manner. Mutations in seven genes cause FTD, with those in tau (MAPT), chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9ORF72), and progranulin (GRN) being the most common. Mutations in MAPT give rise to FTLD-tau and mutations in C9ORF72 and GRN to FTLD-TDP. The other four genes are transactive response–DNA binding protein-43 (TARDBP), fused in sarcoma (FUS), valosin-containing protein (VCP), and charged multivesicular body protein 2B (CHMP2B). Mutations in TARDBP and VCP give rise to FTLD-TDP, mutations in FUS to FTLD-FUS, and mutations in CHMP2B to FTLD-UPS. The discovery that mutations in MAPT cause neurodegeneration and dementia has important implications for understanding Alzheimer disease. PMID:22355793

  10. Mutational landscape of yeast mutator strains.

    PubMed

    Serero, Alexandre; Jubin, Claire; Loeillet, Sophie; Legoix-Né, Patricia; Nicolas, Alain G

    2014-02-01

    The acquisition of mutations is relevant to every aspect of genetics, including cancer and evolution of species on Darwinian selection. Genome variations arise from rare stochastic imperfections of cellular metabolism and deficiencies in maintenance genes. Here, we established the genome-wide spectrum of mutations that accumulate in a WT and in nine Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutator strains deficient for distinct genome maintenance processes: pol32Δ and rad27Δ (replication), msh2Δ (mismatch repair), tsa1Δ (oxidative stress), mre11Δ (recombination), mec1Δ tel1Δ (DNA damage/S-phase checkpoints), pif1Δ (maintenance of mitochondrial genome and telomere length), cac1Δ cac3Δ (nucleosome deposition), and clb5Δ (cell cycle progression). This study reveals the diversity, complexity, and ultimate unique nature of each mutational spectrum, composed of punctual mutations, chromosomal structural variations, and/or aneuploidies. The mutations produced in clb5Δ/CCNB1, mec1Δ/ATR, tel1Δ/ATM, and rad27Δ/FEN1 strains extensively reshape the genome, following a trajectory dependent on previous events. It comprises the transmission of unstable genomes that lead to colony mosaicisms. This comprehensive analytical approach of mutator defects provides a model to understand how genome variations might accumulate during clonal evolution of somatic cell populations, including tumor cells.

  11. Mutation accumulation and fitness in mutator subpopulations of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Maharjan, Ram P; Liu, Bin; Li, Yang; Reeves, Peter R; Wang, Lei; Ferenci, Thomas

    2013-02-23

    Bacterial populations in clinical and laboratory settings contain a significant proportion of mutants with elevated mutation rates (mutators). Mutators have a particular advantage when multiple beneficial mutations are needed for fitness, as in antibiotic resistance. Nevertheless, high mutation rates potentially lead to increasing numbers of deleterious mutations and subsequently to the decreased fitness of mutators. To test how fitness changed with mutation accumulation, genome sequencing and fitness assays of nine Escherichia coli mutY mutators were undertaken in an evolving chemostat population at three time points. Unexpectedly, the fitness in members of the mutator subpopulation became constant despite a growing number of mutations over time. To test if the accumulated mutations affected fitness, we replaced each of the known beneficial mutations with wild-type alleles in a mutator isolate. We found that the other 25 accumulated mutations were not deleterious. Our results suggest that isolates with deleterious mutations are eliminated by competition in a continuous culture, leaving mutators with mostly neutral mutations. Interestingly, the mutator-non-mutator balance in the population reversed after the fitness plateau of mutators was reached, suggesting that the mutator-non-mutator ratio in populations has more to do with competition between members of the population than the accumulation of deleterious mutations.

  12. UV Signature Mutations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing complete tumor genomes and exomes has sparked the cancer field's interest in mutation signatures for identifying the tumor's carcinogen. This review and meta-analysis discusses signatures and their proper use. We first distinguish between a mutagen's canonical mutations – deviations from a random distribution of base changes to create a pattern typical of that mutagen – and the subset of signature mutations, which are unique to that mutagen and permit inference backward from mutations to mutagen. To verify UV signature mutations, we assembled literature datasets on cells exposed to UVC, UVB, UVA, or solar simulator light (SSL) and tested canonical UV mutation features as criteria for clustering datasets. A confirmed UV signature was: ≥60% of mutations are C→T at a dipyrimidine site, with ≥5% CC→TT. Other canonical features such as a bias for mutations on the non-transcribed strand or at the 3' pyrimidine had limited application. The most robust classifier combined these features with criteria for the rarity of non-UV canonical mutations. In addition, several signatures proposed for specific UV wavelengths were limited to specific genes or species; non-signature mutations induced by UV may cause melanoma BRAF mutations; and the mutagen for sunlight-related skin neoplasms may vary between continents. PMID:25354245

  13. Gestational mutations in radiation carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meza, R.; Luebeck, G.; Moolgavkar, S.

    Mutations in critical genes during gestation could increase substantially the risk of cancer. We examine the consequences of such mutations using the Luebeck-Moolgavkar model for colorectal cancer and the Lea-Coulson modification of the Luria-Delbruck model for the accumulation of mutations during gestation. When gestational mutation rates are high, such mutations make a significant contribution to cancer risk even for adult tumors. Furthermore, gestational mutations ocurring at distinct times during emryonic developmemt lead to substantially different numbers of mutated cells at birth, with early mutations leading to a large number (jackpots) of mutated cells at birth and mutation occurring late leading to only a few mutated cells. Thus gestational mutations could confer considerable heterogeneity of the risk of cancer. If the fetus is exposed to an environmental mutagen, such as ionizing radiation, the gestational mutation rate would be expected to increase. We examine the consequences of such exposures during gestation on the subsequent development of cancer.

  14. Mutation rates as adaptations.

    PubMed

    Maley, C

    1997-06-01

    In order to better understand life, it is helpful to look beyond the envelop of life as we know it. A simple model of coevolution was implemented with the addition of a gene for the mutation rate of the individual. This allowed the mutation rate itself to evolve in a lineage. The model shows that when the individuals interact in a sort of zero-sum game, the lineages maintain relatively high mutation rates. However, when individuals engage in interactions that have greater consequences for one individual in the interaction than the other, lineages tend to evolve relatively low mutation rates. This model suggests that one possible cause for differential mutation rates across genes may be the coevolutionary pressure of the various forms of interactions with other genes. PMID:9219670

  15. Mutation and premating isolation.

    PubMed

    Woodruff, R C; Thompson, J N

    2002-11-01

    While premating isolation might be traceable to different genetic mechanisms in different species, evidence supports the idea that as few as one or two genes may often be sufficient to initiate isolation. Thus, new mutation can theoretically play a key role in the process. But it has long been thought that a new isolation mutation would fail, because there would be no other individuals for the isolation-mutation-carrier to mate with. We now realize that premeiotic mutations are very common and will yield a cluster of progeny carrying the same new mutant allele. In this paper, we discuss the evidence for genetically simple premating isolation barriers and the role that clusters of an isolation mutation may play in initiating allopatric, and even sympatric, species divisions.

  16. Multiplex detection of mutations.

    PubMed

    Perlin, David S; Balashov, Sergey; Park, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Rapid and reliable detection of mutations at the genetic level is an integral part of modern molecular diagnostics. These mutations can range from dominant single nucleotide polymorphisms within specific loci to codominant heterozygotic insertions and they present considerable challenges to investigators in developing rapid nucleic acid-based amplification assays that can distinguish wild-type from mutant alleles. The recent improvements of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using self-reporting fluorescence probes have given researchers a powerful tool in developing assays for mutation detection that can be multiplexed for high-throughput screening of multiple mutations and cost effectiveness. Here we describe an application of a multiplexed real-time PCR assay using Molecular Beacon probes for the detection of mutations in codon 54 of the CYP51A gene in Aspergillus fumigatus conferring triazole resistance.

  17. Mutation and premating isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodruff, R. C.; Thompson, J. N. Jr

    2002-01-01

    While premating isolation might be traceable to different genetic mechanisms in different species, evidence supports the idea that as few as one or two genes may often be sufficient to initiate isolation. Thus, new mutation can theoretically play a key role in the process. But it has long been thought that a new isolation mutation would fail, because there would be no other individuals for the isolation-mutation-carrier to mate with. We now realize that premeiotic mutations are very common and will yield a cluster of progeny carrying the same new mutant allele. In this paper, we discuss the evidence for genetically simple premating isolation barriers and the role that clusters of an isolation mutation may play in initiating allopatric, and even sympatric, species divisions.

  18. Mutations in man

    SciTech Connect

    Obe, G.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains 13 selections that cover some of the following topics: DNA repair, gene or point mutations, aspects of nondisjunction, origin and significance of chromosomal alterations, structure and organization of the human genome, and mutagenic activity of cigarette smoke.

  19. Comparing Mutational Variabilities

    PubMed Central

    Houle, D.; Morikawa, B.; Lynch, M.

    1996-01-01

    We have reviewed the available data on V(M), the amount of genetic variation in phenotypic traits produced each generation by mutation. We use these data to make several qualitative tests of the mutation-selection balance hypothesis for the maintenance of genetic variance (MSB). To compare V(M) values, we use three dimensionless quantities: mutational heritability, V(M)/V(E); the mutational coefficient of variation, CV(M); and the ratio of the standing genetic variance to V(M), V(G)/V(M). Since genetic coefficients of variation for life history traits are larger than those for morphological traits, we predict that under MSB, life history traits should also have larger CV(M). This is confirmed; life history traits have a median CV(M) value more than six times higher than that for morphological traits. V(G)/V(M) approximates the persistence time of mutations under MSB in an infinite population. In order for MSB to hold, V(G)/V(M) must be small, substantially less than 1000, and life history traits should have smaller values than morphological traits. V(G)/V(M) averages about 50 generations for life history traits and 100 generations for morphological traits. These observations are all consistent with the predictions of a mutation-selection balance model. PMID:8807316

  20. Mutational spectrum drives the rise of mutator bacteria.

    PubMed

    Couce, Alejandro; Guelfo, Javier R; Blázquez, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how mutator strains emerge in bacterial populations is relevant both to evolutionary theory and to reduce the threat they pose in clinical settings. The rise of mutator alleles is understood as a result of their hitchhiking with linked beneficial mutations, although the factors that govern this process remain unclear. A prominent but underappreciated fact is that each mutator allele increases only a specific spectrum of mutational changes. This spectrum has been speculated to alter the distribution of fitness effects of beneficial mutations, potentially affecting hitchhiking. To study this possibility, we analyzed the fitness distribution of beneficial mutations generated from different mutator and wild-type Escherichia coli strains. Using antibiotic resistance as a model system, we show that mutational spectra can alter these distributions substantially, ultimately determining the competitive ability of each strain across environments. Computer simulation showed that the effect of mutational spectrum on hitchhiking dynamics follows a non-linear function, implying that even slight spectrum-dependent fitness differences are sufficient to alter mutator success frequency by several orders of magnitude. These results indicate an unanticipated central role for the mutational spectrum in the evolution of bacterial mutation rates. At a practical level, this study indicates that knowledge of the molecular details of resistance determinants is crucial for minimizing mutator evolution during antibiotic therapy.

  1. Mutations in Lettuce Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Beiquan

    2011-01-01

    Lettuce is a major vegetable in western countries. Mutations generated genetic variations and played an important role in the domestication of the crop. Many traits derived from natural and induced mutations, such as dwarfing, early flowering, male sterility, and chlorophyll deficiency, are useful in physiological and genetic studies. Mutants were also used to develop new lettuce products including miniature and herbicide-tolerant cultivars. Mutant analysis was critical in lettuce genomic studies including identification and cloning of disease-resistance genes. Mutagenesis combined with genomic technology may provide powerful tools for the discovery of novel gene alleles. In addition to radiation and chemical mutagens, unconventional approaches such as tissue or protoplast culture, transposable elements, and space flights have been utilized to generate mutants in lettuce. Since mutation breeding is considered nontransgenic, it is more acceptable to consumers and will be explored more in the future for lettuce improvement. PMID:22287955

  2. Sex and deleterious mutations.

    PubMed

    Gordo, Isabel; Campos, Paulo R A

    2008-05-01

    The evolutionary advantage of sexual reproduction has been considered as one of the most pressing questions in evolutionary biology. While a pluralistic view of the evolution of sex and recombination has been suggested by some, here we take a simpler view and try to quantify the conditions under which sex can evolve given a set of minimal assumptions. Since real populations are finite and also subject to recurrent deleterious mutations, this minimal model should apply generally to all populations. We show that the maximum advantage of recombination occurs for an intermediate value of the deleterious effect of mutations. Furthermore we show that the conditions under which the biggest advantage of sex is achieved are those that produce the fastest fitness decline in the corresponding asexual population and are therefore the conditions for which Muller's ratchet has the strongest effect. We also show that the selective advantage of a modifier of the recombination rate depends on its strength. The quantification of the range of selective effects that favors recombination then leads us to suggest that, if in stressful environments the effect of deleterious mutations is enhanced, a connection between sex and stress could be expected, as it is found in several species.

  3. Mutator and MULE Transposons.

    PubMed

    Lisch, Damon

    2015-04-01

    The Mutator system of transposable elements (TEs) is a highly mutagenic family of transposons in maize. Because they transpose at high rates and target genic regions, these transposons can rapidly generate large numbers of new mutants, which has made the Mutator system a favored tool for both forward and reverse mutagenesis in maize. Low copy number versions of this system have also proved to be excellent models for understanding the regulation and behavior of Class II transposons in plants. Notably, the availability of a naturally occurring locus that can heritably silence autonomous Mutator elements has provided insights into the means by which otherwise active transposons are recognized and silenced. This chapter will provide a review of the biology, regulation, evolution and uses of this remarkable transposon system, with an emphasis on recent developments in our understanding of the ways in which this TE system is recognized and epigenetically silenced as well as recent evidence that Mu-like elements (MULEs) have had a significant impact on the evolution of plant genomes.

  4. OXPHOS mutations and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Koopman, Werner J H; Distelmaier, Felix; Smeitink, Jan AM; Willems, Peter HGM

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) sustains organelle function and plays a central role in cellular energy metabolism. The OXPHOS system consists of 5 multisubunit complexes (CI–CV) that are built up of 92 different structural proteins encoded by the nuclear (nDNA) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Biogenesis of a functional OXPHOS system further requires the assistance of nDNA-encoded OXPHOS assembly factors, of which 35 are currently identified. In humans, mutations in both structural and assembly genes and in genes involved in mtDNA maintenance, replication, transcription, and translation induce ‘primary' OXPHOS disorders that are associated with neurodegenerative diseases including Leigh syndrome (LS), which is probably the most classical OXPHOS disease during early childhood. Here, we present the current insights regarding function, biogenesis, regulation, and supramolecular architecture of the OXPHOS system, as well as its genetic origin. Next, we provide an inventory of OXPHOS structural and assembly genes which, when mutated, induce human neurodegenerative disorders. Finally, we discuss the consequences of mutations in OXPHOS structural and assembly genes at the single cell level and how this information has advanced our understanding of the role of OXPHOS dysfunction in neurodegeneration. PMID:23149385

  5. Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA mutations in Chinese patients: 16 novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Weimin; Wang, Yun; Meng, Yan; Su, Liang; Shi, Huiping; Huang, Shangzhi

    2010-08-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA; Morquio A syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase (GALNS) and transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. This is the first systematic mutation screen in Chinese MPS IVA patients. Mutation detections in 24 unrelated Chinese MPS IVA patients were performed by PCR and direct sequencing of exons or the mRNA of GALNS. A total of 42 mutant alleles were identified, belonging to 27 different mutations. Out of the 27 mutations, 16 were novel, including 2 splicing mutations (c.567-1G>T and c.634-1G>A), 2 nonsense mutations (p.W325X and p.Q422X) and 12 missense mutations (p.T88I, p.H142R, p.P163H, p.G168L, p.H236D, p.N289S, p.T312A, p.G316V, p.A324E, p.L366P, p.Q422K and p.F452L). p.G340D was found to be a common mutation in the Chinese MPS IVA patients, accounting for 16.7% of the total number of mutant alleles. The results show that the mutations in Chinese MPS IVA patients are also family specific but have a different mutation spectrum as compared to those of other populations.

  6. Calreticulin Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Lavi, Noa

    2014-01-01

    With the discovery of the JAK2V617F mutation in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative (Ph−) myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) in 2005, major advances have been made in the diagnosis of MPNs, in understanding of their pathogenesis involving the JAK/STAT pathway, and finally in the development of novel therapies targeting this pathway. Nevertheless, it remains unknown which mutations exist in approximately one-third of patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL essential thrombocythemia (ET) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF). At the end of 2013, two studies identified recurrent mutations in the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR) using whole-exome sequencing. These mutations were revealed in the majority of ET and PMF patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL but not in polycythemia vera patients. Somatic 52-bp deletions (type 1 mutations) and recurrent 5-bp insertions (type 2 mutations) in exon 9 of the CALR gene (the last exon encoding the C-terminal amino acids of the protein calreticulin) were detected and found always to generate frameshift mutations. All detected mutant calreticulin proteins shared a novel amino acid sequence at the C-terminal. Mutations in CALR are acquired early in the clonal history of the disease, and they cause activation of JAK/STAT signaling. The CALR mutations are the second most frequent mutations in Ph− MPN patients after the JAK2V617F mutation, and their detection has significantly improved the diagnostic approach for ET and PMF. The characteristics of the CALR mutations as well as their diagnostic, clinical, and pathogenesis implications are discussed in this review. PMID:25386351

  7. Filaggrin mutations and the skin.

    PubMed

    De, Dipankar; Handa, Sanjeev

    2012-01-01

    Filaggrin is very important in the terminal differentiation of the skin and the formation of cornified envelope in the stratum corneum. Several mutations in the filaggrin gene have been identified in the last decade, mostly from the European countries. Loss of function mutations in the filaggrin gene results in reduced production of filaggrin, depending on the type and site of mutation. Such mutations in the filaggrin gene have been shown to be the most significant genetic risk factor for development of atopic dermatitis and undoubtedly has a role in the pathogenesis of ichthyosis vulgaris. Though there is theoretical possibility of association with hand eczema and allergic contact dermatitis; in clinical studies, the strength of these associations was not significantly strong. In this review, we have discussed the structure and function of filaggrin, basic genetics, type of mutations in filaggrin gene, and association of such mutations with different dermatoses.

  8. Ramifications of four concurrent thrombophilic mutations and one hypofibrinolytic mutation.

    PubMed

    Glueck, Charles J; Goldenberg, Naila; Wang, Ping; Aregawi, Dawit

    2004-10-01

    A kindred was examined in which the 48-year-old white female proband with three deep venous thrombosis-pulmonary emboli events had four thrombophilic and one hypofibrinolytic mutations, and in which her 14-year-old asymptomatic daughter had four thrombophilic mutations. The proband was heterozygous for the G1691A factor V Leiden, G20210A prothrombin, and platelet glycoprotein IIIa PL A1/A2 mutations, had high factor VIII (221%), and was homozygous for the 4G4G plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 gene mutation, with high plasminogen activator inhibitor activity (23.7 U/mL). Her 14-year-old daughter was homozygous for the G1691A factor V Leiden and platelet glycoprotein IIb-IIIa PL A2/A2 mutations, compound heterozygous for the C677T and A1298C methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) mutations, and heterozygous for the G20210A prothrombin mutation, a combination with an estimated likelihood of 1.6 x 10(-7). In 247 white healthy controls, there was no V Leiden homozygosity and no V Leiden-prothrombin gene compound heterozygosity. Heterozygosity for the V Leiden and prothrombin gene mutations was 3.2% and 4.1%, respectively. Homozygosity for the platelet glycoprotein IIb-IIIa PL A2A2, PAI-1 gene 4G4G, and C677T MTHFR mutations was 3.2%, 22.7%, and 12%, respectively. The proband will receive anticoagulation therapy for life. Beyond aspirin, avoidance of exogenous estrogens, and enoxaparin prophylaxis during pregnancy, it is not known whether the proband's daughter should have lifelong anticoagulation therapy, or only after her first thrombotic event. PMID:15497023

  9. Parkinsonism Associated with Glucocerebrosidase Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Sunwoo, Mun-Kyung; Kim, Seung-Min; Lee, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Background Gaucher's disease is an autosomal recessive, lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations of the β-glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA). There is increasing evidence that GBA mutations are a genetic risk factor for the development of Parkinson's disease (PD). We report herein a family of Koreans exhibiting parkinsonism-associated GBA mutations. Case Report A 44-year-old woman suffering from slowness and paresthesia of the left arm for the previous 1.5years, visited our hospital to manage known invasive ductal carcinoma. During a preoperative evaluation, she was diagnosed with Gaucher's disease and double mutations of S271G and R359X in GBA. Parkinsonian features including low amplitude postural tremors, rigidity, bradykinesia and shuffling gait were observed. Genetic analysis also revealed that her older sister, who had also been diagnosed with PD and had been taking dopaminergic drugs for 8-years, also possessed a heterozygote R359X mutation in GBA. 18F-fluoropropylcarbomethoxyiodophenylnortropane positron-emission tomography in these patients revealed decreased uptake of dopamine transporter in the posterior portion of the bilateral putamen. Conclusions This case study demonstrates Korean familial cases of PD with heterozygote mutation of GBA, further supporting the association between PD and GBA mutation. PMID:21779299

  10. Bladder Cancer and Genetic Mutations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Yangde

    2015-09-01

    The most common type of urinary bladder cancer is called as transitional cell carcinoma. The major risk factors for bladder cancer are environmental, tobacco smoking, exposure to toxic industrial chemicals and gases, bladder inflammation due to microbial and parasitic infections, as well as some adverse side-effects of medications. The genetic mutations in some chromosomal genes, such as FGFR3, RB1, HRAS, TP53, TSC1, and others, occur which form tumors in the urinary bladder. These genes play an important role in the regulation of cell division which prevents cells from dividing too quickly. The changes in the genes of human chromosome 9 are usually responsible for tumor in bladder cancer, but the genetic mutation of chromosome 22 can also result in bladder cancer. The identification of p53 gene mutation has been studied at NIH, Washington, DC, USA, in urine samples of bladder cancer patients. The invasive bladder cancers were determined for the presence of gene mutations on p53 suppressor gene. The 18 different bladder tumors were evaluated, and 11 (61 %) had genetic mutations of p53 gene. The bladder cancer studies have suggested that 70 % of bladder cancers involve a specific mutation in a particular gene, namely telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene. The TERT gene is involved in DNA protection, cellular aging processes, and cancer. The Urothelial carcinomas of the bladder have been described in Atlas of genetics and cytogenetics in oncology and hematology. HRAS is a proto-oncogene and has potential to cause cancer in several organs including the bladder. The TSC1 c. 1907 1908 del (E636fs) mutation in bladder cancer suggests that the location of the mutation is Exon 15 with frequency of TSC1 mutation of 11.7 %. The recent findings of BAP1 mutations have shown that it contributes to BRCA pathway alterations in bladder cancer. The discoveries of more gene mutations and new biomarkers and polymerase chain reaction bioassays for gene mutations in bladder

  11. Mutational landscape and underlying mutational processes in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kasar, S; Brown, J R

    2016-07-01

    Sequencing studies have been instrumental in understanding the genetic basis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Our recent whole-genome sequencing study focusing on lower cytogenetic risk CLL demonstrated that CLL mutations can be attributed to 3 key mutational processes-2 types of activation induced-cytidine deaminase (AID) signatures and an aging signature-that operate at different times throughout CLL evolution. PMID:27652313

  12. PPARγ mutations, lipodystrophy and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Astapova, Olga; Leff, Todd

    2014-11-01

    The focus of this review is the lipodystrophy syndrome caused by mutation in the PPARγ nuclear receptor - partial familial lipodystrophy FPLD3. To provide a broader context for how these mutations act to generate the clinical features of partial lipodystrophy we will review the basic biology of PPARγ and also survey the set PPARγ genetic variants that do not cause lipodystrophy, but are nonetheless associated with clinically related syndromes, specifically type 2 diabetes.

  13. Mutations in cardiovascular connexin genes.

    PubMed

    Molica, Filippo; Meens, Merlijn J P; Morel, Sandrine; Kwak, Brenda R

    2014-09-01

    Connexins (Cxs) form a family of transmembrane proteins comprising 21 members in humans. Cxs differ in their expression patterns, biophysical properties and ability to combine into homomeric or heteromeric gap junction channels between neighbouring cells. The permeation of ions and small metabolites through gap junction channels or hemichannels confers a crucial role to these proteins in intercellular communication and in maintaining tissue homeostasis. Among others, Cx37, Cx40, Cx43, Cx45 and Cx47 are found in heart, blood and lymphatic vessels. Mutations or polymorphisms in the genes coding for these Cxs have not only been implicated in cardiovascular pathologies but also in a variety of other disorders. While mutations in Cx43 are mostly linked to oculodentodigital dysplasia, Cx47 mutations are associated with Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease and lymphoedema. Cx40 mutations are principally linked to atrial fibrillation. Mutations in Cx37 have not yet been described, but polymorphisms in the Cx37 gene have been implicated in the development of arterial disease. This review addresses current knowledge on gene mutations in cardiovascular Cxs systematically and links them to alterations in channel properties and disease.

  14. Genome destabilizing mutator alleles drive specific mutational trajectories in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Peter C; Shen, Yaoqing; Corbett, Richard; Jones, Steven J M; Hieter, Philip

    2014-02-01

    In addition to environmental factors and intrinsic variations in base substitution rates, specific genome-destabilizing mutations can shape the mutational trajectory of genomes. How specific alleles influence the nature and position of accumulated mutations in a genomic context is largely unknown. Understanding the impact of genome-destabilizing alleles is particularly relevant to cancer genomes where biased mutational signatures are identifiable. We first created a more complete picture of cellular pathways that impact mutation rate using a primary screen to identify essential Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene mutations that cause mutator phenotypes. Drawing primarily on new alleles identified in this resource, we measure the impact of diverse mutator alleles on mutation patterns directly by whole-genome sequencing of 68 mutation-accumulation strains derived from wild-type and 11 parental mutator genotypes. The accumulated mutations differ across mutator strains, displaying base-substitution biases, allele-specific mutation hotspots, and break-associated mutation clustering. For example, in mutants of POLα and the Cdc13-Stn1-Ten1 complex, we find a distinct subtelomeric bias for mutations that we show is independent of the target sequence. Together our data suggest that specific genome-instability mutations are sufficient to drive discrete mutational signatures, some of which share properties with mutation patterns seen in tumors. Thus, in a population of cells, genome-instability mutations could influence clonal evolution by establishing discrete mutational trajectories for genomes.

  15. Genome Destabilizing Mutator Alleles Drive Specific Mutational Trajectories in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Stirling, Peter C.; Shen, Yaoqing; Corbett, Richard; Jones, Steven J. M.; Hieter, Philip

    2014-01-01

    In addition to environmental factors and intrinsic variations in base substitution rates, specific genome-destabilizing mutations can shape the mutational trajectory of genomes. How specific alleles influence the nature and position of accumulated mutations in a genomic context is largely unknown. Understanding the impact of genome-destabilizing alleles is particularly relevant to cancer genomes where biased mutational signatures are identifiable. We first created a more complete picture of cellular pathways that impact mutation rate using a primary screen to identify essential Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene mutations that cause mutator phenotypes. Drawing primarily on new alleles identified in this resource, we measure the impact of diverse mutator alleles on mutation patterns directly by whole-genome sequencing of 68 mutation-accumulation strains derived from wild-type and 11 parental mutator genotypes. The accumulated mutations differ across mutator strains, displaying base-substitution biases, allele-specific mutation hotspots, and break-associated mutation clustering. For example, in mutants of POLα and the Cdc13–Stn1–Ten1 complex, we find a distinct subtelomeric bias for mutations that we show is independent of the target sequence. Together our data suggest that specific genome-instability mutations are sufficient to drive discrete mutational signatures, some of which share properties with mutation patterns seen in tumors. Thus, in a population of cells, genome-instability mutations could influence clonal evolution by establishing discrete mutational trajectories for genomes. PMID:24336748

  16. The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Patterson, M N; Hughes, I A; Gottlieb, B; Pinsky, L

    1994-09-01

    The androgen receptor gene mutations database is a comprehensive listing of mutations published in journals and meetings proceedings. The majority of mutations are point mutations identified in patients with androgen insensitivity syndrome. Information is included regarding the phenotype, the nature and location of the mutations, as well as the effects of the mutations on the androgen binding activity of the receptor. The current version of the database contains 149 entries, of which 114 are unique mutations. The database is available from EMBL (NetServ@EMBL-Heidelberg.DE) or as a Macintosh Filemaker file (mc33001@musica.mcgill.ca).

  17. Mutator Dynamics on a Smooth Evolutionary Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, David A.; Levine, Herbert

    1998-03-01

    We investigate a model of evolutionary dynamics on a smooth landscape which features a ``mutator'' allele which increases the mutation rate. We show that when the fitness is far from its equilibrium value the expected proportion of mutators approaches a value governed solely by the transition rates into and out of the mutator state, resulting in a much faster fitness increase than would be the case without the mutator allele. Near the fitness equilibrium, the mutators are severely suppressed, due to the detrimental effects of a large mutation rate near the fitness maximum. We discuss the results of a recent experiment on natural selection of E. coli in the light of our model.

  18. HFE mutations in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Willis, Gavin; Wimperis, Jennie Z; Smith, Katy; Fellows, Ian W; Jennings, Barbara A

    2003-01-01

    Most individuals diagnosed with hereditary hemochromatosis have mutations in both copies of the HFE gene, with such mutations being common in populations of north European origin. The number of individuals currently diagnosed and treated for hemochromatosis is small relative to the number carrying two HFE mutations. Studies searching for undiagnosed hemochromatosis cases among disease cohorts have generally failed to find the number of cases that would be expected if disease were the commonest outcome for individuals with two C282Y HFE mutations. Our aim was to test the hypothesis that individuals with two HFE mutations would be under-represented in an elderly population because many would have died from disease caused by hemochromatosis before they reached old age. This is a cross-sectional study of elderly patients referred for full blood counts at the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital. We screened blood samples from 1,000 elderly men (aged 85 and over) and women (aged 89 and over) for the C282Y, H63D, and S65C mutations of the HFE gene. We also analyzed any recent laboratory data relevant to signs of hemochromatosis. None of the ten possible genotypes was significantly under- or over-represented compared to the expected frequency calculated from the Hardy-Weinberg equation. Four C282Y homozygotes were found. There were few significant differences in the laboratory findings between the genotypes. Our data suggest that most people with HFE mutations survive to old age and do not suffer from signs of iron overload and hemochromatosis. PMID:12972032

  19. [Founder mutation in Lynch syndrome].

    PubMed

    Cajal, Andrea R; Piñero, Tamara A; Verzura, Alicia; Santino, Juan Pablo; Solano, Angela R; Kalfayan, Pablo G; Ferro, Alejandra; Vaccaro, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Lynch syndrome is the most frequent syndrome in hereditary colorectal cancer, a family-specific deleterious mutations in genes encoding DNA reparation proteins: MLH1 (mutL homolog 1), MSH2, MSH6 (mutS homolog 2 y 6, respectively), PMS2 (PMS1 homolog 2, mismatch repair system component) y MUTYH (mutY DNA glycosylase). The c.2252_2253delAA, p.Lys751Serfs*3 mutation in MLH1 gene segregates with a haplotype reported in the northern region of Italy and whose origin was attributed to a founder effect. This mutation co-segregates with typical characteristics of Lynch syndrome, including early age at onset and multiple primary tumors in the same individual, a high frequency of pancreatic cancer, high microsatellite instability and lack of PMS2 expression. This report describes a mutation in an Argentinian patient with endometrioid adenocarcinoma of uterus. Her first-degree relatives had a history of colon cancer diagnosed before 50 years, fulfilling the Amsterdam Criteria I and Lynch syndrome II. The high pathogenicity associated to this mutation makes necessary the study of all members from families with hereditary cancer, allowing pre-symptomatic genetic diagnosis, early assessment and the instauration of preventive treatments.

  20. Accelerating Mutational Load Is Not Due to Synergistic Epistasis or Mutator Alleles in Mutation Accumulation Lines of Yeast.

    PubMed

    Jasmin, Jean-Nicolas; Lenormand, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Much of our knowledge about the fitness effects of new mutations has been gained from mutation accumulation (MA) experiments. Yet the fitness effect of single mutations is rarely measured in MA experiments. This raises several issues, notably for inferring epistasis for fitness. The acceleration of fitness decline in MA lines has been taken as evidence for synergistic epistasis, but establishing the role of epistasis requires measuring the fitness of genotypes carrying known numbers of mutations. Otherwise, accelerating fitness loss could be explained by increased genetic mutation rates. Here we segregated mutations accumulated over 4800 generations in haploid and diploid MA lines of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found no correspondence between an accelerated fitness decline and synergistic epistasis among deleterious mutations in haploid lines. Pairs of mutations showed no overall epistasis. Furthermore, several lines of evidence indicate that genetic mutation rates did not increase in the MA lines. Crucially, segregant fitness analyses revealed that MA accelerated in both haploid and diploid lines, even though the fitness of diploid lines was nearly constant during the MA experiment. This suggests that the accelerated fitness decline in haploids was caused by cryptic environmental factors that increased mutation rates in all lines during the last third of the lines' transfers. In addition, we provide new estimates of deleterious mutation rates, including lethal mutations, and highlight that nearly all the mutational load we observed was due to one or two mutations having a large effect on fitness.

  1. Gene mutations in Cushing's disease

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Qi; Ge, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Cushing's disease (CD) is a severe (and potentially fatal) disease caused by adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting adenomas of the pituitary gland (often termed pituitary adenomas). The majority of ACTH-secreting corticotroph tumors are sporadic and CD rarely appears as a familial disorder, thus, the genetic mechanisms underlying CD are poorly understood. Studies have reported that various mutated genes are associated with CD, such as those in menin 1, aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein and the nuclear receptor subfamily 3 group C member 1. Recently it was identified that ubiquitin-specific protease 8 mutations contribute to CD, which was significant towards elucidating the genetic mechanisms of CD. The present study reviews the associated gene mutations in CD patients. PMID:27588171

  2. Phenotypic clustering in MPZ mutations.

    PubMed

    Shy, Michael E; Jáni, Agnes; Krajewski, Karen; Grandis, Marina; Lewis, Richard A; Li, Jun; Shy, Rosemary R; Balsamo, Janne; Lilien, Jack; Garbern, James Y; Kamholz, John

    2004-02-01

    Myelin protein zero (MPZ) is a member of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily with single extracellular, transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains. Homotypic interactions between extracellular domains of MPZ adhere adjacent myelin wraps to each other. MPZ is also necessary for myelin compaction since mice which lack MPZ develop severe dysmyelinating neuropathies in which compaction is dramatically disrupted. MPZ mutations in humans cause the inherited demyelinating neuropathy CMT1B. Some mutations cause the severe neuropathies of infancy designated as Dejerine-Sottas disease, while others cause a 'classical' Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease Type 1B (CMT1B) phenotype with normal early milestones but development of disability during the first two decades of life. Still other mutations cause a neuropathy that presents in adults, with normal nerve conduction velocities, designated as a 'CMT2' form of CMT1B. To correlate the phenotype of patients with MPZ mutations with their genotype, we identified and evaluated 13 patients from 12 different families with eight different MPZ mutations. In addition, we re-analysed the clinical data from 64 cases of CMT1B from the literature. Contrary to our expectations, we found that most patients presented with either an early onset neuropathy with signs and symptoms prior to the onset of walking or a late onset neuropathy with signs and symptoms at around age 40 years. Only occasional patients presented with a 'classical' CMT phenotype. Correlation of specific MPZ mutations with their phenotypes demonstrated that addition of either a charged amino acid or altering a cysteine residue in the extracellular domain caused a severe early onset neuropathy. Severe neuropathy was also caused by truncation of the cytoplasmic domain or alteration of an evolutionarily conserved amino acid. Taken together, these data suggest that early onset neuropathy is caused by MPZ mutations that significantly disrupt the tertiary structure of MPZ and thus

  3. Radiation-induced mutation at minisatellite loci

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrova, Y.E. |; Nesterov, V.N.; Krouchinsky, N.G.

    1997-10-01

    We are studying the radiation-induced increase of mutation rate in minisatellite loci in mice and humans. Minisatellite mutations were scored by multilocus DNA fingerprint analysis in the progeny of {gamma}-irradiated and non-irradiated mice. The frequency of mutation in offspring of irradiated males was 1.7 higher that in the control group. Germline mutation at human minisatellite loci was studied among children born in heavily polluted areas of the Mogilev district of Belarus after the Chernobyl accident and in a control population. The frequency of mutation assayed both by DNA fingerprinting and by eight single locus probes was found to be two times higher in the exposed families than in the control group. Furthermore, mutation rate was correlated with the parental radiation dose for chronic exposure {sup 137}Cs, consistent with radiation-induction of germline mutation. The potential use of minisatellites in monitoring germline mutation in humans will be discussed.

  4. Signatures of mutational processes in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Wedge, David C.; Aparicio, Samuel A.J.R.; Behjati, Sam; Biankin, Andrew V.; Bignell, Graham R.; Bolli, Niccolo; Borg, Ake; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Boyault, Sandrine; Burkhardt, Birgit; Butler, Adam P.; Caldas, Carlos; Davies, Helen R.; Desmedt, Christine; Eils, Roland; Eyfjörd, Jórunn Erla; Foekens, John A.; Greaves, Mel; Hosoda, Fumie; Hutter, Barbara; Ilicic, Tomislav; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Imielinsk, Marcin; Jäger, Natalie; Jones, David T.W.; Jones, David; Knappskog, Stian; Kool, Marcel; Lakhani, Sunil R.; López-Otín, Carlos; Martin, Sancha; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Nakamura, Hiromi; Northcott, Paul A.; Pajic, Marina; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Paradiso, Angelo; Pearson, John V.; Puente, Xose S.; Raine, Keiran; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Richardson, Andrea L.; Richter, Julia; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schlesner, Matthias; Schumacher, Ton N.; Span, Paul N.; Teague, Jon W.; Totoki, Yasushi; Tutt, Andrew N.J.; Valdés-Mas, Rafael; van Buuren, Marit M.; van ’t Veer, Laura; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Waddell, Nicola; Yates, Lucy R.; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Futreal, P. Andrew; McDermott, Ultan; Lichter, Peter; Meyerson, Matthew; Grimmond, Sean M.; Siebert, Reiner; Campo, Elías; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Pfister, Stefan M.; Campbell, Peter J.; Stratton, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    All cancers are caused by somatic mutations. However, understanding of the biological processes generating these mutations is limited. The catalogue of somatic mutations from a cancer genome bears the signatures of the mutational processes that have been operative. Here, we analysed 4,938,362 mutations from 7,042 cancers and extracted more than 20 distinct mutational signatures. Some are present in many cancer types, notably a signature attributed to the APOBEC family of cytidine deaminases, whereas others are confined to a single class. Certain signatures are associated with age of the patient at cancer diagnosis, known mutagenic exposures or defects in DNA maintenance, but many are of cryptic origin. In addition to these genome-wide mutational signatures, hypermutation localized to small genomic regions, kataegis, is found in many cancer types. The results reveal the diversity of mutational processes underlying the development of cancer with potential implications for understanding of cancer etiology, prevention and therapy. PMID:23945592

  5. Signatures of mutational processes in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Wedge, David C; Aparicio, Samuel A J R; Behjati, Sam; Biankin, Andrew V; Bignell, Graham R; Bolli, Niccolò; Borg, Ake; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Boyault, Sandrine; Burkhardt, Birgit; Butler, Adam P; Caldas, Carlos; Davies, Helen R; Desmedt, Christine; Eils, Roland; Eyfjörd, Jórunn Erla; Foekens, John A; Greaves, Mel; Hosoda, Fumie; Hutter, Barbara; Ilicic, Tomislav; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Imielinski, Marcin; Imielinsk, Marcin; Jäger, Natalie; Jones, David T W; Jones, David; Knappskog, Stian; Kool, Marcel; Lakhani, Sunil R; López-Otín, Carlos; Martin, Sancha; Munshi, Nikhil C; Nakamura, Hiromi; Northcott, Paul A; Pajic, Marina; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Paradiso, Angelo; Pearson, John V; Puente, Xose S; Raine, Keiran; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Richardson, Andrea L; Richter, Julia; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schlesner, Matthias; Schumacher, Ton N; Span, Paul N; Teague, Jon W; Totoki, Yasushi; Tutt, Andrew N J; Valdés-Mas, Rafael; van Buuren, Marit M; van 't Veer, Laura; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Waddell, Nicola; Yates, Lucy R; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Futreal, P Andrew; McDermott, Ultan; Lichter, Peter; Meyerson, Matthew; Grimmond, Sean M; Siebert, Reiner; Campo, Elías; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Pfister, Stefan M; Campbell, Peter J; Stratton, Michael R

    2013-08-22

    All cancers are caused by somatic mutations; however, understanding of the biological processes generating these mutations is limited. The catalogue of somatic mutations from a cancer genome bears the signatures of the mutational processes that have been operative. Here we analysed 4,938,362 mutations from 7,042 cancers and extracted more than 20 distinct mutational signatures. Some are present in many cancer types, notably a signature attributed to the APOBEC family of cytidine deaminases, whereas others are confined to a single cancer class. Certain signatures are associated with age of the patient at cancer diagnosis, known mutagenic exposures or defects in DNA maintenance, but many are of cryptic origin. In addition to these genome-wide mutational signatures, hypermutation localized to small genomic regions, 'kataegis', is found in many cancer types. The results reveal the diversity of mutational processes underlying the development of cancer, with potential implications for understanding of cancer aetiology, prevention and therapy.

  6. MECHANISMS OF STATIONARY PHASE MUTATION: A Decade of Adaptive Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Foster, P. L.

    2010-01-01

    A decade of research on adaptive mutation has revealed a plethora of mutagenic mechanisms that may be important in evolution. The DNA synthesis associated with recombination could be an important source of spontaneous mutation in cells that are not proliferating. The movement of insertion elements can be responsive to environmental conditions. Insertion elements not only activate and inactivate genes, they also provide sequence homology that allows large-scale genomic rearrangements. Some conjugative plasmids can recombine with their host’s chromosome, and may acquire chromosomal genes that could then spread through the population and even to other species. Finally, a subpopulation of transient hypermutators could be a source of multiple variant alleles, providing a mechanism for rapid evolution under adverse conditions. PMID:10690404

  7. Tracking Down Mutations Cell by Cell.

    PubMed

    Kosik, Kenneth S

    2016-03-16

    Using somatic cell nuclear transfer, Hazen et al. (2016) examined clonally expanded single neurons for mutations and found ∼100 mutations from a variety of classes. Post-mitotic mutations in individual neurons represent an exploratory direction for finding fundamental origins of neurodegeneration. PMID:26985720

  8. Mutation rate evolution in replicator dynamics.

    PubMed

    Allen, Benjamin; Rosenbloom, Daniel I Scholes

    2012-11-01

    The mutation rate of an organism is itself evolvable. In stable environments, if faithful replication is costless, theory predicts that mutation rates will evolve to zero. However, positive mutation rates can evolve in novel or fluctuating environments, as analytical and empirical studies have shown. Previous work on this question has focused on environments that fluctuate independently of the evolving population. Here we consider fluctuations that arise from frequency-dependent selection in the evolving population itself. We investigate how the dynamics of competing traits can induce selective pressure on the rates of mutation between these traits. To address this question, we introduce a theoretical framework combining replicator dynamics and adaptive dynamics. We suppose that changes in mutation rates are rare, compared to changes in the traits under direct selection, so that the expected evolutionary trajectories of mutation rates can be obtained from analysis of pairwise competition between strains of different rates. Depending on the nature of frequency-dependent trait dynamics, we demonstrate three possible outcomes of this competition. First, if trait frequencies are at a mutation-selection equilibrium, lower mutation rates can displace higher ones. Second, if trait dynamics converge to a heteroclinic cycle-arising, for example, from "rock-paper-scissors" interactions-mutator strains succeed against non-mutators. Third, in cases where selection alone maintains all traits at positive frequencies, zero and nonzero mutation rates can coexist indefinitely. Our second result suggests that relatively high mutation rates may be observed for traits subject to cyclical frequency-dependent dynamics.

  9. Mutation analysis in patients with Wilson disease: identification of 4 novel mutations. Mutation in brief no. 250. Online.

    PubMed

    Haas, R; Gutierrez-Rivero, B; Knoche, J; Böker, K; Manns, M P; Schmidt, H H

    1999-01-01

    In order to obtain novel mutations in the recently discovered Wilson disease gene, we screened 5 unrelated German individuals for mutations in the 21 exons and their flanking intronic sequences. We detected 9 mutations affecting the Wilson disease gene. Four of those, designated 802-808delTGTAAGT, 2008-2013delTATATG, Cys985Thr, and Ile1148Thr have not yet been reported. One patient had a homozygous mutation whereas the remaining four subjects were compound heterozygous. Therefore these data confirm, that mutations causing Wilson disease are frequently found in affected subjects and they are very heterogenous. PMID:10447265

  10. Plastome Mutations and Recombination Events in Barley Chloroplast Mutator Seedlings.

    PubMed

    Landau, Alejandra; Lencina, Franco; Pacheco, María G; Prina, Alberto R

    2016-05-01

    The barley chloroplast mutator (cpm) is an allele of a nuclear gene that when homozygous induces several types of cytoplasmically inherited chlorophyll deficiencies. In this work, a plastome Targeting Induced Local Lesions in Genomes (TILLING) strategy based on mismatch digestion was used on families that carried the cpm genotype through many generations. Extensive scanning of 33 plastome genes and a few intergenic regions was conducted. Numerous polymorphisms were detected on both genic and intergenic regions. The detected polymorphisms can be accounted for by at least 61 independent mutational events. The vast majority of the polymorphisms originated in substitutions and small indels (insertions/deletions) in microsatellites. The rpl23 and the rps16 genes were the most polymorphic. Interestingly, the variation observed in the rpl23 gene consisted of several combinations of 5 different one nucleotide polymorphisms. Besides, 4 large indels that have direct repeats at both ends were also observed, which appear to be originated from recombinational events. The cpm mutation spectrum suggests that the CPM gene product is probably involved in plastome mismatch repair. The numerous subtle molecular changes that were localized in a wide range of plastome sites show the cpm as a valuable source of plastome variability for plant research and/or plant breeding. Moreover, the cpm mutant appears to be an interesting experimental material for investigating the mechanisms responsible for maintaining the stability of plant organelle DNA.

  11. Interplay of mutation and disassortativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, Sanjiv K.; Jalan, Sarika

    2015-08-01

    Despite disassortativity being commonly observed in many biological networks, our current understanding of its evolutionary origin is inadequate. Motivated by the occurrence of mutations during an evolutionary time span that results in changes in the behavior of interactions, we demonstrate that if we maximize the stability of the underlying system, the genetic algorithm leads to the evolution of a disassortative structure. The mutation probability governs the degree of saturation of the disassortativity coefficient, and this reveals the origin of the wide range of disassortativity values found in real systems. We analytically verify these results for star networks, and by considering various values for the antisymmetric couplings, we find a regime in which scale-free networks are more stable than the corresponding random networks.

  12. Spectrum of mutations in mut methylmalonic acidemia and identification of a common Hispanic mutation and haplotype.

    PubMed

    Worgan, Lisa C; Niles, Kirsten; Tirone, Jamie C; Hofmann, Adam; Verner, Andrei; Sammak, Alya'a; Kucic, Terrence; Lepage, Pierre; Rosenblatt, David S

    2006-01-01

    Cobalamin nonresponsive methylmalonic acidemia (MMA, mut complementation class) results from mutations in the nuclear gene MUT, which codes for the mitochondrial enzyme methylmalonyl CoA mutase (MCM). To better elucidate the spectrum of mutations that cause MMA, the MUT gene was sequenced in 160 patients with mut MMA. Sequence analysis identified mutations in 96% of disease alleles. Mutations were found in all coding exons, but predominantly in exons 2, 3, 6, and 11. A total of 116 different mutations, 68 of which were novel, were identified. Of the 116 different mutations, 53% were missense mutations, 22% were deletions, duplications or insertions, 16% were nonsense mutations, and 9% were splice-site mutations. Sixty-one of the mutations have only been identified in one family. A novel mutation in exon 2, c.322C>T (p.R108C), was identified in 16 of 27 Hispanic patients. SNP genotyping data demonstrated that Hispanic patients with this mutation share a common haplotype. Three other mutations were seen exclusively in Hispanic patients: c.280G>A (p.G94R), c.1022dupA, and c.970G>A (p.A324T). Seven mutations were seen almost exclusively in black patients, including the previously reported c.2150G>T (p.G717V) mutation, which was identified in 12 of 29 black patients. Two mutations were seen only in Asian patients. Some frequently identified mutations were not population-specific and were identified in patients of various ethnic backgrounds. Some of these mutations were found in mutation clusters in exons 2, 3, 6, and 11, suggesting a recurrent mutation.

  13. Tailoring the metabolism against mutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulbahce, Natali; Motter, Adilson E.; Almaas, Eivind; Barabasi, Albert Laszlo

    2008-03-01

    In the post-genomic era, organisms can be modelled at the whole-cell level in silico via steady state methods to describe their metabolic capabilities. We use two such methods, Flux Balance Analysis and Minimization of Metabolic Adjustment to explore the behavior of cells (of E. coli and S. cerevisiae) after severe mutations. We propose experimentally feasible ways of modifying the underlying biochemical reaction network of a mutant cell such that cell functionality, in particular growth rate, is significantly improved.

  14. [Pathologic manifestations of hormonal receptor mutations].

    PubMed

    Milgrom, E

    2000-01-01

    Mutations of receptor genes are involved in various aspects of thyroid and gonadal pathology. Activating mutations of TSH and LH receptors are associated with hyperthyroidism and premature puberty. These mutations are dominant and lead to the synthesis of a constitutive receptor, i.e. a receptor active even in the absence of hormone. Inactivating mutations of TSH, gonadotropin and GnRH receptors are recessive. They determine either a hypothyroidism or a hypogonadism. In the case of alterations of gonadotropin receptors the hypogonadism is hypergonadotrophic. It is hypogonadotrophic in the case of mutations of the GnRH receptor. PMID:10989556

  15. Somatic mutation, genomic variation, and neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Poduri, Annapurna; Evrony, Gilad D; Cai, Xuyu; Walsh, Christopher A

    2013-07-01

    Genetic mutations causing human disease are conventionally thought to be inherited through the germ line from one's parents and present in all somatic (body) cells, except for most cancer mutations, which arise somatically. Increasingly, somatic mutations are being identified in diseases other than cancer, including neurodevelopmental diseases. Somatic mutations can arise during the course of prenatal brain development and cause neurological disease-even when present at low levels of mosaicism, for example-resulting in brain malformations associated with epilepsy and intellectual disability. Novel, highly sensitive technologies will allow more accurate evaluation of somatic mutations in neurodevelopmental disorders and during normal brain development.

  16. Somatic Mutation, Genomic Variation, and Neurological Disease

    PubMed Central

    Poduri, Annapurna; Evrony, Gilad D.; Cai, Xuyu; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic mutations causing human disease are conventionally thought to be inherited through the germ line from one’s parents and present in all somatic (body) cells, except for most cancer mutations, which arise somatically. Increasingly, somatic mutations are being identified in diseases other than cancer, including neurodevelopmental diseases. Somatic mutations can arise during the course of prenatal brain development and cause neurological disease—even when present at low levels of mosaicism, for example—resulting in brain malformations associated with epilepsy and intellectual disability. Novel, highly sensitive technologies will allow more accurate evaluation of somatic mutations in neurodevelopmental disorders and during normal brain development. PMID:23828942

  17. LHON: Mitochondrial Mutations and More.

    PubMed

    Kirches, E

    2011-03-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrial disorder leading to severe visual impairment or even blindness by death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). The primary cause of the disease is usually a mutation of the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) causing a single amino acid exchange in one of the mtDNA-encoded subunits of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, the first complex of the electron transport chain. It was thus obvious to accuse neuronal energy depletion as the most probable mediator of neuronal death. The group of Valerio Carelli and other authors have nicely shown that energy depletion shapes the cell fate in a LHON cybrid cell model. However, the cybrids used were osteosarcoma cells, which do not fully model neuronal energy metabolism. Although complex I mutations may cause oxidative stress, a potential pathogenetic role of the latter was less taken into focus. The hypothesis of bioenergetic failure does not provide a simple explanation for the relatively late disease onset and for the incomplete penetrance, which differs remarkably between genders. It is assumed that other genetic and environmental factors are needed in addition to the 'primary LHON mutations' to elicit RGC death. Relevant nuclear modifier genes have not been identified so far. The review discusses the unresolved problems of a pathogenetic hypothesis based on ATP decline and/or ROS-induced apoptosis in RGCs.

  18. The evolution of low mutation rates in experimental mutator populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Michael J; Hsieh, Yu-Ying; Yu, Yen-Hsin; Chang, Shang-Lin; Leu, Jun-Yi

    2012-07-10

    Mutation is the source of both beneficial adaptive variation and deleterious genetic load, fueling the opposing selective forces than shape mutation rate evolution. This dichotomy is well illustrated by the evolution of the mutator phenotype, a genome-wide 10- to 100-fold increase in mutation rate. This phenotype has often been observed in clonally expanding populations exposed to novel or frequently changing conditions. Although studies of both experimental and natural populations have shed light on the evolutionary forces that lead to the spread of the mutator allele through a population, significant gaps in our understanding of mutator evolution remain. Here we use an experimental evolution approach to investigate the conditions required for the evolution of a reduction in mutation rate and the mechanisms by which populations tolerate the accumulation of deleterious mutations. We find that after ∼6,700 generations, four out of eight experimental mutator lines had evolved a decreased mutation rate. We provide evidence that the accumulation of deleterious mutations leads to selection for reduced mutation rate clones in populations of mutators. Finally, we test the long-term consequences of the mutator phenotype, finding that mutator lines follow different evolutionary trajectories, some of which lead to drug resistance.

  19. Myopathies associated with β-tropomyosin mutations.

    PubMed

    Tajsharghi, H; Ohlsson, M; Palm, L; Oldfors, A

    2012-11-01

    Mutations in TPM2, encoding β-tropomyosin, have recently been found to cause a range of muscle disorders. We review the clinical and morphological expression of the previously reported mutations illustrating the heterogeneity of β-tropomyosin-associated diseases and describe an additional case with a novel mutation. The manifestations of mutations in TPM2 include non-specific congenital myopathy with type 1 fibre predominance, nemaline myopathy, cap disease and distal arthrogryposis. In addition, Escobar syndrome with nemaline myopathy is a manifestation of homozygous truncating β-tropomyosin mutation. Cap disease appears to be the most common morphological manifestation. A coarse intermyofibrillar network and jagged Z lines are additional frequent changes. The dominant β-tropomyosin mutations manifest either as congenital myopathy or distal arthrogryposis. The various congenital myopathies are usually associated with moderate muscle weakness and no congenital joint contractures. The distal arthrogryposis syndromes associated with TPM2 mutations include the less severe forms, with congenital contractures mainly of the hands and feet and mild or no muscle weakness. The dominant TPM2 mutations include amino acid deletions/insertions and missense mutations. There is no clear relation between the type of mutations or the localisation of the mutated residue in the β-tropomyosin molecule and the clinical and morphological phenotype. PMID:22749895

  20. Mechanisms of Mutation in Nondividing Cells

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Patricia L.; Rosche, William A.

    2010-01-01

    When populations of cells are subjected to nonlethal selection, mutations arise in the absence of cell division, a phenomenon that has been called “adaptive mutation.” In a strain of Escherichia coli that cannot metabolize lactose (Lac−) but that reverts to lactose utilization (Lac+) when lactose is its sole energy and carbon source, the mutational process consists of two components. (1) A highly efficient, recombination-dependent mechanism giving rise to mutations on the F′ episome that carries the Lac− allele; and (2) a less efficient, unknown mechanism giving rise to mutations elsewhere in the genome. Both selected and nonselected mutations arise in the Lac− population, but nonselected mutations are enriched in Lac+ mutants, suggesting that some Lac+ cells have passed though a transient period of increased mutation. These results have several evolutionary implications. (1) DNA synthesis initiated by recombination could be an important source of spontaneous mutation, particularly in cells that are not undergoing genomic replication. (2) The highly active mutational mechanism on the episome could be important in the horizontal transfer of variant alleles among species that carry and exchange conjugal plasmids. (3) A subpopulation of cells in a state of transient mutation could be a source of multiple variant alleles and could provide a mechanism for rapid adaptive evolution under adverse conditions. PMID:10415479

  1. KRAS mutation testing in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Perincheri, Sudhir; Hui, Pei

    2015-03-01

    Activating mutation of KRAS plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of common human malignancies and molecular testing of KRAS mutation has emerged as an essential biomarker in the current practice of clinical oncology. The presence of KRAS mutation is generally associated with clinical aggressiveness of the cancer and reduced survival of the patient. Therapeutically, KRAS mutation testing has maximum utility in stratifying metastatic colorectal carcinoma and lung cancer patients for treatment with targeted therapy. Diagnostically, KRAS mutation testing is useful in the workup of pancreaticobiliary and thyroid cancers, particularly using cytological specimens. In the era of precision medicine, the role of KRAS mutation testing is poised to expand, likely in a setting of combinatorial therapeutic strategy and requiring additional mutation testing of its upstream and/or downstream effectors.

  2. Androgen receptor gene mutation, rearrangement, polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Eisermann, Kurtis; Wang, Dan; Jing, Yifeng; Pascal, Laura E; Wang, Zhou

    2013-09-01

    Genetic aberrations of the androgen receptor (AR) caused by mutations, rearrangements, and polymorphisms result in a mutant receptor that has varied functions compared to wild type AR. To date, over 1,000 mutations have been reported in the AR with most of these being associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). While mutations of AR associated with prostate cancer occur less often in early stage localized disease, mutations in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients treated with anti-androgens occur more frequently with 10-30% of these patients having some form of mutation in the AR. Resistance to anti-androgen therapy usually results from gain-of-function mutations in the LBD such as is seen with bicalutamide and more recently with enzalutamide (MDV3100). Thus, it is crucial to investigate these new AR mutations arising from drug resistance to anti-androgens and other small molecule pharmacological agents.

  3. Too Many Mutants with Multiple Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Drake, John W.

    2007-01-01

    It has recently become clear that the classical notion of the random nature of mutation does not hold for the distribution of mutations among genes: most collections of mutants contain more isolates with two or more mutations than predicted by the mutant frequency on the assumption of a random distribution of mutations. Excesses of multiples are seen in a wide range of organisms, including riboviruses, DNA viruses, prokaryotes, yeasts, and higher eukaryotic cell lines and tissues. In addition, such excesses are produced by DNA polymerases in vitro. These “multiples” appear to be generated by transient, localized hypermutation rather than by heritable mutator mutations. The components of multiples are sometimes scattered at random and sometimes display an excess of smaller distances between mutations. As yet, almost nothing is known about the mechanisms that generate multiples, but such mutations have the capacity to accelerate those evolutionary pathways that require multiple mutations where the individual mutations are neutral or deleterious. Examples that impinge on human health may include carcinogenesis and the adaptation of microbial pathogens as they move between individual hosts. PMID:17687667

  4. Mutations affecting enzymatic activity in liver arginase

    SciTech Connect

    Vockley, J.G.; Tabor, D.E.; Goodman, B.K.

    1994-09-01

    The hydrolysis of arginine to ornithine and urea is catalyzed by arginase in the last step of the urea cycle. We examined a group of arginase deficient patients by PCR-SSCP analysis to characterize the molecular basis of this disorder. A heterogeneous population of nonsense mutations, microdeletions, and missense mutations has been identified in our cohort. Microdeletions which introduce premature stop codons downstream of the deletion and nonsense mutations result in no arginase activity. These mutations occur randomly along the gene. The majority of missense mutations identified appear to occur in regions of high cross-species homology. To test the effect of these missense mutations on arginase activity, site-directed mutagenesis was used to re-create the patient mutations for in vivo expression studies in a prokaryotic fusion-protein expression system. Of 4 different missense mutations identified in 6 individuals, only one was located outside of a conserved region. The three substitution mutations within the conserved regions had a significant effect on enzymatic activity (0-3.1 nmole/30min, normal is 1300-1400 nmoles/30min, as determined by in vitro arginase assay), while the fourth mutation, a T to S substitution, did not. In addition, site-directed mutagenesis was utilized to create mutations not in residues postulated to play a significant role in the enzymatic function or active site formation in manganese-binding proteins such as arginase. We have determined that the substitution of glycine for a histidine residue, located in a very highly conserved region of exon 3, and the substitution of a histidine and an aspartic acid residue within a similarly conserved region in exon 4, totally abolishes enzymatic activity. Mutations substituting glycine for an additional histidine and aspartic acid residue in exon 4 and two aspartic acid residues in exon 7 have also been created. We are currently in the process of characterizing these mutations.

  5. How mutation affects evolutionary games on graphs.

    PubMed

    Allen, Benjamin; Traulsen, Arne; Tarnita, Corina E; Nowak, Martin A

    2012-04-21

    Evolutionary dynamics are affected by population structure, mutation rates and update rules. Spatial or network structure facilitates the clustering of strategies, which represents a mechanism for the evolution of cooperation. Mutation dilutes this effect. Here we analyze how mutation influences evolutionary clustering on graphs. We introduce new mathematical methods to evolutionary game theory, specifically the analysis of coalescing random walks via generating functions. These techniques allow us to derive exact identity-by-descent (IBD) probabilities, which characterize spatial assortment on lattices and Cayley trees. From these IBD probabilities we obtain exact conditions for the evolution of cooperation and other game strategies, showing the dual effects of graph topology and mutation rate. High mutation rates diminish the clustering of cooperators, hindering their evolutionary success. Our model can represent either genetic evolution with mutation, or social imitation processes with random strategy exploration.

  6. DCDC2 Mutations Cause Neonatal Sclerosing Cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Girard, Muriel; Bizet, Albane A; Lachaux, Alain; Gonzales, Emmanuel; Filhol, Emilie; Collardeau-Frachon, Sophie; Jeanpierre, Cécile; Henry, Charline; Fabre, Monique; Viremouneix, Loic; Galmiche, Louise; Debray, Dominique; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Nitschke, Patrick; Pariente, Danièle; Guettier, Catherine; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Heidet, Laurence; Bertholet, Aurelia; Jacquemin, Emmanuel; Henrion-Caude, Alexandra; Saunier, Sophie

    2016-10-01

    Neonatal sclerosing cholangitis (NSC) is a rare biliary disease leading to liver transplantation in childhood. Patients with NSC and ichtyosis have already been identified with a CLDN1 mutation, encoding a tight-junction protein. However, for the majority of patients, the molecular basis of NSC remains unknown. We identified biallelic missense mutations or in-frame deletion in DCDC2 in four affected children. Mutations involve highly conserved amino acids in the doublecortin domains of the protein. In cholangiocytes, DCDC2 protein is normally located in the cytoplasm and cilia, whereas in patients the mutated protein is accumulated in the cytoplasm, absent from cilia, and associated with ciliogenesis defect. This is the first report of DCDC2 mutations in NSC. This data expands the molecular spectrum of NSC, that can be considered as a ciliopathy and also expands the clinical spectrum of the DCDC2 mutations, previously reported in dyslexia, deafness, and nephronophtisis. PMID:27319779

  7. DCDC2 Mutations Cause Neonatal Sclerosing Cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Girard, Muriel; Bizet, Albane A; Lachaux, Alain; Gonzales, Emmanuel; Filhol, Emilie; Collardeau-Frachon, Sophie; Jeanpierre, Cécile; Henry, Charline; Fabre, Monique; Viremouneix, Loic; Galmiche, Louise; Debray, Dominique; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Nitschke, Patrick; Pariente, Danièle; Guettier, Catherine; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Heidet, Laurence; Bertholet, Aurelia; Jacquemin, Emmanuel; Henrion-Caude, Alexandra; Saunier, Sophie

    2016-10-01

    Neonatal sclerosing cholangitis (NSC) is a rare biliary disease leading to liver transplantation in childhood. Patients with NSC and ichtyosis have already been identified with a CLDN1 mutation, encoding a tight-junction protein. However, for the majority of patients, the molecular basis of NSC remains unknown. We identified biallelic missense mutations or in-frame deletion in DCDC2 in four affected children. Mutations involve highly conserved amino acids in the doublecortin domains of the protein. In cholangiocytes, DCDC2 protein is normally located in the cytoplasm and cilia, whereas in patients the mutated protein is accumulated in the cytoplasm, absent from cilia, and associated with ciliogenesis defect. This is the first report of DCDC2 mutations in NSC. This data expands the molecular spectrum of NSC, that can be considered as a ciliopathy and also expands the clinical spectrum of the DCDC2 mutations, previously reported in dyslexia, deafness, and nephronophtisis.

  8. Spliceosome mutations exhibit specific associations with epigenetic modifiers and proto-oncogenes mutated in myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mian, Syed A; Smith, Alexander E; Kulasekararaj, Austin G; Kizilors, Aytug; Mohamedali, Azim M; Lea, Nicholas C; Mitsopoulos, Konstantinos; Ford, Kevin; Nasser, Erick; Seidl, Thomas; Mufti, Ghulam J

    2013-07-01

    The recent identification of acquired mutations in key components of the spliceosome machinery strongly implicates abnormalities of mRNA splicing in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes. However, questions remain as to how these aberrations functionally combine with the growing list of mutations in genes involved in epigenetic modification and cell signaling/transcription regulation identified in these diseases. In this study, amplicon sequencing was used to perform a mutation screen in 154 myelodysplastic syndrome patients using a 22-gene panel, including commonly mutated spliceosome components (SF3B1, SRSF2, U2AF1, ZRSR2), and a further 18 genes known to be mutated in myeloid cancers. Sequencing of the 22-gene panel revealed that 76% (n=117) of the patients had mutations in at least one of the genes, with 38% (n=59) having splicing gene mutations and 49% (n=75) patients harboring more than one gene mutation. Interestingly, single and specific epigenetic modifier mutations tended to coexist with SF3B1 and SRSF2 mutations (P<0.03). Furthermore, mutations in SF3B1 and SRSF2 were mutually exclusive to TP53 mutations both at diagnosis and at the time of disease transformation. Moreover, mutations in FLT3, NRAS, RUNX1, CCBL and C-KIT were more likely to co-occur with splicing factor mutations generally (P<0.02), and SRSF2 mutants in particular (P<0.003) and were significantly associated with disease transformation (P<0.02). SF3B1 and TP53 mutations had varying impacts on overall survival with hazard ratios of 0.2 (P<0.03, 95% CI, 0.1-0.8) and 2.1 (P<0.04, 95% CI, 1.1-4.4), respectively. Moreover, patients with splicing factor mutations alone had a better overall survival than those with epigenetic modifier mutations, or cell signaling/transcription regulator mutations with and without coexisting mutations of splicing factor genes, with worsening prognosis (P<0.001). These findings suggest that splicing factor mutations are maintained throughout disease

  9. The Mutational Robustness of Influenza A Virus.

    PubMed

    Visher, Elisa; Whitefield, Shawn E; McCrone, John T; Fitzsimmons, William; Lauring, Adam S

    2016-08-01

    A virus' mutational robustness is described in terms of the strength and distribution of the mutational fitness effects, or MFE. The distribution of MFE is central to many questions in evolutionary theory and is a key parameter in models of molecular evolution. Here we define the mutational fitness effects in influenza A virus by generating 128 viruses, each with a single nucleotide mutation. In contrast to mutational scanning approaches, this strategy allowed us to unambiguously assign fitness values to individual mutations. The presence of each desired mutation and the absence of additional mutations were verified by next generation sequencing of each stock. A mutation was considered lethal only after we failed to rescue virus in three independent transfections. We measured the fitness of each viable mutant relative to the wild type by quantitative RT-PCR following direct competition on A549 cells. We found that 31.6% of the mutations in the genome-wide dataset were lethal and that the lethal fraction did not differ appreciably between the HA- and NA-encoding segments and the rest of the genome. Of the viable mutants, the fitness mean and standard deviation were 0.80 and 0.22 in the genome-wide dataset and best modeled as a beta distribution. The fitness impact of mutation was marginally lower in the segments coding for HA and NA (0.88 ± 0.16) than in the other 6 segments (0.78 ± 0.24), and their respective beta distributions had slightly different shape parameters. The results for influenza A virus are remarkably similar to our own analysis of CirSeq-derived fitness values from poliovirus and previously published data from other small, single stranded DNA and RNA viruses. These data suggest that genome size, and not nucleic acid type or mode of replication, is the main determinant of viral mutational fitness effects. PMID:27571422

  10. The Mutational Robustness of Influenza A Virus

    PubMed Central

    McCrone, John T.; Lauring, Adam S.

    2016-01-01

    A virus’ mutational robustness is described in terms of the strength and distribution of the mutational fitness effects, or MFE. The distribution of MFE is central to many questions in evolutionary theory and is a key parameter in models of molecular evolution. Here we define the mutational fitness effects in influenza A virus by generating 128 viruses, each with a single nucleotide mutation. In contrast to mutational scanning approaches, this strategy allowed us to unambiguously assign fitness values to individual mutations. The presence of each desired mutation and the absence of additional mutations were verified by next generation sequencing of each stock. A mutation was considered lethal only after we failed to rescue virus in three independent transfections. We measured the fitness of each viable mutant relative to the wild type by quantitative RT-PCR following direct competition on A549 cells. We found that 31.6% of the mutations in the genome-wide dataset were lethal and that the lethal fraction did not differ appreciably between the HA- and NA-encoding segments and the rest of the genome. Of the viable mutants, the fitness mean and standard deviation were 0.80 and 0.22 in the genome-wide dataset and best modeled as a beta distribution. The fitness impact of mutation was marginally lower in the segments coding for HA and NA (0.88 ± 0.16) than in the other 6 segments (0.78 ± 0.24), and their respective beta distributions had slightly different shape parameters. The results for influenza A virus are remarkably similar to our own analysis of CirSeq-derived fitness values from poliovirus and previously published data from other small, single stranded DNA and RNA viruses. These data suggest that genome size, and not nucleic acid type or mode of replication, is the main determinant of viral mutational fitness effects. PMID:27571422

  11. LHON: Mitochondrial Mutations and More

    PubMed Central

    Kirches, E

    2011-01-01

    Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrial disorder leading to severe visual impairment or even blindness by death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). The primary cause of the disease is usually a mutation of the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) causing a single amino acid exchange in one of the mtDNA-encoded subunits of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, the first complex of the electron transport chain. It was thus obvious to accuse neuronal energy depletion as the most probable mediator of neuronal death. The group of Valerio Carelli and other authors have nicely shown that energy depletion shapes the cell fate in a LHON cybrid cell model. However, the cybrids used were osteosarcoma cells, which do not fully model neuronal energy metabolism. Although complex I mutations may cause oxidative stress, a potential pathogenetic role of the latter was less taken into focus. The hypothesis of bioenergetic failure does not provide a simple explanation for the relatively late disease onset and for the incomplete penetrance, which differs remarkably between genders. It is assumed that other genetic and environmental factors are needed in addition to the ‘primary LHON mutations’ to elicit RGC death. Relevant nuclear modifier genes have not been identified so far. The review discusses the unresolved problems of a pathogenetic hypothesis based on ATP decline and/or ROS-induced apoptosis in RGCs. PMID:21886454

  12. Copy number variation and mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Brian; Weidner, Jacob; Wabick, Kevin

    2009-11-01

    Until very recently, the standard model of DNA included two genes for each trait. This dated model has given way to a model that includes copies of some genes well in excess of the canonical two. Copy number variations in the human genome play critical roles in causing or aggravating a number of syndromes and diseases while providing increased resistance to others. We explore the role of mutation, crossover, inversion, and reproduction in determining copy number variations in a numerical simulation of a population. The numerical model consists of a population of individuals, where each individual is represented by a single strand of DNA with the same number of genes. Each gene is initially assigned to one of two traits. Fitness of the individual is determined by the two most fit genes for trait one, and trait two genetic material is treated as a reservoir of junk DNA. After a sufficient number of generations, during which the genetic distribution is allowed to reach a steady-state, the mean numberof genes per trait and the copy number variation are recorded. Here, we focus on the role of mutation and compare simulation results to theory.

  13. Determination of a mutational spectrum

    DOEpatents

    Thilly, William G.; Keohavong, Phouthone

    1991-01-01

    A method of resolving (physically separating) mutant DNA from nonmutant DNA and a method of defining or establishing a mutational spectrum or profile of alterations present in nucleic acid sequences from a sample to be analyzed, such as a tissue or body fluid. The present method is based on the fact that it is possible, through the use of DGGE, to separate nucleic acid sequences which differ by only a single base change and on the ability to detect the separate mutant molecules. The present invention, in another aspect, relates to a method for determining a mutational spectrum in a DNA sequence of interest present in a population of cells. The method of the present invention is useful as a diagnostic or analytical tool in forensic science in assessing environmental and/or occupational exposures to potentially genetically toxic materials (also referred to as potential mutagens); in biotechnology, particularly in the study of the relationship between the amino acid sequence of enzymes and other biologically-active proteins or protein-containing substances and their respective functions; and in determining the effects of drugs, cosmetics and other chemicals for which toxicity data must be obtained.

  14. Point mutation instability (PIN) mutator phenotype as model for true back mutations seen in hereditary tyrosinemia type 1 - a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    van Dyk, Etresia; Pretorius, Pieter J

    2012-05-01

    Hereditary tyrosinemia type 1 (HT1) is an autosomal recessive disorder affecting fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH), the last enzyme in the tyrosine catabolism pathway. The liver mosaicism observed in HT1 patients is due to the reversion to the wild type of one allele of the original point mutation in fah. It is generally accepted that these reversions are true back mutations; however, the mechanism is still unresolved. Previous reports excluded intragenic recombination, mitotic recombination, or homologous recombination with a pseudogene as possible mechanisms of mutation reversion in HT1. Sequence analysis did not reveal DNA motifs, tandem repeats or other sequence peculiarities that may be involved in mutation reversion. We propose the hypothesis that a point mutation instability mutator (PIN) phenotype brought about by the sustained stress environment created by the accumulating metabolites in the cell is the driver of the true back mutations in HT1. The metabolites accumulating in HT1 create a sustained stress environment by activating the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and AKT survival pathways, inducing aberrant mitosis and development of death resistant cells, depleting glutathione, and impairing DNA ligase IV and possibly DNA polymerases δ and ε. This continual production of proliferative and stress-related survival signals in the cellular environment coupled with the mutagenicity of FAA, may instigate a mutator phenotype and could end in tumorigenesis and/or mutation reversion. The establishment of a PIN-mutator phenotype therefore not only seems to be a possible mechanism underlying the true back mutations, but also contributes to explaining the clinical heterogeneity seen in hereditary tyrosinemia type 1.

  15. Methods for detection of ataxia telangiectasia mutations

    DOEpatents

    Gatti, Richard A.

    2005-10-04

    The present invention is directed to a method of screening large, complex, polyexonic eukaryotic genes such as the ATM gene for mutations and polymorphisms by an improved version of single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) electrophoresis that allows electrophoresis of two or three amplified segments in a single lane. The present invention also is directed to new mutations and polymorphisms in the ATM gene that are useful in performing more accurate screening of human DNA samples for mutations and in distinguishing mutations from polymorphisms, thereby improving the efficiency of automated screening methods.

  16. Novel PORCN mutations in focal dermal hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Froyen, G; Govaerts, K; Van Esch, H; Verbeeck, J; Tuomi, M-L; Heikkilä, H; Torniainen, S; Devriendt, K; Fryns, J-P; Marynen, P; Järvelä, I; Ala-Mello, S

    2009-12-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (FDH), Goltz or Goltz-Gorlin syndrome, is an X-linked dominant multisystem disorder characterized primarily by involvement of the skin, skeletal system and eyes. We screened for mutations in the PORCN gene in eight patients of Belgian and Finnish origin with firm clinical suspicion of FDH. First, we performed quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis to define the copy number at this locus. Next, we sequenced the coding regions and flanking intronic sequences of the PORCN gene. Three de novo mutations were identified in our patients with FDH: a 150-kb deletion removing six genes including PORCN, as defined by qPCR and X-array-CGH, and two heterozygous missense mutations; c.992T>G (p.L331R) in exon 11 and c.1094G>A (p.R365Q) in exon 13 of the gene. Both point mutations changed highly conserved amino acids and were not found in 300 control X chromosomes. The three patients in whom mutations were identified all present with characteristic dermal findings together with limb manifestations, which were not seen in our mutation-negative patients. The clinical characteristics of our patients with PORCN mutations were compared with the previously reported mutation-positive cases. In this report, we summarize the literature on PORCN mutations and associated phenotypes.

  17. Repair-Resistant Mutation in Neurospora

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, David; Macleod, Helen; Loo, Melanie

    1987-01-01

    Chronic UV treatment produces severalfold fewer mutations in Neurospora conidia than does the same total dose of acute UV. Experiments were designed to determine the conditions required for chronic UV mutagenesis. Measurement of the coincidence frequency for two independent mutations revealed the existence of a subset of cells which are mutable by chronic UV. Analysis of forward mutation at the mtr locus showed that the genetic alterations produced by chronic UV were virtually all point mutants, even though the assay system could detect alterations or deletions extending into neighboring genes. A significant fraction of the mutants produced by acute UV were multigenic deletions. The size of the dose-rate effect (acute UV mutation frequency divided by chronic UV mutation frequency) was compared for several different mutation assay systems. Forward mutations (recessive lethals and mtr) gave values ranging from four to nine. For events which were restricted to specific molecular sites (specific reversions and nonsense suppressor mutations), there was a wider range of dose-rate ratios. This suggests that chronic UV mutation may be restricted to certain molecular sequences or configurations. PMID:3609724

  18. Calreticulin Exon 9 Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yu-Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Background Calreticulin (CALR) mutations were recently discovered in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). We studied the frequency and type of CALR mutations and their hematological characteristics. Methods A total of 168 MPN patients (36 polycythemia vera [PV], 114 essential thrombocythemia [ET], and 18 primary myelofibrosis [PMF] cases) were included in the study. CALR mutation was analyzed by the direct sequencing method. Results CALR mutations were detected in 21.9% of ET and 16.7% of PMF patients, which accounted for 58.5% and 33.3% of ET and PMF patients without Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) or myeloproliferative leukemia virus oncogenes (MPL) mutations, respectively. A total of five types of mutation were detected, among which, L367fs*46 (53.6%) and K385fs*47 (35.7%) were found to be the most common. ET patients with CALR mutation had lower leukocyte counts and ages compared with JAK2-mutated ET patients. Conclusion Genotyping for CALR could be a useful diagnostic tool for JAK2-or MPL-negative ET or PMF patients. CALR mutation may be a distinct disease group, with different hematological characteristics than that of JAK2-positive patients. PMID:25553276

  19. Gene mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Amin, Nisar A; Malek, Sami N

    2016-04-01

    The recent discovery of genes mutated in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has stimulated new research into the role of these genes in CLL pathogenesis. CLL cases carry approximately 5-20 mutated genes per exome, a lower number than detected in many human tumors. Of the recurrently mutated genes in CLL, all are mutated in 10% or less of patients when assayed in unselected CLL cohorts at diagnosis. Mutations in TP53 are of major clinical relevance, are often associated with del17p and gain in frequency over time. TP53 mutated and associated del17p states substantially lower response rates, remission duration, and survival in CLL. Mutations in NOTCH1 and SF3B1 are recurrent, often associated with progressive CLL that is also IgVH unmutated and ZAP70-positive and are under investigation as targets for novel therapies and as factors influencing CLL outcome. There are an estimated 20-50 additional mutated genes with frequencies of 1%-5% in CLL; more work is needed to identify these and to study their significance. Finally, of the major biological aberration categories influencing CLL as a disease, gene mutations will need to be placed into context with regard to their ultimate role and importance. Such calibrated appreciation necessitates studies incorporating multiple CLL driver aberrations into biological and clinical analyses. PMID:27040699

  20. Compensating the Fitness Costs of Synonymous Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Knöppel, Anna; Näsvall, Joakim; Andersson, Dan I.

    2016-01-01

    Synonymous mutations do not change the sequence of the polypeptide but they may still influence fitness. We investigated in Salmonella enterica how four synonymous mutations in the rpsT gene (encoding ribosomal protein S20) reduce fitness (i.e., growth rate) and the mechanisms by which this cost can be genetically compensated. The reduced growth rates of the synonymous mutants were correlated with reduced levels of the rpsT transcript and S20 protein. In an adaptive evolution experiment, these fitness impairments could be compensated by mutations that either caused up-regulation of S20 through increased gene dosage (due to duplications), increased transcription of the rpsT gene (due to an rpoD mutation or mutations in rpsT), or increased translation from the rpsT transcript (due to rpsT mutations). We suggest that the reduced levels of S20 in the synonymous mutants result in production of a defective subpopulation of 30S subunits lacking S20 that reduce protein synthesis and bacterial growth and that the compensatory mutations restore S20 levels and the number of functional ribosomes. Our results demonstrate how specific synonymous mutations can cause substantial fitness reductions and that many different types of intra- and extragenic compensatory mutations can efficiently restore fitness. Furthermore, this study highlights that also synonymous sites can be under strong selection, which may have implications for the use of dN/dS ratios as signature for selection. PMID:26882986

  1. A Landscape of Driver Mutations in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Hodis, Eran; Watson, Ian R.; Kryukov, Gregory V.; Arold, Stefan T.; Imielinski, Marcin; Theurillat, Jean-Philippe; Nickerson, Elizabeth; Auclair, Daniel; Li, Liren; Place, Chelsea; DiCara, Daniel; Ramos, Alex H.; Lawrence, Michael S.; Cibulskis, Kristian; Sivachenko, Andrey; Voet, Douglas; Saksena, Gordon; Stransky, Nicolas; Onofrio, Robert C.; Winckler, Wendy; Ardlie, Kristin; Wagle, Nikhil; Wargo, Jennifer; Chong, Kelly; Morton, Donald L.; Stemke-Hale, Katherine; Chen, Guo; Noble, Michael; Meyerson, Matthew; Ladbury, John E.; Davies, Michael A.; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Wagner, Stephan N.; Hoon, Dave S.B.; Schadendorf, Dirk; Lander, Eric S.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Getz, Gad; Garraway, Levi A.; Chin, Lynda

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Despite recent insights into melanoma genetics, systematic surveys for driver mutations are challenged by an abundance of passenger mutations caused by carcinogenic ultraviolet (UV) light exposure. We developed a permutation-based framework to address this challenge, employing mutation data from intronic sequences to control for passenger mutational load on a per gene basis. Analysis of large-scale melanoma exome data by this approach discovered six novel melanoma genes (PPP6C, RAC1, SNX31, TACC1, STK19 and ARID2), three of which - RAC1, PPP6C and STK19 - harbored recurrent and potentially targetable mutations. Integration with chromosomal copy number data contextualized the landscape of driver mutations, providing oncogenic insights in BRAF- and NRAS-driven melanoma as well as those without known NRAS/BRAF mutations. The landscape also clarified a mutational basis for RB and p53 pathway deregulation in this malignancy. Finally, the spectrum of driver mutations provided unequivocal genomic evidence for a direct mutagenic role of UV light in melanoma pathogenesis. PMID:22817889

  2. Regular systems of inbreeding with mutation.

    PubMed

    Campbell, R B

    1988-08-01

    Probability of identity by type is studied for regular systems of inbreeding in the presence of mutation. Analytic results are presented for half-sib mating, first cousin mating, and half nth cousin mating under both infinite allele and two allele (back mutation) models. Reasonable rates of mutation do not provide significantly different results from probability of identity by descent in the absence of mutation. Homozygosity is higher under half-sib mating than under first cousin mating, but the expected number of copies of a gene in the population is higher under first cousin mating than under half-sib mating.

  3. Evolution of Mutation Rate in Asexual Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wylie, Scott; Levine, Herbert; Kessler, David

    2007-03-01

    Several evolution experiments with E. coli document the spontaneous emergence and eventual fixation of so called ``mutator'' alleles that increase the genomic mutation rate by the order of 100-fold. Variations in mutation rates are due to polymorphisms in the molecular machinery that copies and checks the genome for errors. These polymorphisms are coded in the genome and thus heritable. Like any heritable trait, elevated mutation rates are subject to natural selection and evolution. However, unlike other traits, mutation rate does not directly affect the rate at which an organism reproduces, i.e. its fitness. Rather, it affects the statistical distribution of the offspring's fitness. This fitness distribution, in turn, leads via ``hitchhiking'' to a change in the frequency of the mutator allele, i.e. evolution of the mutation rate itself. In our work we simulate a birth-death process that approximates simple asexual populations and we measure the fixation probability of rare mutators. We then develop an approximate analytic model of the population dynamics, the results of which agree reasonably well with simulation. In particular, we are able to analytically predict the ``effective fitness'' of mutators and the conditions under which they are expected to emerge.

  4. WRN mutations in Werner syndrome patients: genomic rearrangements, unusual intronic mutations and ethnic-specific alterations

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Katrin; Lee, Lin; Leistritz, Dru F.; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Saha, Bidisha; Hisama, Fuki M.; Eyman, Daniel K.; Lessel, Davor; Nürnberg, Peter; Li, Chumei; Garcia-F-Villalta, María J.; Kets, Carolien M.; Schmidtke, Joerg; Cruz, Vítor Tedim; Van den Akker, Peter C.; Boak, Joseph; Peter, Dincy; Compoginis, Goli; Cefle, Kivanc; Ozturk, Sukru; López, Norberto; Wessel, Theda; Poot, Martin; Ippel, P. F.; Groff-Kellermann, Birgit; Hoehn, Holger; Martin, George M.; Kubisch, Christian; Oshima, Junko

    2015-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive segmental progeroid syndrome caused by null mutations at the WRN locus, which codes for a member of the RecQ family of DNA helicases. Since 1988, the International Registry of Werner syndrome had enrolled 130 molecularly confirmed WS cases from among 110 worldwide pedigrees. We now report 18 new mutations, including two genomic rearrangements, a deep intronic mutation resulting in a novel exon, a splice consensus mutation leading to utilization of the nearby splice site, and two rare missense mutations. We also review evidence for founder mutations among various ethnic/geographic groups. Founder WRN mutations had been previously reported in Japan and Northern Sardinia. Our Registry now suggests characteristic mutations originated in Morocco, Turkey, The Netherlands and elsewhere. PMID:20443122

  5. Mutations, mutation rates, and evolution at the hypervariable VNTR loci of Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Vogler, Amy J; Keys, Christine E; Allender, Christopher; Bailey, Ira; Girard, Jessica; Pearson, Talima; Smith, Kimothy L; Wagner, David M; Keim, Paul

    2007-03-01

    VNTRs are able to discriminate among closely related isolates of recently emerged clonal pathogens, including Yersinia pestis the etiologic agent of plague, because of their great diversity. Diversity is driven largely by mutation but little is known about VNTR mutation rates, factors affecting mutation rates, or the mutational mechanisms. The molecular epidemiological utility of VNTRs will be greatly enhanced when this foundational knowledge is available. Here, we measure mutation rates for 43 VNTR loci in Y. pestis using an in vitro generated population encompassing approximately 96,000 generations. We estimate the combined 43-locus rate and individual rates for 14 loci. A comparison of Y. pestis and Escherichia coli O157:H7 VNTR mutation rates and products revealed a similar relationship between diversity and mutation rate in these two species. Likewise, the relationship between repeat copy number and mutation rate is nearly identical between these species, suggesting a generalized relationship that may be applicable to other species. The single- versus multiple-repeat mutation ratios and the insertion versus deletion mutation ratios were also similar, providing support for a general model for the mutations associated with VNTRs. Finally, we use two small sets of Y. pestis isolates to show how this general model and our estimated mutation rates can be used to compare alternate phylogenies, and to evaluate the significance of genotype matches, near-matches, and mismatches found in empirical comparisons with a reference database. PMID:17161849

  6. Clock-like mutational processes in human somatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Jones, Philip H.; Wedge, David C.; Sale, Julian E.; Campbell, Peter J.; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Stratton, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    During the course of a lifetime somatic cells acquire mutations. Different mutational processes may contribute to the mutations accumulated in a cell, with each imprinting a mutational signature on the cell’s genome. Some processes generate mutations throughout life at a constant rate in all individuals and the number of mutations in a cell attributable to these processes will be proportional to the chronological age of the person. Using mutations from 10,250 cancer genomes across 36 cancer types, we investigated clock-like mutational processes that have been operating in normal human cells. Two mutational signatures show clock-like properties. Both exhibit different mutation rates in different tissues. However, their mutation rates are not correlated indicating that the underlying processes are subject to different biological influences. For one signature, the rate of cell division may influence its mutation rate. This study provides the first survey of clock-like mutational processes operative in human somatic cells. PMID:26551669

  7. Clock-like mutational processes in human somatic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Jones, Philip H.; Wedge, David C.; Sale, Julian E.; Campbell, Peter J.; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Stratton, Michael R.

    2015-11-09

    During the course of a lifetime, somatic cells acquire mutations. Different mutational processes may contribute to the mutations accumulated in a cell, with each imprinting a mutational signature on the cell's genome. Some processes generate mutations throughout life at a constant rate in all individuals, and the number of mutations in a cell attributable to these processes will be proportional to the chronological age of the person. Using mutations from 10,250 cancer genomes across 36 cancer types, we investigated clock-like mutational processes that have been operating in normal human cells. Two mutational signatures show clock-like properties. Both exhibit different mutation rates in different tissues. However, their mutation rates are not correlated, indicating that the underlying processes are subject to different biological influences. For one signature, the rate of cell division may influence its mutation rate. This paper provides the first survey of clock-like mutational processes operating in human somatic cells.

  8. Efficiency of carcinogenesis: is the mutator phenotype inevitable?

    PubMed

    Beckman, Robert A

    2010-10-01

    Cancer development requires multiple oncogenic mutations. Pathogenic mechanisms which accelerate this process may be favored carcinogenic pathways. Mutator mutations are mutations in genetic stability genes, and increase the mutation rate, speeding up the accumulation of oncogenic mutations. The mutator hypothesis states that mutator mutations play a critical role in carcinogenesis. Alternatively, tumors might arise by mutations occurring at the normal rate followed by selection and expansion of various premalignant lineages on the path to cancer. This alternative pathway is a significant argument against the mutator hypothesis. Mutator mutations may also lead to accumulation of deleterious mutations, which could lead to extinction of premalignant lineages before they become cancerous, another argument against the mutator hypothesis. Finally, the need for acquisition of a mutator mutation imposes an additional step on the carcinogenic process. Accordingly, the mutator hypothesis has been a seminal but controversial idea for several decades despite considerable experimental and theoretical work. To resolve this debate, the concept of efficiency has been introduced as a metric for comparing carcinogenic mechanisms, and a new theoretical approach of focused quantitative modeling has been applied. The results demonstrate that, given what is already known, the predominance of mutator mechanisms is likely inevitable, as they overwhelm less efficient non-mutator pathways to cancer.

  9. Efficiency of carcinogenesis: is the mutator phenotype inevitable?

    PubMed

    Beckman, Robert A

    2010-10-01

    Cancer development requires multiple oncogenic mutations. Pathogenic mechanisms which accelerate this process may be favored carcinogenic pathways. Mutator mutations are mutations in genetic stability genes, and increase the mutation rate, speeding up the accumulation of oncogenic mutations. The mutator hypothesis states that mutator mutations play a critical role in carcinogenesis. Alternatively, tumors might arise by mutations occurring at the normal rate followed by selection and expansion of various premalignant lineages on the path to cancer. This alternative pathway is a significant argument against the mutator hypothesis. Mutator mutations may also lead to accumulation of deleterious mutations, which could lead to extinction of premalignant lineages before they become cancerous, another argument against the mutator hypothesis. Finally, the need for acquisition of a mutator mutation imposes an additional step on the carcinogenic process. Accordingly, the mutator hypothesis has been a seminal but controversial idea for several decades despite considerable experimental and theoretical work. To resolve this debate, the concept of efficiency has been introduced as a metric for comparing carcinogenic mechanisms, and a new theoretical approach of focused quantitative modeling has been applied. The results demonstrate that, given what is already known, the predominance of mutator mechanisms is likely inevitable, as they overwhelm less efficient non-mutator pathways to cancer. PMID:20934514

  10. Studies of human mutation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Neel, J.V.

    1990-01-01

    November 1989, marked the beginning of a new three-year cycle of DOE grant support, in connection with which the program underwent a major reorganization. This document presents the progress on the three objectives of the present program which are: to isolate by the technique of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE), proteins of special interest because of the relative mutability of the corresponding gene, establish the identity of the protein, and, for selected proteins, move to a characterization of the corresponding gene; to develop a more efficient approach, based on 2-D PAGE, for the detection of variants in DNA, with special reference to the identification of mutations in the parents of the individual whose DNA is being examined; and, to continue an effective interface with the genetic studies on the children of atomic bomb survivors in Japan, with reference to both the planning and implementation of new studies at the molecular level.

  11. De novo mutations in epileptic encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Allen, Andrew S; Berkovic, Samuel F; Cossette, Patrick; Delanty, Norman; Dlugos, Dennis; Eichler, Evan E; Epstein, Michael P; Glauser, Tracy; Goldstein, David B; Han, Yujun; Heinzen, Erin L; Hitomi, Yuki; Howell, Katherine B; Johnson, Michael R; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Lowenstein, Daniel H; Lu, Yi-Fan; Madou, Maura R Z; Marson, Anthony G; Mefford, Heather C; Esmaeeli Nieh, Sahar; O'Brien, Terence J; Ottman, Ruth; Petrovski, Slavé; Poduri, Annapurna; Ruzzo, Elizabeth K; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Sherr, Elliott H; Yuskaitis, Christopher J; Abou-Khalil, Bassel; Alldredge, Brian K; Bautista, Jocelyn F; Berkovic, Samuel F; Boro, Alex; Cascino, Gregory D; Consalvo, Damian; Crumrine, Patricia; Devinsky, Orrin; Dlugos, Dennis; Epstein, Michael P; Fiol, Miguel; Fountain, Nathan B; French, Jacqueline; Friedman, Daniel; Geller, Eric B; Glauser, Tracy; Glynn, Simon; Haut, Sheryl R; Hayward, Jean; Helmers, Sandra L; Joshi, Sucheta; Kanner, Andres; Kirsch, Heidi E; Knowlton, Robert C; Kossoff, Eric H; Kuperman, Rachel; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Lowenstein, Daniel H; McGuire, Shannon M; Motika, Paul V; Novotny, Edward J; Ottman, Ruth; Paolicchi, Juliann M; Parent, Jack M; Park, Kristen; Poduri, Annapurna; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Shellhaas, Renée A; Sherr, Elliott H; Shih, Jerry J; Singh, Rani; Sirven, Joseph; Smith, Michael C; Sullivan, Joseph; Lin Thio, Liu; Venkat, Anu; Vining, Eileen P G; Von Allmen, Gretchen K; Weisenberg, Judith L; Widdess-Walsh, Peter; Winawer, Melodie R

    2013-09-12

    Epileptic encephalopathies are a devastating group of severe childhood epilepsy disorders for which the cause is often unknown. Here we report a screen for de novo mutations in patients with two classical epileptic encephalopathies: infantile spasms (n = 149) and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (n = 115). We sequenced the exomes of 264 probands, and their parents, and confirmed 329 de novo mutations. A likelihood analysis showed a significant excess of de novo mutations in the ∼4,000 genes that are the most intolerant to functional genetic variation in the human population (P = 2.9 × 10(-3)). Among these are GABRB3, with de novo mutations in four patients, and ALG13, with the same de novo mutation in two patients; both genes show clear statistical evidence of association with epileptic encephalopathy. Given the relevant site-specific mutation rates, the probabilities of these outcomes occurring by chance are P = 4.1 × 10(-10) and P = 7.8 × 10(-12), respectively. Other genes with de novo mutations in this cohort include CACNA1A, CHD2, FLNA, GABRA1, GRIN1, GRIN2B, HNRNPU, IQSEC2, MTOR and NEDD4L. Finally, we show that the de novo mutations observed are enriched in specific gene sets including genes regulated by the fragile X protein (P < 10(-8)), as has been reported previously for autism spectrum disorders.

  12. Quantifying the mutational meltdown in diploid populations.

    PubMed

    Coron, Camille; Méléard, Sylvie; Porcher, Emmanuelle; Robert, Alexandre

    2013-05-01

    Mutational meltdown, in which demographic and genetic processes mutually reinforce one another to accelerate the extinction of small populations, has been poorly quantified despite its potential importance in conservation biology. Here we present a model-based framework to study and quantify the mutational meltdown in a finite diploid population that is evolving continuously in time and subject to resource competition. We model slightly deleterious mutations affecting the population demographic parameters and study how the rate of mutation fixation increases as the genetic load increases, a process that we investigate at two timescales: an ecological scale and a mutational scale. Unlike most previous studies, we treat population size as a random process in continuous time. We show that as deleterious mutations accumulate, the decrease in mean population size accelerates with time relative to a null model with a constant mean fixation time. We quantify this mutational meltdown via the change in the mean fixation time after each new mutation fixation, and we show that the meltdown appears less severe than predicted by earlier theoretical work. We also emphasize that mean population size alone can be a misleading index of the risk of population extinction, which could be better evaluated with additional information on demographic parameters.

  13. Mitochondrial DNA mutations in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, A; Mambo, E; Sidransky, D

    2006-08-01

    Somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations have been increasingly observed in primary human cancers. As each cell contains many mitochondria with multiple copies of mtDNA, it is possible that wild-type and mutant mtDNA can co-exist in a state called heteroplasmy. During cell division, mitochondria are randomly distributed to daughter cells. Over time, the proportion of the mutant mtDNA within the cell can vary and may drift toward predominantly mutant or wild type to achieve homoplasmy. Thus, the biological impact of a given mutation may vary, depending on the proportion of mutant mtDNAs carried by the cell. This effect contributes to the various phenotypes observed among family members carrying the same pathogenic mtDNA mutation. Most mutations occur in the coding sequences but few result in substantial amino acid changes raising questions as to their biological consequence. Studies reveal that mtDNA play a crucial role in the development of cancer but further work is required to establish the functional significance of specific mitochondrial mutations in cancer and disease progression. The origin of somatic mtDNA mutations in human cancer and their potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications in cancer are discussed. This review article provides a detailed summary of mtDNA mutations that have been reported in various types of cancer. Furthermore, this review offers some perspective as to the origin of these of mutations, their functional consequences in cancer development, and possible therapeutic implications.

  14. Stress-directed adaptive mutations and evolution.

    PubMed

    Wright, Barbara E

    2004-05-01

    Comparative biochemistry demonstrates that the metabolites, complex biochemical networks, enzymes and regulatory mechanisms essential to all living cells are conserved in amazing detail throughout evolution. Thus, in order to evolve, an organism must overcome new adverse conditions without creating different but equally dangerous alterations in its ongoing successful metabolic relationship with its environment. Evidence suggests that stable long-term acquisitive evolution results from minor increases in mutation rates of genes related to a particular stress, with minimal disturbance to the balanced and resilient metabolism critical for responding to an unpredictable environment. Microorganisms have evolved specific biochemical feedback mechanisms that direct mutations to genes derepressed by starvation or other stressors in their environment. Transcription of the activated genes creates localized supercoiling and DNA secondary structures with unpaired bases vulnerable to mutation. The resulting mutants provide appropriate variants for selection by the stress involved, thus accelerating evolution with minimal random damage to the genome. This model has successfully predicted mutation frequencies in genes of E. coli and humans. Stressed cells observed in the laboratory over hundreds of generations accumulate mutations that also arise by this mechanism. When this occurs in repair-deficient mutator strains with high rates of random mutation, the specific stress-directed mutations are also enhanced.

  15. Analyzing Effects of Naturally Occurring Missense Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe; Miteva, Maria A.; Wang, Lin; Alexov, Emil

    2012-01-01

    Single-point mutation in genome, for example, single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) or rare genetic mutation, is the change of a single nucleotide for another in the genome sequence. Some of them will produce an amino acid substitution in the corresponding protein sequence (missense mutations); others will not. This paper focuses on genetic mutations resulting in a change in the amino acid sequence of the corresponding protein and how to assess their effects on protein wild-type characteristics. The existing methods and approaches for predicting the effects of mutation on protein stability, structure, and dynamics are outlined and discussed with respect to their underlying principles. Available resources, either as stand-alone applications or webservers, are pointed out as well. It is emphasized that understanding the molecular mechanisms behind these effects due to these missense mutations is of critical importance for detecting disease-causing mutations. The paper provides several examples of the application of 3D structure-based methods to model the effects of protein stability and protein-protein interactions caused by missense mutations as well. PMID:22577471

  16. Validation of Deleterious Mutations in Vorderwald Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Reinartz, Sina; Distl, Ottmar

    2016-01-01

    In Montbéliarde cattle two candidate mutations on bovine chromosomes 19 and 29 responsible for embryonic lethality have been detected. Montbéliarde bulls have been introduced into Vorderwald cattle to improve milk and fattening performance. Due to the small population size of Vorderwald cattle and the wide use of a few Montbéliarde bulls through artificial insemination, inbreeding on Montbéliarde bulls in later generations was increasing. Therefore, we genotyped an aborted fetus which was inbred on Montbéliarde as well as Vorderwald x Montbéliarde crossbred bulls for both deleterious mutations. The abortion was observed in an experimental herd of Vorderwald cattle. The objectives of the present study were to prove if one or both lethal mutations may be assumed to have caused this abortion and to show whether these deleterious mutations have been introduced into the Vorderwald cattle population through Montbéliarde bulls. The aborted fetus was homozygous for the SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T mutation (ss2019324563) on BTA29 and both parents as well as the paternal and maternal grandsire were heterozygous for this mutation. In addition, the parents and the paternal grandsire were carriers of the MH2-haplotype linked with the T-allele of the SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T mutation. For the SHBG:g.27956790C>T mutation (rs38377500) on BTA19 (MH1), the aborted fetus and its sire were heterozygous. Among all further 341 Vorderwald cattle genotyped we found 27 SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T heterozygous animals resulting in an allele frequency of 0.0396. Among the 120 male Vorderwald cattle, there were 12 heterozygous with an allele frequency of 0.05. The SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T mutation could not be found in further nine cattle breeds nor in Vorderwald cattle with contributions from Ayrshire bulls. In 69 Vorderwald cattle without genes from Montbéliarde bulls the mutated allele of SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T could not be detected. The SHBG:g.27956790C>T mutation appeared unlikely to be responsible

  17. Validation of Deleterious Mutations in Vorderwald Cattle.

    PubMed

    Reinartz, Sina; Distl, Ottmar

    2016-01-01

    In Montbéliarde cattle two candidate mutations on bovine chromosomes 19 and 29 responsible for embryonic lethality have been detected. Montbéliarde bulls have been introduced into Vorderwald cattle to improve milk and fattening performance. Due to the small population size of Vorderwald cattle and the wide use of a few Montbéliarde bulls through artificial insemination, inbreeding on Montbéliarde bulls in later generations was increasing. Therefore, we genotyped an aborted fetus which was inbred on Montbéliarde as well as Vorderwald x Montbéliarde crossbred bulls for both deleterious mutations. The abortion was observed in an experimental herd of Vorderwald cattle. The objectives of the present study were to prove if one or both lethal mutations may be assumed to have caused this abortion and to show whether these deleterious mutations have been introduced into the Vorderwald cattle population through Montbéliarde bulls. The aborted fetus was homozygous for the SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T mutation (ss2019324563) on BTA29 and both parents as well as the paternal and maternal grandsire were heterozygous for this mutation. In addition, the parents and the paternal grandsire were carriers of the MH2-haplotype linked with the T-allele of the SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T mutation. For the SHBG:g.27956790C>T mutation (rs38377500) on BTA19 (MH1), the aborted fetus and its sire were heterozygous. Among all further 341 Vorderwald cattle genotyped we found 27 SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T heterozygous animals resulting in an allele frequency of 0.0396. Among the 120 male Vorderwald cattle, there were 12 heterozygous with an allele frequency of 0.05. The SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T mutation could not be found in further nine cattle breeds nor in Vorderwald cattle with contributions from Ayrshire bulls. In 69 Vorderwald cattle without genes from Montbéliarde bulls the mutated allele of SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T could not be detected. The SHBG:g.27956790C>T mutation appeared unlikely to be responsible

  18. The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Trifiro, M; Lumbroso, R; Vasiliou, D M; Pinsky, L

    1996-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. We have added (if available) data on the androgen binding phenotype of the mutant AR, the clinical phenotype of the affected persons, the family history and whether the pathogenicity of a mutation has been proven. Exonic mutations are now listed in 5'-->3' sequence regardless of type and single base pair changes are presented in codon context. Splice site and intronic mutations are listed separately. The database has allowed us to substantiate and amplify the observation of mutational hot spots within exons encoding the AR androgen binding domain. The database is available from EML (ftp://www.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen) or as a Macintosh Filemaker file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  19. The fitness costs of antibiotic resistance mutations

    PubMed Central

    Melnyk, Anita H; Wong, Alex; Kassen, Rees

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is increasing in pathogenic microbial populations and is thus a major threat to public health. The fate of a resistance mutation in pathogen populations is determined in part by its fitness. Mutations that suffer little or no fitness cost are more likely to persist in the absence of antibiotic treatment. In this review, we performed a meta-analysis to investigate the fitness costs associated with single mutational events that confer resistance. Generally, these mutations were costly, although several drug classes and species of bacteria on average did not show a cost. Further investigations into the rate and fitness values of compensatory mutations that alleviate the costs of resistance will help us to better understand both the emergence and management of antibiotic resistance in clinical settings. PMID:25861385

  20. Elevated germline mutation rate in teenage fathers

    PubMed Central

    Forster, Peter; Hohoff, Carsten; Dunkelmann, Bettina; Schürenkamp, Marianne; Pfeiffer, Heidi; Neuhuber, Franz; Brinkmann, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Men age and die, while cells in their germline are programmed to be immortal. To elucidate how germ cells maintain viable DNA despite increasing parental age, we analysed DNA from 24 097 parents and their children, from Europe, the Middle East and Africa. We chose repetitive microsatellite DNA that mutates (unlike point mutations) only as a result of cellular replication, providing us with a natural ‘cell-cycle counter’. We observe, as expected, that the overall mutation rate for fathers is seven times higher than for mothers. Also as expected, mothers have a low and lifelong constant DNA mutation rate. Surprisingly, however, we discover that (i) teenage fathers already set out from a much higher mutation rate than teenage mothers (potentially equivalent to 77–196 male germline cell divisions by puberty); and (ii) ageing men maintain sperm DNA quality similar to that of teenagers, presumably by using fresh batches of stem cells known as ‘A-dark spermatogonia’. PMID:25694621

  1. The Human PAX6 Mutation Database.

    PubMed

    Brown, A; McKie, M; van Heyningen, V; Prosser, J

    1998-01-01

    The Human PAX6 Mutation Database contains details of 94 mutations of the PAX6 gene. A Microsoft Access program is used by the Curator to store, update and search the database entries. Mutations can be entered directly by the Curator, or imported from submissions made via the World Wide Web. The PAX6 Mutation Database web page at URL http://www.hgu.mrc.ac.uk/Softdata/PAX6/ provides information about PAX6, as well as a fill-in form through which new mutations can be submitted to the Curator. A search facility allows remote users to query the database. A plain text format file of the data can be downloaded via the World Wide Web. The Curation program contains prior knowledge of the genetic code and of the PAX6 gene including cDNA sequence, location of intron/exon boundaries, and protein domains, so that the minimum of information need be provided by the submitter or Curator.

  2. Quantification of Colonic Stem Cell Mutations.

    PubMed

    Whetstone, Ryan D; Gold, Barry

    2015-01-01

    The ability to measure stem cell mutations is a powerful tool to quantify in a critical cell population if, and to what extent, a chemical can induce mutations that potentially lead to cancer. The use of an enzymatic assay to quantify stem cell mutations in the X-linked glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene has been previously reported.(1) This method requires the preparation of frozen sections and incubation of the sectioned tissue with a reaction mixture that yields a blue color if the cells produce functional glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) enzyme. If not, the cells appear whitish. We have modified the reaction mixture using Optimal Cutting Temperature Compound (OCT) medium in place of polyvinyl alcohol. This facilitates pH measurement, increases solubilization of the G6PD staining components and restricts diffusion of the G6PD enzyme. To demonstrate that a mutation occurred in a stem cell, the entire crypt must lack G6PD enzymatic activity. Only if a stem cell harbors a phenotypic G6PD mutation will all of the progeny in the crypt lack G6PD enzymatic activity. To identify crypts with a stem cell mutation, four consecutive adjacent frozen sections (a level) were cut at 7 µm thicknesses. This approach of making adjacent cuts provides conformation that a crypt was fully mutated since the same mutated crypt will be observed in adjacent sections. Slides with tissue samples that were more than 50 µm apart were prepared to assess a total of >10(4) crypts per mouse. The mutation frequency is the number of observed mutated (white) crypts÷by the number of wild type (blue) crypts in a treatment group. PMID:26436534

  3. MED12 mutation in patients with hysteromyoma

    PubMed Central

    YE, JUN; WANG, HUA; CHEN, YA-BAO; YUAN, DONG-LAN; ZHANG, LI-XIN; LIU, LIN

    2015-01-01

    Mediator Complex Subunit 12 (MED12) is a subunit of the mediator complex, which is believed to regulate global, as well as gene-specific, transcription. It has been reported that MED12 is mutated at high frequency in hysteromyoma. Recent studies have also shown that MED12 presents with different mutation frequencies in hysteromyoma patients of different populations. However, there are few studies with regard to the MED12 gene mutation in hysteromyoma patients in the Chinese Han population. In the present study, the MED12 mutations of 171 patients with hysteromyoma were analyzed; the results showed that 93 patients exhibited different MED12 mutations, including 131G→T, 131G→A, 130G→A, 146C→T, 130G→A, 130G→C, 128A→C, 130G→T, 127Ins27, 118_132Del15, 117_134Del18, 131_148Del18 and 141_165Del15. The mutation frequency was similar to that found in individuals of African descent or individuals of other non-Caucasian ethnicities, and lower than that in the Finnish or North American populations. Further analysis of 141 patients whose hysteromyoma was measured showed that the mutation frequency of MED12 in patients with large hysteromyomas was significantly lower than that in those with small hysteromyomas. These results suggested that MED12 mutation was important in the development of hysteromyomas in the Chinese Han population and that the size of the hysteromyoma may negatively correlate with the mutation frequency of MED12. This study supplemented current information on MED12 mutations in different races and may aid in developing personalized diagnoses for patients with hysteromyoma in the future. PMID:26137144

  4. HPMV: human protein mutation viewer - relating sequence mutations to protein sequence architecture and function changes.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Westley Arthur; Kuchibhatla, Durga Bhavani; Limviphuvadh, Vachiranee; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Eisenhaber, Birgit; Eisenhaber, Frank

    2015-10-01

    Next-generation sequencing advances are rapidly expanding the number of human mutations to be analyzed for causative roles in genetic disorders. Our Human Protein Mutation Viewer (HPMV) is intended to explore the biomolecular mechanistic significance of non-synonymous human mutations in protein-coding genomic regions. The tool helps to assess whether protein mutations affect the occurrence of sequence-architectural features (globular domains, targeting signals, post-translational modification sites, etc.). As input, HPMV accepts protein mutations - as UniProt accessions with mutations (e.g. HGVS nomenclature), genome coordinates, or FASTA sequences. As output, HPMV provides an interactive cartoon showing the mutations in relation to elements of the sequence architecture. A large variety of protein sequence architectural features were selected for their particular relevance to mutation interpretation. Clicking a sequence feature in the cartoon expands a tree view of additional information including multiple sequence alignments of conserved domains and a simple 3D viewer mapping the mutation to known PDB structures, if available. The cartoon is also correlated with a multiple sequence alignment of similar sequences from other organisms. In cases where a mutation is likely to have a straightforward interpretation (e.g. a point mutation disrupting a well-understood targeting signal), this interpretation is suggested. The interactive cartoon can be downloaded as standalone viewer in Java jar format to be saved and viewed later with only a standard Java runtime environment. The HPMV website is: http://hpmv.bii.a-star.edu.sg/ .

  5. Why Are Phenotypic Mutation Rates Much Higher Than Genotypic Mutation Rates?

    PubMed Central

    Bürger, Reinhard; Willensdorfer, Martin; Nowak, Martin A.

    2006-01-01

    The evolution of genotypic mutation rates has been investigated in numerous theoretical and experimental studies. Mutations, however, occur not only when copying DNA, but also when building the phenotype, especially when translating and transcribing DNA to RNA and protein. Here we study the effect of such phenotypic mutations. We find a maximum phenotypic mutation rate, umax, that is compatible with maintaining a certain function of the organism. This may be called a phenotypic error threshold. In particular, we find a minimum phenotypic mutation rate, umin, with the property that there is (nearly) no selection pressure to reduce the rate of phenotypic mutations below this value. If there is a cost for lowering the phenotypic mutation rate, then umin is close to the optimum phenotypic mutation rate that maximizes the fitness of the organism. In our model, there is selective pressure to decrease the rate of genotypic mutations to zero, but to decrease the rate of phenotypic mutations only to a positive value. Despite its simplicity, our model can explain part of the huge difference between genotypic and phenotypic mutation rates that is observed in nature. The relevant data are summarized. PMID:16143614

  6. WT1 mutations in T-ALL.

    PubMed

    Tosello, Valeria; Mansour, Marc R; Barnes, Kelly; Paganin, Maddalena; Sulis, Maria Luisa; Jenkinson, Sarah; Allen, Christopher G; Gale, Rosemary E; Linch, David C; Palomero, Teresa; Real, Pedro; Murty, Vundavalli; Yao, Xiaopan; Richards, Susan M; Goldstone, Anthony; Rowe, Jacob; Basso, Giuseppe; Wiernik, Peter H; Paietta, Elisabeth; Pieters, Rob; Horstmann, Martin; Meijerink, Jules P P; Ferrando, Adolfo A

    2009-07-30

    The molecular mechanisms involved in disease progression and relapse in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) are poorly understood. We used single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis to analyze paired diagnostic and relapsed T-ALL samples to identify recurrent genetic alterations in T-ALL. This analysis showed that diagnosis and relapsed cases have common genetic alterations, but also that relapsed samples frequently lose chromosomal markers present at diagnosis, suggesting that relapsed T-ALL emerges from an ancestral clone different from the major leukemic population at diagnosis. In addition, we identified deletions and associated mutations in the WT1 tumor suppressor gene in 2 of 9 samples. Subsequent analysis showed WT1 mutations in 28 of 211 (13.2%) of pediatric and 10 of 85 (11.7%) of adult T-ALL cases. WT1 mutations present in T-ALL are predominantly heterozygous frameshift mutations resulting in truncation of the C-terminal zinc finger domains of this transcription factor. WT1 mutations are most prominently found in T-ALL cases with aberrant rearrangements of the oncogenic TLX1, TLX3, and HOXA transcription factor oncogenes. Survival analysis demonstrated that WT1 mutations do not confer adverse prognosis in pediatric and adult T-ALL. Overall, these results identify the presence of WT1 mutations as a recurrent genetic alteration in T-ALL. PMID:19494353

  7. SOX10 mutations mimic isolated hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Pingault, V; Faubert, E; Baral, V; Gherbi, S; Loundon, N; Couloigner, V; Denoyelle, F; Noël-Pétroff, N; Ducou Le Pointe, H; Elmaleh-Bergès, M; Bondurand, N; Marlin, S

    2015-10-01

    Ninety genes have been identified to date that are involved in non-syndromic hearing loss, and more than 300 different forms of syndromic hearing impairment have been described. Mutations in SOX10, one of the genes contributing to syndromic hearing loss, induce a large range of phenotypes, including several subtypes of Waardenburg syndrome and Kallmann syndrome with deafness. In addition, rare mutations have been identified in patients with isolated signs of these diseases. We used the recent characterization of temporal bone imaging aspects in patients with SOX10 mutations to identify possible patients with isolated hearing loss due to SOX10 mutation. We selected 21 patients with isolated deafness and temporal bone morphological defects for mutational screening. We identified two SOX10 mutations and found that both resulted in a non-functional protein in vitro. Re-evaluation of the two affected patients showed that both had previously undiagnosed olfactory defects. Diagnosis of anosmia or hyposmia in young children is challenging, and particularly in the absence of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), SOX10 mutations can mimic non-syndromic hearing impairment. MRI should complete temporal bones computed tomographic scan in the management of congenital deafness as it can detect brain anomalies, cochlear nerve defects, and olfactory bulb malformation in addition to inner ear malformations.

  8. RUNX2 mutations in cleidocranial dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Lee, K-E; Seymen, F; Ko, J; Yildirim, M; Tuna, E B; Gencay, K; Kim, J-W

    2013-01-01

    The runt-related transcription factor 2 gene (RUNX2), which is also known as CBFA1, is a master regulatory gene in bone formation. Mutations in RUNX2 have been identified in cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) patients. CCD is a rare autosomal dominant skeletal dysplasia that is characterized by delayed closure of cranial sutures, aplastic or hypoplastic clavicle formation, short stature, and dental anomalies, including malocclusion, supernumerary teeth, and delayed eruption of permanent teeth. In this study, we recruited three de novo CCD families and performed mutational analysis of the RUNX2 gene as a candidate gene approach. The mutational study revealed three disease-causing mutations: a missense mutation (c.674G>A, p.Arg225Gln), a frameshift mutation (c.1119delC, p.Arg374Glyfs*), and a nonsense mutation (c.1171C>T, p.Arg391*). Clinical examination revealed a unique dental phenotype (no typical supernumerary teeth, but duplication of anterior teeth) in one patient. We believe that this finding will broaden the understanding of the mechanism of supernumerary teeth formation and CCD-related phenotypes. PMID:24222232

  9. New mutations affecting induced mutagenesis in yeast.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, C W; Krauss, B R; Christensen, R B

    1985-01-01

    Previously isolated mutations in baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, that impair induced mutagenesis were all identified with the aid of tests that either exclusively or predominantly detect base-pair substitutions. To avoid this bias, we have screened 11 366 potentially mutant clones for UV-induced reversion of the frameshift allele, his4-38, and have identified 10 mutants that give much reduced yields of revertants. Complementation and recombination tests show that 6 of these carry mutations at the previously known REV1, REV1 and REV3 loci, while the remaining 4 define 3 new genes, REV4 (2 mutations), REV5 and REV6. The rev4 mutations are readily suppressed in many genetic backgrounds and, like the rev5 mutation, impart only a limited deficiency for induced mutagenesis: it is likely, therefore that the REV4+ and REV5+ gene functions are only remotely concerned with this process. The rev6 mutants have a more general deficiency, however, as well as marked sensitivity to UV and an increased spontaneous mutation rate, properties that suggest the REV6 gene is directly involved in mutation induction. The REV5 gene is located about 1 cM proximal to CYC1 on chromosome X.

  10. Muller's ratchet, epistasis and mutation effects.

    PubMed

    Butcher, D

    1995-09-01

    In this study, computer simulation is used to show that despite synergistic epistasis for fitness, Muller's ratchet can lead to lethal fitness loss in a population of asexuals through the accumulation of deleterious mutations. This result contradicts previous work that indicated that epistasis will halt the ratchet. The present results show that epistasis will not halt the ratchet provided that rather than a single deleterious mutation effect, there is a distribution of deleterious mutation effects with sufficient density near zero. In addition to epistasis and mutation distribution, the ability of Muller's ratchet to lead to the extinction of an asexual population under epistasis for fitness depends strongly on the expected number of offspring that survive to reproductive age. This strong dependence is not present in the nonepistatic model and suggests that interpreting the population growth parameter as fecundity is inadequate. Because a continuous distribution of mutation effects is used in this model, an emphasis is placed on the dynamics of the mutation effect distribution rather than on the dynamics of the number of least mutation loaded individuals. This perspective suggests that current models of gene interaction are too simple to apply directly to long-term prediction for populations undergoing the ratchet.

  11. New mutations in CMT 1 and HNPP

    SciTech Connect

    Vandenberghe, A.; Boucherat, M.; Bonnebouche, C.

    1994-09-01

    The majority of mutations in CMT 1 (Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1) are due to a duplication of a 1.5 Mb fragment from chromosome 17 containing the PMP22 myelin gene. In addition, micromutations are found in the genes for PMP22 and myelin Po. We collected data from over one hundred families with a duplication in 17p11.2. In about 10% of these families, a de novo mutation was observed. All parents were clinically examined as normal and correct paternity was confirmed. Some families were informative for polymorphic probes located in the duplicated region, and we could deduce a majority of new mutations to be from paternal origin. HNPP (hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies) is believed to be the reciprocal product of an unequal crossing over underlying the CMT 1 mutation and is due to a deletion of the 1.5 Mb fragment. One new HNPP mutation was found among 7 deleted HNPP families. This mutation is of paternal origin. Clinically assigned CMT 1 patients without a duplication are screened for micromutations applying the SSCP technique. In one family, a de novo mutation was found in the gene for Po.

  12. Significance of duon mutations in cancer genomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Vinod Kumar; Smith, Kyle S.; Flinders, Colin; Mumenthaler, Shannon M.; de, Subhajyoti

    2016-06-01

    Functional mutations in coding regions not only affect the structure and function of the protein products, but may also modulate their expression in some cases. This class of mutations, recently dubbed “duon mutations” due to their dual roles, can potentially have major impacts on downstream pathways. However their significance in diseases such as cancer remain unclear. In a survey covering 4606 samples from 19 cancer types, and integrating allelic expression, overall mRNA expression, regulatory motif perturbation, and chromatin signatures in one composite index called REDACT score, we identified potential duon mutations. Several such mutations are detected in known cancer genes in multiple cancer types. For instance a potential duon mutation in TP53 is associated with increased expression of the mutant allelic gene copy, thereby possibly amplifying the functional effects on the downstream pathways. Another potential duon mutation in SF3B1 is associated with abnormal splicing and changes in angiogenesis and matrix degradation related pathways. Our findings emphasize the need to interrogate the mutations in coding regions beyond their obvious effects on protein structures.

  13. Predicting Resistance Mutations Using Protein Design Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, K.; Georgiev, I; Donald, B; Anderson, A

    2010-01-01

    Drug resistance resulting from mutations to the target is an unfortunate common phenomenon that limits the lifetime of many of the most successful drugs. In contrast to the investigation of mutations after clinical exposure, it would be powerful to be able to incorporate strategies early in the development process to predict and overcome the effects of possible resistance mutations. Here we present a unique prospective application of an ensemble-based protein design algorithm, K*, to predict potential resistance mutations in dihydrofolate reductase from Staphylococcus aureus using positive design to maintain catalytic function and negative design to interfere with binding of a lead inhibitor. Enzyme inhibition assays show that three of the four highly-ranked predicted mutants are active yet display lower affinity (18-, 9-, and 13-fold) for the inhibitor. A crystal structure of the top-ranked mutant enzyme validates the predicted conformations of the mutated residues and the structural basis of the loss of potency. The use of protein design algorithms to predict resistance mutations could be incorporated in a lead design strategy against any target that is susceptible to mutational resistance.

  14. RET mutations in MEN 2 associated diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstra, R.M.W.; Stelwagen, T.; Stulp, R.P.

    1994-09-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN 2) comprises three clinically distinct dominantly inherited cancer syndromes namely MEN 2A, MEN 2B and familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (FMTC). Germline (point) mutations of the RET proto-oncogene have been reported to occur in all these syndromes. In MEN 2A and FMTC patients the mutations occurred within codons specifying cysteine residues in the transition of the RET extracellular and transmembrane domains, while in MEN 2B patients we could detect a single RET mutation in the tyrosine kinase domain in all patients. Also in patients suffering from Hirschsprung`s disease (HSCR), mutations in the RET gene have been found. These mutations are spread all over the gene. Several families have been described in which MEN 2 and HSCR are associated. MEN 2A is also found associated with cutaneous lichen amyloidosis (CLA). It might be that specific RET mutations correlate with these disease associations. We therefore scanned DNA from patients from a family with MEN 2A and HSCR, MEN 2A and CLA and CLA only for RET mutations. Results obtained thus far do not support the existence of specific correlations.

  15. Significance of duon mutations in cancer genomes

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Vinod Kumar; Smith, Kyle S.; Flinders, Colin; Mumenthaler, Shannon M.; De, Subhajyoti

    2016-01-01

    Functional mutations in coding regions not only affect the structure and function of the protein products, but may also modulate their expression in some cases. This class of mutations, recently dubbed “duon mutations” due to their dual roles, can potentially have major impacts on downstream pathways. However their significance in diseases such as cancer remain unclear. In a survey covering 4606 samples from 19 cancer types, and integrating allelic expression, overall mRNA expression, regulatory motif perturbation, and chromatin signatures in one composite index called REDACT score, we identified potential duon mutations. Several such mutations are detected in known cancer genes in multiple cancer types. For instance a potential duon mutation in TP53 is associated with increased expression of the mutant allelic gene copy, thereby possibly amplifying the functional effects on the downstream pathways. Another potential duon mutation in SF3B1 is associated with abnormal splicing and changes in angiogenesis and matrix degradation related pathways. Our findings emphasize the need to interrogate the mutations in coding regions beyond their obvious effects on protein structures. PMID:27272679

  16. Proliferation of mutators in A cell population.

    PubMed Central

    Mao, E F; Lane, L; Lee, J; Miller, J H

    1997-01-01

    A Lac- strain of Escherichia coli that reverts by the addition of a G to a G-G-G-G-G-G sequence was used to study the proliferation of mutators in a bacterial culture. Selection for the Lac+ phenotype, which is greatly stimulated in mismatch repair-deficient strains, results in an increase in the percentage of mutators in the selected population from less than 1 per 100,000 cells to 1 per 200 cells. All the mutators detected were deficient in the mismatch repair system. Mutagenesis results in a similar increase in the percentage of mutators. Mutagenesis combined with a single selection can result in a population of more than 50% mutators when a sample of several thousand cells is grown out and selected. Mutagenesis combined with two or more successive selections can generate a population that is 100% mutator. These experiments are discussed in relation to ideas that an early step in carcinogenesis is the creation of a mutator phenotype. PMID:8990293

  17. BRCA1 mutations in southern England.

    PubMed Central

    Eccles, D. M.; Englefield, P.; Soulby, M. A.; Campbell, I. G.

    1998-01-01

    If genetic testing for breast and ovarian cancer predisposition is to become available within a public health care system there needs to be a rational and cost-effective approach to mutation analysis. We have screened for BRCA1 mutations in 230 women with breast cancer, all from the Wessex region of southern England, in order to establish the parameters on which to base a cost-effective regional mutation analysis strategy. Truncating mutations were detected in 10/155 (6.5%) consecutive cases selected only for diagnosis under the age of 40 (nine of these ten women had a strong family history of breast or ovarian cancer), 3/61 (4.9%) bilateral-breast cancer cases (all three mutations occurring among women for whom the first cancer was diagnosed under 40 years) and 8/30 (26.6%) breast cancer cases presenting to the genetics clinic (for whom a strong family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer was present). Ten different mutations were detected in 17 families, but three of these accounted for 10/17 (59%) of the families. The cost of screening the population for mutations in the entire BRCA1 gene is unacceptably high. However, the cost of screening a carefully selected patient cohort is low, the risk of misinterpretation much less and the potential clinical benefits clearer. PMID:9649133

  18. Reverse mutations in fragile X syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W.T.; Nolin, S.; Houck, G.E.

    1994-09-01

    The fragile X syndrome is the most common inherited form of mental retardation. Yet new mutations have not been described and no affected child has been born to a carrier mother having less than 60 FMR-1 CGG triplet repeats. Reverse mutations also appear to be very rare. We have previously identified the daughter of a premutation mother (95 CGGs) who inherited a normal repeat size of 35 as a reverse mutation. In the process of carrier testing by PCR, we have now identified two additional females with reverse mutations. All three of these reverse mutation women were previously tested by linkage as part of known fragile X families (subsequently confirmed by direct analysis), and assigned a > 99% risk as a carrier. In the second family, the mother carries a premutation allele of 95 repeats and the daughter inherited a 43 repeat allele. Prior to direct DNA testing, she had a positive prenatal diagnosis by linkage (> 99% risk) and cytogenetics with 3/450 cells apparently positive. Subsequent retesting of the products of conception by PCR now reveals a 43 repeat allele from her carrier mother with an 82 repeat allele. Testing with close CA markers (FRAXAC1 and DXS548) confirmed that these women inherited the same chromosome and their full mutation brothers. Further analysis is pending. These examples of reverse mutations are the only ones we have identified in our study of offspring of more than 200 carriers (400+ meioses) examined to date. Therefore, we conclude the frequency of fragile X back mutations is likely to be less than 1%. Retesting of linkage positive carriers is recommended to detect reverse mutations and assure accurate genetic counseling.

  19. Comprehensive mutation profiling of mucinous gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rokutan, Hirofumi; Hosoda, Fumie; Hama, Natsuko; Nakamura, Hiromi; Totoki, Yasushi; Furukawa, Eisaku; Arakawa, Erika; Ohashi, Shoko; Urushidate, Tomoko; Satoh, Hironori; Shimizu, Hiroko; Igarashi, Keiko; Yachida, Shinichi; Katai, Hitoshi; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Fukayama, Masashi; Shibata, Tatsuhiro

    2016-10-01

    Mucinous gastric carcinoma (MGC) is a unique subtype of gastric cancer with a poor survival outcome. Comprehensive molecular profiles and putative therapeutic targets of MGC remain undetermined. We subjected 16 tumour-normal tissue pairs to whole-exome sequencing (WES) and an expanded set of 52 tumour-normal tissue pairs to subsequent targeted sequencing. The latter focused on 114 genes identified by WES. Twenty-two histologically differentiated MGCs (D-MGCs) and 46 undifferentiated MGCs (U-MGCs) were analysed. Chromatin modifier genes, including ARID1A (21%), MLL2 (19%), MLL3 (15%), and KDM6A (7%), were frequently mutated (47%) in MGC. We also identified mutations in potential therapeutic target genes, including MTOR (9%), BRCA2 (9%), BRCA1 (7%), and ERBB3 (6%). RHOA mutation was detected only in 4% of U-MGCs and in no D-MGCs. MYH9 was recurrently (13%) mutated in MGC, with all these being of the U-MGC subtype (p = 0.023). Three U-MGCs harboured MYH9 nonsense mutations. MYH9 knockdown enhanced cell migration and induced intracytoplasmic mucin and cellular elongation. BCOR mutation was associated with improved survival. In U-MGCs, the MLH1 expression status and combined mutation status (TP53/BCL11B or TP53/MLL2) were prognostic factors. A comparative analysis of driver genes revealed that the mutation profile of D-MGC was similar to that of intestinal-type gastric cancer, whereas U-MGC was a distinct entity, harbouring a different mutational profile to intestinal- and diffuse-type gastric cancers. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27313181

  20. BRCC3 mutations in myeloid neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Dayong; Nagata, Yasunobu; Grossmann, Vera; Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Okuno, Yusuke; Nagae, Genta; Hosono, Naoko; Schnittger, Susanne; Sanada, Masashi; Przychodzen, Bartlomiej; Kon, Ayana; Polprasert, Chantana; Shen, Wenyi; Clemente, Michael J.; Phillips, James G.; Alpermann, Tamara; Yoshida, Kenichi; Nadarajah, Niroshan; Sekeres, Mikkael A.; Oakley, Kevin; Nguyen, Nhu; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Koeffler, H. Phillip; Klein, Hans-Ulrich; Dugas, Martin; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Miyano, Satoru; Haferlach, Claudia; Kern, Wolfgang; Haferlach, Torsten; Du, Yang; Ogawa, Seishi; Makishima, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Next generation sequencing technologies have provided insights into the molecular heterogeneity of various myeloid neoplasms, revealing previously unknown somatic genetic events. In our cohort of 1444 cases analyzed by next generation sequencing, somatic mutations in the gene BRCA1-BRCA2-containing complex 3 (BRCC3) were identified in 28 cases (1.9%). BRCC3 is a member of the JAMM/MPN+ family of zinc metalloproteases capable of cleaving Lys-63 linked polyubiquitin chains, and is implicated in DNA repair. The mutations were located throughout its coding region. The average variant allelic frequency of BRCC3 mutations was 30.1%, and by a serial sample analysis at two different time points a BRCC3 mutation was already identified in the initial stage of a myelodysplastic syndrome. BRCC3 mutations commonly occurred in nonsense (n=12), frameshift (n=4), and splice site (n=5) configurations. Due to the marginal male dominance (odds ratio; 2.00, 0.84–4.73) of BRCC3 mutations, the majority of mutations (n=23; 82%) were hemizygous. Phenotypically, BRCC3 mutations were frequently observed in myelodysplastic syndromes and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms and associated with -Y abnormality (odds ratio; 3.70, 1.25–11.0). Clinically, BRCC3 mutations were also related to higher age (P=0.01), although prognosis was not affected. Knockdown of Brcc3 gene expression in murine bone marrow lineage negative, Sca1 positive, c-kit positive cells resulted in 2-fold more colony formation and modest differentiation defect. Thus, BRCC3 likely plays a role as tumor-associated gene in myelodysplastic syndromes and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms. PMID:26001790

  1. BRCC3 mutations in myeloid neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dayong; Nagata, Yasunobu; Grossmann, Vera; Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Okuno, Yusuke; Nagae, Genta; Hosono, Naoko; Schnittger, Susanne; Sanada, Masashi; Przychodzen, Bartlomiej; Kon, Ayana; Polprasert, Chantana; Shen, Wenyi; Clemente, Michael J; Phillips, James G; Alpermann, Tamara; Yoshida, Kenichi; Nadarajah, Niroshan; Sekeres, Mikkael A; Oakley, Kevin; Nguyen, Nhu; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Koeffler, H Phillip; Klein, Hans-Ulrich; Dugas, Martin; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Miyano, Satoru; Haferlach, Claudia; Kern, Wolfgang; Haferlach, Torsten; Du, Yang; Ogawa, Seishi; Makishima, Hideki

    2015-08-01

    Next generation sequencing technologies have provided insights into the molecular heterogeneity of various myeloid neoplasms, revealing previously unknown somatic genetic events. In our cohort of 1444 cases analyzed by next generation sequencing, somatic mutations in the gene BRCA1-BRCA2-containing complex 3 (BRCC3) were identified in 28 cases (1.9%). BRCC3 is a member of the JAMM/MPN+ family of zinc metalloproteases capable of cleaving Lys-63 linked polyubiquitin chains, and is implicated in DNA repair. The mutations were located throughout its coding region. The average variant allelic frequency of BRCC3 mutations was 30.1%, and by a serial sample analysis at two different time points a BRCC3 mutation was already identified in the initial stage of a myelodysplastic syndrome. BRCC3 mutations commonly occurred in nonsense (n=12), frameshift (n=4), and splice site (n=5) configurations. Due to the marginal male dominance (odds ratio; 2.00, 0.84-4.73) of BRCC3 mutations, the majority of mutations (n=23; 82%) were hemizygous. Phenotypically, BRCC3 mutations were frequently observed in myelodysplastic syndromes and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms and associated with -Y abnormality (odds ratio; 3.70, 1.25-11.0). Clinically, BRCC3 mutations were also related to higher age (P=0.01), although prognosis was not affected. Knockdown of Brcc3 gene expression in murine bone marrow lineage negative, Sca1 positive, c-kit positive cells resulted in 2-fold more colony formation and modest differentiation defect. Thus, BRCC3 likely plays a role as tumor-associated gene in myelodysplastic syndromes and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms. PMID:26001790

  2. FLG mutations in ichthyosis vulgaris and atopic eczema: spectrum of mutations and population genetics.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, M

    2010-03-01

    Filaggrin is a key protein involved in skin barrier function. Mutations in the gene encoding filaggrin (FLG) have been identified as the cause of ichthyosis vulgaris and have been shown to be major predisposing factors for atopic eczema (AE), initially in European populations. Subsequently, FLG mutations were identified in Japanese, Chinese, Taiwanese and Korean populations. It was demonstrated that FLG mutations are closely associated with AE in the Japanese population. Notably, the same FLG mutations identified in the European population were rarely found in Asians. These results exemplify differences in filaggrin population genetics between Europe and Asia. For mutation screening, background information needs to be obtained on prevalent FLG mutations for each geographical population. It is therefore important to establish the global population genetics maps for FLG mutations. Mutations at any site within FLG, even mutations in C-terminal imperfect filaggrin repeats, cause significant reductions in amounts of profilaggrin/filaggrin peptide in patient epidermis as the C-terminal region is essential for proper processing of profilaggrin into filaggrin. Thus, no genotype-phenotype correlation has been observed in patients with FLG mutations. A restoration of the barrier function seems a feasible and promising strategy for treatment and prevention in individuals with filaggrin deficiency.

  3. MutationAligner: a resource of recurrent mutation hotspots in protein domains in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Nicholas Paul; Reznik, Ed; Gao, Jianjiong; Sumer, Selcuk Onur; Schultz, Nikolaus; Sander, Chris; Miller, Martin L.

    2016-01-01

    The MutationAligner web resource, available at http://www.mutationaligner.org, enables discovery and exploration of somatic mutation hotspots identified in protein domains in currently (mid-2015) more than 5000 cancer patient samples across 22 different tumor types. Using multiple sequence alignments of protein domains in the human genome, we extend the principle of recurrence analysis by aggregating mutations in homologous positions across sets of paralogous genes. Protein domain analysis enhances the statistical power to detect cancer-relevant mutations and links mutations to the specific biological functions encoded in domains. We illustrate how the MutationAligner database and interactive web tool can be used to explore, visualize and analyze mutation hotspots in protein domains across genes and tumor types. We believe that MutationAligner will be an important resource for the cancer research community by providing detailed clues for the functional importance of particular mutations, as well as for the design of functional genomics experiments and for decision support in precision medicine. MutationAligner is slated to be periodically updated to incorporate additional analyses and new data from cancer genomics projects. PMID:26590264

  4. Mutational screening of the RB1 gene in Italian patients with retinoblastoma reveals 11 novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, Katia; Hadjistilianou, Theodora; Mari, Francesca; Speciale, Caterina; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Cetta, Francesco; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Giachino, Daniela; Pasini, Barbara; Acquaviva, Antonio; Caporossi, Aldo; Frezzotti, Renato; Renieri, Alessandra; Bruttini, Mirella

    2006-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB, OMIM#180200) is the most common intraocular tumour in infancy and early childhood. Constituent mutations in the RB1 gene predispose individuals to RB development. We performed a mutational screening of the RB1 gene in Italian patients affected by RB referred to the Medical Genetics of the University of Siena. In 35 unrelated patients, we identified germline RB1 mutations in 6 out of 9 familial cases (66%) and in 7 out of 26 with no family history of RB (27%). Using the single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) technique, 11 novel mutations were detected, including 3 nonsense, 5 frameshift and 4 splice-site mutations. Only two of these mutations (1 splice site and 1 missense) were previously reported. The mutation spectrum reflects the published literature, encompassing predominately nonsense or frameshift and splicing mutations. RB1 germline mutation was detected in 37% of our cases. Gross rearrangements outside the investigated region, altered DNA methylation, or mutations in non-coding regions, may be the cause of disease in the remainder of the patients. Some cases, e.g. a case of incomplete penetrance, or variable expressivity ranging from retinoma to multiple tumours, are discussed in detail. In addition, a case of pre-conception genetic counselling resolved by rescue of banked cordonal blood of the affected deceased child is described.

  5. Studies of human mutation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Neel, J.V.

    1991-07-15

    The three objectives of the program are: To isolate by the technique of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE), proteins of special interest because of the relative mutability of the corresponding gene, establish the identity of the protein, and, for selected proteins, move to a characterization of the corresponding gene; To develop a more efficient approach, based on 2-D PAGE, for the detection of variants in DNA, with special reference to the identification of a variant in a child not present in either parent of the child (i.e., a mutation); and, To continue an effective interface with the genetic studies on the children of atomic bomb survivors in Japan, with reference to both the planning and implementation of new studies at the molecular level. For administrative purposes, the program is subdivided into four sections, each under the direction of one of the four co-PIs; the progress during the past year will be summarized in accordance with this sectional structure. 1 tab.

  6. Melanoma: from mutations to medicine

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Hensin; Chin, Lynda; Garraway, Levi A.; Fisher, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Melanoma is often considered one of the most aggressive and treatment-resistant human cancers. It is a disease that, due to the presence of melanin pigment, was accurately diagnosed earlier than most other malignancies and that has been subjected to countless therapeutic strategies. Aside from early surgical resection, no therapeutic modality has been found to afford a high likelihood of curative outcome. However, discoveries reported in recent years have revealed a near avalanche of breakthroughs in the melanoma field—breakthroughs that span fundamental understanding of the molecular basis of the disease all the way to new therapeutic strategies that produce unquestionable clinical benefit. These discoveries have been born from the successful fruits of numerous researchers working in many—sometimes-related, although also distinct—biomedical disciplines. Discoveries of frequent mutations involving BRAF(V600E), developmental and oncogenic roles for the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) pathway, clinical efficacy of BRAF-targeted small molecules, and emerging mechanisms underlying resistance to targeted therapeutics represent just a sample of the findings that have created a striking inflection in the quest for clinically meaningful progress in the melanoma field. PMID:22661227

  7. Spectrum of mutations and genotype-phenotype analysis in Noonan syndrome patients with RIT1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Yaoita, Masako; Niihori, Tetsuya; Mizuno, Seiji; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Hayashi, Shion; Watanabe, Atsushi; Yokozawa, Masato; Suzumura, Hiroshi; Nakahara, Akihiko; Nakano, Yusuke; Hokosaki, Tatsunori; Ohmori, Ayumi; Sawada, Hirofumi; Migita, Ohsuke; Mima, Aya; Lapunzina, Pablo; Santos-Simarro, Fernando; García-Miñaúr, Sixto; Ogata, Tsutomu; Kawame, Hiroshi; Kurosawa, Kenji; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Inoue, Shin-Ichi; Matsubara, Yoichi; Kure, Shigeo; Aoki, Yoko

    2016-02-01

    RASopathies are autosomal dominant disorders caused by mutations in more than 10 known genes that regulate the RAS/MAPK pathway. Noonan syndrome (NS) is a RASopathy characterized by a distinctive facial appearance, musculoskeletal abnormalities, and congenital heart defects. We have recently identified mutations in RIT1 in patients with NS. To delineate the clinical manifestations in RIT1 mutation-positive patients, we further performed a RIT1 analysis in RASopathy patients and identified 7 RIT1 mutations, including two novel mutations, p.A77S and p.A77T, in 14 of 186 patients. Perinatal abnormalities, including nuchal translucency, fetal hydrops, pleural effusion, or chylothorax and congenital heart defects, are observed in all RIT1 mutation-positive patients. Luciferase assays in NIH 3T3 cells demonstrated that the newly identified RIT1 mutants, including p.A77S and p.A77T, and the previously identified p.F82V, p.T83P, p.Y89H, and p.M90I, enhanced Elk1 transactivation. Genotype-phenotype correlation analyses of previously reported NS patients harboring RIT1, PTPN11, SOS1, RAF1, and KRAS revealed that hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (56 %) was more frequent in patients harboring a RIT1 mutation than in patients harboring PTPN11 (9 %) and SOS1 mutations (10 %). The rates of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were similar between patients harboring RIT1 mutations and patients harboring RAF1 mutations (75 %). Short stature (52 %) was less prevalent in patients harboring RIT1 mutations than in patients harboring PTPN11 (71 %) and RAF1 (83 %) mutations. These results delineate the clinical manifestations of RIT1 mutation-positive NS patients: high frequencies of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, atrial septal defects, and pulmonary stenosis; and lower frequencies of ptosis and short stature. PMID:26714497

  8. Novel pathogenic mutations in the glucocerebrosidase locus.

    PubMed

    Duran, Raquel; McNeill, Alisdair; Mehta, Atul; Hughes, Derralyn; Cox, Timothy; Deegan, Patrick; Schapira, Anthony H V; Hardy, John

    2012-08-01

    To determine the frequency of mutations responsible for Gaucher's disease, we systematically sequenced the GBA1 gene as part of a molecular characterization of 73 adult patients in the United Kingdom. Five hitherto unknown pathogenic variants were identified, one of which is a splice site change; the others are novel missense mutations. Given that GBA1 gene mutations are an important risk factor for the development of Parkinson's disease, we contend that a complete analysis and molecular characterization of both the known and novel GBA1 variants will be needed before the biochemical processes underlying this genetic association can be fully understood. PMID:22658918

  9. Novel mutations in the human HPRT gene.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Khue Vu; Naviaux, Robert K; Paik, Kacie K; Nyhan, William L

    2011-06-01

    Inherited mutation of a purine salvage enzyme, hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT), gives rise to Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome (LNS) or HPRT-related gout. Here, we report five novel independent mutations in the coding region of the HPRT gene from five unrelated male patients manifesting different clinical phenotypes associated with LNS: exon 2: c.133A > G, p.45R > G; c.35A > C, p.12D > A; c.88delG; exon 7: c.530A > T, p.177D > V; and c.318 + 1G > C: IVS3 + 1G > C splice site mutation.

  10. Multiple mutations and mutation combinations in the sodium channel of permethrin resistant mosquitoes, Culex quinquefasciatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ting; Zhang, Lee; Reid, William R.; Xu, Qiang; Dong, Ke; Liu, Nannan

    2012-10-01

    A previous study identified 3 nonsynonymous and 6 synonymous mutations in the entire mosquito sodium channel of Culex quinquefasciatus, the prevalence of which were strongly correlated with levels of resistance and increased dramatically following insecticide selection. However, it is unclear whether this is unique to this specific resistant population or is a common mechanism in field mosquito populations in response to insecticide pressure. The current study therefore further characterized these mutations and their combinations in other field and permethrin selected Culex mosquitoes, finding that the co-existence of all 9 mutations was indeed correlated with the high levels of permethrin resistance in mosquitoes. Comparison of mutation combinations revealed several common mutation combinations presented across different field and permethrin selected populations in response to high levels of insecticide resistance, demonstrating that the co-existence of multiple mutations is a common event in response to insecticide resistance across different Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquito populations.

  11. The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Trifiro, M; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L

    1997-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 212 to 272. We have expanded the database: (i) by adding a large amount of new data on somatic mutations in prostatic cancer tissue; (ii) by defining a new constitutional phenotype, mild androgen insensitivity (MAI); (iii) by placing additional relevant information on an internet site (http://www.mcgill.ca/androgendb/ ). The database has allowed us to examine the contribution of CpG sites to the multiplicity of reports of the same mutation in different families. The database is also available from EMBL (ftp.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen) or as a Macintosh Filemaker Pro or Word file (MC33@musica,mcgill.ca)

  12. BRAF mutation in papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Yoram; Xing, Mingzhao; Mambo, Elizabeth; Guo, Zhongmin; Wu, Guogun; Trink, Barry; Beller, Uziel; Westra, William H; Ladenson, Paul W; Sidransky, David

    2003-04-16

    The BRAF gene has been found to be activated by mutation in human cancers, predominantly in malignant melanoma. We tested 476 primary tumors, including 214 lung, 126 head and neck, 54 thyroid, 27 bladder, 38 cervical, and 17 prostate cancers, for the BRAF T1796A mutation by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction enzyme analysis of BRAF exon 15. In 24 (69%) of the 35 papillary thyroid carcinomas examined, we found a missense thymine (T)-->adenine (A) transversion at nucleotide 1796 in the BRAF gene (T1796A). The T1796A mutation was detected in four lung cancers and in six head and neck cancers but not in bladder, cervical, or prostate cancers. Our data suggest that activating BRAF mutations may be an important event in the development of papillary thyroid cancer.

  13. Mutations affecting gonadotropin secretion and action.

    PubMed

    Huhtaniemi, Ilpo

    2003-01-01

    A number of mutations are known to disturb the development and function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. They affect hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal function at multiple levels, from the migration of gonadotropin releasing hormone neurons to the hypothalamus right through to gonadotropin action in the ovary and testis. Most of the mutations are inactivating, causing various forms of hypogonadism. Exceptions are the activating mutations of the luteinizing hormone receptor, causing male-limited gonadotropin-independent precocious puberty. The human mutations and genetically modified animal models have clarified the molecular pathogenesis of hypogonadism and such disorders can now be diagnosed using molecular biological techniques, enabling selection of specific treatments and appropriate counselling of patients and their families.

  14. BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations

    MedlinePlus

    ... testing may be offered. Genetic testing requires a DNA sample from blood or saliva. There are several ... specific BRCA mutation is present. This is called DNA sequencing. Your DNA then can be tested to ...

  15. Mutations in GNAL cause primary torsion dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Tania; Saunders-Pullman, Rachel; Masuho, Ikuo; Luciano, Marta San; Raymond, Deborah; Factor, Stewart; Lang, Anthony E.; Liang, Tsao-Wei; Trosch, Richard M.; White, Sierra; Ainehsazan, Edmond; Herve, Denis; Sharma, Nutan; Ehrlich, Michelle E.; Martemyanov, Kirill A.; Bressman, Susan B.; Ozelius, Laurie J.

    2012-01-01

    Dystonia is a movement disorder characterized by repetitive twisting muscle contractions and postures1,2. Its molecular pathophysiology is poorly understood, in part due to limited knowledge of the genetic basis of the disorder. Only three genes for primary torsion dystonia (PTD), TOR1A (DYT1)3, THAP1 (DYT6)4, and CIZ15 have been identified. Using exome sequencing in two PTD families we identified a novel causative gene, GNAL, with a nonsense p.S293X mutation resulting in premature stop codon in one family and a missense p.V137M mutation in the other. Screening of GNAL in 39 PTD families, revealed six additional novel mutations in this gene. Impaired function of several of the mutations was shown by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) assays. PMID:23222958

  16. Emerging patterns of somatic mutations in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Ian R.; Takahashi, Koichi; Futreal, P. Andrew; Chin, Lynda

    2014-01-01

    The advance in technological tools for massively parallel, high-throughput sequencing of DNA has enabled the comprehensive characterization of somatic mutations in large number of tumor samples. Here, we review recent cancer genomic studies that have assembled emerging views of the landscapes of somatic mutations through deep sequencing analyses of the coding exomes and whole genomes in various cancer types. We discuss the comparative genomics of different cancers, including mutation rates, spectrums, and roles of environmental insults that influence these processes. We highlight the developing statistical approaches used to identify significantly mutated genes, and discuss the emerging biological and clinical insights from such analyses as well as the challenges ahead translating these genomic data into clinical impacts. PMID:24022702

  17. De novo mutations in human genetic disease.

    PubMed

    Veltman, Joris A; Brunner, Han G

    2012-08-01

    New mutations have long been known to cause genetic disease, but their true contribution to the disease burden can only now be determined using family-based whole-genome or whole-exome sequencing approaches. In this Review we discuss recent findings suggesting that de novo mutations play a prominent part in rare and common forms of neurodevelopmental diseases, including intellectual disability, autism and schizophrenia. De novo mutations provide a mechanism by which early-onset reproductively lethal diseases remain frequent in the population. These mutations, although individually rare, may capture a significant part of the heritability for complex genetic diseases that is not detectable by genome-wide association studies. PMID:22805709

  18. ATM Mutations in Cancer: Therapeutic Implications.

    PubMed

    Choi, Michael; Kipps, Thomas; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2016-08-01

    Activation of checkpoint arrest and homologous DNA repair are necessary for maintenance of genomic integrity during DNA replication. Germ-line mutations of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene result in the well-characterized ataxia telangiectasia syndrome, which manifests with an increased cancer predisposition, including a 20% to 30% lifetime risk of lymphoid, gastric, breast, central nervous system, skin, and other cancers. Somatic ATM mutations or deletions are commonly found in lymphoid malignancies, as well as a variety of solid tumors. Such mutations may result in chemotherapy resistance and adverse prognosis, but may also be exploited by existing or emerging targeted therapies that produce synthetic lethal states. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(8); 1781-91. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27413114

  19. Emerging patterns of somatic mutations in cancer.

    PubMed

    Watson, Ian R; Takahashi, Koichi; Futreal, P Andrew; Chin, Lynda

    2013-10-01

    Recent advances in technological tools for massively parallel, high-throughput sequencing of DNA have enabled the comprehensive characterization of somatic mutations in a large number of tumour samples. In this Review, we describe recent cancer genomic studies that have assembled emerging views of the landscapes of somatic mutations through deep-sequencing analyses of the coding exomes and whole genomes in various cancer types. We discuss the comparative genomics of different cancers, including mutation rates and spectra, as well as the roles of environmental insults that influence these processes. We highlight the developing statistical approaches that are used to identify significantly mutated genes, and discuss the emerging biological and clinical insights from such analyses, as well as the future challenges of translating these genomic data into clinical impacts.

  20. Mutations of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS): An update.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Bani Bandana; Kadam, N N

    2016-01-01

    The plethora of knowledge gained on myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), a heterogeneous pre-malignant disorder of hematopoietic stem cells, through sequencing of several pathway genes has unveiled molecular pathogenesis and its progression to AML. Evolution of phenotypic classification and risk-stratification based on peripheral cytopenias and blast count has moved to five-tier risk-groups solely concerning chromosomal aberrations. Increased frequency of complex abnormalities, which is associated with genetic instability, defines the subgroup of worst prognosis in MDS. However, the independent effect of monosomal karyotype remains controversial. Recent discoveries on mutations in RNA-splicing machinery (SF3B1, SRSF2, ZRSR2, U2AF1, U2AF2); DNA methylation (TET2, DNMT3A, IDH1/2); chromatin modification (ASXL1, EZH2); transcription factor (TP53, RUNX1); signal transduction/kinases (FLT3, JAK2); RAS pathway (KRAS, NRAS, CBL, NF1, PTPN11); cohesin complex (STAG2, CTCF, SMC1A, RAD21); DNA repair (ATM, BRCC3, DLRE1C, FANCL); and other pathway genes have given insights into the independent effects and interaction of co-occurrence of mutations on disease-phenotype. RNA-splicing and DNA methylation mutations appeared to occur early and are reported as 'founder' mutations in over 50% MDS patients. TET2 mutation, through altered DNA methylation, has been found to have independent prognostic response to hypomethylating agents. Moreover, presence of DNMT3A, TET2 and ASXL1 mutations in normal elderly individuals forms the basis of understanding that accumulation of somatic mutations may not cause direct disease-development; however, cooperation with other mutations in the genes that are frequently mutated in myeloid and other hematopoietic cancers might result in clonal expansion through self-renewal and/or proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells. Identification of small molecules as inhibitors of epigenetic mutations has opened avenues for tailoring targeted drug development. The

  1. Effect of Mutation Order on Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Nangalia, Jyoti; Silber, Yvonne; Wedge, David C.; Grinfeld, Jacob; Baxter, E. Joanna; Massie, Charles E.; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Menon, Suraj; Godfrey, Anna L.; Dimitropoulou, Danai; Guglielmelli, Paola; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Besses, Carles; Döhner, Konstanze; Harrison, Claire N.; Vassiliou, George S.; Vannucchi, Alessandro; Campbell, Peter J.; Green, Anthony R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cancers result from the accumulation of somatic mutations, and their properties are thought to reflect the sum of these mutations. However, little is known about the effect of the order in which mutations are acquired. METHODS We determined mutation order in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms by genotyping hematopoietic colonies or by means of next-generation sequencing. Stem cells and progenitor cells were isolated to study the effect of mutation order on mature and immature hematopoietic cells. RESULTS The age at which a patient presented with a myeloproliferative neoplasm, acquisition of JAK2 V617F homozygosity, and the balance of immature progenitors were all influenced by mutation order. As compared with patients in whom the TET2 mutation was acquired first (hereafter referred to as “TET2-first patients”), patients in whom the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) mutation was acquired first (“JAK2-first patients”) had a greater likelihood of presenting with polycythemia vera than with essential thrombocythemia, an increased risk of thrombosis, and an increased sensitivity of JAK2-mutant progenitors to ruxolitinib in vitro. Mutation order influenced the proliferative response to JAK2 V617F and the capacity of double-mutant hematopoietic cells and progenitor cells to generate colony-forming cells. Moreover, the hematopoietic stem-and-progenitor-cell compartment was dominated by TET2 single-mutant cells in TET2-first patients but by JAK2–TET2 double-mutant cells in JAK2-first patients. Prior mutation of TET2 altered the transcriptional consequences of JAK2 V617F in a cell-intrinsic manner and prevented JAK2 V617F from up-regulating genes associated with proliferation. CONCLUSIONS The order in which JAK2 and TET2 mutations were acquired influenced clinical features, the response to targeted therapy, the biology of stem and progenitor cells, and clonal evolution in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms. (Funded by Leukemia and Lymphoma Research

  2. The stability of mutator (MR)-induced X-chromosomal recessive visible mutations in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Eeken, J C

    1982-10-01

    In Drosophila, MR (male recombination) second chromosomes are known to act as mutators and recombination inducers in males. The induction of visible mutations by MR is observed at only a limited number of genes, such as singed bristle (sn), raspberry eye colour (ras), yellow body colour (y) and a carmine eye colour (car). Furthermore, sn mutations induced by MR are highly unstable, changing from a strong to a weak expression or reverting to the wild-type. It has been hypothesized by analogy with IS mutations in microorganisms, that MR-induced mutations also represent mutations of the insertion type. In this investigation the stability of two MR-h12-induced X-linked visible mutations was tested, one singed (snMR) and one raspberry (rasMR). The reversion frequency of both MR-induced mutations was low in the base population as well as upon outcrossing to C(1)DX, yw f females. The data reported here show that the MR-induced mutations become highly unstable when MR is re-introduced. The change of expression of an MR-induced mutation to a weaker phenotype or to the wild-type occurred at a frequency of 3.3 X 10(-3) (ras) to 20.4 X 10(-3) (sn). Recessive lethal mutations induced by MR in the X-chromosomes carrying the MR-induced singed or raspberry mutation were isolated and analysed. Among 11 independently MR-induced lethals in the rasMR-carrying X-chromosome, 4 were found to be allelic to a small deficiency that included the raspberry gene. 13 lethals were induced by MR in the snMR-carrying X-chromosome. Of these, 3 were located near the sn locus but none was allelic to a deficiency including the singed gene. PMID:6815525

  3. [Afatinib as first-line therapy in mutation-positive EGFR. Results by type of mutation].

    PubMed

    Vidal, Óscar Juan

    2016-04-01

    The discovery of endothelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations has laid the foundations for personalized medicine in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). In phase III trials, the first-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), gefitinib and erlotinib, demonstrated greater efficacy compared with chemotherapy in patients with EGFR mutations, achieving progression-free survival of 8-13.5 months. Afatinib, a second-generation irreversible pan-ErbB inhibitor, is the first TKI that has shown a benefit in overall survival (OS) compared with chemotherapy in EGFR mutation-positive NSCLC when used as first-line treatment. Exon 19 deletion (Del19) and the single-point substitution mutation (L858R) in exon 21, called activating mutations due to their ability to confer sensitivity to TKI, represent approximately 90% of the EGFR mutations in NSCLC. Distinct sensitivity to TKI has been observed depending on the type of mutation, with greater progression-free survival in patients with the Del19 mutation. The analysis of OS in the LUX-Lung 3 and LUX-Lung 6 trials showed a statistically significant increase in survival in afatinib-treated patients with the Del 19 mutation, but no significant increase in that of patients with the L858R mutation. Direct comparison of afatinib and gefitinib as first-line therapy (LUX-Lung 7 trial) showed a statistically-significant increase in progression-free survival (hazard ratio: 0.73; 95% confidence interval, 0.57-0.95; p=0.0165) with afatinib. In the analysis by type of mutation, this benefit was observed for both the Del19 and the L858R mutations. PMID:27426243

  4. Normal mutation rate variants arise in a Mutator (Mut S) Escherichia coli population.

    PubMed

    Turrientes, María-Carmen; Baquero, Fernando; Levin, Bruce R; Martínez, José-Luis; Ripoll, Aida; González-Alba, José-María; Tobes, Raquel; Manrique, Marina; Baquero, Maria-Rosario; Rodríguez-Domínguez, Mario-José; Cantón, Rafael; Galán, Juan-Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The rate at which mutations are generated is central to the pace of evolution. Although this rate is remarkably similar amongst all cellular organisms, bacterial strains with mutation rates 100 fold greater than the modal rates of their species are commonly isolated from natural sources and emerge in experimental populations. Theoretical studies postulate and empirical studies teort the hypotheses that these "mutator" strains evolved in response to selection for elevated rates of generation of inherited variation that enable bacteria to adapt to novel and/or rapidly changing environments. Less clear are the conditions under which selection will favor reductions in mutation rates. Declines in rates of mutation for established populations of mutator bacteria are not anticipated if such changes are attributed to the costs of augmented rates of generation of deleterious mutations. Here we report experimental evidence of evolution towards reduced mutation rates in a clinical isolate of Escherichia coli with an hyper-mutable phenotype due a deletion in a mismatch repair gene, (ΔmutS). The emergence in a ΔmutS background of variants with mutation rates approaching those of the normal rates of strains carrying wild-type MutS was associated with increase in fitness with respect to ancestral strain. We postulate that such an increase in fitness could be attributed to the emergence of mechanisms driving a permanent "aerobic style of life", the negative consequence of this behavior being regulated by the evolution of mechanisms protecting the cell against increased endogenous oxidative radicals involved in DNA damage, and thus reducing mutation rate. Gene expression assays and full sequencing of evolved mutator and normo-mutable variants supports the hypothesis. In conclusion, we postulate that the observed reductions in mutation rate are coincidental to, rather than, the selective force responsible for this evolution.

  5. [Afatinib as first-line therapy in mutation-positive EGFR. Results by type of mutation].

    PubMed

    Vidal, Óscar Juan

    2016-04-01

    The discovery of endothelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations has laid the foundations for personalized medicine in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). In phase III trials, the first-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), gefitinib and erlotinib, demonstrated greater efficacy compared with chemotherapy in patients with EGFR mutations, achieving progression-free survival of 8-13.5 months. Afatinib, a second-generation irreversible pan-ErbB inhibitor, is the first TKI that has shown a benefit in overall survival (OS) compared with chemotherapy in EGFR mutation-positive NSCLC when used as first-line treatment. Exon 19 deletion (Del19) and the single-point substitution mutation (L858R) in exon 21, called activating mutations due to their ability to confer sensitivity to TKI, represent approximately 90% of the EGFR mutations in NSCLC. Distinct sensitivity to TKI has been observed depending on the type of mutation, with greater progression-free survival in patients with the Del19 mutation. The analysis of OS in the LUX-Lung 3 and LUX-Lung 6 trials showed a statistically significant increase in survival in afatinib-treated patients with the Del 19 mutation, but no significant increase in that of patients with the L858R mutation. Direct comparison of afatinib and gefitinib as first-line therapy (LUX-Lung 7 trial) showed a statistically-significant increase in progression-free survival (hazard ratio: 0.73; 95% confidence interval, 0.57-0.95; p=0.0165) with afatinib. In the analysis by type of mutation, this benefit was observed for both the Del19 and the L858R mutations.

  6. Recurrent inactivating RASA2 mutations in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Arafeh, Rand; Qutob, Nouar; Emmanuel, Rafi; Keren-Paz, Alona; Madore, Jason; Elkahloun, Abdel; Wilmott, James S.; Gartner, Jared J.; Di Pizio, Antonella; Winograd-Katz, Sabina; Sindiri, Sivasish; Rotkopf, Ron; Dutton-Regester, Ken; Johansson, Peter; Pritchard, Antonia; Waddell, Nicola; Hill, Victoria K.; Lin, Jimmy C.; Hevroni, Yael; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Khan, Javed; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Niv, Masha Y.; Ulitsky, Igor; Mann, Graham J; Scolyer, Richard A.; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Samuels, Yardena

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of 501 melanoma exomes revealed RASA2, encoding a RasGAP, as a tumor-suppressor gene mutated in 5% of melanomas. Recurrent loss-of-function mutations in RASA2 were found to increase RAS activation, melanoma cell growth and migration. RASA2 expression was lost in ≥30% of human melanomas and was associated with reduced patient survival. These findings reveal RASA2 inactivation as a melanoma driver and highlight the importance of Ras GAPs in cancer. PMID:26502337

  7. Calreticulin (CALR) mutation in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs)

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wenyi

    2015-01-01

    As a heterogeneous group of disease, myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) have confused hematologists and hematopathologists with their protean clinical presentations and myriads of morphologies. A thought of classifying MPNs based on molecular alterations has gained popularity because there is increasing evidence that molecular or chromosomal alterations have a better correlation with clinical presentation, response to therapies, and prognosis than conventional morphological classification. This type of efforts has been facilitated by the advancement of molecular technologies. A significant number of gene mutations have been identified in MPNs with JAK2 and MPL being the major ones. However, a significant gap is present in that many cases of MPNs do not harbor any of these mutations. This gap is recently filled by the discovery of Calreticulin (CALR) mutation in MPNs without JAK2 or MPL mutation and since then, the clinical and molecular correlation in MPNs has become a hot research topic. There seems to be a fairly consistent correlation between CALR mutation and certain hematological parameters such as a high platelet count and a better prognosis in MPNs with CALR mutation. However, controversies are present regarding the risks of thrombosis, interactions of CALR with other gene mutation, the role of CALR in the pathogenesis, and the optimal treatment strategies. In addition, there are many questions remain to be answered, which all boiled down to the molecular mechanisms by which CALR causes or contributes to MPNs. Here, we summarized current published literatures on CALR mutations in MPNs with an emphasis on the clinical-molecular correlation. We also discussed the controversies and questions remain to be answered. PMID:27358884

  8. (Somatic mutations in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The study is concerned the design of new assays that may detect rare somatic mutations in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, which may increase upon exposure to mutagens, and thus become a marker of human exposure to such mutagens. Two assays for somatic mutation were presented, one for mitochondrial DNA deletions which was developed by the author, and one for deletions of the ADA gene which resides in the nucleus.

  9. Simulated coevolution in a mutating ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sá Martins, J. S.

    2000-03-01

    The bit-string Penna model is used to simulate the competition between an asexual parthenogenetic and a sexual population sharing the same environment. A newborn of either population can mutate and become a part of the other with some probability. In a stable environment the sexual population soon dies out. When an infestation by rapidly mutating genetically coupled parasites is introduced, however, sexual reproduction prevails, as predicted by the so-called Red Queen hypothesis for the evolution of sex.

  10. Comparative mutational analyses of influenza A viruses

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Peter Pak-Hang; Rogozin, Igor B.; Choy, Ka-Tim; Ng, Hoi Yee

    2015-01-01

    The error-prone RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) and external selective pressures are the driving forces for RNA viral diversity. When confounded by selective pressures, it is difficult to assess if influenza A viruses (IAV) that have a wide host range possess comparable or distinct spontaneous mutational frequency in their RdRPs. We used in-depth bioinformatics analyses to assess the spontaneous mutational frequencies of two RdRPs derived from human seasonal (A/Wuhan/359/95; Wuhan) and H5N1 (A/Vietnam/1203/04; VN1203) viruses using the mini-genome system with a common firefly luciferase reporter serving as the template. High-fidelity reverse transcriptase was applied to generate high-quality mutational spectra which allowed us to assess and compare the mutational frequencies and mutable motifs along a target sequence of the two RdRPs of two different subtypes. We observed correlated mutational spectra (τ correlation P < 0.0001), comparable mutational frequencies (H3N2:5.8 ± 0.9; H5N1:6.0 ± 0.5), and discovered a highly mutable motif “(A)AAG” for both Wuhan and VN1203 RdRPs. Results were then confirmed with two recombinant A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) viruses that possess RdRP derived from Wuhan or VN1203 (RG-PR8×WuhanPB2, PB1, PA, NP and RG-PR8×VN1203PB2, PB1, PA, NP). Applying novel bioinformatics analysis on influenza mutational spectra, we provide a platform for a comprehensive analysis of the spontaneous mutation spectra for an RNA virus. PMID:25404565

  11. Mutational spectrum of adult T-ALL.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Martin; Vosberg, Sebastian; Schlee, Cornelia; Heesch, Sandra; Schwartz, Stefan; Gökbuget, Nicola; Hoelzer, Dieter; Graf, Alexander; Krebs, Stefan; Bartram, Isabelle; Blum, Helmut; Brüggemann, Monika; Hecht, Jochen; Bohlander, Stefan K; Greif, Philipp A; Baldus, Claudia D

    2015-02-20

    Novel target discovery is warranted to improve treatment in adult T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) patients. We provide a comprehensive study on mutations to enhance the understanding of therapeutic targets and studied 81 adult T-ALL patients. NOTCH1 exhibitedthe highest mutation rate (53%). Mutation frequencies of FBXW7 (10%), WT1 (10%), JAK3 (12%), PHF6 (11%), and BCL11B (10%) were in line with previous reports. We identified recurrent alterations in transcription factors DNM2, and RELN, the WNT pathway associated cadherin FAT1, and in epigenetic regulators (MLL2, EZH2). Interestingly, we discovered novel recurrent mutations in the DNA repair complex member HERC1, in NOTCH2, and in the splicing factor ZRSR2. A frequently affected pathway was the JAK/STAT pathway (18%) and a significant proportion of T-ALL patients harboured mutations in epigenetic regulators (33%), both predominantly found in the unfavourable subgroup of early T-ALL. Importantly, adult T-ALL patients not only showed a highly heterogeneous mutational spectrum, but also variable subclonal allele frequencies implicated in therapy resistance and evolution of relapse. In conclusion, we provide novel insights in genetic alterations of signalling pathways (e.g. druggable by γ-secretase inhibitors, JAK inhibitors or EZH2 inhibitors), present in over 80% of all adult T-ALL patients, that could guide novel therapeutic approaches.

  12. Mutational spectrum of adult T-ALL.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Martin; Vosberg, Sebastian; Schlee, Cornelia; Heesch, Sandra; Schwartz, Stefan; Gökbuget, Nicola; Hoelzer, Dieter; Graf, Alexander; Krebs, Stefan; Bartram, Isabelle; Blum, Helmut; Brüggemann, Monika; Hecht, Jochen; Bohlander, Stefan K; Greif, Philipp A; Baldus, Claudia D

    2015-02-20

    Novel target discovery is warranted to improve treatment in adult T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) patients. We provide a comprehensive study on mutations to enhance the understanding of therapeutic targets and studied 81 adult T-ALL patients. NOTCH1 exhibitedthe highest mutation rate (53%). Mutation frequencies of FBXW7 (10%), WT1 (10%), JAK3 (12%), PHF6 (11%), and BCL11B (10%) were in line with previous reports. We identified recurrent alterations in transcription factors DNM2, and RELN, the WNT pathway associated cadherin FAT1, and in epigenetic regulators (MLL2, EZH2). Interestingly, we discovered novel recurrent mutations in the DNA repair complex member HERC1, in NOTCH2, and in the splicing factor ZRSR2. A frequently affected pathway was the JAK/STAT pathway (18%) and a significant proportion of T-ALL patients harboured mutations in epigenetic regulators (33%), both predominantly found in the unfavourable subgroup of early T-ALL. Importantly, adult T-ALL patients not only showed a highly heterogeneous mutational spectrum, but also variable subclonal allele frequencies implicated in therapy resistance and evolution of relapse. In conclusion, we provide novel insights in genetic alterations of signalling pathways (e.g. druggable by γ-secretase inhibitors, JAK inhibitors or EZH2 inhibitors), present in over 80% of all adult T-ALL patients, that could guide novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:25595890

  13. RELN Mutations in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lammert, Dawn B.; Howell, Brian W.

    2016-01-01

    RELN encodes a large, secreted glycoprotein integral to proper neuronal positioning during development and regulation of synaptic function postnatally. Rare, homozygous, null mutations lead to lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia (LCH), accompanied by developmental delay and epilepsy. Until recently, little was known about the frequency or consequences of heterozygous mutations. Several lines of evidence from multiple studies now implicate heterozygous mutations in RELN in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). RELN maps to the AUTS1 locus on 7q22, and at this time over 40 distinct mutations have been identified that would alter the protein sequence, four of which are de novo. The RELN mutations that are most clearly consequential are those that are predicted to inactivate the signaling function of the encoded protein and those that fall in a highly conserved RXR motif found at the core of the 16 Reelin subrepeats. Despite the growing evidence of RELN dysfunction in ASD, it appears that these mutations in isolation are insufficient and that secondary genetic or environmental factors are likely required for a diagnosis. PMID:27064498

  14. Diploid yeast cells yield homozygous spontaneous mutations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esposito, M. S.; Bruschi, C. V.; Brushi, C. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    A leucine-requiring hybrid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, homoallelic at the LEU1 locus (leu1-12/leu1-12) and heterozygous for three chromosome-VII genetic markers distal to the LEU1 locus, was employed to inquire: (1) whether spontaneous gene mutation and mitotic segregation of heterozygous markers occur in positive nonrandom association and (2) whether homozygous LEU1/LEU1 mutant diploids are generated. The results demonstrate that gene mutation of leu1-12 to LEU1 and mitotic segregation of heterozygous chromosome-VII markers occur in strong positive nonrandom association, suggesting that the stimulatory DNA lesion is both mutagenic and recombinogenic. In addition, genetic analysis of diploid Leu+ revertants revealed that approximately 3% of mutations of leu1-12 to LEU1 result in LEU1/LEU1 homozygotes. Red-white sectored Leu+ colonies exhibit genotypes that implicate post-replicational chromatid breakage and exchange near the site of leu1-12 reversion, chromosome loss, and subsequent restitution of diploidy, in the sequence of events leading to mutational homozygosis. By analogy, diploid cell populations can yield variants homozygous for novel recessive gene mutations at biologically significant rates. Mutational homozygosis may be relevant to both carcinogenesis and the evolution of asexual diploid organisms.

  15. A DSPP mutation causing dentinogenesis imperfecta and characterization of the mutational effect.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sook-Kyung; Lee, Kyung-Eun; Song, Su Jeong; Hyun, Hong-Keun; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Jung-Wook

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the DSPP gene have been identified in nonsyndromic hereditary dentin defects, but the genotype-phenotype correlations are not fully understood. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the mutations of DSPP affecting the IPV leader sequence result in mutant DSPP retention in rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In this study, we identified a Korean family with dentinogenesis imperfecta type III. To identify the disease causing mutation in this family, we performed mutational analysis based on candidate gene sequencing. Exons and exon-intron boundaries of DSPP gene were sequenced, and the effects of the identified mutation on the pre-mRNA splicing and protein secretion were investigated. Candidate gene sequencing revealed a mutation (c.50C > T, p.P17L) in exon 2 of the DSPP gene. The splicing assay showed that the mutation did not influence pre-mRNA splicing. However, the mutation interfered with protein secretion and resulted in the mutant protein remaining largely in the ER. These results suggest that the mutation affects ER-to-Golgi apparatus export and results in the reduction of secreted DSPP and ER overload. This may induce cell stress and damage processing and/or transport of dentin matrix proteins or other critical proteins.

  16. Exploring the common molecular basis for the universal DNA mutation bias: Revival of Loewdin mutation model

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Liang-Yu; Wang, Guang-Zhong; Ma, Bin-Guang; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} There exists a universal G:C {yields} A:T mutation bias in three domains of life. {yields} This universal mutation bias has not been sufficiently explained. {yields} A DNA mutation model proposed by Loewdin 40 years ago offers a common explanation. -- Abstract: Recently, numerous genome analyses revealed the existence of a universal G:C {yields} A:T mutation bias in bacteria, fungi, plants and animals. To explore the molecular basis for this mutation bias, we examined the three well-known DNA mutation models, i.e., oxidative damage model, UV-radiation damage model and CpG hypermutation model. It was revealed that these models cannot provide a sufficient explanation to the universal mutation bias. Therefore, we resorted to a DNA mutation model proposed by Loewdin 40 years ago, which was based on inter-base double proton transfers (DPT). Since DPT is a fundamental and spontaneous chemical process and occurs much more frequently within GC pairs than AT pairs, Loewdin model offers a common explanation for the observed universal mutation bias and thus has broad biological implications.

  17. An Alpha Tubulin Mutation Suppresses Nuclear Migration Mutations in Aspergillus Nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Willins, D. A.; Xiang, X.; Morris, N. R.

    1995-01-01

    Microtubules and cytoplasmic dynein, a microtubule-dependent motor, are required for nuclei to move along the hyphae of filamentous fungi. Nuclear migration in Aspergillus nidulans is blocked by heat-sensitive (hs(-)) mutations in the nudA gene, which encodes dynein heavy chain, and the nudF gene, which encodes a G protein β-subunit-like protein. Hs(-) mutations in the nudC and nudG genes also prevent nuclear migration. We have isolated extragenic suppressor mutations that reverse the hs(-) phenotypes caused by these mutations. Here we show that one nudF suppressor also suppresses hs(-) mutations in nudA, nudC, and nudG and deletions in nudA and nudF. This suppressor mutation is in the tubA alpha tubulin gene, and its characteristics suggest that it destabilizes microtubules. The mutation alters microtubule staining and confers sensitivity to cold and benomyl, two treatments that destabilize microtubules. Treatment with low concentrations of benomyl also suppresses the hs(-) nudA, nudC, nudF, and nudG mutations and the nudA and nudF deletions. Suppression of the hs(-) nudA mutation and the nudA deletion is especially interesting because these strains lack active dynein heavy chain. Together, these results suggest that microtubule destabilization allows nuclei to migrate even in the absence of cytoplasmic dynein motor function. PMID:8601474

  18. 394delTT: a Nordic cystic fibrosis mutation.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, M; Anvret, M; Claustres, M; Eiken, H G; Eiklid, K; Schaedel, C; Stolpe, L; Tranebjaerg, L

    1994-02-01

    In a systematic screening for mutations in the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator among Danish cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, we identified a mutation in exon 3 (394delTT); this mutation was found to be relatively common in Denmark. We therefore screened for 394delTT in Sweden and Norway, where it turned out to be the second most frequent mutation, accounting for 4% of all CF mutations. It also occurs with a high frequency in Finland, but has not been found in larger surveys of mutations in the CFTR gene. Thus, 394delTT seems to be a specific Nordic CF mutation.

  19. Novel recurrently mutated genes and a prognostic mutation signature in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jun; Wu, William K K; Li, Xiangchun; He, Jun; Li, Xiao-Xing; Ng, Simon S M; Yu, Chang; Gao, Zhibo; Yang, Jie; Li, Miao; Wang, Qiaoxiu; Liang, Qiaoyi; Pan, Yi; Tong, Joanna H; To, Ka F; Wong, Nathalie; Zhang, Ning; Chen, Jie; Lu, Youyong; Lai, Paul B S; Chan, Francis K L; Li, Yingrui; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jun; Sung, Joseph J Y

    2015-01-01

    Background Characterisation of colorectal cancer (CRC) genomes by next-generation sequencing has led to the discovery of novel recurrently mutated genes. Nevertheless, genomic data has not yet been used for CRC prognostication. Objective To identify recurrent somatic mutations with prognostic significance in patients with CRC. Method Exome sequencing was performed to identify somatic mutations in tumour tissues of 22 patients with CRC, followed by validation of 187 recurrent and pathway-related genes using targeted capture sequencing in additional 160 cases. Results Seven significantly mutated genes, including four reported (APC, TP53, KRAS and SMAD4) and three novel recurrently mutated genes (CDH10, FAT4 and DOCK2), exhibited high mutation prevalence (6–14% for novel cancer genes) and higher-than-expected number of non-silent mutations in our CRC cohort. For prognostication, a five-gene-signature (CDH10, COL6A3, SMAD4, TMEM132D, VCAN) was devised, in which mutation(s) in one or more of these genes was significantly associated with better overall survival independent of tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) staging. The median survival time was 80.4 months in the mutant group versus 42.4 months in the wild type group (p=0.0051). The prognostic significance of this signature was successfully verified using the data set from the Cancer Genome Atlas study. Conclusions The application of next-generation sequencing has led to the identification of three novel significantly mutated genes in CRC and a mutation signature that predicts survival outcomes for stratifying patients with CRC independent of TNM staging. PMID:24951259

  20. Frequent PIK3CA Mutations in Colorectal and Endometrial Cancer with Double Somatic Mismatch Repair Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Stacey A.; Turner, Emily H.; Beightol, Mallory B.; Jacobson, Angela; Gooley, Ted A.; Salipante, Stephen J.; Haraldsdottir, Sigurdis; Smith, Christina; Scroggins, Sheena; Tait, Jonathan F.; Grady, William M.; Lin, Edward H.; Cohn, David E.; Goodfellow, Paul J.; Arnold, Mark W.; de la Chapelle, Albert; Pearlman, Rachel; Hampel, Heather; Pritchard, Colin C.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Double somatic mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes have recently been described in colorectal and endometrial cancers with microsatellite instability (MSI) not attributable to MLH1 hypermethylation or germline mutation. We sought to define the molecular phenotype of this newly recognized tumor subtype. Methods From two prospective Lynch syndrome screening studies, we identified patients with colorectal and endometrial tumors harboring ≥2 somatic MMR mutations, but normal germline MMR testing (“double somatic”). We determined the frequencies of tumor PIK3CA, BRAF, KRAS, NRAS, and PTEN mutations by targeted next-generation sequencing and used logistic-regression models to compare them to: Lynch syndrome, MLH1 hypermethylated, and microsatellite stable (MSS) tumors. We validated our findings using independent datasets from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Results Among colorectal cancer cases, we found that 14/21 (67%) of double somatic cases had PIK3CA mutations vs. 4/18 (22%) Lynch syndrome, 2/10 (20%) MLH1 hypermethylated, and 12/78 (15%) MSS tumors; p<0.0001. PIK3CA mutations were detected in 100% of 13 double somatic endometrial cancers (p=0.04). BRAF mutations were absent in double somatic and Lynch syndrome colorectal tumors. We found highly similar results in a validation cohort from TCGA (113 colorectal, 178 endometrial cancer), with 100% of double somatic cases harboring a PIK3CA mutation (p<0.0001). Conclusions PIK3CA mutations are present in double somatic mutated colorectal and endometrial cancers at substantially higher frequencies than other MSI subgroups. PIK3CA mutation status may better define an emerging molecular entity in colorectal and endometrial cancers, with the potential to inform screening and therapeutic decision making. PMID:27302833

  1. Mediastinal paragangliomas related to SDHx gene mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ćwikła, Jarosław; Prejbisz, Aleksander; Kwiatek, Paweł; Szperl, Małgorzata; Michalski, Wojciech; Wyrwicz, Lucjan; Kuśmierczyk, Mariusz; Januszewicz, Andrzej; Maciejczyk, Anna; Roszczynko, Marta; Pęczkowska, Mariola

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Paragangliomas (PGLs) related to hereditary syndromes are rare mediastinal tumors. Paragangliomas are caused by mutations in genes encoding subunits of succinate dehydrogenase enzyme (SDH). Aim To evaluate clinical, anatomical and functional characteristics of mediastinal paragangliomas related to SDHx gene mutations. Material and methods Retrospective analysis of 75 patients with confirmed SDHx gene mutations (24 patients with SDHB, 5 SDHC, 46 with SDHD mutations) was performed. Patients underwent evaluation using computed tomography (CT), somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) (99mTc-[HYNIC,Tyr3]-octreotide), 123I mIBG scintigraphy and urinary excretion of total methoxycatecholamines. Results Out of 75 patients, 16 (21%) patients (1 SDHB, 15 SDHD mutations) had 17 PGLs localized in the mediastinum. Fourteen PGLs were localized in the middle mediastinum (intrapericardial) and 3 PGLs in the posterior mediastinum. The median diameter of paragangliomas measured on the axial slice was 24.3 mm (interquartile range (IQR): 14.7–36.6), and the median volume was 2.78 ml (IQR: 0.87–16.16). Twelve out of 16 patients (75%) underwent SRS, and 11 of them (92.3%) had pathological uptake of the radiotracer. Eleven (68.75%) out of 16 patients underwent 123 I mIBG, with only 3 positive results. Symptoms of catecholamine excretion were observed in 3 patients with PGLs localized in the posterior mediastinum. All PGLs were benign except in 1 patient with the SDHB mutation and PGL detected in the posterior mediastinum, who had a metastatic disease. Conclusions Most mediastinal paragangliomas were related to SDHD gene mutations. They were asymptomatic, localized in the medial mediastinum, intrapericardially. PMID:27785149

  2. MUTATIONS INDUCED BY URBAN AIR AND DRINKING WATER: DO THEY LEAVE A MUTATIONAL SIGNATURE IN HUMAN TUMORS?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mutations Induced by Urban Air and Drinking Water: Do They Leave a Mutational Signature in Human Tumors?

    Mutation spectra of complex environmental mixtures have been determined thus far only in Salmonella. We have determined mutation spectra for the particulate organics ...

  3. Directed evolution of mutator adenoviruses resistant to antibody neutralization.

    PubMed

    Myers, Nicolle D; Skorohodova, Ksenia V; Gounder, Anshu P; Smith, Jason G

    2013-05-01

    We incorporated a previously identified mutation that reduces the fidelity of the DNA polymerase into a human adenovirus vector. Using this mutator vector, we demonstrate rapid selection of resistance to a neutralizing anti-hexon monoclonal antibody due to a G434D mutation in hexon that precludes antibody binding. Since mutator adenoviruses can accumulate compound mutations that are unattainable using traditional random mutagenesis techniques, this approach will be valuable to the study of antivirals and host factor interactions.

  4. Integrative analysis of mutational and transcriptional profiles reveals driver mutations of metastatic breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Hyun; Zhao, Xing-Ming; Yoon, Ina; Lee, Jin Young; Kwon, Nam Hoon; Wang, Yin-Ying; Lee, Kyung-Min; Lee, Min-Joo; Kim, Jisun; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; In, Yongho; Hao, Jin-Kao; Park, Kyung-Mii; Noh, Dong-Young; Han, Wonshik; Kim, Sunghoon

    2016-01-01

    Despite the explosion in the numbers of cancer genomic studies, metastasis is still the major cause of cancer mortality. In breast cancer, approximately one-fifth of metastatic patients survive 5 years. Therefore, detecting the patients at a high risk of developing distant metastasis at first diagnosis is critical for effective treatment strategy. We hereby present a novel systems biology approach to identify driver mutations escalating the risk of metastasis based on both exome and RNA sequencing of our collected 78 normal-paired breast cancers. Unlike driver mutations occurring commonly in cancers as reported in the literature, the mutations detected here are relatively rare mutations occurring in less than half metastatic samples. By supposing that the driver mutations should affect the metastasis gene signatures, we develop a novel computational pipeline to identify the driver mutations that affect transcription factors regulating metastasis gene signatures. We identify driver mutations in ADPGK, NUP93, PCGF6, PKP2 and SLC22A5, which are verified to enhance cancer cell migration and prompt metastasis with in vitro experiments. The discovered somatic mutations may be helpful for identifying patients who are likely to develop distant metastasis. PMID:27625789

  5. Integrative analysis of mutational and transcriptional profiles reveals driver mutations of metastatic breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Hyun; Zhao, Xing-Ming; Yoon, Ina; Lee, Jin Young; Kwon, Nam Hoon; Wang, Yin-Ying; Lee, Kyung-Min; Lee, Min-Joo; Kim, Jisun; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; In, Yongho; Hao, Jin-Kao; Park, Kyung-Mii; Noh, Dong-Young; Han, Wonshik; Kim, Sunghoon

    2016-01-01

    Despite the explosion in the numbers of cancer genomic studies, metastasis is still the major cause of cancer mortality. In breast cancer, approximately one-fifth of metastatic patients survive 5 years. Therefore, detecting the patients at a high risk of developing distant metastasis at first diagnosis is critical for effective treatment strategy. We hereby present a novel systems biology approach to identify driver mutations escalating the risk of metastasis based on both exome and RNA sequencing of our collected 78 normal-paired breast cancers. Unlike driver mutations occurring commonly in cancers as reported in the literature, the mutations detected here are relatively rare mutations occurring in less than half metastatic samples. By supposing that the driver mutations should affect the metastasis gene signatures, we develop a novel computational pipeline to identify the driver mutations that affect transcription factors regulating metastasis gene signatures. We identify driver mutations in ADPGK, NUP93, PCGF6, PKP2 and SLC22A5, which are verified to enhance cancer cell migration and prompt metastasis with in vitro experiments. The discovered somatic mutations may be helpful for identifying patients who are likely to develop distant metastasis.

  6. Nonadaptive mutations occur on the F' episome during adaptive mutation conditions in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Foster, P L

    1997-01-01

    One of the most studied examples of adaptive mutation is a strain of Escherichia coli, FC40, that cannot utilize lactose (Lac-) but that readily reverts to lactose utilization (Lac+) when lactose is its sole carbon source. Adaptive reversion to Lac+ occurs at a high rate when the Lac- allele is on an F' episome and conjugal functions are expressed. It was previously shown that nonselected mutations on the chromosome did not appear in the Lac- population while episomal Lac+ mutations accumulated, but it remained possible that nonselected mutations might occur on the episome. To investigate this possibility, a second mutational target was created on the Lac- episome by mutation of a Tn1O element, which encodes tetracycline resistance (Tetr), to tetracycline sensitivity (Tets). Reversion rates to Tetr during normal growth and during lactose selection were measured. The results show that nonselected Tetr mutations do accumulate in Lac- cells when those cells are under selection to become Lac+. Thus, reversion to Lac+ in FC40 does not appear to be adaptive in the narrow sense of the word. In addition, the results suggest that during lactose selection, both Lac+ and Tetr mutations are created or preserved by the same recombination-dependent mechanism. PMID:9045812

  7. Integrative analysis of mutational and transcriptional profiles reveals driver mutations of metastatic breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Hyun; Zhao, Xing-Ming; Yoon, Ina; Lee, Jin Young; Kwon, Nam Hoon; Wang, Yin-Ying; Lee, Kyung-Min; Lee, Min-Joo; Kim, Jisun; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; In, Yongho; Hao, Jin-Kao; Park, Kyung-Mii; Noh, Dong-Young; Han, Wonshik; Kim, Sunghoon

    2016-01-01

    Despite the explosion in the numbers of cancer genomic studies, metastasis is still the major cause of cancer mortality. In breast cancer, approximately one-fifth of metastatic patients survive 5 years. Therefore, detecting the patients at a high risk of developing distant metastasis at first diagnosis is critical for effective treatment strategy. We hereby present a novel systems biology approach to identify driver mutations escalating the risk of metastasis based on both exome and RNA sequencing of our collected 78 normal-paired breast cancers. Unlike driver mutations occurring commonly in cancers as reported in the literature, the mutations detected here are relatively rare mutations occurring in less than half metastatic samples. By supposing that the driver mutations should affect the metastasis gene signatures, we develop a novel computational pipeline to identify the driver mutations that affect transcription factors regulating metastasis gene signatures. We identify driver mutations in ADPGK, NUP93, PCGF6, PKP2 and SLC22A5, which are verified to enhance cancer cell migration and prompt metastasis with in vitro experiments. The discovered somatic mutations may be helpful for identifying patients who are likely to develop distant metastasis. PMID:27625789

  8. Volatility of Mutator Phenotypes at Single Cell Resolution.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Scott R; Schultz, Eric M; Chappell, Thomas M; Kohrn, Brendan; Knowels, Gary M; Herr, Alan J

    2015-04-01

    Mutator phenotypes accelerate the evolutionary process of neoplastic transformation. Historically, the measurement of mutation rates has relied on scoring the occurrence of rare mutations in target genes in large populations of cells. Averaging mutation rates over large cell populations assumes that new mutations arise at a constant rate during each cell division. If the mutation rate is not constant, an expanding mutator population may contain subclones with widely divergent rates of evolution. Here, we report mutation rate measurements of individual cell divisions of mutator yeast deficient in DNA polymerase ε proofreading and base-base mismatch repair. Our data are best fit by a model in which cells can assume one of two distinct mutator states, with mutation rates that differ by an order of magnitude. In error-prone cell divisions, mutations occurred on the same chromosome more frequently than expected by chance, often in DNA with similar predicted replication timing, consistent with a spatiotemporal dimension to the hypermutator state. Mapping of mutations onto predicted replicons revealed that mutations were enriched in the first half of the replicon as well as near termination zones. Taken together, our findings show that individual genome replication events exhibit an unexpected volatility that may deepen our understanding of the evolution of mutator-driven malignancies.

  9. Measurements of mutation rates in B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Wabl, M; Jäck, H M; Meyer, J; Beck-Engeser, G; von Borstel, R C; Steinberg, C M

    1987-04-01

    It is established that somatic mutation is an important source of antibody diversity in vivo. It is also established that Igh-V gene segments are hypermutable in vitro. This is not a completely satisfactory situation. While there is no reason to believe that Igh-V genes are not hypermutable in vivo as well, direct experimental evidence is lacking. Perhaps experiments with transgenic mice will soon fill this gap. It is not so clear how much higher than normal the rate of hypermutation is. As far as we are aware, there are no direct measurements of mutation rates per base pair per cell generation in mammals, certainly not for lymphocyte cell lines. For a variety of reasons, it is difficult to measure very low mutation rates. The general consensus is that the normal rate should be somewhere between 10(-10) and 10(-12) mutations per base pair per cell generation. Therefore, an experiment designed to directly determine a rate using the compartmentalization test would involve hundreds of cultures, each containing at least 10(9) cells. It is not a trivial problem to find one or a few mutants among so many cells. It is simple to study mutation to resistance to a drug, for example, ouabain or azaguanine, but, as we discussed, there are technical and conceptual pitfalls. The vast excess of dead cells influences the growth of a few mutant cells, particularly in lymphocyte cell lines. Even if this problem could be solved, the mutation rate so obtained would be "per gene(s)" and not "per base pair". The problems associated with cytotoxic agents can be avoided by immunofluorescence methods in conjunction with selective cloning or cell sorting. Using these techniques, we have carried out extensive experiments to determine whether the immunoglobulin mutator system acts, at least partially, on genetic elements other than those in or near the heavy chain variable region gene segment. For an opal termination codon in a heavy chain constant region gene segment, the rate of reversion

  10. Ontogeny of the barley plant as related to mutation expression and detection of pollen mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgdon, A.L.; Marcus, A.H.; Arenaz, P.; Rosichan, J.L.; Bogyo, T.P.; Nilan, R.A.

    1980-05-29

    Clustering of mutant pollen grains in a population of normal pollen due to premeiotic mutational events complicates translating mutation frequencies into rates. Embryo ontogeny in barley will be described and used to illustrate the formation of such mutant clusters. The nature of the statistics for mutation frequency will be described from a study of the reversion frequencies of various waxy mutants in barley. Computer analysis by a jackknife method of the reversion frequencies of a waxy mutant treated with the mutagen sodium azide showed a significantly higher reversion frequency than untreated material. Problems of the computer analysis suggest a better experimental design for pollen mutation experiments. Preliminary work on computer modeling for pollen development and mutation will be described.

  11. Ontogeny of the barley plant as related to mutation expression and detection of pollen mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgdon, A.L.; Marcus, A.H.; Arenaz, P.; Rosichan, J.L.; Bogyo, T.P.; Nilan, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    Clustering of mutant pollen grains in a population of normal pollen due to premeiotic mutational events complicates translating mutation frequencies into rates. Embryo ontogeny in barley will be described and used to illustrate the formation of such mutant clusters. The nature of the statistics for mutation frequency will be described from a study of the reversion frequencies of various waxy mutants in barley. Computer analysis by a ''jackknife'' method of the reversion of a waxy mutant treated with the mutagen sodium azide showed a significantly higher reversion frequency than untreated material. Problems of the computer analysis suggest a better experimental design for pollen mutation experiments. Preliminary work on computer modeling for pollen development and mutation will be described.

  12. Urinary Tract Effects of HPSE2 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Helen M.; Roberts, Neil A.; Hilton, Emma N.; McKenzie, Edward A.; Daly, Sarah B.; Hadfield, Kristen D.; Rahal, Jeffery S.; Gardiner, Natalie J.; Tanley, Simon W.; Lewis, Malcolm A.; Sites, Emily; Angle, Brad; Alves, Cláudia; Lourenço, Teresa; Rodrigues, Márcia; Calado, Angelina; Amado, Marta; Guerreiro, Nancy; Serras, Inês; Beetz, Christian; Varga, Rita-Eva; Silay, Mesrur Selcuk; Darlow, John M.; Dobson, Mark G.; Barton, David E.; Hunziker, Manuela; Puri, Prem; Feather, Sally A.; Goodship, Judith A.; Goodship, Timothy H.J.; Lambert, Heather J.; Cordell, Heather J.; Saggar, Anand; Kinali, Maria; Lorenz, Christian; Moeller, Kristina; Schaefer, Franz; Bayazit, Aysun K.; Weber, Stefanie; Newman, William G.

    2015-01-01

    Urofacial syndrome (UFS) is an autosomal recessive congenital disease featuring grimacing and incomplete bladder emptying. Mutations of HPSE2, encoding heparanase 2, a heparanase 1 inhibitor, occur in UFS, but knowledge about the HPSE2 mutation spectrum is limited. Here, seven UFS kindreds with HPSE2 mutations are presented, including one with deleted asparagine 254, suggesting a role for this amino acid, which is conserved in vertebrate orthologs. HPSE2 mutations were absent in 23 non-neurogenic neurogenic bladder probands and, of 439 families with nonsyndromic vesicoureteric reflux, only one carried a putative pathogenic HPSE2 variant. Homozygous Hpse2 mutant mouse bladders contained urine more often than did wild-type organs, phenocopying human UFS. Pelvic ganglia neural cell bodies contained heparanase 1, heparanase 2, and leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domains-2 (LRIG2), which is mutated in certain UFS families. In conclusion, heparanase 2 is an autonomic neural protein implicated in bladder emptying, but HPSE2 variants are uncommon in urinary diseases resembling UFS. PMID:25145936

  13. GREMLIN 2 Mutations and Dental Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Kantaputra, P N; Kaewgahya, M; Hatsadaloi, A; Vogel, P; Kawasaki, K; Ohazama, A; Ketudat Cairns, J R

    2015-12-01

    Isolated or nonsyndromic tooth agenesis or hypodontia is the most common human malformation. It has been associated with mutations in MSX1, PAX9, EDA, AXIN2, EDAR, EDARADD, and WNT10A. GREMLIN 2 (GREM2) is a strong bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) antagonist that is known to regulate BMPs in embryogenesis and tissue development. Bmp4 has been shown to have a role in tooth development. Grem2(-/-) mice have small, malformed maxillary and mandibular incisors, indicating that Grem2 has important roles in normal tooth development. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that GREM2 mutations are associated with human malformations, which include isolated tooth agenesis, microdontia, short tooth roots, taurodontism, sparse and slow-growing hair, and dry and itchy skin. We sequenced WNT10A, WNT10B, MSX1, EDA, EDAR, EDARADD, AXIN2, and PAX9 in all 7 patients to rule out the effects of other ectodermal dysplasias and other tooth-related genes and did not find mutations in any of them. GREM2 mutations exhibit variable expressivity even within the same families. The inheritance is autosomal dominant with incomplete penetrance. The expression of Grem2 during the early development of mouse teeth and hair follicles and the evaluation of the likely effects of the mutations on the protein structure substantiate these new findings.

  14. Mutations in ANTXR1 Cause GAPO Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Stránecký, Viktor; Hoischen, Alexander; Hartmannová, Hana; Zaki, Maha S.; Chaudhary, Amit; Zudaire, Enrique; Nosková, Lenka; Barešová, Veronika; Přistoupilová, Anna; Hodaňová, Kateřina; Sovová, Jana; Hůlková, Helena; Piherová, Lenka; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y.; de Silva, Deepthi; Senanayake, Manouri P.; Farrag, Sameh; Zeman, Jiří; Martásek, Pavel; Baxová, Alice; Afifi, Hanan H.; St. Croix, Brad; Brunner, Han G.; Temtamy, Samia; Kmoch, Stanislav

    2013-01-01

    The genetic cause of GAPO syndrome, a condition characterized by growth retardation, alopecia, pseudoanodontia, and progressive visual impairment, has not previously been identified. We studied four ethnically unrelated affected individuals and identified homozygous nonsense mutations (c.262C>T [p.Arg88*] and c.505C>T [p.Arg169*]) or splicing mutations (c.1435–12A>G [p.Gly479Phefs*119]) in ANTXR1, which encodes anthrax toxin receptor 1. The nonsense mutations predictably trigger nonsense-mediated mRNA decay, resulting in the loss of ANTXR1. The transcript with the splicing mutation theoretically encodes a truncated ANTXR1 containing a neopeptide composed of 118 unique amino acids in its C terminus. GAPO syndrome’s major phenotypic features, which include dental abnormalities and the accumulation of extracellular matrix, recapitulate those found in Antxr1-mutant mice and point toward an underlying defect in extracellular-matrix regulation. Thus, we propose that mutations affecting ANTXR1 function are responsible for this disease’s characteristic generalized defect in extracellular-matrix homeostasis. PMID:23602711

  15. Somatic mutation of PTEN in bladder carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Aveyard, J S; Skilleter, A; Habuchi, T; Knowles, M A

    1999-01-01

    The tumour suppressor gene PTEN/MMAC1, which is mutated or homozygously deleted in glioma, breast and prostate cancer, is mapped to a region of 10q which shows loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in bladder cancer. We screened 123 bladder tumours for LOH in the region of PTEN. In 53 informative muscle invasive tumours (≥ pT2), allele loss was detected in 13 (24.5%) and allelic imbalance in four tumours (overall frequency 32%). LOH was found in four of 60 (6.6%) informative, non-invasive tumours (pTa/pT1). We screened 63 muscle invasive tumours for PTEN mutations by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and for homozygous deletion by duplex quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Two homozygous deletions were identified but no mutations. Of 15 bladder tumour cell lines analysed, three showed homozygous deletion of all or part of the PTEN gene, but none had mutations detectable by SSCP analysis. Our results indicate that PTEN is involved in the development of some bladder tumours. The low frequency of mutation of the retained allele in tumours with 10q23 LOH suggests that there may be another predominant mechanism of inactivation of the second allele, for example small intragenic deletions, that hemizygosity may be sufficient for phenotypic effect, or that there is another target gene at 10q23. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10360673

  16. Genotype-Phenotype Correlations by Ethnicity and Mutation Location in BRCA Mutation Carriers.

    PubMed

    Bayraktar, Soley; Jackson, Michelle; Gutierrez-Barrera, Angelica M; Liu, Diane; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Brandt, Amanda; Woodson, Ashley; Litton, Jennifer; Lu, Karen H; Valero, Vicente; Arun, Banu K

    2015-01-01

    The genotype-phenotype correlations of the specific BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in multi-ethnic populations in USA have not yet been fully investigated. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of ethnicity at specific mutation locations and breast/ovarian cancer phenotypes. Our cohort included 445 women with different ethnic backgrounds who underwent BRCA genetic testing between 1997 and 2010. Known clinical and pathologic characteristics were compared with Chi-Square Analysis or Fisher's Exact test as appropriate. The three most common mutation locations in BRCA1 (exons 2, 11, and 20) and BRCA2 (exons 10, 11, and 25) genes were chosen. Prevalence of BRCA1 exon 2 mutations were significantly higher in Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) women compared to Caucasians (41% versus 15%; p = 0.001). Similarly, AJ women with breast cancer were more likely to have BRCA1 exon 2 mutation (47% positivity in AJ women versus 0-12.5% positivity in other ethnicities; p = 0.004). Women carrying the exon 20 BRCA1 mutation had the highest probability of having combined breast and ovarian cancers compared to women carrying other exon mutations (p = 0.05). The median age at initial cancer diagnosis, phenotypic features of breast cancer tumors, and overall survival did not vary significantly by ethnicity or mutation location. Our data suggest that ethnicity does not affect age of onset, overall survival or confer different risks of breast and ovarian cancer development in BRCA carriers. These results also suggest that women carrying the exon 20 BRCA1 mutation may warrant mutation-specific counseling and be more aggressively managed for risk reduction.

  17. Mutation rates, spectra, and genome-wide distribution of spontaneous mutations in mismatch repair deficient yeast.

    PubMed

    Lang, Gregory I; Parsons, Lance; Gammie, Alison E

    2013-09-01

    DNA mismatch repair is a highly conserved DNA repair pathway. In humans, germline mutations in hMSH2 or hMLH1, key components of mismatch repair, have been associated with Lynch syndrome, a leading cause of inherited cancer mortality. Current estimates of the mutation rate and the mutational spectra in mismatch repair defective cells are primarily limited to a small number of individual reporter loci. Here we use the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to generate a genome-wide view of the rates, spectra, and distribution of mutation in the absence of mismatch repair. We performed mutation accumulation assays and next generation sequencing on 19 strains, including 16 msh2 missense variants implicated in Lynch cancer syndrome. The mutation rate for DNA mismatch repair null strains was approximately 1 mutation per genome per generation, 225-fold greater than the wild-type rate. The mutations were distributed randomly throughout the genome, independent of replication timing. The mutation spectra included insertions/deletions at homopolymeric runs (87.7%) and at larger microsatellites (5.9%), as well as transitions (4.5%) and transversions (1.9%). Additionally, repeat regions with proximal repeats are more likely to be mutated. A bias toward deletions at homopolymers and insertions at (AT)n microsatellites suggests a different mechanism for mismatch generation at these sites. Interestingly, 5% of the single base pair substitutions might represent double-slippage events that occurred at the junction of immediately adjacent repeats, resulting in a shift in the repeat boundary. These data suggest a closer scrutiny of tumor suppressors with homopolymeric runs with proximal repeats as the potential drivers of oncogenesis in mismatch repair defective cells. PMID:23821616

  18. Germline mutation rates and the long-term phenotypic effects of mutation accumulation in wild-type laboratory mice and mutator mice.

    PubMed

    Uchimura, Arikuni; Higuchi, Mayumi; Minakuchi, Yohei; Ohno, Mizuki; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Miura, Ikuo; Wakana, Shigeharu; Nishino, Jo; Yagi, Takeshi

    2015-08-01

    The germline mutation rate is an important parameter that affects the amount of genetic variation and the rate of evolution. However, neither the rate of germline mutations in laboratory mice nor the biological significance of the mutation rate in mammalian populations is clear. Here we studied genome-wide mutation rates and the long-term effects of mutation accumulation on phenotype in more than 20 generations of wild-type C57BL/6 mice and mutator mice, which have high DNA replication error rates. We estimated the base-substitution mutation rate to be 5.4 × 10(-9) (95% confidence interval = 4.6 × 10(-9)-6.5 × 10(-9)) per nucleotide per generation in C57BL/6 laboratory mice, about half the rate reported in humans. The mutation rate in mutator mice was 17 times that in wild-type mice. Abnormal phenotypes were 4.1-fold more frequent in the mutator lines than in the wild-type lines. After several generations, the mutator mice reproduced at substantially lower rates than the controls, exhibiting low pregnancy rates, lower survival rates, and smaller litter sizes, and many of the breeding lines died out. These results provide fundamental information about mouse genetics and reveal the impact of germline mutation rates on phenotypes in a mammalian population.

  19. Germline mutation rates and the long-term phenotypic effects of mutation accumulation in wild-type laboratory mice and mutator mice

    PubMed Central

    Uchimura, Arikuni; Higuchi, Mayumi; Minakuchi, Yohei; Ohno, Mizuki; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Miura, Ikuo; Wakana, Shigeharu; Nishino, Jo; Yagi, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    The germline mutation rate is an important parameter that affects the amount of genetic variation and the rate of evolution. However, neither the rate of germline mutations in laboratory mice nor the biological significance of the mutation rate in mammalian populations is clear. Here we studied genome-wide mutation rates and the long-term effects of mutation accumulation on phenotype in more than 20 generations of wild-type C57BL/6 mice and mutator mice, which have high DNA replication error rates. We estimated the base-substitution mutation rate to be 5.4 × 10−9 (95% confidence interval = 4.6 × 10−9–6.5 × 10−9) per nucleotide per generation in C57BL/6 laboratory mice, about half the rate reported in humans. The mutation rate in mutator mice was 17 times that in wild-type mice. Abnormal phenotypes were 4.1-fold more frequent in the mutator lines than in the wild-type lines. After several generations, the mutator mice reproduced at substantially lower rates than the controls, exhibiting low pregnancy rates, lower survival rates, and smaller litter sizes, and many of the breeding lines died out. These results provide fundamental information about mouse genetics and reveal the impact of germline mutation rates on phenotypes in a mammalian population. PMID:26129709

  20. Inherited thrombocytopenia due to GATA-1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Millikan, Patrick D; Balamohan, Sanjeev M; Raskind, Wendy H; Kacena, Melissa A

    2011-09-01

    The GATA family of transcription factors, including the founding member, GATA-1, have an important role in gene regulation. GATA-1 is integral to successful hematopoiesis. A wide variety of mutations in GATA-1 affect its function, as well as its interaction with its cofactors (especially Friend of GATA) and the genes upon which GATA-1 acts. Here we review the known mutations, focusing on the specific alterations within the amino acid sequence, the resulting effect on hematopoietic development, and the clinical manifestations that result. Attention is also paid to the relationship between Trisomy 21, also known as Down syndrome, and the phenomenon of a truncated GATA-1, named GATA-1s. The evidence for specific interaction between GATA-1 and chromosome 21, which may explain the correlation between these two mutations, is briefly reviewed.

  1. BRAF Mutation in Colorectal Cancer: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Barras, David

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is still one of the deadliest cancer-related diseases. About 10% of CRC patients are characterized by a mutation in the B-Raf proto-oncogene serine/threonine kinase (BRAF) gene resulting in a valine-to-glutamate change at the residue 600 (V600E). This mutation is also present in more than 60% of melanoma patients. BRAF inhibitors were developed and found to improve patient survival; however, most patients at the end of the track ultimately develop resistance to these inhibitors. Melanoma patients benefit from the combination of BRAF inhibitors with mitogen/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK) inhibitors, among others. Unfortunately, colorectal patients do not respond much efficiently, which suggests different resistance mechanisms between the two cancer types. This review aims at shedding light on recent discoveries that improve our understanding of the BRAF mutation biology in CRC. PMID:26396549

  2. LRRK2 mutations and neurotoxicant susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jang-Won

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between genetic and environmental factors are thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of the majority of Parkinson’s disease (PD) cases. However, our understanding of these interactions is at an early stage. Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are the most common cause of hereditary PD. Penetrance of LRRK2 mutations is incomplete and variable, suggesting that other environmental or genetic factors may contribute to the development of the disorder. Recently, using animal models, several attempts have been made to understand if LRRK2 may mediate sensitivity to environmental neurotoxicants. Here, we critically review the most current data on how LRRK2 mutations influence neurotoxicity in PD models. PMID:25888648

  3. Effect of Mutations on HP Lattice Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Guangjie; Vogel, Thomas; Landau, David; Li, Ying; Wüst, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Using Wang-Landau sampling with approriate trial moves[2], we investigate the effect of different types of mutations on lattice proteins in the HP model. While exact studies have been carried out for short HP proteins[3], the systems we investigate are of much larger size and hence not accessible for exact enumerations. Based on the estimated density of states, we systematically analyse the changes in structure and degeneracy of ground states of particular proteins and measure thermodynamic quantities like the stability of ground states and the specific heat, for example. Both, neutral mutations, which do not change the structure and stability of ground states, as well as critical mutations, which do change the thermodynamic behavior qualitatively, have been observed. Research supported by NSF

  4. Radiation-induced mutations and plant breeding

    SciTech Connect

    Naqvi, S.H.M.

    1985-01-01

    Ionizing radiation could cause genetic changes in an organism and could modify gene linkages. The induction of mutation through radiation is random and the probability of getting the desired genetic change is low but can be increased by manipulating different parameters such as dose rate, physical conditions under which the material has been irradiated, etc. Induced mutations have been used as a supplement to conventional plant breeding, particularly for creating genetic variability for specific characters such as improved plant structure, pest and disease resistance, and desired changes in maturity period; more than 200 varieties of crop plants have been developed by this technique. The Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission has used this technique fruitfully to evolve better germplasm in cotton, rice, chickpea, wheat and mungbean; some of the mutants have become popular commercial varieties. This paper describes some uses of radiation induced mutations and the results achieved in Pakistan so far.

  5. The Importance of Mutational Drivers in GBM.

    PubMed

    Kalkan, Rasime

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive primary brain tumor, providing few effective therapeutic options, given the tumor heterogeneity and the accumulation of different genetic abnormalities that cause treatment failure. The many different genetic and epigenetic alterations present in GBM lead to modification of several major signaling pathways resulting in brain tumor growth, progression, and therapeutic resistance. Many functionally important mutations have been discovered, known as neutral passengers. IDH1/2, EZH2, and DNMT3A are the best known epigenetic modifiers in cancer. These mutations are important in determining disease prognosis such that the status of the MGMT gene is a direct target of chemotherapy. For these reasons, newly developed technologies are necessary to determine new candidate targets for targeted-therapy development in GBM. The determination of mutations will aid in this and in the discovery of combinations of targeted and conventional therapies to improve GBM treatment. PMID:27278882

  6. Association of mutations in FLNA with craniosynostosis

    PubMed Central

    Fennell, Nathalie; Foulds, Nicola; Johnson, Diana S; Wilson, Louise C; Wyatt, Michelle; Robertson, Stephen P; Johnson, David; Wall, Steven A; Wilkie, Andrew O M

    2015-01-01

    Mutations of FLNA, an X-linked gene that encodes the cytoskeletal protein filamin A, cause diverse and distinct phenotypes including periventricular nodular heterotopia and otopalatodigital spectrum disorders (OPDS). Craniofacial abnormalities associated with OPDS include supraorbital hyperostosis, down-slanting palpebral fissures and micrognathia; craniosynostosis was previously described in association with FLNA mutations in two individual case reports. Here we present four further OPDS subjects who have pathological FLNA variants and craniosynostosis, supporting a causal link. Together with the previously reported patients, frontometaphyseal dysplasia was the most common clinical diagnosis (4 of 6 cases overall); 5 patients had multiple suture synostosis with the sagittal suture being the most frequently involved (also 5 patients). No genotype-phenotype correlation was evident in the distribution of FLNA mutations. This report highlights the need to consider a filaminopathy in the differential diagnosis of craniosynostosis, especially in the presence of atypical cranial or skeletal features. PMID:25873011

  7. Understanding mutagenesis through delineation of mutational signatures in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Petljak, Mia; Alexandrov, Ludmil B

    2016-06-01

    Each individual cell within a human body acquires a certain number of somatic mutations during a course of its lifetime. These mutations originate from a wide spectra of both endogenous and exogenous mutational processes that leave distinct patterns of mutations, termed mutational signatures, embedded within the genomes of all cells. In recent years, the vast amount of data produced by sequencing of cancer genomes was coupled with novel mathematical models and computational tools to generate the first comprehensive map of mutational signatures in human cancer. Up to date, >30 distinct mutational signatures have been identified, and etiologies have been proposed for many of them. This review provides a brief historical background on examination of mutational patterns in human cancer, summarizes the knowledge accumulated since introducing the concept of mutational signatures and discusses their future potential applications and perspectives within the field.

  8. The spectrum of mutation produced by low dose radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Morley,Alexander,A; Turner, David,R

    2004-10-31

    Inherited mutations are the basis of evolution and acquired mutations in humans are important in ageing, cancer and possibly various forms of tissue degeneration. Mutations are responsible for many of the long-term effects of radiation. However, sensitive direct detection of mutations in humans has been difficult. The aims of the project were to develop methods for the sensitive enumeration of mutations in DNA, to measure mutation frequencies in a wide variety of tissue types and to quantify the mutational effect of direct oxidative damage produced by radiation, at both high and low doses. The project was successful in developing a sensitive method which could detect mutations directly in the genetic material, DNA at a sensitivity of 1 mutated molecule in 1000000000 unmutated molecules. However a number of methodological problems had to be overcome and lack of ongoing funding made it impossible to fulfill all of the aims of the project

  9. Understanding mutagenesis through delineation of mutational signatures in human cancer

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Petljak, Mia; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.

    2016-05-04

    Each individual cell within a human body acquires a certain number of somatic mutations during a course of its lifetime. These mutations originate from a wide spectra of both endogenous and exogenous mutational processes that leave distinct patterns of mutations, termed mutational signatures, embedded within the genomes of all cells. In recent years, the vast amount of data produced by sequencing of cancer genomes was coupled with novel mathematical models and computational tools to generate the first comprehensive map of mutational signatures in human cancer. Up to date, >30 distinct mutational signatures have been identified, and etiologies have been proposedmore » for many of them. This paper provides a brief historical background on examination of mutational patterns in human cancer, summarizes the knowledge accumulated since introducing the concept of mutational signatures and discusses their future potential applications and perspectives within the field.« less

  10. Driver Missense Mutation Identification Using Feature Selection and Model Fusion.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Ahmed T; Meng, Tao; Chen, Shu-Ching; Iyengar, S S; Iyengar, Puneeth; Yordy, John; Shyu, Mei-Ling

    2015-12-01

    Driver mutations propel oncogenesis and occur much less frequently than passenger mutations. The need for automatic and accurate identification of driver mutations has increased dramatically with the exponential growth of mutation data. Current computational solutions to identify driver mutations rely on sequence homology. Here we construct a machine learning-based framework that does not rely on sequence homology or domain knowledge to predict driver missense mutations. A windowing approach to represent the local environment of the sequence around the mutation point as a mutation sample is applied, followed by extraction of three sequence-level features from each sample. After selecting the most significant features, the support vector machine and multimodal fusion strategies are employed to give final predictions. The proposed framework achieves relatively high performance and outperforms current state-of-the-art algorithms. The ease of deploying the proposed framework and the relatively accurate performance make this solution applicable to large-scale mutation data analyses. PMID:26402258

  11. Cystic fibrosis mutations in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Venegas, Patricia B; Novak, Jessica M; Oscar, Castro A; Sánchez, Félix L; Gutiérrez, Inés G; Rivera, Julio M; Salas, Jorge P; Montero, Jenny F; Grody, Wayne W

    2003-04-01

    Using polymerase chain reaction amplification of DNA in dried blood spots and a nonisotopic reverse dot blot hybridization method, we performed molecular genetic analysis for 6 and for 16 of the most common mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR) in 24 unrelated Costa Rican individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF). While many countries and ethnic groups have been surveyed for CF mutations since the cloning of CFTR, Costa Rica has not heretofore been studied. Moreover, Costa Rica represents an especially intriguing population because of its mixed European-African-Amerindian origins and the existence of a detailed historical record of the founding Spanish families. Thus, such a study may reveal not only the population frequencies of various mutant alleles in this country, but also something about their geographic migrations and ethnic founder effects. The most common CF mutation in Caucasians, deltaF508, was found in only 11 (23%) of the CF chromosomes studied, while the G542X mutation, relatively rare in the general population but more common in southern Europe, was observed in 12 (25%). None of the other mutations tested was found in any of the subjects. We failed to detect the second mutant allele in 17 subjects and could not detect either allele in 4 subjects. The high prevalence of the G542X mutation in our cohort, which exceeds that of both the general Caucasian population and the American Hispanic population, reflects the strong genetic influence of the original Spanish founding families of Costa Rica. These results highlight important differences in Costa Rican CF genotypes as compared both to other North American and European populations and to American Hispanics, raising important implications about isolated founder effects and strategies for population screening in that country.

  12. DNAJC13 mutations in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Vilariño-Güell, Carles; Rajput, Alex; Milnerwood, Austen J.; Shah, Brinda; Szu-Tu, Chelsea; Trinh, Joanne; Yu, Irene; Encarnacion, Mary; Munsie, Lise N.; Tapia, Lucia; Gustavsson, Emil K.; Chou, Patrick; Tatarnikov, Igor; Evans, Daniel M.; Pishotta, Frederick T.; Volta, Mattia; Beccano-Kelly, Dayne; Thompson, Christina; Lin, Michelle K.; Sherman, Holly E.; Han, Heather J.; Guenther, Bruce L.; Wasserman, Wyeth W.; Bernard, Virginie; Ross, Colin J.; Appel-Cresswell, Silke; Stoessl, A. Jon; Robinson, Christopher A.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Ross, Owen A.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Aasly, Jan O.; Wu, Ruey-Meei; Hentati, Faycal; Gibson, Rachel A.; McPherson, Peter S.; Girard, Martine; Rajput, Michele; Rajput, Ali H.; Farrer, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    A Saskatchewan multi-incident family was clinically characterized with Parkinson disease (PD) and Lewy body pathology. PD segregates as an autosomal-dominant trait, which could not be ascribed to any known mutation. DNA from three affected members was subjected to exome sequencing. Genome alignment, variant annotation and comparative analyses were used to identify shared coding mutations. Sanger sequencing was performed within the extended family and ethnically matched controls. Subsequent genotyping was performed in a multi-ethnic case–control series consisting of 2928 patients and 2676 control subjects from Canada, Norway, Taiwan, Tunisia, and the USA. A novel mutation in receptor-mediated endocytosis 8/RME-8 (DNAJC13 p.Asn855Ser) was found to segregate with disease. Screening of cases and controls identified four additional patients with the mutation, of which two had familial parkinsonism. All carriers shared an ancestral DNAJC13 p.Asn855Ser haplotype and claimed Dutch–German–Russian Mennonite heritage. DNAJC13 regulates the dynamics of clathrin coats on early endosomes. Cellular analysis shows that the mutation confers a toxic gain-of-function and impairs endosomal transport. DNAJC13 immunoreactivity was also noted within Lewy body inclusions. In late-onset disease which is most reminiscent of idiopathic PD subtle deficits in endosomal receptor-sorting/recycling are highlighted by the discovery of pathogenic mutations VPS35, LRRK2 and now DNAJC13. With this latest discovery, and from a neuronal perspective, a temporal and functional ecology is emerging that connects synaptic exo- and endocytosis, vesicular trafficking, endosomal recycling and the endo-lysosomal degradative pathway. Molecular deficits in these processes are genetically linked to the phenotypic spectrum of parkinsonism associated with Lewy body pathology. PMID:24218364

  13. Confidence-based somatic mutation evaluation and prioritization.

    PubMed

    Löwer, Martin; Renard, Bernhard Y; de Graaf, Jos; Wagner, Meike; Paret, Claudia; Kneip, Christoph; Türeci, Ozlem; Diken, Mustafa; Britten, Cedrik; Kreiter, Sebastian; Koslowski, Michael; Castle, John C; Sahin, Ugur

    2012-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) has enabled high throughput discovery of somatic mutations. Detection depends on experimental design, lab platforms, parameters and analysis algorithms. However, NGS-based somatic mutation detection is prone to erroneous calls, with reported validation rates near 54% and congruence between algorithms less than 50%. Here, we developed an algorithm to assign a single statistic, a false discovery rate (FDR), to each somatic mutation identified by NGS. This FDR confidence value accurately discriminates true mutations from erroneous calls. Using sequencing data generated from triplicate exome profiling of C57BL/6 mice and B16-F10 melanoma cells, we used the existing algorithms GATK, SAMtools and SomaticSNiPer to identify somatic mutations. For each identified mutation, our algorithm assigned an FDR. We selected 139 mutations for validation, including 50 somatic mutations assigned a low FDR (high confidence) and 44 mutations assigned a high FDR (low confidence). All of the high confidence somatic mutations validated (50 of 50), none of the 44 low confidence somatic mutations validated, and 15 of 45 mutations with an intermediate FDR validated. Furthermore, the assignment of a single FDR to individual mutations enables statistical comparisons of lab and computation methodologies, including ROC curves and AUC metrics. Using the HiSeq 2000, single end 50 nt reads from replicates generate the highest confidence somatic mutation call set.

  14. Recurrent inactivating RASA2 mutations in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Arafeh, Rand; Qutob, Nouar; Emmanuel, Rafi; Keren-Paz, Alona; Madore, Jason; Elkahloun, Abdel; Wilmott, James S; Gartner, Jared J; Di Pizio, Antonella; Winograd-Katz, Sabina; Sindiri, Sivasish; Rotkopf, Ron; Dutton-Regester, Ken; Johansson, Peter; Pritchard, Antonia L; Waddell, Nicola; Hill, Victoria K; Lin, Jimmy C; Hevroni, Yael; Rosenberg, Steven A; Khan, Javed; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Niv, Masha Y; Ulitsky, Igor; Mann, Graham J; Scolyer, Richard A; Hayward, Nicholas K; Samuels, Yardena

    2015-12-01

    Analysis of 501 melanoma exomes identified RASA2, encoding a RasGAP, as a tumor-suppressor gene mutated in 5% of melanomas. Recurrent loss-of-function mutations in RASA2 were found to increase RAS activation, melanoma cell growth and migration. RASA2 expression was lost in ≥30% of human melanomas and was associated with reduced patient survival. These findings identify RASA2 inactivation as a melanoma driver and highlight the importance of RasGAPs in cancer. PMID:26502337

  15. On spatial mutation-selection models

    SciTech Connect

    Kondratiev, Yuri; Kutoviy, Oleksandr E-mail: kutovyi@mit.edu; Minlos, Robert Pirogov, Sergey

    2013-11-15

    We discuss the selection procedure in the framework of mutation models. We study the regulation for stochastically developing systems based on a transformation of the initial Markov process which includes a cost functional. The transformation of initial Markov process by cost functional has an analytic realization in terms of a Kimura-Maruyama type equation for the time evolution of states or in terms of the corresponding Feynman-Kac formula on the path space. The state evolution of the system including the limiting behavior is studied for two types of mutation-selection models.

  16. p16 Mutations in hereditary melanomas

    SciTech Connect

    Hussussian, C.J.; Struewing, J.P.; Goldstein, A.M.

    1994-09-01

    The p16 gene (CDK4 inhibitor) is located in chromosome 9p21, a region that shows linkage to hereditary melanoma and is deleted in many different tumors. p16 was analyzed in 19 families with hereditary melanoma by amplifying the entire coding region in 5 short segments and screening by SSCP under several conditions that should resolve >95% of polymorphisms. A total of 10 variants were detected in 15 families. The mutations detected included 7 missense, 1 silent, 1 nonsense, and one that destroyed a consensus splice donor site. One of the missense mutations was present in 5/21 spouses in these families, giving an estimated allele frequency of 0.12. Therefore the {triangle}436 [G{yields}A] variant is a common polymorphism and is not involved in the development of melanoma. However, there was strong evidence for the involvement of the other p16 mutations in five 9p21 linked families. In these families, a total of 17/19 individuals with melanoma inherited the mutant allele, while only 2/26 unaffected family members (1 with dysplastic nevi) and 0/13 spouses had the mutant alleles. In two additional 9p21 linked families, one segregated a silent mutation in 3/4 of the affected individuals, and the second only contained the common {triangle}436 [G{yields}A] mutation. In the two families with strong evidence of linkage to chromosome 1p36 and exclusion of linkage to 9p21, no SSCP variants were detected at p16 among 11 melanoma cases, except for a single affected individual who inherited the variant from an unaffected parent. These data confirm the existence of genetic heterogeneity in families with hereditary melanoma. Most (5/7) of the families with strong linkage to 9p21 had p16 missense mutations that segregated with the disease, while 2 families with strong linkage to chromosome 1p36 did not have any detectable p16 mutations that segregated with the disease. Further functional analyses of these mutations will clarify which are causally related to hereditary melanoma.

  17. The study of human mutation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Neel, J.V.

    1992-01-01

    We will describe recent developments regarding the question of induced mutations in the survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. As part of that work we, describe some developments with respect to the Amerindian blood samples collected under DoE sponsorship between 1964 and 1982. Then developments regarding the application of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) to the study of genetic variation and mutation affecting protein characteristics. In particular, we will report on the identification and isolation of genes of especial interest as reflected in the behavior of the proteins which they encode.

  18. Mutational dynamics of aroid chloroplast genomes.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ibrar; Biggs, Patrick J; Matthews, Peter J; Collins, Lesley J; Hendy, Michael D; Lockhart, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    A characteristic feature of eukaryote and prokaryote genomes is the co-occurrence of nucleotide substitution and insertion/deletion (indel) mutations. Although similar observations have also been made for chloroplast DNA, genome-wide associations have not been reported. We determined the chloroplast genome sequences for two morphotypes of taro (Colocasia esculenta; family Araceae) and compared these with four publicly available aroid chloroplast genomes. Here, we report the extent of genome-wide association between direct and inverted repeats, indels, and substitutions in these aroid chloroplast genomes. We suggest that alternative but not mutually exclusive hypotheses explain the mutational dynamics of chloroplast genome evolution. PMID:23204304

  19. Molecular evaluation of a novel missense mutation & an insertional truncating mutation in SUMF1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Kotecha, Udhaya H.; Movva, Sireesha; Sharma, Deepak; Verma, Jyotsna; Puri, Ratna Dua; Verma, Ishwar Chander

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Multiple suphphatase deficiency (MSD) is an autosomal recessive disorder affecting the post translational activation of all enzymes of the sulphatase family. To date, approximately 30 different mutations have been identified in the causative gene, sulfatase modifying factor 1 (SUMF1). We describe here the mutation analysis of a case of MSD. Methods: The proband was a four year old boy with developmental delay followed by neuroregression. He had coarse facies, appendicular hypertonia, truncal ataxia and ichthyosis limited to both lower limbs. Radiographs showed dysostosis multiplex. Clinical suspicion of MSD was confirmed by enzyme analysis of four enzymes of the sulphatase group. Results: The patient was compound heterozygote for a c.451A>G (p.K151E) substitution in exon 3 and a single base insertion mutation (c.690_691 InsT) in exon 5 in the SUMF1 gene. The bioinformatic analysis of the missense mutation revealed no apparent effect on the overall structure. However, the mutated 151-amino acid residue was found to be adjacent to the substrate binding and the active site residues, thereby affecting the substrate binding and/or catalytic activity, resulting in almost complete loss of enzyme function. Conclusions: The two mutations identified in the present case were novel. This is perhaps the first report of an insertion mutation in SUMF1 causing premature truncation of the protein. PMID:25222778

  20. PAH Mutation Analysis Consortium Database: 1997. Prototype for relational locus-specific mutation databases.

    PubMed Central

    Nowacki, P M; Byck, S; Prevost, L; Scriver, C R

    1998-01-01

    PAHdb (http://www.mcgill.ca/pahdb ) is a curated relational database (Fig. 1) of nucleotide variation in the human PAH cDNA (GenBank U49897). Among 328 different mutations by state (Fig. 2) the majority are rare mutations causing hyperphenylalaninemia (HPA) (OMIM 261600), the remainder are polymorphic variants without apparent effect on phenotype. PAHdb modules contain mutations, polymorphic haplotypes, genotype-phenotype correlations, expression analysis, sources of information and the reference sequence; the database also contains pages of clinical information and data on three ENU mouse orthologues of human HPA. Only six different mutations account for 60% of human HPA chromosomes worldwide, mutations stratify by population and geographic region, and the Oriental and Caucasian mutation sets are different (Fig. 3). PAHdb provides curated electronic publication and one third of its incoming reports are direct submissions. Each different mutation receives a systematic (nucleotide) name and a unique identifier (UID). Data are accessed both by a Newsletter and a search engine on the website; integrity of the database is ensured by keeping the curated template offline. There have been >6500 online interrogations of the website. PMID:9399840

  1. Variable expressivity and mutation databases: The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Beitel, L K; Trifiro, M A

    2001-05-01

    For over 50 years genetics has presumed that variations in phenotypic expression have, for the most part, been the result of alterations in genotype. The importance and value of mutation databases has been based on the premise that the same gene or allelic variation in a specific gene that has been proven to determine a specific phenotype, will always produce the same phenotype. However, recent evidence has shown that so called "simple" Mendelian disorders or monogenic traits are often far from simple, exhibiting phenotypic variation (variable expressivity) that cannot be explained solely by a gene or allelic alteration. The AR gene mutations database now lists 25 cases where different degrees of androgen insensitivity are caused by identical mutations in the androgen receptor gene. In five of these cases the phenotypic variability is due to somatic mosaicism, that is, somatic mutations that occur in only certain cells of androgen-sensitive tissue. Recently, a number of other cases of variable expressivity have also been linked to somatic mosaicism. The impact of variable expressivity due to somatic mutations and mosaicism on mutation databases is discussed. In particular, the effect of an organism exhibiting genetic heterogeneity within its tissues, and the possibility of an organism's genotype changing over its lifetime, are considered to have important implications for mutation databases in the future. PMID:11317353

  2. Target gene mutational pattern in Lynch syndrome colorectal carcinomas according to tumour location and germline mutation

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Manuela; Pinto, Carla; Peixoto, Ana; Veiga, Isabel; Lopes, Paula; Henrique, Rui; Baldaia, Helena; Carneiro, Fátima; Seruca, Raquel; Tomlinson, Ian; Kovac, Michal; Heinimann, Karl; Teixeira, Manuel R

    2015-01-01

    Background: We previously reported that the target genes in sporadic mismatch repair (MMR)-deficient colorectal carcinomas (CRCs) in the distal colon differ from those occurring elsewhere in the colon. This study aimed to compare the target gene mutational pattern in microsatellite instability (MSI) CRC from Lynch syndrome patients stratified by tumour location and germline mutation, as well as with that of sporadic disease. Methods: A series of CRC from Lynch syndrome patients was analysed for MSI in genes predicted to be selective MSI targets and known to be involved in several pathways of colorectal carcinogenesis. Results: The most frequently mutated genes belong to the TGF-β superfamily pathway, namely ACVR2A and TGFBR2. A significantly higher frequency of target gene mutations was observed in CRC from patients with germline mutations in MLH1 or MSH2 when compared with MSH6. Mutations in microsatellite sequences (A)7 of BMPR2 and (A)8 of MSH3 were significantly more frequent in the distal CRC. Additionally, we observed differences in MSH3 and TGFBR2 mutational frequency between Lynch syndrome and sporadic MSI CRC regarding tumour location. Conclusions: Our results indicate that the pattern of genetic changes differs in CRC depending on tumour location and between Lynch syndrome and sporadic MSI CRC, suggesting that carcinogenesis can occur by different pathways even if driven by generalised MSI. PMID:26247575

  3. Confirmation of the mitochondrial ND1 gene mutation G3635A as a primary LHON mutation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Juhua; Zhu, Yihua; Tong, Yi; Chen, Lu; Liu, Lijuan; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xiaoyan; Huang, Dinggou; Qiu, Wentong; Zhuang, Shuliu; Ma, Xu

    2009-08-14

    We report the clinical and genetic characterization of two Chinese LHON families who do not carry the primary LHON-mutations. Mitochondrial genome sequence analysis revealed the presence of a homoplasmic ND1 G3635A mutation in both families. In Family LHON-001, 31 other variants belonging to the East Asian haplogroup R11a were identified and in Family LHON-019, 37 other variants belonging to the East Asian haplogroup D4g were determined. The ND1 G3635A mutation changes the conversed serine110 residue to asparagine. This mutation has been previously described in a single Russian LHON family and has been suggested to contribute to increased LHON expressivity. In addition, a mutation in cytochrome c oxidase subunit II at C7868T (COII/L95F) may act in synergy with G3635A, increasing LHON expressivity in Family LHON-001, which had a higher level of LHON penetrance than Family LHON-019. In summary, the G3635A mutation is confirmed as a rare primary pathogenic mutation for LHON.

  4. The Alternative Splicing Mutation Database: a hub for investigations of alternative splicing using mutational evidence

    PubMed Central

    Bechtel, Jason M; Rajesh, Preeti; Ilikchyan, Irina; Deng, Ying; Mishra, Pankaj K; Wang, Qi; Wu, Xiaochun; Afonin, Kirill A; Grose, William E; Wang, Ye; Khuder, Sadik; Fedorov, Alexei

    2008-01-01

    Background Some mutations in the internal regions of exons occur within splicing enhancers and silencers, influencing the pattern of alternative splicing in the corresponding genes. To understand how these sequence changes affect splicing, we created a database of these mutations. Findings The Alternative Splicing Mutation Database (ASMD) serves as a repository for all exonic mutations not associated with splicing junctions that measurably change the pattern of alternative splicing. In this initial published release (version 1.2), only human sequences are present, but the ASMD will grow to include other organisms, (see Availability and requirements section for the ASMD web address). This relational database allows users to investigate connections between mutations and features of the surrounding sequences, including flanking sequences, RNA secondary structures and strengths of splice junctions. Splicing effects of the mutations are quantified by the relative presence of alternative mRNA isoforms with and without a given mutation. This measure is further categorized by the accuracy of the experimental methods employed. The database currently contains 170 mutations in 66 exons, yet these numbers increase regularly. We developed an algorithm to derive a table of oligonucleotide Splicing Potential (SP) values from the ASMD dataset. We present the SP concept and tools in detail in our corresponding article. Conclusion The current data set demonstrates that mutations affecting splicing are located throughout exons and might be enriched within local RNA secondary structures. Exons from the ASMD have below average splicing junction strength scores, but the difference is small and is judged not to be significant. PMID:18611286

  5. Biallelic BRCA2 Mutations Shape the Somatic Mutational Landscape of Aggressive Prostate Tumors.

    PubMed

    Decker, Brennan; Karyadi, Danielle M; Davis, Brian W; Karlins, Eric; Tillmans, Lori S; Stanford, Janet L; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Ostrander, Elaine A

    2016-05-01

    To identify clinically important molecular subtypes of prostate cancer (PCa), we characterized the somatic landscape of aggressive tumors via deep, whole-genome sequencing. In our discovery set of ten tumor/normal subject pairs with Gleason scores of 8-10 at diagnosis, coordinated analysis of germline and somatic variants, including single-nucleotide variants, indels, and structural variants, revealed biallelic BRCA2 disruptions in a subset of samples. Compared to the other samples, the PCa BRCA2-deficient tumors exhibited a complex and highly specific mutation signature, featuring a 2.88-fold increased somatic mutation rate, depletion of context-specific C>T substitutions, and an enrichment for deletions, especially those longer than 10 bp. We next performed a BRCA2 deficiency-targeted reanalysis of 150 metastatic PCa tumors, and each of the 18 BRCA2-mutated samples recapitulated the BRCA2 deficiency-associated mutation signature, underscoring the potent influence of these lesions on somatic mutagenesis and tumor evolution. Among all 21 individuals with BRCA2-deficient tumors, only about half carried deleterious germline alleles. Importantly, the somatic mutation signature in tumors with one germline and one somatic risk allele was indistinguishable from those with purely somatic mutations. Our observations clearly demonstrate that BRCA2-disrupted tumors represent a unique and clinically relevant molecular subtype of aggressive PCa, highlighting both the promise and utility of this mutation signature as a prognostic and treatment-selection biomarker. Further, any test designed to leverage BRCA2 status as a biomarker for PCa must consider both germline and somatic mutations and all types of deleterious mutations.

  6. Mutations in Escherichia coli that relieve catabolite repression of tryptophanase synthesis. Tryptophanase promoter-like mutations.

    PubMed

    Ward, D F; Yudkin, M D

    1976-01-01

    From a strain lacking adenyl cyclase and the catabolite-sensitive gene activator protein, two mutants were isolated that can synthesize tryptophanase. Each mutation is extremely closely linked to the tryptophanase structural gene. The mutations differ from one another in the rate of synthesis of tryptophanase that they permit in the genetic background in which they were isolated; they differ from one another and also from the wild type in the maximum rate of synthesis of tryptophanase that they permit in a genetic background with intact adenyl cyclase and catabolite-sensitive gene activator protein. Both mutations appear to lie in the tryptophanase promoter.

  7. Somatic mitochondrial DNA mutations do not increase neuronal vulnerability to MPTP in young POLG mutator mice.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ying; Clark, Joanne; Zheng, Kangni; Kujoth, Gregory C; Prolla, Tomas A; Simon, David K

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are hypothesized to play a pathogenic role in aging and age-related neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD). In support of this, high levels of somatic mtDNA mutations in “POLG mutator” mice carrying a proofreading-deficient form of mtDNA polymerase ã (Polg(D257A)) lead to a premature aging phenotype. However, the relevance of this finding to the normal aging process has been questioned as the number of mutations is greater even in young POLG mutator mice, which shows no overt phenotype, than levels achieved during normal aging in mice. Vulnerability of dopaminergic neurons to 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) increases with age, and we hypothesized that this may result in part from the accumulation with age of somatic mtDNA mutations. If correct, then levels of mutations in young (2–3 month old) POLG mutator mice should be sufficient to increase vulnerability to MPTP. In contrast, we find that susceptibility to MPTP in both heterozygous and homozygous POLG mutator mice at this young age is not different from that of wild type littermate controls as measured by levels of tyrosine hydroxylase positive (TH+) striatal terminals, striatal dopamine and its metabolites, a marker of oxidative damage, or stereological counts of TH+ and total substantia nigra neurons. These unexpected results do not support the hypothesis that somatic mtDNA mutations contribute to the age-related vulnerability of dopaminergic neurons to MPTP. It remains possible that somatic mtDNA mutations influence vulnerability to other stressors, or require additional time for the deleterious consequences to manifest. Furthermore, the impact of the higher levels of mutations present at older ages in these mice was not assessed in our study, although a prior study also failed to detect an increase in vulnerability to MPTP in older mice. With these caveats, the current data do not provide evidence for a role of somatic mt

  8. Positive mutations and mutation-dependent Verhulst factor in Penna ageing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss de Oliveira, S.; Stauffer, D.; de Oliveira, P. M. C.; Sá Martins, J. S.

    2004-02-01

    We modify twice the Penna model for biological ageing. First, we introduce back (good) mutations and a memory for them into the model. It allows us to observe an improvement of the species fitness over long-time scales as well as punctuated equilibrium. Second, we adopt a food/space competition factor that depends on the number of accumulated mutations in the individuals genomes, and get rid of the fixed limiting number of allowed mutations. Besides reproducing the main results of the standard model, we also observe a mortality maximum for the oldest old.

  9. De Novo Discovery of Mutated Driver Pathways in Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandin, Fabio; Upfal, Eli; Raphael, Benjamin J.

    Next-generation DNA sequencing technologies are enabling genome-wide measurements of somatic mutations in large numbers of cancer patients. A major challenge in interpretation of this data is to distinguish functional driver mutations that are important for cancer development from random, passenger mutations. A common approach to identify driver mutations is to find genes that are mutated at significant frequency in a large cohort of cancer genomes. This approach is confounded by the observation that driver mutations target multiple cellular signaling and regulatory pathways. Thus, each cancer patient may exhibit a different combination of mutations that are sufficient to perturb the necessary pathways. However, the current understanding of the somatic mutational process of cancer [3,5,6] places two additional constraints on the expected patterns of somatic mutations in a cancer pathway. First, an important cancer pathway should be perturbed in a large number of patients. Thus we expect that with genome-wide measurements of somatic mutations a driver pathway will exhibit high coverage, where most patients will have a mutation in some gene in the pathway. Second, since driver mutations are relatively rare and typically a single driver mutation is sufficient to perturb a pathway, a reasonable assumption is that most patients have a single driver mutation in a pathway. Thus, the genes in a driver pathway exhibit a pattern of mutually exclusive driver mutations, where driver mutations are observed in exactly one gene in the pathway in each patient. There are numerous examples of sets of mutually exclusive mutations [5,6].

  10. From Gene Mutation to Protein Characterization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffet, David A.

    2009-01-01

    A seven-week "gene to protein" laboratory sequence is described for an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course. Student pairs were given the task of introducing a point mutation of their choosing into the well studied protein, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). After conducting literature searches, each student group chose the…

  11. Air pollution induces heritable DNA mutations

    PubMed Central

    Somers, Christopher M.; Yauk, Carole L.; White, Paul A.; Parfett, Craig L. J.; Quinn, James S.

    2002-01-01

    Hundreds of thousands of people worldwide live or work in close proximity to steel mills. Integrated steel production generates chemical pollution containing compounds that can induce genetic damage (1, 2). Previous investigations of herring gulls in the Great Lakes demonstrated elevated DNA mutation rates near steel mills (3, 4) but could not determine the importance of airborne or aquatic routes of contaminant exposure, or eliminate possible confounding factors such as nutritional status and disease burden. To address these issues experimentally, we exposed laboratory mice in situ to ambient air in a polluted industrial area near steel mills. Heritable mutation frequency at tandem-repeat DNA loci in mice exposed 1 km downwind from two integrated steel mills was 1.5- to 2.0-fold elevated compared with those at a reference site 30 km away. This statistically significant elevation was due primarily to an increase in mutations inherited through the paternal germline. Our results indicate that human and wildlife populations in proximity to integrated steel mills may be at risk of developing germline mutations more frequently because of the inhalation of airborne chemical mutagens. PMID:12473746

  12. Novel ATM mutations with ataxia-telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Li; Wang, Tian; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Zhou, Hai-Yan; Luan, Xing-Hua; Shen, Jun-Yi; Chen, Sheng-Di; Cao, Li

    2016-01-12

    Ataxia telangiectasia is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia with onset in childhood, oculocutaneous telangiectasia, increased serum alpha-fetoprotein, immunodeficiency, chromosomal instability, and radiation hypersensitivity. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene (ATM) is one of the known genes to be associated with ataxia telangiectasia. We reported the clinical and genetic findings of three early-onset Chinese patients who demonstrated ataxia, oculomotor apraxia, choreoathetosis, myoclonus and telangiectasia of eyes. Sequence analysis of ATM revealed two known nonsense mutations c.8287C>T and c.9139C>T in the siblings. Though the siblings carried the same mutations, they showed different clinical features involving strephenopodia, exotropia, torsion dystonia, myoclonus and extrapyramidal impairments. The other patient was compound heterozygotes for ATM: c.8911C>T and c.7141_7151delAATGGAAAAAT, both of which were not reported previously and not found in 200 control chromosomes. This study widens the spectrum of mutations and phenotypes in ataxia telangiectasia.

  13. PMS2 mutations in childhood cancer.

    PubMed

    De Vos, Michel; Hayward, Bruce E; Charlton, Ruth; Taylor, Graham R; Glaser, Adam W; Picton, Susan; Cole, Trevor R; Maher, Eamonn R; McKeown, Carole M E; Mann, Jill R; Yates, John R; Baralle, Diana; Rankin, Julia; Bonthron, David T; Sheridan, Eamonn

    2006-03-01

    Until recently, the PMS2 DNA mismatch repair gene has only rarely been implicated as a cancer susceptibility locus. New studies have shown, however, that earlier analyses of this gene have had technical limitations and also that the genetic behavior of mutant PMS2 alleles is unusual, in that, unlike MLH1 or MSH2 mutations, PMS2 mutations show low heterozygote penetrance. As a result, a dominantly inherited cancer predisposition has not been a feature reported in families with PMS2 mutations. Such families have instead been ascertained through childhood-onset cancers in homozygotes or through apparently sporadic colorectal cancer in heterozygotes. We present further information on the phenotype associated with homozygous PMS2 deficiency in 13 patients from six families of Pakistani origin living in the United Kingdom. This syndrome is characterized by café-au-lait skin pigmentation and a characteristic tumor spectrum, including leukemias, lymphomas, cerebral malignancies (such as supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors, astrocytomas, and glioblastomas), and colorectal neoplasia with an onset in early adult life. We present evidence for a founder effect in five families, all of which carried the same R802-->X mutation (i.e., arginine-802 to stop) in PMS2. This cancer syndrome can be mistaken for neurofibromatosis type 1, with important management implications including the risk of the disorder occurring in siblings and the likelihood of tumor development in affected individuals.

  14. Mutational Analysis of Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Erstad, Derek J.; Cusack, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive cutaneous neuroendocrine malignancy that is associated with a poor prognosis. The pathogenesis of MCC is not well understood, and despite a recent plethora of mutational analyses, we have yet to find a set of signature mutations implicated in the majority of cases. Mutations, including TP53, Retinoblastoma and PIK3CA, have been documented in subsets of patients. Other mechanisms are also likely at play, including infection with the Merkel cell polyomavirus in a subset of patients, dysregulated immune surveillance, epigenetic alterations, aberrant protein expression, posttranslational modifications and microRNAs. In this review, we summarize what is known about MCC genetic mutations and chromosomal abnormalities, and their clinical significance. We also examine aberrant protein function and microRNA expression, and discuss the therapeutic and prognostic implications of these findings. Multiple clinical trials designed to selectively target overexpressed oncogenes in MCC are currently underway, though most are still in early phases. As we accumulate more molecular data on MCC, we will be better able to understand its pathogenic mechanisms, develop libraries of targeted therapies, and define molecular prognostic signatures to enhance our clinicopathologic knowledge. PMID:25329450

  15. Novel ATM mutations with ataxia-telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Li; Wang, Tian; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Zhou, Hai-Yan; Luan, Xing-Hua; Shen, Jun-Yi; Chen, Sheng-Di; Cao, Li

    2016-01-12

    Ataxia telangiectasia is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia with onset in childhood, oculocutaneous telangiectasia, increased serum alpha-fetoprotein, immunodeficiency, chromosomal instability, and radiation hypersensitivity. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene (ATM) is one of the known genes to be associated with ataxia telangiectasia. We reported the clinical and genetic findings of three early-onset Chinese patients who demonstrated ataxia, oculomotor apraxia, choreoathetosis, myoclonus and telangiectasia of eyes. Sequence analysis of ATM revealed two known nonsense mutations c.8287C>T and c.9139C>T in the siblings. Though the siblings carried the same mutations, they showed different clinical features involving strephenopodia, exotropia, torsion dystonia, myoclonus and extrapyramidal impairments. The other patient was compound heterozygotes for ATM: c.8911C>T and c.7141_7151delAATGGAAAAAT, both of which were not reported previously and not found in 200 control chromosomes. This study widens the spectrum of mutations and phenotypes in ataxia telangiectasia. PMID:26628246

  16. Integrative visual analysis of protein sequence mutations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background An important aspect of studying the relationship between protein sequence, structure and function is the molecular characterization of the effect of protein mutations. To understand the functional impact of amino acid changes, the multiple biological properties of protein residues have to be considered together. Results Here, we present a novel visual approach for analyzing residue mutations. It combines different biological visualizations and integrates them with molecular data derived from external resources. To show various aspects of the biological information on different scales, our approach includes one-dimensional sequence views, three-dimensional protein structure views and two-dimensional views of residue interaction networks as well as aggregated views. The views are linked tightly and synchronized to reduce the cognitive load of the user when switching between them. In particular, the protein mutations are mapped onto the views together with further functional and structural information. We also assess the impact of individual amino acid changes by the detailed analysis and visualization of the involved residue interactions. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach and the developed software on the data provided for the BioVis 2013 data contest. Conclusions Our visual approach and software greatly facilitate the integrative and interactive analysis of protein mutations based on complementary visualizations. The different data views offered to the user are enriched with information about molecular properties of amino acid residues and further biological knowledge. PMID:25237389

  17. LEOPARD Syndrome: Clinical Features and Gene Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Quintana, E.; Rodríguez-González, F.

    2012-01-01

    The RAS/MAPK pathway proteins with germline mutations in their respective genes are associated with some disorders such as Noonan, LEOPARD (LS), neurofibromatosis type 1, Costello and cardio-facio-cutaneous syndromes. LEOPARD is an acronym, mnemonic for the major manifestations of this disorder, characterized by multiple lentigines, electrocardiographic abnormalities, ocular hypertelorism, pulmonic stenosis, abnormal genitalia, retardation of growth, and sensorineural deafness. Though it is not included in the acronym, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most frequent cardiac anomaly observed, representing a potentially life-threatening problem in these patients. PTPN11, RAF1 and BRAF are the genes known to be associated with LS, identifying molecular genetic testing of the 3 gene mutations in about 95% of affected individuals. PTPN11 mutations are the most frequently found. Eleven different missense PTPN11 mutations (Tyr279Cys/Ser, Ala461Thr, Gly464Ala, Thr468Met/Pro, Arg498Trp/Leu, Gln506Pro, and Gln510Glu/Pro) have been reported so far in LS, 2 of which (Tyr279Cys and Thr468Met) occur in about 65% of the cases. Here, we provide an overview of clinical aspects of this disorder, the molecular mechanisms underlying pathogenesis and major genotype-phenotype correlations. PMID:23239957

  18. RPGR mutation analysis and disease: an update.

    PubMed

    Shu, Xinhua; Black, Graeme C; Rice, Jacqueline M; Hart-Holden, Niki; Jones, Alison; O'Grady, Anna; Ramsden, Simon; Wright, Alan F

    2007-04-01

    Mutations in the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) gene are the most common single cause of retinitis pigmentosa, accounting for up to 15 to 20% of cases in Caucasians. A total of 240 different RPGR mutations have been reported, including 24 novel ones in this work, which are associated with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) (95%), cone, cone-rod dystrophy, or atrophic macular atrophy (3%), and syndromal retinal dystrophies with ciliary dyskinesia and hearing loss (2%). All disease-causing mutations occur in one or more RPGR isoforms containing the carboxyl-terminal exon open reading frame 15 (ORF15), which are widely expressed but show their highest expression in the connecting cilia of rod and cone photoreceptors. Of reported RPGR mutations, 55% occur in a glutamic acid-rich domain within exon ORF15, which accounts for only 31% of the protein. RPGR forms complexes with a variety of other proteins and appears to have a role in microtubular organization and transport between photoreceptor inner and outer segments.

  19. Prostaglandin transporter mutations cause pachydermoperiostosis with myelofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Diggle, Christine P; Parry, David A; Logan, Clare V; Laissue, Paul; Rivera, Carolina; Restrepo, Carlos Martín; Fonseca, Dora J; Morgan, Joanne E; Allanore, Yannick; Fontenay, Michaela; Wipff, Julien; Varret, Mathilde; Gibault, Laure; Dalantaeva, Nadezhda; Korbonits, Márta; Zhou, Bowen; Yuan, Gang; Harifi, Ghita; Cefle, Kivanc; Palanduz, Sukru; Akoglu, Hadim; Zwijnenburg, Petra J; Lichtenbelt, Klaske D; Aubry-Rozier, Bérengère; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Accadia, Maria; Brancati, Francesco; Sheridan, Eamonn G; Taylor, Graham R; Carr, Ian M; Johnson, Colin A; Markham, Alexander F; Bonthron, David T

    2012-08-01

    Pachydermoperiostosis, or primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (PHO), is an inherited multisystem disorder, whose features closely mimic the reactive osteoarthropathy that commonly accompanies neoplastic and inflammatory pathologies. We previously described deficiency of the prostaglandin-degrading enzyme 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (HPGD) as a cause of this condition, implicating elevated circulating prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) as causative of PHO, and perhaps also as the principal mediator of secondary HO. However, PHO is genetically heterogeneous. Here, we use whole-exome sequencing to identify recessive mutations of the prostaglandin transporter SLCO2A1, in individuals lacking HPGD mutations. We performed exome sequencing of four probands with severe PHO, followed by conventional mutation analysis of SLCO2A1 in nine others. Biallelic SLCO2A1 mutations were identified in 12 of the 13 families. Affected individuals had elevated urinary PGE(2), but unlike HPGD-deficient patients, also excreted considerable quantities of the PGE(2) metabolite, PGE-M. Clinical differences between the two groups were also identified, notably that SLCO2A1-deficient individuals have a high frequency of severe anemia due to myelofibrosis. These findings reinforce the key role of systemic or local prostaglandin excess as the stimulus to HO. They also suggest that the induction or maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells by prostaglandin may depend upon transporter activity. PMID:22553128

  20. Timing, rates and spectra of human germline mutation

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Sarah J.; Hardwick, Robert J.; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Turki, Saeed Al; Dominiczak, Anna; Morris, Andrew; Porteous, David; Smith, Blair; Stratton, Michael R.; Hurles, Matthew E.

    2015-01-01

    Germline mutations are a driving force behind genome evolution and genetic disease. We investigated genome-wide mutation rates and spectra in multi-sibling families. Mutation rate increased with paternal age in all families, but the number of additional mutations per year differed more than two-fold between families. Meta-analysis of 6,570 mutations showed that germline methylation influences mutation rates. In contrast to somatic mutations, we found remarkable consistency of germline mutation spectra between the sexes and at different paternal ages. 3.8% of mutations were mosaic in the parental germline, resulting in 1.3% of mutations being shared between siblings. The number of these shared mutations varied significantly between families. Our data suggest that the mutation rate per cell division is higher during both early embryogenesis and differentiation of primordial germ cells, but is reduced substantially during post-pubertal spermatogenesis. These findings have important consequences for the recurrence risks of disorders caused by de novo mutations. PMID:26656846

  1. Detection of mutations in the ALD gene (ABCD1) in seven Italian families: description of four novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Lira, M G; Mottes, M; Pignatti, P F; Medica, I; Uziel, G; Cappa, M; Bertini, E; Rizzuto, N; Salviati, A

    2000-09-01

    The study describes the mutations causing adrenoleukodystrophy in seven Italian families. Four missense mutations leading to amino acid substitutions, two frameshift mutations leading to a premature termination signal, and a splicing mutation were identified. Mutations 2014C>T (P543L), 2053A>G (Q556A), 673-674insCC, and 1874+1G>A are described for the first time in this report. Mutations 1638C>T (R418W), 1588G>A(R401Q), and 1801-1802delAG are already known to be link to ALD.

  2. Genetic mutations associated with status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, M; Shorvon, S

    2015-08-01

    This paper reports the results of a preliminary search of the literature aimed at identifying the genetic mutations reported to be strongly associated with status epilepticus. Genetic mutations were selected for inclusion if status epilepticus was specifically mentioned as a consequence of the mutation in standard genetic databases or in a case report or review article. Mutations in 122 genes were identified. The genetic mutations identified were found in only rare conditions (sometimes vanishingly rare) and mostly in infants and young children with multiple other handicaps. Most of the genetic mutations can be subdivided into those associated with cortical dysplasias, inborn errors of metabolism, mitochondrial disease, or epileptic encephalopathies and childhood syndromes. There are no identified 'pure status epilepticus genes'. The range of genes underpinning status epilepticus differs in many ways from the range of genes underpinning epilepsy, which suggests that the processes underpinning status epilepticus differ from those underpinning epilepsy. It has been frequently postulated that status epilepticus is the result of a failure of 'seizure termination mechanisms', but the wide variety of genes affecting very diverse biochemical pathways identified in this survey makes any unitary cause unlikely. The genetic influences in status epilepticus are likely to involve a wide range of mechanisms, some related to development, some to cerebral energy production, some to diverse altered biochemical pathways, some to transmitter and membrane function, and some to defects in networks or systems. The fact that many of the identified genes are involved with cerebral development suggests that status epilepticus might often be a system or network phenomenon. To date, there are very few genes identified which are associated with adult-onset status epilepticus (except in those with preexisting neurological damage), and this is disappointing as the cause of many adult

  3. Reverse mutation in fragile X syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Antinolo, G.; Borrego, S.; Cabeza, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    The fragile X syndrome is the most common cause of familial mental retardation, with an incidence of {approximately}1/1,500 in males and 1/2,500 in females. The clinical expression includes moderate to severe mental retardation, macroorchidism, dysmorphic facial features and behavior disturbances. In 1991, the FMR-1 gene was isolated from the region of the fragile X site. The fragile X phenotype has been found, in most cases, to be characterized at the molecular level by expansion of a (CGG){sub n} repeat and hypermethylation of a CpG island identified in the 5{prime}-UTR of the FMR-1 gene. It has been proposed, and some evidence has been shown, that germ cells carry only premutation alleles and that expansion occurs at a postzygotic stage. A few cases of reduction of the (CGG){sub n} repeat in fragile X syndrome have been reported. These reductions were from a larger premutation to a smaller premutation, in female-to-male transmission, from full mutation to a mosaic pattern, reduction from mosaic full-mutation/premutation females or regression from premutation to normal. We present here the novel observation of a phenotypically normal female carrying a nonmosaic full-mutation allele in somatic cells who transmits a premutation allele to her daughter. This daughter has three mosaic offspring with the full mutation and the premutation. Two of them are monozygotic (MZ) twins sharing a concordant mutation pattern. They are monoamniotic monochorionic, which indicates a late form of twinning. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Mitochondrial mutations in subjects with psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Sequeira, Adolfo; Rollins, Brandi; Magnan, Christophe; van Oven, Mannis; Baldi, Pierre; Myers, Richard M; Barchas, Jack D; Schatzberg, Alan F; Watson, Stanley J; Akil, Huda; Bunney, William E; Vawter, Marquis P

    2015-01-01

    A considerable body of evidence supports the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in psychiatric disorders and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are known to alter brain energy metabolism, neurotransmission, and cause neurodegenerative disorders. Genetic studies focusing on common nuclear genome variants associated with these disorders have produced genome wide significant results but those studies have not directly studied mtDNA variants. The purpose of this study is to investigate, using next generation sequencing, the involvement of mtDNA variation in bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, major depressive disorder, and methamphetamine use. MtDNA extracted from multiple brain regions and blood were sequenced (121 mtDNA samples with an average of 8,800x coverage) and compared to an electronic database containing 26,850 mtDNA genomes. We confirmed novel and rare variants, and confirmed next generation sequencing error hotspots by traditional sequencing and genotyping methods. We observed a significant increase of non-synonymous mutations found in individuals with schizophrenia. Novel and rare non-synonymous mutations were found in psychiatric cases in mtDNA genes: ND6, ATP6, CYTB, and ND2. We also observed mtDNA heteroplasmy in brain at a locus previously associated with schizophrenia (T16519C). Large differences in heteroplasmy levels across brain regions within subjects suggest that somatic mutations accumulate differentially in brain regions. Finally, multiplasmy, a heteroplasmic measure of repeat length, was observed in brain from selective cases at a higher frequency than controls. These results offer support for increased rates of mtDNA substitutions in schizophrenia shown in our prior results. The variable levels of heteroplasmic/multiplasmic somatic mutations that occur in brain may be indicators of genetic instability in mtDNA.

  5. The Wilson disease gene: Haplotypes and mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.R.; Roberts, E.A.; Cox, D.W.; Walshe, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    Wilson disease (WND) is an autosomal recessive defect of copper transport. The gene involved in WND, located on chromosome 13, has recently been shown to be a putative copper transporting P-type ATPase, designated ATP7B. The gene is highly similar to ATP7A, located on the X chromosome, which is defective in Menkes disease, another disorder of copper transport. We have available for study WND families from Canada (34 families), the United Kingdom (32 families), Japan (4 families), Iceland (3 families) and Hong Kong (2 families). We have utilized four highly polymorphic CA repeat markers (D13S296, D13S301, D13S314 and D13S316) surrounding the ATP7B locus to construct haplotypes in these families. Analysis indicates that there are many unique WND haplotypes not present on normal chromosomes and that there may be a large number of different WND mutations. We have screened the WND patients for mutations in the ATP7B gene. Fifty six patients, representing all of the identified haplotypes, have been screened using single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP), followed by selective sequencing. To date, 19 mutations and 12 polymorphisms have been identified. All of the changes are nucleotide substitutions or small insertions/deletions and there is no evidence for larger deletions as seen in the similar gene on the X chromosome, ATP7A. Haplotypes of close markers and the ability to detect some of the mutations present in the gene allow for more reliable molecular diagnosis of presymptomatic sibs of WND patients. A reassessment of individuals previously diagnosed in the presymptomatic phase is now required, as we have have identified some heterozygotes who are biochemically indistinguishable from affected homozygotes. The identification of specific mutations will soon allow direct diagnosis of WND patients with a high level of certainty.

  6. Coherent Somatic Mutation in Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Kenneth Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Many aspects of autoimmune disease are not well understood, including the specificities of autoimmune targets, and patterns of co-morbidity and cross-heritability across diseases. Prior work has provided evidence that somatic mutation caused by gene conversion and deletion at segmentally duplicated loci is relevant to several diseases. Simple tandem repeat (STR) sequence is highly mutable, both somatically and in the germ-line, and somatic STR mutations are observed under inflammation. Results Protein-coding genes spanning STRs having markers of mutability, including germ-line variability, high total length, repeat count and/or repeat similarity, are evaluated in the context of autoimmunity. For the initiation of autoimmune disease, antigens whose autoantibodies are the first observed in a disease, termed primary autoantigens, are informative. Three primary autoantigens, thyroid peroxidase (TPO), phogrin (PTPRN2) and filaggrin (FLG), include STRs that are among the eleven longest STRs spanned by protein-coding genes. This association of primary autoantigens with long STR sequence is highly significant (). Long STRs occur within twenty genes that are associated with sixteen common autoimmune diseases and atherosclerosis. The repeat within the TTC34 gene is an outlier in terms of length and a link with systemic lupus erythematosus is proposed. Conclusions The results support the hypothesis that many autoimmune diseases are triggered by immune responses to proteins whose DNA sequence mutates somatically in a coherent, consistent fashion. Other autoimmune diseases may be caused by coherent somatic mutations in immune cells. The coherent somatic mutation hypothesis has the potential to be a comprehensive explanation for the initiation of many autoimmune diseases. PMID:24988487

  7. Preaxial polydactyly associated with a MSX1 mutation and report of two novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Wattanarat, Onnida; Kantaputra, Piranit Nik

    2016-01-01

    We report two novel heterozygous missense MSX1 mutations in two Thai families (c.739C>T; p.Pro247Ser and c.607G>A; p.Ala203Thr). The p.Ala203Thr mutation was found in a female patient, her sister, and their father and is associated with unilateral cleft lip and palate, hypodontia, and microdontia. The p.Pro247Ser mutation was found in a three-generation Thai family and was associated with bilateral cleft lip and palate, hypodontia, microdontia, and dens invaginatus. The proband also had preaxial polydactyly of the left hand. The role of Msx1 in limb development in mice is discussed. Intrafamilial variability of the phenotypes is clearly evident. This is the first time that a limb anomaly has been reported to be associated with a mutation in MSX1.

  8. GATA2 mutations in sporadic and familial acute myeloid leukaemia patients with CEBPA mutations.

    PubMed

    Green, Claire L; Tawana, Kiran; Hills, Robert K; Bödör, Csaba; Fitzgibbon, Jude; Inglott, Sarah; Ancliff, Phil; Burnett, Alan K; Linch, David C; Gale, Rosemary E

    2013-06-01

    GATA2 mutations have recently been reported in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients with CEBPA-double mutations. To explore their impact on this favourable-risk disease, we determined GATA2 status in 153 sporadic AML patients and three members of a germ-line CEBPA-mutant family at AML presentation. Overall, 27% (15/55) CEBPA-double, 16% (7/43) CEBPA-single and 0% (0/55) normal karyotype/CEBPA-wild-type patients were GATA2-mutant. All familial AML patients acquired both a second CEBPA and a GATA2 mutation. CEBPA and GATA2 mutant levels indicated that both mutations were likely to be early events in leukaemogenesis. GATA2 status did not impact on the favourable outcome of CEBPA-double/FLT3-inernal tandem duplication-negative patients.

  9. Mutation--The Engine of Evolution: Studying Mutation and Its Role in the Evolution of Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hershberg, Ruth

    2015-09-01

    Mutation is the engine of evolution in that it generates the genetic variation on which the evolutionary process depends. To understand the evolutionary process we must therefore characterize the rates and patterns of mutation. Starting with the seminal Luria and Delbruck fluctuation experiments in 1943, studies utilizing a variety of approaches have revealed much about mutation rates and patterns and about how these may vary between different bacterial strains and species along the chromosome and between different growth conditions. This work provides a critical overview of the results and conclusions drawn from these studies, of the debate surrounding some of these conclusions, and of the challenges faced when studying mutation and its role in bacterial evolution. PMID:26330518

  10. Mitochondrial DNA mutations in mutator mice confer respiration defects and B-cell lymphoma development.

    PubMed

    Mito, Takayuki; Kikkawa, Yoshiaki; Shimizu, Akinori; Hashizume, Osamu; Katada, Shun; Imanishi, Hirotake; Ota, Azusa; Kato, Yukina; Nakada, Kazuto; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutator mice are proposed to express premature aging phenotypes including kyphosis and hair loss (alopecia) due to their carrying a nuclear-encoded mtDNA polymerase with a defective proofreading function, which causes accelerated accumulation of random mutations in mtDNA, resulting in expression of respiration defects. On the contrary, transmitochondrial mito-miceΔ carrying mtDNA with a large-scale deletion mutation (ΔmtDNA) also express respiration defects, but not express premature aging phenotypes. Here, we resolved this discrepancy by generating mtDNA mutator mice sharing the same C57BL/6J (B6J) nuclear background with that of mito-miceΔ. Expression patterns of premature aging phenotypes are very close, when we compared between homozygous mtDNA mutator mice carrying a B6J nuclear background and selected mito-miceΔ only carrying predominant amounts of ΔmtDNA, in their expression of significant respiration defects, kyphosis, and a short lifespan, but not the alopecia. Therefore, the apparent discrepancy in the presence and absence of premature aging phenotypes in mtDNA mutator mice and mito-miceΔ, respectively, is partly the result of differences in the nuclear background of mtDNA mutator mice and of the broad range of ΔmtDNA proportions of mito-miceΔ used in previous studies. We also provided direct evidence that mtDNA abnormalities in homozygous mtDNA mutator mice are responsible for respiration defects by demonstrating the co-transfer of mtDNA and respiration defects from mtDNA mutator mice into mtDNA-less (ρ(0)) mouse cells. Moreover, heterozygous mtDNA mutator mice had a normal lifespan, but frequently developed B-cell lymphoma, suggesting that the mtDNA abnormalities in heterozygous mutator mice are not sufficient to induce a short lifespan and aging phenotypes, but are able to contribute to the B-cell lymphoma development during their prolonged lifespan.

  11. The topography of mutational processes in breast cancer genomes

    PubMed Central

    Morganella, Sandro; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Glodzik, Dominik; Zou, Xueqing; Davies, Helen; Staaf, Johan; Sieuwerts, Anieta M.; Brinkman, Arie B.; Martin, Sancha; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Butler, Adam; Kim, Hyung-Yong; Borg, Åke; Sotiriou, Christos; Futreal, P. Andrew; Campbell, Peter J.; Span, Paul N.; Van Laere, Steven; Lakhani, Sunil R.; Eyfjord, Jorunn E.; Thompson, Alastair M.; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.; van de Vijver, Marc J.; Martens, John W. M.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Richardson, Andrea L.; Kong, Gu; Thomas, Gilles; Sale, Julian; Rada, Cristina; Stratton, Michael R.; Birney, Ewan; Nik-Zainal, Serena

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mutations in human cancers show unevenness in genomic distribution that correlate with aspects of genome structure and function. These mutations are, however, generated by multiple mutational processes operating through the cellular lineage between the fertilized egg and the cancer cell, each composed of specific DNA damage and repair components and leaving its own characteristic mutational signature on the genome. Using somatic mutation catalogues from 560 breast cancer whole-genome sequences, here we show that each of 12 base substitution, 2 insertion/deletion (indel) and 6 rearrangement mutational signatures present in breast tissue, exhibit distinct relationships with genomic features relating to transcription, DNA replication and chromatin organization. This signature-based approach permits visualization of the genomic distribution of mutational processes associated with APOBEC enzymes, mismatch repair deficiency and homologous recombinational repair deficiency, as well as mutational processes of unknown aetiology. Furthermore, it highlights mechanistic insights including a putative replication-dependent mechanism of APOBEC-related mutagenesis. PMID:27136393

  12. Modelling mutational landscapes of human cancers in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivier, Magali; Weninger, Annette; Ardin, Maude; Huskova, Hana; Castells, Xavier; Vallée, Maxime P.; McKay, James; Nedelko, Tatiana; Muehlbauer, Karl-Rudolf; Marusawa, Hiroyuki; Alexander, John; Hazelwood, Lee; Byrnes, Graham; Hollstein, Monica; Zavadil, Jiri

    2014-03-01

    Experimental models that recapitulate mutational landscapes of human cancers are needed to decipher the rapidly expanding data on human somatic mutations. We demonstrate that mutation patterns in immortalised cell lines derived from primary murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) exposed in vitro to carcinogens recapitulate key features of mutational signatures observed in human cancers. In experiments with several cancer-causing agents we obtained high genome-wide concordance between human tumour mutation data and in vitro data with respect to predominant substitution types, strand bias and sequence context. Moreover, we found signature mutations in well-studied human cancer driver genes. To explore endogenous mutagenesis, we used MEFs ectopically expressing activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) and observed an excess of AID signature mutations in immortalised cell lines compared to their non-transgenic counterparts. MEF immortalisation is thus a simple and powerful strategy for modelling cancer mutation landscapes that facilitates the interpretation of human tumour genome-wide sequencing data.

  13. Mutated Genes in Schizophrenia Map to Brain Networks

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2013 Mutated Genes in Schizophrenia Map to Brain Networks Schizophrenia networks in the prefrontal cortex area of the brain. ... of spontaneous mutations in genes that form a network in the front region of the brain. The ...

  14. Recurrent Somatic Mutations in Regulatory Regions of Human Cancer Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Melton, Collin; Reuter, Jason A.; Spacek, Damek V.; Snyder, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant regulation of gene expression in cancer can promote survival and proliferation of cancer cells. Here we integrate TCGA whole genome sequencing data of 436 patients from eight cancer subtypes with ENCODE and other regulatory annotations to identify point mutations in regulatory regions. We find evidence for positive selection of mutations in transcription factor binding sites, consistent with these sites regulating important cancer cell functions. Using a novel method that adjusts for sample- and genomic locus-specific mutation rate, we identify recurrently mutated sites across cancer patients. Mutated regulatory sites include known sites in the TERT promoter and many novel sites, including a subset in proximity to cancer genes. In reporter assays, two novel sites display decreased enhancer activity upon mutation. These data demonstrate that many regulatory regions contain mutations under selective pressure and suggest a larger role for regulatory mutations in cancer than previously appreciated. PMID:26053494

  15. Alström Syndrome: Mutation Spectrum of ALMS1.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Jan D; Muller, Jean; Collin, Gayle B; Milan, Gabriella; Kingsmore, Stephen F; Dinwiddie, Darrell; Farrow, Emily G; Miller, Neil A; Favaretto, Francesca; Maffei, Pietro; Dollfus, Hélène; Vettor, Roberto; Naggert, Jürgen K

    2015-07-01

    Alström Syndrome (ALMS), a recessive, monogenic ciliopathy caused by mutations in ALMS1, is typically characterized by multisystem involvement including early cone-rod retinal dystrophy and blindness, hearing loss, childhood obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiomyopathy, fibrosis, and multiple organ failure. The precise function of ALMS1 remains elusive, but roles in endosomal and ciliary transport and cell cycle regulation have been shown. The aim of our study was to further define the spectrum of ALMS1 mutations in patients with clinical features of ALMS. Mutational analysis in a world-wide cohort of 204 families identified 109 novel mutations, extending the number of known ALMS1 mutations to 239 and highlighting the allelic heterogeneity of this disorder. This study represents the most comprehensive mutation analysis in patients with ALMS, identifying the largest number of novel mutations in a single study worldwide. Here, we also provide an overview of all ALMS1 mutations identified to date.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: familial acute myeloid leukemia with mutated CEBPA

    MedlinePlus

    ... N. A family harboring a germ-line N-terminal C/EBPalpha mutation and development of acute myeloid leukemia with an additional somatic C-terminal C/EBPalpha mutation. Genes Chromosomes Cancer. 2010 Mar; ...

  17. Alström Syndrome: Mutation Spectrum of ALMS1.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Jan D; Muller, Jean; Collin, Gayle B; Milan, Gabriella; Kingsmore, Stephen F; Dinwiddie, Darrell; Farrow, Emily G; Miller, Neil A; Favaretto, Francesca; Maffei, Pietro; Dollfus, Hélène; Vettor, Roberto; Naggert, Jürgen K

    2015-07-01

    Alström Syndrome (ALMS), a recessive, monogenic ciliopathy caused by mutations in ALMS1, is typically characterized by multisystem involvement including early cone-rod retinal dystrophy and blindness, hearing loss, childhood obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiomyopathy, fibrosis, and multiple organ failure. The precise function of ALMS1 remains elusive, but roles in endosomal and ciliary transport and cell cycle regulation have been shown. The aim of our study was to further define the spectrum of ALMS1 mutations in patients with clinical features of ALMS. Mutational analysis in a world-wide cohort of 204 families identified 109 novel mutations, extending the number of known ALMS1 mutations to 239 and highlighting the allelic heterogeneity of this disorder. This study represents the most comprehensive mutation analysis in patients with ALMS, identifying the largest number of novel mutations in a single study worldwide. Here, we also provide an overview of all ALMS1 mutations identified to date. PMID:25846608

  18. The topography of mutational processes in breast cancer genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Morganella, Sandro; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Glodzik, Dominik; Zou, Xueqing; Davies, Helen; Staaf, Johan; Sieuwerts, Anieta M.; Brinkman, Arie B.; Martin, Sancha; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Butler, Adam; Kim, Hyung -Yong; Borg, Ake; Sotiriou, Christos; Futreal, P. Andrew; Campbell, Peter J.; Span, Paul N.; Van Laere, Steven; Lakhani, Sunil R.; Eyfjord, Jorunn E.; Thompson, Alastair M.; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.; van de Vijver, Marc J.; Martens, John W. M.; Borresen-Dale, Anne -Lise; Richardson, Andrea L.; Kong, Gu; Thomas, Gilles; Sale, Julian; Rada, Cristina; Stratton, Michael R.; Birney, Ewan; Nik-Zainal, Serena

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mutations in human cancers show unevenness in genomic distribution that correlate with aspects of genome structure and function. These mutations are, however, generated by multiple mutational processes operating through the cellular lineage between the fertilized egg and the cancer cell, each composed of specific DNA damage and repair components and leaving its own characteristic mutational signature on the genome. Using somatic mutation catalogues from 560 breast cancer whole-genome sequences, here we show that each of 12 base substitution, 2 insertion/deletion (indel) and 6 rearrangement mutational signatures present in breast tissue, exhibit distinct relationships with genomic features relating to transcription, DNA replication and chromatin organization. This signature-based approach permits visualization of the genomic distribution of mutational processes associated with APOBEC enzymes, mismatch repair deficiency and homologous recombinational repair deficiency, as well as mutational processes of unknown aetiology. Lastly, it highlights mechanistic insights including a putative replication-dependent mechanism of APOBEC-related mutagenesis.

  19. An MRPS12 mutation modifies aminoglycoside sensitivity caused by 12S rRNA mutations

    PubMed Central

    Emperador, Sonia; Pacheu-Grau, David; Bayona-Bafaluy, M. Pilar; Garrido-Pérez, Nuria; Martín-Navarro, Antonio; López-Pérez, Manuel J.; Montoya, Julio; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Several homoplasmic pathologic mutations in mitochondrial DNA, such as those causing Leber hereditary optic neuropathy or non-syndromic hearing loss, show incomplete penetrance. Therefore, other elements must modify their pathogenicity. Discovery of these modifying factors is not an easy task because in multifactorial diseases conventional genetic approaches may not always be informative. Here, we have taken an evolutionary approach to unmask putative modifying factors for a particular homoplasmic pathologic mutation causing aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss, the m.1494C>T transition in the mitochondrial DNA. The mutation is located in the decoding site of the mitochondrial ribosomal RNA. We first looked at mammalian species that had fixed the human pathologic mutation. These mutations are called compensated pathogenic deviations because an organism carrying one must also have another that suppresses the deleterious effect of the first. We found that species from the primate family Cercopithecidae (old world monkeys) harbor the m.1494T allele even if their auditory function is normal. In humans the m.1494T allele increases the susceptibility to aminoglycosides. However, in primary fibroblasts from a Cercopithecidae species, aminoglycosides do not impair cell growth, respiratory complex IV activity and quantity or the mitochondrial protein synthesis. Interestingly, this species also carries a fixed mutation in the mitochondrial ribosomal protein S12. We show that the expression of this variant in a human m.1494T cell line reduces its susceptibility to aminoglycosides. Because several mutations in this human protein have been described, they may possibly explain the absence of pathologic phenotype in some pedigree members with the most frequent pathologic mutations in mitochondrial ribosomal RNA. PMID:25642242

  20. Exonuclease mutations in DNA polymerase epsilon reveal replication strand specific mutation patterns and human origins of replication.

    PubMed

    Shinbrot, Eve; Henninger, Erin E; Weinhold, Nils; Covington, Kyle R; Göksenin, A Yasemin; Schultz, Nikolaus; Chao, Hsu; Doddapaneni, HarshaVardhan; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Sander, Chris; Pursell, Zachary F; Wheeler, David A

    2014-11-01

    Tumors with somatic mutations in the proofreading exonuclease domain of DNA polymerase epsilon (POLE-exo*) exhibit a novel mutator phenotype, with markedly elevated TCT→TAT and TCG→TTG mutations and overall mutation frequencies often exceeding 100 mutations/Mb. Here, we identify POLE-exo* tumors in numerous cancers and classify them into two groups, A and B, according to their mutational properties. Group A mutants are found only in POLE, whereas Group B mutants are found in POLE and POLD1 and appear to be nonfunctional. In Group A, cell-free polymerase assays confirm that mutations in the exonuclease domain result in high mutation frequencies with a preference for C→A mutation. We describe the patterns of amino acid substitutions caused by POLE-exo* and compare them to other tumor types. The nucleotide preference of POLE-exo* leads to increased frequencies of recurrent nonsense mutations in key tumor suppressors such as TP53, ATM, and PIK3R1. We further demonstrate that strand-specific mutation patterns arise from some of these POLE-exo* mutants during genome duplication. This is the first direct proof of leading strand-specific replication by human POLE, which has only been demonstrated in yeast so far. Taken together, the extremely high mutation frequency and strand specificity of mutations provide a unique identifier of eukaryotic origins of replication.

  1. Frameshift mutations in dentin phosphoprotein and dependence of dentin disease phenotype on mutation location.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Pekka; Papagiannoulis-Lascarides, Lisa; Waltimo-Siren, Janna; Ollila, Päivi; Karjalainen, Sara; Arte, Sirpa; Veerkamp, Jaap; Tallon Walton, Victoria; Chimenos Küstner, Eduard; Siltanen, Tarja; Holappa, Heidi; Lukinmaa, Pirjo-Liisa; Alaluusua, Satu

    2011-04-01

    We describe results from a mutational analysis of the region of the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene encoding dentin phosphoprotein (DPP) in 12 families with dominantly inherited dentin diseases. In eight families (five mutations in the N-terminal third of DPP), the clinical and radiologic features were uniform and compatible with dentin dysplasia type II (DD-II) with major clinical signs in the deciduous dentition. In the other families (four mutations in the more C-terminal part), the permanent teeth also were affected, and the diseases could be classified as variants of dentinogenesis imperfecta. Attrition was not prominent, but periapical infections were common. Discoloring with varying intensity was evident, and pulps and root canals were obliterated in the permanent dentition. All mutations caused a frameshift that replaced the Ser-Ser-Asx repeat by a code for a hydrophobic downstream sequence of approximately original length. We conclude that frameshift mutations in DSPP explain a significant part of dentin diseases. Furthermore, we propose that the location of the mutation is reflected in the phenotypic features as a gradient from DD-II to more severe disease that does not conform to the classic definitions of DI-II. PMID:20949630

  2. Repository of mutations from Oman: The entry point to a national mutation database

    PubMed Central

    Rajab, Anna; Hamza, Nishath; Al Harasi, Salma; Al Lawati, Fatma; Gibbons, Una; Al Alawi, Intesar; Kobus, Karoline; Hassan, Suha; Mahir, Ghariba; Al Salmi, Qasim; Mons, Barend; Robinson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The Sultanate of Oman is a rapidly developing Muslim country with well-organized government-funded health care services, and expanding medical genetic facilities. The preservation of tribal structures within the Omani population coupled with geographical isolation has produced unique patterns of rare mutations. In order to provide diagnosticians and researchers with access to an up-to-date resource that will assist them in their daily practice we collated and analyzed all of the Mendelian disease-associated mutations identified in the Omani population. By the 1 st of August 2015, the dataset contained 300 mutations detected in over 150 different genes. More than half of the data collected reflect novel genetic variations that were first described in the Omani population, and most disorders with known mutations are inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion. A number of novel Mendelian disease genes have been discovered in Omani nationals, and the corresponding mutations are included here. The current study provides a comprehensive resource of the mutations in the Omani population published in scientific literature or reported through service provision that will be useful for genetic care in Oman and will be a starting point for variation databases as next-generation sequencing technologies are introduced into genetic medicine in Oman. PMID:26594346

  3. Was the C282Y mutation an Irish Gaelic mutation that the Vikings help disseminate?

    PubMed

    Whittington, C A

    2006-01-01

    The C282Y mutation is held to have arisen in either a Celtic or a Viking ancestor some 60 generations ago. While the Scandinavians have a high frequency of C282Y, the Irish have the highest frequency of the C282Y mutation in the world. However testing of the Irish people for C282Y has been patchy. The true frequency of the C282Y mutation in Ireland and specifically in the relatively isolated western province of Connaught is unknown. Establishment of the C282Y frequency in the Irish male population of Connaught with traditional Irish surnames, a group which has a virtual fixation for Y chromosome R1b3, could help establish C282Y as an Irish mutation. Elucidation of greater C282Y haplotype diversity for the Irish as opposed to the Scandinavians would indicate the Irish as the likely source population for C282Y. Taken together, linking of C282Y to the Irish Gaelic male population of Connaught and establishment of an Irish origin of the C282Y mutation would point to dissemination of the C282Y mutation by Viking raiders and colonizers.

  4. Repository of mutations from Oman: The entry point to a national mutation database.

    PubMed

    Rajab, Anna; Hamza, Nishath; Al Harasi, Salma; Al Lawati, Fatma; Gibbons, Una; Al Alawi, Intesar; Kobus, Karoline; Hassan, Suha; Mahir, Ghariba; Al Salmi, Qasim; Mons, Barend; Robinson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The Sultanate of Oman is a rapidly developing Muslim country with well-organized government-funded health care services, and expanding medical genetic facilities. The preservation of tribal structures within the Omani population coupled with geographical isolation has produced unique patterns of rare mutations. In order to provide diagnosticians and researchers with access to an up-to-date resource that will assist them in their daily practice we collated and analyzed all of the Mendelian disease-associated mutations identified in the Omani population. By the 1 (st) of August 2015, the dataset contained 300 mutations detected in over 150 different genes. More than half of the data collected reflect novel genetic variations that were first described in the Omani population, and most disorders with known mutations are inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion. A number of novel Mendelian disease genes have been discovered in Omani nationals, and the corresponding mutations are included here. The current study provides a comprehensive resource of the mutations in the Omani population published in scientific literature or reported through service provision that will be useful for genetic care in Oman and will be a starting point for variation databases as next-generation sequencing technologies are introduced into genetic medicine in Oman. PMID:26594346

  5. Estimation of the RNU2 macrosatellite mutation rate by BRCA1 mutation tracing

    PubMed Central

    Tessereau, Chloé; Lesecque, Yann; Monnet, Nastasia; Buisson, Monique; Barjhoux, Laure; Léoné, Mélanie; Feng, Bingjian; Goldgar, David E.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Mousset, Sylvain; Duret, Laurent; Mazoyer, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Large tandem repeat sequences have been poorly investigated as severe technical limitations and their frequent absence from the genome reference hinder their analysis. Extensive allelotyping of this class of variation has not been possible until now and their mutational dynamics are still poorly known. In order to estimate the mutation rate of a macrosatellite, we analysed in detail the RNU2 locus, which displays at least 50 different alleles containing 5-82 copies of a 6.1 kb repeat unit. Mining data from the 1000 Genomes Project allowed us to precisely estimate copy numbers of the RNU2 repeat unit using read depth of coverage. This further revealed significantly different mean values in various recent modern human populations, favoring a scenario of fast evolution of this locus. Its proximity to a disease gene with numerous founder mutations, BRCA1, within the same linkage disequilibrium block, offered the unique opportunity to trace RNU2 arrays over a large timescale. Analysis of the transmission of RNU2 arrays associated with one ‘private’ mutation in an extended kindred and four founder mutations in multiple kindreds gave an estimation by maximum likelihood of 5 × 10−3 mutations per generation, which is close to that of microsatellites. PMID:25034697

  6. Frameshift mutations in dentin phosphoprotein and dependence of dentin disease phenotype on mutation location.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Pekka; Papagiannoulis-Lascarides, Lisa; Waltimo-Siren, Janna; Ollila, Päivi; Karjalainen, Sara; Arte, Sirpa; Veerkamp, Jaap; Tallon Walton, Victoria; Chimenos Küstner, Eduard; Siltanen, Tarja; Holappa, Heidi; Lukinmaa, Pirjo-Liisa; Alaluusua, Satu

    2011-04-01

    We describe results from a mutational analysis of the region of the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene encoding dentin phosphoprotein (DPP) in 12 families with dominantly inherited dentin diseases. In eight families (five mutations in the N-terminal third of DPP), the clinical and radiologic features were uniform and compatible with dentin dysplasia type II (DD-II) with major clinical signs in the deciduous dentition. In the other families (four mutations in the more C-terminal part), the permanent teeth also were affected, and the diseases could be classified as variants of dentinogenesis imperfecta. Attrition was not prominent, but periapical infections were common. Discoloring with varying intensity was evident, and pulps and root canals were obliterated in the permanent dentition. All mutations caused a frameshift that replaced the Ser-Ser-Asx repeat by a code for a hydrophobic downstream sequence of approximately original length. We conclude that frameshift mutations in DSPP explain a significant part of dentin diseases. Furthermore, we propose that the location of the mutation is reflected in the phenotypic features as a gradient from DD-II to more severe disease that does not conform to the classic definitions of DI-II.

  7. The spectrum of β-thalassemia mutations in Hatay, Turkey: reporting three new mutations.

    PubMed

    Aldemir, Ozgur; Izmirli, Muzeyyen; Kaya, Hasan

    2014-01-01

    β-Thalassemia (β-thal) is an important health problem in Hatay, Southern Turkey, because of its high carrier frequency and the frequency of consanguinity. The aim of this study was to reveal the spectrum of β-thal mutations and to provide a foundation for prenatal genetic testing that will be a part of an effective prevention program for β-thal disease in Hatay. We determined the spectrum of β-thal mutations in 93 unrelated affected patients. Using a direct sequencing method, we identified a large number of β-thal mutations. We found different results from other parts of Turkey. A total of 16 different β-thal mutations were characterized in the parents. The most common mutations were: IVS-I-110 (G>A), IVS-I-6 (T>C), IVS-I-1 (G>A), frameshift codon (FSC) 8 (-AA), codon 39 (C>T) and IVS-II-745 (C>G). Since our region has seen many Syrian and Iraqi immigrants, we report that the prevalence of the thalassemia traits are different from other regions of Turkey. Our study demonstrates the spectrum of β-thal mutations in the Hatay region, and that there was great molecular heterogeneity.

  8. The molecular landscape of ASPM mutations in primary microcephaly

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, A K; Swanson, E A; Cox, J J; Karbani, G; Malik, S; Springell, K; Hampshire, D; Ahmed, M; Bond, J; Di Benedetto, D; Fichera, M; Romano, C; Dobyns, W B; Woods, C G

    2009-01-01

    Background: Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH) is a model disease to study human neurogenesis. In affected individuals the brain grows at a reduced rate during fetal life resulting in a small but structurally normal brain and mental retardation. The condition is genetically heterogeneous with mutations in ASPM being most commonly reported. Methods and results: We have examined this further by studying three cohorts of microcephalic children to extend both the phenotype and the mutation spectrum. Firstly, in 99 consecutively ascertained consanguineous families with a strict diagnosis of MCPH, 41 (41%) were homozygous at the MCPH5 locus and all but two families had mutations. Thus, 39% of consanguineous MCPH families had homozygous ASPM mutations. Secondly, in 27 non-consanguineous, predominantly Caucasian families with a strict diagnosis of MCPH, 11 (40%) had ASPM mutations. Thirdly, in 45 families with a less restricted phenotype including microcephaly and mental retardation, but regardless of other neurological features, only 3 (7%) had an ASPM mutation. This report contains 27 novel mutations and almost doubles the number of MCPH associated ASPM mutations known to 57. All but one of the mutations lead to the use of a premature termination codon, 23 were nonsense mutations, 28 deletions or insertions, 5 splicing, and 1 was a translocation. Seventeen of the 57 mutations were recurrent. There were no definitive missense mutations found nor was there any mutation/phenotype correlation. ASPM mutations were found in all ethnic groups studied. Conclusion: This study confirms that mutations in ASPM are the most common cause of MCPH, that ASPM mutations are restricted to individuals with an MCPH phenotype, and that ASPM testing in primary microcephaly is clinically useful. PMID:19028728

  9. Inactivation of Cancer Mutations Utilizing CRISPR/Cas9.

    PubMed

    Gebler, Christina; Lohoff, Tim; Paszkowski-Rogacz, Maciej; Mircetic, Jovan; Chakraborty, Debojyoti; Camgoz, Aylin; Hamann, Martin V; Theis, Mirko; Thiede, Christian; Buchholz, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Although whole-genome sequencing has uncovered a large number of mutations that drive tumorigenesis, functional ratification for most mutations remains sparse. Here, we present an approach to test functional relevance of tumor mutations employing CRISPR/Cas9. Combining comprehensive sgRNA design and an efficient reporter assay to nominate efficient and selective sgRNAs, we establish a pipeline to dissect roles of cancer mutations with potential applicability to personalized medicine and future therapeutic use. PMID:27576906

  10. RNF43 is frequently mutated in colorectal and endometrial cancers

    PubMed Central

    Giannakis, Marios; Hodis, Eran; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Yamauchi, Mai; Rosenbluh, Joseph; Cibulskis, Kristian; Saksena, Gordon; Lawrence, Michael S.; Qian, ZhiRong; Nishihara, Reiko; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Hahn, William C.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Lander, Eric S.; Getz, Gad; Ogino, Shuji; Fuchs, Charles S.; Garraway, Levi A.

    2014-01-01

    We report somatic mutations of RNF43 in over 18% of colorectal adenocarcinomas and endometrial carcinomas. RNF43 encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase that negatively regulates Wnt signaling. Truncating mutations of RNF43 are more prevalent in microsatellite-unstable tumors and show mutual exclusivity with inactivating APC mutations in colorectal adenocarcinomas. These results indicate that RNF43 is one of the most commonly mutated genes in colorectal and endometrial cancers. PMID:25344691

  11. Markov chain for estimating human mitochondrial DNA mutation pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vantika, Sandy; Pasaribu, Udjianna S.

    2015-12-01

    The Markov chain was proposed to estimate the human mitochondrial DNA mutation pattern. One DNA sequence was taken randomly from 100 sequences in Genbank. The nucleotide transition matrix and mutation transition matrix were estimated from this sequence. We determined whether the states (mutation/normal) are recurrent or transient. The results showed that both of them are recurrent.

  12. Spectrum of small mutations in the dystrophin coding region

    SciTech Connect

    Prior, T.W.; Bartolo, C.; Pearl, D.K.

    1995-07-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD and BMD) are caused by defects in the dystrophin gene. About two-thirds of the affected patients have large deletions or duplications, which occur in the 5` and central portion of the gene. The nondeletion/duplication cases are most likely the result of smaller mutations that cannot be identified by current diagnostic screening strategies. We screened {approximately} 80% of the dystrophin coding sequence for small mutations in 158 patients without deletions or duplications and identified 29 mutations. The study indicates that many of the DMD and the majority of the BMD small mutations lie in noncoding regions of the gene. All of the mutations identified were unique to single patients, and most of the mutations resulted in protein truncation. We did not find a clustering of small mutations similar to the deletion distribution but found > 40% of the small mutations 3` of exon 55. The extent of protein truncation caused by the 3` mutations did not determine the phenotype, since even the exon 76 nonsense mutation resulted in the severe DMD phenotype. Our study confirms that the dystrophin gene is subject to a high rate of mutation in CpG sequences. As a consequence of not finding any hotspots or prevalent small mutations, we conclude that it is presently not possible to perform direct carrier and prenatal diagnostics for many families without deletions or duplications. 71 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. More Frequent than Desired: Midgut Stem Cell Somatic Mutations.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Ip, Y Tony

    2015-12-01

    The accumulation of somatic mutations in adult stem cells contributes to the decline of tissue functions and cancer initiation. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Siudeja et al. (2015) investigate the rate and mechanism of naturally occurring mutations in Drosophila midgut intestinal stem cells during aging and find high-frequency mutations arising from multiple mechanisms. PMID:26637937

  14. Mitochondrial DNA exhibits resistance to induced point and deletion mutations

    PubMed Central

    Valente, William J.; Ericson, Nolan G.; Long, Alexandra S.; White, Paul A.; Marchetti, Francesco; Bielas, Jason H.

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations contributes to the pathogenesis of human disease. Currently, mitochondrial mutations are largely considered results of inaccurate processing of its heavily damaged genome. However, mainly from a lack of methods to monitor mtDNA mutations with sufficient sensitivity and accuracy, a link between mtDNA damage and mutation has not been established. To test the hypothesis that mtDNA-damaging agents induce mtDNA mutations, we exposed MutaTMMouse mice to benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) or N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU), daily for 28 consecutive days, and quantified mtDNA point and deletion mutations in bone marrow and liver using our newly developed Digital Random Mutation Capture (dRMC) and Digital Deletion Detection (3D) assays. Surprisingly, our results demonstrate mutagen treatment did not increase mitochondrial point or deletion mutation frequencies, despite evidence both compounds increase nuclear DNA mutations and demonstrated B[a]P adduct formation in mtDNA. These findings contradict models of mtDNA mutagenesis that assert the elevated rate of mtDNA mutation stems from damage sensitivity and abridged repair capacity. Rather, our results demonstrate induced mtDNA damage does not readily convert into mutation. These findings suggest robust mitochondrial damage responses repress induced mutations after mutagen exposure. PMID:27550180

  15. Tobacco Induced Mutations: A Fun, Visually Impressive Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milholland, Rebecca B. R.; Hines, Stefani D.

    2004-01-01

    A modified version "Tobacco Induced Mutations" of Ames assay experiment provides a meaningful context for students to learn about the concept of mutations by using a known carcinogen that is tobacco. This experiment shows toxicological concept of the dose/response relationship and visually demonstrates when a mutation have occurred in bacteria…

  16. A Haplotype Framework for Cystic Fibrosis Mutations in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Elahi, Elahe; Khodadad, Ahmad; Kupershmidt, Ilya; Ghasemi, Fereshteh; Alinasab, Babak; Naghizadeh, Ramin; Eason, Robert G.; Amini, Mahshid; Esmaili, Mehran; Esmaeili Dooki, Mohammad R.; Sanati, Mohammad H.; Davis, Ronald W.; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Thorstenson, Yvonne R.

    2006-01-01

    This is the first comprehensive profile of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mutations and their corresponding haplotypes in the Iranian population. All of the 27 CFTR exons of 60 unrelated Iranian CF patients were sequenced to identify disease-causing mutations. Eleven core haplotypes of CFTR were identified by genotyping six high-frequency simple nucleotide polymorphisms. The carrier frequency of 2.5 in 100 (1 in 40) was estimated from the frequency of heterozygous patients and suggests that contrary to popular belief, cystic fibrosis may be a common, under-diagnosed disease in Iran. A heterogeneous mutation spectrum was observed at the CFTR locus in 60 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients from Iran. Twenty putative disease-causing mutations were identified on 64 (53%) of the 120 chromosomes. The five most common Iranian mutations together represented 37% of the expected mutated alleles. The most frequent mutation, ΔF508 (p.F508del), represented only 16% of the expected mutated alleles. The next most frequent mutations were c.1677del2 (p.515fs) at 7.5%, c.4041C>G (p.N1303K) at 5.6%, c.2183AA>G (p.684fs) at 5%, and c.3661A>T (p.K1177X) at 2.5%. Three of the five most frequent Iranian mutations are not included in a commonly used panel of CF mutations, underscoring the importance of identifying geographic-specific mutations in this population. PMID:16436643

  17. Clock-like mutational processes in human somatic cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Jones, Philip H.; Wedge, David C.; Sale, Julian E.; Campbell, Peter J.; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Stratton, Michael R.

    2015-11-09

    During the course of a lifetime, somatic cells acquire mutations. Different mutational processes may contribute to the mutations accumulated in a cell, with each imprinting a mutational signature on the cell's genome. Some processes generate mutations throughout life at a constant rate in all individuals, and the number of mutations in a cell attributable to these processes will be proportional to the chronological age of the person. Using mutations from 10,250 cancer genomes across 36 cancer types, we investigated clock-like mutational processes that have been operating in normal human cells. Two mutational signatures show clock-like properties. Both exhibit different mutationmore » rates in different tissues. However, their mutation rates are not correlated, indicating that the underlying processes are subject to different biological influences. For one signature, the rate of cell division may influence its mutation rate. This paper provides the first survey of clock-like mutational processes operating in human somatic cells.« less

  18. Targeted next-generation sequencing extends the phenotypic and mutational spectrums for EYS mutations

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Shun; Tian, Yuanyuan; Chen, Xue

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We aim to determine genetic lesions with a phenotypic correlation in four Chinese families with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Methods Medical histories were carefully reviewed. All patients received comprehensive ophthalmic evaluations. The next-generation sequencing (NGS) approach targeting a panel of 205 retinal disease–relevant genes and 15 candidate genes was selectively performed on probands from the four recruited families for mutation detection. Online predictive software and crystal structure modeling were also applied to test the potential pathogenic effects of identified mutations. Results Of the four families, two were diagnosed with RP sino pigmento (RPSP). Patients with RPSP claimed to have earlier RP age of onset but slower disease progression. Five mutations in the eyes shut homolog (EYS) gene, involving two novel (c.7228+1G>A and c.9248G>A) and three recurrent mutations (c.4957dupA, c.6416G>A and c.6557G>A), were found as RP causative in the four families. The missense variant c.5093T>C was determined to be a variant of unknown significance (VUS) due to the variant’s colocalization in the same allele with the reported pathogenic mutation c.6416G>A. The two novel variants were further confirmed absent in 100 unrelated healthy controls. Online predictive software indicated potential pathogenicity of the three missense mutations. Further, crystal structural modeling suggested generation of two abnormal hydrogen bonds by the missense mutation p.G2186E (c.6557G>A) and elongation of its neighboring β-sheet induced by p.G3083D (c.9248G>A), which could alter the tertiary structure of the eys protein and thus interrupt its physicochemical properties. Conclusions Taken together, with the targeted NGS approach, we reveal novel EYS mutations and prove the efficiency of targeted NGS in the genetic diagnoses of RP. We also first report the correlation between EYS mutations and RPSP. The genotypic-phenotypic relationship in all

  19. Mutations in ARSB in MPS VI patients in India.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Juby; Jagadeesh, Sujatha M; Bhat, Meenakshi; Udhaya Kumar, S; Thiyagarajan, Saravanamuthu; Srinivasan, Sudha

    2015-09-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI) is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism caused by mutations in the arylsulfatase B gene (ARSB) and consequent deficient activity of ARSB, a lysosomal enzyme. We present here the results of a study undertaken to identify the mutations in ARSB in MPS VI patients in India. Around 160 ARSB mutations, of which just 4 are from India, have been reported in the literature. Our study covered nine MPS VI patients from eight families. Both familial mutations were found in seven families, and only one mutation was found in one family. Seven mutations were found - four novel (p.G38_G40del3, p.C91R, p.L98R and p.R315P), two previously reported from India (p.D53N and p.W450C), and one reported from outside India (p.R160Q). One mutation, p.W450C, was present in two families, and the other six mutations were present in one family each. Analysis of the molecular structure of the enzyme revealed that most of these mutations either cause loss of an active site residue or destabilize the structure of the enzyme. The only previous study on mutations in ARSB in Indian MPS VI patients, by Kantaputra et al. 2014 [1], reported four novel mutations of which two (p.D53N and p.W450C) were found in our study as well. Till date, nine mutations have been reported from India, through our study and the Kantaputra study. Eight out of these nine mutations have been found only in India. This suggests that the population studied by us might have its own typical set of mutations, with other populations equally likely to have their own set of mutations. PMID:26937411

  20. The Androgen Receptor Gene Mutations Database.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Lehvaslaiho, H; Beitel, L K; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M

    1998-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 272 to 309 in the past year. We have expanded the database: (i) by giving each entry an accession number; (ii) by adding information on the length of polymorphic polyglutamine (polyGln) and polyglycine (polyGly) tracts in exon 1; (iii) by adding information on large gene deletions; (iv) by providing a direct link with a completely searchable database (courtesy EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute). The addition of the exon 1 polymorphisms is discussed in light of their possible relevance as markers for predisposition to prostate or breast cancer. The database is also available on the internet (http://www.mcgill. ca/androgendb/ ), from EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (ftp. ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen ), or as a Macintosh FilemakerPro or Word file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  1. Big Blue Transgenic Mouse lacl mutation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stiegler, G.L.; Stillwell, L.C. )

    1993-01-01

    In this report the authors describe a rapid general method for mutant blue plaque molecular analysis. The mutant analysis discussed here resulted from radon inhalation exposure. The described method circumvents Stratagene's plasmid isolation and ensuing sequence analysis of the entire lac1 gene. The authors have adapted the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis for localizing mutations within the lac1 coding region. Three overlapping PCR products of approximately 450 bp representing the entire lac1 coding region are used for SSCP analysis. Those PCR products with an altered SSCP electrophoretic migration focus the mutation to a smaller region of the lac1 gene that is analyzed by direct cycle sequencing. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Ghrelin Receptor Mutations and Human Obesity.

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Tao, Y-X

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR) was originally identified as an orphan receptor in porcine and rat anterior pituitary membranes. In 1999, GHSR was deorphanized and shown to be a receptor for ghrelin, a peptide hormone secreted from the stomach. Therefore, GHSR is also called ghrelin receptor. In addition to regulating growth hormone secretion, ghrelin receptor regulates various physiological processes, including food intake and energy expenditure, glucose metabolism, cardiovascular functions, gastric acid secretion and motility, and immune function. Several human genetic studies conducted in populations originated from Europe, Africa, South America, and East Asia identified rare mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms that might be associated with human obesity and short stature. Functional analyses of mutant GHSRs reveal multiple defects, including cell surface expression, ligand binding, and basal and stimulated signaling. With growing understanding in the functionality of naturally occurring GHSR mutations, potential therapeutic strategies including pharmacological chaperones and novel ligands could be used to correct the GHSR mutants. PMID:27288828

  3. ELOVL5 mutations cause spinocerebellar ataxia 38.

    PubMed

    Di Gregorio, Eleonora; Borroni, Barbara; Giorgio, Elisa; Lacerenza, Daniela; Ferrero, Marta; Lo Buono, Nicola; Ragusa, Neftj; Mancini, Cecilia; Gaussen, Marion; Calcia, Alessandro; Mitro, Nico; Hoxha, Eriola; Mura, Isabella; Coviello, Domenico A; Moon, Young-Ah; Tesson, Christelle; Vaula, Giovanna; Couarch, Philippe; Orsi, Laura; Duregon, Eleonora; Papotti, Mauro Giulio; Deleuze, Jean-François; Imbert, Jean; Costanzi, Chiara; Padovani, Alessandro; Giunti, Paola; Maillet-Vioud, Marcel; Durr, Alexandra; Brice, Alexis; Tempia, Filippo; Funaro, Ada; Boccone, Loredana; Caruso, Donatella; Stevanin, Giovanni; Brusco, Alfredo

    2014-08-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a heterogeneous group of autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorders involving the cerebellum and 23 different genes. We mapped SCA38 to a 56 Mb region on chromosome 6p in a SCA-affected Italian family by whole-genome linkage analysis. Targeted resequencing identified a single missense mutation (c.689G>T [p.Gly230Val]) in ELOVL5. Mutation screening of 456 independent SCA-affected individuals identified the same mutation in two further unrelated Italian families. Haplotyping showed that at least two of the three families shared a common ancestor. One further missense variant (c.214C>G [p.Leu72Val]) was found in a French family. Both missense changes affect conserved amino acids, are predicted to be damaging by multiple bioinformatics tools, and were not identified in ethnically matched controls or within variant databases. ELOVL5 encodes an elongase involved in the synthesis of polyunsaturated fatty acids of the ω3 and ω6 series. Arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, two final products of the enzyme, were reduced in the serum of affected individuals. Immunohistochemistry on control mice and human brain demonstrated high levels in Purkinje cells. In transfection experiments, subcellular localization of altered ELOVL5 showed a perinuclear distribution with a signal increase in the Golgi compartment, whereas the wild-type showed a widespread signal in the endoplasmic reticulum. SCA38 and SCA34 are examples of SCAs due to mutations in elongase-encoding genes, emphasizing the importance of fatty-acid metabolism in neurological diseases.

  4. Better living with hyper-mutation.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Myron F

    2016-07-01

    The simplest forms of mutations, base substitutions, typically have negative consequences, aside from their existential role in evolution and fitness. Hypermutations, mutations on steroids, occurring at frequencies of 10(-2) -10(-4) per base pair, straddle a domain between fitness and death, depending on the presence or absence of regulatory constraints. Two facets of hypermutation, one in Escherichia coli involving DNA polymerase V (pol V), the other in humans, involving activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) are portrayed. Pol V is induced as part of the DNA-damage-induced SOS regulon, and is responsible for generating the lion's share of mutations when catalyzing translesion DNA synthesis (TLS). Four regulatory mechanisms, temporal, internal, conformational, and spatial, activate pol V to copy damaged DNA and then deactivate it. On the flip side of the coin, SOS-induced pols V, IV, and II mutate undamaged DNA, thus providing genetic diversity heightening long-term survival and evolutionary fitness. Fitness in humans is principally the domain of a remarkably versatile immune system marked by somatic hypermutations (SHM) in immunoglobulin variable (IgV) regions that ensure antibody (Ab) diversity. AID initiates SHM by deaminating C → U, favoring hot WRC (W = A/T, R = A/G) motifs. Since there are large numbers of trinucleotide motif targets throughout IgV, AID must exercise considerable catalytic restraint to avoid attacking such sites repeatedly, which would otherwise compromise diversity. Processive, random, and inefficient AID-catalyzed dC deamination simulates salient features of SHM, yet generates B-cell lymphomas when working at the wrong time in the wrong place. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 57:421-434, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Selection-mutation process of RNA viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aafif, Amal; Lin, Juan

    1998-02-01

    RNA viruses mutate at a rate 105-106 times faster than their DNA counterparts. This process can be simulated by a continuous stochastic model on a smooth one-dimensional fitness landscape where selection forces the viral quasispecies to climb uphill to higher fitness values. Theoretical results of the model with drift velocity proportional to fitness are fitted to the experimental observations made by Novella et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 92, 5841 (1995)].

  6. Genetic mutations in Gorlin-Goltz syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Daneswari, Muthumula; Reddy, Mutjumula Swamy Ranga

    2013-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is a rare multisystemic disease inherited in a dominant autosomal at a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. It is mainly characterized by basal cell carcinoma, odontogenic keratocyst and skeletal anomalies. Diagnosis is based upon established major and minor clinical and radiographic criteria and gene mutation analysis. This article presents a case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, its genetic predisposition, diagnosis and management. PMID:24339558

  7. Activating STAT6 mutations in follicular lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Yildiz, Mehmet; Li, Hongxiu; Bernard, Denzil; Amin, Nisar A.; Ouillette, Peter; Jones, Siân; Saiya-Cork, Kamlai; Parkin, Brian; Jacobi, Kathryn; Shedden, Kerby; Wang, Shaomeng; Chang, Alfred E.; Kaminski, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) is the second most common non-Hodgkin lymphoma in the Western world. FL cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic factors influence FL biology and clinical outcome. To further our understanding of the genetic basis of FL, we performed whole-exome sequencing of 23 highly purified FL cases and 1 transformed FL case and expanded findings to a combined total of 114 FLs. We report recurrent mutations in the transcription factor STAT6 in 11% of FLs and identified the STAT6 amino acid residue 419 as a novel STAT6 mutation hotspot (p.419D/G, p.419D/A, and p.419D/H). FL-associated STAT6 mutations were activating, as evidenced by increased transactivation in HEK293T cell–based transfection/luciferase reporter assays, heightened interleukin-4 (IL-4) –induced activation of target genes in stable STAT6 transfected lymphoma cell lines, and elevated baseline expression levels of STAT6 target genes in primary FL B cells harboring mutant STAT6. Mechanistically, FL-associated STAT6 mutations facilitated nuclear residency of STAT6, independent of IL-4–induced STAT6-Y641 phosphorylation. Structural modeling of STAT6 based on the structure of the STAT1-DNA complex revealed that most FL-associated STAT6 mutants locate to the STAT6-DNA interface, potentially facilitating heightened interactions. The genetic and functional data combined strengthen the recognition of the IL-4/JAK/STAT6 axis as a driver of FL pathogenesis. PMID:25428220

  8. The point mutation process in proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, R. M.; Dayhoff, M. O.

    1978-01-01

    An optimized scoring matrix for residue-by-residue comparisons of distantly related protein sequences has been developed. The scoring matrix is based on observed exchanges and mutabilities of amino acids in 1572 closely related sequences derived from a cross-section of protein groups. Very few superimposed or parallel mutations are included in the data. The scoring matrix is most useful for demonstrating the relatedness of proteins between 65 and 85% different.

  9. Parton branching in the color mutation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwa, Rudolph C.; Wu, Yuanfang

    1999-11-01

    The soft production problem in hadronic collisions as described in the eikonal color mutation branching model is improved in the way that the initial parton distribution is treated. Furry branching of the partons is considered as a means of describing the nonperturbative process of parton reproduction in the soft interaction. The values of all the moments, and Cq, for q=2,...,5, as well as their energy dependences, can be correctly determined by the use of only two parameters.

  10. The directed mutation controversy and neo-Darwinism.

    PubMed

    Lenski, R E; Mittler, J E

    1993-01-01

    According to neo-Darwinian theory, random mutation produces genetic differences among organisms whereas natural selection tends to increase the frequency of advantageous alleles. However, several recent papers claim that certain mutations in bacteria and yeast occur at much higher rates specifically when the mutant phenotypes are advantageous. Various molecular models have been proposed that might explain these directed mutations, but the models have not been confirmed. Critics contend that studies purporting to demonstrate directed mutation lack certain controls and fail to account adequately for population dynamics. Further experiments that address these criticisms do not support the existence of directed mutations.

  11. Clinical relevance between CALR mutation and myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Chen; Ma, Xiaochao

    2015-01-01

    In late 2013, somatic mutations in calreticulin (CALR), mainly those involving insertions and deletions in exon 9, attracted the great attention of hematologists and researchers. These JAK2- and MPL- mutual exclusive mutations enjoy a favorable specificity and prevalence (20-30%) in patients with essential thrombocythemia (ET) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF), suggesting promise for these mutations in disease management. Moreover, these genetic variations are now also considered as a group of independent risk factors for disease prognosis. In this mini-review, we will document the value of CALR mutations in disease diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutic strategy selection, and we will discuss current advances in methods to detect these mutations. PMID:27358872

  12. Novel recurrently mutated genes in African American colon cancers

    PubMed Central

    Guda, Kishore; Veigl, Martina L.; Varadan, Vinay; Nosrati, Arman; Ravi, Lakshmeswari; Lutterbaugh, James; Beard, Lydia; Willson, James K. V.; Sedwick, W. David; Wang, Zhenghe John; Molyneaux, Neil; Miron, Alexander; Adams, Mark D.; Elston, Robert C.; Markowitz, Sanford D.; Willis, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    We used whole-exome and targeted sequencing to characterize somatic mutations in 103 colorectal cancers (CRC) from African Americans, identifying 20 new genes as significantly mutated in CRC. Resequencing 129 Caucasian derived CRCs confirmed a 15-gene set as a preferential target for mutations in African American CRCs. Two predominant genes, ephrin type A receptor 6 (EPHA6) and folliculin (FLCN), with mutations exclusive to African American CRCs, are by genetic and biological criteria highly likely African American CRC driver genes. These previously unsuspected differences in the mutational landscapes of CRCs arising among individuals of different ethnicities have potential to impact on broader disparities in cancer behaviors. PMID:25583493

  13. Novel recurrently mutated genes in African American colon cancers.

    PubMed

    Guda, Kishore; Veigl, Martina L; Varadan, Vinay; Nosrati, Arman; Ravi, Lakshmeswari; Lutterbaugh, James; Beard, Lydia; Willson, James K V; Sedwick, W David; Wang, Zhenghe John; Molyneaux, Neil; Miron, Alexander; Adams, Mark D; Elston, Robert C; Markowitz, Sanford D; Willis, Joseph E

    2015-01-27

    We used whole-exome and targeted sequencing to characterize somatic mutations in 103 colorectal cancers (CRC) from African Americans, identifying 20 new genes as significantly mutated in CRC. Resequencing 129 Caucasian derived CRCs confirmed a 15-gene set as a preferential target for mutations in African American CRCs. Two predominant genes, ephrin type A receptor 6 (EPHA6) and folliculin (FLCN), with mutations exclusive to African American CRCs, are by genetic and biological criteria highly likely African American CRC driver genes. These previously unsuspected differences in the mutational landscapes of CRCs arising among individuals of different ethnicities have potential to impact on broader disparities in cancer behaviors. PMID:25583493

  14. Persistence of HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance mutations.

    PubMed

    Castro, Hannah; Pillay, Deenan; Cane, Patricia; Asboe, David; Cambiano, Valentina; Phillips, Andrew; Dunn, David T

    2013-11-01

    There are few data on the persistence of individual human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmitted drug resistance (TDR) mutations in the absence of selective drug pressure. We studied 313 patients in whom TDR mutations were detected at their first resistance test and who had a subsequent test performed while ART-naive. The rate at which mutations became undetectable was estimated using exponential regression accounting for interval censoring. Most thymidine analogue mutations (TAMs) and T215 revertants (but not T215F/Y) were found to be highly stable, with NNRTI and PI mutations being relatively less persistent. Our estimates are important for informing HIV transmission models.

  15. Prospects for cellular mutational assays in human populations

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, M.L.

    1984-06-29

    Practical, sensitive, and effective human cellular assays for detecting somatic and germinal mutations would have great value in environmental mutagenesis and carcinogenesis studies. Such assays would fill the void between human mutagenicity and the data that exist from short-term tests and from mutagenicity in other species. This paper discusses the following possible human cellular assays: (1) HPRT (hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase) somatic cell mutation based on 6-thioguanine resistance; (2) hemoglobin somatic cell mutation assay; (3) glycophorin somatic cell mutation assay; and (4) LDH-X sperm cell mutation assay. 18 references.

  16. Mutation detection in X-linked hydrocephalus

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, S.M.; Balnaves, M.E.; Rosenthal, A.

    1994-09-01

    X-linked hydrocephalus (XLH), which maps to Xq28, affects about 1 in 30,000 male births. A candidate gene, L1-CAM, which codes for a neural adhesion molecule, mapped to the same region of the X chromosome. Rosenthal et al. (1992) identified a patient with XLH that had aberrant splicing of L1-CAM. A mutation at a potential branch point signal in an intron was identified. The gene has a number of exons and encodes a 4.2 kb mRNA. We isolated RNA from lymphocytes or fibroblasts from five XLH patients. cDNA was synthesized and the gene was amplified in two overlapping fragments, 2.2 kb and 1.7 kb respectively. A nested PCR approach with two rounds of PCR amplification was employed. Patient 900124 did not have a full length 5{prime} fragment and 880022 did not have a full length 3{prime} product. Restriction digestions defined the region of the alteration in the messenger RNA and sequencing in this region showed the loss of exons 10 and 21, respectively. All 5{prime} and 3{prime} products were also digested with several restriction enzymes (e.g., Msp I, Taq I), which have CG in their recognition sites, in the hope that point mutations that alter these restriction enzyme sites might be identified. A point mutation creating an Msp I site was found in patient 930067.

  17. ACTN1 mutations cause congenital macrothrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Kunishima, Shinji; Okuno, Yusuke; Yoshida, Kenichi; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Sanada, Masashi; Muramatsu, Hideki; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Miyazaki, Koji; Sakai, Michio; Ohtake, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Iguchi, Akihiro; Niimi, Gen; Otsu, Makoto; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Miyano, Satoru; Saito, Hidehiko; Kojima, Seiji; Ogawa, Seishi

    2013-03-01

    Congenital macrothrombocytopenia (CMTP) is a heterogeneous group of rare platelet disorders characterized by a congenital reduction of platelet counts and abnormally large platelets, for which CMTP-causing mutations are only found in approximately half the cases. We herein performed whole-exome sequencing and targeted Sanger sequencing to identify mutations that cause CMTP, in which a dominant mode of transmission had been suspected but for which no known responsible mutations have been documented. In 13 Japanese CMTP-affected pedigrees, we identified six (46%) affected by ACTN1 variants cosegregating with CMTP. In the entire cohort, ACNT1 variants accounted for 5.5% of the dominant forms of CMTP cases and represented the fourth most common cause in Japanese individuals. Individuals with ACTN1 variants presented with moderate macrothrombocytopenia with anisocytosis but were either asymptomatic or had only a modest bleeding tendency. ACTN1 encodes α-actinin-1, a member of the actin-crosslinking protein superfamily that participates in the organization of the cytoskeleton. In vitro transfection experiments in Chinese hamster ovary cells demonstrated that altered α-actinin-1 disrupted the normal actin-based cytoskeletal structure. Moreover, transduction of mouse fetal liver-derived megakaryocytes with disease-associated ACTN1 variants caused a disorganized actin-based cytoskeleton in megakaryocytes, resulting in the production of abnormally large proplatelet tips, which were reduced in number. Our findings provide an insight into the pathogenesis of CMTP.

  18. Cis-regulatory mutations in human disease

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Cis-acting regulatory sequences are required for the proper temporal and spatial control of gene expression. Variation in gene expression is highly heritable and a significant determinant of human disease susceptibility. The diversity of human genetic diseases attributed, in whole or in part, to mutations in non-coding regulatory sequences is on the rise. Improvements in genome-wide methods of associating genetic variation with human disease and predicting DNA with cis-regulatory potential are two of the major reasons for these recent advances. This review will highlight select examples from the literature that have successfully integrated genetic and genomic approaches to uncover the molecular basis by which cis-regulatory mutations alter gene expression and contribute to human disease. The fine mapping of disease-causing variants has led to the discovery of novel cis-acting regulatory elements that, in some instances, are located as far away as 1.5 Mb from the target gene. In other cases, the prior knowledge of the regulatory landscape surrounding the gene of interest aided in the selection of enhancers for mutation screening. The success of these studies should provide a framework for following up on the large number of genome-wide association studies that have identified common variants in non-coding regions of the genome that associate with increased risk of human diseases including, diabetes, autism, Crohn's, colorectal cancer, and asthma, to name a few. PMID:19641089

  19. Ichthyosis vulgaris: the filaggrin mutation disease.

    PubMed

    Thyssen, J P; Godoy-Gijon, E; Elias, P M

    2013-06-01

    Ichthyosis vulgaris is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG) and is characterized clinically by xerosis, scaling, keratosis pilaris, palmar and plantar hyperlinearity, and a strong association with atopic disorders. According to the published studies presented in this review article, FLG mutations are observed in approximately 7·7% of Europeans and 3·0% of Asians, but appear to be infrequent in darker-skinned populations. This clinical review article provides an overview of ichthyosis vulgaris epidemiology, related disorders and pathomechanisms. Not only does ichthyosis vulgaris possess a wide clinical spectrum, recent studies suggest that carriers of FLG mutations may have a generally altered risk of developing common diseases, even beyond atopic disorders. Mechanistic studies have shown increased penetration of allergens and chemicals in filaggrin-deficient skin, and epidemiological studies have found higher levels of hand eczema, irritant contact dermatitis, nickel sensitization and serum vitamin D levels. When relevant, individuals should be informed about an increased risk of developing dermatitis when repeatedly or continuously exposed to nickel or irritants. Moreover, with our current knowledge, individuals with ichthyosis vulgaris should be protected against neonatal exposure to cats to prevent atopic dermatitis and should abstain from smoking to prevent asthma. Finally, they should be advised against excessive exposure to factors that decrease skin barrier functions and increase the risk of atopic dermatitis.

  20. Painful peripheral neuropathy and sodium channel mutations.

    PubMed

    Hoeijmakers, Janneke G J; Faber, Catharina G; Merkies, Ingemar S J; Waxman, Stephen G

    2015-06-01

    Peripheral neuropathy can lead to neuropathic pain in a subset of patients. Painful peripheral neuropathy is a debilitating disorder, reflected by a reduced quality of life. Therapeutic strategies are limited and often disappointing, as in most cases targeted treatment is not available. Elucidating pathogenetic factors for pain might provide a target for optimal treatment. Voltage-gated sodium channels NaV1.7-NaV1.9 are expressed in the small-diameter dorsal root ganglion neurons and their axons. By a targeted gene approach, missense gain-of-function mutations of NaV1.7-NaV1.9 have been demonstrated in painful peripheral neuropathy. Functional analyses have shown that these mutations produce a spectrum of pro-excitatory changes in channel biophysics, with the shared outcome at the cellular level of dorsal root ganglion hyperexcitability. Reduced neurite outgrowth may be another consequence of sodium channel mutations, and possible therapeutic strategies include blockade of sodium channels or block of reverse operation of the sodium-calcium exchanger. Increased understanding of the pathophysiology of painful peripheral neuropathy offers new targets that may provide a basis for more effective treatment.

  1. Bypass of genetic constraints during mutator evolution to antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Couce, Alejandro; Rodríguez-Rojas, Alexandro; Blázquez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Genetic constraints can block many mutational pathways to optimal genotypes in real fitness landscapes, yet the extent to which this can limit evolution remains to be determined. Interestingly, mutator bacteria elevate only specific types of mutations, and therefore could be very sensitive to genetic constraints. Testing this possibility is not only clinically relevant, but can also inform about the general impact of genetic constraints in adaptation. Here, we evolved 576 populations of two mutator and one wild-type Escherichia coli to doubling concentrations of the antibiotic cefotaxime. All strains carried TEM-1, a β-lactamase enzyme well known by its low availability of mutational pathways. Crucially, one of the mutators does not elevate any of the relevant first-step mutations known to improve cefatoximase activity. Despite this, both mutators displayed a similar ability to evolve more than 1000-fold resistance. Initial adaptation proceeded in parallel through general multi-drug resistance mechanisms. High-level resistance, in contrast, was achieved through divergent paths; with the a priori inferior mutator exploiting alternative mutational pathways in PBP3, the target of the antibiotic. These results have implications for mutator management in clinical infections and, more generally, illustrate that limits to natural selection in real organisms are alleviated by the existence of multiple loci contributing to fitness. PMID:25716795

  2. Pan-Cancer Analysis of Mutation Hotspots in Protein Domains.

    PubMed

    Miller, Martin L; Reznik, Ed; Gauthier, Nicholas P; Aksoy, Bülent Arman; Korkut, Anil; Gao, Jianjiong; Ciriello, Giovanni; Schultz, Nikolaus; Sander, Chris

    2015-09-23

    In cancer genomics, recurrence of mutations in independent tumor samples is a strong indicator of functional impact. However, rare functional mutations can escape detection by recurrence analysis owing to lack of statistical power. We enhance statistical power by extending the notion of recurrence of mutations from single genes to gene families that share homologous protein domains. Domain mutation analysis also sharpens the functional interpretation of the impact of mutations, as domains more succinctly embody function than entire genes. By mapping mutations in 22 different tumor types to equivalent positions in multiple sequence alignments of domains, we confirm well-known functional mutation hotspots, identify uncharacterized rare variants in one gene that are equivalent to well-characterized mutations in another gene, detect previously unknown mutation hotspots, and provide hypotheses about molecular mechanisms and downstream effects of domain mutations. With the rapid expansion of cancer genomics projects, protein domain hotspot analysis will likely provide many more leads linking mutations in proteins to the cancer phenotype. PMID:27135912

  3. Bypass of genetic constraints during mutator evolution to antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Couce, Alejandro; Rodríguez-Rojas, Alexandro; Blázquez, Jesús

    2015-04-01

    Genetic constraints can block many mutational pathways to optimal genotypes in real fitness landscapes, yet the extent to which this can limit evolution remains to be determined. Interestingly, mutator bacteria elevate only specific types of mutations, and therefore could be very sensitive to genetic constraints. Testing this possibility is not only clinically relevant, but can also inform about the general impact of genetic constraints in adaptation. Here, we evolved 576 populations of two mutator and one wild-type Escherichia coli to doubling concentrations of the antibiotic cefotaxime. All strains carried TEM-1, a β-lactamase enzyme well known by its low availability of mutational pathways. Crucially, one of the mutators does not elevate any of the relevant first-step mutations known to improve cefatoximase activity. Despite this, both mutators displayed a similar ability to evolve more than 1000-fold resistance. Initial adaptation proceeded in parallel through general multi-drug resistance mechanisms. High-level resistance, in contrast, was achieved through divergent paths; with the a priori inferior mutator exploiting alternative mutational pathways in PBP3, the target of the antibiotic. These results have implications for mutator management in clinical infections and, more generally, illustrate that limits to natural selection in real organisms are alleviated by the existence of multiple loci contributing to fitness.

  4. Mutated tumor alleles are expressed according to their DNA frequency.

    PubMed

    Castle, John C; Loewer, Martin; Boegel, Sebastian; Tadmor, Arbel D; Boisguerin, Valesca; de Graaf, Jos; Paret, Claudia; Diken, Mustafa; Kreiter, Sebastian; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2014-04-22

    The transcription of tumor mutations from DNA into RNA has implications for biology, epigenetics and clinical practice. It is not clear if mutations are in general transcribed and, if so, at what proportion to the wild-type allele. Here, we examined the correlation between DNA mutation allele frequency and RNA mutation allele frequency. We sequenced the exome and transcriptome of tumor cell lines with large copy number variations, identified heterozygous single nucleotide mutations and absolute DNA copy number, and determined the corresponding DNA and RNA mutation allele fraction. We found that 99% of the DNA mutations in expressed genes are expressed as RNA. Moreover, we found a high correlation between the DNA and RNA mutation allele frequency. Exceptions are mutations that cause premature termination codons and therefore activate nonsense-mediated decay. Beyond this, we did not find evidence of any wide-scale mechanism, such as allele-specific epigenetic silencing, preferentially promoting mutated or wild-type alleles. In conclusion, our data strongly suggest that genes are equally transcribed from all alleles, mutated and wild-type, and thus transcribed in proportion to their DNA allele frequency.

  5. Weaver syndrome and EZH2 mutations: Clarifying the clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Tatton-Brown, Katrina; Murray, Anne; Hanks, Sandra; Douglas, Jenny; Armstrong, Ruth; Banka, Siddharth; Bird, Lynne M; Clericuzio, Carol L; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Cushing, Tom; Flinter, Frances; Jacquemont, Marie-Line; Joss, Shelagh; Kinning, Esther; Lynch, Sally Ann; Magee, Alex; McConnell, Vivienne; Medeira, Ana; Ozono, Keiichi; Patton, Michael; Rankin, Julia; Shears, Debbie; Simon, Marleen; Splitt, Miranda; Strenger, Volker; Stuurman, Kyra; Taylor, Clare; Titheradge, Hannah; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Temple, I Karen; Cole, Trevor; Seal, Sheila; Rahman, Nazneen

    2013-12-01

    Weaver syndrome, first described in 1974, is characterized by tall stature, a typical facial appearance, and variable intellectual disability. In 2011, mutations in the histone methyltransferase, EZH2, were shown to cause Weaver syndrome. To date, we have identified 48 individuals with EZH2 mutations. The mutations were primarily missense mutations occurring throughout the gene, with some clustering in the SET domain (12/48). Truncating mutations were uncommon (4/48) and only identified in the final exon, after the SET domain. Through analyses of clinical data and facial photographs of EZH2 mutation-positive individuals, we have shown that the facial features can be subtle and the clinical diagnosis of Weaver syndrome is thus challenging, especially in older individuals. However, tall stature is very common, reported in >90% of affected individuals. Intellectual disability is also common, present in ~80%, but is highly variable and frequently mild. Additional clinical features which may help in stratifying individuals to EZH2 mutation testing include camptodactyly, soft, doughy skin, umbilical hernia, and a low, hoarse cry. Considerable phenotypic overlap between Sotos and Weaver syndromes is also evident. The identification of an EZH2 mutation can therefore provide an objective means of confirming a subtle presentation of Weaver syndrome and/or distinguishing Weaver and Sotos syndromes. As mutation testing becomes increasingly accessible and larger numbers of EZH2 mutation-positive individuals are identified, knowledge of the clinical spectrum and prognostic implications of EZH2 mutations should improve.

  6. Mutation analysis of 28 gaucher disease patients: The Australasian experience

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, B.D.; Nelson, P.V.; Robertson, E.F.; Morris, C.P.

    1994-01-15

    Gaucher disease is the most common lysomal storage disease. It is an autosomal recessive disorder that results from a deficiency of {beta}-glucocerrebrosidase. Three clinical phenotypes have been described: non-neuronopathic, acute neuronopathic, and subacuteneuronopathic. Genomic DNA from 28 Australasian patients of diverse ethnic origin with Gaucher disease was screened for 3 common mutations (1226G, 1448C and 84GG) using the amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS), and one uncommon mutation (1504T) by restriction enzyme digestion. Thirty-eight of the 56 independent alleles in these patients were characterized, with 1448C present in 42% and 1226G in 28% of the alleles. The 1226G mutation was associated only with the nonneuronopathic phenotype and 7 of the 15 patients who carried the 1448C mutation developed neuronopathic disease. Three infants who died in the neonatal period following a rapidly progressive neurodegenerative course carried no identifiable mutations. The 84GG mutation was carried by 2 Jewish patients and 1504T was present in one patient. It is now possible to rapidly identify the common Gaucher mutations using ARMS and restriction enzyme digestion, and our findings confirm the heterogeneity of mutations in Gaucher disease. It is also possible to predict in part the phenotypic outcome when screening patients for these mutations. The authors consider mutation analysis to be of most use in prenatal diagnosis and for carrier detection within affected families. 27 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Mitochondrial Mutations in Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Salivary Glands

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Marietta; Smith, Ian M.; Califano, Joseph A.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Ha, Patrick K.

    2009-01-01

    Background The MitoChip v2.0 resequencing array is an array-based technique allowing for accurate and complete sequencing of the mitochondrial genome. No studies have investigated mitochondrial mutation in salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinomas. Methodology The entire mitochondrial genome of 22 salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinomas (ACC) of salivary glands and matched leukocyte DNA was sequenced to determine the frequency and distribution of mitochondrial mutations in ACC tumors. Principal Findings Seventeen of 22 ACCs (77%) carried mitochondrial mutations, ranging in number from 1 to 37 mutations. A disproportionate number of mutations occurred in the D-loop. Twelve of 17 tumors (70.6%) carried mutations resulting in amino acid changes of translated proteins. Nine of 17 tumors (52.9%) with a mutation carried an amino acid changing mutation in the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase (NADH) complex. Conclusions/Significance Mitochondrial mutation is frequent in salivary ACCs. The high incidence of amino acid changing mutations implicates alterations in aerobic respiration in ACC carcinogenesis. D-loop mutations are of unclear significance, but may be associated with alterations in transcription or replication. PMID:20041111

  8. Weaver syndrome and EZH2 mutations: Clarifying the clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Tatton-Brown, Katrina; Murray, Anne; Hanks, Sandra; Douglas, Jenny; Armstrong, Ruth; Banka, Siddharth; Bird, Lynne M; Clericuzio, Carol L; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Cushing, Tom; Flinter, Frances; Jacquemont, Marie-Line; Joss, Shelagh; Kinning, Esther; Lynch, Sally Ann; Magee, Alex; McConnell, Vivienne; Medeira, Ana; Ozono, Keiichi; Patton, Michael; Rankin, Julia; Shears, Debbie; Simon, Marleen; Splitt, Miranda; Strenger, Volker; Stuurman, Kyra; Taylor, Clare; Titheradge, Hannah; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Temple, I Karen; Cole, Trevor; Seal, Sheila; Rahman, Nazneen

    2013-12-01

    Weaver syndrome, first described in 1974, is characterized by tall stature, a typical facial appearance, and variable intellectual disability. In 2011, mutations in the histone methyltransferase, EZH2, were shown to cause Weaver syndrome. To date, we have identified 48 individuals with EZH2 mutations. The mutations were primarily missense mutations occurring throughout the gene, with some clustering in the SET domain (12/48). Truncating mutations were uncommon (4/48) and only identified in the final exon, after the SET domain. Through analyses of clinical data and facial photographs of EZH2 mutation-positive individuals, we have shown that the facial features can be subtle and the clinical diagnosis of Weaver syndrome is thus challenging, especially in older individuals. However, tall stature is very common, reported in >90% of affected individuals. Intellectual disability is also common, present in ~80%, but is highly variable and frequently mild. Additional clinical features which may help in stratifying individuals to EZH2 mutation testing include camptodactyly, soft, doughy skin, umbilical hernia, and a low, hoarse cry. Considerable phenotypic overlap between Sotos and Weaver syndromes is also evident. The identification of an EZH2 mutation can therefore provide an objective means of confirming a subtle presentation of Weaver syndrome and/or distinguishing Weaver and Sotos syndromes. As mutation testing becomes increasingly accessible and larger numbers of EZH2 mutation-positive individuals are identified, knowledge of the clinical spectrum and prognostic implications of EZH2 mutations should improve. PMID:24214728

  9. Mutation Update and Review of Severe Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Froese, D Sean; Huemer, Martina; Suormala, Terttu; Burda, Patricie; Coelho, David; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Landolt, Markus A; Kožich, Viktor; Fowler, Brian; Baumgartner, Matthias R

    2016-05-01

    Severe 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency is caused by mutations in the MTHFR gene and results in hyperhomocysteinemia and varying severity of disease, ranging from neonatal lethal to adult onset. Including those described here, 109 MTHFR mutations have been reported in 171 families, consisting of 70 missense mutations, 17 that primarily affect splicing, 11 nonsense mutations, seven small deletions, two no-stop mutations, one small duplication, and one large duplication. Only 36% of mutations recur in unrelated families, indicating that most are "private." The most common mutation is c.1530A>G (numbered from NM_005957.4, p.Lys510 = ) causing a splicing defect, found in 13 families; the most common missense mutation is c.1129C>T (p.Arg377Cys) identified in 10 families. To increase disease understanding, we report enzymatic activity, detected mutations, and clinical onset information (early, <1 year; or late, >1 year) for all published patients available, demonstrating that patients with early onset have less residual enzyme activity than those presenting later. We also review animal models, diagnostic approaches, clinical presentations, and treatment options. This is the first large review of mutations in MTHFR, highlighting the wide spectrum of disease-causing mutations. PMID:26872964

  10. Screening of sarcomere gene mutations in young athletes with abnormal findings in electrocardiography: identification of a MYH7 mutation and MYBPC3 mutations.

    PubMed

    Kadota, Chika; Arimura, Takuro; Hayashi, Takeharu; Naruse, Taeko K; Kawai, Sachio; Kimura, Akinori

    2015-10-01

    There is an overlap between the physiological cardiac remodeling associated with training in athletes, the so-called athlete's heart, and mild forms of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), the most common hereditary cardiac disease. HCM is often accompanied by unfavorable outcomes including a sudden cardiac death in the adolescents. Because one of the initial signs of HCM is abnormality in electrocardiogram (ECG), athletes may need to monitor for ECG findings to prevent any unfavorable outcomes. HCM is caused by mutations in genes for sarcomere proteins, but there is no report on the systematic screening of gene mutations in athletes. One hundred and two genetically unrelated young Japanese athletes with abnormal ECG findings were the subjects for the analysis of four sarcomere genes, MYH7, MYBPC3, TNNT2 and TNNI3. We found that 5 out of 102 (4.9%) athletes carried mutations: a heterozygous MYH7 Glu935Lys mutation, a heterozygous MYBPC3 Arg160Trp mutation and another heterozygous MYBPC3 Thr1046Met mutation, all of which had been reported as HCM-associated mutations, in 1, 2 and 2 subjects, respectively. This is the first study of systematic screening of sarcomere gene mutations in a cohort of athletes with abnormal ECG, demonstrating the presence of sarcomere gene mutations in the athlete's heart.

  11. Costs and benefits of mutational robustness in RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Stern, Adi; Bianco, Simone; Yeh, Ming Te; Wright, Caroline; Butcher, Kristin; Tang, Chao; Nielsen, Rasmus; Andino, Raul

    2014-08-21

    The accumulation of mutations in RNA viruses is thought to facilitate rapid adaptation to changes in the environment. However, most mutations have deleterious effects on fitness, especially for viruses. Thus, tolerance to mutations should determine the nature and extent of genetic diversity that can be maintained in the population. Here, we combine population genetics theory, computer simulation, and experimental evolution to examine the advantages and disadvantages of tolerance to mutations, also known as mutational robustness. We find that mutational robustness increases neutral diversity and, as expected, can facilitate adaptation to a new environment. Surprisingly, under certain conditions, robustness may also be an impediment for viral adaptation, if a highly diverse population contains a large proportion of previously neutral mutations that are deleterious in the new environment. These findings may inform therapeutic strategies that cause extinction of otherwise robust viral populations.

  12. Rare nonconservative LRP6 mutations are associated with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajvir; Smith, Emily; Fathzadeh, Mohsen; Liu, Wenzhong; Go, Gwang-Woong; Subrahmanyan, Lakshman; Faramarzi, Saeed; McKenna, William; Mani, Arya

    2013-09-01

    A rare mutation in LRP6 has been shown to underlie autosomal dominant coronary artery disease (CAD) and metabolic syndrome in an Iranian kindred. The prevalence and spectrum of LRP6 mutations in the disease population of the United States is not known. Two hundred white Americans with early onset familial CAD and metabolic syndrome and 2,000 healthy Northern European controls were screened for nonconservative mutations in LRP6. Three novel mutations were identified, which cosegregated with the metabolic traits in the kindreds of the affected subjects and none in the controls. All three mutations reside in the second propeller domain, which plays a critical role in ligand binding. Two of the mutations substituted highly conserved arginines in the second YWTD domain and the third substituted a conserved glycosylation site. The functional characterization of one of the variants showed that it impairs Wnt signaling and acts as a loss of function mutation.

  13. Hepatitis C virus induces a mutator phenotype: enhanced mutations of immunoglobulin and protooncogenes.

    PubMed

    Machida, Keigo; Cheng, Kevin T-N; Sung, Vicky M-H; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Lindsay, Karen L; Levine, Alexandra M; Lai, Ming-Yang; Lai, Michael M C

    2004-03-23

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a nonretroviral oncogenic RNA virus, which is frequently associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and B cell lymphoma. We demonstrated here that acute and chronic HCV infection caused a 5- to 10-fold increase in mutation frequency in Ig heavy chain, BCL-6, p53, and beta-catenin genes of in vitro HCV-infected B cell lines and HCV-associated peripheral blood mononuclear cells, lymphomas, and HCCs. The nucleotide-substitution pattern of p53 and beta-catenin was different from that of Ig heavy chain in HCV-infected cells, suggesting two different mechanisms of mutation. In addition, the mutated protooncogenes were amplified in HCV-associated lymphomas and HCCs, but not in lymphomas of nonviral origin or HBV-associated HCC. HCV induced error-prone DNA polymerase zeta, polymerase iota, and activation-induced cytidine deaminase, which together, contributed to the enhancement of mutation frequency, as demonstrated by the RNA interference experiments. These results indicate that HCV induces a mutator phenotype and may transform cells by a hit-and-run mechanism. This finding provides a mechanism of oncogenesis for an RNA virus.

  14. Novel IFT122 mutations in three Argentinian patients with cranioectodermal dysplasia: Expanding the mutational spectrum.

    PubMed

    Moosa, Shahida; Obregon, Maria Gabriela; Altmüller, Janine; Thiele, Holger; Nürnberg, Peter; Fano, Virginia; Wollnik, Bernd

    2016-05-01

    Cranioectodermal dysplasia (CED), also known as Sensenbrenner syndrome, is an autosomal recessive ciliary chondrodysplasia characterized by a recognizable craniofacial gestalt, skeletal abnormalities, and ectodermal features. To date, four genes have been shown to underlie the syndrome, namely, IFT122 (WDR10), WDR35 (IFT121), IFT43 (C14orf179), and WDR19 (IFT144). Clinical characterization of a larger cohort of patients with CED has been undertaken previously. Nevertheless, there are too few molecularly confirmed patients reported in the literature to determine precise genotype-phenotype correlations. To date, biallelic IFT122 mutations have been described in only five families. We therefore studied three unrelated Argentinian patients with typical features of CED using a 4813 next-generation sequencing (NGS) gene panel, which we call the "Mendeliome." The three patients had different, novel, compound heterozygous mutations in IFT122. Consequently, we compared these three patients to those previously described with IFT122 mutations. Thus, our report serves to add 6 novel mutations to the IFT122 mutation spectrum and to contribute to the IFT122-related clinical characterization. PMID:26792575

  15. Whole-genome mutational landscape and characterization of noncoding and structural mutations in liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Akihiro; Furuta, Mayuko; Totoki, Yasushi; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Kato, Mamoru; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Kawakami, Yoshiiku; Ueno, Masaki; Gotoh, Kunihito; Ariizumi, Shun-Ichi; Wardell, Christopher P; Hayami, Shinya; Nakamura, Toru; Aikata, Hiroshi; Arihiro, Koji; Boroevich, Keith A; Abe, Tetsuo; Nakano, Kaoru; Maejima, Kazuhiro; Sasaki-Oku, Aya; Ohsawa, Ayako; Shibuya, Tetsuo; Nakamura, Hiromi; Hama, Natsuko; Hosoda, Fumie; Arai, Yasuhito; Ohashi, Shoko; Urushidate, Tomoko; Nagae, Genta; Yamamoto, Shogo; Ueda, Hiroki; Tatsuno, Kenji; Ojima, Hidenori; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Okusaka, Takuji; Kubo, Michiaki; Marubashi, Shigeru; Yamada, Terumasa; Hirano, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Masakazu; Ohdan, Hideki; Shimada, Kazuaki; Ishikawa, Osamu; Yamaue, Hiroki; Chayama, Kazuki; Miyano, Satoru; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Nakagawa, Hidewaki

    2016-05-01

    Liver cancer, which is most often associated with virus infection, is prevalent worldwide, and its underlying etiology and genomic structure are heterogeneous. Here we provide a whole-genome landscape of somatic alterations in 300 liver cancers from Japanese individuals. Our comprehensive analysis identified point mutations, structural variations (STVs), and virus integrations, in noncoding and coding regions. We discovered mutational signatures related to liver carcinogenesis and recurrently mutated coding and noncoding regions, such as long intergenic noncoding RNA genes (NEAT1 and MALAT1), promoters, CTCF-binding sites, and regulatory regions. STV analysis found a significant association with replication timing and identified known (CDKN2A, CCND1, APC, and TERT) and new (ASH1L, NCOR1, and MACROD2) cancer-related genes that were recurrently affected by STVs, leading to altered expression. These results emphasize the value of whole-genome sequencing analysis in discovering cancer driver mutations and understanding comprehensive molecular profiles of liver cancer, especially with regard to STVs and noncoding mutations. PMID:27064257

  16. RAS Mutations and Oncogenesis: Not all RAS Mutations are Created Equally

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mark Steven; Miller, Lance D.

    2012-01-01

    Mutation in RAS proteins is one of the most common genetic alterations observed in human and experimentally induced rodent cancers. In vivo, oncogenic mutations have been shown to occur at exons 12, 13, and 61, resulting in any 1 of 19 possible point mutations in a given tumor for a specific RAS isoform. While some studies have suggested a possible role of different mutant alleles in determining tumor severity and phenotype, no general consensus has emerged on the oncogenicity of different mutant alleles in tumor formation and progression. Part of this may be due to a lack of a single, signature pathway that shows significant alterations between different mutations. Rather, it is likely that subtle differences in the activation, or lack thereof, of downstream effectors by different RAS mutant alleles may determine the eventual outcome in terms of tumor phenotype. This paper reviews our current understanding of the potential role of different RAS mutations on tumorigenesis, highlights studies in model cell culture and in vivo systems, and discusses the potential of expression array and computational network modeling to dissect out differences in activated RAS genes in conferring a transforming phenotype. PMID:22303394

  17. Characteristics of Frontotemporal Dementia Patients with a Progranulin Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Huey, Edward D.; Grafman, Jordan; Wassermann, Eric M.; Pietrini, Pietro; Tierney, Michael C.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Spina, Salvatore; Baker, Matt; Hutton, Mike; Elder, Joshua W.; Berger, Stephen L.; Heflin, Kyle A.; Hardy, John; Momeni, Parastoo

    2010-01-01

    Objective Mutations in the Progranulin gene (PGRN) recently have been discovered to be associated with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) linked to 17q21 without identified MAPT mutations. The range of mutations of PGRN that can result in the FTD phenotype and the clinical presentation of patients with PGRN mutations have yet to be determined. Methods In this study, we examined 84 FTD patients from families not known previously to have illness linked to chromosome 17 for identified PGRN and MAPT mutations and sequenced the coding exons and the flanking intronic regions of PGRN. We compared the prevalence, clinical characteristics, magnetic resonance imaging and 18-fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography results, and neuropsychological testing of patients with the PGRN R493X mutation with those patients without identified PGRN mutations. Results We discovered a new PGRN mutation (R493X) resulting in a stop codon in two patients. This was the only PGRN mutation identified in our sample. The patients with the PGRN R493X mutation had a rapid illness course and had predominant right-sided atrophy and hypometabolism on magnetic resonance imaging and 18-fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography. The affected father of one of the patients with the PGRN R493X mutation showed frontal and temporal atrophy without neurofibrillary tangles on neuropathological examination. Interpretation Known PGRN and MAPT mutations were rare and of similar prevalence in our sample (2 compared with 1/84). The patients with the PGRN R493X mutation had a clinical presentation comparable with other behavior-predominant FTD patients. The neuropathology of an affected family member of a patient with the PGRN R493X mutation appears not to be Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:16983677

  18. Distinct clinical characteristics of myeloproliferative neoplasms with calreticulin mutations

    PubMed Central

    Andrikovics, Hajnalka; Krahling, Tunde; Balassa, Katalin; Halm, Gabriella; Bors, Andras; Koszarska, Magdalena; Batai, Arpad; Dolgos, Janos; Csomor, Judit; Egyed, Miklos; Sipos, Andrea; Remenyi, Peter; Tordai, Attila; Masszi, Tamas

    2014-01-01

    Somatic insertions/deletions in the calreticulin gene have recently been discovered to be causative alterations in myeloproliferative neoplasms. A combination of qualitative and quantitative allele-specific polymerase chain reaction, fragment-sizing, high resolution melting and Sanger-sequencing was applied for the detection of three driver mutations (in Janus kinase 2, calreticulin and myeloproliferative leukemia virus oncogene genes) in 289 cases of essential thrombocythemia and 99 cases of primary myelofibrosis. In essential thrombocythemia, 154 (53%) Janus kinase 2 V617F, 96 (33%) calreticulin, 9 (3%) myeloproliferative leukemia virus oncogene gene mutation-positive and 30 triple-negative (11%) cases were identified, while in primary myelofibrosis 56 (57%) Janus kinase 2 V617F, 25 (25%) calreticulin, 7 (7%) myeloproliferative leukemia virus oncogene gene mutation-positive and 11 (11%) triple-negative cases were identified. Patients positive for the calreticulin mutation were younger and had higher platelet counts compared to Janus kinase 2 mutation-positive counterparts. Calreticulin mutation-positive patients with essential thrombocythemia showed a lower risk of developing venous thrombosis, but no difference in overall survival. Calreticulin mutation-positive patients with primary myelofibrosis had a better overall survival compared to that of the Janus kinase 2 mutation-positive (P=0.04) or triple-negative cases (P=0.01). Type 2 calreticulin mutation occurred more frequently in essential thrombocythemia than in primary myelofibrosis (P=0.049). In essential thrombocythemia, the calreticulin mutational load was higher than the Janus kinase 2 mutational load (P<0.001), and increased gradually in advanced stages. Calreticulin mutational load influenced blood counts even at the time point of diagnosis in essential thrombocythemia. We confirm that calreticulin mutation is associated with distinct clinical characteristics and explored relationships between mutation

  19. Differential Persistence of Transmitted HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutation Classes

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Vivek; Sucupira, Maria C.; Bacchetti, Peter; Hartogensis, Wendy; Diaz, Ricardo S.; Kallas, Esper G.; Janini, Luiz M.; Liegler, Teri; Pilcher, Christopher D.; Grant, Robert M.; Cortes, Rodrigo; Deeks, Steven G.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Transmitted human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) drug resistance (TDR) mutations can become replaced over time by emerging wild-type viral variants with improved fitness. The impact of class-specific mutations on this rate of mutation replacement is uncertain. Methods. We studied participants with acute and/or early HIV infection and TDR in 2 cohorts (San Francisco, California, and São Paulo, Brazil). We followed baseline mutations longitudinally and compared replacement rates between mutation classes with use of a parametric proportional hazards model. Results. Among 75 individuals with 195 TDR mutations, M184V/I became undetectable markedly faster than did nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) mutations (hazard ratio, 77.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 14.7–408.2; P < .0001), while protease inhibitor and NNRTI replacement rates were similar. Higher plasma HIV-1 RNA level predicted faster mutation replacement, but this was not statistically significant (hazard ratio, 1.71 log10 copies/mL; 95% CI, .90–3.25 log10 copies/mL; P = .11). We found substantial person-to-person variability in mutation replacement rates not accounted for by viral load or mutation class (P < .0001). Conclusions. The rapid replacement of M184V/I mutations is consistent with known fitness costs. The long-term persistence of NNRTI and protease inhibitor mutations suggests a risk for person-to-person propagation. Host and/or viral factors not accounted for by viral load or mutation class are likely influencing mutation replacement and warrant further study. PMID:21451005

  20. A germ-line-selective advantage rather than an increased mutation rate can explain some unexpectedly common human disease mutations.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soo-Kyung; Yoon, Song-Ro; Calabrese, Peter; Arnheim, Norman

    2008-07-22

    Two nucleotide substitutions in the human FGFR2 gene (C755G or C758G) are responsible for virtually all sporadic cases of Apert syndrome. This condition is 100-1,000 times more common than genomic mutation frequency data predict. Here, we report on the C758G de novo Apert syndrome mutation. Using data on older donors, we show that spontaneous mutations are not uniformly distributed throughout normal testes. Instead, we find foci where C758G mutation frequencies are 3-4 orders of magnitude greater than the remaining tissue. We conclude this nucleotide site is not a mutation hot spot even after accounting for possible Luria-Delbruck "mutation jackpots." An alternative explanation for such foci involving positive selection acting on adult self-renewing Ap spermatogonia experiencing the rare mutation could not be rejected. Further, the two youngest individuals studied (19 and 23 years old) had lower mutation frequencies and smaller foci at both mutation sites compared with the older individuals. This implies that the mutation frequency of foci increases as adults age, and thus selection could explain the paternal age effect for Apert syndrome and other genetic conditions. Our results, now including the analysis of two mutations in the same set of testes, suggest that positive selection can increase the relative frequency of premeiotic germ cells carrying such mutations, although individuals who inherit them have reduced fitness. In addition, we compared the anatomical distribution of C758G mutation foci with both new and old data on the C755G mutation in the same testis and found their positions were not correlated with one another. PMID:18632557

  1. Clinical and Genetic Characterization of Manifesting Carriers of DMD Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Soltanzadeh, Payam; Friez, Michael J.; Dunn, Diane; von Niederhausern, Andrew; Gurvich, Olga L.; Swoboda, Kathryn J.; Sampson, Jacinda B.; Pestronk, Alan; Connolly, Anne M.; Florence, Julaine M.; Finkel, Richard S.; Bönnemann, Carsten G.; Medne, Livija; Mendell, Jerry R.; Mathews, Katherine D.; Wong, Brenda L.; Sussman, Michael D.; Zonana, Jonathan; Kovak, Karen; Gospe, Sidney M.; Gappmaier, Eduard; Taylor, Laura E.; Howard, Michael T.; Weiss, Robert B.; Flanigan, Kevin M.

    2010-01-01

    Manifesting carriers of DMD gene mutations may present diagnostic challenges, particularly in the absence of a family history of dystrophinopathy. We review the clinical and genetic features in fifteen manifesting carriers identified among 860 subjects within the United Dystrophinopathy Project, a large clinical dystrophinopathy cohort whose members undergo comprehensive DMD mutation analysis. We defined manifesting carriers as females with significant weakness, excluding those with only myalgias/cramps. DNA extracted from peripheral blood was used to study X chromosome inactivation patterns. Among these manifesting carriers, age at symptom onset ranged from 2 to 47 years. Seven had no family history and eight had male relatives with Duchene muscular dystrophy (DMD). Clinical severity among the manifesting carriers varied from a DMD-like progression to a very mild Becker muscular dystrophy-like phenotype. Eight had exonic deletions or duplications and six had point mutations. One patient had two mutations (an exonic deletion and a splice site mutation), consistent with a heterozygous compound state. The X chromosome inactivation pattern was skewed toward nonrandom in four out of seven informative deletions or duplications but was random in all cases with nonsense mutations. We present the results of DMD mutation analysis in this manifesting carrier cohort, including the first example of a presumably compound heterozygous DMD mutation. Our results demonstrate that improved molecular diagnostic methods facilitate the identification of DMD mutations in manifesting carriers, and confirm the heterogeneity of mutational mechanisms as well as the wide spectrum of phenotypes. PMID:20630757

  2. Phenylketonuria mutation analysis in Northern Ireland: A rapid stepwise approach

    SciTech Connect

    Zschocke, J.; Graham, C.A.; Nevin, N.C.

    1995-12-01

    We present a multistep approach for the rapid analysis of phenylketonuria (PKU) mutations. In the first step, three common mutations and a polymorphic short tandem repeat (STR) system are rapidly analyzed with a fluorescent multiplex assay. In the second step, minihaplotypes combining STR and VNTR data are used to determine rare mutations likely to be present in an investigated patient, which are then confirmed by restriction enzyme analysis. The remaining mutations are analyzed with denaturant gradient-gel electrophoresis and sequencing. The first two steps together identify both mutations in 90%-95% of PKU patients, and results can be obtained within 2 d. We have investigated 121 Northern Irish families with hyperphenylalaninemia, including virtually all patients born since 1972, and have found 34 different mutations on 241 of the 242 mutant alleles. Three mutations (R408W, 165T, and F39L) account for 57.5% of mutations, while 14 mutations occur with a frequency of 1%-6%. The present analysis system is efficient and inexpensive and is particularly well suited to routine mutation analysis in a diagnostic setting. 19 refs., 5 tabs.

  3. The Origin of Spontaneous Mutation in SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    PubMed Central

    Quah, Siew-Keen; von Borstel, R. C.; Hastings, P. J.

    1980-01-01

    Characterization of two antimutator loci in yeast shows that both are members of the same mutagenic repair system known to be responsible for almost all induced mutation (Lawrence and Christensen 1976, 1979a,b; Prakash 1976). One of the these newly isolated antimutator mutations is an allele of rev3 (Lemontt 1971b). Two other alleles of rev3 were tested and were also found to be antimutators. Double mutants carrying rev3 and mutator mutations of rad3, rad51 or rad18 are like rev3 single mutants with respect to spontaneous mutation rate, supporting the hypothesis (Hastings, Quah and von Borstel 1976) that many mutators in yeast act by channelling spontaneous lesions from accurate to mutagenic repair. However, the enhanced mutation rate seen in a radiation-resistant mutator mutant mut1 is not dependent on REV3, but is dependent on another gene designated ANT1. An additive effect on the reduction in spontaneous mutation, seen in the ant1 rev3 double-mutant strain, leads to the conclusion that at least 90% of spontaneous mutations seen in the wild type are caused by mutagenic repair of spontaneous lesions. PMID:7021317

  4. CALR mutation profile in Irish patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Haslam, Karl; Conneally, Eibhlin; Flynn, Catherine M; Cahill, Mary R; Gilligan, Oonagh; O'Shea, Derville; Langabeer, Stephen E

    2016-09-01

    Insertion and/or deletion mutations of the CALR gene have recently been demonstrated to be the second most common driver mutations in the myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) of essential thrombocythemia (ET) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF). Given the diagnostic and emerging prognostic significance of these mutations, in addition to the geographical heterogeneity reported, the incidence of CALR mutations was determined in an Irish cohort of patients with MPNs with a view to incorporate this analysis into a prospective screening program. A series of 202 patients with known or suspected ET and PMF were screened for the presence of CALR mutations. CALR mutations were detected in 58 patients. Type 1 and Type 1-like deletion mutations were the most common (n=40) followed by Type 2 and Type 2-like insertion mutations (n=17). The CALR mutation profile in Irish ET and PMF patients appears similar to that in other European populations. Establishment of this mutational profile allows the introduction of a rational, molecular diagnostic algorithm in cases of suspected ET and PMF that will improve clinical management. PMID:27352261

  5. The rich phase structure of a mutator model

    PubMed Central

    Saakian, David B.; Yakushkina, Tatiana; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2016-01-01

    We propose a modification of the Crow-Kimura and Eigen models of biological molecular evolution to include a mutator gene that causes both an increase in the mutation rate and a change in the fitness landscape. This mutator effect relates to a wide range of biomedical problems. There are three possible phases: mutator phase, mixed phase and non-selective phase. We calculate the phase structure, the mean fitness and the fraction of the mutator allele in the population, which can be applied to describe cancer development and RNA viruses. We find that depending on the genome length, either the normal or the mutator allele dominates in the mixed phase. We analytically solve the model for a general fitness function. We conclude that the random fitness landscape is an appropriate choice for describing the observed mutator phenomenon in the case of a small fraction of mutators. It is shown that the increase in the mutation rates in the regular and the mutator parts of the genome should be set independently; only some combinations of these increases can push the complex biomedical system to the non-selective phase, potentially related to the eradication of tumors. PMID:27721395

  6. Mutation Profile of Well-Differentiated Thyroid Cancer in Asians

    PubMed Central

    Song, Young Shin; Lim, Jung Ah

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular diagnostics have led to significant insights into the genetic basis of thyroid tumorigenesis. Among the mutations commonly seen in thyroid cancers, the vast majority are associated with the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. B-Raf proto-oncogene (BRAF) mutations are the most common mutations observed in papillary thyroid cancers (PTCs), followed by RET/PTC rearrangements and RAS mutations, while follicular thyroid cancers are more likely to harbor RAS mutations or PAX8/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) rearrangements. Beyond these more common mutations, alterations in the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter have recently been associated with clinicopathologic features, disease prognosis, and tumorigenesis in thyroid cancer. While the mutations underlying thyroid tumorigenesis are well known, the frequency of these mutations is strongly associated with geography, with clear differences reported between Asian and Western countries. Of particular interest is the prevalence of BRAF mutations, with Korean patients exhibiting the highest rate of BRAF-associated thyroid cancers in the world. Here, we review the prevalence of each of the most common mutations in Asian and Western countries, and identify the characteristics of well-differentiated thyroid cancer in Asians. PMID:26435130

  7. Genomic mutation rates that neutralize adaptive evolution and natural selection.

    PubMed

    Gerrish, Philip J; Colato, Alexandre; Sniegowski, Paul D

    2013-08-01

    When mutation rates are low, natural selection remains effective, and increasing the mutation rate can give rise to an increase in adaptation rate. When mutation rates are high to begin with, however, increasing the mutation rate may have a detrimental effect because of the overwhelming presence of deleterious mutations. Indeed, if mutation rates are high enough: (i) adaptive evolution may be neutralized, resulting in a zero (or negative) adaptation rate despite the continued availability of adaptive and/or compensatory mutations, or (ii) natural selection may be neutralized, because the fitness of lineages bearing adaptive and/or compensatory mutations--whether established or newly arising--is eroded by excessive mutation, causing such lineages to decline in frequency. We apply these two criteria to a standard model of asexual adaptive evolution and derive mathematical expressions--some new, some old in new guise--delineating the mutation rates under which either adaptive evolution or natural selection is neutralized. The expressions are simple and require no a priori knowledge of organism- and/or environment-specific parameters. Our discussion connects these results to each other and to previous theory, showing convergence or equivalence of the different results in most cases.

  8. Genomic mutation rates that neutralize adaptive evolution and natural selection.

    PubMed

    Gerrish, Philip J; Colato, Alexandre; Sniegowski, Paul D

    2013-08-01

    When mutation rates are low, natural selection remains effective, and increasing the mutation rate can give rise to an increase in adaptation rate. When mutation rates are high to begin with, however, increasing the mutation rate may have a detrimental effect because of the overwhelming presence of deleterious mutations. Indeed, if mutation rates are high enough: (i) adaptive evolution may be neutralized, resulting in a zero (or negative) adaptation rate despite the continued availability of adaptive and/or compensatory mutations, or (ii) natural selection may be neutralized, because the fitness of lineages bearing adaptive and/or compensatory mutations--whether established or newly arising--is eroded by excessive mutation, causing such lineages to decline in frequency. We apply these two criteria to a standard model of asexual adaptive evolution and derive mathematical expressions--some new, some old in new guise--delineating the mutation rates under which either adaptive evolution or natural selection is neutralized. The expressions are simple and require no a priori knowledge of organism- and/or environment-specific parameters. Our discussion connects these results to each other and to previous theory, showing convergence or equivalence of the different results in most cases. PMID:23720539

  9. Analysis of Dominant Mutations Affecting Muscle Excitation in Caenorhabditis Elegans

    PubMed Central

    Reiner, D. J.; Weinshenker, D.; Thomas, J. H.

    1995-01-01

    We examined mutations that disrupt muscle activation in Caenorhabditis elegans. Fifteen of 17 of these genes were identified previously and we describe new mutations in three of them. We also describe mutations in two new genes, exp-3 and exp-4. We assessed the degree of defect in pharyngeal, body-wall, egg-laying, and enteric muscle activation in animals mutant for each gene. Mutations in all 17 genes are semidominant and, in cases that could be tested, appear to be gain-of-function. Based on their phenotypes, the genes fall into three broad categories: mutations in 11 genes cause defective muscle activation, mutations in four genes cause hyperactivated muscle, and mutations in two genes cause defective activation in some muscle types and hyperactivation in others. In all testable cases, the mutations blocked response to pharmacological activators of egg laying, but did not block muscle activation by irradiation with a laser microbeam. The data suggest that these mutations affect muscle excitation, but not the capacity of the muscle fibers to contract. For most of the genes, apparent loss-of-function mutants have a grossly wild-type phenotype. These observations suggest that there is a large group of genes that function in muscle excitation that can be identified primarily by dominant mutations. PMID:8582640

  10. MoKCa database—mutations of kinases in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Christopher J.; Gao, Qiong; Mitsopoulous, Costas; Zvelebil, Marketa; Pearl, Laurence H.; Pearl, Frances M. G.

    2009-01-01

    Members of the protein kinase family are amongst the most commonly mutated genes in human cancer, and both mutated and activated protein kinases have proved to be tractable targets for the development of new anticancer therapies The MoKCa database (Mutations of Kinases in Cancer, http://strubiol.icr.ac.uk/extra/mokca) has been developed to structurally and functionally annotate, and where possible predict, the phenotypic consequences of mutations in protein kinases implicated in cancer. Somatic mutation data from tumours and tumour cell lines have been mapped onto the crystal structures of the affected protein domains. Positions of the mutated amino-acids are highlighted on a sequence-based domain pictogram, as well as a 3D-image of the protein structure, and in a molecular graphics package, integrated for interactive viewing. The data associated with each mutation is presented in the Web interface, along with expert annotation of the detailed molecular functional implications of the mutation. Proteins are linked to functional annotation resources and are annotated with structural and functional features such as domains and phosphorylation sites. MoKCa aims to provide assessments available from multiple sources and algorithms for each potential cancer-associated mutation, and present these together in a consistent and coherent fashion to facilitate authoritative annotation by cancer biologists and structural biologists, directly involved in the generation and analysis of new mutational data. PMID:18986996

  11. Inference of directional selection and mutation parameters assuming equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Vogl, Claus; Bergman, Juraj

    2015-12-01

    In a classical study, Wright (1931) proposed a model for the evolution of a biallelic locus under the influence of mutation, directional selection and drift. He derived the equilibrium distribution of the allelic proportion conditional on the scaled mutation rate, the mutation bias and the scaled strength of directional selection. The equilibrium distribution can be used for inference of these parameters with genome-wide datasets of "site frequency spectra" (SFS). Assuming that the scaled mutation rate is low, Wright's model can be approximated by a boundary-mutation model, where mutations are introduced into the population exclusively from sites fixed for the preferred or unpreferred allelic states. With the boundary-mutation model, inference can be partitioned: (i) the shape of the SFS distribution within the polymorphic region is determined by random drift and directional selection, but not by the mutation parameters, such that inference of the selection parameter relies exclusively on the polymorphic sites in the SFS; (ii) the mutation parameters can be inferred from the amount of polymorphic and monomorphic preferred and unpreferred alleles, conditional on the selection parameter. Herein, we derive maximum likelihood estimators for the mutation and selection parameters in equilibrium and apply the method to simulated SFS data as well as empirical data from a Madagascar population of Drosophila simulans.

  12. Novel CDKN2A mutations in Austrian melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Burgstaller-Muehlbacher, Sebastian; Marko, Martha; Müller, Christoph; Wendt, Judith; Pehamberger, Hubert; Okamoto, Ichiro

    2015-10-01

    CDKN2A is the most prominent familial melanoma gene, with mutations occurring in up to 40% of the families. Numerous mutations in the gene are known, several of them representing regional founder mutations. We sought to determine, for the first time, germline mutations in CDKN2A in Austria to identify novel mutations. In total, 700 individuals (136 patients with a positive family history and 164 with at least two primary melanomas as the high-risk groups; 200 with single primary melanomas; and 200 healthy individuals as the control groups) were Sanger sequenced for CDKN2A exon 1α, 1β, and 2. The 136 patients with affected relatives were also sequenced for CDK4 exon 2. We found the disease-associated mutations p.R24P (8×), p.N71T (1×), p.G101W (1×), and p.V126D (1×) in the group with affected relatives and p.R24P (2×) in the group with several primary melanomas. Furthermore, we discovered four mutations of unknown significance, two of which were novel: p.A34V and c.151-4 G>C, respectively. Computational effect prediction suggested p.A34V as conferring a high risk for melanoma, whereas c.151-4 G>C, although being predicted as a splice site mutation by MutationTaster, could not functionally be confirmed to alter splicing. Moreover, computational effect prediction confirmed accumulation of high-penetrance mutations in high-risk groups, whereas mutations of unknown significance were distributed across all groups. p.R24P is the most common high-risk mutation in Austria. In addition, we discovered two new mutations in Austrian melanoma patients, p.A34V and c.151-4 G>C, respectively.

  13. Novel CDKN2A mutations in Austrian melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Burgstaller-Muehlbacher, Sebastian; Marko, Martha; Müller, Christoph; Wendt, Judith; Pehamberger, Hubert; Okamoto, Ichiro

    2015-10-01

    CDKN2A is the most prominent familial melanoma gene, with mutations occurring in up to 40% of the families. Numerous mutations in the gene are known, several of them representing regional founder mutations. We sought to determine, for the first time, germline mutations in CDKN2A in Austria to identify novel mutations. In total, 700 individuals (136 patients with a positive family history and 164 with at least two primary melanomas as the high-risk groups; 200 with single primary melanomas; and 200 healthy individuals as the control groups) were Sanger sequenced for CDKN2A exon 1α, 1β, and 2. The 136 patients with affected relatives were also sequenced for CDK4 exon 2. We found the disease-associated mutations p.R24P (8×), p.N71T (1×), p.G101W (1×), and p.V126D (1×) in the group with affected relatives and p.R24P (2×) in the group with several primary melanomas. Furthermore, we discovered four mutations of unknown significance, two of which were novel: p.A34V and c.151-4 G>C, respectively. Computational effect prediction suggested p.A34V as conferring a high risk for melanoma, whereas c.151-4 G>C, although being predicted as a splice site mutation by MutationTaster, could not functionally be confirmed to alter splicing. Moreover, computational effect prediction confirmed accumulation of high-penetrance mutations in high-risk groups, whereas mutations of unknown significance were distributed across all groups. p.R24P is the most common high-risk mutation in Austria. In addition, we discovered two new mutations in Austrian melanoma patients, p.A34V and c.151-4 G>C, respectively. PMID:26225579

  14. Parkinson disease (PARK) genes are somatically mutated in cutaneous melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, Yardena; Azizi, Esther; Qutob, Nouar; Inzelberg, Lilah; Domany, Eytan; Schechtman, Edna; Friedman, Eitan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess whether Parkinson disease (PD) genes are somatically mutated in cutaneous melanoma (CM) tissue, because CM occurs in patients with PD at higher rates than in the general population and PD is more common than expected in CM cohorts. Methods: We cross-referenced somatic mutations in metastatic CM detected by whole-exome sequencing with the 15 known PD (PARK) genes. We computed the empirical distribution of the sum of mutations in each gene (Smut) and of the number of tissue samples in which a given gene was mutated at least once (SSampl) for each of the analyzable genes, determined the 90th and 95th percentiles of the empirical distributions of these sums, and verified the location of PARK genes in these distributions. Identical analyses were applied to adenocarcinoma of lung (ADENOCA-LUNG) and squamous cell carcinoma of lung (SQUAMCA-LUNG). We also analyzed the distribution of the number of mutated PARK genes in CM samples vs the 2 lung cancers. Results: Somatic CM mutation analysis (n = 246) detected 315,914 mutations in 18,758 genes. Somatic CM mutations were found in 14 of 15 PARK genes. Forty-eight percent of CM samples carried ≥1 PARK mutation and 25% carried multiple PARK mutations. PARK8 mutations occurred above the 95th percentile of the empirical distribution for SMut and SSampl. Significantly more CM samples harbored multiple PARK gene mutations compared with SQUAMCA-LUNG (p = 0.0026) and with ADENOCA-LUNG (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: The overrepresentation of somatic PARK mutations in CM suggests shared dysregulated pathways for CM and PD. PMID:27123489

  15. Novel pathogenic mutations and skin biopsy analysis in Knobloch syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Oscar; Kague, Erika; Bagatini, Kelly; Tu, Hongmin; Heljasvaara, Ritva; Carvalhaes, Lorenza; Gava, Elisandra; de Oliveira, Gisele; Godoi, Paulo; Oliva, Glaucius; Kitten, Gregory; Pihlajaniemi, Taina; Passos-Bueno, Maria-Rita

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To facilitate future diagnosis of Knobloch syndrome (KS) and better understand its etiology, we sought to identify not yet described COL18A1 mutations in KS patients. In addition, we tested whether mutations in this gene lead to absence of the COL18A1 gene product and attempted to better characterize the functional effect of a previously reported missense mutation. Methods Direct sequencing of COL18A1 exons was performed in KS patients from four unrelated pedigrees. We used immunofluorescent histochemistry in skin biopsies to evaluate the presence of type XVIII collagen in four KS patients carrying two already described mutations: c.3277C>T, a nonsense mutation, and c.3601G>A, a missense mutation. Furthermore, we determined the binding properties of the mutated endostatin domain p.A1381T (c.3601G>A) to extracellular matrix proteins using ELISA and surface plasmon resonance assays. Results We identified four novel mutations in COL18A1, including a large deletion involving exon 41. Skin biopsies from KS patients revealed lack of type XVIII collagen in epithelial basement membranes and blood vessels. We also found a reduced affinity of p.A1381T endostatin to some extracellular matrix components. Conclusions COL18A1 mutations involved in Knobloch syndrome have a distribution bias toward the coding exons of the C-terminal end. Large deletions must also be considered when point mutations are not identified in patients with characteristic KS phenotype. We report, for the first time, lack of type XVIII collagen in KS patients by immunofluorescent histochemistry in skin biopsy samples. As a final point, we suggest the employment of this technique as a preliminary and complementary test for diagnosis of KS in cases when mutation screening either does not detect mutations or reveals mutations of uncertain effect, such as the p.A1381T change. PMID:19390655

  16. Somatic CALR Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms with Nonmutated JAK2

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, E.J.; Nice, F.L.; Gundem, G.; Wedge, D.C.; Avezov, E.; Li, J.; Kollmann, K.; Kent, D.G.; Aziz, A.; Godfrey, A.L.; Hinton, J.; Martincorena, I.; Van Loo, P.; Jones, A.V.; Guglielmelli, P.; Tarpey, P.; Harding, H.P.; Fitzpatrick, J.D.; Goudie, C.T.; Ortmann, C.A.; Loughran, S.J.; Raine, K.; Jones, D.R.; Butler, A.P.; Teague, J.W.; O’Meara, S.; McLaren, S.; Bianchi, M.; Silber, Y.; Dimitropoulou, D.; Bloxham, D.; Mudie, L.; Maddison, M.; Robinson, B.; Keohane, C.; Maclean, C.; Hill, K.; Orchard, K.; Tauro, S.; Du, M.-Q.; Greaves, M.; Bowen, D.; Huntly, B.J.P.; Harrison, C.N.; Cross, N.C.P.; Ron, D.; Vannucchi, A.M.; Papaemmanuil, E.; Campbell, P.J.; Green, A.R.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Somatic mutations in the Janus kinase 2 gene (JAK2) occur in many myeloproliferative neoplasms, but the molecular pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2 is obscure, and the diagnosis of these neoplasms remains a challenge. METHODS We performed exome sequencing of samples obtained from 151 patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms. The mutation status of the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR) was assessed in an additional 1345 hematologic cancers, 1517 other cancers, and 550 controls. We established phylogenetic trees using hematopoietic colonies. We assessed calreticulin subcellular localization using immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. RESULTS Exome sequencing identified 1498 mutations in 151 patients, with medians of 6.5, 6.5, and 13.0 mutations per patient in samples of polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and myelofibrosis, respectively. Somatic CALR mutations were found in 70 to 84% of samples of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2, in 8% of myelodysplasia samples, in occasional samples of other myeloid cancers, and in none of the other cancers. A total of 148 CALR mutations were identified with 19 distinct variants. Mutations were located in exon 9 and generated a +1 base-pair frameshift, which would result in a mutant protein with a novel C-terminal. Mutant calreticulin was observed in the endoplasmic reticulum without increased cell-surface or Golgi accumulation. Patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms carrying CALR mutations presented with higher platelet counts and lower hemoglobin levels than patients with mutated JAK2. Mutation of CALR was detected in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Clonal analyses showed CALR mutations in the earliest phylogenetic node, a finding consistent with its role as an initiating mutation in some patients. CONCLUSIONS Somatic mutations in the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone CALR were found in a majority of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms with

  17. Mutations in the diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter (DTDST) gene (SLC26A2): 22 novel mutations, mutation review, associated skeletal phenotypes, and diagnostic relevance.

    PubMed

    Rossi, A; Superti-Furga, A

    2001-03-01

    Mutations in the DTDST gene can result in a family of skeletal dysplasia conditions which comprise two lethal disorders, achondrogenesis type 1B (ACG1B) and atelosteogenesis type 2 (AO2); and two non-lethal disorders, diastrophic dysplasia (DTD) and recessive multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (rMED). The gene product is a sulfate-chloride exchanger of the cell membrane. Inactivation of the sulfate exchanger leads to intracellular sulfate depletion and to the synthesis of undersulfated proteoglycans in susceptible cells such as chondrocytes and fibroblasts. Genotype-phenotype correlations are recognizable, with mutations predicting a truncated protein or a non-conservative amino acid substitution in a transmembrane domain giving the severe phenotypes, and non-transmembrane amino acid substitutions and splice site mutations giving the milder phenotypes. The clinical phenotype is modulated strictly by the degree of residual activity. Over 30 mutations have been observed, including 22 novel mutations reported here. The most frequent mutation, 862C>T (R279W), is a mild mutation giving the rMED phenotype when homozygous and mostly DTD when compounded; occurrence at a CpG dinucleotide and its panethnic distribution suggest independent recurrence. Mutation IVS1+2T>C is the second most common mutation, but is very frequent in Finland. It produces low levels of correctly spliced mRNA, and results in DTD when homozygous. Two other mutations, 1045-1047delGTT (V340del) and 558C>T (R178X), are associated with severe phenotypes and have been observed in multiple patients. Most other mutations are rare. Heterozygotes are clinically unaffected. When clinical samples are screened for radiologic and histologic features compatible with the ACG1B/AO2/DTD/rMED spectrum prior to analysis, the mutation detection rate is high (over 90% of alleles), and appropriate genetic counseling can be given. The sulfate uptake or sulfate incorporation assays in cultured fibroblasts have largely been

  18. [Treatment of BRAF-mutated metastatic melanoma].

    PubMed

    Boyles, Tessa Bystrup; Svane, Inge Marie; Bastholt, Lars; Schmidt, Henrik

    2016-08-29

    Melanoma is an aggressive form of skin cancer which is the cause of a great number of skin cancer-related deaths worldwide and about 300 deaths in Denmark. After several years of failure of treatment of metastatic melanoma, the development of BRAF- and later MEK inhibitors was considered revolutionary. Treatment with BRAF inhibitors alone and especially in combination with a MEK inhibitor improves outcome for patients with BRAF V600-mutated metastatic melanoma. However, even when treated with the combination of the inhibitors, many patients develop acquired resistance within a year. PMID:27592869

  19. Equine diseases caused by known genetic mutations.

    PubMed

    Finno, Carrie J; Spier, Sharon J; Valberg, Stephanie J

    2009-03-01

    The recent development of equine genome maps by the equine genome community and the complete sequencing of the horse genome performed at the Broad Institute have accelerated the pace of genetic discovery. This review focuses on genetic diseases in the horse for which a mutation is currently known, including hyperkalemic periodic paralysis, severe combined immunodeficiency, overo lethal white syndrome, junctional epidermolysis bullosa, glycogen branching enzyme deficiency, malignant hyperthermia, hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia, and polysaccharide storage myopathy. Emphasis is placed on the prevalence, clinical signs, etiology, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis for each disease.

  20. Novel MPZ mutations and congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, Hugh J.; Santagata, Sandro; Shapiro, Frederic; Batish, Sat Dev; Couchon, Libby; Donnelly, Stephen; Kang, Peter B.

    2010-01-01

    We report two new MPZ mutations causing congenital hypomyelinating neuropathies; c.368_382delGCACGTTCACTTGTG (in-frame deletion of five amino acids) and c.392A>G, Asn131Ser. Each child had clinical and electrodiagnostic features consistent with an inherited neuropathy, confirmed by sural nerve biopsy. The cases illustrate the clinically heterogeneity that exists even within early-onset forms of this disease. They also lend additional support to the emerging clinical and laboratory evidence that impaired intracellular protein trafficking may represent the cause of some congenital hypomyelinating neuropathies. PMID:20621479

  1. A novel mutation in type II methemoglobinemia.

    PubMed

    Hudspeth, Michelle P; Joseph, Sumy; Holden, Kenton R

    2010-01-01

    Type II methemoglobinemia is a somatic deficiency of cytochrome b5 reductase with severe global neurologic impairment. We report a novel mutation in exon 3 of the CYB5R3 gene on chromosome 22 consisting of homozygous 1-base pair (bp) deletion noted as c.215delG; p.Gly72AlafsX100. The patient had improvement of gross motor skills, chewing, and swallowing that may be due to the initiation of daily ascorbic acid therapy. We hypothesize that a possible response to ascorbic acid may be related to the effect of making additional ferrous iron available for its role as a cofactor in carnitine synthesis. PMID:19471045

  2. Defining actionable mutations for oncology therapeutic development.

    PubMed

    Carr, T Hedley; McEwen, Robert; Dougherty, Brian; Johnson, Justin H; Dry, Jonathan R; Lai, Zhongwu; Ghazoui, Zara; Laing, Naomi M; Hodgson, Darren R; Cruzalegui, Francisco; Hollingsworth, Simon J; Barrett, J Carl

    2016-04-26

    Genomic profiling of tumours in patients in clinical trials enables rapid testing of multiple hypotheses to confirm which genomic events determine likely responder groups for targeted agents. A key challenge of this new capability is defining which specific genomic events should be classified as 'actionable' (that is, potentially responsive to a targeted therapy), especially when looking for early indications of patient subgroups likely to be responsive to new drugs. This Opinion article discusses some of the different approaches being taken in early clinical development to define actionable mutations, and describes our strategy to address this challenge in early-stage exploratory clinical trials. PMID:27112209

  3. Mutations in ZBTB20 cause Primrose syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cordeddu, Viviana; Redeker, Bert; Stellacci, Emilia; Jongejan, Aldo; Fragale, Alessandra; Bradley, Ted E J; Anselmi, Massimiliano; Ciolfi, Andrea; Cecchetti, Serena; Muto, Valentina; Bernardini, Laura; Azage, Meron; Carvalho, Daniel R; Espay, Alberto J; Male, Alison; Molin, Anna-Maja; Posmyk, Renata; Battisti, Carla; Casertano, Alberto; Melis, Daniela; van Kampen, Antoine; Baas, Frank; Mannens, Marcel M; Bocchinfuso, Gianfranco; Stella, Lorenzo; Tartaglia, Marco; Hennekam, Raoul C

    2014-08-01

    Primrose syndrome and 3q13.31 microdeletion syndrome are clinically related disorders characterized by tall stature, macrocephaly, intellectual disability, disturbed behavior and unusual facial features, with diabetes, deafness, progressive muscle wasting and ectopic calcifications specifically occurring in the former. We report that missense mutations in ZBTB20, residing within the 3q13.31 microdeletion syndrome critical region, underlie Primrose syndrome. This finding establishes a genetic link between these disorders and delineates the impact of ZBTB20 dysregulation on development, growth and metabolism.

  4. Emerging pathogens: Dynamics, mutation and drug resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Perelson, A.S.; Goldstein, B.; Korber, B.T.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objectives of this project were to develop models of the spread of pathogens, such as HIV-1 and influenza, in humans, and then to use the models to address the possibility of designing appropriate drug therapies that may limit the ability of the pathogen to escape treatment by mutating into a drug resistant form. We have developed a model of drug-resistance to amantidine and rimantadine, the two major antiviral drugs used to treat influenza, and have used the model to suggest treatment strategies during an epidemic.

  5. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) mutations database: review of the "old" and update of the new mutations.

    PubMed

    Minucci, Angelo; Moradkhani, Kamran; Hwang, Ming Jing; Zuppi, Cecilia; Giardina, Bruno; Capoluongo, Ettore

    2012-03-15

    In the present paper we have updated the G6PD mutations database, including all the last discovered G6PD genetic variants. We underline that the last database has been published by Vulliamy et al. [1] who analytically reported 140 G6PD mutations: along with Vulliamy's database, there are two main sites, such as http://202.120.189.88/mutdb/ and www.LOVD.nl/MR, where almost all G6PD mutations can be found. Compared to the previous mutation reports, in our paper we have included for each mutation some additional information, such as: the secondary structure and the enzyme 3D position involving by mutation, the creation or abolition of a restriction site (with the enzyme involved) and the conservation score associated with each amino acid position. The mutations reported in the present tab have been divided according to the gene's region involved (coding and non-coding) and mutations affecting the coding region in: single, multiple (at least with two bases involved) and deletion. We underline that for the listed mutations, reported in italic, literature doesn't provide all the biochemical or bio-molecular information or the research data. Finally, for the "old" mutations, we tried to verify features previously reported and, when subsequently modified, we updated the specific information using the latest literature data. PMID:22293322

  6. Somatic CTNNB1 mutation in hepatoblastoma from a patient with Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome and germline GPC3 mutation.

    PubMed

    Kosaki, Rika; Takenouchi, Toshiki; Takeda, Noriko; Kagami, Masayo; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Hata, Kenichiro; Kosaki, Kenjiro

    2014-04-01

    Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome is a rare overgrowth syndrome caused by the GPC3 mutation at Xq26 and is clinically characterized by multiple congenital abnormalities, intellectual disability, pre/postnatal overgrowth, distinctive craniofacial features, macrocephaly, and organomegaly. Although this syndrome is known to be associated with a risk for embryonal tumors, similar to other overgrowth syndromes, the pathogenetic basis of this mode of tumorigenesis remains largely unknown. Here, we report a boy with Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome who had a germline loss-of function mutation in GPC3. At 9 months of age, he developed hepatoblastoma. A comparison of exome analysis results for the germline genome and for the tumor genome revealed a somatic mutation, p.Ile35Ser, within the degradation targeting box of β-catenin. The same somatic mutation in CTNNB1 has been repeatedly reported in hepatoblastoma and other cancers. This finding suggested that the CTNNB1 mutation in the tumor tissue represents a driver mutation and that both the GPC3 and the CTNNB1 mutations contributed to tumorigenesis in a clearly defined sequential manner in the propositus. The current observation of a somatic CTNNB1 mutation in a hepatoblastoma from a patient with a germline GPC3 mutation supports the notion that the mutation in GPC3 may influence one of the initial steps in tumorigenesis and the progression to hepatoblastoma. PMID:24459012

  7. Somatic CTNNB1 mutation in hepatoblastoma from a patient with Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome and germline GPC3 mutation.

    PubMed

    Kosaki, Rika; Takenouchi, Toshiki; Takeda, Noriko; Kagami, Masayo; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Hata, Kenichiro; Kosaki, Kenjiro

    2014-04-01

    Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome is a rare overgrowth syndrome caused by the GPC3 mutation at Xq26 and is clinically characterized by multiple congenital abnormalities, intellectual disability, pre/postnatal overgrowth, distinctive craniofacial features, macrocephaly, and organomegaly. Although this syndrome is known to be associated with a risk for embryonal tumors, similar to other overgrowth syndromes, the pathogenetic basis of this mode of tumorigenesis remains largely unknown. Here, we report a boy with Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome who had a germline loss-of function mutation in GPC3. At 9 months of age, he developed hepatoblastoma. A comparison of exome analysis results for the germline genome and for the tumor genome revealed a somatic mutation, p.Ile35Ser, within the degradation targeting box of β-catenin. The same somatic mutation in CTNNB1 has been repeatedly reported in hepatoblastoma and other cancers. This finding suggested that the CTNNB1 mutation in the tumor tissue represents a driver mutation and that both the GPC3 and the CTNNB1 mutations contributed to tumorigenesis in a clearly defined sequential manner in the propositus. The current observation of a somatic CTNNB1 mutation in a hepatoblastoma from a patient with a germline GPC3 mutation supports the notion that the mutation in GPC3 may influence one of the initial steps in tumorigenesis and the progression to hepatoblastoma.

  8. Systematic Mapping of Protein Mutational Space by Prolonged Drift Reveals the Deleterious Effects of Seemingly Neutral Mutations.

    PubMed

    Rockah-Shmuel, Liat; Tóth-Petróczy, Ágnes; Tawfik, Dan S

    2015-08-01

    Systematic mappings of the effects of protein mutations are becoming increasingly popular. Unexpectedly, these experiments often find that proteins are tolerant to most amino acid substitutions, including substitutions in positions that are highly conserved in nature. To obtain a more realistic distribution of the effects of protein mutations, we applied a laboratory drift comprising 17 rounds of random mutagenesis and selection of M.HaeIII, a DNA methyltransferase. During this drift, multiple mutations gradually accumulated. Deep sequencing of the drifted gene ensembles allowed determination of the relative effects of all possible single nucleotide mutations. Despite being averaged across many different genetic backgrounds, about 67% of all nonsynonymous, missense mutations were evidently deleterious, and an additional 16% were likely to be deleterious. In the early generations, the frequency of most deleterious mutations remained high. However, by the 17th generation, their frequency was consistently reduced, and those remaining were accepted alongside compensatory mutations. The tolerance to mutations measured in this laboratory drift correlated with sequence exchanges seen in M.HaeIII's natural orthologs. The biophysical constraints dictating purging in nature and in this laboratory drift also seemed to overlap. Our experiment therefore provides an improved method for measuring the effects of protein mutations that more closely replicates the natural evolutionary forces, and thereby a more realistic view of the mutational space of proteins.

  9. Isolation and Characterization of Dominant Female Sterile Mutations of Drosophila Melanogaster. I. Mutations on the Third Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Erdelyi, M.; Szabad, J.

    1989-01-01

    Fifty-one dominant female sterile (Fs) mutations linked to the third chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster are described. EMS induced Fs mutations arise with the frequency of one Fs per about 2500 recessive lethals. Complementation analysis of the revertants showed that these Fs mutations represent 27-34 loci, about 60% of the third chromosome units mutable to dominant female sterility by EMS. The Fs mutations were mapped on the basis of mitotic recombination induced in the female (in 16 cases also in the male) germ-line. Behavior of the revertants and the Fs(+) germ-line clones demonstrate the gain-of-function nature of the Fs alleles. With two exceptions, the Fs(3) mutations are germ-line dependent. Novel phenotypes appeared in most of the Fs mutations. With eight exceptions, the Fs(3) mutations are fully penetrant, in some cases with variable expressivity. One of the Fs(3) mutations is a non-ovary-dependent egg retention mutation, two others alter egg shape, and 27 bring about arrest in development at about the time of fertilization. In 21 of the Fs(3) mutations embryos develop to the larval stage of differentiation; this group includes 5 new alleles of Toll and 4 of easter. PMID:2499514

  10. Systematic Mapping of Protein Mutational Space by Prolonged Drift Reveals the Deleterious Effects of Seemingly Neutral Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Rockah-Shmuel, Liat; Tóth-Petróczy, Ágnes; Tawfik, Dan S.

    2015-01-01

    Systematic mappings of the effects of protein mutations are becoming increasingly popular. Unexpectedly, these experiments often find that proteins are tolerant to most amino acid substitutions, including substitutions in positions that are highly conserved in nature. To obtain a more realistic distribution of the effects of protein mutations, we applied a laboratory drift comprising 17 rounds of random mutagenesis and selection of M.HaeIII, a DNA methyltransferase. During this drift, multiple mutations gradually accumulated. Deep sequencing of the drifted gene ensembles allowed determination of the relative effects of all possible single nucleotide mutations. Despite being averaged across many different genetic backgrounds, about 67% of all nonsynonymous, missense mutations were evidently deleterious, and an additional 16% were likely to be deleterious. In the early generations, the frequency of most deleterious mutations remained high. However, by the 17th generation, their frequency was consistently reduced, and those remaining were accepted alongside compensatory mutations. The tolerance to mutations measured in this laboratory drift correlated with sequence exchanges seen in M.HaeIII’s natural orthologs. The biophysical constraints dictating purging in nature and in this laboratory drift also seemed to overlap. Our experiment therefore provides an improved method for measuring the effects of protein mutations that more closely replicates the natural evolutionary forces, and thereby a more realistic view of the mutational space of proteins. PMID:26274323

  11. Mutations affecting the chemosensory neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Starich, T.A.; Herman, R.K.; Kari, C.K.

    1995-01-01

    We have identified and characterized 95 mutations that reduce or abolish dye filling of amphid and phasmid neurons and that have little effect on viability, fertility or movement. Twenty-seven mutations occurred spontaneously in strains with a high frequency of transposon insertion. Sixty-eight were isolated after treatment with EMS. All of the mutations result in defects in one or more chemosensory responses, such as chemotaxis to ammonium chloride or formation of dauer larvae under conditions of starvation and overcrowding. Seventy-five of the mutations are alleles of 12 previously defined genes, mutations which were previously shown to lead to defects in amphid ultrastructure. We have assigned 20 mutations to 13 new genes, called dyf-1 through dyf-13. We expect that the genes represented by dye-filling defective mutants are important for the differentiation of amphid and phasmid chemosensilla. 58 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. PHF6 mutations in adult acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Van Vlierberghe, P; Patel, J; Abdel-Wahab, O; Lobry, C; Hedvat, C V; Balbin, M; Nicolas, C; Payer, A R; Fernandez, H F; Tallman, M S; Paietta, E; Melnick, A; Vandenberghe, P; Speleman, F; Aifantis, I; Cools, J; Levine, R; Ferrando, A

    2011-01-01

    Loss of function mutations and deletions encompassing the plant homeodomain finger 6 (PHF6) gene are present in about 20% of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (ALLs). Here, we report the identification of recurrent mutations in PHF6 in 10/353 adult acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs). Genetic lesions in PHF6 found in AMLs are frameshift and nonsense mutations distributed through the gene or point mutations involving the second plant homeodomain (PHD)-like domain of the protein. As in the case of T-ALL, where PHF6 alterations are found almost exclusively in males, mutations in PHF6 were seven times more prevalent in males than in females with AML. Overall, these results identify PHF6 as a tumor suppressor gene mutated in AML and extend the role of this X-linked tumor suppressor gene in the pathogenesis of hematologic tumors.

  13. The origins, determinants, and consequences of human mutations.

    PubMed

    Shendure, Jay; Akey, Joshua M

    2015-09-25

    Germline mutations are the principal cause of heritable disease and the ultimate source of evolutionary change. Similarly, somatic mutations are the primary cause of cancer and may contribute to the burden of human disease more broadly than previously appreciated. Here, we review recent insights into the rates, spectrum, and determinants of genomic mutations and how these parameters inform our understanding of both Mendelian and complex human diseases. We also consider models for conceptualizing mutational consequences and outline several key areas for future research, including the development of new technologies to access and quantify the full spectrum of mutations, as well as to better interpret the consequences of mutations with respect to molecular functionality, evolutionary fitness, and disease pathogenicity.

  14. Update of the androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Beitel, L K; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M

    1999-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 309 to 374 during the past year. We have expanded the database by adding information on AR-interacting proteins; and we have improved the database by identifying those mutation entries that have been updated. Mutations of unknown significance have now been reported in both the 5' and 3' untranslated regions of the AR gene, and in individuals who are somatic mosaics constitutionally. In addition, single nucleotide polymorphisms, including silent mutations, have been discovered in normal individuals and in individuals with male infertility. A mutation hotspot associated with prostatic cancer has been identified in exon 5. The database is available on the internet (http://www.mcgill.ca/androgendb/), from EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (ftp.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen), or as a Macintosh FilemakerPro or Word file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  15. A Novel Mutation of DAX-1 Associated with Secretory Azoospermia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lihua; Liu, Yuchen; Diao, Ruiying; Cai, Zhiming; Li, Honggang; Gui, Yaoting

    2015-01-01

    Secretory azoospermia is a severe form of male infertility caused by unknown factors. DAX-1 is predominantly expressed in mammalian reproductive tissues and plays an important role in spermatogenesis because Dax-1 knockout male mice show spermatogenesis defects. To examine whether DAX-1 is involved in the pathogenesis of secretory azoospermia in humans, we sequenced all of the exons of DAX-1 in 776 patients diagnosed with secretory azoospermia and 709 proven fertile men. A number of coding mutations unique to the patient group, including two synonymous mutations and six missense mutations, were identified. Of the missense mutations, our functional assay demonstrated that the V385L mutation caused the reduced functioning of DAX-1. This novel mutation (p. V385L) of DAX-1 is the first to be identified in association with secretory azoospermia, thereby highlighting the important role of DAX-1 in spermatogenesis. PMID:26207377

  16. How do oncoprotein mutations rewire protein-protein interaction networks?

    PubMed

    Bowler, Emily H; Wang, Zhenghe; Ewing, Rob M

    2015-01-01

    The acquisition of mutations that activate oncogenes or inactivate tumor suppressors is a primary feature of most cancers. Mutations that directly alter protein sequence and structure drive the development of tumors through aberrant expression and modification of proteins, in many cases directly impacting components of signal transduction pathways and cellular architecture. Cancer-associated mutations may have direct or indirect effects on proteins and their interactions and while the effects of mutations on signaling pathways have been widely studied, how mutations alter underlying protein-protein interaction networks is much less well understood. Systematic mapping of oncoprotein protein interactions using proteomics techniques as well as computational network analyses is revealing how oncoprotein mutations perturb protein-protein interaction networks and drive the cancer phenotype. PMID:26325016

  17. DMD mutation spectrum analysis in 613 Chinese patients with dystrophinopathy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ruolan; Zhu, Guosheng; Zhu, Huimin; Ma, Ruiyu; Peng, Ying; Liang, Desheng; Wu, Lingqian

    2015-08-01

    Dystrophinopathy is a group of inherited diseases caused by mutations in the DMD gene. Within the dystrophinopathy spectrum, Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies are common X-linked recessive disorders that mainly feature striated muscle necrosis. We combined multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification with Sanger sequencing to detect large deletions/duplications and point mutations in the DMD gene in 613 Chinese patients. A total of 571 (93.1%) patients were diagnosed, including 428 (69.8%) with large deletions/duplications and 143 (23.3%) with point mutations. Deletion/duplication breakpoints gathered mostly in introns 44-55. Reading frame rules could explain 88.6% of deletion mutations. We identified seventy novel point mutations that had not been previously reported. Spectrum expansion and genotype-phenotype analysis of DMD mutations on such a large sample size in Han Chinese population would provide new insights into the pathogenic mechanism underlying dystrophinopathies.

  18. Frequency of TERT promoter mutations in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Vinagre, João; Almeida, Ana; Pópulo, Helena; Batista, Rui; Lyra, Joana; Pinto, Vasco; Coelho, Ricardo; Celestino, Ricardo; Prazeres, Hugo; Lima, Luis; Melo, Miguel; da Rocha, Adriana Gaspar; Preto, Ana; Castro, Patrícia; Castro, Ligia; Pardal, Fernando; Lopes, José Manuel; Santos, Lúcio Lara; Reis, Rui Manuel; Cameselle-Teijeiro, José; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Lima, Jorge; Máximo, Valdemar; Soares, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Reactivation of telomerase has been implicated in human tumorigenesis, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we report the presence of recurrent somatic mutations in the TERT promoter in cancers of the central nervous system (43%), bladder (59%), thyroid (follicular cell-derived, 10%) and skin (melanoma, 29%). In thyroid cancers, the presence of TERT promoter mutations (when occurring together with BRAF mutations) is significantly associated with higher TERT mRNA expression, and in glioblastoma we find a trend for increased telomerase expression in cases harbouring TERT promoter mutations. Both in thyroid cancers and glioblastoma, TERT promoter mutations are significantly associated with older age of the patients. Our results show that TERT promoter mutations are relatively frequent in specific types of human cancers, where they lead to enhanced expression of telomerase. PMID:23887589

  19. Sensitive quantification of somatic mutations using molecular inversion probes.

    PubMed

    Hirani, Rena; Connolly, Ashley R; Putral, Lisa; Dobrovic, Alexander; Trau, Matt

    2011-11-01

    Somatic mutations in DNA can serve as cancer specific biomarkers and are increasingly being used to direct treatment. However, they can be difficult to detect in tissue biopsies because there is often only a minimal amount of sample and the mutations are often masked by the presence of wild type alleles from nontumor material in the sample. To facilitate the sensitive and specific analysis of DNA mutations in tissues, a multiplex assay capable of detecting nucleotide changes in less than 150 cells was developed. The assay extends the application of molecular inversion probes to enable sensitive discrimination and quantification of nucleotide mutations that are present in less than 0.1% of a cell population. The assay was characterized by detecting selected mutations in the KRAS gene, which has been implicated in up to 25% of all cancers. These mutations were detected in a single multiplex assay by incorporating the rapid flow cytometric readout of multiplexable DNA biosensors.

  20. Dissecting genetic and environmental mutation signatures with model organisms.

    PubMed

    Segovia, Romulo; Tam, Annie S; Stirling, Peter C

    2015-08-01

    Deep sequencing has impacted on cancer research by enabling routine sequencing of genomes and exomes to identify genetic changes associated with carcinogenesis. Researchers can now use the frequency, type, and context of all mutations in tumor genomes to extract mutation signatures that reflect the driving mutational processes. Identifying mutation signatures, however, may not immediately suggest a mechanism. Consequently, several recent studies have employed deep sequencing of model organisms exposed to discrete genetic or environmental perturbations. These studies exploit the simpler genomes and availability of powerful genetic tools in model organisms to analyze mutation signatures under controlled conditions, forging mechanistic links between mutational processes and signatures. We discuss the power of this approach and suggest that many such studies may be on the horizon.

  1. Clusters of Multiple Mutations: Incidence and Molecular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kin; Gordenin, Dmitry A.

    2016-01-01

    It has been long understood that mutation distribution across genomic space and in time is not completely random. Indeed, recent surprising discoveries identified multiple simultaneous mutations occurring in tiny regions within chromosomes, while the rest of the genome remains relatively mutation-free. Mechanistic elucidation of these phenomena called mutation showers, mutation clusters, or kataegis is ongoing, in parallel with findings of abundant clustered mutagenesis in cancer genomes. So far, the combination of factors most important for clustered mutagenesis is the induction of DNA lesions with unusually long and persistent single-strand DNA intermediates. In addition to being a fascinating phenomenon, clustered mutagenesis also became an indispensable tool for identifying a previously unrecognized major source of mutation in cancer – APOBEC cytidine deaminases. Future research on clustered mutagenesis carries a promise of shedding light onto important mechanistic details of genome maintenance, with potentially profound implications for human health. PMID:26631512

  2. Distinct neurological disorders with ATP1A3 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Heinzen, Erin L.; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Brashear, Allison; Clapcote, Steven J.; Gurrieri, Fiorella; Goldstein, David B.; Jóhannesson, Sigurður H.; Mikati, Mohamad A.; Neville, Brian; Nicole, Sophie; Ozelius, Laurie J.; Poulsen, Hanne; Schyns, Tsveta; Sweadner, Kathleen J.; van den Maagdenberg, Arn; Vilsen, Bente

    2014-01-01

    Genetic research has shown that mutations that modify the protein-coding sequence of ATP1A3, the gene encoding the α3 subunit of Na+/K+-ATPase, cause both rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism and alternating hemiplegia of childhood. These discoveries link two clinically distinct neurological diseases to the same gene, however, ATP1A3 mutations are, with one exception, disease-specific. Although the exact mechanism of how these mutations lead to disease is still unknown, much knowledge has been gained about functional consequences of ATP1A3 mutations using a range of in vitro and animal model systems, and the role of Na+/K+-ATPases in the brain. Researchers and clinicians are attempting to further characterise neurological manifestations associated with mutations in ATP1A3, and to build on the existing molecular knowledge to understand how specific mutations can lead to different diseases. PMID:24739246

  3. Competition between transposable elements and mutator genes in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fehér, Tamás; Bogos, Balázs; Méhi, Orsolya; Fekete, Gergely; Csörgo, Bálint; Kovács, Károly; Pósfai, György; Papp, Balázs; Hurst, Laurence D; Pál, Csaba

    2012-10-01

    Although both genotypes with elevated mutation rate (mutators) and mobilization of insertion sequence (IS) elements have substantial impact on genome diversification, their potential interactions are unknown. Moreover, the evolutionary forces driving gradual accumulation of these elements are unclear: Do these elements spread in an initially transposon-free bacterial genome as they enable rapid adaptive evolution? To address these issues, we inserted an active IS1 element into a reduced Escherichia coli genome devoid of all other mobile DNA. Evolutionary laboratory experiments revealed that IS elements increase mutational supply and occasionally generate variants with especially large phenotypic effects. However, their impact on adaptive evolution is small compared with mismatch repair mutator alleles, and hence, the latter impede the spread of IS-carrying strains. Given their ubiquity in natural populations, such mutator alleles could limit early phase of IS element evolution in a new bacterial host. More generally, our work demonstrates the existence of an evolutionary conflict between mutation-promoting mechanisms.

  4. BRCA1 founder mutations compared to ovarian cancer in Belarus.

    PubMed

    Savanevich, Alena; Oszurek, Oleg; Lubiński, Jan; Cybulski, Cezary; Dębniak, Tadeusz; Narod, Steven A; Gronwald, Jacek

    2014-09-01

    In Belarus and other Slavic countries, founder mutations in the BRCA1 gene are responsible for a significant proportion of breast cancer cases, but the data on contribution of these mutations to ovarian cancers are limited. To estimate the proportion of ovarian cancers in Belarus, which are dependent on BRCA1 Slavic founder mutations, we sought the presence of three most frequent mutations (BRCA1: 5382insC, C61G and, 4153delA) in 158 consecutive unselected cases of ovarian cancer. One of the three founder mutations was present in 25 of 158 unselected cases of ovarian cancer (15.8 %). We recommend that all cases of ovarian cancer in Belarus be offered genetic testing for these founder mutations. Furthermore, genetic testing of the Belarusian population will provide the opportunity to prevent a significant proportion of ovarian cancer.

  5. De novo mutations in schizophrenia implicate synaptic networks.

    PubMed

    Fromer, Menachem; Pocklington, Andrew J; Kavanagh, David H; Williams, Hywel J; Dwyer, Sarah; Gormley, Padhraig; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Rees, Elliott; Palta, Priit; Ruderfer, Douglas M; Carrera, Noa; Humphreys, Isla; Johnson, Jessica S; Roussos, Panos; Barker, Douglas D; Banks, Eric; Milanova, Vihra; Grant, Seth G; Hannon, Eilis; Rose, Samuel A; Chambert, Kimberly; Mahajan, Milind; Scolnick, Edward M; Moran, Jennifer L; Kirov, George; Palotie, Aarno; McCarroll, Steven A; Holmans, Peter; Sklar, Pamela; Owen, Michael J; Purcell, Shaun M; O'Donovan, Michael C

    2014-02-13

    Inherited alleles account for most of the genetic risk for schizophrenia. However, new (de novo) mutations, in the form of large chromosomal copy number changes, occur in a small fraction of cases and disproportionally disrupt genes encoding postsynaptic proteins. Here we show that small de novo mutations, affecting one or a few nucleotides, are overrepresented among glutamatergic postsynaptic proteins comprising activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (ARC) and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) complexes. Mutations are additionally enriched in proteins that interact with these complexes to modulate synaptic strength, namely proteins regulating actin filament dynamics and those whose messenger RNAs are targets of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). Genes affected by mutations in schizophrenia overlap those mutated in autism and intellectual disability, as do mutation-enriched synaptic pathways. Aligning our findings with a parallel case-control study, we demonstrate reproducible insights into aetiological mechanisms for schizophrenia and reveal pathophysiology shared with other neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:24463507

  6. Dissecting genetic and environmental mutation signatures with model organisms.

    PubMed

    Segovia, Romulo; Tam, Annie S; Stirling, Peter C

    2015-08-01

    Deep sequencing has impacted on cancer research by enabling routine sequencing of genomes and exomes to identify genetic changes associated with carcinogenesis. Researchers can now use the frequency, type, and context of all mutations in tumor genomes to extract mutation signatures that reflect the driving mutational processes. Identifying mutation signatures, however, may not immediately suggest a mechanism. Consequently, several recent studies have employed deep sequencing of model organisms exposed to discrete genetic or environmental perturbations. These studies exploit the simpler genomes and availability of powerful genetic tools in model organisms to analyze mutation signatures under controlled conditions, forging mechanistic links between mutational processes and signatures. We discuss the power of this approach and suggest that many such studies may be on the horizon. PMID:25940384

  7. Male mutation rates and the cost of sex for females

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redfield, Rosemary J.

    1994-05-01

    ALTHOUGH we do not know why sex evolved, the twofold cost of meiosis for females provides a standard against which postulated benefits of sex can be evaluated1. The most reliable benefit is sex's ability to reduce the impact of deleterious mutations2,3. But deleterious mutations may themselves generate a large and previously overlooked female-specific cost of sex. DNA sequence comparisons have confirmed Haldane's suggestion that most mutations arise in the male germ line4,5; recent estimates of α, the ratio of male to female mutation rates, are ten, six and two in humans, primates and rodents, respectively6-8. Consequently, male gametes may give progeny more mutations than the associated sexual recombination eliminates. Here I describe computer simulations showing that the cost of male mutations can easily exceed the benefits of recombination, causing females to produce fitter progeny by parthenogenesis than by mating. The persistence of sexual reproduction by females thus becomes even more problematic.

  8. KRAS Mutations in Canine and Feline Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Crozier, C; Wood, G A; Foster, R A; Stasi, S; Liu, J H W; Bartlett, J M S; Coomber, B L; Sabine, V S

    2016-07-01

    Companion animals may serve as valuable models for studying human cancers. Although KRAS is the most commonly mutated gene in human ductal pancreatic cancers (57%), with mutations frequently occurring at codons 12, 13 and 61, human pancreatic acinar cell carcinomas (ACCs) lack activating KRAS mutations. In the present study, 32 pancreatic ACC samples obtained from 14 dogs and 18 cats, including seven metastases, were analyzed for six common activating KRAS mutations located in codons 12 (n = 5) and 13 (n = 1) using Sequenom MassARRAY. No KRAS mutations were found, suggesting that, similar to human pancreatic ACC, KRAS mutations do not play a critical role in feline or canine pancreatic ACC. Due to the similarity of the clinical disease in dogs and cats to that of man, this study confirms that companion animals offer potential as a suitable model for investigating this rare subtype of pancreatic carcinoma.

  9. Distinct neurological disorders with ATP1A3 mutations.

    PubMed

    Heinzen, Erin L; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Brashear, Allison; Clapcote, Steven J; Gurrieri, Fiorella; Goldstein, David B; Jóhannesson, Sigurður H; Mikati, Mohamad A; Neville, Brian; Nicole, Sophie; Ozelius, Laurie J; Poulsen, Hanne; Schyns, Tsveta; Sweadner, Kathleen J; van den Maagdenberg, Arn; Vilsen, Bente

    2014-05-01

    Genetic research has shown that mutations that modify the protein-coding sequence of ATP1A3, the gene encoding the α3 subunit of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, cause both rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism and alternating hemiplegia of childhood. These discoveries link two clinically distinct neurological diseases to the same gene, however, ATP1A3 mutations are, with one exception, disease-specific. Although the exact mechanism of how these mutations lead to disease is still unknown, much knowledge has been gained about functional consequences of ATP1A3 mutations using a range of in-vitro and animal model systems, and the role of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPases in the brain. Researchers and clinicians are attempting to further characterise neurological manifestations associated with mutations in ATP1A3, and to build on the existing molecular knowledge to understand how specific mutations can lead to different diseases. PMID:24739246

  10. A Novel Mutation of DAX-1 Associated with Secretory Azoospermia.

    PubMed

    Mou, Lisha; Xie, Nie; Yang, Lihua; Liu, Yuchen; Diao, Ruiying; Cai, Zhiming; Li, Honggang; Gui, Yaoting

    2015-01-01

    Secretory azoospermia is a severe form of male infertility caused by unknown factors. DAX-1 is predominantly expressed in mammalian reproductive tissues and plays an important role in spermatogenesis because Dax-1 knockout male mice show spermatogenesis defects. To examine whether DAX-1 is involved in the pathogenesis of secretory azoospermia in humans, we sequenced all of the exons of DAX-1 in 776 patients diagnosed with secretory azoospermia and 709 proven fertile men. A number of coding mutations unique to the patient group, including two synonymous mutations and six missense mutations, were identified. Of the missense mutations, our functional assay demonstrated that the V385L mutation caused the reduced functioning of DAX-1. This novel mutation (p. V385L) of DAX-1 is the first to be identified in association with secretory azoospermia, thereby highlighting the important role of DAX-1 in spermatogenesis. PMID:26207377

  11. A patient with a novel homozygous missense mutation in FTO and concomitant nonsense mutation in CETP

    PubMed Central

    Çağlayan, Ahmet Okay; Tüysüz, Beyhan; Coşkun, Süleyman; Quon, Jennifer; Harmanci, Akdes Serin; Baranoski, Jacob F.; Baran, Burçin; Erson-Omay, E. Zeynep; Henegariu, Octavian; Mane, Shrikant M.; Bilgüvar, Kaya; Yasuno, Katsuhito; Günel, Murat

    2015-01-01

    The fat mass and obesity associated gene (FTO) has previously been associated with a variety of diseases and conditions, notably obesity, acute coronary syndrome and metabolic syndrome. Reports describing mutations in FTO as well as FTO animal models have further demonstrated a role for FTO in the development of the brain and other organs. Here, we describe a patient born of consanguineous union who presented with microcephaly, developmental delay, behavioral abnormalities, dysmorphic facial features, hypotonia, and other various phenotypic abnormalities. Whole exome sequencing revealed a novel homozygous missense mutation in FTO and a nonsense mutation in the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP). Exome CNV analysis revealed no disease causing large duplications or deletions within coding regions. Patient’s, her parents’ and non-related control’ fibroblasts were analyzed for morphologic defects, abnormal proliferation, apoptosis and transcriptome profile. We have shown that FTO is located in nucleus of cells from each tested samples. Western blot analysis demonstrated no changes in patient FTO. Q-PCR analysis revealed slightly decreased levels of FTO expression in patient cells compared to controls. No morphological or proliferation differences between the patient and control fibroblasts were observed. There is still much to be learned about the molecular mechanisms by which mutations in FTO contribute to such severe phenotypes. PMID:26740239

  12. Mutations in sfdA and sfdB suppress multiple developmental mutations in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed Central

    Kellner, Ellen M; Adams, Thomas H

    2002-01-01

    Conidiophore morphogenesis in Aspergillus nidulans occurs in response to developmental signals that result in the activation of brlA, a well-characterized gene that encodes a transcription factor that is central to asexual development. Loss-of-function mutations in flbD and other fluffy loci have previously been shown to result in delayed development and reduced expression of brlA. flbD message is detectable during both hyphal growth and conidiation, and its gene product is similar to the Myb family of transcription factors. To further understand the regulatory pathway to brlA activation and conidiation, we isolated suppressor mutations that rescued development in strains with a flbD null allele. We describe here two new loci, designated sfdA and sfdB for suppressors of flbD, that bypass the requirement of flbD for development. sfd mutant alleles were found to restore developmental timing and brlA expression to strains with flbD deletions. In addition, sfd mutations suppress the developmental defects in strains harboring loss-of-function mutations in fluG, flbA, flbB, flbC, and flbE. All alleles of sfdA and sfdB that we have isolated are recessive to their wild-type alleles in diploids. Strains with mutant sfd alleles in otherwise developmentally wild-type backgrounds have reduced growth phenotypes and develop conidiophores in submerged cultures. PMID:11805053

  13. Gonadosomatic mosaicism for lethal mutations in Drosophila lethal mutations disturbing larval development

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, A.I.; Sakharova, N.Yu.

    1988-11-01

    Phenogenetic analysis of autonomous lethal mutations obtained by the method of gonadosomatic mosaicism which manifested during larval stages, established that the nuclei of hypodermal cells, salivary glands suprapharyngeal ganglion, pharynx, esophagus, gizzard, and hindgut are the derivatives of the same nucleus (from the first two nuclei of cleavage) as the nuclei of the cells of the imaginal-somatic tissues.

  14. Early progressive encephalopathy in boys and MECP2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Kankirawatana, P; Leonard, H; Ellaway, C; Scurlock, J; Mansour, A; Makris, C M; Dure, L S; Friez, M; Lane, J; Kiraly-Borri, C; Fabian, V; Davis, M; Jackson, J; Christodoulou, J; Kaufmann, W E; Ravine, D; Percy, A K

    2006-07-11

    MECP2 mutations mainly occur in females with Rett syndrome. Mutations have been described in 11 boys with progressive encephalopathy: seven of nine with affected sisters and two de novo. The authors report four de novo occurrences: three pathogenic and one potentially pathogenic. Common features include failure to thrive, respiratory insufficiency, microcephaly, and abnormal motor control. MECP2 mutations should be assessed in boys with progressive encephalopathy and one or more of respiratory insufficiency, abnormal movements or tone, and intractable seizures.

  15. Complementation analysis of eleven tryptophanase mutations in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    White, M K; Yudkin, M D

    1979-10-01

    Nine independent mutants deficient in tryptophanase activity were isolated. Each mutation was transferred to a specialized transducing phage that carries the tryptophanase region of the Escherichia coli chromosome. The nine phages thus produced, and a tenth carrying a previously characterized tryptophanase mutation, were used to lysogenize a bacterial strain harbouring a mutation in the tryptophanase structural gene and also a suppressor of polarity. In no case was complementation observed; we conclude that there is no closely linked positive regulatory gene for tryptophanase.

  16. Algorithms for Detecting Significantly Mutated Pathways in Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandin, Fabio; Upfal, Eli; Raphael, Benjamin J.

    Recent genome sequencing studies have shown that the somatic mutations that drive cancer development are distributed across a large number of genes. This mutational heterogeneity complicates efforts to distinguish functional mutations from sporadic, passenger mutations. Since cancer mutations are hypothesized to target a relatively small number of cellular signaling and regulatory pathways, a common approach is to assess whether known pathways are enriched for mutated genes. However, restricting attention to known pathways will not reveal novel cancer genes or pathways. An alterative strategy is to examine mutated genes in the context of genome-scale interaction networks that include both well characterized pathways and additional gene interactions measured through various approaches. We introduce a computational framework for de novo identification of subnetworks in a large gene interaction network that are mutated in a significant number of patients. This framework includes two major features. First, we introduce a diffusion process on the interaction network to define a local neighborhood of "influence" for each mutated gene in the network. Second, we derive a two-stage multiple hypothesis test to bound the false discovery rate (FDR) associated with the identified subnetworks. We test these algorithms on a large human protein-protein interaction network using mutation data from two recent studies: glioblastoma samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas and lung adenocarcinoma samples from the Tumor Sequencing Project. We successfully recover pathways that are known to be important in these cancers, such as the p53 pathway. We also identify additional pathways, such as the Notch signaling pathway, that have been implicated in other cancers but not previously reported as mutated in these samples. Our approach is the first, to our knowledge, to demonstrate a computationally efficient strategy for de novo identification of statistically significant mutated subnetworks. We

  17. MUTATION RATES OF BACTERIA IN STEADY STATE POPULATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Maurice S.

    1955-01-01

    The breeder and the chemostat have been used to measure mutation rates for two mutations under a variety of steady state growth conditions. These rates have been found to be higher in complex medium than in minimal (F) medium. The effects of changes in nutritional conditions on these high rates have been described. In addition, the mutation rates at short generation times, in complex medium, have been shown to decrease with increasing generation time. PMID:13271726

  18. Is deafness mutation screening required in cystic fibrosis patients?

    PubMed

    Abusamra, Rania; McShane, Donna

    2016-08-01

    Aminoglycosides are widely used in cystic fibrosis management. The m.1555A>G mutation predisposes to aminoglycoside ototoxicity. It may cause later onset hearing loss in the absence of aminoglycosides use and gradual hearing loss may be an inevitable consequence of the mutation. Given that aminoglycoside therapy forms the backbone of IV protocols in CF, this article recommends screening for this mutation to allow informed decision-making prior to aminoglycoside administration, to avoid preventable deafness. PMID:27427311

  19. Human somatic mutation assays as biomarkers of carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Compton, P J; Hooper, K; Smith, M T

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes four assays that detect somatic gene mutations in humans: the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase assay, the glycophorin A assay, the HLA-A assay, and the sickle cell hemoglobin assay. Somatic gene mutation can be considered a biomarker of carcinogenesis, and assays for somatic mutation may assist epidemiologists in studies that attempt to identify factors associated with increased risks of cancer. Practical aspects of the use of these assays are discussed. PMID:1954924

  20. Human somatic mutation assays as biomarkers of carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Compton, P.J.E.; Smith, M.T. ); Hooper, K. )

    1991-08-01

    This paper describes four assays that detect somatic gene mutations in humans: the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase assay, the glycophorin A assay, the HLA-A assay, and the sickle cell hemoglobin assay. Somatic gene mutations can be considered a biomarker of carcinogenesis, and assays for somatic mutation may assist epidemiologists in studies that attempt to identify factors associated with increased risks of cancer. Practical aspects of the use of these assays are discussed.

  1. Selection of a Mutant of Escherichia coli Which Has High Mutation Rates

    PubMed Central

    Helling, Robert B.

    1968-01-01

    A mutation which causes high mutation rates in all other loci tested was induced with nitrosoguanidine and was selected through the ability of the progeny of such mutant cells to mutate to streptomycin resistance at a higher rate than the wild-type cells. This mutation (mut-2) and the Treffers' mutation (mutT1) mapped at approximately the same position to the right of leu. Specificity studies showed that the two mutations differ in rates of mutation produced. PMID:4879569

  2. Deleterious mutation and the evolution of eusociality.

    PubMed

    Cherry, Joshua L

    2002-12-01

    Certain arguments concerning the evolution of eusociality form a classic example of the application of the principles of kin selection. These arguments center on the different degrees of relatedness of potential beneficiaries of an individual's efforts, for example a female's higher relatedness to her sisters than to her daughters in a haplodiploid system. This type of reasoning is insufficicnt to account for the evolution and maintainence of sexual reproduction, because parthenogenic females produce offspring that are more closely related to them than are offspring produced sexually. Among the forces invoked to explain sexual reproduction is deleterious mutation. This factor can be shown to favor eusociality as well, because siblings produced by helping carry fewer deleterious alleles on average than would offspring. The strength of this effect depends on the genomewide deleterious mutation rate, U, and on the selection coefficient, s, associated with deleterious alleles. For small s, the effect depends approximately on the product Us. This phenomenon illustrates that an assumption implicit in some analyses-that the relatedness of an individual to an actor is all that matters to its value to that actor-can fail for the evolution of eusociality as it does for the evolution of sex. PMID:12583576

  3. Predicting the Pathogenicity of RPE65 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Philp, A.R.; Jin, M.; Li, S.; Schindler, E.I.; Iannaccone, A.; Lam, B.L.; Weleber, R.G.; Fishman, G.A.; Jacobson, S.G.; Mullins, R.F.; Travis, G.H.; Stone, E.M.

    2009-01-01

    To assist in distinguishing disease-causing mutations from non-pathogenic polymorphisms, we developed an objective algorithm to calculate an “estimate of pathogenic probability” (EPP) based on the prevalence of a specific variation, its segregation within families, and its predicted effects on protein structure. Eleven missense variations in the RPE65 gene were evaluated in patients with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) using the EPP algorithm. The accuracy of the EPP algorithm was evaluated using a cell-culture assay of RPE65-isomerase activity The variations were engineered into plasmids containing a human RPE65 cDNA and the retinoid isomerase activity of each variant was determined in cultured cells. The EPP algorithm predicted eight substitution mutations to be disease-causing variants. The isomerase catalytic activities of these RPE65 variants were all less than 6% of wild-type. In contrast, the EPP algorithm predicted the other three substitutions to be non-disease-causing, with isomerase activities of 68%, 127% and 110% of wild-type, respectively. We observed complete concordance between the predicted pathogenicities of missense variations in the RPE65 gene and retinoid isomerase activities measured in a functional assay. These results suggest that the EPP algorithm may be useful to evaluate the pathogenicity of missense variations in other disease genes where functional assays are not available. PMID:19431183

  4. Combined Immunodeficiency Associated with DOCK8 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Davis, Jeremiah C.; Lamborn, Ian T.; Freeman, Alexandra F.; Jing, Huie; Favreau, Amanda J.; Matthews, Helen F.; Davis, Joie; Turner, Maria L.; Uzel, Gulbu; Holland, Steven M.; Su, Helen C.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recurrent sinopulmonary and cutaneous viral infections with elevated serum levels of IgE are features of some variants of combined immunodeficiency. The genetic causes of these variants are unknown. METHODS We collected longitudinal clinical data on 11 patients from eight families who had recurrent sinopulmonary and cutaneous viral infections. We performed comparative genomic hybridization arrays and targeted gene sequencing. Variants with predicted loss-of-expression mutations were confirmed by means of a quantitative reverse-transcriptase –polymerase-chain-reaction assay and immunoblotting. We evaluated the number and function of lymphocytes with the use of in vitro assays and flow cytometry. RESULTS Patients had recurrent otitis media, sinusitis, and pneumonias; recurrent Staphylococcus aureus skin infections with otitis externa; recurrent, severe herpes simplex virus or herpes zoster infections; extensive and persistent infections with molluscum contagiosum; and human papillomavirus infections. Most patients had severe atopy with anaphylaxis; several had squamous-cell carcinomas, and one had T-cell lymphoma –leukemia. Elevated serum IgE levels, hypereosinophilia, low numbers of T cells and B cells, low serum IgM levels, and variable IgG antibody responses were common. Expansion in vitro of activated CD8 T cells was impaired. Novel homozygous or compound heterozygous deletions and point mutations in the gene encoding the dedicator of cytokinesis 8 protein (DOCK8) led to the absence of DOCK8 protein in lymphocytes. CONCLUSIONS Autosomal recessive DOCK8 deficiency is associated with a novel variant of combined immunodeficiency. PMID:19776401

  5. The Evolutionary Potential of Phenotypic Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Yanagida, Hayato; Gispan, Ariel; Kadouri, Noam; Rozen, Shelly; Sharon, Michal; Barkai, Naama; Tawfik, Dan S.

    2015-01-01

    Errors in protein synthesis, so-called phenotypic mutations, are orders-of-magnitude more frequent than genetic mutations. Here, we provide direct evidence that alternative protein forms and phenotypic variability derived from translational errors paved the path to genetic, evolutionary adaptations via gene duplication. We explored the evolutionary origins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae IDP3 - an NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase mediating fatty acids ß-oxidation in the peroxisome. Following the yeast whole genome duplication, IDP3 diverged from a cytosolic ancestral gene by acquisition of a C-terminal peroxisomal targeting signal. We discovered that the pre-duplicated cytosolic IDPs are partially localized to the peroxisome owing to +1 translational frameshifts that bypass the stop codon and unveil cryptic peroxisomal targeting signals within the 3’-UTR. Exploring putative cryptic signals in all 3’-UTRs of yeast genomes, we found that other enzymes related to NADPH production such as pyruvate carboxylase 1 (PYC1) might be prone to peroxisomal localization via cryptic signals. Using laboratory evolution we found that these translational frameshifts are rapidly imprinted via genetic single base deletions occurring within the very same gene location. Further, as exemplified here, the sequences that promote translational frameshifts are also more prone to genetic deletions. Thus, genotypes conferring higher phenotypic variability not only meet immediate challenges by unveiling cryptic 3’-UTR sequences, but also boost the potential for future genetic adaptations. PMID:26244544

  6. The Evolutionary Potential of Phenotypic Mutations.

    PubMed

    Yanagida, Hayato; Gispan, Ariel; Kadouri, Noam; Rozen, Shelly; Sharon, Michal; Barkai, Naama; Tawfik, Dan S

    2015-08-01

    Errors in protein synthesis, so-called phenotypic mutations, are orders-of-magnitude more frequent than genetic mutations. Here, we provide direct evidence that alternative protein forms and phenotypic variability derived from translational errors paved the path to genetic, evolutionary adaptations via gene duplication. We explored the evolutionary origins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae IDP3 - an NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase mediating fatty acids ß-oxidation in the peroxisome. Following the yeast whole genome duplication, IDP3 diverged from a cytosolic ancestral gene by acquisition of a C-terminal peroxisomal targeting signal. We discovered that the pre-duplicated cytosolic IDPs are partially localized to the peroxisome owing to +1 translational frameshifts that bypass the stop codon and unveil cryptic peroxisomal targeting signals within the 3'-UTR. Exploring putative cryptic signals in all 3'-UTRs of yeast genomes, we found that other enzymes related to NADPH production such as pyruvate carboxylase 1 (PYC1) might be prone to peroxisomal localization via cryptic signals. Using laboratory evolution we found that these translational frameshifts are rapidly imprinted via genetic single base deletions occurring within the very same gene location. Further, as exemplified here, the sequences that promote translational frameshifts are also more prone to genetic deletions. Thus, genotypes conferring higher phenotypic variability not only meet immediate challenges by unveiling cryptic 3'-UTR sequences, but also boost the potential for future genetic adaptations.

  7. [Mutation detection by PCR-TGGE].

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, T; Nishiyama, K; Matsuo, M

    1995-07-01

    The variants in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) heat-labile toxin (LT) gene were detected by temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE). 15 clinical strains isolated from patients and a wild type strain (B2C) were analyzed after the conventional PCR. Although all PCR products (707bp) corresponded to A-subunit of LT, three strains were the different electrophoretic patterns after silver staining as compared to the wild type. For further electrophoretic analyses, the 707bp region was divided into 4 parts. The different ones were localized in the downstream part (183bp), but each those DNA bands was not so clear than DNA bands in 707bp. The clearer patterns were obtained by using a primer attached GC-clamp. The hetero-duplex assays in TGGE were proceeded by a series of procedures in mixing with the equal quantity of PCR products derived from a variant and a wild type, heat-denaturation and then annealing. TGGE of those mixed samples had 4 bands that were 2 front bands as homo-duplex and 2 slower migration bands as hetero-duplex. To Confirm the site of the mutations, the nucleotide sequences in each 183bp PCR products were decided by dideoxynucleotide-fluorescent dye method. Indeed, two variants were recognized four one-base substitutions without deletions and the one was five. Thus, the difference of migration in TGGE depended on the number and the localization in mutation sites.

  8. P53 mutations in Ewing's sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Park, Y K; Chi, S G; Kim, Y W; Park, H R; Unni, K K

    2001-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene is one of the most frequently altered genes in human malignancies. To explore the implication of p53 alteration in Ewing's sarcoma, we analyzed the deletion and sequence alterations of p53 and abnormal amplification of MDM2, which acts as a functional inhibitor of p53, in 35 tissue specimens. Quantitative genomic PCR analysis showed that 2 of 35 tumors have extremely low levels of the p53 gene, indicating a homozygous deletion of the gene. Mutational analysis of exons 4 to 9 of p53 by PCR-SSCP revealed that 3 of 35 tumors carry sequence alterations in exons 5 or 8, and DNA sequencing analysis identified missense point mutations at codon 132 (AAG-->ATG, lysine-->methionine) and codon 135 (TGC-->TCC, cystein-->serine) in exon 5, and codon 287 (GAG-->GTG, glutamic acid-->valine) in exon 8 from these tumors. No abnormal amplification of the MDM2 gene was recognized. Taken together, our data demonstrate that p53 is genetically altered in a small fraction of Ewing's sarcoma.

  9. FRAXE mutation analysis in three Spanish families

    SciTech Connect

    Carbonell, P.; Lopez, I.; Gabarron, J.

    1996-08-09

    Very little is known about the phenotype of FRAXE-positive individuals and the relation between the genotype/phenotype and genotype/cytogenetic expression. We describe three families with normal and mildly affected individuals and a severely retarded male expressing fragility at the FRAXE locus or presenting different expansions at the CGG FRAXE triplet. In addition, we analyze the FRAXE mutation in sperm DNA from a retarded male carrier with a handicapped daughter expressing fragility at the FRAXE locus. Mental status in FRAXE individuals is highly variable and, although mild mental retardation is observed in most cases, several carrier males are apparently normal. It seems that methylation is not as strictly associated with size of CGG triplets in the FRAXE locus as in FRAXA, and it is possible that normal carrier individuals with fully methylated increments in lymphocytes have a certain proportion of unmethylated alleles in the critical (i.e., neural) tissues. FRAXE mutation is apparently similar to FRAXA in that males with somatic large methylated increments are carriers of small unmethylated ones in germinal cells. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Reducing mutation load through sexual selection on males.

    PubMed

    McGuigan, Katrina; Petfield, Donna; Blows, Mark W

    2011-10-01

    Mutation load is a key parameter in evolutionary theories, but relatively little empirical information exists on the mutation load of populations, or the elimination of this load through selection. We manipulated the opportunity for sexual selection within a mutation accumulation divergence experiment to determine how sexual selection on males affected the accumulation of mutations contributing to sexual and nonsexual fitness. Sexual selection prevented the accumulation of mutations affecting male mating success, the target trait, as well as reducing mutation load on productivity, a nonsexual fitness component. Mutational correlations between mating success and productivity (estimated in the absence of sexual selection) were positive. Sexual selection significantly reduced these fitness component correlations. Male mating success significantly diverged between sexual selection treatments, consistent with the fixation of genetic differences. However, the rank of the treatments was not consistent across assays, indicating that the mutational effects on mating success were conditional on biotic and abiotic context. Our experiment suggests that greater insight into the genetic targets of natural and sexual selection can be gained by focusing on mutational rather than standing genetic variation, and on the behavior of trait variances rather than means.

  11. 8-oxoguanine causes spontaneous de novo germline mutations in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Mizuki; Sakumi, Kunihiko; Fukumura, Ryutaro; Furuichi, Masato; Iwasaki, Yuki; Hokama, Masaaki; Ikemura, Toshimichi; Tsuzuki, Teruhisa; Gondo, Yoichi; Nakabeppu, Yusaku

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous germline mutations generate genetic diversity in populations of sexually reproductive organisms, and are thus regarded as a driving force of evolution. However, the cause and mechanism remain unclear. 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) is a candidate molecule that causes germline mutations, because it makes DNA more prone to mutation and is constantly generated by reactive oxygen species in vivo. We show here that endogenous 8-oxoG caused de novo spontaneous and heritable G to T mutations in mice, which occurred at different stages in the germ cell lineage and were distributed throughout the chromosomes. Using exome analyses covering 40.9 Mb of mouse transcribed regions, we found increased frequencies of G to T mutations at a rate of 2 × 10−7 mutations/base/generation in offspring of Mth1/Ogg1/Mutyh triple knockout (TOY-KO) mice, which accumulate 8-oxoG in the nuclear DNA of gonadal cells. The roles of MTH1, OGG1, and MUTYH are specific for the prevention of 8-oxoG-induced mutation, and 99% of the mutations observed in TOY-KO mice were G to T transversions caused by 8-oxoG; therefore, we concluded that 8-oxoG is a causative molecule for spontaneous and inheritable mutations of the germ lineage cells. PMID:24732879

  12. Chromatin accessibility contributes to simultaneous mutations of cancer genes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yi; Su, Xian-Bin; He, Kun-Yan; Wu, Bing-Hao; Zhang, Bo-Yu; Han, Ze-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mutations of many cancer genes tend to co-occur (termed co-mutations) in certain patterns during tumor initiation and progression. However, the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms that contribute to the co-mutations of these cancer genes have yet to be explored. Here, we systematically investigated the association between the somatic co-mutations of cancer genes and high-order chromatin conformation. Significantly, somatic point co-mutations in protein-coding genes were closely associated with high-order spatial chromatin folding. We propose that these regions be termed Spatial Co-mutation Hotspots (SCHs) and report their occurrence in different cancer types. The conserved mutational signatures and DNA sequences flanking these point co-mutations, as well as CTCF-binding sites, are also enriched within the SCH regions. The genetic alterations that are harboured in the same SCHs tend to disrupt cancer driver genes involved in multiple signalling pathways. The present work demonstrates that high-order spatial chromatin organisation may contribute to the somatic co-mutations of certain cancer genes during tumor development. PMID:27762310

  13. Accelerated mutation accumulation in asexual lineages of a freshwater snail.

    PubMed

    Neiman, Maurine; Hehman, Gery; Miller, Joseph T; Logsdon, John M; Taylor, Douglas R

    2010-04-01

    Sexual reproduction is both extremely costly and widespread relative to asexual reproduction, meaning that it must also confer profound advantages in order to persist. One theorized benefit of sex is that it facilitates the clearance of harmful mutations, which would accumulate more rapidly in the absence of recombination. The extent to which ineffective purifying selection and mutation accumulation are direct consequences of asexuality and whether the accelerated buildup of harmful mutations in asexuals can occur rapidly enough to maintain sex within natural populations, however, remain as open questions. We addressed key components of these questions by estimating the rate of mutation accumulation in the mitochondrial genomes of multiple sexual and asexual representatives of Potamopyrgus antipodarum, a New Zealand snail characterized by mixed sexual/asexual populations. We found that increased mutation accumulation is associated with asexuality and occurs rapidly enough to be detected in recently derived asexual lineages of P. antipodarum. Our results demonstrate that increased mutation accumulation in asexuals can differentially affect coexisting and ecologically similar sexual and asexual lineages. The accelerated rate of mutation accumulation observed in asexual P. antipodarum provides some of the most direct evidence to date for a link between asexuality and mutation accumulation and implies that mutational buildup could be rapid enough to contribute to the short-term evolutionary mechanisms that favor sexual reproduction.

  14. Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia with nucleophosmin (NPM1) mutation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jie; Zuo, Zhuang; Fu, Bin; Oki, Yasuhiro; Tang, Guilin; Goswami, Maitrayee; Priyanka, Priyanka; Muzzafar, Tariq; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Wang, Sa A

    2016-01-01

    Nucleophosmin (NPM1) mutations in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) are extremely uncommon, and the clinicopathologic features of these neoplasms are poorly characterized. Over a 10-yr interval, NPM1 mutation analysis was performed in 152 CMML at our institution. NPM1 mutations were identified in 8 (5.3%) patients, five men and three women, with a median age of 72 yr (range, 27-87). In all patients, the bone marrow was hypercellular with multilineage dysplasia, monocytosis, and retained maturation supporting a diagnosis of CMML. NPM1 mutation allele burden was <5% in two patients and >10% in six patients. Four (50%) patients, all with >10% NPM1, progressed AML with a median interval of 11 months (range, 1-21). Compared with 144 CMML without NPM1 mutations, CMML patients with NPM1 mutation presented with more severe anemia (P = 0.053), higher BM monocyte percentage (P = 0.033), and an increased tendency for AML progression (P = 0.088) and an inferior overall survival (P = 0.076). Mutations involving NRAS/KRAS (2/7), TET2(2/5), ASXL1(1/5,) and FLT3(0/8) were not significantly different between these two groups. In summary, CMML with NPM1 mutation shows histopathological features of CMML, but patients appear to have a high probability for AML progression and may require aggressive clinical intervention, especially in patients with a high mutation burden.

  15. Oxidative injury is a common consequence of BMPR2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Lane, Kirk L; Talati, Megha; Austin, Eric; Hemnes, Anna R; Johnson, Jennifer A; Fessel, Joshua P; Blackwell, Tom; Mernaugh, Ray L; Robinson, Linda; Fike, Candice; Roberts, L Jackson; West, James

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hereditary pulmonary arterial hypertension(PAH) is usually caused by mutations in BMPR2. Mutations are found throughout the gene, and common molecular consequences of different types of mutation are not known. Knowledge of common molecular consequences would provide insight into molecular etiology of disease. The objective of this study was to determine common molecular consequences across classes of BMPR2 mutation. METHODS #ENTITYSTARTX00026; RESULTS: Increased superoxide and peroxide production, and alterations in genes associated with oxidative stress were a common consequence of stable transfection of vascular smooth muscle cells with three distinct classes of BMPR2 mutation, in the ligand binding domain, the kinase domain, and the cytoplasmic tail domain. Measurement of oxidized lipids in whole lung from transgenic mice expressing a mutation in the BMPR2 cytoplasmic tail showed a 50% increase in isoprostanes and a twofold increase in isofurans, suggesting increased ROS of mitochondrial origin. Immunohistochemistry on BMPR2 transgenic mouse lung showed that oxidative stress was vascular-specific. Electron microscopy showed decreased mitochondrial size and variability in pulmonary vessels from BMPR2 mutant mice. Measurement of oxidized lipids in urine from humans with BMPR2 mutations demonstrated increased ROS, regardless of disease status. Immunohistochemistry on HPAH patient lung confirmed oxidative stress specific to the vasculature. CONCLUSIONS: Increased oxidative stress, likely of mitochondrial origin, is a common consequence of BMPR2 mutation across mutation types in cell culture, mice, and humans.

  16. Two novel mutations involved in hereditary tyrosinemia type I

    SciTech Connect

    St-Louis, M.; Poudrier, J.; Phaneuf, D.

    1994-09-01

    The deficiency of fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase, the last enzyme in the tyrosine catabolic pathway is the cause of hereditary tyrosinemia type I (HT1), an autosomal recessive disease. The disease has been reported worldwide. The incidence is much higher in two clusters: the Saguenay- Lac St-Jean region (Quebec, Canada) and in Scandinavia. Seven mutations have been reported in the last two years. Here we describe two new missense mutations identified by direct sequencing of PCR products in two HT1 patients, a Norwegian (patient No. 1) and a French-Canadian (patient No. 2). The first mutation consists of a G to A transition at position 337 of the FAH gene which predicts a change from glycine to serine (G337S). The second mutation is an A to G transition at position 381 which predicts a change from arginine to glycine (R381G). Patient No. 1 seems heterozygous for the G337S mutation and for a splice mutation (IVS12+5G{r_arrow}A) which was previously described. Patient No. 2 was also found heterozygous for the R381G mutation and for a rare nonsense mutation (E357X) already reported. In vitro transcription and translation were performed on mutant cDNA to demonstrate the responsibility of these two mutations in causing the decreased amount of FAH detected by Western blot analysis.

  17. CFTR gene mutations in isolated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    SciTech Connect

    Pignatti, P.F.; Bombien, C.; Marigo, C.

    1994-09-01

    In order to identify a possible hereditary predisposition to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), we have looked for the presence of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene DNA sequence modifications in 28 unrelated patients with no signs of cystic fibrosis. The known mutations in Italian CF patients, as well as the most frequent worldwide CF mutations, were investigated. In addition, a denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of about half of the coding sequence of the gene in 56 chromosomes from the patients and in 102 chromosomes from control individuals affected by other pulmonary diseases and from normal controls was performed. Nine different CFTR gene mutations and polymorphisms were found in seven patients, a highly significant increase over controls. Two of the patients were compound heterozygotes. Two frequent CF mutations were detected: deletion F508 and R117H; two rare CF mutations: R1066C and 3667ins4; and five CF sequence variants: R75Q (which was also described as a disease-causing mutation in male sterility cases due to the absence of the vasa deferentia), G576A, 2736 A{r_arrow}G, L997F, and 3271+18C{r_arrow}T. Seven (78%) of the mutations are localized in transmembrane domains. Six (86%) of the patients with defined mutations and polymorphisms had bronchiectasis. These results indicate that CFTR gene mutations and sequence alterations may be involved in the etiopathogenesis of some cases of COPD.

  18. Rapid identification of HEXA mutations in Tay-Sachs patients.

    PubMed

    Giraud, Carole; Dussau, Jeanne; Azouguene, Emilie; Feillet, François; Puech, Jean-Philippe; Caillaud, Catherine

    2010-02-19

    Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) is a recessively inherited neurodegenerative disorder due to mutations in the HEXA gene resulting in a beta-hexosaminidase A (Hex A) deficiency. The purpose of this study was to characterize the molecular abnormalities in patients with infantile or later-onset forms of the disease. The complete sequencing of the 14 exons and flanking regions of the HEXA gene was performed with a unique technical condition in 10 unrelated TSD patients. Eleven mutations were identified, including five splice mutations, one insertion, two deletions and three single-base substitutions. Four mutations were novel: two splice mutations (IVS8+5G>A, IVS2+4delAGTA), one missense mutation in exon 6 (c.621T>G (p.D207E)) and one small deletion (c.1211-1212delTG) in exon 11 resulting in a premature stop codon at residue 429. The c.621T>G missense mutation was found in a patient presenting an infantile form. Its putative role in the pathogenesis of TSD is suspected as residue 207 is highly conserved in human, mouse and rat. Moreover, structural modelling predicted changes likely to affect substrate binding and catalytic activity of the enzyme. The time-saving procedure reported here could be useful for the characterization of Tay-Sachs-causing mutations, in particular in non-Ashkenazi patients mainly exhibiting rare mutations. PMID:20100466

  19. Survival probability of beneficial mutations in bacterial batch culture.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Lindi M; Zhu, Anna Dai

    2015-05-01

    The survival of rare beneficial mutations can be extremely sensitive to the organism's life history and the trait affected by the mutation. Given the tremendous impact of bacteria in batch culture as a model system for the study of adaptation, it is important to understand the survival probability of beneficial mutations in these populations. Here we develop a life-history model for bacterial populations in batch culture and predict the survival of mutations that increase fitness through their effects on specific traits: lag time, fission time, viability, and the timing of stationary phase. We find that if beneficial mutations are present in the founding population at the beginning of culture growth, mutations that reduce the mortality of daughter cells are the most likely to survive drift. In contrast, of mutations that occur de novo during growth, those that delay the onset of stationary phase are the most likely to survive. Our model predicts that approximately fivefold population growth between bottlenecks will optimize the occurrence and survival of beneficial mutations of all four types. This prediction is relatively insensitive to other model parameters, such as the lag time, fission time, or mortality rate of the population. We further estimate that bottlenecks that are more severe than this optimal prediction substantially reduce the occurrence and survival of adaptive mutations.

  20. Identification and functional analysis of novel THAP1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Lohmann, Katja; Uflacker, Nils; Erogullari, Alev; Lohnau, Thora; Winkler, Susen; Dendorfer, Andreas; Schneider, Susanne A; Osmanovic, Alma; Svetel, Marina; Ferbert, Andreas; Zittel, Simone; Kühn, Andrea A; Schmidt, Alexander; Altenmüller, Eckart; Münchau, Alexander; Kamm, Christoph; Wittstock, Matthias; Kupsch, Andreas; Moro, Elena; Volkmann, Jens; Kostic, Vladimir; Kaiser, Frank J; Klein, Christine; Brüggemann, Norbert

    2012-02-01

    Mutations in THAP1 have been associated with dystonia 6 (DYT6). THAP1 encodes a transcription factor that represses the expression of DYT1. To further evaluate the mutational spectrum of THAP1 and its associated phenotype, we sequenced THAP1 in 567 patients with focal (n = 461), segmental (n = 68), or generalized dystonia (n = 38). We identified 10 novel variants, including six missense substitutions within the DNA-binding Thanatos-associated protein domain (Arg13His, Lys16Glu, His23Pro, Lys24Glu, Pro26Leu, Ile80Val), a 1bp-deletion downstream of the nuclear localization signal (Asp191Thrfs*9), and three alterations in the untranslated regions. The effect of the missense variants was assessed using prediction tools and luciferase reporter gene assays. This indicated the Ile80Val substitution as a benign variant. The subcellular localization of Asp191Thrfs*9 suggests a disturbed nuclear import for this mutation. Thus, we consider six of the 10 novel variants as pathogenic mutations accounting for a mutation frequency of 1.1%. Mutation carriers presented mainly with early onset dystonia (<12 years in five of six patients). Symptoms started in an arm or neck and spread to become generalized in three patients or segmental in two patients. Speech was affected in four mutation carriers. In conclusion, THAP1 mutations are rare in unselected dystonia patients and functional analysis is necessary to distinguish between benign variants and pathogenic mutations. PMID:21847143

  1. Identification and functional analysis of novel THAP1 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Lohmann, Katja; Uflacker, Nils; Erogullari, Alev; Lohnau, Thora; Winkler, Susen; Dendorfer, Andreas; Schneider, Susanne A; Osmanovic, Alma; Svetel, Marina; Ferbert, Andreas; Zittel, Simone; Kühn, Andrea A; Schmidt, Alexander; Altenmüller, Eckart; Münchau, Alexander; Kamm, Christoph; Wittstock, Matthias; Kupsch, Andreas; Moro, Elena; Volkmann, Jens; Kostic, Vladimir; Kaiser, Frank J; Klein, Christine; Brüggemann, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in THAP1 have been associated with dystonia 6 (DYT6). THAP1 encodes a transcription factor that represses the expression of DYT1. To further evaluate the mutational spectrum of THAP1 and its associated phenotype, we sequenced THAP1 in 567 patients with focal (n=461), segmental (n=68), or generalized dystonia (n=38). We identified 10 novel variants, including six missense substitutions within the DNA-binding Thanatos-associated protein domain (Arg13His, Lys16Glu, His23Pro, Lys24Glu, Pro26Leu, Ile80Val), a 1bp-deletion downstream of the nuclear localization signal (Asp191Thrfs*9), and three alterations in the untranslated regions. The effect of the missense variants was assessed using prediction tools and luciferase reporter gene assays. This indicated the Ile80Val substitution as a benign variant. The subcellular localization of Asp191Thrfs*9 suggests a disturbed nuclear import for this mutation. Thus, we consider six of the 10 novel variants as pathogenic mutations accounting for a mutation frequency of 1.1%. Mutation carriers presented mainly with early onset dystonia (<12 years in five of six patients). Symptoms started in an arm or neck and spread to become generalized in three patients or segmental in two patients. Speech was affected in four mutation carriers. In conclusion, THAP1 mutations are rare in unselected dystonia patients and functional analysis is necessary to distinguish between benign variants and pathogenic mutations. PMID:21847143

  2. RFLP analysis for APP 717 mutations associated with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zeldenrust, S R; Murrell, J; Farlow, M; Ghetti, B; Roses, A D; Benson, M D

    1993-06-01

    Familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) has been shown to be associated with three distinct point mutations within the same codon of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene. The mutation identified in the Indiana kindred is a G-->T transversion at the first position of the codon for amino acid 717, resulting in a substitution of phenylalanine for valine in the APP protein. Screening of persons at risk for the APP Phe-717 mutation using a variation of the polymerase chain reaction identified nine positives among 34 tested. In addition, DNA from 145 FAD subjects were tested for the three known APP 717 mutations.

  3. Mutational Robustness of Morphological Traits in the Ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila

    PubMed Central

    Long, Hongan; Zufall, Rebecca A.

    2014-01-01

    Ciliate nuclear architecture, in particular the sequestration of a transcriptionally silent germline genome, allows for the accumulation of mutations that are "hidden" from selection during many rounds of asexual reproduction. After sexual conjugation, these mutations are expressed, potentially resulting in highly variable phenotypes. Morphological traits are widely used in ciliate taxonomy, however, the extent to which the values of these traits are robust to change in the face of mutation is largely unknown. In this study, we examine the effects of mutations accumulated in the germline genome to test the mutational robustness of four traits commonly used in ciliate morphological taxonomy (number of somatic kineties, number of post-oral kineties, macronuclear size, and cell size). We find that the number of post-oral kineties is robust to mutation, confirming that it should be preferentially used in taxonomy. By contrast, we find that, as in other unicellular and multicellular species, cell/macronucleus size changes in response to mutation. Thus, we argue that cell/macronucleus sizes, which are widely used in taxonomy, should be treated cautiously for species identification. Finally, we find evidence of correlations between cell and macronucleus sizes and fitness, suggesting possible mutational pleiotropy. This study demonstrates the importance of, and methods for, determining mutational robustness to guide morphological taxonomy in ciliates. PMID:25227613

  4. Condition-dependent mutation rates and sexual selection.

    PubMed

    Cotton, S

    2009-04-01

    'Good genes' models of sexual selection show that females can gain indirect benefits for their offspring if male ornaments are condition-dependent signals of genetic quality. Recurrent deleterious mutation is viewed as a major contributor to variance in genetic quality, and previous theoretical treatments of 'good genes' processes have assumed that the influx of new mutations is constant. I propose that this assumption is too simplistic, and that mutation rates vary in ways that are important for sexual selection. Recent data have shown that individuals in poor condition can have higher mutation rates, and I argue that if both male sexual ornaments and mutation rates are condition-dependent, then females can use male ornamentation to evaluate their mate's mutation rate. As most mutations are deleterious, females benefit from choosing well-ornamented mates, as they are less likely to contribute germline-derived mutations to offspring. I discuss some of the evolutionary ramifications of condition-dependent mutation rates and sexual selection. PMID:19210586

  5. PAX6 mutations may be associated with high myopia.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Alex W; Kearns, Lisa S; Jamieson, Robyn V; Williamson, Kathy A; van Heyningen, Veronica; Mackey, David A

    2007-09-01

    PAX6 is a key regulator of eye development and there are many well recognized ophthalmic sequelae of mutations at this locus. The 14 exon PAX6 gene is well conserved across species and phyla. Coding region mutations manifest in a variety of phenotypes. Predicted premature protein truncations are generally associated with classical aniridia. Missense mutations are often found in cases with variant phenotypes such as ectopia pupillae; isolated foveal hypoplasia; nystagmus and hyaloid vessel proliferation. The locus has also been implicated, through a genome-wide sib-pair scan, to be important in the normal variation of myopia. We investigated the association between identified PAX6 mutations and refractive error in Australian patients from four pedigrees. Two of eight subjects with a 1410delC PAX6 mutation had a mean spherical equivalence < -9D, whilst a mean spherical equivalence < or = -5D was recorded in two from four subjects with an Arg240Stop PAX6 mutation and one of two subjects with a Glu93Stop mutation. One individual identified with a Pro346Ala PAX6 mutation had a mean spherical equivalence of +2.8 D. Thus, our observations generally support other incidental findings, that PAX6 mutation, particularly predicted haploinsufficiency, may be associated with extreme refractive error, although the mechanism by which this occurs is not clear. PMID:17896318

  6. Novel mutations in PDE6B causing human retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lu-Lu; Han, Ru-Yi; Yang, Fa-Yu; Yu, Xin-Ping; Xu, Jin-Ling; Min, Qing-Jie; Tian, Jie; Ge, Xiang-Lian; Zheng, Si-Si; Lin, Ye-Wen; Zheng, Yi-Han; Qu, Jia; Gu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    AIM To identify the genetic defects of a Chinese patient with sporadic retinitis pigmentosa (RP). METHODS Ophthalmologic examinations were performed on the sporadic RP patient, 144 genes associated with retinal diseases were scanned with capture next generation sequencing (CNGS) approach. Two heterozygous mutations in PDE6B were confirmed in the pedigree by Sanger sequencing subsequently. The carrier frequency of PDE6B mutations of reported PDE6B mutations based on the available two public exome databases (1000 Genomes Project and ESP6500 Genomes Project) and one in-house exome database was investigated. RESULTS We identified compound heterozygosity of two novel nonsense mutations c.1133G>A (p.W378X) and c.2395C>T (p.R799X) in PDE6B, one reported causative gene for RP. Neither of the two mutations in our study was presented in three exome databases. Two mutations (p.R74C and p.T604I) in PDE6B have relatively high frequencies in the ESP6500 and in-house databases, respectively, while no common dominant mutation in each of the database or across all databases. CONCLUSION We demonstrates that compound heterozygosity of two novel nonsense mutations in PDE6B could lead to RP. These results collectively point to enormous potential of next-generation sequencing in determining the genetic etiology of RP and how various mutations in PDE6B contribute to the genetic heterogeneity of RP. PMID:27588261

  7. Frequent DPH3 promoter mutations in skin cancers.

    PubMed

    Denisova, Evgeniya; Heidenreich, Barbara; Nagore, Eduardo; Rachakonda, P Sivaramakrishna; Hosen, Ismail; Akrap, Ivana; Traves, Víctor; García-Casado, Zaida; López-Guerrero, José Antonio; Requena, Celia; Sanmartin, Onofre; Serra-Guillén, Carlos; Llombart, Beatriz; Guillén, Carlos; Ferrando, Jose; Gimeno, Enrique; Nordheim, Alfred; Hemminki, Kari; Kumar, Rajiv

    2015-11-01

    Recent reports suggested frequent occurrence of cancer associated somatic mutations within regulatory elements of the genome. Based on initial exome sequencing of 21 melanomas, we report frequent somatic mutations in skin cancers in a bidirectional promoter of diphthamide biosynthesis 3 (DPH3) and oxidoreductase NAD-binding domain containing 1 (OXNAD1) genes. The UV-signature mutations occurred at sites adjacent and within a binding motif for E-twenty six/ternary complex factors (Ets/TCF), at -8 and -9 bp from DPH3 transcription start site. Follow up screening of 586 different skin lesions showed that the DPH3 promoter mutations were present in melanocytic nevi (2/114; 2%), melanoma (30/304; 10%), basal cell carcinoma of skin (BCC; 57/137; 42%) and squamous cell carcinoma of skin (SCC; 12/31; 39%). Reporter assays carried out in one melanoma cell line for DPH3 and OXNAD1 orientations showed statistically significant increased promoter activity due to -8/-9CC > TT tandem mutations; although, no effect of the mutations on DPH3 and OXNAD1 transcription in tumors was observed. The results from this study show occurrence of frequent somatic non-coding mutations adjacent to a pre-existing binding site for Ets transcription factors within the directional promoter of DPH3 and OXNAD1 genes in three major skin cancers. The detected mutations displayed typical UV signature; however, the functionality of the mutations remains to be determined. PMID:26416425

  8. Rarity of CDK4 germline mutations in familial melanoma.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, A M; Chidambaram, A; Halpern, A; Holly, E A; Guerry IV, D; Sagebiel, R; Elder, D E; Tucker, M A

    2002-02-01

    To date, two genes have been implicated in melanoma pathogenesis. The first, CDKN2A, is a tumour suppressor gene with germline mutations detected in 20% of melanoma-prone families. The second, CDK4, is an oncogene with co-segregating germline mutations detected in only three kindreds worldwide. We examined 16 American melanoma-prone families for mutations in all coding exons of CDK4 and screened additional members of two previously reported families with the Arg24Cys germline CDK4 mutation to evaluate the penetrance of the mutation. No new CDK4 mutations were identified. In the two Arg24Cys families, the penetrance was estimated to be 63%. Overall, 12 out of 12 invasive melanoma patients, none out of one in situ melanoma patient, five out of 13 dysplastic naevi patients, two out of 15 unaffected family members, and none out of 10 spouses carried the Arg24Cys mutation. Dysplastic naevi did not strongly co-segregate with the Arg24Cys mutation. Thus the phenotype observed in melanoma-prone CDK4 families appears to be more complex than just the CDK4 mutation. Both genetic and environmental factors are likely to contribute to the occurrence of melanoma and dysplastic naevi in these families. In summary, although CDK4 is a melanoma susceptibility gene, it plays a minor role in hereditary melanoma.

  9. Mutations Determining Mitomycin Resistance in Bacillus subtilis1

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, V. N.

    1966-01-01

    Iyer, V. N. (Microbiology Research Institute, Canada Department of Agriculture, Ottawa, Canada). Mutations determining mitomycin resistance in Bacillus subtilis. J. Bacteriol. 92:1663–1669. 1966.—The pattern of development of genetic resistance in Bacillus subtilis to mitomycin C was studied, and spontaneous single and multistep mutants were obtained. The transmission and expression of these mutations in sensitive strains proved possible by means of genetic transformation. The mutations were genetically studied in relation to a chromosomal mutation, mac-1, which confers resistance to the macrolide antibiotic erythromycin and which has been previously localized in the early-replicating segment of the B. subtilis chromosome. The results indicate that all of three primary mutations studied in this manner, as well as a secondary and tertiary mutation derived from one of the primary mutations, are clustered in this early-replicating segment. It appears that the secondary and tertiary mutations enhance the resistance conferred by the primary mutation, apparently without themselves conferring any resistance. PMID:4959718

  10. Clinical and mutation profile of multicentric osteolysis nodulosis and arthropathy.

    PubMed

    Bhavani, Gandham SriLakshmi; Shah, Hitesh; Shukla, Anju; Gupta, Neerja; Gowrishankar, Kalpana; Rao, Anand P; Kabra, Madhulika; Agarwal, Meenal; Ranganath, Prajnya; Ekbote, Alka V; Phadke, Shubha R; Kamath, Asha; Dalal, Ashwin; Girisha, Katta Mohan

    2016-02-01

    ​Multicentric osteolysis nodulosis and arthropathy (MONA) is an infrequently described autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia characterized by progressive osteolysis and arthropathy. Inactivating mutations in MMP2, encoding matrix metalloproteinase-2, are known to cause this disorder. Fifteen families with mutations in MMP2 have been reported in literature. In this study we screened thirteen individuals from eleven families for MMP2 mutations and identified eight mutations (five novel and three known variants). We characterize the clinical, radiographic and molecular findings in all individuals with molecularly proven MONA from the present cohort and previous reports, and provide a comprehensive review of the MMP2 related disorders. PMID:26601801

  11. CDH1 germline mutations and hereditary lobular breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Corso, Giovanni; Intra, Mattia; Trentin, Chiara; Veronesi, Paolo; Galimberti, Viviana

    2016-04-01

    Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer is an autosomal dominant inherited disease associated of CDH1 germline mutations (that encodes for the E-cadherin protein), and lobular breast cancer is the second most frequent type of neoplasia. Recently, novel E-cadherin constitutional alterations have been identified in pedigree clustering only for lobular breast carcinoma without evidence of diffuse gastric tumors and in absence of BRCA1/2 mutations. This first evidence opens novel questions about the inherited correlation between diffuse gastric and lobular breast cancers. In this brief review we revise the literature data about the CDH1 mutation frequency affecting exclusively lobular breast cancer, providing clinical recommendation for asymptomatic mutation carriers.

  12. Human Germline Mutation and the Erratic Evolutionary Clock

    PubMed Central

    Przeworski, Molly

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of the chronology of human evolution relies on the “molecular clock” provided by the steady accumulation of substitutions on an evolutionary lineage. Recent analyses of human pedigrees have called this understanding into question by revealing unexpectedly low germline mutation rates, which imply that substitutions accrue more slowly than previously believed. Translating mutation rates estimated from pedigrees into substitution rates is not as straightforward as it may seem, however. We dissect the steps involved, emphasizing that dating evolutionary events requires not “a mutation rate” but a precise characterization of how mutations accumulate in development in males and females—knowledge that remains elusive. PMID:27760127

  13. Frequent DPH3 promoter mutations in skin cancers

    PubMed Central

    Denisova, Evgeniya; Heidenreich, Barbara; Nagore, Eduardo; Rachakonda, P. Sivaramakrishna; Hosen, Ismail; Akrap, Ivana; Traves, Víctor; García-Casado, Zaida; López-Guerrero, José Antonio; Requena, Celia; Sanmartin, Onofre; Serra-Guillén, Carlos; Llombart, Beatriz; Guillén, Carlos; Ferrando, Jose; Gimeno, Enrique; Nordheim, Alfred; Hemminki, Kari; Kumar, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    Recent reports suggested frequent occurrence of cancer associated somatic mutations within regulatory elements of the genome. Based on initial exome sequencing of 21 melanomas, we report frequent somatic mutations in skin cancers in a bidirectional promoter of diphthamide biosynthesis 3 (DPH3) and oxidoreductase NAD-binding domain containing 1 (OXNAD1) genes. The UV-signature mutations occurred at sites adjacent and within a binding motif for E-twenty six/ternary complex factors (Ets/TCF), at −8 and −9 bp from DPH3 transcription start site. Follow up screening of 586 different skin lesions showed that the DPH3 promoter mutations were present in melanocytic nevi (2/114; 2%), melanoma (30/304; 10%), basal cell carcinoma of skin (BCC; 57/137; 42%) and squamous cell carcinoma of skin (SCC; 12/31; 39%). Reporter assays carried out in one melanoma cell line for DPH3 and OXNAD1 orientations showed statistically significant increased promoter activity due to −8/−9CC > TT tandem mutations; although, no effect of the mutations on DPH3 and OXNAD1 transcription in tumors was observed. The results from this study show occurrence of frequent somatic non-coding mutations adjacent to a pre-existing binding site for Ets transcription factors within the directional promoter of DPH3 and OXNAD1 genes in three major skin cancers. The detected mutations displayed typical UV signature; however, the functionality of the mutations remains to be determined. PMID:26416425

  14. Mutation study of Spanish patients with Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Fontalba, Ana; Fernandez-L, Africa; García-Alegria, Eva; Albiñana, Virginia; Garrido-Martin, Eva M; Blanco, Francisco J; Zarrabeitia, Roberto; Perez-Molino, Alfonso; Bernabeu-Herrero, Maria E; Ojeda, Maria-Luisa; Fernandez-Luna, Jose L; Bernabeu, Carmelo; Botella, Luisa M

    2008-01-01

    Background Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant and age-dependent vascular disorder characterised mainly by mutations in the Endoglin (ENG) or activin receptor-like kinase-1 (ALK1, ACVRL1) genes. Methods Here, we have identified 22 ALK1 mutations and 15 ENG mutations, many of which had not previously been reported, in independent Spanish families afflicted with HHT. Results We identified mutations in thirty-seven unrelated families. A detailed analysis of clinical symptoms was recorded for each patient analyzed, with a higher significant presence of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVM) in HHT1 patients over HHT2. Twenty-two mutations in ALK1 and fifteen in ENG genes were identified. Many of them, almost half, represented new mutations in ALK1 and in ENG. Missense mutations in ENG and ALK1 were localized in a tridimensional protein structure model. Conclusion Overall, ALK1 mutations (HHT2) were predominant over ENG mutations (HHT1) in our Spanish population, in agreement with previous data from our country and other Mediterranean countries (France, Italy), but different to Northern Europe or North America. There was a significant increase of PAVM associated with HHT1 over HHT2 in these families. PMID:18673552

  15. The mutational spectrum in Treacher Collins syndrome reveals a predominance of mutations that create a premature-termination codon

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, S.J.; Gladwin, A.J.; Dixon, M.J.

    1997-03-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development, the features of which include conductive hearing loss and cleft palate. The TCS locus has been mapped to human chromosome 5q31.3-32 and the mutated gene identified. In the current investigation, 25 previously undescribed mutations, which are spread throughout the gene, are presented. This brings the total reported to date to 35, which represents a detection rate of 60%. Of the mutations that have been reported to date, all but one result in the introduction of a premature-termination codon into the predicted protein, treacle. Moreover, the mutations are largely family specific, although a common 5-bp deletion in exon 24 (seven different families) and a recurrent splicing mutation in intron 3 (two different families) have been identified. This mutational spectrum supports the hypothesis that TCS results from haploin-sufficiency. 49 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. A Novel Missense Mutation in POMT1 Modulates the Severe Congenital Muscular Dystrophy Phenotype Associated with POMT1 Nonsense Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Stephanie E.; Conta, Jessie H.; Winder, Thomas L.; Willer, Tobias; Eskuri, Jamie M.; Haas, Richard; Patterson, Kathleen; Campbell, Kevin P.; Moore, Steven A.; Gospe, Sidney M.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in POMT1 lead to a group of neuromuscular conditions ranging in severity from Walker-Warburg syndrome to limb girdle muscular dystrophy. We report two male siblings, ages 19 and 14, and an unrelated 6-year old female with early onset muscular dystrophy and intellectual disability with minimal structural brain anomalies and no ocular abnormalities. Compound heterozygous mutations in POMT1 were identified including a previously reported nonsense mutation (c.2167dupG; p.Asp723Glyfs*8) associated with Walker-Warburg syndrome and a novel missense mutation in a highly conserved region of the protein O-mannosyltransferase 1 protein (c.1958C>T; p.Pro653Leu). This novel variant reduces the phenotypic severity compared to patients with homozygous c.2167dupG mutations or compound heterozygous patients with a c.2167dupG mutation and a wide range of other mutant POMT1 alleles. PMID:24491487

  17. Different patterns of bcl-6 and p53 gene mutations in tonsillar B cells indicate separate mutational mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yavuz, Akif S; Monson, Nancy L; Yavuz, Sule; Grammer, Amrie C; Longo, Nancy; Girschick, Hermann J; Lipsky, Peter E

    2002-11-01

    Mutations within the 5'-non-coding region of the bcl-6 gene can occur in lymphomas that originate from germinal centers (GCs), as well as in normal memory and GC B cells. Mutations in the p53 gene occur in 50% of human cancers. Since both bcl-6 and p53 can be mutated in certain circumstances, we investigated the accumulation of mutations in these genes in individual tonsillar B and T cells to determine whether the mutations exhibited a pattern anticipated from the B-cell hypermutation machinery. In tonsillar GC B cells, the overall mutational frequencies in the 5'-non-coding region of the bcl-6 gene was 0.85 x 10(-3)/bp. In contrast, there were no mutations in a region 2.8 kb downstream of the promoter. RGYW (purine, guanine, pyrimidine, A/T) targeting and a significantly lower mutational frequency in nai;ve B and GC founder B cells compared with GC B cells suggested that a similar mutator mechanism was active on Ig genes and this non-Ig gene. The mutational frequency in the exon-7-region of p53 was similar in the GC, memory and nai;ve B-cell subsets (1.02 x 10(-3) to 1.25 x 10(-3)/bp). RGYW/WRCY motifs were not targeted preferentially in the p53 gene. Moreover, a comparable mutational frequency of p53 was noted in tonsillar B and T cells. Hence, mutations in p53 do not appear to be the result of the B-cell hypermutational mechanism.

  18. Germ-line origins of mutation in families with hemophilia B: the sex ratio varies with the type of mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Ketterling, R P; Vielhaber, E; Bottema, C D; Schaid, D J; Cohen, M P; Sexauer, C L; Sommer, S S

    1993-01-01

    Previous epidemiological and biochemical studies have generated conflicting estimates of the sex ratio of mutation. Direct genomic sequencing in combination with haplotype analysis extends previous analyses by allowing the precise mutation to be determined in a given family. From analysis of the factor IX gene of 260 consecutive families with hemophilia B, we report the germ-line origin of mutation in 25 families. When combined with 14 origins of mutation reported by others and with 4 origins previously reported by us, a total of 25 occur in the female germ line, and 18 occur in the male germ line. The excess of germ-line origins in females does not imply an overall excess mutation rate per base pair in the female germ line. Bayesian analysis of the data indicates that the sex ratio varies with the type of mutation. The aggregate of single-base substitutions shows a male predominance of germ-line mutations (P < .002). The maximum-likelihood estimate of the male predominance is 3.5-fold. Of the single-base substitutions, transitions at the dinucleotide CpG show the largest male predominance (11-fold). In contrast to single-base substitutions, deletions display a sex ratio of unity. Analysis of the parental age at transmission of a new mutation suggests that germ-line mutations are associated with a small increase in parental age in females but little, if any, increase in males. Although direct genomic sequencing offers a general method for defining the origin of mutation in specific families, accurate estimates of the sex ratios of different mutational classes require large sample sizes and careful correction for multiple biases of ascertainment. The biases in the present data result in an underestimate of the enhancement of mutation in males. PMID:8434583

  19. Analysis of gene mutations among South Indian patients with maple syrup urine disease: identification of four novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, M P; Menon, Krishnakumar N; Vasudevan, D M

    2013-10-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is predominantly caused by mutations in the BCKDHA, BCKDHB and DBT genes, which encode for the E1alpha, E1beta and E2 subunits of the branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase complex, respectively. Because disease causing mutations play a major role in the development of the disease, prenatal diagnosis at gestational level may have significance in making decisions by parents. Thus, this study was aimed to screen South Indian MSUD patients for mutations and assess the genotype-phenotype correlation. Thirteen patients diagnosed with MSUD by conventional biochemical screening such as urine analysis by DNPH test, thin layer chromatography for amino acids and blood amino acid quantification by HPLC were selected for mutation analysis. The entire coding regions of the BCKDHA, BCKDHB and DBT genes were analyzed for mutations by PCR-based direct DNA sequencing. BCKDHA and BCKDHB mutations were seen in 43% of the total ten patients, while disease-causing DBT gene mutation was observed only in 14%. Three patients displayed no mutations. Novel mutations were c.130C>T in BCKDHA gene, c. 599C>T and c.121_122delAC in BCKDHB gene and c.190G>A in DBT gene. Notably, patients harbouring these mutations were non-responsive to thiamine supplementation and other treatment regimens and might have a worse prognosis as compared to the patients not having such mutations. Thus, identification of these mutations may have a crucial role in the treatment as well as understanding the molecular mechanisms in MSUD. PMID:24772966

  20. Novel MBTPS2 missense mutation causes a keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans phenotype: mutation update and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Wang, Y; Cheng, R; Ni, C; Liang, J; Li, M; Yao, Z

    2016-10-01

    Keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans (KFSD) is an X-linked condition characterized by keratotic follicular papules and progressive alopecia, which is caused by mutations in the MBTPS2 gene. We carried out a genetic study on a child who was suspected clinically to have KFSD. Sanger sequencing was performed to detect mutations in the entire coding region of MBTPS2. A novel missense mutation (c.599C>T) was identified in the patient, confirming a diagnosis of KFSD. We reviewed related cases with MBTPS2 mutations for evidence of genotype-phenotype correlations. PMID:27663151

  1. Experimental Design to Evaluate Directed Adaptive Mutation in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chiaro, Christopher R; May, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Background We describe the experimental design for a methodological approach to determine whether directed adaptive mutation occurs in mammalian cells. Identification of directed adaptive mutation would have profound practical significance for a wide variety of biomedical problems, including disease development and resistance to treatment. In adaptive mutation, the genetic or epigenetic change is not random; instead, the presence and type of selection influences the frequency and character of the mutation event. Adaptive mutation can contribute to the evolution of microbial pathogenesis, cancer, and drug resistance, and may become a focus of novel therapeutic interventions. Objective Our experimental approach was designed to distinguish between 3 types of mutation: (1) random mutations that are independent of selective pressure, (2) undirected adaptive mutations that arise when selective pressure induces a general increase in the mutation rate, and (3) directed adaptive mutations that arise when selective pressure induces targeted mutations that specifically influence the adaptive response. The purpose of this report is to introduce an experimental design and describe limited pilot experiment data (not to describe a complete set of experiments); hence, it is an early report. Methods An experimental design based on immortalization of mouse embryonic fibroblast cells is presented that links clonal cell growth to reversal of an inactivating polyadenylation site mutation. Thus, cells exhibit growth only in the presence of both the countermutation and an inducing agent (doxycycline). The type and frequency of mutation in the presence or absence of doxycycline will be evaluated. Additional experimental approaches would determine whether the cells exhibit a generalized increase in mutation rate and/or whether the cells show altered expression of error-prone DNA polymerases or of mismatch repair proteins. Results We performed the initial stages of characterizing our system

  2. Somatic mitochondrial DNA mutations in Chinese patients with osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Man; Wan, Yanfang; Zou, Qinghua

    2013-01-01

    Somatic mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been long proposed to drive the pathogenesis and progression of human malignancies. Previous investigations have revealed a high frequency of somatic mutations in the D-loop control region of mtDNA in osteosarcoma. However, little is known with regard to whether or not somatic mutations also occur in the coding regions of mtDNA in osteosarcoma. To test this possibility, in the present study we screened somatic mutations over the full-length mitochondrial genome of 31 osteosarcoma tumour tissue samples, and corresponding peripheral blood samples from the same cohort of patients. We detected a sum of 11 somatic mutations in the mtDNA coding regions in our series. Nine of them were missense or frameshift mutations that have the potential to hamper mitochondrial respiratory function. In combination with our earlier observations on the D-loop fragment, 71.0% (22/31) of patients with osteosarcoma carried at least one somatic mtDNA mutation, and a total of 40 somatic mutations were identified. Amongst them, 29 (72.5%) were located in the D-loop region, two (5%) were in the sequences of the tRNA genes, two (5%) were in the mitochondrial ATP synthase subunit 6 gene and seven (17.5%) occurred in genes encoding components of the mitochondrial respiratory complexes. In addition, somatic mtDNA mutation was not closely associated with the clinicopathological characteristics of osteosarcoma. Together, these findings suggest that somatic mutations are highly prevalent events in both coding and non-coding regions of mtDNA in osteosarcoma. Some missense and frameshift mutations are putatively harmful to proper mitochondrial activity and might play vital roles in osteosarcoma carcinogenesis. PMID:23441585

  3. Heterozygous Reelin Mutations Cause Autosomal-Dominant Lateral Temporal Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Dazzo, Emanuela; Fanciulli, Manuela; Serioli, Elena; Minervini, Giovanni; Pulitano, Patrizia; Binelli, Simona; Di Bonaventura, Carlo; Luisi, Concetta; Pasini, Elena; Striano, Salvatore; Striano, Pasquale; Coppola, Giangennaro; Chiavegato, Angela; Radovic, Slobodanka; Spadotto, Alessandro; Uzzau, Sergio; La Neve, Angela; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Mecarelli, Oriano; Tosatto, Silvio C.E.; Ottman, Ruth; Michelucci, Roberto; Nobile, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal-dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE) is a genetic epilepsy syndrome clinically characterized by focal seizures with prominent auditory symptoms. ADLTE is genetically heterogeneous, and mutations in LGI1 account for fewer than 50% of affected families. Here, we report the identification of causal mutations in reelin (RELN) in seven ADLTE-affected families without LGI1 mutations. We initially investigated 13 ADLTE-affected families by performing SNP-array linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing and identified three heterozygous missense mutations co-segregating with the syndrome. Subsequent analysis of 15 small ADLTE-affected families revealed four additional missense mutations. 3D modeling predicted that all mutations have structural effects on protein-domain folding. Overall, RELN mutations occurred in 7/40 (17.5%) ADLTE-affected families. RELN encodes a secreted protein, Reelin, which has important functions in both the developing and adult brain and is also found in the blood serum. We show that ADLTE-related mutations significantly decrease serum levels of Reelin, suggesting an inhibitory effect of mutations on protein secretion. We also show that Reelin and LGI1 co-localize in a subset of rat brain neurons, supporting an involvement of both proteins in a common molecular pathway underlying ADLTE. Homozygous RELN mutations are known to cause lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia. Our findings extend the spectrum of neurological disorders associated with RELN mutations and establish a link between RELN and LGI1, which play key regulatory roles in both the developing and adult brain. PMID:26046367

  4. Molecular analysis of mucopolysaccharidosis IVA: Common mutations and racial difference

    SciTech Connect

    Tomatsu, S.; Hori, T.; Nakashima, Y.

    1994-09-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency in N-acetylgalactosamine -6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS). Studies on the molecular basis of MPS IVA have been facilitated following cloning of the full-length cDNA and genomic DNA. In this study we detected mutations from 20 Caucasian and 19 Japanese MPS IVA patients using SSCP system and compared mutations of Caucasian origin with those of Japanese origin. The results showed the presence of 16 various mutations (3 small, deletions, 2 nonsense and 11 missense mutations) for Caucasian patients and 15 (1 deletion, 1 large alteration and 13 missense mutations) for Japanese. Moreover, two common mutations existed; one is double gene deletion characteristic for Japanese (6 alleles; 15%) and the other is a point mutation (1113F A{yields}T transition) characteristic for Caucasian (9 alleles; 22.5%). And the clear genotype/phenotype relationship among 1342delCA, IVS1(-2), P151S, Q148X, R386C, I113F, Q473X, W220G, P151L, A291T, R90W, and P77R, for a severe type, G96B N204K and V138A for a milder type, was observed. Only R386 mutation was seen in both of the populations. Further, the precise DNA analysis for double gene deletion of a common double gene deletion has been performed by defining the breakpoints and the results showed that one deletion was caused by homologous recombination due to Alu repetitive sequences and the other was due to nonhomologous recombination of short direct repeat. Haplotype analysis for six alleles with double deletion were different, indicating the different origin of this mutation or the frequent recombination events before a mutational event. Thus the mutations in GALNS gene are very heterogeneous and the racial difference is characteristic.

  5. Genetic Mutations Associated With Cigarette Smoking in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Blackford, Amanda; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Kensler, Thomas W.; Wolfgang, Christopher; Jones, Siân; Zhang, Xiaosong; Parsons, D. Willams; Lin, Jimmy Cheng-Ho; Leary, Rebecca J.; Eshleman, James R.; Goggins, Michael; Jaffee, Elizabeth M.; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Maitra, Anirban; Klein, Alison; Cameron, John L.; Olino, Kelly; Schulick, Richard; Winter, Jordan; Vogelstein, Bert; Velculescu, Victor E.; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2009-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoking doubles the risk of pancreatic cancer and smoking accounts for 20 to 25% of pancreatic cancers. The recent sequencing of the pancreatic cancer genome provides an unprecedented opportunity to identify mutational patterns associated with smoking. Design We previously sequenced over 750 million base pairs of DNA from 23,219 transcripts in 24 adenocarcinomas of the pancreas (“Discovery Screen”). In this previous study the 39 genes that were mutated more than once in the Discovery Screen were sequenced in an additional 90 adenocarcinomas of the pancreas (“Validation Screen”). Here we compared the somatic mutations in the cancers obtained from individuals who ever smoked cigarettes (n=64) to the somatic mutations in the cancers obtained from individuals who never smoked cigarettes (n=50). Results When adjusted for age and gender, analyses of the Discovery Screen revealed significantly more non-synonymous mutations in the carcinomas obtained from ever smokers (mean 53.1 mutations per tumor, SD 27.9) than in the carcinomas obtained from never smokers (mean 38.5, SD 11.1, p=0.04). The difference between smokers and non-smokers was not driven by mutations in known driver genes in pancreatic cancer (KRAS, TP53, p16/CDKN2A and SMAD4), but instead was predominantly observed in genes mutated at lower frequency. No differences were observed in mutations in carcinomas from the head vs. tail of the gland. Conclusion Pancreatic carcinomas from cigarette smokers harbor more mutations than do carcinomas from never smokers. The types and patterns of these mutations provide insight into the mechanisms by which cigarette smoking causes pancreatic cancer. PMID:19351817

  6. Hepatitis C Virus NS3 Mutations in Hemophiliacs

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ming Valerie; Charlton, Ashley N.; Rouster, Susan D.; Zamor, Philippe J.; Sherman, Kenneth E.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Hemophiliacs have high HCV exposure risk from blood products that did not undergo heat inactivation or disease-specific screening prior to 1987. Repeated exposure to infected factor concentrates predisposes hemophiliacs to higher likelihood of HCV from multiple sources. HIV coinfection could result in impaired clearance of less fit variants resulting in enrichment of quasispecies carrying resistance mutations. Aim We postulated that hemophiliacs demonstrate increased prevalence of baseline signature mutations in the HCV NS3/4 serine protease coding domain. Methods We examined the prevalence of putative HCV protease inhibitor mutations, mutations, sub-classified into dominant mutations if changes conferred resistance, and minor variants not associated with drug resistance, in patients with hemophilia A or B, infected with HCV or HCV/HIV, prior to HCV PI exposure. Results 151 subjects were evaluated, including 22 hemophiliacs and 129 non-hemophilic controls. Of 58 mutations detected, 55 (95%) were resistance mutations and 3 (5%) were minor variants. Dominant mutations were detected in 10 (45.5%) hemophiliacs and in 43 (33.3%) controls (OR 1.67, 95% CI 0.67–4.16). There was no statistical difference in proportion of dominant mutations (p=0.27) or minor variants (p=0.47) between groups, despite adjustment for HIV status (p=0.44). Conclusion No significant differences in dominant or minor resistance mutations between hemophiliacs and non-hemophiliacs were observed. HIV presence or prior HAART exposure did not affect baseline distribution. We conclude that hemophiliacs are not at higher risk for pre-existing HCV PI mutations, and prospective studies of response to PI-based regimens with HCV activity are indicated. PMID:24697920

  7. Interactions between FLG mutations and allergens in atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Liu, Jiang-Bo; Liu, Qiang; Yao, Mianzhi; Cheng, Ruhong; Xue, Hui; Zhou, Hua; Yao, Zhirong

    2012-12-01

    Filaggrin gene (FLG) mutations and sensitization in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) have been well documented. However, whether an interaction exists between these mutations and specific sensitization in AD patients is still unknown. The aim of the study was to explore the interaction between FLG mutations and specific sensitization in AD patients. A total of 249 AD outpatients were recruited in the current study. Skin prick tests were conducted to assess the patient's sensitization to specific allergens. FLG mutations were analyzed through comprehensive sequencing. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to determine the interactions between FLG mutations and sensitization present. The mean age of the patients was 3.5 years, and the mean age of onset of AD was 9.6 months. The mean SCORAD of the patients was 25.8. Fourteen types of mutations were identified in the FLG of 64 patients. A total of 24 (9.6 %) and 29 (11.6 %) cases were mutated with 3321delA and K4671X, respectively. Sensitization to at least one type of allergen was detected in 118 patients (47.4 %). Logistic regression analyses showed that FLG mutations presented an interaction with sensitization to peanut and did not interact with the other detected allergens among AD patients. Sensitization to peanut allergens would have an interaction with the mutation of K4671X and the combined mutations in FLG in patients with atopic dermatitis. However, sensitization to the other common allergens might not interact with FLG mutations in the development of atopic dermatitis. PMID:22903496

  8. Heterozygous reelin mutations cause autosomal-dominant lateral temporal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Dazzo, Emanuela; Fanciulli, Manuela; Serioli, Elena; Minervini, Giovanni; Pulitano, Patrizia; Binelli, Simona; Di Bonaventura, Carlo; Luisi, Concetta; Pasini, Elena; Striano, Salvatore; Striano, Pasquale; Coppola, Giangennaro; Chiavegato, Angela; Radovic, Slobodanka; Spadotto, Alessandro; Uzzau, Sergio; La Neve, Angela; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Mecarelli, Oriano; Tosatto, Silvio C E; Ottman, Ruth; Michelucci, Roberto; Nobile, Carlo

    2015-06-01

    Autosomal-dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE) is a genetic epilepsy syndrome clinically characterized by focal seizures with prominent auditory symptoms. ADLTE is genetically heterogeneous, and mutations in LGI1 account for fewer than 50% of affected families. Here, we report the identification of causal mutations in reelin (RELN) in seven ADLTE-affected families without LGI1 mutations. We initially investigated 13 ADLTE-affected families by performing SNP-array linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing and identified three heterozygous missense mutations co-segregating with the syndrome. Subsequent analysis of 15 small ADLTE-affected families revealed four additional missense mutations. 3D modeling predicted that all mutations have structural effects on protein-domain folding. Overall, RELN mutations occurred in 7/40 (17.5%) ADLTE-affected families. RELN encodes a secreted protein, Reelin, which has important functions in both the developing and adult brain and is also found in the blood serum. We show that ADLTE-related mutations significantly decrease serum levels of Reelin, suggesting an inhibitory effect of mutations on protein secretion. We also show that Reelin and LGI1 co-localize in a subset of rat brain neurons, supporting an involvement of both proteins in a common molecular pathway underlying ADLTE. Homozygous RELN mutations are known to cause lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia. Our findings extend the spectrum of neurological disorders associated with RELN mutations and establish a link between RELN and LGI1, which play key regulatory roles in both the developing and adult brain. PMID:26046367

  9. Mechanisms of mutational robustness in transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Joshua L.; Wagner, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Robustness is the invariance of a phenotype in the face of environmental or genetic change. The phenotypes produced by transcriptional regulatory circuits are gene expression patterns that are to some extent robust to mutations. Here we review several causes of this robustness. They include robustness of individual transcription factor binding sites, homotypic clusters of such sites, redundant enhancers, transcription factors, redundant transcription factors, and the wiring of transcriptional regulatory circuits. Such robustness can either be an adaptation by itself, a byproduct of other adaptations, or the result of biophysical principles and non-adaptive forces of genome evolution. The potential consequences of such robustness include complex regulatory network topologies that arise through neutral evolution, as well as cryptic variation, i.e., genotypic divergence without phenotypic divergence. On the longest evolutionary timescales, the robustness of transcriptional regulation has helped shape life as we know it, by facilitating evolutionary innovations that helped organisms such as flowering plants and vertebrates diversify. PMID:26579194

  10. Rapid Bioinformatic Identification of Thermostabilizing Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, David B.; Karpowich, Nathan K.; Song, Jin Mei; Wang, Da-Neng

    2015-01-01

    Ex vivo stability is a valuable protein characteristic but is laborious to improve experimentally. In addition to biopharmaceutical and industrial applications, stable protein is important for biochemical and structural studies. Taking advantage of the large number of available genomic sequences and growth temperature data, we present two bioinformatic methods to identify a limited set of amino acids or positions that likely underlie thermostability. Because these methods allow thousands of homologs to be examined in silico, they have the advantage of providing both speed and statistical power. Using these methods, we introduced, via mutation, amino acids from thermoadapted homologs into an exemplar mesophilic membrane protein, and demonstrated significantly increased thermostability while preserving protein activity. PMID:26445442

  11. Powerful mutators lurking in the genome

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Vincent; Vartanian, Jean-Pierre; Wain-Hobson, Simon

    2008-01-01

    The human genome encodes numerous enzymes capable of deaminating polynucleotides. While they are capable of exquisite specificity, occasionally they result in hypermutation where up to 90 per cent of cytidine or adenosine residues may be edited. As such, they constitute a formidable anti-viral barrier, for no virus can survive such a high mutation rate. As the APOBEC3 group of cytidine deaminases edit single-stranded viral DNA, the crucial question is can they hyperedit chromosomal DNA? Everything points to a positive answer. Nonetheless, hypermutants per se have not yet been described, probably being countered by highly efficient mismatch repair. For the APOBEC3 genes, not only is their physiological function unknown, but also their role in the induction of cancer remains to be determined. Yet given the pace of research, all this is certain to change in the next few years. PMID:19042181

  12. Gigaxonin mutation analysis in patients with NIFID.

    PubMed

    Dequen, Florence; Cairns, Nigel J; Bigio, Eileen H; Julien, Jean-Pierre

    2011-08-01

    Neuronal intermediate filament inclusion disease (NIFID) is a frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) characterized by frontotemporal dementia (FTD), pyramidal and extrapyramidal signs. The disease is histologically characterized by the presence of abnormal neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions (NCIs) which contain α-internexin and other neuronal intermediate filament (IF) proteins. Gigaxonin (GAN) is a cytoskeletal regulating protein and the genetic cause of giant axonal neuropathy. Since the immunoreactive profile of NCIs in NIFID is similar to that observed in brain sections from Gan(Δex1/Δex1) mice, we speculated that GAN could be a candidate gene causing NIFID. Therefore, we performed a mutation analysis of GAN in NIFID patients. Although the NCIs of NIFID and Gan(Δex1/Δex1) mice were immunohistochemically similar, no GAN variant was identified in DNA obtained from well-characterized cases of NIFID. PMID:19782434

  13. p53 mutation heterogeneity in cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Soussi, T. . E-mail: thierry.soussi@free.fr; Lozano, G.

    2005-06-10

    The p53 gene is inactivated in about 50% of human cancers and the p53 protein is an essential component of the cell response induced by genotoxic stresses such as those generated by radiotherapy or chemotherapy. It is therefore highly likely that these alterations are an important component in tumor resistance to therapy. The particular characteristics of these alterations, 80% of which are missense mutations leading to functionally heterogeneous proteins, make p53 a unique gene in the class of tumor suppressor genes. A considerable number of mutant p53 proteins probably have an oncogenic activity per se and therefore actively participate in cell transformation. The fact that the apoptotic and antiproliferative functions of p53 can be dissociated in certain mutants also suggests another level of complexity in the relationships between p53 inactivation and neoplasia.

  14. VPS35 Mutations in Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vilariño-Güell, Carles; Wider, Christian; Ross, Owen A.; Dachsel, Justus C.; Kachergus, Jennifer M.; Lincoln, Sarah J.; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra I.; Cobb, Stephanie A.; Wilhoite, Greggory J.; Bacon, Justin A.; Behrouz, Bahareh; Melrose, Heather L.; Hentati, Emna; Puschmann, Andreas; Evans, Daniel M.; Conibear, Elizabeth; Wasserman, Wyeth W.; Aasly, Jan O.; Burkhard, Pierre R.; Djaldetti, Ruth; Ghika, Joseph; Hentati, Faycal; Krygowska-Wajs, Anna; Lynch, Tim; Melamed, Eldad; Rajput, Alex; Rajput, Ali H.; Solida, Alessandra; Wu, Ruey-Meei; Uitti, Ryan J.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Vingerhoets, François; Farrer, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    The identification of genetic causes for Mendelian disorders has been based on the collection of multi-incident families, linkage analysis, and sequencing of genes in candidate intervals. This study describes the application of next-generation sequencing technologies to a Swiss kindred presenting with autosomal-dominant, late-onset Parkinson disease (PD). The family has tremor-predominant dopa-responsive parkinsonism with a mean onset of 50.6 ± 7.3 years. Exome analysis suggests that an aspartic-acid-to-asparagine mutation within vacuolar protein sorting 35 (VPS35 c.1858G>A; p.Asp620Asn) is the genetic determinant of disease. VPS35 is a central component of the retromer cargo-recognition complex, is critical for endosome-trans-golgi trafficking and membrane-protein recycling, and is evolutionarily highly conserved. VPS35 c.1858G>A was found in all affected members of the Swiss kindred and in three more families and one patient with sporadic PD, but it was not observed in 3,309 controls. Further sequencing of familial affected probands revealed only one other missense variant, VPS35 c.946C>T; (p.Pro316Ser), in a pedigree with one unaffected and two affected carriers, and thus the pathogenicity of this mutation remains uncertain. Retromer-mediated sorting and transport is best characterized for acid hydrolase receptors. However, the complex has many types of cargo and is involved in a diverse array of biologic pathways from developmental Wnt signaling to lysosome biogenesis. Our study implicates disruption of VPS35 and retromer-mediated trans-membrane protein sorting, rescue, and recycling in the neurodegenerative process leading to PD. PMID:21763482

  15. Cancer-Associated IDH1 Mutations Produce 2-hydroxyglutarate

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, L.; White, D; Gross, S; Bennett, B; Bittinger, M; Driggers, E; Fantin, V; Jang, H; Jin, S; et al.

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the enzyme cytosolic isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) are a common feature of a major subset of primary human brain cancers. These mutations occur at a single amino acid residue of the IDH1 active site, resulting in loss of the enzyme's ability to catalyse conversion of isocitrate to {alpha}-ketoglutarate. However, only a single copy of the gene is mutated in tumours, raising the possibility that the mutations do not result in a simple loss of function. Here we show that cancer-associated IDH1 mutations result in a new ability of the enzyme to catalyse the NADPH-dependent reduction of {alpha}-ketoglutarate to R(-)-2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG). Structural studies demonstrate that when arginine 132 is mutated to histidine, residues in the active site are shifted to produce structural changes consistent with reduced oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate and acquisition of the ability to convert {alpha}-ketoglutarate to 2HG. Excess accumulation of 2HG has been shown to lead to an elevated risk of malignant brain tumours in patients with inborn errors of 2HG metabolism. Similarly, in human malignant gliomas harbouring IDH1 mutations, we find markedly elevated levels of 2HG. These data demonstrate that the IDH1 mutations result in production of the onco-metabolite 2HG, and indicate that the excess 2HG which accumulates in vivo contributes to the formation and malignant progression of gliomas.

  16. Low Genetic Quality Alters Key Dimensions of the Mutational Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Nathaniel P; Agrawal, Aneil F

    2016-03-01

    Mutations affect individual health, population persistence, adaptation, diversification, and genome evolution. There is evidence that the mutation rate varies among genotypes, but the causes of this variation are poorly understood. Here, we link differences in genetic quality with variation in spontaneous mutation in a Drosophila mutation accumulation experiment. We find that chromosomes maintained in low-quality genetic backgrounds experience a higher rate of indel mutation and a lower rate of gene conversion in a manner consistent with condition-based differences in the mechanisms used to repair DNA double strand breaks. These aspects of the mutational spectrum were also associated with body mass, suggesting that the effect of genetic quality on DNA repair was mediated by overall condition, and providing a mechanistic explanation for the differences in mutational fitness decline among these genotypes. The rate and spectrum of substitutions was unaffected by genetic quality, but we find variation in the probability of substitutions and indels with respect to several aspects of local sequence context, particularly GC content, with implications for models of molecular evolution and genome scans for signs of selection. Our finding that the chances of mutation depend on genetic context and overall condition has important implications for how sequences evolve, the risk of extinction, and human health.

  17. Low Genetic Quality Alters Key Dimensions of the Mutational Spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Nathaniel P.; Agrawal, Aneil F.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations affect individual health, population persistence, adaptation, diversification, and genome evolution. There is evidence that the mutation rate varies among genotypes, but the causes of this variation are poorly understood. Here, we link differences in genetic quality with variation in spontaneous mutation in a Drosophila mutation accumulation experiment. We find that chromosomes maintained in low-quality genetic backgrounds experience a higher rate of indel mutation and a lower rate of gene conversion in a manner consistent with condition-based differences in the mechanisms used to repair DNA double strand breaks. These aspects of the mutational spectrum were also associated with body mass, suggesting that the effect of genetic quality on DNA repair was mediated by overall condition, and providing a mechanistic explanation for the differences in mutational fitness decline among these genotypes. The rate and spectrum of substitutions was unaffected by genetic quality, but we find variation in the probability of substitutions and indels with respect to several aspects of local sequence context, particularly GC content, with implications for models of molecular evolution and genome scans for signs of selection. Our finding that the chances of mutation depend on genetic context and overall condition has important implications for how sequences evolve, the risk of extinction, and human health. PMID:27015430

  18. Immunohistochemistry predicts nucleophosmin (NPM) mutations in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Falini, Brunangelo; Martelli, Maria Paola; Bolli, Niccolò; Bonasso, Rossella; Ghia, Emanuela; Pallotta, Maria Teresa; Diverio, Daniela; Nicoletti, Ildo; Pacini, Roberta; Tabarrini, Alessia; Galletti, Barbara Verducci; Mannucci, Roberta; Roti, Giovanni; Rosati, Roberto; Specchia, Giorgina; Liso, Arcangelo; Tiacci, Enrico; Alcalay, Myriam; Luzi, Lucilla; Volorio, Sara; Bernard, Loris; Guarini, Anna; Amadori, Sergio; Mandelli, Franco; Pane, Fabrizio; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Saglio, Giuseppe; Pelicci, Pier-Giuseppe; Martelli, Massimo F; Mecucci, Cristina

    2006-09-15

    Nucleophosmin (NPM) exon-12 mutations occur in 50% to 60% of adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with normal karyotype and are predictors of favorable prognosis. We evaluated bone marrow or peripheral blood samples from 450 adult patients with AML of the GIMEMA (Gruppo Italiano Malattie Ematologiche Maligne dell'Adulto)/AML12 EORTC (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer) trial to (1) search for new exon-12 NPM mutations; (2) determine whether NPM immunostaining on paraffin-embedded biopsies predicts NPM mutations; and (3) investigate altered nucleocytoplasmic NPM traffic in primary AML cells. Fourteen NPM mutations, including 8 new variants, were identified. All 200 AML cases expressing cytoplasmic NPM (NPMc(+) AML) carried NPM mutations. None of the 250 cases with nucleus-restricted NPM (NPMc(-) AML) was mutated. At the C-terminus, NPM leukemic mutants carried mutations of only tryptophan 290 or of both tryptophans 288 and 290 and a new nuclear export signal (NES) motif, which appear to underlie their nuclear export. The specific Crm1/exportin-1 inhibitor leptomycin-B relocated NPM mutants from cytoplasm to nucleus of primary NPMc(+) AML cells, demonstrating that nuclear export is NES dependent. NPM mutants bound and recruited wild-type NPM into leukemic cell cytoplasm. Because alterations at C-terminus of leukemic NPM mutants are similar, immunohistochemistry detects all exon-12 NPM mutations and is a valuable, inexpensive tool in the diagnostic-prognostic work-up of patients with AML with normal karyotype.

  19. A Novel Technique to Detect EGFR Mutations in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanbin; Lei, Ting; Liu, Zhiyu; Kuang, Yanbin; Lyu, Jianxin; Wang, Qi

    2016-05-23

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutations occur in multiple human cancers; therefore, the detection of EGFR mutations could lead to early cancer diagnosis. This study describes a novel EGFR mutation detection technique. Compared to direct DNA sequencing detection methods, this method is based on allele-specific amplification (ASA), recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA), peptide nucleic acid (PNA), and SYBR Green I (SYBR), referred to as the AS-RPA-PNA-SYBR (ARPS) system. The principle of this technique is based on three continuous steps: ASA or ASA combined with PNA to prevent non-target sequence amplification (even single nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs), the rapid amplification advantage of RPA, and appropriate SYBR Green I detection (the samples harboring EGFR mutations show a green signal). Using this method, the EGFR 19Del(2) mutation was detected in 5 min, while the EGFR L858R mutation was detected in 10 min. In this study, the detection of EGFR mutations in clinical samples using the ARPS system was compatible with that determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing methods. Thus, this newly developed methodology that uses the ARPS system with appropriate primer sets is a rapid, reliable, and practical way to assess EGFR mutations in clinical samples.

  20. Mosaic mutations in early-onset genetic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Halvorsen, Matt; Petrovski, Slavé; Shellhaas, Renée; Tang, Yingying; Crandall, Laura; Goldstein, David; Devinsky, Orrin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose An emerging approach in medical genetics is to identify de novo mutations in patients with severe early-onset genetic disease that are absent in population controls and in the patient’s parents. This approach, however, frequently misses post-zygotic “mosaic” mutations that are present in only a portion of the healthy parents’ cells and are transmitted to offspring. Methods We constructed a mosaic transmission screen for variants that have an ~50% alternative allele ratio in the proband but are significantly less than 50% in the transmitting parent. We applied it to two family-based genetic disease cohorts consisting of 9 cases of sudden unexplained death in childhood (SUDC) and 338 previously published cases of epileptic encephalopathy. Results The screen identified six parental-mosaic transmissions across the two cohorts. The resultant rate of ~0.02 identified transmissions per trio is far lower than that of de novo mutations. Among these transmissions were two likely disease-causing mutations: an SCN1A mutation transmitted to an SUDC proband and her sibling with Dravet syndrome, as well as an SLC6A1 mutation in a proband with epileptic encephalopathy. Conclusion These results highlight explicit screening for mosaic mutations as an important complement to the established approach of screening for de novo mutations. PMID:26716362

  1. Clonal diversity of recurrently mutated genes in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Walter, MJ; Shen, D; Shao, J; Ding, L; White, BS; Kandoth, C; Miller, CA; Niu, B; McLellan, MD; Dees, ND; Fulton, R; Elliot, K; Heath, S; Grillot, M; Westervelt, P; Link, DC; DiPersio, JF; Mardis, E; Ley, TJ; Wilson, RK; Graubert, TA

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that most cases of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) are clonally heterogeneous, with a founding clone and multiple subclones. It is not known whether specific gene mutations typically occur in founding clones or subclones. We screened a panel of 94 candidate genes in a cohort of 157 patients with MDS or secondary acute myeloid leukemia (sAML). This included 150 cases with samples obtained at MDS diagnosis and 15 cases with samples obtained at sAML transformation (8 were also analyzed at the MDS stage). We performed whole-genome sequencing (WGS) to define the clonal architecture in eight sAML genomes and identified the range of variant allele frequencies (VAFs) for founding clone mutations. At least one mutation or cytogenetic abnormality was detected in 83% of the 150 MDS patients and 17 genes were significantly mutated (false discovery rate ≤0.05). Individual genes and patient samples displayed a wide range of VAFs for recurrently mutated genes, indicating that no single gene is exclusively mutated in the founding clone. The VAFs of recurrently mutated genes did not fully recapitulate the clonal architecture defined by WGS, suggesting that comprehensive sequencing may be required to accurately assess the clonal status of recurrently mutated genes in MDS. PMID:23443460

  2. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for point mutation detection

    SciTech Connect

    Taranenko, N.I.; Chung, C.N.; Zhu, Y.F.

    1996-10-01

    A point mutation can be associated with the pathogenesis of inherited or acquired diseases. Laser desorption mass spectrometry coupled with allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was first used for point mutation detection. G551D is one of several mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene present in 1-3% of the mutant CFTR alleles in most European populations. In this work, two different approaches were pursued to detect G551D point mutation in the cystic fibrosis gene. The strategy is to amplify the desired region of DNA template by PCR using two primers that overlap one base at the site of the point mutation and which vary in size. If the two primers based on the normal sequence match the target DNA sequence, a normal PCR product will be produced. However, if the alternately sized primers that match the mutant sequence recognize the target DNA, an abnormal PCR product will be produced. Thus, the mass spectrometer can be used to identify patients that are homozygous normal, heterozygous for a mutation or homozygous abnormal at a mutation site. Another approach to identify similar mutations is the use of sequence specific restriction enzymes which respond to changes in the DNA sequence. Mass spectrometry is used to detect the length of the restriction fragments generated by digestion of a PCR generated target fragment. 21 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for point mutation detection

    SciTech Connect

    Taranenko, N.I.; Chung, C.N.; Zhu, Y.F.

    1996-12-31

    A point mutation can be associated with the pathogenesis of inherited or acquired diseases. Laser desorption mass spectrometry coupled with allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was first used for point mutation detection. G551D is one of several mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene present in 1-3% of the mutant CFTR alleles in most European populations. In this work, two different approaches were pursued to detect G551D point mutation in the cystic fibrosis gene. The strategy is to amplify the desired region of DNA template by PCR using two primers that overlap one base at the site of the point mutation and which vary in size. If the two primers based on the normal sequence match the target DNA sequence, a normal PCR product will be produced. However, if the alternately sized primers that match the mutant sequence recognize the target DNA, an abnormal PCR product will be produced. Thus, the mass spectrometer can be used to identify patients that are homozygous normal, heterozygous for a mutation or homozygous abnormal at a mutation site. Another approach to identify similar mutations is the use of sequence specific restriction enzymes which respond to changes in the DNA sequence. Mass spectrometry is used to detect the length of the restriction fragments by digestion of a PCR generated target fragment. 21 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Simulating inbreeding depression through the mutation accumulation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, A. O.; de Oliveira, S. Moss; Bernardes, Américo T.

    2000-04-01

    Using the Penna model for biological aging, which is based on the mutation accumulation theory, we show that the number of homozygous loci corresponding to deleterious mutations is higher in small populations than in large ones. This decrease of heterozygosity may drive small populations to extinction even when no drastic change of the environment occurs.

  5. The Spontaneous Mutation Rate in the Fission Yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Farlow, Ashley; Long, Hongan; Arnoux, Stéphanie; Sung, Way; Doak, Thomas G; Nordborg, Magnus; Lynch, Michael

    2015-10-01

    The rate at which new mutations arise in the genome is a key factor in the evolution and adaptation of species. Here we describe the rate and spectrum of spontaneous mutations for the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, a key model organism with many similarities to higher eukaryotes. We undertook an ∼1700-generation mutation accumulation (MA) experiment with a haploid S. pombe, generating 422 single-base substitutions and 119 insertion-deletion mutations (indels) across the 96 replicates. This equates to a base-substitution mutation rate of 2.00 × 10(-10) mutations per site per generation, similar to that reported for the distantly related budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, these two yeast species differ dramatically in their spectrum of base substitutions, the types of indels (S. pombe is more prone to insertions), and the pattern of selection required to counteract a strong AT-biased mutation rate. Overall, our results indicate that GC-biased gene conversion does not play a major role in shaping the nucleotide composition of the S. pombe genome and suggest that the mechanisms of DNA maintenance may have diverged significantly between fission and budding yeasts. Unexpectedly, CpG sites appear to be excessively liable to mutation in both species despite the likely absence of DNA methylation.

  6. A Novel Technique to Detect EGFR Mutations in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanbin; Lei, Ting; Liu, Zhiyu; Kuang, Yanbin; Lyu, Jianxin; Wang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutations occur in multiple human cancers; therefore, the detection of EGFR mutations could lead to early cancer diagnosis. This study describes a novel EGFR mutation detection technique. Compared to direct DNA sequencing detection methods, this method is based on allele-specific amplification (ASA), recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA), peptide nucleic acid (PNA), and SYBR Green I (SYBR), referred to as the AS-RPA-PNA-SYBR (ARPS) system. The principle of this technique is based on three continuous steps: ASA or ASA combined with PNA to prevent non-target sequence amplification (even single nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs), the rapid amplification advantage of RPA, and appropriate SYBR Green I detection (the samples harboring EGFR mutations show a green signal). Using this method, the EGFR 19Del(2) mutation was detected in 5 min, while the EGFR L858R mutation was detected in 10 min. In this study, the detection of EGFR mutations in clinical samples using the ARPS system was compatible with that determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing methods. Thus, this newly developed methodology that uses the ARPS system with appropriate primer sets is a rapid, reliable, and practical way to assess EGFR mutations in clinical samples. PMID:27223277

  7. [BRAF V600E mutation in thyroid nodules in Argentina].

    PubMed

    Ilera, Verónica; Dourisboure, Ricardo; Colobraro, Antonio; Silva Croome, María Del Carmen; Olstein, Gustavo; Gauna, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    This prospective study analyzed the frequency of V600E mutation of oncogene BRAF in patients operated for benign thyroid nodules and for papillary thyroid cancer in an Argentine population. In patients with papillary thyroid cancer we compared clinicopathological characteristics between those harboring BRAF mutation and those without it. Twenty five consecutive patients operated for benign nodules and for papillary carcinoma were prospectively included. Fresh tissue samples of thyroid nodules and of adjacent thyroid parenchyma were obtained. DNA was extracted and amplified by amplification refractory mutation system polymerase chain reaction (ARMS PCR). Direct sequencing was performed in four samples. Of those patients operated for papillary thyroid cancer, 77% harbored BRAF mutation. All samples from adjacent thyroid parenchyma and from patients operated for benign nodules tested negative for the mutation. Direct sequencing confirmed the results obtained by ARMS PCR. Patients with BRAF mutation were significantly older at the time of diagnosis (BRAF+ 47.7 ± 12.7 years vs. BRAF- 24.7 ± 8.1 years, p < 0.01). Nine out of ten papillary carcinomas with BRAF mutation corresponded to the classic histological subtype, which was not observed in BRAF negative tumors (p < 0.02). In conclusion, we found a high frequency of BRAF V600E mutation in this population of patients operated for papillary thyroid carcinoma in Argentina. These results are consistent with those reported in the literature. PMID:27576281

  8. Alström Syndrome: Mutation spectrum of ALMS1

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Jan D.; Muller, Jean; Collin, Gayle B.; Milan, Gabriella; Kingsmore, Stephen F.; Dinwiddie, Darrell; Farrow, Emily G.; Miller, Neil A.; Favaretto, Francesca; Maffei, Pietro; Dollfus, Hélène; Vettor, Roberto; Naggert, Jürgen K.

    2015-01-01

    Alström Syndrome, a recessive, monogenic ciliopathy caused by mutations in ALMS1, is typically characterized by multi-system involvement including early cone-rod retinal dystrophy and blindness, hearing loss, childhood obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiomyopathy, fibrosis and multiple organ failure. The precise function of ALMS1 remains elusive, but roles in endosomal and ciliary transport and cell cycle regulation have been shown. The aim of our study was to further define the spectrum of ALMS1 mutations in patients with clinical features of Alström Syndrome. Mutational analysis in a world-wide cohort of 204 families identified 109 novel mutations, extending the number of known ALMS1 mutations to 239 and highlighting the allelic heterogeneity of this disorder. This study represents the most comprehensive mutation analysis in patients with Alström Syndrome, identifying the largest number of novel mutations in a single study worldwide. Here, we also provide an overview of all ALMS1 mutations identified to date. PMID:25846608

  9. Extended phenotypic spectrum of KIF5A mutations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yo-Tsen; Laurá, Matilde; Hersheson, Joshua; Horga, Alejandro; Jaunmuktane, Zane; Brandner, Sebastian; Pittman, Alan; Hughes, Deborah; Polke, James M.; Sweeney, Mary G.; Proukakis, Christos; Janssen, John C.; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Zuchner, Stephan; Shields, Kevin G.; Reilly, Mary M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To establish the phenotypic spectrum of KIF5A mutations and to investigate whether KIF5A mutations cause axonal neuropathy associated with hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) or typical Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 (CMT2). Methods: KIF5A sequencing of the motor-domain coding exons was performed in 186 patients with the clinical diagnosis of HSP and in 215 patients with typical CMT2. Another 66 patients with HSP or CMT2 with pyramidal signs were sequenced for all exons of KIF5A by targeted resequencing. One additional patient was genetically diagnosed by whole-exome sequencing. Results: Five KIF5A mutations were identified in 6 unrelated patients: R204W and D232N were novel mutations; R204Q, R280C, and R280H have been previously reported. Three patients had CMT2 as the predominant and presenting phenotype; 2 of them also had pyramidal signs. The other 3 patients presented with HSP but also had significant axonal neuropathy or other additional features. Conclusion: This is currently the largest study investigating KIF5A mutations. By combining next-generation sequencing and conventional sequencing, we confirm that KIF5A mutations can cause variable phenotypes ranging from HSP to CMT2. The identification of mutations in CMT2 broadens the phenotypic spectrum and underlines the importance of KIF5A mutations, which involve degeneration of both the central and peripheral nervous systems and should be tested in HSP and CMT2. PMID:25008398

  10. Recessive truncating titin gene, TTN, mutations presenting as centronuclear myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ceyhan-Birsoy, Ozge; Agrawal, Pankaj B.; Hidalgo, Carlos; Schmitz-Abe, Klaus; DeChene, Elizabeth T.; Swanson, Lindsay C.; Soemedi, Rachel; Vasli, Nasim; Iannaccone, Susan T.; Shieh, Perry B.; Shur, Natasha; Dennison, Jane M.; Lawlor, Michael W.; Laporte, Jocelyn; Markianos, Kyriacos; Fairbrother, William G.; Granzier, Henk

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To identify causative genes for centronuclear myopathies (CNM), a heterogeneous group of rare inherited muscle disorders that often present in infancy or early life with weakness and hypotonia, using next-generation sequencing of whole exomes and genomes. Methods: Whole-exome or -genome sequencing was performed in a cohort of 29 unrelated patients with clinicopathologic diagnoses of CNM or related myopathy depleted for cases with mutations of MTM1, DNM2, and BIN1. Immunofluorescence analyses on muscle biopsies, splicing assays, and gel electrophoresis of patient muscle proteins were performed to determine the molecular consequences of mutations of interest. Results: Autosomal recessive compound heterozygous truncating mutations of the titin gene, TTN, were identified in 5 individuals. Biochemical analyses demonstrated increased titin degradation and truncated titin proteins in patient muscles, establishing the impact of the mutations. Conclusions: Our study identifies truncating TTN mutations as a cause of congenital myopathy that is reported as CNM. Unlike the classic CNM genes that are all involved in excitation-contraction coupling at the triad, TTN encodes the giant sarcomeric protein titin, which forms a myofibrillar backbone for the components of the contractile machinery. This study expands the phenotypic spectrum associated with TTN mutations and indicates that TTN mutation analysis should be considered in cases of possible CNM without mutations in the classic CNM genes. PMID:23975875

  11. 40 CFR 799.9510 - TSCA bacterial reverse mutation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... point mutations, which involve substitution, addition or deletion of one or a few DNA base pairs. The... features that make them more sensitive for the detection of mutations, including responsive DNA sequences at the reversion sites, increased cell permeability to large molecules and elimination of DNA...

  12. 40 CFR 799.9510 - TSCA bacterial reverse mutation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... point mutations, which involve substitution, addition or deletion of one or a few DNA base pairs. The... features that make them more sensitive for the detection of mutations, including responsive DNA sequences at the reversion sites, increased cell permeability to large molecules and elimination of DNA...

  13. Somatic mutations in disorders with disrupted brain connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Ho

    2016-01-01

    Mutations occur during cell division in all somatic lineages. Because neurogenesis persists throughout human life, somatic mutations in the brain arise during development and accumulate with the aging process. The human brain consists of 100 billion neurons that form an extraordinarily intricate network of connections to achieve higher level cognitive functions. Due to this network architecture, perturbed neuronal functions are rarely restricted to a focal area; instead, they are often spread via the neuronal network to affect other connected areas. Although somatic diversity is an evident feature of the brain, the extent to which somatic mutations affect the neuronal structure and function and their contribution to neurological disorders associated with disrupted brain connectivity remain largely unexplored. Notably, recent reports indicate that brain somatic mutations can indeed play a critical role that leads to the structural and functional abnormalities of the brain observed in several neurodevelopmental disorders. Here, I review the extent and significance of brain somatic mutations and provide my perspective regarding these mutations as potential molecular lesions underlying relatively common conditions with disrupted brain connectivity. Moreover, I discuss emerging technical platforms that will facilitate the detection of low-frequency somatic mutations and validate the biological functions of the identified mutations in the context of brain connectivity. PMID:27282107

  14. Prevention of avoidable mutational diseases: Memorandum from a WHO Meeting*

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    About 1% of children are born with a serious disorder which is the direct result of a mutational event in a parent or a more distant ancestor. These disorders, of which several thousand are known, mainly afflict the blood, bone, brain, ear, eye or muscle and the changes are usually irrevocable by the time of diagnosis. Another 1% of individuals will develop a serious genetic disease some time after birth. In addition to these direct consequences of a mutant event, far higher proportions will suffer from the indirect effects of one or several mutations. In view of their chronic and severe nature most of these disorders impose a burden disproportionate to their frequency, and it is sound public health policy to avoid the birth of babies known to have the established mutations and prevent further cases in the immediate or distant future by minimizing the exposure of people at risk to known mutagens. The advantages in permitting certain mutagenic exposures must be assessed against the later costs. Owing to the natural mutation rate and the vast backlog of previous mutations, the prospects of prevention are limited to preventing an increase, rather than to achieving any substantial decrease. This Memorandum describes progress in the ability to dissect and interpret the mutational process, to identify populations at risk, and to evaluate the consequences of the various types of mutational event and emphasizes that the current approach to prevention of mutational disease must involve improving our ability to study populations that appear to be at increased risk. PMID:3488837

  15. Somatic Activating PIK3CA Mutations Cause Venous Malformation.

    PubMed

    Limaye, Nisha; Kangas, Jaakko; Mendola, Antonella; Godfraind, Catherine; Schlögel, Matthieu J; Helaers, Raphael; Eklund, Lauri; Boon, Laurence M; Vikkula, Miikka

    2015-12-01

    Somatic mutations in TEK, the gene encoding endothelial cell tyrosine kinase receptor TIE2, cause more than half of sporadically occurring unifocal venous malformations (VMs). Here, we report that somatic mutations in PIK3CA, the gene encoding the catalytic p110α subunit of PI3K, cause 54% (27 out of 50) of VMs with no detected TEK mutation. The hotspot mutations c.1624G>A, c.1633G>A, and c.3140A>G (p.Glu542Lys, p.Glu545Lys, and p.His1047Arg), frequent in PIK3CA-associated cancers, overgrowth syndromes, and lymphatic malformation (LM), account for >92% of individuals who carry mutations. Like VM-causative mutations in TEK, the PIK3CA mutations cause chronic activation of AKT, dysregulation of certain important angiogenic factors, and abnormal endothelial cell morphology when expressed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The p110α-specific inhibitor BYL719 restores all abnormal phenotypes tested, in PIK3CA- as well as TEK-mutant HUVECs, demonstrating that they operate via the same pathogenic pathways. Nevertheless, significant genotype-phenotype correlations in lesion localization and histology are observed between individuals with mutations in PIK3CA versus TEK, pointing to gene-specific effects. PMID:26637981

  16. Phenotypic Involvement in Females with the FMR1 Gene Mutation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddle, J. E.; Cheema, A.; Sobesky, W. E.; Gardner, S. C.; Taylor, A. K.; Pennington, B. F.; Hagerman, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    A study investigated phenotypic effects seen in 114 females with premutation and 41 females (ages 18-58) with full Fragile X mental retardation gene mutation. Those with the full mutation had a greater incidence of hand-flapping, eye contact problems, special education help for reading and math, and grade retention. (Author/CR)

  17. Biological insights into BRAFV600 mutations in melanoma patient

    PubMed Central

    Improta, Giuseppina; Pelosi, Giuseppe; Tamborini, Elena; Donia, Marco; Santinami, Mario; de Braud, Filippo; Fraggetta, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    Some experimental evidence indicates that uncommon BRAF mutations consisting in the substitution of 2 adjacent nucleotides within codon 600 are in a cis configuration and associate with BRAF gene amplification. These findings suggest that BRAFV600 mutations are unlikely to occur as homozygous alterations in clinical melanoma samples, with gene amplification perhaps contributing to mask the heterozygous state. PMID:24179707

  18. Genetic analyses of fancy rat-derived mutations.

    PubMed

    Kuramoto, Takashi; Yokoe, Mayuko; Yagasaki, Kayoko; Kawaguchi, Tatsuya; Kumafuji, Kenta; Serikawa, Tadao

    2010-01-01

    To collect rat mutations and increase the value of the rat model system, we introduced fancy-derived mutations to the laboratory and carried out genetic analyses. Six fancy rats were shipped from a fancy rat colony in the USA and used as founders. After initial crosses with a laboratory strain, TM/Kyo or PVG/Seac, inbreeding started and 6 partially inbred lines, including 2 sublines, were produced as Kyoto Fancy Rat Stock (KFRS) strains. During inbreeding, we isolated 9 mutations: 5 coat colors, American mink (am), Black eye (Be), grey (g), Pearl (Pel), siamese (sia); 1 coat pattern, head spot (hs); 2 coat textures, Rex (Re), satin (sat); and an ear pinnae malformation, dumbo (dmbo). Genetic analyses mapped 7 mutations to particular regions of the rat chromosomes (Chr): am to Chr 1, sia to Chr 1, sat to Chr 3, Re to Chr 7, g to Chr 8, dmbo to Chr 14, and hs to Chr 15. Candidate gene analysis revealed that a missense mutation in the tyrosinase gene, Ser79Pro, was responsible for sia. From mutant phenotypes and mapping positions, it is likely that all mutations isolated in this study were unique to the fancy rat. These findings suggest that fancy rat colonies are a good source for collecting rat mutations. The fancy-derived mutations, made available to biomedical research in the current study, will increase the scientific value of laboratory rats. PMID:20484848

  19. POLE mutations in families predisposed to cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Aoude, Lauren G; Heitzer, Ellen; Johansson, Peter; Gartside, Michael; Wadt, Karin; Pritchard, Antonia L; Palmer, Jane M; Symmons, Judith; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Tomlinson, Ian; Kearsey, Stephen; Hayward, Nicholas K

    2015-12-01

    Germline mutations in the exonuclease domain of POLE have been shown to predispose to colorectal cancers and adenomas. POLE is an enzyme involved in DNA repair and chromosomal DNA replication. In order to assess whether such mutations might also predispose to cutaneous melanoma, we interrogated whole-genome and exome data from probands of 34 melanoma families lacking pathogenic mutations in known high penetrance melanoma susceptibility genes: CDKN2A, CDK4, BAP1, TERT, POT1, ACD and TERF2IP. We found a novel germline mutation, POLE p.(Trp347Cys), in a 7-case cutaneous melanoma family. Functional assays in S. pombe showed that this mutation led to an increased DNA mutation rate comparable to that seen with a Pol ε mutant with no exonuclease activity. We then performed targeted sequencing of POLE in 1243 cutaneous melanoma cases and found that a further ten probands had novel or rare variants in the exonuclease domain of POLE. Although this frequency is not significantly higher than that in unselected Caucasian controls, we observed multiple cancer types in the melanoma families, suggesting that some germline POLE mutations may predispose to a broad spectrum of cancers, including melanoma. In addition, we found the first mutation outside the exonuclease domain, p.(Gln520Arg), in a family with an extensive history of colorectal cancer.

  20. Low Genetic Quality Alters Key Dimensions of the Mutational Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Nathaniel P; Agrawal, Aneil F

    2016-03-01

    Mutations affect individual health, population persistence, adaptation, diversification, and genome evolution. There is evidence that the mutation rate varies among genotypes, but the causes of this variation are poorly understood. Here, we link differences in genetic quality with variation in spontaneous mutation in a Drosophila mutation accumulation experiment. We find that chromosomes maintained in low-quality genetic backgrounds experience a higher rate of indel mutation and a lower rate of gene conversion in a manner consistent with condition-based differences in the mechanisms used to repair DNA double strand breaks. These aspects of the mutational spectrum were also associated with body mass, suggesting that the effect of genetic quality on DNA repair was mediated by overall condition, and providing a mechanistic explanation for the differences in mutational fitness decline among these genotypes. The rate and spectrum of substitutions was unaffected by genetic quality, but we find variation in the probability of substitutions and indels with respect to several aspects of local sequence context, particularly GC content, with implications for models of molecular evolution and genome scans for signs of selection. Our finding that the chances of mutation depend on genetic context and overall condition has important implications for how sequences evolve, the risk of extinction, and human health. PMID:27015430

  1. Deletion Mutations Keep Kinase Inhibitors in the Loop

    PubMed Central

    Freed, Daniel M.; Park, Jin H.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Effective clinical application of conformationally selective kinase inhibitors requires tailoring drug choice to the tumor's activating mutation(s). In this issue of Cancer Cell, Foster et al. (2016) describe how activating deletions in BRAF, EGFR, and HER2 cause primary resistance to common inhibitors, suggesting strategies for improved inhibitor selection. PMID:27070691

  2. Mutations and epimutations in the origin of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Peltomaeki, Paeivi

    2012-02-15

    Cancer is traditionally viewed as a disease of abnormal cell proliferation controlled by a series of mutations. Mutations typically affect oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes thereby conferring growth advantage. Genomic instability facilitates mutation accumulation. Recent findings demonstrate that activation of oncogenes and inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, as well as genomic instability, can be achieved by epigenetic mechanisms as well. Unlike genetic mutations, epimutations do not change the base sequence of DNA and are potentially reversible. Similar to genetic mutations, epimutations are associated with specific patterns of gene expression that are heritable through cell divisions. Knudson's hypothesis postulates that inactivation of tumor suppressor genes requires two hits, with the first hit occurring either in somatic cells (sporadic cancer) or in the germline (hereditary cancer) and the second one always being somatic. Studies on hereditary and sporadic forms of colorectal carcinoma have made it evident that, apart from genetic mutations, epimutations may serve as either hit or both. Furthermore, recent next-generation sequencing studies show that epigenetic genes, such as those encoding histone modifying enzymes and subunits for chromatin remodeling systems, are themselves frequent targets of somatic mutations in cancer and can act like tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes. This review discusses genetic vs. epigenetic origin of cancer, including cancer susceptibility, in light of recent discoveries. Situations in which mutations and epimutations occur to serve analogous purposes are highlighted.

  3. The significance of spliceosome mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rozovski, Uri; Keating, Michael; Estrov, Zeev

    2013-07-01

    Cellular proteins produced via alternative splicing provide neoplastic cells with survival advantage and/or promote neoplastic cell proliferation. Pre-mRNA is spliced by the spliceosome consisting of large complexes of small nuclear RNA (snRNA) and protein subunits. Spliceosome gene mutations were detected in 40-80% of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), particularly in those with ringed sideroblasts. Recently, two large whole-genome sequencing studies identified mutations in the spliceosome gene SF3B1 in approximately 10% of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Intrigued by these findings, we performed a pathway enrichment analysis and found that, unlike in MDS, in CLL spliceosome mutations exist almost exclusively in SF3B1. Patients with CLL with an SF3B1 gene mutation are characterized by a short progression-free survival and a low 10-year survival rate. Furthermore, the frequency of SF3B1 mutations is significantly higher in chemotherapy treated than in untreated patients with CLL, suggesting that chemotherapy induces SF3B1 gene mutations or selects a population of mutated cells. Whether SF3B1 gene mutations have a role in leukemogenesis, either because of altered splicing or other splicing-unrelated functions such as ectopic expression of Homeobox (Hox) genes previously reported in SF3B1+(/-) mice, remains to be determined.

  4. POLE mutations in families predisposed to cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Aoude, Lauren G; Heitzer, Ellen; Johansson, Peter; Gartside, Michael; Wadt, Karin; Pritchard, Antonia L; Palmer, Jane M; Symmons, Judith; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Tomlinson, Ian; Kearsey, Stephen; Hayward, Nicholas K

    2015-12-01

    Germline mutations in the exonuclease domain of POLE have been shown to predispose to colorectal cancers and adenomas. POLE is an enzyme involved in DNA repair and chromosomal DNA replication. In order to assess whether such mutations might also predispose to cutaneous melanoma, we interrogated whole-genome and exome data from probands of 34 melanoma families lacking pathogenic mutations in known high penetrance melanoma susceptibility genes: CDKN2A, CDK4, BAP1, TERT, POT1, ACD and TERF2IP. We found a novel germline mutation, POLE p.(Trp347Cys), in a 7-case cutaneous melanoma family. Functional assays in S. pombe showed that this mutation led to an increased DNA mutation rate comparable to that seen with a Pol ε mutant with no exonuclease activity. We then performed targeted sequencing of POLE in 1243 cutaneous melanoma cases and found that a further ten probands had novel or rare variants in the exonuclease domain of POLE. Although this frequency is not significantly higher than that in unselected Caucasian controls, we observed multiple cancer types in the melanoma families, suggesting that some germline POLE mutations may predispose to a broad spectrum of cancers, including melanoma. In addition, we found the first mutation outside the exonuclease domain, p.(Gln520Arg), in a family with an extensive history of colorectal cancer. PMID:26251183

  5. A Novel Technique to Detect EGFR Mutations in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuanbin; Lei, Ting; Liu, Zhiyu; Kuang, Yanbin; Lyu, Jianxin; Wang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutations occur in multiple human cancers; therefore, the detection of EGFR mutations could lead to early cancer diagnosis. This study describes a novel EGFR mutation detection technique. Compared to direct DNA sequencing detection methods, this method is based on allele-specific amplification (ASA), recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA), peptide nucleic acid (PNA), and SYBR Green I (SYBR), referred to as the AS-RPA-PNA-SYBR (ARPS) system. The principle of this technique is based on three continuous steps: ASA or ASA combined with PNA to prevent non-target sequence amplification (even single nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs), the rapid amplification advantage of RPA, and appropriate SYBR Green I detection (the samples harboring EGFR mutations show a green signal). Using this method, the EGFR 19Del(2) mutation was detected in 5 min, while the EGFR L858R mutation was detected in 10 min. In this study, the detection of EGFR mutations in clinical samples using the ARPS system was compatible with that determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing methods. Thus, this newly developed methodology that uses the ARPS system with appropriate primer sets is a rapid, reliable, and practical way to assess EGFR mutations in clinical samples. PMID:27223277

  6. The Spontaneous Mutation Rate in the Fission Yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Farlow, Ashley; Long, Hongan; Arnoux, Stéphanie; Sung, Way; Doak, Thomas G.; Nordborg, Magnus; Lynch, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The rate at which new mutations arise in the genome is a key factor in the evolution and adaptation of species. Here we describe the rate and spectrum of spontaneous mutations for the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, a key model organism with many similarities to higher eukaryotes. We undertook an ∼1700-generation mutation accumulation (MA) experiment with a haploid S. pombe, generating 422 single-base substitutions and 119 insertion-deletion mutations (indels) across the 96 replicates. This equates to a base-substitution mutation rate of 2.00 × 10−10 mutations per site per generation, similar to that reported for the distantly related budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, these two yeast species differ dramatically in their spectrum of base substitutions, the types of indels (S. pombe is more prone to insertions), and the pattern of selection required to counteract a strong AT-biased mutation rate. Overall, our results indicate that GC-biased gene conversion does not play a major role in shaping the nucleotide composition of the S. pombe genome and suggest that the mechanisms of DNA maintenance may have diverged significantly between fission and budding yeasts. Unexpectedly, CpG sites appear to be excessively liable to mutation in both species despite the likely absence of DNA methylation. PMID:26265703

  7. Skin cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Gumaste, P V; Penn, L A; Cymerman, R M; Kirchhoff, T; Polsky, D; McLellan, B

    2015-06-01

    Women with BRCA1/2 mutations have an elevated risk of breast and ovarian cancer. These patients and their clinicians are often concerned about their risk for other cancers, including skin cancer. Research evaluating the association between BRCA1/2 mutations and skin cancer is limited and has produced inconsistent results. Herein, we review the current literature on the risk of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. No studies have shown a statistically significant risk of melanoma in BRCA1 families. BRCA2 mutations have been linked to melanoma in large breast and ovarian cancer families, though a statistically significant elevated risk was reported in only one study. Five additional studies have shown some association between BRCA2 mutations and melanoma, while four studies did not find any association. With respect to nonmelanoma skin cancers, studies have produced conflicting results. Given the current state of medical knowledge, there is insufficient evidence to warrant increased skin cancer surveillance of patients with a confirmed BRCA1/2 mutation or a family history of a BRCA1/2 mutation, in the absence of standard risk factors. Nonetheless, suspected BRCA1/2 mutation carriers should be counselled about skin cancer risks and may benefit from yearly full skin examinations.

  8. Genetic analyses of fancy rat-derived mutations.

    PubMed

    Kuramoto, Takashi; Yokoe, Mayuko; Yagasaki, Kayoko; Kawaguchi, Tatsuya; Kumafuji, Kenta; Serikawa, Tadao

    2010-01-01

    To collect rat mutations and increase the value of the rat model system, we introduced fancy-derived mutations to the laboratory and carried out genetic analyses. Six fancy rats were shipped from a fancy rat colony in the USA and used as founders. After initial crosses with a laboratory strain, TM/Kyo or PVG/Seac, inbreeding started and 6 partially inbred lines, including 2 sublines, were produced as Kyoto Fancy Rat Stock (KFRS) strains. During inbreeding, we isolated 9 mutations: 5 coat colors, American mink (am), Black eye (Be), grey (g), Pearl (Pel), siamese (sia); 1 coat pattern, head spot (hs); 2 coat textures, Rex (Re), satin (sat); and an ear pinnae malformation, dumbo (dmbo). Genetic analyses mapped 7 mutations to particular regions of the rat chromosomes (Chr): am to Chr 1, sia to Chr 1, sat to Chr 3, Re to Chr 7, g to Chr 8, dmbo to Chr 14, and hs to Chr 15. Candidate gene analysis revealed that a missense mutation in the tyrosinase gene, Ser79Pro, was responsible for sia. From mutant phenotypes and mapping positions, it is likely that all mutations isolated in this study were unique to the fancy rat. These findings suggest that fancy rat colonies are a good source for collecting rat mutations. The fancy-derived mutations, made available to biomedical research in the current study, will increase the scientific value of laboratory rats.

  9. The topography of mutational processes in breast cancer genomes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Morganella, Sandro; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Glodzik, Dominik; Zou, Xueqing; Davies, Helen; Staaf, Johan; Sieuwerts, Anieta M.; Brinkman, Arie B.; Martin, Sancha; Ramakrishna, Manasa; et al

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mutations in human cancers show unevenness in genomic distribution that correlate with aspects of genome structure and function. These mutations are, however, generated by multiple mutational processes operating through the cellular lineage between the fertilized egg and the cancer cell, each composed of specific DNA damage and repair components and leaving its own characteristic mutational signature on the genome. Using somatic mutation catalogues from 560 breast cancer whole-genome sequences, here we show that each of 12 base substitution, 2 insertion/deletion (indel) and 6 rearrangement mutational signatures present in breast tissue, exhibit distinct relationships with genomic features relating to transcription,more » DNA replication and chromatin organization. This signature-based approach permits visualization of the genomic distribution of mutational processes associated with APOBEC enzymes, mismatch repair deficiency and homologous recombinational repair deficiency, as well as mutational processes of unknown aetiology. Lastly, it highlights mechanistic insights including a putative replication-dependent mechanism of APOBEC-related mutagenesis.« less

  10. An ancient founder mutation in PROKR2 impairs human reproduction.

    PubMed

    Avbelj Stefanija, Magdalena; Jeanpierre, Marc; Sykiotis, Gerasimos P; Young, Jacques; Quinton, Richard; Abreu, Ana Paula; Plummer, Lacey; Au, Margaret G; Balasubramanian, Ravikumar; Dwyer, Andrew A; Florez, Jose C; Cheetham, Timothy; Pearce, Simon H; Purushothaman, Radhika; Schinzel, Albert; Pugeat, Michel; Jacobson-Dickman, Elka E; Ten, Svetlana; Latronico, Ana Claudia; Gusella, James F; Dode, Catherine; Crowley, William F; Pitteloud, Nelly

    2012-10-01

    Congenital gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) deficiency manifests as absent or incomplete sexual maturation and infertility. Although the disease exhibits marked locus and allelic heterogeneity, with the causal mutations being both rare and private, one causal mutation in the prokineticin receptor, PROKR2 L173R, appears unusually prevalent among GnRH-deficient patients of diverse geographic and ethnic origins. To track the genetic ancestry of PROKR2 L173R, haplotype mapping was performed in 22 unrelated patients with GnRH deficiency carrying L173R and their 30 first-degree relatives. The mutation's age was estimated using a haplotype-decay model. Thirteen subjects were informative and in all of them the mutation was present on the same ~123 kb haplotype whose population frequency is ≤10%. Thus, PROKR2 L173R represents a founder mutation whose age is estimated at approximately 9000 years. Inheritance of PROKR2 L173R-associated GnRH deficiency was complex with highly variable penetrance among carriers, influenced by additional mutations in the other PROKR2 allele (recessive inheritance) or another gene (digenicity). The paradoxical identification of an ancient founder mutation that impairs reproduction has intriguing implications for the inheritance mechanisms of PROKR2 L173R-associated GnRH deficiency and for the relevant processes of evolutionary selection, including potential selective advantages of mutation carriers in genes affecting reproduction.

  11. Spontaneous mutational effects on reproductive traits of arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, R G; Byers, D L; Darmo, E

    2000-01-01

    A study of spontaneous mutation in Arabidopsis thaliana was initiated from a single inbred Columbia founder; 120 lines were established and advanced 17 generations by single-seed descent. Here, we report an assay of reproductive traits in a random set of 40 lines from generations 8 and 17, grown together at the same time with plants representing generation 0. For three reproductive traits, mean number of seeds per fruit, number of fruits, and dry mass of the infructescence, the means did not differ significantly among generations. Nevertheless, by generation 17, significant divergence among lines was detected for each trait, indicating accumulation of mutations in some lines. Standardized measures of mutational variance accord with those obtained for other organisms. These findings suggest that the distribution of mutational effects for these traits is approximately symmetric, in contrast to the usual assumption that mutations have predominantly negative effects on traits directly related to fitness. Because distinct generations were grown contemporaneously, each line was represented by three sublines, and seeds were equal in age, these estimates are free of potentially substantial sources of bias. The finding of an approximately symmetric distribution of mutational effects invalidates the standard approach for inferring properties of spontaneous mutation and necessitates further development of more general approaches that avoid restrictions on the distribution of mutational effects. PMID:10790410

  12. EGFR Mutation Testing Practices within the Asia Pacific Region

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Keith M.; Utomo, Ahmad; Rajadurai, Pathmanathan; Tran, Van Khanh; Du, Xiang; Chou, Teh-Ying; Enriquez, Ma. Luisa D.; Lee, Geon Kook; Iqbal, Jabed; Shuangshoti, Shanop; Chung, Jin-Haeng; Hagiwara, Koichi; Liang, Zhiyong; Normanno, Nicola; Park, Keunchil; Toyooka, Shinichi; Tsai, Chun-Ming; Waring, Paul; Zhang, Li; McCormack, Rose; Ratcliffe, Marianne; Itoh, Yohji; Sugeno, Masatoshi; Mok, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The efficacy of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors in EGFR mutation-positive non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients necessitates accurate, timely testing. Although EGFR mutation testing has been adopted by many laboratories in Asia, data are lacking on the proportion of NSCLC patients tested in each country, and the most commonly used testing methods. Methods: A retrospective survey of records from NSCLC patients tested for EGFR mutations during 2011 was conducted in 11 Asian Pacific countries at 40 sites that routinely performed EGFR mutation testing during that period. Patient records were used to complete an online questionnaire at each site. Results: Of the 22,193 NSCLC patient records surveyed, 31.8% (95% confidence interval: 31.2%–32.5%) were tested for EGFR mutations. The rate of EGFR mutation positivity was 39.6% among the 10,687 cases tested. The majority of samples were biopsy and/or cytology samples (71.4%). DNA sequencing was the most commonly used testing method accounting for 40% and 32.5% of tissue and cytology samples, respectively. A pathology report was available only to 60.0% of the sites, and 47.5% were not members of a Quality Assurance Scheme. Conclusions: In 2011, EGFR mutation testing practices varied widely across Asia. These data provide a reference platform from which to improve the molecular diagnosis of NSCLC, and EGFR mutation testing in particular, in Asia. PMID:25376513

  13. Identification of new mutations in familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Siddique, T.; Deng, H.X.; Hentati, A.

    1994-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a lethal neurodegenerative disease due to motor neuron death in the cortex, brain stem and spinal cord. Ten percent of ALS cases are familial (FALS). Previously a subset of FALS families have been mapped to chromosome 21 and mutations in the Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase gene have been identified in those families. Nineteen different mutations at 16 distinct codons have been documented, of which 12 different mutations were identified in our 29 FALS families. These mutations account for about twenty percent of all FALS families screened. The mutations identified in our FALS families are A4V, A4T, G37R, G41D, H43R, G85R, G93A, E100G, L106V, I113T, L144F, and V148G. Mutation A4V is the most frequent one which occurred in 14 out of our 29 FALS families. In further screening of our FALS families, two new mutations, V14M and L84V, have been identified. Thus a total of 21 different mutations at 18 distinct codon sites have been identified in SOD1.

  14. Key Clinical Features to Identify Girls with "CDKL5" Mutations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Nectoux, Juliette; Rosas-Vargas, Haydee; Milh, Mathieu; Boddaert, Nathalie; Girard, Benoit; Cances, Claude; Ville, Dorothee; Afenjar, Alexandra; Rio, Marlene; Heron, Delphine; Morel, Marie Ange N'Guyen; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Philippe, Christophe; Jonveaux, Philippe; Chelly, Jamel; Bienvenu, Thierry

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the human X-linked cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 ("CDKL5") gene have been shown to cause infantile spasms as well as Rett syndrome (RTT)-like phenotype. To date, less than 25 different mutations have been reported. So far, there are still little data on the key clinical diagnosis criteria and on the natural history of…

  15. A highly unexpected strong correlation between fixation probability of nonsynonymous mutations and mutation rate.

    PubMed

    Wyckoff, Gerald J; Malcom, Christine M; Vallender, Eric J; Lahn, Bruce T

    2005-07-01

    Under prevailing theories, the nonsynonymous-to-synonymous substitution ratio (i.e. K(a)/K(s)), which measures the fixation probability of nonsynonymous mutations, is correlated with the strength of selection. In this article, we report that K(a)/K(s) is also strongly correlated with the mutation rate as measured by K(s), and that this correlation appears to have a similar magnitude as the correlation between K(a)/K(s) and selective strength. This finding cannot be reconciled with current theories. It suggests that we should re-evaluate the current paradigms of coding-sequence evolution, and that the wide use of K(a)/K(s) as a measure of selective strength needs reassessment.

  16. Analysis of any point mutation in DNA. The amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS).

    PubMed Central

    Newton, C R; Graham, A; Heptinstall, L E; Powell, S J; Summers, C; Kalsheker, N; Smith, J C; Markham, A F

    1989-01-01

    We have improved the "polymerase chain reaction" (PCR) to permit rapid analysis of any known mutation in genomic DNA. We demonstrate a system, ARMS (Amplification Refractory Mutation System), that allows genotyping solely by inspection of reaction mixtures after agarose gel electrophoresis. The system is simple, reliable and non-isotopic. It will clearly distinguish heterozygotes at a locus from homozygotes for either allele. The system requires neither restriction enzyme digestion, allele-specific oligonucleotides as conventionally applied, nor the sequence analysis of PCR products. The basis of the invention is that unexpectedly, oligonucleotides with a mismatched 3'-residue will not function as primers in the PCR under appropriate conditions. We have analysed DNA from patients with alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency, from carriers of the disease and from normal individuals. Our findings are in complete agreement with allele assignments derived by direct sequencing of PCR products. Images PMID:2785681

  17. Whole genome sequencing of mutation accumulation lines reveals a low mutation rate in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Saxer, Gerda; Havlak, Paul; Fox, Sara A; Quance, Michael A; Gupta, Sharu; Fofanov, Yuriy; Strassmann, Joan E; Queller, David C

    2012-01-01

    Spontaneous mutations play a central role in evolution. Despite their importance, mutation rates are some of the most elusive parameters to measure in evolutionary biology. The combination of mutation accumulation (MA) experiments and whole-genome sequencing now makes it possible to estimate mutation rates by directly observing new mutations at the molecular level across the whole genome. We performed an MA experiment with the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum and sequenced the genomes of three randomly chosen lines using high-throughput sequencing to estimate the spontaneous mutation rate in this model organism. The mitochondrial mutation rate of 6.76×10(-9), with a Poisson confidence interval of 4.1×10(-9) - 9.5×10(-9), per nucleotide per generation is slightly lower than estimates for other taxa. The mutation rate estimate for the nuclear DNA of 2.9×10(-11), with a Poisson confidence interval ranging from 7.4×10(-13) to 1.6×10(-10), is the lowest reported for any eukaryote. These results are consistent with low microsatellite mutation rates previously observed in D. discoideum and low levels of genetic variation observed in wild D. discoideum populations. In addition, D. discoideum has been shown to be quite resistant to DNA damage, which suggests an efficient DNA-repair mechanism that could be an adaptation to life in soil and frequent exposure to intracellular and extracellular mutagenic compounds. The social aspect of the life cycle of D. discoideum and a large portion of the genome under relaxed selection during vegetative growth could also select for a low mutation rate. This hypothesis is supported by a significantly lower mutation rate per cell division in multicellular eukaryotes compared with unicellular eukaryotes. PMID:23056439

  18. Novel FLG null mutations in Korean patients with atopic dermatitis and comparison of the mutational spectra in Asian populations.

    PubMed

    Park, Joonhong; Jekarl, Dong Wook; Kim, Yonggoo; Kim, Jiyeon; Kim, Myungshin; Park, Young Min

    2015-09-01

    Filaggrin is essential for the development of the skin barrier. Mutations in the gene encoding filaggrin have been identified as major predisposing factors for atopic disorders. Molecular analysis of the FLG gene in this study showed nine null and one unclassified mutation in 13 of 81 Korean patients with atopic dermatitis (AD): five novel null mutations (i.e. p.S1405*, c.5671_5672delinsTA, p.W1947*, p.G2025* and p.E3070*); four reported null mutations (i.e. c.3321delA, p.S1515*, p.S3296* and p.K4022*); and one unclassified mutation (i.e. c.306delAAAGCACAG). These variants are nonsense, premature termination codon or in-frame deletion expected to cause loss-of-function of FLG. Genotype-phenotype correlation is not obvious in Korean AD patients with FLG null mutations. According to a review of the mutational spectra of the FLG gene in the Asian populations, FLG null mutations appeared to be unique in each population but some mutations such as p.R501*, c.3321delA, p.S1515*, p.S3296* and p.K4022* were commonly found in at least two of the selected Asian populations including Korean, Japanese, Chinese, Singaporean Chinese or Taiwanese. Further investigations on a larger group of Korean AD would be necessary to elucidate its clinical pathogenesis and mutational spectrum related to specific FLG null mutations for AD.

  19. Clinical implications of novel mutations in epigenetic modifiers in AML.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Patel, Jay; Levine, Ross L

    2011-12-01

    The studies highlighted in this article suggest that mutations in TET2 mutations may impart adverse outcome in patients with CN-AML, whereas mutations in DNMT3a may have adverse implications in a broader set of patients with AML. The data with IDH enzyme mutations are less clear, in that individual IDH1 and IDH2 mutations may have different clinical effects and the data so far have not suggested a uniform effect on outcome. Despite the exciting data indicating that mutational testing for these alterations may be clinically useful, several challenges to understanding their clinical relevance remain. First, patients may simultaneously have mutations in multiple genes described in this article (FLT3, NPM1, CEBPa, DNMT3a, IDH1/2, or TET2), and in additional genes not mentioned earlier (Ras,47 PTEN,48 PHF6,49 ASXL1,15 and RUNX145). Furthermore, comprehensive sequencing studies of well-annotated, homogeneously treated patient cohorts are needed to understand the clinical implications of integrated mutational profiling in AML. An additional challenge to using mutational analysis for TET2 and DNMT3a in clinical use is identifying a means for rapid molecular testing of these mutations. This challenge may be met by the use of non–polymerase chain reaction–based methods of target enrichment, such as hybrid capture, followed by next-generation sequencing technologies. Moreover, clinical studies evaluating the biochemical consequences of mutations in some of these genes (eg, production of 2-HG in bodily fluids from patients with IDH-mutant AML or increased hydroxymethylcytosine levels in pretreatment blast DNA in patients with TET2/IDH mutant AML) may also prove to be useful in identifying biomarkers. Alternatively, protein-based technologies such as immunohistochemistry or mass spectrometry may be used in the clinical setting to detect the mutant proteins or loss of expression of specific proteins in patients with mutations. An additional area of importance highlighted by

  20. Biomedical Mutation Analysis (BMA): A software tool for analyzing mutations associated with antiviral resistance

    PubMed Central

    Salvatierra, Karina; Florez, Hector

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is considered a major public health problem, with 200 million people infected worldwide. The treatment for HCV chronic infection with pegylated interferon alpha plus ribavirin inhibitors is unspecific; consequently, the treatment is effective in only 50% of patients infected. This has prompted the development of direct-acting antivirals (DAA) that target virus proteins. These DAA have demonstrated a potent effect in vitro and in vivo; however, virus mutations associated with the development of resistance have been described. Objective: To design and develop an online information system for detecting mutations in amino acids known to be implicated in resistance to DAA. Materials and methods:    We have used computer applications, technological tools, standard languages, infrastructure systems and algorithms, to analyze positions associated with resistance to DAA for the NS3, NS5A, and NS5B genes of HCV. Results: We have designed and developed an online information system named Biomedical Mutation Analysis (BMA), which allows users to calculate changes in nucleotide and amino acid sequences for each selected sequence from conventional Sanger and cloning sequencing using a graphical interface. Conclusion: BMA quickly, easily and effectively analyzes mutations, including complete documentation and examples. Furthermore, the development of different visualization techniques allows proper interpretation and understanding of the results. The data obtained using BMA will be useful for the assessment and surveillance of HCV resistance to new antivirals, and for the treatment regimens by selecting those DAA to which the virus is not resistant, avoiding unnecessary treatment failures. The software is available at: http://bma.itiud.org. PMID:27547378

  1. Overlapping DSPP mutations cause dentin dysplasia and dentinogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    McKnight, D A; Simmer, J P; Hart, P S; Hart, T C; Fisher, L W

    2008-12-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) and dentin dysplasia (DD) are allelic disorders due to mutations in DSPP. Typically, the phenotype breeds true within a family. Recently, two reports showed that 3 different net -1 bp frameshift mutations early in DSPP's repeat domain caused DD, whereas 6 more 3' frameshift mutations were associated with DGI. Here we identify a DD kindred with a novel -1 bp frameshift (c.3141delC) that falls within the portion of the DSPP repeat domain previously associated solely with the DGI phenotype. This new frameshift mutation shows that overlapping DSPP mutations can give rise to either DGI or DD phenotypes. Furthermore, the consistent kindred presentation of the DD or DGI phenotype appears to be dependent on an as-yet-undescribed genetic modifier closely linked to DSPP.

  2. Cardiac troponin T mutations promote life-threatening arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Fiset, Céline; Giles, Wayne R

    2008-12-01

    Mutations in contractile proteins in heart muscle can cause anatomical changes that result in cardiac arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. However, a conundrum has existed because mutations in one such contractile protein, a so-called Ca2+ sensor troponin T (TnT), can promote ventricular rhythm disturbances even in the absence of hypertrophy or fibrosis. Thus, these mutations must enhance abnormal electrophysiological events via alternative means. In this issue of the JCI, Baudenbacher et al. report a novel mechanism to explain this puzzle (see the related article beginning on page 3893). They show that a selected TnT mutation in the adult mouse heart can markedly increase the sensitivity of cardiac muscle myofilaments to Ca2+ and enhance the susceptibility to arrhythmia, even in the absence of anatomical deformities. As these same mutations can cause some forms of arrhythmias in humans, these findings are of both basic and translational significance. PMID:19033655

  3. Mutation spectrum in South American Lynch syndrome families

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Genetic counselling and testing for Lynch syndrome have recently been introduced in several South American countries, though yet not available in the public health care system. Methods We compiled data from publications and hereditary cancer registries to characterize the Lynch syndrome mutation spectrum in South America. In total, data from 267 families that fulfilled the Amsterdam criteria and/or the Bethesda guidelines from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia and Uruguay were included. Results Disease-predisposing mutations were identified in 37% of the families and affected MLH1 in 60% and MSH2 in 40%. Half of the mutations have not previously been reported and potential founder effects were identified in Brazil and in Colombia. Conclusion The South American Lynch syndrome mutation spectrum includes multiple new mutations, identifies potential founder effects and is useful for future development of genetic testing in this continent. PMID:24344984

  4. A novel MIP mutation in familial congenital nuclear cataracts.

    PubMed

    Qin, Litao; Guo, Liangjie; Wang, Hongdan; Li, Tao; Lou, Guiyu; Guo, Qiannan; Hou, Qiaofang; Liu, Hongyan; Liao, Shixiu; Liu, Zhe

    2016-09-01

    We screened 60 known genes which are involved in inherited cataract in a pregnant woman with a four-generation family history of autosomal dominant congenital nuclear cataract through next-generation sequencing (NGS) and identified a heterozygous mutation, c.508dupC (p.L170fs), in the major intrinsic protein (MIP) gene. This mutation results in a frame-shift in MIP and has not been previously reported. The correlation of the mutation with disease was validated by Sanger sequencing of DNA from the other affected or unaffected members of the family. Therefore, our data expand the mutation spectrum of MIP mutation, and suggest that NGS is an accurate, rapid, and cost-effective method in the genetic diagnosis of congenital nuclear cataract.

  5. SPOP mutation leads to genomic instability in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boysen, Gunther; Barbieri, Christopher E; Prandi, Davide; Blattner, Mirjam; Chae, Sung-Suk; Dahija, Arun; Nataraj, Srilakshmi; Huang, Dennis; Marotz, Clarisse; Xu, Limei; Huang, Julie; Lecca, Paola; Chhangawala, Sagar; Liu, Deli; Zhou, Pengbo; Sboner, Andrea; de Bono, Johann S

    2015-01-01

    Genomic instability is a fundamental feature of human cancer often resulting from impaired genome maintenance. In prostate cancer, structural genomic rearrangements are a common mechanism driving tumorigenesis. However, somatic alterations predisposing to chromosomal rearrangements in prostate cancer remain largely undefined. Here, we show that SPOP, the most commonly mutated gene in primary prostate cancer modulates DNA double strand break (DSB) repair, and that SPOP mutation is associated with genomic instability. In vivo, SPOP mutation results in a transcriptional response consistent with BRCA1 inactivation resulting in impaired homology-directed repair (HDR) of DSB. Furthermore, we found that SPOP mutation sensitizes to DNA damaging therapeutic agents such as PARP inhibitors. These results implicate SPOP as a novel participant in DSB repair, suggest that SPOP mutation drives prostate tumorigenesis in part through genomic instability, and indicate that mutant SPOP may increase response to DNA-damaging therapeutics. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09207.001 PMID:26374986

  6. Assessing the Disease-Liability of Mutations in CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Ferec, Claude; Cutting, Garry R.

    2012-01-01

    Over 1900 mutations have been reported in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), the gene defective in patients with cystic fibrosis. These mutations have been discovered primarily in individuals who have features consistent with the diagnosis of CF. In some cases, it has been recognized that the mutations are not causative of cystic fibrosis but are responsible for disorders with features similar to CF, and these conditions have been termed CFTR-related disorders or CFTR-RD. There are also mutations in CFTR that do not contribute to any known disease state. Distinguishing CFTR mutations according to their penetrance for an abnormal phenotype is important for clinical management, structure/function analysis of CFTR, and understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying CF. PMID:23209179

  7. Mutational Spectrum Analysis of Neurodegenerative Diseases and Its Pathogenic Implication.

    PubMed

    Shen, Liang; Ji, Hong-Fang

    2015-10-14

    One of the most conspicuous features of neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) is the occurrence of dramatic conformation change of individual proteins. We performed a mutational spectrum analysis of disease-causing missense mutations in seven types of NDs at nucleotide and amino acid levels, and compared the results with those of non-NDs. The main findings included: (i) The higher mutation ratio of G:C→T:A transversion to G:C→A:T transition was observed in NDs than in non-NDs, interpreting the excessive guanine-specific oxidative DNA damage in NDs; (ii) glycine and proline had highest mutability in NDs than in non-NDs, which favor the protein conformation change in NDs; (iii) surprisingly low mutation frequency of arginine was observed in NDs. These findings help to understand how mutations may cause NDs.

  8. Mutation screening of the ARX gene in patients with autism

    PubMed Central

    Chaste, Pauline; Nygren, Gudrun; Anckarsäter, Henrik; Råstam, Maria; Coleman, Mary; Leboyer, Marion; Gillberg, Christopher; Betancur, Catalina

    2007-01-01

    Mutations in the ARX gene are associated with a broad spectrum of disorders, including nonsyndromic X-linked mental retardation, sometimes associated with epilepsy, as well as syndromic forms with brain abnormalities and abnormal genitalia. Furthermore, ARX mutations have been described in a few patients with autism or autistic features. In this study, we screened the ARX gene in 226 male patients with autism spectrum disorders and mental retardation; 42 of the patients had epilepsy. The mutation analysis was performed by direct sequencing of all exons and flanking regions. No ARX mutations were identified in any of the patients tested. These findings indicate that mutations in the ARX gene are very rare in autism. PMID:17044103

  9. Mastocytosis: a mutated KIT receptor induced myeloproliferative disorder

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Anindya; Ghosh, Joydeep; Kapur, Reuben

    2015-01-01

    Although more than 90% systemic mastocytosis (SM) patients express gain of function mutations in the KIT receptor, recent next generation sequencing has revealed the presence of several additional genetic and epigenetic mutations in a subset of these patients, which confer poor prognosis and inferior overall survival. A clear understanding of how genetic and epigenetic mutations cooperate in regulating the tremendous heterogeneity observed in these patients will be essential for designing effective treatment strategies for this complex disease. In this review, we describe the clinical heterogeneity observed in patients with mastocytosis, the nature of relatively novel mutations identified in these patients, therapeutic strategies to target molecules downstream from activating KIT receptor and finally we speculate on potential novel strategies to interfere with the function of not only the oncogenic KIT receptor but also epigenetic mutations seen in these patients. PMID:26158763

  10. Exhaustive Database Searching for Amino Acid Mutations in Proteomes

    SciTech Connect

    Hyatt, Philip Douglas; Pan, Chongle

    2012-01-01

    Amino acid mutations in proteins can be found by searching tandem mass spectra acquired in shotgun proteomics experiments against protein sequences predicted from genomes. Traditionally, unconstrained searches for amino acid mutations have been accomplished by using a sequence tagging approach that combines de novo sequencing with database searching. However, this approach is limited by the performance of de novo sequencing. The Sipros algorithm v2.0 was developed to perform unconstrained database searching using high-resolution tandem mass spectra by exhaustively enumerating all single non-isobaric mutations for every residue in a protein database. The performance of Sipros for amino acid mutation identification exceeded that of an established sequence tagging algorithm, Inspect, based on benchmarking results from a Rhodopseudomonas palustris proteomics dataset. To demonstrate the viability of the algorithm for meta-proteomics, Sipros was used to identify amino acid mutations in a natural microbial community in acid mine drainage.

  11. Structural Effects of Oncogenic PI3K alpha Mutations

    SciTech Connect

    S Gabelli; C Huang; D Mandelker; O Schmidt-Kittler; B Vogelstein; L Amzel

    2011-12-31

    Physiological activation of PI3K{alpha} is brought about by the release of the inhibition by p85 when the nSH2 binds the phosphorylated tyrosine of activated receptors or their substrates. Oncogenic mutations of PI3K{alpha} result in a constitutively activated enzyme that triggers downstream pathways that increase tumor aggressiveness and survival. Structural information suggests that some mutations also activate the enzyme by releasing p85 inhibition. Other mutations work by different mechanisms. For example, the most common mutation, His1047Arg, causes a conformational change that increases membrane association resulting in greater accessibility to the substrate, an integral membrane component. These effects are examples of the subtle structural changes that result in increased activity. The structures of these and other mutants are providing the basis for the design of isozyme-specific, mutation-specific inhibitors for individualized cancer therapies.

  12. Dihydropteroate synthase gene mutations in Pneumocystis and sulfa resistance.

    PubMed

    Huang, Laurence; Crothers, Kristina; Atzori, Chiara; Benfield, Thomas; Miller, Robert; Rabodonirina, Meja; Helweg-Larsen, Jannik

    2004-10-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) remains a major cause of illness and death in HIV-infected persons. Sulfa drugs, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) and dapsone are mainstays of PCP treatment and prophylaxis. While prophylaxis has reduced the incidence of PCP, its use has raised concerns about development of resistant organisms. The inability to culture human Pneumocystis, Pneumocystis jirovecii, in a standardized culture system prevents routine susceptibility testing and detection of drug resistance. In other microorganisms, sulfa drug resistance has resulted from specific point mutations in the dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) gene. Similar mutations have been observed in P. jirovecii. Studies have consistently demonstrated a significant association between the use of sulfa drugs for PCP prophylaxis and DHPS gene mutations. Whether these mutations confer resistance to TMP-SMX or dapsone plus trimethoprim for PCP treatment remains unclear. We review studies of DHPS mutations in P. jirovecii and summarize the evidence for resistance to sulfamethoxazole and dapsone.

  13. Sulfa use, dihydropteroate synthase mutations, and Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Stein, Cheryl R; Poole, Charles; Kazanjian, Powel; Meshnick, Steven R

    2004-10-01

    A systematic review was conducted to examine the associations in Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) patients between dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) mutations and sulfa or sulfone (sulfa) prophylaxis and between DHPS mutations and sulfa treatment outcome. Selection criteria included study populations composed entirely of PCP patients and mutation or treatment outcome results for all patients, regardless of exposure status. Based on 13 studies, the risk of developing DHPS mutations is higher for PCP patients receiving sulfa prophylaxis than for PCP patients not receiving sulfa prophylaxis (p < 0.001). Results are too heterogeneous (p < 0.001) to warrant a single summary effect estimate. Estimated effects are weaker after 1996 and stronger in studies that included multiple isolates per patient. Five studies examined treatment outcome. The effect of DHPS mutations on treatment outcome has not been well studied, and the few studies that have been conducted are inconsistent even as to the presence or absence of an association.

  14. BRCA1 mutations in primary breast and ovarian carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Futreal, P.A.; Cochran, C.; Bennett, L.M.; Haugen-Strano, A.; Terry, L.; Barrett, J.C.; Wiseman, R.; Liu, Q.; Shattuck-Eidens, D.; Harshman, K.

    1994-10-07

    Loss of heterozygosity data from familial tumors suggested that BRCA1, a gene that confers susceptibility to ovarian and early-onset breast cancer, encodes a tumor suppressor. The BRCA1 region is also subject to allelic loss in sporadic breast and ovarian cancers, an indication that BRCA1 mutations may occur somatically in these tumors. The BRCA1 coding region was examined for mutations in primary breast and ovarian tumors that show allele loss at the BRCA1 locus. Mutations were detected in 3 of 32 breast and 1 of 12 ovarian carcinomas; all four mutations were germline alterations and occurred in early-onset cancers. These results suggest that mutation of BRCA1 may not be critical in the development of the majority of breast and ovarian cancers that arise in the absence of a mutant germline allele.

  15. The deleterious mutation load is insensitive to recent population history

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Yuval B.; Turchin, Michael C.; Pritchard, Jonathan K.; Sella, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Human populations have undergone dramatic changes in population size in the past 100,000 years, including recent rapid growth. How these demographic events have affected the burden of deleterious mutations in individuals and the frequencies of disease mutations in populations remains unclear. We use population genetic models to show that recent human demography has likely had little impact on the average burden of deleterious mutations. This prediction is supported by two exome sequence datasets showing that individuals of west African and European ancestry carry very similar burdens of damaging mutations. We further show that for many diseases, rare alleles are unlikely to contribute a large fraction of the heritable variation, and therefore the impact of recent growth is likely to be modest. However, for those diseases that have a direct impact on fitness, strongly deleterious rare mutations likely do play an important role, and recent growth will have increased their impact. PMID:24509481

  16. SPOP mutation leads to genomic instability in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Boysen, Gunther; Barbieri, Christopher E; Prandi, Davide; Blattner, Mirjam; Chae, Sung-Suk; Dahija, Arun; Nataraj, Srilakshmi; Huang, Dennis; Marotz, Clarisse; Xu, Limei; Huang, Julie; Lecca, Paola; Chhangawala, Sagar; Liu, Deli; Zhou, Pengbo; Sboner, Andrea; de Bono, Johann S; Demichelis, Francesca; Houvras, Yariv; Rubin, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Genomic instability is a fundamental feature of human cancer often resulting from impaired genome maintenance. In prostate cancer, structural genomic rearrangements are a common mechanism driving tumorigenesis. However, somatic alterations predisposing to chromosomal rearrangements in prostate cancer remain largely undefined. Here, we show that SPOP, the most commonly mutated gene in primary prostate cancer modulates DNA double strand break (DSB) repair, and that SPOP mutation is associated with genomic instability. In vivo, SPOP mutation results in a transcriptional response consistent with BRCA1 inactivation resulting in impaired homology-directed repair (HDR) of DSB. Furthermore, we found that SPOP mutation sensitizes to DNA damaging therapeutic agents such as PARP inhibitors. These results implicate SPOP as a novel participant in DSB repair, suggest that SPOP mutation drives prostate tumorigenesis in part through genomic instability, and indicate that mutant SPOP may increase response to DNA-damaging therapeutics. PMID:26374986

  17. SPOP mutation leads to genomic instability in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Boysen, Gunther; Barbieri, Christopher E; Prandi, Davide; Blattner, Mirjam; Chae, Sung-Suk; Dahija, Arun; Nataraj, Srilakshmi; Huang, Dennis; Marotz, Clarisse; Xu, Limei; Huang, Julie; Lecca, Paola; Chhangawala, Sagar; Liu, Deli; Zhou, Pengbo; Sboner, Andrea; de Bono, Johann S; Demichelis, Francesca; Houvras, Yariv; Rubin, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Genomic instability is a fundamental feature of human cancer often resulting from impaired genome maintenance. In prostate cancer, structural genomic rearrangements are a common mechanism driving tumorigenesis. However, somatic alterations predisposing to chromosomal rearrangements in prostate cancer remain largely undefined. Here, we show that SPOP, the most commonly mutated gene in primary prostate cancer modulates DNA double strand break (DSB) repair, and that SPOP mutation is associated with genomic instability. In vivo, SPOP mutation results in a transcriptional response consistent with BRCA1 inactivation resulting in impaired homology-directed repair (HDR) of DSB. Furthermore, we found that SPOP mutation sensitizes to DNA damaging therapeutic agents such as PARP inhibitors. These results implicate SPOP as a novel participant in DSB repair, suggest that SPOP mutation drives prostate tumorigenesis in part through genomic instability, and indicate that mutant SPOP may increase response to DNA-damaging therapeutics.

  18. Evolutionary triage governs fitness in driver and passenger mutations and suggests targeting never mutations

    PubMed Central

    Gatenby, R A.; Cunningham, J. J.; Brown, J. S.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic and epigenetic changes in cancer cells are typically divided into “drivers” and “passengers”. Drug development strategies target driver mutations, but inter- and intra-tumoral heterogeneity usually results in emergence of resistance. Here we model intratumoral evolution in the context of a fecundity/survivorship trade-off. Simulations demonstrate the fitness value, of any genetic change is not fixed but dependent on evolutionary triage governed by initial cell properties, current selection forces, and prior genotypic/phenotypic trajectories. We demonstrate spatial variations in molecular properties of tumor cells are the result of changes in environmental selection forces such as blood flow. Simulated therapies targeting fitness-increasing (driver) mutations usually decrease the tumor burden but almost inevitably fail due to population heterogeneity. An alternative strategy targets gene mutations that are never observed. Because up or down regulation of these genes unconditionally reduces cellular fitness, they are eliminated by evolutionary triage but can be exploited for targeted therapy. PMID:25407411

  19. Mechanism of rescue of common p53 cancer mutations by second-site suppressor mutations

    PubMed Central

    Nikolova, Penka V.; Wong, Kam-Bo; DeDecker, Brian; Henckel, Julia; Fersht, Alan R.

    2000-01-01

    The core domain of p53 is extremely susceptible to mutations that lead to loss of function. We analysed the stability and DNA-binding activity of such mutants to understand the mechanism of second-site suppressor mutations. Double-mutant cycles show that N239Y and N268D act as ‘global stability’ suppressors by increasing the stability of the cancer mutants G245S and V143A—the free energy changes are additive. Conversely, the suppressor H168R is specific for the R249S mutation: despite destabilizing wild type, H168R has virtually no effect on the stability of R249S, but restores its binding affinity for the gadd45 promoter. NMR structural comparisons of R249S/H168R and R249S/T123A/H168R with wild type and R249S show that H168R reverts some of the structural changes induced by R249S. These results have implications for possible drug therapy to restore the function of tumorigenic mutants of p53: the function of mutants such as V143A and G245S is theoretically possible to restore by small molecules that simply bind to and hence stabilize the native structure, whereas R249S requires alteration of its mutant native structure. PMID:10654936

  20. Effects of a mitochondrial mutator mutation in yeast POS5 NADH kinase on mitochondrial nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Linda J; Mathews, Christopher K

    2012-09-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains three NADH/NAD(+) kinases, one of which is localized in mitochondria and phosphorylates NADH in preference to NAD(+). Strand et al. reported that a yeast mutation in POS5, which encodes the mitochondrial NADH kinase, is a mutator, specific for mitochondrial genes (Strand, M. K., Stuart, G. R., Longley, M. J., Graziewicz, M. A., Dominick, O. C., and Copeland, W. C. (2003) Eukaryot. Cell 2, 809-820). Because of the involvement of NADPH in deoxyribonucleotide biosynthesis, we asked whether mitochondria in a pos5 deletion mutant contain abnormal deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) pools. We found the pools of the four dNTPs to be more than doubled in mutant mitochondrial extracts relative to wild-type mitochondrial extracts. This might partly explain the mitochondrial mutator phenotype. However, the loss of antioxidant protection is also likely to be significant. To this end, we measured pyridine nucleotide pools in mutant and wild-type mitochondrial extracts and found NADPH levels to be diminished by ∼4-fold in Δpos5 mitochondrial extracts, with NADP(+) diminished to a lesser degree. Our data suggest that both dNTP abnormalities and lack of antioxidant protection contribute to elevated mitochondrial gene mutagenesis in cells lacking the mitochondrial NADH kinase. The data also confirm previous reports of the specific function of Pos5p in mitochondrial NADP(+) and NADPH biosynthesis.

  1. Role of TP53 mutations in vulvar carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Choschzick, Matthias; Hantaredja, Widianto; Tennstedt, Pierre; Gieseking, Frederike; Wölber, Linn; Simon, Ronald

    2011-09-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV)-independent development of vulvar carcinomas is common and the disruption of the TP53 pathway seems to play a key role in these tumors. Overexpression of TP53 in precursor lesions (differentiated VIN) and associated invasive carcinomas is regarded as an important diagnostic feature of this subtype of vulvar cancer. To determine the relationship of TP53 mutation status with clinicopathologic parameters, HPV status, and patient outcome, 18 squamous cell carcinomas of the vulva with TP53 overexpression along with 21 immunohistochemically TP53-negative tumors were analyzed. TP53 mutations were found in 17 (43.6%) of vulvar cancers, 18 (46.2%) tumors were HPV associated, and 8 (20.5%) carcinomas showed no relation to HPV infection or TP53 mutations. The presence of TP53 mutations was significantly linked to TP53 overexpression (P=0.002) and negative HPV status (P=0.012). The specificity of TP53 protein overexpression for the occurrence of TP53 mutations was 68.2%, with a positive predictive value of 66.7%. The most frequent mutation types were C:G →T:A transitions (57.9%). This mutation pattern strongly indicates the important role of oxidative stress in vulvar carcinogenesis. There were no relationships between TP53 mutation status and tumor stage, grading, nodal status, depth of invasion, or patient prognosis. In summary, TP53 mutations play a crucial role in a substantial proportion of vulvar carcinomas and are probably associated to cellular oxidative stress in chronically degenerative diseases of the vulva, such as lichen sclerosus. These data support the potential utility of restoring TP53 function as a therapeutic alternative in vulvar cancer. Further studies are necessary to clarify the prognostic implications of TP53 mutations in vulvar carcinomas.

  2. Angiogenin Loss-of-Function Mutations in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, David; Yu, Wenhao; Kishikawa, Hiroko; Folkerth, Rebecca D.; Iafrate, A. John; Shen, Yiping; Xin, Winnie; Sims, Katherine; Hu, Guo-fu

    2009-01-01

    Objective Heterozygous missense mutations in the coding region of angiogenin (ANG), an angiogenic ribonuclease, have been reported in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. However, the role of ANG in motor neuron physiology and the functional consequences of these mutations are unknown. We searched for new mutations and sought to define the functional consequences of these mutations. Methods We sequenced the coding region of ANG in an independent cohort of North American ALS patients. Identified ANG mutations were then characterized using functional assays of angiogenesis, ribonucleolysis, and nuclear translocation. We also examined expression of ANG in normal human fetal and adult spinal cords. Results We identified four mutations in the coding region of ANG from 298 ALS patients. Three of these mutations are present in the mature protein. Among the four mutations, P(-4)S, S28N, and P112L are novel, and K17I has been reported previously. Functional assays show that these ANG mutations result in complete loss of function. The mutant ANG proteins are unable to induce angiogenesis because of a deficiency in ribonuclease activity, nuclear translocation, or both. As a correlate, we demonstrate strong ANG expression in both endothelial cells and motor neurons of normal human spinal cords from the developing fetus and adult. Interpretation We provide the first evidence that ANG mutations, identified in ALS patients, are associated with functional loss of ANG activity. Moreover, strong ANG expression, in normal human fetal and adult spinal cord neurons and endothelial cells, confirms the plausibility of ANG dysfunction being relevant to the pathogenesis of ALS. PMID:17886298

  3. Transcriptomic Characterization of Hepatocellular Carcinoma with CTNNB1 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Du, Chengzhi; Xu, Naiqing; Huang, Huanwei; Cai, Tao; Zhang, Aiqun; Han, Ze-Guang; Zhou, Weiping; Chen, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the sixth most common solid tumor worldwide and the third leading cause of cancer-related death. HCC is a particularly serious threat to the Chinese population. Although many molecular alterations are known to be involved in the tumorigenesis of hepatocytes, no systemic survey has examined the somatic mutations in HCC samples from Chinese patients. Our goal was to elucidate somatic mutations in Chinese HCC patients and investigate the possible molecular mechanisms involved in tumorigenesis. Experimental Design A total of 110 hepatitis B virus (HBV)-positive HCC samples and 46 HBV-negative HCC samples were genotyped for hot-spot mutations in the CSF1R, CTNNB1, KRAS, BRAF, NRAS, ERBB2, MET, PIK3CA, JAK1, and SMO genes. The transcriptomes of the CTNNB1 mutation-positive HCC samples from the HBV-positive patients (CB+ HCC) were compared to adjacent non-cancerous livers, and significantly altered genes were functionally validated in vitro. Results CTNNB1 mutations accounted for the majority of the mutations detected in our study. A slightly higher mutation rate was found in the HBV-positive patients than in their negative counterparts. A distinct pattern of CTNNB1 mutation was detected in these two populations, and drastic changes at the transcriptomic level were detected in the CB+ tumors compared to adjacent non-cancerous livers. Potential tumor suppressors (FoxA3 and Onecut1) and oncogenes (MAFG and SSX1) were functionally validated. Conclusions Our work is the first systemic characterization of oncogenic mutations in HCC samples from Chinese patients. Targeting the Wnt-β-catenin pathway may represent a valid treatment option for Chinese HCC patients. Our work also suggests that targeting ONECUT1, FOXA3, SSX1, and MAFG may be a valid treatment option for CTNNB1 mutation positive HCC patients. PMID:24798046

  4. Algorithms and semantic infrastructure for mutation impact extraction and grounding

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mutation impact extraction is a hitherto unaccomplished task in state of the art mutation extraction systems. Protein mutations and their impacts on protein properties are hidden in scientific literature, making them poorly accessible for protein engineers and inaccessible for phenotype-prediction systems that currently depend on manually curated genomic variation databases. Results We present the first rule-based approach for the extraction of mutation impacts on protein properties, categorizing their directionality as positive, negative or neutral. Furthermore protein and mutation mentions are grounded to their respective UniProtKB IDs and selected protein properties, namely protein functions to concepts found in the Gene Ontology. The extracted entities are populated to an OWL-DL Mutation Impact ontology facilitating complex querying for mutation impacts using SPARQL. We illustrate retrieval of proteins and mutant sequences for a given direction of impact on specific protein properties. Moreover we provide programmatic access to the data through semantic web services using the SADI (Semantic Automated Discovery and Integration) framework. Conclusion We address the problem of access to legacy mutation data in unstructured form through the creation of novel mutation impact extraction methods which are evaluated on a corpus of full-text articles on haloalkane dehalogenases, tagged by domain experts. Our approaches show state of the art levels of precision and recall for Mutation Grounding and respectable level of precision but lower recall for the task of Mutant-Impact relation extraction. The system is deployed using text mining and semantic web technologies with the goal of publishing to a broad spectrum of consumers. PMID:21143808

  5. Elevated Mutation Rate during Meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Rattray, Alison; Santoyo, Gustavo; Shafer, Brenda; Strathern, Jeffrey N.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations accumulate during all stages of growth, but only germ line mutations contribute to evolution. While meiosis contributes to evolution by reassortment of parental alleles, we show here that the process itself is inherently mutagenic. We have previously shown that the DNA synthesis associated with repair of a double-strand break is about 1000-fold less accurate than S-phase synthesis. Since the process of meiosis involves many programmed DSBs, we reasoned that this repair might also be mutagenic. Indeed, in the early 1960′s Magni and Von Borstel observed elevated reversion of recessive alleles during meiosis, and found that the revertants were more likely to be associated with a crossover than non-revertants, a process that they called “the meiotic effect.” Here we use a forward mutation reporter (CAN1 HIS3) placed at either a meiotic recombination coldspot or hotspot near the MAT locus on Chromosome III. We find that the increased mutation rate at CAN1 (6 to 21 –fold) correlates with the underlying recombination rate at the locus. Importantly, we show that the elevated mutation rate is fully dependent upon Spo11, the protein that introduces the meiosis specific DSBs. To examine associated recombination we selected for random spores with or without a mutation in CAN1. We find that the mutations isolated this way show an increased association with recombination (crossovers, loss of crossover interference and/or increased gene conversion tracts). Polζ appears to contribute about half of the mutations induced during meiosis, but is not the only source of mutations for the meiotic effect. We see no difference in either the spectrum or distribution of mutations between mitosis and meiosis. The correlation of hotspots with elevated mutagenesis provides a mechanism for organisms to control evolution rates in a gene specific manner. PMID:25569256

  6. Mutation directional selection sheds light on prion pathogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Liang; Ji, Hong-Fang

    2011-07-01

    Highlights: {yields} Most pathogenic mutations possess strong directional selection, i.e., enhancing hydrophobicity or decreasing negative and increasing positive charge. {yields} Mutation-induced changes may strengthen the interactions between PrP and facilitating factors. {yields} The findings also have significant implications for exploring potential regions involved in the conformational transition from PrP{sup C} to PrP{sup Sc}. -- Abstract: As mutations in the PRNP gene account for human hereditary prion diseases (PrDs), it is crucial to elucidating how these mutations affect the central pathogenic conformational transition of normal cellular prion protein (PrP{sup C}) to abnormal scrapie isoform (PrP{sup Sc}). Many studies proposed that these pathogenic mutations may make PrP more susceptible to conformational change through altering its structure stability. By evaluating the most recent observations regarding pathogenic mutations, it was found that the pathogenic mutations do not exert a uniform effect on the thermodynamic stability of the human PrP's structure. Through analyzing the reported PrDs-related mutations, we found that 25 out of 27 mutations possess strong directional selection, i.e., enhancing hydrophobicity or decreasing negative and increasing positive charge. Based on the triggering role reported by previous studies of facilitating factors in PrP{sup C} conversion, e.g., lipid and polyanion, we proposed that the mutation-induced changes may strengthen the interaction between PrP and facilitating factors, which will accelerate PrP conversion and cause PrDs.

  7. Elevated mutation rate during meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Rattray, Alison; Santoyo, Gustavo; Shafer, Brenda; Strathern, Jeffrey N

    2015-01-01

    Mutations accumulate during all stages of growth, but only germ line mutations contribute to evolution. While meiosis contributes to evolution by reassortment of parental alleles, we show here that the process itself is inherently mutagenic. We have previously shown that the DNA synthesis associated with repair of a double-strand break is about 1000-fold less accurate than S-phase synthesis. Since the process of meiosis involves many programmed DSBs, we reasoned that this repair might also be mutagenic. Indeed, in the early 1960's Magni and Von Borstel observed elevated reversion of recessive alleles during meiosis, and found that the revertants were more likely to be associated with a crossover than non-revertants, a process that they called "the meiotic effect." Here we use a forward mutation reporter (CAN1 HIS3) placed at either a meiotic recombination coldspot or hotspot near the MAT locus on Chromosome III. We find that the increased mutation rate at CAN1 (6 to 21 -fold) correlates with the underlying recombination rate at the locus. Importantly, we show that the elevated mutation rate is fully dependent upon Spo11, the protein that introduces the meiosis specific DSBs. To examine associated recombination we selected for random spores with or without a mutation in CAN1. We find that the mutations isolated this way show an increased association with recombination (crossovers, loss of crossover interference and/or increased gene conversion tracts). Polζ appears to contribute about half of the mutations induced during meiosis, but is not the only source of mutations for the meiotic effect. We see no difference in either the spectrum or distribution of mutations between mitosis and meiosis. The correlation of hotspots with elevated mutagenesis provides a mechanism for organisms to control evolution rates in a gene specific manner.

  8. NPHS2 mutations in steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome: a mutation update and the associated phenotypic spectrum.

    PubMed

    Bouchireb, Karim; Boyer, Olivia; Gribouval, Olivier; Nevo, Fabien; Huynh-Cong, Evelyne; Morinière, Vincent; Campait, Raphaëlle; Ars, Elisabet; Brackman, Damien; Dantal, Jacques; Eckart, Philippe; Gigante, Maddalena; Lipska, Beata S; Liutkus, Aurélia; Megarbane, André; Mohsin, Nabil; Ozaltin, Fatih; Saleem, Moin A; Schaefer, Franz; Soulami, Kenza; Torra, Roser; Garcelon, Nicolas; Mollet, Géraldine; Dahan, Karin; Antignac, Corinne

    2014-02-01

    Mutations in the NPHS2 gene encoding podocin are implicated in an autosomal-recessive form of nonsyndromic steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome in both pediatric and adult patients. Patients with homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations commonly present with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome before the age of 6 years and rapidly progress to end-stage kidney disease with a very low prevalence of recurrence after renal transplantation. Here, we reviewed all the NPHS2 mutations published between October 1999 and September 2013, and also all novel mutations identified in our personal cohort and in international genetic laboratories. We identified 25 novel pathogenic mutations in addition to the 101 already described. The mutations are distributed along the entire coding region and lead to all kinds of alterations including 53 missense, 17 nonsense, 11 small insertions, 26 small deletions, 16 splicing, two indel mutations, and one mutation in the stop codon. In addition, 43 variants were classified